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Sample records for core transport barrier

  1. Electron internal transport barrier in the core of TJ-II ECH plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estrada, T.; Hidalgo, C. [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusion por Confinamiento Magnetico. Asociacion EURATOM CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Dreval, N. [and others

    2003-07-01

    The influence of the magnetic topology on the formation of electron internal transport barriers (e-ITB) has been experimentally studied in the stellarator TJ-II. The formation of e-ITBs in electron cyclotron heated plasmas can be triggered by positioning a low order rational surface close to the plasma core region, while in configurations without any low order rational there are no indications of barrier formation within the available heating power. The e-ITB formation is characterized by an increase in the core electron temperature and plasma potential. Positive radial electric field increases in a factor of three in the plasma central region when the e-ITB forms. The results demonstrate that low order rational surfaces modify radial electric fields and electron heat transport. (orig.)

  2. Formation of core transport barrier and CH-Mode by ion Bernstein wave heating in PBX-M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, M.; Bell, R.; Bernabei, S.; Gettelfinger, G.; Hatcher, R.; Kaita, R.; Kaye, S.; Kugel, H.; LeBlanc, B.; Manickam, J.

    1995-01-01

    Observation of core transport barrier formation (for particles, ion and electron energies, and toroidal momentum) by ion Bernstein wave heating (IBWH) in PBX-M plasma is reported. The formation of a transport barrier leads to a strong peaking and significant increase of the core pressure (70%) and toroidal momentum (20%), and has been termed the core-high confinement mode (CH-Mode). This formation of a transport barrier is consistent, in terms of the expected barrier location as well as the required threshold power, with a theoretical model based on the poloidal sheared flow generation by the ion Bernstein wave power. The use of ion Bernstein wave (IBW) induced sheared flow as a tool to control plasma pressure and bootstrap current profiles shows a favorable scaling for the use in future reactor grade tokamak plasmas

  3. Comparison of discharges with core transport barriers on DIII-D and JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luce, T.C.; Alper, B.; Challis, C.D.

    1997-07-01

    The basic phenomenology of discharges with core transport barriers is the same for DIII-D and JET. The limitations on performance in both cases are well described by MHD stability calculations. Since the discharge behavior of the two machines is so similar, it seems reasonable to apply a simple parameterization of fusion performance which describes well the best performance discharges on DIII-D. The highest fusion performance shot on JET has Q DD = 3.1 10 -3 at 3.2 MA. Scaling from the highest Q DD DIII-D single-null discharge would predict Q DD = 4.2 10 -3 for JET. Raising the plasma current to 4.0 MA would increase the projection to 6.6 10 -3 . Realization of such performance would require significant effort to develop lower q plasmas with an H-mode edge. Because the performance is so closely tied to the current profile, this class of discharges also shows significant potential for steady state if current profile control can be demonstrated

  4. Core density fluctuations in reverse magnetic shear plasmas with internal transport barrier on JT-60U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazikian, R.; Shinohara, K.; Yoshino, R.; Fujita, T.; Shirai, H.; Kramer, G.T.

    1999-01-01

    First measurements of the radial correlation length of density fluctuations in JT-60U plasmas with internal transport barrier (ITB) is reported. The measurements are obtained using a newly installed correlation reflectometer operating in the upper X-mode. Before transport barrier formation in the low beam power current ramp-up phase of the discharge, reflectometer measurements indicate density fluctuation levels n-tilde/n∼0.1-0.2% and radial correlation lengths 2-3 cm (k r p i ≤0.5) in the central plasma region (r/a r p i ∼3. However, fluctuation levels are considerably higher than measured near the magnetic axis. Reflectometer measurements obtained at the foot of the ITB also indicate high fluctuation levels compared to measurements in the central region of the discharge. (author)

  5. Magnetohydrodynamic behaviour during core transport barrier experiments with ion Bernstein wave heating in PBX-M: I ELMs fluctuations and crash events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sesnic, S.; Kaita, R.; Batha, S.H.

    1998-01-01

    If the ion Bernstein wave (IBW) heating power in an H mode discharge of the PBX-M experiment exceeds a threshold power of about 200 kW, a core transport barrier is created in the central region of the plasma. At lower neutral beam injection (NBI) powers, the core barrier is accompanied by an edge L mode. The high edge localized mode (ELM) repetition frequency (1 kHz) prevents the creation of a strong barrier, so the edge first has to make an H-to-L transition before a strong core transport barrier can be created. At higher NBI powers, the ELM repetition frequency is lowered to less than 200 Hz, which allows the immediate creation of a strong core barrier. Edge localized mode loss, which propagates radially first on a fast (non-diffusive) and then on a slow (diffusive) time-scale all the way to the plasma core, is strongly reduced in the core barrier region. Correlated with the reduced ELM loss, the fluctuations in the core barrier region are also strongly reduced, both during the ELM and during the quite periods between the ELMs. There is strong evidence that the IBW induced poloidal flow shear is responsible for the stabilization of core turbulence and the creation of the core transport barrier. The large perpendicular E x B flow shear component of the measured toroidal velocity in co-injection neutral beam heated discharges seems to be largely cancelled by the ion diamagnetic drift shear produced by large ion pressure gradients in the core barrier region. The value of IBW induced poloidal flow has not been experimentally determined, but its numerical value is found to be a factor of 4 larger than either the toroidal velocity or the ion diamagnetic drift shear components, leaving only IBW induced flow shear as the most probable cause for the turbulence stabilization. The core turbulence suppression and the creation of the core transport barrier is also consistent with expectations from a comparison between the E x B flow shear rate and a rough estimate of the

  6. Observations of core modes during RF-generated internal transport barriers in Alcator C-Mod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynn, A G [Fusion Research Center, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX (United States); Phillips, P E [Fusion Research Center, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX (United States); Hubbard, A E [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, MIT, Cambridge, MA (United States); Wukitch, S J [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, MIT, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2004-05-01

    In the Alcator C-Mod tokamak, a high-resolution heterodyne ECE radiometer has been used to measure the electron temperature in plasma discharges with internal transport barriers (ITBs). ITBs are formed by the application of off-axis (r/a {approx} 0.5) ICRF power. Strong density peaking indicates the formation of the ITB. When the ITB is formed, the ECE radiometer detects a small amplitude mode localized near the magnetic axis. Surprisingly, as this mode amplitude grows a dip in the temperature profile is clearly observed at the same location. If sawteeth are present, the mode amplitude appears to be suppressed by the sawtooth crash and no dip in the temperate profiles is observed. TORAY, a ray-tracing code, has been used to investigate the possible refractive effects of the steep density gradients in the ITB and its effects on the ECE observations. The results show that refractive effects can explain the observed local changes in temperature. Ray-tracing also indicates that the observed modes are density fluctuations. Observations of broadband density fluctuations during 4.5 T ITBs are also described.

  7. A comparative study of core and edge transport barrier dynamics of DIII-D and TFTR tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synakowski, E.J.; Beer, M.; Bell, R.E.

    2001-01-01

    Confinement bifurcations and subsequent plasma dynamics in the TFTR core and the DIII-D core and edge are compared in order to identify a common physics basis. Observations suggest a framework in which ExB shear plays a dominant role in the barrier dynamics. In TFTR, bifurcations from the reverse shear (RS) into the enhanced reverse shear (ERS) regime with high power balanced neutral beam heating (above 25 MW at 4.8 T) resemble edge H mode transitions observed on DIII-D. In both, radial electric field (E r ) excursions precede confinement changes and are manifest as localized changes in the impurity poloidal rotation. Reduced transport follows the excursions, and in both cases strong E r shear is reinforced by the plasma pressure. These characteristics are contrasted with DIII-D negative central shear (NCS) barrier evolution with unidirectional beam injection. There, the improved confinement region can develop slowly, depending on the neutral beam input power and torque. Rapid expansion and deepening of this region follows an increase in the neutral beam heating power. The initial formation phase is modulated by confinement steps and interruptions. An analog for these steps is found in TFTR RS plasmas. Although these do not dominate the TFTR plasma evolution during low power (7 MW) heating, they can represent significant transport reductions when additional heating is applied. In both devices, no strong excursion in E r precedes these latter confinement bifurcations. The triggering event of these steps may be related to current profile relaxation, but it is not always connected with simple integral or half-integer values of the minimum in the q profile. Finally, variations of E r and the ExB shear through the application of unidirectional injection on TFTR yielded plasmas with confinement characteristics and barrier dynamics similar to those of DIII-D NCS plasmas. The data underscore that the physics responsible for the enhanced confinement states is fundamentally

  8. A comparative study of core and edge transport barrier dynamics of DIII-D and TFTR tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synakowski, E.J.; Beer, M.A.; Bell, R.E.

    1999-01-01

    Confinement bifurcations and subsequent plasma dynamics in the TFTR core and the DIII-D core and edge are compared in order to identify a common physics basis. Observations suggest a framework in which ExB shear plays a dominant role in the barrier dynamics. In TFTR, bifurcations from the reverse shear (RS) into the enhanced reverse shear (ERS) regime with high power balanced neutral beam heating (above 25 MW at 4.8 T) resemble edge H mode transitions observed on DIII-D. In both, radial electric field (E r ) excursions precede confinement changes and are manifest as localized changes in the impurity poloidal rotation. Reduced transport follows the excursions, and in both cases strong E r shear is reinforced by the plasma pressure. These characteristics are contrasted with DIII-D negative central shear (NCS) barrier evolution with unidirectional beam injection. There, the improved confinement region can develop slowly, depending on the neutral beam input power and torque. Rapid expansion and deepening of this region follows an increase in the neutral beam heating power. The initial formation phase is modulated by confinement steps and interruptions. An analog for these steps is found in TFTR RS plasmas. Although these do not dominate the TFTR plasma evolution during low power (7 MW) heating, they can represent significant transport reductions when additional heating is applied. In both devices, no strong excursion in E r precedes these latter confinement bifurcations. The triggering event of these steps may be related to current profile relaxation, but it is not always connected with simple integral or half-integer values of the minimum in the q profile. Finally, variations of E r and the ExB shear through the application of unidirectional injection on TFTR yielded plasmas with confinement characteristics and barrier dynamics similar to those of DIII-D NCS plasmas. The data underscore that the physics responsible for the enhanced confinement states is fundamentally

  9. Electron internal transport barrier formation and dynamics in the plasma core of the TJ-II stellarator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estrada, T [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusion por Confinamiento Magnetico, Asociacion Euratom-CIEMAT, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Krupnik, L [Institute of Plasma Physics, NSC ' KIPT' , Kharkov (Ukraine); Dreval, N [Institute of Plasma Physics, NSC ' KIPT' , Kharkov (Ukraine); Melnikov, A [Institute of Nuclear Fusion, RRC ' Kurchatov Institute' , Moscow, Russia (Russian Federation); Khrebtov, S M [Institute of Plasma Physics, NSC ' KIPT' , Kharkov (Ukraine); Hidalgo, C [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusion por Confinamiento Magnetico, Asociacion Euratom-CIEMAT, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Milligen, B van [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusion por Confinamiento Magnetico, Asociacion Euratom-CIEMAT, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Castejon, F [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusion por Confinamiento Magnetico, Asociacion Euratom-CIEMAT, 28040 Madrid (Spain); AscasIbar, E [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusion por Confinamiento Magnetico, Asociacion Euratom-CIEMAT, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Eliseev, L [Institute of Nuclear Fusion, RRC ' Kurchatov Institute' , Moscow, Russia (Russian Federation); Chmyga, A A [Institute of Plasma Physics, NSC ' KIPT' , Kharkov (Ukraine); Komarov, A D [Institute of Plasma Physics, NSC ' KIPT' , Kharkov (Ukraine); Kozachok, A S [Institute of Plasma Physics, NSC ' KIPT' , Kharkov (Ukraine); Tereshin, V [Institute of Plasma Physics, NSC ' KIPT' , Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2004-01-01

    The influence of magnetic topology on the formation of electron internal transport barriers (e-ITBs) has been studied experimentally in electron cyclotron heated plasmas in the stellarator TJ-II. e-ITB formation is characterized by an increase in core electron temperature and plasma potential. The positive radial electric field increases by a factor of 3 in the central plasma region when an e-ITB forms. The experiments reported demonstrate that the formation of an e-ITB depends on the magnetic configuration. Calculations of the modification of the rotational transform due to plasma current lead to the interpretation that the formation of an e-ITB can be triggered by positioning a low order rational surface close to the plasma core region. In configurations without any central low order rational, no barrier is formed for any accessible value of heating power. Different mechanisms associated with neoclassical/turbulent bifurcations and kinetic effects are put forward to explain the impact of magnetic topology on radial electric fields and confinement.

  10. Transport barriers in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldas, I L; Szezech, J D Jr; Kroetz, T; Marcus, F A; Roberto, M; Viana, R L; Lopes, S R

    2012-01-01

    We discuss the creation of transport barriers in magnetically confined plasmas with non monotonic equilibrium radial profiles. These barriers reduce the transport in the shearless region (i.e., where the twist condition does not hold). For the chaotic motion of particles in an equilibrium electric field with a nonmonotonic radial profile, perturbed by electrostatic waves, we show that a nontwist transport barrier can be created in the plasma by modifying the electric field radial profile. We also show non twist barriers in chaotic magnetic field line transport in the plasma near to the tokamak wall with resonant modes due to electric currents in external coils.

  11. The role of zonal flows and predator-prey oscillations in triggering the formation of edge and core transport barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, L.; Zeng, L.; Rhodes, T. L.; Hillesheim, J. C.; Peebles, W. A.; Groebner, R. J.; Burrell, K. H.; McKee, G. R.; Yan, Z.; Tynan, G. R.; Diamond, P. H.; Boedo, J. A.; Doyle, E. J.; Grierson, B. A.; Chrystal, C.; Austin, M. E.; Solomon, W. M.; Wang, G.

    2014-07-01

    We present direct evidence of low frequency, radially sheared, turbulence-driven flows (zonal flows (ZFs)) triggering edge transport barrier formation preceding the L- to H-mode transition via periodic turbulence suppression in limit-cycle oscillations (LCOs), consistent with predator-prey dynamics. The final transition to edge-localized mode-free H-mode occurs after the equilibrium E × B flow shear increases due to ion pressure profile evolution. ZFs are also observed to initiate formation of an electron internal transport barrier (ITB) at the q = 2 rational surface via local suppression of electron-scale turbulence. Multi-channel Doppler backscattering (DBS) has revealed the radial structure of the ZF-induced shear layer and the E × B shearing rate, ωE×B, in both barrier types. During edge barrier formation, the shearing rate lags the turbulence envelope during the LCO by 90°, transitioning to anti-correlation (180°) when the equilibrium shear dominates the turbulence-driven flow shear due to the increasing edge pressure gradient. The time-dependent flow shear and the turbulence envelope are anti-correlated (180° out of phase) in the electron ITB. LCOs with time-reversed evolution dynamics (transitioning from an equilibrium-flow dominated to a ZF-dominated state) have also been observed during the H-L back-transition and are potentially of interest for controlled ramp-down of the plasma stored energy and pressure (normalized to the poloidal magnetic field) \\beta_{\\theta} =2\\mu_{0} n{( {T_{e} +T_{i}})}/{B_{\\theta}^{2}} in ITER.

  12. Multiple zonal jets and convective heat transport barriers in a quasi-geostrophic model of planetary cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guervilly, C.; Cardin, P.

    2017-10-01

    We study rapidly rotating Boussinesq convection driven by internal heating in a full sphere. We use a numerical model based on the quasi-geostrophic approximation for the velocity field, whereas the temperature field is 3-D. This approximation allows us to perform simulations for Ekman numbers down to 10-8, Prandtl numbers relevant for liquid metals (˜10-1) and Reynolds numbers up to 3 × 104. Persistent zonal flows composed of multiple jets form as a result of the mixing of potential vorticity. For the largest Rayleigh numbers computed, the zonal velocity is larger than the convective velocity despite the presence of boundary friction. The convective structures and the zonal jets widen when the thermal forcing increases. Prograde and retrograde zonal jets are dynamically different: in the prograde jets (which correspond to weak potential vorticity gradients) the convection transports heat efficiently and the mean temperature tends to be homogenized; by contrast, in the cores of the retrograde jets (which correspond to steep gradients of potential vorticity) the dynamics is dominated by the propagation of Rossby waves, resulting in the formation of steep mean temperature gradients and the dominance of conduction in the heat transfer process. Consequently, in quasi-geostrophic systems, the width of the retrograde zonal jets controls the efficiency of the heat transfer.

  13. Transport barrier in Helical system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ida, Katsumi

    1998-01-01

    Experiments on the transport barrier in Helical plasmas are reviewed. There are two mechanisms of transport improvement, that results in the formation of the transport barrier. One is the improvement of neoclassical transport by reducing the ripple loss with radial electric field, which exist only in helical plasma. The other is the improvement of anomalous transport due to the suppression of fluctuations associated with a radial electric field shear both in tokamak and helical plasma. The formation of the transport barrier can be triggered by the radial electric field shear associated with the transition of the radial electric field (L/H transition or ion-electron root transition) or the peaked density or the optimization of magnetic field shear. The mechanisms of transport barrier formation are also discussed. (author). 60 refs

  14. Impurity transport in internal transport barrier discharges on JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dux, R.; Giroud, C.; Zastrow, K.-D.

    2004-01-01

    Impurity behaviour in JET internal transport barrier (ITB) discharges with reversed shear has been investigated. Metallic impurities accumulate in cases with too strong peaking of the main ion density profile. The accumulation is due to inwardly directed drift velocities inside the ITB radius. The strength of the impurity peaking increases with the impurity charge and is low for the low-Z elements C and Ne. Transport calculations show that the observed behaviour is consistent with dominant neoclassical impurity transport inside the ITB. In some cases, MHD events in the core flatten the radial profile of the metallic impurity. (author)

  15. Transport barrier fluctuations governed by SOL turbulence spreading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghendrih, Ph.; Sarazin, Y.; Ciraolo, G.; Darmet, G.; Garbet, X.; Grangirard, V.; Tamain, P.; Benkadda, S.; Beyer, P.

    2007-01-01

    Turbulence spreading, namely turbulent transport extending into a stable region is reported both for the flat density profiles in the far SOL and into a modeled H-mode barrier. It is shown that due to turbulence penetration, the pedestal width fluctuates and that its effective width is a factor 2 smaller than the linear predicted width. Turbulence overshooting throughout the pedestal leads to a non-vanishing turbulent transport within the barrier and provides a coupling of core and SOL turbulence despite the transport barrier

  16. Understanding transport barriers through modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozhansky, V

    2004-01-01

    Models of radial electric field formation are discussed and compared with the results of numerical simulations from fluid transport codes and Monte Carlo codes. A comparison of the fluid and Monte Carlo codes is presented. A conclusion is arrived at that all the simulations do not predict any bifurcation of the electric field, i.e. no bifurcation of poloidal rotation from low to high Mach number values is obtained. In most of the simulations, the radial electric field is close to the neoclassical electric field. The deviation from neoclassical electric field at the separatrix due to the existence of a transitional viscous layer is discussed. Scalings for the shear of the poloidal rotation are checked versus simulation results. It is demonstrated that assuming the critical shear to be of the order of 10 5 s -1 , it is possible to obtain a L-H transition power scaling close to that observed in the experiment. The dependence of the threshold on the magnetic field direction, pellet injection, aspect ratio and other factors are discussed on the basis of existing simulations. Transport codes where transport coefficients depend on the turbulence level and scenario simulations of L-H transition are analysed. However, the details of gyrofluid and gyrokinetic modelling should be discussed elsewhere. Simulations of internal transport barrier (ITB) formation are discussed as well as factors responsible for ITB formation

  17. Internal transport barriers: critical physics issues?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litaudon, X [Association Euratom-CEA, DSM, Departement de Recherches sur La Fusion Controlee, Centre d' Etudes de Cadarache, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France)

    2006-05-15

    Plasmas regimes with improved core energy confinement properties, i.e. with internal transport barriers (ITB), provide a possible route towards simultaneous high fusion performance and continuous tokamak reactor operation in a non-inductive current drive state. High core confinement regimes should be made compatible with a dominant fraction of the plasma current self-generated (pressure-driven) by the bootstrap effect while operating at high normalized pressure and moderate current. Furthermore, ITB regimes with 'non-stiff' plasma core pressure break the link observed in standard inductive operation between fusion performances and plasma pressure at the edge, thus offering a new degree of freedom in the tokamak operational space. Prospects and critical issues for using plasmas with enhanced thermal core insulation as a basis for steady tokamak reactor operation are reviewed in the light of the encouraging experimental and modelling results obtained recently (typically in the last two years). An extensive set of data from experiments carried out worldwide has been gathered on ITB regimes covering a wide range of parameters (q-profile, T{sub i}/T{sub e}, gradient length, shaping, normalized toroidal Larmor radius, collisionality, Mach number, etc). In the light of the progress made recently, the following critical physics issues relevant to the extrapolation of ITB regimes to next-step experiments, such as ITER, are addressed: 1. conditions for ITB formation and existence of a power threshold,; 2. ITB sustainment at T{sub i} {approx} T{sub e}, with low toroidal torque injection, low central particle fuelling but at high density and low impurity concentration,; 3. control of confinement for sustaining wide ITBs that encompass a large volume at high {beta}{sub N},; 4. real time profile control (q and pressure) with high bootstrap current and large fraction of alpha-heating and; 5. compatibility of core with edge transport barriers or with external core

  18. Control of Internal Transport Barriers in Magnetically Confined Fusion Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panta, Soma; Newman, David; Sanchez, Raul; Terry, Paul

    2016-10-01

    In magnetic confinement fusion devices the best performance often involves some sort of transport barriers to reduce the energy and particle flow from core to edge. Those barriers create gradients in the temperature and density profiles. If gradients in the profiles are too steep that can lead to instabilities and the system collapses. Control of these barriers is therefore an important challenge for fusion devices (burning plasmas). In this work we focus on the dynamics of internal transport barriers. Using a simple 7 field transport model, extensively used for barrier dynamics and control studies, we explore the use of RF heating to control the local gradients and therefore the growth rates and shearing rates for barrier initiation and control in self-heated fusion plasmas. Ion channel barriers can be formed in self-heated plasmas with some NBI heating but electron channel barriers are very sensitive. They can be formed in self-heated plasmas with additional auxiliary heating i.e. NBI and radio-frequency(RF). Using RF heating on both electrons and ions at proper locations, electron channel barriers along with ion channel barriers can be formed and removed demonstrating a control technique. Investigating the role of pellet injection in controlling the barriers is our next goal. Work supported by DOE Grant DE-FG02-04ER54741.

  19. Report on the combined meeting of the core confinement and internal transport barrier expert group, confinement database and modeling expert group and edge pedestal expert group, 12-16 April 1999, Garching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janeschitz, G.; Connor, J.W.; Cordey, G.; Kardaun, O.; Mukhovatov, V.; Stambaugh, R.; Ryter, F.; Wakatani, M.

    1999-01-01

    This contribution to the ITER EDA Newsletter reports on the combined meeting of the core confinement and internal transport barrier expert group, confinement database and modeling expert group and edge pedestal expert group in Garching, Germany. This is the first workshop of its kind after the re-organisation of the expert groups. The new scheme of the meetings, namely to permit more interaction between groups by arranging them at the same time and location turned out to be very successful. The main issues discussed were for the Confinement Database: merging of edge pedestal and confinement data, improvement of the density- and magnetic shape parameters, addition of new dedicated threshold data, the effect of different divertors in JET; for the H-Mode Power Threshold Database: assembly of a new version of the database with about 650 time points from 10 tokamaks; for the 1-D Modelling Workshop: management of the database after the re-organisation of the Joint Central Team an ongoing efforts in plasma transport modelling; for the newly formed pedestal group: issues of the H-mode shear layer at the plasma edge. There was also an executive summary given of a recent USA workshop on internal transport barriers and regimes with weak or negative magnetic shear

  20. Low-impact, high toughness transportation barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Alternatives to existing transportation truck escape ramps and crash barriers are examined using arrays of : wood, bamboo, and fiberglass structural elements that act as energy absorbers as they deform. The : behaviors of each material type are analy...

  1. Structural Stability of Tokamak Equilibrium: Transport Barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solano, E. R.

    2001-07-01

    A generalised theory of structural stability of differential equations is introduced and applied to the Grad-Shafranov equation. It is discussed how the formation and loss of transport barrier could be associated with the appearance/disappearance of equilibria. The equilibrium conjecture is presented: transport barriers are associated with locally diamagnetic regions in the plasma, and affected by the paramagnetism of the bootstrap current. (Author) 18 refs.

  2. Transport Barriers in Bootstrap Driven Tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staebler, Gary

    2017-10-01

    Maximizing the bootstrap current in a tokamak, so that it drives a high fraction of the total current, reduces the external power required to drive current by other means. Improved energy confinement, relative to empirical scaling laws, enables a reactor to more fully take advantage of the bootstrap driven tokamak. Experiments have demonstrated improved energy confinement due to the spontaneous formation of an internal transport barrier in high bootstrap fraction discharges. Gyrokinetic analysis, and quasilinear predictive modeling, demonstrates that the observed transport barrier is due to the suppression of turbulence primarily due to the large Shafranov shift. ExB velocity shear does not play a significant role in the transport barrier due to the high safety factor. It will be shown, that the Shafranov shift can produce a bifurcation to improved confinement in regions of positive magnetic shear or a continuous reduction in transport for weak or negative magnetic shear. Operation at high safety factor lowers the pressure gradient threshold for the Shafranov shift driven barrier formation. The ion energy transport is reduced to neoclassical and electron energy and particle transport is reduced, but still turbulent, within the barrier. Deeper into the plasma, very large levels of electron transport are observed. The observed electron temperature profile is shown to be close to the threshold for the electron temperature gradient (ETG) mode. A large ETG driven energy transport is qualitatively consistent with recent multi-scale gyrokinetic simulations showing that reducing the ion scale turbulence can lead to large increase in the electron scale transport. A new saturation model for the quasilinear TGLF transport code, that fits these multi-scale gyrokinetic simulations, can match the data if the impact of zonal flow mixing on the ETG modes is reduced at high safety factor. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under DE-FG02-95ER54309 and DE-FC02

  3. Control of internal transport barriers on Alcator C-Mod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiore, C.L.; Bonoli, P.T.; Ernst, D.R.; Hubbard, A.E.; Greenwald, M.J.; Lynn, A.; Marmar, E.S.; Phillips, P.; Redi, M.H.; Rice, J.E.; Wolfe, S.M.; Wukitch, S.J.; Zhurovich, K.

    2004-01-01

    Recent studies of internal transport and double transport barrier regimes in the Alcator C-Mod [I. H. Hutchinson et al., Phys. Plasmas 1, 1511 (1994)] have explored the limits for forming, maintaining, and controlling these plasmas. The C-Mod provides a unique platform for studying such discharges: the ions and electrons are tightly coupled by collisions and the plasma has no internal particle or momentum sources. The double-barrier mode comprised of an edge barrier with an internal transport barrier (ITB) can be induced at will using off-axis ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) injection on either the low or high field side of the plasma with either of the available ICRF frequencies (70 or 80 MHz). When an enhanced D α high confinement mode (EDA H-mode) is accessed in Ohmic plasmas, the double barrier ITB forms spontaneously if the H-mode is sustained for ∼2 energy confinement times. The ITBs formed in both Ohmic and ICRF heated plasmas are quite similar regardless of the trigger method. They are characterized by strong central peaking of the electron density, and a reduction of the core particle and energy transport. The control of impurity influx and heating of the core plasma in the presence of the ITB have been achieved with the addition of central ICRF power in both the Ohmic H-mode and ICRF induced ITBs. The radial location of the particle transport barrier is dependent on the toroidal magnetic field but not on the location of the ICRF resonance. A narrow region of decreased electron thermal transport, as determined by sawtooth heat pulse analysis, is found in these plasmas as well. Transport analysis indicates that a reduction of the particle diffusivity in the barrier region allows the neoclassical pinch to drive the density and impurity accumulation in the plasma center. An examination of the gyrokinetic stability at the trigger time for the ITB suggests that the density and temperature profiles are inherently stable to ion temperature gradient and

  4. Stochastic transport of particles across single barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreuter, Christian; Siems, Ullrich; Henseler, Peter; Nielaba, Peter; Leiderer, Paul; Erbe, Artur

    2012-01-01

    Transport phenomena of interacting particles are of high interest for many applications in biology and mesoscopic systems. Here we present measurements on colloidal particles, which are confined in narrow channels on a substrate and interact with a barrier, which impedes the motion along the channel. The substrate of the particle is tilted in order for the particles to be driven towards the barrier and, if the energy gained by the tilt is large enough, surpass the barrier by thermal activation. We therefore study the influence of this barrier as well as the influence of particle interaction on the particle transport through such systems. All experiments are supported with Brownian dynamics simulations in order to complement the experiments with tests of a large range of parameter space which cannot be accessed in experiments.

  5. Transport barriers in bootstrap-driven tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staebler, G. M.; Garofalo, A. M.; Pan, C.; McClenaghan, J.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; Lao, L. L.

    2018-05-01

    Experiments have demonstrated improved energy confinement due to the spontaneous formation of an internal transport barrier in high bootstrap fraction discharges. Gyrokinetic analysis, and quasilinear predictive modeling, demonstrates that the observed transport barrier is caused by the suppression of turbulence primarily from the large Shafranov shift. It is shown that the Shafranov shift can produce a bifurcation to improved confinement in regions of positive magnetic shear or a continuous reduction in transport for weak or negative magnetic shear. Operation at high safety factor lowers the pressure gradient threshold for the Shafranov shift-driven barrier formation. Two self-organized states of the internal and edge transport barrier are observed. It is shown that these two states are controlled by the interaction of the bootstrap current with magnetic shear, and the kinetic ballooning mode instability boundary. Election scale energy transport is predicted to be dominant in the inner 60% of the profile. Evidence is presented that energetic particle-driven instabilities could be playing a role in the thermal energy transport in this region.

  6. Formation and collapse of internal transport barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuyama, A.; Itoh, K.; Itoh, S.I.; Yagi, M.

    1999-01-01

    A theoretical model of internal transport barrier (ITB) is developed. The transport model based on the self-sustained turbulence theory of the current-diffusive ballooning mode is extended to include the effects of ExB rotation shear. Delayed formation of ITB is observed in transport simulations. The influence of finite gyroradius is also discussed. Simulation of the current ramp-up experiment successfully described the radial profile of density, temperature and safety factor. A model of ITB collapse due to magnetic braiding is proposed. Sudden enhancement of transport triggered by overlapping of magnetic islands terminates ITB. The possibility of destabilizing global low-n modes is also discussed. (author)

  7. Formation and collapse of internal transport barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuyama, A.; Itoh, K.; Itoh, S.-I.; Yagi, M.

    2001-01-01

    A theoretical model of internal transport barrier (ITB) is developed. The transport model based on the self-sustained turbulence theory of the current-diffusive ballooning mode is extended to include the effects of ExB rotation shear. Delayed formation of ITB is observed in transport simulations. The influence of finite gyroradius is also discussed. Simulation of the current ramp-up experiment successfully described the radial profile of density, temperature and safety factor. A model of ITB collapse due to magnetic braiding is proposed. Sudden enhancement of transport triggered by overlaping of magnetic islands terminates ITB. The possibility of destabilizing global low-n modes is also discussed. (author)

  8. Advanced transport modeling of toroidal plasmas with transport barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuyama, A.; Murakami, S.; Honda, M.; Izumi, Y.; Yagi, M.; Nakajima, N.; Nakamura, Y.; Ozeki, T.

    2005-01-01

    Transport modeling of toroidal plasmas is one of the most important issue to predict time evolution of burning plasmas and to develop control schemes in reactor plasmas. In order to describe the plasma rotation and rapid transition self-consistently, we have developed an advanced scheme of transport modeling based on dynamical transport equation and applied it to the analysis of transport barrier formation. First we propose a new transport model and examine its behavior by the use of conventional diffusive transport equation. This model includes the electrostatic toroidal ITG mode and the electromagnetic ballooning mode and successfully describes the formation of internal transport barriers. Then the dynamical transport equation is introduced to describe the plasma rotation and the radial electric field self-consistently. The formation of edge transport barriers is systematically studied and compared with experimental observations. The possibility of kinetic transport modeling in velocity space is also examined. Finally the modular structure of integrated modeling code for tokamaks and helical systems is discussed. (author)

  9. RF Current Drive in Internal Transport Barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peysson, Y.; Basiuk, V.; Huysmans, G. [Association EURATOM-CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC, CEA-Cadarache, 13 - St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Decker, J.; Bers, A.; Ram, A.K. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2005-07-01

    The current drive problem in regimes with internal transport barrier is addressed using a fast solver of the electron drift kinetic equation which may be used for arbitrary tokamak plasma magnetic equilibrium and any type of electron radio-frequency wave. Parametric studies are performed for the Lower Hybrid and Electron Cyclotron waves. (authors)

  10. JET internal transport barriers: experiment vs theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esposito, B [Associazione Euratom - ENEA sulla Fusione, C.R. Frascati, CP 65, I-00040, Frascati, Rome (Italy); Crisanti, F [Associazione Euratom - ENEA sulla Fusione, C.R. Frascati, CP 65, I-00040, Frascati, Rome (Italy); Parail, V [Euratom/UKAEA Fusion Association, Cuhlam Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Maget, P [Association Euratom - CEA pour la Fusion, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Baranov, Y [Euratom/UKAEA Fusion Association, Cuhlam Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Becoulet, A [Association Euratom - CEA pour la Fusion, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Castaldo, C [Associazione Euratom - ENEA sulla Fusione, C.R. Frascati, CP 65, I-00040, Frascati, Rome (Italy); Challis, C D [Euratom/UKAEA Fusion Association, Cuhlam Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Angelis, R De [Associazione Euratom - ENEA sulla Fusione, C.R. Frascati, CP 65, I-00040, Frascati, Rome (Italy); Garbet, X [Association Euratom - CEA pour la Fusion, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Giroud, C [Association Euratom - CEA pour la Fusion, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Hawkes, N [Euratom/UKAEA Fusion Association, Cuhlam Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Joffrin, E [Association Euratom - CEA pour la Fusion, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Litaudon, X [Association Euratom - CEA pour la Fusion, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Mazon, D [Association Euratom - CEA pour la Fusion, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Riva, M [Associazione Euratom - ENEA sulla Fusione, C.R. Frascati, CP 65, I-00040, Frascati, Rome (Italy); Zastrow, K D [Euratom/UKAEA Fusion Association, Cuhlam Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2003-06-01

    A large variety of JET discharges with internal transport barriers (ITBs) has been analysed in order to determine the main features which characterize turbulence stabilization at the barrier. It is found that the location of barriers is well correlated with regions where the ExB flow shearing rate exceeds the linear growth rate of the ion temperature gradient mode instability ({gamma}{sub {eta}{sub i}}). A key point is the dependence of {gamma}{sub {eta}{sub i}} on the magnetic shear: in the discharges of this database the reduction of {gamma}{sub {eta}{sub i}} associated to very low or null magnetic shear favours the formation of an ITB. After the ITB formation a positive feedback occurs in which the ExB flow shear mechanism has the leading role and the position of the barrier may be no longer linked to the low shear region.

  11. Charge transport through DNA based electronic barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Sunil R.; Chawda, Vivek; Qi, Jianqing; Anantram, M. P.; Sinha, Niraj

    2018-05-01

    We report charge transport in electronic 'barriers' constructed by sequence engineering in DNA. Considering the ionization potentials of Thymine-Adenine (AT) and Guanine-Cytosine (GC) base pairs, we treat AT as 'barriers'. The effect of DNA conformation (A and B form) on charge transport is also investigated. Particularly, the effect of width of 'barriers' on hole transport is investigated. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations are performed on energy minimized DNA structures to obtain the electronic Hamiltonian. The quantum transport calculations are performed using the Landauer-Buttiker framework. Our main findings are contrary to previous studies. We find that a longer A-DNA with more AT base pairs can conduct better than shorter A-DNA with a smaller number of AT base pairs. We also find that some sequences of A-DNA can conduct better than a corresponding B-DNA with the same sequence. The counterions mediated charge transport and long range interactions are speculated to be responsible for counter-intuitive length and AT content dependence of conductance of A-DNA.

  12. Impurity transport in internal transport barrier discharges on JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dux, R.

    2002-01-01

    In JET plasmas with internal transport barrier (ITB) the behaviour of metallic and low-Z impurities (C, Ne) was investigated. In ITB discharges with reversed shear, the metallic impurities accumulate in cases with too strong peaking of the density profile, while the concentration of low-Z elements C and Ne is only mildly peaked. The accumulation might be so strong, that the central radiation approximately equals the central heating power followed by a radiative collapse of the transport barrier. The radial location with strong impurity gradients (convective barrier) was identified to be situated inside (not at!) the heat flux barrier. Calculations of neo-classical transport were performed for these discharges, including impurity-impurity collisions. It was found, that the observed Z-dependence of the impurity peaking and the location of the impurity 'barrier' can be explained with neo-classical transport. ITB discharges with monotonic shear show less inward convection and seem to be advantageous with respect to plasma purity. (author)

  13. Thermal barrier and support for nuclear reactor fuel core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betts, W.S. Jr.; Pickering, J.L.; Black, W.E.

    1987-01-01

    A nuclear reactor is described having a thermal barrier for supporting a fuel column of a nuclear reactor core within a reactor vessel having a fixed rigid metal liner. The fuel column has a refractory post extending downward. The thermal barrier comprises, in combination, a metallic core support having an interior chamber secured to the metal liner; fibrous thermal insulation material covering the metal liner and surrounding the metallic core support; means associated with the metallic core support and resting on the top for locating and supporting the full column post; and a column of ceramic material located within the interior chamber of the metallic core support, the height of the column is less than the height of the metallic core support so that the ceramic column will engage the means for locating and supporting the fuel column post only upon plastic deformation of the metallic core support; the core support comprises a metallic cylinder and the ceramic column comprises coaxially aligned ceramic pads. Each pad has a hole located within the metallic cylinder by means of a ceramic post passing through the holes in the pads

  14. Heat and momentum transport of ion internal transport barrier plasmas on Large Helical Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaoka, K.; Ida, K.; Yoshinuma, M.

    2010-11-01

    The peaked ion-temperature profile with steep gradient so called ion internal transport barrier (ion ITB) was formed in the neutral beam heated plasmas on the Large Helical Device (LHD) and the high-ion-temperature regime of helical plasmas has been significantly extended. The ion thermal diffusivity in the ion ITB plasma decreases down to the neoclassical transport level. The heavy ion beam probe (HIBP) observed the smooth potential profile with negative radial electric field (ion root) in the core region where the ion thermal diffusivity decreases significantly. The large toroidal rotation was also observed in the ion ITB core and the transport of toroidal momentum was analyzed qualitatively. The decrease of momentum diffusivity with ion temperature increase was observed in the ion ITB core. The toroidal rotation driven by ion temperature gradient so called intrinsic rotation is also identified. (author)

  15. Homoepitaxial graphene tunnel barriers for spin transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam L. Friedman

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Tunnel barriers are key elements for both charge-and spin-based electronics, offering devices with reduced power consumption and new paradigms for information processing. Such devices require mating dissimilar materials, raising issues of heteroepitaxy, interface stability, and electronic states that severely complicate fabrication and compromise performance. Graphene is the perfect tunnel barrier. It is an insulator out-of-plane, possesses a defect-free, linear habit, and is impervious to interdiffusion. Nonetheless, true tunneling between two stacked graphene layers is not possible in environmental conditions usable for electronics applications. However, two stacked graphene layers can be decoupled using chemical functionalization. Here, we demonstrate that hydrogenation or fluorination of graphene can be used to create a tunnel barrier. We demonstrate successful tunneling by measuring non-linear IV curves and a weakly temperature dependent zero-bias resistance. We demonstrate lateral transport of spin currents in non-local spin-valve structures, and determine spin lifetimes with the non-local Hanle effect. We compare the results for hydrogenated and fluorinated tunnel and we discuss the possibility that ferromagnetic moments in the hydrogenated graphene tunnel barrier affect the spin transport of our devices.

  16. Homoepitaxial graphene tunnel barriers for spin transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Adam L.; van't Erve, Olaf M. J.; Robinson, Jeremy T.; Whitener, Keith E.; Jonker, Berend T.

    2016-05-01

    Tunnel barriers are key elements for both charge-and spin-based electronics, offering devices with reduced power consumption and new paradigms for information processing. Such devices require mating dissimilar materials, raising issues of heteroepitaxy, interface stability, and electronic states that severely complicate fabrication and compromise performance. Graphene is the perfect tunnel barrier. It is an insulator out-of-plane, possesses a defect-free, linear habit, and is impervious to interdiffusion. Nonetheless, true tunneling between two stacked graphene layers is not possible in environmental conditions usable for electronics applications. However, two stacked graphene layers can be decoupled using chemical functionalization. Here, we demonstrate that hydrogenation or fluorination of graphene can be used to create a tunnel barrier. We demonstrate successful tunneling by measuring non-linear IV curves and a weakly temperature dependent zero-bias resistance. We demonstrate lateral transport of spin currents in non-local spin-valve structures, and determine spin lifetimes with the non-local Hanle effect. We compare the results for hydrogenated and fluorinated tunnel and we discuss the possibility that ferromagnetic moments in the hydrogenated graphene tunnel barrier affect the spin transport of our devices.

  17. Resolving the mystery of transport within internal transport barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staebler, G. M.; Belli, E. A.; Candy, J.; Waltz, R. E.; Greenfield, C. M.; Lao, L. L.; Smith, S. P. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Kinsey, J. E. [CompX, P.O. Box 2672, Del Mar, California 92014-5672 (United States); Grierson, B. A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451 (United States); Chrystal, C. [University of California-San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, California 92093-0417 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    The Trapped Gyro-Landau Fluid (TGLF) quasi-linear model [G. M. Staebler, et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 102508 (2005)], which is calibrated to nonlinear gyrokinetic turbulence simulations, is now able to predict the electron density, electron and ion temperatures, and ion toroidal rotation simultaneously for internal transport barrier (ITB) discharges. This is a strong validation of gyrokinetic theory of ITBs, requiring multiple instabilities responsible for transport in different channels at different scales. The mystery of transport inside the ITB is that momentum and particle transport is far above the predicted neoclassical levels in apparent contradiction with the expectation from the theory of suppression of turbulence by E×B velocity shear. The success of TGLF in predicting ITB transport is due to the inclusion of ion gyro-radius scale modes that become dominant at high E×B velocity shear and to improvements to TGLF that allow momentum transport from gyrokinetic turbulence to be faithfully modeled.

  18. The barrier within: endothelial transport of hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolka, Cathryn M; Bergman, Richard N

    2012-08-01

    Hormones are involved in a plethora of processes including development and growth, metabolism, mood, and immune responses. These essential functions are dependent on the ability of the hormone to access its target tissue. In the case of endocrine hormones that are transported through the blood, this often means that the endothelium must be crossed. Many studies have shown that the concentrations of hormones and nutrients in blood can be very different from those surrounding the cells on the tissue side of the blood vessel endothelium, suggesting that transport across this barrier can be rate limiting for hormone action. This transport can be regulated by altering the surface area of the blood vessel available for diffusion through to the underlying tissue or by the permeability of the endothelium. Many hormones are known to directly or indirectly affect the endothelial barrier, thus affecting their own distribution to their target tissues. Dysfunction of the endothelial barrier is found in many diseases, particularly those associated with the metabolic syndrome. The interrelatedness of hormones may help to explain why the cluster of diseases in the metabolic syndrome occur together so frequently and suggests that treating the endothelium may ameliorate defects in more than one disease. Here, we review the structure and function of the endothelium, its contribution to the function of hormones, and its involvement in disease.

  19. Internal transport barrier physics in helical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, M.; Minami, T.; Fujisawa, A.; Herranz, J.; Ida, K.; Yamagishi, O.; Yamada, H.; Maaberg, H.; Beidler, C.D.; Dinklage, A.; Estrada, T.; Castejon, F.; Murakami, S.

    2005-01-01

    The electron internal transport barrier (eITB) has been observed in wide range of helical systems, such as CHS [eg.,1], LHD [eg., 2], TJ-II [eg., 3] and W7-AS [eg., 4]. The eITB isA defined as highly peaked electron temperature (Te) profile with strongly positive radial electric field (Er) in the central region. These observations are reviewed in this paper to understand the device-independent common findings and also to draw the main differences. This is the first report from the International Stellarator Profile Database Activity. The formation of the strong central positive Er has been understood mainly as a result of the ambipolarity of neoclassical electron and ion fluxes, although some additional convective electron flux such as driven by ECRH is required in some situations. This 'neoclassical' physics peculiar to low collisional regime of helical plasmas provides the commonly observed existence of the ECRH power threshold (which is also depending on the density). This is contrastive characteristics to the ITB observed in tokamaks. The dependence of the ECRH power threshold on the magnetic configuration and on the heating scenario among these devices are currently being examined by taking the effective ripple and the trapped particle fraction as parameters to achieve the comprehensive understanding. The roles of low order rational surfaces on the onset of eITB formation and also on its radial size (location of the footpoint of the eITB) have been indicated in inward shifted configurations in LHD (depending on the relative locations of heating position and 2/1 island) and TJ-II (eITB becomes possible at higher density when 3/2 rational is introduced in the plasma core region). It is speculated that, for the latter case, the resonance causes an extra electron flux to trigger the positive Er. The interplay between low order rational surfaces and the formation of eITB still waits for the systematic experiment and theoretical analysis. The external controllability

  20. Paleoclassical transport explains electron transport barriers in RTP and TEXTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogeweij, G M D [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM-FOM, PO Box 1207, NL-3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Callen, J D [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706-1609 (United States)

    2008-06-15

    The recently developed paleoclassical transport model sets the minimum level of electron thermal transport in a tokamak. This transport level has proven to be in good agreement with experimental observations in many cases when fluctuation-induced anomalous transport is small, i.e. in (near-)ohmic plasmas in small to medium size tokamaks, inside internal transport barriers (ITBs) or edge transport barriers (H-mode pedestal). In this paper predictions of the paleoclassical transport model are compared in detail with data from such kinds of discharges: ohmic discharges from the RTP tokamak, EC heated RTP discharges featuring both dynamic and shot-to-shot scans of the ECH power deposition radius and off-axis EC heated discharges from the TEXTOR tokamak. For ohmically heated RTP discharges the T{sub e} profiles predicted by the paleoclassical model are in reasonable agreement with the experimental observations, and various parametric dependences are captured satisfactorily. The electron thermal ITBs observed in steady state EC heated RTP discharges and transiently after switch-off of off-axis ECH in TEXTOR are predicted very well by the paleoclassical model.

  1. Control of electron internal transport barriers in TCV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, M A; Behn, R; Coda, S; Condrea, I; Duval, B P; Goodman, T P; Karpushov, A; Martin, Y; Martynov, An; Moret, J-M; Nikkola, P; Porte, L; Sauter, O; Scarabosio, A; Zhuang, G [Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Association EURATOM-Confederation Suisse, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, CRPP-EPFL, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2004-05-01

    Current profile tailoring has been performed by application of electron cyclotron heating (ECH) and electron cyclotron current drive, leading to improved energy confinement in the plasma core of the TCV tokamak. The improved confinement is characterized by a substantial enhancement (H-factor) of the global electron energy confinement time relative to the prediction of the RLW scaling law (Rebut P H et al 1989 Proc. 12th Int. Conf. of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion Research (Nice, 1988) vol 2 (Vienna: IAEA) p 191), which predicts well Ohmic and standard ECH discharges on TCV. The improved confinement is attributed to a hollow current density profile producing a reversed shear profile creating an electron internal transport barrier. We relate the strength of the barrier to the depth of the hollow current density profile and the volume enclosed by the radial location of the peak current density. The {rho}{sub T}{sup *} (Tresset G et al 2002 Nucl. Fusion 42 520) criterion is used to evaluate the performance of the barrier relative to changes in the ECH parameters or the addition of Ohmic current, which aid in identifying the control parameters available for improving either the strength or volume of the barrier for enhanced performance. A figure of merit for the global scaling factor is used that scales the confinement enhancement as the product of the barrier volume and strength.

  2. Control of electron internal transport barriers in TCV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, M A; Behn, R; Coda, S; Condrea, I; Duval, B P; Goodman, T P; Karpushov, A; Martin, Y; Martynov, An; Moret, J-M; Nikkola, P; Porte, L; Sauter, O; Scarabosio, A; Zhuang, G

    2004-01-01

    Current profile tailoring has been performed by application of electron cyclotron heating (ECH) and electron cyclotron current drive, leading to improved energy confinement in the plasma core of the TCV tokamak. The improved confinement is characterized by a substantial enhancement (H-factor) of the global electron energy confinement time relative to the prediction of the RLW scaling law (Rebut P H et al 1989 Proc. 12th Int. Conf. of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion Research (Nice, 1988) vol 2 (Vienna: IAEA) p 191), which predicts well Ohmic and standard ECH discharges on TCV. The improved confinement is attributed to a hollow current density profile producing a reversed shear profile creating an electron internal transport barrier. We relate the strength of the barrier to the depth of the hollow current density profile and the volume enclosed by the radial location of the peak current density. The ρ T * (Tresset G et al 2002 Nucl. Fusion 42 520) criterion is used to evaluate the performance of the barrier relative to changes in the ECH parameters or the addition of Ohmic current, which aid in identifying the control parameters available for improving either the strength or volume of the barrier for enhanced performance. A figure of merit for the global scaling factor is used that scales the confinement enhancement as the product of the barrier volume and strength

  3. Whole core transport calculation for the VHTR hexagonal core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, J. Y.; Kim, K. S.; Lee, C. C.; Joo, H. G.

    2007-01-01

    Recently, the DeCART code which performs the whole core calculation by coupling the radial MOC transport kernel with the axial nodal kernel has equipped a kernel to deal with the hexagonal geometry and applied to the VHTR hexagonal core to examine the accuracy and the computational efficiency of the implemented kernel. The implementation includes a modular ray tracing module based on the hexagonal assembly and a multi-group CMFD module to perform an efficient transport calculation. The requirements for the modular ray are: (1) the assembly based path linking and (2) the complete reflection capabilities. The first requirement is met by adjusting the azimuthal angle and the ray spacing for the modular ray to construct a core ray by the path linking. The second requirement is met by expanding the constructed azimuthal angle in the range of [0,30 degree] to the remained range to reflect completely at the core boundaries. The considered reflecting surface angles for the complete reflection are 30n's (n=1,2,1,12). The CMFD module performs the equivalent diffusion calculation to the radial MOC transport calculation based on the homogenized structure units. The structure units include the hexagonal pin cells and gap cells appearing at the assembly boundary. Therefore, the CMFD module is programmed to deal with the unstructured cells such as the gap cells. The CMFD equation consists of the two parts of (1) the conventional FDM and (2) the current corrective parts. Since the second part of the CMFD equation guarantees the reproducibility of the radial MOC transport solutions for the cell averaged reaction rate and the net current at the cell surfaces, how to build the first part of the CMFD equation is not important. Therefore, the first part of the CMFD equation is roughly built by using the normal distance from the gravity center to the surface. The VHTR core uses helium as a coolant which is realized as a void hole in a neutronics calculation. This void hole which

  4. Three dimensions transport calculations for PWR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richebois, E.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this work is to define improved 3-D core calculation methods based on the transport theory. These methods can be particularly useful and lead to more precise computations in areas of the core where anisotropy and steep flux gradients occur, especially near interface and boundary conditions and in regions of high heterogeneity (bundle with absorbent rods). In order to apply the transport theory a new method for calculating reflector constants has been developed, since traditional methods were only suited for 2-group diffusion core calculations and could not be extrapolated to transport calculations. In this thesis work, the new method for obtaining reflector constants is derived regardless of the number of energy groups and of the operator used. The core calculations results using the reflector constants thereof obtained have been validated on the EDF's power reactor Saint Laurent B1 with MOX loading. The advantages of a 3-D core transport calculation scheme have been highlighted as opposed to diffusion methods; there are a considerable number of significant effects and potential advantages to be gained in rod worth calculations for instance. These preliminary results obtained with on particular cycle will have to be confirmed by more systematic analysis. Accidents like MSLB (main steam line break) and LOCA (loss of coolant accident) should also be investigated and constitute challenging situations where anisotropy is high and/or flux gradients are steep. This method is now being validated for others EDF's PWRs' reactors, as well as for experimental reactors and other types of commercial reactors. (author)

  5. Recent experimental studies of edge and internal transport barriers in the DIII-D tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gohil, P; Baylor, L R; Burrell, K H; Casper, T A; Doyle, E J; Greenfield, C M; Jernigan, T C; Kinsey, J E; Lasnier, C J; Moyer, R A; Murakami, M; Rhodes, T L; Rudakov, D L; Staebler, G M; Wang, G; Watkins, J G; West, W P; Zeng, L

    2003-01-01

    Results from recent experiments on the DIII-D tokamak have revealed many important details on transport barriers at the plasma edge and in the plasma core. These experiments include: (a) the formation of the H-mode edge barrier directly by pellet injection; (b) the formation of a quiescent H-mode edge barrier (QH-mode) which is free from edge localized modes, but which still exhibits good density and radiative power control; (c) the formation of multiple transport barriers, such as the quiescent double barrier (QDB) which combines an internal transport barrier with the quiescent H-mode edge barrier. Results from the pellet-induced H-mode experiments indicate that: (a) the edge temperature (electron or ion) does not need to attain a critical value for the formation of the H-mode barrier, (b) pellet injection leads to an increased gradient in the radial electric field, E r , at the plasma edge; (c) the experimentally determined edge parameters at barrier transition are well below the predictions of several theories on the formation of the H-mode barrier, (d) pellet injection can lower the threshold power required to form the H-mode barrier. The quiescent H-mode barrier exhibits good density control as the result of continuous magnetohydrodynamic activity at the plasma edge called the edge harmonic oscillation (EHO). The EHO enhances the edge particle transport whilst maintaining a good energy transport barrier. The ability to produce multiple barriers in the QDB regime has led to long duration, high-performance plasmas with β N H 89 values of 7 for up to 10 times the confinement time. Density profile control in the plasma core of QDB plasmas has been demonstrated using on-axis electron cyclotron heating

  6. Effect of density control and impurity transport on internal transport barrier formation in tokamak plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamakami, Tomoyuki; Fujita, Takaaki; Arimoto, Hideki; Yamazaki, Kozo

    2014-01-01

    In future fusion reactors, density control, such as fueling by pellet injection, is an effective method to control the formation of the internal transport barrier (ITB) in reversed magnetic shear plasma, which can improve plasma performance. On the other hand, an operation with ITB can cause accumulation of impurities inside the core ITB region. We studied the relation between pellet injection and ITB formation and the effect of impurity transport on the core of ITB for tokamak plasmas by using the toroidal transport analysis linkage. For ITB formation, we showed that the pellet has to be injected beyond the position where the safety factor q takes the minimum value. We confirmed that the accumulation of impurities causes the attenuation of ITB owing to radiation loss inside the ITB region. Moreover, in terms of the divertor heat flux reduction by impurity gas, the line radiation loss is high for high-Z noble gas impurities, such as Kr, whereas factor Q decreases slightly. (author)

  7. Nonlocal transport in the presence of transport barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del-Castillo-Negrete, D.

    2013-10-01

    There is experimental, numerical, and theoretical evidence that transport in plasmas can, under certain circumstances, depart from the standard local, diffusive description. Examples include fast pulse propagation phenomena in perturbative experiments, non-diffusive scaling in L-mode plasmas, and non-Gaussian statistics of fluctuations. From the theoretical perspective, non-diffusive transport descriptions follow from the relaxation of the restrictive assumptions (locality, scale separation, and Gaussian/Markovian statistics) at the foundation of diffusive models. We discuss an alternative class of models able to capture some of the observed non-diffusive transport phenomenology. The models are based on a class of nonlocal, integro-differential operators that provide a unifying framework to describe non- Fickian scale-free transport, and non-Markovian (memory) effects. We study the interplay between nonlocality and internal transport barriers (ITBs) in perturbative transport including cold edge pulses and power modulation. Of particular interest in the nonlocal ``tunnelling'' of perturbations through ITBs. Also, flux-gradient diagrams are discussed as diagnostics to detect nonlocal transport processes in numerical simulations and experiments. Work supported by the US Department of Energy.

  8. Edge and internal transport barrier formations in CHS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamura, S.; Minami, T.; Akiyama, T.; Fujisawa, A.; Ida, K.; Iguchi, H.; Isobe, M.; Nagaoka, K.; Nakamura, K.; Nishimura, S.; Matsuoka, K.; Matsushita, H.; Nakano, H.; Nishiura, M.; Ohshima, S.; Shimizu, A.; Suzuki, C.; Takahashi, C.; Toi, K.; Yoshimura, Y.; Yoshinuma, M.; Oishi, T.; Kado, S.

    2005-01-01

    Edge transport barrier (ETB) formation was observed in CHS. Sharp decrease of Hα emission indicates the quick transition of edge particle transport. Increase of the density gradient at the edge was measured by various profile diagnostics and the improvement of the global energy confinement was confirmed based on the stellarator confinement scaling. The heating power threshold exists. The transition and back transition is controlled by the heating power. The local density measurement by the beam emission spectroscopy shows intermittent burst of the low frequency fluctuations during the ETB formation phase. The ETB formation together with the electron temperature increase (electron ITB) in the core region were observed for the NBI discharges without ECH. (author)

  9. Self-regulation of turbulence bursts and transport barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floriani, E; Ciraolo, G; Ghendrih, Ph; Sarazin, Y; Lima, R

    2013-01-01

    The interplay between turbulent bursts and transport barriers is analyzed with a simplified model of interchange turbulence in magnetically confined plasmas. The turbulent bursts spread into the transport barriers and, depending on the competing magnitude of the burst and stopping capability of the barrier, can burn through. Simulations of two models of transport barriers are presented: a hard barrier where interchange turbulence modes are stable in a prescribed region and a soft barrier with external plasma biasing. The response of the transport barriers to the non-linear perturbations of the turbulent bursts, addressed in a predator–prey approach, indicates that the barriers monitor an amplification factor of the turbulent bursts, with amplification smaller than one for most bursts and, in some cases, amplification factors that can significantly exceed unity. The weak barriers in corrugated profiles and magnetic structures, as well as the standard barriers, are characterized by these transmission properties, which then regulate the turbulent burst transport properties. The interplays of barriers and turbulent bursts are modeled as competing stochastic processes. For different classes of the probability density function (PDF) of these processes, one can predict the heavy tail properties of the bursts downstream from the barrier, either exponential for a leaky barrier, or with power laws for a tight barrier. The intrinsic probing of the transport barriers by the turbulent bursts thus gives access to the properties of the barriers. The main stochastic variables are the barrier width and the spreading distance of the turbulent bursts within the barrier, together with their level of correlation. One finds that in the case of a barrier with volumetric losses, such as radiation or particle losses as addressed in our present simulations, the stochastic model predicts a leaky behavior with an exponential PDF of escaping turbulent bursts in agreement with the simulation

  10. Transport of the moving barrier driven by chiral active particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Jing-jing; Huang, Xiao-qun; Ai, Bao-quan

    2018-03-01

    Transport of a moving V-shaped barrier exposed to a bath of chiral active particles is investigated in a two-dimensional channel. Due to the chirality of active particles and the transversal asymmetry of the barrier position, active particles can power and steer the directed transport of the barrier in the longitudinal direction. The transport of the barrier is determined by the chirality of active particles. The moving barrier and active particles move in the opposite directions. The average velocity of the barrier is much larger than that of active particles. There exist optimal parameters (the chirality, the self-propulsion speed, the packing fraction, and the channel width) at which the average velocity of the barrier takes its maximal value. In particular, tailoring the geometry of the barrier and the active concentration provides novel strategies to control the transport properties of micro-objects or cargoes in an active medium.

  11. Measuring Health-related Transportation Barriers in Urban Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locatelli, Sara M; Sharp, Lisa K; Syed, Saming T; Bhansari, Shikhi; Gerber, Ben S

    Access to reliable transportation is important for people with chronic diseases considering the need for frequent medical visits and for medications from the pharmacy. Understanding of the extent to which transportation barriers, including lack of transportation, contribute to poor health outcomes has been hindered by a lack of consistency in measuring or operationally defining "transportation barriers." The current study uses the Rasch measurement model to examine the psychometric properties of a new measure designed to capture types of transportation and associated barriers within an urban context. Two hundred forty-four adults with type 2 diabetes were recruited from within an academic medical center in Chicago and completed the newly developed transportation questions as part of a larger National Institutes of Health funded study (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01498159). Results suggested a two subscale structure that reflected 1) general transportation barriers and 2) public transportation barriers.

  12. Effect of Internal and Edge Transport Barriers in ITER Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pianroj, Y.; Onjun, T.; Suwanna, S.; Picha, R.; Poolyarat, N.

    2009-07-01

    Full text: Predictive simulations of ITER with the presence of both an edge transport barrier (ETB) and an internal transport barrier (ITB) are carried out using the BALDUR integrated predictive modeling code. In these simulations, the boundary is taken at the top of the pedestal, where the pedestal values are described using the theory-based pedestal models. These pedestal temperature models are based on three different pedestal width scalings: magnetic and flow shear stabilization (δ α ρ ζ 2 ), flow shear stabilization (δ α Root ρ Rq), and normalized poloidal pressure (δ α R Root βθ, ped). The pedestal width scalings are combined with a pedestal pressure gradient scaling based on ballooning mode limit to predict the pedestal temperature. A version of the semi-empirical Mixed Bohm/gyro Bohm (Mixed B/gB) core transport model that includes ITB effects is used to compute the evolution of plasma profiles and plasma performance, which defined by Fusion Q factor. The results from the cases excluding and including ITB are compared. The preliminary results show the Q value resulted from ITB-excluded simulation is less than the one with ITB included

  13. Transition phenomena and thermal transport property in LHD plasmas with an electron internal transport barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimozuma, T.; Kubo, S.; Idei, H.

    2005-01-01

    Two kinds of improved core confinement were observed during centrally focused Electron Cyclotron Heating (ECH) into plasmas sustained by Counter (CNTR) and Co Neutral Beam Injections (NBI) in the Large Helical Device (LHD). One shows transition phenomena to the high-electron-temperature state and has a clear electron Internal Transport Barrier (eITB) in CNTR NBI plasma. Another has no clear transition and no ECH power threshold, but shows a broad high temperature profiles with moderate temperature gradient, which indicates the improved core confinement with additional ECH in Co NBI plasma. The electron heat transport characteristics of these plasmas were directly investigated by using the heat pulse propagation excited by Modulated ECH (MECH). The difference of the features could be caused by the existence of the m/n=2/1 rational surface or island determined by the direction of NBI beam-driven current. (author)

  14. Transition phenomena and thermal transport properties in LHD plasmas with an electron internal transport barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimozuma, T.; Kubo, S.; Idei, H.; Inagaki, S.; Tamura, N.; Tokuzawa, T.; Morisaki, T.; Watanabe, K.Y.; Ida, K.; Yamada, I.; Narihara, K.; Muto, S.; Yokoyama, M.; Yoshimura, Y.; Notake, T.; Ohkubo, K.; Seki, T.; Saito, K.; Kumazawa, R.; Mutoh, T.; Watari, T.; Komori, A.

    2005-01-01

    Two types of improved core confinement were observed during centrally focused electron cyclotron heating (ECH) into plasmas sustained by counter (CNTR) and Co neutral beam injections (NBI) in the Large Helical Device. The CNTR NBI plasma displayed transition phenomena to the high-electron-temperature state and had a clear electron internal transport barrier, while the Co NBI plasma did not show a clear transition or an ECH power threshold but showed broad high temperature profiles with moderate temperature gradient. This indicated that the Co NBI plasma with additional ECH also had an improved core confinement. The electron heat transport characteristics of these plasmas were directly investigated using heat pulse propagation excited by modulated ECH. These effects appear to be related to the m/n = 2/1 rational surface or the island induced by NBI beam-driven current

  15. The Physics of Internal Transport Barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tala, T.; Andrew, Y.; Crombe, K.; Garbet, X.; Hawkes, N.; Kierneva, N.; Mantica, P.; Piches, S.; Thyagaraja, A.; Weiland, J.

    2007-07-01

    The Internal Transport Barriers (ITBs) were found more than a decade ago. Still for the time being, there are many open questions concerning their physics and dynamics. Several mechanisms are believed to affect the triggering and formation of the ITB, and subsequent dynamical processes, like expansion, strengthening and collapse of the barrier. Regarding the question of dominant ITB formation mechanisms, many experimental results on JET are consistent with ITB dynamics controlled by the E X B flow shear and local magnetic shear. On the other hand, the actual triggering of the ITB is less clear. While the role of minimum value of the q profile approaching an integer value is known to be significant, the actual role of q is delicate as the ITB is triggered before q min reaches an integer value, indicated by the grand Alfven Cascades. The prime candidate to explain the ITB triggering is the E X B flow shear. The increase in the EXB flow shear within the ITB is experimentally seen as a spin-up of the carbon poloidal velocity with the charge exchange resonance spectroscopy measurements. Furthermore, the transport modelling with the Weiland and GLF23 transport models using the experimental poloidal velocity instead of the neoclassical one strongly supports the crucial role of EXB flow shear in triggering the ITB. The causality between the onset of the ITB and spin-up of the poloidal velocity has been studied extensively and will be reported here. The role of magnetic shear is also undisputable. When the magnetic shear is negative enough, for example in the case of current hole, a strong ITB in the electron channel is observed, and often with very small EXB flow shear. The role of magnetic shear is less clear for ion heat transport channel. Certainly it facilitates the ITB formation, but whether it alone is able to trigger an ITB has not been proven. The role of stabilisation, the role of density peaking, the dilution effects due to impurities and fast particles are

  16. High density internal transport barriers for burning plasma operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pericoli Ridolfini, V.

    2005-01-01

    One of the proposed ITER scenarios foresees the creation and sustainment of an internal transport barrier (ITB) in order to improve the confinement properties of the hot core plasma. The more stringent requests are: the ITB must be sustained with electron heating only with no or very small external momentum source, the strong collisional coupling at the envisaged density (line average >1.0 1020 m-3) must not prevent the barrier existence, the bootstrap current created by the large induced gradients must have a radial profile consistent with that requested by the barrier creation and sustainment. To all these items the studies carried out in FTU in the same density range (ne0 ?1.5 1020 m-3) provide encouraging prospects. With pure electron heating and current drive (LH+ECH) steady electron barrier are generated and maintained with central e- temperature >5.0 keV. Almost full CD conditions are established with a bootstrap current close to 25% of the total and well aligned with that driven by the LH waves and responsible for the barrier building. The clear change in the density fluctuations close to the ITB radius, observed by reflectometry, indicates stabilization of turbulence that is consistent with the drop of the thermal electron diffusivity inside the ITB to very low values, ?e<0.5 m2/s estimated by the transport analysis. The 10 fold neutron rate increase testifies a significant collisional ion heating, even though usually ?Ti0/Ti0 does not exceed 40%, because the e--i + equipartition time, always 4-5 times longer than the energy confinement time, does not allow thermal equilibrium with electrons to be attained. The ion thermal diffusivity inside the barrier must be lowered to the neoclassical level to account for the observed Ti(r) profiles, clearly indicating at least a non-degraded ion transport. The global confinement in turn improves by 1.6 times above the FTU L-scaling. The ITB radius can be controlled by varying the LH power deposition profile that is

  17. Triggering of internal transport barrier in JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joffrin, E. [Association Euratom-CEA pour la Fusion, CEA Cadarache, St. Paul lez Durance (France); Gorini, G. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, EURATOM-ENEA-CNR Association, Milan (Italy); Challis, C.D. [Euratom/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon (United Kingdom)] [and others

    2002-08-01

    Internal transport barriers (ITBs) can be produced in JET by the application of strong additional heating during the current rise phase of the plasma discharge. Using up to 3 MW of lower hybrid power to tailor the q-profile prior to the main heating phase, a large variety of q-profiles ranging from low positive to strong negative central shear have been obtained during the current rise (0.4 MA s{sup -1}). With negative central magnetic shear s=(r/q)(r/q), the analysis of ITB triggering reveals a correlation between the formation of the ITB and q{sub andmin;} reaching an integer value (q=2 or q=3). This observation is confirmed by the analysis of the Alfven cascades. The minimum power required to access regimes with ITBs is probably related to the transport and magnetohydrodynamic properties of integer magnetic surfaces. Laser ablation and shallow pellet injection have also been attempted in recent JET ITB triggering experiments. (author)

  18. Electron internal transport barriers and magnetic topology in the stellarator TJ-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estrada, T.; Lopez-Bruna, D.; Alosno, A.; Ascasibar, E.; Baciero, A.; Cappa, A.; Castejon, F.; Fernandez, A.; Herranz, J.; Hidalgo, C.; Pablos, J. L. de; Pastor, I.; Sanchez, E.; Sanchez, J.

    2005-07-01

    In most helical systems electron Internal Transport Barriers (e-ITB) are observed in Electron Cyclotron Heated (ECH) plasmas with high heating power density. In the stellarator TJ-II, e- ITBs are easily achievable by positioning a low order rational surface close to the plasma core, because this increases the density range in which the e-ITB can form. Experiments with different low order rationals show a dependence of the threshold density and barrier quality on the order of the rational (3/2, 4/2, 5/3, ...). In addition, during the formation of e-ITB quasicoherent modes are frequently observed in the plasma core region. The mode can exist before or after the e-ITB phenomenon at the radial location of the transport barrier foot but vanishes as the barrier is fully developed. (Author)

  19. Properties of internal transport barrier formation in JT-60U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Yoshiteru; Suzuki, T.; Ide, S.

    2003-01-01

    The dependence of the ion thermal diffusivity (χ i ) on the radial electric field (E r ) shear has been investigated in JT-60U plasmas. In positive magnetic shear (PS) plasmas, χ i in the core region generally increases with the heating power, similar to the L mode at low heating power. However, as a result of the intensive central heating, which is relevant to the enhancement of the E γ shear, a weak internal transport barrier (ITB) is formed, and χ i in the core region starts to decrease. Corresponding to a further increase of the heating power, a strong ITB is formed and χ i is reduced substantially. In the case of reversed magnetic shear (RS) plasmas, on the other hand, no power degradation of χ i is observed in any of heating regimes. The electron thermal diffusivity (χ e ) is strongly correlated with χ i in PS and RS plasmas. There exists a threshold in the effective E γ shear to change the state from a weak to a strong ITB. It is found that the threshold of the effective E γ shear in the case of a PS plasma depends on the poloidal magnetic field at the ITB. There are multiple levels of reduced transport in the strong ITB for RS plasmas. (author)

  20. Properties of internal transport barrier formation in JT-60U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Y.; Suzuki, T.; Ide, S.

    2003-01-01

    The dependence of the ion thermal diffusivity (χ i ) on the radial electric field (E r ) shear has been investigated in JT-60U plasmas. In positive magnetic shear (PS) plasmas, χ i in the core region generally increases with the heating power, similar to the L mode at low heating power. However, as a result of the intensive central heating, which is relevant to the enhancement of the E r shear, a weak internal transport barrier (ITB) is formed, and χ i in the core region starts to decrease. Corresponding to a further increase of the heating power, a strong ITB is formed and χ i is reduced substantially. In the case of reversed magnetic shear (RS) plasmas, on the other hand, no power degradation of χ i is observed in any of the heating regimes. The electron thermal diffusivity (χ e ) is strongly correlated with χ i in PS and RS plasmas. There exists a threshold in the effective E r shear to change the state from a weak to a strong ITB. It is found that the threshold of the effective E r shear in the case of a PS plasma depends on the poloidal magnetic field at the ITB. There are multiple levels of reduced transport in the strong ITB for RS plasmas. (author)

  1. Internal transport barriers on Alcator C-Mod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiore, C.L.; Rice, J.E.; Bonoli, P.T.; Boivin, R.L.; Goetz, J.A.; Hubbard, A.E.; Hutchinson, I.H.; Granetz, R.S.; Greenwald, M.J.; Marmar, E.S.; Mossessian, D.; Porkolab, M.; Taylor, G.; Snipes, J.; Wolfe, S.M.; Wukitch, S.J.

    2001-01-01

    The formation of internal transport barriers (ITBs) has been observed in the core region of Alcator C-Mod [I. H. Hutchinson et al., Phys. Plasmas 1, 1511 (1994)] under a variety of conditions. The improvement in core confinement following pellet injection (pellet enhanced performance or PEP mode) has been well documented on Alcator C-Mod in the past. Recently three new ITB phenomena have been observed which require no externally applied particle or momentum input. Short lived ITBs form spontaneously following the high confinement to low confinement mode transition and are characterized by a large increase in the global neutron production (enhanced neutron or EN modes). Experiments with ion cyclotron range of frequencies power injection to the plasma off-axis on the high field side results in the central density rising abruptly and becoming peaked. The ITB formed at this time lasts for ten energy confinement times. The central toroidal rotation velocity decreases and changes sign as the density rises. Similar spontaneous ITBs have been observed in ohmically heated H-mode plasmas. All of these ITB events have strongly peaked density profiles with a minimum in the density scale length occurring near r/a=0.5 and have improved confinement parameters in the core region of the plasma

  2. Suppression of turbulent transport in NSTX internal transport barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuh, Howard

    2008-11-01

    Electron transport will be important for ITER where fusion alphas and high-energy beam ions will primarily heat electrons. In the NSTX, internal transport barriers (ITBs) are observed in reversed (negative) shear discharges where diffusivities for electron and ion thermal channels and momentum are reduced. While neutral beam heating can produce ITBs in both electron and ion channels, High Harmonic Fast Wave (HHFW) heating can produce electron thermal ITBs under reversed magnetic shear conditions without momentum input. Interestingly, the location of the electron ITB does not necessarily match that of the ion ITB: the electron ITB correlates well with the minimum in the magnetic shear determined by Motional Stark Effect (MSE) [1] constrained equilibria, whereas the ion ITB better correlates with the maximum ExB shearing rate. Measured electron temperature gradients can exceed critical linear thresholds for ETG instability calculated by linear gyrokinetic codes in the ITB confinement region. The high-k microwave scattering diagnostic [2] shows reduced local density fluctuations at wavenumbers characteristic of electron turbulence for discharges with strongly negative magnetic shear versus weakly negative or positive magnetic shear. Fluctuation reductions are found to be spatially and temporally correlated with the local magnetic shear. These results are consistent with non-linear gyrokinetic simulations predictions showing the reduction of electron transport in negative magnetic shear conditions despite being linearly unstable [3]. Electron transport improvement via negative magnetic shear rather than ExB shear highlights the importance of current profile control in ITER and future devices. [1] F.M. Levinton, H. Yuh et al., PoP 14, 056119 [2] D.R. Smith, E. Mazzucato et al., RSI 75, 3840 [3] Jenko, F. and Dorland, W., PRL 89 225001

  3. Feasibility study on embedded transport core calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, B.; Zikatanov, L.; Ivanov, K.

    2007-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to develop an advanced core calculation methodology based on embedded diffusion and transport calculations. The scheme proposed in this work is based on embedded diffusion or SP 3 pin-by-pin local fuel assembly calculation within the framework of the Nodal Expansion Method (NEM) diffusion core calculation. The SP 3 method has gained popularity in the last 10 years as an advanced method for neutronics calculation. NEM is a multi-group nodal diffusion code developed, maintained and continuously improved at the Pennsylvania State University. The developed calculation scheme is a non-linear iteration process, which involves cross-section homogenization, on-line discontinuity factors generation, and boundary conditions evaluation by the global solution passed to the local calculation. In order to accomplish the local calculation, a new code has been developed based on the Finite Elements Method (FEM), which is capable of performing both diffusion and SP 3 calculations. The new code will be used in the framework of the NEM code in order to perform embedded pin-by-pin diffusion and SP 3 calculations on fuel assembly basis. The development of the diffusion and SP 3 FEM code is presented first following by its application to several problems. Description of the proposed embedded scheme is provided next as well as the obtained preliminary results of the C3 MOX benchmark. The results from the embedded calculations are compared with direct pin-by-pin whole core calculations in terms of accuracy and efficiency followed by conclusions made about the feasibility of the proposed embedded approach. (authors)

  4. Results from transient transport experiments in Rijnhuizen tokamak project: Heat convection, transport barriers and 'non-local' effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mantica, P.; Gorini, G.; Hogeweij, G.M.D.; Kloe, J. de; Lopez Cardozo, N.J.; Schilham, A.M.R.

    2001-01-01

    An overview of experimental transport studies performed on the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project (RTP) using transient transport techniques in both Ohmic and ECH dominated plasmas is presented. Modulated Electron Cyclotron Heating (ECH) and oblique pellet injection (OPI) have been used to induce electron temperature (T e ) perturbations at different radial locations. These were used to probe the electron transport barriers observed near low order rational magnetic surfaces in ECH dominated steady-state RTP plasmas. Layers of inward electron heat convection in off-axis ECH plasmas were detected with modulated ECH. This suggests that RTP electron transport barriers consist of heat pinch layers rather than layers of low thermal diffusivity. In a different set of experiments, OPI triggered a transient rise of the core T e due to an increase of the T e gradient in the 1< q<2 region. These transient transport barriers were probed with modulated ECH and found to be due to a transient drop of the electron heat diffusivity, except for off-axis ECH plasmas, where a transient inward pinch is also observed. Transient transport studies in RTP could not solve this puzzling interplay between heat diffusion and convection in determining an electron transport barrier. They nevertheless provided challenging experimental evidence both for theoretical modelling and for future experiments. (author)

  5. Implications of the Homogeneous Nucleation Barrier for Top-Down Crystallization in Mercury's Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huguet, L.; Hauck, S. A.; Van Orman, J. A.; Jing, Z.

    2018-05-01

    Crystallization of solids in planetary cores depends both on ambient temperatures falling below the liquidus and on the ability to nucleate crystal growth. We discuss the implications of the nucleation barrier for thermal evolution of Mercury's core.

  6. Theoretical modeling of transport barriers in helical plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toda, S.; Itoh, K.; Ohyabu, N.

    2008-10-01

    A unified transport modelling to explain electron Internal Transport Barriers (e-ITB) in helical plasmas and Internal Diffusion Barriers (IDB) observed in Large Helical Device (LHD) is proposed. The e-ITB can be predicted with the effect of zonal flows to obtain the e-ITB in the low collisional regime when the radial variation of the particle anomalous diffusivity is included. Transport analysis in this article can newly show that the particle fuelling induces the IDB formation when this unified transport modelling is used in the high collisional regime. The density limit for the IDB in helical plasmas is also examined including the effect of the radiation loss. (author)

  7. Transport phenomena in sharply contrasting media with a diffusion barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dvoretskaya, O A; Kondratenko, P S

    2011-01-01

    Using the advection–diffusion equation, we analytically study contaminant transport in a sharply contrasting medium with a diffusion barrier due to localization of a contaminant source in a low-permeability medium. Anomalous diffusion behavior and a crossover between different transport regimes are observed. The diffusion barrier results in exponential attenuation of the source power, retardation of the contaminant plume growth and modification of the concentration distribution at large distances. (paper)

  8. Hydrocarbon formation core protection and and transportation apparatus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2013-01-01

    An apparatus for transporting core samples includes an outer tube having an open end and a cover removably mounted to the open end; a core tube slidable into and out ofthe outer tube when the cover is removed from the outer tube; and a stabilizing structure between the core tube and the outer tube,

  9. Progress Towards Increased Understanding and Control of Internal Transport Barriers on DIII-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doyle, E. J. [University of California, Los Angeles; Greenfield, C. M. [General Atomics; Austin, M. E. [University of Texas, Austin; Baylor, Larry R [ORNL; Burrell, K. H. [General Atomics; Casper, T. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); DeBoo, J. C. [General Atomics; Ernst, D. R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Fenzi, C. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Gohil, P. [General Atomics; Groebner, R. J. [General Atomics; Heidbrink, W. W. [University of California, Irvine; Jackson, G. L. [General Atomics; Jernigan, Thomas C [ORNL; Kinsey, J. E. [Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA; Lao, L. L. [General Atomics; Makowski, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Mckee, G. R. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Murakami, Masanori [ORNL; Peebles, W. A. [University of California, Los Angeles; Prater, R. [General Atomics; Rettig, C. L. [University of California, Los Angeles; Rhodes, T. L. [University of California, Los Angeles; Rost, J. C. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Staebler, G. M. [General Atomics; Stallard, B. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Strait, E. J. [General Atomics; Synakowski, E. J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Thomas, D. M. [General Atomics; Wade, Mickey R [ORNL; Waltz, R. E. [General Atomics; Zeng, L. [University of California, Los Angeles

    2001-01-01

    Substantial progress has been made towards both understanding and control of internal transport barriers (ITBs) on DIII-D, resulting in the discovery of a new sustained high performance operating mode termed the Quiescent Double-Barrier (QDB) regime. The QDB regime combines core transport barriers with a quiescent, ELM-free H-mode edge (termed QH-mode), giving rise to separate (double) core and edge transport barriers. The core and edge barriers are mutually compatible and do not merge, resulting in broad core profiles with an edge pedestal. The QH-mode edge is characterized by ELM-free behavior with continuous multiharmonic MHD activity in the pedestal region, and has provided density and impurity control for 3.5 s (>20 τE) with divertor pumping. QDB plasmas are long-pulse high-performance candidates, having maintained a βNH89 product of 7 for 5 energy confinement times (Ti ≤ 16 keV, βN ≤ 2.9, H89 ≤ 2.4, τE ≤ 150 ms, DD neutron rate Sn ≤ 4x1015 s-1). The QDB regime has only been obtained in counter-NBI discharges (injection anti-parallel to plasma current) with divertor pumping. Other results include successful expansion of the ITB radius using (separately) both impurity injection and counter-NBI, and the formation of ITBs in the electron thermal channel using both ECH and strong negative central shear (NCS) at high power. These results are interpreted within a theoretical framework in which turbulence suppression is the key to ITB formation and control, and a decrease in core turbulence is observed in all cases of ITB formation.

  10. Progress towards increased understanding and control of internal transport barriers (ITBs) on DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyle, E.J.; Greenfield, C.M.; Austin, M.E.

    2001-01-01

    Substantial progress has been made towards both understanding and control of internal transport barriers (ITBs) on DIII-D, resulting in the discovery of a new sustained high performance operating mode termed the Quiescent Double-Barrier (QDB) regime. The QDB regime combines core transport barriers with a quiescent, ELM-free H-mode edge (termed QH-mode), giving rise to separate (double) core and edge transport barriers. The core and edge barriers are mutually compatible and do not merge, resulting in broad core profiles with an edge pedestal. The QH-mode edge is characterized by ELM-free behavior with continuous multiharmonic MHD activity in the pedestal region, and has provided density and impurity control for 3.5 s (>20 τ E ) with divertor pumping. QDB plasmas are long-pulse high-performance candidates, having maintained a β N H 89 product of 7 for 5 energy confinement times (T i ≤16 keV, β N ≤2.9, H 89 ≤2.4, τ E ≤150 ms, DD neutron rate S n ≤4x10 15 s -1 ). The QDB regime has only been obtained in counter-NBI discharges (injection anti-parallel to plasma current) with divertor pumping. Other results include successful expansion of the ITB radius using (separately) both impurity injection and counter-NBI, and the formation of ITBs in the electron thermal channel using both ECH and strong negative central shear (NCS) at high power. These results are interpreted within a theoretical framework in which turbulence suppression is the key to ITB formation and control, and a decrease in core turbulence is observed in all cases of ITB formation. (author)

  11. Containment analysis of the 9975 transportation package with multiple barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinson, D.W.

    2000-01-01

    A containment analysis has been performed for the scenario of non-routine transfer of a damaged 9975 package containing plutonium metal from K-area monitored storage to F-area on the Savannah River Site. A multiple barrier system with each barrier having a defined leakage rate of less than 1times10 -3 cm 3 /sec of air at Standard Temperature and Pressure was analyzed to determine the number of barriers needed to transport the package under normal transportation conditions to meet transportation requirements for containment. The barrier system was analyzed parametrically to achieve a composite system that met the federal requirements for the maximum permissible release rate given in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71. The multiple barrier system acts to retard the release of radioactivity. That is, a build-up in the radioactivity release rate occurs with time. For example, a system with three barriers (e.g., sealed plastic barrier) with a total free volume of 4,500 cm 3 could be transported for a total time of up to approximately 10 days with a release rate within the permissible rate. Additional number of barriers, or volume of the barriers, or both, would extend to this period of time. For example, a system with seven barriers with a total free volume of 4,500 cm 3 could be transported for up to 100 days. Plastic bags are one type of barrier used in movement of radioactive materials and capable of achieving a leak rate of 1times10 -3 cm 3 /sec of air at STP. Low-density polyethylene bags can withstand high temperature (up to 180 degrees C); a barrier thickness of 10 mils should be suitable for the barrier system. Additional requirements for barriers are listed in Section 4.2 of this report. Container testing per ANSI N14.5 is required to demonstrate leak rates for the individual barriers of less than 1times10 -3 cm 3 /sec

  12. Effect of contact barrier on electron transport in graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yang-Bo; Han, Bing-Hong; Liao, Zhi-Min; Zhao, Qing; Xu, Jun; Yu, Da-Peng

    2010-01-14

    The influence of the barrier between metal electrodes and graphene on the electrical properties was studied on a two-electrode device. A classical barrier model was used to analyze the current-voltage characteristics. Primary parameters including barrier height and effective resistance were achieved. The electron transport properties under magnetic field were further investigated. An abnormal peak-valley-peak shape of voltage-magnetoresistance curve was observed. The underlying mechanisms were discussed under the consideration of the important influence of the contact barrier. Our results indicate electrical properties of graphene based devices are sensitive to the contact interface.

  13. Paleoclassical transport explains electron transport barriers in RTP and TEXTOR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogeweij, G. M. D.; Callen, J.D.

    2008-01-01

    The recently developed paleoclassical transport model sets the minimum level of electron thermal transport in a tokamak. This transport level has proven to be in good agreement with experimental observations in many cases when fluctuation-induced anomalous transport is small, i.e. in (near-) ohmic

  14. Simulation study of burning control with internal transport barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tateishi, Gonta [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Yagi, Masatoshi; Itoh, S.I. [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics

    2000-02-01

    Dynamics of burning plasma with internal transport barrier is studied by use of a one dimensional transport simulation code. Two possible mechanisms are modeled for internal transport barrier collapse. One is the collapse, which occurs above the critical pressure gradient, the impact of which is modeled by the enhancement of thermal conductivity. The other is the collapse, which occurs due to the sawtooth trigger. The extended Kadomtsev type reconnection model with multiple resonant surfaces is introduced. Both models are examined for the analysis of long time sustainment of burning. A test of profile control to mitigate the collapse is investigated. The additional circulating power to suppress thermal quench (collapse) is evaluated. (author)

  15. Physics of strong internal transport barriers in JT-60U reversed-magnetic-shear plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, N; Takizuka, T; Sakamoto, Y; Fujita, T; Kamada, Y; Ide, S; Koide, Y [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 801-1 Mukouyama, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan)

    2006-05-15

    The physics of strong internal transport barriers (ITBs) in JT-60U reversed-magnetic-shear (RS) plasmas has been studied through the modelling on the 1.5 dimensional transport simulation. The key physics to produce two scalings on the basis of the JT-60U box-type ITB database are identified. As for the scaling for the narrow ITB width proportional to the ion poloidal gyroradius, the following three physics are important: (1) the sharp reduction of the anomalous transport below the neoclassical level in the RS region, (2) the autonomous formation of pressure and current profiles through the neoclassical transport and the bootstrap current and (3) the large difference between the neoclassical transport and the anomalous transport in the normal-shear region. As for the scaling for the energy confinement inside ITB ({epsilon}{sub f}{beta}{sub p,core} {approx} 0.25, where {epsilon}{sub f} is the inverse aspect ratio at the ITB foot and {beta}{sub p,core} is the core poloidal beta value), the value of 0.25 is found to be a saturation value due to the MHD equilibrium. The value of {epsilon}{sub f}{beta}{sub p,core} reaches the saturation value, when the box-type ITB is formed in the strong RS plasma with a large asymmetry of the poloidal magnetic field, regardless of the details of the transport and the non-inductively driven current.

  16. Physics of electron internal transport barrier in toroidal helical plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, K.; Toda, S.; Fujisawa, A.; Ida, K.; Itoh, S.-I.; Yagi, M.; Fukuyama, A.; Diamond, P.H.

    2006-10-01

    The role of zonal flows in the formation of the transport barrier in the helical plasmas is analyzed using the transport code. A set of one-dimensional transport equations is analyzed, including the effect of zonal flows. The turbulent transport coefficient is shown to be suppressed when the plasma state changes from the weak negative radial electric field to the strong positive one. This bifurcation of the turbulent transport is newly caused by the change of the damping rate of zonal flows. It is theoretically demonstrated that the damping rate of zonal flows governs the global confinement in toroidal plasmas. (author)

  17. Relaxation oscillations and transport barrier dynamics in tokamak edge plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benkadda, Sadruddin; Beyer, Peter; Fuhr-Chaudier, Guillaume; Garbet, Xavier; Ghendrih, Philippe; Sarazin, Yanick

    2004-01-01

    Oscillations of turbulent transport of particles and energy in magnetically confined plasmas can be easily observed in simulations of a variety of turbulence models. These oscillations typically involve a mechanism of energy exchange between fluctuations and a poloidal shear flow. This kind of ''predator-prey'' mechanism is found to be not relevant for transport barrier relaxations. In RBM simulations of resistive ballooning turbulence with transport barrier, relaxation oscillations of the latter are observed even in the case of frozen poloidal shear flow. These relaxations are due to a transitory growth of a mode localized at the barrier center. A one-dimensional model for the evolution of such a mode in the presence of a shear flow describes a transitory growth of an initial perturbation. Oscillations in the case of a finite steady-state shear flow are possible due to the coupling of the mode to the dynamics of the pressure profile. (author)

  18. Nanoparticle transport across the blood brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabrucker, Andreas M; Ruozi, Barbara; Belletti, Daniela; Pederzoli, Francesca; Forni, Flavio; Vandelli, Maria Angela; Tosi, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    While the role of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is increasingly recognized in the (development of treatments targeting neurodegenerative disorders, to date, few strategies exist that enable drug delivery of non-BBB crossing molecules directly to their site of action, the brain. However, the recent advent of Nanomedicines may provide a potent tool to implement CNS targeted delivery of active compounds. Approaches for BBB crossing are deeply investigated in relation to the pathology: among the main important diseases of the CNS, this review focuses on the application of nanomedicines to neurodegenerative disorders (Alzheimer, Parkinson and Huntington's Disease) and to other brain pathologies as epilepsy, infectious diseases, multiple sclerosis, lysosomal storage disorders, strokes.

  19. Nonlinear transport theory in the metal with tunnel barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubov, E. E.

    2018-02-01

    Within the framework of the scattering matrix formalism, the nonlinear Kubo theory for electron transport in the metal with a tunnel barrier has been considered. A general expression for the mean electrical current was obtained. It significantly simplifies the calculation of nonlinear contributions to the conductivity of various hybrid structures. In the model of the tunnel Hamiltonian, all linear and nonlinear contributions to a mean electrical current are evaluated. The linear approximation agrees with results of other theories. For effective barrier transmission ?, the ballistic transport is realised with a value of the Landauer conductivity equal to ?.

  20. Internal transport barrier physics for steady state operation in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakatani, Masahiro [Kyoto Univ., Graduate School of Engineering, Uji, Kyoto (Japan); Fukuda, Takeshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment; Connor, Jack W. [Culham Science Centre, EURATOM/UKAEA Association (United Kingdom); Garbet, Xavier [Culham Science Centre, EFDA-JET CSU (United Kingdom); Gormezano, Claude [Associazone EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione C.R. Frascati (Italy); Mukhovatov, Vladimir [ITER Naka Joint Work Site, ITER Physics Unit, Naka, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2003-07-01

    Experimental results for the ITB (Internal Transport Barrier) formation and sustainment are compiled in a unified manner to find common features of ITBs in tokamaks. Global scaling laws for threshold power to obtain the ITBs are discussed. Theoretical models for plasmas with ITBs are summarized from stability and transport point of view. Finally possibility to obtain steady-state ITBs will be discussed in addition to extrapolation to ITER. (author)

  1. Fast change in core transport after L-H transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadomtsev, B.B.; Itoh, K.; Itoh, S.

    1995-03-01

    The transport in the core tokamak plasma is known to change very rapidly after the L-H transition in the edge plasma. A qualitative discussion is given for this fast transmission of the transport change. A picture based on the successive bifurcations is presented. (author)

  2. Some factors affecting radiative heat transport in PWR cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, A.N.

    1989-04-01

    This report discusses radiative heat transport in Pressurized Water Reactor cores, using simple models to illustrate basic features of the transport process. Heat transport by conduction and convection is ignored in order to focus attention on the restrictions on radiative heat transport imposed by the geometry of the heat emitting and absorbing structures. The importance of the spacing of the emitting and absorbing structures is emphasised. Steady state temperature distributions are found for models of cores which are uniformly heated by fission product decay. In all of the models, a steady state temperature distribution can only be obtained if the central core temperature is in excess of the melting point of UO 2 . It has recently been reported that the MIMAS computer code, which takes into account radiative heat transport, has been used to model the heat-up of the Three Mile Island-2 reactor core, and the computations indicate that the core could not have reached the melting point of UO 2 at any time or any place. We discuss this result in the light of the calculations presented in this paper. It appears that the predicted stabilisation of the core temperatures at ∼ 2200 0 C may be a consequence of the artificially large spacing between the radial rings employed in the MIMAS code, rather than a result of physical significance. (author)

  3. Electronic transport for armchair graphene nanoribbons with a potential barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Hu, Zhou; Ben-Liang, Zhou; Guang-Hui, Zhou; Zi-Gang, Duan

    2010-01-01

    This paper studies the electronic transport property through a square potential barrier in armchair-edge graphene nanoribbon (AGNR). Using the Dirac equation with the continuity condition for wave functions at the interfaces between regions with and without a barrier, we calculate the mode-dependent transmission probability for both semiconducting and metallic AGNRs, respectively. It is shown that, by some numerical examples, the transmission probability is generally an oscillating function of the height and range of the barrier for both types of AGNRs. The main difference between the two types of systems is that the magnitude of oscillation for the semiconducting AGNR is larger than that for the metallic one. This fact implies that the electronic transport property for AGNRs depends sensitively on their widths and edge details due to the Dirac nature of fermions in the system

  4. Ab initio transport across bismuth selenide surface barriers

    KAUST Repository

    Narayan, Awadhesh; Rungger, Ivan; Droghetti, Andrea; Sanvito, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    © 2014 American Physical Society. We investigate the effect of potential barriers in the form of step edges on the scattering properties of Bi2Se3(111) topological surface states by means of large-scale ab initio transport simulations. Our results

  5. Iron uptake and transport at the blood-brain barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Annette Burkhart; Thomsen, Louiza Bohn; Moos, Torben

    The mechanism by which iron is transported across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) remains controversial, and in this study we aimed to further clarify mechanisms by which iron is transported into the brain. We analyzed and compared the mRNA and protein expression of a variety of proteins involved...... in the transport of iron (transferrin receptor, divalent metal transporter I (DMT1), steap 2, steap 3, ceruloplasmin, hephaestin and ferroportin) in both primary rat brain capillary endothelial cells (BCEC) and immortalized rat brain capillary endothelial cell line (RBE4) grown in co-culture with defined polarity....... The mRNA expression of the iron-related molecules was also investigated in isolated brain capillaries from iron deficiency, iron reversible and normal rats. We also performed iron transport studies to analyze the routes by which iron is transported through the brain capillary endothelial cells: i) We...

  6. Intrinsic Rotation and Momentum Transport in Reversed Shear Plasmas with Internal Transport Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhang, Hogun; Kim, S. S.; Diamond, P. H.

    2010-11-01

    The intrinsic rotation in fusion plasmas is believed to be generated via the residual stress without external momentum input. The physical mechanism responsible for the generation and transport of intrinsic rotation in L- and H-mode tokamak plasmas has been studied extensively. However, it is noted that the physics of intrinsic rotation generation and its relationship to the formation of internal transport barriers (ITBs) in reversed shear (RS) tokamak plasmas have not been explored in detail, which is the main subject in the present work. A global gyrofluid code TRB is used for this study. It is found that the large intrinsic rotation (˜10-30% of the ion sound speed depending on ITB characteristics) is generated near the ITB region and propagates into the core. The intrinsic rotation increases linearly as the temperature gradient at ITB position increases, albeit not indefinitely. Key parameters related to the symmetry breaking, such as turbulent intensity and its gradient, the flux surface averaged parallel wavenumber are evaluated dynamically during the ITB formation. The role of reversed shear and the q-profile curvature is presented in relation to the symmetry breaking mechanism in RS plasmas.

  7. Homoepitaxial graphene tunnel barriers for spin transport (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Adam L.

    2015-09-01

    Tunnel barriers are key elements for both charge-and spin-based electronics, offering devices with reduced power consumption and new paradigms for information processing. Such devices require mating dissimilar materials, raising issues of heteroepitaxy, interface stability, and electronic states that severely complicate fabrication and compromise performance. Graphene is the perfect tunnel barrier. It is an insulator out-of-plane, possesses a defect-free, linear habit, and is impervious to interdiffusion. Nonetheless, true tunneling between two stacked graphene layers is not possible in environmental conditions (magnetic field, temperature, etc.) usable for electronics applications. However, two stacked graphene layers can be decoupled using chemical functionalization. Here, we demonstrate homoepitaxial tunnel barrier devices in which graphene serves as both the tunnel barrier and the high mobility transport channel. Beginning with multilayer graphene, we fluorinate or hydrogenate the top layer to decouple it from the bottom layer, so that it serves as a single monolayer tunnel barrier for both charge and spin injection into the lower graphene transport channel. We demonstrate successful tunneling by measuring non-linear IV curves, and a weakly temperature dependent zero bias resistance. We perform lateral transport of spin currents in non-local spin-valve structures and determine spin lifetimes with the non-local Hanle effect to be commensurate with previous studies (~200 ps). However, we also demonstrate the highest spin polarization efficiencies (~45%) yet measured in graphene-based spin devices [1]. [1] A.L. Friedman, et al., Homoepitaxial tunnel barriers with functionalized graphene-on-graphene for charge and spin transport, Nat. Comm. 5, 3161 (2014).

  8. Elms: MHD Instabilities at the transport barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huysmans, G.T.A

    2005-07-01

    Significant progress has been made in recent years both on the experimental characterisation of ELMs (edge localized modes) and the theory and modelling of ELMs. The observed maximum pressure gradient is in good agreement with the calculated ideal MHD stability limits due to peeling-ballooning modes. The dependence on plasma current and plasma shape are also reproduced by the ideal MHD model. It will be a challenge to verify experimentally the influence of the extensions to the ideal MHD theory such as the possibly incomplete diamagnetic stabilisation, the influence of shear flow, finite resistivity or the stabilizing influence of the separatrix on peeling modes. The observations of the filamentary structures find their explanation in the theory and simulations of the early non-linear phase of the evolution of ballooning modes. One of the remaining open questions is what determines the size of the ELM and its duration. This is related to the loss mechanism of energy and density. Some heuristic descriptions of possible mechanisms have been proposed in literature but none of the models so far makes quantitative predictions on the ELM size. Also the numerical simulations are not yet advanced to the point where the full ELM crash can be modelled. The theory and simulations of the ELMs are necessary to decide between the possible parameters, such as the collisionality or the parallel transport time, that are proposed for the extrapolation of ELM sizes to ITER.

  9. Elms: MHD Instabilities at the transport barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huysmans, G.T.A.

    2005-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in recent years both on the experimental characterisation of ELMs (edge localized modes) and the theory and modelling of ELMs. The observed maximum pressure gradient is in good agreement with the calculated ideal MHD stability limits due to peeling-ballooning modes. The dependence on plasma current and plasma shape are also reproduced by the ideal MHD model. It will be a challenge to verify experimentally the influence of the extensions to the ideal MHD theory such as the possibly incomplete diamagnetic stabilisation, the influence of shear flow, finite resistivity or the stabilizing influence of the separatrix on peeling modes. The observations of the filamentary structures find their explanation in the theory and simulations of the early non-linear phase of the evolution of ballooning modes. One of the remaining open questions is what determines the size of the ELM and its duration. This is related to the loss mechanism of energy and density. Some heuristic descriptions of possible mechanisms have been proposed in literature but none of the models so far makes quantitative predictions on the ELM size. Also the numerical simulations are not yet advanced to the point where the full ELM crash can be modelled. The theory and simulations of the ELMs are necessary to decide between the possible parameters, such as the collisionality or the parallel transport time, that are proposed for the extrapolation of ELM sizes to ITER

  10. Internal transport barrier production and control in Alcator C-Mod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiore, C L [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Bonoli, P T [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Ernst, D R [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Greenwald, M J [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Marmar, E S [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Redi, M H [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ (United States); Rice, J E [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Wukitch, S J [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Zhurovich, K [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2004-12-01

    Internal transport barriers (ITBs), marked by a steep density profile, even stronger peaking in the pressure profile and reduction of core transport are obtained in Alcator C-Mod. They are induced by the use of off-axis D(H) ICRF (ion cyclotron range of frequencies) power deposition. They also arise spontaneously in Ohmic H-mode plasmas once the H-mode lasts for several energy confinement times. Recent studies have explored the limits for forming, maintaining and controlling these plasmas. The C-Mod provides a unique platform for studying such discharges: the high density (up to 8 x 10{sup 20} m{sup -3}) causes the ions and electrons to be tightly coupled by collisions with T{sub i}/T{sub e} = 1, and the plasma has no internal particle or momentum sources. The ITBs formed in both Ohmic and ICRF heated plasmas are quite similar regardless of the trigger method. Control of impurity influx and heating of the core plasma in the presence of the ITB have been achieved with the addition of central ICRF power, in both Ohmic H-mode and ICRF induced ITBs. Control of the radial location of the transport barrier is achieved through manipulation of the toroidal magnetic field and plasma current. A narrow region of decreased electron thermal transport, as determined by sawtooth heat pulse analysis, is found in these plasmas as well. Transport analysis indicates that reduction of the particle diffusivity in the barrier region allows the neoclassical pinch to drive the density and impurity accumulation in the plasma centre. Examination of the gyro-kinetic stability indicates that the density and temperature profiles of the plasma core are inherently stable to long-wavelength drift mode driven turbulence at the onset time of the ITB, but that the increasing density gradients cause the trapped electron mode to play a role in providing a control mechanism to ultimately limit the density and impurity rise in the plasma centre.

  11. Transportation barriers to accessing health care for urban children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Serena; Zarr, Robert L; Kass-Hout, Taha A; Kourosh, Atoosa; Kelly, Nancy R

    2006-11-01

    The Texas Children's Hospital Residents' Primary Care Group Clinic provides primary care to urban low-income children. The objective of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the impact of transportation problems on a family's ability to keep an appointment. One hundred eighty-three caregivers of children with an appointment were interviewed. Caregivers who kept their appointment were compared with those who did not with respect to demographic and transportation-related characteristics. Logistic regression modeling predicted caregivers with the following characteristics were more likely not to keep an appointment: not using a car to the last kept appointment, not keeping an appointment in the past due to transportation problems, having more than two people in the household, and not keeping an appointment in the past due to reasons other than transportation problems. Future research should focus on developing interventions to help low-income urban families overcome non-financial access barriers, including transportation problems.

  12. Electronic transport for armchair graphene nanoribbons with a potential barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Benliang; Zhou Benhu; Liao Wenhu; Zhou Guanghui

    2010-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the electronic transport properties through a rectangular potential barrier embedded in armchair-edge graphene nanoribbons (AGNRs) of various widths. Using the Landauer formula and Dirac equation with the continuity conditions for all segments of wave functions at the interfaces between regions inside and outside the barrier, we calculate analytically the conductance and Fano factor for the both metallic and semiconducting AGNRs, respectively. It is shown that, by some numerical examples, at Dirac point the both types of AGNRs own a minimum conductance associated with the maximum Fano factor. The results are discussed and compared with the previous relevant works.

  13. Core-shell architectures as nano-size transporters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adeli, M.; Zarnegar, Z.; Kabiri, R.; Salimi, F.; Dadkah, A.

    2006-01-01

    Core-shell architectures containing poly (ethylene imine) (PEI) as a core and poly (lactide) (PLA) as arms were prepared. PEI was used as macro initiator for ring opening polymerization of lactide. PEI-PLA core-shell architectures were able to encapsulate guest molecules. Size of the core-shell architectures was between 10- 100 nm, hence they can be considered as nano carriers to transport the guest molecules. Transport capacity of nano carriers depends on their nano-environments and type of self-assembly in solvent. In solid state nano carriers self-assemble as long structures with nano-size diameter or they form network structures. Aggregations type depends on the concentration of nano carriers in solution. Effect of the shell thickness and aggregation type on the release rate are also investigated

  14. Improved fueling and transport barrier formation with pellet injection from different locations on DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baylor, L.R.; Jernigan, T.C.; Gohil, P.

    2001-01-01

    Pellet injection has been employed on DIII-D from different injection locations to optimize the mass deposition for density profile control and internal transport barrier formation. Transport barriers have been formed deep in the plasma core with central mass deposition from high field side (HFS) injected pellets and in the edge with pellets that trigger L-mode to H-mode transitions. Pellets injected from all locations can trigger the H-mode transition, which depends on the edge density gradient created and not on the radial extent of the pellet deposition. Pellets injected from inside the magnetic axis from the inner wall or vertical port lead to stronger central mass deposition than pellets injected from the low field side (LFS) and thus yield deeper more efficient fueling. (author)

  15. Biomechanics of the transport barrier in the nuclear pore complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, George J; Fassati, Ariberto; Hoogenboom, Bart W

    2017-08-01

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) is the selective gateway through which all molecules must pass when entering or exiting the nucleus. It is a cog in the gene expression pathway, an entrance to the nucleus exploited by viruses, and a highly-tuned nanoscale filter. The NPC is a large proteinaceous assembly with a central lumen occluded by natively disordered proteins, known as FG-nucleoporins (or FG-nups). These FG-nups, along with a family of soluble proteins known as nuclear transport receptors (NTRs), form the selective transport barrier. Although much is known about the transport cycle and the necessity of NTRs for chaperoning cargo molecules through the NPC, the mechanism by which NTRs and NTR•cargo complexes translocate the selective transport barrier is not well understood. How can disordered FG-nups and soluble NTRs form a transport barrier that is selective, ATP-free, and fast? In this work, we review various mechanical approaches - both experimental and theoretical/computational - employed to better understand the morphology of the FG-nups, and their role in nucleocytoplasmic transport. Recent experiments on FG-nups tethered to planar surfaces, coupled with quantitative modelling work suggests that FG-nup morphologies are the result of a finely balanced system with significant contributions from FG-nup cohesiveness and entropic repulsion, and from NTR•FG-nup binding avidity; whilst AFM experiments on intact NPCs suggest that the FG-nups are sufficiently cohesive to form condensates in the centre of the NPC lumen, which may transiently dissolve to facilitate the transport of larger cargoes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Increased understanding of neoclassical internal transport barrier on CHS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minami, T.

    2002-01-01

    The recent progress of the study on neoclassical internal transport barrier (N-ITB) of Compact Helical System (CHS) is reported. This barrier is formed due to the positive electric field and the electric field shear that are created by bifurcation of radial electric field with the electron cyclotron (EC) heating on helical devices. Previously N-ITB was observed for ECH plasma, recently N-ITB barrier was also observed for EC (53.2 GHz 2nd harmonic) heated NBI plasma. The N-ITB of EC heated NBI plasma is formed at the outer location (r/a=0.4-0.6) in comparison with that (r/a=0.3) of ECH plasma, so that the improved confinement region is expanded. The improvement in the ion energy transport is also observed and the ion temperature is increased up to 400 eV along with the electron temperature, that is two times higher than that of the plasma without N-ITB. The particle transport is studied by measuring the peak energy of Titanium Kα line intensity with the soft X-ray CCD camera. The energy is shifted from 4.68 kV to 4.73 kV by forming N-ITB. The improvement of the impurity transport has been confirmed inside N-ITB by comparing the experimental result with the MIST code. (author)

  17. Glutamate Transporters in the Blood-Brain Barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helms, Hans Christian Cederberg; Nielsen, Carsten Uhd; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2017-01-01

    concentration of L-glutamate causes excitotoxicity. A tight control of the brain interstitial fluid L-glutamate levels is therefore imperative, in order to maintain optimal neurotransmission and to avoid such excitotoxicity. The blood-brain barrier, i.e., the endothelial lining of the brain capillaries...... cells. The mechanisms underlying transendothelial L-glutamate transport are however still not well understood. The present chapter summarizes the current knowledge on blood-brain barrier L-glutamate transporters and the suggested pathways for the brain-to-blood L-glutamate efflux......., regulates the exchange of nutrients, gases, and metabolic waste products between plasma and brain interstitial fluid. It has been suggested that brain capillary endothelial cells could play an important role in L-glutamate homeostasis by mediating brain-to-blood L-glutamate efflux. Both in vitro and in vivo...

  18. Internal transport barriers in optimized shear plasmas in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sips, A.C.C.; Baranov, Y.F.; Challis, C.D.; Cottrell, G.A.; Eriksson, L.-G.; Gormezano, C.; Gowers, C.; Haas, J.C.M. de; Hellermann, M. von; Huysmans, G.T.A.; Howman, A.; K ig, R.; Lazarus, A.; Nielsen, P.; O'Brien, D.; Sadler, G.; Soeldner, F.X.; Stamp, M.F.; Tubbing, B.J.D.; Ward, D.J.; Greenfield, C.M.; Luce, T.; Strait, E.J.; Lazarus, E.A.; Wade, M.; Rice, B.W.

    1998-01-01

    Experiments using high-power heating during the current ramp-up phase of the discharge have obtained the highest D-D neutron rates in JET; S n =5x6x10 16 neutrons s -1 , with n e0 approx.= 6x10 19 m - 3, T e0 approx.= 12 keV and T i0 approx.= 26 keV. The best discharges (I p = 3.3 MA and B t = 3.4 tesla) have peaked pressure profiles with a transport barrier located at r/a = 0.55. The pressure peaking is limited by MHD modes and requires active input power control to achieve the best performance. Deuterium neutral beam injection into a tritium-rich target plasma has established internal transport barriers at power levels close to the lowest threshold for pure deuterium plasmas. (author)

  19. The use of internal transport barriers in tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Challis, C D [Euratom/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2004-12-01

    Internal transport barriers (ITBs) can provide high tokamak confinement at modest plasma current. This is desirable for operation with most of the current driven non-inductively by the bootstrap mechanism, as currently envisaged for steady-state power plants. Maintaining such plasmas in steady conditions with high plasma purity is challenging, however, due to MHD instabilities and impurity transport effects. Significant progress has been made in the control of ITB plasmas: the pressure profile has been varied using the barrier location; q-profile modification has been achieved with non-inductive current drive, and means have been found to affect density peaking and impurity accumulation. All these features are, to some extent, interdependent and must be integrated self-consistently to demonstrate a sound basis for extrapolation to future devices.

  20. Double internal transport barrier triggering mechanism in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Jiaqi; Mou, Zongze; Long, Yongxing; Mahajan, Swadesh M.

    2004-01-01

    Sheared flow layers created by energy released in magnetic reconnection processes are studied with the magneto hydrodynamics (MHD), aimed at internal transport barrier (ITB) dynamics. The double tearing mode induced by electron viscosity is investigated and proposed as a triggering mechanism for double internal transport barrier (DITB) observed in tokamak plasmas with non-monotonic safety factor profiles. The quasi-linear development of the mode is simulated and the emphasis is placed on the structure of sheared poloidal flow layers formed in the vicinity of the magnetic islands. For viscosity double tearing modes, it is shown that the sheared flows induced by the mode may reach the level required by the condition for ITB formation. Especially, the flow layers are found to form just outside the magnetic islands. The scaling of the generated velocity with plasma parameters is given. Possible explanation for the experimental observations that the preferential formation of transport barriers in the proximity of low order rational surface is discussed. (author)

  1. Electron internal transport barriers and magnetic topology in the stellarator TJ-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estrada, T.; Alonso, A.; Castejon, F.; Hidalgo, C.; Pablos, J.L. de; Tereshin, V.; Krupnik, L.; Chmyga, A.A.; Dreval, N.; Khrebtov, S.M.; Komarov, A.D.; Kozachok, A.S.; Eliseev, L.; Melnikov, A.V.

    2005-01-01

    Electron Internal Transport Barriers (e-ITBs) are frequently observed in helical systems. e-ITBs are characterized by an increase in core electron temperature and plasma potential as well as an improvement in core electron heat confinement. A comparative study of transport barriers in different helical devices will be presented by Yokoyama et al at this conference. In most helical systems, and in particular in TJ-II stellarator, the formation of e-ITBs is observed in Electron Cyclotron Heated plasmas with high heating power density. In TJ-II, e-ITBs are also formed in magnetic configurations having a low order rational surface close to the plasma core where the ECH power is deposited. In such configurations the key element to improve heat confinement, i.e. the strong radial electric field, results from a synergistic effect between enhanced electron heat fluxes through the low order rational surface and pump-out mechanisms in the heat deposition zone. Recent experiments show a quasi-coherent mode associated with a rational surface that triggers the formation of the e-ITB. This quasi-coherent mode is observed by both ECE and HIBP diagnostics. The mode is found to be localized within the radial range ρ: 0.0 - 0.4, with a maximum amplitude around ρ: 0.25 - 0.35, close to the foot of the e- ITB. The quasi-coherent mode evolves during the formation/annihilation of the e-ITB and vanishes as the barrier is fully developed. These observations indicate that the quasi-coherent modes are modified by the radial electric fields that develop at the transitions, thereby showing the importance of ExB flows in the evolution of MHD instabilities linked to low-order rational surfaces. Further studies are in progress to investigate the influence of the order of the low rational surfaces (3/2, 5/3,...) in triggering core transitions. (author)

  2. Frontiers in Cancer Nanomedicine: Directing Mass Transport through Biological Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Mauro

    2010-01-01

    The physics of mass transport within body compartments and across biological barriers differentiates cancers from healthy tissues. Variants of nanoparticles can be manufactured in combinatorially large sets, varying only one transport-affecting design parameter at a time. Nanoparticles can also be used as building blocks for systems that perform sequences of coordinated actions, in accordance to a prescribed logic. These are referred to as Logic-Embedded Vectors “(LEV)” in the following. Nanoparticles and LEVs are ideal probes for the determination of mass transport laws in tumors, acting as imaging contrast enhancers, and can be employed for the lesion-selective delivery of therapy. Their size, shape, density and surface chemistry dominate convective transport in the blood stream, margination, cell adhesion, selective cellular uptake, as well as sub-cellular trafficking and localization. As argued here, the understanding of transport differentials in cancer, termed ‘transport oncophysics’ unveils a new promising frontier in oncology: the development of lesion-specific delivery particulates that exploit mass transport differentials to deploy treatment of greater efficacy and reduced side effects. PMID:20079548

  3. Energy and particle core transport in tokamaks and stellarators compared

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beurskens, Marc; Angioni, Clemente; Beidler, Craig; Dinklage, Andreas; Fuchert, Golo; Hirsch, Matthias; Puetterich, Thomas; Wolf, Robert [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Greifswald/Garching (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The paper discusses expectations for core transport in the Wendelstein 7-X stellarator (W7-X) and presents a comparison to tokamaks. In tokamaks, the neoclassical trapped-particle-driven losses are small and turbulence dominates the energy and particle transport. At reactor relevant low collisionality, the heat transport is limited by ion temperature gradient limited turbulence, clamping the temperature gradient. The particle transport is set by an anomalous inward pinch, yielding peaked profiles. A strong edge pedestal adds to the good confinement properties. In traditional stellarators the 3D geometry cause increased trapped orbit losses. At reactor relevant low collisionality and high temperatures, these neoclassical losses would be well above the turbulent transport losses. The W7-X design minimizes neoclassical losses and turbulent transport can become dominant. Moreover, the separation of regions of bad curvature and that of trapped particle orbits in W7-X may have favourable implications on the turbulent electron heat transport. The neoclassical particle thermodiffusion is outward. Without core particle sources the density profile is flat or even hollow. The presence of a turbulence driven inward anomalous particle pinch in W7-X (like in tokamaks) is an open topic of research.

  4. Combined core/boundary layer plasma transport simulations in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prinja, A.K.; Schafer, R.F. Jr.; Conn, R.W.; Howe, H.C.

    1987-01-01

    Significant new numerical results are presented from self-consistent core and boundary or scrape-off layer plasma simulations with 3-D neutral transport calculations. For a symmetric belt limiter it is shown that, for plasma conditions considered here, the pump limiter collection efficiency increases from 11% to 18% of the core efflux as a result of local reionization of blade deflected neutrals. This hitherto unobserved effect causes a significant amplification of upstream ion flux entering the pump limiter. Results from coupling of an earlier developed two-zone edge plasma model ODESSA to the PROCTR core plasma simulation code indicates that intense recycling divertor operation may not be possible because of stagnation of upstream flow velocity. This results in a self-consistent reduction of density gradient in an intermediate region between the central plasma and separatrix, and a concomitant reduction of core-efflux. There is also evidence of increased recycling at the first wall. (orig.)

  5. Stable sustainment of plasmas with electron internal transport barrier by ECH in the LHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Y.; Kasahara, H.; Tokitani, M.; Sakamoto, R.; Ueda, Y.; Marushchenko, N. B.; Seki, R.; Kubo, S.; Shimozuma, T.; Igami, H.; Takahashi, H.; Tsujimura, T. I.; Makino, R.; Kobayashi, S.; Ito, S.; Mizuno, Y.; Okada, K.; Akiyama, T.; Tanaka, K.; Tokuzawa, T.; Yamada, I.; Yamada, H.; Mutoh, T.; Takeiri, Y.; the LHD Experiment Group

    2018-02-01

    The long pulse experiments in the Large Helical Device has made progress in sustainment of improved confinement states. It was found that steady-state sustainment of the plasmas with improved confinement at the core region, that is, electron internal transport barrier (e-ITB), was achieved with no significant difficulty. Sustainment of a plasma having e-ITB with the line average electron density n e_ave of 1.1 × 1019 m-3 and the central electron temperature T e0 of ˜3.5 keV for longer than 5 min only with 340 kW ECH power was successfully demonstrated.

  6. Characteristics of internal transport barriers from the JET optimised shear database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rochard, F.; Litaudon, X.; Soeldner, F.

    2000-02-01

    The general features of the Internal Transport Barriers (ITBs) obtained in the JET 'Optimised Shear' regime are deduced from the analyses of a large database of discharges including the experiments performed with a mixture of Deuterium-Tritium (D-T) ions. The coupled and complex spatio-temporal dynamics of the ITBs are studied from the radial profiles measurements of the thermal ion and electron temperatures. The spatial locations of the ITBs inside the plasma column are deduced from the radial derivatives of the plasmas profiles. In particular, our analyses show that the radial positions of the ITB follow the same evolution for both the electron and ion temperature profiles. Among the JET 'Optimised Shear' database, we propose to distinguish two categories of discharges depending on the edge conditions: the ITBs are triggered either with an L-mode edge or simultaneously with an edge transport barrier (H-mode). The characteristics of the ITBs and plasma performances of these two categories are compared. Experimental conditions to successfully combine the edge and core transport barriers are given. In particular, emphasis is given on the description and analyses of the 'Optimised Shear' discharges which combine an ITB with an ELMy edge since this operating mode opens the route to high performance regimes which could be extrapolated towards steady-state conditions. (author)

  7. Statistical analysis of internal transport barriers in JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maget, P [Association Euratom-CEA, Cadarache, F-13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Esposito, B [Associazione Euratom-ENEA sulla Fusione, C.R. Frascati, Frascati (Italy); Joffrin, E [Association Euratom-CEA, Cadarache, F-13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Hawkes, N [Euratom-UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Mazon, D [Association Euratom-CEA, Cadarache, F-13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Baranov, Y [Euratom-UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Fourment, C [Association Euratom-CEA, Cadarache, F-13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Hoang, G T [Association Euratom-CEA, Cadarache, F-13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2003-08-01

    The potential role of magnetic shear, rational safety factor surfaces and shearing rate on the confinement is investigated on the basis of a database analysis of JET internal transport barriers (ITBs). The ITB is quantified using the JET ITB criterion (Tresset G et al 2002 Nucl. Fusion 42 520). The relation between the shearing rate and the magnetic shear, already established for positive magnetic shear barrier (Tala T J J et al 2001 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 43 507), is investigated at low and negative magnetic shear, where the threshold in shearing rate is found to be lower than for positive magnetic shear barriers. Defining the ITB from the departure from profile stiffness is found to be consistent with the database results, and the critical gradient length is found to be minimum at low magnetic shear. Finally, ITBs are found to be localized in the vicinity of integer safety factor surfaces in positive magnetic shear plasmas, whereas no correlation is found with integer values when the barrier is localized in negative magnetic shear regions.

  8. Ab initio transport across bismuth selenide surface barriers

    KAUST Repository

    Narayan, Awadhesh

    2014-11-24

    © 2014 American Physical Society. We investigate the effect of potential barriers in the form of step edges on the scattering properties of Bi2Se3(111) topological surface states by means of large-scale ab initio transport simulations. Our results demonstrate the suppression of perfect backscattering, while all other scattering processes, which do not entail a complete spin and momentum reversal, are allowed. Furthermore, we find that the spin of the surface state develops an out-of-plane component as it traverses the barrier. Our calculations reveal the existence of quasibound states in the vicinity of the surface barriers, which appear in the form of an enhanced density of states in the energy window corresponding to the topological state. For double barriers we demonstrate the formation of quantum well states. To complement our first-principles results we construct a two-dimensional low-energy effective model and illustrate its shortcomings. Our findings are discussed in the context of a number of recent experimental works.

  9. Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Model Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E.L. Hardin

    2000-07-17

    The Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Model Report (EBS PMR) is one of nine PMRs supporting the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) being developed by the Yucca Mountain Project for the Site Recommendation Report (SRR). The EBS PMR summarizes the development and abstraction of models for processes that govern the evolution of conditions within the emplacement drifts of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. Details of these individual models are documented in 23 supporting Analysis/Model Reports (AMRs). Nineteen of these AMRs are for process models, and the remaining 4 describe the abstraction of results for application in TSPA. The process models themselves cluster around four major topics: ''Water Distribution and Removal Model, Physical and Chemical Environment Model, Radionuclide Transport Model, and Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model''. One AMR (Engineered Barrier System-Features, Events, and Processes/Degradation Modes Analysis) summarizes the formal screening analysis used to select the Features, Events, and Processes (FEPs) included in TSPA and those excluded from further consideration. Performance of a potential Yucca Mountain high-level radioactive waste repository depends on both the natural barrier system (NBS) and the engineered barrier system (EBS) and on their interactions. Although the waste packages are generally considered as components of the EBS, the EBS as defined in the EBS PMR includes all engineered components outside the waste packages. The principal function of the EBS is to complement the geologic system in limiting the amount of water contacting nuclear waste. A number of alternatives were considered by the Project for different EBS designs that could provide better performance than the design analyzed for the Viability Assessment. The design concept selected was Enhanced Design Alternative II (EDA II).

  10. Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Model Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    E.L. Hardin

    2000-01-01

    The Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Model Report (EBS PMR) is one of nine PMRs supporting the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) being developed by the Yucca Mountain Project for the Site Recommendation Report (SRR). The EBS PMR summarizes the development and abstraction of models for processes that govern the evolution of conditions within the emplacement drifts of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. Details of these individual models are documented in 23 supporting Analysis/Model Reports (AMRs). Nineteen of these AMRs are for process models, and the remaining 4 describe the abstraction of results for application in TSPA. The process models themselves cluster around four major topics: ''Water Distribution and Removal Model, Physical and Chemical Environment Model, Radionuclide Transport Model, and Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model''. One AMR (Engineered Barrier System-Features, Events, and Processes/Degradation Modes Analysis) summarizes the formal screening analysis used to select the Features, Events, and Processes (FEPs) included in TSPA and those excluded from further consideration. Performance of a potential Yucca Mountain high-level radioactive waste repository depends on both the natural barrier system (NBS) and the engineered barrier system (EBS) and on their interactions. Although the waste packages are generally considered as components of the EBS, the EBS as defined in the EBS PMR includes all engineered components outside the waste packages. The principal function of the EBS is to complement the geologic system in limiting the amount of water contacting nuclear waste. A number of alternatives were considered by the Project for different EBS designs that could provide better performance than the design analyzed for the Viability Assessment. The design concept selected was Enhanced Design Alternative II (EDA II)

  11. Minaret, a deterministic neutron transport solver for nuclear core calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moller, J-Y.; Lautard, J-J.

    2011-01-01

    We present here MINARET a deterministic transport solver for nuclear core calculations to solve the steady state Boltzmann equation. The code follows the multi-group formalism to discretize the energy variable. It uses discrete ordinate method to deal with the angular variable and a DGFEM to solve spatially the Boltzmann equation. The mesh is unstructured in 2D and semi-unstructured in 3D (cylindrical). Curved triangles can be used to fit the exact geometry. For the curved elements, two different sets of basis functions can be used. Transport solver is accelerated with a DSA method. Diffusion and SPN calculations are made possible by skipping the transport sweep in the source iteration. The transport calculations are parallelized with respect to the angular directions. Numerical results are presented for simple geometries and for the C5G7 Benchmark, JHR reactor and the ESFR (in 2D and 3D). Straight and curved finite element results are compared. (author)

  12. Minaret, a deterministic neutron transport solver for nuclear core calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moller, J-Y.; Lautard, J-J., E-mail: jean-yves.moller@cea.fr, E-mail: jean-jacques.lautard@cea.fr [CEA - Centre de Saclay , Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2011-07-01

    We present here MINARET a deterministic transport solver for nuclear core calculations to solve the steady state Boltzmann equation. The code follows the multi-group formalism to discretize the energy variable. It uses discrete ordinate method to deal with the angular variable and a DGFEM to solve spatially the Boltzmann equation. The mesh is unstructured in 2D and semi-unstructured in 3D (cylindrical). Curved triangles can be used to fit the exact geometry. For the curved elements, two different sets of basis functions can be used. Transport solver is accelerated with a DSA method. Diffusion and SPN calculations are made possible by skipping the transport sweep in the source iteration. The transport calculations are parallelized with respect to the angular directions. Numerical results are presented for simple geometries and for the C5G7 Benchmark, JHR reactor and the ESFR (in 2D and 3D). Straight and curved finite element results are compared. (author)

  13. Internal transport barrier simulation and analysis in LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GarcIa, J; Yamazaki, K; Dies, J; Izquierdo, J

    2006-01-01

    In order to study the electron heat transport channel and to clarify the electron thermal diffusivity dependence with some plasma parameters in large helical device (LHD) shots with electron internal transport barrier (eITB), some transport models have been added to the TOTAL code. These models can be divided into two categories: GyroBohm-like drift wave model and other drift wave models with shorter wavelength. A new model consisting of a mix of both models has also been derived for this study as a good candidate for explaining the eITB. The effect of anomalous transport reduction by the electric field shear has been introduced by means of the factor (1 + (τf ExB ) γ ) -1 . This factor has been previously checked as a good candidate to suppress anomalous transport in tokamak plasmas. Results show that a combination of the GyroBohm-like model and the drift wave model with shorter wavelength together with the electric field shear can explain the transition between non-eITB and eITB shots. The central temperature dependence with density is also well simulated. In the case of GyroBohm models, they also fit temperature profiles, although central temperature dependence with density is higher

  14. Internal Transport Barrier Driven by Redistribution of Energetic Ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, K.L.; Heidbrink, W.W.; Ruskov, E.; Petty, C.C.; Greenfield, C.M.; Nazikian, R.; Budny, R.

    2004-01-01

    Alfven instabilities excited by energetic ions are used as a means to reduce the central magnetic shear in a tokamak via redistribution of energetic ions. When the central magnetic shear is low enough, ballooning modes become stable for any plasma pressure gradient and an internal transport barrier (ITB) with a steep pressure gradient can exist. This mechanism can sustain a steady-state ITB as demonstrated by experimental data from the DIII-D tokamak. It can also produce a shear in toroidal and poloidal plasma rotation. Possible application of this technique to use the energetic alpha particles for improvement of burning plasma performance is discussed

  15. Assessment of assembly homogenized two-steps core dynamic calculations using direct whole core transport solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hursin, Mathieu; Downar, Thomas J.; Yoon, Joo Il; Joo, Han Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Reactivity initiated accident analysis with direct whole core transient transport code. • Comparison with usual “two steps” procedure. • Effect of effective delayed neutron fraction definition on energy deposition in the fuel. • Effect of homogenized few-group cross sections generation at the assembly level on energy deposition in the fuel. • Effect of effective fuel temperature definition on energy deposition in the fuel. - Abstract: The impact of the approximations in the “two-steps” procedure used in the current generation of nodal simulators for core transient calculations is assessed by using a higher order solution obtained from a direct, whole core, transient transport calculation. A control rod ejection accident in an idealized minicore is analyzed with PARCS, which uses the two-steps procedure and DeCART which provides the higher order solution. DeCART is used as lattice code to provide the homogenized cross sections and kinetics parameters to PARCS. The approximations made by using (1) the homogenized few-group cross sections and kinetic parameters generated at the assembly level, (2) an effective delayed neutrons fraction, (3) an effective fuel temperature and (4) the few-group formulation are investigated in terms of global and local core power behavior. The results presented in the paper show that the current two-steps procedure produces sufficiently accurate transient results with respect to the direct whole core calculation solution, provided that its parameters are carefully generated using the prescriptions described in the present article.

  16. Edge transport barrier formation in compact helical system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamura, S; Minami, T; Oishi, T; Suzuki, C; Ida, K; Isobe, M; Yoshimura, Y; Nagaoka, K; Toi, K; Fujisawa, A; Akiyama, T; Iguchi, H; Ikeda, R; Kado, S; Matsuoka, K; Matsushita, H; Nakamura, K; Nakano, H; Nishimura, S; Nishiura, M; Ohshima, S; Shimizu, A; Takagi, S; Takahashi, C; Takeuchi, M; Yoshinuma, M

    2004-01-01

    The edge transport barrier (ETB) for particle transport is formed in the neutral beam (NB) heated hydrogen discharges in compact helical system (CHS). The transition to the ETB formation and the back transition are controlled by the heating power. The existence of the heating power threshold is confirmed and it is roughly proportional to the density. The Hα emission signal shows a clear drop at the transition (the timescale of signal decrease is ∼1 ms for the high heating power case). The ETB formation continues for the full duration of NB injection (100 ms) with a moderate level of radiation power loss. Local density profile measurement shows increase of the edge density and the movement of the density gradient region towards the edge

  17. Creation and dynamical co-evolution of electron and ion channel transport barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, D.E.

    2002-01-01

    A wide variety of magnetic confinement devices have found transitions to an enhanced confinement regime. Simple dynamical models have been able to capture much of the dynamics of these barriers however an open question has been the disconnected nature of the electron thermal transport channel sometimes observed in the presence of a standard ('ion channel' barrier. By adding to simple barrier model an evolution equation for electron fluctuations we can investigate the interaction between the formation of the standard ion channel barrier and the somewhat less common electron channel barrier. Barrier formation in the electron channel is even more sensitive to the alignment of the various gradients making up the sheared radial electric field than the ion barrier is. Electron channel heat transport is found to significantly increase after the formation of the ion channel barrier but before the electron channel barrier is formed. This increased transport is important in the barrier evolution. (author)

  18. Toward whole-core neutron transport without spatial homogenization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, E. E.

    2009-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: A long-term goal of computational reactor physics is the deterministic analysis of power reactor core neutronics without incurring significant discretization errors in the energy, spatial or angular variables. In principle, given large enough parallel configurations with unlimited CPU time and memory, this goal could be achieved using existing three-dimensional neutron transport codes. In practice, however, solving the Boltzmann equation for neutrons over the six-dimensional phase space is made intractable by the nature of neutron cross-sections and the complexity and size of power reactor cores. Tens of thousands of energy groups would be required for faithful cross section representation. Likewise, the numerous material interfaces present in power reactor lattices require exceedingly fine spatial mesh structures; these ubiquitous interfaces preclude effective implementation of adaptive grid, mesh-less methods and related techniques that have been applied so successfully in other areas of engineering science. These challenges notwithstanding, substantial progress continues in the pursuit for more robust deterministic methods for whole-core neutronics analysis. This paper examines the progress over roughly the last decade, emphasizing the space-angle variables and the quest to eliminate errors attributable to spatial homogenization. As prolog we briefly assess 1990's methods used in light water reactor analysis and review the lessons learned from the C5G7 benchmark exercises which were originated in 1999 to appraise the ability of transport codes to perform core calculations without homogenization. We proceed by examining progress over the last decade much of which falls into three areas. These may be broadly characterized as reduced homogenization, dynamic homogenization and planar-axial synthesis. In the first, homogenization in three-dimensional calculations is reduced from the fuel assembly to the pin-cell level. In the second

  19. Internal transport barrier in tokamak and helical plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ida, K.; Fujita, T.

    2018-03-01

    The differences and similarities between the internal transport barriers (ITBs) of tokamak and helical plasmas are reviewed. By comparing the characteristics of the ITBs in tokamak and helical plasmas, the mechanisms of the physics for the formation and dynamics of the ITB are clarified. The ITB is defined as the appearance of discontinuity of temperature, flow velocity, or density gradient in the radius. From the radial profiles of temperature, flow velocity, and density the ITB is characterized by the three parameters of normalized temperature gradient, R/{L}T, the location, {ρ }{ITB}, and the width, W/a, and can be expressed by ‘weak’ ITB (small R/{L}T) or ‘strong’ (large R/{L}T), ‘small’ ITB (small {ρ }{ITB}) or ‘large’ ITB (large {ρ }{ITB}), and ‘narrow’ (small W/a) or ‘wide’ (large W/a). Three key physics elements for the ITB formation, radial electric field shear, magnetic shear, and rational surface (and/or magnetic island) are described. The characteristics of electron and ion heat transport and electron and impurity transport are reviewed. There are significant differences in ion heat transport and electron heat transport. The dynamics of ITB formation and termination is also discussed. The emergence of the location of the ITB is sometimes far inside the ITB foot in the steady-state phase and the ITB region shows radial propagation during the formation of the ITB. The non-diffusive terms in momentum transport and impurity transport become more dominant in the plasma with the ITB. The reversal of the sign of non-diffusive terms in momentum transport and impurity transport associated with the formation of the ITB reported in helical plasma is described. Non-local transport plays an important role in determining the radial profile of temperature and density. The spontaneous change in temperature curvature (second radial derivative of temperature) in the ITB region is described. In addition, the key parameters of the control of the

  20. Internal transport barrier formation and pellet injection simulation in helical and tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higashiyama, You; Yamazaki, Kozo; Arimoto, Hideki; Garcia, Jeronimo

    2008-01-01

    In the future fusion reactor, plasma density peaking is important for increase in the fusion power gain and for achievement of confinement improvement mode. Density control and internal transport barrier (ITB) formation due to pellet injection have been simulated in tokamak and helical reactors using the toroidal transport linkage code TOTAL. First, pellet injection simulation is carried out, including the neutral gas shielding model and the mass relocation model in the TOTAL code, and the effectiveness of high-field side (HFS) pellet injection is clarified. Second, ITB simulation with pellet injection is carried out with the confinement improvement model based on the E x B shear effects, and it is found that deep pellet penetration is helpful for ITB formation as well as plasma core fuelling in the reversed-shear tokamak and helical reactors. (author)

  1. Estrogen and insulin transport through the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Aaron A; Bedel, Nicholas D; Shen, Ling; Woods, Stephen C; Liu, Min

    2016-09-01

    Obesity is associated with insulin resistance and reduced transport of insulin through the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Reversal of high-fat diet-induced obesity (HFD-DIO) by dietary intervention improves the transport of insulin through the BBB and the sensitivity of insulin in the brain. Although both insulin and estrogen (E2), when given alone, reduce food intake and body weight via the brain, E2 actually renders the brain relatively insensitive to insulin's catabolic action. The objective of these studies was to determine if E2 influences the ability of insulin to be transported into the brain, since the receptors for both E2 and insulin are found in BBB endothelial cells. E2 (acute or chronic) was systemically administered to ovariectomized (OVX) female rats and male rats fed a chow or a high-fat diet. Food intake, body weight and other metabolic parameters were assessed along with insulin entry into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Acute E2 treatment in OVX female and male rats reduced body weight and food intake, and chronic E2 treatment prevented or partially reversed high-fat diet-induced obesity. However, none of these conditions increased insulin transport into the CNS; rather, chronic E2 treatment was associated less-effective insulin transport into the CNS relative to weight-matched controls. Thus, the reduction of brain insulin sensitivity by E2 is unlikely to be mediated by increasing the amount of insulin entering the CNS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Simulation of internal transport barriers by means of the canonical profile transport model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dnestrovskij, Yu. N.; Cherkasov, S. V.; Dnestrovskij, A. Yu.; Lysenko, S. E.; Walsh, M. J.

    2006-01-01

    Models with critical gradients are widely used to describe energy balance in L-mode discharges. The so-called first critical gradient can be found from the canonical temperature profile. Here, it is suggested that discharge regimes with transport barriers can be described based on the idea of the second critical gradient. If, in a certain plasma region, the pressure gradient exceeds the second critical gradient, then the plasma bifurcates into a new state and a transport barrier forms in this region. This idea was implemented in a modified canonical profile transport model that makes it possible to describe the energy and particle balance in tokamak plasmas with arbitrary cross sections and aspect ratios. The magnitude of the second critical gradient was chosen by comparing the results calculated for several tokamak discharges with the experimental data. It is found that the second critical gradient is related to the magnetic shear s. The criterion of the transport barrier formation has the form (a 2 /r)d/drln(p/p c ) > z 0 (r), where r is the radial coordinate, a is the plasma minor radius, p is the plasma pressure, p c is the canonical pressure profile, and the dimensionless function z O (r) = C O + C 1 s (with C 0i ∼1, C 0e ∼3, and C 1i,e ∼2) describes the difference between the first and second critical gradients. Simulations show that this criterion is close to that obtained experimentally in JET. The model constructed here is used to simulate internal transport barriers in the JET, TFTR, DIII-D, and MAST tokamaks. The possible dependence of the second critical gradient on the plasma parameters is discussed

  3. Axial SPN and radial MOC coupled whole core transport calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Jin-Young; Kim, Kang-Seog; Lee, Chung-Chan; Zee, Sung-Quun; Joo, Han-Gyu

    2007-01-01

    The Simplified P N (SP N ) method is applied to the axial solution of the two-dimensional (2-D) method of characteristics (MOC) solution based whole core transport calculation. A sub-plane scheme and the nodal expansion method (NEM) are employed for the solution of the one-dimensional (1-D) SP N equations involving a radial transverse leakage. The SP N solver replaces the axial diffusion solver of the DeCART direct whole core transport code to provide more accurate, transport theory based axial solutions. In the sub-plane scheme, the radial equivalent homogenization parameters generated by the local MOC for a thick plane are assigned to the multiple finer planes in the subsequent global three-dimensional (3-D) coarse mesh finite difference (CMFD) calculation in which the NEM is employed for the axial solution. The sub-plane scheme induces a much less nodal error while having little impact on the axial leakage representation of the radial MOC calculation. The performance of the sub-plane scheme and SP N nodal transport solver is examined by solving a set of demonstrative problems and the C5G7MOX 3-D extension benchmark problems. It is shown in the demonstrative problems that the nodal error reaching upto 1,400 pcm in a rodded case is reduced to 10 pcm by introducing 10 sub-planes per MOC plane and the transport error is reduced from about 150 pcm to 10 pcm by using SP 3 . Also it is observed, in the C5G7MOX rodded configuration B problem, that the eigenvalues and pin power errors of 180 pcm and 2.2% of the 10 sub-planes diffusion case are reduced to 40 pcm and 1.4%, respectively, for SP 3 with only about a 15% increase in the computing time. It is shown that the SP 5 case gives very similar results to the SP 3 case. (author)

  4. Framework Application for Core Edge Transport Simulation (FACETS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krasheninnikov, Sergei; Pigarov, Alexander

    2011-10-15

    The FACETS (Framework Application for Core-Edge Transport Simulations) project of Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) Program was aimed at providing a high-fidelity whole-tokamak modeling for the U.S. magnetic fusion energy program and ITER through coupling separate components for each of the core region, edge region, and wall, with realistic plasma particles and power sources and turbulent transport simulation. The project also aimed at developing advanced numerical algorithms, efficient implicit coupling methods, and software tools utilizing the leadership class computing facilities under Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR). The FACETS project was conducted by a multi-discipline, multi-institutional teams, the Lead PI was J.R. Cary (Tech-X Corp.). In the FACETS project, the Applied Plasma Theory Group at the MAE Department of UCSD developed the Wall and Plasma-Surface Interaction (WALLPSI) module, performed its validation against experimental data, and integrated it into the developed framework. WALLPSI is a one-dimensional, coarse grained, reaction/advection/diffusion code applied to each material boundary cell in the common modeling domain for a tokamak. It incorporates an advanced model for plasma particle transport and retention in the solid matter of plasma facing components, simulation of plasma heat power load handling, calculation of erosion/deposition, and simulation of synergistic effects in strong plasma-wall coupling.

  5. Heavy ion transport in the core of ASDEX upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odstrcil, Tomas [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Physik-Department E28, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 85747 Garching (Germany); Puetterich, Thomas; Angioni, Clemente; Bilato, Roberto; Gude, Anja; Vezinet, Didier [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Mazon, Didier [CEA, IRFM F-13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France); Collaboration: ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2016-07-01

    High impurity concentration in the core of the future fusion reactors can lead to the serious degradation of the achievable fusion gain. Therefore, a better understanding of the underlying impurity transport processes is necessary for higher performance, more efficient power exhaust and avoidance of impurity accumulation. Radial impurity transport is mainly driven by neoclassical and turbulent particle fluxes. Both these components show substantial variation depending on the poloidal angle. Consequently, an asymmetry in the poloidal distribution of impurities leads to significant changes in the radial impurity flow and the total content of the plasma core. The aim of this contribution is to experimentally verify a model describing the poloidal asymmetry of heavy impurities using measurements from ASDEX Upgrade. The observed asymmetries are caused mainly by the centrifugal force and poloidal electric force created by the fast particles produced by intensive ion-cyclotron heating. Finally, a change in the radial transport of the tungsten ions will be presented in the case of large inboard and outboard impurity accumulation.

  6. Transport barrier formation by LHCD on TRIAM-1M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanada, K.; Iyomasa, A.; Zushi, H.; Hasegawa, M.; Nakamura, K.; Sakamoto, M.; Sato, K.N.; Idei, H.; Kawasaki, S.; Nakashima, H.; Higashijima, A.; Sasaki, K.; Hoshika, H.

    2004-01-01

    Internal transport barrier (ITB) has been obtained in full lower hybrid current driven (LHCD) plasmas on a superconducting tokamak, TRIMA-1M (R 0.84 m, a x b = 0.12 m x 0.18 m, B T L/R . ITB is terminated by the reduction of current drive efficiency caused by metal impurities accumulation. In some condition, self organized slow sawtooth oscillations (SSSO) of plasma current, density, temperature, and so on with the period comparable to the current diffusion time have been also observed during ITB discharge. The oscillation has the capability of particle exhaust, as the result, it may play an role in the avoidance of the impurity accumulation and the dilution in the future steady state fusion plasma with ITB, as the edge-localized mode in H-mode. (authors)

  7. Directional mass transport in an atmospheric pressure surface barrier discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickenson, A; Morabit, Y; Hasan, M I; Walsh, J L

    2017-10-25

    In an atmospheric pressure surface barrier discharge the inherent physical separation between the plasma generation region and downstream point of application reduces the flux of reactive chemical species reaching the sample, potentially limiting application efficacy. This contribution explores the impact of manipulating the phase angle of the applied voltage to exert a level of control over the electrohydrodynamic forces generated by the plasma. As these forces produce a convective flow which is the primary mechanism of species transport, the technique facilitates the targeted delivery of reactive species to a downstream point without compromising the underpinning species generation mechanisms. Particle Imaging Velocimetry measurements are used to demonstrate that a phase shift between sinusoidal voltages applied to adjacent electrodes in a surface barrier discharge results in a significant deviation in the direction of the plasma induced gas flow. Using a two-dimensional numerical air plasma model, it is shown that the phase shift impacts the spatial distribution of the deposited charge on the dielectric surface between the adjacent electrodes. The modified surface charge distribution reduces the propagation length of the discharge ignited on the lagging electrode, causing an imbalance in the generated forces and consequently a variation in the direction of the resulting gas flow.

  8. Modeling of impurity transport in the core plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulse, R.A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a brief overview of computer modeling of impurity transport in the core region of controlled thermonuclear fusion plasmas. The atomic processes of importance in these high temperature plasmas and the numerical formulation of the model are described. Selected modeling examples are then used to highlight some features of the physics of impurity behavior in large tokamak fusion devices, with an emphasis on demonstrating the sensitivity of such modeling to uncertainties in the rate coefficients used for the atomic processes. This leads to a discussion of current requirements and opportunities for generating the improved sets of comprehensive atomic data needed to support present and future fusion impurity modeling studies

  9. Transport across the blood-brain barrier of pluronic leptin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Tulin O; Farr, Susan A; Yi, Xiang; Vinogradov, Serguei; Batrakova, Elena; Banks, William A; Kabanov, Alexander V

    2010-04-01

    Leptin is a peptide hormone produced primarily by adipose tissue that acts as a major regulator of food intake and energy homeostasis. Impaired transport of leptin across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) contributes to leptin resistance, which is a cause of obesity. Leptin as a candidate for the treatment of this obesity is limited because of the short half-life in circulation and the decreased BBB transport that arises in obesity. Chemical modification of polypeptides with amphiphilic poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide) block copolymers (Pluronic) is a promising technology to improve efficiency of delivery of polypeptides to the brain. In the present study, we determined the effects of Pluronic P85 (P85) with intermediate hydrophilic-lipophilic balance conjugated with leptin via a degradable SS bond [leptin(ss)-P85] on food intake, clearance, stability, and BBB uptake. The leptin(ss)-P85 exhibited biological activity when injected intracerebroventricularly after overnight food deprivation and 125I-leptin(ss)-P85 was stable in blood, with a half-time clearance of 32.3 min (versus 5.46 min for leptin). 125I-Leptin(ss)-P85 crossed the BBB [blood-to-brain unidirectional influx rate (K(i)) = 0.272 +/- 0.037 microl/g x min] by a nonsaturable mechanism unrelated to the leptin transporter. Capillary depletion showed that most of the 125I-leptin(ss)-P85 taken up by the brain reached the brain parenchyma. Food intake was reduced when 3 mg of leptin(ss)-P85 was administered via tail vein in normal body weight mice [0-30 min, p penetration by a mechanism-independent BBB leptin transporter.

  10. Charge transport in highly efficient iridium cored electrophosphorescent dendrimers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, Jonathan P. J.; Samuel, Ifor D. W.; Lo, Shih-Chun; Burn, Paul L.; Weiter, Martin; Bässler, Heinz

    2004-01-01

    Electrophosphorescent dendrimers are promising materials for highly efficient light-emitting diodes. They consist of a phosphorescent core onto which dendritic groups are attached. Here, we present an investigation into the optical and electronic properties of highly efficient phosphorescent dendrimers. The effect of dendrimer structure on charge transport and optical properties is studied using temperature-dependent charge-generation-layer time-of-flight measurements and current voltage (I-V) analysis. A model is used to explain trends seen in the I-V characteristics. We demonstrate that fine tuning the mobility by chemical structure is possible in these dendrimers and show that this can lead to highly efficient bilayer dendrimer light-emitting diodes with neat emissive layers. Power efficiencies of 20 lm/W were measured for devices containing a second-generation (G2) Ir(ppy)3 dendrimer with a 1,3,5-tris(2-N-phenylbenzimidazolyl)benzene electron transport layer.

  11. Community Relations for the Transport of TMI-2 Core Debris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, T.A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes community relations for the transport of Three Mile Island Unit 2 core debris, before and during the first two years of the campaign. The author defines community relations as interactions with groups or individuals to influence public perception. Members of Congress, state and local officials, news media, special interest groups, and private citizens are included in the definition of community. The paper discusses issues of concern to the community, level of interest generated by the transport campaign, events that kept community interest focused on the campaign, and communication techniques employed to provide the community with factual information and to generate public confidence. Finally, the paper describes lessons learned from the community relations effort. (author)

  12. Poloidal rotation dynamics, radial electric field, and neoclassical theory in the jet internal-transport-barrier region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crombé, K; Andrew, Y; Brix, M; Giroud, C; Hacquin, S; Hawkes, N C; Murari, A; Nave, M F F; Ongena, J; Parail, V; Van Oost, G; Voitsekhovitch, I; Zastrow, K-D

    2005-10-07

    Results from the first measurements of a core plasma poloidal rotation velocity (upsilontheta) across internal transport barriers (ITB) on JET are presented. The spatial and temporal evolution of the ITB can be followed along with the upsilontheta radial profiles, providing a very clear link between the location of the steepest region of the ion temperature gradient and localized spin-up of upsilontheta. The upsilontheta measurements are an order of magnitude higher than the neoclassical predictions for thermal particles in the ITB region, contrary to the close agreement found between the determined and predicted particle and heat transport coefficients [K.-D. Zastrow, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 46, B255 (2004)]. These results have significant implications for the understanding of transport barrier dynamics due to their large impact on the measured radial electric field profile.

  13. Progress in transport modelling of internal transport barrier plasmas in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tala, T.; Bourdelle, C.; Imbeaux, F.; Moreau, D.; Garbet, X.; Joffrin, E.; Laborde, L.; Litaudon, X.; Mazon, D.; Parail, V.; Corrigan, G.; Heading, D.; Crisanti, F.; Mantica, P.; Salmi, A.; Strand, P.; Weiland, J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper will report on the recent progress in transport modelling of Internal Transport Barrier (ITB) plasmas. Two separate issues will be covered, fully predictive transport modelling of ITBs in the multi-tokamak database, including micro-stability analyses of ITBs, and predictive closed-loop (i.e. real-time control) transport simulations of the q-profile and ITBs. For the first time, the predictive capabilities of the mixed Bohm/GyroBohm and Weiland transport models are investigated with discharges from the ITPA ITB database by fully predictive transport simulations. The predictive transport simulations with the Bohm/GyroBohm model agree very well with experimental results from JET and JT-60U. In order to achieve a good agreement in DIII-D, the stabilisation had to be included into the model, showing the significant role played by the stabilisation in governing the physics of the ITBs. The significant role of the stabilisation is also emphasised by the gyrokinetic analysis. The Weiland transport model shows only limited agreement between the model predictions and experimental results with respect to the formation and location of the ITB. The fully predictive closed-loop simulations with real-time control of the q-profile and ITB show that it is possible to reach various set-point profiles for q and ITB and control them for longer than a current diffusion time in JET using the same real-time control technique as in the experiments. (author)

  14. Formation of transport barriers in the MAST spherical tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, H; Field, A R; Akers, R J; Brickley, C; Conway, N J; Patel, A; Carolan, P G; Challis, C; Counsell, G F; Cunningham, G; Helander, P; Kirk, A; Lloyd, B; Maingi, R; Tournianski, M R; Walsh, M J

    2004-01-01

    In the Mega Ampere Spherical Tokamak (MAST) plasmas have been generated with internal (ITB) or edge (ETB) transport barriers. ITBs were achieved in both the electron and the ion energy channel. In the presence of an ITB in the ion energy channel, transport analysis shows that the ion thermal diffusivity, χ i , is reduced to almost neoclassical values while the ITB persists. The widely tested criteria for ITB formation ρ t * =ρ s αlnT/αR>ρ ITB * ∼0.014 (ρ s : Larmor radius at sound speed) obtained from dimensional analysis of JET discharges is easily exceeded on MAST. Even without the evidence of an ρ T * >0.014 often applies, showing that this criterion in its current form is not generally applicable. ETBs are most easily formed in MAST if in a double null divertor configuration the discharge is vertically balanced, so that both X-points are almost on the same flux surface (CDND), and if the plasma is refuelled from the high field side mid-plane. The H-mode threshold power, P thr = 0.5 MW, in connected double null diverted (CDND) is only about half of that in a similar disconnected discharge with the ion ∇ B drift towards the X-point on the last closed flux surface (LDND). P thr scales between lower double null diverted (LDND) and the single null diverted configuration with the plasma surface area on MAST

  15. A dimensionless criterion for characterising internal transport barriers in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tresset, G.; Litaudon, X.; Moreau, D.

    2000-07-01

    A simple criterion, based on a dimensionless parameter (ρ T * =ρ s /L T ) related to drift wave turbulence stabilisation and anomalous transport theory, is proposed in order to characterise the emergence and the space-time evolution of internal transport barriers (ITB's) during a tokamak discharge. The underlying physics which led us to consider the possible relevance of this parameter as a local indicator of a bifurcated plasma state is the breaking of the gyro-Bohm turbulence scaling by the diamagnetic velocity shear, which has been observed in various numerical simulations [e.g. X. Garbet and R.E. Waltz, Phys. Plasmas 3(1996) 1898]. The presence of an ITB is inferred when ρ T * exceeds a threshold value. The main features like the emergence time, location and even dynamics of ITB's can then be summarized on a single graphical representation consistent with measurement uncertainties. The validity of such a criterion is demonstrated on the Optimized Shear (OS) database of JET in several experimental configurations. Large database analysis and realtime control of OS discharges are envisaged as the most attractive applications. (author)

  16. Arbitrary poloidal gyroradius effects in tokamak pedestals and transport barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagan, Grigory; Catto, Peter J

    2008-01-01

    A technique is developed and applied for analyzing pedestal and internal transport barrier (ITB) regions in a tokamak by formulating a special version of gyrokinetics. In contrast to typical gyrokinetic treatments, canonical angular momentum is taken as the gyrokinetic radial variable rather than the radial guiding center location. Such an approach allows strong radial plasma gradients to be treated, while retaining zonal flow and neoclassical (including orbit squeezing) behavior and the effects of turbulence. The new, nonlinear gyrokinetic variables are constructed to higher order than is typically the case. The nonlinear gyrokinetic equation obtained is capable of handling such problems as collisional zonal flow damping with radial wavelengths comparable to the ion poloidal gyroradius, as well as zonal flow and neoclassical transport in the pedestal or ITB. This choice of gyrokinetic variables allows the toroidally rotating Maxwellian solution of the isothermal tokamak limit to be recovered. More importantly, we prove that a physically acceptable solution for the lowest order ion distribution function in the banana regime anywhere in a tokamak and, in particular, in the pedestal must be nearly this same isothermal Maxwellian solution. That is, the ion temperature variation scale must be much greater than the poloidal ion gyroradius. Consequently, in the banana regime the background radial ion temperature profile cannot have a pedestal similar to that of plasma density

  17. Prospects in deterministic three dimensional whole-core transport calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The point we made in this paper is that, although detailed and precise three-dimensional (3D) whole-core transport calculations may be obtained in the future with massively parallel computers, they would have an application to only some of the problems of the nuclear industry, more precisely those regarding multiphysics or for methodology validation or nuclear safety calculations. On the other hand, typical design reactor cycle calculations comprising many one-point core calculations can have very strict constraints in computing time and will not directly benefit from the advances in computations in large scale computers. Consequently, in this paper we review some of the deterministic 3D transport methods which in the very near future may have potential for industrial applications and, even with low-order approximations such as a low resolution in energy, might represent an advantage as compared with present industrial methodology, for which one of the main approximations is due to power reconstruction. These methods comprise the response-matrix method and methods based on the two-dimensional (2D) method of characteristics, such as the fusion method.

  18. Formation and sustainment of internal transport barriers in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor with the baseline heating mix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poli, Francesca M.; Kessel, Charles E. [Princeton Plasma Physics laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2013-05-15

    Plasmas with internal transport barriers (ITBs) are a potential and attractive route to steady-state operation in ITER. These plasmas exhibit radially localized regions of improved confinement with steep pressure gradients in the plasma core, which drive large bootstrap current and generate hollow current profiles and negative magnetic shear. This work examines the formation and sustainment of ITBs in ITER with electron cyclotron heating and current drive. The time-dependent transport simulations indicate that, with a trade-off of the power delivered to the equatorial and to the upper launcher, the sustainment of steady-state ITBs can be demonstrated in ITER with the baseline heating configuration.

  19. Formation and sustainment of internal transport barriers in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor with the baseline heating mixa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poli, Francesca M.; Kessel, Charles E.

    2013-05-01

    Plasmas with internal transport barriers (ITBs) are a potential and attractive route to steady-state operation in ITER. These plasmas exhibit radially localized regions of improved confinement with steep pressure gradients in the plasma core, which drive large bootstrap current and generate hollow current profiles and negative magnetic shear. This work examines the formation and sustainment of ITBs in ITER with electron cyclotron heating and current drive. The time-dependent transport simulations indicate that, with a trade-off of the power delivered to the equatorial and to the upper launcher, the sustainment of steady-state ITBs can be demonstrated in ITER with the baseline heating configuration.

  20. Simultaneous realization of high density edge transport barrier and improved L-mode on CHS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minami, Takashi; Okamura, Shoichi; Suzuki, Chihiro

    2008-10-01

    An edge transport barrier (ETB) formation and an improved L-mode (IL mode) have been simultaneously realized in high density region (n-bar e - 1.2x10 20 m -3 ) on Compact Helical System (CHS). When the ETB is formed during the IL mode, the density reduction in the edge region is suppressed by the barrier formation. As a result of the continuous increasing of the temperature by the IL mode, the stored energy during the combined mode increased up to the maximum stored energy (W p - 9.4 kJ) recorded in CHS experiments. The plasma pressure in the peripheral region increases up to three times larger than that of the L-mode, and the large edge plasma pressure gradient is formed accompanying the pedestal structure. That is caused by the anomalous transport reduction that is confirmed from the sharp drop of the density fluctuation in the edge region. The neutral particle reduction in the peripheral region and the metallic impurity accumulation in the core plasma are simultaneously observed during the high density ETB formation. (author)

  1. Study of internal transport barriers in the initial phase of Ohmic discharges in TUMAN-3M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Askinazi, L G; Bulanin, V V; Vildjunas, M I; Golant, V E; Gorokhov, M V; Kornev, V A; Krikunov, S V; Lebedev, S V; Petrov, A V; Rozhdestvensky, V V; Tukachinsky, A S; Zhubr, N A

    2004-01-01

    A regime with electron heat confinement improvement was recently found in the initial phase of discharges in the TUMAN-3M tokamak. An internal transport barrier (ITB) formation in this regime was confirmed by Thomson scattering measurements and by transport modelling. Two possible reasons for the ITB formation are discussed in the paper: by reduction of turbulent transport in the presence of low magnetic shear or by plasma sheared rotation. It is demonstrated that low magnetic shear formation is possible in the current ramp-up phase of the Ohmic discharge. The low magnetic shear does not seem to be the only reason for the transport reduction. Results of Doppler reflectometry measurements of poloidal rotation of density fluctuations are presented. It is found that core confinement improvement correlates with the appearance of sheared rotation of the density fluctuations and with a burst of the MHD activity. The ITB formation in the regime seems to be a result of a combined action of reduced magnetic shear and plasma sheared rotation

  2. Pellet injection into H-mode ITER plasma with the presence of internal transport barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leekhaphan, P.; Onjun, T.

    2011-04-01

    The impacts of pellet injection into ITER type-1 ELMy H-mode plasma with the presence of internal transport barriers (ITBs) are investigated using self-consistent core-edge simulations of 1.5D BALDUR integrated predictive modeling code. In these simulations, the plasma core transport is predicted using a combination of a semi-empirical Mixed B/gB anomalous transport model, which can self-consistently predict the formation of ITBs, and the NCLASS neoclassical model. For simplicity, it is assumed that toroidal velocity for ω E× B calculation is proportional to local ion temperature. In addition, the boundary conditions are predicted using the pedestal temperature model based on magnetic and flow shear stabilization width scaling; while the density of each plasma species, including both hydrogenic and impurity species, at the boundary are assumed to be a large fraction of its line averaged density. For the pellet's behaviors in the hot plasma, the Neutral Gas Shielding (NGS) model by Milora-Foster is used. It was found that the injection of pellet could result in further improvement of fusion performance from that of the formation of ITB. However, the impact of pellet injection is quite complicated. It is also found that the pellets cannot penetrate into a deep core of the plasma. The injection of the pellet results in a formation of density peak in the region close to the plasma edge. The injection of pellet can result in an improved nuclear fusion performance depending on the properties of pellet (i.e., increase up to 5% with a speed of 1 km/s and radius of 2 mm). A sensitivity analysis is carried out to determine the impact of pellet parameters, which are: the pellet radius, the pellet velocity, and the frequency of injection. The increase in the pellet radius and frequency were found to greatly improve the performance and effectiveness of fuelling. However, changing the velocity is observed to exert small impact.

  3. New solution for transport and industrial noise protection through reflective noise barriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kralov Ivan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A new solution for protection of transportation and industrial noise through reflective noise barriers is proposed and investigated in this study. The new solution combines the advantages of the known barriers and has its own advantages in addition. The preliminary results show a very good level of noise reduction for this type of barriers.

  4. Role of E x B Shear and Magnetic Shear in the Formation of Transport Barriers in DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrell, K.H.

    2005-01-01

    Development of the E x B shear stabilization model to explain the formation of transport barriers in magnetic confinement devices is a major achievement of fusion research. This concept has the universality needed to explain the H-mode edge transport barriers seen in limiter and divertor tokamaks, stellarators, and mirror machines; the broader edge transport barrier seen in VH-mode plasmas; and the core transport barriers formed in tokamaks with low or negative magnetic shear. These examples of confinement improvement are of considerable physical interest; it is not often that a system self-organizes to reduce transport when an additional source of free energy is applied to it. The transport decrease associated with E x B velocity shear is also of great practical benefit to fusion research. The fundamental physics involved in transport reduction is the effect of E x B shear on the growth, radial extent, and phase correlation of turbulent eddies in the plasma. The same basic transport reduction process can be operational in various portions of the plasma because there are a number of ways to change the radial electric field E r . An important theme in this area is the synergistic effect of E x B velocity shear and magnetic shear. Although the E x B velocity shear appears to have an effect on broader classes of microturbulence, magnetic shear can mitigate some potentially harmful effects of E x B velocity shear and facilitate turbulence stabilization. The experimental results on DIII-D and other devices are generally consistent with the basic theoretical models

  5. Power dependence of ion thermal diffusivity at the internal transport barrier in JT-60U

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakamoto, Yoshiteru; Suzuki, Takahiro; Ide, Shunsuke [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment] [and others

    2002-09-01

    The formation properties of an internal transport barrier (ITB) were investigated in a weak positive magnetic shear plasma by changing the neutral beam heating power. The ion thermal diffusivity in the core region shows L-mode state, weak ITB, and strong ITB, depending upon the heating power. Two features of ITB formation were experimentally confirmed. Weak ITB was formed in spite of the absence of an apparent transition in an ion temperature profile. On the other hand, strong ITB appeared after an apparent transition from the weak ITB. In addition, the ion thermal diffusivity at the ITB is correlated to the radial electric field shear. In the case of the weak ITB, ion thermal diffusivity decreased gradually with increases in the radial electric field shear. There exists a threshold in the radial electric field shear, which allows for a change in state from that of weak to strong ITBs. (author)

  6. Transport properties of damaged materials. Cementitious barriers partnership

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langton, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2014-11-01

    The objective of the Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP) project is to develop tools to improve understanding and prediction of the long-term structural, hydraulic, and chemical performance of cementitious barriers used in low-level waste storage applications. One key concern for the long-term durability of concrete is the degradation of the cementitious matrix, which occurs as a result of aggressive chemical species entering the material or leaching out in the environment, depending on the exposure conditions. The objective of the experimental study described in this report is to provide experimental data relating damage in cementitious materials to changes in transport properties, which can eventually be used to support predictive model development. In order to get results within a reasonable timeframe and to induce as much as possible uniform damage level in materials, concrete samples were exposed to freezing and thawing (F/T) cycles. The methodology consisted in exposing samples to F/T cycles and monitoring damage level with ultrasonic pulse velocity measurements. Upon reaching pre-selected damage levels, samples were tested to evaluate changes in transport properties. Material selection for the study was motivated by the need to get results rapidly, in order to assess the relevance of the methodology. Consequently, samples already available at SIMCO from past studies were used. They consisted in three different concrete mixtures cured for five years in wet conditions. The mixtures had water-to-cement ratios of 0.5, 0.65 and 0.75 and were prepared with ASTM Type I cement only. The results showed that porosity is not a good indicator for damage caused by the formation of microcracks. Some materials exhibited little variations in porosity even for high damage levels. On the other hand, significant variations in tortuosity were measured in all materials. This implies that damage caused by internal pressure does not necessarily create additional pore space in

  7. Transport properties of damaged materials. Cementitious barriers partnership

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langton, C.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP) project is to develop tools to improve understanding and prediction of the long-term structural, hydraulic, and chemical performance of cementitious barriers used in low-level waste storage applications. One key concern for the long-term durability of concrete is the degradation of the cementitious matrix, which occurs as a result of aggressive chemical species entering the material or leaching out in the environment, depending on the exposure conditions. The objective of the experimental study described in this report is to provide experimental data relating damage in cementitious materials to changes in transport properties, which can eventually be used to support predictive model development. In order to get results within a reasonable timeframe and to induce as much as possible uniform damage level in materials, concrete samples were exposed to freezing and thawing (F/T) cycles. The methodology consisted in exposing samples to F/T cycles and monitoring damage level with ultrasonic pulse velocity measurements. Upon reaching pre-selected damage levels, samples were tested to evaluate changes in transport properties. Material selection for the study was motivated by the need to get results rapidly, in order to assess the relevance of the methodology. Consequently, samples already available at SIMCO from past studies were used. They consisted in three different concrete mixtures cured for five years in wet conditions. The mixtures had water-to-cement ratios of 0.5, 0.65 and 0.75 and were prepared with ASTM Type I cement only. The results showed that porosity is not a good indicator for damage caused by the formation of microcracks. Some materials exhibited little variations in porosity even for high damage levels. On the other hand, significant variations in tortuosity were measured in all materials. This implies that damage caused by internal pressure does not necessarily create additional pore space in

  8. Hydrophilic solute transport across the rat blood-brain barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucchesi, K.J.

    1987-01-01

    Brain capillary permeability-surface area products (PS) of hydrophilic solutes ranging in size from 180 to 5,500 Daltons were measured in rats according to the method of Ohno, Pettigrew and Rapoport. The distribution volume of 70 KD dextran at 10 minutes after i.v. injection was also measured to determine the residual volume of blood in brain tissue at the time of sacrifice. Small test solutes were injected in pairs in order to elucidate whether their transfer into the brain proceeds by diffusion through water- or lipid-filled channels or by vesicular transport. This issue was examined in rats whose blood-brain barrier (BBB) was presumed to be intact (untreated) and in rats that received intracarotid infusions to open the BBB (isosmotic salt (ISS) and hyperosmolar arabinose). Ohno PS values of 3 H-inulin and 14 C-L-glucose in untreated rats were found to decrease as the labelling time was lengthened. This was evidence that a rapidly equilibrating compartment exists between blood and brain that renders the Ohno two-compartment model inadequate for computing true transfer rate constants. When the data were reanalyzed using a multi-compartment graphical analysis, solutes with different molecular radii were found to enter the brain at approximately equal rates. Furthermore, unidirectional transport is likely to be initiated by solute adsorption to a glycocalyx coat on the luminal surface of brain capillary endothelium. Apparently, more inulin than L-glucose was adsorbed, which may account for its slightly faster transfer across the BBB. After rats were treated with intracarotid infusions of ISS or hyperosmolar arabinose, solute PS values were significantly increased, but the ratio of PS for each of the solute pairs approached that of their free-diffusion coefficients

  9. Formation of transport barriers in the MAST spherical tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, H [EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Field, A R [EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Akers, R J [EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Brickley, C [EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Conway, N J [EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Patel, A [EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Carolan, P G [EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Challis, C [EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Counsell, G F [EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Cunningham, G [EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Helander, P [EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Kirk, A [EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Lloyd, B [EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Maingi, R [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Tournianski, M R [EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Walsh, M J [Walsh Scientific Ltd, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire, OX14 3EB (United Kingdom)

    2004-05-01

    In the Mega Ampere Spherical Tokamak (MAST) plasmas have been generated with internal (ITB) or edge (ETB) transport barriers. ITBs were achieved in both the electron and the ion energy channel. In the presence of an ITB in the ion energy channel, transport analysis shows that the ion thermal diffusivity, {chi}{sub i}, is reduced to almost neoclassical values while the ITB persists. The widely tested criteria for ITB formation {rho}{sub t}{sup *}={rho}{sub s}{alpha}lnT/{alpha}R>{rho}{sub ITB}{sup *}{approx}0.014 ({rho}{sub s}: Larmor radius at sound speed) obtained from dimensional analysis of JET discharges is easily exceeded on MAST. Even without the evidence of an {rho}{sub T}{sup *}>0.014 often applies, showing that this criterion in its current form is not generally applicable. ETBs are most easily formed in MAST if in a double null divertor configuration the discharge is vertically balanced, so that both X-points are almost on the same flux surface (CDND), and if the plasma is refuelled from the high field side mid-plane. The H-mode threshold power, P{sub thr} = 0.5 MW, in connected double null diverted (CDND) is only about half of that in a similar disconnected discharge with the ion {nabla} B drift towards the X-point on the last closed flux surface (LDND). P{sub thr} scales between lower double null diverted (LDND) and the single null diverted configuration with the plasma surface area on MAST.

  10. Comparison of Edge and Internal Transport Barriers in Drift Wave Predictive Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weiland, J.; Crombe, K.; Mantica, P.

    2011-01-01

    We have simulated the formation of an internal transport barrier on JET including a self-consistent treatment of ion and electron temperatures and poloidal and toroidal momentum. Similar simulations of edge transport barriers, including the L-H transition have also been made. However, here only p...... for the internal barrier. For the edge barrier the edge density was varied and it turned out that a lower edge density gave a stronger barrier. Electromagnetic and nonlocal effects were important for both types of barriers. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]......We have simulated the formation of an internal transport barrier on JET including a self-consistent treatment of ion and electron temperatures and poloidal and toroidal momentum. Similar simulations of edge transport barriers, including the L-H transition have also been made. However, here only...... polodal momentum and the temperatures were simulated. The internal barrier included an anomalous spinup of poloidal momentum similar to that in the experiment. Also the edge barrier was accompanied by a spinup of poloidal momentum. The experimental density (with no barrier) was used and kept fixed...

  11. Increased understanding of neoclassical internal transport barrier on CHS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minami, T.; Fujisawa, A.; Iguchi, H.

    2002-10-01

    We report the recent progress of the study on neoclassical internal transport barrier (N-ITB) on Compact Helical System experiment. N-ITB has been observed for EC heated NBI plasma. The improved confinement region for electrons is expanded compared to that of the previous N-ITB plasma heated by only ECH. Moreover, the ion temperature is found to be increased simultaneously by about two to three times (T i (0) ∼ 400-500 eV) with steep gradient region at ρ - 0.6. From the measurement of the averaged peak energy intensity using the soft X-ray CCD camera it is confirmed that the impurity confinement is also improved with N-ITB. The radial electric field is observed to bifurcate into electron root (E r - 15 kV/m) and rather large electric field shear (dE r /dr - 300 kV/m 2 ) is produced in the layer between ion and electron root. (author)

  12. Increased understanding of neoclassical internal transport barrier on CHS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minami, T.; Fujisawa, A.; Iguchi, H.

    2003-01-01

    We report the recent progress of the study on neoclassical internal transport barrier (N-ITB) on Compact Helical System experiment. N-ITB has been observed for EC heated NBI plasma. The improved confinement region for electrons is expanded compared to that of the previous N-ITB plasma heated by only ECH. Moreover, the ion temperature is found to be increased simultaneously by about two to three times (T i (0)∼400-500eV) with steep gradient region at ρ∼0.6. From the measurement of the averaged peak energy intensity using the soft X-ray CCD camera it is confirmed that the impurity confinement is also improved with N-ITB. The radial electric field is observed to bifurcate into electron root (E r ∼15kV/m) and rather large electric field shear (dE r /dr∼300kV/m 2 ) is produced in the layer between ion and electron root. (author)

  13. Real-time control of internal transport barriers in JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazon, D.; Litaudon, X.; Moreau, D. [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA Cadarache, St. Paul lez Durance (France)] [and others

    2002-07-01

    We present the results of recent experiments related to real-time control of internal transport barriers (ITBs) in JET. Using a simple criterion to characterize the ITB existence, location and strength, we have successfully controlled for the first time the radial electron temperature profile within the ITB. The dimensionless variable used in the real-time algorithm - ratio of the ion gyro-radius to the local gradient scale length of the electron temperature - is a measure of the normalized electron temperature gradient and characterizes satisfactorily the main ITB features with a relatively low computational cost. We show several examples of control of this variable in various experimental conditions of toroidal field and plasma current, using different heating systems as control actuators. We also present a double-loop feedback scheme where both the global neutron rate from D-D reactions and the ITB strength are controlled simultaneously. In this case the ITB is sustained in a fully non-inductive current drive regime during several seconds. With the proposed control method, disruptions are avoided by holding the plasma performance at a prescribed target and this opens the route towards stationary operation of tokamak plasmas with ITBs. Initial results suggest that the additional control of the current profile is an important issue for achieving steady-state operation, in particular in the triggering and the sustainment of the ITB. (author)

  14. On creating transport barrier by radio-frequency waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sen, S.; Cairns, R.A.; Dasgupta, B.; Pantis, G.

    1998-01-01

    The use of radio frequency (RF) waves in the range of Alfven frequencies is shown to stabilize the drift-ballooning modes in the tokamak if the radial profile of the RF field energy is properly chosen. Stabilization is achieved by the ponder motive force arising due to the radial gradient in the RF field energy. The estimate of the RF power required for this stabilization is found to be rather modest and hence should be easily obtained in the actual experiments. This result therefore shows that the use of the RF waves can create a transport barrier to reduce the loss of particle and energy from the plasma. The new improved mode produced by the RF is expected to have all the advantageous features of the enhanced reverse shear (ERS) modes and at the same time will, unlike the ERS plasma, be sustainable for unlimited period of time and hence should be an attractive choice for the reactor-grade self-sustaining plasma. (author)

  15. Global plasma oscillations in electron internal transport barriers in TCV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Udintsev, V S; Sauter, O; Asp, E; Fable, E; Goodman, T P; Turri, G; Graves, J P; Zucca, C [Association Euratom-Confederation Suisse, EPFL/SB/CRPP, Station 13, CH-1015, Lausanne (Switzerland); Scarabosio, A [Max-Planck Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, IPP-EURATOM Association, Garching (Germany); Zhuang, G [Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei (China)

    2008-12-15

    In the Tokamak a Configuration Variable (TCV) (Hofmann F et al1994 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 36 B277), global plasma oscillations have been discovered in fully non-inductively driven plasmas featuring electron internal transport barriers (ITB) with strong ECRH/ECCD. These oscillations are linked to the destabilization and stabilization of MHD modes near the foot of the ITB and can lead to large oscillations of the total plasma current and line-averaged density, among others. They are intrinsically related to the fact that ITBs have large pressure gradients in a region of low magnetic shear. Therefore, the ideal MHD limit is relatively low and infernal modes can be unstable. Depending on the proximity to the ideal limit, small crashes or resistive modes can appear which affect the time evolution of the discharge. Being near marginal stability, the modes can self-stabilize due to the modification of the pressure gradient and local q-profile. The plasma recovers good confinement, reverses shear and the ITB builds up, until a new MHD mode is destabilized. TCV results show that this cycling behaviour can be controlled by modifying the current density or the pressure profiles, either with Ohmic current density perturbation or by modifying the ECH/ECCD power. It is demonstrated that many observations such as q {>=} 2 sawteeth, beta collapses, minor disruptions and oscillation regimes in ITBs can be assigned to the same physics origin: the proximity to the infernal mode stability limit.

  16. Increased understanding of neoclassical internal transport barrier on CHS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minami, T.; Fujisawa, A.; Iguchi, H.

    2002-01-01

    We report the recent progress of the study on neoclassical internal transport barrier (N-ITB) on Compact Helical System experiment. N-ITB has been observed for EC heated NBI plasma. The improved confinement region for electrons is expanded compared to that of the previous N-ITB plasma heated by only ECH. Moreover, the ion temperature is found to be increased simultaneously by about two to three times (T i (0)∼400-500eV) with steep gradient region at ρ∼0.6. From the measurement of the averaged peak energy intensity using the soft X-ray CCD camera it is confirmed that the impurity confinement is also improved with N-ITB. The radial electric field is observed to bifurcate into electron root (E r ∼15kV/m) and rather large electric field shear (dE r /dr∼-300kV/m 2 ) is produced in the layer between ion and electron root. (author)

  17. Global plasma oscillations in electron internal transport barriers in TCV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udintsev, V. S.; Sauter, O.; Asp, E.; Fable, E.; Goodman, T. P.; Turri, G.; Graves, J. P.; Scarabosio, A.; Zhuang, G.; Zucca, C.; TCV Team

    2008-12-01

    In the Tokamak à Configuration Variable (TCV) (Hofmann F et al1994 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 36 B277), global plasma oscillations have been discovered in fully non-inductively driven plasmas featuring electron internal transport barriers (ITB) with strong ECRH/ECCD. These oscillations are linked to the destabilization and stabilization of MHD modes near the foot of the ITB and can lead to large oscillations of the total plasma current and line-averaged density, among others. They are intrinsically related to the fact that ITBs have large pressure gradients in a region of low magnetic shear. Therefore, the ideal MHD limit is relatively low and infernal modes can be unstable. Depending on the proximity to the ideal limit, small crashes or resistive modes can appear which affect the time evolution of the discharge. Being near marginal stability, the modes can self-stabilize due to the modification of the pressure gradient and local q-profile. The plasma recovers good confinement, reverses shear and the ITB builds up, until a new MHD mode is destabilized. TCV results show that this cycling behaviour can be controlled by modifying the current density or the pressure profiles, either with Ohmic current density perturbation or by modifying the ECH/ECCD power. It is demonstrated that many observations such as q >= 2 sawteeth, beta collapses, minor disruptions and oscillation regimes in ITBs can be assigned to the same physics origin: the proximity to the infernal mode stability limit.

  18. Internal transport barriers in the National Spherical Torus Experimenta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuh, H. Y.; Levinton, F. M.; Bell, R. E.; Hosea, J. C.; Kaye, S. M.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Mazzucato, E.; Peterson, J. L.; Smith, D. R.; Candy, J.; Waltz, R. E.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C.; Lee, W.; Park, H. K.

    2009-05-01

    In the National Spherical Torus Experiment [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 41, 1435 (2001)], internal transport barriers (ITBs) are observed in reversed (negative) shear discharges where diffusivities for electron and ion thermal channels and momentum are reduced. While neutral beam heating can produce ITBs in both electron and ion channels, high harmonic fast wave heating can also produce electron ITBs (e-ITBs) under reversed magnetic shear conditions without momentum input. Interestingly, the location of the e-ITB does not necessarily match that of the ion ITB (i-ITB). The e-ITB location correlates best with the magnetic shear minima location determined by motional Stark effect constrained equilibria, whereas the i-ITB location better correlates with the location of maximum E ×B shearing rate. Measured electron temperature gradients in the e-ITB can exceed critical gradients for the onset of electron thermal gradient microinstabilities calculated by linear gyrokinetic codes. A high-k microwave scattering diagnostic shows locally reduced density fluctuations at wave numbers characteristic of electron turbulence for discharges with strongly negative magnetic shear versus weakly negative or positive magnetic shear. Reductions in fluctuation amplitude are found to be correlated with the local value of magnetic shear. These results are consistent with nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations predicting a reduction in electron turbulence under negative magnetic shear conditions despite exceeding critical gradients.

  19. Transport of oxidants and radionuclides through a clay barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neretnieks, I.

    1978-02-01

    The masstransfer rate for oxidants to, and radionuclides from a capsule in a repository has been computed. The capsule which is 0.75 m in diameter is surrounded by Montmorillonite clay. The hole is 1.5 m in diameter. For one capsule about 1220g copper will corrode due to oxygen corrosion in 10 000 years. If the fissures in the rock nearest the hole are filled with clay, the corrosion will decrease significantly. This is valid for a case where the groundwater is in equilibrium with oxygen of 0.2 bar pressure (normal air pressure). Measurements of the oxygen content in groundwater at large depths show a more than 1 000 times smaller values. The transport rate will then be correspondingly smaller. Corrosion due to sulphate/sulphide corrosion may reach some 590 g in the same time if there is 10 mg/l of the least abundant component. The radionuclides Sr 90 , Cs 137 , Am 241 and Am 243 will decay totally in the clay barriers. Pu 240 will be seriously hindered. The total dissolution of the uranium oxide in a capsule takes at least 1.8 million years. Nuclides with high solubilities decrease in about 2 000 years to half their original concentration. The sodium in the Montmorillonite clay in the fissures is exchanged for calcium in about 20 000 years. The exchange of the sodium in the clay in the hole takes millions of years

  20. The transport and behaviour of isoproturon in unsaturated chalk cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besien, T. J.; Williams, R. J.; Johnson, A. C.

    2000-04-01

    A batch sorption study, a microcosm degradation study, and two separate column leaching studies were used to investigate the transport and fate of isoproturon in unsaturated chalk. The column leaching studies used undisturbed core material obtained from the field by dry percussion drilling. Each column leaching study used 25 cm long, 10 cm wide unsaturated chalk cores through which a pulse of isoproturon and bromide was eluted. The cores were set-up to simulate conditions in the unsaturated zone of the UK Chalk aquifer by applying a suction of 1 kPa (0.1 m H 2O) to the base of each column, and eluting at a rate corresponding to an average recharge rate through the unsaturated Chalk. A dye tracer indicated that the flow was through the matrix under these conditions. The results from the first column study showed high recovery rates for both isoproturon (73-92%) and bromide (93-96%), and that isoproturon was retarded by a factor of about 1.23 relative to bromide. In the second column study, two of the four columns were eluted with non-sterile groundwater in place of the sterile groundwater used on all other columns, and this study showed high recovery rates for bromide (85-92%) and lower recovery rates for isoproturon (66-79% — sterile groundwater, 48-61% — non-sterile groundwater). The enhanced degradation in the columns eluted with non-sterile groundwater indicated that groundwater microorganisms had increased the degradation rate within these columns. Overall, the reduced isoproturon recovery in the second column study was attributed to increased microbial degradation as a result of the longer study duration (162 vs. 105 days). The breakthrough curves (BTCs) for bromide had a characteristic convection-dispersion shape and were accurately simulated with the minimum of calibration using a simple convection-dispersion model (LEACHP). However, the isoproturon BTCs had an unusual shape and could not be accurately simulated.

  1. Ballistic transport through graphene nanostructures of velocity and potential barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krstajic, P M; Vasilopoulos, P

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the electronic properties of graphene nanostructures when the Fermi velocity and the electrostatic potential vary in space. First, we consider the transmission T and conductance G through single and double barriers. We show that G for velocity barriers differs markedly from that for potential barriers for energies below the height of the latter and it exhibits periodic oscillations as a function of the energy for strong velocity modulation. Special attention is given to superlattices (SLs). It is shown that an applied bias can efficiently widen or shrink the allowed minibands of velocity-modulated SLs. The spectrum in the Kronig-Penney limit is periodic in the strength of the barriers. Collimation of an electron beam incident on an SL with velocity and potential barriers is present but it disappears when the potential barriers are absent. The number of additional Dirac points may change considerably if barriers and wells have sufficiently different Fermi velocities.

  2. High density internal transport barriers for burning plasma operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ridolfini, V Pericoli [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, CR Frascati, Rome (Italy); Barbato, E [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, CR Frascati, Rome (Italy); Buratti, P [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, CR Frascati, Rome (Italy)] (and others)

    2005-12-15

    A tokamak plasma with internal transport barriers (ITBs) is the best candidate for a steady ITER operation, since the high energy confinement allows working at plasma currents (I{sub p}) lower than the reference scenario. To build and sustain an ITB at the ITER high density ({>=}10{sup 20} m{sup -3}) and largely dominant electron (e{sup -}) heating is not trivial in most existing tokamaks. FTU can instead meet both requests, thanks to its radiofrequency heating systems, lower hybrid (LH, up to 1.9 MW) and electron cyclotron (EC up to 1.2 MW). By the combined use of them, ITBs are obtained up to peak densities n{sub e0} > 1.3 x 10{sup 20} m{sup -3}, with central e{sup -} temperatures T{sub e0} {approx} 5.5 keV, and are sustained for as long as the heating pulse is applied (>35 confinement times, {tau}{sub E}). At n{sub e0} {approx} 0.8 x 10{sup 20} m{sup -3} T{sub e0} can be larger than 11 keV. Almost full current drive (CD) and an overall good steadiness is attained within about one {tau}{sub E}, 20 times faster than the ohmic current relaxation time. The ITB extends over a central region with an almost flat or slightly reversed q profile and q{sub min} {approx} 1.3 that is fully sustained by off-axis lower hybrid current drive. Consequent to this is the beneficial good alignment of the bootstrap current, generated by the ITB large pressure gradients, with the LH driven current. Reflectometry shows a clear change in the turbulence close to the ITB radius, consistent with the reduced e{sup -} transport. Ions (i{sup +}) are significantly heated via collisions, but thermal equilibrium with electrons cannot be attained since the e{sup -}-i{sup +} equipartition time is always 4-5 times longer than {tau}{sub E}. No degradation of the overall ion transport, rather a reduction of the i{sup +} heat diffusivity, is observed inside the ITB. The global confinement has been improved up to 1.6 times over the scaling predictions. The ITB radius can be controlled by adjusting the

  3. Role of Reynolds stress and toroidal momentum transport in the dynamics of internal transport barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S. S.; Jhang, Hogun; Diamond, P. H.

    2012-01-01

    We study the interplay between intrinsic rotation and internal transport barrier (ITB) dynamics through the dynamic change of the parallel Reynolds stress. Global flux-driven gyrofluid simulations are used for this study. In particular, we investigate the role of parallel velocity gradient instability (PVGI) in the ITB formation and the back transition. It is found that the excitation of PVGI is followed by a change in the Reynolds stress which drives a momentum redistribution. This significantly influences E×B shear evolution and subsequent ITB dynamics. Nonlocal interactions among fluctuations are also observed during the PVGI excitation, resulting in turbulence suppression at the ITB.

  4. Noble internal transport barriers and radial subdiffusion of toroidal magnetic lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misguich, J.H.; Reuss, J.D. [Association Euratom-CEA sur la Fusion, CEA/DSM/DRFC, 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Constantinescu, D.; Steinbrecher, G. [Association Euratom-N.A.S.T.I., Dept. of Physics, University of Craiova (Romania); Vlad, M.; Spineanu, F. [Association Euratom-N.A.S.T.I., National Institute of Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Bucharest (Romania); Weyssow, B.; Balescu, R. [Association Euratom-Etat Belge sur la Fusion, Universite Libre de Bruxelles (Belgium)

    2002-02-01

    Internal transport barriers (ITB's) observed in tokamaks are described by a purely magnetic approach. Magnetic line motion in toroidal geometry with broken magnetic surfaces is studied from a previously derived Hamiltonian map in situation of incomplete chaos. This appears to reproduce in a realistic way the main features of a tokamak, for a given safety factor profile and in terms of a single parameter L representing the amplitude of the magnetic perturbation. New results are given concerning the Shafranov shift as function of L. For small values of L, closed magnetic surfaces exist (KAM tori) and island chains begin to appear on rational surfaces for higher values of L, with chaotic zones around hyperbolic points, as expected. Single trajectories of magnetic line motion indicate the persistence of a central protected plasma core, surrounded by a chaotic shell enclosed in a double-sided transport barrier. Magnetic lines which succeed to escape across this barrier begin to wander in a wide chaotic sea extending up to a very robust barrier (as long as L{<=}1). For values of L{>=}1, above the escape threshold, most magnetic lines succeed to escape out of the external barrier which has become a permeable Cantorus. Statistical analysis of a large number of trajectories, representing the evolution of a bunch of magnetic lines, indicate that the flux variable {psi} asymptotically grows in a diffuse manner as (L{sup 2}t) with a L{sup 2} scaling as expected, but that the average radial position r{sub m}(t) asymptotically grows as (L{sup 2}t){sup 1/4} while the mean square displacement around this average radius asymptotically grows in a sub-diffusive manner as (L{sup 2}t){sup 1/2}. This result shows the slower dispersion in the present incomplete chaotic regime, which is different from the usual quasilinear diffusion in completely chaotic situations. For physical times t{sub {phi}} of the order of the escape time defined by x{sub m}(t{sub {phi}}) {approx}1, the motion

  5. Noble internal transport barriers and radial subdiffusion of toroidal magnetic lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misguich, J.H.; Reuss, J.D.; Constantinescu, D.; Steinbrecher, G.; Vlad, M.; Spineanu, F.; Weyssow, B.; Balescu, R.

    2002-02-01

    Internal transport barriers (ITB's) observed in tokamaks are described by a purely magnetic approach. Magnetic line motion in toroidal geometry with broken magnetic surfaces is studied from a previously derived Hamiltonian map in situation of incomplete chaos. This appears to reproduce in a realistic way the main features of a tokamak, for a given safety factor profile and in terms of a single parameter L representing the amplitude of the magnetic perturbation. New results are given concerning the Shafranov shift as function of L. For small values of L, closed magnetic surfaces exist (KAM tori) and island chains begin to appear on rational surfaces for higher values of L, with chaotic zones around hyperbolic points, as expected. Single trajectories of magnetic line motion indicate the persistence of a central protected plasma core, surrounded by a chaotic shell enclosed in a double-sided transport barrier. Magnetic lines which succeed to escape across this barrier begin to wander in a wide chaotic sea extending up to a very robust barrier (as long as L≤1). For values of L≥1, above the escape threshold, most magnetic lines succeed to escape out of the external barrier which has become a permeable Cantorus. Statistical analysis of a large number of trajectories, representing the evolution of a bunch of magnetic lines, indicate that the flux variable ψ asymptotically grows in a diffuse manner as (L 2 t) with a L 2 scaling as expected, but that the average radial position r m (t) asymptotically grows as (L 2 t) 1/4 while the mean square displacement around this average radius asymptotically grows in a sub-diffusive manner as (L 2 t) 1/2 . This result shows the slower dispersion in the present incomplete chaotic regime, which is different from the usual quasilinear diffusion in completely chaotic situations. For physical times t φ of the order of the escape time defined by x m (t φ ) ∼1, the motion appears to be super-diffusive, however, but less dangerous than

  6. Representing solute transport through the multi-barrier disposal system by simplified concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poteri, A.; Nordman, H.; Pulkkanen, V-M.; Kekaelaeinen, P.; Hautojaervi, A.

    2012-02-01

    The repository system chosen in Finland for spent nuclear fuel is composed of multiple successive transport barriers. If a waste canister is leaking, this multi-barrier system retards and limits the release rates of radionuclides into the biosphere. Analysis of radionuclide migration in the previous performance assessments has largely been based on numerical modelling of the repository system. The simplified analytical approach introduced here provides a tool to analyse the performance of the whole system using simplified representations of the individual transport barriers. This approach is based on the main characteristics of the individual barriers and on the generic nature of the coupling between successive barriers. In the case of underground repository the mass transfer between successive transport barriers is strongly restricted by the interfaces between barriers leading to well-mixed conditions in these barriers. The approach here simplifies the barrier system so that it can be described with a very simple compartment model, where each barrier is represented by a single, or in the case of buffer, by not more than two compartments. This system of compartments could be solved in analogy with a radioactive decay chain. The model of well mixed compartments lends itself to a very descriptive way to represent and analyse the barrier system because the relative efficiency of the different barriers in hindering transport of solutes can be parameterised by the solutes half-times in the corresponding compartments. In a real repository system there will also be a delay between the start of the inflow and the start of the outflow from the barrier. This delay can be important for the release rates of the short lived and sorbing radionuclides, and it was also included in the simplified representation of the barrier system. In a geological multi-barrier system, spreading of the outflowing release pulse is often governed by the typical behaviour of one transport barrier

  7. Representing solute transport through the multi-barrier disposal system by simplified concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poteri, A.; Nordman, H.; Pulkkanen, V-M. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Kekaelaeinen, P. [Jyvaeskylae Univ. (Finland). Dept. pf Physics; Hautojaervi, A.

    2012-02-15

    The repository system chosen in Finland for spent nuclear fuel is composed of multiple successive transport barriers. If a waste canister is leaking, this multi-barrier system retards and limits the release rates of radionuclides into the biosphere. Analysis of radionuclide migration in the previous performance assessments has largely been based on numerical modelling of the repository system. The simplified analytical approach introduced here provides a tool to analyse the performance of the whole system using simplified representations of the individual transport barriers. This approach is based on the main characteristics of the individual barriers and on the generic nature of the coupling between successive barriers. In the case of underground repository the mass transfer between successive transport barriers is strongly restricted by the interfaces between barriers leading to well-mixed conditions in these barriers. The approach here simplifies the barrier system so that it can be described with a very simple compartment model, where each barrier is represented by a single, or in the case of buffer, by not more than two compartments. This system of compartments could be solved in analogy with a radioactive decay chain. The model of well mixed compartments lends itself to a very descriptive way to represent and analyse the barrier system because the relative efficiency of the different barriers in hindering transport of solutes can be parameterised by the solutes half-times in the corresponding compartments. In a real repository system there will also be a delay between the start of the inflow and the start of the outflow from the barrier. This delay can be important for the release rates of the short lived and sorbing radionuclides, and it was also included in the simplified representation of the barrier system. In a geological multi-barrier system, spreading of the outflowing release pulse is often governed by the typical behaviour of one transport barrier

  8. Apparatus for the measurement of radionuclide transport rates in rock cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weed, H.C.; Koszykowski, R.F.; Dibley, L.L.; Murray, I.

    1981-09-01

    An apparatus and procedure for the study of radionuclide transport in intact rock cores are presented in this report. This equipment more closely simulates natural conditions of radionuclide transport than do crushed rock columns. The apparatus and the procedure from rock core preparation through data analysis are described. The retardation factors measured are the ratio of the transport rate of a non-retarded radionuclide, such as 3 H, to the transport rate of a retarded radionuclide. Sample results from a study of the transport of /sup 95m/Tc and 85 Sr in brine through a sandstone core are included

  9. A new treatment of the heat transport equation with a transport barrier and applications to ECRH experiments in Tore Supra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, X.L.; Giruzzi, A.G.; Bouquey, F.; Clary, J.; Darbos, C.; Lennholm, M.; Magne, R.; Segui, J.L. [CEA Cadarache, Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Clemencon, A. [MIT, Electrochemical Energy Laboratory, Cambridge, MA (United States); Guivarch, C. [Ecole Nationale des Ponts et Chaussees, 77 - Marne-la-Vallee (France)

    2004-07-01

    An exact analytical solution of the electron heat diffusion equation in a cylinder has been found with a step-like diffusion coefficient, plus a monomial increase in the radial direction and a constant damping term. This model is sufficiently general to describe heat diffusion in the presence of a critical gradient threshold or a transport barrier, superimposed to the usual trend of increasing heat diffusivity from the plasma core to the edge. This type of representation allows us to see some well-known properties of heat transport phenomena in a different light. For instance, it has been shown that the contributions of the Eigenmodes to the time dependent solution grow at speeds that depend on the Eigenmode order i.e. at the beginning of the heating phase all the Eigenmodes are equally involved, whereas at the end only the lower order ones are left. This implies, e.g., that high frequency modulation experiments provide a characterization of transport phenomena that is intrinsically different with respect to power balance analysis of a stationary phase. It is particularly useful to analyse power switch on/off events and whenever high frequency modulations are not technically feasible. Low-frequency (1-2 Hz) ECRH modulation experiments have been performed on Tore Supra. A large jump (a factor of 8) in the heat diffusivity has been clearly identified at the ECRH power deposition layer. The amplitude and phase of several harmonics of the Fourier transform of the modulated temperature, as well as the time evolution of the modulated temperature have been reproduced by the analytical solution. The jump is found to be much weaker at lower ECRH power (one gyrotron)

  10. [Carrier-mediated Transport of Cationic Drugs across the Blood-Tissue Barrier].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Yoshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Studies of neurological dysfunction have revealed the neuroprotective effect of several cationic drugs, suggesting their usefulness in the treatment of neurological diseases. In the brain and retina, blood-tissue barriers such as blood-brain barrier (BBB) and blood-retinal barrier (BRB) are formed to restrict nonspecific solute transport between the circulating blood and neural tissues. Therefore study of cationic drug transport at these barriers is essential to achieve systemic delivery of neuroprotective agents into the neural tissues. In the retina, severe diseases such as diabetic retinopathy and macular degeneration can cause neurological dysfunction that dramatically affects patients' QOL. The BRB is formed by retinal capillary endothelial cells (inner BRB) and retinal pigment epithelial cells (outer BRB). Blood-to-retina transport of cationic drugs was investigated at the inner BRB, which is known to nourish two thirds of the retina. Blood-to-retinal transport of verapamil suggested that the barrier function of the BRB differs from that of the BBB. Moreover, carrier-mediated transport of verapamil and pyrilamine revealed the involvement of novel organic cation transporters at the inner BRB. The identified transport systems for cationic drugs are sensitive to several cationic neuroprotective and anti-angiogenic agents such as clonidine and propranolol, and the involvement of novel transporters was also suggested in their blood-to-retina transport across the inner BRB.

  11. Core barrier formation near integer q surfaces in DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Austin, M. E.; Gentle, K. W.; Burrell, K. H.; Waltz, R. E.; Gohil, P.; Greenfield, C. M.; Groebner, R. J.; Petty, C. C.; Prater, R.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Luo, Y.; Kinsey, J. E.; Makowski, M. A.; McKee, G. R.; Shafer, M. W.; Nazikian, R.; Rhodes, T. L.; Van Zeeland, M. A.

    2006-01-01

    Recent DIII-D experiments have significantly improved the understanding of internal transport barriers (ITBs) that are triggered close to the time when an integer value of the minimum in q is crossed. While this phenomenon has been observed on many tokamaks, the extensive transport and fluctuation diagnostics on DIII-D have permitted a detailed study of the generation mechanisms of q-triggered ITBs as pertaining to turbulence suppression dynamics, shear flows, and energetic particle modes. In these discharges, the evolution of the q profile is measured using motional Stark effect polarimetry and the integer q min crossings are further pinpointed in time by the observation of Alfven cascades. High time resolution measurements of the ion and electron temperatures and the toroidal rotation show that the start of improved confinement is simultaneous in all three channels, and that this event precedes the traversal of integer q min by 5-20 ms. There is no significant low-frequency magnetohydrodynamic activity prior to or just after the crossing of the integer q min and hence magnetic reconnection is determined not to be the precipitant of the confinement change. Instead, results from the GYRO code point to the effects of zonal flows near low order rational q values as playing a role in ITB triggering. A reduction in local turbulent fluctuations is observed at the start of the temperature rise and, concurrently, an increase in turbulence poloidal flow velocity and flow shear is measured with the beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic. For the case of a transition to an enduring internal barrier the fluctuation level remains at a reduced amplitude. The timing and nature of the temperature, rotation, and fluctuation changes leading to internal barriers suggests transport improvement due to increased shear flow arising from the zonal flow structures

  12. Edge and coupled core/edge transport modelling in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lodestro, L.L.; Casper, T.A.; Cohen, R.H.

    1999-01-01

    Recent advances in the theory and modelling of tokamak edge, scrape-off-layer (SOL) and divertor plasmas are described. The effects of the poloidal E x B drift on inner/outer divertor-plate asymmetries within a 1D analysis are shown to be in good agreement with experimental trends; above a critical v ExB , the model predicts transitions to supersonic flow at the inboard midplane. 2D simulations show the importance of E x B flow in the private-flux region and of ∇ B-drifts. A theory of rough plasma-facing surfaces is given, predicting modifications to the SOL plasma. The parametric dependence of detached-plasma states in slab geometry has been explored; with sufficient pumping, the location of the ionization front can be controlled; otherwise only fronts near the plate or the X-point are stable. Studies with a more accurate Monte-Carlo neutrals model and a detailed non-LTE radiation-transport code indicate various effects are important for quantitative modelling. Detailed simulations of the DIII-D core and edge are presented; impurity and plasma flow are discussed and shown to be well modelled with UEDGE. (author)

  13. Edge and coupled core-edge transport modelling in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lodestro, L.L.; Casper, T.A.; Cohen, R.H.

    2001-01-01

    Recent advances in the theory and modelling of tokamak edge, scrape-off-layer (SOL) and divertor plasmas are described. The effects of the poloidal ExB drift on inner/outer divertor-plate asymmetries within a 1D analysis are shown to be in good agreement with experimental trends; above a critical v ExB, the model predicts transitions to supersonic SOL flow at the inboard midplane. 2D simulations show the importance of ExB flow in the private-flux region and of ∇ B-drifts. A theory of rough plasma-facing surfaces is given, predicting modifications to the SOL plasma. The parametric dependence of detached-plasma states in slab geometry has been explored; with sufficient pumping, the location of the ionization front can be controlled; otherwise only fronts near the plate or the X-point are stable. Studies with a more accurate Monte-Carlo neutrals model and a detailed non-LTE radiation-transport code indicate various effects are important for quantitative modelling. Detailed simulations of the DIII-D core and edge are presented; impurity and plasma flow are discussed and shown to be well modelled with UEDGE. (author)

  14. Exciton Transport Simulations in Phenyl Cored Thiophene Dendrimers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwiseon; Erkan Kose, Muhammet; Graf, Peter; Kopidakis, Nikos; Rumbles, Garry; Shaheen, Sean E.

    2009-03-01

    Phenyl cored 3-arm and 4-arm thiophene dendrimers are promising materials for use in photovoltaic devices. It is important to understand the energy transfer mechanisms in these molecules to guide the synthesis of novel dendrimers with improved efficiency. A method is developed to estimate the exciton diffusion lengths for the dendrimers and similar chromophores in amorphous films. The approach exploits Fermi's Golden Rule to estimate the energy transfer rates for an ensemble of bimolecular complexes in random orientations. Using Poisson's equation to evaluate Coulomb integrals led to efficient calculation of excitonic couplings between the transition densities. Monte-Carlo simulations revealed the dynamics of energy transport in the dendrimers. Experimental exciton diffusion lengths of the dendrimers range 10 ˜ 20 nm, increasing with the size of the dendrimer. Simulated diffusion lengths correlate well with experiments. The chemical structure of the chromophore, the shape of the transition densities and the exciton lifetime are found to be the most important factors that determine the exciton diffusion length in amorphous films.

  15. Velocity barrier-controlled of spin-valley polarized transport in monolayer WSe2 junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Xuejun; Lv, Qiang; Cao, Zhenzhou

    2018-05-01

    In this work, we have theoretically investigated the influence of velocity barrier on the spin-valley polarized transport in monolayer (ML) WSe2 junction with a large spin-orbit coupling (SOC). Both the spin-valley resolved transmission probabilities and conductance are strong dependent on the velocity barrier, as the velocity barrier decreases to 0.06, a spin-valley polarization of exceeding 90% is observed, which is distinct from the ML MoS2 owing to incommensurable SOC. In addition, the spin-valley polarization is further increased above 95% in a ML WSe2 superlattice, in particular, it's found many extraordinary velocity barrier-dependent transport gaps for multiple barrier due to evanescent tunneling. Our results may open an avenue for the velocity barrier-controlled high-efficiency spin and valley polarizations in ML WSe2-based electronic devices.

  16. Internal transport barrier discharges in JET and their sensitivity to edge conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sips, A.C.C.

    2001-01-01

    Experiments in JET have concentrated on steady state discharges with internal transport barriers (ITBs). The ITBs are formed during the current rise phase of the discharge with low magnetic shear (=r/q(dq/dr)) in the centre and with high additional heating power. In order to achieve stability against disruptions at high pressure peaking, which is typical for ITB discharges, the pressure profile can be broadened with an H mode transport barrier at the edge of the plasma. However, the strong increase in edge pressure during an ELM free H mode weakens the ITB owing to a reduction of the rotational shear and pressure gradient at the ITB location. In addition, type I ELM activity during the H mode phase leads to a collapse of the ITB with the input powers available in JET (up to 28 MW). The best ITB discharges are obtained with input power control to reduce the core pressure, and with the edge pressure of the plasma controlled by argon gas dosing. These discharges achieve steady conditions for several energy confinement times (τ E ) with H97 confinement enhancement factors (τ E /τ E,ITER97scaling ) of 1.2-1.6 at line averaged densities of around 30-40% of the Greenwald density. Increasing the density by using additional deuterium gas dosing or shallow pellet fuelling leads to a weakening of the ITB. In order to sustain ITBs at higher densities, type III ELMs should be maintained at the plasma edge, giving scope for future experiments in JET. (author)

  17. Dynamics of the pedestal structure in the edge transport barrier in CHS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kado, S.; Oishi, T.; Tanaka, S.

    2006-10-01

    The dynamic behavior of the edge pedestal in the edge transport barrier (ETB) formation discharge (H-mode) in the compact helical system (CHS) is investigated. Edge Harmonic Oscillations (EHOs) having a fundamental frequency of 2-4.5 kHz, depending on the magnetic configuration, and their second harmonic are observed when the density gradient of the pedestal reaches a certain threshold. There are two groups of so-called EHOs in the CHS. One is located in the edge region where the ι=1 surface exists, and the other is in the core region (although we also call it EHO in this paper) around the half radius where the ι=0.5 surface exists. The magnetic probe signal is revealed to reflect the latter mode, showing the poloidal mode number of 2, while that for the edge BES channel is 1. The density build-up saturates simultaneously with the increase of EHOs in the edge BES channel, which suggests that to a considerable extend the mode increases the particle transport. (author)

  18. Gyrofluid Simulations of Intrinsic Rotation Generation in Reversed Shear Plasmas with Internal Transport Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhang, Hogun; Kim, S. S.; Kwon, J. M.; Terzolo, L.; Kim, J. Y.; Diamond, P. H.

    2010-11-01

    It is accepted that the intrinsic rotation is generated via the residual stress, which is non-diffusive components of the turbulent Reynolds stress, without external momentum input. The physics leading to the onset of intrinsic rotation in L- and H- mode plasmas have been elucidated elsewhere. However, the physics responsible for the generation and transport of the intrinsic rotation and its relationship to the formation of internal transport barriers (ITBs) in reversed shear (RS) plasmas have not been explored in detail, which is the main subject in the present work. The revised version of the global gyrofluid code TRB is used for this study. It is found that the large intrinsic rotation (˜10-30% of the ion sound speed depending on ITB characteristics) is generated near the ITB region and propagates into the core. The intrinsic rotation increases linearly as the temperature gradient at ITB position increases, albeit not indefinitely. Key parameters related to the symmetry breaking, such as turbulent intensity and its gradient, the flux surface averaged parallel wavenumber are evaluated dynamically during the ITB formation. In particular, the role of reversed shear and the q-profile curvature is presented in relation to the symmetry breaking in RS plasmas.

  19. Relationship between particle and heat transport in JT-60U plasmas with internal transport barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takenaga, H.

    2002-01-01

    Relationship between particle and heat transport in an internal transport barrier (ITB) has been systematically investigated for the first time in reversed shear (RS) and high-β p ELMy H-mode (weak positive shear) plasmas of JT-60U for understanding of compatibility of improved energy confinement and effective particle control such as exhaust of helium ash and reduction in impurity contamination. In the RS plasma, no helium and carbon accumulation inside the ITB is observed even with highly improved energy confinement. In the high-β p plasma, both helium and carbon density profiles are flat. As the ion temperature profile changes from parabolic- to box-type, the helium diffusivity decreases by a factor of about 2 as well as the ion thermal diffusivity in the RS plasma. The measured soft X-ray profile is more peaked than that calculated by assuming the same n AR profile as the n e profile in the Ar injected RS plasma with the box-type profile, suggesting accumulation of Ar inside the ITB. Particle transport is improved with no change of ion temperature in the RS plasma, when density fluctuation is drastically reduced by a pellet injection. (author)

  20. Transport-diffusion comparisons for small core LMFBR disruptive accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomlinson, E.T.

    1977-11-01

    A number of numerical experiments were performed to assess the validity of diffusion theory for calculating the reactivity state of various small core LMFBR disrupted geometries. The disrupted configurations correspond, in general, to various configurations predicted by SAS3A for transient undercooling (TUC) and transient overpower (TOP) accidents for homogeneous cores and to the ZPPR-7 configurations for heterogeneous core. In all TUC cases diffusion theory was shown to be inadequate for the calculation of reactivity changes during core disassembly

  1. Formation of an internal transport barrier in the ohmic H-mode in the TUMAN-3M tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrejko, M.V.; Askinazi, L.G.; Golant, V.E.; Zhubr, N.A.; Kornev, V.A.; Krikunov, S.V.; Lebedev, S.V.; Levin, L.S.; Razdobarin, G.T.; Rozhdestvensky, V.V.; Smirnov, A.I.; Tukachinsky, A.S.; Yaroshevich, S.P.

    2000-01-01

    In experiments on studying the ohmic H-mode in the TUMAN-3M tokamak, it is found that, in high-current (I p ∼ 120-170 kA) discharges, a region with high electron-temperature and density gradients is formed in the plasma core. In this case, the energy confinement time τ E attains 9-18 ms, which is nearly twice as large as that predicted by the ELM-free ITER-93H scaling. This is evidence that the internal transport barrier in a plasma can exist without auxiliary heating. Calculations of the effective thermal diffusivity by the ASTRA transport code demonstrate a strong suppression of heat transport in the region where the temperature and density gradients are high

  2. Spin transport through electric field modulated graphene periodic ferromagnetic barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sattari, F.; Faizabadi, E.

    2014-01-01

    Using the transfer matrix method, the spin transmission coefficient and the spin conductivity are studied theoretically through the monolayer and bilayer graphene periodic ferromagnetic barriers modulated by a homogeneous electric field. The spin conductivity of the systems has an oscillatory behavior with respect to the external electric field which depends on the spin state of electron. In addition, the oscillation amplitude of the spin conductivity and spin polarization increase by increasing the number of barriers, but for a monolayer system with number of barriers greater than thirty, also for a bilayer system with the number of barriers greater than four, the oscillation amplitude does not change significantly. Our probes show that for bilayer system unlike monolayer structure the highest value of spin polarization achieved can be 1 or (−1). So, for designing spintronic devices, bilayer graphene is more efficient

  3. Active core profile and transport modification by application of ion Bernstein wave power in the Princeton Beta Experiment-Modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, B.; Batha, S.; Bell, R.; Bernabei, S.; Blush, L.; de la Luna, E.; Doerner, R.; Dunlap, J.; England, A.; Garcia, I.; Ignat, D.; Isler, R.; Jones, S.; Kaita, R.; Kaye, S.; Kugel, H.; Levinton, F.; Luckhardt, S.; Mutoh, T.; Okabayashi, M.; Ono, M.; Paoletti, F.; Paul, S.; Petravich, G.; Post-Zwicker, A.; Sauthoff, N.; Schmitz, L.; Sesnic, S.; Takahashi, H.; Talvard, M.; Tighe, W.; Tynan, G.; von Goeler, S.; Woskov, P.; Zolfaghari, A.

    1995-03-01

    Application of Ion Bernstein Wave Heating (IBWH) into the Princeton Beta Experiment-Modification (PBX-M) [Phys. Fluids B 2, 1271 (1990)] tokamak stabilizes sawtooth oscillations and generates peaked density profiles. A transport barrier, spatially correlated with the IBWH power deposition profile, is observed in the core of IBWH-assisted neutral beam injection (NBI) discharges. A precursor to the fully developed barrier is seen in the soft x-ray data during edge localized mode (ELM) activity. Sustained IBWH operation is conducive to a regime where the barrier supports large ∇ne, ∇Te, ∇νφ, and ∇Ti, delimiting the confinement zone. This regime is reminiscent of the H(high) mode, but with a confinement zone moved inward. The core region has better than H-mode confinement while the peripheral region is L(low)-mode-like. The peaked profile enhances NBI core deposition and increases nuclear reactivity. An increase in central Ti results from χi reduction (compared to the H mode) and better beam penetration. Bootstrap current fractions of up to 0.32-0.35 locally and 0.28 overall were obtained when an additional NBI burst is applied to this plasma.

  4. Active core profile and transport modification by application of ion Bernstein wave power in the Princeton Beta Experiment-Modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeBlanc, B.; Batha, S.; Bell, R.; Bernabei, S.; Blush, L.; de la Luna, E.; Doerner, R.; Dunlap, J.; England, A.; Garcia, I.; Ignat, D.; Isler, R.; Jones, S.; Kaita, R.; Kaye, S.; Kugel, H.; Levinton, F.; Luckhardt, S.; Mutoh, T.; Okabayashi, M.; Ono, M.; Paoletti, F.; Paul, S.; Petravich, G.; Post-Zwicker, A.; Sauthoff, N.; Schmitz, L.; Sesnic, S.; Takahashi, H.; Talvard, M.; Tighe, W.; Tynan, G.; von Goeler, S.; Woskov, P.; Zolfaghari, A.

    1995-01-01

    Application of Ion Bernstein Wave Heating (IBWH) into the Princeton Beta Experiment-Modification (PBX-M) [Phys. Fluids B 2, 1271 (1990)] tokamak stabilizes sawtooth oscillations and generates peaked density profiles. A transport barrier, spatially correlated with the IBWH power deposition profile, is observed in the core of IBWH-assisted neutral beam injection (NBI) discharges. A precursor to the fully developed barrier is seen in the soft x-ray data during edge localized mode (ELM) activity. Sustained IBWH operation is conducive to a regime where the barrier supports large ∇n e , ∇T e , ∇ν φ , and ∇T i , delimiting the confinement zone. This regime is reminiscent of the H(high) mode, but with a confinement zone moved inward. The core region has better than H-mode confinement while the peripheral region is L(low)-mode-like. The peaked profile enhances NBI core deposition and increases nuclear reactivity. An increase in central T i results from χ i reduction (compared to the H mode) and better beam penetration. Bootstrap current fractions of up to 0.32--0.35 locally and 0.28 overall were obtained when an additional NBI burst is applied to this plasma

  5. Active core profile and transport modification by application of Ion Bernstein Wave power in PBX-M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeBlanc, B.; Bell, R.

    1995-01-01

    Application of Ion Bernstein Wave Heating (IBWH) into the Princeton Beta Experiment-Modification (PBX-M) tokamak stabilizes sawtooth oscillations and generates peaked density profiles. A transport barrier, spatially correlated with the IBWH power deposition profile, is observed in the core of IBWH assisted neutral beam injection (NBI) discharges. A precursor to the fully developed barrier is seen in the soft x-ray data during edge localized mode (ELM) activity. Sustained IBWH operation is conducive to a regime where the barrier supports large triangledown n e , triangledown T e , triangledown v phi , and triangledown T i , delimiting the confinement zone. This regime is reminiscent of the H(high)-mode but with a confinement zone moved inwards. The core region has better than H-mode confinement while the peripheral region is L(low)-mode-like. The peaked profile enhanced NBI core deposition and increases nuclear reactivity. An increase in central T i results from χ i reduction (compared to H-mode) and better beam penetration. Bootstrap current fractions of up to 0.32--0.35 locally and 0.28 overall were obtained when an additional NBI burst is applied to this plasma

  6. Rotation and impurity studies in the presence of MHD activity and internal transport barriers on TCV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Federspiel, L. I.

    2014-07-01

    This thesis focuses on measurements of toroidal rotation and impurity profiles in improved plasma scenarios and in the presence of magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) activity. Experiments were performed on TCV, the Tokamak a Configuration Variable in Lausanne. In TCV, plasma rotation is measured by the charge exchange recombination spectroscopy diagnostic (CXRS). The CXRS is associated with a low power diagnostic neutral beam injector (DNBI) that provides CX emission from the hot plasma core, without perturbing the plasma with additional torque. The beam is observed transversally by the CXRS diagnostic so that local ion temperature, density and intrinsic velocity measurements are obtained. The three systems composing the present day CXRS2013 diagnostic cover the entire TCV radial midplane with up to 80 measurement locations separated by around 7 mm with a time resolution ranging from 2-30 ms. The main upgrades concerned the installation of new sensitive cameras, the overhaul of the toroidal system, the extended-chord configuration and the automation of the acquisition and analysis processes. These new Cars capabilities permitted the investigation of more complex scenarios featuring low intensity and/or fast events, like the low density electron internal transport barriers (eITBs) and the sawtooth (ST) instability. A comparison between rotation profiles measured over several sawtooth events and across a 'canonical' sawtooth cycle has been undertaken in limited L-mode plasmas. The averaged rotation profiles obtained with the upgraded CXRS diagnostic show that ST restrict the maximum attainable and that the rotation profiles are flattened and almost always display a small co-current contribution. It is this effect that results in the 1/I{sub p} scaling observed in TCV limited L-mode plasmas. The co-current core contribution is related to the ST crash, whilst, during the quiescent ramp of the sawtooth period, a plasma recoil outside the mixing radius is observed. A

  7. Rotation and impurity studies in the presence of MHD activity and internal transport barriers on TCV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federspiel, L. I.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis focuses on measurements of toroidal rotation and impurity profiles in improved plasma scenarios and in the presence of magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) activity. Experiments were performed on TCV, the Tokamak a Configuration Variable in Lausanne. In TCV, plasma rotation is measured by the charge exchange recombination spectroscopy diagnostic (CXRS). The CXRS is associated with a low power diagnostic neutral beam injector (DNBI) that provides CX emission from the hot plasma core, without perturbing the plasma with additional torque. The beam is observed transversally by the CXRS diagnostic so that local ion temperature, density and intrinsic velocity measurements are obtained. The three systems composing the present day CXRS2013 diagnostic cover the entire TCV radial midplane with up to 80 measurement locations separated by around 7 mm with a time resolution ranging from 2-30 ms. The main upgrades concerned the installation of new sensitive cameras, the overhaul of the toroidal system, the extended-chord configuration and the automation of the acquisition and analysis processes. These new Cars capabilities permitted the investigation of more complex scenarios featuring low intensity and/or fast events, like the low density electron internal transport barriers (eITBs) and the sawtooth (ST) instability. A comparison between rotation profiles measured over several sawtooth events and across a 'canonical' sawtooth cycle has been undertaken in limited L-mode plasmas. The averaged rotation profiles obtained with the upgraded CXRS diagnostic show that ST restrict the maximum attainable and that the rotation profiles are flattened and almost always display a small co-current contribution. It is this effect that results in the 1/I p scaling observed in TCV limited L-mode plasmas. The co-current core contribution is related to the ST crash, whilst, during the quiescent ramp of the sawtooth period, a plasma recoil outside the mixing radius is observed. A high

  8. Interpretation of transport barriers and of subneoclassical transport in the framework of the revisited neoclassical theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogister, A.L.

    1999-01-01

    'Subneoclassical' heat fluxes are predicted in the high collisionality regime by the revisited neoclassical theory, which includes the roles of Finite Larmor Radius effects and Inertia, that we published earlier. Unlike conventional neoclassical theory, the revisited theory further provides a non degenerate ambipolarity constraint which defines unambiguously the radial electric field. Together with the parallel momentum equation, the ambipolarity constraint leads, under some conditions, to radial electric field profiles with high negative shear akin to those observed in spontaneous edge transport barriers. The predictions of the theory are outlined, with emphasis laid on the interpretation of experimental results such as magnitude of the jumps, width of the shear layer, local scaling laws. Extension of the theory to triggered transitions and cold pulse propagation studies is suggested. (author)

  9. Pellet injection into H-mode ITER plasma with the presence of internal transport barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leekhaphan, P. [Thammasat University, School of Bio-Chemical Engineering and Technology, Sirindhorn International Institute of Technology (Thailand); Onjun, T. [Thammasat University, School of Manufacturing Systems and Mechanical Engineering, Sirindhorn International Institute of Technology (Thailand)

    2011-04-15

    The impacts of pellet injection into ITER type-1 ELMy H-mode plasma with the presence of internal transport barriers (ITBs) are investigated using self-consistent core-edge simulations of 1.5D BALDUR integrated predictive modeling code. In these simulations, the plasma core transport is predicted using a combination of a semi-empirical Mixed B/gB anomalous transport model, which can self-consistently predict the formation of ITBs, and the NCLASS neoclassical model. For simplicity, it is assumed that toroidal velocity for {omega}{sub E Multiplication-Sign B} calculation is proportional to local ion temperature. In addition, the boundary conditions are predicted using the pedestal temperature model based on magnetic and flow shear stabilization width scaling; while the density of each plasma species, including both hydrogenic and impurity species, at the boundary are assumed to be a large fraction of its line averaged density. For the pellet's behaviors in the hot plasma, the Neutral Gas Shielding (NGS) model by Milora-Foster is used. It was found that the injection of pellet could result in further improvement of fusion performance from that of the formation of ITB. However, the impact of pellet injection is quite complicated. It is also found that the pellets cannot penetrate into a deep core of the plasma. The injection of the pellet results in a formation of density peak in the region close to the plasma edge. The injection of pellet can result in an improved nuclear fusion performance depending on the properties of pellet (i.e., increase up to 5% with a speed of 1 km/s and radius of 2 mm). A sensitivity analysis is carried out to determine the impact of pellet parameters, which are: the pellet radius, the pellet velocity, and the frequency of injection. The increase in the pellet radius and frequency were found to greatly improve the performance and effectiveness of fuelling. However, changing the velocity is observed to exert small impact.

  10. Relationship between particle and heat transport in JT-60U plasmas with internal transport barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takenaga, H.; Higashijima, S.; Oyama, N.

    2003-01-01

    The relationship between particle and heat transport in an internal transport barrier (ITB) has been systematically investigated in reversed shear (RS) and high β p ELMy H-mode plasmas in JT-60U. No helium and carbon accumulation inside the ITB is observed even with ion heat transport reduced to a neoclassical level. On the other hand, the heavy impurity argon is accumulated inside the ITB. The argon density profile estimated from the soft x-ray profile is more peaked, by a factor of 2-4 in the RS plasma and of 1.6 in the high β p mode plasma, than the electron density profile. The helium diffusivity (D He ) and the ion thermal diffusivity (χ i ) are at an anomalous level in the high β p mode plasma, where D He and χ i are higher by a factor of 5-10 than the neoclassical value. In the RS plasma, D He is reduced from the anomalous to the neoclassical level, together with χ i . The carbon and argon density profiles calculated using the transport coefficients reduced to the neoclassical level only in the ITB are more peaked than the measured profiles, even when χ i is reduced to the neoclassical level. Argon exhaust from the inside of the ITB is demonstrated by applying ECH in the high β p mode plasma, where both electron and argon density profiles become flatter. The reduction of the neoclassical inward velocity for argon due to the reduction of density gradient is consistent with the experimental observation. In the RS plasma, the density gradient is not decreased by ECH and argon is not exhausted. These results suggest the importance of density gradient control to suppress heavy impurity accumulation. (author)

  11. Relationship between particle and heat transport in JT-60U plasmas with internal transport barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takenaga, Hidenobu; Higashijima, S.; Oyama, N.

    2003-01-01

    The relationship between particle and heat transport in an internal transport barrier (ITB) has been systematically investigated in reversed shear (RS) and high β p ELMy H-mode plasmas in JT-60U. No helium and carbon accumulation inside the ITB is observed even with ion heat transport reduced to a neoclassical level. On the other hand, the heavy impurity argon is accumulated inside the ITB. The argon density profile estimated from the soft x-ray profile is more peaked, by a factor of 2-4 in the RS plasma and of 1.6 in the high β p mode plasma, than the electron density profile. The helium diffusivity (D He ) and the ion thermal diffusivity (χ i ) are at an anomalous level in the high β p mode plasma, where D He and χ i are higher by a factor of 5-10 than the neoclassical value. In the RS plasma, D He is reduced from the anomalous to the neoclassical level, together with χ i . The carbon and argon density profiles calculated using the transport coefficients reduced to the neoclassical level only in the ITB are more peaked than the measured profiles, even when χ i is reduced to the neoclassical level. Argon exhaust from the inside of the ITB is demonstrated by applying ECH in the high β p mode plasma, where both electron and argon density profiles become flatter. The reduction of the neoclassical inward velocity for argon due to the reduction of density gradient is consistent with the experimental observation. In the RS plasma, the density gradient is not decreased by ECH and argon is not exhausted. These results suggest the importance of density control to suppress heavy impurity accumulation. (author)

  12. Glucose Transporters at the Blood-Brain Barrier: Function, Regulation and Gateways for Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patching, Simon G

    2017-03-01

    Glucose transporters (GLUTs) at the blood-brain barrier maintain the continuous high glucose and energy demands of the brain. They also act as therapeutic targets and provide routes of entry for drug delivery to the brain and central nervous system for treatment of neurological and neurovascular conditions and brain tumours. This article first describes the distribution, function and regulation of glucose transporters at the blood-brain barrier, the major ones being the sodium-independent facilitative transporters GLUT1 and GLUT3. Other GLUTs and sodium-dependent transporters (SGLTs) have also been identified at lower levels and under various physiological conditions. It then considers the effects on glucose transporter expression and distribution of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia associated with diabetes and oxygen/glucose deprivation associated with cerebral ischemia. A reduction in glucose transporters at the blood-brain barrier that occurs before the onset of the main pathophysiological changes and symptoms of Alzheimer's disease is a potential causative effect in the vascular hypothesis of the disease. Mutations in glucose transporters, notably those identified in GLUT1 deficiency syndrome, and some recreational drug compounds also alter the expression and/or activity of glucose transporters at the blood-brain barrier. Approaches for drug delivery across the blood-brain barrier include the pro-drug strategy whereby drug molecules are conjugated to glucose transporter substrates or encapsulated in nano-enabled delivery systems (e.g. liposomes, micelles, nanoparticles) that are functionalised to target glucose transporters. Finally, the continuous development of blood-brain barrier in vitro models is important for studying glucose transporter function, effects of disease conditions and interactions with drugs and xenobiotics.

  13. Nanoscale stiffness topography reveals structure and mechanics of the transport barrier in intact nuclear pore complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bestembayeva, Aizhan; Kramer, Armin; Labokha, Aksana A.; Osmanović, Dino; Liashkovich, Ivan; Orlova, Elena V.; Ford, Ian J.; Charras, Guillaume; Fassati, Ariberto; Hoogenboom, Bart W.

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) is the gate for transport between the cell nucleus and the cytoplasm. Small molecules cross the NPC by passive diffusion, but molecules larger than ∼5 nm must bind to nuclear transport receptors to overcome a selective barrier within the NPC. Although the structure and shape of the cytoplasmic ring of the NPC are relatively well characterized, the selective barrier is situated deep within the central channel of the NPC and depends critically on unstructured nuclear pore proteins, and is therefore not well understood. Here, we show that stiffness topography with sharp atomic force microscopy tips can generate nanoscale cross-sections of the NPC. The cross-sections reveal two distinct structures, a cytoplasmic ring and a central plug structure, which are consistent with the three-dimensional NPC structure derived from electron microscopy. The central plug persists after reactivation of the transport cycle and resultant cargo release, indicating that the plug is an intrinsic part of the NPC barrier. Added nuclear transport receptors accumulate on the intact transport barrier and lead to a homogenization of the barrier stiffness. The observed nanomechanical properties in the NPC indicate the presence of a cohesive barrier to transport and are quantitatively consistent with the presence of a central condensate of nuclear pore proteins in the NPC channel.

  14. Framework Application for Core Edge Transport Simulation (FACETS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malony, Allen D; Shende, Sameer S; Huck, Kevin A; Mr. Alan Morris, and Mr. Wyatt Spear

    2012-03-14

    The goal of the FACETS project (Framework Application for Core-Edge Transport Simulations) was to provide a multiphysics, parallel framework application (FACETS) that will enable whole-device modeling for the U.S. fusion program, to provide the modeling infrastructure needed for ITER, the next step fusion confinement device. Through use of modern computational methods, including component technology and object oriented design, FACETS is able to switch from one model to another for a given aspect of the physics in a flexible manner. This enables use of simplified models for rapid turnaround or high-fidelity models that can take advantage of the largest supercomputer hardware. FACETS does so in a heterogeneous parallel context, where different parts of the application execute in parallel by utilizing task farming, domain decomposition, and/or pipelining as needed and applicable. ParaTools, Inc. was tasked with supporting the performance analysis and tuning of the FACETS components and framework in order to achieve the parallel scaling goals of the project. The TAU Performance System® was used for instrumentation, measurement, archiving, and profile / tracing analysis. ParaTools, Inc. also assisted in FACETS performance engineering efforts. Through the use of the TAU Performance System, ParaTools provided instrumentation, measurement, analysis and archival support for the FACETS project. Performance optimization of key components has yielded significant performance speedups. TAU was integrated into the FACETS build for both the full coupled application and the UEDGE component. The performance database provided archival storage of the performance regression testing data generated by the project, and helped to track improvements in the software development.

  15. Magnetic Transport Barriers in the DIII-D Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, J.; Volpe, F.; Evans, T. E.; Ali, H.; Punjabi, A.

    2009-11-01

    Large overlapping magnetic islands generate chaotic fields. However, a previous work [1] showed that second or third order perturbations of special topology and strength can also generate magnetic diffusion ``barriers" in the middle of stochastic regions. In the present study, we numerically assess their experimental feasibility at DIII-D. For this, realistic I- and C-coils perturbations are superimposed on the equilibrium field and puncture plots are generated with a field-line tracer. A criterion is defined for the automatic recognition of barriers and successfully tested on earlier symplectic maps in magnetic coordinates. The criterion is systematically applied to the new puncture plots in search for dependencies, e.g. upon the edge safety factor q95, which might be relevant to edge localized mode (ELM) stability, as well as to assess the robustness of barriers against fluctuations of the plasma parameters and coil currents. 8pt [1] H. Ali and A. Punjabi, Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 49, 1565 (2007).

  16. Core and Complementary Chiropractic: Lowering Barriers to Patient Utilization of Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triano, John J; McGregor, Marion

    2016-12-01

    The use of chiropractic services has stalled while interest in accessing manipulation services is rising. The purpose of this paper is to consider this dilemma in the context of the dynamics of professional socialization, surveys of public attitudes, and a potential strategic action. This is a reflection work grounded in the literature on professional socialization and the attitudes held regarding chiropractic in modern society, to include its members, and in original data on training programs. Data were interpreted on the background of the authors' cross-cultural experiences spanning patient care, research, education, and interprofessional collaboration. Recommendation on a strategic action to counter barriers in patient referrals was synthesized. Professional socialization is the process by which society enables professional privilege. Illustration of typical and divergent professional socialization models emerged that explain cognitive dissonance toward the profession. Questions of trust are commensurate with the experiences during patient encounters rather than with a common identity for the profession. Diversity among encounters perpetuates the uncertainty that affects referral sources. Commonality as an anchor for consistent professional identity and socialization through the content of core chiropractic, defined by training and practice, offers a means to offset uncertainty. Complementary chiropractic, analogous to complementary medicine, provides an outlet under professional socialization for the interests to explore additional methods of care. The practice workplace is an effective lever for altering barriers to the use of services. Clarifying rhetoric through conceptualization of core and complementary practices simplifies the socialization dynamic. Further, it takes advantage of accepted cultural semantics in meaningful analogy while continuing to empower practical diversity in care delivery in response to evolving scientific evidence.

  17. Behavior of electron and ion transport in discharges with an internal transport barrier in the DIII-D tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenfield, C.M.; Staebler, G.M.; Rettig, C.L.

    1999-01-01

    We report results of experiments to further determine the underlying physics behind the formation and development of internal transport barriers (ITB) in the DIII-D tokamak. The initial ITB formation occurs when the neutral beam heating power exceeds a threshold value during the early stages of the current ramp in low-density discharges. This region of reduced transport, made accessible by suppression of long-wavelength turbulence by sheared flows, is most evident in the ion temperature and impurity rotation profiles. In some cases, reduced transport is also observed in the electron temperature and density profiles. If the power is near the threshold, the barrier remains stationary and encloses only a small fraction of the plasma volume. If, however, the power is increased, the transport barrier expands to encompass a larger fraction of the plasma volume. The dynamic behavior of the transport barrier during the growth phase exhibits rapid transport events that are associated with both broadening of the profiles and reductions in turbulence and associated transport. In some, but not all, cases, these events are correlated with the safety factor q passing through integer values. The final state following this evolution is a plasma exhibiting ion thermal transport at or below neoclassical levels. Typically, the electron thermal transport remains anomalously high. Recent experimental results are reported in which rf electron heating was applied to plasmas with an ion ITB, thereby increasing both the electron and ion transport. Although the results are partially in agreement with the usual E-vector x B-vector shear suppression hypothesis, the results still leave questions that must be addressed in future experiments. (author)

  18. Behavior of electron and ion transport in discharges with an internal transport barrier in the DIII-D tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenfield, C.M.; Staebler, G.M.; Rettig, C.L.

    1998-12-01

    The authors report results of experiments to further determine the underlying physics behind the formation and development of internal transport barriers (ITB) in the DIII-D tokamak. The initial ITB formation occurs when the neutral beam heating power exceeds a threshold value during the early stages of the current ramp in low-density discharges. This region of reduced transport, made accessible by suppression of long-wavelength turbulence by sheared flows, is most evident in the ion temperature and impurity rotation profiles. In some cases, reduced transport is also observed in the electron temperature and density profiles. If the power is near the threshold, the barrier remains stationary and enclosed only a small fraction of the plasma volume. If, however, the power is increased, the transport barrier expands to encompass a larger fraction of the plasma volume. The dynamic behavior of the transport barrier during the growth phase exhibits rapid transport events that are associated with both broadening of the profiles and reductions in turbulence and associated transport. In some, but not all, cases, these events are correlated with the safety factor q passing through integer values. The final state following this evolution is a plasma exhibiting ion thermal transport at or below neoclassical levels. Typically, the electron thermal transport remains anomalously high. Recent experimental results are reported in which rf electron heating was applied to plasmas with an ion ITB, thereby increasing both the electron and ion transport. Although the results are partially in agreement with the usual rvec E x rvec B shear suppression hypothesis, the results still leave questions that must be addressed in future experiments

  19. Introducing FACETS, the Framework Application for Core-Edge Transport Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cary, John R.; Candy, Jeff; Cohen, Ronald H.; Krasheninnikov, Sergei I.; McCune, Douglas C.; Estep, Donald J.; Larson, Jay W.; Malony, Allen; Worley, Patrick H.; Carlsson, Johann Anders; Hakim, A.H.; Hamill, P.; Kruger, Scott E.; Muzsala, S.; Pletzer, Alexander; Shasharina, Svetlana; Wade-Stein, D.; Wang, N.; McInnes, Lois C.; Wildey, T.; Casper, T.A.; Diachin, Lori A.; Epperly, Thomas; Rognlien, T.D.; Fahey, Mark R.; Kuehn, Jeffery A.; Morris, A.; Shende, Sameer; Feibush, E.; Hammett, Gregory W.; Indireshkumar, K.; Ludescher, C.; Randerson, L.; Stotler, D.; Pigarov, A.; Bonoli, P.; Chang, C.S.; D'Ippolito, D.A.; Colella, Philip; Keyes, David E.; Bramley, R.

    2007-01-01

    The FACETS (Framework Application for Core-Edge Transport Simulations) project began in January 2007 with the goal of providing core to wall transport modeling of a tokamak fusion reactor. This involves coupling previously separate computations for the core, edge, and wall regions. Such a coupling is primarily through connection regions of lower dimensionality. The project has started developing a component-based coupling framework to bring together models for each of these regions. In the first year, the core model will be a 1 dimensional model (1D transport across flux surfaces coupled to a 2D equilibrium) with fixed equilibrium. The initial edge model will be the fluid model, UEDGE, but inclusion of kinetic models is planned for the out years. The project also has an embedded Scientific Application Partnership that is examining embedding a full-scale turbulence model for obtaining the crosssurface fluxes into a core transport code.

  20. Computational images of internal-transport-barrier oscillations in tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bizarro, J.P S. [Inst Super Tecn, Ctr Fusao Nucl, EURATOM Assoc, P-1049001 Lisbon (Portugal); Litaudon, X.L. [CEA Cadarache, Dept Rech Fus Controlee, EURATOM Assoc, F-13108 St Paul Les Durance (France); Tala, T.J.J. [Assoc Euratom Tekes, FIN-02044 Espoo (Finland); JET EFDA Contributors [Culham Sci Ctr, Abingdon OX14 3DB, Oxon (United Kingdom)

    2008-07-01

    A well-known benchmarked code, where a Bohm-gyro-Bohm transport model is complemented with an empirical scaling for the dynamics of internal transport barriers (ITBs), is used to model the ITB oscillations that are often seen in advanced tokamak scenarios with a dominant fraction of bootstrap current. (authors)

  1. The 13th International Workshop on H-mode Physics and Transport Barriers (Oxford, UK, 2011) The 13th International Workshop on H-mode Physics and Transport Barriers (Oxford, UK, 2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saibene, G.

    2012-11-01

    as to stimulate and lead the open discussion. Poster sessions were also organized to present specialist papers and provide a venue for continued discussion. The topics selected for this edition of the workshop were: 1. Integrated plasma scenarios for ITER and a reactor: experimental and theoretical studies, including the self-stabilizing transport approach. 2. Edge transport barrier control and plasma performance: physics of 3D stochastic magnetic fields for ELM suppression. 3. H-mode transition physics and H-mode pedestal structure: pedestal dynamics near transitions and requirements for high-confinement access and sustainment. 4. Energetic particle driven instabilities and related physics: H-mode and the transport barrier. 5. Role of and evidence for non-diffusive particle and toroidal momentum transport and impact of fuelling: experiments, theory and modelling. 6. Long-range correlation of plasma turbulence and interaction between edge and core transport. The choice of topics, and the amount of progress in the understanding of the complexity of transport barriers physics reflect the drive in the fusion community towards the preparation for the ITER tokamak operation. More than 100 scientists (including students) attended the three-day workshop, coming from all over the world to present their newest results, discuss with colleagues and enjoy the atmosphere of the beautiful Lady Margaret Hall. The preparation work of the International Advisory Committee (G. Saibene (EU - Chair), R. Groebner (US), T. S Hahm (KO), A. Hubbard (US), K. Ida (Japan), S. Lebedev (RF), N. Oyama (Japan), E Wolfrum (EU)) has been rewarded by the enthusiastic participation of scientists, experimentalist, modellers and theoreticians, and by the high level of the scientific discussion throughout the workshop, during lunch breaks and even at the conference dinner. The Committee is also grateful to EFDA for the support in the organization of the workshop and to the Local Organizing Committee (E

  2. Study of Heat Flux Threshold and Perturbation Effect on Transport Barrier Formation Based on Bifurcation Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatthong, B.; Onjun, T.; Imbeaux, F.; Sarazin, Y.; Strugarek, A.; Picha, R.; Poolyarat, N.

    2011-06-01

    Full text: Formation of transport barrier in fusion plasma is studied using a simple one-field bistable S-curve bifurcation model. This model is characterized by an S-line with two stable branches corresponding to the low (L) and high (H) confinement modes, connected by an unstable branch. Assumptions used in this model are such that the reduction in anomalous transport is caused by v E velocity shear effect and also this velocity shear is proportional to pressure gradient. In this study, analytical and numerical approaches are used to obtain necessary conditions for transport barrier formation, i.e. the ratio of anomalous over neoclassical coefficients and heat flux thresholds which must be exceeded. Several profiles of heat sources are considered in this work including constant, Gaussian, and hyperbolic tangent forms. Moreover, the effect of perturbation in heat flux is investigated with respect to transport barrier formation

  3. Barriers to Superfast Water Transport in Carbon Nanotube Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walther, Jens Honore; Ritos, Konstantinos; Cruz-Chu, Eduardo R.

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) membranes hold the promise of extraordinary fast water transport for applications such as energy efficient filtration and molecular level drug delivery. However, experiments and computations have reported flow rate enhancements over continuum hydrodynamics that contradict each...... over the continuum predictions. These rates are far below those reported experimentally. The results suggest that the reported superfast water transport rates cannot be attributed to interactions of water with pristine CNTs alone....

  4. Development of internal transport barrier scenarios at ITER-relevant high triangularity in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimini, F.G.; Becoulet, M.; Giovannozzi, E.; Lomas, P.J.; Tudisco, O.; Alper, B.; Crisanti, F.; Baar, M. de; Luna, E. de La; Vries, P. de; Ekedahl, A.; Hawkes, N.; Huysmans, G.; Litaudon, X.; Parail, V.; Saibene, G.; Tuccillo, A.A.; Zastrow, K.D.

    2005-01-01

    The development of scenarios characterized by H-mode confinement and internal transport barriers (ITBs) in high triangularity, δ ∼ 0.4-0.5, discharges is of particular interest for ITER advanced tokamak operation. Previous JET experiments have shown that high triangularity favours H-modes which are ELM-free or develop type I edge localized mode (ELM) activity, which inhibits long lasting ITBs. The recent experiments reported here concentrate on integrated optimization of edge and core conditions. The stability of the edge pedestal was controlled using gas injection, deuterium or light impurities, and plasma current ramps. Both methods yield more ITB-friendly edge pedestal conditions, varying from small type I to type III ELMs and, in extreme cases, resulting in L-mode. In parallel, the conditions for triggering and sustaining ITBs encompassing a large proportion of the plasma volume (outer ITBs) were optimized, as opposed to less performing ITBs located closer to the plasma centre (inner ITB). These plasmas have deeply reversed target current profiles with q min ∼ 3 and a narrow inner ITB, located typically at a small normalized radius ρ E , at q 95 = 7.5, H 89 β N ∼ 3.5-4 and ∼60% of the Greenwald density limit. In summary, a high triangularity scenario has been developed, which combines the desirable characteristics of controlled edge, long lasting wide ITBs and high performance at density higher than the low triangularity JET scenarios

  5. Historical summary of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 core debris transportation campaign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, R.C.; Tyacke, M.J. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Quinn, G.J. [Wastren, Inc., Germantown, MD (United States)

    1993-03-01

    Transport of the damaged core materials from the Unit 2 reactor of the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station (TMI-2) to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for examination and storage presented many technical and institutional challenges, including assessing the ability to transport the damaged core; removing and packaging core debris in ways suitable for transport; developing a transport package that could both meet Federal regulations and interface with the facilities at TMI-2 and the INEL; and developing a transport plan, support logistics, and public communications channels suited to the task. This report is a historical summary of how the US Department of Energy addressed those challenges and transported, received, and stored the TMI-2 core debris at the INEL. Subjects discussed include preparations for transport, loading at TMI-2, institutional issues, transport operations, receipt and storage at the INEL, governmental inquiries/investigations, and lessons learned. Because of public attention focused on the TMI-2 Core Debris Transport Program, the exchange of information between the program and public was extensive. This exchange is a focus for parts of this report to explain why various operations were conducted as they were and why certain technical approaches were employed. And, because of that exchange, the program may have contributed to a better public understanding of such actions and may contribute to planning and execution of similar future actions.

  6. Historical summary of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 core debris transportation campaign

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt, R.C.; Tyacke, M.J.; Quinn, G.J.

    1993-03-01

    Transport of the damaged core materials from the Unit 2 reactor of the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station (TMI-2) to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for examination and storage presented many technical and institutional challenges, including assessing the ability to transport the damaged core; removing and packaging core debris in ways suitable for transport; developing a transport package that could both meet Federal regulations and interface with the facilities at TMI-2 and the INEL; and developing a transport plan, support logistics, and public communications channels suited to the task. This report is a historical summary of how the US Department of Energy addressed those challenges and transported, received, and stored the TMI-2 core debris at the INEL. Subjects discussed include preparations for transport, loading at TMI-2, institutional issues, transport operations, receipt and storage at the INEL, governmental inquiries/investigations, and lessons learned. Because of public attention focused on the TMI-2 Core Debris Transport Program, the exchange of information between the program and public was extensive. This exchange is a focus for parts of this report to explain why various operations were conducted as they were and why certain technical approaches were employed. And, because of that exchange, the program may have contributed to a better public understanding of such actions and may contribute to planning and execution of similar future actions

  7. Density-based and transport-based core-periphery structures in networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Hoon; Cucuringu, Mihai; Porter, Mason A

    2014-03-01

    Networks often possess mesoscale structures, and studying them can yield insights into both structure and function. It is most common to study community structure, but numerous other types of mesoscale structures also exist. In this paper, we examine core-periphery structures based on both density and transport. In such structures, core network components are well-connected both among themselves and to peripheral components, which are not well-connected to anything. We examine core-periphery structures in a wide range of examples of transportation, social, and financial networks-including road networks in large urban areas, a rabbit warren, a dolphin social network, a European interbank network, and a migration network between counties in the United States. We illustrate that a recently developed transport-based notion of node coreness is very useful for characterizing transportation networks. We also generalize this notion to examine core versus peripheral edges, and we show that the resulting diagnostic is also useful for transportation networks. To examine the properties of transportation networks further, we develop a family of generative models of roadlike networks. We illustrate the effect of the dimensionality of the embedding space on transportation networks, and we demonstrate that the correlations between different measures of coreness can be very different for different types of networks.

  8. Core transport properties in JT-60U and JET identity plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Litaudon, X.; Sakamoto, Y.; de Vries, P. C.; Salmi, A.; Tala, T.; Angioni, C.; Benkadda, S.; Beurskens, M. N. A.; Bourdelle, C.; Brix, M.; Crombe, K.; Fujita, T.; Futatani, S.; Garbet, X.; Giroud, C.; Hawkes, N. C.; Hayashi, N.; Hoang, G. T.; Hogeweij, G. M. D.; Matsunaga, G.; Nakano, T.; Oyama, N.; Parail, V.; Shinohara, K.; Suzuki, T.; Takechi, M.; Takenaga, H.; Takizuka, T.; Urano, H.; Voitsekhovitch, I.; Yoshida, M.

    2011-01-01

    The paper compares the transport properties of a set of dimensionless identity experiments performed between JET and JT-60U in the advanced tokamak regime with internal transport barrier, ITB. These International Tokamak Physics Activity, ITPA, joint experiments were carried out with the same plasma

  9. Transport barriers with and without shear flows in a magnetized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinell, Julio J.

    2014-01-01

    Different ways of producing a transport barrier in a toroidal magnetized plasma are discussed and the properties of the barriers are analyzed. The first mechanism is associated with the presence of a sheared plasma flow that is present in a limited region of the plasma, which creates a zonal flow. In contrast to the usual paradigm stating that the sheared flow reduces the turbulence correlation length and leads to suppression of the fluctuation driven transport in the region of highest shear, it is shown that from the perspective of chaotic transport of plasma particles in the fluctuation fields, the transport barrier is formed in the region of zero shear and it can be destroyed when the fluctuation level is high enough. It is also shown that finite gyroradius effects modify the dynamics and introduces new conditions for barrier formation. The second mechanism considers a method in which radio-frequency waves injected into the plasma can stabilize the drift waves and therefore the anomalous transport is reduced, creating a barrier. This process does not involve the presence of sheared flows and depends only on the effect of the RF wave field on the drift waves. The stabilizing effect in this case is due to the nonlinear ponderomotive force which acts in a way that offsets the pressure gradient destabilization. Finally, a mechanism based on the ponderomotive force of RF waves is described which produces poloidal plasma rotation around the resonant surface due to the asymmetry of induced transport; it creates a transport barrier by shear flow stabilization of turbulence

  10. Magneto-transport in CdTe/CdMnTe dilute magnetic semiconductor single barrier structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyons, V.R.

    1999-03-01

    This thesis presents work done on electrical transport through dilute magnetic semiconductor (DMS) single barriers in both zero and non-zero magnetic fields. The fields are applied either perpendicular or parallel to the DMS layers. The main samples under investigation consist of 100 A and 200 A CdTe/Cd 0.8 Mn 0.2 Te/CdTe single barrier heterostructures. In addition electrical characterisation of the non magnetic layers is performed. Current through the barrier is measured as a function of voltage, magnetic field and temperature. A theoretical model is derived in order to calculate the current as a function of barrier height, barrier width, emitting layer carrier concentration, applied bias and temperature. These variables are then treated as fitting parameters and comparisons are made between the calculated and the experimental currents. The barriers are shown to produce non-Ohmic transport. The roles of quantum mechanical tunnelling and thermal activation across the barrier are investigated and shown to be highly mixed. An unexpectedly high degree of tunnelling is found to occur at high temperatures, within the region previously assumed to be dominated by thermal activation. Moreover the barrier height is found to be lower and the width greater than expected. These observations suggest that a high level of Mn diffusion occurs, possibly due to In dopant related effects. This suggestion is validated by the high emitting layer carrier concentration suggested by the fitting. At low temperatures and voltages the thicker barrier sample is shown to contain a parasitic leak path which short-circuits the barrier. This leak may exist in both samples but only becomes dominant where the barriers are sufficiently opaque to the incident carriers. Changes in a magnetic field are expected to be due to sp-d exchange induced giant Zeeman splitting in the barrier and either normal spin splitting or sp-d exchange effects in the emitter regions. The application of a magnetic field is

  11. Charge transport mechanisms of graphene/semiconductor Schottky barriers: A theoretical and experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, Haijian; Liu, Zhenghui; Xu, Gengzhao; Shi, Lin; Fan, Yingmin; Yang, Hui; Xu, Ke; Wang, Jianfeng; Ren, Guoqiang

    2014-01-01

    Graphene has been proposed as a material for semiconductor electronic and optoelectronic devices. Understanding the charge transport mechanisms of graphene/semiconductor Schottky barriers will be crucial for future applications. Here, we report a theoretical model to describe the transport mechanisms at the interface of graphene and semiconductors based on conventional semiconductor Schottky theory and a floating Fermi level of graphene. The contact barrier heights can be estimated through this model and be close to the values obtained from the experiments, which are lower than those of the metal/semiconductor contacts. A detailed analysis reveals that the barrier heights are as the function of the interface separations and dielectric constants, and are influenced by the interfacial states of semiconductors. Our calculations show how this behavior of lowering barrier heights arises from the Fermi level shift of graphene induced by the charge transfer owing to the unique linear electronic structure

  12. Transport properties of electrons in fractal magnetic-barrier structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lifeng; Fang, Chao; Guo, Yong

    2010-09-01

    Quantum transport properties in fractal magnetically modulated structures are studied by the transfer-matrix method. It is found that the transmission spectra depend sensitively not only on the incident energy and the direction of the wave vector but also on the stage of the fractal structures. Resonance splitting, enhancement, and position shift of the resonance peaks under different magnetic modulation are observed at four different fractal stages, and the relationship between the conductance in the fractal structure and magnetic modulation is also revealed. The results indicate the spectra of the transmission can be considered as fingerprints for the fractal structures, which show the subtle correspondence between magnetic structures and transport behaviors.

  13. Polyester-Based, Biodegradable Core-Multishell Nanocarriers for the Transport of Hydrophobic Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina A. Walker

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A water-soluble, core-multishell (CMS nanocarrier based on a new hyperbranched polyester core building block was synthesized and characterized towards drug transport and degradation of the nanocarrier. The hydrophobic drug dexamethasone was encapsulated and the enzyme-mediated biodegradability was investigated by NMR spectroscopy. The new CMS nanocarrier can transport one molecule of dexamethasone and degrades within five days at a skin temperature of 32 °C to biocompatible fragments.

  14. Transport of recycled deuterium to the plasma core in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skinner, C.H.; Bell, M.G.; Budny, R.V.; Jassby, D.L.; Park, H.; Ramsey, A.T.; Stotler, D.P.; Strachan, J.D.

    1997-10-01

    The authors report a study of the fueling of the plasma core by recycling in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). They have analyzed discharges fueled by deuterium recycled from the limiter and tritium-only neutral beam injection. In these plasmas, the DT neutron rate provides a measure of the deuterium influx into the core plasma. They find a reduced influx with plasmas using lithium pellet conditioning and with plasmas of reduced major (and minor) radius. Modeling with the DEGAS neutrals code shows that the dependence on radius can be related to the penetration of neutrals through the scrape-off layer

  15. Prediction of barrier inhomogeneities and carrier transport in Ni-silicided Schottky diode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, A.R.; Dimitriu, C.B.; Horsfall, A.B.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Wright, N.G.; O'Neill, A.G.; Maiti, C.K.

    2006-01-01

    Based on Quantum Mechanical (QM) carrier transport and the effects of interface states, a theoretical model has been developed to predict the anomalous current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of a non-ideal Ni-silicided Schottky diode at low temperatures. Physical parameters such as barrier height, ideality factor, series resistance and effective Richardson constant of a silicided Schottky diode were extracted from forward I-V characteristics and are subsequently used for the simulation of both forward and reverse I-V characteristics using a QM transport model in which the effects of interface state and bias dependent barrier reduction are incorporated. The present analysis indicates that the effects of barrier inhomogeneity caused by incomplete silicide formation at the junction and the interface states may change the conventional current transport process, leading to anomalous forward and reverse I-V characteristics for the Ni-silicided Schottky diode

  16. Electric-field effects on electronic tunneling transport in magnetic barrier structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Yong; Wang Hao; Gu Binglin; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki

    2000-01-01

    Electronic transport properties in magnetic barrier structures under the influence of an electric field have been investigated. The results indicate that the characteristics of transmission resonance are determined not only by the structure and the incident wave vector but also strongly by the electric field. It is shown that the transmission coefficient at resonance in the low-energy range is suppressed by applying the electric field for electron tunneling through the magnetic barrier structure, arranged with identical magnetic barriers and wells. It is also shown that the transmission resonance is first enhanced up to optimal resonance, and then suppressed with further increased electric field for electron tunneling through the magnetic barrier structure, arranged with unidentical building blocks. Strong suppression of the current density is also found in the magnetic barrier structure, arranged with two different building blocks

  17. How to manage barriers to formation and implementation of policy packages in transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Åkerman, Jonas; Gudmundsson, Henrik; Sørensen, Claus Hedegaard

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study has been to explore success factors and barriers to the formation and implementation of single policy measures and policy packages in transport, and to identify strategies to manage such barriers. As a first step, we developed a typology of barriers and success factors...... for policy formation and implementation. Secondly, we carried out an empirical analysis of barriers and success factors in four cases of policy packaging: Urban Congestion Charging; National Heavy Vehicle Fees; Aviation in the European Emissions Trading System and The EU’s First Railway Package. The third...... and final task was to identify more general strategies to manage barriers in policy formation and implementation. A main conclusion in this report is that a conscious application of these strategies may contribute significantly to successful formation and implementation of even controversial policies...

  18. Memory bottlenecks and memory contention in multi-core Monte Carlo transport codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tramm, J.R.; Siegel, A.R.

    2013-01-01

    The simulation of whole nuclear cores through the use of Monte Carlo codes requires an impracticably long time-to-solution. We have extracted a kernel that executes only the most computationally expensive steps of the Monte Carlo particle transport algorithm - the calculation of macroscopic cross sections - in an effort to expose bottlenecks within multi-core, shared memory architectures. (authors)

  19. Transport spectroscopy and modeling of a clean MOS point contact tunnel barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirkhorshidian, Amir; Bishop, Nathaniel; Dominguez, Jason; Grubbs, Robert; Wendt, Joel; Lilly, Michael; Carroll, Malcolm

    2014-03-01

    We present transport spectroscopy of non-implanted and antimony-implanted tunnel barriers formed in MOS split-gate structures at 4K. The non-implanted barrier shows no signs of resonant behavior while the Sb-implanted barrier shows resonances superimposed on the clean transport. We simulate the transmission through the clean barrier over the entire gate and bias range of the experiment using a phenomenological 1D-tunneling model that includes Fowler-Nordheim tunneling and Schottky barrier lowering to capture effects at high bias. The model is qualitatively similar to experiment when the barrier height has a quadratic dependence in contrast to a linear one, which can be a sign of 2D effects such as confinement perpendicular to the transport direction. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, a U.S. DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences user facility. This work was supported by the Sandia National Laboratories Directed Research and Development Program. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  20. Strategies for transporting nanoparticles across the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tian-Tian; Li, Wen; Meng, Guanmin; Wang, Pei; Liao, Wenzhen

    2016-02-01

    The existence of blood-brain barrier (BBB) hampers the effective treatment of central nervous system (CNS) diseases. Almost all macromolecular drugs and more than 98% of small molecule drugs cannot pass the BBB. Therefore, the BBB remains a big challenge for delivery of therapeutics to the central nervous system. With the structural and mechanistic elucidation of the BBB under both physiological and pathological conditions, it is now possible to design delivery systems that could cross the BBB effectively. Because of their advantageous properties, nanoparticles have been widely deployed for brain-targeted delivery. This review paper presents the current understanding of the BBB under physiological and pathological conditions, and summarizes strategies and systems for BBB crossing with a focus on nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems. In summary, with wider applications and broader prospection the treatment of brain targeted therapy, nano-medicines have proved to be more potent, more specific and less toxic than traditional drug therapy.

  1. Possibility of internal transport barrier formation and electric field bifurcation in LHD plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanuki, H.; Itoh, K.; Yokoyama, M.; Fujisawa, A.; Ida, K.; Toda, S.; Itoh, S.-I.; Yagi, M.; Fukuyama, A.

    1999-05-01

    Theoretical analysis of the electric field bifurcation is made for the LHD plasma. For given shapes of plasma profiles, a region of bifurcation is obtained in a space of the plasma parameters. In this region of plasma parameters, the electric field domain interface is predicted to appear in the plasma column. The reduction of turbulent transport is expected to occur in the vicinity of the interface, inducing a internal transport barrier. Within this simple model, the plasma with internal barriers is predicted to be realized for the parameters of T e (0) ∼ 2 keV and n(0) ≅ 10 18 m -3 . (author)

  2. Turbulence and transport characteristics of a barrier in a toroidal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujisawa, A; Shimizu, A; Nakano, H; Ohsima, S; Itoh, K; Iguchi, H; Yoshimura, Y; Minami, T; Nagaoka, K; Takahashi, C; Kojima, M; Nishimura, S; Isobe, M; Suzuki, C; Akiyama, T; Nagashima, Y; Ida, K; Toi, K; Ido, T; Itoh, S-I; Matsuoka, K; Okamura, S; Diamond, P H

    2006-01-01

    Turbulence and zonal flow at a transport barrier are studied with twin heavy ion beam probes in a toroidal helical plasma. A wavelet analysis is used to extract turbulence properties, e.g. spectra of both density and potential fluctuations, the coherence and the phase between them and the dispersion relation. Particle transport estimated from the fundamental characteristics is found to clearly rise with their intermittent activities after the barrier is broken down. Time-dependent analysis reveals that the intermittency of turbulence is correlated with the evolution of the stationary zonal flow

  3. Turbulence and transport characteristics of a barrier in a toroidal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujisawa, A.; Shimizu, A.; Nakano, H.

    2005-10-01

    Turbulence and zonal flow at a transport barrier are studied with twin heavy ion beam probes in a toroidal helical plasma. A wavelet analysis is used to extract turbulence properties, e.g., spectra of both density and potential fluctuations, coherence and phase between them, and the dispersion relation. Particle transport estimated from the fundamental characteristics is found to clearly rise with their intermittent activities after the barrier is broken down. The time-dependent analysis reveals that intermittency of turbulence is correlated with evolution of stationary zonal flow. (author)

  4. Transport Properties of a Kinetic Model for Chemical Reactions without Barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, Giselle M.; Kremer, Gilberto M.; Soares, Ana Jacinta

    2011-01-01

    A kinetic model of the Boltzmann equation for chemical reactions without energy barrier is considered here with the aim of evaluating the reaction rate and characterizing the transport coefficient of shear viscosity for the reactive system. The Chapman-Enskog solution of the Boltzmann equation is used to compute the chemical reaction effects, in a flow regime for which the reaction process is close to the final equilibrium state. Some numerical results are provided illustrating that the considered chemical reaction without energy barrier can induce an appreciable influence on the reaction rate and on the transport coefficient of shear viscosity.

  5. Visualisation and Quantification of Transport in Barrier Rocks with Positron Emission Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulenkampff, J.; Gajewski, C.; Gründig, M.; Lippmann-Pipke, J.; Mittmann, H.; Richter, M.; Wolf, M.

    2009-04-01

    In tight barrier rocks laboratory observation of radionuclide transport and determination of transport parameters is a demanding and interminable task, because of slow rates, small concentrations, and intricate chemical interactions. The validity of results from common laboratory methods, like flow- and diffusion experiments on small samples, is limited by the heterogeneity of the pathways and adherent upscaling issues, because homogeneous conditions have to be presumed for these input-output investigations. But nano-pores or micro-fractures could be present, which would provide pathways for heterogeneous transport processes. Transport properties of these pathways are most influential boundary conditions for reactions between fluid components and crystal surfaces. We propose Positron Emission Tomography (GEO-PET) as an appropriate method for direct observation of heterogeneous transport of radiotracers in tight material on the laboratory scale. With high-resolution PET scanners, which are common instruments of biomedical research ("small animal PET"), it is possible to determine the spatio-temporal distribution of the tracer activity with a resolution of almost 1 mm during about three periods of the tracer half-life (half-lives of some applicable PET tracers: 18F: 1.8 h, 124I: 4.2 days, 58Co: 70.8 days). The PET tracer is applied as ion in solution or as marker for compounds, like colloids. The most considerable difference between PET applications on geomaterial compared to biological tissue is the stronger attenuation and scattering of radiation because of the higher density of rock material. After travelling the positron attenuation length in dense material (about 1 mm), the positron annihilates in contact with an electron, transmitting two photons with 511 keV, propagating in antiparallel direction. The sample size of geomaterial is limited by the attenuation length of these photons. By applying an appropriate attenuation correction it is possible to investigate

  6. Final Report for the "Fusion Application for Core-Edge Transport Simulations (FACETS)"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cary, John R; Kruger, Scott

    2014-10-02

    The FACETS project over its lifetime developed the first self-consistent core-edge coupled capabilities, a new transport solver for modeling core transport in tokamak cores, developed a new code for modeling wall physics over long time scales, and significantly improved the capabilities and performance of legacy components, UEDGE, NUBEAM, GLF23, GYRO, and BOUT++. These improved capabilities leveraged the team’s expertise in applied mathematics (solvers and algorithms) and computer science (performance improvements and language interoperability). The project pioneered new methods for tackling the complexity of simulating the concomitant complexity of tokamak experiments.

  7. Brain barriers and functional interfaces with sequential appearance of ABC efflux transporters during human development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møllgård, Kjeld; Dziegielewska, Katarzyna M.; Holst, Camilla B.

    2017-01-01

    Adult brain is protected from entry of drugs and toxins by specific mechanisms such as ABC (ATP-binding Cassette) efflux transporters. Little is known when these appear in human brain during development. Cellular distribution of three main ABC transporters (ABCC1, ABCG2, ABCB1) was determined...... at blood-brain barriers and interfaces in human embryos and fetuses in first half of gestation. Antibodies against claudin-5 and-11 and antibodies to α-fetoprotein were used to describe morphological and functional aspects of brain barriers. First exchange interfaces to be established, probably at 4...... three transporters. Results provide evidence for sequential establishment of brain exchange interfaces and spatial and temporal timetable for three main ABC transporters in early human brain....

  8. On trans-parenchymal transport after blood brain barrier opening: pump-diffuse-pump hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postnov, D. E.; Postnikov, E. B.; Karavaev, A. S.; Glushkovskaya-Semyachkina, O. V.

    2018-04-01

    Transparenchymal transport attracted the attention of many research groups after the discovery of glymphatic mechanism for the brain drainage in 2012. While the main facts of rapid transport of substances across the parenchyma are well established experimentally, specific mechanisms that drive this drainage are just hypothezised but not proved yed. Moreover, the number of modeling studies show that the pulse wave powered mechanism is unlikely able to perform pumping as suggested. Thus, the problem is still open. In addition, new data obtained under the conditions of intensionally opened blood brain barrier shows the presence of equally fast transport in opposite durection. In our study we investigate the possible physical mechanisms for rapid transport of substances after the opening of blood-brain barrier under the conditions of zero net flow.

  9. Efficiency of LH current drive in tokamaks featuring an internal transport barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, C I de; Ziebell, L F; Rosa, P R da S

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we study the effects of the occurrence of radial transport of particles in a tokamak on the efficiency of the current drive by lower hybrid (LH) waves, in the presence of an internal transport barrier. The results are obtained by numerical solution of the Fokker-Planck equation which rules the evolution of the electron distribution function. We assume that the radial transport of particles can be due to magnetic or electrostatic fluctuations. In both cases the efficiency of the current drive is shown to increase with the increase of the fluctuations that originate the transport. The dependence of the current drive efficiency on the depth and position of the barrier is also investigated

  10. Quality Assurance in the removal and transport of the TMI-2 core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, G.R.; Marsden, J.F.

    1988-01-01

    EG ampersand G Idaho, acting on behalf of the US Department of Energy (DOE), is cooperating with the owner of the TMI-2 plant, General Public Utilities Nuclear (GPUN), in the removal and transport of the damaged TMI-2 core to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) near Idaho Falls, Idaho. Quality Assurance (QA) played an important role in the removal and transport of the damaged TMI-2 core. To illustrate, the authors have chosen to discuss some of the important quality assurance techniques utilized in the design, fabrication, acceptance, and use of the three different types of equipment; the core boring machine, the core debris canisters, and the transport casks. Rather than a thorough discussion of the QA aspects of each task, the authors have purposely chosen to present only the key applications of quality assurance principles and methodology unique to each piece of equipment. The intent of this approach is to effectively communicate the importance of ''task teamwork'' in QA

  11. Tunneling rates in electron transport through double-barrier molecular junctions in a scanning tunneling microscope

    OpenAIRE

    Nazin, G. V.; Wu, S. W.; Ho, W.

    2005-01-01

    The scanning tunneling microscope enables atomic-scale measurements of electron transport through individual molecules. Copper phthalocyanine and magnesium porphine molecules adsorbed on a thin oxide film grown on the NiAl(110) surface were probed. The single-molecule junctions contained two tunneling barriers, vacuum gap, and oxide film. Differential conductance spectroscopy shows that electron transport occurs via vibronic states of the molecules. The intensity of spectral peaks correspondi...

  12. Observation of internal transport barrier in ELMy H-mode plasmas on the EAST tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y.; Gao, X.; Liu, H. Q.; Li, G. Q.; Zhang, T.; Zeng, L.; Liu, Y. K.; Wu, M. Q.; Kong, D. F.; Ming, T. F.; Han, X.; Wang, Y. M.; Zang, Q.; Lyu, B.; Li, Y. Y.; Duan, Y. M.; Zhong, F. B.; Li, K.; Xu, L. Q.; Gong, X. Z.; Sun, Y. W.; Qian, J. P.; Ding, B. J.; Liu, Z. X.; Liu, F. K.; Hu, C. D.; Xiang, N.; Liang, Y. F.; Zhang, X. D.; Wan, B. N.; Li, J. G.; Wan, Y. X.; EAST Team

    2017-08-01

    The internal transport barrier (ITB) has been obtained in ELMy H-mode plasmas by neutron beam injection and lower hybrid wave heating on the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). The ITB structure has been observed in profiles of ion temperature, electron temperature, and electron density within ρ safety factor q(0) ˜ 1. Transport coefficients are calculated by particle balance and power balance analysis, showing an obvious reduction after the ITB formation.

  13. Initial Studies of Core and Edge Transport of NSTX Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synakowski, E.J.; Bell, M.G.; Bell, R.E.; Bush, C.E.; Bourdelle, C.; Darrow, D.; Dorland, W.; Ejiri, A.; Fredrickson, E.D.; Gates, D.A.; Kaye, S.M.; Kubota, S.; Kugel, H.W.; LeBlanc, B.P.; Maingi, R.; Maqueda, R.J.; Menard, J.E.; Mueller, D.; Rosenberg, A.; Sabbagh, S.A.; Stutman, D.; Taylor, G.; Johnson, D.W.; Kaita, R.; Ono, M.; Paoletti, F.; Peebles, W.; Peng, Y-K.M.; Roquemore, A.L.; Skinner, C.H.; Soukhanovskii, V.A.

    2001-01-01

    Rapidly developing diagnostic, operational, and analysis capability is enabling the first detailed local physics studies to begin in high-beta plasmas of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). These studies are motivated in part by energy confinement times in neutral-beam-heated discharges that are favorable with respect to predictions from the ITER-89P scaling expression. Analysis of heat fluxes based on profile measurements with neutral-beam injection (NBI) suggest that the ion thermal transport may be exceptionally low, and that electron thermal transport is the dominant loss channel. This analysis motivates studies of possible sources of ion heating not presently accounted for by classical collisional processes. Gyrokinetic microstability studies indicate that long wavelength turbulence with k(subscript ''theta'') rho(subscript ''i'') ∼ 0.1-1 may be suppressed in these plasmas, while modes with k(subscript ''theta'') rho(subscript ''i'') ∼ 50 may be robust. High-harmonic fast-wave (HHFW) heating efficiently heats electrons on NSTX, and studies have begun using it to assess transport in the electron channel. Regarding edge transport, H-mode [high-confinement mode] transitions occur with either NBI or HHFW heating. The power required for low-confinement mode (L-mode) to H-mode transitions far exceeds that expected from empirical edge-localized-mode-free H-mode scaling laws derived from moderate aspect ratio devices. Finally, initial fluctuation measurements made with two techniques are permitting the first characterizations of edge turbulence

  14. Demystifying the Barriers to Transport Infrastructure Project Development in Fast Developing Regions: The Case of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianyi Nie

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Transport infrastructure (TI has become one of the primary drivers for sustainable economic growth and social progress. However, a wider take-up is currently inhibited in fast developing regions (FDRs by many barriers, which have not been explored explicitly in previous studies. In this study, a three-dimensional framework (i.e., macro environment, local environment, and the construction process is proposed to structure the barriers in a reasonable way. Professionals’ opinions on the importance of the barriers are collected through questionnaire survey. The survey results were analyzed by the ranking analysis technique. It is found that the top five barriers are “difficulty in survey and design during the construction process”, “weak support from economy”, “insufficient funding”, “harsh regional climate”, and “cost overrun”. Further analysis, based on a factor analysis, indicates that these critical barriers could be grouped into three clusters: “administration on transport infrastructure”, “construction technology and cost management”, and “geographical and economic conditions”. The research findings demonstrate the usefulness of the proposed framework, and the implication is that a barriers-based checklist favors stakeholders to improve the efficiency and sustainability of TI development in FDRs. Although the study is situated in China, it sheds light on the subject in other developing countries.

  15. Near-field geologic environment as an effective barrier against radionuclide transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umeki, H.; Sakuma, H.; Ishiguro, K.; Hatanaka, K.; Naito, M.

    1993-01-01

    A generic performance assessment of the geologic disposal system of HLW in Japan has been carried out by the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) in accordance with the overall HLW management program defined by the Japanese Atomic Energy Commission. A massive engineered barrier system, consisting of vitrified waste, carbon-steel overpack and thick bentonite buffer, is introduced to ensure a long-term performance of the disposal system considering a wide range of geologic environment. A major part of the total performance of the disposal system is borne by the engineered barrier system given a geologic environment that assures and complements the performance of such engineered barrier system. The performance of the natural barrier system coupled with the strong engineered barrier system was investigated by sensitivity analyses. Two types of conceptual model were considered for the analysis to describe radionuclide transport in geologic media and the range of relevant parameters was given by taking the variation of the geologic environment in Japan into account. The results show that the degree of retardation of radionuclide transport chosen in the geologic media varies significantly depending on the parameter values chosen. However, it is indicated that there are realistic combinations of those geologic parameter values which could provide a sufficient degree of retardation within a range of only a few tens of meters from the engineered barrier system. The relative importance of the near-field geologic environment is also discussed

  16. Suberized transport barriers in Arabidopsis, barley and rice roots: From the model plant to crop species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreszies, Tino; Schreiber, Lukas; Ranathunge, Kosala

    2018-02-07

    Water is the most important prerequisite for life and plays a major role during uptake and transport of nutrients. Roots are the plant organs that take up the major part of water, from the surrounding soil. Water uptake is related to the root system architecture, root growth, age and species dependent complex developmental changes in the anatomical structures. The latter is mainly attributed to the deposition of suberized barriers in certain layers of cell walls, such as endo- and exodermis. With respect to water permeability, changes in the suberization of roots are most relevant. Water transport or hydraulic conductivity of roots (Lp r ) can be described by the composite transport model and is known to be very variable between plant species and growth conditions and root developmental states. In this review, we summarize how anatomical structures and apoplastic barriers of roots can diversely affect water transport, comparing the model plant Arabidopsis with crop plants, such as barley and rice. Results comparing the suberin amounts and water transport properties indicate that the common assumption that suberin amount negatively correlates with water and solute transport through roots may not always be true. The composition, microstructure and localization of suberin may also have a great impact on the formation of efficient barriers to water and solutes. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  17. Development of whole core thermal-hydraulic analysis program ACT. 3. Coupling core module with primary heat transport system module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtaka, Masahiko; Ohshima, Hiroyuki

    1998-10-01

    A whole core thermal-hydraulic analysis program ACT is being developed for the purpose of evaluating detailed in-core thermal hydraulic phenomena of fast reactors including inter-wrapper flow under various reactor operation conditions. In this work, the core module as a main part of the ACT developed last year, which simulates thermal-hydraulics in the subassemblies and the inter-subassembly gaps, was coupled with an one dimensional plant system thermal-hydraulic analysis code LEDHER to simulate transients in the primary heat transport system and to give appropriate boundary conditions to the core model. The effective algorithm to couple these two calculation modules was developed, which required minimum modification of them. In order to couple these two calculation modules on the computing system, parallel computing technique using PVM (Parallel Virtual Machine) programming environment was applied. The code system was applied to analyze an out-of-pile sodium experiment simulating core with 7 subassemblies under transient condition for code verification. It was confirmed that the analytical results show a similar tendency of experimental results. (author)

  18. Preparations to load, transport, receive, and store the damaged TMI-2 [Three Mile Island] reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reno, H.W.; Schmitt, R.C.; Quinn, G.J.; Ayers, A.L. Jr.; Lilburn, B.J. Jr.; Uhl, D.L.

    1986-03-01

    The March 1979 incident at the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station (TMI) which damaged the core of the Unit 2 reactor resulted in numerous scientific and technical challenges. Some of those challenges involve removing, packaging, and transporting the core debris to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for storage, examination, and preparation for final disposal. This paper highlights preparations for transporting the core debris from TMI to INEL and receiving and storing that material at INEL. Issues discussed include interfacing of equipment and facilities at TMI, loading operations, transportation activities using a newly designed cask, receiving and storing operations at INEL, and criticality control during storage. Key to the transportation effort was designing, testing, fabricating, and licensing two rail casks which individually provide double containment of the damaged fuel. 27 figs

  19. Microturbulent drift mode suppression as a trigger mechanism for internal transport barriers on Alcator C-Mod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhurovich, K.; Fiore, C.L.; Ernst, D.R.; Bonoli, P.T.; Greenwald, M.J.; Hubbard, A.E.; Hughes, J.W.; Marmar, E.S.; Mikkelsen, D.R.; Phillips, P.; Rice, J.E.

    2007-01-01

    Internal transport barriers (ITBs) can be routinely produced in enhanced D α (EDA) H-mode discharges on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak by putting the minority ion cyclotron resonance layer at vertical bar r/a vertical bar ≥ 0.5 during the current flat top phase of the discharge. These ITBs are characterized by density peaking at constant temperature and are therefore both particle and energy transport barriers. The ITB formation appears to result from widening the region near the magnetic axis in which toroidal drift modes are stable, allowing the Ware pinch to peak the density profile. Experimental evidence shows that shifting the ICRF resonance off-axis results in a local flattening of ion and electron temperature profiles. TRANSP calculations of ion temperature profiles support this experimentally observed trend. Stability analysis of ion temperature gradient (ITG) and electron temperature gradient modes at times before ITB formation is done using the linear gyrokinetic code GS2. These gyrokinetic calculations find that the most unstable modes in the C-Mod EDA H-mode core, prior to ITB onset, are the toroidal ITG driven type. These modes are suppressed in the ITB region through a temperature gradient reduction when the ICRF resonance is shifted off-axis

  20. Novel fluorescent core-shell nanocontainers for cell membrane transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Meizhen; Kuhlmann, Christoph R W; Sorokina, Ksenia; Li, Chen; Mihov, George; Pietrowski, Eweline; Koynov, Kaloian; Klapper, Markus; Luhmann, Heiko J; Müllen, Klaus; Weil, Tanja

    2008-05-01

    The synthesis and characterization of novel core-shell macromolecules consisting of a fluorescent perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxdiimide chromophore in the center surrounded by a hydrophobic polyphenylene shell as a first and a flexible hydrophilic polymer shell as a second layer was presented. Following this strategy, several macromolecules bearing varying polymer chain lengths, different polymer shell densities, and increasing numbers of positive and negative charges were achieved. Because all of these macromolecules reveal a good water solubility, their ability to cross cellular membranes was investigated. In this way, a qualitative relationship between the molecular architecture of these macromolecules and the biological response was established.

  1. Electronic transport in armchair graphene nanoribbon under double magnetic barrier modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haiyan; Wu, Chao; Xie, Fang; Zhang, Xiaojiao; Zhou, Guanghui

    2018-03-01

    We present a theoretical investigation of the transport properties and the magnetoresistance effect in armchair graphene nanoribbons (AGNRs) under modulation by two magnetic barriers. The energy levels are found to be degenerate for a metallic AGNR but are not degenerate for a semiconducting AGNR. However, the conductance characteristics show quantized plateaus in both the metallic and semiconducting cases. When the magnetization directions of the barriers change from parallel to antiparallel, the conductance plateau in the metallic AGNR shows a degenerate feature due to matching between the transport modes in different regions. As the barrier height increases, the conductance shows more oscillatory behavior with sharp peaks and troughs. Specifically, the initial position of nonzero conductance for the metallic AGNR system moves towards a higher energy regime, which indicates that an energy gap has been opened. In addition, the magnetoresistance ratio also shows plateau structures in certain specific energy regions. These results may be useful in the design of electron devices based on AGNR nanostructures.

  2. Dynamics of the edge transport barrier at plasma biasing on the CASTOR tokamak

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stöckel, Jan; Spolaore, M.; Peleman, P.; Brotánková, Jana; Horáček, Jan; Dejarnac, Renaud; Devynck, P.; Ďuran, Ivan; Gunn, J. P.; Hron, Martin; Kocan, M.; Martines, E.; Pánek, Radomír; Sharma, A.; Van Oost, G.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 6 (2006), s. 19-23 ISSN 1562-6016. [International Conference on Plasma Physics and Technology/11th./. Alushta, 11.9.2006-16.9.2006] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : tokamak * plasma * transport barrier * relaxations Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics http:// vant .kipt.kharkov.ua/TABFRAME.html

  3. St. John's Wort constituents modulate P-glycoprotein transport activity at the blood-brain barrier.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ott, M.; Huls, M.; Cornelius, M.G.; Fricker, G.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the short-term signaling effects of St. John's Wort (SJW) extract and selected SJW constituents on the blood-brain barrier transporter P-glycoprotein and to describe the role of PKC in the signaling. METHODS: Cultured porcine brain capillary

  4. Quantitative Analysis of Nanoparticle Transport through in Vitro Blood-Brain Barrier Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Åberg, Christoffer

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticle transport through the blood-brain barrier has received much attention of late, both from the point of view of nano-enabled drug delivery, as well as due to concerns about unintended exposure of nanomaterials to humans and other organisms. In vitro models play a lead role in efforts to

  5. Electron thermal transport barrier and magnetohydrodynamic activity observed in Tokamak plasmas with negative central shear

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.R. de Baar,; Hogeweij, G. M. D.; Cardozo, N. J. L.; Oomens, A. A. M.; Schüller, F. C.

    1997-01-01

    In the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project, plasmas with steady-state negative central shear (NCS) are made with off-axis electron cyclotron heating. Shifting the power deposition by 2 mm results in a sharp transition of confinement. The good confinement branch features a transport barrier at the off-axis

  6. Diffusive Transport of Sulphide through an Engineering Barrier System in a Deep Geological Repository

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, S. A.; Sleep, B. E.; McKelvie, J. R. M.; Krol, M.

    2015-12-01

    Bentonite is a naturally occurring clay-rich sediment containing montmorillonite, a smectitic clay mineral that has a high cation exchange capacity and swells upon contact with water. Owing to these characteristics, highly compacted bentonite (HCB) is an often included component of engineered barrier systems (EBS) designed to protect used fuel containers (UFCs) in deep geological repositories (DGR) for high-level nuclear waste. The low water activity and high swelling pressure of HCB suppresses microbial activity and the related production of sulphide that could cause microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) of UFCs The Canadian Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) has chosen a UFC that consists of an inner steel core and outer copper coating which is resistant to corrosion. However, under anaerobic conditions, MIC can still contribute to UFC corrosion if sulphides are present in the groundwater. Therefore the EBS consisting of bentonite blocks and pellets has been designed to impede the movement of sulphides to the UFC. In order to examine the effectiveness of the EBS, a 3D numerical model was developed capable of simulating the diffusive transport of sulphide within the NWMO EBS. The model was developed using COMSOL Multiphysics, a finite element software package and is parametric which allows the impact of different repository layouts to be assessed. The developed model was of the entire NWMO placement room, as well as, a stand-alone UFC and included conservative assumptions such as a fully saturated system and a constant concentration boundary condition. The results showed that the highest sulphide flux occurred at the semi-spherical end caps of the UFC. Further studies examined the effect of sulphide hotspots and fractures, representing possible EBS failure mechanisms. The model results highlight that even with conservative assumptions the chosen EBS will effectively protect the UFC from microbiologically influenced corrosion.

  7. Development of internal transport barrier scenarios at ITER-relevant high triangularity in Jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rimini, F.G.; Becoulet, M.; Ekedahl, A.; Huysmans, G.; Joffrin, E.; Litaudon, X. [Association Euratom-CEA, Centre d' Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee; Giovannozzi, E.; Tudisco, O.; Crisanti, F. [Association Euratol/ENEA/CNR sulla Fusione, Frascali, Rome (Italy); Lomas, P.J.; Alper, B.; Hawkes, N.; Parail, V.; Zastrow, K.D. [Euratom/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Baar, M. de; Vries, P. de [Association Euratom-Fom, TEC Cluster, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); La Luna, E. de [Association Euratom-Ciemat, Madrid (Spain); Saibene, G. [EFDA CSU, Garching (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    The development of ITB s(Internal Transport Barrier) scenarios in high triangularity discharges is of particular interest for ITER advanced tokamak operation. Previous JET experiments have shown that high triangularity favours ELM (Edge Localized Mode)-Free or type I ELMs, which inhibit long lasting ITBs. The recent experiments reported here concentrate on integrated optimisation of edge and core conditions. Edge pedestal was controlled using gas injection, Deuterium or light impurities, and plasma current ramps. Both methods yield more ITB-friendly edge pedestal conditions, varying from small type I to type III ELMs and, in extreme cases, to L-mode edge. In parallel, the conditions for triggering and sustaining a wide ITB were optimised. This plasmas have deeply reversed target current profiles with g{sub min} 3. A narrow inner ITB, located in the reversed shear region, is routinely observed. Large radius ITBs are only triggered when the input power exceeds 20-22 MW, but they do not usually survive the transition into H-mode. The best results, in terms of sustained high performance, have been obtained with Neon injection: a wide ITB is triggered during the phase with L-mode edge and survives into H-mode for about 2 s at H{sub 89}{beta}{sub N} {approx} 3.5 and {approx} 60% of the Greenwald density limit. In summary, a high triangularity scenario has been developed, which combines the desirable I characteristics of controlled edge, long lasting wide ITBs and high performance at density higher than the low triangularity JET scenarios. (authors)

  8. Transport in the high temperature core of toroidal confinement systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiland, J.

    1994-01-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental results on confinement of hot plasmas in toroidal devices, particularly tokamaks, are discussed from general principal points of view and related to predictions from a toroidal drift wave model using a full transport matrix including off diagonal terms. A reactive fluid model corresponding to a two pole approximation of the kinetic response is used. This model has the ability to reproduce both adiabatic and isothermal limits of the perpendicular dynamics. 106 refs, 8 figs, 1 tab

  9. Amyloid-beta transporter expression at the blood-CSF barrier is age-dependent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascale Crissey L

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Age is the major risk factor for many neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD. There is an accumulation of amyloid-beta peptides (Aβ in both the AD brain and the normal aging brain. Clearance of Aβ from the brain occurs via active transport at the blood-brain barrier (BBB and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB. With increasing age, the expression of the Aβ efflux transporters is decreased and the Aβ influx transporter expression is increased at the BBB, adding to the amyloid burden in the brain. Expression of the Aβ transporters at the choroid plexus (CP epithelium as a function of aging was the subject of this study. Methods This project investigated the changes in expression of the Aβ transporters, the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP-1, P-glycoprotein (P-gp, LRP-2 (megalin and the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE at the BCSFB in Brown-Norway/Fischer rats at ages 3, 6, 9, 12, 20, 30 and 36 months, using real time RT-PCR to measure transporter mRNA expression, and immunohistochemistry (IHC to measure transporter protein in isolated rat CP. Results There was an increase in the transcription of the Aβ efflux transporters, LRP-1 and P-gp, no change in RAGE expression and a decrease in LRP-2, the CP epithelium influx transporter, at the BCSFB with aging. Decreased Aβ42 concentration in the CP, as measured by quantitative IHC, was associated with these Aβ transporter alterations. Conclusions Age-dependent alterations in the CP Aβ transporters are associated with a decrease in Aβ42 accumulation in the CP, and are reciprocal to the changes seen in these transporters at the BBB, suggesting a possible compensatory role for the BCSFB in Aβ clearance in aging.

  10. Role of external torque in the formation of ion thermal internal transport barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhang, Hogun; Kim, S. S.; Diamond, P. H.

    2012-04-01

    We present an analytic study of the impact of external torque on the formation of ion internal transport barriers (ITBs). A simple analytic relation representing the effect of low external torque on transport bifurcations is derived based on a two field transport model of pressure and toroidal momentum density. It is found that the application of an external torque can either facilitate or hamper bifurcation in heat flux driven plasmas depending on its sign relative to the direction of intrinsic torque. The ratio between radially integrated momentum (i.e., external torque) density to power input is shown to be a key macroscopic control parameter governing the characteristics of bifurcation.

  11. Barriers to and enablers for European rail freight transport for integrated door-to-door logistics service. Part 1: Barriers to multimodal rail freight transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewan Md Zahurul ISLAM

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to examine and identify barriers to and enablers for the European rail freight transport services as a transport chain partner along the supply chains in the changing market scenario. The changing market scenario includes, among others, requiring 'door-to-door' rather than 'terminal to terminal' and integrated service, competitive ability to attract non-rail cargo type, changes in the customer requirements (e.g. reliable service and changes in the operational requirements and practices. Using a literature review method, the paper is presented in two parts. The part 1 focuses on the identification of barriers to the European rail freight service by reviewing freight logistics services for global supply chains followed by the current performance of European rail freight transport followed by a discussion on the rail freight market liberalisation in Europe. Then rail freight transport in the Unites States (U.S. is discussed. The research notes that although the background, scope and necessity for reform measures in Europe differ from those of the U.S., some lessons can be learned and the main lesson is that an appropriate reform measure can enhance rail sector competitive ability in Europe. Examining and identifying the barriers in the part 1 (with the pan-Pacific examples of rail freight transports, the part 2 of the paper focuses on recommending clear actions and steps as enablers for the rail freight industry in general and operators in particular. The research in part 1 of the paper finds that: •\tIn many European countries, the rail freight market is not fully liberalised. In such market segment, infrastructure managers do act independently for incumbents and new entrant operators that hamper the progress of building a competitive market; •\tThe rail operators have not yet achieved the service quality (e.g. customer tailored service needed for the modern supply chains; •\tThey operate

  12. Working with the States to Transport TMI-2 Core Debris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, T.A.; Anselmo, A.A.

    1989-01-01

    Close communications with state officials has been a key factor in success of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 core debris shipments. The U.S. Department of Energy made extensive efforts to provide state officials with schedule information, answer technical questions, and satisfy concerns. Communications started before the campaign and continued during shipments and at intervals between shipments. Those efforts led to good working relationships with the states, kept governors and other state officials informed so they could respond to public concerns, provided the opportunity to recognize and respond to specific state concerns, facilitated state inspections, and provided avenues to avoid conflict and potential litigation. Good communications and working relationships with state officials also greatly benefited the community relations effort for the campaign. (author)

  13. Working with the states to transport TMI-2 core debris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, T.A.; Anselmo, A.A.

    1989-01-01

    This reports that close communications with state officials has been a key factor in success of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 core debris shipments. The U.S. Department of Energy made extensive efforts to provide state officials with schedule information, answer technical questions, and satisfy concerns. Communications started before the campaign and continued during shipments and at intervals between shipments. Those efforts led to good working relationships with the states, kept governors and other state officials informed so they could respond to public concerns, facilitated state inspections, and provided avenues to avoid conflict and potential litigation. Good communications and working relationships with state officials also greatly benefited the community relations effort for the campaign

  14. Anisotropic transport of normal metal-barrier-normal metal junctions in monolayer phosphorene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sarkar, Sangita; Agarwal, Amit; Sengupta, K

    2017-07-19

    We study transport properties of a phosphorene monolayer in the presence of single and multiple potential barriers of height U 0 and width d, using both continuum and microscopic lattice models, and show that the nature of electron transport along its armchair edge (x direction) is qualitatively different from its counterpart in both conventional two-dimensional electron gas with Schrödinger-like quasiparticles and graphene or surfaces of topological insulators hosting massless Dirac quasiparticles. We show that the transport, mediated by massive Dirac electrons, allows one to achieve collimated quasiparticle motion along x and thus makes monolayer phosphorene an ideal experimental platform for studying Klein paradox in the context of gapped Dirac materials. We study the dependence of the tunneling conductance [Formula: see text] as a function of d and U 0 , and demonstrate that for a given applied voltage V its behavior changes from oscillatory to decaying function of d for a range of U 0 with finite non-zero upper and lower bounds, and provide analytical expression for these bounds within which G decays with d. We contrast such behavior of G with that of massless Dirac electrons in graphene and also with that along the zigzag edge (y direction) in phosphorene where the quasiparticles obey an effective Schrödinger equation at low energy. We also study transport through multiple barriers along x and demonstrate that these properties hold for transport through multiple barriers as well. Finally, we suggest concrete experiments which may verify our theoretical predictions.

  15. Evolutionarily Conserved Roles for Blood-Brain Barrier Xenobiotic Transporters in Endogenous Steroid Partitioning and Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha J. Hindle

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Central nervous system (CNS chemical protection depends upon discrete control of small-molecule access by the blood-brain barrier (BBB. Curiously, some drugs cause CNS side-effects despite negligible transit past the BBB. To investigate this phenomenon, we asked whether the highly BBB-enriched drug efflux transporter MDR1 has dual functions in controlling drug and endogenous molecule CNS homeostasis. If this is true, then brain-impermeable drugs could induce behavioral changes by affecting brain levels of endogenous molecules. Using computational, genetic, and pharmacologic approaches across diverse organisms, we demonstrate that BBB-localized efflux transporters are critical for regulating brain levels of endogenous steroids and steroid-regulated behaviors (sleep in Drosophila and anxiety in mice. Furthermore, we show that MDR1-interacting drugs are associated with anxiety-related behaviors in humans. We propose a general mechanism for common behavioral side effects of prescription drugs: pharmacologically challenging BBB efflux transporters disrupts brain levels of endogenous substrates and implicates the BBB in behavioral regulation. : Hindle et al. shed light on the curious finding that some drugs cause behavioral side-effects despite negligible access into the brain. These authors propose a unifying hypothesis that links blood-brain barrier drug transporter function and brain access of circulating steroids to common CNS adverse drug responses. Keywords: drug side effect mechanisms, central nervous system, blood brain barrier, behavior, toxicology, drug transporters, endobiotics, steroid hormones

  16. Propranolol transport across the inner blood-retinal barrier: potential involvement of a novel organic cation transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Yoshiyuki; Shimizu, Yoshimi; Kusagawa, Yusuke; Akanuma, Shin-Ichi; Hosoya, Ken-Ichi

    2013-09-01

    The influx transport of propranolol across the inner blood-retinal barrier (BRB) was investigated. In the in vivo analysis of carotid artery single-injection method, [(3) H]propranolol uptake by the retina was greater than that of an internal reference compound, and was reduced by several organic cations. In the in vitro uptake study, TR-iBRB2 cells, an in vitro model of the inner BRB, showed a time-, concentration-, pH- and temperature-dependent [(3) H]propranolol uptake, suggesting the involvement of a carrier-mediated transport process in the influx of propranolol across the inner BRB. In the inhibition study, various organic cations, including drugs and candidates for the treatment of the retinal diseases, inhibited the [(3) H]propranolol uptake by TR-iBRB2 cells with no significant effects by the substrates and inhibitors of well-characterized organic cation transporters, suggesting that the influx transport of propranolol is performed by a novel transporter at the inner BRB. An analysis of the relationship between the inhibitory effect and the lipophilicity of inhibitors suggests a lipophilicity-dependent inhibitory effect of amines on the [(3) H]propranolol uptake by TR-iBRB2 cells. These results showed that influx transport of propranolol across the inner BRB is performed by a carrier-mediated transport process, suggesting the involvement of a novel organic cation transporter. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Transport of fresh MOX fuel assemblies for the Monju initial core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurakami, J.; Ouchi, Y.; Usami, M.

    1997-01-01

    Transport of fresh MOX fuel assemblies for the prototype FBR MONJU initial core started in July 1992 and ended in March 1994. As many as 205 fresh MOX fuel assemblies for an inner core, 91 assemblies for an outer core and 5 assemblies for testing) were transported in nine transport missions. The packaging for fuel assemblies, which has shielding and shock absorbing material inside, meets IAEA regulatory requirements for Type B(U) packaging including hypothetical accident conditions such as the 9 m drop test, fire test, etc. Moreover, this package design feature such advanced technologies as high performance neutron shielding material and an automatic hold-down mechanism for the fuel assemblies. Every effort was made to carry out safe transport in conjunction with the cooperation of every competent organisation. This effort includes establishment of the transport control centre, communication training, and accompanying of the radiation monitoring expert. No transport accident occurred during the transport and all the transport missions were successfully completed on schedule. (Author)

  18. Discontinuity model for internal transport barrier formation in reversed magnetic shear plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishimoto, Y.; Kim, J-Y.; Horton, W.; Tajima, T.; LeBrun, M.J.

    2001-01-01

    To aid in understanding the internal transport barrier (ITB) being formed in reversed magnetic shear experiments, in addition to the well known shear flow effect, we point out an important nonlocal effect and/or finite size effect which comes from the complex behavior of the nonlocal mode over a finite radial region around the minimum q(safety factor)-surface. The nonlocal mode changes its structure depending on the sign of the magnetic shear and due to this fact, the nonlocal modes are weakly excited across the q min -surface. This leads to a discontinuity or gap which disconnects the phase relation in the global wave structure across the q min -surface. Once such a discontinuity (or gap) is formed, transport suppression occurs and therefore a transport barrier can be expected near the q min -surface. We confirm the existence of this discontinuity using a toroidal particle simulation. (author)

  19. Edge-core interaction revealed with dynamic transport experiment in LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, N.; Ida, K.; Inagaki, S.

    2010-11-01

    Large scale coherent structures in electron heat transport of both core and edge plasmas are clearly found in plasma with a nonlocal transport phenomenon (NTP, a core electron temperature rise in response to an edge cooling) on Large Helical Device (LHD). At the onset of the NTP, a first order transition of the electron heat transport, which is characterized by a discontinuity of electron temperature gradient, is found to take place over a wide region (at least 6 cm wide) in the periphery of the plasma. At about the same time, over a wide region (about 10 cm wide) of the plasma core, a second order transition of the electron heat transport, which is characterized by a discontinuity of the time derivative of the electron temperature gradient, appears. The both large scale coherent structures are of a scale larger than a typical micro-turbulent eddy size (a few mm in this case). In order to assess dynamic characteristics of the electron heat transport state in the core region during the NTP, a transit time distribution analysis is applied to the temporal behaviors of the electron temperature gradient. The analysis results more clearly show the existence of the large coherent structures in electron heat transport. Thus the NTP observed in LHD is considered to be invoked by the interaction of those structures. (author)

  20. Radiological impacts of transporting Three Mile Island core debris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, N.D.

    1986-01-01

    This document presents an assessment of the radiological impacts of one cask shipment. It focuses on potential effects of the shipment on the public along the route. The document begins with a description of the shipping cask, followed by a description of the survivability tests required to confirm the cask design. Some actual accidents that similar casks have survived wholly intact are described. Next considered is the limit of radiation exposure dose rate that is imposed by regulatory agencies under normal conditions. No shipping of radioactive material is allowed unless the container is at or below the normal limit. A comparison is made between the normal radiation exposure limit and the radiation dose received annually by individuals from natural sources. Then, estimates of the radiation dose received by persons along the rail route in urban, suburban, and rural areas during normal transport are presented. Those times when the train stops for whatever reason (called rest stops) are considered also. Next, potential accident events are considered. Recent accident statistics are presented, and chances for an accident at different train velocities are estimated for any mile of track. The alternative of truck transport is considered briefly

  1. Electron transport and noise spectroscopy in organic magnetic tunnel junctions with PTCDA and Alq3 barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Isidoro; Cascales, Juan Pedro; Hong, Jhen-Yong; Lin, Minn-Tsong; Prezioso, Mirko; Riminucci, Alberto; Dediu, Valentin A.; Aliev, Farkhad G.

    2016-10-01

    The possible influence of internal barrier dynamics on spin, charge transport and their fluctuations in organic spintronics remains poorly understood. Here we present investigation of the electron transport and low frequency noise at temperatures down to 0.3K in magnetic tunnel junctions with an organic PTCDA barriers with thickness up to 5 nm in the tunneling regime and with 200 nm thick Alq3 barrier in the hopping regime. We observed high tunneling magneto-resistance at low temperatures (15-40%) and spin dependent super-poissonian shot noise in organic magnetic tunnel junctions (OMTJs) with PTCDA. The Fano factor exceeds 1.5-2 values which could be caused by interfacial states controlled by spin dependent bunching in the tunneling events through the molecules.1 The bias dependence of the low frequency noise in OMTJs with PTCDA barriers which includes both 1/f and random telegraph noise activated at specific biases will also be discussed. On the other hand, the organic junctions with ferromagnetic electrodes and thick Alq3 barriers present sub-poissonian shot noise which depends on the temperature, indicative of variable range hopping.

  2. Characterization and scaling of the tokamak edge transport barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Philip Adrian

    2012-04-24

    scaling for {tau} {sub E,ped} are nearly identical to the IPB98 global confinement scaling. This strongly suggests a significant pedestal contribution to the global confinement. The extrapolations result in a global confinement time of 3 s for ITER which is at the lower end of the IPB98 scaling. The pedestal real space gradients show a very strong correlation with the pedestal top values. The trend is particularly pronounced for T{sub e} and shows no deviation due to other parameters. The gradients in {Psi}{sub N} coordinates shows no such correlation. The normalized pressure gradient {alpha}, which is important for the pedestal stability, has a strong correlation with the normalized pressure and with the plasma shape. The plasma shape plays an important role for the pedestal which can have significant impact on the extrapolations. The presented study confirms that the pedestal cannot be described by a unifying theory. The different observations favour various mechanisms. The pedestal top values of electron and ion temperature and density can be individually transport limited, but together they can still reach the peeling-ballooning stability limit. At the same time the pedestal widths of temperature and density scale individually.

  3. Characterization and scaling of the tokamak edge transport barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Philip Adrian

    2012-01-01

    confinement scaling. This strongly suggests a significant pedestal contribution to the global confinement. The extrapolations result in a global confinement time of 3 s for ITER which is at the lower end of the IPB98 scaling. The pedestal real space gradients show a very strong correlation with the pedestal top values. The trend is particularly pronounced for T e and shows no deviation due to other parameters. The gradients in Ψ N coordinates shows no such correlation. The normalized pressure gradient α, which is important for the pedestal stability, has a strong correlation with the normalized pressure and with the plasma shape. The plasma shape plays an important role for the pedestal which can have significant impact on the extrapolations. The presented study confirms that the pedestal cannot be described by a unifying theory. The different observations favour various mechanisms. The pedestal top values of electron and ion temperature and density can be individually transport limited, but together they can still reach the peeling-ballooning stability limit. At the same time the pedestal widths of temperature and density scale individually.

  4. Mathematical Modeling and Experimental Validation of Nanoemulsion-Based Drug Transport across Cellular Barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadakia, Ekta; Shah, Lipa; Amiji, Mansoor M

    2017-07-01

    Nanoemulsions have shown potential in delivering drug across epithelial and endothelial cell barriers, which express efflux transporters. However, their transport mechanisms are not entirely understood. Our goal was to investigate the cellular permeability of nanoemulsion-encapsulated drugs and apply mathematical modeling to elucidate transport mechanisms and sensitive nanoemulsion attributes. Transport studies were performed in Caco-2 cells, using fish oil nanoemulsions and a model substrate, rhodamine-123. Permeability data was modeled using a semi-mechanistic approach, capturing the following cellular processes: endocytotic uptake of the nanoemulsion, release of rhodamine-123 from the nanoemulsion, efflux and passive permeability of rhodamine-123 in aqueous solution. Nanoemulsions not only improved the permeability of rhodamine-123, but were also less sensitive to efflux transporters. The model captured bidirectional permeability results and identified sensitive processes, such as the release of the nanoemulsion-encapsulated drug and cellular uptake of the nanoemulsion. Mathematical description of cellular processes, improved our understanding of transport mechanisms, such as nanoemulsions don't inhibit efflux to improve drug permeability. Instead, their endocytotic uptake, results in higher intracellular drug concentrations, thereby increasing the concentration gradient and transcellular permeability across biological barriers. Modeling results indicated optimizing nanoemulsion attributes like the droplet size and intracellular drug release rate, may further improve drug permeability.

  5. Physics of turbulence control and transport barrier formation in DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyle, E.J.; Burrell, K.H.; Carlstrom, T.N.

    1996-10-01

    This paper describes the physical mechanisms responsible for turbulence control and transport barrier formation on DIII-D as determined from a synthesis of results from different enhanced confinement regimes, including quantitative and qualitative comparisons to theory. A wide range of DIII-D data support the hypothesis that a single underlying physical mechanism, turbulence suppression via E x B shear flow is playing an essential, though not necessarily unique, role in reducing turbulence and transport in all of the following improved confinement regimes: H-mode, VH-mode, high-ell i modes, improved performance counter-injection L-mode discharges and high performance negative central shear (NCS) discharges. DIII-D data also indicate that synergistic effects are important in some cases, as in NCS discharges where negative magnetic shear also plays a role in transport barrier formation. This work indicates that in order to control turbulence and transport it is important to focus on understanding physical mechanisms, such as E x B shear, which can regulate and control entire classes of turbulent modes, and thus control transport. In the highest performance DIII-D discharges, NCS plasmas with a VH-mode like edge, turbulence is suppressed at all radii, resulting in neoclassical levels of ion transport over most of the plasma volume

  6. Identification of zonal flows and their characteristics on transport barrier in CHS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujisawa, A.; Shimizu, A.; Nakano, H.; Ohshima, S.; Iguchi, H.; Yoshimura, Y.; Minami, T.; Itoh, K.; Isobe, M.; Suzuki, C.; Nishimura, S.; Akiyama, T.; Nagaoka, K.; Takahashi, C.; Ida, K.; Toi, K.; Okamura, S.; Matsuoka, K.; Itoh, S.-I.; Diamond, P.H.

    2005-01-01

    Relation between turbulence and electric field has been one of the central issues related to the transport physics of toroidal plasmas. Recently, zonal flow, axi-symmetric band-like structure (m=n=0) with a finite radial wavelength, has just come up the third element responsible for the plasma transport. Theories and simulations have expected that the zonal flow should be a mechanism to control the saturation level of turbulence and the resultant transport. In CHS, dual heavy ion beam probes (HIBP) succeeded to prove the presence of the zonal flow and to show the dynamics and structure of the zonal flows. The experiment shows a long-distance correlation between radial electric field (or plasma flow) in low frequency range (< ∼1 kHz), together with radial structure of the zonal flow; characteristic radial length of ∼1.5 cm and life time of ∼1.5 ms. Different characteristics of the zonal flow and turbulence was found in states with and without a transport barrier; the zonal flow activity shrinks with an increase in turbulence level after the barrier breaks down. The recent HIBP experiments have just provided further insight into the system of zonal flow and turbulence. A wavelet analysis is performed on the fluctuation on the barrier position in the state with the transport barrier. The analysis reveals a causal relationship between the zonal flow evolution and turbulence level; the zonal flow is found to increase toward the mean flow direction as turbulence level decreases in the frequency range of 100-150kHz. The observation shows the presence of a nonlinear interaction between zonal flow and the turbulence, or a process of the zonal flow to affect the turbulence level. This paper presents surveys on zonal flow, particularly the recent experiments to demonstrate a causal relationship between zonal flow component and turbulence. Besides, other results obtained with a wavelet analysis are presented on the transport barrier; e.g., density and potential

  7. Barrier height inhomogeneity in electrical transport characteristics of InGaN/GaN heterostructure interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roul, Basanta [Materials Research Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Central Research Laboratory, Bharat Electronics, Bangalore 560013 (India); Mukundan, Shruti; Chandan, Greeshma; Mohan, Lokesh; Krupanidhi, S. B., E-mail: sbk@mrc.iisc.ernet.in [Materials Research Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)

    2015-03-15

    We have grown InGaN/GaN heterostructures using plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy and studied the temperature dependent electrical transport characteristics. The barrier height (φ{sub b}) and the ideally factor (η) estimated using thermionic emission model were found to be temperature dependent. The conventional Richardson plot of ln(J{sub s}/T{sup 2}) versus 1/kT showed two temperature regions (region-I: 400–500 K and region-II: 200–350 K) and it provides Richardson constants (A{sup ∗}) which are much lower than the theoretical value of GaN. The observed variation in the barrier height and the presence of two temperature regions were attributed to spatial barrier inhomogeneities at the heterojunction interface and was explained by assuming a double Gaussian distribution of barrier heights with mean barrier height values 1.61 and 1.21 eV with standard deviation (σ{sub s}{sup 2}) of 0.044 and 0.022 V, respectively. The modified Richardson plot of ln(J{sub s}/T{sup 2}) − (q{sup 2}σ{sub s}{sup 2}/2k{sup 2}T{sup 2}) versus 1/kT for two temperature regions gave mean barrier height values as 1.61 eV and 1.22 eV with Richardson constants (A{sup ∗}) values 25.5 Acm{sup −2}K{sup −2} and 43.9 Acm{sup −2}K{sup −2}, respectively, which are very close to the theoretical value. The observed barrier height inhomogeneities were interpreted on the basis of the existence of a double Gaussian distribution of barrier heights at the interface.

  8. Transport rankings of non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs across blood-brain barrier in vitro models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iveta Novakova

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to conduct a comprehensive study about the transport properties of NSAIDs across the blood-brain barrier (BBB in vitro. Transport studies with celecoxib, diclofenac, ibuprofen, meloxicam, piroxicam and tenoxicam were accomplished across Transwell models based on cell line PBMEC/C1-2, ECV304 or primary rat brain endothelial cells. Single as well as group substance studies were carried out. In group studies substance group compositions, transport medium and serum content were varied, transport inhibitors verapamil and probenecid were added. Resulted permeability coefficients were compared and normalized to internal standards diazepam and carboxyfluorescein. Transport rankings of NSAIDs across each model were obtained. Single substance studies showed similar rankings as corresponding group studies across PBMEC/C1-2 or ECV304 cell layers. Serum content, glioma conditioned medium and inhibitors probenecid and verapamil influenced resulted permeability significantly. Basic differences of transport properties of the investigated NSAIDs were similar comparing all three in vitro BBB models. Different substance combinations in the group studies and addition of probenecid and verapamil suggested that transporter proteins are involved in the transport of every tested NSAID. Results especially underlined the importance of same experimental conditions (transport medium, serum content, species origin, cell line for proper data comparison.

  9. Three dimensions transport calculations for PWR core; Calcul de coeur R.E.P. en transport 3D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richebois, E

    2000-07-01

    The objective of this work is to define improved 3-D core calculation methods based on the transport theory. These methods can be particularly useful and lead to more precise computations in areas of the core where anisotropy and steep flux gradients occur, especially near interface and boundary conditions and in regions of high heterogeneity (bundle with absorbent rods). In order to apply the transport theory a new method for calculating reflector constants has been developed, since traditional methods were only suited for 2-group diffusion core calculations and could not be extrapolated to transport calculations. In this thesis work, the new method for obtaining reflector constants is derived regardless of the number of energy groups and of the operator used. The core calculations results using the reflector constants thereof obtained have been validated on the EDF's power reactor Saint Laurent B1 with MOX loading. The advantages of a 3-D core transport calculation scheme have been highlighted as opposed to diffusion methods; there are a considerable number of significant effects and potential advantages to be gained in rod worth calculations for instance. These preliminary results obtained with on particular cycle will have to be confirmed by more systematic analysis. Accidents like MSLB (main steam line break) and LOCA (loss of coolant accident) should also be investigated and constitute challenging situations where anisotropy is high and/or flux gradients are steep. This method is now being validated for others EDF's PWRs' reactors, as well as for experimental reactors and other types of commercial reactors. (author)

  10. Three dimensions transport calculations for PWR core; Calcul de coeur R.E.P. en transport 3D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richebois, E

    2000-07-01

    The objective of this work is to define improved 3-D core calculation methods based on the transport theory. These methods can be particularly useful and lead to more precise computations in areas of the core where anisotropy and steep flux gradients occur, especially near interface and boundary conditions and in regions of high heterogeneity (bundle with absorbent rods). In order to apply the transport theory a new method for calculating reflector constants has been developed, since traditional methods were only suited for 2-group diffusion core calculations and could not be extrapolated to transport calculations. In this thesis work, the new method for obtaining reflector constants is derived regardless of the number of energy groups and of the operator used. The core calculations results using the reflector constants thereof obtained have been validated on the EDF's power reactor Saint Laurent B1 with MOX loading. The advantages of a 3-D core transport calculation scheme have been highlighted as opposed to diffusion methods; there are a considerable number of significant effects and potential advantages to be gained in rod worth calculations for instance. These preliminary results obtained with on particular cycle will have to be confirmed by more systematic analysis. Accidents like MSLB (main steam line break) and LOCA (loss of coolant accident) should also be investigated and constitute challenging situations where anisotropy is high and/or flux gradients are steep. This method is now being validated for others EDF's PWRs' reactors, as well as for experimental reactors and other types of commercial reactors. (author)

  11. Experimental methods and transport models for drug delivery across the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Bingmei M

    2012-06-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a dynamic barrier essential for maintaining the micro-environment of the brain. Although the special anatomical features of the BBB determine its protective role for the central nervous system (CNS) from blood-born neurotoxins, however, the BBB extremely limits the therapeutic efficacy of drugs into the CNS, which greatly hinders the treatment of major brain diseases. This review summarized the unique structures of the BBB, described a variety of in vivo and in vitro experimental methods for determining the transport properties of the BBB, e.g., the permeability of the BBB to water, ions, and solutes including nutrients, therapeutic agents and drug carriers, and presented newly developed mathematical models which quantitatively correlate the anatomical structures of the BBB with its barrier functions. Finally, on the basis of the experimental observations and the quantitative models, several strategies for drug delivery through the BBB were proposed.

  12. Opioid transport by ATP-binding cassette transporters at the blood-brain barrier: implications for neuropsychopharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tournier, Nicolas; Declèves, Xavier; Saubaméa, Bruno; Scherrmann, Jean-Michel; Cisternino, Salvatore

    2011-01-01

    Some of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters like P-glycoprotein (P-gp; ABCB1, MDR1), BCRP (ABCG2) and MRPs (ABCCs) that are present at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) influence the brain pharmacokinetics (PK) of their substrates by restricting their uptake or enhancing their clearance from the brain into the blood, which has consequences for their CNS pharmacodynamics (PD). Opioid drugs have been invaluable tools for understanding the PK-PD relationships of these ABC-transporters. The effects of morphine, methadone and loperamide on the CNS are modulated by P-gp. This review examines the ways in which other opioid drugs and some of their active metabolites interact with ABC transporters and suggests new mechanisms that may be involved in the variability of the response of the CNS to these drugs like carrier-mediated system belonging to the solute carrier (SLC) superfamily. Exposure to opioids may also alter the expression of ABC transporters. P-gp can be overproduced during morphine treatment, suggesting that the drug has a direct or, more likely, an indirect action. Variations in cerebral neurotransmitters during exposure to opioids and the release of cytokines during pain could be new endogenous stimuli affecting transporter synthesis. This review concludes with an analysis of the pharmacotherapeutic and clinical impacts of the interactions between ABC transporters and opioids.

  13. Operational range and transport barrier of the H-mode in the stellarator W7-AS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirsch, M.; Amadeo, P.; Anton, M.; Baldzuhn, J.; Brakel, R.; Bleuel, J.; Fiedler, S.; Geist, T.; Grigull, P.; Hartfuss, H.J.; Jaenicke, R.; Kick, M.; Kisslinger, J.; Koponen, J.; Wagner, F.; Weller, A.; Wobig, H.; Zoletnik, S.; Holzhauer, E.

    1998-01-01

    In W7-AS the H-mode is characterized by an edge transport barrier localized in the first 3-4 cm inside the separatrix. In the ELMy H-mode preceding the quiescent state ELMs appear as a sudden breakdown of the edge transport barrier in coincidence with bursts of fluctuations. Between ELMs fluctuations are identical to those of the quiescent H-mode. The operational range of the quiescent H-mode is determined by narrow windows of the edge rotational transform and a threshold edge electron density. In contrast, ELM-like events are observed for a variety of plasma conditions by far exceeding the narrow operational windows for the quiescent state. (author)

  14. Investigation of the potential barrier lowering for quasi-ballistic transport in short channel MOSFETs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jaehong; Kwon, Yongmin; Ji, Junghwan; Shin, Hyungcheol

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the quasi-ballistic carrier transport in short channel MOSFETs is investigated from the point of potential barrier lowering. To investigate the ballistic characteristic of transistors, we extracted the channel backscattering coefficient and the ballistic ratio from experimental data obtained by RF C-V and DC I-V measurements. Two factors that modulate the potential barrier height, besides the gate bias, are considered in this work: the drain bias (V DS ) and the channel doping concentration (N A ). We extract the critical length by calculating the potential drop in the channel region and conclude that the drain bias and the channel doping concentration affect the quasi-ballistic carrier transport.

  15. Tunneling rates in electron transport through double-barrier molecular junctions in a scanning tunneling microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazin, G V; Wu, S W; Ho, W

    2005-06-21

    The scanning tunneling microscope enables atomic-scale measurements of electron transport through individual molecules. Copper phthalocyanine and magnesium porphine molecules adsorbed on a thin oxide film grown on the NiAl(110) surface were probed. The single-molecule junctions contained two tunneling barriers, vacuum gap, and oxide film. Differential conductance spectroscopy shows that electron transport occurs via vibronic states of the molecules. The intensity of spectral peaks corresponding to the individual vibronic states depends on the relative electron tunneling rates through the two barriers of the junction, as found by varying the vacuum gap tunneling rate by changing the height of the scanning tunneling microscope tip above the molecule. A simple, sequential tunneling model explains the observed trends.

  16. Classical and quantum transport through entropic barriers modeled by hardwall hyperboloidal constrictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hales, R.; Waalkens, H.

    2009-01-01

    We study the quantum transport through entropic barriers induced by hardwall constrictions of hyperboloidal shape in two and three spatial dimensions. Using the separability of the Schroedinger equation and the classical equations of motion for these geometries, we study in detail the quantum transmission probabilities and the associated quantum resonances, and relate them to the classical phase structures which govern the transport through the constrictions. These classical phase structures are compared to the analogous structures which, as has been shown only recently, govern reaction type dynamics in smooth systems. Although the systems studied in this paper are special due their separability they can be taken as a guide to study entropic barriers resulting from constriction geometries that lead to non-separable dynamics.

  17. Globalization of the automobile industry in China: dynamics and barriers in greening of the road transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gan Lin

    2003-01-01

    This article describes the state of the automobile industry and urban road transportation management in China. It reviews how the automobile industry is evolving to respond to challenges in economic development, environmental regulations, and technological change. The dynamics and barriers resulting from technological change of automobiles in response to reduction of exhaust emissions and energy-efficiency improvement are analyzed. It is argued that consideration of externality costs should be integrated in automobile industrial policymaking and transportation management. Efforts need to be made to use more economic incentives for emissions reduction, and to promote technological change for cleaner vehicle development. This paper questions the current government policy of encouraging private car ownership, and suggests that improvement in public transportation systems, stronger emissions control, and technology innovation on environmental friendly automobile technologies would be relevant to China's drive toward sustainable transportation development. Social inequities resulted from automobile use is also stressed in the analysis

  18. Globalization of the automobile industry in China. Dynamics and barriers in the greening of road transportation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gan, Lin

    2001-08-01

    This article describes the state of the automobile industry and urban road transportation management in China. It reviews how the automobile industry is evolving to respond to challenges in economic development, environmental regulations, and technological change. The dynamics and barriers resulting from technological change of the automobile in response to reduction of exhaust emissions and energy-efficiency improvement are analyzed. It is argued that consideration of externality costs should be integrated in automobile industrial policy making and transport management. This paper questions the current government policy of encouraging private car ownership, and suggests that improvement in public transportation systems and stronger emissions control would be relevant to China's drive toward sustainable transportation development. (author)

  19. Globalization of the automobile industry in China: dynamics and barriers in greening of the road transportation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin Gan [Center for International Climate and Environmental Research, Oslo (Norway)

    2003-05-01

    This article describes the state of the automobile industry and urban road transportation management in China. It reviews how the automobile industry is evolving to respond to challenges in economic development, environmental regulations, and technological change. The dynamics and barriers resulting from technological change of automobiles in response to reduction of exhaust emissions and energy-efficiency improvement are analysed. It is argued that consideration of externality costs should be integrated in automobile industrial policymaking and transportation management. Efforts need to be made to use more economic incentives for emissions reduction, and to promote technological change for cleaner vehicle development. This paper questions the current government policy of encouraging private car ownership, and suggests that improvement in public transportation systems, stronger emissions control, and technology innovation on environmental friendly automobile technologies would be relevant to China's drive toward sustainable transportation development. Social inequities resulted from automobile use is also stressed in the analysis. (author)

  20. Globalization of the automobile industry in China: dynamics and barriers in greening of the road transportation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gan Lin E-mail: lin.gan@cicero.uio.no

    2003-05-01

    This article describes the state of the automobile industry and urban road transportation management in China. It reviews how the automobile industry is evolving to respond to challenges in economic development, environmental regulations, and technological change. The dynamics and barriers resulting from technological change of automobiles in response to reduction of exhaust emissions and energy-efficiency improvement are analyzed. It is argued that consideration of externality costs should be integrated in automobile industrial policymaking and transportation management. Efforts need to be made to use more economic incentives for emissions reduction, and to promote technological change for cleaner vehicle development. This paper questions the current government policy of encouraging private car ownership, and suggests that improvement in public transportation systems, stronger emissions control, and technology innovation on environmental friendly automobile technologies would be relevant to China's drive toward sustainable transportation development. Social inequities resulted from automobile use is also stressed in the analysis.

  1. Application of CFRP with High Hydrogen Gas Barrier Characteristics to Fuel Tanks of Space Transportation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonemoto, Koichi; Yamamoto, Yuta; Okuyama, Keiichi; Ebina, Takeo

    In the future, carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRPs) with high hydrogen gas barrier performance will find wide applications in all industrial hydrogen tanks that aim at weight reduction; the use of such materials will be preferred to the use of conventional metallic materials such as stainless steel or aluminum. The hydrogen gas barrier performance of CFRP will become an important issue with the introduction of hydrogen-fuel aircraft. It will also play an important role in realizing fully reusable space transportation system that will have high specific tensile CFRP structures. Such materials are also required for the manufacture of high-pressure hydrogen gas vessels for use in the fuel cell systems of automobiles. This paper introduces a new composite concept that can be used to realize CFRPs with high hydrogen gas barrier performance for applications in the cryogenic tanks of fully reusable space transportation system by the incorporation of a nonmetallic crystal layer, which is actually a dense and highly oriented clay crystal laminate. The preliminary test results show that the hydrogen gas barrier characteristics of this material after cryogenic heat shocks and cyclic loads are still better than those of other polymer materials by approximately two orders of magnitude.

  2. Evolution of thermal ion transport barriers in reversed shear/ optimised shear plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voitsekhovitch, I.; Garbet, X.; Moreau, D.; Bush, C.E.; Budny, R.V.; Gohil, P.; Kinsey, J.E.; Talyor, T.S.; Litaudon, X.

    2001-01-01

    The effects of the magnetic and ExB rotation shears on the thermal ion transport in advanced tokamak scenarios are analyzed through the predictive modelling of the evolution of internal transport barriers. Such a modelling is performed with an experimentally validated L-mode thermal diffusivity completed with a semi-empirical shear correction which is based on simple theoretical arguments from turbulence studies. A multi-machine test of the model on relevant discharges from the ITER Data Base (TFTR, DIII-D and JET) is presented. (author)

  3. Design and validation of a microfluidic device for blood-brain barrier monitoring and transport studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugolini, Giovanni Stefano; Occhetta, Paola; Saccani, Alessandra; Re, Francesca; Krol, Silke; Rasponi, Marco; Redaelli, Alberto

    2018-04-01

    In vitro blood-brain barrier models are highly relevant for drug screening and drug development studies, due to the challenging task of understanding the transport mechanism of drug molecules through the blood-brain barrier towards the brain tissue. In this respect, microfluidics holds potential for providing microsystems that require low amounts of cells and reagent and can be potentially multiplexed for increasing the ease and throughput of the drug screening process. We here describe the design, development and validation of a microfluidic device for endothelial blood-brain barrier cell transport studies. The device comprises of two microstructured layers (top culture chamber and bottom collection chamber) sandwiching a porous membrane for the cell culture. Microstructured layers include two pairs of physical electrodes, embedded into the device layers by geometrically defined guiding channels with computationally optimized positions. These electrodes allow the use of commercial electrical measurement systems for monitoring trans-endothelial electrical resistance (TEER). We employed the designed device for performing preliminary assessment of endothelial barrier formation with murine brain endothelial cells (Br-bEnd5). Results demonstrate that cellular junctional complexes effectively form in the cultures (expression of VE-Cadherin and ZO-1) and that the TEER monitoring systems effectively detects an increase of resistance of the cultured cell layers indicative of tight junction formation. Finally, we validate the use of the described microsystem for drug transport studies demonstrating that Br-bEnd5 cells significantly hinder the transport of molecules (40 kDa and 4 kDa dextran) from the top culture chamber to the bottom collection chamber.

  4. Formation condition of internal transport barrier in JT-60U plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koide, Y.; Fujita, T.; Takizuka, T.; Shirai, H.; Hatae, T.; Isayama, A.; Isei, N.; Sakamoto, Y.; Kamada, Y.; Kikuchi, M.

    2001-01-01

    Onset condition of Internal Transport Barrier (ITB) in reversed shear discharges was investigated. Local values of electron density, electron temperature, and ion temperature seem not to be essential for the ITB onset. Remarkable correlation between electron temperature gradient and magnetic shear was observed at the onset. In addition, ITB well outside the q-minimum position was found. Its onset condition seems to be continuous with that observed in negative shear region. (author)

  5. Barriers to Implementation of Recommendations for Transport of Children in Ground Ambulances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Rashida H; Shah, Manish; Doughty, Cara; Gilchrest, Anthony

    2017-10-16

    The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) released draft recommendations in 2010 on the safe transport of children in ground ambulances. The purpose of this study was to assess awareness of these guidelines among emergency medical service (EMS) agencies and to identify implementation barriers. We conducted a cross-sectional, anonymous online survey of 911-responding, ground transport EMS agencies in Texas. Demographics, modes of transport based on case scenarios, and barriers to implementation were assessed. Of 62 eligible EMS agencies that took the survey, 35.7% were aware of the NHTSA guidelines, 62.5% agreed they would improve safety, and 41.1% planned to implement them. Seventy-five percent of EMS agencies used the ideal or acceptable alternative to transport children requiring continuous monitoring, and 69.5% chose ideal or acceptable alternatives for children requiring spinal immobilization. The ideal or acceptable alternative was not chosen for children who were not injured or ill (93.2%), ill or injured but not requiring continuous monitoring (53.3%), and situations when multiple patients required transport (57.6%). The main requirements for implementation were provider education, ambulance interior modifications, new guidelines in the EMS agency, and purchase of new equipment. Few EMS agencies are aware of the NHTSA guidelines on safe transport of children in ground ambulances. Although most agencies appropriately transport children who require monitoring, interventions, or spinal immobilization, they use inappropriate means to transport children in situations with multiple patients, lack of injury or illness, or lack of need for monitoring.

  6. Effects of nitrogen seeding on core ion thermal transport in JET ILW L-mode plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonanomi, N.; Mantica, P.; Citrin, J.; Giroud, C.; Lerche, E.; Sozzi, C.; Taylor, D.; Tsalas, M.; Van Eester, D.; JET Contributors,

    2018-01-01

    A set of experiments was carried out in JET ILW (Joint European Torus with ITER-Like Wall) L-mode plasmas in order to study the effects of light impurities on core ion thermal transport. N was puffed into some discharges and its profile was measured by active Charge Exchange diagnostics, while ICRH

  7. Open noise barriers based on sonic crystals. Advances in noise control in transport infraestructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peiro Torres, M.P.; Redondo Pastor, J.; Bravo Plana-Sala, J.M.; Sanchez Perez, J.V.

    2016-07-01

    Noise control is an environmental problem of first magnitude nowadays. In this work, we present a new concept of acoustic screen designed to control the specific noise generated by transport infrastructures, based on new materials called sonic crystals. These materials are formed by arrangements of acoustic scatterers in air, and provide a new and different mechanism in the fight against noise from those of the classical screens. This mechanism is usually called multiple scattering and is due to their structuring in addition to their physical properties. Due to the separation between scatterers, these barriers are transparent to air and water allowing a reduction on their foundations. Tests carried out in a wind tunnel show a reduction of 42% in the overturning momentum compared to classical barriers. The acoustical performance of these barriers is shown in this work, explaining the new characteristics provided in the control of noise. Finally, an example of these barriers is presented and classified according to acoustic standardization tests. The acoustic barrier reported in this work provides a high technological solution in the field of noise control. (Author)

  8. Anisotropic transport of normal metal-barrier-normal metal junctions in monolayer phosphorene

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sarkar, Sangita; Agarwal, Amit; Sengupta, K.

    2017-07-01

    We study transport properties of a phosphorene monolayer in the presence of single and multiple potential barriers of height U 0 and width d, using both continuum and microscopic lattice models, and show that the nature of electron transport along its armchair edge (x direction) is qualitatively different from its counterpart in both conventional two-dimensional electron gas with Schrödinger-like quasiparticles and graphene or surfaces of topological insulators hosting massless Dirac quasiparticles. We show that the transport, mediated by massive Dirac electrons, allows one to achieve collimated quasiparticle motion along x and thus makes monolayer phosphorene an ideal experimental platform for studying Klein paradox in the context of gapped Dirac materials. We study the dependence of the tunneling conductance G\\equiv {{G}xx} as a function of d and U 0, and demonstrate that for a given applied voltage V its behavior changes from oscillatory to decaying function of d for a range of U 0 with finite non-zero upper and lower bounds, and provide analytical expression for these bounds within which G decays with d. We contrast such behavior of G with that of massless Dirac electrons in graphene and also with that along the zigzag edge (y direction) in phosphorene where the quasiparticles obey an effective Schrödinger equation at low energy. We also study transport through multiple barriers along x and demonstrate that these properties hold for transport through multiple barriers as well. Finally, we suggest concrete experiments which may verify our theoretical predictions.

  9. Logistic Core Operations with SAP Inventory Management, Warehousing, Transportation, and Compliance

    CERN Document Server

    Kappauf, Jens; Koch, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    “Logistic Core Operations with SAP” not only provides an overview of core logistics processes and functionality—it also shows how SAP’s Business Suite covers logistic core operations, what features are supported, and which systems can be used to implement end-to-end processes in the following logistic core disciplines: Procurement, Distribution, Transportation, Warehouse Logistics and Inventory Management, and Compliance and Reporting. In this context the authors not only explain their integration, the organizational set-up, and master data, but also which solution fits best for a particular business need.   This book serves as a solid foundation for understanding SAP software. No matter whether you are a student or a manager involved in an SAP implementation, the authors go far beyond traditional function and feature descriptions, helping you ask the right questions, providing answers, and making recommendations. The book assists you in understanding SAP terminology, concepts and technological compo...

  10. Large-scale Instability during Gravitational Collapse with Neutrino Transport and a Core-Collapse Supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksenov, A. G.; Chechetkin, V. M.

    2018-04-01

    Most of the energy released in the gravitational collapse of the cores of massive stars is carried away by neutrinos. Neutrinos play a pivotal role in explaining core-collape supernovae. Currently, mathematical models of the gravitational collapse are based on multi-dimensional gas dynamics and thermonuclear reactions, while neutrino transport is considered in a simplified way. Multidimensional gas dynamics is used with neutrino transport in the flux-limited diffusion approximation to study the role of multi-dimensional effects. The possibility of large-scale convection is discussed, which is interesting both for explaining SN II and for setting up observations to register possible high-energy (≳10MeV) neutrinos from the supernova. A new multi-dimensional, multi-temperature gas dynamics method with neutrino transport is presented.

  11. Quantum Effects for a Proton in a Low-Barrier, Double-Well Potential: Core Level Photoemission Spectroscopy of Acetylacetone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feyer, Vitaliy; Prince, Kevin C; Coreno, Marcello; Melandri, Sonia; Maris, Assimo; Evangelisti, Luca; Caminati, Walther; Giuliano, Barbara M; Kjaergaard, Henrik G; Carravetta, Vincenzo

    2018-02-01

    We have performed core level photoemission spectroscopy of gaseous acetylacetone, its fully deuterated form, and two derivatives, benzoylacetone and dibenzoylmethane. These molecules show intramolecular hydrogen bonds, with a proton located in a double-well potential, whose barrier height is different for the three compounds. This has allowed us to examine the effect of the double-well potential on photoemission spectra. Two distinct O 1s core hole peaks are observed, previously assigned to two chemical states of oxygen. We provide an alternative assignment of the double-peak structure of O 1s spectra by taking full account of the extended nature of the wave function associated with the nuclear motion of the proton, the shape of the ground and final state potentials in which the proton is located, and the nonzero temperature of the samples. The peaks are explained in terms of an unusual Franck-Condon factor distribution.

  12. Transport properties of Dirac electrons in graphene based double velocity-barrier structures in electric and magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Lei; Li, Yu-Xian; Liu, Jian-Jun

    2012-01-01

    Using transfer matrix method, transport properties in graphene based double velocity-barrier structures under magnetic and electric fields are numerically studied. It is found that velocity barriers for the velocity ratio (the Fermi velocity inside the barrier to that outside the barrier) less than one (or for the velocity ratio greater than one) have properties similar to electrostatic wells (or barriers). The velocity barriers for the velocity ratio greater than one significantly enlarge the resonant tunneling region of electrostatic barriers. In the presence of magnetic field, the plateau width of the Fano factor with a Poissonian value shortens (or broadens) for the case of the velocity ratio less than one (or greater than one). When the Fermi energy is equal to the electrostatic barrier height, for different values of the velocity ratio, both the conductivities and the Fano factors remain fixed. -- Highlights: ► We model graphene based velocity-barrier structures in electric and magnetic fields. ► Velocity barrier for ξ 1) have property similar to electrostatic well (barrier). ► Velocity barrier for ξ>1 enlarge the resonant tunneling region of electrostatic barrier. ► The plateau width of Fano factor shortens (or broadens) for the case of ξ 1). ► The conductivity remains fixed at the point of E F =U 0 for different values of ξ.

  13. Plasma Turbulence Suppression and Transport Barrier Formation by Externally Driven RF Waves in Spherical Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruma, C.; Cuperman, S.C.; Komoshvili, K.

    2002-01-01

    Turbulent transport of heat and particles is the principle obstacle confronting controlled fusion today. Thus, we investigate quantitatively the suppression of turbulence and formation of transport barriers in spherical tokamaks by sheared electric fields generated by externally driven radio-frequency (RF) waves, in the frequency range o)A n o] < o)ci (e)A and o)ci are the Alfven and ion cyclotron frequencies). This investigation consists of the solution of the full-wave equation for a spherical tokamak in the presence of externally driven fast waves and the evaluation of the power dissipation by the mode-converted Alfven waves. This in turn, provides a radial flow shear responsible for the suppression of plasma turbulence. Thus, a strongly non-linear equation for the radial sheared electric field is solved, the turbulent transport suppression rate is evaluated and compared with the ion temperature gradient (ITG) instability increment. For illustration, the case of START-like device (Sykes 2000) is treated. Thus, (i) the exact D-shape cross-section is considered; (ii) additional kinetic (including Landau damping) and particle trapping effects are added to the resistive two-fluid dielectric tensor operator; (iii) a finite extension antenna located on the low-field-side of the plasma is considered; (iv) a rigorous 2.5 finite elements numerical code (Sewell 1993) is used; and (v) the turbulence and transport barrier generated as a result of wave-plasma interaction is evaluated

  14. Discontinuity model for internal transport barrier formation in reversed magnetic shear plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishimoto, Y.; Dettrick, S.A.; Li, J.Q.; Shirai, S.; Kim, J.Y.; Horton, W.; Tajima, T.; LeBrun, M.J.

    2000-01-01

    It is becoming clear that tokamak anomalous transport is dominated by radially extended non-local modes which originate from strong toroidal coupling of rational surfaces in non-uniform plasmas. To aid in understanding the internal transport barrier (ITB) formed in reversed magnetic shear experiments, in addition to the well known shear flow effect, the article points out an important non-local effect and/or finite size effect which comes from the complex behaviour of the mode over a finite radial region around the minimum q (safety factor) surface. The non-local mode, which is characterized by its radial extent and the degree of tilting in the poloidal direction (Δr, θ 0 ), changes its structure depending on the sign of the magnetic shear, and as a result such modes are weakly excited across the q min surface. This leads to a discontinuity or gap which disconnects the phase relation in the global wave structure across the q min surface. Once such a discontinuity (or gap) is formed, transport suppression occurs and therefore a transport barrier can be expected near the q min surface. The existence of this discontinuity is confirmed through use of a toroidal particle simulation. It is also shown that whether such a discontinuity is efficiently established depends on the presence of the radial electric field and the related plasma shear flow. (author)

  15. Theoretical issues in tokamak confinement: (i) Internal/edge transport barriers and (ii) runaway avalanche confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connor, J.W.; Helander, P.; Thyagaraja, A.; Andersson, F.; Fueloep, T.; Eriksson, L.-G.; Romanelli, M.

    2001-01-01

    This paper summarises a number of distinct, but related, pieces of work on key confinement issues for tokamaks, in particular the formation of internal and edge transport barriers, both within turbulent and neoclassical models, and radial diffusion of avalanching runaway electrons. First-principle simulations of tokamak turbulence and transport using the two-fluid, electromagnetic, global code CUTIE are described. The code has demonstrated the spontaneous formation of internal transport barriers near mode rational surfaces, in qualitative agreement with observations on JET and RTP. The theory of neoclassical transport in an impure, toroidal plasma has been extended to allow for steeper pressure and temperature gradients than are usually considered, and is then found to become nonlinear under conditions typical of the tokamak edge. For instance, the particle flux is found to be a nonmonotonic function of the gradients, thus allowing for a bifurcation in the ion particle flux. Finally, it is shown that radial diffusion caused by magnetic fluctuations can effectively suppress avalanches of runaway electrons if the fluctuation amplitude exceeds δB/B∼10 -3 . (author)

  16. Atmospheric Transport and Mixing linked to Rossby Wave Breaking in GFDL Dynamical Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C.; Barnes, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric transport and mixing plays an important role in the global energy balance and the distribution of health-related chemical constituents. Previous studies suggest a close linkage between large-scale transport and Rossby wave breaking (RWB). In this work, we use the GFDL spectral dynamical core to investigate this relationship and study the response of RWB-related transport in different climate scenarios. In a standard control run, we quantify the contribution of RWB to the total transport and mixing of an idealized tracer. In addition, we divide the contribution further into the two types of RWB - anticyclonic wave breaking (AWB) and cyclonic wave breaking (CWB) -- and contrast their efficiency at transport and mixing. Our results are compared to a previous study in which the transport ability of the two types of RWB is studied for individual baroclinic wave life-cycles. In a series of sensitivity runs, we study the response of RWB-related transport and mixing to various states of the jet streams. The responses of the mean strength, frequency, and the efficiency of RWB-related transport are documented and the implications for the transport and mixing in a warmer climate are discussed.

  17. On the link between the q-profile and internal transport barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baranov, Yu F [EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Garbet, X [Association Euratom-CEA, CE de Cadarache, F-13108, St Paul lez Durance (France); Hawkes, N C [EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Alper, B [EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Barnsley, R [EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Challis, C D [EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Giroud, C [EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Joffrin, E [Association Euratom-CEA, CE de Cadarache, F-13108, St Paul lez Durance (France); Mantsinen, M [Helsinki University of Technology, Association Euratom-Tekes (Finland); Orsitto, F [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, C.R. Frascati, Frascati (Italy); Parail, V [EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Sharapov, S E [EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2004-08-01

    Numerous experiments were performed on JET to clarify the link between rational q, magnetic shear and internal transport barriers (ITBs) by varying the q-profile from a monotonic one to one with a central reversed shear (Challis et al 2002 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 44 1031). The q-profile was found to be crucial in two cases: for ITB formation in the presence of a strong negative magnetic shear and for ITBs in the vicinity of low order rational q surfaces with a small magnetic shear. The ITBs of these two types have been modelled and analysed in this work using transport codes (TRANSP, JETTO, TRB). Transport coefficients were calculated using several widely used theories of micro-turbulence and compared with data deduced from the experiment to verify the applicability of the theories. Different underlying physical mechanisms were found to be responsible for ITB formation in a negative magnetic shear and in the vicinity of a rational minimum q.

  18. Core-shell nanophosphor architecture: toward efficient energy transport in inorganic/organic hybrid solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qinghua; Yuan, Yongbiao; Chen, Zihan; Jin, Xiao; Wei, Tai-huei; Li, Yue; Qin, Yuancheng; Sun, Weifu

    2014-08-13

    In this work, a core-shell nanostructure of samarium phosphates encapsulated into a Eu(3+)-doped silica shell has been successfully fabricated, which has been confirmed by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and high-resolution TEM. Moreover, we report the energy transfer process from the Sm(3+) to emitters Eu(3+) that widens the light absorption range of the hybrid solar cells (HSCs) and the strong enhancement of the electron-transport of TiO2/poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) bulk heterojunction (BHJ) HSCs by introducing the unique core-shell nanoarchitecture. Furthermore, by applying femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy, we successfully obtain the electron transport lifetimes of BHJ systems with or without incorporating the core-shell nanophosphors (NPs). Concrete evidence has been provided that the doping of core-shell NPs improves the efficiency of electron transfers from donor to acceptor, but the hole transport almost remains unchanged. In particular, the hot electron transfer lifetime was shortened from 30.2 to 16.7 ps, i.e., more than 44% faster than pure TiO2 acceptor. Consequently, a notable power conversion efficiency of 3.30% for SmPO4@Eu(3+):SiO2 blended TiO2/P3HT HSCs is achieved at 5 wt % as compared to 1.98% of pure TiO2/P3HT HSCs. This work indicates that the core-shell NPs can efficiently broaden the absorption region, facilitate electron-transport of BHJ, and enhance photovoltaic performance of inorganic/organic HSCs.

  19. Role of low-order rational surfaces in transport barrier formation on the Large Helical Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toi, K.; Tanaka, K.; Watanabe, F.

    2010-11-01

    In the Large Helical Device, edge transport barrier (ETB) was formed by H-mode transition near the low-order rational surfaces, that is, at the ι/2π=1 resonant layer (ι/2π: the rotational transform) in outward-shifted plasmas of R ax =3.9m (R ax : the magnetic axis position in the vacuum field), and the ι/2π=2 resonant layer in inward-shifted plasmas of R ax =3.6m. The ι/2π=1 and 2 resonant layers reside in the stochastic field region existing just outside the last closed magnetic surface (LCFS). In the outward-shifted plasmas, H-modes without edge localized modes (ELM-free H-modes) followed by giant ELMs were obtained, while H-modes with high frequency and low amplitude ELMs were obtained in the inward-shifted plasmas. A new type of barrier formation induced by TAE bursts was observed in the plasmas of R ax =3.6m, where the transport barrier is formed near the ι/2π=1 surface locates inside LCFS. (author)

  20. Determination of membrane behaviour during transport of pollutants n clay barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musso, M.; Pejon, O.

    2010-01-01

    The study of the transport of contaminants in clay barriers had a extensive development in environmental geotechnics. The most studied transport processes are solutes by advection - dispersion and diffusion generated by hydraulic and chemical gradients respectively. Greater attention should be given to the chemical - osmotic flow and behavior membrane clay barriers, since in one case the water molecules move through the existence of a chemical gradient and on the other the means totally or partially inhibits the passage of solutes. The team developed to measure these processes was constructed based on items international literature and performance was verified using two types of materials KCl solution . One material is a bentonite geocomposite (Geosynthetic Clay Liner GCL ) similar to that used by other researchers. The other material is a soil barrier compacted clay (Compacted Clay Liner CCL) Fm. Corumbataí (Permian), belonging to the Paraná basin in the state of Sao Paulo, Brazil . The results show the proper performance of the equipment built . Osmotic pressure generation and membrane performance was verified for both samples. Further corroborated influence of the type of clay mineral in the osmotic pressure generated value and membrane behavior

  1. Synergistic effects of the safety factor and shear flows on development of internal transport barriers in reversed shear plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, A.K.; Dong, J.Q.; Qu, W.X.; Qiu, X.M.

    2002-01-01

    A new suppression mechanism of turbulent transport, characteristic of the synergism between safety factor and shear flows, is proposed to explain the internal transport barriers (ITBs) observed in neutral-beam-heated tokamak discharges with reversed magnetic shear. It is shown that the evolution of turbulent transport with the strength of the suppression mechanism reproduces the basic features of the formation and development of ITBs observed in experiments. In addition, the present analyses predict the possibility of global ion and electron heat transport barriers

  2. Technical Work Plan for: Near Field Environment: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J.D. Schreiber

    2006-01-01

    This technical work plan (TWP) describes work activities to be performed by the Near-Field Environment Team. The objective of the work scope covered by this TWP is to generate Revision 03 of EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction, referred to herein as the radionuclide transport abstraction (RTA) report. The RTA report is being revised primarily to address condition reports (CRs), to address issues identified by the Independent Validation Review Team (IVRT), to address the potential impact of transport, aging, and disposal (TAD) canister design on transport models, and to ensure integration with other models that are closely associated with the RTA report and being developed or revised in other analysis/model reports in response to IVRT comments. The RTA report will be developed in accordance with the most current version of LP-SIII.10Q-BSC and will reflect current administrative procedures (LP-3.15Q-BSC, ''Managing Technical Product Inputs''; LP-SIII.2Q-BSC, ''Qualification of Unqualified Data''; etc.), and will develop related Document Input Reference System (DIRS) reports and data qualifications as applicable in accordance with prevailing procedures. The RTA report consists of three models: the engineered barrier system (EBS) flow model, the EBS transport model, and the EBS-unsaturated zone (UZ) interface model. The flux-splitting submodel in the EBS flow model will change, so the EBS flow model will be validated again. The EBS transport model and validation of the model will be substantially revised in Revision 03 of the RTA report, which is the main subject of this TWP. The EBS-UZ interface model may be changed in Revision 03 of the RTA report due to changes in the conceptualization of the UZ transport abstraction model (a particle tracker transport model based on the discrete fracture transfer function will be used instead of the dual-continuum transport model previously used). Validation of the EBS-UZ interface model will be revised to be consistent with

  3. Impact of nuclear 'pasta' on neutrino transport in collapsing stellar cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonoda, Hidetaka; Watanabe, Gentaro; Sato, Katsuhiko; Takiwaki, Tomoya; Yasuoka, Kenji; Ebisuzaki, Toshikazu

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear 'pasta', nonspherical nuclei in dense matter, is predicted to occur in collapsing supernova cores. We show how pasta phases affect the neutrino transport cross section via weak neutral current using several nuclear models. This is the first calculation of the neutrino opacity of the phases with rod-like and slab-like nuclei taking account of finite temperature effects, which are well described by the quantum molecular dynamics. We also show that pasta phases can occupy 10-20% of the mass of supernova cores in the later stage of the collapse

  4. Barrier inhomogeneities limited current and 1/f noise transport in GaN based nanoscale Schottky barrier diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ashutosh; Heilmann, M.; Latzel, Michael; Kapoor, Raman; Sharma, Intu; Göbelt, M.; Christiansen, Silke H.; Kumar, Vikram; Singh, Rajendra

    2016-01-01

    The electrical behaviour of Schottky barrier diodes realized on vertically standing individual GaN nanorods and array of nanorods is investigated. The Schottky diodes on individual nanorod show highest barrier height in comparison with large area diodes on nanorods array and epitaxial film which is in contrast with previously published work. The discrepancy between the electrical behaviour of nanoscale Schottky diodes and large area diodes is explained using cathodoluminescence measurements, surface potential analysis using Kelvin probe force microscopy and 1ow frequency noise measurements. The noise measurements on large area diodes on nanorods array and epitaxial film suggest the presence of barrier inhomogeneities at the metal/semiconductor interface which deviate the noise spectra from Lorentzian to 1/f type. These barrier inhomogeneities in large area diodes resulted in reduced barrier height whereas due to the limited role of barrier inhomogeneities in individual nanorod based Schottky diode, a higher barrier height is obtained. PMID:27282258

  5. Reactive Transport and Coupled THM Processes in Engineering Barrier Systems (EBS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steefel, Carl; Rutqvist, Jonny; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Liu, Hui-Hai; Sonnenthal, Eric; Houseworth, Jim; Birkholzer, Jens

    2010-01-01

    Geological repositories for disposal of high-level nuclear wastes generally rely on a multi-barrier system to isolate radioactive wastes from the biosphere. The multi-barrier system typically consists of a natural barrier system, including repository host rock and its surrounding subsurface environment, and an engineering barrier system (EBS). EBS represents the man-made, engineered materials placed within a repository, including the waste form, waste canisters, buffer materials, backfill and seals (OECD, 2003). EBS plays a significant role in the containment and long-term retardation of radionuclide release. EBS is involved in complex thermal, hydrogeological, mechanical, chemical and biological processes, such as heat release due to radionuclide decay, multiphase flow (including gas release due to canister corrosion), swelling of buffer materials, radionuclide diffusive transport, waste dissolution and chemical reactions. All these processes are related to each other. An in-depth understanding of these coupled processes is critical for the performance assessment (PA) for EBS and the entire repository. Within the EBS group of Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Campaign, LBNL is currently focused on (1) thermal-hydraulic-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes in buffer materials (bentonite) and (2) diffusive transport in EBS associated with clay host rock, with a long-term goal to develop a full understanding of (and needed modeling capabilities to simulate) impacts of coupled processes on radionuclide transport in different components of EBS, as well as the interaction between near-field host rock (e.g., clay) and EBS and how they effect radionuclide release. This final report documents the progress that LBNL has made in its focus areas. Specifically, Section 2 summarizes progress on literature review for THMC processes and reactive-diffusive radionuclide transport in bentonite. The literature review provides a picture of the state-of-the-art of the relevant research areas

  6. Reactive Transport and Coupled THM Processes in Engineering Barrier Systems (EBS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steefel, Carl; Rutqvist, Jonny; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Liu, Hui-Hai; Sonnenthal, Eric; Houseworth, Jim; Birkholzer, Jens

    2010-08-31

    Geological repositories for disposal of high-level nuclear wastes generally rely on a multi-barrier system to isolate radioactive wastes from the biosphere. The multi-barrier system typically consists of a natural barrier system, including repository host rock and its surrounding subsurface environment, and an engineering barrier system (EBS). EBS represents the man-made, engineered materials placed within a repository, including the waste form, waste canisters, buffer materials, backfill and seals (OECD, 2003). EBS plays a significant role in the containment and long-term retardation of radionuclide release. EBS is involved in complex thermal, hydrogeological, mechanical, chemical and biological processes, such as heat release due to radionuclide decay, multiphase flow (including gas release due to canister corrosion), swelling of buffer materials, radionuclide diffusive transport, waste dissolution and chemical reactions. All these processes are related to each other. An in-depth understanding of these coupled processes is critical for the performance assessment (PA) for EBS and the entire repository. Within the EBS group of Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Campaign, LBNL is currently focused on (1) thermal-hydraulic-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes in buffer materials (bentonite) and (2) diffusive transport in EBS associated with clay host rock, with a long-term goal to develop a full understanding of (and needed modeling capabilities to simulate) impacts of coupled processes on radionuclide transport in different components of EBS, as well as the interaction between near-field host rock (e.g., clay) and EBS and how they effect radionuclide release. This final report documents the progress that LBNL has made in its focus areas. Specifically, Section 2 summarizes progress on literature review for THMC processes and reactive-diffusive radionuclide transport in bentonite. The literature review provides a picture of the state-of-the-art of the relevant research areas

  7. Blood-brain barrier transport of drugs for the treatment of brain diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabathuler, Reinhard

    2009-06-01

    The central nervous system is a sanctuary protected by barriers that regulate brain homeostasis and control the transport of endogenous compounds into the brain. The blood-brain barrier, formed by endothelial cells of the brain capillaries, restricts access to brain cells allowing entry only to amino acids, glucose and hormones needed for normal brain cell function and metabolism. This very tight regulation of brain cell access is essential for the survival of neurons which do not have a significant capacity to regenerate, but also prevents therapeutic compounds, small and large, from reaching the brain. As a result, various strategies are being developed to enhance access of drugs to the brain parenchyma at therapeutically meaningful concentrations to effectively manage disease.

  8. Aging alters mRNA expression of amyloid transporter genes at the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osgood, Doreen; Miller, Miles C; Messier, Arthur A; Gonzalez, Liliana; Silverberg, Gerald D

    2017-09-01

    Decreased clearance of potentially toxic metabolites, due to aging changes, likely plays a significant role in the accumulation of amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptides and other macromolecules in the brain of the elderly and in the patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Aging is the single most important risk factor for AD development. Aβ transport receptor proteins expressed at the blood-brain barrier are significantly altered with age: the efflux transporters lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 and P-glycoprotein are reduced, whereas the influx transporter receptor for advanced glycation end products is increased. These receptors play an important role in maintaining brain biochemical homeostasis. We now report that, in a rat model of aging, gene transcription is altered in aging, as measured by Aβ receptor gene messenger RNA (mRNA) at 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 20, 30, and 36 months. Gene mRNA expression from isolated cerebral microvessels was measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 and P-glycoprotein mRNA were significantly reduced in aging, and receptor for advanced glycation end products was increased, in parallel with the changes seen in receptor protein expression. Transcriptional changes appear to play a role in aging alterations in blood-brain barrier receptor expression and Aβ accumulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Modelling of diamagnetic stabilization of ideal MHD eigenmodes associated with the transport barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huysmans, G.; Sharapov, S.; Mikhailovskii, A.; Kerner, W.

    2001-01-01

    A new code, MISHKA-D (Drift MHD), has been developed as an extension of the ideal MHD code MISHKA-1 in order to investigate the finite gyroradius stabilizing effect of ion diamagnetic drift frequency, ω *i , on linear ideal MHD eigenmodes in tokamaks with shaped plasma cross-section. The MISHKA-D code gives a self-consistent computation of both stable and unstable eigenmodes with eigenvalues [γ] ≅ ω *i in plasmas with strong radial variation in the ion diamagnetic frequency. Test results of the MISHKA-D code show good agreement with the analytically obtained ω *i -spectrum and stability limits of the internal kink mode, n/m=1/1, used as a benchmark case. Finite-n ballooning and low-n kink (peeling) modes in the edge transport barrier just inside the separatrix are studied for H-mode plasma with the ω *i -effect included. The ion diamagnetic stabilization of the ballooning modes is found to be most effective for narrow edge pedestals. For low enough plasma density the ω *i - stabilization can lead to a second zone of ballooning stability, in which all the ballooning modes are stable for any value of the pressure gradient. For internal transport barriers typical of JET optimised shear discharges, the stabilizing influence of ion diamagnetic frequency on the n=1 global pressure driven disruptive mode is studied. A strong radial variation of ω *i is found to significantly decrease the stabilizing ω *i - effect on the n=1 mode, in comparison with the case of constant ω *i estimated at the foot of the internal transport barrier. (author)

  10. Improved core-edge tokamak transport simulations with the CORSICA 2 code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarditi, A.; Cohen, R.H.; Crotinger, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    The CORSICA 2 code models the nonlinear transport between the core and the edge of a tokamak plasma. The code couples a 2D axisymmetric edge/SOL model (UEDGE) to a 1D model for the radial core transport in toroidal flux coordinates (the transport module from the CORSICA 1 code). The core density and temperature profiles are joined to the flux-surface average profiles from the 2D code sufficiently inside the magnetic separatrix, at a flux surface on which the edge profiles are approximately constant. In the present version of the code, the deuterium density and electron and ion temperatures are coupled. The electron density is determined by imposing quasi-neutrality, both in the core and in the edge. The model allows the core-edge coupling of multiple ion densities while retaining a single temperature (corresponding to the equilibration value) for the all ion species. Applications of CORSICA 2 to modeling the DIII-D tokamak are discussed. This work will focus on the simulation of the L-H transition, coupling a single ion species (deuterium) and the two (electron and ion) temperatures. These simulations will employ a new self-consistent model for the L-H transition that is being implemented in the UEDGE code. Applications to the modeling of ITER ignition scenarios are also discussed. This will involve coupling a second density species (the thermal alphas), bringing the total number of coupled variables up to four. Finally, the progress in evolving the magnetic geometry is discussed. Currently, this geometry is calculated by CORSICA's MHD equilibrium module (TEQ) at the beginning of the run and fixed thereafter. However, CORSICA 1 can evolve this geometry quasistatically, and this quasistatic treatment is being extended to include the edge/SOL geometry. Recent improvements for code speed-up are also presented

  11. Environmental impact assessment in urban transport planning: Exploring process-related barriers in Spanish practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soria-Lara, Julio A., E-mail: j.a.sorialara@uva.nl; Bertolini, Luca, E-mail: l.bertolini@uva.nl; Brömmelstroet, Marco te, E-mail: M.C.G.teBrommelstroet@uva.nl

    2015-01-15

    The effectiveness of EIA for evaluating transport planning projects is increasingly being questioned by practitioners, institutions and scholars. The academic literature has traditionally focused more on solving content-related problems with EIA (i.e. the measurement of environmental effects) than on process-related issues (i.e. the role of EIA in the planning process and the interaction between key actors). Focusing only on technical improvements is not sufficient for rectifying the effectiveness problems of EIA. In order to address this knowledge gap, the paper explores how EIA is experienced in the Spanish planning context and offers in-depth insight into EIA process-related issues in the field of urban transport planning. From the multitude of involved actors, the research focuses on exploring the perceptions of the two main professional groups: EIA developers and transport planners. Through a web-based survey we assess the importance of process-related barriers to the effective use of EIA in urban transport planning. The analyses revealed process issues based fundamentally on unstructured stakeholders involvement and an inefficient public participation - Highlights: • Qualitative research on perceptions of EIA participants on EIA processes. • Web-based survey with different participants (EIA-developers; transport planners). • It was seen an inefficient participation of stakeholders during the EIA processes.

  12. Internal electron transport barrier due to neoclassical ambipolarity in the Helically Symmetric Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lore, J.; Briesemeister, A.; Anderson, D. T.; Anderson, F. S. B.; Likin, K. M.; Talmadge, J. N.; Zhai, K.; Guttenfelder, W.; Deng, C. B.; Spong, D. A.

    2010-01-01

    Electron cyclotron heated plasmas in the Helically Symmetric Experiment (HSX) feature strongly peaked electron temperature profiles; central temperatures are 2.5 keV with 100 kW injected power. These measurements, coupled with neoclassical predictions of large 'electron root' radial electric fields with strong radial shear, are evidence of a neoclassically driven thermal transport barrier. Neoclassical transport quantities are calculated using the PENTA code [D. A. Spong, Phys. Plasmas 12, 056114 (2005)], in which momentum is conserved and parallel flow is included. Unlike a conventional stellarator, which exhibits strong flow damping in all directions on a flux surface, quasisymmetric stellarators are free to rotate in the direction of symmetry, and the effect of momentum conservation in neoclassical calculations may therefore be significant. Momentum conservation is shown to modify the neoclassical ion flux and ambipolar ion root radial electric fields in the quasisymmetric configuration. The effect is much smaller in a HSX configuration where the symmetry is spoiled. In addition to neoclassical transport, a model of trapped electron mode turbulence is used to calculate the turbulent-driven electron thermal diffusivity. Turbulent transport quenching due to the neoclassically predicted radial electric field profile is needed in predictive transport simulations to reproduce the peaking of the measured electron temperature profile [Guttenfelder et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 215002 (2008)].

  13. Pulsed Magnetic Field Improves the Transport of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles through Cell Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Kyoung Ah; Shin, Meong Cheol; Yu, Faquan; Yang, Meizhu; David, Allan E.; Yang, Victor C.; Rosania, Gus R.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how a magnetic field affects the interaction of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) with cells is fundamental to any potential downstream applications of MNPs as gene and drug delivery vehicles. Here, we present a quantitative analysis of how a pulsed magnetic field influences the manner in which MNPs interact with, and penetrate across a cell monolayer. Relative to a constant magnetic field, the rate of MNP uptake and transport across cell monolayers was enhanced by a pulsed magnetic field. MNP transport across cells was significantly inhibited at low temperature under both constant and pulsed magnetic field conditions, consistent with an active mechanism (i.e. endocytosis) mediating MNP transport. Microscopic observations and biochemical analysis indicated that, in a constant magnetic field, transport of MNPs across the cells was inhibited due to the formation of large (>2 μm) magnetically-induced MNP aggregates, which exceeded the size of endocytic vesicles. Thus, a pulsed magnetic field enhances the cellular uptake and transport of MNPs across cell barriers relative to a constant magnetic field by promoting accumulation while minimizing magnetically-induced MNP aggregates at the cell surface. PMID:23373613

  14. Altered blood-brain barrier transport in neuro-inflammatory disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Geert J; de Vries, Helga E

    2016-06-01

    During neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory disorders of the central nervous system (CNS), such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and multiple sclerosis (MS), the protective function of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) may be severely impaired. The general neuro-inflammatory response, ranging from activation of glial cells to immune cell infiltration that is frequently associated with such brain diseases may underlie the loss of the integrity and function of the BBB. Consequentially, the delivery and disposition of drugs to the brain will be altered and may influence the treatment efficiency of such diseases. Altered BBB transport of drugs into the CNS during diseases may be the result of changes in both specific transport and non-specific transport pathways. Potential alterations in transport routes like adsorptive mediated endocytosis and receptor-mediated endocytosis may affect drug delivery to the brain. As such, drugs that normally are unable to traverse the BBB may reach their target in the diseased brain due to increased permeability. In contrast, the delivery of (targeted) drugs could be hampered during inflammatory conditions due to disturbed transport mechanisms. Therefore, the inventory of the neuro-inflammatory status of the neurovasculature (or recovery thereof) is of utmost importance in choosing and designing an adequate drug targeting strategy under disease conditions. Within this review we will briefly discuss how the function of the BBB can be affected during disease and how this may influence the delivery of drugs into the diseased CNS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Regulatory mechanisms for iron transport across the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duck, Kari A; Simpson, Ian A; Connor, James R

    2017-12-09

    Many critical metabolic functions in the brain require adequate and timely delivery of iron. However, most studies when considering brain iron uptake have ignored the iron requirements of the endothelial cells that form the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Moreover, current models of BBB iron transport do not address regional regulation of brain iron uptake or how neurons, when adapting to metabolic demands, can acquire more iron. In this study, we demonstrate that both iron-poor transferrin (apo-Tf) and the iron chelator, deferoxamine, stimulate release of iron from iron-loaded endothelial cells in an in vitro BBB model. The role of the endosomal divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) in BBB iron acquisition and transport has been questioned. Here, we show that inhibition of DMT1 alters the transport of iron and Tf across the endothelial cells. These data support an endosome-mediated model of Tf-bound iron uptake into the brain and identifies mechanisms for local regional regulation of brain iron uptake. Moreover, our data provide an explanation for the disparity in the ratio of Tf to iron transport into the brain that has confounded the field. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Glucose transporter of the human brain and blood-brain barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalaria, R.N.; Gravina, S.A.; Schmidley, J.W.; Perry, G.; Harik, S.I.

    1988-01-01

    We identified and characterized the glucose transporter in the human cerebral cortex, cerebral microvessels, and choroid plexus by specific D-glucose-displaceable [3H]cytochalasin B binding. The binding was saturable, with a dissociation constant less than 1 microM. Maximal binding capacity was approximately 7 pmol/mg protein in the cerebral cortex, approximately 42 pmol/mg protein in brain microvessels, and approximately 27 pmol/mg protein in the choroid plexus. Several hexoses displaced specific [3H]cytochalasin B binding to microvessels in a rank-order that correlated well with their known ability to cross the blood-brain barrier; the only exception was 2-deoxy-D-glucose, which had much higher affinity for the glucose transporter than the natural substrate, D-glucose. Irreversible photoaffinity labeling of the glucose transporter of microvessels with [3H]cytochalasin B, followed by solubilization and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, labeled a protein band with an average molecular weight of approximately 55,000. Monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies specific to the human erythrocyte glucose transporter immunocytochemically stained brain blood vessels and the few trapped erythrocytes in situ, with minimal staining of the neuropil. In the choroid plexus, blood vessels did not stain, but the epithelium reacted positively. We conclude that human brain microvessels are richly endowed with a glucose transport moiety similar in molecular weight and antigenic characteristics to that of human erythrocytes and brain microvessels of other mammalian species

  17. Environmental impact assessment in urban transport planning: Exploring process-related barriers in Spanish practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soria-Lara, Julio A.; Bertolini, Luca; Brömmelstroet, Marco te

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of EIA for evaluating transport planning projects is increasingly being questioned by practitioners, institutions and scholars. The academic literature has traditionally focused more on solving content-related problems with EIA (i.e. the measurement of environmental effects) than on process-related issues (i.e. the role of EIA in the planning process and the interaction between key actors). Focusing only on technical improvements is not sufficient for rectifying the effectiveness problems of EIA. In order to address this knowledge gap, the paper explores how EIA is experienced in the Spanish planning context and offers in-depth insight into EIA process-related issues in the field of urban transport planning. From the multitude of involved actors, the research focuses on exploring the perceptions of the two main professional groups: EIA developers and transport planners. Through a web-based survey we assess the importance of process-related barriers to the effective use of EIA in urban transport planning. The analyses revealed process issues based fundamentally on unstructured stakeholders involvement and an inefficient public participation - Highlights: • Qualitative research on perceptions of EIA participants on EIA processes. • Web-based survey with different participants (EIA-developers; transport planners). • It was seen an inefficient participation of stakeholders during the EIA processes

  18. Observations on the W-transport in the core plasma of JET and ASDEX Upgrade

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pütterich, T.; Dux, R.; Neu, R.; Bernert, M.; Beurskens, M.N.A.; Bobkov, V.; Brezinsek, S.; Challis, C.; Coenen, J.W.; Coffey, I.; Czarnecka, A.; Giroud, C.; Jacquet, P.; Joffrin, E.; Kallenbach, A.; Lehnen, M.; Lerche, E.; De La Luna, E.; Marsen, S.; Matthews, G.; Mayoral, M.-L.; McDermott, R.M.; Meigs, A.; Mlynář, Jan; Sertoli, M.; van Rooij, G.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 12 (2013), s. 124036-124036 ISSN 0741-3335. [European Physical Society Conference on Plasma Physics/40./. Espoo, 01.07.2013-05.07.2013] Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : tokamak * impurity transport * core plasma * fusion * tungsten * ASDEX Upgrade Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.386, year: 2013 http://iopscience.iop.org/0741-3335/55/12/124036/pdf/0741-3335_55_12_124036.pdf

  19. Active control of internal transport barrier and confinement database in JT-60U reversed shear plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakamoto, Yoshiteru; Takizuka, Tomonori; Shirai, Hiroshi; Fujita, Takaaki; Kamada, Yutaka; Ide, Shunsuke; Fukuda, Takeshi; Koide, Yoshihiko [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    2001-07-01

    Active control of internal transport barrier (ITB) and confinement properties of plasma with ITB have been studied in reversed shear plasmas. Modifications of the radial electric field (E{sub r}) profile by changing the combination of tangential neutral beams can control the ITB strength, where the contribution to E{sub r} from the toroidal rotation plays an important role. The ITB confinement database of reversed shear plasmas has been constructed. Stored energy is strongly correlated with poloidal magnetic field at the ITB foot. (author)

  20. CITY TRANSPORT IN BARRIER-FREE ARCHITECTURAL PLANNING SPACE FOR PEOPLE WITH LIMITED MOBILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pryadko Igor’ Petrovich

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the current state of transport organization for people with limited mobility. The article evaluates the results of the actions the executive authorities of Moscow and Moscow Region take. Barrier-free space organization for disabled people and parents with prams is given a special attention. The lack of strategy in the sphere leads to considerable difficulties for people with limited ability. This problem should be solved in cooperation with the survey of other peoples' needs. The article gives examples of comfortable urban space in Sochi, Moscow, Chita, Mytishchi and analyses the ways urbanism influences people with limited abilities.

  1. Gas transport in the bentonite barrier of AGP and their interfaces; Transporte de gas en la barrera de bentonita de un AGP y sus interfases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez Rodrigo, V.; Villar Gelicia, M. V.; Martin Martin, P. L.; Romero Alvarez, F. J.

    2014-07-01

    The research of gas transport processes through the barriers is of great relevance in the assessment of the behaviour of the repository. The main objective of this study is to determine the properties of gas transport in saturated bentonite samples and the interfaces between them. (Author)

  2. A 3D transport-based core analysis code for research reactors with unstructured geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Tengfei; Wu, Hongchun; Zheng, Youqi; Cao, Liangzhi; Li, Yunzhao

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • A core analysis code package based on 3D neutron transport calculation in complex geometry is developed. • The fine considerations on flux mapping, control rod effects and isotope depletion are modeled. • The code is proved to be with high accuracy and capable of handling flexible operational cases for research reactors. - Abstract: As an effort to enhance the accuracy in simulating the operations of research reactors, a 3D transport core analysis code system named REFT was developed. HELIOS is employed due to the flexibility of describing complex geometry. A 3D triangular nodal S N method transport solver, DNTR, endows the package the capability of modeling cores with unstructured geometry assemblies. A series of dedicated methods were introduced to meet the requirements of research reactor simulations. Afterwards, to make it more user friendly, a graphical user interface was also developed for REFT. In order to validate the developed code system, the calculated results were compared with the experimental results. Both the numerical and experimental results are in close agreement with each other, with the relative errors of k eff being less than 0.5%. Results for depletion calculations were also verified by comparing them with the experimental data and acceptable consistency was observed in results

  3. Microstructure of Josephson junctions: Effect on supercurrent transport in YBCO grain boundary and barrier layer junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merkle, K.L.; Huang, Y.

    1998-01-01

    The electric transport of high-temperature superconductors, such as YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x (YBCO), can be strongly restricted by the presence of high-angle grain boundaries (GB). This weak-link behavior is governed by the macroscopic GB geometry and the microscopic grain boundary structure and composition at the atomic level. Whereas grain boundaries present a considerable impediment to high current applications of high T c materials, there is considerable commercial interest in exploiting the weak-link-nature of grain boundaries for the design of microelectronic devices, such as superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). The Josephson junctions which form the basis of this technology can also be formed by introducing artificial barriers into the superconductor. The authors have examined both types of Josephson junctions by EM techniques in an effort to understand the connection between microstructure/chemistry and electrical transport properties. This knowledge is a valuable resource for the design and production of improved devices

  4. Internal transport barrier triggering by rational magnetic flux surfaces in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joffrin, E.; Challis, C.D.; Conway, G.D.

    2003-01-01

    The formation of Internal Transport Barriers (ITBs) has been experimentally associated with the presence of rational q-surfaces in both JET and ASDEX Upgrade. The triggering mechanisms are related to the occurrence of magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities such as mode coupling or fishbone activity. These events could locally modify the poloidal velocity and increase transiently the shearing rate to values comparable to the linear growth rate of ITG modes. For JET reversed magnetic shear scenarios, ITB emergence occurs preferentially when the minimum q reaches an integer value. In this case, transport effects localised in the vicinity of zero magnetic shear and close to rational q values may also contribute to the formation of ITBs.The role of rational q surfaces on ITB triggering stresses the importance of q profile control for advanced tokamak scenario and could contribute to lower substantially the access power to these scenarios in next step facilities. (author)

  5. Internal transport barrier triggering by rational magnetic flux surfaces in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joffrin, E.; Challis, C.D.; Conway, G.D.

    2003-01-01

    The formation of internal transport barriers (ITBs) has been experimentally associated with the presence of rational q surfaces in both JET and ASDEX Upgrade. The triggering mechanisms are related to the occurrence of magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities such as mode coupling and fishbone activity. These events could locally modify the poloidal velocity and increase transiently the shearing rate to values comparable with the linear growth rate of ion temperature gradient modes. For JET reversed magnetic shear scenarios, ITB emergence occurs preferentially when the minimum q reaches an integral value. In this case, transport effects localized in the vicinity of zero magnetic shear and close to rational q values may be at the origin of ITB formation. The role of rational q surfaces in ITB triggering stresses the importance of q profile control for an advanced tokamak scenario and could assist in substantially lowering the access power to these scenarios in next step facilities. (author)

  6. Internal Transport Barrier triggering by rational magnetic flux surfaces in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joffrin, E.H.

    2002-01-01

    The formation of Internal Transport Barriers (ITBs) has been experimentally associated with the presence of rational q-surfaces in both JET and ASDEX Upgrade. The triggering mechanisms are related to the occurrence of magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities such as mode coupling or fishbone activity. These events could locally modify the poloidal velocity and increase transiently the shearing rate to values comparable to the linear growth rate of ITG modes. For reversed magnetic shear scenario, ITB emergence occurs preferentially when the minimum q reaches an integer value. In this case, transport effects localised in the vicinity of zero magnetic shear and close to rational q values may also contribute to the formation of ITBs. The role of rational q surfaces on ITB triggering stresses the importance of q profile control for advanced tokamak scenario and could contribute to lower substantially the access power to these scenarios in next step facilities. (author)

  7. Formation conditions for electron internal transport barriers in JT-60U plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujita, T [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Naka Fusion Research Establishment, Naka-machi, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan); Fukuda, T [Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Sakamoto, Y [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Naka Fusion Research Establishment, Naka-machi, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan); Ide, S [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Naka Fusion Research Establishment, Naka-machi, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan); Suzuki, T [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Naka Fusion Research Establishment, Naka-machi, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan); Takenaga, H [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Naka Fusion Research Establishment, Naka-machi, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan); Ida, K [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Idei, H [Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Shimozuma, T [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Fujisawa, A [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Ohdachi, S [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Toi, K [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan)

    2004-05-01

    The formation of electron internal transport barriers (ITBs) was studied using electron cyclotron (EC) heating in JT-60U positive shear (PS) and reversed shear (RS) plasmas with scan of neutral beam (NB) power. With no or low values of NB power and with a small radial electric field (E{sub r}) gradient, a strong, box-type electron ITB was formed in RS plasmas while a peaked profile with no strong electron ITBs was observed in PS plasmas within the available EC power. When the NB power and the E{sub r} gradient were increased, the electron transport in strong electron ITBs with EC heating in RS plasmas was not affected, while electron thermal diffusivity was reduced in conjunction with the reduction of ion thermal diffusivity, and strong electron and ion ITBs were formed in PS plasmas.

  8. Performance of intact and partially degraded concrete barriers in limiting mass transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walton, J.C.

    1992-06-01

    Mass transport through concrete barriers and release rate from concrete vaults are quantitatively evaluated. The thorny issue of appropriate diffusion coefficients for use in performance assessment calculations is covered, with no ultimate solution found. Release from monolithic concrete vaults composed of concrete waste forms is estimated with a semi-analytical solution. A parametric study illustrates the importance of different parameters on release. A second situation of importance is the role of a concrete shell or vault placed around typical waste forms in limiting mass transport. In both situations, the primary factor controlling concrete performance is cracks. The implications of leaching behavior on likely groundwater concentrations is examined. Frequently, lower groundwater concentrations can be expected in the absence of engineered covers that reduce infiltration

  9. The composite water and solute transport of barley (Hordeum vulgare) roots: effect of suberized barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranathunge, Kosala; Kim, Yangmin X; Wassmann, Friedrich; Kreszies, Tino; Zeisler, Viktoria; Schreiber, Lukas

    2017-03-01

    Roots have complex anatomical structures, and certain localized cell layers develop suberized apoplastic barriers. The size and tightness of these barriers depend on the growth conditions and on the age of the root. Such complex anatomical structures result in a composite water and solute transport in roots. Development of apoplastic barriers along barley seminal roots was detected using various staining methods, and the suberin amounts in the apical and basal zones were analysed using gas chromatography-mass spectometry (GC-MS). The hydraulic conductivity of roots ( Lp r ) and of cortical cells ( Lp c ) was measured using root and cell pressure probes. When grown in hydroponics, barley roots did not form an exodermis, even at their basal zones. However, they developed an endodermis. Endodermal Casparian bands first appeared as 'dots' as early as at 20 mm from the apex, whereas a patchy suberin lamellae appeared at 60 mm. The endodermal suberin accounted for the total suberin of the roots. The absolute amount in the basal zone was significantly higher than in the apical zone, which was inversely proportional to the Lp r . Comparison of Lp r and Lp c suggested that cell to cell pathways dominate for water transport in roots. However, the calculation of Lp r from Lp c showed that at least 26 % of water transport occurs through the apoplast. Roots had different solute permeabilities ( P sr ) and reflection coefficients ( σ sr ) for the solutes used. The σ sr was below unity for the solutes, which have virtually zero permeability for semi-permeable membranes. Suberized endodermis significantly reduces Lp r of seminal roots. The water and solute transport across barley roots is composite in nature and they do not behave like ideal osmometers. The composite transport model should be extended by adding components arranged in series (cortex, endodermis) in addition to the currently included components arranged in parallel (apoplastic, cell to cell pathways). © The

  10. A kinetic model for chemical reactions without barriers: transport coefficients and eigenmodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, Giselle M; Kremer, Gilberto M; Marques, Wilson Jr; Soares, Ana Jacinta

    2011-01-01

    The kinetic model of the Boltzmann equation proposed in the work of Kremer and Soares 2009 for a binary mixture undergoing chemical reactions of symmetric type which occur without activation energy is revisited here, with the aim of investigating in detail the transport properties of the reactive mixture and the influence of the reaction process on the transport coefficients. Accordingly, the non-equilibrium solutions of the Boltzmann equations are determined through an expansion in Sonine polynomials up to the first order, using the Chapman–Enskog method, in a chemical regime for which the reaction process is close to its final equilibrium state. The non-equilibrium deviations are explicitly calculated for what concerns the thermal–diffusion ratio and coefficients of shear viscosity, diffusion and thermal conductivity. The theoretical and formal analysis developed in the present paper is complemented with some numerical simulations performed for different concentrations of reactants and products of the reaction as well as for both exothermic and endothermic chemical processes. The results reveal that chemical reactions without energy barrier can induce an appreciable influence on the transport properties of the mixture. Oppositely to the case of reactions with activation energy, the coefficients of shear viscosity and thermal conductivity become larger than those of an inert mixture when the reactions are exothermic. An application of the non-barrier model and its detailed transport picture are included in this paper, in order to investigate the dynamics of the local perturbations on the constituent number densities, and velocity and temperature of the whole mixture, induced by spontaneous internal fluctuations. It is shown that for the longitudinal disturbances there exist two hydrodynamic sound modes, one purely diffusive hydrodynamic mode and one kinetic mode

  11. A kinetic model for chemical reactions without barriers: transport coefficients and eigenmodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Giselle M.; Kremer, Gilberto M.; Marques, Wilson, Jr.; Jacinta Soares, Ana

    2011-03-01

    The kinetic model of the Boltzmann equation proposed in the work of Kremer and Soares 2009 for a binary mixture undergoing chemical reactions of symmetric type which occur without activation energy is revisited here, with the aim of investigating in detail the transport properties of the reactive mixture and the influence of the reaction process on the transport coefficients. Accordingly, the non-equilibrium solutions of the Boltzmann equations are determined through an expansion in Sonine polynomials up to the first order, using the Chapman-Enskog method, in a chemical regime for which the reaction process is close to its final equilibrium state. The non-equilibrium deviations are explicitly calculated for what concerns the thermal-diffusion ratio and coefficients of shear viscosity, diffusion and thermal conductivity. The theoretical and formal analysis developed in the present paper is complemented with some numerical simulations performed for different concentrations of reactants and products of the reaction as well as for both exothermic and endothermic chemical processes. The results reveal that chemical reactions without energy barrier can induce an appreciable influence on the transport properties of the mixture. Oppositely to the case of reactions with activation energy, the coefficients of shear viscosity and thermal conductivity become larger than those of an inert mixture when the reactions are exothermic. An application of the non-barrier model and its detailed transport picture are included in this paper, in order to investigate the dynamics of the local perturbations on the constituent number densities, and velocity and temperature of the whole mixture, induced by spontaneous internal fluctuations. It is shown that for the longitudinal disturbances there exist two hydrodynamic sound modes, one purely diffusive hydrodynamic mode and one kinetic mode.

  12. The Fuel Efficiency of Maritime Transport. Potential for improvement and analysis of barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faber, J.; Nelissen, D.; Smit, M. [CE Delft, Delft (Netherlands); Behrends, B. [Marena Ltd., s.l. (United Kingdom); Lee, D.S. [Manchester Metropolitan University, Machester (United Kingdom)

    2012-02-15

    There is significant potential to improve the fuel efficiency of ships and thus contribute to reducing greenhouse gas emissions from maritime transport. It has long been recognised that this potential is not being fully exploited, owing to the existence of non-market barriers. This report analyses the barriers to implementing fuel efficiency improvements, and concludes that the most important of these are the split incentive between ship owners and operators, a lack of trusted data on new technologies, and transaction costs associated with evaluating measures. As a result, in practice about a quarter of the cost-effective abatement potential is unavailable. There are several ways to overcome these barriers. The split incentive can - to some extent - be overcome by providing more detailed information on the fuel efficiency of vessels, making due allowance for operational profiles. This would allow fuel consumption to be more accurately projected and a larger share of efficiency benefits to accrue to ship owners, thus increasing the return on investment in fuel-saving technologies. This would also require changes to standard charter parties. The credibility of information on new technologies can be improved through intensive collaboration between suppliers of new technologies and shipping companies. In order to overcome risk, government subsidies could provide an incentive. This could have the additional benefit that governments could require publication of results.

  13. Sensitivity analysis on retardation effect of natural barriers against radionuclide transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatanaka, K.

    1994-01-01

    The generic performance assessment of the geological disposal system for high level waste (HLW) in Japan has been carried out by the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) in accordance with the overall HLW management program defined by the Atomic Energy Commission of Japan. The Japanese concept of the geological disposal system is based on a multi-barrier system which is composed of vitrified waste, carbon steel overpack, thick bentonite buffer and a variety of realistic geological conditions. The main objectives of the study are the detailed analysis of the performance of engineered barrier system (EBS) and the analysis of the performance of natural barrier system (NBS) and the evaluation of its compliance with the required overall system performance. Sensitivity analysis was carried out for the objectives to investigate the way and extent of the retardation in the release to biosphere by the effect of NBS, and to clarify the conditions which is sufficient to ensure that the overall system meets safety requirement. The radionuclide transport model in geological media, the sensitivity analysis, and the calculated results of the retardation effect of NBS in terms of the sensitivity parameters are reported. (K.I.)

  14. Experimental and gyrokinetic investigation of core impurity transport in Alcator C-mod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, N.; Greenwald, M.; Podpaly, Y.; Reinke, M. L.; Rice, J. E.; White, A. E.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Puetterich, T.

    2010-11-01

    A new multiple pulse laser blow-off system coupled with an upgraded high resolution x-ray spectrometer with spatial resolution allow for the most detailed studies of impurity transport on Alcator C-mod to date. Trace impurity injections created by the laser blow-off technique were introduced into plasmas with a wide range of parameters and time evolving profiles of He-like calcium were measured. The unique measurement of a single charge state profile and line integrated emission measurements from spectroscopic diagnostics were compared with the simulated emission from the impurity transport code STRAHL. A nonlinear least squares fitting routine was coupled with STRAHL, allowing for core impurity transport coefficients with errors to be determined. With this method, experimental data from trace calcium injections were analyzed and radially dependent, core values (< r/a ˜.6) of the diffusive and convective components of the impurity flux were obtained. The STRAHL results are compared with linear and global, nonlinear simulations from the gyrokinetic code GYRO. Results of this comparison and an investigation of the underlying physics associated with turbulent impurity transport will be presented.

  15. The Role of P-Glycoprotein in Transport of Danshensu across the Blood-Brain Barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng-Fei Yu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Danshensu (3-(3, 4-dihydroxyphenyl lactic acid, a water-soluble active component isolated from the root of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge, is widely used for the treatment of cerebrovascular diseases. The present study aims to investigate the role of P-glycoprotein in transport of Danshensu across the blood-brain barrier. Sprague-Dawley rats were pretreated with verapamil at a dose of 20 mg kg−1 (verapamil group or the same volume of normal saline (control group. Ninety minutes later, the animals were administrated with Danshensu (15 mg kg−1 by intravenous injection. At 15 min, 30 min, and 60 min after Danshensu administration, the levels of Danshensu in the blood and brain were detected by high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS. The results showed that Danshensu concentrations in the brain of the rats pretreated with verapamil were significantly increased. In addition, the brain-plasma ratios of the group pretreated with verapamil were much higher than that of the control group. There was no difference in Danshensu level in plasma between the verapamil group and control group. The findings indicated that Danshensu can pass the blood-brain barrier, and P-glycoprotein plays an important role in Danshensu transportation in brain.

  16. Density fluctuation measurement at edge and internal transport barriers in JT-60U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyama, N; Bruskin, L G; Takenaga, H; Shinohara, K; Isayama, A; Ide, S; Sakamoto, Y; Suzuki, T; Fujita, T; Kamada, Y; Miura, Y

    2004-01-01

    A new analytical method using a combination of the O-mode reflectometer and a time-dependent two-dimensional full-wave simulation code has been developed for the quantitative evaluation of density fluctuations in JT-60U. Two statistical parameters of the reflectometer signals, fluctuation index (F) and elongation factor (χ), are introduced as measures of the fluctuation amplitude (γ) and the width of the poloidal wave number spectrum (k θ0 ). This method is applied to the edge transport barrier (ETB) and internal transport barrier (ITB). At the transition to the ELM free H-mode phase, analysis suggests that the density fluctuation level reduced from 1.9-3.2% to 0.29-0.44%, while the value of k θ0 changed from 1.6-2.0 to 0.77-0.81 cm -1 in the ETB region. On the other hand, the amplitude of the density fluctuation was evaluated as 1.0-2.0% at the ITB region, even after the formation of the box type ITB. Instead, when a pellet was injected into the plasma with a box type ITB as an external perturbation, a remarkable change in the frequency spectrum was observed. Analysis suggests a reduction in the density fluctuation level to 0.4-0.6% after the pellet injection

  17. Influence of ion transport on discharge propagation of nanosecond dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Weizhuo; Koji, Fukagata

    2017-11-01

    A numerical study has been conducted to understand the streamer formation and propagation of nanosecond pulsed surface dielectric barrier discharge of positive polarity. First we compared the result of different grid configuration to investigate the influence of x and y direction grid spacing on the streamer propagation. The streamer propagation is sensitive to y grid spacing especially at the dielectric surface. The streamer propagation velocity can reach 0.2 cm/ns when the voltage magnitude is 12 kV. A narrow gap was found between the streamer and dielectric barrier, where the plasma density is several orders of magnitude smaller than the streamer region. Analyses on the ion transport in the gap and streamer regions show the different ion transport mechanisms in the two different region. In the gap region, the diffusion of electron toward the dielectric layer decreases the seed electron in the beginning of voltage pulse, resulting that ionization avalanche does not occur. The streamer region is not significantly affected by the diffusion flux toward the dielectric layer, so that ionization avalanche takes place and leads to dramatic increase of plasma density.

  18. Efficiency and constraints in transport planning. [Denmark]. Effektivitet og barrierer i transportplanlaegningen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skjoett-Larsen, T.

    1991-06-15

    Results from several of the research projects financed by the Danish Ministry of Energy have shown that there are potentials for saving energy and reducing operational costs which can be fulfilled through improved planning of industrial transport projects. Yet it has also been observed that many good ideas are seldom put into practice. The factors which act as constraints to the realization of possible solutions to transport problems are examined. Fourteen industrial companies were interviewed in relation to their distribution planning. Recommendations for a more efficient mediation of research results to target groups are offered. Relevant data from named Danish firms are presented. The named constraints are claimed to be insufficient knowledge (of research results in this area), lack of definition of effectivity targets, unsatisfactory motivation and training of personnel, organisational barriers and external barriers such as trucks that are too small, ferry taxes that are too high, road and rail networks that are in need of extension etc. These problems are discussed. (AB).

  19. Multi-dimensional relativistic simulations of core-collapse supernovae with energy-dependent neutrino transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, Bernhard

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis, we have presented the first multi-dimensional models of core-collapse supernovae that combine a detailed, up-to-date treatment of neutrino transport, the equation of state, and - in particular - general relativistic gravity. Building on the well-tested neutrino transport code VERTEX and the GR hydrodynamics code CoCoNuT, we developed and implemented a relativistic generalization of a ray-by-ray-plus method for energy-dependent neutrino transport. The result of these effort, the VERTEX-CoCoNuT code, also incorporates a number of improved numerical techniques that have not been used in the code components VERTEX and CoCoNuT before. In order to validate the VERTEX-CoCoNuT code, we conducted several test simulations in spherical symmetry, most notably a comparison with the one-dimensional relativistic supernova code AGILE-BOLTZTRAN and the Newtonian PROMETHEUSVERTEX code. (orig.)

  20. Multi-dimensional relativistic simulations of core-collapse supernovae with energy-dependent neutrino transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Bernhard

    2009-05-07

    In this thesis, we have presented the first multi-dimensional models of core-collapse supernovae that combine a detailed, up-to-date treatment of neutrino transport, the equation of state, and - in particular - general relativistic gravity. Building on the well-tested neutrino transport code VERTEX and the GR hydrodynamics code CoCoNuT, we developed and implemented a relativistic generalization of a ray-by-ray-plus method for energy-dependent neutrino transport. The result of these effort, the VERTEX-CoCoNuT code, also incorporates a number of improved numerical techniques that have not been used in the code components VERTEX and CoCoNuT before. In order to validate the VERTEX-CoCoNuT code, we conducted several test simulations in spherical symmetry, most notably a comparison with the one-dimensional relativistic supernova code AGILE-BOLTZTRAN and the Newtonian PROMETHEUSVERTEX code. (orig.)

  1. Transporting TMI-2 core debris to INEL: Public safety and public response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt, R.C.; Reno, H.W.; Young, W.R.; Hamric, J.P.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the approach taken by the US Department of Energy to ensure that public safety is maintained during transport of core debris from the Unit-2 reactor at the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station near Harrisburg, PA, to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, ID. It provides up-to-date information about public response to the transport action and discusses DOE's position on several institutional issues. The authors advise that planners of future transport operations be prepared for a multitude of comments from all levels of federal, state, and local governments, special interest groups, and private citizens. They also advise planners to keep meticulous records concerning all informational transactions. 3 figs

  2. Hierarchical modeling of plasma and transport phenomena in a dielectric barrier discharge reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bali, N.; Aggelopoulos, C. A.; Skouras, E. D.; Tsakiroglou, C. D.; Burganos, V. N.

    2017-12-01

    A novel dual-time hierarchical approach is developed to link the plasma process to macroscopic transport phenomena in the interior of a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor that has been used for soil remediation (Aggelopoulos et al 2016 Chem. Eng. J. 301 353-61). The generation of active species by plasma reactions is simulated at the microseconds (µs) timescale, whereas convection and thermal conduction are simulated at the macroscopic (minutes) timescale. This hierarchical model is implemented in order to investigate the influence of the plasma DBD process on the transport and reaction mechanisms during remediation of polluted soil. In the microscopic model, the variables of interest include the plasma-induced reactive concentrations, while in the macroscopic approach, the temperature distribution, and the velocity field both inside the discharge gap and within the polluted soil material as well. For the latter model, the Navier-Stokes and Darcy Brinkman equations for the transport phenomena in the porous domain are solved numerically using a FEM software. The effective medium theory is employed to provide estimates of the effective time-evolving and three-phase transport properties in the soil sample. Model predictions considering the temporal evolution of the plasma remediation process are presented and compared with corresponding experimental data.

  3. Effects of insulin on hexose transport across blood-brain barrier in normoglycemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namba, H.; Lucignani, G.; Nehlig, A.; Patlak, C.; Pettigrew, K.; Kennedy, C.; Sokoloff, L.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of insulin on 3-O-[ 14 C] methylglucose transport across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) were studied in conscious rats under steady-state normoglycemic conditions. The [ 14 C]methylglucose was infused intravenously at a constant rate, and animals were killed at various times between 5 and 30 min after the initiation of the infusion. The time course of the arterial plasma concentration of [ 14 C]methylglucose was determined in timed arterial blood samples taken during the infusion. Local cerebral tissue concentrations of [ 14 C]methylglucose at the time of killing were determined by quantitative autoradiography of brain sections. The rate constants for inward and outward transport of [ 14 C]methylglucose across the BBB, K 1 , and k 2 , respectively, were estimated by a least-squares, best-fit of a kinetic equation to the measured time courses of plasma and tissue concentrations. The equilibrium distribution ration, K 1 /k 2 , for [ 14 C]methylglucose in brain increased by ∼ 10-11% in the hyperinsulinemic animals. Because 3-O-[ 14 C]methylglucose shares the same carrier that transports glucose and other hexoses across the BBB, these results suggest that hyperinsulinemia decreases the rate constants for transport but increases the distribution space for hexoses in brain. These effects are, however, quite small and are probably minor or negligible when compared with the major effects of insulin in other tissues

  4. Alpha Adrenergic Induction of Transport of Lysosomal Enzyme across the Blood-Brain Barrier.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiko Urayama

    Full Text Available The impermeability of the adult blood-brain barrier (BBB to lysosomal enzymes impedes the ability to treat the central nervous system manifestations of lysosomal storage diseases. Here, we found that simultaneous stimulation of the alpha1 and alpha2 adrenoreceptor restores in adult mice the high rate of transport for the lysosomal enzyme P-GUS that is seen in neonates but lost with development. Beta adrenergics, other monoamines, and acetylcholine did not restore this transport. A high dose (500 microg/mouse of clonidine, a strong alpha2 and weak alpha1 agonist, was able to act as monotherapy in the stimulation of P-GUS transport. Neither use of alpha1 plus alpha2 agonists nor the high dose clonidine disrupted the BBB to albumin. In situ brain perfusion and immunohistochemistry studies indicated that adrengerics act on transporters already at the luminal surface of brain endothelial cells. These results show that adrenergic stimulation, including monotherapy with clonidine, could be key for CNS enzyme replacement therapy.

  5. Enhancing the design of in situ chemical barriers with multicomponent reactive transport modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevougian, S.D.; Steefel, C.I.; Yabusaki, S.B.

    1994-11-01

    This paper addresses the need for systematic control of field-scale performance in the emplacement and operation of in situ chemical treatment barriers; in particular, it addresses the issue of how the local coupling of reaction kinetics and material heterogeneities at the laboratory or bench scale can be accurately upscaled to the field. The authors have recently developed modeling analysis tools that can explicitly account for all relevant chemical reactions that accompany the transport of reagents and contaminants through a chemically and physically heterogeneous subsurface rock or soil matrix. These tools are incorporated into an enhanced design methodology for in situ chemical treatment technologies, and the new methodology is demonstrated in the ongoing design of a field experiment for the In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) project at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. The ISRM design approach, which systematically integrates bench-scale and site characterization information, provides an ideal test for the new reactive transport techniques. The need for the enhanced chemistry capability is demonstrated by an example that shows how intra-aqueous redox kinetics can affect the transport of reactive solutes. Simulations are carried out on massively parallel computer architectures to resolve the influence of multiscale heterogeneities on multicomponent, multidimensional reactive transport. The technology will soon be available to design larger-scale remediation schemes

  6. Kinetics of Transferrin and Transferrin-Receptor during Iron Transport through Blood Brain Barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Aminul; Liu, Jin; Dutta, Prashanta

    2017-11-01

    Transferrin and its receptors play an important role during the uptake and transcytosis of iron by blood brain barrier (BBB) endothelial cells to maintain iron homeostasis in BBB endothelium and brain. In the blood side of BBB, ferric iron binds with the apo-transferrin to form holo-transferrin which enters the endothelial cell via transferrin receptor mediated endocytosis. Depending on the initial concentration of iron inside the cell endocytosed holo-transferrin can either be acidified in the endosome or exocytosed through the basolateral membrane. Acidification of holo-transferrin in the endosome releases ferrous irons which may either be stored and used by the cell or transported into brain side. Exocytosis of the holo-transferrin through basolateral membrane leads to transport of iron bound to transferrin into brain side. In this work, kinetics of internalization, recycling and exocytosis of transferrin and its receptors are modeled by laws of mass action during iron transport in BBB endothelial cell. Kinetic parameters for the model are determined by least square analysis. Our results suggest that the cell's initial iron content determines the extent of the two possible iron transport pathways, which will be presented in this talk Research reported in this publication was supported by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number R01GM122081.

  7. Measurement and modelling of reactive transport in geological barriers for nuclear waste containment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Qingrong; Joseph, Claudia; Schmeide, Katja; Jivkov, Andrey P

    2015-11-11

    Compacted clays are considered as excellent candidates for barriers to radionuclide transport in future repositories for nuclear waste due to their very low hydraulic permeability. Diffusion is the dominant transport mechanism, controlled by a nano-scale pore system. Assessment of the clays' long-term containment function requires adequate modelling of such pore systems and their evolution. Existing characterisation techniques do not provide complete pore space information for effective modelling, such as pore and throat size distributions and connectivity. Special network models for reactive transport are proposed here using the complimentary character of the pore space and the solid phase. This balances the insufficient characterisation information and provides the means for future mechanical-physical-chemical coupling. The anisotropy and heterogeneity of clays is represented using different length parameters and percentage of pores in different directions. Resulting networks are described as mathematical graphs with efficient discrete calculus formulation of transport. Opalinus Clay (OPA) is chosen as an example. Experimental data for the tritiated water (HTO) and U(vi) diffusion through OPA are presented. Calculated diffusion coefficients of HTO and uranium species are within the ranges of the experimentally determined data in different clay directions. This verifies the proposed pore network model and validates that uranium complexes are diffusing as neutral species in OPA. In the case of U(vi) diffusion the method is extended to account for sorption and convection. Rather than changing pore radii by coarse grained mathematical formula, physical sorption is simulated in each pore, which is more accurate and realistic.

  8. Transport characteristics of guanidino compounds at the blood-brain barrier and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier: relevance to neural disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tachikawa Masanori

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Guanidino compounds (GCs, such as creatine, phosphocreatine, guanidinoacetic acid, creatinine, methylguanidine, guanidinosuccinic acid, γ-guanidinobutyric acid, β-guanidinopropionic acid, guanidinoethane sulfonic acid and α-guanidinoglutaric acid, are present in the mammalian brain. Although creatine and phosphocreatine play important roles in energy homeostasis in the brain, accumulation of GCs may induce epileptic discharges and convulsions. This review focuses on how physiologically important and/or neurotoxic GCs are distributed in the brain under physiological and pathological conditions. Transporters for GCs at the blood-brain barrier (BBB and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF barrier (BCSFB have emerged as substantial contributors to GCs distribution in the brain. Creatine transporter (CRT/solute carrier (SLC 6A8 expressed at the BBB regulates creatine concentration in the brain, and represents a major pathway for supply of creatine from the circulating blood to the brain. CRT may be a key factor facilitating blood-to-brain guanidinoacetate transport in patients deficient in S-adenosylmethionine:guanidinoacetate N-methyltransferase, the creatine biosynthetic enzyme, resulting in cerebral accumulation of guanidinoacetate. CRT, taurine transporter (TauT/SLC6A6 and organic cation transporter (OCT3/SLC22A3 expressed at the BCSFB are involved in guanidinoacetic acid or creatinine efflux transport from CSF. Interestingly, BBB efflux transport of GCs, including guanidinoacetate and creatinine, is negligible, though the BBB has a variety of efflux transport systems for synthetic precursors of GCs, such as amino acids and neurotransmitters. Instead, the BCSFB functions as a major cerebral clearance system for GCs. In conclusion, transport of GCs at the BBB and BCSFB appears to be the key determinant of the cerebral levels of GCs, and changes in the transport characteristics may cause the abnormal distribution of GCs in the brain seen

  9. Studies of the disruption prevention by ECRH at plasma current rise stage in limiter discharges/Possibility of an internal transport barrier producing under dominating electron transport in the T-10 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alikaev, V.V.; Borshegovskij, A.A.; Chistyakov, V.V.

    2001-01-01

    'Studies of the Disruption Prevention by ECRH at Plasma Current Rise Stage in Limiter Discharges' - Studies of disruption prevention by means of ECRH in T-10 at the plasma current rise phase in limiter discharges with circular plasma cross-section were performed. Reliable disruption prevention by ECRH at HF power (P HF ) min level equal to 20% of ohmic heating power P OH was demonstrated. m/n=2/1 mode MHD-activity developed before disruption (with characteristic time ∼ 120 ms) can be considered as disruption precursor and can be used in a feedback system. 'Possibility of an Internal Transport Barrier Producing under Dominating Electron Transport in the T-10 Tokamak' - The reversed shear experiments were carried out on T-10 at the HF power up to 1MW. The reversed shear in the core was produced by on-axis ECCD in direction opposite to the plasma current. There are no obvious signs of Internal Transport Barriers formation under condition when high-k turbulence determines the electron transport. (author)

  10. Self-consistent computation of transport barrier formation by fluid drift turbulence in tokamak geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, B.; Jenko, F.; Peeters, A.G.; Teo, A.C.Y.

    1999-01-01

    (1) Computations of turbulence from the electromagnetic gyro fluid model are performed in a flux surface geometry representing the actual MHD equilibrium of the ASDEX Upgrade edge flux surfaces. The transition to ideal ballooning seen in simple geometries as the plasma beta rises is suppressed, leaving the transport at quantitatively realistic levels. Computations for core parameters at half-radius geometry show significant contribution due to the finite beta electron dynamics, possibly removing the standard ITG threshold. (2) Strong inward vorticity transport in edge turbulence, resulting from ion diamagnetic flows, may lead to a build up of mean ExB vorticity fast enough to cause an H-mode transition. (3) Friction of mean ion flows against neutrals involves both toroidal and poloidal flow components, leading to a finite radial current due to a given ExB profile even with zero poloidal rotation. (author)

  11. Self-consistent computation of transport barrier formation by fluid drift turbulence in tokamak geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, B.; Jenko, F.; Peeters, A.; Teo, A.C-Y.

    2001-01-01

    (1) Computations of turbulence from the electromagnetic gyrofluid model are performed in a flux surface geometry representing the actual MHD equilibrium of the ASDEX Upgrade edge flux surfaces. The transition to ideal ballooning seen in simple geometries as the plasma beta rises is suppressed, leaving the transport at quantitatively realistic levels. Computations for core parameters at half-radius geometry show significant contribution due to the finite beta electron dynamics, possibly removing the standard ITG threshold. (2) Strong inward vorticity transport in edge turbulence, resulting from ion diamagnetic flows, may lead to a build up of mean ExB vorticity fast enough to cause an H-mode transition. (3) Friction of mean ion flows against neutrals involves both toroidal and poloidal flow components, leading to a finite radial current due to a given ExB profile even with zero poloidal rotation. (author)

  12. Impairment of brain endothelial glucose transporter by methamphetamine causes blood-brain barrier dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murrin L Charles

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methamphetamine (METH, an addictive psycho-stimulant drug with euphoric effect is known to cause neurotoxicity due to oxidative stress, dopamine accumulation and glial cell activation. Here we hypothesized that METH-induced interference of glucose uptake and transport at the endothelium can disrupt the energy requirement of the blood-brain barrier (BBB function and integrity. We undertake this study because there is no report of METH effects on glucose uptake and transport across the blood-brain barrier (BBB to date. Results In this study, we demonstrate that METH-induced disruption of glucose uptake by endothelium lead to BBB dysfunction. Our data indicate that a low concentration of METH (20 μM increased the expression of glucose transporter protein-1 (GLUT1 in primary human brain endothelial cell (hBEC, main component of BBB without affecting the glucose uptake. A high concentration of 200 μM of METH decreased both the glucose uptake and GLUT1 protein levels in hBEC culture. Transcription process appeared to regulate the changes in METH-induced GLUT1 expression. METH-induced decrease in GLUT1 protein level was associated with reduction in BBB tight junction protein occludin and zonula occludens-1. Functional assessment of the trans-endothelial electrical resistance of the cell monolayers and permeability of dye tracers in animal model validated the pharmacokinetics and molecular findings that inhibition of glucose uptake by GLUT1 inhibitor cytochalasin B (CB aggravated the METH-induced disruption of the BBB integrity. Application of acetyl-L-carnitine suppressed the effects of METH on glucose uptake and BBB function. Conclusion Our findings suggest that impairment of GLUT1 at the brain endothelium by METH may contribute to energy-associated disruption of tight junction assembly and loss of BBB integrity.

  13. Quality assurance in the removal and transport of the TMI-2 [Three Mile Island Unit 2] core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, G.R.; Marsden, J.F.

    1988-01-01

    The March 1979 accident at Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) damaged the core of the reactor. One of the major cleanup activities involves removal of the damaged core from the reactor and transporting it from the TMI-2 site near Middletown, Pennsylvania, to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) near Idaho Falls, Idaho. Removal and transport of the damaged core necessitated the development of much specialized equipment. This paper focuses on the role quality assurance (QA) played in the design, fabrication, acceptance, and use of three important pieces of core debris removal and transportation equipment: (1) the core boring machine, (2) the fuel debris canisters, (3) the NuPac 125-B rail cask and handling equipment

  14. Parallelization of a three-dimensional whole core transport code DeCART

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin Young, Cho; Han Gyu, Joo; Ha Yong, Kim; Moon-Hee, Chang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Yuseong-gu, Daejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-07-01

    Parallelization of the DeCART (deterministic core analysis based on ray tracing) code is presented that reduces the computational burden of the tremendous computing time and memory required in three-dimensional whole core transport calculations. The parallelization employs the concept of MPI grouping and the MPI/OpenMP mixed scheme as well. Since most of the computing time and memory are used in MOC (method of characteristics) and the multi-group CMFD (coarse mesh finite difference) calculation in DeCART, variables and subroutines related to these two modules are the primary targets for parallelization. Specifically, the ray tracing module was parallelized using a planar domain decomposition scheme and an angular domain decomposition scheme. The parallel performance of the DeCART code is evaluated by solving a rodded variation of the C5G7MOX three dimensional benchmark problem and a simplified three-dimensional SMART PWR core problem. In C5G7MOX problem with 24 CPUs, a speedup of maximum 21 is obtained on an IBM Regatta machine and 22 on a LINUX Cluster in the MOC kernel, which indicates good parallel performance of the DeCART code. In the simplified SMART problem, the memory requirement of about 11 GBytes in the single processor cases reduces to 940 Mbytes with 24 processors, which means that the DeCART code can now solve large core problems with affordable LINUX clusters. (authors)

  15. Strain relaxation and ambipolar electrical transport in GaAs/InSb core-shell nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieger, Torsten; Zellekens, Patrick; Demarina, Natalia; Hassan, Ali Al; Hackemüller, Franz Josef; Lüth, Hans; Pietsch, Ullrich; Schäpers, Thomas; Grützmacher, Detlev; Lepsa, Mihail Ion

    2017-11-30

    The growth, crystal structure, strain relaxation and room temperature transport characteristics of GaAs/InSb core-shell nanowires grown using molecular beam epitaxy are investigated. Due to the large lattice mismatch between GaAs and InSb of 14%, a transition from island-based to layer-like growth occurs during the formation of the shell. High resolution transmission electron microscopy in combination with geometric phase analyses as well as X-ray diffraction with synchrotron radiation are used to investigate the strain relaxation and prove the existence of different dislocations relaxing the strain on zinc blende and wurtzite core-shell nanowire segments. While on the wurtzite phase only Frank partial dislocations are found, the strain on the zinc blende phase is relaxed by dislocations with perfect, Shockley partial and Frank partial dislocations. Even for ultrathin shells of about 2 nm thickness, the strain caused by the high lattice mismatch between GaAs and InSb is relaxed almost completely. Transfer characteristics of the core-shell nanowires show an ambipolar conductance behavior whose strength strongly depends on the dimensions of the nanowires. The interpretation is given based on an electronic band profile which is calculated for completely relaxed core/shell structures. The peculiarities of the band alignment in this situation implies simultaneously occupied electron and hole channels in the InSb shell. The ambipolar behavior is then explained by the change of carrier concentration in both channels by the gate voltage.

  16. Tungsten Transport in the Core of JET H-mode Plasmas, Experiments and Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angioni, Clemente

    2014-10-01

    The physics of heavy impurity transport in tokamak plasmas plays an essential role towards the achievement of practical fusion energy. Reliable predictions of the behavior of these impurities require the development of realistic theoretical models and a complete understanding of present experiments, against which models can be validated. Recent experimental campaigns at JET with the ITER-like wall, with a W divertor, provide an extremely interesting and relevant opportunity to perform this combined experimental and theoretical research. Theoretical models of both neoclassical and turbulent transport must consistently include the impact of any poloidal asymmetry of the W density to enable quantitative predictions of the 2D W density distribution over the poloidal cross section. The agreement between theoretical predictions and experimentally reconstructed 2D W densities allows the identification of the main mechanisms which govern W transport in the core of JET H-mode plasmas. Neoclassical transport is largely enhanced by centrifugal effects and the neoclassical convection dominates, leading to central accumulation in the presence of central peaking of the density profiles and insufficiently peaked ion temperature profiles. The strength of the neoclassical temperature screening is affected by poloidal asymmetries. Only around mid-radius, turbulent diffusion offsets neoclassical transport. Consistently with observations in other devices, ion cyclotron resonance heating in the plasma center can flatten the electron density profile and peak the ion temperature profile and provide a means to reverse the neoclassical convection. MHD activity may hamper or speed up the accumulation process depending on mode number and plasma conditions. Finally, the relationship of JET results to a parallel modelling activity of the W behavior in the core of ASDEX Upgrade plasmas is presented. This project has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation

  17. Developmental changes of l-arginine transport at the blood-brain barrier in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachikawa, Masanori; Hirose, Shirou; Akanuma, Shin-Ichi; Matsuyama, Ryo; Hosoya, Ken-Ichi

    2018-05-01

    l-Arginine is required for regulating synapse formation/patterning and angiogenesis in the developing brain. We hypothesized that this requirement would be met by increased transporter-mediated supply across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Thus, the purpose of this work was to test the idea that elevation of blood-to-brain l-arginine transport across the BBB in the postnatal period coincides with up-regulation of cationic acid transporter 1 (CAT1) expression in developing brain capillaries. We found that the apparent brain-to-plasma concentration ratio (Kp, app) of l-arginine after intravenous administration during the first and second postnatal weeks was 2-fold greater than that at the adult stage. Kp, app of l-serine was also increased at the first postnatal week. In contrast, Kp, app of d-mannitol, a passively BBB-permeable molecule, did not change, indicating that increased transport of l-arginine and l-serine is not due to BBB immaturity. Double immunohistochemical staining of CAT1 and a marker protein, glucose transporter 1, revealed that CAT1 was localized on both luminal and abluminal membranes of brain capillary endothelial cells during the developmental and adult stages. A dramatic increase in CAT1 expression in the brain was seen at postnatal day 7 (P7) and day 14 (P14) and the expression subsequently decreased as the brain matured. In accordance with this, intense immunostaining of CAT1 was observed in brain capillaries at P7 and P14. These findings strongly support our hypothesis and suggest that the supply of blood-born l-arginine to the brain via CAT1 at the BBB plays a key role in meeting the elevated demand for l-arginine in postnatal brain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Transporter-Guided Delivery of Nanoparticles to Improve Drug Permeation across Cellular Barriers and Drug Exposure to Selective Cell Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longfa Kou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Targeted nano-drug delivery systems conjugated with specific ligands to target selective cell-surface receptors or transporters could enhance the efficacy of drug delivery and therapy. Transporters are expressed differentially on the cell-surface of different cell types, and also specific transporters are expressed at higher than normal levels in selective cell types under pathological conditions. They also play a key role in intestinal absorption, delivery via non-oral routes (e.g., pulmonary route and nasal route, and transfer across biological barriers (e.g., blood–brain barrier and blood–retinal barrier. As such, the cell-surface transporters represent ideal targets for nano-drug delivery systems to facilitate drug delivery to selective cell types under normal or pathological conditions and also to avoid off-target adverse side effects of the drugs. There is increasing evidence in recent years supporting the utility of cell-surface transporters in the field of nano-drug delivery to increase oral bioavailability, to improve transfer across the blood–brain barrier, and to enhance delivery of therapeutics in a cell-type selective manner in disease states. Here we provide a comprehensive review of recent advancements in this interesting and important area. We also highlight certain key aspects that need to be taken into account for optimal development of transporter-assisted nano-drug delivery systems.

  19. Evolutionarily Conserved Roles for Blood-Brain Barrier Xenobiotic Transporters in Endogenous Steroid Partitioning and Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindle, Samantha J; Munji, Roeben N; Dolghih, Elena; Gaskins, Garrett; Orng, Souvinh; Ishimoto, Hiroshi; Soung, Allison; DeSalvo, Michael; Kitamoto, Toshihiro; Keiser, Michael J; Jacobson, Matthew P; Daneman, Richard; Bainton, Roland J

    2017-10-31

    Central nervous system (CNS) chemical protection depends upon discrete control of small-molecule access by the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Curiously, some drugs cause CNS side-effects despite negligible transit past the BBB. To investigate this phenomenon, we asked whether the highly BBB-enriched drug efflux transporter MDR1 has dual functions in controlling drug and endogenous molecule CNS homeostasis. If this is true, then brain-impermeable drugs could induce behavioral changes by affecting brain levels of endogenous molecules. Using computational, genetic, and pharmacologic approaches across diverse organisms, we demonstrate that BBB-localized efflux transporters are critical for regulating brain levels of endogenous steroids and steroid-regulated behaviors (sleep in Drosophila and anxiety in mice). Furthermore, we show that MDR1-interacting drugs are associated with anxiety-related behaviors in humans. We propose a general mechanism for common behavioral side effects of prescription drugs: pharmacologically challenging BBB efflux transporters disrupts brain levels of endogenous substrates and implicates the BBB in behavioral regulation. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Analysis and modelling of power modulation experiments in JET plasmas with internal transport barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marinoni, A [Politecnico di Milano, dipartimento di Ingegneria Nucleare, Milano (Italy); Mantica, P [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, Euratom-ENEA-CNR Association, Milan (Italy); Eester, D Van [LPP-ERM/KMS, Association EURATOM-Belgian State, TEC, B-1000 Brussels (Belgium); Imbeaux, F [Association EURATOM-CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC, CEA Cadarache, 13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Mantsinen, M [Helsinki University of Technology, Association Euratom-Tekes, PO Box 2200 (Finland); Hawkes, N [Euratom-UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon (United Kingdom); Joffrin, E [Association EURATOM-CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC, CEA Cadarache, 13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Kiptily, V [Euratom-UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon (United Kingdom); Pinches, S D [Max Plank Institut fur Plasmaphysik, Euratom Association, Garching (Germany); Salmi, A [Helsinki University of Technology, Association Euratom-Tekes, PO Box 2200 (Finland); Sharapov, S [Euratom-UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon (United Kingdom); Voitsekhovitch, I [Euratom-UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon (United Kingdom); Vries, P de [FOM Institut voor Plasmafysica, Association Euratom-FOM, Nieuwegein, The (Netherlands); Zastrow, K D [Euratom-UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon (United Kingdom)

    2006-10-15

    Understanding the physics of internal transport barriers (ITBs) is a crucial issue in developing ITER relevant advanced tokamak scenarios. To gain new information on ITBs, RF power modulation experiments, mainly devoted to the study of electron heat transport through ITBs, have been performed on the JET tokamak. The main physics results have been reported in [1]. The present paper describes in detail the data analysis and numerical modelling work carried out for the interpretation of the experiments. ITBs located in the negative shear region behave as localized insulating layers able to stop the heat wave propagation, thus implying that the ITB is a region of low diffusivity characterized by a loss of stiffness. Various sources of spurious effects affecting the interpretation of the results are analysed and discussed. First principle based models have so far failed to predict the temperature profile in the first place, which prevented their application to modulation results, while empirical transport models have been set up and reproduce the major part of the data.

  1. 3-D Whole-Core Transport Calculation with 3D/2D Rotational Plane Slicing Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Han Jong; Cho, Nam Zin [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Use of the method of characteristics (MOC) is very popular due to its capability of heterogeneous geometry treatment and widely used for 2-D core calculation, but direct extension of MOC to 3-D core is not so attractive due to huge calculational cost. 2-D/1-D fusion method was very successful for 3-D calculation of current generation reactor types (highly heterogeneous in radial direction but piece-wise homogeneous in axial direction). In this paper, 2-D MOC concept is extended to 3-D core calculation with little modification of an existing 2-D MOC code. The key idea is to suppose 3-D geometry as a set of many 2-D planes like a phone-directory book. Dividing 3-D structure into a large number of 2-D planes and solving each plane with a simple 2-D SN transport method would give the solution of a 3-D structure. This method was developed independently at KAIST but it is found that this concept is similar with that of 'plane tracing' in the MCCG-3D code. The method developed was tested on the 3-D C5G7 OECD/NEA benchmark problem and compared with the 2-D/1-D fusion method. Results show that the proposed method is worth investigating further. A new approach to 3-D whole-core transport calculation is described and tested. By slicing 3-D structure along characteristic planes and solving each 2-D plane problem, we can get 3-D solution. The numerical test results indicate that the new method is comparable with the 2D/1D fusion method and outperforms other existing methods. But more fair comparison should be done in similar discretization level.

  2. Coupled full core neutron transport/CFD simulations of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kochunas, B.; Stimpson, S.; Collins, B.; Downar, T.; Brewster, R.; Baglietto, E.; Yan, J.

    2012-01-01

    Recently as part of the CASL project, a capability to perform 3D whole-core coupled neutron transport and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations was demonstrated. This work uses the 2D/1D transport code DeCART and the commercial CFD code STAR-CCM+. It builds on previous CASL work demonstrating coupling for smaller spatial domains. The coupling methodology is described along with the problem simulated and results are presented for fresh hot full power conditions. An additional comparison is made to an equivalent model that uses lower order T/H feedback to assess the importance and cost of high fidelity feedback to the neutronics problem. A simulation of a quarter core Combustion Engineering (CE) PWR core was performed with the coupled codes using a Fixed Point Gauss-Seidel iteration technique. The total approximate calculation requirements are nearly 10,000 CPU hours and 1 TB of memory. The problem took 6 coupled iterations to converge. The CFD coupled model and low order T/H feedback model compared well for global solution parameters, with a difference in the critical boron concentration and average outlet temperature of 14 ppm B and 0.94 deg. C, respectively. Differences in the power distribution were more significant with maximum relative differences in the core-wide pin peaking factor (Fq) of 5.37% and average relative differences in flat flux region power of 11.54%. Future work will focus on analyzing problems more relevant to CASL using models with less approximations. (authors)

  3. Transport coefficients in neutron star cores in BHF approach. Comparison of different nucleon potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shternin, P. S.; Baldo, M.; Schulze, H.-J.

    2017-12-01

    Thermal conductivity and shear viscosity of npeµ matter in non-superfluid neutron star cores are considered in the framework of Brueckner-Hartree-Fock many-body theory. We extend our previous work (Shternin et al 2013 PRC 88 065803) by analysing different nucleon-nucleon potentials and different three-body forces. We find that the use of different potentials leads up to one order of magnitude variations in the values of the nucleon contribution to transport coefficients. The nucleon contribution dominates the thermal conductivity, but for all considered models the shear viscosity is dominated by leptons.

  4. Whole core neutronics modeling of a TRIGA reactor using integral transport theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwinkendorf, K.N.; Toffer, H.

    1990-01-01

    An innovative analysis approach for performing whole core reactor physics calculations for TRIGA reactors has been employed recently at the Westinghouse Hanford Company. A deterministic transport theory model with sufficient geometric complexity to evaluate asymmetric loading patterns was used. Calculations of this complexity have been performed in the past using Monte Carlo simulation, such as the MCNP code. However, the Monte Carlo calculations are more difficult to prepare and require more computer time. On the Hanford Site CRAY XMP-18 computer, the new methods required less than one-third of the central processing unit time per calculation as compared to an MCNP calculation using 100,000 neutron histories

  5. Core and edge aspects of quiescent double barrier operation on DIII-D, with relevance to critical ITB physics issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyle, E.J.; Casper, T.A.; Burrell, K.H.

    2003-01-01

    Recent results from DIII-D address critical internal transport barrier (ITB) research issues relating to sustainability, impurity accumulation and ITB control, and have also demonstrated successful application of general profile control tools. In addition, substantial progress has been made in understanding the physics of the Quiescent Double Barrier (QDB) regime, increasing the demonstrated operating space for the regime and improving performance. Highlights include: (1) A clear demonstration of q-profile modification using electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD); (2) Successful use of localized profile control using electron cyclotron heating (ECH) or ECCD to reduce central high-Z impurity accumulation associated with density peaking; (3) Theory based modeling codes are now being used to design experiments; (4) The operating space for Quiescent H-mode (QH-mode) has been substantially broadened, in particular higher density operation has been achieved; (5) Both absolute (β≤ 3.8%, neutron rate S n ≤ 5.5x10 15 s -1 ) and relative (β N H 89 = 7 for 10τ E ) performance has been increased; (6) With regard to sustainment, QDB plasmas have been run for 3.8 s or 26 τ E . These results emphasize that it is possible to produce sustained high quality H-mode performance with an edge localized mode (ELM)-free edge, directly addressing a major issue in fusion research, of how to ameliorate or eliminate ELM induced pulsed divertor particle and heat loads. (author)

  6. Noble Cantor sets acting as partial internal transport barriers in fusion plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misguich, J.H.; Reuss, J.D.; Constantinescu, D.; Steinbrecher, G.; Vlad, M.; Spineanu, F.; Weyssow, B.; Balescu, R.

    2002-03-01

    In hot laboratory plasmas, Internal Transport Barriers (ITB) have recently been observed, localized in the radial profile 'around' rational values of the winding number ω(r)=1/q(r). Such barriers are obviously related to the perturbed magnetic structure, described by a 1+1/2 Hamiltonian in presence of a perturbation. From the point of view of non-linear Hamiltonian dynamical systems this experimental result appears highly paradoxical since rational q-values generally correspond to the less robust tori. We have studied the appearance of chaos of toroidal magnetic lines by a discrete area-preserving map named 'tokamap'. By increasing the perturbation, we have observed in a wide chaotic sea the destruction of the last confining Kolmogorov-Arnold-Moser (KAM) surfaces, broken and transformed into permeable Cantor sets (Cantori). The flux across a Cantorus has been computed by using refined mathematical techniques due to MacKay, Mather and Aubry. We have proved that the ITB observed in the tokamap is actually composed of two permeable Cantori with 'noble' values of ω (in the definition of Percival). More generally, between the dominant chains of rational islands q = m/m-1, the most resistant barriers between q = m+2/m+1 and m+1/m have been checked (Green, MacKay and Stark) to be localized on the 'most irrational' numbers in these Farey intervals, i.e. on the noble numbers N(1,m)≡ 1+[1/(m+1/G)] (where G is the Golden number) defined by their continuous fraction expansion N(i,m) = [i,m,(1) ∞ ]. In conclusion, the study of the tokamap mapping allowed us to predict on mathematical basis that ITB can occur in tokamak plasmas not only 'around' rational magnetic surfaces but more precisely on noble q-values of irrational surfaces, and to localize them by the Fibonacci series of their convergent. (authors)

  7. Mixed first- and second-order transport method using domain decomposition techniques for reactor core calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girardi, E.; Ruggieri, J.M.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the last developments made on a domain decomposition method applied to reactor core calculations. In this method, two kind of balance equation with two different numerical methods dealing with two different unknowns are coupled. In the first part the two balance transport equations (first order and second order one) are presented with the corresponding following numerical methods: Variational Nodal Method and Discrete Ordinate Nodal Method. In the second part, the Multi-Method/Multi-Domain algorithm is introduced by applying the Schwarz domain decomposition to the multigroup eigenvalue problem of the transport equation. The resulting algorithm is then provided. The projection operators used to coupled the two methods are detailed in the last part of the paper. Finally some preliminary numerical applications on benchmarks are given showing encouraging results. (authors)

  8. Study of an edge transport barrier by Langmuir probes in the compact helical system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, M [Department of Energy Engineering and Science, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Toi, K [National Institute of Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Nagaoka, K [National Institute of Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Suzuki, C [National Institute of Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Minami, T [National Institute of Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Akiyama, T [National Institute of Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Isobe, M [National Institute of Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Yoshimura, Y [National Institute of Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Nishimura, S [National Institute of Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Shimizu, A [National Institute of Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Takahashi, C [National Institute of Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Matsuoka, K [National Institute of Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Okamura, S [National Institute of Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan)

    2006-05-15

    The edge transport barrier (ETB) produced by the L-H transition was measured by a triple Langmuir probe (LP) at two toroidal sections of the compact helical system (CHS), of which diagnostic method has good time and spatial resolutions. The radial profiles of electron density (n{sub e}), electron temperature (T{sub e}) and space potential (V{sub s}) in the ETB region have different shapes at two different toroidal sections. These profiles are deformed inside the ETB region at one location and are formed with rather smooth variations at the other. These deformations gradually disappear in the deep H-phase (after {approx}15 ms from the transition) and the profiles inside the ETB become similar at both sections. The deformation seems linked to the presence of a non-rotating magnetic island at the rational surface of the rotational transform {iota}/2{pi} = 1.

  9. Characteristics of internal transport barrier in JT-60U reversed shear plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Y.; Kamada, Y.; Ide, S.; Fujita, T.; Shirai, H.; Takizuka, T.; Koide, Y.; Fukuda, T.; Oikawa, T.; Suzuki, T.; Shinohara, K.; Yoshino, R.

    2001-01-01

    Characteristics of internal transport barrier (ITB) structure are studied and the active ITB control has been developed in JT-60U reversed shear plasmas. The following results are found. Outward propagation of the ITB with steep T i gradient is limited to the minimum safety factor location (ρ qmin ). However the ITB with reduced T i gradient can move to the outside of ρ qmin . Lower boundary of ITB width is proportional to the ion poloidal gyroradius at the ITB center. Furthermore the demonstration of the active control of the ITB strength based on the modification of the radial electric field shear profile is successfully performed by the toroidal momentum injection in different directions or the increase of heating power by neutral beams. (author)

  10. Application of the "Behind the Barriers" resilience conceptual model to a flooded rail transport system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzva, Michael; Barroca, Bruno

    2017-04-01

    The vulnerability of guided transport systems facing natural hazards is a burning issue for the urban risks management. Experience feedbacks on guided transport systems show they are particularly vulnerable to natural risks, especially flood risks. Besides, the resilience concept is used as a systemic approach for making an accurate analysis of the effect of these natural risks on rail guided transport systems. In this context, several conceptual models of resilience are elaborated for presenting the various possible resilience strategies applied to urban technical systems. One of this resilience conceptual model is the so-called "Behind The Barriers" model based on the identification of four complementary types of resilience: (i) cognitive resilience, linked to knowledge of the risk and the potential failures; (ii) functional resilience, representing the capacity of a system to protect itself from damage while continuing to provide services; (iii) correlative resilience, that characterises the relationship between service demand and the capacity of the system to respond; (iv) organisational resilience, expressing the capacity to mobilise an area much wider than the one affected. In addition to the work already published during the 7th Resilience Engineering Symposium, the purpose of this paper is to offer an application of a resilience conceptual model, the "Behind the Barriers" model, relating to a specific urban technical system, the public guided transport system, and facing a particular risk, a flood hazard. To do that, the paper is focused on a past incident on a French Intercity railway line as a studied case. Indeed, on June 18th and 19th 2013, the rise of the level of the "Gave de Pau" river, located in the municipality of Coarraze, caused many disorders on the intercity line serving the cities of Tarbes, Pau and Lourdes . Among the disorders caused by the flooding, about 100 meters of railway embankments were collapsed. With a constraint to reopen the

  11. Localized MHD activity near transport barriers in JT-60U and TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manickam, J.

    2001-01-01

    Localized MHD activity observed in JT-60U and TFTR near transport barriers with their associated large pressure gradients is investigated. Stability analysis of equilibria modeling the experiments supports an identification of this MHD as being due to an ideal MHD n=1 instability. The appearance of the instability depends on the local pressure gradient, local shear in the q profile and the proximity of rational surfaces where q∼m/n and m and n are the poloidal and toroidal mode numbers respectively. The mode width is shown to depend on the local value of q, and is larger when q is smaller. In addition the role of the edge current density in coupling the internal mode to the plasma edge and of the energetic particles which can drive fishbone like modes is investigated. (author)

  12. Shear flow generation and transport barrier formation on rational surface current sheets in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaogang; Xiao Chijie; Wang Jiaqi

    2009-01-01

    Full text: A thin current sheet with a magnetic field component in the same direction can form the electrical field perpendicularly pointing to the sheet, therefore an ExB flow with a strong shear across the current sheet. An electrical potential well is also found on the rational surface of RFP as well as the neutral sheet of the magnetotail with the E-field pointing to the rational (neutral) surface. Theoretically, a current singularity is found to be formed on the rational surface in ideal MHD. It is then very likely that the sheet current on the rational surfaces will generate the electrical potential well in its vicinity so the electrical field pointing to the sheet. It results in an ExB flow with a strong shear in the immediate neighborhood of the rational surface. It may be the cause of the transport barrier often seen near the low (m, n) rational surfaces with MHD signals. (author)

  13. Generation of sheared poloidal flows via Reynolds stress and transport barrier physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidalgo, C.; Pedrosa, M.A.; Sanchez, E.; Balbin, R.; Lopez-Fraguas, A.; Milligen, B. van; Silva, C.; Fernandes, H.; Varandas, C.A.F.; Riccardi, C.; Carrozza, R.; Fontanesi, M.; Carreras, B.A.; Garcia, L.

    2000-01-01

    A view of the latest experimental results and progress in the understanding of the role of poloidal flows driven by fluctuations via Reynolds stress is given. Reynolds stress shows a radial gradient close to the velocity shear layer location in tokamaks and stellarators, indicating that this mechanism may drive significant poloidal flows in the plasma boundary. Observation of the generation of ExB sheared flows via Reynolds stress at the ion Bernstein resonance layer has been noticed in toroidal magnetized plasmas. The experimental evidence of sheared ExB flows linked to the location of rational surfaces in stellarator plasmas might be interpreted in terms of Reynolds stress sheared driven flows. These results show that ExB sheared flows driven by fluctuations can play an important role in the generation of transport barriers. (author)

  14. Effect of toroidal field ripple on the formation of internal transport barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vries, P C de; Hawkes, N C; Challis, C D; Andrew, Y; Beurskens, M; Brix, M; Giroud, C; Zastrow, K-D [EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Joffrin, E [EFDA-JET CSU, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Litaudon, X [Association EURATOM-CEA, DSM/DFRC, CEA Cadarache, 13108, St Paul lez Durance (France); Brzozowski, J; Johnson, T [Association EURATOM-VR, Fusion Plasma Physics, EES, KTH, Stockholm (Sweden); Crombe, K [Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Hobirk, J [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Euratom Association, 85748 Garching (Germany); Loennroth, J; Salmi, A [Association Euratom-Tekes, Helsinki University of Technology, PO Box 4100, 02015 TKK (Finland); Tala, T [Association Euratom-Tekes, VTT, PO Box 1000, 02044 VTT (Finland); Yavorskij, V [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Association EURATOM-OEAW, University of Innsbruck (Austria)], E-mail: Peter.de.Vries@jet.uk

    2008-06-15

    The effect of a toroidal field (TF) ripple on the formation and performance of internal transport barriers (ITBs) has been studied in JET. It was found that the TF ripple had a profound effect on the toroidal plasma rotation. An increased TF ripple up to {delta} = 1% led to a lower rotation and reduced the rotational shear in the region where the ITBs were formed. ITB triggering events were observed in all cases and it is thought that the rotational shear may be less important for this process than, for example, the q-profile. However, the increase in the pressure gradient following the ITB trigger was reduced in discharges with a larger TF ripple and consequently a lower rotational shear. This suggests that toroidal rotation and its shear play a role in the growth of the ITB once it has been triggered.

  15. Identity physics experiment on internal transport barriers in JT-60U and JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Vries, P C; Beurskens, M N A; Brix, M; Giroud, C; Hawkes, N C; Parail, V [EURATOM/UKAEA Association, Culham Science Centre, OX14 3DB, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Sakamoto, Y; Fujita, T; Hayashi, N; Matsunaga, G; Oyama, N; Shinohara, K; Suzuki, T; Takechi, M [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka, Ibaraki-ken 311-0193 (Japan); Litaudon, X; Joffrin, E [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Crombe, K [Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, Rozier 44, 9000 Gent (Belgium); Mantica, P [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, EURATOM/ENEA-CNR Association, Milano (Italy); Salmi, A [Association Euratom-Tekes, Helsinki University of Technology, PO Box 4100 (Finland); Strintzi, D, E-mail: Peter.de.Vries@jet.u [National Technical University of Athens, EURATOM Association, GR-15773, Athens (Greece)

    2009-12-15

    A series of experiments have been carried out in 2008 at JT-60U and JET to find common characteristics and explain differences between internal transport barriers (ITBs). The identity experiments succeeded in matching the profiles of most dimensionless parameters at the time ITBs were triggered. Thereafter the q-profile development deviated due to differences in non-inductive current density profile, affecting the ITB. Furthermore, the ITBs in JET were more strongly influenced by the H-mode pedestal or edge localized modes. It was found to be difficult to match the plasma rotation characteristics in both devices. However, the wide range of Mach numbers obtained in these experiments shows that the rotation has little effect on the triggering of ITBs in plasmas with reversed magnetic shear. On the other hand the toroidal rotation and more specifically the rotational shear had an impact on the subsequent growth and allowed the formation of strong ITBs.

  16. Formation of neoclassical internal transport barriers under various operational regimes on compact helical system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minami, T [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Fujisawa, A [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Iguchi, H [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Nishimura, S [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Ida, K [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Yokoyama, M [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Murakami, S [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Yoshimura, Y [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Isobe, M [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Suzuki, C [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Nagaoka, K [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Akiyama, T [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Yoshinuma, M [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Shimizu, A [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Takahashi, C [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Matsuoka, K [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Okamura, S [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan)

    2004-05-01

    Optimization has been carried out on the operational regime where neoclassical internal transport barriers (N-ITBs) are formed. The condition of the forming N-ITB is sensitive to the location of the electron cyclotron heating resonance zone. A high electron temperature is obtained for the central heating (-2 cm < R{sub resonance} < 2 cm). The variation of the magnetic axis location affects the formation of the N-ITB. The electron and ion temperatures at the magnetic axis location (R{sub ax}) of 94.9 cm are higher than those at 92.1 and 97.4 cm. This result indicates that the neoclassical flux and the created radial electric field are influenced by the magnetic field structure.

  17. Brief communication "Stratospheric winds, transport barriers and the 2011 Arctic ozone hole"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Olascoaga

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The Arctic stratosphere throughout the late winter and early spring of 2011 was characterized by an unusually severe ozone loss, resulting in what has been described as an ozone hole. The 2011 ozone loss was made possible by unusually cold temperatures throughout the Arctic stratosphere. Here we consider the issue of what constitutes suitable environmental conditions for the formation and maintenance of a polar ozone hole. Our discussion focuses on the importance of the stratospheric wind field and, in particular, the importance of a high latitude zonal jet, which serves as a meridional transport barrier both prior to ozone hole formation and during the ozone hole maintenance phase. It is argued that stratospheric conditions in the boreal winter/spring of 2011 were highly unusual inasmuch as in that year Antarctic-like Lagrangian dynamics led to the formation of a boreal ozone hole.

  18. EC + LH current drive efficiency in the presence of an internal transport barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosa, P.R. da S; Ziebell, L.F.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we study the effects of the presence of an internal transport barrier (ITB) on the current drive efficiency and power deposition profiles in the case of electron cyclotron waves interacting with an extended tail generated by lower hybrid (LH) waves. We study the subject by numerically solving the Fokker-Planck equation, with temperature and density profiles corrected along the time evolution at each collision time, based on the actual time-evolving electron distribution function. The results obtained show that the LH and electron cyclotron (EC) power absorption profiles and the current driven by the combined action of both types of waves are weakly dependent on the depth of the ITB, slightly more dependent on the level of magnetic turbulence and much more dependent on the level of EC wave power. (author)

  19. Internal transport barrier and β limit in ohmically heated plasma in TUMAN-3M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreiko, M.V.; Askinazi, L.G.; Golant, V.E.

    2001-01-01

    An Internal Transport Barrier (ITB) was found in ohmically heated plasma in TUMAN-3M (R 0 =53 cm, a l =22 cm - circular limiter configuration, B t ≤0.7T, I p ≤175 kA, ≤6.0·10 19 m -3 ). The barrier reveals itself as a formation of a steep gradient on electron temperature and density radial profiles. The regions with reduced diffusion and electron thermal diffusivity are in between r=0.5a and r=0.7a. The ITB appears more frequently in the shots with higher plasma current. At lower currents (I p N limit in the ohmically heated plasma are presented. Stored energy was measured using diamagnetic loops and compared with W calculated from kinetic data obtained by Thomson scattering and microwave interferometry. Measurements of the stored energy and of the β were performed in the ohmic H-mode before and after boronization and in the scenario with the fast Current Ramp-Down in the ohmic H-mode. Maximum value of β T of 2.0 % and β N of 2 were achieved. The β N limit achieved is 'soft' (nondisruptive) limit. The stored energy slowly decays after the Current Ramp-Down. No correlation was found between beta restriction and MHD phenomena. (author)

  20. Internal transport barrier and β limit in ohmically heated plasma in TUMAN-3M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreiko, M.V.; Askinazi, L.G.; Golant, V.E.

    1999-01-01

    An Internal Transport Barrier (ITB) was found in ohmically heated plasma in TUMAN-3M (R 0 = 53 cm, a l = 22 cm - circular limiter configuration, B t ≤ 0.7 T, I p ≤ 175 kA, ≤ 6.0·10 19 m -3 ). The barrier reveals itself as a formation of a steep gradient on electron temperature and density radial profiles. The regions with reduced diffusion and electron thermal diffusivity are in between r = 0.5a and r = 0.7a. The ITB appears more frequently in the shots with higher plasma current. At lower currents (I p N limit in the ohmically heated plasma are presented. Stored energy was measured using diamagnetic loops and compared with W calculated from kinetic data obtained by Thomson scattering and microwave interferometry. Measurements of the stored energy and of the β were performed in the ohmic H-mode before and after boronization and in the scenario with the fast Current Ramp-Down in the ohmic H-mode. Maximum value of β T of 2.0% and β N of 2 were achieved. The β N limit achieved is 'soft' (non-disruptive) limit. The stored energy slowly decays after the Current Ramp-Down. No correlation was found between beta restriction and MHD phenomena. (author)

  1. Non-linear gyrokinetic simulations of microturbulence in TCV electron internal transport barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapillonne, X; Brunner, S; Sauter, O; Villard, L [Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Association EURATOM-Confederation Suisse, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Fable, E; Goerler, T; Jenko, F; Merz, F, E-mail: stephan.brunner@epfl.ch [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2011-05-15

    Using the local (flux-tube) version of the Eulerian code GENE (Jenko et al 2000 Phys. Plasmas 7 1904), gyrokinetic simulations of microturbulence were carried out considering parameters relevant to electron-internal transport barriers (e-ITBs) in the TCV tokamak (Sauter et al 2005 Phys. Rev. Lett. 94 105002), generated under conditions of low or negative shear. For typical density and temperature gradients measured in such barriers, the corresponding simulated fluctuation spectra appears to simultaneously contain longer wavelength trapped electron modes (TEMs, for typically k{sub p}erpendicular{rho}{sub i} < 0.5, k{sub p}erpendicular being the characteristic perpendicular wavenumber and {rho}{sub i} the ion Larmor radius) and shorter wavelength ion temperature gradient modes (ITG, k{sub p}erpendicular{rho}{sub i} > 0.5). The contributions to the electron particle flux from these two types of modes are, respectively, outward/inward and may cancel each other for experimentally realistic gradients. This mechanism may partly explain the feasibility of e-ITBs. The non-linear simulation results confirm the predictions of a previously developed quasi-linear model (Fable et al 2010 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 52 015007), namely that the stationary condition of zero particle flux is obtained through the competitive contributions of ITG and TEM. A quantitative comparison of the electron heat flux with experimental estimates is presented as well.

  2. Non-linear gyrokinetic simulations of microturbulence in TCV electron internal transport barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapillonne, X.; Brunner, S.; Sauter, O.; Villard, L.; Fable, E.; Görler, T.; Jenko, F.; Merz, F.

    2011-05-01

    Using the local (flux-tube) version of the Eulerian code GENE (Jenko et al 2000 Phys. Plasmas 7 1904), gyrokinetic simulations of microturbulence were carried out considering parameters relevant to electron-internal transport barriers (e-ITBs) in the TCV tokamak (Sauter et al 2005 Phys. Rev. Lett. 94 105002), generated under conditions of low or negative shear. For typical density and temperature gradients measured in such barriers, the corresponding simulated fluctuation spectra appears to simultaneously contain longer wavelength trapped electron modes (TEMs, for typically k⊥ρi 0.5). The contributions to the electron particle flux from these two types of modes are, respectively, outward/inward and may cancel each other for experimentally realistic gradients. This mechanism may partly explain the feasibility of e-ITBs. The non-linear simulation results confirm the predictions of a previously developed quasi-linear model (Fable et al 2010 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 52 015007), namely that the stationary condition of zero particle flux is obtained through the competitive contributions of ITG and TEM. A quantitative comparison of the electron heat flux with experimental estimates is presented as well.

  3. Building waste management core indicators through Spatial Material Flow Analysis: Net recovery and transport intensity indexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Font Vivanco, David, E-mail: font@cml.leidenuniv.nl [Institut de Ciencia i Tecnologia Ambientals (ICTA), Departament d' Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (UAB), 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Institute of Environmental Sciences (CML), Leiden University, P.O. Box 9518, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Puig Ventosa, Ignasi [ENT Environment and Management, Carrer Sant Joan 39, First Floor, 08800 Vilanova i la Geltru, Barcelona (Spain); Gabarrell Durany, Xavier [Institut de Ciencia i Tecnologia Ambientals (ICTA), Departament d' Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (UAB), 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sustainability and proximity principles have a key role in waste management. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Core indicators are needed in order to quantify and evaluate them. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A systematic, step-by-step approach is developed in this study for their development. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transport may play a significant role in terms of environmental and economic costs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Policy action is required in order to advance in the consecution of these principles. - Abstract: In this paper, the material and spatial characterization of the flows within a municipal solid waste (MSW) management system are combined through a Network-Based Spatial Material Flow Analysis. Using this information, two core indicators are developed for the bio-waste fraction, the Net Recovery Index (NRI) and the Transport Intensity Index (TII), which are aimed at assessing progress towards policy-related sustainable MSW management strategies and objectives. The NRI approaches the capacity of a MSW management system for converting waste into resources through a systematic metabolic approach, whereas the TII addresses efficiency in terms of the transport requirements to manage a specific waste flow throughout the entire MSW management life cycle. Therefore, both indicators could be useful in assessing key MSW management policy strategies, such as the consecution of higher recycling levels (sustainability principle) or the minimization of transport by locating treatment facilities closer to generation sources (proximity principle). To apply this methodological approach, the bio-waste management system of the region of Catalonia (Spain) has been chosen as a case study. Results show the adequacy of both indicators for identifying those points within the system with higher capacity to compromise its environmental, economic and social performance and therefore establishing clear targets for policy

  4. Building waste management core indicators through Spatial Material Flow Analysis: Net recovery and transport intensity indexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Font Vivanco, David; Puig Ventosa, Ignasi; Gabarrell Durany, Xavier

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Sustainability and proximity principles have a key role in waste management. ► Core indicators are needed in order to quantify and evaluate them. ► A systematic, step-by-step approach is developed in this study for their development. ► Transport may play a significant role in terms of environmental and economic costs. ► Policy action is required in order to advance in the consecution of these principles. - Abstract: In this paper, the material and spatial characterization of the flows within a municipal solid waste (MSW) management system are combined through a Network-Based Spatial Material Flow Analysis. Using this information, two core indicators are developed for the bio-waste fraction, the Net Recovery Index (NRI) and the Transport Intensity Index (TII), which are aimed at assessing progress towards policy-related sustainable MSW management strategies and objectives. The NRI approaches the capacity of a MSW management system for converting waste into resources through a systematic metabolic approach, whereas the TII addresses efficiency in terms of the transport requirements to manage a specific waste flow throughout the entire MSW management life cycle. Therefore, both indicators could be useful in assessing key MSW management policy strategies, such as the consecution of higher recycling levels (sustainability principle) or the minimization of transport by locating treatment facilities closer to generation sources (proximity principle). To apply this methodological approach, the bio-waste management system of the region of Catalonia (Spain) has been chosen as a case study. Results show the adequacy of both indicators for identifying those points within the system with higher capacity to compromise its environmental, economic and social performance and therefore establishing clear targets for policy prioritization. Moreover, this methodological approach permits scenario building, which could be useful in assessing the outcomes of

  5. Methylmercury transport across the blood-brain barrier by molecular mimicry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerper, L.E.; Ballatori, N.; Clarkson, T.W.

    1990-01-01

    The mechanism by which methylmercury (MeHg) crosses the blood-brain barrier is not known. Co-administration of MeHg with L-cysteine by intravenous injection has been shown to accelerate MeHg uptake into brain tissue in rats. Since the complex of MeHg with L-cysteine is structurally similar to L-methionine, a substrate for the L (leucine-preferring) neutral amino acid transport system, this amino acid carrier may be involved in MeHg uptake into brain. To examine this hypothesis, the rapid carotid infusion technique was used in the rat. The concentration-dependence of initial rates of Me 203 Hg uptake into rat brains following injection of Me 203 Hg-L-cysteine complex was non-linear, exhibiting characteristics of saturable transport (K m 250 μM, V max 700 pmol·g -1 ·15 s -1 ). A slower, nonsaturable uptake was seen following MeHg-D-cysteine injection. MeHg-L-cysteine uptake was inhibited by co-injection of L-methionine (K i 200 μM), D-methionine (K i 600 μM), and amino acid analog 2-aminobicyclo-(2,2,1)-heptane-2-carboxylic acid (K i 1.4 mM), but not by amino acid analog α-methylaminoisobutyric acid. Transport of 14 C-L-phenylalanine was inhibited by MeHg-L-cysteine, but not by MeHgCl. The results suggest that MeHg may enter brain capillary endothelial cells as a cysteine complex, via amino acid transport system L

  6. A multi-purpose unit concept to integrate storage, transportation, and the engineered barrier system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollaway, W.R.; Rozier, R.; Nitti, D.A.; Williams, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    The Multi-Purpose Unit (MPU) is a new concept for standardizing and integrating the waste management functions of spent fuel storage, transportation, and geologic disposal. The MPU concept would use one unit, composed of a relatively thick-walled inner canister with a multi-purpose overpack, to meet the requirements for storage in 10 CFR 72, transportation in 10 CFR 71, and the engineered barrier system in 10 CFR 60. The MPU concept differs from the recently proposed Multi-Purpose Canister (MPC) concept in that the MPU concept uses a single multi-purpose overpack for storage, transportation, and geologic disposal, while the MPC concept uses separate and unique overpacks for each of these system functions. A design concept for the MPU is presented along with an estimate of unit costs. An initial evaluation of overall system cost showed that the MPU concept could be economically competitive with the current reference system. The MPU concept provides the potential for significant reduction, simplification, and standardization of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (CRWMS) facilities and operations, including those at the utilities, during waste acceptance and transportation, and at the Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) facility and the repository. The primary issues for the MPU concept relate to uncertainties with respect to licensing, and the programmatic risks associated with implementing the MPU concept before the repository design is finalized. The strong potential exhibited by the MPU concept demonstrates that this option merits additional development and should be considered in the next phase of work on multi-purpose concepts for the CRWMS

  7. Nano carriers for drug transport across the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinming; Tsibouklis, John; Weng, Tingting; Zhang, Buning; Yin, Guoqiang; Feng, Guangzhu; Cui, Yingde; Savina, Irina N; Mikhalovska, Lyuba I; Sandeman, Susan R; Howel, Carol A; Mikhalovsky, Sergey V

    2017-01-01

    Effective therapy lies in achieving a therapeutic amount of drug to the proper site in the body and then maintaining the desired drug concentration for a sufficient time interval to be clinically effective for treatment. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) hinders most drugs from entering the central nervous system (CNS) from the blood stream, leading to the difficulty of delivering drugs to the brain via the circulatory system for the treatment, diagnosis and prevention of brain diseases. Several brain drug delivery approaches have been developed, such as intracerebral and intracerebroventricular administration, intranasal delivery and blood-to-brain delivery, as a result of transient BBB disruption induced by biological, chemical or physical stimuli such as zonula occludens toxin, mannitol, magnetic heating and ultrasound, but these approaches showed disadvantages of being dangerous, high cost and unsuitability for most brain diseases and drugs. The strategy of vector-mediated blood-to-brain delivery, which involves improving BBB permeability of the drug-carrier conjugate, can minimize side effects, such as being submicrometre objects that behave as a whole unit in terms of their transport and properties, nanomaterials, are promising carrier vehicles for direct drug transport across the intact BBB as a result of their potential to enter the brain capillary endothelial cells by means of normal endocytosis and transcytosis due to their small size, as well as their possibility of being functionalized with multiple copies of the drug molecule of interest. This review provids a concise discussion of nano carriers for drug transport across the intact BBB, various forms of nanomaterials including inorganic/solid lipid/polymeric nanoparticles, nanoemulsions, quantum dots, nanogels, liposomes, micelles, dendrimers, polymersomes and exosomes are critically evaluated, their mechanisms for drug transport across the BBB are reviewed, and the future directions of this area are fully

  8. Barrier effects of remote high mountain on atmospheric metal transport in the eastern Tibetan Plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bing, Haijian; Zhou, Jun; Wu, Yanhong; Luo, Xiaosan; Xiang, Zhongxiang; Sun, Hongyang; Wang, Jipeng; Zhu, He

    2018-07-01

    Anthropogenic metals adsorbed on suspended fine particles can be deposited on remote and inaccessible high mountains by long-range atmospheric transport. In this study, we investigated the cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) in the soils, mosses and rainfall of three transects on the Gongga Mountain, eastern Tibetan Plateau, to understand the mountain interception effects on their atmospheric transport. The concentrations of Cd and Pb in the soils and mosses displayed a pattern of eastern transect>northern transect>western transect. The distribution of Cd and Pb on the eastern transect increased from 2000 to 2900m a.s.l. (above sea level), decreased toward the timberline, and increased again with altitude; on the northern transect, it generally decreased with altitude whereas a distribution trend was not clearly observed on the western transect. The Cd and Pb concentrations in the rainfall of the eastern transect generally decreased with altitude, and they were higher inside forests than outside forests and temporally higher in the winter than the summer. The Pb isotopic ratios coupled with moss bio-monitoring distinguished anthropogenic sources of Cd and Pb on the eastern and northern transects, whereas bedrock weathering was the main source of Cd and Pb on the western transect. We proposed a conceptual model to delineate the effects of terrain, local climate and vegetation on the transport of atmospheric metals. Our results highlighted the high mountains in the eastern Tibetan Plateau as an effective natural barrier limiting atmospheric metal transport. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A validation report for the KALIMER core design computing system by the Monte Carlo transport theory code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ki Bog; Kim, Yeong Il; Kim, Kang Seok; Kim, Sang Ji; Kim, Young Gyun; Song, Hoon; Lee, Dong Uk; Lee, Byoung Oon; Jang, Jin Wook; Lim, Hyun Jin; Kim, Hak Sung

    2004-05-01

    In this report, the results of KALIMER (Korea Advanced LIquid MEtal Reactor) core design calculated by the K-CORE computing system are compared and analyzed with those of MCDEP calculation. The effective multiplication factor, flux distribution, fission power distribution and the number densities of the important nuclides effected from the depletion calculation for the R-Z model and Hex-Z model of KALIMER core are compared. It is confirmed that the results of K-CORE system compared with those of MCDEP based on the Monte Carlo transport theory method agree well within 700 pcm for the effective multiplication factor estimation and also within 2% in the driver fuel region, within 10% in the radial blanket region for the reaction rate and the fission power density. Thus, the K-CORE system for the core design of KALIMER by treating the lumped fission product and mainly important nuclides can be used as a core design tool keeping the necessary accuracy

  10. Simplified P{sub n} transport core calculations in the Apollo3 system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baudron, Anne-Marie; Lautard, Jean-Jacques, E-mail: anne-marie.baudron@cea.fr, E-mail: jean-jacques.lautard@cea.fr [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, CEA Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2011-07-01

    This paper describes the development of two different neutronics core solvers based on the Simplified P{sub N} transport (SP{sub N}) approximation developed in the context of a new generation nuclear reactor computational system, APOLLO3. Two different approaches have been used. The first one solves the standard SPN system. In the second approach, the SP{sub N} equations are solved as diffusion equations by treating the SP{sub N} flux harmonics like pseudo energy groups, obtained by a change of variable. These two methods have been implemented for Cartesian and hexagonal geometries in the kinetics solver MINOS. The numerical approximation is based on the mixed dual finite formulation and the discretization uses the Raviart-Thomas-Nedelec finite elements. For the unstructured geometries, the SP{sub N} equations are treated by the SN transport solver MINARET by considering the second SP{sub N} approach. The MINARET solver is based on discontinuous Galerkin finite element approximation on cylindrical unstructured meshes composed of a set of conforming triangles for the radial direction. Numerical applications are presented for both solvers in different core configurations (the Jules Horowitz research reactor (JHR) and the Generation IV fast reactor project ESFR). (author)

  11. Simplified P_n transport core calculations in the Apollo3 system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baudron, Anne-Marie; Lautard, Jean-Jacques

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the development of two different neutronics core solvers based on the Simplified P_N transport (SP_N) approximation developed in the context of a new generation nuclear reactor computational system, APOLLO3. Two different approaches have been used. The first one solves the standard SPN system. In the second approach, the SP_N equations are solved as diffusion equations by treating the SP_N flux harmonics like pseudo energy groups, obtained by a change of variable. These two methods have been implemented for Cartesian and hexagonal geometries in the kinetics solver MINOS. The numerical approximation is based on the mixed dual finite formulation and the discretization uses the Raviart-Thomas-Nedelec finite elements. For the unstructured geometries, the SP_N equations are treated by the SN transport solver MINARET by considering the second SP_N approach. The MINARET solver is based on discontinuous Galerkin finite element approximation on cylindrical unstructured meshes composed of a set of conforming triangles for the radial direction. Numerical applications are presented for both solvers in different core configurations (the Jules Horowitz research reactor (JHR) and the Generation IV fast reactor project ESFR). (author)

  12. EDITORIAL: Special issue containing papers presented at the 12th International Workshop on H-mode Physics and Transport Barriers Special issue containing papers presented at the 12th International Workshop on H-mode Physics and Transport Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahm, T. S.

    2010-06-01

    The 12th International Workshop on H-mode Physics and Transport Barriers was held at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey, USA between September 30 and October 2, 2009. This meeting was the continuation of a series of previous meetings which was initiated in 1987 and has been held bi-annually since then. Following the recent tradition at the last few meetings, the program was sub- divided into six sessions. At each session, an overview talk was presented, followed by two or three shorter oral presentations which supplemented the coverage of important issues. These talks were followed by discussion periods and poster sessions of contributed papers. The sessions were: Physics of Transition to/from Enhanced Confinement Regimes, Pedestal and Edge Localized Mode Dynamics, Plasma Rotation and Momentum Transport, Role of 3D Physics in Transport Barriers, Transport Barriers: Theory and Simulations and High Priority ITER Issues on Transport Barriers. The diversity of the 90 registered participants was remarkable, with 22 different nationalities. US participants were in the majority (36), followed by Japan (14), South Korea (7), and China (6). This special issue of Nuclear Fusion consists of a cluster of 18 accepted papers from submitted manuscripts based on overview talks and poster presentations. The paper selection procedure followed the guidelines of Nuclear Fusion which are essentially the same as for regular articles with an additional requirement on timeliness of submission, review and revision. One overview paper and five contributed papers report on the H-mode pedestal related results which reflect the importance of this issue concerning the successful operation of ITER. Four papers address the rotation and momentum transport which play a crucial role in transport barrier physics. The transport barrier transition condition is the main focus of other four papers. Finally, four additional papers are devoted to the behaviour and control of

  13. Two-dimensional full-core transport theory Benchmarks for the WWER reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petkov, P.T.

    2002-01-01

    Several two-dimensional full-core real geometry many-group steady-state problems for the WWER-440 and WWER-1000 reactors have been solved by the MARIKO code, based on the method of characteristics. The reference transport theory solutions include assembly-wise and pin-wise power distributions. Homogenized two-group diffusion parameters and discontinuity factors have been calculated by MARIKO for each assembly type both for the whole assembly and for each cell in the smallest sector of symmetry, using the B1 method for calculation of the critical spectrum. Accurate albedo-type boundary conditions have been calculated by MARIKO for the core-reflector and core-absorber boundaries, both for each outer assembly face and for each outer cell face. Comparison with the reference solutions of the two-group nodal diffusion code SPPS-1.6 and the few-group fine-mesh diffusion codes HEX2DA and HEX2DB are presented (Authors)

  14. PREFACE: 11th IAEA Technical Meeting on H-mode Physics and Transport Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takizuka, Tomonori

    2008-07-01

    This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series contains papers based on invited talks and contributed posters presented at the 11th IAEA Technical Meeting on H-mode Physics and Transport Barriers. This meeting was held at the Tsukuba International Congress Center in Tsukuba, Japan, on 26-28 September 2007, and was organized jointly by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency and the University of Tsukuba. The previous ten meetings in this series were held in San Diego (USA) 1987, Gut Ising (Germany) 1989, Abingdon (UK) 1991, Naka (Japan) 1993, Princeton (USA) 1995, Kloster Seeon (Germany) 1997, Oxford (UK) 1999, Toki (Japan) 2001, San Diego (USA) 2003, and St Petersburg (Russia) 2005. The purpose of the eleventh meeting was to present and discuss new results on H-mode (edge transport barrier, ETB) and internal transport barrier, ITB, experiments, theory and modeling in magnetic fusion research. It was expected that contributions give new and improved insights into the physics mechanisms behind high confinement modes of H-mode and ITBs. Ultimately, this research should lead to improved projections for ITER. As has been the tradition at the recent meetings of this series, the program was subdivided into six topics. The topics selected for the eleventh meeting were: H-mode transition and the pedestal-width Dynamics in ETB: ELM threshold, non-linear evolution and suppression, etc Transport relations of various quantities including turbulence in plasmas with ITB: rotation physics is especially highlighted Transport barriers in non-axisymmetric magnetic fields Theory and simulation on transport barriers Projections of transport barrier physics to ITER For each topic there was an invited talk presenting an overview of the topic, based on contributions to the meeting and on recently published external results. The six invited talks were: A Leonard (GA, USA): Progress in characterization of the H-mode pedestal and L-H transition N Oyama (JAEA, Japan): Progress and issues in

  15. Production of internal transport barriers via self-generated mean flows in Alcator C-Moda)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiore, C. L.; Ernst, D. R.; Podpaly, Y. A.; Mikkelsen, D.; Howard, N. T.; Lee, Jungpyo; Reinke, M. L.; Rice, J. E.; Hughes, J. W.; Ma, Y.; Rowan, W. L.; Bespamyatnov, I.

    2012-05-01

    New results suggest that changes observed in the intrinsic toroidal rotation influence the internal transport barrier (ITB) formation in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak [E. S. Marmar and Alcator C-Mod group, Fusion Sci. Technol. 51, 261 (2007)]. These arise when the resonance for ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) minority heating is positioned off-axis at or outside of the plasma half-radius. These ITBs form in a reactor relevant regime, without particle or momentum injection, with Ti ≈ Te, and with monotonic q profiles (qmin 1.5 × 105 rad/s) in the region where the ITB foot is observed. Gyrokinetic analyses indicate that this spontaneous shearing rate is comparable to the linear ion temperature gradient (ITG) growth rate at the ITB location and is sufficient to reduce the turbulent particle and energy transport. New and detailed measurement of the ion temperature demonstrates that the radial profile flattens as the ICRF resonance position moves off axis, decreasing the drive for the ITG the instability as well. These results are the first evidence that intrinsic rotation can affect confinement in ITB plasmas.

  16. Organic Light-Emitting Diodes Using Multifunctional Phosphorescent Dendrimers with Iridium-Complex Core and Charge-Transporting Dendrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuzuki, Toshimitsu; Shirasawa, Nobuhiko; Suzuki, Toshiyasu; Tokito, Shizuo

    2005-06-01

    We report a novel class of light-emitting materials for use in organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs): multifunctional phosphorescent dendrimers that have a phosphorescent core and dendrons based on charge-transporting building blocks. We synthesized first-generation and second-generation dendrimers consisting of a fac-tris(2-phenylpyridine)iridium [Ir(ppy)3] core and hole-transporting phenylcarbazole-based dendrons. Smooth amorphous films of these dendrimers were formed by spin-coating them from solutions. The OLEDs using the dendrimer exhibited bright green or yellowish-green emission from the Ir(ppy)3 core. The OLEDs using the film containing a mixture of the dendrimer and an electron-transporting material exhibited higher efficiency than those using the neat dendrimer film. The external quantum efficiency of OLEDs using the film containing a mixture of the first-generation dendrimer and an electron-transporting material was as high as 7.6%.

  17. Theoretical Compartment Modeling of DCE-MRI Data Based on the Transport across Physiological Barriers in the Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Fanea

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurological disorders represent major causes of lost years of healthy life and mortality worldwide. Development of their quantitative interdisciplinary in vivo evaluation is required. Compartment modeling (CM of brain data acquired in vivo using magnetic resonance imaging techniques with clinically available contrast agents can be performed to quantitatively assess brain perfusion. Transport of 1H spins in water molecules across physiological compartmental brain barriers in three different pools was mathematically modeled and theoretically evaluated in this paper and the corresponding theoretical compartment modeling of dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI data was analyzed. The pools considered were blood, tissue, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. The blood and CSF data were mathematically modeled assuming continuous flow of the 1H spins in these pools. Tissue data was modeled using three CMs. Results in this paper show that transport across physiological brain barriers such as the blood to brain barrier, the extracellular space to the intracellular space barrier, or the blood to CSF barrier can be evaluated quantitatively. Statistical evaluations of this quantitative information may be performed to assess tissue perfusion, barriers' integrity, and CSF flow in vivo in the normal or disease-affected brain or to assess response to therapy.

  18. Deciphering Equatorial Pacific Deep Sea Sediment Transport Regimes by Core-Log-Seismic Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, E.; Tominaga, M.; Marcantonio, F.

    2017-12-01

    Investigating deep-sea sediment transportation and deposition regimes is a key to accurately understand implications from geological information recorded by pelagic sediments, e.g. climate signals. However, except for physical oceanographic particle trap experiments, geochemical analyses of in situsediments, and theoretical modeling of the relation between the bottom currents and sediment particle flux, it has remained a challenging task to document the movement of deep sea sediments, that takes place over time. We utilized high-resolution, multichannel reflection seismic data from the eastern equatorial Pacific region with drilling and logging results from two Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) sites, the Pacific Equatorial Age Transect (PEAT) 7 (Site U1337) and 8 (Site U1338), to characterize sediment transportation regimes on 18-24 Ma oceanic crust. Site U1337, constructed by a series of distinct abyssal hills and abyssal basins; Site U1338, located 570 km SE from Site U1337 site and constructed by a series of ridges, seamounts, and abyssal hills. These sites are of particular interest due to their proximity to the equatorial productivity zone, areas with high sedimentation rates and preservation of carbonate-bearing sediment that provide invaluable insights on equatorial Pacific ecosystems and carbon cycle. We integrate downhole geophysical logging data as well as geochemistry and physical properties measurements on recovered cores from IODP Sites U1337 and U1338 to comprehensively examine the mobility of deep-sea sediments and sediment diagenesis over times in a quasi-3D manner. We also examine 1100 km of high resolution underway seismic surveys from site survey lines in between PEAT 7 and 8 in order to investigate changes in sediment transportation between both sites. Integrating detailed seismic interpretations, high resolution core data, and 230Th flux measurements we aim to create a detailed chronological sedimentation and sediment diagenesis history

  19. Edge and Core Impurity Transport Study with Spectroscopic Instruments in LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Shigeru; Goto, Motoshi; Kobayashi, Masahiro; Muto, Sadatsugu; Chowdhuri, Malay Bikas; Chunfeng, Dong; Hangyu, Zhou; Zhengying, Cui; Fujii, Keisuke; Hasuo, Masahiro; Iwamae, Atsushi; Furuzawa, Akihiro; Sakurai, Ikuya; Tawara, Yuzuru; Yinxian, Jie; Baonian, Wan; Zhenwei, Wu; Koubiti, Mohammed; Yamaguchi, Naohiro

    2009-01-01

    Impurity transport was investigated at both edge and core regions in large helical device (LHD) with developed spectroscopic instruments which can measure one- and two-dimensional distributions of impurities. The edge impurity behavior was studied recently using four carbon resonant transitions in different ionization stages of CIII (977A), CIV (1548A), CV (40.3A) and CVI (33.7A). When the line-averaged electron density, n e , is increased from 1 to 6 x 10 13 cm -3 , the ratio of (CIII+CIV)/n e increases while the ratio of (CV+CVI)/n e decreases. Here, CIII+CIV (CV+CVI) expresses the sum of CIII (CV) and CIV (CVI) intensities. The CIII+CIV indicates the carbon influx and the CV+CVI indicates the emissions through the transport in the ergodic layer. The result thus gives experimental evidence on the impurity screening by the ergodic layer in LHD, which is also supported by a three-dimensional edge particle simulation. The core impurity behavior is also studied in high-density discharges (n e ≤ 1x 10 15 cm -3 ) with multi H 2 -pellets injection. It is found that the ratio of V/D (V: convection velocity, D: diffusion coefficient) decreases after pellet injection and Z eff profile shows a flat one at values of 1.1-1.2. These results confirm no impurity accumulation occurs in high-density discharges. As a result, the iron density, n Fe , is analyzed to be 6 x 10 -7 ( = n Fe /n e ) of which the amount can be negligible as radiation source even in such high-density discharges. One- and two-dimensional impurity distributions from space-resolved VUV and EUV spectrometers newly developed for further impurity transport study are also presented with their preliminary results. (magnetically confined plasma)

  20. Few-Group Transport Analysis of the Core-Reflector Problem in Fast Reactor Cores via Equivalent Group Condensation and Local/Global Iteration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Won, Jong Hyuck; Cho, Nam Zin

    2011-01-01

    In deterministic neutron transport methods, a process called fine-group to few-group condensation is used to reduce the computational burden. However, recent results on the core-reflector problem in fast reactor cores show that use of a small number of energy groups has limitation to describe neutron flux around core reflector interface. Therefore, researches are still ongoing to overcome this limitation. Recently, the authors proposed I) direct application of equivalently condensed angle-dependent total cross section to discrete ordinates method to overcome the limitation of conventional multi-group approximations, and II) local/global iteration framework in which fine-group discrete ordinates calculation is used in local problems while few-group transport calculation is used in the global problem iteratively. In this paper, an analysis of the core-reflector problem is performed in few-group structure using equivalent angle-dependent total cross section with local/global iteration. Numerical results are obtained under S 12 discrete ordinates-like transport method with scattering cross section up to P1 Legendre expansion

  1. Homogeneous Reactor Experiment (HRE) Pond cryogenic barrier technology demonstration: Pre-barrier subsurface hydrology and contaminant transport investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moline, G.R.

    1998-03-01

    The Homogeneous Reactor Experiment (HRE) Pond is the site of a former impoundment for radioactive wastes that has since been drained, filled with soil, and covered with an asphalt cap. The site is bordered to the east and south by a tributary that empties into Melton Branch Creek and that contains significant concentrations of radioactive contaminants, primarily 90 Sr. Because of the proximity of the tributary to the HRE disposal site and the probable flow of groundwater from the site to the tributary, it is hypothesized that the HRE Pond is a source of contamination to he creek. As a means for temporary containment of contaminants within the impoundment, a cryogenic barrier technology demonstration was initiated in FY96 with a background hydrologic investigation that continued through FY97. Cryogenic equipment installation was completed in FY97, and freezing was initiated in September of 1997. This report documents the results of a hydrologic and geologic investigation of the HRE Pond/cryogenic barrier site. The purpose of this investigation is to evaluate the hydrologic conditions within and around the impoundment in order to meet the following objectives: (1) to provide a pre-barrier subsurface hydrologic baseline for post-barrier performance assessment; (2) to confirm that the impoundment is hydraulically connected to the surrounding sediments; and (3) to determine the likely contaminant exit pathways from the impoundment. The methods of investigation included water level and temperature monitoring in a network of wells and standpipes in and surrounding the impoundment, a helium tracer test conducted under ambient flow conditions, and geologic logging during the drilling of boreholes for installation of cryogenic probes and temperature monitoring wells

  2. Suppressing electron turbulence and triggering internal transport barriers with reversed magnetic shear in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, J. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Bell, R.; Guttenfelder, W.; Hammett, G. W.; Kaye, S. M.; LeBlanc, B.; Mikkelsen, D. R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Candy, J. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186 (United States); Smith, D. R. [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Yuh, H. Y. [Nova Photonics Inc., Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States)

    2012-05-15

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)] can achieve high electron plasma confinement regimes that are super-critically unstable to the electron temperature gradient driven (ETG) instability. These plasmas, dubbed electron internal transport barriers (e-ITBs), occur when the magnetic shear becomes strongly negative. Using the gyrokinetic code GYRO [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)], the first nonlinear ETG simulations of NSTX e-ITB plasmas reinforce this observation. Local simulations identify a strongly upshifted nonlinear critical gradient for thermal transport that depends on magnetic shear. Global simulations show e-ITB formation can occur when the magnetic shear becomes strongly negative. While the ETG-driven thermal flux at the outer edge of the barrier is large enough to be experimentally relevant, the turbulence cannot propagate past the barrier into the plasma interior.

  3. A reassessment of the blood-brain barrier transport of large neutral amino acids during acute systemic inflammation in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Rasmus H; Berg, Ronan M G; Taudorf, Sarah

    2018-01-01

    We reassessed data from a previous study on the transcerebral net exchange of large neutral amino acids (LNAAs) using a novel mathematical model of blood-brain barrier (BBB) transport. The study included twelve healthy volunteers who received a 4-h intravenous lipopolysaccharide (LPS) infusion...

  4. The enzymatic degradation and transport of leucine-enkephalin and 4-imidazolidinone enkephalin prodrugs at the blood-brain barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, L.; Bak, A.; Friis, G.J.

    1998-01-01

    In this study, the stability in and transport across a cell culture model of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is investigated for leucine-enkephalin (Leu-enkephalin) and four 4-imidazolidinone prodrugs of Leu-enkephalin. The results show that Leu-enkephalin is degraded in the cell culture model...

  5. Role of Transporters in Central Nervous System Drug Delivery and Blood-Brain Barrier Protection: Relevance to Treatment of Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hrvoje Brzica

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. The only approved pharmacologic treatment for ischemic stroke is thrombolysis via recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (r-tPA. A short therapeutic window and serious adverse events (ie, hemorrhage, excitotoxicity greatly limit r-tPA therapy, which indicates an essential need to develop novel stroke treatment paradigms. Transporters expressed at the blood-brain barrier (BBB provide a significant opportunity to advance stroke therapy via central nervous system delivery of drugs that have neuroprotective properties. Examples of such transporters include organic anion–transporting polypeptides (Oatps and organic cation transporters (Octs. In addition, multidrug resistance proteins (Mrps are transporter targets in brain microvascular endothelial cells that can be exploited to preserve BBB integrity in the setting of stroke. Here, we review current knowledge on stroke pharmacotherapy and demonstrate how endogenous BBB transporters can be targeted for improvement of ischemic stroke treatment.

  6. Building waste management core indicators through Spatial Material Flow Analysis: net recovery and transport intensity indexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Font Vivanco, David; Puig Ventosa, Ignasi; Gabarrell Durany, Xavier

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, the material and spatial characterization of the flows within a municipal solid waste (MSW) management system are combined through a Network-Based Spatial Material Flow Analysis. Using this information, two core indicators are developed for the bio-waste fraction, the Net Recovery Index (NRI) and the Transport Intensity Index (TII), which are aimed at assessing progress towards policy-related sustainable MSW management strategies and objectives. The NRI approaches the capacity of a MSW management system for converting waste into resources through a systematic metabolic approach, whereas the TII addresses efficiency in terms of the transport requirements to manage a specific waste flow throughout the entire MSW management life cycle. Therefore, both indicators could be useful in assessing key MSW management policy strategies, such as the consecution of higher recycling levels (sustainability principle) or the minimization of transport by locating treatment facilities closer to generation sources (proximity principle). To apply this methodological approach, the bio-waste management system of the region of Catalonia (Spain) has been chosen as a case study. Results show the adequacy of both indicators for identifying those points within the system with higher capacity to compromise its environmental, economic and social performance and therefore establishing clear targets for policy prioritization. Moreover, this methodological approach permits scenario building, which could be useful in assessing the outcomes of hypothetical scenarios, thus proving its adequacy for strategic planning. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Zebrafish as a visual and dynamic model to study the transport of nanosized drug delivery systems across the biological barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ye; Miao, Xiaoqing; Chen, Tongkai; Yi, Xiang; Wang, Ruibing; Zhao, Haitao; Lee, Simon Ming-Yuen; Wang, Xueqing; Zheng, Ying

    2017-08-01

    With the wide application of nanotechnology to drug delivery systems, a simple, dynamic and visual in vivo model for high-throughput screening of novel formulations with fluorescence markers across biological barriers is desperately needed. In vitro cell culture models have been widely used, although they are far from a complimentary in vivo system. Mammalian animal models are common predictive models to study transport, but they are costly and time consuming. Zebrafish (Danio rerio), a small vertebrate model, have the potential to be developed as an "intermediate" model for quick evaluations. Based on our previously established coumarin 6 nanocrystals (C6-NCs), which have two different sizes, the present study investigates the transportation of C6-NCs across four biological barriers, including the chorion, blood brain barrier (BBB), blood retinal barrier (BRB) and gastrointestinal (GI) barrier, using zebrafish embryos and larvae as in vivo models. The biodistribution and elimination of C6 from different organs were quantified in adult zebrafish. The results showed that compared to 200nm C6-NCs, 70nm C6-NCs showed better permeability across these biological barriers. A FRET study suggested that intact C6-NCs together with the free dissolved form of C6 were absorbed into the larval zebrafish. More C6 was accumulated in different organs after incubation with small sized NCs via lipid raft-mediated endocytosis in adult zebrafish, which is consistent with the findings from in vitro cell monolayers and the zebrafish larvae model. C6-NCs could be gradually eliminated in each organ over time. This study demonstrated the successful application of zebrafish as a simple and dynamic model to simultaneously assess the transport of nanosized drug delivery systems across several biological barriers and biodistribution in different organs, especially in the brain, which could be used for central nervous system (CNS) drug and delivery system screening. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B

  8. Estimation of reactor core calculation by HELIOS/MASTER at power generating condition through DeCART, whole-core transport code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H. Y.; Joo, H. G.; Kim, K. S.; Kim, G. Y.; Jang, M. H.

    2003-01-01

    The reactivity and power distribution errors of the HELIOS/MASTER core calculation under power generating conditions are assessed using a whole core transport code DeCART. For this work, the cross section tablesets were generated for a medium sized PWR following the standard procedure and two group nodal core calculations were performed. The test cases include the HELIOS calculations for 2-D assemblies at constant thermal conditions, MASTER 3D assembly calculations at power generating conditions, and the core calculations at HZP, HFP, and an abnormal power conditions. In all these cases, the results of the DeCART code in which pinwise thermal feedback effects are incorporated are used as the reference. The core reactivity, assemblywise power distribution, axial power distribution, peaking factor, and thermal feedback effects are then compared. The comparison shows that the error of the HELIOS/MASTER system in the core reactivity, assembly wise power distribution, pin peaking factor are only 100∼300 pcm, 3%, and 2%, respectively. As far as the detailed pinwise power distribution is concerned, however, errors greater than 15% are observed

  9. Gyrokinetic analyses of core heat transport in JT-60U plasmas with different toroidal rotation direction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narita, Emi; Fukuda, Takeshi; Honda, Mitsuru; Hayashi, Nobuhiko; Urano, Hajime; Ide, Shunsuke

    2015-01-01

    Tokamak plasmas with an internal transport barrier (ITB) are capable of maintaining improved confinement performance. The ITBs formed in plasmas with the weak magnetic shear and the weak radial electric field shear are often observed to be modest. In these ITB plasmas, it has been found that the electron temperature ITB is steeper when toroidal rotation is in a co-direction with respect to the plasma current than when toroidal rotation is in a counter-direction. To clarify the relationship between the direction of toroidal rotation and heat transport in the ITB region, we examine dominant instabilities using the flux-tube gyrokinetic code GS2. The linear calculations show a difference in the real frequencies; the counter-rotation case has a more trapped electron mode than the co-rotation case. In addition, the nonlinear calculations show that with this difference, the ratio of the electron heat diffusivity χ_e to the ion's χ_i is higher for the counter-rotation case than for the co-rotation case. The difference in χ_e /χ_i agrees with the experiment. We also find that the effect of the difference in the flow shear between the two cases due to the toroidal rotation direction on the linear growth rate is not significant. (author)

  10. One-speed neutron transport in spheres with totally absorbing cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sjoestrand, N.G.

    1988-01-01

    Stationary and time-dependent transport of neutrons of one speed has been studied in spheres with totally absorbing cores. For stationary, critical reactors the number of secondaries per collision has been calculated numerically for various inner and outer radii. In the time-dependent case, the decay constant has been calculated for spherical shells of different inner radii and thicknesses. For a fixed ratio between shell thickness and inner radius, the curve of the decay constant versus shell thickness crosses the Corngold limit in the same way as the curve for a homogeneous sphere. When the ratio goes to zero the curve approaches that for an infinite slab. The behaviour is discussed in view of a new result from collision theory, viz. that the following condition must be fulfilled for a body at the point where the decay constant curve crosses the Corngold limit: the average exit distance of the neutrons is equal to the mean free path for scattering

  11. Depletion methodology in the 3-D whole core transport code DeCART

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kang Seog; Cho, Jin Young; Zee, Sung Quun

    2005-02-01

    Three dimensional whole-core transport code DeCART has been developed to include a characteristics of the numerical reactor to replace partly the experiment. This code adopts the deterministic method in simulating the neutron behavior with the least assumption and approximation. This neutronic code is also coupled with the thermal hydraulic code CFD and the thermo mechanical code to simulate the combined effects. Depletion module has been implemented in DeCART code to predict the depleted composition in the fuel. The exponential matrix method of ORIGEN-2 has been used for the depletion calculation. The library of including decay constants, yield matrix and others has been used and greatly simplified for the calculation efficiency. This report summarizes the theoretical backgrounds and includes the verification of the depletion module in DeCART by performing the benchmark calculations.

  12. Quiescent double barrier regime in the DIII-D tokamak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfield, C M; Burrell, K H; DeBoo, J C; Doyle, E J; Stallard, B W; Synakowski, E J; Fenzi, C; Gohil, P; Groebner, R J; Lao, L L; Makowski, M A; McKee, G R; Moyer, R A; Rettig, C L; Rhodes, T L; Pinsker, R I; Staebler, G M; West, W P

    2001-05-14

    A new sustained high-performance regime, combining discrete edge and core transport barriers, has been discovered in the DIII-D tokamak. Edge localized modes (ELMs) are replaced by a steady oscillation that increases edge particle transport, thereby allowing particle control with no ELM-induced pulsed divertor heat load. The core barrier resembles those usually seen with a low (L) mode edge, without the degradation often associated with ELMs. The barriers are separated by a narrow region of high transport associated with a zero crossing in the E x B shearing rate.

  13. Unmasking the Role of Uptake Transporters for Digoxin Uptake Across the Barriers of the Central Nervous System in Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunal S Taskar

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The role of uptake transporter (organic anion–transporting polypeptide [Oatp] in the disposition of a P-glycoprotein (P-gp substrate (digoxin at the barriers of central nervous system, namely, the blood-brain barrier (BBB, blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB, and brain-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB, was studied using rat as a preclinical species. In vivo chemical inhibition of P-gp and Oatp was achieved using elacridar and rifampicin, respectively. Our findings show that (1 digoxin had a low brain-to-plasma concentration ratio (B/P (0.07 in rat; (2 in the presence of elacridar, the B/P of digoxin increased by about 12-fold; (3 rifampicin administration alone did not change the digoxin B/P significantly when compared with digoxin B/P alone; (4 rifampicin administration along with elacridar resulted only in 6-fold increase in the B/P of digoxin; (5 similar fold changes and trends were seen with the spinal cord-to-plasma concentration ratio of digoxin, indicating the similarity between BBB and the BSCB; and (6 unlike BBB and BSCB, the presence of rifampicin further increased the cerebrospinal fluid-to-plasma concentration ratio (CSF/P for digoxin, suggesting a differential orientation of the uptake transporters at the BCSFB (CSF to blood compared with the BBB (blood to brain. The observations for digoxin uptake, at least at the BBB and the BSCB, advocate the importance of uptake transporters (Oatps. However, the activity of such uptake transporters became evident only after inhibition of the efflux transporter (P-gp.

  14. Development of 2-D/1-D fusion method for three-dimensional whole-core heterogeneous neutron transport calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Gil Soo

    2006-02-01

    To describe power distribution and multiplication factor of a reactor core accurately, it is necessary to perform calculations based on neutron transport equation considering heterogeneous geometry and scattering angles. These calculations require very heavy calculations and were nearly impossible with computers of old days. From the limitation of computing power, traditional approach of reactor core design consists of heterogeneous transport calculation in fuel assembly level and whole core diffusion nodal calculation with assembly homogenized properties, resulting from fuel assembly transport calculation. This approach may be effective in computation time, but it gives less accurate results for highly heterogeneous problems. As potential for whole core heterogeneous transport calculation became more feasible owing to rapid development of computing power during last several years, the interests in two and three dimensional whole core heterogeneous transport calculations by deterministic method are increased. For two dimensional calculation, there were several successful approaches using even parity transport equation with triangular meshes, S N method with refined rectangular meshes, the method of characteristics (MOC) with unstructured meshes, and so on. The work in this thesis originally started from the two dimensional whole core heterogeneous transport calculation by using MOC. After successful achievement in two dimensional calculation, there were efforts in three-dimensional whole-core heterogeneous transport calculation using MOC. Since direct extension to three dimensional calculation of MOC requires too much computing power, indirect approach to three dimensional calculation was considered.Thus, 2D/1D fusion method for three dimensional heterogeneous transport calculation was developed and successfully implemented in a computer code. The 2D/1D fusion method is synergistic combination of the MOC for radial 2-D calculation and S N -like methods for axial 1

  15. Warm-Core Intensification of a Hurricane Through Horizontal Eddy Heat Transports Inside the Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Scott A.; Montgomery, Michael T.; Fulton, John; Nolan, David S.

    2001-01-01

    A simulation of Hurricane Bob (1991) using the PSU/NCAR MM5 mesoscale model with a finest mesh spacing of 1.3 km is used to diagnose the heat budget of the hurricane. Heat budget terms, including latent and radiative heating, boundary layer forcing, and advection terms were output directly from the model for a 6-h period with 2-min frequency. Previous studies of warm core formation have emphasized the warming associated with gentle subsidence within the eye. The simulation of Hurricane Bob also identifies subsidence warming as a major factor for eye warming, but also shows a significant contribution from horizontal advective terms. When averaged over the area of the eye, excluding the eyewall (at least in an azimuthal mean sense), subsidence is found to strongly warm the mid-troposphere (2-9 km) while horizontal advection warms the mid to upper troposphere (5-13 km) with about equal magnitude. Partitioning of the horizontal advective terms into azimuthal mean and eddy components shows that the mean radial circulation cannot, as expected, generally contribute to this warming, but that it is produced almost entirely by the horizontal eddy transport of heat into the eye. A further breakdown of the eddy components into azimuthal wave numbers 1, 2, and higher indicates that the warming is dominated by wave number 1 asymmetries, with smaller contributions coming from higher wave numbers. Warming by horizontal eddy transport is consistent with idealized modeling of vortex Rossby waves and work is in progress to identify and clarify the role of vortex Rossby waves in warm-core intensification in both the full-physics model and idealized models.

  16. Heat and fission product transport in molten core material pool with crust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, J.I.; Suh, K.Y.; Kang, C.S.

    2005-01-01

    Heat transfer and fluid flow in a molten pool are influenced by internal volumetric heat generated from the radioactive decay of fission product species retained in the reactor vessel during a severe accident. The pool superheat is determined based on the overall energy balance that equates the heat production rate to the heat loss rate. Decay heat of fission products in the pool is estimated by product of the mass concentration and energy conversion factor of each fission product. Twenty-nine elements are chosen and classified by their chemical properties to calculate heat generation rate in the pool. The mass concentration of a fission product is obtained from released fraction and the tabular output of the ORIGEN 2 code. The initial core and pool inventories at each time can also be estimated using ORIGEN 2. The released fraction of each fission product is calculated based on the bubble dynamics and mass transport. Numerical analysis is performed for heat and fission product transport in a molten core material pool during the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) accident. The pool is assumed to be a partially filled hemisphere, whose change in geometry is neglected during the numerical calculation. Calculated results indicate that the peak temperature in the molten pool is significantly lowered, since a substantial amount of the volatile fission products is released from the molten pool during progression of the accident. The results may directly be applied to the existing severe accident analysis codes to more mechanistically determine the thermal load to the reactor vessel lower head during the in-vessel retention

  17. Link between self-consistent pressure profiles and electron internal transport barriers in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Razumova, K A [Nuclear Fusion Institute, RRC ' Kurchatov Institute' , 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); Andreev, V F [Nuclear Fusion Institute, RRC ' Kurchatov Institute' , 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); Donne, A J H [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM-FOM, partner in the Trilateral Euregio Cluster, PO Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Hogeweij, G M D [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM-FOM, partner in the Trilateral Euregio Cluster, PO Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Lysenko, S E [Nuclear Fusion Institute, RRC ' Kurchatov Institute' , 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); Shelukhin, D A [Nuclear Fusion Institute, RRC ' Kurchatov Institute' , 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); Spakman, G W [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM-FOM, partner in the Trilateral Euregio Cluster, PO Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Vershkov, V A [Nuclear Fusion Institute, RRC ' Kurchatov Institute' , 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); Zhuravlev, V A [Nuclear Fusion Institute, RRC ' Kurchatov Institute' , 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2006-09-15

    Tokamak plasmas have a tendency to self-organization: the plasma pressure profiles obtained in different operational regimes and even in various tokamaks may be represented by a single typical curve, called the self-consistent pressure profile. About a decade ago local zones with enhanced confinement were discovered in tokamak plasmas. These zones are referred to as internal transport barriers (ITBs) and they can act on the electron and/or ion fluid. Here the pressure gradients can largely exceed the gradients dictated by profile consistency. So the existence of ITBs seems to be in contradiction with the self-consistent pressure profiles (this is also often referred to as profile resilience or profile stiffness). In this paper we will discuss the interplay between profile consistency and ITBs. A summary of the cumulative information obtained from T-10, RTP and TEXTOR is given, and a coherent explanation of the main features of the observed phenomena is suggested. Both phenomena, the self-consistent profile and ITB, are connected with the density of rational magnetic surfaces, where the turbulent cells are situated. The distance between these cells determines the level of their interaction, and therefore the level of the turbulent transport. This process regulates the plasma pressure profile. If the distance is wide, the turbulent flux may be diminished and the ITB may be formed. In regions with rarefied surfaces the steeper pressure gradients are possible without instantaneously inducing pressure driven instabilities, which force the profiles back to their self-consistent shapes. Also it can be expected that the ITB region is wider for lower dq/d{rho} (more rarefied surfaces)

  18. Production of internal transport barriers via self-generated mean flows in Alcator C-Mod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiore, C. L.; Ernst, D. R.; Podpaly, Y. A.; Howard, N. T.; Lee, Jungpyo; Reinke, M. L.; Rice, J. E.; Hughes, J. W.; Ma, Y. [MIT-PSFC, 77 Mass. Ave., Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Mikkelsen, D. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451 (United States); Rowan, W. L.; Bespamyatnov, I. [FRC, U of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2012-05-15

    New results suggest that changes observed in the intrinsic toroidal rotation influence the internal transport barrier (ITB) formation in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak [E. S. Marmar and Alcator C-Mod group, Fusion Sci. Technol. 51, 261 (2007)]. These arise when the resonance for ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) minority heating is positioned off-axis at or outside of the plasma half-radius. These ITBs form in a reactor relevant regime, without particle or momentum injection, with Ti Almost-Equal-To Te, and with monotonic q profiles (q{sub min} < 1). C-Mod H-mode plasmas exhibit strong intrinsic co-current rotation that increases with increasing stored energy without external drive. When the resonance position is moved off-axis, the rotation decreases in the center of the plasma resulting in a radial toroidal rotation profile with a central well which deepens and moves farther off-axis when the ICRF resonance location reaches the plasma half-radius. This profile results in strong E Multiplication-Sign B shear (>1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} rad/s) in the region where the ITB foot is observed. Gyrokinetic analyses indicate that this spontaneous shearing rate is comparable to the linear ion temperature gradient (ITG) growth rate at the ITB location and is sufficient to reduce the turbulent particle and energy transport. New and detailed measurement of the ion temperature demonstrates that the radial profile flattens as the ICRF resonance position moves off axis, decreasing the drive for the ITG the instability as well. These results are the first evidence that intrinsic rotation can affect confinement in ITB plasmas.

  19. Sensitive and transportable gadolinium-core plastic scintillator sphere for neutron detection and counting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumazert, Jonathan; Coulon, Romain; Carrel, Frédérick; Corre, Gwenolé; Normand, Stéphane [CEA, LIST, Laboratoire Capteurs Architectures Electroniques, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Méchin, Laurence [CNRS, UCBN, Groupe de Recherche en Informatique, Image, Automatique et Instrumentation de Caen, 14050 Caen (France); Hamel, Matthieu [CEA, LIST, Laboratoire Capteurs Architectures Electroniques, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2016-08-21

    Neutron detection forms a critical branch of nuclear-related issues, currently driven by the search for competitive alternative technologies to neutron counters based on the helium-3 isotope. The deployment of plastic scintillators shows a high potential for efficient detectors, safer and more reliable than liquids, more easily scalable and cost-effective than inorganic. In the meantime, natural gadolinium, through its 155 and mostly 157 isotopes, presents an exceptionally high interaction probability with thermal neutrons. This paper introduces a dual system including a metal gadolinium core inserted at the center of a high-scale plastic scintillator sphere. Incident fast neutrons are thermalized by the scintillator shell and then may be captured with a significant probability by gadolinium 155 and 157 nuclei in the core. The deposition of a sufficient fraction of the capture high-energy prompt gamma signature inside the scintillator shell will then allow discrimination from background radiations by energy threshold, and therefore neutron detection. The scaling of the system with the Monte Carlo MCNPX2.7 code was carried out according to a tradeoff between the moderation of incident fast neutrons and the probability of slow neutron capture by a moderate-cost metal gadolinium core. Based on the parameters extracted from simulation, a first laboratory prototype for the assessment of the detection method principle has been synthetized. The robustness and sensitivity of the neutron detection principle are then assessed by counting measurement experiments. Experimental results confirm the potential for a stable, highly sensitive, transportable and cost-efficient neutron detector and orientate future investigation toward promising axes.

  20. FULLY GENERAL RELATIVISTIC SIMULATIONS OF CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE WITH AN APPROXIMATE NEUTRINO TRANSPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuroda, Takami; Kotake, Kei [Division of Theoretical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Takiwaki, Tomoya [Center for Computational Astrophysics, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2012-08-10

    We present results from the first generation of multi-dimensional hydrodynamic core-collapse simulations in full general relativity (GR) that include an approximate treatment of neutrino transport. Using an M1 closure scheme with an analytic variable Eddington factor, we solve the energy-independent set of radiation energy and momentum based on the Thorne's momentum formalism. Our newly developed code is designed to evolve the Einstein field equation together with the GR radiation hydrodynamic equations. We follow the dynamics starting from the onset of gravitational core collapse of a 15 M{sub Sun} star, through bounce, up to about 100 ms postbounce in this study. By computing four models that differ according to 1D to 3D and by switching from special relativistic (SR) to GR hydrodynamics, we study how the spacial multi-dimensionality and GR would affect the dynamics in the early postbounce phase. Our 3D results support the anticipation in previous 1D results that the neutrino luminosity and average neutrino energy of any neutrino flavor in the postbounce phase increase when switching from SR to GR hydrodynamics. This is because the deeper gravitational well of GR produces more compact core structures, and thus hotter neutrino spheres at smaller radii. By analyzing the residency timescale to the neutrino-heating timescale in the gain region, we show that the criterion to initiate neutrino-driven explosions can be most easily satisfied in 3D models, irrespective of SR or GR hydrodynamics. Our results suggest that the combination of GR and 3D hydrodynamics provides the most favorable condition to drive a robust neutrino-driven explosion.

  1. Sensitive and transportable gadolinium-core plastic scintillator sphere for neutron detection and counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumazert, Jonathan; Coulon, Romain; Carrel, Frédérick; Corre, Gwenolé; Normand, Stéphane; Méchin, Laurence; Hamel, Matthieu

    2016-01-01

    Neutron detection forms a critical branch of nuclear-related issues, currently driven by the search for competitive alternative technologies to neutron counters based on the helium-3 isotope. The deployment of plastic scintillators shows a high potential for efficient detectors, safer and more reliable than liquids, more easily scalable and cost-effective than inorganic. In the meantime, natural gadolinium, through its 155 and mostly 157 isotopes, presents an exceptionally high interaction probability with thermal neutrons. This paper introduces a dual system including a metal gadolinium core inserted at the center of a high-scale plastic scintillator sphere. Incident fast neutrons are thermalized by the scintillator shell and then may be captured with a significant probability by gadolinium 155 and 157 nuclei in the core. The deposition of a sufficient fraction of the capture high-energy prompt gamma signature inside the scintillator shell will then allow discrimination from background radiations by energy threshold, and therefore neutron detection. The scaling of the system with the Monte Carlo MCNPX2.7 code was carried out according to a tradeoff between the moderation of incident fast neutrons and the probability of slow neutron capture by a moderate-cost metal gadolinium core. Based on the parameters extracted from simulation, a first laboratory prototype for the assessment of the detection method principle has been synthetized. The robustness and sensitivity of the neutron detection principle are then assessed by counting measurement experiments. Experimental results confirm the potential for a stable, highly sensitive, transportable and cost-efficient neutron detector and orientate future investigation toward promising axes.

  2. Core to surge-line energy transport in a severe accident scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marzo, M. di; Almenas, K.; Gopalnarayanan, S.

    1994-01-01

    The analysis of loss of coolant accidents in a nuclear power plant, which progress to the stage where the core is uncovered, poses important safety related questions. One of these concerns the rate of energy transport to metal components of the primary system. An experimental program has been conducted at the Univ. of Maryland test facility which quantifies the rate of energy transfer from an uncovered core in a B ampersand W (once-through type steam generators) plant. SF 6 is used to simulate the natural circulation driving force of the high pressure steam expected at prototypical conditions. A time-dependent scaling methodology is developed to transpose experimental data to prototypical conditions. To achieve this transformation, a nominal fluid temperature increase rate of 1.0 degrees C/s is inferred from available TMI-2 event data. To bracket the range of potential prototypical transient scenarios, temperature ramps of 0.8 degrees C/s and 1.2 degrees C/s are also considered. Repeated tests, covering a range of test facility conditions, lead to estimated failure times at the surge line nozzle of 1.5 to 2 hours after initiation of the natural circulation phase of the transient

  3. Ring waves as a mass transport mechanism in air-driven core-annular flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camassa, Roberto; Forest, M Gregory; Lee, Long; Ogrosky, H Reed; Olander, Jeffrey

    2012-12-01

    Air-driven core-annular fluid flows occur in many situations, from lung airways to engineering applications. Here we study, experimentally and theoretically, flows where a viscous liquid film lining the inside of a tube is forced upwards against gravity by turbulent airflow up the center of the tube. We present results on the thickness and mean speed of the film and properties of the interfacial waves that develop from an instability of the air-liquid interface. We derive a long-wave asymptotic model and compare properties of its solutions with those of the experiments. Traveling wave solutions of this long-wave model exhibit evidence of different mass transport regimes: Past a certain threshold, sufficiently large-amplitude waves begin to trap cores of fluid which propagate upward at wave speeds. This theoretical result is then confirmed by a second set of experiments that show evidence of ring waves of annular fluid propagating over the underlying creeping flow. By tuning the parameters of the experiments, the strength of this phenomenon can be adjusted in a way that is predicted qualitatively by the model.

  4. Animal models for studying transport across the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonate, P L

    1995-01-01

    There are many reasons for wishing to determine the rate of uptake of a drug from blood into brain parenchyma. However, when faced with doing so for the first time, choosing a method can be a formidable task. There are at least 7 methods from which to choose: indicator dilution, brain uptake index, microdialysis, external registration, PET scanning, in situ perfusion, and compartmental modeling. Each method has advantages and disadvantages. Some methods require very little equipment while others require equipment that can cost millions of dollars. Some methods require very little technical experience whereas others require complex surgical manipulation. The mathematics alone for the various methods range from simple algebra to complex integral calculus and differential equations. Like most things in science, as the complexity of the technique increases, so does the quantity of information it provides. This review is meant to serve as a starting point for the researcher who wishes to study transport and uptake across the blood-brain barrier in animal models. An overview of the mathematical theory, as well as an introduction to the techniques, is presented.

  5. Transport of nanoparticles through the blood-brain barrier for imaging and therapeutic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilo, Malka; Motiei, Menachem; Hana, Panet; Popovtzer, Rachela

    2014-01-01

    A critical problem in the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders and diseases, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's, is the incapability to overcome the restrictive mechanism of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and to deliver important therapeutic agents to the brain. During the last decade, nanoparticles have gained attention as promising drug delivery agents that can transport across the BBB and increase the uptake of appropriate drugs in the brain. In this study we have developed insulin-targeted gold nanoparticles (INS-GNPs) and investigated quantitatively the amount of INS-GNPs that cross the BBB by the receptor-mediated endocytosis process. For this purpose, INS-GNPs and control GNPs were injected into the tail vein of male BALB/c mice. Major organs were then extracted and a blood sample was taken from the mice, and thereafter analyzed for gold content by flame atomic absorption spectroscopy. Results show that two hours post-intravenous injection, the amount of INS-GNPs found in mouse brains is over 5 times greater than that of the control, untargeted GNPs. Results of further experimentation on a rat model show that INS-GNPs can also serve as CT contrast agents to highlight specific brain regions in which they accumulate. Due to the fact that they can overcome the restrictive mechanism of the BBB, this approach could be a potentially valuable tool, helping to confront the great challenge of delivering important imaging and therapeutic agents to the brain for detection and treatment of neurodegenerative disorders and diseases.

  6. Simulation studies of current transport in metal-insulator-semiconductor Schottky barrier diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chand, Subhash; Bala, Saroj

    2007-01-01

    The current-voltage characteristics of Schottky diodes with an interfacial insulator layer are analysed by numerical simulation. The current-voltage data of the metal-insulator-semiconductor Schottky diode are simulated using thermionic emission diffusion (TED) equation taking into account an interfacial layer parameter. The calculated current-voltage data are fitted into ideal TED equation to see the apparent effect of interfacial layer parameters on current transport. Results obtained from the simulation studies shows that with mere presence of an interfacial layer at the metal-semiconductor interface the Schottky contact behave as an ideal diode of apparently high barrier height (BH), but with same ideality factor and series resistance as considered for a pure Schottky contact without an interfacial layer. This apparent BH decreases linearly with decreasing temperature. The effects giving rise to high ideality factor in metal-insulator-semiconductor diode are analysed. Reasons for observed temperature dependence of ideality factor in experimentally fabricated metal-insulator-semiconductor diodes are analysed and possible mechanisms are discussed

  7. Progress towards steady-state operation and real time control of internal transport barriers in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litaudon, X.

    2002-01-01

    In JET advanced tokamak research mainly focuses on plasmas with internal transport barriers (ITBs), generated by modifications of the current profile. The formerly developed optimised shear regime with low magnetic shear in the plasma center has been extended to deeply reversed magnetic shear configurations. ITBs occur at much lower access powers. The achievement of high fusion performance is reported in deeply reversed magnetic shear configuration. The generation of plasmas with wide ITBs in this configuration has allowed an extension of the accessible normalised toroidal beta at high magnetic field. We report on the successful sustainment and control of the electron and ion ITB in full current drive operation with a large fraction of bootstrap current. Progress towards the steady state capability of ITB plasmas includes techniques to avoid strong ELM activity and the newly developed real time control of the local ITB strength. Thanks to the real time control of the ITB characteristics the improved confinement state is maintained in a more reproducible and stable manner in quasi-stationary conditions. (author)

  8. Progress towards steady-state operation and real time control of internal transport barriers in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litaudon, X.; Becoulet, A.; Crisanti, F.

    2003-01-01

    In JET advanced tokamak research mainly focuses on plasmas with internal transport barriers (ITBs), generated by modifications of the current profile. The formerly developed optimised shear regime with low magnetic shear in the plasma center has been extended to deeply reversed magnetic shear configurations. High fusion performance with wide ITBs has been obtained transiently in deeply reversed magnetic shear configuration: H IPB98(y,2) ∼1.9, β N =2.4 at I p =2.5MA. At somewhat reduced performance electron and ion ITBs have been sustained in full current drive operation with 1MA of bootstrap current: H IPB98(y,2) ∼1, β N =1.7 at I p =2.0MA. The ITBs have been maintained up to 11s. This duration, much larger than the energy confinement time (37 times larger), is already approaching a current resistive time. New real-time measurements and feedback control algorithms have been developed and implemented in JET for successfully controlling the ITB dynamics and the current density profile in the highly non-inductive regime. (author)

  9. Ternary polyplex micelles with PEG shells and intermediate barrier to complexed DNA cores for efficient systemic gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junjie; Chen, Qixian; Zha, Zengshi; Li, Hui; Toh, Kazuko; Dirisala, Anjaneyulu; Matsumoto, Yu; Osada, Kensuke; Kataoka, Kazunori; Ge, Zhishen

    2015-07-10

    Simultaneous achievement of prolonged retention in blood circulation and efficient gene transfection activity in target tissues has always been a major challenge hindering in vivo applications of nonviral gene vectors via systemic administration. Herein, we constructed novel rod-shaped ternary polyplex micelles (TPMs) via complexation between the mixed block copolymers of poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly{N'-[N-(2-aminoethyl)-2-aminoethyl]aspartamide} (PEG-b-PAsp(DET)) and poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-b-PAsp(DET) (PNIPAM-b-PAsp(DET)) and plasmid DNA (pDNA) at room temperature, exhibiting distinct temperature-responsive formation of a hydrophobic intermediate layer between PEG shells and pDNA cores through facile temperature increase from room temperature to body temperature (~37 °C). As compared with binary polyplex micelles of PEG-b-PAsp(DET) (BPMs), TPMs were confirmed to condense pDNA into a more compact structure, which achieved enhanced tolerability to nuclease digestion and strong counter polyanion exchange. In vitro gene transfection results demonstrated TPMs exhibiting enhanced gene transfection efficiency due to efficient cellular uptake and endosomal escape. Moreover, in vivo performance evaluation after intravenous injection confirmed that TPMs achieved significantly prolonged blood circulation, high tumor accumulation, and promoted gene expression in tumor tissue. Moreover, TPMs loading therapeutic pDNA encoding an anti-angiogenic protein remarkably suppressed tumor growth following intravenous injection into H22 tumor-bearing mice. These results suggest TPMs with PEG shells and facilely engineered intermediate barrier to inner complexed pDNA have great potentials as systemic nonviral gene vectors for cancer gene therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Transport of nuclides during a core meltdown accident, with consideration of filtered venting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeggblom, H.

    1981-01-01

    A BWR core meltdown accident has been studied with respect to the transport of radioactive and nonactive gases and aerosols. A system consisting of a containment with an outer stone condenser in three parts was considered. Calculations of the aerosol behaviour have been made with the computer programme NAUA and HAARM-3, assuming one single compartment. Results from these calculations have been used for multicompartment calculations with CORRAL II. The code was modified so that particles of different sizes could be considered in the different compartments, and the time dependence of the particles can be arbitrary. In addition to the aerosol transport and deposition, the corresponding quantities for elemental iodine were calculated. It was concluded, that if the total volume of the condenser system is of the order of 10 5 m 3 , practically all elemental iodine and particles can be retained in the system. The only leakage to the environment will be caused by inefficient sealing during the first five hours. The pressure can never damage the condenser. (author)

  11. Core radial electric field and transport in Wendelstein 7-X plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pablant, N. A.; Langenberg, A.; Alonso, A.; Beidler, C. D.; Bitter, M.; Bozhenkov, S.; Burhenn, R.; Beurskens, M.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Dinklage, A.; Fuchert, G.; Gates, D.; Geiger, J.; Hill, K. W.; Höfel, U.; Hirsch, M.; Knauer, J.; Krämer-Flecken, A.; Landreman, M.; Lazerson, S.; Maaßberg, H.; Marchuk, O.; Massidda, S.; Neilson, G. H.; Pasch, E.; Satake, S.; Svennson, J.; Traverso, P.; Turkin, Y.; Valson, P.; Velasco, J. L.; Weir, G.; Windisch, T.; Wolf, R. C.; Yokoyama, M.; Zhang, D.; W7-X Team

    2018-02-01

    The results from the investigation of neoclassical core transport and the role of the radial electric field profile (Er) in the first operational phase of the Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) stellarator are presented. In stellarator plasmas, the details of the Er profile are expected to have a strong effect on both the particle and heat fluxes. Investigation of the radial electric field is important in understanding neoclassical transport and in validation of neoclassical calculations. The radial electric field is closely related to the perpendicular plasma flow (u⊥) through the force balance equation. This allows the radial electric field to be inferred from measurements of the perpendicular flow velocity, which can be measured using the x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer and correlation reflectometry diagnostics. Large changes in the perpendicular rotation, on the order of Δu⊥˜ 5 km/s (ΔEr ˜ 12 kV/m), have been observed within a set of experiments where the heating power was stepped down from 2 MW to 0.6 MW. These experiments are examined in detail to explore the relationship between heating power temperature, and density profiles and the radial electric field. Finally, the inferred Er profiles are compared to initial neoclassical calculations based on measured plasma profiles. The results from several neoclassical codes, sfincs, fortec-3d, and dkes, are compared both with each other and the measurements. These comparisons show good agreement, giving confidence in the applicability of the neoclassical calculations to the W7-X configuration.

  12. Core2D. A code for non-isothermal water flow and reactive solute transport. Users manual version 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samper, J.; Juncosa, R.; Delgado, J.; Montenegro, L.

    2000-01-01

    Understanding natural groundwater quality patterns, quantifying groundwater pollution and assessing the effects of waste disposal, require modeling tools accounting for water flow, and transport of heat and dissolved species as well as their complex interactions with solid and gases phases. This report contains the users manual of CORE ''2D Version V.2.0, a COde for modeling water flow (saturated and unsaturated), heat transport and multicomponent Reactive solute transport under both local chemical equilibrium and kinetic conditions. it is an updated and improved version of CORE-LE-2D V0 (Samper et al., 1988) which in turns is an extended version of TRANQUI, a previous reactive transport code (ENRESA, 1995). All these codes were developed within the context of Research Projects funded by ENRESA and the European Commission. (Author)

  13. Core 2D. A code for non-isothermal water flow and reactive solute transport. Users manual version 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samper, J; Juncosa, R; Delgado, J; Montenegro, L [Universidad de A Coruna (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    Understanding natural groundwater quality patterns, quantifying groundwater pollution and assessing the effects of waste disposal, require modeling tools accounting for water flow, and transport of heat and dissolved species as well as their complex interactions with solid and gases phases. This report contains the users manual of CORE ''2D Version V.2.0, a COde for modeling water flow (saturated and unsaturated), heat transport and multicomponent Reactive solute transport under both local chemical equilibrium and kinetic conditions. it is an updated and improved version of CORE-LE-2D V0 (Samper et al., 1988) which in turns is an extended version of TRANQUI, a previous reactive transport code (ENRESA, 1995). All these codes were developed within the context of Research Projects funded by ENRESA and the European Commission. (Author)

  14. Core 2D. A code for non-isothermal water flow and reactive solute transport. Users manual version 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samper, J.; Juncosa, R.; Delgado, J.; Montenegro, L. [Universidad de A Coruna (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    Understanding natural groundwater quality patterns, quantifying groundwater pollution and assessing the effects of waste disposal, require modeling tools accounting for water flow, and transport of heat and dissolved species as well as their complex interactions with solid and gases phases. This report contains the users manual of CORE ''2D Version V.2.0, a COde for modeling water flow (saturated and unsaturated), heat transport and multicomponent Reactive solute transport under both local chemical equilibrium and kinetic conditions. it is an updated and improved version of CORE-LE-2D V0 (Samper et al., 1988) which in turns is an extended version of TRANQUI, a previous reactive transport code (ENRESA, 1995). All these codes were developed within the context of Research Projects funded by ENRESA and the European Commission. (Author)

  15. Micro-positron emission tomography for measuring sub-core scale single and multiphase transport parameters in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahasky, Christopher; Benson, Sally M.

    2018-05-01

    Accurate descriptions of heterogeneity in porous media are important for understanding and modeling single phase (e.g. contaminant transport, saltwater intrusion) and multiphase (e.g. geologic carbon storage, enhanced oil recovery) transport problems. Application of medical imaging to experimentally quantify these processes has led to significant progress in material characterization and understanding fluid transport behavior at laboratory scales. While widely utilized in cancer diagnosis and management, cardiology, and neurology, positron emission tomography (PET) has had relatively limited applications in earth science. This study utilizes a small-bore micro-PET scanner to image and quantify the transport behavior of pulses of a conservative aqueous radiotracer injected during single and multiphase flow experiments in two heterogeneous Berea sandstone cores. The cores are discretized into axial-parallel streamtubes, and using the reconstructed micro-PET data, expressions are derived from spatial moment analysis for calculating sub-core tracer flux and pore water velocity. Using the flux and velocity measurements, it is possible to calculate porosity and saturation from volumetric flux balance, and calculate permeability and water relative permeability from Darcy's law. Second spatial moment analysis enables measurement of sub-core solute dispersion during both single phase and multiphase experiments. A numerical simulation model is developed to verify the assumptions of the streamtube dimension reduction technique. A variation of the reactor ratio is presented as a diagnostic metric to efficiently determine the validity of the streamtube approximation in core and column-scale experiments. This study introduces a new method to quantify sub-core permeability, relative permeability, and dispersion. These experimental and analytical methods provide a foundation for future work on experimental measurements of differences in transport behavior across scales.

  16. Assessment of ABCG2-mediated transport of pesticides across the rabbit placenta barrier using a novel MDCKII in vitro model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halwachs, Sandra; Schäfer, Ingo; Kneuer, Carsten; Seibel, Peter; Honscha, Walther

    2016-01-01

    In humans, the ATP-binding cassette efflux transporter ABCG2 contributes to the fetoprotective barrier function of the placenta, potentially limiting the toxicity of transporter substrates to the fetus. During testing of chemicals including pesticides, developmental toxicity studies are performed in rabbit. Despite its toxicological relevance, ABCG2-mediated transport of pesticides in rabbit placenta has not been yet elucidated. We therefore generated polarized MDCK II cells expressing the ABCG2 transporter from rabbit placenta (rbABCG2) and evaluated interaction of the efflux transporter with selected insecticides, fungicides, and herbicides. The Hoechst H33342 accumulation assay indicated that 13 widely used pesticidal active substances including azoxystrobin, carbendazim, chlorpyrifos, chlormequat, diflufenican, dimethoate, dimethomorph, dithianon, ioxynil, methiocarb, propamocarb, rimsulfuron and toclofos-methyl may be rbABCG2 inhibitors and/or substrates. No such evidence was obtained for chlorpyrifos-methyl, epoxiconazole, glyphosate, imazalil and thiacloprid. Moreover, chlorpyrifos (CPF), dimethomorph, tolclofos-methyl and rimsulfuron showed concentration-dependent inhibition of H33342 excretion in rbABCG2-transduced MDCKII cells. To further evaluate the role of rbABCG2 in pesticide transport across the placenta barrier, we generated polarized MDCKII-rbABCG2 monolayers. Confocal microscopy confirmed correct localization of rbABCG2 protein in the apical plasma membrane. In transepithelial flux studies, we showed the time-dependent preferential basolateral to apical (B > A) directed transport of [ 14 C] CPF across polarized MDCKII-rbABCG2 monolayers which was significantly inhibited by the ABCG2 inhibitor fumitremorgin C (FTC). Using this novel in vitro cell culture model, we altogether showed functional secretory activity of the ABCG2 transporter from rabbit placenta and identified several pesticides like the insecticide CPF as potential rbABCG2 substrates

  17. Assessment of ABCG2-mediated transport of pesticides across the rabbit placenta barrier using a novel MDCKII in vitro model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halwachs, Sandra [Institute of Pharmacology, Pharmacy and Toxicology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Universität Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany); Schäfer, Ingo [Molecular Cell Therapy, Center for Biotechnology and Biomedicine, Faculty of Medicine, Universität Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany); Kneuer, Carsten [Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR), Pesticide Safety, Max-Dohrn-Straße 8-10, D-10589 Berlin (Germany); Seibel, Peter [Molecular Cell Therapy, Center for Biotechnology and Biomedicine, Faculty of Medicine, Universität Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany); Honscha, Walther, E-mail: honscha@vetmed.uni-leipzig.de [Institute of Pharmacology, Pharmacy and Toxicology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Universität Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany)

    2016-08-15

    In humans, the ATP-binding cassette efflux transporter ABCG2 contributes to the fetoprotective barrier function of the placenta, potentially limiting the toxicity of transporter substrates to the fetus. During testing of chemicals including pesticides, developmental toxicity studies are performed in rabbit. Despite its toxicological relevance, ABCG2-mediated transport of pesticides in rabbit placenta has not been yet elucidated. We therefore generated polarized MDCK II cells expressing the ABCG2 transporter from rabbit placenta (rbABCG2) and evaluated interaction of the efflux transporter with selected insecticides, fungicides, and herbicides. The Hoechst H33342 accumulation assay indicated that 13 widely used pesticidal active substances including azoxystrobin, carbendazim, chlorpyrifos, chlormequat, diflufenican, dimethoate, dimethomorph, dithianon, ioxynil, methiocarb, propamocarb, rimsulfuron and toclofos-methyl may be rbABCG2 inhibitors and/or substrates. No such evidence was obtained for chlorpyrifos-methyl, epoxiconazole, glyphosate, imazalil and thiacloprid. Moreover, chlorpyrifos (CPF), dimethomorph, tolclofos-methyl and rimsulfuron showed concentration-dependent inhibition of H33342 excretion in rbABCG2-transduced MDCKII cells. To further evaluate the role of rbABCG2 in pesticide transport across the placenta barrier, we generated polarized MDCKII-rbABCG2 monolayers. Confocal microscopy confirmed correct localization of rbABCG2 protein in the apical plasma membrane. In transepithelial flux studies, we showed the time-dependent preferential basolateral to apical (B > A) directed transport of [{sup 14}C] CPF across polarized MDCKII-rbABCG2 monolayers which was significantly inhibited by the ABCG2 inhibitor fumitremorgin C (FTC). Using this novel in vitro cell culture model, we altogether showed functional secretory activity of the ABCG2 transporter from rabbit placenta and identified several pesticides like the insecticide CPF as potential rbABCG2

  18. Travel to Food : Transportation Barriers for the Food Insecure in Tampa Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    In partnership with the Center for Urban Transportation Research (CUTR) at the University of South Florida (USF), the Transportation Innovation Group informed practical transportation solutions aimed at improved food access in Tampa Bay (Hillsborough...

  19. TWO-DIMENSIONAL CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA MODELS WITH MULTI-DIMENSIONAL TRANSPORT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolence, Joshua C.; Burrows, Adam; Zhang, Weiqun

    2015-01-01

    We present new two-dimensional (2D) axisymmetric neutrino radiation/hydrodynamic models of core-collapse supernova (CCSN) cores. We use the CASTRO code, which incorporates truly multi-dimensional, multi-group, flux-limited diffusion (MGFLD) neutrino transport, including all relevant O(v/c) terms. Our main motivation for carrying out this study is to compare with recent 2D models produced by other groups who have obtained explosions for some progenitor stars and with recent 2D VULCAN results that did not incorporate O(v/c) terms. We follow the evolution of 12, 15, 20, and 25 solar-mass progenitors to approximately 600 ms after bounce and do not obtain an explosion in any of these models. Though the reason for the qualitative disagreement among the groups engaged in CCSN modeling remains unclear, we speculate that the simplifying ''ray-by-ray'' approach employed by all other groups may be compromising their results. We show that ''ray-by-ray'' calculations greatly exaggerate the angular and temporal variations of the neutrino fluxes, which we argue are better captured by our multi-dimensional MGFLD approach. On the other hand, our 2D models also make approximations, making it difficult to draw definitive conclusions concerning the root of the differences between groups. We discuss some of the diagnostics often employed in the analyses of CCSN simulations and highlight the intimate relationship between the various explosion conditions that have been proposed. Finally, we explore the ingredients that may be missing in current calculations that may be important in reproducing the properties of the average CCSNe, should the delayed neutrino-heating mechanism be the correct mechanism of explosion

  20. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Non-Cost Barriers to Consumer Adoption of New Light-Duty Vehicle Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephens, T.

    2013-03-01

    Consumer preferences are key to the adoption of new vehicle technologies. Barriers to consumer adoption include price and other obstacles, such as limited driving range and charging infrastructure; unfamiliarity with the technology and uncertainty about direct benefits; limited makes and models with the technology; reputation or perception of the technology; standardization issues; and regulations. For each of these non-cost barriers, this report estimates an effective cost and summarizes underlying influences on consumer preferences, approximate magnitude and relative severity, and assesses potential actions, based on a comprehensive literature review. While the report concludes that non-cost barriers are significant, effective cost and potential market share are very uncertain. Policies and programs including opportunities for drivers to test drive advanced vehicles, general public outreach and information programs, incentives for providing charging and fueling infrastructure, and development of technology standards were examined for their ability to address barriers, but little quantitative data exists on the effectiveness of these measures. This is one in a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency effort to pinpoint underexplored strategies for reducing GHGs and petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  1. Transportation Energy Futures Series. Non-Cost Barriers to Consumer Adoption of New Light-Duty Vehicle Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephens, Thomas [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Consumer preferences are key to the adoption of new vehicle technologies. Barriers to consumer adoption include price and other obstacles, such as limited driving range and charging infrastructure; unfamiliarity with the technology and uncertainty about direct benefits; limited makes and models with the technology; reputation or perception of the technology; standardization issues; and regulations. For each of these non-cost barriers, this report estimates an effective cost and summarizes underlying influences on consumer preferences, approximate magnitude and relative severity, and assesses potential actions, based on a comprehensive literature review. While the report concludes that non-cost barriers are significant, effective cost and potential market share are very uncertain. Policies and programs including opportunities for drivers to test drive advanced vehicles, general public outreach and information programs, incentives for providing charging and fueling infrastructure, and development of technology standards were examined for their ability to address barriers, but little quantitative data exists on the effectiveness of these measures. This is one in a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency effort to pinpoint underexplored strategies for reducing GHGs and petroleum dependence related to transportation. View all reports on the TEF Web page, http://www.eere.energy.gov/analysis/transportationenergyfutures/index.html.

  2. Safety factor profile dependence of turbulent structure formation in relevant to internal transport barrier relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokunaga, S.; Yagi, M.; Itoh, S.-I.; Itoh, K.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: It is widely understood that the improved confinement mode with transport barrier is necessary to achieve the self-ignition condition in ITER. The negative magnetic shear, mean ExB flow shear, and zonal flow are considered to play important roles for ITB formation. In our previous study, it is found that the non-linear interaction between the meso-scale modes produces non-local energy transfer to the off-resonant mode in the vicinity of q min surface and brings global relaxation of the temperature profile involving ITB collapse. Experimental studies indicate that a relationship exists between the ITB formation and safety factor q-profile, with a reversed magnetic shear (RS) configuration. Transitional ITB events occur on the low-order rational resonant surface. The ITB shape and location depend on the q-profile and q min position. These observations indicate that the q-profile might play an essential role in determining the turbulent structure. In this study, the effect of safety factor profile on the ion temperature gradient driven drift wave (ITG) turbulence is investigated using a global non-linear simulation code based on the gyro-fluid model. A heat source and toroidal momentum source are introduced. Dependence of safety factor profiles on ITB formation and its stability is examined to clarify the influence of the radial distribution of the rational surfaces and the q min value. It is found that the nonlinearly excited meso-scale mode in the vicinity of q min depends on the value of q min . A detailed analysis of the structure selection rule is in progress. (author)

  3. Characteristic features of edge transport barrier formed in helical divertor configuration of the Large Helical Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toi, K.; Ohdachi, S.; Watanabe, F.

    2006-10-01

    In a helical divertor configuration of the Large Helical Device (LHD), transport barrier was formed through low to high confinement (L-H) transition in the plasma edge region including ergodic field layer of which region is in the magnetic hill. The plasma stored energy or the averaged bulk plasma beta dia > (derived from diamagnetic measurement) starts to increase just after the transition. In the case that both dia > and line-averaged electron density e > at the transition are relatively high as dia >≥1.5% and e >≥2x10 19 m -3 , the increase is hampered by rapid growth of edge MHD modes and/or small ELM like activities just after the transition. On the other hand, the transition at lower e > (≤1.5x10 19 m -3 ) and dia > (<2%) leads to a continuous increase in the stored energy with a time scale longer than the global energy confinement time, without suffering from these MHD activities near the edge. The ETB typically formed in electron density profile extends into ergodic field layer defined in the vacuum field. The width of ETB is almost independent of the toroidal field strength from 0.5T to 1.5T and is much larger than the poloidal ion gyro-radius. When resonant helical field perturbations are applied to expand a magnetic island size at the rational surface of the rotational transform ι/2π=1 near the edge, the L-H transition is triggered at lower electron density compared with the case without the field perturbations. The application of large helical field perturbations also suppresses edge MHD modes and ELM like activities. (author)

  4. The role of flow shear in the ballooning stability of tokamak transport barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webster, A.J.; Wilson, H.R.; Scaife, A.M.M.

    2004-01-01

    A tokamak's economic performance is strongly affected by the plasma pressure that it may sustain, which in turn is limited by the maximum pressure gradients that may be supported. Ballooning modes are typically driven unstable by increasing the pressure gradient, and because they can radially extend across many rational surfaces, they can seriously reduce a plasma's energy confinement. Here an eigenmode formulation is used to study the stability of ballooning modes in internal transport barriers ('ITBs'), in which very strong pressure gradients and flow shears may be found. This extends previous studies that used an 'eikonal' formulation, as it enables the study of: ballooning modes with a finite toroidal mode-number n (finite wavelength perpendicular to the magnetic field), to find new solution branches, to obtain the eigenmode structures, and to investigate the effects of a radially varying equilibrium. The structure of a finite n ballooning mode in flow shear is found to be significantly affected by a radially varying equilibrium, and at low flow shears the growth rates are increased above those of modes studied in the limit of n→∞. The different solution branches can couple as the flow shear is increased, leading to a pair of asymmetric mode structures with complex conjugate growth rates. These effects are shown to be a consequence of the mode trying to localize at the most unstable radial location, and its desire to rotate with the flow. In addition, closer to marginal stability a sufficiently strong flow-shear can (at least for some cases), destabilize a previously stable mode

  5. An in vitro transport model for rapid screening and predicting the permeability of candidate compounds at blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhi-Hong; Sun, Xiao; Mei, Chao; Sun, Xiao-Bo; Liu, Xiao-Dong; Chang, Qi

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to design and develop a simple in vitro blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeation model for elementarily and rapidly predicting the permeability of candidate compounds at BBB and further evaluating whether P-glycoprotein (P-gp) affects them across BBB. The model was mainly composed of cultured rat brain microvascular endothelial cells (rBMECs), glass contraption, and micropore membrane. First, we evaluated the model by morphological observation. Second, the restriction effects of paracellular transport were verified by measuring marker probes transport, and monitoring transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) and leakage. Finally, protein expression and activity of P-gp were confirmed by carrying out Western blot analysis and polarized transport of rhodamine-123 (Rho123) in rBMECs. The rBMECs retained both endothelial cells and BBB features. The rBMECs model reproducibly attained approximately 130 Ω cm² on the steady-state TEER value, and displayed a barrier function to marker probes transport by decreasing the permeability. Protein band of 170 kDa manifested the existence of P-gp in the rBMECs, and the findings of cyclosporin A-sensitive decrease of Rho123 efflux confirmed the presence of P-gp activity. A simple, rapid, and convenient in vitro BBB permeation model was successfully established and applied to evaluate the BBB transport profiles of three natural flavonoids: quercetin, naringenin, and rutin.

  6. Three-dimensional transport coefficient model and prediction-correction numerical method for thermal margin analysis of PWR cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, C.

    1981-01-01

    Combustion Engineering Inc. designs its modern PWR reactor cores using open-core thermal-hydraulic methods where the mass, momentum and energy equations are solved in three dimensions (one axial and two lateral directions). The resultant fluid properties are used to compute the minimum Departure from Nuclear Boiling Ratio (DNBR) which ultimately sets the power capability of the core. The on-line digital monitoring and protection systems require a small fast-running algorithm of the design code. This paper presents two techniques used in the development of the on-line DNB algorithm. First, a three-dimensional transport coefficient model is introduced to radially group the flow subchannel into channels for the thermal-hydraulic fluid properties calculation. Conservation equations of mass, momentum and energy for this channels are derived using transport coefficients to modify the calculation of the radial transport of enthalpy and momentum. Second, a simplified, non-iterative numerical method, called the prediction-correction method, is applied together with the transport coefficient model to reduce the computer execution time in the determination of fluid properties. Comparison of the algorithm and the design thermal-hydraulic code shows agreement to within 0.65% equivalent power at a 95/95 confidence/probability level for all normal operating conditions of the PWR core. This algorithm accuracy is achieved with 1/800th of the computer processing time of its parent design code. (orig.)

  7. Barrier inhomogeneities and electronic transport of Pt contacts to relatively highly doped n-type 4H-SiC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Lingqin; Wang, Dejun

    2015-01-01

    The barrier characteristics of Pt contacts to relatively highly doped (∼1 × 10 18  cm −3 ) 4H-SiC were investigated using current-voltage (I-V) and capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements in the temperature range of 160–573 K. The barrier height and ideally factor estimated from the I-V characteristics based on the thermionic emission model are abnormally temperature-dependent, which can be explained by assuming the presence of a double Gaussian distribution (GD) of inhomogeneous barrier heights. However, in the low temperature region (160–323 K), the obtained mean barrier height according to GD is lower than the actual mean value from C-V measurement. The values of barrier height determined from the thermionic field emission model are well consistent with those from the C-V measurements, which suggest that the current transport process could be modified by electron tunneling at low temperatures

  8. A Detailed Comparison of Multidimensional Boltzmann Neutrino Transport Methods in Core-collapse Supernovae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richers, Sherwood; Nagakura, Hiroki; Ott, Christian D.; Dolence, Joshua; Sumiyoshi, Kohsuke; Yamada, Shoichi

    2017-01-01

    The mechanism driving core-collapse supernovae is sensitive to the interplay between matter and neutrino radiation. However, neutrino radiation transport is very difficult to simulate, and several radiation transport methods of varying levels of approximation are available. We carefully compare for the first time in multiple spatial dimensions the discrete ordinates (DO) code of Nagakura, Yamada, and Sumiyoshi and the Monte Carlo (MC) code Sedonu, under the assumptions of a static fluid background, flat spacetime, elastic scattering, and full special relativity. We find remarkably good agreement in all spectral, angular, and fluid interaction quantities, lending confidence to both methods. The DO method excels in determining the heating and cooling rates in the optically thick region. The MC method predicts sharper angular features due to the effectively infinite angular resolution, but struggles to drive down noise in quantities where subtractive cancellation is prevalent, such as the net gain in the protoneutron star and off-diagonal components of the Eddington tensor. We also find that errors in the angular moments of the distribution functions induced by neglecting velocity dependence are subdominant to those from limited momentum-space resolution. We briefly compare directly computed second angular moments to those predicted by popular algebraic two-moment closures, and we find that the errors from the approximate closures are comparable to the difference between the DO and MC methods. Included in this work is an improved Sedonu code, which now implements a fully special relativistic, time-independent version of the grid-agnostic MC random walk approximation.

  9. A Detailed Comparison of Multidimensional Boltzmann Neutrino Transport Methods in Core-collapse Supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richers, Sherwood; Nagakura, Hiroki; Ott, Christian D. [TAPIR, Walter Burke Institute for Theoretical Physics, Mail code 350-17, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Dolence, Joshua [CCS-2, Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Sumiyoshi, Kohsuke [Numazu College of Technology, Ooka 3600, Numazu, Shizuoka 410-8501 (Japan); Yamada, Shoichi, E-mail: srichers@tapir.caltech.edu [Advanced Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)

    2017-10-01

    The mechanism driving core-collapse supernovae is sensitive to the interplay between matter and neutrino radiation. However, neutrino radiation transport is very difficult to simulate, and several radiation transport methods of varying levels of approximation are available. We carefully compare for the first time in multiple spatial dimensions the discrete ordinates (DO) code of Nagakura, Yamada, and Sumiyoshi and the Monte Carlo (MC) code Sedonu, under the assumptions of a static fluid background, flat spacetime, elastic scattering, and full special relativity. We find remarkably good agreement in all spectral, angular, and fluid interaction quantities, lending confidence to both methods. The DO method excels in determining the heating and cooling rates in the optically thick region. The MC method predicts sharper angular features due to the effectively infinite angular resolution, but struggles to drive down noise in quantities where subtractive cancellation is prevalent, such as the net gain in the protoneutron star and off-diagonal components of the Eddington tensor. We also find that errors in the angular moments of the distribution functions induced by neglecting velocity dependence are subdominant to those from limited momentum-space resolution. We briefly compare directly computed second angular moments to those predicted by popular algebraic two-moment closures, and we find that the errors from the approximate closures are comparable to the difference between the DO and MC methods. Included in this work is an improved Sedonu code, which now implements a fully special relativistic, time-independent version of the grid-agnostic MC random walk approximation.

  10. Carrier-Mediated Transport of Nicotine Across the Inner Blood-Retinal Barrier: Involvement of a Novel Organic Cation Transporter Driven by an Outward H(+) Gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tega, Yuma; Kubo, Yoshiyuki; Yuzurihara, Chihiro; Akanuma, Shin-Ichi; Hosoya, Ken-Ichi

    2015-09-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the blood-to-retina transport of nicotine across the inner blood-retinal barrier (BRB). Using the in vivo vascular injection method, the blood-to-retina influx clearance of nicotine across the BRB was determined as 131 μL/(min?g retina), which is much higher than that of a nonpermeable paracellular marker, and blood-to-retina transport of nicotine was inhibited by organic cations such as pyrilamine and verapamil. The nicotine uptake by a conditionally immortalized rat retinal capillary endothelial cell line (TR-iBRB2 cells), an in vitro model of the inner BRB, exhibited time, temperature, and concentration dependence with a Km of 492 μM. These results suggest the involvement of a carrier-mediated transport process in nicotine transport in the inner BRB. The nicotine uptake by TR-iBRB2 cells was stimulated by an outwardly directed H(+) gradient, and the uptake was significantly inhibited by bulky and hydrophobic cationic drugs, whereas inhibitors of organic cation transporters did not show inhibitory effect. These results suggest that the novel organic cation transport system driven by an outwardly directed H(+) gradient is involved in the blood-to-retina transport of nicotine across the inner BRB. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  11. Applying CFD in the Analysis of Heavy-Oil Transportation in Curved Pipes Using Core-Flow Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Conceição

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Multiphase flow of oil, gas and water occurs in the petroleum industry from the reservoir to the processing units. The occurrence of heavy oils in the world is increasing significantly and points to the need for greater investment in the reservoirs exploitation and, consequently, to the development of new technologies for the production and transport of this oil. Therefore, it is interesting improve techniques to ensure an increase in energy efficiency in the transport of this oil. The core-flow technique is one of the most advantageous methods of lifting and transporting of oil. The core-flow technique does not alter the oil viscosity, but change the flow pattern and thus, reducing friction during heavy oil transportation. This flow pattern is characterized by a fine water pellicle that is formed close to the inner wall of the pipe, aging as lubricant of the oil flowing in the core of the pipe. In this sense, the objective of this paper is to study the isothermal flow of heavy oil in curved pipelines, employing the core-flow technique. A three-dimensional, transient and isothermal mathematical model that considers the mixture and k-e  turbulence models to address the gas-water-heavy oil three-phase flow in the pipe was applied for analysis. Simulations with different flow patterns of the involved phases (oil-gas-water have been done, in order to optimize the transport of heavy oils. Results of pressure and volumetric fraction distribution of the involved phases are presented and analyzed. It was verified that the oil core lubricated by a fine water layer flowing in the pipe considerably decreases pressure drop.

  12. ON THE REQUIREMENTS FOR REALISTIC MODELING OF NEUTRINO TRANSPORT IN SIMULATIONS OF CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lentz, Eric J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1200 (United States); Mezzacappa, Anthony; Hix, W. Raphael [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6354 (United States); Messer, O. E. Bronson [Computer Science and Mathematics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6164 (United States); Liebendoerfer, Matthias [Department of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Bruenn, Stephen W., E-mail: elentz@utk.edu, E-mail: mezzacappaa@ornl.gov [Department of Physics, Florida Atlantic University, 777 Glades Road, Boca Raton, FL 33431-0991 (United States)

    2012-03-01

    We have conducted a series of numerical experiments with the spherically symmetric, general relativistic, neutrino radiation hydrodynamics code AGILE-BOLTZTRAN to examine the effects of several approximations used in multidimensional core-collapse supernova simulations. Our code permits us to examine the effects of these approximations quantitatively by removing, or substituting for, the pieces of supernova physics of interest. These approximations include: (1) using Newtonian versus general relativistic gravity, hydrodynamics, and transport; (2) using a reduced set of weak interactions, including the omission of non-isoenergetic neutrino scattering, versus the current state-of-the-art; and (3) omitting the velocity-dependent terms, or observer corrections, from the neutrino Boltzmann kinetic equation. We demonstrate that each of these changes has noticeable effects on the outcomes of our simulations. Of these, we find that the omission of observer corrections is particularly detrimental to the potential for neutrino-driven explosions and exhibits a failure to conserve lepton number. Finally, we discuss the impact of these results on our understanding of current, and the requirements for future, multidimensional models.

  13. ON THE REQUIREMENTS FOR REALISTIC MODELING OF NEUTRINO TRANSPORT IN SIMULATIONS OF CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lentz, Eric J.; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Hix, W. Raphael; Messer, O. E. Bronson; Liebendörfer, Matthias; Bruenn, Stephen W.

    2012-01-01

    We have conducted a series of numerical experiments with the spherically symmetric, general relativistic, neutrino radiation hydrodynamics code AGILE-BOLTZTRAN to examine the effects of several approximations used in multidimensional core-collapse supernova simulations. Our code permits us to examine the effects of these approximations quantitatively by removing, or substituting for, the pieces of supernova physics of interest. These approximations include: (1) using Newtonian versus general relativistic gravity, hydrodynamics, and transport; (2) using a reduced set of weak interactions, including the omission of non-isoenergetic neutrino scattering, versus the current state-of-the-art; and (3) omitting the velocity-dependent terms, or observer corrections, from the neutrino Boltzmann kinetic equation. We demonstrate that each of these changes has noticeable effects on the outcomes of our simulations. Of these, we find that the omission of observer corrections is particularly detrimental to the potential for neutrino-driven explosions and exhibits a failure to conserve lepton number. Finally, we discuss the impact of these results on our understanding of current, and the requirements for future, multidimensional models.

  14. Placental Drug Transport-on-a-Chip: A Microengineered In Vitro Model of Transporter-Mediated Drug Efflux in the Human Placental Barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blundell, Cassidy; Yi, Yoon-Suk; Ma, Lin; Tess, Emily R; Farrell, Megan J; Georgescu, Andrei; Aleksunes, Lauren M; Huh, Dongeun

    2018-01-01

    The current lack of knowledge about the effect of maternally administered drugs on the developing fetus is a major public health concern worldwide. The first critical step toward predicting the safety of medications in pregnancy is to screen drug compounds for their ability to cross the placenta. However, this type of preclinical study has been hampered by the limited capacity of existing in vitro and ex vivo models to mimic physiological drug transport across the maternal-fetal interface in the human placenta. Here the proof-of-principle for utilizing a microengineered model of the human placental barrier to simulate and investigate drug transfer from the maternal to the fetal circulation is demonstrated. Using the gestational diabetes drug glyburide as a model compound, it is shown that the microphysiological system is capable of reconstituting efflux transporter-mediated active transport function of the human placental barrier to limit fetal exposure to maternally administered drugs. The data provide evidence that the placenta-on-a-chip may serve as a new screening platform to enable more accurate prediction of drug transport in the human placenta. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Modeling the Hydrogeochemical Transport of Radionuclides through Engineered Barriers System in the Proposed LLW Disposal Site of Taiwan - 12082

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Wen-Sheng [Hydrotech Research Institute, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Liu, Chen-Wuing; Tsao, Jui-Hsuan [Department of Bioenvironmental Systems Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Li, Ming-Hsu [Institute of Hydrological and Oceanic Sciences, National Central University, Jhongli, Taiwan (China)

    2012-07-01

    A proposed site for final disposal of low-level radioactive waste located in Daren Township of Taitung County along the southeastern coast has been on the selected list in Taiwan. The geology of the Daren site consists of argillite and meta-sedimentary rocks. A mined cavern design with a tunnel system of 500 m below the surface is proposed. Concrete is used as the main confinement material for the engineered barrier. To investigate the hydrogeochemical transport of radionuclides through engineered barriers system, HYDROGEOCHEM5.0 model was applied to simulate the complex chemical interactions among radionuclides, the cement minerals of the concrete, groundwater flow, and transport in the proposed site. The simulation results showed that the engineered barriers system with the side ditch efficiently drained the ground water and lowered the concentration of the concrete degradation induced species (e.g., hydrogen ion, sulfate, and chloride). The velocity of groundwater observed at side ditch gradually decreased with time due to the fouling of pore space by the mineral formation of ettringite and thaumasite. The short half-life of Co-60, Sr-90 and Cs-137 significantly reduced the concentrations, whereas the long half-life of I-129(1.57x10{sup 7} years) and Am-241(432 years) remain stable concentrations at the interface of waste canister and concrete barrier after 300 years. The mineral saturation index (SI) was much less than zero due to the low aqueous concentration of radionuclide, so that the precipitation formation of Co-60, Sr-90, I-129, Cs-137 and Am-241 related minerals were not found. The effect of adsorption/desorption (i.e., surface complexation model) could be a crucial geochemical mechanism for the modeling of liquid-solid phase behavior of radionuclide in geochemically dynamic environments. Moreover, the development of advanced numerical models that are coupled with hydrogeochemical transport and dose assessment of radionuclide is required in the future

  16. Detecting the transport barriers in the Pearl River estuary, Southern China with the aid of Lagrangian coherent structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xing; Zhan, Haigang; Cai, Shuqun; Zhan, Weikang; Ni, Peitong

    2018-05-01

    Knowledge of horizontal transport pathways is important for the protection of the marine ecosystem in coastal areas. In this paper, we develop a 3D model to simulate hydrodynamics and particle transport in the Pearl River Estuary (PRE), Southern China, to study the barriers to transport in the PRE. Specifically, we use the flow velocity produced by the model to locate Lagrangian coherent structures (LCSs) hidden in ocean surface currents. Our findings show that a remarkable LCS begins upstream near the Humen inlet, extends to the Wanshan Islands via Neilingding Island, and can act as a transport barrier in the estuary. This LCS appeared 1-2 h after high tide and was persistent for 6-7 h during every ebb tide. Particles released on the west side of the LCS moved downstream, exited the estuary by Daxi Channel, and seldom spread to the east side, especially the Hong Kong Sea area. An analysis of several scenarios suggested that the formation of this LCS was due to topography restrictions and tidal forces.

  17. Role of the current density profile on drift wave stability in internal transport barrier reversed magnetic shear experiments at JET and Tore Supra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fourment, C; Hoang, G T; Eriksson, L-G; Garbet, X; Litaudon, X; Tresset, G [EURATOM-CEA Association, CEA/DSM/DRFC, CEA Cadarache, 13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2003-03-01

    The role of the current density profile on drift wave stability is investigated using a linear electrostatic gyro-kinetic code. The growth rates are shown to have a linear dependence on the normalized temperature gradients above a certain threshold. A parametric study of the threshold shows a dramatic stabilizing effect of negative magnetic shear, especially for large scale instabilities. A set of handy formulae fitting the threshold as a function of the magnetic shear and the safety factor is proposed. Analysis of reversed magnetic shear discharges with internal transport barrier (ITB) in JET shows that ion ITBs can be triggered by the negative magnetic shear in the core of the plasma. Subsequently, the increase of the ExB shearing rate allows for the expansion of the ITB, despite the increase of the linear growth rates due to the temperature gradient peaking. In the case of the electron ITB obtained in the Tore Supra LHEP mode, the central increase of the confinement is associated with the stabilization of large scale trapped electron modes by the negative magnetic shear effect, whereas the steep electron temperature gradient destabilizes the small scale electron temperature gradient modes, which prevent the electron heat transport to reach neoclassical levels.

  18. Radiation profile measurements for edge transport barrier discharges in Compact Helical System using AXUV photodiode arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, C.; Okamura, S.; Minami, T.; Akiyama, T.; Fujisawa, A.; Ida, K.; Isobe, M.; Matsuoka, K.; Nagaoka, K.; Nishimura, S.; Peterson, B. J.; Shimizu, A.; Takahashi, C.; Toi, K.; Yoshimura, Y.

    2005-01-01

    The formation of edge transport barrier (ETB) has recently been found in Compact Helical System (CHS) plasmas heated by co-injected neutral beam injection (NBI) with strong gas puffing. This regime is characterized by the appearance of the steep gradient of the electron density near the edge following the abrupt drop of hydrogen Balmer alpha (H α ) line intensity. In addition to single channel pyroelectric detector as a conventional bolometer, we have employed unfiltered absolute extreme ultraviolet (AXUV) photodiode arrays as a simple and low-cost diagnostic to investigate spatial and temporal variations of radiation emissivity in the ETB discharges. A compact mounting module for a 20 channel AXUV photodiode array including an in-vacuum preamplifier for immediate current-voltage conversion has successfully been designed and fabricated. Two identical modules installed in the upper and lower viewports provide 40 lines of sight covering the inboard and outboard sides within the horizontally elongated cross section of the CHS plasma with wide viewing angle. Although spectral uniformity of the detector sensitivity of the AXUV photodiode is unsatisfied for photon energies lower than 200 eV, it has been confirmed that the signals of AXUV photodiode and pyroelectric detector in the ETB discharges show roughly the same behavior except for the very beginning and end of the discharges. The results of the measurements in typical ETB discharges show that the signals of all the channels of the AXUV photodiode arrays begin to increase more rapidly at the moment of the transition than before. The rate of the increase is larger for the edge viewing chords than for the center viewing ones, which indicates the flattening of the radiation profile following the change in the electron density profile after the formation of the ETB. However, the signals for the edge chords tend to saturate after several tens of milliseconds, while they still continue to increase for the central chords

  19. Barriers to and enablers for European rail freight transport for integrated door-to-door logistics service. Part 2: Enablers for multimodal rail freight transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewan Md Zahurul ISLAM

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to examine and identify barriers to and enablers for the European rail freight transport services as a transport chain partner along the supply chains in the changing market scenario. The changing market scenario includes, among others, requiring 'door-to-door' rather than 'terminal to terminal' and integrated service, competitive ability to attract non-rail cargo type, changes in the customer requirements (e.g. reliable service and changes in the operational requirements and practices. Using a literature review method, the paper is presented in two parts. The part 1 focuses on the identification of barriers to the European rail freight service by reviewing freight logistics services for global supply chains followed by the current performance of European rail freight transport followed by a discussion on the rail freight market liberalisation in Europe. Then rail freight transport in the Unites States (U.S. is discussed. The research notes that although the background, scope and necessity for reform measures in Europe differ from those of the U.S., some lessons can be learned and the main lesson is that an appropriate reform measure can enhance rail sector competitive ability in Europe. The part 2 of the paper is dedicated to recommend some concrete steps and actions as enablers to remove the barriers identified in the part 1 to develop multimodal rail freight transport. The enablers for multimodal rail freight transport include: •\tEuropean rail freight transport market needs full liberalisation so that incumbent and new entrants can compete freely. •\tThe rail operators need to acquire service (e.g. customer tailored services, door to door service quality offered by road freight operators. •\tThey need to conduct a combination of ‘terminal-to-terminal’ and door-to-door operations, as and when needed; •\tThey must build partnership with freight forwarder or 3PLs to include all types of customers