WorldWideScience

Sample records for core surface flow

  1. Fluid flow near the surface of earth's outer core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloxham, Jeremy; Jackson, Andrew

    1991-01-01

    This review examines the recent attempts at extracting information on the pattern of fluid flow near the surface of the outer core from the geomagnetic secular variation. Maps of the fluid flow at the core surface are important as they may provide some insight into the process of the geodynamo and may place useful constraints on geodynamo models. In contrast to the case of mantle convection, only very small lateral variations in core density are necessary to drive the flow; these density variations are, by several orders of magnitude, too small to be imaged seismically; therefore, the geomagnetic secular variation is utilized to infer the flow. As substantial differences exist between maps developed by different researchers, the possible underlying reasons for these differences are examined with particular attention given to the inherent problems of nonuniqueness.

  2. Fluid flow near the surface of earth's outer core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloxham, Jeremy; Jackson, Andrew

    1991-01-01

    This review examines the recent attempts at extracting information on the pattern of fluid flow near the surface of the outer core from the geomagnetic secular variation. Maps of the fluid flow at the core surface are important as they may provide some insight into the process of the geodynamo and may place useful constraints on geodynamo models. In contrast to the case of mantle convection, only very small lateral variations in core density are necessary to drive the flow; these density variations are, by several orders of magnitude, too small to be imaged seismically; therefore, the geomagnetic secular variation is utilized to infer the flow. As substantial differences exist between maps developed by different researchers, the possible underlying reasons for these differences are examined with particular attention given to the inherent problems of nonuniqueness.

  3. Core surface flow modelling from high-resolution secular variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holme, R.; Olsen, Nils

    2006-01-01

    -flux hypothesis, but the spectrum of the SV implies that a conclusive test of frozen-flux is not possible. We parametrize the effects of diffusion as an expected misfit in the flow prediction due to departure from the frozen-flux hypothesis; at low spherical harmonic degrees, this contribution dominates...... the expected departure of the SV predictions from flow to the observed SV, while at high degrees the SV model uncertainty is dominant. We construct fine-scale core surface flows to model the SV. Flow non-uniqueness is a serious problem because the flows are sufficiently small scale to allow flow around non......-series of magnetic data and better parametrization of the external magnetic field....

  4. On the flow magnitude and field-flow alignment at Earth's core surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finlay, Chris; Amit, H.

    We present a method to estimate the typical magnitude of flow close toEarth's core surface based on observational knowledge of the maingeomagnetic field (MF) and its secular variation (SV), together withprior information concerning field-flow alignment gleaned from numericaldynamo models. An expr......We present a method to estimate the typical magnitude of flow close toEarth's core surface based on observational knowledge of the maingeomagnetic field (MF) and its secular variation (SV), together withprior information concerning field-flow alignment gleaned from numericaldynamo models....... An expression linking the core surface flow magnitude tospherical harmonic spectra of the MF and SV is derived from the magneticinduction equation. This involves the angle gamma between the flowand the horizontal gradient of the radial field. We study gamma in asuite of numerical dynamo models and discuss...... that the amount of field-flow alignment depends primarily on amagnetic modified Rayleigh number Raeta = alpha g0 Delta T D / eta Omega , which measures the vigorof convective driving relative to the strength of magnetic dissipation.Synthetic tests of the flow magnitude estimation scheme are encouraging...

  5. On the flow magnitude and field-flow alignment at Earth's core surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finlay, Chris; Amit, H.

    We present a method to estimate the typical magnitude of flow close toEarth's core surface based on observational knowledge of the maingeomagnetic field (MF) and its secular variation (SV), together withprior information concerning field-flow alignment gleaned from numericaldynamo models. An expr......We present a method to estimate the typical magnitude of flow close toEarth's core surface based on observational knowledge of the maingeomagnetic field (MF) and its secular variation (SV), together withprior information concerning field-flow alignment gleaned from numericaldynamo models....... An expression linking the core surface flow magnitude tospherical harmonic spectra of the MF and SV is derived from the magneticinduction equation. This involves the angle gamma between the flowand the horizontal gradient of the radial field. We study gamma in asuite of numerical dynamo models and discuss...... that the amount of field-flow alignment depends primarily on amagnetic modified Rayleigh number Raeta = alpha g0 Delta T D / eta Omega , which measures the vigorof convective driving relative to the strength of magnetic dissipation.Synthetic tests of the flow magnitude estimation scheme are encouraging...

  6. Eddy viscosity of core flow inferred from comparison between time evolutions of the length-of-day and a core surface flow model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushima, M.

    2016-12-01

    Diffusive processes of large scales in the Earth's core are dominated not by the molecular diffusion but by the eddy diffusion. To carry out numerical simulations of realistic geodynamo models, it is important to adopt appropriate parameters. However, the eddy viscous diffusion, or the eddy viscosity, is not a property of the core fluid but of the core flow. Hence it is significant to estimate the eddy viscosity from core flow models. In fact, fluid motion near the Earth's core surface provides useful information on core dynamics, features of the core-mantle boundary (CMB), and core-mantle coupling, for example. Such core fluid motion can be estimated from spatial and temporal distributions of the geomagnetic field. Most of core surface flow models rely on the frozen-flux approximation (Roberts and Scott, 1965), in which the magnetic diffusion is neglected. It should be noted, however, that there exists a viscous boundary layer at the CMB, where the magnetic diffusion may play an important role in secular variations of geomagnetic field. Therefore, a new approach to estimation of core surface flow has been devised by Matsushima (2015). That is, the magnetic diffusion is explicitly incorporated within the viscous boundary layer, while it is neglected below the boundary layer at the CMB which is assumed to be a spherical surface. A core surface flow model between 1840 and 2015 has been derived from a geomagnetic field model, COV-OBS.x1 (Gillet et al., 2015). Temporal variations of core flows contain information on phenomena in relation with core-mantle coupling, such as the LOD (length-of-day), and spin-up/spin-down of core flows. In particular, core surface flows inside the viscous boundary layer at the CMB may reveal an interesting feature in relation with Earth's rotation. We have examined time series of the LOD and vorticity derived from the core surface flow model. We have found a possible correlation between the LOD and the axial component of global vorticity

  7. Spatial Resolution of Core Surface Flow Models Derived From Satellite Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eymin, C.; Hulot, G.

    Core surface flows are usually computed from observations of the internal magnetic field and its secular variation. With observatory based secular variation models, the spatial resolution of core surface flows was mainly limited by the resolution of the secular variation model itself. This resolution dramatically improved with magnetic satellite data and for the first time the main limitation on core surface flow compu- tations comes from the hiding of the smallest length scale of the internal magnetic field by the crust. Indeed, the invisible small scale magnetic field may interact with core flows to produce large scale secular variation. This interaction cannot be taken into account during the flow computation process and may alter the computed flow models, even for large length scales. We investigate here the effects of the truncation of the internal magnetic field with known flow models using two different and inde- pendent core surface flow computation methods. In particular, we try to estimate the amplitude of the error introduced by this truncation and the spatial resolution that can be obtained with the new satellite data for core surface flows.

  8. Core surface flow modelling from high-resolution secular variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holme, R.; Olsen, Nils

    2006-01-01

    -flux hypothesis, but the spectrum of the SV implies that a conclusive test of frozen-flux is not possible. We parametrize the effects of diffusion as an expected misfit in the flow prediction due to departure from the frozen-flux hypothesis; at low spherical harmonic degrees, this contribution dominates...

  9. Decadal variability in core surface flows deduced from geomagnetic observatory monthly means

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whaler, K. A.; Olsen, Nils; Finlay, Chris

    2016-01-01

    itself changes slowly, its time derivative can be locally (temporally and spatially) large, in particular when and where core surface secular acceleration peaks. Spherical harmonic expansion coefficients of the flows are not well resolved, and many of them are strongly correlated. Averaging functions......Monthly means of the magnetic field measurements at ground observatories are a key data source for studying temporal changes of the core magnetic field. However, when they are calculated in the usual way, contributions of external (magnetospheric and ionospheric) origin may remain, which make them...

  10. Influence of surface displacement on solid state flow induced by horizontally heterogeneous Joule heating in the inner core of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takehiro, Shin-ichi

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the influence of surface displacement on fluid motions induced by horizontally heterogeneous Joule heating in the inner core. The difference between the governing equations and those of Takehiro (2011) is the boundary conditions at the inner core boundary (ICB). The temperature disturbance at the ICB coincides with the melting temperature, which varies depending on the surface displacement. The normal component of stress equalizes with the buoyancy induced by the surface displacement. The toroidal magnetic field and surface displacement with the horizontal structure of Y20 spherical harmonics is given. The flow fields are calculated numerically for various amplitudes of surface displacement with the expected values of the parameters of the core. Further, by considering the heat balance at the ICB, the surface displacement amplitude is related to the turbulent velocity amplitude in the outer core, near the ICB. The results show that when the turbulent velocity is on the order of 10-1 -10-2 m/s, the flow and stress fields are similar to those of Takehiro (2011), where the surface displacement vanishes. As the amplitude of the turbulent velocity decreases, the amplitude of the surface displacement increases, and counter flows from the polar to equatorial regions emerge around the ICB, while flow in the inner regions is directed from the equatorial to polar regions, and the non-zero radial component of velocity at the ICB remains. When the turbulent velocity is on the order of 10-4 -10-5 m/s, the radial component of velocity at the ICB vanishes, the surface counter flows become stronger than the flow in the inner region, and the amplitude of the stress field near the ICB dominates the inner region, which might be unsuitable for explaining the elastic anisotropy in the inner core.

  11. Short-term variations in core surface flow resolved from an improved method of calculating observatory monthly means

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nils; Whaler, K. A.; Finlay, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Monthly means of the magnetic field measurements taken by ground observatories are a useful data source for studying temporal changes of the core magnetic field and the underlying core flow. However, the usual way of calculating monthly means as the arithmetic mean of all days (geomagnetic quiet...... as well as disturbed) and all local times (day and night) may result in contributions from external (magnetospheric and ionospheric) origin in the (ordinary, omm) monthly means. Such contamination makes monthly means less favourable for core studies. We calculated revised monthly means (rmm...... a secular variation spherical harmonic model. The main field is specified by the CHAOS-4 model. Data from up to 128 observatories between 1997 and 2013 were used to calculate 185 flow models from the omm and rmm, for each possible set of three consecutive months. The full 3x3 (non-diagonal) data covariance...

  12. Secular variation and core-flow modelling with stable strafication at the top of the core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holme, Richard; Buffett, Bruce

    2015-04-01

    Observed geomagnetic secular variation has been used for many years to provide an observational constraint on the dynamics of the core through the modelling of its surface flow. Recent results in both seismology and mineral physics provide strong evidence of a stably stratified layer at the top of the core, which has substantial implications for the calculation of such flows. It has been assumed for many years that the dynamic state at the core surface is close to tangentially geostrophic, and pure stable stratification also requires a flow to be toroidal. Combining these two conditions requires variations in flow that are completely zonal toroidal, which are known not to provide an adequate explanation of the observed secular variation. However, a stably stratified layer can support flow instabilities of a more general character. Buffett (2014) has recently provided a model in which zonal toroidal motions are associated with the excitation of a zonal poloidal instability. This model is able to explain the broad variation of the axial dipole over the past 100 years, and also to explain feature of geomagnetic jerks that cannot be explained by purely torsional motions. This model has inspired a new generation of core-flow models, with a substantial time-varying zonal poloidal component, something that is absent from most models of core surface flow. Here, we present these new models, and consider to what extent this flow structure can explain the details of secular variation. We also consider the implications for the connection between core-surface flow and length-of-day variation - a stably stratified layer has implications for the interpretation of core flow and the Earth's angular momentum budget. Finally, we consider the ability of core-surface flow models to probe the structure of the stably- stratified layer. Buffett (2014). Geomagnetic fluctuations reveal stable stratification at the top of the Earth's core, Nature 507, 484-487, doi:10.1038/nature13122

  13. HANARO core channel flow-rate measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Heon Il; Chae, Hee Tae; Im, Don Soon; Kim, Seon Duk [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-06-01

    HANARO core consists of 23 hexagonal flow tubes and 16 cylindrical flow tubes. To get the core flow distribution, we used 6 flow-rate measuring dummy fuel assemblies (instrumented dummy fuel assemblies). The differential pressures were measured and converted to flow-rates using the predetermined relationship between AP and flow-rate for each instrumented dummy fuel assemblies. The flow-rate for the cylindrical flow channels shows +-7% relative errors and that for the hexagonal flow channels shows +-3.5% relative errors. Generally the flow-rates of outer core channels show smaller values compared to those of inner core. The channels near to the core inlet pipe and outlet pipes also show somewhat lower flow-rates. For the lower flow channels, the thermal margin was checked by considering complete linear power histories. From the experimental results, the gap flow-rate was estimated to be 49.4 kg/s (cf. design flow of 50 kg/s). 15 tabs., 9 figs., 10 refs. (Author) .new.

  14. Zonal flow formation in the Earth's core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagoshi, Takehiro; Kageyama, Akira; Sato, Tetsuya

    2010-02-11

    Zonal jets are very common in nature. Well-known examples are those in the atmospheres of giant planets and the alternating jet streams found in the Earth's world ocean. Zonal flow formation in nuclear fusion devices is also well studied. A common feature of these zonal flows is that they are spontaneously generated in turbulent systems. Because the Earth's outer core is believed to be in a turbulent state, it is possible that there is zonal flow in the liquid iron of the outer core. Here we report an investigation at the current low-viscosity limit of numerical simulations of the geodynamo. We find a previously unknown convection regime of the outer core that has a dual structure comprising inner, sheet-like radial plumes and an outer, westward cylindrical zonal flow. We numerically confirm that the dual-convection structure with such a zonal flow is stable under a strong, self-generated dipole magnetic field.

  15. Core flow control system for field applications; Sistema de controle de core-flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granzotto, Desiree G.; Adachi, Vanessa Y.; Bannwart, Antonio C.; Moura, Luiz F.M. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil); Sassim, Natache S.D.A. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Centro de Estudo do Petroleo (CEPETRO); Carvalho, Carlos H.M. [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The significant heavy oil reserves worldwide and the presently high crude oil prices make it essential the development of technologies for heavy oil production and transportation. Heavy oils, with their inherent features of high viscosity (100- 10,000 cP) and density (below 20 deg API) require specific techniques to make it viable their flow in pipes at high flow rates. One of the simplest methods, which do not require use of heat or diluents, is provided by oil-water annular flow (core-flow). Among the still unsolved issues regarding core-flow is the two-phase flow control in order to avoid abrupt increases in the pressure drop due to the possible occurrence of bad water-lubricated points, and thus obtain a safe operation of the line at the lowest possible water-oil ratio. This work presents results of core flow tests which allow designing a control system for the inlet pressure of the line, by actuating on the water flow rate at a fixed oil flow rate. With the circuit model and the specified controller, simulations can be done to assess its performance. The experiments were run at core-flow circuit of LABPETRO-UNICAMP. (author)

  16. The electrical conductivity and surface conduction of consolidated rock cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkafeef, Saad F; Alajmi, Abdullah F

    2007-05-15

    A fully computerized high-pressure and high-temperature core holder device is simultaneously used to determine the electrical conductivity, zeta potential, and surface conductivity of consolidated rock cores in aqueous and nonaqueous systems. The total electrical conductivity of rock cores was determined by coupling streaming current and potential measurements. This shows that neglecting the surface conductivity Ksigma is crucial to converting the streaming potential into zeta potentials. It is observed that plots of the core total conductivity as a function of the electrolyte conductivity KL exhibit two behaviors. At low ionic strength, the core conductivity clearly depends on the contribution of surface conductivity behind the slip plane, whereas at higher ionic strength, the magnitude of the surface conductivity becomes negligible. The electrical conductivity of rock cores was found to be in good agreement with the O'Brien theory and the Briggs method. The contribution of the stagnant layer to the surface conductivity in nonaqueous systems has been shown to be significant. This shows that the stagnant layer displays significantly different behavior in different nonaqueous systems, depending on the core porosity and the double-layer overlap. The results indicate that the application of electrokinetics in petroleum reservoirs can provide important insights into reservoir fluid flow characterization.

  17. Free surface flow focusing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, I.R.

    2012-01-01

    Reducing the area through which a fluid is allowed to flow often leads to an increase of flow velocity. A familiar example of this is a garden hose, where one can change the rather weak stream that usually flows out into a strong jet by narrowing the orifice at the end of the hose. In this example,

  18. Free surface flow focusing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, I.R.

    2012-01-01

    Reducing the area through which a fluid is allowed to flow often leads to an increase of flow velocity. A familiar example of this is a garden hose, where one can change the rather weak stream that usually flows out into a strong jet by narrowing the orifice at the end of the hose. In this example,

  19. Thermocapillary Flow on Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Baier, Tobias; Hardt, Steffen

    2010-01-01

    A liquid in Cassie-Baxter state above a structured superhydrophobic surface is ideally suited for surface driven transport due to its large free surface fraction in close contact to a solid. We investigate thermal Marangoni flow over a superhydrophobic array of fins oriented parallel or perpendicular to an applied temperature gradient. In the Stokes limit we derive an analytical expression for the bulk flow velocity above the surface and compare it with numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes equation. Even for moderate temperature gradients comparatively large flow velocities are induced, suggesting to utilize this principle for microfluidic pumping.

  20. Convective cores in galactic cooling flows

    CERN Document Server

    Kritsuk, A G; Müller, E

    2000-01-01

    We use hydrodynamic simulations with adaptive grid refinement to study the dependence of hot gas flows in X-ray luminous giant elliptical galaxies on the efficiency of heat supply to the gas. We consider a number of potential heating mechanisms including Type Ia supernovae and sporadic nuclear activity of a central supermassive black hole. As a starting point for this research we use an equilibrium hydrostatic recycling model (Kritsuk 1996). We show that a compact cooling inflow develops, if the heating is slightly insufficient to counterbalance radiative cooling of the hot gas in the central few kiloparsecs. An excessive heating in the centre, instead, drives a convectively unstable outflow. We model the onset of the instability and a quasi-steady convective regime in the core of the galaxy in two-dimensions assuming axial symmetry. Provided the power of net energy supply in the core is not too high, the convection remains subsonic. The convective pattern is dominated by buoyancy driven large-scale mushroom-...

  1. Core-annular flow through a horizontal pipe: Hydrodynamic counterbalancing of buoyancy force on core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ooms, G.; Vuik, C.; Poesio, P.

    2007-01-01

    A theoretical investigation has been made of core-annular flow: the flow of a high-viscosity liquid core surrounded by a low-viscosity liquid annular layer through a horizontal pipe. Special attention is paid to the question of how the buoyancy force on the core, caused by a density difference betwe

  2. Core-annular flow through a horizontal pipe: Hydrodynamic counterbalancing of buoyancy force on core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ooms, G.; Vuik, C.; Poesio, P.

    2007-01-01

    A theoretical investigation has been made of core-annular flow: the flow of a high-viscosity liquid core surrounded by a low-viscosity liquid annular layer through a horizontal pipe. Special attention is paid to the question of how the buoyancy force on the core, caused by a density difference

  3. Flow over riblet curved surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loureiro, J B R; Freire, A P Silva, E-mail: atila@mecanica.ufrj.br [Mechanical Engineering Program, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (COPPE/UFRJ), C.P. 68503, 21.941-972, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-12-22

    The present work studies the mechanics of turbulent drag reduction over curved surfaces by riblets. The effects of surface modification on flow separation over steep and smooth curved surfaces are investigated. Four types of two-dimensional surfaces are studied based on the morphometric parameters that describe the body of a blue whale. Local measurements of mean velocity and turbulence profiles are obtained through laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) and particle image velocimetry (PIV).

  4. Surface obstacles in pulsatile flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Ian A.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2016-11-01

    Flows past obstacles mounted on flat surfaces have been widely studied due to their ubiquity in nature and engineering. For nearly all of these studies, the freestream flow over the obstacle was steady, i.e. constant velocity unidirectional flow. Unsteady, pulsatile flows occur frequently in biology, geophysics, biomedical engineering, etc. Our study is aimed at extending the comprehensive knowledge base that exists for steady flows to considerably more complex pulsatile flows. Beyond the important practical applications, characterizing the vortex and wake dynamics of flows around surface obstacles embedded in pulsatile flows can provide insights into the underlying physics in all wake and junction flows. In this study, we experimentally investigated the wake of four canonical surface obstacles: hemisphere, cube, and circular cylinders with aspect ratio of 1:1 and 2:1. Phase-averaged PIV and hot-wire anemometry are used to characterize the dynamics of coherent structures in the wake and at the windward junction of the obstacles. Complex physics occur during the deceleration phase of the pulsatile inflow. We propose a framework for understanding these physics based on self-induced vortex propagation, similar to the phenomena exhibited by vortex rings. This material is based in part upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Number CBET-1236351, and GW Centeor Biomimetics and Bioinspired Engineering (COBRE).

  5. Numerical evaluation of gas core length in free surface vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristofano, L.; Nobili, M.; Caruso, G.

    2014-11-01

    The formation and evolution of free surface vortices represent an important topic in many hydraulic intakes, since strong whirlpools introduce swirl flow at the intake, and could cause entrainment of floating matters and gas. In particular, gas entrainment phenomena are an important safety issue for Sodium cooled Fast Reactors, because the introduction of gas bubbles within the core causes dangerous reactivity fluctuation. In this paper, a numerical evaluation of the gas core length in free surface vortices is presented, according to two different approaches. In the first one, a prediction method, developed by the Japanese researcher Sakai and his team, has been applied. This method is based on the Burgers vortex model, and it is able to estimate the gas core length of a free surface vortex starting from two parameters calculated with single-phase CFD simulations. The two parameters are the circulation and the downward velocity gradient. The other approach consists in performing a two-phase CFD simulation of a free surface vortex, in order to numerically reproduce the gas- liquid interface deformation. Mapped convergent mesh is used to reduce numerical error and a VOF (Volume Of Fluid) method was selected to track the gas-liquid interface. Two different turbulence models have been tested and analyzed. Experimental measurements of free surface vortices gas core length have been executed, using optical methods, and numerical results have been compared with experimental measurements. The computational domain and the boundary conditions of the CFD simulations were set consistently with the experimental test conditions.

  6. Surface flow measurements from drones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauro, Flavia; Porfiri, Maurizio; Grimaldi, Salvatore

    2016-09-01

    Drones are transforming the way we sense and interact with the environment. However, despite their increased capabilities, the use of drones in geophysical sciences usually focuses on image acquisition for generating high-resolution maps. Motivated by the increasing demand for innovative and high performance geophysical observational methodologies, we posit the integration of drone technology and optical sensing toward a quantitative characterization of surface flow phenomena. We demonstrate that a recreational drone can be used to yield accurate surface flow maps of sub-meter water bodies. Specifically, drone's vibrations do not hinder surface flow observations, and velocity measurements are in agreement with traditional techniques. This first instance of quantitative water flow sensing from a flying drone paves the way to novel observations of the environment.

  7. Paleomagnetic correlation of surface and subsurface basaltic lava flows and flow groups in the southern part of the Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho, with paleomagnetic data tables for drill cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champion, Duane E.; Hodges, Mary K.V.; Davis, Linda C.; Lanphere, Marvin A.

    2011-01-01

    Paleomagnetic inclination and polarity studies have been conducted on thousands of subcore samples from 51 coreholes located at and near the Idaho National Laboratory. These studies are used to paleomagnetically characterize and correlate successive stratigraphic intervals in each corehole to similar depth intervals in adjacent coreholes. Paleomagnetic results from 83 surface paleomagnetic sites, within and near the INL, are used to correlate these buried lava flow groups to basaltic shield volcanoes still exposed on the surface of the eastern Snake River Plain. Sample handling and demagnetization protocols are described as well as the paleomagnetic data averaging process. Paleomagnetic inclination comparisons between coreholes located only kilometers apart show comparable stratigraphic successions of mean inclination values over tens of meters of depth. At greater distance between coreholes, comparable correlation of mean inclination values is less consistent because flow groups may be missing or additional flow groups may be present and found at different depth intervals. Two shallow intersecting cross-sections, A-A- and B-B- (oriented southwest-northeast and northwest-southeast, respectively), drawn through southwest Idaho National Laboratory coreholes show the corehole to corehole or surface to corehole correlations derived from the paleomagnetic inclination data. From stratigraphic top to bottom, key results included the (1) Quaking Aspen Butte flow group, which erupted from Quaking Aspen Butte southwest of the Idaho National Laboratory, flowed northeast, and has been found in the subsurface in corehole USGS 132; (2) Vent 5206 flow group, which erupted near the southwestern border of the Idaho National Laboratory, flowed north and east, and has been found in the subsurface in coreholes USGS 132, USGS 129, USGS 131, USGS 127, USGS 130, USGS 128, and STF-AQ-01; and (3) Mid Butte flow group, which erupted north of U.S. Highway 20, flowed northwest, and has been

  8. Core Flow Distribution from Coupled Supercritical Water Reactor Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po Hu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces an extended code package PARCS/RELAP5 to analyze steady state of SCWR US reference design. An 8 × 8 quarter core model in PARCS and a reactor core model in RELAP5 are used to study the core flow distribution under various steady state conditions. The possibility of moderator flow reversal is found in some hot moderator channels. Different moderator flow orifice strategies, both uniform across the core and nonuniform based on the power distribution, are explored with the goal of preventing the reversal.

  9. Alteration of helical vortex core without change in flow topology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Velte, Clara Marika; Okulov, Valery; Hansen, Martin Otto Laver

    2011-01-01

    The abrupt expansion of the slender vortex core with changes in flow topology is commonly known as vortex breakdown. We present new experimental observations of an alteration of the helical vortex core in wall bounded turbulent flow with abrupt growth in core size, but without change in flow...... topology. The helical symmetry as such is preserved, although the characteristic parameters of helical symmetry of the vortex core transfer from a smooth linear variation to a different trend under the influence of a non-uniform pressure gradient, causing an increase in helical pitch without changing its...

  10. Rapidly changing flows in the Earth's core

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nils; Mandea, M.

    2008-01-01

    A large part of the Earth's magnetic field is generated by fluid motion in the molten outer core(1). As a result of continuous satellite measurements since 1999, the core magnetic field and its recent variations can now be described with a high resolution in space and time(2). These data have rec...... of future numerical models of the geodynamo....

  11. Elastic instability in stratified core annular flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonhomme, Oriane; Morozov, Alexander; Leng, Jacques; Colin, Annie

    2011-06-01

    We study experimentally the interfacial instability between a layer of dilute polymer solution and water flowing in a thin capillary. The use of microfluidic devices allows us to observe and quantify in great detail the features of the flow. At low velocities, the flow takes the form of a straight jet, while at high velocities, steady or advected wavy jets are produced. We demonstrate that the transition between these flow regimes is purely elastic--it is caused by the viscoelasticity of the polymer solution only. The linear stability analysis of the flow in the short-wave approximation supplemented with a kinematic criterion captures quantitatively the flow diagram. Surprisingly, unstable flows are observed for strong velocities, whereas convected flows are observed for low velocities. We demonstrate that this instability can be used to measure the rheological properties of dilute polymer solutions that are difficult to assess otherwise.

  12. Elastic instability in stratified core annular flow

    CERN Document Server

    Bonhomme, Oriane; Leng, Jacques; Colin, Annie

    2010-01-01

    We study experimentally the interfacial instability between a layer of dilute polymer solution and water flowing in a thin capillary. The use of microfluidic devices allows us to observe and quantify in great detail the features of the flow. At low velocities, the flow takes the form of a straight jet, while at high velocities, steady or advected wavy jets are produced. We demonstrate that the transition between these flow regimes is purely elastic -- it is caused by viscoelasticity of the polymer solution only. The linear stability analysis of the flow in the short-wave approximation captures quantitatively the flow diagram. Surprisingly, unstable flows are observed for strong velocities, whereas convected flows are observed for low velocities. We demonstrate that this instability can be used to measure rheological properties of dilute polymer solutions that are difficult to assess otherwise.

  13. Planetary gyre, time-dependent eddies, torsional waves, and equatorial jets at the Earth's core surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gillet, N.; Jault, D.; Finlay, Chris

    2015-01-01

    We report a calculation of time-dependent quasi-geostrophic core flows for 1940–2010. Inverting recursively for an ensemble of solutions, we evaluate the main source of uncertainties, namely, the model errors arising from interactions between unresolved core surface motions and magnetic fields. T...

  14. Study on multidimensional temperature and flow field in pebble core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Goon Cherl; Lee, J. J.; Cho, Y. J.; Kim, J. W. [Seoul Nat. Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kwang Yong; Choi, J. Y.; Lee, Y. M.; Cheong, S. H. [Inha Univ., Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-02-15

    This project intends to contribute to the national PBR technology development by improving the system code and investigating the applicability of CFD code to pebble core. This project consists of five research tasks below to consequently contribute to the assessment of reactor types for hydrogen production by producing a set of experimental data and the results of CFD code model assessment. Turbulent flow experiment and model assessment. CFD analysis for local flow field and heat transfer in pebble core. Experiment on accident flow and assessment of CFD applicability. Sensitivity analysis for geometrical parameters of inlet plenum. Experiment on effective thermal conductivity and model improvement.

  15. Effects of surface anisotropy on magnetic vortex core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pylypovskyi, Oleksandr V., E-mail: engraver@univ.net.ua [Taras Shevchenko National University of Kiev, 01601 Kiev (Ukraine); Sheka, Denis D. [Taras Shevchenko National University of Kiev, 01601 Kiev (Ukraine); Kravchuk, Volodymyr P.; Gaididei, Yuri [Institute for Theoretical Physics, 03143 Kiev (Ukraine)

    2014-06-01

    The vortex core shape in the three dimensional Heisenberg magnet is essentially influenced by a surface anisotropy. We predict that depending of the surface anisotropy type there appears barrel- or pillow-shaped deformation of the vortex core along the magnet thickness. Our theoretical study is well confirmed by spin–lattice simulations. - Highlights: • The shape of magnetic vortex core is essentially influenced by SA (surface anisotropy). • We predict barrel- or pillow-shaped deformation of the vortex depending on SA. • The variational approach fully describes the vortex core deformation. • We performed spin–lattice simulations to detect SA influence on the vortex core.

  16. Planetary gyre, time-dependent eddies, torsional waves, and equatorial jets at the Earth's core surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gillet, N.; Jault, D.; Finlay, Chris

    2015-01-01

    We report a calculation of time-dependent quasi-geostrophic core flows for 1940–2010. Inverting recursively for an ensemble of solutions, we evaluate the main source of uncertainties, namely, the model errors arising from interactions between unresolved core surface motions and magnetic fields....... Temporal correlations of these uncertainties are accounted for. The covariance matrix for the flow coefficients is also obtained recursively from the dispersion of an ensemble of solutions. Maps of the flow at the core surface show, upon a planetary-scale gyre, time-dependent large-scale eddies...... between the magnetic field and subdecadal nonzonal motions within the fluid outer core. Both the zonal and the more energetic nonzonal interannual motions were particularly intense close to the equator (below 10∘ latitude) between 1995 and 2010. We revise down the amplitude of the decade fluctuations...

  17. Derived Metric Tensors for Flow Surface Visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obermaier, H; Joy, K I

    2012-12-01

    Integral flow surfaces constitute a widely used flow visualization tool due to their capability to convey important flow information such as fluid transport, mixing, and domain segmentation. Current flow surface rendering techniques limit their expressiveness, however, by focusing virtually exclusively on displacement visualization, visually neglecting the more complex notion of deformation such as shearing and stretching that is central to the field of continuum mechanics. To incorporate this information into the flow surface visualization and analysis process, we derive a metric tensor field that encodes local surface deformations as induced by the velocity gradient of the underlying flow field. We demonstrate how properties of the resulting metric tensor field are capable of enhancing present surface visualization and generation methods and develop novel surface querying, sampling, and visualization techniques. The provided results show how this step towards unifying classic flow visualization and more advanced concepts from continuum mechanics enables more detailed and improved flow analysis.

  18. Survey on Discrete Surface Ricci Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Zhang; Wei Zeng; Ren Guo; Feng Luo; Xianfeng David Gu

    2015-01-01

    Ricci flow deforms the Riemannian metric proportionally to the curvature, such that the curvature evolves according to a nonlinear heat diffusion process, and becomes constant eventually. Ricci flow is a powerful computational tool to design Riemannian metrics by prescribed curvatures. Surface Ricci flow has been generalized to the discrete setting. This work surveys the theory of discrete surface Ricci flow, its computational algorithms, and the applications for surface registration and shape analysis.

  19. Reverse Flow Engine Core Having a Ducted Fan with Integrated Secondary Flow Blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisska, Michael K. (Inventor); Princen, Norman H. (Inventor); Kuehn, Mark S. (Inventor); Cosentino, Gary B. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Secondary air flow is provided for a ducted fan having a reverse flow turbine engine core driving a fan blisk. The fan blisk incorporates a set of thrust fan blades extending from an outer hub and a set of integral secondary flow blades extending intermediate an inner hub and the outer hub. A nacelle provides an outer flow duct for the thrust fan blades and a secondary flow duct carries flow from the integral secondary flow blades as cooling air for components of the reverse flow turbine engine.

  20. Continuous flow analysis of labile iron in ice-cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiscock, William T; Fischer, Hubertus; Bigler, Matthias; Gfeller, Gideon; Leuenberger, Daiana; Mini, Olivia

    2013-05-07

    The important active and passive role of mineral dust aerosol in the climate and the global carbon cycle over the last glacial/interglacial cycles has been recognized. However, little data on the most important aeolian dust-derived biological micronutrient, iron (Fe), has so far been available from ice-cores from Greenland or Antarctica. Furthermore, Fe deposition reconstructions derived from the palaeoproxies particulate dust and calcium differ significantly from the Fe flux data available. The ability to measure high temporal resolution Fe data in polar ice-cores is crucial for the study of the timing and magnitude of relationships between geochemical events and biological responses in the open ocean. This work adapts an existing flow injection analysis (FIA) methodology for low-level trace Fe determinations with an existing glaciochemical analysis system, continuous flow analysis (CFA) of ice-cores. Fe-induced oxidation of N,N'-dimethyl-p-pheylenediamine (DPD) is used to quantify the biologically more important and easily leachable Fe fraction released in a controlled digestion step at pH ~1.0. The developed method was successfully applied to the determination of labile Fe in ice-core samples collected from the Antarctic Byrd ice-core and the Greenland Ice-Core Project (GRIP) ice-core.

  1. Burnout and distribution of liquid between the flow core and wall films in narrow slot channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boltenko, E. A.; Shpakovskii, A. A.

    2010-03-01

    Previous works on studying distribution of liquid between the flow core and wall films in narrow slot channels are briefly reviewed. Interrelation between mass transfer processes and burnout is shown. A procedure for calculating burnout on convex and concave heat-transfer surfaces in narrow slot channels is presented.

  2. Surface and Core Electronic Structure of Oxidized Silicon Nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor A. Nama

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ab initio restricted Hartree-Fock method within the framework of large unit cell formalism is used to simulate silicon nanocrystals between 216 and 1000 atoms (1.6–2.65 nm in diameter that include Bravais and primitive cell multiples. The investigated properties include core and oxidized surface properties. Results revealed that electronic properties converge to some limit as the size of the nanocrystal increases. Increasing the size of the core of a nanocrystal resulted in an increase of the energy gap, valence band width, and cohesive energy. The lattice constant of the core and oxidized surface parts shows a decreasing trend as the nanocrystal increases in a size that converges to 5.28 Ǻ in a good agreement with the experiment. Surface and core convergence to the same lattice constant reflects good adherence of oxide layer at the surface. The core density of states shows highly degenerate states that split at the oxygenated (001-(1×1 surface due to symmetry breaking. The nanocrystal surface shows smaller gap and higher valence and conduction bands when compared to the core part, due to oxygen surface atoms and reduced structural symmetry. The smaller surface energy gap shows that energy gap of the nanocrystal is controlled by the surface part. Unlike the core part, the surface part shows a descending energy gap that proves its obedience to quantum confinement effects. Nanocrystal geometry proved to have some influence on all electronic properties including the energy gap.

  3. Effects of Surface Anisotropy on Magnetic Vortex Core

    OpenAIRE

    Pylypovskyi, Oleksandr V.; Sheka, Denis D.; Kravchuk, Volodymyr P.; Gaididei, Yuri

    2013-01-01

    The vortex core shape in the three dimensional Heisenberg magnet is essentially influenced by a surface anisotropy. We predict that depending of the surface anisotropy type there appears barrel- or pillow-shaped deformation of the vortex core along the magnet thickness. Our theoretical study is well confirmed by spin-lattice simulations.

  4. Simulation of non-Newtonian oil-water core annular flow through return bends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Fan; Wang, Ke; Skote, Martin; Wong, Teck Neng; Duan, Fei

    2017-07-01

    The volume of fluid (VOF) model is used together with the continuum surface force (CSF) model to numerically simulate the non-Newtonian oil-water core annular flow across return bends. A comprehensive study is conducted to generate the profiles of pressure, velocity, volume fraction and wall shear stress for different oil properties, flow directions, and bend geometries. It is revealed that the oil core may adhere to the bend wall under certain operating conditions. Through the analysis of the total pressure gradient and fouling angle, suitable bend geometric parameters are identified for avoiding the risk of fouling.

  5. Surfing wavy surfaces: Bacteria-surface interactions in flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miño, Gastón L.; Kantsler, Vasily; Stocker, Roman

    2014-11-01

    Complex processes occur when microbes interact with surfaces, from mixture enhancement and motion rectification to biofilm formation. Microbe-surface interactions frequently occur in flowing fluids, and flow has recently been shown to have itself unexpected consequences on the dynamics of motile microbes. Here we report on microfluidic experiments in which the interactions of Escherichia coli bacteria with wavy surfaces was quantified in the presence of fluid flow, a model system for naturally occurring topography of many real surfaces. We quantify surface interactions in terms of incident and scattering angles over a range of flow conditions, and compare results to the observations for a microchannel with straight walls.

  6. Review of coaxial flow gas core nuclear rocket fluid mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, H.

    1976-01-01

    Almost all of the fluid mechanics research associated with the coaxial flow gas core reactor ended abruptly with the interruption of NASA's space nuclear program because of policy and budgetary considerations in 1973. An overview of program accomplishments is presented through a review of the experiments conducted and the analyses performed. Areas are indicated where additional research is required for a fuller understanding of cavity flow and of the factors which influence cold and hot flow containment. A bibliography is included with graphic material.

  7. Dense core formation in supersonic turbulent converging flows

    CERN Document Server

    Gong, Hao

    2011-01-01

    We use numerical hydrodynamic simulations to investigate prestellar core formation in the dynamic environment of giant molecular clouds, focusing on planar post-shock layers produced by colliding turbulent flows. A key goal is to test how core evolution and properties depend on the velocity dispersion in the parent cloud; our simulation suite consists of 180 models with inflow Mach numbers Ma=v/c_s=1.1-9. At all Mach numbers, our models show that turbulence and self-gravity collect gas within post-shock regions into filaments at the same time as overdense areas within these filaments condense into cores. This morphology, together with the subsonic velocities we find inside cores, is similar to observations. We extend previous results showing that core collapse develops in an ``outside-in'' manner, with density and velocity approaching the Larson-Penston asymptotic solution. The time for the first core to collapse varies as 1/sqrt(v), consistent with analytic estimates. Core building takes 10 times as long as ...

  8. Study on stability of natural circulation flow in an LMFBR. Pt. 2. Stability of core flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koga, Tomonari [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Abiko, Chiba (Japan). Abiko Research Lab.

    1997-11-01

    By using an experimental apparatus with water in which the primary loop and the core of an LMFBR were roughly simulated, stability of natural circulation flows in the core has been experimentally evaluated. The following were clarified as a result of the present study: (1) Though a certain and stable flow occurs in the primary loop under a steady state of natural circulation, a chaotic flow or a variant flow in addition to the steady flow arises in some simulated fuel sub-assemblies. The chaotic flow tends to occur in the range of large Reynolds number and large Richardson number. (2) Estimation of the fluctuation supposed as a chaos revealed that it was a high dimensional chaos. (author)

  9. Application of photogrammetry to surface flow visualization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karthikeyan, N.; Venkatakrishnan, L. [Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Experimental Aerodynamics Division, National Aerospace Laboratories, Delhi (India)

    2011-03-15

    The construction of three-dimensional surface flow fields is an extremely difficult task owing largely to the fragmented information available in the form of 2D images. Here, the method of photogrammetric resection based on a comprehensive camera model has been used to map oil flow visualization images on to the surface grid of the model. The data exported in the VRML format allow for user interaction in a manner not possible with 2D images. The technique is demonstrated here using the surface oil flow visualization images of a simplified landing gear model at low speed in a conventional wind tunnel without any specialized rigs for photogrammetry. The results are not limited to low-speed regimes and show that this technique can have significant impact on understanding the flow physics associated with the surface flow topology of highly three-dimensional separated flows on complex models. (orig.)

  10. Influence of core sand properties on flow dynamics of core shooting process based on experiment and multiphase simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-jiang Ni

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The influence of core sand properties on flow dynamics was investigated synchronously with various core sands, transparent core-box and high-speed camera. To confirm whether the core shooting process has significant turbulence, the flow pattern of sand particles in the shooting head and core box was reproduced with colored core sands. By incorporating the kinetic theory of granular flow (KTGF, kinetic-frictional constitutive correlation and turbulence model, a two-fluid model (TFM was established to study the flow dynamics of the core shooting process. Two-fluid model (TFM simulations were then performed and a areasonable agreement was achieved between the simulation and experimental results. Based on the experimental and simulation results, the effects of turbulence, sand density, sand diameter and binder ratio were analyzed in terms of filling process, sand volume fraction (αs and sand velocity (Vs.

  11. Characterization of interfacial waves in horizontal core-annular flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Sumit; Bhattacharya, Amitabh; Singh, Ramesh; Tabor, Rico F.

    2016-11-01

    In this work, we characterize interfacial waves in horizontal core annular flow (CAF) of fuel-oil and water. Experimental studies on CAF were performed in an acrylic pipe of 15.5mm internal diameter, and the time evolution of the oil-water interface shape was recorded with a high speed camera for a range of different flow-rates of oil (Qo) and water (Qw). The power spectrum of the interface shape shows a range of notable features. First, there is negligible energy in wavenumbers larger than 2 π / a , where a is the thickness of the annulus. Second, for high Qo /Qw , there is no single dominant wavelength, as the flow in the confined annulus does not allow formation of a preferred mode. Third, for lower Qo /Qw , a dominant mode arises at a wavenumber of 2 π / a . We also observe that the power spectrum of the interface shape depends weakly on Qw, and strongly on Qo, perhaps because the net shear rate in the annulus appears to depend weakly on Qw as well. We also attempt to build a general empirical model for CAF by relating the interfacial stress (calculated via the mean pressure gradient) to the flow rate in the annulus, the annular thickness and the core velocity. Authors are thankful to Orica Mining Services (Australia) for the financial support.

  12. Surface oscillations in channeled snow flows

    CERN Document Server

    Rastello, Marie

    2007-01-01

    An experimental device has been built to measure velocity profiles and friction laws in channeled snow flows. The measurements show that the velocity depends linearly on the vertical position in the flow and that the friction coefficient is a first-order polynomial in velocity (u) and thickness (h) of the flow. In all flows, oscillations on the surface of the flow were observed throughout the channel and measured at the location of the probes. The experimental results are confronted with a shallow water approach. Using a Saint-Venant modeling, we show that the flow is effectively uniform in the streamwise direction at the measurement location. We show that the surface oscillations produced by the Archimedes's screw at the top of the channel persist throughout the whole length of the channel and are the source of the measured oscillations. This last result provides good validation of the description of such channeled snow flows by a Saint-Venant modeling.

  13. Plasma flow interaction with ITER divertor related surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dojčinović, Ivan P.

    2010-11-01

    It has been found that the plasma flow generated by quasistationary plasma accelerators can be used for simulation of high energy plasma interaction with different materials of interest for fusion experiments. It is especially important for the studies of the processes such as ELMs (edge localized modes), plasma disruptions and VDEs (vertical displacement events), during which a significant part of the confined hot plasma is lost from the core to the SOL (scrape off layer) enveloping the core region. Experiments using plasma guns have been used to assess erosion from disruptions and ELMs. Namely, in this experiment modification of different targets, like tungsten, molybdenum, CFC and silicon single crystal surface by the action of hydrogen and nitrogen quasistationary compression plasma flow (CPF) generated by magnetoplasma compressor (MPC) has been studied. MPC plasma flow with standard parameters (1 MJ/m2 in 0.1 ms) can be used for simulation of transient peak thermal loads during Type I ELMs and disruptions. Analysis of the targets erosion, brittle destruction, melting processes, and dust formation has been performed. These surface phenomena are results of specific conditions during CPF interaction with target surface. The investigations are related to the fundamental aspects of high energy plasma flow interaction with different material of interest for fusion. One of the purposes is a study of competition between melting and cleavage of treated solid surface. The other is investigation of plasma interaction with first wall and divertor component materials related to the ITER experiment.

  14. High Resolution Continuous Flow Analysis System for Polar Ice Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallmayr, Remi; Azuma, Kumiko; Yamada, Hironobu; Kjær, Helle Astrid; Vallelonga, Paul; Azuma, Nobuhiko; Takata, Morimasa

    2014-05-01

    In the last decades, Continuous Flow Analysis (CFA) technology for ice core analyses has been developed to reconstruct the past changes of the climate system 1), 2). Compared with traditional analyses of discrete samples, a CFA system offers much faster and higher depth resolution analyses. It also generates a decontaminated sample stream without time-consuming sample processing procedure by using the inner area of an ice-core sample.. The CFA system that we have been developing is currently able to continuously measure stable water isotopes 3) and electrolytic conductivity, as well as to collect discrete samples for the both inner and outer areas with variable depth resolutions. Chemistry analyses4) and methane-gas analysis 5) are planned to be added using the continuous water stream system 5). In order to optimize the resolution of the current system with minimal sample volumes necessary for different analyses, our CFA system typically melts an ice core at 1.6 cm/min. Instead of using a wire position encoder with typical 1mm positioning resolution 6), we decided to use a high-accuracy CCD Laser displacement sensor (LKG-G505, Keyence). At the 1.6 cm/min melt rate, the positioning resolution was increased to 0.27mm. Also, the mixing volume that occurs in our open split debubbler is regulated using its weight. The overflow pumping rate is smoothly PID controlled to maintain the weight as low as possible, while keeping a safety buffer of water to avoid air bubbles downstream. To evaluate the system's depth-resolution, we will present the preliminary data of electrolytic conductivity obtained by melting 12 bags of the North Greenland Eemian Ice Drilling (NEEM) ice core. The samples correspond to different climate intervals (Greenland Stadial 21, 22, Greenland Stadial 5, Greenland Interstadial 5, Greenland Interstadial 7, Greenland Stadial 8). We will present results for the Greenland Stadial -8, whose depths and ages are between 1723.7 and 1724.8 meters, and 35.520 to

  15. Evaluation of the influence of bypass flow gap distribution on the core hot spot in a prismatic VHTR core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min-Hwan, E-mail: mhkim@kaeri.re.kr [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedeokdaero, Yoseong, Daejeon 304-353 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Hong-Sik [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedeokdaero, Yoseong, Daejeon 304-353 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > A procedure to evaluate the local gap size variation between graphite blocks was developed and applied to a prismatic core VHTR. > The analysis for the core bypass flow and hot spot was carried out based on the calculated gap distributions. > The predicted gap size is large enough to affect the flow distribution in the core. > The bypass gap and flow distributions are closely related to the local hot spot temperature and its location. > The core restraint mechanism preventing outward movement of graphite block reduces the bypass gap size and hot spot temperature. - Abstract: Core bypass flow in VHTR is one of the key issues for core thermal margins and efficiency. The bypass flow in the prismatic core varies during core cycles due to the irradiation shrinkage/swelling and thermal expansion of the graphite blocks. A procedure to evaluate the local gap size variation between graphite blocks was developed and applied to a prismatic core VHTR. The influence of the core restraint mechanism on the bypass flow gap was evaluated. The predicted gap size is as much as 8 mm when the graphite block is exposed to its allowable limit of fast neutron fluence. The analysis for the core bypass flow and hot spot was carried out based on the calculated gap distributions. The results indicate that the bypass gap and flow distributions are closely related to the local hot spot and its location and the core restraint mechanism preventing outward movement of the graphite block by a fastening device reduces the bypass gap size, which results in the decrease of maximum fuel temperature not less than 100 deg. C, when compared to the case without it.

  16. Coherent flow structures at earth's surface

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Venditti, J.G; Best, J.L; Church, M; Hardy, R.J

    2013-01-01

    This book reviews the recent progress in the study of the turbulent flows that sculpt the Earth's surface, focusing in particular on the organized structures that have been identified in recent years...

  17. The surface core level shift for lithium at the surface of lithium borate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wooten, David [Air Force Institute of Technology, 2950 Hobson Way, Wright Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433-7765 (United States); Ketsman, I.; Xiao, Jie [Department of Physics and Astronomy and the Nebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, P.O. Box 880111, Lincoln, NE 68588-0111 (United States); Losovyj, Ya.B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and the Nebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, P.O. Box 880111, Lincoln, NE 68588-0111 (United States); J. Bennett Johnston Sr. Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices, Louisiana State University, 6980 Jefferson Highway, Baton Rouge, LA 70806 (United States); Petrosky, J.; McClory, J. [Air Force Institute of Technology, 2950 Hobson Way, Wright Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433-7765 (United States); Burak, Ya.V.; Adamiv, V.T. [Institute of Physical Optics, Dragomanov 23, Lviv 79005 (Ukraine); Dowben, P.A., E-mail: pdowben@unl.ed [Department of Physics and Astronomy and the Nebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, P.O. Box 880111, Lincoln, NE 68588-0111 (United States)

    2010-01-01

    The shallow Li 1s core level exhibits a surface-to-bulk core level shift for the stoichiometric Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}(1 1 0) surface. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy was used to indentify Li 1s bulk and surface core level components at binding energies -56.5+-0.4 and -53.7+-0.5 eV, respectively. We find photoemission evidence for surface states of Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}(1 1 0) that exist in the gap of the projected bulk density of states. The existence of surface states is consistent with the large surface-to-bulk core level shift for the Li 1s core.

  18. Surface Flow from Visual Cues

    OpenAIRE

    Petit, Benjamin,; Letouzey, Antoine; Boyer, Edmond; Franco, Jean-Sébastien

    2011-01-01

    International audience; In this paper we study the estimation of dense, instantaneous 3D motion fields over a non-rigidly moving surface observed by multi-camera systems. The motivation arises from multi-camera applications that require motion information, for arbitrary subjects, in order to perform tasks such as surface tracking or segmentation. To this aim, we present a novel framework that allows to efficiently compute dense 3D displacement fields using low level visual cues and geometric con...

  19. Flow structure from a horizontal cylinder coincident with a free surface in shallow water flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kahraman Ali

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Vortex formation from a horizontal cylinder coincident with a free surface of a shallow water flow having a depth of 25.4 [mm] was experimentally investigated using the PIV technique. Instantaneous and time-averaged flow patterns in the wake region of the cylinder were examined for three different cylinder diameter values under the fully developed turbulent boundary layer condition. Reynolds numbers were in the range of 1124£ Re£ 3374 and Froude numbers were in the range of 0.41 £ Fr £ 0.71 based on the cylinder diameter. It was found that a jet-like flow giving rise to increasing the flow entrainment between the core and wake regions depending on the cylinder diameter was formed between the lower surface of the cylinder and bottom surface of the channel. Vorticity intensity, Reynolds stress correlations and the primary recirculating bubble lengths were grown to higher values with increasing the cylinder diameter. On the other hand, in the case of the lowest level of the jet-like flow emanating from the beneath of the smallest cylinder, the variation of flow characteristics were attenuated significantly in a shorter distance. The variation of the reattachment location of the separated flow to the free-surface is a strong function of the cylinder diameter and the Froude number.

  20. Planetary gyre, time-dependent eddies, torsional waves, and equatorial jets at the Earth's core surface

    CERN Document Server

    Gillet, N; Finlay, C C

    2016-01-01

    We report a calculation of time-dependent quasi-geostrophic core flows for 1940-2010. Inverting recursively for an ensemble of solutions, we evaluate the main source of uncertainties, namely the model errors arising from interactions between unresolved core surface motions and magnetic fields. Temporal correlations of these uncertainties are accounted for. The covariance matrix for the flow coefficients is also obtained recursively from the dispersion of an ensemble of solutions. Maps of the flow at the core surface show, upon a planetary-scale gyre, time-dependent large-scale eddies at mid-latitudes and vigorous azimuthal jets in the equatorial belt. The stationary part of the flow predominates on all the spatial scales that we can resolve. We retrieve torsional waves that explain the length-of-day changes at 4 to 9.5 years periods. These waves may be triggered by the nonlinear interaction between the magnetic field and sub-decadal non-zonal motions within the fluid outer core. Both the zonal and the more en...

  1. Lifespan theorem for constrained surface diffusion flows

    CERN Document Server

    McCoy, James; Williams, Graham; 10.1007/s00209-010-0720-7

    2012-01-01

    We consider closed immersed hypersurfaces in $\\R^{3}$ and $\\R^4$ evolving by a class of constrained surface diffusion flows. Our result, similar to earlier results for the Willmore flow, gives both a positive lower bound on the time for which a smooth solution exists, and a small upper bound on a power of the total curvature during this time. By phrasing the theorem in terms of the concentration of curvature in the initial surface, our result holds for very general initial data and has applications to further development in asymptotic analysis for these flows.

  2. CISM Course on Free Surface Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Rath, Hans-Josef

    1998-01-01

    The book covers selected problems in free surface flows. The topics range from linear and nonlinear gravity and capillary waves, thin film dynamics, equilibrium shape, stability, and dynamics of capillary surfaces to thermal Marangoni effects in several geometries. The fluid dynamical problems are supplemented by a review Eulerian based computational methods.

  3. Free surface flows: coalescence, spreading and dewetting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hernandez Sanchez, Jose Federico

    2015-01-01

    Capillary and wetting phenomena are an essential part of nature. Its presence is noticed in many circumstances where solid and liquid surfaces come into contact. In this thesis different types of capillary free surface flows are studied. The topics discussed are mainly the coalescence of viscous ses

  4. CORE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krigslund, Jeppe; Hansen, Jonas; Hundebøll, Martin

    2013-01-01

    different flows. Instead of maintaining these approaches separate, we propose a protocol (CORE) that brings together these coding mechanisms. Our protocol uses random linear network coding (RLNC) for intra- session coding but allows nodes in the network to setup inter- session coding regions where flows...... intersect. Routes for unicast sessions are agnostic to other sessions and setup beforehand, CORE will then discover and exploit intersecting routes. Our approach allows the inter-session regions to leverage RLNC to compensate for losses or failures in the overhearing or transmitting process. Thus, we...... increase the benefits of XORing by exploiting the underlying RLNC structure of individual flows. This goes beyond providing additional reliability to each individual session and beyond exploiting coding opportunistically. Our numerical results show that CORE outperforms both forwarding and COPE...

  5. CORE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krigslund, Jeppe; Hansen, Jonas; Hundebøll, Martin

    2013-01-01

    different flows. Instead of maintaining these approaches separate, we propose a protocol (CORE) that brings together these coding mechanisms. Our protocol uses random linear network coding (RLNC) for intra- session coding but allows nodes in the network to setup inter- session coding regions where flows...... intersect. Routes for unicast sessions are agnostic to other sessions and setup beforehand, CORE will then discover and exploit intersecting routes. Our approach allows the inter-session regions to leverage RLNC to compensate for losses or failures in the overhearing or transmitting process. Thus, we...... increase the benefits of XORing by exploiting the underlying RLNC structure of individual flows. This goes beyond providing additional reliability to each individual session and beyond exploiting coding opportunistically. Our numerical results show that CORE outperforms both forwarding and COPE...

  6. Liquid infused surfaces in turbulent channel flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Matthew; Stone, Howard; Smits, Alexander; Jacobi, Ian; Samaha, Mohamed; Wexler, Jason; Shang, Jessica; Rosenberg, Brian; Hellström, Leo; Fan, Yuyang; Wang, Karen; Lee, Kevin; Hultmark, Marcus

    2014-11-01

    A turbulent channel flow facility is used to measure the drag reduction capabilities and dynamic behavior of liquid-infused micro-patterned surfaces. Liquid infused surfaces have been proposed as a robust alternative to traditional air-cushion-based superhydrophobic surfaces. The mobile liquid lubricant creates a surface slip with the outer turbulent shear flow as well as an energetic sink to dampen turbulent fluctuations. Micro-manufactured surfaces can be mounted flush in the channel and exposed to turbulent flows. Two configurations are possible, both capable of producing laminar and turbulent flows. The first configuration allows detailed investigation of the infused liquid layer and the other allows well resolved pressure gradient measurements. Both of the configurations have high aspect ratios 15-45:1. Drag reduction for a variety of liquid-infused surface architectures is quantified by measuring pressure drop in the channel. Flow in the oil film is simultaneously visualized using fluorescent dye. Supported under ONR Grants N00014-12-1-0875 and N00014-12-1-0962 (program manager Ki-Han Kim).

  7. Core surface magnetic field evolution 2000–2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finlay, Chris; Jackson, A.; Gillet, N.;

    2012-01-01

    traditional quadratic or maximum entropy regularization in space, and second or third time derivative regularization in time. Entropy regularization allows the construction of models with approximately constant spectral slope at the core surface, avoiding both the divergence characteristic of the crustal...

  8. Origin of metallic surface core-level shifts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldén, Magnus; Skriver, Hans Lomholt; Abrikosov, I. A.

    1995-01-01

    The unique property of the open 4f energy shell in the lanthanide metals is used to show that the initial-state energy shift gives an insufficient description of surface core-level shifts. Instead a treatment, which fully includes the final-state screening, account for the experimentally observed...

  9. Stability of three-layered core-annular flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Dipin; Pushpavanam, Subramaniam; Sundararajan, T.

    2016-11-01

    Stability of a three-layered core-annular flow is analyzed using the method of modal linear stability analysis. A temporal analysis shows that the flow becomes unstable to two modes of instability when inertial effects are negligible. An energy budget analysis reveals that these two modes correspond to capillary instability associated with each fluid-fluid interface. With an increase in Reynolds number, the system exhibits additional Reynolds stress modes of instabilities. These modes correspond to the Tollmien-Schlichting type of waves associated with high Reynolds number shear flows, and are considered precursor to transition to turbulence. An investigation of the parameter space reveals that the system may simultaneously show up to 5 distinct modes of instability, viz., the two capillary modes at each interface and three Reynolds stress modes in the bulk of each phase. In addition, a spatio-temporal analysis shows that the Reynolds stress modes are always convectively unstable whereas the capillary modes may undergo a transition from convective to absolute instability with decrease in Weber number. To obtain encapsulated droplets in experiments, the operating parameters must be chosen such that the system lies in the regime of convective instability. MHRD-Govt of India, NSF 0968313.

  10. Surface Structure Enhanced Microchannel Flow Boiling

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Yangying; Antao, Dion Savio; Chu, Kuang-Han; Chen, Siyu; Hendricks, Terry J.; Zhang, Tiejun; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the role of surface microstructures in two-phase microchannels on suppressing flow instabilities and enhancing heat transfer. We designed and fabricated microchannels with well-defined silicon micropillar arrays on the bottom heated microchannel wall to promote capillary flow for thin film evaporation while facilitating nucleation only from the sidewalls. Our experimental results show significantly reduced temperature and pressure drop fluctuation especially at high heat fluxe...

  11. Superhydrophobic surfaces in turbulent channel flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yixuan; Alame, Karim; Mahesh, Krishnan

    2016-11-01

    The drag reduction effect of superhydrophobic surfaces in turbulent channel flow is studied using direct numerical simulation. The volume of fluid (VOF) methodology is used to resolve the dynamics of the interface. Laminar flow simulations show good agreement with experiment, and illustrate the relative importance of geometry and interface boundary condition. An analytical solution for the multi-phase problem is obtained that shows good agreement with simulation. Turbulent simulations over a longitudinally grooved surface show drag reduction even in the fully wetted regime. The statistics show that geometry alone can cause an apparent slip to the external flow. Instantaneous plots indicate that the grooves prevent the penetration of near wall vorticity, yielding overall drag reduction. Results for spectra, wall pressure fluctuations and correlations will be presented. Unsteady effects on the air-vapor interface will be discussed. Results for random roughness surfaces will be presented. Supported by Office of Naval Research.

  12. Surface core-level shifts for Pt single-crystal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baetzold, R. C.; Apai, G.; Shustorovich, E.; Jaeger, R.

    1982-10-01

    The (111) and (110) surfaces of Pt, clean, oxidized, and covered by CO, have been investigated for surface 4f core-level binding-energy shifts. For the (111) face the surface Pt4f72 core level was shifted by 0.40+/-0.05 eV to lower binding energy relative to the bulk peak. On the (110)-(1×2) reconstructed surface similarly shifted peaks at 0.21+/-0.05 and 0.55+/-0.05 eV were observed. Chemisorbed carbon monoxide shifts the Pt(111) surface-related core level by 1.3 eV to higher binding energy. Formation of subsurface oxygen did not produce changes in the Pt(111)4f72 core-level binding energies. The results obtained are explained and their possible implications are discussed.

  13. Combining nutation and surface gravity observations to estimate the Earth's core and inner core resonant frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Yann; Lambert, Sébastien; Rosat, Séverine; Nurul Huda, Ibnu; Bizouard, Christian

    2017-04-01

    Nutation time series derived from very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) and time varying surface gravity data recorded by superconducting gravimeters (SG) have long been used separately to assess the Earth's interior via the estimation of the free core and inner core resonance effects on nutation or tidal gravity. The results obtained from these two techniques have been shown recently to be consistent, making relevant the combination of VLBI and SG observables and the estimation of Earth's interior parameters in a single inversion. We present here the intermediate results of the ongoing project of combining nutation and surface gravity time series to improve estimates of the Earth's core and inner core resonant frequencies. We use VLBI nutation time series spanning 1984-2016 derived by the International VLBI Service for geodesy and astrometry (IVS) as the result of a combination of inputs from various IVS analysis centers, and surface gravity data from about 15 SG stations. We address here the resonance model used for describing the Earth's interior response to tidal excitation, the data preparation consisting of the error recalibration and amplitude fitting for nutation data, and processing of SG time-varying gravity to remove any gaps, spikes, steps and other disturbances, followed by the tidal analysis with the ETERNA 3.4 software package, the preliminary estimates of the resonant periods, and the correlations between parameters.

  14. Ab initio surface core-level shifts and surface segregation energies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldén, Magnus; Skriver, Hans Lomholt; Johansson, Börje

    1993-01-01

    We have calculated the surface core-level energy shifts of the 4d and 5d transition metals by means of local-density theory and a Green’s-function technique based on the linear muffin-tin orbitals method. Final-state effects are included by treating the core-ionized atom as an impurity located...

  15. Liquid Infused Surfaces in Turbulent Channel Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Matthew; Liu, Ying; Stone, Howard; Hultmark, Marcus

    2016-11-01

    Liquid infused surfaces have been proposed as a robust method for turbulent drag reduction. These surfaces consist of functionalized roughness elements wetted with a liquid lubricant that is immiscible with external fluids. The presence of the lubricant creates mobile, fluid-fluid interfaces, each of which can support a localized slip. Collectively, these interfaces yield a finite slip velocity at the effective surface, which has been demonstrated to reduce skin friction drag in turbulent flows. Retention of the lubricant layer is critical to maintaining the drag reduction effect. A turbulent channel-flow facility is used to characterize the drag reduction and robustness of various liquid infused surfaces. Micro-manufactured surfaces are mounted flush in the channel and exposed to turbulent flows. The retention of fluorescent lubricants and pressure drop are monitored to characterize the effects of surface geometry and lubricant properties. Supported under ONR Grants N00014-12-1-0875 and N00014-12-1-0962 (program manager Ki-Han Kim) and by the Department of Defense (DoD) through the National Defense Science & Engineering Graduate Fellowship (NDSEG) Program.

  16. Simulating the Cooling Flow of Cool-Core Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Yuan

    2011-01-01

    We carry out high-resolution adaptive mesh refinement simulations of a cool core cluster, resolving the flow from Mpc scales down to pc scales. We do not (yet) include any AGN heating, focusing instead on cooling in order to understand how gas gets to the supermassive black hole (SMBH) at the center of the cluster. We find that, as the gas cools, the cluster develops a very flat temperature profile, undergoing a cooling catastrophe only in the central 10-100 pc of the cluster. Outside of this region, the flow is smooth, with no local cooling instabilities, and naturally produces very little low-temperature gas (below a few keV), in agreement with observations. The gas cooling in the center of the cluster rapidly forms a thin accretion disk. The amount of cold gas produced at the very center grows rapidly until a reasonable estimate of the resulting AGN heating rate (assuming even a moderate accretion efficiency) would overwhelm cooling. We argue that this naturally produces a thermostat which links the coolin...

  17. Gravity-capillary free-surface flows

    CERN Document Server

    Vanden-Broeck, Jean-Marc

    2010-01-01

    Free surface problems occur in many aspects of science and of everyday life such as the waves on a beach, bubbles rising in a glass of champagne, melting ice, pouring flows from a container and sails billowing in the wind. Consequently, the effect of surface tension on gravity-capillary flows continues to be a fertile field of research in applied mathematics and engineering. Concentrating on applications arising from fluid dynamics, Vanden-Broeck draws upon his years of experience in the field to address the many challenges involved in attempting to describe such flows mathematically. Whilst careful numerical techniques are implemented to solve the basic equations, an emphasis is placed upon the reader developing a deep understanding of the structure of the resulting solutions. The author also reviews relevant concepts in fluid mechanics to help readers from other scientific fields who are interested in free boundary problems.

  18. Surface core-level shifts for simple metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldén, Magnus; Skriver, Hans Lomholt; Johansson, Börje

    1994-01-01

    . We discuss the surface shifts of the electrostatic potentials and the band centers in order to trace the microscopic origin of the SCLS in the simple metals and find that the anomalous subsurface core-level shifts in beryllium are caused by charge dipoles, which persist several layers into the bulk......We have performed an ab initio study of the surface core-level binding energy shift (SCLS) for 11 of the simple metals by means of a Green’s-function technique within the tight-binding linear-muffin-tin-orbitals method. Initial- and final-state effects are included within the concept of complete....... We furthermore conclude that the unexpected negative sign of the SCLS in beryllium is predominantly an initial-state effect and is caused by the high electron density in this metal....

  19. Polygon formation and surface flow on a rotating fluid surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergmann, Raymond; Tophøj, Laust Emil Hjerrild; Homan, T. A. M.;

    2011-01-01

    We present a study of polygons forming on the free surface of a water flow confined to a stationary cylinder and driven by a rotating bottom plate as described by Jansson et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett., vol. 96, 2006, 174502). In particular, we study the case of a triangular structure, either completel...

  20. Surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) flow sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Shrinivas G.

    1991-03-01

    The use of a surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) device to measure the rate of gas flow is described. A SAW oscillator heated to a suitable temperature above ambient is placed in the path of a flowing gas. Convective cooling caused by the gas flow results in a change in the oscillator frequency. A 73-MHz oscillator fabricated on 128 deg rotated Y-cut lithium niobate substrate and heated to 55 C above ambient shows a frequency variation greater than 142 kHz for flow-rate variation from 0 to 1000 cu cm/min. The output of the sensor can be calibrated to provide a measurement of volume flow rate, pressure differential across channel ports, or mass flow rate. High sensitivity, wide dynamic range, and direct digital output are among the attractive features of this sensor. Theoretical expressions for the sensitivity and response time of the sensor are derived. It is shown that by using ultrasonic Lamb waves propagating in thin membranes, a flow sensor with faster response than a SAW sensor can be realized.

  1. Turbulence coefficients and stability studies for the coaxial flow or dissimiliar fluids. [gaseous core nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, H.; Lavan, Z.

    1975-01-01

    Analytical investigations of fluid dynamics problems of relevance to the gaseous core nuclear reactor program are presented. The vortex type flow which appears in the nuclear light bulb concept is analyzed along with the fluid flow in the fuel inlet region for the coaxial flow gaseous core nuclear reactor concept. The development of numerical methods for the solution of the Navier-Stokes equations for appropriate geometries is extended to the case of rotating flows and almost completes the gas core program requirements in this area. The investigations demonstrate that the conceptual design of the coaxial flow reactor needs further development.

  2. Can Core Flows inferred from Geomagnetic Field Models explain the Earth's Dynamo?

    CERN Document Server

    Schaeffer, Nathanaël; Pais, Maria Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    We test the ability of velocity fields inferred from geomagnetic secular variation data to produce the global magnetic field of the Earth. Our kinematic dynamo calculations use quasi-geostrophic (QG) flows inverted from geomagnetic field models which, as such, incorporate flow structures that are Earth-like and may be important for the geodynamo. Furthermore, the QG hypothesis allows straightforward prolongation of the flow from the core surface to the bulk. As expected from previous studies, we check that a simple quasi-geostrophic flow is not able to sustain the magnetic field against ohmic decay. Additional complexity is then introduced in the flow, inspired by the action of the Lorentz force. Indeed, on centenial timescales, the Lorentz force can balance the Coriolis force and strict quasi-geostrophy may not be the best ansatz. When the columnar flow is modified to account for the action of the Lorentz force, magnetic field is generated for Elsasser numbers larger than 0.25 and magnetic Reynolds numbers l...

  3. Insect contamination protection for laminar flow surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croom, Cynthia C.; Holmes, Bruce J.

    1986-01-01

    The ability of modern aircraft surfaces to achieve laminar flow was well-accepted in recent years. Obtaining the maximum benefit of laminar flow for aircraft drag reduction requires maintaining minimum leading-edge contamination. Previously proposed insect contamination prevention methods have proved impractical due to cost, weight, or inconvenience. Past work has shown that insects will not adhere to water-wetted surfaces, but the large volumes of water required for protection rendered such a system impractical. The results of a flight experiment conducted by NASA to evaluate the performance of a porous leading-edge fluid discharge ice protection system operated as an insect contamination protections system are presented. In addition, these flights explored the environmental and atmospheric conditions most suitable for insect accumulation.

  4. Highly stable superhydrophobic surfaces under flow conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Moonchan; Yim, Changyong; Jeon, Sangmin

    2015-01-01

    We synthesized hydrophobic anodic aluminum oxide nanostructures with pore diameters of 35, 50, 65, and 80 nm directly on quartz crystal microresonators, and the stability of the resulting superhydrophobicity was investigated under flow conditions by measuring changes in the resonance frequency and dissipation factor. When the quartz substrates were immersed in water, their hydrophobic surfaces did not wet due to the presence of an air interlayer. The air interlayer was gradually replaced by water over time, which caused decreases in the resonance frequency (i.e., increases in mass) and increases in the dissipation factor (i.e., increases in viscous damping). Although the water contact angles of the nanostructures increased with increasing pore size, the stability of their superhydrophobicity increased with decreasing pore size under both static conditions (without flow) and dynamic conditions (with flow); this increase can be attributed to an increase in the solid surface area that interacts with the air layer above the nanopores as the pore size decreases. Further, the effects of increasing the flow rate on the stability of the superhydrophobicity were quantitatively determined.

  5. Deconvolution-based resolution enhancement of chemical ice core records obtained by continuous flow analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Sune Olander; Andersen, Katrine K.; Johnsen, Sigfus Johann;

    2005-01-01

    Continuous flow analysis (CFA) has become a popular measuring technique for obtaining high-resolution chemical ice core records due to an attractive combination of measuring speed and resolution. However, when analyzing the deeper sections of ice cores or cores from low-accumulation areas, there ...

  6. Effects of non-uniform core flow on peak cladding temperature: MOXY/SCORE sensitivity calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, S.C.

    1979-08-15

    The MOXY/SCORE computer program is used to evaluate the potential effect on peak cladding temperature of selective cooling that may result from a nonuniform mass flux at the core boundaries during the blowdown phase of the LOFT L2-4 test. The results of this study indicate that the effect of the flow nonuniformity at the core boundaries will be neutralized by a strong radial flow redistribution in the neighborhood of core boundaries. The implication is that the flow nonuniformity at the core boundaries has no significant effect on the thermal-hydraulic behavior and cladding temperature at the hot plane.

  7. Film stability in a vertical rotating tube with a core-gas flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, G. S. R.; Lu, P. C.; Ostrach, S.

    1971-01-01

    The linear hydrodynamic stability of a thin-liquid layer flowing along the inside wall of a vertical tube rotating about its axis in the presence of a core-gas flow is examined. The stability problem is formulated under the conditions that the liquid film is thin, the density and viscosity ratios of gas to liquid are small and the relative (axial) pressure gradient in the gas is of the same order as gravity. The resulting eigenvalue problem is first solved by a perturbation method appropriate to axisymmetric long-wave disturbances. The damped nature (to within the thin-film and other approximations made) of the nonaxisymmetric and short-wave disturbances is noted. In view of the limitations on a truncated perturbation solution when the disturbance wavenumber is not small, an initial value method using digital computer is presented. Stability characteristics of neutral, growing, and damped modes are presented showing the influences of rotation, surface tension, and the core-gas flow. Energy balance in a neutral mode is also illustrated.

  8. Out-of-Core Construction and Visualization of Multiresolution Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindstrom, P

    2003-02-03

    We present a method for end-to-end out-of-core simplification and view-dependent visualization of large surfaces. The method consists of three phases: (1) memory insensitive simplification; (2) memory insensitive construction of a multiresolution hierarchy; and (3) run-time, output-sensitive, view-dependent rendering and navigation of the mesh. The first two off-line phases are performed entirely on disk, and use only a small, constant amount of memory, whereas the run-time system pages in only the rendered parts of the mesh in a cache coherent manner. As a result, we are able to process and visualize arbitrarily large meshes given a sufficient amount of disk space; a constant multiple of the size of the input mesh. Similar to recent work on out-of-core simplification, our memory insensitive method uses vertex clustering on a rectilinear octree grid to coarsen and create a hierarchy for the mesh, and a quadric error metric to choose vertex positions at all levels of resolution. We show how the quadric information can be used to concisely represent vertex position, surface normal, error, and curvature information for anisotropic view-dependent coarsening and silhouette preservation. The run-time component of our system uses asynchronous rendering and view-dependent refinement driven by screen-space error and visibility. The system exploits frame-to-frame coherence and has been designed to allow preemptive refinement at the granularity of individual vertices to support refinement on a time budget. Our results indicate a significant improvement in processing speed over previous methods for out-of-core multiresolution surface construction. Meanwhile, all phases of the method are disk and memory efficient, and are fairly straightforward to implement.

  9. Out-of-Core Construction and Visualization of Multiresolution Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindstrom, P

    2002-11-04

    We present a method for end-to-end out-of-core simplification and view-dependent visualization of large surfaces. The method consists of three phases: (1) memory insensitive simplification; (2) memory insensitive construction of a multiresolution hierarchy; and (3) run-time, output-sensitive, view-dependent rendering and navigation of the mesh. The first two off-line phases are performed entirely on disk, and use only a small, constant amount of memory, whereas the run-time system pages in only the rendered parts of the mesh in a cache coherent manner. As a result, we are able to process and visualize arbitrarily large meshes given a sufficient amount of disk space; a constant multiple of the size of the input mesh. Similar to recent work on out-of-core simplification, our memory insensitive method uses vertex clustering on a uniform octree grid to coarsen a mesh and create a hierarchy, and a quadric error metric to choose vertex positions at all levels of resolution. We show how the quadric information can be used to concisely represent vertex position, surface normal, error, and curvature information for anisotropic view-dependent coarsening and silhouette preservation. The run-time component of our system uses asynchronous rendering and view-dependent refinement driven by screen-space error and visibility. The system exploits frame-to-frame coherence and has been designed to allow preemptive refinement at the granularity of individual vertices to support refinement on a time budget. Our results indicate a significant improvement in processing speed over previous methods for out-of-core multiresolution surface construction. Meanwhile, all phases of the method are both disk and memory efficient, and are fairly straightforward to implement.

  10. Transport of bromide measured by soil coring, suction plates, and lysimeters under transient flow conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasteel, R.; Pütz, Th.; Vereecken, H.

    2003-04-01

    Lysimeter studies are one step within the registration procedure of pesticides. Flow and transport in these free-draining lysimeters do not reflect the field situation mainly because of the occurence of a zone of local saturation at the lower boundary (seepage face). The objective of this study is to evaluate the impact of flow and transport behaviour of bromide detected with different measuring devices (lysimeters, suction plates, and soil coring) by comparing experimental results with numerical simulations in heterogeneous flow domains. We applied bromide as a small pulse to the bare soil surface (Orthic Luvisol) of the three devices and the displacement of bromide was regurlarly sampled for three years under natural wheather conditions. Based on the mean breakthrough curves we observe experimentally that lysimeters have a lower effective pore-water velocity and exhibit more solute spreading resulting in a larger dispersivity than the suction plates. This can be ascribed to the artefact of the lower boundary. We performed numerical transport simulations in 2-D heterogeneous flow fields (scaling approach) choosing appropriate boundary conditions for the various devices. The simulations allow to follow the temporal evolution of flow and transport processes in the various devices and to gain additional process understanding. We conclude that the model is essentially capable to reproduce the main experimental findings only if we account for the spatial correlation structure of the hydraulic properties, i.e. soil heterogeneity.

  11. Fluorescent beeswax for surface flow velocity observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, S.; Tauro, F.; Petroselli, A.; Mocio, G.; Capocci, I.; Rapiti, E.; Rapiti, R.; Cipollari, G.; Porfiri, M.

    2012-12-01

    Watershed surface processes control downstream runoff phenomena, waste and pollutant diffusion, erosion mechanics, and sediment transport. A quantitative understanding of the flow physics is currently limited by the lack of effective tracing techniques suitable for basin-scale observations. More specifically, field experiments require environmentally resilient, non-invasive, and low cost measurement systems that can potentially operate in remotely-controlled or unmanned conditions. Traditional tracing methodologies are largely not capable to cope with extreme in-situ conditions, including practical logistic challenges as well as inherent flow complexity. Specifically, most of available technologies need physical sampling to estimate the tracer concentration and do not allow for continuous-time measurements. In addition, commonly used tracers, such as isotopes, dyes, and chemicals, are not directly applicable to monitor surface hillslope processes and large-scale microchannel networks due to elaborate detection processes and dispersion issues. In this context, the feasibility of using buoyant fluorescent microspheres as particle tracers in natural water flows is investigated. Specifically, a novel fabrication methodology is designed to manufacture particles from natural beeswax and a highly diluted solution of a nontoxic fluorescent red dye. The fabrication procedure allows for adjusting the size of the particles from tens of microns up to a few millimeters and their density from positively to negatively-buoyant with respect to water. An array of experimental techniques is employed to conduct a thorough characterization of the fluorescence and morphology of the tracers. In addition, ad-hoc experiments are designed to assess the fluorescence response due to Ultra Violet (UV) exposure and thermal processes. Proof-of-concept laboratory analysis are conducted to illustrate the integration of the novel particle tracers in existing tracing methods for surface flow

  12. Free surface flows under compensated gravity conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Dreyer, Miachel E

    2007-01-01

    This book considers the behavior of fluids in a low-gravity environment with special emphasis on application in PMD (propellant management device) systems . In the compensated gravity environment of a spacecraft, the hydrostatic pressure decreases to very low values depending on the residual acceleration, and surface tension forces become dominant. Consequently, surface tension can be used to transport and position liquids if the residual acceleration and the resulting hydrostatic pressure are small compared to the capillary pressure. One prominent application is the use of PMDs in surface-tension satellite tanks. PMDs must ensure that the tank outlet is covered with liquid whenever outflow is demanded. Furthermore, PMDs are used to ensure expulsion and refilling of tanks for liquids and gases for life support, reactants, and experiment supplies. Since most of the PMD designs are not testable on ground and thus rely on analytical or numerical concepts, this book treats three different flow problems with analy...

  13. Fabrication of a polyvinylidene difluoride fiber with a metal core and its application as directional air flow sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Yixiang; Liu, Rongrong; Hui, Shen

    2016-09-01

    We fabricated a sensitive air flow detector that mimic the sensing mechanism found at the tail of some insects. [see Y. Yang, A. Klein, H. Bleckmann and C. Liu, Appl. Phys. Lett. 99(2) (2011); J. J. Heys, T. Gedeon, B. C. Knott and Y. Kim, J. Biomech. 41(5), 977 (2008); J. Tao and X. Yu, Smart Mat. Struct. 21(11) (2012)]. Our bionic airflow sensor uses a polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) microfiber with a molybdenum core which we produced with the hot extrusion tensile method. The surface of the fiber is partially coated with conductive silver adhesive that serve as surface electrodes. A third electrode, the metal core is used to polarize polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) under the surface electrodes. The cantilever beam structure of the prepared symmetric electrodes of metal core piezoelectric fiber (SMPF) is used as the artificial hair airflow sensor. The surface electrodes are used to measure output voltage. Our theoretical and experimental results show that the SMPF responds fast to air flow changes, the output charge has an exponential correlation with airflow velocity and a cosine relation with the direction of airflow. Our bionic airflow sensor with directional sensing ability can also measure air flow amplitude. [see H. Droogendijk, R. G. P. Sanders and G. J. M. Krijnen, New J. Phys. 15 (2013)]. By using two surface electrodes, our sensing circuit further improves sensitivity.

  14. Surface Effects on Nanoscale Gas Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beskok, Ali; Barisik, Murat

    2010-11-01

    3D MD simulations of linear Couette flow of argon gas confined within nano-scale channels are performed in the slip, transition and free molecular flow regimes. The velocity and density profiles show deviations from the kinetic theory based predictions in the near wall region that typically extends three molecular diameters (s) from each surface. Utilizing the Irwin-Kirkwood theorem, stress tensor components for argon gas confined in nano-channels are investigated. Outside the 3s region, three normal stress components are identical, and equal to pressure predicted using the ideal gas law, while the shear stress is a constant. Within the 3s region, the normal stresses become anisotropic and the shear stress shows deviations from its bulk value due to the surface virial effects. Utilizing the kinetic theory and MD predicted shear stress values, the tangential momentum accommodation coefficient for argon gas interacting with FCC structured walls (100) plane facing the fluid is calculated to be 0.75; this value is independent of the Knudsen number. Results show emergence of the 3s region as an additional characteristic length scale in nano-confined gas flows.

  15. Experimental and Analytic Study on the Core Bypass Flow in a Very High Temperature Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard Schultz

    2012-04-01

    Core bypass flow has been one of key issues in the very high temperature reactor (VHTR) design for securing core thermal margins and achieving target temperatures at the core exit. The bypass flow in a prismatic VHTR core occurs through the control element holes and the radial and axial gaps between the graphite blocks for manufacturing and refueling tolerances. These gaps vary with the core life cycles because of the irradiation swelling/shrinkage characteristic of the graphite blocks such as fuel and reflector blocks, which are main components of a core's structure. Thus, the core bypass flow occurs in a complicated multidimensional way. The accurate prediction of this bypass flow and counter-measures to minimize it are thus of major importance in assuring core thermal margins and securing higher core efficiency. Even with this importance, there has not been much effort in quantifying and accurately modeling the effect of the core bypass flow. The main objectives of this project were to generate experimental data for validating the software to be used to calculate the bypass flow in a prismatic VHTR core, validate thermofluid analysis tools and their model improvements, and identify and assess measures for reducing the bypass flow. To achieve these objectives, tasks were defined to (1) design and construct experiments to generate validation data for software analysis tools, (2) determine the experimental conditions and define the measurement requirements and techniques, (3) generate and analyze the experimental data, (4) validate and improve the thermofluid analysis tools, and (5) identify measures to control the bypass flow and assess its performance in the experiment.

  16. Effect of complicated coolant flow behavior in the ABWR lower plenum on flow distribution to the core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Shun, E-mail: swatanabe@edu.esys.tsukuba.ac.jp [University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennoudai, Tsukuba 305-8573, Ibaraki (Japan); Abe, Yutaka, E-mail: abe@kz.tsukuba.ac.jp [University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennoudai, Tsukuba 305-8573, Ibaraki (Japan); Kaneko, Akiko, E-mail: kaneko@kz.tsukuba.ac.jp [University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennoudai, Tsukuba 305-8573, Ibaraki (Japan); Watanabe, Fumitoshi, E-mail: Watanabe.Fumitoshi@tepco.co.jp [Tokyo Electric Power Company, 4-1, Egasaki, Tsurumi, Yokohama 230-8510, Kanagawa (Japan); Tezuka, Kenichi, E-mail: tezuka.kenichi@tepco.co.jp [Tokyo Electric Power Company, 4-1, Egasaki, Tsurumi, Yokohama 230-8510, Kanagawa (Japan); Hirao, Kazuki, E-mail: hirao.kazuki@tepco.co.jp [Tokyo Electric Power Company, 4-1, Egasaki, Tsurumi, Yokohama 230-8510, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • A 1/10th model of the lower plenum was constructed to obtain the benchmark data. • Complicated flow behaviors were measured using LDV and PIV. • Flow distribution in the lower plenum became non-uniform. • Flow distribution became uniform at the core inlet through the side entry orifices. • The vortices were observed around the side entry orifices. - Abstract: One of the cost reduction strategies in nuclear power generation is the augmentation of power outputs by increasing the coolant flow rate. To achieve augmentation of the power outputs in an Advanced Boiling Water Reactor, it is extremely important to evaluate the coolant flow from the lower plenum to the core inlet, which dominates the coolant flow distribution over the rod bundle of the core. In the lower plenum, there are a number of structures, such as control rod driving mechanisms and guide tubes. In addition, core support beams and side entry orifices are placed at the core inlet. Therefore, it is estimated that the coolant flow becomes very complicated in these areas. To predict complicated coolant flow in the lower plenum and core inlet, simulation using a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code is helpful. However, previous experimental data are not enough to verify the simulation results for the intended flow channel in this study. Hence, this study focuses on establishing a benchmark for the CFD code using the visualization method. Based on the validation process, the functions of the complicated flow structure at the core inlet and through the lower plenum are demonstrated in detail in the coolant flow distribution to the core. A 1/10th model of a lower plenum was constructed, and the velocity profiles were measured using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and Laser-Doppler Velocimetry (LDV). Each measurement was performed for a Reynolds number of 2620. From the flow velocity measurement, the vertical velocity at the center of the lower plenum is determined to be faster than

  17. Porous flow of liquid water in Enceladus rock core driven by heterogeneous tidal heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choblet, Gael; Tobie, Gabriel; Behounkova, Marie; Cadek, Ondrej

    2016-10-01

    Surface heat flux estimates in excess of 15 GW (e.g. Howett et al., 2016) raise the question of the origin of Enceladus' heat production. While strong heating by tidal dissipation is probably the only viable source, whether the maximum production occurs in the outer ice shell or, deeper, in the ocean or in the rock core, is however unclear. While the analysis of measurements by the Cassini mission (gravity and topography data, observed libration), seems to favor an extremely thin shell at Enceladus South Pole (a few kms only, cf. Thomas et al., 2016, Cadek et al., 2016), the distribution of heat sources remains a major issue in the light of the evolutionary trend that led to this present-day physical state of the moon.Here, we build up on a recent evaluation of tidal deformation in a porous rock core saturated with liquid water indicating that, owing to its unconsolidated state, plausible core rheologies could lead to significant heat production there (typically 20 GW, Tobie et al., in prep.). We describe porous flow in a 3D spherical model following the work of Travis and Schubert (2015). Compaction of the rock matrix is neglected. Water characteristics (density and viscosity), and the bulk thermal conductivity of the porous core are temperature-dependent and the effect of non-water compounds can be considered. Tidal heating is introduced as a heterogeneous heat source with a pattern inferred from numerical models of the tidal response. Our analysis focuses particularly on the heat flux pattern at the ocean/core interface where water is advected in/out of the porous medium.

  18. Characterisation of the core poloidal flow at ASDEX upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebschy, Alexander [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Physik-Department E28, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); McDermott, Rachael M.; Geiger, Benedikt; Cavedon, Marco; Dunne, Michael G.; Dux, Ralph; Fischer, Rainer; Kappatou, Athina; McCarthy, Patrick J.; Viezzer, Eleonora [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Collaboration: the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2016-07-01

    Plasma rotation has a strong influence on the transport of heat, particles, and momentum in fusion plasmas via a variety of mechanisms, for example, by the stabilization of modes and the suppression of plasma turbulence. In tokamaks, the toroidal rotation (u{sub tor}) is essentially a free parameter that is usually dominated by the external momentum input from neutral beams used to heat the plasma. The poloidal rotation (u{sub pol}), on the other hand, is strongly damped and is predicted to remain at Neoclassical (NC) levels of a few km/s. Measuring the inboard-outboard asymmetry of u{sub tor} with charge exchange recombination spectroscopy enables an indirect measurement of u{sub pol} and, hence, the measurement of the complete plasma flow on a flux surface. In order to characterise the nature of u{sub pol} at ASDEX Upgrade a poloidal rotation database has been built that contains a large variation in the parameters that, according to NC theory, drive u{sub pol}; namely, the main ion temperature and density gradients and collisionality. Initial results from this database and a detailed comparison of u{sub pol} to NC theory in interesting plasma scenarios, are presented in this poster.

  19. Automatic Tip Vortex Core Profiling for Numerical Flow Simulations of Rotorcraft in Hover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, David L.; Chaderjian, Neal M.

    2010-01-01

    An automated approach is presented that extracts visual and quantitative data from vortex cores produced by Navier-Stokes simulations of rotorcraft in hover mode. This approach extracts contiguous rotor tip vortex-core trajectories, cross-flow velocity profiles, and vortex-core diameter variation with wake age (azimuth angle). This automated approach is faster and more accurate than a conventional manual approach. Moreover, this new approach allows for an efficient way to quantitatively compare vortex-core profiles from different flow simulations, e.g., grid resolution studies, and validate computed results with experimental data

  20. Ice-sheet flow conditions deduced from mechanical tests of ice core

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miyamoto, Atsushi; Narita, Hideki; Hondoh, Takeo;

    1999-01-01

    Uniaxial compression tests were performed on samples of the Greenland Ice Core Project (GRIP) deep ice core, both in the field and later in a cold-room laboratory, in order to understand the ice-flow behavior of large ice sheets. Experiments were conducted under conditions of constant strain rate......-core samples with basal planes parallel to the horizontal plane of the ice sheet. The ice-flow enhancement factors show a gradual increase with depth down to approximately 2000 m. These results can be interpreted in terms of an increase in the fourth-order Schmid factor. Below 2000 m depth, the flow...

  1. Experimental Investigation on Cross Flow of Wedge-shaped Gap in the core of Prismatic VHTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Hun; Park, Goon Cherl; Cho, Hyoung Kyu [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Su Jong [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls (United States)

    2014-10-15

    The core of the PMR type reactor consists of assemblies of hexagonal graphite blocks. The graphite blocks have lots of advantages for neutron economy and high temperature structural integrity. The height and flat-to-flat width of fuel bock are 793 mm and 360 mm, respectively. Each block has 108 coolant channels of which the diameter is 16 mm. And there are gaps between blocks not only vertically but also horizontally for reloading of the fuel elements. The vertical gap induces the bypass flow and through the horizontal gap the cross flow is formed. Since the complicated flow distribution occurs by the bypass flow and cross flow, flow characteristics in the core of the PMR reactor cannot be treated as a simple pipe flow. The fuel zone of the PMR core consists of multiple layers of fuel blocks. The shape change of the fuel blocks could be caused by the thermal expansion and fast-neutron induced shrinkage. It could make different axial shrinkage of fuel block and this leads to wedge-shaped gaps between two stacked fuel blocks. The cross flow is often considered as a leakage flow through the horizontal gap between stacked fuel blocks and it complicates the flow distribution in the reactor core by connecting the coolant channel and the bypass gap. Moreover, the cross flow could lead to uneven coolant distribution and consequently cause superheating of individual fuel element zones with increased fission product release. Since the core cross flow has a negative impact on safety and efficiency of VHTR, core cross flow phenomena have to be investigated to improve the core thermal margin of VHTR. To develop the cross flow loss coefficient model for determination of the flow distribution for PMR core analysis codes, study on cross flow for PMR200 core is essential. In particular, to predict the amount of flow through the cross flow gap, obtaining accurate flow loss coefficient is important. In this study, the full-scale cross flow experimental facility was constructed to

  2. Turbulent Flow past High Temperature Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehmedagic, Igbal; Thangam, Siva; Carlucci, Pasquale; Buckley, Liam; Carlucci, Donald

    2014-11-01

    Flow over high-temperature surfaces subject to wall heating is analyzed with applications to projectile design. In this study, computations are performed using an anisotropic Reynolds-stress model to study flow past surfaces that are subject to radiative flux. The model utilizes a phenomenological treatment of the energy spectrum and diffusivities of momentum and heat to include the effects of wall heat transfer and radiative exchange. The radiative transport is modeled using Eddington approximation including the weighted effect of nongrayness of the fluid. The time-averaged equations of motion and energy are solved using the modeled form of transport equations for the turbulence kinetic energy and the scalar form of turbulence dissipation with an efficient finite-volume algorithm. The model is applied for available test cases to validate its predictive capabilities for capturing the effects of wall heat transfer. Computational results are compared with experimental data available in the literature. Applications involving the design of projectiles are summarized. Funded in part by U.S. Army, ARDEC.

  3. Flow Dynamic Analysis of Core Shooting Process through Experiment and Multiphase Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changjiang Ni

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Core shooting process is the most widely used technique to make sand cores and it plays an important role in the quality of sand cores as well as the manufacture of complicated castings in metal casting industry. In this paper, the flow behavior of sand particles in the core box was investigated synchronously with transparent core box, high-speed camera, and pressure measuring system. The flow pattern of sand particles in the shooting head of the core shooting machine was reproduced with various colored core sand layers. Taking both kinetic and frictional stress into account, a kinetic-frictional constitutive correlation was established to describe the internal momentum transfer in the solid phase. Two-fluid model (TFM simulations with turbulence model were then performed and good agreement was achieved between the experimental and simulation results on the flow behavior of sand particles in both the shooting head and the core box. Based on the experimental and simulation results, the flow behavior of sand particles in the core box, the formation of “dead zone” in the shooting head, and the effect of drag force were analyzed in terms of sand volume fraction (αs, sand velocity (Vs, and pressure variation (P.

  4. Heat transfer effect of an extended surface in downward-facing subcooled flow boiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Abdul R., E-mail: khan@vis.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Erkan, Nejdet, E-mail: erkan@vis.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Nuclear Professional School, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki, 319-1188 (Japan); Okamoto, Koji, E-mail: okamoto@n.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Nuclear Professional School, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki, 319-1188 (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Compare downward-facing flow boiling results from bare and extended surfaces. • Upstream and downstream temperatures were measured on the extended surface. • Downstream temperatures exceed upstream temperatures for all flow rates. • Bubble accumulation occurs downstream on extended surface. • Extended surface heat transfer lower than bare surface as flow rate reduced. - Abstract: New BWR containment designs are considering cavity flooding as an accident management strategy. Unlike the PWR, the BWR has many Control Rod Guide Tube (CRGT) penetrations in the lower head. During a severe accident scenario with core melt in the lower plenum along with cavity flooding, the penetrations may affect the heat transfer on the ex-vessel surface and disrupt fluid flow during the boiling process. A small-scale experiment was performed to investigate the issues existing in downward-facing boiling phenomenon with an extended surface. The results were compared with a bare (flat) surface. The mass flux of 244 kg/m{sup 2} s, 215 kg/m{sup 2} s, and 177 kg/m{sup 2} s were applied in this study. CHF conditions were observed only for the 177 kg/m{sup 2} s case. The boiling curves for both types of surfaces and all flow rates were obtained. The boiling curves for the highest flow rate showed lower surface temperatures for the extended surface experiments when compared to the bare surface. The downstream location on the extended surface yielded the highest surface temperatures as the flow rate was reduced. The bubble accumulation and low velocity in the wake produced by flow around the extended surface was believed to have caused the elevated temperatures in the downstream location. Although an extended surface may enhance the overall heat transfer, a reduction in the local heat transfer was observed in the current experiments.

  5. On the core and f-nucleolus of flow games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kern, Walter; Paulusma, Daniël

    2009-01-01

    Using the ellipsoid method, both Deng et al. [Deng, X., Q. Fang, X. Sun. 2006. Finding nucleolus of flow game. Proc. 17th ACM-SIAM Sympos. Discrete Algorithms. ACM Press, New York, 124–131] and Potters et al. [Potters, J., H. Reijnierse, A. Biswas. 2006. The nucleolus of balanced simple flow network

  6. On the core and f-nucleolus of flow games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kern, Walter; Paulusma, Daniël

    Using the ellipsoid method, both Deng et al. [Deng, X., Q. Fang, X. Sun. 2006. Finding nucleolus of flow game. Proc. 17th ACM-SIAM Sympos. Discrete Algorithms. ACM Press, New York, 124–131] and Potters et al. [Potters, J., H. Reijnierse, A. Biswas. 2006. The nucleolus of balanced simple flow

  7. Variability modes in core flows inverted from geomagnetic field models

    CERN Document Server

    Pais, Maria A; Schaeffer, Nathanaël

    2014-01-01

    We use flows that we invert from two geomagnetic field models spanning centennial time periods (gufm1 and COV-OBS), and apply Principal Component Analysis and Singular Value Decomposition of coupled fields to extract the main modes characterizing their spatial and temporal variations. The quasi geostrophic flows inverted from both geomagnetic field models show similar features. However, COV-OBS has a less energetic mean flow and larger time variability. The statistical significance of flow components is tested from analyses performed on subareas of the whole domain. Bootstrapping methods are also used to extract robust flow features required by both gufm1 and COV-OBS. Three main empirical circulation modes emerge, simultaneously constrained by both geomagnetic field models and expected to be robust against the particular a priori used to build them. Mode 1 exhibits three large robust vortices at medium/high latitudes, with opposite circulation under the Atlantic and the Pacific hemispheres. Mode 2 interesting...

  8. On Limiting Behavior of Contaminant Transport Models in Coupled Surface and Groundwater Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent J. Ervin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available There has been a surge of work on models for coupling surface-water with groundwater flows which is at its core the Stokes-Darcy problem. The resulting (Stokes-Darcy fluid velocity is important because the flow transports contaminants. The analysis of models including the transport of contaminants has, however, focused on a quasi-static Stokes-Darcy model. Herein we consider the fully evolutionary system including contaminant transport and analyze its quasi-static limits.

  9. Uniform surface polished method of complex holes in abrasive flow machining

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A-Cheng WANG; Lung TSAI; Kuo-Zoo LIANG; Chun-Ho LIU; Shi-Hong WENG

    2009-01-01

    Abrasive flow machining(AFM) is an effective method that can remove the recasting layer produced by wire electrical discharge machining(WEDM). However, the surface roughness will not be easily uniform when a complex hole is polished by this method. CFD numerical method is aided to design good passageways to find the smooth roughness on the complex hole in AFM. Through the present method, it reveals that the shear forces in the polishing process and the flow properties of the medium in AFM play the roles in controlling the roughness on the entire surface. A power law model was firstly set up by utilizing the effect of shear rates on the medium viscosities, and the coefficients of the power law would be found by solving the algebraic equation from the relations between the shear rates and viscosities. Then the velocities, strain rates and shear forces of the medium acting on the surface would be obtained in the constant pressure by CFD software. Finally, the optimal mold core put into the complex hole could be designed after these simulations. The results show that the shear forces and strain rates change sharply on the entire surface if no mold core is inserted into the complex hole, whereas they hardly make any difference when the core shape is similar to the complex hole. Three experimental types of mold core were used. The results demonstrate that the similar shape of the mold core inserted into the hole could find the uniform roughness on the surface.

  10. Investigation on the Core Bypass Flow in a Very High Temperature Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, Yassin

    2013-10-22

    Uncertainties associated with the core bypass flow are some of the key issues that directly influence the coolant mass flow distribution and magnitude, and thus the operational core temperature profiles, in the very high-temperature reactor (VHTR). Designers will attempt to configure the core geometry so the core cooling flow rate magnitude and distribution conform to the design values. The objective of this project is to study the bypass flow both experimentally and computationally. Researchers will develop experimental data using state-of-the-art particle image velocimetry in a small test facility. The team will attempt to obtain full field temperature distribution using racks of thermocouples. The experimental data are intended to benchmark computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes by providing detailed information. These experimental data are urgently needed for validation of the CFD codes. The following are the project tasks: • Construct a small-scale bench-top experiment to resemble the bypass flow between the graphite blocks, varying parameters to address their impact on bypass flow. Wall roughness of the graphite block walls, spacing between the blocks, and temperature of the blocks are some of the parameters to be tested. • Perform CFD to evaluate pre- and post-test calculations and turbulence models, including sensitivity studies to achieve high accuracy. • Develop the state-of-the art large eddy simulation (LES) using appropriate subgrid modeling. • Develop models to be used in systems thermal hydraulics codes to account and estimate the bypass flows. These computer programs include, among others, RELAP3D, MELCOR, GAMMA, and GAS-NET. Actual core bypass flow rate may vary considerably from the design value. Although the uncertainty of the bypass flow rate is not known, some sources have stated that the bypass flow rates in the Fort St. Vrain reactor were between 8 and 25 percent of the total reactor mass flow rate. If bypass flow rates are on the

  11. Large-Scale Flow and Spiral Core Instability in Rayleigh-Benard Convection

    CERN Document Server

    Aranson, I S; Steinberg, V; Tsimring, L S; Aranson, Igor; Assenheimer, Michel; Steinberg, Victor; Tsimring, Lev S.

    1996-01-01

    The spiral core instability, observed in large aspect ratio Rayleigh-Benard convection, is studied numerically in the framework of the Swift-Hohenberg equation coupled to a large-scale flow. It is shown that the instability leads to non-trivial core dynamics and is driven by the self-generated vorticity. Moreover, the recently reported transition from spirals to hexagons near the core is shown to occur only in the presence of a non-variational nonlinearity, and is triggered by the spiral core instability. Qualitative agreement between the simulations and the experiments is demonstrated.

  12. Use of Distribution Devices for Hydraulic Profiling of Coolant Flow in Core Gas-cooled Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Satin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In setting up a reactor plant for the transportation-power module of the megawatt class an important task is to optimize the path of flow, i.e. providing moderate hydraulic resistance, uniform distribution of the coolant. Significant contribution to the hydraulic losses makes one selected design of the coolant supplies. It is, in particular, hemispherical or semi-elliptical shape of the supply reservoir, which is selected to reduce its mass, resulting in the formation of torusshaped vortex in the inlet manifold, that leads to uneven coolant velocity at the inlet into the core, the flow pulsations, hydraulic losses.To control the flow redistribution in the core according to the level of energy are used the switchgear - deflectors installed in a hemispherical reservoir supplying coolant to the fuel elements (FE of the core of gas-cooled reactor. This design solution has an effect on the structure of the flow, rate in the cooling duct, and the flow resistance of the collector.In this paper we present the results of experiments carried out on the gas dynamic model of coolant paths, deflectors, and core, comprising 55 fuel rod simulators. Numerical simulation of flow in two-parameter model, using the k-ε turbulence model, and the software package ANSYS CFX v14.0 is performed. The paper demonstrates that experimental results are in compliance with calculated ones.The results obtained suggest that the use of switchgear ensures a coolant flow balance directly at the core inlet, thereby providing temperature reduction of fuel rods with a uniform power release in the cross-section. Considered options to find constructive solutions for deflectors give an idea to solve the problem of reducing hydraulic losses in the coolant paths, to decrease pulsation components of flow in the core and length of initial section of flow stabilization.

  13. Steady flows at the top of earth's core derived from geomagnetic field models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorhies, Coerte V.

    1986-01-01

    Select models of the main geomagnetic field and its secular variation are extrapolated to the base of an insulating mantle and used to estimate the adjacent fluid motion of a perfectly conducting outer core. The assumption of steady motion provides formally unique solutions and is tested along with that of no upwelling. The hypothesis of no upwelling is found to be substantially worse than that of steady motion. Although the actual motion is not thought to be steady, the large-scale secular variation at the top of the core can be adequately described by a large-scale, combined toroidal-poloidal circulation which is steady for intervals of at least a decade or two. The derived flows include a bulk westward drift but are complicated by superimposed jets, gyres, and surface divergence indicative of vigorous vertical motion at depth. The circulation pattern and key global properties including rms speed, upwelling, and westward drift are found to be fairly insensitive to variations in modeling parameters.

  14. Thermochemical flows couple the Earth's inner core growth to mantle heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, Julien; Amit, Hagay; Hulot, Gauthier; Olson, Peter

    2008-08-07

    Seismic waves sampling the top 100 km of the Earth's inner core reveal that the eastern hemisphere (40 degrees E-180 degrees E) is seismically faster, more isotropic and more attenuating than the western hemisphere. The origin of this hemispherical dichotomy is a challenging problem for our understanding of the Earth as a system of dynamically coupled layers. Previously, laboratory experiments have established that thermal control from the lower mantle can drastically affect fluid flow in the outer core, which in turn can induce textural heterogeneity on the inner core solidification front. The resulting texture should be consistent with other expected manifestations of thermal mantle control on the geodynamo, specifically magnetic flux concentrations in the time-average palaeomagnetic field over the past 5 Myr, and preferred eddy locations in flows imaged below the core-mantle boundary by the analysis of historical geomagnetic secular variation. Here we show that a single model of thermochemical convection and dynamo action can account for all these effects by producing a large-scale, long-term outer core flow that couples the heterogeneity of the inner core with that of the lower mantle. The main feature of this thermochemical 'wind' is a cyclonic circulation below Asia, which concentrates magnetic field on the core-mantle boundary at the observed location and locally agrees with core flow images. This wind also causes anomalously high rates of light element release in the eastern hemisphere of the inner core boundary, suggesting that lateral seismic anomalies at the top of the inner core result from mantle-induced variations in its freezing rate.

  15. Adhesion to model surfaces in a flow through system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habeger, C.F.; Linhart, R.V.; Adair, J.H. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    1995-12-31

    A hydrodynamic method for measuring the adhesion of particles to a surface has been designed. By using hydrodynamic flow to remove particles from a model surface, the adhesive strength of particles to the surface can be measured using a flow-through cell. The hydrodynamic force required to displace a particle is calculated using the cell dimensions and the flow rate in Poiseuille`s equation.

  16. Mars Thermal History: Core, Atmosphere, Mantle, Phobos and Surface (MaTH CAMPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicks, J. K.; Weller, M. B.; Towles, N. J.; Thissen, C.; Knezek, N. R.; Johnston, S.; Hongsresawat, S.; Duncan, M. S.; Black, B. A.; Schmerr, N. C.; Panning, M. P.; Montesi, L.; Manga, M.; Lognonne, P. H.

    2014-12-01

    The death of the Martian dynamo ~4.1 Ga and sustained volcanism throughout Martian history place fundamental constraints on the thermal history of the planet. To explore the implications for mantle structure, we constructed holistic models of Mars that include the core, mantle, lithosphere/surface, atmosphere, and an atmospheric capture of Phobos in a collaborative effort begun at the CIDER 2014 summer program. For our thermal model of the core, we employ an iterative solver and parameterized phase diagram to compute pressure, density, and temperature in the core for a variety of initial accretion temperatures and bulk compositions. We use this model to constrain core-mantle boundary (CMB) temperature and heat flow. We couple this model for the evolution of the core with a one-dimensional parameterized convection model for the mantle. The upper boundary condition is set by the state of the Martian atmosphere. We consider the effect of a distinct compositional layer at the base of the mantle that may represent dense magma ocean crystallization products or a primitive layer untouched by magma ocean processes. We find successful models that allow sufficient CMB heat flow to power an early dynamo and the potential of melt generation through extended periods of Mars' history. In addition to dynamo and magmatism timing, other diagnostics allow us to compare model outputs to modern observables. The mass, moment of inertia, and tidal Love number of our model planet are compared directly to measured values. Additionally, deformation and stress on the lithosphere due to internal volume changes and changes in surface loading predicted by our thermal evolution models could be recorded in the Martian crust. Finally, coupling temperature-dependent tidal dissipation affects Phobos' orbital secular evolution and gives constraint on mantle temperatures. These constraints are discussed for the different scenarios of Phobos capture. We present a suite of models that satisfy the

  17. On the levitation force in horizontal core-annular flow with a large viscosity ratio and small density ratio

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ooms, G.; Pourquie, M.J.B.M.; Beerens, J.C.

    2013-01-01

    A numerical study has been made of horizontal core-annular flow: the flow of a high-viscosity liquid core surrounded by a low-viscosity liquid annular layer through a horizontal pipe. Special attention is paid to the question how the buoyancy force on the core, caused by a density difference between

  18. Viscous flows stretching and shrinking of surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Mehmood, Ahmer

    2017-01-01

    This authored monograph provides a detailed discussion of the boundary layer flow due to a moving plate. The topical focus lies on the 2- and 3-dimensional case, considering axially symmetric and unsteady flows. The author derives a criterion for the self-similar and non-similar flow, and the turbulent flow due to a stretching or shrinking sheet is also discussed. The target audience primarily comprises research experts in the field of boundary layer flow, but the book will also be beneficial for graduate students.

  19. The Kinematics in the Cores of Low Surface Brightness Galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swaters, R. A.; Verheijen, M. A. W.; Bershady, M. A.; Andersen, D. R.; Ryder, S. D.; Pisano, D. J.; Walker, M. A.; Freeman, K. C.

    2004-01-01

    Systematic effects on HI and Hα long-slit observations make a measurement of the inner slope of the dark matter density distribution difficult to determine. Halos with constant density cores and ones with r-1 profiles both appear consistent with the data, although constant density cores generally pr

  20. Cladding defects in hollow core fibers for surface mode suppression and improved birefringence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michieletto, M; Lyngsø, J K; Lægsgaard, J; Bang, O

    2014-09-22

    We demonstrate a novel polarization maintaining hollow-core photonic bandgap fiber geometry that reduces the impact of surface modes on fiber transmission. The cladding structure is modified with a row of partially collapsed holes to strip away unwanted surface modes. A theoretical investigation of the surface mode stripping is presented and compared to the measured performance of four 7-cells core fibers that were drawn with different collapse ratio of the defects. The varying pressure along the defect row in the cladding during drawing introduces an ellipticity of the core. This, combined with the presence of antiresonant features on the core wall, makes the fibers birefringent, with excellent polarization maintaining properties.

  1. Is inner core seismic anisotropy a marker of plastic flow of cubic iron?

    CERN Document Server

    Lincot, A; Cardin, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates whether observations of seismic anisotropy are compatible with a cubic structure of the inner core Fe alloy. We assume that anisotropy is the result of plastic deformation within a large scale flow induced by preferred growth at the inner core equator. Based on elastic moduli from the literature, bcc- or fcc-Fe produce seismic anisotropy well below seismic observations ($\\textless{}0.4\\%$). A Monte-Carlo approach allows us to generalize this result to any form of elastic anisotropy in a cubic system. Within our model, inner core global anisotropy is not compatible with a cubic structure of Fe alloy. Hence, if the inner core material is indeed cubic, large scale coherent anisotropic structures, incompatible with plastic deformation induced by large scale flow, must be present.

  2. An improved continuous flow analysis system for high-resolution field measurements on ice cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Patrik R; Federer, Urs; Hutterli, Manuel A; Bigler, Matthias; Schüpbach, Simon; Ruth, Urs; Schmitt, Jochen; Stocker, Thomas F

    2008-11-01

    Continuous flow analysis (CFA) is a well-established method to obtain information about impurity contents in ice cores as indicators of past changes in the climate system. A section of an ice core is continuously melted on a melter head supplying a sample water flow which is analyzed online. This provides high depth and time resolution of the ice core records and very efficient sample decontamination as only the inner part of the ice sample is analyzed. Here we present an improved CFA system which has been totally redesigned in view of a significantly enhanced overall efficiency and flexibility, signal quality, compactness, and ease of use. These are critical requirements especially for operations of CFA during field campaigns, e.g., in Antarctica or Greenland. Furthermore, a novel deviceto measure the total air content in the ice was developed. Subsequently, the air bubbles are now extracted continuously from the sample water flow for subsequent gas measurements.

  3. Control of skin blood flow, sweating, and heart rate - Role of skin vs. core temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyss, C. R.; Brengelmann, G. L.; Johnson, J. M.; Rowell, L. B.; Niederberger, M.

    1974-01-01

    A study was conducted to generate quantitative expressions for the influence of core temperature, skin temperature, and the rate of change of skin temperature on sweat rate, skin blood flow, and heart rate. A second goal of the study was to determine whether the use of esophageal temperature rather than the right atrial temperature as a measure of core temperature would lead to different conclusions about the control of measured effector variables.

  4. Studies of the Precessing Vortex Core in Swirling Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.O. Vigueras-Zuñiga

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Large scale coherent structures play an important role in the behavior of the combustion regime inside any type ofcombustor stabilized by swirl, with special impact on factors such as flame stability, blow off, emissions and theoccurrence of thermo-acoustic oscillations. Lean premixed combustion is widely used and is known to impact many ofthese factors, causing complex interrelationships with any coherent structure formed. Despite the extensiveexperimentation in this matter, the above phenomena are poorly understood. Numerical simulations have been usedto try to explain the development of different regimes, but their extremely complex nature and lack of time dependentvalidation show varied and debatable results. The precessing vortex core (PVC is a well-known coherent structurewhose development, intensity and occurrence has not been well documented. This paper thus adopts an experimentalapproach to characterize the PVC in a simple swirl burner under combustion conditions so as to reveal the effects ofswirl and other variables on the latter. Aided by a high speed photography (HSP system, the recognition and extentof several different types of PVCs were observed and discussed.

  5. Transient LOFA computations for a VHTR using one-twelfth core flow models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tung, Yu-Hsin, E-mail: touushin@gmail.com [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Ferng, Yuh-Ming, E-mail: ymferng@ess.nthu.edu.tw [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Johnson, Richard W., E-mail: rwjohnson@cableone.net [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Chieng, Ching-Chang, E-mail: ccchieng@cityu.edu.hk [Dept of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Investigation of flow and heat transfer for a 1/12 VHTR core model using CFD. • The high performance computing using ∼531 M sufficient refined mesh. • LOFA transient calculations employ both laminar and turbulence models to characterize natural convection. • The comparisons with small models suggest the need of large flow model. - Abstract: A prismatic gas-cooled very high temperature reactor (VHTR) is being developed under the next generation nuclear program. One of the concerns for the reactor design is the effects of a loss of flow accident (LOFA) where the coolant circulators are lost for some reason, causing a loss of forced coolant flow through the core. In the previous studies, the natural circulation in the whole reactor vessel (RV) was obtained by segmentation strategies if the computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis with a sufficiently refined mesh was conducted, due to the limits of computer capability. The computational domains in the previous studies were segmented sections which were small flow region models, such as 1/12 sectors, or a combination of a few number of the 1/12 sector (ranging from 2 to 15) using geometric symmetry, for a full dome region. The present paper investigates the flow and heat transfer for a much larger flow region model, a 1/12 core model, using high performance computing. The computation meshes for 1/12 sector and 1/12 reactor core are of 7.8 M and ∼531 M, respectively. Over 85,000 and 35,000 iterations for steady and transient (100 s) calculations are required to achieve convergence, respectively. ∼0.1 min CPU time was required using 192 computer cores for the 1/12 sector model and ∼1.3 min CPU time using 768 cores in parallel for the 1/12 core model, for every iteration, using ALPS, Advanced Large-scale Parallel Superclusters. For the LOFA transient condition, this study employs both laminar flow and different turbulence models to characterize the phenomenon of natural convection. The

  6. Can We Tell the Inner Core Size and the Heat Flow Pattern inside a Planet from the Observed Magnetic Field?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, H.; Russell, C. T.; Wicht, J.; Christensen, U. R.

    2012-09-01

    Several distinct features of Saturn's magnetic field have been revealed in a recent study based on in-situ magnetic field measurements made by the Cassini spacecraft [1]. The field at the dynamo surface is found to be strongly concentrated near the spin-poles with little hemispherical asymmetry. This field geometry corresponds to a zig-zag shape magnetic spectrum with pronounced odd degree terms and all odd degree magnetic moments possess the same sign ( , and all be positive in this case). This is in contrast to the field properties at the outer core surface of the Earth, where the field near the spinpoles is at a relative minimum compared to field at mid-latitude (see Fig. 1). An anticyclonic polar vortex with upwelling flow inside the tangent cylinder (the tangent cylinder is an imaginary cylinder parallel to the spin axis and tangent to the inner core surface at the equator) has been inferred at the Earth's core surface from geomagnetic secular variation analyses [2]. The associated advective transport of magnetic field is like responsible for the typical minimum or inverse geomagnetic field at high latitudes and the pronounced flux patches at midlatitudes. This feature is also frequently found in convectively driven geodynamo models [3].

  7. Inelastic non-Newtonian flow over heterogeneously slippery surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haase, A. Sander; Wood, Jeffery A.; Sprakel, Lisette M.J.; Lammertink, Rob G.H.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we investigated inelastic non-Newtonian fluid flow over heterogeneously slippery surfaces. First, we simulated the flow of aqueous xanthan gum solutions over a bubble mattress, which is a superhydrophobic surface consisting of transversely positioned no-slip walls and no-shear gas bub

  8. Investigation of Abnormal Heat Transfer and Flow in a VHTR Reactor Core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawaji, Masahiro [City College of New York, NY (United States); Valentin, Francisco I. [City College of New York, NY (United States); Artoun, Narbeh [City College of New York, NY (United States); Banerjee, Sanjoy [City College of New York, NY (United States); Sohal, Manohar [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Schultz, Richard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); McEligot, Donald M. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-12-21

    The main objective of this project was to identify and characterize the conditions under which abnormal heat transfer phenomena would occur in a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) with a prismatic core. High pressure/high temperature experiments have been conducted to obtain data that could be used for validation of VHTR design and safety analysis codes. The focus of these experiments was on the generation of benchmark data for design and off-design heat transfer for forced, mixed and natural circulation in a VHTR core. In particular, a flow laminarization phenomenon was intensely investigated since it could give rise to hot spots in the VHTR core.

  9. Deconvolution-based resolution enhancement of chemical ice core records obtained by continuous flow analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Sune Olander; Andersen, Katrine K.; Johnsen, Sigfus Johann

    2005-01-01

    Continuous flow analysis (CFA) has become a popular measuring technique for obtaining high-resolution chemical ice core records due to an attractive combination of measuring speed and resolution. However, when analyzing the deeper sections of ice cores or cores from low-accumulation areas......, there is still need for further improvement of the resolution. Here a method for resolution enhancement of CFA data is presented. It is demonstrated that it is possible to improve the resolution of CFA data by restoring some of the detail that was lost in the measuring process, thus improving the usefulness...

  10. Flux-flow resistivity in UPt3: Evidence for nonsingular vortex-core structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lütke-Entrup, N.; Blaauwgeers, R.; Plaçais, B.; Huxley, A.; Kambe, S.; Krusius, M.; Mathieu, P.; Simon, Y.

    2001-07-01

    We have investigated the core structure of B-phase vortex lines in two clean UPt3 crystals, using flux-flow dissipation as the probe. The flux-flow resistivity is determined from the skin depth of the high-frequency oscillations of the vortex lines in the pinned state. With Ĥ⊥ĉ, our data agree with the previously established scaling law of the moderately clean limit with anisotropic gap. When Ĥ||ĉ, the resistivity is three times larger. We interpret this increase as evidence for a vortex-core structure with two length scales, as predicted for UPt3 with a two-component order parameter.

  11. Dynamics and Instabilities of Free Surface and Vortex Flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tophøj, Laust Emil Hjerrild

    2012-01-01

    This PhD thesis consists of two main parts. The first part describes the dynamics of an ideal fluid on a stationary free surface of a given shape. It turns out that one can formulate a set of self-contained equations of momentum conservation for the tangential flow, with no reference to the flow...... of the fluid bulk. With these equations, one can in principle predict the surface flow on a given free surface, once its shape has been measured. The equations are expressed for a general surface using Riemannian geometry and their solutions are discussed, including some difficulties that may arise...

  12. Using the UM dynamical cores to reproduce idealised 3D flows

    CERN Document Server

    Mayne, N J; Acreman, David M; Smith, Chris; Wood, Nigel; Amundsen, David Skålid; Thuburn, John; Jackson, David R

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate that both the current (New Dynamics), and next generation (ENDGame) dynamical cores of the UK Met Office global circulation model, the UM, reproduce consistently, the long-term, large-scale flows found in several published idealised tests. The cases presented are the Held-Suarez test, a simplified model of Earth (including a stratosphere), and a hypothetical tidally locked Earth. Furthermore, we show that using simplifications to the dynamical equations, which are expected to be justified for the physical domains and flow regimes we have studied, and which are supported by the ENDGame dynamical core, also produces matching long-term, large-scale flows. Finally, we present evidence for differences in the detail of the planetary flows and circulations resulting from improvements in the ENDGame formulation over New Dynamics.

  13. Self-assembled core-polyethylene glycol-lipid shell nanoparticles demonstrate high stability in shear flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zhiqiang; Ye, Huilin; Kröger, Martin; Li, Ying

    2017-05-24

    A core-polyethylene glycol-lipid shell (CPLS) nanoparticle consists of an inorganic core coated with polyethylene glycol (PEG) polymers, surrounded by a lipid bilayer shell. It can be self-assembled from a PEGylated core with surface-tethered PEG chains, where all the distal ends are covalently bonded to lipid molecules. Upon adding free lipids, a complete lipid bilayer shell can be formed on the surface driven by the hydrophobic nature of lipid tails, leading to the formation of a CPLS nanoparticle. The stability of CPLS nanoparticles in shear flow has been systematically studied through large scale dissipative particle dynamics simulations. CPLS nanoparticles demonstrate higher stability and less deformation in shear flow, compared with lipid vesicles. Burst leakage of drug molecules inside lipid vesicles and CPLS NPs can be induced by the large pores at their tips. These pores are initiated by the maximum stress in the waist region. It further grows along with the tank-treading motion of vesicles or CPLS NPs in shear flow. However, due to the constraints applied by PEG polymers, CPLS NPs are less deformed than vesicles with comparable size under the same flow conditions. Thus, the less deformed CPLS NPs express a smaller maximum stress at waists, demonstrating higher stability. Pore formation at waists, evolving into large pores on vesicles, leads to the burst leakage of drug molecules and complete rupture of vesicles. In contrast, although similar drug leakage in CPLS nanoparticles can occur at high shear rates, pores initiated at moderate shear rates tend to be short-lived and close due to the constraints mediated by PEG polymers. This kind of 'self-healing' capability can be observed over a wide range of shear rates for CPLS nanoparticles. Our results suggest self-assembled CPLS nanoparticles to exhibit high stability during blood circulation without rapid drug leakage. These features make CPLS nanoparticles candidates for a promising drug delivery platform.

  14. Hydrodynamics of the free surface flow in Pelton turbine buckets

    OpenAIRE

    Perrig, Alexandre; Avellan, François; Farhat, Mohamed

    2008-01-01

    The design of Pelton turbines has always been more difficult than that of reaction turbines, and their performances lower. Indeed, the Pelton turbines combine 4 types of flows: (i) confined, steady-state flow in the piping systems and injector, (ii) free water jets, (iii) 3D unsteady free surface flows in the buckets, and (iv) dispersed 2-phase flows in the casing. The flow in Pelton turbines has not been analyzed so far with such detail as the flow in the reaction turbines, thus the understa...

  15. Hydrodynamics of the free surface flow in Pelton turbine buckets

    OpenAIRE

    Perrig, Alexandre

    2007-01-01

    The design of Pelton turbines has always been more difficult than that of reaction turbines, and their performances lower. Indeed, the Pelton turbines combine 4 types of flows: (i) confined, steady-state flow in the piping systems and injector, (ii) free water jets, (iii) 3D unsteady free surface flows in the buckets, and (iv) dispersed 2-phase flows in the casing. The flow in Pelton turbines has not been analyzed so far with such detail as the flow in the reaction turbines, thus the understa...

  16. Tackling OpenFlow power hog in core networks with KeyFlow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saldaña Cercos, Silvia; Oliveira, R. E.; Vitoi, R.

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive data plane power consumption analysis of an OpenFlow 1.0 switch broken down into its design modules is presented, and KeyFlow as an alternative solution is proposed, since it eliminates a flow table lookup by reducing 53.7% of the overall power consumption....

  17. Ricci flow on Kaehler-Einstein surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Xiuxiong; Tian, Gang

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, we construct a set of new functionals of Ricci curvature on any Kaehler manifolds which are invariant under holomorphic transfermations in Kaehler Einstein manifolds and essentially decreasing under the Kaehler Ricci flow. Moreover, if the initial metric has non-negative bisectional curvature, using Tian's inequality, we can prove that each of the functionals has uniform lower bound along the flow which gives a set of integral estimates on curvature. Using this set of integral ...

  18. Simulant-material experimental investigation of flow dynamics in the CRBR Upper-Core Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilhelm, D.; Starkovich, V.S.; Chapyak, E.J.

    1982-09-01

    The results of a simulant-material experimental investigation of flow dynamics in the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) Upper Core Structure are described. The methodology used to design the experimental apparatus and select test conditions is detailed. Numerous comparisons between experimental data and SIMMER-II Code calculations are presented with both advantages and limitations of the SIMMER modeling features identified.

  19. Numerical simulations of leading-edge vortex core axial velocity for flow over delta wings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Numerical simulations have been performed to investigate the characteristics of leading-edge vortex core axial velocity over two delta wings with leading edge swept angles Λ =50°and 76°, respectively. It is obtained that Reynolds number has the most important effect on the axial velocity of the primary leading-edge vortex core. At Reynolds numbers larger than 105, the jet-like flow of the vortex core is the most common type for both the large and the moderate swept delta wings. While if Reynolds number decreases to 103―104, the core axial velocity distributions for these two delta wings present the wake-like profile for all angles of attack considered in the present investigation.

  20. Cladding defects in hollow core fibers for surface mode suppression and improved birefringence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michieletto, Mattia; Lyngso, J. K.; Lægsgaard, Jesper;

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel polarization maintaining hollow-core photonic bandgap fiber geometry that reduces the impact of surface modes on fiber transmission. The cladding structure is modified with a row of partially collapsed holes to strip away unwanted surface modes. A theoretical investigation...... of the surface mode stripping is presented and compared to the measured performance of four 7-cells core fibers that were drawn with different collapse ratio of the defects. The varying pressure along the defect row in the cladding during drawing introduces an ellipticity of the core. This, combined...

  1. Core-annular miscible two-fluid flow in a slippery pipe: A stability analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Geetanjali; Usha, Ranganathan; Sahu, Kirti Chandra

    2017-09-01

    This study is motivated by the preliminary direct numerical simulations in double-diffusive (DD) core-annular flows with slip at the wall which displayed elliptical shaped instability patterns as in a rigid pipe case; however, slip at the pipe wall delays the onset of instability for a range of parameters and increases the phase speed. This increased our curiosity to have a thorough understanding of the linear stability characteristics of the miscible DD two-fluid flow in a pipe with slip at the pipe wall. The present study, therefore, addresses the linear stability of viscosity-stratified core-annular Poiseuille flow of miscible fluids with matched density in a slippery pipe in the presence of two scalars diffusing at different rates. The physical mechanisms responsible for the occurrence of instabilities in the DD system are explained through an energy budget analysis. The differences and similarities between core-annular flow in a slippery pipe and in a plane channel with velocity slip at the walls are explored. The stability characteristics are significantly affected by the presence of slip. The diffusivity effect is non-monotonic in a DD system. A striking feature of instability is that only a band of wavenumbers is destabilized in the presence of moderate to large inertial effects. Both the longwave and shortwave are stabilized at small Reynolds numbers. Slip exhibits a dual role of stabilizing or destabilizing the flow. The preliminary direct numerical simulations confirm the predictions of the linear stability analysis. The present study reveals that it may be possible to control the instabilities in core-annular pressure driven pipe flows by imposing a velocity slip at the walls.

  2. Parametric Study of Flow Patterns behind the Standing Accretion Shock Wave for Core-Collapse Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Iwakami, Wakana; Yamada, Shoichi

    2013-01-01

    The systematic research of flow patterns behind the accretion shock wave is conducted using three-dimensional hydrodynamics simulations for core-collapse supernovae in this study. Changing the accretion rate and neutrino luminosity, the steady solutions of the one-dimensional irrotational accretion flow passing through the spherical shock wave are evolved by imposing a random perturbation with 1% amplitude at the onset of the simulations. Depending on the accretion rate and neutrino luminosity, various flow patterns appear behind the shock wave. We classified them into the three fundamental flow patterns: (1) sloshing motion, (2) spiral motion, (3) multiple high-entropy bubbles, and the two anomalous flow patterns: (4) spiral motion with buoyant bubbles, and (5) spiral motion with pulsating rotational velocity. The sloshing and spiral motions tend to be dominant in the higher accretion rate and lower neutrino luminosity, and the generations of multiple buoyant bubbles tend to prevail in the lower accretion ra...

  3. Deep layer-resolved core-level shifts in the beryllium surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldén, Magnus; Skriver, Hans Lomholt; Johansson, Börje

    1993-01-01

    Core-level energy shifts for the beryllium surface region are calculated by means of a Green’s function technique within the tight-binding linear muffin-tin orbitals method. Both initial- and final-state effects in the core-ionization process are fully accounted for. Anomalously large energy shifts...

  4. Capillary flow of solder on chemically roughened PWB surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosking, F.M.; Stevenson, J.O.; Yost, F.G.

    1996-02-01

    The Center for Solder Science and Technology at Sandia National Laboratories has developed a solderability test for evaluating fundamental solder flow over PWB (printed wiring boards) surface finishes. The work supports a cooperative research and development agreement between Sandia, the National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS), and several industrial partners. An important facet of the effort involved the ``engineering`` of copper surfaces through mechanical and chemical roughening. The roughened topography enhances solder flow, especially over very fine features. In this paper, we describe how etching with different chemical solutions can affect solder flow on a specially designed ball grid array test vehicle (BGATV). The effects of circuit geometry, solution concentration, and etching time are discussed. Surface roughness and solder flow data are presented to support the roughening premise. Noticeable improvements in solder wettability were observed on uniformly etched surfaces having relatively steep peak-to-valley slopes.

  5. Lagrangian Transport Through Surfaces in Volume-Preserving Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Karrasch, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Advective transport of scalar quantities through surfaces is of fundamental importance in many scientific applications. From the Eulerian perspective of the surface it can be quantified by the well-known integral of the flux density. The recent development of highly accurate semi-Lagrangian methods for solving scalar conservation laws and of Lagrangian approaches to coherent structures in turbulent (geophysical) fluid flows necessitate a new approach to transport from the (Lagrangian) material perspective. We present a Lagrangian framework for calculating transport of conserved quantities through a given surface in $n$-dimensional, fully aperiodic, volume-preserving flows. Our approach does not involve any dynamical assumptions on the surface or its boundary.

  6. Free-Surface Viscous Flow Solution Methods for Ship Hydrodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    WACKERS, Jeroen; Koren, Barry; Raven, H.C.; Van Der Ploeg,, Atze; Starke, A.R.; Deng, G.B.; Queutey, P.; VISONNEAU, Michel; Hino, T.; Ohashi, K

    2011-01-01

    The simulation of viscous free-surface water flow is a subject that has reached a certain maturity and is nowadays used in industrial applications, like the simulation of the flow around ships. While almost all methods used are based on the Navier-Stokes equations, the discretisation methods for the water surface differ widely. Many of these highly different methods are being used with success. We review three of these methods, by describing in detail their implementation in one particular co...

  7. Free-Surface Viscous Flow Solution Methods for Ship Hydrodynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wackers, J.; Koren, B.; Raven, H.C.; Ploeg, A. van der; Starke, A.R.; Deng, G.B.; Queutey, P.; Visonneau, M.; Hino, T.; Ohashi, K.

    2011-01-01

    The simulation of viscous free-surface water flow is a subject that has reached a certain maturity and is nowadays used in industrial applications, like the simulation of the flow around ships. While almost all methods used are based on the Navier-Stokes equations, the discretisation methods for the

  8. Rewetting and Flow Film Boiling Along Hot Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王补宣Thermal Engineering Department; Tsinghua University; Beijing 100084; PRC; 彭晓峰

    1994-01-01

    The recent investigations on the rewettmg and film boiling of liquid flowing along a hot/heated surface are briefly reviewed and discussed.Some advanced theoretical analyses are conducted and new conclusions achieved.These investigations describe the fundamental characteristics of liquid flow boiling and further the complicated rewetting phenomena,and have resulted in considerable insight intothe mechanism.

  9. A High-Resolution Continuous Flow Analysis System for Polar Ice Cores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dallmayr, Remi; Goto-Azuma, Kumiko; Kjær, Helle Astrid;

    2016-01-01

    of Polar Research (NIPR) in Tokyo. The system allows the continuous analysis of stable water isotopes and electrical conductivity, as well as the collection of discrete samples from both inner and outer parts of the core. This CFA system was designed to have sufficiently high temporal resolution to detect......In recent decades, the development of continuous flow analysis (CFA) technology for ice core analysis has enabled greater sample throughput and greater depth resolution compared with the classic discrete sampling technique. We developed the first Japanese CFA system at the National Institute...

  10. Optimization of High-Resolution Continuous Flow Analysis for Transient Climate Signals in Ice Cores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bigler, Matthias; Svensson, Anders; Kettner, Ernesto

    2011-01-01

    Over the past two decades, continuous flow analysis (CFA) systems have been refined and widely used to measure aerosol constituents in polar and alpine ice cores in very high-depth resolution. Here we present a newly designed system consisting of sodium, ammonium, dust particles, and electrolytic...... meltwater conductivity detection modules. The system is optimized for high- resolution determination of transient signals in thin layers of deep polar ice cores. Based on standard measurements and by comparing sections of early Holocene and glacial ice from Greenland, we find that the new system features...

  11. A Massive, Cooling-Flow-Induced Starburst in the Core of a Highly Luminous Galaxy Cluster

    CERN Document Server

    McDonald, M; Benson, B A; Foley, R J; Ruel, J; Sullivan, P; Veilleux, S; Aird, K A; Ashby, M L N; Bautz, M; Bazin, G; Bleem, L E; Brodwin, M; Carlstrom, J E; Chang, C L; Cho, H M; Clocchiatti, A; Crawford, T M; Crites, A T; de Haan, T; Desai, S; Dobbs, M A; Dudley, J P; Egami, E; Forman, W R; Garmire, G P; George, E M; Gladders, M D; Gonzalez, A H; Halverson, N W; Harrington, N L; High, F W; Holder, G P; Holzapfel, W L; Hoover, S; Hrubes, J D; Jones, C; Joy, M; Keisler, R; Knox, L; Lee, A T; Leitch, E M; Lieu, J; Lueker, M; Luong-Van, D; Mantz, A; Marrone, D P; McMahon, J J; Mehl, J; Meyer, S S; Miller, E D; Mocanu, L; Mohr, J J; Montroy, T E; Murray, S S; Natoli, T; Padin, S; Plagge, T; Pryke, C; Rawle, T D; Reichardt, C L; Rest, A; Rex, M; Ruhl, J E; Saliwanchik, B R; Saro, A; Sayre, J T; Schaffer, K K; Shaw, L; Shirokoff, E; Simcoe, R; Song, J; Spieler, H G; Stalder, B; Staniszewski, Z; Stark, A A; Story, K; Stubbs, C W; Suhada, R; van Engelen, A; Vanderlinde, K; Vieira, J D; Vikhlinin, A; Williamson, R; Zahn, O; Zenteno, A

    2012-01-01

    In the cores of some galaxy clusters the hot intracluster plasma is dense enough that it should cool radiatively in the cluster's lifetime, leading to continuous "cooling flows" of gas sinking towards the cluster center, yet no such cooling flow has been observed. The low observed star formation rates and cool gas masses for these "cool core" clusters suggest that much of the cooling must be offset by astrophysical feedback to prevent the formation of a runaway cooling flow. Here we report X-ray, optical, and infrared observations of the galaxy cluster SPT-CLJ2344-4243 at z = 0.596. These observations reveal an exceptionally luminous (L_2-10 keV = 8.2 x 10^45 erg/s) galaxy cluster which hosts an extremely strong cooling flow (dM/dt = 3820 +/- 530 Msun/yr). Further, the central galaxy in this cluster appears to be experiencing a massive starburst (740 +/- 160 Msun/yr), which suggests that the feedback source responsible for preventing runaway cooling in nearby cool core clusters may not yet be fully establishe...

  12. Integrated Surface/subsurface flow modeling in PFLOTRAN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Painter, Scott L [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Understanding soil water, groundwater, and shallow surface water dynamics as an integrated hydrological system is critical for understanding the Earth’s critical zone, the thin outer layer at our planet’s surface where vegetation, soil, rock, and gases interact to regulate the environment. Computational tools that take this view of soil moisture and shallow surface flows as a single integrated system are typically referred to as integrated surface/subsurface hydrology models. We extend the open-source, highly parallel, subsurface flow and reactive transport simulator PFLOTRAN to accommodate surface flows. In contrast to most previous implementations, we do not represent a distinct surface system. Instead, the vertical gradient in hydraulic head at the land surface is neglected, which allows the surface flow system to be eliminated and incorporated directly into the subsurface system. This tight coupling approach leads to a robust capability and also greatly simplifies implementation in existing subsurface simulators such as PFLOTRAN. Successful comparisons to independent numerical solutions build confidence in the approximation and implementation. Example simulations of the Walker Branch and East Fork Poplar Creek watersheds near Oak Ridge, Tennessee demonstrate the robustness of the approach in geometrically complex applications. The lack of a robust integrated surface/subsurface hydrology capability had been a barrier to PFLOTRAN’s use in critical zone studies. This work addresses that capability gap, thus enabling PFLOTRAN as a community platform for building integrated models of the critical zone.

  13. CoreFlow: a computational platform for integration, analysis and modeling of complex biological data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasculescu, Adrian; Schoof, Erwin M; Creixell, Pau; Zheng, Yong; Olhovsky, Marina; Tian, Ruijun; So, Jonathan; Vanderlaan, Rachel D; Pawson, Tony; Linding, Rune; Colwill, Karen

    2014-04-04

    A major challenge in mass spectrometry and other large-scale applications is how to handle, integrate, and model the data that is produced. Given the speed at which technology advances and the need to keep pace with biological experiments, we designed a computational platform, CoreFlow, which provides programmers with a framework to manage data in real-time. It allows users to upload data into a relational database (MySQL), and to create custom scripts in high-level languages such as R, Python, or Perl for processing, correcting and modeling this data. CoreFlow organizes these scripts into project-specific pipelines, tracks interdependencies between related tasks, and enables the generation of summary reports as well as publication-quality images. As a result, the gap between experimental and computational components of a typical large-scale biology project is reduced, decreasing the time between data generation, analysis and manuscript writing. CoreFlow is being released to the scientific community as an open-sourced software package complete with proteomics-specific examples, which include corrections for incomplete isotopic labeling of peptides (SILAC) or arginine-to-proline conversion, and modeling of multiple/selected reaction monitoring (MRM/SRM) results. CoreFlow was purposely designed as an environment for programmers to rapidly perform data analysis. These analyses are assembled into project-specific workflows that are readily shared with biologists to guide the next stages of experimentation. Its simple yet powerful interface provides a structure where scripts can be written and tested virtually simultaneously to shorten the life cycle of code development for a particular task. The scripts are exposed at every step so that a user can quickly see the relationships between the data, the assumptions that have been made, and the manipulations that have been performed. Since the scripts use commonly available programming languages, they can easily be

  14. The Influence of Slope Breaks on Lava Flow Surface Disruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaze, Lori S.; Baloga, Stephen M.; Fagents, Sarah A.; Wright, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Changes in the underlying slope of a lava flow impart a significant fraction of rotational energy beyond the slope break. The eddies, circulation and vortices caused by this rotational energy can disrupt the flow surface, having a significant impact on heat loss and thus the distance the flow can travel. A basic mechanics model is used to compute the rotational energy caused by a slope change. The gain in rotational energy is deposited into an eddy of radius R whose energy is dissipated as it travels downstream. A model of eddy friction with the ambient lava is used to compute the time-rate of energy dissipation. The key parameter of the dissipation rate is shown to be rho R(sup 2/)mu, where ? is the lava density and mu is the viscosity, which can vary by orders of magnitude for different flows. The potential spatial disruption of the lava flow surface is investigated by introducing steady-state models for the main flow beyond the steepening slope break. One model applies to slow-moving flows with both gravity and pressure as the driving forces. The other model applies to fast-moving, low-viscosity, turbulent flows. These models provide the flow velocity that establishes the downstream transport distance of disrupting eddies before they dissipate. The potential influence of slope breaks is discussed in connection with field studies of lava flows from the 1801 Hualalai and 1823 Keaiwa Kilauea, Hawaii, and 2004 Etna eruptions.

  15. On effect of precession-induced flows in the liquid core for early Earth's history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Shalimov

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Secondary and tertiary flow patterns seen in experiments simulating flow in the Earth's liquid core induced by luni-solar precession of the solid mantle (Vanyo et al., 1995 hint at the development of non-axisymmetric columnar periodic structures. A simple interpretation of the structure formation is presented in a hydrodynamic approach. It is suggested that if similar flow patterns can occur in the Earth's liquid core enclosed into precessing and rotating mantle then kinematic of the flows may be regarded as a possible geodynamo mechanism for early Earth's history (before the solid core formation.

  16. Tracer injection techniques in flowing surface water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wörman, A.

    2009-04-01

    Residence time distributions for flowing water and reactive matter are commonly used integrated properties of the transport process for determining technical issues of water resource management and in eco-hydrological science. Two general issues for tracer techniques are that the concentration-vs-time relation following a tracer injection (the breakthrough curve) gives unique transport information in different parts of the curve and separation of hydromechanical and reactive mechanisms often require simultaneous tracer injections. This presentation discusses evaluation methods for simultaneous tracer injections based on examples of tracer experiments in small rivers, streams and wetlands. Tritiated water is used as a practically inert substance to reflect the actual hydrodynamics, but other involved tracers are Cr(III)-51, P-32 and N-15. Hydromechanical, in-stream dispersion is reflected as a symmetrical spreading of the spatial concentration distribution. This requires that the transport distance over water depth is larger than about five times the flow Peclet number. Transversal retention of both inert and reactive solutes is reflected in terms of the tail of the breakthrough curve. Especially, reactive solutes can have a substantial magnification of the tailing behaviour depending on reaction rates or partitioning coefficients. To accurately discriminate between the effects of reactions and hydromechanical mixing its is relevant to use simultaneous injections of inert and reactive tracers with a sequential or integrated evaluation procedure. As an example, the slope of the P-32 tailing is consistently smaller than that of a simultaneous tritium injection in Ekeby wetland, Eskilstuna. The same applies to N-15 injected in the same experiment, but nitrogen is affected also by a systematic loss due to denitrification. Uptake in stream-bed sediments can be caused by a pumping effect arising when a variable pressure field is created on the stream bottom due to bed

  17. Wetting and free surface flow modeling for potting and encapsulation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooks, Carlton, F.; Brooks, Michael J. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Graham, Alan Lyman (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Noble, David F. (David Frederick) (.; )); Notz, Patrick K.; Hopkins, Matthew Morgan; Castaneda, Jaime N.; Mahoney, Leo James (Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, MO); Baer, Thomas A.; Berchtold, Kathryn (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Adolf, Douglas Brian; Wilkes, Edward Dean; Rao, Rekha Ranjana; Givler, Richard C.; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Cote, Raymond O.; Mondy, Lisa Ann; Grillet, Anne Mary; Kraynik, Andrew Michael

    2007-06-01

    As part of an effort to reduce costs and improve quality control in encapsulation and potting processes the Technology Initiative Project ''Defect Free Manufacturing and Assembly'' has completed a computational modeling study of flows representative of those seen in these processes. Flow solutions are obtained using a coupled, finite-element-based, numerical method based on the GOMA/ARIA suite of Sandia flow solvers. The evolution of the free surface is solved with an advanced level set algorithm. This approach incorporates novel methods for representing surface tension and wetting forces that affect the evolution of the free surface. In addition, two commercially available codes, ProCAST and MOLDFLOW, are also used on geometries representing encapsulation processes at the Kansas City Plant. Visual observations of the flow in several geometries are recorded in the laboratory and compared to the models. Wetting properties for the materials in these experiments are measured using a unique flowthrough goniometer.

  18. Effects of Surface Emitting and Cumulative Collisions on Elliptic Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jian-Li; WU Feng-Juan; ZHANG Jing-Bo; TANG Gui-Xin; HUO Lei

    2008-01-01

    @@ The integral and differential elliptic flow of partons is calculated using the multiphase transport model for Au+Au collisions at centre-of-mass energy √SNN=200 GeV.It is shown that elliptic flow of partons freezing out at early time,which is affected mainly by surface emittance,decreases with time and elliptic flow of partons freezing out at late time,which is dominated by cumulative collisions,increases with time.The elliptic flow of partons freezing out early has a large contribution to the flatting of curve of final differential elliptic flow at large transverse momentum.It is argued that the effect of surface emittance is not neglectable.

  19. Flow condensation on copper-based nanotextured superhydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torresin, Daniele; Tiwari, Manish K; Del Col, Davide; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2013-01-15

    Superhydrophobic surfaces have shown excellent ability to promote dropwise condensation with high droplet mobility, leading to enhanced surface thermal transport. To date, however, it is unclear how superhydrophobic surfaces would perform under the stringent flow condensation conditions of saturated vapor at high temperature, which can affect superhydrophobicity. Here, we investigate this issue employing "all-copper" superhydrophobic surfaces with controlled nanostructuring for minimal thermal resistance. Flow condensation tests performed with saturated vapor at a high temperature (110 °C) showed the condensing drops penetrate the surface texture (i.e., attain the Wenzel state with lower droplet mobility). At the same time, the vapor shear helped ameliorate the mobility and enhanced the thermal transport. At the high end of the examined vapor velocity range, a heat flux of ~600 kW m(-2) was measured at 10 K subcooling and 18 m s(-1) vapor velocity. This clearly highlights the excellent potential of a nanostructured superhydrophobic surface in flow condensation applications. The surfaces sustained dropwise condensation and vapor shear for five days, following which mechanical degradation caused a transition to filmwise condensation. Overall, our results underscore the need to investigate superhydrophobic surfaces under stringent and realistic flow condensation conditions before drawing conclusions regarding their performance in practically relevant condensation applications.

  20. Mechanism and numerical analysis of heat transfer enhancement in the core flow along a tube

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The present study introduces the principles of enhanced heat transfer in the core flow to form an equivalent thermal boundary layer in the fully developed laminar tube flow, which consequently enlarges the temperature gradient of the fluid near the tube wall, and thereby enhances the heat transfer between the fluid and the tube wall. At the same time, the increase of flow resistance in the tube is not so obvious. Mechanism analysis and numerical calculation based on air and water have been carried out to verify the principle and method presented in this paper, which may bring positive effects to the design of heat exchanger with high heat transfer efficiency and low flow resistance.

  1. Slit-surface electrospinning: a novel process developed for high-throughput fabrication of core-sheath fibers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuri Yan

    Full Text Available In this work, we report on the development of slit-surface electrospinning--a process that co-localizes two solutions along a slit surface to spontaneously emit multiple core-sheath cone-jets at rates of up to 1 L/h. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that production of electrospun core-sheath fibers has been scaled to this magnitude. Fibers produced in this study were defect-free (i.e. non-beaded and core-sheath geometry was visually confirmed under scanning electron microscopy. The versatility of our system was demonstrated by fabrication of (1 fibers encapsulating a drug, (2 bicomponent fibers, (3 hollow fibers, and (4 fibers from a polymer that is not normally electrospinnable. Additionally, we demonstrate control of the process by modulating parameters such as flow rate, solution viscosity, and fixture design. The technological achievements demonstrated in this work significantly advance core-sheath electrospinning towards commercial and manufacturing viability.

  2. Optimization of high-resolution continuous flow analysis for transient climate signals in ice cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigler, Matthias; Svensson, Anders; Kettner, Ernesto; Vallelonga, Paul; Nielsen, Maibritt E; Steffensen, Jørgen Peder

    2011-05-15

    Over the past two decades, continuous flow analysis (CFA) systems have been refined and widely used to measure aerosol constituents in polar and alpine ice cores in very high-depth resolution. Here we present a newly designed system consisting of sodium, ammonium, dust particles, and electrolytic meltwater conductivity detection modules. The system is optimized for high-resolution determination of transient signals in thin layers of deep polar ice cores. Based on standard measurements and by comparing sections of early Holocene and glacial ice from Greenland, we find that the new system features a depth resolution in the ice of a few millimeters which is considerably better than other CFA systems. Thus, the new system can resolve ice strata down to 10 mm thickness and has the potential of identifying annual layers in both Greenland and Antarctic ice cores throughout the last glacial cycle.

  3. CoreFlow: A computational platform for integration, analysis and modeling of complex biological data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pasculescu, Adrian; Schoof, Erwin; Creixell, Pau

    2014-01-01

    between data generation, analysis and manuscript writing. CoreFlow is being released to the scientific community as an open-sourced software package complete with proteomics-specific examples, which include corrections for incomplete isotopic labeling of peptides (SILAC) or arginine-to-proline conversion...... provides programmers with a framework to manage data in real-time. It allows users to upload data into a relational database (MySQL), and to create custom scripts in high-level languages such as R, Python, or Perl for processing, correcting and modeling this data. CoreFlow organizes these scripts...... into project-specific pipelines, tracks interdependencies between related tasks, and enables the generation of summary reports as well as publication-quality images. As a result, the gap between experimental and computational components of a typical large-scale biology project is reduced, decreasing the time...

  4. Surface Forces on a Deforming Ellipsoid in Shear Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Kightley, E P; Evans, J A; Bortz, D M

    2016-01-01

    We present a model for computing the surface force density on a fluid ellipsoid in simple shear flow, which we derive by coupling existing models for the shape of a fluid droplet and the surface force density on a solid ellipsoid. The primary contribution of this coupling is to develop a method to compute the force acting against a plane intersecting the ellipsoid, which we call the fragmentation force. The model can be used to simulate the motion, shape, surface force density, and breakage of fluid droplets and colloidal aggregates in shear flow.

  5. Surface tension driven flow in glass melts and model fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcneil, T. J.; Cole, R.; Subramanian, R. S.

    1982-01-01

    Surface tension driven flow has been investigated analytically and experimentally using an apparatus where a free column of molten glass or model fluids was supported at its top and bottom faces by solid surfaces. The glass used in the experiments was sodium diborate, and the model fluids were silicone oils. In both the model fluid and glass melt experiments, conclusive evidence was obtained to prove that the observed flow was driven primarily by surface tension forces. The experimental observations are in qualitative agreement with predictions from the theoretical model.

  6. Buoy Relay Method for Instantaneous Fluid Flow with Free Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Several methods have been used to approximate free surface boundaries in finite-difference numerical simulations. Each of these methods has its advantages and disadvantages. This paper presents a new technique for the numerical solution of transient incompressible free surface fluid flows. This powerful method, which is based on the concepts of "Buoy positioning" and "Buoy relaying", successfully represents the free surface using a Lagrangian method on a Eulerian grid by directly solving the free surface evolution equation. The Eulerian finite-difference forms of the full Navier-Stokes equations are solved by the Successive over Relaxation (SOR) method with a set of buoys to keep track of the free surface. The capabilities of the analysis procedure are demonstrated through viscous free surface fluid flow examples. The method is simpler and more efficient than other methods especially in treating complicated free boundary configurations.

  7. Local mesh refinement for incompressible fluid flow with free surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terasaka, H.; Kajiwara, H.; Ogura, K. [Tokyo Electric Power Company (Japan)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    A new local mesh refinement (LMR) technique has been developed and applied to incompressible fluid flows with free surface boundaries. The LMR method embeds patches of fine grid in arbitrary regions of interest. Hence, more accurate solutions can be obtained with a lower number of computational cells. This method is very suitable for the simulation of free surface movements because free surface flow problems generally require a finer computational grid to obtain adequate results. By using this technique, one can place finer grids only near the surfaces, and therefore greatly reduce the total number of cells and computational costs. This paper introduces LMR3D, a three-dimensional incompressible flow analysis code. Numerical examples calculated with the code demonstrate well the advantages of the LMR method.

  8. The effect of surface wettability on inertial pouring flows

    CERN Document Server

    Bouwhuis, Wilco

    2015-01-01

    A liquid poured from a curved solid surface can separate as a steady jet or sheet, or trickle down along the solid surface. It was shown by Duez et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 084503 (2010)] that surface wettability controls the separation of an inertial flow from a solid surface to an unexpected degree, which was further motivated by an inertial-capillary adhesion model. In this paper we extend the analysis by a control volume calculation that takes into account the velocity profile within the flowing layer, supported by Boundary Integral potential flow simulations, and the detailed capillary forces induced by the local curvatures of the sheet. Our analysis captures the appearance of a critical Weber number below which no steady separated solutions can be sustained. We investigate the dependence of the critical Weber number on the wettability and sharpness of the edge of the curved solid, and recover the key experimental trends.

  9. Vortex core timelines and ribbon summarizations: flow summarization over time and simulation ensembles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Alexis Y. L.; Lee, Joohwi; Taylor, Russell M.

    2013-01-01

    We present two new vortex-summarization techniques designed to portray vortex motion over an entire simulation and over an ensemble of simulations in a single image. Linear "vortex core timelines" with cone glyphs summarize flow over all time steps of a single simulation, with color varying to indicate time. Simplified "ribbon summarizations" with hue nominally encoding ensemble membership and saturation encoding time enable direct visual comparison of the distribution of vortices in time and space for a set of simulations.

  10. Directed Fluid Flow Produced by Arrays of Magnetically Actuated Core-Shell Biomimetic Cilia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiser, B. L.; Shields, A. R.; Evans, B. A.; Superfine, R.

    2010-03-01

    We have developed a novel core-shell microstructure that we use to fabricate arrays of flexible, magnetically actuated biomimetic cilia. Our biomimetic cilia mimic the size and beat shape of biological cilia in order to replicate the transport of fluid driven by cilia in many biological systems including the determination of left-right asymmetry in the vertebrate embryonic nodal plate and mucociliary clearance in the lung. Our core-shell structures consist of a flexible poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) core surrounded by a shell of nickel approximately forty nanometers thick; by using a core-shell structure, we can tune the mechanical and magnetic properties independently. We present the fabrication process and the long-range transport that occurs above the beating biomimetic cilia tips and will report on progress toward biomimetic cilia induced flow in viscoelastic fluids similar to mucus in the human airway. These flows may have applications in photonics and microfluidics, and our structures may be further useful as sensors or actuators in microelectromechanical systems.

  11. Integral methods for shallow free-surface flows with separation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Watanabe, S.; Putkaradze, V.; Bohr, Tomas

    2003-01-01

    eddy and separated flow. Assuming a variable radial velocity profile as in Karman-Pohlhausen's method, we obtain a system of two ordinary differential equations for stationary states that can smoothly go through the jump. Solutions of the system are in good agreement with experiments. For the flow down......, and stationary jumps, obtained, for instance, behind a sluice gate. We then include time dependence in the model to study the stability of these waves. This allows us to distinguish between sub- and supercritical flows by calculating dispersion relations for wavelengths of the order of the width of the layer.......We study laminar thin film flows with large distortions of the free surface, using the method of averaging across the flow. Two specific problems are studied: the circular hydraulic jump and the flow down an inclined plane. For the circular hydraulic jump our method is able to handle an internal...

  12. Numerical simulation of two-dimensional steady granular flows in rotating drum: On surface flow rheology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renouf, M.; Bonamy, D.; Dubois, F.; Alart, P.

    2005-10-01

    The rheology of two-dimensional steady surface flow of cohesionless cylinders in a rotating drum is investigated through nonsmooth contact dynamics simulations. Profiles of volume fraction, translational and angular velocity, rms velocity, strain rate, and stress tensor are measured at the midpoint along the length of the surface-flowing layer, where the flow is generally considered as steady and homogeneous. Analysis of these data and their interrelations suggest the local inertial number—defined as the ratio between local inertial forces and local confinement forces—to be the relevant dimensionless parameter to describe the transition from the quasistatic part of the packing to the flowing part at the surface of the heap. Variations of the components of the stress tensor as well as the ones of rms velocity as a function of the inertial number are analyzed within both the quasistatic and the flowing phases. Their implications are discussed.

  13. A soil flowing characteristics monitoring method in planetary drilling and coring verification experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Junyue; Quan, Qiquan; Jiang, Shengyuan; Chen, Chongbin; Yuan, Fengpei; Deng, Zongquan

    2017-03-01

    Some type of piercing into the subsurface formation is required in future planetary explorations to enhance the understanding of early stars' geological evolution and the origin of life. Compared with other technical methods, drilling & coring, only utilizing the compound locomotion of rotation and penetration, can sample the subsurface soil relatively efficient and convenient. However, given the uncertain mechanical properties of planetary soil, drilling state signals should be monitored online to improve the robustness of drilling system and avoid potential drilling faults. Since the flowing characteristics of interacted soil, such as removal volume, coring height, removal velocity and accumulation angle, directly reveal the drilling conditions, they are enhancing resources to comprehend the sampling phenomenon and can be used to help control the drill tool. This paper proposed a novel soil flowing characteristics (SFC) monitoring method by applying an industrial camera to record the flowing characteristics of removed cuttings and by utilizing an ultrasonic sensor into the hollow auger to monitor the sampled core. Experiments in one typical lunar regolith simulant indicate that the monitored SFC accurately reflects the interaction between the drill tool and soil.

  14. Induced Core Formation Time in Subcritical Magnetic Clouds by Large-Scale Trans-Alfv\\'enic Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Kudoh, Takahiro

    2014-01-01

    We clarify the mechanism of accelerated core formation by large-scale nonlinear flows in subcritical magnetic clouds by finding a semi-analytical formula for the core formation time and describing the physical processes that lead to them. Recent numerical simulations show that nonlinear flows induce rapid ambipolar diffusion that leads to localized supercritical regions that can collapse. Here, we employ non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic simulations including ambipolar diffusion for gravitationally stratified sheets threaded by vertical magnetic fields. One of the horizontal dimensions is eliminated, resulting in a simpler two-dimensional simulation that can clarify the basic process of accelerated core formation. A parameter study of simulations shows that the core formation time is inversely proportional to the square of the flow speed when the flow speed is greater than the Alfv\\'en speed. We find a semi-analytical formula that explains this numerical result. The formula also predicts that the core formation t...

  15. Vortex cores and vortex motion in superconductors with anisotropic Fermi surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galvis, J.A. [Laboratorio de Bajas Temperaturas, Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales Nicolás Cabrera, Condensed Matter Physics Center (IFIMAC), Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Ciencias Naturales, Facultad de ingeniería y Ciencias Básicas, Universidad Central, Bogotá (Colombia); National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32310 (United States); Herrera, E.; Guillamón, I.; Vieira, S. [Laboratorio de Bajas Temperaturas, Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales Nicolás Cabrera, Condensed Matter Physics Center (IFIMAC), Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Unidad Asociada de Altos Campos Magnéticos y Bajas Temperaturas, UAM, CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Suderow, H., E-mail: hermann.suderow@uam.es [Laboratorio de Bajas Temperaturas, Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales Nicolás Cabrera, Condensed Matter Physics Center (IFIMAC), Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Unidad Asociada de Altos Campos Magnéticos y Bajas Temperaturas, UAM, CSIC, Madrid (Spain)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • The observation of vortex cores is reviewed, with emphasis in new experiments. • Vortex cores are follow superconducting gap and Fermi surface shapes. • The vortex core shape influences vortex dynamics. - Abstract: Explaning static and dynamic properties of the vortex lattice in anisotropic superconductors requires a careful characterization of vortex cores. The vortex core contains Andreev bound states whose spatial extension depends on the anisotropy of the electronic band-structure and superconducting gap. This might have an impact on the anisotropy of the superconducting properties and on vortex dynamics. Here we briefly summarize basic concepts to understand anisotropic vortex cores and review vortex core imaging experiments. We further discuss moving vortex lattices and the influence of vortex core shape in vortex motion. We find vortex motion in highly tilted magnetic fields. We associate vortex motion to the vortex entry barrier and the screening currents at the surface. We find preferential vortex motion along the main axis of the vortex lattice. After travelling integers of the intervortex distance, we find that vortices move more slowly due to the washboard potential of the vortex lattice.

  16. On the Formation of Cool, Non-Flowing Cores in Galaxy Clusters via Hierarchical Mergers

    CERN Document Server

    Burns, J O; Norman, M L; Bryan, G L

    2003-01-01

    We present a new model for the creation of cool cores in rich galaxy clusters within a LambdaCDM cosmological framework using the results from high spatial dynamic range, adaptive mesh hydro/N-body simulations. It is proposed that cores of cool gas first form in subclusters and these subclusters merge to create rich clusters with cool, central X-Ray excesses. The rich cool clusters do not possess ``cooling flows'' due to the presence of bulk velocities in the intracluster medium in excess of 1000 km/sec produced by on-going accretion of gas from supercluster filaments. This new model has several attractive features including the presence of substantial core substructure within the cool cores, and it predicts the appearance of cool bullets, cool fronts, and cool filaments all of which have been recently observed with X-Ray satellites. This hierarchical formation model is also consistent with the observation that cool cores in Abell clusters occur preferentially in dense supercluster environments. On the other ...

  17. FastFlow: Efficient Parallel Streaming Applications on Multi-core

    CERN Document Server

    Aldinucci, Marco; Meneghin, Massimiliano

    2009-01-01

    Shared memory multiprocessors come back to popularity thanks to rapid spreading of commodity multi-core architectures. As ever, shared memory programs are fairly easy to write and quite hard to optimise; providing multi-core programmers with optimising tools and programming frameworks is a nowadays challenge. Few efforts have been done to support effective streaming applications on these architectures. In this paper we introduce FastFlow, a low-level programming framework based on lock-free queues explicitly designed to support high-level languages for streaming applications. We compare FastFlow with state-of-the-art programming frameworks such as Cilk, OpenMP, and Intel TBB. We experimentally demonstrate that FastFlow is always more efficient than all of them in a set of micro-benchmarks and on a real world application; the speedup edge of FastFlow over other solutions might be bold for fine grain tasks, as an example +35% on OpenMP, +226% on Cilk, +96% on TBB for the alignment of protein P01111 against UniP...

  18. TiO{sub 2} Coated Core-Shell Nanoparticles Fabricated through Sol-Gel Reaction of Titanium Precursor on Surface of Silica Core Templates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Suk Bon [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co. Ltd., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    TiO{sub 2} hollow capsules have been mainly investigated through various methods using soft and hard templates such as polymer latex and silica nanoparticles (NPs). However, fabrication of these materials inevitably involves the removal process of polymer latex and silica template used through calcination at high temperature and etching with toxic etchants, respectively. As a result, these processes result in the generation of chemical waste as well as serious environmental concerns. To overcome above mentioned problems, although studies on in situ recrystallization transformation of silica into more useful functional nanostructured silica materials such as microporous zeolites or mesoporous silicas instead of removal of the silica templates were reported in recent, the additional process, including hydrothermal reaction and calcination at high temperature in the removal of the organic templates used is required to fabricate these materials. Resulting TiO{sub 2} coated core-shell NPs showed a smooth surface and uniform TiO{sub 2} shell layer. TiO{sub 2} shell layer after the calcination processes at high temperature under air flowing exhibited the crystal structure corresponding to the anatase phase. The formation of the TiO{sub 2} shell layer on the surface of the silica core templates was investigated through the various analyses. TiO{sub 2} shell layer after the calcination treatment at high temperature exhibited the anatase phase with a crystal size of ca. 5.37 nm. Resulting TiO{sub 2} coated core-shell NPs can be utilized as a photocatalyst.

  19. EFFECTS OF GRAPHITE SURFACE ROUGHNESS ON BYPASS FLOW COMPUTATIONS FOR AN HTGR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rich Johnson; Yu-Hsin Tung; Hiroyuki Sato

    2011-07-01

    Bypass flow in a prismatic high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) occurs between graphite blocks as they sit side by side in the core. Bypass flow is not intentionally designed to occur in the reactor, but is present because of tolerances in manufacture, imperfect installation and expansion and shrinkage of the blocks from heating and irradiation. It is desired to increase the knowledge of the effects of such flow, which has been estimated to be as much as 20% of the total helium coolant flow. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations can provide estimates of the scale and impacts of bypass flow. Previous CFD calculations have examined the effects of bypass gap width, level and distribution of heat generation and effects of shrinkage. The present contribution examines the effects of graphite surface roughness on the bypass flow for different relative roughness factors on three gap widths. Such calculations should be validated using specific bypass flow measurements. While such experiments are currently underway for the specific reference prismatic HTGR design for the next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) program of the U. S. Dept. of Energy, the data are not yet available. To enhance confidence in the present calculations, wall shear stress and heat transfer results for several turbulence models and their associated wall treatments are first compared for flow in a single tube that is representative of a coolant channel in the prismatic HTGR core. The results are compared to published correlations for wall shear stress and Nusselt number in turbulent pipe flow. Turbulence models that perform well are then used to make bypass flow calculations in a symmetric onetwelfth sector of a prismatic block that includes bypass flow. The comparison of shear stress and Nusselt number results with published correlations constitutes a partial validation of the CFD model. Calculations are also compared to ones made previously using a different CFD code. Results indicate that

  20. Droplet detachment by air flow for microstructured superhydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Pengfei; Lv, Cunjing; Yao, Zhaohui

    2013-04-30

    Quantitative correlation between critical air velocity and roughness of microstructured surface has still not been established systematically until the present; the dynamics of water droplet detachment by air flow from micropillar-like superhydrophobic surfaces is investigated by combining experiments and simulation comparisons. Experimental evidence demonstrates that the onset of water droplet detachment from horizontal micropillar-like superhydrophobic surfaces under air flow always starts with detachment of the rear contact lines of the droplets from the pillar tops, which exhibits a similar dynamic mechanism for water droplet motion under a gravity field. On the basis of theoretical analysis and numerical simulation, an explicit analytical model is proposed for investigating the detaching mechanism, in which the critical air velocity can be fully determined by several intrinsic parameters: water-solid interface area fraction, droplet volume, and Young's contact angle. This model gives predictions of the critical detachment velocity of air flow that agree well with the experimental measurements.

  1. Persistent Near-Surface Flow Structures from Local Helioseismology

    CERN Document Server

    Howe, R; Baker, D; Harra, L; van Driel-Gesztelyi, L; Bogart, R S

    2015-01-01

    Near-surface flows measured by the ring-diagram technique of local helioseismology show structures that persist over multiple rotations. We examine these phenomena using data from the {\\em Global Oscillation Network Group} (GONG) and the {\\em Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager} (HMI) and show that a correlation analysis of the structures can be used to estimate the rotation rate as a function of latitude, giving a result consistent with the near-surface rate from global helioseismology and slightly slower than that obtained from a similar analysis of the surface magnetic field strength. At latitudes of 60$^{\\circ}$ and above the HMI flow data reveal a strong signature of a two-sided zonal flow structure. This signature may be related to recent reports of "giant cells" in solar convection.

  2. Flow visualization of a vortex ring interaction with porous surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrynuk, John T.; Van Luipen, Jason; Bohl, Douglas

    2012-03-01

    The interaction of vortex rings of constant Reynolds number with porous surfaces composed of wire meshes of constant open area, i.e., surface porosity, but variable wire diameter is studied using flow visualization. The results indicate that several regimes of flow behavior exist in the parameter space investigated. The vortex ring passes through and immediately reforms downstream of the surface for porous surfaces with small wire mesh diameters. The transmitted vortex ring has the same diameter, but lower convection speed and circulation than the pre-interaction vortex ring. For these cases, secondary vortex rings are formed on the upstream side of the porous surface that convect upstream away from the screen. As the wire diameter of the porous surface is increased, smaller sub-scale vortical structures are formed on the transmitted vortex ring as it passes through the surface. The spatial scale of these structures is dependent on the diameter of the mesh wire. The vortex ring is disrupted but is able to reform downstream when these structures are small compared to the scale of the vortex ring. When these structures are large enough the transmitted vortex ring is disrupted and does not reform. The results indicate that the dynamics governing the vortex ring/mesh surface interaction are dependent not only on the strength of the vortex ring and the porosity of the surface, as previously thought, but also on the length scales (i.e., the diameter and spacing of the wire mesh) of the porous surface.

  3. Vortex cores and vortex motion in superconductors with anisotropic Fermi surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvis, J. A.; Herrera, E.; Guillamón, I.; Vieira, S.; Suderow, H.

    2017-02-01

    Explaning static and dynamic properties of the vortex lattice in anisotropic superconductors requires a careful characterization of vortex cores. The vortex core contains Andreev bound states whose spatial extension depends on the anisotropy of the electronic band-structure and superconducting gap. This might have an impact on the anisotropy of the superconducting properties and on vortex dynamics. Here we briefly summarize basic concepts to understand anisotropic vortex cores and review vortex core imaging experiments. We further discuss moving vortex lattices and the influence of vortex core shape in vortex motion. We find vortex motion in highly tilted magnetic fields. We associate vortex motion to the vortex entry barrier and the screening currents at the surface. We find preferential vortex motion along the main axis of the vortex lattice. After travelling integers of the intervortex distance, we find that vortices move more slowly due to the washboard potential of the vortex lattice.

  4. The surface heat flow of the Arabian Shield in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förster, A.; Förster, H.-J.; Masarweh, R.; Masri, A.; Tarawneh, K.; Desert Group

    2007-04-01

    Surface heat flow in southern Jordan (western part of the Arabian Plate) was determined in a dense cluster of five, up to 900-m-deep boreholes that have encountered sedimentary rocks of Paleozoic (Ordovician and Silurian) age. These rocks are underlain by an igneous and metamorphic basement, which has been studied for its radiogenic heat production, along the eastern margin of the Dead Sea Transform (DST) fault system. The heat flow, calculated from continuous temperature logs and laboratory-measured thermal conductivity of drillcores and surface samples, averages to 60.3 ± 3.4 mW m -2 and contrasts the common view of the late Proterozoic-consolidated Arabian Shield constituting a low heat-flow province of ⩽45 mW m -2. Although only characterizing an area of about 300 km 2, this average is unlikely representing a positive local anomaly caused by voluminous HHP granites/rhyolites at shallow depths. Instead, a heat flow of 60 mW m -2 is considered a robust estimate of the Phanerozoic conductive surface heat flow not only for Jordan, but for the Arabian Shield in areas unaffected by younger reactivation. The large variation in conductive heat flow (36-88 mW m -2) previously observed in Jordan, southern Syria, and Saudi Arabia is irreconcilable with their broad similarity in lithosphere structure and composition and rather reflects a combination of factors including low-quality temperature data and insufficient knowledge on thermal rock properties.

  5. Boundary conditions for soft glassy flows: slippage and surface fluidization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansard, Vincent; Bocquet, Lydéric; Colin, Annie

    2014-09-28

    We explore the question of surface boundary conditions for the flow of a dense emulsion. We make use of microlithographic tools to create surfaces with well controlled roughness patterns and measure using dynamic confocal microscopy both the slip velocity and the shear rate close to the wall, which we relate to the notion of surface fluidization. Both slippage and wall fluidization depend non-monotonously on the roughness. We interpret this behavior within a simple model in terms of the building of a stratified layer and the activation of plastic events by the surface roughness.

  6. Design and fabrication of a metal core PVDF fiber for an air flow sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Yixiang; Liu, Rongrong; Huang, Xiaomei; Hong, Jin; Huang, Huiyu; Hui, Shen

    2015-10-01

    To track prey or avoid predators, many arthropods can detect variations in airflow and pressure gradients using an array of very thin and sensitive filiform hairs. In this study, metal core piezoelectric poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) fibers were prepared to mimic such hair sensors. The flexibility of the fibers was very good, which was helpful for overcoming the typical brittleness of piezoelectric ceramic fibers. At the same time, the diameter of the fibers was very small (down to 50 μm in diameter). In order to mimic the insects’ hairs to the maximum extent, which was expected to greatly improve the sensitivity of such PVDF fiber-based sensors, a feasible process to prepare and extract electrodes on the surface of the fibers had to be developed. Compared with stainless steel filament-core fibers, the molybdenum filament-core PVDF fibers were easy to stretch. The molybdenum filament was then covered by a cylindrical PVDF layer with a diameter of 400 μm. One half of the longitudinal surface of the fibers was spray-coated with a conductive silver adhesive. The metal core was then used as one electrode, and the conductive silver adhesive was used as the other electrode. After polarization, a single metal-core PVDF fiber could be used as an airflow sensor. The surface structure and the sections of the PVDF fiber were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. The results of the mechanical stretching tests showed that the metal core greatly enhanced the mechanical properties of the PVDF fibers. X-ray diffraction revealed that the greater the stretching ratio, the higher the α-to-β-phase conversion rate during the preparation of the PVDF fibers. A single metal-core PVDF fiber was used as a bionic airflow sensor, and a mechanical model of this sensor was derived. The airflow sensing capability of the PVDF fiber was experimentally confirmed in a miniature wind tunnel. The results showed that a cantilevered metal-core PVDF fiber is capable of detecting the range

  7. Lifespan theorem for simples constrained surface diffusion flows

    CERN Document Server

    Wheeler, Glen

    2012-01-01

    We consider closed immersed hypersurfaces in $\\R^3$ and $\\R^4$ evolving by a special class of constrained surface diffusion flows. This class of constrained flows includes the classical surface diffusion flow. In this paper we present a Lifespan Theorem for these flows, which gives a positive lower bound on the time for which a smooth solution exists, and a small upper bound on the total curvature during this time. The hypothesis of the theorem is that the surface is not already singular in terms of concentration of curvature. This turns out to be a deep property of the initial manifold, as the lower bound on maximal time obtained depends precisely upon the concentration of curvature of the initial manifold in $L^2$ for $M^2$ immersed in $R^3$ and additionally on the concentration in $L^3$ for $M^3$ immersed in $R^4$. This is stronger than a previous result on a different class of constrained surface diffusion flows, as here we obtain an improved lower bound on maximal time, a better estimate during this peri...

  8. A unified slip boundary condition for flow over a surface

    CERN Document Server

    Thalakkottor, Joseph John

    2015-01-01

    Interface between two phases of matter are ubiquitous in nature and technology. Determining the correct velocity condition at an interface is essential for understanding and designing of flows over a surface. We demonstrate that both the widely used no-slip and the Navier and Maxwell slip boundary conditions do not capture the complete physics associated with complex problems, such as spreading of liquids or corner flows. Hence, we present a unified boundary condition that is applicable to a wide-range of flow problems.

  9. Surface Runoff in Watershed Modeling—Turbulent or Laminar Flows?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark E. Grismer

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Determination of overland sheet flow depths, velocities and celerities across the hillslope in watershed modeling is important towards estimation of surface storage, travel times to streams and soil detachment rates. It requires careful characterization of the flow processes. Similarly, determination of the temporal variation of hillslope-riparian-stream hydrologic connectivity requires estimation of the shallow subsurface soil hydraulic conductivity and soil-water retention (i.e., drainable porosities parameters. Field rainfall and runoff simulation studies provide considerable information and insight into these processes; in particular, that sheet flows are likely laminar and that shallow hydraulic conductivities and storage can be determined from the plot studies. Here, using a 1 m by 2 m long runoff simulation flume, we found that for overland flow rates per unit width of roughly 30–60 mm2/s and bedslopes of 10%–66% with varying sand roughness depths that all flow depths were predicted by laminar flow equations alone and that equivalent Manning’s n values were depth dependent and quite small relative to those used in watershed modeling studies. Even for overland flow rates greater than those typically measured or modeled and using Manning’s n values of 0.30–0.35, often assumed in physical watershed model applications for relatively smooth surface conditions, the laminar flow velocities were 4–5 times greater, while the laminar flow depths were 4–5 times smaller. This observation suggests that travel times, surface storage volumes and surface shear stresses associated with erosion across the landscape would be poorly predicted using turbulent flow assumptions. Filling the flume with fine sand and conducting runoff studies, we were unable to produce sheet flow, but found that subsurface flows were onflow rate, soil depth and slope dependent and drainable porosities were only soil depth and slope dependent. Moreover, both the sand

  10. Biomolecular Nano-Flow-Sensor to Measure Near-Surface Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noji Hiroyuki

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We have proposed and experimentally demonstrated that the measurement of the near-surface flow at the interface between a liquid and solid using a 10 nm-sized biomolecular motor of F1-ATPase as a nano-flow-sensor. For this purpose, we developed a microfluidic test-bed chip to precisely control the liquid flow acting on the F1-ATPase. In order to visualize the rotation of F1-ATPase, several hundreds nanometer-sized particle was immobilized at the rotational axis of F1-ATPase to enhance the rotation to be detected by optical microscopy. The rotational motion of F1-ATPase, which was immobilized on an inner surface of the test-bed chip, was measured to obtain the correlation between the near-surface flow and the rotation speed of F1-ATPase. As a result, we obtained the relationship that the rotation speed of F1-ATPase was linearly decelerated with increasing flow velocity. The mechanism of the correlation between the rotation speed and the near-surface flow remains unclear, however the concept to use biomolecule as a nano-flow-sensor was proofed successfully. (See supplementary material 1 Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11671-009-9479-3 contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. Click here for file

  11. Fluorescent eco-particles for surface flow physics analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauro, F.; Porfiri, M.; Grimaldi, S.

    2013-03-01

    In this letter, we describe a novel methodology for fabricating inexpensive environmentally-friendly fluorescent microparticles for quantitative surface flow visualization. Particles are synthesized from natural white beeswax and a highly diluted solution of a nontoxic fluorescent red dye. Bead fluorescence exhibits a long lifetime in adverse conditions, such as exposure to weathering agents, and is enhanced by Ultra Violet radiation. The fluorescent eco-particles are integrated in a particle image velocimetry study of circular hydraulic jump to demonstrate their feasibility in tracing complex surface flows.

  12. Fluorescent eco-particles for surface flow physics analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Tauro

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In this letter, we describe a novel methodology for fabricating inexpensive environmentally-friendly fluorescent microparticles for quantitative surface flow visualization. Particles are synthesized from natural white beeswax and a highly diluted solution of a nontoxic fluorescent red dye. Bead fluorescence exhibits a long lifetime in adverse conditions, such as exposure to weathering agents, and is enhanced by Ultra Violet radiation. The fluorescent eco-particles are integrated in a particle image velocimetry study of circular hydraulic jump to demonstrate their feasibility in tracing complex surface flows.

  13. A Level Set Discontinuous Galerkin Method for Free Surface Flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grooss, Jesper; Hesthaven, Jan

    2006-01-01

    We present a discontinuous Galerkin method on a fully unstructured grid for the modeling of unsteady incompressible fluid flows with free surfaces. The surface is modeled by embedding and represented by a levelset. We discuss the discretization of the flow equations and the level set equation...... as well a various ways of advancing the equations in time using velocity projection techniques. The efficacy of the method for the representation of the levelset and its reinitialization is discussed and several numerical tests confirm the robustness and versatility of the proposed scheme....

  14. Vortices generation in the reactive flow on the evaporative surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Cha Ryeom; Lee, Chang Jin [Konkuk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Vortices generation and flow dynamics are investigated by a numerical calculation with LES methodology on the evaporative surface including chemical reactions. For simplicity, fuel is radially injected from the surface in order to decouple pyrolysis of solid fuel from the governing equation and consideration of heat transfer balance. Nevertheless its simple treatment of chemical reactions and fuel pyrolysis, numerical results captured very fundamental understandings in terms of averaged temperature, velocity profile, and mixture fraction distribution. Results showed that a well-defined turbulent velocity profile at the inlet becomes twisted and highly wrinkled in the downstream reaching the maximum velocity at far above the surface, where the flame is located. And the thickness of boundary layer increases in the downstream due to the enhanced interaction of axial flow and mass injection from the surface. Also, chemical reaction appears highly active and partially concentrated along the plane where flow condition is in stoichiometric. In particular, flame front locates at the surface where mixture fraction Z equals to 0.07. Flame front severely wrinkles in the downstream by the interaction with turbulences in the flow. Partial reactions on the flame front contribute to produce hot spots periodically in the downstream attaining the max temperature at the center of each spot. This may take the role of additional unsteady heat generations and pressure perturbations in the downstream. Future study will focus on the evolution of hot spots and pressure perturbations in the post chamber of lab scale hybrid rocket motors.

  15. Energy flow and energy dissipation in a free surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldburg, Walter; Cressman, John

    2005-11-01

    Turbulent flows on a free surface are strongly compressible [1] and do not conserve energy in the absence of viscosity as bulk fluids do. Despite violation of assumptions essential to Kolmogorov's theory of 1941 (K41) [2, 3], surface flows show strong agreement with Kolmogorov scaling, though intermittency is larger there. Steady state turbulence is generated in a tank of water, and the spatially averaged energy flux is measured from the four-fifth's law at each instant of time. Likewise, the energy dissipation rate as measured from velocity gradients is also a random variable in this experiment. The energy flux - dissipation rate cross-correlation is measured to be correlated in incompressible bulk flows, but strongly anti-correlated on the surface. We argue that the reason for this discrepancy between surface and bulk flows is due to compressible effects present on the surface. [1] J. R. Cressman, J. Davoudi, W. I. Goldburg, and J. Schumacher, New Journal of Physics, 6, 53, 2004. [2] U. Frisch. Turbulence: The legacy of A. N. Kolmogorov, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1995. [3] A. N. Kolmogorov, Doklady Akad. Nauk SSSR, 32, 16, 1941.

  16. Ultra-sensitive Flow Injection Analysis (FIA) determination of calcium in ice cores at ppt level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traversi, R; Becagli, S; Castellano, E; Maggi, V; Morganti, A; Severi, M; Udisti, R

    2007-07-02

    A Flow Injection Analysis (FIA) spectrofluorimetric method for calcium determination in ice cores was optimised in order to achieve better analytical performances which would make it suitable for reliable calcium measurements at ppt level. The method here optimised is based on the formation of a fluorescent compound between Ca and Quin-2 in buffered environment. A careful evaluation of operative parameters (reagent concentration, buffer composition and concentration, pH), influence of interfering species possibly present in real samples and potential favourable effect of surfactant addition was carried out. The obtained detection limit is around 15 ppt, which is one order of magnitude lower than the most sensitive Flow Analysis method for Ca determination currently available in literature and reproducibility is better than 4% for Ca concentrations of 0.2 ppb. The method was validated through measurements performed in parallel with Ion Chromatography on 200 samples from an alpine ice core (Lys Glacier) revealing an excellent fit between the two chemical series. Calcium stratigraphy in Lys ice core was discussed in terms of seasonal pattern and occurrence of Saharan dust events.

  17. Continuous flow analysis of total organic carbon in polar ice cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federer, Urs; Kaufmann, Patrik R; Hutterli, Manuel A; Schüpbach, Simon; Stocker, Thomas F

    2008-11-01

    Ice cores are a widely used archive to reconstruct past changes of the climate system. This is done by measuring the concentration of substances in the ice and in the air of bubbles enclosed in ice. Some species pertaining to the carbon cycle (e.g., CO2, CH4) are routinely measured. However, information about the organic fraction of the impurities in polar ice is still very limited. Therefore, we developed a new method to determine the content of total organic carbon (TOC) in ice cores using a continuous flow analysis (CFA) system. The method is based on photochemical oxidation of TOC and the electrolytic quantification of the CO2 produced during oxidation. The TOC instrument features a limit of detection of 2 ppbC and a response time of 60 s at a sample flow rate of 0.7 mL/min and a linear measurement range of 2-4000 ppbC. First measurements on the ice core from Talos Dome, Antarctica, reveal TOC concentrations varying between 80 and 360 ppbC in the 20 m section presented.

  18. Reaction kinetics of fluorite in flow systems and surface chemistry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张荣华; 胡书敏

    1996-01-01

    The kinetic experiments of fluorite in water-HCl solution in an open-flow system at the temperatures ≤100℃ reveal that the variation of flow rate (U) can change the reaction rate orders from 0 to 2 or higher. In the far from equilibrium systems, the dissolution rates of fluorite in aqueous solutions have a zero order.The reaction rates are controlled by pH values of input solutions. In fact, the reaction rates are related to the concentrations of the active sites occupied by H+ on fluorite surface [SOH]. X-ray photospectroscopy observations on fluorite surface before and after reaction indicate that surface chemical processes control the reaction rates: Cl- cations attach on and enter into surface of fluorite besides H+ when fluorites react with HCl solutions, which affect the reaction rates.

  19. Evaluation of post-surface conditioning to improve interfacial adhesion in post-core restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mylswamy Sumitha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim : To examine the influence of different post-surface treatments on the interfacial strength between epoxy resin-based fiber posts and methacrylate-based resin composites that are employed as core build-up materials. Materials and Methods : Forty clear posts were divided into four groups of 10 each. The different surface treatments used were etching with alkaline potassium permanganate, 10% hydrogen peroxide, 37% phosphoric acid, and silanization alone. After etching and thorough rinsing, a single layer of silane was applied to the post surface. Then the post was placed in a rectangular plastic matrix and core bulid-up was done using Multi Core, a dual cured composite resin. A slab of uniform thickness, with the post in the center and the core build-up composite on either side was created. The specimens were cut so as to obtain microtensile sticks that were loaded in tension at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min until failure. The statistical analysis was performed using two-way ANOVA and the paired T test for post-hoc comparisons. Results : The results achieved with potassium permanganate had a significant influence on microtensile interfacial bond strength values with the tested material. Conclusion : Surface chemical treatments of the resin phase of fiber posts enhance the silanization efficiency of the quartz fiber phase, so that the adhesion in the post/core unit may be considered as a net sum of chemical and micromechanical retention.

  20. Upscaling the overland flow resistance coefficient for vegetated surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J.; Ivanov, V. Y.; Katopodes, N.

    2011-12-01

    Estimation of hydraulic resistance for overland flows plays a crucial role in modeling rainfall-runoff, flood routing, and soil erosion processes. The resistance affects not only the accurate calculations of flow variables, but also the predictions of their derivative outcomes. In particular, resistance is highly spatially variable and controlled by local flow conditions and bed characteristics in hillslopes vegetated with patches of shrubs or woody plants. Numerous studies sought general ways of relating hydraulic resistance to roughness coefficients. A typical approach in determining the Darcy-Weisbach friction factor (f) is to relate it to the Reynolds number (Re). The case is applicable when flow completely submerges roughness elements. On the other hand, when the surface covered with stones, organic litter, or vegetation is not fully submerged by the flow, the f-Re relationship does not hold. Flow dimensionless variables other than Re may become predominant in determining the resistance. There is little information on how to determine the roughness coefficient of vegetated hillslopes of arbitrary scale as a function of flow variables and bed characteristics. Although many field or laboratory studies have attempted to address the problem, most of them were carried out in channels and over a limited range of possible flow conditions. The objective of this study was to investigate the upscaling properties of the resistance coefficient by resolving the details of the flow process at an extremely fine-scale. The domain was conceptualized as a sloped plane with a number of "obstacles" of centimeter scale (i.e., representing vegetation stems) that have infinitely long height. A number of simulations were designed with a numerical model resolving the two-dimensional form of Saint-Venant equations representing the propagation of dynamic wave. The simulations explored how the resistance coefficient varied with different vegetation covers, domain slopes, flow rates and

  1. Two-phase flow across a partially damaged core during the reflood phase of a loca

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruyer, P., E-mail: pierre.ruyer@irsn.fr [IRSN PSN/SEMIA/LIMAR, B.P. 3, 13 115 St-Paul-Lez-Durance Cedex (France); Seiler, N.; Biton, B.; Lelong, F.; Secondi, F.; Baalbaki, D. [IRSN PSN/SEMIA/LIMAR, B.P. 3, 13 115 St-Paul-Lez-Durance Cedex (France); Gradeck, M. [LEMTA Nancy University CNRS Vandoeuvre les Nancy (France)

    2013-11-15

    This study focuses on thermal-hydraulic simulations, at sub-channel scale, of a damaged PWR reactor core during a Loss Of Coolant Accident (LOCA). The aim of this study is to simulate the thermal-hydraulics to provide the thermal-mechanical code DRACCAR with an accurate wall heat transfer law. This latter code is developed by the Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN) to evaluate the thermics and deformations of fuel assemblies within the core. The present paper first describes the use of CFD to perform analysis at sub-channel scale. Then we study the capabilities of existing codes CATHARE-3 and CESAR to simulate dispersed droplet flows.

  2. Turbulent momentum transport in core tokamak plasmas and penetration of scrape-off layer flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abiteboul, J.; Ghendrih, Ph; Grandgirard, V.; Cartier-Michaud, T.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Garbet, X.; Latu, G.; Passeron, C.; Sarazin, Y.; Strugarek, A.; Thomine, O.; Zarzoso, D.

    2013-07-01

    The turbulent transport of toroidal angular momentum in the core of a tokamak plasma is investigated in global, full-f gyrokinetic simulations, performed with the GYSELA code in the flux-driven regime. During the initial turbulent phase, a front of positive Reynolds stress propagates radially, generating intrinsic toroidal rotation from a vanishing initial profile. This is also accompanied by a propagating front of turbulent heat flux. In the statistical steady-state regime, turbulent transport exhibits large-scale avalanche-like events which are found to transport both heat and momentum, and similar statistical properties are obtained for both fluxes. The impact of scrape-off layer flows is also investigated by modifying the boundary conditions in the simulations. The observed impact is radially localized for L-mode like poloidal profiles of parallel velocity at the edge, while a constant velocity at the edge can modify the core toroidal rotation profile in a large fraction of the radial domain.

  3. Numerical investigation on Coanda flow over a logarithmic surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gan, CaiYin; Sahari, Khairul Salleh Mohamed; Tan, ChingSeong [Universiti Tenaga Nasional, Jalan (Malaysia)

    2015-07-15

    The Coanda effect has been introduced into lift generation designs. In this paper, a logarithmic spiral surface is introduced as a curvature shape to evaluate the development of jet flow along the Coanda curvature. Moreover, 2D computational fluid dynamics numerical simulation is adopted to measure velocity profile, jet width growth, maximum velocity decay, and surface static pressure along the curvature surface. A parametric study on the effect of varying exit jet heights on the Coanda effect is also presented. Results show that jet width grows proportionally along the curved surface, and the proportional decay of maximum velocity and surface pressure is lower than the atmospheric pressure. A wider exit jet height produces lower static pressure on the unmanned aerial vehicle surface and a slower maximum velocity decay. Overall parametric analysis of varying exit jet heights shows that the effective range of d/R is 0.1 to 0.14.

  4. A new model for turbidity current behavior based on integration of flow monitoring and precision coring in a submarine canyon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symons, William O.; Sumner, Esther J.; Paull, Charles K.; Cartigny, Matthieu J.B.; Xu, Jingping; Maier, Katherine L.; Lorenson, Thomas; Talling, Peter J.

    2017-01-01

    Submarine turbidity currents create some of the largest sediment accumulations on Earth, yet there are few direct measurements of these flows. Instead, most of our understanding of turbidity currents results from analyzing their deposits in the sedimentary record. However, the lack of direct flow measurements means that there is considerable debate regarding how to interpret flow properties from ancient deposits. This novel study combines detailed flow monitoring with unusually precisely located cores at different heights, and multiple locations, within the Monterey submarine canyon, offshore California, USA. Dating demonstrates that the cores include the time interval that flows were monitored in the canyon, albeit individual layers cannot be tied to specific flows. There is good correlation between grain sizes collected by traps within the flow and grain sizes measured in cores from similar heights on the canyon walls. Synthesis of flow and deposit data suggests that turbidity currents sourced from the upper reaches of Monterey Canyon comprise three flow phases. Initially, a thin (38–50 m) powerful flow in the upper canyon can transport, tilt, and break the most proximal moorings and deposit chaotic sands and gravel on the canyon floor. The initially thin flow front then thickens and deposits interbedded sands and silty muds on the canyon walls as much as 62 m above the canyon floor. Finally, the flow thickens along its length, thus lofting silty mud and depositing it at greater altitudes than the previous deposits and in excess of 70 m altitude.

  5. Oscillating sources in a shear flow with a free surface

    CERN Document Server

    Ellingsen, Simen Å

    2016-01-01

    We report on progress on the free surface flow in the presence of submerged oscillating line sources (2D) or point sources (3D) when a simple shear flow is present varying linearly with depth. Such sources are in routine use as Green functions in the realm of potential theory for calculating wave-body interactions, but no such theory exists in for rotational flow. We solve the linearized problem in 2D and 3D from first principles, based on the Euler equations, when the sources are at rest relative to the undisturbed surface. Both in 2D and 3D a new type of solution appears compared to irrotational case, a critical layer-like flow whose surface manifestation ("wave") drifts downstream from the source at the velocity of the flow at the source depth. We analyse the additional vorticity in light of the vorticity equation and provide a simple physical argument why a critical layer is a necessary consequence of Kelvin's circulation theorem. In 3D a related critical layer phenomenon occurs at every depth, whereby a ...

  6. Mechanics of fluid flow over compliant wrinkled polymeric surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raayai, Shabnam; McKinley, Gareth; Boyce, Mary

    2014-03-01

    Skin friction coefficients (based on frontal area) of sharks and dolphins are lower than birds, fish and swimming beetles. By either exploiting flow-induced changes in their flexible skin or microscale textures, dolphins and sharks can change the structure of the fluid flow around them and thus reduce viscous drag forces on their bodies. Inspired by this ability, investigators have tried using compliant walls and riblet-like textures as drag reduction methods in aircraft and marine industries and have been able to achieve reductions up to 19%. Here we investigate flow-structure interaction and wrinkling of soft polymer surfaces that can emulate shark riblets and dolphin's flexible skin. Wrinkling arises spontaneously as the result of mismatched deformation of a thin stiff coating bound to a thick soft elastic substrate. Wrinkles can be fabricated by controlling the ratio of the stiffness of the coating and substrate, the applied displacement and the thickness of the coating. In this work we will examine the evolution in the kinematic structures associated with steady viscous flow over the polymer wrinkled surfaces and in particular compare the skin friction with corresponding results for flow over non-textured and rigid surfaces.

  7. Surface waves propagation on a turbulent flow forced electromagnetically

    CERN Document Server

    Gutiérrez, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    We study the propagation of monochromatic surface waves on a turbulent flow. The flow is generated in a layer of liquid metal by an electromagnetic forcing. This forcing creates a quasi two-dimensional (2D) turbulence with strong vertical vorticity. The turbulent flow contains much more energy than the surface waves. In order to focus on the surface wave, the deformations induced by the turbulent flow are removed. This is done by performing a coherent phase averaging. For wavelengths smaller than the forcing lengthscale, we observe a significant increase of the wavelength of the propagating wave that has not been reported before. We suggest that it can be explained by the random deflection of the wave induced by the velocity gradient of the turbulent flow. Under this assumption, the wavelength shift is an estimate of the fluctuations of deflection angle. The local measurements of the wave frequency far from the wavemaker do not reveal such systematic behavior, although a small shift is measured. Finally we qu...

  8. Benthic foraminiferal census data from Mobile Bay, Alabama--counts of surface samples and box cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richwine, Kathryn A.; Osterman, Lisa E.

    2012-01-01

    A study was undertaken in order to understand recent environmental change in Mobile Bay, Alabama. For this study a series of surface sediment and box core samples was collected. The surface benthic foraminiferal data provide the modern baseline conditions of the bay and can be used as a reference for changing paleoenvironmental parameters recorded in the box cores. The 14 sampling locations were chosen in the bay to cover the wide diversity of fluvial and marine-influenced environments on both sides of the shipping channel.

  9. Bragg gratings in surface-core fibers: Refractive index and directional curvature sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osório, Jonas H.; Oliveira, Ricardo; Aristilde, Stenio; Chesini, Giancarlo; Franco, Marcos A. R.; Nogueira, Rogério N.; Cordeiro, Cristiano M. B.

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we report, to our knowledge, the first extended study of the inscription of Bragg gratings in surface-core fibers and their application in refractive index and directional curvature sensing. The research ranges from fiber fabrication and grating inscription in untapered and tapered fibers to the performance of simulations and sensing measurements. Maximum sensitivities of 40 nm/RIU and 202.7 pm/m-1 were attained in refractive index and curvature measurements respectively. The obtained results compares well to other fiber Bragg grating based devices. Ease of fabrication, robustness and versatility makes surface-core fibers an interesting platform when exploring fiber sensing devices.

  10. Controlling Surface Roughness to Enhance Mass Flow Rates in Nanochannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimon, Malgorzata; Emerson, David; Reese, Jason

    2012-11-01

    A very active field of research in fluid mechanics and material science is predicting the behavior of Newtonian fluids flowing over porous media with different wettabilities. Opposite effects have been observed: some state that wall roughness always suppresses fluid-slip, whereas others show that for some cases roughness may reduce the surface friction. In this work, MD simulations were carried out to further investigate physical mechanisms for liquid slip, and factors affecting it. A rough wall was formed by either periodically spaced rectangular protrusions or was represented by a cosine wave. The MD simulations were conducted to study Poiseuille and Couette flow of liquid argon in a nanochannel with hydrophilic kryptonian walls. The effect of wall roughness and interface wettability on the streaming velocity, and the slip-length at the walls, is observed to be significant. Our results show a dependency of mass flow rate on the type of flow and topography of the channel walls. For a fixed magnitude of the driving force, an increase in the mass flow rate, compared to the smooth surface, was observed for the wavy roughness, whereas the opposite effect was observed for Couette flow where a higher slip was obtained for rectangular gaps. The study is funded in the UK by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council.

  11. Integral methods for shallow free-surface flows with separation

    CERN Document Server

    Watanabe, S; Bohr, T; Watanabe, Shinya; Putkaradze, Vachtang; Bohr, Tomas

    2000-01-01

    We study laminar thin film flows with large distortions in the free surface using the method of averaging across the flow. Two concrete problems are studied: the circular hydraulic jump and the flow down an inclined plane. For the circular hydraulic jump our method is able to handle an internal eddy and separated flow. Assuming a variable radial velocity profile like in Karman-Pohlhausen's method, we obtain a system of two ordinary differential equations for stationary states that can smoothly go through the jump where previous studies encountered a singularity. Solutions of the system are in good agreement with experiments. For the flow down an inclined plane we take a similar approach and derive a simple model in which the velocity profile is not restricted to a parabolic or self-similar form. Two types of solutions with large surface distortions are found: solitary, kink-like propagating fronts, obtained when the flow rate is suddenly changed, and stationary jumps, obtained, e.g., behind a sluice gate. We ...

  12. Moving least squares simulation of free surface flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Felter, C. L.; Walther, Jens Honore; Henriksen, Christian

    2014-01-01

    derivatives and a Runge–Kutta method for the time derivatives. The computational frame is Lagrangian, which means that the computational nodes are convected with the flow. The method proposed here is benchmarked using the standard lid driven cavity problem, a rotating free surface problem, and the simulation...

  13. Heat Flow for the Minimal Surface with Plateau Boundary Condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kung Ching CHANG; Jia Quan LIU

    2003-01-01

    The heat flow for the minimal surface under Plateau boundary condition is defined to be aparabolic variational inequality, and then the existence, uniqueness, regularity, continuous dependenceon the initial data and the asymptotics are studied. It is applied as a deformation of the level sets inthe critical point theory.

  14. Numerical simulations of viscoelastic flows with free surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Comminal, Raphaël; Spangenberg, Jon; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2013-01-01

    We present a new methodology to simulate viscoelastic flows with free-surfaces. These simulations are motivated by the modelling of polymers manufacturing techniques, such as extrusion and injection moulding. One of the consequences of viscoelasticity is that polymeric materials have a “memory...

  15. A surface-renewal model of cross-flow microfiltration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hasan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model using classical cake-filtration theory and the surface-renewal concept is formulated for describing cross-flow microfiltration under dynamic and steady-state conditions. The model can predict the permeate flux and cake buildup in the filter. The three basic parameters of the model are the membrane resistance, specific cake resistance and rate of surface renewal. The model is able to correlate experimental permeate flow rate data in the microfiltration of fermentation broths in laboratory- and pilot-scale units with an average root-mean-square (RMS error of 4.6%. The experimental data are also compared against the critical-flux model of cross-flow microfiltration, which has average RMS errors of 6.3, 5.5 and 6.1% for the cases of cake filtration, intermediate blocking and complete blocking mechanisms, respectively.

  16. Drops subjected to surface acoustic waves: flow dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunet, Philippe; Baudoin, Michael; Bou Matar, Olivier; Dynamique Des Systèmes Hors Equilibre Team; Aiman-Films Team

    2012-11-01

    Ultrasonic acoustic waves of frequency beyond the MHz are known to induce streaming flow in fluids that can be suitable to perform elementary operations in microfluidics systems. One of the currently appealing geometry is that of a sessile drop subjected to surface acoustic waves (SAW). Such Rayleigh waves produce non-trival actuation in the drop leading to internal flow, drop displacement, free-surface oscillations and atomization. We recently carried out experiments and numerical simulations that allowed to better understand the underlying physical mechanisms that couple acoustic propagation and fluid actuation. We varied the frequency and amplitude of actuation, as well as the properties of the fluid, and we measured the effects of these parameters on the dynamics of the flow. We compared these results to finite-elements numerical simulations.

  17. Computed Flow and Fluorescence Over the Ocular Surface

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Longfei; Henshaw, W D; King-Smith, P E

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescein is perhaps the most commonly used substance to visualize tear film thickness and dynamics; better understanding of this process aids understanding of dry eye syndrome which afflicts millions of people. We study a mathematical model for tear film flow, evaporation, solutal transport and fluorescence over the exposed ocular surface during the interblink. Transport of the fluorescein ion by fluid flow in the tear film affects the intensity of fluorescence via changes in concentration and tear film thickness. Evaporation causes increased osmolarity and potential irritation over the ocular surface; it also alters fluorescein concentration and thus fluorescence. Using thinning rates from in vivo measurements together with thin film equations for flow and transport of multiple solutes, we compute dynamic results for tear film quantities of interest. We compare our computed intensity distributions with in vivo observations. A number of experimental features are recovered by the model.

  18. A Boundary Condition for Simulation of Flow Over Porous Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frink, Neal T.; Bonhaus, Daryl L.; Vatsa, Veer N.; Bauer, Steven X. S.; Tinetti, Ana F.

    2001-01-01

    A new boundary condition is presented.for simulating the flow over passively porous surfaces. The model builds on the prior work of R.H. Bush to eliminate the need for constructing grid within an underlying plenum, thereby simplifying the numerical modeling of passively porous flow control systems and reducing computation cost. Code experts.for two structured-grid.flow solvers, TLNS3D and CFL3D. and one unstructured solver, USM3Dns, collaborated with an experimental porosity expert to develop the model and implement it into their respective codes. Results presented,for the three codes on a slender forebody with circumferential porosity and a wing with leading-edge porosity demonstrate a good agreement with experimental data and a remarkable ability to predict the aggregate aerodynamic effects of surface porosity with a simple boundary condition.

  19. Flow injection chemiluminescence sensor based on core-shell magnetic molecularly imprinted nanoparticles for determination of sulfadiazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Fuguang; Li, Huaijiang; Sun, Min; Fan, Lulu; Qiu, Huamin; Li, Xiangjun; Luo, Chuannan

    2012-03-09

    A novel flow injection chemiluminescence (FI-CL) sensor for determination of sulfadiazine (SDZ) using core-shell magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers (MMIPs) as recognition element is developed. Briefly, a hydrophilic MMIPs layer was produced at the surface of Fe(3)O(4)@SiO(2) magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) via combination of molecular imprinting and reversible stimuli responsive hydrogel. And it provided the MMIPs with excellent adsorption capacity and rapid adsorption rate due to the imprinted sites mostly situated on the surface of MMIPs. Then the prepared SDZ-MMIPs were packed into flow cell to establish a novel FI-CL sensor. The sensor provided a wide linear range for SDZ of 4.0×10(-7) to 1.0×10(-4) mol L(-1) with a detection limit of 1.54×10(-7) mol L(-1). And the relative standard deviation (RSD) for the determination of 1.0×10(-6) mol L(-1) SDZ was 2.56% (n=11). The proposed method was applied to determine SDZ in urine samples and satisfactory results were obtained.

  20. Characterization of interfacial waves and pressure drop in horizontal oil-water core-annular flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Sumit; Tabor, Rico F.; Singh, Ramesh; Bhattacharya, Amitabh

    2017-08-01

    We study the transportation of highly viscous furnace-oil in a horizontal pipe as core-annular flow (CAF) using experiments. Pressure drop and high-speed images of the fully developed CAF are recorded for a wide range of flow rate combinations. The height profiles (with respect to the centerline of the pipe) of the upper and lower interfaces of the core are obtained using a high-speed camera and image analysis. Time series of the interface height are used to calculate the average holdup of the oil phase, speed of the interface, and the power spectra of the interface profile. We find that the ratio of the effective velocity of the annular fluid to the core velocity, α , shows a large scatter. Using the average value of this ratio (α =0.74 ) yields a good estimate of the measured holdup for the whole range of flow rate ratios, mainly due to the low sensitivity of the holdup ratio to the velocity ratio. Dimensional analysis implies that, if the thickness of the annular fluid is much smaller than the pipe radius, then, for the given range of parameters in our experiments, the non-dimensional interface shape, as well as the non-dimensional wall shear stress, can depend only on the shear Reynolds number and the velocity ratio. Our experimental data show that, for both lower and upper interfaces, the normalized power spectrum of the interface height has a strong dependence on the shear Reynolds number. Specifically, for low shear Reynolds numbers, interfacial modes with large wavelengths dominate, while, for large shear Reynolds numbers, interfacial modes with small wavelengths dominate. Normalized variance of the interface height is higher at lower shear Reynolds numbers and tends to a constant with increasing shear Reynolds number. Surprisingly, our experimental data also show that the effective wall shear stress is, to a large extent, proportional to the square of the core velocity. Using the implied scalings for the holdup ratio and wall shear stress, we can derive

  1. SToRM: A numerical model for environmental surface flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoes, Francisco J.

    2009-01-01

    SToRM (System for Transport and River Modeling) is a numerical model developed to simulate free surface flows in complex environmental domains. It is based on the depth-averaged St. Venant equations, which are discretized using unstructured upwind finite volume methods, and contains both steady and unsteady solution techniques. This article provides a brief description of the numerical approach selected to discretize the governing equations in space and time, including important aspects of solving natural environmental flows, such as the wetting and drying algorithm. The presentation is illustrated with several application examples, covering both laboratory and natural river flow cases, which show the model’s ability to solve complex flow phenomena.

  2. Stability of shear shallow water flows with free surface

    CERN Document Server

    Chesnokov, Alexander; Gavrilyuk, Sergey; Pavlov, Maxim

    2016-01-01

    Stability of inviscid shear shallow water flows with free surface is studied in the framework of the Benney equations. This is done by investigating the generalized hyperbolicity of the integrodifferential Benney system of equations. It is shown that all shear flows having monotonic convex velocity profiles are stable. The hydrodynamic approximations of the model corresponding to the classes of flows with piecewise linear continuous and discontinuous velocity profiles are derived and studied. It is shown that these approximations possess Hamiltonian structure and a complete system of Riemann invariants, which are found in an explicit form. Sufficient conditions for hyperbolicity of the governing equations for such multilayer flows are formulated. The generalization of the above results to the case of stratified fluid is less obvious, however, it is established that vorticity has a stabilizing effect.

  3. Tennis core strings of polyamide-6 modified by surface-capped nano-silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Juan; Yi, Hongling; Lin, Heng; Zheng, Baicun

    2013-01-01

    A new method that modified silica nanoparticles were infused into PA6 is to produce tennis core string through a melt-extrusion process. The idea was to produce a highly strong and elastic tennis core string of PA6, utilizing the interactions between modified silica and polymer. The effects of surface-capped nano-silica on the strength and elongation of tennis core string were studied. It has been observed that with the infusion of silica nanoparticles modified by γ-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GPS), the stress at breaking and E-modulus of tennis core string is enhanced by 46.24% and 15.17% comparing with neat PA6 with changeless elongation at breaking at a critical concentration. The source of this improvement has been traced to the produced strong covalent bond and hydrogen bond between epoxy groups and-COOH and-NH2 in polyamide. Besides, compared with kinds of others strings of previous research results, tennis core string added nano-silica modified by γ-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GPS) has a strength at breaking at 352.43 MPa exceeding the natural gut string, the polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF), Monofil string and integrated nylon string by 42.05%, 4.49% and 9.38%, respectively. Meanwhile, tennis core string of polyamide modified by surface-capped nanosilica (PGMNS) has a higher elastic ratio at 0.15 than the other four strings.

  4. The importance of base flow in sustaining surface water flow in the Upper Colorado River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Matthew P.; Buto, Susan G.; Susong, David D.; Rumsey, Christine

    2016-01-01

    The Colorado River has been identified as the most overallocated river in the world. Considering predicted future imbalances between water supply and demand and the growing recognition that base flow (a proxy for groundwater discharge to streams) is critical for sustaining flow in streams and rivers, there is a need to develop methods to better quantify present-day base flow across large regions. We adapted and applied the spatially referenced regression on watershed attributes (SPARROW) water quality model to assess the spatial distribution of base flow, the fraction of streamflow supported by base flow, and estimates of and potential processes contributing to the amount of base flow that is lost during in-stream transport in the Upper Colorado River Basin (UCRB). On average, 56% of the streamflow in the UCRB originated as base flow, and precipitation was identified as the dominant driver of spatial variability in base flow at the scale of the UCRB, with the majority of base flow discharge to streams occurring in upper elevation watersheds. The model estimates an average of 1.8 × 1010 m3/yr of base flow in the UCRB; greater than 80% of which is lost during in-stream transport to the Lower Colorado River Basin via processes including evapotranspiration and water diversion for irrigation. Our results indicate that surface waters in the Colorado River Basin are dependent on base flow, and that management approaches that consider groundwater and surface water as a joint resource will be needed to effectively manage current and future water resources in the Basin.

  5. Numerical Simulation of Electroosmotic Flow near Earthworm Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y.Q. Zu; Y.Y. Yan

    2006-01-01

    The electroosmotic flow near an earthworm surface is simulated numerically to further understand the anti soil adhesion mechanism of earthworm. A lattice Poisson method is employed to solve electric potential and charge distributions in the electric double layer along the earthworm surface. The external electric field is obtained by solving a Laplace equation. The electroosmotic flow controlled by the Navier-Stokes equations with external body force is simulated by the lattice Boltzmann method. A benchmark test shows that accurate electric potential distributions can be obtained by the LPM. The simulation shows that the moving vortices,which probably contribute to anti soil adhesion,are fonned near earthworm body surface by the nonuniform and variational electrical force.

  6. Foam Core Particleboards with Intumescent FRT Veneer: Cone Calorimeter Testing With Varying Adhesives, Surface Layer Thicknesses, and Processing Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark A. Dietenberger; Johannes Welling; Ali Shalbafan

    2014-01-01

    Intumescent FRT Veneers adhered to the surface of foam core particleboard to provide adequate fire protection were evaluated by means of cone calorimeter tests (ASTM E1354). The foam core particleboards were prepared with variations in surface layer treatment, adhesives, surface layer thicknesses, and processing conditions. Ignitability, heat release rate profile, peak...

  7. Compositional variation within thick (>10 m) flow units of Mauna Kea Volcano cored by the Hawaii Scientific Drilling Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shichun; Vollinger, Michael J.; Frey, Frederick A.; Rhodes, J. Michael; Zhang, Qun

    2016-07-01

    Geochemical analyses of stratigraphic sequences of lava flows are necessary to understand how a volcano works. Typically one sample from each lava flow is collected and studied with the assumption that this sample is representative of the flow composition. This assumption may not be valid. The thickness of flows ranges from 100 m. Geochemical heterogeneity in thin flows may be created by interaction with the surficial environment whereas magmatic processes occurring during emplacement may create geochemical heterogeneities in thick flows. The Hawaii Scientific Drilling Project (HSDP) cored ∼3.3 km of basalt erupted at Mauna Kea Volcano. In order to determine geochemical heterogeneities in a flow, multiple samples from four thick (9.3-98.4 m) HSDP flow units were analyzed for major and trace elements. We found that major element abundances in three submarine flow units are controlled by the varying proportion of olivine, the primary phenocryst phase in these samples. Post-magmatic alteration of a subaerial flow led to loss of SiO2, CaO, Na2O, K2O and P2O5, and as a consequence, contents of immobile elements, such as Fe2O3 and Al2O3, increase. The mobility of SiO2 is important because Mauma Kea shield lavas divide into two groups that differ in SiO2 content. Post-magmatic mobility of SiO2 adds complexity to determining if these groups reflect differences in source or process. The most mobile elements during post-magmatic subaerial and submarine alteration are K and Rb, and Ba, Sr and U were also mobile, but their abundances are not highly correlated with K and Rb. The Ba/Th ratio has been used to document an important role for a plagioclase-rich source component for basalt from the Galapagos, Iceland and Hawaii. Although Ba/Th is anomalously high in Hawaiian basalt, variation in Ba abundance within a single flow shows that it is not a reliable indicator of a deep source component. In contrast, ratios involving elements that are typically immobile, such as La/Nb, La

  8. Investigation of aluminum surface cleaning using cavitating fluid flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ralys, Aurimas; Striška, Vytautas; Mokšin, Vadim [Vilnius Gediminas Technical University, Faculty of Mechanics, Department of Machine Engineering, J. Basanavičiaus str.28, 03224, Vilnius (Lithuania)

    2013-12-16

    This paper investigates efficiency of specially designed atomizer used to spray water and cavitate microbubbles in water flow. Surface cleaning system was used to clean machined (grinded) aluminum surface from abrasive particles. It is established that cleaning efficiency depends on diameter of the diffuser, water pressure and distance between nozzle and metal surface. It is obtained that the best cleaning efficiency (100%) is achieved at pressure 36 bar, when diameter of diffuser is 0.4 mm and distance between nozzle and surface is 1 mm. It is also established that satisfactory cleaning efficiency (80%) is achieved not only when atomizer is placed closer to metal surface, but also at larger (120 mm) distances.

  9. Improved methodologies for continuous-flow analysis of stable water isotopes in ice cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Tyler R.; White, James W. C.; Steig, Eric J.; Vaughn, Bruce H.; Morris, Valerie; Gkinis, Vasileios; Markle, Bradley R.; Schoenemann, Spruce W.

    2017-02-01

    Water isotopes in ice cores are used as a climate proxy for local temperature and regional atmospheric circulation as well as evaporative conditions in moisture source regions. Traditional measurements of water isotopes have been achieved using magnetic sector isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). However, a number of recent studies have shown that laser absorption spectrometry (LAS) performs as well or better than IRMS. The new LAS technology has been combined with continuous-flow analysis (CFA) to improve data density and sample throughput in numerous prior ice coring projects. Here, we present a comparable semi-automated LAS-CFA system for measuring high-resolution water isotopes of ice cores. We outline new methods for partitioning both system precision and mixing length into liquid and vapor components - useful measures for defining and improving the overall performance of the system. Critically, these methods take into account the uncertainty of depth registration that is not present in IRMS nor fully accounted for in other CFA studies. These analyses are achieved using samples from a South Pole firn core, a Greenland ice core, and the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) Divide ice core. The measurement system utilizes a 16-position carousel contained in a freezer to consecutively deliver ˜ 1 m × 1.3 cm2 ice sticks to a temperature-controlled melt head, where the ice is converted to a continuous liquid stream and eventually vaporized using a concentric nebulizer for isotopic analysis. An integrated delivery system for water isotope standards is used for calibration to the Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water (VSMOW) scale, and depth registration is achieved using a precise overhead laser distance device with an uncertainty of ±0.2 mm. As an added check on the system, we perform inter-lab LAS comparisons using WAIS Divide ice samples, a corroboratory step not taken in prior CFA studies. The overall results are important for substantiating data obtained from LAS

  10. A comparison of tonsillar surface swabbing, fine-needle aspiration core sampling, and dissected tonsillar core biopsy culture in children with recurrent tonsillitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Saurav; Sil, Abheek; Sarkar, Soma; Sikder, Biswajit

    2017-06-01

    In recurrent tonsillitis, the pathogenic bacteria are harbored in the tonsil core, and therefore cultures of superficial swab samples are not particularly accurate in identifying specific types of core bacteria. On the other hand, the results of fine-needle aspiration (FNA) cultures of core samples have been closely correlated with the findings of core cultures in excised tonsils, and both methods are far superior to surface swabbing. We conducted a prospective study to compare the accuracy of culture findings from tonsillar tissue obtained by surface swabbing, FNA sampling of the tonsil core in situ, and core sampling of the excised tonsil in children with recurrent tonsillitis. Our patient population was made up of 54 children-22 boys and 32 girls, aged 4 to 14 years (mean: 10.7)-who were undergoing elective tonsillectomy during a 1-year period. On the day of surgery, a surface swab, core FNA sample, and dissected core sample were obtained from each patient and sent for culture. Culture showed that the three methods were in agreement in 34 cases (63.0%). In 9 cases (16.7%) the surface swab culture grew different pathogens from those of the two core cultures, and in 3 other cases (5.6%) the surface swab culture was negative while the two core cultures were positive for the same pathogens. In all, the results of core FNA culture and dissected core culture were in agreement in 46 cases (85.2%); in only 4 cases (7.4%) did the core FNA culture fail to accurately identify the causative pathogens. Overall, the sensitivity and specificity of core FNA sampling were 100 and 50% respectively, compared with 82.9 and 30.8% for the superficial tonsillar swab. We conclude that routine culture of surface swab specimens in patients with chronic or recurrent tonsillitis is neither reliable nor valid. We recommend that core FNA sampling be considered the diagnostic method of choice since it can be done on an outpatient basis, it would reliably allow for culture-directed antibiotic

  11. Core flows and heat transfer induced by inhomogeneous cooling with sub- and supercritical convection

    CERN Document Server

    Dietrich, Wieland; Wicht, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    The amount and spatial pattern of heat extracted from cores of terrestrial planets is ultimately controlled by the thermal structure of the lower rocky mantle. Using the most common model to tackle this problem, a rapidly rotating and differentially cooled spherical shell containing an incompressible and viscous liquid is numerically investigated. To gain the physical basics, we consider a simple, equatorial symmetric perturbation of the CMB heat flux shaped as a spherical harmonic $Y_{11}$. The thermodynamic properties of the induced flows mainly depend on the degree of nonlinearity parametrised by a horizontal Rayleigh number $Ra_h=q^\\ast Ra$, where $q^\\ast$ is the relative CMB heat flux anomaly amplitude and $Ra$ is the Rayleigh number which controls radial buoyancy-driven convection. Depending on $Ra_h$ we characterise three flow regimes through their spatial patterns, heat transport and flow speed scalings: in the linear conductive regime the radial inward flow is found to be phase shifted $90^\\circ$ eas...

  12. Characterizing developing adverse pressure gradient flows subject to surface roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzek, Brian; Chao, Donald; Turan, Özden; Castillo, Luciano

    2010-04-01

    An experimental study was conducted to examine the effects of surface roughness and adverse pressure gradient (APG) on the development of a turbulent boundary layer. Hot-wire anemometry measurements were carried out using single and X-wire probes in all regions of a developing APG flow in an open return wind tunnel test section. The same experimental conditions (i.e., T ∞, U ref, and C p) were maintained for smooth, k + = 0, and rough, k + = 41-60, surfaces with Reynolds number based on momentum thickness, 3,000 carefully designed such that the x-dependence in the flow field was known. Despite this fact, only a very small region of the boundary layer showed a balance of the various terms in the integrated boundary layer equation. The skin friction computed from this technique showed up to a 58% increase due to the surface roughness. Various equilibrium parameters were studied and the effect of roughness was investigated. The generated flow was not in equilibrium according to the Clauser (J Aero Sci 21:91-108, 1954) definition due to its developing nature. After a development region, the flow reached the equilibrium condition as defined by Castillo and George (2001), where Λ = const, is the pressure gradient parameter. Moreover, it was found that this equilibrium condition can be used to classify developing APG flows. Furthermore, the Zagarola and Smits (J Fluid Mech 373:33-79, 1998a) scaling of the mean velocity deficit, U ∞δ*/δ, can also be used as a criteria to classify developing APG flows which supports the equilibrium condition of Castillo and George (2001). With this information a ‘full APG region’ was defined.

  13. Squeezed hollow-core photonic Bragg fiber for surface sensing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingwen; Qu, Hang; Skorobogatiy, Maksim

    2016-07-11

    We propose to use squeezed hollow-core photonic bandgap Bragg fibers for surface sensing applications. We demonstrate theoretically and confirm experimentally that squeezing a section of the Bragg fiber core increases overlap between the optical fields of the core guided modes and the modes bound to the sensing layer, thus, significantly enhancing their interaction via anticrossing phenomenon, which, in turn, enhances surface sensitivity of the fiber sensor. As a practical demonstration, we apply our fiber sensor to in situ monitoring of the dissolution dynamics of a sub-micron-thick polyvinyl butyral (PVB) film coated on the surface of the liquid-filled Bragg fiber core. Strong spectral shift is observed during the dissolution of the PVB film, and a surface spectral sensitivity of ~0.07nm/nm is achieved experimentally with aqueous analytes. The proposed fiber sensor offers a new sensing modality and opens new sensing applications for photonic bandgap fibers, such as real-time detection of binding and affinity, study of kinetics, etc. for a range of chemical and biological samples.

  14. Asteroseismic measurement of surface-to-core rotation in a main-sequence star*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurtz Donald W.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We have discovered rotationally split core g-mode triplets and surface p-mode triplets and quintuplets in a terminal age main-sequence A star, KIC 11145123, that shows both δ Sct p-mode pulsations and γ Dor g-mode pulsations. This gives the first robust determination of the rotation of the deep core and surface of a main-sequence star, essentially model-independently. We find its rotation to be nearly uniform with a period near 100 d, but we show with high confidence that the surface rotates slightly faster than the core. A strong angular momentum transfer mechanism must be operating to produce the nearly rigid rotation, and a mechanism other than viscosity must be operating to produce a more rapidly rotating surface than core. Our asteroseismic result, along with previous asteroseismic constraints on internal rotation in some B stars, and measurements of internal rotation in some subgiant, giant and white dwarf stars, has made angular momentum transport in stars throughout their lifetimes an observational science.

  15. Applying CFD in the Analysis of Heavy-Oil Transportation in Curved Pipes Using Core-Flow Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Conceição

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Multiphase flow of oil, gas and water occurs in the petroleum industry from the reservoir to the processing units. The occurrence of heavy oils in the world is increasing significantly and points to the need for greater investment in the reservoirs exploitation and, consequently, to the development of new technologies for the production and transport of this oil. Therefore, it is interesting improve techniques to ensure an increase in energy efficiency in the transport of this oil. The core-flow technique is one of the most advantageous methods of lifting and transporting of oil. The core-flow technique does not alter the oil viscosity, but change the flow pattern and thus, reducing friction during heavy oil transportation. This flow pattern is characterized by a fine water pellicle that is formed close to the inner wall of the pipe, aging as lubricant of the oil flowing in the core of the pipe. In this sense, the objective of this paper is to study the isothermal flow of heavy oil in curved pipelines, employing the core-flow technique. A three-dimensional, transient and isothermal mathematical model that considers the mixture and k-e  turbulence models to address the gas-water-heavy oil three-phase flow in the pipe was applied for analysis. Simulations with different flow patterns of the involved phases (oil-gas-water have been done, in order to optimize the transport of heavy oils. Results of pressure and volumetric fraction distribution of the involved phases are presented and analyzed. It was verified that the oil core lubricated by a fine water layer flowing in the pipe considerably decreases pressure drop.

  16. Spatial development of the wind-driven water surface flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemin, Rémi; Caulliez, Guillemette

    2015-04-01

    The water velocity field induced by wind and waves beneath an air-water interface is investigated experimentally versus fetch in the large Marseille-Luminy wind wave tank. Measurements of the vertical velocity profiles inside the subsurface shear layer were performed by a three-component Nortek acoustic Doppler velocimeter. The surface drift current was also derived from visualizations of small floating drifters recorded by a video camera looking vertically from above the water surface. Surface wave height and slopes were determined simultaneously by means of capacitance gauges and a single-point laser slope system located in the immediate vicinity of the profiler. Observations were made at steady low to moderate wind speeds and various fetches ranging between 1 and 15 meters. This study first corroborates that the thin subsurface water boundary layer forced by wind at the leading edge of the water sheet is laminar. The surface drift current velocity indeed increases gradually with fetch, following a 1/3 power law characteristic of an accelerated flat-plate laminar boundary layer. The laminar-turbulent transition manifests itself by a sudden decrease in the water surface flow velocity and a rapid deepening of the boundary layer due to the development of large-scale longitudinal vortices. Further downstream, when characteristic capillary-gravity wind waves develop at the surface, the water flow velocity increases again rapidly within a sublayer of typically 4 mm depth. This phenomenon is explained by the occurrence of an intense momentum flux from waves to the mean flow due to the dissipation of parasitic capillaries generated ahead of the dominant wave crests. This phenomenon also sustains significant small-scale turbulent motions within the whole boundary layer. However, when gravity-capillary waves of length longer than 10 cm then grow at the water surface, the mean flow velocity field decreases drastically over the whole boundary layer thickness. At the same

  17. Drag reduction in turbulent flows over superhydrophobic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniello, Robert J.; Waterhouse, Nicholas E.; Rothstein, Jonathan P.

    2009-08-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate that periodic, micropatterned superhydrophobic surfaces, previously noted for their ability to provide laminar flow drag reduction, are capable of reducing drag in the turbulent flow regime. Superhydrophobic surfaces contain micro- or nanoscale hydrophobic features which can support a shear-free air-water interface between peaks in the surface topology. Particle image velocimetry and pressure drop measurements were used to observe significant slip velocities, shear stress, and pressure drop reductions corresponding to drag reductions approaching 50%. At a given Reynolds number, drag reduction is found to increase with increasing feature size and spacing, as in laminar flows. No observable drag reduction was noted in the laminar regime, consistent with previous experimental results for the channel geometry considered. The onset of drag reduction occurs at a critical Reynolds number where the viscous sublayer thickness approaches the scale of the superhydrophobic microfeatures and performance is seen to increase with further reduction in viscous sublayer height. These results indicate superhydrophobic surfaces may provide a significant drag reducing mechanism for marine vessels.

  18. Surface Plasmon Scattering in Exposed Core Optical Fiber for Enhanced Resolution Refractive Index Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizaveta Klantsataya

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Refractometric sensors based on optical excitation of surface plasmons on the side of an optical fiber is an established sensing architecture that has enabled laboratory demonstrations of cost effective portable devices for biological and chemical applications. Here we report a Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR configuration realized in an Exposed Core Microstructured Optical Fiber (ECF capable of optimizing both sensitivity and resolution. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of fabrication of a rough metal coating suitable for spectral interrogation of scattered plasmonic wave using chemical electroless plating technique on a 10 μm diameter exposed core of the ECF. Performance of the sensor in terms of its refractive index sensitivity and full width at half maximum (FWHM of SPR response is compared to that achieved with an unstructured bare core fiber with 140 μm core diameter. The experimental improvement in FWHM, and therefore the detection limit, is found to be a factor of two (75 nm for ECF in comparison to 150 nm for the large core fiber. Refractive index sensitivity of 1800 nm/RIU was achieved for both fibers in the sensing range of aqueous environment (1.33–1.37 suitable for biosensing applications.

  19. Surface Plasmon Scattering in Exposed Core Optical Fiber for Enhanced Resolution Refractive Index Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klantsataya, Elizaveta; François, Alexandre; Ebendorff-Heidepriem, Heike; Hoffmann, Peter; Monro, Tanya M.

    2015-01-01

    Refractometric sensors based on optical excitation of surface plasmons on the side of an optical fiber is an established sensing architecture that has enabled laboratory demonstrations of cost effective portable devices for biological and chemical applications. Here we report a Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) configuration realized in an Exposed Core Microstructured Optical Fiber (ECF) capable of optimizing both sensitivity and resolution. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of fabrication of a rough metal coating suitable for spectral interrogation of scattered plasmonic wave using chemical electroless plating technique on a 10 μm diameter exposed core of the ECF. Performance of the sensor in terms of its refractive index sensitivity and full width at half maximum (FWHM) of SPR response is compared to that achieved with an unstructured bare core fiber with 140 μm core diameter. The experimental improvement in FWHM, and therefore the detection limit, is found to be a factor of two (75 nm for ECF in comparison to 150 nm for the large core fiber). Refractive index sensitivity of 1800 nm/RIU was achieved for both fibers in the sensing range of aqueous environment (1.33–1.37) suitable for biosensing applications. PMID:26426022

  20. Deep mantle heat flow and thermal evolution of the Earth's core based on thermo-chemical mantle convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, T.; Tackley, P.; Buffett, B.

    2004-12-01

    A coupled core-mantle evolution model that combines the global heat balance in the core with a fully-dynamical thermo-chemical mantle convection [Nakagawa and Tackley, 2004 published in EPSL] is used to investigate the deep mantle heat flow that is required to sustain the magnetic field generated by the geodynamo process. Effects of a radioactive heat source due to potassium in the core are also included in the global heat balance in the Earth??s core. Two important parameters are checked in this study; (1) density variation between depleted hartzbergite and basaltic material (0 to 3 percent) and (2) concentration of radioactive potassium in the core alloy (0ppm to 400ppm). The parameter set that most closely satisfies the criteria of size of the inner core (1220km at present time) is around 2 percent of density difference in a convecting mantle and 200ppm of radioactive heat source in the core. The concentration of potassium in the core is consistent with the geochemical approach [Murthy et al., 2003] but smaller than other successful thermal evolution models [Labrosse, 2003; Nimmo et al., 2004]. Heat flow through the core-mantle boundary and the contribution of radioactive heat sources in the core are consistent with theoretical estimates [e.g. Buffett, 2002] and geochemical constraints [Gessmann and Wood, 2002]. The power available to the geodynamo, based on the predicted heat flow through the core-mantle boundary, is approximately four times greater than the value predicted by numerical models of the geodynamo [Christensen and Kutzner, 2004] but closer to theoretical estimates [e.g. Buffett, 2002].

  1. Mass Redistribution in the Core and Time-varying Gravity at the Earth's Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Wei-Jia; Chao, Benjamin F.; Fang, Ming

    2003-01-01

    The Earth's liquid outer core is in convection, as suggested by the existence of the geomagnetic field in much of the Earth's history. One consequence of the convection is the redistribution of mass resulting from relative motion among fluid parcels with slightly different densities. This time dependent mass redistribution inside the core produces a small perturbation on the gravity field of the Earth. With our numerical dynamo solutions, we find that the mass redistribution (and the resultant gravity field) symmetric about the equator is much stronger than that anti-symmetric about the equator. In particular, J(sub 2) component is the strongest. In addition, the gravity field variation increases with the Rayleigh number that measures the driving force for the geodynamo in the core. With reasonable scaling from the current dynamo solutions, we could expect that at the surface of the Earth, the J(sub 2) variation from the core is on the order of l0(exp -16)/year relative to the mean (i.e. spherically symmetric) gravity field of the Earth. The possible shielding effect due to core-mantle boundary pressure variation loading is likely much smaller and is therefore negligible. Our results suggest that time-varying gravity field perturbation due to core mass redistribution may be measured with modem space geodetic observations, which will result a new means of detecting dynamical processes in the Earth's deep interior.

  2. Mass Redistribution in the Core and Time-varying Gravity at the Earth's Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Wei-Jia; Chao, Benjamin F.; Fang, Ming

    2003-01-01

    The Earth's liquid outer core is in convection, as suggested by the existence of the geomagnetic field in much of the Earth's history. One consequence of the convection is the redistribution of mass resulting from relative motion among fluid parcels with slightly different densities. This time dependent mass redistribution inside the core produces a small perturbation on the gravity field of the Earth. With our numerical dynamo solutions, we find that the mass redistribution (and the resultant gravity field) symmetric about the equator is much stronger than that anti-symmetric about the equator. In particular, J(sub 2) component is the strongest. In addition, the gravity field variation increases with the Rayleigh number that measures the driving force for the geodynamo in the core. With reasonable scaling from the current dynamo solutions, we could expect that at the surface of the Earth, the J(sub 2) variation from the core is on the order of l0(exp -16)/year relative to the mean (i.e. spherically symmetric) gravity field of the Earth. The possible shielding effect due to core-mantle boundary pressure variation loading is likely much smaller and is therefore negligible. Our results suggest that time-varying gravity field perturbation due to core mass redistribution may be measured with modem space geodetic observations, which will result a new means of detecting dynamical processes in the Earth's deep interior.

  3. Estimating Stream Surface Flow Velocities from Video Clips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weijs, S. V.; Brauchli, T.; Chen, Z.; Huwald, H.

    2014-12-01

    Measuring surface flow velocities in streams can provide important information on discharge. This information is independent of water level, the most commonly used proxy for discharge and therefore has significant potential to reduce uncertainties. Advances in cheap and commonly used imaging devices (e.g. smartphone cameras) and image processing techniques offer new opportunities to get velocity information. Short video clips of streams can be used in combination with optical flow algorithms to get proxies for stream surface velocities. Here some initial results are presented and the main challenges are discussed, especially in view of using these techniques in a citizen science context (specifically the "WeSenseIt" project, a citizen observatory of water), where we try to minimize the need for site preparation and additional equipment needed to take measurements.

  4. Measuring surface flow velocity with smartphones: potential for citizen observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weijs, Steven V.; Chen, Zichong; Brauchli, Tristan; Huwald, Hendrik

    2014-05-01

    Stream flow velocity is an important variable for discharge estimation and research on sediment dynamics. Given the influence of the latter on rating curves (stage-discharge relations), and the relative scarcity of direct streamflow measurements, surface velocity measurements can offer important information for, e.g., flood warning, hydropower, and hydrological science and engineering in general. With the growing amount of sensing and computing power in the hands of more outdoorsy individuals, and the advances in image processing techniques, there is now a tremendous potential to obtain hydrologically relevant data from motivated citizens. This is the main focus of the interdisciplinary "WeSenseIt" project, a citizen observatory of water. In this subproject, we investigate the feasibility of stream flow surface velocity measurements from movie clips taken by (smartphone-) cameras. First results from movie-clip derived velocity information will be shown and compared to reference measurements.

  5. Injection Induced Mixing in Flows Separating From Smooth Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, John J. (Technical Monitor); Wundrow, David W.

    2004-01-01

    An analytic model for predicting the effect of unsteady local surface injection on the flow separating from a streamlined body at angle of attack is proposed. The model uses the premise that separation control results from enhanced mixing along the shear layer that develops between the main stream and the fluid in the underlying recirculation zone. High-Reynolds-number asymptotic methods are used to connect the unsteady surface injection to an instability wave propagating on the separating shear layer and then to the large-scale coherent structures that produce the increased mixing. The results is a tool that can guide the choice of fluid-actuator parameters to maximize flow-control effectiveness and may also facilitate computer-based numerical experiments.

  6. Magnetohydrodynamic Vortex Behavior in Free-Surface Channel Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubricht, J.; Rhoads, J.; Spence, E.; Ji, H.

    2011-10-01

    Flowing liquid plasma-facing systems have been proposed for fusion devices due to their structural consistency and capability to withstand enormous heat fluxes. In support of these designs, the effects of magnetic field on the thermal mixing of conductive fluids need to be studied and understood. The Princeton Liquid Metal Experiment (LMX) consists of a free-surface, externally driven channel flow subjected to a strong vertical magnetic field. LMX uses an infrared camera and non-intrusive heat signatures to visually study the vortex street of a vertical cylinder while an array of potential probes has been installed to map the velocity profile for varying magnetic field strengths. Our studies show a decrease in surface activity with increasing field strength as well as distinct changes in vortex behavior. Velocity distributions across the channel are compared with infrared observations and the relationship between Strouhal number and magnetic field strength is examined.

  7. Heat Transfer Enhancement in Turbulent Flows by Blocked Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onur YEMENİCİ

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the heat transfer analyses over flat and blocked surfaces were carried out in turbulent flow under the influence of the block height. A constant-temperature hot wire anemometer was used to the velocity and turbulent intensity measurements, while temperature values were measured by copper-constantan thermocouples. The average Stanton numbers for block heights of 15 and 25 mm were higher than those of flat surface by %38 and %84, respectively. The results showed that the presence of the blocks increased the heat transfer and the enhancement rose with block heights

  8. Integrated Surface-enhanced Raman Spectroscopy chip based on liquid core waveguide

    CERN Document Server

    Lai, Chunhong; Chen, Li; Li, Junhui; Liu, Qinghao; Xu, Yi

    2015-01-01

    We propose an integrated surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) chip based on liquid-core waveguide with total reflection, through which the depression of leaky mode enable a long propagating distance. An Raman enhancement factor for rhodamine 6G of 2.5*105 is obtained, and a excellent repeatability is shown. The peaks in the SERS spectrum of DNA of silkworm clearly illustrate the information of the molecule structure. The integration of the SERS substrate, micro-fluid, and liquid-core waveguide make such a SERS chip attractive for biochemical detection with high performance.

  9. First-principles calculation of core-level binding energy shift in surface chemical processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Combined with third generation synchrotron radiation light sources, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) with higher energy resolution, brilliance, enhanced surface sensitivity and photoemission cross section in real time found extensive applications in solid-gas interface chemistry. This paper reports the calculation of the core-level binding energy shifts (CLS) using the first-principles density functional theory. The interplay between the CLS calculations and XPS measurements to uncover the structures, adsorption sites and chemical reactions in complex surface chemical processes are highlight. Its application on clean low index (111) and vicinal transition metal surfaces, molecular adsorption in terms of sites and configuration, and reaction kinetics are domonstrated.

  10. Immiscible displacement of oil by water in a microchannel: Asymmetric flow behavior and nonlinear stability analysis of core-annular flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foroughi, Hooman; Abbasi, Alireza; Das, Kausik S.; Kawaji, Masahiro

    2012-02-01

    The immiscible displacement of oil by water in a circular microchannel was investigated. A fused silica microchannel with an inner diameter of 250 μm and a length of 7 cm was initially filled with a viscous silicone oil. Only water then was injected into the channel. We describe our flow observations based on the two-dimensional images captured in the middle of the channel. The water finger displaced the oil and left an oil film on the channel wall. While the oil was being displaced at the core, the flow resistance decreased, which resulted in increases in water flow rate and inertia. Eventually, the water finger reached the channel exit and formed a core-annular flow pattern. The wavelength of the waves formed at the oil-water interface also increased with the increase in inertia. The initially symmetric interfacial waves became asymmetric with time. Also, the water core shifted from the center of the channel and left a thinner oil film on one side of the microchannel. Under all flow rates tested in this study, as long as the water was continuously injected, the water core was stable and no breakup into droplets was observed. We also discuss the flow stability based on nonlinear and linear stability analyses performed on the core-annular flow. Compared to the linear analysis, which ignores the inertia effects, the nonlinear analysis, which includes the inertia effects, predicts longer interfacial wavelengths by a factor of (1)/(1-(ao)/(2)(Wew+Weo(ao2)/(1-ao2))) where Wew and Weo are the Weber numbers of the water and the oil phases, respectively, and ao is the unperturbed water core radius made dimensionless by the channel radius.

  11. Immiscible displacement of oil by water in a microchannel: asymmetric flow behavior and nonlinear stability analysis of core-annular flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foroughi, Hooman; Abbasi, Alireza; Das, Kausik S; Kawaji, Masahiro

    2012-02-01

    The immiscible displacement of oil by water in a circular microchannel was investigated. A fused silica microchannel with an inner diameter of 250 μm and a length of 7 cm was initially filled with a viscous silicone oil. Only water then was injected into the channel. We describe our flow observations based on the two-dimensional images captured in the middle of the channel. The water finger displaced the oil and left an oil film on the channel wall. While the oil was being displaced at the core, the flow resistance decreased, which resulted in increases in water flow rate and inertia. Eventually, the water finger reached the channel exit and formed a core-annular flow pattern. The wavelength of the waves formed at the oil-water interface also increased with the increase in inertia. The initially symmetric interfacial waves became asymmetric with time. Also, the water core shifted from the center of the channel and left a thinner oil film on one side of the microchannel. Under all flow rates tested in this study, as long as the water was continuously injected, the water core was stable and no breakup into droplets was observed. We also discuss the flow stability based on nonlinear and linear stability analyses performed on the core-annular flow. Compared to the linear analysis, which ignores the inertia effects, the nonlinear analysis, which includes the inertia effects, predicts longer interfacial wavelengths by a factor of 1/sqrt[1-a(o)/2(We(w) + We(o)a(o)(2)/1-a(o)(2))] where We(w) and We(o) are the Weber numbers of the water and the oil phases, respectively, and a(o) is the unperturbed water core radius made dimensionless by the channel radius.

  12. Inelastic non-Newtonian flow over heterogeneously slippery surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, A. Sander; Wood, Jeffery A.; Sprakel, Lisette M. J.; Lammertink, Rob G. H.

    2017-02-01

    In this study, we investigated inelastic non-Newtonian fluid flow over heterogeneously slippery surfaces. First, we simulated the flow of aqueous xanthan gum solutions over a bubble mattress, which is a superhydrophobic surface consisting of transversely positioned no-slip walls and no-shear gas bubbles. The results reveal that for shear-thinning fluids wall slip can be increased significantly, provided that the system is operated in the shear-thinning regime. For a 0.2 wt% xanthan gum solution with a power-law index of n =0.4 , the numerical results indicate that wall slip can be enhanced 3.2 times when compared to a Newtonian liquid. This enhancement factor was also predicted from a theoretical analysis, which gave an expression for the maximum slip length that can be attained over flat, heterogeneously slippery surfaces. Although this equation was derived for a no-slip/no-shear unit length that is much larger than the typical size of the system, we found that it can also be used to predict the enhancement in the regime where the slip length is proportional to the size of the no-shear region or the bubble width. The results could be coupled to the hydrodynamic development or entrance length of the system, as maximum wall slip is only reached when the fluid flow can fully adapt to the no-slip and no-shear conditions at the wall.

  13. Behaviour of steel pipe exposed to fouling by heavy oil during core-annular flow; Comportamento de tubo de aco exposto a sujeira de oleo pesado durante escoamento nucleo-anular

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa, Adriana; Bannwart, Antonio C. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Mecanica. Dept. de Engenharia de Petroleo

    2004-07-01

    The use of water-assisted technologies such as core-annular flow to the pipelines of viscous oils has been proposed as an attractive alternative for production and transportation of heavy crudes in both onshore and offshore scenarios. Usually, core-annular flow can be created by injecting a relatively small water flow rate laterally in the pipe, so as to form a thin water annulus surrounding the viscous oil, which is pumped through the center. The reduction in friction losses obtained thanks to lubrication by water is significant, since the pressure drop in a steady state core flow becomes comparable to water flow only. For a complete assessment of core flow technology, however, unwanted effects associated with possible oil adhesion onto the pipe wall should be investigated, since these may cause severe fouling of the wall and pressure drop increase. It has been observed that oil adhesion on metallic surfaces may occur for certain types of crude and oilphilic pipe materials. In this work we present results of pressure drop monitoring during 35 hour-operation of a heavy oil-water core annular flow in a 26.08 mm. i.d. horizontal steel pipe. The oil used is described in terms of its main components and the results of static wet ability tests are also presented for comparison (author)

  14. Influence of Elastic and Surface Strains on the Optical Properties of Semiconducting Core-Shell Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangeri, John; Heinonen, Olle; Karpeyev, Dmitry; Nakhmanson, Serge

    2015-07-01

    Core-shell nanoparticle systems of Zn-ZnO and ZnO-TiO2 are studied computationally using finite-element methods. The inclusion of a surface free energy and the elastic mismatch of the core and shell create an imprinting effect within the shell structure that produces a wide variation of strains. Due to this diversity of strains, the sharp, direct, band-gap edges of the bulk semiconductor are observed to be broadened. We show that a variety of factors, such as particle size, core-to-shell volume ratio, applied hydrostatic pressure, shell microstructure, as well as the effect of elastic anisotropy, can influence the distribution of optical band-gap values throughout the particle.

  15. Incompressible material point method for free surface flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Xiong; Sze, Kam Yim; Lian, Yanping; Liu, Yan

    2017-02-01

    To overcome the shortcomings of the weakly compressible material point method (WCMPM) for modeling the free surface flow problems, an incompressible material point method (iMPM) is proposed based on operator splitting technique which splits the solution of momentum equation into two steps. An intermediate velocity field is first obtained by solving the momentum equations ignoring the pressure gradient term, and then the intermediate velocity field is corrected by the pressure term to obtain a divergence-free velocity field. A level set function which represents the signed distance to free surface is used to track the free surface and apply the pressure boundary conditions. Moreover, an hourglass damping is introduced to suppress the spurious velocity modes which are caused by the discretization of the cell center velocity divergence from the grid vertexes velocities when solving pressure Poisson equations. Numerical examples including dam break, oscillation of a cubic liquid drop and a droplet impact into deep pool show that the proposed incompressible material point method is much more accurate and efficient than the weakly compressible material point method in solving free surface flow problems.

  16. Solder flow over fine line PWB surface finishes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosking, F.M.; Hernandez, C.L.

    1998-08-01

    The rapid advancement of interconnect technology has stimulated the development of alternative printed wiring board (PWB) surface finishes to enhance the solderability of standard copper and solder-coated surfaces. These new finishes are based on either metallic or organic chemistries. As part of an ongoing solderability study, Sandia National Laboratories has investigated the solder flow behavior of two azole-based organic solderability preservations, immersion Au, immersion Ag, electroless Pd, and electroless Pd/Ni on fine line copper features. The coated substrates were solder tested in the as-fabricated and environmentally-stressed conditions. Samples were processed through an inerted reflow machine. The azole-based coatings generally provided the most effective protection after aging. Thin Pd over Cu yielded the best wetting results of the metallic coatings, with complete dissolution of the Pd overcoat and wetting of the underlying Cu by the flowing solder. Limited wetting was measured on the thicker Pd and Pd over Ni finishes, which were not completely dissolved by the molten solder. The immersion Au and Ag finishes yielded the lowest wetted lengths, respectively. These general differences in solderability were directly attributed to the type of surface finish which the solder came in contact with. The effects of circuit geometry, surface finish, stressing, and solder processing conditions are discussed.

  17. Examining metal nanoparticle surface chemistry using hollow-core, photonic-crystal, fiber-assisted SERS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eftekhari, Fatemeh; Lee, Anna; Kumacheva, Eugenia; Helmy, Amr S

    2012-02-15

    In this Letter, we demonstrate the efficacy of hollow core photonic crystal fibers (HCPCFs) as a surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) platform for investigating the ligand exchange process on the surface of gold nanoparticles. Raman measurements carried out using this platform show the capability to monitor minute amounts of surface ligands on gold nanoparticles used as an SERS substrate. The SERS signal from an HCPCF exhibits a tenfold enhancement compared to that in a direct sampling scheme using a cuvette. Using exchange of cytotoxic cetyltrimethylammonium bromide with α-methoxy-ω-mercaptopoly(ethylene glycol) on the surface of gold nanorods as an exemplary system, we show the feasibility of using HCPCF SERS to monitor the change in surface chemistry of nanoparticles.

  18. Magnetohydrodynamic Stagnation Point Flow with a Convective Surface Boundary Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafar, Khamisah; Ishak, Anuar; Nazar, Roslinda

    2011-09-01

    This study analyzes the steady laminar two-dimensional stagnation point flow and heat transfer of an incompressible viscous fluid impinging normal to a horizontal plate, with the bottom surface of the plate heated by convection from a hot fluid. A uniform magnetic field is applied in a direction normal to the flat plate, with a free stream velocity varying linearly with the distance from the stagnation point. The governing partial differential equations are first transformed into ordinary differential equations, before being solved numerically. The analysis includes the effects of the magnetic parameter, the Prandtl number, and the convective parameter on the heat transfer rate at the surface. Results showed that the heat transfer rate at the surface increases with increasing values of these quantities.

  19. Magnetohydrodynamic stagnation point flow with a convective surface boundary condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jafar, Khamisah [Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia). Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment; Ishak, Anuar; Nazar, Roslinda [Universiti Kebangsaan, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia). School of Mathematical Sciences

    2011-08-15

    This study analyzes the steady laminar two-dimensional stagnation point flow and heat transfer of an incompressible viscous fluid impinging normal to a horizontal plate, with the bottom surface of the plate heated by convection from a hot fluid. A uniform magnetic field is applied in a direction normal to the flat plate, with a free stream velocity varying linearly with the distance from the stagnation point. The governing partial differential equations are first transformed into ordinary differential equations, before being solved numerically. The analysis includes the effects of the magnetic parameter, the Prandtl number, and the convective parameter on the heat transfer rate at the surface. Results showed that the heat transfer rate at the surface increases with increasing values of these quantities. (orig.)

  20. Flow boiling of water on nanocoated surfaces in a microchannel

    CERN Document Server

    Phan, Hai Trieu; Marty, Philippe; Colasson, Stéphane; Gavillet, Jérôme

    2010-01-01

    Experiments were performed to study the effects of surface wettability on flow boiling of water at atmospheric pressure. The test channel is a single rectangular channel 0.5 mm high, 5 mm wide and 180 mm long. The mass flux was set at 100 kg/m2 s and the base heat flux varied from 30 to 80 kW/m2. Water enters the test channel under subcooled conditions. The samples are silicone oxide (SiOx), titanium (Ti), diamond-like carbon (DLC) and carbon-doped silicon oxide (SiOC) surfaces with static contact angles of 26{\\deg}, 49{\\deg}, 63{\\deg} and 103{\\deg}, respectively. The results show significant impacts of surface wettability on heat transfer coefficient.

  1. A study of relative permeability parameters on rock cores using a two-phase flow test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Hui Chiao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To ensure sequestration safety, confirming the injectivity of the reservoir rock formation is of critical importance, requiring studies of the rock permeability to uncover the fluid migration scenarios within the porous reservoir rock. Two-phase (super-critical CO2-brine flow behavior following the post CO2 injection is believed to be a dominating factor; its flooding behavior within the porous rock media needs to be further clarified prior to confirming the feasibility of domestic CO2 geo-sequestration. This study aims to determine the relative permeability of rock cores obtained from field outcropping. A test facility was established to determine the relative permeability during drainage and imbibition processes using a core-flooding test characterized by displacement method. The test facility was assembled locally and is regarded as a pioneering attempt. By relevant data interpretation, the parameters of relative permeability for predicting the movement of super-critical CO2 after injection can be modeled. More reliable parameters can be obtained using history matching processes wherein time-elapsed data calibration is used in conjunction with a computer code, TOUGH2. The test results were iteratively calibrated using numerical simulation by conducting a history matching process. The K-S curves derived from best-fit parameters are believed to be the most relevant relative permeability for the reservoir rock. Through this preliminary study, a better understanding of some of the problems and limitations associated with the determination of the rock relative permeability using two-phase flow test is achieved, but more advanced research is required.

  2. Numerical Investigation Of Surface Roughness Effects On The Flow Field In A Swirl Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali SAKİN

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate axial and tangential velocity profiles, turbulent dissipation rate, turbulent kinetic energy and pressure losses under the influence of surface roughness for the swirling flow in a cyclone separator. The governing equations for this flow were solved by using Fluent CFD code. First, numerical analyses were run to verify numerical solution and domain with experimental results. Velocity profiles, turbulent parameters and pressure drops were calculated by increasing inlet velocity from 10 to 20 m/s and roughness height from 0 to 4 mm. Analyses of results showed that pressure losses are decreased and velocity field is considerably affected by increasing roughness height.

  3. Steep waves in free-surface flow past narrow topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Stephen L.; Binder, Benjamin J.; Mattner, Trent W.; Denier, James P.

    2017-06-01

    In this work, we compute steep forced solitary wave solutions for the problem of free-surface flow over a localised topographic disturbance in an otherwise flat horizontal channel bottom. A single forced solitary wave and a double-crested forced solitary wave solution are shown to exist, both of which approach the Stokes limiting configuration of an included angle of 12 0° and a stagnation point at the wave crests. The solution space for the topographically forced problem is compared to that found in Wade et al. ["On the free-surface flow of very steep forced solitary waves," J. Fluid Mech. 739, 1-21 (2014)], who considered forcing due to a localised distribution of pressure applied to the free surface. The main feature that differentiates the two types of forcing is an additional solution that exists in the pressure-forced problem, a steep wave with a cusp at a single wave crest. Our numerical results suggest that this cusped-wave solution does not exist in the topographically forced problem.

  4. TRANSPORT OF BICOMPONENT CONTAMINANT IN FREE-SURFACE WETLAND FLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Bin; ZENG Li; WU Yi-hong; JI Ping; ZHAO Yi-jun

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical analysis of a pulsed bicomponent contaminant emission into a free-surface wetland flow.The basic equations are for the bicomponent contaminant transport in the wetland flow under the combined action of advection,mass dispersion,and ecological reaction at the phase averaged scale.The effect of the ecological reaction is separated from the hydrodynamic effect via a set of widely used transforms.The analytical solution for the evolution of the depth-averaged concentration is rigorously derived,with a limiting case covering the known solution for the single component contaminant transport.It is found that the depth-averaged species concentration of the bicomponent contaminant can approach an equilibrium state determined by the distribution coefficient.

  5. Evolution of karst conduit networks in transition from pressurised flow to free surface flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perne, M.; Covington, M. D.; Gabrovšek, F.

    2014-06-01

    We present a novel modelling approach to study the evolution of conduit networks in soluble rocks. Unlike the models presented so far, the model allows a transition from pressurised (pipe) flow to a free surface (open channel) flow in evolving discrete conduit networks. It calculates flow, solute transport and dissolutional enlargement within each time step and steps through time until a stable flow pattern establishes. The flow in each time step is calculated by calling the EPA Storm Water Management Model (EPA SWMM), which efficiently solves the 1-D Saint Venant equations in a network of conduits. We present several cases with low dip and sub-vertical networks to demonstrate mechanisms of flow pathway selection. In low dip models the inputs were randomly distributed to several junctions. The evolution of pathways progresses upstream: initially pathways linking outlets to the closest inputs evolve fastest because the gradient along these pathways is largest. When a pathway efficiently drains the available recharge, the head drop along the pathway attracts flow from the neighbouring upstream junctions and new connecting pathways evolve. The mechanism progresses from the output boundary inwards until all inputs are connected to the stable flow system. In the pressurised phase, each junction is drained by at least one conduit, but only one conduit remains active in the vadose phase. The selection depends on the initial geometry of a junction, initial distribution of diameters, the evolution in a pressurised regime, and on the dip of the conduits, which plays an important role in vadose entrenchment. In high dip networks, the vadose zone propagates downwards and inwards from the rim of the massif. When a network with randomly distributed initial diameters is supplied with concentrated recharge from the adjacent area, the sink point regresses up upstream along junctions connected to the prominent pathways. Large conductive structures provide deep penetration of high

  6. Evolution of karst conduit networks in transition from pressurised flow to free surface flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Perne

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel modelling approach to study the evolution of conduit networks in soluble rocks. Unlike the models presented so far, the model allows a transition from pressurised (pipe flow to a free surface (open channel flow in evolving discrete conduit networks. It calculates flow, solute transport and dissolutional enlargement within each time step and steps through time until a stable flow pattern establishes. The flow in each time step is calculated by calling the EPA Storm Water Management Model (EPA SWMM, which efficiently solves the 1-D Saint Venant equations in a network of conduits. We present several cases with low dip and sub-vertical networks to demonstrate mechanisms of flow pathway selection. In low dip models the inputs were randomly distributed to several junctions. The evolution of pathways progresses upstream: initially pathways linking outlets to the closest inputs evolve fastest because the gradient along these pathways is largest. When a pathway efficiently drains the available recharge, the head drop along the pathway attracts flow from the neighbouring upstream junctions and new connecting pathways evolve. The mechanism progresses from the output boundary inwards until all inputs are connected to the stable flow system. In the pressurised phase, each junction is drained by at least one conduit, but only one conduit remains active in the vadose phase. The selection depends on the initial geometry of a junction, initial distribution of diameters, the evolution in a pressurised regime, and on the dip of the conduits, which plays an important role in vadose entrenchment. In high dip networks, the vadose zone propagates downwards and inwards from the rim of the massif. When a network with randomly distributed initial diameters is supplied with concentrated recharge from the adjacent area, the sink point regresses up upstream along junctions connected to the prominent pathways. Large conductive structures provide deep

  7. Preparation of quercetin imprinted core-shell organosilicate microspheres using surface imprinting technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng Yang; Wen Dan Hou; Hong Deng Qiu; Xia Liu; Sheng Xiang Jiang

    2012-01-01

    In this work,the quercetin imprinted core-shell microspheres were prepared using silica surface imprinting technique.A simple sol-gel procedure was used for the synthesis of the imprinted materials with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane as functional monomer and tetraethyl orthosilicate as crosslinker.The SEM images indicated that the MIPs shell was successfully grafted onto the silica surface.The characteristics of the molecularly imprinted polymers such as capacity,selectivity and absorption dynamic were investigated by rebinding experiments.The results showed that the prepared MIPs had good imprinting effect and adsorption amount of quercetin.

  8. Strain and flow in the metamorphic core complex of Ios Island (Cyclades, Greece)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizera, Marcel; Behrmann, Jan H.

    2016-10-01

    We have analysed strain and flow kinematics in the footwall of the South Cyclades Shear Zone (SCSZ), an important tectonic boundary within the Attic-Cycladic Crystalline Complex exposed on Ios Island, Cyclades, Aegean Sea. Coarse-grained augen gneisses in the basement unit flooring the SCSZ and forming a metamorphic core complex are excellently suited to measure finite strain using the Fry method and estimate the vorticity number ( W k) of flow with the "blocked-object" method. The results show that Oligo-Miocene exhumation of the basement unit during extension brought approximately 70 % N-S crustal stretching and up to 40 % subvertical shortening in a plane strain environment ( k = 0.99). Linear down-section strain decrease constrains a zone of contact deformation of the SCSZ of about 1.5 km thick. Kinematic vorticity number estimates suggest little deviation from pure shear ( W k = 0.26). Finite strain and W k are not correlated, indicating that the Ios basement and the overlying cover units were stretched compatibly. While the SCSZ is a localized zone of high strain, net displacement, however, may be restricted to about ten kilometres. This has important repercussions on large-scale tectonic models for extension in the Aegean.

  9. Multi-core/GPU accelerated multi-resolution simulations of compressible flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejazialhosseini, Babak; Rossinelli, Diego; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2010-11-01

    We develop a multi-resolution solver for single and multi-phase compressible flow simulations by coupling average interpolating wavelets and local time stepping schemes with high order finite volume schemes. Wavelets allow for high compression rates and explicit control over the error in adaptive representation of the flow field, but their efficient parallel implementation is hindered by the use of traditional data parallel models. In this work we demonstrate that this methodology can be implemented so that it can benefit from the processing power of emerging hybrid multicore and multi-GPU architectures. This is achieved by exploiting task-based parallelism paradigm and the concept of wavelet blocks combined with OpenCL and Intel Threading Building Blocks. The solver is able to handle high resolution jumps and benefits from adaptive time integration using local time stepping schemes as implemented on heterogeneous multi-core/GPU architectures. We demonstrate the accuracy of our method and the performance of our solver on different architectures for 2D simulations of shock-bubble interaction and Richtmeyer-Meshkov instability.

  10. Modification of Turbulent Boundary Layer Flows by Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gose, James W.; Golovin, Kevin; Barros, Julio; Schultz, Michael P.; Tuteja, Anish; Perlin, Marc; Ceccio, Steven L.

    2016-11-01

    Measurements of near zero pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer (TBL) flow over several superhydrophobic surfaces (SHSs) are presented and compared to those for a hydraulically smooth baseline. The surfaces were developed at the University of Michigan as part of an ongoing research thrust to investigate the feasibility of SHSs for skin-friction drag reduction in turbulent flow. The SHSs were previously evaluated in fully-developed turbulent channel flow and have been shown to provide meaningful drag reduction. The TBL experiments were conducted at the USNA in a water tunnel with a test section 2.0 m (L) x 0.2 m (W) x 0.2 m (H). The free-stream speed was set to 1.26 m/s which corresponded to a friction Reynolds number of 1,500. The TBL was tripped at the test section inlet with a 0.8 mm diameter wire. The upper and side walls provided optical access, while the lower wall was either the smooth baseline or a spray coated SHS. The velocity measurements were obtained with a TSI FSA3500 two-component Laser-Doppler Velocimeter (LDV) and custom-designed beam displacer operated in coincidence mode. The LDV probe volume diameter was 45 μm (approx. one wall-unit). The measurements were recorded 1.5 m downstream of the trip. When the measured quantities were normalized using the inner variables, the results indicated a significant reduction in the near wall viscous and total stresses with little effect on the flow outside the inner layer.

  11. Laser Treatment of Wood Surfaces for Ski Cores: An Experimental Parameter Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Petutschnigg

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the production of skis with wooden cores has increased due to changes in customer awareness concerning ecological issues and rising raw material costs for mineral oil resources. The preparation of ski surfaces is one of the main expense factors in the production of skis. Thus, one perspective of the AMER SPORTS CORPORATION is to treat wood surfaces with laser beams to develop new aesthetic possibilities in ski design. This study deals with different laser treatments for samples from various wood species: beech, ash, lime, and spruce. The parameters investigated are laser beam intensity and number of laser points on the surface. To evaluate the aesthetic changes, the CIELab color measurements were applied. Changes in the main wood components were observed by the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR using an ATR (attenuated total reflectance unit. The results show that the laser treatments on wood surfaces have an influence on wood color and the chemical composition. Especially the intensity of laser beams affects the color changes in different patterns for the parameters observed. These findings will be useful to develop innovative design possibilities of wood surfaces for ski cores as well as for further product design applications (e.g., mass customization.

  12. Localized reactive flow in carbonate rocks: Core-flood experiments and network simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haoyue; Bernabé, Yves; Mok, Ulrich; Evans, Brian

    2016-11-01

    We conducted four core-flood experiments on samples of a micritic, reef limestone from Abu Dhabi under conditions of constant flow rate. The pore fluid was water in equilibrium with CO2, which, because of its lowered pH, is chemically reactive with the limestone. Flow rates were between 0.03 and 0.1 mL/min. The difference between up and downstream pore pressures dropped to final values ≪1 MPa over periods of 3-18 h. Scanning electron microscope and microtomography imaging of the starting material showed that the limestone is mostly calcite and lacks connected macroporosity and that the prevailing pores are few microns large. During each experiment, a wormhole formed by localized dissolution, an observation consistent with the decreases in pressure head between the up and downstream reservoirs. Moreover, we numerically modeled the changes in permeability during the experiments. We devised a network approach that separated the pore space into competing subnetworks of pipes. Thus, the problem was framed as a competition of flow of the reactive fluid among the adversary subnetworks. The precondition for localization within certain time is that the leading subnetwork rapidly becomes more transmissible than its competitors. This novel model successfully simulated features of the shape of the wormhole as it grew from few to about 100 µm, matched the pressure history patterns, and yielded the correct order of magnitude of the breakthrough time. Finally, we systematically studied the impact of changing the statistical parameters of the subnetworks. Larger mean radius and spatial correlation of the leading subnetwork led to faster localization.

  13. FLOW NOISE MEASUREMENT OF SURFACE SHIP WITH TOWED MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In this article, a new acoustic test technique using towed model was introduced to study flow noise caused by a surface ship. The project of model test was be properly designed for acoustic signal collecting and with the help of appropriate data processing method different kinds of acoustic sources could be successfully identified. A lot of work about fuid noise could be carried on with the towed model, and the noise corresponding to low frequency which is especially interested for its long distance radiating with small attenuation could also be studied in this way.

  14. Topological Fluid Mechanics with Applications to Free Surfaces and Axisymmetric Flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøns, Morten

    1996-01-01

    Topological fluid mechanics is the study of qualitative features of fluid patterns. We discuss applications to the flow beneath a stagnant surface film, and to patterns in axisymmetric flow.......Topological fluid mechanics is the study of qualitative features of fluid patterns. We discuss applications to the flow beneath a stagnant surface film, and to patterns in axisymmetric flow....

  15. Porosity and Permeability Evolution in Cemented Rock Cores under Reactive Flowing Conditions: Comparative Analysis between Limestone and Sandstone Host Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, P.; Karpyn, Z.; Li, L.

    2013-12-01

    CO2-brine has the potential to alter wellbore cement in depleted oil and gas reservoirs under geological CO2 sequestration conditions. A better understanding of CO2-brine-cement-rock interaction is needed to evaluate the seal integrity of candidate sequestration formation in the long run. This work investigates possible alteration of wellbore cement when bonded by different host formation rock upon exposure to CO2-saturated brine. Composite cement-sandstone and cement-limestone core samples were created to perform reactive coreflood experiments. After an eight-day dynamic flow-through period, both cores had a similar extent of porosity increase, while the cement-limestone core experienced a ten-fold higher increase in permeability. With the aid of X-ray Micro-CT imaging and Scanning Electron Microscopy, it is observed that cement underwent greater degradation at the cement-sandstone interface. Degradation of cement-limestone core mainly took place on the host rock matrix. Worm holes were developed and a solution channel was formed in the limestone, creating a dominant flow path that altered both flow and reaction behavior. Limestone buffered the injected acidic brine preventing further deterioration of cement near the core outlet. Changes in fluid chemistry of limestone and sandstone coreflood effluents are compared. Results from this work are aimed at assisting the development and validation of robust reactive transport models through direct measurement of cemented rock core porosity and permeability evolution as well as the effluent aqueous chemistry change. This will subsequently improve predictive capabilities of reactive transport models associated with CO2 sequestration in geologic environments. Permeability Evolution of Cement-Rock Core Sample during Dynamic Flow of CO2-Brine

  16. Escherichia coli control in a surface flow treatment wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacIntyre, M E; Warner, B G; Slawson, R M

    2006-06-01

    A field experiment showed that numbers of Escherichia coli declined significantly when floating Lemna spp. plants were removed to create open water areas in a typical newly constructed surface flow treatment wetland in southern Ontario. It is suggested that E. coli declined immediately after Lemna removal because the Lemna was shading the water column from penetration by natural UV radiation, it was providing favourable attachment sites for the E. coli, and it was not allowing effective free exchange of oxygen from surface winds to the water column to maintain high enough dissolved oxygen supplies for predator zooplankton populations. Operators of wetland systems must have the specialized skills required to recognize the cause and the appropriate maintenance requirements to maintain efficient operation of such unconventional systems should E. coli numbers increase during the course of operation.

  17. Flow Regimes of Mesoscale Circulations Forced by Inhomogeneous Surface Heating

    CERN Document Server

    Hossain, M Alamgir

    2016-01-01

    Urbanization is one of the extreme process that increases uncertainty in future climate projections. Flow regimes of mesoscale circulations associated with surface heating due to urbanization have been investigated using a wavelet based computational fluid dynamics~(CFD) model. The results of our numerical model have been validated against that of a laboratory model, as well as reference numerical simulations. Characteristics of urban induced circulations have been studied for surface heat flux perturbation ($H_0$) between $28.93$Wm$^{-2}$ and $925.92$Wm$^{-2}$, and the results have been analyzed against available boundary layer measurements under similar physical conditions. Our primary study shows that urban/rural heat flux anomalies introduce strong oscillations in the convective boundary layer (CBL), and transfers a fraction of the turbulent kinetic energy vertically through internal waves. Such results complement previous investigators' hypothesis that temporal oscillations in urban-induced mesoscale cir...

  18. The Topographic Torque on a Bounding Surface of a Rotating Gravitating Fluid and the Excitation by Core Motions of Decadal Fluctuations in the Earth's Rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hide, Raymond

    1995-01-01

    General expressions (with potential applications in several areas of geophysical fluid dynamics) are derived for all three components of the contribution made by the geostrophic part of the pressure field associated with flow in a rotating gravitating fluid to the topographic torque exerted by the fluid on a rigid impermeable bounding surface of any shape. When applied to the Earth's liquid metallic core, which is bounded by nearly spherical surfaces and can be divided into two main regions, the "torosphere" and "polosphere," the expressions reduce to formulae given previously by the author, thereby providing further support for his work and that of others on the role of topographic coupling at the core-mantle boundary in the excitation by core motions of Earth rotation fluctuations on decadal time scales. They also show that recent criticisms of that work are vitiated by mathematical and physical errors. Contrary to these criticisms, the author's scheme for exploiting Earth rotation and other geophysical data (either real or simulated in computer models) in quantitative studies of the topography of the core-mantle boundary (CMB) by intercomparing various models of (a) motions in the core based on geomagnetic secular variation data and (b) CMB topography based on seismological and gravity data has a sound theoretical basis. The practical scope of the scheme is of course limited by the accuracy of real data, but this is a matter for investigation, not a priori assessment.

  19. Internal flow measurements of drop impacting a solid surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S. Santosh; Karn, Ashish; Arndt, Roger E. A.; Hong, Jiarong

    2017-03-01

    Understanding the fundamental physical process involved in drop impacts is important for a variety of engineering and scientific applications. Despite exhaustive research efforts on the dynamics of drop morphology upon impact, very few studies investigate the fluid dynamics induced within a drop upon impact. This study employs planar particle image velocimetry (PIV) with fluorescent particles to quantify the internal flow field of a drop impact on a solid surface. The image distortion caused by the curved liquid-air interface at the drop boundary is corrected using a ray-tracing algorithm. PIV analysis using the corrected images has yielded interesting insights into the flow initiated within a drop upon impact. Depending on the pre-impact conditions, characterized by impact number, different vortex modes are observed in the recoil phase of the drop impact. Further, the strength of these vortices and the kinetic energy of the internal flow field have been quantified. Our studies show a consistent negative power law correlation between vortex strength, internal kinetic energy and the impact number.

  20. Effect of Energetic Plasma Flux on Flowing Liquid Lithium Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalathiparambil, Kishor; Jung, Soonwook; Christenson, Michael; Fiflis, Peter; Xu, Wenyu; Szott, Mathew; Ruzic, David

    2014-10-01

    An operational liquid lithium system with steady state flow driven by thermo-electric magneto-hydrodynamic force and capable of constantly refreshing the plasma exposed surface have been demonstrated at U of I. To evaluate the system performance in reactor relevant conditions, specifically to understand the effect of disruptive plasma events on the performance of the liquid metal PFCs, the setup was integrated to a pulsed plasma generator. A coaxial plasma generator drives the plasma towards a theta pinch which preferentially heats the ions, simulating ELM like flux, and the plasma is further guided towards the target chamber which houses the flowing lithium system. The effect of the incident flux is examined using diagnostic tools including triple Langmuir probe, calorimeter, rogowski coils, Ion energy analyzers, and fast frame spectral image acquisition with specific optical filters. The plasma have been well characterized and a density of ~1021 m-3, with electron temperature ~10 - 20 eV is measured, and final plasma velocities of 34 - 74 kms-1 have been observed. Calorimetric measurements using planar molybdenum targets indicate a maximum plasma energy (with 6 kV plasma gun and 20 kV theta pinch) of 0.08 MJm-2 with plasma divergence effects resulting in marginal reduction of 40 +/- 23 J in plasma energy. Further results from the other diagnostic tools, using the flowing lithium targets and the planar targets coated with lithium will be presented. DOE DE-SC0008587.

  1. Thermodynamic analysis of shark skin texture surfaces for microchannel flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hai-Yan; Zhang, Hao-Chun; Guo, Yang-Yu; Tan, He-Ping; Li, Yao; Xie, Gong-Nan

    2016-09-01

    The studies of shark skin textured surfaces in flow drag reduction provide inspiration to researchers overcoming technical challenges from actual production application. In this paper, three kinds of infinite parallel plate flow models with microstructure inspired by shark skin were established, namely blade model, wedge model and the smooth model, according to cross-sectional shape of microstructure. Simulation was carried out by using FLUENT, which simplified the computation process associated with direct numeric simulations. To get the best performance from simulation results, shear-stress transport k-omega turbulence model was chosen during the simulation. Since drag reduction mechanism is generally discussed from kinetics point of view, which cannot interpret the cause of these losses directly, a drag reduction rate was established based on the second law of thermodynamics. Considering abrasion and fabrication precision in practical applications, three kinds of abraded geometry models were constructed and tested, and the ideal microstructure was found to achieve best performance suited to manufacturing production on the basis of drag reduction rate. It was also believed that bionic shark skin surfaces with mechanical abrasion may draw more attention from industrial designers and gain wide applications with drag-reducing characteristics.

  2. Influence of magmatism on mantle cooling, surface heat flow and Urey ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Takashi; Tackley, Paul J.

    2012-05-01

    Two-dimensional thermo-chemical mantle convection simulations are used to investigate the influence of melting-inducted differentiation on the thermal evolution of Earth's mantle, focussing in particular on matching the present-day surface heat flow and the 'Urey ratio'. The influence of internal heating rate, initial mantle temperature and partitioning of heat-producing elements into basaltic crust are studied. High initial mantle temperatures, which are expected following Earth's accretion, cause major differences in early mantle thermo-chemical structures, but by the present-day surface heat flux and internal structures are indistinguishable from cases with a low initial temperature. Assuming three different values of mantle heat production that vary by more than a factor of two results in small differences in present-day heat flow, as does assuming different partitioning ratios of heat-producing elements into crust. Indeed, all of the cases presented here, regardless of exact parameters, have approximately Earth's present-day heat flow, with substantial fractions coming from the core and from mantle cooling. As a consequence of the model present-day surface heat flow varying only slightly with parameters, the Urey ratio (the ratio of total heat production to the total surface heat flow) is highly dependent on the amount of internal heat production, and due to the large uncertainty in this, the Urey ratio is considered to be a much poorer constraint on thermal evolution than the heat flow. The range of present-day Urey ratio observed in simulations here is about 0.3 to 0.5, which is consistent with observational and geochemical constraints (Jaupart et al., 2007). Magmatic heat transport contributes an upper bound of 9% to Earth's present-day heat loss but a much higher fraction at earlier times—often more than convective heat loss—so neglecting this causes an overestimation of the Urey ratio. Magmatic heat transport also plays an important role in mantle

  3. Variations of ion concentrations in the deep ice core and surface snow at NEEM, Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto-Azuma, K.; Wegner, A.; Hansson, M.; Hirabayashi, M.; Kuramoto, T.; Miyake, T.; Motoyama, H.; NEEM Aerosol Consortium members

    2012-04-01

    Discrete samples were collected from the CFA (Continuous Flow Analysis) melt fractions during the field campaign carried out at NEEM, Greenland in 2009-2011, and were distributed to different laboratories. Ionic species were analyzed at National Institute of Polar Research (Japan) and Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research (Germany). Here we present and compare the ion concentration data obtained by both institutes. Most of the ions show good agreement between the two institutes. As is indicated with the CFA data (Bigler and the NEEM Aerosol Consortium members, EGU 2012), ion chromatograph data also display that calcium and sodium, mainly originated from terrestrial dust and sea-salt, respectively, show large variations associated with Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events. Chloride, fluoride, sulfate, sodium, potassium and magnesium also show such variations, as has been already reported for other Greenland ice cores. New ion data obtained from the NEEM deep core also show large variability of oxalate and phosphate concentrations during DO events. Acetate, which is thought to be mainly derived from biomass burning, as is oxalate, appears to show variability associated with DO events, but to a lesser extent. On the other hand, nitrate, ammonium and methanesulfonate do not show such variations. Together with ion data from the deep ice core, we present those from the pits dug during the NEEM field campaign to discuss seasonal variations of ionic species. The seasonal and millennial scale variations of ions are thought to be caused by changes in atmospheric circulation and source strength.

  4. Tunable photonic elements at the surface of an optical fiber with piezoelectric core

    CERN Document Server

    Dmitriev, Artemiy V

    2016-01-01

    Tunable photonic elements at the surface of an optical fiber with piezoelectric core are proposed and analyzed theoretically. These elements are based on whispering gallery modes whose propagation along the fiber is fully controlled by nanoscale variation of the effective fiber radius, which can be tuned by means of a piezoelectric actuator embedded into the core. The developed theory allows one to express the introduced effective radius variation through the shape of the actuator and the voltage applied to it. In particular, the design of a miniature tunable optical delay line and a miniature tunable dispersion compensator is presented. The potential application of the suggested model to the design of a miniature optical buffer is discussed.

  5. Synthesis and Surface Properties of Silica Spheres with Core Shell Structure by One Convenient Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. P. Das

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Earlier, we have published a paper on the preparation of silica sphere using propanol as cosurfactant. We report here a highly cost-effective method of preparation of mesoporous silica spheres with core shell structure using sodium silicate as silica precursor, cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB as surfactant, and methanol as cosurfactant. Thus after removal of the template by dissolutions or/and activation at higher temperature, mesoporous silica spheres with core shell structure were obtained. The products prepared with methanol to CTAB molar ratio 8.5 : 1 were confirmed to give best results. All the spherical products have very large surface area (∼589–1044 m2/g, pore volume (∼0.98–1.41 cm3/g, and ordered pore structure.

  6. Surface atmospheric pressure excitation of the translational mode of the inner core

    CERN Document Server

    Rosat, Séverine; Rogister, Yves

    2014-01-01

    Using hourly atmospheric surface pressure field from ECMWF (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts) and from NCEP (National Centers for Environmental Prediction) Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR) models, we show that atmospheric pressure fluctuations excite the translational oscillation of the inner core, the so-called Slichter mode, to the sub-nanogal level at the Earth surface. The computation is performed using a normal-mode formalism for a spherical, self-gravitating anelastic PREM-like Earth model. We determine the statistical response in the form of power spectral densities of the degree-one spherical harmonic components of the observed pressure field. Both hypotheses of inverted and non-inverted barometer for the ocean response to pressure forcing are considered. Based on previously computed noise levels, we show that the surface excitation amplitude is below the limit of detection of the superconducting gravimeters, making the Slichter mode detection a challenging instrumental task...

  7. Exploring the core level shift origin of sulfur and thiolates on Pd(111) surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvarezza, Roberto Carlos; Carro, Pilar

    2015-10-01

    Thiol molecules on planar metal surfaces are widely used for building sensing and electronic devices and also as capping agents to protect and to control the size and shape of nanoparticles. In the case of Pd the thiol molecules exhibit a complex behavior because C-S bond scission is possible, resulting in a significant amount of co-adsorbed S. Therefore identification of these species on Pd is a key point for many applications, a task that is usually achieved by XPS. Here we show, from DFT calculations, that the core level shift (CLS) of the S 2p binding energy (BE) of thiol and sulfur on different thiol-Pd(111) surface models strongly depends on the adsorbed or subsurface state of sulfur atoms. Our results reflect the complexity of S 2p BE behavior and contribute to understanding and reanalyzing the experimental data of thiolated Pd surfaces.

  8. Core-shell nanowire based electrical surface fastener used for room-temperature electronic packaging bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Ju, Yang; Hosoi, Atsushi

    2014-03-01

    With the ongoing miniaturization in electronic packaging, the traditional solders suffer from severe performance degradation. In addition, the high temperature required in the traditional solder reflow process may damage electronic elements. Therefore, there is an increasing urgent need for a new kind of nontoxic solder that can afford good mechanical stress and electrical contact at low temperature. This paper presents a method of fabricating nanowire surface fastener for the application of microelectronic packaging bonding at room temperature. This surface fastener consists of copper core and polystyrene shell nanowire arrays. It showed an adhesive strength of ˜24 N/cm2 and an electrical resistance of ˜0.41 × 10-2 Ω·cm2. This kind of nanowire surface fastener may enable the exploration of wide range applications, involving assembly of components in the electronic packaging.

  9. Measurements of viscosity and permeability of two phase miscible fluid flow in rock cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J L; Taylor, D G

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the application of 1H magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to the measurement of fluid viscosity and rock core plug permeability during two phase miscible displacements in certain rock types. The core plug permeability was determined by monitoring glycerol solutions displacing D2O. Simple physical principles were used to calculate the core permeability from the measured displacement angle for a set of Lochaline sandstone core plugs. In a further experiment the viscosity of polyacrylamide solution 1500 ppm was determined in the core plug. The permeability and viscosity results compared well to conventional core analysis methods.

  10. New sol–gel refractory coatings on chemically-bonded sand cores for foundry applications to improve casting surface quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nwaogu, Ugochukwu Chibuzoh; Poulsen, T.; Stage, R.K.

    2011-01-01

    Foundry refractory coatings protect bonded sand cores and moulds from producing defective castings during the casting process by providing a barrier between the core and the liquid metal. In this study, new sol–gel refractory coating on phenolic urethane cold box (PUCB) core was examined....... The coating density, viscosity, moisture content and wet and dry weight of the coating were evaluated on cores that had been coated at three different dip-coating times. The coating coverage, surface appearance and depth of penetration into the cores were examined with a Stereomicroscope. Gray iron castings...... were produced with sol-gel coated and uncoated cores and the results were related to the coating properties. The casting results were also compared with castings made with cores coated with commercial alcohol-based and water-based foundry coatings. The analyses show that castings produced with sol...

  11. Effect of Different Surface Treatment on Shear Bond Strength of Veneering Composite to Polyetherketone Core Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Pourkhalili

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective:The purpose of this in vitro study was to assess the effect of different surface treatment methods on shear bond strength of the veneering composite to polyetheretherketone (PEEK core material. Materials and Methods::In this in vitro, experimental study, 60 PEEK discs were fabricated, polished with silicon carbide abrasive paper and divided into five surface treatment groups (n=12 namely air abrasion with 110µm alumina particles at 0.2MPa pressure for 10 seconds, 98% sulfuric acid etching for one minute, air abrasion plus sulfuric acid etching, application of cyanoacrylate resin and a no surface treatment control group. Visio.link adhesive and GC Gradia veneering composite were applied on PEEK surfaces and light-cured. Shear bond strength was measured using a universal testing machine and the data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test. Results:The mean ± standard deviation (SD values of shear bond strength of the veneering composite to PEEK surfaces were 8.85±3.03, 15.6±5.02, 30.42±5.43, 26.14±4.33 and 5.94±4.49MPa in the control, air-abrasion, sulfuric acid etching, air-abrasion plus sulfuric acid etching and cyanoacrylate resin groups, respectively. The control and cyanoacrylate groups had significant differences with air abrasion, sulfuric acid etching and air abrasion plus sulfuric acid etching groups in terms of shear bond strength (P<0.0001. Higher bond strength values were noted in sulfuric acid etching, air-abrasion plus sulfuric acid etching and air abrasion groups compared to the control and cyanoacrylate groups (P<0.0001. Conclusion:Sulfuric acid etching, air abrasion and a combination of both are recommended as efficient surface treatments to increase the shear bond strength of the veneering composite to PEEK core material.

  12. Physical mechanism of surface roughening of the radial Ge-core/Si-shell nanowire heterostructure and thermodynamic prediction of surface stability of the InAs-core/GaAs-shell nanowire structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Y Y; Ouyang, G; Wang, C X; Yang, G W

    2013-02-13

    As a promising and typical semiconductor heterostructure at the nanoscale, the radial Ge/Si NW heterostructure, that is, the Ge-core/Si-shell NW structure, has been widely investigated and used in various nanodevices such as solar cells, lasers, and sensors because of the strong changes in the band structure and increased charge carrier mobility. Therefore, to attain high quality radial semiconductor NW heterostructures, controllable and stable epitaxial growth of core-shell NW structures has become a major challenge for both experimental and theoretical evaluation. Surface roughening is usually undesirable for the epitaxial growth of high quality radial semiconductor NW heterostructures, because it would destroy the core-shell NW structures. For example, the surface of the Ge-core/Si-shell NWs always exhibits a periodic modulation with island-like morphologies, that is, surface roughening, during epitaxial growth. Therefore, the physical understanding of the surface roughening behavior during the epitaxial growth of core-shell NW structures is essential and urgent for theoretical design and experimentally controlling the growth of high quality radial semiconductor NW heterostructures. Here, we proposed a quantitative thermodynamic theory to address the physical process of epitaxial growth of core-shell NW structures and surface roughening. We showed that the transformation from the Frank-van der Merwe mode to the Stranski-Krastanow mode during the epitaxial growth of radial semiconductor NW heterostructures is the physical origin of surface roughening. We deduced the thermodynamic criterion for the formation of the surface roughening and the phase diagram of growth and showed that the radius of the NWs and the thickness of the shell layer can not only determine the formation of the surface roughening in a core-shell NW structure, but also control the periodicity and amplitude of the surface roughness. The agreement between the theoretical results and the

  13. Smolt Responses to Hydrodynamic Conditions in Forebay Flow Nets of Surface Flow Outlets, 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Hedgepeth, J. B.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Anderson, Michael G.; Deng, Zhiqun; Khan, Fenton; Mueller, Robert P.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Sather, Nichole K.; Serkowski, John A.; Steinbeck, John R.

    2009-04-01

    This study provides information on juvenile salmonid behaviors at McNary and The Dalles dams that can be used by the USACE, fisheries resource managers, and others to support decisions on long-term measures to enhance fish passage. We researched smolt movements and ambient hydrodynamic conditions using a new approach combining simultaneous acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) and acoustic imaging device (AID) measurements at surface flow outlets (SFO) at McNary and The Dalles dams on the Columbia River during spring and summer 2007. Because swimming effort vectors could be computed from the simultaneous fish and flow data, fish behavior could be categorized as passive, swimming against the flow (positively rheotactic), and swimming with the flow (negatively rheotactic). We present bivariate relationships to provide insight into fish responses to particular hydraulic variables that engineers might consider during SFO design. The data indicate potential for this empirical approach of simultaneous water/fish measurements to lead to SFO design guidelines in the future.

  14. THE SURFACE AREA PRESERVING MEAN CURVATURE FLOW IN QUASI-FUCHSIAN MANIFOLDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tian Daping; Li Guanghan; Wu Chuanxi

    2012-01-01

    In this paper,we consider the surface area preserving mean curvature flow in quasi-Fuchsian 3-manifolds.We show that the flow exists for all times and converges exponentially to a smooth surface of constant mean curvature with the same surface area as the initial surface.

  15. Stability of core-annular flow of power-law fluids in the presence of interfacial surfactant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The shear-thinning influence on the core-annular flow stability of two immiscible power-law fluids is considered by making a linear stability analysis.The flow is driven by an axial pressure gradient in a straight pipe with the interface between the two fluids occupied by an insoluble surfactant.Given the basic flow for this core-annular arrangement,the analytical solution is obtained with respect to the power-law fluid model.The linearized equations for the evolution of infinitesimal disturbances are derived and the stability problem is formulated as a generalized matrix eigenvalue problem,which is solved by using the software package Matlab based on the QZ algorithm.The shear-thinning property is found to have marked influence on the power-law fluid core-annular flow stability,which is reflected in various aspects.First,the capillary instability is magnified by the shear-thinning property,which may lead to an essential difference between power-law and Newtonian fluid flows.Especially when the interface is close to the pipe wall,the power-law fluid flow may be unstable while the Newtonian fluid flow is stable.Second,under disturbances to the interface a velocity discontinuity at the interface appears which is destabilizing to the flow.The magnitude of this velocity discontinuity is affected by the power-law index and the flow stability is influenced correspondingly.Besides,the shear-thinning property may induce new stability modes which do not appear in the Newtonian fluid flow.The flow stability shows much dependence on the interface location,the role of which was neglected in most previous studies.The shear-thinning fluid flow is more unstable to long wave disturbances when the interface is close to the pipe wall,while the Newtonian fluid flow is more unstable when the interface is close to the pipe centerline.But this trend is changed by the addition of interfacial surfactant,for which the power-law fluid flow is more stable no matter where the interface is

  16. Effect of wettability on scale-up of multiphase flow from core-scale to reservoir fine-grid-scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Y.C.; Mani, V.; Mohanty, K.K. [Univ. of Houston, TX (United States)

    1997-08-01

    Typical field simulation grid-blocks are internally heterogeneous. The objective of this work is to study how the wettability of the rock affects its scale-up of multiphase flow properties from core-scale to fine-grid reservoir simulation scale ({approximately} 10{prime} x 10{prime} x 5{prime}). Reservoir models need another level of upscaling to coarse-grid simulation scale, which is not addressed here. Heterogeneity is modeled here as a correlated random field parameterized in terms of its variance and two-point variogram. Variogram models of both finite (spherical) and infinite (fractal) correlation length are included as special cases. Local core-scale porosity, permeability, capillary pressure function, relative permeability functions, and initial water saturation are assumed to be correlated. Water injection is simulated and effective flow properties and flow equations are calculated. For strongly water-wet media, capillarity has a stabilizing/homogenizing effect on multiphase flow. For small variance in permeability, and for small correlation length, effective relative permeability can be described by capillary equilibrium models. At higher variance and moderate correlation length, the average flow can be described by a dynamic relative permeability. As the oil wettability increases, the capillary stabilizing effect decreases and the deviation from this average flow increases. For fractal fields with large variance in permeability, effective relative permeability is not adequate in describing the flow.

  17. Towards an integrated petrophysical tool for multiphase flow properties of core samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenormand, R. [Institut Francais du Petrole, Rueil Malmaison (France)

    1997-08-01

    This paper describes the first use of an Integrated Petrophysical Tool (IPT) on reservoir rock samples. The IPT simultaneously measures the following petrophysical properties: (1) Complete capillary pressure cycle: primary drainage, spontaneous and forced imbibitions, secondary drainage (the cycle leads to the wettability of the core by using the USBM index); End-points and parts of the relative permeability curves; Formation factor and resistivity index. The IPT is based on the steady-state injection of one fluid through the sample placed in a Hassler cell. The experiment leading to the whole Pc cycle on two reservoir sandstones consists of about 30 steps at various oil or water flow rates. It takes about four weeks and is operated at room conditions. Relative permeabilities are in line with standard steady-state measurements. Capillary pressures are in accordance with standard centrifuge measurements. There is no comparison for the resistivity index, but the results are in agreement with literature data. However, the accurate determination of saturation remains the main difficulty and some improvements are proposed. In conclusion, the Integrated Petrophysical Tool is as accurate as standard methods and has the advantage of providing the various parameters on the same sample and during a single experiment. The FIT is easy to use and can be automated. In addition, it can be operated in reservoir conditions.

  18. Continuous flow analysis method for determination of soluble iron and aluminium in ice cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spolaor, A; Vallelonga, P; Gabrieli, J; Roman, M; Barbante, C

    2013-01-01

    Iron and aluminium are the two most abundant metals on the Earth's crust, but they display quite different biogeochemical properties. While iron is essential to many biological processes, aluminium has not been found to have any biological function at all. In environmental studies, iron has been studied in detail for its limiting role in the bioproductivity of high nutrient, low carbon oceanic zones, while aluminium is routinely used as a reference of crustal contributions to atmospheric deposition archives including peat bogs, lacustrine and marine sediments and ice sheets and glaciers. We report here the development of a flow injection analysis technique, which has been optimised for the simultaneous determination of soluble iron and aluminium in polar ice cores. Iron was determined by its catalytic role in the reduction of N,N-dimethyl-p-phenylenediamene (DPD) to a semiquinonic form (DPDQ) and subsequent absorption spectroscopy at 514 nm. Aluminium was determined by spectroscopic analysis of an aluminium-lumogallion complex that exhibits fluorescence at 560 nm. These techniques have been applied to a section of Greenland ice dated to 1729-1733 AD and indicate that volcanism is a source of highly soluble aluminium and iron.

  19. Localized surface plasmon mediated energy transfer in the vicinity of core-shell nanoparticle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishodia, Manmohan Singh; Juneja, Soniya

    2016-05-01

    Multipole spectral expansion based theory of energy transfer interactions between a donor and an acceptor molecule in the vicinity of a core-shell (nanoshell or core@shell) based plasmonic nanostructure is developed. In view of the diverse applications and rich plasmonic features such as tuning capability of surface plasmon (SP) frequencies, greater sensitivity to the change of dielectric environment, controllable redirection of electromagnetic radiation, closed form expressions for Energy Transfer Rate Enhancement Factor (ETREF) near core-shell particle are reported. The dependence of ETREF on different parameters is established through fitting equations, perceived to be of key importance for developing appropriate designs. The theoretical approach developed in the present work is capable of treating higher order multipoles, which, in turn, are also shown to play a crucial role in the present context. Moreover, closed form expressions derived in the present work can directly be used as formula, e.g., for designing SP based biosensors and estimating energy exchange between proteins and excitonic interactions in quantum dots.

  20. Localized surface plasmon mediated energy transfer in the vicinity of core-shell nanoparticle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shishodia, Manmohan Singh, E-mail: manmohan@gbu.ac.in; Juneja, Soniya [Department of Applied Physics, School of Vocational Studies and Applied Sciences, Gautam Buddha University, Greater Noida 201308 (India)

    2016-05-28

    Multipole spectral expansion based theory of energy transfer interactions between a donor and an acceptor molecule in the vicinity of a core-shell (nanoshell or core@shell) based plasmonic nanostructure is developed. In view of the diverse applications and rich plasmonic features such as tuning capability of surface plasmon (SP) frequencies, greater sensitivity to the change of dielectric environment, controllable redirection of electromagnetic radiation, closed form expressions for Energy Transfer Rate Enhancement Factor (ETREF) near core-shell particle are reported. The dependence of ETREF on different parameters is established through fitting equations, perceived to be of key importance for developing appropriate designs. The theoretical approach developed in the present work is capable of treating higher order multipoles, which, in turn, are also shown to play a crucial role in the present context. Moreover, closed form expressions derived in the present work can directly be used as formula, e.g., for designing SP based biosensors and estimating energy exchange between proteins and excitonic interactions in quantum dots.

  1. Seasonality of submesoscale flows in the ocean surface boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckingham, Christian E.; Naveira Garabato, Alberto C.; Thompson, Andrew F.; Brannigan, Liam; Lazar, Ayah; Marshall, David P.; George Nurser, A. J.; Damerell, Gillian; Heywood, Karen J.; Belcher, Stephen E.

    2016-03-01

    A signature of submesoscale flows in the upper ocean is skewness in the distribution of relative vorticity. Expected to result for high Rossby number flows, such skewness has implications for mixing, dissipation, and stratification within the upper ocean. An array of moorings deployed in the Northeast Atlantic for 1 year as part of the experiment of the Ocean Surface Mixing, Ocean Submesoscale Interaction Study (OSMOSIS) reveals that relative vorticity is positively skewed during winter even though the scale of the Rossby number is less than 0.5. Furthermore, this skewness is reduced to zero during spring and autumn. There is also evidence of modest seasonal variations in the gradient Rossby number. The proposed mechanism by which relative vorticity is skewed is that the ratio of lateral to vertical buoyancy gradients, as summarized by the inverse gradient Richardson number, restricts its range during winter but less so at other times of the year. These results support recent observations and model simulations suggesting that the upper ocean is host to a seasonal cycle in submesoscale turbulence.

  2. Continuous vs. pulsating flow boiling. Part 2: Statistical comparison using response surface methodology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kærn, Martin Ryhl; Elmegaard, Brian; Meyer, Knud Erik

    2016-01-01

    Response surface methodology is used to investigate an active method for flow boiling heat transfer enhancement by means of fluid flow pulsation. The flow pulsations are introduced by a flow modulating expansion device and compared with the baseline continuous flow provided by a stepper-motor exp......Response surface methodology is used to investigate an active method for flow boiling heat transfer enhancement by means of fluid flow pulsation. The flow pulsations are introduced by a flow modulating expansion device and compared with the baseline continuous flow provided by a stepper...... pulsations is statistically significant in terms of the time-averaged flow boiling heat transfer coefficient. The cycle time range from 1 s to 9 s for the pulsations. The results show that the effect of fluid flow pulsations is statistically significant, disregarding the lowest heat flux measurements...

  3. Free Surface Thin Film Flow of a Sisko’s Fluid over a Surface Topography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Shah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The flow of a thin film down an inclined surface over topography is considered for the case of liquids with Sisko’s model viscosity. For the first time lubrication theory is used to reduce the governing equations to a non-linear evolution equation for a current of a Sisko’s model non-Newtonian fluid on an inclined plane under the action of gravity and the viscous stresses. This model is solved numerically using an efficient Full Approximation Storage (FAS multigrid algorithm. Free surface results are plotted and carefully examined near the topography for different values of power-law index np, viscosity parameter m, the aspect ratio A and for different inclination angle of the plane with the horizontal. Number of complications and additional physical effects are discussed that enrich real situations. It is observed that the flows into narrow trenches develop a capillary ridge just in front of the upstream edge of a trench followed by a small trough. For relatively small width trenches, the free surface is almost everywhere flat as the dimensional width of the trench is much smaller than the capillary length scale. In this region, surface tension dominates the solution and acts so as to stretch a membrane across the trench leading to smaller height deviations. The ridge originates from the topographic forcing which works to force fluid upstream immediately prior to the trench before helping to accelerate it over. The upstream forcing slows down the fluid locally and increases the layer thickness.

  4. Solid-core and hollow magnetic nanostructures: Synthesis, surface modifications and biological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieciecka, Dorota; Nawara, Krzysztof; Kijewska, Krystyna; Nowicka, Anna M; Mazur, Maciej; Krysinski, Pawel

    2013-10-01

    In the need of development of versatile and flexible platforms for sensing, nanostructured particles are one of the systems of choice. Additionally, the state-of-the-art, controlled surface modifications of these structures offer broad possibilities of using such systems for diagnostics and therapy, often referred to as thera(g)nostics. In this brief review we will focus on the synthesis and surface modifications of solid-core magnetic nanostructures and polymeric capsules containing nanoferrites modified with anti-cancer drug--doxorubicin, designed for magnetic field-driven drug delivery for cancer therapy. We will also outline some problems related to the usage of such structures. The encapsulation and distribution of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles modified with doxorubicin will be demonstrated in the polypyrrole spherical microvessels.

  5. A population of faint low surface brightness galaxies in the Perseus cluster core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, Carolin; Lisker, Thorsten; Ambachew Tilahun, Liyualem; Grebel, Eva K.; Conselice, Christopher J.; Penny, Samantha; Janz, Joachim; Gallagher, John S.; Kotulla, Ralf; McCormac, James

    2017-09-01

    We present the detection of 89 low surface brightness (LSB), and thus low stellar density galaxy candidates in the Perseus cluster core, of the kind named 'ultra-diffuse galaxies', with mean effective V-band surface brightnesses 24.8-27.1 mag arcsec-2, total V-band magnitudes -11.8 to -15.5 mag, and half-light radii 0.7-4.1 kpc. The candidates have been identified in a deep mosaic covering 0.3 deg2, based on wide-field imaging data obtained with the William Herschel Telescope. We find that the LSB galaxy population is depleted in the cluster centre and only very few LSB candidates have half-light radii larger than 3 kpc. This appears consistent with an estimate of their tidal radius, which does not reach beyond the stellar extent even if we assume a high dark matter content (M/L = 100). In fact, three of our candidates seem to be associated with tidal streams, which points to their current disruption. Given that published data on faint LSB candidates in the Coma cluster - with its comparable central density to Perseus - show the same dearth of large objects in the core region, we conclude that these cannot survive the strong tides in the centres of massive clusters.

  6. Generation of three-dimensional patterns through wave interaction in a model of free surface swirling flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabre, D; Mougel, J, E-mail: david.fabre@imft.fr [Institut de Mécanique des Fluides de Toulouse (IMFT), University of Toulouse (France)

    2014-12-01

    The free surface flow in a cylindrical tank over a rotating bottom is known to support spectacular three-dimensional patterns, including deformation of the inner free surface into the shape of rotating polygons and sloshing behavior of the upper free surface (e.g. Iga et al 2014 Fluid Dyn. Res. 46 031409). Through a stability analysis of a simplified model of this flow, we show that such patterns can be explained as a resonance mechanism involving different families of waves. The approach extends a previous work (Tophøj et al 2013 Phys. Rev. Lett. 110 194502) which explained the rotating polygons as an interaction between gravity waves and centrifugal waves, under the assumption that the base flow can be modeled as a potential vortex. We show that this previous model is justified for strong rotation rates (Dry-Potential case), and that for weaker rotations it can be improved by introducing an inner vortex core in solid-body rotation, which either extends to the center of the plate (Wet case) or surrounds a dry central region (Dry-Composite case). The study of this improved model predicts two new kinds of instabilities. The first occurs at low rotations (Wet case) and results from an interaction between gravity waves and the Kelvin–Kirchhoff wave (namely, oscillation of the boundary of the vortex core). This instability is proposed to be at the origin of the sloshing phenomenon. The second new instability occurs, for moderate rotations, (Dry-Composite case) as an interaction between gravity waves and a ‘Kelvin-Centrifugal’ wave characterized by deformation of the inner surface and the vortex core boundary in opposite directions. This instability exists for all azimuthal wave numbers starting from m = 1, this case corresponding to a ‘monogon’ pattern. (paper)

  7. Effect of surface conditioning modalities on the repair bond strength of resin composite to the zirconia core / veneering ceramic complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Mutlu; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Pereira, Sarina Maciel; Amaral, Regina; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Pekkan, Gurel

    2013-06-01

    This study evaluated the effect of different surface conditioning protocols on the repair strength of resin composite to the zirconia core / veneering ceramic complex, simulating the clinical chipping phenomenon. Forty disk-shaped zirconia core (Lava Zirconia, 3M ESPE) (diameter: 3 mm) specimens were veneered circumferentially with a feldspathic veneering ceramic (VM7, Vita Zahnfabrik) (thickness: 2 mm) using a split metal mold. They were then embedded in autopolymerizing acrylic with the bonding surfaces exposed. Specimens were randomly assigned to one of the following surface conditioning protocols (n = 10 per group): group 1, veneer: 4% hydrofluoric acid (HF) (Porcelain Etch) + core: aluminum trioxide (50-µm Al2O3) + core + veneer: silane (ESPE-Sil); group 2: core: Al2O3 (50 µm) + veneer: HF + core + veneer: silane; group 3: veneer: HF + core: 30 µm aluminum trioxide particles coated with silica (30 µm SiO2) + core + veneer: silane; group 4: core: 30 µm SiO2 + veneer: HF + core + veneer: silane. Core and veneer ceramic were conditioned individually but no attempt was made to avoid cross contamination of conditioning, simulating the clinical intraoral repair situation. Adhesive resin (VisioBond) was applied to both the core and the veneer ceramic, and resin composite (Quadrant Posterior) was bonded onto both substrates using polyethylene molds and photopolymerized. After thermocycling (6000 cycles, 5°C-55°C), the specimens were subjected to shear bond testing using a universal testing machine (1 mm/min). Failure modes were identified using an optical microscope, and scanning electron microscope images were obtained. Bond strength data (MPa) were analyzed statistically using the non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis test followed by the Wilcoxon rank-sum test and the Bonferroni Holm correction (α = 0.05). Group 3 demonstrated significantly higher values (MPa) (8.6 ± 2.7) than those of the other groups (3.2 ± 3.1, 3.2 ± 3, and 3.1 ± 3.5 for groups 1, 2, and 4

  8. Determining pore length scales and pore surface relaxivity of rock cores by internal magnetic fields modulation at 2MHz NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huabing; Nogueira d'Eurydice, Marcel; Obruchkov, Sergei; Galvosas, Petrik

    2014-09-01

    Pore length scales and pore surface relaxivities of rock cores with different lithologies were studied on a 2MHz Rock Core Analyzer. To determine the pore length scales of the rock cores, the high eigenmodes of spin bearing molecules satisfying the diffusion equation were detected with optimized encoding periods in the presence of internal magnetic fields Bin. The results were confirmed using a 64MHz NMR system, which supports the feasibility of high eigenmode detection at fields as low as 2MHz. Furthermore, this methodology was combined with relaxometry measurements to a two-dimensional experiment, which provides correlation between pore length and relaxation time. This techniques also yields information on the surface relaxivity of the rock cores. The estimated surface relaxivities were then compared to the results using an independent NMR method.

  9. Effects of nanoparticles-coated surface on flow boiling CHF Using FC-72

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Seok Bin; Seo, Han; Kim, Kyung Mo; Bang, In Cheol [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    CHF mechanism in flow boiling can be distinguished into two types. One is liquid film dryout (LFD) developed at smaller heat flux with higher vapor quality, which occurs in BWR. The other is departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) occurring in PWR with relatively higher heat flux at lower vapor quality. Many studies have focused on the physical understanding for the CHF phenomenon, clear explanation for CHF, especially DNB, which isn't achieved yet. The present study aims to investigate feasibility of DNB enhancement and promising mechanisms for the nanotechnology-engineered surfaces. In general the widely accepted DNB models are proposed from Weisman and Pei and Lee and Mudawwar. One is near-wall bubble crowding model based on the enthalpy transportation through the interface between boundary layer and the bulk core. The other is liquid sublayer dryout model introducing liquid sublayer located between vapor blanket and heated surface. By using highly wettable refrigerant FC-72 as a working fluid, the study focuses on the effect of porosity and roughness from nanoparticles-formed porous structure on vertical heated surface. The CHF enhancement phenomena in FC-72 refrigerant on a bare and a nanoparticles-coated heater were investigated according to inlet subcooling. The nanoparticles-coated surface shows CHF enhancement up to 40% compared to bare surface, while the enhancement ratio decreases as the inlet subcooling increases. Due to the high wettability of FC-72 working fluid, only the porosity and roughness are the key parameters for CHF enhancement. Increased porosity and roughness by nanoparticles deposited on the surface provide the enhancement of rewetting process induced by increased capillary action. Based on the momentum balance, liquid velocity to the sublayer is related to porosity. Then increasing porosity supplies more liquid to the sublayer delaying CHF.

  10. Carbon isotope heterogeneities in deep Earth: Recycling of surface carbon or from core?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satish-Kumar, Madhusoodhan

    2017-04-01

    Subduction of crustal materials, mantle melting and upwelling of deep mantle, in addition to a potential source from the core, largely controls the Earth's deep carbon cycle. Large variations in carbon isotopic composition between different reservoirs have been used widely to differentiate the source of carbon and to understand the carbon inventories and its recycling processes. However, how far high-temperature and hign-pressure conditions can affect the carbon isotope distribution, is a question still unanswered to clearly address the deep carbon cycle. I present here a review on carbon isotope fractionation processes in deep Earth and critically evaluate whether we can easily differentiate between surface carbon and deep carbon based on isotope characteristics. Recent experimental carbon isotope fractionation studies in the Fe-C system suggests that light carbon is selectively partition into metallic core during early magma ocean environment (Satish-Kumar et al., 2011). Furthermore, carbonate melts can be a medium for efficient crystallisation of diamonds in Earth's mantle (Palyanov et al., 2013). Rayleigh fractionation modelling based on fractionation suggests that core can be a reservoir of 12C enriched carbon and can itself form a reservoir which can cause heterogeneity in mantle carbon (Wood et al., 2013). In addition, high pressure experiments in the carbon-saturated model harzburgite system (Enstatite-Magnesite-Olivine-Graphite), carbonated silicate melting resulted in 13C enrichment in the carbon dissolved in the silicate melt relative to elemental graphite (Mizutani et al., 2014). 13C enrichment in carbonate melt were further confirmed in experiments where redox melting between olivine and graphite produced a carbonate melt as well as carbonate reduction experiments to form graphite. A third factor, still unconquered is the effect of pressure on isotope fractionation process. Theoretical studies as well as preliminary experimental studies have suggested

  11. A NUMERICAL INVESTIGATION INTO ELECTROOSMOTIC FLOW IN MICROCHANNELS WITH COMPLEX WAVY SURFACES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Her-Terng Yau

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the flow characteristics of electroosmotic flow in a microchannel with complex wavy surfaces. A general method of coordinate transformation is used to solve the governing equations describing the electroosmotic flow in the microchannel. Numerical simulations are performed to analyze the effects of wave amplitude on the electrical field, flow streamlines, and flow fields in the microchannel. The simulation results show that, compared to a traditional pressure-driven flow, flow recirculation is not developed in the electroosmotic flow in a microchannel with complex wavy surfaces. The simulations also show that the electrical field and velocity profiles change along the channel in the region of wavy surfaces. Non-flat velocity profiles are observed in different cross-sections of the channel in the region of wavy surfaces.

  12. An atomistic-continuum hybrid simulation of fluid flows over superhydrophobic surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Qiang; He, Guo-Wei

    2009-01-01

    Recent experiments have found that slip length could be as large as on the order of 1 μm for fluid flows over superhydrophobic surfaces. Superhydrophobic surfaces can be achieved by patterning roughness on hydrophobic surfaces. In the present paper, an atomistic-continuum hybrid approach is developed to simulate the Couette flows over superhydrophobic surfaces, in which a molecular dynamics simulation is used in a small region near the superhydrophobic surface where the continuum assumption i...

  13. Core 2D. A code for non-isothermal water flow and reactive solute transport. Users manual version 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samper, J.; Juncosa, R.; Delgado, J.; Montenegro, L. [Universidad de A Coruna (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    Understanding natural groundwater quality patterns, quantifying groundwater pollution and assessing the effects of waste disposal, require modeling tools accounting for water flow, and transport of heat and dissolved species as well as their complex interactions with solid and gases phases. This report contains the users manual of CORE ''2D Version V.2.0, a COde for modeling water flow (saturated and unsaturated), heat transport and multicomponent Reactive solute transport under both local chemical equilibrium and kinetic conditions. it is an updated and improved version of CORE-LE-2D V0 (Samper et al., 1988) which in turns is an extended version of TRANQUI, a previous reactive transport code (ENRESA, 1995). All these codes were developed within the context of Research Projects funded by ENRESA and the European Commission. (Author)

  14. Application of Core Dynamics Modeling to Core-Mantle Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Weijia

    2003-01-01

    Observations have demonstrated that length of day (LOD) variation on decadal time scales results from exchange of axial angular momentum between the solid mantle and the core. There are in general four core-mantle interaction mechanisms that couple the core and the mantle. Of which, three have been suggested likely the dominant coupling mechanism for the decadal core-mantle angular momentum exchange, namely, gravitational core-mantle coupling arising from density anomalies in the mantle and in the core (including the inner core), the electromagnetic coupling arising from Lorentz force in the electrically conducting lower mantle (e.g. D-layer), and the topographic coupling arising from non-hydrostatic pressure acting on the core-mantle boundary (CMB) topography. In the past decades, most effort has been on estimating the coupling torques from surface geomagnetic observations (kinematic approach), which has provided insights on the core dynamical processes. In the meantime, it also creates questions and concerns on approximations in the studies that may invalidate the corresponding conclusions. The most serious problem is perhaps the approximations that are inconsistent with dynamical processes in the core, such as inconsistencies between the core surface flow beneath the CMB and the CMB topography, and that between the D-layer electric conductivity and the approximations on toroidal field at the CMB. These inconsistencies can only be addressed with numerical core dynamics modeling. In the past few years, we applied our MoSST (Modular, Scalable, Self-consistent and Three-dimensional) core dynamics model to study core-mantle interactions together with geodynamo simulation, aiming at assessing the effect of the dynamical inconsistencies in the kinematic studies on core-mantle coupling torques. We focus on topographic and electromagnetic core-mantle couplings and find that, for the topographic coupling, the consistency between the core flow and the CMB topography is

  15. Experimental calibration and validation of sewer/surface flow exchange equations in steady and unsteady flow conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinato, Matteo; Martins, Ricardo; Kesserwani, Georges; Leandro, Jorge; Djordjević, Slobodan; Shucksmith, James

    2017-09-01

    The linkage between sewer pipe flow and floodplain flow is recognised to induce an important source of uncertainty within two-dimensional (2D) urban flood models. This uncertainty is often attributed to the use of empirical hydraulic formulae (the one-dimensional (1D) weir and orifice steady flow equations) to achieve data-connectivity at the linking interface, which require the determination of discharge coefficients. Because of the paucity of high resolution localised data for this type of flows, the current understanding and quantification of a suitable range for those discharge coefficients is somewhat lacking. To fulfil this gap, this work presents the results acquired from an instrumented physical model designed to study the interaction between a pipe network flow and a floodplain flow. The full range of sewer-to-surface and surface-to-sewer flow conditions at the exchange zone are experimentally analysed in both steady and unsteady flow regimes. Steady state measured discharges are first analysed considering the relationship between the energy heads from the sewer flow and the floodplain flow; these results show that existing weir and orifice formulae are valid for describing the flow exchange for the present physical model, and yield new calibrated discharge coefficients for each of the flow conditions. The measured exchange discharges are also integrated (as a source term) within a 2D numerical flood model (a finite volume solver to the 2D Shallow Water Equations (SWE)), which is shown to reproduce the observed coefficients. This calibrated numerical model is then used to simulate a series of unsteady flow tests reproduced within the experimental facility. Results show that the numerical model overestimated the values of mean surcharge flow rate. This suggests the occurrence of additional head losses in unsteady conditions which are not currently accounted for within flood models calibrated in steady flow conditions.

  16. On the power spectrum of solar surface flows

    CERN Document Server

    Rieutord, M; Rincon, F; Malherbe, J -M; Meunier, N; Berger, T; Frank, Z

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this work is to give new observational constraints on solar surface flows by determining the horizontal scale dependence of the velocity and intensity fields, as represented by their power spectra, and to offer some theoretical guidelines to interpret these spectra. We use long time series of images taken by SOT/Hinode and reconstruct both horizontal (by granule tracking) and vertical (by Doppler effect) velocity fields in a field of view 75x75Mm^2. At small sub-granulation scales, the kinetic energy spectral density associated with vertical motions exhibits a k^{-13/3}-like spectrum, while the intensity fluctuation spectrum follows a k^{-17/3}-like spectrum. We discuss the physical origin of these scalings and argue that they provide a direct observational signature of buoyancy-driven turbulent dynamics in a strongly thermally diffusive regime. In the mesogranulation range and up to a scale of 25Mm, we find that the vertical velocity field amplitude decreases like L^{-3/2} with the horizontal scal...

  17. Effects of confinement & surface roughness in electrorheological flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helal, Ahmed; Telleria, Maria J.; Wang, Julie; Strauss, Marc; Murphy, Mike; McKinley, Gareth; Hosoi, A. E.

    2014-11-01

    Electrorheological (ER) fluids are dielectric suspensions that exhibit a fast, reversible change in rheological properties with the application of an external electric field. Upon the application of the electric field, the material develops a field-dependent yield stress that is typically modeled using a Bingham plastic model. ER fluids are promising for designing small, cheap and rapidly actuated hydraulic devices such as rapidly-switchable valves, where fluid flowing in a microchannel can be arrested by applying an external electric field. In the lubrication limit, for a Bingham plastic fluid, the maximum pressure the channel can hold, before yielding, is a function of the field-dependent yield stress, the length of the channel and the electrode gap. In practice, the finite width of the channel and the surface roughness of the electrodes could affect the maximum yield pressure but a quantitative understanding of these effects is currently lacking. In this study, we experimentally investigate the effects of the channel aspect ratio (width/height) and the effects of electrode roughness on the performance of ER valves. Based on this quantitative analysis, we formulate new performance metrics for ER valves as well as design rules for ER valves that will help guide and optimize future designs.

  18. Mechanisms of surface alloy segregation on faceted core-shell nanowire growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Voorhees, Peter W.; Davis, Stephen H.

    2017-03-01

    A general two-dimensional faceted model that accounts for capillarity and deposition of an AxB 1-x alloy is developed for the growth of the shell on a hexagonal core. With this model, the surface alloy segregation and morphological evolution in the processes of the faceted core-shell nanowire growth are studied both analytically and numerically. Mechanisms of formation of Al-rich stripes along { 112 } facets and Al-poor quantum dots/wires at the apices of { 112 } facets are identified. More specifically, it is found that diffusion tends to move the atoms from { 112 } facets to { 110 } facets. The formation of Al-rich stripes along the { 112 } facets is due to the large ratios of mobilities of Al atoms and Ga atoms on { 112 } facets, even though Al atoms diffuse slower than Ga on the { 110 } facets. In addition, the difference of interaction parameters in the enthalpy on different facets can also lead to lines of enhanced concentration of Al behind { 112 } facets. If the attachment rates of Al on the { 112 } facets are smaller than that on { 110 } facets, Al-poor dots will grow at the end of the Al-rich stripes because the growth process switches from diffusion dominant to deposition dominant when the size of the nanowire gets large. Moreover, influences of different parameters on the distribution of concentrations of the atoms in the shell are investigated in details.

  19. Surface elevation change artifact at the NEEM ice core drilling site, North Greenland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg Larsen, Lars; Schøtt Hvidberg, Christine; Dahl-Jensen, Dorthe; Lilja Buchardt, Susanne

    2014-05-01

    The NEEM deep drilling site (77.45°N 51.06°W) is located at the main ice divide in North Greenland. For the ice core drilling project, a number of buildings was erected and left on the snow surface during the five-year project period. The structures created snowdrifts that formed accordingly to the predominant wind direction on the lee side on the buildings and the overwintering cargo. To get access to the buildings, the snowdrifts and the accumulated snow were removed and the surface in the camp was leveled with heavy machinery each summer. In the camp a GPS reference pole was placed as a part of the NEEM strain net, 12 poles placed in three diamonds at distances of 2,5 km, 7,5 km and 25 km they were all measured with high precision GPS every year. Around the reference pole, a 1 km x 1 km grid with a spacing of 100 m was measured with differential GPS each year. In this work, we present results from the GPS surface topography measurements in and around the campsite. The mapping of the topography in and around the campsite shows how the snowdrifts evolve and are the reason for the lift of the camp site area. The accumulated snowdrifts are compared to the dominant wind directions from year to year. The annual snow accumulation at the NEEM site is 0.60 m. The reference pole in the camp indicates an additional snow accumulation of 0.50 m per year caused by collected drifting snow. The surface topography mapping shows that this artificially elevated surface extends up to several kilometers out in the terrain. This could have possible implications on other glaciological and geophysical measurements in the area i.e. pit and snow accumulation studies.

  20. Rough surface Au@Ag core-shell nanoparticles to fabricating high sensitivity SERS immunochromatographic sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qiangqiang; Liu, Hongwu Liu; Wu, Ze; Liu, An; Yao, Cuize; Li, Xiuqing; Xiao, Wei; Yu, Shiting; Luo, Zhi; Tang, Yong

    2015-11-14

    Immunochromatographic sensors (ICSs) are inexpensive, simple, portable, and robust, thus making ICSs commonplace in clinical diagnoses, food testing, and environmental monitoring. However, commonly used gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) ICSs have low sensitivity. Therefore, we developed highly sensitive surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) ICSs. To enhance the sensitivity of SERS ICSs, rough surface core-shell Au@Ag nanoparticles (RSAu@AgNPs) were prepared by coating silver on the surface of gold nanoflowers (AuNFs). Then these nanoparticles were used as SERS substrate in the SERS ICSs, after which the SERS ICSs were implemented to detect haemoglobin and heavy metal cadmium ion (Cd(2+)). The limit of detection (LOD) of the SERS ICSs for detecting haemoglobin was 8 ng/mL, and the linear range of the SERS ICSs was from 31.3 to 2000 ng/mL. The LOD of the SERS ICSs for detecting Cd(2+) was 0.05 ng/mL and the linear analysis range was from 0.05 to 25 ng/mL. The cross reactivity of the SERS ICSs was studied and results showed that the SERS ICSs exhibited highly specific for detection of haemoglobin and Cd(2+), respectively. The SERS ICSs were then used to detect haemoglobin (spiked in serum and in stool) and Cd(2+) (spiked in tap water, river water, and soil leaching water), and the results showed high recovery. These characteristics indicated that SERS ICSs were ideal tools for clinical diagnosis and environmental pollution monitoring.

  1. Magnetized Converging Flows toward the Hot Core in the Intermediate/High-mass Star-forming Region NGC 6334 V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juárez, Carmen; Girart, Josep M.; Zamora-Avilés, Manuel; Tang, Ya-Wen; Koch, Patrick M.; Liu, Hauyu Baobab; Palau, Aina; Ballesteros-Paredes, Javier; Zhang, Qizhou; Qiu, Keping

    2017-07-01

    We present Submillimeter Array (SMA) observations at 345 GHz toward the intermediate/high-mass cluster-forming region NGC 6334 V. From the dust emission we spatially resolve three dense condensations, the brightest one presenting the typical chemistry of a hot core. The magnetic field (derived from the dust polarized emission) shows a bimodal converging pattern toward the hot core. The molecular emission traces two filamentary structures at two different velocities, separated by 2 km s-1, converging to the hot core and following the magnetic field distribution. We compare the velocity field and the magnetic field derived from the SMA observations with magnetohydrodynamic simulations of star-forming regions dominated by gravity. This comparison allows us to show how the gas falls in from the larger-scale extended dense core (˜0.1 pc) of NGC 6334 V toward the higher-density hot core region (˜0.02 pc) through two distinctive converging flows dragging the magnetic field, whose strength seems to have been overcome by gravity.

  2. Characterizing black carbon in rain and ice cores using coupled tangential flow filtration and transmission electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ellis

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Antarctic ice cores have been used to study the history of black carbon (BC, but little is known with regards to the physical and chemical characteristics of these particles in the remote atmosphere. Characterization remains limited by ultra-trace concentrations in ice core samples and the lack of adequate methods to isolate the particles unaltered from the melt water. To investigate the physical and chemical characteristics of these particles, we have developed a tangential flow filtration (TFF method combined with transmission electron microscopy (TEM. Tests using ultrapure water and polystyrene latex particle standards resulted in excellent blanks and significant particle recovery. This approach has been applied to melt water from Antarctic ice cores as well as tropical rain from Darwin, Australia with successful results: TEM analysis revealed a variety of BC particle morphologies, insoluble coatings, and the attachment of BC to mineral dust particles. The TFF-based concentration of these particles has proven to give excellent results for TEM studies of BC particles in Antarctic ice cores and can be used for future studies of insoluble aerosols in rainwater and ice core samples.

  3. Modeling sheet-flow sand transport under progressive surface waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kranenburg, W.M.

    2013-01-01

    In the near-shore zone, energetic sea waves generate sheet-flow sand transport. In present day coastal models, wave-induced sheet-flow sand transport rates are usually predicted with semi-empirical transport formulas, based on extensive research on this phenomenon in oscillatory flow tunnels. Howeve

  4. Determination of averaged axisymmetric flow surfaces according to results obtained by numerical simulation of flow in turbomachinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdanović-Jovanović Jasmina B.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the increasing need for energy saving worldwide, the designing process of turbomachinery, as an essential part of thermal and hydroenergy systems, goes in the direction of enlarging efficiency. Therefore, the optimization of turbomachinery designing strongly affects the energy efficiency of the entire system. In the designing process of turbomachinery blade profiling, the model of axisymmetric fluid flows is commonly used in technical practice, even though this model suits only the profile cascades with infinite number of infinitely thin blades. The actual flow in turbomachinery profile cascades is not axisymmetric, and it can be fictively derived into the axisymmetric flow by averaging flow parameters in the blade passages according to the circular coordinate. Using numerical simulations of flow in turbomachinery runners, its operating parameters can be preliminarily determined. Furthermore, using the numerically obtained flow parameters in the blade passages, averaged axisymmetric flow surfaces in blade profile cascades can also be determined. The method of determination of averaged flow parameters and averaged meridian streamlines is presented in this paper, using the integral continuity equation for averaged flow parameters. With thus obtained results, every designer can be able to compare the obtained averaged flow surfaces with axisymmetric flow surfaces, as well as the specific work of elementary stages, which are used in the procedure of blade designing. Numerical simulations of flow in an exemplary axial flow pump, used as a part of the thermal power plant cooling system, were performed using Ansys CFX. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR33040: Revitalization of existing and designing new micro and mini hydropower plants (from 100 kW to 1000 kW in the territory of South and Southeast Serbia

  5. Sliver spherical nanoshells coated gain-assisted ellipsoidal silica core for low-threshold surface plasmon amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yifei; Guo, Zhongyi; Sun, Yongxuan; Shen, Fei; Mao, Xiaoqin; Wang, Wei; Li, Yan; Liu, Yi; Wang, Xinshun; Qu, Shiliang

    2015-11-01

    We have proposed an ellipsoidal gain-assisted silica core coated with a spherical Ag nanoshell for the stable low-threshold spaser generation. The results show that the surface plasmon can be amplified greatly by increasing the optical gain to a critical value (gain threshold). By varying the ellipticities of the ellipsoidal dielectric core nanoparticles (NPs), the gain threshold of the silica can drop 32.7% compared to that of a spherical core-shell particle. The physical mechanism of the lower gain threshold has been explained and discussed in detail by investigating the quality factor (QF) and the localized field distributions associated with the laser mode. Furthermore, we have also investigated the influence of the ellipticities of the gain-assist silica core on the level of gain threshold. With increasing the ellipticities of the silica core, the level of gain threshold decreases accordingly, and the corresponding super-resonance wavelength also shows a red shift.

  6. Comparison of Helicobacter pylori colonization on the tonsillar surface versus tonsillar core tissue as determined by the CLO test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khademi, Bijan; Niknejad, Nika; Gandomi, Behrooz; Yeganeh, Firoozeh

    2007-08-01

    We conducted a prospective study to determine the correlation between the presence or absence of Helicobacter pylori on the tonsillar surface and in the tonsillar core as determined by the Campylobacter-like organism (CLO) rapid urease enzyme test. Our study population was made up of 55 patients who underwent adenoidectomy, tonsillectomy, or both from December 2002 through April 2003 at Khalili Hospital in Shiraz, Iran. Of these 55 patients, 45 (82%) were positive and 10 (18%) were negative for H pylori colonization as determined by CLO testing. Analysis of samples obtained from individual patients revealed differences in H pylori colonization between tonsillar surface samples and the core tissue samples. Of 106 tonsils obtained from 53 patients who underwent adenotonsillectomy or tonsillectomy, H pylori was found on 56 tonsillar surface samples (53%) and 24 tonsillar core samples (23%); only 13 tonsils (12%) contained H pylori both on the surface and in the core. We conclude that a surface swab is neither specific nor sensitive as an indicator of the presence or absence of H. pylori colonization in tonsillar core tissue.

  7. Development, testing and application of DrainFlow: A fully distributed integrated surface-subsurface flow model for drainage study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokri, Ali; Bardsley, William Earl

    2016-06-01

    Hydrological and hydrogeological investigation of drained land is a complex and integrated procedure. The scale of drainage studies may vary from a high-resolution small scale project through to comprehensive catchment or regional scale investigations. This wide range of scales and integrated system behaviour poses a significant challenge for the development of suitable drainage models. Toward meeting these requirements, a fully distributed coupled surface-subsurface flow model titled DrainFlow has been developed and is described. DrainFlow includes both the diffusive wave equation for surface flow components (overland flow, open drain, tile drain) and Richard's equation for saturated/unsaturated zones. To overcome the non-linearity problem created from switching between wet and dry boundaries, a smooth transitioning technique is introduced to buffer the model at tile drains and at interfaces between surface and subsurface flow boundaries. This gives a continuous transition between Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. DrainFlow is tested against five well-known integrated surface-subsurface flow benchmarks. DrainFlow as applied to some synthetic drainage study examples is quite flexible for changing all or part of the model dimensions as required by problem complexity, problem scale, and data availability. This flexibility enables DrainFlow to be modified to allow for changes in both scale and boundary conditions, as often encountered in real-world drainage studies. Compared to existing drainage models, DrainFlow has the advantage of estimating actual infiltration directly from the partial differential form of Richard's equation rather than through analytical or empirical infiltration approaches like the Green and Ampt equation.

  8. Influence of light intensity on surface free energy and dentin bond strength of core build-up resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Y; Tsujimoto, A; Furuichi, T; Suzuki, T; Tsubota, K; Miyazaki, M; Platt, J A

    2015-01-01

    We examined the influence of light intensity on surface free energy characteristics and dentin bond strength of dual-cure direct core build-up resin systems. Two commercially available dual-cure direct core build-up resin systems, Clearfil DC Core Automix with Clearfil Bond SE One and UniFil Core EM with Self-Etching Bond, were studied. Bovine mandibular incisors were mounted in acrylic resin and the facial dentin surfaces were wet ground on 600-grit silicon carbide paper. Adhesives were applied to dentin surfaces and cured with light intensities of 0 (no irradiation), 200, 400, and 600 mW/cm(2). The surface free energy of the adhesives (five samples per group) was determined by measuring the contact angles of three test liquids placed on the cured adhesives. To determine the strength of the dentin bond, the core build-up resin pastes were condensed into the mold on the adhesive-treated dentin surfaces according to the methods described for the surface free energy measurement. The resin pastes were cured with the same light intensities as those used for the adhesives. Ten specimens per group were stored in water maintained at 37°C for 24 hours, after which they were shear tested at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/minute in a universal testing machine. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and a Tukey-Kramer test were performed, with the significance level set at 0.05. The surface free energies of the adhesive-treated dentin surfaces decreased with an increase in the light intensity of the curing unit. Two-way ANOVA revealed that the type of core build-up system and the light intensity significantly influence the bond strength, although there was no significant interaction between the two factors. The highest bond strengths were achieved when the resin pastes were cured with the strongest light intensity for all the core build-up systems. When polymerized with a light intensity of 200 mW/cm(2) or less, significantly lower bond strengths were observed. CONClUSIONS: The

  9. Parallel computation of a dam-break flow model using OpenMP on a multi-core computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shanghong; Xia, Zhongxi; Yuan, Rui; Jiang, Xiaoming

    2014-05-01

    High-performance calculations are of great importance to the simulation of dam-break events, as discontinuous solutions and accelerated speed are key factors in the process of dam-break flow modeling. In this study, Roe's approximate Riemann solution of the finite volume method is adopted to solve the interface flux of grid cells and accurately simulate the discontinuous flow, and shared memory technology (OpenMP) is used to realize parallel computing. Because an explicit discrete technique is used to solve the governing equations, and there is no correlation between grid calculations in a single time step, the parallel dam-break model can be easily realized by adding OpenMP instructions to the loop structure of the grid calculations. The performance of the model is analyzed using six computing cores and four different grid division schemes for the Pangtoupao flood storage area in China. The results show that the parallel computing improves precision and increases the simulation speed of the dam-break flow, the simulation of 320 h flood process can be completed within 1.6 h on a 16-kernel computer; a speedup factor of 8.64× is achieved. Further analysis reveals that the models involving a larger number of calculations exhibit greater efficiency and a higher rate of acceleration. At the same time, the model has good extendibility, as the speedup increases with the number of processor cores. The parallel model based on OpenMP can make full use of multi-core processors, making it possible to simulate dam-break flows in large-scale watersheds on a single computer.

  10. Narrow Scale Flow and a Weak Field by the Top of Earth's Core: Evidence from Orsted, Magsat and Secular Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorhies, Coerte V.

    2004-01-01

    As Earth's main magnetic field weakens, our magnetic shield against the onslaught of the solar wind thins. And the field strength needed to fend off battering by solar coronal mass ejections is decreasing, just when the delicate complexity of modem, vulnerable, electro-technological systems is increasing at an unprecedented rate. Recently, a working group of distinguished scientist from across the nation has asked NASA's Solid Earth and Natural Hazards program a key question: What are the dynamics of Earth s magnetic field and its interactions with the Earth system? Paleomagnetic studies of crustal rocks magnetized in the geologic past reveal that polarity reversals have occurred many times during Earth s history. Networked super-computer simulations of core field and flow, including effects of gravitational, pressure, rotational Coriolis, magnetic and viscous forces, suggest how this might happen in detail. And space-based measurements of the real, time-varying magnetic field help constrain estimates of the speed and direction of fluid iron flowing near the top of the core and enable tests of some hypotheses about such flow. Now scientists at NASA s Goddard Space Flight Center have developed and applied methods to test the hypotheses of narrow scale flow and of a dynamically weak magnetic field near the top of Earth s core. Using two completely different methods, C. V. Voorhies has shown these hypotheses lead to specific theoretical forms for the "spectrum" of Earth s main magnetic field and the spectrum of its rate of change. Much as solar physicists use a prism to separate sunlight into its spectrum, from long wavelength red to short wavelength blue light, geophysicists use a digital prism, spherical harmonic analysis, to separate the measured geomagnetic field into its spectrum, from long to short wavelength fields. They do this for the rate of change of the field as well.

  11. Enteric and indicator virus removal by surface flow wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachmadi, Andri T; Kitajima, Masaaki; Pepper, Ian L; Gerba, Charles P

    2016-01-15

    We investigated the occurrence and attenuation of several human enteric viruses (i.e., norovirus, adenovirus, Aichi virus 1, polyomaviruses, and enterovirus) as well as a plant virus, pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV), at two surface flow wetlands in Arizona. The retention time in one of the wetlands was seven days, whereas in the other wetland it could not be defined. Water samples were collected at the inlet and outlet from the wetlands over nine months, and concentration of viral genomes was determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Of the human enteric viruses tested, adenovirus and Aichi virus 1 were found in the greatest prevalence in treated wastewater (i.e., inlet of the wetlands). Reduction efficiencies of enteric viruses by the wetlands ranged from 1 to 3 log10. Polyomaviruses were generally removed to below detection limit, indicating at least 2 to 4 log10 removal. PMMoV was detected in a greater concentration in the inlet of both wetlands for all the viruses tested (10(4) to 10(7) genome copies/L), but exhibited little or no removal (1 log10 or less). To determine the factors associated with virus genome attenuation (as determined by qPCR), the persistence of PMMoV and poliovirus type 1 (an enterovirus) was studied in autoclaved and natural wetland water, and deionized water incubated under three different temperatures for 21 days. A combination of elevated water temperature and biological activities reduced poliovirus by 1 to 4 log10, while PMMoV was not significantly reduced during this time period. Overall, PMMoV showed much greater persistence than human viruses in the wetland treatment.

  12. Integrated Water Flow Model (IWFM), A Tool For Numerically Simulating Linked Groundwater, Surface Water And Land-Surface Hydrologic Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogrul, E. C.; Brush, C. F.; Kadir, T. N.

    2006-12-01

    The Integrated Water Flow Model (IWFM) is a comprehensive input-driven application for simulating groundwater flow, surface water flow and land-surface hydrologic processes, and interactions between these processes, developed by the California Department of Water Resources (DWR). IWFM couples a 3-D finite element groundwater flow process and 1-D land surface, lake, stream flow and vertical unsaturated-zone flow processes which are solved simultaneously at each time step. The groundwater flow system is simulated as a multilayer aquifer system with a mixture of confined and unconfined aquifers separated by semiconfining layers. The groundwater flow process can simulate changing aquifer conditions (confined to unconfined and vice versa), subsidence, tile drains, injection wells and pumping wells. The land surface process calculates elemental water budgets for agricultural, urban, riparian and native vegetation classes. Crop water demands are dynamically calculated using distributed soil properties, land use and crop data, and precipitation and evapotranspiration rates. The crop mix can also be automatically modified as a function of pumping lift using logit functions. Surface water diversions and groundwater pumping can each be specified, or can be automatically adjusted at run time to balance water supply with water demand. The land-surface process also routes runoff to streams and deep percolation to the unsaturated zone. Surface water networks are specified as a series of stream nodes (coincident with groundwater nodes) with specified bed elevation, conductance and stage-flow relationships. Stream nodes are linked to form stream reaches. Stream inflows at the model boundary, surface water diversion locations, and one or more surface water deliveries per location are specified. IWFM routes stream flows through the network, calculating groundwater-surface water interactions, accumulating inflows from runoff, and allocating available stream flows to meet specified or

  13. Role of radiogenic heat generation in surface heat flow formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khutorskoi, M. D.; Polyak, B. G.

    2016-03-01

    Heat generation due to decay of long-lived radioactive isotopes is considered in the Earth's crust of the Archean-Proterozoic and Paleozoic provinces of Eurasia and North America. The heat flow that forms in the mantle is calculated as the difference between the heat flow observed at the boundary of the solid Earth and radiogenic heat flow produced in the crust. The heat regime in regions with anomalously high radiogenic heat generation is discussed. The relationship between various heat flow components in the Precambrian and Phanerozoic provinces has been comparatively analyzed, and the role of erosion of the surfaceheat- generating layer has been estimated.

  14. MHD Stability Analysis and Flow Controls of Liquid Metal Free Surface Film Flows as Fusion Reactor PFCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiujie; Pan, Chuanjie; Xu, Zengyu

    2016-12-01

    Numerical and experimental investigation results on the magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) film flows along flat and curved bottom surfaces are summarized in this study. A simplified modeling has been developed to study the liquid metal MHD film state, which has been validated by the existing experimental results. Numerical results on how the inlet velocity (V), the chute width (W) and the inlet film thickness (d0) affect the MHD film flow state are obtained. MHD stability analysis results are also provided in this study. The results show that strong magnetic fields make the stable V decrease several times compared to the case with no magnetic field, especially small radial magnetic fields (Bn) will have a significant impact on the MHD film flow state. Based on the above numerical and MHD stability analysis results flow control methods are proposed for flat and curved MHD film flows. For curved film flow we firstly proposed a new multi-layers MHD film flow system with a solid metal mesh to get the stable MHD film flows along the curved bottom surface. Experiments on flat and curved MHD film flows are also carried out and some firstly observed results are achieved. supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Nos. 2014GB125003 and 2013GB114002), National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11105044)

  15. A new method for high-resolution methane measurements on polar ice cores using continuous flow analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüpbach, Simon; Federer, Urs; Kaufmann, Patrik R; Hutterli, Manuel A; Buiron, Daphné; Blunier, Thomas; Fischer, Hubertus; Stocker, Thomas F

    2009-07-15

    Methane (CH4) is the second most important anthropogenic greenhouse gas in the atmosphere. Rapid variations of the CH4 concentration, as frequently registered, for example, during the last ice age, have been used as reliable time markers for the definition of a common time scale of polar ice cores. In addition, these variations indicate changes in the sources of methane primarily associated with the presence of wetlands. In order to determine the exact time evolution of such fast concentration changes, CH4 measurements of the highest resolution in the ice core archive are required. Here, we present a new, semicontinuous and field-deployable CH4 detection method, which was incorporated in a continuous flow analysis (CFA) system. In CFA, samples cut along the axis of an ice core are melted at a melt speed of typically 3.5 cm/min. The air from bubbles in the ice core is extracted continuously from the meltwater and forwarded to a gas chromatograph (GC) for high-resolution CH4 measurements. The GC performs a measurement every 3.5 min, hence, a depth resolution of 15 cm is achieved atthe chosen melt rate. An even higher resolution is not necessary due to the low pass filtering of air in ice cores caused by the slow bubble enclosure process and the diffusion of air in firn. Reproducibility of the new method is 3%, thus, for a typical CH4 concentration of 500 ppb during an ice age, this corresponds to an absolute precision of 15 ppb, comparable to traditional analyses on discrete samples. Results of CFA-CH4 measurements on the ice core from Talos Dome (Antarctica) illustrate the much higher temporal resolution of our method compared with established melt-refreeze CH4 measurements and demonstrate the feasibility of the new method.

  16. Retention mechanisms and the flow wetted surface - implications for safety analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elert, M. [Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1997-02-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the state-of-the-art concerning the flow wetted surface, its importance for radionuclide transport in the geosphere and review various suggestions on how to increase the present knowledge. Definitions are made of the various concepts used for the flow wetted surface as well as the various model parameters used. In the report methods proposed to assess the flow wetted surface are reviewed and discussed, tracer tests, tunnel and borehole investigations, geochemical studies, heat transport studies and theoretical modelling. Furthermore, a review is made of how the flow wetted surface has been treated in various safety analyses. Finally, an overall discussion with recommendations is presented, where it is concluded that at present no individual method for estimating the flow wetted surface can be selected that satisfies all requirements concerning giving relevant values, covering relevant distances and being practical to apply. Instead a combination of methods must be used. In the long-term research as well as in the safety assessment modelling focus should be put on assessing the ratio between flow wetted surface and water flux. The long-term research should address both the detailed flow within the fractures and the effective flow wetted surface along the flow paths. 55 refs.

  17. Free surface flow of a suspension of rigid particles in a non-Newtonian fluid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svec, Oldrich; Skocek, Jan; Stang, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    A numerical framework capable of predicting the free surface flow of a suspension of rigid particles in a non-Newtonian fluid is described. The framework is a combination of the lattice Boltzmann method for fluid flow, the mass tracking algorithm for free surface representation, the immersed...

  18. The interaction of human endothelial cells with chemical gradient surfaces during exposure to flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruardy, TG; Moorlag, HE; Schakenraad, JM; Van der Meer, J; Van der Mei, HC; Busscher, HJ; Olij, WJV; Anderson, HR

    1998-01-01

    In this study, the position bound shape, spreading, detachment and migration of adhering HUVEC endothelial cells on dichlorodimethylsilane (DDS) chemical gradient surfaces was investigated during exposure to flow in a parallel plate flow chamber in the presence of` serum proteins. Gradient surfaces

  19. Experimental studies of the streaming flow due to the adsorption of particles at a liquid surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Pushpendra; Musunuri, Naga; Fischer, Ian

    2016-11-01

    The particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique is used to study the streaming flow that is induced when particles are adsorbed at a liquid surface. The flow develops within a fraction of second after the adsorption of the particle and persists for several seconds. The fluid directly below the particle rises upward, and near the surface, it moves away from the particle. The flow causes powders sprinkled on a liquid surface to disperse on the surface. The flow strength, and the volume over which it extends, decreases with decreasing particle size. The streaming flow induced by the adsorption of two or more particles is a combination of the flows which they induce individually. The work was supported by National Science Foundation.

  20. Experimental and numerical investigations of high temperature gas heat transfer and flow in a VHTR reactor core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentin Rodriguez, Francisco Ivan

    High pressure/high temperature forced and natural convection experiments have been conducted in support of the development of a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) with a prismatic core. VHTRs are designed with the capability to withstand accidents by preventing nuclear fuel meltdown, using passive safety mechanisms; a product of advanced reactor designs including the implementation of inert gases like helium as coolants. The present experiments utilize a high temperature/high pressure gas flow test facility constructed for forced and natural circulation experiments. This work examines fundamental aspects of high temperature gas heat transfer applied to VHTR operational and accident scenarios. Two different types of experiments, forced convection and natural circulation, were conducted under high pressure and high temperature conditions using three different gases: air, nitrogen and helium. The experimental data were analyzed to obtain heat transfer coefficient data in the form of Nusselt numbers as a function of Reynolds, Grashof and Prandtl numbers. This work also examines the flow laminarization phenomenon (turbulent flows displaying much lower heat transfer parameters than expected due to intense heating conditions) in detail for a full range of Reynolds numbers including: laminar, transition and turbulent flows under forced convection and its impact on heat transfer. This phenomenon could give rise to deterioration in convection heat transfer and occurrence of hot spots in the reactor core. Forced and mixed convection data analyzed indicated the occurrence of flow laminarization phenomenon due to the buoyancy and acceleration effects induced by strong heating. Turbulence parameters were also measured using a hot wire anemometer in forced convection experiments to confirm the existence of the flow laminarization phenomenon. In particular, these results demonstrated the influence of pressure on delayed transition between laminar and turbulent flow. The heat

  1. NUMERICAL MODELLING OF FREE-SURFACE FLOWS WITH BOTTOM AND SURFACE-LAYER PRESSURE TREATMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Kun; JIN Sheng; LIU Gang

    2009-01-01

    A new non-hydrostatic numerical model with the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations on structured grids was constructed and discussed. The algorithm is based upon a staggered finite difference Crank-Nicholson scheme on a Cartesian grid. The eddy viscosity coefficient was calculated by the efficient k-ε turbulence model. A new surface-layer non-hydrostatic treatment and a local cell bottom treatment were introduced so that the three-dimensional model is fully non-hydrostatic and is free of any hydrostatic assumption. The developed model is second-order accuracy in both time and space when semi-implicit coefficient is set to 0.5. The validity of the present solution algorithm was demonstrated from its application to the three-dimension channel flow and the wave propagation over a submerged bar problems.

  2. Measurement of the interaction between the flow and the free surface of a liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamoto, Koji [Univ. of Tokyo, Ibaraki (Japan); Schmidl, W.D.; Philip, O.G. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The interaction between the flow and free surface was evaluated measuring the velocity distribution and surface movement simultaneously. The test section was a rectangular tank having a free surface. A rectangular nozzle was set near the free surface, causing the wavy free surface condition. The flow under the free surface was visualized by a laser light sheet and small tracer particles. With image processing techniques, the movement of the free surface and the movement of the particles were simultaneously measured from the recorded images, resulting in the velocity distributions and surface locations. Then, the interactions between the flow and free surface were evaluated using the form of turbulent energy and surface-related turbulent values. By increasing the turbulent energy near the free surface, the fluctuations of the free surface height and the inclination of the free surface were increased. The higher fluctuation of horizontal velocity was related to the higher surface position and negative inclination. The image processing technique is found to be very useful to evaluate the interaction between free surface and flow.

  3. Succeed escape: Flow shear promotes tumbling of Escherichia colinear a solid surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molaei, Mehdi; Sheng, Jian

    2016-10-01

    Understanding how bacteria move close to a surface under various stimuli is crucial for a broad range of microbial processes including biofilm formation, bacterial transport and migration. While prior studies focus on interactions between single stimulus and bacterial suspension, we emphasize on compounding effects of flow shear and solid surfaces on bacterial motility, especially reorientation and tumble. We have applied microfluidics and digital holographic microscopy to capture a large number (>105) of 3D Escherichia coli trajectories near a surface under various flow shear. We find that near-surface flow shear promotes cell reorientation and mitigates the tumble suppression and re-orientation confinement found in a quiescent flow, and consequently enhances surface normal bacterial dispersion. Conditional sampling suggests that two complimentary hydrodynamic mechanisms, Jeffrey Orbit and shear-induced flagella unbundling, are responsible for the enhancement in bacterial tumble motility. These findings imply that flow shear may mitigate cell trapping and prevent biofilm initiation.

  4. Mass flow rate sensitivity and uncertainty analysis in natural circulation boiling water reactor core from Monte Carlo simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinosa-Paredes, Gilberto, E-mail: gepe@xanum.uam.m [Area de Ingenieria en Recursos Energeticos, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco, 186, Col. Vicentina, Mexico D.F., 09340 (Mexico); Verma, Surendra P. [Centro de Investigacion en Energia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Priv. Xochicalco s/no., Col Centro, Apartado Postal 34, Temixco 62580 (Mexico); Vazquez-Rodriguez, Alejandro [Area de Ingenieria en Recursos Energeticos, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco, 186, Col. Vicentina, Mexico D.F., 09340 (Mexico); Nunez-Carrera, Alejandro [Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias, Doctor Barragan 779, Col. Narvarte, Mexico D.F. 03020 (Mexico)

    2010-05-15

    Our aim was to evaluate the sensitivity and uncertainty of mass flow rate in the core on the performance of natural circulation boiling water reactor (NCBWR). This analysis was carried out through Monte Carlo simulations of sizes up to 40,000, and the size, i.e., repetition of 25,000 was considered as valid for routine applications. A simplified boiling water reactor (SBWR) was used as an application example of Monte Carlo method. The numerical code to simulate the SBWR performance considers a one-dimensional thermo-hydraulics model along with non-equilibrium thermodynamics and non-homogeneous flow approximation, one-dimensional fuel rod heat transfer. The neutron processes were simulated with a point reactor kinetics model with six groups of delayed neutrons. The sensitivity was evaluated in terms of 99% confidence intervals of the mean to understand the range of mean values that may represent the entire statistical population of performance variables. The regression analysis with mass flow rate as the predictor variable showed statistically valid linear correlations for both neutron flux and fuel temperature and quadratic relationship for the void fraction. No statistically valid correlation was observed for the total heat flux as a function of the mass flow rate although heat flux at individual nodes was positively correlated with this variable. These correlations are useful for the study, analysis and design of any NCBWR. The uncertainties were propagated as follows: for 10% change in the mass flow rate in the core, the responses for neutron power, total heat flux, average fuel temperature and average void fraction changed by 8.74%, 7.77%, 2.74% and 0.58%, respectively.

  5. In Vitro Evaluation of Various Surface Treatments of Fiber Posts on the Bond Strength to Composite Core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sareh Nadalizadeh

    Full Text Available Introduction: The reliable bond at the root-post-core interface is critical for the clinical success of post-retained restorations. To decrease the risk of fracture, it is important to optimize the adhesion. Therefore, various post surface treatments have been proposed. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of various surface treatments of fiber posts on the bond strength to composite core. Materials & Methods: In this study, 40 fiber reinforced posts were used. After preparing and sectioning them, resulting specimens were divided into four groups (N=28. The posts received different surface treatments such as no surface treatment (control group, preparing with hydrogen peroxide 10%, preparing with silane, preparing with HF and silane. Then, posts were tested in micro tensile testing machine. The results were analyzed by One-Way ANOVA and Dunnett T3 test. Results: The greatest bond strength observed was in treatment with hydrogen peroxide 10% (19.84±8.95 MPa, and the lowest strength was related to the control group (12.44±3.40 MPa. The comparison of the groups with Dunnett T3 test showed that the differences between the groups was statistically significant (α=0.05.Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, preparing with H2O2 -10 % and silane increases the bond strength of FRC posts to the composite core more than the other methods. Generally, the bond strength of posts to the composite core increases by surface treatment.

  6. A High-Resolution Continuous Flow Analysis System for Polar Ice Cores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dallmayr, Remi; Goto-Azuma, Kumiko; Kjær, Helle Astrid

    2016-01-01

    of Polar Research (NIPR) in Tokyo. The system allows the continuous analysis of stable water isotopes and electrical conductivity, as well as the collection of discrete samples from both inner and outer parts of the core. This CFA system was designed to have sufficiently high temporal resolution to detect...... signals of abrupt climate change in deep polar ice cores. To test its performance, we used the system to analyze different climate intervals in ice drilled at the NEEM (North Greenland Eemian Ice Drilling) site, Greenland. The quality of our continuous measurement of stable water isotopes has been...

  7. Optimization of High-Resolution Continuous Flow Analysis for Transient Climate Signals in Ice Cores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bigler, Matthias; Svensson, Anders; Kettner, Ernesto

    2011-01-01

    meltwater conductivity detection modules. The system is optimized for high- resolution determination of transient signals in thin layers of deep polar ice cores. Based on standard measurements and by comparing sections of early Holocene and glacial ice from Greenland, we find that the new system features...... a depth resolution in the ice of a few millimeters which is considerably better than other CFA systems. Thus, the new system can resolve ice strata down to 10 mm thickness and has the potential of identifying annual layers in both Greenland and Antarctic ice cores throughout the last glacial cycle....

  8. Effects of preferential flow on soil-water and surface runoff in a forested watershed in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinhua CHENG; Hongjiang ZHANG; Youyan ZHANG; Yuhu SHI; Yun CHENG

    2009-01-01

    Preferential flow is a runoff mechanism intermediate between matrix flow and surface flow, transmitting water at high velocity through the subsurface zone. To assess the effect of preferential flow on soil-water flow and surface runoff in a forested watershed, precipitation and volumes of preferential flow, matrix flow and surface runoff were measured over a period of four years in a forested watershed in the Three Gorges area of southern China. Results show that preferential-flow hydrographs have gentler rises and steeper recessions than those for matrix flow and surface runoff. Preferential flow as a percentage of soil-water flow ranged from 2.40% to 8.72% and the maximum preferential-flow velocity exceeded as much as 5600 times that of matrix flow. This shows that preferential flow plays an important role in the movement of soil water. Preferential flow has a significant effect on peak surface runoff by increasing the surface runoff rate and accelerating the appearance of peak surface runoff. Preferential flow can also prolong the duration of surface runoff. Surface runoff was observed to be positively correlated with preferential flow. The greater the sum of rainfall amount and antecedent precipitation is, the greater the effect of preferential flow on surface runoff is.

  9. Effects of mass flow rate and droplet velocity on surface heat flux during cryogen spray cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karapetian, Emil [Department of Chemical Engineering and Material Sciences, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Aguilar, Guillermo [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Kimel, Sol [Beckman Laser Institute, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Lavernia, Enrique J [Department of Chemical Engineering and Material Sciences, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Nelson, J Stuart [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2003-01-07

    Cryogen spray cooling (CSC) is used to protect the epidermis during dermatologic laser surgery. To date, the relative influence of the fundamental spray parameters on surface cooling remains incompletely understood. This study explores the effects of mass flow rate and average droplet velocity on the surface heat flux during CSC. It is shown that the effect of mass flow rate on the surface heat flux is much more important compared to that of droplet velocity. However, for fully atomized sprays with small flow rates, droplet velocity can make a substantial difference in the surface heat flux. (note)

  10. High Temperature Stress Analysis on 61-pin Test Assembly for Reactor Core Sub-channel Flow Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dongwon; Kim, Hyungmo; Lee, Hyeongyeon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    In this study, a high temperature heat transfer and stress analysis of a 61-pin test fuel assembly scaled down from the full scale 217-pin sub-assembly was conducted. The reactor core subchannel flow characteristic test will be conducted to evaluate uncertainties in computer codes used for reactor core thermal hydraulic design. Stress analysis for a 61-pin fuel assembly scaled down from Prototype Generation IV Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor was conducted and structural integrity in terms of load controlled stress limits was conducted. In this study, The evaluations on load-controlled stress limits for a 61-pin test fuel assembly to be used for reactor core subchannel flow distribution tests were conducted assuming that the test assembly is installed in a Prototype Generation IV Sodium-cooled fast reactor core. The 61-pin test assembly has the geometric similarity on P/D and H/D with PGSFR and material of fuel assembly is austenitic stainless steel 316L. The stress analysis results showed that 4.05MPa under primary load occurred at mid part of the test assembly and it was shown that the value of 4.05Mpa was far smaller than the code allowable of 127MPa. , it was shown that the stress intensity due to due to primary load is very small. The stress analysis results under primary and secondary loads showed that maximum stress intensity of 84.08MPa occurred at upper flange tangent to outer casing and the value was well within the code allowable of 268.8MPa. Integrity evaluations based on strain limits and creep-fatigue damage are underway according to the elevated design codes.

  11. The curved shape of Caulobacter crescentus enhances surface colonization in flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persat, Alexandre; Stone, Howard A.; Gitai, Zemer

    2014-05-01

    Each bacterial species has a characteristic shape, but the benefits of specific morphologies remain largely unknown. To understand potential functions for cell shape, we focused on the curved bacterium Caulobacter crescentus. Paradoxically, C. crescentus curvature is robustly maintained in the wild but straight mutants have no known disadvantage in standard laboratory conditions. Here we demonstrate that cell curvature enhances C. crescentus surface colonization in flow. Imaging the formation of microcolonies at high spatial and temporal resolution indicates that flow causes curved cells to orient such that they arc over the surface, thereby decreasing the distance between the surface and polar adhesive pili, and orienting pili to face the surface. C. crescentus thus repurposes pilus retraction, typically used for surface motility, for surface attachment. The benefit provided by curvature is eliminated at high flow intensity, raising the possibility that diversity in curvature adapts related species for life in different flow environments.

  12. A comparison between numerical predictions and theoretical and experimental results for laminar core-annular flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerens, J.C.; Ooms, G.; Pourquie, M.J.B.M.; Westerweel, J.

    2014-01-01

    high-viscosity liquid core surrounded by a laminar low-viscosity liquid annular layer through a vertical pipe. The numerical results are compared with theoretical results from linear stability calculations and with experimental data. The comparison is good and the general conclusion of our study is

  13. Flow, slippage and a hydrodynamic boundary condition of polymers at surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, M; Pastorino, C; Servantie, J [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Georg-August-Universitaet, D-37077 Goettingen (Germany)], E-mail: mmueller@theorie.physik.uni-goettingen.de

    2008-12-10

    Tailoring surface interactions or grafting of polymers onto surfaces is a versatile tool for controlling wettability, lubrication, adhesion and interactions between surfaces. Using molecular dynamics of a coarse-grained, bead-spring model and dynamic single-chain-in-mean-field simulations, we investigate how structural changes near the surface affect the flow of a polymer melt over the surface and how these changes can be parameterized by a hydrodynamic boundary condition. We study the temperature dependence of the near-surface flow of a polymer melt at a corrugated, attractive surface. At weakly attractive surfaces, lubrication layers form, the slip length is large and increases upon cooling. Close to the glass transition temperature, very large slip lengths are observed. At a more attractive surface, a 'sticky surface layer' is build up, giving rise to a small slip length. Upon cooling, the slip length decreases at high temperatures, passes through a minimum and increases upon approaching the glass transition temperature. At strongly attractive surfaces, the Navier slip condition fails to describe Couette and Poiseuille flows simultaneously. A similar failure of the Navier slip condition is observed for the flow of a polymer melt over a brush comprised of identical molecules. The wetting and flow properties of this surface are rather complex. Most notably, the cyclic motion of the grafted molecules gives rise to a reversal of the flow direction at the grafting surface. The failure of the Navier slip condition in both cases can be rationalized within a schematic, two-layer model, which demonstrates that the Navier slip condition fails to simultaneously describe Poiseuille and Couette flow if the fluid at the surface exhibits a higher viscosity than the bulk.

  14. Impact of surface roughness of Au core in Au/Pd core-shell nanoparticles toward formic acid oxidation - Experiment and simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chiajen; Huang, Chienwen; Hao, Yaowu; Liu, Fuqiang

    2013-12-01

    The Au/Pd core-shell nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized via galvanic replacement of Cu by Pd on hollow Au cores by adding different concentrations of Na2SO3 solution. It was found that the higher concentration of Na2SO3 that was used, the rougher the Au nanospheres became. However, the rougher Au surface may cause more defects in the Pd layers and decrease the catalytic abilities. The Au/Pd NPs synthesized using 0 M Na2SO3 (denoted as 0 M-Au/Pd NPs) have the smoothest Pd surface and demonstrate higher formic acid oxidation (FAO) activity (0.714 mA cm-2, normalized to the surface area of Pd) than other Au/Pd NPs and commercial Pd black (0.47 mA cm-2). Additional electrochemical characterization of the 0 M-Au/Pd NPs also demonstrated lower CO-stripping onset and peak potentials, higher stability (8× improvement in stabilized oxidation current), and superior durability (by 1.6×) than the Pd black. In addition, a simple simulation of FAO was adopted to predict the anodic curve by including reaction intermediates of formate and hydroxyl. The 0 M-Au/Pd NPs were found to show higher formate and lower hydroxyl coverage than the Pd black.

  15. Self-construction of core-shell and hollow zeolite analcime icositetrahedra: a reversed crystal growth process via oriented aggregation of nanocrystallites and recrystallization from surface to core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xueying; Qiao, Minghua; Xie, Songhai; Fan, Kangnian; Zhou, Wuzong; He, Heyong

    2007-10-31

    Zeolite analcime with a core-shell and hollow icositetrahedron architecture was prepared by a one-pot hydrothermal route in the presence of ethylamine and Raney Ni. Detailed investigations on samples at different preparation stages revealed that the growth of the complex single crystalline geometrical structure did not follow the classic crystal growth route, i.e., a crystal with a highly symmetric morphology (such as polyhedra) is normally developed by attachment of atoms or ions to a nucleus. A reversed crystal growth process through oriented aggregation of nanocrystallites and surface recrystallization was observed. The whole process can be described by the following four successive steps. (1) Primary analcime nanoplatelets undergo oriented aggregation to yield discus-shaped particles. (2) These disci further assemble into polycrystalline microspheres. (3) The relatively large platelets grow into nanorods by consuming the smaller ones, and meanwhile, the surface of the microspheres recrystallizes into a thin single crystalline icositetrahedral shell via Ostwald ripening. (4) Recrystallization continues from the surface to the core at the expense of the nanorods, and the thickness of the monocrystalline shell keeps on increasing until all the nanorods are consumed, leading to hollow single crystalline analcime icositetrahedra. The present work adds new useful information for the understanding of the principles of zeolite growth.

  16. Holocene accumulation and ice flow near the West Antarctic Ice Sheet Divide ice core site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutnik, Michelle R.; Fudge, T. J.; Conway, Howard; Waddington, Edwin D.; Neumann, Thomas A.; Cuffey, Kurt M.; Buizert, Christo; Taylor, Kendrick C.

    2016-05-01

    The West Antarctic Ice Sheet Divide Core (WDC) provided a high-resolution climate record from near the Ross-Amundsen Divide in Central West Antarctica. In addition, radar-detected internal layers in the vicinity of the WDC site have been dated directly from the ice core to provide spatial variations in the age structure of the region. Using these two data sets together, we first infer a high-resolution Holocene accumulation-rate history from 9.2 kyr of the ice-core timescale and then confirm that this climate history is consistent with internal layers upstream of the core site. Even though the WDC was drilled only 24 km from the modern ice divide, advection of ice from upstream must be taken into account. We evaluate histories of accumulation rate by using a flowband model to generate internal layers that we compare to observed layers. Results show that the centennially averaged accumulation rate was over 20% lower than modern at 9.2 kyr before present (B.P.), increased by 40% from 9.2 to 2.3 kyr B.P., and decreased by at least 10% over the past 2 kyr B.P. to the modern values; these Holocene accumulation-rate changes in Central West Antarctica are larger than changes inferred from East Antarctic ice-core records. Despite significant changes in accumulation rate, throughout the Holocene the regional accumulation pattern has likely remained similar to today, and the ice-divide position has likely remained on average within 5 km of its modern position. Continent-scale ice-sheet models used for reconstructions of West Antarctic ice volume should incorporate this accumulation history.

  17. An Exposed-Core Grapefruit Fibers Based Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianchao Yang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available To solve the problem of air hole coating and analyte filling in microstructured optical fiber-based surface plasmon resonance (SPR sensors, we designed an exposed-core grapefruit fiber (EC-GFs-based SPR sensor. The exposed section of the EC-GF is coated with a SPR, supporting thin silver film, which can sense the analyte in the external environment. The asymmetrically coated fiber can support two separate resonance peaks (x- and y-polarized peaks with orthogonal polarizations and x-polarized peak, providing a much higher peak loss than y-polarized, also the x-polarized peak has higher wavelength and amplitude sensitivities. A large analyte refractive index (RI range from 1.33 to 1.42 is calculated to investigate the sensing performance of the sensor, and an extremely high wavelength sensitivity of 13,500 nm/refractive index unit (RIU is obtained. The silver layer thickness, which may affect the sensing performance, is also discussed. This work can provide a reference for developing a high sensitivity, real-time, fast-response, and distributed SPR RI sensor.

  18. Detection of amino acid neurotransmitters by surface enhanced Raman scattering and hollow core photonic crystal fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Vidhu S.; Khetani, Altaf; Monfared, Ali Momenpour T.; Smith, Brett; Anis, Hanan; Trudeau, Vance L.

    2012-03-01

    The present work explores the feasibility of using surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for detecting the neurotransmitters such as glutamate (GLU) and gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA). These amino acid neurotransmitters that respectively mediate fast excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission in the brain, are important for neuroendocrine control, and upsets in their synthesis are also linked to epilepsy. Our SERS-based detection scheme enabled the detection of low amounts of GLU (10-7 M) and GABA (10-4 M). It may complement existing techniques for characterizing such kinds of neurotransmitters that include high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) or mass spectrography (MS). This is mainly because SERS has other advantages such as ease of sample preparation, molecular specificity and sensitivity, thus making it potentially applicable to characterization of experimental brain extracts or clinical diagnostic samples of cerebrospinal fluid and saliva. Using hollow core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF) further enhanced the Raman signal relative to that in a standard cuvette providing sensitive detection of GLU and GABA in micro-litre volume of aqueous solutions.

  19. Reduction of protein adsorption on silica and polystyrene surfaces due to coating with Complex Coacervate Core Micelles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brzozowska, A. M.; Hofs, B.; de Keizer, A.; Fokkink, R.; Stuart, Martien A. Cohen; Norde, W.

    2009-01-01

    The reduction of protein adsorption by a polymer brush formed upon adsorption of Complex Coacervate Core Micelles (C3Ms), consisting of a charged copolymer containing a neutral block and an oppositely charged homopolymer, on silica and polystyrene surfaces has been studied in situ using fixed angle

  20. Comparative evaluation of effects of different surface treatment methods on bond strength between fiber post and composite core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosharraf, Ramin; Baghaei Yazdi, Najmeh

    2012-05-01

    Debonding of a composite resin core of the fiber post often occurs at the interface between these two materials. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of different surface treatment methods on bond strength between fiber posts and composite core. Sixty-four fiber posts were picked in two groups (Hetco and Exacto). Each group was further divided into four subgroups using different surface treatments: 1) silanization; 2) sandblasting; 3) Treatment with 24% H(2)O(2), and 4) no treatment (control group). A cylindrical plexiglass matrix was placed around the post and filled with the core resin composite. Specimens were stored in 5000 thermal cycles between 5℃ and 55℃. Tensile bond strength (TBS) test and evaluation using stereomicroscope were performed on the specimen and the data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA, Post Hoc Scheffe tests and Fisher's Exact Test (α=.05). There was a significant difference between the effect of different surface treatments on TBS (Pstrength of fiber posts to composite resin core, but there were not any significant differences between these groups and control group. There was not any significant difference between two brands of fiber posts that had been used in this study. Although silanization and sandblasting can improve the TBS, there was not any significant differences between surface treatments used.

  1. Propellant flow rate through simulated liquid-core nuclear rocket fuel bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcguirk, J. P.; Park, C.

    1972-01-01

    Experimental investigation of the validity of Zuber and Finlay's (1965) gas flow-rate formula for a two-phase flow in a rotating cylinder under high centrifugal acceleration. This formula was originally derived from tests in a 1-g environment in pipes. In the light of the investigation results obtained, the formula is valid also for a high-g environment in the rotating chamber tested.

  2. Experimental study on two-phase flow natural circulation in a core catcher cooling channel for EU-APR1400 using air-water system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Ki Won [Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of); Nguyen, Thanh Hung [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47906 (United States); Ha, Kwang Soon; Kim, Hwan Yeol; Song, Jinho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hyun Sun [Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Revankar, Shripad T., E-mail: shripad@postech.ac.kr [Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47906 (United States); Kim, Moo Hwan [Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon 305-338 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • Two-phase flow regimes and transition behavior were observed in the coolant channel. • Test were conducted for natural circulation with air-water. • Data were obtained on flow regime, void fraction, flow rates and re-wetting time. • The data were related to a cooling capability of core catcher system. - Abstract: Ex-vessel core catcher cooling system driven by natural circulation is designed using a full scaled air-water system. A transparent half symmetric section of a core catcher coolant channel of a pressurized water reactor was designed with instrumentations for local void fraction measurement and flow visualization. Two designs of air-water top separator water tanks are studied including one with modified ‘super-step’ design which prevents gas entrainment into down-comer. In the experiment air flow rates are set corresponding to steam generation rate for given corium decay power. Measurements of natural circulation flow rate, spatial local void fraction distribution and re-wetting time near the top wall are carried out for various air flow rates which simulate boiling-induced vapor generation. Since heat transfer and critical heat flux are strongly dependent on the water mass flow rate and development of two-phase flow on the heated wall, knowledge of two-phase flow characteristics in the coolant channel is essential. Results on flow visualization showing two phase flow structure specifically near the high void accumulation regions, local void profiles, rewetting time, and natural circulation flow rate are presented for various air flow rates that simulate corium power levels. The data are useful in assessing the cooling capability of and safety of the core catcher system.

  3. Effect of different surface treatments on microtensile bond strength of two resin cements to aged simulated composite core materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeili, Behnaz; Alaghehmand, Homayoon; Shakerian, Mohadese

    2015-01-01

    Roughening of the aged composite resin core (CRC) surface seems essential for durable adhesion. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of various surface treatments and different resin cements on microtensile bond strength (µ TBS) between two aged core build-up composites (CBCs) and feldspathic ceramic. A total of 16 composite blocks made of two CBCs, Core.it and Build-it were randomly assigned to four surface treatment groups after water storage and thermocycling (2 weeks and 500 cycles). Experimental groups included surface roughening with air abrasion (AA), hydrofluoric acid, pumice, and laser and then were bonded to computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing feldspathic ceramic blocks using two resin cements, Panavia F2 (PF), and Duo-link (DL). The µ TBS was tested, and the fracture mode was assessed. The data were analyzed with multiple analysis of variance to estimate the contribution of different surface treatments, resin cements, and two aged CRCs on µ TBS. Statistical significance level was set at α strength (P strength was in AA group cemented with PF (31.83 MPa). The most common failure mode was cohesive fracture in the cement. Different surface treatments had different effects on µ TBS of aged CRCs to feldspathic ceramics. PF was significantly better than DL.

  4. The curved shape of the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus enhances colonization of surfaces in flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persat, Alexandre; Gitai, Zemer; Stone, Howard

    2014-11-01

    Bacteria thrive in all types of fluid environments; flow is thus a ubiquitous aspect of their lives. Bacteria have evolved a variety of cellular components contributing to their growth in specific environments. However, cellular features that help them survive and develop in flow have been rarely characterized. Here, we show that Caulobacter crescentus may have evolved its curved shape to enhance the colonization of surfaces in flow. C. crescentus curvature is preserved in the wild but straight mutants have no known growth disadvantage in standard laboratory conditions. Leveraging microfluidics and single-cell imaging, we demonstrate that curvature enhances surface colonization in flow, promoting the formation of larger microcolonies. Cells attach to a surface from a single pole, so that flow affects their orientation. In flow, viscous forces generate a torque on the curved cell body, which reorients the cell in the direction of the flow. The curved cell appears to arc above the surface, optimally orienting its unattached pole towards the surface. This reduces the distance between the surface and the pole, thereby enhancing attachment of its progeny. Additionally, we show that curved shape enhances colony spreading across the direction of the flow, generating more robust biofilm compared to straight mutants.

  5. Pressure-dependent surface viscosity and its surprising consequences in interfacial lubrication flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikantan, Harishankar; Squires, Todd M.

    2017-02-01

    The surface shear rheology of many insoluble surfactants depends strongly on the surface pressure (or concentration) of that surfactant. Here we highlight the dramatic consequences that surface-pressure-dependent surface viscosities have on interfacially dominant flows, by considering lubrication-style geometries within high Boussinesq (Bo) number flows. As with three-dimensional lubrication, high-Bo surfactant flows through thin gaps give high surface pressures, which in turn increase the local surface viscosity, further amplifying lubrication stresses and surface pressures. Despite their strong nonlinearity, the governing equations are separable, so that results from two-dimensional Newtonian lubrication analyses may be immediately adapted to treat surfactant monolayers with a general functional form of ηs(Π ) . Three paradigmatic systems are analyzed to reveal qualitatively new features: a maximum, self-limiting value for surfactant fluxes and particle migration velocities appears for Π -thickening surfactants, and kinematic reversibility is broken for the journal bearing and for suspensions more generally.

  6. Heat Transfer from a dc Laminar Plasma-Jet Flow to Different Solid Surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟显; 潘文霞; 吴承康

    2003-01-01

    The heat flux distributions were measured by using transient method for an argon dc laminar plasma-jet flow impinging normally on a plate surface embedded with copper probes. Different powders were coated on the probe surfaces and the effect of powder coatings on the heat transfer from jet flow to the probe surface was examined.Experimental results show that the maximum values of the heat flux to the probe increase with the coating of fine metal powders, while for the surfaces coated with fine ceramic powders, the maximum values of heat flux decrease, compared with that to the bare copper probe surface.

  7. Modelling of Urban Water Flow - Coupling Surface and Pipe Flow. The State of The Eureka Projekt Risursim

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieschulz, K.-P.; Risursim Project Group

    The challenge of serving the cities with efficient drainage networks and waste water systems is increasingly getting larger as the cities grow. Urban flooding, sewer over- flow and rainfall impact are high priority issues in most countries. The German and Norwegian EUREKA-Project RISURSIM (Risk management for urban drainage systems simulation and optimization) headed by ITWM focuses these problems. The overall objective is the development of an integrated planning and man- agement tool to allow cost effective management for urban drainage systems. The project consortium includes applied mathematics and water engineering research in- stitutes, municipal drainage works as well as insurance companies. Focussing on flooding events caused by surcharged sewer systems a dual drainage model has been developed to most accurately describe the hydraulic processes of flooded drainage systems taking in account the possible interactions between surface and surcharged sewer system. This dual drainage simulation model is computing water levels above ground and assessing possible damage costs. Hydraulic models for both, surface runoff and flooded surfaces, and sewer flow have been established. Surface flow is simulated in a 2-dimensional shallow water approach using GIS-based detailed physical surface data. Links to the hydraulic pipe flow model are stablished at all inlets of surface drainage (manholes, street inlets and private drain pipes) to the underground sewer system. These inlets are interpreted as possible sinks or sources in the mathematical model of both, surface and sewer flow simulation. In addition, the interaction between the public sewer system and private drains is taken into account in order to assess flooding of buildings or private ground via house drains. The status of the project is outlined; the structure of the being developed decision support system is presented.

  8. Continuous flow analysis method for determination of dissolved reactive phosphorus in ice cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjær, Helle Astrid; Vallelonga, Paul; Svensson, Anders; Kristensen, Magnus Elleskov L; Tibuleac, Catalin; Bigler, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) is an essential macronutrient for all living organisms. Phosphorus is often present in nature as the soluble phosphate ion PO4(3-) and has biological, terrestrial, and marine emission sources. Thus PO4(3-) detected in ice cores has the potential to be an important tracer for biological activity in the past. In this study a continuous and highly sensitive absorption method for detection of dissolved reactive phosphorus (DRP) in ice cores has been developed using a molybdate reagent and a 2-m liquid waveguide capillary cell (LWCC). DRP is the soluble form of the nutrient phosphorus, which reacts with molybdate. The method was optimized to meet the low concentrations of DRP in Greenland ice, with a depth resolution of approximately 2 cm and an analytical uncertainty of 1.1 nM (0.1 ppb) PO4(3-). The method has been applied to segments of a shallow firn core from Northeast Greenland, indicating a mean concentration level of 2.74 nM (0.26 ppb) PO4(3-) for the period 1930-2005 with a standard deviation of 1.37 nM (0.13 ppb) PO4(3-) and values reaching as high as 10.52 nM (1 ppb) PO4(3-). Similar levels were detected for the period 1771-1823. Based on impurity abundances, dust and biogenic particles were found to be the most likely sources of DRP deposited in Northeast Greenland.

  9. FLOW VELOCITY AND SURFACE TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON CONVECTIVE HEAT TRANSFER COEFFICIENT FROM URBAN CANOPY SURFACES BY NUMERICAL SIMULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivaraja Subramania Pillai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the effect of flow velocity and building surface temperature effects on Convective Heat Transfer Coefficient (CHTC from urban building surfaces by numerical simulation. The thermal effects produced by geometrical and physical properties of urban areas generate a relatively differential heating and uncomfortable environment compared to rural regions called as Urban Heat Island (UHI phenomena. The urban thermal comfort is directly related to the CHTC from the urban canopy surfaces. This CHTC from urban canopy surfaces expected to depend upon the wind velocity flowing over the urban canopy surfaces, urban canopy configurations, building surface temperature etc. But the most influential parameter on CHTC has not been clarified yet. Urban canopy type experiments in thermally stratified wind tunnel have normally been used to study the heat transfer issues. But, it is not an easy task in wind tunnel experiments to evaluate local CHTC, which vary on individual canyon surfaces such as building roof, walls and ground. Numerical simulation validated by wind tunnel experiments can be an alternative for the prediction of CHTC from building surfaces in an urban area. In our study, wind tunnel experiments were conducted to validate the low-Reynolds-number k- ε model which was used for the evaluation of CHTC from surfaces. The calculated CFD results showed good agreement with experimental results. After this validation, the effects of flow velocity and building surface temperature effects on CHTC from urban building surfaces were investigated. It has been found that the change in velocity remarkably affects the CHTC from urban canopy surfaces and change in surface temperature has almost no effect over the CHTC from urban canopy surfaces.

  10. FLOW VELOCITY AND SURFACE TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON CONVECTIVE HEAT TRANSFER COEFFICIENT FROM URBAN CANOPY SURFACES BY NUMERICAL SIMULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivaraja Subramania Pillai

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the effect of flow velocity and building surface temperature effects on Convective Heat Transfer Coefficient (CHTC from urban building surfaces by numerical simulation. The thermal effects produced by geometrical and physical properties of urban areas generate a relatively differential heating and uncomfortable environment compared to rural regions called as Urban Heat Island (UHI phenomena. The urban thermal comfort is directly related to the CHTC from the urban canopy surfaces. This CHTC from urban canopy surfaces expected to depend upon the wind velocity flowing over the urban canopy surfaces, urban canopy configurations, building surface temperature etc. But the most influential parameter on CHTC has not been clarified yet. Urban canopy type experiments in thermally stratified wind tunnel have normally been used to study the heat transfer issues. But, it is not an easy task in wind tunnel experiments to evaluate local CHTC, which vary on individual canyon surfaces such as building roof, walls and ground. Numerical simulation validated by wind tunnel experiments can be an alternative for the prediction of CHTC from building surfaces in an urban area. In our study, wind tunnel experiments were conducted to validate the low-Reynolds-number k-ε model which was used for the evaluation of CHTC from surfaces. The calculated CFD results showed good agreement with experimental results. After this validation, the effects of flow velocity and building surface temperature effects on CHTC from urban building surfaces were investigated. It has been found that the change in velocity remarkably affects the CHTC from urban canopy surfaces and change in surface temperature has almost no effect over the CHTC from urban canopy surfaces.

  11. Surface water mass composition changes captured by cores of Arctic land-fast sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, I. J.; Eicken, H.; Mahoney, A. R.; Van Hale, R.; Gough, A. J.; Fukamachi, Y.; Jones, J.

    2016-04-01

    In the Arctic, land-fast sea ice growth can be influenced by fresher water from rivers and residual summer melt. This paper examines a method to reconstruct changes in water masses using oxygen isotope measurements of sea ice cores. To determine changes in sea water isotope composition over the course of the ice growth period, the output of a sea ice thermodynamic model (driven with reanalysis data, observations of snow depth, and freeze-up dates) is used along with sea ice oxygen isotope measurements and an isotopic fractionation model. Direct measurements of sea ice growth rates are used to validate the output of the sea ice growth model. It is shown that for sea ice formed during the 2011/2012 ice growth season at Barrow, Alaska, large changes in isotopic composition of the ocean waters were captured by the sea ice isotopic composition. Salinity anomalies in the ocean were also tracked by moored instruments. These data indicate episodic advection of meteoric water, having both lower salinity and lower oxygen isotopic composition, during the winter sea ice growth season. Such advection of meteoric water during winter is surprising, as no surface meltwater and no local river discharge should be occurring at this time of year in that area. How accurately changes in water masses as indicated by oxygen isotope composition can be reconstructed using oxygen isotope analysis of sea ice cores is addressed, along with methods/strategies that could be used to further optimize the results. The method described will be useful for winter detection of meteoric water presence in Arctic fast ice regions, which is important for climate studies in a rapidly changing Arctic. Land-fast sea ice effective fractionation coefficients were derived, with a range of +1.82‰ to +2.52‰. Those derived effective fractionation coefficients will be useful for future water mass component proportion calculations. In particular, the equations given can be used to inform choices made when

  12. Linear surface roughness growth and flow smoothening in a three-dimensional biofilm model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, D. A.

    2013-09-01

    The sessile microbial communities known as biofilms exhibit varying architectures as environmental factors are varied, which for immersed biofilms includes the shear rate of the surrounding flow. Here we modify an established agent-based biofilm model to include affine flow and employ it to analyze the growth of surface roughness of single-species, three-dimensional biofilms. We find linear growth laws for surface geometry in both horizontal and vertical directions and measure the thickness of the active surface layer, which is shown to anticorrelate with roughness. Flow is shown to monotonically reduce surface roughness without affecting the thickness of the active layer. We argue that the rapid roughening is due to nonlocal surface interactions mediated by the nutrient field, which are curtailed when advection competes with diffusion. We further argue the need for simplified models to elucidate the underlying mechanisms coupling flow to growth.

  13. Flow and heat transfer in compact offset strip fin surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junqi DONG; Jiangping CHEN; Zhijiu CHEN

    2008-01-01

    Experimental studies of air-side heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of offset strip fins and flat tube heat exchangers were performed. A series of tests were conducted for 9 heat exchangers with different fin space, fin height, fin strip length and flow length, at a constant tube-side water flow rate of 2.5 m3/h. The char-acteristics of the heat transfer and pressure drop of differ-ent fin space, fin height and fin length were analyzed and compared. The curves of the heat transfer coefficients vs. The pumping power per unit frontal area were then plot-ted. Moreover, the enhanced heat transfer mechanism of offset strip fins was analyzed using field synergy theory. The results showed that fin length and flow length have more obviously effect on the thermal hydraulic character-istics of offset strip fins.

  14. Analysis on MHD Stability of Free Surface Jet flow in a Gradient Magnetic Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许增裕; 康伟山; 潘传杰

    2004-01-01

    The simplified modeling for analysis on MHD stability of free surface jet flow in a gradient magnetic fields is based on the theoretical and experimental results on channel liquid metal MHD flow, especially, the results of MHD flow velocity distribution in cross-section of channels (rectangular duct and circular pipe), and the expected results from the modeling are well agreed with the recent experimental data obtained. It is the first modeling which can efficiently explain the experimental results of liquid-metal free surface jet flow.

  15. High-resolution continuous flow analysis setup for water isotopic measurement from ice cores using laser spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuelsson, B. D.; Baisden, W. T.; Bertler, N. A. N.; Keller, E. D.; Gkinis, V.

    2014-12-01

    Here we present an experimental setup for water stable isotopes (δ18O and δD) continuous flow measurements. It is the first continuous flow laser spectroscopy system that is using Off-Axis Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy (OA-ICOS; analyzer manufactured by Los Gatos Research - LGR) in combination with an evaporation unit to continuously analyze sample from an ice core. A Water Vapor Isotopic Standard Source (WVISS) calibration unit, manufactured by LGR, was modified to: (1) increase the temporal resolution by reducing the response time (2) enable measurements on several water standards, and (3) to reduce the influence from memory effects. While this setup was designed for the Continuous Flow Analysis (CFA) of ice cores, it can also continuously analyze other liquid or vapor sources. The modified setup provides a shorter response time (~54 and 18 s for 2013 and 2014 setup, respectively) compared to the original WVISS unit (~62 s), which is an improvement in measurement resolution. Another improvement compared to the original WVISS is that the modified setup has a reduced memory effect. Stability tests comparing the modified WVISS and WVISS setups were performed and Allan deviations (σAllan) were calculated to determine precision at different averaging times. For the 2013 modified setup the precision after integration times of 103 s are 0.060 and 0.070‰ for δ18O and δD, respectively. For the WVISS setup the corresponding σAllan values are 0.030, 0.060 and 0.043‰ for δ18O, δD and δ17O, respectively. For the WVISS setup the precision is 0.035, 0.070 and 0.042‰ after 103 s for δ18O, δD and δ17O, respectively. Both the modified setups and WVISS setup are influenced by instrumental drift with δ18O being more drift sensitive than δD. The σAllan values for δ18O of 0.30 and 0.18‰ for the modified (2013) and WVISS setup, respectively after averaging times of 104 s (2.78 h). The Isotopic Water Analyzer (IWA)-modified WVISS setup used during the

  16. High-resolution continuous flow analysis setup for water isotopic measurement from ice cores using laser spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. D. Emanuelsson

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Here we present an experimental setup for water stable isotopes (δ18O and δD continuous flow measurements. It is the first continuous flow laser spectroscopy system that is using Off-Axis Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy (OA-ICOS; analyzer manufactured by Los Gatos Research – LGR in combination with an evaporation unit to continuously analyze sample from an ice core. A Water Vapor Isotopic Standard Source (WVISS calibration unit, manufactured by LGR, was modified to: (1 increase the temporal resolution by reducing the response time (2 enable measurements on several water standards, and (3 to reduce the influence from memory effects. While this setup was designed for the Continuous Flow Analysis (CFA of ice cores, it can also continuously analyze other liquid or vapor sources. The modified setup provides a shorter response time (~54 and 18 s for 2013 and 2014 setup, respectively compared to the original WVISS unit (~62 s, which is an improvement in measurement resolution. Another improvement compared to the original WVISS is that the modified setup has a reduced memory effect. Stability tests comparing the modified WVISS and WVISS setups were performed and Allan deviations (σAllan were calculated to determine precision at different averaging times. For the 2013 modified setup the precision after integration times of 103 s are 0.060 and 0.070‰ for δ18O and δD, respectively. For the WVISS setup the corresponding σAllan values are 0.030, 0.060 and 0.043‰ for δ18O, δD and δ17O, respectively. For the WVISS setup the precision is 0.035, 0.070 and 0.042‰ after 103 s for δ18O, δD and δ17O, respectively. Both the modified setups and WVISS setup are influenced by instrumental drift with δ18O being more drift sensitive than δD. The σAllan values for δ18O of 0.30 and 0.18‰ for the modified (2013 and WVISS setup, respectively after averaging times of 104 s (2.78 h. The Isotopic Water Analyzer (IWA-modified WVISS setup used

  17. A surface-aware projection basis for quasigeostrophic flow

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, K S

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that altimetric observations of the ocean's mesoscale eddy field reflect the combined influence of surface buoyancy and interior potential vorticity anomalies. The former have a surface-trapped structure, while the latter have a more grave form. To assess the relative importance of each contribution to the signal, it is useful to project the observed field onto a set of modes that separates their influence in a natural way. However, the surface-trapped dynamics are not well-represented by standard baroclinic modes; moreover, they are dependent on horizontal scale. Here we derive a modal decomposition that results from the simultaneous diagonalization of the energy and a generalisation of potential enstrophy that includes contributions from the surface buoyancy fields. This approach yields a family of orthonomal bases that depend on two parameters: the standard baroclinic modes are recovered in a limiting case, while other choices provide modes that represent surface and interior dynami...

  18. Effect of Surface Forces on the Gas Flow in Nanosize Capillaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldughin, V. I.; Zhdanov, V. M.

    2005-05-01

    The flow of gas in ultrafine capillary under the action of temperature gradient is considered with allowance for the action of surface forces. It is shown that the presence of surface forces considerably increases the effect of thermal transpiration compared to the classical value determined in a free molecular regime of gas flow. The coefficient responsible for the mechanocaloric effect for the case of gas flow under the pressure gradient was also determined using Onsager relation for the kinetic coefficients calculated with accownt of the effect of surface forces.

  19. Rotating polygon instability of a swirling free surface flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tophøj, Laust Emil Hjerrild; Bohr, Tomas; Mougel, J.;

    2013-01-01

    an analytically soluble model, which, together with estimates of the circulation based on angular momentum balance, reproduces the main features of the experimental phase diagram. The generality of our arguments implies that the instability should not be limited to flows with a rotating bottom (implying singular...

  20. Low-Flow Film Boiling Heat Transfer on Vertical Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munthe Andersen, J. G.; Dix, G. E.; Leonard, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    The phenomenon of film boiling heat transfer for high wall temperatures has been investigated. Based on the assumption of laminar flow for the film, the continuity, momentum, and energy equations for the vapor film are solved and a Bromley-type analytical expression for the heat transfer...... length, an average film boiling heat transfer coefficient is obtained....

  1. Control and optimzation of sub-surface flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, J.D.

    2013-01-01

    Controlling the flow of fluids (e.g. water, oil, natural gas or CO2) in subsurface porous media is a technical process with many mathematical challenges. The underlying physics can be described with coupled nearly-elliptic and nearly-hyperbolic nonlinear partial differential equations, which require

  2. Free-surface grease flow on a rotating plate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerberg, L.G.; Li, Jianchang; Höglund, E.; Lugt, Pieter Martin; Baart, P.

    2014-01-01

    Grease lubrication is traditionally used in a great variety of mechanical systems such as rolling bearings, seals, and gears where it has been shown more advantageous than oil, mainly due to its consistency allowing the grease to stay inside the system and not leak out. Knowledge of the flow dynamic

  3. Molecular dynamics of fluid flow at solid surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koplik, Joel; Banavar, Jayanth R.; Willemsen, Jorge F.

    1989-05-01

    Molecular dynamics techniques are used to study the microscopic aspects of several slow viscous flows past a solid wall, where both fluid and wall have a molecular structure. Systems of several thousand molecules are found to exhibit reasonable continuum behavior, albeit with significant thermal fluctuations. In Couette and Poiseuille flow of liquids it is found that the no-slip boundary condition arises naturally as a consequence of molecular roughness, and that the velocity and stress fields agree with the solutions of the Stokes equations. At lower densities slip appears, which can be incorporated into a flow-independent slip-length boundary condition. The trajectories of individual molecules in Poiseuille flow are examined, and it is also found that their average behavior is given by Taylor-Aris hydrodynamic dispersion. An immiscible two-fluid system is simulated by a species-dependent intermolecular interaction. A static meniscus is observed whose contact angle agrees with simple estimates and, when motion occurs, velocity-dependent advancing and receding angles are observed. The local velocity field near a moving contact line shows a breakdown of the no-slip condition and, up to substantial statistical fluctuations, is consistent with earlier predictions of Dussan [AIChE J. 23, 131 (1977)].

  4. Demonstration of over core stress measurement from surface using the Sigra IST tool

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gray, I

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available 7 Core Sample Mechanical Properties Page 8 Stress Measurement Results Page 8 Principal and Tectonic Stresses and Tectonic Strains Page 9 Conclusions Page 11 Acknowledgments Page 11 Table 1 Sample Descriptions... Solutions Page 26 Appendix D Directional Survey Information Page 39 Appendix E Photographs of Each Test Core Page 41 4 5 TABLES Table 1- Sample Descriptions and Material...

  5. Modelling free surface flow with curvilinear streamlines by a non-hydrostatic model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zerihun Yebegaeshet T.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study addresses a particular phenomenon in open channel flows for which the basic assumption of hydrostatic pressure distribution is essentially invalid, and expands previous suggestions to flows where streamline curvature is significant. The proposed model incorporates the effects of the vertical curvature of the streamline and steep slope, in making the pressure distribution non-hydrostatic, and overcomes the accuracy problem of the Saint-Venant equations when simulating curvilinear free surface flow problems. Furthermore, the model is demonstrated to be a higher-order one-dimensional model that includes terms accounting for wave-like variations of the free surface on a constant slope channel. Test results of predicted flow surface and pressure profiles for flow in a channel transition from mild to steep slopes, transcritical flow over a short-crested weir and flow with dual free surfaces are compared with experimental data and previous numerical results. A good agreement is attained between the experimental and computed results. The overall simulation results reveal the satisfactory performance of the proposed model in simulating rapidly varied gravity-driven flows with predominant non-hydrostatic pressure distribution effects. This study suggests that a higher-order pressure equation should be used for modelling the pressure distribution of a curvilinear flow in a steeply sloping channel.

  6. Multiscale Finite Element Methods for Flows on Rough Surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Efendiev, Yalchin

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present the Multiscale Finite Element Method (MsFEM) for problems on rough heterogeneous surfaces. We consider the diffusion equation on oscillatory surfaces. Our objective is to represent small-scale features of the solution via multiscale basis functions described on a coarse grid. This problem arises in many applications where processes occur on surfaces or thin layers. We present a unified multiscale finite element framework that entails the use of transformations that map the reference surface to the deformed surface. The main ingredients of MsFEM are (1) the construction of multiscale basis functions and (2) a global coupling of these basis functions. For the construction of multiscale basis functions, our approach uses the transformation of the reference surface to a deformed surface. On the deformed surface, multiscale basis functions are defined where reduced (1D) problems are solved along the edges of coarse-grid blocks to calculate nodalmultiscale basis functions. Furthermore, these basis functions are transformed back to the reference configuration. We discuss the use of appropriate transformation operators that improve the accuracy of the method. The method has an optimal convergence if the transformed surface is smooth and the image of the coarse partition in the reference configuration forms a quasiuniform partition. In this paper, we consider such transformations based on harmonic coordinates (following H. Owhadi and L. Zhang [Comm. Pure and Applied Math., LX(2007), pp. 675-723]) and discuss gridding issues in the reference configuration. Numerical results are presented where we compare the MsFEM when two types of deformations are used formultiscale basis construction. The first deformation employs local information and the second deformation employs a global information. Our numerical results showthat one can improve the accuracy of the simulations when a global information is used. © 2013 Global-Science Press.

  7. High-sensitivity molecular sensing using hollow-core photonic crystal fiber and surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xuan; Shi, Chao; Wheeler, Damon; Newhouse, Rebecca; Chen, Bin; Zhang, Jin Z; Gu, Claire

    2010-05-01

    A high-sensitivity molecular sensor using a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HCPCF) based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has been experimentally demonstrated and theoretically analyzed. A factor of 100 in sensitivity enhancement is shown in comparison to direct sampling under the same conditions. With a silver nanoparticle colloid as the SERS substrate and Rhodamine 6G as a test molecule, the lowest detectable concentration is 10(-10) M with a liquid-core photonic crystal fiber (LCPCF) probe, and 10(-8) M for direct sampling. The high sensitivity provided by the LCPCF SERS probe is promising for molecular detection in various sensing applications.

  8. Experimental Study on Momentum Transfer of Surface Texture in Taylor-Couette Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yabo; Yao, Zhenqiang; Cheng, De

    2017-05-01

    The behavior of Taylor-Couette (TC) flow has been extensively studied. However, no suitable torque prediction models exist for high-capacity fluid machinery. The Eckhardt-Grossmann-Lohse (EGL) theory, derived based on the Navier-Stokes equations, is proposed to model torque behavior. This theory suggests that surfaces are the significant energy transfer interfaces between cylinders and annular flow. This study mainly focuses on the effects of surface texture on momentum transfer behavior through global torque measurement. First, a power-law torque behavior model is built to reveal the relationship between dimensionless torque and the Taylor number based on the EGL theory. Second, TC flow apparatus is designed and built based on the CNC machine tool to verify the torque behavior model. Third, four surface texture films are tested to check the effects of surface texture on momentum transfer. A stereo microscope and three-dimensional topography instrument are employed to analyze surface morphology. Global torque behavior is measured by rotating a multi component dynamometer, and the effects of surface texture on the annular flow behavior are observed via images obtained using a high-speed camera. Finally, torque behaviors under four different surface conditions are fitted and compared. The experimental results indicate that surface textures have a remarkable influence on torque behavior, and that the peak roughness of surface texture enhances the momentum transfer by strengthening the fluctuation in the TC flow.

  9. MHD Flow Towards a Permeable Surface with Prescribed Wall Heat Flux

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anuar Ishak; Roslinda Nazar; Ioan Pop

    2009-01-01

    The steady magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) mixed convection flow towards a vertical permeable surface with prescribed heat flux is investigated. The governing partial differential equations are transformed into a system of ordinary differential equations, which is then solved numerically by a finite-difference method. The features of the flow and heat transfer characteristics for different values of the governing parameters are analysed and discussed. Both assisting and opposing flows are considered. It is found that dual solutions exist for the assisting flow, besides the solutions usually reported in the literature for the opposing flow.

  10. Surface flow types, near-bed hydraulics and the distribution of stream macroinvertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Reid

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Spatial variation in hydraulic conditions in streams often results in distinct water surface patterns, or surface flow types. Visual assessments of the distribution of surface flow types have been used to provide rapid assessment of the habitat heterogeneity. The efficacy of this approach is predicated on the notion that surface flow types consistently represent a distinct suite of hydraulic conditions with biological relevance. This study tested this notion, asking three specific questions. First, do surface flow types provide a characterisation of physical habitat that is relevant to macroinvertebrates? Second, how well do near-bed hydraulic conditions explain macroinvertebrate distributions? Third, what components of near-bed hydraulic conditions exert the strongest influence on macroinvertebrate distributions?

    Results show that hydraulic conditions (incorporating direct measurements of near-bed velocity and turbulence in three dimensions and substratum character (incorporating estimates of particle size distribution, and biofilm and macrophyte cover within each surface flow type were largely distinct and that macroinvertebrate assemblages differed across flow types in taxon richness and assemblage composition, thus supporting the notion that rapid assessments of surface flow type distributions provide biologically relevant information.

    Macroinvertebrate assemblages were most strongly correlated with water depth, size of a flow type patch, near-bed velocity in the downstream direction, turbulence in the transverse direction, % pebble, % sand, % silt and clay and macrophyte cover. This study suggests that surface flow type mapping provides an assessment of physical habitat that is relevant to macroinvertebrates. The strong relationship detected between macroinvertebrate assemblages and transverse turbulence also highlights the value of directly measuring near-bed hydraulics. Further investigations are required to test the

  11. Surface flow types, near-bed hydraulics and the distribution of stream macroinvertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Reid

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Spatial variation in hydraulic conditions in streams often results in distinct water surface patterns, or surface flow types. Visual assessments of the distribution of surface flow types have been used to provide rapid assessment of habitat heterogeneity. The efficacy of this approach is predicated on the notion that surface flow types consistently represent a distinct suite of hydraulic conditions with biological relevance. This study tested this notion, asking three specific questions. First, do surface flow types provide a characterisation of physical habitat that is relevant to macroinvertebrates? Second, how well do near-bed hydraulic conditions explain macroinvertebrate distributions? Third, what components of near-bed hydraulic conditions exert the strongest influence on macroinvertebrate distributions?

    Results show that hydraulic conditions (incorporating direct measurements of near-bed velocity and turbulence in three dimensions and substratum character (incorporating estimates of particle size distribution, and biofilm and macrophyte cover within each surface flow type were largely distinct and that macroinvertebrate assemblages differed across flow types in taxon richness and assemblage composition, thus supporting the notion that rapid assessments of surface flow type distributions provide biologically relevant information.

    Macroinvertebrate assemblages were most strongly correlated with water depth, size of a flow type patch, near-bed velocity in the downstream direction, turbulence in the transverse direction, % pebble, % sand, % silt and clay and macrophyte cover. This study suggests that surface flow type mapping provides an assessment of physical habitat that is relevant to macroinvertebrates. The strong relationship detected between macroinvertebrate assemblages and transverse turbulence also highlights the value of directly measuring near-bed hydraulics. Further investigations are required to test the

  12. What Supergranule Flow Models Tell Us About the Sun's Surface Shear Layer and Magnetic Flux Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathaway, David

    2011-01-01

    Models of the photospheric flows due to supergranulation are generated using an evolving spectrum of vector spherical harmonics up to spherical harmonic wavenumber l1500. Doppler velocity data generated from these models are compared to direct Doppler observations from SOHO/MDI and SDO/HMI. The models are adjusted to match the observed spatial power spectrum as well as the wavenumber dependence of the cell lifetimes, differential rotation velocities, meridional flow velocities, and relative strength of radial vs. horizontal flows. The equatorial rotation rate as a function of wavelength matches the rotation rate as a function of depth as determined by global helioseismology. This leads to the conclusions that the cellular structures are anchored at depths equal to their widths, that the surface shear layer extends to at least 70 degrees latitude, and that the poleward meridional flow decreases in amplitude and reverses direction at the base of the surface shear layer (approx.35 Mm below the surface). Using the modeled flows to passively transport magnetic flux indicates that the observed differential rotation and meridional flow of the magnetic elements are directly related to the differential rotation and meridional flow of the convective pattern itself. The magnetic elements are transported by the evolving boundaries of the supergranule pattern (where the convective flows converge) and are unaffected by the weaker flows associated with the differential rotation or meridional flow of the photospheric plasma.

  13. The Growth of Black Holes and Bulges at the Cores of Cooling Flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rafferty, D.A.; McNamara, B.R.; Nulsen, P.E.J.; Wise, M.

    2007-01-01

    Central cluster galaxies (cDs) in cooling flows are growing rapidly through gas accretion and star formation. At the same time, AGN outbursts fueled by accretion onto supermassive black holes are generating X-ray cavity systems and driving outflows that exceed those in powerful quasars. We show that

  14. The Growth of Black Holes and Bulges at the Cores of Cooling Flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rafferty, D.A.; McNamara, B.R.; Nulsen, P.E.J.; Wise, M.

    2007-01-01

    Central cluster galaxies (cDs) in cooling flows are growing rapidly through gas accretion and star formation. At the same time, AGN outbursts fueled by accretion onto supermassive black holes are generating X-ray cavity systems and driving outflows that exceed those in powerful quasars. We show that

  15. Linear surface roughness growth and flow smoothening in a three-dimensional biofilm model

    CERN Document Server

    Head, D A

    2013-01-01

    The sessile microbial communities known as biofilms exhibit different surface structures as environmental factors are varied, including nutrient availability and flow-generated shear stresses. Here we modify an established agent-based biofilm model to include adhesive interactions, permitting it to mechanically react to an imposed stress. This model is employed to analyse the growth of surface roughness of single-species, three-dimensional biofilms. We find linear growth laws of surface geometry in both horizontal and vertical directions, and an active surface layer whose thickness anti-correlates with roughness. Flow is consistently shown to reduce surface roughness without affecting the active layer. We argue that the rapid roughening is due to non-local surface interactions mediated by the nutrient field which are curtailed by sufficiently rapid flows, and suggest simplified models will need to be developed to elucidate the underlying mechanisms.

  16. Decorin core protein (decoron shape complements collagen fibril surface structure and mediates its binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph P R O Orgel

    Full Text Available Decorin is the archetypal small leucine rich repeat proteoglycan of the vertebrate extracellular matrix (ECM. With its glycosaminoglycuronan chain, it is responsible for stabilizing inter-fibrillar organization. Type I collagen is the predominant member of the fibrillar collagen family, fulfilling both organizational and structural roles in animal ECMs. In this study, interactions between decoron (the decorin core protein and binding sites in the d and e(1 bands of the type I collagen fibril were investigated through molecular modeling of their respective X-ray diffraction structures. Previously, it was proposed that a model-based, highly curved concave decoron interacts with a single collagen molecule, which would form extensive van der Waals contacts and give rise to strong non-specific binding. However, the large well-ordered aggregate that is the collagen fibril places significant restraints on modes of ligand binding and necessitates multi-collagen molecular contacts. We present here a relatively high-resolution model of the decoron-fibril collagen complex. We find that the respective crystal structures complement each other well, although it is the monomeric form of decoron that shows the most appropriate shape complementarity with the fibril surface and favorable calculated energies of interaction. One molecule of decoron interacts with four to six collagen molecules, and the binding specificity relies on a large number of hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions, primarily with the collagen motifs KXGDRGE and AKGDRGE (d and e(1 bands. This work helps us to understand collagen-decorin interactions and the molecular architecture of the fibrillar ECM in health and disease.

  17. Modelling free surface flows with smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.Di G.Sigalotti

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the method of Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH is extended to include an adaptive density kernel estimation (ADKE procedure. It is shown that for a van der Waals (vdW fluid, this method can be used to deal with free-surface phenomena without difficulties. In particular, arbitrary moving boundaries can be easily handled because surface tension is effectively simulated by the cohesive pressure forces. Moreover, the ADKE method is seen to increase both the accuracy and stability of SPH since it allows the width of the kernel interpolant to vary locally in a way that only the minimum necessary smoothing is applied at and near free surfaces and sharp fluid-fluid interfaces. The method is robust and easy to implement. Examples of its resolving power are given for both the formation of a circular liquid drop under surface tension and the nonlinear oscillation of excited drops.

  18. Effects of core strength training using stable versus unstable surfaces on physical fitness in adolescents: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granacher, Urs; Schellbach, Jörg; Klein, Katja; Prieske, Olaf; Baeyens, Jean-Pierre; Muehlbauer, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that core strength training is an effective means to enhance trunk muscle strength (TMS) and proxies of physical fitness in youth. Of note, cross-sectional studies revealed that the inclusion of unstable elements in core strengthening exercises produced increases in trunk muscle activity and thus provide potential extra training stimuli for performance enhancement. Thus, utilizing unstable surfaces during core strength training may even produce larger performance gains. However, the effects of core strength training using unstable surfaces are unresolved in youth. This randomized controlled study specifically investigated the effects of core strength training performed on stable surfaces (CSTS) compared to unstable surfaces (CSTU) on physical fitness in school-aged children. Twenty-seven (14 girls, 13 boys) healthy subjects (mean age: 14 ± 1 years, age range: 13-15 years) were randomly assigned to a CSTS (n = 13) or a CSTU (n = 14) group. Both training programs lasted 6 weeks (2 sessions/week) and included frontal, dorsal, and lateral core exercises. During CSTU, these exercises were conducted on unstable surfaces (e.g., TOGU© DYNAIR CUSSIONS, THERA-BAND© STABILITY TRAINER). Significant main effects of Time (pre vs. post) were observed for the TMS tests (8-22%, f = 0.47-0.76), the jumping sideways test (4-5%, f = 1.07), and the Y balance test (2-3%, f = 0.46-0.49). Trends towards significance were found for the standing long jump test (1-3%, f = 0.39) and the stand-and-reach test (0-2%, f = 0.39). We could not detect any significant main effects of Group. Significant Time x Group interactions were detected for the stand-and-reach test in favour of the CSTU group (2%, f = 0.54). Core strength training resulted in significant increases in proxies of physical fitness in adolescents. However, CSTU as compared to CSTS had only limited additional effects (i.e., stand-and-reach test). Consequently, if the

  19. Numerical simulations of developing flow and vortex street in a rectangular channel with a cylindrical core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Dongil [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Ottawa, 161 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5 (Canada); Tavoularis, Stavros, E-mail: stavros.tavoularis@uottawa.ca [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Ottawa, 161 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5 (Canada)

    2012-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LES are more accurate than URANS for rod bundle flows. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer URANS are still an acceptable choice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Steady RANS analysis is very inaccurate in narrow gap regions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Streamwise-periodic boundary conditions are not suitable for practical rod bundles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gap instability is an inviscid process. - Abstract: Three-dimensional, unsteady simulations of developing turbulent flows in a rectangular channel containing a cylindrical rod have been performed to investigate their sensitivity to the choices of boundary conditions and turbulence models. Among all methods, large eddy simulations, employed in a downstream sub-domain of the channel as part of the segregated hybrid model, reproduced most accurately the experimental results. However, unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) simulations with a Reynolds stress model appear to be also an acceptable choice for approximate rod bundle analyses, making fairly accurate predictions at a much lower computational cost. In agreement with previous findings, steady RANS simulations are not recommended as a low-cost substitute of URANS for flows in tightly packed rod bundles. The URANS simulations were found to be insensitive to inlet turbulence specification and to be more accurate when a uniform inlet velocity was specified rather than a fully developed inlet velocity distribution. Developing flow simulations were found to be preferable to simulations with a streamwise-periodic boundary condition. Finally, unsteady inviscid (Euler) simulations with a fully developed initial velocity distribution predicted the onset of gap instability, but were otherwise found to be unsuitable for practical analysis of rod bundle flows.

  20. A fully coupled depth-integrated model for surface water and groundwater flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanyi; Yuan, Dekui; Lin, Binliang; Teo, Fang-Yenn

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents the development of a fully coupled surface water and groundwater flow model. The governing equations of the model are derived based on a control volume approach, with the velocity profiles of the two types of flows being both taken into consideration. The surface water and groundwater flows are both modelled based on the unified equations and the water exchange and interaction between the two types of flows can be taken into account. The model can be used to simulate the surface water and groundwater flows simultaneously with the same numerical scheme without other effort being needed to link them. The model is not only suitable for the porous medium consisting of fine sediments, but also for coarse sediments and crushed rocks by adding a quadratic friction term. Benchmark tests are conducted to validate the model. The model predictions agree well with the data.

  1. Weak Anchoring and Surface Elasticity Effects in Electroosmotic Flow of Nematic Liquid Crystals Through Narrow Confinements

    CERN Document Server

    Poddar, Antarip; Chakraborty, Suman

    2016-01-01

    Advent of nematic liquid crystals flows have attracted renewed attention in view of microfluidic transport phenomena. Among various transport processes, electroosmosis stands as one of the efficient flow actuation method through narrow confinement. In the present study, we explore the electrically actuated flow of a nematic fluid with ionic inclusions taking into account the influences from surface induced elastic and electrical double layer phenomena. Influence of surface effects on the flow characteristics is known to get augmented in micro-confined environment and must be properly addressed. Towards this, we devise the coupled flow governing equations from fundamental free energy analysis considering the contributions from first and second-order elastic, dielectric, flexoelectric, ionic and entropic energies. We have further considered weak anchoring surface conditions with second order elasticity which helps us to more accurately capture the director deformations along the boundaries. The present study fo...

  2. Effects of Asymmetrical Micro Electrode Surface Topography to AC Electroosmosis flow Rate

    CERN Document Server

    Hong-Yuan, Jiang; Zhen-Xiu, Hou; Yu-Kun, Ren; Yong-Jun, Sun

    2010-01-01

    AC Electroosmosis (ACEO) has many advantages such as low power consumption, non-moving parts, and easy to integrate etc., so it is widely used for low concentration microfluid manipulation in low frequency range. Classical ACEO theory assumes that electric double layer (EDL) is the main cause of electric field induced flow, and gives electric-flow field coupling equations for ACEO flow rate. But the calculation data usually are tens times faster than the experimental velocities. In this paper, electrode surface topography is included to solve ACEO flow rate. With electrode surface roughness as the characteristic parameter, equivalent EDL model is set up to modify the classical EDL model. The relationship between flow rate and electrode surface roughness is studied. Experiment results agree with the simulation very well, proving the feasibility of equivalent EDL model.

  3. Surface zwitterionicalization of poly(vinylidene fluoride) membranes from the entrapped reactive core-shell silica nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Li-Jing; Zhu, Li-Ping; Zhang, Pei-Bin; Zhu, Bao-Ku; Xu, You-Yi

    2016-04-15

    We demonstrate the preparation and properties of poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) filtration membranes modified via surface zwitterionicalization mediated by reactive core-shell silica nanoparticles (SiO2 NPs). The organic/inorganic hybrid SiO2 NPs grafted with poly(methyl meth acrylate)-block-poly(2-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) copolymer (PMMA-b-PDMAEMA) shell were prepared by surface-initiated reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer (SI-RAFT) polymerization and then used as a membrane-making additive of PVDF membranes. The PDMAEMA exposed on membrane surface and pore walls were quaternized into zwitterionic poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate) (PSBMA) using 1,3-propane sultone (1,3-PS) as the quaternization agent. The membrane surface chemistry and morphology were analyzed by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. The hydrophilicity, permeability and antifouling ability of the investigated membranes were evaluated in detail. It was found that the PSBMA chains brought highly-hydrophilic and strong fouling resistant characteristics to PVDF membranes due to the powerful hydration of zwitterionic surface. The SiO2 cores and PMMA chains in the hybrid NPs play a role of anchors for the linking of PSBMA chains to membrane surface. Compared to the traditional strategies for membrane hydrophilic modification, the developed method in this work combined the advantages of both blending and surface reaction.

  4. A Robust volume conservative divergence-free ISPH framework for free-surface flow problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahar, Gourabananda; Dhar, Anirban

    2016-10-01

    This study presents a Volume Conservative approach for resolving volume conservation issue in divergence-free incompressible Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (ISPH). Irregular free surface deformation may introduce error in volume computation, which has a cascading effect over time. Proposed correction decreases this numerical compressibility to a minimal value. The correction is obtained directly by solving Navier-Stokes momentum equation. Consequently, the framework does not require any parametric study for mixed source/sink term or iterative solution of pressure Poisson equations. The correction is implemented on four different types of flow: (a) pressurized flow in a closed box, (b) dambreak flow, (c) flow through porous block, (d) lock-exchange flow of immiscible fluids (both free-surface and pressurized flow). All four scenarios are shown to have minimal error compared to pure divergence-free ISPH.

  5. Segregating photoelastic particles in free-surface granular flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Amalia L.; Vriend, Nathalie M.

    2016-11-01

    We experimentally investigate bimodal avalanches of photoelastic discs between two narrow side-walls. We visualize the physical phenomena that occur during segregation and quantify the dynamic appearance of force chains within the bulk of the flow from fringe patterns using photoelastic theory. The photoelastic technique has been used in granular research for almost half a century and has been applied in a variety of quasi-steady systems. We have now adapted the technique to perform well within dynamic granular flows where collisions are short-lived and force chains are formed and broken continuously. Our photoelastic urethane discs are cast in-house to provide high-resolution fringe patterns and a high stress-optic coefficient. In addition we carried out stress relaxation tests to study the viscoelastic properties of the photoelastic material, and measured the speed of force transmission and dampening from a moving particle onto a static chain of particles. In our avalanche experiments, we also employ particle tracking and particle velocimetry techniques to measure the general flow field within the avalanche. The overall goal of our work is to investigate and quantify the influence of the distribution of forces on the fundamental processes that drive segregation.

  6. Non-hydrostatic versus hydrostatic modelings of free surface flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jing-xin; SUKHODOLOV Alexander N.; LIU Hua

    2014-01-01

    The hydrodynamics of geophysical flows in oceanic shelves, estuaries, and rivers are often studied by solving shallow water equations under either hydrostatic or non-hydrostatic assumptions. Although the hydrostatic models are quite accurate and cost-efficient for many practical applications, there are situations when the fully hydrodynamic models are preferred despite a larger cost for computations. The present numerical model is implemented by the finite volume method (FVM) based on unstructured grids. The model can be efficiently switched between hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic modules. The case study shows that for waves pro- pagating along the bar a criterion with respect to the shallowness alone, the ratio between the depth and the wave length, is insu- fficient to warrant the performance of shallow flow equations with a hydrostatic approach and the nonlinearity in wave dynamics can be better accounted with a hydrodynamic approach. Besides the prediction of the flows over complex bathymetries, for instance, over asymmetrical dunes, by a hydrodynamic approach is shown to be superior in accuracy to the hydrostatic simulation.

  7. A Level Set Discontinuous Galerkin Method for Free Surface Flows - and Water-Wave Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grooss, Jesper

    2005-01-01

    We present a discontinuous Galerkin method on a fully unstructured grid for the modeling of unsteady incompressible fluid flows with free surfaces. The surface is modeled by a level set technique. We describe the discontinuous Galerkin method in general, and its application to the flow equations....... The deferred correction method is applied on the fluid flow equations and show good results in periodic domains. We describe the design of a level set method for the free surface modeling. The level set utilize the high order accurate discontinuous Galerkin method fully and represent smooth surfaces very...... equations in time are discussed. We investigate theory of di erential algebraic equations, and connect the theory to current methods for solving the unsteady fluid flow equations. We explore the use of a semi-implicit spectral deferred correction method having potential to achieve high temporal order...

  8. An adaptive numerical method for free surface flows passing rigidly mounted obstacles

    CERN Document Server

    Nikitin, Kirill D; Terekhov, Kirill M; Vassilevski, Yuri V; Yanbarisov, Ruslan

    2016-01-01

    The paper develops a method for the numerical simulation of a free-surface flow of incompressible viscous fluid around a streamlined body. The body is a rigid stationary construction partially submerged in the fluid. The application we are interested in the paper is a flow around a surface mounted offshore oil platform. The numerical method builds on a hybrid finite volume / finite difference discretization using adaptive octree cubic meshes. The mesh is dynamically refined towards the free surface and the construction. Special care is taken to devise a discretization for the case of curvilinear boundaries and interfaces immersed in the octree Cartesian background computational mesh. To demonstrate the accuracy of the method, we show the results for two benchmark problems: the sloshing 3D container and the channel laminar flow passing the 3D cylinder of circular cross-section. Further, we simulate numerically a flow with surface waves around an offshore oil platform for the realistic set of geophysical data.

  9. LARGE EDDY SIMULATION OF FREE SURFACE TURBULENT CHANNEL FLOW WITH HEAT TRANSFER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) was used to study the free-surface turbulent channel flow with passive heat transfer. The three-dimensional filtered incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and energy equation were numerically solved with dynamic Subgrid Scale (SGS) models for modeling turbulent stresses and heat flux. To compare the turbulent behavior of the free-surface and two-walled channel flows, the LES of two-walled turbulent channel flow was performed. The statistical quantities and flow structures of the free-surface turbulence with heat transfer in the vicinity of the free-surface were investigated. The results are also in good agreement with theoretical analysis and available results by Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS).

  10. Fabrication of Nanopillar Micropatterns by Hybrid Mask Lithography for Surface-Directed Liquid Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumihito Arai

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel method for fabricating nanopillar micropatterns for surface-directed liquid flows. It employs hybrid mask lithography, which uses a mask consisting of a combination of a photoresist and nanoparticles in the photolithography process. The nanopillar density is controlled by varying the weight ratio of nanoparticles in the composite mask. Hybrid mask lithography was used to fabricate a surface-directed liquid flow. The effect of the surface-directed liquid flow, which was formed by the air-liquid interface due to nanopillar micropatterns, was evaluated, and the results show that the oscillation of microparticles, when the micro-tool was actuated, was dramatically reduced by using a surface-directed liquid flow. Moreover, the target particle was manipulated individually without non-oscillating ambient particles.

  11. Scaling up ecohydrological processes: role of surface water flow in water-limited landscapes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Popp, A

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available microscale processes like ecohydrological feedback mechanisms and spatial exchange like surface water flow, the authors derive transition probabilities from a fine-scale simulation model. They applied two versions of the landscape model, one that includes...

  12. Numerical study on cavitating flow due to a hydrofoil near a free surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping-Chen Wu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A numerical strategy is proposed for a viscous uniform flow past a 2-D partially cavitating hydrofoil placed at a finite depth from the free surface. The flow was modeled by the Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS equations. A finite-volume method with the SIMPLE scheme and k-ε turbulence model were employed for computations. The “full cavitation model,” which included the effects of vaporization, noncondensible gases and compressibility, was incorporated in the computation of cavitating flow. The cavity shape and free surface were updated iteratively till a reasonable convergence was reached. As for the determination of the free surface, the VOF approach was adopted. The test cases show the accuracy and stability of our procedure to capture the cavitating flow near the free surface.

  13. A field study of colloid transport in surface and subsurface flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Tang, Xiang-Yu; Xian, Qing-Song; Weisbrod, Noam; Yang, Jae E.; Wang, Hong-Lan

    2016-11-01

    Colloids have been recognized to enhance the migration of strongly-sorbing contaminants. However, few field investigations have examined combined colloid transport via surface runoff and subsurface flows. In a headwater catchment of the upper Yangtze River, a 6 m (L) by 4 m (W) sloping (6°) farmland plot was built by cement walls to form no-flow side boundaries. The plot was monitored in the summer of 2014 for the release and transport of natural colloids via surface runoff and subsurface flows (i.e., the interflow from the soil-mudrock interface and fracture flow from the mudrock-sandstone interface) in response to rain events. The water sources of the subsurface flows were apportioned to individual rain events using a two end-member model (i.e., mobile pre-event soil water extracted by a suction-cup sampler vs. rainwater (event water)) based on δ18O measurements. For rain events with high preceding soil moisture, mobile pre-event soil water was the main contributor (generally >60%) to the fracture flow. The colloid concentration in the surface runoff was 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than that in the subsurface flows. The lowest colloid concentration was found in the subsurface interflow, which was probably the result of pore-scale colloid straining mechanisms. The rainfall intensity and its temporal variation govern the dynamics of the colloid concentrations in both surface runoff and subsurface flows. The duration of the antecedent dry period affected not only the relative contributions of the rainwater and the mobile pre-event soil water to the subsurface flows but also the peak colloid concentration, particularly in the fracture flow. The rain period because their transport in association with colloids may occur rapidly over long distances via both surface runoff and subsurface flows with rainfall.

  14. Excitation of the Slichter mode by collision with a meteoroid or pressure variations at the surface and core boundaries

    CERN Document Server

    Rosat, S; 10.1016/J.PEPI.2011.10.007

    2012-01-01

    We use a normal-mode formalism to compute the response of a spherical, self-gravitating anelastic PREM-like Earth model to various excitation sources at the Slichter mode period. The formalism makes use of the theory of the Earth's free oscillations based upon an eigenfunction expansion methodology. We determine the complete response in the form of Green's function obtained from a generalization of Betti's reciprocity theorem. Surficial (surface load, fluid core pressure), internal (earthquakes, explosions) and external (object impact) sources of excitation are investigated to show that the translational motion of the inner-core would be best excited by a pressure acting at the core boundaries at time-scales shorter than the Slichter eigenperiods.

  15. Detection of anti-HLA antibodies with flow cytometry in needle core biopsies of renal transplants recipients with chronic allograft nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Laurent; Guignier, Fredy; Bocrie, Olivier; D'Athis, Philippe; Rageot, David; Rifle, Gérard; Justrabo, Eve; Mousson, Christiane

    2005-05-27

    The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of detecting anti-HLA antibodies in eluates from needle core biopsies of renal transplants with chronic allograft nephropathy. Two methods of screening, the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and flow cytometry (FlowPRA) were compared. Twenty renal transplants with CAN were removed after irreversible graft failure. To assess the feasibility of detecting anti-HLA antibodies in small samples, needle core biopsies were sampled at the same place as surgical samples and at a second cortical area. Antibodies were eluted with an acid elution kit and anti-class I and class II IgG HLA antibodies detected using ELISA and flow cytometry. Flow cytometry was found to be more sensitive than ELISA for detecting anti-HLA antibodies in eluates from renal transplants with CAN (95% vs. 75% of positive cases). Detection of anti-HLA antibodies showed good agreement between surgical samples and needle core biopsies performed at the same place for anti-class I (80% vs. 65%, r=0.724 PHLA antibodies (70% vs. 55%, r=0.827 PHLA antibodies in needle core biopsies sampled at different sites suggests that immunization to class I donor antigen could be underestimated in needle core biopsy samples. These data indicate that anti-HLA antibodies can be detected in needle core biopsies from renal transplants. Provided further evaluation is done, elution might be a complementary method to detect anti-HLA antibodies when they are bound to the transplant.

  16. The axisymmetric long-wave interfacial stability of core-annular flow of power-law fluid with surfactant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-Wei Sun; Jie Peng; Ke-Qin Zhu

    2012-01-01

    The long wave stability of core-annular flow of power-law fluids with an axial pressure gradient is investigated at low Reynolds number.The interface between the two fluids is populated with an insoluble surfactant.The analytic solution for the growth rate of perturbation is obtained with long wave approximation.We are mainly concerned with the effects of shear-thinning/thickening property and interfacial surfactant on the flow stability.The results show that the influence of shear-thinning/thickening property accounts to the change of the capillary number.For a clean interface,the shear-thinning property enhances the capillary instability when the interface is close to the pipe wall.The converse is true when the interface is close to the pipe centerline.For shear-thickening fluids,the situation is reversed.When the interface is close to the pipe centerline,the capillary instability can be restrained due to the influence of surfactant.A parameter set can be found under which the flow is linearly stable.

  17. Observations on the flow structures and transport in a warm-core ring in the Gulf of Mexico

    CERN Document Server

    Lipinski, Doug

    2013-01-01

    This study presents several new observations from the study of a warm-core ring (WCR) in the Gulf of Mexico based on the ECCO2 global ocean simulation. Using Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS) techniques to investigate this flow reveals a pattern of transversely intersecting LCS in the mixed layer of the WCR which experiences consistent stretching behavior over a large region of space and time. A detailed analysis of this flow region leads to an analytical model velocity field which captures the essential elements that generate the transversely intersecting LCS. The model parameters are determined from the WCR and the resulting LCS show excellent agreement with those observed in the WCR. The three-dimensional transport behavior which creates these structures relies on the small radial outflow which is present in the mixed layer and is not seen below the pycnocline, leading to a sharp change in the character of the LCS at the bottom of the mixed layer. The flow behavior revealed by the LCS limits fluid excha...

  18. Thermographic investigation of surface temperature of the evaporating liquid layer under the action of gas flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kreta Aleksei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study of the temperature field on the surface of horizontal liquid layer (Ethanol evaporating into gas flow (Air has been performed. Temperature gradient of the gas-liquid interface has been measured with the help of Titanium 570M IR camera. Shear stresses on gas-liquid interface induced by thermocapillary effect and inert gas flow have been defined.

  19. Should blood flow during cardiopulmonary bypass be individualized more than to body surface area?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Sisse Anette; Larsson, A; Andreasen, Jan Jesper;

    Blood flow during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) is calculated on body surface area (BSA). Increasing comorbidity, age and weight of today's cardiac patients question this calculation as it may not reflect individual metabolic requirement. The hypothesis was that a measured cardiac index (CI) prior...... not improve cerebral and systemic oxygenation compared to a blood flow based on BSA....

  20. Aluminum-contaminant transport by surface runoff and bypass flow from an acid sulphate soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minh, L.Q.; Tuong, T.P.; Mensvoort, van M.E.F.; Bouma, J.

    2002-01-01

    Quantifying the process and the amount of acid-contaminant released to the surroundings is important in assessing the environmental hazards associated with reclaiming acid sulphate soils (ASS). The roles of surface runoff and bypass flow (i.e. the rapid downward flow of free water along macropores t

  1. Efficient numerical solution of steady free-surface Navier-Stokes flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brummelen, E.H. van; Raven, H.C.; Koren, B.

    2001-01-01

    Numerical solution of flows that are partially bounded by a freely moving boundary is of great importance in practical applications such as ship hydrodynamics. The usual method for solving steady viscous free-surface flow subject to gravitation is alternating time integration of the kinematic cond

  2. A stereo vision method for tracking particle flow on the weld pool surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, C.X.; Richardson, I.M.; Kenjeres, S.; Kleijn, C.R.; Saldi, Z.

    2009-01-01

    The oscillation of a weld pool surface makes the fluid flow motion quite complex. Two-dimensional results cannot reflect enough information to quantitatively describe the fluid flow in the weld pool; however, there are few direct three-dimensional results available. In this paper, we describe a

  3. Aluminum-contaminant transport by surface runoff and bypass flow from an acid sulphate soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minh, L.Q.; Tuong, T.P.; Mensvoort, van M.E.F.; Bouma, J.

    2002-01-01

    Quantifying the process and the amount of acid-contaminant released to the surroundings is important in assessing the environmental hazards associated with reclaiming acid sulphate soils (ASS). The roles of surface runoff and bypass flow (i.e. the rapid downward flow of free water along macropores t

  4. Ice core evidence for a 20th century increase in surface mass balance in coastal Dronning Maud Land, East Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippe, Morgane; Tison, Jean-Louis; Fjøsne, Karen; Hubbard, Bryn; Kjær, Helle A.; Lenaerts, Jan T. M.; Drews, Reinhard; Sheldon, Simon G.; De Bondt, Kevin; Claeys, Philippe; Pattyn, Frank

    2016-10-01

    Ice cores provide temporal records of surface mass balance (SMB). Coastal areas of Antarctica have relatively high and variable SMB, but are under-represented in records spanning more than 100 years. Here we present SMB reconstruction from a 120 m-long ice core drilled in 2012 on the Derwael Ice Rise, coastal Dronning Maud Land, East Antarctica. Water stable isotope (δ18O and δD) stratigraphy is supplemented by discontinuous major ion profiles and continuous electrical conductivity measurements. The base of the ice core is dated to AD 1759 ± 16, providing a climate proxy for the past ˜ 250 years. The core's annual layer thickness history is combined with its gravimetric density profile to reconstruct the site's SMB history, corrected for the influence of ice deformation. The mean SMB for the core's entire history is 0.47 ± 0.02 m water equivalent (w.e.) a-1. The time series of reconstructed annual SMB shows high variability, but a general increase beginning in the 20th century. This increase is particularly marked during the last 50 years (1962-2011), which yields mean SMB of 0.61 ± 0.01 m w.e. a-1. This trend is compared with other reported SMB data in Antarctica, generally showing a high spatial variability. Output of the fully coupled Community Earth System Model (CESM) suggests that, although atmospheric circulation is the main factor influencing SMB, variability in sea surface temperatures and sea ice cover in the precipitation source region also explain part of the variability in SMB. Local snow redistribution can also influence interannual variability but is unlikely to influence long-term trends significantly. This is the first record from a coastal ice core in East Antarctica to show an increase in SMB beginning in the early 20th century and particularly marked during the last 50 years.

  5. Wind Characteristics of Coastal and Inland Surface Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Chelakara; Lazarus, Steven; Jin, Tetsuya

    2015-11-01

    Lidar measurements of the winds in the surface layer (up to 80 m) inland and near the beach are studied to better characterize the velocity profile and the effect of roughness. Mean and root-mean-squared profiles of horizontal and vertical wind components are analyzed. The effects of variable time (18, 60 and 600 seconds) averaging on the above profiles are discussed. The validity of common surface layer wind profile models to estimate skin friction drag is assessed in light of these measurements. Other turbulence statistics such as auto- and cross- correlations in spatial and temporal domains are also presented. The help of FIT DMES field measurement crew is acknowledged.

  6. Interannual variability of the surface mass balance of West Antarctica from ITASE cores and ERA40 reanalyses, 1958-2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genthon, C. [CNRS/UJF, Laboratoire de Glaciologie et Geophysique de l' Environnement, 54 Rue Moliere, BP 96, Saint Martin d' Heres cedex (France); Kaspari, S. [University of Maine, Climate Change Institute, Orono, ME (United States); Mayewski, P.A. [University of Maine, Climate Change Institute, Orono, ME (United States); University of Maine, Department of Earth Sciences, Orono, ME (United States)

    2005-06-01

    Time series of west-Antarctic (WA) annual surface mass balance (SMB) from ITASE firn/ice cores are compared with the ECMWF 1958-2001 ERA40 reanalysis-based model forecasts. The ITASE series partially confirm the spatial structure of the signature of El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) in WA precipitation as previously identified in ERA40 and other models. However, an improvement of ERA40's ability to reproduce the west-Antarctic SMB since the 1970s is evidenced and is probably related to the onset and increasing use of satellite data in late 1972 and 1978. Restricting the analysis to the 1973-2000 (satellite) period, interannual correlations between ITASE cores and ERA40 SMB series are generally significant (95% confidence level) but weak. The fraction of common variability increases when the series are spatially averaged, suggesting that small-scale perturbation (SSP) of the large-scale SMB variability significantly contributes to year-to-year variability in single core series. A comparison of stake network and core data from the South Pole suggests that SSP can almost fully obscure the large-scale component of the SMB variability as recorded in a single core. Because of SSP, the 1973-2000 period is too brief to verify whether all aspects of the WA large-scale signatures of ENSO and of the Antarctic Oscillation suggested by ERA40 are confirmed in the core series. More annually resolved field data from cores and stakes, spatially extended using high-resolution ground penetrating radar, are necessary to fully assess the relationship between the Antarctic SMB and the large-scale climate as currently suggested by meteorological and climate models. (orig.)

  7. Solution structure of the porcine sapovirus VPg core reveals a stable three-helical bundle with a conserved surface patch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Hyo-Jeong; Min, Hye Jung; Yun, Hyosuk; Pelton, Jeffery G; Wemmer, David E; Cho, Kyoung-Oh; Kim, Jeong-Sun; Lee, Chul Won

    2015-04-17

    Viral protein genome-linked (VPg) proteins play a critical role in the life cycle of vertebrate and plant positive-sense RNA viruses by acting as a protein primer for genome replication and as a protein cap for translation initiation. Here we report the solution structure of the porcine sapovirus VPg core (VPg(C)) determined by multi-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. The structure of VPg(C) is composed of three α-helices stabilized by several conserved hydrophobic residues that form a helical bundle core similar to that of feline calicivirus VPg. The putative nucleotide acceptor Tyr956 within the first helix of the core is completely exposed to solvent accessible surface to facilitate nucleotidylation by viral RNA polymerase. Comparison of VPg structures suggests that the surface for nucleotidylation site is highly conserved among the Caliciviridae family, whereas the backbone core structures are different. These structural features suggest that caliciviruses share common mechanisms of VPg-dependent viral replication and translation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Solvent-surface interactions control the phase structure in laser-generated iron-gold core-shell nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagener, Philipp; Jakobi, Jurij; Rehbock, Christoph; Chakravadhanula, Venkata Sai Kiran; Thede, Claas; Wiedwald, Ulf; Bartsch, Mathias; Kienle, Lorenz; Barcikowski, Stephan

    2016-03-01

    This work highlights a strategy for the one-step synthesis of FeAu nanoparticles by the pulsed laser ablation of alloy targets in the presence of different solvents. This method allows particle generation without the use of additional chemicals; hence, solvent-metal interactions could be studied without cross effects from organic surface ligands. A detailed analysis of generated particles via transmission electron microscopy in combination with EDX elemental mapping could conclusively verify that the nature of the used solvent governs the internal phase structure of the formed nanoparticles. In the presence of acetone or methyl methacrylate, a gold shell covering a non-oxidized iron core was formed, whereas in aqueous media, an Au core with an Fe3O4 shell was generated. This core-shell morphology was the predominant species found in >90% of the examined nanoparticles. These findings indicate that fundamental chemical interactions between the nanoparticle surface and the solvent significantly contribute to phase segregation and elemental distribution in FeAu nanoparticles. A consecutive analysis of resulting Fe@Au core-shell nanoparticles revealed outstanding oxidation resistance and fair magnetic and optical properties. In particular, the combination of these features with high stability magnetism and plasmonics may create new opportunities for this hybrid material in imaging applications.

  9. Detection of three-dimensional surfaces from optic flow: the effects of noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, G J; Wuestefeld, A P

    1993-09-01

    Previous research (Andersen, 1989) has suggested that the recovery of 3-D shape from nonsmooth optic flow (motion transparency) can be performed by segregating surfaces according to the distributions of velocities present in the flow field. Five experiments were conducted to examine this hypothesis in a surface detection paradigm and to determine the limitations of human observers to detect 3-D surfaces in the presence of noise. Two display types were examined: a flow field that simulated a surface corrugated in depth and a flow field that simulated a random volume. In addition, two types of noise were examined: a distribution of noise velocities that overlapped or did not overlap the velocity distribution that defined the surface. Corrugation frequency and surface density were also examined. Detection performance increased with decreasing corrugation frequency, decreasing noise density, and decreasing surface density. Overall, the subjects demonstrated remarkable tolerance to the presence of noise and, for some conditions, could discriminate surface from random conditions when noise density was twice the surface density. Discrimination accuracy was greater for the nonoverlapping than for the overlapping noise, providing support for an analysis based on the distribution of velocities.

  10. Tomo-PIV measurement of flow around an arbitrarily moving body with surface reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Sunghyuk; Jeon, Young Jin; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2015-02-01

    A three-dimensional surface of an arbitrarily moving body in a flow field was reconstructed using the DAISY descriptor and epipolar geometry constraints. The surface shape of a moving body was reconstructed with tomographic PIV flow measurement. Experimental images were captured using the tomographic PIV system, which consisted of four high-speed cameras and a laser. The originally captured images, which contained the shape of the arbitrary moving body and the tracer particles, were separated into the particle and surface images using a Gaussian smoothing filter. The weak contrast of the surface images was enhanced using a local histogram equalization method. The histogram-equalized surface images were used to reconstruct the surface shape of the moving body. The surface reconstruction method required a sufficiently detailed surface pattern to obtain the intensity gradient profile of the local descriptor. The separated particle images were used to reconstruct the particle volume intensity via tomographic reconstruction approaches. Voxels behind the reconstructed body surface were neglected during the tomographic reconstruction and velocity calculation. The three-dimensional three-component flow vectors were calculated based on the cross-correlation functions between the reconstructed particle volumes. Three-dimensional experiments that modeled the flows around a flapping flag, a rotating cylinder, and a flapping robot fish tail were conducted to validate the present technique.

  11. Initial adhesion of Listeria monocytogenes to solid surfaces under liquid flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szlavik, Julie; Soares Paiva, Dionísio; Mørk, Nils;

    2012-01-01

    strains of L. monocytogenes was investigated under liquid flow at two levels of shear stress on six different surfaces using a flow chamber set-up with microscopy measurements. The surfaces tested were glass and PVC, and glass coated with beef extract, casein, and homogenised and unhomogenised milk....... In addition, the effect of prior environmental stress (5% NaCl, low nutrient availability) on initial adhesion was investigated. The hydrophobicity of the investigated surfaces was determined by contact angle measurements and the surface properties of the investigated L. monocytogenes strains were determined.......001) was observed but not of interactions between surface-shear stress. No correlation between surface hydrophobicity and IAR was observed. Addition of 5% NaCl during propagation resulted in a decrease in IAR whilst propagation in low nutrient media caused an increase indicating a general change in surface...

  12. Experimental Study of gas-liquid two-phase flow affected by wall surface wettability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takamasa, T. [Faculty of Marine Technology, Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology, 2-1-6 Etchujima, Koto, Tokyo 135-8533 (Japan); Hazuku, T. [Faculty of Marine Technology, Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology, 2-1-6 Etchujima, Koto, Tokyo 135-8533 (Japan)], E-mail: hazuku@kaiyodai.ac.jp; Hibiki, T. [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, 400 Central Drive, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2017 (United States)

    2008-12-15

    To evaluate the effect of wall surface wettability on the characteristics of upward gas-liquid two-phase flow in a vertical pipe, an experimental study was performed using three test pipes: an acrylic pipe, a hydrophilic pipe and a hydrophobic pipe. Basic flow characteristics such as flow patterns, pressure drop and void fraction were measured in these three pipes. In the hydrophilic pipe, a slug to churn flow transition boundary was shifted to a higher gas velocity at a given liquid velocity, whereas a churn to annular flow transition boundary was shifted to a lower gas velocity at a given liquid velocity. In the hydrophobic pipe, an inverted-churn flow regime was observed in the region where the churn flow regime was observed in the acrylic pipe, while a droplet flow regime was observed in the region where an annular flow regime was observed in the acrylic pipe. At a high gas flow rate, the mean void fraction in the hydrophobic pipe was higher than in the acrylic pipe. The effect of surface wettability on frictional pressure loss was confirmed to be insignificant under the present experimental conditions.

  13. Hall-magnetohydrodynamic surface waves in solar wind flow-structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miteva, Rossitsa; Zhelyazkov, Ivan; Erdélyi, Robert

    2004-02-01

    This paper investigates the parallel propagation of agnetohydrodynamic (MHD) surface waves travelling along an ideal steady plasma slab surrounded by a steady plasma environment in the framework of Hall magnetohydrodynamics. The magnitudes of the ambient magnetic field, plasma density and flow velocity inside and outside the slab are different. Two possible directions of the relative flow velocity (in a frame of reference co-moving with the ambient flow) have been studied. In contrast to the conventional MHD surface waves which are usually assumed to be pure surface or pseudo-surface waves, the Hall-MHD approach makes it necessary to treat the normal MHD slab's modes as generalized surface waves. The latter have to be considered as a superposition of two partial waves, one of which is a pure/pseudo-surface-wave whereas the other constitutive wave is a leaky one. From the two kinds of surface-wave modes that can propagate, notably sausage and kink ones, the dispersion behaviour of the kink mode turns out to be more complicated than that of the sausage mode. In general, the flow increases the waves' phase velocities comparing with their magnitudes in a static Hall-MHD plasma slab. The applicability of the results to real solar wind flow-structures is briefly discussed. EHPRG Award Lecture.

  14. Free-surface flow around an appended hull

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lungu, A.; Pacuraru, F.

    2010-08-01

    The prediction of the total drag experienced by an advancing ship is a complicated problem which requires a thorough understanding of the hydrodynamic forces acting on the hull, the physical processes from which these forces arise as well as their mutual interaction. A general numerical method to predict the hydrodynamic performance of a twin-propeller combatant ship is presented in the paper, which describes the solution of a RANS solver coupled with a body force method as an attempt in investigating the flow features around the ship hull equipped with rotating propellers and rudders. A special focus is made on the propeller non-symmetrical inflow field, aimed at obtaining the necessary data for the propulsive performances evaluation as well as for the propeller final design. The reported work allows not only the performance evaluation for the overall performances of a hull, but also leads to the development, implementation and validation of new concepts in modeling the turbulent vortical flows, with direct connection to the ship propulsion problem.

  15. Free-surface flow around an appended hull

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lungu, A; Pacuraru, F, E-mail: adrian.lungu@ugal.r [Department of Ship Hydrodynamics, ' Dunarea de Jos' University of Galati 47 Domneasca Street, Galati 800008 (Romania)

    2010-08-15

    The prediction of the total drag experienced by an advancing ship is a complicated problem which requires a thorough understanding of the hydrodynamic forces acting on the hull, the physical processes from which these forces arise as well as their mutual interaction. A general numerical method to predict the hydrodynamic performance of a twin-propeller combatant ship is presented in the paper, which describes the solution of a RANS solver coupled with a body force method as an attempt in investigating the flow features around the ship hull equipped with rotating propellers and rudders. A special focus is made on the propeller non-symmetrical inflow field, aimed at obtaining the necessary data for the propulsive performances evaluation as well as for the propeller final design. The reported work allows not only the performance evaluation for the overall performances of a hull, but also leads to the development, implementation and validation of new concepts in modeling the turbulent vortical flows, with direct connection to the ship propulsion problem.

  16. Laminar flow in a microchannel with hydrophobic surface patterned microribs oriented parallel to the flow direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynes, D.; Jeffs, K.; Woolford, B.; Webb, B. W.

    2007-09-01

    This paper reports results of an analytical and experimental investigation of the laminar flow in a parallel-plate microchannel with ultrahydrophobic top and bottom walls. The walls are fabricated with microribs and cavities that are oriented parallel to the flow direction. The channel walls are modeled in an idealized fashion, with the shape of the liquid-vapor meniscus approximated as flat. An analytical model of the vapor cavity flow is employed and coupled with a numerical model of the liquid flow by matching the local liquid and vapor phase velocity and shear stress at the interface. The numerical predictions show that the effective slip length and the reduction in the classical friction factor-Reynolds number product increase with increasing relative cavity width, increasing relative cavity depth, and decreasing relative microrib/cavity module length. Comparisons were also made between the zero shear interface model and the liquid-vapor cavity coupled model. The results illustrate that the zero shear interface model underpredicts the overall flow resistance. Further, the deviation between the two models was found to be significantly larger for increasing values of both the relative rib/cavity module width and the cavity fraction. The trends in the frictional pressure drop predictions are in good agreement with experimental measurements made at similar conditions, with greater deviation observed at increasing size of the cavity fraction. Based on the numerical predictions, an expression is proposed in which the friction factor-Reynolds number product may be estimated in terms of the important variables.

  17. Experimental studies into the fluid dynamic performance of the coolant flow in the mixed core of the Temelin NPP VVER-1000 reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M. Dmitriev

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of studies into the interassembly coolant interaction in the Temelin nuclear power plant (NPP VVER-1000 reactor core. An aerodynamic test bench was used to study the coolant flow processes in a TVSA-type fuel assembly bundle. To obtain more detailed information on the coolant flow dynamics, a VVER-1000 reactor core fragment was selected as the test model, which comprised two segments of a TVSA-12 PLUS fuel assembly and one segment of a TVSA-T assembly with stiffening angles and an interassembly gap. The studies into the coolant fluid dynamics consisted in measuring the velocity vector both in representative TVSA regions and inside the interassembly gap using a five-channel pneumometric probe. An analysis into the spatial distribution of the absolute flow velocity projections made it possible to detail the TVSA spacer, mixing and combined spacer grid flow pattern, identify the regions with the maximum transverse coolant flow, and determine the depth of the coolant flow disturbance propagation and redistribution in adjacent TVSA assemblies. The results of the studies into the interassembly coolant interaction among the adjacent TVSA assemblies are used at OKBM Afrikantov to update the VVER-1000 core thermal-hydraulic analysis procedures and have been added to the database for verification of computational fluid dynamics (CFD codes and for detailed cellwise analyses of the VVER-100 reactor cores.

  18. Estimation of Near Surface Wind Speeds in Strongly Rotating Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Crowell, Sean; Wicker, Louis

    2013-01-01

    Modeling studies consistently demonstrate that the most violent winds in tornadic vortices occur in the lowest tens of meters above the surface. These velocities are unobservable by radar platforms due to line of sight consider- ations. In this work, a methodology is developed which utilizes parametric tangential velocity models derived from Doppler radar measurements, to- gether with a tangential momentum and mass continuity constraint, to esti- mate the radial and vertical velocities in a steady axisymmetric frame. The main result is that information from observations aloft can be extrapolated into the surface layer of the vortex. The impact of the amount of information available to the retrieval is demonstrated through some numerical tests with pseudo-data.

  19. Thermocouple Rakes for Measuring Boundary Layer Flows Extremely Close to Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Danny P.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Martin, Lisa C.; Blaha, Charles A.

    2001-01-01

    Of vital interest to aerodynamic researchers is precise knowledge of the flow velocity profile next to the surface. This information is needed for turbulence model development and the calculation of viscous shear force. Though many instruments can determine the flow velocity profile near the surface, none of them can make measurements closer than approximately 0.01 in. from the surface. The thermocouple boundary-layer rake can measure much closer to the surface than conventional instruments can, such as a total pressure boundary layer rake, hot wire, or hot film. By embedding the sensors (thermocouples) in the region where the velocity is equivalent to the velocity ahead of a constant thickness strut, the boundary-layer flow profile can be obtained. The present device fabricated at the NASA Glenn Research Center microsystem clean room has a heater made of platinum and thermocouples made of platinum and gold. Equal numbers of thermocouples are placed both upstream and downstream of the heater, so that the voltage generated by each pair at the same distance from the surface is indicative of the difference in temperature between the upstream and downstream thermocouple locations. This voltage differential is a function of the flow velocity, and like the conventional total pressure rake, it can provide the velocity profile. In order to measure flow extremely close to the surface, the strut is made of fused quartz with extremely low heat conductivity. A large size thermocouple boundary layer rake is shown in the following photo. The latest medium size sensors already provide smooth velocity profiles well into the boundary layer, as close as 0.0025 in. from the surface. This is about 4 times closer to the surface than the previously used total pressure rakes. This device also has the advantage of providing the flow profile of separated flow and also it is possible to measure simultaneous turbulence levels within the boundary layer.

  20. The Growth of Black Holes and Bulges at the Cores of Cooling Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Rafferty, D A; Nulsen, P E J; Wise, M W

    2006-01-01

    Central cluster galaxies (cDs) in cooling flows are growing rapidly through gas accretion and star formation. At the same time, AGN outbursts fueled by accretion onto supermassive black holes are generating X-ray cavity systems and driving outflows that exceed those in powerful quasars. We show that the resulting bulge and black hole growth follows a trend that is roughly consistent with the slope of the local (Magorrian) relation between bulge and black hole mass for nearby quiescent ellipticals. However, a large scatter suggests that cD bulges and black holes do not always grow in lock-step. New measurements made with XMM, Chandra, and FUSE of the condensation rates in cooling flows are now approaching or are comparable to the star formation rates, alleviating the need for an invisible sink of cold matter. We show that the remaining radiation losses can be offset by AGN outbursts in more than half of the systems in our sample, indicating that the level of cooling and star formation is regulated by AGN feedb...

  1. Analysis of partial and total flow blockage of a single fuel assembly of an MTR research reactor core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adorni, Martina [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, Nucleare e della Produzione, Facolta di Ingegneria, Universita di Pisa, Via Diotisalvi, 2-56100 Pisa (Italy)]. E-mail: martina_adorni@tin.it; Bousbia-Salah, Anis [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, Nucleare e della Produzione, Facolta di Ingegneria, Universita di Pisa, Via Diotisalvi, 2-56100 Pisa (Italy); Hamidouche, Tewfik [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Centre de Recherche Nucleaire d' Alger-Algeria, 02 Boulevard Frantz fanon, BP 399 Alger-gare (Algeria); Maro, Beniamino Di [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, Nucleare e della Produzione, Facolta di Ingegneria, Universita di Pisa, Via Diotisalvi, 2-56100 Pisa (Italy); Pierro, Franco [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, Nucleare e della Produzione, Facolta di Ingegneria, Universita di Pisa, Via Diotisalvi, 2-56100 Pisa (Italy); D' Auria, Francesco [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, Nucleare e della Produzione, Facolta di Ingegneria, Universita di Pisa, Via Diotisalvi, 2-56100 Pisa (Italy)

    2005-10-15

    The main aim of the following study is to perform a safety analysis of the IAEA 10 MW MTR Pool type Research Reactor [IAEA-TECDOC-233, 1980. IAEA Research Reactor Core Conversion from the use of high-enriched uranium to the use of low enriched uranium fuels Guidebook] under flow blockage of a single Fuel Assembly (FA) conditions. Such event was rarely investigated in the open literature notwithstanding the fat that it constitutes a severe accident that may lead to local dryout and eventually to loss of the FA integrity. The transients herein considered are related to partial and total obstruction of the cooling channel of a single Fuel Assembly of the reactor core. This study constitutes the first step of a larger work, which consists in performing a 3D simulation using the Best Estimate coupled code technique. However, as a first approach the instantaneous reactor power is derived through the point kinetic approach of the used thermal-hydraulic system code.

  2. Effects of surface roughness and electrokinetic heterogeneity on electroosmotic flow in microchannel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masilamani, Kannan; Ganguly, Suvankar; Feichtinger, Christian; Bartuschat, Dominik; Rüde, Ulrich, E-mail: suva_112@yahoo.co.in [Department of Computer Science 10 University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Cauerstr.11 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2015-06-15

    In this paper, a hybrid lattice-Boltzmann and finite-difference (LB-FD) model is applied to simulate the effects of three-dimensional surface roughness and electrokinetic heterogeneity on electroosmotic flow (EOF) in a microchannel. The lattice-Boltzmann (LB) method has been employed to obtain the flow field and a finite-difference (FD) method is used to solve the Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) equation for the electrostatic potential distribution. Numerical simulation of flow through a square cross-section microchannel with designed roughness is conducted and the results are critically analysed. The effects of surface heterogeneity on the electroosmotic transport are investigated for different roughness height, width, roughness interval spacing, and roughness surface potential. Numerical simulations reveal that the presence of surface roughness changes the nature of electroosmotic transport through the microchannel. It is found that the electroosmotic velocity decreases with the increase in roughness height and the velocity profile becomes asymmetric. For the same height of the roughness elements, the EOF velocity rises with the increase in roughness width. For the heterogeneously charged rough channel, the velocity profile shows a distinct deviation from the conventional plug-like flow pattern. The simulation results also indicate locally induced flow vortices which can be utilized to enhance the flow and mixing within the microchannel. The present study has important implications towards electrokinetic flow control in the microchannel, and can provide an efficient way to design a microfluidic system of practical interest. (paper)

  3. Direct velocity measurement and enhanced mixing in laminar flows over ultrahydrophobic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Jia

    2005-11-01

    A series of experiment are presented studying the kinematics of water flowing over drag-reducing ultrahydrophobic surfaces. The surfaces are fabricated from silicon wafers using photolithography and are designed to incorporate patterns of microridges with precise spacing and alignment. These surfaces are reacted with an organosilane to achieve high hydrophobicity. Microridges with different widths, spacing and alignments are tested in a microchannel flow cell with rectangular cross-section. The velocity profile across the microchannel is measured with micro particle image velocimetry (μ-PIV) capable of resolving the flow down to length scales well below the size of the surface features. A maximum slip velocity of >60% of the average velocity in the flow is observed at the center of the air-water interface supported between these hydrophobic microridges, and the no-slip boundary condition is found at the hydrophobic microridges. The μ-PIV measurements demonstrate that slip along the shear-free air-water interface supported between the hydrophobic micron-sized ridges is the primary mechanism responsible for the drag reduction. The experiment velocity and pressure drop measurement are compared with the prediction of numerical simulation and an analytical model. By aligning the hydrophobic microridges at an acute angle to the flow direction a secondary flow is produced which can significantly enhance mixing in this laminar flow.

  4. Change in ice rheology during climate variations – implications for ice flow modelling and dating of the EPICA Dome C core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Durand

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of the distribution of crystallographic orientations (i.e., the fabric along ice cores provides information on past and current ice flow in ice-sheets. Besides the usually observed formation of a vertical single maximum fabric, the EPICA Dome C ice core (EDC shows an abrupt and unexpected strengthening of its fabric during termination II around 1750 m depth. Such strengthening has already been observed for sites located on an ice-sheet flank. This suggests that horizontal shear could occur along the EDC core. Moreover, the change in the fabric leads to a modification of the effective viscosity between neighbouring ice layers. Through the use of an anisotropic ice flow model, we quantify the change in effective viscosity and investigate its implication for ice flow and dating.

  5. Phase-detection measurements in free-surface turbulent shear flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanson, Hubert

    2016-04-01

    High-velocity self-aerated flows are described as ‘white waters’ because of the entrained air bubbles. The air entrainment induces a drastic change in the multiphase flow structure of the water column and this leads to significant bubble-turbulence interactions, turbulence modulation and associated mixing processes impacting on the bulk flow properties. In these high-velocity free-surface turbulent flows, the phase-detection needle probe is a most reliable instrumentation. The signal processing of a phase-detection probe is re-visited herein. It is shown that the processing may be performed on the raw probe signal as well as the thresholded data. The latter yields the time-averaged void fraction, the bubble count rate, the particle chord time distributions and the particle clustering properties within the particulate flow regions. The raw probe signal analysis gives further the auto-correlation time scale and the power spectrum density function. Finally dimensional considerations are developed with a focus on the physical modelling of free-surface flows in hydraulic structures. It is argued that the notion of scale effects must be defined in terms of some specific set of air-water flow properties within well-defined testing conditions, while a number of free-surface flow characteristics are more prone to scale effects than others, even in large-size physical facilities.

  6. Mode pattern of internal flow in a water droplet on a vibrating hydrophobic surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hun; Lim, Hee-Chang

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study is to understand the mode pattern of the internal flow in a water droplet placed on a hydrophobic surface that periodically and vertically vibrates. As a result, a water droplet on a vibrating hydrophobic surface has a typical shape that depends on each resonance mode, and, additionally, we observed a diversified lobe size and internal flows in the water droplet. The size of each lobe at the resonance frequency was relatively greater than that at the neighboring frequencies, and the internal flow of the nth order mode was also observed in the flow visualization. In general, large symmetrical flow streams were generated along the vertical axis in each mode, with a large circulating movement from the bottom to the top, and then to the triple contact line along the droplet surface. In contrast, modes 2 and 4 generated a Y-shaped flow pattern, in which the flow moved to the node point in the lower part of the droplet, but modes 6 and 8 had similar patterns, with only a little difference. In addition, as a result of the PIV measurement, while the flow velocity of mode 4 was faster than that of model 2, those of modes 6 and 8 were almost similar.

  7. The effect of surface roughness on rarefied gas flows by lattice Boltzmann method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Chao-Feng; Ni Yu-Shan

    2008-01-01

    This paper studies the roughness effect combining with effects of rarefaction and compressibility by a lattice Boltzmann model for rarefied gas flows at high Knudsen numbers. By discussing the effect of the tangential momentum accommodation coefficient on the rough boundary condition, the lattice Boltzmann simulations of nitrogen and helium flows are performed in a two-dimensional microchannel with rough boundaries. The surface roughness effects in the microchannel on the velocity field, the mass flow rate and the friction coefficient are studied and analysed. Numerical results for the two gases in micro scale show different characteristics from macroscopic flows and demonstrate the feasibility of the lattice Boltzmann model in rarefied gas dynamics.

  8. Effects of Surface Wettability and Roughness on the Heat Transfer Performance of Fluid Flowing through Microchannels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Cui

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The surface characteristics, such as wettability and roughness, play an important role in heat transfer performance in the field of microfluidic flow. In this paper, the process of a hot liquid flowing through a microchannel with cold walls, which possesses different surface wettabilities and microstructures, is simulated by a transient double-distribution function (DDF two-phase thermal lattice Boltzmann BGK (LBGK model. The Shan-Chen multiphase LBGK model is used to describe the flow field and the independent distribution function is introduced to solve the temperature field. The simulation results show that the roughness of the channel wall improves the heat transfer, no matter what the surface wettability is. These simulations reveal that the heat exchange characteristics are directly related to the flow behavior. For the smooth-superhydrophobic-surface flow, a gas film forms that acts as an insulating layer since the thermal conductivity of the gas is relatively small in comparison to that of a liquid. In case of the rough-superhydrophobic-surface flow, the vortex motion of the gas within the grooves significantly enhances the heat exchange between the fluid and wall.

  9. Trace projection transformation: a new method for measurement of debris flow surface velocity fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yan; Cui, Peng; Guo, Xiaojun; Ge, Yonggang

    2016-12-01

    Spatiotemporal variation of velocity is important for debris flow dynamics. This paper presents a new method, the trace projection transformation, for accurate, non-contact measurement of a debris-flow surface velocity field based on a combination of dense optical flow and perspective projection transformation. The algorithm for interpreting and processing is implemented in C ++ and realized in Visual Studio 2012. The method allows quantitative analysis of flow motion through videos from various angles (camera positioned at the opposite direction of fluid motion). It yields the spatiotemporal distribution of surface velocity field at pixel level and thus provides a quantitative description of the surface processes. The trace projection transformation is superior to conventional measurement methods in that it obtains the full surface velocity field by computing the optical flow of all pixels. The result achieves a 90% accuracy of when comparing with the observed values. As a case study, the method is applied to the quantitative analysis of surface velocity field of a specific debris flow.

  10. Mathematical modelling of surface water-groundwater flow and salinity interactions in the coastal zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanoudaki, Katerina; Kampanis, Nikolaos A.

    2014-05-01

    Coastal areas are the most densely-populated areas in the world. Consequently water demand is high, posing great pressure on fresh water resources. Climatic change and its direct impacts on meteorological variables (e.g. precipitation) and indirect impact on sea level rise, as well as anthropogenic pressures (e.g. groundwater abstraction), are strong drivers causing groundwater salinisation and subsequently affecting coastal wetlands salinity with adverse effects on the corresponding ecosystems. Coastal zones are a difficult hydrologic environment to represent with a mathematical model due to the large number of contributing hydrologic processes and variable-density flow conditions. Simulation of sea level rise and tidal effects on aquifer salinisation and accurate prediction of interactions between coastal waters, groundwater and neighbouring wetlands requires the use of integrated surface water-groundwater models. In the past few decades several computer codes have been developed to simulate coupled surface and groundwater flow. In these numerical models surface water flow is usually described by the 1-D Saint Venant equations (e.g. Swain and Wexler, 1996) or the 2D shallow water equations (e.g. Liang et al., 2007). Further simplified equations, such as the diffusion and kinematic wave approximations to the Saint Venant equations, are also employed for the description of 2D overland flow and 1D stream flow (e.g. Gunduz and Aral, 2005). However, for coastal bays, estuaries and wetlands it is often desirable to solve the 3D shallow water equations to simulate surface water flow. This is the case e.g. for wind-driven flows or density-stratified flows. Furthermore, most integrated models are based on the assumption of constant fluid density and therefore their applicability to coastal regions is questionable. Thus, most of the existing codes are not well-suited to represent surface water-groundwater interactions in coastal areas. To this end, the 3D integrated

  11. Free-surface flow simulations for discharge-based operation of hydraulic structure gates

    CERN Document Server

    Erdbrink, C D; Sloot, P M A

    2014-01-01

    We combine non-hydrostatic flow simulations of the free surface with a discharge model based on elementary gate flow equations for decision support in operation of hydraulic structure gates. A water level-based gate control used in most of today's general practice does not take into account the fact that gate operation scenarios producing similar total discharged volumes and similar water levels may have different local flow characteristics. Accurate and timely prediction of local flow conditions around hydraulic gates is important for several aspects of structure management: ecology, scour, flow-induced gate vibrations and waterway navigation. The modelling approach is described and tested for a multi-gate sluice structure regulating discharge from a river to the sea. The number of opened gates is varied and the discharge is stabilized with automated control by varying gate openings. The free-surface model was validated for discharge showing a correlation coefficient of 0.994 compared to experimental data. A...

  12. SIMULATION OF STRONG TURBULENCE FLOW WITH FREE SURFACE INCLUDING THE EFFECTS OF STREAMLINE CURVATURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Hui-chao; LIU Yu-ling; WEI Wen-li

    2005-01-01

    This paper is concerned with a mathematical model for two-dimensional strong turbulence flow with free surface including the effects of streamline curvature in orthogonal curvilinear coordinate system, with which the characteristics of the turbulence flow field on the ogee spillway was numerical simulated. In the numerical simulation, the flow control equations in orthogonal curvilinear coordinate system were discretized by the finite volume method, the physical parameters( P, U,V,K,ε,γt,etc.) were arranged on a staggered grid, the discretized equations were solved with the SIMPLEC method, and the complex free surface was dealt with VOF method. The computed results show that the velocity fields, pressure field, shear stress distribution and kinetic energy of turbulent flow on the ogee spillway are in agreement with experimental data. This confirms that the model can be used for numerical simulation of the turbulence flow on ogee spillway.

  13. Inertia Effects in the Flow of a Herschel-Bulkley ERF between Fixed Surfaces of Revolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Walicka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Many electrorheological fluids (ERFs as fluids with microstructure demonstrate viscoplastic behaviours. Rheometric measurements indicate that some flows of these fluids may be modelled as the flows of a Herschel-Bulkley fluid. In this paper, the flow of a Herschel-Bulkley ER fluid—with a fractional power-law exponent—in a narrow clearance between two fixed surfaces of revolution with common axis of symmetry is considered. The flow is externally pressurized, and it is considered with inertia effect. In order to solve this problem, the boundary layer equations are used. The influence of inertia forces on the pressure distribution is examined by using the method of averaged inertia terms of the momentum equation. Numerical examples of externally pressurized ERFs flows in the clearance between parallel disks and concentric spherical surfaces are presented.

  14. Surface supersaturation in flow-rate modulation epitaxy of GaN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akasaka, Tetsuya; Lin, Chia-Hung; Yamamoto, Hideki; Kumakura, Kazuhide

    2017-06-01

    Hillocks on N-face GaN (000 1 bar) films are effectively eliminated by group-III-source flow-rate modulation epitaxy (FME), wherein the flow-rate of group-III sources are sequentially modulated under a constant supply of NH3. A hillock-free smooth surface obtained by group-III-source FME is attributed to the enhancement of step-flow growth. We found that a hillock originates from a micropipe and grows by spiral growth around the micropipe. The spiral growth rate rapidly decreases with decreasing the degree of surface supersaturation σ, while the step-flow growth rate decreases linearly. For group-III-source FME, wherein σ is lower than conventional continuous growth, the spiral growth rate could be lower than the step-flow growth one so that the formation of hillocks is suppressed.

  15. Lubrication of textured surfaces: a general theory for flow and shear stress factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaraggi, Michele

    2012-08-01

    We report on a mean field theory of textured surface lubrication. We study the fluid flow dynamics occurring at the interface as a function of the texture characteristics, e.g. texture area density, shape and distribution of microstructures, and local slip lengths. The present results may be very important for the investigation of tailored microtextured surfaces for low-friction hydrodynamic applications.

  16. Early bifurcation in rotating fluid flow with free surface studied by axisymmetric numerical simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santos, M. B. L.; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    1996-01-01

    . This one is a coaxial disk in contact with the fluid surface but without covering it entirely. The study focuses on the occurrence of time-dependent flow, more specifically, the first transition to unsteadiness, by considering cavity cases with different amounts of free surface, for a fixed aspect ratio...

  17. CFD simulation of two- and three-dimensional free-surface flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apsley, David; Hu, Wei

    2003-06-01

    The paper describes the implementation of moving-mesh and free-surface capabilities within a 3-d finite-volume Reynolds-averaged-Navier-Stokes solver, using surface-conforming multi-block structured meshes. The free-surface kinematic condition can be applied in two ways: enforcing zero net mass flux or solving the kinematic equation by a finite-difference method. The free surface is best defined by intermediate control points rather than the mesh vertices. Application of the dynamic boundary condition to the piezometric pressure at these points provides a hydrostatic restoring force which helps to eliminate any unnatural free-surface undulations. The implementation of time-marching methods on moving grids are described in some detail and it is shown that a second-order scheme must be applied in both scalar-transport and free-surface equations if flows driven by free-surface height variations are to be computed without significant wave attenuation using a modest number of time steps. Computations of five flows of theoretical and practical interest - forced motion in a pump, linear waves in a tank, quasi-1d flow over a ramp, solitary wave interaction with a submerged obstacle and 3-d flow about a surface-penetrating cylinder - are described to illustrate the capabilities of our code and methods.

  18. Surface tension effects on vertical upward annular flows in a small diameter pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadatomi, Michio, E-mail: sadatomi@mech.kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Dept. of Advanced Mechanical Systems, Kumamoto Univ., 39-1, Kurokami 2-chome, Chuou-ku, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Kawahara, Akimaro [Dept. of Advanced Mechanical Systems, Kumamoto Univ., 39-1, Kurokami 2-chome, Chuou-ku, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Suzuki, Aruta [Plant Design & Engineering Dept., Environment, Energy & Plant Headquarters, Hitachi Zosen Corporation, 7-89, Nankokita 1-chome, Suminoe-ku, Osaka, 559-8559 (Japan)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • Surface tension effects were clarified on annular flow in a small diameter pipe. • The mean liquid film thickness became thinner with decreasing of surface tension. • The liquid droplet fraction and the interfacial shear stress became higher with it. • New prediction methods for the above parameters were developed and validated. - Abstract: Experiments were conducted to study the surface tension effects on vertical upward annular flows in a 5 mm I.D. pipe using water and low surface tension water with a little surfactant as the test liquid and air as the test gas. Firstly, the experimental results on the mean liquid film thickness, the liquid droplet fraction and the interfacial shear stress in annular flows together with some flow pictures are presented to clarify the surface tension effects. From these, the followings are clarified: In the low surface tension case, the liquid film surface becomes rough, the liquid film thickness thin, the liquid droplet fraction high, and the interfacial shear stress high. Secondary, correlations in literatures for the respective parameters are tested against the present data. The test results show that no correlation for the respective parameters could predict well the present data. Thus, correlations are revised by accounting for the surface tension effects. The results of the experiments, the correlations tests and their revisions mentioned above are presented in the present paper.

  19. Molecular weight dependence of surface flow near the bulk glass transition temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Yu; Salez, Thomas; Benzaquen, Michael; Raphael, Elie; Forrest, James A.

    2014-03-01

    We present the study on molecular weight dependent sub-Tg surface dynamics of polymer thin films by using the Nano-step experiment [McGraw et al. Soft Matter 7, 7832 (2011)]. By varying the molecular weight, we are able to probe the surface dynamics of the free surface below Tg with the polymer size comparable to the surface depth. In particular, we define and use a correlation function to compare measured and calculated profiles to analyze the transition from the bulk flow to flow restricted to the surface region. Surprisingly, even for the polymers with Mw = 22,000 surface flow is still observed below the bulk Tg value. A numerical simulation of random walk is used to find the fraction of polymer of which all of the polymer segments are located in the free surface region. The simulation results indicate that there are still a significant fraction of polymer molecules where all segments are in the near free surface region. These molecules can undergo flow consistent with the experimental results.

  20. Effect of Vapor Flow on Jumping Droplets during Condensation on Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Daniel J.; Miljkovic, Nenad; Enright, Ryan; Limia, Alexander; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2013-11-01

    Upon coalescence of droplets on a superhydrophobic surface, the net reduction in droplet surface area results in a release of surface energy that can cause the coalesced droplet to ``jump'' away from the surface. Jumping condensing surfaces have been shown to enhance condensation heat transfer by up to 30% compared to state-of-the-art dropwise condensing surfaces. While the heat transfer enhancement of jumping condensation is well documented, droplet behavior after departure from the surface has not been considered. Vapor flows to the condensing surface due to mass conservation. This flow can increase drag on departing droplets, resulting in complete droplet reversal and return to the surface. Upon return, these larger droplets impede heat transfer until they jump again or finally shed due to gravity. By characterizing individual droplet trajectories during condensation on hydrophobic nanostructured copper oxide surfaces for a variety of heat fluxes (q'' = 0.1 - 2 W/cm2), we showed that vapor flow entrainment dominates droplet motion for droplets smaller than R ~ 30 um at high heat fluxes (q'' >2 W/cm2). Furthermore, we developed an analytical model of droplet motion based on first principles and the Reynolds drag equation which agreed well with the experimental data. We considered condensation on both flat and tubular geometries with our model, and we suggest avenues to further enhance heat transfer which minimize droplet return due to entrainment.

  1. Dust evolution, a global view: III. Core/mantle grains, organic nano-globules, comets and surface chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A. P.

    2016-12-01

    Within the framework of The Heterogeneous dust Evolution Model for Interstellar Solids (THEMIS), this work explores the surface processes and chemistry relating to core/mantle interstellar and cometary grain structures and their influence on the nature of these fascinating particles. It appears that a realistic consideration of the nature and chemical reactivity of interstellar grain surfaces could self-consistently and within a coherent framework explain: the anomalous oxygen depletion, the nature of the CO dark gas, the formation of `polar ice' mantles, the red wing on the 3 μm water ice band, the basis for the O-rich chemistry observed in hot cores, the origin of organic nano-globules and the 3.2 μm `carbonyl' absorption band observed in comet reflectance spectra. It is proposed that the reaction of gas phase species with carbonaceous a-C(:H) grain surfaces in the interstellar medium, in particular the incorporation of atomic oxygen into grain surfaces in epoxide functional groups, is the key to explaining these observations. Thus, the chemistry of cosmic dust is much more intimately related with that of the interstellar gas than has previously been considered. The current models for interstellar gas and dust chemistry will therefore most likely need to be fundamentally modified to include these new grain surface processes.

  2. Quantitative reconstruction of late Holocene surface evolution on an alpine debris-flow fan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schürch, Peter; Densmore, Alexander L.; Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Rosser, Nick J.; Kober, Florian; Schlunegger, Fritz; McArdell, Brian; Alfimov, Vasili

    2016-12-01

    Debris-flow fans form a ubiquitous record of past debris-flow activity in mountainous areas, and may be useful for inferring past flow characteristics and consequent future hazard. Extracting information on past debris flows from fan records, however, requires an understanding of debris-flow deposition and fan surface evolution; field-scale studies of these processes have been very limited. In this paper, we document the patterns and timing of debris-flow deposition on the surface of the large and exceptionally active Illgraben fan in southwestern Switzerland. We use terrain analysis, radiocarbon dating of sediment fill in the Illgraben catchment, and cosmogenic 10Be and 36Cl exposure dating of debris-flow deposits on the fan to constrain the temporal evolution of the sediment routing system in the catchment and on the fan during the past 3200 years. We show that the fan surface preserves a set of debris-flow lobes that were predominantly deposited after the occurrence of a large rock avalanche near the fan apex at about 3200 years ago. This rock avalanche shifted the apex of the fan and impounded sediment within the Illgraben catchment. Subsequent evolution of the fan surface has been governed by both lateral and radial shifts in the active depositional lobe, revealed by the cosmogenic radionuclide dates and by cross-cutting geometrical relationships on the fan surface. This pattern of frequent avulsion and fan surface occupation provides field-scale evidence of the type of large-scale compensatory behavior observed in experimental sediment routing systems.

  3. COUPLING SIMULATION OF SURFACE FLOW AND SUBSURFACE FLOW OVER POROUS MEDIA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Pei-wen; LIU De-fu; SONG Yu-pu

    2004-01-01

    Mathematical model of water flow over porous media is developed, the computer program is compiled ,and an example is given to verify the validity of the model. The results of the calculation show that the model is very useful and worth going further study in practical engineering.

  4. A Level Set Discontinuous Galerkin Method for Free Surface Flows - and Water-Wave Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grooss, Jesper

    2005-01-01

    We present a discontinuous Galerkin method on a fully unstructured grid for the modeling of unsteady incompressible fluid flows with free surfaces. The surface is modeled by a level set technique. We describe the discontinuous Galerkin method in general, and its application to the flow equations....... accurately. We present techniques for reinitialization, and outline the strengths and weaknesses of the level set method. Through a few numerical tests, the robustness and versatility of the proposed scheme is confirmed.......We present a discontinuous Galerkin method on a fully unstructured grid for the modeling of unsteady incompressible fluid flows with free surfaces. The surface is modeled by a level set technique. We describe the discontinuous Galerkin method in general, and its application to the flow equations....... The deferred correction method is applied on the fluid flow equations and show good results in periodic domains. We describe the design of a level set method for the free surface modeling. The level set utilize the high order accurate discontinuous Galerkin method fully and represent smooth surfaces very...

  5. Numerical modeling and simulation of flow through porous fabric surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zheng; Li, Xiaolin

    We designed a numerical scheme to model the permeability of the fabric surface in an incompressible fluid by coupling the projection method with the Ghost Fluid Method in the front tracking framework. The pressure jump condition is obtained by adding a source term to the Poisson's equation in the projection step without modifications on its coefficients. The numerical results suggest that this approach has the ability to reproduce the relationship between pressure drop and relative velocity observed in the experiments. We use this algorithm to study the effects of porosity on the drag force and stability of parachutes during its inflation and deceleration.

  6. Free-surface modelling technology for compressible and violent flows

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Heyns, Johan A

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available of bench-marked test cases FCSCF is compared to a state-of-the-art higher-resolution scheme. II.B. Evaluation of FCSCF FCSCF is evaluated by applying it to a number of benchmark problems presented in literature. To asses the increased accuracy.... In line with the above a new weakly compressible formulation for the volume-of-fluid free-surface mod- elling approach is presented, where after it is evaluated by considering various bench-marked test cases. 9 of 16 American Institute of Aeronautics...

  7. PARTICLE IMAGE VELOCIMETRY MEASUREMENTS IN A REPRESENTATIVE GAS-COOLED PRISMATIC REACTOR CORE MODEL: FLOW IN THE COOLANT CHANNELS AND INTERSTITIAL BYPASS GAPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas E. Conder; Richard Skifton; Ralph Budwig

    2012-11-01

    Core bypass flow is one of the key issues with the prismatic Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor, and it refers to the coolant that navigates through the interstitial, non-cooling passages between the graphite fuel blocks instead of traveling through the designated coolant channels. To determine the bypass flow, a double scale representative model was manufactured and installed in the Matched Index-of-Refraction flow facility; after which, stereo Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) was employed to measure the flow field within. PIV images were analyzed to produce vector maps, and flow rates were calculated by numerically integrating over the velocity field. It was found that the bypass flow varied between 6.9-15.8% for channel Reynolds numbers of 1,746 and 4,618. The results were compared to computational fluid dynamic (CFD) pre-test simulations. When compared to these pretest calculations, the CFD analysis appeared to under predict the flow through the gap.

  8. Nonlinear stability of oscillatory core-annular flow: A generalized Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation with time periodic coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coward, Adrian V.; Papageorgiou, Demetrios T.; Smyrlis, Yiorgos S.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper the nonlinear stability of two-phase core-annular flow in a pipe is examined when the acting pressure gradient is modulated by time harmonic oscillations and viscosity stratification and interfacial tension is present. An exact solution of the Navier-Stokes equations is used as the background state to develop an asymptotic theory valid for thin annular layers, which leads to a novel nonlinear evolution describing the spatio-temporal evolution of the interface. The evolution equation is an extension of the equation found for constant pressure gradients and generalizes the Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation with dispersive effects found by Papageorgiou, Maldarelli & Rumschitzki, Phys. Fluids A 2(3), 1990, pp. 340-352, to a similar system with time periodic coefficients. The distinct regimes of slow and moderate flow are considered and the corresponding evolution is derived. Certain solutions are described analytically in the neighborhood of the first bifurcation point by use of multiple scales asymptotics. Extensive numerical experiments, using dynamical systems ideas, are carried out in order to evaluate the effect of the oscillatory pressure gradient on the solutions in the presence of a constant pressure gradient.

  9. MHD biconvective flow of Powell Eyring nanofluid over stretched surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseem, Faiza; Shafiq, Anum; Zhao, Lifeng; Naseem, Anum

    2017-06-01

    The present work is focused on behavioral characteristics of gyrotactic microorganisms to describe their role in heat and mass transfer in the presence of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) forces in Powell-Eyring nanofluids. Implications concerning stretching sheet with respect to velocity, temperature, nanoparticle concentration and motile microorganism density were explored to highlight influential parameters. Aim of utilizing microorganisms was primarily to stabilize the nanoparticle suspension due to bioconvection generated by the combined effects of buoyancy forces and magnetic field. Influence of Newtonian heating was also analyzed by taking into account thermophoretic mechanism and Brownian motion effects to insinuate series solutions mediated by homotopy analysis method (HAM). Mathematical model captured the boundary layer regime that explicitly involved contemporary non linear partial differential equations converted into the ordinary differential equations. To depict nanofluid flow characteristics, pertinent parameters namely bioconvection Lewis number Lb, traditional Lewis number Le, bioconvection Péclet number Pe, buoyancy ratio parameter Nr, bioconvection Rayleigh number Rb, thermophoresis parameter Nt, Hartmann number M, Grashof number Gr, and Eckert number Ec were computed and analyzed. Results revealed evidence of hydromagnetic bioconvection for microorganism which was represented by graphs and tables. Our findings further show a significant effect of Newtonian heating over a stretching plate by examining the coefficient values of skin friction, local Nusselt number and the local density number. Comparison was made between Newtonian fluid and Powell-Eyring fluid on velocity field and temperature field. Results are compared of with contemporary studies and our findings are found in excellent agreement with these studies.

  10. Simulation of Vapor Flows Between Two Closed Surfaces of Evaporation and Condensation at High Vacuum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张旭斌; 许春建; 周明

    2003-01-01

    The steady multi-component vapor flows between two closed surfaces of evaporation and condensation are investigated numerically by the nonlinear Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook equation. The mathematical model will make it possible to determine the profiles of the process variables between two surfaces of evaporation and condensation if the conditions of evaporation and condensation surfaces are taken into consideration. It is used to simulate the vapor behaviors of the pure dibutylphthalate and the ethylhexyl phthalate-ethylhexyl sebacate mixture. The effects of the liquid composition of the evaporation surface, the evaporation temperature, the condensation temperature and the distance between evaporation and condensation surfaces on the evaporation efficiency and separation factor are discussed.

  11. Measurements of slip length for flows over graphite surface with gas domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dayong; Wang, Yuliang; Pan, Yunlu; Zhao, Xuezeng

    2016-10-01

    We present the measurements of slip lengths for the flows of purified water over graphite surface covered with surface nanobubbles or nano/micropancakes, which can be produced after using high temperature water to replace low temperature water. The slip length values measured on bare graphite surface, nano/micropancake or nanobubble covered graphite surfaces are about 8 nm, 27 nm, and 63 nm, respectively. Our results indicate that the gaseous domains formed at the solid-liquid interface, including surface nanobubbles and nano/micropancakes, could act as a lubricant and significantly increase slip length.

  12. INVESTIGATION ON THERMAL-FLOW CHARACTERISTICS OF HTGR CORE USING THERMIX-KONVEK MODULE AND VSOP'94 CODE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudarmono Sudarmono

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The failure of heat removal system of water-cooled reactor such as PWR in Three Mile Islands and Fukushima Daiichi BWR makes nuclear society starting to consider the use of high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR. Reactor Physics and Technology Division – Center for Nuclear Reactor Safety and Technology  (PTRKN has tasks to perform research and development on the conceptual design of cogeneration gas cooled reactor with medium power level of 200 MWt. HTGR is one of nuclear energy generation system, which has high energy efficiency, and has high and clean inherent safety level. The geometry and structure of the HTGR200 core are designed to produce the output of helium gas coolant temperature as high as 950 °C to be used for hydrogen production and other industrial processes in co-generative way. The output of very high temperature helium gas will cause thermal stress on the fuel pebble that threats the integrity of fission product confinement. Therefore, it is necessary to perform thermal-flow evaluation to determine the temperature distribution in the graphite and fuel pebble in the HTGR core. The evaluation was carried out by Thermix-Konvek module code that has been already integrated into VSOP'94 code. The HTGR core geometry was done using BIRGIT module code for 2-D model (RZ model with 5 channels of pebble flow in active core in the radial direction. The evaluation results showed that the highest and lowest temperatures in the reactor core are 999.3 °C and 886.5 °C, while the highest temperature of TRISO UO2 is 1510.20 °C in the position (z= 335.51 cm; r=0 cm. The analysis done based on reactor condition of 120 kg/s of coolant mass flow rate, 7 MPa of pressure and 200 MWth of power. Compared to the temperature distribution resulted between VSOP’94 code and fuel temperature limitation as high as 1600 oC, there is enough safety margin from melting or disintegrating. Keywords: Thermal-Flow, VSOP’94, Thermix-Konvek, HTGR, temperature

  13. Surface mass balance and water stable isotopes derived from firn cores on three ice rises, Fimbul Ice Shelf, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Carmen P.; Schlosser, Elisabeth; Divine, Dmitry V.; Kohler, Jack; Martma, Tõnu; Eichler, Anja; Schwikowski, Margit; Isaksson, Elisabeth

    2016-11-01

    Three shallow firn cores were retrieved in the austral summers of 2011/12 and 2013/14 on the ice rises Kupol Ciolkovskogo (KC), Kupol Moskovskij (KM), and Blåskimen Island (BI), all part of Fimbul Ice Shelf (FIS) in western Dronning Maud Land (DML), Antarctica. The cores were dated back to 1958 (KC), 1995 (KM), and 1996 (BI) by annual layer counting using high-resolution oxygen isotope (δ18O) data, and by identifying volcanic horizons using non-sea-salt sulfate (nssSO42-) data. The water stable isotope records show that the atmospheric signature of the annual snow accumulation cycle is well preserved in the firn column, especially at KM and BI. We are able to determine the annual surface mass balance (SMB), as well as the mean SMB values between identified volcanic horizons. Average SMB at the KM and BI sites (0.68 and 0.70 mw. e. yr-1) was higher than at the KC site (0.24 mw. e. yr-1), and there was greater temporal variability as well. Trends in the SMB and δ18O records from the KC core over the period of 1958-2012 agree well with other previously investigated cores in the area, thus the KC site could be considered the most representative of the climate of the region. Cores from KM and BI appear to be more affected by local meteorological conditions and surface topography. Our results suggest that the ice rises are suitable sites for the retrieval of longer firn and ice cores, but that BI has the best preserved seasonal cycles of the three records and is thus the most optimal site for high-resolution studies of temporal variability of the climate signal. Deuterium excess data suggest a possible effect of seasonal moisture transport changes on the annual isotopic signal. In agreement with previous studies, large-scale atmospheric circulation patterns most likely provide the dominant influence on water stable isotope ratios preserved at the core sites.

  14. Influences of the Exhaust Flow on the Boundary Layer Flow on the Wafer Surface in Spin Coating System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Seiichi KIMURA; Mizue MUNEKATA; Hiroaki KURISHIMA; Kazuyoshi MATSUZAKI; Hideki OHBA

    2005-01-01

    @@ Recently, development of high technology has been required for the formation of thin uniform film in manufacturing processes of semiconductor as the semiconductor become more sophisticated. Spin coating is usually used for spreading photoresist on a wafer surface. However, since rotating speed of the disk is very high in spin coating, the dropped resist scatters outward and reattaches to the film surface. So, the scattered resist is removed by the exhaust flow generated at the gap between the wafer edge and the catch cup. It is seriously concemed that the stripes called Ekman spiral vortices appears on the disk in the case of high rotating speed and the film thickness increases near the wafer edge in the case of low rotating speed, because it prevent the formation of uniform film. The purpose of this study is to make clear the generation mechanism of Ekman spiral vortices and the influence of exhaust flow on it. Moreover the influence of the catch cup geometry on the wafer surface boundary layer flow is investigated.

  15. Effect of surface conditioning techniques on the resistance of resin composite core materials on titanium posts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akisli, [No Value; Ozcan, M; Nergiz, [No Value

    2003-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluated the resistance of various post and core materials against torsional forces on differently conditioned titanium posts. Method and materials: One hundred fifty pure titanium posts (DIN 17850-Ti4/3.7065) were conditioned utilizing Silicoater Classical, Silicoater MD,

  16. Effect of surface conditioning techniques on the resistance of resin composite core materials on titanium posts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akisli, [No Value; Ozcan, M; Nergiz, [No Value

    2003-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluated the resistance of various post and core materials against torsional forces on differently conditioned titanium posts. Method and materials: One hundred fifty pure titanium posts (DIN 17850-Ti4/3.7065) were conditioned utilizing Silicoater Classical, Silicoater MD, Roc

  17. Preparation of Multifunctional Fe@Au Core-Shell Nanoparticles with Surface Grafting as a Potential Treatment for Magnetic Hyperthermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ren-Jei Chung

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron core gold shell nanoparticles grafted with Methotrexate (MTX and indocyanine green (ICG were synthesized for the first time in this study, and preliminarily evaluated for their potential in magnetic hyperthermia treatment. The core-shell Fe@Au nanoparticles were prepared via the microemulsion process and then grafted with MTX and ICG using hydrolyzed poly(styrene-alt-maleic acid (PSMA to obtain core-shell Fe@Au-PSMA-ICG/MTX nanoparticles. MTX is an anti-cancer therapeutic, and ICG is a fluorescent dye. XRD, TEM, FTIR and UV-Vis spectrometry were performed to characterize the nanoparticles. The data indicated that the average size of the nanoparticles was 6.4 ± 09 nm and that the Au coating protected the Fe core from oxidation. MTX and ICG were successfully grafted onto the surface of the nanoparticles. Under exposure to high frequency induction waves, the superparamagnetic nanoparticles elevated the temperature of a solution in a few minutes, which suggested the potential for an application in magnetic hyperthermia treatment. The in vitro studies verified that the nanoparticles were biocompatible; nonetheless, the Fe@Au-PSMA-ICG/MTX nanoparticles killed cancer cells (Hep-G2 via the magnetic hyperthermia mechanism and the release of MTX.

  18. The Hydroelastic Response of a Flexible Surface-Piercing Strut in Wetted, Ventilated, and Cavitating Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwood, Casey; Ward, Jacob; Young, Yin Lu; Felli, Mario; Falchi, Massimo; Ceccio, Steven

    2016-11-01

    High-speed and highly loaded lifting surfaces are prone to ventilation and cavitation. Increasing use of compliant materials (e.g. composites) in such systems necessitates a better understanding of the fluid-structure interactions of lifting surfaces in multiphase flow. Experiments on a flexible surface-piercing hydrofoil have been performed in a towing tank and a free-surface cavitation tunnel. The objectives are (i) to demonstrate the effects of material compliance upon hydrodynamic performance and stability of multiphase flow regimes, and (ii) to quantify the effects of multiphase flow upon the structural response and hydroelastic stability of flexible lifting bodies. A non-optical shape-sensing method is developed, which permits 3D bending and twisting deformations of the hydrofoil to be accurately inferred. The effects of the foil's compliance on hydrodynamic loads, structural motions and flow regimes are discussed. Partial immersion of the hydrofoil causes a mode-dependent change in added-mass that can encourage coalescence of higher modes. At the same time, increasing flow speed and ventilated flow decrease the damping associated with certain modes. Unsteady cavity shedding modulates the system parameters, causing a broadening of the frequency response. The authors would like to acknowledge the support of Dr. Ki-Han Kim under ONR Grant Number N00014-13-1-0383 and N00014-16-1-2433.

  19. The dynamic response of hyporheic zone redox zonation after surface flow perturbation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, M.; Zheng, L.; Cardenas, M. B.

    2015-12-01

    As water in a stream or river flows over ripples and other bedforms, differential surface pressures create bedform-induced hyporheic exchange. The oxygen, carbon, and nutrients carried into the bed by the surface water as well as those already existing in the bed material form the basis for microbial communities in the sediment.The resulting dissolved oxygen conditions are a critical control on the ecological function of the hyporheic zone (HZ), from both micro- and macro-biological habitat perspectives. Because hyporheic exchange rates are controlled by surface flow velocity, variations in surface flow have significant impact on the subsurface oxygen conditions. Most rivers are subject to flow velocity variations due to natural forcing including precipitation and variations in evapotranspiration as well as anthropogenic forces like dam releases. We use a large (10m x 0.7m x 0.3m) programmable flume instrumented with a bedform-scale high-resolution planar optode dissolved oxygen imaging system to observe the distribution of oxygenated sediment within the HZ over time. Using this system we characterize the rate at which hyporheic oxygen conditions reconfigure in response to changes in the surface flow velocity, particularly the time it takes for conditions to recover after a pulse of increased flow velocity. In addition, we make use of numerical models to further identify critical response time drivers. With these tools, we develop equations to describe the post-disturbance recovery time as a function of relative pulse magnitude and duration. Using these equations we can predict the time scale over which the hyporheic zone will recover following both natural and anthropogenic flow regime disturbances. Being able to predict the magnitude and duration of dissolved oxygen changes in the wake of flow perturbing events allows us to better understand the impact these disturbances have on the ecology of the hyporheic zone.

  20. Tsunami-induced force and surface pressure on multiple rectangular buildings in an unsteady free-surface channel flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahmanpour, Alireza; Eames, Ian

    2016-11-01

    We study the flow around multiple rectangular obstacles in an unsteady free-surface channel flow using a combination of mathematical models, computations and experiments. The unsteady flow is triggered by a dam-break. The total drag force and surface pressure distribution on the obstacles are examined. The height and length of the building are fixed; the influence of initial water height and blocking ratio b / w is studied. The force scalings are confirmed from the computational analysis and found to be consistent with the experimental results. The effects of the additional buildings on the total drag force are noted and compared against the case of a single building. Increasing the number of buildings as well as the blocking ratio results in the water to inundate further onshore. The pressure distribution on the individual surfaces are analyzed and shown to vary linearly with height from the building base and dominated by the hydrostatic component. We summarize the results in terms of a new Fr - b / w regime diagram and explain how the force on buildings subject to an unsteady flow can be estimated from the upstream velocity and water height. We would like to thank HR Wallingford for their continued support in funding the project.

  1. Photonic crystal fiber-based surface plasmon resonance sensor with selective analyte channels and graphene-silver deposited core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rifat, Ahmmed A; Mahdiraji, G Amouzad; Chow, Desmond M; Shee, Yu Gang; Ahmed, Rajib; Adikan, Faisal Rafiq Mahamd

    2015-05-19

    We propose a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor based on photonic crystal fiber (PCF) with selectively filled analyte channels. Silver is used as the plasmonic material to accurately detect the analytes and is coated with a thin graphene layer to prevent oxidation. The liquid-filled cores are placed near to the metallic channel for easy excitation of free electrons to produce surface plasmon waves (SPWs). Surface plasmons along the metal surface are excited with a leaky Gaussian-like core guided mode. Numerical investigations of the fiber's properties and sensing performance are performed using the finite element method (FEM). The proposed sensor shows maximum amplitude sensitivity of 418 Refractive Index Units (RIU-1) with resolution as high as 2.4 × 10(-5) RIU. Using the wavelength interrogation method, a maximum refractive index (RI) sensitivity of 3000 nm/RIU in the sensing range of 1.46-1.49 is achieved. The proposed sensor is suitable for detecting various high RI chemicals, biochemical and organic chemical analytes. Additionally, the effects of fiber structural parameters on the properties of plasmonic excitation are investigated and optimized for sensing performance as well as reducing the sensor's footprint.

  2. Photonic Crystal Fiber-Based Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensor with Selective Analyte Channels and Graphene-Silver Deposited Core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmmed A. Rifat

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We propose a surface plasmon resonance (SPR sensor based on photonic crystal fiber (PCF with selectively filled analyte channels. Silver is used as the plasmonic material to accurately detect the analytes and is coated with a thin graphene layer to prevent oxidation. The liquid-filled cores are placed near to the metallic channel for easy excitation of free electrons to produce surface plasmon waves (SPWs. Surface plasmons along the metal surface are excited with a leaky Gaussian-like core guided mode. Numerical investigations of the fiber’s properties and sensing performance are performed using the finite element method (FEM. The proposed sensor shows maximum amplitude sensitivity of 418 Refractive Index Units (RIU−1 with resolution as high as 2.4 × 10−5 RIU. Using the wavelength interrogation method, a maximum refractive index (RI sensitivity of 3000 nm/RIU in the sensing range of 1.46–1.49 is achieved. The proposed sensor is suitable for detecting various high RI chemicals, biochemical and organic chemical analytes. Additionally, the effects of fiber structural parameters on the properties of plasmonic excitation are investigated and optimized for sensing performance as well as reducing the sensor’s footprint.

  3. The effect of surface plasmon resonance on optical response in dielectric (core)–metal (shell) nanoparticles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Farjami Shayesteh; Matin Saie

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we present the effect of refractive index of an embedding medium, core and shell having various sizes of metallic nanoshells on the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) properties in the spherical dielectric–metal core–shell nanoparticles based on the quasistatic approaches and Mie theory. For the metallic nanoshell with dimensions comparable to the wavelength of light, the quasistatic approximation shows good agreement with the Mie theory results. However, for large nanoparticles the quasistatic approximation is not appropriate and Mie theory illustrates SPR due to dipole and quadrupole in extinction cross-section. The typical cross-section calculations show two peaks that related to inner and outer surfaces. The dimensional dependence of optical constant in the Drude model leads to a decrease in plasma absorption in metal core–shell. By increasing the shell radius and therefore increasing the metal content the SPR at the outer surface shifts to higher energy and the weaker peak (at inner surface) shifts to lower energy. Also, depending on the metal shell materials SPR occurs in different energy regions and therefore can be tuned the SP frequency at higher energy by changing the shell materials. In addition, SPR frequency is sensitive to variation in refractive index of the environment of core-shell.

  4. Photonic Crystal Fiber-Based Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensor with Selective Analyte Channels and Graphene-Silver Deposited Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rifat, Ahmmed A.; Mahdiraji, G. Amouzad; Chow, Desmond M.; Shee, Yu Gang; Ahmed, Rajib; Adikan, Faisal Rafiq Mahamd

    2015-01-01

    We propose a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor based on photonic crystal fiber (PCF) with selectively filled analyte channels. Silver is used as the plasmonic material to accurately detect the analytes and is coated with a thin graphene layer to prevent oxidation. The liquid-filled cores are placed near to the metallic channel for easy excitation of free electrons to produce surface plasmon waves (SPWs). Surface plasmons along the metal surface are excited with a leaky Gaussian-like core guided mode. Numerical investigations of the fiber’s properties and sensing performance are performed using the finite element method (FEM). The proposed sensor shows maximum amplitude sensitivity of 418 Refractive Index Units (RIU−1) with resolution as high as 2.4 × 10−5 RIU. Using the wavelength interrogation method, a maximum refractive index (RI) sensitivity of 3000 nm/RIU in the sensing range of 1.46–1.49 is achieved. The proposed sensor is suitable for detecting various high RI chemicals, biochemical and organic chemical analytes. Additionally, the effects of fiber structural parameters on the properties of plasmonic excitation are investigated and optimized for sensing performance as well as reducing the sensor’s footprint. PMID:25996510

  5. A bacterial glycan core linked to surface (S)-layer proteins modulates host immunity through Th17 suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settem, R P; Honma, K; Nakajima, T; Phansopa, C; Roy, S; Stafford, G P; Sharma, A

    2013-03-01

    Tannerella forsythia is a pathogen implicated in periodontitis, an inflammatory disease of the tooth-supporting tissues often leading to tooth loss. This key periodontal pathogen is decorated with a unique glycan core O-glycosidically linked to the bacterium's proteinaceous surface (S)-layer lattice and other glycoproteins. Herein, we show that the terminal motif of this glycan core acts to modulate dendritic cell effector functions to suppress T-helper (Th)17 responses. In contrast to the wild-type bacterial strain, infection with a mutant strain lacking the complete S-layer glycan core induced robust Th17 and reduced periodontal bone loss in mice. Our findings demonstrate that surface glycosylation of this pathogen may act to ensure its persistence in the host likely through suppression of Th17 responses. In addition, our data suggest that the bacterium then induces the Toll-like receptor 2-Th2 inflammatory axis that has previously been shown to cause bone destruction. Our study provides a biological basis for pathogenesis and opens opportunities in exploiting bacterial glycans as therapeutic targets against periodontitis and a range of other infectious diseases.

  6. Evolution of material surfaces in the temporal transition in channel flow

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Yaomin; Chen, Shiyi

    2016-01-01

    We report a Lagrangian study on the evolution of material surfaces in the K-type temporal transitional channel flow. Based on the Eulerian velocity field from the DNS, a backward-particle-tracking method is applied to solve the transport equation of the Lagrangian scalar field, and then the iso-surfaces of the Lagrangian field can be extracted as material surfaces in the evolution. Three critical issues for Lagrangian investigations on the evolution of coherent structures using material surfaces are addressed. First, the initial scalar field is uniquely determined based on proposed criteria, so that the initial material surfaces can be approximated as vortex surfaces, and keep invariant in the initial laminar state. Second, the evolution of typical material surfaces initially from different wall distances is presented, and then the influential material surface with the maximum deformation is identified. Large vorticity variations with the maximum curvature growth of vortex lines are also observed on this surf...

  7. Retention/Diffusivity Studies in Free-Surface Flowing Liquid Lithium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.A. Stubbers; G.H. Miley; M. Nieto; W. Olczak; D.N. Ruzic; A. Hassanein

    2004-12-14

    FLIRE was designed to measure the hydrogen and helium retention and diffusivity in a flowing stream of liquid lithium, and it has accomplished these goals. Retention coefficients for helium in the flowing liquid stream were 0.1-2% for flow speeds of 44 cm/s and implantation energies between 500 and 2000 eV. The energy dependence of retention is linear for the energy range considered, as expected, and the dependence of retention on flow velocity fits the expected square-root of flow speed dependence. Estimates of the helium diffusion coefficient in the flowing lithium stream were {approx} 4 x 10{sup -7} cm{sup 2}/s, and are independent of implantation energy. This value is much lower than expected, which could be due to several factors, such as mixing, bubble formation or surface film formation. In the case of hydrogen, long term retention and release mechanisms are of greatest importance, since this relates to tritium inventory in flowing lithium PFCs for fusion applications. The amount of hydride formation was measured for flowing lithium exposed to neutral deuterium gas. Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) measurements indicate that the hydride concentration was between 0.1 and 0.2% over a wide range of pressures (6.5 x 10{sup -5} to 1 Torr). This result implies that the deuterium absorption rate is limited by the surface dissociation rate, since deuterium (hydrogen/tritium) is absorbed in its atomic form, not its molecular form.

  8. Core-level spectroscopy investigation of the Mo{sub 0.75}Re{sub 0.25}(100) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyman, P.F.; Zehner, D.M.

    1993-10-01

    Preferential surface segregation in the Mo{sub 0.75}(100) surface region was investigated using high-resolution core-level spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation. The magnitude and direction of the surface core-level shifts observed in this study can be qualitatively understood by comparison to W and Mo core-level shifts. Measured core-level intensities are found to be consistent with the segregation of Mo to the surface of the alloy, with an enrichment of Re in the second layer (as found in previous investigations). It is inferred that both Tc and Os will segregate to the Mo{sub 0.75}Re{sub 0.25}(100) surface.

  9. Lubricant-impregnated surfaces for drag reduction in viscous laminar flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Brian; Khalil, Karim; Varanasi, Kripa; MIT Team

    2013-11-01

    For the first time, we explore the potential of lubricant impregnated surfaces (LIS) in reducing drag. LIS, inspired by the surface of the Nepenthes pitcher plant, have been introduced as a novel way of functionalizing a surface. LIS are characterized by extremely low contact angle hysteresis and have been show to effectively repel various liquids including water, oils, ketchup and blood. Motivated by the slippery nature of such surfaces, we explore the potential of LIS to reduce drag in internal flows. We observe a reduction in drag for LIS surfaces in a viscous laminar drag flow and model the impact of relevant system parameters (lubricant viscosity, working fluid viscosity, solid fraction, depth of texture, etc.).

  10. Boundary layer flow near a stagnation point on a permeable vertical surface immersed in a nanofluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Noor Adila; Yacob, Nor Azizah; Bachok, Norfifah; Ramli, Nazirah; Ishak, Anuar

    2015-10-01

    A steady mixed convection boundary layer flow near a stagnation point on a permeable vertical surface immersed in a nanofluid is investigated. The velocity of the external flow is assumed to vary linearly with the distance from the stagnation-point. The governing partial differential equations are first transformed into ordinary differential equations, before being solved numerically using the Keller box method with the help of MATLAB software. The effects of physical parameters such as the suction/injection parameter, Brownian motion parameter, thermophoresis parameter and Lewis number on the heat and mass transfer rate at the surface as well as the temperature and concentration profiles are analyzed and discussed. Both assisting and opposing flows are considered. It is found that, increasing the thermophoresis parameter, Brownian motion parameter and Lewis number are to decrease the heat transfer rate at the surface, but on the other hand increase the mass transfer rate at the surface for both assisting and opposing flows. In addition, increasing suction parameter tends to increase the heat transfer rate at the surface. However, the opposite behavior occurs for the effect of mass transfer rate at the surface.

  11. Asteroseismic measurement of slow, nearly uniform surface-to-core rotation in the main-sequence F star KIC 9244992

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saio, Hideyuki; Kurtz, Donald W.; Takata, Masao;

    2015-01-01

    We have found a rotationally split series of core g-mode triplets and surface p-mode multiplets in a main-sequence F star, KIC 9244992. Comparison with models shows that the star has a mass of about 1.45 M-circle dot, and is at an advanced stage of main-sequence evolution in which the central......, obtained from p-mode splittings, is 66 d, slightly slower than the rotation of 64 d in the core, measured by g-mode splittings. KIC 9244992 is similar to KIC 11145123 in that both are near the end of main-sequence stage with very slow and nearly uniform rotation. This indicates the angular momentum...

  12. The Effect Of Core Polarization On The Population Of The Rydberg States Of ArVIII Ions Escaping Solid Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galijas, S. M. D.; Nedeljkovic, N. N.; Majkic, M. D.; Bunjac, A. B.

    2010-07-01

    The appearance of maxima at nA = nmax in the population distributions for the Rydberg states of multiply charged ions ArVIII escaping solid surfaces at intermediate velocities ( v ˜1 a.u.) is discussed. Within the framework of the time-symmetrized two-state vector model, in which the state of a single active electron is described by two wave functions 1 ? and 2 ? , the regular maxima appear as a consequence of the electron tunneling through the potential barrier created between the ionic core and the polarized solid. The pronounced peaks (resonances) in the population distributions are addressed to the electron tunneling in the vicinity of the potential barrier top. The appropriate etalon equation method is used in the calculation of the function 1 ? ; the effect of core polarization is expressed via the function ?2.

  13. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON THE RELATION OF BED MORPHOLOGY WITH SURFACE FLOW IN MEANDER CHANNELS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Alternate bars have the property that they migrate downstream whenever floods occur. However,in meander channels whose bend angles are larger than a critical value, the migration of bars can be suppressed, and the positions of bank erosion and flood attack also will be steady. In this study, the bed morphology in flume channels with bends of various lengths and angles is investigated at various flow discharges, and the relation of bed morphology to surface flow is investigated in detail using fluid measuring software. An effort is made to obtain guidelines for the plane shape design of meander channels. Based on the experimental results of bed topography and measurement of surface flow direction and velocity distribution, from the viewpoint of bank erosion and the concentration and dispersion of flood flow the most suitable plane shape for meandering channels is suggested through which the migration of alternate bars is suppressed.

  14. Surface heat transfer and flow properties of vortex arrays induced artificially and from centrifugal instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, C. S.; Ligrani, P. M.; Tuzzolo, M. F.

    1992-01-01

    The paper presents and compares fluid-flow and heat transfer properties from artificially induced vortices in a flat-plate turbulent boundary layer and naturally occurring vortices due to centrifugal instabilities in a curved-channel laminar flow. Pairs and arrays of vortices are artificially induced by placing half-delta wings on the plate surface. With both arrays and pairs of vortices, streamwise velocities and total pressures are high, and surface heat transfer is locally augmented in vortex downwash regions. In contrast to vortices in the arrays vortices in the pairs tend to move in the streamwise direction with significant divergence (when the common flow between pair is toward the wall) or convergence (when the common flow between pair is away from the wall). The vortices in the arrays cause maximum peak-to-peak heat transfer variations of up to 12 percent of local spanwise-averaged values for initial vortex spacings between 1 to 2.5 generator heights.

  15. NARROW-DISPERSED CROSSLINKED CORE-SHELL POLYMER MICROSPHERES PREPARED BY SURFACE-INITIATED ATOM TRANSFER RADICAL POLYMERIZATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-zeng Zhao; Xin-lin Yang; Feng Bai; Wen-qiang Huang

    2005-01-01

    Grafting of polystyrene with narrowly dispersed polymer microspheres through surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) was investigated. Polydivinylbenzene (PDVB) microspheres were prepared by dispersion polymerization with poly(N-vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP) as stabilizer. The surfaces of PDVB microspheres were chloromethylated by chloromethyl methyl ether in the presence of zinc chloride as catalyst to form chloromethylbenzene initiating core sites for subsequent ATRP grafting of styrene using CuC1/bpy as catalytic system. Polystyrene was found to be grafted not only from the particle surfaces but also from within a thin shell layer, resulting in the formation of particles size increased from 2.38-2.58 μm, which can further grow to 2.93 μm during secondary grafting polymerization of styrene. This demonstrates that grafting polymerization proceeds through a typical ATRP procedure with living nature. All of the prepared microspheres have narrow particle size distribution with coefficient of variation around 10%.

  16. Photoluminescence effects of graphitic core size and surface functional groups in carbon dots: COO− induced red-shift emission

    KAUST Repository

    Hola, Katerina

    2014-04-01

    We present a simple molecular approach to control the lipophilic/ hydrophilic nature of photoluminescent carbon dots (CDs) based on pyrolysis of alkyl gallate precursors. Depending on the gallic acid derivative used, CDs with different alkyl groups (methyl, propyl, lauryl) on the surface can be obtained by isothermal heating at 270 C. This precursor-derived approach allows not only the control of lipophilicity but also the length of the particular alkyl chain enables the control over both the size and photoluminescence (PL) of the prepared CDs. Moreover, the alkyl chains on the CDs surface can be readily converted to carboxylate groups via a mild base hydrolysis to obtain water dispersible CDs with a record biocompatibility. The observed differences in PL properties of CDs and time-resolved PL data, including contributions from carbogenic cores and surface functional group, are rationalized and discussed in detail using time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A wind tunnel study of flows over idealised urban surfaces with roughness sublayer corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Yat-Kiu; Liu, Chun-Ho

    2016-08-01

    Dynamics in the roughness (RSLs) and inertial (ISLs) sublayers in the turbulent boundary layers (TBLs) over idealised urban surfaces are investigated analytically and experimentally. In this paper, we derive an analytical solution to the mean velocity profile, which is a continuous function applicable to both RSL and ISL, over rough surfaces in isothermal conditions. Afterwards, a modified mixing-length model for RSL/ISL transport is developed that elucidates how surface roughness affects the turbulence motions. A series of wind tunnel experiments are conducted to measure the vertical profiles of mean and fluctuating velocities, together with momentum flux over various configurations of surface-mounted ribs in cross flows using hot-wire anemometry (HWA). The analytical solution agrees well with the wind tunnel result that improves the estimate to mean velocity profile over urban surfaces and TBL dynamics as well. The thicknesses of RSL and ISL are calculated by monitoring the convergence/divergence between the temporally averaged and spatio-temporally averaged profiles of momentum flux. It is found that the height of RSL/ISL interface is a function of surface roughness. Examining the direct, physical influence of roughness elements on near-surface RSL flows reveals that the TBL flows over rough surfaces exhibit turbulence motions of two different length scales which are functions of the RSL and ISL structure. Conclusively, given a TBL, the rougher the surface, the higher is the RSL intruding upward that would thinner the ISL up to 50 %. Therefore, the conventional ISL log-law approximation to TBL flows over urban surfaces should be applied with caution.

  18. NUMERICAL STUDY OF THE INFLUENCE OF SURFACE ROUGHNESS OF CYLINDER ON FLOW STRUCTURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, the influence of surface roughness on flow structure was numerically studied.An adaptive numerical method, the fast vortex method was employed.A mathematical roughness, which comes from the no-slip condition of vortex method, was introduced.The numerical results indicate that the roughness has appreciable influence on the flow structure.The vortex shedding could be controlled if the forward multi-layer boundary condition is exerted.

  19. Magnetohydrodynamic viscous flow over a nonlinearly moving surface: Closed-form solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Tiegang

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow over a nonlinearly (power-law velocity) moving surface is investigated analytically and solutions are presented for a few special conditions. The solutions are obtained in closed forms with hyperbolic functions. The effects of the magnetic, the wall moving, and the mass transpiration parameters are discussed. These solutions are important to show the flow physics as well as to be used as bench mark problems for numerical validation and development of new solution schemes.

  20. NUMERICAL ANALYSIS OF SATURATED-UNSATURATED SEEPAGE FLOW IN FRACTURED ROCK MASS DUE TO SURFACE INFILTRATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Seepage flow in fractured rock mass due to surface infiltration is a saturated-unsaturated seepage process. Aimed at rock mass with large fracture density, which can be equivalent to continuum, a mathematical model for saturated-unsaturated seepage flow in fractured rock mass due to surface infiltration was established in this paper. The Galerkin finite element method was used in numerical simulation and a finite element program used to calculate saturated-unsaturated seepage flow due to surface infiltration was worked out. A model experiment was employed examine the reasonableness of the program. The results show that the proposed model and program are reasonable. The application of the analysis method in this paper in an engineering project shows that the method is reliable and feasible.