WorldWideScience

Sample records for core protein interacts

  1. Packing in protein cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaines, J. C.; Clark, A. H.; Regan, L.; O'Hern, C. S.

    2017-07-01

    Proteins are biological polymers that underlie all cellular functions. The first high-resolution protein structures were determined by x-ray crystallography in the 1960s. Since then, there has been continued interest in understanding and predicting protein structure and stability. It is well-established that a large contribution to protein stability originates from the sequestration from solvent of hydrophobic residues in the protein core. How are such hydrophobic residues arranged in the core; how can one best model the packing of these residues, and are residues loosely packed with multiple allowed side chain conformations or densely packed with a single allowed side chain conformation? Here we show that to properly model the packing of residues in protein cores it is essential that amino acids are represented by appropriately calibrated atom sizes, and that hydrogen atoms are explicitly included. We show that protein cores possess a packing fraction of φ ≈ 0.56 , which is significantly less than the typically quoted value of 0.74 obtained using the extended atom representation. We also compare the results for the packing of amino acids in protein cores to results obtained for jammed packings from discrete element simulations of spheres, elongated particles, and composite particles with bumpy surfaces. We show that amino acids in protein cores pack as densely as disordered jammed packings of particles with similar values for the aspect ratio and bumpiness as found for amino acids. Knowing the structural properties of protein cores is of both fundamental and practical importance. Practically, it enables the assessment of changes in the structure and stability of proteins arising from amino acid mutations (such as those identified as a result of the massive human genome sequencing efforts) and the design of new folded, stable proteins and protein-protein interactions with tunable specificity and affinity.

  2. TRF2 Protein Interacts with Core Histones to Stabilize Chromosome Ends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konishi, Akimitsu; Izumi, Takashi; Shimizu, Shigeomi

    2016-09-23

    Mammalian chromosome ends are protected by a specialized nucleoprotein complex called telomeres. Both shelterin, a telomere-specific multi-protein complex, and higher order telomeric chromatin structures combine to stabilize the chromosome ends. Here, we showed that TRF2, a component of shelterin, binds to core histones to protect chromosome ends from inappropriate DNA damage response and loss of telomeric DNA. The N-terminal Gly/Arg-rich domain (GAR domain) of TRF2 directly binds to the globular domain of core histones. The conserved arginine residues in the GAR domain of TRF2 are required for this interaction. A TRF2 mutant with these arginine residues substituted by alanine lost the ability to protect telomeres and induced rapid telomere shortening caused by the cleavage of a loop structure of the telomeric chromatin. These findings showed a previously unnoticed interaction between the shelterin complex and nucleosomal histones to stabilize the chromosome ends. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Interaction of mitoxantrone, as an anticancer drug, with chromatin proteins, core histones and H1, in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajihassan, Zahra; Rabbani-Chadegani, Azra

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, for the first time we have investigated the interaction of anticancer drug mitoxantrone with histone H1 and core histone proteins in solution using fluorescence, UV/Vis, CD spectroscopy and thermal denaturation techniques. The results showed that mitoxantrone reduced the absorbencies of H1 and core histone proteins at 210 nm (hypochromicity) and fluorescence emission intensity was decreased in a dose dependent. Binding of mitoxantrone changed secondary structures of the proteins as circular dichroism analysis confirmed it. Also, mitoxantrone increased the melting temperature of core histones at the final step of denaturation. The results suggest higher affinity of mitoxantrone to histone H1 compared to core histones providing histone proteins as a new target for mitoxantrone action at the chromatin level. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Requirement of cellular DDX3 for hepatitis C virus replication is unrelated to its interaction with the viral core protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angus, Allan G N; Dalrymple, David; Boulant, Steeve; McGivern, David R; Clayton, Reginald F; Scott, Martin J; Adair, Richard; Graham, Susan; Owsianka, Ania M; Targett-Adams, Paul; Li, Kui; Wakita, Takaji; McLauchlan, John; Lemon, Stanley M; Patel, Arvind H

    2010-01-01

    The cellular DEAD-box protein DDX3 was recently shown to be essential for hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication. Prior to that, we had reported that HCV core binds to DDX3 in yeast-two hybrid and transient transfection assays. Here, we confirm by co-immunoprecipitation that this interaction occurs in cells replicating the JFH1 virus. Consistent with this result, immunofluorescence staining of infected cells revealed a dramatic redistribution of cytoplasmic DDX3 by core protein to the virus assembly sites around lipid droplets. Given this close association of DDX3 with core and lipid droplets, and its involvement in virus replication, we investigated the importance of this host factor in the virus life cycle. Mutagenesis studies located a single amino acid in the N-terminal domain of JFH1 core that when changed to alanine significantly abrogated this interaction. Surprisingly, this mutation did not alter infectious virus production and RNA replication, indicating that the core-DDX3 interaction is dispensable in the HCV life cycle. Consistent with previous studies, siRNA-led knockdown of DDX3 lowered virus production and RNA replication levels of both WT JFH1 and the mutant virus unable to bind DDX3. Thus, our study shows for the first time that the requirement of DDX3 for HCV replication is unrelated to its interaction with the viral core protein.

  5. Interaction between hepatitis C virus core protein and translin protein- a possible molecular mechanism for hepatocellular carcinoma and lymphoma caused by hepatitis C virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke Li; Gang Wang; Li Li; Ju-Mei Chen; Lin Wang; Jun Cheng; Yin-Ying Lu; Ling-Xin Zhang; Jin-Song Mu; Yuan Hong; Yan Liu; Hui-Juan Duan

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the interaction between hepatitis C viruscore protein and translin protein and its role in thepathogenensis of hepatocellular carcinoma and lymphoma.METHODS: With the components of the yeast two hybridsystem 3, "bait" plasmids of HCV core the gene wasconstructed. After proving that hepatitis C virus core proteincould be firmly expressed in AH109 yeast strains, yeast two-hybrid screening was performed by mating AH109 with Y187that transformed with liver cDNA library plasmids - pACT2and then plated on quadrople dropout (QDO) medium andthen assayed for α-gal activity. Sequencing analysis of thegenes of library plasmids in yeast colonies that could growon QDO with α-gal activity was performed. The interactionbetween HCV core protein and the protein we obtained frompositive colony was further confirmed by repeating yeasttwo - hybrid analysis and coimmunoprecipitation in vitro.RESULTS: A gene from a positive colony was the gene oftranslin, a recombination hotspot binding protein. Theinteraction between HCV core protein and translin proteincould be proved not only in yeast, but also in vitro.CONCLUSION: The core protein of HCV can interact withtranslin protein. This can partly explain the molecularmechanism for hepatocellular carcinoma and lymphomacaused by HCV.

  6. Screening and identification of interacting proteins with hepatitis B virus core protein in leukocytes and cloning of new gene C1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-Mei Lin; Jun Cheng; Yin-Ying Lu; Shu-Lin Zhang; Qian Yang; Tian-Yan Chen; Min Liu; Lin Wang

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the biological function of HBcAg in pathogenesis of HBV replication in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs).METHODS: HBcAg region was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and HBV HBcAg bait plasmid pGBKT7-HBcAg was constructed by routine molecular biological methods. Then the recombinant plasmid DNA was transformed into yeast AH109. After the HBV core protein was expressed in AH10g yeast strains (Western blot analysis), yeast-two hybrid screening was performed by mating AH109 with Y187 containing leukocyte cDNA library plasmid. Diploid yeast cells were plated on synthetic dropout nutrient medium (SD/-Trp-Leu-HisAde) (QDO) and synthetic dropout nutrient medium (SD/-Trp-Leu-His-Ade) (TDO). The second screening was performed with the LacZ report gene ( yeast cells were grown in QDO medium containing X-a-gal). The interaction between HBV core protein and the protein obtained from positive colonies was further confirmed by repeating yeast-two hybrid. After plasmid DNA was extracted from blue colonies and sequenced, the results were analyzed by bioinformatic methods.RESULTS: Eighteen colonies were obtained and sequenced, including hypermethylated in cancer 2 (3colones), eukaryotic translation elongation factor 2 (2colones), acetyl-coenzyme A synthetase 3 (1 colone),DNA polymerase gamma (1 colone), putative translation initiation factor (1 colone), chemokine (C-C motif)receptor 5 (1 colone), mitochondrial ribosomal protein L41 (1 colone), kyot binding protein genes (1 colone),RanBPM (1 colone), HBeAg-binding protein 3 (1 colone),programmed cell death 2 (1 colone). Four new genes with unknown function were identified.CONCLUSION: Successful cloning of genes of HBV core protein interacting proteins in leukocytes may provide some new clues for studying the biological functions of HBV core protein.

  7. Autoinhibitory Interdomain Interactions and Subfamily-specific Extensions Redefine the Catalytic Core of the Human DEAD-box Protein DDX3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floor, Stephen N; Condon, Kendall J; Sharma, Deepak; Jankowsky, Eckhard; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2016-01-29

    DEAD-box proteins utilize ATP to bind and remodel RNA and RNA-protein complexes. All DEAD-box proteins share a conserved core that consists of two RecA-like domains. The core is flanked by subfamily-specific extensions of idiosyncratic function. The Ded1/DDX3 subfamily of DEAD-box proteins is of particular interest as members function during protein translation, are essential for viability, and are frequently altered in human malignancies. Here, we define the function of the subfamily-specific extensions of the human DEAD-box protein DDX3. We describe the crystal structure of the subfamily-specific core of wild-type DDX3 at 2.2 Å resolution, alone and in the presence of AMP or nonhydrolyzable ATP. These structures illustrate a unique interdomain interaction between the two ATPase domains in which the C-terminal domain clashes with the RNA-binding surface. Destabilizing this interaction accelerates RNA duplex unwinding, suggesting that it is present in solution and inhibitory for catalysis. We use this core fragment of DDX3 to test the function of two recurrent medulloblastoma variants of DDX3 and find that both inactivate the protein in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, these results redefine the structural and functional core of the DDX3 subfamily of DEAD-box proteins.

  8. Protein-protein interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byron, Olwyn; Vestergaard, Bente

    2015-01-01

    Responsive formation of protein:protein interaction (PPI) upon diverse stimuli is a fundament of cellular function. As a consequence, PPIs are complex, adaptive entities, and exist in structurally heterogeneous interplays defined by the energetic states of the free and complexed protomers....... The biophysical and structural investigations of PPIs consequently demand hybrid approaches, implementing orthogonal methods and strategies for global data analysis. Currently, impressive developments in hardware and software within several methodologies define a new era for the biostructural community. Data can...

  9. Diacylglycerol Acyltransferase-1 Localizes Hepatitis C Virus NS5A Protein to Lipid Droplets and Enhances NS5A Interaction with the Viral Capsid Core*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camus, Gregory; Herker, Eva; Modi, Ankit A.; Haas, Joel T.; Ramage, Holly R.; Farese, Robert V.; Ott, Melanie

    2013-01-01

    The triglyceride-synthesizing enzyme acyl CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1) plays a critical role in hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection by recruiting the HCV capsid protein core onto the surface of cellular lipid droplets (LDs). Here we find a new interaction between the non-structural protein NS5A and DGAT1 and show that the trafficking of NS5A to LDs depends on DGAT1 activity. DGAT1 forms a complex with NS5A and core and facilitates the interaction between both viral proteins. A catalytically inactive mutant of DGAT1 (H426A) blocks the localization of NS5A, but not core, to LDs in a dominant-negative manner and impairs the release of infectious viral particles, underscoring the importance of DGAT1-mediated translocation of NS5A to LDs in viral particle production. We propose a model whereby DGAT1 serves as a cellular hub for HCV core and NS5A proteins, guiding both onto the surface of the same subset of LDs, those generated by DGAT1. These results highlight the critical role of DGAT1 as a host factor for HCV infection and as a potential drug target for antiviral therapy. PMID:23420847

  10. Genome-wide annotation, expression profiling, and protein interaction studies of the core cell-cycle genes in Phalaenopsis aphrodite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsiang-Yin; Chen, Jhun-Chen; Wei, Miao-Ju; Lien, Yi-Chen; Li, Huang-Hsien; Ko, Swee-Suak; Liu, Zin-Huang; Fang, Su-Chiung

    2014-01-01

    Orchidaceae is one of the most abundant and diverse families in the plant kingdom and its unique developmental patterns have drawn the attention of many evolutionary biologists. Particular areas of interest have included the co-evolution of pollinators and distinct floral structures, and symbiotic relationships with mycorrhizal flora. However, comprehensive studies to decipher the molecular basis of growth and development in orchids remain scarce. Cell proliferation governed by cell-cycle regulation is fundamental to growth and development of the plant body. We took advantage of recently released transcriptome information to systematically isolate and annotate the core cell-cycle regulators in the moth orchid Phalaenopsis aphrodite. Our data verified that Phalaenopsis cyclin-dependent kinase A (CDKA) is an evolutionarily conserved CDK. Expression profiling studies suggested that core cell-cycle genes functioning during the G1/S, S, and G2/M stages were preferentially enriched in the meristematic tissues that have high proliferation activity. In addition, subcellular localization and pairwise interaction analyses of various combinations of CDKs and cyclins, and of E2 promoter-binding factors and dimerization partners confirmed interactions of the functional units. Furthermore, our data showed that expression of the core cell-cycle genes was coordinately regulated during pollination-induced reproductive development. The data obtained establish a fundamental framework for study of the cell-cycle machinery in Phalaenopsis orchids.

  11. Application of Core Dynamics Modeling to Core-Mantle Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Weijia

    2003-01-01

    Observations have demonstrated that length of day (LOD) variation on decadal time scales results from exchange of axial angular momentum between the solid mantle and the core. There are in general four core-mantle interaction mechanisms that couple the core and the mantle. Of which, three have been suggested likely the dominant coupling mechanism for the decadal core-mantle angular momentum exchange, namely, gravitational core-mantle coupling arising from density anomalies in the mantle and in the core (including the inner core), the electromagnetic coupling arising from Lorentz force in the electrically conducting lower mantle (e.g. D-layer), and the topographic coupling arising from non-hydrostatic pressure acting on the core-mantle boundary (CMB) topography. In the past decades, most effort has been on estimating the coupling torques from surface geomagnetic observations (kinematic approach), which has provided insights on the core dynamical processes. In the meantime, it also creates questions and concerns on approximations in the studies that may invalidate the corresponding conclusions. The most serious problem is perhaps the approximations that are inconsistent with dynamical processes in the core, such as inconsistencies between the core surface flow beneath the CMB and the CMB topography, and that between the D-layer electric conductivity and the approximations on toroidal field at the CMB. These inconsistencies can only be addressed with numerical core dynamics modeling. In the past few years, we applied our MoSST (Modular, Scalable, Self-consistent and Three-dimensional) core dynamics model to study core-mantle interactions together with geodynamo simulation, aiming at assessing the effect of the dynamical inconsistencies in the kinematic studies on core-mantle coupling torques. We focus on topographic and electromagnetic core-mantle couplings and find that, for the topographic coupling, the consistency between the core flow and the CMB topography is

  12. PIC: Protein Interactions Calculator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tina, K G; Bhadra, R; Srinivasan, N

    2007-07-01

    Interactions within a protein structure and interactions between proteins in an assembly are essential considerations in understanding molecular basis of stability and functions of proteins and their complexes. There are several weak and strong interactions that render stability to a protein structure or an assembly. Protein Interactions Calculator (PIC) is a server which, given the coordinate set of 3D structure of a protein or an assembly, computes various interactions such as disulphide bonds, interactions between hydrophobic residues, ionic interactions, hydrogen bonds, aromatic-aromatic interactions, aromatic-sulphur interactions and cation-pi interactions within a protein or between proteins in a complex. Interactions are calculated on the basis of standard, published criteria. The identified interactions between residues can be visualized using a RasMol and Jmol interface. The advantage with PIC server is the easy availability of inter-residue interaction calculations in a single site. It also determines the accessible surface area and residue-depth, which is the distance of a residue from the surface of the protein. User can also recognize specific kind of interactions, such as apolar-apolar residue interactions or ionic interactions, that are formed between buried or exposed residues or near the surface or deep inside.

  13. Protein-Protein Interaction Databases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szklarczyk, Damian; Jensen, Lars Juhl

    2015-01-01

    of research are explored. Here we present an overview of the most widely used protein-protein interaction databases and the methods they employ to gather, combine, and predict interactions. We also point out the trade-off between comprehensiveness and accuracy and the main pitfall scientists have to be aware......Years of meticulous curation of scientific literature and increasingly reliable computational predictions have resulted in creation of vast databases of protein interaction data. Over the years, these repositories have become a basic framework in which experiments are analyzed and new directions...

  14. The hepatitis C virus core protein inhibits adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL)-mediated lipid mobilization and enhances the ATGL interaction with comparative gene identification 58 (CGI-58) and lipid droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camus, Gregory; Schweiger, Martina; Herker, Eva; Harris, Charles; Kondratowicz, Andrew S; Tsou, Chia-Lin; Farese, Robert V; Herath, Kithsiri; Previs, Stephen F; Roddy, Thomas P; Pinto, Shirly; Zechner, Rudolf; Ott, Melanie

    2014-12-26

    Liver steatosis is a common health problem associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV) and an important risk factor for the development of liver fibrosis and cancer. Steatosis is caused by triglycerides (TG) accumulating in lipid droplets (LDs), cellular organelles composed of neutral lipids surrounded by a monolayer of phospholipids. The HCV nucleocapsid core localizes to the surface of LDs and induces steatosis in cultured cells and mouse livers by decreasing intracellular TG degradation (lipolysis). Here we report that core at the surface of LDs interferes with the activity of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), the key lipolytic enzyme in the first step of TG breakdown. Expressing core in livers or mouse embryonic fibroblasts of ATGL(-/-) mice no longer decreases TG degradation as observed in LDs from wild-type mice, supporting the model that core reduces lipolysis by engaging ATGL. Core must localize at LDs to inhibit lipolysis, as ex vivo TG hydrolysis is impaired in purified LDs coated with core but not when free core is added to LDs. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments revealed that core does not directly interact with the ATGL complex but, unexpectedly, increased the interaction between ATGL and its activator CGI-58 as well as the recruitment of both proteins to LDs. These data link the anti-lipolytic activity of the HCV core protein with altered ATGL binding to CGI-58 and the enhanced association of both proteins with LDs.

  15. Interaction of a C-terminal Truncated Hepatitis C Virus Core Protein with Plasmid DNA Vaccine Leads to in vitro Assembly of Heterogeneous Virus-like Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Acosta-Rivero

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, it has been shown that HCV core proteins (HCcAg with C-terminal deletions assemble in vitro into virus-like particles (VLPs in the presence of structured RNA molecules. Results presented in this work showed that a truncated HCcAg variant covering the first 120 aa (HCcAg.120 with a 32 aa N-terminal fusion peptide (6xHistag-XpressTMepitope interacts with plasmid DNA vaccine. Interestingly, the buoyant density of VLPs containing HCcAg.120 in CsCl gradients changed from 1.15-1,17 g mLˉ1 to 1.30-1.34 g mLˉ1 after addition of plasmid DNA to assembly reactions. In addition, a delay in electrophoretic mobility of HCcAg.120-plasmid samples on agarose gels was observed indicating a direct interaction between VLPs and nucleic acids. Remarkably, addition of either plasmid DNA or tRNA to assembly reactions leaded to heterogeneous and larger VLPs formation than those observed in HCcAg.120 assembly reactions. VLPs containing HCcAg.120 induced a specific IgG antibodies in mice that reacted with hepatocytes from HCV-infected patients. VLPs obtained in this work would be important to elucidate the mechanisms behind the ability of HCcAg to assemble into a nucleocapsid structure. Besides, the capacity of particles containing HCcAg.120 to interact with nucleic acids could be used in the development of DNA vaccines and viral vectors based on these particles.

  16. Modulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 3 by hepatitis C virus core protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ngo, HT; Pham, Long; Kim, JW;

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is highly dependent on cellular proteins for its own propagation. In order to identify the cellular factors involved in HCV propagation, we performed protein microarray assays using the HCV core protein as a probe. Of ~9,000 host proteins immobilized in a microarray......, approximately 100 cellular proteins were identified as HCV core-interacting partners. Of these candidates, mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 3 (MAPKAPK3) was selected for further characterization. MAPKAPK3 is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is activated by stress and growth...... inducers. Binding of HCV core to MAPKAPK3 was confirmed by in vitro pulldown assay and further verified by coimmunoprecipitation assay. HCV core protein interacted with MAPKAPK3 through amino acid residues 41 to 75 of core and the N-terminal half of kinase domain of MAPKAPK3. In addition, both RNA...

  17. Interactive protein manipulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SNCrivelli@lbl.gov

    2003-07-01

    We describe an interactive visualization and modeling program for the creation of protein structures ''from scratch''. The input to our program is an amino acid sequence -decoded from a gene- and a sequence of predicted secondary structure types for each amino acid-provided by external structure prediction programs. Our program can be used in the set-up phase of a protein structure prediction process; the structures created with it serve as input for a subsequent global internal energy minimization, or another method of protein structure prediction. Our program supports basic visualization methods for protein structures, interactive manipulation based on inverse kinematics, and visualization guides to aid a user in creating ''good'' initial structures.

  18. Oligomeric protein structure networks: insights into protein-protein interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brinda KV

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-protein association is essential for a variety of cellular processes and hence a large number of investigations are being carried out to understand the principles of protein-protein interactions. In this study, oligomeric protein structures are viewed from a network perspective to obtain new insights into protein association. Structure graphs of proteins have been constructed from a non-redundant set of protein oligomer crystal structures by considering amino acid residues as nodes and the edges are based on the strength of the non-covalent interactions between the residues. The analysis of such networks has been carried out in terms of amino acid clusters and hubs (highly connected residues with special emphasis to protein interfaces. Results A variety of interactions such as hydrogen bond, salt bridges, aromatic and hydrophobic interactions, which occur at the interfaces are identified in a consolidated manner as amino acid clusters at the interface, from this study. Moreover, the characterization of the highly connected hub-forming residues at the interfaces and their comparison with the hubs from the non-interface regions and the non-hubs in the interface regions show that there is a predominance of charged interactions at the interfaces. Further, strong and weak interfaces are identified on the basis of the interaction strength between amino acid residues and the sizes of the interface clusters, which also show that many protein interfaces are stronger than their monomeric protein cores. The interface strengths evaluated based on the interface clusters and hubs also correlate well with experimentally determined dissociation constants for known complexes. Finally, the interface hubs identified using the present method correlate very well with experimentally determined hotspots in the interfaces of protein complexes obtained from the Alanine Scanning Energetics database (ASEdb. A few predictions of interface hot

  19. Cardiolipin Interactions with Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planas-Iglesias, Joan; Dwarakanath, Himal; Mohammadyani, Dariush; Yanamala, Naveena; Kagan, Valerian E; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith

    2015-09-15

    Cardiolipins (CL) represent unique phospholipids of bacteria and eukaryotic mitochondria with four acyl chains and two phosphate groups that have been implicated in numerous functions from energy metabolism to apoptosis. Many proteins are known to interact with CL, and several cocrystal structures of protein-CL complexes exist. In this work, we describe the collection of the first systematic and, to the best of our knowledge, the comprehensive gold standard data set of all known CL-binding proteins. There are 62 proteins in this data set, 21 of which have nonredundant crystal structures with bound CL molecules available. Using binding patch analysis of amino acid frequencies, secondary structures and loop supersecondary structures considering phosphate and acyl chain binding regions together and separately, we gained a detailed understanding of the general structural and dynamic features involved in CL binding to proteins. Exhaustive docking of CL to all known structures of proteins experimentally shown to interact with CL demonstrated the validity of the docking approach, and provides a rich source of information for experimentalists who may wish to validate predictions.

  20. Geodynamo Modeling of Core-Mantle Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Wei-Jia; Chao, Benjamin F.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Angular momentum exchange between the Earth's mantle and core influences the Earth's rotation on time scales of decades and longer, in particular in the length of day (LOD) which have been measured with progressively increasing accuracy for the last two centuries. There are four possible coupling mechanisms for transferring the axial angular momentum across the core-mantle boundary (CMB): viscous, magnetic, topography, and gravitational torques. Here we use our scalable, modularized, fully dynamic geodynamo model for the core to assess the importance of these torques. This numerical model, as an extension of the Kuang-Bloxham model that has successfully simulated the generation of the Earth's magnetic field, is used to obtain numerical results in various physical conditions in terms of specific parameterization consistent with the dynamical processes in the fluid outer core. The results show that depending on the electrical conductivity of the lower mantle and the amplitude of the boundary topography at CMB, both magnetic and topographic couplings can contribute significantly to the angular momentum exchange. This implies that the core-mantle interactions are far more complex than has been assumed and that there is unlikely a single dominant coupling mechanism for the observed decadal LOD variation.

  1. Expression of viral polymerase and phosphorylation of core protein determine core and capsid localization of the human hepatitis B virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deroubaix, Aurélie; Osseman, Quentin; Cassany, Aurélia; Bégu, Dominique; Ragues, Jessica; Kassab, Somar; Lainé, Sébastien; Kann, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Biopsies from patients show that hepadnaviral core proteins and capsids - collectively called core - are found in the nucleus and cytoplasm of infected hepatocytes. In the majority of studies, cytoplasmic core localization is related to low viraemia while nuclear core localization is associated with high viral loads. In order to better understand the molecular interactions leading to core localization, we analysed transfected hepatoma cells using immune fluorescence microscopy. We observed that expression of core protein in the absence of other viral proteins led to nuclear localization of core protein and capsids, while expression of core in the context of the other viral proteins resulted in a predominantly cytoplasmic localization. Analysis of which viral partner was responsible for cytoplasmic retention indicated that the HBx, surface proteins and HBeAg had no impact but that the viral polymerase was the major determinant. Further analysis revealed that ϵ, an RNA structure to which the viral polymerase binds, was essential for cytoplasmic retention. Furthermore, we showed that core protein phosphorylation at Ser 164 was essential for the cytoplasmic core localization phenotype, which is likely to explain differences observed between individual cells.

  2. Scaffolds for blocking protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershberger, Stefan J; Lee, Song-Gil; Chmielewski, Jean

    2007-01-01

    Due to the pivotal roles that protein-protein interactions play in a plethora of biological processes, the design of therapeutic agents targeting these interactions has become an attractive and important area of research. The development of such agents is faced with a variety of challenges. Nevertheless, considerable progress has been made in the design of proteomimetics capable of disrupting protein-protein interactions. Those inhibitors based on molecular scaffold designs hold considerable interest because of the ease of variation in regard to their displayed functionality. In particular, protein surface mimetics, alpha-helical mimetics, beta-sheet/beta-strand mimetics, as well as beta-turn mimetics have successfully modulated protein-protein interactions involved in such diseases as cancer and HIV. In this review, current progress in the development of molecular scaffolds designed for the disruption of protein-protein interactions will be discussed with an emphasis on those active against biological targets.

  3. Differential Stoichiometry among Core Ribosomal Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavov, Nikolai; Semrau, Stefan; Airoldi, Edoardo; Budnik, Bogdan; van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Summary Understanding the regulation and structure of ribosomes is essential to understanding protein synthesis and its dysregulation in disease. While ribosomes are believed to have a fixed stoichiometry among their core ribosomal proteins (RPs), some experiments suggest a more variable composition. Testing such variability requires direct and precise quantification of RPs. We used mass spectrometry to directly quantify RPs across monosomes and polysomes of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESC) and budding yeast. Our data show that the stoichiometry among core RPs in wild-type yeast cells and ESC depends both on the growth conditions and on the number of ribosomes bound per mRNA. Furthermore, we find that the fitness of cells with a deleted RP-gene is inversely proportional to the enrichment of the corresponding RP in polysomes. Together, our findings support the existence of ribosomes with distinct protein composition and physiological function. PMID:26565899

  4. Purification and characterization of adenovirus core protein VII: a histone-like protein that is critical for adenovirus core formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Gaurav; Moria, Nithesh; Williams, Martin; Krishnarjuna, Bankala; Pouton, Colin W

    2017-07-01

    Adenovirus protein VII is a highly cationic core protein that forms a nucleosome-like structure in the adenovirus core by condensing DNA in combination with protein V and mu. It has been proposed that protein VII could condense DNA in a manner analogous to mammalian histones. Due to the lack of an expression and purification protocol, the interactions between protein VII and DNA are poorly understood. In this study we describe methods for the purification of biologically active recombinant protein VII using an E. coli expression system. We expressed a cleavable fusion of protein VII with thioredoxin and established methods for purification of this fusion protein in denatured form. We describe an efficient method for resolving the cleavage products to obtain pure protein VII using hydroxyapatite column chromatography. Mass spectroscopy data confirmed its mass and purity to be 19.4 kDa and >98 %, respectively. Purified recombinant protein VII spontaneously condensed dsDNA to form particles, as shown by dye exclusion assay, electrophoretic mobility shift assay and nuclease protection assay. Additionally, an in vitro bioluminescence assay revealed that protein VII can be used to enhance the transfection of mammalian cells with lipofectamine/DNA complexes. The availability of recombinant protein VII will facilitate future studies of the structure of the adenovirus core. Improved understanding of the structure and function of protein VII will be valuable in elucidating the mechanism of adenoviral DNA condensation, defining the morphology of the adenovirus core and establishing the mechanism by which adenoviral DNA enters the nucleus.

  5. Protein-protein interaction assays: eliminating false positive interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Tuan N.; Goodrich, James A.

    2006-01-01

    Many methods commonly used to identify and characterize interactions between two or more proteins are variations of the immobilized protein-protein interaction assay (for example, glutathione S-transferase (GST) pulldown and coimmunoprecipitation). A potential, and often overlooked, problem with these assays is the possibility that an observed interaction is mediated not by direct contact between proteins, but instead by nucleic acid contaminating the protein preparations. As a negatively cha...

  6. Controllability in protein interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuchty, Stefan

    2014-05-13

    Recently, the focus of network research shifted to network controllability, prompting us to determine proteins that are important for the control of the underlying interaction webs. In particular, we determined minimum dominating sets of proteins (MDSets) in human and yeast protein interaction networks. Such groups of proteins were defined as optimized subsets where each non-MDSet protein can be reached by an interaction from an MDSet protein. Notably, we found that MDSet proteins were enriched with essential, cancer-related, and virus-targeted genes. Their central position allowed MDSet proteins to connect protein complexes and to have a higher impact on network resilience than hub proteins. As for their involvement in regulatory functions, MDSet proteins were enriched with transcription factors and protein kinases and were significantly involved in bottleneck interactions, regulatory links, phosphorylation events, and genetic interactions.

  7. Core-shell microparticles for protein sequestration and controlled release of a protein-laden core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinker, Torri E; Philbrick, Brandon D; Temenoff, Johnna S

    2016-12-21

    Development of multifunctional biomaterials that sequester, isolate, and redeliver cell-secreted proteins at a specific timepoint may be required to achieve the level of temporal control needed to more fully regulate tissue regeneration and repair. In response, we fabricated core-shell heparin-poly(ethylene-glycol) (PEG) microparticles (MPs) with a degradable PEG-based shell that can temporally control delivery of protein-laden heparin MPs. Core-shell MPs were fabricated via a re-emulsification technique and the number of heparin MPs per PEG-based shell could be tuned by varying the mass of heparin MPs in the precursor PEG phase. When heparin MPs were loaded with bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) and then encapsulated into core-shell MPs, degradable core-shell MPs initiated similar C2C12 cell alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity as the soluble control, while non-degradable core-shell MPs initiated a significantly lower response (85+19% vs. 9.0+4.8% of the soluble control, respectively). Similarly, when degradable core-shell MPs were formed and then loaded with BMP-2, they induced a ∼7-fold higher C2C12 ALP activity than the soluble control. As C2C12 ALP activity was enhanced by BMP-2, these studies indicated that degradable core-shell MPs were able to deliver a bioactive, BMP-2-laden heparin MP core. Overall, these dynamic core-shell MPs have the potential to sequester, isolate, and then redeliver proteins attached to a heparin core to initiate a cell response, which could be of great benefit to tissue regeneration applications requiring tight temporal control over protein presentation.

  8. Bound or free: interaction of the C-terminal domain of Escherichia coli single-stranded DNA-binding protein (SSB) with the tetrameric core of SSB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xun-Cheng; Wang, Yao; Yagi, Hiromasa; Shishmarev, Dmitry; Mason, Claire E; Smith, Paul J; Vandevenne, Marylène; Dixon, Nicholas E; Otting, Gottfried

    2014-04-01

    Single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-binding protein (SSB) protects ssDNA from degradation and recruits other proteins for DNA replication and repair. Escherichia coli SSB is the prototypical eubacterial SSB in a family of tetrameric SSBs. It consists of a structurally well-defined ssDNA binding domain (OB-domain) and a disordered C-terminal domain (C-domain). The eight-residue C-terminal segment of SSB (C-peptide) mediates the binding of SSB to many different SSB-binding proteins. Previously published nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data of the monomeric state at pH 3.4 showed that the C-peptide binds to the OB-domain at a site that overlaps with the ssDNA binding site, but investigating the protein at neutral pH is difficult because of the high molecular mass and limited solubility of the tetramer. Here we show that the C-domain is highly mobile in the SSB tetramer at neutral pH and that binding of the C-peptide to the OB-domain is so weak that most of the C-peptides are unbound even in the absence of ssDNA. We address the problem of determining intramolecular binding affinities in the situation of fast exchange between two states, one of which cannot be observed by NMR and cannot be fully populated. The results were confirmed by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and microscale thermophoresis. The C-peptide-OB-domain interaction is shown to be driven primarily by electrostatic interactions, so that binding of 1 equiv of (dT)35 releases practically all C-peptides from the OB-domain tetramer. The interaction is much more sensitive to NaCl than to potassium glutamate, which is the usual osmolyte in E. coli. As the C-peptide is predominantly in the unbound state irrespective of the presence of ssDNA, long-range electrostatic effects from the C-peptide may contribute more to regulating the activity of SSB than any engagement of the C-peptide by the OB-domain.

  9. Waves in the core and mechanical core-mantle interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jault, D.; Finlay, Chris

    2015-01-01

    the motions in the direction parallel to the Earth'srotation axis. This property accounts for the signicance of the core-mantle topography.In addition, the stiening of the uid in the direction parallel to the rotation axis gives riseto a magnetic diusion layer attached to the core-mantle boundary, which would...

  10. The core and unique proteins of haloarchaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Capes Melinda D

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since the first genome of a halophilic archaeon was sequenced in 2000, biologists have been advancing the understanding of genomic characteristics that allow for survival in the harsh natural environments of these organisms. An increase in protein acidity and GC-bias in the genome have been implicated as factors in tolerance to extreme salinity, desiccation, and high solar radiation. However, few previous attempts have been made to identify novel genes that would permit survival in such extreme conditions. Results With the recent release of several new complete haloarchaeal genome sequences, we have conducted a comprehensive comparative genomic analysis focusing on the identification of unique haloarchaeal conserved proteins that likely play key roles in environmental adaptation. Using bioinformatic methods, we have clustered 31,312 predicted proteins from nine haloarchaeal genomes into 4,455 haloarchaeal orthologous groups (HOGs. We assigned likely functions by association with established COG and KOG databases in NCBI. After identifying homologs in four additional haloarchaeal genomes, we determined that there were 784 core haloarchaeal protein clusters (cHOGs, of which 83 clusters were found primarily in haloarchaea. Further analysis found that 55 clusters were truly unique (tucHOGs to haloarchaea and qualify as signature proteins while 28 were nearly unique (nucHOGs, the vast majority of which were coded for on the haloarchaeal chromosomes. Of the signature proteins, only one example with any predicted function, Ral, involved in desiccation/radiation tolerance in Halobacterium sp. NRC-1, was identified. Among the core clusters, 33% was predicted to function in metabolism, 25% in information transfer and storage, 10% in cell processes and signaling, and 22% belong to poorly characterized or general function groups. Conclusion Our studies have established conserved groups of nearly 800 protein clusters present in all

  11. Conductometric monitoring of protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spera, Rosanna; Festa, Fernanda; Bragazzi, Nicola L; Pechkova, Eugenia; LaBaer, Joshua; Nicolini, Claudio

    2013-12-06

    Conductometric monitoring of protein-protein and protein-sterol interactions is here proved feasible by coupling quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM_D) to nucleic acid programmable protein arrays (NAPPA). The conductance curves measured in NAPPA microarrays printed on quartz surface allowed the identification of binding events between the immobilized proteins and the query. NAPPA allows the immobilization on the quartz surface of a wide range of proteins and can be easily adapted to generate innumerous types of biosensors. Indeed multiple proteins on the same quartz crystal have been tested and envisaged proving the possibility of analyzing the same array for several distinct interactions. Two examples of NAPPA-based conductometer applications with clinical relevance are presented herein, the interaction between the transcription factors Jun and ATF2 and the interaction between Cytochrome P540scc and cholesterol.

  12. Time-Resolved Fluorescence Anisotropy Study of the Interaction Between DNA and a Peptide Truncated from the p53 Protein Core Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chengxuan; Liang, Gaiting; Liu, Zhen; Zu, Lily

    2014-03-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy spectroscopy was applied to study the interaction between a peptide truncated from the binding site of tumor suppressor p53 protein and the DNAs covalently labeled with 6-carboxyfluorescein (FAM) dye. Fluorescence intensity quenching and changes of anisotropy decay lifetime were monitored when FAM labeled DNA formed complex with the peptide. The results demonstrated that the sequence of DNA could not define the binding specificity between the peptide and DNA. But the anisotropy decay of FAM can be used to examine the binding affinity of the peptide to DNA. The fluorescent dynamics of FAM can also be used to represent the rigidity of the complex formed between the peptide and DNA.

  13. Trafficking of hepatitis C virus core protein during virus particle assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie A Counihan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV core protein is directed to the surface of lipid droplets (LD, a step that is essential for infectious virus production. However, the process by which core is recruited from LD into nascent virus particles is not well understood. To investigate the kinetics of core trafficking, we developed methods to image functional core protein in live, virus-producing cells. During the peak of virus assembly, core formed polarized caps on large, immotile LDs, adjacent to putative sites of assembly. In addition, LD-independent, motile puncta of core were found to traffic along microtubules. Importantly, core was recruited from LDs into these puncta, and interaction between the viral NS2 and NS3-4A proteins was essential for this recruitment process. These data reveal new aspects of core trafficking and identify a novel role for viral nonstructural proteins in virus particle assembly.

  14. High throughput protein-protein interaction data: clues for the architecture of protein complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pang Chi

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-throughput techniques are becoming widely used to study protein-protein interactions and protein complexes on a proteome-wide scale. Here we have explored the potential of these techniques to accurately determine the constituent proteins of complexes and their architecture within the complex. Results Two-dimensional representations of the 19S and 20S proteasome, mediator, and SAGA complexes were generated and overlaid with high quality pairwise interaction data, core-module-attachment classifications from affinity purifications of complexes and predicted domain-domain interactions. Pairwise interaction data could accurately determine the members of each complex, but was unexpectedly poor at deciphering the topology of proteins in complexes. Core and module data from affinity purification studies were less useful for accurately defining the member proteins of these complexes. However, these data gave strong information on the spatial proximity of many proteins. Predicted domain-domain interactions provided some insight into the topology of proteins within complexes, but was affected by a lack of available structural data for the co-activator complexes and the presence of shared domains in paralogous proteins. Conclusion The constituent proteins of complexes are likely to be determined with accuracy by combining data from high-throughput techniques. The topology of some proteins in the complexes will be able to be clearly inferred. We finally suggest strategies that can be employed to use high throughput interaction data to define the membership and understand the architecture of proteins in novel complexes.

  15. Homogeneous protein analysis by magnetic core-shell nanorod probes

    KAUST Repository

    Schrittwieser, Stefan

    2016-03-29

    Studying protein interactions is of vital importance both to fundamental biology research and to medical applications. Here, we report on the experimental proof of a universally applicable label-free homogeneous platform for rapid protein analysis. It is based on optically detecting changes in the rotational dynamics of magnetically agitated core-shell nanorods upon their specific interaction with proteins. By adjusting the excitation frequency, we are able to optimize the measurement signal for each analyte protein size. In addition, due to the locking of the optical signal to the magnetic excitation frequency, background signals are suppressed, thus allowing exclusive studies of processes at the nanoprobe surface only. We study target proteins (soluble domain of the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 - sHER2) specifically binding to antibodies (trastuzumab) immobilized on the surface of our nanoprobes and demonstrate direct deduction of their respective sizes. Additionally, we examine the dependence of our measurement signal on the concentration of the analyte protein, and deduce a minimally detectable sHER2 concentration of 440 pM. For our homogeneous measurement platform, good dispersion stability of the applied nanoprobes under physiological conditions is of vital importance. To that end, we support our measurement data by theoretical modeling of the total particle-particle interaction energies. The successful implementation of our platform offers scope for applications in biomarker-based diagnostics as well as for answering basic biology questions.

  16. Outflow - Core Interaction in Barnard 1

    CERN Document Server

    Hiramatsu, Masaaki; Takakuwa, Shigehisa

    2010-01-01

    In order to study how outflows from protostars influence the physical and chemical conditions of the parent molecular cloud, we have observed Barnard 1 (B1) main core, which harbors four Class 0 and three Class I sources, in the CO (J=1-0), CH3OH (J_K=2_K-1_K), and the SiO (J=1-0) lines using the NRO 45 m telescope. We have identified three CO outflows in this region; one is an elongated (~ 0.3 pc) bipolar outflow from a Class 0 protostar B1-c in the submillimeter clump SMM 2, another is a rather compact (~ 0.1 pc) outflow from a Class I protostar B1 IRS in the clump SMM 6, and the other is extended outflow from a Class I protostar in SMM 11. In the western lobe of the SMM 2 outflow, both the SiO and CH3OH lines show broad redshifted wings with the terminal velocities of 25 km/s and 13 km/s, respectively. It is likely that the shocks caused by the interaction between the outflow and ambient gas enhance the abundance of SiO and CH3OH in the gas phase. The total energy input rate by the outflows (1.1x10^{-3} Ls...

  17. Protein-Protein Interaction Site Predictions with Three-Dimensional Probability Distributions of Interacting Atoms on Protein Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ching-Tai; Peng, Hung-Pin; Jian, Jhih-Wei; Tsai, Keng-Chang; Chang, Jeng-Yih; Yang, Ei-Wen; Chen, Jun-Bo; Ho, Shinn-Ying; Hsu, Wen-Lian; Yang, An-Suei

    2012-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are key to many biological processes. Computational methodologies devised to predict protein-protein interaction (PPI) sites on protein surfaces are important tools in providing insights into the biological functions of proteins and in developing therapeutics targeting the protein-protein interaction sites. One of the general features of PPI sites is that the core regions from the two interacting protein surfaces are complementary to each other, similar to the interior of proteins in packing density and in the physicochemical nature of the amino acid composition. In this work, we simulated the physicochemical complementarities by constructing three-dimensional probability density maps of non-covalent interacting atoms on the protein surfaces. The interacting probabilities were derived from the interior of known structures. Machine learning algorithms were applied to learn the characteristic patterns of the probability density maps specific to the PPI sites. The trained predictors for PPI sites were cross-validated with the training cases (consisting of 432 proteins) and were tested on an independent dataset (consisting of 142 proteins). The residue-based Matthews correlation coefficient for the independent test set was 0.423; the accuracy, precision, sensitivity, specificity were 0.753, 0.519, 0.677, and 0.779 respectively. The benchmark results indicate that the optimized machine learning models are among the best predictors in identifying PPI sites on protein surfaces. In particular, the PPI site prediction accuracy increases with increasing size of the PPI site and with increasing hydrophobicity in amino acid composition of the PPI interface; the core interface regions are more likely to be recognized with high prediction confidence. The results indicate that the physicochemical complementarity patterns on protein surfaces are important determinants in PPIs, and a substantial portion of the PPI sites can be predicted correctly with

  18. Interactions between HMG proteins and the core sequence of DNaseI hypersensitive site 2 in the locus control region (LCR) of the human β-like globin gene cluster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    HMG proteins are abundant chromosomal non-histone proteins. It has been suggested that the HMG proteins may play an important role in the structure and function of chromatin. In the present study, the binding of HMG proteins (HMG1/2 and HMG14/17) to the core DNA sequence of DNaseI hypersensitive site 2 (HS2core DNA sequence, -10681--10970 bp) in the locus control region (LCR) of the human b-like globin gene cluster has been examined by using both the in vitro nucleosome reconstitution and the gel mobility shift assays. Here we show that HMG1/2 can bind to the naked HS2core DNA sequence, however, HMG14/17 cannot. Using the in vitro nucleosome reconstitution we demonstrate that HMG14/17 can bind to the HS2core DNA sequence which is assembled into nucleosomes with the core histone octamer transferred from chicken erythrocytes. In contrast, HMG1/2 cannot bind to the nucleosomes reconstituted in vitro with the HS2core DNA sequence. These results indicate that the binding patterns between HMG proteins and the HS2core DNA sequence which exists in different states (the naked DNA or the in vitro reconstituted nucleosomal DNA) are quite different. We speculate that HMG proteins might play a critical role in the regulation of the human β-like globin gene's expression.

  19. Interactions between HMG proteins and the core sequence of DNaseI hypersensitive site 2 in the locus control region (LCR) of the human b-like globin gene cluster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    HMG proteins are abundant chromosomal non-histone proteins. It has been suggested that the HMG proteins may play an important role in the structure and function of chromatin. In the present study, the binding of HMG proteins (HMG1/2 and HMG14/17) to the core DNA sequence of DNaseI hypersensitive site 2 (HS2core DNA sequence, -10681--10970 bp) in the locus control region (LCR) of the human b-like globin gene cluster has been examined by using both the in vitro nucleosome reconstitution and the gel mobility shift assays. Here we show that HMG1/2 can bind to the naked HS2core DNA sequence, however, HMG14/17 cannot. Using the in vitro nucleosome reconstitution we demonstrate that HMG14/17 can bind to the HS2core DNA sequence which is assembled into nucleosomes with the core histone octamer transferred from chicken erythrocytes. In contrast, HMG1/2 cannot bind to the nucleosomes reconstituted in vitro with the HS2core DNA sequence. These results indicate that the binding patterns between HMG proteins and the HS2core DNA sequence which exists in different states (the naked DNA or the in vitro reconstituted nucleosomal DNA) are quite different. We speculate that HMG proteins might play a critical role in the regulation of the human b-like globin gene's expression.

  20. HSC90 is required for nascent hepatitis C virus core protein stability in yeast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Naoko; Inayoshi, Yasutaka; Satoh, Naoko; Fukuda, Takashi; Iwai, Kenta; Tomoda, Hiroshi; Kohara, Michinori; Kataoka, Kazuhiro; Shimamoto, Akira; Furuichi, Yasuhiro; Nomoto, Akio; Naganuma, Akira; Kuge, Shusuke

    2012-07-30

    Hepatitis C virus core protein (Core) contributes to HCV pathogenicity. Here, we demonstrate that Core impairs growth in budding yeast. We identify HSP90 inhibitors as compounds that reduce intracellular Core protein level and restore yeast growth. Our results suggest that HSC90 (Hsc82) may function in the protection of the nascent Core polypeptide against degradation in yeast and the C-terminal region of Core corresponding to the organelle-interaction domain was responsible for Hsc82-dependent stability. The yeast system may be utilized to select compounds that can direct the C-terminal region to reduce the stability of Core protein. Copyright © 2012 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Discovering functional interaction patterns in protein-protein interaction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Can Tolga

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years, a considerable amount of research effort has been directed to the analysis of biological networks with the availability of genome-scale networks of genes and/or proteins of an increasing number of organisms. A protein-protein interaction (PPI network is a particular biological network which represents physical interactions between pairs of proteins of an organism. Major research on PPI networks has focused on understanding the topological organization of PPI networks, evolution of PPI networks and identification of conserved subnetworks across different species, discovery of modules of interaction, use of PPI networks for functional annotation of uncharacterized proteins, and improvement of the accuracy of currently available networks. Results In this article, we map known functional annotations of proteins onto a PPI network in order to identify frequently occurring interaction patterns in the functional space. We propose a new frequent pattern identification technique, PPISpan, adapted specifically for PPI networks from a well-known frequent subgraph identification method, gSpan. Existing module discovery techniques either look for specific clique-like highly interacting protein clusters or linear paths of interaction. However, our goal is different; instead of single clusters or pathways, we look for recurring functional interaction patterns in arbitrary topologies. We have applied PPISpan on PPI networks of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and identified a number of frequently occurring functional interaction patterns. Conclusion With the help of PPISpan, recurring functional interaction patterns in an organism's PPI network can be identified. Such an analysis offers a new perspective on the modular organization of PPI networks. The complete list of identified functional interaction patterns is available at http://bioserver.ceng.metu.edu.tr/PPISpan/.

  2. Protopia: a protein-protein interaction tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Real-Chicharro, Alejandro; Ruiz-Mostazo, Iván; Navas-Delgado, Ismael; Kerzazi, Amine; Chniber, Othmane; Sánchez-Jiménez, Francisca; Medina, Miguel Ángel; Aldana-Montes, José F

    2009-01-01

    Background Protein-protein interactions can be considered the basic skeleton for living organism self-organization and homeostasis. Impressive quantities of experimental data are being obtained and computational tools are essential to integrate and to organize this information. This paper presents Protopia, a biological tool that offers a way of searching for proteins and their interactions in different Protein Interaction Web Databases, as a part of a multidisciplinary initiative of our institution for the integration of biological data . Results The tool accesses the different Databases (at present, the free version of Transfac, DIP, Hprd, Int-Act and iHop), and results are expressed with biological protein names or databases codes and can be depicted as a vector or a matrix. They can be represented and handled interactively as an organic graph. Comparison among databases is carried out using the Uniprot codes annotated for each protein. Conclusion The tool locates and integrates the current information stored in the aforementioned databases, and redundancies among them are detected. Results are compatible with the most important network analysers, so that they can be compared and analysed by other world-wide known tools and platforms. The visualization possibilities help to attain this goal and they are especially interesting for handling multiple-step or complex networks. PMID:19828077

  3. Identification of a functional, CRM-1-dependent nuclear export signal in hepatitis C virus core protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Cerutti

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is a major cause of chronic liver disease worldwide. HCV core protein is involved in nucleocapsid formation, but it also interacts with multiple cytoplasmic and nuclear molecules and plays a crucial role in the development of liver disease and hepatocarcinogenesis. The core protein is found mostly in the cytoplasm during HCV infection, but also in the nucleus in patients with hepatocarcinoma and in core-transgenic mice. HCV core contains nuclear localization signals (NLS, but no nuclear export signal (NES has yet been identified.We show here that the aa(109-133 region directs the translocation of core from the nucleus to the cytoplasm by the CRM-1-mediated nuclear export pathway. Mutagenesis of the three hydrophobic residues (L119, I123 and L126 in the identified NES or in the sequence encoding the mature core aa(1-173 significantly enhanced the nuclear localisation of the corresponding proteins in transfected Huh7 cells. Both the NES and the adjacent hydrophobic sequence in domain II of core were required to maintain the core protein or its fragments in the cytoplasmic compartment. Electron microscopy studies of the JFH1 replication model demonstrated that core was translocated into the nucleus a few minutes after the virus entered the cell. The blockade of nucleocytoplasmic export by leptomycin B treatment early in infection led to the detection of core protein in the nucleus by confocal microscopy and coincided with a decrease in virus replication.Our data suggest that the functional NLS and NES direct HCV core protein shuttling between the cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments, with at least some core protein transported to the nucleus. These new properties of HCV core may be essential for virus multiplication and interaction with nuclear molecules, influence cell signaling and the pathogenesis of HCV infection.

  4. Identification of a functional, CRM-1-dependent nuclear export signal in hepatitis C virus core protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerutti, Andrea; Maillard, Patrick; Minisini, Rosalba; Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier; Roohvand, Farzin; Pecheur, Eve-Isabelle; Pirisi, Mario; Budkowska, Agata

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of chronic liver disease worldwide. HCV core protein is involved in nucleocapsid formation, but it also interacts with multiple cytoplasmic and nuclear molecules and plays a crucial role in the development of liver disease and hepatocarcinogenesis. The core protein is found mostly in the cytoplasm during HCV infection, but also in the nucleus in patients with hepatocarcinoma and in core-transgenic mice. HCV core contains nuclear localization signals (NLS), but no nuclear export signal (NES) has yet been identified.We show here that the aa(109-133) region directs the translocation of core from the nucleus to the cytoplasm by the CRM-1-mediated nuclear export pathway. Mutagenesis of the three hydrophobic residues (L119, I123 and L126) in the identified NES or in the sequence encoding the mature core aa(1-173) significantly enhanced the nuclear localisation of the corresponding proteins in transfected Huh7 cells. Both the NES and the adjacent hydrophobic sequence in domain II of core were required to maintain the core protein or its fragments in the cytoplasmic compartment. Electron microscopy studies of the JFH1 replication model demonstrated that core was translocated into the nucleus a few minutes after the virus entered the cell. The blockade of nucleocytoplasmic export by leptomycin B treatment early in infection led to the detection of core protein in the nucleus by confocal microscopy and coincided with a decrease in virus replication.Our data suggest that the functional NLS and NES direct HCV core protein shuttling between the cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments, with at least some core protein transported to the nucleus. These new properties of HCV core may be essential for virus multiplication and interaction with nuclear molecules, influence cell signaling and the pathogenesis of HCV infection.

  5. Detecting mutually exclusive interactions in protein-protein interaction maps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Sánchez Claros

    Full Text Available Comprehensive protein interaction maps can complement genetic and biochemical experiments and allow the formulation of new hypotheses to be tested in the system of interest. The computational analysis of the maps may help to focus on interesting cases and thereby to appropriately prioritize the validation experiments. We show here that, by automatically comparing and analyzing structurally similar regions of proteins of known structure interacting with a common partner, it is possible to identify mutually exclusive interactions present in the maps with a sensitivity of 70% and a specificity higher than 85% and that, in about three fourth of the correctly identified complexes, we also correctly recognize at least one residue (five on average belonging to the interaction interface. Given the present and continuously increasing number of proteins of known structure, the requirement of the knowledge of the structure of the interacting proteins does not substantially impact on the coverage of our strategy that can be estimated to be around 25%. We also introduce here the Estrella server that embodies this strategy, is designed for users interested in validating specific hypotheses about the functional role of a protein-protein interaction and it also allows access to pre-computed data for seven organisms.

  6. Detecting mutually exclusive interactions in protein-protein interaction maps.

    KAUST Repository

    Sánchez Claros, Carmen

    2012-06-08

    Comprehensive protein interaction maps can complement genetic and biochemical experiments and allow the formulation of new hypotheses to be tested in the system of interest. The computational analysis of the maps may help to focus on interesting cases and thereby to appropriately prioritize the validation experiments. We show here that, by automatically comparing and analyzing structurally similar regions of proteins of known structure interacting with a common partner, it is possible to identify mutually exclusive interactions present in the maps with a sensitivity of 70% and a specificity higher than 85% and that, in about three fourth of the correctly identified complexes, we also correctly recognize at least one residue (five on average) belonging to the interaction interface. Given the present and continuously increasing number of proteins of known structure, the requirement of the knowledge of the structure of the interacting proteins does not substantially impact on the coverage of our strategy that can be estimated to be around 25%. We also introduce here the Estrella server that embodies this strategy, is designed for users interested in validating specific hypotheses about the functional role of a protein-protein interaction and it also allows access to pre-computed data for seven organisms.

  7. Database of Interacting Proteins (DIP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The DIP database catalogs experimentally determined interactions between proteins. It combines information from a variety of sources to create a single, consistent...

  8. Interactions between HMG proteins and the core sequence of DNaseI hypersensitive site 2 in the locus control region (LCR) of the human β-Mike globin gene cluster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵晖; 张树冰; 蒋俶; 钱若兰

    2000-01-01

    HMG proteins are abundant chromosomal non-histone proteins. It has been suggested that the HMG proteins may play an important role in the structure and function of chromatin. In the present study, the binding of HMG proteins (HMG1/2 and HMG14/17) to the core DNA sequence of DNasel hypersensitive site 2 (HS2core DNA sequence, -10681-10970 bp) in the locus control region (LCR) of the human β-like globin gene cluster has been examined by using both the in vitro nucleosome reconstitution and the gel mobility shift assays. Here we show that HMG1/2 can bind to the naked HS2core DNA sequence, however, HMG 14/17 cannot. Using the in vitro nucleosome reconstitution we demonstrate that HMG14/17 can bind to the HS2core DNA sequence which is assembled into nucleosomes with the core histone octamer transferred from chicken erythrocytes. In contrast, HMG 1/2 cannot bind to the nucleosomes reconstituted in vitro with the HS2core DNA sequence. These results indicate that the binding patterns between HMG proteins and t

  9. Deciphering protein-protein interactions. Part II. Computational methods to predict protein and domain interaction partners

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shoemaker, Benjamin A; Panchenko, Anna R

    2007-01-01

    .... In this review we describe different approaches to predict protein interaction partners as well as highlight recent achievements in the prediction of specific domains mediating protein-protein interactions...

  10. Protein mixtures: interactions and gelation

    OpenAIRE

    Ersch, C.

    2015-01-01

    Gelation is a ubiquitous process in the preparation of foods. As most foods are multi constituent mixtures, understanding gelation in mixtures is an important goal in food science. Here we presented a systematic investigation on the influence of molecular interactions on the gelation in protein mixtures. Gelatin gels with added globular protein and globular protein gels with added gelatin were analyzed for their gel microstructure and rheological properties. Mixed gels with altered microstruc...

  11. The effect of HCV Core protein on the expression of miR-150

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayad Khanizadeh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background : Hepatitis C virus (HCV is considered as one of the major pathogenic agents of chronic liver diseases. Previous studies have shown that HCV proteins can interaction with gene regulatory networks such as microRNAs. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of HCV core protein on the expression of miR-150 in a cell culture model. Materials and Methods: Plasmids expressing full HCV core protein was transfected into Huh7 cell lines while a GFP expressing plasmid employed as negative control. Subsequently, total RNA extracted and Real-Time PCR performed to measure the expression level of miR-150 expression. Moreover, trypan blue exclusion assay was performed to investigate the effect of core protein on cell viability. Results: The gene expression analysis of miR-150 in Huh7 cells showed that endogenous HCV core protein could significantly down regulation of miR-150 when compared to GFP control plasmid and normal cells (P<0.01. Beside, core protein induced no significant proliferative or cytotoxic effects on hepatic cells as determined by trypan blue exclusion assay (P<0.05. Conclusion: Our study suggests that HCV core protein can led to down regulation of miR-150 expression. This data revealed that HCV protein interactions with cell regulatory machinery may contribute to pathogenesis of chronic liver diseases.

  12. Protein-protein interactions as drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skwarczynska, Malgorzata; Ottmann, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Modulation of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) is becoming increasingly important in drug discovery and chemical biology. While a few years ago this 'target class' was deemed to be largely undruggable an impressing number of publications and success stories now show that targeting PPIs with small, drug-like molecules indeed is a feasible approach. Here, we summarize the current state of small-molecule inhibition and stabilization of PPIs and review the active molecules from a structural and medicinal chemistry angle, especially focusing on the key examples of iNOS, LFA-1 and 14-3-3.

  13. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YJL199C, YJL199C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available d in closely related Saccharomyces species; protein detected in large-scale protein-protein interaction studies...cies; protein detected in large-scale protein-protein interaction studies Rows with this prey as prey (4) Ro...n; not conserved in closely related Saccharomyces species; protein detected in large-scale protein-protein interaction studies... species; protein detected in large-scale protein-protein interaction studies Rows with this prey as prey Ro

  14. Automatic Extraction of Protein Interaction in Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Peilei; Wang, Ting

    2014-01-01

    Protein-protein interaction extraction is the key precondition of the construction of protein knowledge network, and it is very important for the research in the biomedicine. This paper extracted directional protein-protein interaction from the biological text, using the SVM-based method. Experiments were evaluated on the LLL05 corpus with good results. The results show that dependency features are import for the protein-protein interaction extraction and features related to the interaction w...

  15. Prediction of Protein-Protein Interactions Using Protein Signature Profiling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mahmood A. Mahdavi; Yen-Han Lin

    2007-01-01

    Protein domains are conserved and functionally independent structures that play an important role in interactions among related proteins. Domain-domain inter- actions have been recently used to predict protein-protein interactions (PPI). In general, the interaction probability of a pair of domains is scored using a trained scoring function. Satisfying a threshold, the protein pairs carrying those domains are regarded as "interacting". In this study, the signature contents of proteins were utilized to predict PPI pairs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Caenorhabditis ele- gans, and Homo sapiens. Similarity between protein signature patterns was scored and PPI predictions were drawn based on the binary similarity scoring function. Results show that the true positive rate of prediction by the proposed approach is approximately 32% higher than that using the maximum likelihood estimation method when compared with a test set, resulting in 22% increase in the area un- der the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. When proteins containing one or two signatures were removed, the sensitivity of the predicted PPI pairs in- creased significantly. The predicted PPI pairs are on average 11 times more likely to interact than the random selection at a confidence level of 0.95, and on aver- age 4 times better than those predicted by either phylogenetic profiling or gene expression profiling.

  16. A second-generation protein-protein interaction network of Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häuser, Roman; Ceol, Arnaud; Rajagopala, Seesandra V; Mosca, Roberto; Siszler, Gabriella; Wermke, Nadja; Sikorski, Patricia; Schwarz, Frank; Schick, Matthias; Wuchty, Stefan; Aloy, Patrick; Uetz, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Helicobacter pylori infections cause gastric ulcers and play a major role in the development of gastric cancer. In 2001, the first protein interactome was published for this species, revealing over 1500 binary protein interactions resulting from 261 yeast two-hybrid screens. Here we roughly double the number of previously published interactions using an ORFeome-based, proteome-wide yeast two-hybrid screening strategy. We identified a total of 1515 protein-protein interactions, of which 1461 are new. The integration of all the interactions reported in H. pylori results in 3004 unique interactions that connect about 70% of its proteome. Excluding interactions of promiscuous proteins we derived from our new data a core network consisting of 908 interactions. We compared our data set to several other bacterial interactomes and experimentally benchmarked the conservation of interactions using 365 protein pairs (interologs) of E. coli of which one third turned out to be conserved in both species.

  17. Protein mixtures: interactions and gelation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ersch, C.

    2015-01-01

    Gelation is a ubiquitous process in the preparation of foods. As most foods are multi constituent mixtures, understanding gelation in mixtures is an important goal in food science. Here we presented a systematic investigation on the influence of molecular interactions on the gelation in protein mixt

  18. Protein mixtures: interactions and gelation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ersch, C.

    2015-01-01

    Gelation is a ubiquitous process in the preparation of foods. As most foods are multi constituent mixtures, understanding gelation in mixtures is an important goal in food science. Here we presented a systematic investigation on the influence of molecular interactions on the gelation in protein mixt

  19. Protein interaction network related to Helicobacter pylori infection response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kyu Kwang Kim; Han Bok Kim

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To understand the complex reaction of gastric inflammation induced by Helicobacter pylori (H pylori ) in a systematic manner using a protein interaction network. METHODS: The expression of genes significantly changed on microarray during H pylori infection was scanned from the web literary database and translated into proteins. A network of protein interactions was constructed by searching the primary interactions of selected proteins. The constructed network was mathematically analyzed and its biological function was examined. In addition, the nodes on the network were checked to determine if they had any further functional importance or relation to other proteins by extending them.RESULTS: The scale-free network showing the relationship between inflammation and carcinogenesis was constructed. Mathematical analysis showed hub and bottleneck proteins, and these proteins were mostly related to immune response. The network contained pathways and proteins related to H pylori infection, such as the JAK-STAT pathway triggered by interleukins. Activation of nuclear factor (NF)-kB, TLR4, and other proteins known to function as core proteins of immune response were also found.These immune-related proteins interacted on the network with pathways and proteins related to the cell cycle, cell maintenance and proliferation, and transcription regulators such as BRCA1, FOS, REL, and zinc finger proteins. The extension of nodes showed interactions of the immune proteins with cancerrelated proteins. One extended network, the core network, a summarized form of the extended network, and cell pathway model were constructed. CONCLUSION: Immune-related proteins activated by H pylori infection interact with proto-oncogene proteins. The hub and bottleneck proteins are potential drug targets for gastric inflammation and cancer.

  20. Dynamics of lipid droplets induced by the hepatitis C virus core protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyn, Rodney K. [Steacie Institute for Molecular Sciences, National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, Canada K1A 0R6 (Canada); Department of Chemistry, University of Ottawa, Ottawa (Canada); Kennedy, David C.; Stolow, Albert; Ridsdale, Andrew [Steacie Institute for Molecular Sciences, National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, Canada K1A 0R6 (Canada); Pezacki, John Paul, E-mail: john.pezacki@nrc.ca [Steacie Institute for Molecular Sciences, National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, Canada K1A 0R6 (Canada); Department of Chemistry, University of Ottawa, Ottawa (Canada)

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} Hepatitis C virus uses lipid droplets (LD) onto which HCV core proteins bind. {yields} HCV core proteins on LDs facilitate viral particle assembly. {yields} We used a novel combination of CARS, two-photon fluorescence, and DIC microscopies. {yields} Particle tracking experiments show that core slowly affects LD localization. {yields} Particle tracking measured the change in speed and directionality of LD movement. -- Abstract: The hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a global health problem, with limited treatment options and no vaccine available. HCV uses components of the host cell to proliferate, including lipid droplets (LD) onto which HCV core proteins bind and facilitate viral particle assembly. We have measured the dynamics of HCV core protein-mediated changes in LDs and rates of LD movement on microtubules using a combination of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), two-photon fluorescence (TPF), and differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopies. Results show that the HCV core protein induces rapid increases in LD size. Particle tracking experiments show that HCV core protein slowly affects LD localization by controlling the directionality of LD movement on microtubules. These dynamic processes ultimately aid HCV in propagating and the molecules and interactions involved represent novel targets for potential therapeutic intervention.

  1. New Compound Classes: Protein-Protein Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottmann, C

    2016-01-01

    "Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are one of the most promising new targets in drug discovery. With estimates between 300,000 and 650,000 in human physiology, targeted modulation of PPIs would tremendously extend the "druggable" genome. In fact, in every disease a wealth of potentially addressable PPIs can be found making pharmacological intervention based on PPI modulators in principle a generally applicable technology. An impressing number of success stories in small-molecule PPI inhibition and natural-product PPI stabilization increasingly encourage academia and industry to invest in PPI modulation. In this chapter examples of both inhibition as well as stabilization of PPIs are reviewed including some of the technologies which has been used for their identification."

  2. Protein- protein interaction detection system using fluorescent protein microdomains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2010-02-23

    The invention provides a protein labeling and interaction detection system based on engineered fragments of fluorescent and chromophoric proteins that require fused interacting polypeptides to drive the association of the fragments, and further are soluble and stable, and do not change the solubility of polypeptides to which they are fused. In one embodiment, a test protein X is fused to a sixteen amino acid fragment of GFP (.beta.-strand 10, amino acids 198-214), engineered to not perturb fusion protein solubility. A second test protein Y is fused to a sixteen amino acid fragment of GFP (.beta.-strand 11, amino acids 215-230), engineered to not perturb fusion protein solubility. When X and Y interact, they bring the GFP strands into proximity, and are detected by complementation with a third GFP fragment consisting of GFP amino acids 1-198 (strands 1-9). When GFP strands 10 and 11 are held together by interaction of protein X and Y, they spontaneous association with GFP strands 1-9, resulting in structural complementation, folding, and concomitant GFP fluorescence.

  3. Discovery of protein complexes with core-attachment structures from Tandem Affinity Purification (TAP) data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Min; Li, Xiao-Li; Kwoh, Chee-Keong; Ng, See-Kiong; Wong, Limsoon

    2012-09-01

    Many cellular functions involve protein complexes that are formed by multiple interacting proteins. Tandem Affinity Purification (TAP) is a popular experimental method for detecting such multi-protein interactions. However, current computational methods that predict protein complexes from TAP data require converting the co-complex relationships in TAP data into binary interactions. The resulting pairwise protein-protein interaction (PPI) network is then mined for densely connected regions that are identified as putative protein complexes. Converting the TAP data into PPI data not only introduces errors but also loses useful information about the underlying multi-protein relationships that can be exploited to detect the internal organization (i.e., core-attachment structures) of protein complexes. In this article, we propose a method called CACHET that detects protein complexes with Core-AttaCHment structures directly from bipartitETAP data. CACHET models the TAP data as a bipartite graph in which the two vertex sets are the baits and the preys, respectively. The edges between the two vertex sets represent bait-prey relationships. CACHET first focuses on detecting high-quality protein-complex cores from the bipartite graph. To minimize the effects of false positive interactions, the bait-prey relationships are indexed with reliability scores. Only non-redundant, reliable bicliques computed from the TAP bipartite graph are regarded as protein-complex cores. CACHET constructs protein complexes by including attachment proteins into the cores. We applied CACHET on large-scale TAP datasets and found that CACHET outperformed existing methods in terms of prediction accuracy (i.e., F-measure and functional homogeneity of predicted complexes). In addition, the protein complexes predicted by CACHET are equipped with core-attachment structures that provide useful biological insights into the inherent functional organization of protein complexes. Our supplementary material can

  4. Predicting protein-protein interactions from sequence using correlation coefficient and high-quality interaction dataset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ming-Guang; Xia, Jun-Feng; Li, Xue-Ling; Huang, De-Shuang

    2010-03-01

    Identifying protein-protein interactions (PPIs) is critical for understanding the cellular function of the proteins and the machinery of a proteome. Data of PPIs derived from high-throughput technologies are often incomplete and noisy. Therefore, it is important to develop computational methods and high-quality interaction dataset for predicting PPIs. A sequence-based method is proposed by combining correlation coefficient (CC) transformation and support vector machine (SVM). CC transformation not only adequately considers the neighboring effect of protein sequence but describes the level of CC between two protein sequences. A gold standard positives (interacting) dataset MIPS Core and a gold standard negatives (non-interacting) dataset GO-NEG of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were mined to objectively evaluate the above method and attenuate the bias. The SVM model combined with CC transformation yielded the best performance with a high accuracy of 87.94% using gold standard positives and gold standard negatives datasets. The source code of MATLAB and the datasets are available on request under smgsmg@mail.ustc.edu.cn.

  5. Coevolution of gene expression among interacting proteins

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Physically interacting proteins or parts of proteins are expected to evolve in a coordinated manner that preserves proper interactions. Such coevolution at the amino acid-sequence level is well documented and has been used to predict interacting proteins, domains, and amino acids. Interacting proteins are also often precisely coexpressed with one another, presumably to maintain proper stoichiometry among interacting components. Here, we show that the expression levels of physically inter...

  6. Gap junctions and connexin-interacting proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giepmans, Ben N G

    2004-01-01

    Gap junctions form channels between adjacent cells. The core proteins of these channels are the connexins. Regulation of gap junction communication (GJC) can be modulated by connexin-associating proteins, such as regulatory protein phosphatases and protein kinases, of which c-Src is the best-studied

  7. Gap junctions and connexin-interacting proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giepmans, Ben N G

    2004-01-01

    Gap junctions form channels between adjacent cells. The core proteins of these channels are the connexins. Regulation of gap junction communication (GJC) can be modulated by connexin-associating proteins, such as regulatory protein phosphatases and protein kinases, of which c-Src is the

  8. Gap junctions and connexin-interacting proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giepmans, Ben N G

    2004-01-01

    Gap junctions form channels between adjacent cells. The core proteins of these channels are the connexins. Regulation of gap junction communication (GJC) can be modulated by connexin-associating proteins, such as regulatory protein phosphatases and protein kinases, of which c-Src is the best-studied

  9. Chimeric hepatitis B virus core particles with parts or copies of the hepatitis C virus core protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshikawa, A.; Tanaka, T; Hoshi, Y.; Kato, N; K. Tachibana; Iizuka, H; Machida, A; Okamoto, H; Yamasaki, M.; Miyakawa, Y

    1993-01-01

    Either parts or multiple copies of the core gene of hepatitis C virus (HCV) were fused to the 3' terminus of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) core gene with 34 codons removed. As many as four copies of HCV core protein (720 amino acids) were fused to the carboxy terminus of truncated HBV core protein (149 amino acids) without preventing the assembly of HBV core particles. Chimeric core particles were sandwiched between monoclonal antibody to HBV core and that to HCV core, thereby indicating that a...

  10. Chimeric hepatitis B virus core particles with parts or copies of the hepatitis C virus core protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshikawa, A.; Tanaka, T; Hoshi, Y.; Kato, N.; Tachibana, K; Iizuka, H.; Machida, A; Okamoto, H; Yamasaki, M.; Miyakawa, Y

    1993-01-01

    Either parts or multiple copies of the core gene of hepatitis C virus (HCV) were fused to the 3' terminus of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) core gene with 34 codons removed. As many as four copies of HCV core protein (720 amino acids) were fused to the carboxy terminus of truncated HBV core protein (149 amino acids) without preventing the assembly of HBV core particles. Chimeric core particles were sandwiched between monoclonal antibody to HBV core and that to HCV core, thereby indicating that a...

  11. Crystal Structure of the Human Cytomegalovirus pUL50-pUL53 Core Nuclear Egress Complex Provides Insight into a Unique Assembly Scaffold for Virus-Host Protein Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walzer, Sascha A; Egerer-Sieber, Claudia; Sticht, Heinrich; Sevvana, Madhumati; Hohl, Katharina; Milbradt, Jens; Muller, Yves A; Marschall, Manfred

    2015-11-13

    Nuclear replication of cytomegalovirus relies on elaborate mechanisms of nucleocytoplasmic egress of viral particles. Thus, the role of two essential and conserved viral nuclear egress proteins, pUL50 and pUL53, is pivotal. pUL50 and pUL53 heterodimerize and form a core nuclear egress complex (NEC), which is anchored to the inner nuclear membrane and provides a scaffold for the assembly of a multimeric viral-cellular NEC. Here, we report the crystal structure of the pUL50-pUL53 heterodimer (amino acids 1-175 and 50-292, respectively) at 2.44 Å resolution. Both proteins adopt a globular fold with mixed α and β secondary structure elements. pUL53-specific features include a zinc-binding site and a hook-like N-terminal extension, the latter representing a hallmark element of the pUL50-pUL53 interaction. The hook-like extension (amino acids 59-87) embraces pUL50 and contributes 1510 Å(2) to the total interface area (1880 Å(2)). The pUL50 structure overall resembles the recently published NMR structure of the murine cytomegalovirus homolog pM50 but reveals a considerable repositioning of the very C-terminal α-helix of pUL50 upon pUL53 binding. pUL53 shows structural resemblance with the GHKL domain of bacterial sensory histidine kinases. A close examination of the crystal structure indicates partial assembly of pUL50-pUL53 heterodimers to hexameric ring-like structures possibly providing additional scaffolding opportunities for NEC. In combination, the structural information on pUL50-pUL53 considerably improves our understanding of the mechanism of HCMV nuclear egress. It may also accelerate the validation of the NEC as a unique target for developing a novel type of antiviral drug and improved options of broad-spectrum antiherpesviral therapy.

  12. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YDR425W, YGL161C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available icles; computational analysis of large-scale protein-protein interaction data sug...olgi vesicles; computational analysis of large-scale protein-protein interaction data suggests a possible ro

  13. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YPL070W, YOR155C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available utational analysis of large-scale protein-protein interaction data suggests a possible role in transcription...9 domain; computational analysis of large-scale protein-protein interaction data suggests a possible role in

  14. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YPL070W, YLR245C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available utational analysis of large-scale protein-protein interaction data suggests a possible role in transcription...Vps9 domain; computational analysis of large-scale protein-protein interaction data suggests a possible role

  15. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YPL070W, YPR193C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available utational analysis of large-scale protein-protein interaction data suggests a possible role in transcription...in; computational analysis of large-scale protein-protein interaction data suggests a possible role in trans

  16. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YGL161C, YDR084C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available les; computational analysis of large-scale protein-protein interaction data suggests a possible role in vesi...GTPases, localized to late Golgi vesicles; computational analysis of large-scale protein-protein interaction

  17. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YDL226C, YGL198W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available omputational analysis of large-scale protein-protein interaction data suggests a ... computational analysis of large-scale protein-protein interaction data suggests a possible role in vesicle-

  18. Probing protein-sugar interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebel, C; Eisenberg, H; Ghirlando, R

    2000-01-01

    We have investigated the partial specific volumes (2) (ml/g), hydration, and cosolvent interactions of rabbit muscle aldolase by equilibrium sedimentation in the analytical ultracentrifuge and by direct density increment (partial differential/partial differentialc(2))(mu) measurements over a range of sugar concentrations and temperature. In a series of sugars increasing in size, glucose, sucrose, raffinose, and alpha-cyclodextrin, (partial differential/ partial differentialc(2))(mu) decreases linearly with the solvent density rho(0). These sugar cosolvents do not interact with the protein; however, the interaction parameter B(1) (g water/g protein) mildly increases with increasing sugar size. The experimental B(1) values are smaller than values calculated by excluded volume (rolling ball) considerations. B(1) relates to hydration in this and in other instances studied. It decreases with increasing temperature, leading to an increase in (2) due to reduced water of hydration electrostriction. The density increments (partial differential/ partial differentialc(2))(mu), however, decrease in concave up form in the case of glycerol and in concave down form for trehalose, leading to more complex behavior in the case of carbohydrates playing a biological role as osmolytes and antifreeze agents. A critical discussion, based on the thermodynamics of multicomponent solutions, is presented.

  19. High-resolution crystal structure of a hepatitis B virus replication inhibitor bound to the viral core protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klumpp, Klaus; Lam, Angela M; Lukacs, Christine; Vogel, Robert; Ren, Suping; Espiritu, Christine; Baydo, Ruth; Atkins, Kateri; Abendroth, Jan; Liao, Guochun; Efimov, Andrey; Hartman, George; Flores, Osvaldo A

    2015-12-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) core protein is essential for HBV replication and an important target for antiviral drug discovery. We report the first, to our knowledge, high-resolution crystal structure of an antiviral compound bound to the HBV core protein. The compound NVR-010-001-E2 can induce assembly of the HBV core wild-type and Y132A mutant proteins and thermostabilize the proteins with a Tm increase of more than 10 °C. NVR-010-001-E2 binds at the dimer-dimer interface of the core proteins, forms a new interaction surface promoting protein-protein interaction, induces protein assembly, and increases stability. The impact of naturally occurring core protein mutations on antiviral activity correlates with NVR-010-001-E2 binding interactions determined by crystallography. The crystal structure provides understanding of a drug efficacy mechanism related to the induction and stabilization of protein-protein interactions and enables structure-guided design to improve antiviral potency and drug-like properties.

  20. Inferring protein-protein interaction complexes from immunoprecipitation data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kutzera, J.; Hoefsloot, H.C.J.; Malovannaya, A.; Smit, A.B.; Van Mechelen, I.; Smilde, A.K.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Protein inverted question markprotein interactions in cells are widely explored using small inverted question markscale experiments. However, the search for protein complexes and their interactions in data from high throughput experiments such as immunoprecipitation is still a challenge.

  1. Inferring protein-protein interaction complexes from immunoprecipitation data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kutzera, J.; Hoefsloot, H.C.J.; Malovannaya, A.; Smit, A.B.; Van Mechelen, I.; Smilde, A.K.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Protein inverted question markprotein interactions in cells are widely explored using small inverted question markscale experiments. However, the search for protein complexes and their interactions in data from high throughput experiments such as immunoprecipitation is still a challenge.

  2. New approach for predicting protein-protein interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are of vital importance for virtually all processes of a living cell. The study of these associations of protein molecules could improve people's understanding of diseases and provide basis for therapeutic approaches.

  3. Expression and characterization of hepatitis C virus core protein fused to hepatitis B virus core antigen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨莉; 王春林; 汪垣; 李光地

    1999-01-01

    Recombinant plasmids were constructed by fusing the gene fragments encoding the full-length (1-191aa) and the truncated (1-40aa and 1-69aa) HCV core proteins (HCc) respectively to the core gene of HBV at the position of amino acid 144 and expressed in E. coli. The products were analyzed by ELISA, Western blotting as well as the immunization of the mice. The results showed that those fusion proteins (B144C191, B144C69, B144C40) possessed the dual antigenicity and immunogenicity of both hepatitis B virus core antigen (HBcAg) and hepatitis C virus core protein (HCc). Analysis by electron microscopy and CsCl density gradient ultra-centrifugation revealed that similar to the HBcAg itself, all fusion proteins were able to form particles. Comparison of the antigenicity and immunogenicity of those fusion proteins showed that the length of HCc gene fused to HBeAg had no much effect on the antigenicity and immunogenicity of HBcAg, however, B144C69 and B144C40 induced higher titres antibodies against HCc than B14d

  4. Structures of the compact helical core domains of feline calicivirus and murine norovirus VPg proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leen, Eoin N; Kwok, K Y Rex; Birtley, James R; Simpson, Peter J; Subba-Reddy, Chennareddy V; Chaudhry, Yasmin; Sosnovtsev, Stanislav V; Green, Kim Y; Prater, Sean N; Tong, Michael; Young, Joanna C; Chung, Liliane M W; Marchant, Jan; Roberts, Lisa O; Kao, C Cheng; Matthews, Stephen; Goodfellow, Ian G; Curry, Stephen

    2013-05-01

    We report the solution structures of the VPg proteins from feline calicivirus (FCV) and murine norovirus (MNV), which have been determined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. In both cases, the core of the protein adopts a compact helical structure flanked by flexible N and C termini. Remarkably, while the core of FCV VPg contains a well-defined three-helix bundle, the MNV VPg core has just the first two of these secondary structure elements. In both cases, the VPg cores are stabilized by networks of hydrophobic and salt bridge interactions. The Tyr residue in VPg that is nucleotidylated by the viral NS7 polymerase (Y24 in FCV, Y26 in MNV) occurs in a conserved position within the first helix of the core. Intriguingly, given its structure, VPg would appear to be unable to bind to the viral polymerase so as to place this Tyr in the active site without a major conformation change to VPg or the polymerase. However, mutations that destabilized the VPg core either had no effect on or reduced both the ability of the protein to be nucleotidylated and virus infectivity and did not reveal a clear structure-activity relationship. The precise role of the calicivirus VPg core in virus replication remains to be determined, but knowledge of its structure will facilitate future investigations.

  5. Variability and conservation in hepatitis B virus core protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myers Richard

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis B core protein (HBVc has been extensively studied from both a structural and immunological point of view, but the evolutionary forces driving sequence variation within core are incompletely understood. Results In this study, the observed variation in HBVc protein sequence has been examined in a collection of a large number of HBVc protein sequences from public sequence repositories. An alignment of several hundred sequences was carried out, and used to analyse the distribution of polymorphisms along the HBVc. Polymorphisms were found at 44 out of 185 amino acid positions analysed and were clustered predominantly in those parts of HBVc forming the outer surface and spike on intact capsid. The relationship between HBVc diversity and HBV genotype was examined. The position of variable amino acids along the sequence was examined in terms of the structural constraints of capsid and envelope assembly, and also in terms of immunological recognition by T and B cells. Conclusion Over three quarters of amino acids within the HBVc sequence are non-polymorphic, and variation is focused to a few amino acids. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that core protein specific forces constrain its diversity within the context of overall HBV genome evolution. As a consequence, core protein is not a reliable predictor of virus genotype. The structural requirements of capsid assembly are likely to play a major role in limiting diversity. The phylogenetic analysis further suggests that immunological selection does not play a major role in driving HBVc diversity.

  6. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YEL043W, YOR164C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available on quantitative analysis of protein-protein interaction maps; may interact with ribosomes, based on co-purification studies...ing based on quantitative analysis of protein-protein interaction maps; may interact with ribosomes, based on co-purification studies

  7. High-resolution crystal structure of a hepatitis B virus replication inhibitor bound to the viral core protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klumpp, Klaus; Lam, Angela M.; Lukacs, Christine; Vogel, Robert; Ren, Suping; Espiritu, Christine; Baydo, Ruth; Atkins, Kateri; Abendroth, Jan; Liao, Guochun; Efimov, Andrey; Hartman, George; Flores, Osvaldo A.

    2015-01-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) core protein is essential for HBV replication and an important target for antiviral drug discovery. We report the first, to our knowledge, high-resolution crystal structure of an antiviral compound bound to the HBV core protein. The compound NVR-010–001-E2 can induce assembly of the HBV core wild-type and Y132A mutant proteins and thermostabilize the proteins with a Tm increase of more than 10 °C. NVR-010–001-E2 binds at the dimer–dimer interface of the core proteins, forms a new interaction surface promoting protein–protein interaction, induces protein assembly, and increases stability. The impact of naturally occurring core protein mutations on antiviral activity correlates with NVR-010–001-E2 binding interactions determined by crystallography. The crystal structure provides understanding of a drug efficacy mechanism related to the induction and stabilization of protein–protein interactions and enables structure-guided design to improve antiviral potency and drug-like properties. PMID:26598693

  8. Towards Inferring Protein Interactions: Challenges and Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Xiang

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Discovering interacting proteins has been an essential part of functional genomics. However, existing experimental techniques only uncover a small portion of any interactome. Furthermore, these data often have a very high false rate. By conceptualizing the interactions at domain level, we provide a more abstract representation of interactome, which also facilitates the discovery of unobserved protein-protein interactions. Although several domain-based approaches have been proposed to predict protein-protein interactions, they usually assume that domain interactions are independent on each other for the convenience of computational modeling. A new framework to predict protein interactions is proposed in this paper, where no assumption is made about domain interactions. Protein interactions may be the result of multiple domain interactions which are dependent on each other. A conjunctive norm form representation is used to capture the relationships between protein interactions and domain interactions. The problem of interaction inference is then modeled as a constraint satisfiability problem and solved via linear programing. Experimental results on a combined yeast data set have demonstrated the robustness and the accuracy of the proposed algorithm. Moreover, we also map some predicted interacting domains to three-dimensional structures of protein complexes to show the validity of our predictions.

  9. Coarse-grain modelling of protein-protein interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baaden, Marc; Marrink, Siewert J.

    2013-01-01

    Here, we review recent advances towards the modelling of protein-protein interactions (PPI) at the coarse-grained (CG) level, a technique that is now widely used to understand protein affinity, aggregation and self-assembly behaviour. PPI models of soluble proteins and membrane proteins are separate

  10. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YPL095C, YGL198W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available d to late Golgi vesicles; computational analysis of large-scale protein-protein interaction data suggests a ...gene name YIP4 Prey description Protein that interacts with Rab GTPases, localized to late Golgi vesicles; computation

  11. Coevolution of gene expression among interacting proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraser, Hunter B.; Hirsh, Aaron E.; Wall, Dennis P.; Eisen,Michael B.

    2004-03-01

    Physically interacting proteins or parts of proteins are expected to evolve in a coordinated manner that preserves proper interactions. Such coevolution at the amino acid-sequence level is well documented and has been used to predict interacting proteins, domains, and amino acids. Interacting proteins are also often precisely coexpressed with one another, presumably to maintain proper stoichiometry among interacting components. Here, we show that the expression levels of physically interacting proteins coevolve. We estimate average expression levels of genes from four closely related fungi of the genus Saccharomyces using the codon adaptation index and show that expression levels of interacting proteins exhibit coordinated changes in these different species. We find that this coevolution of expression is a more powerful predictor of physical interaction than is coevolution of amino acid sequence. These results demonstrate previously uncharacterized coevolution of gene expression, adding a different dimension to the study of the coevolution of interacting proteins and underscoring the importance of maintaining coexpression of interacting proteins over evolutionary time. Our results also suggest that expression coevolution can be used for computational prediction of protein protein interactions.

  12. Bioinformatic Prediction of WSSV-Host Protein-Protein Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available WSSV is one of the most dangerous pathogens in shrimp aquaculture. However, the molecular mechanism of how WSSV interacts with shrimp is still not very clear. In the present study, bioinformatic approaches were used to predict interactions between proteins from WSSV and shrimp. The genome data of WSSV (NC_003225.1 and the constructed transcriptome data of F. chinensis were used to screen potentially interacting proteins by searching in protein interaction databases, including STRING, Reactome, and DIP. Forty-four pairs of proteins were suggested to have interactions between WSSV and the shrimp. Gene ontology analysis revealed that 6 pairs of these interacting proteins were classified into “extracellular region” or “receptor complex” GO-terms. KEGG pathway analysis showed that they were involved in the “ECM-receptor interaction pathway.” In the 6 pairs of interacting proteins, an envelope protein called “collagen-like protein” (WSSV-CLP encoded by an early virus gene “wsv001” in WSSV interacted with 6 deduced proteins from the shrimp, including three integrin alpha (ITGA, two integrin beta (ITGB, and one syndecan (SDC. Sequence analysis on WSSV-CLP, ITGA, ITGB, and SDC revealed that they possessed the sequence features for protein-protein interactions. This study might provide new insights into the interaction mechanisms between WSSV and shrimp.

  13. PSAIA – Protein Structure and Interaction Analyzer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlahoviček Kristian

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background PSAIA (Protein Structure and Interaction Analyzer was developed to compute geometric parameters for large sets of protein structures in order to predict and investigate protein-protein interaction sites. Results In addition to most relevant established algorithms, PSAIA offers a new method PIADA (Protein Interaction Atom Distance Algorithm for the determination of residue interaction pairs. We found that PIADA produced more satisfactory results than comparable algorithms implemented in PSAIA. Particular advantages of PSAIA include its capacity to combine different methods to detect the locations and types of interactions between residues and its ability, without any further automation steps, to handle large numbers of protein structures and complexes. Generally, the integration of a variety of methods enables PSAIA to offer easier automation of analysis and greater reliability of results. PSAIA can be used either via a graphical user interface or from the command-line. Results are generated in either tabular or XML format. Conclusion In a straightforward fashion and for large sets of protein structures, PSAIA enables the calculation of protein geometric parameters and the determination of location and type for protein-protein interaction sites. XML formatted output enables easy conversion of results to various formats suitable for statistic analysis. Results from smaller data sets demonstrated the influence of geometry on protein interaction sites. Comprehensive analysis of properties of large data sets lead to new information useful in the prediction of protein-protein interaction sites.

  14. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YNL189W, YJL199C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available tein; not conserved in closely related Saccharomyces species; protein detected in large-scale protein-protein interaction studies...myces species; protein detected in large-scale protein-protein interaction studies Rows with this prey as pr

  15. Inferring interaction partners from protein sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Bitbol, Anne-Florence; Colwell, Lucy J; Wingreen, Ned S

    2016-01-01

    Specific protein-protein interactions are crucial in the cell, both to ensure the formation and stability of multi-protein complexes, and to enable signal transduction in various pathways. Functional interactions between proteins result in coevolution between the interaction partners. Hence, the sequences of interacting partners are correlated. Here we exploit these correlations to accurately identify which proteins are specific interaction partners from sequence data alone. Our general approach, which employs a pairwise maximum entropy model to infer direct couplings between residues, has been successfully used to predict the three-dimensional structures of proteins from sequences. Building on this approach, we introduce an iterative algorithm to predict specific interaction partners from among the members of two protein families. We assess the algorithm's performance on histidine kinases and response regulators from bacterial two-component signaling systems. The algorithm proves successful without any a pri...

  16. PIPE: a protein-protein interaction prediction engine based on the re-occurring short polypeptide sequences between known interacting protein pairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greenblatt Jack

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identification of protein interaction networks has received considerable attention in the post-genomic era. The currently available biochemical approaches used to detect protein-protein interactions are all time and labour intensive. Consequently there is a growing need for the development of computational tools that are capable of effectively identifying such interactions. Results Here we explain the development and implementation of a novel Protein-Protein Interaction Prediction Engine termed PIPE. This tool is capable of predicting protein-protein interactions for any target pair of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins from their primary structure and without the need for any additional information or predictions about the proteins. PIPE showed a sensitivity of 61% for detecting any yeast protein interaction with 89% specificity and an overall accuracy of 75%. This rate of success is comparable to those associated with the most commonly used biochemical techniques. Using PIPE, we identified a novel interaction between YGL227W (vid30 and YMR135C (gid8 yeast proteins. This lead us to the identification of a novel yeast complex that here we term vid30 complex (vid30c. The observed interaction was confirmed by tandem affinity purification (TAP tag, verifying the ability of PIPE to predict novel protein-protein interactions. We then used PIPE analysis to investigate the internal architecture of vid30c. It appeared from PIPE analysis that vid30c may consist of a core and a secondary component. Generation of yeast gene deletion strains combined with TAP tagging analysis indicated that the deletion of a member of the core component interfered with the formation of vid30c, however, deletion of a member of the secondary component had little effect (if any on the formation of vid30c. Also, PIPE can be used to analyse yeast proteins for which TAP tagging fails, thereby allowing us to predict protein interactions that are not

  17. Bilayer-thickness-mediated interactions between integral membrane proteins

    CERN Document Server

    Kahraman, Osman; Klug, William S; Haselwandter, Christoph A

    2016-01-01

    Hydrophobic thickness mismatch between integral membrane proteins and the surrounding lipid bilayer can produce lipid bilayer thickness deformations. Experiment and theory have shown that protein-induced lipid bilayer thickness deformations can yield energetically favorable bilayer-mediated interactions between integral membrane proteins, and large-scale organization of integral membrane proteins into protein clusters in cell membranes. Within the continuum elasticity theory of membranes, the energy cost of protein-induced bilayer thickness deformations can be captured by considering compression and expansion of the bilayer hydrophobic core, membrane tension, and bilayer bending, resulting in biharmonic equilibrium equations describing the shape of lipid bilayers for a given set of bilayer-protein boundary conditions. Here we develop a combined analytic and numerical methodology for the solution of the equilibrium elastic equations associated with protein-induced lipid bilayer deformations. Our methodology al...

  18. In vivo bacterial morphogenetic protein interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Ploeg, R.; den Blaauwen, T.; Meghea, A.

    2012-01-01

    This chapter will discuss none-invasive techniques that are widely used to study protein-protein interactions. As an example, their application in exploring interactions between proteins involved in bacterial cell division will be evaluated. First, bacterial morphology and cell division of the rod-s

  19. Ontology integration to identify protein complex in protein interaction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhihao

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein complexes can be identified from the protein interaction networks derived from experimental data sets. However, these analyses are challenging because of the presence of unreliable interactions and the complex connectivity of the network. The integration of protein-protein interactions with the data from other sources can be leveraged for improving the effectiveness of protein complexes detection algorithms. Methods We have developed novel semantic similarity method, which use Gene Ontology (GO annotations to measure the reliability of protein-protein interactions. The protein interaction networks can be converted into a weighted graph representation by assigning the reliability values to each interaction as a weight. Following the approach of that of the previously proposed clustering algorithm IPCA which expands clusters starting from seeded vertices, we present a clustering algorithm OIIP based on the new weighted Protein-Protein interaction networks for identifying protein complexes. Results The algorithm OIIP is applied to the protein interaction network of Sacchromyces cerevisiae and identifies many well known complexes. Experimental results show that the algorithm OIIP has higher F-measure and accuracy compared to other competing approaches.

  20. Analysis of Protein-Membrane Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemmer, Gerdi Christine

    Cellular membranes are complex structures, consisting of hundreds of different lipids and proteins. These membranes act as barriers between distinct environments, constituting hot spots for many essential functions of the cell, including signaling, energy conversion, and transport. These functions...... are implemented by soluble proteins reversibly binding to, as well as by integral membrane proteins embedded in, cellular membranes. The activity and interaction of these proteins is furthermore modulated by the lipids of the membrane. Here, liposomes were used as model membrane systems to investigate...... interactions between proteins and lipids. First, interactions of soluble proteins with membranes and specific lipids were studied, using two proteins: Annexin V and Tma1. The protein was first subjected to a lipid/protein overlay assay to identify candidate interaction partners in a fast and efficient way...

  1. Immunological Properties of Hepatitis B Core Antigen Fusion Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Michael J.; Hastings, Gillian Z.; Brown, Alan L.; Grace, Ken G.; Rowlands, David J.; Brown, Fred; Clarke, Berwyn E.

    1990-04-01

    The immunogenicity of a 19 amino acid peptide from foot-and-mouth disease virus has previously been shown to approach that of the inactivated virus from which it was derived after multimeric particulate presentation as an N-terminal fusion with hepatitis B core antigen. In this report we demonstrate that rhinovirus peptide-hepatitis B core antigen fusion proteins are 10-fold more immunogenic than peptide coupled to keyhole limpet hemocyanin and 100-fold more immunogenic than uncoupled peptide with an added helper T-cell epitope. The fusion proteins can be readily administered without adjuvant or with adjuvants acceptable for human and veterinary application and can elicit a response after nasal or oral dosing. The fusion proteins can also act as T-cell-independent antigens. These properties provide further support for their suitability as presentation systems for "foreign" epitopes in the development of vaccines.

  2. Assessing protein-protein interactions based on the semantic similarity of interacting proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Guangyu; Kim, Byungmin; Alguwaizani, Saud; Han, Kyungsook

    2015-01-01

    The Gene Ontology (GO) has been used in estimating the semantic similarity of proteins since it has the largest and reliable vocabulary of gene products and characteristics. We developed a new method which can assess Protein-Protein Interactions (PPI) using the branching factor and information content of the common ancestor of interacting proteins in the GO hierarchy. We performed a comparative evaluation of the measure with other GO-based similarity measures and evaluation results showed that our method outperformed others in most GO domains.

  3. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YGL198W, YDR084C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available les; computational analysis of large-scale protein-protein interaction data suggests a possible role in vesi... GTPases, localized to late Golgi vesicles; computational analysis of large-scale protein-protein interactio

  4. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YNL189W, YOR284W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ait as prey (0) YOR284W HUA2 Cytoplasmic protein of unknown function; computational analysis of large-scal...protein of unknown function; computational analysis of large-scale protein-protein interaction data suggests

  5. A conserved mammalian protein interaction network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Åsa Pérez-Bercoff

    Full Text Available Physical interactions between proteins mediate a variety of biological functions, including signal transduction, physical structuring of the cell and regulation. While extensive catalogs of such interactions are known from model organisms, their evolutionary histories are difficult to study given the lack of interaction data from phylogenetic outgroups. Using phylogenomic approaches, we infer a upper bound on the time of origin for a large set of human protein-protein interactions, showing that most such interactions appear relatively ancient, dating no later than the radiation of placental mammals. By analyzing paired alignments of orthologous and putatively interacting protein-coding genes from eight mammals, we find evidence for weak but significant co-evolution, as measured by relative selective constraint, between pairs of genes with interacting proteins. However, we find no strong evidence for shared instances of directional selection within an interacting pair. Finally, we use a network approach to show that the distribution of selective constraint across the protein interaction network is non-random, with a clear tendency for interacting proteins to share similar selective constraints. Collectively, the results suggest that, on the whole, protein interactions in mammals are under selective constraint, presumably due to their functional roles.

  6. Hemoglobin interacting proteins and implications of spectrin hemoglobin interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Avik; Chakrabarti, Abhijit

    2015-10-14

    In this report we have analyzed interacting partners of hemoglobin inside erythrocyte and sought possible implications of hemoglobin-spectrin interaction. Our list of identified cytosolic hemoglobin interacting proteins includes redox regulators like peroxiredoxin-2, Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase, catalase, aldehyde dehydrogenase-1, flavin reductase and chaperones like HSP70, α-hemoglobin stabilizing protein. Others include metabolic enzymes like carbonic anhydrase-1, selenium binding protein-1, purine nucleoside phosphorylase and nucleoside diphosphate kinase. Additionally, various membrane proteins like α and β spectrin, ankyrin, band3, protein4.1, actin and glyceraldehyde 3 phosphate dehydrogenase have been shown to interact with hemoglobin. Our result indicates that major membrane skeleton protein spectrin, that also has a chaperone like activity, helps to fold the unstable alpha-globin chains in vitro. Taken together our results could provide insight into a protein network evolved around hemoglobin molecule inside erythrocyte that may add a new perspective in understanding the hemoglobin function and homeostasis.

  7. Inhibition of Protein-Protein Interactions and Signaling by Small Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Ernesto

    2010-03-01

    Protein-protein interactions are at the core of cell signaling pathways as well as many bacterial and viral infection processes. As such, they define critical targets for drug development against diseases such as cancer, arthritis, obesity, AIDS and many others. Until now, the clinical inhibition of protein-protein interactions and signaling has been accomplished with the use of antibodies or soluble versions of receptor molecules. Small molecule replacements of these therapeutic agents have been extremely difficult to develop; either the necessary potency has been hard to achieve or the expected biological effect has not been obtained. In this presentation, we show that a rigorous thermodynamic approach that combines differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) provides a unique platform for the identification and optimization of small molecular weight inhibitors of protein-protein interactions. Recent advances in the development of cell entry inhibitors of HIV-1 using this approach will be discussed.

  8. Protein-Protein Interactions in the Regulation of WRKY Transcription Factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yingjun Chi; Yan Yang; Yuan Zhou; Jie Zhou; Baofang Fan; Jing-Quan Yu; Zhixiang Chen

    2013-01-01

    It has been almost 20 years since the first report of a WRKY transcription factor,SPF1,from sweet potato.Great progress has been made since then in establishing the diverse biological roles of WRKY transcription factors in plant growth,development,and responses to biotic and abiotic stress.Despite the functional diversity,almost all analyzed WRKY proteins recognize the TrGACC/T W-box sequences and,therefore,mechanisms other than mere recognition of the core W-box promoter elements are necessary to achieve the regulatory specificity of WRKY transcription factors.Research over the past several years has revealed that WRKY transcription factors physically interact with a wide range of proteins with roles in signaling,transcription,and chromatin remodeling.Studies of WRKY-interacting proteins have provided important insights into the regulation and mode of action of members of the important family of transcription factors.It has also emerged that the slightly varied WRKY domains and other protein motifs conserved within each of the seven WRKY subfamilies participate in protein-protein interactions and mediate complex functional interactions between WRKY proteins and between WRKY and other regulatory proteins in the modulation of important biological processes.In this review,we summarize studies of protein-protein interactions for WRKY transcription factors and discuss how the interacting partners contribute,at different levels,to the establishment of the complex regulatory and functional network of WRKY transcription factors.

  9. Protein Synthesis--An Interactive Game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, Lee Ann J.; Jackson, Karen E.

    1998-01-01

    Describes an interactive game designed to help students see and understand the dynamic relationship between DNA, RNA, and proteins. Appropriate for either a class or laboratory setting, following a lecture session about protein synthesis. (DDR)

  10. Iron-carbonate interaction at Earth's core-mantle boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorfman, S. M.; Badro, J.; Nabiei, F.; Prakapenka, V.; Gillet, P.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon storage and flux in the deep Earth are moderated by oxygen fugacity and interactions with iron-bearing phases. The amount of carbon stored in Earth's mantle versus the core depends on carbon-iron chemistry at the core-mantle boundary. Oxidized carbonates subducted from Earth's surface to the lowermost mantle may encounter reduced Fe0 metal from disproportionation of Fe2+ in lower mantle silicates or mixing with the core. To understand the fate of carbonates in the lowermost mantle, we have performed experiments on sandwiches of single-crystal (Ca0.6Mg0.4)CO3 dolomite and Fe foil in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell at lower mantle conditions of 49-110 GPa and 1800-2500 K. Syntheses were conducted with in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction to identify phase assemblages. After quench to ambient conditions, samples were sectioned with a focused Ga+ ion beam for composition analysis with transmission electron microscopy. At the centers of the heated spots, iron melted and reacted completely with the carbonate to form magnesiowüstite, iron carbide, diamond, magnesium-rich carbonate and calcium carbonate. In samples heated at 49 and 64 GPa, the two carbonates exhibit a eutectoid texture. In the sample heated at 110 GPa, the carbonates form rounded ~150-nm-diameter grains with a higher modal proportion of interspersed diamonds. The presence of reduced iron in the deep lower mantle and core-mantle boundary region will promote the formation of diamonds in carbonate-bearing subducted slabs. The complete reaction of metallic iron to oxides and carbides in the presence of mantle carbonate supports the formation of these phases at the Earth's core-mantle boundary and in ultra-low velocity zones.

  11. Hepatitis C virus core protein induces apoptosis-like caspase independent cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor Michael

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV associated liver diseases may be related to apoptotic processes. Thus, we investigated the role of different HCV proteins in apoptosis induction as well as their potency to interact with different apoptosis inducing agents. Methods and Results The use of a tightly adjustable tetracycline (Tet-dependent HCV protein expression cell system with the founder osteosarcoma cell line U-2 OS allowed switch-off and on of the endogenous production of HCV proteins. Analyzed were cell lines expressing the HCV polyprotein, the core protein, protein complexes of the core, envelope proteins E1, E2 and p7, and non-structural proteins NS3 and NS4A, NS4B or NS5A and NS5B. Apoptosis was measured mainly by the detection of hypodiploid apoptotic nuclei in the absence or presence of mitomycin C, etoposide, TRAIL and an agonistic anti-CD95 antibody. To further characterize cell death induction, a variety of different methods like fluorescence microscopy, TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT-catalyzed deoxyuridinephosphate (dUTP-nick end labeling assay, Annexin V staining, Western blot and caspase activation assays were included into our analysis. Two cell lines expressing the core protein but not the total polyprotein exerted a strong apoptotic effect, while the other cell lines did not induce any or only a slight effect by measuring the hypodiploid nuclei. Cell death induction was caspase-independent since it could not be blocked by zVAD-fmk. Moreover, caspase activity was absent in Western blot analysis and fluorometric assays while typical apoptosis-associated morphological features like the membrane blebbing and nuclei condensation and fragmentation could be clearly observed by microscopy. None of the HCV proteins influenced the apoptotic effect mediated via the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway while only the core protein enhanced death-receptor-mediated apoptosis. Conclusion Our data showed a caspase

  12. Integral UBL domain proteins: a family of proteasome interacting proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus; Gordon, Colin

    2004-01-01

    The family of ubiquitin-like (UBL) domain proteins (UDPs) comprises a conserved group of proteins involved in a multitude of different cellular activities. However, recent studies on UBL-domain proteins indicate that these proteins appear to share a common property in their ability to interact wi...

  13. Protein-Protein Interactions in Virus-Host Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, Anderson F; Pinney, John W

    2017-01-01

    To study virus-host protein interactions, knowledge about viral and host protein architectures and repertoires, their particular evolutionary mechanisms, and information on relevant sources of biological data is essential. The purpose of this review article is to provide a thorough overview about these aspects. Protein domains are basic units defining protein interactions, and the uniqueness of viral domain repertoires, their mode of evolution, and their roles during viral infection make viruses interesting models of study. Mutations at protein interfaces can reduce or increase their binding affinities by changing protein electrostatics and structural properties. During the course of a viral infection, both pathogen and cellular proteins are constantly competing for binding partners. Endogenous interfaces mediating intraspecific interactions-viral-viral or host-host interactions-are constantly targeted and inhibited by exogenous interfaces mediating viral-host interactions. From a biomedical perspective, blocking such interactions is the main mechanism underlying antiviral therapies. Some proteins are able to bind multiple partners, and their modes of interaction define how fast these "hub proteins" evolve. "Party hubs" have multiple interfaces; they establish simultaneous/stable (domain-domain) interactions, and tend to evolve slowly. On the other hand, "date hubs" have few interfaces; they establish transient/weak (domain-motif) interactions by means of short linear peptides (15 or fewer residues), and can evolve faster. Viral infections are mediated by several protein-protein interactions (PPIs), which can be represented as networks (protein interaction networks, PINs), with proteins being depicted as nodes, and their interactions as edges. It has been suggested that viral proteins tend to establish interactions with more central and highly connected host proteins. In an evolutionary arms race, viral and host proteins are constantly changing their interface

  14. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YOR124C, YGR268C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available that of Type I J-proteins; computational analysis of large-scale protein-protein interaction data suggests a...tational analysis of large-scale protein-protein interaction data suggests a possible role in actin patch as

  15. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YLR291C, YJL199C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ved in closely related Saccharomyces species; protein detected in large-scale protein-protein interaction studies...in large-scale protein-protein interaction studies Rows with this prey as prey Rows with this prey as prey (

  16. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YML064C, YJL199C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available y related Saccharomyces species; protein detected in large-scale protein-protein interaction studies Rows wi...in-protein interaction studies Rows with this prey as prey (4) Rows with this prey as bait (1) 28 6 3 4 0 0 ...d in closely related Saccharomyces species; protein detected in large-scale prote

  17. CATIA Core Tools Computer Aided Three-Dimensional Interactive Application

    CERN Document Server

    Michaud, Michel

    2012-01-01

    CATIA Core Tools: Computer-Aided Three-Dimensional Interactive Application explains how to use the essential features of this cutting-edge solution for product design and innovation. The book begins with the basics, such as launching the software, configuring the settings, and managing files. Next, you'll learn about sketching, modeling, drafting, and visualization tools and techniques. Easy-to-follow instructions along with detailed illustrations and screenshots help you get started using several CATIA workbenches right away. Reverse engineering--a valuable product development skill--is also covered in this practical resource.

  18. Adding protein context to the human protein-protein interaction network to reveal meaningful interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin H Schaefer

    Full Text Available Interactions of proteins regulate signaling, catalysis, gene expression and many other cellular functions. Therefore, characterizing the entire human interactome is a key effort in current proteomics research. This challenge is complicated by the dynamic nature of protein-protein interactions (PPIs, which are conditional on the cellular context: both interacting proteins must be expressed in the same cell and localized in the same organelle to meet. Additionally, interactions underlie a delicate control of signaling pathways, e.g. by post-translational modifications of the protein partners - hence, many diseases are caused by the perturbation of these mechanisms. Despite the high degree of cell-state specificity of PPIs, many interactions are measured under artificial conditions (e.g. yeast cells are transfected with human genes in yeast two-hybrid assays or even if detected in a physiological context, this information is missing from the common PPI databases. To overcome these problems, we developed a method that assigns context information to PPIs inferred from various attributes of the interacting proteins: gene expression, functional and disease annotations, and inferred pathways. We demonstrate that context consistency correlates with the experimental reliability of PPIs, which allows us to generate high-confidence tissue- and function-specific subnetworks. We illustrate how these context-filtered networks are enriched in bona fide pathways and disease proteins to prove the ability of context-filters to highlight meaningful interactions with respect to various biological questions. We use this approach to study the lung-specific pathways used by the influenza virus, pointing to IRAK1, BHLHE40 and TOLLIP as potential regulators of influenza virus pathogenicity, and to study the signalling pathways that play a role in Alzheimer's disease, identifying a pathway involving the altered phosphorylation of the Tau protein. Finally, we provide the

  19. Mass spectrometric analysis of protein interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Jonas; Jørgensen, Thomas J. D.; Roepstorff, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Mass spectrometry is a powerful tool for identification of interaction partners and structural characterization of protein interactions because of its high sensitivity, mass accuracy and tolerance towards sample heterogeneity. Several tools that allow studies of protein interaction are now...... available and recent developments that increase the confidence of studies of protein interaction by mass spectrometry include quantification of affinity-purified proteins by stable isotope labeling and reagents for surface topology studies that can be identified by mass-contributing reporters (e.g. isotope...... labels, cleavable cross-linkers or fragment ions. The use of mass spectrometers to study protein interactions using deuterium exchange and for analysis of intact protein complexes recently has progressed considerably....

  20. Molecular characterization of suppression of hepatitis B virus transcription by hepatitis C virus core protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王海林; 颜子颖; 侯云德; 金冬雁

    1997-01-01

    To further elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the suppression of hepatitis B virus (HBV) expression by the hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein, five molecular clones of HCV cDNA sequence con-taining the 5’ noncoding (5’NC) and the core regions have been isolated from Chinese HBV- and HCV-coinfected pa-tients. Sequence comparison and phylogenetic analysis showed that the HCV sequence cloned from coinfected individu-als is indistinguishable from that identified in other patients. Cotransfection assay confirmed that the core protein ex-pressed from one of the cloned sequence is capable of suppressing the expression of hepatitis B surface and e antigens (HBsAg and HBeAg, respectively). Deletion mapping revealed that the C-terminal hydrophobic region of the HCV core is necessary for the suppression. Results from reporter assays demonstrated that HCV core protein interacts with the HBV C promoter and enhancer II elements and down-regulates the transcription of HBV as well as other cellular and het

  1. Bilayer-thickness-mediated interactions between integral membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahraman, Osman; Koch, Peter D; Klug, William S; Haselwandter, Christoph A

    2016-04-01

    Hydrophobic thickness mismatch between integral membrane proteins and the surrounding lipid bilayer can produce lipid bilayer thickness deformations. Experiment and theory have shown that protein-induced lipid bilayer thickness deformations can yield energetically favorable bilayer-mediated interactions between integral membrane proteins, and large-scale organization of integral membrane proteins into protein clusters in cell membranes. Within the continuum elasticity theory of membranes, the energy cost of protein-induced bilayer thickness deformations can be captured by considering compression and expansion of the bilayer hydrophobic core, membrane tension, and bilayer bending, resulting in biharmonic equilibrium equations describing the shape of lipid bilayers for a given set of bilayer-protein boundary conditions. Here we develop a combined analytic and numerical methodology for the solution of the equilibrium elastic equations associated with protein-induced lipid bilayer deformations. Our methodology allows accurate prediction of thickness-mediated protein interactions for arbitrary protein symmetries at arbitrary protein separations and relative orientations. We provide exact analytic solutions for cylindrical integral membrane proteins with constant and varying hydrophobic thickness, and develop perturbative analytic solutions for noncylindrical protein shapes. We complement these analytic solutions, and assess their accuracy, by developing both finite element and finite difference numerical solution schemes. We provide error estimates of our numerical solution schemes and systematically assess their convergence properties. Taken together, the work presented here puts into place an analytic and numerical framework which allows calculation of bilayer-mediated elastic interactions between integral membrane proteins for the complicated protein shapes suggested by structural biology and at the small protein separations most relevant for the crowded membrane

  2. The human histone chaperone sNASP interacts with linker and core histones through distinct mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huanyu; Ge, Zhongqi; Walsh, Scott T R; Parthun, Mark R

    2012-01-01

    Somatic nuclear autoantigenic sperm protein (sNASP) is a human homolog of the N1/N2 family of histone chaperones. sNASP contains the domain structure characteristic of this family, which includes a large acidic patch flanked by several tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) motifs. sNASP possesses a unique binding specificity in that it forms specific complexes with both histone H1 and histones H3/H4. Based on the binding affinities of sNASP variants to histones H1, H3.3, H4 and H3.3/H4 complexes, sNASP uses distinct structural domains to interact with linker and core histones. For example, one of the acidic patches of sNASP was essential for linker histone binding but not for core histone interactions. The fourth TPR of sNASP played a critical role in interactions with histone H3/H4 complexes, but did not influence histone H1 binding. Finally, analysis of cellular proteins demonstrated that sNASP existed in distinct complexes that contained either linker or core histones.

  3. C-terminal domain of hepatitis C virus core protein is essential for secretion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Soo-Ho Choi; Kyu-Jin Park; So-Yeon Kim; Dong-Hwa Choi; Jung-Min Park; Soon B. Hwang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: We have previously demonstrated that hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein is efficiently released into the culture medium in insect cells. The objective of this study is to characterize the HCV core secretion in insect cells.METHODS: We constructed recombinant baculoviruses expressing various-length of mutant core proteins, expressed these proteins in insect cells, and examined core protein secretion in insect cells.RESULTS: Only wild type core was efficiently released into the culture medium, although the protein expression level of wild type core was lower than those of other mutant core proteins. We found that the shorter form of the core construct expressed the higher level of protein. However, if more than 18 amino acids of the core were truncated at the C-terminus,core proteins were no longer seareted into the culture medium.Membrane flotation data show that the secreted core proteins are associated with the cellular membrane protein, indicating that HCV core is secreted as a membrane complex.CONCLUSION: The C-terminal 18 amino acids of HCV core were crucial for core secretion into the culture media.Since HCV replication occurs on lipid raft membrane structure,these results suggest that HCV may utilize a unique core release mechanism to escape immune surveillance, thereby potentially representing the feature of HCV morphogenesis.

  4. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YPR040W, YDL188C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YPR040W TIP41 Protein that interacts physically and genetically with Tap42p, which ...ait ORF YPR040W Bait gene name TIP41 Bait description Protein that interacts physically and genetically

  5. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YPR040W, YDL134C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YPR040W TIP41 Protein that interacts physically and genetically with Tap42p, which ...Bait ORF YPR040W Bait gene name TIP41 Bait description Protein that interacts physically and genetically

  6. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YPR103W, YOR047C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available tein involved in control of glucose-regulated gene expression; interacts with protein kinase Snf1p, glucose sensors...gulated gene expression; interacts with protein kinase Snf1p, glucose sensors Snf

  7. Hamiltonian replica exchange molecular dynamics using soft-core interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hritz, Jozef; Oostenbrink, Chris

    2008-04-14

    To overcome the problem of insufficient conformational sampling within biomolecular simulations, we have developed a novel Hamiltonian replica exchange molecular dynamics (H-REMD) scheme that uses soft-core interactions between those parts of the system that contribute most to high energy barriers. The advantage of this approach over other H-REMD schemes is the possibility to use a relatively small number of replicas with locally larger differences between the individual Hamiltonians. Because soft-core potentials are almost the same as regular ones at longer distances, most of the interactions between atoms of perturbed parts will only be slightly changed. Rather, the strong repulsion between atoms that are close in space, which in many cases results in high energy barriers, is weakened within higher replicas of our proposed scheme. In addition to the soft-core interactions, we proposed to include multiple replicas using the same Hamiltonian/level of softness. We have tested the new protocol on the GTP and 8-Br-GTP molecules, which are known to have high energy barriers between the anti and syn conformation of the base with respect to the sugar moiety. During two 25 ns MD simulations of both systems the transition from the more stable to the less stable (but still experimentally observed) conformation is not seen at all. Also temperature REMD over 50 replicas for 1 ns did not show any transition at room temperature. On the other hand, more than 20 of such transitions are observed in H-REMD using six replicas (at three different Hamiltonians) during 6.8 ns per replica for GTP and 12 replicas (at six different Hamiltonians) during 8.7 ns per replica for 8-Br-GTP. The large increase in sampling efficiency was obtained from an optimized H-REMD scheme involving soft-core potentials, with multiple simulations using the same level of softness. The optimization of the scheme was performed by fast mimicking [J. Hritz and C. Oostenbrink, J. Chem. Phys. 127, 204104 (2007)].

  8. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YGR268C, YER125W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available larity to that of Type I J-proteins; computational analysis of large-scale protein-protein interaction data ...equence similarity to that of Type I J-proteins; computational analysis of large-scale protein-protein inter

  9. Mapping interactions of Chikungunya virus nonstructural proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreejith, R; Rana, Jyoti; Dudha, Namrata; Kumar, Kapila; Gabrani, Reema; Sharma, Sanjeev K; Gupta, Amita; Vrati, Sudhanshu; Chaudhary, Vijay K; Gupta, Sanjay

    2012-10-01

    The four nonstructural proteins (nsPs1-4) of Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) play important roles involving enzymatic activities and specific interactions with both viral and host components, during different stages of viral pathogenesis. Elucidation of the presence and/or absence of interactions among nsPs in a systematic manner is thus of scientific interest. In the current study, each pair-wise combination among the four nonstructural proteins of CHIKV was systematically analyzed for possible interactions. Six novel protein interactions were identified for CHIKV, using systems such as yeast two-hybrid, GST pull down and ELISA, three of which have not been previously reported for the genus Alphavirus. These interactions form a network of organized associations that suggest the spatial arrangement of nonstructural proteins in the late replicase complex. The study identified novel interactions as well as concurred with previously described associations in related alphaviruses.

  10. In vivo bacterial morphogenetic protein interactions

    OpenAIRE

    van der Ploeg, R.; den Blaauwen, T.; Meghea, A.

    2012-01-01

    This chapter will discuss none-invasive techniques that are widely used to study protein-protein interactions. As an example, their application in exploring interactions between proteins involved in bacterial cell division will be evaluated. First, bacterial morphology and cell division of the rod-shaped bacterium Escherichia coli will be introduced. Next, three bacterial two-hybrid methods and three Förster resonance energy transfer detection methods that are frequently applied to detect int...

  11. An Interactive Introduction to Protein Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, W. Theodore

    2004-01-01

    To improve student understanding of protein structure and the significance of noncovalent interactions in protein structure and function, students are assigned a project to write a paper complemented with computer-generated images. The assignment provides an opportunity for students to select a protein structure that is of interest and detail…

  12. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YML064C, YOR284W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available th this bait as prey (0) YOR284W HUA2 Cytoplasmic protein of unknown function; computational analysis of large-scale... unknown function; computational analysis of large-scale protein-protein interact

  13. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YJR091C, YKL076C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available encoding membrane-associated proteins; involved in localizing the Arp2/3 complex to mitochondria; overexpre...NA-binding proteins, interacts with mRNAs encoding membrane-associated proteins; involved in localizing the

  14. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YJR091C, YNR048W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available encoding membrane-associated proteins; involved in localizing the Arp2/3 complex to mitochondria; overexpre...y of RNA-binding proteins, interacts with mRNAs encoding membrane-associated proteins; involved in localizing

  15. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YJR091C, YML015C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available encoding membrane-associated proteins; involved in localizing the Arp2/3 complex to mitochondria; overexpre...y of RNA-binding proteins, interacts with mRNAs encoding membrane-associated proteins; involved in localizing

  16. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YDL239C, YPL070W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Vps9 domain; computational analysis of large-scale protein-protein interaction data suggests a possible role...ey description Cytoplasmic protein of unknown function containing a Vps9 domain; computational analysis of large-scale

  17. Inferring interaction partners from protein sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitbol, Anne-Florence; Dwyer, Robert S.; Colwell, Lucy J.; Wingreen, Ned S.

    2016-01-01

    Specific protein−protein interactions are crucial in the cell, both to ensure the formation and stability of multiprotein complexes and to enable signal transduction in various pathways. Functional interactions between proteins result in coevolution between the interaction partners, causing their sequences to be correlated. Here we exploit these correlations to accurately identify, from sequence data alone, which proteins are specific interaction partners. Our general approach, which employs a pairwise maximum entropy model to infer couplings between residues, has been successfully used to predict the 3D structures of proteins from sequences. Thus inspired, we introduce an iterative algorithm to predict specific interaction partners from two protein families whose members are known to interact. We first assess the algorithm’s performance on histidine kinases and response regulators from bacterial two-component signaling systems. We obtain a striking 0.93 true positive fraction on our complete dataset without any a priori knowledge of interaction partners, and we uncover the origin of this success. We then apply the algorithm to proteins from ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter complexes, and obtain accurate predictions in these systems as well. Finally, we present two metrics that accurately distinguish interacting protein families from noninteracting ones, using only sequence data. PMID:27663738

  18. Noninvasive imaging of protein-protein interactions in living animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luker, Gary D.; Sharma, Vijay; Pica, Christina M.; Dahlheimer, Julie L.; Li, Wei; Ochesky, Joseph; Ryan, Christine E.; Piwnica-Worms, Helen; Piwnica-Worms, David

    2002-05-01

    Protein-protein interactions control transcription, cell division, and cell proliferation as well as mediate signal transduction, oncogenic transformation, and regulation of cell death. Although a variety of methods have been used to investigate protein interactions in vitro and in cultured cells, none can analyze these interactions in intact, living animals. To enable noninvasive molecular imaging of protein-protein interactions in vivo by positron-emission tomography and fluorescence imaging, we engineered a fusion reporter gene comprising a mutant herpes simplex virus 1 thymidine kinase and green fluorescent protein for readout of a tetracycline-inducible, two-hybrid system in vivo. By using micro-positron-emission tomography, interactions between p53 tumor suppressor and the large T antigen of simian virus 40 were visualized in tumor xenografts of HeLa cells stably transfected with the imaging constructs. Imaging protein-binding partners in vivo will enable functional proteomics in whole animals and provide a tool for screening compounds targeted to specific protein-protein interactions in living animals.

  19. Baryon-Baryon Interactions ---Nijmegen Extended-Soft-Core Models---

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijken, T. A.; Nagels, M. M.; Yamamoto, Y.

    We review the Nijmegen extended-soft-core (ESC) models for the baryon-baryon (BB) interactions of the SU(3) flavor-octet of baryons (N, Lambda, Sigma, and Xi). The interactions are basically studied from the meson-exchange point of view, in the spirit of the Yukawa-approach to the nuclear force problem [H. Yukawa, ``On the interaction of Elementary Particles I'', Proceedings of the Physico-Mathematical Society of Japan 17 (1935), 48], using generalized soft-core Yukawa-functions. These interactions are supplemented with (i) multiple-gluon-exchange, and (ii) structural effects due to the quark-core of the baryons. We present in some detail the most recent extended-soft-core model, henceforth referred to as ESC08, which is the most complete, sophisticated, and successful interaction-model. Furthermore, we discuss briefly its predecessor the ESC04-model [Th. A. Rijken and Y. Yamamoto, Phys. Rev. C 73 (2006), 044007; Th. A. Rijken and Y. Yamamoto, Ph ys. Rev. C 73 (2006), 044008; Th. A. Rijken and Y. Yamamoto, nucl-th/0608074]. For the soft-core one-boson-exchange (OBE) models we refer to the literature [Th. A. Rijken, in Proceedings of the International Conference on Few-Body Problems in Nuclear and Particle Physics, Quebec, 1974, ed. R. J. Slobodrian, B. Cuec and R. Ramavataram (Presses Universitè Laval, Quebec, 1975), p. 136; Th. A. Rijken, Ph. D. thesis, University of Nijmegen, 1975; M. M. Nagels, Th. A. Rijken and J. J. de Swart, Phys. Rev. D 17 (1978), 768; P. M. M. Maessen, Th. A. Rijken and J. J. de Swart, Phys. Rev. C 40 (1989), 2226; Th. A. Rijken, V. G. J. Stoks and Y. Yamamoto, Phys. Rev. C 59 (1999), 21; V. G. J. Stoks and Th. A. Rijken, Phys. Rev. C 59 (1999), 3009]. All ingredients of these latter models are also part of ESC08, and so a description of ESC08 comprises all models so far in principle. The extended-soft-core (ESC) interactions consist of local- and non-local-potentials due to (i) one-boson-exchanges (OBE), which are the members of nonets of

  20. Protein-protein interaction based on pairwise similarity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaki Nazar

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-protein interaction (PPI is essential to most biological processes. Abnormal interactions may have implications in a number of neurological syndromes. Given that the association and dissociation of protein molecules is crucial, computational tools capable of effectively identifying PPI are desirable. In this paper, we propose a simple yet effective method to detect PPI based on pairwise similarity and using only the primary structure of the protein. The PPI based on Pairwise Similarity (PPI-PS method consists of a representation of each protein sequence by a vector of pairwise similarities against large subsequences of amino acids created by a shifting window which passes over concatenated protein training sequences. Each coordinate of this vector is typically the E-value of the Smith-Waterman score. These vectors are then used to compute the kernel matrix which will be exploited in conjunction with support vector machines. Results To assess the ability of the proposed method to recognize the difference between "interacted" and "non-interacted" proteins pairs, we applied it on different datasets from the available yeast saccharomyces cerevisiae protein interaction. The proposed method achieved reasonable improvement over the existing state-of-the-art methods for PPI prediction. Conclusion Pairwise similarity score provides a relevant measure of similarity between protein sequences. This similarity incorporates biological knowledge about proteins and it is extremely powerful when combined with support vector machine to predict PPI.

  1. Characterization of protein hubs by inferring interacting motifs from protein interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon Aragues

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The characterization of protein interactions is essential for understanding biological systems. While genome-scale methods are available for identifying interacting proteins, they do not pinpoint the interacting motifs (e.g., a domain, sequence segments, a binding site, or a set of residues. Here, we develop and apply a method for delineating the interacting motifs of hub proteins (i.e., highly connected proteins. The method relies on the observation that proteins with common interaction partners tend to interact with these partners through a common interacting motif. The sole input for the method are binary protein interactions; neither sequence nor structure information is needed. The approach is evaluated by comparing the inferred interacting motifs with domain families defined for 368 proteins in the Structural Classification of Proteins (SCOP. The positive predictive value of the method for detecting proteins with common SCOP families is 75% at sensitivity of 10%. Most of the inferred interacting motifs were significantly associated with sequence patterns, which could be responsible for the common interactions. We find that yeast hubs with multiple interacting motifs are more likely to be essential than hubs with one or two interacting motifs, thus rationalizing the previously observed correlation between essentiality and the number of interacting partners of a protein. We also find that yeast hubs with multiple interacting motifs evolve slower than the average protein, contrary to the hubs with one or two interacting motifs. The proposed method will help us discover unknown interacting motifs and provide biological insights about protein hubs and their roles in interaction networks.

  2. Information assessment on predicting protein-protein interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerstein Mark

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identifying protein-protein interactions is fundamental for understanding the molecular machinery of the cell. Proteome-wide studies of protein-protein interactions are of significant value, but the high-throughput experimental technologies suffer from high rates of both false positive and false negative predictions. In addition to high-throughput experimental data, many diverse types of genomic data can help predict protein-protein interactions, such as mRNA expression, localization, essentiality, and functional annotation. Evaluations of the information contributions from different evidences help to establish more parsimonious models with comparable or better prediction accuracy, and to obtain biological insights of the relationships between protein-protein interactions and other genomic information. Results Our assessment is based on the genomic features used in a Bayesian network approach to predict protein-protein interactions genome-wide in yeast. In the special case, when one does not have any missing information about any of the features, our analysis shows that there is a larger information contribution from the functional-classification than from expression correlations or essentiality. We also show that in this case alternative models, such as logistic regression and random forest, may be more effective than Bayesian networks for predicting interactions. Conclusions In the restricted problem posed by the complete-information subset, we identified that the MIPS and Gene Ontology (GO functional similarity datasets as the dominating information contributors for predicting the protein-protein interactions under the framework proposed by Jansen et al. Random forests based on the MIPS and GO information alone can give highly accurate classifications. In this particular subset of complete information, adding other genomic data does little for improving predictions. We also found that the data discretizations used in the

  3. Structural similarity of genetically interacting proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nussinov Ruth

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The study of gene mutants and their interactions is fundamental to understanding gene function and backup mechanisms within the cell. The recent availability of large scale genetic interaction networks in yeast and worm allows the investigation of the biological mechanisms underlying these interactions at a global scale. To date, less than 2% of the known genetic interactions in yeast or worm can be accounted for by sequence similarity. Results Here, we perform a genome-scale structural comparison among protein pairs in the two species. We show that significant fractions of genetic interactions involve structurally similar proteins, spanning 7–10% and 14% of all known interactions in yeast and worm, respectively. We identify several structural features that are predictive of genetic interactions and show their superiority over sequence-based features. Conclusion Structural similarity is an important property that can explain and predict genetic interactions. According to the available data, the most abundant mechanism for genetic interactions among structurally similar proteins is a common interacting partner shared by two genetically interacting proteins.

  4. Protein-protein interaction predictions using text mining methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanikolaou, Nikolas; Pavlopoulos, Georgios A; Theodosiou, Theodosios; Iliopoulos, Ioannis

    2015-03-01

    It is beyond any doubt that proteins and their interactions play an essential role in most complex biological processes. The understanding of their function individually, but also in the form of protein complexes is of a great importance. Nowadays, despite the plethora of various high-throughput experimental approaches for detecting protein-protein interactions, many computational methods aiming to predict new interactions have appeared and gained interest. In this review, we focus on text-mining based computational methodologies, aiming to extract information for proteins and their interactions from public repositories such as literature and various biological databases. We discuss their strengths, their weaknesses and how they complement existing experimental techniques by simultaneously commenting on the biological databases which hold such information and the benchmark datasets that can be used for evaluating new tools.

  5. Dynamic fluctuations of protein-carbohydrate interactions promote protein aggregation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Voynov

    Full Text Available Protein-carbohydrate interactions are important for glycoprotein structure and function. Antibodies of the IgG class, with increasing significance as therapeutics, are glycosylated at a conserved site in the constant Fc region. We hypothesized that disruption of protein-carbohydrate interactions in the glycosylated domain of antibodies leads to the exposure of aggregation-prone motifs. Aggregation is one of the main problems in protein-based therapeutics because of immunogenicity concerns and decreased efficacy. To explore the significance of intramolecular interactions between aromatic amino acids and carbohydrates in the IgG glycosylated domain, we utilized computer simulations, fluorescence analysis, and site-directed mutagenesis. We find that the surface exposure of one aromatic amino acid increases due to dynamic fluctuations. Moreover, protein-carbohydrate interactions decrease upon stress, while protein-protein and carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions increase. Substitution of the carbohydrate-interacting aromatic amino acids with non-aromatic residues leads to a significantly lower stability than wild type, and to compromised binding to Fc receptors. Our results support a mechanism for antibody aggregation via decreased protein-carbohydrate interactions, leading to the exposure of aggregation-prone regions, and to aggregation.

  6. Toll-like receptor 2 senses hepatitis C virus core protein but not infectious viral particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Marco; Zeisel, Mirjam B.; Jilg, Nikolaus; Paranhos-Baccalà, Glaucia; Stoll-Keller, Françoise; Wakita, Takaji; Hafkemeyer, Peter; Blum, Hubert E.; Barth, Heidi; Henneke, Philipp; Baumert, Thomas F.

    2009-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are pathogen recognition molecules activating the innate immune system. Cell surface expressed TLRs, such as TLR2 and TLR4 have been shown to play an important role in human host defenses against viruses through sensing of viral structural proteins. In this study, we aimed to elucidate whether TLR2 and TLR4 participate in inducing antiviral immunity against hepatitis C virus by sensing viral structural proteins. We studied TLR2 and TLR4 activation by cell-culture derived infectious virions (HCVcc) and serum-derived virions in comparison to purified recombinant HCV structural proteins and enveloped virus-like particles. Incubation of TLR2 or TLR4 transfected cell lines with recombinant core protein resulted in activation of TLR2-dependent signaling. In contrast, neither infectious virions nor enveloped HCV-like particles triggered TLR2 and TLR4 signaling. These findings suggest that monomeric HCV core protein but not intact infectious particles are sensed by TLR2. Impairment of core-TLR interaction in infectious viral particles may contribute to escape from innate antiviral immune responses. PMID:20375602

  7. Interaction between plate make and protein in protein crystallisation screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon J King

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Protein crystallisation screening involves the parallel testing of large numbers of candidate conditions with the aim of identifying conditions suitable as a starting point for the production of diffraction quality crystals. Generally, condition screening is performed in 96-well plates. While previous studies have examined the effects of protein construct, protein purity, or crystallisation condition ingredients on protein crystallisation, few have examined the effect of the crystallisation plate. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed a statistically rigorous examination of protein crystallisation, and evaluated interactions between crystallisation success and plate row/column, different plates of same make, different plate makes and different proteins. From our analysis of protein crystallisation, we found a significant interaction between plate make and the specific protein being crystallised. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Protein crystal structure determination is the principal method for determining protein structure but is limited by the need to produce crystals of the protein under study. Many important proteins are difficult to crystallize, so that identification of factors that assist crystallisation could open up the structure determination of these more challenging targets. Our findings suggest that protein crystallisation success may be improved by matching a protein with its optimal plate make.

  8. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YGL198W, YGL161C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YGL198W YIP4 Protein that interacts with Rab GTPases, localized to late Golgi vesicles; comput...that interacts with Rab GTPases, localized to late Golgi vesicles; computational ...eracts with Rab GTPases, localized to late Golgi vesicles; computational analysis of large-scale protein-pro...ized to late Golgi vesicles; computational analysis of large-scale protein-protein interaction data suggests

  9. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YGL161C, YGL198W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YGL161C YIP5 Protein that interacts with Rab GTPases, localized to late Golgi vesicles; comput...that interacts with Rab GTPases, localized to late Golgi vesicles; computational ...eracts with Rab GTPases, localized to late Golgi vesicles; computational analysis of large-scale protein-pro...ized to late Golgi vesicles; computational analysis of large-scale protein-protein interaction data suggests

  10. Dengue Virus Capsid Protein Binds Core Histones and Inhibits Nucleosome Formation in Human Liver Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colpitts, Tonya M.; Barthel, Sebastian; Wang, Penghua; Fikrig, Erol

    2011-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a member of the Flaviviridae and a globally (re)emerging pathogen that causes serious human disease. There is no specific antiviral or vaccine for dengue virus infection. Flavivirus capsid (C) is a structural protein responsible for gathering the viral RNA into a nucleocapsid that forms the core of a mature virus particle. Flaviviral replication is known to occur in the cytoplasm yet a large portion of capsid protein localizes to the nucleus during infection. The reasons for the nuclear presences of capsid are not completely understood. Here, we expressed mature DENV C in a tandem affinity purification assay to identify potential binding partners in human liver cells. DENV C targeted the four core histones, H2A, H2B, H3 and H4. DENV C bound recombinant histones in solution and colocalized with histones in the nucleus and cytoplasm of liver cells during DENV infection. We show that DENV C acts as a histone mimic, forming heterodimers with core histones, binding DNA and disrupting nucleosome formation. We also demonstrate that DENV infection increases the amounts of core histones in livers cells, which may be a cellular response to C binding away the histone proteins. Infection with DENV additionally alters levels of H2A phosphorylation in a time-dependent manner. The interactions of C and histones add an interesting new role for the presence of C in the nucleus during DENV infection. PMID:21909430

  11. Dengue virus capsid protein binds core histones and inhibits nucleosome formation in human liver cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonya M Colpitts

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV is a member of the Flaviviridae and a globally (reemerging pathogen that causes serious human disease. There is no specific antiviral or vaccine for dengue virus infection. Flavivirus capsid (C is a structural protein responsible for gathering the viral RNA into a nucleocapsid that forms the core of a mature virus particle. Flaviviral replication is known to occur in the cytoplasm yet a large portion of capsid protein localizes to the nucleus during infection. The reasons for the nuclear presences of capsid are not completely understood. Here, we expressed mature DENV C in a tandem affinity purification assay to identify potential binding partners in human liver cells. DENV C targeted the four core histones, H2A, H2B, H3 and H4. DENV C bound recombinant histones in solution and colocalized with histones in the nucleus and cytoplasm of liver cells during DENV infection. We show that DENV C acts as a histone mimic, forming heterodimers with core histones, binding DNA and disrupting nucleosome formation. We also demonstrate that DENV infection increases the amounts of core histones in livers cells, which may be a cellular response to C binding away the histone proteins. Infection with DENV additionally alters levels of H2A phosphorylation in a time-dependent manner. The interactions of C and histones add an interesting new role for the presence of C in the nucleus during DENV infection.

  12. Self-interaction correction and relativistic exchange on the core states and core hyperfine fields in Fe, Co, and Ni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severin, L.; Richter, M.; Steinbeck, L.

    1997-04-01

    Local density calculations with self-interaction-corrected core states are reported for the transition-metal ferromagnets Fe, Co, and Ni. The hyperfine field matrix elements have been computed. Good agreement with measurements is obtained for Co, whereas for Fe and Ni the discrepancy between local density theory and experiment remains also in the self-interaction-corrected calculation. Possible changes in the core states due to relativistic exchange corrections are also discussed and found to be of minor importance.

  13. Data management of protein interaction networks

    CERN Document Server

    Cannataro, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Interactomics: a complete survey from data generation to knowledge extraction With the increasing use of high-throughput experimental assays, more and more protein interaction databases are becoming available. As a result, computational analysis of protein-to-protein interaction (PPI) data and networks, now known as interactomics, has become an essential tool to determine functionally associated proteins. From wet lab technologies to data management to knowledge extraction, this timely book guides readers through the new science of interactomics, giving them the tools needed to: Generate

  14. Protein-phospholipid interactions in blood clotting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, James H; Davis-Harrison, Rebecca L; Tavoosi, Narjes; Ke, Ke; Pureza, Vincent; Boettcher, John M; Clay, Mary C; Rienstra, Chad M; Ohkubo, Y Zenmei; Pogorelov, Taras V; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2010-04-01

    Most steps of the blood clotting cascade require the assembly of a serine protease with its specific regulatory protein on a suitable phospholipid bilayer. Unfortunately, the molecular details of how blood clotting proteins bind to membrane surfaces remain poorly understood, owing to a dearth of techniques for studying protein-membrane interactions at high resolution. Our laboratories are tackling this question using a combination of approaches, including nanoscale membrane bilayers, solid-state NMR, and large-scale molecular dynamics simulations. These studies are now providing structural insights at atomic resolution into clotting protein-membrane interactions. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Laplacian Spectrum and Protein-Protein Interaction Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Anirban

    2007-01-01

    From the spectral plot of the (normalized) graph Laplacian, the essential qualitative properties of a network can be simultaneously deduced. Given a class of empirical networks, reconstruction schemes for elucidating the evolutionary dynamics leading to those particular data can then be developed. This method is exemplified for protein-protein interaction networks. Traces of their evolutionary history of duplication and divergence processes are identified. In particular, we can identify typical specific features that robustly distinguish protein-protein interaction networks from other classes of networks, in spite of possible statistical fluctuations of the underlying data.

  16. Structural insights into yeast histone chaperone Hif1: a scaffold protein recruiting protein complexes to core histones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hejun; Zhang, Mengying; He, Wei; Zhu, Zhongliang; Teng, Maikun; Gao, Yongxiang; Niu, Liwen

    2014-09-15

    Yeast Hif1 [Hat1 (histone acetyltransferase 1)-interacting factor], a homologue of human NASP (nuclear autoantigenic sperm protein), is a histone chaperone that is involved in various protein complexes which modify histones during telomeric silencing and chromatin reassembly. For elucidating the structural basis of Hif1, in the present paper we demonstrate the crystal structure of Hif1 consisting of a superhelixed TPR (tetratricopeptide repeat) domain and an extended acid loop covering the rear of TPR domain, which represent typical characteristics of SHNi-TPR [Sim3 (start independent of mitosis 3)-Hif1-NASP interrupted TPR] proteins. Our binding assay indicates that Hif1 could bind to the histone octamer via histones H3 and H4. The acid loop is shown to be crucial for the binding of histones and may also change the conformation of the TPR groove. By binding to the core histone complex Hif1 may recruit functional protein complexes to modify histones during chromatin reassembly.

  17. Intraviral protein interactions of Chandipura virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Kapila; Rana, Jyoti; Sreejith, R; Gabrani, Reema; Sharma, Sanjeev K; Gupta, Amita; Chaudhary, Vijay K; Gupta, Sanjay

    2012-10-01

    Chandipura virus (CHPV) is an emerging rhabdovirus responsible for several outbreaks of fatal encephalitis among children in India. The characteristic structure of the virus is a result of extensive and specific interplay among its five encoded proteins. The revelation of interactions among CHPV proteins can help in gaining insight into viral architecture and pathogenesis. In the current study, we carried out comprehensive yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) analysis to elucidate intraviral protein-protein interactions. All of the interactions identified by Y2H were assessed for reliability by GST pull-down and ELISA. A total of eight interactions were identified among four viral proteins. Five of these interactions are being reported for the first time for CHPV. Among these, the glycoprotein (G)-nucleocapsid (N) interaction could be considered novel, as this has not been reported for any members of the family Rhabdoviridae. This study provides a framework within which the roles of the identified protein interactions can be explored further for understanding the biology of this virus at the molecular level.

  18. NOXclass: prediction of protein-protein interaction types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sommer Ingolf

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Structural models determined by X-ray crystallography play a central role in understanding protein-protein interactions at the molecular level. Interpretation of these models requires the distinction between non-specific crystal packing contacts and biologically relevant interactions. This has been investigated previously and classification approaches have been proposed. However, less attention has been devoted to distinguishing different types of biological interactions. These interactions are classified as obligate and non-obligate according to the effect of the complex formation on the stability of the protomers. So far no automatic classification methods for distinguishing obligate, non-obligate and crystal packing interactions have been made available. Results Six interface properties have been investigated on a dataset of 243 protein interactions. The six properties have been combined using a support vector machine algorithm, resulting in NOXclass, a classifier for distinguishing obligate, non-obligate and crystal packing interactions. We achieve an accuracy of 91.8% for the classification of these three types of interactions using a leave-one-out cross-validation procedure. Conclusion NOXclass allows the interpretation and analysis of protein quaternary structures. In particular, it generates testable hypotheses regarding the nature of protein-protein interactions, when experimental results are not available. We expect this server will benefit the users of protein structural models, as well as protein crystallographers and NMR spectroscopists. A web server based on the method and the datasets used in this study are available at http://noxclass.bioinf.mpi-inf.mpg.de/.

  19. Characterization of protein-protein interactions by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velazquez-Campoy, Adrian; Leavitt, Stephanie A; Freire, Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of protein-protein interactions has attracted the attention of many researchers from both a fundamental point of view and a practical point of view. From a fundamental point of view, the development of an understanding of the signaling events triggered by the interaction of two or more proteins provides key information to elucidate the functioning of many cell processes. From a practical point of view, understanding protein-protein interactions at a quantitative level provides the foundation for the development of antagonists or agonists of those interactions. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) is the only technique with the capability of measuring not only binding affinity but the enthalpic and entropic components that define affinity. Over the years, isothermal titration calorimeters have evolved in sensitivity and accuracy. Today, TA Instruments and MicroCal market instruments with the performance required to evaluate protein-protein interactions. In this methods paper, we describe general procedures to analyze heterodimeric (porcine pancreatic trypsin binding to soybean trypsin inhibitor) and homodimeric (bovine pancreatic α-chymotrypsin) protein associations by ITC.

  20. Analysis of correlations between protein complex and protein-protein interaction and mRNA expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Lun; XUE Hong; LU Hongchao; ZHAO Yi; ZHU Xiaopeng; BU Dongbo; LING Lunjiang; CHEN Runsheng

    2003-01-01

    Protein-protein interaction is a physical interaction of two proteins in living cells. In budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, large-scale protein-protein interaction data have been obtained through high-throughput yeast two-hybrid systems (Y2H) and protein complex purification techniques based on mass-spectrometry. Here, we collect 11855 interactions between total 2617 proteins. Through seriate genome-wide mRNA expression data, similarity between two genes could be measured. Protein complex data can also be obtained publicly and can be translated to pair relationship that any two proteins can only exist in the same complex or not. Analysis of protein complex data, protein-protein interaction data and mRNA expression data can elucidate correlations between them. The results show that proteins that have interactions or similar expression patterns have a higher possibility to be in the same protein complex than randomized selected proteins, and proteins which have interactions and similar expression patterns are even more possible to exist in the same protein complex. The work indicates that comprehensive integration and analysis of public large-scale bioinformatical data, such as protein complex data, protein-protein interaction data and mRNA expression data, may help to uncover their relationships and common biological information underlying these data. The strategies described here may help to integrate and analyze other functional genomic and proteomic data, such as gene expression profiling, protein-localization mapping and large-scale phenotypic data, both in yeast and in other organisms.

  1. Protein-protein interaction network of celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamanian Azodi, Mona; Peyvandi, Hassan; Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad; Safaei, Akram; Rostami, Kamran; Vafaee, Reza; Heidari, Mohammadhossein; Hosseini, Mostafa; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the Protein-Protein Interaction Network of Celiac Disease. Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune disease with susceptibility of individuals to gluten of wheat, rye and barley. Understanding the molecular mechanisms and involved pathway may lead to the development of drug target discovery. The protein interaction network is one of the supportive fields to discover the pathogenesis biomarkers for celiac disease. In the present study, we collected the articles that focused on the proteomic data in celiac disease. According to the gene expression investigations of these articles, 31 candidate proteins were selected for this study. The networks of related differentially expressed protein were explored using Cytoscape 3.3 and the PPI analysis methods such as MCODE and ClueGO. According to the network analysis Ubiquitin C, Heat shock protein 90kDa alpha (cytosolic and Grp94); class A, B and 1 member, Heat shock 70kDa protein, and protein 5 (glucose-regulated protein, 78kDa), T-complex, Chaperon in containing TCP1; subunit 7 (beta) and subunit 4 (delta) and subunit 2 (beta), have been introduced as hub-bottlnecks proteins. HSP90AA1, MKKS, EZR, HSPA14, APOB and CAD have been determined as seed proteins. Chaperons have a bold presentation in curtail area in network therefore these key proteins beside the other hub-bottlneck proteins may be a suitable candidates biomarker panel for diagnosis, prognosis and treatment processes in celiac disease.

  2. Evolvability of yeast protein-protein interaction interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talavera, David; Williams, Simon G; Norris, Matthew G S; Robertson, David L; Lovell, Simon C

    2012-06-22

    The functional importance of protein-protein interactions indicates that there should be strong evolutionary constraint on their interaction interfaces. However, binding interfaces are frequently affected by amino acid replacements. Change due to coevolution within interfaces can contribute to variability but is not ubiquitous. An alternative explanation for the ability of surfaces to accept replacements may be that many residues can be changed without affecting the interaction. Candidates for these types of residues are those that make interchain interaction only through the protein main chain, β-carbon, or associated hydrogen atoms. Since almost all residues have these atoms, we hypothesize that this subset of interface residues may be more easily substituted than those that make interactions through other atoms. We term such interactions "residue type independent." Investigating this hypothesis, we find that nearly a quarter of residues in protein interaction interfaces make exclusively interchain residue-type-independent contacts. These residues are less structurally constrained and less conserved than residues making residue-type-specific interactions. We propose that residue-type-independent interactions allow substitutions in binding interfaces while the specificity of binding is maintained.

  3. Treponema denticola interactions with host proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Christopher Fenno

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Oral Treponema species, most notably T. denticola, are implicated in the destructive effects of human periodontal disease. Progress in the molecular analysis of interactions between T. denticola and host proteins is reviewed here, with particular emphasis on the characterization of surface-expressed and secreted proteins of T. denticola involved in interactions with host cells, extracellular matrix components, and components of the innate immune system.

  4. Moonlighting proteins in sperm-egg interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, François M; Serres, Catherine; Auer, Jana

    2014-12-01

    Sperm-egg interaction is a highly species-specific step during the fertilization process. The first steps consist of recognition between proteins on the sperm head and zona pellucida (ZP) glycoproteins, the acellular coat that protects the oocyte. We aimed to determine which sperm head proteins interact with ZP2, ZP3 and ZP4 in humans. Two approaches were combined to identify these proteins: immunoblotting human spermatozoa targeted by antisperm antibodies (ASAs) from infertile men and far-Western blotting of human sperm proteins overlaid by each of the human recombinant ZP (hrZP) proteins. We used a proteomic approach with 2D electrophoretic separation of sperm protein revealed using either ASAs eluted from infertile patients or recombinant human ZP glycoproteins expressed in Chinese-hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Only spots highlighted by both methods were analysed by MALDI-MS/MS for identification. We identified proteins already described in human spermatozoa, but implicated in different metabolic pathways such as glycolytic enzymes [phosphokinase type 3 (PK3), enolase 1 (ENO1), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), aldolase A (ALDOA) and triose phosphate isomerase (TPI)], detoxification enzymes [GST Mu (GSTM) and phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase (PHGPx) 4], ion channels [voltage-dependent anion channel 2 (VDAC2)] or structural proteins (outer dense fibre 2). Several proteins were localized on the sperm head by indirect immunofluorescence, and their interaction with ZP proteins was confirmed by co-precipitation experiments. These results confirm the complexity of the sperm-ZP recognition process in humans with the implication of different proteins interacting with the main three ZP glycoproteins. The multiple roles of these proteins suggest that they are multifaceted or moonlighting proteins.

  5. Interface-resolved network of protein-protein interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret E Johnson

    Full Text Available We define an interface-interaction network (IIN to capture the specificity and competition between protein-protein interactions (PPI. This new type of network represents interactions between individual interfaces used in functional protein binding and thereby contains the detail necessary to describe the competition and cooperation between any pair of binding partners. Here we establish a general framework for the construction of IINs that merges computational structure-based interface assignment with careful curation of available literature. To complement limited structural data, the inclusion of biochemical data is critical for achieving the accuracy and completeness necessary to analyze the specificity and competition between the protein interactions. Firstly, this procedure provides a means to clarify the information content of existing data on purported protein interactions and to remove indirect and spurious interactions. Secondly, the IIN we have constructed here for proteins involved in clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME exhibits distinctive topological properties. In contrast to PPI networks with their global and relatively dense connectivity, the fragmentation of the IIN into distinctive network modules suggests that different functional pressures act on the evolution of its topology. Large modules in the IIN are formed by interfaces sharing specificity for certain domain types, such as SH3 domains distributed across different proteins. The shared and distinct specificity of an interface is necessary for effective negative and positive design of highly selective binding targets. Lastly, the organization of detailed structural data in a network format allows one to identify pathways of specific binding interactions and thereby predict effects of mutations at specific surfaces on a protein and of specific binding inhibitors, as we explore in several examples. Overall, the endocytosis IIN is remarkably complex and rich in features masked

  6. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YGL237C, YOR047C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ene expression; interacts with protein kinase Snf1p, glucose sensors Snf3p and Rgt2p, and TATA-binding prote... expression; interacts with protein kinase Snf1p, glucose sensors Snf3p and Rgt2p, and TATA-binding protein

  7. Mining minimal motif pair sets maximally covering interactions in a protein-protein interaction network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boyen, P.; Neven, F.; Valentim, F.L.; Dijk, van A.D.J.

    2013-01-01

    Correlated motif covering (CMC) is the problem of finding a set of motif pairs, i.e., pairs of patterns, in the sequences of proteins from a protein-protein interaction network (PPI-network) that describe the interactions in the network as concisely as possible. In other words, a perfect solution fo

  8. A simple dependence between protein evolution rate and the number of protein-protein interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirsh Aaron E

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been shown for an evolutionarily distant genomic comparison that the number of protein-protein interactions a protein has correlates negatively with their rates of evolution. However, the generality of this observation has recently been challenged. Here we examine the problem using protein-protein interaction data from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and genome sequences from two other yeast species. Results In contrast to a previous study that used an incomplete set of protein-protein interactions, we observed a highly significant correlation between number of interactions and evolutionary distance to either Candida albicans or Schizosaccharomyces pombe. This study differs from the previous one in that it includes all known protein interactions from S. cerevisiae, and a larger set of protein evolutionary rates. In both evolutionary comparisons, a simple monotonic relationship was found across the entire range of the number of protein-protein interactions. In agreement with our earlier findings, this relationship cannot be explained by the fact that proteins with many interactions tend to be important to yeast. The generality of these correlations in other kingdoms of life unfortunately cannot be addressed at this time, due to the incompleteness of protein-protein interaction data from organisms other than S. cerevisiae. Conclusions Protein-protein interactions tend to slow the rate at which proteins evolve. This may be due to structural constraints that must be met to maintain interactions, but more work is needed to definitively establish the mechanism(s behind the correlations we have observed.

  9. The hepatitis B virus core protein intradimer interface modulates capsid assembly and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selzer, Lisa; Katen, Sarah P; Zlotnick, Adam

    2014-09-02

    During the hepatitis B virus (HBV) life cycle, capsid assembly and disassembly must ensure correct packaging and release of the viral genome. Here we show that changes in the dynamics of the core protein play an important role in regulating these processes. The HBV capsid assembles from 120 copies of the core protein homodimer. Each monomer contains a conserved cysteine at position 61 that can form an intradimer disulfide that we use as a marker for dimer conformational states. We show that dimers in the context of capsids form intradimer disulfides relatively rapidly. Surprisingly, compared to reduced dimers, fully oxidized dimers assembled slower and into capsids that were morphologically similar but less stable. We hypothesize that oxidized protein adopts a geometry (or constellation of geometries) that is unfavorable for capsid assembly, resulting in weaker dimer-dimer interactions as well as slower assembly kinetics. Our results suggest that structural flexibility at the core protein intradimer interface is essential for regulating capsid assembly and stability. We further suggest that capsid destabilization by the C61-C61 disulfide has a regulatory function to support capsid disassembly and release of the viral genome.

  10. Understanding Protein-Protein Interactions Using Local Structural Features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Planas-Iglesias, Joan; Bonet, Jaume; García-García, Javier;

    2013-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) play a relevant role among the different functions of a cell. Identifying the PPI network of a given organism (interactome) is useful to shed light on the key molecular mechanisms within a biological system. In this work, we show the role of structural features...... (loops and domains) to comprehend the molecular mechanisms of PPIs. A paradox in protein-protein binding is to explain how the unbound proteins of a binary complex recognize each other among a large population within a cell and how they find their best docking interface in a short timescale. We use...

  11. Molecular principles of protein stability and protein-protein interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Lendel, Christofer

    2005-01-01

    Proteins with highly specific binding properties constitute the basis for many important applications in biotechnology and medicine. Immunoglobulins have so far been the obvious choice but recent advances in protein engineering have provided several novel constructs that indeed challenge antibodies. One class of such binding proteins is based on the 58 residues three-helix bundle Z domain from staphylococcal protein A (SPA). These so-called affibodies are selected from libraries containing Z ...

  12. HCVpro: Hepatitis C virus protein interaction database

    KAUST Repository

    Kwofie, Samuel K.

    2011-12-01

    It is essential to catalog characterized hepatitis C virus (HCV) protein-protein interaction (PPI) data and the associated plethora of vital functional information to augment the search for therapies, vaccines and diagnostic biomarkers. In furtherance of these goals, we have developed the hepatitis C virus protein interaction database (HCVpro) by integrating manually verified hepatitis C virus-virus and virus-human protein interactions curated from literature and databases. HCVpro is a comprehensive and integrated HCV-specific knowledgebase housing consolidated information on PPIs, functional genomics and molecular data obtained from a variety of virus databases (VirHostNet, VirusMint, HCVdb and euHCVdb), and from BIND and other relevant biology repositories. HCVpro is further populated with information on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) related genes that are mapped onto their encoded cellular proteins. Incorporated proteins have been mapped onto Gene Ontologies, canonical pathways, Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) and extensively cross-referenced to other essential annotations. The database is enriched with exhaustive reviews on structure and functions of HCV proteins, current state of drug and vaccine development and links to recommended journal articles. Users can query the database using specific protein identifiers (IDs), chromosomal locations of a gene, interaction detection methods, indexed PubMed sources as well as HCVpro, BIND and VirusMint IDs. The use of HCVpro is free and the resource can be accessed via http://apps.sanbi.ac.za/hcvpro/ or http://cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/hcvpro/. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  13. Length, protein–protein interactions, and complexity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, T.; Frenkel, D.; Gupta, V.; Deem, M.W.

    2005-01-01

    The evolutionary reason for the increase in gene length from archaea to prokaryotes to eukaryotes observed in large-scale genome sequencing efforts has been unclear. We propose here that the increasing complexity of protein–protein interactions has driven the selection of longer proteins, as they ar

  14. INTERACTION OF ANTIGEN AND ANTIBODY ON CORE-SHELL POLYMERIC MICROSPHERES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gang Li; Qing-bin Meng; Zhan-yong Li; Ying-li An; Xiao-xia Zhu

    2011-01-01

    Monodispersed microspheres with polystyrene as the core and poly(acrylamide-co-N-acryloxysuccinimide) as the shell were synthesized by a two-step surfactant-free emulsion copolymerization. The core-shell morphology of the microspheres was shown by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Rabbit immunoglobulin G (as antigen) was covalently coupled onto the microspheres by the reaction between succinimide-activated ester groups on the shell of the microspheres and amino groups of the antigen molecules. The size of particles was characterized by dynamic light scattering technique and was found to vary upon bioconjugation and interaction with proteins. The binding process was shown to be specific to goat anti-rabbit immunoglobulin G (as antibody) and reversible upon the addition of free antigen into the system.

  15. Hepatitis C virus core protein impairs metabolic disorder of liver cell via HOTAIR-Sirt1 signalling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi-qin; Gu, Xin-yu; Hu, Jin-xing; Ping, Yu; Li, Hua; Yan, Jing-ya; Li, Juan; Sun, Ran; Yu, Zu-jing; Zhang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    It has been suggested that Hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein is associated with metabolic disorders of liver cell. However, the precise mechanism is still unclear. The aim of the present study was to explore the impact of HCV core protein on hepatocyte metabolism by HepG2 and the possible involvement of long non-coding (lnc) RNAs in this process. The effect of HCV core protein on lncRNAs expression was examined with quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR). Manipulation of HVC core protein and lncRNA HOTAIR was to evaluate the role of interaction between them on cell metabolism-related gene expression and cellular metabolism. The potential downstream Sirt1 signal was examined by western blotting and qRT-PCR. Our data suggested that suppression of HOTAIR abrogates HCV core protein-induced reduction in Sirt1 and differential expression of glucose- and lipid-metabolism-related genes. Also it benefits for metabolic homoeostasis of hepatocyte indicated by restoration of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level and NAD/NADH ratio. By manipulation of HOTAIR, we concluded that HOTAIR negatively regulates Sirt1 expression through affecting its promotor methylation. Moreover, overexpression of Sirt1 reverses pcDNA-HOTAIR-induced glucose- and lipid-metabolism-related gene expression. Our study suggests that HCV core protein causes dysfunction of glucose and lipid metabolism in liver cells through HOTAIR-Sirt1 signalling pathway. PMID:27129296

  16. Website on Protein Interaction and Protein Structure Related Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Manoj; Liang, Shoudan; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    In today's world, three seemingly diverse fields - computer information technology, nanotechnology and biotechnology are joining forces to enlarge our scientific knowledge and solve complex technological problems. Our group is dedicated to conduct theoretical research exploring the challenges in this area. The major areas of research include: 1) Yeast Protein Interactions; 2) Protein Structures; and 3) Current Transport through Small Molecules.

  17. Protein-Protein Interaction Reagents | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The CTD2 Center at Emory University has a library of genes used to study protein-protein interactions in mammalian cells. These genes are cloned in different mammalian expression vectors. A list of available cancer-associated genes can be accessed below. Emory_CTD^2_PPI_Reagents.xlsx Contact: Haian Fu

  18. Protein-Protein Interactions (PPI) reagents: | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The CTD2 Center at Emory University has a library of genes used to study protein-protein interactions in mammalian cells. These genes are cloned in different mammalian expression vectors. A list of available cancer-associated genes can be accessed below.

  19. Protein-Protein Interactions (PPI) reagents: | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The CTD2 Center at Emory University has a library of genes used to study protein-protein interactions in mammalian cells. These genes are cloned in different mammalian expression vectors. A list of available cancer-associated genes can be accessed below.

  20. Protein-protein interaction networks in the spinocerebellar ataxias

    OpenAIRE

    David C Rubinsztein

    2006-01-01

    A large yeast two-hybrid study investigating whether the proteins mutated in different forms of spinocerebellar ataxia have interacting protein partners in common suggests that some forms do share common pathways, and will provide a valuable resource for future work on these diseases.

  1. Mapping Protein-Protein Interactions by Quantitative Proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dengjel, Joern; Kratchmarova, Irina; Blagoev, Blagoy

    2010-01-01

    spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics in combination with affinity purification protocols has become the method of choice to map and track the dynamic changes in protein-protein interactions, including the ones occurring during cellular signaling events. Different quantitative MS strategies have been used...

  2. Teaching Noncovalent Interactions Using Protein Molecular Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornasari, Maria Silvina; Parisi, Gustavo; Echave, Julian

    2008-01-01

    Noncovalent interactions and physicochemical properties of amino acids are important topics in biochemistry courses. Here, we present a computational laboratory where the capacity of each of the 20 amino acids to maintain different noncovalent interactions are used to investigate the stabilizing forces in a set of proteins coming from organisms…

  3. Dynamic protein-protein interaction subnetworks of lung cancer in cases with smoking history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wei; He, Li-Ran; Zhao, Yan-Chao; Chan, Man-Him; Zhang, Meng; He, Miao

    2013-02-01

    Smoking is the primary cause of lung cancer and is linked to 85% of lung cancer cases. However, how lung cancer develops in patients with smoking history remains unclear. Systems approaches that combine human protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks and gene expression data are superior to traditional methods. We performed these systems to determine the role that smoking plays in lung cancer development and used the support vector machine (SVM) model to predict PPIs. By defining expression variance (EV), we found 520 dynamic proteins (EV>0.4) using data from the Human Protein Reference Database and Gene Expression Omnibus Database, and built 7 dynamic PPI subnetworks of lung cancer in patients with smoking history. We also determined the primary functions of each subnetwork: signal transduction, apoptosis, and cell migration and adhesion for subnetwork A; cell-sustained angiogenesis for subnetwork B; apoptosis for subnetwork C; and, finally, signal transduction and cell replication and proliferation for subnetworks D-G. The probability distribution of the degree of dynamic protein and static protein differed, clearly showing that the dynamic proteins were not the core proteins which widely connected with their neighbor proteins. There were high correlations among the dynamic proteins, suggesting that the dynamic proteins tend to form specific dynamic modules. We also found that the dynamic proteins were only correlated with the expression of selected proteins but not all neighbor proteins when cancer occurred.

  4. Inferring domain-domain interactions from protein-protein interactions with formal concept analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Khor

    Full Text Available Identifying reliable domain-domain interactions will increase our ability to predict novel protein-protein interactions, to unravel interactions in protein complexes, and thus gain more information about the function and behavior of genes. One of the challenges of identifying reliable domain-domain interactions is domain promiscuity. Promiscuous domains are domains that can occur in many domain architectures and are therefore found in many proteins. This becomes a problem for a method where the score of a domain-pair is the ratio between observed and expected frequencies because the protein-protein interaction network is sparse. As such, many protein-pairs will be non-interacting and domain-pairs with promiscuous domains will be penalized. This domain promiscuity challenge to the problem of inferring reliable domain-domain interactions from protein-protein interactions has been recognized, and a number of work-arounds have been proposed. This paper reports on an application of Formal Concept Analysis to this problem. It is found that the relationship between formal concepts provides a natural way for rare domains to elevate the rank of promiscuous domain-pairs and enrich highly ranked domain-pairs with reliable domain-domain interactions. This piggybacking of promiscuous domain-pairs onto less promiscuous domain-pairs is possible only with concept lattices whose attribute-labels are not reduced and is enhanced by the presence of proteins that comprise both promiscuous and rare domains.

  5. Analysis of protein interaction networks related to core transcription factors target genes in embryonic stem cells%胚胎干细胞核心转录因子靶基因集蛋白互作网络特征分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    左长清; 汪宗桂; 吴铁; 崔燎

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is sufficient to reprogram somatic cells, through transduction of some core transcription factors, into pluripotent stem cells (iPS) that exhibit the essential characteristics of embryonic stem (ES) cells. At present, the complex mechanism is not yet fully understood.OBJECTIVE: To study the protein interaction networks related to core transcription factors target genes in embryonic stem cells and to obtain regulatory mechanism controlled "stemness".METHODS: Non-redundant protein interaction data (NRPD) were obtained after removal of redundant data in BioGRID database.Protein interaction pairs, formed by the target genes, were extracted by perl program and the largest continuous protein interaction networks were obtained through searching NRPD using breadth-first search algorithm. At the same time, 1 000 random networks were analyzed and compared. At last, network visualization was analyzed through the Cytoscape software and network characteristics were explained using complex scale-free network model of Barabasi-Albert.RESULTS AND CONCLUSION : More protein interaction pairs and larger continuous protein network, statistically significant difference compared with random genes, were formed by core transcription factor target genes. The continuous protein network is scale-free characteristics of complex networks. This study has suggested that target genes may regulate synergistically "stemness" characteristics of embryonic stem cells through close interaction and forming a network module.%背景:外源性核心转录因子导入终末分化细胞能产生具有与胚胎干细胞特性相似的诱导多潜能干细胞,其复杂机制目前尚未完全阐明.目的:分析核心转录因子靶基因集蛋白互作网络特征,获得其影响"干性"特征的调控机制.方法:去除BioGRID数据库中的冗余数据,获得非冗余蛋白互作数据库.perl程序搜索靶基因集组成的蛋白互作对,广度优先算法搜索非冗余蛋白互作数

  6. The expanded FindCore method for identification of a core atom set for assessment of protein structure prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, David A; Grullon, Jennifer; Huang, Yuanpeng J; Tejero, Roberto; Montelione, Gaetano T

    2014-02-01

    Maximizing the scientific impact of NMR-based structure determination requires robust and statistically sound methods for assessing the precision of NMR-derived structures. In particular, a method to define a core atom set for calculating superimpositions and validating structure predictions is critical to the use of NMR-derived structures as targets in the CASP competition. FindCore (Snyder and Montelione, Proteins 2005;59:673-686) is a superimposition independent method for identifying a core atom set and partitioning that set into domains. However, as FindCore optimizes superimposition by sensitively excluding not-well-defined atoms, the FindCore core may not comprise all atoms suitable for use in certain applications of NMR structures, including the CASP assessment process. Adapting the FindCore approach to assess predicted models against experimental NMR structures in CASP10 required modification of the FindCore method. This paper describes conventions and a standard protocol to calculate an "Expanded FindCore" atom set suitable for validation and application in biological and biophysical contexts. A key application of the Expanded FindCore method is to identify a core set of atoms in the experimental NMR structure for which it makes sense to validate predicted protein structure models. We demonstrate the application of this Expanded FindCore method in characterizing well-defined regions of 18 NMR-derived CASP10 target structures. The Expanded FindCore protocol defines "expanded core atom sets" that match an expert's intuition of which parts of the structure are sufficiently well defined to use in assessing CASP model predictions. We also illustrate the impact of this analysis on the CASP GDT assessment scores.

  7. Protein complexes predictions within protein interaction networks using genetic algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadan, Emad; Naef, Ahmed; Ahmed, Moataz

    2016-07-25

    Protein-protein interaction networks are receiving increased attention due to their importance in understanding life at the cellular level. A major challenge in systems biology is to understand the modular structure of such biological networks. Although clustering techniques have been proposed for clustering protein-protein interaction networks, those techniques suffer from some drawbacks. The application of earlier clustering techniques to protein-protein interaction networks in order to predict protein complexes within the networks does not yield good results due to the small-world and power-law properties of these networks. In this paper, we construct a new clustering algorithm for predicting protein complexes through the use of genetic algorithms. We design an objective function for exclusive clustering and overlapping clustering. We assess the quality of our proposed clustering algorithm using two gold-standard data sets. Our algorithm can identify protein complexes that are significantly enriched in the gold-standard data sets. Furthermore, our method surpasses three competing methods: MCL, ClusterOne, and MCODE in terms of the quality of the predicted complexes. The source code and accompanying examples are freely available at http://faculty.kfupm.edu.sa/ics/eramadan/GACluster.zip .

  8. Controllability of protein-protein interaction phosphorylation-based networks: Participation of the hub 14-3-3 protein family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhart, Marina; Flores, Gabriel; Bustos, Diego M

    2016-05-19

    Posttranslational regulation of protein function is an ubiquitous mechanism in eukaryotic cells. Here, we analyzed biological properties of nodes and edges of a human protein-protein interaction phosphorylation-based network, especially of those nodes critical for the network controllability. We found that the minimal number of critical nodes needed to control the whole network is 29%, which is considerably lower compared to other real networks. These critical nodes are more regulated by posttranslational modifications and contain more binding domains to these modifications than other kinds of nodes in the network, suggesting an intra-group fast regulation. Also, when we analyzed the edges characteristics that connect critical and non-critical nodes, we found that the former are enriched in domain-to-eukaryotic linear motif interactions, whereas the later are enriched in domain-domain interactions. Our findings suggest a possible structure for protein-protein interaction networks with a densely interconnected and self-regulated central core, composed of critical nodes with a high participation in the controllability of the full network, and less regulated peripheral nodes. Our study offers a deeper understanding of complex network control and bridges the controllability theorems for complex networks and biological protein-protein interaction phosphorylation-based networked systems.

  9. Cloning and characterization of a novel hepatitis B virus core binding protein C12

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yin-Ying Lu; Jun Cheng; Yong-Ping Yang; Yan Liu; Lin Wang; Ke Li; Ling-Xia Zhang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate the biological function of HBV core antigen (HBcAg) on pathogenesis of hepatitis B, a novel gene C12 coding for protein with unknown function interacting with HBcAg in hepatocytes was identified and characterized. METHODS: HBcAg bait plasmid pGBKT7-HBcAg was constructed and transformed into yeast AH109, then the transformed yeast was mated with yeast Y187 containing liver complementary DNA (cDNA) library plasmid in 2×YPDA medium. Diploid yeast was plated on synthetic dropout nutrient medium (SD/-Trp-Leu-His-Ade) and synthetic dropout nutrient medium (SD/-Trp-Leu-His-Ade)containing X-α-gal for screening twice. After extracting and sequencing of plasmid from blue colonies, we isolated a cDNA clone encoding a novel protein designated as C12that directly interacted with HBcAg. The interaction between HBcAg and C12 was verified again by re-mating.pEGFP-N1-C12 fluorescent protein fusion gene was transfected in 293 and L02 cell, and observed by fluorescent microscope. MTT reduction assay was used to study the action of C12 protein effect on metabolism of mammal cell. Yeast two-hybrid and cDNA microarray were performed to search binding protein and differential expression genes regulated by C12 protein.RESULTS: C12 gene was screened and identified by yeast two-hybrid system 3. The interaction between HBcAg and the novel protein coded by the new gene C12 was further confirmed by re-mating. After 48 h, fluorescence of fusion protein could be observed steadily in the 293 and L02 cell plasma. Under MTT assay, we found that the expression of C12 did not influence the growth of liver cells. Seventeen differential expression genes in HepG2 cells transfected with C12 protein expression plasmid by cDNA microarray,of which 16 genes were upregulated and 1 gene was downregulated by C12 protein. Twenty-one colonies containing 16 different genes coding for C12 protein binding proteins were isolated by yeast two-hybrid, there were 2 new genes with unknown function

  10. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YPL070W, YBR176W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available utational analysis of large-scale protein-protein interaction data suggests a possible role in transcription...otein of unknown function containing a Vps9 domain; computational analysis of large-scale

  11. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YDR084C, YGL198W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available with Rab GTPases, localized to late Golgi vesicles; computational analysis of large-scale...omputational analysis of large-scale protein-protein interaction data suggests a possible role in vesicle-me

  12. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YPR148C, YDL237W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YPR148C - Protein of unknown function that may interact with ribosomes, based on co-purification experiments... with ribosomes, based on co-purification experiments; green fluorescent protein

  13. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YLR347C, YLR377C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ucleoporins to mediate nuclear import of NLS-containing cargo proteins via the nuclear pore complex; regulat...0p; interacts with nucleoporins to mediate nuclear import of NLS-containing cargo proteins via the nuclear p

  14. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YLR347C, YBR176W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ucleoporins to mediate nuclear import of NLS-containing cargo proteins via the nuclear pore complex; regulat...p; interacts with nucleoporins to mediate nuclear import of NLS-containing cargo proteins via the nuclear po

  15. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YGL145W, YNL258C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ripheral membrane protein required for Golgi-to-ER retrograde traffic; component ... membrane protein required for Golgi-to-ER retrograde traffic; component of the ER target site that interact

  16. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YDL226C, YJL151C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available s bait as prey (0) YJL151C SNA3 Integral membrane protein localized to vacuolar intralumenal vesicles, computation...intralumenal vesicles, computational analysis of large-scale protein-protein interaction data suggests a pos... gene name SNA3 Prey description Integral membrane protein localized to vacuolar

  17. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YDR026C, YDL030W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YDR026C - Protein of unknown function that may interact with ribosomes, based on co-purification...ein of unknown function that may interact with ribosomes, based on co-purification

  18. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YNL311C, YKL001C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YNL311C - Protein of unknown function that may interact with ribosomes, based on co-purification...nknown function that may interact with ribosomes, based on co-purification experi

  19. An evaluation of in vitro protein-protein interaction techniques: assessing contaminating background proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Jenika M; Winstone, Tara L; Coorssen, Jens R; Turner, Raymond J

    2006-04-01

    Determination of protein-protein interactions is an important component in assigning function and discerning the biological relevance of proteins within a broader cellular context. In vitro protein-protein interaction methodologies, including affinity chromatography, coimmunoprecipitation, and newer approaches such as protein chip arrays, hold much promise in the detection of protein interactions, particularly in well-characterized organisms with sequenced genomes. However, each of these approaches attracts certain background proteins that can thwart detection and identification of true interactors. In addition, recombinant proteins expressed in Escherichia coli are also extensively used to assess protein-protein interactions, and background proteins in these isolates can thus contaminate interaction studies. Rigorous validation of a true interaction thus requires not only that an interaction be found by alternate techniques, but more importantly that researchers be aware of and control for matrix/support dependence. Here, we evaluate these methods for proteins interacting with DmsD (an E. coli redox enzyme maturation protein chaperone), in vitro, using E. coli subcellular fractions as prey sources. We compare and contrast the various in vitro interaction methods to identify some of the background proteins and protein profiles that are inherent to each of the methods in an E. coli system.

  20. Geometric de-noising of protein-protein interaction networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleksii Kuchaiev

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Understanding complex networks of protein-protein interactions (PPIs is one of the foremost challenges of the post-genomic era. Due to the recent advances in experimental bio-technology, including yeast-2-hybrid (Y2H, tandem affinity purification (TAP and other high-throughput methods for protein-protein interaction (PPI detection, huge amounts of PPI network data are becoming available. Of major concern, however, are the levels of noise and incompleteness. For example, for Y2H screens, it is thought that the false positive rate could be as high as 64%, and the false negative rate may range from 43% to 71%. TAP experiments are believed to have comparable levels of noise.We present a novel technique to assess the confidence levels of interactions in PPI networks obtained from experimental studies. We use it for predicting new interactions and thus for guiding future biological experiments. This technique is the first to utilize currently the best fitting network model for PPI networks, geometric graphs. Our approach achieves specificity of 85% and sensitivity of 90%. We use it to assign confidence scores to physical protein-protein interactions in the human PPI network downloaded from BioGRID. Using our approach, we predict 251 interactions in the human PPI network, a statistically significant fraction of which correspond to protein pairs sharing common GO terms. Moreover, we validate a statistically significant portion of our predicted interactions in the HPRD database and the newer release of BioGRID. The data and Matlab code implementing the methods are freely available from the web site: http://www.kuchaev.com/Denoising.

  1. Screening for protein-DNA interactions by automatable DNA-protein interaction ELISA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luise H Brand

    Full Text Available DNA-binding proteins (DBPs, such as transcription factors, constitute about 10% of the protein-coding genes in eukaryotic genomes and play pivotal roles in the regulation of chromatin structure and gene expression by binding to short stretches of DNA. Despite their number and importance, only for a minor portion of DBPs the binding sequence had been disclosed. Methods that allow the de novo identification of DNA-binding motifs of known DBPs, such as protein binding microarray technology or SELEX, are not yet suited for high-throughput and automation. To close this gap, we report an automatable DNA-protein-interaction (DPI-ELISA screen of an optimized double-stranded DNA (dsDNA probe library that allows the high-throughput identification of hexanucleotide DNA-binding motifs. In contrast to other methods, this DPI-ELISA screen can be performed manually or with standard laboratory automation. Furthermore, output evaluation does not require extensive computational analysis to derive a binding consensus. We could show that the DPI-ELISA screen disclosed the full spectrum of binding preferences for a given DBP. As an example, AtWRKY11 was used to demonstrate that the automated DPI-ELISA screen revealed the entire range of in vitro binding preferences. In addition, protein extracts of AtbZIP63 and the DNA-binding domain of AtWRKY33 were analyzed, which led to a refinement of their known DNA-binding consensi. Finally, we performed a DPI-ELISA screen to disclose the DNA-binding consensus of a yet uncharacterized putative DBP, AtTIFY1. A palindromic TGATCA-consensus was uncovered and we could show that the GATC-core is compulsory for AtTIFY1 binding. This specific interaction between AtTIFY1 and its DNA-binding motif was confirmed by in vivo plant one-hybrid assays in protoplasts. Thus, the value and applicability of the DPI-ELISA screen for de novo binding site identification of DBPs, also under automatized conditions, is a promising approach for a

  2. Protein-protein interaction network analysis of cirrhosis liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safaei, Akram; Rezaei Tavirani, Mostafa; Arefi Oskouei, Afsaneh; Zamanian Azodi, Mona; Mohebbi, Seyed Reza; Nikzamir, Abdol Rahim

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of biological characteristics of 13 identified proteins of patients with cirrhotic liver disease is the main aim of this research. In clinical usage, liver biopsy remains the gold standard for diagnosis of hepatic fibrosis. Evaluation and confirmation of liver fibrosis stages and severity of chronic diseases require a precise and noninvasive biomarkers. Since the early detection of cirrhosis is a clinical problem, achieving a sensitive, specific and predictive novel method based on biomarkers is an important task. Essential analysis, such as gene ontology (GO) enrichment and protein-protein interactions (PPI) was undergone EXPASy, STRING Database and DAVID Bioinformatics Resources query. Based on GO analysis, most of proteins are located in the endoplasmic reticulum lumen, intracellular organelle lumen, membrane-enclosed lumen, and extracellular region. The relevant molecular functions are actin binding, metal ion binding, cation binding and ion binding. Cell adhesion, biological adhesion, cellular amino acid derivative, metabolic process and homeostatic process are the related processes. Protein-protein interaction network analysis introduced five proteins (fibroblast growth factor receptor 4, tropomyosin 4, tropomyosin 2 (beta), lectin, Lectin galactoside-binding soluble 3 binding protein and apolipoprotein A-I) as hub and bottleneck proteins. Our result indicates that regulation of lipid metabolism and cell survival are important biological processes involved in cirrhosis disease. More investigation of above mentioned proteins will provide a better understanding of cirrhosis disease.

  3. Analysis of Protein-Membrane Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemmer, Gerdi Christine

    Cellular membranes are complex structures, consisting of hundreds of different lipids and proteins. These membranes act as barriers between distinct environments, constituting hot spots for many essential functions of the cell, including signaling, energy conversion, and transport. These functions....... Discovered interactions were then probed on the level of the membrane using liposome-based assays. In the second part, a transmembrane protein was investigated. Assays to probe activity of the plasma membrane ATPase (Arabidopsis thaliana H+ -ATPase isoform 2 (AHA2)) in single liposomes using both giant...... are implemented by soluble proteins reversibly binding to, as well as by integral membrane proteins embedded in, cellular membranes. The activity and interaction of these proteins is furthermore modulated by the lipids of the membrane. Here, liposomes were used as model membrane systems to investigate...

  4. Biospecific protein immobilization for rapid analysis of weak protein interactions using self-interaction nanoparticle spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengali, Aditya N; Tessier, Peter M

    2009-10-01

    "Reversible" protein interactions govern diverse biological behavior ranging from intracellular transport and toxic protein aggregation to protein crystallization and inactivation of protein therapeutics. Much less is known about weak protein interactions than their stronger counterparts since they are difficult to characterize, especially in a parallel format (in contrast to a sequential format) necessary for high-throughput screening. We have recently introduced a highly efficient approach of characterizing protein self-association, namely self-interaction nanoparticle spectroscopy (SINS; Tessier et al., 2008; J Am Chem Soc 130:3106-3112). This approach exploits the separation-dependent optical properties of gold nanoparticles to detect weak self-interactions between proteins immobilized on nanoparticles. A limitation of our previous work is that differences in the sequence and structure of proteins can lead to significant differences in their affinity to adsorb to nanoparticle surfaces, which complicates analysis of the corresponding protein self-association behavior. In this work we demonstrate a highly specific approach for coating nanoparticles with proteins using biotin-avidin interactions to generate protein-nanoparticle conjugates that report protein self-interactions through changes in their optical properties. Using lysozyme as a model protein that is refractory to characterization by conventional SINS, we demonstrate that surface Plasmon wavelengths for gold-avidin-lysozyme conjugates over a range of solution conditions (i.e., pH and ionic strength) are well correlated with lysozyme osmotic second virial coefficient measurements. Since SINS requires orders of magnitude less protein and time than conventional methods (e.g., static light scattering), we envision this approach will find application in large screens of protein self-association aimed at either preventing (e.g., protein aggregation) or promoting (e.g., protein crystallization) these

  5. Proteomic analysis of SETD6 interacting proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Ofir; Chen, Ayelet; Feldman, Michal; Levy, Dan

    2016-03-01

    SETD6 (SET-domain-containing protein 6) is a mono-methyltransferase that has been shown to methylate RelA and H2AZ. Using a proteomic approach we recently identified several new SETD6 substrates. To identify novel SETD6 interacting proteins, SETD6 was immunoprecipitated (IP) from Human erythromyeloblastoid leukemia K562 cells. SETD6 binding proteins were subjected to mass-spectrometry analysis resulting in 115 new SETD6 binding candidates. STRING database was used to map the SETD6 interactome network. Network enrichment analysis of biological processes with Gene Ontology (GO) database, identified three major groups; metabolic processes, muscle contraction and protein folding.

  6. Structure of the protein core of the glypican Dally-like and localization of a region important for hedgehog signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min-Sung; Saunders, Adam M.; Hamaoka, Brent Y.; Beachy, Philip A.; Leahy, Daniel J. (Stanford-MED); (JHU)

    2011-09-20

    Glypicans are heparan sulfate proteoglycans that modulate the signaling of multiple growth factors active during animal development, and loss of glypican function is associated with widespread developmental abnormalities. Glypicans consist of a conserved, approximately 45-kDa N-terminal protein core region followed by a stalk region that is tethered to the cell membrane by a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol anchor. The stalk regions are predicted to be random coil but contain a variable number of attachment sites for heparan sulfate chains. Both the N-terminal protein core and the heparan sulfate attachments are important for glypican function. We report here the 2.4-{angstrom} crystal structure of the N-terminal protein core region of the Drosophila glypican Dally-like (Dlp). This structure reveals an elongated, {alpha}-helical fold for glypican core regions that does not appear homologous to any known structure. The Dlp core protein is required for normal responsiveness to Hedgehog (Hh) signals, and we identify a localized region on the Dlp surface important for mediating its function in Hh signaling. Purified Dlp protein core does not, however, interact appreciably with either Hh or an Hh:Ihog complex.

  7. Coevolution study of mitochondria respiratory chain proteins:Toward the understanding of protein-protein interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming Yang; Yan Ge; Jiayan Wu; Jingfa Xiao; Jun Yu

    2011-01-01

    Coevolution can be seen as the interdependency between evolutionary histories. In the context of protein evolution, functional correlation proteins are ever-present coordinated evolutionary characters without disruption of organismal integrity. As to complex system, there are two forms of protein-protein interactions in vivo, which refer to inter-complex interaction and intra-complex interaction. In this paper, we studied the difference of coevolution characters between inter-complex interaction and intra-complex interaction using "Mirror tree" method on the respiratory chain (RC) proteins. We divided the correlation coefficients of every pairwise RC proteins into two groups corresponding to the binary protein-protein interaction in intra-complex and the binary protein-protein interaction in inter-complex, respectively. A dramatical discrepancy is detected between the coevolution characters of the two sets of protein interactions (Wilcoxon test, p-value = 4.4 x 10-6). Our finding reveals some critical information on coevolutionary study and assists the mechanical investigation of protein-protein interaction.Furthermore, the results also provide some unique clue for supramolecular organization of protein complexes in the mitochondrial inner membrane. More detailed binding sites map and genome information of nuclear encoded RC proteins will be extraordinary valuable for the further mitochondria dynamics study.

  8. Inferring high-confidence human protein-protein interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Xueping

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As numerous experimental factors drive the acquisition, identification, and interpretation of protein-protein interactions (PPIs, aggregated assemblies of human PPI data invariably contain experiment-dependent noise. Ascertaining the reliability of PPIs collected from these diverse studies and scoring them to infer high-confidence networks is a non-trivial task. Moreover, a large number of PPIs share the same number of reported occurrences, making it impossible to distinguish the reliability of these PPIs and rank-order them. For example, for the data analyzed here, we found that the majority (>83% of currently available human PPIs have been reported only once. Results In this work, we proposed an unsupervised statistical approach to score a set of diverse, experimentally identified PPIs from nine primary databases to create subsets of high-confidence human PPI networks. We evaluated this ranking method by comparing it with other methods and assessing their ability to retrieve protein associations from a number of diverse and independent reference sets. These reference sets contain known biological data that are either directly or indirectly linked to interactions between proteins. We quantified the average effect of using ranked protein interaction data to retrieve this information and showed that, when compared to randomly ranked interaction data sets, the proposed method created a larger enrichment (~134% than either ranking based on the hypergeometric test (~109% or occurrence ranking (~46%. Conclusions From our evaluations, it was clear that ranked interactions were always of value because higher-ranked PPIs had a higher likelihood of retrieving high-confidence experimental data. Reducing the noise inherent in aggregated experimental PPIs via our ranking scheme further increased the accuracy and enrichment of PPIs derived from a number of biologically relevant data sets. These results suggest that using our high

  9. Both core and F proteins of hepatitis C virus could enhance cell proliferation in transgenic mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Wen-Ta [Graduate Institute of Medical Biotechnology, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Li, Hui-Chun [Department of Biochemistry, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Lee, Shen-Kao; Ma, Hsin-Chieh; Yang, Chee-Hing; Chen, Hung-Ling [Graduate Institute of Medical Biotechnology, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Lo, Shih-Yen, E-mail: losylo@mail.tcu.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Medical Biotechnology, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Department of Laboratory Medicine, Buddhist Tzu Chi General Hospital, Hualien, Taiwan (China)

    2013-05-24

    Highlights: •HCV core and F proteins could induce hepatocyte proliferation in the transgenic mice. •β-Catenin signaling pathway was activated by core protein in the transgenic mice. •β-Catenin signaling pathway was activated by myc-F protein in the transgenic mice. •Expression of SMA protein was enhanced by core but not myc-F protein. -- Abstract: The role of the protein encoded by the alternative open reading frame (ARF/F/core+1) of the Hepatitis C virus (HCV) genome in viral pathogenesis remains unknown. The different forms of ARF/F/core+1 protein were labile in cultured cells, a myc-tag fused at the N-terminus of the F protein made it more stable. To determine the role of core and F proteins in HCV pathogenesis, transgenic mice with either protein expression under the control of Albumin promoter were generated. Expression of core protein and F protein with myc tag (myc-F) could be detected by Western blotting analysis in the livers of these mice. The ratio of liver to body weight is increased for both core and myc-F transgenic mice compared to that of wild type mice. Indeed, the proliferating cell nuclear antigen protein, a proliferation marker, was up-regulated in the transgenic mice with core or myc-F protein. Further analyses by microarray and Western blotting suggested that β-catenin signaling pathway was activated by either core or myc-F protein in the transgenic mice. These transgenic mice were further treated with either Diethynitrosamine (a tumor initiator) or Phenobarbital (a tumor promoter). Phenobarbital but not Diethynitrosamine treatment could increase the liver/body weight ratio of these mice. However, no tumor formation was observed in these mice. In conclusion, HCV core and myc-F proteins could induce hepatocyte proliferation in the transgenic mice possibly through β-catenin signaling pathway.

  10. A Bayesian Framework for Combining Protein and Network Topology Information for Predicting Protein-Protein Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birlutiu, Adriana; d'Alché-Buc, Florence; Heskes, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Computational methods for predicting protein-protein interactions are important tools that can complement high-throughput technologies and guide biologists in designing new laboratory experiments. The proteins and the interactions between them can be described by a network which is characterized by several topological properties. Information about proteins and interactions between them, in combination with knowledge about topological properties of the network, can be used for developing computational methods that can accurately predict unknown protein-protein interactions. This paper presents a supervised learning framework based on Bayesian inference for combining two types of information: i) network topology information, and ii) information related to proteins and the interactions between them. The motivation of our model is that by combining these two types of information one can achieve a better accuracy in predicting protein-protein interactions, than by using models constructed from these two types of information independently.

  11. Predicting protein-protein interactions in the post synaptic density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-shira, Ossnat; Chechik, Gal

    2013-09-01

    The post synaptic density (PSD) is a specialization of the cytoskeleton at the synaptic junction, composed of hundreds of different proteins. Characterizing the protein components of the PSD and their interactions can help elucidate the mechanism of long-term changes in synaptic plasticity, which underlie learning and memory. Unfortunately, our knowledge of the proteome and interactome of the PSD is still partial and noisy. In this study we describe a computational framework to improve the reconstruction of the PSD network. The approach is based on learning the characteristics of PSD protein interactions from a set of trusted interactions, expanding this set with data collected from large scale repositories, and then predicting novel interaction with proteins that are suspected to reside in the PSD. Using this method we obtained thirty predicted interactions, with more than half of which having supporting evidence in the literature. We discuss in details two of these new interactions, Lrrtm1 with PSD-95 and Src with Capg. The first may take part in a mechanism underlying glutamatergic dysfunction in schizophrenia. The second suggests an alternative mechanism to regulate dendritic spines maturation.

  12. Optical methods in the study of protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masi, Alessio; Cicchi, Riccardo; Carloni, Adolfo; Pavone, Francesco Saverio; Arcangeli, Annarosa

    2010-01-01

    Förster (or Fluorescence) resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a physical process in which energy is transferred nonradiatively from an excited fluorophore, serving as a donor, to another chromophore (acceptor). Among the techniques related to fluorescence microscopy, FRET is unique in providing signals sensitive to intra- and intermolecular distances in the 1-10 nm range. Because of its potency, FRET is increasingly used to visualize and quantify the dynamics of protein-protein interaction in living cells, with high spatio-temporal resolution. Here we describe the physical bases of FRET, detailing the principal methods applied: (1) measurement of signal intensity and (2) analysis of fluorescence lifetime (FLIM). Although several technical complications must be carefully considered, both methods can be applied fruitfully to specific fields. For example, FRET based on intensity detection is more suitable to follow biological phenomena at a finely tuned spatial and temporal scale. Furthermore, a specific fluorescence signal occurring close to the plasma membrane (advantage of the discovery and use of spontaneously fluorescent proteins, like the green fluorescent protein (GFP). Until now, FRET has been widely used to analyze the structural characteristics of several proteins, including integrins and ion channels. More recently, this method has been applied to clarify the interaction dynamics of these classes of membrane proteins with cytosolic signaling proteins. We report two examples in which the interaction dynamics between integrins and ion channels have been studied with FRET methods. Using fluorescent antibodies and applying FRET-FLIM, the direct interaction of beta1 integrin with the receptor for Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF-R) has been proved in living endothelial cells. A different approach, based on TIRFM measurement of the FRET intensity of fluorescently labeled recombinant proteins, suggests that a direct interaction also occurs between integrins and the

  13. Protein-protein interaction network of celiac disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamanian Azodi, Mona; Peyvandi, Hassan; Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad; Safaei, Akram; Rostami, Kamran; Vafaee, Reza; Heidari, Mohammadhossein; Hosseini, Mostafa; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study is to investigate the Protein-Protein Interaction Network of Celiac Disease. Background: Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune disease with susceptibility of individuals to gluten of wheat, rye and barley. Understanding the molecular mechanisms and involved pathway may lead to the development of drug target discovery. The protein interaction network is one of the supportive fields to discover the pathogenesis biomarkers for celiac disease. Material and methods: In the present study, we collected the articles that focused on the proteomic data in celiac disease. According to the gene expression investigations of these articles, 31 candidate proteins were selected for this study. The networks of related differentially expressed protein were explored using Cytoscape 3.3 and the PPI analysis methods such as MCODE and ClueGO. Results: According to the network analysis Ubiquitin C, Heat shock protein 90kDa alpha (cytosolic and Grp94); class A, B and 1 member, Heat shock 70kDa protein, and protein 5 (glucose-regulated protein, 78kDa), T-complex, Chaperon in containing TCP1; subunit 7 (beta) and subunit 4 (delta) and subunit 2 (beta), have been introduced as hub-bottlnecks proteins. HSP90AA1, MKKS, EZR, HSPA14, APOB and CAD have been determined as seed proteins. Conclusion: Chaperons have a bold presentation in curtail area in network therefore these key proteins beside the other hub-bottlneck proteins may be a suitable candidates biomarker panel for diagnosis, prognosis and treatment processes in celiac disease. PMID:27895852

  14. Interactive visualization and task management on the 48-core Intel SCC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Woning, J.; Bakker, R.; Noulard, E.; Vernhes, S.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we propose and describe how we have built a tool that enables a user to interactively monitor and manage a many-core system like the 48-core experimental Singlechip Cloud Computer (SCC), which was created by Intel Labs targeting the many-core research community. We provide the user

  15. The core planar cell polarity gene prickle interacts with flamingo to promote sensory axon advance in the Drosophila embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrkusich, Eli M; Flanagan, Dustin J; Whitington, Paul M

    2011-10-01

    The atypical cadherin Drosophila protein Flamingo and its vertebrate homologues play widespread roles in the regulation of both dendrite and axon growth. However, little is understood about the molecular mechanisms that underpin these functions. Whereas flamingo interacts with a well-defined group of genes in regulating planar cell polarity, previous studies have uncovered little evidence that the other core planar cell polarity genes are involved in regulation of neurite growth. We present data in this study showing that the planar cell polarity gene prickle interacts with flamingo in regulating sensory axon advance at a key choice point - the transition between the peripheral nervous system and the central nervous system. The cytoplasmic tail of the Flamingo protein is not required for this interaction. Overexpression of another core planar cell polarity gene dishevelled produces a similar phenotype to prickle mutants, suggesting that this gene may also play a role in regulation of sensory axon advance.

  16. Annotation and retrieval in protein interaction databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannataro, Mario; Hiram Guzzi, Pietro; Veltri, Pierangelo

    2014-06-01

    Biological databases have been developed with a special focus on the efficient retrieval of single records or the efficient computation of specialized bioinformatics algorithms against the overall database, such as in sequence alignment. The continuos production of biological knowledge spread on several biological databases and ontologies, such as Gene Ontology, and the availability of efficient techniques to handle such knowledge, such as annotation and semantic similarity measures, enable the development on novel bioinformatics applications that explicitly use and integrate such knowledge. After introducing the annotation process and the main semantic similarity measures, this paper shows how annotations and semantic similarity can be exploited to improve the extraction and analysis of biologically relevant data from protein interaction databases. As case studies, the paper presents two novel software tools, OntoPIN and CytoSeVis, both based on the use of Gene Ontology annotations, for the advanced querying of protein interaction databases and for the enhanced visualization of protein interaction networks.

  17. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YOR047C, YKL038W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available racts with protein kinase Snf1p, glucose sensors Snf3p and Rgt2p, and TATA-binding protein Spt15p; acts as a...Bait description Protein involved in control of glucose-regulated gene expression; interacts with protein kinase Snf1p, glucose senso...rs Snf3p and Rgt2p, and TATA-binding protein Spt15p; acts as a regulator of the tra

  18. Protein-protein interactions within late pre-40S ribosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melody G Campbell

    Full Text Available Ribosome assembly in eukaryotic organisms requires more than 200 assembly factors to facilitate and coordinate rRNA transcription, processing, and folding with the binding of the ribosomal proteins. Many of these assembly factors bind and dissociate at defined times giving rise to discrete assembly intermediates, some of which have been partially characterized with regards to their protein and RNA composition. Here, we have analyzed the protein-protein interactions between the seven assembly factors bound to late cytoplasmic pre-40S ribosomes using recombinant proteins in binding assays. Our data show that these factors form two modules: one comprising Enp1 and the export adaptor Ltv1 near the beak structure, and the second comprising the kinase Rio2, the nuclease Nob1, and a regulatory RNA binding protein Dim2/Pno1 on the front of the head. The GTPase-like Tsr1 and the universally conserved methylase Dim1 are also peripherally connected to this second module. Additionally, in an effort to further define the locations for these essential proteins, we have analyzed the interactions between these assembly factors and six ribosomal proteins: Rps0, Rps3, Rps5, Rps14, Rps15 and Rps29. Together, these results and previous RNA-protein crosslinking data allow us to propose a model for the binding sites of these seven assembly factors. Furthermore, our data show that the essential kinase Rio2 is located at the center of the pre-ribosomal particle and interacts, directly or indirectly, with every other assembly factor, as well as three ribosomal proteins required for cytoplasmic 40S maturation. These data suggest that Rio2 could play a central role in regulating cytoplasmic maturation steps.

  19. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YDR425W, YGL198W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available with this bait as prey (0) YGL198W YIP4 Protein that interacts with Rab GTPases, localized to late Golgi vesicles; computation...IP4 Prey description Protein that interacts with Rab GTPases, localized to late Golgi vesicles; computatio

  20. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YMR047C, YDR229W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available R229W IVY1 Phospholipid-binding protein that interacts with both Ypt7p and Vps33p, may partially...holipid-binding protein that interacts with both Ypt7p and Vps33p, may partially counteract the action of Vp

  1. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YHR114W, YDR422C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available substrate specificity; vacuolar protein containing KIS (Kinase-Interacting Sequence) and ASC (Association w...strate specificity; vacuolar protein containing KIS (Kinase-Interacting Sequence) and ASC (Association with ...e 4 CuraGen (0 or 1) 0 S. Fields (0 or 1) 0 Association (0 or 1,YPD) 0 Complex (0

  2. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YBR108W, YDR388W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YBR108W AIM3 Protein interacting with Rvs167p; null mutant is viable and displays e...l mutant is viable and displays elevated frequency of mitochondrial genome loss R...8 - Show YBR108W Bait ORF YBR108W Bait gene name AIM3 Bait description Protein interacting with Rvs167p; nul

  3. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YBR108W, YGR136W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YBR108W AIM3 Protein interacting with Rvs167p; null mutant is viable and displays e...w YBR108W Bait ORF YBR108W Bait gene name AIM3 Bait description Protein interacting with Rvs167p; null mutant is viable and display

  4. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YMR280C, YOR047C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available olved in control of glucose-regulated gene expression; interacts with protein kinase Snf1p, glucose sensor... glucose-regulated gene expression; interacts with protein kinase Snf1p, glucose sensors Snf3p and Rgt2p, an

  5. Interaction of Hepatitis C virus proteins with pattern recognition receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imran Muhammad

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hepatitis C virus (HCV is an important human pathogen that causes acute and chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma worldwide. This positive stranded RNA virus is extremely efficient in establishing persistent infection by escaping immune detection or hindering the host immune responses. Recent studies have discovered two important signaling pathways that activate the host innate immunity against viral infection. One of these pathways utilizes members of Toll-like receptor (TLR family and the other uses the RNA helicase retinoic acid inducible gene I (RIG-I as the receptors for intracellular viral double stranded RNA (dsRNA, and activation of transcription factors. In this review article, we summarize the interaction of HCV proteins with various host receptors/sensors through one of these two pathways or both, and how they exploit these interactions to escape from host defense mechanisms. For this purpose, we searched data from Pubmed and Google Scholar. We found that three HCV proteins; Core (C, non structural 3/4 A (NS3/4A and non structural 5A (NS5A have direct interactions with these two pathways. Core protein only in the monomeric form stimulates TLR2 pathway assisting the virus to evade from the innate immune system. NS3/4A disrupts TLR3 and RIG-1 signaling pathways by cleaving Toll/IL-1 receptor domain-containing adapter inducing IFN-beta (TRIF and Cardif, the two important adapter proteins of these signaling cascades respectively, thus halting the defense against HCV. NS5A downmodulates the expressions of NKG2D on natural killer cells (NK cells via TLR4 pathway and impairs the functional ability of these cells. TLRs and RIG-1 pathways have a central role in innate immunity and despite their opposing natures to HCV proteins, when exploited together, HCV as an ever developing virus against host immunity is able to accumulate these mechanisms for near unbeatable survival.

  6. Potential disruption of protein-protein interactions by graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Mei; Kang, Hongsuk; Yang, Zaixing; Luan, Binquan; Zhou, Ruhong

    2016-06-14

    Graphene oxide (GO) is a promising novel nanomaterial with a wide range of potential biomedical applications due to its many intriguing properties. However, very little research has been conducted to study its possible adverse effects on protein-protein interactions (and thus subsequent toxicity to human). Here, the potential cytotoxicity of GO is investigated at molecular level using large-scale, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to explore the interaction mechanism between a protein dimer and a GO nanosheet oxidized at different levels. Our theoretical results reveal that GO nanosheet could intercalate between the two monomers of HIV-1 integrase dimer, disrupting the protein-protein interactions and eventually lead to dimer disassociation as graphene does [B. Luan et al., ACS Nano 9(1), 663 (2015)], albeit its insertion process is slower when compared with graphene due to the additional steric and attractive interactions. This study helps to better understand the toxicity of GO to cell functions which could shed light on how to improve its biocompatibility and biosafety for its wide potential biomedical applications.

  7. Potential disruption of protein-protein interactions by graphene oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Mei; Kang, Hongsuk; Yang, Zaixing; Luan, Binquan; Zhou, Ruhong

    2016-06-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) is a promising novel nanomaterial with a wide range of potential biomedical applications due to its many intriguing properties. However, very little research has been conducted to study its possible adverse effects on protein-protein interactions (and thus subsequent toxicity to human). Here, the potential cytotoxicity of GO is investigated at molecular level using large-scale, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to explore the interaction mechanism between a protein dimer and a GO nanosheet oxidized at different levels. Our theoretical results reveal that GO nanosheet could intercalate between the two monomers of HIV-1 integrase dimer, disrupting the protein-protein interactions and eventually lead to dimer disassociation as graphene does [B. Luan et al., ACS Nano 9(1), 663 (2015)], albeit its insertion process is slower when compared with graphene due to the additional steric and attractive interactions. This study helps to better understand the toxicity of GO to cell functions which could shed light on how to improve its biocompatibility and biosafety for its wide potential biomedical applications.

  8. Laplacian Spectrum and Protein-Protein Interaction Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Banerjee, Anirban; Jost, Jürgen

    2007-01-01

    From the spectral plot of the (normalized) graph Laplacian, the essential qualitative properties of a network can be simultaneously deduced. Given a class of empirical networks, reconstruction schemes for elucidating the evolutionary dynamics leading to those particular data can then be developed. This method is exemplified for protein-protein interaction networks. Traces of their evolutionary history of duplication and divergence processes are identified. In particular, we can identify typic...

  9. Modulators of 14-3-3 Protein-Protein Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevers, Loes M; Sijbesma, Eline; Botta, Maurizio; MacKintosh, Carol; Obsil, Tomas; Landrieu, Isabelle; Cau, Ylenia; Wilson, Andrew J; Karawajczyk, Anna; Eickhoff, Jan; Davis, Jeremy; Hann, Michael M; O'Mahony, Gavin; Doveston, Richard G; Brunsveld, Luc; Ottmann, Christian

    2017-10-02

    Direct interactions between proteins are essential for the regulation of their functions in biological pathways. Targeting the complex network of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) has now been widely recognized as an attractive means to therapeutically intervene in disease states. Even though this is a challenging endeavor and PPIs have long been regarded as 'undruggable' targets, the last two decades have seen an increasing number of successful examples of PPI modulators resulting in a growing interest in this field. PPI modulation requires novel approaches and the integrated efforts of multiple disciplines to be a fruitful strategy. This Perspective focuses on the hub protein 14-3-3, which has several hundred identified protein interaction partners and is therefore involved in a wide range of cellular processes and diseases. Here, we aim to provide an integrated overview of the approaches explored for the modulation of 14-3-3 PPIs and review the examples resulting from these efforts in both inhibiting and stabilizing specific 14-3-3 protein complexes by small molecules, peptide-mimetics and natural products.

  10. Targeting protein-protein interactions for parasite control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina M Taylor

    Full Text Available Finding new drug targets for pathogenic infections would be of great utility for humanity, as there is a large need to develop new drugs to fight infections due to the developing resistance and side effects of current treatments. Current drug targets for pathogen infections involve only a single protein. However, proteins rarely act in isolation, and the majority of biological processes occur via interactions with other proteins, so protein-protein interactions (PPIs offer a realm of unexplored potential drug targets and are thought to be the next-generation of drug targets. Parasitic worms were chosen for this study because they have deleterious effects on human health, livestock, and plants, costing society billions of dollars annually and many sequenced genomes are available. In this study, we present a computational approach that utilizes whole genomes of 6 parasitic and 1 free-living worm species and 2 hosts. The species were placed in orthologous groups, then binned in species-specific orthologous groups. Proteins that are essential and conserved among species that span a phyla are of greatest value, as they provide foundations for developing broad-control strategies. Two PPI databases were used to find PPIs within the species specific bins. PPIs with unique helminth proteins and helminth proteins with unique features relative to the host, such as indels, were prioritized as drug targets. The PPIs were scored based on RNAi phenotype and homology to the PDB (Protein DataBank. EST data for the various life stages, GO annotation, and druggability were also taken into consideration. Several PPIs emerged from this study as potential drug targets. A few interactions were supported by co-localization of expression in M. incognita (plant parasite and B. malayi (H. sapiens parasite, which have extremely different modes of parasitism. As more genomes of pathogens are sequenced and PPI databases expanded, this methodology will become increasingly

  11. The effect of protein-protein and protein-membrane interactions on membrane fouling in ultrafiltration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, I.H.; Prádanos, P.; Hernández, A.

    2000-01-01

    It was studied how protein-protein and protein-membrane interactions influence the filtration performance during the ultrafiltration of protein solutions over polymeric membranes. This was done by measuring flux, streaming potential, and protein transmission during filtration of bovine serum albumin

  12. The effect of protein-protein and protein-membrane interactions on membrane fouling in ultrafiltration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, I.H.; Prádanos, P.; Hernández, A.

    2000-01-01

    It was studied how protein-protein and protein-membrane interactions influence the filtration performance during the ultrafiltration of protein solutions over polymeric membranes. This was done by measuring flux, streaming potential, and protein transmission during filtration of bovine serum albumin

  13. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YJR091C, YKL113C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available encoding membrane-associated proteins; involved in localizing the Arp2/3 complex to mitochondria; overexpre...r of the Puf family of RNA-binding proteins, interacts with mRNAs encoding membrane-associated proteins; involved in localizing

  14. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YJR091C, YDR389W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available encoding membrane-associated proteins; involved in localizing the Arp2/3 complex to mitochondria; overexpre...d proteins; involved in localizing the Arp2/3 complex to mitochondria; overexpression causes increased sensi...scription Member of the Puf family of RNA-binding proteins, interacts with mRNAs encoding membrane-associate

  15. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YJR091C, YDL147W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available encoding membrane-associated proteins; involved in localizing the Arp2/3 complex to mitochondria; overexpre...g proteins, interacts with mRNAs encoding membrane-associated proteins; involved in localizing the Arp2/3 co

  16. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YOR358W, YOR047C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ; interacts with protein kinase Snf1p, glucose sensors Snf3p and Rgt2p, and TATA-binding protein Spt15p; act...rotein kinase Snf1p, glucose sensors Snf3p and Rgt2p, and TATA-binding protein Spt15p; acts as a regulator o

  17. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YGL127C, YOR047C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ith protein kinase Snf1p, glucose sensors Snf3p and Rgt2p, and TATA-binding protein Spt15p; acts as a regula...rotein involved in control of glucose-regulated gene expression; interacts with protein kinase Snf1p, glucose sensors

  18. Designed armadillo repeat proteins as general peptide-binding scaffolds: consensus design and computational optimization of the hydrophobic core

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parmeggiani, Fabio; Pellarin, Riccardo; Larsen, Anders Peter

    2007-01-01

    interactions with peptides or parts of proteins in extended conformation. The conserved binding mode of the peptide in extended form, observed for different targets, makes armadillo repeat proteins attractive candidates for the generation of modular peptide-binding scaffolds. Taking advantage of the large...... number of repeat sequences available, a consensus-based approach combined with a force field-based optimization of the hydrophobic core was used to derive soluble, highly expressed, stable, monomeric designed proteins with improved characteristics compared to natural armadillo proteins. These sequences...

  19. PCorral--interactive mining of protein interactions from MEDLINE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chen; Jimeno-Yepes, Antonio; Arregui, Miguel; Kirsch, Harald; Rebholz-Schuhmann, Dietrich

    2013-01-01

    The extraction of information from the scientific literature is a complex task-for researchers doing manual curation and for automatic text processing solutions. The identification of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) requires the extraction of protein named entities and their relations. Semi-automatic interactive support is one approach to combine both solutions for efficient working processes to generate reliable database content. In principle, the extraction of PPIs can be achieved with different methods that can be combined to deliver high precision and/or high recall results in different combinations at the same time. Interactive use can be achieved, if the analytical methods are fast enough to process the retrieved documents. PCorral provides interactive mining of PPIs from the scientific literature allowing curators to skim MEDLINE for PPIs at low overheads. The keyword query to PCorral steers the selection of documents, and the subsequent text analysis generates high recall and high precision results for the curator. The underlying components of PCorral process the documents on-the-fly and are available, as well, as web service from the Whatizit infrastructure. The human interface summarizes the identified PPI results, and the involved entities are linked to relevant resources and databases. Altogether, PCorral serves curator at both the beginning and the end of the curation workflow for information retrieval and information extraction. Database URL: http://www.ebi.ac.uk/Rebholz-srv/pcorral.

  20. Identification of NAD interacting residues in proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghava Gajendra PS

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Small molecular cofactors or ligands play a crucial role in the proper functioning of cells. Accurate annotation of their target proteins and binding sites is required for the complete understanding of reaction mechanisms. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+ or NAD is one of the most commonly used organic cofactors in living cells, which plays a critical role in cellular metabolism, storage and regulatory processes. In the past, several NAD binding proteins (NADBP have been reported in the literature, which are responsible for a wide-range of activities in the cell. Attempts have been made to derive a rule for the binding of NAD+ to its target proteins. However, so far an efficient model could not be derived due to the time consuming process of structure determination, and limitations of similarity based approaches. Thus a sequence and non-similarity based method is needed to characterize the NAD binding sites to help in the annotation. In this study attempts have been made to predict NAD binding proteins and their interacting residues (NIRs from amino acid sequence using bioinformatics tools. Results We extracted 1556 proteins chains from 555 NAD binding proteins whose structure is available in Protein Data Bank. Then we removed all redundant protein chains and finally obtained 195 non-redundant NAD binding protein chains, where no two chains have more than 40% sequence identity. In this study all models were developed and evaluated using five-fold cross validation technique on the above dataset of 195 NAD binding proteins. While certain type of residues are preferred (e.g. Gly, Tyr, Thr, His in NAD interaction, residues like Ala, Glu, Leu, Lys are not preferred. A support vector machine (SVM based method has been developed using various window lengths of amino acid sequence for predicting NAD interacting residues and obtained maximum Matthew's correlation coefficient (MCC 0.47 with accuracy 74.13% at window length 17

  1. The ionic interaction of Klebsiella pneumoniae K2 capsule and core lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresno, Sandra; Jiménez, Natalia; Izquierdo, Luis; Merino, Susana; Corsaro, Maria Michela; De Castro, Cristina; Parrilli, Michelangelo; Naldi, Teresa; Regué, Miguel; Tomás, Juan M

    2006-06-01

    The complete structures of LPS core types 1 and 2 from Klebsiella pneumoniae have been described by other authors. They are characterized by a lack of phosphoryl residues, but they contain galacturonic acid (GalA) residues, which contribute to the necessary negative charges. The presence of a capsule was determined in core-LPS non-polar mutants from strains 52145 (O1 : K2), DL1 (O1 : K1) and C3 (O8 : K66). O-antigen ligase (waaL) mutants produced a capsule. Core mutants containing the GalA residues were capsulated, while those lacking the residues were non capsulated. Since the proteins involved in the transfer of GalA (WabG) and glucosamine residues (WabH) are known, the chemical basis of the capsular-K2-cell-surface association was studied. Phenol/water extracts from K. pneumoniae 52145DeltawabH waaL and 52145DeltawaaL mutants, but not those from from K. pneumoniae 52145DeltawabG waaL mutant, contained both LPS and capsular polysaccharide, even after hydrophobic chromatography. The two polysaccharides were dissociated by gel-filtration chromatography, eluting with detergent and metal-ion chelators. From these results, it is concluded that the K2 capsular polysaccharide is associated by an ionic interaction to the LPS through the negative charge provided by the carboxyl groups of the GalA residues.

  2. High performance multi-core iron oxide nanoparticles for magnetic hyperthermia: microwave synthesis, and the role of core-to-core interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco-Andujar, C.; Ortega, D.; Southern, P.; PankhurstJoint Last Authors., Q. A.; Thanh, N. T. K.

    2015-01-01

    The adoption of magnetic hyperthermia as either a stand-alone or adjunct therapy for cancer is still far from being optimised due to the variable performance found in many iron oxide nanoparticle systems, including commercially available formulations. Herein, we present a reproducible and potentially scalable microwave-based method to make stable citric acid coated multi-core iron oxide nanoparticles, with exceptional magnetic heating parameters, viz. intrinsic loss parameters (ILPs) of up to 4.1 nH m2 kg-1, 35% better than the best commercial equivalents. We also probe the core-to-core magnetic interactions in the particles via remanence-derived Henkel and ΔM plots. These reveal a monotonic dependence of the ILP on the magnetic interaction field Hint, and show that the interactions are demagnetising in nature, and act to hinder the magnetic heating mechanism.The adoption of magnetic hyperthermia as either a stand-alone or adjunct therapy for cancer is still far from being optimised due to the variable performance found in many iron oxide nanoparticle systems, including commercially available formulations. Herein, we present a reproducible and potentially scalable microwave-based method to make stable citric acid coated multi-core iron oxide nanoparticles, with exceptional magnetic heating parameters, viz. intrinsic loss parameters (ILPs) of up to 4.1 nH m2 kg-1, 35% better than the best commercial equivalents. We also probe the core-to-core magnetic interactions in the particles via remanence-derived Henkel and ΔM plots. These reveal a monotonic dependence of the ILP on the magnetic interaction field Hint, and show that the interactions are demagnetising in nature, and act to hinder the magnetic heating mechanism. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Reproducibility studies and additional characterisation data including SQUID Magnetometry, TEM, ATR-FTIR, XRD and Mossbauer spectroscopy. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr06239f

  3. Protein coalitions in a core mammalian biochemical network linked by rapidly evolving proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsoka Sophia

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellular ATP levels are generated by glucose-stimulated mitochondrial metabolism and determine metabolic responses, such as glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS from the β-cells of pancreatic islets. We describe an analysis of the evolutionary processes affecting the core enzymes involved in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in mammals. The proteins involved in this system belong to ancient enzymatic pathways: glycolysis, the TCA cycle and oxidative phosphorylation. Results We identify two sets of proteins, or protein coalitions, in this group of 77 enzymes with distinct evolutionary patterns. Members of the glycolysis, TCA cycle, metabolite transport, pyruvate and NADH shuttles have low rates of protein sequence evolution, as inferred from a human-mouse comparison, and relatively high rates of evolutionary gene duplication. Respiratory chain and glutathione pathway proteins evolve faster, exhibiting lower rates of gene duplication. A small number of proteins in the system evolve significantly faster than co-pathway members and may serve as rapidly evolving adapters, linking groups of co-evolving genes. Conclusions Our results provide insights into the evolution of the involved proteins. We find evidence for two coalitions of proteins and the role of co-adaptation in protein evolution is identified and could be used in future research within a functional context.

  4. Studying protein-protein interactions using peptide arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Katz, C.; Levy-Beladev, L.; Rotem-Bamberger, S.; Rito, T.; Rudiger, S.G.D.; Friedler, A.

    2010-01-01

    Screening of arrays and libraries of compounds is well-established as a high-throughput method for detecting and analyzing interactions in both biological and chemical systems. Arrays and libraries can be composed from various types of molecules, ranging from small organic compounds to DNA, proteins

  5. A framework for protein and membrane interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Bacci, Giorgio; Miculan, Marino; 10.4204/EPTCS.11.2

    2009-01-01

    We introduce the BioBeta Framework, a meta-model for both protein-level and membrane-level interactions of living cells. This formalism aims to provide a formal setting where to encode, compare and merge models at different abstraction levels; in particular, higher-level (e.g. membrane) activities can be given a formal biological justification in terms of low-level (i.e., protein) interactions. A BioBeta specification provides a protein signature together a set of protein reactions, in the spirit of the kappa-calculus. Moreover, the specification describes when a protein configuration triggers one of the only two membrane interaction allowed, that is "pinch" and "fuse". In this paper we define the syntax and semantics of BioBeta, analyse its properties, give it an interpretation as biobigraphical reactive systems, and discuss its expressivity by comparing with kappa-calculus and modelling significant examples. Notably, BioBeta has been designed after a bigraphical metamodel for the same purposes. Hence, each ...

  6. Detecting protein-protein interactions in living cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottschalk, Marie; Bach, Anders; Hansen, Jakob Lerche

    2009-01-01

    The PDZ domain mediated interaction between the NMDA receptor and its intracellular scaffolding protein, PSD-95, is a potential target for treatment of ischemic brain diseases. We have recently developed a number of peptide analogues with improved affinity for the PDZ domains of PSD-95 compared......-terminal of the NMDA receptor and PDZ2 of PSD-95 were fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP) and Renilla luciferase (Rluc) and expressed in COS7 cells. A robust and specific BRET signal was obtained by expression of the appropriate partner proteins and subsequently, the assay was used to evaluate a Tat......-conjugated peptide for its ability to disrupt the PSD-95/NMDA receptor interaction in living cells....

  7. Next-Generation Sequencing for Binary Protein-Protein Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard eSuter

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The yeast two-hybrid (Y2H system exploits host cell genetics in order to display binary protein-protein interactions (PPIs via defined and selectable phenotypes. Numerous improvements have been made to this method, adapting the screening principle for diverse applications, including drug discovery and the scale-up for proteome wide interaction screens in human and other organisms. Here we discuss a systematic workflow and analysis scheme for screening data generated by Y2H and related assays that includes high-throughput selection procedures, readout of comprehensive results via next-generation sequencing (NGS, and the interpretation of interaction data via quantitative statistics. The novel assays and tools will serve the broader scientific community to harness the power of NGS technology to address PPI networks in health and disease. We discuss examples of how this next-generation platform can be applied to address specific questions in diverse fields of biology and medicine.

  8. Exposing the Alkanesulfonate Monooxygenase Protein-Protein Interaction Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayal, Paritosh V; Singh, Harsimran; Busenlehner, Laura S; Ellis, Holly R

    2015-12-29

    The alkanesulfonate monooxygenase enzymes (SsuE and SsuD) catalyze the desulfonation of diverse alkanesulfonate substrates. The SsuE enzyme is an NADPH-dependent FMN reductase that provides reduced flavin to the SsuD monooxygenase enzyme. Previous studies have highlighted the presence of protein-protein interactions between SsuE and SsuD thought to be important in the flavin transfer event, but the putative interaction sites have not been identified. Protected sites on specific regions of SsuE and SsuD were identified by hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry. An α-helix on SsuD containing conserved charged amino acids showed a decrease in percent deuteration in the presence of SsuE. The α-helical region of SsuD is part of an insertion sequence and is adjacent to the active site opening. A SsuD variant containing substitutions of the charged residues showed a 4-fold decrease in coupled assays that included SsuE to provide reduced FMN, but there was no activity observed with an SsuD variant containing a deletion of the α-helix under similar conditions. Desulfonation by the SsuD deletion variant was only observed with an increase in enzyme and substrate concentrations. Although activity was observed under certain conditions, there were no protein-protein interactions observed with the SsuD variants and SsuE in pull-down assays and fluorimetric titrations. The results from these studies suggest that optimal transfer of reduced flavin from SsuE to SsuD requires defined protein-protein interactions, but diffusion can occur under specified conditions. A basis is established for further studies to evaluate the structural features of the alkanesulfonate monooxygenase enzymes that promote desulfonation.

  9. Differential Effects of Hydrophobic Core Packing Residues for Thermodynamic and Mechanical Stability of a Hyperthermophilic Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tych, Katarzyna M; Batchelor, Matthew; Hoffmann, Toni; Wilson, Michael C; Hughes, Megan L; Paci, Emanuele; Brockwell, David J; Dougan, Lorna

    2016-07-26

    Proteins from organisms that have adapted to environmental extremes provide attractive systems to explore and determine the origins of protein stability. Improved hydrophobic core packing and decreased loop-length flexibility can increase the thermodynamic stability of proteins from hyperthermophilic organisms. However, their impact on protein mechanical stability is not known. Here, we use protein engineering, biophysical characterization, single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS), and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to measure the effect of altering hydrophobic core packing on the stability of the cold shock protein TmCSP from the hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima. We make two variants of TmCSP in which a mutation is made to reduce the size of aliphatic groups from buried hydrophobic side chains. In the first, a mutation is introduced in a long loop (TmCSP L40A); in the other, the mutation is introduced on the C-terminal β-strand (TmCSP V62A). We use MD simulations to confirm that the mutant TmCSP L40A shows the most significant increase in loop flexibility, and mutant TmCSP V62A shows greater disruption to the core packing. We measure the thermodynamic stability (ΔGD-N) of the mutated proteins and show that there is a more significant reduction for TmCSP L40A (ΔΔG = 63%) than TmCSP V62A (ΔΔG = 47%), as might be expected on the basis of the relative reduction in the size of the side chain. By contrast, SMFS measures the mechanical stability (ΔG*) and shows a greater reduction for TmCSP V62A (ΔΔG* = 8.4%) than TmCSP L40A (ΔΔG* = 2.5%). While the impact on the mechanical stability is subtle, the results demonstrate the power of tuning noncovalent interactions to modulate both the thermodynamic and mechanical stability of a protein. Such understanding and control provide the opportunity to design proteins with optimized thermodynamic and mechanical properties.

  10. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YEL017W, YEL017W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17W GTT3 Protein of unknown function with a possible role in glutathione metabolism, as suggested by compu...Bait description Protein of unknown function with a possible role in glutathione metabolism, as suggested by comput...ion Protein of unknown function with a possible role in glutathione metabolism, as suggested by computationa...YEL017W GTT3 Protein of unknown function with a possible role in glutathione metabolism, as suggested by com...putational analysis of large-scale protein-protein interaction data; GFP-fusion pro

  11. Study on the effect of electrostatic interaction on core-shell nanoparticles preparation with microemulsion technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Xiaoxiao; WANG Kemin; TAN Weihong; CHEN Jiyun; DUAN Jinghua; YUAN Yin; LIN Xia

    2005-01-01

    The routine method for preparation of silica core-shell nanoparticles (NPs) is to carry out nucleation and shell coating through the hydrolysis of silane in water in oil (W/O) microemulsion to form three-dimensional netted silica shell. We found that electrostatic interaction of the core materials with shell materials would determine whether the stable core-shell silica NPs formed or not. The traditional important factors such as molecular weight of core materials or the thickness of the shell have no obvious relationship with it. And the stability of the core-shell silica NPs can be improved after changing the electric charge polarity by regulating the experiment condition of relevant materials if some core materials cannot be doped inside to form the stable core-shell silica NPs based on the traditional method, which provided experimental and theoretic foundation for preparation and application of the core-shell silica NPs.

  12. "Hot cores" in proteins: Comparative analysis of the apolar contact area in structures from hyper/thermophilic and mesophilic organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bossa Francesco

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A wide variety of stabilizing factors have been invoked so far to elucidate the structural basis of protein thermostability. These include, amongst the others, a higher number of ion-pairs interactions and hydrogen bonds, together with a better packing of hydrophobic residues. It has been frequently observed that packing of hydrophobic side chains is improved in hyperthermophilic proteins, when compared to their mesophilic counterparts. In this work, protein crystal structures from hyper/thermophilic organisms and their mesophilic homologs have been compared, in order to quantify the difference of apolar contact area and to assess the role played by the hydrophobic contacts in the stabilization of the protein core, at high temperatures. Results The construction of two datasets was carried out so as to satisfy several restrictive criteria, such as minimum redundancy, resolution and R-value thresholds and lack of any structural defect in the collected structures. This approach allowed to quantify with relatively high precision the apolar contact area between interacting residues, reducing the uncertainty due to the position of atoms in the crystal structures, the redundancy of data and the size of the dataset. To identify the common core regions of these proteins, the study was focused on segments that conserve a similar main chain conformation in the structures analyzed, excluding the intervening regions whose structure differs markedly. The results indicated that hyperthermophilic proteins underwent a significant increase of the hydrophobic contact area contributed by those residues composing the alpha-helices of the structurally conserved regions. Conclusion This study indicates the decreased flexibility of alpha-helices in proteins core as a major factor contributing to the enhanced termostability of a number of hyperthermophilic proteins. This effect, in turn, may be due to an increased number of buried methyl groups in

  13. Sequence Motifs in MADS Transcription Factors Responsible for Specificity and Diversification of Protein-Protein Interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, van A.D.J.; Morabito, G.; Fiers, M.A.; Ham, van R.C.H.J.; Angenent, G.C.; Immink, R.G.H.

    2010-01-01

    Protein sequences encompass tertiary structures and contain information about specific molecular interactions, which in turn determine biological functions of proteins. Knowledge about how protein sequences define interaction specificity is largely missing, in particular for paralogous protein famil

  14. A Novel Approach for Protein-Named Entity Recognition and Protein-Protein Interaction Extraction

    OpenAIRE

    Meijing Li; Tsendsuren Munkhdalai; Xiuming Yu; Keun Ho Ryu

    2015-01-01

    Many researchers focus on developing protein-named entity recognition (Protein-NER) or PPI extraction systems. However, the studies about these two topics cannot be merged well; then existing PPI extraction systems’ Protein-NER still needs to improve. In this paper, we developed the protein-protein interaction extraction system named PPIMiner based on Support Vector Machine (SVM) and parsing tree. PPIMiner consists of three main models: natural language processing (NLP) model, Protein-NER mod...

  15. The Development and Characterization of Protein-Based Stationary Phases for Studying Drug-Protein and Protein-Protein Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Sanghvi, Mitesh; Moaddel, Ruin; Wainer, Irving W.

    2011-01-01

    Protein-based liquid chromatography stationary phases are used in bioaffinity chromatography for studying drug-protein interactions, the determination of binding affinities, competitive and allosteric interactions, as well as for studying protein-protein interactions. This review addresses the development and characterization of protein-based stationary phase, and the application of these phases using frontal and zonal chromatography techniques. The approach will be illustrated using immobili...

  16. Magnetic core/shell Fe3O4/Au nanoparticles for studies of quinolones binding to protein by fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Rui; Song, Daqian; Xiong, Huixia; Ai, Lisha; Ma, Pinyi; Sun, Ying

    2016-03-01

    Magnetic core/shell Fe3O4/Au nanoparticles were used in the determination of drug binding to bovine serum albumin (BSA) using a fluorescence spectroscopic method. The binding constants and number of binding sites for protein with drugs were calculated using the Scatchard equation. Because of their superparamagnetic and biocompatible characteristics, magnetic core/shell Fe3O4/Au nanoparticles served as carrier proteins for fixing proteins. After binding of the protein to a drug, the magnetic core/shell Fe3O4/Au nanoparticles-protein-drug complex was separated from the free drug using an applied magnetic field. The free drug concentration was obtained directly by fluorescence spectrometry and the proteins did not influence the drug determination. So, the achieved number of binding sites should be reliable. The binding constant and site number for ciprofloxacin (CPFX) binding to BSA were 2.055 × 10(5) L/mol and 31.7, and the corresponding values for norfloxacin (NOR) binding to BSA were 1.383 × 10(5) L/mol and 38.8. Based on the achieved results, a suitable method was proposed for the determination of binding constants and the site number for molecular interactions. The method was especially suitable for studies on the interactions of serum albumin with the active ingredients of Chinese medicine.

  17. Drug Target Protein-Protein Interaction Networks: A Systematic Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanghe Feng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The identification and validation of drug targets are crucial in biomedical research and many studies have been conducted on analyzing drug target features for getting a better understanding on principles of their mechanisms. But most of them are based on either strong biological hypotheses or the chemical and physical properties of those targets separately. In this paper, we investigated three main ways to understand the functional biomolecules based on the topological features of drug targets. There are no significant differences between targets and common proteins in the protein-protein interactions network, indicating the drug targets are neither hub proteins which are dominant nor the bridge proteins. According to some special topological structures of the drug targets, there are significant differences between known targets and other proteins. Furthermore, the drug targets mainly belong to three typical communities based on their modularity. These topological features are helpful to understand how the drug targets work in the PPI network. Particularly, it is an alternative way to predict potential targets or extract nontargets to test a new drug target efficiently and economically. By this way, a drug target’s homologue set containing 102 potential target proteins is predicted in the paper.

  18. Exploring NMR ensembles of calcium binding proteins: Perspectives to design inhibitors of protein-protein interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craescu Constantin T

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Disrupting protein-protein interactions by small organic molecules is nowadays a promising strategy employed to block protein targets involved in different pathologies. However, structural changes occurring at the binding interfaces make difficult drug discovery processes using structure-based drug design/virtual screening approaches. Here we focused on two homologous calcium binding proteins, calmodulin and human centrin 2, involved in different cellular functions via protein-protein interactions, and known to undergo important conformational changes upon ligand binding. Results In order to find suitable protein conformations of calmodulin and centrin for further structure-based drug design/virtual screening, we performed in silico structural/energetic analysis and molecular docking of terphenyl (a mimicking alpha-helical molecule known to inhibit protein-protein interactions of calmodulin into X-ray and NMR ensembles of calmodulin and centrin. We employed several scoring methods in order to find the best protein conformations. Our results show that docking on NMR structures of calmodulin and centrin can be very helpful to take into account conformational changes occurring at protein-protein interfaces. Conclusions NMR structures of protein-protein complexes nowadays available could efficiently be exploited for further structure-based drug design/virtual screening processes employed to design small molecule inhibitors of protein-protein interactions.

  19. The retrovirus MA and PreTM proteins follow immature MVL cores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Bahl

    2013-01-01

    Detergent can dissolve retrovirus, exept the immature core. Here we show that the Matrix protein (MA) and the Transmembrane protein in its immature form (PreTM) bind to the retrovirus core. These attachments explain the attachment in the virus particle and the dynamics of the ability to fuse...

  20. The role of whey acidic protein four-disulfide-core proteins in respiratory health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Donna M; Doherty, Declan F; Dougan, Caoifa M; Weldon, Sinéad; Taggart, Clifford C

    2017-04-01

    Members of the whey acidic protein (WAP) or WAP four-disulfide-core (WFDC) family of proteins are a relatively under-explored family of low molecular weight proteins. The two most prominent WFDC proteins, secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) and elafin (or the precursor, trappin-2), have been shown to possess multiple functions including anti-protease, anti-bacterial, anti-viral and anti-inflammatory properties. It is therefore of no surprise that both SLPI and elafin/trappin-2 have been developed as potential therapeutics. Given the abundance of SLPI and elafin/trappin-2 in the human lung, most work in the area of WFDC research has focused on the role of WFDC proteins in protecting the lung from proteolytic attack. In this review, we will outline the current evidence regarding the expanding role of WFDC protein function with a focus on WFDC activity in lung disease as well as emerging data regarding the function of some of the more recently described WFDC proteins.

  1. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YLR319C, YGL015C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YLR319C BUD6 Actin- and formin-interacting protein, involved in actin cable nucleation and polarized...in actin cable nucleation and polarized cell growth; isolated as bipolar budding mutant; potential Cdc28p su

  2. Sentence Simplification Aids Protein-Protein Interaction Extraction

    CERN Document Server

    Jonnalagadda, Siddhartha

    2010-01-01

    Accurate systems for extracting Protein-Protein Interactions (PPIs) automatically from biomedical articles can help accelerate biomedical research. Biomedical Informatics researchers are collaborating to provide metaservices and advance the state-of-art in PPI extraction. One problem often neglected by current Natural Language Processing systems is the characteristic complexity of the sentences in biomedical literature. In this paper, we report on the impact that automatic simplification of sentences has on the performance of a state-of-art PPI extraction system, showing a substantial improvement in recall (8%) when the sentence simplification method is applied, without significant impact to precision.

  3. Protein-protein interactions as druggable targets: recent technological advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higueruelo, Alicia P; Jubb, Harry; Blundell, Tom L

    2013-10-01

    Classical target-based drug discovery, where large chemical libraries are screened using inhibitory assays for a single target, has struggled to find ligands that inhibit protein-protein interactions (PPI). Nevertheless, in the past decade there have been successes that have demonstrated that PPI can be useful drug targets, and the field is now evolving fast. This review focuses on the new approaches and concepts that are being developed to tackle these challenging targets: the use of fragment based methods to explore the chemical space, stapled peptides to regulate intracellular PPI, alternatives to competitive inhibition and the use of antibodies to enable small molecule discovery for these targets.

  4. A reliability measure of protein-protein interactions and a reliability measure-based search engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Byungkyu; Han, Kyungsook

    2010-02-01

    Many methods developed for estimating the reliability of protein-protein interactions are based on the topology of protein-protein interaction networks. This paper describes a new reliability measure for protein-protein interactions, which does not rely on the topology of protein interaction networks, but expresses biological information on functional roles, sub-cellular localisations and protein classes as a scoring schema. The new measure is useful for filtering many spurious interactions, as well as for estimating the reliability of protein interaction data. In particular, the reliability measure can be used to search protein-protein interactions with the desired reliability in databases. The reliability-based search engine is available at http://yeast.hpid.org. We believe this is the first search engine for interacting proteins, which is made available to public. The search engine and the reliability measure of protein interactions should provide useful information for determining proteins to focus on.

  5. The human core exosome interacts with differentially localized processive RNases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomecki, Rafal; Kristiansen, Maiken Søndergaard; Lykke-Andersen, Søren

    2010-01-01

    from the associated subunits Dis3p (Rrp44p) and Rrp6p. The former is a nuclear and cytoplasmic RNase II/R-like enzyme, which possesses both processive exo- and endonuclease activities, whereas the latter is a distributive RNase D-like nuclear exonuclease. Although the exosome core is highly conserved...

  6. Bidirectional lipid droplet velocities are controlled by differential binding strengths of HCV core DII protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyn, Rodney K; Hope, Graham; Sherratt, Allison R; McLauchlan, John; Pezacki, John Paul

    2013-01-01

    Host cell lipid droplets (LD) are essential in the hepatitis C virus (HCV) life cycle and are targeted by the viral capsid core protein. Core-coated LDs accumulate in the perinuclear region and facilitate viral particle assembly, but it is unclear how mobility of these LDs is directed by core. Herein we used two-photon fluorescence, differential interference contrast imaging, and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopies, to reveal novel core-mediated changes to LD dynamics. Expression of core protein's lipid binding domain II (DII-core) induced slower LD speeds, but did not affect directionality of movement on microtubules. Modulating the LD binding strength of DII-core further impacted LD mobility, revealing the temporal effects of LD-bound DII-core. These results for DII-core coated LDs support a model for core-mediated LD localization that involves core slowing down the rate of movement of LDs until localization at the perinuclear region is accomplished where LD movement ceases. The guided localization of LDs by HCV core protein not only is essential to the viral life cycle but also poses an interesting target for the development of antiviral strategies against HCV.

  7. DELLA proteins interact with FLC to repress flowering transition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongwei Guo

    2016-01-01

    Flowering is a highly orchestrated and extremely critical process in a plant’s life cycle. Previous study has demonstrated that SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CONSTANS 1 (SOC1) and FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) integrate the gibberellic acid (GA) signaling pathway and vernalization pathway in regulating flowering time, but detailed molecular mechanisms remain largely unclear. In GA signaling pathway, DELLA proteins are a group of master transcriptional regulators, while in vernalization pathway FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) is a core transcriptional repressor that down-regulates the expression of SOC1 and FT. Here, we report that DELLA proteins interact with FLC in vitro and in vivo, and the LHRI domains of DELLAs and the C-terminus of MADS domain of FLC are required for these interactions. Phenotypic and gene expression analysis showed that mutation of FLC reduces while over-expression of FLC enhances the GA response in the flowering process. Further, DELLA-FLC interactions promote the repression ability of FLC on its target genes. In summary, these findings report that the interaction between MADS box transcription factor FLC and GRAS domain regulator DELLAs may integrate various signaling inputs in flowering time control, and shed new light on the regulatory mechanism both for FLC and DELLAs in regulating gene expression.

  8. Predicting disease-related proteins based on clique backbone in protein-protein interaction network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lei; Zhao, Xudong; Tang, Xianglong

    2014-01-01

    Network biology integrates different kinds of data, including physical or functional networks and disease gene sets, to interpret human disease. A clique (maximal complete subgraph) in a protein-protein interaction network is a topological module and possesses inherently biological significance. A disease-related clique possibly associates with complex diseases. Fully identifying disease components in a clique is conductive to uncovering disease mechanisms. This paper proposes an approach of predicting disease proteins based on cliques in a protein-protein interaction network. To tolerate false positive and negative interactions in protein networks, extending cliques and scoring predicted disease proteins with gene ontology terms are introduced to the clique-based method. Precisions of predicted disease proteins are verified by disease phenotypes and steadily keep to more than 95%. The predicted disease proteins associated with cliques can partly complement mapping between genotype and phenotype, and provide clues for understanding the pathogenesis of serious diseases.

  9. IRBIT Interacts with the Catalytic Core of Phosphatidylinositol Phosphate Kinase Type Iα and IIα through Conserved Catalytic Aspartate Residues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideaki Ando

    Full Text Available Phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinases (PIPKs are lipid kinases that generate phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5P2, a critical lipid signaling molecule that regulates diverse cellular functions, including the activities of membrane channels and transporters. IRBIT (IP3R-binding protein released with inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate is a multifunctional protein that regulates diverse target proteins. Here, we report that IRBIT forms signaling complexes with members of the PIPK family. IRBIT bound to all PIPK isoforms in heterologous expression systems and specifically interacted with PIPK type Iα (PIPKIα and type IIα (PIPKIIα in mouse cerebellum. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that two conserved catalytic aspartate residues of PIPKIα and PIPKIIα are involved in the interaction with IRBIT. Furthermore, phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate, Mg2+, and/or ATP interfered with the interaction, suggesting that IRBIT interacts with catalytic cores of PIPKs. Mutations of phosphorylation sites in the serine-rich region of IRBIT affected the selectivity of its interaction with PIPKIα and PIPKIIα. The structural flexibility of the serine-rich region, located in the intrinsically disordered protein region, is assumed to underlie the mechanism of this interaction. Furthermore, in vitro binding experiments and immunocytochemistry suggest that IRBIT and PIPKIα interact with the Na+/HCO3- cotransporter NBCe1-B. These results suggest that IRBIT forms signaling complexes with PIPKIα and NBCe1-B, whose activity is regulated by PI(4,5P2.

  10. Coverage of protein domain families with structural protein-protein interactions: current progress and future trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncearenco, Alexander; Shoemaker, Benjamin A; Zhang, Dachuan; Sarychev, Alexey; Panchenko, Anna R

    2014-01-01

    Protein interactions have evolved into highly precise and regulated networks adding an immense layer of complexity to cellular systems. The most accurate atomistic description of protein binding sites can be obtained directly from structures of protein complexes. The availability of structurally characterized protein interfaces significantly improves our understanding of interactomes, and the progress in structural characterization of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) can be measured by calculating the structural coverage of protein domain families. We analyze the coverage of protein domain families (defined according to CDD and Pfam databases) by structures, structural protein-protein complexes and unique protein binding sites. Structural PPI coverage of currently available protein families is about 30% without any signs of saturation in coverage growth dynamics. Given the current growth rates of domain databases and structural PPI deposition, complete domain coverage with PPIs is not expected in the near future. As a result of this study we identify families without any protein-protein interaction evidence (listed on a supporting website http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Structure/ibis/coverage/) and propose them as potential targets for structural studies with a focus on protein interactions. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Notable Aspects of Glycan-Protein Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Cohen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This mini review highlights several interesting aspects of glycan-mediated interactions that are common between cells, bacteria, and viruses. Glycans are ubiquitously found on all living cells, and in the extracellular milieu of multicellular organisms. They are known to mediate initial binding and recognition events of both immune cells and pathogens with their target cells or tissues. The host target tissues are hidden under a layer of secreted glycosylated decoy targets. In addition, pathogens can utilize and display host glycans to prevent identification as foreign by the host’s immune system (molecular mimicry. Both the host and pathogens continually evolve. The host evolves to prevent infection and the pathogens evolve to evade host defenses. Many pathogens express both glycan-binding proteins and glycosidases. Interestingly, these proteins are often located at the tip of elongated protrusions in bacteria, or in the leading edge of the cell. Glycan-protein interactions have low affinity and, as a result, multivalent interactions are often required to achieve biologically relevant binding. These enable dynamic forms of adhesion mechanisms, reviewed here, and include rolling (cells, stick and roll (bacteria or surfacing (viruses.

  12. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YDL167C, YBR212W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available as bait (2) Rows with this bait as prey (0) YBR212W NGR1 RNA binding protein that negatively regulates grow...ption RNA binding protein that negatively regulates growth rate; interacts with the 3' UTR of the mitochondr

  13. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YOR302W, YOR047C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available rol of glucose-regulated gene expression; interacts with protein kinase Snf1p, glucose sensors Snf3p and Rgt...tein kinase Snf1p, glucose sensors Snf3p and Rgt2p, and TATA-binding protein Spt1

  14. Stabilizer-Guided Inhibition of Protein-Protein Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milroy, Lech-Gustav; Bartel, Maria; Henen, Morkos A; Leysen, Seppe; Adriaans, Joris M C; Brunsveld, Luc; Landrieu, Isabelle; Ottmann, Christian

    2015-12-21

    The discovery of novel protein-protein interaction (PPI) modulators represents one of the great molecular challenges of the modern era. PPIs can be modulated by either inhibitor or stabilizer compounds, which target different though proximal regions of the protein interface. In principle, protein-stabilizer complexes can guide the design of PPI inhibitors (and vice versa). In the present work, we combine X-ray crystallographic data from both stabilizer and inhibitor co-crystal complexes of the adapter protein 14-3-3 to characterize, down to the atomic scale, inhibitors of the 14-3-3/Tau PPI, a potential drug target to treat Alzheimer's disease. The most potent compound notably inhibited the binding of phosphorylated full-length Tau to 14-3-3 according to NMR spectroscopy studies. Our work sets a precedent for the rational design of PPI inhibitors guided by PPI stabilizer-protein complexes while potentially enabling access to new synthetically tractable stabilizers of 14-3-3 and other PPIs. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Stabilization of protein-protein interactions by small molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordanetto, Fabrizio; Schäfer, Anja; Ottmann, Christian

    2014-11-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are implicated in every disease and mastering the ability to influence PPIs with small molecules would considerably enlarge the druggable genome. Whereas inhibition of PPIs has repeatedly been shown to work successfully, targeted stabilization of PPIs is underrepresented in the literature. This is all the more surprising because natural products like FK506, rapamycin, brefeldin, forskolin and fusicoccin confer their physiological activity by stabilizing specific PPIs. However, recently a number of very interesting synthetic molecules have been reported from drug discovery projects that indeed achieve their desired activities by stabilizing either homo- or hetero-oligomeric complexes of their target proteins. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YOR285W, YDR233C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available racts with exocyst subunit Sec6p and with Yip3p; also interacts with Sbh1p; null mutant has an altered (most...tion ER membrane protein that interacts with exocyst subunit Sec6p and with Yip3p; also interacts with Sbh1p; null mutant has an alte...red (mostly cisternal) ER morphology; member of the RTNL

  17. Structure of Protein Phosphatase 2A Core Enzyme Bound to Tumor-Inducing Toxins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xing,Y.; Xu, Y.; Chen, Y.; Jeffrey, P.; Chao, Y.; Lin, Z.; Li, Z.; Strack, S.; Stock, J.; Shi, Y.

    2006-01-01

    The serine/threonine phosphatase protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) plays an essential role in many aspects of cellular functions and has been shown to be an important tumor suppressor. The core enzyme of PP2A comprises a 65 kDa scaffolding subunit and a 36 kDa catalytic subunit. Here we report the crystal structures of the PP2A core enzyme bound to two of its inhibitors, the tumor-inducing agents okadaic acid and microcystin-LR, at 2.6 and 2.8 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. The catalytic subunit recognizes one end of the elongated scaffolding subunit by interacting with the conserved ridges of HEAT repeats 11-15. Formation of the core enzyme forces the scaffolding subunit to undergo pronounced structural rearrangement. The scaffolding subunit exhibits considerable conformational flexibility, which is proposed to play an essential role in PP2A function. These structures, together with biochemical analyses, reveal significant insights into PP2A function and serve as a framework for deciphering the diverse roles of PP2A in cellular physiology.

  18. CPL:Detecting Protein Complexes by Propagating Labels on Protein-Protein Interaction Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    代启国; 郭茂祖; 刘晓燕; 滕志霞; 王春宇

    2014-01-01

    Proteins usually bind together to form complexes, which play an important role in cellular activities. Many graph clustering methods have been proposed to identify protein complexes by finding dense regions in protein-protein interaction networks. We present a novel framework (CPL) that detects protein complexes by propagating labels through interactions in a network, in which labels denote complex identifiers. With proper propagation in CPL, proteins in the same complex will be assigned with the same labels. CPL does not make any strong assumptions about the topological structures of the complexes, as in previous methods. The CPL algorithm is tested on several publicly available yeast protein-protein interaction networks and compared with several state-of-the-art methods. The results suggest that CPL performs better than the existing methods. An analysis of the functional homogeneity based on a gene ontology analysis shows that the detected complexes of CPL are highly biologically relevant.

  19. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YBR187W, YNR032W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available st a possible role in ribosome biogenesis Rows with this bait as bait (1) Rows with this bait as prey (0) YN...ccumulation; interacts with Tap42p, which binds to and regulates other protein phosphatases Rows with this prey as prey (2) Row... and physical interactions suggest a possible role in ribosome biogenesis Rows with this bait as bait Rows w...ith this bait as bait (1) Rows with this bait as prey Rows with this bait as prey...quired for glycogen accumulation; interacts with Tap42p, which binds to and regulates other protein phosphatases Row

  20. HCV core protein promotes hepatocyte proliferation and chemoresistance by inhibiting NR4A1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Yongsheng, E-mail: yongshengtanwhu@126.com; Li, Yan, E-mail: liyansd2@163.com

    2015-10-23

    This study investigated the effect of HCV core protein on the proliferation of hepatocytes and hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HCC), the influence of HCV core protein on HCC apoptosis induced by the chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin, and the mechanism through which HCV core protein acts as a potential oncoprotein in HCV-related HCC by measuring the levels of NR4A1 and Runt-related transcription factor 3 (RUNX3), which are associated with tumor suppression and chemotherapy resistance. In the present study, PcDNA3.1-core and RUNX3 siRNA were transfected into LO2 and HepG2 cells using Lipofectamine 2000. LO2-core, HepG2-core, LO2-RUNX3 {sup low} and control cells were treated with different concentrations of cisplatin for 72 h, and cell proliferation and apoptosis were assayed using the CellTiter 96{sup ®}Aqueous Non-Radioactive Cell Proliferation Assay Kit. Western blot and real time PCR analyses were used to detect NR4A1, RUNX3, smad7, Cyclin D1 and BAX. Confocal microscopy was used to determine the levels of NR4A1 in HepG2 and HepG2-core cells. The growth rate of HepG2-core cells was considerably greater than that of HepG2 cells. HCV core protein increased the expression of cyclin D1 and decreased the expressions of NR4A1 and RUNX3. In LO2 – RUNX3 {sup low}, the rate of cell proliferation and the level of cisplatin resistance were the same as in the LO2 -core. These results suggest that HCV core protein decreases the sensitivity of hepatocytes to cisplatin by inhibiting the expression of NR4A1 and promoting the expression of smad7, which negatively regulates the TGF-β pathway. This effect results in down regulation of RUNX3, a target of the TGF-β pathway. Taken together, these findings indicate that in hepatocytes, HCV core protein increases drug resistance and inhibits cell apoptosis by inhibiting the expressions of NR4A1 and RUNX3. - Highlights: • HCV core protein inhibits HepG2 cell sensitivity to cisplatin. • Core expression in HepG2 decreases

  1. Similar Energetic Contributions of Packing in the Core of Membrane and Water-Soluble Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joh, Nathan H.; Oberai, Amit; Yang, Duan; Whitelegge, Julian P.; Bowie, James U.; (UCLA)

    2009-09-15

    A major driving force for water-soluble protein folding is the hydrophobic effect, but membrane proteins cannot make use of this stabilizing contribution in the apolar core of the bilayer. It has been proposed that membrane proteins compensate by packing more efficiently. We therefore investigated packing contributions experimentally by observing the energetic and structural consequences of cavity creating mutations in the core of a membrane protein. We observed little difference in the packing energetics of water and membrane soluble proteins. Our results imply that other mechanisms are employed to stabilize the structure of membrane proteins.

  2. Comprehensive peptidomimetic libraries targeting protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitby, Landon R; Boger, Dale L

    2012-10-16

    Transient protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are essential components in cellular signaling pathways as well as in important processes such as viral infection, replication, and immune suppression. The unknown or uncharacterized PPIs involved in such interaction networks often represent compelling therapeutic targets for drug discovery. To date, however, the main strategies for discovery of small molecule modulators of PPIs are typically limited to structurally characterized targets. Recent developments in molecular scaffolds that mimic the side chain display of peptide secondary structures have yielded effective designs, but few screening libraries of such mimetics are available to interrogate PPI targets. We initiated a program to prepare a comprehensive small molecule library designed to mimic the three major recognition motifs that mediate PPIs (α-helix, β-turn, and β-strand). Three libraries would be built around templates designed to mimic each such secondary structure and substituted with all triplet combinations of groups representing the 20 natural amino acid side chains. When combined, the three libraries would contain a member capable of mimicking the key interaction and recognition residues of most targetable PPIs. In this Account, we summarize the results of the design, synthesis, and validation of an 8000 member α-helix mimetic library and a 4200 member β-turn mimetic library. We expect that the screening of these libraries will not only provide lead structures against α-helix- or β-turn-mediated protein-protein or peptide-receptor interactions, even if the nature of the interaction is unknown, but also yield key insights into the recognition motif (α-helix or β-turn) and identify the key residues mediating the interaction. Consistent with this expectation, the screening of the libraries against p53/MDM2 and HIV-1 gp41 (α-helix mimetic library) or the opioid receptors (β-turn mimetic library) led to the discovery of library members expected

  3. Abnormal distribution of calcium-handling proteins: a novel distinctive marker in core myopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herasse, Muriel; Parain, Karine; Marty, Isabelle; Monnier, Nicole; Kaindl, Angela M; Leroy, Jean-Paul; Richard, Pascale; Lunardi, Jöel; Romero, Norma B; Ferreiro, Ana

    2007-01-01

    Central core disease (CCD) and multi-minicore disease (MmD) are muscle disorders characterized by foci of mitochondria depletion and sarcomere disorganization ("cores") in muscle fibers. Although core myopathies are the most frequent congenital myopathies, their pathogenesis remains elusive and specific diagnostic markers are lacking. Core myopathies are mostly caused by mutations in 2 sarcoplasmic reticulum proteins: the massive Ca-release channel RyR1 or the selenoprotein N (SelN) of unknown function. To search for distinctive markers and to obtain further pathophysiological insight, we identified the molecular defects in 12 core myopathy patients and analyzed the immunolocalization of 6 proteins of the Ca-release complex in their muscle biopsies. In 7 cases with RYR1 mutations (6 CCD, one MmD), RyR1 was depleted from the cores; in contrast, the other proteins of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (calsequestrin, SERCA1/2, and triadin) and the T-tubule (dihydropyridine receptor-alpha1subunit) accumulated within or around the lesions, suggesting an original modification of the Ca-release complex protein arrangement. Conversely, all Ca-related proteins were distributed normally in 5 MmD cases with SelN mutations. Our results provide an appropriate tool to orientate the differential and molecular diagnosis of core myopathies and suggest that different pathophysiological mechanisms lead to core formation in SelN- and in RyR1-related core myopathies.

  4. Bidirectional Lipid Droplet Velocities Are Controlled by Differential Binding Strengths of HCV Core DII Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyn, Rodney K.; Hope, Graham; Sherratt, Allison R.; McLauchlan, John; Pezacki, John Paul

    2013-01-01

    Host cell lipid droplets (LD) are essential in the hepatitis C virus (HCV) life cycle and are targeted by the viral capsid core protein. Core-coated LDs accumulate in the perinuclear region and facilitate viral particle assembly, but it is unclear how mobility of these LDs is directed by core. Herein we used two-photon fluorescence, differential interference contrast imaging, and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopies, to reveal novel core-mediated changes to LD dynamics. Expression of core protein’s lipid binding domain II (DII-core) induced slower LD speeds, but did not affect directionality of movement on microtubules. Modulating the LD binding strength of DII-core further impacted LD mobility, revealing the temporal effects of LD-bound DII-core. These results for DII-core coated LDs support a model for core-mediated LD localization that involves core slowing down the rate of movement of LDs until localization at the perinuclear region is accomplished where LD movement ceases. The guided localization of LDs by HCV core protein not only is essential to the viral life cycle but also poses an interesting target for the development of antiviral strategies against HCV. PMID:24223760

  5. Hepatic inflammation mediated by hepatitis C virus core protein is ameliorated by blocking complement activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsu Chen-Ming

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pathogenesis of inflammation and fibrosis in chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection remains unclear. Transgenic mice with constitutive HCV core over-expression display steatosis only. While the reasons for this are unclear, it may be important that core protein production in these models begins during gestation, in contrast to human hepatitis C virus infection, which occurs post-natally and typically in adults. AIMS: To more realistically model the effect of core protein production in the adult liver, we developed a mouse with conditional expression of HCV core and examined the effect of core protein production in the adult liver. Methods Liver biopsy samples from transgenic mice with tetracycline(tet-regulated conditional core protein expression were evaluated immunohistologically. Microarray analysis of HCV core transgenic mice with steatohepatitis pointed to a role of the complement pathway. This was further explored by blocking complement activation by in vivo administration of CD55 (decay accelerating factor for complement, which inhibits activation of C3. Results Transgenic mice exhibited low, intermediate, or high HCV core protein expression when fed a permissive diet of standard chow. Aside from hepatic steatosis, hepatic inflammation and fibrosis were seen in mice with intermediate levels of core protein. Microarray analyses of inflamed liver demonstrated activation of both the complement (C3 up-regulation and coagulation pathways (fibrinogen B up-regulation. Administration of CD55 reduced hepatic inflammation. Conclusion Transgenic mice that conditionally express intermediate HCV core protein develop inflammation, steatosis, and fibrosis. These effects mediated by HCV core are reduced by administration of CD55, a regulator of the complement pathway. The model may be valuable in investigating the pathogenesis of liver inflammation in chronic hepatitis C.

  6. Strategies for crystallizing a chromatin protein in complex with the nucleosome core particle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makde, Ravindra D; Tan, Song

    2013-11-15

    The molecular details of how chromatin factors and enzymes interact with the nucleosome are critical to understanding fundamental genetic processes including cell division and gene regulation. A structural understanding of such processes has been hindered by the difficulty in producing diffraction-quality crystals of chromatin proteins in complex with the nucleosome. We describe here the steps used to grow crystals of the 300-kDa RCC1 chromatin factor/nucleosome core particle complex that diffract to 2.9-Å resolution. These steps include both pre- and postcrystallization strategies potentially useful to other complexes. We screened multiple variant RCC1/nucleosome core particle complexes assembled using different RCC1 homologs and deletion variants, and nucleosomes containing nucleosomal DNA with different sequences and lengths, as well as histone deletion variants. We found that using RCC1 from different species produced different crystal forms of the RCC1/nucleosome complex consistent with key crystal packing interactions mediated by RCC1. Optimization of postcrystallization soaks to dehydrate the crystals dramatically improved the diffraction quality of the RCC1/nucleosome crystal from 5.0- to 2.9-Å resolution. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The role of mutations in core protein of hepatitis B virus in liver fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbasi Shahsanam

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The core protein of hepatitis B virus encompasses B- and T-cell immunodominant epitopes and subdivided into two domains: the N-terminal and the functional C-terminal consisted phosphorylation sites. Mutations of the core gene may change the conformation of the core protein or cause alteration of important epitopes in the host immune response. In this study twenty nine men (mean age 40 ± 9 years old with chronic hepatitis B were recruited for direct sequencing of the core gene. Serum ALT and HBV DNA level were measured at the time of liver biopsy. The effects of core protein mutations on patients' characteristics and subsequently mutations in B cell, T helper and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL epitopes and also C-terminal domain of core protein on the activity of liver disease was evaluated. Liver fibrosis was significantly increased in patients with core protein mutation (1.0 ± 0.8 vs 1.9 ± 1.4 for mean stage of fibrosis P = 0.05. Mutations in CTL epitopes and in phosphorylation sites of C-terminal domain of core protein also were associated with higher liver fibrosis (P = 0.003 and P = 0.04; Fisher's exact test for both. Patients with mutation in C-terminal domain had higher serum ALT (62 ± 17 vs 36 ± 12 IU/l, p = 0.02. Patients with mutations in B cell and T helper epitopes did not show significant difference in the clinical features. Our data suggests that core protein mutations in CTL epitopes and C-terminal domain accompanied with higher stage of liver fibrosis may be due to alterations in the function of core protein.

  8. Evaluation of clustering algorithms for protein-protein interaction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Helden Jacques

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein interactions are crucial components of all cellular processes. Recently, high-throughput methods have been developed to obtain a global description of the interactome (the whole network of protein interactions for a given organism. In 2002, the yeast interactome was estimated to contain up to 80,000 potential interactions. This estimate is based on the integration of data sets obtained by various methods (mass spectrometry, two-hybrid methods, genetic studies. High-throughput methods are known, however, to yield a non-negligible rate of false positives, and to miss a fraction of existing interactions. The interactome can be represented as a graph where nodes correspond with proteins and edges with pairwise interactions. In recent years clustering methods have been developed and applied in order to extract relevant modules from such graphs. These algorithms require the specification of parameters that may drastically affect the results. In this paper we present a comparative assessment of four algorithms: Markov Clustering (MCL, Restricted Neighborhood Search Clustering (RNSC, Super Paramagnetic Clustering (SPC, and Molecular Complex Detection (MCODE. Results A test graph was built on the basis of 220 complexes annotated in the MIPS database. To evaluate the robustness to false positives and false negatives, we derived 41 altered graphs by randomly removing edges from or adding edges to the test graph in various proportions. Each clustering algorithm was applied to these graphs with various parameter settings, and the clusters were compared with the annotated complexes. We analyzed the sensitivity of the algorithms to the parameters and determined their optimal parameter values. We also evaluated their robustness to alterations of the test graph. We then applied the four algorithms to six graphs obtained from high-throughput experiments and compared the resulting clusters with the annotated complexes. Conclusion This

  9. Atomic-level description of protein-lipid interactions using an accelerated membrane model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baylon, Javier L; Vermaas, Josh V; Muller, Melanie P; Arcario, Mark J; Pogorelov, Taras V; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2016-07-01

    Peripheral membrane proteins are structurally diverse proteins that are involved in fundamental cellular processes. Their activity of these proteins is frequently modulated through their interaction with cellular membranes, and as a result techniques to study the interfacial interaction between peripheral proteins and the membrane are in high demand. Due to the fluid nature of the membrane and the reversibility of protein-membrane interactions, the experimental study of these systems remains a challenging task. Molecular dynamics simulations offer a suitable approach to study protein-lipid interactions; however, the slow dynamics of the lipids often prevents sufficient sampling of specific membrane-protein interactions in atomistic simulations. To increase lipid dynamics while preserving the atomistic detail of protein-lipid interactions, in the highly mobile membrane-mimetic (HMMM) model the membrane core is replaced by an organic solvent, while short-tailed lipids provide a nearly complete representation of natural lipids at the organic solvent/water interface. Here, we present a brief introduction and a summary of recent applications of the HMMM to study different membrane proteins, complementing the experimental characterization of the presented systems, and we offer a perspective of future applications of the HMMM to study other classes of membrane proteins. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane proteins edited by J.C. Gumbart and Sergei Noskov.

  10. Single methyl groups can act as toggle switches to specify transmembrane protein-protein interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Li; Steinocher, Helena; Shelar, Ashish

    2017-01-01

    Transmembrane domains (TMDs) engage in protein-protein interactions that regulate many cellular processes, but the rules governing the specificity of these interactions are poorly understood. To discover these principles, we analyzed 26-residue model transmembrane proteins consisting exclusively ...

  11. Support vector machine for predicting protein interactions using domain scores

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Xin-jun; WANG Yi-fei

    2009-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions play a crucial role in the cellular process such as metabolic pathways and immunological recognition. This paper presents a new domain score-based support vector machine (SVM) to infer protein interactions, which can be used not only to explore all possible domain interactions by the kernel method, but also to reflect the evolutionary conservation of domains in proteins by using the domain scores of proteins. The experimental result on the Saccharomyces cerevisiae dataset demonstrates that this approach can predict protein-protein interactions with higher performances compared to the existing approaches.

  12. Hepatitis C virus core protein induces neuroimmune activation and potentiates Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 neurotoxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pornpun Vivithanaporn

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hepatitis C virus (HCV genomes and proteins are present in human brain tissues although the impact of HIV/HCV co-infection on neuropathogenesis remains unclear. Herein, we investigate HCV infectivity and effects on neuronal survival and neuroinflammation in conjunction with HIV infection. METHODOLOGY: Human microglia, astrocyte and neuron cultures were infected with cell culture-derived HCV or exposed to HCV core protein with or without HIV-1 infection or HIV-1 Viral Protein R (Vpr exposure. Host immune gene expression and cell viability were measured. Patch-clamp studies of human neurons were performed in the presence or absence of HCV core protein. Neurobehavioral performance and neuropathology were examined in HIV-1 Vpr-transgenic mice in which stereotaxic intrastriatal implants of HCV core protein were performed. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: HCV-encoded RNA as well as HCV core and non-structural 3 (NS3 proteins were detectable in human microglia and astrocytes infected with HCV. HCV core protein exposure induced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin-1β, interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α in microglia (p<0.05 but not in astrocytes while increased chemokine (e.g. CXCL10 and interleukin-8 expression was observed in both microglia and astrocytes (p<0.05. HCV core protein modulated neuronal membrane currents and reduced both β-III-tubulin and lipidated LC3-II expression (p<0.05. Neurons exposed to supernatants from HCV core-activated microglia exhibited reduced β-III-tubulin expression (p<0.05. HCV core protein neurotoxicity and interleukin-6 induction were potentiated by HIV-1 Vpr protein (p<0.05. HIV-1 Vpr transgenic mice implanted with HCV core protein showed gliosis, reduced neuronal counts together with diminished LC3 immunoreactivity. HCV core-implanted animals displayed neurobehavioral deficits at days 7 and 14 post-implantation (p<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: HCV core protein exposure caused neuronal injury

  13. Prediction of Protein-protein Interactions on the Basis of Evolutionary Conservation of Protein Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Kotelnikova

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Motivation: Although a great deal of progress is being made in the development of fast and reliable experimental techniques to extract genome-wide networks of protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions, the sequencing of new genomes proceeds at an even faster rate. That is why there is a considerable need for reliable methods of in-silico prediction of protein interaction based solely on sequence similarity information and known interactions from well-studied organisms. This problem can be solved if a dependency exists between sequence similarity and the conservation of the proteins’ functions.Results: In this paper, we introduce a novel probabilistic method for prediction of protein-protein interactions using a new empirical probabilistic formula describing the loss of interactions between homologous proteins during the course of evolution. This formula describes an evolutional process quite similar to the process of the Earth’s population growth. In addition, our method favors predictions confi rmed by several interacting pairs over predictions coming from a single interacting pair. Our approach is useful in working with “noisy” data such as those coming from high-throughput experiments. We have generated predictions for fi ve “model” organisms: H. sapiens, D. melanogaster, C. elegans, A. thaliana, and S. cerevisiae and evaluated the quality of these predictions.

  14. Crystal structure of the dimeric protein core of decorin, the archetypal small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Paul G; McEwan, Paul A; Dodd, Carole M; Bergmann, Ernst M; Bishop, Paul N; Bella, Jordi

    2004-11-02

    Decorin is a ubiquitous extracellular matrix proteoglycan with a variety of important biological functions that are mediated by its interactions with extracellular matrix proteins, cytokines, and cell surface receptors. Decorin is the prototype of the family of small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycans and proteins (SLRPs), characterized by a protein core composed of leucine-rich repeats (LRRs), flanked by two cysteine-rich regions. We report here the crystal structure of the dimeric protein core of decorin, the best characterized member of the SLRP family. Each monomer adopts the curved solenoid fold characteristic of LRR domains, with a parallel beta-sheet on the inside interwoven with loops containing short segments of beta-strands, 3(10) helices, and polyproline II helices on the outside. Two main features are unique to this structure. First, decorin dimerizes through the concave surfaces of the LRR domains, which have been implicated previously in protein-ligand interactions. The amount of surface buried in this dimer rivals the buried surfaces of some of the highest-affinity macromolecular complexes reported to date. Second, the C-terminal region adopts an unusual capping motif that involves a laterally extended LRR and a disulfide bond. This motif seems to be unique to SLRPs and has not been observed in any other LRR protein structure to date. Possible implications of these features for decorin ligand binding and SLRP function are discussed.

  15. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YNR006W, YHL002W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available has Ubiquitin Interaction Motifs which bind ubiquitin (Ubi4p) Rows with this bait as bait (1) Rows with this..., as well as for recycling of Golgi proteins and formation of lumenal membranes Rows with this prey as prey (1) Row...ined for degradation; has Ubiquitin Interaction Motifs which bind ubiquitin (Ubi4p) Row...s with this bait as bait Rows with this bait as bait (1) Rows with this bait as prey Rows with this ba...degradation, as well as for recycling of Golgi proteins and formation of lumenal membranes Row

  16. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YDL239C, YPL255W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YDL239C ADY3 Protein required for spore wall formation, thought to mediate assembly... of a Don1p-containing structure at the leading edge of the prospore membrane via interaction with spindle p...it as prey (1) YPL255W BBP1 Protein required for the spindle pole body (SPB) dupl...ows with this prey as bait (0) 4 8 3 4 0 0 0 0 0 - - - - - 0 0 7 - Show YDL239C Bait ORF YDL...ediate assembly of a Don1p-containing structure at the leading edge of the prospore membrane via interaction with spindl

  17. The Histone Deacetylase Complex 1 Protein of Arabidopsis Has the Capacity to Interact with Multiple Proteins Including Histone 3-Binding Proteins and Histone 1 Variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrella, Giorgio; Carr, Craig; Asensi-Fabado, Maria A; Donald, Naomi A; Páldi, Katalin; Hannah, Matthew A; Amtmann, Anna

    2016-05-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins can adopt multiple conformations, thereby enabling interaction with a wide variety of partners. They often serve as hubs in protein interaction networks. We have previously shown that the Histone Deacetylase Complex 1 (HDC1) protein from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) interacts with histone deacetylases and quantitatively determines histone acetylation levels, transcriptional activity, and several phenotypes, including abscisic acid sensitivity during germination, vegetative growth rate, and flowering time. HDC1-type proteins are ubiquitous in plants, but they contain no known structural or functional domains. Here, we explored the protein interaction spectrum of HDC1 using a quantitative bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay in tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) epidermal cells. In addition to binding histone deacetylases, HDC1 directly interacted with histone H3-binding proteins and corepressor-associated proteins but not with H3 or the corepressors themselves. Surprisingly, HDC1 also was able to interact with variants of the linker histone H1. Truncation of HDC1 to the ancestral core sequence narrowed the spectrum of interactions and of phenotypic outputs but maintained binding to a H3-binding protein and to H1. Thus, HDC1 provides a potential link between H1 and histone-modifying complexes.

  18. Protein complex prediction based on k-connected subgraphs in protein interaction network

    OpenAIRE

    Habibi Mahnaz; Eslahchi Changiz; Wong Limsoon

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Protein complexes play an important role in cellular mechanisms. Recently, several methods have been presented to predict protein complexes in a protein interaction network. In these methods, a protein complex is predicted as a dense subgraph of protein interactions. However, interactions data are incomplete and a protein complex does not have to be a complete or dense subgraph. Results We propose a more appropriate protein complex prediction method, CFA, that is based on ...

  19. Glycosphingolipid–Protein Interaction in Signal Transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Russo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Glycosphingolipids (GSLs are a class of ceramide-based glycolipids essential for embryo development in mammals. The synthesis of specific GSLs depends on the expression of distinctive sets of GSL synthesizing enzymes that is tightly regulated during development. Several reports have described how cell surface receptors can be kept in a resting state or activate alternative signalling events as a consequence of their interaction with GSLs. Specific GSLs, indeed, interface with specific protein domains that are found in signalling molecules and which act as GSL sensors to modify signalling responses. The regulation exerted by GSLs on signal transduction is orthogonal to the ligand–receptor axis, as it usually does not directly interfere with the ligand binding to receptors. Due to their properties of adjustable production and orthogonal action on receptors, GSLs add a new dimension to the control of the signalling in development. GSLs can, indeed, dynamically influence progenitor cell response to morphogenetic stimuli, resulting in alternative differentiation fates. Here, we review the available literature on GSL–protein interactions and their effects on cell signalling and development.

  20. Glycosphingolipid–Protein Interaction in Signal Transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Domenico; Parashuraman, Seetharaman; D’Angelo, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Glycosphingolipids (GSLs) are a class of ceramide-based glycolipids essential for embryo development in mammals. The synthesis of specific GSLs depends on the expression of distinctive sets of GSL synthesizing enzymes that is tightly regulated during development. Several reports have described how cell surface receptors can be kept in a resting state or activate alternative signalling events as a consequence of their interaction with GSLs. Specific GSLs, indeed, interface with specific protein domains that are found in signalling molecules and which act as GSL sensors to modify signalling responses. The regulation exerted by GSLs on signal transduction is orthogonal to the ligand–receptor axis, as it usually does not directly interfere with the ligand binding to receptors. Due to their properties of adjustable production and orthogonal action on receptors, GSLs add a new dimension to the control of the signalling in development. GSLs can, indeed, dynamically influence progenitor cell response to morphogenetic stimuli, resulting in alternative differentiation fates. Here, we review the available literature on GSL–protein interactions and their effects on cell signalling and development. PMID:27754465

  1. Interaction graph mining for protein complexes using local clique merging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Li; Tan, Soon-Heng; Foo, Chuan-Sheng; Ng, See-Kiong

    2005-01-01

    While recent technological advances have made available large datasets of experimentally-detected pairwise protein-protein interactions, there is still a lack of experimentally-determined protein complex data. To make up for this lack of protein complex data, we explore the mining of existing protein interaction graphs for protein complexes. This paper proposes a novel graph mining algorithm to detect the dense neighborhoods (highly connected regions) in an interaction graph which may correspond to protein complexes. Our algorithm first locates local cliques for each graph vertex (protein) and then merge the detected local cliques according to their affinity to form maximal dense regions. We present experimental results with yeast protein interaction data to demonstrate the effectiveness of our proposed method. Compared with other existing techniques, our predicted complexes can match or overlap significantly better with the known protein complexes in the MIPS benchmark database. Novel protein complexes were also predicted to help biologists in their search for new protein complexes.

  2. Fragment molecular orbital method for studying lanthanide interactions with proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsushima, Satoru [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Biophysics; Komeiji, Y. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba (Japan); Mochizuki, Y. [Rikkyo Univ., Tokyo (Japan)

    2017-06-01

    The binding affinity of the calcium-binding protein calmodulin towards Eu{sup 3+} was studied as a model for lanthanide protein interactions in the large family of ''EF-hand'' calcium-binding proteins.

  3. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YDL239C, YLR423C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YDL239C ADY3 Protein required for spore wall formation, thought to mediate assembly... of a Don1p-containing structure at the leading edge of the prospore membrane via interaction with spindle p...0 0 - - - - - 0 0 34 - Show YDL239C Bait ORF YDL239C Bait gene name ADY3 Bait des...ure at the leading edge of the prospore membrane via interaction with spindle pole body components; potentia

  4. Protein-Protein Interaction Network and Gene Ontology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yunkyu; Kim, Seok; Yi, Gwan-Su; Park, Jinah

    Evolution of computer technologies makes it possible to access a large amount and various kinds of biological data via internet such as DNA sequences, proteomics data and information discovered about them. It is expected that the combination of various data could help researchers find further knowledge about them. Roles of a visualization system are to invoke human abilities to integrate information and to recognize certain patterns in the data. Thus, when the various kinds of data are examined and analyzed manually, an effective visualization system is an essential part. One instance of these integrated visualizations can be combination of protein-protein interaction (PPI) data and Gene Ontology (GO) which could help enhance the analysis of PPI network. We introduce a simple but comprehensive visualization system that integrates GO and PPI data where GO and PPI graphs are visualized side-by-side and supports quick reference functions between them. Furthermore, the proposed system provides several interactive visualization methods for efficiently analyzing the PPI network and GO directedacyclic- graph such as context-based browsing and common ancestors finding.

  5. 3.5A cryoEM structure of hepatitis B virus core assembled from full-length core protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuekui Yu

    Full Text Available The capsid shell of infectious hepatitis B virus (HBV is composed of 240 copies of a single protein called HBV core antigen (HBc. An atomic model of a core assembled from truncated HBc was determined previously by X-ray crystallography. In an attempt to obtain atomic structural information of HBV core in a near native, non-crystalline environment, we reconstructed a 3.5Å-resolution structure of a recombinant core assembled from full-length HBc by cryo electron microscopy (cryoEM and derived an atomic model. The structure shows that the 240 molecules of full-length HBc form a core with two layers. The outer layer, composed of the N-terminal assembly domain, is similar to the crystal structure of the truncated HBc, but has three differences. First, unlike the crystal structure, our cryoEM structure shows no disulfide bond between the Cys61 residues of the two subunits within the dimer building block, indicating such bond is not required for core formation. Second, our cryoEM structure reveals up to four more residues in the linker region (amino acids 140-149. Third, the loops in the cryoEM structures containing this linker region in subunits B and C are oriented differently (~30° and ~90° from their counterparts in the crystal structure. The inner layer, composed of the C-terminal arginine-rich domain (ARD and the ARD-bound RNAs, is partially-ordered and connected with the outer layer through linkers positioned around the two-fold axes. Weak densities emanate from the rims of positively charged channels through the icosahedral three-fold and local three-fold axes. We attribute these densities to the exposed portions of some ARDs, thus explaining ARD's accessibility by proteases and antibodies. Our data supports a role of ARD in mediating communication between inside and outside of the core during HBV maturation and envelopment.

  6. Protein function prediction using neighbor relativity in protein-protein interaction network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosavi, Sobhan; Rahgozar, Masoud; Rahimi, Amir

    2013-04-01

    There is a large gap between the number of discovered proteins and the number of functionally annotated ones. Due to the high cost of determining protein function by wet-lab research, function prediction has become a major task for computational biology and bioinformatics. Some researches utilize the proteins interaction information to predict function for un-annotated proteins. In this paper, we propose a novel approach called "Neighbor Relativity Coefficient" (NRC) based on interaction network topology which estimates the functional similarity between two proteins. NRC is calculated for each pair of proteins based on their graph-based features including distance, common neighbors and the number of paths between them. In order to ascribe function to an un-annotated protein, NRC estimates a weight for each neighbor to transfer its annotation to the unknown protein. Finally, the unknown protein will be annotated by the top score transferred functions. We also investigate the effect of using different coefficients for various types of functions. The proposed method has been evaluated on Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Homo sapiens interaction networks. The performance analysis demonstrates that NRC yields better results in comparison with previous protein function prediction approaches that utilize interaction network. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Developing algorithms for predicting protein-protein interactions of homology modeled proteins.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Shawn Bryan; Sale, Kenneth L.; Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Roe, Diana C.

    2006-01-01

    The goal of this project was to examine the protein-protein docking problem, especially as it relates to homology-based structures, identify the key bottlenecks in current software tools, and evaluate and prototype new algorithms that may be developed to improve these bottlenecks. This report describes the current challenges in the protein-protein docking problem: correctly predicting the binding site for the protein-protein interaction and correctly placing the sidechains. Two different and complementary approaches are taken that can help with the protein-protein docking problem. The first approach is to predict interaction sites prior to docking, and uses bioinformatics studies of protein-protein interactions to predict theses interaction site. The second approach is to improve validation of predicted complexes after docking, and uses an improved scoring function for evaluating proposed docked poses, incorporating a solvation term. This scoring function demonstrates significant improvement over current state-of-the art functions. Initial studies on both these approaches are promising, and argue for full development of these algorithms.

  8. Novel protein-protein interaction family proteins involved in chloroplast movement response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Yutaka; Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Wada, Masamitsu

    2011-04-01

    To optimize photosynthetic activity, chloroplasts change their intracellular location in response to ambient light conditions; chloroplasts move toward low intensity light to maximize light capture, and away from high intensity light to avoid photodamage. Although several proteins have been reported to be involved in the chloroplast photorelocation movement response, any physical interaction among them was not found so far. We recently found a physical interaction between two plant-specific coiled-coil proteins, WEB1 (Weak Chloroplast Movement under Blue Light 1) and PMI2 (Plastid Movement Impaired 2), that were identified to regulate chloroplast movement velocity. Since the both coiled-coil regions of WEB1 and PMI2 were classified into an uncharacterized protein family having DUF827 (DUF: Domain of Unknown Function) domain, it was the first report that DUF827 proteins could mediate protein-protein interaction. In this mini-review article, we discuss regarding molecular function of WEB1 and PMI2, and also define a novel protein family composed of WEB1, PMI2 and WEB1/PMI2-like proteins for protein-protein interaction in land plants.

  9. Identification of compound-protein interactions through the analysis of gene ontology, KEGG enrichment for proteins and molecular fragments of compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Zhang, Yu-Hang; Zheng, Mingyue; Huang, Tao; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2016-12-01

    Compound-protein interactions play important roles in every cell via the recognition and regulation of specific functional proteins. The correct identification of compound-protein interactions can lead to a good comprehension of this complicated system and provide useful input for the investigation of various attributes of compounds and proteins. In this study, we attempted to understand this system by extracting properties from both proteins and compounds, in which proteins were represented by gene ontology and KEGG pathway enrichment scores and compounds were represented by molecular fragments. Advanced feature selection methods, including minimum redundancy maximum relevance, incremental feature selection, and the basic machine learning algorithm random forest, were used to analyze these properties and extract core factors for the determination of actual compound-protein interactions. Compound-protein interactions reported in The Binding Databases were used as positive samples. To improve the reliability of the results, the analytic procedure was executed five times using different negative samples. Simultaneously, five optimal prediction methods based on a random forest and yielding maximum MCCs of approximately 77.55 % were constructed and may be useful tools for the prediction of compound-protein interactions. This work provides new clues to understanding the system of compound-protein interactions by analyzing extracted core features. Our results indicate that compound-protein interactions are related to biological processes involving immune, developmental and hormone-associated pathways.

  10. The Foundations of Protein-Ligand Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klebe, Gerhard

    For the specific design of a drug we must first answer the question: How does a drug achieve its activity? An active ingredient must, in order to develop its action, bind to a particular target molecule in the body. Usually this is a protein, but also nucleic acids in the form of RNA and DNA can be target structures for active agents. The most important condition for binding is at first that the active agent exhibits the correct size and shape in order to optimally fit into a cavity exposed to the surface of the protein, the "bindingpocket". It is further necessary for the surface properties of the ligand and protein to be mutually compatible to form specific interactions. In 1894 Emil Fischer compared the exact fit of a substrate for the catalytic centre of an enzyme with the picture of a "lock-and-key". Paul Ehrlich coined in 1913 "Corpora non agunt nisi fixata", literally "bodies do not work when they are not bound". He wanted to imply that active agents that are meant to kill bacteria or parasites must be "fixed" by them, i.e. linked to their structures. Both concepts form the starting point for any rational concept in the development of active pharmaceutical ingredients. In many respects they still apply today. A drug must, after being administered, reach its target and interact with a biological macromolecule. Specific agents have a large affinity and sufficient selectivity to bind to the macromolecule's active site. This is the only way they can develop the desired biological activity without side-effects.

  11. Protein-lipid interactions at interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilde, P.

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available Foams and emulsions are both types of multiphase foods and are a dispersion of one immiscible phase (e.g. air or oil in another (e.g. water. Amphiphilic molecules (either proteins or chemical compounds are able to stabilise the interface between these phases and are termed emulsifiers. The ability of protein emulsifiers to bind lipid is reviewed, and the mechanisms underlying the behaviour of these and low molecular weight surfactants (LMWS at the interface are summarised. New research, exploiting atomic force microscopy, has given fresh insights into the mechanisms by which proteins and LMWS interact when both are present at the interface, compromising the stability of foams and emulsions stabilised by these mixtures. The understanding of component interactions at the interfacial level is essential if advances are to be made in the control and manipulation of multiphase foods during production and storage.Las espumas y las emulsiones son dispersiones de una fase inmiscible (ejemplo aire o aceite en otra (ejemplo agua. Las moléculas anfifílicas (bien proteínas o compuestos químicos pueden estabilizar la interfase y se denominan emulsionantes. En este artículo se revisa la habilidad de los emulsionantes proteínicos para enlazar lípidos y los mecanismos que subyacen en el comportamiento de estas moléculas así como de los tensioactivos de bajo peso molecular en la interfase. Recientes investigaciones que usan la microscopía han ofrecido visiones nuevas de los mecanismos mediante los cuales las proteínas y los tensioactivos de bajo peso molecular interaccionan cuando ambos están presentes en la interfase, comprometiendo la estabilidad de espumas y emulsiones estabilizadas por estas mezclas. El entendimiento de las interacciones entre componentes a nivel interfacial es esencial para lograr avances en el control y manipulación de alimentos multifases durante la producción y el almacenamiento.

  12. Analysis and application of large-scale protein-protein interaction data sets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Jingchun; XU Jinlin; LI Yixue; SHI Tieliu

    2005-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions play key roles in cells. Lots of experimental approaches and in silico methods have been developed to identify and predict large-scale protein-protein interactions. However, compared with the traditionally experimental results, the high-throughput protein-protein interaction data often contain the false positives in high probability. In order to fully utilize the large-scale data, it is necessary to develop bioinformatic methods for systematically evaluating those data in order to further improve the data reliability and mine biological information. This review summarizes the methodologies of analysis and application of high-throughput protein-protein interaction data, including the evaluation methods, the relationship between protein-protein interaction data and other protein biological information, and their applications in biological study. In addition, this paper also suggests some interesting topics on mining high-throughput protein-protein interaction data.

  13. Decorin core protein (decoron shape complements collagen fibril surface structure and mediates its binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph P R O Orgel

    Full Text Available Decorin is the archetypal small leucine rich repeat proteoglycan of the vertebrate extracellular matrix (ECM. With its glycosaminoglycuronan chain, it is responsible for stabilizing inter-fibrillar organization. Type I collagen is the predominant member of the fibrillar collagen family, fulfilling both organizational and structural roles in animal ECMs. In this study, interactions between decoron (the decorin core protein and binding sites in the d and e(1 bands of the type I collagen fibril were investigated through molecular modeling of their respective X-ray diffraction structures. Previously, it was proposed that a model-based, highly curved concave decoron interacts with a single collagen molecule, which would form extensive van der Waals contacts and give rise to strong non-specific binding. However, the large well-ordered aggregate that is the collagen fibril places significant restraints on modes of ligand binding and necessitates multi-collagen molecular contacts. We present here a relatively high-resolution model of the decoron-fibril collagen complex. We find that the respective crystal structures complement each other well, although it is the monomeric form of decoron that shows the most appropriate shape complementarity with the fibril surface and favorable calculated energies of interaction. One molecule of decoron interacts with four to six collagen molecules, and the binding specificity relies on a large number of hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions, primarily with the collagen motifs KXGDRGE and AKGDRGE (d and e(1 bands. This work helps us to understand collagen-decorin interactions and the molecular architecture of the fibrillar ECM in health and disease.

  14. pH/sugar dual responsive core-cross-linked PIC micelles for enhanced intracellular protein delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jie; Zhang, Yanxin; Zhang, Ju; Gao, Hongjun; Liu, Gan; Ma, Rujiang; An, Yingli; Kong, Deling; Shi, Linqi

    2013-10-14

    Herein, a series of biocompatible, robust, pH/sugar-sensitive, core-cross-linked, polyion complex (PIC) micelles based on phenylboronic acid-catechol interaction were developed for protein intracellular delivery. The rationally designed poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(glutamic acid-co-glutamicamidophenylboronic acid) (PEG-b-P(Glu-co-GluPBA)) and poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(l-lysine-co-ε-3,4-dihydroxyphenylcarboxyl-L-lysine) (PEG-b-P(Lys-co-LysCA)) copolymers were successfully synthesized and self-assembled under neutral aqueous condition to form uniform micelles. These micelles possessed a distinct core-cross-linked core-shell structure comprised of the PEG outer shell and the PGlu/PLys polyion complex core bearing boronate ester cross-linking bonds. The cross-linked micelles displayed superior physiological stabilities compared with their non-cross-linked counterparts while swelling and disassembling in the presence of excess fructose or at endosomal pH. Notably, either negatively or positively charged proteins can be encapsulated into the micelles efficiently under mild conditions. The in vitro release studies showed that the release of protein cargoes under physiological conditions was minimized, while a burst release occurred in response to excess fructose or endosomal pH. The cytotoxicity of micelles was determined by cck-8 assay in HepG2 cells. The cytochrome C loaded micelles could efficiently delivery proteins into HepG2 cells and exhibited enhanced apoptosis ability. Hence, this type of core-cross-linked PIC micelles has opened a new avenue to intracellular protein delivery.

  15. CORE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krigslund, Jeppe; Hansen, Jonas; Hundebøll, Martin

    2013-01-01

    different flows. Instead of maintaining these approaches separate, we propose a protocol (CORE) that brings together these coding mechanisms. Our protocol uses random linear network coding (RLNC) for intra- session coding but allows nodes in the network to setup inter- session coding regions where flows...... intersect. Routes for unicast sessions are agnostic to other sessions and setup beforehand, CORE will then discover and exploit intersecting routes. Our approach allows the inter-session regions to leverage RLNC to compensate for losses or failures in the overhearing or transmitting process. Thus, we...... increase the benefits of XORing by exploiting the underlying RLNC structure of individual flows. This goes beyond providing additional reliability to each individual session and beyond exploiting coding opportunistically. Our numerical results show that CORE outperforms both forwarding and COPE...

  16. CORE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krigslund, Jeppe; Hansen, Jonas; Hundebøll, Martin

    2013-01-01

    different flows. Instead of maintaining these approaches separate, we propose a protocol (CORE) that brings together these coding mechanisms. Our protocol uses random linear network coding (RLNC) for intra- session coding but allows nodes in the network to setup inter- session coding regions where flows...... intersect. Routes for unicast sessions are agnostic to other sessions and setup beforehand, CORE will then discover and exploit intersecting routes. Our approach allows the inter-session regions to leverage RLNC to compensate for losses or failures in the overhearing or transmitting process. Thus, we...... increase the benefits of XORing by exploiting the underlying RLNC structure of individual flows. This goes beyond providing additional reliability to each individual session and beyond exploiting coding opportunistically. Our numerical results show that CORE outperforms both forwarding and COPE...

  17. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YJR091C, YLR156W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ion with Jsn1p in a large-scale analysis Rows with this prey as prey (1) Rows with this prey as bait (0) 7 5...scription Putative protein of unknown function; exhibits a two-hybrid interaction with Jsn1p in a large-scale

  18. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YNL041C, YDR229W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available pholipid-binding protein that interacts with both Ypt7p and Vps33p, may partially...teracts with both Ypt7p and Vps33p, may partially counteract the action of Vps33p and vice versa, localizes

  19. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YIL007C, YOR117W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YIL007C NAS2 Proteasome-interacting protein involved in the assembly of the base su... - - - - - 0 0 3 4 Show YIL007C Bait ORF YIL007C Bait gene name NAS2 Bait description Proteasome-interacti

  20. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YDL044C, YLR386W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available of mitochondrial RNA polymerase (Rpo41p) and couples RNA processing and translation to transcription Rows wi...protein that interacts with an N-terminal region of mitochondrial RNA polymerase (Rpo41p) and couples RNA pr

  1. Prediction of Protein-Protein Interaction Sites Based on Naive Bayes Classifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haijiang Geng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein functions through interactions with other proteins and biomolecules and these interactions occur on the so-called interface residues of the protein sequences. Identifying interface residues makes us better understand the biological mechanism of protein interaction. Meanwhile, information about the interface residues contributes to the understanding of metabolic, signal transduction networks and indicates directions in drug designing. In recent years, researchers have focused on developing new computational methods for predicting protein interface residues. Here we creatively used a 181-dimension protein sequence feature vector as input to the Naive Bayes Classifier- (NBC- based method to predict interaction sites in protein-protein complexes interaction. The prediction of interaction sites in protein interactions is regarded as an amino acid residue binary classification problem by applying NBC with protein sequence features. Independent test results suggested that Naive Bayes Classifier-based method with the protein sequence features as input vectors performed well.

  2. Categorizing Biases in High-Confidence High-Throughput Protein-Protein Interaction Data Sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Interactions Functional Diversity in Protein Interaction Data Sets—Al- though genomic-scale protein-protein interaction detection campaigns are by design...mapped out in Fig. 2 show that the different data sets covered distinct parts of the interaction space, with some FIG. 1. Functional diversity among

  3. The Identification of Three Sizes of Core Proteins during the Establishment of Persistent Hepatitis C Virus Infection in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qingjiao Liao; Jiansheng Tian; Yang Wu; Xulin Chen

    2013-01-01

    Similar to Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in humans,HCVcc infection can also result in persistent and chronic infection.The core protein is a variable protein and exists in several sizes.Some sizes of core proteins have been reported to be related to chronic HCV infection.To study the possible role of the core protein in persistent HCV infection,a persistent HCVcc infection was established,and the expression of the core protein was analysed over the course of the infection.The results show that there are three sizes of core proteins (p24,p21 and p19) expressed during the establishment of persistent HCVcc infection.Of these,the p21 core protein is the mature form of the HCV core protein.The p24 core protein is the phosphorylated form of p21.The p19 core protein appears to be a functional by-product generated during the course of infection.These three core proteins are all localized in the cytoplasm and can be encapsidated into the HCV virion.The appearance of the p19 and p24 core proteins might be related to acute HCVcc infection and chronic infection respectively and may play an important role in the pathology of a HCV infection.

  4. Constructing the HBV-human protein interaction network to understand the relationship between HBV and hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang De-Rong

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epidemiological studies have clearly validated the association between hepatitis B virus (HBV infection and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Patients with chronic HBV infection are at increased risk of HCC, in particular those with active liver disease and cirrhosis. Methods We catalogued all published interactions between HBV and human proteins, identifying 250 descriptions of HBV and human protein interactions and 146 unique human proteins that interact with HBV proteins by text mining. Results Integration of this data set into a reconstructed human interactome showed that cellular proteins interacting with HBV are made up of core proteins that are interconnected with many pathways. A global analysis based on functional annotation highlighted the enrichment of cellular pathways targeted by HBV. Conclusions By connecting the cellular proteins targeted by HBV, we have constructed a central network of proteins associated with hepatocellular carcinoma, which might be to regard as the basis of a detailed map for tracking new cellular interactions, and guiding future investigations.

  5. Protein-protein interaction network-based detection of functionally similar proteins within species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Baoxing; Wang, Fen; Guo, Yang; Sang, Qing; Liu, Min; Li, Dengyun; Fang, Wei; Zhang, Deli

    2012-07-01

    Although functionally similar proteins across species have been widely studied, functionally similar proteins within species showing low sequence similarity have not been examined in detail. Identification of these proteins is of significant importance for understanding biological functions, evolution of protein families, progression of co-evolution, and convergent evolution and others which cannot be obtained by detection of functionally similar proteins across species. Here, we explored a method of detecting functionally similar proteins within species based on graph theory. After denoting protein-protein interaction networks using graphs, we split the graphs into subgraphs using the 1-hop method. Proteins with functional similarities in a species were detected using a method of modified shortest path to compare these subgraphs and to find the eligible optimal results. Using seven protein-protein interaction networks and this method, some functionally similar proteins with low sequence similarity that cannot detected by sequence alignment were identified. By analyzing the results, we found that, sometimes, it is difficult to separate homologous from convergent evolution. Evaluation of the performance of our method by gene ontology term overlap showed that the precision of our method was excellent. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Genes transactivated by hepatitis C virus core protein, a microarray assay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Liu; Shu-Lin Zhang; Jun Cheng; Yan Liu; Lin Wang; Qing Shao; Jian Zhang; Shu-Mei Lin

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To explore the new target genes transactivated by hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein and to elucidate the pathogenesis of HCV infection.METHODS: Reverse transcribed cDNA was subjected tomicroarray assay. The coding gene transactivated by HCV core protein was cloned and analyzed with bioinformatics methods.RESULTS: The expressive vector of pcDNA3.1(-)-core was constructed and confirmed by restriction enzyme digestion and DNA sequencing and approved correct. mRNA was purified from HepG2 and HepG2 cells transfected with pcDNA3.1(-)-core, respectively. The cDNA derived was subjected to microarray assay. A new gene namedHCTP4 was cloned with molecular biological method in combination with bioinformatics method.CONCLUSION: HCV core is a potential transactivator.Microarray is an efficient and convenient method for analysis of differentially expressed genes.

  7. A Piezoelectric Screw Dislocation Interacting with an Elliptical Piezoelectric Inhomogeneity Containing a Confocal Elliptical Rigid Core

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋纯志; 谢超; 刘又文

    2011-01-01

    The electro-elastic interaction between a piezoelectric screw dislocation and an elliptical piezoelectric inhomogeneity, which contains an electrically conductive confocal elliptical rigid core under remote anti-plane shear stresses and in-plane electrical load is dealt with. The anaJytical solutions to the elastic field and the electric field, the interracial stress fields of inhomogeneity and matrix under longitudinal shear and the image force acting on the dislocation are derived by means of complex method. The effect of material properties and geometric configurations of the rigid core on interracial stresses generated by a remote uniform load, rigid core and material electroelastic properties on the image force is discussed.

  8. Self-interaction chromatography as a tool for optimizing conditions for membrane protein crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielsen, Mads; Nagy, Lisa A; DeLucas, Lawrence J; Cogdell, Richard J

    2010-01-01

    The second virial coefficient, or B value, is a measurement of how well a protein interacts with itself in solution. These interactions can lead to protein crystallization or precipitation, depending on their strength, with a narrow range of B values (the 'crystallization slot') being known to promote crystallization. A convenient method of determining the B value is by self-interaction chromatography. This paper describes how the light-harvesting complex 1-reaction centre core complex from Allochromatium vinosum yielded single straight-edged crystals after iterative cycles of self-interaction chromatography and crystallization. This process allowed the rapid screening of small molecules and detergents as crystallization additives. Here, a description is given of how self-interaction chromatography has been utilized to improve the crystallization conditions of a membrane protein.

  9. In silico identification of essential proteins in Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis based on protein-protein interaction networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folador, Edson Luiz; de Carvalho, Paulo Vinícius Sanches Daltro; Silva, Wanderson Marques;

    2016-01-01

    and decreased production of meat, wool, and milk. Current diagnosis or treatment protocols are not fully effective and, thus, require further research of Cp pathogenesis. RESULTS: Here, we mapped known protein-protein interactions (PPI) from various species to nine Cp strains to reconstruct parts...

  10. Mechanisms of peroxynitrite interactions with heme proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jia; Groves, John T

    2010-07-19

    Oxygenated heme proteins are known to react rapidly with nitric oxide (NO) to produce peroxynitrite (PN) at the heme site. This process could lead either to attenuation of the effects of NO or to nitrosative protein damage. PN is a powerful nitrating and oxidizing agent that has been implicated in a variety of cell injuries. Accordingly, it is important to delineate the nature and variety of reaction mechanisms of PN interactions with heme proteins. In this Forum, we survey the range of reactions of PN with heme proteins, with particular attention to myoglobin and cytochrome c. While these two proteins are textbook paradigms for oxygen binding and electron transfer, respectively, both have recently been shown to have other important functions that involve NO and PN. We have recently described direct evidence that ferrylmyolgobin (ferrylMb) and nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)) are both produced during the reaction of PN and metmyolgobin (metMb) (Su, J.; Groves, J. T. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2009, 131, 12979-12988). Kinetic evidence indicates that these products evolve from the initial formation of a caged radical intermediate [Fe(IV) horizontal lineO.NO(2)]. This caged pair reacts mainly via internal return with a rate constant k(r) to form metMb and nitrate in an oxygen-rebound scenario. Detectable amounts of ferrylMb are observed by stopped-flow spectrophotometry, appearing at a rate consistent with the rate, k(obs), of heme-mediated PN decomposition. Freely diffusing NO(2), which is liberated concomitantly from the radical pair (k(e)), preferentially nitrates myoglobin Tyr103 and added fluorescein. For cytochrome c, Raman spectroscopy has revealed that a substantial fraction of cytochrome c converts to a beta-sheet structure, at the expense of turns and helices at low pH (Balakrishnan, G.; Hu, Y.; Oyerinde, O. F.; Su, J.; Groves, J. T.; Spiro, T. G. J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2007, 129, 504-505). It is proposed that a short beta-sheet segment, comprising residues 37-39 and 58

  11. Elucidating the Interacting Domains of Chandipura Virus Nucleocapsid Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapila Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The nucleocapsid (N protein of Chandipura virus (CHPV plays a crucial role in viral life cycle, besides being an important structural component of the virion through proper organization of its interactions with other viral proteins. In a recent study, the authors had mapped the associations among CHPV proteins and shown that N protein interacts with four of the viral proteins: N, phosphoprotein (P, matrix protein (M, and glycoprotein (G. The present study aimed to distinguish the regions of CHPV N protein responsible for its interactions with other viral proteins. In this direction, we have generated the structure of CHPV N protein by homology modeling using SWISS-MODEL workspace and Accelrys Discovery Studio client 2.55 and mapped the domains of N protein using PiSQRD. The interactions of N protein fragments with other proteins were determined by ZDOCK rigid-body docking method and validated by yeast two-hybrid and ELISA. The study revealed a unique binding site, comprising of amino acids 1–30 at the N terminus of the nucleocapsid protein (N1 that is instrumental in its interactions with N, P, M, and G proteins. It was also observed that N2 associates with N and G proteins while N3 interacts with N, P, and M proteins.

  12. Mapping of protein-protein interactions within the DNA-dependent protein kinase complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gell, D; Jackson, S P

    1999-01-01

    In mammalian cells, the Ku and DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) proteins are required for the correct and efficient repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Ku comprises two tightly-associated subunits of approximately 69 and approximately 83 kDa, which are termed Ku70 and Ku80 (or Ku86), respectively. Previously, a number of regions of both Ku subunits have been demonstrated to be involved in their interaction, but the molecular mechanism of this interaction remains unknown. We have identified a region in Ku70 (amino acid residues 449-578) and a region in Ku80 (residues 439-592) that participate in Ku subunit interaction. Sequence analysis reveals that these interaction regions share sequence homology and suggests that the Ku subunits are structurally related. On binding to a DNA double-strand break, Ku is able to interact with DNA-PKcs, but how this interaction is mediated has not been defined. We show that the extreme C-terminus of Ku80, specifically the final 12 amino acid residues, mediates a highly specific interaction with DNA-PKcs. Strikingly, these residues appear to be conserved only in Ku80 sequences from vertebrate organisms. These data suggest that Ku has evolved to become part of the DNA-PK holo-enzyme by acquisition of a protein-protein interaction motif at the C-terminus of Ku80. PMID:10446239

  13. Shock-turbulence interaction in core-collapse supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdikamalov, Ernazar; Zhaksylykov, Azamat; Radice, David; Berdibek, Shapagat

    2016-10-01

    Nuclear shell burning in the final stages of the lives of massive stars is accompanied by strong turbulent convection. The resulting fluctuations aid supernova explosion by amplifying the non-radial flow in the post-shock region. In this work, we investigate the physical mechanism behind this amplification using a linear perturbation theory. We model the shock wave as a one-dimensional planar discontinuity and consider its interaction with vorticity and entropy perturbations in the upstream flow. We find that, as the perturbations cross the shock, their total turbulent kinetic energy is amplified by a factor of ˜2, while the average linear size of turbulent eddies decreases by about the same factor. These values are not sensitive to the parameters of the upstream turbulence and the nuclear dissociation efficiency at the shock. Finally, we discuss the implication of our results for the supernova explosion mechanism. We show that the upstream perturbations can decrease the critical neutrino luminosity for producing explosion by several per cent.

  14. Transactivating effect of hepatitis C virus core protein:A suppression subtractive hybridization study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Liu; Yan Liu; Jun Cheng; Shu-Lin Zhang; Lin Wang; Qing Shao; Jian Zhang; Qian Yang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the transactivating effect of hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein and to screen genes transactivated by HCV core protein.METHODS: pcDNA3.1(-)-core containing full-length HCV core gene was constructed by insertion of HCV core gene into EcoRI/BanHI site. HepG2 cells were cotransfected with pcDNA3.1(-)-core and pSV-lacZ. After 48 h, cells were collected and detected for the expression of β-gal by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit. HepG2 cells were transiently transfected with pcDNA3.1(-)-core using Lipofectamine reagent. Cells were collected and total mRNA was isolated. A subtracted cDNA library was generated and constructed into a pGEM-Teasy vector. The library was amplified with E. coli strain JM109. The cDNAs were sequenced and analyzed in GenBank with BLAST search after polymerase chain reaction (PCR).RESULTS: The core mRNA and protein could be detected in HepG2 cell lysate which was transfected by the pcDNA3.1(-)-core. The activity of β-galactosidase in HepG2 cells transfected by the pcDNA3.1(-)-core was 5.4 times higher than that of HepG2 cells transfected by control plasmid. The subtractive library of genes transactivated by HCV core protein was constructed successfully. The amplified library contained 233positive clones. Colony PCR showed that 2:13 clones contained 100-1 000 bp inserts. Sequence analysis was performed in 63 clones. Six of the sequences were unknown genes. The full length sequences were obtained with bioinformatics method, accepted by GenBank. It was suggested that six novel cDNA sequences might be target genes transactivated by HCV core protein.CONCLUSION: The core protein of HCV has transactivating effects on SV40 early promoter/enhancer. A total of 63 clones from cDNA library were randomly chosen and sequenced.Using the BLAST program at the National Center for Biotechnology Information, six of the sequences were unknown genes. The other 57 sequences were highly similar to known genes.

  15. Player–Game Interaction and Cognitive Gameplay: A Taxonomic Framework for the Core Mechanic of Videogames

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamran Sedig

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive gameplay—the cognitive dimension of a player’s experience—emerges from the interaction between a player and a game. While its design requires careful consideration, cognitive gameplay can be designed only indirectly via the design of game components. In this paper, we focus on one such component—the core mechanic—which binds a player and game together through the performance of essential interactions. Little extant research has been aimed at developing frameworks to support the design of interactions within the core mechanic with cognitive gameplay in mind. We present a taxonomic framework named INFORM (Interaction desigN For the cORe Mechanic to address this gap. INFORM employs twelve micro-level elements that collectively give structure to any individual interaction within the core mechanic. We characterize these elements in the context of videogames, and discuss their potential influences on cognitive gameplay. We situate these elements within a broader framework that synthesizes concepts relevant to game design. INFORM is a descriptive framework, and provides a common vocabulary and a set of concepts that designers can use to think systematically about issues related to micro-level interaction design and cognitive gameplay.

  16. Linguistic feature analysis for protein interaction extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelis Chris

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rapid growth of the amount of publicly available reports on biomedical experimental results has recently caused a boost of text mining approaches for protein interaction extraction. Most approaches rely implicitly or explicitly on linguistic, i.e., lexical and syntactic, data extracted from text. However, only few attempts have been made to evaluate the contribution of the different feature types. In this work, we contribute to this evaluation by studying the relative importance of deep syntactic features, i.e., grammatical relations, shallow syntactic features (part-of-speech information and lexical features. For this purpose, we use a recently proposed approach that uses support vector machines with structured kernels. Results Our results reveal that the contribution of the different feature types varies for the different data sets on which the experiments were conducted. The smaller the training corpus compared to the test data, the more important the role of grammatical relations becomes. Moreover, deep syntactic information based classifiers prove to be more robust on heterogeneous texts where no or only limited common vocabulary is shared. Conclusion Our findings suggest that grammatical relations play an important role in the interaction extraction task. Moreover, the net advantage of adding lexical and shallow syntactic features is small related to the number of added features. This implies that efficient classifiers can be built by using only a small fraction of the features that are typically being used in recent approaches.

  17. Studying protein-protein interactions via blot overlay/far western blot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Randy A

    2015-01-01

    Blot overlay is a useful method for studying protein-protein interactions. This technique involves fractionating proteins on SDS-PAGE, blotting to nitrocellulose or PVDF membrane, and then incubating with a probe of interest. The probe is typically a protein that is radiolabeled, biotinylated, or simply visualized with a specific antibody. When the probe is visualized via antibody detection, this technique is often referred to as "Far Western blot." Many different kinds of protein-protein interactions can be studied via blot overlay, and the method is applicable to screens for unknown protein-protein interactions as well as to the detailed characterization of known interactions.

  18. HCV core protein represses the apoptosis and improves the autophagy of human hepatocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Changhong; Qu, Aihua; Han, Xiaochun; Wang, Yiguo

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study aims to investigate the influence on human hepatocytes apoptosis and autophagy by the hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein. Methods: QSG-7701, a human-derived non-neoplastic liver cell line, was transfected with PIRES-core vector that was a eukaryotic vector to express HCV core protein. Fluorescence microscope was used to observe the changes of nuclei in apoptosis cells by Annex in V-FITC/PI double staining. Flow cytometry was applied to detect the rate of cell apoptosis. Western blotting was used to detect the expression of HCV core protein, transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), autophagic biomarker microtubule associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3), and Beclin-1. Results: The apoptosis rate was significantly lower (P < 0.05) in QSG7701/core group (transfected with PIRES-core vector, (1.34±0.07)%) than in QSG7701 group (no transfection, (2.35±0.11)%) and in QSG7701 QSG7701/pcDNA3.1 group (transfected with pcDNA3.1 vector, (2.58±0.1)%). NF-κB expression was up-expressed in QSG7701/core group than in QSG7701/pcDNA3.1 group and QSG7701 group (P < 0.05). LC3-II expression and Beclin-1 expression was significant higher in QSG7701/core group than in the QSG7701/pcDNA3.1 group and QSG7701 group (P < 0.05). Conclusion: HCV core protein can repress the apoptosis and improve the autophagy of QSG7701 through up-regulating NF-κB and Beclin-1 expression. PMID:26629077

  19. Drosophila sperm surface alpha-L-fucosidase interacts with the egg coats through its core fucose residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intra, Jari; Concetta, Veltri; Daniela, De Caro; Perotti, Maria Elisa; Pasini, Maria Enrica

    2015-08-01

    Sperm-oocyte interaction during fertilization is multiphasic, with multicomponent events, taking place between egg's glycoproteins and sperm surface receptors. Protein-carbohydrate complementarities in gamete recognition have observed in cases throughout the whole evolutionary scale. Sperm-associated α-L-fucosidases have been identified in various organisms. Their wide distribution and known properties reflect the hypothesis that fucose and α-L-fucosidases have fundamental function(s) during gamete interactions. An α-L-fucosidase has been detected as transmembrane protein on the surface of spermatozoa of eleven species across the genus Drosophila. Immunofluorescence labeling showed that the protein is localized in the sperm plasma membrane over the acrosome and the tail, in Drosophila melanogaster. In the present study, efforts were made to analyze with solid phase assays the oligosaccharide recognition ability of fruit fly sperm α-L-fucosidase with defined carbohydrate chains that can functionally mimic egg glycoconjugates. Our results showed that α-L-fucosidase bound to fucose residue and in particular it prefers N-glycans carrying core α1,6-linked fucose and core α1,3-linked fucose in N-glycans carrying only a terminal mannose residue. The ability of sperm α-L-fucosidase to bind to the micropylar chorion and to the vitelline envelope was examined in in vitro assays in presence of α-L-fucosidase, either alone or in combination with molecules containing fucose residues. No binding was detected when α-L-fucosidase was pre-incubated with fucoidan, a polymer of α-L-fucose and the monosaccharide fucose. Furthermore, egg labeling with anti-horseradish peroxidase, that recognized only core α1,3-linked fucose, correlates with α-L-fucosidase micropylar binding. Collectively, these data support the hypothesis of the potential role of this glycosidase in sperm-egg interactions in Drosophila.

  20. Hepatitis B Virus Core Protein Phosphorylation Sites Affect Capsid Stability and Transient Exposure of the C-terminal Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selzer, Lisa; Kant, Ravi; Wang, Joseph C-Y; Bothner, Brian; Zlotnick, Adam

    2015-11-20

    Hepatitis B virus core protein has 183 amino acids divided into an assembly domain and an arginine-rich C-terminal domain (CTD) that regulates essential functions including genome packaging, reverse transcription, and intracellular trafficking. Here, we investigated the CTD in empty hepatitis B virus (HBV) T=4 capsids. We examined wild-type core protein (Cp183-WT) and a mutant core protein (Cp183-EEE), in which three CTD serines are replaced with glutamate to mimic phosphorylated protein. We found that Cp183-WT capsids were less stable than Cp183-EEE capsids. When we tested CTD sensitivity to trypsin, we detected two different populations of CTDs differentiated by their rate of trypsin cleavage. Interestingly, CTDs from Cp183-EEE capsids exhibited a much slower rate of proteolytic cleavage when compared with CTDs of Cp183-WT capsids. Cryo-electron microscopy studies of trypsin-digested capsids show that CTDs at five-fold symmetry vertices are most protected. We hypothesize that electrostatic interactions between glutamates and arginines in Cp183-EEE, particularly at five-fold, increase capsid stability and reduce CTD exposure. Our studies show that quasi-equivalent CTDs exhibit different rates of exposure and thus might perform distinct functions during the hepatitis B virus lifecycle. Our results demonstrate a structural role for CTD phosphorylation and indicate crosstalk between CTDs within a capsid particle. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Hepatitis C virus core protein induces hepatic steatosis via Sirt1-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chuanhai; Wang, Jingjing; Zhang, Hanlin; Liu, Shunai; Lee, Hyuek Jong; Jin, Wanzhu; Cheng, Jun

    2017-09-12

    Hepatic steatosis is a common feature of patients with chronic hepatitis C. Previous reports have shown that the overexpression of hepatitis C virus core-encoding sequences (hepatitis C virus genotypes 3a and 1b) significantly induces intracellular triglyceride accumulation. However, the underlying mechanism has not yet been revealed. To investigate whether Sirt1 is involved in hepatitis C virus-mediated hepatic steatosis, the overexpression of hepatitis C virus core 1b protein and Sirt1 and the knockdown of Sirt1 in HepG2 cells were performed. To confirm the results of the cellular experiment liver-specific Sirt1 KO mice with lentivirus-mediated hepatitis C virus core 1b overexpression were studied. Our results show that hepatitis C virus core 1b protein overexpression led to the accumulation of triglycerides in HepG2 cells. Notably the expression of PPARγ2 was dramatically increased at both the mRNA and protein levels by hepatitis C virus core 1b overexpression. The protein expression of Sirt1 is an upstream regulator of PPARγ2 and was also significantly increased after core 1b overexpression. In addition, the overexpression or knockdown of Sirt1 expression alone was sufficient to modulate p300-mediated PPARγ2 deacetylation. In vivo studies showed that hepatitis C virus core protein 1b-induced hepatic steatosis was attenuated in liver-specific Sirt1 KO mice by downregulation of PPARγ2 expression. Sirt1 mediates hepatitis C virus core protein 1b-induced hepatic steatosis by regulation of PPARγ2 expression. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Stable evolutionary signal in a Yeast protein interaction network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferdig Michael T

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The recently emerged protein interaction network paradigm can provide novel and important insights into the innerworkings of a cell. Yet, the heavy burden of both false positive and false negative protein-protein interaction data casts doubt on the broader usefulness of these interaction sets. Approaches focusing on one-protein-at-a-time have been powerfully employed to demonstrate the high degree of conservation of proteins participating in numerous interactions; here, we expand his 'node' focused paradigm to investigate the relative persistence of 'link' based evolutionary signals in a protein interaction network of S. cerevisiae and point out the value of this relatively untapped source of information. Results The trend for highly connected proteins to be preferably conserved in evolution is stable, even in the context of tremendous noise in the underlying protein interactions as well as in the assignment of orthology among five higher eukaryotes. We find that local clustering around interactions correlates with preferred evolutionary conservation of the participating proteins; furthermore the correlation between high local clustering and evolutionary conservation is accompanied by a stable elevated degree of coexpression of the interacting proteins. We use this conserved interaction data, combined with P. falciparum /Yeast orthologs, as proof-of-principle that high-order network topology can be used comparatively to deduce local network structure in non-model organisms. Conclusion High local clustering is a criterion for the reliability of an interaction and coincides with preferred evolutionary conservation and significant coexpression. These strong and stable correlations indicate that evolutionary units go beyond a single protein to include the interactions among them. In particular, the stability of these signals in the face of extreme noise suggests that empirical protein interaction data can be integrated with

  3. Virus-producing cells determine the host protein profiles of HIV-1 virion cores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos Steven

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Upon HIV entry into target cells, viral cores are released and rearranged into reverse transcription complexes (RTCs, which support reverse transcription and also protect and transport viral cDNA to the site of integration. RTCs are composed of viral and cellular proteins that originate from both target and producer cells, the latter entering the target cell within the viral core. However, the proteome of HIV-1 viral cores in the context of the type of producer cells has not yet been characterized. Results We examined the proteomic profiles of the cores purified from HIV-1 NL4-3 virions assembled in Sup-T1 cells (T lymphocytes, PMA and vitamin D3 activated THP1 (model of macrophages, mMΦ, and non-activated THP1 cells (model of monocytes, mMN and assessed potential involvement of identified proteins in the early stages of infection using gene ontology information and data from genome-wide screens on proteins important for HIV-1 replication. We identified 202 cellular proteins incorporated in the viral cores (T cells: 125, mMΦ: 110, mMN: 90 with the overlap between these sets limited to 42 proteins. The groups of RNA binding (29, DNA binding (17, cytoskeleton (15, cytoskeleton regulation (21, chaperone (18, vesicular trafficking-associated (12 and ubiquitin-proteasome pathway-associated proteins (9 were most numerous. Cores of the virions from SupT1 cells contained twice as many RNA binding proteins as cores of THP1-derived virus, whereas cores of virions from mMΦ and mMN were enriched in components of cytoskeleton and vesicular transport machinery, most probably due to differences in virion assembly pathways between these cells. Spectra of chaperones, cytoskeletal proteins and ubiquitin-proteasome pathway components were similar between viral cores from different cell types, whereas DNA-binding and especially RNA-binding proteins were highly diverse. Western blot analysis showed that within the group of overlapping proteins

  4. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YJR055W, YPL193W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YJR055W HIT1 Protein of unknown function, required for growth at high temperature Row...s with this bait as bait (1) Rows with this bait as prey (0) YPL193W RSA1 Protein involved in the assembly... of 60S ribosomal subunits; functionally interacts with Dbp6p; functions in a late nucleoplasmic step of the assembly Row...s with this prey as prey (1) Rows with this prey as bait (0) 6 5 2 2...unknown function, required for growth at high temperature Rows with this bait as bait Rows with this bait as bait (1) Row

  5. Predicting and validating protein interactions using network structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pao-Yang Chen

    Full Text Available Protein interactions play a vital part in the function of a cell. As experimental techniques for detection and validation of protein interactions are time consuming, there is a need for computational methods for this task. Protein interactions appear to form a network with a relatively high degree of local clustering. In this paper we exploit this clustering by suggesting a score based on triplets of observed protein interactions. The score utilises both protein characteristics and network properties. Our score based on triplets is shown to complement existing techniques for predicting protein interactions, outperforming them on data sets which display a high degree of clustering. The predicted interactions score highly against test measures for accuracy. Compared to a similar score derived from pairwise interactions only, the triplet score displays higher sensitivity and specificity. By looking at specific examples, we show how an experimental set of interactions can be enriched and validated. As part of this work we also examine the effect of different prior databases upon the accuracy of prediction and find that the interactions from the same kingdom give better results than from across kingdoms, suggesting that there may be fundamental differences between the networks. These results all emphasize that network structure is important and helps in the accurate prediction of protein interactions. The protein interaction data set and the program used in our analysis, and a list of predictions and validations, are available at http://www.stats.ox.ac.uk/bioinfo/resources/PredictingInteractions.

  6. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YNL273W, YMR048W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ing gap repair of damaged DNA; interacts with the MCM helicase Rows with this bait as bait (1) Rows with thi...s bait as prey (0) YMR048W CSM3 Protein required for accurate chromosome segregation during meiosis Row...s with this prey as prey (1) Rows with this prey as bait (0) 4 3 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 - - - -...rk to promote sister chromatid cohesion after DNA damage, facilitating gap repair of damaged DNA; interacts with the MCM helicase Row...s with this bait as bait Rows with this bait as bait (1) Rows with this bait as prey Row

  7. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YDL239C, YDR273W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YDL239C ADY3 Protein required for spore wall formation, thought to mediate assembly... of a Don1p-containing structure at the leading edge of the prospore membrane via interaction with spindle p...it as prey (1) YDR273W DON1 Meiosis-specific component of the spindle pole body, ...0 - - - - - 0 0 5 - Show YDL239C Bait ORF YDL239C Bait gene name ADY3 Bait descri... at the leading edge of the prospore membrane via interaction with spindle pole body components; potentially

  8. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YDL239C, YOR324C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YDL239C ADY3 Protein required for spore wall formation, thought to mediate assembly... of a Don1p-containing structure at the leading edge of the prospore membrane via interaction with spindle p... as bait (0) 4 5 3 4 0 0 0 0 0 - - - - - 0 0 4 - Show YDL239C Bait ORF YDL239C Ba... a Don1p-containing structure at the leading edge of the prospore membrane via interaction with spindle pole

  9. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YDL239C, YDR148C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YDL239C ADY3 Protein required for spore wall formation, thought to mediate assembly... of a Don1p-containing structure at the leading edge of the prospore membrane via interaction with spindle p...s prey as bait (0) 4 15 2 5 0 0 0 0 0 - - - - - 0 0 3 - Show YDL239C Bait ORF YDL...mbly of a Don1p-containing structure at the leading edge of the prospore membrane via interaction with spindl

  10. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YDL239C, YAL028W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YDL239C ADY3 Protein required for spore wall formation, thought to mediate assembly... of a Don1p-containing structure at the leading edge of the prospore membrane via interaction with spindle p...(1) Rows with this prey as bait (0) 4 5 4 7 0 0 0 0 0 - - - - - 0 0 3 - Show YDL239C Bait ORF YDL... to mediate assembly of a Don1p-containing structure at the leading edge of the prospore membrane via interaction with spindl

  11. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YDL239C, YBR072W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YDL239C ADY3 Protein required for spore wall formation, thought to mediate assembly... of a Don1p-containing structure at the leading edge of the prospore membrane via interaction with spindle p... (3) Rows with this prey as bait (0) 4 52 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 - - - - - 0 0 3 - Show YDL239C Bait ORF YDL...ht to mediate assembly of a Don1p-containing structure at the leading edge of the prospore membrane via interaction with spindl

  12. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YDL239C, YLR072W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YDL239C ADY3 Protein required for spore wall formation, thought to mediate assembly... of a Don1p-containing structure at the leading edge of the prospore membrane via interaction with spindle p... with this prey as prey (1) Rows with this prey as bait (0) 4 5 4 7 0 0 0 0 0 - - - - - 0 0 4 - Show YDL239C Bait ORF YDL...pore membrane via interaction with spindle pole body components; potentially phosphorylated by Cdc28p Rows w

  13. Widely predicting specific protein functions based on protein-protein interaction data and gene expression profile

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Lei; LI Xia; GUO Zheng; ZHU MingZhu; LI YanHui; RAO ShaoQi

    2007-01-01

    GESTs (gene expression similarity and taxonomy similarity), a gene functional prediction approach previously proposed by us, is based on gene expression similarity and concept similarity of functional classes defined in Gene Ontology (GO). In this paper, we extend this method to protein-protein interaction data by introducing several methods to filter the neighbors in protein interaction networks for a protein of unknown function(s). Unlike other conventional methods, the proposed approach automatically selects the most appropriate functional classes as specific as possible during the learning process, and calls on genes annotated to nearby classes to support the predictions to some small-sized specific classes in GO. Based on the yeast protein-protein interaction information from MIPS and a dataset of gene expression profiles, we assess the performances of our approach for predicting protein functions to "biology process" by three measures particularly designed for functional classes organized in GO. Results show that our method is powerful for widely predicting gene functions with very specific functional terms. Based on the GO database published in December 2004, we predict some proteins whose functions were unknown at that time, and some of the predictions have been confirmed by the new SGD annotation data published in April, 2006.

  14. Widely predicting specific protein functions based on protein-protein interaction data and gene expression profile

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    GESTs (gene expression similarity and taxonomy similarity), a gene functional prediction approach previously proposed by us, is based on gene expression similarity and concept similarity of functional classes defined in Gene Ontology (GO). In this paper, we extend this method to protein-protein interac-tion data by introducing several methods to filter the neighbors in protein interaction networks for a protein of unknown function(s). Unlike other conventional methods, the proposed approach automati-cally selects the most appropriate functional classes as specific as possible during the learning proc-ess, and calls on genes annotated to nearby classes to support the predictions to some small-sized specific classes in GO. Based on the yeast protein-protein interaction information from MIPS and a dataset of gene expression profiles, we assess the performances of our approach for predicting protein functions to “biology process” by three measures particularly designed for functional classes organ-ized in GO. Results show that our method is powerful for widely predicting gene functions with very specific functional terms. Based on the GO database published in December 2004, we predict some proteins whose functions were unknown at that time, and some of the predictions have been confirmed by the new SGD annotation data published in April, 2006.

  15. HCV Core Protein Uses Multiple Mechanisms to Induce Oxidative Stress in Human Hepatoma Huh7 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Alexander V.; Smirnova, Olga A.; Petrushanko, Irina Y.; Ivanova, Olga N.; Karpenko, Inna L.; Alekseeva, Ekaterina; Sominskaya, Irina; Makarov, Alexander A.; Bartosch, Birke; Kochetkov, Sergey N.; Isaguliants, Maria G.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is accompanied by the induction of oxidative stress, mediated by several virus proteins, the most prominent being the nucleocapsid protein (HCV core). Here, using the truncated forms of HCV core, we have delineated several mechanisms by which it induces the oxidative stress. The N-terminal 36 amino acids of HCV core induced TGFβ1-dependent expression of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases 1 and 4, both of which independently contributed to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The same fragment also induced the expression of cyclo-oxygenase 2, which, however, made no input into ROS production. Amino acids 37–191 of HCV core up-regulated the transcription of a ROS generating enzyme cytochrome P450 2E1. Furthermore, the same fragment induced the expression of endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductin 1α. The latter triggered efflux of Ca2+ from ER to mitochondria via mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter, leading to generation of superoxide anions, and possibly also H2O2. Suppression of any of these pathways in cells expressing the full-length core protein led to a partial inhibition of ROS production. Thus, HCV core causes oxidative stress via several independent pathways, each mediated by a distinct region of the protein. PMID:26035647

  16. Correlation of disorder between S. cerevisiae interacting proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rue-Albrecht, Kevin; Shields, Denis C; Khaldi, Nora

    2012-01-01

    Protein disorder has been frequently associated with protein-protein interaction. However, our knowledge of how protein disorder evolves within a network is limited. It is expected that physically interacting proteins evolve in a coordinated manner. This has so far been shown in their evolutionary rate, and in their gene expression levels. Here we examine the percentage of predicted disorder residues within binary and complex interacting proteins (physical and functional interactions respectively) to investigate how the disorder of a protein relates to that of its interacting partners. We show that the level of disorder of interacting proteins are correlated, with a greater correlation seen among proteins that are co-members of the same complex, and a lesser correlation between proteins that are documented as binary interactors of each other. There is a striking variation among complexes not only in their disorder, but in the extent to which the proteins within the complex differ in their levels of disorder, with RNA processes and protein binding complexes showing more variation in the disorder of their proteins, whilst other complexes show very little variation in the overall disorder of their constituent proteins. There is likely to be a stronger selection for complex subunits to have similar disorder, than is seen for proteins involved in binary interactions. Thus, binary interactions may be more resilient to changes in disorder than are complex interactions. These results add a new dimension to the role of disorder in protein networks, and highlight the potential importance of maintaining similar disorder in the members of a complex.

  17. A Brief Review of RNA-Protein Interaction Database Resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Yi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available RNA-protein interactions play critical roles in various biological processes. By collecting and analyzing the RNA-protein interactions and binding sites from experiments and predictions, RNA-protein interaction databases have become an essential resource for the exploration of the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulatory network. Here, we briefly review several widely used RNA-protein interaction database resources developed in recent years to provide a guide of these databases. The content and major functions in databases are presented. The brief description of database helps users to quickly choose the database containing information they interested. In short, these RNA-protein interaction database resources are continually updated, but the current state shows the efforts to identify and analyze the large amount of RNA-protein interactions.

  18. Affinity of anticancer drug, daunomycin, to core histones in solution:comparison of free and cross-linked proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Azra RABBANI; Sayeh ABDOSAMADI; Naghmeh SARI-SARAF

    2007-01-01

    Aim: The interaction of anthracyclinc anticancer drugs with chromatin, nuclco-somes and historic H1 has been extensively studied. In the present study, for the first time, we have investigated the binding of anthracycline antibiotic, daunomycin,to free and cross-linked thymus core histones (CL-core) in solution and in the absence of DNA. Methods: Fluorescence, UV/Vis spectroscopy and equilibrium dialysis techniques were used. Results: The UV spectroscopy results show that daunomycin induces hypochromicity in the absorption spectra of the core histones.Fluorescence emission intensity is decreased upon daunomycin binding and the process is concentration dependent. The equilibrium dialysis shows that the bind-ing is positive cooperative with the binding sites as Scatchard plot and Hill Coef-ficient confirm it. Conclusion: The results suggest that daunomycin shows much higher affinity to core histories free in solution than to CL-core, implying that the binding is most likely due to the accessibility of these proteins to the environment.It is suggested that daunomycin binds strongly to open state of histones, such as in tumor cells, rather than to their compact structure seen in normal chromatin.

  19. Effects of interactions on dynamic correlations of hard-core bosons at finite temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauseweh, Benedikt; Uhrig, Götz S.

    2017-09-01

    We investigate how dynamic correlations of hard-core bosonic excitation at finite temperature are affected by additional interactions besides the hard-core repulsion which prevents them from occupying the same site. We focus especially on dimerized spin systems, where these additional interactions between the elementary excitations, triplons, lead to the formation of bound states, relevant for the correct description of scattering processes. In order to include these effects quantitatively, we extend the previously developed Brückner approach to include also nearest-neighbor (NN) and next-nearest neighbor (NNN) interactions correctly in a low-temperature expansion. This leads to the extension of the scalar Bethe-Salpeter equation to a matrix-valued equation. As an example, we consider the Heisenberg spin ladder to illustrate the significance of the additional interactions on the spectral functions at finite temperature, which are proportional to inelastic neutron scattering rates.

  20. Transcription factors do it together : the hows and whys of studying protein-protein interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Immink, R.G.H.; Angenent, G.C.

    2002-01-01

    Protein–protein interactions are intrinsic to virtually every cellular process. Recent breakthroughs in techniques to study protein-interaction and the availability of fully sequenced plant genomes have attracted many plant scientists to undertake the first steps in the field of protein interactions

  1. The Core Extrusion Schema-Revised: Hiding Oneself Predicts Severity of Social Interaction Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levinson, Cheri A; Rodebaugh, Thomas L; Lim, Michelle H; Fernandez, Katya C

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive behavioral models of social anxiety disorder (SAD) suggest that fear of negative evaluation is a core fear or vulnerability for SAD. However, why negative evaluation is feared is not fully understood. It is possible that core beliefs contribute to the relationship between fear of negative evaluation and SAD. One of these beliefs may be a core extrusion schema: a constellation of beliefs that one's true self will be rejected by others and therefore one should hide one's true self. In the current study (N = 699), we extended research on the Core Extrusion Schema and created a shortened and revised version of the measure called the Core Extrusion Schema-Revised The Core Extrusion Schema-Revised demonstrated good factor fit for its two subscales (Hidden Self and Rejection of the True Self) and was invariant across gender and ethnicity. The Hidden Self subscale demonstrated excellent incremental validity within the full sample as well as in participants diagnosed with generalized SAD. Specifically, the Hidden Self subscale may help explain severity of social interaction anxiety. This measure could be used with individuals diagnosed with generalized SAD to design exposures targeting these core beliefs.

  2. Technology and mechanism of a new protein-based core sand for aluminum casting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石晶玉; 黄天佑; 石红玉; 何镇明

    2001-01-01

    The protein-based binding material is from natural products, which is nontoxic and recyclable. This kind of green binder is earnestly needed by aluminum casting products. The new protein-based core possesses higher strength and easier shakeout. Its tensile strength is close to that of common resin sands. The micro-mechanism of protein binder was investigated by using infrared spectrum, chemical element analysis, SEM and thermal lost-mass analysis.

  3. Hepatitis C virus core protein inhibits interferon production by a human plasmacytoid dendritic cell line and dysregulates interferon regulatory factor-7 and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT 1 protein expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy E L Stone

    Full Text Available Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells (pDCs represent a key immune cell population in the defense against viruses. pDCs detect viral pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs through pattern recognition receptors (PRR. PRR/PAMP interactions trigger signaling events that induce interferon (IFN production to initiate local and systemic responses. pDCs produce Type I and Type III (IFNL IFNs in response to HCV RNA. Extracellular HCV core protein (Core is found in the circulation in chronic infection. This study defined how Core modulates PRR signaling in pDCs. Type I and III IFN expression and production following exposure to recombinant Core or β-galactosiade was assessed in human GEN2.2 cells, a pDC cell line. Core suppressed type I and III IFN production in response to TLR agonists and the HCV PAMP agonist of RIG-I. Core suppression of IFN induction was linked with decreased IRF-7 protein levels and increased non-phosphorylated STAT1 protein. Circulating Core protein interferes with PRR signaling by pDCs to suppress IFN production. Strategies to define and target Core effects on pDCs may serve to enhance IFN production and antiviral actions against HCV.

  4. AtPIN: Arabidopsis thaliana Protein Interaction Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva-Filho Marcio C

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-protein interactions (PPIs constitute one of the most crucial conditions to sustain life in living organisms. To study PPI in Arabidopsis thaliana we have developed AtPIN, a database and web interface for searching and building interaction networks based on publicly available protein-protein interaction datasets. Description All interactions were divided into experimentally demonstrated or predicted. The PPIs in the AtPIN database present a cellular compartment classification (C3 which divides the PPI into 4 classes according to its interaction evidence and subcellular localization. It has been shown in the literature that a pair of genuine interacting proteins are generally expected to have a common cellular role and proteins that have common interaction partners have a high chance of sharing a common function. In AtPIN, due to its integrative profile, the reliability index for a reported PPI can be postulated in terms of the proportion of interaction partners that two proteins have in common. For this, we implement the Functional Similarity Weight (FSW calculation for all first level interactions present in AtPIN database. In order to identify target proteins of cytosolic glutamyl-tRNA synthetase (Cyt-gluRS (AT5G26710 we combined two approaches, AtPIN search and yeast two-hybrid screening. Interestingly, the proteins glutamine synthetase (AT5G35630, a disease resistance protein (AT3G50950 and a zinc finger protein (AT5G24930, which has been predicted as target proteins for Cyt-gluRS by AtPIN, were also detected in the experimental screening. Conclusions AtPIN is a friendly and easy-to-use tool that aggregates information on Arabidopsis thaliana PPIs, ontology, and sub-cellular localization, and might be a useful and reliable strategy to map protein-protein interactions in Arabidopsis. AtPIN can be accessed at http://bioinfo.esalq.usp.br/atpin.

  5. A least square method based model for identifying protein complexes in protein-protein interaction network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Qiguo; Guo, Maozu; Guo, Yingjie; Liu, Xiaoyan; Liu, Yang; Teng, Zhixia

    2014-01-01

    Protein complex formed by a group of physical interacting proteins plays a crucial role in cell activities. Great effort has been made to computationally identify protein complexes from protein-protein interaction (PPI) network. However, the accuracy of the prediction is still far from being satisfactory, because the topological structures of protein complexes in the PPI network are too complicated. This paper proposes a novel optimization framework to detect complexes from PPI network, named PLSMC. The method is on the basis of the fact that if two proteins are in a common complex, they are likely to be interacting. PLSMC employs this relation to determine complexes by a penalized least squares method. PLSMC is applied to several public yeast PPI networks, and compared with several state-of-the-art methods. The results indicate that PLSMC outperforms other methods. In particular, complexes predicted by PLSMC can match known complexes with a higher accuracy than other methods. Furthermore, the predicted complexes have high functional homogeneity.

  6. Dynamics of protein-protein interactions studied by paramagnetic NMR spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Somireddy Venkata, Bharat Kumar Reddy

    2012-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions play an important role in all cellular processes such as signal transduction, electron transfer, gene regulation, transcription, and translation. Understanding these protein-protein interactions at the molecular level, is an important aim in structural biology. The

  7. Dynamics of protein-protein interactions studied by paramagnetic NMR spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Somireddy Venkata, Bharat Kumar Reddy

    2012-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions play an important role in all cellular processes such as signal transduction, electron transfer, gene regulation, transcription, and translation. Understanding these protein-protein interactions at the molecular level, is an important aim in structural biology. The prote

  8. A scored human protein-protein interaction network to catalyze genomic interpretation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Taibo; Wernersson, Rasmus; Hansen, Rasmus B;

    2017-01-01

    Genome-scale human protein-protein interaction networks are critical to understanding cell biology and interpreting genomic data, but challenging to produce experimentally. Through data integration and quality control, we provide a scored human protein-protein interaction network (In...

  9. A Laboratory-Intensive Course on the Experimental Study of Protein-Protein Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witherow, D. Scott; Carson, Sue

    2011-01-01

    The study of protein-protein interactions is important to scientists in a wide range of disciplines. We present here the assessment of a lab-intensive course that teaches students techniques used to identify and further study protein-protein interactions. One of the unique elements of the course is that students perform a yeast two-hybrid screen…

  10. Lasso Peptide Biosynthetic Protein LarB1 Binds Both Leader and Core Peptide Regions of the Precursor Protein LarA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Wai Ling; Chen, Maria Y; Maksimov, Mikhail O; Link, A James

    2016-10-26

    Lasso peptides are a member of the superclass of ribosomally synthesized and posttranslationally modified peptides (RiPPs). Like all RiPPs, lasso peptides are derived from a gene-encoded precursor protein. The biosynthesis of lasso peptides requires two enzymatic activities: proteolytic cleavage between the leader peptide and the core peptide in the precursor protein, accomplished by the B enzymes, and ATP-dependent isopeptide bond formation, accomplished by the C enzymes. In a subset of lasso peptide biosynthetic gene clusters from Gram-positive organisms, the B enzyme is split between two proteins. One such gene cluster is found in the organism Rhodococcus jostii, which produces the antimicrobial lasso peptide lariatin. The B enzyme in R. jostii is split between two open reading frames, larB1 and larB2, both of which are required for lariatin biosynthesis. While the cysteine catalytic triad is found within the LarB2 protein, LarB1 is a PqqD homologue expected to bind to the lariatin precursor LarA based on its structural homology to other RiPP leader peptide binding domains. We show that LarB1 binds to the leader peptide of the lariatin precursor protein LarA with a sub-micromolar affinity. We used photocrosslinking with the noncanonical amino acid p-azidophenylalanine and mass spectrometry to map the interaction of LarA and LarB1. This analysis shows that the LarA leader peptide interacts with a conserved motif within LarB1 and, unexpectedly, the core peptide of LarA also binds to LarB1 in several positions. A Rosetta model built from distance restraints from the photocrosslinking experiments shows that the scissile bond between the leader peptide and core peptide in LarA is in a solvent-exposed loop.

  11. Extended-soft-core baryon-baryon model. II. Hyperon-nucleon interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijken, T.A.; Yamamoto, Y.

    2006-01-01

    The YN results are presented from the extended soft-core (ESC) interactions. They consist of local and nonlocal potentials because of (i) one-boson exchanges (OBE), which are the members of nonets of pseudoscalar, vector, scalar, and axial mesons; (ii) diffractive exchanges; (iii) two-pseudoscalar

  12. Structural proteins of ribonucleic acid tumor viruses. Purification of envelope, core, and internal components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, M; August, J T

    1976-01-25

    Murine type C virus structural proteins, the envelope glycopeptides, 30,000 dalton major core protein, and 15,000 dalton internal protein have each been purified to near homogeneity and in high yield from the smae batch of virus by use of phosphocellulose column chromatography and gel filtration procedures. Evidence that these proteins are specified by the viral genome was obtained by competition radioimmunoassay analysis, comparing these polypeptides from Rauscher virus cultivated in a variety of mammalian cell lines; all of the reactive antigenic determinants of these proteins appeared to be virus-specific.

  13. Phage display library screening for identification of interacting protein partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addepalli, Balasubrahmanyam; Rao, Suryadevara; Hunt, Arthur G

    2015-01-01

    Phage display is a versatile high-throughput screening method employed to understand and improve the chemical biology, be it production of human monoclonal antibodies or identification of interacting protein partners. A majority of cell proteins operate in a concerted fashion either by stable or transient interactions. Such interactions can be mediated by recognition of small amino acid sequence motifs on the protein surface. Phage display can play a crucial role in identification of such motifs. This report describes the use of phage display for the identification of high affinity sequence motifs that could be responsible for interactions with a target (bait) protein.

  14. Protein–Protein Interactions in Virus–Host Systems

    OpenAIRE

    de Brito, Anderson F; Pinney, John W

    2017-01-01

    To study virus–host protein interactions, knowledge about viral and host protein architectures and repertoires, their particular evolutionary mechanisms, and information on relevant sources of biological data is essential. The purpose of this review article is to provide a thorough overview about these aspects. Protein domains are basic units defining protein interactions, and the uniqueness of viral domain repertoires, their mode of evolution, and their roles during viral infection make viru...

  15. Effects of ethanol on the proteasome interacting proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fawzia; Bardag-Gorce

    2010-01-01

    Proteasome dysfunction has been repeatedly reported in alcoholic liver disease. Ethanol metabolism endproducts affect the structure of the proteasome, and, therefore, change the proteasome interaction with its regulatory complexes 19S and PA28, as well as its interacting proteins. Chronic ethanol feeding alters the ubiquitin-proteasome activity by altering the interaction between the 19S and the 20S proteasome interaction. The degradation of oxidized and damaged proteins is thus decreased and leads to accum...

  16. Role of protein-protein interactions in cytochrome P450-mediated drug metabolism and toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandel, Sylvie E; Lampe, Jed N

    2014-09-15

    Through their unique oxidative chemistry, cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (CYPs) catalyze the elimination of most drugs and toxins from the human body. Protein-protein interactions play a critical role in this process. Historically, the study of CYP-protein interactions has focused on their electron transfer partners and allosteric mediators, cytochrome P450 reductase and cytochrome b5. However, CYPs can bind other proteins that also affect CYP function. Some examples include the progesterone receptor membrane component 1, damage resistance protein 1, human and bovine serum albumin, and intestinal fatty acid binding protein, in addition to other CYP isoforms. Furthermore, disruption of these interactions can lead to altered paths of metabolism and the production of toxic metabolites. In this review, we summarize the available evidence for CYP protein-protein interactions from the literature and offer a discussion of the potential impact of future studies aimed at characterizing noncanonical protein-protein interactions with CYP enzymes.

  17. Dynamics of axial torsional libration under the mantle-inner core gravitational interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, B. F.

    2017-01-01

    The aims of this paper are (i) formulating the dynamics of the mantle-inner core gravitational (MICG) interaction in terms of the spherical-harmonic multipoles of mass density. The modeled MICG system is composed of two concentric rigid bodies (mantle and inner core) of near-spherical but otherwise heterogeneous configuration, with a fluid outer core in between playing a passive role. We derive the general equation of motion for the vector rotation but only focus on the polar component that describes the MICG axial torsional libration. The torsion constant and hence the square of the natural frequency of the libration is proportional to the product of the equatorial ellipticities of the mantle and inner-core geoid embodied in their multipoles (of two different types) of degree 2 and order 2 (such as the Large Low-Shear-Velocity Provinces above the core-mantle boundary) and (ii) studying the geophysical implications upon equating the said MICG libration to the steady 6 year oscillation that are observed in the Earth's spin rate or the length-of-day variation (ΔLOD). In particular, the MICG torsion constant is found to be Γ>˜z = CIC σz2 ≈ 6.5 × 1019 N m, while the inner core's (BIC - AIC) ≈ 1.08 × 1031 kg m2 gives the inner core triaxiality (BIC - AIC)/CIC ≈ 1.8 × 10-4, about 8 times the whole-Earth value. It is also asserted that the required inner-core ellipticity amounts to no more than 140 m in geoid height, much smaller than the sensitivity required for the seismic wave travel time to resolve the variation of the inner core.

  18. A Conserved Hydrophobic Core in Gαi1 Regulates G Protein Activation and Release from Activated Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Ali I; Lokits, Alyssa D; Gilbert, James A; Iverson, T M; Meiler, Jens; Hamm, Heidi E

    2016-09-09

    G protein-coupled receptor-mediated heterotrimeric G protein activation is a major mode of signal transduction in the cell. Previously, we and other groups reported that the α5 helix of Gαi1, especially the hydrophobic interactions in this region, plays a key role during nucleotide release and G protein activation. To further investigate the effect of this hydrophobic core, we disrupted it in Gαi1 by inserting 4 alanine amino acids into the α5 helix between residues Gln(333) and Phe(334) (Ins4A). This extends the length of the α5 helix without disturbing the β6-α5 loop interactions. This mutant has high basal nucleotide exchange activity yet no receptor-mediated activation of nucleotide exchange. By using structural approaches, we show that this mutant loses critical hydrophobic interactions, leading to significant rearrangements of side chain residues His(57), Phe(189), Phe(191), and Phe(336); it also disturbs the rotation of the α5 helix and the π-π interaction between His(57) and Phe(189) In addition, the insertion mutant abolishes G protein release from the activated receptor after nucleotide binding. Our biochemical and computational data indicate that the interactions between α5, α1, and β2-β3 are not only vital for GDP release during G protein activation, but they are also necessary for proper GTP binding (or GDP rebinding). Thus, our studies suggest that this hydrophobic interface is critical for accurate rearrangement of the α5 helix for G protein release from the receptor after GTP binding.

  19. Structural Rearrangement upon Fragmentation of the Stability Core of the ALS-Linked Protein TDP-43.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Brittany R; Zitzewitz, Jill A; Massi, Francesca

    2017-08-08

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is the most common adult degenerative motor neuron disease. Experimental evidence indicates a direct role of transactive-response DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) in the pathology of ALS and other neurodegenerative diseases. TDP-43 has been identified as a major component of cytoplasmic inclusions in patients with sporadic ALS; however, the molecular basis of the disease mechanism is not yet fully understood. Fragmentation within the second RNA recognition motif (RRM2) of TDP-43 has been observed in patient tissues and may play a role in the formation of aggregates in disease. To determine the structural and dynamical changes resulting from the truncation that could lead to aggregation and toxicity, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of the full-length RRM2 domain (the stability core of TDP-43) and of a truncated variant (where residues 189-207 are deleted to mimic a site of cleavage within RRM2 found in ALS patients). Our simulations show heterogeneous structural reorganization and decreased stability of the truncated RRM2 domain compared to the full-length domain, consistent with previous experimental results. The decreased stability and structural reorganization in the truncated RRM2 result in a higher probability of protein-protein interactions through altered electrostatic surface charges and increased accessibility of hydrophobic residues (including the nuclear export sequence), providing a rationale for the increased cytoplasmic aggregation of RRM2 fragments seen in sporadic ALS patients. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Probing Bio-Nano Interactions between Blood Proteins and Monolayer-Stabilized Graphene Sheets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gan, Shiyu; Zhong, Lijie; Han, Dongxue

    2015-01-01

    to significant improvement in their resistance to electrolyte salts and long-term stability, but retain their core structural characteristics. Five types of model human blood proteins including human fibrinogen, γ-globulin, bovine serum albumin (BSA), insulin, and histone are tested. The main drving forces...... stability in biological environments is limited. Systematic probing on the binding of proteins to CCG is currently lacking. Herein, we report a comprehensive study on the interactions between blood proteins and stabilized CCG (sCCG). CCG nanosheets are functionalized by monolayers of perylene leading...

  1. Requirement for sex comb on midleg protein interactions in Drosophila polycomb group repression.

    OpenAIRE

    Aidan J Peterson; Mallin, Daniel R.; Francis, Nicole J.; Ketel, Carrie S.; Stamm, Joyce; Voeller, Rochus K.; Kingston, Robert E.; Jeffrey A Simon

    2004-01-01

    The Drosophila Sex Comb on Midleg (SCM) protein is a transcriptional repressor of the Polycomb group (PcG). Although genetic studies establish SCM as a crucial PcG member, its molecular role is not known. To investigate how SCM might link to PcG complexes, we analyzed the in vivo role of a conserved protein interaction module, the SPM domain. This domain is found in SCM and in another PcG protein, Polyhomeotic (PH), which is a core component of Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1). SCM-PH int...

  2. Folding superfunnel to describe cooperative folding of interacting proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeller, László

    2016-07-01

    This paper proposes a generalization of the well-known folding funnel concept of proteins. In the funnel model the polypeptide chain is treated as an individual object not interacting with other proteins. Since biological systems are considerably crowded, protein-protein interaction is a fundamental feature during the life cycle of proteins. The folding superfunnel proposed here describes the folding process of interacting proteins in various situations. The first example discussed is the folding of the freshly synthesized protein with the aid of chaperones. Another important aspect of protein-protein interactions is the folding of the recently characterized intrinsically disordered proteins, where binding to target proteins plays a crucial role in the completion of the folding process. The third scenario where the folding superfunnel is used is the formation of aggregates from destabilized proteins, which is an important factor in case of several conformational diseases. The folding superfunnel constructed here with the minimal assumption about the interaction potential explains all three cases mentioned above. Proteins 2016; 84:1009-1016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Human cytomegalovirus IE2 protein interacts with transcription activating factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU; Jinping(徐进平); YE; Linbai(叶林柏)

    2002-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) IE86 Cdna was cloned into Pgex-2T and fusion protein GST-IE86 was expressed in E. Coli. SDS-PAGE and Western blot assay indicated that fusion protein GST-IE86 with molecular weight of 92 ku is soluble in the supernatant of cell lysate. Protein GST and fusion protein GST-IE86 were purified by affinity chromatography. The technology of co-separation and specific affinity chromatography was used to study the interactions of HCMV IE86 protein with some transcriptional regulatory proteins and transcriptional factors. The results indicated that IE86 interacts separately with transcriptional factor TFIIB and promoter DNA binding transcription trans-activating factors SP1, AP1 and AP2 to form a heterogenous protein complex. These transcriptional trans-activating factors, transcriptional factor and IE86 protein were adsorbed and retained in the affinity chromatography simultaneously. But IE86 protein could not interact with NF-Кb, suggesting that the function of IE86 protein that can interact with transcriptional factor and transcriptional trans-activating factors has no relevance to protein glycosylation. IE86 protein probably has two domains responsible for binding transcriptional trans-activating regulatory proteins and transcriptional factors respectively, thus activating the transcription of many genes. The interactions accelerated the assembly of the transcriptional initiation complexes.

  4. The dynamic multisite interactions between two intrinsically disordered proteins

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Shaowen

    2017-05-11

    Protein interactions involving intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) comprise a variety of binding modes, from the well characterized folding upon binding to dynamic fuzzy complex. To date, most studies concern the binding of an IDP to a structured protein, while the Interaction between two IDPs is poorly understood. In this study, we combined NMR, smFRET, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to characterize the interaction between two IDPs, the C-terminal domain (CTD) of protein 4.1G and the nuclear mitotic apparatus (NuMA) protein. It is revealed that CTD and NuMA form a fuzzy complex with remaining structural disorder. Multiple binding sites on both proteins were identified by MD and mutagenesis studies. Our study provides an atomic scenario in which two IDPs bearing multiple binding sites interact with each other in dynamic equilibrium. The combined approach employed here could be widely applicable for investigating IDPs and their dynamic interactions.

  5. What Evidence Is There for the Homology of Protein-Protein Interactions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Anna C. F.; Jones, Nick S.; Porter, Mason A.; Deane, Charlotte M.

    2012-01-01

    The notion that sequence homology implies functional similarity underlies much of computational biology. In the case of protein-protein interactions, an interaction can be inferred between two proteins on the basis that sequence-similar proteins have been observed to interact. The use of transferred interactions is common, but the legitimacy of such inferred interactions is not clear. Here we investigate transferred interactions and whether data incompleteness explains the lack of evidence found for them. Using definitions of homology associated with functional annotation transfer, we estimate that conservation rates of interactions are low even after taking interactome incompleteness into account. For example, at a blastp -value threshold of , we estimate the conservation rate to be about between S. cerevisiae and H. sapiens. Our method also produces estimates of interactome sizes (which are similar to those previously proposed). Using our estimates of interaction conservation we estimate the rate at which protein-protein interactions are lost across species. To our knowledge, this is the first such study based on large-scale data. Previous work has suggested that interactions transferred within species are more reliable than interactions transferred across species. By controlling for factors that are specific to within-species interaction prediction, we propose that the transfer of interactions within species might be less reliable than transfers between species. Protein-protein interactions appear to be very rarely conserved unless very high sequence similarity is observed. Consequently, inferred interactions should be used with care. PMID:23028270

  6. Requirement for sex comb on midleg protein interactions in Drosophila polycomb group repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Aidan J; Mallin, Daniel R; Francis, Nicole J; Ketel, Carrie S; Stamm, Joyce; Voeller, Rochus K; Kingston, Robert E; Simon, Jeffrey A

    2004-07-01

    The Drosophila Sex Comb on Midleg (SCM) protein is a transcriptional repressor of the Polycomb group (PcG). Although genetic studies establish SCM as a crucial PcG member, its molecular role is not known. To investigate how SCM might link to PcG complexes, we analyzed the in vivo role of a conserved protein interaction module, the SPM domain. This domain is found in SCM and in another PcG protein, Polyhomeotic (PH), which is a core component of Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1). SCM-PH interactions in vitro are mediated by their respective SPM domains. Yeast two-hybrid and in vitro binding assays were used to isolate and characterize >30 missense mutations in the SPM domain of SCM. Genetic rescue assays showed that SCM repressor function in vivo is disrupted by mutations that impair SPM domain interactions in vitro. Furthermore, overexpression of an isolated, wild-type SPM domain produced PcG loss-of-function phenotypes in flies. Coassembly of SCM with a reconstituted PRC1 core complex shows that SCM can partner with PRC1. However, gel filtration chromatography showed that the bulk of SCM is biochemically separable from PH in embryo nuclear extracts. These results suggest that SCM, although not a core component of PRC1, interacts and functions with PRC1 in gene silencing.

  7. Reconstituting Protein Interaction Networks Using Parameter-Dependent Domain-Domain Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-07

    that approximately 80% of eukaryotic proteins and 67% of prokaryotic proteins have multiple domains [13,14]. Most annotation databases characterize...domain annotations, Domain-domain interactions, Protein-protein interaction networks Background The living cell is a dynamic, interconnected system...detailed in Methods. Here, we illustrate its application on a well- annotated single- cell organism. We created a merged set of protein-domain annotations

  8. The protein interaction network of a taxis signal transduction system in a Halophilic Archaeon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schlesner Matthias

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The taxis signaling system of the extreme halophilic archaeon Halobacterium (Hbt. salinarum differs in several aspects from its model bacterial counterparts Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. We studied the protein interactions in the Hbt. salinarum taxis signaling system to gain an understanding of its structure, to gain knowledge about its known components and to search for new members. Results The interaction analysis revealed that the core signaling proteins are involved in different protein complexes and our data provide evidence for dynamic interchanges between them. Fifteen of the eighteen taxis receptors (halobacterial transducers, Htrs can be assigned to four different groups depending on their interactions with the core signaling proteins. Only one of these groups, which contains six of the eight Htrs with known signals, shows the composition expected for signaling complexes (receptor, kinase CheA, adaptor CheW, response regulator CheY. From the two Hbt. salinarum CheW proteins, only CheW1 is engaged in signaling complexes with Htrs and CheA, whereas CheW2 interacts with Htrs but not with CheA. CheY connects the core signaling structure to a subnetwork consisting of the two CheF proteins (which build a link to the flagellar apparatus, CheD (the hub of the subnetwork, two CheC complexes and the receptor methylesterase CheB. Conclusions Based on our findings, we propose two hypotheses. First, Hbt. salinarum might have the capability to dynamically adjust the impact of certain Htrs or Htr clusters depending on its current needs or environmental conditions. Secondly, we propose a hypothetical feedback loop from the response regulator to Htr methylation made from the CheC proteins, CheD and CheB, which might contribute to adaptation analogous to the CheC/CheD system of B. subtilis.

  9. Preferential interactions and the effect of protein PEGylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Louise Stenstrup; Thulstrup, Peter Waaben; Kasimova, Marina Robertovna;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: PEGylation is a strategy used by the pharmaceutical industry to prolong systemic circulation of protein drugs, whereas formulation excipients are used for stabilization of proteins during storage. Here we investigate the role of PEGylation in protein stabilization by formulation...... excipients that preferentially interact with the protein. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The model protein hen egg white lysozyme was doubly PEGylated on two lysines with 5 kDa linear PEGs (mPEG-succinimidyl valerate, MW 5000) and studied in the absence and presence of preferentially excluded sucrose...... excipients. This suggests that formulation principles using preferentially interacting excipients are similar for PEGylated and non-PEGylated proteins....

  10. Membrane-mediated interaction between strongly anisotropic protein scaffolds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonatan Schweitzer

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Specialized proteins serve as scaffolds sculpting strongly curved membranes of intracellular organelles. Effective membrane shaping requires segregation of these proteins into domains and is, therefore, critically dependent on the protein-protein interaction. Interactions mediated by membrane elastic deformations have been extensively analyzed within approximations of large inter-protein distances, small extents of the protein-mediated membrane bending and small deviations of the protein shapes from isotropic spherical segments. At the same time, important classes of the realistic membrane-shaping proteins have strongly elongated shapes with large and highly anisotropic curvature. Here we investigated, computationally, the membrane mediated interaction between proteins or protein oligomers representing membrane scaffolds with strongly anisotropic curvature, and addressed, quantitatively, a specific case of the scaffold geometrical parameters characterizing BAR domains, which are crucial for membrane shaping in endocytosis. In addition to the previously analyzed contributions to the interaction, we considered a repulsive force stemming from the entropy of the scaffold orientation. We computed this interaction to be of the same order of magnitude as the well-known attractive force related to the entropy of membrane undulations. We demonstrated the scaffold shape anisotropy to cause a mutual aligning of the scaffolds and to generate a strong attractive interaction bringing the scaffolds close to each other to equilibrium distances much smaller than the scaffold size. We computed the energy of interaction between scaffolds of a realistic geometry to constitute tens of kBT, which guarantees a robust segregation of the scaffolds into domains.

  11. Evolution of Drosophila ribosomal protein gene core promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaotu; Zhang, Kangyu; Li, Xiaoman

    2009-03-01

    The coordinated expression of ribosomal protein genes (RPGs) has been well documented in many species. Previous analyses of RPG promoters focus only on Fungi and mammals. Recognizing this gap and using a comparative genomics approach, we utilize a motif-finding algorithm that incorporates cross-species conservation to identify several significant motifs in Drosophila RPG promoters. As a result, significant differences of the enriched motifs in RPG promoter are found among Drosophila, Fungi, and mammals, demonstrating the evolutionary dynamics of the ribosomal gene regulatory network. We also report a motif present in similar numbers of RPGs among Drosophila species which does not appear to be conserved at the individual RPG gene level. A module-wise stabilizing selection theory is proposed to explain this observation. Overall, our results provide significant insight into the fast-evolving nature of transcriptional regulation in the RPG module.

  12. Protein interactions in genome maintenance as novel antibacterial targets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimee H Marceau

    Full Text Available Antibacterial compounds typically act by directly inhibiting essential bacterial enzyme activities. Although this general mechanism of action has fueled traditional antibiotic discovery efforts for decades, new antibiotic development has not kept pace with the emergence of drug resistant bacterial strains. These limitations have severely restricted the therapeutic tools available for treating bacterial infections. Here we test an alternative antibacterial lead-compound identification strategy in which essential protein-protein interactions are targeted rather than enzymatic activities. Bacterial single-stranded DNA-binding proteins (SSBs form conserved protein interaction "hubs" that are essential for recruiting many DNA replication, recombination, and repair proteins to SSB/DNA nucleoprotein substrates. Three small molecules that block SSB/protein interactions are shown to have antibacterial activity against diverse bacterial species. Consistent with a model in which the compounds target multiple SSB/protein interactions, treatment of Bacillus subtilis cultures with the compounds leads to rapid inhibition of DNA replication and recombination, and ultimately to cell death. The compounds also have unanticipated effects on protein synthesis that could be due to a previously unknown role for SSB/protein interactions in translation or to off-target effects. Our results highlight the potential of targeting protein-protein interactions, particularly those that mediate genome maintenance, as a powerful approach for identifying new antibacterial compounds.

  13. Mitochondrial iron accumulation exacerbates hepatic toxicity caused by hepatitis C virus core protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekine, Shuichi; Ito, Konomi; Watanabe, Haruna; Nakano, Takafumi [Laboratory of Biopharmaceutics, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8675 (Japan); Moriya, Kyoji; Shintani, Yoshizumi; Fujie, Hajime; Tsutsumi, Takeya; Miyoshi, Hideyuki; Fujinaga, Hidetake; Shinzawa, Seiko; Koike, Kazuhiko [Department of Internal Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan); Horie, Toshiharu, E-mail: t.horie@thu.ac.jp [Laboratory of Biopharmaceutics, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8675 (Japan)

    2015-02-01

    Patients with long-lasting hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection are at major risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Iron accumulation in the livers of these patients is thought to exacerbate conditions of oxidative stress. Transgenic mice that express the HCV core protein develop HCC after the steatosis stage and produce an excess of hepatic reactive oxygen species (ROS). The overproduction of ROS in the liver is the net result of HCV core protein-induced dysfunction of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. This study examined the impact of ferric nitrilacetic acid (Fe-NTA)-mediated iron overload on mitochondrial damage and ROS production in HCV core protein-expressing HepG2 (human HCC) cells (Hep39b cells). A decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and ROS production were observed following Fe-NTA treatment. After continuous exposure to Fe-NTA for six days, cell toxicity was observed in Hep39b cells, but not in mock (vector-transfected) HepG2 cells. Moreover, mitochondrial iron ({sup 59}Fe) uptake was increased in the livers of HCV core protein-expressing transgenic mice. This increase in mitochondrial iron uptake was inhibited by Ru360, a mitochondrial Ca{sup 2+} uniporter inhibitor. Furthermore, the Fe-NTA-induced augmentation of mitochondrial dysfunction, ROS production, and cell toxicity were also inhibited by Ru360 in Hep39b cells. Taken together, these results indicate that Ca{sup 2+} uniporter-mediated mitochondrial accumulation of iron exacerbates hepatocyte toxicity caused by the HCV core protein. - Highlights: • Iron accumulation in the livers of patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is thought to exacerbate oxidative stress. • The impact of iron overload on mitochondrial damage and ROS production in HCV core protein-expressing cells were examined. • Mitochondrial iron uptake was increased in the livers of HCV core protein-expressing transgenic mice. • Ca{sup 2+} uniporter-mediated mitochondrial accumulation of iron exacerbates

  14. Globular and disordered-the non-identical twins in protein-protein interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teilum, Kaare; Olsen, Johan Gotthardt; Kragelund, Birthe Brandt

    2015-01-01

    In biology proteins from different structural classes interact across and within classes in ways that are optimized to achieve balanced functional outputs. The interactions between intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) and other proteins rely on changes in flexibility and this is seen as a str...... of other protein-protein interactions. We find that ordered proteins and the disordered ones act as non-identical twins operating by similar principles but where the disordered proteins complexes are on average less stable by 2.5 kcal mol(-1)....

  15. 14-3-3 proteins in plant-pathogen interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano-Durán, Rosa; Robatzek, Silke

    2015-05-01

    14-3-3 proteins define a eukaryotic-specific protein family with a general role in signal transduction. Primarily, 14-3-3 proteins act as phosphosensors, binding phosphorylated client proteins and modulating their functions. Since phosphorylation regulates a plethora of different physiological responses in plants, 14-3-3 proteins play roles in multiple signaling pathways, including those controlling metabolism, hormone signaling, cell division, and responses to abiotic and biotic stimuli. Increasing evidence supports a prominent role of 14-3-3 proteins in regulating plant immunity against pathogens at various levels. In this review, potential links between 14-3-3 function and the regulation of plant-pathogen interactions are discussed, with a special focus on the regulation of 14-3-3 proteins in response to pathogen perception, interactions between 14-3-3 proteins and defense-related proteins, and 14-3-3 proteins as targets of pathogen effectors.

  16. Synthetic protein interactions reveal a functional map of the cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Lisa K; Ólafsson, Guðjón; Ledesma-Fernández, Elena; Thorpe, Peter H

    2016-01-01

    To understand the function of eukaryotic cells, it is critical to understand the role of protein-protein interactions and protein localization. Currently, we do not know the importance of global protein localization nor do we understand to what extent the cell is permissive for new protein associations – a key requirement for the evolution of new protein functions. To answer this question, we fused every protein in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae with a partner from each of the major cellular compartments and quantitatively assessed the effects upon growth. This analysis reveals that cells have a remarkable and unanticipated tolerance for forced protein associations, even if these associations lead to a proportion of the protein moving compartments within the cell. Furthermore, the interactions that do perturb growth provide a functional map of spatial protein regulation, identifying key regulatory complexes for the normal homeostasis of eukaryotic cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13053.001 PMID:27098839

  17. Hydrodynamical Simulations of the Stream-Core Interaction in the Slow Merger of Massive Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanova, N; Spruit, H; Podsiadlowski, Ph.

    2002-01-01

    We present detailed simulations of the interaction of a stream emanating from a mass-losing secondary with the core of a massive supergiant in the slow merger of the two stars inside a common envelope. The dynamics of the stream can be divided into a ballistic phase, starting at the L_1 point, and a hydrodynamical phase where the stream interacts strongly with the core. Considering the merger of a 1 and 5Msun star with a 20Msun evolved supergiant, we present two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations using the PROMETHEUS code to demonstrate how the penetration depth and post-impact conditions depend on the initial properties of stream material (e.g. entropy, angular momentum, stream width) and the properties of the core (e.g. density structure and rotation rate). Using these results, we present a fitting formula for the entropy generated in the stream--core interaction and a recipe for the determination of the penetration depth based on a modified Bernoulli integral.

  18. The Core Interaction of Platforms: How Startups Connect Users and Producers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi M. E. Korhonen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The platform economy is disrupting innovation while presenting both opportunities and challenges for startups. Platforms support value creation between multiple participant groups, and this operationalization of an ecosystem’s value co-creation represents the “core interaction” of a platform. This article focuses on that core interaction and studies how startups connect producers and users in value-creating core interaction through digital platforms. The study is based on an analysis of 29 cases of platform startups interviewed at a leading European startup event. The studied startups were envisioning even millions of users and hundreds or thousands of producers co-creating value on their platforms. In such platform businesses, our results highlight the importance of attracting a large user pool, providing novel services to those users, offering a new market for producers, supporting the core interaction in various ways, and utilizing elements of the platform canvas – an adaptation of the business model canvas, which we have accommodated for platform-based business models – to accomplish these goals.

  19. Proteins interacting with the 26S proteasome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann-Petersen, R; Gordon, C

    2004-01-01

    The 26S proteasome is the multi-protein protease that recognizes and degrades ubiquitinylated substrates targeted for destruction by the ubiquitin pathway. In addition to the well-documented subunit organization of the 26S holoenzyme, it is clear that a number of other proteins transiently...... associate with the 26S complex. These transiently associated proteins confer a number of different roles such as substrate presentation, cleavage of the multi-ubiquitin chain from the protein substrate and turnover of misfolded proteins. Such activities are essential for the 26S proteasome to efficiently...

  20. From networks of protein interactions to networks of functional dependencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciani Davide

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As protein-protein interactions connect proteins that participate in either the same or different functions, networks of interacting and functionally annotated proteins can be converted into process graphs of inter-dependent function nodes (each node corresponding to interacting proteins with the same functional annotation. However, as proteins have multiple annotations, the process graph is non-redundant, if only proteins participating directly in a given function are included in the related function node. Results Reasoning that topological features (e.g., clusters of highly inter-connected proteins might help approaching structured and non-redundant understanding of molecular function, an algorithm was developed that prioritizes inclusion of proteins into the function nodes that best overlap protein clusters. Specifically, the algorithm identifies function nodes (and their mutual relations, based on the topological analysis of a protein interaction network, which can be related to various biological domains, such as cellular components (e.g., peroxisome and cellular bud or biological processes (e.g., cell budding of the model organism S. cerevisiae. Conclusions The method we have described allows converting a protein interaction network into a non-redundant process graph of inter-dependent function nodes. The examples we have described show that the resulting graph allows researchers to formulate testable hypotheses about dependencies among functions and the underlying mechanisms.

  1. Proteomic analysis of Clostridium thermocellum core metabolism: relative protein expression profiles and growth phase-dependent changes in protein expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rydzak Thomas

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clostridium thermocellum produces H2 and ethanol, as well as CO2, acetate, formate, and lactate, directly from cellulosic biomass. It is therefore an attractive model for biofuel production via consolidated bioprocessing. Optimization of end-product yields and titres is crucial for making biofuel production economically feasible. Relative protein expression profiles may provide targets for metabolic engineering, while understanding changes in protein expression and metabolism in response to carbon limitation, pH, and growth phase may aid in reactor optimization. We performed shotgun 2D-HPLC-MS/MS on closed-batch cellobiose-grown exponential phase C. thermocellum cell-free extracts to determine relative protein expression profiles of core metabolic proteins involved carbohydrate utilization, energy conservation, and end-product synthesis. iTRAQ (isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation based protein quantitation was used to determine changes in core metabolic proteins in response to growth phase. Results Relative abundance profiles revealed differential levels of putative enzymes capable of catalyzing parallel pathways. The majority of proteins involved in pyruvate catabolism and end-product synthesis were detected with high abundance, with the exception of aldehyde dehydrogenase, ferredoxin-dependent Ech-type [NiFe]-hydrogenase, and RNF-type NADH:ferredoxin oxidoreductase. Using 4-plex 2D-HPLC-MS/MS, 24% of the 144 core metabolism proteins detected demonstrated moderate changes in expression during transition from exponential to stationary phase. Notably, proteins involved in pyruvate synthesis decreased in stationary phase, whereas proteins involved in glycogen metabolism, pyruvate catabolism, and end-product synthesis increased in stationary phase. Several proteins that may directly dictate end-product synthesis patterns, including pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductases, alcohol dehydrogenases, and a putative

  2. Computational design of protein interactions: designing proteins that neutralize influenza by inhibiting its hemagglutinin surface protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleishman, Sarel

    2012-02-01

    Molecular recognition underlies all life processes. Design of interactions not seen in nature is a test of our understanding of molecular recognition and could unlock the vast potential of subtle control over molecular interaction networks, allowing the design of novel diagnostics and therapeutics for basic and applied research. We developed the first general method for designing protein interactions. The method starts by computing a region of high affinity interactions between dismembered amino acid residues and the target surface and then identifying proteins that can harbor these residues. Designs are tested experimentally for binding the target surface and successful ones are affinity matured using yeast cell surface display. Applied to the conserved stem region of influenza hemagglutinin we designed two unrelated proteins that, following affinity maturation, bound hemagglutinin at subnanomolar dissociation constants. Co-crystal structures of hemagglutinin bound to the two designed binders were within 1Angstrom RMSd of their models, validating the accuracy of the design strategy. One of the designed proteins inhibits the conformational changes that underlie hemagglutinin's cell-invasion functions and blocks virus infectivity in cell culture, suggesting that such proteins may in future serve as diagnostics and antivirals against a wide range of pathogenic influenza strains. We have used this method to obtain experimentally validated binders of several other target proteins, demonstrating the generality of the approach. We discuss the combination of modeling and high-throughput characterization of design variants which has been key to the success of this approach, as well as how we have used the data obtained in this project to enhance our understanding of molecular recognition. References: Science 332:816 JMB, in press Protein Sci 20:753

  3. CORE: Common Region Extension Based Multiple Protein Structure Alignment for Producing Multiple Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Woo-Cheol Kim; Sanghyun Park; Jung-Im Won

    2013-01-01

    Over the past several decades,biologists have conducted numerous studies examining both general and specific functions of proteins.Generally,if similarities in either the structure or sequence of amino acids exist for two proteins,then a common biological function is expected.Protein function is determined primarily based on the structure rather than the sequence of amino acids.The algorithm for protein structure alignment is an essential tool for the research.The quality of the algorithm depends on the quality of the similarity measure that is used,and the similarity measure is an objective function used to determine the best alignment.However,none of existing similarity measures became golden standard because of their individual strength and weakness.They require excessive filtering to find a single alignment.In this paper,we introduce a new strategy that finds not a single alignment,but multiple alignments with different lengths.This method has obvious benefits of high quality alignment.However,this novel method leads to a new problem that the running time for this method is considerably longer than that for methods that find only a single alignment.To address this problem,we propose algorithms that can locate a common region (CORE) of multiple alignment candidates,and can then extend the CORE into multiple alignments.Because the CORE can be defined from a final alignment,we introduce CORE* that is similar to CORE and propose an algorithm to identify the CORE*.By adopting CORE* and dynamic programming,our proposed method produces multiple alignments of various lengths with higher accuracy than previous methods.In the experiments,the alignments identified by our algorithm are longer than those obtained by TM-align by 17% and 15.48%,on average,when the comparison is conducted at the level of super-family and fold,respectively.

  4. Genome-wide protein-protein interactions and protein function exploration in cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Qi; Ma, Weimin; Liu, Hui; Li, Jiang; Wang, Huan; Lu, Fang; Zhao, Chen; Shi, Tieliu

    2015-10-22

    Genome-wide network analysis is well implemented to study proteins of unknown function. Here, we effectively explored protein functions and the biological mechanism based on inferred high confident protein-protein interaction (PPI) network in cyanobacteria. We integrated data from seven different sources and predicted 1,997 PPIs, which were evaluated by experiments in molecular mechanism, text mining of literatures in proved direct/indirect evidences, and "interologs" in conservation. Combined the predicted PPIs with known PPIs, we obtained 4,715 no-redundant PPIs (involving 3,231 proteins covering over 90% of genome) to generate the PPI network. Based on the PPI network, terms in Gene ontology (GO) were assigned to function-unknown proteins. Functional modules were identified by dissecting the PPI network into sub-networks and analyzing pathway enrichment, with which we investigated novel function of underlying proteins in protein complexes and pathways. Examples of photosynthesis and DNA repair indicate that the network approach is a powerful tool in protein function analysis. Overall, this systems biology approach provides a new insight into posterior functional analysis of PPIs in cyanobacteria.

  5. An investigation of ab initio shell-model interactions derived by no-core shell model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, XiaoBao; Dong, GuoXiang; Li, QingFeng; Shen, CaiWan; Yu, ShaoYing

    2016-09-01

    The microscopic shell-model effective interactions are mainly based on the many-body perturbation theory (MBPT), the first work of which can be traced to Brown and Kuo's first attempt in 1966, derived from the Hamada-Johnston nucleon-nucleon potential. However, the convergence of the MBPT is still unclear. On the other hand, ab initio theories, such as Green's function Monte Carlo (GFMC), no-core shell model (NCSM), and coupled-cluster theory with single and double excitations (CCSD), have made many progress in recent years. However, due to the increasing demanding of computing resources, these ab initio applications are usually limited to nuclei with mass up to A = 16. Recently, people have realized the ab initio construction of valence-space effective interactions, which is obtained through a second-time renormalization, or to be more exactly, projecting the full-manybody Hamiltonian into core, one-body, and two-body cluster parts. In this paper, we present the investigation of such ab initio shell-model interactions, by the recent derived sd-shell effective interactions based on effective J-matrix Inverse Scattering Potential (JISP) and chiral effective-field theory (EFT) through NCSM. In this work, we have seen the similarity between the ab initio shellmodel interactions and the interactions obtained by MBPT or by empirical fitting. Without the inclusion of three-body (3-bd) force, the ab initio shell-model interactions still share similar defects with the microscopic interactions by MBPT, i.e., T = 1 channel is more attractive while T = 0 channel is more repulsive than empirical interactions. The progress to include more many-body correlations and 3-bd force is still badly needed, to see whether such efforts of ab initio shell-model interactions can reach similar precision as the interactions fitted to experimental data.

  6. Core-shell interaction and its impact on the optical absorption of pure and doped core-shell CdSe/ZnSe nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinqin; Cui, Yingqi; Yu, Shengping; Zeng, Qun; Yang, Mingli

    2016-04-07

    The structural, electronic, and optical properties of core-shell nanoclusters, (CdSe)(x)@(CdSe)(y) and their Zn-substituted complexes of x = 2-4 and y = 16-28, were studied with density functional theory calculations. The substitution was applied in the cores, the shells, and/or the whole clusters. All these clusters are characterized by their core-shell structures in which the core-shell interaction was found different from those in core or in shell, as reflected by their bondlengths, volumes, and binding energies. Moreover, the core and shell combine together to compose a new cluster with electronic and optical properties different from those of separated individuals, as reflected by their HOMO-LUMO gaps and optical absorptions. With the substitution of Cd by Zn, the structural, electronic, and optical properties of clusters change regularly. The binding energy increases with Zn content, attributed to the strong Zn-Se bonding. For the same core/shell, the structure with a CdSe shell/core has a narrower gap than that with a ZnSe shell/core. The optical absorption spectra also change accordingly with Zn substitution. The peaks blueshift with increasing Zn concentration, accompanying with shape variations in case large number of Cd atoms are substituted. Our calculations reveal the core-shell interaction and its influence on the electronic and optical properties of the core-shell clusters, suggesting a composition-structure-property relationship for the design of core-shell CdSe and ZnSe nanoclusters.

  7. Detecting reliable non interacting proteins (NIPs) significantly enhancing the computational prediction of protein-protein interactions using machine learning methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, A; Mazzocco, G; Kel, A; Wyrwicz, L S; Plewczynski, D

    2016-03-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) play a vital role in most biological processes. Hence their comprehension can promote a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying living systems. However, besides the cost and the time limitation involved in the detection of experimentally validated PPIs, the noise in the data is still an important issue to overcome. In the last decade several in silico PPI prediction methods using both structural and genomic information were developed for this purpose. Here we introduce a unique validation approach aimed to collect reliable non interacting proteins (NIPs). Thereafter the most relevant protein/protein-pair related features were selected. Finally, the prepared dataset was used for PPI classification, leveraging the prediction capabilities of well-established machine learning methods. Our best classification procedure displayed specificity and sensitivity values of 96.33% and 98.02%, respectively, surpassing the prediction capabilities of other methods, including those trained on gold standard datasets. We showed that the PPI/NIP predictive performances can be considerably improved by focusing on data preparation.

  8. Protein–Protein Interactions in Virus–Host Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson F. Brito

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available To study virus–host protein interactions, knowledge about viral and host protein architectures and repertoires, their particular evolutionary mechanisms, and information on relevant sources of biological data is essential. The purpose of this review article is to provide a thorough overview about these aspects. Protein domains are basic units defining protein interactions, and the uniqueness of viral domain repertoires, their mode of evolution, and their roles during viral infection make viruses interesting models of study. Mutations at protein interfaces can reduce or increase their binding affinities by changing protein electrostatics and structural properties. During the course of a viral infection, both pathogen and cellular proteins are constantly competing for binding partners. Endogenous interfaces mediating intraspecific interactions—viral–viral or host–host interactions—are constantly targeted and inhibited by exogenous interfaces mediating viral–host interactions. From a biomedical perspective, blocking such interactions is the main mechanism underlying antiviral therapies. Some proteins are able to bind multiple partners, and their modes of interaction define how fast these “hub proteins” evolve. “Party hubs” have multiple interfaces; they establish simultaneous/stable (domain–domain interactions, and tend to evolve slowly. On the other hand, “date hubs” have few interfaces; they establish transient/weak (domain–motif interactions by means of short linear peptides (15 or fewer residues, and can evolve faster. Viral infections are mediated by several protein–protein interactions (PPIs, which can be represented as networks (protein interaction networks, PINs, with proteins being depicted as nodes, and their interactions as edges. It has been suggested that viral proteins tend to establish interactions with more central and highly connected host proteins. In an evolutionary arms race, viral and host proteins

  9. Protein–Protein Interactions in Virus–Host Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, Anderson F.; Pinney, John W.

    2017-01-01

    To study virus–host protein interactions, knowledge about viral and host protein architectures and repertoires, their particular evolutionary mechanisms, and information on relevant sources of biological data is essential. The purpose of this review article is to provide a thorough overview about these aspects. Protein domains are basic units defining protein interactions, and the uniqueness of viral domain repertoires, their mode of evolution, and their roles during viral infection make viruses interesting models of study. Mutations at protein interfaces can reduce or increase their binding affinities by changing protein electrostatics and structural properties. During the course of a viral infection, both pathogen and cellular proteins are constantly competing for binding partners. Endogenous interfaces mediating intraspecific interactions—viral–viral or host–host interactions—are constantly targeted and inhibited by exogenous interfaces mediating viral–host interactions. From a biomedical perspective, blocking such interactions is the main mechanism underlying antiviral therapies. Some proteins are able to bind multiple partners, and their modes of interaction define how fast these “hub proteins” evolve. “Party hubs” have multiple interfaces; they establish simultaneous/stable (domain–domain) interactions, and tend to evolve slowly. On the other hand, “date hubs” have few interfaces; they establish transient/weak (domain–motif) interactions by means of short linear peptides (15 or fewer residues), and can evolve faster. Viral infections are mediated by several protein–protein interactions (PPIs), which can be represented as networks (protein interaction networks, PINs), with proteins being depicted as nodes, and their interactions as edges. It has been suggested that viral proteins tend to establish interactions with more central and highly connected host proteins. In an evolutionary arms race, viral and host proteins are constantly

  10. Single molecule force spectroscopy reveals critical roles of hydrophobic core packing in determining the mechanical stability of protein GB1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Tianjia; Wang, Hui-Chuan Eileen; Li, Hongbin

    2012-08-21

    Understanding molecular determinants of protein mechanical stability is important not only for elucidating how elastomeric proteins are designed and functioning in biological systems but also for designing protein building blocks with defined nanomechanical properties for constructing novel biomaterials. GB1 is a small α/β protein and exhibits significant mechanical stability. It is thought that the shear topology of GB1 plays an important role in determining its mechanical stability. Here, we combine single molecule atomic force microscopy and protein engineering techniques to investigate the effect of side chain reduction and hydrophobic core packing on the mechanical stability of GB1. We engineered seven point mutants and carried out mechanical φ-value analysis of the mechanical unfolding of GB1. We found that three mutations, which are across the surfaces of two subdomains that are to be sheared by the applied stretching force, in the hydrophobic core (F30L, Y45L, and F52L) result in significant decrease in mechanical unfolding force of GB1. The mechanical unfolding force of these mutants drop by 50-90 pN compared with wild-type GB1, which unfolds at around 180 pN at a pulling speed of 400 nm/s. These results indicate that hydrophobic core packing plays an important role in determining the mechanical stability of GB1 and suggest that optimizing hydrophobic interactions across the surfaces that are to be sheared will likely be an efficient method to enhance the mechanical stability of GB1 and GB1 homologues.

  11. Structural study of surfactant-dependent interaction with protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehan, Sumit; Aswal, Vinod K., E-mail: vkaswal@barc.gov.in [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Kohlbrecher, Joachim [Laboratory for Neutron Scattering, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 PSI Villigen (Switzerland)

    2015-06-24

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) has been used to study the complex structure of anionic BSA protein with three different (cationic DTAB, anionic SDS and non-ionic C12E10) surfactants. These systems form very different surfactant-dependent complexes. We show that the structure of protein-surfactant complex is initiated by the site-specific electrostatic interaction between the components, followed by the hydrophobic interaction at high surfactant concentrations. It is also found that hydrophobic interaction is preferred over the electrostatic interaction in deciding the resultant structure of protein-surfactant complexes.

  12. Mitochondrial nucleoid interacting proteins support mitochondrial protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, J; Cooper, H M; Reyes, A; Di Re, M; Sembongi, H; Litwin, T R; Gao, J; Neuman, K C; Fearnley, I M; Spinazzola, A; Walker, J E; Holt, I J

    2012-07-01

    Mitochondrial ribosomes and translation factors co-purify with mitochondrial nucleoids of human cells, based on affinity protein purification of tagged mitochondrial DNA binding proteins. Among the most frequently identified proteins were ATAD3 and prohibitin, which have been identified previously as nucleoid components, using a variety of methods. Both proteins are demonstrated to be required for mitochondrial protein synthesis in human cultured cells, and the major binding partner of ATAD3 is the mitochondrial ribosome. Altered ATAD3 expression also perturbs mtDNA maintenance and replication. These findings suggest an intimate association between nucleoids and the machinery of protein synthesis in mitochondria. ATAD3 and prohibitin are tightly associated with the mitochondrial membranes and so we propose that they support nucleic acid complexes at the inner membrane of the mitochondrion.

  13. New scenarios for hard-core interactions in a hadron resonance gas

    CERN Document Server

    Satarov, L M; Alba, P; Gorenstein, M I; Stoecker, H

    2016-01-01

    The equation of state of a baryon-symmetric hadronic matter with hard-sphere interactions is studied. It is assumed that mesons are point-like, but baryons and antibaryons have the same hard-core radius rB. Three possibilities are considered: 1) the baryon-baryon and antibaryon-baryon interactions are the same; 2) baryons do not interact with antibaryons; 3) the baryon-antibaryon and meson-(anti)baryon interactions are negligible. By choosing the parameter rB=0.3-0.6 fm, we calculate the nucleon to pion ratio as a function of temperature and perform the fit of hadron yields measured in central Pb+Pb collisions at the bombarding energy Ecm=2.76 TeV per nucleon pair. New nontrivial effects in the interacting hadron resonance gas at temperatures 150-200 MeV are found.

  14. Insight into the Unfolding Properties of Chd64, a Small, Single Domain Protein with a Globular Core and Disordered Tails.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneta Tarczewska

    Full Text Available Two major lipophilic hormones, 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E and juvenile hormone (JH, govern insect development and growth. While the mode of action of 20E is well understood, some understanding of JH-dependent signalling has been attained only in the past few years, and the crosstalk of the two hormonal pathways remains unknown. Two proteins, the calponin-like Chd64 and immunophilin FKBP39 proteins, have recently been found to play pivotal roles in the formation of dynamic, multiprotein complex that cross-links these two signalling pathways. However, the molecular mechanism of the interaction remains unexplored. The aim of this work was to determine structural elements of Chd64 to provide an understanding of molecular basis of multiple interactions. We analysed Chd64 in two unrelated insect species, Drosophila melanogaster (DmChd64 and Tribolium castaneum (TcChd64. Using hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS, we showed that both Chd64 proteins have disordered tails that outflank the globular core. The folds of the globular cores of both Chd64 resemble the calponin homology (CH domain previously resolved by crystallography. Monitoring the unfolding of DmChd64 and TcChd64 by far-ultraviolet (UV circular dichroism (CD spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy and size-exclusion chromatography (SEC revealed a highly complex process. Chd64 unfolds and forms of a molten globule (MG-like intermediate state. Furthermore, our data indicate that in some conditions, Chd64 may exists in discrete structural forms, indicating that the protein is pliable and capable of easily acquiring different conformations. The plasticity of Chd64 and the existence of terminal intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs may be crucial for multiple interactions with many partners.

  15. Protein Interactions between Fe65, the LDL receptor-related protein and the amyloid precursor protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulvihill, Melinda; Guttman, Miklos; Komives, Elizabeth A.

    2011-01-01

    The adapter protein, Fe65 has been proposed to be the link between the intracellular domains of the amyloid precursor protein, APP (AICD) and the LDL receptor-related protein (LRP-CT). Functional linkage between these two proteins has been established and mutations within LRP-CT affect the amount of Aβ produced from APP. Previous work showed that the AICD binds to the protein interaction domain 2 (PID2) of Fe65. Although the structure of PID1 was solved recently all attempts to demonstrate LRP-CT binding to this domain failed. We used biophysical experiments and binding studies to investigate the binding between these three proteins. Full-length Fe65 bound more weakly to AICD than did N-terminally truncated forms, however the intramolecular domain-domain interactions that had been proposed to inhibit binding could not be observed using amide H/D exchange. Surprisingly, when the LRP-CT is phosphorylated at Tyr4507, it bound to Fe65-PID1 despite the fact that this domain belongs to the Dab-like subclass of PIDs that is not supposed to be phosphorylation dependent. Mutation of a critical arginine abolished binding providing further proof of the phosphorylation-dependence. The Fe65-PID1 domain thus provides a link between the Dab-like class and the IRS-like class of PID domains and is the first Dab-like family member to show phosphorylation-dependent binding. PMID:21650223

  16. Functional Maps of Protein Complexes from Quantitative Genetic Interaction Data

    OpenAIRE

    Sourav Bandyopadhyay; Ryan Kelley; Krogan, Nevan J.; Trey Ideker

    2008-01-01

    Recently, a number of advanced screening technologies have allowed for the comprehensive quantification of aggravating and alleviating genetic interactions among gene pairs. In parallel, TAP-MS studies (tandem affinity purification followed by mass spectroscopy) have been successful at identifying physical protein interactions that can indicate proteins participating in the same molecular complex. Here, we propose a method for the joint learning of protein complexes and their functional relat...

  17. Multiplex single-molecule interaction profiling of DNA barcoded proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Gu, Liangcai; Li, Chao; Aach, John; Hill, David E.; Vidal, Marc; Church, George M.

    2014-01-01

    In contrast with advances in massively parallel DNA sequencing1, high-throughput protein analyses2-4 are often limited by ensemble measurements, individual analyte purification and hence compromised quality and cost-effectiveness. Single-molecule (SM) protein detection achieved using optical methods5 is limited by the number of spectrally nonoverlapping chromophores. Here, we introduce a single molecular interaction-sequencing (SMI-Seq) technology for parallel protein interaction profiling le...

  18. Topological and organizational properties of the products of house-keeping and tissue-specific genes in protein-protein interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wen-Hsien; Liu, Wei-Chung; Hwang, Ming-Jing

    2009-03-11

    Human cells of various tissue types differ greatly in morphology despite having the same set of genetic information. Some genes are expressed in all cell types to perform house-keeping functions, while some are selectively expressed to perform tissue-specific functions. In this study, we wished to elucidate how proteins encoded by human house-keeping genes and tissue-specific genes are organized in human protein-protein interaction networks. We constructed protein-protein interaction networks for different tissue types using two gene expression datasets and one protein-protein interaction database. We then calculated three network indices of topological importance, the degree, closeness, and betweenness centralities, to measure the network position of proteins encoded by house-keeping and tissue-specific genes, and quantified their local connectivity structure. Compared to a random selection of proteins, house-keeping gene-encoded proteins tended to have a greater number of directly interacting neighbors and occupy network positions in several shortest paths of interaction between protein pairs, whereas tissue-specific gene-encoded proteins did not. In addition, house-keeping gene-encoded proteins tended to connect with other house-keeping gene-encoded proteins in all tissue types, whereas tissue-specific gene-encoded proteins also tended to connect with other tissue-specific gene-encoded proteins, but only in approximately half of the tissue types examined. Our analysis showed that house-keeping gene-encoded proteins tend to occupy important network positions, while those encoded by tissue-specific genes do not. The biological implications of our findings were discussed and we proposed a hypothesis regarding how cells organize their protein tools in protein-protein interaction networks. Our results led us to speculate that house-keeping gene-encoded proteins might form a core in human protein-protein interaction networks, while clusters of tissue-specific gene

  19. Directional interactions and cooperativity between mechanosensitive membrane proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haselwandter, Christoph A.; Phillips, Rob

    2013-01-01

    While modern structural biology has provided us with a rich and diverse picture of membrane proteins, the biological function of membrane proteins is often influenced by the mechanical properties of the surrounding lipid bilayer. Here we explore the relation between the shape of membrane proteins and the cooperative function of membrane proteins induced by membrane-mediated elastic interactions. For the experimental model system of mechanosensitive ion channels we find that the sign and strength of elastic interactions depend on the protein shape, yielding distinct cooperative gating curves for distinct protein orientations. Our approach predicts how directional elastic interactions affect the molecular structure, organization, and biological function of proteins in crowded membranes. PMID:25309021

  20. Interaction between Protein, Phytate, and Microbial Phytase. In Vitro Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kies, A.K.; Jonge, de L.H.; Kemme, P.A.; Jongbloed, A.W.

    2006-01-01

    The interaction between protein and phytate was investigated in vitro using proteins extracted from five common feedstuffs and from casein. The appearance of naturally present soluble protein-phytate complexes in the feedstuffs, the formation of complexes at different pHs, and the degradation of the

  1. 14-3-3 proteins interact with specific MEK kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanger, G R; Widmann, C; Porter, A C; Sather, S; Johnson, G L; Vaillancourt, R R

    1998-02-06

    MEK (mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase) kinases (MEKKs) regulate c-Jun N-terminal kinase and extracellular response kinase pathways. The 14-3-3zeta and 14-3-3epsilon isoforms were isolated in a two-hybrid screen for proteins interacting with the N-terminal regulatory domain of MEKK3. 14-3-3 proteins bound both the N-terminal regulatory and C-terminal kinase domains of MEKK3. The binding affinity of 14-3-3 for the MEKK3 N terminus was 90 nM, demonstrating a high affinity interaction. 14-3-3 proteins also interacted with MEKK1 and MEKK2, but not MEKK4. Endogenous 14-3-3 protein and MEKK1 and MEKK2 were similarly distributed in the cell, consistent with their in vitro interactions. MEKK1 and 14-3-3 proteins colocalized using two-color digital confocal immunofluorescence. Binding of 14-3-3 proteins mapped to the N-terminal 393 residues of 196-kDa MEKK1. Unlike MEKK2 and MEKK3, the C-terminal kinase domain of MEKK1 demonstrated little or no ability to interact with 14-3-3 proteins. MEKK1, but not MEKK2, -3 or -4, is a caspase-3 substrate that when cleaved releases the kinase domain from the N-terminal regulatory domain. Functionally, caspase-3 cleavage of MEKK1 releases the kinase domain from the N-terminal 14-3-3-binding region, demonstrating that caspases can selectively alter protein kinase interactions with regulatory proteins. With regard to MEKK1, -2 and -3, 14-3-3 proteins do not appear to directly influence activity, but rather function as "scaffolds" for protein-protein interactions.

  2. Protein-protein interactions: principles, techniques, and their potential role in new drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shagufta H; Ahmad, Faizan; Ahmad, Nihal; Flynn, Daniel C; Kumar, Raj

    2011-06-01

    A vast network of genes is inter-linked through protein-protein interactions and is critical component of almost every biological process under physiological conditions. Any disruption of the biologically essential network leads to pathological conditions resulting into related diseases. Therefore, proper understanding of biological functions warrants a comprehensive knowledge of protein-protein interactions and the molecular mechanisms that govern such processes. The importance of protein-protein interaction process is highlighted by the fact that a number of powerful techniques/methods have been developed to understand how such interactions take place under various physiological and pathological conditions. Many of the key protein-protein interactions are known to participate in disease-associated signaling pathways, and represent novel targets for therapeutic intervention. Thus, controlling protein-protein interactions offers a rich dividend for the discovery of new drug targets. Availability of various tools to study and the knowledge of human genome have put us in a unique position to understand highly complex biological network, and the mechanisms involved therein. In this review article, we have summarized protein-protein interaction networks, techniques/methods of their binding/kinetic parameters, and the role of these interactions in the development of potential tools for drug designing.

  3. Transcription factors do it together : the hows and whys of studying protein-protein interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Immink, R.G.H.; Angenent, G.C.

    2002-01-01

    Protein–protein interactions are intrinsic to virtually every cellular process. Recent breakthroughs in techniques to study protein-interaction and the availability of fully sequenced plant genomes have attracted many plant scientists to undertake the first steps in the field of protein

  4. Interrogating the architecture of protein assemblies and protein interaction networks by cross-linking mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Fan; Heck, Albert J R

    2015-01-01

    Proteins are involved in almost all processes of the living cell. They are organized through extensive networks of interaction, by tightly bound macromolecular assemblies or more transiently via signaling nodes. Therefore, revealing the architecture of protein complexes and protein interaction netwo

  5. Mapping functional prion-prion protein interaction sites using prion protein based peptide-arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rigter, A.; Priem, J.; Timmers-Parohi, D.; Langeveld, J.; Bossers, A.

    2009-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are at the basis of most if not all biological processes in living cells. Therefore, adapting existing techniques or developing new techniques to study interactions between proteins are of importance in elucidating which amino acid sequences contribute to these interacti

  6. Predicting Pharmacodynamic Drug-Drug Interactions through Signaling Propagation Interference on Protein-Protein Interaction Networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyunghyun Park

    Full Text Available As pharmacodynamic drug-drug interactions (PD DDIs could lead to severe adverse effects in patients, it is important to identify potential PD DDIs in drug development. The signaling starting from drug targets is propagated through protein-protein interaction (PPI networks. PD DDIs could occur by close interference on the same targets or within the same pathways as well as distant interference through cross-talking pathways. However, most of the previous approaches have considered only close interference by measuring distances between drug targets or comparing target neighbors. We have applied a random walk with restart algorithm to simulate signaling propagation from drug targets in order to capture the possibility of their distant interference. Cross validation with DrugBank and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes DRUG shows that the proposed method outperforms the previous methods significantly. We also provide a web service with which PD DDIs for drug pairs can be analyzed at http://biosoft.kaist.ac.kr/targetrw.

  7. Casein - whey protein interactions in heated milk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasbinder, Astrid Jolanda

    2003-01-01

    Heating of milk is an essential step in the processing of various dairy products, like for example yoghurt. A major consequence of the heat treatment is the denaturation of whey proteins, which either associate with the casein micelle or form soluble whey protein aggregates. By combination of enzyma

  8. RNA-protein interactions: an overview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Re, Angela; Joshi, Tejal; Kulberkyte, Eleonora;

    2014-01-01

    RNA binding proteins (RBPs) are key players in the regulation of gene expression. In this chapter we discuss the main protein-RNA recognition modes used by RBPs in order to regulate multiple steps of RNA processing. We discuss traditional and state-of-the-art technologies that can be used to stud...

  9. Protein-flavour interactions in relation to development of novel protein foods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heng, L.; Koningsveld, van G.A.; Gruppen, H.; Boekel, van M.A.J.S.; Vincken, J.P.; Roozen, J.P.; Voragen, A.G.J.

    2004-01-01

    Proteins are known to interact with relatively small molecules such as flavour compounds and saponins, and may thus influence the taste perception of food. In this study, the interactions of flavour volatiles with pea proteins, and the effects of heat on these interactions were investigated. The pre

  10. Grafted block complex coacervate core micelles and their effect on protein adsorption on silica and polystyrene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brzozowska, Agata M.; de Keizer, Arie; Norde, Willem; Detrembleur, Christophe; Stuart, Martien Cohen

    2010-01-01

    We have studied the formation and the stability of grafted block complex coacervate core micelles (C3Ms) in solution and the influence of grafted block C3M coatings on the adsorption of the proteins beta-lactoglobulin, bovine serum albumin, and lysozyme. The C3Ms consist of a grafted block copolymer

  11. PPLook: an automated data mining tool for protein-protein interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Li

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extracting and visualizing of protein-protein interaction (PPI from text literatures are a meaningful topic in protein science. It assists the identification of interactions among proteins. There is a lack of tools to extract PPI, visualize and classify the results. Results We developed a PPI search system, termed PPLook, which automatically extracts and visualizes protein-protein interaction (PPI from text. Given a query protein name, PPLook can search a dataset for other proteins interacting with it by using a keywords dictionary pattern-matching algorithm, and display the topological parameters, such as the number of nodes, edges, and connected components. The visualization component of PPLook enables us to view the interaction relationship among the proteins in a three-dimensional space based on the OpenGL graphics interface technology. PPLook can also provide the functions of selecting protein semantic class, counting the number of semantic class proteins which interact with query protein, counting the literature number of articles appearing the interaction relationship about the query protein. Moreover, PPLook provides heterogeneous search and a user-friendly graphical interface. Conclusions PPLook is an effective tool for biologists and biosystem developers who need to access PPI information from the literature. PPLook is freely available for non-commercial users at http://meta.usc.edu/softs/PPLook.

  12. Computational biology for target discovery and characterization: a feasibility study in protein-protein interaction detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, C; Zemla, A

    2009-02-25

    In this work we developed new code for detecting putative multi-domain protein-protein interactions for a small network of bacterial pathogen proteins, and determined how structure-driven domain-fusion (DF) methods should be scaled up for whole-proteome analysis. Protein-protein interactions are of great interest in structural biology and are important for understanding the biology of pathogens. The ability to predict protein-protein interactions provides a means for development of anti-microbials that may interfer with key processes in pathogenicity. The function of a protein-protein complex can be elucidated through knowledge of its structure. The overall goal of this project was to determine the feasibility of extending current LLNL capabilities to produce a high-throughput systems bio-informatics capability for identification and characterization of putative interacting protein partners within known or suspected small protein networks. We extended an existing LLNL methodology for identification of putative protein-protein interacting partners (Chakicherla et al (in review)) by writing a new code to identify multi-domain-fusion linkages (3 or more per complex). We applied these codes to the proteins in the Yersinia pestis quorum sensing network, known as the lsr operon, which comprises a virulence mechanism in this pathogen. We determined that efficient application of our computational algorithms in high-throughput for detection of putative protein-protein complexes genome wide would require pre-computation of PDB domains and construction of a domain-domain association database.

  13. Information-driven structural modelling of protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, João P G L M; Karaca, Ezgi; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein docking aims at predicting the three-dimensional structure of a protein complex starting from the free forms of the individual partners. As assessed in the CAPRI community-wide experiment, the most successful docking algorithms combine pure laws of physics with information derived from various experimental or bioinformatics sources. Of these so-called "information-driven" approaches, HADDOCK stands out as one of the most successful representatives. In this chapter, we briefly summarize which experimental information can be used to drive the docking prediction in HADDOCK, and then focus on the docking protocol itself. We discuss and illustrate with a tutorial example a "classical" protein-protein docking prediction, as well as more recent developments for modelling multi-body systems and large conformational changes.

  14. Core-Shell Microgels with Switchable Elasticity at Constant Interfacial Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seuss, Maximilian; Schmolke, Willi; Drechsler, Astrid; Fery, Andreas; Seiffert, Sebastian

    2016-06-29

    Hydrogels based on poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAAm) exhibit a thermo-reversible volume phase transition from swollen to deswollen states. This change of the hydrogel volume is accompanied by changes of the hydrogel elastic and Young's moduli and of the hydrogel interfacial interactions. To decouple these parameters from one another, we present a class of submillimeter sized hydrogel particles that consist of a thermosensitive pNIPAAm core wrapped by a nonthermosensitive polyacrylamide (pAAm) shell, each templated by droplet-based microfluidics. When the microgel core deswells upon increase of the temperature to above 34 °C, the shell is stretched and dragged to follow this deswelling into the microgel interior, resulting in an increase of the microgel surficial Young's modulus. However, as the surface interactions of the pAAm shell are independent of temperature at around 34 °C, they do not considerably change during the pNIPAAm-core volume phase transition. This feature makes these core-shell microgels a promising platform to be used as building blocks to assemble soft materials with rationally and independently tunable mechanics.

  15. Rosetta stone method for detecting protein function and protein-protein interactions from genome sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, David; Marcotte, Edward M.; Pellegrini, Matteo; Thompson, Michael J.; Yeates, Todd O.

    2002-10-15

    A computational method system, and computer program are provided for inferring functional links from genome sequences. One method is based on the observation that some pairs of proteins A' and B' have homologs in another organism fused into a single protein chain AB. A trans-genome comparison of sequences can reveal these AB sequences, which are Rosetta Stone sequences because they decipher an interaction between A' and B. Another method compares the genomic sequence of two or more organisms to create a phylogenetic profile for each protein indicating its presence or absence across all the genomes. The profile provides information regarding functional links between different families of proteins. In yet another method a combination of the above two methods is used to predict functional links.

  16. A comprehensive resource of interacting protein regions for refining human transcription factor networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etsuko Miyamoto-Sato

    Full Text Available Large-scale data sets of protein-protein interactions (PPIs are a valuable resource for mapping and analysis of the topological and dynamic features of interactome networks. The currently available large-scale PPI data sets only contain information on interaction partners. The data presented in this study also include the sequences involved in the interactions (i.e., the interacting regions, IRs suggested to correspond to functional and structural domains. Here we present the first large-scale IR data set obtained using mRNA display for 50 human transcription factors (TFs, including 12 transcription-related proteins. The core data set (966 IRs; 943 PPIs displays a verification rate of 70%. Analysis of the IR data set revealed the existence of IRs that interact with multiple partners. Furthermore, these IRs were preferentially associated with intrinsic disorder. This finding supports the hypothesis that intrinsically disordered regions play a major role in the dynamics and diversity of TF networks through their ability to structurally adapt to and bind with multiple partners. Accordingly, this domain-based interaction resource represents an important step in refining protein interactions and networks at the domain level and in associating network analysis with biological structure and function.

  17. Influence of Concrete Properties on Molten Core-Concrete Interaction: A Simulation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-yang Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In a severe nuclear power plant accident, the molten core can be released into the reactor pit and interact with sacrificial concrete. In this paper, a simulation study is presented that aims to address the influence of sacrificial concrete properties on molten core-concrete interaction (MCCI. In particular, based on the MELCOR Code, the ferrosiliceous concrete used in European Pressurized Water Reactor (EPR is taken into account with respect to the different ablation enthalpy and Fe2O3 and H2O contents. Results indicate that the concrete ablation rate as well as the hydrogen generation rate depends much on the concrete ablation enthalpy and Fe2O3 and H2O contents. In practice, the ablation enthalpy of sacrificial concrete is the higher the better, while the Fe2O3 and H2O content of sacrificial concrete is the lower the better.

  18. Nuclear structure calculations in $^{20}$Ne with No-Core Configuration-Interaction model

    CERN Document Server

    Konieczka, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    Negative parity states in $^{20}$Ne and Gamow-Teller strength distribution for the ground-state beta-decay of $^{20}$Na are calculated for the very first time using recently developed No-Core Configuration-Interaction model. The approach is based on multi-reference density functional theory involving isospin and angular-momentum projections. Advantages and shortcomings of the method are briefly discussed.

  19. The role of electrostatics in protein-protein interactions of a monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, D; Keeling, R; Tracka, M; van der Walle, C F; Uddin, S; Warwicker, J; Curtis, R

    2014-07-07

    Understanding how protein-protein interactions depend on the choice of buffer, salt, ionic strength, and pH is needed to have better control over protein solution behavior. Here, we have characterized the pH and ionic strength dependence of protein-protein interactions in terms of an interaction parameter kD obtained from dynamic light scattering and the osmotic second virial coefficient B22 measured by static light scattering. A simplified protein-protein interaction model based on a Baxter adhesive potential and an electric double layer force is used to separate out the contributions of longer-ranged electrostatic interactions from short-ranged attractive forces. The ionic strength dependence of protein-protein interactions for solutions at pH 6.5 and below can be accurately captured using a Deryaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) potential to describe the double layer forces. In solutions at pH 9, attractive electrostatics occur over the ionic strength range of 5-275 mM. At intermediate pH values (7.25 to 8.5), there is a crossover effect characterized by a nonmonotonic ionic strength dependence of protein-protein interactions, which can be rationalized by the competing effects of long-ranged repulsive double layer forces at low ionic strength and a shorter ranged electrostatic attraction, which dominates above a critical ionic strength. The change of interactions from repulsive to attractive indicates a concomitant change in the angular dependence of protein-protein interaction from isotropic to anisotropic. In the second part of the paper, we show how the Baxter adhesive potential can be used to predict values of kD from fitting to B22 measurements, thus providing a molecular basis for the linear correlation between the two protein-protein interaction parameters.

  20. The nature of protein domain evolution: shaping the interaction network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagowski, Christoph P; Bruins, Wouter; Te Velthuis, Aartjan J W

    2010-08-01

    The proteomes that make up the collection of proteins in contemporary organisms evolved through recombination and duplication of a limited set of domains. These protein domains are essentially the main components of globular proteins and are the most principal level at which protein function and protein interactions can be understood. An important aspect of domain evolution is their atomic structure and biochemical function, which are both specified by the information in the amino acid sequence. Changes in this information may bring about new folds, functions and protein architectures. With the present and still increasing wealth of sequences and annotation data brought about by genomics, new evolutionary relationships are constantly being revealed, unknown structures modeled and phylogenies inferred. Such investigations not only help predict the function of newly discovered proteins, but also assist in mapping unforeseen pathways of evolution and reveal crucial, co-evolving inter- and intra-molecular interactions. In turn this will help us describe how protein domains shaped cellular interaction networks and the dynamics with which they are regulated in the cell. Additionally, these studies can be used for the design of new and optimized protein domains for therapy. In this review, we aim to describe the basic concepts of protein domain evolution and illustrate recent developments in molecular evolution that have provided valuable new insights in the field of comparative genomics and protein interaction networks.

  1. Interaction between -Synuclein and Other Proteins in Neurodegenerative Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurt A. Jellinger

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein aggregation is a common characteristic of many neurodegenerative disorders, and the interaction between pathological/toxic proteins to cause neurodegeneration is a hot topic of current neuroscience research. Despite clinical, genetic, and experimental differences, evidence increasingly indicates considerable overlap between synucleinopathies and tauopathies or other protein-misfolding diseases. Inclusions, characteristics of these disorders, also occurring in other neurodegenerative diseases, suggest interactions of pathological proteins engaging common downstream pathways. Novel findings that have shifted our understanding in the role of pathologic proteins in the pathogenesis of Parkinson and Alzheimer diseases have confirmed correlations/overlaps between these and other neurodegenerative disorders. The synergistic effects of α-synuclein, hyperphosphorylated tau, amyloid-β, and other pathologic proteins, and the underlying molecular pathogenic mechanisms, including induction and spread of protein aggregates, are critically reviewed, suggesting a dualism or triad of neurodegeneration in protein-misfolding disorders, although the etiology of most of these processes is still mysterious.

  2. Characterization of the fusion core in zebrafish endogenous retroviral envelope protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Jian [State Key Laboratory of Virology, College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei 430072 (China); State Key Laboratory of Virology, Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, Hubei 430071 (China); Zhang, Huaidong [CAS Key Laboratory of Special Pathogens and Biosafety, Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, Hubei 430071 (China); Gong, Rui, E-mail: gongr@wh.iov.cn [CAS Key Laboratory of Special Pathogens and Biosafety, Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, Hubei 430071 (China); Xiao, Gengfu, E-mail: xiaogf@wh.iov.cn [State Key Laboratory of Virology, College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei 430072 (China); State Key Laboratory of Virology, Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, Hubei 430071 (China)

    2015-05-08

    Zebrafish endogenous retrovirus (ZFERV) is the unique endogenous retrovirus in zebrafish, as yet, containing intact open reading frames of its envelope protein gene in zebrafish genome. Similarly, several envelope proteins of endogenous retroviruses in human and other mammalian animal genomes (such as syncytin-1 and 2 in human, syncytin-A and B in mouse) were identified and shown to be functional in induction of cell–cell fusion involved in placental development. ZFERV envelope protein (Env) gene appears to be also functional in vivo because it is expressible. After sequence alignment, we found ZFERV Env shares similar structural profiles with syncytin and other type I viral envelopes, especially in the regions of N- and C-terminal heptad repeats (NHR and CHR) which were crucial for membrane fusion. We expressed the regions of N + C protein in the ZFERV Env (residues 459–567, including predicted NHR and CHR) to characterize the fusion core structure. We found N + C protein could form a stable coiled-coil trimer that consists of three helical NHR regions forming a central trimeric core, and three helical CHR regions packing into the grooves on the surface of the central core. The structural characterization of the fusion core revealed the possible mechanism of fusion mediated by ZFERV Env. These results gave comprehensive explanation of how the ancient virus infects the zebrafish and integrates into the genome million years ago, and showed a rational clue for discovery of physiological significance (e.g., medicate cell–cell fusion). - Highlights: • ZFERV Env shares similar structural profiles with syncytin and other type I viral envelopes. • The fusion core of ZFERV Env forms stable coiled-coil trimer including three NHRs and three CHRs. • The structural mechanism of viral entry mediated by ZFERV Env is disclosed. • The results are helpful for further discovery of physiological function of ZFERV Env in zebrafish.

  3. First-order theory for Earth’s inner-core anisotropy due to super-rotation and Ramachandran interaction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Andrew Das Arulsamy

    2015-06-01

    Solidification mechanism at the Lehmann (inner core) boundary are postulated on the basis of Ramachandran interaction by taking the fluctuating inner core super-rotation into account. The postulates are found to be consistent with compressional or P-wave velocity obtained from seismic data analysis. We justify these postulates to be physically sound and precise, and show that the fluctuating inner core super-rotation causes significant changes to the strength of Fe–Fe Ramachandran interaction, which then leads to the observed asymmetric and anisotropic inner core. Our postulates also reliably explain that the depth-dependent anisotropic P-wave attenuation close to inner core surface (to about 100 km deep) is due to phonon excitation probability and different atomic orientation. We also discuss the consistency of our postulates with respect to asymmetric inner core anisotropy (between western and eastern inner core hemispheres).

  4. A core viral protein binds host nucleosomes to sequester immune danger signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avgousti, Daphne C; Herrmann, Christin; Kulej, Katarzyna; Pancholi, Neha J; Sekulic, Nikolina; Petrescu, Joana; Molden, Rosalynn C; Blumenthal, Daniel; Paris, Andrew J; Reyes, Emigdio D; Ostapchuk, Philomena; Hearing, Patrick; Seeholzer, Steven H; Worthen, G Scott; Black, Ben E; Garcia, Benjamin A; Weitzman, Matthew D

    2016-07-01

    Viral proteins mimic host protein structure and function to redirect cellular processes and subvert innate defenses. Small basic proteins compact and regulate both viral and cellular DNA genomes. Nucleosomes are the repeating units of cellular chromatin and play an important part in innate immune responses. Viral-encoded core basic proteins compact viral genomes, but their impact on host chromatin structure and function remains unexplored. Adenoviruses encode a highly basic protein called protein VII that resembles cellular histones. Although protein VII binds viral DNA and is incorporated with viral genomes into virus particles, it is unknown whether protein VII affects cellular chromatin. Here we show that protein VII alters cellular chromatin, leading us to hypothesize that this has an impact on antiviral responses during adenovirus infection in human cells. We find that protein VII forms complexes with nucleosomes and limits DNA accessibility. We identified post-translational modifications on protein VII that are responsible for chromatin localization. Furthermore, proteomic analysis demonstrated that protein VII is sufficient to alter the protein composition of host chromatin. We found that protein VII is necessary and sufficient for retention in the chromatin of members of the high-mobility-group protein B family (HMGB1, HMGB2 and HMGB3). HMGB1 is actively released in response to inflammatory stimuli and functions as a danger signal to activate immune responses. We showed that protein VII can directly bind HMGB1 in vitro and further demonstrated that protein VII expression in mouse lungs is sufficient to decrease inflammation-induced HMGB1 content and neutrophil recruitment in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Together, our in vitro and in vivo results show that protein VII sequesters HMGB1 and can prevent its release. This study uncovers a viral strategy in which nucleosome binding is exploited to control extracellular immune signaling.

  5. Finding finer functions for partially characterized proteins by protein-protein interaction networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Based on high-throughput data, numerous algorithms have been designed to find functions of novel proteins. However, the effectiveness of such algorithms is currently limited by some fundamental factors, including (1) the low a-priori probability of novel proteins participating in a detailed function; (2) the huge false data present in high-throughput datasets; (3) the incomplete data coverage of functional classes; (4) the abundant but heterogeneous negative samples for training the algorithms; and (5) the lack of detailed functional knowledge for training algorithms. Here, for partially characterized proteins, we suggest an approach to finding their finer functions based on protein interaction sub-networks or gene expression patterns, defined in function-specific subspaces. The proposed approach can lessen the above-mentioned problems by properly defining the prediction range and functionally filtering the noisy data, and thus can efficiently find proteins' novel functions. For thousands of yeast and human proteins partially characterized, it is able to reliably find their finer functions (e.g., the translational functions) with more than 90% precision. The predicted finer functions are highly valuable both for guiding the follow-up wet-lab validation and for providing the necessary data for training algorithms to learn other proteins.

  6. Evolution of biomolecular networks: lessons from metabolic and protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Takuji; Bork, Peer

    2009-11-01

    Despite only becoming popular at the beginning of this decade, biomolecular networks are now frameworks that facilitate many discoveries in molecular biology. The nodes of these networks are usually proteins (specifically enzymes in metabolic networks), whereas the links (or edges) are their interactions with other molecules. These networks are made up of protein-protein interactions or enzyme-enzyme interactions through shared metabolites in the case of metabolic networks. Evolutionary analysis has revealed that changes in the nodes and links in protein-protein interaction and metabolic networks are subject to different selection pressures owing to distinct topological features. However, many evolutionary constraints can be uncovered only if temporal and spatial aspects are included in the network analysis.

  7. (S)Pinning down protein interactions by NMR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teilum, Kaare; Kunze, Micha Ben Achim; Erlendsson, Simon

    2017-01-01

    all types of protein reactions, which can span orders of magnitudes in affinities, reaction rates and lifetimes of states. As the more versatile technique, solution NMR spectroscopy offers a remarkable catalogue of methods that can be successfully applied to the quantitative as well as qualitative...... descriptions of protein interactions. In this review we provide an easy-access approach to NMR for the non-NMR specialist and describe how and when solution state NMR spectroscopy is the method of choice for addressing protein ligand interaction. We describe very briefly the theoretical background...... and illustrate simple protein-ligand interactions and as well as typical strategies for measuring binding constants using NMR spectroscopy. Finally, this review provides examples of caveats of the method as well as the options to improve the outcome of an NMR analysis of a protein interaction reaction...

  8. Protein-surface interaction maps for ion-exchange chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, Alexander S; Cramer, Steven M

    2011-04-05

    In this paper, protein-surface interaction maps were generated by performing coarse-grained protein-surface calculations. This approach allowed for the rapid determination of the protein-surface interaction energies at a range of orientations and distances. Interaction maps of lysozyme indicated that there was a contiguous series of orientations corresponding to several adjacent preferred binding regions on the protein surface. Examination of these orientations provided insight into the residues involved in surface interactions, which qualitatively agreed with the retention data for single-site mutants. Interaction maps of lysozyme single-site mutants were also generated and provided significant insight into why these variants exhibited significant differences in their chromatographic behavior. This approach was also employed to study the binding behavior of CspB and related mutants. The results indicated that, in addition to describing general trends in the data, these maps provided significant insight into retention data of the single-site mutants. In particular, subtle retention trends observed with the K12 and K13 mutants were well-described using this interaction map approach. Finally, the number of interaction points with energies stronger than -2 kcal/mol was shown to be able to semi-quantitatively predict the behavior of most of the mutants. This rapid approach for calculating protein-surface interaction maps is expected to facilitate future method development for separating closely related protein variants in ion-exchange systems.

  9. Exploratory study of molten core material/concrete interactions, July 1975--March 1977. [BWR; PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, D.A.; Dahlgren, D.A.; Muir, J.F.; Murfin, W.D.

    1978-02-01

    An experimental study of the interaction between high-temperature molten materials and structural concrete is described. The experimental efforts focused on the interaction of melts of reactor core materials weighing 12 to 200 kg at temperatures 1700 to 2800/sup 0/C with calcareous and basaltic concrete representative of that found in existing light-water nuclear reactors. Observations concerning the rate and mode of melt penetration into concrete, the nature and generation rate of gases liberated during the interaction, and heat transfer from the melt to the concrete are described. Concrete erosion is shown to be primarily a melting process with little contribution from mechanical spallation. Water and carbon dioxide thermally released from the concrete are extensively reduced to hydrogen and carbon monoxide. Heat transfer from the melt to the concrete is shown to be dependent on gas generation rate and crucible geometry. Interpretation of results from the interaction experiments is supported by separate studies of the thermal decomposition of concretes, response of bulk concrete to intense heat fluxes (28 to 280 W/cm/sup 2/), and heat transfer from molten materials to decomposing solids. The experimental results are compared to assumptions made in previous analytic studies of core meltdown accidents in light-water nuclear reactors. A preliminary computer code, INTER, which models and extrapolates results of the experimental program is described. The code allows estimation of the effect of physical parameters on the nature of the melt/concrete interaction.

  10. The structure of the core NuRD repression complex provides insights into its interaction with chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millard, Christopher J; Varma, Niranjan; Saleh, Almutasem; Morris, Kyle; Watson, Peter J; Bottrill, Andrew R; Fairall, Louise; Smith, Corinne J; Schwabe, John W R

    2016-04-21

    The NuRD complex is a multi-protein transcriptional corepressor that couples histone deacetylase and ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling activities. The complex regulates the higher-order structure of chromatin, and has important roles in the regulation of gene expression, DNA damage repair and cell differentiation. HDACs 1 and 2 are recruited by the MTA1 corepressor to form the catalytic core of the complex. The histone chaperone protein RBBP4, has previously been shown to bind to the carboxy-terminal tail of MTA1. We show that MTA1 recruits a second copy of RBBP4. The crystal structure reveals an extensive interface between MTA1 and RBBP4. An EM structure, supported by SAXS and crosslinking, reveals the architecture of the dimeric HDAC1:MTA1:RBBP4 assembly which forms the core of the NuRD complex. We find evidence that in this complex RBBP4 mediates interaction with histone H3 tails, but not histone H4, suggesting a mechanism for recruitment of the NuRD complex to chromatin.

  11. Cross-species Virus-host Protein-Protein Interactions Inhibiting Innate Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    SUBJECTTERMS viral pathogen, zoonotic, arenavirus, host tropism, protein - protein interactions, RIG-I, Z protein , CARD domain, MAVS 16. SECURITY...individually subcloned into Checkmate M2H System (Promega) bait and prey reporter plasmids. The genes encoding the viral Z proteins were synthesized... viral proteins were calculated with PhyML. While several residue positions are highly conserved across Z proteins (Figure 8), significant sequence

  12. A protein domain interaction interface database: InterPare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Jungsul

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most proteins function by interacting with other molecules. Their interaction interfaces are highly conserved throughout evolution to avoid undesirable interactions that lead to fatal disorders in cells. Rational drug discovery includes computational methods to identify the interaction sites of lead compounds to the target molecules. Identifying and classifying protein interaction interfaces on a large scale can help researchers discover drug targets more efficiently. Description We introduce a large-scale protein domain interaction interface database called InterPare http://interpare.net. It contains both inter-chain (between chains interfaces and intra-chain (within chain interfaces. InterPare uses three methods to detect interfaces: 1 the geometric distance method for checking the distance between atoms that belong to different domains, 2 Accessible Surface Area (ASA, a method for detecting the buried region of a protein that is detached from a solvent when forming multimers or complexes, and 3 the Voronoi diagram, a computational geometry method that uses a mathematical definition of interface regions. InterPare includes visualization tools to display protein interior, surface, and interaction interfaces. It also provides statistics such as the amino acid propensities of queried protein according to its interior, surface, and interface region. The atom coordinates that belong to interface, surface, and interior regions can be downloaded from the website. Conclusion InterPare is an open and public database server for protein interaction interface information. It contains the large-scale interface data for proteins whose 3D-structures are known. As of November 2004, there were 10,583 (Geometric distance, 10,431 (ASA, and 11,010 (Voronoi diagram entries in the Protein Data Bank (PDB containing interfaces, according to the above three methods. In the case of the geometric distance method, there are 31,620 inter-chain domain

  13. Unveiling protein functions through the dynamics of the interaction network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Sendiña-Nadal

    Full Text Available Protein interaction networks have become a tool to study biological processes, either for predicting molecular functions or for designing proper new drugs to regulate the main biological interactions. Furthermore, such networks are known to be organized in sub-networks of proteins contributing to the same cellular function. However, the protein function prediction is not accurate and each protein has traditionally been assigned to only one function by the network formalism. By considering the network of the physical interactions between proteins of the yeast together with a manual and single functional classification scheme, we introduce a method able to reveal important information on protein function, at both micro- and macro-scale. In particular, the inspection of the properties of oscillatory dynamics on top of the protein interaction network leads to the identification of misclassification problems in protein function assignments, as well as to unveil correct identification of protein functions. We also demonstrate that our approach can give a network representation of the meta-organization of biological processes by unraveling the interactions between different functional classes.

  14. Understanding protein–protein interactions by genetic suppression

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sitaraman Sujatha; Dipankar Chatterji

    2000-01-01

    Protein–protein interactions influence many cellular processes and it is increasingly being felt that even a weak and remote interplay between two subunits of a protein or between two proteins in a complex may govern the fate of a particular biochemical pathway. In a bacterial system where the complete genome sequence is available, it is an arduous task to assign function to a large number of proteins. It is possible that many of them are peripherally associated with a cellular event and it is very difficult to probe such interaction. However, mutations in the genes that encode such proteins (primary mutations) are useful in these studies. Isolation of a suppressor or a second-site mutation that restores the phenotype abolished by the primary mutation could be an elegant yet simple way to follow a set of interacting proteins. Such a reversion site need not necessarily be geometrically close to the primary mutation site.

  15. Efficiency of the immunome protein interaction network increases during evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortutay, Csaba; Vihinen, Mauno

    2008-04-22

    Details of the mechanisms and selection pressures that shape the emergence and development of complex biological systems, such as the human immune system, are poorly understood. A recent definition of a reference set of proteins essential for the human immunome, combined with information about protein interaction networks for these proteins, facilitates evolutionary study of this biological machinery. Here, we present a detailed study of the development of the immunome protein interaction network during eight evolutionary steps from Bilateria ancestors to human. New nodes show preferential attachment to high degree proteins. The efficiency of the immunome protein interaction network increases during the evolutionary steps, whereas the vulnerability of the network decreases. Our results shed light on selective forces acting on the emergence of biological networks. It is likely that the high efficiency and low vulnerability are intrinsic properties of many biological networks, which arise from the effects of evolutionary processes yet to be uncovered.

  16. Regulation of PCNA-protein interactions for genome stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mailand, Niels; Gibbs-Seymour, Ian; Bekker-Jensen, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) has a central role in promoting faithful DNA replication, providing a molecular platform that facilitates the myriad protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions that occur at the replication fork. Numerous PCNA-associated proteins compete for binding...... to a common surface on PCNA; hence these interactions need to be tightly regulated and coordinated to ensure proper chromosome replication and integrity. Control of PCNA-protein interactions is multilayered and involves post-translational modifications, in particular ubiquitylation, accessory factors...... and regulated degradation of PCNA-associated proteins. This regulatory framework allows cells to maintain a fine-tuned balance between replication fidelity and processivity in response to DNA damage....

  17. Multifunctionality of the linker histones: an emerging role for protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBryant, Steven J; Lu, Xu; Hansen, Jeffrey C

    2010-05-01

    Linker histones, e.g., H1, are best known for their ability to bind to nucleosomes and stabilize both nucleosome structure and condensed higher-order chromatin structures. However, over the years many investigators have reported specific interactions between linker histones and proteins involved in important cellular processes. The purpose of this review is to highlight evidence indicating an important alternative mode of action for H1, namely protein-protein interactions. We first review key aspects of the traditional view of linker histone action, including the importance of the H1 C-terminal domain. We then discuss the current state of knowledge of linker histone interactions with other proteins, and, where possible, highlight the mechanism of linker histone-mediated protein-protein interactions. Taken together, the data suggest a combinatorial role for the linker histones, functioning both as primary chromatin architectural proteins and simultaneously as recruitment hubs for proteins involved in accessing and modifying the chromatin fiber.

  18. Structure based energy calculation to determine the regulation of G protein signalling by RGS and RGS-G protein interaction specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulati, Gavish; Gaonkar, Krutika Satish; Kamraj, Balu; Kumar, Ambuj; Purohit, Rituraj

    2012-09-01

    The RGS proteins act as GTPase activating proteins and therefore regulate the lifespan of the active G alpha-GTP by accelerating the GTP hydrolysis. Modulatory residues in the RGS protein are present at the periphery of the RGS domain-G protein interface which is essential to fine-tune the G protein recognition and interaction. The docking energies of the mutant complex and the native complex were compared to see the effects of the mutations in the Modulatory regions. Mutations of Modulatory residues in high-activity RGS proteins lead to loss of function, whereas multiple mutations in the low-activity RGS proteins in critical Modulatory positions lead to complete gain of function. In the RGS proteins the Significant and Conserved core residues with peripheral Modulatory residues selectively optimize G protein recognition and inactivation. The flexibility of the structures of the mutant complexes were seen to be higher and the accessible surface area for the complexes increased after the mutations in the Modulatory residues. Through this approach we analyzed the interaction specificity among the RGS and the G alpha protein, the approach can also be applied to other protein families to find the residues which along with the core binding domain, fine tune the protein recognition and are crucial in the loss or gain of function.

  19. Protein-protein interaction domains of Bacillus subtilis DivIVA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Baarle, S.; Celik, I.N.; Kaval, K.G.; Bramkamp, M.; Hamoen, L.W.; Halbedel, S.

    2013-01-01

    DivIVA proteins are curvature sensitive membrane binding proteins that recruit other proteins to the poles and the division septum. They consist of a conserved N-terminal lipid binding domain fused to a less conserved C-terminal domain. DivIVA homologues interact with different proteins involved in

  20. Protein-protein interaction domains of Bacillus subtilis DivIVA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. van Baarle; I.N. Celik; K.G. Kaval; M. Bramkamp; L.W. Hamoen; S. Halbedel

    2012-01-01

    DivIVA proteins are curvature sensitive membrane binding proteins that recruit other proteins to the poles and the division septum. They consist of a conserved N-terminal lipid binding domain fused to a less conserved C-terminal domain. DivIVA homologues interact with different proteins involved in

  1. Protein Interactions Investigated by the Raman Spectroscopy for Biosensor Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. P. Kengne-Momo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Interaction and surface binding characteristics of staphylococcal protein A (SpA and an anti-Escherichia coli immunoglobulin G (IgG were studied using the Raman spectroscopy. The tyrosine amino acid residues present in the α-helix structure of SpA were found to be involved in interaction with IgG. In bulk interaction condition the native structure of proteins was almost preserved where interaction-related changes were observed in the overall secondary structure (α-helix of SpA. In the adsorbed state, the protein structure was largely modified, which allowed the identification of tyrosine amino acids involved in SpA and IgG interaction. This study constitutes a direct Raman spectroscopic investigation of SpA and IgG (receptor-antibody interaction mechanism in the goal of a future biosensor application for detection of pathogenic microorganisms.

  2. A Global Protein Kinase and Phosphatase Interaction Network in Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitkreutz, Ashton; Choi, Hyungwon; Sharom, Jeffrey R.; Boucher, Lorrie; Neduva, Victor; Larsen, Brett; Lin, Zhen-Yuan; Breitkreutz, Bobby-Joe; Stark, Chris; Liu, Guomin; Ahn, Jessica; Dewar-Darch, Danielle; Reguly, Teresa; Tang, Xiaojing; Almeida, Ricardo; Qin, Zhaohui Steve; Pawson, Tony; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I.; Tyers, Mike

    2011-01-01

    The interactions of protein kinases and phosphatases with their regulatory subunits and substrates underpin cellular regulation. We identified a kinase and phosphatase interaction (KPI) network of 1844 interactions in budding yeast by mass spectrometric analysis of protein complexes. The KPI network contained many dense local regions of interactions that suggested new functions. Notably, the cell cycle phosphatase Cdc14 associated with multiple kinases that revealed roles for Cdc14 in mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling, the DNA damage response, and metabolism, whereas interactions of the target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1) uncovered new effector kinases in nitrogen and carbon metabolism. An extensive backbone of kinase-kinase interactions cross-connects the proteome and may serve to coordinate diverse cellular responses. PMID:20489023

  3. A protein interaction map of the kalimantacin biosynthesis assembly line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit Uytterhoeven

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial secondary metabolite kalimantacin is produced by a hybrid polyketide/ non-ribosomal peptide system in Pseudomonas fluorescens BCCM_ID9359. In this study, the kalimantacin biosynthesis gene cluster is analyzed by yeast two-hybrid analysis, creating a protein-protein interaction map of the entire assembly line. In total, 28 potential interactions were identified, of which 13 could be confirmed further. These interactions include the dimerization of ketosynthase domains, a link between assembly line modules 9 and 10, and a specific interaction between the trans-acting enoyl reductase BatK and the carrier proteins of modules 8 and 10. These interactions reveal fundamental insight into the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites.This study is the first to reveal interactions in a complete biosynthetic pathway. Similar future studies could build a strong basis for engineering strategies in such clusters.

  4. Protein Charge and Mass Contribute to the Spatio-temporal Dynamics of Protein-Protein Interactions in a Minimal Proteome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yu; Wang, Hong; Nussinov, Ruth; Ma, Buyong

    2013-01-01

    We constructed and simulated a ‘minimal proteome’ model using Langevin dynamics. It contains 206 essential protein types which were compiled from the literature. For comparison, we generated six proteomes with randomized concentrations. We found that the net charges and molecular weights of the proteins in the minimal genome are not random. The net charge of a protein decreases linearly with molecular weight, with small proteins being mostly positively charged and large proteins negatively charged. The protein copy numbers in the minimal genome have the tendency to maximize the number of protein-protein interactions in the network. Negatively charged proteins which tend to have larger sizes can provide large collision cross-section allowing them to interact with other proteins; on the other hand, the smaller positively charged proteins could have higher diffusion speed and are more likely to collide with other proteins. Proteomes with random charge/mass populations form less stable clusters than those with experimental protein copy numbers. Our study suggests that ‘proper’ populations of negatively and positively charged proteins are important for maintaining a protein-protein interaction network in a proteome. It is interesting to note that the minimal genome model based on the charge and mass of E. Coli may have a larger protein-protein interaction network than that based on the lower organism M. pneumoniae. PMID:23420643

  5. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YHR111W, YIL008W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YHR111W UBA4 Protein that activates Urm1p before its conjugation to proteins (urmyl...description Protein that activates Urm1p before its conjugation to proteins (urmylation); one target is the

  6. Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors and Interacting Proteins in Epileptogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Feng; Tang, Feng-Ru

    2016-01-01

    Neurotransmitter and receptor systems are involved in different neurological and neuropsychological disorders such as Parkinson's disease, depression, Alzheimer's disease and epilepsy. Recent advances in studies of signal transduction pathways or interacting proteins of neurotransmitter receptor systems suggest that different receptor systems may share the common signal transduction pathways or interacting proteins which may be better therapeutic targets for development of drugs to effectively control brain diseases. In this paper, we reviewed metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) and their related signal transduction pathways or interacting proteins in status epilepticus and temporal lobe epilepsy, and proposed some novel therapeutical drug targets for controlling epilepsy and epileptogenesis.

  7. Predicting RNA-Protein Interactions Using Only Sequence Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muppirala Usha K

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA-protein interactions (RPIs play important roles in a wide variety of cellular processes, ranging from transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression to host defense against pathogens. High throughput experiments to identify RNA-protein interactions are beginning to provide valuable information about the complexity of RNA-protein interaction networks, but are expensive and time consuming. Hence, there is a need for reliable computational methods for predicting RNA-protein interactions. Results We propose RPISeq, a family of classifiers for predicting RNA-protein interactions using only sequence information. Given the sequences of an RNA and a protein as input, RPIseq predicts whether or not the RNA-protein pair interact. The RNA sequence is encoded as a normalized vector of its ribonucleotide 4-mer composition, and the protein sequence is encoded as a normalized vector of its 3-mer composition, based on a 7-letter reduced alphabet representation. Two variants of RPISeq are presented: RPISeq-SVM, which uses a Support Vector Machine (SVM classifier and RPISeq-RF, which uses a Random Forest classifier. On two non-redundant benchmark datasets extracted from the Protein-RNA Interface Database (PRIDB, RPISeq achieved an AUC (Area Under the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC curve of 0.96 and 0.92. On a third dataset containing only mRNA-protein interactions, the performance of RPISeq was competitive with that of a published method that requires information regarding many different features (e.g., mRNA half-life, GO annotations of the putative RNA and protein partners. In addition, RPISeq classifiers trained using the PRIDB data correctly predicted the majority (57-99% of non-coding RNA-protein interactions in NPInter-derived networks from E. coli, S. cerevisiae, D. melanogaster, M. musculus, and H. sapiens. Conclusions Our experiments with RPISeq demonstrate that RNA-protein interactions can be

  8. PDZ domain-mediated interactions of G protein-coupled receptors with postsynaptic density protein 95

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Thor C; Wirth, Volker F; Roberts, Nina Ingerslev;

    2013-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest family of membrane proteins in the human genome. Their signaling is regulated by scaffold proteins containing PDZ domains, but although these interactions are important for GPCR function, they are still poorly understood. We here present...... with colocalization of the full-length proteins in cells and with previous studies, we suggest that the range of relevant interactions might extend to interactions with K i = 450 µM in the in vitro assays. Within this range, we identify novel PSD-95 interactions with the chemokine receptor CXCR2, the neuropeptide Y...

  9. M-Track: detecting short-lived protein-protein interactions in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuzuarregui, Aurora; Kupka, Thomas; Bhatt, Bhumika; Dohnal, Ilse; Mudrak, Ingrid; Friedmann, Christina; Schüchner, Stefan; Frohner, Ingrid E.; Ammerer, Gustav; Ogris, Egon

    2012-01-01

    We developed a protein-proximity assay in yeast based on fusing a histone lysine methyltransferase onto a bait and its substrate onto a prey. Upon binding, the prey is stably methylated and detected by methylation-specific antibodies. We applied this approach to detect varying interaction affinities among proteins in a mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway and to detect short-lived interactions between protein phosphatase 2A and its substrates that have so far escaped direct detection. PMID:22581371

  10. Stabilized helical peptides: a strategy to target protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Mark A

    2014-08-14

    Protein-protein interactions are critical for cell proliferation, differentiation, and function. Peptides hold great promise for clinical applications focused on targeting protein-protein interactions. Advantages of peptides include a large chemical space and potential diversity of sequences and structures. However, peptides do present well-known challenges for drug development. Progress has been made in the development of stabilizing alpha helices for potential therapeutic applications. Advantages and disadvantages of different methods of helical peptide stabilization are discussed.

  11. History of protein-protein interactions: from egg-white to complex networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Pascal; Gingras, Anne-Claude

    2012-05-01

    Today, it is widely appreciated that protein-protein interactions play a fundamental role in biological processes. This was not always the case. The study of protein interactions started slowly and evolved considerably, together with conceptual and technological progress in different areas of research through the late 19th and the 20th centuries. In this review, we present some of the key experiments that have introduced major conceptual advances in biochemistry and molecular biology, and review technological breakthroughs that have paved the way for today's systems-wide approaches to protein-protein interaction analysis. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. A modified resonant recognition model to predict protein-protein interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiang; WANG Yifei

    2007-01-01

    Proteins are fundamental components of all living cells and the protein-protein interaction plays an important role in vital movement.This paper briefly introduced the original Resonant Recognition Model (RRM),and then modified it by using the wavelet transform to acquire the Modified Resonant Recognition Model (MRRM).The key characteristic of the new model is that it can predict directly the proteinprotein interaction from the primary sequence,and the MRRM is more suitable than the RRM for this prediction.The results of numerical experiments show that the MRRM is effective for predicting the protein-protein interaction.

  13. Control of vertebrate core planar cell polarity protein localization and dynamics by Prickle 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Mitchell T; Wallingford, John B

    2015-10-01

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) is a ubiquitous property of animal tissues and is essential for morphogenesis and homeostasis. In most cases, this fundamental property is governed by a deeply conserved set of 'core PCP' proteins, which includes the transmembrane proteins Van Gogh-like (Vangl) and Frizzled (Fzd), as well as the cytoplasmic effectors Prickle (Pk) and Dishevelled (Dvl). Asymmetric localization of these proteins is thought to be central to their function, and understanding the dynamics of these proteins is an important challenge in developmental biology. Among the processes that are organized by the core PCP proteins is the directional beating of cilia, such as those in the vertebrate node, airway and brain. Here, we exploit the live imaging capabilities of Xenopus to chart the progressive asymmetric localization of fluorescent reporters of Dvl1, Pk2 and Vangl1 in a planar polarized ciliated epithelium. Using this system, we also characterize the influence of Pk2 on the asymmetric dynamics of Vangl1 at the cell cortex, and we define regions of Pk2 that control its own localization and those impacting Vangl1. Finally, our data reveal a striking uncoupling of Vangl1 and Dvl1 asymmetry. This study advances our understanding of conserved PCP protein functions and also establishes a rapid, tractable platform to facilitate future in vivo studies of vertebrate PCP protein dynamics.

  14. Integrating protein-protein interactions and text mining for protein function prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leser Ulf

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Functional annotation of proteins remains a challenging task. Currently the scientific literature serves as the main source for yet uncurated functional annotations, but curation work is slow and expensive. Automatic techniques that support this work are still lacking reliability. We developed a method to identify conserved protein interaction graphs and to predict missing protein functions from orthologs in these graphs. To enhance the precision of the results, we furthermore implemented a procedure that validates all predictions based on findings reported in the literature. Results Using this procedure, more than 80% of the GO annotations for proteins with highly conserved orthologs that are available in UniProtKb/Swiss-Prot could be verified automatically. For a subset of proteins we predicted new GO annotations that were not available in UniProtKb/Swiss-Prot. All predictions were correct (100% precision according to the verifications from a trained curator. Conclusion Our method of integrating CCSs and literature mining is thus a highly reliable approach to predict GO annotations for weakly characterized proteins with orthologs.

  15. The origins of the evolutionary signal used to predict protein-protein interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapna Lakshmipuram S

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The correlation of genetic distances between pairs of protein sequence alignments has been used to infer protein-protein interactions. It has been suggested that these correlations are based on the signal of co-evolution between interacting proteins. However, although mutations in different proteins associated with maintaining an interaction clearly occur (particularly in binding interfaces and neighbourhoods, many other factors contribute to correlated rates of sequence evolution. Proteins in the same genome are usually linked by shared evolutionary history and so it would be expected that there would be topological similarities in their phylogenetic trees, whether they are interacting or not. For this reason the underlying species tree is often corrected for. Moreover processes such as expression level, are known to effect evolutionary rates. However, it has been argued that the correlated rates of evolution used to predict protein interaction explicitly includes shared evolutionary history; here we test this hypothesis. Results In order to identify the evolutionary mechanisms giving rise to the correlations between interaction proteins, we use phylogenetic methods to distinguish similarities in tree topologies from similarities in genetic distances. We use a range of datasets of interacting and non-interacting proteins from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We find that the signal of correlated evolution between interacting proteins is predominantly a result of shared evolutionary rates, rather than similarities in tree topology, independent of evolutionary divergence. Conclusions Since interacting proteins do not have tree topologies that are more similar than the control group of non-interacting proteins, it is likely that coevolution does not contribute much to, if any, of the observed correlations.

  16. Membrane interaction of retroviral Gag proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Alfred Dick

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Assembly of an infectious retroviral particle relies on multimerization of the Gag polyprotein at the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane. The three domains of Gag common to all retroviruses-- MA, CA, and NC-- provide the signals for membrane binding, assembly, and viral RNA packaging, respectively. These signals do not function independently of one another. For example, Gag multimerization enhances membrane binding and is more efficient when NC is interacting with RNA. MA binding to the plasma membrane is governed by several principles, including electrostatics, recognition of specific lipid head groups, hydrophobic interactions, and membrane order. HIV-1 uses many of these principles while Rous sarcoma virus (RSV appears to use fewer. This review describes the principles that govern Gag interactions with membranes, focusing on RSV and HIV-1 Gag. The review also defines lipid and membrane behavior, and discusses the complexities in determining how lipid and membrane behavior impact Gag membrane binding.

  17. High prevalence of antibodies to core+1/ARF protein in HCV-infected patients with advanced cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassela, Katerina; Karakasiliotis, Ioannis; Charpantidis, Stefanos; Koskinas, John; Mylopoulou, Theodora; Mimidis, Konstantinos; Sarrazin, Christoph; Grammatikos, Georgios; Mavromara, Penelope

    2017-07-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) possesses a second open reading frame (ORF) within the core gene encoding an additional protein, known as the alternative reading frame protein (ARFP), F or core+1. The biological significance of the core+1/ARF protein remains elusive. However, several independent studies have shown the presence of core+1/ARFP antibodies in chronically HCV-infected patients. Furthermore, a higher prevalence of core+1/ARFP antibodies was detected in patients with HCV-associated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Here, we investigated the incidence of core+1/ARFPantibodies in chronically HCV-infected patients at different stages of cirrhosis in comparison to chronically HCV-infected patients at earlier stages of disease. Using ELISA, we assessed the prevalence of anti-core+1 antibodies in 30 patients with advanced cirrhosis [model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) ≥15] in comparison with 50 patients with mild cirrhosis (MELD core+1 antibodies, in contrast with 16.5 % of non-cirrhotic HCV patients. Moreover, there was significantly higher positivity for anti-core+1 antibodies in HCV patients with advanced cirrhosis (36.7 %) compared to those with early cirrhosis (24 %) (Pcore+1 antibodies in HCV patients with HCC, suggest that core+1 protein may have a role in virus-associated pathogenesis, and provide evidence to suggest that the levels of anti-core+1 antibodies may serve as a marker for disease progression.

  18. Alternative splicing in the human gene for the core protein A1 generates another hnRNP protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buvoli, M; Cobianchi, F; Bestagno, M G; Mangiarotti, A; Bassi, M T; Biamonti, G; Riva, S

    1990-01-01

    The human hnRNP core protein A1 (34 kd) is encoded by a 4.6 kb gene split into 10 exons. Here we show that the A1 gene can be differentially spliced by the addition of an extra exon. The new transcript encodes a minor protein of the hnRNP complex, here defined A1B protein, with a calculated mol. wt of 38 kd, that coincides with a protein previously designated as B2 by some authors. In vitro translation of the mRNAs selected by hybridization with A1 cDNA produced two proteins of 34 and 38 kd; Northern blot analysis of poly(A)+ RNA from HeLa cells revealed that the abundance of the A1B mRNA was approximately 5% that of A1. The A1B protein was detected by Western blotting with an anti-A1 monoclonal antibody both in enriched preparations of basic hnRNP proteins and in 40S hnRNP particles. The A1B protein exhibits a significantly higher affinity than A1 for ssDNA. The recombinant A1B protein, expressed in Escherichia coli, shows the same electrophoretic mobility and charge as the cellular one. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:1691095

  19. Metabotropic glutamate receptors and interacting proteins: evolving drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enz, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    The correct targeting, localization, regulation and signaling of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) represent major mechanisms underlying the complex function of neuronal networks. These tasks are accomplished by the formation of synaptic signal complexes that integrate functionally related proteins such as neurotransmitter receptors, enzymes and scaffold proteins. By these means, proteins interacting with mGluRs are important regulators of glutamatergic neurotransmission. Most described mGluR interaction partners bind to the intracellular C-termini of the receptors. These domains are extensively spliced and phosphorylated, resulting in a high variability of binding surfaces offered to interacting proteins. Malfunction of mGluRs and associated proteins are linked to neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders including addiction, depression, epilepsy, schizophrenia, Alzheimer's, Huntington's and Parkinson's disease. MGluR associated signal complexes are dynamic structures that assemble and disassemble in response to the neuronal fate. This, in principle, allows therapeutic intervention, defining mGluRs and interacting proteins as promising drug targets. In the last years, several studies elucidated the geometry of mGluRs in contact with regulatory proteins, providing a solid fundament for the development of new therapeutic strategies. Here, I will give an overview of human disorders directly associated with mGluR malfunction, provide an up-to-date summary of mGluR interacting proteins and highlight recently described structures of mGluR domains in contact with binding partners.

  20. Protein solvent and weak protein protein interactions in halophilic malate dehydrogenase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebel, Christine; Faou, Pierre; Zaccai, Giuseppe

    1999-01-01

    With the aim to correlate the solvation, stability and solubility properties of halophilic malate dehydrogenase, we characterized its weak interparticle interactions by small-angle neutron scattering in various solvents. The protein concentration dependence of the apparent radius of gyration and forward scattered intensity extrapolated from Guinier plots, and thus the second virial coefficient, A2, were determined for each solvent condition. In NaCl 1M+2-methylpentane-2,4-diol 30%, a solvent that promotes protein crystallization, A2 is negative, -0.4×10 -4 ml mol g -2 and indicating attractive interactions; in ammonium sulfate 3M, in which the protein precipitates at high concentrations, A2˜0. In 2-5M NaCl, 1-3.5M NaOAc, 1-4.5M KF or 1-2M (NH 4) 2SO 4, in which the protein is very soluble, A2 is positive with a value of the order of 0.4×10 -4 ml mol g -2 which decreases with increasing salt concentration. In MgCl 2 however, A2 increases with increasing salt concentration from 0.2 to 1.3M.

  1. Protein-protein interactions between proteins of Citrus tristeza virus isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nchongboh, Chofong Gilbert; Wu, Guan-Wei; Hong, Ni; Wang, Guo-Ping

    2014-12-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is one of the most devastating pathogens of citrus. Its genome is organized into 12 open reading frames (ORFs), of which ten ORFs located at the 3'-terminus of the genome have multiple biological functions. The ten genes at the 3'-terminus of the genome of a severe isolate (CTV-S4) and three ORFs (CP, CPm and p20) of three other isolates (N4, S45 and HB1) were cloned into pGBKT7 and pGADT7 yeast shuttle vectors. Yeast two-hybridization (Y2H) assays results revealed a strong self-interaction for CP and p20, and a unique interaction between the CPm of CTV-S4 (severe) and CP of CTV-N4 (mild) isolates. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation also confirmed these interactions. Analysis of the deletion mutants delineated the domains of CP and p20 self-interaction. Furthermore, the domains responsible for CP and p20 self-interactions were mapped at the CP amino acids sites 41-84 and p20 amino acids sites 1-21 by Y2H. This study provided new information on CTV protein interactions which will help for further understanding the biological functions.

  2. Prediction of protein-protein interactions between viruses and human by an SVM model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui Guangyu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several computational methods have been developed to predict protein-protein interactions from amino acid sequences, but most of those methods are intended for the interactions within a species rather than for interactions across different species. Methods for predicting interactions between homogeneous proteins are not appropriate for finding those between heterogeneous proteins since they do not distinguish the interactions between proteins of the same species from those of different species. Results We developed a new method for representing a protein sequence of variable length in a frequency vector of fixed length, which encodes the relative frequency of three consecutive amino acids of a sequence. We built a support vector machine (SVM model to predict human proteins that interact with virus proteins. In two types of viruses, human papillomaviruses (HPV and hepatitis C virus (HCV, our SVM model achieved an average accuracy above 80%, which is higher than that of another SVM model with a different representation scheme. Using the SVM model and Gene Ontology (GO annotations of proteins, we predicted new interactions between virus proteins and human proteins. Conclusions Encoding the relative frequency of amino acid triplets of a protein sequence is a simple yet powerful representation method for predicting protein-protein interactions across different species. The representation method has several advantages: (1 it enables a prediction model to achieve a better performance than other representations, (2 it generates feature vectors of fixed length regardless of the sequence length, and (3 the same representation is applicable to different types of proteins.

  3. Anticancer drug mithramycin interacts with core histones: An additional mode of action of the DNA groove binder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrita Banerjee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mithramycin (MTR is a clinically approved DNA-binding antitumor antibiotic currently in Phase 2 clinical trials at National Institutes of Health for treatment of osteosarcoma. In view of the resurgence in the studies of this generic antibiotic as a human medicine, we have examined the binding properties of MTR with the integral component of chromatin – histone proteins – as a part of our broad objective to classify DNA-binding molecules in terms of their ability to bind chromosomal DNA alone (single binding mode or both histones and chromosomal DNA (dual binding mode. The present report shows that besides DNA, MTR also binds to core histones present in chromatin and thus possesses the property of dual binding in the chromatin context. In contrast to the MTR–DNA interaction, association of MTR with histones does not require obligatory presence of bivalent metal ion like Mg2+. As a consequence of its ability to interact with core histones, MTR inhibits histone H3 acetylation at lysine 18, an important signature of active chromatin, in vitro and ex vivo. Reanalysis of microarray data of Ewing sarcoma cell lines shows that upon MTR treatment there is a significant down regulation of genes, possibly implicating a repression of H3K18Ac-enriched genes apart from DNA-binding transcription factors. Association of MTR with core histones and its ability to alter post-translational modification of histone H3 clearly indicates an additional mode of action of this anticancer drug that could be implicated in novel therapeutic strategies.

  4. Exploring structure and interactions of the bacterial adaptor protein YjbH by crosslinking mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Eryani, Yusra; Ib Rasmussen, Morten; Kjellström, Sven; Højrup, Peter; Emanuelsson, Cecilia; von Wachenfeldt, Claes

    2016-09-01

    Adaptor proteins assist proteases in degrading specific proteins under appropriate conditions. The adaptor protein YjbH promotes the degradation of an important global transcriptional regulator Spx, which controls the expression of hundreds of genes and operons in response to thiol-specific oxidative stress in Bacillus subtilis. Under normal growth conditions, the transcription factor is bound to the adaptor protein and therefore degraded by the AAA+ protease ClpXP. If this binding is alleviated during stress, the transcription factor accumulates and turns on genes encoding stress-alleviating proteins. The adaptor protein YjbH is thus a key player involved in these interactions but its structure is unknown. To gain insight into its structure and interactions we have used chemical crosslinking mass spectrometry. Distance constraints obtained from the crosslinked monomer were used to select and validate a structure model of YjbH and then to probe its interactions with other proteins. The core structure of YjbH is reminiscent of DsbA family proteins. One lysine residue in YjbH (K177), located in one of the α-helices outside the thioredoxin fold, crosslinked to both Spx K99 and Spx K117, thereby suggesting one side of the YjbH for the interaction with Spx. Another lysine residue that crosslinked to Spx was YjbH K5, located in the long and presumably very flexible N-terminal arm of YjbH. Our crosslinking data lend support to a model proposed based on site-directed mutagenesis where the YjbH interaction with Spx can stabilize and present the C-terminal region of Spx for protease recognition and proteolysis. Proteins 2016; 84:1234-1245. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Designing specificity of protein-substrate interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coluzza, I.; Frenkel, D.

    2004-01-01

    One of the key properties of biological molecules is that they can bind strongly to certain substrates yet interact only weakly with the very large number of other molecules that they encounter. Using a simple lattice model, we test several methods to design molecule-substrate binding specificity. W

  6. Designing specificity of protein-substrate interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coluzza, I.; Frenkel, D.

    2004-01-01

    One of the key properties of biological molecules is that they can bind strongly to certain substrates yet interact only weakly with the very large number of other molecules that they encounter. Using a simple lattice model, we test several methods to design molecule-substrate binding specificity.

  7. Scalable prediction of compound-protein interactions using minwise hashing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabei, Yasuo; Yamanishi, Yoshihiro

    2013-01-01

    The identification of compound-protein interactions plays key roles in the drug development toward discovery of new drug leads and new therapeutic protein targets. There is therefore a strong incentive to develop new efficient methods for predicting compound-protein interactions on a genome-wide scale. In this paper we develop a novel chemogenomic method to make a scalable prediction of compound-protein interactions from heterogeneous biological data using minwise hashing. The proposed method mainly consists of two steps: 1) construction of new compact fingerprints for compound-protein pairs by an improved minwise hashing algorithm, and 2) application of a sparsity-induced classifier to the compact fingerprints. We test the proposed method on its ability to make a large-scale prediction of compound-protein interactions from compound substructure fingerprints and protein domain fingerprints, and show superior performance of the proposed method compared with the previous chemogenomic methods in terms of prediction accuracy, computational efficiency, and interpretability of the predictive model. All the previously developed methods are not computationally feasible for the full dataset consisting of about 200 millions of compound-protein pairs. The proposed method is expected to be useful for virtual screening of a huge number of compounds against many protein targets.

  8. First principles design of a core bioenergetic transmembrane electron-transfer protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goparaju, Geetha; Fry, Bryan A.; Chobot, Sarah E.; Wiedman, Gregory; Moser, Christopher C.; Leslie Dutton, P.; Discher, Bohdana M.

    2016-05-01

    Here we describe the design, Escherichia coli expression and characterization of a simplified, adaptable and functionally transparent single chain 4-α-helix transmembrane protein frame that binds multiple heme and light activatable porphyrins. Such man-made cofactor-binding oxidoreductases, designed from first principles with minimal reference to natural protein sequences, are known as maquettes. This design is an adaptable frame aiming to uncover core engineering principles governing bioenergetic transmembrane electron-transfer function and recapitulate protein archetypes proposed to represent the origins of photosynthesis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics — the design and engineering of electronic transfer cofactors, proteins and protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L. Ross Anderson.

  9. Novel Technology for Protein-Protein Interaction-based Targeted Drug Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Me Hwang

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a simple but highly efficient in-cell protein-protein interaction (PPI discovery system based on the translocation properties of protein kinase C- and its C1a domain in live cells. This system allows the visual detection of trimeric and dimeric protein interactions including cytosolic, nuclear, and/or membrane proteins with their cognate ligands. In addition, this system can be used to identify pharmacological small compounds that inhibit specific PPIs. These properties make this PPI system an attractive tool for screening drug candidates and mapping the protein interactome.

  10. Water-mediated ionic interactions in protein structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Sabarinathan; K Aishwarya; R Sarani; M Kirti Vaishnavi; K Sekar

    2011-06-01

    It is well known that water molecules play an indispensable role in the structure and function of biological macromolecules. The water-mediated ionic interactions between the charged residues provide stability and plasticity and in turn address the function of the protein structures. Thus, this study specifically addresses the number of possible water-mediated ionic interactions, their occurrence, distribution and nature found in 90% non-redundant protein chains. Further, it provides a statistical report of different charged residue pairs that are mediated by surface or buried water molecules to form the interactions. Also, it discusses its contributions in stabilizing various secondary structural elements of the protein. Thus, the present study shows the ubiquitous nature of the interactions that imparts plasticity and flexibility to a protein molecule.

  11. A proteomics strategy to elucidate functional protein-protein interactions applied to EGF signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blagoev, B.; Kratchmarova, I.; Ong, S.E.

    2003-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics can reveal protein-protein interactions on a large scale, but it has been difficult to separate background binding from functionally important interactions and still preserve weak binders. To investigate the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway, we...... and Src homologous and collagen (Shc) protein. We identified 228 proteins, of which 28 were selectively enriched upon stimulation. EGFR and Shc, which interact directly with the bait, had large differential ratios. Many signaling molecules specifically formed complexes with the activated EGFR-Shc, as did...... plectin, epiplakin, cytokeratin networks, histone H3, the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored molecule CD59, and two novel proteins. SILAC combined with modification-based affinity purification is a useful approach to detect specific and functional protein-protein interactions....

  12. A protein-protein interaction map of the Trypanosoma brucei paraflagellar rod.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvain Lacomble

    Full Text Available We have conducted a protein interaction study of components within a specific sub-compartment of a eukaryotic flagellum. The trypanosome flagellum contains a para-crystalline extra-axonemal structure termed the paraflagellar rod (PFR with around forty identified components. We have used a Gateway cloning approach coupled with yeast two-hybrid, RNAi and 2D DiGE to define a protein-protein interaction network taking place in this structure. We define two clusters of interactions; the first being characterised by two proteins with a shared domain which is not sufficient for maintaining the interaction. The other cohort is populated by eight proteins, a number of which possess a PFR domain and sub-populations of this network exhibit dependency relationships. Finally, we provide clues as to the structural organisation of the PFR at the molecular level. This multi-strand approach shows that protein interactome data can be generated for insoluble protein complexes.

  13. Inferring High-Confidence Human Protein-Protein Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Similarly, the top-ranked interaction between L-threonine dehydrogenase ( TDH ) and aminoacetone synthetase (alias of GCAT) catalyzes the conversion of L...acetyltransferase TDH 2 L-threonine dehydrogenase 2 577.4 11.0 1328.0 CXCL16 4 Inducible T cell co-stimulator CXCR6 4 Inducible T cell co-stimulator

  14. Identification of influential spreaders in online social networks using interaction weighted K-core decomposition method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-garadi, Mohammed Ali; Varathan, Kasturi Dewi; Ravana, Sri Devi

    2017-02-01

    Online social networks (OSNs) have become a vital part of everyday living. OSNs provide researchers and scientists with unique prospects to comprehend individuals on a scale and to analyze human behavioral patterns. Influential spreaders identification is an important subject in understanding the dynamics of information diffusion in OSNs. Targeting these influential spreaders is significant in planning the techniques for accelerating the propagation of information that is useful for various applications, such as viral marketing applications or blocking the diffusion of annoying information (spreading of viruses, rumors, online negative behaviors, and cyberbullying). Existing K-core decomposition methods consider links equally when calculating the influential spreaders for unweighted networks. Alternatively, the proposed link weights are based only on the degree of nodes. Thus, if a node is linked to high-degree nodes, then this node will receive high weight and is treated as an important node. Conversely, the degree of nodes in OSN context does not always provide accurate influence of users. In the present study, we improve the K-core method for OSNs by proposing a novel link-weighting method based on the interaction among users. The proposed method is based on the observation that the interaction of users is a significant factor in quantifying the spreading capability of user in OSNs. The tracking of diffusion links in the real spreading dynamics of information verifies the effectiveness of our proposed method for identifying influential spreaders in OSNs as compared with degree centrality, PageRank, and original K-core.

  15. Star Formation and Feedback: A Molecular Outflow-Prestellar Core Interaction in L1689N

    CERN Document Server

    Lis, D C; Gerin, M; Pagani, L; Roueff, E; van der Tak, F F S; Vastel, C; Walmsley, C M

    2016-01-01

    We present Herschel, ALMA Compact Array (ACA), and Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) observations of the prestellar core in L1689N, which has been suggested to be interacting with a molecular outflow driven by the nearby solar type protostar IRAS 16293-2422. This source is characterized by some of the highest deuteration levels seen in the interstellar medium. The change in the NH2D line velocity and width across the core provides clear evidence of an interaction with the outflow, traced by the high-velocity water emission. Quiescent, cold gas, characterized by narrow line widths is seen in the NE part of the core, while broader, more disturbed line profiles are seen in the W/SW part. Strong N2D+ and ND3 emission is detected with the ACA, extending S/SW from the peak of the single-dish NH2D emission. The ACA data also reveal the presence a compact dust continuum source, with a mean size of ~1100 au, a central density of (1-2) 10^7 cm-3, and a mass of 0.2-0.4 Msun. The dust emission peak is displaced ~5"...

  16. Neurodegenerative diseases: quantitative predictions of protein-RNA interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirillo, Davide; Agostini, Federico; Klus, Petr; Marchese, Domenica; Rodriguez, Silvia; Bolognesi, Benedetta; Tartaglia, Gian Gaetano

    2013-02-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that RNA plays an active role in a number of neurodegenerative diseases. We recently introduced a theoretical framework, catRAPID, to predict the binding ability of protein and RNA molecules. Here, we use catRAPID to investigate ribonucleoprotein interactions linked to inherited intellectual disability, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Creutzfeuld-Jakob, Alzheimer's, and Parkinson's diseases. We specifically focus on (1) RNA interactions with fragile X mental retardation protein FMRP; (2) protein sequestration caused by CGG repeats; (3) noncoding transcripts regulated by TAR DNA-binding protein 43 TDP-43; (4) autogenous regulation of TDP-43 and FMRP; (5) iron-mediated expression of amyloid precursor protein APP and α-synuclein; (6) interactions between prions and RNA aptamers. Our results are in striking agreement with experimental evidence and provide new insights in processes associated with neuronal function and misfunction.

  17. PPISEARCHENGINE: gene ontology-based search for protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Byungkyu; Cui, Guangyu; Lee, Hyunjin; Huang, De-Shuang; Han, Kyungsook

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a new search engine called PPISearchEngine which finds protein-protein interactions (PPIs) using the gene ontology (GO) and the biological relations of proteins. For efficient retrieval of PPIs, each GO term is assigned a prime number and the relation between the terms is represented by the product of prime numbers. This representation is hidden from users but facilitates the search for the interactions of a query protein by unique prime factorisation of the number that represents the query protein. For a query protein, PPISearchEngine considers not only the GO term associated with the query protein but also the GO terms at the lower level than the GO term in the GO hierarchy, and finds all the interactions of the query protein which satisfy the search condition. In contrast, the standard keyword-matching or ID-matching search method cannot find the interactions of a protein unless the interactions involve a protein with explicit annotations. To the best of our knowledge, this search engine is the first method that can process queries like 'for protein p with GO [Formula: see text], find p's interaction partners with GO [Formula: see text]'. PPISearchEngine is freely available to academics at http://search.hpid.org/.

  18. Proteomic Analyses of NF1-Interacting Proteins in Keratinocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0070 TITLE: Proteomic Analyses of NF1 -Interacting Proteins in Keratinocytes PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Shyni Varghese...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a.CONTRACT NUMBER Proteomic Analyses of NF1 -Interacting Proteins in Keratinocytes 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0070 5c. PROGRAM...in the NF1 null epidermis, we analyzed NF1 expression in a mouse model of psoriasis (imiquimod-induced psoriasis-like skin inflammation) and

  19. Decomposition of total solvation energy into core, side-chains and water contributions: Role of cross correlations and protein conformational fluctuations in dynamics of hydration layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Sayantan; Mukherjee, Saumyak; Bagchi, Biman

    2017-09-01

    Dynamical coupling between water and amino acid side-chain residues in solvation dynamics is investigated by selecting residues often used as natural probes, namely tryptophan, tyrosine and histidine, located at different positions on protein surface. Such differently placed residues are found to exhibit different timescales of relaxation. The total solvation response measured by the probe is decomposed in terms of its interactions with (i) protein core, (ii) side-chain and (iii) water. Significant anti cross-correlation among these contributions are observed. When the motion of the protein side-chains is quenched, solvation either becomes faster or slower depending on the location of the probe.

  20. Transient interactions studied by NMR : iron sulfur proteins and their interaction partners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, Xingfu

    2009-01-01

    The interactions between proteins are of central importance for virtually every process in a living cell. It has long been a mystery how two proteins associate to form a complex in a complicated cellular context. Recently, it was found that an intermediate state called encounter state, of a protein