WorldWideScience

Sample records for core power density

  1. Three-dimensional Core Design of a Super Fast Reactor with a High Power Density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Liangzhi; Oka, Yoshiaki; Ishiwatari, Yuki; Ikejiri, Satoshi; Ju, Haitao

    2010-01-01

    The SuperCritical Water-cooled Reactor (SCWR) pursues high power density to reduce its capital cost. The fast spectrum SCWR, called a super fast reactor, can be designed with a higher power density than thermal spectrum SCWR. The mechanism of increasing the average power density of the super fast reactor is studied theoretically and numerically. Some key parameters affecting the average power density, including fuel pin outer diameter, fuel pitch, power peaking factor, and the fraction of seed assemblies, are analyzed and optimized to achieve a more compact core. Based on those sensitivity analyses, a compact super fast reactor is successfully designed with an average power density of 294.8 W/cm 3 . The core characteristics are analyzed by using three-dimensional neutronics/thermal-hydraulics coupling method. Numerical results show that all of the design criteria and goals are satisfied

  2. Core design and fuel rod analyses of a super fast reactor with high power density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju, Haitao; Cao, Liangzhi; Lu, Haoliang; Oka, Yoshiaki; Ikejiri, Satoshi; Ishiwatari, Yuki

    2009-01-01

    A Super Fast Reactor is a pressure-vessel type, fast spectrum SuperCritical Water Reactor (SCWR) that is presently researched in a Japanese project. One of the most important advantages of the Super Fast Reactor is the higher power density compared to the thermal spectrum SCWR, which reduces the capital cost. A preliminary core has an average power density of 158.8W/cc. In this paper, the principle of improving the average power density is studied and the core design is improved. After the sensitivity analyses on the fuel rod configurations, the fuel assembly configurations and the core configurations, an improved core with an average power density of 294.8W/cc is designed by 3-D neutronic/thermal-hydraulic coupled calculations. This power density is competitive with that of typical Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors (LMFBR). In order to ensure the fuel rod integrity of this core design, the fuel rod behaviors on the normal operating condition are analyzed using FEMAXI-6 code. The power histories of each fuel rod are taken from the neutronics calculation results in the core design. The cladding surface temperature histories are taken from the thermal-hydraulic calculation results in the core design. Four types of the limiting fuel rods, with the Maximum Cladding Surface Temperature (MCST), Maximum Power Peak(MPP), Maximum Discharge Burnup(MDB) and Different Coolant Flow Pattern (DCFP), are chosen to cover all the fuel rods in the core. The available design range of the fuel rod design parameters, such as initial gas plenum pressure, gas plenum position, gas plenum length, grain size and gap size, are found out in order to satisfy the following design criteria: (1) Maximum fuel centerline temperature should be less than 1900degC. (2) Maximum cladding stress in circumstance direction should be less than 100MPa. (3) Pressure difference on the cladding should be less than 1/3 of buckling collapse pressure. (4) Cumulative damage faction (CDF) of the cladding should be

  3. Formulation of detector response function to calculate the power density profiles using in-core neutron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, S. A.; Peter, J. K.; Semmler, W.; Shultis, J. K.

    2007-01-01

    By measuring neutron fluxes at different locations throughout a core, it's possible to derive the power-density profile P k (W cm - 3), at an axial depth z of fuel rod k. Micro-pocket fission detectors (MPFD) have been fabricated to perform such in-core neutron flux measurements. The purpose of this study is to develop a mathematical model to obtain axial power density distributions in the fuel rods from the in-core responses of the MPFDs

  4. Development of Optimized Core Design and Analysis Methods for High Power Density BWRs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirvan, Koroush

    Increasing the economic competitiveness of nuclear energy is vital to its future. Improving the economics of BWRs is the main goal of this work, focusing on designing cores with higher power density, to reduce the BWR capital cost. Generally, the core power density in BWRs is limited by the thermal Critical Power of its assemblies, below which heat removal can be accomplished with low fuel and cladding temperatures. The present study investigates both increases in the heat transfer area between ~he fuel and coolant and changes in operating parameters to achieve higher power levels while meeting the appropriate thermal as well as materials and neutronic constraints. A scoping study is conducted under the constraints of using fuel with cylindrical geometry, traditional materials and enrichments below 5% to enhance its licensability. The reactor vessel diameter is limited to the largest proposed thus far. The BWR with High power Density (BWR-HD) is found to have a power level of 5000 MWth, equivalent to 26% uprated ABWR, resulting into 20% cheaper O&M and Capital costs. This is achieved by utilizing the same number of assemblies, but with wider 16x16 assemblies and 50% shorter active fuel than that of the ABWR. The fuel rod diameter and pitch are reduced to just over 45% of the ABWR values. Traditional cruciform form control rods are used, which restricts the assembly span to less than 1.2 times the current GE14 design due to limitation on shutdown margin. Thus, it is possible to increase the power density and specific power by 65%, while maintaining the nominal ABWR Minimum Critical Power Ratio (MCPR) margin. The plant systems outside the vessel are assumed to be the same as the ABWR-Il design, utilizing a combination of active and passive safety systems. Safety analyses applied a void reactivity coefficient calculated by SIMULA TE-3 for an equilibrium cycle core that showed a 15% less negative coefficient for the BWR-HD compared to the ABWR. The feedwater

  5. Analysis of the methodical component of core power density field calculation error on the basis of Mochovce-1 commissioning tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brik, A.

    2009-01-01

    In the first decade of June 2008, during the power commissioning of the reactor at the Mochovce NPP unit 1, the experiment with reducing the thermal power of core almost to the balance-of-plant (BOP) needs was performed. After the reactor has operated for seven hours at low power (about 200 220 MW (thermal)), its power was increased (at a rate of about 0.25% of N nom /min) to the initial level, close to 107% (1471 MW). During the experiment, core parameters, which were subsequently used for comparing the measured data with the results of experiment simulation calculations, were recorded in the reactor in-core monitoring system database. Calculated and measured levels of critical concentrations of boric acid were compared, along with power density distributions by fuel elements and assemblies obtained both by the KRUIZ in-core monitoring system and on the basis of calculations simulating reactor operation in accordance with the given core power variation schedule. The final stage consisted of assessing the methodical component of power density micro- and macro-fields calculation error in the core of Mochovce-1 reactor operating with varying load. (author)

  6. Analysis of the methodical component of core power density field calculation error on the basis of Mochovce-1 commissioning tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brik, A.

    2009-01-01

    In the first decade of June 2008, during the power commissioning of the reactor at Mochovce NPP unit 1, the experiment with reducing the thermal power of core almost to the balance-of-plant needs was performed. After the reactor has operated for seven hours at low power (about 200 220 MW (thermal)), its power was increased (at a rate of about 0.25% of N nom /min) to the initial level, close to 107% (1471 MW). During the experiment, core parameters, which were subsequently used for comparing the measured data with the results of experiment simulation calculations, were recorded in the reactor in-core monitoring system's database. Calculated and measured levels of critical concentrations of boric acid were compared, along with power density distributions by fuel elements and assemblies obtained both by the KRUIZ in-core monitoring system and on the basis of calculations simulating reactor operation in accordance with the given core power variation schedule. The final stage consisted of assessing the methodical component of power density micro- and macro-fields' calculation error in the core of Mochovce-1 reactor operating with varying load. (Authors)

  7. Research on instability design method without occurring boiling transition for hyper ABWR plants of extended core power density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, T.; Hotta, A.; Ama, T.

    2008-01-01

    The hyper ABWR (Advanced Boiling Water Reactor) project aims to develop an advanced BWR concept that is competitive in the global market with both highly economic and safety features. Expecting plant construction within the coming ten years, a research program for substantiating the basic design of a high core power density ABWR was conducted. By inheriting the conventional ABWR design, it is possible to reduce construction costs. In order to achieve the rated core power of over 1650MWe which is almost equivalent to that of the EPR (European Pressurized Water Reactor), the core power density of ABWR will be up-rated by at least 25%. Three key subjects linked to this target were recognized. They are, (1) fuel design applicable to the high power density core, (2) improvement of the evaluation method for the coupled neutronic and thermal-hydraulic instability under a wider power-flow operating range, and (3) improvement of the steam separator performance under high quality conditions. In this paper, the second subject has been focused on. In the second subject, the uncertainty approach was introduced in the instability analysis where the best-estimate plant simulator was combined with a direct prediction of boiling transition by the sub-channel code. By employing the CSAU like method, a safety evaluation system that enables to include influences of uncertainties has been developed. Based on the correlation between the time margin for reaching the boiling transition under power oscillations and the decay ratio in the power-flow operation map, an automatic power oscillation suppressing system was designed. The set-point for activating suppression mechanisms (i.e. scram or SRI) could be determined based on this correlation. It was proposed that the present conservative acceptance criterion of the deterministic decay ratio can be replaced with a more rational one of the time margin with including uncertainties. (author)

  8. Neutronic studies of the long life core concept: Part 1, Design and performance of 1000 MWe uranium oxide fueled low power density LMR cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orechwa, Y.

    1987-04-01

    The parametric behavior of some key neutronic performance parameters for low power density LMR cores fueled with uranium oxide is investigated. The results are compared to reference homogeneous and heterogeneous cores with normal fuel management and Pu fueling. It can be concluded that with respect to minimizing the initial fissile mass and thereby economizing on the inventory costs and carrying charges, the superior neutron economy of the LMR fuel cycle is best exploited through normal fuel management with Pu recycling. In the once-through mode the LMR fuel cycle has disadvantages due to a higher fissile inventory and is not competitive with the LWR fuel cycle

  9. Shaping of the axial power density distribution in the core to minimize the vapor volume fraction at the outlet of the VVER-1200 fuel assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savander, V. I.; Shumskiy, B. E., E-mail: borisshumskij@yandex.ru [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Russian Federation); Pinegin, A. A. [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    The possibility of decreasing the vapor fraction at the VVER-1200 fuel assembly outlet by shaping the axial power density field is considered. The power density field was shaped by axial redistribution of the concentration of the burnable gadolinium poison in the Gd-containing fuel rods. The mathematical modeling of the VVER-1200 core was performed using the NOSTRA computer code.

  10. Core Power Control of the fast nuclear reactors with estimation of the delayed neutron precursor density using Sliding Mode method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansarifar, G.R.; Nasrabadi, M.N.; Hassanvand, R.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • We present a S.M.C. system based on the S.M.O for control of a fast reactor power. • A S.M.O has been developed to estimate the density of delayed neutron precursor. • The stability analysis has been given by means Lyapunov approach. • The control system is guaranteed to be stable within a large range. • The comparison between S.M.C. and the conventional PID controller has been done. - Abstract: In this paper, a nonlinear controller using sliding mode method which is a robust nonlinear controller is designed to control a fast nuclear reactor. The reactor core is simulated based on the point kinetics equations and one delayed neutron group. Considering the limitations of the delayed neutron precursor density measurement, a sliding mode observer is designed to estimate it and finally a sliding mode control based on the sliding mode observer is presented. The stability analysis is given by means Lyapunov approach, thus the control system is guaranteed to be stable within a large range. Sliding Mode Control (SMC) is one of the robust and nonlinear methods which have several advantages such as robustness against matched external disturbances and parameter uncertainties. The employed method is easy to implement in practical applications and moreover, the sliding mode control exhibits the desired dynamic properties during the entire output-tracking process independent of perturbations. Simulation results are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed controller in terms of performance, robustness and stability.

  11. Core-shell N-doped active carbon fiber@graphene composites for aqueous symmetric supercapacitors with high-energy and high-power density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Qinxing; Bao, Rongrong; Xie, Chao; Zheng, Anran; Wu, Shihua; Zhang, Yufeng; Zhang, Renwei; Zhao, Peng

    2016-06-01

    Graphene wrapped nitrogen-doped active carbon fibers (ACF@GR) of a core-shell structure were successfully prepared by a simple dip-coating method using natural silk as template. Compared to pure silk active carbon, the as-prepared ACF@GR composites exhibit high specific surface area in a range of 1628-2035 m2 g-1, as well as superior energy storage capability, an extremely high single-electrode capacitance of 552.8 F g-1 was achieved at a current density of 0.1 A g-1 in 6 M KOH aqueous electrolyte. The assembled aqueous symmetric supercapacitors are capable of deliver both high energy density and high power density, for instance, 17.1 Wh kg-1 at a power density of 50.0 W kg-1, and 12.2 Wh kg-1 at 4.7 kW kg-1 with a retention rate of 71.3% for ACF@GR1-based supercapacitor.

  12. High Power ICRH scenarios in Tore-Supra: a potential route towards improved core confinement at high density?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rimini, F.G.; Fenzi-Bonizec, C.; Hoang, G.T.; Bourdelle, C.; Clairet, F.; Elbeze, D.; Gil, C.; Giruzzi, G.; Imbeaux, F.; Joffrin, E.; Lotte, P.; Maget, P.; Schunke, P.; Tsitrone, E. [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC, Centre de Cadarache, 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Hennequin, P.; Honore, C. [CNRS-Ecole Polytechnique, LPTP, 91 - Palaiseau (France)

    2005-07-01

    As shown by many tokamak experiments, including Tore-Supra, an operational scenario based on tailoring the current profile via a combination of electron heating and fast plasma current ramp is particularly attractive for producing conditions favourable to internal transport barriers (ITBs) development. As we have reported in this paper, however, this is not a foolproof method for producing ITBs. In our case, reversed or flat shear conditions were indeed created, but only transiently and in a very narrow region in the plasma centre, {rho} < 0.3, and the KINEZERO code micro-stability analysis does not indicate that any significant stabilization of ITG (ion temperature gradient) or ETG (electron temperature gradient) modes is taking place. We have used the Cronos transport code to predict how we could redesign the experiment to maximize the probability to obtain more favourable conditions for triggering and sustaining high performance ITBs. Our modelling is done assuming that recycling can be moderated and edge density can be kept lower than in the actual experiments. In this case, with a substantial increase in LHCD power, from 2.5 MW to 8 MW, we could approach conditions of flat current profile over a wide region, extending to half radius, with a significant fraction of the total current, {approx} 70%, being non-inductively driven. The predictive Cronos transport model, which includes local reduction of transport according to magnetic shear, yields a long-lasting wide electron ITB located close to mid-radius.

  13. CRISS power spectral density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaeth, W.

    1979-04-01

    The correlation of signal components at different frequencies like higher harmonics cannot be detected by a normal power spectral density measurement, since this technique correlates only components at the same frequency. This paper describes a special method for measuring the correlation of two signal components at different frequencies: the CRISS power spectral density. From this new function in frequency analysis, the correlation of two components can be determined quantitatively either they stem from one signal or from two diverse signals. The principle of the method, suitable for the higher harmonics of a signal as well as for any other frequency combinations is shown for the digital frequency analysis technique. Two examples of CRISS power spectral densities demonstrates the operation of the new method. (orig.) [de

  14. Core power capability verification for PWR NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xian Chunyu; Liu Changwen; Zhang Hong; Liang Wei

    2002-01-01

    The Principle and methodology of pressurized water reactor nuclear power plant core power capability verification for reload are introduced. The radial and axial power distributions of normal operation (category I or condition I) and abnormal operation (category II or condition II) are simulated by using neutronics calculation code. The linear power density margin and DNBR margin for both categories, which reflect core safety, are analyzed from the point view of reactor physics and T/H, and thus category I operating domain and category II protection set point are verified. Besides, the verification results of reference NPP are also given

  15. Apparatus for measurement of tree core density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blincow, D.W.

    1975-01-01

    Apparatus is described for direct measurement of the density of a core sample from a tree. A radiation source and detector with a receptacle for the core therebetween, an integrator unit for the detector output, and an indicating meter driven by the integrator unit are described

  16. Early-type galaxy core phase densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlberg, R. G.; Hartwick, F. D. A.

    2014-01-01

    Early-type galaxies have projected central density brightness profile logarithmic slopes, γ', ranging from about 0 to 1. We show that γ' is strongly correlated, r = 0.83, with the coarse grain phase density of the galaxy core, Q 0 ≡ ρ/σ 3 . The luminosity-γ' correlation is much weaker, r = –0.51. Q 0 also serves to separate the distribution of steep core profiles, γ' > 0.5, from shallow profiles, γ' < 0.3, although there are many galaxies of intermediate slope, at intermediate Q 0 , in a volume-limited sample. The transition phase density separating the two profile types is approximately 0.003 M ☉ pc –3 km –3 s 3 , which is also where the relation between Q 0 and core mass shows a change in slope, the rotation rate of the central part of the galaxy increases, and the ratio of the black hole to core mass increases. These relations are considered relative to the globular cluster inspiral core buildup and binary black hole core scouring mechanisms for core creation and evolution. Mass-enhanced globular cluster inspiral models have quantitative predictions that are supported by data, but no single model yet completely explains the correlations.

  17. High Power Density Motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kascak, Daniel J.

    2004-01-01

    With the growing concerns of global warming, the need for pollution-free vehicles is ever increasing. Pollution-free flight is one of NASA's goals for the 21" Century. , One method of approaching that goal is hydrogen-fueled aircraft that use fuel cells or turbo- generators to develop electric power that can drive electric motors that turn the aircraft's propulsive fans or propellers. Hydrogen fuel would likely be carried as a liquid, stored in tanks at its boiling point of 20.5 K (-422.5 F). Conventional electric motors, however, are far too heavy (for a given horsepower) to use on aircraft. Fortunately the liquid hydrogen fuel can provide essentially free refrigeration that can be used to cool the windings of motors before the hydrogen is used for fuel. Either High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) or high purity metals such as copper or aluminum may be used in the motor windings. Superconductors have essentially zero electrical resistance to steady current. The electrical resistance of high purity aluminum or copper near liquid hydrogen temperature can be l/lOO* or less of the room temperature resistance. These conductors could provide higher motor efficiency than normal room-temperature motors achieve. But much more importantly, these conductors can carry ten to a hundred times more current than copper conductors do in normal motors operating at room temperature. This is a consequence of the low electrical resistance and of good heat transfer coefficients in boiling LH2. Thus the conductors can produce higher magnetic field strengths and consequently higher motor torque and power. Designs, analysis and actual cryogenic motor tests show that such cryogenic motors could produce three or more times as much power per unit weight as turbine engines can, whereas conventional motors produce only 1/5 as much power per weight as turbine engines. This summer work has been done with Litz wire to maximize the current density. The current is limited by the amount of heat it

  18. TRIGA research reactors with higher power density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whittemore, W.L.

    1994-01-01

    The recent trend in new or upgraded research reactors is to higher power densities (hence higher neutron flux levels) but not necessarily to higher power levels. The TRIGA LEU fuel with burnable poison is available in small diameter fuel rods capable of high power per rod (≅48 kW/rod) with acceptable peak fuel temperatures. The performance of a 10-MW research reactor with a compact core of hexagonal TRIGA fuel clusters has been calculated in detail. With its light water coolant, beryllium and D 2 O reflector regions, this reactor can provide in-core experiments with thermal fluxes in excess of 3 x 10 14 n/cm 2 ·s and fast fluxes (>0.1 MeV) of 2 x 10 14 n/cm 2 ·s. The core centerline thermal neutron flux in the D 2 O reflector is about 2 x 10 14 n/cm 2 ·s and the average core power density is about 230 kW/liter. Using other TRIGA fuel developed for 25-MW test reactors but arranged in hexagonal arrays, power densities in excess of 300 kW/liter are readily available. A core with TRIGA fuel operating at 15-MW and generating such a power density is capable of producing thermal neutron fluxes in a D 2 O reflector of 3 x 10 14 n/cm 2 ·s. A beryllium-filled central region of the core can further enhance the core leakage and hence the neutron flux in the reflector. (author)

  19. Power reactor core safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rim, C.S.; Kim, W.C.; Shon, D.S.; Kim, J.

    1981-01-01

    As a part of nuclear safety research program, a project was launched to develop a model to predict fuel failure, to produce the data required for the localizaton of fuel design and fabrication technology, to establish safety limits for regulation of nuclear power plants and to develop reactor operation method to minimize fuel failure through the study of fuel failure mechanisms. During 1980, the first year of this project, various fuel failure mechanisms were analyzed, an experimental method for out-of-pile tests to study the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behaviour of Zircaloy cladding underiodine environment was established, and characteristics of PWR and CANDU Zircaloy specimens were examined. Also developed during 1980 were the methods and correlations to evaluate fuel failures in the reactor core based on operating data from power reactors

  20. Reactor Core Design and Analysis for a Micronuclear Power Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Sun

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Underwater vehicle is designed to ensure the security of country sea boundary, providing harsh requirements for its power system design. Conventional power sources, such as battery and Stirling engine, are featured with low power and short lifetime. Micronuclear reactor power source featured with higher power density and longer lifetime would strongly meet the demands of unmanned underwater vehicle power system. In this paper, a 2.4 MWt lithium heat pipe cooled reactor core is designed for micronuclear power source, which can be applied for underwater vehicles. The core features with small volume, high power density, long lifetime, and low noise level. Uranium nitride fuel with 70% enrichment and lithium heat pipes are adopted in the core. The reactivity is controlled by six control drums with B4C neutron absorber. Monte Carlo code MCNP is used for calculating the power distribution, characteristics of reactivity feedback, and core criticality safety. A code MCORE coupling MCNP and ORIGEN is used to analyze the burnup characteristics of the designed core. The results show that the core life is 14 years, and the core parameters satisfy the safety requirements. This work provides reference to the design and application of the micronuclear power source.

  1. Cu₂-xSe@mSiO₂-PEG core-shell nanoparticles: a low-toxic and efficient difunctional nanoplatform for chemo-photothermal therapy under near infrared light radiation with a safe power density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xijian; Wang, Qian; Li, Chun; Zou, Rujia; Li, Bo; Song, Guosheng; Xu, Kaibing; Zheng, Yun; Hu, Junqing

    2014-04-21

    A low-toxic difunctional nanoplatform integrating both photothermal therapy and chemotherapy for killing cancer cells using Cu₂-xSe@mSiO₂-PEG core-shell nanoparticles is reported. Silica coating and further PEG modification improve the hydrophilicity and biocompatibility of copper selenide nanoparticles. As-prepared Cu₂-xSe@mSiO₂-PEG nanoparticles not only display strong near infrared (NIR) region absorption and good photothermal effect, but also exhibit excellent biocompatibility. The mesoporous silica shell is provided as the carrier for loading the anticancer drug, doxorubicin (DOX). Moreover, the release of DOX from Cu₂-xSe@mSiO₂-PEG core-shell nanoparticles can be triggered by pH and NIR light, resulting in a synergistic effect for killing cancer cells. Importantly, the combination of photothermal therapy and chemotherapy driven by NIR radiation with safe power density significantly improves the therapeutic efficacy, and demonstrates better therapeutic effects for cancer treatment than individual therapy.

  2. BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES AND CORE GAS DENSITY IN REXCESS CLUSTERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haarsma, Deborah B.; Leisman, Luke; Donahue, Megan; Bruch, Seth; Voit, G. Mark; Boehringer, Hans; Pratt, Gabriel W.; Pierini, Daniele; Croston, Judith H.; Arnaud, Monique

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the relationship between brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) and their host clusters using a sample of nearby galaxy clusters from the Representative XMM-Newton Cluster Structure Survey. The sample was imaged with the Southern Observatory for Astrophysical Research in R band to investigate the mass of the old stellar population. Using a metric radius of 12 h -1 kpc, we found that the BCG luminosity depends weakly on overall cluster mass as L BCG ∝ M 0.18±0.07 cl , consistent with previous work. We found that 90% of the BCGs are located within 0.035 r 500 of the peak of the X-ray emission, including all of the cool core (CC) clusters. We also found an unexpected correlation between the BCG metric luminosity and the core gas density for non-cool-core (non-CC) clusters, following a power law of n e ∝ L 2.7±0.4 BCG (where n e is measured at 0.008 r 500 ). The correlation is not easily explained by star formation (which is weak in non-CC clusters) or overall cluster mass (which is not correlated with core gas density). The trend persists even when the BCG is not located near the peak of the X-ray emission, so proximity is not necessary. We suggest that, for non-CC clusters, this correlation implies that the same process that sets the central entropy of the cluster gas also determines the central stellar density of the BCG, and that this underlying physical process is likely to be mergers.

  3. Safety characteristics of mid-sized MOX fueled liquid metal reactor core of high converter type in the initiating phase of unprotected loss of flow accident. Effect of low specific fuel power density on ULOF behavior brought by employment of large diameter fuel pins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Masayoshi; Kawada, Kenichi; Niwa, Hajime

    2003-07-01

    Safety characteristics in core disruptive accidents (CDAs) of mid-sized MOX fueled liquid metal reactor core of high converter type have been examined by using the CDA initiating phase analysis code SAS4A. The design concept of high converter type reactor core has been studied as one of options in the category of sodium-cooled reactor in Phase II of Feasibility Study on Commercialized Fast Reactor Cycle System. An unprotected loss-of-flow accident (ULOF) has been selected as a representative CDA initiator for this study. A core concept of high converter type, which employed a large diameter fuel pin of 11.1 mm with 1.2 m core height to get a large fuel volume fraction in the core to achieve high internal conversion ratio was proposed in JFY2001. Each fuel subassembly of the core (abbreviated here as UPL120)was provided with an upper sodium plenum directly above the core to reduce the sodium void reactivity worth. Because of the large fuel pin diameter, average specific fuel power density (31 kW/kg-MOX) of UPL120 is about one half of those of conventional large MOX cores. The reactivity worth of sodium voiding is 6$ in the whole core, and -1$ in the all upper plenums. Initiating phase of ULOF accident in UPL120 under the conditions of nominal design and best estimate analysis resulted in a slightly super-prompt critical power burst. The causes of the super-prompt criticality have been identified twofold: (a) the low specific fuel power density of core reduced the effectiveness of prompt negative reactivity feedback of Doppler and axial fuel expansion effects upon increase in reactor power, and (b) the longer core height compared with conventional 1m cores brought, together with the lower specific power density, a remarkable delay in insertion of negative fuel dispersion reactivity after the onset of fuel disruption in sodium voided subassembly due to the lower linear heat rating in the top portion of the core. During the delay, burst-type fuel failures in sodium un

  4. Research on Power Output Characteristics of Magnetic Core in Energy Harvesting Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong-Ping GUO

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic core is the dominant factor in the performance of current transformer energy harvesting devices. The power output model of the magnetic core is established and verified through experiments. According to the actual application requirements, the concept of power density is proposed. The relationships of power density to air gap, material and dimension of the magnetic core are analyzed and verified through experiments.

  5. Inference of core barrel motion from neutron noise spectral density. [PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, J.C.; Shahrokhi, F.; Kryter, R.C.

    1977-03-15

    A method was developed for inference of core barrel motion from the following statistical descriptors: cross-power spectral density, autopower spectral density, and amplitude probability density. To quantify the core barrel motion in a typical pressurized water reactor (PWR), a scale factor was calculated in both one- and two-dimensional geometries using forward, variational, and perturbation methods of discrete ordinates neutron transport. A procedure for selection of the proper frequency band limits for the statistical descriptors was developed. It was found that although perturbation theory is adequate for the calculation of the scale factor, two-dimensional geometric effects are important enough to rule out the use of a one-dimensional approximation for all but the crudest calculations. It was also found that contributions of gamma rays can be ignored and that the results are relatively insensitive to the cross-section set employed. The proper frequency band for the statistical descriptors is conveniently determined from the coherence and phase information from two ex-core power range neutron monitors positioned diametrically across the reactor vessel. Core barrel motion can then be quantified from the integral of the band-limited cross-power spectral density of two diametrically opposed ex-core monitors or, if the coherence between the pair is greater than or equal to 0.7, from a properly band-limited amplitude probability density function. Wide-band amplitude probability density functions were demonstrated to yield erroneous estimates for the magnitude of core barrel motion.

  6. Electronic DC transformer with high power density

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pavlovský, M.

    2006-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the possibilities of increasing the power density of high-power dc-dc converters with galvanic isolation. Three cornerstones for reaching high power densities are identified as: size reduction of passive components, reduction of losses particularly in active components

  7. Fragmentation of massive dense cores down to ≲ 1000 AU: Relation between fragmentation and density structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palau, Aina; Girart, Josep M.; Estalella, Robert; Fuente, Asunción; Fontani, Francesco; Sánchez-Monge, Álvaro; Commerçon, Benoit; Hennebelle, Patrick; Busquet, Gemma; Bontemps, Sylvain; Zapata, Luis A.; Zhang, Qizhou; Di Francesco, James

    2014-01-01

    In order to shed light on the main physical processes controlling fragmentation of massive dense cores, we present a uniform study of the density structure of 19 massive dense cores, selected to be at similar evolutionary stages, for which their relative fragmentation level was assessed in a previous work. We inferred the density structure of the 19 cores through a simultaneous fit of the radial intensity profiles at 450 and 850 μm (or 1.2 mm in two cases) and the spectral energy distribution, assuming spherical symmetry and that the density and temperature of the cores decrease with radius following power-laws. Even though the estimated fragmentation level is strictly speaking a lower limit, its relative value is significant and several trends could be explored with our data. We find a weak (inverse) trend of fragmentation level and density power-law index, with steeper density profiles tending to show lower fragmentation, and vice versa. In addition, we find a trend of fragmentation increasing with density within a given radius, which arises from a combination of flat density profile and high central density and is consistent with Jeans fragmentation. We considered the effects of rotational-to-gravitational energy ratio, non-thermal velocity dispersion, and turbulence mode on the density structure of the cores, and found that compressive turbulence seems to yield higher central densities. Finally, a possible explanation for the origin of cores with concentrated density profiles, which are the cores showing no fragmentation, could be related with a strong magnetic field, consistent with the outcome of radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations.

  8. Fragmentation of massive dense cores down to ≲ 1000 AU: Relation between fragmentation and density structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palau, Aina; Girart, Josep M. [Institut de Ciències de l' Espai (CSIC-IEEC), Campus UAB-Facultat de Ciències, Torre C5-parell 2, E-08193 Bellaterra, Catalunya (Spain); Estalella, Robert [Departament d' Astronomia i Meteorologia (IEEC-UB), Institut de Ciències del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès, 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Fuente, Asunción [Observatorio Astronómico Nacional, P.O. Box 112, E-28803 Alcalá de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Fontani, Francesco; Sánchez-Monge, Álvaro [Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, INAF, Lago E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Commerçon, Benoit; Hennebelle, Patrick [Laboratoire de Radioastronomie, UMR CNRS 8112, École Normale Supérieure et Observatoire de Paris, 24 rue Lhomond, F-75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Busquet, Gemma [INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, Area di Recerca di Tor Vergata, Via Fosso Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Bontemps, Sylvain [Université de Bordeaux, LAB, UMR 5804, F-33270 Floirac (France); Zapata, Luis A. [Centro de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, P.O. Box 3-72, 58090 Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico); Zhang, Qizhou [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Di Francesco, James, E-mail: palau@ieec.uab.es [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 355, STN CSC, Victoria, BC, V8W 3P6 (Canada)

    2014-04-10

    In order to shed light on the main physical processes controlling fragmentation of massive dense cores, we present a uniform study of the density structure of 19 massive dense cores, selected to be at similar evolutionary stages, for which their relative fragmentation level was assessed in a previous work. We inferred the density structure of the 19 cores through a simultaneous fit of the radial intensity profiles at 450 and 850 μm (or 1.2 mm in two cases) and the spectral energy distribution, assuming spherical symmetry and that the density and temperature of the cores decrease with radius following power-laws. Even though the estimated fragmentation level is strictly speaking a lower limit, its relative value is significant and several trends could be explored with our data. We find a weak (inverse) trend of fragmentation level and density power-law index, with steeper density profiles tending to show lower fragmentation, and vice versa. In addition, we find a trend of fragmentation increasing with density within a given radius, which arises from a combination of flat density profile and high central density and is consistent with Jeans fragmentation. We considered the effects of rotational-to-gravitational energy ratio, non-thermal velocity dispersion, and turbulence mode on the density structure of the cores, and found that compressive turbulence seems to yield higher central densities. Finally, a possible explanation for the origin of cores with concentrated density profiles, which are the cores showing no fragmentation, could be related with a strong magnetic field, consistent with the outcome of radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations.

  9. Studies on the inhomogeneous core density of a fluidized bed nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Hagen, T.H.J.J.; Van Dam, H.; Hoogenboom, J.E.; Khotylev, V.A. [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands). Interfaculty Reactor Inst.; Harteveld, W.; Mudde, R.F.

    1997-12-31

    Results are reported on the expected time dependent core density profile of a fluidized-bed nuclear fission reactor. Core densities have been measured in a test facility by the gamma-transmission technique. Bubble and particle-cluster sizes, positions, velocities and frequencies could be determined. Neutronic studies have been performed on the influence of core voids on reactivity using Monte-Carlo and neutron-transport codes. Fuel-particle importance has been determined. Point-kinetic parameters have been calculated for linking reactivity perturbations to power fluctuations. (author)

  10. In core system mapping reactor power distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoriyaz, H.; Moreira, J.M.L.

    1989-01-01

    Based on the signals of SPND'S (Self Powered Neutron Detectors) distributed inside of a core, the spatial power distribution is obtained using the MAP program, developed in this work. The methodology applied in MAP program uses a least mean square technique to calculate expansion coefficients that depend on the SPND'S signals. The final power or neutron flux distribution is obtained by a combination of certains functions or expansion modes that are provided from diffusion calculation with the CITATION code. The MAP program is written in PASCAL language and will be used in IEA-R1 reactor for assisting its operation. (author) [pt

  11. Combat Power Analysis is Combat Power Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-17

    Lanchester equations, Weapon Effectiveness Index (WEI), Weighted Unit Value (WUV), Armored Division Equivalents (ADE), and Unit Frontages. The research...6 Lanchester Equations... Lanchester Equations ............................................................................................... 53 Appendix C: Relative Combat Power

  12. Core support structure for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinkamp, E.; Tautz, J.; Ries, H.

    1979-01-01

    A core support structure for nuclear power plants includes a grid of mutually crossing bridges and a support ring surrounding the grid and connected to ends of the outer bridges of the grid, the grid being formed of profile rod crosses having legs of given length, respective legs of pairs of adjacent crosses abutting one another endwise to form together a side of the smallest mesh opening of the grid, and weld means for securing the profile rod crosses to one another at the mutually abutting ends of the legs thereof; and method of producing the foregoing core support structure

  13. Experimental core electron density of cubic boron nitride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlberg, Nanna; Bindzus, Niels; Bjerg, Lasse

    as well as experimental result. The redistribution of electron density will, if not accounted for, result in increased thermal parameters. It is estimated that 1.7-2 electrons is transferred from boron to nitrogen. [1]: N. Bindzus, T. Straasø, N. Wahlberg, J. Becker, L. Bjerg, N. Lock, A.-C. Dippel, and B......Experimental core electron density of cubic boron nitride Nanna Wahlberg*, Niels Bindzus*, Lasse Bjerg*, Jacob Becker*, and Bo B. Iversen* *Aarhus University, Department of Chemistry, CMC, Langelandsgade 140, 8000 Århus, Denmark The resent progress in powder diffraction provides data of quality...... obtained. The displacement parameters reported here are significantly lower than those previously reported, stressing the importance of an adequate description of the core density. The charge transfer from boron to nitrogen clearly affects the inner electron density, which is evident from theoretical...

  14. High-resolution gamma ray attenuation density measurements on mining exploration drill cores, including cut cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, P.-S.; Bourke, A.

    2017-01-01

    Physical property measurements are increasingly important in mining exploration. For density determinations on rocks, one method applicable on exploration drill cores relies on gamma ray attenuation. This non-destructive method is ideal because each measurement takes only 10 s, making it suitable for high-resolution logging. However calibration has been problematic. In this paper we present new empirical, site-specific correction equations for whole NQ and BQ cores. The corrections force back the gamma densities to the "true" values established by the immersion method. For the NQ core caliber, the density range extends to high values (massive pyrite, 5 g/cm3) and the correction is thought to be very robust. We also present additional empirical correction factors for cut cores which take into account the missing material. These "cut core correction factors", which are not site-specific, were established by making gamma density measurements on truncated aluminum cylinders of various residual thicknesses. Finally we show two examples of application for the Abitibi Greenstone Belt in Canada. The gamma ray attenuation measurement system is part of a multi-sensor core logger which also determines magnetic susceptibility, geochemistry and mineralogy on rock cores, and performs line-scan imaging.

  15. Synthesis of Axial Power Distribution Using 5-Level Ex-core Detector in a Core Protection System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Bon-Seung; Lee, Chung-Chan; Zee, Sung-Quun

    2007-01-01

    In ABB-CE digital plants, Core Protection Calculator System (CPCS) is used for a core protection based on several online measured system parameters including 3- level safety grade ex-core detector signals. The CPCS provides four independent channels for the departure from a nucleate boiling ratio (DNBR) and local power density (LPD) trip signals to the reactor protection system. Each channel consists of a core protection calculator (CPC) and a control element assembly calculator (CEAC). The cubic spline synthesis technique has been used in online calculations of the core axial power distributions using 3-level ex-core detector signals in CPC. The pre-determined cubic spline function sets are used depending on the characteristics of the ex-core detector responses. But this method shows large power distribution errors for the extremely skewed axial shapes due to restrictive function sets and an incorrect SAM value. Especially thus situation is worse at a higher burnup. To solve these problems, the cubic spline function sets are improved and it is demonstrated that the axial power shapes can be synthesized more accurately with the new function sets than those of a conventional CPC. In this paper, synthesis of an axial power distribution using a 5-level ex-core detector is described and the axial power distributions are compared between 3-level and 5-level ex-core detector systems

  16. On-line generation of core monitoring power distribution in the SCOMS couppled with core design code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K. B.; Kim, K. K.; In, W. K.; Ji, S. K.; Jang, M. H.

    2002-01-01

    The paper provides the description of the methodology and main program module of power distribution calculation of SCOMS(SMART COre Monitoring System). The simulation results of the SMART core using the developed SCOMS are included. The planar radial peaking factor(Fxy) is relatively high in SMART core because control banks are inserted to the core at normal operation. If the conventional core monitoring method is adapted to SMART, highly skewed planar radial peaking factor Fxy yields an excessive conservatism and reduces the operation margin. In addition to this, the error of the core monitoring would be enlarged and thus operating margin would be degraded, because it is impossible to precalculate the core monitoring constants for all the control banks configurations taking into account the operation history in the design stage. To get rid of these drawbacks in the conventional power distribution calculation methodology, new methodology to calculate the three dimensional power distribution is developed. Core monitoring constants are calculated with the core design code (MASTER) which is on-line coupled with SCOMS. Three dimensional (3D) power distribution and the several peaking factors are calculated using the in-core detector signals and core monitoring constant provided at real time. Developed methodology is applied to the SMART core and the various core states are simulated. Based on the simulation results, it is founded that the three dimensional peaking factor to calculate the Linear Power Density and the pseudo hot-pin axial power distribution to calculate the Departure Nucleate Boiling Ratio show the more conservative values than those of the best-estimated core design code, and SCOMS adapted developed methodology can secures the more operation margin than the conventional methodology

  17. Core fueling to produce peaked density profiles in large tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikkelsen, D.R.; McGuire, K.M.; Schmidt, G.L.; Zweben, S.J.

    1994-06-01

    Peaking the density profile increases the usable bootstrap current and the average fusion power density; this could reduce the current drive power and increase the net output of power producing tokamaks. The use of neutral beams and pellet injection to produce peaked density profiles is assessed. We show that with radially ''hollow'' diffusivity profiles (and no particle pinch) moderately peaked density profiles can be produced by particle source profiles which are peaked off-axis. The fueling penetration requirements can therefore be relaxed and this greatly improves the feasibility of generating peaked density profiles in large tokamaks. In particular, neutral beam fueling does not require MeV particle energy. Even with beam voltages of ∼200 keV, however, exceptionally good particle confinement, τ p much-gt τ E is required to achieve net electrical power generation. In system with no power production requirement (e.g., neutron sources) neutral beam fueling should be capable of producing peaked density profiles in devices as large as ITER. Fueling systems with low energy cost per particle (such as cryogenic pellet injection) must be used in power producing tokamaks when τ p ∼ τ E . Simulations with pellet injection speeds of 7 km/sec show the peaking factor, n eo /left-angle n e right-angle, approaching 2

  18. Core fuelling to produce peaked density profiles in large tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikkelsen, D.R.; McGuire, K.M.; Schmidt, G.L.; Zweben, S.J.

    1995-01-01

    Peaking the density profile increases the usable bootstrap current and the average fusion power density; this could reduce the current drive power and increase the net output of power producing tokamaks. The use of neutral beams and pellet injection to produce peaked density profiles is assessed. It is shown that with radially 'hollow' diffusivity profiles (and no particle pinch) moderately peaked density profiles can be produced by particle source profiles that are peaked off-axis. The fuelling penetration requirements can therefore be relaxed and this greatly improves the feasibility of generating peaked density profiles in large tokamaks. In particular, neutral beam fuelling does not require Megavolt particle energies. Even with beam voltages of ∼ 200 keV, however, exceptionally good particle confinement is needed to achieve net electrical power generation. The required ratio of particle to thermal diffusivities is an order of magnitude outside the range reported for tokamaks. In a system with no power production requirement (e.g., neutron sources) neutral beam fuelling should be capable of producing peaked density profiles in devices as large as ITER. Fuelling systems with low energy cost per particle - such as cryogenic pellet injection - must be used in power producing tokamaks when τ P ∼ τ E . Simulations with pellet injection speeds of 7 km/s show that the peaking factor, n e0 / e >, approaches 2. (author). 65 refs, 8 figs

  19. Large Core Three Branch Polymer Power Splitters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Prajzler

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We report about three branch large core polymer power splitters optimized for connecting standard plastic optical fibers. A new point of the design is insertion of a rectangle-shaped spacing between the input and the central part of the splitter, which will ensure more even distribution of the output optical power. The splitters were designed by beam propagation method using BeamPROP software. Acrylic-based polymers were used as optical waveguides being poured into the Y-grooves realized by computer numerical controlled engraving on poly(methyl methacrylate substrate. Measurement of the optical insertion losses proved that the insertion optical loss could be lowered to 2.1 dB at 650 nm and optical power coupling ratio could reach 31.8% : 37.3% : 30.9%.

  20. Development of UCMS for Analysis of Designed and Measured Core Power Distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Sang Rae; Hong, Sun Kwan; Yang, Sung Tae

    2009-01-01

    In this study, reactor core loading patterns were determined by calculating and verifying the factors affecting peak power and important core safety variables were reconciled with their design criteria using a newly designed unified core management system. Core loading patterns are designed for quadrant cores under the assumption that the power distribution of the reactor core is the same among symmetric fuel assemblies within the core. Actual core power distributions measured during core operation may differ slightly from their designed data. Reactor engineers monitor these differences between the designed and measured data by performing a surveillance procedure every month according to the technical specification requirements. It is difficult to monitor overall power distribution behavior throughout the assemblies using the current procedure because it requires the reactor engineer to compare the designed data with only the maximum value of the power peaking factor and the relative power density. It is necessary to enhance this procedure to check the primary variables such as core power distribution, because long cycle operation, high burnup, power up-rate, and improved fuel can change the environment in the core. To achieve this goal, a web-based Unified Core Management System (UCMS) was developed. To build the UCMS, a database system was established using reactor design data such as that in the Nuclear Design Report (NDR) and automated core analysis codes for all light water reactor power plants. The UCMS is designed to help reactor engineers to monitor important core variables and core safety margins by comparing the measured core power distribution with designed data for each fuel assembly during the cycle operation in nuclear power plants

  1. High Power Density Power Electronic Converters for Large Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Senturk, Osman Selcuk

    . For these VSCs, high power density is required due to limited turbine nacelle space. Also, high reliability is required since maintenance cost of these remotely located wind turbines is quite high and these turbines operate under harsh operating conditions. In order to select a high power density and reliability......In large wind turbines (in MW and multi-MW ranges), which are extensively utilized in wind power plants, full-scale medium voltage (MV) multi-level (ML) voltage source converters (VSCs) are being more preferably employed nowadays for interfacing these wind turbines with electricity grids...... VSC solution for wind turbines, first, the VSC topology and the switch technology to be employed should be specified such that the highest possible power density and reliability are to be attained. Then, this qualitative approach should be complemented with the power density and reliability...

  2. Fuel density effect on parameter of reactivity coefficient of the Innovative Research Reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rokhmadi; Tukiran S

    2013-01-01

    The multipurpose of research reactor utilization make many countries build the new research reactor. Trend of this reactor for this moment is multipurpose reactor type with a compact core to get high neutron flux at the low or medium level of power. The research reactor in Indonesia right now is already 25 year old. Therefor, it is needed to design a new research reactor as a alternative called it innovative research reactor (IRR) and then as an exchanger for old research reactor. The aim of this research is to complete RRI core design data as a requirement for design license. Calculation done is to get the RRI core reactivity coefficients with 5 x 5 core configuration and 20 MW of power, has more than 40 days cycle of length. The RRI core reactivity coefficient calculation is done for new U-"9Mo-Al fuel with variation of densities. The calculation is done by using WIMSD-5B and BATAN-FUEL computer codes. The result of calculation for conceptual design showed that the equilibrium RRI core with 5 x 5 configuration, 450 g, 550 g and 700 g of fuel loadings have negative reactivity coefficients of fuel temperature, moderator temperature, void fraction and density of moderator but the values of the reactivities are very variation. This results has met the safety criteria for RRI core conceptual design. (author)

  3. A study of HANARO core conversion using high density U-Mo fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K.H.; Lee, C.S.; Lee, B.C.; Park, S.J.; Kim, H.; Kim, C.K.

    2002-01-01

    Currently, HANARO is using 3.15gU/cc U3Si/Al as a driver fuel. HANARO has seven vertical irradiation holes in the core region. Three of them including a central trap are located in the inner region of the core and mainly being used for material irradiation tests. Four of them are located in the reflector tank but cooled by primary coolant. They are used for fuel irradiation tests or radioisotope development tests. For minimum core modification using high density U-Mo fuels, no dimension change is assumed in the current fuel rods and the cladding thickness remains the same in this study. The high density U-Mo fuel will have up to about twice the linear uranium loading of a current HANARO driver fuel. Using this high density fuel 8 fuel sites can be replaced with irradiation sites. Three kinds of conceptual cores are considered using 5 gU/cc U-7Mo/Al and 16 gU/cc U-7Mo. The increase of the linear heat generation rate due to the decrease of total fuel length can be overcome by more uniform radial and axial power distribution using different uranium densities and different fuel meat diameters are introduced into those cores. The new core has 4.54 times larger surface-to-volume ratio than the reference core. The core uranium loading, linear heat generation rate, excess reactivity, and control rod worth as well as the neutron spectra are analysed for each core. (author)

  4. O Electromagnetic Power Waves and Power Density Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, Donald Wayne

    1980-12-01

    On January 10, 1884 Lord Rayleigh presented a paper entitled "On the Transfer of Energy in the Electromagnetic Field" to the Royal Society of London. This paper had been authored by the late Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge, Professor J. H. Poynting and in it he claimed that there was a general law for the transfer of electromagnetic energy. He argued that associated with each point in space is a quantity, that has since been called the Poynting vector, that is a measure of the rate of energy flow per unit area. His analysis was concerned with the integration of this power density vector at all points over an enclosing surface of a specific volume. The interpretation of this Poynting vector as a true measure of the local power density was viewed with great skepticism unless the vector was integrated over a closed surface, as the development of the concept required. However, within the last decade or so Shadowitz indicates that a number of prominent authors have argued that the criticism of the interpretation of Poynting's vector as a local power density vector is unjustified. The present paper is not concerned with these arguments but instead is concerned with a decomposition of Poynting's power density vector into two and only two components: one vector which has the same direction as Poynting's vector and which is called the forward power density vector, and another vector, directed opposite to the Poynting vector and called the reverse power density vector. These new local forward and reverse power density vectors will be shown to be dependent upon forward and reverse power wave vectors and these vectors in turn will be related to newly defined forward and reverse components of the electric and magnetic fields. The sum of these forward and reverse power density vectors, which is simply the original Poynting vector, is associated with the total electromagnetic energy traveling past the local point. Another vector which is the difference between the forward

  5. High power density carbonate fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuh, C.; Johnsen, R.; Doyon, J.; Allen, J. [Energy Research Corp., Danbury, CT (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Carbonate fuel cell is a highly efficient and environmentally clean source of power generation. Many organizations worldwide are actively pursuing the development of the technology. Field demonstration of multi-MW size power plant has been initiated in 1996, a step toward commercialization before the turn of the century, Energy Research Corporation (ERC) is planning to introduce a 2.85MW commercial fuel cell power plant with an efficiency of 58%, which is quite attractive for distributed power generation. However, to further expand competitive edge over alternative systems and to achieve wider market penetration, ERC is exploring advanced carbonate fuel cells having significantly higher power densities. A more compact power plant would also stimulate interest in new markets such as ships and submarines where space limitations exist. The activities focused on reducing cell polarization and internal resistance as well as on advanced thin cell components.

  6. Optimal Design and Analysis of the Stepped Core for Wireless Power Transfer Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiu Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The key of wireless power transfer technology rests on finding the most suitable means to improve the efficiency of the system. The wireless power transfer system applied in implantable medical devices can reduce the patients’ physical and economic burden because it will achieve charging in vitro. For a deep brain stimulator, in this paper, the transmitter coil is designed and optimized. According to the previous research results, the coils with ferrite core can improve the performance of the wireless power transfer system. Compared with the normal ferrite core, the stepped core can produce more uniform magnetic flux density. In this paper, the finite element method (FEM is used to analyze the system. The simulation results indicate that the core loss generated in the optimal stepped ferrite core can reduce about 10% compared with the normal ferrite core, and the efficiency of the wireless power transfer system can be increased significantly.

  7. Methods to enhance blanket power density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, P.Y.; Miller, L.G.; Bohn, T.S.; Deis, G.A.; Longhurst, G.R.; Masson, L.S.; Wessol, D.E.; Abdou, M.A.

    1982-06-01

    The overall objective of this task is to investigate the extent to which the power density in the FED/INTOR breeder blanket test modules can be enhanced by artificial means. Assuming a viable approach can be developed, it will allow advanced reactor blanket modules to be tested on FED/INTOR under representative conditions

  8. HEDPIN: a computer program to estimate pinwise power density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cappiello, M.W.

    1976-05-01

    A description is given of the digital computer program, HEDPIN. This program, modeled after a previously developed program, POWPIN, provides a means of estimating the pinwise power density distribution in fast reactor triangular pitched pin bundles. The capability also exists for computing any reaction rate of interest at the respective pin positions within an assembly. HEDPIN was developed in support of FTR fuel and test management as well as fast reactor core design and core characterization planning and analysis. The results of a test devised to check out HEDPIN's computational method are given, and the realm of application is discussed. Nearly all programming is in FORTRAN IV. Variable dimensioning is employed to make efficient use of core memory and maintain short running time for small problems. Input instructions, sample problem, and a program listing are also given

  9. Density functional theory studies of screw dislocation core structures in bcc metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Søren Lund; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel

    2003-01-01

    The core structures of (I 11) screw dislocations in bee metals are studied using density functional theory in the local-density approximation. For Mo and Fe, direct calculations of the core structures show the cores to be symmetric with respect to 180degrees rotations around an axis perpendicular...... to symmetric core structures for all the studied metals....

  10. Analysis and study on core power capability with margin method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Tongxian; Wu Lei; Yu Yingrui; Zhou Jinman

    2015-01-01

    Core power capability analysis focuses on the power distribution control of reactor within the given mode of operation, for the purpose of defining the allowed normal operating space so that Condition Ⅰ maneuvering flexibility is maintained and Condition Ⅱ occurrences are adequately protected by the reactor protection system. For the traditional core power capability analysis methods, such as synthesis method or advanced three dimension method, usually calculate the key safety parameters of the power distribution, and then verify that these parameters meet the design criteria. For PWR with on-line power distribution monitoring system, core power capability analysis calculates the most power level which just meets the design criteria. On the base of 3D FAC method of Westinghouse, the calculation model of core power capability analysis with margin method is introduced to provide reference for engineers. The core power capability analysis of specific burnup of Sanmen NPP is performed with the margin method. The results demonstrate the rationality of the margin method. The calculation model of the margin method not only helps engineers to master the core power capability analysis for AP1000, but also provides reference for engineers for core power capability analysis of other PWR with on-line power distribution monitoring system. (authors)

  11. A NEW RECIPE FOR OBTAINING CENTRAL VOLUME DENSITIES OF PRESTELLAR CORES FROM SIZE MEASUREMENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tassis, Konstantinos; Yorke, Harold W.

    2011-01-01

    We propose a simple analytical method for estimating the central volume density of prestellar molecular cloud cores from their column density profiles. Prestellar cores feature a flat central part of the column density and volume density profiles of the same size indicating the existence of a uniform-density inner region. The size of this region is set by the thermal pressure force which depends only on the central volume density and temperature of the core, and can provide a direct measurement of the central volume density. Thus, a simple length measurement can immediately yield a central density estimate independent of any dynamical model for the core and without the need for fitting. Using the radius at which the column density is 90% of the central value as an estimate of the size of the flat inner part of the column density profile yields an estimate of the central volume density within a factor of two for well-resolved cores.

  12. Investigating the impact of uneven magnetic flux density distribution on core loss estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niroumand, Farideh Javidi; Nymand, Morten; Wang, Yiren

    2017-01-01

    is calculated according to an effective flux density value and the macroscopic dimensions of the cores. However, the flux distribution in the core can alter by core shapes and/or operating conditions due to nonlinear material properties. This paper studies the element-wise estimation of the loss in magnetic......There are several approaches for loss estimation in magnetic cores, and all these approaches highly rely on accurate information about flux density distribution in the cores. It is often assumed that the magnetic flux density evenly distributes throughout the core and the overall core loss...

  13. Density of basalt core from Hilo drill hole, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, J.G.

    2001-01-01

    Density measurements of 1600 samples of core from 889 to 3097 m depth below sea level in the Hawaii Scientific Drilling Program hole near Hilo, Hawaii show marked differences between the basaltic rock types and help define stratigraphy in the hole. Water-saturated densities of subaerial lava flows (occurring above 1079 m depth) have the broadest range because of the large density variation within a single lava flow. Water-saturated densities commonly range from 2.0 to 3.0 with an average of 2.55 ?? 0.24 g/cc. Dikes and sills range from 2.8 to 3.1 g/cc). Densities of hyaloclastite commonly range from 2.3 to 2.7, with an overall average of about 2.5 g/cc. The low-density of most hyaloclastite is due primarily to palagonitization of abundant glass and presence of secondary minerals in the interstices between fragments. Four principal zones of pillow lava, separated by hyaloclastite, occur in the drill core. The shallowest (1983-2136 m) is paradoxically the densest, averaging 3.01 ?? 0.10 g/cc. The second (2234-2470 m) is decidedly the lightest, averaging 2.67 ?? 0.13 g/cc. The third (2640-2790 m) and fourth (2918-bottom at 3097 m) are high, averaging 2.89 ?? 0.17 and 2.97 ?? 0.08 g/cc, respectively. The first pillow zone includes degassed pillows i.e. lava erupted on land that flowed into the sea. These pillows are poor in vesicles, because the subaerial, one-atmosphere vesicles were compressed when the flow descended to deeper water and higher pressure. The second (low-density, non-degassed) pillow zone is the most vesicle-rich, apparently because it was erupted subaqueously at a shallow depth. The higher densities of the third and fourth zones result from a low vesicularity of only a few percent and an olivine content averaging more than 5% for the third zone and about 10% for the fourth zone. The uppermost hyaloclastite extending about 400 m below the bottom of the subaerial basalt is poorly cemented and absorbs up to 6 wt% of water when immersed. Progressing

  14. Development of An On-Line, Core Power Distribution Monitoring System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tunc ALdemir; Don Miller; Peng Wang

    2007-01-01

    The objective of the proposed work was to develop a software package that can construct in three-dimensional core power distributions using the signals from constant temperature power sensors distributed in the reactor core. The software developed uses a mode-based state/parameter estimation technique that is particularly attractive when there are model uncertainties and/or large signal noise. The software yields the expected value of local power at the detector locations and points in between, as well as the probability distribution of the local power density

  15. Development of An On-Line, Core Power Distribution Monitoring System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tunc ALdemir; Don Miller; Peng Wang

    2007-10-02

    The objective of the proposed work was to develop a software package that can construct in three-dimensional core power distributions using the signals from constant temperature power sensors distributed in the reactor core. The software developed uses a mode-based state/parameter estmation technique that is particularly attractive when there are model uncertainties and/or large signal noise. The software yields the expected value of local power at the detector locations and points in between, as well as the probability distribution of the local power density

  16. Determination of power density distribution of fuel assemblies for research reactor by directly measuring the strontium-91 activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Liq-Ji

    1987-01-01

    This work described the investigations of reactor core power peaking and three dimensional power density distribution of present core configuration of Tsing Hua Open-pool reactor (THOR). An experimental program, based on non-destructive fuel gamma scanning of 91 Sr activities, provides the data of fission density distribution for individual fuel pin of four-rod TRIGA-LEU cluster or for MTR-type fuel assembly. The informations are essentially important for the safety of reactor operation and for fuel management especially for the mixed loading with three different types of fuel at present. The relative power peaking values and the power density distribution for present core are discussed. (author)

  17. Approach to improve the axial power distribution for the application of a core protection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Bon Seung; Cho, Jin Young; Song, Jae Seung; Lee, Chung Chan

    2008-01-01

    A Core Protection Calculator System (CPCS) is a digital computer based on a safety system for generating trip signals based on a calculation of the Departure from Nucleate Boiling Ratio (DNBR) and the Local Power Density (LPD) by using several on-line measured system parameters including 3-level ex-core detector signals. A few approaches to improve the axial power distribution for the application of a core protection system were performed. For the Yonggwang unit 3 (cycle 1), axial power distributions were synthesized by applying the cubic spline method and compared with the neutronics code results. Several new cubic spline function sets were generated for the drastically distorted axial shapes for a 3-level ex-core detector system. In addition, synthesized axial shapes with a 5-level ex-core detector signals were compared with the conventional 3-level detector results. It demonstrates that the newly generated function sets appear to be better than that of the conventional CPC from the aspect of an axial power synthesis, particularly for the heavily distorted shapes. Moreover, synthesis of an axial power distribution using 5-level ex-core detector signals appears to be better than that of the 3-level ex-core detector signals. From the above results, improvement of the thermal margin is expected because of an uncertainty decreasing a core protection system. (authors)

  18. Determination of power peak factor using control rods, ex-core detectors and neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Rose Mary Gomes do Prado

    2005-01-01

    This work presents a methodology based on the artificial neural network technique to predict in real time the power peak factor in a form that can be implemented in reactor protection systems. The neural network inputs were those available in the reactor protection systems, namely, the axial and quadrant power differences obtained from measured ex-core detector signals, and the position of control rods. The response of ex core detector signals was measured in experiments especially performed in the IPEN/MB-01 zero-power reactor. Several reactor states with different power density distribution were obtained by positioning the control rods in different configurations. The power distribution and its peak factor were calculated for each of these reactor states using the Citation code. The obtained results show that the power peak factor correlates well with the control rod position and the quadrant power difference, and with a lesser degree with the axial power differences. The data presented an inherent organisation and could be classified into different classes of power peak factor behaviour as a function of position of control rods, axial power difference and quadrant power difference. The RBF networks were able to identify classes and interpolate the power peak factor values. The relative error for the power peak factor estimation ranged from 0.19 % to 0.67 %, less than the one that was obtained performing a power density distribution map with in-core detectors. It was observed that the positions of control rods bear the detailed and localised information about the power density distribution, and that the axial and the quadrant power difference describe its global variations in the axial and radial directions. The results showed that the RBF and MLP networks produced similar results, and that a neural network correlation can be implemented in power reactor protection systems. (author)

  19. Effect of burnup history by moderator density on neutron-physical characteristics of WWER-1000 core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ovdiienko, I.; Kuchin, A.; Khalimonchuk, V.; Ieremenko, M.

    2011-01-01

    Results of assessment of burnup history effect by moderator density on neutron physical characteristics of WWER-1000 core are presented on example of stationary fuel loading with Russian design fuel assembly TWSA and AER benchmark for Khmelnitsky NPP that was proposed by TUV and SSTC NRC at nineteenth symposium. Assessment was performed by DYN3D code and cross section library sets generated by HELIOS code. Burnup history was taken into account by preparing of numerous cross section sets with different isotopic composition each of which was obtained by burning under different moderator density. For analysis of history effect 20 cross section sets were prepared for each fuel assembly corresponded to each of 20 axial layers of reactor core model for DYN3D code. Four fuel cycles were modeled both for stationary fuel loading with TWSA and AER benchmark for Khmelnitsky NPP to obtain steady value of error due to neglect of burnup history effect. Main attention of study was paid to effect of burnup history by moderator density to axial power distribution. Results of study for AER benchmark were compared with experimental values of axial power distribution for fuel assemblies of first, second, third and fourth year operation. (Authors)

  20. Safeguarding subcriticality during loading and shuffling operations in the higher density of the RSG-GAS's silicide core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sembiring, T.M.; Kuntoro, I.

    2003-01-01

    The core conversion program of the RSG-GAS reactor is to convert the all-oxide to all-silicide core. The silicide equilibrium core with fuel meat density of 3.55 gU cm -3 is an optimal core for RSG-GAS reactor and it can significantly increase the operation cycle length from 25 to 32 full power days. Nevertheless, the subcriticality of the shutdown core and the shutdown margin are lower than of the oxide core. Therefore, the deviation of subcriticality condition in the higher silicide core caused by the fuel loading and shuffling error should be reanalysed. The objective of this work is to analyse the sufficiency of the subcriticality condition of the shutdown core to face the worst condition caused by an error during loading and shuffling operations. The calculations were carried out using the 2-dimensional multigroup neutron diffusion code of Batan-FUEL. In the fuel handling error, the calculated results showed that the subcriticality condition of the shutdown higher density silicide equilibrium core of RSG-GAS can be maintained. Therefore, all fuel management steps are fixed in the present reactor operation manual can be applied in the higher silicide equilibrium core of RSG-GAS reactor. (author)

  1. Hollow-core fibers for high power pulse delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michieletto, Mattia; Lyngsø, Jens K.; Jakobsen, Christian

    2016-01-01

    We investigate hollow-core fibers for fiber delivery of high power ultrashort laser pulses. We use numerical techniques to design an anti-resonant hollow-core fiber having one layer of non-touching tubes to determine which structures offer the best optical properties for the delivery of high power...... picosecond pulses. A novel fiber with 7 tubes and a core of 30 mu m was fabricated and it is here described and characterized, showing remarkable low loss, low bend loss, and good mode quality. Its optical properties are compared to both a 10 mu m and a 18 mu m core diameter photonic band gap hollow......-core fiber. The three fibers are characterized experimentally for the delivery of 22 picosecond pulses at 1032nm. We demonstrate flexible, diffraction limited beam delivery with output average powers in excess of 70W. (C) 2016 Optical Society of America...

  2. High-density multicore fiber with heterogeneous core arrangement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amma, Y.; Sasaki, Y.; Takenaga, K.

    2015-01-01

    A 30-core fiber with heterogeneous cores that achieved large spatial multiplicity and low crosstalk of less than −40 dB at 100 km was demonstrated. The correlation lengths were estimated to be more than 1 m.......A 30-core fiber with heterogeneous cores that achieved large spatial multiplicity and low crosstalk of less than −40 dB at 100 km was demonstrated. The correlation lengths were estimated to be more than 1 m....

  3. Modeling of the core of Atucha II nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco, Anibal

    2007-01-01

    This work is part of a Nuclear Engineer degree thesis of the Instituto Balseiro and it is carried out under the development of an Argentinean Nuclear Power Plant Simulator. To obtain the best representation of the reactor physical behavior using the state of the art tools this Simulator should couple a 3D neutronics core calculation code with a thermal-hydraulics system code. Focused in the neutronic nature of this job, using PARCS, we modeled and performed calculations of the nuclear power plant Atucha 2 core. Whenever it is possible, we compare our results against results obtained with PUMA (the official core code for Atucha 2). (author) [es

  4. Response of a core coherent density oscillation on electron cyclotron resonance heating in Heliotron J plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, T.; Kobayashi, S.; Lu, X. X.; Kenmochi, N.; Ida, K.; Ohshima, S.; Yamamoto, S.; Kado, S.; Kokubu, D.; Nagasaki, K.; Okada, H.; Minami, T.; Otani, Y.; Mizuuchi, T.

    2018-01-01

    We report properties of a coherent density oscillation observed in the core region and its response to electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECH) in Heliotron J plasma. The measurement was performed using a multi-channel beam emission spectroscopy system. The density oscillation is observed in a radial region between the core and the half radius. The poloidal mode number is found to be 1 (or 2). By modulating the ECH power with 100 Hz, repetition of formation and deformation of a strong electron temperature gradient, which is likely ascribed to be an electron internal transport barrier, is realized. Amplitude and rotation frequency of the coherent density oscillation sitting at the strong electron temperature gradient location are modulated by the ECH, while the poloidal mode structure remains almost unchanged. The change in the rotation velocity in the laboratory frame is derived. Assuming that the change of the rotation velocity is given by the background E × B velocity, a possible time evolution of the radial electric field was deduced.

  5. On-line generation of three-dimensional core power distribution using incore detector signals to monitor safety limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Jin Wook; Lee, Ki Bog; Na, Man Gyun; Lee, Yoon Joon

    2004-01-01

    It is essential in commercial reactors that the safety limits imposed on the fuel pellets and fuel clad barriers, such as the Linear Power Density (LPD) and the Departure from Nucleate Boiling Ratio (DNBR), are not violated during reactor operations. In order to accurately monitor the safety limits of current reactor states, a detailed three-dimensional (3D) core power distribution should be estimated from the in-core detector signals. In this paper, we propose a calculation methodology for detailed 3D core power distribution, using in-core detector signals and core monitoring constants such as the 3D Coupling Coefficients (3DCC), node power fraction, and pin-to-node factors. Also, the calculation method for several core safety parameters is introduced. The core monitoring constants for the real core state are promptly provided by the core design code and on-line MASTER(Multi-purpose Analyzer for Static and Transient Effects of Reactors), coupled with the core monitoring program. Through the plant computer, core state variables, which include reactor thermal power, control rod bank position, boron concentration, inlet moderator temperature, and flow rate, are supplied as input data for MASTER. MASTER performs the core calculation based on the neutron balance equation and generates several core monitoring constants corresponding to the real core state in addition to the expected core power distribution. The accuracy of the developed method is verified through a comparison with the current CECOR method. Because in all the verification calculation cases the proposed method shows a more conservative value than the best estimated value and a less conservative one than the current CECOR and COLSS methods, it is also confirmed that this method secures a greater operating margin through the simulation of the YGN-3 cycle-1 core from the viewpoint of the power peaking factor for the LPD and the pseudo hot pin axial power distribution for the DNBR calculation

  6. ac power control in the Core Flow Test Loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, D.W.

    1980-01-01

    This work represents a status report on a development effort to design an ac power controller for the Core Flow Test Loop. The Core Flow Test Loop will be an engineering test facility which will simulate the thermal environment of a gas-cooled fast-breeder reactor. The problems and limitations of using sinusoidal ac power to simulate the power generated within a nuclear reactor are addressed. The transformer-thyristor configuration chosen for the Core Flow Test Loop power supply is presented. The initial considerations, design, and analysis of a closed-loop controller prototype are detailed. The design is then analyzed for improved performance possibilities and failure modes are investigated at length. A summary of the work completed to date and a proposed outline for continued development completes the report

  7. The online simulation of core physics in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Qiang

    2005-01-01

    The three-dimensional power distribution in core is one of the most important status variables of nuclear reactor. In order to monitor the 3-D in core power distribution timely and accurately, the online simulation system of core physics was designed in the paper. This system combines core physics simulation with the data, which is from the plant and reactor instrumentation. The design of the system consists of the hardware part and the software part. The online simulation system consists of a main simulation computer and a simulation operation station. The online simulation system software includes of the real-time simulation support software, the system communication software, the simulation program and the simulation interface software. Two-group and three-dimensional neutron kinetics model with six groups delayed neutrons was used in the real-time simulation of nuclear reactor core physics. According to the characteristics of the nuclear reactor, the core was divided into many nodes. Resolving the neutron equation, the method of separate variables was used. The input data from the plant and reactor instrumentation system consist of core thermal power, loop temperatures and pressure, control rod positions, boron concentration, core exit thermocouple data, Excore detector signals, in core flux detectors signals. There are two purposes using the data, one is to ensure that the model is as close as the current actual reactor condition, and the other is to calibrate the calculated power distribution. In this paper, the scheme of the online simulation system was introduced. Under the real-time simulation support system, the simulation program is being compiled. Compared with the actual operational data, the elementary simulation results were reasonable and correct. (author)

  8. UNVEILING THE DETAILED DENSITY AND VELOCITY STRUCTURES OF THE PROTOSTELLAR CORE B335

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurono, Yasutaka; Saito, Masao; Kamazaki, Takeshi; Morita, Koh-Ichiro; Kawabe, Ryohei, E-mail: yasutaka.kurono@nao.ac.jp [Chile Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa 2-21-1, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2013-03-10

    We present an observational study of the protostellar core B335 harboring a low-mass Class 0 source. The observations of the H{sup 13}CO{sup +}(J = 1-0) line emission were carried out using the Nobeyama 45 m telescope and Nobeyama Millimeter Array. Our combined image of the interferometer and single-dish data depicts detailed structures of the dense envelope within the core. We found that the core has a radial density profile of n(r){proportional_to}r {sup -p} and a reliable difference in the power-law indices between the outer and inner regions of the core: p Almost-Equal-To 2 for r {approx}> 4000 AU and p Almost-Equal-To 1.5 for r {approx}< 4000 AU. The dense core shows a slight overall velocity gradient of {approx}1.0 km s{sup -1} over the scale of 20, 000 AU across the outflow axis. We believe that this velocity gradient represents a solid-body-like rotation of the core. The dense envelope has a quite symmetrical velocity structure with a remarkable line broadening toward the core center, which is especially prominent in the position-velocity diagram across the outflow axis. The model calculations of position-velocity diagrams do a good job of reproducing observational results using the collapse model of an isothermal sphere in which the core has an inner free-fall region and an outer region conserving the conditions at the formation stage of a central stellar object. We derived a central stellar mass of {approx}0.1 M{sub Sun }, and suggest a small inward velocity, v{sub r{>=}r{sub i{sub n{sub f}}}}{approx}0 km s{sup -1} in the outer core at {approx}> 4000 AU. We concluded that our data can be well explained by gravitational collapse with a quasi-static initial condition, such as Shu's model, or by the isothermal collapse of a marginally critical Bonnor-Ebert sphere.

  9. Safety aspects of core power distribution surveillance and control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beraha, D.; Grumbach, R.; Hoeld, A.; Werner, W.

    1978-01-01

    The incentives for improved core surveillance and core control systems are outlined. An efficient code for evaluating the power distribution is indispensable for designing and testing such a system. The characteristics of the core simulator QUABOX/CUBBOX and the features required for off-line and on-line applications are described. The important role of the simulator for the safety assessment of a digital core control system is underlined. With regard to the safety aspects of core control, possible disturbances are classified. Simulation results are given concerning the failure of a control actuator. It is shown that means can be devised to prevent unstable behaviour of the control system and, furthermore, to contribute to a safe reactor operation by accounting for process disturbances. (author)

  10. Antiproton Powered Gas Core Fission Rocket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kammash, Terry

    2005-01-01

    Extensive research in recent years has demonstrated that 'at rest' annihilation of antiprotons in the uranium isotope U238 leads to fission at nearly 100% efficiency. The resulting highly-ionizing, energetic fission fragments can heat a suitable medium to very high temperatures, making such a process particularly suitable for space propulsion applications. Such an ionized medium, which would serve as a propellant, can be confined by a magnetic field during the heating process, and subsequently ejected through a magnetic nozzle to generate thrust. The gasdynamic mirror (GDM) magnetic configuration is especially suited for this application since the underlying confinement principle is that the plasma be of such density and temperature as to make the ion-ion collision mean free path shorter than the plasma length. Under these conditions the plasma behaves like a fluid, and its escape from the system is analogous to the flow of a gas into vacuum from a vessel with a hole. For the system we propose we envisage radially injecting atomic or U238 plasma beam at a pre-determined position and axially pulsing an antiproton beam which upon interaction with the uranium target gives rise to near isotropic ejection of fission fragments with a total mass of 212 amu and total energy of about 160 MeV. These particles, along with the annihilation products (i.e. pions and muons) will heat the background U238 gas - inserted into the chamber just prior to the release of the antiproton - to one keV temperature. Preliminary analysis reveals that such a propulsion system can produce a specific impulse of about 3000 seconds at a thrust of about 50 kN. When applied to a round trip Mars mission, we find that such a journey can be accomplished in about 142 days with 2 days of thrusting and requiring only one gram of antiprotons to achieve it

  11. Fission-powered in-core thermoacoustic sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrett, Steven L. [Graduate Program in Acoustics, Penn State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Smith, James A. [Fundamental Fuel Properties, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415 (United States); Smith, Robert W. M. [Applied Research Laboratory, Penn State University, State College, Pennsylvania 16804 (United States); Heidrich, Brenden J. [Nuclear Science User Facilities, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415 (United States); Heibel, Michael D. [Global Technology Development, Westinghouse Electric Company, Cranberry Township, Pennsylvania 16066 (United States)

    2016-04-04

    A thermoacoustic engine is operated within the core of a nuclear reactor to acoustically telemeter coolant temperature (frequency-encoded) and reactor power level (amplitude-encoded) outside the reactor, thus providing the values of these important parameters without external electrical power or wiring. We present data from two hydrophones in the coolant (far from the core) and an accelerometer attached to a structure outside the reactor. These signals have been detected even in the presence of substantial background noise generated by the reactor's fluid pumps.

  12. Calculation of power density with MCNP in TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snoj, L.; Ravnik, M.

    2006-01-01

    Modern Monte Carlo codes (e.g. MCNP) allow calculation of power density distribution in 3-D geometry assuming detailed geometry without unit-cell homogenization. To normalize MCNP calculation by the steady-state thermal power of a reactor, one must use appropriate scaling factors. The description of the scaling factors is not adequately described in the MCNP manual and requires detailed knowledge of the code model. As the application of MCNP for power density calculation in TRIGA reactors has not been reported in open literature, the procedure of calculating power density with MCNP and its normalization to the power level of a reactor is described in the paper. (author)

  13. Preliminary concept of a zero power nuclear reactor core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mai, Luiz Antonio; Siqueira, Paulo de Tarso D., E-mail: lamai@ipen.b, E-mail: ptsiquei@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this work is to define a zero power core to study the neutronic behavior of a modern research reactor as the future RMB (Brazilian Nuclear Multipurpose reactor). The platform used was the IPEN/MB-01 nuclear reactor, installed at the Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (IPEN-CNEN/SP). Equilibrium among minimal changes in the current reactor facilities and an arrangement that will be as representative as possible of a future core were taken into account. The active parts of the elements (fuel and control/safety) were determined to be exactly equal the elements of a future reactor. After several technical discussions, a basic configuration for the zero power core was defined. This reactor will validate the neutronic calculations and will allow the execution of countless future experiments aiming a real core. Of all possible alternative configurations for the zero power core representative of a future reactor - named ZPC-MRR (Zero Power Core - Modern Research Reactor), it was concluded, through technical and practical arguments, that the core will have an array of 4 x 5 positions, with 19 fuel elements, identical in its active part to a standard MTR (Material Test Reactor), 4 control/safety elements having a unique flat surface and a central position of irradiation. The specifications of the fuel elements (FEs) are the same as defined to standard MTR in its active part, but the inferior nozzles are differentiated because ZPC-MRR will be a set without heat generation. A study of reactivity was performed using MCNP code, and it was estimated that it will have around 2700 pcm reactivity excess in its 19 FEs configuration (alike the present IPEN/MB-01 reactivity). The effective change in the IPEN/MB-01 reactor will be made only in the control rods drive mechanism. It will be necessary to modify the center of this mechanism. Major modifications in the facility will not be necessary. (author)

  14. Preliminary concept of a zero power nuclear reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mai, Luiz Antonio; Siqueira, Paulo de Tarso D.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to define a zero power core to study the neutronic behavior of a modern research reactor as the future RMB (Brazilian Nuclear Multipurpose reactor). The platform used was the IPEN/MB-01 nuclear reactor, installed at the Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (IPEN-CNEN/SP). Equilibrium among minimal changes in the current reactor facilities and an arrangement that will be as representative as possible of a future core were taken into account. The active parts of the elements (fuel and control/safety) were determined to be exactly equal the elements of a future reactor. After several technical discussions, a basic configuration for the zero power core was defined. This reactor will validate the neutronic calculations and will allow the execution of countless future experiments aiming a real core. Of all possible alternative configurations for the zero power core representative of a future reactor - named ZPC-MRR (Zero Power Core - Modern Research Reactor), it was concluded, through technical and practical arguments, that the core will have an array of 4 x 5 positions, with 19 fuel elements, identical in its active part to a standard MTR (Material Test Reactor), 4 control/safety elements having a unique flat surface and a central position of irradiation. The specifications of the fuel elements (FEs) are the same as defined to standard MTR in its active part, but the inferior nozzles are differentiated because ZPC-MRR will be a set without heat generation. A study of reactivity was performed using MCNP code, and it was estimated that it will have around 2700 pcm reactivity excess in its 19 FEs configuration (alike the present IPEN/MB-01 reactivity). The effective change in the IPEN/MB-01 reactor will be made only in the control rods drive mechanism. It will be necessary to modify the center of this mechanism. Major modifications in the facility will not be necessary. (author)

  15. Nuclear detectors for in-core power-reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchene, Jean; Verdant, Robert.

    1979-12-01

    Nuclear reactor control is commonly obtained through neutronic measurements, ex-core and in-core. In large size reactors flux instabilities may take place. For a good monitoring of them, local in-core power measurements become particularly useful. This paper intends to review the questions about neutronic sensors with could be used in-core. A historical account about methods is given first, from early power reactors with brief description of each system. Sensors presently used (ionization fission chambers, self-powered detectors) are then considered and also those which could be developped such as gamma thermometers. Their physical basis, main characteristics and operation modes are detailed. Preliminary tests and works needed for an extension of their life-time are indicated. As an example present irradiation tests at the CEA are then proposed. Two tables will help comparing the characteristics of each type in terms of its precise purpose: fuel monitoring, safety or power control. Finally a table summarizes the kind of sensors mounted on working power reactors and another one is a review of characteristics for some detectors from obtainable commercial sheets [fr

  16. Study on in-core fuel management for CNP1500 nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Dongsheng

    2005-10-01

    CNP1500 is a four-loop PWR nuclear power plant with light water as moderator and coolant. The reactor core is composed of 205 AFA-3GXL fuel assemblies. The active core height at cold is 426.4 cm and equivalent diameter is 347.0 cm. The reactor thermal output is 4250 MW, and average linear power density is 179.5 W/cm. The cycle length of equilibrium cycle core is 470 equivalent full power days. For all cycles, the moderator temperature coefficients at all conditions are negative values, the nuclear enthalpy rise factors F ΔH at hot full power, all control rods out and equilibrium xenon are less than the limit value, the maximum discharge assembly burnup is less 55000 MW·d/tU, and the shutdown margin values at the end of life meet design criteria. The low-leakage core loading reduces radiation damage on pressure vessel and is beneficial to prolong use lifetime of it. The in-core fuel management design scheme and main calculation results for CNP1500 nuclear power plant are presented. (author)

  17. Optimal power and distribution control for weakly-coupled-core reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oohori, Takahumi; Kaji, Ikuo

    1977-01-01

    A numerical procedure has been devised for obtaining the optimal power and distribution control for a weakly-coupled-core reactor. Several difficulties were encountered in solving this optimization problem: (1) nonlinearity of the reactor kinetics equations; (2) neutron-leakage interaction between the cores; (3) localized power changes occurring in addition to the total power changes; (4) constraints imposed on the states - e.g. reactivity, reactor period. To obviate these difficulties, use is made of the generalized Newton method to convert the problem into an iterative sequence of linear programming problems, after approximating the differential equations and the integral performance criterion by a set of discrete algebraic equations. In this procedure, a heuristic but effective method is used for deriving an initial approximation, which is then made to converge toward the optimal solution. Delayed-neutron one-group point reactor models embodying transient temperature feed-back to the reactivity are used in obtaining the kinetics equations for the weakly-coupled-core reactor. The criterion adopted for determining the optimality is a norm relevant to the deviations of neutron density from the desired trajectories or else to the time derivatives of the neutron density; uniform control intervals are prescribed. Examples are given of two coupled-core reactors with typical parameters to illustrate the results obtained with this procedure. A comparison is also made between the coupled-core reactor and the one-point reactor. (auth.)

  18. Reconstruction calculation of pin power for ship reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Haofeng; Shang Xueli; Chen Wenzhen; Wang Qiao

    2010-01-01

    Aiming at the limitation of the software that pin power distribution for ship reactor core was unavailable, the calculation model and method of the axial and radial pin power distribution were proposed. Reconstruction calculations of pin power along axis and radius was carried out by bicubic and bilinear interpolation and cubic spline interpolation, respectively. The results were compared with those obtained by professional reactor physical soft with fine mesh difference. It is shown that our reconstruction calculation of pin power is simple and reliable as well as accurate, which provides an important theoretic base for the safety analysis and operating administration of the ship nuclear reactor. (authors)

  19. The system of the measurement of reactor power and the monitoring of core power distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xianfeng

    1999-01-01

    The author mainly describes the measurement of the reactor power and the monitoring of the core power distribution in DAYA BAY nuclear power plant, introduces the calibration for the measurement system. Ex-core nuclear instrumentation system (RPN) and LOCA surveillance system (LSS) are the most important system for the object. they perform the measurement of the reactor power and the monitoring of the core power distribution on-line and timely. They also play the important roles in the reactor control and the reactor protection. For the same purpose there are test instrumentation system (KME) and in-core instrumentation system (RIC). All of them work together ensuring the exact measurement and effective monitoring, ensuring the safety of the reactor power plant

  20. Power density forecasting device for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuzaki, Takaharu; Kiguchi, Takashi.

    1978-01-01

    Purpose: To attain effective reactor operation in a bwr type reactor by forecasting the power density of the reactor after adjustment and comparing the same with the present status of the reactor by the on-line calculation in a short time. Constitution: The present status for the reactor is estimated in a present status decision section based on a measurement signal from the reactor and it is stored in an operation result collection section. The reactor status after the forecasting is estimated in a forecasting section based on a setting signal from a forecasting condition setting section and it is compared with the result value from the operation results collection section. If the forecast value does not coincide with the result value in the above comparison, the setting value in the forecast condition setting section is changed in the control section. The above procedures are repeated so as to minimize the difference between the forecast value and the result value to thereby exactly forecast the reactor status and operate the reactor effectively. (Moriyama, K.)

  1. Emergency core cooling systems in CANDU nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-12-01

    This report contains the responses by the Advisory Committee on Nuclear Safety to three questions posed by the Atomic Energy Control Board concerning the need for Emergency Core Cooling Systems (ECCS) in CANDU nuclear power plants, the effectiveness requirement for such systems, and the extent to which experimental evidence should be available to demonstrate compliance with effectiveness standards

  2. Ambient RF energy scavenging: GSM and WLAN power density measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, H.J.; Reniers, A.C.F.; Theeuwes, J.A.C.

    2009-01-01

    To assess the feasibility of ambient RF energy scavenging, a survey of expected power density levels distant from GSM-900 and GSM-1800 base stations has been conducted and power density measurements have been performed in a WLAN environment. It appears that for distances ranging from 25 m to 100 m

  3. Overview of the TITAN-II reversed-field pinch aqueous fusion power core design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, C.P.C.; Creedon, R.L.; Grotz, S.; Cheng, E.T.; Sharafat, S.; Cooke, P.I.H.

    1988-03-01

    TITAN-II is a compact, high power density Reversed-Field Pinch fusion power reactor design based on the aqueous lithium solution fusion power core concept. The selected breeding and structural materials are LiNO/sub 3/ and 9-C low activation ferritic steel, respectively. TITAN-II is a viable alternative to the TITAN-I lithium self-cooled design for the Reversed-Field Pinch reactor to operate at a neutron wall loading of 18 MWm/sup 2/. Submerging the complete fusion power core and the primary loop in a large pool of cool water will minimize the probability of radioactivity release. Since the protection of the large pool integrity is the only requirement for the protection of the public, TITAN-II is a passive safety assurance design. 13 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Overview of the TITAN-II reversed-field pinch aqueous fusion power core design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, C.P.C.; Creedon, R.L.; Cheng, E.T. (General Atomic Co., San Diego, CA (USA)); Grotz, S.P.; Sharafat, S.; Cooke, P.I.H. (California Univ., Los Angeles (USA). Dept. of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering; California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (USA). Inst. for Plasma and Fusion Research); TITAN Research Group

    1989-04-01

    TITAN-II is a compact, high-power-density Reversed-Field Pinch fusion power reactor design based on the aqueous lithium solution fusion power core concept. The selected breeding and structural materials are LiNO/sub 3/ and 9-C low activation ferritic steel, respectively. TITAN-II is a viable alternative to the TITAN-I lithium self-cooled design for the Reversed-Field Pinch reactor to operate at a neutron wall loading of 18 MW/m/sup 2/. Submerging the complete fusion power core and the primary loop in a large pool of cool water will minimize the probability of radioactivity release. Since the protection of the large pool integrity is the only requirement for the protection of the public, TITAN-II is a level 2 of passive safety assurance design. (orig.).

  5. Method of estimating thermal power distribution of core of BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekimizu, Koichi

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To accurately and rapidly predict the thermal power of the core of a BWR they reactor at load follow-up operating time. Method: A parameter value corrected from a correction coefficient deciding unit and a xenon density distribution value predicted and calculated from a xenon density distributor are inputted to a thermal power distribution predicting devise, the status amount such as coolant flow rate or the like predetermined at this and next high power operating times is substituted for physical model to predict and calculate the thermal power distribution. The status amount of a nuclear reactor at the time of operating in previous high power corresponding to the next high power operation to be predicted is read from the status amount of the reactor stored in time series manner is a reactor core status memory, and the physical model used in the prediction and calculation of the thermal power distribution at the time of next high power operation is corrected. (Sikiya, K.)

  6. Density Anomalies in the Mantle and the Gravitational Core-Mantle Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Weijia; Liu, Lanbo

    2003-01-01

    Seismic studies suggest that the bulk of the mantle is heterogeneous, with density variations in depth as well as in horizontal directions (latitude and longitude). This density variation produces a three- dimensional gravity field throughout the Earth. On the other hand, the core density also varies in both time and space, due to convective core flow. Consequently, the fluid outer core and the solid mantle interact gravitationally due to the mass anomalies in both regions. This gravitational core-mantle interaction could play a significant role in exchange of angular momentum between the core and the mantle, and thus the change in Earth's rotation on time scales of decades and longer. Aiming at estimating the significance of the gravitational core-mantle interaction on Earth's rotation variation, we introduce in our MoSST core dynamics model a heterogeneous mantle, with a density distribution derived from seismic results. In this model, the core convection is driven by the buoyancy forces. And the density variation is determined dynamically with the convection. Numerical simulation is carried out with different parameter values, intending to extrapolate numerical results for geophysical implications.

  7. Modelling of core protection and monitoring system for PWR nuclear power plant simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung Kun Lee; Byoung Sung Han

    1997-01-01

    A nuclear power plant simulator was developed for Younggwang units 3 and 4 nuclear power plant (YGN Nos 3 and 4) in Korea; it has been in operation on training center since November 1996. The core protection calculator (CPC) and the core operating limit supervisory system (COLSS) for the simulator were also developed. The CPC is a digital computer-based core protection system, which performs on-line calculation of departure from nucleate boiling ratio (DNBR) and local power density (LPD). It initiates reactor trip when the core conditions exceed designated DNBR or LPD limitations. The COLSS is designed to assist operators by implementing the limiting conditions for operations in the technical specifications. With these systems, it is possible to increase capacity factor and safety of nuclear power plants, because the COLSS data can show accurate operation margin to plant operators and the CPC can protect reactor core. In this study, the function of CPC/COLSS is analyzed in detail, and then simulation model for CPC/COLSS is presented based on the function. Compared with the YGN Nos 3 and 4 plant operation data and CEDIPS/COLSS FORTRAN code test results, the predictions with the model show reasonable results. (Author)

  8. A performance analysis for MHD power cycles operating at maximum power density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahin, Bahri; Kodal, Ali; Yavuz, Hasbi

    1996-01-01

    An analysis of the thermal efficiency of a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power cycle at maximum power density for a constant velocity type MHD generator has been carried out. The irreversibilities at the compressor and the MHD generator are taken into account. The results obtained from power density analysis were compared with those of maximum power analysis. It is shown that by using the power density criteria the MHD cycle efficiency can be increased effectively. (author)

  9. Whole core calculations of power reactors by Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Masayuki; Mori, Takamasa

    1993-01-01

    Whole core calculations have been performed for a commercial size PWR and a prototype LMFBR by using vectorized Monte Carlo codes. Geometries of cores were precisely represented in a pin by pin model. The calculated parameters were k eff , control rod worth, power distribution and so on. Both multigroup and continuous energy models were used and the accuracy of multigroup approximation was evaluated through the comparison of both results. One million neutron histories were tracked to considerably reduce variances. It was demonstrated that the high speed vectorized codes could calculate k eff , assembly power and some reactivity worths within practical computation time. For pin power and small reactivity worth calculations, the order of 10 million histories would be necessary. Required number of histories to achieve target design accuracy were estimated for those neutronic parameters. (orig.)

  10. Core power distribution measurement and data processing in Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hong

    1997-01-01

    For the first time in China, Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station applied the advanced technology of worldwide commercial pressurized reactors to the in-core detectors, the leading excore six-chamber instrumentation for precise axial power distribution, and the related data processing. Described in this article are the neutron flux measurement in Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station, and the detailed data processing

  11. Low-Power Embedded DSP Core for Communication Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Ya-Lan; Chen, Wei-Hao; Tan, Ming Hsuan; Lin, Maw-Ching; Jou, Shyh-Jye

    2003-12-01

    This paper proposes a parameterized digital signal processor (DSP) core for an embedded digital signal processing system designed to achieve demodulation/synchronization with better performance and flexibility. The features of this DSP core include parameterized data path, dual MAC unit, subword MAC, and optional function-specific blocks for accelerating communication system modulation operations. This DSP core also has a low-power structure, which includes the gray-code addressing mode, pipeline sharing, and advanced hardware looping. Users can select the parameters and special functional blocks based on the character of their applications and then generating a DSP core. The DSP core has been implemented via a cell-based design method using a synthesizable Verilog code with TSMC 0.35[InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.]m SPQM and 0.25[InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.]m 1P5M library. The equivalent gate count of the core area without memory is approximately 50 k. Moreover, the maximum operating frequency of a[InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] version is 100 MHz (0.35[InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.]m) and 140 MHz (0.25[InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.]m).

  12. ICRF power limitation relation to density limit in ASDEX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryter, F.

    1992-01-01

    Launching high ICRF power into ASDEX plasmas required good antenna-plasma coupling. This could be achieved by sufficient electron density in front of the antennas i.e. small antenna-plasma distance (1-2 cm) and moderate to high line-averaged electron density compared to the density window in ASDEX. These are conditions eventually close to the density limit. ICRF heated discharges terminated by plasma disruptions caused by the RF pulse limited the maximum RF power which can be injected into the plasma. The disruptions occurring in these cases have clear phenomenological similarities with those observed in density limit discharges. We show in this paper that the ICRF-power limitation by plasma disruptions in ASDEX was due to reaching the density limit. (orig.)

  13. ICRF power limitation relation to density limit in ASDEX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryter, F.

    1992-01-01

    Launching high ICRF power into ASDEX plasmas required good antenna-plasma coupling. This could be achieved by sufficient electron density in front of the antennas i.e. small antenna-plasma distance (1-2 cm) and moderate to high line-averaged electron density compared to the density window in ASDEX. These are conditions eventually close to the density limit. ICRF heated discharges terminated by plasma disruptions caused by the RF pulse limited the maximum RF power which can be injected into the plasma. The disruptions occurring in these cases have clear phenomenological similarities with those observed in density limit discharges. We show in this paper that the ICRF-power limitation by plasma disruptions in ASDEX was due to reaching the density limit. (author) 3 refs., 3 figs

  14. Industrialization of nanocrystalline Fe–Si–B–P–Cu alloys for high magnetic flux density cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takenaka, Kana; Setyawan, Albertus D.; Sharma, Parmanand; Nishiyama, Nobuyuki; Makino, Akihiro

    2016-01-01

    Nanocrystalline Fe–Si–B–P–Cu alloys exhibit high saturation magnetic flux density (B s ) and extremely low magnetic core loss (W), simultaneously. Low amorphous-forming ability of these alloys hinders their application potential in power transformers and motors. Here we report a solution to this problem. Minor addition of C is found to be effective in increasing the amorphous-forming ability of Fe–Si–B–P–Cu alloys. It allows fabrication of 120 mm wide ribbons (which was limited to less than 40 mm) without noticeable degradation in magnetic properties. The nanocrystalline (Fe 85.7 Si 0.5 B 9.5 P 3.5 Cu 0.8 ) 99 C 1 ribbons exhibit low coercivity (H c )~4.5 A/m, high B s ~1.83 T and low W~0.27 W/kg (@ 1.5 T and 50 Hz). Success in fabrication of long (60–100 m) and wide (~120 mm) ribbons, which are made up of low cost elements is promising for mass production of energy efficient high power transformers and motors - Highlights: • Minor addition of C in FeSiBPCu alloy increases amorphous-forming ability. • The FeSiBPCuC alloy exhibits B s close to Si-steel and Core loss lower than it. • Excellent soft magnetic properties were obtained for 120 mm wide ribbons. • Nanocrystalline FeSiBPCuC alloy can be produced at industrial scale with low cost. • The alloy is suitable for making low energy loss power transformers and motors.

  15. BWR power oscillation evaluation methodologies in core design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hotta, Akitoshi

    1995-01-01

    At the initial stage of BWR development, the power oscillation due to the nuclear-thermal interaction originated in random boiling phenomena and nuclear void feedback was feared. But it was shown that under the high pressure condition in the normal operation of recent commercial BWRs, the core is in very stable state. However, power oscillation events have been observed in actual machines, and it is necessary to do the stability evaluation that sufficiently reflects the detailed operation conditions of actual plants. As the cause of power oscillation events, the instability of control system and nuclear-thermal coupling instability are important, and their mechanisms are explained. As the model for analyzing the stability of BWR core, the nuclear-thermal coupling model in frequency domain is the central existence. As the information for the design, the parameters of fuel assemblies, and the nuclear parameters and the thermohydraulic parameters of cores are enumerated. LAPUR-TSI is a nuclear-thermal coupling model. The analysis system in the software of Tokyo Electric Power Co. is outlined, and the analysis model was verified. (K.I.)

  16. Coupled neutronics and thermal hydraulics of high density cores for FRM II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breitkreutz, Harald

    2011-03-04

    % enriched disperse UMo core with different densities at two reactor power levels, and two 40% enriched monolithic UMo cores, one with flat plates and one with plates that have a thickness gradient. Again, two different power levels were regarded. To estimate the uncertainty of the performed calculations, a sensitivity analysis was conducted. This includes results of neutronics, burn-up and thermal hydraulics. The identified uncertainties are generally quite small. (orig.)

  17. Coupled neutronics and thermal hydraulics of high density cores for FRM II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breitkreutz, Harald

    2011-01-01

    different densities at two reactor power levels, and two 40% enriched monolithic UMo cores, one with flat plates and one with plates that have a thickness gradient. Again, two different power levels were regarded. To estimate the uncertainty of the performed calculations, a sensitivity analysis was conducted. This includes results of neutronics, burn-up and thermal hydraulics. The identified uncertainties are generally quite small. (orig.)

  18. Development of Core Monitoring System for Nuclear Power Plants (I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.H.; Kim, Y.B.; Park, M.G; Lee, E.K.; Shin, H.C.; Lee, D.J. [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    1.Object and Necessity of the Study -The main objectives of this study are (1)conversion of APOLLO version BEACON system to HP-UX version core monitoring system, (2)provision of the technical bases to enhance the in-house capability of developing more advanced core monitoring system. 2.Results of the Study - In this study, the revolutionary core monitoring technologies such as; nodal analysis and isotope depletion calculation method, advanced schemes for power distribution control, and treatment of nuclear databank were established. The verification and validation work has been successfully performed by comparing the results with those of the design code and measurement data. The advanced graphic user interface and plant interface method have been implemented to ensure the future upgrade capability. The Unix shell scripts and system dependent software are also improved to support administrative functions of the system. (author). 14 refs., 112 figs., 52 tabs.

  19. Physicians’ Professionally Responsible Power: A Core Concept of Clinical Ethics

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Laurence B.

    2016-01-01

    The gathering of power unto themselves by physicians, a process supported by evidence-based practice, clinical guidelines, licensure, organizational culture, and other social factors, makes the ethics of power—the legitimation of physicians’ power—a core concept of clinical ethics. In the absence of legitimation, the physician’s power over patients becomes problematic, even predatory. As has occurred in previous issues of the Journal, the papers in the 2016 clinical ethics issue bear on the professionally responsible deployment of power by physicians. This introduction explores themes of physicians’ power in papers from an international group of authors who address autonomy and trust, the virtues of perinatal hospice, conjoined twins in ethics and law, addiction and autonomy in clinical research on addicting substances, euthanasia of patients with dementia in Belgium, and a pragmatic approach to clinical futility. PMID:26671961

  20. Power Spectral Density and Hilbert Transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    there is 1.3 W of power. How much bandwidth does a pure sine wave require? The bandwidth of an ideal sine wave is 0 Hz. How do you represent a 1-W...the Hilbert transform. 2.3 Hilbert Transform The Hilbert transform is a math function used to convert a real function into an analytic signal...The math operation minus 2 means to move 2 steps back on the number line. For minus –2, we move 2 steps backwards from –2, which is the same as

  1. High volumetric power density, non-enzymatic, glucose fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oncescu, Vlad; Erickson, David

    2013-01-01

    The development of new implantable medical devices has been limited in the past by slow advances in lithium battery technology. Non-enzymatic glucose fuel cells are promising replacement candidates for lithium batteries because of good long-term stability and adequate power density. The devices developed to date however use an "oxygen depletion design" whereby the electrodes are stacked on top of each other leading to low volumetric power density and complicated fabrication protocols. Here we have developed a novel single-layer fuel cell with good performance (2 μW cm⁻²) and stability that can be integrated directly as a coating layer on large implantable devices, or stacked to obtain a high volumetric power density (over 16 μW cm⁻³). This represents the first demonstration of a low volume non-enzymatic fuel cell stack with high power density, greatly increasing the range of applications for non-enzymatic glucose fuel cells.

  2. Gas core reactor power plants designed for low proliferation potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowry, L.L.

    1977-09-01

    The feasibility of gas core nuclear power plants to provide adequate power while maintaining a low inventory and low divertability of fissile material is studied. Four concepts were examined. Two used a mixture of UF 6 and helium in the reactor cavities, and two used a uranium-argon plasma, held away from the walls by vortex buffer confinement. Power levels varied from 200 to 2500 MWth. Power plant subsystems were sized to determine their fissile material inventories. All reactors ran, with a breeding ratio of unity, on 233 U born from thorium. Fission product removal was continuous. Newly born 233 U was removed continuously from the breeding blanket and returned to the reactor cavities. The 2500-MWth power plant contained a total of 191 kg of 233 U. Less than 4 kg could be diverted before the reactor shut down. The plasma reactor power plants had smaller inventories. In general, inventories were about a factor of 10 less than those in current U.S. power reactors

  3. Nuclear piston engine and pulsed gaseous core reactor power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dugan, E.T.

    1976-01-01

    The investigated nuclear piston engines consist of a pulsed, gaseous core reactor enclosed by a moderating-reflecting cylinder and piston assembly and operate on a thermodynamic cycle similar to the internal combustion engine. The primary working fluid is a mixture of uranium hexafluoride, UF 6 , and helium, He, gases. Highly enriched UF 6 gas is the reactor fuel. The helium is added to enhance the thermodynamic and heat transfer characteristics of the primary working fluid and also to provide a neutron flux flattening effect in the cylindrical core. Two and four-stroke engines have been studied in which a neutron source is the counterpart of the sparkplug in the internal combustion engine. The piston motions which have been investigated include pure simple harmonic, simple harmonic with dwell periods, and simple harmonic in combination with non-simple harmonic motion. The results of the conducted investigations indicate good performance potential for the nuclear piston engine with overall efficiencies of as high as 50 percent for nuclear piston engine power generating units of from 10 to 50 Mw(e) capacity. Larger plants can be conceptually designed by increasing the number of pistons, with the mechanical complexity and physical size as the probable limiting factors. The primary uses for such power systems would be for small mobile and fixed ground-based power generation (especially for peaking units for electrical utilities) and also for nautical propulsion and ship power

  4. VG-400 atomic power and technological installation. Possible core design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komarov, E.V.; Laptev, F.V.; Lyubivyj, A.G.; Mitenkov, F.M.; Samojlov, O.B.; Sukhachevskij, Yu.B.

    1979-01-01

    The main characteristics, basic circuit and configuration of equipment of the VG-400 atomic power and technological installation are considered. This installation is intended for supplying with highly-potential heat of thermal electrochemical hydrogen production and for power generation in the steam-turbine cycle. The main installation characteristics: HTGR reactor heat power 1100 MW, electric power 300 MW, helium coolant pressure 50 atm, output temperature 950 deg C, steam pressure in the second contour 175 atm, temperature 535 deg C, core diameter and height 6.4 m and 4 m, respectively, number of spherical fuel elements 8.5x10 5 . The installation can ensure hydrogen production of 10 5 Nxm 3 /h. For the VG-400 reactor block the integral arrangement of the first circuit equipment in the reinforced concrete is chosen. Two versions of the reactor core with prismatic and spherical fuel elements are compared. It is shown that taking into account great potentialities of the spherical zone in a case of further temperature increase and its positive qualities with respect to construction and processing of fuel elements and graphite blocks, the utilization of simplier units and mechanisms in the overloading system and in the process of profiling of energy distribution the choice of the spherical configuration for the VG-400 pilot plant installation seems to be valid

  5. Improving the peak power density estimation for the DNBR trip signal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreira, Joao M. L.; Souza, Rose Mary G.P.

    2002-01-01

    The departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) core protection in PWR reactors is usually carried out through the over temperature trip or the instantaneous minimum DNB ratio (DNBR) trip. The protection is obtained through specialized correlations or fast digital computer simulators that infer the core power level, and local coolant thermal and flow conditions out of process variables furnished by the instrumentation. The power density distribution information is usually expressed in terms of F q , the power peak factor, and its location. F q , in its turn, can be determined through the control rod position or, more often, through the power axial offset (AO) F q =f (AO, control rod positions). The AO, defined as the difference between upper and lower long ion chambers signals, is supplied for each channel by separate sets of out-of-core detectors positioned 90 or 120 degrees apart in plan. The AO is given by AO=(S t -S b )/(S t +S b ) where S t and S b are the out-of-core signals from the top and the bottom sections, respectively. In current PWRs a large penalty is imposed to the result of the first equation, because of the difficult of inferring with good accuracy the peak factor from the AO obtained from the out-of-core instrumentation. This ends up reducing the plant capacity factor. In this work, the f function in the first equation, which correlates the power peak factor with the axial offset yielded by out-of-core detectors and control rod positions, is obtained through a combination of specific experiments in the IPEN/MB-01 zero-power reactor and calculation results. For improving the peak factor estimation, it is necessary to consider accurately the response of the out-of-core detectors to different power density distribution in the core. This task is not easily accomplished through calculation due to the difficulties involved in the necessary neutron transport treatment for the out-of-core detector responses

  6. Enhancing power density of biophotovoltaics by decoupling storage and power delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saar, Kadi L.; Bombelli, Paolo; Lea-Smith, David J.; Call, Toby; Aro, Eva-Mari; Müller, Thomas; Howe, Christopher J.; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.

    2018-01-01

    Biophotovoltaic devices (BPVs), which use photosynthetic organisms as active materials to harvest light, have a range of attractive features relative to synthetic and non-biological photovoltaics, including their environmentally friendly nature and ability to self-repair. However, efficiencies of BPVs are currently lower than those of synthetic analogues. Here, we demonstrate BPVs delivering anodic power densities of over 0.5 W m-2, a value five times that for previously described BPVs. We achieved this through the use of cyanobacterial mutants with increased electron export characteristics together with a microscale flow-based design that allowed independent optimization of the charging and power delivery processes, as well as membrane-free operation by exploiting laminar flow to separate the catholyte and anolyte streams. These results suggest that miniaturization of active elements and flow control for decoupled operation and independent optimization of the core processes involved in BPV design are effective strategies for enhancing power output and thus the potential of BPVs as viable systems for sustainable energy generation.

  7. Improving Power Density of Free-Piston Stirling Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Maxwell H.; Prahl, Joseph M.; Loparo, Kenneth A.

    2016-01-01

    Analyses and experiments demonstrate the potential benefits of optimizing piston and displacer motion in a free-piston Stirling Engine. Isothermal analysis shows the theoretical limits of power density improvement due to ideal motion in ideal Stirling engines. More realistic models based on nodal analysis show that ideal piston and displacer waveforms are not optimal, often producing less power than engines that use sinusoidal piston and displacer motion. Constrained optimization using nodal analysis predicts that Stirling engine power density can be increased by as much as 58 percent using optimized higher harmonic piston and displacer motion. An experiment is conducted in which an engine designed for sinusoidal motion is forced to operate with both second and third harmonics, resulting in a piston power increase of as much as 14 percent. Analytical predictions are compared to experimental data and show close agreement with indirect thermodynamic power calculations, but poor agreement with direct electrical power measurements.

  8. Improving Free-Piston Stirling Engine Power Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Maxwell H.

    2016-01-01

    Analyses and experiments demonstrate the potential benefits of optimizing piston and displacer motion in a free piston Stirling Engine. Isothermal analysis shows the theoretical limits of power density improvement due to ideal motion in ideal Stirling engines. More realistic models based on nodal analysis show that ideal piston and displacer waveforms are not optimal, often producing less power than engines that use sinusoidal piston and displacer motion. Constrained optimization using nodal analysis predicts that Stirling engine power density can be increased by as much as 58% using optimized higher harmonic piston and displacer motion. An experiment is conducted in which an engine designed for sinusoidal motion is forced to operate with both second and third harmonics, resulting in a maximum piston power increase of 14%. Analytical predictions are compared to experimental data showing close agreement with indirect thermodynamic power calculations, but poor agreement with direct electrical power measurements.

  9. PIII Plasma Density Enhancement by a New DC Power Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-Callejas, R.; Godoy-Cabrera, O. G.; Granda-Gutierrez, E. E.; Piedad-Beneitez, A. de la; Munoz-Castro, A. E.; Valencia A, R.; Barocio, S. R.; Mercado-Cabrera, A.; Pena-Eguiluz, R.

    2006-01-01

    In practical terms, those plasmas produced by a DC voltage power supply do not attain densities above the 108 to 109 cm-3 band. Here we present a power supply, controlled in current and voltage, which has been successfully designed and constructed delivering plasma densities in the orders of 109 - 1010 cm-3. Its experimental performance test was conducted within one toroidal and one cylindrical chambers capable of 29 and 35 litres, respectively, using nitrogen gas. The DC plasma was characterized by a double electric probe. Several physical phenomena present in the PIII process have been keenly investigated including plasma sheath dynamics, interaction of plasma and surface, etc. In this paper we analyze the effect of the implantation voltage, plasma density and pulse time in the PIII average heating power and fluence density

  10. Physicians' Professionally Responsible Power: A Core Concept of Clinical Ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Laurence B

    2016-02-01

    The gathering of power unto themselves by physicians, a process supported by evidence-based practice, clinical guidelines, licensure, organizational culture, and other social factors, makes the ethics of power--the legitimation of physicians' power--a core concept of clinical ethics. In the absence of legitimation, the physician's power over patients becomes problematic, even predatory. As has occurred in previous issues of the Journal, the papers in the 2016 clinical ethics issue bear on the professionally responsible deployment of power by physicians. This introduction explores themes of physicians' power in papers from an international group of authors who address autonomy and trust, the virtues of perinatal hospice, conjoined twins in ethics and law, addiction and autonomy in clinical research on addicting substances, euthanasia of patients with dementia in Belgium, and a pragmatic approach to clinical futility. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press, on behalf of the Journal of Medicine and Philosophy Inc. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Neutron flux and power in RTP core-15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabir, Mohamad Hairie, E-mail: m-hairie@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my; Zin, Muhammad Rawi Md; Usang, Mark Dennis; Bayar, Abi Muttaqin Jalal; Hamzah, Na’im Syauqi Bin [Nuclear and reactor Physics Section, Nuclear Technology Center, Technical Support Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2016-01-22

    PUSPATI TRIGA Reactor achieved initial criticality on June 28, 1982. The reactor is designed to effectively implement the various fields of basic nuclear research, manpower training, and production of radioisotopes. This paper describes the reactor parameters calculation for the PUSPATI TRIGA REACTOR (RTP); focusing on the application of the developed reactor 3D model for criticality calculation, analysis of power and neutron flux distribution of TRIGA core. The 3D continuous energy Monte Carlo code MCNP was used to develop a versatile and accurate full model of the TRIGA reactor. The model represents in detailed all important components of the core with literally no physical approximation. The consistency and accuracy of the developed RTP MCNP model was established by comparing calculations to the available experimental results and TRIGLAV code calculation.

  12. Reconstruction and analysis of temperature and density spatial profiles inertial confinement fusion implosion cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mancini, R. C.

    2007-01-01

    We discuss several methods for the extraction of temperature and density spatial profiles in inertial confinement fusion implosion cores based on the analysis of the x-ray emission from spectroscopic tracers added to the deuterium fuel. The ideas rely on (1) detailed spectral models that take into account collisional-radiative atomic kinetics, Stark broadened line shapes, and radiation transport calculations, (2) the availability of narrow-band, gated pinhole and slit x-ray images, and space-resolved line spectra of the core, and (3) several data analysis and reconstruction methods that include a multi-objective search and optimization technique based on a novel application of Pareto genetic algorithms to plasma spectroscopy. The spectroscopic analysis yields the spatial profiles of temperature and density in the core at the collapse of the implosion, and also the extent of shell material mixing into the core. Results are illustrated with data recorded in implosion experiments driven by the OMEGA and Z facilities

  13. High power density yeast catalyzed microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguli, Rahul

    Microbial fuel cells leverage whole cell biocatalysis to convert the energy stored in energy-rich renewable biomolecules such as sugar, directly to electrical energy at high efficiencies. Advantages of the process include ambient temperature operation, operation in natural streams such as wastewater without the need to clean electrodes, minimal balance-of-plant requirements compared to conventional fuel cells, and environmentally friendly operation. These make the technology very attractive as portable power sources and waste-to-energy converters. The principal problem facing the technology is the low power densities compared to other conventional portable power sources such as batteries and traditional fuel cells. In this work we examined the yeast catalyzed microbial fuel cell and developed methods to increase the power density from such fuel cells. A combination of cyclic voltammetry and optical absorption measurements were used to establish significant adsorption of electron mediators by the microbes. Mediator adsorption was demonstrated to be an important limitation in achieving high power densities in yeast-catalyzed microbial fuel cells. Specifically, the power densities are low for the length of time mediator adsorption continues to occur. Once the mediator adsorption stops, the power densities increase. Rotating disk chronoamperometry was used to extract reaction rate information, and a simple kinetic expression was developed for the current observed in the anodic half-cell. Since the rate expression showed that the current was directly related to microbe concentration close to the electrode, methods to increase cell mass attached to the anode was investigated. Electrically biased electrodes were demonstrated to develop biofilm-like layers of the Baker's yeast with a high concentration of cells directly connected to the electrode. The increased cell mass did increase the power density 2 times compared to a non biofilm fuel cell, but the power density

  14. Evaluation of neutron flux density and power density with SPN-detectors and micro calorimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehre, G.; Rindelhardt, U.; Seidenkranz, T.; Hogel, J.; Jirousek, V.; Vazek, J.

    1983-02-01

    During investigations with a special equipped fuel assembly in the Rheinsberg nuclear power station the neutron flux and the power density were evaluated from measurements with SPN-detectors and micro calorimeters. The reliability of both detector types, their measurement accuracy under different physical conditions and the usefulness of the developed calculation models are discussed in detail. The thermal flux and the power density evaluated with SPND's agree well with theoretical results. The values obtained through micro calorimeter measurements are systematic lower by about 18%. This deviation is probably a result of differences in the used calculation models. (author)

  15. Core fusion accidents in nuclear power reactors. Knowledge review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentaib, Ahmed; Bonneville, Herve; Clement, Bernard; Cranga, Michel; Fichot, Florian; Koundy, Vincent; Meignen, Renaud; Corenwinder, Francois; Leteinturier, Denis; Monroig, Frederique; Nahas, Georges; Pichereau, Frederique; Van-Dorsselaere, Jean-Pierre; Cenerino, Gerard; Jacquemain, Didier; Raimond, Emmanuel; Ducros, Gerard; Journeau, Christophe; Magallon, Daniel; Seiler, Jean-Marie; Tourniaire, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    This reference document proposes a large and detailed review of severe core fusion accidents occurring in nuclear power reactors. It aims at presenting the scientific aspects of these accidents, a review of knowledge and research perspectives on this issue. After having recalled design and operation principles and safety principles for reactors operating in France, and the main studied and envisaged accident scenarios for the management of severe accidents in French PWRs, the authors describe the physical phenomena occurring during a core fusion accident, in the reactor vessel and in the containment building, their sequence and means to mitigate their effects: development of the accident within the reactor vessel, phenomena able to result in an early failure of the containment building, phenomena able to result in a delayed failure with the corium-concrete interaction, corium retention and cooling in and out of the vessel, release of fission products. They address the behaviour of containment buildings during such an accident (sizing situations, mechanical behaviour, bypasses). They review and discuss lessons learned from accidents (Three Mile Island and Chernobyl) and simulation tests (Phebus-PF). A last chapter gives an overview of software and approaches for the numerical simulation of a core fusion accident

  16. Lamination effects on a 3D model of the magnetic core of power transformers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poveda-Lerma Antonio

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the lamination effect on the model of a power transformer’s core with stacked E-I structure is analyzed. The distribution of the magnetic flux in the laminations depends on the stacking method. In this work it is shown, using a 3D FEM model and an experimental prototype, that the non-uniform distribution of the flux in a laminated E-I core with alternate-lap joint stack increases substantially the average value of the magnetic flux density in the core, compared with a butt joint stack. Both the simulated model and the experimental tests show that the presence of constructive air-gaps in the E-I junctions gives rise to a zig-zag flux in the depth direction. This inter-lamination flux reduces the magnetic flux density in the I-pieces and increases substantially the magnetic flux density in the E-pieces, with highly saturated points that traditional 2D analysis cannot reproduce. The relation between the number of laminations included in the model, and the computational resourses needed to build it, is also evaluated in this work.

  17. Aerosol core nuclear reactor for space-based high energy/power nuclear-pumped lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prelas, M.A.; Boody, F.P.; Zediker, M.S.

    1987-01-01

    An aerosol core reactor concept can overcome the efficiency and/or chemical activity problems of other fuel-reactant interface concepts. In the design of a laser using the nuclear energy for a photon-intermediate pumping scheme, several features of the aerosol core reactor concept are attractive. First, the photon-intermediate pumping concept coupled with photon concentration methods and the aerosol fuel can provide the high power densities required to drive high energy/power lasers efficiently (about 25 to 100 kW/cu cm). Secondly, the intermediate photons should have relatively large mean free paths in the aerosol fuel which will allow the concept to scale more favorably. Finally, the aerosol core reactor concept can use materials which should allow the system to operate at high temperatures. An excimer laser pumped by the photons created in the fluorescer driven by a self-critical aerosol core reactor would have reasonable dimensions (finite cylinder of height 245 cm and radius of 245 cm), reasonable laser energy (1 MJ in approximately a 1 millisecond pulse), and reasonable mass (21 kg uranium, 8280 kg moderator, 460 kg fluorescer, 450 kg laser medium, and 3233 kg reflector). 12 references

  18. Gas-core reactor power transient analysis. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kascak, A.F.

    1972-01-01

    The gas core reactor is a proposed device which features high temperatures. It has applications in high specific impulse space missions, and possibly in low thermal pollution MHD power plants. The nuclear fuel is a ball of uranium plasma radiating thermal photons as opposed to gamma rays. This thermal energy is picked up before it reaches the solid cavity liner by an inflowing seeded propellant stream and convected out through a rocket nozzle. A wall-burnout condition will exist if there is not enough flow of propellant to convect the energy back into the cavity. A reactor must therefore operate with a certain amount of excess propellant flow. Due to the thermal inertia of the flowing propellant, the reactor can undergo power transients in excess of the steady-state wall burnout power for short periods of time. The objective of the study was to determine how long the wall burnout power could be exceeded without burning out the cavity liner. The model used in the heat-transfer calculation was one-dimensional, and thermal radiation was assumed to be a diffusion process. (auth)

  19. Research on Power Factor Correction Boost Inductor Design Optimization – Efficiency vs. Power Density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Qingnan; Andersen, Michael A. E.; Thomsen, Ole Cornelius

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays, efficiency and power density are the most important issues for Power Factor Correction (PFC) converters development. However, it is a challenge to reach both high efficiency and power density in a system at the same time. In this paper, taking a Bridgeless PFC (BPFC) as an example......, a useful compromise between efficiency and power density of the Boost inductors on 3.2kW is achieved using an optimized design procedure. The experimental verifications based on the optimized inductor are carried out from 300W to 3.2kW at 220Vac input....

  20. The biological properties of iron oxide core high-density lipoprotein in experimental atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skajaa, Torjus; Cormode, David P.; Jarzyna, Peter A.; Delshad, Amanda; Blachford, Courtney; Barazza, Alessandra; Fisher, Edward A.; Gordon, Ronald E.; Fayad, Zahi A.; Mulder, Willem J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Lipoproteins are a family of plasma nanoparticles responsible for the transportation of lipids throughout the body. High-density lipoprotein (HDL), the smallest of the lipoprotein family, measures 7-13 nm in diameter and consists of a cholesteryl ester and triglyceride core that is covered with a

  1. Stopping power of degenerate electron liquid at metallic densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Shigenori; Ichimaru, Setsuo

    1985-01-01

    We calculate the stopping power of the degenerate electron liquid at metallic densities in the dielectric formalism. The strong Coulomb-coupling effects beyond the random-phase approximation are taken into account through the static and dynamic local-field corrections. It is shown that those strong-coupling and dynamic effects act to enhance the stopping power substantially in the low-velocity regime, leading to an improved agreement with experimental data. (author)

  2. Ultrasonic density detector for vessel and reactor core two-phase flow measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arave, A.E.

    1979-01-01

    A local ultrasonic density (LUD) detector has been developed by EG and G Idaho, Inc., at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) reactor vessel and core two-phase flow density measurements. The principle of operating the sensor is the change in propagation time of a torsional ultrasonic wave in a metal transmission line as a function of the density of the surrounding media. A theoretical physics model is presented which represents the total propagation time as a function of the sensor modulus of elasticity and polar moment of inertia

  3. Determination of power density in VVER-1000 Mock-Up in LR-0 reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Košál Michal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The pin power density is an important quantity which has to be monitored during the reactor operation, for two main reasons. Firstly, it is part of the limits and conditions of safe operation and, secondly, it is source term in neutron transport calculations used for the adequate assessing of the state of core structures and pressure vessel material. It is often calculated using deterministic codes which may have problems with an adequate definition of boundary conditions in subcritical regions. This may lead to overestimation of real situation, and therefore the validation of the utility codes contributes not only to better fuel utilization, but also to more precise description of radiation situation in structural components of core. Current paper presents methods developed at LR-0 reactor, as well as selected results for pin power density measurement in peripheral regions of VVER-1000 mock-up. The presented data show that the results of a utility diffusion code at core boundary overestimate the measurement. This situation, however satisfactory safe, may lead to unduly conservative approach in the determination of radiation damage of core structures.

  4. Metal Amorphous Nanocomposite (MANC) Alloy Cores with Spatially Tuned Permeability for Advanced Power Magnetics Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byerly, K.; Ohodnicki, P. R.; Moon, S. R.; Leary, A. M.; Keylin, V.; McHenry, M. E.; Simizu, S.; Beddingfield, R.; Yu, Y.; Feichter, G.; Noebe, R.; Bowman, R.; Bhattacharya, S.

    2018-06-01

    Metal amorphous nanocomposite (MANC) alloys are an emerging class of soft magnetic materials showing promise for a range of inductive components targeted for higher power density and higher efficiency power conversion applications including inductors, transformers, and rotating electrical machinery. Magnetization reversal mechanisms within these alloys are typically determined by composition optimization as well as controlled annealing treatments to generate a nanocomposite structure composed of nanocrystals embedded in an amorphous precursor. Here we demonstrate the concept of spatially varying the permeability within a given component for optimization of performance by using the strain annealing process. The concept is realized experimentally through the smoothing of the flux profile from the inner to outer core radius achieved by a monotonic variation in tension during the strain annealing process. Great potential exists for an extension of this concept to a wide range of other power magnetic components and more complex spatially varying permeability profiles through advances in strain annealing techniques and controls.

  5. High-Power-Density, High-Energy-Density Fluorinated Graphene for Primary Lithium Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guiming Zhong

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Li/CFx is one of the highest-energy-density primary batteries; however, poor rate capability hinders its practical applications in high-power devices. Here we report a preparation of fluorinated graphene (GFx with superior performance through a direct gas fluorination method. We find that the so-called “semi-ionic” C-F bond content in all C-F bonds presents a more critical impact on rate performance of the GFx in comparison with sp2 C content in the GFx, morphology, structure, and specific surface area of the materials. The rate capability remains excellent before the semi-ionic C-F bond proportion in the GFx decreases. Thus, by optimizing semi-ionic C-F content in our GFx, we obtain the optimal x of 0.8, with which the GF0.8 exhibits a very high energy density of 1,073 Wh kg−1 and an excellent power density of 21,460 W kg−1 at a high current density of 10 A g−1. More importantly, our approach opens a new avenue to obtain fluorinated carbon with high energy densities without compromising high power densities.

  6. Thermodynamic, energy efficiency, and power density analysis of reverse electrodialysis power generation with natural salinity gradients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yip, N.Y.; Vermaas, D.A.; Nijmeijer, K.; Elimelech, M.

    2014-01-01

    Reverse electrodialysis (RED) can harness the Gibbs free energy of mixing when fresh river water flows into the sea for sustainable power generation. In this study, we carry out a thermodynamic and energy efficiency analysis of RED power generation, and assess the membrane power density. First, we

  7. 47 CFR 25.208 - Power flux density limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Power flux density limits. 25.208 Section 25.208 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE... emissions from all co-frequency space stations of a single non-geostationary-satellite orbit (NGSO) system...

  8. In-core fuel management for the course on operational physics of power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, S.H.

    1982-01-01

    The heart of a nuclear power station is the reactor core producing power from the fissioning of uranium or plutonium fuel. Expertise in many different technical fields is required to provide fuel for continuous economical operation of a nuclear power plant. In general, these various technical disciplines can be dichotomized into ''Out-of-core'' and ''In-core'' fuel management. In-core fuel management is concerned, as the name implies, with the reactor core itself. It entails calculating the core reactivity, power distribution, and isotopic inventory for the first and subsequent cores of a nuclear power plant to maintain adequate safety margins and operating lifetime for each core. In addition, the selection of reloading schemes is made to minimize energy costs

  9. Reactor core cooling device for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuda, Masahiko.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention concerns a reactor core cooling facility upon rupture of pipelines in a BWR type nuclear power plant. That is, when rupture of pipelines should occur in the reactor container, an releasing safety valve operates instantly and then a depressurization valve operates to depressurize the inside of a reactor pressure vessel. Further, an injection valve of cooling water injection pipelines is opened and cooling water is injected to cool the reactor core from the time when the pressure is lowered to a level capable of injecting water to the pressure vessel by the static water head of a pool water as a water source. Further, steams released from the pressure vessel and steams in the pressure vessel are condensed in a high pressure/low pressure emergency condensation device and the inside of the reactor container is depressurized and cooled. When the reactor is isolated, since the steams in the pressure vessel are condensed in the state that the steam supply valve and the return valve of a steam supply pipelines are opened and a vent valve is closed, the reactor can be maintained safely. (I.S.)

  10. Nuclear power reactor core melt accidents. Current State of Knowledge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquemain, Didier; Cenerino, Gerard; Corenwinder, Francois; Raimond, Emmanuel IRSN; Bentaib, Ahmed; Bonneville, Herve; Clement, Bernard; Cranga, Michel; Fichot, Florian; Koundy, Vincent; Meignen, Renaud; Corenwinder, Francois; Leteinturier, Denis; Monroig, Frederique; Nahas, Georges; Pichereau, Frederique; Van-Dorsselaere, Jean-Pierre; Couturier, Jean; Debaudringhien, Cecile; Duprat, Anna; Dupuy, Patricia; Evrard, Jean-Michel; Nicaise, Gregory; Berthoud, Georges; Studer, Etienne; Boulaud, Denis; Chaumont, Bernard; Clement, Bernard; Gonzalez, Richard; Queniart, Daniel; Peltier, Jean; Goue, Georges; Lefevre, Odile; Marano, Sandrine; Gobin, Jean-Dominique; Schwarz, Michel; Repussard, Jacques; Haste, Tim; Ducros, Gerard; Journeau, Christophe; Magallon, Daniel; Seiler, Jean-Marie; Tourniaire, Bruno; Durin, Michel; Andreo, Francois; Atkhen, Kresna; Daguse, Thierry; Dubreuil-Chambardel, Alain; Kappler, Francois; Labadie, Gerard; Schumm, Andreas; Gauntt, Randall O.; Birchley, Jonathan

    2015-11-01

    For over thirty years, IPSN and subsequently IRSN has played a major international role in the field of nuclear power reactor core melt accidents through the undertaking of important experimental programmes (the most significant being the Phebus-FP programme), the development of validated simulation tools (the ASTEC code that is today the leading European tool for modelling severe accidents), and the coordination of the SARNET (Severe Accident Research Network) international network of excellence. These accidents are described as 'severe accidents' because they can lead to radioactive releases outside the plant concerned, with serious consequences for the general public and for the environment. This book compiles the sum of the knowledge acquired on this subject and summarises the lessons that have been learnt from severe accidents around the world for the prevention and reduction of the consequences of such accidents, without addressing those from the Fukushima accident, where knowledge of events is still evolving. The knowledge accumulated by the Institute on these subjects enabled it to play an active role in informing public authorities, the media and the public when this accident occurred, and continues to do so to this day. Following the introduction, which describes the structure of this book and highlights the objectives of R and D on core melt accidents, this book briefly presents the design and operating principles (Chapter 2) and safety principles (Chapter 3) of the reactors currently in operation in France, as well as the main accident scenarios envisaged and studied (Chapter 4). The objective of these chapters is not to provide exhaustive information on these subjects (the reader should refer to the general reference documents listed in the corresponding chapters), but instead to provide the information needed in order to understand, firstly, the general approach adopted in France for preventing and mitigating the consequences of core melt

  11. Dimmable electronic ballasts by variable power density modulation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borekci, Selim; Kesler, Selami

    2014-11-01

    Dimming can be accomplished commonly by switching frequency and pulse density modulation techniques and a variable inductor. In this study, a variable power density modulation (VPDM) control technique is proposed for dimming applications. A fluorescent lamp is operated in several states to meet the desired lamp power in a modulation period. The proposed technique has the same advantages of magnetic dimming topologies have. In addition, a unique and flexible control technique can be achieved. A prototype dimmable electronic ballast is built and experiments related to it have been conducted. As a result, a 36WT8 fluorescent lamp can be driven for a desired lamp power from several alternatives without modulating the switching frequency.

  12. Nonimaging optical designs for maximum-power-density remote irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuermann, D; Gordon, J M; Ries, H

    1998-04-01

    Designs for flexible, high-power-density, remote irradiation systems are presented. Applications include industrial infrared heating such as in semiconductor processing, alternatives to laser light for certain medical procedures, and general remote high-brightness lighting. The high power densities in herent to the small active radiating regions of conventional metal-halide, halogen, xenon, microwave-sulfur, and related lamps can be restored with nonimaging concentrators with little loss of power. These high fluxlevels can then be transported at high transmissivity with light channels such as optical fibers or lightpipes, and reshaped into luminaires that can deliver prescribed angular and spatial flux distributions onto desired targets. Details for nominally two- and three-dimensional systems are developed, along with estimates ofoptical performance.

  13. Mechanical and Physical Properties of Low Density Kenaf Core Particleboards Bonded with Different Resins

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamad Jani Saad; Izran Kamal

    2012-01-01

    Single layer kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus) core particleboards bonded with urea formaldehyde (UF), phenol formaldehyde (PF) and polymeric 4,4-methyl phenylmethane di-isocyanate (PMDI) resins were manufactured. The boards were fabricated with three different densities i.e 350 kg/m3, 450 kg/m3 and 550 kg/m3. Each type of the resin used was sprayed at three different resin loadings on the kenaf core particles. The boards produced was evaluated for its modulus of rupture (MOR), modulus of elasticit...

  14. High Energy Density Sciences with High Power Lasers at SACLA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Ryosuke

    2013-10-01

    One of the interesting topics on high energy density sciences with high power lasers is creation of extremely high pressures in material. The pressures of more than 0.1 TPa are the energy density corresponding to the chemical bonding energy, resulting in expectation of dramatic changes in the chemical reactions. At pressures of more than TPa, most of material would be melted on the shock Hugoniot curve. However, if the temperature is less than 1eV or lower than a melting point at pressures of more than TPa, novel solid states of matter must be created through a pressured phase transition. One of the interesting materials must be carbon. At pressures of more than TPa, the diamond structure changes to BC and cubic at more than 3TPa. To create such novel states of matter, several kinds of isentropic-like compression techniques are being developed with high power lasers. To explore the ``Tera-Pascal Science,'' now we have a new tool which is an x-ray free electron laser as well as high power lasers. The XFEL will clear the details of the HED states and also efficiently create hot dense matter. We have started a new project on high energy density sciences using an XFEL (SACLA) in Japan, which is a HERMES (High Energy density Revolution of Matter in Extreme States) project.

  15. Density-based and transport-based core-periphery structures in networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Hoon; Cucuringu, Mihai; Porter, Mason A

    2014-03-01

    Networks often possess mesoscale structures, and studying them can yield insights into both structure and function. It is most common to study community structure, but numerous other types of mesoscale structures also exist. In this paper, we examine core-periphery structures based on both density and transport. In such structures, core network components are well-connected both among themselves and to peripheral components, which are not well-connected to anything. We examine core-periphery structures in a wide range of examples of transportation, social, and financial networks-including road networks in large urban areas, a rabbit warren, a dolphin social network, a European interbank network, and a migration network between counties in the United States. We illustrate that a recently developed transport-based notion of node coreness is very useful for characterizing transportation networks. We also generalize this notion to examine core versus peripheral edges, and we show that the resulting diagnostic is also useful for transportation networks. To examine the properties of transportation networks further, we develop a family of generative models of roadlike networks. We illustrate the effect of the dimensionality of the embedding space on transportation networks, and we demonstrate that the correlations between different measures of coreness can be very different for different types of networks.

  16. The collapse of a molecular cloud core to stellar densities using radiation non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurster, James; Bate, Matthew R.; Price, Daniel J.

    2018-04-01

    We present results from radiation non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) calculations that follow the collapse of rotating, magnetized, molecular cloud cores to stellar densities. These are the first such calculations to include all three non-ideal effects: ambipolar diffusion, Ohmic resistivity, and the Hall effect. We employ an ionization model in which cosmic ray ionization dominates at low temperatures and thermal ionization takes over at high temperatures. We explore the effects of varying the cosmic ray ionization rate from ζcr = 10-10 to 10-16 s-1. Models with ionization rates ≳10-12 s-1 produce results that are indistinguishable from ideal MHD. Decreasing the cosmic ray ionization rate extends the lifetime of the first hydrostatic core up to a factor of 2, but the lifetimes are still substantially shorter than those obtained without magnetic fields. Outflows from the first hydrostatic core phase are launched in all models, but the outflows become broader and slower as the ionization rate is reduced. The outflow morphology following stellar core formation is complex and strongly dependent on the cosmic ray ionization rate. Calculations with high ionization rates quickly produce a fast (≈14 km s-1) bipolar outflow that is distinct from the first core outflow, but with the lowest ionization rate, a slower (≈3-4 km s-1) conical outflow develops gradually and seamlessly merges into the first core outflow.

  17. Two-dimensional AXUV-based radiated power density diagnostics on NSTX-U.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faust, I; Delgado-Aparicio, L; Bell, R E; Tritz, K; Diallo, A; Gerhardt, S P; LeBlanc, B; Kozub, T A; Parker, R R; Stratton, B C

    2014-11-01

    A new set of radiated-power-density diagnostics for the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade (NSTX-U) tokamak have been designed to measure the two-dimensional poloidal structure of the total photon emissivity profile in order to perform power balance, impurity transport, and magnetohydrodynamic studies. Multiple AXUV-diode based pinhole cameras will be installed in the same toroidal angle at various poloidal locations. The local emissivity will be obtained from several types of tomographic reconstructions. The layout and response expected for the new radially viewing poloidal arrays will be shown for different impurity concentrations to characterize the diagnostic sensitivity. The radiated power profile inverted from the array data will also be used for estimates of power losses during transitions from various divertor configurations in NSTX-U. The effect of in-out and top/bottom asymmetries in the core radiation from high-Z impurities will be addressed.

  18. Two-dimensional AXUV-based radiated power density diagnostics on NSTX-Ua)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faust, I.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Bell, R. E.; Tritz, K.; Diallo, A.; Gerhardt, S. P.; LeBlanc, B.; Kozub, T. A.; Parker, R. R.; Stratton, B. C.

    2014-11-01

    A new set of radiated-power-density diagnostics for the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade (NSTX-U) tokamak have been designed to measure the two-dimensional poloidal structure of the total photon emissivity profile in order to perform power balance, impurity transport, and magnetohydrodynamic studies. Multiple AXUV-diode based pinhole cameras will be installed in the same toroidal angle at various poloidal locations. The local emissivity will be obtained from several types of tomographic reconstructions. The layout and response expected for the new radially viewing poloidal arrays will be shown for different impurity concentrations to characterize the diagnostic sensitivity. The radiated power profile inverted from the array data will also be used for estimates of power losses during transitions from various divertor configurations in NSTX-U. The effect of in-out and top/bottom asymmetries in the core radiation from high-Z impurities will be addressed.

  19. Two-dimensional AXUV-based radiated power density diagnostics on NSTX-U

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faust, I.; Parker, R. R. [MIT - Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Bell, R. E.; Diallo, A.; Gerhardt, S. P.; LeBlanc, B.; Kozub, T. A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States); Tritz, K. [The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21209 (United States); Stratton, B. C. [MIT - Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    A new set of radiated-power-density diagnostics for the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade (NSTX-U) tokamak have been designed to measure the two-dimensional poloidal structure of the total photon emissivity profile in order to perform power balance, impurity transport, and magnetohydrodynamic studies. Multiple AXUV-diode based pinhole cameras will be installed in the same toroidal angle at various poloidal locations. The local emissivity will be obtained from several types of tomographic reconstructions. The layout and response expected for the new radially viewing poloidal arrays will be shown for different impurity concentrations to characterize the diagnostic sensitivity. The radiated power profile inverted from the array data will also be used for estimates of power losses during transitions from various divertor configurations in NSTX-U. The effect of in-out and top/bottom asymmetries in the core radiation from high-Z impurities will be addressed.

  20. Two-dimensional AXUV-based radiated power density diagnostics on NSTX-U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faust, I.; Parker, R. R.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Bell, R. E.; Diallo, A.; Gerhardt, S. P.; LeBlanc, B.; Kozub, T. A.; Tritz, K.; Stratton, B. C.

    2014-01-01

    A new set of radiated-power-density diagnostics for the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade (NSTX-U) tokamak have been designed to measure the two-dimensional poloidal structure of the total photon emissivity profile in order to perform power balance, impurity transport, and magnetohydrodynamic studies. Multiple AXUV-diode based pinhole cameras will be installed in the same toroidal angle at various poloidal locations. The local emissivity will be obtained from several types of tomographic reconstructions. The layout and response expected for the new radially viewing poloidal arrays will be shown for different impurity concentrations to characterize the diagnostic sensitivity. The radiated power profile inverted from the array data will also be used for estimates of power losses during transitions from various divertor configurations in NSTX-U. The effect of in-out and top/bottom asymmetries in the core radiation from high-Z impurities will be addressed

  1. Fusion power core engineering for the ARIES-ST power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tillack, M.S.; Wang, X.R.; Pulsifer, J.; Malang, S.; Sze, D.K.; Billone, M.; Sviatoslavsky, I.

    2003-01-01

    ARIES-ST is a 1000 MWe fusion power plant based on a low aspect ratio 'spherical torus' (ST) plasma. The ARIES-ST power core was designed to accommodate the unique features of an ST power plant, to meet the top-level requirements of an attractive fusion energy source, and to minimize extrapolation from the fusion technology database under development throughout the world. The result is an advanced helium-cooled ferritic steel blanket with flowing PbLi breeder and tungsten plasma-interactive components. Design improvements, such as the use of SiC inserts in the blanket to extend the outlet coolant temperature range were explored and the results are reported here. In the final design point, the power and particle loads found in ARIES-ST are relatively similar to other advanced tokamak power plants (e.g. ARIES-RS [Fusion Eng. Des. 38 (1997) 3; Fusion Eng. Des. 38 (1997) 87]) such that exotic technologies were not required in order to satisfy all of the design criteria. Najmabadi and the ARIES Team [Fusion Eng. Des. (this issue)] provide an overview of ARIES-ST design. In this article, the details of the power core design are presented together with analysis of the thermal-hydraulic, thermomechanical and materials behavior of in-vessel components. Detailed engineering analysis of ARIES-ST TF and PF systems, nuclear analysis, and safety are given in the companion papers

  2. Results from core-edge experiments in high Power, high performance plasmas on DIII-D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.W. Petrie

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Significant challenges to reducing divertor heat flux in highly powered near-double null divertor (DND hybrid plasmas, while still maintaining both high performance metrics and low enough density for application of RF heating, are identified. For these DNDs on DIII-D, the scaling of the peak heat flux at the outer target (q⊥P ∝ [PSOL x IP] 0.92 for PSOL= 8−19MW and IP= 1.0–1.4MA, and is consistent with standard ITPA scaling for single-null H-mode plasmas. Two divertor heat flux reduction methods were tested. First, applying the puff-and-pump radiating divertor to DIII-D plasmas may be problematical at high power and H98 (≥ 1.5 due to improvement in confinement time with deuterium gas puffing which can lead to unacceptably high core density under certain conditions. Second, q⊥P for these high performance DNDs was reduced by ≈35% when an open divertor is closed on the common flux side of the outer divertor target (“semi-slot” but also that heating near the slot opening is a significant source for impurity contamination of the core.

  3. Power Requirements Determined for High-Power-Density Electric Motors for Electric Aircraft Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Dexter; Brown, Gerald V.

    2005-01-01

    Future advanced aircraft fueled by hydrogen are being developed to use electric drive systems instead of gas turbine engines for propulsion. Current conventional electric motor power densities cannot match those of today s gas turbine aircraft engines. However, if significant technological advances could be made in high-power-density motor development, the benefits of an electric propulsion system, such as the reduction of harmful emissions, could be realized.

  4. High power density reactors based on direct cooled particle beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, J. R.; Horn, F. L.

    Reactors based on direct cooled High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) type particle fuel are described. The small diameter particle fuel is packed between concentric porous cylinders to make annular fuel elements, with the inlet coolant gas flowing inwards. Hot exit gas flows out along the central channel of each element. Because of the very large heat transfer area in the packed beds, power densities in particle bed reactors (PBRs) are extremely high resulting in compact, lightweight systems. Coolant exit temperatures are high, because of the ceramic fuel temperature capabilities, and the reactors can be ramped to full power and temperature very rapidly. PBR systems can generate very high burst power levels using open cycle hydrogen coolant, or high continuous powers using closed cycle helium coolant. PBR technology is described and development requirements assessed.

  5. High power density reactors based on direct cooled particle beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, J.R.; Horn, F.L.

    1985-01-01

    Reactors based on direct cooled HTGR type particle fuel are described. The small diameter particle fuel is packed between concentric porous cylinders to make annular fuel elements, with the inlet coolant gas flowing inwards. Hot exit gas flows out long the central channel of each element. Because of the very large heat transfer area in the packed beds, power densities in particle bed reactors (PBR's) are extremely high resulting in compact, lightweight systems. Coolant exit temperatures are high, because of the ceramic fuel temperature capabilities, and the reactors can be ramped to full power and temperature very rapidly. PBR systems can generate very high burst power levels using open cycle hydrogen coolant, or high continuous powers using closed cycle helium coolant. PBR technology is described and development requirements assessed. 12 figs

  6. Development of Liquid-Vapor Core Reactors with MHD Generator for Space Power and Propulsion Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samim Anghaie

    2002-01-01

    Any reactor that utilizes fuel consisting of a fissile material in a gaseous state may be referred to as a gaseous core reactor (GCR). Studies on GCRs have primarily been limited to the conceptual phase, mostly due to budget cuts and program cancellations in the early 1970's. A few scientific experiments have been conducted on candidate concepts, primarily of static pressure fissile gas filling a cylindrical or spherical cavity surrounded by a moderating shell, such as beryllium, heavy water, or graphite. The main interest in this area of nuclear power generation is for space applications. The interest in space applications has developed due to the promise of significant enhancement in fuel utilization, safety, plant efficiency, special high-performance features, load-following capabilities, power conversion optimization, and other key aspects of nuclear power generation. The design of a successful GCR adapted for use in space is complicated. The fissile material studied in the pa st has been in a fluorine compound, either a tetrafluoride or a hexafluoride. Both of these molecules have an impact on the structural material used in the making of a GCR. Uranium hexafluoride as a fuel allows for a lower operating temperature, but at temperatures greater than 900K becomes essentially impossible to contain. This difficulty with the use of UF6 has caused engineers and scientists to use uranium tetrafluoride, which is a more stable molecule but has the disadvantage of requiring significantly higher operating temperatures. Gas core reactors have traditionally been studied in a steady state configuration. In this manner a fissile gas and working fluid are introduced into the core, called a cavity, that is surrounded by a reflector constructed of materials such as Be or BeO. These reactors have often been described as cavity reactors because the density of the fissile gas is low and criticality is achieved only by means of the reflector to reduce neutron leakage from the core

  7. Evaluation for the models of neutron diffusion theory in terms of power density distributions of the HTTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takamatsu, Kuniyoshi; Shimakawa, Satoshi; Nojiri, Naoki; Fujimoto, Nozomu

    2003-10-01

    In the case of evaluations for the highest temperature of the fuels in the HTTR, it is very important to expect the power density distributions accurately; therefore, it is necessary to improve the analytical model with the neutron diffusion and the burn-up theory. The power density distributions are analyzed in terms of two models, the one mixing the fuels and the burnable poisons homogeneously and the other modeling them heterogeneously. Moreover these analytical power density distributions are compared with the ones derived from the gross gamma-ray measurements and the Monte Carlo calculational code with continuous energy. As a result the homogeneous mixed model isn't enough to expect the power density distributions of the core in the axial direction; on the other hand, the heterogeneous model improves the accuracy. (author)

  8. Determination of the in-core power and the average core temperature of low power research reactors using gamma dose rate measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osei Poku, L.

    2012-01-01

    Most reactors incorporate out-of-core neutron detectors to monitor the reactor power. An accurate relationship between the powers indicated by these detectors and actual core thermal power is required. This relationship is established by calibrating the thermal power. The most common method used in calibrating the thermal power of low power reactors is neutron activation technique. To enhance the principle of multiplicity and diversity of measuring the thermal neutron flux and/or power and temperature difference and/or average core temperature of low power research reactors, an alternative and complimentary method has been developed, in addition to the current method. Thermal neutron flux/Power and temperature difference/average core temperature were correlated with measured gamma dose rate. The thermal neutron flux and power predicted using gamma dose rate measurement were in good agreement with the calibrated/indicated thermal neutron fluxes and powers. The predicted data was also good agreement with thermal neutron fluxes and powers obtained using the activation technique. At an indicated power of 30 kW, the gamma dose rate measured predicted thermal neutron flux of (1* 10 12 ± 0.00255 * 10 12 ) n/cm 2 s and (0.987* 10 12 ± 0.00243 * 10 12 ) which corresponded to powers of (30.06 ± 0.075) kW and (29.6 ± 0.073) for both normal level of the pool water and 40 cm below normal levels respectively. At an indicated power of 15 kW, the gamma dose rate measured predicted thermal neutron flux of (5.07* 10 11 ± 0.025* 10 11 ) n/cm 2 s and (5.12 * 10 11 ±0.024* 10 11 ) n/cm 2 s which corresponded to power of (15.21 ± 0.075) kW and (15.36 ± 0.073) kW for both normal levels of the pool water and 40 cm below normal levels respectively. The power predicted by this work also compared well with power obtained from a three-dimensional neutronic analysis for GHARR-1 core. The predicted power also compares well with calculated power using a correlation equation obtained from

  9. Thermodynamic, energy efficiency, and power density analysis of reverse electrodialysis power generation with natural salinity gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Ngai Yin; Vermaas, David A; Nijmeijer, Kitty; Elimelech, Menachem

    2014-05-06

    Reverse electrodialysis (RED) can harness the Gibbs free energy of mixing when fresh river water flows into the sea for sustainable power generation. In this study, we carry out a thermodynamic and energy efficiency analysis of RED power generation, and assess the membrane power density. First, we present a reversible thermodynamic model for RED and verify that the theoretical maximum extractable work in a reversible RED process is identical to the Gibbs free energy of mixing. Work extraction in an irreversible process with maximized power density using a constant-resistance load is then examined to assess the energy conversion efficiency and power density. With equal volumes of seawater and river water, energy conversion efficiency of ∼ 33-44% can be obtained in RED, while the rest is lost through dissipation in the internal resistance of the ion-exchange membrane stack. We show that imperfections in the selectivity of typical ion exchange membranes (namely, co-ion transport, osmosis, and electro-osmosis) can detrimentally lower efficiency by up to 26%, with co-ion leakage being the dominant effect. Further inspection of the power density profile during RED revealed inherent ineffectiveness toward the end of the process. By judicious early discontinuation of the controlled mixing process, the overall power density performance can be considerably enhanced by up to 7-fold, without significant compromise to the energy efficiency. Additionally, membrane resistance was found to be an important factor in determining the power densities attainable. Lastly, the performance of an RED stack was examined for different membrane conductivities and intermembrane distances simulating high performance membranes and stack design. By thoughtful selection of the operating parameters, an efficiency of ∼ 37% and an overall gross power density of 3.5 W/m(2) represent the maximum performance that can potentially be achieved in a seawater-river water RED system with low

  10. The Density Jump at the Inner Core Boundary in the Eastern and Western Hemispheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnoshchekov, D. N.; Ovtchinnikov, V. M.

    2018-02-01

    The results of analysis of more than 1300 new PKiKP/PcP amplitude ratios measured in Southeast Asia and South America at the epicentral distances of 3.2°-35.2° are presented. The density jump in the Eastern Hemisphere of the Earth's inner core (IC) is 0.3 g/cm3, and it is 0.9 g/cm3 in the Western one. Taking the large discrepancy in the obtained estimates into consideration, maintenance of such large lateral variations in the mosaic properties of the IC reflecting surface requires considerable variations in the thermodynamic parameters (mostly temperature) of the inner-outer core transition. However, if the observed asymmetry in the density jump distribution is of a global character, the data presented support the translation model of the IC dynamics. This model implies IC crystallization in the Western Hemisphere and melting in the Eastern one, not vice versa, as suggested by another geodynamic model based on thermochemical convection in the outer core and the thermal balance of the core-mantle system.

  11. Active learning for noisy oracle via density power divergence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sogawa, Yasuhiro; Ueno, Tsuyoshi; Kawahara, Yoshinobu; Washio, Takashi

    2013-10-01

    The accuracy of active learning is critically influenced by the existence of noisy labels given by a noisy oracle. In this paper, we propose a novel pool-based active learning framework through robust measures based on density power divergence. By minimizing density power divergence, such as β-divergence and γ-divergence, one can estimate the model accurately even under the existence of noisy labels within data. Accordingly, we develop query selecting measures for pool-based active learning using these divergences. In addition, we propose an evaluation scheme for these measures based on asymptotic statistical analyses, which enables us to perform active learning by evaluating an estimation error directly. Experiments with benchmark datasets and real-world image datasets show that our active learning scheme performs better than several baseline methods. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. High-field, high-density tokamak power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohn, D.R.; Cook, D.L.; Hay, R.D.; Kaplan, D.; Kreischer, K.; Lidskii, L.M.; Stephany, W.; Williams, J.E.C.; Jassby, D.L.; Okabayashi, M.

    1977-11-01

    A conceptual design of a compact (R 0 = 6.0 m) high power density (average P/sub f/ = 7.7 MW/m 3 ) tokamak demonstration power reactor has been developed. High magnetic field (B/sub t/ = 7.4 T) and moderate elongation (b/a = 1.6) permit operation at the high density (n(0) approximately 5 x 10 14 cm -3 ) needed for ignition in a relatively small plasma, with a spatially-averaged toroidal beta of only 4%. A unique design for the Nb 3 Sn toroidal-field magnet system reduces the stress in the high-field trunk region, and allows modularization for simpler disassembly. The modest value of toroidal beta permits a simple, modularized plasma-shaping coil system, located inside the TF coil trunk. Heating of the dense central plasma is attained by the use of ripple-assisted injection of 120-keV D 0 beams. The ripple-coil system also affords dynamic control of the plasma temperature during the burn period. A FLIBE-lithium blanket is designed especially for high-power-density operation in a high-field environment, and gives an overall tritium breeding ratio of 1.05 in the slowly pumped lithium

  13. Atmospheric turbulence profiling with unknown power spectral density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helin, Tapio; Kindermann, Stefan; Lehtonen, Jonatan; Ramlau, Ronny

    2018-04-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) is a technology in modern ground-based optical telescopes to compensate for the wavefront distortions caused by atmospheric turbulence. One method that allows to retrieve information about the atmosphere from telescope data is so-called SLODAR, where the atmospheric turbulence profile is estimated based on correlation data of Shack-Hartmann wavefront measurements. This approach relies on a layered Kolmogorov turbulence model. In this article, we propose a novel extension of the SLODAR concept by including a general non-Kolmogorov turbulence layer close to the ground with an unknown power spectral density. We prove that the joint estimation problem of the turbulence profile above ground simultaneously with the unknown power spectral density at the ground is ill-posed and propose three numerical reconstruction methods. We demonstrate by numerical simulations that our methods lead to substantial improvements in the turbulence profile reconstruction compared to the standard SLODAR-type approach. Also, our methods can accurately locate local perturbations in non-Kolmogorov power spectral densities.

  14. Use of in-core self-powered detectors in the nuclear reactor control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitel'man, M.G.; Andreev, L.G.; Batenin, I.V.

    1975-01-01

    The paper describes the results of experiments conducted at the Obninsk atomic power station on the establishment of an integrated system for the control and automatic regulation of the distribution of energy liberation. The pick-ups used for this system are direct-charge detectors with rhodium emitters. The system, which consists of 12 integral DPZ-7 detectors distributed evenly on 2 mutually perpendicular diamaters and 2 assemblies, each containing 4 1n direct-charge detectors, monitors the distribution of neutron flow density according to core height. Increased signals from the detectors were fed into the summation block, in which the outgoing signal was also adjusted. The half-life of the rhodium was calculated and the non-inertia of the entire system ascertained. The total operating time of the system for the automatic control of reactor power is approximately 1 h. The influence of interference was not determined. During the experiment, the power of the reactor remained constant, i.e. its regulation by the direct-charge detectors inside the core was effective. (author)

  15. Adaptive control method for core power control in TRIGA Mark II reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabri Minhat, Mohd; Selamat, Hazlina; Subha, Nurul Adilla Mohd

    2018-01-01

    The 1MWth Reactor TRIGA PUSPATI (RTP) Mark II type has undergone more than 35 years of operation. The existing core power control uses feedback control algorithm (FCA). It is challenging to keep the core power stable at the desired value within acceptable error bands to meet the safety demand of RTP due to the sensitivity of nuclear research reactor operation. Currently, the system is not satisfied with power tracking performance and can be improved. Therefore, a new design core power control is very important to improve the current performance in tracking and regulate reactor power by control the movement of control rods. In this paper, the adaptive controller and focus on Model Reference Adaptive Control (MRAC) and Self-Tuning Control (STC) were applied to the control of the core power. The model for core power control was based on mathematical models of the reactor core, adaptive controller model, and control rods selection programming. The mathematical models of the reactor core were based on point kinetics model, thermal hydraulic models, and reactivity models. The adaptive control model was presented using Lyapunov method to ensure stable close loop system and STC Generalised Minimum Variance (GMV) Controller was not necessary to know the exact plant transfer function in designing the core power control. The performance between proposed adaptive control and FCA will be compared via computer simulation and analysed the simulation results manifest the effectiveness and the good performance of the proposed control method for core power control.

  16. Direct measurement of the transition from edge to core power coupling in a light-ion helicon source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowicz, P. A.; Caneses, J. F.; Showers, M. A.; Green, D. L.; Goulding, R. H.; Caughman, J. B. O.; Biewer, T. M.; Rapp, J.; Ruzic, D. N.

    2018-05-01

    We present time-resolved measurements of an edge-to-core power transition in a light-ion (deuterium) helicon discharge in the form of infra-red camera imaging of a thin stainless steel target plate on the Proto-Material Exposure eXperiment device. The time-resolved images measure the two-dimensional distribution of power deposition in the helicon discharge. The discharge displays a mode transition characterized by a significant increase in the on-axis electron density and core power coupling, suppression of edge power coupling, and the formation of a fast-wave radial eigenmode. Although the self-consistent mechanism that drives this transition is not yet understood, the edge-to-core power transition displays characteristics that are consistent with the discharge entering a slow-wave anti-resonant regime. RF magnetic field measurements made across the plasma column, together with the power deposition results, provide direct evidence to support the suppression of the slow-wave in favor of core plasma production by the fast-wave in a light-ion helicon source.

  17. Bridge density functional approximation for non-uniform hard core repulsive Yukawa fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Shiqi

    2008-01-01

    In this work, a bridge density functional approximation (BDFA) (J. Chem. Phys. 112, 8079 (2000)) for a non-uniform hard-sphere fluid is extended to a non-uniform hard-core repulsive Yukawa (HCRY) fluid. It is found that the choice of a bulk bridge functional approximation is crucial for both a uniform HCRY fluid and a non-uniform HCRY fluid. A new bridge functional approximation is proposed, which can accurately predict the radial distribution function of the bulk HCRY fluid. With the new bridge functional approximation and its associated bulk second order direct correlation function as input, the BDFA can be used to well calculate the density profile of the HCRY fluid subjected to the influence of varying external fields, and the theoretical predictions are in good agreement with the corresponding simulation data. The calculated results indicate that the present BDFA captures quantitatively the phenomena such as the coexistence of solid-like high density phase and low density gas phase, and the adsorption properties of the HCRY fluid, which qualitatively differ from those of the fluids combining both hard-core repulsion and an attractive tail. (condensed matter: structure, thermal and mechanical properties)

  18. Nuclear Power Reactor Core Melt Accidents. Current State of Knowledge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentaib, Ahmed; Bonneville, Herve; Clement, Bernard; Cranga, Michel; Fichot, Florian; Koundy, Vincent; Meignen, Renaud; Corenwinder, Francois; Leteinturier, Denis; Monroig, Frederique; Nahas, Georges; Pichereau, Frederique; Van-Dorsselaere, Jean-Pierre; Cenerino, Gerard; Jacquemain, Didier; Raimond, Emmanuel; Ducros, Gerard; Journeau, Christophe; Magallon, Daniel; Seiler, Jean-Marie; Tourniaire, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    For over thirty years, IPSN and subsequently IRSN has played a major international role in the field of nuclear power reactor core melt accidents through the undertaking of important experimental programmes (the most significant being the Phebus- FP programme), the development of validated simulation tools (the ASTEC code that is today the leading European tool for modelling severe accidents), and the coordination of the SARNET (Severe Accident Research Network) international network of excellence. These accidents are described as 'severe accidents' because they can lead to radioactive releases outside the plant concerned, with serious consequences for the general public and for the environment. This book compiles the sum of the knowledge acquired on this subject and summarises the lessons that have been learnt from severe accidents around the world for the prevention and reduction of the consequences of such accidents, without addressing those from the Fukushima accident, where knowledge of events is still evolving. The knowledge accumulated by the Institute on these subjects enabled it to play an active role in informing public authorities, the media and the public when this accident occurred, and continues to do so to this day

  19. Self-powered in-core detectors of cobalt type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonsson, Georg

    1975-01-01

    Testing and development of self-powered neutron detectors with a cobalt emitter is described. Long term irradiation at 400 deg C is expected to indicate insulation quality, change in calibration and 60 Co build-up. Dynamic tests to investigate possible transient effects due to temperature changes are being performed on a number of detectors up to about 600 deg C. A long term irradiation at low temperature has been terminated after 4.5 years. On completion, neutron dose was estimated to be 5.6 x 10 21 nvt and the 60 Co background was 9.3 % of the full flux signal. A recently introduced long term test is expected to provide data on instability effects due to 61 Co. For a BWR in-core detector installation, the main advantage of cobalt detectors, apart from the small size, appears to be long life. Development work is being done on detectors with vanadium-cobalt emitters, electronic separation of fast and delayed signals and reduction of gamma sensitivity. (O.T.)

  20. Optimization of power and energy densities in supercapacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, David B. [Sandia National Laboratories, PO Box 969 MS 9291, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States)

    2010-06-01

    Supercapacitors use nanoporous electrodes to store large amounts of charge on their high surface areas, and use the ions in electrolytes to carry charge into the pores. Their high power density makes them a potentially useful complement to batteries. However, ion transport through long, narrow channels still limits power and efficiency in these devices. Proper design can mitigate this. Current collector geometry must also be considered once this is done. Here, De Levie's model for porous electrodes is applied to quantitatively predict device performance and to propose optimal device designs for given specifications. Effects unique to nanoscale pores are considered, including that pores may not have enough salt to fully charge. Supercapacitors are of value for electric vehicles, portable electronics, and power conditioning in electrical grids with distributed renewable sources, and that value will increase as new device fabrication methods are developed and proper design accommodates those improvements. Example design outlines for vehicle applications are proposed and compared. (author)

  1. SOLAR NEUTRINO PHYSICS OSCILLATIONS: SENSITIVITY TO THE ELECTRONIC DENSITY IN THE SUN'S CORE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, Ilidio [Centro Multidisciplinar de Astrofisica, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Turck-Chieze, Sylvaine, E-mail: ilidio.lopes@ist.utl.pt, E-mail: ilopes@uevora.pt, E-mail: sylvaine.turck-chieze@cea.fr [CEA/IRFU/Service d' Astrophysique, CE Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2013-03-01

    Solar neutrinos coming from different nuclear reactions are now detected with high statistics. Consequently, an accurate spectroscopic analysis of the neutrino fluxes arriving on Earth's detectors becomes available, in the context of neutrino oscillations. In this work, we explore the possibility of using this information to infer the radial profile of the electronic density in the solar core. So, we discuss the constraints on the Sun's density and chemical composition that can be determined from solar neutrino observations. This approach constitutes an independent and alternative diagnostic to the helioseismic investigations already done. The direct inversion method, which we propose to obtain the radial solar electronic density profile, is almost independent of the solar model.

  2. Determination of neutron flux densities in WWR-S reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomasek, F.

    1989-04-01

    The method is described of determining neutron flux densities and neutron fluences using activation detectors. The basic definitions and relations for determining reaction rates, fluence and neutron flux as well as the characteristics of some reactions and of sitable activation detectors are reported. The flux densities were determined of thermal and fast neutrons and of gamma quanta in the WWR-S reactor core. The data measured in the period 1984-1987 are tabulated. Cross sections for the individual reactions were determined from spectra measurements processed using program SAND-II and cross section library ENDF-B IV. Neutron flux densities were also measured for the WWR-S reactor vertical channels. (E.J.). 10 figs., 8 tabs., 111 refs

  3. Sensitivity analysis for reactivity and power density investigations in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naguib, K.; Morcos, H.N.; Sallam, O.H.; Abdelsamei, SH.

    1993-01-01

    Sensitivity analysis theory based on the variational functional approaches was applied to evaluate sensitivities of eigenvalues and power densities due to variation of the absorber concentration in the reactor core. The practical usefulness of this method is illustrated by considering test cases. The result indicates that this method is as accurate as those obtained from direct calculations, yet it provides an economical means in saving computational time since it requires fewer calculations. The SARC-1/2 code have been written in Fortran-77 to solve this problem.3 tab. 1 fig

  4. Gas density fluctuations in the Perseus Cluster: clumping factor and velocity power spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuravleva, I.; Churazov, E.; Arevalo, P.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Allen, S. W.; Fabian, A. C.; Forman, W. R.; Sanders, J. S.; Simionescu, A.; Sunyaev, R.; Vikhlinin, A.; Werner, N.

    2015-05-20

    X-ray surface brightness fluctuations in the core of the Perseus Cluster are analysed, using deep observations with the Chandra observatory. The amplitude of gas density fluctuations on different scales is measured in a set of radial annuli. It varies from 7 to 12 per cent on scales of ~10–30 kpc within radii of 30–220 kpc from the cluster centre. Using a statistical linear relation between the observed amplitude of density fluctuations and predicted velocity, the characteristic velocity of gas motions on each scale is calculated. The typical amplitudes of the velocity outside the central 30 kpc region are 90–140 km s-1 on ~20–30 kpc scales and 70–100 km s-1 on smaller scales ~7–10 kpc. The velocity power spectrum (PS) is consistent with cascade of turbulence and its slope is in a broad agreement with the slope for canonical Kolmogorov turbulence. The gas clumping factor estimated from the PS of the density fluctuations is lower than 7–8 per cent for radii ~30–220 kpc from the centre, leading to a density bias of less than 3–4 per cent in the cluster core. Uncertainties of the analysis are examined and discussed. Future measurements of the gas velocities with the Astro-H, Athena and Smart-X observatories will directly measure the gas density–velocity perturbation relation and further reduce systematic uncertainties in this analysis.

  5. Profiles of radiation power density in WEGA stellarator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, D.; Otte, M.; Giannone, L.

    2005-01-01

    On the WEGA stellarator, a 12 channel bolometer camera has been used to measure the radiation power losses of the plasma, which is heated by ECR at 2.45 GHz with a maximum power of 26 kW. The typical electron temperatures achieved are around 10 eV. The bolometer is of the Au resistor type and is positioned on the mid-plane, viewing the plasma from the low-field side with a spatial resolution of about 6 cm. The viewing angle is opened to poloidally (±47 o ) and covers the whole cross-section. Angular profiles of radiation power density (emissivity) can be achieved using the measured fluxes to the channels, which are given by the integrals along the sight lines. Using Abel inversion with maximum entropy regularisation, radial profiles of emissivity could be obtained. It is found that the angular profile of emissivity depends on the magnetic configuration, the working gas (Ar, He) and the heating scenario. Peaked and hollow emissivity profiles have been obtained by using different types of heating antenna. By changing the magnetic configuration, strong edge radiation has been observed. The largest emissivity values are obtained in the upper SOL range of Ar-discharges. This edge radiation can be reduced by shifting the flux surfaces inwards or by changing their shape at the antenna. The reconstruction of the radial profile of the emissivity was carried out in the case of a peaked angular profile with minimum edge radiation. The total radiation power was estimated by linear extrapolation of the integrated radiation power in the viewing region to the torus volume. It is typically less than 30% of the ECRH input power, but depending on the ECRH input power, again the magnetic configuration, the working gas as well as the absolute field strength on the magnetic axis. Maximum radiation losses have been obtained around 0.6·B0, where B 0 =87.5 mT is the resonant field strength of the ECRH. No evidence for impurities was obtained from spectroscopic measurements, and thus the

  6. Metamorphic core complex formation by density inversion and lower-crust extrusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, F; Goodliffe, A M; Taylor, B

    2001-06-21

    Metamorphic core complexes are domal uplifts of metamorphic and plutonic rocks bounded by shear zones that separate them from unmetamorphosed cover rocks. Interpretations of how these features form are varied and controversial, and include models involving extension on low-angle normal faults, plutonic intrusions and flexural rotation of initially high-angle normal faults. The D'Entrecasteaux islands of Papua New Guinea are actively forming metamorphic core complexes located within a continental rift that laterally evolves to sea-floor spreading. The continental rifting is recent (since approximately 6 Myr ago), seismogenic and occurring at a rapid rate ( approximately 25 mm yr-1). Here we present evidence-based on isostatic modelling, geological data and heat-flow measurements-that the D'Entrecasteaux core complexes accommodate extension through the vertical extrusion of ductile lower-crust material, driven by a crustal density inversion. Although buoyant extrusion is accentuated in this region by the geological structure present-which consists of dense ophiolite overlaying less-dense continental crust-this mechanism may be generally applicable to regions where thermal expansion lowers crustal density with depth.

  7. Development of a standard data base for FBR core nuclear design. 10. Reevaluation of atomic number density of JOYO Mk-II core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Numata, Kazuyuki; Sato, Wakaei [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center; Ishikawa, Makoto; Arii, Yoshio [Nuclear Energy System Incorporation, Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-07-01

    The material composition of JOYO Mk-II core components in its initial core was reevaluated as a part of the effort for developing a standard data base for FBR core nuclear design. The special feature of the reevaluation is to treat the decay of Pu-241 isotope, so that the atomic number densities of Pu-241 and Am-241 in fuel assemblies can be exactly evaluated on the initial critical date, Nov. 22nd, 1982. Further, the atomic number densities of other core components were also evaluated to improve the analytical accuracy. Those include the control rods which were not so strictly evaluated in the past, and the dummy fuels and the neutron sources which were not treated in the analytical model so far. The results of the present reevaluation were as follows: (1) The changes of atomic number densities of the major nuclides such as Pu-239, U-235 and U-238 were about {+-}0.2 to 0.3%. On the other hand, the number density of Pu-241, which was the motivation of the present work, was reduced by 12%. From the fact, the number densities in the past analysis might be based on the isotope measurement of the manufacturing point of time without considering the decay of Pu-241. (2) As the other core components, the number densities of control rods and outer reflector-type A were largely improved. (author)

  8. Design of 50 MWe HTR-PBMR reactor core and nuclear power plant fuel using SRAC2006 programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bima Caraka Putra; Yosaphat Sumardi; Yohannes Sardjono

    2014-01-01

    This research aims to assess the design of core and fuel of nuclear power plant type High Temperature Reactor-Pebble Bed Modular Reactor 50 MWe from the Beginning of Life (BOL) to Ending of life (EOL) with eight years operating life. The parameters that need to be analyzed in this research are the temperature distribution inside the core, quantity enrichment of U 235 , fuel composition, criticality, and temperature reactivity coefficient of the core. The research was conducted with a data set of core design parameters such as nuclides density, core and fuel dimensions, and the axial temperature distribution inside the core. Using SRAC2006 program package, the effective multiplication factor (k eff ) values obtained from the input data that has been prepared. The results show the value of the criticality of core is proportional to the addition of U 235 enrichment. The optimum enrichment obtained at 10.125% without the use of burnable poison with an excess reactivity of 3.1 2% at BOL. The addition Gd 2O3 obtained an optimum value of 12 ppm burnable poison with an excess reactivity 0.38 %. The use of Er 2O3 with an optimum value 290 ppm has an excess reactivity 1.24 % at BOL. The core temperature reactivity coefficient with and without the use of burnable poison has a negative values that indicates the nature of its inherent safety. (author)

  9. Assessment of Microbial Fuel Cell Configurations and Power Densities

    KAUST Repository

    Logan, Bruce E.

    2015-07-30

    Different microbial electrochemical technologies are being developed for a many diverse applications, including wastewater treatment, biofuel production, water desalination, remote power sources, and as biosensors. Current and energy densities will always be limited relative to batteries and chemical fuel cells, but these technologies have other advantages based on the self-sustaining nature of the microorganisms that can donate or accept electrons from an electrode, the range of fuels that can be used, and versatility in the chemicals that can be produced. The high cost of membranes will likely limit applications of microbial electrochemical technologies that might require a membrane. For microbial fuel cells, which do not need a membrane, questions remain on whether larger-scale systems can produce power densities similar to those obtained in laboratory-scale systems. It is shown here that configuration and fuel (pure chemicals in laboratory media versus actual wastewaters) remain the key factors in power production, rather than the scale of the application. Systems must be scaled up through careful consideration of electrode spacing and packing per unit volume of reactor.

  10. Assessment of Microbial Fuel Cell Configurations and Power Densities

    KAUST Repository

    Logan, Bruce E.; Wallack, Maxwell J; Kim, Kyoung-Yeol; He, Weihua; Feng, Yujie; Saikaly, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Different microbial electrochemical technologies are being developed for a many diverse applications, including wastewater treatment, biofuel production, water desalination, remote power sources, and as biosensors. Current and energy densities will always be limited relative to batteries and chemical fuel cells, but these technologies have other advantages based on the self-sustaining nature of the microorganisms that can donate or accept electrons from an electrode, the range of fuels that can be used, and versatility in the chemicals that can be produced. The high cost of membranes will likely limit applications of microbial electrochemical technologies that might require a membrane. For microbial fuel cells, which do not need a membrane, questions remain on whether larger-scale systems can produce power densities similar to those obtained in laboratory-scale systems. It is shown here that configuration and fuel (pure chemicals in laboratory media versus actual wastewaters) remain the key factors in power production, rather than the scale of the application. Systems must be scaled up through careful consideration of electrode spacing and packing per unit volume of reactor.

  11. Pulsed power drivers for ICF and high energy density physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, J.J.; Matzen, M.K.; McDaniel, D.H.

    1995-01-01

    Nanosecond Pulsed Power Science and Technology has its origins in the 1960s and over the past decade has matured into a flexible and robust discipline capable of addressing key physics issues of importance to ICF and high Energy Density Physics. The major leverage provided by pulsed power is its ability to generate and deliver high energy and high power at low cost and high efficiency. A low-cost, high-efficiency driver is important because of the very large capital investment required for multi-megajoule ignition-class systems. High efficiency is of additional importance for a commercially viable inertial fusion energy option. Nanosecond pulsed power has been aggressively and successfully developed at Sandia over the past twenty years. This effort has led to the development of unique multi-purpose facilities supported by highly capable diagnostic, calculational and analytic capabilities. The Sandia Particle-beam Fusion Program has evolved as part of an integrated national ICF Program. It applies the low-cost, high-efficiency leverage provided by nanosecond pulsed power systems to the longer-term goals of the national program, i.e., the Laboratory Microfusion Facility and Inertial Fusion Energy. A separate effort has led to the application of nanosecond pulsed power to the generation of intense, high-energy laboratory x-ray sources for application to x-ray laser and radiation effects science research. Saturn is the most powerful of these sources to date. It generates ∼500 kilojoules of x-rays from a magnetically driven implosion (Z-pinch). This paper describes results of x-ray physics experiments performed on Saturn, plans for a new Z-pinch drive capability for PBFA-II, and a design concept for the proposed ∼15 MJ Jupiter facility. The opportunities for ICF-relevant research using these facilities will also be discussed

  12. Automated ligand fitting by core-fragment fitting and extension into density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Klei, Herbert; Adams, Paul D.; Moriarty, Nigel W.; Cohn, Judith D.

    2006-01-01

    An automated ligand-fitting procedure has been developed and tested on 9327 ligands and (F o − F c )exp(iϕ c ) difference density from macromolecular structures in the Protein Data Bank. A procedure for fitting of ligands to electron-density maps by first fitting a core fragment of the ligand to density and then extending the remainder of the ligand into density is presented. The approach was tested by fitting 9327 ligands over a wide range of resolutions (most are in the range 0.8-4.8 Å) from the Protein Data Bank (PDB) into (F o − F c )exp(iϕ c ) difference density calculated using entries from the PDB without these ligands. The procedure was able to place 58% of these 9327 ligands within 2 Å (r.m.s.d.) of the coordinates of the atoms in the original PDB entry for that ligand. The success of the fitting procedure was relatively insensitive to the size of the ligand in the range 10–100 non-H atoms and was only moderately sensitive to resolution, with the percentage of ligands placed near the coordinates of the original PDB entry for fits in the range 58–73% over all resolution ranges tested

  13. Density fluctuation effects on collective neutrino oscillations in O-Ne-Mg core-collapse supernovae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherry, John F.; Fuller, George M.; Wu Mengru; Qian Yongzhong; Carlson, J.; Duan Huaiyu

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the effect of matter density fluctuations on supernova collective neutrino flavor oscillations. In particular, we use full multiangle, three-flavor, self-consistent simulations of the evolution of the neutrino flavor field in the envelope of an O-Ne-Mg core-collapse supernova at shock breakout (neutronization neutrino burst) to study the effect of the matter density ''bump'' left by the He-burning shell. We find a seemingly counterintuitive increase in the overall ν e survival probability created by this matter density feature. We discuss this behavior in terms of the interplay between the matter density profile and neutrino collective effects. While our results give new insights into this interplay, they also suggest an immediate consequence for supernova neutrino burst detection: it will be difficult to use a burst signal to extract information on fossil burning shells or other fluctuations of this scale in the matter density profile. Consistent with previous studies, our results also show that the interplay of neutrino self-coupling and matter fluctuation could cause a significant increase in the ν e survival probability at very low energy.

  14. Two and three dimensional core power distribution monitor and display

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Impink, A.J. Jr.; Grobmyer, L.R.

    1988-01-01

    This patent describes a sensor monitoring system for displaying a profile of fractional deviations in relative coolant enthalpy rise over a defined area comprising at least a part of a core of a nuclear reactor, which system comprises: core exit coolant temperature sensors positioned to monitor at least a portion of the defined area; an inlet temperature sensor outside the core which monitors the temperature of core coolant at an inlet to the reactor means, responsive to the outputs from both the core exit temperature sensors and the inlet temperature sensor, for generating corresponding representative values of actual coolant enthalpy rise and corresponding values of relative enthalpy rise at each location in the defined area at which a core exit coolant temperature sensor is available; means, responsive to the generated values of relative enthalpy rise and to reference values of relative enthalpy rise at corresponding locations in the defined area, for generating values of the fractional deviation of the measured values of relative enthalpy rise from the corresponding values; means for interpolating the generated values of fractional deviation in relative enthalpy rise to provide interpolated values of fractional deviation in relative enthalpy rise at locations in the defined area of the core other than those at which core exit coolant temperature sensors are available; and means for multidimensionally displaying the generated and interpolated values

  15. The Multi一physics Research on I ron一Core Vibration Noise of Power Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI U Ja

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of theoretical research releted to the magnetostriction and maxwell’.s equations,the fi- nite element coupling in the transient electromagnetic field coupling,structure and sound field coupling has been developed In thts paper by using the flnlte element sOftWare CO}IS01., Whleh establish a serles three-phase COT’e re- actor model, to analyzing the power frequency magnetic field distribution,core magnetostrictive displacement,max- well force displacement and sound pressure level of the three-phase series core reactor under the power frequency working state. According to transient magnetic field distribution in the simulation of the reactor,the magnetic flux density distribution inside the reactor and the vibration displacement distribution are calculated,the acoustic field distribution is measured alao. It is shown that physical field simulation results and measured data are basically in consisent by experiment,it is proved multi-physics coupling is an effective method for forecast of noise.

  16. High-power picosecond pulse delivery through hollow core photonic band gap fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michieletto, Mattia; Johansen, Mette Marie; Lyngsø, Jens Kristian

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrated robust and bend insensitive fiber delivery of high power pulsed laser with diffraction limited beam quality for two different kind of hollow core photonic band gap fibers......We demonstrated robust and bend insensitive fiber delivery of high power pulsed laser with diffraction limited beam quality for two different kind of hollow core photonic band gap fibers...

  17. Accurate core-electron binding energy shifts from density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahata, Yuji; Marques, Alberto Dos Santos

    2010-01-01

    Current review covers description of density functional methods of calculation of accurate core-electron binding energy (CEBE) of second and third row atoms; applications of calculated CEBEs and CEBE shifts (ΔCEBEs) in elucidation of topics such as: hydrogen-bonding, peptide bond, polymers, DNA bases, Hammett substituent (σ) constants, inductive and resonance effects, quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR), and solid state effect (WD). This review limits itself to works of mainly Chong and his coworkers for the period post-2002. It is not a fully comprehensive account of the current state of the art.

  18. Estimation of a Reactor Core Power Peaking Factor Using Support Vector Regression and Uncertainty Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, In Ho; Naa, Man Gyun; Lee, Yoon Joon; Park, Goon Cherl

    2009-01-01

    The monitoring of detailed 3-dimensional (3D) reactor core power distribution is a prerequisite in the operation of nuclear power reactors to ensure that various safety limits imposed on the LPD and DNBR, are not violated during nuclear power reactor operation. The LPD and DNBR should be calculated in order to perform the two major functions of the core protection calculator system (CPCS) and the core operation limit supervisory system (COLSS). The LPD at the hottest part of a hot fuel rod, which is related to the power peaking factor (PPF, F q ), is more important than the LPD at any other position in a reactor core. The LPD needs to be estimated accurately to prevent nuclear fuel rods from melting. In this study, support vector regression (SVR) and uncertainty analysis have been applied to estimation of reactor core power peaking factor

  19. Galactic densities, substructure and the initial power spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bullock, J.S.; Zentner, A.R.

    2003-01-01

    Although the currently favored cold dark matter plus cosmological constant model for structure formation assumes an n = 1 scale-invariant initial power spectrum, most inflation models produce at least mild deviations from n = 1. Because the lever arm from the CMB normalization to galaxy scales is long, even a small 'tilt' can have important implications for galactic observations. Here we calculate the COBS-normalized power spectra for several well-motivated models of inflation and compute implications for the substructure content and central densities of galaxy halos. Using an analytic model, normalized against N-body simulations, we show that while halos in the standard (n = 1) model are overdense by a factor of ∼ 6 compared to observations, several of our example inflation+LCDM models predict halo densities well within the range of observations, which prefer models with n ∼ 0.85. We go on to use a semi-analytic model (also normalized against N-body simulations) to follow the merger histories of galaxy-sized halos and track the orbital decay, disruption, and evolution of the merging substructure. Models with n ∼ 0.85 predict a factor of ∼ 3 fewer subhalos at a fixed circular velocity than the standard n 1 case. Although this level of reduction does not resolve the 'dwarf satellite problem', it does imply that the level of feedback required to match the observed number of dwarfs is sensitive to the initial power spectrum. Finally, the fraction of galaxy-halo mass that is bound up in substructure is consistent with limits imposed by multiply imaged quasars for all models considered: f sat > 0.01 even for an effective tilt of n ∼ 0.8. We conclude that, at their current level, lensing constraints of this kind do not provide an interesting probe of the primordial power spectrum

  20. Exploring novel high power density concepts for attractive fusion systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdou, M.A. [California State Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; APEX Team

    1999-05-01

    The advanced power extraction study is aimed at exploring innovative concepts for fusion power technology (FPT) that can tremendously enhance the potential of fusion as an attractive and competitive energy source. Specifically, the study is exploring new and `revolutionary` concepts that can provide the capability to efficiently extract heat from systems with high neutron and surface heat loads while satisfying all the FPT functional requirements and maximizing reliability, maintainability, safety, and environmental requirements. The primary criteria for measuring performance of the new concepts are: (1) high power density capability with a peak neutron wall load (NWL) of {proportional_to}10 MW m{sup -2} and surface heat flux of {proportional_to}2 MW m{sup -2}; (2) high power conversion efficiency, {proportional_to}40% net; and (3) clear potential to achieve high availability; specifically low failure rate, large design margin, and short downtime for maintenance. A requirement that MTBF{>=}43 MTTR was derived as a necessary condition to achieve the required first wall/blanket availability, where MTBF is the mean time between failures and MTTR is the mean time to recover. Highlights of innovative and promising new concepts that may satisfy these criteria are provided. (orig.) 40 refs.

  1. On-power verification of the dynamic response of self-powered in-core detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serdula, K.; Beaudet, M.

    1996-01-01

    Self-powered in-core detectors are used for on-line safety and regulation purposes in CANDU reactors. Such applications require use of detectors whose response is primarily prompt to changes in flux. In-service verification of the detectors' response is required to ensure significant degradation in performance has not occurred during long-term operation. Changes in the detector characteristics occur due to nuclear interactions and failures. Present verification requires significant station resources and disrupts power production. Use of the 'noise' in the detector signal is being investigated as an alternative to assess the dynamic response of the detectors during long-term operation. Measurements of reference 'signatures' were obtained from replacement shutdown system detectors. Results show 'noise' measurements are a promising alternative to the current verification method. Identification of changes in the detector response function assist in accurate diagnosis and prognosis of changes in detector signals due to process changes. (author)

  2. Density matrix embedding in an antisymmetrized geminal power bath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchimochi, Takashi; Welborn, Matthew; Van Voorhis, Troy

    2015-01-01

    Density matrix embedding theory (DMET) has emerged as a powerful tool for performing wave function-in-wave function embedding for strongly correlated systems. In traditional DMET, an accurate calculation is performed on a small impurity embedded in a mean field bath. Here, we extend the original DMET equations to account for correlation in the bath via an antisymmetrized geminal power (AGP) wave function. The resulting formalism has a number of advantages. First, it allows one to properly treat the weak correlation limit of independent pairs, which DMET is unable to do with a mean-field bath. Second, it associates a size extensive correlation energy with a given density matrix (for the models tested), which AGP by itself is incapable of providing. Third, it provides a reasonable description of charge redistribution in strongly correlated but non-periodic systems. Thus, AGP-DMET appears to be a good starting point for describing electron correlation in molecules, which are aperiodic and possess both strong and weak electron correlation

  3. Ultrathin Coaxial Fiber Supercapacitors Achieving High Energy and Power Densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Caiwei; Xie, Yingxi; Sanghadasa, Mohan; Tang, Yong; Lu, Longsheng; Lin, Liwei

    2017-11-15

    Fiber-based supercapacitors have attracted significant interests because of their potential applications in wearable electronics. Although much progress has been made in recent years, the energy and power densities, mechanical strength, and flexibility of such devices are still in need of improvement for practical applications. Here, we demonstrate an ultrathin microcoaxial fiber supercapacitor (μCFSC) with high energy and power densities (2.7 mW h/cm 3 and 13 W/cm 3 ), as well as excellent mechanical properties. The prototype with the smallest reported overall diameter (∼13 μm) is fabricated by successive coating of functional layers onto a single micro-carbon-fiber via a scalable process. Combining the simulation results via the electrochemical model, we attribute the high performance to the well-controlled thin coatings that make full use of the electrode materials and minimize the ion transport path between electrodes. Moreover, the μCFSC features high bending flexibility and large tensile strength (more than 1 GPa), which make it promising as a building block for various flexible energy storage applications.

  4. POWER SPECTRUM DENSITY (PSD ANALYSIS OF AUTOMOTIVE PEDAL-PAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AHMED RITHAUDDEEN YUSOFF

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Vibration at the pedal-pad may contribute to discomfort of foot plantar fascia during driving. This is due to transmission of vibration to the mount, chassis, pedal, and then to the foot plantar fascia. This experimental study is conducted to determine the estimation of peak value using the power spectral density of the vertical vibration input at the foot. The power spectral density value is calculated based on the frequency range between 13 Hz to 18 Hz. This experiment was conducted using 12 subjects testing on three size of pedal-pads; small, medium and large. The result shows that peak value occurs at resonance frequency of 15 Hz. The PSD values at that resonance frequency are 0.251 (m/s2 2/Hz for small pedal-pad, followed by the medium pedal-pad is at 0.387 (m/s2 2/Hz and lastly for the large pedal-pad is at 0.483 (m/s22/Hz. The resultsindicate that during driving, the foot vibration when interact with the large pedal-pad contributed higher stimulus compared with the small and medium pedal-pad. The pedal-pad size plays an important role in the pedal element designs in terms of vibration-transfer from pedal-pads on the feet, particularly to provide comfort to the driver while driving.

  5. State-space model predictive control method for core power control in pressurized water reactor nuclear power stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Guo Xu; Wu, Jie; Zeng, Bifan; Wu, Wangqiang; Ma, Xiao Qian [School of Electric Power, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou (China); Xu, Zhibin [Electric Power Research Institute of Guangdong Power Grid Corporation, Guangzhou (China)

    2017-02-15

    A well-performed core power control to track load changes is crucial in pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power stations. It is challenging to keep the core power stable at the desired value within acceptable error bands for the safety demands of the PWR due to the sensitivity of nuclear reactors. In this paper, a state-space model predictive control (MPC) method was applied to the control of the core power. The model for core power control was based on mathematical models of the reactor core, the MPC model, and quadratic programming (QP). The mathematical models of the reactor core were based on neutron dynamic models, thermal hydraulic models, and reactivity models. The MPC model was presented in state-space model form, and QP was introduced for optimization solution under system constraints. Simulations of the proposed state-space MPC control system in PWR were designed for control performance analysis, and the simulation results manifest the effectiveness and the good performance of the proposed control method for core power control.

  6. Results and interpretation of noise measurements using in-core self powered neutron detector strings at Unit 2 of the Paks Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gloeckler, O.; Por, G.; Valko, J.

    1986-11-01

    In-core neutron noise and fuel assembly outlet temperature noise measurements were performed at Unit 2 of Paks Nuclear Power Plant. Characteristics of the reactor and the noise measuring equipment are briefly described. The in-core Rhodium emitter selfpowered neutron detector strings positioned axially above the other show high coherence and linear phase at low frequencies indicating a marked transport effect, not regularly measured in PWRs. The coherence between horizontally placed neutron detectors is small and the phase is zero. A transport effect of different nature is obtained between neutron detectors (in-core and ex-core) and fuel assembly outlet thermocouples. The observed characteristics depend on reactor and fuel assembly power in a way supporting interpretation in terms of coolant density and void content changes and power feedback effects. During routine analysis vibration of 1.1 Hz appeared as a strong peak in the power spectra. The control assembly that was responsible for the observed behaviour could be localized with high certainty. (author)

  7. Study on the impact of the engineering energy gain and the FPC mass power density on the generation cost of fusion power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Desuo; Wu Yican

    2004-01-01

    The impact of the engineering energy gain and the fusion-power-core (FPC) mass power density (MPD) on the generation cost of fusion power plant are analyzed based on the economic elasticity approach in this paper. From the functions describing the relationship of the generation cost with the engineering energy gain and the MPD, the elasticity coefficients of the generation cost with the engineering energy gain and the MPD have been derived respectively to analyze their sensitivity to the generation cost and the MPD to the generation cost decreases with increasing the engineering energy gain or the MPD. (authors)

  8. Comparison of the fractional power motor with cores made of various magnetic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gmyrek, Zbigniew; Lefik, Marcin; Cavagnino, Andrea; Ferraris, Luca

    2017-12-01

    The optimization of the motor cores, coupled with new core shapes as well as powering the motor at high frequency are the primary reasons for the use of new materials. The utilization of new materials, like SMC (soft magnetic composite), reduce the core loss and/or provide quasi-isotropic core's properties in any magnetization direction. Moreover, the use of SMC materials allows for avoiding degradation of the material portions, resulting from punching process, thereby preventing the deterioration of operating parameters of the motor. The authors examine the impact of technological parameters on the properties of a new type of SMC material and analyze the possibility of its use as the core of the fractional power motor. The result of the work is an indication of the shape of the rotor core made of a new SMC material to achieve operational parameters similar to those that have a motor with a core made of laminations.

  9. Fuel pin failure root causes and power distribution gradients in WWER cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikus, J.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to investigate the influence of some core heterogeneities and reactor construction materials on space power distribution in WWER type cores, especially from viewpoint of the values and gradient occurrence that could result in static loads with some consequences, e.g., fuel pin (FP) or fuel assembly (FA) bowing and possible contribution to the FP failure root causes. Presented information were obtained by means of experiments on research reactor LR-0 concerning the: 1) Power distribution estimation on pellet surface of the FPs neighbouring a FP containing gadolinium (Gd 2 O 3 ) burnable absorber integrated into fuel in WWER-440 and -1000 type cores; 2) Power distribution measurement in periphery FAs neighbouring the baffle in WWER-1000 type cores and 3) Power distribution in FAs neighbouring the control rod absorbing part in a WWER-440 type core. (author)

  10. LTCC magnetic components for high density power converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebourgeois, Richard; Labouré, Eric; Lembeye, Yves; Ferrieux, Jean-Paul

    2018-04-01

    This paper deals with multilayer magnetic components for power electronics application and specifically for high frequency switching. New formulations based on nickel-zinc-copper spinel ferrites were developed for high power and high frequency applications. These ferrites can be sintered at low temperature (around 900°C) which makes them compatible with the LTCC (Low Temperature Co-fired Ceramics) technology. Metallic parts of silver or gold can be fully integrated inside the ferrite while guaranteeing the integrity of both the ferrite and the metal. To make inductors or transformers with the required properties, it is mandatory to have nonmagnetic parts between the turns of the winding. Then it is essential to find a dielectric material, which can be co-sintered both with the ferrite and the metal. We will present the solution we found to this problem and we will describe the results we obtained for a multilayer co-sintered transformer. We will see that these new components have good performance compared with the state of the art and are very promising for developing high density switching mode power supplies.

  11. A heterogeneous multi-core platform for low power signal processing in systems-on-chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paker, Ozgun; Sparsø, Jens; Haandbæk, Niels

    2002-01-01

    is based on message passing. The mini-cores are designed as parameterized soft macros intended for a synthesis based design flow. A 520.000 transistor 0.25µm CMOS prototype chip containing 6 mini-cores has been fabricated and tested. Its power consumption is only 50% higher than a hardwired ASIC and more......This paper presents a low-power and programmable DSP architecture - a heterogeneous multiprocessor platform consisting of standard CPU/DSP cores, and a set of simple instruction set processors called mini-cores each optimized for a particular class of algorithm (FIR, IIR, LMS, etc.). Communication...

  12. ARIES-I Fusion-Power-Core Engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharafat, S.; Najmabadi, F.; Wong, C.P.C.

    1991-01-01

    The ARIES research program is a multi-institutional project, the goal of which is to determine the economic, safety, and environmental potential of tokamak fusion reactors. The ARIES-I steady-state tokamak reactor is a conceptual, DT-burning, 1000 MWe reactor with a major radius of 6.75 m, a minor radius of 1.5 m, and an average neutron wall loading of 2.5 MW/m 2 . The ARIES-I plasma operates in the first MHD stability regime with a toroidal beta of 1.9%. The choice to operate in the first stability regime, with a high aspect ratio and with a low plasma current, leads to the need for high magnetic field to achieve adequate fusion power density (β 2 B 4 ). The toroidal field at the plasma center is 11 T and the maximum field at the coil is 21 T. Nonetheless, it is found that the maximum stress in the structural material of these magnets is ∝700 MPa and industrially available alloys can be used. The impurity-control and particle-exhaust system is based on a high recycling double-null divertor system. The low-activation silicon-carbide (SiC) composite is used as structural material. The breeder material, Li 2 ZrO 3 , and the multiplier material, Be, are both sphere-packed between poloidally nested SiC-composite shells. The divertor plates consist of SiC-composite tube shells protected with 2 mm-thick tungsten armor. The first wall, blanket, shield, and divertor are all helium cooled with an inlet coolant temperature of 350deg C at a pressure of 10 MPa. The high helium-outlet temperature of 650deg C ensures a relatively high gross thermal efficiency of 49%. The ARIES-I design has demonstrated that tokamak reactors have the potential to achieve a high level of safety coupled with a Class-C waste-disposal rating. (orig.)

  13. Determining the axial power profile of partly flooded fuel in a compact core assembled in reactor LR-0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Košťál, Michal; Švadlenková, Marie; Baroň, Petr; Rypar, Vojtěch; Milčák, Ján

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Fission density in partly flooded compact core. • Calculation of fission density axial profile. • Significant calculational under prediction of experimental axial profile. - Abstract: Measurement and calculation of the axial power profile near the boundary of a moderated and non-moderated core is used to analyze the suitability of the neutron-physical process description, mainly the angular cross-section of a water-moderated uranium system. This is also an important issue because it affects the radiation situation above the partly flooded core of a water-moderated reactor. Axial power profiles of various fuel pins irradiated on reactor LR-0 were measured and the results were compared with MCNP6 code calculations using the ENDF/B-VII.0 nuclear data library. The calculated power profile in positions above the moderator level significantly underestimates experimental results. This might be caused by an improper description of the angular distribution of scattered neutrons in a water-moderated uranium system.

  14. Some aspects of optimising the reactor core for a 600 MW(e) high temperature helium turbine power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, U; Presser, W

    1972-04-24

    For the HHT 600 MW(e) power plant a core design with Triagonal blocks containing 24 channels with directly cooled fuel pins was considered. The design was found to require a low HM loading in the fuel zone to achieve favourable economic merits. For low HM densities a strong incentive exists to aim for burn-ups between 80 and 100 GWd/t. At the present an average discharge irradiation of 80 GWd/t was thought feasible and a reference design with a HM density of 0.6 g/cm {sup 3} in both core zones was chosen. The optimisation is not likely to be upset by local hot channel effects as a special investigation into the influence of safety margins found no changes in fuel cycle economics.

  15. K-correlation power spectral density and surface scatter model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittman, Michael G.

    2006-08-01

    The K-Correlation or ABC model for surface power spectral density (PSD) and BRDF has been around for years. Eugene Church and John Stover, in particular, have published descriptions of its use in describing smooth surfaces. The model has, however, remained underused in the optical analysis community partially due to the lack of a clear summary tailored toward that application. This paper provides the K-Correlation PSD normalized to σ(λ) and BRDF normalized to TIS(σ,λ) in a format intended to be used by stray light analysts. It is hoped that this paper will promote use of the model by analysts and its incorporation as a standard tool into stray light modeling software.

  16. Power-spectral-density relationship for retarded differential equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, L. K.

    1974-01-01

    The power spectral density (PSD) relationship between input and output of a set of linear differential-difference equations of the retarded type with real constant coefficients and delays is discussed. The form of the PSD relationship is identical with that applicable to unretarded equations. Since the PSD relationship is useful if and only if the system described by the equations is stable, the stability must be determined before applying the PSD relationship. Since it is sometimes difficult to determine the stability of retarded equations, such equations are often approximated by simpler forms. It is pointed out that some common approximations can lead to erroneous conclusions regarding the stability of a system and, therefore, to the possibility of obtaining PSD results which are not valid.

  17. CENTER FOR PULSED POWER DRIVEN HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PLASMA STUDIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Professor Bruce R. Kusse; Professor David A. Hammer

    2007-04-18

    This annual report summarizes the activities of the Cornell Center for Pulsed-Power-Driven High-Energy-Density Plasma Studies, for the 12-month period October 1, 2005-September 30, 2006. This period corresponds to the first year of the two-year extension (awarded in October, 2005) to the original 3-year NNSA/DOE Cooperative Agreement with Cornell, DE-FC03-02NA00057. As such, the period covered in this report also corresponds to the fourth year of the (now) 5-year term of the Cooperative Agreement. The participants, in addition to Cornell University, include Imperial College, London (IC), the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR), the University of Rochester (UR), the Weizmann Institute of Science (WSI), and the P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute (LPI), Moscow. A listing of all faculty, technical staff and students, both graduate and undergraduate, who participated in Center research activities during the year in question is given in Appendix A.

  18. Power Spectral Density Evaluation of Laser Milled Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raoul-Amadeus Lorbeer

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Ablating surfaces with a pulsed laser system in milling processes often leads to surface changes depending on the milling depth. Especially if a constant surface roughness and evenness is essential to the process, structural degradation may advance until the process fails. The process investigated is the generation of precise thrust by laser ablation. Here, it is essential to predict or rather control the evolution of the surfaces roughness. Laser ablative milling with a short pulse laser system in vacuum (≈1 Pa were performed over depths of several 10 µm documenting the evolution of surface roughness and unevenness with a white light interference microscope. Power spectral density analysis of the generated surface data reveals a strong influence of the crystalline structure of the solid. Furthermore, it was possible to demonstrate that this effect could be suppressed for gold.

  19. Cause and countermeasure for heat up of HTTR core support plate at power rise tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimoto, Nozomu; Takada, Eiji; Nakagawa, Shigeaki; Tachibana, Yukio; Kawasaki, Kozo; Saikusa, Akio; Kojima, Takao; Iyoku, Tatuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment

    2002-01-01

    HTTR has carried out many kinds of tests as power rise tests in which reactor power rises step by step after attained the first criticality. In the tests, temperature of a core support plate reached higher than expected at each power level, the temperature was expected to be higher than the maximum working temperature at 100% power level. Therefore, tests under the high temperature test operation mode, in which the core flow rate was different, were carried out to predict the temperature at 100% power precisely, and investigate the cause of the temperature rise. From the investigation, it was clear that the cause was gap flow in the core support structure. Furthermore, it was estimated that the temperature of the core support plate rose locally due to change in gap width between the core support plate and a seal plate due to change in core pressure drop. The maximum working temperature of the core support plate was revised. The integrity of core support plate under the revised maximum working temperature condition was confirmed by stress analyses. (author)

  20. Cost-based optimizations of power density and target-blanket modularity for 232Th/233U-based ADEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakowski, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    A cost-based parametric systems model is developed for an Accelerator-Driven Energy Production (ADEP) system based on a 232 Th/ 233 U fuel cycle and a molten-salt (LiF/BeF 2 /ThF 3 ) fluid-fuel primary system. Simplified neutron-balance, accelerator, reactor-core, chemical-processing, and balance-of-plant models are combined parametrically with a simplified costing model. The main focus of this model is to examine trade offs related to fission power density, reactor-core modularity, 233 U breeding rate, and fission product transmutation capacity

  1. Modeling the Power Variability of Core Speed Scaling on Homogeneous Multicore Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihui Du

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a family of power models that can capture the nonuniform power effects of speed scaling among homogeneous cores on multicore processors. These models depart from traditional ones, which assume that individual cores contribute to power consumption as independent entities. In our approach, we remove this independence assumption and employ statistical variables of core speed (average speed and the dispersion of the core speeds to capture the comprehensive heterogeneous impact of subtle interactions among the underlying hardware. We systematically explore the model family, deriving basic and refined models that give progressively better fits, and analyze them in detail. The proposed methodology provides an easy way to build power models to reflect the realistic workings of current multicore processors more accurately. Moreover, unlike the existing lower-level power models that require knowledge of microarchitectural details of the CPU cores and the last level cache to capture core interdependency, ours are easier to use and scalable to emerging and future multicore architectures with more cores. These attributes make the models particularly useful to system users or algorithm designers who need a quick way to estimate power consumption. We evaluate the family of models on contemporary x86 multicore processors using the SPEC2006 benchmarks. Our best model yields an average predicted error as low as 5%.

  2. Comparison of the fractional power motor with cores made of various magnetic materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gmyrek Zbigniew

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The optimization of the motor cores, coupled with new core shapes as well as powering the motor at high frequency are the primary reasons for the use of new materials. The utilization of new materials, like SMC (soft magnetic composite, reduce the core loss and/or provide quasi-isotropic core’s properties in any magnetization direction. Moreover, the use of SMC materials allows for avoiding degradation of the material portions, resulting from punching process, thereby preventing the deterioration of operating parameters of the motor. The authors examine the impact of technological parameters on the properties of a new type of SMC material and analyze the possibility of its use as the core of the fractional power motor. The result of the work is an indication of the shape of the rotor core made of a new SMC material to achieve operational parameters similar to those that have a motor with a core made of laminations.

  3. Analysis of the critical and first full power operating cores for PARR using leu oxide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, L.A.; Qazi, M.K.; Bokhari, I.H.; Fazal, R.

    1989-10-01

    This paper explains the analysis for determining the first full power operating core for PARR using LEU oxide fuel. The core configuration selected for this first full power operation contains about 6.13 kg of U-235 distributed in 19 standard and five control fuel elements. The neutron flux level is doubled when core is shifted from 5MW to 10 MW. Total nuclear power peaking factor of the core is 2.03. The analysis shows that the core can be operated safely at 5 MW with a flow rate of 520 meter cube per hour and at 10 MW with a flow rate of 900 meter cube per hour. (A.B.). 10 figs

  4. On the density within the dark-matter core in our galaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ninković S.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Assuming that the disc of our Galaxy, the Milky Way, obeys the classical exponential law, that it is maximal and the Sun is rather far from the maximum of its circular velocity, one finds that, most likely, the galactic corona (subsystem containing the dark matter has a nearly constant density within its core which contains the position of the Sun. The approach applied in the present paper is local, i.e. quantities characterizing the solar neighbourhood are treated. The assumptions and the result could explain why the ratio of the moduli of the Oort constants is expected to exceed the value of 1.0 which corresponds to the locally flat rotation curve of the Milky Way.

  5. Ultrahigh temperature vapor core reactor-MHD system for space nuclear electric power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maya, Isaac; Anghaie, Samim; Diaz, Nils J.; Dugan, Edward T.

    1991-01-01

    The conceptual design of a nuclear space power system based on the ultrahigh temperature vapor core reactor with MHD energy conversion is presented. This UF4 fueled gas core cavity reactor operates at 4000 K maximum core temperature and 40 atm. Materials experiments, conducted with UF4 up to 2200 K, demonstrate acceptable compatibility with tungsten-molybdenum-, and carbon-based materials. The supporting nuclear, heat transfer, fluid flow and MHD analysis, and fissioning plasma physics experiments are also discussed.

  6. ADX: a high field, high power density, advanced divertor and RF tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBombard, B.; Marmar, E.; Irby, J.; Terry, J. L.; Vieira, R.; Wallace, G.; Whyte, D. G.; Wolfe, S.; Wukitch, S.; Baek, S.; Beck, W.; Bonoli, P.; Brunner, D.; Doody, J.; Ellis, R.; Ernst, D.; Fiore, C.; Freidberg, J. P.; Golfinopoulos, T.; Granetz, R.; Greenwald, M.; Hartwig, Z. S.; Hubbard, A.; Hughes, J. W.; Hutchinson, I. H.; Kessel, C.; Kotschenreuther, M.; Leccacorvi, R.; Lin, Y.; Lipschultz, B.; Mahajan, S.; Minervini, J.; Mumgaard, R.; Nygren, R.; Parker, R.; Poli, F.; Porkolab, M.; Reinke, M. L.; Rice, J.; Rognlien, T.; Rowan, W.; Shiraiwa, S.; Terry, D.; Theiler, C.; Titus, P.; Umansky, M.; Valanju, P.; Walk, J.; White, A.; Wilson, J. R.; Wright, G.; Zweben, S. J.

    2015-05-01

    The MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center and collaborators are proposing a high-performance Advanced Divertor and RF tokamak eXperiment (ADX)—a tokamak specifically designed to address critical gaps in the world fusion research programme on the pathway to next-step devices: fusion nuclear science facility (FNSF), fusion pilot plant (FPP) and/or demonstration power plant (DEMO). This high-field (⩾6.5 T, 1.5 MA), high power density facility (P/S ˜ 1.5 MW m-2) will test innovative divertor ideas, including an ‘X-point target divertor’ concept, at the required performance parameters—reactor-level boundary plasma pressures, magnetic field strengths and parallel heat flux densities entering into the divertor region—while simultaneously producing high-performance core plasma conditions that are prototypical of a reactor: equilibrated and strongly coupled electrons and ions, regimes with low or no torque, and no fuelling from external heating and current drive systems. Equally important, the experimental platform will test innovative concepts for lower hybrid current drive and ion cyclotron range of frequency actuators with the unprecedented ability to deploy launch structures both on the low-magnetic-field side and the high-magnetic-field side—the latter being a location where energetic plasma-material interactions can be controlled and favourable RF wave physics leads to efficient current drive, current profile control, heating and flow drive. This triple combination—advanced divertors, advanced RF actuators, reactor-prototypical core plasma conditions—will enable ADX to explore enhanced core confinement physics, such as made possible by reversed central shear, using only the types of external drive systems that are considered viable for a fusion power plant. Such an integrated demonstration of high-performance core-divertor operation with steady-state sustainment would pave the way towards an attractive pilot plant, as envisioned in the ARC concept

  7. Core safety of Indian nuclear power plants (NPPs) under extreme ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Of course, the accidents led to release of radioactivity due to probable melt down of reactor ... advances in technology and a better understanding of the nuclear power, the ..... PHWR system offers certain intrinsic advantages (Narora Atomic Power ...... system, Non Active Process Water System (NAPWS), Service Water Sys-.

  8. A new baryonic equation of state at sub-nuclear densities for core-collapse simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furusawa, Shun; Yamada, Shoichi; Sumiyoshi, Kohsuke; Suzuki, Hideyuki [Department of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Department of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan) and Advanced Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Numazu College of Technology, Ooka 3600, Numazu, Shizuoka 410-8501 (Japan); Faculty of Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, Yamazaki 2641, Noda, Chiba 278-8510 (Japan)

    2012-11-12

    We construct a new equation of state for baryons at sub-nuclear densities for the use in core-collapse simulations of massive stars. The formulation is based on the nuclear statistical equilibrium description and the liquid drop approximation of nuclei. The model free energy to minimize is calculated by using relativistic mean field theory for nucleons and the mass formula for nuclei with atomic number up to {approx} 1000. We have also taken into account the pasta phase. We find that the free energy and other thermodynamical quantities are not very different from those given in the standard EOSs that adopt the single nucleus approximation. On the other hand, the average mass is systematically different, which may have an important effect to the rates of electron captures and coherent neutrino scatterings on nuclei in supernova cores. It is also interesting that the root mean square of the mass number is not very different from the average mass number, since the former is important for the evaluation of coherent scattering rates on nuclei but has been unavailable so far.

  9. A new baryonic equation of state at sub-nuclear densities for core-collapse simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furusawa, Shun; Yamada, Shoichi; Sumiyoshi, Kohsuke; Suzuki, Hideyuki

    2012-01-01

    We construct a new equation of state for baryons at sub-nuclear densities for the use in core-collapse simulations of massive stars. The formulation is based on the nuclear statistical equilibrium description and the liquid drop approximation of nuclei. The model free energy to minimize is calculated by using relativistic mean field theory for nucleons and the mass formula for nuclei with atomic number up to ∼ 1000. We have also taken into account the pasta phase. We find that the free energy and other thermodynamical quantities are not very different from those given in the standard EOSs that adopt the single nucleus approximation. On the other hand, the average mass is systematically different, which may have an important effect to the rates of electron captures and coherent neutrino scatterings on nuclei in supernova cores. It is also interesting that the root mean square of the mass number is not very different from the average mass number, since the former is important for the evaluation of coherent scattering rates on nuclei but has been unavailable so far.

  10. A new baryonic equation of state at sub-nuclear densities for core-collapse simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furusawa, Shun; Yamada, Shoichi; Sumiyoshi, Kohsuke; Suzuki, Hideyuki

    2012-11-01

    We construct a new equation of state for baryons at sub-nuclear densities for the use in core-collapse simulations of massive stars. The formulation is based on the nuclear statistical equilibrium description and the liquid drop approximation of nuclei. The model free energy to minimize is calculated by using relativistic mean field theory for nucleons and the mass formula for nuclei with atomic number up to ~ 1000. We have also taken into account the pasta phase. We find that the free energy and other thermodynamical quantities are not very different from those given in the standard EOSs that adopt the single nucleus approximation. On the other hand, the average mass is systematically different, which may have an important effect to the rates of electron captures and coherent neutrino scatterings on nuclei in supernova cores. It is also interesting that the root mean square of the mass number is not very different from the average mass number, since the former is important for the evaluation of coherent scattering rates on nuclei but has been unavailable so far.

  11. In-core fuel management programs for nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-10-01

    In response to the interest shown by Member States, the IAEA organized a co-ordinated research programme to develop and make available in the open domain a set of programs to perform in-core fuel management calculations. This report summarizes the work performed in the context of the CRP. As a result of this programme, complete in-core fuel management packages for three types of reactors, namely PWR's, BWR's and PHWR are now available from the NEA Data Bank. For some reactor types, these program packages are available with three levels of sophistication ranging from simple methods for educational purposes to more comprehensive methods that can be used for reactor design and operation. In addition some operating data have been compiled to allow code validation. (author)

  12. Core density fluctuations in reverse magnetic shear plasmas with internal transport barrier on JT-60U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazikian, R.; Shinohara, K.; Yoshino, R.; Fujita, T.; Shirai, H.; Kramer, G.T.

    1999-01-01

    First measurements of the radial correlation length of density fluctuations in JT-60U plasmas with internal transport barrier (ITB) is reported. The measurements are obtained using a newly installed correlation reflectometer operating in the upper X-mode. Before transport barrier formation in the low beam power current ramp-up phase of the discharge, reflectometer measurements indicate density fluctuation levels n-tilde/n∼0.1-0.2% and radial correlation lengths 2-3 cm (k r p i ≤0.5) in the central plasma region (r/a r p i ∼3. However, fluctuation levels are considerably higher than measured near the magnetic axis. Reflectometer measurements obtained at the foot of the ITB also indicate high fluctuation levels compared to measurements in the central region of the discharge. (author)

  13. SMART core power control method by coolant temperature variation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chung Chan; Cho, Byung Oh

    2001-08-01

    SMART is a soluble boron-free integral type pressurized water reactor. Its moderator temperature coefficient (MTC) is strongly negative throughout the cycle. The purpose of this report is how to utilize the primary coolant temperature as a second reactivity control system using the strong negative MTC. The reactivity components associated with reactor power change are Doppler reactivity due to fuel temperature change, moderator temperature reactivity and xenon reactivity. Doppler reactivity and moderator temperature reactivity take effects almost as soon as reactor power changes. On the other hand, xenon reactivity change takes more than several hours to reach an equilibrium state. Therefore, coolant temperature at equilibrium state is chosen as the reference temperature. The power dependent reference temperature line is limited above 50% power not to affect adversely in reactor safety. To compensate transient xenon reactivity, coolant temperature operating range is expanded. The suggested coolant temperature operation range requires minimum control rod motion for 50% power change. For smaller power changes such as 25% power change, it is not necessary to move control rods to assure that fuel design limits are not exceeded

  14. Methods for reconstruction of the density distribution of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pessoa, Paulo O.; Silva, Fernando C.; Martinez, Aquilino S.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Two methods for reconstruction of the pin power distribution are presented. • The ARM method uses analytical solution of the 2D diffusion equation. • The PRM method uses polynomial solution without boundary conditions. • The maximum errors in pin power reconstruction occur in the peripheral water region. • The errors are significantly less in the inner area of the core. - Abstract: In analytical reconstruction method (ARM), the two-dimensional (2D) neutron diffusion equation is analytically solved for two energy groups (2G) and homogeneous nodes with dimensions of a fuel assembly (FA). The solution employs a 2D fourth-order expansion for the axial leakage term. The Nodal Expansion Method (NEM) provides the solution average values as the four average partial currents on the surfaces of the node, the average flux in the node and the multiplying factor of the problem. The expansion coefficients for the axial leakage are determined directly from NEM method or can be determined in the reconstruction method. A new polynomial reconstruction method (PRM) is implemented based on the 2D expansion for the axial leakage term. The ARM method use the four average currents on the surfaces of the node and four average fluxes in corners of the node as boundary conditions and the average flux in the node as a consistency condition. To determine the average fluxes in corners of the node an analytical solution is employed. This analytical solution uses the average fluxes on the surfaces of the node as boundary conditions and discontinuities in corners are incorporated. The polynomial and analytical solutions to the PRM and ARM methods, respectively, represent the homogeneous flux distributions. The detailed distributions inside a FA are estimated by product of homogeneous distribution by local heterogeneous form function. Moreover, the form functions of power are used. The results show that the methods have good accuracy when compared with reference values and

  15. Power distribution gradients in WWER type cores and fuel failure root causes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikuš, Ján M., E-mail: JanMikus.nrc@hotmail.com

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • Power (fission rate) distribution gradients can represent fuel failure root causes. • Positions with above gradients were investigated in WWER type cores on reactor LR-0. • Above gradients were evaluated near core heterogeneities and construction materials. • Results can be used for code validation and fuel failure occurrence investigation. - Abstract: Neutron flux non-uniformity and gradients of neutron current resulting in corresponding power (fission rate) distribution changes can represent root causes of the fuel failure. Such situation can be expected in vicinity of some core heterogeneities and construction materials. Since needed data cannot be obtained from nuclear power plant (NPP), results of some benchmark type experiments performed on light water, zero-power research reactor LR-0 were used for investigation of the above phenomenon. Attention was focused on determination of the spatial power distribution changes in fuel assemblies (FAs): Containing fuel rods (FRs) with Gd burnable absorber in WWER-440 and WWER-1000 type cores, Neighboring the core blanket and dummy steel assembly simulators on the periphery of the WWER-440 standard and low leakage type cores, resp., Neighboring baffle in WWER-1000 type cores, and Neighboring control rod (CR) in WWER-440 type cores, namely (a) power peak in axial power distribution in periphery FRs of the adjacent FAs near the area between CR fuel part and butt joint to the CR absorbing part and (b) decrease in radial power distribution in FRs near CR absorbing part. An overview of relevant experimental results from reactor LR-0 and some information concerning leaking FAs on NPP Temelín are presented. Obtained data can be used for code validation and subsequently for the fuel failure occurrence investigation.

  16. Core radial power profile effect on system and core cooling behavior during reflood phase of PWR-LOCA with CCTF data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimoto, Hajime; Iguchi, Tadashi; Murao, Yoshio

    1985-01-01

    In the reactor safety assessment during reflood phase of a PWR-LOCA, it is assumed implicitly that the core thermal hydraulic behavior is evaluated by the one-dimensional model with an average power rod. In order to assess the applicability of the one-dimensional treatment, integral tests were performed with various core radial power profiles using the Cylindrical Core Test Facility (CCTF) whose core includes about 2,000 heater rods. The CCTF results confirm that the core radial power profile has weak effect on the thermal hydraulic behavior in the primary system except core. It is also confirmed that the core differential pressure in the axial direction is predicted by the one-dimensional core model with an average power rod even in the case with a steep radial power profile in the core. Even though the core heat transfer coefficient is dependent on the core radial power profile, it is found that the error of the peak clad surface temperature calculation is less than 15 K using the one-dimensional model in the CCTF tests. The CCTF results support the one-dimensional treatment assumed in the reactor safety assessment. (author)

  17. Electrical design of a high current density air-core reversed-field pinch ''ZTP''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reass, W.A.; Cribble, R.F.; Melton, J.G.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes the electrical design of a small, high current density (10 MA/m 2 ) toroidal reversed-field Z-Pinch (RFP) presently being constructed at Los Alamos. Special purpose magnetic field programs were used to calculate self and mutual inductances for the poloidal field windings. The network analysis program MINI-SCEPTRE was then used to predict plasma current, including the interaction between toroidal and poloidal field circuits, as described by the Bessel function model for RFP's. Using these programs, coil geometry was obtained for minimal field errors and the pulse power systems were optimized to minimize equilibrium control power. Results of computer modeling and implementation of the electrical circuits are presented

  18. Electrical design of a high current density air-core reversed-field pinch ZTP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reass, W.A.; Melton, J.G.; Gribble, R.F.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes the electrical design of a small, high current density (10 MA/m 2 ) toroidal reversed-field Z-Pinch (RFP) presently being constructed at Los Alamos. Special purpose magnetic field programs were used to calculate self and mutual inductances for the poloidal field windings. The network analysis program MINI-SCEPTRE was then used to predict plasma current, including the interaction between toroidal and poloidal field circuits, as described by the Bessel function model for RFP's. Using these programs, coil geometry was obtained for minimal field errors and the pulse power systems were optimized to minimize equilibrium control power. Results of computer modeling and implementation of the electrical circuits are presented

  19. Thermal-Hydraulic Performance of Cross-Shaped Spiral Fuel in High-Power-Density BWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conboy, Thomas; Hejzlar, Pavel

    2006-01-01

    Power up-rating of existing nuclear reactors promises to be an area of great study for years to come. One of the major approaches to efficiently increasing power density is by way of advanced fuel design, and cross-shaped spiral-fuel has shown such potential in previous studies. Our work aims to model the thermal-hydraulic consequences of filling a BWR core with these spiral-shaped pins. The helically-wound pins have a cross-section resembling a 4-petaled flower. They fill an assembly in a tight bundle, their dimensions chosen carefully such that the petals of neighboring pins contact each other at their outer-most extent in a self-supporting lattice, absent of grid spacers. Potential advantages of this design raise much optimism from a thermal-hydraulic perspective. These spiral rods possess about 40% larger surface area than traditional rods, resulting in increased cooling and a proportional reduction in average surface heat flux. The thin petal-like extensions help by lowering thermal resistance between the hot central region of the pin and the bulk coolant flow, decreasing the maximum fuel temperature by 200 deg. C according to Finite Element (COSMOS) models. However, COSMOS models also predict a potential problem area at the 'elbow' region of two adjoining petals, where heat flux peaking is twice that along the extensions. Preliminary VIPRE models, which account only for the surface area increase, predict a 22% increase in critical power. It is also anticipated that the spiral twist would provide the flowing coolant with an additional radial velocity component, and likely promote turbulence and mixing within an assembly. These factors are expected to provide further margin for increased power density, and are currently being incorporated into the VIPRE model. The reduction in pressure drop inherent in any core without grid-spacers is also expected to be significant in aiding core stability, though this has not yet been quantified. Spiral-fuel seems to be a

  20. An open library of relativistic core electron density function for the QTAIM analysis with pseudopotentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Wenli; Cai, Ziyu; Wang, Jiankang; Xin, Kunyu

    2018-04-29

    Based on two-component relativistic atomic calculations, a free electron density function (EDF) library has been developed for nearly all the known ECPs of the elements Li (Z = 3) up to Ubn (Z = 120), which can be interfaced into modern quantum chemistry programs to save the .wfx wavefunction file. The applicability of this EDF library is demonstrated by the analyses of the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) and other real space functions on HeCuF, PtO42+, OgF 4 , and TlCl 3 (DMSO) 2 . When a large-core ECP is used, it shows that the corrections by EDF may significantly improve the properties of some density-derived real space functions, but they are invalid for the wavefunction-depending real space functions. To classify different chemical bonds and especially some nonclassical interactions, a list of universal criteria has also been proposed. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Self powered neutron detectors as in-core detectors for Sodium-cooled Fast Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, V., E-mail: vasudha.verma@physics.uu.se [Division of Applied Nuclear Physics, Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-75120 Uppsala (Sweden); CEA, DEN, DER, Instrumentation Sensors and Dosimetry Laboratory, Cadarache, F-13108 St-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Barbot, L.; Filliatre, P. [CEA, DEN, DER, Instrumentation Sensors and Dosimetry Laboratory, Cadarache, F-13108 St-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Hellesen, C. [Division of Applied Nuclear Physics, Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-75120 Uppsala (Sweden); Jammes, C. [CEA, DEN, DER, Instrumentation Sensors and Dosimetry Laboratory, Cadarache, F-13108 St-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Svärd, S. Jacobsson [Division of Applied Nuclear Physics, Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-75120 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2017-07-11

    Neutron flux monitoring system forms an integral part of the design of a Generation IV sodium cooled fast reactor. Diverse possibilities of detector system installation must be studied for various locations in the reactor vessel in order to detect any perturbations in the core. Results from a previous paper indicated that it is possible to detect changes in neutron source distribution initiated by an inadvertent withdrawal of outer control rod with in-vessel fission chambers located azimuthally around the core. It is, however, not possible to follow inner control rod withdrawal and precisely know the location of the perturbation in the core. Hence the use of complimentary in-core detectors coupled with the peripheral fission chambers is proposed to enable robust core monitoring across the radial direction. In this paper, we assess the feasibility of using self-powered neutron detectors (SPNDs) as in-core detectors in fast reactors for detecting local changes in the power distribution when the reactor is operated at nominal power. We study the neutron and gamma contributions to the total output current of the detector modelled with Platinum as the emitter material. It is shown that this SPND placed in an SFR-like environment would give a sufficiently measurable prompt neutron induced current of the order of 600 nA/m. The corresponding induced current in the connecting cable is two orders of magnitude lower and can be neglected. This means that the SPND can follow in-core power fluctuations. This validates the operability of an SPND in an SFR-like environment. - Highlights: • Studied possibility of using SPNDs as in-core detectors in SFRs. • Study done to detect local power profile changes when reactor is at nominal power. • SPND with a Pt-emitter gives measurable prompt current of the order of 600 nA/m. • Dominant proportion of prompt response is maintained throughout the operation. • Detector signal gives dynamic information on the power fluctuations.

  2. Time delays between core power production and external detector response from Monte Carlo calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentine, T.E.; Mihalczo, J.T.

    1996-01-01

    One primary concern for design of safety systems for reactors is the time response of external detectors to changes in the core. This paper describes a way to estimate the time delay between the core power production and the external detector response using Monte Carlo calculations and suggests a technique to measure the time delay. The Monte Carlo code KENO-NR was used to determine the time delay between the core power production and the external detector response for a conceptual design of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor. The Monte Carlo estimated time delay was determined to be about 10 ms for this conceptual design of the ANS reactor

  3. Constraining the supersaturation density equation of state from core-collapse supernova simulations? Excluded volume extension of the baryons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    In this article the role of the supersaturation density equation of state (EOS) is explored in simulations of failed core-collapse supernova explosions. Therefore the nuclear EOS is extended via a one-parameter excluded-volume description for baryons, taking into account their finite and increasing volume with increasing density in excess of saturation density. Parameters are selected such that the resulting supernova EOS represent extreme cases, with high pressure variations at supersaturation density which feature extreme stiff and soft EOS variants of the reference case, i.e. without excluded-volume corrections. Unlike in the interior of neutron stars with central densities in excess of several times saturation density, central densities of core-collapse supernovae reach only slightly above saturation density. Hence, the impact of the supersaturation density EOS on the supernova dynamics as well as the neutrino signal is found to be negligible. It is mainly determined from the low- and intermediate-density domain, which is left unmodified within this generalized excluded volume approach. (orig.)

  4. Power Spectral Density Specification and Analysis of Large Optical Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidick, Erkin

    2009-01-01

    The 2-dimensional Power Spectral Density (PSD) can be used to characterize the mid- and the high-spatial frequency components of the surface height errors of an optical surface. We found it necessary to have a complete, easy-to-use approach for specifying and evaluating the PSD characteristics of large optical surfaces, an approach that allows one to specify the surface quality of a large optical surface based on simulated results using a PSD function and to evaluate the measured surface profile data of the same optic in comparison with those predicted by the simulations during the specification-derivation process. This paper provides a complete mathematical description of PSD error, and proposes a new approach in which a 2-dimentional (2D) PSD is converted into a 1-dimentional (1D) one by azimuthally averaging the 2D-PSD. The 1D-PSD calculated this way has the same unit and the same profile as the original PSD function, thus allows one to compare the two with each other directly.

  5. Reconstruction of core axial power shapes using the alternating conditional expectation algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Eun Ki; Kim, Yong Hee; Cha, Kune Ho; Park, Moon Ghu

    1999-01-01

    We have introduced the alternating conditional expectation (ACE) algorithm in reconstructing 20-node axial core power shapes from five-level in-core detector powers. The core design code, Reactor Operation and Control Simulation (ROCS), calculates 3-dimensional power distributions for various core states, and the reference core-averaged axial power shapes and corresponding simulated detector powers are utilized to synthesize the axial power shape. By using the ACE algorithm, the optimal relationship between a dependent variable, the plane power, and independent variables, five detector powers, is determined without any preprocessing. A total of ∼3490 data sets per each cycle of YongGwang Nuclear (YGN) power plant units 3 and 4 is used for the regression. Continuous analytic function corresponding to each optimal transformation is calculated by simple regression model. The reconstructed axial power shapes of ∼21,200 cases are compared to the original ROCS axial power shapes. Also, to test the validity and accuracy of the new method, its performance is compared with that of the Fourier fitting method (FFM), a typical method of the deterministic approach. For a total of 21,204 data cases, the averages of root mean square (rms) error, axial peak error (ΔF z ), and axial shape index error (ΔASI) of new method are calculated as 0.81%, 0.51% and 0.00204, while those of FFM are 2.29%, 2.37% and 0.00264, respectively. We also evaluated the wide range of axial power profiles from the xenon-oscillation. The results show that the newly developed method is far superior to FFM; average rms and axial peak error are just ∼35 and ∼20% of those of FFM, respectively

  6. ADX: a high field, high power density, Advanced Divertor test eXperiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, R.; Labombard, B.; Marmar, E.; Irby, J.; Shiraiwa, S.; Terry, J.; Wallace, G.; Whyte, D. G.; Wolfe, S.; Wukitch, S.; ADX Team

    2014-10-01

    The MIT PSFC and collaborators are proposing an advanced divertor experiment (ADX) - a tokamak specifically designed to address critical gaps in the world fusion research program on the pathway to FNSF/DEMO. This high field (6.5 tesla, 1.5 MA), high power density (P/S ~ 1.5 MW/m2) facility would utilize Alcator magnet technology to test innovative divertor concepts for next-step DT fusion devices (FNSF, DEMO) at reactor-level boundary plasma pressures and parallel heat flux densities while producing high performance core plasma conditions. The experimental platform would also test advanced lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) and ion-cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) actuators and wave physics at the plasma densities and magnetic field strengths of a DEMO, with the unique ability to deploy launcher structures both on the low-magnetic-field side and the high-field side - a location where energetic plasma-material interactions can be controlled and wave physics is most favorable for efficient current drive, heating and flow drive. This innovative experiment would perform plasma science and technology R&D necessary to inform the conceptual development and accelerate the readiness-for-deployment of FNSF/DEMO - in a timely manner, on a cost-effective research platform. Supported by DE-FC02-99ER54512.

  7. Management of radioactive waste from a major core damage in a BWR power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elkert, J.; Christensen, H.; Torstenfelt, B.

    1990-01-01

    Large amounts of fission products would be released in case of a major core damage in a nuclear power reactor. In this theoretical study the core damage is caused by a loss of coolant accident followed by a complete loss of all electric power for about 30 minutes resulting in the release of 10% of the core inventory of noble gases. A second case has also been briefly studied, in which the corresponding core damage is supposed to be created merely by the complete loss of electric power during a limited time period. It appears from the study that the radioactive waste generated as a consequence of an accident of the extent can be managed in the reference reactor with only minor modifications required in the waste plant. The detailed results of the study are reactor specific, but many of the findings and recommendations are generally applicable. (author) 28 refs

  8. A Practical Core Loss Model for Filter Inductors of Power Electronic Converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matsumori, Hiroaki; Shimizu, Toshihisa; Wang, Xiongfei

    2018-01-01

    This paper proposes a core loss model for filter inductors of power electronic converters. The model allows a computationally efficient analysis on the core loss of the inductor under the square voltage excitation and the premagnetization condition. First, the core loss of the filter inductor under...... buck chopper excitation is evaluated with the proposed model and compared with the conventional methods. The comparison shows that the proposed method results in a better core loss prediction under the premagnetized condition than that of conventional alternatives. Then, the core loss of the filter...... inductor with the pulsewidth modulated inverter excitation is evaluated, which shows that the proposed model not only accurately predicts the core loss but also identifies the hysteresis loss part. These results demonstrate that the approach can further be used for the development of magnetic materials...

  9. Power-Energy Simulation for Multi-Core Processors in Bench-marking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona A. Abou-Of

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available At Microarchitectural level, multi-core processor, as a complex System on Chip, has sophisticated on-chip components including cores, shared caches, interconnects and system controllers such as memory and ethernet controllers. At technological level, architects should consider the device types forecast in the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS. Energy simulation enables architects to study two important metrics simultaneously. Timing is a key element of the CPU performance that imposes constraints on the CPU target clock frequency. Power and the resulting heat impose more severe design constraints, such as core clustering, while semiconductor industry is providing more transistors in the die area in pace with Moore’s law. Energy simulators provide a solution for such serious challenge. Energy is modelled either by combining performance benchmarking tool with a power simulator or by an integrated framework of both performance simulator and power profiling system. This article presents and asses trade-offs between different architectures using four cores battery-powered mobile systems by running a custom-made and a standard benchmark tools. The experimental results assure the Energy/ Frequency convexity rule over a range of frequency settings on different number of enabled cores. The reported results show that increasing the number of cores has a great effect on increasing the power consumption. However, a minimum energy dissipation will occur at a lower frequency which reduces the power consumption. Despite that, increasing the number of cores will also increase the effective cores value which will reflect a better processor performance.

  10. High-power density miniscale power generation and energy harvesting systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyshevski, Sergey Edward [Department of Electrical and Microelectronics Engineering, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY 14623-5603 (United States)

    2011-01-15

    This paper reports design, analysis, evaluations and characterization of miniscale self-sustained power generation systems. Our ultimate objective is to guarantee highly-efficient mechanical-to-electrical energy conversion, ensure premier wind- or hydro-energy harvesting capabilities, enable electric machinery and power electronics solutions, stabilize output voltage, etc. By performing the advanced scalable power generation system design, we enable miniscale energy sources and energy harvesting technologies. The proposed systems integrate: (1) turbine which rotates a radial- or axial-topology permanent-magnet synchronous generator at variable angular velocity depending on flow rate, speed and load, and, (2) power electronic module with controllable rectifier, soft-switching converter and energy storage stages. These scalable energy systems can be utilized as miniscale auxiliary and self-sustained power units in various applications, such as, aerospace, automotive, biotechnology, biomedical, and marine. The proposed systems uniquely suit various submersible and harsh environment applications. Due to operation in dynamic rapidly-changing envelopes (variable speed, load changes, etc.), sound solutions are researched, proposed and verified. We focus on enabling system organizations utilizing advanced developments for various components, such as generators, converters, and energy storage. Basic, applied and experimental findings are reported. The prototypes of integrated power generation systems were tested, characterized and evaluated. It is documented that high-power density, high efficiency, robustness and other enabling capabilities are achieved. The results and solutions are scalable from micro ({proportional_to}100 {mu}W) to medium ({proportional_to}100 kW) and heavy-duty (sub-megawatt) auxiliary and power systems. (author)

  11. High-power density miniscale power generation and energy harvesting systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyshevski, Sergey Edward

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports design, analysis, evaluations and characterization of miniscale self-sustained power generation systems. Our ultimate objective is to guarantee highly-efficient mechanical-to-electrical energy conversion, ensure premier wind- or hydro-energy harvesting capabilities, enable electric machinery and power electronics solutions, stabilize output voltage, etc. By performing the advanced scalable power generation system design, we enable miniscale energy sources and energy harvesting technologies. The proposed systems integrate: (1) turbine which rotates a radial- or axial-topology permanent-magnet synchronous generator at variable angular velocity depending on flow rate, speed and load, and, (2) power electronic module with controllable rectifier, soft-switching converter and energy storage stages. These scalable energy systems can be utilized as miniscale auxiliary and self-sustained power units in various applications, such as, aerospace, automotive, biotechnology, biomedical, and marine. The proposed systems uniquely suit various submersible and harsh environment applications. Due to operation in dynamic rapidly-changing envelopes (variable speed, load changes, etc.), sound solutions are researched, proposed and verified. We focus on enabling system organizations utilizing advanced developments for various components, such as generators, converters, and energy storage. Basic, applied and experimental findings are reported. The prototypes of integrated power generation systems were tested, characterized and evaluated. It is documented that high-power density, high efficiency, robustness and other enabling capabilities are achieved. The results and solutions are scalable from micro (∼100 μW) to medium (∼100 kW) and heavy-duty (sub-megawatt) auxiliary and power systems.

  12. The simultaneous measurements of core and outer core density fluctuations in L-H transition using CO2 laser collective scattering diagnostic in the EAST superconducting tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, G.M.; Li, Y.D.; Zhang, X.D.; Sun, P.J.; Hu, L.Q.; Li, J.G.; Wu, G.J.

    2013-01-01

    The H-mode is the projected basic operation scenario for the ITER tokamak. The turbulence de-correlation by the synergistic effect of zonal flow and equilibrium ExB flow shear is believed to be the reason for L-H transition, however, the detailed physical mechanism has not been identified so far. Tangential multi-channel CO 2 laser collective scattering diagnostic system (mainly k r measurement) was first installed to investigate electron density fluctuations on EAST tokamak. The measurements in a spontaneous dithering L-H transition show that in core plasma (0 < r/a < 0.5) the low-frequency fluctuations strengthen greatly before L-H transition; meanwhile in outer core plasma (0.2 < r/a < 1) the low-frequency fluctuations strengthen slightly. Bispectral analysis reveals that the coupling strength between low- and high-frequency fluctuations in both core and outer core plasma strengthens greatly before the transition, but the latter is greater than the former. The results indicate that the low-frequency fluctuations of the core and outer core plasma play active, but different, roles in the spontaneous L-H transition. (author)

  13. High-power picosecond pulse delivery through hollow core photonic band gap fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michieletto, Mattia; Johansen, Mette Marie; Lyngsø, Jens Kristian

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrated robust and bend insensitive fiber delivery of high power laser with diffraction limited beam quality for two different kinds of hollow core band gap fibers. The light source for this experiment consists of ytterbium-doped double clad fiber aeroGAIN-ROD-PM85 in a high power amplifier...

  14. Environment-based pin-power reconstruction method for homogeneous core calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leroyer, H.; Brosselard, C.; Girardi, E.

    2012-01-01

    Core calculation schemes are usually based on a classical two-step approach associated with assembly and core calculations. During the first step, infinite lattice assemblies calculations relying on a fundamental mode approach are used to generate cross-sections libraries for PWRs core calculations. This fundamental mode hypothesis may be questioned when dealing with loading patterns involving several types of assemblies (UOX, MOX), burnable poisons, control rods and burn-up gradients. This paper proposes a calculation method able to take into account the heterogeneous environment of the assemblies when using homogeneous core calculations and an appropriate pin-power reconstruction. This methodology is applied to MOX assemblies, computed within an environment of UOX assemblies. The new environment-based pin-power reconstruction is then used on various clusters of 3x3 assemblies showing burn-up gradients and UOX/MOX interfaces, and compared to reference calculations performed with APOLLO-2. The results show that UOX/MOX interfaces are much better calculated with the environment-based calculation scheme when compared to the usual pin-power reconstruction method. The power peak is always better located and calculated with the environment-based pin-power reconstruction method on every cluster configuration studied. This study shows that taking into account the environment in transport calculations can significantly improve the pin-power reconstruction so far as it is consistent with the core loading pattern. (authors)

  15. Adaptive control of a PWR core power using neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arab-Alibeik, H.; Setayeshi, S.

    2005-01-01

    Reactor power control is important because of safety concerns and the call for regular and appropriate operation of nuclear power plants. It seems that the load-follow operation of these plants will be unavoidable in the future. Discrepancies between the real plant and the model used in controller design for load-follow operation encourage one to use auto-tuning and (or) adaptive techniques. Neural network technology shows great promise for addressing many problems in non-model-based adaptive control methods. Also, there has been a great attention to inverse control especially in the neural and fuzzy control context. Fortunately, online adaptation eliminates some limitations of inverse control and its shortcomings for real world applications. We use a neural adaptive inverse controller to control the power of a PWR reactor. The stability of the system and convergence of the controller parameters are guaranteed during online adaptation phase provided the controller is near the plant's real inverse after offline training period. The performance of the controller is verified using nonlinear simulations in diverse operating conditions

  16. Microfabricated Air-core Toroidal Inductor In Very High Frequency Power Converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lê Thanh, Hoà; Nour, Yasser; Han, Anpan

    2018-01-01

    Miniaturization of power supplies is required for future intelligent electronic systems e.g. internet of things devices. Inductors play an essential role, and they are by far the most bulky and expensive components in power supplies. This paper presents a miniaturized microelectromechanical systems...... (MEMS) inductor and its performance in a very high frequency (VHF) power converter. The MEMS inductor is a siliconembedded air-core toroidal inductor, and it is constructed with through-silicon vias, suspended copper windings, silicon fixtures, and a silicon support die. The air-core inductors...

  17. Fuzzy logic based power-efficient real-time multi-core system

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmed, Jameel; Najam, Shaheryar; Najam, Zohaib

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on identifying the performance challenges involved in computer architectures, optimal configuration settings and analysing their impact on the performance of multi-core architectures. Proposing a power and throughput-aware fuzzy-logic-based reconfiguration for Multi-Processor Systems on Chip (MPSoCs) in both simulation and real-time environments, it is divided into two major parts. The first part deals with the simulation-based power and throughput-aware fuzzy logic reconfiguration for multi-core architectures, presenting the results of a detailed analysis on the factors impacting the power consumption and performance of MPSoCs. In turn, the second part highlights the real-time implementation of fuzzy-logic-based power-efficient reconfigurable multi-core architectures for Intel and Leone3 processors. .

  18. Thermal property and density measurements of samples taken from drilling cores from potential geologic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagedrost, J.F.; Capps, W.

    1983-12-01

    Density, steady-state conductivity, enthalpy, specific heat, heat capacity, thermal diffusivity and linear thermal expansion were measured on 59 materials from core drill samples of several geologic media, including rock salt, basalt, and other associated rocks from 7 potential sites for nuclear waste isolation. The measurements were conducted from or near to room temperature up to 500 0 C, or to lower temperatures if limited by specimen cracking or fracturing. Ample documentation establishes the reliability of the property measurement methods and the accuracy of the results. Thermal expansions of salts reached 2.2 to 2.8 percent at 500 0 C. Associated rocks were from 0.6 to 1.6 percent. Basalts were close to 0.3 percent at 500 0 C. Specific heats of salts varied from 0.213 to 0.233 cal g -1 C -1 , and basalts averaged 0.239 cal g -1 C -1 . Thermal conductivities of salts at 50 0 C were from 0.022 to 0.046 wcm -1 C -1 , and at 500 0 C, from 0.012 to 0.027 wcm -1 C -1 . Basalts conductivities ranged from 0.020 to 0.022 wcm -1 C -1 at 100 0 C and 0.016 to 0.018 at 500 0 C. There were no obvious conductivity trends relative to source location. Room temperature densities of salts were from 2.14 to 2.29 gcm -3 , and basalts, from 2.83 to 2.90 gcm -3 . The extreme friability of some materials made specimen fabrication difficult. 21 references, 17 figures, 28 tables

  19. Monitoring device for the power distribution within a nuclear reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanzawa, Tomio; Kumanomido, Hironori; Toyoshi, Isamu.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a monitoring device for the power distribution in the reactor core that calculates the power distribution based on the measurement by instruments disposed within the reactor core of BWR type reactors. Constitution: The power distribution monitoring device in a reactor core comprises a signal correcting device, a signal normalizing device and a power distribution calculating device, in which the power distribution calculating device is constituted with an average power calculating device for four fuel assemblies and an average power calculating device for fuel assemblies. Gamma-ray signals corrected by the signal correcting device and signals from neutron detectors are inputted to the signal normalizing device, both of which are calibrated to determine the axial gamma-ray signal distribution in the central water gap region with the four fuel assemblies being as the unit. The average power from the four fuel assemblies are inputted to the fuel assembly average power calculating device to allocate to each of the fuel assembly average power thereby attaining the purpose. Further, thermal restriction values are calculated thereby enabling to secure the fuel integrity. (Kamimura, M.)

  20. Effect of graphite target power density on tribological properties of graphite-like carbon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Dan; Jiang, Bailing; Li, Hongtao; Du, Yuzhou; Yang, Chao

    2018-05-01

    In order to improve the tribological performance, a series of graphite-like carbon (GLC) films with different graphite target power densities were prepared by magnetron sputtering. The valence bond and microstructure of films were characterized by AFM, TEM, XPS and Raman spectra. The variation of mechanical and tribological properties with graphite target power density was analyzed. The results showed that with the increase of graphite target power density, the deposition rate and the ratio of sp2 bond increased obviously. The hardness firstly increased and then decreased with the increase of graphite target power density, whilst the friction coefficient and the specific wear rate increased slightly after a decrease with the increasing graphite target power density. The friction coefficient and the specific wear rate were the lowest when the graphite target power density was 23.3 W/cm2.

  1. Optimization design of toroidal core for magnetic energy harvesting near power line by considering saturation effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Bumjin; Kim, Dongwook; Park, Jaehyoung; Kim, Kibeom; Koo, Jay; Park, HyunHo; Ahn, Seungyoung

    2018-05-01

    Recently, magnetic energy harvesting technologies have been studied actively for self-sustainable operation of applications around power line. However, magnetic energy harvesting around power lines has the problem of magnetic saturation, which can cause power performance degradation of the harvester. In this paper, optimal design of a toroidal core for magnetic energy harvesters has been proposed with consideration of magnetic saturation near power lines. Using Permeability-H curve and Ampere's circuital law, the optimum dimensional parameters needed to generate induced voltage were analyzed via calculation and simulation. To reflect a real environment, we consider the nonlinear characteristic of the magnetic core material and supply current through a 3-phase distribution panel used in the industry. The effectiveness of the proposed design methodology is verified by experiments in a power distribution panel and takes 60.9 V from power line current of 60 A at 60 Hz.

  2. Path to Market for Compact Modular Fusion Power Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Simon; Baerny, Jennifer K.; Mattor, Nathan; Stoulil, Don; Miller, Ronald; Marston, Theodore

    2012-08-01

    The benefits of an energy source whose reactants are plentiful and whose products are benign is hard to measure, but at no time in history has this energy source been more needed. Nuclear fusion continues to promise to be this energy source. However, the path to market for fusion systems is still regularly a matter for long-term (20 + year) plans. This white paper is intended to stimulate discussion of faster commercialization paths, distilling guidance from investors, utilities, and the wider energy research community (including from ARPA-E). There is great interest in a small modular fusion system that can be developed quickly and inexpensively. A simple model shows how compact modular fusion can produce a low cost development path by optimizing traditional systems that burn deuterium and tritium, operating not only at high magnetic field strength, but also by omitting some components that allow for the core to become more compact and easier to maintain. The dominant hurdles to the development of low cost, practical fusion systems are discussed, primarily in terms of the constraints placed on the cost of development stages in the private sector. The main finding presented here is that the bridge from DOE Office of Science to the energy market can come at the Proof of Principle development stage, providing the concept is sufficiently compact and inexpensive that its development allows for a normal technology commercialization path.

  3. Constant-Temperature Calorimetry for In-Core Power Measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radcliff, Thomas D.; Miller, Don W.; Kauffman, Andrew C.

    2000-01-01

    Reactor thermal limits are based on fuel energy deposition and cladding temperature. This paper presents a two-wire in-core instrument that directly measures fuel energy deposition. The instrument is based on the addition of heat through resistive dissipation of input electrical energy to a small mass of reactor fuel or fuel analogue. A feedback loop controls the input electrical energy needed to maintain the fuel mass at a nearly constant temperature regardless of the nuclear energy deposited in the mass. Energy addition to the fuel and fuel temperature feedback to the controller are provided by a resistive heating element embedded in the fuel mass. As long as the external heat transfer environment remains constant, the input electrical energy is inversely related to the actual nuclear energy deposition. To demonstrate this instrument, we first scaled the sensor and controller parameters and then used the results to guide fabrication of prototype instruments. In-reactor testing was performed to measure the instrument sensitivity, linearity, bandwidth, and long-term drift characteristics of the prototypes. The instrument is shown to be capable of high-sensitivity, linear measurement of fuel energy deposition with sufficient bandwidth for safety-related measurements. It is also clear that a means to compensate the sensor for changes in the external heat transfer environment is required. Means of actively measuring heat losses and performing this compensation are discussed

  4. Effect of Rigid Polyurethane Foam Core Density on Flexural and Compressive Properties of Sandwich Panels with Glass/Epoxy Faces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    saeed Nemati

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sandwich panels as composite materials have two external walls of either metallic or polymer type. The space between these walls is filled by hard foam or other materials and the thickness of different layers is based on the final application of the panel. In the present work, the extent of variation in core density of polyether urethane foam and subsequent flexural and compressive changes in sandwich panels with glass or epoxy face sheets are tested and investigated. A number of hard polyether urethane foams with different middle panel layers density 80-295 kg/m3 are designed to study the effect of foam density on mechanical properties including flexural and compressive properties. Flexural and compressive test resultsshow that increased core density leads to improved mechanical properties. The slope of the curve decreases beyond density of 235 kg/m3. The reason may be explained on the limitation of shear intensity in increasing the mechanical properties. In this respect an optimum density of 235 kg/m3 is obtained for the system under examinations and for reaching higher strength panels, foams of different core materials should be selected.

  5. Research on intelligent monitor for 3D power distribution of reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia, Hong; Li, Bin; Liu, Jianxin

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Core power distribution of ex-core measurement system has been reconstructed. • Building up an artificial intelligence model for 3-D core power distribution. • Error of the experiments has been reduced to 0.76%. • Methods for improving the accuracy of the model have been obtained. - Abstract: A real-time monitor for 3D reactor power distribution is critical for nuclear safety and high efficiency of NPP’s operation as well as for optimizing the control system, especially when the nuclear power plant (NPP) works at a certain power level or it works in load following operation. This paper was based on analyzing the monitor for 3D reactor power distribution technologies used in modern NPPs. Furthermore, considering the latest research outcomes, the paper proposed a method based on using an ex-core neutron detector system and a neural network to set up a real time monitor system for reactor’s 3D power distribution supervision. The results of the experiments performed on a reactor simulation machine illustrated that the new monitor system worked very well for a certain burn-up range during the fuel cycle. In addition, this new model could reduce the errors associated with the fitting of the distribution effectively, and several optimization methods were also obtained to improve the accuracy of the simulation model

  6. On-line reconstruction of in-core power distribution by harmonics expansion method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Changhui; Wu Hongchun; Cao Liangzhi; Yang Ping

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → A harmonics expansion method for the on-line in-core power reconstruction is proposed. → A harmonics data library is pre-generated off-line and a code named COMS is developed. → Numerical results show that the maximum relative error of the reconstruction is less than 5.5%. → This method has a high computational speed compared to traditional methods. - Abstract: Fixed in-core detectors are most suitable in real-time response to in-core power distributions in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). In this paper, a harmonics expansion method is used to reconstruct the in-core power distribution of a PWR on-line. In this method, the in-core power distribution is expanded by the harmonics of one reference case. The expansion coefficients are calculated using signals provided by fixed in-core detectors. To conserve computing time and improve reconstruction precision, a harmonics data library containing the harmonics of different reference cases is constructed. Upon reconstruction of the in-core power distribution on-line, the two closest reference cases are searched from the harmonics data library to produce expanded harmonics by interpolation. The Unit 1 reactor of DayaBay Nuclear Power Plant (DayaBay NPP) in China is considered for verification. The maximum relative error between the measurement and reconstruction results is less than 5.5%, and the computing time is about 0.53 s for a single reconstruction, indicating that this method is suitable for the on-line monitoring of PWRs.

  7. Methods to enhance blanket power density in low-power fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, P.Y.; Miller, L.G.; Bohn, T.S.; Deis, G.A.; Longhurst, G.R.; Masson, L.S.; Wessol, D.E.; Abdou, M.A.

    1982-06-01

    The overall objective of this task is to investigate the extent to which the power density in the FED breeder blanket test modules can be enhanced by artificial means. Assuming a viable approach can be developed, it will allow testing of advanced reactor blanket modules on INTOR at representative conditions. The tentative approach adopted for this task consists of three parts. First, the requirements for augmented heating of the test module are outlined for different applications of interest. Second, methods are identified which have potential for augmenting the heating power in a test module, and this list of methods is narrowed to those which appear to be most useful. Finally, these methods are examined in more detail to determine the practical benefits of employing each

  8. Implementation of 252Cf-source-driven power spectrum density measurement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Yong; Wei Biao; Feng Peng; Li Jiansheng; Ye Cenming

    2012-01-01

    The principle of 252 Cf-source-driven power spectrum density measurement method is introduced. A measurement system and platform is realized accordingly, which is a combination of hardware and software, for measuring nuclear parameters. The detection method of neutron pulses based on an ultra-high-speed data acquisition card (three channels, 1 GHz sampling rate, 1 ns synchronization) is described, and the data processing process and the power spectrum density algorithm on PC are designed. This 252 Cf-source-driven power spectrum density measurement system can effectively obtain the nuclear tag parameters of nuclear random processes, such as correlation function and power spectrum density. (authors)

  9. High Energy Density Dielectrics for Pulsed Power Applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wu, Richard L; Bray, Kevin R

    2008-01-01

    This report was developed under a SBIR contract. Aluminum oxynitride (AlON) capacitors exhibit several promising characteristics for high energy density capacitor applications in extreme environments...

  10. ADX: A high Power Density, Advanced RF-Driven Divertor Test Tokamak for PMI studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyte, Dennis; ADX Team

    2015-11-01

    The MIT PSFC and collaborators are proposing an advanced divertor experiment, ADX; a divertor test tokamak dedicated to address critical gaps in plasma-material interactions (PMI) science, and the world fusion research program, on the pathway to FNSF/DEMO. Basic ADX design features are motivated and discussed. In order to assess the widest range of advanced divertor concepts, a large fraction (>50%) of the toroidal field volume is purpose-built with innovative magnetic topology control and flexibility for assessing different surfaces, including liquids. ADX features high B-field (>6 Tesla) and high global power density (P/S ~ 1.5 MW/m2) in order to access the full range of parallel heat flux and divertor plasma pressures foreseen for reactors, while simultaneously assessing the effect of highly dissipative divertors on core plasma/pedestal. Various options for efficiently achieving high field are being assessed including the use of Alcator technology (cryogenic cooled copper) and high-temperature superconductors. The experimental platform would also explore advanced lower hybrid current drive and ion-cyclotron range of frequency actuators located at the high-field side; a location which is predicted to greatly reduce the PMI effects on the launcher while minimally perturbing the core plasma. The synergistic effects of high-field launchers with high total B on current and flow drive can thus be studied in reactor-relevant boundary plasmas.

  11. Design and fabrication of self-powered in-core neutron flux monitor assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, M.K.; Cho, S.W.; Kang, H.D.; Cho, K.K.; Cho, B.S.; Kang, S.S.

    1980-01-01

    This is the final report on the prototypical fabrication of an in-core neutron flux monitor detector assembly for a specific power reactor conducted by KAERI from July 1, 1978 to December 31, 1979. It is well known that power reactors require a large number of in-core neutron flux detector for reactor regulation and the structures of detector assemblies are different from reactor to reactor. Therefore, from the nature of this project, it should be noted here that the target model of the prototypical farbrication of an in-core neutron flux monitor detector assembly is a VFD-2 System for Wolsung CANDU. It is concluded that fabrication of in-core neutron flux monitor detector assembly for CANDU reactor is technically feasible and will bring economical benefit as much as 50 % of the unit price if they are fabricated in Korea by using partially materials which are available from local market. (author)

  12. COLLAPSE AND FRAGMENTATION OF MAGNETIC MOLECULAR CLOUD CORES WITH THE ENZO AMR MHD CODE. I. UNIFORM DENSITY SPHERES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boss, Alan P.; Keiser, Sandra A.

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic fields are important contributors to the dynamics of collapsing molecular cloud cores, and can have a major effect on whether collapse results in a single protostar or fragmentation into a binary or multiple protostar system. New models are presented of the collapse of magnetic cloud cores using the adaptive mesh refinement code Enzo2.0. The code was used to calculate the ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) of initially spherical, uniform density, and rotation clouds with density perturbations, i.e., the Boss and Bodenheimer standard isothermal test case for three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamics codes. After first verifying that Enzo reproduces the binary fragmentation expected for the non-magnetic test case, a large set of models was computed with varied initial magnetic field strengths and directions with respect to the cloud core axis of rotation (parallel or perpendicular), density perturbation amplitudes, and equations of state. Three significantly different outcomes resulted: (1) contraction without sustained collapse, forming a denser cloud core; (2) collapse to form a single protostar with significant spiral arms; and (3) collapse and fragmentation into binary or multiple protostar systems, with multiple spiral arms. Comparisons are also made with previous MHD calculations of similar clouds with a barotropic equations of state. These results for the collapse of initially uniform density spheres illustrate the central importance of both magnetic field direction and field strength for determining the outcome of dynamic protostellar collapse.

  13. In-situ Density and Thermal Expansion Measurements of Fe and Fe-S Alloying Liquids Under Planetary Core Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Z.; Chantel, J.; Yu, T.; Sakamaki, T.; Wang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Liquid iron is likely the dominant constituent in the cores of terrestrial planets and icy satellites such as Earth, Mars, Mercury, the Moon, Ganymede, and Io. Suggested by geophysical and geochemical observations, light elements such as S, C, Si, etc., are likely present in planetary cores. These light elements can significantly reduce the density and melting temperature of the Fe cores, and hence their abundances are crucial to our understanding of the structure and thermal history of planetary cores, as well as the generation of intrinsic magnetic fields. Knowledge on the density of Fe-light element alloying liquids at high pressures is critical to place constraints on the composition of planetary cores. However, density data on liquid Fe-light element alloys at core pressures are very limited in pressure and composition and are sometimes controversial. In this study, we extend the density dataset for Fe-rich liquids by measuring the density of Fe, Fe-10wt%S, Fe-20wt%S, Fe-27wt%S, and FeS liquids using the X-ray absorption technique in a DIA-type multianvil apparatus up to 7 GPa and 2173 K. An ion chamber (1D-detector) and a CCD camera (2D-detector) were used to measure intensities of transmitted monochromatic X-rays through molten samples, with the photon energy optimized at 40 keV. The densities were then determined from the Beer-Lambert law using the mass absorption coefficients, calibrated by solid standards using X-ray diffraction. At each pressure, density measurements were conducted at a range of temperatures above the liquidus of the samples, enabling the determination of thermal expansion. Combined with our previous results on the sound velocity of Fe and Fe-S liquids at high pressures (Jing et al., 2014, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 396, 78-87), these data provide tight constraints on the equation of state and thermodynamic properties such as the adiabatic temperature gradient for Fe-S liquids. We will discuss these results with implications to planetary

  14. Contribution of Anticipated Transients Without Scram (ATWS) to core melt at United States nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giachetti, R.T.

    1989-09-01

    This report looks at WASH-1400 and several other Probabilistic Risk Assessments (PRAs) and Probabilistic Safety Studies (PSSs) to determine the contribution of Anticipated Transients Without Scram (ATWS) events to the total core melt probability at eight nuclear power plants in the United States. After considering each plant individually, the results are compared from plant to plant to see if any generic conclusions regarding ATWS, or core melt in general, can be made. 8 refs., 34 tabs

  15. In-core neutron flux measurements at PARR using self powered neutron detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, A.; Ansari, S.A.

    1989-10-01

    This report describes experimental reactor physics measure ments at PARR using the in-core neutron detectors. Rhodium self powered neutron detectors (SPND) were used in the PARR core and several measurements were made aimed at detector calibration, response time determination and neutron flux measurements. The detectors were calibrated at low power using gold foils and full power by the thermal channel. Based on this calibration it was observed that the detector response remains almost linear throughout the power range. The self powered detectors were used for on-line determination of absolute neutron flux in the core as well as the spatial distribution of neutron flux or reactor power. The experimental, axial and horizontal flux mapping results at certain locations in the core are presented. The total response time of rhodium detector was experimentally determined to be about 5 minutes, which agree well with the theoretical results. Because of longer response time of SPND of the detectors it is not possible to use them in the reactor protection system. (author). 10 figs

  16. Core concept of fast power reactor with zero sodium void reactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matveev, V.I.; Chebeskov, A.N.; Krivitsky, I.Y.

    1991-01-01

    The paper presents a core concept of BN-800 - type fast power reactor with zero sodium void reactivity (SVR). Consideration is given to the layout-and some design features of such a core. Some considerations on the determination of the required SVR value as one of the fast reactor safety criteria in accidents with coolant boiling are presented. Some methodical considerations an the development of calculation models that give a correct description of the new core features are stated. The results of the integral SVR calculation studies are included. reactivity excursions under different scenarios of sodium boiling are estimated, some corrections into the calculated SVR value are discussed. (author)

  17. INCA: method of analyzing in-core detector data in power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ober, T.G.; Terney, W.B.; Marks, G.H.

    1975-04-01

    A method (INCA) is described by which signals from fixed in-core detectors are related to estimates of the three dimensional power distribution in an operating reactor core and to the maximum linear heat rate in the core. A description of the large library of data accompanying the method is provided. A detailed examination of the analytical verifications performed using the method is presented, and a summary of the uncertainty associated with the method is given. The uncertainty assigned to the maximum linear heat rate inferred by the method from operating reactor data is found to be 5.8 percent at a 95/95 confidence level. (U.S.)

  18. Fuel management service for Tarapur Atomic Power Station core thermal hydraulics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, D.; Venkat Raj, V.; Markandeya, S.G.

    1977-01-01

    Core thermal hydraulic analysis forms an integral part of the fuel management service for the Tarapur reactors. A distinguishing feature of boiling water reactors is the dependence of core flow distribution on the power distribution. Because of the changes in the axial and radial power distribution from cycle to cycle as well as during the cycle and also the variations in leakage flow, it is necessary to evaluate the core thermal hydraulic parameters for every cycle. Some of the typical results obtained in the course of analysis for different cycles of both the units at Tarapur are presented. The use of MCPR (Minimum Critical Power Ratio), instead of MCHFR (Minimum Critical Heat Flux Ratio) as a figure of merit for fuel cladding integrity is also discussed. (K.B.)

  19. Solution of the 'MIDICORE' WWER-1000 core periphery power distribution benchmark by KARATE and MCNP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temesvari, E.; Hegyi, G.; Hordosy, G.; Maraczy, C.

    2011-01-01

    The 'MIDICORE' WWER-1000 core periphery power distribution benchmark was proposed by Mr. Mikolas on the twentieth Symposium of AER in Finland in 2010. This MIDICORE benchmark is a two-dimensional calculation benchmark based on the WWER-1000 reactor core cold state geometry with taking into account the geometry of explicit radial reflector. The main task of the benchmark is to test the pin by pin power distribution in selected fuel assemblies at the periphery of the WWER-1000 core. In this paper we present our results (k eff , integral fission power) calculated by MCNP and the KARATE code system in KFKI-AEKI and the comparison to the preliminary reference Monte Carlo calculation results made by NRI, Rez. (Authors)

  20. A heuristic application of critical power ratio to pressurized water reactor core design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Seung Hoon; Jeun, Gyoo Dong

    2002-01-01

    The approach for evaluating the critical heat flux (CHF) margin using the departure from nucleate boiling ratio (DNBR) concept has been widely applied to PWR core design, while DNBR in this approach does not indicate appropriately the CHF margin in terms of the attainable power margin-to-CHF against a reactor core condition. The CHF power margin must be calculated by increasing power until the minimum DNBR reaches a DNBR limit. The Critical Power Ratio (CPR), defined as the ratio of the predicted CHF power to the operating power, is considered more reasonable for indicating the CHF margin and can be calculated by a CPR correlation based on the heat balance of a test bundle. This approach yields directly the CHF power margin, but the calculated CPR must be corrected to compensate for many local effects of the actual core, which are not considered in the CHF test and analysis. In this paper, correction of the calculated CPR is made so that it may become equal to the DNB overpower margin. Exemplary calculations showed that the correction tends to be increased as power distribution is more distorted, but are not unduly large

  1. 40 CFR 1042.140 - Maximum engine power, displacement, power density, and maximum in-use engine speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... cylinders having an internal diameter of 13.0 cm and a 15.5 cm stroke length, the rounded displacement would... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Maximum engine power, displacement... Maximum engine power, displacement, power density, and maximum in-use engine speed. This section describes...

  2. Simulating Valence-to-Core X-ray Emission Spectroscopy of Transition Metal Complexes with Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Mukamel, Shaul; Khalil, Munira; Govind, Niranjan

    2015-12-08

    Valence-to-core (VtC) X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) has emerged as a powerful technique for the structural characterization of complex organometallic compounds in realistic environments. Since the spectrum represents electronic transitions from the ligand molecular orbitals to the core holes of the metal centers, the approach is more chemically sensitive to the metal-ligand bonding character compared with conventional X-ray absorption techniques. In this paper we study how linear-response time-dependent density functional theory (LR-TDDFT) can be harnessed to simulate K-edge VtC X-ray emission spectra reliably. LR-TDDFT allows one to go beyond the single-particle picture that has been extensively used to simulate VtC-XES. We consider seven low- and high-spin model complexes involving chromium, manganese, and iron transition metal centers. Our results are in good agreement with experiment.

  3. Thermal limits validation of gamma thermometer power adaption in CFE Laguna Verde 2 reactor core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuevas V, G.; Banfield, J. [GE-Hitachi Nuclear Energy Americas LLC, Global Nuclear Fuel, Americas LLC, 3901 Castle Hayne Road, Wilmingtonm, North Carolina (United States); Avila N, A., E-mail: Gabriel.Cuevas-Vivas@ge.com [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Central Nucleoelectrica Laguna Verde, Carretera Cardel-Nautla Km 42.5, Alto Lucero, Veracruz (Mexico)

    2016-09-15

    This paper presents the status of GEH work on Gamma Thermometer (GT) validation using the signals of the instruments installed in the Laguna Verde Unit 2 reactor core. The long-standing technical collaboration between Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE), Global Nuclear Fuel - Americas LLC (GNF) and GE-Hitachi Nuclear Energy Americas LLC (GEH) is moving forward with solid steps to a final implementation of GTs in a nuclear reactor core. Each GT is integrated into a slightly modified Local Power Range Monitor (LPRM) assembly. Six instrumentation strings are equipped with two gamma field detectors for a total of twenty-four bundles whose calculated powers are adapted to the instrumentation readings in addition to their use as calibration instruments for LPRMs. Since November 2007, the six GT instrumentation strings have been operable with almost no degradation by the strong neutron and gamma fluxes in the Laguna Verde Unit 2 reactor core. In this paper, the thermal limits, Critical Power Ratio (CPR) and maximum Linear Heat Generation Rate (LHGR), of bundles directly monitored by either Traverse In-core Probes (TIPs) or GTs are used to establish validation results that confirm the viability of TIP system replacement with automatic fixed in-core probes (AFIPs, GTs, in a Boiling Water Reactor. The new GNF steady-state reactor core simulator AETNA02 is used to obtain power and exposure distribution. Using this code with an updated methodology for GT power adaption, a reduced value of the GT interpolation uncertainty is obtained that is fed into the LHGR calculation. This new method achieves margin recovery for the adapted thermal limits for use in the Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ESBWR) or any other BWR in the future that employs a GT based AFIP system for local power measurements. (Author)

  4. Thermal limits validation of gamma thermometer power adaption in CFE Laguna Verde 2 reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuevas V, G.; Banfield, J.; Avila N, A.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents the status of GEH work on Gamma Thermometer (GT) validation using the signals of the instruments installed in the Laguna Verde Unit 2 reactor core. The long-standing technical collaboration between Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE), Global Nuclear Fuel - Americas LLC (GNF) and GE-Hitachi Nuclear Energy Americas LLC (GEH) is moving forward with solid steps to a final implementation of GTs in a nuclear reactor core. Each GT is integrated into a slightly modified Local Power Range Monitor (LPRM) assembly. Six instrumentation strings are equipped with two gamma field detectors for a total of twenty-four bundles whose calculated powers are adapted to the instrumentation readings in addition to their use as calibration instruments for LPRMs. Since November 2007, the six GT instrumentation strings have been operable with almost no degradation by the strong neutron and gamma fluxes in the Laguna Verde Unit 2 reactor core. In this paper, the thermal limits, Critical Power Ratio (CPR) and maximum Linear Heat Generation Rate (LHGR), of bundles directly monitored by either Traverse In-core Probes (TIPs) or GTs are used to establish validation results that confirm the viability of TIP system replacement with automatic fixed in-core probes (AFIPs, GTs, in a Boiling Water Reactor. The new GNF steady-state reactor core simulator AETNA02 is used to obtain power and exposure distribution. Using this code with an updated methodology for GT power adaption, a reduced value of the GT interpolation uncertainty is obtained that is fed into the LHGR calculation. This new method achieves margin recovery for the adapted thermal limits for use in the Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ESBWR) or any other BWR in the future that employs a GT based AFIP system for local power measurements. (Author)

  5. Automated in-core image generation from video to aid visual inspection of nuclear power plant cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, Paul, E-mail: paul.murray@strath.ac.uk [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Strathclyde, Technology and Innovation Centre, 99 George Street, Glasgow, G1 1RD (United Kingdom); West, Graeme; Marshall, Stephen; McArthur, Stephen [Dept. Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Strathclyde, Royal College Building, 204 George Street, Glasgow G1 1XW (United Kingdom)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • A method is presented which improves visual inspection of reactor cores. • Significant time savings are made to activities on the critical outage path. • New information is extracted from existing data sources without additional overhead. • Examples from industrial case studies across the UK fleet of AGR stations. - Abstract: Inspection and monitoring of key components of nuclear power plant reactors is an essential activity for understanding the current health of the power plant and ensuring that they continue to remain safe to operate. As the power plants age, and the components degrade from their initial start-of-life conditions, the requirement for more and more detailed inspection and monitoring information increases. Deployment of new monitoring and inspection equipment on existing operational plant is complex and expensive, as the effect of introducing new sensing and imaging equipment to the existing operational functions needs to be fully understood. Where existing sources of data can be leveraged, the need for new equipment development and installation can be offset by the development of advanced data processing techniques. This paper introduces a novel technique for creating full 360° panoramic images of the inside surface of fuel channels from in-core inspection footage. Through the development of this technique, a number of technical challenges associated with the constraints of using existing equipment have been addressed. These include: the inability to calibrate the camera specifically for image stitching; dealing with additional data not relevant to the panorama construction; dealing with noisy images; and generalising the approach to work with two different capture devices deployed at seven different Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor nuclear power plants. The resulting data processing system is currently under formal assessment with a view to replacing the existing manual assembly of in-core defect montages. Deployment of the

  6. The whiteStar development project: Westinghouse's next generation core design simulator and core monitoring software to power the nuclear renaissance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, W. A.; Mayhue, L. T.; Penkrot, V. S.; Zhang, B.

    2009-01-01

    The WhiteStar project has undertaken the development of the next generation core analysis and monitoring system for Westinghouse Electric Company. This on-going project focuses on the development of the ANC core simulator, BEACON core monitoring system and NEXUS nuclear data generation system. This system contains many functional upgrades to the ANC core simulator and BEACON core monitoring products as well as the release of the NEXUS family of codes. The NEXUS family of codes is an automated once-through cross section generation system designed for use in both PWR and BWR applications. ANC is a multi-dimensional nodal code for all nuclear core design calculations at a given condition. ANC predicts core reactivity, assembly power, rod power, detector thimble flux, and other relevant core characteristics. BEACON is an advanced core monitoring and support system which uses existing instrumentation data in conjunction with an analytical methodology for on-line generation and evaluation of 3D core power distributions. This new system is needed to design and monitor the Westinghouse AP1000 PWR. This paper describes provides an overview of the software system, software development methodologies used as well some initial results. (authors)

  7. Self powered neutron detectors as in-core detectors for Sodium-cooled Fast Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, V.; Barbot, L.; Filliatre, P.; Hellesen, C.; Jammes, C.; Svärd, S. Jacobsson

    2017-07-01

    Neutron flux monitoring system forms an integral part of the design of a Generation IV sodium cooled fast reactor. Diverse possibilities of detector system installation must be studied for various locations in the reactor vessel in order to detect any perturbations in the core. Results from a previous paper indicated that it is possible to detect changes in neutron source distribution initiated by an inadvertent withdrawal of outer control rod with in-vessel fission chambers located azimuthally around the core. It is, however, not possible to follow inner control rod withdrawal and precisely know the location of the perturbation in the core. Hence the use of complimentary in-core detectors coupled with the peripheral fission chambers is proposed to enable robust core monitoring across the radial direction. In this paper, we assess the feasibility of using self-powered neutron detectors (SPNDs) as in-core detectors in fast reactors for detecting local changes in the power distribution when the reactor is operated at nominal power. We study the neutron and gamma contributions to the total output current of the detector modelled with Platinum as the emitter material. It is shown that this SPND placed in an SFR-like environment would give a sufficiently measurable prompt neutron induced current of the order of 600 nA/m. The corresponding induced current in the connecting cable is two orders of magnitude lower and can be neglected. This means that the SPND can follow in-core power fluctuations. This validates the operability of an SPND in an SFR-like environment.

  8. Estimation of reactor core calculation by HELIOS/MASTER at power generating condition through DeCART, whole-core transport code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H. Y.; Joo, H. G.; Kim, K. S.; Kim, G. Y.; Jang, M. H.

    2003-01-01

    The reactivity and power distribution errors of the HELIOS/MASTER core calculation under power generating conditions are assessed using a whole core transport code DeCART. For this work, the cross section tablesets were generated for a medium sized PWR following the standard procedure and two group nodal core calculations were performed. The test cases include the HELIOS calculations for 2-D assemblies at constant thermal conditions, MASTER 3D assembly calculations at power generating conditions, and the core calculations at HZP, HFP, and an abnormal power conditions. In all these cases, the results of the DeCART code in which pinwise thermal feedback effects are incorporated are used as the reference. The core reactivity, assemblywise power distribution, axial power distribution, peaking factor, and thermal feedback effects are then compared. The comparison shows that the error of the HELIOS/MASTER system in the core reactivity, assembly wise power distribution, pin peaking factor are only 100∼300 pcm, 3%, and 2%, respectively. As far as the detailed pinwise power distribution is concerned, however, errors greater than 15% are observed

  9. New final doublets and power densities for the international linear ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this paper we use current and proposed final doublet magnet technologies to reoptimise the interaction region of the international linear collider and reduce the power losses. The result is a set of three new final doublet layouts with improved beam transport properties. The effect of localised power deposition and ...

  10. Ab initio translationally invariant nonlocal one-body densities from no-core shell-model theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, M.; Elster, Ch.; Popa, G.; Launey, K. D.; Nogga, A.; Maris, P.

    2018-02-01

    Background: It is well known that effective nuclear interactions are in general nonlocal. Thus if nuclear densities obtained from ab initio no-core shell-model (NCSM) calculations are to be used in reaction calculations, translationally invariant nonlocal densities must be available. Purpose: Though it is standard to extract translationally invariant one-body local densities from NCSM calculations to calculate local nuclear observables like radii and transition amplitudes, the corresponding nonlocal one-body densities have not been considered so far. A major reason for this is that the procedure for removing the center-of-mass component from NCSM wave functions up to now has only been developed for local densities. Results: A formulation for removing center-of-mass contributions from nonlocal one-body densities obtained from NCSM and symmetry-adapted NCSM (SA-NCSM) calculations is derived, and applied to the ground state densities of 4He, 6Li, 12C, and 16O. The nonlocality is studied as a function of angular momentum components in momentum as well as coordinate space. Conclusions: We find that the nonlocality for the ground state densities of the nuclei under consideration increases as a function of the angular momentum. The relative magnitude of those contributions decreases with increasing angular momentum. In general, the nonlocal structure of the one-body density matrices we studied is given by the shell structure of the nucleus, and cannot be described with simple functional forms.

  11. Computation of the Mutual Inductance between Air-Cored Coils of Wireless Power Transformer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anele, A O; Hamam, Y; Djouani, K; Chassagne, L; Alayli, Y; Linares, J

    2015-01-01

    Wireless power transfer system is a modern technology which allows the transfer of electric power between the air-cored coils of its transformer via high frequency magnetic fields. However, due to its coil separation distance and misalignment, maximum power transfer is not guaranteed. Based on a more efficient and general model available in the literature, rederived mathematical models for evaluating the mutual inductance between circular coils with and without lateral and angular misalignment are presented. Rather than presenting results numerically, the computed results are graphically implemented using MATLAB codes. The results are compared with the published ones and clarification regarding the errors made are presented. In conclusion, this study shows that power transfer efficiency of the system can be improved if a higher frequency alternating current is supplied to the primary coil, the reactive parts of the coils are compensated with capacitors and ferrite cores are added to the coils. (paper)

  12. Research on 3D power distribution of PWR reactor core based on RBF neural network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Hong; Li Bin; Liu Jianxin

    2014-01-01

    Real-time monitor for 3D power distribution is critical to nuclear safety and high efficiency of NPP's operation as well as the control system optimization. A method was proposed to set up a real-time monitor system for 3D power distribution by using of ex-core neutron detecting system and RBF neural network for improving the instantaneity of the monitoring results and reducing the fitting error of the 3D power distribution. A series of experiments were operated on a 300 MW PWR simulation system. The results demonstrate that the new monitor system works very well under condition of certain burnup range during the fuel cycle and reconstructs the real-time 3D distribution of reactor core power. The accuracy of the model is improved effectively with the help of several methods. (authors)

  13. Comparative assessment of out-of-core nuclear thermionic power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estabrook, W.C.; Koenig, D.R.; Prickett, W.Z.

    1975-01-01

    The hardware selections available for fabrication of a nuclear electric propulsion stage for planetary exploration were explored. The investigation was centered around a heat-pipe-cooled, fast-spectrum nuclear reactor for an out-of-core power conversion system with sufficient detail for comparison with the in-core system studies completed previously. A survey of competing power conversion systems still indicated that the modular reliability of thermionic converters makes them the desirable choice to provide the 240-kWe end-of-life power for at least 20,000 full power hours. The electrical energy will be used to operate a number of mercury ion bombardment thrusters with a specific impulse in the range of about 4,000-5,000 seconds. (Author)

  14. Role of Density Gradient Driven Trapped Electron Modes in the H-Mode Inner Core with Electron Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, D.

    2015-11-01

    We present new experiments and nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations showing that density gradient driven TEM (DGTEM) turbulence dominates the inner core of H-Mode plasmas during strong electron heating. Thus α-heating may degrade inner core confinement in H-Mode plasmas with moderate density peaking. These DIII-D low torque quiescent H-mode experiments were designed to study DGTEM turbulence. Gyrokinetic simulations using GYRO (and GENE) closely match not only particle, energy, and momentum fluxes, but also density fluctuation spectra, with and without ECH. Adding 3.4 MW ECH doubles Te /Ti from 0.5 to 1.0, which halves the linear TEM critical density gradient, locally flattening the density profile. Density fluctuations from Doppler backscattering (DBS) intensify near ρ = 0.3 during ECH, displaying a band of coherent fluctuations with adjacent toroidal mode numbers. GYRO closely reproduces the DBS spectrum and its change in shape and intensity with ECH, identifying these as coherent TEMs. Prior to ECH, parallel flow shear lowers the effective nonlinear DGTEM critical density gradient 50%, but is negligible during ECH, when transport displays extreme stiffness in the density gradient. GS2 predictions show the DGTEM can be suppressed, to avoid degradation with electron heating, by broadening the current density profile to attain q0 >qmin > 1 . A related experiment in the same regime varied the electron temperature gradient in the outer half-radius (ρ ~ 0 . 65) using ECH, revealing spatially coherent 2D mode structures in the Te fluctuations measured by ECE imaging. Fourier analysis with modulated ECH finds a threshold in Te profile stiffness. Supported by the US DOE under DE-FC02-08ER54966 and DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  15. Implementation of a fast running full core pin power reconstruction method in DYN3D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez-Torres, Armando Miguel; Sanchez-Espinoza, Victor Hugo; Kliem, Sören; Gommlich, Andre

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • New pin power reconstruction (PPR) method for the nodal diffusion code DYN3D. • Flexible PPR method applicable to a single, a group or to all fuel assemblies (square, hex). • Combination of nodal with pin-wise solutions (non-conform geometry). • PPR capabilities shown for REA of a Minicore (REA) PWR whole core. - Abstract: This paper presents a substantial extension of the pin power reconstruction (PPR) method used in the reactor dynamics code DYN3D with the aim to better describe the heterogeneity within the fuel assembly during reactor simulations. The flexibility of the new implemented PPR permits the local spatial refinement of one fuel assembly, of a cluster of fuel assemblies, of a quarter or eight of a core or even of a whole core. The application of PPR in core regions of interest will pave the way for the coupling with sub-channel codes enabling the prediction of local safety parameters. One of the main advantages of considering regions and not only a hot fuel assembly (FA) is the fact that the cross flow within this region can be taken into account by the subchannel code. The implementation of the new PPR method has been tested analysing a rod ejection accident (REA) in a PWR minicore consisting of 3 × 3 FA. Finally, the new capabilities of DNY3D are demonstrated by the analysing a boron dilution transient in a PWR MOX core and the pin power of a VVER-1000 reactor at stationary conditions

  16. Implementation of a fast running full core pin power reconstruction method in DYN3D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Torres, Armando Miguel [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Department of Nuclear Systems, Carretera Mexico – Toluca s/n, La Marquesa, 52750 Ocoyoacac (Mexico); Sanchez-Espinoza, Victor Hugo, E-mail: victor.sanchez@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, Hermann-vom-Helmhotz-Platz 1, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Kliem, Sören; Gommlich, Andre [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: • New pin power reconstruction (PPR) method for the nodal diffusion code DYN3D. • Flexible PPR method applicable to a single, a group or to all fuel assemblies (square, hex). • Combination of nodal with pin-wise solutions (non-conform geometry). • PPR capabilities shown for REA of a Minicore (REA) PWR whole core. - Abstract: This paper presents a substantial extension of the pin power reconstruction (PPR) method used in the reactor dynamics code DYN3D with the aim to better describe the heterogeneity within the fuel assembly during reactor simulations. The flexibility of the new implemented PPR permits the local spatial refinement of one fuel assembly, of a cluster of fuel assemblies, of a quarter or eight of a core or even of a whole core. The application of PPR in core regions of interest will pave the way for the coupling with sub-channel codes enabling the prediction of local safety parameters. One of the main advantages of considering regions and not only a hot fuel assembly (FA) is the fact that the cross flow within this region can be taken into account by the subchannel code. The implementation of the new PPR method has been tested analysing a rod ejection accident (REA) in a PWR minicore consisting of 3 × 3 FA. Finally, the new capabilities of DNY3D are demonstrated by the analysing a boron dilution transient in a PWR MOX core and the pin power of a VVER-1000 reactor at stationary conditions.

  17. Application of MSHIM core control strategy for westinghouse AP1000 nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onoue, Masaaki; Kawanishi, Tomohiro; Carlson, William R.; Morita, Toshio

    2003-01-01

    Westinghouse has developed a new core control strategy, in which two independently moving Rod Cluster Control Assembly (RCCA) groups are utilized for core control; one group for reactivity/temperature control, the other for axial power distribution (Axial Offset) control. This control procedure eliminates the need for Chemical Shim adjustments during power maneuvers, such as load follow, and is designated MSHIM (Mechanical Shim). This core control strategy is utilized in the AP1000. In the AP1000, it is possible to perform MSHIM load follow maneuvers for up to 95% of cycle life without changing the soluble boron concentration in the moderator. This core control strategy has been evaluated, via computer simulations, to provide appropriate margins to core and fuel design limits during normal operation maneuvers (including load follow operations) and also during anticipated Condition II accident transients. The primary benefits of MSHIM as a control strategy are as follows; Power change operation can be totally automated due to the elimination of boron concentration adjustments. Full load follow capability is achievable for up to more than 95% of cycle life. Load follow operations performed solely by mechanical devices results in a significant reduction in the boron system requirements and a significant reduction in daily effluent to be processed. (author)

  18. Wind power statistics and an evaluation of wind energy density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamil, M.; Parsa, S.; Majidi, M. [Materials and Energy Research Centre, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    1995-11-01

    In this paper the statistical data of fifty days` wind speed measurements at the MERC- solar site are used to find out the wind energy density and other wind characteristics with the help of the Weibull probability distribution function. It is emphasized that the Weibull and Rayleigh probability functions are useful tools for wind energy density estimation but are not quite appropriate for properly fitting the actual wind data of low mean speed, short-time records. One has to use either the actual wind data (histogram) or look for a better fit by other models of the probability function. (Author)

  19. The influence of changes in the VVER-1000 fuel assembly shape during operation on the power density distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shishkov, L. K., E-mail: Shishkov-LK@nrcki.ru; Gorodkov, S. S.; Mikailov, E. F.; Sukhino-Homenko, E. A.; Sumarokova, A. S., E-mail: Sumarokova-AS@nrcki.ru [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    A new approach to calculation of the coefficients of sensitivity of the fuel pin power to deviations in gap sizes between fuel assemblies of the VVER-1000 reactor during its operation is proposed. It is shown that the calculations by the MCU code should be performed for a full-size model of the core to take the interference of the gap influence into account. In order to reduce the conservatism of calculations, the coolant density and coolant temperature feedbacks should be taken into account, as well as the fuel burnup.

  20. Density and temperature profile modifications with electron cyclotron power injection in quiescent double barrier discharges on DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casper, T A; Burrell, K H; Doyle, E J; Gohil, P; Lasnier, C J; Leonard, A W; Moller, J M; Osborne, T H; Snyder, P B; Thomas, D M; Weiland, J; West, W P

    2006-01-01

    Quiescent double barrier (QDB) conditions often form when an internal transport barrier is created with high-power neutral-beam injection into a quiescent H-mode (QH) plasma. These QH-modes offer an attractive, high-performance operating scenario for burning plasma experiments due to their quasi-stationarity and lack of edge localized modes. Our initial experiments and modelling using ECH/ECCD in QDB shots were designed to control the current profile and, indeed, we have observed a strong dependence on the q-profile when EC-power is used inside the core transport barrier region. While strong electron heating is observed with EC power injection, we also observe a drop in the other core parameters, namely ion temperature and rotation, electron density and impurity concentration. At onset and termination of the EC pulse, dynamically changing conditions are induced that provide a rapid evolution of T e /T i profiles accessible with 0.3 e /T i ) axis e /T i ratio as the ion temperature and density profiles flatten with this change in transport. The change in transport is consistent with a destabilization of ITG turbulence as inferred from the reduction of the stability threshold due to the change in T e /T i

  1. Effects of Radial Reflector Composition on Core Reactivity and Peak Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sang Yoon; Lee, Kyung Hoon; Song, Jae Seung

    2007-10-01

    The effects of radial SA-240 alloy shroud on core reactivity and peak power are evaluated. The existence of radial SA-240 alloy shroud makes reflector water volume decrease, so the thermal absorption cross section of radial reflector is lower than without SA-240 alloy shroud case. Finally, the cycle length is increased from 788 EFPD to 845 EFPD and the peak power is decreased from 1.66 to 1.49. In the case of without SA-240 alloy shroud, a new core loading pattern search has been performed. For the guarantee of the same equivalent cycle length of with SA-240 alloy shroud case, the enrichment of U-235 should be increased from 4.22 w/o to 4.68 w/o. The nuclear key safety parameters of new core loading pattern have been calculated and recorded for the future

  2. Effects of Radial Reflector Composition on Core Reactivity and Peak Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sang Yoon; Lee, Kyung Hoon; Song, Jae Seung

    2007-10-15

    The effects of radial SA-240 alloy shroud on core reactivity and peak power are evaluated. The existence of radial SA-240 alloy shroud makes reflector water volume decrease, so the thermal absorption cross section of radial reflector is lower than without SA-240 alloy shroud case. Finally, the cycle length is increased from 788 EFPD to 845 EFPD and the peak power is decreased from 1.66 to 1.49. In the case of without SA-240 alloy shroud, a new core loading pattern search has been performed. For the guarantee of the same equivalent cycle length of with SA-240 alloy shroud case, the enrichment of U-235 should be increased from 4.22 w/o to 4.68 w/o. The nuclear key safety parameters of new core loading pattern have been calculated and recorded for the future.

  3. Analysis of in-core coolant temperatures of FFTF instrumented fuels tests at full power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoth, C.W.

    1981-01-01

    Two full size highly instrumented fuel assemblies were inserted into the core of the Fast Flux Test Facility in December of 1979. The major objectives of these instrumented tests are to provide verification of the FFTF core conditions and to characterize temperature patterns within FFTF driver fuel assemblies. A review is presented of the results obtained during the power ascents and during irradiation at a constant reactor power of 400 MWt. The results obtained from these instrumented tests verify the conservative nature of the design methods used to establish core conditions in FFTF. The success of these tests also demonstrates the ability to design, fabricate, install and irradiate complex, instrumented fuel tests in FFTF using commercially procured components

  4. Nuclear analysis and performance of the Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) core power operation at Shippingport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hecker, H.C.

    1984-04-01

    This report presents the nuclear analysis and discusses the performance of the LWBR core at Shippingport during power operation from initial startup through end-of-life at 28,730 EFPH. Core follow depletion calculations confirmed that the reactivity bias and power distributions were well within the uncertainty allowances used in the design and safety analysis of LWBR. The magnitude of the core follow reactivity bias has shown that the calculational models used can predict the behavior of U 233 -Th systems with closely spaced fuel rod lattices and movable fuel. In addition, the calculated final fissile loading is sufficiently greater than the initial fissile inventory that the measurements to be performed for proof-of-breeding evaluations are expected to confirm that breeding has occurred

  5. Frontiers in pulse-power-based high energy density plasma physics and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2008-03-01

    The papers in this volume of report were presented at the Symposium on Frontiers in Pulse-power-based High Energy Density Physics' held by National Institute for Fusion Science. The topics include the present status of high energy density plasma researches, extreme ultraviolet sources, intense radiation sources, high power ion beams, and R and D of related pulse power technologies. The 13 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  6. Frontiers of particle beam and high energy density plasma science using pulse power technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masugata, Katsumi

    2011-04-01

    The papers presented at the symposium on “Frontiers of Particle Beam and High Energy Density Plasma Science using Pulse Power Technology” held in November 20-21, 2009 at National Institute for Fusion Science are collected. The papers reflect the present status and resent progress in the experiment and theoretical works on high power particle beams and high energy density plasmas produced by pulsed power technology. (author)

  7. Influence of core NA on thermal-induced mode instabilities in high power fiber amplifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao, Rumao; Ma, Pengfei; Wang, Xiaolin; Zhou, Pu; Liu, Zejin

    2015-01-01

    We report on the influence of core NA on thermal-induced mode instabilities (MI) in high power fiber amplifiers. The influence of core NA and the V-parameter on MI has been investigated numerically. It shows that core NA has a larger influence on MI for fibers with a smaller core-cladding-ratio, and the influence of core NA on the threshold is more obvious when the amplifiers are pumped at 915 nm. The dependence of the threshold on the V-parameter revealed that the threshold increases linearly as the V-parameter decreases when the V-parameter is larger than 3.5, and the threshold shows an exponential increase as the V-parameter decreases when the V-parameter is less than 3.5. We also discussed the effect of linewidth on MI, which indicates that the influence of linewidth can be neglected for a linewidth smaller than 1 nm when the fiber core NA is smaller than 0.07 and the fiber length is shorter than 20 m. Fiber amplifiers with different core NA were experimentally analyzed, which agreed with the theoretical predictions. (letter)

  8. Self-powered in-core neutron detector assembly with uniform perturbation characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    An in-core neutron detector assembly consisting of a number of longitudinally extending self-powered detectors is described. The uniform mechanical structures and materials are placed symmetrically at each active detector portion thus ensuring that local perturbation factors are uniform. (U.K.)

  9. Influence of FA pin power minimisation on neutron-physical core characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikolas, P.

    2005-01-01

    The influence of optimisation of radial fuel enrichment profilation in fuel assembly of Gd-2 type on lowering its pin power non-uniformity and subsequent lowering of F dH in WWER-440 cores are described in this paper (Author)

  10. Design of the zero power reactor core of Instituto de Energia Atomica, SP, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Antonio Carlos de Almeida

    1974-01-01

    The main characteristics of a graphite moderated core of a critical assembly to be installed in the zero power reactor of the Instituto de Energia Atomica have been defined. Several simple geometric configurations have been selected and criticality studies have been made. The necessary quantity of fissile uranium has been calculated. (author)

  11. Design and Fabrication of Air-core Inductors for Power Conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lê Thanh, Hoà; Mizushima, Io; Tang, Peter Torben

    supply on chip (PwrSoC) [1]. Examples of PwrSoC applications are power adaptors for LED illumination and the “Internet of Things”. We report an air-core MEMS inductor. Our process is scalable and universal for making inductors with versatile geometries e.g. spiral, solenoid, toroid, and advanced...

  12. Results of an analysis of in-core measurements during the first core cycle of the Greifswald nuclear power plant, unit 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehre, G.

    1982-01-01

    First results of an analysis of flux and temperature values obtained from the in-core system in the third unit of the Greifswald nuclear power plant during the first core cycle are presented. The analysis has been performed with the aid of the computer code INCA. Possibilities and limits of this code are shown. (author)

  13. Fuel and Core Design Verification for Extended Power Up-rate in Ringhals Unit 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabrielsson, Petter; Stepniewski, Marek; Almberger, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Vattenfall's Westinghouse 3-loop PWR Ringhals 3 at the western coast of Sweden is scheduled for an extended power up-rate from 2783 to 3160 MWt in 2007, in the frame of the so called GREAT-project. The project will realize an up-rating initially planned and analysed back in 1995, but with a number of significant improvements outlined in this paper. For the licensing of the up-rated power level, a complete revision of the safety analyses, radiological analyses and systems verifications in FSAR is being performed by Westinghouse Electrics Belgium. The work is performed in close cooperation with Vattenfall in the areas of core calculations and input data. For more than a decade, Vattenfall has performed all core design and reload safety evaluations (RSE) for Ringhals, independent of fuel vendors and safety analysts. In GREAT all core parameters in the safety analysis checklist (SAC) used for the safety analyses are determined based upon a set of nine reference loading patterns designed by Vattenfall covering a wide range of fuel and core designs and extreme cycle-to-cycle variations. To facilitate the calculation of SAC parameters Westinghouse has provided a Reload Safety Evaluation Procedure report (RSEP) with detailed specifications for the calculation of all core parameters used in the analyses. The procedure has been automatized by Vattenfall in a set of scripts executing 3D core simulator calculations and extracting the key results. The same tools will be used in Vattenfall's future RSE for Ringhals 3. This approach is taken to obtain consistency between core designs and core calculations for the safety analyses and the cycle specific calculations, to minimize the risk for future violations of the safety analyses. (authors)

  14. Modeling and analysis of the disk MHD generator component of a gas core reactor/MHD Rankine cycle space power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, G.E.; Dugan, E.T.; Lear, W.E. Jr.; Appelbaum, J.G.

    1990-01-01

    A gas core nuclear reactor (GCR)/disk magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator direct closed Rankine space power system concept is described. The GCR/disk MHD generator marriage facilitates efficient high electric power density system performance at relatively high operating temperatures. The system concept promises high specific power levels, on the order of 1 kW e /kg. An overview of the disk MHD generator component magnetofluiddynamic and plasma physics theoretical modeling is provided. Results from a parametric design analysis of the disk MHD generator are presented and discussed

  15. Mini-cavity plasma core reactors for dual-mode space nuclear power/propulsion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chow, S.

    1976-01-01

    A mini-cavity plasma core reactor is investigated for potential use in a dual-mode space power and propulsion system. In the propulsive mode, hydrogen propellant is injected radially inward through the reactor solid regions and into the cavity. The propellant is heated by both solid driver fuel elements surrounding the cavity and uranium plasma before it is exhausted out the nozzle. The propellant only removes a fraction of the driver power, the remainder is transferred by a coolant fluid to a power conversion system, which incorporates a radiator for heat rejection. In the power generation mode, the plasma and propellant flows are shut off, and the driver elements supply thermal power to the power conversion system, which generates electricity for primary electric propulsion purposes

  16. Effective Domain Partitioning for Multi-Clock Domain IP Core Wrapper Design under Power Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Thomas Edison; Yoneda, Tomokazu; Zhao, Danella; Fujiwara, Hideo

    The rapid advancement of VLSI technology has made it possible for chip designers and manufacturers to embed the components of a whole system onto a single chip, called System-on-Chip or SoC. SoCs make use of pre-designed modules, called IP-cores, which provide faster design time and quicker time-to-market. Furthermore, SoCs that operate at multiple clock domains and very low power requirements are being utilized in the latest communications, networking and signal processing devices. As a result, the testing of SoCs and multi-clock domain embedded cores under power constraints has been rapidly gaining importance. In this research, a novel method for designing power-aware test wrappers for embedded cores with multiple clock domains is presented. By effectively partitioning the various clock domains, we are able to increase the solution space of possible test schedules for the core. Since previous methods were limited to concurrently testing all the clock domains, we effectively remove this limitation by making use of bandwidth conversion, multiple shift frequencies and properly gating the clock signals to control the shift activity of various core logic elements. The combination of the above techniques gains us greater flexibility when determining an optimal test schedule under very tight power constraints. Furthermore, since it is computationally intensive to search the entire expanded solution space for the possible test schedules, we propose a heuristic 3-D bin packing algorithm to determine the optimal wrapper architecture and test schedule while minimizing the test time under power and bandwidth constraints.

  17. Fundamental design bases for independent core cooling in Swedish nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jelinek, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    New regulations on design and construction of nuclear power plants came into force in 2005. The need of an independent core cooling system and if the regulations should include such a requirement was discussed. The Swedish Radiation Safety authority (SSM) decided to not include such a requirement because of open questions about the water balance and started to investigate the consequences of an independent core cooling system. The investigation is now finished and SSM is also looking at the lessons learned from the accident in Fukushima 2011. One of the most important measures in the Swedish national action plan is the implementation of an independent core cooling function for all Swedish power plants. SSM has investigated the basic design criteria for such a function where some important questions are the level of defence in depth and the acceptance criteria. There is also a question about independence between the levels of defence in depth that SSM have included in the criteria. Another issue that has to be taken into account is the complexity of the system and the need of automation where independence and simplicity are very strong criteria. In the beginning of 2014 a memorandum was finalized regarding fundamental design bases for independent core cooling in Swedish nuclear power reactors. A decision based on this memorandum with an implementation plan will be made in the first half of 2014. Sweden is also investigating the possibility to have armed personnel on site, which is not allowed currently. The result from the investigation will have impact on the possibility to use mobile equipment and the level of protection of permanent equipment. In this paper, SSM will present the memorandum for design bases for independent core cooling in Swedish nuclear power reactors that was finalized in March 20147 that also describe SSM's position regarding independence and automation of the independent core cooling function. This memorandum describes the Swedish

  18. Effects of motor programming on the power spectral density function of finger and wrist movements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Galen, G P; Van Doorn, R R; Schomaker, L R

    Power spectral density analysis was applied to the frequency content of the acceleration signal of pen movements in line drawing. The relative power in frequency bands between 1 and 32 Hz was measured as a function of motoric and anatomic task demands. Results showed a decrease of power at the lower

  19. The density jump at the inner core boundary using underground nuclear explosion records

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasnoshchekov, D.N.; Ovchinnikov, V.M.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the estimation of the minimum jump value using experimental wave forms reflected from the boundary between the Earth core and mantle (PcP) and the one between the inner and outer core (PKiKP) at a distance of 6 deg. Digital seismic records of underground nuclear tests conducted at the Semipalatinsk test site in 70s by Zerenda-Vostochny-Chkalovo seismic array have been used. (author)

  20. Axial power distribution calculation using a neural network in the nuclear reactor core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Y. H.; Cha, K. H.; Lee, S. H. [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    This paper is concerned with an algorithm based on neural networks to calculate the axial power distribution using excore detector signals in the nuclear reactor core. The fundamental basis of the algorithm is that the detector response can be fairly accurately estimated using computational codes. In other words, the training set, which represents relationship between detector signals and axial power distributions, for the neural network can be obtained through calculations instead of measurements. Application of the new method to the Yonggwang nuclear power plant unit 3 (YGN-3) shows that it is superior to the current algorithm in place. 7 refs., 4 figs. (Author)

  1. Core design experience of WWER-440 reactors when they working on increased power level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adeev, V.; Panov, A.; Melenchuk, I.

    2015-01-01

    The Kola NPP continues commercial operation of 2nd generation fuel (FA-2) and trial operation of 3rd generation fuel (FA-3), which has a number of design features providing the best operational characteristics. This report gives the results of VVER-440 core operation with FA-2 and FA-3 with enrichment increased up to 4.87%, and at the power level uprated to 107% of nominal power level. Brief analysis of obtained data is carried out. Peculiarities and techniques of developing loading patterns with new types of nuclear fuel for operation at the uprated power level are reviewed. (authors)

  2. Axial power distribution calculation using a neural network in the nuclear reactor core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Y H; Cha, K H; Lee, S H [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    This paper is concerned with an algorithm based on neural networks to calculate the axial power distribution using excore detector signals in the nuclear reactor core. The fundamental basis of the algorithm is that the detector response can be fairly accurately estimated using computational codes. In other words, the training set, which represents relationship between detector signals and axial power distributions, for the neural network can be obtained through calculations instead of measurements. Application of the new method to the Yonggwang nuclear power plant unit 3 (YGN-3) shows that it is superior to the current algorithm in place. 7 refs., 4 figs. (Author)

  3. Design and test of the borosilicate glass burnable poison rod for Qinshan nuclear power plant core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Jinhua; Sun Hanhong

    1988-08-01

    Material for the burnable poison of Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant core is GG-17 borosilicate glass. The chemical composition and physico-chemical properties of GG-17 is very close to Pyrex-7740 glass used by Westinghouse. It is expected from the results of the experiments that the borosilicate glass burnable poison rod can be successfully used in Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant due to good physical, mechanical, corrosion-resistant and irradiaton properties for both GG-17 glass and cold-worked stainless steel cladding. Change of material for burnable poison from boron-bearing stainless steel to borosilicate glass will bring about much more economic benefit to Qinshan Naclear Power Plant

  4. Feedback control of plasma density and heating power for steady state operation in LHD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamio, Shuji, E-mail: kamio@nifs.ac.jp; Kasahara, Hiroshi; Seki, Tetsuo; Saito, Kenji; Seki, Ryosuke; Nomura, Goro; Mutoh, Takashi

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • We upgraded a control system for steady state operation in LHD. • This system contains gas fueling system and ICRF power control system. • Automatic power boost system is also attached for stable operation. • As a result, we achieved the long pulse up to 48 min in the electron density of more than 1 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −3}. - Abstract: For steady state operation, the feedback control of plasma density and heating power system was developed in the Large Helical Device (LHD). In order to achieve a record of the long pulse discharge, stable plasma density and heating power are needed. This system contains the radio frequency (RF) heating power control, interlocks, gas fueling, automatic RF phase control, ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) antenna position control, and graphical user interface (GUI). Using the density control system, the electron density was controlled to the target density and using the RF heating power control system, the RF power injection could be stable. As a result of using this system, we achieved the long pulse up to 48 min in the electron density of more than 1 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −3}. Further, the ICRF hardware experienced no critical accidents during the 17th LHD experiment campaign in 2013.

  5. Operation manual for the core flow test loop zone power-supply controller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harper, R.E.

    1981-11-01

    The core flow test loop, which is part of the Gas-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor Program (GCFR) at ORNL, is a high-pressure, high-temperature, out-of-reactor helium circulation system that is being constructed to permit study of the performance at steady-state and transient conditions of simulated segments of core assemblies for a GCFR demonstration plant. The simulated core segments, which are divided into zones, contain electrical heating elements to simulate the heat generated by fission. To control the power which is applied to a zone, a novel multitapped transformer and zone power control system have been designed and built which satisfy stringent design criteria. The controller can match power output to demand to within better than +-1% over a 900:1 dynamic range and perform full-power transients within 1 s. The power is applied in such a way as to minimize the electromagnetic interference at the bandwidth of the loop instrumentation, and the controller incorporates several error detection techniques, making it inherently fail-safe. The operation manual describes the specifications, operating instructions, error detection capabilities, error recovery, troubleshooting, calibration and QA procedures, and maintenance requirements. Also included are sections on the theory of operation, circuitry description, and a complete set of schematics.

  6. Core-power and decay-time limits for disabled automatic-actuation of LOFT ECCS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, G.H.

    1978-01-01

    The Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) for the LOFT reactor may need to be disabled for modifications or repairs of hardware or instrumentation or for component testing during periods when the reactor system is hot and pressurized, or it may be desirable to enable the ECCS to be disabled without the necessity of cooling down and depressurizing the reactor. LTR 113-47 has shown that the LOFT ECCS can be safely bypassed or disabled when the total core power does not exceed 25 kW. A modified policy involves disabling the automatic actuation of the LOFT ECCS, but still retaining the manual activation capability. Disabling of the automatic actuation can be safely utilized, without subjecting the fuel cladding to unacceptable temperatures, when the LOFT power decays to 70 kW; this power level permits a maximum delay of 20 minutes following a LOCA for the manual actuation of ECCS

  7. Calculation of core axial power shapes using alternating conditional expectation algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Eun Ki; Kim, Yong Hee; Cha, Kune Ho; Park, Moon Kyu

    1998-01-01

    We have introduced the alternating conditional expectation (ACE) algorithm in the method of reconstructing 20 node axial power shapes from five level detector powers. The ACE algorithm was used to find the optimal relationships between each plane power and normalized five detector powers. The obtained all optimal transformations had simple forms to be represented with polynomials. The reference axial power shapes and simulated detector powers were drawn out of the 3-dimensional results of Reactor Operation and Control Simulation (ROCS) code for various core states. By the ACE algorithm, we obtained the optimal relationship between dependent variable plane power, y, and independent variable detector powers, {Di, i=1,...,5 without any preprocessing, where a total of ≅3490 data sets per each cycle of YongGwang Nuclear (YGN) Power Plant units 3 and 4 are used. To test the validity and accuracy of the new method, about 21,200 cases of reconstructed axial power shapes are compared to original ROCS axial power shapes, and they are also contrasted with those obtained by Fourier fitting method (FFM). The average error of root mean square (rms), axial peak (DFZ), and axial shape index (DASI) of our new method for total 21204 data cases are 0.81%, 0.51% and 0.00204, while FFM 2.29%, 2.37% and 0.00264, respectively. The evaluation results for the data sets not used in the ACE transformations also show that the accuracy of new method is much better than that of FFM

  8. Measurement of power distribution in FCA-HCLWR core (Phase-1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, Akio; Osugi, Toshitaka; Satoh, Kunio

    1991-11-01

    In the report are described experiments with zone-type mock-up cores (FCA XIV) which consisted of uranium fuels and polystilene plates, assembled at FCA (Fast Critical Assembly), to study a series of physical characteristics for high conversion light water reactors. As one example of those characteristics, power distributions were measured by a γ-counting method in the mock-up cores by changing parametrically voidage states of the moderator, volume ratio of moderator to fuel and fuel enrichment. Fine structures of fission rate in a plate-array cell having strong heterogeneities were obtained at the center cell of the core to investigate the validity of the SRAC code for the analysis of the high conversion light water reactor. Furthermore infinite multiplication factors K ∞ which are an important physical parameter were derived from calculated migration areas and bucklings of each direction. This was obtained by fitting the measured power distributions into a cosine function. Calculated power distributions of radial directions overestimate largely the measure ones, while those of axial directions agree well with the measured values. Calculations on fine structure of fission ratio in the cell follow generally the measured values, but it is recognized that the calculation underestimates the measurement in a soft neutron spectrum core. As for infinite multiplication factors K ∞ , calculated values by the SRAC code agree within experimental errors with measured ones. No trend is observed on different voidage state of moderator and fuel enrichment in the limit of this experiment. (author)

  9. Active core profile and transport modification by application of ion Bernstein wave power in the Princeton Beta Experiment-Modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, B.; Batha, S.; Bell, R.; Bernabei, S.; Blush, L.; de la Luna, E.; Doerner, R.; Dunlap, J.; England, A.; Garcia, I.; Ignat, D.; Isler, R.; Jones, S.; Kaita, R.; Kaye, S.; Kugel, H.; Levinton, F.; Luckhardt, S.; Mutoh, T.; Okabayashi, M.; Ono, M.; Paoletti, F.; Paul, S.; Petravich, G.; Post-Zwicker, A.; Sauthoff, N.; Schmitz, L.; Sesnic, S.; Takahashi, H.; Talvard, M.; Tighe, W.; Tynan, G.; von Goeler, S.; Woskov, P.; Zolfaghari, A.

    1995-03-01

    Application of Ion Bernstein Wave Heating (IBWH) into the Princeton Beta Experiment-Modification (PBX-M) [Phys. Fluids B 2, 1271 (1990)] tokamak stabilizes sawtooth oscillations and generates peaked density profiles. A transport barrier, spatially correlated with the IBWH power deposition profile, is observed in the core of IBWH-assisted neutral beam injection (NBI) discharges. A precursor to the fully developed barrier is seen in the soft x-ray data during edge localized mode (ELM) activity. Sustained IBWH operation is conducive to a regime where the barrier supports large ∇ne, ∇Te, ∇νφ, and ∇Ti, delimiting the confinement zone. This regime is reminiscent of the H(high) mode, but with a confinement zone moved inward. The core region has better than H-mode confinement while the peripheral region is L(low)-mode-like. The peaked profile enhances NBI core deposition and increases nuclear reactivity. An increase in central Ti results from χi reduction (compared to the H mode) and better beam penetration. Bootstrap current fractions of up to 0.32-0.35 locally and 0.28 overall were obtained when an additional NBI burst is applied to this plasma.

  10. Active core profile and transport modification by application of ion Bernstein wave power in the Princeton Beta Experiment-Modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeBlanc, B.; Batha, S.; Bell, R.; Bernabei, S.; Blush, L.; de la Luna, E.; Doerner, R.; Dunlap, J.; England, A.; Garcia, I.; Ignat, D.; Isler, R.; Jones, S.; Kaita, R.; Kaye, S.; Kugel, H.; Levinton, F.; Luckhardt, S.; Mutoh, T.; Okabayashi, M.; Ono, M.; Paoletti, F.; Paul, S.; Petravich, G.; Post-Zwicker, A.; Sauthoff, N.; Schmitz, L.; Sesnic, S.; Takahashi, H.; Talvard, M.; Tighe, W.; Tynan, G.; von Goeler, S.; Woskov, P.; Zolfaghari, A.

    1995-01-01

    Application of Ion Bernstein Wave Heating (IBWH) into the Princeton Beta Experiment-Modification (PBX-M) [Phys. Fluids B 2, 1271 (1990)] tokamak stabilizes sawtooth oscillations and generates peaked density profiles. A transport barrier, spatially correlated with the IBWH power deposition profile, is observed in the core of IBWH-assisted neutral beam injection (NBI) discharges. A precursor to the fully developed barrier is seen in the soft x-ray data during edge localized mode (ELM) activity. Sustained IBWH operation is conducive to a regime where the barrier supports large ∇n e , ∇T e , ∇ν φ , and ∇T i , delimiting the confinement zone. This regime is reminiscent of the H(high) mode, but with a confinement zone moved inward. The core region has better than H-mode confinement while the peripheral region is L(low)-mode-like. The peaked profile enhances NBI core deposition and increases nuclear reactivity. An increase in central T i results from χ i reduction (compared to the H mode) and better beam penetration. Bootstrap current fractions of up to 0.32--0.35 locally and 0.28 overall were obtained when an additional NBI burst is applied to this plasma

  11. Active core profile and transport modification by application of Ion Bernstein Wave power in PBX-M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeBlanc, B.; Bell, R.

    1995-01-01

    Application of Ion Bernstein Wave Heating (IBWH) into the Princeton Beta Experiment-Modification (PBX-M) tokamak stabilizes sawtooth oscillations and generates peaked density profiles. A transport barrier, spatially correlated with the IBWH power deposition profile, is observed in the core of IBWH assisted neutral beam injection (NBI) discharges. A precursor to the fully developed barrier is seen in the soft x-ray data during edge localized mode (ELM) activity. Sustained IBWH operation is conducive to a regime where the barrier supports large triangledown n e , triangledown T e , triangledown v phi , and triangledown T i , delimiting the confinement zone. This regime is reminiscent of the H(high)-mode but with a confinement zone moved inwards. The core region has better than H-mode confinement while the peripheral region is L(low)-mode-like. The peaked profile enhanced NBI core deposition and increases nuclear reactivity. An increase in central T i results from χ i reduction (compared to H-mode) and better beam penetration. Bootstrap current fractions of up to 0.32--0.35 locally and 0.28 overall were obtained when an additional NBI burst is applied to this plasma

  12. Radiation power profiles and density limit with a divertor in the W7-AS stellarator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giannone, L.; Burhenn, R.; McCormick, K.; Brakel, R.; Feng, Y.; Grigull, P.; Igitkhanov, Y.

    2002-01-01

    The addition of a divertor into the W7-AS stellarator has allowed access to a high density regime where the radiation profiles reach a steady state. In earlier limiter discharges, the plasma suffered a radiative collapse at high densities. In contrast to limiter experiments, where the impurity confinement time measured by Al laser blow-off increased with increasing line integrated density, in divertor discharges, above a density threshold, the impurity confinement time decreased with increasing line integrated density. The observation that the divertor plasma radiates mainly at the plasma edge rather than the plasma centre is a further indication that changes to the impurity transport coefficients at these high densities are the basis for the achievement of steady state discharges in the divertor configuration of W7-AS. The maximum line integrated density reached with a divertor is compared to that reached with a limiter. The previously derived scaling law for the density limit with a limiter shows that the achieved densities do not exceed those predicted when the higher deposited power is taken into account. In a divertor the radiated power is located at the plasma edge and increasing the density, cooling the plasma edge and radiating sufficient power to cause plasma detachment determines the density limit. (author)

  13. Fabrication of 3D Air-core MEMS Inductors for High Frequency Power Electronic Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lê Thanh, Hoà; Mizushima, Io; Nour, Yasser

    2018-01-01

    footprints have an inductance from 34.2 to 44.6 nH and a quality factor from 10 to 13 at frequencies ranging from 30 to 72 MHz. The air-core inductors show threefold lower parasitic capacitance and up to a 140% higher-quality factor and a 230% higher-operation frequency than silicon-core inductors. A 33 MHz...... boost converter mounted with an air-core toroidal inductor achieves an efficiency of 68.2%, which is better than converters mounted with a Si-core inductor (64.1%). Our inductors show good thermal cycling stability, and they are mechanically stable after vibration and 2-m-drop tests.......We report a fabrication technology for 3D air-core inductors for small footprint and very-high-frequency power conversions. Our process is scalable and highly generic for fabricating inductors with a wide range of geometries and core shapes. We demonstrate spiral, solenoid, and toroidal inductors...

  14. Examining real-time time-dependent density functional theory nonequilibrium simulations for the calculation of electronic stopping power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yost, Dillon C.; Yao, Yi; Kanai, Yosuke

    2017-09-01

    In ion irradiation processes, electronic stopping power describes the energy transfer rate from the irradiating ion to the target material's electrons. Due to the scarcity and significant uncertainties in experimental electronic stopping power data for materials beyond simple solids, there has been growing interest in the use of first-principles theory for calculating electronic stopping power. In recent years, advances in high-performance computing have opened the door to fully first-principles nonequilibrium simulations based on real-time time-dependent density functional theory (RT-TDDFT). While it has been demonstrated that the RT-TDDFT approach is capable of predicting electronic stopping power for a wide range of condensed matter systems, there has yet to be an exhaustive examination of the physical and numerical approximations involved and their effects on the calculated stopping power. We discuss the results of such a study for crystalline silicon with protons as irradiating ions. We examine the influences of key approximations in RT-TDDFT nonequilibrium simulations on the calculated electronic stopping power, including approximations related to basis sets, finite size effects, exchange-correlation approximation, pseudopotentials, and more. Finally, we propose a simple and efficient correction scheme to account for the contribution from core-electron excitations to the stopping power, as it was found to be significant for large proton velocities.

  15. High power density superconducting motor for control applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, J; Granados, X; Lloberas, J; Torres, R; Grau, J; Maynou, R; Bosch, R

    2008-01-01

    A high dynamics superconducting low power motor for control applications has been considered for design. The rotor is cylindrical with machined bulks that generate the field by trapping flux in a four poles configuration. The toothless iron armature is wound by copper, acting iron only as magnetic screen. Details of the magnetic assembling, cryogenics and electrical supply conditioning will be reported. Improvements due to the use of a superconducting set are compared with performances of equivalent conventional motors

  16. Interactions between canopy cover density and regeneration cores of older saplings in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) stands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchi, M.; Nocentini, S.; Ducci, F.

    2016-07-01

    Aim of the study: This paper provides an analysis of growth and survival of twenty–year–old Scots pine saplings in relation to canopy cover density (CCD) gradients, from dense (D–CCD), sparse (S–CCD), and gap (G–CCD) situations. Area of study: Aladag (Bolu) in northern Turkey. Material and methods: Sparse canopy cover density (S–CCD), dense canopy cover density (D–CCD) and gap canopy (G–CCD) were chosen within ten different strip sample plots (10 × 50 m) with sapling regeneration cores. Those regeneration cores were divided into two portions (individuals at the edge and middle of the regeneration cores) and from each portion three individuals was were obtained from a sample. The growth relationships of individual saplings were calculated with stem analyses. Honowski Light Factor (HLF) (ratio of Terminal sprout length (T) to Lateral sprout length (L)) was used to present growth potential measure of seedlings. Main results: The largest sapling regeneration cores were found in the G–CCD followed by S–CCD, and finally D–CCD, all tested for significance with Kruskal–Wallis Test. Compared with saplings in the middle of regeneration cores (crop saplings), those at the edge were always reduced in terms of mean height. Significant difference was only found between the ‘Main Crop’ and the ‘Edge 1’ of the regeneration cores for G–CCD suggesting that sapling regeneration cores are more typical under G–CCD conditions. HLF ratios were greater than 1 with high growth potentials for both CCD gradients (G–CCD and S–CCD) and there were no significant variations between G–CCD and S–CCD for main crop and edges. The thinning after 12–14 years increased sapling growth. However, under D–CCD, growth had virtually ceased. Research highlights: Naturally occurring Scots pine saplings are suppressed by a dense canopy. However, they are tolerant of shade to the extent that they can survive over relatively long time–periods (10–12 years) and

  17. Stable formation of ultrahigh power-density 248 nm channels in Xe cluster targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borisov, Alex B.; Racz, Ervin; Khan, Shahab F.; Poopalasingam, Sankar; McCorkindale, John C.; Boguta, John; Longworth, James W.; Rhodes, Charles K. [Laboratory for X-ray Microimaging and Bioinformatics, Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607-7059 (United States); KFKI Research Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, EURATOM Association, P.O. Box 49, 1525 Budapest (Hungary)

    2012-07-11

    The optimization of relativistic and ponderomotive self-channeling of ultra-powerful 248 nm laser pulses launched in underdense plasmas with an appropriate longitudinal gradient in the electron density profile located at the initial stage of the self-channeling leads to (1) stable channel formation and (2) highly efficient power compression producing power densities in the 10{sup 19}-10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 3} range. The comparison of theoretical studies with experimental results involving the correlation of (a) Thomson images of the electron density with (b) x-ray images of the channel morphology demonstrates that more than 90% of the incident 248 nm power can be trapped in stable channels and that this stable propagation can be extended to power levels significantly exceeding the critical power of the self-channeling process.

  18. Core management and fuel handling for nuclear power plants. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This Safety Guide supplements and elaborates upon the safety requirements for core management and fuel handling that are presented in Section 5 of the Safety Requirements publication on the operation of nuclear power plants. The present publication supersedes the IAEA Safety Guide on Safety Aspects of Core Management and Fuel Handling, issued in 1985 as Safety Series No. 50-SG-010. It is also related to the Safety Guide on the Operating Organization for Nuclear Power Plants, which identifies fuel management as one of the various functions to be performed by the operating organization. The purpose of this Safety Guide is to provide recommendations for core management and fuel handling at nuclear power plants on the basis of current international good practice. The present Safety Guide addresses those aspects of fuel management activities that are necessary in order to allow optimum reactor core operation without compromising the limits imposed by the design safety considerations relating to the nuclear fuel and the plant as a whole. In this publication, 'core management' refers to those activities that are associated with fuel management in the core and reactivity control, and 'fuel handling' refers to the movement, storage and control of fresh and irradiated fuel. Fuel management comprises both core management and fuel handling. This Safety Guide deals with fuel management for all types of land based stationary thermal neutron power plants. It describes the safety objectives of core management, the tasks that have to be accomplished to meet these objectives and the activities undertaken to perform those tasks. It also deals with the receipt of fresh fuel, storage and handling of fuel and other core components, the loading and unloading of fuel and core components, and the insertion and removal of other reactor materials. In addition, it deals with loading a transport container with irradiated fuel and its preparation for transport off the site. Transport

  19. Core management and fuel handling for nuclear power plants. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This Safety Guide supplements and elaborates upon the safety requirements for core management and fuel handling that are presented in Section 5 of the Safety Requirements publication on the operation of nuclear power plants. The present publication supersedes the IAEA Safety Guide on Safety Aspects of Core Management and Fuel Handling, issued in 1985 as Safety Series No. 50-SG-010. It is also related to the Safety Guide on the Operating Organization for Nuclear Power Plants, which identifies fuel management as one of the various functions to be performed by the operating organization. The purpose of this Safety Guide is to provide recommendations for core management and fuel handling at nuclear power plants on the basis of current international good practice. The present Safety Guide addresses those aspects of fuel management activities that are necessary in order to allow optimum reactor core operation without compromising the limits imposed by the design safety considerations relating to the nuclear fuel and the plant as a whole. In this publication, 'core management' refers to those activities that are associated with fuel management in the core and reactivity control, and 'fuel handling' refers to the movement, storage and control of fresh and irradiated fuel. Fuel management comprises both core management and fuel handling. This Safety Guide deals with fuel management for all types of land based stationary thermal neutron power plants. It describes the safety objectives of core management, the tasks that have to be accomplished to meet these objectives and the activities undertaken to perform those tasks. It also deals with the receipt of fresh fuel, storage and handling of fuel and other core components, the loading and unloading of fuel and core components, and the insertion and removal of other reactor materials. In addition, it deals with loading a transport container with irradiated fuel and its preparation for transport off the site. Transport

  20. The ARIES-RS power core - recent development in Li/V designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sze Dai-Kai; Billone, M.C.; Hua, T.Q.; Tillack, M.; Najmabadi, F.; Wang Xueren; Malang, S.; El-Guebaly, L.A.; Sviatoslavsky, I.N.; Blanchard, J.P.; Crowell, J.A.; Khater, H.Y.; Mogahed, E.A.; Waganer, L.M.; Lee, D.; Cole, D.

    1998-01-01

    The ARIES-RS fusion power plant design study is based on reversed-shear (RS) physics with a Li/V (lithium breeder and vanadium structure) blanket. The reversed-shear discharge has been documented in many large tokamak experiments. The plasma in the RS mode has a high beta, low current, and low current drive requirement. Therefore, it is an attractive physics regime for a fusion power plant. The blanket system based on Li/V has high temperature operating capability, good tritium breeding, excellent high heat flux removal capability, long structural life time, low activation, low after heat and good safety characteristics. For these reasons, the ARIES-RS reactor study selected Li/V as the reference blanket. The combination of attractive physics and attractive blanket engineering is expected to result in a superior power plant design. This paper summarizes the power core design of the ARIES-RS power plant study. (orig.)

  1. A 380 V High Efficiency and High Power Density Switched-Capacitor Power Converter using Wide Band Gap Semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Lin; Knott, Arnold; Jørgensen, Ivan Harald Holger

    2018-01-01

    . This paper presents such a high voltage low power switched-capacitor DC-DC converter with an input voltage upto 380 V (compatible with rectified European mains) and an output power experimentally validated up to 21.3 W. The wideband gap semiconductor devices of GaN switches and SiC diodes are combined...... to compose the proposed power stage. Their switching and loss characteristics are analyzed with transient waveforms and thermal images. Different isolated driving circuits are compared and a compact isolated halfbridge driving circuit is proposed. The full-load efficiencies of 98.3% and 97.6% are achieved......State-of-the-art switched-capacitor DC-DC power converters mainly focus on low voltage and/or high power applications. However, at high voltage and low power levels, new designs are anticipated to emerge and a power converter that has both high efficiency and high power density is highly desirable...

  2. Oscillating thermionic conversion for high-density space power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, D.L.; Morris, J.F.

    1988-01-01

    The compactness, maneuverability, and productive weight utilization of space nuclear reactors benefit from the use of thermionic converters at high temperature. Nuclear-thermionic-conversion power requirements are discussed, and the role of oscillations in thermionic energy conversion (TEC) history is examined. Proposed TEC oscillations are addressed, and the results of recent studies of TEC oscillations are reviewed. The possible use of high-frequency TEC oscillations to amplify low-frequency ones is considered. The accomplishments of various programs studying the use of high-temperature thermionic oscillators are examined. 16 references

  3. Universal analytical scattering form factor for shell-, core-shell, or homogeneous particles with continuously variable density profile shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Tobias

    2011-09-01

    A novel analytical and continuous density distribution function with a widely variable shape is reported and used to derive an analytical scattering form factor that allows us to universally describe the scattering from particles with the radial density profile of homogeneous spheres, shells, or core-shell particles. Composed by the sum of two Fermi-Dirac distribution functions, the shape of the density profile can be altered continuously from step-like via Gaussian-like or parabolic to asymptotically hyperbolic by varying a single "shape parameter", d. Using this density profile, the scattering form factor can be calculated numerically. An analytical form factor can be derived using an approximate expression for the original Fermi-Dirac distribution function. This approximation is accurate for sufficiently small rescaled shape parameters, d/R (R being the particle radius), up to values of d/R ≈ 0.1, and thus captures step-like, Gaussian-like, and parabolic as well as asymptotically hyperbolic profile shapes. It is expected that this form factor is particularly useful in a model-dependent analysis of small-angle scattering data since the applied continuous and analytical function for the particle density profile can be compared directly with the density profile extracted from the data by model-free approaches like the generalized inverse Fourier transform method. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  4. Power distribution investigation in the transition phase of the low moderation type MOX fueled LWR from the high conversion core to the breeding core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akie, Hiroshi; Nakano, Yoshihiro; Okubo, Tsutomu

    2011-01-01

    The key concept of Innovative Water Reactor for Flexible Fuel Cycle (FLWR) is a core transition from a high conversion (HC) type to a plutonium breeding (BR) type in a same reactor system only by replacing fuel assemblies. Consequently in this transition phase, there are two types of assemblies in the same core. Due to the differences of the two assembly types, region-wise soft to hard neutron spectra appears and result in a large power peaking. Therefore, power distribution of FLWR in the HC to BR transition phase was studied by performing assembly and core calculations. For the whole core calculation, a new 14-group energy structure is developed to better represent the power distribution obtained with the fine 107-group structure than the 9-group structure in the previous evaluations. Calculations on few assemblies geometries show large local power peakings can be effectively reduced by considering plutonium enrichment distribution in an assembly. In the whole core calculation, there is a power level mismatch between HC and BR assemblies, but overall power distribution flattening is possible by optimizing fuel assemblies loading. Although the fuel loading should be decided also taking into account the void coefficient, transition from HC to BR type FLWR seems feasible without difficulty. (author)

  5. High Power Spark Delivery System Using Hollow Core Kagome Lattice Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciprian Dumitrache

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the use of the recently developed hollow core kagome lattice fibers for delivery of high power laser pulses. Compared to other photonic crystal fibers (PCFs, the hollow core kagome fibers have larger core diameter (~50 µm, which allows for higher energy coupling in the fiber while also maintaining high beam quality at the output (M2 = 1.25. We have conducted a study of the maximum deliverable energy versus laser pulse duration using a Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm. Pulse energies as high as 30 mJ were transmitted for 30 ns pulse durations. This represents, to our knowledge; the highest laser pulse energy delivered using PCFs. Two fiber damage mechanisms were identified as damage at the fiber input and damage within the bulk of the fiber. Finally, we have demonstrated fiber delivered laser ignition on a single-cylinder gasoline direct injection engine.

  6. 3D Core Model for simulation of nuclear power plants: Simulation requirements, model features, and validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zerbino, H.

    1999-01-01

    In 1994-1996, Thomson Training and Simulation (TT and S) earned out the D50 Project, which involved the design and construction of optimized replica simulators for one Dutch and three German Nuclear Power Plants. It was recognized early on that the faithful reproduction of the Siemens reactor control and protection systems would impose extremely stringent demands on the simulation models, particularly the Core physics and the RCS thermohydraulics. The quality of the models, and their thorough validation, were thus essential. The present paper describes the main features of the fully 3D Core model implemented by TT and S, and its extensive validation campaign, which was defined in extremely positive collaboration with the Customer and the Core Data suppliers. (author)

  7. Determining the magnetically nonlinear characteristics of a three phase core-type power transformer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolinar, Matjaz; Stumberger, Gorazd; Polajzer, Bostjan; Dolinar, Drago

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents nonlinear iron core model of a three-phase, three-limb power transformer which is given by the current-dependant characteristics of flux linkages. The magnetically nonlinear characteristics are determined by controlled magnetic excitation of all three limbs which allows to take into account the variable magnetic-cross couplings between different coils placed on limbs, caused by saturation. The corresponding partial derivatives of measured flux linkage characteristics are used in the transformer circuit model as a magnetically nonlinear iron core model in order to analyze the behaviour of a nonsymmetrically excited transformer. Numerical results using transformer model with the determined iron core model agree very well with the measured results

  8. Nanomaterials Enabled High Energy and Power Density Li-ion Batteries, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — There is a need for high energy (~ 200 Wh/kg) and high power (> 500 W/kg) density rechargeable Li-ion batteries that are safe and reliable for several space and...

  9. Study of In-Cylinder Reactions of High Power-Density Direct Injection Diesel Engines

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jansons, M

    2004-01-01

    Direct-injection (DI) Diesel or compression-ignition (CI) engine combustion process is investigated when new design and operational strategies are employed in order to achieve a high power-density (HPD) engine...

  10. Efficient, High Power Density Hydrocarbon-Fueled Solid Oxide Stack System, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Precision Combustion, Inc. (PCI) proposes to develop and demonstrate an innovative high power density design for direct internal reforming of regolith off-gases...

  11. Efficient, high power density hydrocarbon-fueled solid oxide stack system, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Precision Combustion, Inc. (PCI) proposes to develop and demonstrate an innovative high power density design for direct internal reforming of regolith off-gases...

  12. Neutronics simulations on hypothetical power excursion and possible core melt scenarios in CANDU6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yonghee

    2015-01-01

    LOCA (Loss of coolant accident) is an outstanding safety issue in the CANDU reactor system since the coolant void reactivity is strongly positive. To deal with the LOCA, the CANDU systems are equipped with specially designed quickly-acting secondary shutdown system. Nevertheless, the so-called design-extended conditions are requested to be taken into account in the safety analysis for nuclear reactor systems after the Fukushima accident. As a DEC scenario, the worst accident situation in a CANDU reactor system is a unprotected LOCA, which is supposed to lead to a power excursion and possibly a core melt-down. In this work, the hypothetical unprotected LOCA scenario is simulated in view of the power excursion and fuel temperature changes by using a simplified point-kinetics (PK) model accounting for the fuel temperature change. In the PK model, the core reactivity is assumed to be affected by a large break LOCA and the fuel temperature is simulated to account for the Doppler effect. In addition, unlike the conventional PK simulation, we have also considered the Xe-I model to evaluate the impact of Xe during the LOCA. Also, we tried to simulate the fuel and core melt-down scenario in terms of the reactivity through a series of neutronics calculations for hypothetical core conditions. In case of a power excursion and possible fuel melt-down situation, the reactor system behavior is very uncertain. In this work, we tried to understand the impacts of fuel melt and relocation within the pressure vessel on the core reactivity and failure of pressure and calandria tubes. (author)

  13. A High Power Density Integrated Charger for Electric Vehicles with Active Ripple Compensation

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Liwen; Zhang, Chengning

    2015-01-01

    This paper suggests a high power density on-board integrated charger with active ripple compensation circuit for electric vehicles. To obtain a high power density and high efficiency, silicon carbide devices are reported to meet the requirement of high-switching-frequency operation. An integrated bidirectional converter is proposed to function as AC/DC battery charger and to transfer energy between battery pack and motor drive of the traction system. In addition, the conventional H-bridge cir...

  14. Control of plasma density distribution via wireless power transfer in an inductively coupled plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hee-Jin; Lee, Hyo-Chang; Kim, Young-Cheol; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2013-01-01

    With an enlargement of the wafer size, development of large-area plasma sources and control of plasma density distribution are required. To control the spatial distribution of the plasma density, wireless power transfer is applied to an inductively coupled plasma for the first time. An inner powered antenna and an outer resonant coil connected to a variable capacitor are placed on the top of the chamber. As the self-resonance frequency ω r of the resonant coil is adjusted, the power transfer rate from the inner powered coil to the outer resonant coil is changed and the dramatic evolution of the plasma density profile is measured. As ω r of the outer resonant coil changes from the non-resonant condition (where ω r is not the driving angular frequency ω rf ) to the resonant condition (where ω r = ω rf ), the plasma density profile evolves from a convex shape with maximal plasma density at the radial center into a concave shape with maximal plasma density in the vicinity of the resonant antenna coil. This result shows that the plasma density distribution can be successfully controlled via wireless resonance power transfer. (fast track communication)

  15. Noise variation by compressive stress on the model core of power transformers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizokami, Masato, E-mail: mizokami.g76.masato@jp.nssmc.com; Kurosaki, Yousuke

    2015-05-01

    The reduction of audible noise generated by cores for power transformers has been required due to environmental concern. It is known that compressive stress in the rolling direction of electrical steel affects magnetostriction and it can result in an increase in noise level. In this research, the effect of compressive stress to noise was investigated on a 3-phase 3-limb model core. Compressive stress was applied in the rolling direction of the limbs from the outside of the core. It increased the sound pressure levels and the slope of the rise was about 2 dBA/MPa. Magnetostriction on single sheet samples was also measured under compressive stress and the harmonic components of the magnetostriction were compared with those of noise. It revealed that the variation in magnetostriction with compressive stress did not entirely correspond to that in noise. In one of the experiments, localized bending happened on one limb during compressing the core. While deformation of the core had not been intended, the noise was measured. The deformation increased the noise by more than 10 dBA and it occurred on most of the harmonic components. - Highlights: • Audible noise was measured on a model core to which compressive stress was applied. • The stress in the rolling direction of the steel causes a rise in noise level. • The slope of the rise in sound pressure level up to 2.5 MPa is about 2 dBA/MPa. • Variation in magnetostriction by stress does not entirely agree with that in noise. • Bend arisen in the core causes an extreme increase in noise.

  16. Noise variation by compressive stress on the model core of power transformers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizokami, Masato; Kurosaki, Yousuke

    2015-01-01

    The reduction of audible noise generated by cores for power transformers has been required due to environmental concern. It is known that compressive stress in the rolling direction of electrical steel affects magnetostriction and it can result in an increase in noise level. In this research, the effect of compressive stress to noise was investigated on a 3-phase 3-limb model core. Compressive stress was applied in the rolling direction of the limbs from the outside of the core. It increased the sound pressure levels and the slope of the rise was about 2 dBA/MPa. Magnetostriction on single sheet samples was also measured under compressive stress and the harmonic components of the magnetostriction were compared with those of noise. It revealed that the variation in magnetostriction with compressive stress did not entirely correspond to that in noise. In one of the experiments, localized bending happened on one limb during compressing the core. While deformation of the core had not been intended, the noise was measured. The deformation increased the noise by more than 10 dBA and it occurred on most of the harmonic components. - Highlights: • Audible noise was measured on a model core to which compressive stress was applied. • The stress in the rolling direction of the steel causes a rise in noise level. • The slope of the rise in sound pressure level up to 2.5 MPa is about 2 dBA/MPa. • Variation in magnetostriction by stress does not entirely agree with that in noise. • Bend arisen in the core causes an extreme increase in noise

  17. In core reload design for cycle 4 of Daya Bay nuclear power station both units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zongyao; Liu Xudong; Xian Chunyu; Li Dongsheng; Zhang Hong; Liu Changwen; Rui Min; Wang Yingming; Zhao Ke; Zhang Hong; Xiao Min

    1998-01-01

    The basic principles and the contents of the reload design for Daya Bay nuclear power station are briefly introduced. The in core reload design results, and the comparison between the calculated values and the measured values of both units the fourth cycle are also given. The reload design results of the two units satisfy all the economic requirements and safety criteria. The experimented results shown that the predicated values are tally good with all the measurement values

  18. Relative power density distribution calculations of the Kori unit 1 pressurized water reactor with full-scope explicit modeling of monte carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J. O.; Kim, J. K.

    1997-01-01

    Relative power density distributions of the Kori unit 1 pressurized water reactor calculated by Monte Carlo modeling with the MCNP code. The Kori unit 1 core is modeled on a three-dimensional representation of the one-eighth of the reactor in-vessel component with reflective boundaries at 0 and 45 degrees. The axial core model is based on half core symmetry and is divided into four axial segments. Fission reaction density in each rod is calculated by following 100 cycles with 5,000 test neutrons in each cycle after starting with a localized neutron source and ten noncontributing settle cycles. Relative assembly power distributions are calculated from fission reaction densities of rods in assembly. After 100 cycle calculations, the system coverages to a κ value of 1.00039 ≥ 0.00084. Relative assembly power distribution is nearly the same with that of the Kori unit 1 FSAR. Applicability of the full-scope Monte Carlo simulation in the power distribution calculation is examined by the relative root mean square error of 2.159%. (author)

  19. Safety-related investigations on power distribution in MOX fuel elements in LWR cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, E.; Langenbuch, S.

    1991-01-01

    For the concept of thermal recycling various fuel assembly designs have been developped during the last years. An overview is given describing the present status of MOX-fuel assembly design for PWR and BWR. The local power distribution within the MOX-fuel assembly and influences between neighbouring MOX- and Uranium fuel assemblies have been analyzed by own calculations. These investigations are limited to specific aspects of the spatial power distribution, which are related to the use of MOX-fuel assemblies within the reactor core of LWR. (orig.) [de

  20. Self-powered in-core neutron detector assembly with uniform perturbation characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todt, W.H.; Playfoot, K.C.

    1979-01-01

    Disclosed is a self-powered in-core neutron detector assembly in which a plurality of longitudinally extending self-powered detectors have neutron responsive active portions spaced along a longitudinal path. A low neutron absorptive extension extends from the active portions of the spaced active portions of the detectors in symmetrical longitudinal relationship with the spaced active detector portions of each succeeding detector. The detector extension terminates with the detector assembly to provide a uniform perturbation characteristic over the entire assembly length

  1. Partial thorium loading in the initial core of Kakrapar atomic power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balakrishnan, M.R.

    1993-01-01

    The first unit of Kakrapar nuclear power station has gone critical with some thorium oxide fuel bundles loaded in its core. The thorium helps to flatten the power by reducing neutron flux in the centre of the reactor. However, the placing of the thorium had to be planned with care, because if the neutron flux at a point where a safety rod is located is depressed, the reactivity worth of the safety rod gets reduced. Using a dynamic programing approach, the Reactor Engineering Division of Bhabha Atomic Research Centre worked out a satisfactory configuration for loading the thorium bundles

  2. Power distribution monitoring system in the boiling water cooled reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leshchenko, Yu.I.; Sadulin, V.P.; Semidotskij, I.I.

    1987-01-01

    Consideration is being given to the system of physical power distribution monitoring, used during several years in the VK-50 tank type boiling water cooled reactor. Experiments were conducted to measure the ratios of detector prompt and activation currents, coefficients of detector relative sensitivity with respect to neutrons and effective cross sections of 103 Rh interaction with thermal and epithermal neutrons. Mobile self-powered detectors (SPD) with rhodium emitters are used as the power distribution detectors in the considered system. All detectors move simultaneously with constant rate in channels, located in fuel assembly central tubes, when conducting the measurements. It is concluded on the basis of analyzing the obtained data, that investigated system with calibrated SPD enables to monitor the absolute power distribution in fuel assemblies under conditions of boiling water cooled reactor and is independent of thermal engineering measurements conducted by in core instruments

  3. Off-resonance frequency operation for power transfer in a loosely coupled air core transformer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scudiere, Matthew B

    2012-11-13

    A power transmission system includes a loosely coupled air core transformer having a resonance frequency determined by a product of inductance and capacitance of a primary circuit including a primary coil. A secondary circuit is configured to have a substantially same product of inductance and capacitance. A back EMF generating device (e.g., a battery), which generates a back EMF with power transfer, is attached to the secondary circuit. Once the load power of the back EMF generating device exceeds a certain threshold level, which depends on the system parameters, the power transfer can be achieved at higher transfer efficiency if performed at an operating frequency less than the resonance frequency, which can be from 50% to 95% of the resonance frequency.

  4. Harmonic Domain Modelling of Transformer Core Nonlinearities Using the DIgSILENT PowerFactory Software

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Claus Leth; Bak-Jensen, Birgitte; Wiechowski, Wojciech

    2008-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the results of implementation and verification of an already existing algorithm that allows for calculating saturation characteristics of singlephase power transformers. The algorithm was described for the first time in 1993. Now this algorithm has been implemented using...... the DIgSILENT Programming Language (DPL) as an external script in the harmonic domain calculations of a power system analysis tool PowerFactory [10]. The algorithm is verified by harmonic measurements on a single-phase power transformer. A theoretical analysis of the core nonlinearities phenomena...... in single and three-phase transformers is also presented. This analysis leads to the conclusion that the method can be applied for modelling nonlinearities of three-phase autotransformers....

  5. A combined compensation method for the output voltage of an insulated core transformer power supply

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, L.; Yang, J., E-mail: jyang@mail.hust.edu.cn; Liu, K. F.; Qin, B.; Chen, D. Z. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2014-06-15

    An insulated core transformer (ICT) power supply is an ideal high-voltage generator for irradiation accelerators with energy lower than 3 MeV. However, there is a significant problem that the structure of the segmented cores leads to an increase in the leakage flux and voltage differences between rectifier disks. A high level of consistency in the output of the disks helps to achieve a compact structure by improving the utilization of both the rectifier components and the insulation distances, and consequently increase the output voltage of the power supply. The output voltages of the disks which are far away from the primary coils need to be improved to reduce their inhomogeneity. In this study, by investigating and comparing the existing compensation methods, a new combined compensation method is proposed, which increases the turns on the secondary coils and employs parallel capacitors to improve the consistency of the disks, while covering the entire operating range of the power supply. This method turns out to be both feasible and effective during the development of an ICT power supply. The non-uniformity of the output voltages of the disks is less than 3.5% from no-load to full-load, and the power supply reaches an output specification of 350 kV/60 mA.

  6. Core-power and decay-time limits for disabled automatic-actuation of LOFT ECCS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, G.H.

    1978-01-01

    The Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) for the LOFT reactor may need to be disabled for modifications or repairs of hardware or instrumentation or for component testing during periods when the reactor system is hot and pressurized, or it may be desirable to enable the ECCS to be disabled without the necessity of cooling down and depressurizing the reactor. A policy involves disabling the automatic-actuation of the LOFT ECCS, but still retaining the manual actuation capability. Disabling of the automatic actuation can be safely utilized, without subjecting the fuel cladding to unacceptable temperatures, when the LOFT power decays to 33 kW; this power level permits a maximum delay of 20 minutes following a LOCA for the manual actuation of ECCS. For the operating power of the L2-2 Experiment, the required decay-periods (with operating periods of 40 and 2000 hours) are about 21 and 389 hours, respectively. With operating periods of 40 and 2000 hours at Core-I full power, the required decay-periods are about 42 and 973 hours, respectively. After these decay periods the automatic actuation of the LOFT ECCS can be disabled assuming a maximum delay of 20 minutes following a LOCA for the manual actuation of ECCS. The automatic and manual lineup of the ECCS may be waived if decay power is less than 11 kW

  7. Advanced in-core monitoring system for high-power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitin, V.I.; Alekseev, A.N.; Golovanov, M.N.; Zorin, A.V.; Kalinushkin, A.E.; Kovel, A.I.; Milto, N.V.; Musikhin, A.M.; Tikhonova, N.V.; Filatov, V.P.

    2006-01-01

    This paper encompasses such section as objective, conception and engineering solution for construction of advanced in-core instrumentation system for high power reactor, including WWER-1000. The ICIS main task is known to be an on-line monitoring of power distribution and functionals independently of design programs to avoid a common cause error. This paper shows in what way the recovery of power distribution has been carried out using the signals from in-core neutron detectors or temperature sensors. On the basis of both measured and processed data, the signals of preventive and emergency protection on local parameters (linear power of the maximum intensive fuel rods, departure from nucleate boiling ratio peaking factor) have been automatically generated. The paper presents a detection technology and processing methods for signals from SPNDs and TCs, ICIS composition and structure, computer hardware, system and applied software. Structure, composition and the taken decisions allow combining class IE and class B and C tasks in accordance with international standards of separation and safety category realization. Nowadays, ICIS-M is a system that is capable to ensure: monitoring, safety, information display and diagnostics function, which allow securing actual increase of quality, reliability and safety in operation of nuclear fuel and power units. Meanwhile, it reduce negative influence of human factor on thermal technical reliability in the operational process (Authors)

  8. Core-powered mass-loss and the radius distribution of small exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginzburg, Sivan; Schlichting, Hilke E.; Sari, Re'em

    2018-05-01

    Recent observations identify a valley in the radius distribution of small exoplanets, with planets in the range 1.5-2.0 R⊕ significantly less common than somewhat smaller or larger planets. This valley may suggest a bimodal population of rocky planets that are either engulfed by massive gas envelopes that significantly enlarge their radius, or do not have detectable atmospheres at all. One explanation of such a bimodal distribution is atmospheric erosion by high-energy stellar photons. We investigate an alternative mechanism: the luminosity of the cooling rocky core, which can completely erode light envelopes while preserving heavy ones, produces a deficit of intermediate sized planets. We evolve planetary populations that are derived from observations using a simple analytical prescription, accounting self-consistently for envelope accretion, cooling and mass-loss, and demonstrate that core-powered mass-loss naturally reproduces the observed radius distribution, regardless of the high-energy incident flux. Observations of planets around different stellar types may distinguish between photoevaporation, which is powered by the high-energy tail of the stellar radiation, and core-powered mass-loss, which depends on the bolometric flux through the planet's equilibrium temperature that sets both its cooling and mass-loss rates.

  9. Feasibility of maintaining natural convection mode core cooling in research reactor power upgrades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, J.J.; Belhadj, M.; Aldemir, T.; Christensen, R.N.

    1987-01-01

    Two operational concerns for natural convection coooled research reactors using plate type fuels are: 1) pool top 16 N activity (PTNA), and 2) nucleate boiling in core channels. The feasibility assessment of a power upgrade while maintaining natural convection mode core cooling requires addressing these operational concerns. Previous studies have shown that: a) The conventional technique for reducing PTNA by plume dispersion may not be effective in a large power upgrade of research reactors with small pools. b) Currently used correlations to predict onset of nucleate boiling (ONB) in thin, rectangular core channels are not valid for low-velocity, upward flows such as encountered in natural convection cooling. The PTNA depends on the velocity distribution in the reactor pool. COMMIX-1A code is used to determine the three-dimensional velocity fields in The Ohio State University Research Reactor (OSURR) pool as a function of varying design conditions, following a power upgrade to 500 kW with LEU fuel. It is shown that a sufficiently deep stagnant water layer can be created below the pool top by properly choosing the disperser flow rate. The ONB heat flux is experimentally determined for channel gaps and upward flow velocities in the range 2mm-4mm and 3-16 cm/sec., respectively. Two alternatives to plume dispersion for reducing PTNA and a new correlation to determine the ONB heat flux in thin, rectangular channels under low-velocity, upward flow conditions are proposed. (Author)

  10. Atlas Pulsed Power Facility for High Energy Density Physics Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.B.; Ballard, E.O.; Barr, G.W.; Bowman, D.W.; Chochrane, J.C.; Davis, H.A.; Elizondo, J.M.; Gribble, R.F.; Griego, J.R.; Hicks, R.D.; Hinckley, W.B.; Hosack, K.W.; Nielsen, K.E.; Parker, J.V.; Parsons, M.O.; Rickets, R.L.; Salazar, H.R.; Sanchez, P.G.; Scudder, D.W.; Shapiro, C.; Thompson, M.C.; Trainor, R.J.; Valdez, G.A.; Vigil, B.N.; Watt, R.G.; Wysock, F.J.

    1999-01-01

    The Atlas facility, now under construction at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), will provide a unique capability for performing high-energy-density experiments in support of weapon-physics and basic-research programs. It is intended to be an international user facility, providing opportunities for researchers from national laboratories and academic institutions around the world. Emphasizing institutions around the world. Emphasizing hydrodynamic experiments, Atlas will provide the capability for achieving steady shock pressures exceeding 10-Mbar in a volume of several cubic centimeters. In addition, the kinetic energy associated with solid liner implosion velocities exceeding 12 km/s is sufficient to drive dense, hydrodynamic targets into the ionized regime, permitting the study of complex issues associated with strongly-coupled plasmas. The primary element of Atlas is a 23-MJ capacitor bank, comprised of 96 separate Marx generators housed in 12 separate oil-filled tanks, surrounding a central target chamber. Each tank will house two, independently-removable maintenance units, with each maintenance unit consisting of four Marx modules. Each Marx module has four capacitors that can each be charged to a maximum of 60 kilovolts. When railgap switches are triggered, the marx modules erect to a maximum of 240 kV. The parallel discharge of these 96 Marx modules will deliver a 30-MA current pulse with a 4-5-micros risetime to a cylindrical, imploding liner via 24 vertical, tri-plate, oil-insulated transmission lines. An experimental program for testing and certifying all Marx and transmission line components has been completed. A complete maintenance module and its associated transmission line (the First Article) are now under construction and testing. The current Atlas schedule calls for construction of the machine to be complete by August, 2000. Acceptance testing is scheduled to begin in November, 2000, leading to initial operations in January, 2001

  11. Low prepulse, high power density water dielectric switching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, D.L.; VanDevender, J.P.; Martin, T.H.

    1979-01-01

    Prepulse voltage suppression has proven difficult in high power, high voltage accelerators employing self-breakdown water dielectric switches. A novel and cost effective water switch has been developed at Sandia Laboratories which reduces prepulse voltage by reducing the capacity across the switch. This prepulse suppression switch causes energy formerly stored in the switch capacity and dissipated in the arc to be useful output energy. The switching technique also allows the pulse forming lines to be stacked in parallel and electrically isolated from the load after the line has been discharged. The switch consists of a ground plane, with several holes, inserted between the switch electrodes. The output line switch electrodes extend through the holes and face electrodes on the pulse forming line (PFL). The capacity between the PFL and the output transmission line is reduced by about 80%. The gap spacing between the output line electrode and the hole in the ground plane is adjusted so that breakdown occurs after the main pulse and provides a crow bar between the load and the source. Performance data from the Proto II, Mite and Ripple test facilities are presented

  12. Flexible asymmetric supercapacitors with high energy and high power density in aqueous electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yingwen; Zhang, Hongbo; Lu, Songtao; Varanasi, Chakrapani V.; Liu, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Supercapacitors with both high energy and high power densities are critical for many practical applications. In this paper, we discuss the design and demonstrate the fabrication of flexible asymmetric supercapacitors based on nanocomposite electrodes of MnO2, activated carbon, carbon nanotubes and graphene. The combined unique properties of each of these components enable highly flexible and mechanically strong films that can serve as electrodes directly without using any current collectors or binders. Using these flexible electrodes and a roll-up approach, asymmetric supercapacitors with 2 V working voltage were successfully fabricated. The fabricated device showed excellent rate capability, with 78% of the original capacitance retained when the scan rate was increased from 2 mV s-1 to 500 mV s-1. Owing to the unique composite structure, these supercapacitors were able to deliver high energy density (24 W h kg-1) under high power density (7.8 kW kg-1) conditions. These features could enable supercapacitor based energy storage systems to be very attractive for a variety of critical applications, such as the power sources in hybrid electric vehicles and the back-up powers for wind and solar energy, where both high energy density and high power density are required.Supercapacitors with both high energy and high power densities are critical for many practical applications. In this paper, we discuss the design and demonstrate the fabrication of flexible asymmetric supercapacitors based on nanocomposite electrodes of MnO2, activated carbon, carbon nanotubes and graphene. The combined unique properties of each of these components enable highly flexible and mechanically strong films that can serve as electrodes directly without using any current collectors or binders. Using these flexible electrodes and a roll-up approach, asymmetric supercapacitors with 2 V working voltage were successfully fabricated. The fabricated device showed excellent rate capability, with 78% of

  13. Weld defect identification in friction stir welding using power spectral density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Bipul; Pal, Sukhomay; Bag, Swarup

    2018-04-01

    Power spectral density estimates are powerful in extraction of useful information retained in signal. In the current research work classical periodogram and Welch periodogram algorithms are used for the estimation of power spectral density for vertical force signal and transverse force signal acquired during friction stir welding process. The estimated spectral densities reveal notable insight in identification of defects in friction stir welded samples. It was observed that higher spectral density against each process signals is a key indication in identifying the presence of possible internal defects in the welded samples. The developed methodology can offer preliminary information regarding presence of internal defects in friction stir welded samples can be best accepted as first level of safeguard in monitoring the friction stir welding process.

  14. The domestic development of rhodium self-powered detector used in the core of Qinshan third nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong Weihua; Zhang Zhenhua; Yu Yijun; Zhang Yun; Wu Jun; Deng Peng

    2009-01-01

    This article introduced Qinshan third nuclear power plant's Vanadium detector's principle of work, the domestically development's earlier period preparation, the craft processing process, the domestically sample's experiment as well as the sample in core demonstration test. Elaborated process of manufacture's quality control request and the essential craft, and the factory manufacture experiment situation, and to the installation and trial run process, the modification factor and the test result has carried on the introduction and the analysis. (authors)

  15. A Computational Fluid Dynamic and Heat Transfer Model for Gaseous Core and Gas Cooled Space Power and Propulsion Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anghaie, S.; Chen, G.

    1996-01-01

    A computational model based on the axisymmetric, thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations is developed to predict the convective, radiation and conductive heat transfer in high temperature space nuclear reactors. An implicit-explicit, finite volume, MacCormack method in conjunction with the Gauss-Seidel line iteration procedure is utilized to solve the thermal and fluid governing equations. Simulation of coolant and propellant flows in these reactors involves the subsonic and supersonic flows of hydrogen, helium and uranium tetrafluoride under variable boundary conditions. An enthalpy-rebalancing scheme is developed and implemented to enhance and accelerate the rate of convergence when a wall heat flux boundary condition is used. The model also incorporated the Baldwin and Lomax two-layer algebraic turbulence scheme for the calculation of the turbulent kinetic energy and eddy diffusivity of energy. The Rosseland diffusion approximation is used to simulate the radiative energy transfer in the optically thick environment of gas core reactors. The computational model is benchmarked with experimental data on flow separation angle and drag force acting on a suspended sphere in a cylindrical tube. The heat transfer is validated by comparing the computed results with the standard heat transfer correlations predictions. The model is used to simulate flow and heat transfer under a variety of design conditions. The effect of internal heat generation on the heat transfer in the gas core reactors is examined for a variety of power densities, 100 W/cc, 500 W/cc and 1000 W/cc. The maximum temperature, corresponding with the heat generation rates, are 2150 K, 2750 K and 3550 K, respectively. This analysis shows that the maximum temperature is strongly dependent on the value of heat generation rate. It also indicates that a heat generation rate higher than 1000 W/cc is necessary to maintain the gas temperature at about 3500 K, which is typical design temperature required to achieve high

  16. Optimization of the power distribution in a large power reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emel'yanov, I.Ya.; Nazaryan, V.G.; Postnikov, V.V.

    1978-01-01

    The reactor power distribution optimization problem is solved for the case of the RBMK-1000 reactor. The algorithm is written in terms of the linear programming method. The algorithm rests on two assumptions: 1) the relative power change of each fuel assembly is a linear function of reactivity increment caused by displacement of a regulating rod; 2) the change is an additive value. The algorithm is written in ALGOL for the BESM-6 computer. The optimum reactivity gain for the RBMK reactor has proved to equal the reactivity of 35-40 control rods. The results obtained confirm the validity of the assumptions. It is noted that the total computation time on the BESM-6 can be reduced to 20 min

  17. Design and Performance Test of Axial Halbach Brushless DC Motor with Power Density 1.5 Kw/Kg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Dwi Prasetio

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Progress of technology on electric vehicle component sector is one reason the emergence of electric vehicles at the moment. Starting from battery which has a great current density up to the automatic control systems on electric vehicles. But there are still some shortcomings of this electric vehicle components, one of which is the low value of power density of existing electric motor in the market today.On vehicles such as electric cars when Race Car Contest, energy saving problems about power density of the driving motor is very vital. This is because the total weight of the vehicle has a huge influence on the vehicle efficiency is against it. The issue is one of the reasons of the research task. In this final task is done making the design, simulation, and architecture of the Axial Halbach Brushless DC Motor. Use of system configuration on the halbach magnet to avoid the use of iron as a material cantilever rotor. By changing the material of the cantilever rotor with lighter materials such as aluminum or even carbon fibre, the value of power density electric motors can be increased. Then using the litz wire on coil stator to reduce loss-power loss due to the barriers on the coil. Coreless stator on the system and to avoid the phenomenon of cogging at the time due to low rpm style attraction magnet with iron in the core material. While the creation process begins by determining the specifications of the Axial Halbach Brushless DC motors. Then go into the design phase of the mechanical and electrical design. Who then conducted simulations to help determine other parameters such as air gap, slot turn, and magnetic orientation. The process of making a component of stator and rotor after the simulation is completed. After all the components of the rotor and stator on assembly, mounting the hall sensor is carried out to the right to position obtained by reading the signals. After the motor can spin with good motor performance, testing can be done

  18. Nanocrystal core high-density lipoproteins: a multimodality contrast agent platform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cormode, David P.; Skajaa, Torjus; van Schooneveld, Matti M.; Koole, Rolf; Jarzyna, Peter; Lobatto, Mark E.; Calcagno, Claudia; Barazza, Alessandra; Gordon, Ronald E.; Zanzonico, Pat; Fisher, Edward A.; Fayad, Zahi A.; Mulder, Willem J. M.

    2008-01-01

    High density lipoprotein (HDL) is an important natural nanoparticle that may be modified for biomedical imaging purposes. Here we developed a novel technique to create unique multimodality HDL mimicking nanoparticles by incorporation of gold, iron oxide, or quantum dot nanocrystals for computed

  19. Ex-vessel molten core debris interactions at CANDU nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, M J; Oyinloye, J O; Chambers, I [Electrowatt Consulting Engineers and Scientists, Warrington, Cheshire (United Kingdom); Scott, C K [Atlantic Nuclear Services, Fredericton, NB (Canada); Omar, A M [Atomic Energy Control Board, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    1991-12-31

    Currently, the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) of Canada is sponsoring a project with a long term objective of obtaining an evaluation, independent of the industry, of the consequences to the public and the environment of postulated severe accidents at a Canadian nuclear power plant. Phase 1 of this project is a scoping study conducted to establish the relative consequences of a number of postulated event sequences. The studies in this paper model a multi-unit CANDU reactor at which pre-defined initiating events and their consequences could lead to severe core damage and relocation of the core debris onto the floor of the concrete reactor vault. Depending on the accident sequence assumptions made, an overlying pool of water may or may not be present. The US-NRC computer code CORCON Mod 2.0 was used to calculate the behaviour of the core material interacting with the concrete. The code calculates the decomposition of concrete by the molten core, and also the gases produced, which are released into the containment. The challenges to containment integrity are described, from the viewpoint of foundation decomposition and failure due to overpressure. The containment thermal-hydraulic behaviour is examined using an in-house computer code (CREM) written for this purpose. It is found that the containment envelope, in the absence of mitigating operator actions or design safety features, even for a case involving early core disassembly with the vacuum building unavailable, is unlikely to be failed within the 48 hours time frame examined. The paper identifies several areas for improvement in the models for future studies of core-concrete interactions for CANDU reactor plants. (author). 8 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs.

  20. Ex-vessel molten core debris interactions at CANDU nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, M.J.; Oyinloye, J.O.; Chambers, I.; Scott, C.K.; Omar, A.M.

    1990-01-01

    Currently, the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) of Canada is sponsoring a project with a long term objective of obtaining an evaluation, independent of the industry, of the consequences to the public and the environment of postulated severe accidents at a Canadian nuclear power plant. Phase 1 of this project is a scoping study conducted to establish the relative consequences of a number of postulated event sequences. The studies in this paper model a multi-unit CANDU reactor at which pre-defined initiating events and their consequences could lead to severe core damage and relocation of the core debris onto the floor of the concrete reactor vault. Depending on the accident sequence assumptions made, an overlying pool of water may or may not be present. The US-NRC computer code CORCON Mod 2.0 was used to calculate the behaviour of the core material interacting with the concrete. The code calculates the decomposition of concrete by the molten core, and also the gases produced, which are released into the containment. The challenges to containment integrity are described, from the viewpoint of foundation decomposition and failure due to overpressure. The containment thermal-hydraulic behaviour is examined using an in-house computer code (CREM) written for this purpose. It is found that the containment envelope, in the absence of mitigating operator actions or design safety features, even for a case involving early core disassembly with the vacuum building unavailable, is unlikely to be failed within the 48 hours time frame examined. The paper identifies several areas for improvement in the models for future studies of core-concrete interactions for CANDU reactor plants. (author). 8 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs

  1. Self-Powered Neutron and Gamma Detectors for In-Core Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strindehag, O.

    1971-11-01

    The performance of various types of self-powered neutron and gamma detectors intended for control and power distribution measurements in water cooled reactors is discussed. The self-powered detectors are compared with other types of in-core detectors and attention is paid to such properties as neutron and gamma sensitivity, high-temperature performance, burn-up rate and time of response. Also treated are the advantages and disadvantages of using gamma detector data for power distribution calculations instead of data from neutron detectors. With regard to neutron-sensitive detectors, results from several long-term experiments with vanadium and cobalt detectors are presented. The results include reliability and stability data for these two detector types and the Co build-up in cobalt detectors. Experimental results which reveal the fast response of cobalt detectors are presented, and the use of cobalt detectors in reactor safety systems is discussed. Experience of the design and installation of complete flux probes, electronic units and data processing systems for power reactors is reported. The investigation of gamma-sensitive detectors includes detectors with emitters of lead, zirconium, magnesium and Inconel. Measured gamma sensitivities from calibrations both in a reactor and in a gamma cell are given, and the signal levels of self-powered neutron and gamma detectors when applied to power reactors are compared

  2. Self-Powered Neutron and Gamma Detectors for In-Core Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strindehag, O

    1971-11-15

    The performance of various types of self-powered neutron and gamma detectors intended for control and power distribution measurements in water cooled reactors is discussed. The self-powered detectors are compared with other types of in-core detectors and attention is paid to such properties as neutron and gamma sensitivity, high-temperature performance, burn-up rate and time of response. Also treated are the advantages and disadvantages of using gamma detector data for power distribution calculations instead of data from neutron detectors. With regard to neutron-sensitive detectors, results from several long-term experiments with vanadium and cobalt detectors are presented. The results include reliability and stability data for these two detector types and the Co build-up in cobalt detectors. Experimental results which reveal the fast response of cobalt detectors are presented, and the use of cobalt detectors in reactor safety systems is discussed. Experience of the design and installation of complete flux probes, electronic units and data processing systems for power reactors is reported. The investigation of gamma-sensitive detectors includes detectors with emitters of lead, zirconium, magnesium and Inconel. Measured gamma sensitivities from calibrations both in a reactor and in a gamma cell are given, and the signal levels of self-powered neutron and gamma detectors when applied to power reactors are compared

  3. Toward Low-Cost, High-Energy Density, and High-Power Density Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianlin; Du, Zhijia; Ruther, Rose E.; AN, Seong Jin; David, Lamuel Abraham; Hays, Kevin; Wood, Marissa; Phillip, Nathan D.; Sheng, Yangping; Mao, Chengyu; Kalnaus, Sergiy; Daniel, Claus; Wood, David L.

    2017-09-01

    Reducing cost and increasing energy density are two barriers for widespread application of lithium-ion batteries in electric vehicles. Although the cost of electric vehicle batteries has been reduced by 70% from 2008 to 2015, the current battery pack cost (268/kWh in 2015) is still >2 times what the USABC targets (125/kWh). Even though many advancements in cell chemistry have been realized since the lithium-ion battery was first commercialized in 1991, few major breakthroughs have occurred in the past decade. Therefore, future cost reduction will rely on cell manufacturing and broader market acceptance. This article discusses three major aspects for cost reduction: (1) quality control to minimize scrap rate in cell manufacturing; (2) novel electrode processing and engineering to reduce processing cost and increase energy density and throughputs; and (3) material development and optimization for lithium-ion batteries with high-energy density. Insights on increasing energy and power densities of lithium-ion batteries are also addressed.

  4. Nitrogen-doped amorphous carbon-silicon core-shell structures for high-power supercapacitor electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tali, S A Safiabadi; Soleimani-Amiri, S; Sanaee, Z; Mohajerzadeh, S

    2017-02-10

    We report successful deposition of nitrogen-doped amorphous carbon films to realize high-power core-shell supercapacitor electrodes. A catalyst-free method is proposed to deposit large-area stable, highly conformal and highly conductive nitrogen-doped amorphous carbon (a-C:N) films by means of a direct-current plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique (DC-PECVD). This approach exploits C 2 H 2 and N 2 gases as the sources of carbon and nitrogen constituents and can be applied to various micro and nanostructures. Although as-deposited a-C:N films have a porous surface, their porosity can be significantly improved through a modification process consisting of Ni-assisted annealing and etching steps. The electrochemical analyses demonstrated the superior performance of the modified a-C:N as a supercapacitor active material, where specific capacitance densities as high as 42 F/g and 8.5 mF/cm 2 (45 F/cm 3 ) on silicon microrod arrays were achieved. Furthermore, this supercapacitor electrode showed less than 6% degradation of capacitance over 5000 cycles of a galvanostatic charge-discharge test. It also exhibited a relatively high energy density of 2.3 × 10 3  Wh/m 3 (8.3 × 10 6  J/m 3 ) and ultra-high power density of 2.6 × 10 8  W/m 3 which is among the highest reported values.

  5. Comparison study on in-core neutron detector for online neutron flux mapping of research and power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zareen Khan Abdul Jalil Khan; Mohd Idris Taib; Izhar Abu Husin; Nurfarhana Ayuni

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the comparison study on In-Core neutron detector using for online flux mapping of Research and Power reactor. Technical description of in-core neutron also taken into consideration to identify the different characterization of neutron detector and describe on Self Power neutron detector (SPND) for online neutron flux mapping. Able to provide information on the neutron flux distribution and understand how in-core neutron detector are being used in nuclear power plant including to enable to state the principles of neutron detector. (author)

  6. Evaluation of local power distribution with fine-mesh core model for the HTTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murata, Isao; Yamashita, Kiyonobu; Maruyama, So; Shindo, Ryuichi; Fujimoto, Nozomu; Sudo, Yukio; Nakata, Tetsuo.

    1991-01-01

    An evaluation method of the local power distribution was developed considering the radial and axial heterogeneity caused by fuel rods, BP rods and block end graphite for the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). The evaluation method was verified through the analyses of critical assembly experiments. A good agreement was obtained between calculations and measurements and the difference was less than 3 % on the power distribution. This method was applied to the core design for the HTTR to evaluate the maximum fuel temperature. From these results, it was confirmed that this evaluation method has an enough accuracy and is able to predict the detailed power distribution of the HTTR. (author)

  7. The power-sharing formula for a seed/blanket core-resolution of a paradox

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radkowsky, A.; Segev, M.; Galperin, A.

    1986-01-01

    The ''classical'' formula for the sharing of power between a seed and blanket was based on the two-group diffusion theory model and gave good agreement with experiments conducted in the original Shippingport program and with transport theory. Recently an extensive series of calculations on seed/blanket assemblies showed that the power sharing deviates widely from the classical formula but paradoxically is in good agreement with the one-group formula, which neglects the back leakage of thermal neutrons from the blanket to the seed. The power-sharing formula has now been rederived, and the paradox is resolved by taking into account epithermal absorptions in the seeds. The diffusion theory model is important as a guide to formulating innovative concepts for improved core designs

  8. Incorporation of Resonance Upscattering and Intra-Pellet Power Profile in Direct Whole Core Calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Chang Hyun; Jung Yeon Sang; Joo Han Gyu

    2012-01-01

    It was generally known that the Doppler feedback effect computed by most industrial reactor analysis codes is underestimated than the actual values. Part of the underestimation was attributed to the neglect of the resonance upscattering during the slowing down calculation. On the contrary, the edge peaked power profile noted in burned fuel pins due to more plutonium buildup at the periphery of fuel pellets might lead to smaller power defects than the predicted values obtained with a flat profile. This work is to mitigate these problems with a direct whole core calculation code nTRACER which is capable of handling ringwise depletion as well as incorporating nonuniform power profiles inside a fuel pellet

  9. Review of the Shoreham Nuclear Power Station Probabilistic Risk Assessment: internal events and core damage frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilberg, D.; Shiu, K.; Hanan, N.; Anavim, E.

    1985-11-01

    A review of the Probabilistic Risk Assessment of the Shoreham Nuclear Power Station was conducted with the broad objective of evaluating its risks in relation to those identified in the Reactor Safety Study (WASH-1400). The scope of the review was limited to the ''front end'' part, i.e., to the evaluation of the frequencies of states in which core damage may occur. Furthermore, the review considered only internally generated accidents, consistent with the scope of the PRA. The review included an assessment of the assumptions and methods used in the Shoreham study. It also encompassed a reevaluation of the main results within the scope and general methodological framework of the Shoreham PRA, including both qualitative and quantitative analyses of accident initiators, data bases, and accident sequences which result in initiation of core damage. Specific comparisons are given between the Shoreham study, the results of the present review, and the WASH-1400 BWR, for the core damage frequency. The effect of modeling uncertainties was considered by a limited sensitivity study so as to show how the results would change if other assumptions were made. This review provides an independently assessed point value estimate of core damage frequency and describes the major contributors, by frontline systems and by accident sequences. 17 figs., 81 tabs

  10. Start-up fuel and power flattening of sodium-cooled candle core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takaki, Naoyuki; Sagawa, Yu; Umino, Akitake; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    The hard neutron spectrum and unique power shape of CANDLE enable its distinctive performances such as achieving high burnup more than 30% and exempting necessity of both enrichment and reprocessing. On the other hand, they also cause several challenging problems. One is how the initial fuel can be prepared to start up the first CANDLE reactor because the equilibrium fuel composition that enables stable CANDLE burning is complex both in axial and radial directions. Another prominent problem is high radial power peaking factor that worsens averaged burnup, namely resource utilization factor in once-through mode and shorten the life time of structure materials. The purposes of this study are to solve these two problems. Several ideas for core configurations and startup fuel using single enrichment uranium and iron as a substitute of fission products are studied. As a result, it is found that low enriched uranium is applicable to ignite the core but all concepts examined here exceeded heat limits. Adjustment in enrichment and height of active and burnt zone is opened for future work. Sodium duct assemblies and thorium fuel assemblies loaded in the center region are studied as measures to reduce radial power peaking factor. Replacing 37 fuels by thorium fuel assemblies in the zeroth to third row provides well-balanced performance with flattened radial power distribution. The CANDLE core loaded with natural uranium in the outer and thorium in the center region achieved 35.6% of averaged burnup and 7.0 years of cladding life time owing to mitigated local fast neutron irradiation at the center. Using thorium with natural or depleted uranium in CANDLE reactor is also beneficial to diversifying fission resource and extending available term of fission energy without expansion of needs for enrichment and reprocessing

  11. Introduction of virtual detectors for core monitoring system of korean standard nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eun, Ki Lee.; Yong, Hee Kim.; Jybe, Ho Cha.; Moon, Ghu Park.

    2000-01-01

    A novel algorithm known as the virtual detector method (VDM) is introduced to reconstruct the axial power shape (APS) for the on-line core monitoring system of the Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plant (KSNP). A pure statistical method (SM) is also introduced and the results are compared with the currently implemented five-mode Fourier fitting method (FFM). VDM adopts nine virtual detector informations coupled with a regression model based on the Alternating Conditional Expectation (ACE) algorithm. VDM uses Fourier fitting with the information of nine virtual detectors expanded from the currently implemented FFM, which uses five-level detector information. By introducing virtual detectors, we can increase the number of axial detectors, and thus expect the computational errors of APS to be reduced. The two methods (SM and VDM) are applied to in-core mapping data from six cycles of Yong Gwang nuclear power plant Units 3 and 4. For ∼ 3500 cases of APSs extracted from a cycle of operation which is simulated by a three-dimensional nodal code, the accuracy of the three methods (SM, VDM, FFM) is compared. The average root mean square (RMS) error and average of axial peaking error of SM and VDM resulted in reduction of more than 50 % and 70 %, respectively, relative to FFM. VDM and SM also show more realistic axial profiles and predict more accurate axial peaking than FFM. These improvements can contribute to a larger thermal margin. SM shows the most accurate results for all cases. VDM can almost obtain the same results as SM, and using far fewer computation steps. VDM can be a useful tool for precisely reconstructing axial power shapes in a core monitoring system. (authors)

  12. Core-Shell-Yarn-Based Triboelectric Nanogenerator Textiles as Power Cloths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Aifang; Pu, Xiong; Wen, Rongmei; Liu, Mengmeng; Zhou, Tao; Zhang, Ke; Zhang, Yang; Zhai, Junyi; Hu, Weiguo; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2017-12-26

    Although textile-based triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs) are highly promising because they scavenge energy from their working environment to sustainably power wearable/mobile electronics, the challenge of simultaneously possessing the qualities of cloth remains. In this work, we propose a strategy for TENG textiles as power cloths in which core-shell yarns with core conductive fibers as the electrode and artificial polymer fibers or natural fibrous materials tightly twined around core conductive fibers are applied as the building blocks. The resulting TENG textiles are comfortable, flexible, and fashionable, and their production processes are compatible with industrial, large-scale textile manufacturing. More importantly, the comfortable TENG textiles demonstrate excellent washability and tailorability and can be fully applied in further garment processing. TENG textiles worn under the arm or foot have also been demonstrated to scavenge various types of energy from human motion, such as patting, walking, and running. All of these merits of proposed TENG textiles for clothing uses suggest their great potentials for viable applications in wearable electronics or smart textiles in the near future.

  13. A Novel Method To On-Line Monitor Reactor Nuclear Power And In-Core Thermal Environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Hanying; Miller, Don W.; Li, Dongxu; Radcliff, Thomas D.

    2002-01-01

    For current nuclear power plants, nuclear power can not be directly measured and in-core fuel thermal environments can not be monitored due to the unavailability of an appropriate measurement technology and the inaccessibility of the fuel. If the nuclear deposited power and the in-core thermal conditions (i.e. fuel or coolant temperature and heat transfer coefficient) can be monitored in-situ, then it would play a valuable and critical role in increasing nuclear power, predicting abnormal reactor operation, improving core physical models and reducing core thermal margin so as to implement higher fuel burn-up. Furthermore, the management of core thermal margin and fuel operation may be easier during reactor operation, post-accident or spent fuel storage. On the other hand, for some advanced Generation IV reactors, the sealed and long-lived reactor core design challenges traditional measurement techniques while conventional ex-core detectors and current in-core detectors can not monitor details of the in-core fuel conditions. A method is introduced in this paper that responds to the challenge to measure nuclear power and to monitor the in-core thermal environments, for example, local fuel pin or coolant heat convection coefficient and temperature. In summary, the method, which has been designed for online in-core measurement and surveillance, will be beneficial to advanced plant safety, efficiency and economics by decreasing thermal margin or increasing nuclear power. The method was originally developed for a constant temperature power sensor (CTPS). The CTPS is undergoing design and development for an advanced reactor core to measure in-core nuclear power in measurement mode and to monitor thermal environments in compensation mode. The sensor dynamics was analyzed in compensation mode to determine the environmental temperature and the heat transfer coefficient. Previous research demonstrated that a first order dynamic model is not sufficient to simulate sensor

  14. A DETERMINATION OF THE FLUX DENSITY IN CORE OF DISTRIBUTION TRANSFORMERS, WHAT BUILT WITH THE COMMON USING OF GRAIN AND NON GRAIN ORIENTED MAGNETIC STEELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.V. Pentegov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The development of calculation method to determinate the flux densities in different parts of the magnetic cores of distribution transformers, what built from different types magnetic steel (mixed core. Methodology. The method is based on the scientific positions of Theoretical Electrical Engineering – the theory of the electromagnetic field in nonlinear mediums to determine the distribution of magnetic flux in mixed core of transformer, what are using different types of steel what have the different magnetic properties. Results. The developed method gives possible to make calculation of the flux density and influence of skin effect in different parts of the magnetic cores of distribution transformer, where are used mix of grain oriented (GO and non grain oriented (NGO steels. Was determinate the general basic conditions for the calculation of flux density in the laminations from grain and non grain oriented steels of the magnetic core: the strength of magnetic field for the laminations of particular part of mixed core is the same; the sum of the magnetic fluxes in GO and NGO steels in particular part of mixed core is equal with the designed magnetic flux in this part of mixed core. Discover, the magnetic flux in mixed core of the transformer has specific distribution between magnetic steels. The flux density is higher in laminations from GO steel and smaller in laminations from the NGO steel. That is happened because for magnetic flux is easier pass through laminations from GO steel, what has better magnetic conductance than laminations from NGO steel. Originality. The common using of different types of magnetic steels in cores for distribution transformers gives possibility to make design of transformer with low level of no load losses, high efficiency and with optimal cost. Practical value. The determination of the flux density in different parts of magnetic core with GO and NGO steels gives possibility make accurate calculation of

  15. Comparison of VLBI radio core and X-ray flux densities of extragalactic radio sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloom, S.D.; Marscher, A.P.

    1990-01-01

    The Einstein Observatory revealed that most quasars, selected in a variety of ways, are strong x-ray emitters. Radio bright quasars are statistically more luminous in the x-ray than their radio-quiet counterparts. It was also found that the 90 GHz to soft x-ray spectral index has a very small dispersion for sources selected by their strong millimeter emission. This implies a close relationship between compact radio flux density and x-ray emission. Strong correlations have been found between the arcsecond scale flux densities and soft x-ray fluxes. It is suggested that the correlation can be explained if the soft x-rays were produced by the synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) process within the compact radio emitting region. (author)

  16. Study of variations of radiofrequency power density from mobile phone base stations with distance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayinmode, B. O.; Farai, I. P.

    2013-01-01

    The variations of radiofrequency (RF) radiation power density with distance around some mobile phone base stations (BTSs), in ten randomly selected locations in Ibadan, western Nigeria, were studied. Measurements were made with a calibrated hand-held spectrum analyser. The maximum Global System of Mobile (GSM) communication 1800 signal power density was 323.91 μW m -2 at 250 m radius of a BTS and that of GSM 900 was 1119.00 μW m -2 at 200 m radius of another BTS. The estimated total maximum power density was 2972.00 μW m -2 at 50 m radius of a different BTS. This study shows that the maximum carrier signal power density and the total maximum power density from a BTS may be observed averagely at 200 and 50 m of its radius, respectively. The result of this study demonstrates that exposure of people to RF radiation from phone BTSs in Ibadan city is far less than the recommended limits by International scientific bodies. (authors)

  17. Assessing different parameters estimation methods of Weibull distribution to compute wind power density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammadi, Kasra; Alavi, Omid; Mostafaeipour, Ali; Goudarzi, Navid; Jalilvand, Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Effectiveness of six numerical methods is evaluated to determine wind power density. • More appropriate method for computing the daily wind power density is estimated. • Four windy stations located in the south part of Alberta, Canada namely is investigated. • The more appropriate parameters estimation method was not identical among all examined stations. - Abstract: In this study, the effectiveness of six numerical methods is evaluated to determine the shape (k) and scale (c) parameters of Weibull distribution function for the purpose of calculating the wind power density. The selected methods are graphical method (GP), empirical method of Justus (EMJ), empirical method of Lysen (EML), energy pattern factor method (EPF), maximum likelihood method (ML) and modified maximum likelihood method (MML). The purpose of this study is to identify the more appropriate method for computing the wind power density in four stations distributed in Alberta province of Canada namely Edmonton City Center Awos, Grande Prairie A, Lethbridge A and Waterton Park Gate. To provide a complete analysis, the evaluations are performed on both daily and monthly scales. The results indicate that the precision of computed wind power density values change when different parameters estimation methods are used to determine the k and c parameters. Four methods of EMJ, EML, EPF and ML present very favorable efficiency while the GP method shows weak ability for all stations. However, it is found that the more effective method is not similar among stations owing to the difference in the wind characteristics.

  18. Core Power Limits For A Lead-Bismuth Natural Circulation Actinide Burner Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Cliff Bybee; Kim, D.; Todreas, N. E.; Mujid S. Kazimi

    2002-04-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory and Massachusetts Institute of Technology are investigating the suitability of lead-bismuth cooled fast reactors for producing low-cost electricity as well as for actinide burning. The design being considered here is a pool type reactor that burns actinides and utilizes natural circulation of the primary coolant, a conventional steam power conversion cycle, and a passive decay heat removal system. Thermal-hydraulic evaluations of the actinide burner reactor were performed to determine allowable core power ratings that maintain cladding temperatures below corrosion-established temperature limits during normal operation and following a loss-of-feedwater transient. An economic evaluation was performed to optimize various design parameters by minimizing capital cost. The transient power limit was initially much more restrictive than the steady-state limit. However, enhancements to the reactor vessel auxiliary cooling system for transient decay heat removal resulted in an increased power limit of 1040 MWt, which was close to the steady-state limit. An economic evaluation was performed to estimate the capital cost of the reactor and its sensitivity to the transient power limit. For the 1040 MWt power level, the capital cost estimate was 49 mills per kWhe based on 1999 dollars.

  19. Nuclear data uncertainties for local power densities in the Martin-Hoogenboom benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van der Marck, S.C.; Rochman, D.A.

    2013-01-01

    The recently developed method of fast Total Monte Carlo to propagate nuclear data uncertainties was applied to the Martin-Hoogenboom benchmark. This Martin- Hoogenboom benchmark prescribes that one calculates local pin powers (of light water cooled reactor) with a statistical uncertainty lower than 1% everywhere. Here we report, for the first time, an estimate of the nuclear data uncertainties for these local pin powers. For each of the more than 6 million local power tallies, the uncertainty due to nuclear data uncertainties was calculated, based on random variation of data for 235 U, 238 U, 239 Pu and H in H 2 O thermal scattering. In the center of the core region, the nuclear data uncertainty is 0.9%. Towards the edges of the core, this uncertainty increases to roughly 3%. The nuclear data uncertainties have been shown to be larger than the statistical uncertainties that the benchmark prescribes

  20. Solid-Core, Gas-Cooled Reactor for Space and Surface Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, Jeffrey C.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    2006-01-01

    The solid-core, gas-cooled, Submersion-Subcritical Safe Space (S and 4) reactor is developed for future space power applications and avoidance of single point failures. The Mo-14%Re reactor core is loaded with uranium nitride fuel in enclosed cavities, cooled by He-30%Xe, and sized to provide 550 kWth for seven years of equivalent full power operation. The beryllium oxide reflector disassembles upon impact on water or soil. In addition to decreasing the reactor and shadow shield mass, Spectral Shift Absorber (SSA) materials added to the reactor core ensure that it remains subcritical in the worst-case submersion accident. With a 0.1 mm thick boron carbide coating on the outside surface of the core block and 0.25 mm thick iridium sleeves around the fuel stacks, the reflector outer diameter is 43.5 cm and the combined reactor and shadow shield mass is 935.1 kg. With 12.5 atom% gadolinium-155 added to the fuel, 2.0 mm diameter gadolinium-155 sesquioxide intersititial pins, and a 0.1 mm thick gadolinium-155 sesquioxide coating, the S and 4 reactor has a slightly smaller reflector outer diameter of 43.0 cm, and a total reactor and shield mass of 901.7 kg. With 8.0 atom% europium-151 added to the fuel, 2.0 mm diameter europium-151 sesquioxide interstitial pins, and a 0.1 mm thick europium-151 sesquioxide coating, the reflector's outer diameter and the total reactor and shield mass are further reduced to 41.5 cm and 869.2 kg, respectively

  1. Predicting the density of structural timber members in service. The combine use of wood cores and drill resistance data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morales-Condea, M. J.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Drilling devices is used to get information about the cross-section properties and internal defects of structural members. Drill resistance is correlated with density which is often used to predict the mechanical properties of timber elements. However in situ a regression curve cannot be obtained and pre-existent curves provides unreliable predictions. The present paper proposes a procedure for in situ “calibration” of drill resistance data. The “calibration” is based on density values from wood cores taken in the close vicinity of drill holes. Two approaches were tested. One approach based on a regression curve built using wood cores density and drill resistance values obtained from a limited number of members. The other approach uses the information of one wood core to “calibrate” the drill resistance profile taken at the same member. Following this procedure a density prediction is obtained showing a low mean percentage error and a medium coefficient of determination.Los dispositivos de perforación se utilizan a menudo para obtener información sobre las propiedades de la sección transversal y defectos internos de los elementos estructurales de madera. La resistencia a la perforación se correlaciona con la densidad que, a menudo, se utiliza para obtener la predicción de las propiedades mecánicas de los elementos de madera. Sin embargo, una curva de regresión no puede ser obtenida in situ y las curvas de preexistentes proporcionan predicciones poco fiables. En el presente trabajo se propone un procedimiento de “calibración” in situ de los datos de resistencia de perforación obtenidos en cada caso. La “calibración” se basa en los valores de densidad de pequeñas probetas de madera tomadas en las inmediaciones de los taladros. Para ello se plantean 2 métodos: Un primer enfoque basado en obtener una curva de regresión a partir de los valores de densidad de pequeñas probetas de madera y los valores de resistencia a

  2. Power Production Analysis of the OE Buoy WEC for the CORES Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lavelle, John; Kofoed, Jens Peter

    This report describes the analysis performed on the OE Buoy for the CORES project by the wave energy group at Aalborg University, Denmark. OE Buoy is a type of Oscillating Water Column (OWC) wave energy converter as part of the CORES project. This type of device is one of the most developed...... to extract energy from the ocean (1). Typically, a Wells turbine is used for the Power Take Off (PTO) for OWCs. The Wells turbine has the advantage that it is self-rectifying – with the ability to operate with either direction of airflow, which changes during each cycle of the wave. This type of turbine...... which a total of 39 hours of power production data was collected. A data acquisition system was used to sample the sensors on board and the generator shaft power time-series data was used in the analysis here. A wave-rider buoy, located at the site of OE Buoy and operated by the Marine Institute Ireland...

  3. REJUVENATING THE MATTER POWER SPECTRUM: RESTORING INFORMATION WITH A LOGARITHMIC DENSITY MAPPING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neyrinck, Mark C.; Szalay, Alexander S.; Szapudi, Istvan

    2009-01-01

    We find that nonlinearities in the dark matter power spectrum are dramatically smaller if the density field first undergoes a logarithmic mapping. In the Millennium simulation, this procedure gives a power spectrum with a shape hardly departing from the linear power spectrum for k ∼ -1 at all redshifts. Also, this procedure unveils pristine Fisher information on a range of scales reaching a factor of 2-3 smaller than in the standard power spectrum, yielding 10 times more cumulative signal to noise at z = 0.

  4. Power density effect on feasibility of water cooled thorium breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidik, Permana; Takaki, Naoyuki; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    Breeding is made possible by the high value of neutron regeneration ratio η for 233 U in thermal energy region. The reactor is fueled by 233 U-Th oxide and it has used the light water as moderator. Some characteristics such as spectrum, η value, criticality, breeding performance and number density are evaluated. Several power densities are evaluated in order to analyze its effect to the breeding performance. The η value of fissile 233 U obtains higher value than 2 which may satisfy the breeding capability especially for thermal reactor for all investigated MFR. The increasing enrichment and decreasing conversion ratio are more significant for MFR 233 U enrichment. Number density of 233 Pa decreases significantly with decreasing power density which leads the reactor has better breeding performance because lower capture rate of 233 Pa. (author)

  5. Power density of piezoelectric transformers improved using a contact heat transfer structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Wei Wei; Chen, Li Juan; Pan, Cheng Liang; Liu, Yong Bin; Feng, Zhi Hua

    2012-01-01

    Based on contact heat transfer, a novel method to increase power density of piezoelectric transformers is proposed. A heat transfer structure is realized by directly attaching a dissipater to the piezoelectric transformer plate. By maintaining the vibration mode of the transformer and limiting additional energy losses from the contact interface, an appropriate design can improve power density of the transformer on a large scale, resulting from effective suppression of its working temperature rise. A prototype device was fabricated from a rectangular piezoelectric transformer, a copper heat transfer sheet, a thermal grease insulation pad, and an aluminum heat radiator. The experimental results show the transformer maintains a maximum power density of 135 W/cm(3) and an efficiency of 90.8% with a temperature rise of less than 10 °C after more than 36 h, without notable changes in performance. © 2012 IEEE

  6. Determination of the decay power for a U3O8 designed core using the ORIGEN 2.1 code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, Jose; Gallardo, Alberto; Madariaga, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    After the operation of a nuclear research reactor at a higher power (more than 300 kW), a cooling time is required to remove the residual heat from the core due to the heat produced by the energy emitted by fission products, this fact is common in reactors. There is a short time where the heat output falls to 6 % after the reactor shutdown, the importance of knowing this power is because of the accidental events that this power could cause and affect the fuel after a sudden shutdown in the cooling system of the reactor and there is any other refrigeration system, only that one surrounding the reactor core. This report shows the results of the calculation of the U 3 O 8 core residual power a for the RP-10, using the ORIGEN 2.1 calculation code, verifying the safety of the proposed core within the safety limits accepted for the reactor. (authors).

  7. Burnup Estimation of Rhodium Self-Powered Neutron Detector Emitter in VVER Reactor Core Using Monte Carlo Simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Khrutchinsky, А. А.; Kuten, S. A.; Babichev, L. F.

    2011-01-01

    Estimation of burn-up in a rhodium-103 emitter of self-powered neutron detector in VVER-1000 reactor core has been performed using Monte Carlo simulations within approximation of a constant neutron flux.

  8. EXPERIMENTAL DETERMINATION OF LONGITUDINAL COMPONENT OF MAGNETIC FLUX IN FERROMAGNETIC WIRE OF SINGLE-CORE POWER CABLE ARMOUR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.A. Kostiukov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A problem of determination of effective longitudinal magnetic permeability of single core power cable armour is defined. A technique for experimental determination of longitudinal component of magnetic flux in armour spiral ferromagnetic wire is proposed.

  9. Computer programs for the in-core fuel management of power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-08-01

    This document gives a survey of the presently tested and used computer programs applicable to the in-core fuel management of light and heavy water moderated nuclear power reactors. Each computer program is described (provided that enough information was supplied) such that the nature of the physical problem solved and the basic mathematical or calculational approach are evident. In addition, further information regarding computer requirements, up-to-date applications and experiences and specific details concerning implementation, staff requirements, etc., are provided. Program procurement conditions, possible program implementation assistance and commercial conditions (where applicable) are given. (author)

  10. Low density, microcellular, dopable, agar/gelatin foams for pulsed power experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNamara, W.F. [Orion International Technologies, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Aubert, J.H. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Low-density, microcellular foams prepared from the natural polymers agar and gelatin have been developed for pulsed-power physics experiments. Numerous experiments were supported with foams having densities at or below 10 mg/cm{sup 3}. For some of the experiments, the agar/gelatin foam was uniformly doped with metallic elements using soluble salts. Depending on the method of preparation, cell sizes were typically below 10 microns and for one process were below 1.0 micron.

  11. Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Chronic Pain Display Enhanced Alpha Power Density at Rest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneses, Francisco M; Queirós, Fernanda C; Montoya, Pedro; Miranda, José G V; Dubois-Mendes, Selena M; Sá, Katia N; Luz-Santos, Cleber; Baptista, Abrahão F

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic pain due to neuropathy or musculoskeletal injury frequently exhibit reduced alpha and increased theta power densities. However, little is known about electrical brain activity and chronic pain in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). For this purpose, we evaluated power densities of spontaneous electroencephalogram (EEG) band frequencies (delta, theta, alpha, and beta) in females with persistent pain due to RA. This was a cross-sectional study of 21 participants with RA and 21 healthy controls (mean age = 47.20; SD = 10.40). EEG was recorded at rest over 5 min with participant's eyes closed. Twenty electrodes were placed over five brain regions (frontal, central, parietal, temporal, and occipital). Significant differences were observed in depression and anxiety with higher scores in RA participants than healthy controls (p = 0.002). Participants with RA exhibited increased average absolute alpha power density in all brain regions when compared to controls [F (1.39) = 6.39, p = 0.016], as well as increased average relative alpha power density [F (1.39) = 5.82, p = 0.021] in all regions, except the frontal region, controlling for depression/anxiety. Absolute theta power density also increased in the frontal, central, and parietal regions for participants with RA when compared to controls [F (1, 39) = 4.51, p = 0.040], controlling for depression/anxiety. Differences were not exhibited on beta and delta absolute and relative power densities. The diffuse increased alpha may suggest a possible neurogenic mechanism for chronic pain in individuals with RA.

  12. Non-power law behavior of the radial profile of phase-space density of halos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popolo, A. Del

    2011-01-01

    We study the pseudo phase-space density, ρ(r)/σ 3 (r), of ΛCDM dark matter halos with and without baryons (baryons+DM, and pure DM), by using the model introduced in Del Popolo (2009), which takes into account the effect of dynamical friction, ordered and random angular momentum, baryons adiabatic contraction and dark matter baryons interplay. We examine the radial dependence of ρ(r)/σ 3 (r) over 9 orders of magnitude in radius for structures on galactic and cluster of galaxies scales. We find that ρ(r)/σ 3 (r) is approximately a power-law only in the range of halo radius resolved by current simulations (down to 0.1% of the virial radius) while it has a non-power law behavior below the quoted scale, with inner profiles changing with mass. The non-power-law behavior is more evident for halos constituted both of dark matter and baryons while halos constituted just of dark matter and with angular momentum chosen to reproduce a Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) density profile, are characterized by an approximately power-law behavior. The results of the present paper lead to conclude that density profiles of the NFW type are compatible with a power-law behavior of ρ(r)/σ 3 (r), while those flattening to the halo center, like those found in Del Popolo (2009) or the Einasto profile, or the Burkert profile, cannot produce radial profile of the pseudo-phase-space density that are power-laws at all radii. The results argue against universality of the pseudo phase-space density and as a consequence argue against universality of density profiles constituted by dark matter and baryons as also discussed in Del Popolo (2009)

  13. NASA Glenn Research Center Program in High Power Density Motors for Aeropropulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Gerald V.; Kascak, Albert F.; Ebihara, Ben; Johnson, Dexter; Choi, Benjamin; Siebert, Mark; Buccieri, Carl

    2005-01-01

    Electric drive of transport-sized aircraft propulsors, with electric power generated by fuel cells or turbo-generators, will require electric motors with much higher power density than conventional room-temperature machines. Cryogenic cooling of the motor windings by the liquid hydrogen fuel offers a possible solution, enabling motors with higher power density than turbine engines. Some context on weights of various systems, which is required to assess the problem, is presented. This context includes a survey of turbine engine weights over a considerable size range, a correlation of gear box weights and some examples of conventional and advanced electric motor weights. The NASA Glenn Research Center program for high power density motors is outlined and some technical results to date are presented. These results include current densities of 5,000 A per square centimeter current density achieved in cryogenic coils, finite element predictions compared to measurements of torque production in a switched reluctance motor, and initial tests of a cryogenic switched reluctance motor.

  14. Density dependence of SOL power width in ASDEX upgrade L-Mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Sieglin

    2017-08-01

    A recent study [4] with an open divertor configuration found an asymmetry of the power fall-off length between inner and outer target with a smaller power fall-off length λq,i on the inner divertor target. Measurements with a closed divertor configuration find a similar asymmetry for low recycling divertor conditions. It is found, in the experiment, that the in/out asymmetry λq,i/λq,o is strongly increasing with increasing density. Most notably the heat flux density at the inner divertor target is reducing with increasing λq,i whilst the total power onto each divertor target stays constant. It is found that λq,o exhibits no significant density dependence for hydrogen and deuterium but increases with about the square root of the electron density for helium. The difference between H,D and He could be due to the different recycling behaviour in the divertor. These findings may help current modelling attempts to parametrize the density dependence of the widening of the power channel and thus allow for detailed comparison to both divertor effects like recycling or increased upstream SOL cross field transport.

  15. Evaluation of plasma-wave spectral density from cross-power spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilic, D.B.; Harker, K.J.

    1975-01-01

    The plasma-wave spectral density is evaluated by performing a spatial Fourier transform on experimental cross-power spectra of ion acoustic waves. The cross-power spectra are recorded on analog magnetic tape, converted to digital form, transferred to digital magnetic tape, and Fourier transformed on a digital computer. The important effects of sampling, finite data strings, and data smoothing on the end results are discussed and illustrated. The results indicate the usefulness of the spectral density method for the study of nonlinear wave phenomena. (auth)

  16. Chronic intermittent ethanol exposure and withdrawal leads to adaptations in nucleus accumbens core postsynaptic density proteome and dendritic spines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uys, Joachim D; McGuier, Natalie S; Gass, Justin T; Griffin, William C; Ball, Lauren E; Mulholland, Patrick J

    2016-05-01

    Alcohol use disorder is a chronic relapsing brain disease characterized by the loss of ability to control alcohol (ethanol) intake despite knowledge of detrimental health or personal consequences. Clinical and pre-clinical models provide strong evidence for chronic ethanol-associated alterations in glutamatergic signaling and impaired synaptic plasticity in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). However, the neural mechanisms that contribute to aberrant glutamatergic signaling in ethanol-dependent individuals in this critical brain structure remain unknown. Using an unbiased proteomic approach, we investigated the effects of chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) exposure on neuroadaptations in postsynaptic density (PSD)-enriched proteins in the NAc of ethanol-dependent mice. Compared with controls, CIE exposure significantly changed expression levels of 50 proteins in the PSD-enriched fraction. Systems biology and functional annotation analyses demonstrated that the dysregulated proteins are expressed at tetrapartite synapses and critically regulate cellular morphology. To confirm this latter finding, the density and morphology of dendritic spines were examined in the NAc core of ethanol-dependent mice. We found that CIE exposure and withdrawal differentially altered dendrite diameter and dendritic spine density and morphology. Through the use of quantitative proteomics and functional annotation, these series of experiments demonstrate that ethanol dependence produces neuroadaptations in proteins that modify dendritic spine morphology. In addition, these studies identified novel PSD-related proteins that contribute to the neurobiological mechanisms of ethanol dependence that drive maladaptive structural plasticity of NAc neurons. © 2015 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  17. Workshop on High Power ICH Antenna Designs for High Density Tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aamodt, R. E.

    1990-02-01

    A workshop in high power ICH antenna designs for high density tokamaks was held to: (1) review the data base relevant to the high power heating of high density tokamaks; (2) identify the important issues which need to be addressed in order to ensure the success of the ICRF programs on CIT and Alcator C-MOD; and (3) recommend approaches for resolving the issues in a timely realistic manner. Some specific performance goals for the antenna system define a successful design effort. Simply stated these goals are: couple the specified power per antenna into the desired ion species; produce no more than an acceptable level of RF auxiliary power induced impurities; and have a mechanical structure which safely survives the thermal, mechanical and radiation stresses in the relevant environment. These goals are intimately coupled and difficult tradeoffs between scientific and engineering constraints have to be made.

  18. Workshop on high power ICH antenna designs for high density tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aamodt, R.E.

    1990-01-01

    A workshop in high power ICH antenna designs for high density tokamaks was held in Boulder, Colorado on January 31 through February 2, 1990. The purposes of the workshop were to: (1) review the data base relevant to the high power heating of high density tokamaks; (2) identify the important issues which need to be addressed in order to ensure the success of the ICRF programs on CIT and Alcator C-MOD; and (3) recommend approaches for resolving the issues in a timely realistic manner. Some specific performance goals for the antenna system define a successful design effort. Simply stated these goals are: couple the specified power per antenna into the desired ion species; produce no more than an acceptable level of rf auxiliary power induced impurities; and have a mechanical structure which safely survives the thermal, mechanical and radiation stresses in the relevant environment. These goals are intimately coupled and difficult tradeoffs between scientific and engineering constraints have to be made

  19. 3D thermal-hydraulic analysis on core of PWR nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Zhaohui; Wang Xuefang; Shen Mengyu

    1997-01-01

    Thermal hydraulic analysis of core is of great importance in reactor safety analysis. A computer code, thermal hydraulic analysis porous medium analysis (THAPMA), has been developed to simulate the flow and heat transfer characteristics of reactor components. It has been proved reliable by several numerical tests. In the THAPMA code, a new difference scheme and solution method have been studied in developing the computer software. For the difference scheme, a second order accurate, high resolution scheme, called WSUC scheme, has been proposed. This scheme is total variation bounded and unconditionally stable in convective numeral stability. Numerical tests show that the WSUC is better in accuracy and resolution than the 1-st order upwind, 2-nd order upwind, SOUCUP by Zhu and Rodi. In solution method, a modified PISO algorithm is used, which is not only simpler but also more accurate and more rapid in convergence than the original PISO algorithm. Moreover, the modified PISO algorithm can effectively solve steady and transient state problem. Besides, with the THAPMA code, the flow and heat transfer phenomena in reactor core have been numerically simulated in the light of the design condition of Qinshan PWR nuclear power station (the second-term project). The simulation results supply a theoretical basis for the core design

  20. Maximum attainable power density and wall load in tokamaks underlying reactor relevant constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borrass, K.; Buende, R.

    1979-09-01

    The characteristic data of tokamaks optimized with respect to their power density or wall load are determined. Reactor relevant constraints are imposed, such as a fixed plant net power output, a fixed blanket thickness and the dependence of the maximum toroidal field on the geometry and conductor material. The impact of finite burn times is considered. Various scaling laws of the toroidal beta with the aspect ratio are discussed. (orig.) 891 GG/orig. 892 RDG [de

  1. A High Power Density Integrated Charger for Electric Vehicles with Active Ripple Compensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liwen Pan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper suggests a high power density on-board integrated charger with active ripple compensation circuit for electric vehicles. To obtain a high power density and high efficiency, silicon carbide devices are reported to meet the requirement of high-switching-frequency operation. An integrated bidirectional converter is proposed to function as AC/DC battery charger and to transfer energy between battery pack and motor drive of the traction system. In addition, the conventional H-bridge circuit suffers from ripple power pulsating at second-order line frequency, and a scheme of active ripple compensation circuit has been explored to solve this second-order ripple problem, in which a pair of power switches shared traction mode, a ripple energy storage capacitor, and an energy transfer inductor. Simulation results in MATLAB/Simulink validated the eligibility of the proposed topology. The integrated charger can work as a 70 kW motor drive circuit or a converter with an active ripple compensation circuit for 3 kW charging the battery. The impact of the proposed topology and control strategy on the integrated charger power losses, efficiency, power density, and thermal performance has also been analysed and simulated.

  2. Enhanced energy density and thermostability in polyimide nanocomposites containing core-shell structured BaTiO3@SiO2 nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junchuan; Long, Yunchen; Sun, Ying; Zhang, Xueqin; Yang, Hong; Lin, Baoping

    2017-12-01

    High energy density polymer nanocomposites with high-temperature resistance are quite desirable for film capacitors and many other power electronics. In this study, polyimide-based (PI) nanocomposite films containing the core-shell structured barium titanate@silicon dioxide (BT@SiO2) nanofibers have been successfully synthesized by the solution casting method. In the BT@SiO2/PI nanocomposite films, the dielectric permittivity as well as the breakdown strength increase significantly. The SiO2 shell layers with moderate dielectric permittivity could effectively mitigate the local field concentration induced by the large mismatch between the dielectric permittivity of BT and PI, which contributes to the enhancement of the breakdown strength of the PI nanocomposite films. As a result, the PI nanocomposite film filled with 3 vol% BT@SiO2 nanofibers exhibits a maximal energy density of 2.31 J cm-3 under the field of 346 kV/mm, which is 62% over the pristine PI (1.42 J cm-3 at 308 kV/mm) and about 200% greater than the best commercial polymer, i.e. biaxially oriented polypropylenes (BOPP) (≈1.2 J cm-3). The thermogravimetric analysis results indicate that the BT@SiO2/PI nanocomposite films have good thermal stability below 500 °C.

  3. Dense cores in dark clouds. I. CO observations and column densities of high-extinction regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyers, P.C.; Linke, R.A.; Benson, P.J.

    1983-01-01

    Ninety small (approx.5') visually opaque regions have been selected from Palomar Sky Atlas prints and surveyed in the 2.7 mm J = 1→0 lines of C 18 O and 13 CO. The regions are primarily in complexes of obscuration, including those in Taurus and Ophiuchus. The typical C 18 O emission region has C 18 O line width 0.6 km s - 1 , optical depth 0.4, excitation temperature 10 K, and column density 2 x 10 15 cm - 2 . It has size 0.3 pc, visual extinction approx.11 mag, and mass approx.30 M/sub sun/. Comparison with equilibrium and collapse models indicates that purely thermal supporting motions are consistent with the present data, but unlikely. If the full C 18 O line width reflects turbulent supporting motions, nearly all of the observed clouds are consistent with stable equilibrium. If only part of the C 18 O line width reflects supporting motions, many clouds are also consistent with turbulent contraction. More than half of the clouds have significant departures from Gaussian line shape. The most common asymmetry is a blueshifted peak in the 13 CO line, which is consistent with contracting motion

  4. Plasma core electron density and temperature measurements using CVI line emissions in TCABR Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, F. do, E-mail: fellypen@ifi.unicamp.br [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Centro de Componentes Semicondutores; Machida, M. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica Gleb Wataghin; Severo, J.H.F.; Sanada, E.; Ronchi, G. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica

    2015-08-15

    In this work, we present results of electron temperature (T{sub e} ) and density (n {sub e} ) measurements obtained in Tokamak Chauffage Alfven Bresilien (TCABR) tokamak using visible spectroscopy from CVI line emissions which occurs mainly near the center of the plasma column. The presented method is based on a well-known relationship between the particle flux (Γ {sub ion}) and the photon flux (ø {sub ion}) emitted by an ion species combined with ionizations per photon atomic data provided by the atomic data and analysis structure (ADAS) database. In the experiment, we measured the photon fluxes of three different CVI spectral line emissions, 4685.2, 5290.5, and 6200.6 Å (one line per shot). Using this method it was possible to find out the temporal evolution of T{sub e} and n{sub e} in the plasma. The results achieved are in good agreement with T{sub e} and n{sub e} measurements made using other diagnostic tools. (author)

  5. Treatment of core components from nuclear power plants with PWR and BWR reactors - 16043

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viermann, Joerg; Friske, Andreas; Radzuweit, Joerg

    2009-01-01

    During operation of a Nuclear Power Plant components inside the RPV get irradiated. Irradiation has an effect on physical properties of these components. Some components have to be replaced after certain neutron doses or respectively after a certain operating time of the plant. Such components are for instance water channels and control rods from Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) or control elements, poisoning elements and flow restrictors from Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR). Most of these components are stored in the fuel pool for a certain time after replacement. Then they have to be packaged for further treatment or for disposal. More than 25 years ago GNS developed a system for disposal of irradiated core components which was based on a waste container suitable for transport, storage and disposal of Intermediate Level Waste (ILW), the so-called MOSAIK R cask. The MOSAIK R family of casks is subject of a separate presentation at the ICEM 09 conference. Besides the MOSAIK R cask the treatment system developed by GNS comprised underwater shears to cut the components to size as well as different types of equipment to handle the components, the shears and the MOSAIK R casks in the fuel pool. Over a decade of experience it showed that this system although effective needed improvement for BWR plants where many water channels and control rods had to be replaced after a certain operating time. Because of the large numbers of components the time period needed to cut the components in the pool had a too big influence on other operational work like rearranging of fuel assemblies in the pool. The system was therefore further developed and again a suitable cask was the heart of the solution. GNS developed the type MOSAIK R 80 T, a cask that is capable to ship the unsegmented components with a length of approx. 4.5 m from the Power plants to an external treatment centre. This treatment centre consisting of a hot cell installation with a scrap shear, super-compactor and a heavy

  6. Thermal-hydraulic analysis of the OSURR pool for power upgrade with natural convection core cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, J.J.; Aldemir, T.

    1988-01-01

    Natural convection mode core cooling will be maintained in the LEU conversion/power upgrade of The Ohio State University Research Reactor (OSURR) to 250-500 kW. The pool water will be cooled by a water-glycol-air and a water-water heat exchanger. A plume disperser will be installed in the pool to minimize evaporation from the pool top and to maintain the dose rate due to N-16 activity within allowable levels. The minimization of the pool heat removal system operation costs necessitates maximizing the inlet temperature to the water-glycol-air heat exchanger. For the maximization process, the change in the pool temperature and velocity fields have to be investigated as a function of: location and orientation of the heat removal system components and the plume disperser in the pool; mass flow rate through the plume disperser. The velocity and temperature fields in the pool are determined using COMMIX-1A. The computational system model accounts for the presence of all the pool components (i.e. core, thermal column, beam ports, ion chamber, guide tubes, rabbit, neutron source etc.). The results show that: (1) Both the heat removal system inlet point and the plume disperser have to be located close to the top of the core. (2) Using a disperser system consisting of several pipes may be more feasible than a single unit. (3) For high disperser flow, the disperser jet has to be almost parallel to the top of the core to prevent flow reversal in coolant channels. (4) More than one disperser system may be necessary to create an inversion layer in the pool

  7. Nonlinear control for core power of pressurized water nuclear reactors using constant axial offset strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholam Reza Ansarifar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important operations in nuclear power plants is load following, in which an imbalance of axial power distribution induces xenon oscillations. These oscillations must be maintained within acceptable limits otherwise the nuclear power plant could become unstable. Therefore, bounded xenon oscillation is considered to be a constraint for the load following operation. In this paper, the design of a sliding mode control (SMC, which is a robust nonlinear controller, is presented. SMC is a means to control pressurized water nuclear reactor (PWR power for the load following operation problem in a way that ensures xenon oscillations are kept bounded within acceptable limits. The proposed controller uses constant axial offset (AO strategy to ensure xenon oscillations remain bounded. The constant AO is a robust state constraint for the load following problem. The reactor core is simulated based on the two-point nuclear reactor model with a three delayed neutron groups. The stability analysis is given by means of the Lyapunov approach, thus the control system is guaranteed to be stable within a large range. The employed method is easy to implement in practical applications and moreover, the SMC exhibits the desired dynamic properties during the entire output-tracking process independent of perturbations. Simulation results are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed controller in terms of performance, robustness, and stability. Results show that the proposed controller for the load following operation is so effective that the xenon oscillations are kept bounded in the given region.

  8. Improvement of the Cubic Spline Function Sets for a Synthesis of the Axial Power Distribution of a Core Protection System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Bon-Seung; Lee, Chung-Chan; Zee, Sung-Quun

    2006-01-01

    Online digital core protection system(SCOPS) for a system-integrated modular reactor is being developed as a part of a plant protection system at KAERI. SCOPS calculates the minimum CHFR and maximum LPD based on several online measured system parameters including 3-level ex-core detector signals. In conventional ABB-CE digital power plants, cubic spline synthesis technique has been used in online calculations of the core axial power distributions using ex-core detector signals once every 1 second in CPC. In CPC, pre-determined cubic spline function sets are used depending on the characteristics of the ex-core detector responses. But this method shows an unnegligible power distribution error for the extremely skewed axial shapes by using restrictive function sets. Therefore, this paper describes the cubic spline method for the synthesis of an axial power distribution and it generates several new cubic spline function sets for the application of the core protection system, especially for the severely distorted power shapes needed reactor type

  9. Linearized image reconstruction method for ultrasound modulated electrical impedance tomography based on power density distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Xizi; Xu, Yanbin; Dong, Feng

    2017-01-01

    Electrical resistance tomography (ERT) is a promising measurement technique with important industrial and clinical applications. However, with limited effective measurements, it suffers from poor spatial resolution due to the ill-posedness of the inverse problem. Recently, there has been an increasing research interest in hybrid imaging techniques, utilizing couplings of physical modalities, because these techniques obtain much more effective measurement information and promise high resolution. Ultrasound modulated electrical impedance tomography (UMEIT) is one of the newly developed hybrid imaging techniques, which combines electric and acoustic modalities. A linearized image reconstruction method based on power density is proposed for UMEIT. The interior data, power density distribution, is adopted to reconstruct the conductivity distribution with the proposed image reconstruction method. At the same time, relating the power density change to the change in conductivity, the Jacobian matrix is employed to make the nonlinear problem into a linear one. The analytic formulation of this Jacobian matrix is derived and its effectiveness is also verified. In addition, different excitation patterns are tested and analyzed, and opposite excitation provides the best performance with the proposed method. Also, multiple power density distributions are combined to implement image reconstruction. Finally, image reconstruction is implemented with the linear back-projection (LBP) algorithm. Compared with ERT, with the proposed image reconstruction method, UMEIT can produce reconstructed images with higher quality and better quantitative evaluation results. (paper)

  10. An asymptotically unbiased minimum density power divergence estimator for the Pareto-tail index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dierckx, Goedele; Goegebeur, Yuri; Guillou, Armelle

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a robust and asymptotically unbiased estimator for the tail index of Pareto-type distributions. The estimator is obtained by fitting the extended Pareto distribution to the relative excesses over a high threshold with the minimum density power divergence criterion. Consistency...

  11. Towards High Power Density Metal Supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cell for Mobile Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jimmi; Persson, Åsa H.; Muhl, Thuy Thanh

    2018-01-01

    For use of metal supported solid oxide fuel cell (MS-SOFC) in mobile applications it is important to reduce the thermal mass to enable fast startup, increase stack power density in terms of weight and volume and reduce costs. In the present study, we report on the effect of reducing the Technical...

  12. Towards High Power Density Metal Supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cell for Mobile Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jimmi; Persson, Åsa Helen; Muhl, Thuy

    2017-01-01

    For use of metal supported SOFC in mobile applications it is important to reduce the thermal mass to enable fast start up, increase stack power density in terms of weight and volume and reduce costs. In the present study, we report on the effect of reducing the support layer thickness of 313 μm...

  13. Electroencephalogram Power Density and Slow Wave Sleep as a Function of Prior Waking and Circadian Phase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, Derk-Jan; Brunner, Daniel P.; Beersma, Domien G.M.; Borbély, Alexander A.

    1990-01-01

    Human sleep electroencephalograms, recorded in four experiments, were subjected to spectral analysis. Waking prior to sleep varied from 12 to 36 h and sleep was initiated at different circadian phases. Power density of delta and theta frequencies in rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep and non-REM (NREM)

  14. Effects of SWS deprivation on subsequent EEG power density and spontaneous sleep duration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, Derk Jan; Beersma, Domien G.M.

    In order to test predictions of the 2-process model of sleep regulation, the effects of slow wave sleep (SWS) deprivation by acoustic stimulation during the first part of the sleep period on EEG power density and sleep duration were investigated in 2 experiments. In the first experiment, 8 subjects

  15. High-energy-density physics researches based on pulse power technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horioka, Kazuhiko; Nakajima, Mitsuo; Kawamura, Tohru; Sasaki, Toru; Kondo, Kotaro; Yano, Yuuri

    2006-01-01

    Plasmas driven by pulse power device are of interest, concerning the researches on high-energy-density (HED) physics. Dense plasmas are produced using pulse power driven exploding discharges in water. Experimental results show that the wire plasma is tamped and stabilized by the surrounding water and it evolves through a strongly coupled plasma state. A shock-wave-heated, high temperature plasma is produced in a compact pulse power device. Experimental results show that strong shock waves can be produced in the device. In particular, at low initial pressure condition, the shock Mach number reaches 250 and this indicates that the shock heated region is dominated by radiation processes. (author)

  16. The change of radial power factor distribution due to RCCA insertion at the first cycle core of AP1000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susilo, J.; Suparlina, L.; Deswandri; Sunaryo, G. R.

    2018-02-01

    The using of a computer program for the PWR type core neutronic design parameters analysis has been carried out in some previous studies. These studies included a computer code validation on the neutronic parameters data values resulted from measurements and benchmarking calculation. In this study, the AP1000 first cycle core radial power peaking factor validation and analysis were performed using CITATION module of the SRAC2006 computer code. The computer code has been also validated with a good result to the criticality values of VERA benchmark core. The AP1000 core power distribution calculation has been done in two-dimensional X-Y geometry through ¼ section modeling. The purpose of this research is to determine the accuracy of the SRAC2006 code, and also the safety performance of the AP1000 core first cycle operating. The core calculations were carried out with the several conditions, those are without Rod Cluster Control Assembly (RCCA), by insertion of a single RCCA (AO, M1, M2, MA, MB, MC, MD) and multiple insertion RCCA (MA + MB, MA + MB + MC, MA + MB + MC + MD, and MA + MB + MC + MD + M1). The maximum power factor of the fuel rods value in the fuel assembly assumedapproximately 1.406. The calculation results analysis showed that the 2-dimensional CITATION module of SRAC2006 code is accurate in AP1000 power distribution calculation without RCCA and with MA+MB RCCA insertion.The power peaking factor on the first operating cycle of the AP1000 core without RCCA, as well as with single and multiple RCCA are still below in the safety limit values (less then about 1.798). So in terms of thermal power generated by the fuel assembly, then it can be considered that the AP100 core at the first operating cycle is safe.

  17. Heavy density concrete for nuclear radiation shielding and power stations: [Part]2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singha Roy, P.K.

    1987-01-01

    This article is the second part of the paper entitled 'Heavy density concrete for nuclear radiation shielding and power stations'. In this part, some of the important properties of heavy density concrete are discussed. They include density, water retentivity, air content, permeability with special reference to concrete mixes used in India's nuclear power reactors. All these properties are affected to various extents by heating. Indian shield concrete is rarely subjected to temperatures above 60degC during its life, because of thermal shield protection. During placement, the maximum anticipated rise in temperature due to heat of hydration is restricted to around 45degC by chilling, if necessary to reduce shrinkage stresses and cracks. (M.G.B.)

  18. Thulium heat source for high-endurance and high-energy density power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, C.E.; Kammeraad, J.E.; Van Konynenburg, R.; VanSant, J.H.

    1991-05-01

    We are studying the performance characteristics of radioisotope heat source designs for high-endurance and high-energy-density power systems that use thulium-170. Heat sources in the power range of 5--50 kW th coupled with a power conversion efficiency of ∼30%, can easily satisfy current missions for autonomous underwater vehicles. New naval missions will be possible because thulium isotope power systems have a factor of one-to-two hundred higher endurance and energy density than chemical and electrochemical systems. Thulium-170 also has several other attractive features, including the fact that it decays to stable ytterbium-170 with a half-life of four months. For terrestrial applications, refueling on that time scale should be acceptable in view of the advantage of its benign decay. The heat source designs we are studying account for the requirements of isotope production, shielding, and integration with power conversion components. These requirements are driven by environmental and safety considerations. Thulium is present in the form of thin refractory thulia disks that allow power conversion at high peak temperature. We give estimates of power system state points, performance, mass, and volume characteristics. Monte Carlo radiation analysis provides a detailed assessment of shield requirements and heat transfer under normal and distressed conditions is also considered. 11 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs

  19. Probability density function evolution of power systems subject to stochastic variation of renewable energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, J. Q.; Cong, Y. C.; Xiao, M. Q.

    2018-05-01

    As renewable energies are increasingly integrated into power systems, there is increasing interest in stochastic analysis of power systems.Better techniques should be developed to account for the uncertainty caused by penetration of renewables and consequently analyse its impacts on stochastic stability of power systems. In this paper, the Stochastic Differential Equations (SDEs) are used to represent the evolutionary behaviour of the power systems. The stationary Probability Density Function (PDF) solution to SDEs modelling power systems excited by Gaussian white noise is analysed. Subjected to such random excitation, the Joint Probability Density Function (JPDF) solution to the phase angle and angular velocity is governed by the generalized Fokker-Planck-Kolmogorov (FPK) equation. To solve this equation, the numerical method is adopted. Special measure is taken such that the generalized FPK equation is satisfied in the average sense of integration with the assumed PDF. Both weak and strong intensities of the stochastic excitations are considered in a single machine infinite bus power system. The numerical analysis has the same result as the one given by the Monte Carlo simulation. Potential studies on stochastic behaviour of multi-machine power systems with random excitations are discussed at the end.

  20. Steady state thermal hydraulic analysis of a boiling water reactor core, for various power distributions, using computer code THABNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkat Raj, V.; Saha, D.

    1976-01-01

    The core of a boiling water reactor may see different power distributions during its operational life. How some of the typical power distributions affect some of the thermal hydraulic parameters such as pressure drop minimum critical heat flux ratio, void distribution etc. has been studied using computer code THABNA. The effect of an increase in the leakage flow has also been analysed. (author)

  1. Power-Production Diagnostic Tools for Low-Density Wind Farms with Applications to Wake Steering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takle, E. S.; Herzmann, D.; Rajewski, D. A.; Lundquist, J. K.; Rhodes, M. E.

    2016-12-01

    Hansen (2011) provided guidelines for wind farm wake analysis with applications to "high density" wind farms (where average distance between turbines is less than ten times rotor diameter). For "low-density" (average distance greater than fifteen times rotor diameter) wind farms, or sections of wind farms we demonstrate simpler sorting and visualization tools that reveal wake interactions and opportunities for wind farm power prediction and wake steering. SCADA data from a segment of a large mid-continent wind farm, together with surface flux measurements and lidar data are subjected to analysis and visualization of wake interactions. A time-history animated visualization of a plan view of power level of individual turbines provides a quick analysis of wake interaction dynamics. Yaw-based sectoral histograms of enhancement/decline of wind speed and power from wind farm reference levels reveals angular width of wake interactions and identifies the turbine(s) responsible for the power reduction. Concurrent surface flux measurements within the wind farm allowed us to evaluate stability influence on wake loss. A one-season climatology is used to identify high-priority candidates for wake steering based on estimated power recovery. Typical clearing prices on the day-ahead market are used to estimate the added value of wake steering. Current research is exploring options for identifying candidate locations for wind farm "build-in" in existing low-density wind farms.

  2. Nonstructural protein 5A is incorporated into hepatitis C virus low-density particle through interaction with core protein and microtubules during intracellular transport.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Kuen Lai

    Full Text Available Nonstructural protein 5A (NS5A of hepatitis C virus (HCV serves dual functions in viral RNA replication and virus assembly. Here, we demonstrate that HCV replication complex along with NS5A and Core protein was transported to the lipid droplet (LD through microtubules, and NS5A-Core complexes were then transported from LD through early-to-late endosomes to the plasma membrane via microtubules. Further studies by cofractionation analysis and immunoelectron microscopy of the released particles showed that NS5A-Core complexes, but not NS4B, were present in the low-density fractions, but not in the high-density fractions, of the HCV RNA-containing virions and associated with the internal virion core. Furthermore, exosomal markers CD63 and CD81 were also detected in the low-density fractions, but not in the high-density fractions. Overall, our results suggest that HCV NS5A is associated with the core of the low-density virus particles which exit the cell through a preexisting endosome/exosome pathway and may contribute to HCV natural infection.

  3. Ultrasound assisted destruction of estrogen hormones in aqueous solution: Effect of power density, power intensity and reactor configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suri, Rominder P.S.; Nayak, Mohan; Devaiah, Uthappa; Helmig, Edward

    2007-01-01

    There are many reports documenting the adverse effects, such as feminization of fish, of estrogen hormones in the environment. One of the major sources of these compounds is from municipal wastewater effluents. The biological processes at municipal wastewater treatment plants cannot completely remove these compounds. This paper discusses the use of ultrasound to destroy estrogen compounds in water. The study examines the effect of ultrasound power density and power intensity on the destruction of various estrogen compounds which include: 17α-estradiol, 17β-estradiol, estrone, estriol, equilin, 17α-dihydroequilin, 17α-ethinyl estradiol and norgestrel. These tests were conducted in single component batch and flow through reactors using 0.6, 2 and 4 kW ultrasound sources. The sonolysis process produced 80-90% destruction of individual estrogens at initial concentration of 10 μg/L within 40-60 min of contact time. First order rate constants for the individual compounds under different conditions are presented. The estrogen degradation rates increase with increase in power intensity. However, the energy efficiency of the reactor was higher at lower power density. The 4 kW ultrasound reactor was more energy efficient compared to the 0.6 and 2 kW sonicators

  4. Development of an inconel self powered neutron detector for in-core reactor monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alex, M.; Ghodgaonkar, M. D.

    2007-04-01

    The paper describes the development and testing of an Inconel600 (2 mm diameter×21 cm long) self-powered neutron detector for in-core neutron monitoring. The detector has 3.5 mm overall diameter and 22 cm length and is integrally coupled to a 12 m long mineral insulated cable. The performance of the detector was compared with cobalt and platinum detectors of similar dimensions. Gamma sensitivity measurements performed at the 60Co irradiation facility in 14 MR/h gamma field showed values of -4.4×10 -18 A/R/h/cm (-9.3×10 -24 A/ γ/cm 2-s/cm), -5.2×10 -18 A/R/h/cm (-1.133×10 -23 A/ γ/cm 2-s/cm) and 34×10 -18 A/R/h/cm (7.14×10 -23 A/ γ/cm 2-s/cm) for the Inconel, Co and Pt detectors, respectively. The detectors together with a miniature gamma ion chamber and fission chamber were tested in the in-core Apsara Swimming Pool type reactor. The ion chambers were used to estimate the neutron and gamma fields. With an effective neutron cross-section of 4b, the Inconel detector has a total sensitivity of 6×10 -23 A/nv/cm while the corresponding sensitivities for the platinum and cobalt detectors were 1.69×10 -22 and 2.64×10 -22 A/nv/cm. The linearity of the detector responses at power levels ranging from 100 to 200 kW was within ±5%. The response of the detectors to reactor scram showed that the prompt response of the Inconel detector was 0.95 while it was 0.7 and 0.95 for the platinum and cobalt self-powered detectors, respectively. The detector was also installed in the horizontal flux unit of 540 MW Pressurised Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR). The neutron flux at the detector location was calculated by Triveni code. The detector response was measured from 0.02% to 0.07% of full power and showed good correlation between power level and detector signals. Long-term tests and the dynamic response of the detector to shut down in PHWR are in progress.

  5. Development of an inconel self powered neutron detector for in-core reactor monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alex, M.; Ghodgaonkar, M.D.

    2007-01-01

    The paper describes the development and testing of an Inconel600 (2 mm diameterx21 cm long) self-powered neutron detector for in-core neutron monitoring. The detector has 3.5 mm overall diameter and 22 cm length and is integrally coupled to a 12 m long mineral insulated cable. The performance of the detector was compared with cobalt and platinum detectors of similar dimensions. Gamma sensitivity measurements performed at the 60 Co irradiation facility in 14 MR/h gamma field showed values of -4.4x10 -18 A/R/h/cm (-9.3x10 -24 A/γ/cm 2 -s/cm), -5.2x10 -18 A/R/h/cm (-1.133x10 -23 A/γ/cm 2 -s/cm) and 34x10 -18 A/R/h/cm (7.14x10 -23 A/γ/cm 2 -s/cm) for the Inconel, Co and Pt detectors, respectively. The detectors together with a miniature gamma ion chamber and fission chamber were tested in the in-core Apsara Swimming Pool type reactor. The ion chambers were used to estimate the neutron and gamma fields. With an effective neutron cross-section of 4b, the Inconel detector has a total sensitivity of 6x10 -23 A/nv/cm while the corresponding sensitivities for the platinum and cobalt detectors were 1.69x10 -22 and 2.64x10 -22 A/nv/cm. The linearity of the detector responses at power levels ranging from 100 to 200 kW was within ±5%. The response of the detectors to reactor scram showed that the prompt response of the Inconel detector was 0.95 while it was 0.7 and 0.95 for the platinum and cobalt self-powered detectors, respectively. The detector was also installed in the horizontal flux unit of 540 MW Pressurised Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR). The neutron flux at the detector location was calculated by Triveni code. The detector response was measured from 0.02% to 0.07% of full power and showed good correlation between power level and detector signals. Long-term tests and the dynamic response of the detector to shut down in PHWR are in progress

  6. Development of an inconel self powered neutron detector for in-core reactor monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alex, M. [Electronics Division, BARC, Mumbai (India)]. E-mail: maryalex@barc.gov.in; Ghodgaonkar, M.D. [Electronics Division, BARC, Mumbai (India)

    2007-04-21

    The paper describes the development and testing of an Inconel600 (2 mm diameterx21 cm long) self-powered neutron detector for in-core neutron monitoring. The detector has 3.5 mm overall diameter and 22 cm length and is integrally coupled to a 12 m long mineral insulated cable. The performance of the detector was compared with cobalt and platinum detectors of similar dimensions. Gamma sensitivity measurements performed at the {sup 60}Co irradiation facility in 14 MR/h gamma field showed values of -4.4x10{sup -18} A/R/h/cm (-9.3x10{sup -24} A/{gamma}/cm{sup 2}-s/cm), -5.2x10{sup -18} A/R/h/cm (-1.133x10{sup -23} A/{gamma}/cm{sup 2}-s/cm) and 34x10{sup -18} A/R/h/cm (7.14x10{sup -23} A/{gamma}/cm{sup 2}-s/cm) for the Inconel, Co and Pt detectors, respectively. The detectors together with a miniature gamma ion chamber and fission chamber were tested in the in-core Apsara Swimming Pool type reactor. The ion chambers were used to estimate the neutron and gamma fields. With an effective neutron cross-section of 4b, the Inconel detector has a total sensitivity of 6x10{sup -23} A/nv/cm while the corresponding sensitivities for the platinum and cobalt detectors were 1.69x10{sup -22} and 2.64x10{sup -22} A/nv/cm. The linearity of the detector responses at power levels ranging from 100 to 200 kW was within {+-}5%. The response of the detectors to reactor scram showed that the prompt response of the Inconel detector was 0.95 while it was 0.7 and 0.95 for the platinum and cobalt self-powered detectors, respectively. The detector was also installed in the horizontal flux unit of 540 MW Pressurised Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR). The neutron flux at the detector location was calculated by Triveni code. The detector response was measured from 0.02% to 0.07% of full power and showed good correlation between power level and detector signals. Long-term tests and the dynamic response of the detector to shut down in PHWR are in progress.

  7. Optimized design of a high-power-density PM-assisted synchronous reluctance machine with ferrite magnets for electric vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Xiping

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a permanent magnet (PM-assisted synchronous reluctance machine (PMASynRM using ferrite magnets with the same power density as rareearth PM synchronous motors employed in Toyota Prius 2010. A suitable rotor structure for high torque density and high power density is discussed with respect to the demagnetization of ferrite magnets, mechanical strength and torque ripple. Some electromagnetic characteristics including torque, output power, loss and efficiency are calculated by 2-D finite element analysis (FEA. The analysis results show that a high power density and high efficiency of PMASynRM are obtained by using ferrite magnets.

  8. Compact Reversed-Field Pinch Reactors (CRFPR): fusion-power-core integration study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copenhaver, C.; Krakowski, R.A.; Schnurr, N.M.

    1985-08-01

    Using detailed two-dimensional neutronics studies based on the results of a previous framework study (LA-10200-MS), the fusion-power-core (FPC) integration, maintenance, and radio-activity/afterheat control are examined for the Compact Reversed-Field Pinch Reactor (CRFPR). While maintaining as a base case the nominal 20-MW/m 2 neutron first-wall loading design, CRFPR(20), the cost and technology impact of lower-wall-loading designs are also examined. The additional detail developed as part of this follow-on study also allows the cost estimates to be refined. The cost impact of multiplexing lower-wall-loading FPCs into a approx. 1000-MWe(net) plant is also examined. The CRFPR(20) design remains based on a PbLi-cooled FPC with pressurized-water used as a coolant for first-wall, pumped-limiter, and structural-shield systems. Single-piece FPC maintenance of this steady-state power plant is envisaged and evaluated on the basis of a preliminary layout of the reactor building. This follow-on study also develops the groundwork for assessing the feasibility and impact of impurity/ash control by magnetic divertors as an alternative to previously considered pumped-limiter systems. Lastly, directions for future, more-detailed power-plant designs based on the Reversed-Field Pinch are suggested

  9. Evaluation of in-core measurements with self-powered detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spoden, E.

    1977-01-01

    A calculational method is presented for transformation of n-β currents into relative thermal neutron fluxes taking into account an epithermal correction. The difference between epithermal corrections with cross section ratios is demonstrated based on calculations with NR approximation and multiplied by the ratio of mean epithermal and thermal first collision probabilities as well as on calculations using the model of infinite dilution. The effects of this difference on axial power density distribution, relative power of the fuel assemblies, and the inhomogeneity coefficients are discussed in the light of a characteristic measurement with rhodium emitter in a WWER-type reactor. The effect of errors in the nuclear data on the mean error of relative thermal neutron flux is evaluated. (author)

  10. Ultrasound guided core biopsy of suspicious mammographic calcifications using high frequency and power Doppler ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teh, W.L.; Wilson, A.R.M; Evans, A.J.; Burrell, H.; Pinder, S.E.; Ellis, I.O.

    2000-01-01

    AIM: The pre-operative diagnosis of suspicious mammographic microcalcifications usually requires stereotactic needle biopsy. The aim of this study was to evaluate if high frequency 13 MHz ultrasound (HFUS) and power Doppler (PD) can aid visualization and biopsy of microcalcifications. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty-four consecutive patients presenting with microcalcifications without associated mammographic or palpable masses were examined with HFUS and PD. Ultrasound-guided core biopsy (USCB) was performed where possible. Stereotactic biopsy was carried out when US-guided biopsy was unsuccessful. Surgery was performed if a diagnosis of malignancy was made on core biopsy or if the repeat core biopsy was non-diagnostic. RESULTS: Forty-one patients (93%) had ultrasound abnormalities corresponding to mammographic calcification. USCB was performed on 37 patients. In 29/37, USCB obtained a definitive result (78.4%). USCB was non-diagnostic in 4/9 benign (44.4%) and 4/28 (14.3%) malignant lesions biopsied. The complete and absolute sensitivities for malignancy using USCB were 85.7% (24/28) and 81% (23/28), respectively. USCB correctly identified invasive disease in 12/23 (52.2%) cases. There was no significant difference in the presence of abnormal flow on PD between benign and malignant lesions. However, abnormal PD vascularity was present in 43.5% of invasive cancer and was useful in directing successful biopsy in eight cases. CONCLUSION: The combination of high frequency US with PD is useful in the detection and guidance of successful needle biopsy of microcalcifications particularly where there is an invasive focus within larger areas of DCIS. Teh, W.L. (2000)

  11. One Core Phase Shifting Transformer for Control of the Power Flow Distribution in Electric Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golub I.V.

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the variant of phase shifting transformer that is made, unlike from traditional technology, on the basis of only one magnetic core. The paper describes the methodology related to the analysis of operation modes of device and its components. Additionally it presents a mathematical model of device with determines the relationship between input and output electric quantities as well as own longitudinal and transverse parameters of an equivalent circuit of phase shifting transformer (PST. Proposed configuration of PST is interesting from an economic and operational consideration; enable continuous control of power flow distribution in electric networks as a result of regulation a phase shift angle between input and output voltages of device.

  12. Non-linear behaviour of power density and exposure time of argon laser on ocular tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Sayed, E M; Talaat, M S; Salem, E F [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt)

    1997-12-31

    In ophthalmology, the thermal effect of argon laser is the most widely used category of laser- tissue interaction. The rise in tissue temperature has to exceed a threshold value for photo coagulation of retinal blood vessels. This value mainly depends on the laser. The most suitable argon laser power P and exposure time (t) which would be more effective for thermal and electrical behaviour of chicken eye was studied. This was achieved by measuring the variations in ocular temperature in electroretinogram (ERG) records under the effect of argon experiment, while power density (P) and exposure time (t) were varied in four different ways for each dose (pt). Results indicated that for the same laser dose, the temperature distribution of the eye, using low power density and high exposure time was higher than that high power density and low exposure time, indicating non-linearity of the laser dose. This finding was confirmed by ERG records which showed similar variations in b-wave latency, amplitude and duration, for the laser exposure conditions. This indicates variations in retinal function due to laser-dependent temperature variations. 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. CORE DESIGNS OF ABWR FOR PROPOSED OF THE FIRST NUCLEAR POWER PLANT IN INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohannes Sardjono

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia as an archipelago has been experiencing high growth industry and energy demand due to high population growth, dynamic economic activities. The total population is around 230 million people and 75 % to the total population is living in Java. The introduction of Nuclear Power Plant on Java Bali electricity grid will be possible in 2022 for 2 GWe, using proven technology reactor like ABWR or others light water reactor with nominal power 1000 MWe. In this case, the rated thermal power for the equilibrium cycles is 3926 MWt, the cycle length is 18 month and overall capacity factor is 87 %. The designs were performed for an 872-fuel bundles ABWR core using GE-11 fuel type in an 9×9 fuel rod arrays with 2 Large Central Water Rods (LCWR. The calculations were divided into two steps; the first is to generate bundle library and the other is to make the thermal and reactivity limits satisfied for the core designs. Toshiba General Electric Bundle lattice Analysis (TGBLA and PANACEA computer codes were used as designs tools. TGBLA is a General Electric proprietary computer code which is used to generate bundle lattice library for fuel designs. PANACEA is General Electric proprietary computer code which is used as thermal hydraulic and neutronic coupled BWR core simulator. This result of core designs describes reactivity and thermal margins i.e.; Maximum Linear Heat Generation rate (MLHGR is lower than 14.4 kW/ft, Minimum Critical Power Ratio (MCPR is upper than 1.25, Hot Excess Reactivity (HOTXS is upper than 1 %Dk at BOC and 0.8 %Dk at 200 MWD/ST and Cold Shutdown Margin Reactivity (CSDM is upper than 1 %Dk. It is concluded that the equilibrium core design using GE-11 fuel bundle type satisfies the core design objectives for the proposed of the firs Indonesia ABWR Nuclear Power Plant. Keywords: The first NPP in Indonesia, ABWR-1000 MWe, and core designs.   Indonesia adalah sebagai negara kepulauan yang laju pertumbuhan industri, energi, penduduk

  14. Toward power scaling in an acetylene mid-infrared hollow-core optical fiber gas laser: effects of pressure, fiber length, and pump power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerasinghe, H. W. Kushan; Dadashzadeh, Neda; Thirugnanasambandam, Manasadevi P.; Debord, Benoît.; Chafer, Matthieu; Gérôme, Frédéric; Benabid, Fetah; Corwin, Kristan L.; Washburn, Brian R.

    2018-02-01

    The effect of gas pressure, fiber length, and optical pump power on an acetylene mid-infrared hollow-core optical fiber gas laser (HOFGLAS) is experimentally determined in order to scale the laser to higher powers. The absorbed optical power and threshold power are measured for different pressures providing an optimum pressure for a given fiber length. We observe a linear dependence of both absorbed pump energy and lasing threshold for the acetylene HOFGLAS, while maintaining a good mode quality with an M-squared of 1.15. The threshold and mode behavior are encouraging for scaling to higher pressures and pump powers.

  15. 3D Freeze-Casting of Cellular Graphene Films for Ultrahigh-Power-Density Supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yuanlong; El-Kady, Maher F; Lin, Cheng-Wei; Zhu, Guanzhou; Marsh, Kristofer L; Hwang, Jee Youn; Zhang, Qinghong; Li, Yaogang; Wang, Hongzhi; Kaner, Richard B

    2016-08-01

    3D cellular graphene films with open porosity, high electrical conductivity, and good tensile strength, can be synthesized by a method combining freeze-casting and filtration. The resulting supercapacitors based on 3D porous reduced graphene oxide (RGO) film exhibit extremely high specific power densities and high energy densities. The fabrication process provides an effective means for controlling the pore size, electronic conductivity, and loading mass of the electrode materials, toward devices with high energy-storage performance. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Comparison of energy efficiency and power density in pressure retarded osmosis and reverse electrodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Ngai Yin; Elimelech, Menachem

    2014-09-16

    Pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) and reverse electrodialysis (RED) are emerging membrane-based technologies that can convert chemical energy in salinity gradients to useful work. The two processes have intrinsically different working principles: controlled mixing in PRO is achieved by water permeation across salt-rejecting membranes, whereas RED is driven by ion flux across charged membranes. This study compares the energy efficiency and power density performance of PRO and RED with simulated technologically available membranes for natural, anthropogenic, and engineered salinity gradients (seawater-river water, desalination brine-wastewater, and synthetic hypersaline solutions, respectively). The analysis shows that PRO can achieve both greater efficiencies (54-56%) and higher power densities (2.4-38 W/m(2)) than RED (18-38% and 0.77-1.2 W/m(2)). The superior efficiency is attributed to the ability of PRO membranes to more effectively utilize the salinity difference to drive water permeation and better suppress the detrimental leakage of salts. On the other hand, the low conductivity of currently available ion exchange membranes impedes RED ion flux and, thus, constrains the power density. Both technologies exhibit a trade-off between efficiency and power density: employing more permeable but less selective membranes can enhance the power density, but undesired entropy production due to uncontrolled mixing increases and some efficiency is sacrificed. When the concentration difference is increased (i.e., natural → anthropogenic → engineered salinity gradients), PRO osmotic pressure difference rises proportionally but not so for RED Nernst potential, which has logarithmic dependence on the solution concentration. Because of this inherently different characteristic, RED is unable to take advantage of larger salinity gradients, whereas PRO power density is considerably enhanced. Additionally, high solution concentrations suppress the Donnan exclusion effect of the

  17. Aspects of unconventional cores for large sodium cooled power reactors; evaluation of a literature survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiefhaber, E.

    1978-10-01

    The report gives an overview of a literature study on the application of unconventional cores for sodium cooled fast reactors. Different types of unconventional cores (heterogeneous cores, pancake cores, moderated cores and others) are compared with conventional cores, which are characterized by a cylindrical geometry with two or three fissile zones surrounded by an axial and a radial blanket. The main parameters of interest in this comparison are the neutronic parameters sodium void and Doppler effect, the breeding properties and the steel damage. Consequences for the core safety and the overall plant design are also mentioned

  18. Effects of space-dependent cross sections on core physics parameters for compact fast spectrum space power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lell, R.M.; Hanan, N.A.

    1987-01-01

    Effects of multigroup neutron cross section generation procedures on core physics parameters for compact fast spectrum reactors have been examined. Homogeneous and space-dependent multigroup cross section sets were generated in 11 and 27 groups for a representative fast reactor core. These cross sections were used to compute various reactor physics parameters for the reference core. Coarse group structure and neglect of space-dependence in the generation procedure resulted in inaccurate computations of reactor flux and power distributions and in significant errors regarding estimates of core reactivity and control system worth. Delayed neutron fraction was insensitive to cross section treatment, and computed reactivity coefficients were only slightly sensitive. However, neutron lifetime was found to be very sensitive to cross section treatment. Deficiencies in multigroup cross sections are reflected in core nuclear design and, consequently, in system mechanical design

  19. Measurement of the relative power density distribution of the IPEN/MB-01 reactor, using a fuel rod gamma scanning technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carneiro, Alvaro Luiz Guimaraes

    1996-01-01

    This work presents a measurement methodology for determination of radial and axial relative power density distribution of the IPEN/MB-01 Reactor core by means of the fuel rod gamma scanning. The methodology is based on the proportionality between gamma activity emitted by the radioactive decay of the fission products and power density. The scanning technique consists of counting gamma radiation above 0,6 MeV along the active area of the fuel rod, getting a distribution profile. The experimental results will be used as a benchmark for qualification and to establish possible deviations for the calculational methodology currently used at IPEN. The comparison of the calculated and measured results showed good agreement. (author)

  20. Evaluation of population density and distribution criteria in nuclear power plant siting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, M.

    1994-06-01

    The NRC has proposed revisions to 10 CFR 100 which include the codification of nuclear reactor site population density limits to 500 people per square mile, at the siting stage, averaged over any radial distance out to 30 miles, and 1,000 people per square mile within the 40-year lifetime of a nuclear plant. This study examined whether there are less restrictive alternative population density and/or distribution criteria which would provide equivalent or better protection to human health in the unlikely event of a nuclear accident. This study did not attempt to directly address the issue of actual population density limits because there are no US risk standards established for the evaluation of population density limits. Calculations were performed using source terms for both a current generation light water reactor (LWR) and an advanced light water reactor (ALWR) design. The results of this study suggest that measures which address the distribution of the population density, including emergency response conditions, could result in lower average individual risks to the public than the proposed guidelines that require controlling average population density. Studies also indicate that an exclusion zone size, determined by emergency response conditions and reactor design (power level and safety features), would better serve to protect public health than a rigid standard applied to all sites

  1. Improving the AGR fuel testing power density profile versus irradiation-time in the advanced test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Gray S.; Lillo, Misti A.; Maki, John T.; Petti, David A.

    2009-01-01

    The Very High Temperature gas-cooled Reactor (VHTR), which is currently being developed, achieves simplification of safety through reliance on ceramic-coated fuel particles. Each TRISO-coated fuel particle has its own containment which serves as the principal barrier against radionuclide release under normal operating and accident conditions. These fuel particles, in the form of graphite fuel compacts, are currently undergoing a series of irradiation tests in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to support the Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor (AGR) fuel qualification program. A representive coated fuel particle with an 235 U enrichment of 19.8 wt% was used in this analysis. The fuel burnup analysis tool used to perform the neutronics study reported herein, couples the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP, with the radioactive decay and burnup code ORIGEN2. The fuel burnup methodology known as Monte-Carlo with ORIGEN2 (MCWO) was used to evaluate the AGR experiment assembly and demonstrate compliance with ATR safety requirements. For the AGR graphite fuel compacts, the MCWO-calculated fission power density (FPD) due to neutron fission in 235 U is an important design parameter. One of the more important AGR fuel testing requirements is to maintain the peak fuel compact temperature close to 1250degC throughout the proposed irradiation campaign of 550 effective full power days (EFPDs). Based on the MCWO-calculated FPD, a fixed gas gap size was designed to allow regulation of the fuel compact temperatures throughout the entire fuel irradiation campaign by filling the gap with a mixture of helium and neon gases. The chosen fixed gas gap can only regulate the peak fuel compact temperature in the desired range during the irradiation test if the ratio of the peak power density to the time-dependent low power density (P/T) at 550 EFPDs is less than 2.5. However, given the near constant neutron flux within the ATR driver core and the depletion of 235 U

  2. Generation of high-power-density atmospheric pressure plasma with liquid electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Lifang; Mao Zhiguo; Yin Zengqian; Ran Junxia

    2004-01-01

    We present a method for generating atmospheric pressure plasma using a dielectric barrier discharge reactor with two liquid electrodes. Four distinct kinds of discharge, including stochastic filaments, regular square pattern, glow-like discharge, and Turing stripe pattern, are observed in argon with a flow rate of 9 slm. The electrical and optical characteristics of the device are investigated. Results show that high-power-density atmospheric pressure plasma with high duty ratio in space and time can be obtained. The influence of wall charges on discharge power and duty ratio has been discussed

  3. Analysis of the documents about the core envelopment of nuclear reactor at the Laguna Verde U-1 power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamora R, L.; Medina F, A.

    1999-01-01

    The degradation of internal components at BWR type reactors is an important subject to consider in the performance availability of the power plant. The Wuergassen nuclear reactor license was confiscated due to the presence of cracking in the core envelopment. In consequence it is necessary carrying out a detailed study with the purpose to avoid these problems in the future. This report presents a review and analysis of documents and technical information referring to the core envelopment of a BWR/5/6 and the Laguna Verde Unit 1 nuclear reactor in Mexico. In this document are presented design data, documents about fabrication processes, and manufacturing of core envelopment. (Author)

  4. Anisotropic nanolaminated CoNiFe cores integrated into microinductors for high-frequency dc–dc power conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jooncheol; Kim, Minsoo; Herrault, Florian; Kim, Jung-Kwun; Allen, Mark G

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a rectangular, anisotropic nanolaminated CoNiFe core that possesses a magnetically hard axis in the long geometric axis direction. Previously, we have developed nanolaminated cores comprising tens to hundreds of layers of 300–1000 nm thick metallic alloys (i.e. Ni 80 Fe 20 or Co 44 Ni 37 Fe 19 ) based on sequential electrodeposition, demonstrating suppressed eddy-current losses at MHz frequencies. In this work, magnetic anisotropy was induced to the nanolaminated CoNiFe cores by applying an external magnetic field (50–100 mT) during CoNiFe film electrodeposition. The fabricated cores comprised tens to hundreds of layers of 500–1000 nm thick CoNiFe laminations that have the hard-axis magnetic property. Packaged in a 22-turn solenoid test inductor, the anisotropic core showed 10% increased effective permeability and 25% reduced core power losses at MHz operation frequency, compared to an isotropic core of the identical geometry. Operating the anisotropic nanolaminated CoNiFe core in a step-down dc–dc converter (15 V input to 5 V output) demonstrated 81% converter efficiency at a switching frequency of 1.1 MHz and output power of 6.5 W. A solenoid microinductor with microfabricated windings integrated with the anisotropic nanolaminated CoNiFe core was fabricated, demonstrating a constant inductance of 600 nH up to 10 MHz and peak quality factor exceeding 20 at 4 MHz. The performance of the microinductor with the anisotropic nanolaminated CoNiFe core is compared with other previously reported microinductors. (fast track communication)

  5. Fuel assembly outlet temperature profile influence on core by-pass flow and power distribution determination in WWER -440 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petenyi, V.; Klucarova, K.; Remis, J.

    2003-01-01

    The in core instrumentation of the WWER-440 reactors consists of the thermocouple system and the system of self powered detectors (SPD). The thermocouple systems are positioned about 50 cm above the fuel bundle upper flow-mixing grid. The usual assumption is that, the coolant is well mixed in the Tc location, i.e. the temperature is constant through the flow cross-section area. The present evaluations by using the FLUENT 5.5.14 code reveal that, this assumption is not fulfilled. There exists a temperature profile that depends on fuel assembly geometry and on inner power profile of the fuel assembly. The paper presents the estimation of this effect and its influence on the core power distribution and the core by-pass flow determination. Comparison with measurements in Mochovce NPP will also be a part of this presentation (Authors)

  6. Power Relative to Body Mass Best Predicts Change in Core Temperature During Exercise-Heat Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Oliver R; Willmott, Ashley G B; James, Carl A; Hayes, Mark; Maxwell, Neil S

    2017-02-01

    Gibson, OR, Willmott, AGB, James, CA, Hayes, M, and Maxwell, NS. Power relative to body mass best predicts change in core temperature during exercise-heat stress. J Strength Cond Res 31(2): 403-414, 2017-Controlling internal temperature is crucial when prescribing exercise-heat stress, particularly during interventions designed to induce thermoregulatory adaptations. This study aimed to determine the relationship between the rate of rectal temperature (Trec) increase, and various methods for prescribing exercise-heat stress, to identify the most efficient method of prescribing isothermic heat acclimation (HA) training. Thirty-five men cycled in hot conditions (40° C, 39% R.H.) for 29 ± 2 minutes. Subjects exercised at 60 ± 9% V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak, with methods for prescribing exercise retrospectively observed for each participant. Pearson product moment correlations were calculated for each prescriptive variable against the rate of change in Trec (° C·h), with stepwise multiple regressions performed on statistically significant variables (p ≤ 0.05). Linear regression identified the predicted intensity required to increase Trec by 1.0-2.0° C between 20- and 45-minute periods and the duration taken to increase Trec by 1.5° C in response to incremental intensities to guide prescription. Significant (p ≤ 0.05) relationships with the rate of change in Trec were observed for prescriptions based on relative power (W·kg; r = 0.764), power (%Powermax; r = 0.679), rating of perceived exertion (RPE) (r = 0.577), V[Combining Dot Above]O2 (%V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak; r = 0.562), heart rate (HR) (%HRmax; r = 0.534), and thermal sensation (r = 0.311). Stepwise multiple regressions observed relative power and RPE as variables to improve the model (r = 0.791), with no improvement after inclusion of any anthropometric variable. Prescription of exercise under heat stress using power (W·kg or %Powermax) has the strongest relationship with the rate of change in

  7. New directions in fusion machines: report on the MFAC Panel X on high power density options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linford, R.K.

    1985-01-01

    The high cost of fusion is motivating a shift in research interest toward smaller, lower-cost systems. Panel X of the Magnetic Fusion Advisory Committee (MFAC) was charged to assess the potential benefits and problems associated with small, high-power-density approaches to fusion. The Panel identified figures of merit which are useful in evaluating various approaches to reduce the development costs and capital costs of fusion systems. As a result of their deliberations, the Panel recommended that ''...increased emphasis should be given to improving the mass power density of fusion systems, aiming at a minimum target of 100 kWe/tonne'', and that ''Increased emphasis should be given to concepts that offer the potential to reduce substantially the cost of development steps in physics and technology.''

  8. New directions in fusion machines: report on the MFAC Panel X on high power density options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linford, R.K.

    1985-01-01

    The high cost of fusion is motivating a shift in research interest toward smaller, lower-cost systems. Panel X of the Magnetic Fusion Advisory Committee (MFAC) was charged to assess the potential benefits and problems associated with small, high-power-density approaches to fusion. The Panel identified figures of merit which are useful in evaluating various approaches to reduce the development costs and capital costs of fusion systems. As a result of their deliberations, the Panel recommended that ''...increased emphasis should be given to improving the mass power density of fusion systems, aiming at a minimum target of 100 kWe/tonne'', and that ''Increased emphasis should be given to concepts that offer the potential to reduce substantially the cost of development steps in physics and technology.''

  9. Hydrogen consumption and power density in a co-flow planar SOFC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Moussa, Hocine; Zitouni, Bariza [Laboratoire d' etude des systemes energetiques industriels (LESEI), Universite de Batna, Batna (Algeria); Oulmi, Kafia [Laboratoire de chimie et de chimie de l' environnement, Universite de Batna, Batna (Algeria); Mahmah, Bouziane; Belhamel, Maiouf [CDER, BP. 62 Route de l' Observatoire. Bouzareah. Alger (Algeria); Mandin, Philippe [Centre de Developpement des Energies Renouvelables (CDER), LECA, UMR 7575 CNRS-ENSCP Paris 6 (France)

    2009-06-15

    In the present work, power density and hydrogen consumption in a co-flow planar solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) are studied according to the inlet functional parameters; such as the operational temperature, the operational pressure, the flow rates and the mass fractions of the species. Furthermore, the effect of the cell size is investigated. The results of a zero and a one-dimensional numerical electro-dynamic model predict the remaining quantity of the fed hydrogen at the output of the anode flow channel. The remaining hydrogen quantities and the SOFC's power density obtained are discussed as a function of the inlet functional parameters, the geometrical configuration of the cell and several operating cell voltages values. (author)

  10. A High Power Density Single-Phase PWM Rectifier With Active Ripple Energy Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ruxi [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Wang, Fei [ORNL; Boroyevich, Dushan [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Burgos, Rolando [ABB; Lai, Rixin [General Electric; Ning, Puqi [ORNL; Rajashekara, Kaushik [Rolls Royce

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that single-phase pulse width modulation rectifiers have second-order harmonic currents and corresponding ripple voltages on the dc bus. The low-frequency harmonic current is normally filtered using a bulk capacitor in the bus, which results in low power density. However, pursuing high power density in converter design is a very important goal in the aerospace applications. This paper studies methods for reducing the energy storage capacitor for single-phase rectifiers. The minimum ripple energy storage requirement is derived independently of a specific topology. Based on theminimum ripple energy requirement, the feasibility of the active capacitor s reduction schemes is verified. Then, we propose a bidirectional buck boost converter as the ripple energy storage circuit, which can effectively reduce the energy storage capacitance. The analysis and design are validated by simulation and experimental results.

  11. Effect of Divalent Cations on RED Performance and Cation Exchange Membrane Selection to Enhance Power Densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijnaarts, Timon; Huerta, Elisa; van Baak, Willem; Nijmeijer, Kitty

    2017-11-07

    Reverse electrodialysis (RED) is a membrane-based renewable energy technology that can harvest energy from salinity gradients. The anticipated feed streams are natural river and seawater, both of which contain not only monovalent ions but also divalent ions. However, RED using feed streams containing divalent ions experiences lower power densities because of both uphill transport and increased membrane resistance. In this study, we investigate the effects of divalent cations (Mg 2+ and Ca 2+ ) on RED and demonstrate the mitigation of those effects using both novel and existing commercial cation exchange membranes (CEMs). Monovalent-selective Neosepta CMS is known to block divalent cations transport and can therefore mitigate reductions in stack voltage. The new multivalent-permeable Fuji T1 is able to transport divalent cations without a major increase in resistance. Both strategies significantly improve power densities compared to standard-grade CEMs when performing RED using streams containing divalent cations.

  12. Electrochemical Supercapacitor Electrodes from Sponge-like Graphene Nanoarchitectures with Ultrahigh Power Density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhanwei; Li, Zhi; Holt, Chris M B; Tan, Xuehai; Wang, Huanlei; Amirkhiz, Babak Shalchi; Stephenson, Tyler; Mitlin, David

    2012-10-18

    We employed a microwave synthesis process of cobalt phthalocyanine molecules templated by acid-functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes to create three-dimensional sponge-like graphene nanoarchitectures suited for ionic liquid-based electrochemical capacitor electrodes that operate at very high scan rates. The sequential "bottom-up" molecular synthesis and subsequent carbonization process took less than 20 min to complete. The 3D nanoarchitectures are able to deliver an energy density of 7.1 W·h kg(-1) even at an extra high power density of 48 000 W kg(-1). In addition, the ionic liquid supercapacitor based on this material works very well at room temperature due to its fully opened structures, which is ideal for the high-power energy application requiring more tolerance to temperature variation. Moreover, the structures are stable in both ionic liquids and 1 M H2SO4, retaining 90 and 98% capacitance after 10 000 cycles, respectively.

  13. Power spectral density measurements with 252Cf for a light water moderated research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, W.T.; Mihalczo, J.T.

    1979-01-01

    A method of determining the reactivity of far subcritical systems from neutron noise power spectral density measurements with 252 Cf has previously been tested in fast reactor critical assemblies: a mockup of the Fast Flux Test Facility reactor and a uranium metal sphere. Calculations indicated that this measurement was feasible for a pressurized water reactor (PWR). In order to evaluate the ability to perform these measurements with moderated reactors which have long prompt neutron lifetimes, measurements were performed with a small plate-type research reactor whose neutron lifetime (57 microseconds) was about a factor of three longer than that of a PWR and approx. 50% longer than that of a boiling water reactor. The results of the first measurements of power spectral densities with 252 Cf for a water moderated reactor are presented

  14. Road simulation for four-wheel vehicle whole input power spectral density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiangbo; Qiang, Baomin

    2017-05-01

    As the vibration of running vehicle mainly comes from road and influence vehicle ride performance. So the road roughness power spectral density simulation has great significance to analyze automobile suspension vibration system parameters and evaluate ride comfort. Firstly, this paper based on the mathematical model of road roughness power spectral density, established the integral white noise road random method. Then in the MATLAB/Simulink environment, according to the research method of automobile suspension frame from simple two degree of freedom single-wheel vehicle model to complex multiple degrees of freedom vehicle model, this paper built the simple single incentive input simulation model. Finally the spectrum matrix was used to build whole vehicle incentive input simulation model. This simulation method based on reliable and accurate mathematical theory and can be applied to the random road simulation of any specified spectral which provides pavement incentive model and foundation to vehicle ride performance research and vibration simulation.

  15. A two-parameter family of double-power-law biorthonormal potential-density expansions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilley, Edward J.; Sanders, Jason L.; Evans, N. Wyn

    2018-05-01

    We present a two-parameter family of biorthonormal double-power-law potential-density expansions. Both the potential and density are given in closed analytic form and may be rapidly computed via recurrence relations. We show that this family encompasses all the known analytic biorthonormal expansions: the Zhao expansions (themselves generalizations of ones found earlier by Hernquist & Ostriker and by Clutton-Brock) and the recently discovered Lilley et al. (2017a) expansion. Our new two-parameter family includes expansions based around many familiar spherical density profiles as zeroth-order models, including the γ models and the Jaffe model. It also contains a basis expansion that reproduces the famous Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profile at zeroth order. The new basis expansions have been found via a systematic methodology which has wide applications in finding other new expansions. In the process, we also uncovered a novel integral transform solution to Poisson's equation.

  16. Sub-micrometer-thick all-solid-state supercapacitors with high power and energy densities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Fanhui [Key Laboratory for Liquid-Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials, Ministry of Education, and School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Ding, Yi [Key Laboratory for Liquid-Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials, Ministry of Education, and School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Shandong Applied Research Center for Gold Technology (Au-SDARC), Yantai 264005 (China)

    2011-09-15

    A sub-micrometer-thick, flexible, all-solid-state supercapacitor is fabricated. Through simultaneous realization of high dispersity of pseudocapacitance materials and quick electrode response, the hybrid nanostructures show enhanced volumetric capacitance and excellent stability, as well as very high power and energy densities. This suggests their potential as next-generation, high-performance energy conversion and storage devices for wearable electronics. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  17. Maximization of ICRF power by SOL density tailoring with local gas injection

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jacquet, P.; Goniche, M.; Bobkov, V.; Lerche, E.; Pinsker, R.I.; Pitts, R.A.; Zhang, W.; Colas, L.; Hosea, J.; Moriyama, S.; Wang, S.-J.; Wukitch, S.; Zhang, X.; Bilato, R.; Bufferand, H.; Guimarais, L.; Faugel, H.; Hanson, G.R.; Kocan, M.; Monakhov, I.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Petržílka, Václav; Shaw, A.; Stepanov, I.; Sips, A.C.C.; Van Eester, D.; Wauters, T.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 4 (2016), s. 046001 ISSN 0029-5515 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 633053 - EUROfusion Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : ICRF power * antenna loading * gas injection * SOL density Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 3.307, year: 2016 http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/0029-5515/56/4/046001

  18. Discrimination of neutrons and gamma quanta with the aid of their power density spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchmueller, R.

    1977-01-01

    The paper introduces a method of using only one fission chamber to discriminate the neutron flux against the gamma flux. The gamma chamber current may be several orders of magnitude higher than the neutron chamber current. In specially dimensioned fission chambers the neutrons and gamma quanta are made to generate different current pulses. Discrimination becomes possible by recording the power density spectrum of the mixture of pulses over a broad frequency range ( [de

  19. Seismic analysis of a NPP reactor building using spectrum-compatible power spectral density functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venancio Filho, F.; DeCarvalho Santos, S.H.; Joia, L.A.

    1987-01-01

    A numerical methodology to obtain Power Spectral Density Functions (PSDF) of ground accelerations, compatible with a given design response spectrum is presented. The PSDF's are derived from the statistical analysis of the amplitudes of the frequency components in a set of artificially generated time-histories matching the given spectrum. A so obtained PSDF is then used in the stochastic analysis of a NPP Reactor Building. The main results of this analysis are compared with the ones obtained by deterministic methods

  20. Seismic analysis of a NPP reactor building using spectrum-compatible power spectral density functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venancio Filho, F.; Joia, L.A.

    1987-01-01

    A numerical methodology to obtain Power Spectral Density Functions (PSDF) of ground accelerations, compatible with a given design response spectrum is presented. The PSDF's are derived from the statistical analysis of the amplitudes of the frequency components in a set of artificially generated time-histories matching the given spectrum. A so obtained PSDF is then used in the stochastic analysis of a reactor building. The main results of this analysis are compared with the ones obtained by deterministic methods. (orig./HP)

  1. Effect of areal power density and relative humidity on corrosion resistant container performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gansemer, J.D.

    1994-10-01

    The impact of the rewetting process on the performance of waste containers at the Yucca Mountain repository is analyzed. This paper explores the impact of the temperature-humidity relationships on pitting corrosion failure of stainless steel containers for different areal power densities (APDs)in the repository. It compares the likely performance of containers in a repository with a low APD, 55 Kw/acre, and a high APD, 110 kW/acre

  2. Power spectral density of velocity fluctuations estimated from phase Doppler data

    OpenAIRE

    Jicha Miroslav; Lizal Frantisek; Jedelsky Jan

    2012-01-01

    Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA) and its modifications such as PhaseDoppler Particle Anemometry (P/DPA) is point-wise method for optical nonintrusive measurement of particle velocity with high data rate. Conversion of the LDA velocity data from temporal to frequency domain – calculation of power spectral density (PSD) of velocity fluctuations, is a non trivial task due to nonequidistant data sampling in time. We briefly discuss possibilities for the PSD estimation and specify limitations caused...

  3. Statistical algorithm for automated signature analysis of power spectral density data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piety, K.R.

    1977-01-01

    A statistical algorithm has been developed and implemented on a minicomputer system for on-line, surveillance applications. Power spectral density (PSD) measurements on process signals are the performance signatures that characterize the ''health'' of the monitored equipment. Statistical methods provide a quantitative basis for automating the detection of anomalous conditions. The surveillance algorithm has been tested on signals from neutron sensors, proximeter probes, and accelerometers to determine its potential for monitoring nuclear reactors and rotating machinery

  4. Severe Accident Mitigation by using Core Catcher applicable for Korea standard nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hae Kyun; Kim, Sang Nyung

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear power plants have been designed and operated in order to prevent severe accident because of their risk that contains tremendous radioactive materials that are potentially hazardous. Moreover, the government requested the nuclear industry to implement a severe accident management strategy for existing reactors to mitigate the risk of potential severe accidents. However, Korea standard nuclear power plant(APR-1400 and OPR-1000) are much more vulnerable for severe accident management than that of developed countries. Due to the design feature of reactor cavity in Korea standard nuclear power plant, inequable and serious Molten Core-Concrete Interaction(MCCI) may cause considerable safety problem to the reactor containment liner. At worst, it brings the release of radioactive materials to the environment. This accident applies to the fourth level of defense in depth(IAEA 1996), 'severe accident'. This study proposes and designs the 'slope' to secure reactor containment liner integrity when the corium spreads out from the destroyed reactor vessel to the reactor cavity due to the core melting accident. For this, make the initial corium distribution evenly exploit the 'slope' on the basis of the study of Ex-vessel corium behavior to prevent inequable and serious MCCI, in order to mitigate severe accident. The viscosity has a dominant position in the calculation. According to the result, the spread out distance on the slope is 10.7146841m, considering the rough surface of the concrete(slope) and margin of reactor cavity end(under 11m). Easy to design, production and economic feasibility are the advantage of the designed slope in this study. However, the slope design may unsuitable when the sequences of the accidents did not satisfy the assumptions as mentioned. Despite of those disadvantages, the slope will show a great performance to mitigate the severe accident. As mentioned in assumption, the corium releasing time property was conservatively calculated

  5. Severe Accident Mitigation by using Core Catcher applicable for Korea standard nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hae Kyun; Kim, Sang Nyung [Kyung Hee Univ., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    Nuclear power plants have been designed and operated in order to prevent severe accident because of their risk that contains tremendous radioactive materials that are potentially hazardous. Moreover, the government requested the nuclear industry to implement a severe accident management strategy for existing reactors to mitigate the risk of potential severe accidents. However, Korea standard nuclear power plant(APR-1400 and OPR-1000) are much more vulnerable for severe accident management than that of developed countries. Due to the design feature of reactor cavity in Korea standard nuclear power plant, inequable and serious Molten Core-Concrete Interaction(MCCI) may cause considerable safety problem to the reactor containment liner. At worst, it brings the release of radioactive materials to the environment. This accident applies to the fourth level of defense in depth(IAEA 1996), 'severe accident'. This study proposes and designs the 'slope' to secure reactor containment liner integrity when the corium spreads out from the destroyed reactor vessel to the reactor cavity due to the core melting accident. For this, make the initial corium distribution evenly exploit the 'slope' on the basis of the study of Ex-vessel corium behavior to prevent inequable and serious MCCI, in order to mitigate severe accident. The viscosity has a dominant position in the calculation. According to the result, the spread out distance on the slope is 10.7146841m, considering the rough surface of the concrete(slope) and margin of reactor cavity end(under 11m). Easy to design, production and economic feasibility are the advantage of the designed slope in this study. However, the slope design may unsuitable when the sequences of the accidents did not satisfy the assumptions as mentioned. Despite of those disadvantages, the slope will show a great performance to mitigate the severe accident. As mentioned in assumption, the corium releasing time property was

  6. Effects of sintering temperature on properties of toroid cores using NiZnCu ferrites for power applications at >1 MHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junchang; Mei, Yunhui; Liu, Wen; Li, Xin; Hou, Feng; Lu, Guo-Quan

    2018-05-01

    The microstructures, magnetic and electronic performance of NiZnCu ferrites have been investigated at temperature from 850 °C to 1000 °C. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns showed that only single phase with spinel structure existed. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) results showed that grain size increased with enhancement of sintering temperature and the most homogeneous, compact microstructure was obtained at 950 °C. Magnetic properties measurements revealed that both complex permeability and saturation magnetization increased with increasing of sintering temperature. The initial permeability was approximately linear within the scope of 850-1000 °C as well as the resonance frequency decreased from 70 MHz to 30 MHz. Power loss density tests demonstrated that the core sintered at 950 °C instead of the one sintered at 1000 °C had the lower power loss density at both 5 mT and 10 mT and the higher inductance under a certain exciting direct current at 1 MHz. Also the inductance of the sample sintered at the higher temperature dropped faster than that at the lower temperature. The results showed that the core sintered at 950 °C had better electrical performance and was suitable for wide usage.

  7. Power spectra based Planck constraints on compensated isocurvature, and forecasts for LiteBIRD and CORE space missions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Väliviita, Jussi, E-mail: jussi.valiviita@helsinki.fi [University of Helsinki, Department of Physics and Helsinki Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 64, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland)

    2017-04-01

    Compensated isocurvature perturbations (CIP), where the primordial baryon and cold dark matter density perturbations cancel, do not cause total matter isocurvature perturbation. Consequently, at the linear order in the baryon density contrast Δ, a mixture of CIP and the adiabatic mode leads to the same CMB spectra as the pure adiabatic mode. Only recently, Muñoz et al. showed that at the second order CIP leaves an imprint in the observable CMB by smoothing the power spectra in a similar manner as lensing. This causes a strong degeneracy between the CIP variance Δ{sub rms}{sup 2} ≡ (Δ{sup 2}) and the phenomenological lensing parameter A {sub L}. We study several combinations of the Planck 2015 data and show that the measured lensing potential power spectrum C {sub ℓ}{sup φφ} breaks the degeneracy. Nested sampling of the ΛCDM+Δ{sub rms}{sup 2}(+ A {sub L}) model using the Planck 2015 temperature, polarization, and lensing data gives Δ{sub rms}{sup 2} = (6.9{sup +3.0}{sub −3.1}) × 10{sup −3} at 68% CL. A non-zero value is favoured at 2.3σ (or without the polarization data at 2.8σ). CIP with Δ{sub rms}{sup 2} ≈ 7 × 10{sup −3} improves the bestfit χ{sup 2} by 3.6 compared to the adiabatic ΛCDM model. In contrast, although the temperature data favour A {sub L} ≅ 1.22, allowing A {sub L} ≠ 1 does not improve the joint fit at all, since the lensing data disfavour A {sub L} ≠ 1. Indeed, CIP provides a rare example of a simple model, which is capable of reducing the Planck lensing anomaly significantly and fitting well simultaneously the high (and low) multipole temperature and lensing data, as well as the polarization data. Finally, we derive forecasts for two future satellite missions (LiteBIRD proposal to JAXA/NASA and Exploring Cosmic Origins with CORE proposal to ESA's M5 call) and compare these to simulated Planck data. Due to its coarse angular resolution, LiteBIRD is not able to improve the constraints on Δ{sub rms}{sup 2} or A

  8. Biowaste-Derived Hierarchical Porous Carbon Nanosheets for Ultrahigh Power Density Supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dengfeng; Chen, Chong; Zhao, Gongyuan; Sun, Lei; Du, Baosheng; Zhang, Hong; Li, Zhuo; Sun, Ye; Besenbacher, Flemming; Yu, Miao

    2018-03-05

    Low-cost activated carbons with high capacitive properties remain desirable for supercapacitor applications. Herein, a three-dimensional scaffolding framework of porous carbon nanosheets (PCNSs) has been produced from a typical biowaste, namely, ground cherry calyces, the specific composition and natural structures of which have contributed to the PCNSs having a very large specific surface area of 1612 m 2  g -1 , a hierarchical pore size distribution, a turbostratic carbon structure with a high degree graphitization, and about 10 % oxygen and nitrogen heteroatoms. A high specific capacitance of 350 F g -1 at 0.1 A g -1 has been achieved in a two-electrode system with 6 m KOH; this value is among the highest specific capacitance of biomass-derived carbon materials. More inspiringly, a high energy density of 22.8 Wh kg -1 at a power density of 198.8 W kg -1 can be obtained with 1 m aqueous solution of Li 2 SO 4 , and an ultrahigh energy density of 81.4 Wh kg -1 at a power density of 446.3 W kg -1 is realized with 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate electrolyte. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Genetic search for an optimal power flow solution from a high density cluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amarnath, R.V. [Hi-Tech College of Engineering and Technology, Hyderabad (India); Ramana, N.V. [JNTU College of Engineering, Jagityala (India)

    2008-07-01

    This paper proposed a novel method to solve optimal power flow (OPF) problems. The method is based on a genetic algorithm (GA) search from a High Density Cluster (GAHDC). The algorithm of the proposed method includes 3 stages, notably (1) a suboptimal solution is obtained via a conventional analytical method, (2) a high density cluster, which consists of other suboptimal data points from the first stage, is formed using a density-based cluster algorithm, and (3) a genetic algorithm based search is carried out for the exact optimal solution from a low population sized, high density cluster. The final optimal solution thoroughly satisfies the well defined fitness function. A standard IEEE 30-bus test system was considered for the simulation study. Numerical results were presented and compared with the results of other approaches. It was concluded that although there is not much difference in numerical values, the proposed method has the advantage of minimal computational effort and reduced CPU time. As such, the method would be suitable for online applications such as the present Optimal Power Flow problem. 24 refs., 2 tabs., 4 figs.

  10. Design of robust hollow fiber membranes with high power density for osmotic energy production

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Sui; Sukitpaneenit, Panu; Chung, Neal Tai-Shung

    2014-01-01

    This study highlights the design strategy of highly asymmetric hollow fiber membranes that possess both characteristics of high flux and high mechanical strength to effectively reap the osmotic energy from seawater brine with an ultrahigh power density. An advanced co-extrusion technology was employed to fabricate the polyethersulfone (PES) hollow fiber supports with diversified structures from macrovoid to sponge-like. The microstructure of the supports is found critical for the stability and water permeability of the thin film composite (TFC) membranes. A high porosity in the porous layer is needed to reduce internal concentration polarization, while a thick and relatively dense skin layer underneath the TFC layer is required to maintain good mechanical stability and stress dissipation. The pore size of the supporting layer underneath the TFC layer must be small with a narrow pore size distribution to ensure the formation of a less-defective, highly permeable and mechanically stable TFC layer. The newly developed hollow fiber comprising high asymmetry, high porosity, and a thick skin layer with a small and narrow pore size distribution underneath the TFC layer produces a maximum power density of 24.3W/m2 at 20.0bar by using 1M NaCl as the concentrated brine and deionized (DI) water as the feed. The proposed design strategy for ultrahigh power density membranes clearly advances the osmotic energy production close to commercialization with a quite cost-effective and practicable approach. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  11. Glucose administration attenuates spatial memory deficits induced by chronic low-power-density microwave exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yonghui; Xu, Shangcheng; He, Mindi; Chen, Chunhai; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Chuan; Chu, Fang; Yu, Zhengping; Zhou, Zhou; Zhong, Min

    2012-07-16

    Extensive evidence indicates that glucose administration attenuates memory deficits in rodents and humans, and cognitive impairment has been associated with reduced glucose metabolism and uptake in certain brain regions including the hippocampus. In the present study, we investigated whether glucose treatment attenuated memory deficits caused by chronic low-power-density microwave (MW) exposure, and the effect of MW exposure on hippocampal glucose uptake. We exposed Wistar rats to 2.45 GHz pulsed MW irradiation at a power density of 1 mW/cm(2) for 3 h/day, for up to 30 days. MW exposure induced spatial learning and memory impairments in rats. Hippocampal glucose uptake was also reduced by MW exposure in the absence or presence of insulin, but the levels of blood glucose and insulin were not affected. However, these spatial memory deficits were reversed by systemic glucose treatment. Our results indicate that glucose administration attenuates the spatial memory deficits induced by chronic low-power-density MW exposure, and reduced hippocampal glucose uptake may be associated with cognitive impairment caused by MW exposure. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Graphene-based in-plane micro-supercapacitors with high power and energy densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhong–Shuai; Parvez, Khaled; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Micro-supercapacitors are important on-chip micro-power sources for miniaturized electronic devices. Although the performance of micro-supercapacitors has been significantly advanced by fabricating nanostructured materials, developing thin-film manufacture technologies and device architectures, their power or energy densities remain far from those of electrolytic capacitors or lithium thin-film batteries. Here we demonstrate graphene-based in-plane interdigital micro-supercapacitors on arbitrary substrates. The resulting micro-supercapacitors deliver an area capacitance of 80.7 μF cm−2 and a stack capacitance of 17.9 F cm−3. Further, they show a power density of 495 W cm−3 that is higher than electrolytic capacitors, and an energy density of 2.5 mWh cm−3 that is comparable to lithium thin-film batteries, in association with superior cycling stability. Such microdevices allow for operations at ultrahigh rate up to 1,000 V s−1, three orders of magnitude higher than that of conventional supercapacitors. Micro-supercapacitors with an in-plane geometry have great promise for numerous miniaturized or flexible electronic applications. PMID:24042088

  13. Graphene-based in-plane micro-supercapacitors with high power and energy densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhong-Shuai; Parvez, Khaled; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Micro-supercapacitors are important on-chip micro-power sources for miniaturized electronic devices. Although the performance of micro-supercapacitors has been significantly advanced by fabricating nanostructured materials, developing thin-film manufacture technologies and device architectures, their power or energy densities remain far from those of electrolytic capacitors or lithium thin-film batteries. Here we demonstrate graphene-based in-plane interdigital micro-supercapacitors on arbitrary substrates. The resulting micro-supercapacitors deliver an area capacitance of 80.7 μF cm⁻² and a stack capacitance of 17.9 F cm⁻³. Further, they show a power density of 495 W cm⁻³ that is higher than electrolytic capacitors, and an energy density of 2.5 mWh cm⁻³ that is comparable to lithium thin-film batteries, in association with superior cycling stability. Such microdevices allow for operations at ultrahigh rate up to 1,000 V s⁻¹, three orders of magnitude higher than that of conventional supercapacitors. Micro-supercapacitors with an in-plane geometry have great promise for numerous miniaturized or flexible electronic applications.

  14. Design of robust hollow fiber membranes with high power density for osmotic energy production

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Sui

    2014-04-01

    This study highlights the design strategy of highly asymmetric hollow fiber membranes that possess both characteristics of high flux and high mechanical strength to effectively reap the osmotic energy from seawater brine with an ultrahigh power density. An advanced co-extrusion technology was employed to fabricate the polyethersulfone (PES) hollow fiber supports with diversified structures from macrovoid to sponge-like. The microstructure of the supports is found critical for the stability and water permeability of the thin film composite (TFC) membranes. A high porosity in the porous layer is needed to reduce internal concentration polarization, while a thick and relatively dense skin layer underneath the TFC layer is required to maintain good mechanical stability and stress dissipation. The pore size of the supporting layer underneath the TFC layer must be small with a narrow pore size distribution to ensure the formation of a less-defective, highly permeable and mechanically stable TFC layer. The newly developed hollow fiber comprising high asymmetry, high porosity, and a thick skin layer with a small and narrow pore size distribution underneath the TFC layer produces a maximum power density of 24.3W/m2 at 20.0bar by using 1M NaCl as the concentrated brine and deionized (DI) water as the feed. The proposed design strategy for ultrahigh power density membranes clearly advances the osmotic energy production close to commercialization with a quite cost-effective and practicable approach. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  15. Spacecraft radio scattering observations of the power spectrum of electron density fluctuations in the solar wind

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, R.; Armstrong, J.W.

    1979-01-01

    Solar wind electron density power spectra in the solar equatorial region are inferred from observations of phase scintillations and spectral broadening made with the Viking, Helios, and Pioneer spacecraft. The heliocentric distance range covered is 2--215 R/sub S/, and for some observations close to the sun the spectra extend to fluctuation frequencies as high as 100 Hz. For heliocentric distances > or approx. =20 R/sub S/ the equivalent spacecraft-measured one-dimensional density spectrym V/sub n/e is well modeled by a single power law (f/sup -alpha/) in the frequency range 10 -4 -5 x 10 -2 Hz. The mean spectral index α is 1.65, very close to the Kolmogorov value of 5/3. Under the assumption of constant solar wind speed, V/sub n/e varies as R/sup -3.45/, where R is heliocentric distance. Within 20 R/sub S/, V/sub n/e can still be modeled by a single power law over the frequency range 10 -3 -10 1 Hz, but the spectral index becomes smaller, αapprox.1.1. The flattening of the density spectrum with 20 R/sub S/ is presumably associated with energy deposition in the near-sun region and acceleration of the solar wind

  16. Nominal power density analysis of thermoelectric pins with non-constant cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Yaoguang; Mei, Deqing; Yao, Zhehe; Wang, Yancheng; Liu, Haiyan; Chen, Zichen

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Nominal power density of TEGs with non-constant cross sections pins is analyzed. • An analytical model of nominal power density (NPD) is developed. • Influences of shape parameter on NPD for different geometric pins are investigated. • Effects of dimensionless efficiency and the temperature ratio on NPD are examined. - Abstract: The investigation of the geometric structure of TEG (thermoelectric generator) pins is essential, as their geometry determines the performance of devices. In this study, nominal power density (NPD) is used to find a better geometric structure of thermoelectric pins of TEGs, since a comparison of maximum dimensionless efficiencies for different geometric pins cannot be used to identify the optimum geometry. The influence of shape parameter on NPD for TEG pins in linear, quadratic and exponential cross-sectional functions is studied. The NPD decreases when the shape parameter increases for different geometric pins, while the maximum values of NPD are the same. Then, the effects of dimensionless efficiency and the temperature ratio on the NPD are analyzed. The NPD decreases with the increase in dimensionless efficiency and temperature ratio. Pins with linear variation in cross section have the highest NPD among the three geometries of pins evaluated

  17. Flexible Aqueous Li-Ion Battery with High Energy and Power Densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chongyin; Ji, Xiao; Fan, Xiulin; Gao, Tao; Suo, Liumin; Wang, Fei; Sun, Wei; Chen, Ji; Chen, Long; Han, Fudong; Miao, Ling; Xu, Kang; Gerasopoulos, Konstantinos; Wang, Chunsheng

    2017-11-01

    A flexible and wearable aqueous symmetrical lithium-ion battery is developed using a single LiVPO 4 F material as both cathode and anode in a "water-in-salt" gel polymer electrolyte. The symmetric lithium-ion chemistry exhibits high energy and power density and long cycle life, due to the formation of a robust solid electrolyte interphase consisting of Li 2 CO 3 -LiF, which enables fast Li-ion transport. Energy densities of 141 Wh kg -1 , power densities of 20 600 W kg -1 , and output voltage of 2.4 V can be delivered during >4000 cycles, which is far superior to reported aqueous energy storage devices at the same power level. Moreover, the full cell shows unprecedented tolerance to mechanical stress such as bending and cutting, where it not only does not catastrophically fail, as most nonaqueous cells would, but also maintains cell performance and continues to operate in ambient environment, a unique feature apparently derived from the high stability of the "water-in-salt" gel polymer electrolyte. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Pulse Power Capability Of High Energy Density Capacitors Based on a New Dielectric Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winsor, Paul; Scholz, Tim; Hudis, Martin; Slenes, Kirk M.

    1999-01-01

    A new dielectric composite consisting of a polymer coated onto a high-density metallized Kraft has been developed for application in high energy density pulse power capacitors. The polymer coating is custom formulated for high dielectric constant and strength with minimum dielectric losses. The composite can be wound and processed using conventional wound film capacitor manufacturing equipment. This new system has the potential to achieve 2 to 3 J/cu cm whole capacitor energy density at voltage levels above 3.0 kV, and can maintain its mechanical properties to temperatures above 150 C. The technical and manufacturing development of the composite material and fabrication into capacitors are summarized in this paper. Energy discharge testing, including capacitance and charge-discharge efficiency at normal and elevated temperatures, as well as DC life testing were performed on capacitors manufactured using this material. TPL (Albuquerque, NM) has developed the material and Aerovox (New Bedford, MA) has used the material to build and test actual capacitors. The results of the testing will focus on pulse power applications specifically those found in electro-magnetic armor and guns, high power microwave sources and defibrillators.

  19. ELECTRON-CAPTURE AND β-DECAY RATES FOR sd-SHELL NUCLEI IN STELLAR ENVIRONMENTS RELEVANT TO HIGH-DENSITY O–NE–MG CORES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Toshio [Department of Physics and Graduate School of Integrated Basic Sciences, College of Humanities and Sciences, Nihon University Sakurajosui 3-25-40, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8550 (Japan); Toki, Hiroshi [Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Nomoto, Ken’ichi, E-mail: suzuki@phys.chs.nihon-u.ac.jp [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan)

    2016-02-01

    Electron-capture and β-decay rates for nuclear pairs in the sd-shell are evaluated at high densities and high temperatures relevant to the final evolution of electron-degenerate O–Ne–Mg cores of stars with initial masses of 8–10 M{sub ⊙}. Electron capture induces a rapid contraction of the electron-degenerate O–Ne–Mg core. The outcome of rapid contraction depends on the evolutionary changes in the central density and temperature, which are determined by the competing processes of contraction, cooling, and heating. The fate of the stars is determined by these competitions, whether they end up with electron-capture supernovae or Fe core-collapse supernovae. Since the competing processes are induced by electron capture and β-decay, the accurate weak rates are crucially important. The rates are obtained for pairs with A = 20, 23, 24, 25, and 27 by shell-model calculations in the sd-shell with the USDB Hamiltonian. Effects of Coulomb corrections on the rates are evaluated. The rates for pairs with A = 23 and 25 are important for nuclear Urca processes that determine the cooling rate of the O–Ne–Mg core, while those for pairs with A = 20 and 24 are important for the core contraction and heat generation rates in the core. We provide these nuclear rates at stellar environments in tables with fine enough meshes at various densities and temperatures for studies of astrophysical processes sensitive to the rates. In particular, the accurate rate tables are crucially important for the final fates of not only O–Ne–Mg cores but also a wider range of stars, such as C–O cores of lower-mass stars.

  20. ELECTRON-CAPTURE AND β-DECAY RATES FOR sd-SHELL NUCLEI IN STELLAR ENVIRONMENTS RELEVANT TO HIGH-DENSITY O–NE–MG CORES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Toshio; Toki, Hiroshi; Nomoto, Ken’ichi

    2016-01-01

    Electron-capture and β-decay rates for nuclear pairs in the sd-shell are evaluated at high densities and high temperatures relevant to the final evolution of electron-degenerate O–Ne–Mg cores of stars with initial masses of 8–10 M ⊙ . Electron capture induces a rapid contraction of the electron-degenerate O–Ne–Mg core. The outcome of rapid contraction depends on the evolutionary changes in the central density and temperature, which are determined by the competing processes of contraction, cooling, and heating. The fate of the stars is determined by these competitions, whether they end up with electron-capture supernovae or Fe core-collapse supernovae. Since the competing processes are induced by electron capture and β-decay, the accurate weak rates are crucially important. The rates are obtained for pairs with A = 20, 23, 24, 25, and 27 by shell-model calculations in the sd-shell with the USDB Hamiltonian. Effects of Coulomb corrections on the rates are evaluated. The rates for pairs with A = 23 and 25 are important for nuclear Urca processes that determine the cooling rate of the O–Ne–Mg core, while those for pairs with A = 20 and 24 are important for the core contraction and heat generation rates in the core. We provide these nuclear rates at stellar environments in tables with fine enough meshes at various densities and temperatures for studies of astrophysical processes sensitive to the rates. In particular, the accurate rate tables are crucially important for the final fates of not only O–Ne–Mg cores but also a wider range of stars, such as C–O cores of lower-mass stars

  1. BEAVRS full core burnup calculation in hot full power condition by RMC code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Shichang; Liang, Jingang; Wu, Qu; Guo, JuanJuan; Huang, Shanfang; Tang, Xiao; Li, Zeguang; Wang, Kan

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • TMS and thermal scattering interpolation were developed to treat cross sections OTF. • Hybrid coupling system was developed for HFP burnup calculation of BEAVRS benchmark. • Domain decomposition was applied to handle memory problem of full core burnup. • Critical boron concentration with burnup by RMC agrees with the benchmark results. • RMC is capable of multi-physics coupling for simulations of nuclear reactors in HFP. - Abstract: Monte Carlo method can provide high fidelity neutronics analysis of different types of nuclear reactors, owing to its advantages of the flexible geometry modeling and the use of continuous-energy nuclear cross sections. However, nuclear reactors are complex systems with multi-physics interacting and coupling. MC codes can couple with depletion solver and thermal-hydraulics (T/H) codes simultaneously for the “transport-burnup-thermal-hydraulics” coupling calculations. MIT BEAVRS is a typical “transport-burnup-thermal-hydraulics” coupling benchmark. In this paper, RMC was coupled with sub-channel code COBRA, equipped with on-the-fly temperature-dependent cross section treatment and large-scale detailed burnup calculation based on domain decomposition. Then RMC was applied to the full core burnup calculations of BEAVRS benchmark in hot full power (HFP) condition. The numerical tests show that domain decomposition method can achieve the consistent results compared with original version of RMC while enlarging the computational burnup regions. The results of HFP by RMC agree well with the reference values of BEAVRS benchmark and also agree well with those of MC21. This work proves the feasibility and accuracy of RMC in multi-physics coupling and lifecycle simulations of nuclear reactors.

  2. Radioactive contamination of Danish territory after core-melt accidents at the Barsebaeck power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gjoerup, H.L.; Jensen, N.O.; Hedemann Jensen, P.; Kristensen, L.; Nielsen, O.J.; Petersen, E.L.; Petersen, T.; Roed, J.; Thykier-Nielsen, S.; Heikel Vinter, F.; Warming, L.; Aarkrog, A.

    1982-03-01

    An assessment is made of the radioactive contamination of Danish territory in the event of a core-melt accident at the Barsebaeck nuclear power plant in Sweden. Accidents including both core melt-down and containment failure are considered. Consequences are calculated for a BWR-3 release under common meteorological conditions and for a BWR-2 release under extreme meteorological conditions. Calculations are based on experiments and theoretical work relating to deposition velocities for different types of surface, shielding effect of structures, and weathering. The effects are described of different dose-reducing measures, e.g., decontamination, relocation, destruction of contaminated foodstuffs. The collective effective dose equivalent from external gamma radiation from deposited activity integrated over a time period of 30 years, is calculated to be 3.6 Megamanrem in the BWR-3 case without dose-reducing measures. For the BWR-2 case, the corresponding dose is approx. 41 Megamanrem. A combination of temporary relocation, hosing of roads etc. and digging of gardens is estimated to reduce these doses to approx. 2.5 Megamanrem and approx. 15 Megamanrem, respectively. The collective committed effective dose equivalent from the consumption of contaminated foodstuffs is calculated to 23 Megamanrem in the BWR-3 case without dose-reducing measures. This dose could be reduced to 0.2 Megamanrem if contaminated crops are destroyed during the first year after the accident and if changes are made in agricultural production in the contaminated area. The corresponding doses in the BWR-2 case would be 197 Megamanrem and 1.4 Megmanrem, respectively. (author)

  3. High-resolution Tangential AXUV Arrays for Radiated Power Density Measurements on NSTX-U

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delgado-Aparicio, L [PPPL; Bell, R E [PPPL; Faust, I [MIT; Tritz, K [The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, 21209, USA; Diallo, A [PPPL; Gerhardt, S P [PPPL; Kozub, T A [PPPL; LeBlanc, B P [PPPL; Stratton, B C [PPPL

    2014-07-01

    Precise measurements of the local radiated power density and total radiated power are a matter of the uttermost importance for understanding the onset of impurity-induced instabilities and the study of particle and heat transport. Accounting of power balance is also needed for the understanding the physics of various divertor con gurations for present and future high-power fusion devices. Poloidal asymmetries in the impurity density can result from high Mach numbers and can impact the assessment of their flux-surface-average and hence vary the estimates of P[sub]rad (r, t) and (Z[sub]eff); the latter is used in the calculation of the neoclassical conductivity and the interpretation of non-inductive and inductive current fractions. To this end, the bolometric diagnostic in NSTX-U will be upgraded, enhancing the midplane coverage and radial resolution with two tangential views, and adding a new set of poloidally-viewing arrays to measure the 2D radiation distribution. These systems are designed to contribute to the near- and long-term highest priority research goals for NSTX-U which will integrate non-inductive operation at reduced collisionality, with high-pressure, long energy-confinement-times and a divertor solution with metal walls.

  4. Characterization of neutron leakage probability, k /SUB eff/ , and critical core surface mass density of small reactor assemblies through the Trombay criticality formula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, A.; Rao, K.S.; Srinivasan, M.

    1983-01-01

    The Trombay criticality formula (TCF) has been derived by incorporating a number of well-known concepts of criticality physics to enable prediction of changes in critical size or k /SUB eff/ following alterations in geometrical and physical parameters of uniformly reflected small reactor assemblies characterized by large neutron leakage from the core. The variant parameters considered are size, shape, density and diluent concentration of the core, and density and thickness of the reflector. The effect of these changes (except core size) manifests, through sigma /SUB c/ the critical surface mass density of the ''corresponding critical core,'' that sigma, the massto-surface-area ratio of the core,'' is essentially a measure of the product /rho/ extended to nonspherical systems and plays a dominant role in the TCF. The functional dependence of k /SUB eff/ on sigma/sigma /SUB c/ , the system size relative to critical, is expressed in the TCF through two alternative representations, namely the modified Wigner rational form and, an exponential form, which is given

  5. SU-F-T-136: Breath Hold Lung Phantom Study in Using CT Density Versus Relative Stopping Power Ratio for Proton Pencil Beam Scanning System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syh, J; Wu, H; Rosen, L [Willis-Knighton Medical Center, Shreveport, LA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate mass density effects of CT conversion table and its variation in current treatment planning system of spot scanning proton beam using an IROC proton lung phantom for this study. Methods: A proton lung phantom study was acquired to Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Houston (IROC) Quality Assurance Center. Inside the lung phantom, GAF Chromic films and couples of thermal luminescent dosimeter (TLD) capsules embedded in specified PTV and adjacent structures to monitor delivered dosage and 3D dose distribution profiles. Various material such as cork (Lung), blue water (heart), Techron HPV (ribs) and organic material of balsa wood and cork as dosimetry inserts within phantom of solid water (soft tissue). Relative stopping power (RLSP) values were provided. Our treatment planning system (TPS) doesn’t require SP instead relative density was converted relative to water. However lung phantom was irradiated by planning with density override and the results were compared with IROC measurements. The second attempt was conducted without density override and compared with IROC’s. Results: The higher passing rate of imaging and measurement results of the lung phantom irradiation met the criteria by IROC without density override. The film at coronal plane was found to be shift due to inclined cylinder insertion. The converted CT density worked as expected to correlate relative stopping power. Conclusion: The proton lung phantom provided by IROC is a useful tool to qualify our commissioned proton pencil beam delivery with TPS within reliable confidence. The relative mass stopping power ratios of materials were converted from the relative physical density relative to water and the results were satisfied.

  6. Heavy density concrete for nuclear radiation shielding and power stations: [Part]3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singha Roy, P.K.

    1987-01-01

    This article is the third part of the paper entitled 'Heavy density concrete for nuclear radiation shielding and power stations'. Specific considerations relevant to natural but manufactured heavy aggregates like haematite used in India are briefly discussed. They include water-cement ratio, strength versus water-cement ratio, mix design strength and aggregate grading. Some typical mix proportions in haematite concretes used in India are given. Equipment for heavy density concrete is mentioned. Quality control methods and tests for heavy density concrete are described under the heading: type and chemical composition of the rock, specific gravity and surface absorption of the aggregates, grading of aggregates, cement, batching, mixing, compressive strength, and density. Construction aspects such as form work, placement, vibration, finishing, and temperature control are discussed. Finally it is pointed out that for optimising the design and economy of heavy density concrete, it is necessary to carry out country-wide survey of suitable materials, to study their properties, suitability and effectiveness in shielding radiation. (M.G.B.)

  7. Investigation on the Effect of Kenaf Core and Stalk Fiber on the Medium Density Fiber Board Properties Made of Poplar Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahimeh SH.Alizadeh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to optimize the use of material non-forest resources, in this study the possibility of using the kenaf stalk fibers mixed with poplar fibers in producing medium density fiber board was considered. Variable factors such as density at two levels (0.55, 0.75 g/cm3 and the percentage incorporation of fiber (%50 poplar fibers, - %50 kenaf core fiber, %50 poplar fiber, -% 50 kenaf stalk fiber and %100 poplar fibers were considered. Steaming time and temperature (175°C, 10min, press time and temperature (5 min, 175°C, Pressing pressure (30 kg/cm3, fiber cake moisture (%12 and urea-formaldehyde resin with Concentration of %50 of the study factors were fixed. Results show that adding kenaf core fibers to the poplar fibers increases modulus of elasticity and water absorption but thickness swelling reduces. Increased density in board made with kenaf core has caused increase in bending strength, modulus of elasticity and internal bond strength and their water absorption and thickness swelling after 2 and 24 hours were competitive with poplar (MDF. On the other hand Populus fiber– kenaf stalk board mechanical and physical properties were competitive with (MDF board made of %100 poplar fibers. Finally we can say that according to the statistical analysis, the best treatment in this study was using kenaf core fibers, in making poplar (MDF with 0.75 g/cm3 density.

  8. A geographical model of radio-frequency power density around mobile phone masts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briggs, David; Beale, Linda; Bennett, James; Toledano, Mireille B.; Hoogh, Kees de

    2012-01-01

    Public concern about possible health effects of EMF radiation from mobile phone masts has led to an increase of epidemiological studies and health risk assessments which, in turn, require adequate methods of exposure estimation. Difficulties in exposure modelling are exacerbated both by the complexity of the propagation processes, and the need to obtain estimates for large study populations in order to provide sufficient statistical power to detect or exclude the small relative risks that might exist. Use of geographical information system (GIS) techniques offers the means to make such computations efficiently. This paper describes the development and field validation of a GIS-based exposure model (Geomorf). The model uses a modified Gaussian formulation to represent spatial variations in power densities around mobile phone masts, on the basis of power output, antenna height, tilt and the surrounding propagation environment. Obstruction by topography is allowed for, through use of a visibility function. Model calibration was done using field data from 151 measurement sites (1510 antenna-specific measurements) around a group of masts in a rural location, and 50 measurement sites (658 antenna-specific measurements) in an urban area. Different parameter settings were found to be necessary in urban and rural areas to obtain optimum results. The calibrated models were then validated against independent sets of data gathered from measurement surveys in rural and urban areas, and model performance was compared with that of two commonly used path-loss models (the COST-231 adaptations of the Hata and Walfisch–Ikegami models). Model performance was found to vary somewhat between the rural and urban areas, and at different measurement levels (antenna-specific power density, total power density), but overall gave good estimates (R 2 = 0.641 and 0.615, RMSE = 10.7 and 6.7 dB m at the antenna and site-level respectively). Performance was considerably better than that of both

  9. High energy and power density asymmetric supercapacitors using electrospun cobalt oxide nanowire anode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidyadharan, Baiju; Aziz, Radhiyah Abd; Misnon, Izan Izwan; Anil Kumar, Gopinathan M.; Ismail, Jamil; Yusoff, Mashitah M.; Jose, Rajan

    2014-12-01

    Electrochemical materials are under rigorous search for building advanced energy storage devices. Herein, supercapacitive properties of highly crystalline and ultrathin cobalt oxide (Co3O4) nanowires (diameter ∼30-60 nm) synthesized using an aqueous polymeric solution based electrospinning process are reported. These nanowire electrodes show a specific capacitance (CS) of ∼1110 F g-1 in 6 M KOH at a current density of 1 A g-1 with coulombic efficiency ∼100%. Asymmetric supercapacitors (ASCs) (CS ∼175 F g-1 at 2 A g-1 galvanostatic cycling) are fabricated using the Co3O4 as anode and commercial activated carbon (AC) as cathode and compared their performance with symmetric electrochemical double layer capacitors (EDLCs) fabricated using AC (CS ∼31 F g-1 at 2 A g-1 galvanostatic cycling). The Co3O4//AC ASCs deliver specific energy densities (ES) of 47.6, 35.4, 20 and 8 Wh kg-1 at specific power densities (PS) 1392, 3500, 7000 and 7400 W kg-1, respectively. The performance of ASCs is much superior to the control EDLCs, which deliver ES of 9.2, 8.9, 8.4 and 6.8 Wh kg-1 at PS 358, 695, 1400 and 3500 W kg-1, respectively. The ASCs show nearly six times higher energy density (∼47.6 Wh kg-1) than EDLC (8.4 Wh kg-1) without compromising its power density (∼1400 W kg-1) at similar galvanostatic cycling conditions (2 A g-1).

  10. Interaction of a high-power laser pulse with supercritical-density porous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gus'kov, Sergei Yu; Rozanov, Vladislav B; Caruso, A; Strangio, C

    2000-01-01

    The properties of a nonequilibrium plasma produced by high-power laser pulses with intensities I L ∼ 10 14 -10 15 W cm -2 irradiating plane targets made of a porous material are investigated. The mean density of matter in targets was substantially higher than the critical plasma density corresponding to a plasma resonance. The density of porous material was ρ a ∼ 1 - 20 mg cm -3 , whereas the critical density at the wavelength of incident radiation was ρ cr ∼ 3 mg cm -3 . An anomalously high absorption (no less than 80%) of laser radiation inside a target was observed. Within the first 3 - 4 ns of interaction, the plasma flow through the irradiated target surface in the direction opposite of the direction of the laser beam was noticeably suppressed. Only about 5% of absorbed laser energy was transformed into the energy of particles in this flow during the laser pulse. Absorbed energy was stored as the internal plasma energy at this stage (the greenhouse effect). Then, this energy was transformed, similar to a strong explosion, into the energy of a powerful hydrodynamic flow of matter surrounding the absorption region. The specific features of the formation and evolution of a nonequilibrium laser-produced plasma in porous media are theoretically analysed. This study allows the results of experiments to be explained. In particular, we investigated absorption of laser radiation in the bulk of a target, volume evaporation of porous material, the expansion of a laser-produced plasma inside the pores, stochastic collisions of plasma flows, and hydrothermal energy dissipation. These processes give rise to long-lived oscillations of plasma density and lead to the formation of an internal region where laser radiation is absorbed. (invited paper)

  11. Performance analysis and comparison of an Atkinson cycle coupled to variable temperature heat reservoirs under maximum power and maximum power density conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, P.-Y.; Hou, S.-S.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, performance analysis and comparison based on the maximum power and maximum power density conditions have been conducted for an Atkinson cycle coupled to variable temperature heat reservoirs. The Atkinson cycle is internally reversible but externally irreversible, since there is external irreversibility of heat transfer during the processes of constant volume heat addition and constant pressure heat rejection. This study is based purely on classical thermodynamic analysis methodology. It should be especially emphasized that all the results and conclusions are based on classical thermodynamics. The power density, defined as the ratio of power output to maximum specific volume in the cycle, is taken as the optimization objective because it considers the effects of engine size as related to investment cost. The results show that an engine design based on maximum power density with constant effectiveness of the hot and cold side heat exchangers or constant inlet temperature ratio of the heat reservoirs will have smaller size but higher efficiency, compression ratio, expansion ratio and maximum temperature than one based on maximum power. From the view points of engine size and thermal efficiency, an engine design based on maximum power density is better than one based on maximum power conditions. However, due to the higher compression ratio and maximum temperature in the cycle, an engine design based on maximum power density conditions requires tougher materials for engine construction than one based on maximum power conditions

  12. An Electrochemical Capacitor with Applicable Energy Density of 7.4 Wh/kg at Average Power Density of 3000 W/kg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Teng; Lu, Xihong; Wang, Hanyu; Wang, Gongming; Mathis, Tyler; Liu, Tianyu; Li, Cheng; Tong, Yexiang; Li, Yat

    2015-05-13

    Electrochemical capacitors represent a new class of charge storage devices that can simultaneously achieve high energy density and high power density. Previous reports have been primarily focused on the development of high performance capacitor electrodes. Although these electrodes have achieved excellent specific capacitance based on per unit mass of active materials, the gravimetric energy densities calculated based on the weight of entire capacitor device were fairly small. This is mainly due to the large mass ratio between current collector and active material. We aimed to address this issue by a 2-fold approach of minimizing the mass of current collector and increasing the electrode performance. Here we report an electrochemical capacitor using 3D graphene hollow structure as current collector, vanadium sulfide and manganese oxide as anode and cathode materials, respectively. 3D graphene hollow structure provides a lightweight and highly conductive scaffold for deposition of pseudocapacitive materials. The device achieves an excellent active material ratio of 24%. Significantly, it delivers a remarkable energy density of 7.4 Wh/kg (based on the weight of entire device) at the average power density of 3000 W/kg. This is the highest gravimetric energy density reported for asymmetric electrochemical capacitors at such a high power density.

  13. Power-level regulation and simulation of nonlinear pressurized water reactor core with xenon oscillation using H-infinity loop shaping control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Gang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This investigation is to solve the power-level control issue of a nonlinear pressurized water reactor core with xenon oscillations. A nonlinear pressurized water reactor core is modeled using the lumped parameter method, and a linear model of the core is then obtained through the small perturbation linearization way. The H∞loop shapingcontrolis utilized to design a robust controller of the linearized core model.The calculated H∞loop shaping controller is applied to the nonlinear core model. The nonlinear core model and the H∞ loop shaping controller build the nonlinear core power-level H∞loop shaping control system.Finally, the nonlinear core power-level H∞loop shaping control system is simulatedconsidering two typical load processes that are a step load maneuver and a ramp load maneuver, and simulation results show that the nonlinear control system is effective.

  14. Design and test of-80 kV snubber core assemblies for MFTF sustaining-neutral-beam power supplies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishop, S.R.; Mayhall, D.J.; Wilson, J.H.; De Vore, K.R.; Ross, R.I.; Sears, R.G.

    1981-01-01

    Core snubbers, located near the neutral beam source ends of the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) Sustaining Neutral Beam Power Supply System (SNBPSS) source cables, protect the neutral beam source extractor grid wires from overheating and sputtering during internal sparkdowns. The snubbers work by producing an induced counter-emf which limits the fault current and by absorbing the capacitive energy stored on the 80 kV source cables and power supplies. A computer program STACAL was used in snubber magnetic design to choose appropriate tape wound cores to provide 400 Ω resistance and 25 J energy absorption. The cores are mounted horizontally in a dielectric structure. The central source cable bundle passes through the snubber and terminates on three copper buses. Multilam receptacles on the buses connect to the source module jumper cables. Corona rings and shields limit electric field stresses to allow close clearances between snubbers

  15. Verification Results of Safety-grade Optical Modem for Core Protection Calculator (CPC) in Korea Standard Nuclear Power Plant (KSNP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jangyeol; Son, Kwangseop; Lee, Youngjun; Cheon, Sewoo; Cha, Kyoungho; Lee, Jangsoo; Kwon, Keechoon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    We confirmed that the coverage criteria for a safety-grade optical modem of a Core Protection Calculator is satisfactory using a traceability analysis matrix between high-level requirements and lower-level system test case data set. This paper describes the test environment, test components and items, a traceability analysis, and system tests as a result of system verification and validation based on Software Requirement Specifications (SRS) for a safety-grade optical modem of a Core Protection Calculator (CPC) in a Korea Standard Nuclear Power Plant (KSNP), and Software Design Specifications (SDS) for a safety-grade optical modem of a CPC in a KSNP. All tests were performed according to the test plan and test procedures. Functional testing, performance testing, event testing, and scenario based testing for a safety-grade optical modem of a Core Protection Calculator in a Korea Standard Nuclear Power Plant as a thirty-party verifier were successfully performed.

  16. Power los