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Sample records for core melting model

  1. Modeling of melt retention in EU-APR1400 ex-vessel core catcher

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granovsky, V. S.; Sulatsky, A. A.; Khabensky, V. B.; Sulatskaya, M. B. [Alexandrov Research Inst. of Technology NITI, Sosnovy Bor (Russian Federation); Gusarov, V. V.; Almyashev, V. I.; Komlev, A. A. [Saint Petersburg State Technological Univ. SPbSTU, St.Petersburg (Russian Federation); Bechta, S. [KTH, Stockholm (Sweden); Kim, Y. S. [KHNP, 1312 Gil 70, Yuseongdaero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, R. J.; Kim, H. Y.; Song, J. H. [KAERI, 989 Gil 111, Daedeokdaero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-01

    A core catcher is adopted in the EU-APR1400 reactor design for management and mitigation of severe accidents with reactor core melting. The core catcher concept incorporates a number of engineering solutions used in the catcher designs of European EPR and Russian WER-1000 reactors, such as thin-layer corium spreading for better cooling, retention of the melt in a water-cooled steel vessel, and use of sacrificial material (SM) to control the melt properties. SM is one of the key elements of the catcher design and its performance is critical for melt retention efficiency. This SM consists of oxide components, but the core catcher also includes sacrificial steel which reacts with the metal melt of the molten corium to reduce its temperature. The paper describes the required properties of SM. The melt retention capability of the core catcher can be confirmed by modeling the heat fluxes to the catcher vessel to show that it will not fail. The fulfillment of this requirement is demonstrated on the example of LBLOCA severe accident. Thermal and physicochemical interactions between the oxide and metal melts, interactions of the melts with SM, sacrificial steel and vessel, core catcher external cooling by water and release of non-condensable gases are modeled. (authors)

  2. Ex-Vessel Core Melt Modeling Comparison between MELTSPREAD-CORQUENCH and MELCOR 2.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robb, Kevin R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Farmer, Mitchell [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Francis, Matthew W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-03-01

    System-level code analyses by both United States and international researchers predict major core melting, bottom head failure, and corium-concrete interaction for Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1 (1F1). Although system codes such as MELCOR and MAAP are capable of capturing a wide range of accident phenomena, they currently do not contain detailed models for evaluating some ex-vessel core melt behavior. However, specialized codes containing more detailed modeling are available for melt spreading such as MELTSPREAD as well as long-term molten corium-concrete interaction (MCCI) and debris coolability such as CORQUENCH. In a preceding study, Enhanced Ex-Vessel Analysis for Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1: Melt Spreading and Core-Concrete Interaction Analyses with MELTSPREAD and CORQUENCH, the MELTSPREAD-CORQUENCH codes predicted the 1F1 core melt readily cooled in contrast to predictions by MELCOR. The user community has taken notice and is in the process of updating their systems codes; specifically MAAP and MELCOR, to improve and reduce conservatism in their ex-vessel core melt models. This report investigates why the MELCOR v2.1 code, compared to the MELTSPREAD and CORQUENCH 3.03 codes, yield differing predictions of ex-vessel melt progression. To accomplish this, the differences in the treatment of the ex-vessel melt with respect to melt spreading and long-term coolability are examined. The differences in modeling approaches are summarized, and a comparison of example code predictions is provided.

  3. The interaction of a core melt with concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reimann, M.; Holleck, H.; Skokan, A.; Perinic, D.

    1977-01-01

    In its fourth phase, a hypothetic core melt interacts with the concrete of the reactor foundation. This phase may last several days. Experimental laboratory investigations and theoretical models on the basis of model experiments aim at determining the time curve of the temperature of the core melt in order to quantify the processes up to the solidification of the melt and the end of concrete destroyal. Material interactions: 1) The two phases of the core melt, oxidic and metallic, remain separate for a long period of time. In dependence of the degree of oxidation of the system, the elemental distribution and, in particular, the fission products in the melt may be assessed. 2) The changes in the material values of the core melt in dependence of the temperature curve may be qualitatively assessed. 3) The solidification temperature of the oxidic phase of the core melt may be given in dependence of (UO 2 + ZrO 2 ) content. Thermal interactions: 1) The ratio vertical/radial erosion, which determines the cavity shape, is described in the correct order of magnitude by the extended film model. 2) The correct order of magnitude of the erosion rates is described by the concrete destruction model coupled with the film model. 3) The effects of the different concrete destruction enthalpies and concrete compositions (amount of gaseous decomposition products) may be estimated by the model calculations. (orig./HP) [de

  4. Termination of light-water reactor core-melt accidents with a chemical core catcher: the core-melt source reduction system (COMSORS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Parker, G.W.; Rudolph, J.C.; Osborne-Lee, I.W.; Kenton, M.A.

    1996-09-01

    The Core-Melt Source Reduction System (COMSORS) is a new approach to terminate light-water reactor core melt accidents and ensure containment integrity. A special dissolution glass is placed under the reactor vessel. If core debris is released onto the glass, the glass melts and the debris dissolves into the molten glass, thus creating a homogeneous molten glass. The molten glass, with dissolved core debris, spreads into a wide pool, distributing the heat for removal by radiation to the reactor cavity above or by transfer to water on top of the molten glass. Expected equilibrium glass temperatures are approximately 600 degrees C. The creation of a low-temperature, homogeneous molten glass with known geometry permits cooling of the glass without threatening containment integrity. This report describes the technology, initial experiments to measure key glass properties, and modeling of COMSORS operations

  5. A volatile-rich Earth's core inferred from melting temperature of core materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morard, G.; Andrault, D.; Antonangeli, D.; Nakajima, Y.; Auzende, A. L.; Boulard, E.; Clark, A. N.; Lord, O. T.; Cervera, S.; Siebert, J.; Garbarino, G.; Svitlyk, V.; Mezouar, M.

    2016-12-01

    Planetary cores are mainly constituted of iron and nickel, alloyed with lighter elements (Si, O, C, S or H). Understanding how these elements affect the physical and chemical properties of solid and liquid iron provides stringent constraints on the composition of the Earth's core. In particular, melting curves of iron alloys are key parameter to establish the temperature profile in the Earth's core, and to asses the potential occurrence of partial melting at the Core-Mantle Boundary. Core formation models based on metal-silicate equilibration suggest that Si and O are the major light element components1-4, while the abundance of other elements such as S, C and H is constrained by arguments based on their volatility during planetary accretion5,6. Each compositional model implies a specific thermal state for the core, due to the different effect that light elements have on the melting behaviour of Fe. We recently measured melting temperatures in Fe-C and Fe-O systems at high pressures, which complete the data sets available both for pure Fe7 and other binary alloys8. Compositional models with an O- and Si-rich outer core are suggested to be compatible with seismological constraints on density and sound velocity9. However, their crystallization temperatures of 3650-4050 K at the CMB pressure of 136 GPa are very close to, if not higher than the melting temperature of the silicate mantle and yet mantle melting above the CMB is not a ubiquitous feature. This observation requires significant amounts of volatile elements (S, C or H) in the outer core to further reduce the crystallisation temperature of the core alloy below that of the lower mantle. References 1. Wood, B. J., et al Nature 441, 825-833 (2006). 2. Siebert, J., et al Science 339, 1194-7 (2013). 3. Corgne, A., et al Earth Planet. Sc. Lett. 288, 108-114 (2009). 4. Fischer, R. a. et al. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 167, 177-194 (2015). 5. Dreibus, G. & Palme, H. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 60, 1125-1130 (1995). 6. Mc

  6. Proposed model for fuel-coolant mixing during a core-melt accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corradini, M.L.

    1983-01-01

    If complete failure of normal and emergency coolant flow occurs in a light water reactor, fission product decay heat would eventually cause melting of the reactor fuel and cladding. The core melt may then slump into the lower plenum and later into the reactor cavity and contact residual liquid water. A model is proposed to describe the fuel-coolant mixing process upon contact. The model is compared to intermediate scale experiments being conducted at Sandia. The modelling of this mixing process will aid in understanding three important processes: (1) fuel debris sizes upon quenching in water, (2) the hydrogen source term during fuel quench, and (3) the rate of steam production. Additional observations of Sandia data indicate that the steam explosion is affected by this mixing process

  7. BWR core melt progression phenomena: Experimental analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, L.J.

    1992-01-01

    In the BWR Core Melt in Progression Phenomena Program, experimental results concerning severe fuel damage and core melt progression in BWR core geometry are used to evaluate existing models of the governing phenomena. These include control blade eutectic liquefaction and the subsequent relocation and attack on the channel box structure; oxidation heating and hydrogen generation; Zircaloy melting and relocation; and the continuing oxidation of zirconium with metallic blockage formation. Integral data have been obtained from the BWR DF-4 experiment in the ACRR and from BWR tests in the German CORA exreactor fuel-damage test facility. Additional integral data will be obtained from new CORA BWR test, the full-length FLHT-6 BWR test in the NRU test reactor, and the new program of exreactor experiments at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) on metallic melt relocation and blockage formation. an essential part of this activity is interpretation and use of the results of the BWR tests. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed experiment-specific models for analysis of the BWR experiments; to date, these models have permitted far more precise analyses of the conditions in these experiments than has previously been available. These analyses have provided a basis for more accurate interpretation of the phenomena that the experiments are intended to investigate. The results of posttest analyses of BWR experiments are discussed and significant findings from these analyses are explained. The ORNL control blade/canister models with materials interaction, relocation and blockage models are currently being implemented in SCDAP/RELAP5 as an optional structural component

  8. In vessel core melt progression phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courtaud, M.

    1993-01-01

    For all light water reactor (LWR) accidents, including the so called severe accidents where core melt down can occur, it is necessary to determine the amount and characteristics of fission products released to the environment. For existing reactors this knowledge is used to evaluate the consequences and eventual emergency plans. But for future reactors safety authorities demand decrease risks and reactors designed in such a way that fission products are retained inside the containment, the last protective barrier. This requires improved understanding and knowledge of all accident sequences. In particular it is necessary to be able to describe the very complex phenomena occurring during in vessel core melt progression because they will determine the thermal and mechanical loads on the primary circuit and the timing of its rupture as well as the fission product source term. On the other hand, in case of vessel failure, knowledge of the physical and chemical state of the core melt will provide the initial conditions for analysis of ex-vessel core melt progression and phenomena threatening the containment. Finally a good understanding of in vessel phenomena will help to improve accident management procedures like Emergency Core Cooling System water injection, blowdown and flooding of the vessel well, with their possible adverse effects. Research and Development work on this subject was initiated a long time ago and is still in progress but now it must be intensified in order to meet the safety requirements of the next generation of reactors. Experiments, limited in scale, analysis of the TMI 2 accident which is a unique source of global information and engineering judgment are used to establish and assess physical models that can be implemented in computer codes for reactor accident analysis

  9. Bayesian estimation of core-melt probability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, H.W.

    1984-01-01

    A very simple application of the canonical Bayesian algorithm is made to the problem of estimation of the probability of core melt in a commercial power reactor. An approximation to the results of the Rasmussen study on reactor safety is used as the prior distribution, and the observation that there has been no core melt yet is used as the single experiment. The result is a substantial decrease in the mean probability of core melt--factors of 2 to 4 for reasonable choices of parameters. The purpose is to illustrate the procedure, not to argue for the decrease

  10. Examination of offsite emergency protective measures for core melt accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldrich, D.C.; McGrath, P.E.; Ericson, D.M. Jr.; Jones, R.B.; Rasmussen, N.C.

    Evacuation, sheltering followed by population relocation, and iodine prophylaxis are evaluated as offsite public protective measures in response to potential nuclear reactor accidents involving core-melt. Evaluations were conducted using a modified version of the Reactor Safety Study consequence model. Models representing each protective measure were developed and are discussed. Potential PWR core-melt radioactive material releases are separated into two categories, ''Melt-through'' and ''Atmospheric,'' based upon the mode of containment falure. Protective measures are examined and compared for each category in terms of projected doses to the whole body and thyroid. Measures for ''Atmospheric'' accidents are also examined in terms of their influence on the occurrence of public health effects

  11. Modeling of heat and mass transfer processes during core melt discharge from a reactor pressure vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinh, T.N.; Bui, V.A.; Nourgaliev, R.R. [Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    The objective of the paper is to study heat and mass transfer processes related to core melt discharge from a reactor vessel is a severe light water reactor accident. The phenomenology of the issue includes (1) melt convection in and heat transfer from the melt pool in contact with the vessel lower head wall; (2) fluid dynamics and heat transfer of the melt flow in the growing discharge hole; and (3) multi-dimensional heat conduction in the ablating lower head wall. A program of model development, validation and application is underway (i) to analyse the dominant physical mechanisms determining characteristics of the lower head ablation process; (ii) to develop and validate efficient analytic/computational methods for estimating heat and mass transfer under phase-change conditions in irregular moving-boundary domains; and (iii) to investigate numerically the melt discharge phenomena in a reactor-scale situation, and, in particular, the sensitivity of the melt discharge transient to structural differences and various in-vessel melt progression scenarios. The paper presents recent results of the analysis and model development work supporting the simulant melt-structure interaction experiments.

  12. The modeling of core melting and in-vessel corium relocation in the APRIL code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim. S.W.; Podowski, M.Z.; Lahey, R.T. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    This paper is concerned with the modeling of severe accident phenomena in boiling water reactors (BWR). New models of core melting and in-vessel corium debris relocation are presented, developed for implementation in the APRIL computer code. The results of model testing and validations are given, including comparisons against available experimental data and parametric/sensitivity studies. Also, the application of these models, as parts of the APRIL code, is presented to simulate accident progression in a typical BWR reactor.

  13. Generalized Thermohydraulics Module GENFLO for Combining With the PWR Core Melting Model, BWR Recriticality Neutronics Model and Fuel Performance Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miettinen, Jaakko; Hamalainen, Anitta; Pekkarinen, Esko

    2002-01-01

    Thermal hydraulic simulation capability for accident conditions is needed at present in VTT in several programs. Traditional thermal hydraulic models are too heavy for simulation in the analysis tasks, where the main emphasis is the rapid neutron dynamics or the core melting. The GENFLO thermal hydraulic model has been developed at VTT for special applications in the combined codes. The basic field equations in GENFLO are for the phase mass, the mixture momentum and phase energy conservation equations. The phase separation is solved with the drift flux model. The basic variables to be solved are the pressure, void fraction, mixture velocity, gas enthalpy, liquid enthalpy, and concentration of non-condensable gas fractions. The validation of the thermohydraulic solution alone includes large break LOCA reflooding experiments and in specific for the severe accident conditions QUENCH tests. In the recriticality analysis the core neutronics is simulated with a two-dimensional transient neutronics code TWODIM. The recriticality with one rapid prompt peak is expected during a severe accident scenario, where the control rods have been melted and ECCS reflooding is started after the depressurization. The GENFLO module simulates the BWR thermohydraulics in this application. The core melting module has been developed for the real time operator training by using the APROS engineering simulators. The core heatup, oxidation, metal and fuel pellet relocation and corium pool formation into the lower plenum are calculated. In this application the GENFLO model simulates the PWR vessel thermohydraulics. In the fuel performance analysis the fuel rod transient behavior is simulated with the FRAPTRAN code. GENFLO simulates the subchannel around a single fuel rod and delivers the heat transfer on the cladding surface for the FRAPTRAN. The transient boundary conditions for the subchannel are transmitted from the system code for operational transient, loss of coolant accidents and

  14. Melt spreading code assessment, modifications, and application to the EPR core catcher design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmer, M.T.

    2009-01-01

    The Evolutionary Power Reactor (EPR) is under consideration by various utilities in the United States to provide base load electrical production, and as a result the design is undergoing a certification review by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The severe accident design philosophy for this reactor is based upon the fact that the projected power rating results in a narrow margin for in-vessel melt retention by external cooling of the reactor vessel. As a result, the design addresses ex-vessel core melt stabilization using a mitigation strategy that includes: (1) an external core melt retention system to temporarily hold core melt released from the vessel; (2) a layer of 'sacrificial' material that is admixed with the melt while in the core melt retention system; (3) a melt plug in the lower part of the retention system that, when failed, provides a pathway for the mixture to spread to a large core spreading chamber; and finally, (4) cooling and stabilization of the spread melt by controlled top and bottom flooding. The overall concept is illustrated in Figure 1.1. The melt spreading process relies heavily on inertial flow of a low-viscosity admixed melt to a segmented spreading chamber, and assumes that the melt mass will be distributed to a uniform height in the chamber. The spreading phenomenon thus needs to be modeled properly in order to adequately assess the EPR design. The MELTSPREAD code, developed at Argonne National Laboratory, can model segmented, and both uniform and nonuniform spreading. The NRC is thus utilizing MELTSPREAD to evaluate melt spreading in the EPR design. MELTSPREAD was originally developed to support resolution of the Mark I containment shell vulnerability issue. Following closure of this issue, development of MELTSPREAD ceased in the early 1990's, at which time the melt spreading database upon which the code had been validated was rather limited. In particular, the database that was utilized for initial validation consisted

  15. Examination of offsite radiological emergency measures for nuclear reactor accidents involving core melt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldrich, D.C.; McGrath, P.E.; Rasmussen, N.C.

    1978-06-01

    Evacuation, sheltering followed by population relocation, and iodine prophylaxis are evaluated as offsite public protective measures in response to nuclear reactor accidents involving core-melt. Evaluations were conducted using a modified version of the Reactor Safety Study consequence model. Models representing each measure were developed and are discussed. Potential PWR core-melt radioactive material releases are separated into two categories, ''Melt-through'' and ''Atmospheric,'' based upon the mode of containment failure. Protective measures are examined and compared for each category in terms of projected doses to the whole body and thyroid. Measures for ''Atmospheric'' accidents are also examined in terms of their influence on the occurrence of public health effects

  16. Melt spreading code assessment, modifications, and initial application to the EPR core catcher design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmer, M.T.; Basu, S.

    2009-01-01

    The Evolutionary Power Reactor (EPR) is a 1,600-MWe Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) that is undergoing a design certification review by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The EPR severe accident design philosophy is predicated upon the fact that the projected power rating results in a narrow margin for in-vessel melt retention by external flooding. As a result, the design addresses ex-vessel core melt stabilization using a mitigation strategy that includes: 1) an external core melt retention system to temporarily hold core melt released from the vessel; 2) a layer of 'sacrificial' material that is admixed with the melt while in the core melt retention system; 3) a melt plug that, when failed, provides a pathway for the mixture to spread to a large core spreading chamber; and finally, 4) cooling and stabilization of the spread melt by controlled top and bottom flooding. The melt spreading process relies heavily on inertial flow of a low-viscosity admixed melt to a segmented spreading chamber, and assumes that the melt mass will be distributed to a uniform height in the chamber. The spreading phenomenon thus needs to be modeled properly in order to adequately assess the EPR design. The MELTSPREAD code, developed at Argonne National Laboratory, can model segmented, and both uniform and non-uniform spreading. The NRC is using MELTSPREAD to evaluate melt spreading in the EPR design. The development of MELTSPREAD ceased in the early 1990's, and so the code was first assessed against the more contemporary spreading database and code modifications, as warranted, were carried out before performing confirmatory plant calculations. This paper provides principle findings from the MELTSPREAD assessment activities and resulting code modifications, and also summarizes the results of initial scoping calculations for the EPR plant design and preliminary plant analyses, along with the plan for performing the final set of plant calculations including sensitivity studies

  17. Core melt retention and cooling concept of the ERP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weisshaeupl, H [SIEMENS/KWU, Erlangen (Germany); Yvon, M [Nuclear Power International, Paris (France)

    1996-12-01

    For the French/German European Pressurized Water Reactor (EPR) mitigative measures to cope with the event of a severe accident with core melt down are considered already at the design stage. Following the course of a postulated severe accident with reactor pressure vessel melt through one of the most important features of a future design must be to stabilize and cool the melt within the containment by dedicated measures. This measures should - as far as possible - be passive. One very promising solution for core melt retention seems to be a large enough spreading of the melt on a high temperature resistant protection layer with water cooling from above. This is the favorite concept for the EPR. In dealing with the retention of a molten core outside of the RPV several ``steps`` from leaving the RPV to finally stabilize the melt have to gone through. These steps are: collection of the melt; transfer of the melt; distribution of the melt; confining; cooling and stabilization. The technical features for the EPR solution of a large spreading of the melt are: Dedicated spreading chamber outside the reactor pit (area about 150 m{sup 2}); high temperature resistant protection layers (e.g. Zirconia bricks) at the bottom and part of the lateral structures (thus avoiding melt concrete interaction); reactor pit and spreading compartment are connected via a discharge channel which has a slope to the spreading area and is closed by a steel plate, which will resist the core melt for a certain time in order to allow a collection of the melt; the spreading compartments is connected with the In-Containment Refuelling Water Storage Tank (IRWST) with pipes for water flooding after spreading. These pipes are closed and will only be opened by the hot melt itself. It is shown how the course of the different steps mentioned above is processed and how each of these steps is automatically and passively achieved. (Abstract Truncated)

  18. An Interconnected Network of Core-Forming Melts Produced by Shear Deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruhn, D.; Groebner, N.; Kohlstedt, D. L.

    2000-01-01

    The formation mechanism of terrestrial planetary is still poorly understood, and has been the subject of numerous experimental studies. Several mechanisms have been proposed by which metal-mainly iron with some nickel-could have been extracted from a silicate mantle to form the core. Most recent models involve gravitational sinking of molten metal or metal sulphide through a partially or fully molten mantle that is often referred to as a'magma ocean. Alternative models invoke percolation of molten metal along an interconnected network (that is, porous flow) through a solid silicate matrix. But experimental studies performed at high pressures have shown that, under hydrostatic conditions, these melts do not form an interconnected network, leading to the widespread assumption that formation of metallic cores requires a magma ocean. In contrast, here we present experiments which demonstrate that shear deformation to large strains can interconnect a significant fraction of initially isolated pockets of metal and metal sulphide melts in a solid matrix of polycrystalline olivine. Therefore, in a dynamic (nonhydrostatic) environment, percolation remains a viable mechanism for the segregation and migration of core-forming melts in a solid silicate mantle.

  19. Simulation experiment on the flooding behaviour of core melts: KATS-9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fieg, G.; Massier, H.; Schuetz, W.; Stegmaier, U.; Stern, G.

    2000-11-01

    For future Light Water Reactors special devices (core catchers) are being developed to prevent containment failure by basement erosion after reactor pressure vessel meltthrough during a core meltdown accident. Quick freezing of the molten core masses is desirable to reduce release of radioactivity. Several concepts of core catcher devices have been proposed based on the spreading of corium melt onto flat surfaces with subsequent water cooling. A KATS-experiment has been performed to investigate the flooding behaviour of high temperature melts using alumina-iron thermite melts as a simulant. The oxidic thermite melt is conditioned by adding other oxides to simulate a realistic corium melt as close as possible in terms of liquidus and solidus temperatures. Before flooding with water, spreading of the separate oxidic and metallic melts has been done in one-dimensional channels with a silicate concrete as the substrate. The flooding rate was, in relation to the melt surface, identical to the flooding rate in EPR. (orig.) [de

  20. Modelling of RPV lower head under core melt severe accident condition using OpenFOAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madokoro, Hiroshi; Kretzschmar, Frank; Miassoedov, Alexei

    2017-01-01

    Although six years have been passed since the tragic severe accident at Fukushima Daiichi, still large uncertainties exist in modeling of core degradation and reactor pressure vessel (RPV) failure. It is extremely important to obtain a better understanding of complex phenomena in the lower head in order to improve accident management measures. The possible failure mode of reactor pressure vessel and its failure time are especially a matter of importance. Thermal behavior of the molten pool can be simulated by the Phase-change Effective Convectivity Model (PECM), which is a distributed-parameter model developed in the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Sweden. The model calculates convective currents not using a pure CFD approach but based on so called “characteristic velocities” that are determined by empirical correlations depending on the geometry and physical properties of the molten pool. At the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), the PECM has been implemented in the open-source CFD software OpenFOAM in order to receive detailed predictions of a core melt behavior in the RPV lower head under severe accident conditions. An advantage of using OpenFOAM is that it is very flexible to add and modify models and physical properties. In the current work, the solver is extended to couple PECM with a structure analysis model of the vessel wall. The model considers thermal expansion, plasticity, creep and damage. The model and physical properties are based on those implemented in ANSYS. Although the previous implementation had restriction that the amount of and geometry of the melt cannot be changed, our coupled model allows flexibility of the melt amount and geometry. The extended solver was used to simulate the LIVE-L1 and -L7V experiments and has demonstrated good prediction of the temperature distribution in the molten pool and heat flux distribution through the vessel wall. Regarding the vessel failure the model was applied to one of the FOREVER tests

  1. Simulation of core melt spreading with lava: theoretical background and status of validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allelein, H.-J.; Breest, A.; Spengler, C.

    2000-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to present the GRS R and D achievements and perspectives of its approach to simulate ex-vessel core melt spreading. The basic idea followed by GRS is the analogy of core melt spreading to volcanic lava flows. A fact first proposed by Robson (1967) and now widely accepted is that lava rheologically behaves as a Bingham fluid, which is characterized by yield stress and plastic viscosity. Recent experimental investigations by Epstein (1996) reveal that corium-concrete mixtures may be described as Bingham fluids. The GRS code LAVA is based on a successful lava flow model, but is adapted to prototypic corium and corium-simulation spreading. Furthermore some detailed physical models such as a thermal crust model on the free melt surface and a model for heat conduction into the substratum are added. Heat losses of the bulk, which is represented by one mean temperature, are now determined by radiation and by temperature profiles in the upper crust and in the substratum. In order to reduce the weak mesh dependence of the original algorithm, a random space method of cellular automata is integrated, which removes the mesh bias without increasing calculation time. LAVA is successfully validated against a lot of experiments using different materials spread. The validation process has shown that LAVA is a robust and fast running code to simulate corium-type spreading. LAVA provides all integral information of practical interest (spreading length, height of the melt after stabilization) and seems to be an appropriate tool for handling large core melt masses within a plant application. (orig.)

  2. Nuclear power reactor core melt accidents. Current State of Knowledge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquemain, Didier; Cenerino, Gerard; Corenwinder, Francois; Raimond, Emmanuel IRSN; Bentaib, Ahmed; Bonneville, Herve; Clement, Bernard; Cranga, Michel; Fichot, Florian; Koundy, Vincent; Meignen, Renaud; Corenwinder, Francois; Leteinturier, Denis; Monroig, Frederique; Nahas, Georges; Pichereau, Frederique; Van-Dorsselaere, Jean-Pierre; Couturier, Jean; Debaudringhien, Cecile; Duprat, Anna; Dupuy, Patricia; Evrard, Jean-Michel; Nicaise, Gregory; Berthoud, Georges; Studer, Etienne; Boulaud, Denis; Chaumont, Bernard; Clement, Bernard; Gonzalez, Richard; Queniart, Daniel; Peltier, Jean; Goue, Georges; Lefevre, Odile; Marano, Sandrine; Gobin, Jean-Dominique; Schwarz, Michel; Repussard, Jacques; Haste, Tim; Ducros, Gerard; Journeau, Christophe; Magallon, Daniel; Seiler, Jean-Marie; Tourniaire, Bruno; Durin, Michel; Andreo, Francois; Atkhen, Kresna; Daguse, Thierry; Dubreuil-Chambardel, Alain; Kappler, Francois; Labadie, Gerard; Schumm, Andreas; Gauntt, Randall O.; Birchley, Jonathan

    2015-11-01

    For over thirty years, IPSN and subsequently IRSN has played a major international role in the field of nuclear power reactor core melt accidents through the undertaking of important experimental programmes (the most significant being the Phebus-FP programme), the development of validated simulation tools (the ASTEC code that is today the leading European tool for modelling severe accidents), and the coordination of the SARNET (Severe Accident Research Network) international network of excellence. These accidents are described as 'severe accidents' because they can lead to radioactive releases outside the plant concerned, with serious consequences for the general public and for the environment. This book compiles the sum of the knowledge acquired on this subject and summarises the lessons that have been learnt from severe accidents around the world for the prevention and reduction of the consequences of such accidents, without addressing those from the Fukushima accident, where knowledge of events is still evolving. The knowledge accumulated by the Institute on these subjects enabled it to play an active role in informing public authorities, the media and the public when this accident occurred, and continues to do so to this day. Following the introduction, which describes the structure of this book and highlights the objectives of R and D on core melt accidents, this book briefly presents the design and operating principles (Chapter 2) and safety principles (Chapter 3) of the reactors currently in operation in France, as well as the main accident scenarios envisaged and studied (Chapter 4). The objective of these chapters is not to provide exhaustive information on these subjects (the reader should refer to the general reference documents listed in the corresponding chapters), but instead to provide the information needed in order to understand, firstly, the general approach adopted in France for preventing and mitigating the consequences of core melt

  3. Neutronics simulations on hypothetical power excursion and possible core melt scenarios in CANDU6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yonghee

    2015-01-01

    LOCA (Loss of coolant accident) is an outstanding safety issue in the CANDU reactor system since the coolant void reactivity is strongly positive. To deal with the LOCA, the CANDU systems are equipped with specially designed quickly-acting secondary shutdown system. Nevertheless, the so-called design-extended conditions are requested to be taken into account in the safety analysis for nuclear reactor systems after the Fukushima accident. As a DEC scenario, the worst accident situation in a CANDU reactor system is a unprotected LOCA, which is supposed to lead to a power excursion and possibly a core melt-down. In this work, the hypothetical unprotected LOCA scenario is simulated in view of the power excursion and fuel temperature changes by using a simplified point-kinetics (PK) model accounting for the fuel temperature change. In the PK model, the core reactivity is assumed to be affected by a large break LOCA and the fuel temperature is simulated to account for the Doppler effect. In addition, unlike the conventional PK simulation, we have also considered the Xe-I model to evaluate the impact of Xe during the LOCA. Also, we tried to simulate the fuel and core melt-down scenario in terms of the reactivity through a series of neutronics calculations for hypothetical core conditions. In case of a power excursion and possible fuel melt-down situation, the reactor system behavior is very uncertain. In this work, we tried to understand the impacts of fuel melt and relocation within the pressure vessel on the core reactivity and failure of pressure and calandria tubes. (author)

  4. In-core melt progression for the MAAP 4 codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, C.-D.; Paik, Chan Y.; Henry, Robert E.; Ply, Martin G.

    2004-01-01

    The MAAP 4 core melt progression model contains provisions for the formation of a molten debris pool surrounded by a crust during late phase core degradation. A predominantly oxidic molten pool with a predominantly metallic lower crust may naturally develop through a combination of models for real material phase diagrams, mechanistic relocation, and rules to recognize extremely low porosity and the liquid fractions of adjacent highly degraded nodes. Pool size and shape thus becomes relatively independent of core nodalization (which only governs the coarseness of the crust location). An upper pool crust is mechanistically allowed during consideration of radiative and convective heat losses from the pool top surface to surrounding core nodes, the core barrel, and upper internals. Circulation within the pool causes mass and energy exchange between participating pool nodes, and determines the heat fluxes to the boundary crusts. Side and bottom node failure is predicted based on the time, temperature, and stress. Calculations demonstrate that this concept allows simulation of the degraded core geometry observed during the TMI-2 accident. (author)

  5. Thermal interaction of core melt debris with the TMI-2 baffle, core-former, and lower head structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cronenberg, A.W.; Tolman, E.L.

    1987-09-01

    Recent inspection of the TMI-2 core-former baffle walls (vertical), former plates (horizontal), and lower plenum has been conducted to assess potential damage to these structures. Video observations show evidence of localized melt failure of the baffle walls, whereas fiberoptics data indicate the presence of resolidified debris on the former plates. Lower plenum inspection also confirms the presence of 20 tons or more of core debris in the lower plenum. These data indicate massive core melt relocation and the potential for melt attack on vessel structural components. This report presents analyses aimed at developing an understanding of melt relocation behavior and damage progression to TMI-2 vessel components. Thermal analysis indicates melt-through of the baffle plates, but maintenance of structural integrity of the former plates and lower head. Differences in the damage of these structures is attributed largely to differences in contact time with melt debris and pressure of water. 29 refs., 17 figs., 9 tabs

  6. Melt propagation in dry core debris beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dosanjh, S.S.

    1989-01-01

    During severe light water reactor accidents like Three Mile Island Unit 2, the fuel rods can fragment and thus convert the reactor core into a large particle bed. The postdryout meltdown of such debris beds is examined. A two-dimensional model that considers the presence of oxidic (UO 2 and ZrO 2 ) as well as metallic (e.g., zirconium) constituents is developed. Key results are that a dense metallic crust is created near the bottom of the bed as molten materials flow downward and freeze; liquid accumulates above the blockage and, if zirconium is present, the pool grows rapidly as molten zirconium dissolved both UO 2 and ZrO 2 particles; if the melt wets the solid, a fraction of the melt flows radially outward under the action of capillary forces and freezes near the radial boundary; in a nonwetting system, all of the melt flows into the bottom of the bed; and when zirconium and iron are in intimate contact and the zirconium metal atomic fraction is > 0.33, these metals can liquefy and flow out of the bed very early in the meltdown sequence

  7. Risk reduction of core-melt accidents in advaned CAPRA burner cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maschek, W.; Struwe, D.; Eigemann, M.

    1997-01-01

    As part of the CAPRA Program (Consommation Accrue de Plutonium dans les RApides) the feasibility of fast reactors is investigated to burn plutonium and also to destruct minor actinides. The design of CAPRA cores shows significant differences compared to conventional cores. Especially the high Pu-enrichment has an important influence on the core melt-down behavior and the associated recriticality risk. To cope with this risk, inherent design features and special measures/devices are investigated for their potential of early fuel discharge to reduce the criticality of the reactor core. An assessment of such measures/devices is given and experimental needs are formulated. 11 refs., 5 figs

  8. Preliminary model for core/concrete interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murfin, W.B.

    1977-08-01

    A preliminary model is described for computing the rate of penetration of concrete by a molten LWR core. Among the phenomena included are convective stirring of the melt by evolved gases, admixture of concrete decomposition products to the melt, chemical reactions, radiative heat loss, and variation of heat transfer coefficients with local pressure. The model is most applicable to a two-phase melt (metallic plus oxidic) having a fairly high metallic content

  9. Universal viscosity growth in metallic melts at megabar pressures: the vitreous state of the Earth's inner core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brazhkin, Vadim V; Lyapin, A G

    2000-01-01

    Experimental data on and theoretical models for the viscosity of various types of liquids and melts under pressure are reviewed. Experimentally, the least studied melts are those of metals, whose viscosity is considered to be virtually constant along the melting curve. The authors' new approach to the viscosity of melts involves the measurement of the grain size in solidified samples. Measurements on liquid metals at pressures up to 10 GPa using this method show, contrary to the empirical approach, that the melt viscosity grows considerably along the melting curves. Based on the experimental data and on the critical analysis of current theories, a hypothesis of a universal viscosity behavior is introduced for liquids under pressure. Extrapolating the liquid iron results to the pressures and temperatures at the Earth's core reveals that the Earth's outer core is a very viscous melt with viscosity values ranging from 10 2 Pa s to 10 11 Pa s depending on the depth. The Earth's inner core is presumably an ultraviscous (>10 11 Pa s) glass-like liquid - in disagreement with the current idea of a crystalline inner core. The notion of the highly viscous interior of celestial bodies sheds light on many mysteries of planetary geophysics and astronomy. From the analysis of the pressure variation of the melting and glass-transition temperatures, an entirely new concept of a stable metallic vitreous state arises, calling for further experimental and theoretical study. (reviews of topical problems)

  10. Survey of melt interactions with core retention material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, D.A.

    1979-01-01

    A survey of the interactions of up to 220 kg stainless steel melts at 1973 0 K with the candidate core retention materials borax, firebrick, high alumina cement, and magnesia is described. Data collected for the interactions include rates of material erosion, aerosol generation, gas evolution, and upward heat flux. Borax acts as an ablative solid that rapidly quenches the melt. Firebrick is ablated by the steel melt at a rate of 8.2 x 10 -6 m/s. High alumina cement is found to be an attractive melt retention material especially if it can be used in the unhydrated form. Magnesia is also found to be an attractive material though it can be eroded by the molten oxides of steel

  11. Shock Compression and Melting of an Fe-Ni-Si Alloy: Implications for the Temperature Profile of the Earth's Core and the Heat Flux Across the Core-Mantle Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Youjun; Sekine, Toshimori; Lin, Jung-Fu; He, Hongliang; Liu, Fusheng; Zhang, Mingjian; Sato, Tomoko; Zhu, Wenjun; Yu, Yin

    2018-02-01

    Understanding the melting behavior and the thermal equation of state of Fe-Ni alloyed with candidate light elements at conditions of the Earth's core is critical for our knowledge of the region's thermal structure and chemical composition and the heat flow across the liquid outer core into the lowermost mantle. Here we studied the shock equation of state and melting curve of an Fe-8 wt% Ni-10 wt% Si alloy up to 250 GPa by hypervelocity impacts with direct velocity and reliable temperature measurements. Our results show that the addition of 10 wt% Si to Fe-8 wt% Ni alloy slightly depresses the melting temperature of iron by 200-300 (±200) K at the core-mantle boundary ( 136 GPa) and by 600-800 (±500) K at the inner core-outer core boundary ( 330 GPa), respectively. Our results indicate that Si has a relatively mild effect on the melting temperature of iron compared with S and O. Our thermodynamic modeling shows that Fe-5 wt% Ni alloyed with 6 wt% Si and 2 wt% S (which has a density-velocity profile that matches the outer core's seismic profile well) exhibits an adiabatic profile with temperatures of 3900 K and 5300 K at the top and bottom of the outer core, respectively. If Si is a major light element in the core, a geotherm modeled for the outer core indicates a thermal gradient of 5.8-6.8 (±1.6) K/km in the D″ region and a high heat flow of 13-19 TW across the core-mantle boundary.

  12. EPRTM engineered features for core melt mitigation in severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, Manfred; Henning, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    For the prevention of accident conditions, the EPR TM relies on the proven 3-level safety concepts inherited from its predecessors, the French 'N4' and the German 'Konvoi' NPP. In addition, a new, fourth 'beyond safety' level is implemented for the mitigation of postulated severe accidents (SA) with core melting. It is aimed at preserving the integrity of the containment barrier and at significantly reducing the frequency and magnitude of activity releases into the environment under such extreme conditions. Loss of containment integrity is prevented by dedicated design measures that address short- and long-term challenges, like: the melt-through of the reactor pressure vessel under high internal pressure, energetic hydrogen/steam explosions, containment overpressure failure, and basemat melt-through. The EPR TM SA systems and components that address these issues are: - the dedicated SA valves for the depressurization the primary circuit, - the provisions for H 2 recombination, atmospheric mixing, steam dilution, - the core melt stabilization system, - the dedicated SA containment heat removal system. The core melt stabilization system (CMSS) of the EPR TM is based on a two-stage ex-vessel approach. After its release from the RPV the core debris is first accumulated and conditioned in the (dry) reactor pit by the addition of sacrificial concrete. Then the created molten pool is spread into a lateral core catcher to establish favorable conditions for the later flooding, quenching and cooling with water passively drained from the Internal Refueling Water Storage Tank. Long-term heat removal from the containment is achieved by sprays that are supplied with water by the containment heat removal system. Complementing earlier publications focused on the principle function, basic design, and validation background of the EPR TM CMSS, this paper describes the state achieved after detailed design, as well as the technical solutions chosen for its main components, including

  13. Incorporation of Certain Hydrophobic Excipients in the Core of Melt ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patrick Erah

    incorporation of hydrophobic materials (talc or magnesium stearate) in the core of such granules may further retard .... (500mg) was filled into a capsule shell and ... of the drug particles. The effect of melt granulation on the release profiles of paracetamol is shown in Fig 1. The melt granulations displayed a retarded release.

  14. Large population center and core melt accident considerations in siting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camarinopoulos, L.; Yadigaroglu, G.

    1983-01-01

    The problem of providing suitable demographic siting criteria in the presence of a very large population center in an otherwise sparsely populated region is addressed. Simple calculations were performed making maximum use of pretabulated results of studies where core melt accidents are considered. These show that taking into consideration the air flow patterns in the region can lower the expected population doses from core melt accidents more effectively than distance alone. Expected doses are compared to the annual background radiation dose. A simple siting criterion combining geographical considerations with the probability of a release reaching the large population center is proposed

  15. CFD to modeling molten core behavior simultaneously with chemical phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladimir V Chudanov; Anna E Aksenova; Valerii A Pervichko

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: This paper deals with the basic features of a computing procedure, which can be used for modeling of destruction and melting of a core with subsequent corium retaining into the reactor vessel. The destruction and melting of core mean the account of the following phenomena: a melting, draining (moving of the melt through a porous layer of core debris), freezing with release of an energy, change of geometry, formation of the molten pool, whose convective intermixing and distribution influence on a mechanism of borders destruction. It is necessary to take into account that during of heating molten pool and development in it of convective fluxes a stratification of a multi-component melt on two layers of metal light and of oxide heavy components is observed. These layers are in interaction, they can exchange by the separate components as result of diffusion or oxidizing reactions. It can have an effect considerably on compositions, on a specific weight, and on properties of molten interacting phases, and on a structure of the molten stratified pool. In turn, the retaining of the formed molten masses in reactor vessel requires the solution of a matched heat exchange problem, namely, of a natural convection in a heat generating fluid in partially or completely molten corium and of heat exchange problem with taking into account of a melting of the reactor vessel. In addition, it is necessary to take into account phase segregation, caused by influence of local and of global natural convective flows and thermal lag of heated up boundaries. The mathematical model for simulation of the specified phenomena is based on the Navier-Stokes equations with variable properties together with the heat transfer equation. For modeling of a corium moving through a porous layer of core debris, the special computing algorithm to take into account density jump on interface between a melt and a porous layer of core debris is designed. The model was

  16. The WAIS Melt Monitor: An automated ice core melting system for meltwater sample handling and the collection of high resolution microparticle size distribution data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breton, D. J.; Koffman, B. G.; Kreutz, K. J.; Hamilton, G. S.

    2010-12-01

    Paleoclimate data are often extracted from ice cores by careful geochemical analysis of meltwater samples. The analysis of the microparticles found in ice cores can also yield unique clues about atmospheric dust loading and transport, dust provenance and past environmental conditions. Determination of microparticle concentration, size distribution and chemical makeup as a function of depth is especially difficult because the particle size measurement either consumes or contaminates the meltwater, preventing further geochemical analysis. Here we describe a microcontroller-based ice core melting system which allows the collection of separate microparticle and chemistry samples from the same depth intervals in the ice core, while logging and accurately depth-tagging real-time electrical conductivity and particle size distribution data. This system was designed specifically to support microparticle analysis of the WAIS Divide WDC06A deep ice core, but many of the subsystems are applicable to more general ice core melting operations. Major system components include: a rotary encoder to measure ice core melt displacement with 0.1 millimeter accuracy, a meltwater tracking system to assign core depths to conductivity, particle and sample vial data, an optical debubbler level control system to protect the Abakus laser particle counter from damage due to air bubbles, a Rabbit 3700 microcontroller which communicates with a host PC, collects encoder and optical sensor data and autonomously operates Gilson peristaltic pumps and fraction collectors to provide automatic sample handling, melt monitor control software operating on a standard PC allowing the user to control and view the status of the system, data logging software operating on the same PC to collect data from the melting, electrical conductivity and microparticle measurement systems. Because microparticle samples can easily be contaminated, we use optical air bubble sensors and high resolution ice core density

  17. Catalogue of generic plant states leading to core melt in PWRs: includes appendix 1: detailed description of sequences leading to core melt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-11-01

    The Task Group on thermal-hydraulic system behaviour was given a mandate from PWG 2 on Coolant System-Behaviour with the approval of CSNI to deal with the topic of Accident Management. A writing group was set up to identify generic plant states leading to core melt for pressurized water reactors (PWR) and find 'possible approaches to accident management measures' (AM-Measures) for dealing with them. From a matrix of 15 initiating events and 12 system failures (i.e. from 180 possibilities), 32 event sequences have been identified as leading to core melt. Each sequence has been divided into characteristic plant state intervals according to safety function challenges. For each of the 141 defined characteristic plant state intervals, the members of the Writing Group made proposals for AM-Measures

  18. Models and correlations of the DEBRIS Late-Phase Melt Progression Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, R.C.; Gasser, R.D.

    1997-09-01

    The DEBRIS Late Phase Melt Progression Model is an assembly of models, embodied in a computer code, which is designed to treat late-phase melt progression in dry rubble (or debris) regions that can form as a consequence of a severe core uncover accident in a commercial light water nuclear reactor. The approach is fully two-dimensional, and incorporates a porous medium modeling framework together with conservation and constitutive relationships to simulate the time-dependent evolution of such regions as various physical processes act upon the materials. The objective of the code is to accurately model these processes so that the late-phase melt progression that would occur in different hypothetical severe nuclear reactor accidents can be better understood and characterized. In this report the models and correlations incorporated and used within the current version of DEBRIS are described. These include the global conservation equations solved, heat transfer and fission heating models, melting and refreezing models (including material interactions), liquid and solid relocation models, gas flow and pressure field models, and the temperature and compositionally dependent material properties employed. The specific models described here have been used in the experiment design analysis of the Phebus FPT-4 debris-bed fission-product release experiment. An earlier DEBRIS code version was used to analyze the MP-1 and MP-2 late-phase melt progression experiments conducted at Sandia National Laboratories for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission

  19. SCDAP/RELAP5 modeling of movement of melted material through porous debris in lower head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siefken, L. J.; Harvego, E. A.

    2000-01-01

    A model is described for the movement of melted metallic material through a ceramic porous debris bed. The model is designed for the analysis of severe accidents in LWRs, wherein melted core plate material may slump onto the top of a porous bed of relocated core material supported by the lower head. The permeation of the melted core plate material into the porous debris bed influences the heatup of the debris bed and the heatup of the lower head supporting the debris. A model for mass transport of melted metallic material is applied that includes terms for viscosity and turbulence but neglects inertial and capillary terms because of their small value relative to gravity and viscous terms in the momentum equation. The relative permeability and passability of the porous debris are calculated as functions of debris porosity, particle size, and effective saturation. An iterative numerical solution is used to solve the set of nonlinear equations for mass transport. The effective thermal conductivity of the debris is calculated as a function of porosity, particle size, and saturation. The model integrates the equations for mass transport with a model for the two-dimensional conduction of heat through porous debris. The integrated model has been implemented into the SCDAP/RELAP5 code for the analysis of the integrity of LWR lower heads during severe accidents. The results of the model indicate that melted core plate material may permeate to near the bottom of a 1m deep hot porous debris bed supported by the lower head. The presence of the relocated core plate material was calculated to cause a 12% increase in the heat flux on the external surface of the lower head

  20. Reaction- and melting behaviour of LWR-core components UO2, Zircaloy and steel during the meltdown period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, P.

    1976-07-01

    The reaction behaviour of the UO 2 , Zircaloy-4 and austenitic steel core components was investigated as a function of temperature (till melting temperatures) under inert and oxidizing conditions. Component concentrations varied between that of Corium-A (65 wt.% UO 2 , 18% Zry, 17% steel) and that of Corium-E (35 wt.% UO 2 , 10% Zry, 55% steel). In addition, Zircaloy and stainless steel were used with different degrees of oxidation. The paper describes systematically the phases that arise during heating and melting. The integral composition of the melts and the qualitative as well as quantitative analysis of the phases present in solidified corium are given. In some cases melting points have been determined. The reaction and melting behaviour of the corium specimens strongly depends on the concentration and on the degree of oxidation of the core components. First liquid phases are formed at the Zry-steel interface at about 1,350 0 C. The maximum temperatures of about 2,500 0 C for the complete melting of the corium-specimens are well below the UO 2 melting point. Depending on the steel content and/or degree of oxidation of Zry and steel, a homogeneous metallic or oxide melt or two immiscible melts - one oxide and the other metallic - are obtained. During the melting experiments performed under inert gas conditions the chemical composition of the molten specimens generally change by evaporation losses of single elements, especially of uranium, zirconium and oxygen. The total weight losses go up to 30%; under oxidizing conditions they are substantially smaller due to the occurrence of different phases. In air or water vapor, the occurrence of the phases and the melting behaviour of the core components are strongly influenced by the oxidation rate and the oxygen supply to the surface of the melt. In the case of the hypothetical core melting accident, a heterogeneous melt (oxide and metallic) is probable after the meltdown period. (orig./RW) [de

  1. Sulfur Saturation Limits in Silicate Melts and their Implications for Core Formation Scenarios for Terrestrial Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzheid, Astrid; Grove, Timothy L.

    2002-01-01

    This study explores the controls of temperature, pressure, and silicate melt composition on S solubility in silicate liquids. The solubility of S in FeO-containing silicate melts in equilibrium with metal sulfide increases significantly with increasing temperature but decreases with increasing pressure. The silicate melt structure also exercises a control on S solubility. Increasing the degree of polymerization of the silicate melt structure lowers the S solubility in the silicate liquid. The new set of experimental data is used to expand the model of Mavrogenes and O'Neill(1999) for S solubility in silicate liquids by incorporating the influence of the silicate melt structure. The expected S solubility in the ascending magma is calculated using the expanded model. Because the negative pressure dependence of S solubility is more influential than the positive temperature dependence, decompression and adiabatic ascent of a formerly S-saturated silicate magma will lead to S undersaturation. A primitive magma that is S-saturated in its source region will, therefore, become S-undersaturated as it ascends to shallower depth. In order to precipitate magmatic sulfides, the magma must first cool and undergo fractional crystallization to reach S saturation. The S content in a metallic liquid that is in equilibrium with a magma ocean that contains approx. 200 ppm S (i.e., Earth's bulk mantle S content) ranges from 5.5 to 12 wt% S. This range of S values encompasses the amount of S (9 to 12 wt%) that would be present in the outer core if S is the light element. Thus, the Earth's proto-mantle could be in equilibrium (in terms of the preserved S abundance) with a core-forming metallic phase.

  2. Modelling of the Molten Core Concrete Interaction (MCCI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillaume, M.

    2008-01-01

    Severe accidents of nuclear power plants are very unlikely to occur, yet it is necessary to be able to predict the evolution of the accident. In some situations, heat generation due to the disintegration of fission products could lead to the melting of the core. If the molten core falls on the floor of the building, it would provoke the melting of the concrete floor. The objective of the studies is to calculate the melting rate of the concrete floor. The work presented in this report is in the continuity of the segregation phase model of Seiler and Froment. It is based on the results of the ARTEMIS experiments. Firstly, we have developed a new model to simulate the transfers within the interfacial area. The new model explains how heat is transmitted to concrete: by conduction, convection and latent heat generation. Secondly, we have modified the coupled modelling of the pool and the interfacial area. We have developed two new models: the first one is the 'liquidus model', whose main hypothesis is that there is no resistance to solute transfer between the pool and the interfacial area. The second one is 'the thermal resistance model', whose main hypothesis is that there is no solute transfer and no dissolution of the interfacial area. The second model is able to predict the evolution of the pool temperature and the melting rate in the tests 3 and 4, with the condition that the obstruction time of the interfacial area is about 10 5 s. The model is not able to explain precisely the origin of this value. The liquidus model is able to predict correctly the evolution of the pool temperature and the melting rate in the tests 2 and 6. (author) [fr

  3. Simulant melt experiments on performance of the in-vessel core catcher

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyoung-Ho Kang; Rae-Joon Park; Sang-Baik Kim; Suh, K.Y.; Cheung, F.B.; Rempe, J.L.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: LAVA-GAP experiments are in progress to investigate the performance of the in-vessel core catcher using alumina melt as a corium simulant. The hemispherical in-vessel core catcher made of carbon steel was installed inside the lower head vessel with uniform gap of 5 mm or 10 mm to the inner surface of the lower head vessel. As a performance test of the in-vessel core catcher, the effects of base steel and internal coating materials and gap thickness between the core catcher and the lower head vessel were examined in this study. In the LAVA-GAP-2 and LAVA-GAP-3 tests, the base steel was carbon steel and the gap thickness was 10 mm. On the other hand, in the LAVA-GAP-4 and LAVA-GAP-5 tests, the base steel was stainless steel and the gap thickness was 5 mm. Actual composition of the coating material for the LAVA-GAP-4 test was 92% of ZrO 2 - 8% of Y 2 O 3 including 95% of Ni - 5% of Al bond coat same as the LAVA-GAP-3 test. In these tests, the thickness of ZrO 2 internal coating was 0.5 mm. To examine the effects of the coating material, in-vessel core catcher with a 0.6 mm-thick ZrO 2 coating without bond coat was used in the LAVA-GAP-5 test. This report summarizes the experimental results and the post metallurgical inspection results of the LAVA-GAP-4 and LAVA-GAP- 5 tests. In the LAVA-GAP-4 and LAVA-GAP-5 tests, the core catcher was failed and it was stuck to the inner surface of the lower head vessel. LAVA-GAP-4 and LAVA-GAP-5 test results imply that 5 mm thick gap is rather small for sufficient water ingression and steam venting through the gap. In case of small gap size, water is boiled off and steam increases pressure inside the gap and so water can not ingress into the gap at the initial heat up stage. Metallurgical inspections on the test specimens indicate that the internal coating layer might melt totally and dispersed in the base steel and the solidified iron melt and so the detection frequencies of Zr and O are trivial all

  4. Fuel Rod Melt Progression Simulation Using Low-Temperature Melting Metal Alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seung Dong Lee; Suh, Kune Y.; GoonCherl Park; Un Chul Lee

    2002-01-01

    The TMI-2 accident and various severe fuel damage experiments have shown that core damage is likely to proceed through various states before the core slumps into the lower head. Numerous experiments were conducted to address when and how the core can lose its original geometry, what geometries are formed, and in what processes the core materials are transported to the lower plenum of the reactor pressure vessel. Core degradation progresses along the line of clad ballooning, clad oxidation, material interaction, metallic blockage, molten pool formation, melt progression, and relocation to the lower head. Relocation into the lower plenum may occur from the lateral periphery or from the bottom of the core depending upon the thermal and physical states of the pool. Determining the quantities and rate of molten material transfer to the lower head is important since significant amounts of molten material relocated to the lower head can threaten the vessel integrity by steam explosion and thermal and mechanical attack of the melt. In this paper the focus is placed on the melt flow regime on a cylindrical fuel rod utilizing the LAMDA (Lumped Analysis of Melting in Degrading Assemblies) facility at the Seoul National University. The downward relocation of the molten material is a combination of the external film flow and the internal pipe flow. The heater rods are 0.8 m long and are coated by a low-temperature melting metal alloy. The electrical internal heating method is employed during the test. External heating is adopted to simulate the exothermic Zircaloy-steam reaction. Tests are conducted in several quasi-steady-state conditions. Given the variable boundary conditions including the heat flux and the water level, observation is made for the melting location, progression, and the mass of molten material. Finally, the core melt progression model is developed from the visual inspection and quantitative analysis of the experimental data. As the core material relocates

  5. Comparison of advanced mid-sized reactors regarding passive features, core damage frequencies and core melt retention features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wider, H.

    2005-01-01

    New Light Water Reactors, whose regular safety systems are complemented by passive safety systems, are ready for the market. The special aspect of passive safety features is their actuation and functioning independent of the operator. They add significantly to reduce the core damage frequency (CDF) since the operator continues to play its independent role in actuating the regular safety devices based on modern instrumentation and control (I and C). The latter also has passive features regarding the prevention of accidents. Two reactors with significant passive features that are presently offered on the market are the AP1000 PWR and the SWR 1000 BWR. Their passive features are compared and also their core damage frequencies (CDF). The latter are also compared with those of a VVER-1000. A further discussion about the two passive plants concerns their mitigating features for severe accidents. Regarding core-melt retention both rely on in-vessel cooling of the melt. The new VVER-1000 reactor, on the other hand features a validated ex-vessel concept. (author)

  6. Melting of Fe-Si-O alloys: the Fate of Coexisting Si and O in the Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arveson, S. M.; Lee, K. K. M.

    2017-12-01

    The light element budget of Earth's core plays an integral role in sustaining outer core convection, which powers the geodynamo. Many experiments have been performed on binary iron compounds, but the results do not robustly agree with seismological observations and geochemical constraints. Earth's core is almost certainly made up of multiple light elements, so the future of core composition studies lies in ternary (or higher order) systems in order to examine interactions between light elements. We perform melting experiments on Fe-Si-O alloys in a laser-heated diamond-anvil cell to 80 GPa and 4000 K. Using 2D multi- wavelength imaging radiometry together with textural and chemical analysis of quenched samples, we measure the high-pressure melting curves and determine partitioning of light elements between the melt and the coexisting solid. Quenched samples are analyzed both in map view and in cross section using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron microprobe analysis (EPMA) to examine the 3D melt structure and composition. Partitioning of light elements between molten and solid alloys dictates (1) the density contrast at the ICB, which drives compositional convection in the outer core and (2) the temperature of the CMB, an integral parameter for understanding the deep Earth. Our experiments suggest silicon and oxygen do not simply coexist in the melt and instead show complex solubility based on temperature. Additionally, we do not find evidence of crystallization of SiO2 at low oxygen content as was recently reported.11 Hirose, K., et al., Crystallization of silicon dioxide and compositional evolution of the Earth's core. Nature, 2017. 543(7643): p. 99-102.

  7. Melting of iron at the Earth's core conditions by molecular dynamics simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. N. Wu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available By large scale molecular dynamics simulations of solid-liquid coexistence, we have investigated the melting of iron under pressures from 0 to 364 GPa. The temperatures of liquid and solid regions, and the pressure of the system are calculated to estimate the melting point of iron. We obtain the melting temperature of iron is about 6700±200K under the inner-outer core boundary, which is in good agreement with the result of Alfè et al. By the pair analysis technique, the microstructure of liquid iron under higher pressures is obviously different from that of lower pressures and ambient condition, indicating that the pressure-induced liquid-liquid phase transition may take place in iron melts.

  8. Model for melt blockage (slug) relocation and physico-chemical interactions during core degradation under severe accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veshchunov, M.S.; Shestak, V.E.

    2008-01-01

    The model describing massive melt blockage (slug) relocation and physico-chemical interactions with steam and surrounding fuel rods of a bundle is developed on the base of the observations in the CORA tests. Mass exchange owing to slug oxidation and fuel rods dissolution is described by the previously developed 2D model for the molten pool oxidation. Heat fluxes in oxidising melt along with the oxidation heat effect at the melt relocation front are counterbalanced by the heat losses in the surrounding media and the fusion heat effect of the Zr claddings attacked by the melt. As a result, the slug relocation velocity is calculated from the heat flux matches at the melt propagation front (Stefan problem). A numerical module simulating the slug behaviour is developed by tight coupling of the heat and mass exchange modules. The new model demonstrates a reasonable capability to simulate the main features of the massive slug behaviour observed in the CORA-W1 test

  9. Melting in super-earths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stixrude, Lars

    2014-04-28

    We examine the possible extent of melting in rock-iron super-earths, focusing on those in the habitable zone. We consider the energetics of accretion and core formation, the timescale of cooling and its dependence on viscosity and partial melting, thermal regulation via the temperature dependence of viscosity, and the melting curves of rock and iron components at the ultra-high pressures characteristic of super-earths. We find that the efficiency of kinetic energy deposition during accretion increases with planetary mass; considering the likely role of giant impacts and core formation, we find that super-earths probably complete their accretionary phase in an entirely molten state. Considerations of thermal regulation lead us to propose model temperature profiles of super-earths that are controlled by silicate melting. We estimate melting curves of iron and rock components up to the extreme pressures characteristic of super-earth interiors based on existing experimental and ab initio results and scaling laws. We construct super-earth thermal models by solving the equations of mass conservation and hydrostatic equilibrium, together with equations of state of rock and iron components. We set the potential temperature at the core-mantle boundary and at the surface to the local silicate melting temperature. We find that ancient (∼4 Gyr) super-earths may be partially molten at the top and bottom of their mantles, and that mantle convection is sufficiently vigorous to sustain dynamo action over the whole range of super-earth masses.

  10. A 400-year ice core melt layer record of summertime warming in the Alaska Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winski, D.; Osterberg, E. C.; Kreutz, K. J.; Wake, C. P.; Ferris, D. G.; Campbell, S. W.; Baum, M.; Raudzens Bailey, A.; Birkel, S. D.; Introne, D.; Handley, M.

    2017-12-01

    Warming in high-elevation regions has socially relevant impacts on glacier mass balance, water resources, and sensitive alpine ecosystems, yet very few high-elevation temperature records exist from the middle or high latitudes. While many terrestrial paleoclimate records provide critical temperature records from low elevations over recent centuries, melt layers preserved in alpine glaciers present an opportunity to develop calibrated, annually-resolved temperature records from high elevations. We present a 400-year temperature record based on the melt-layer stratigraphy in two ice cores collected from Mt. Hunter in the Central Alaska Range. The ice core record shows a 60-fold increase in melt frequency and water equivalent melt thickness between the pre-industrial period (before 1850) and present day. We calibrate the melt record to summer temperatures based on local and regional weather station analyses, and find that the increase in melt production represents a summer warming of at least 2° C, exceeding rates of temperature increase at most low elevation sites in Alaska. The Mt. Hunter melt layer record is significantly (p<0.05) correlated with surface temperatures in the central tropical Pacific through a Rossby-wave like pattern that induces high temperatures over Alaska. Our results show that rapid alpine warming has taken place in the Alaska Range for at least a century, and that conditions in the tropical oceans contribute to this warming.

  11. Contribution of Anticipated Transients Without Scram (ATWS) to core melt at United States nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giachetti, R.T.

    1989-09-01

    This report looks at WASH-1400 and several other Probabilistic Risk Assessments (PRAs) and Probabilistic Safety Studies (PSSs) to determine the contribution of Anticipated Transients Without Scram (ATWS) events to the total core melt probability at eight nuclear power plants in the United States. After considering each plant individually, the results are compared from plant to plant to see if any generic conclusions regarding ATWS, or core melt in general, can be made. 8 refs., 34 tabs

  12. Viscosity measurements on metal melts at high pressure and viscosity calculations for the earth's core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mineev, Vladimir N; Funtikov, Aleksandr I

    2004-01-01

    A review is given of experimental and calculated data on the viscosity of iron-based melts on the melting curve. The interest in these data originates in the division of opinion on whether viscosity increases rather moderately or considerably in the high-pressure range. This disagreement is especially pronounced in the interpretation of the values of molten iron and its compounds in the environment of the earth's outer core. The conclusion on a substantial rise in viscosity mostly follows from the universal law, proposed by Brazhkin and Lyapin [1], of viscosity changing along the metal melting curve in the high-pressure range. The review analyzes available experimental and computational data, including the most recent ones. Data on viscosity of metals under shock wave compression in the megabar pressure range are also discussed. It is shown that data on viscosity of metal melts point to a small increase of viscosity on the melting curve. Specifics are discussed of the phase diagram of iron made more complex by the presence of several phase transitions and by the uncertainty in the position of the melting curve in the high-pressure range. Inaccuracies that arise in extrapolating the results of viscosity measurements to the pressure range corresponding to the earth's core environment are pointed out. (reviews of topical problems)

  13. Examination of off-site emergency protective measures for core melt accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldrich, D.C.; Ericson, D.M. Jr.; Jones, R.B.

    1978-01-01

    Results from the Reactor Safety Study (RSS) have shown that to cause significant impacts off-site, i.e., sufficient quantities of biologically important radionuclides released, it is necessary to have a core melt accident. To mitigate the impact of such potential accidents, the design of appropriate emergency response actions requires information as to the relative merit of publicly available protective measures. In order to provide this information, a study using the consequence model developed for the RSS is being conducted to evaluate (in terms of reduced public health effects and dose exposure) potential off-site protective strategies. The paper describes the methods being used in the study as well as the results and conclusions obtained

  14. Severe accident mitigation and core melt retention in the European pressurized reactor (EPR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, Manfred

    2003-01-01

    For the mitigation of severe accidents, the FPR has adopted and improved the defense-in-depth approaches of its predecessors, the French 'N4' and the German 'Konvoi' PWR's. Beyond these evolutionary changes, it includes a new, 4-th level of defense aimed at limiting the consequences of a postulated severe accident with core melting. This involves a strengthening of the confinement function and the avoidance of large early releases, by the prevention of scenarios and events with potentially high loads on the containment, incl. RPV failure at high pressure. The remaining low-pressure accidents are mitigated by dedicated design measures. The paper gives an overview and of the measures for H 2 -mitigation and steam explosion and focuses on a detailed description of the precautions and design measures for the stabilization and long-term cooling of the molten core. In the EPR the latter is achieved by melt spreading into a large outside-cooled crucible lateral to the pit, which is passively flooded and cooled with water from the IRWST. The separation of functions between pit and spreading room not only isolates the core catcher from the various loads during RPV failure, but also avoids any risks related to an unintended initiation of flooding during power operation. A stable state of the melt is reached after a few hours. Complete solidification is achieved within days. The core catcher can optionally be cooled actively by the CHRS, which avoids further steaming into the containment and establishes ambient pressure conditions in the long term. (author)

  15. Crust behavior and erosion rate prediction of EPR sacrificial material impinged by core melt jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Gen; Liu, Ming, E-mail: ming.liu@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Wang, Jinshi; Chong, Daotong; Yan, Junjie

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • A numerical code was developed to analyze melt jet-concrete interaction in the frame of MPS method. • Crust and ablated concrete layer at UO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} melt and concrete interface periodically developed and collapsed. • Concrete surface temperature fluctuated around a low temperature and ablation temperature. • Concrete erosion by Fe-Zr melt jet was significantly faster than that by UO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} melt jet. - Abstract: Sacrificial material is a special ferro-siliceous concrete, designed in the ex-vessel core melt stabilization system of European Pressurized water Reactor (EPR). Given a localized break of RPV lower head, the melt directly impinges onto the dry concrete in form of compact jet. The concrete erosion behavior influences the failure of melt plug, and further affects melt spreading. In this study, a numerical code was developed in the frame of Moving Particle Semi-implicit (MPS) method, to analyze the crust behavior and erosion rate of sacrificial concrete, impinged by prototypic melt jet. In validation of numerical modeling, the time-dependent erosion depth and erosion configuration matched well with the experimental data. Sensitivity study of sacrificial concrete erosion indicates that the crust and ablated concrete layer presented at UO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} melt and concrete interface, whereas no crust could be found in the interaction of Fe-Zr melt with concrete. The crust went through stabilization-fracture-reformation periodic process, accompanied with accumulating and collapsing of molten concrete layer. The concrete surface temperature fluctuated around a low temperature and ablation temperature. It increased as the concrete surface layer was heated to melting, and dropped down when the cold concrete was revealed. The erosion progression was fast in the conditions of small jet diameter and large concrete inclination angle, and it was significantly faster in the erosion by metallic melt jet than by oxidic melt jet.

  16. Melting and solidification behavior of Cu/Al and Ti/Al bimetallic core/shell nanoparticles during additive manufacturing by molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, Farzin; Jeon, Jungmin; Jiang, Shan; Nouranian, Sasan

    2018-05-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to investigate the role of core volume fraction and number of fusing nanoparticles (NPs) on the melting and solidification of Cu/Al and Ti/Al bimetallic core/shell NPs during a superfast heating and slow cooling process, roughly mimicking the conditions of selective laser melting (SLM). One recent trend in the SLM process is the rapid prototyping of nanoscopically heterogeneous alloys, wherein the precious core metal maintains its particulate nature in the final manufactured part. With this potential application in focus, the current work reveals the fundamental role of the interface in the two-stage melting of the core/shell alloy NPs. For a two-NP system, the melting zone gets broader as the core volume fraction increases. This effect is more pronounced for the Ti/Al system than the Cu/Al system because of a larger difference between the melting temperatures of the shell and core metals in the former than the latter. In a larger six-NP system (more nanoscopically heterogeneous), the melting and solidification temperatures of the shell Al roughly coincide, irrespective of the heating or cooling rate, implying that in the SLM process, the part manufacturing time can be reduced due to solidification taking place at higher temperatures. The nanostructure evolution during the cooling of six-NP systems is further investigated. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  17. Method and device for catching reactor core melt-down masses in hypothetical accidents of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morlock, G.; Wiesemes, J.; Bachner, D.

    1977-01-01

    The device is to receive the afterheat of the molten core and in this way to prevent afterflow of coolant and a new criticality. A tank below the reactor pressure vessel, with the proper diameter, contains a store of salt or a salt mixture suitable to receive the afterheat of a core melt-down as heat of fusion or conversion. Above the salt, there is a layer of thermoplastics or of a material forming a hardening foam. Coolant eventually continuing to flow out is separated from the core melt by this barrier layer, and thus the build-up of high steam pressures is prevented. Neutron-absorbing materials, like boron salts mixed to the salts, as well as a subdivision of the salt surface, e.g. by means of canalizing firebricks, prevent the formation of new criticality. Further installations within the tank, like pipings or channels, permit the introduction of water after cooling down of the core or salt melt-down mass and to wash out the brine with all radioactive and other constituents for transport to reprocessing or ultimate storage. (HP) [de

  18. Effect of periodic melting on geochemical and isotopic signals in an ice core from Lomonosovfonna, Svalbard

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pohjola, V.A.; Moore, J.C.; Isaksson, E.; Jauhiainen, T.; Wal, R.S.W. van de; Martma, T.; Meijer, H.A.J.; Vaikmäe, R.

    2002-01-01

    [1] We examine the quality of atmospherically deposited ion and isotope signals in an ice core taken from a periodically melting ice field, Lomonosovfonna in central Spitsbergen, Svalbard. The aim is to determine the degree to which the signals are altered by periodic melting of the ice. We use

  19. An Iron-Rain Model for Core Formation on Asteroid 4 Vesta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Walter S.; Mittlefehldt, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Asteroid 4 Vesta is differentiated into a crust, mantle, and core, as demonstrated by studies of the eucrite and diogenite meteorites and by data from NASA's Dawn spacecraft. Most models for the differentiation and thermal evolution of Vesta assume that the metal phase completely melts within 20 degrees of the eutectic temperature, well before the onset of silicate melting. In such a model, core formation initially happens by Darcy flow, but this is an inefficient process for liquid metal and solid silicate. However, the likely chemical composition of Vesta, similar to H chondrites with perhaps some CM or CV chondrite, has 13-16 weight percent S. For such compositions, metal-sulfide melting will not be complete until a temperature of at least 1350 degrees Centigrade. The silicate solidus for Vesta's composition is between 1100 and 1150 degrees Centigrade, and thus metal and silicate melting must have substantially overlapped in time on Vesta. In this chemically and physically more likely view of Vesta's evolution, metal sulfide drops will sink by Stokes flow through the partially molten silicate magma ocean in a process that can be envisioned as "iron rain". Measurements of eucrites show that moderately siderophile elements such as Ni, Mo, and W reached chemical equilibrium between the metal and silicate phases, which is an important test for any Vesta differentiation model. The equilibration time is a function of the initial metal grain size, which we take to be 25-45 microns based on recent measurements of H6 chondrites. For these sizes and reasonable silicate magma viscosities, equilibration occurs after a fall distance of just a few meters through the magma ocean. Although metal drops may grow in size by merger with other drops, which increases their settling velocities and decreases the total core formation time, the short equilibration distance ensures that the moderately siderophile elements will reach chemical equilibrium between metal and silicate before

  20. Model of interfacial melting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouritsen, Ole G.; Zuckermann, Martin J.

    1987-01-01

    A two-dimensional model is proposed to describe systems with phase transitions which take place in terms of crystalline as well as internal degrees of freedom. Computer simulation of the model shows that the interplay between the two sets of degrees of freedom permits observation of grain-boundar......-boundary formation and interfacial melting, a nonequilibrium process by which the system melts at the boundaries of a polycrystalline domain structure. Lipid membranes are candidates for systems with pronounced interfacial melting behavior....

  1. Numerical analysis of the induction melting process of oxide fuel material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondala Rao, R.; Mangarjuna Rao, P.; Nashine, B.K.; Selvaraj, P.

    2015-01-01

    For the experimental simulation of Molten Fuel-Coolant Interaction (MFCI) phenomenon under hypothetical core meltdown accident scenario in a nuclear reactor, it is required to generate the molten pool of core materials. For this purpose, a laboratory scale Cold wall Crucible induction melting system has been developed. To optimize the system for efficient and reliable melting process, it is required to have comprehensive knowledge on the heat and mass transfer processes along with electromagnetic process that occur during the melting of core materials. Hence, a 2D axi-symmetric numerical model has been developed using a multiphysics software to simulate the induction melting process. The phase change phenomenon is taken into account by using enthalpy formulation. The experimental data available in literature for magnetic field and flow field are used for model validation. The model predicted temperatures are also in good agreement with experimentally measured values. The validated model has been used to study the induction melting behavior of UO_2 fuel material. (author)

  2. 2D model for melt progression through rods and debris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fichot, F.

    2001-01-01

    During the degradation of a nuclear core in a severe accident scenario, the high temperatures reached lead to the melting of materials. The formation of liquid mixtures at various elevations is followed by the flow of molten materials through the core. Liquid mixture may flow under several configurations: axial relocation along the rods, horizontal motion over a plane surface such as the core support plate or a blockage of material, 2D relocation through a debris bed, etc.. The two-dimensional relocation of molten material through a porous debris bed, implemented for the simulation of late degradation phases, has opened a new way to the elaboration of the relocation model for the flow of liquid mixture along the rods. It is based on a volume averaging method, where wall friction and capillary effects are taken into account by introducing effective coefficients to characterize the solid matrix (rods, grids, debris, etc.). A local description of the liquid flow is necessary to derive the effective coefficients. Heat transfers are modelled in a similar way. The derivation of the conservation equations for the liquid mixture falling flow (momentum) in two directions (axial and radial-horizontal) and for the heat exchanges (energy) are the main points of this new model for simulating melt progression. In this presentation, the full model for the relocation and solidification of liquid materials through a rod bundle or a debris bed is described. It is implemented in the ICARE/CATHARE code, developed by IPSN in Cadarache. The main improvements and advantages of the new model are: A single formulation for liquid mixture relocation, in 2D, either through a rod bundle or a porous debris bed, Extensions to complex structures (grids, by-pass, etc..), The modeling of relocation of a liquid mixture over plane surfaces. (author)

  3. Modelling of heat transfer between molten core and concrete with account of phase changes in the melt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petukhov, S.M.; Zemlianoukhin, V.V.

    1992-01-01

    The analysis of the process of heat transfer between molten corium and concrete in the case of severe accident in a PWR is performed. It is shown that Bradley's model may be improved for the case of an oxidic melt. A new model is developed and incorporated in the WECHSL-Mod2 Code. Post-test calculations of melt-concrete interaction experiments are carried out. The comparison and analysis of the experimental results and calculations are presented. (9 figures) (Author)

  4. Phenomena in the interaction among a core melt and protective and sacrificial materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinwarz, W.; Koller, W.; Dyllong, N.; Fischer, M.; Hellmann, S.; Lansmann, V.; Nie, M.; Haefner, W.; Alkan, Z.; Andrae, P.; Rensing, B.

    2000-01-01

    In a postulated core meltdown accident in a light water reactor there are bound to be interactions, in the ex-vessel phase, among the core melt and the structural materials within and below the reactor cavity. In existing plants, these structural materials normally are structural concrete, while future, evolutionary reactor lines are to have sacrificial and protective materials specially designed for this hypothetical case. To add to the state of knowledge about the phenomena occurring, experiments need to be conducted under conditions as realistic as possible. Within the research programs funded by the European Union, the German Federal Ministry for Economics, and the German nuclear power plant operators, experiments on a laboratory as well as an industrial scale on these problems are being carried out in the two projects called CORESA (COrium on REfractory and SAcrificial materials) and ECOSTAR (Ex-vessel COre melt STAbilization Research). The experiments are accompanied by an extensive analytical theoretical program also serving to advance and validate computer codes on the problems under investigation. The projects, which are carried out with international European participation, are expected to allow a concept to be developed for managing postulated accident scenarios involving core meltdown for innovative nuclear power plants, and to provide findings on risk evaluation of plants now in operation so as to further develop accident management measures. (orig.) [de

  5. Evaluation of Melt Behavior with initial Melt Velocity under SFR Severe Accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, Hyo; Bang, In Cheol [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Jerng, Dong Wook [Chung-Ang Univ, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In the current Korean sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) program, early dispersion of the molten metallic fuel within a subchannel is suggested as one of the inherent safety strategies for the initiating phase of hypothetical core disruptive accident (HCDA). The safety strategy provides negative reactivity driven by the melt dispersal, so it could reduce the possibility of the recriticality event under a severe triple or more fault scenario for SFR. Since the behavior of the melt dispersion is unpredictable, it depends on the accident condition, particularly core region. While the voided coolant channel region is usually developed in the inner core, the unvoided coolant channel region is formed in the outer core. It is important to confirm the fuel dispersion with the core region, but there are not sufficient existing studies for them. From the existing studies, the coolant vapor pressure is considered as one of driving force to move the melt towards outside of the core. There is a complexity of the phenomena during intermixing of the melt with the coolant after the horizontal melt injections. It is too difficult to understand the several combined mechanisms related to the melt dispersion and the fragmentation. Thus, it could be worthwhile to study the horizontal melt injections at lower temperature as a preliminary study in order to identify the melt dispersion phenomena. For this reason, it is required to clarify whether the coolant vapor pressure is the driving force of the melt dispersion with the core region. The specific conditions to be well dispersed for the molten metallic fuel were discussed in the experiments with the simulant materials. The each melt behavior was compared to evaluate the melt dispersion under the coolant void condition and the boiling condition. As the results, the following results are remarked: 1. The upward melt dispersion did not occur for a given melt and coolant temperature in the nonboiling range. Over current range of conditions

  6. Evaluation of Melt Behavior with initial Melt Velocity under SFR Severe Accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heo, Hyo; Bang, In Cheol; Jerng, Dong Wook

    2015-01-01

    In the current Korean sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) program, early dispersion of the molten metallic fuel within a subchannel is suggested as one of the inherent safety strategies for the initiating phase of hypothetical core disruptive accident (HCDA). The safety strategy provides negative reactivity driven by the melt dispersal, so it could reduce the possibility of the recriticality event under a severe triple or more fault scenario for SFR. Since the behavior of the melt dispersion is unpredictable, it depends on the accident condition, particularly core region. While the voided coolant channel region is usually developed in the inner core, the unvoided coolant channel region is formed in the outer core. It is important to confirm the fuel dispersion with the core region, but there are not sufficient existing studies for them. From the existing studies, the coolant vapor pressure is considered as one of driving force to move the melt towards outside of the core. There is a complexity of the phenomena during intermixing of the melt with the coolant after the horizontal melt injections. It is too difficult to understand the several combined mechanisms related to the melt dispersion and the fragmentation. Thus, it could be worthwhile to study the horizontal melt injections at lower temperature as a preliminary study in order to identify the melt dispersion phenomena. For this reason, it is required to clarify whether the coolant vapor pressure is the driving force of the melt dispersion with the core region. The specific conditions to be well dispersed for the molten metallic fuel were discussed in the experiments with the simulant materials. The each melt behavior was compared to evaluate the melt dispersion under the coolant void condition and the boiling condition. As the results, the following results are remarked: 1. The upward melt dispersion did not occur for a given melt and coolant temperature in the nonboiling range. Over current range of conditions

  7. Modeling of molten core-concrete interactions and fission-product release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norkus, J.K.; Corradini, M.L.

    1991-09-01

    The study of molten core-concrete interaction is important in estimating the possible consequences of a severe nuclear reactor accident. CORCON-Mod2 is a computer program which models the thermal, chemical, and physical phenomena associated with molten core-concrete interactions. Models have been added to extend and improve the modeling of these phenomena. An ideal solution chemical equilibrium methodology is presented to predict the fission-product vaporization release. Additional chemical species have been added, and the calculation of chemical equilibrium has been expanded to the oxidic layer and to the mixed layer configuration. Recent experiments performed at Argonne National Laboratory are compared to CORCON predictions of melt temperature, erosion depth, and release fraction of fission products. The results consistently underpredicted the melt temperatures and erosion rates. However, the predictions of release of Te, Ba, Sr, and U were good. A sensitivity study of the effects of initial temperature, concrete type, use of the mixing option, degree of zirconium oxidation, cavity size, and amount of control material on erosion, gas production, and release of radioactive materials was performed for a PWR and a BWR. The initial melt temperature had the greatest effect on the results of interest. Concrete type and cavity size also had important effects. 78 refs., 35 figs., 40 tabs

  8. On the sequence of core-melt accidents: Fission product release, source terms and Chernobyl release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albrecht, H

    1986-01-01

    There is a sketch of our ideas on the course of a core melt-out accident in a PWR. There is then a survey of the most important results on fission product release, which were obtained by experiments on the SASCHA melt-out plant. The 3rd part considers questions which are important for determining source terms for the environment and the last part contains some considerations on radioactivity release from the Chernobyl reactor.

  9. Analysis of core melt accident in Fukushima Daiichi-Unit 1 nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, Fumiya

    2011-01-01

    In order to obtain a profound understanding of the serious situation in Unit 1 and Unit 2/3 reactors of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (hereafter abbreviated as 1F1 and 1F2/3, respectively), which was directly caused by tsunami due to a huge earthquake on 11 March 2011, analyses of severe core damage are performed. In the present report, the analysis method and 1F1 analysis are described. The analysis is essentially based on the total energy balance in the core. In the analysis, the total energy vs. temperature curve is developed for each reactor, which is based on the estimated core materials inventory and material property data. Temperature and melt fraction are estimated by comparing the total energy curve with the total stored energy in the core material. The heat source is the decay heat of fission products and actinides together with reaction heat from the zirconium steam reaction. (author)

  10. Simulation of melt spreading in consideration of phase transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spengler, C. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Koeln (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    The analysis of melt spreading and relocation phenomena in the containment of LWR power plants in case of hypothetical severe accidents leading to core melting is an important issue for reactor safety investigations. For the simulation of melt spreading the code LAVA has been developed on the basis of a method from the related subject of volcanology by adding more detailed models for heat transfer phenomena and flow rheology. The development is supported by basic analysis of the spreading of gravity currents as well as experimental investigations of the rheology of solidifying melts. These exhibit strong non-Newtonian effects in case of a high content of solids in the freezing melt. The basic model assumption in LAVA is the ideal Bingham plastic approach to the non-Newtonian, shear-thinning characteristic of solidifying melts. For the recalculation of melt spreading experiments, the temperature-dependent material properties for solidifying melt mixtures have been calculated using correlations from the literature. With the parameters and correlations for the rheological material properties approached by results from literature, it was possible to recalculate successfully recent spreading experiments with simulant materials and prototypic reactor core materials. An application to the behaviour of core melt in the reactor cavity assumed a borderline case for the issue of spreading. This limit is represented by melt conditions (large solid fraction, low volume flux), under which the melt is hardly spreadable. Due to the persistent volume flux the reactor cavity is completely, but inhomogeneously filled with melt. The degree of inhomogeneity is rather small, so it is concluded, that for the long-term coolability of a melt pool in narrow cavities the spreading of melt will probably have only negligible influence. (orig.)

  11. The effect of melt composition on metal-silicate partitioning of siderophile elements and constraints on core formation in the angrite parent body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenstra, E. S.; Sitabi, A. B.; Lin, Y. H.; Rai, N.; Knibbe, J. S.; Berndt, J.; Matveev, S.; van Westrenen, W.

    2017-09-01

    We present 275 new metal-silicate partition coefficients for P, S, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Ge, Mo, and W obtained at moderate P (1.5 GPa) and high T (1683-1883 K). We investigate the effect of silicate melt composition using four end member silicate melt compositions. We identify possible silicate melt dependencies of the metal-silicate partitioning of lower valence elements Ni, Ge and V, elements that are usually assumed to remain unaffected by changes in silicate melt composition. Results for the other elements are consistent with the dependence of their metal-silicate partition coefficients on the individual major oxide components of the silicate melt composition suggested by recently reported parameterizations and theoretical considerations. Using multiple linear regression, we parameterize compiled metal-silicate partitioning results including our new data and report revised expressions that predict their metal-silicate partitioning behavior as a function of P-T-X-fO2. We apply these results to constrain the conditions that prevailed during core formation in the angrite parent body (APB). Our results suggest the siderophile element depletions in angrite meteorites are consistent with a CV bulk composition and constrain APB core formation to have occurred at mildly reducing conditions of 1.4 ± 0.5 log units below the iron-wüstite buffer (ΔIW), corresponding to a APB core mass of 18 ± 11%. The core mass range is constrained to 21 ± 8 mass% if light elements (S and/or C) are assumed to reside in the APB core. Incorporation of light elements in the APB core does not yield significantly different redox states for APB core-mantle differentiation. The inferred redox state is in excellent agreement with independent fO2 estimates recorded by pyroxene and olivine in angrites.

  12. Turbulence model for melt pool natural convection heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelkar, K.M.; Patankar, S.V.

    1994-01-01

    Under severe reactor accident scenarios, pools of molten core material may form in the reactor core or in the hemispherically shaped lower plenum of the reactor vessel. Such molten pools are internally heated due to the radioactive decay heat that gives rise to buoyant flows in the molten pool. The flow in such pools is strongly influenced by the turbulent mixing because the expected Rayleigh numbers under accidents scenarios are very high. The variation of the local heat flux over the boundaries of the molten pools are important in determining the subsequent melt progression behavior. This study reports results of an ongoing effort towards providing a well validated mathematical model for the prediction of buoyant flow and heat transfer in internally heated pool under conditions expected in severe accident scenarios

  13. Study on severe fuel damage and in-vessel melt progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hee Dong; Kim, Sang Baik; Lee, Gyu Jung

    1992-06-01

    In-vessel core melt progression describes the progression of the state of a reactor core from core uncovery up to reactor vessel melt through in uncovered accidents or through temperature stabilization in accidents recovered by core reflooding. Melt progression can be thought as two parts; early melt progression and late melt progression. Early phase of core melt progression includes the progression of core material melting and relocation, which mostly consist of metallic materials. On the other hand, the late phase of core melt progression involves ceramic material melt and relocation to the lower plenum and heat-up the reactor vessel lower head. A large number of information are available for the early melt progression through experiments such as SFD, DF, FLHT test and utilized in the severe accident analysis codes. However, understanding of the late phase melt progression phenomenology is based primary on TMI-2 core examinations and not much experimental information is available. Especilally, the great uncertainties exist in vessel failure mode, melt composition, mass, and temperature. Further research is planned to perform to reduce the uncertainties in understanding of core melt down accidents as parts of long term melt progression research program. A study on the core melt progression at KAERI has been being performed through the Severe Accident Research Program with USNRC. KAERI staff had participated in the PBF SFD experiments at INEL and analyses of experiments were performed using SCDAP code. Experiments of core melt program have not been carried out at KAERI yet. It is planned that further research on core melt down accidents will be performed, which is related to design of future generations of nuclear reactors as parts of long-term project for improvement of nuclear reactor safety. (Author)

  14. Multiscale Models of Melting Arctic Sea Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    Sea ice reflectance or albedo , a key parameter in climate modeling, is primarily determined by melt pond and ice floe configurations. Ice - albedo ...determine their albedo - a key parameter in climate modeling. Here we explore the possibility of a conceptual sea ice climate model passing through a...bifurcation points. Ising model for melt ponds on Arctic sea ice Y. Ma, I. Sudakov, and K. M. Golden Abstract: The albedo of melting

  15. Melt migration modeling in partially molten upper mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghods, Abdolreza

    The objective of this thesis is to investigate the importance of melt migration in shaping major characteristics of geological features associated with the partial melting of the upper mantle, such as sea-floor spreading, continental flood basalts and rifting. The partial melting produces permeable partially molten rocks and a buoyant low viscosity melt. Melt migrates through the partially molten rocks, and transfers mass and heat. Due to its much faster velocity and appreciable buoyancy, melt migration has the potential to modify dynamics of the upwelling partially molten plumes. I develop a 2-D, two-phase flow model and apply it to investigate effects of melt migration on the dynamics and melt generation of upwelling mantle plumes and focusing of melt migration beneath mid-ocean ridges. Melt migration changes distribution of the melt-retention buoyancy force and therefore affects the dynamics of the upwelling plume. This is investigated by modeling a plume with a constant initial melt of 10% where no further melting is considered. Melt migration polarizes melt-retention buoyancy force into high and low melt fraction regions at the top and bottom portions of the plume and therefore results in formation of a more slender and faster upwelling plume. Allowing the plume to melt as it ascends through the upper mantle also produces a slender and faster plume. It is shown that melt produced by decompressional melting of the plume migrates to the upper horizons of the plume, increases the upwelling velocity and thus, the volume of melt generated by the plume. Melt migration produces a plume which lacks the mushroom shape observed for the plume models without melt migration. Melt migration forms a high melt fraction layer beneath the sloping base of the impermeable oceanic lithosphere. Using realistic conditions of melting, freezing and melt extraction, I examine whether the high melt fraction layer is able to focus melt from a wide partial melting zone to a narrow region

  16. Luna 24 ferrobasalt as a low-Mg primary melt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norman, M.; Ryder, G.

    1980-01-01

    Luna 24 very-low titanium (VLT) ferrobasalts, metabasalts, brown glasses and impact melts form a tight compositional cluster with no gradation to other groupings postulated for the Luna 24 core components. This suggests that the Luna 24 VLT ferrobasalt was extruded as a liquid of its own composition and was not derived by fractional crystallization from a more magnesian parent in a surface flow. Furthermore, the characteristics of the core lithologies are not easily visualized as components of such a differential flow, e.g. brown glasses. Gravitative settling models purporting to demonstrate the validity of the flow differentiation model are merely permissive. Subsurface fractionation requires that plagioclase, not olivine, be the liquidus phase. The high-Mg component in the Luna 24 core can be constrained, though not identified, chemically, and it has neither the major element, trace element, isotopic, nor mineralogical characteristics required of a possible parent to the Luna 24 VLT ferrobasalt. Thus models of fractionation lack a physical expression of the less differentiated compositions, contrary to the belief that the high-Mg component in the core is the parent material. The Luna 24 VLT ferrobasalt is probably a primary low-Mg melt from a plagioclase-bearing source region, and may have undergone little or no fractionation prior to eruption. Such a model is compatible with, and suggested by, chemical and experimental data. Caution against posulating that all Mg-poor melts are fractionated products, based on terrestrial models, is advised. The terrestrial oceanic situation of 'primary melts' with similar Mg/Fe is probably not valid for the Moon. (Auth.)

  17. Investigating the translation of Earth's inner core

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Day, Elizabeth A; Cormier, Vernon F; Geballe, Zachary M

    2012-01-01

    The Earth’s inner core provides unique insights into processes that are occurring deep within our Earth today, as well as processes that occurred in the past. The seismic structure of the inner core is complex, and is dominated by anisotropic and isotropic differences between the Eastern...... for models of a translating inner core. Additionally, we investigate the structure at the base of the outer core and the inner core boundary by analyzing PKP-Cdiff waves. The search for observable PKP-Cdiff is particularly concentrated in regions that are predicted to be actively freezing and melting...... and Western ‘hemispheres’ of the inner core. Recent geodynamical models suggest that this hemispherical dichotomy can be explained by a fast translation of the inner core. In these models one side of the inner core is freezing, while the other side is melting, leading to the development of different seismic...

  18. Nickel and helium evidence for melt above the core-mantle boundary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzberg, Claude; Asimow, Paul D; Ionov, Dmitri A; Vidito, Chris; Jackson, Matthew G; Geist, Dennis

    2013-01-17

    High (3)He/(4)He ratios in some basalts have generally been interpreted as originating in an incompletely degassed lower-mantle source. This helium source may have been isolated at the core-mantle boundary region since Earth's accretion. Alternatively, it may have taken part in whole-mantle convection and crust production over the age of the Earth; if so, it is now either a primitive refugium at the core-mantle boundary or is distributed throughout the lower mantle. Here we constrain the problem using lavas from Baffin Island, West Greenland, the Ontong Java Plateau, Isla Gorgona and Fernandina (Galapagos). Olivine phenocryst compositions show that these lavas originated from a peridotite source that was about 20 per cent higher in nickel content than in the modern mid-ocean-ridge basalt source. Where data are available, these lavas also have high (3)He/(4)He. We propose that a less-degassed nickel-rich source formed by core-mantle interaction during the crystallization of a melt-rich layer or basal magma ocean, and that this source continues to be sampled by mantle plumes. The spatial distribution of this source may be constrained by nickel partitioning experiments at the pressures of the core-mantle boundary.

  19. A 2D double-porosity model for melting and melt migration beneath mid-oceanic ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, B.; Liang, Y.; Parmentier, E.

    2017-12-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that the melting and melt extraction region of the MORB mantle is heterogeneous consisting of an interconnected network of high permeability dunite channels in a low porosity harzburgite or lherzolite matrix. In principle, one can include channel formation into the tectonic-scale geodynamic models by solving conservation equations for a chemically reactive and viscously deformable porous medium. Such an approach eventually runs into computational limitations such as resolving fractal-like channels that have a spectrum of width. To better understand first order features of melting and melt-rock interaction beneath MOR, we have formulated a 2D double porosity model in which we treat the triangular melting region as two overlapping continua occupied by the low-porosity matrix and interconnected high-porosity channels. We use melt productivity derived from a thermodynamic model and melt suction rate to close our problem. We use a high-order accurate numerical method to solve the conservation equations in 2D for porosity, solid and melt velocities and concentrations of chemical tracers in the melting region. We carry out numerical simulations to systematically study effects of matrix-to-channel melt suction and spatially distributed channels on the distributions of porosity and trace element and isotopic ratios in the melting region. For near fractional melting with 10 vol% channel in the melting region, the flow field of the matrix melt follows closely to that of the solid because the small porosity (exchange between the melt and the solid. The smearing effect can be approximated by dispersion coefficient. For slowly diffusing trace elements (e.g., LREE and HFSE), the melt migration induced dispersion can be as effective as thermal diffusion. Therefore, sub-kilometer scale heterogeneities of Nd and Hf isotopes are significantly damped or homogenized in the melting region.

  20. Modeling the summertime evolution of sea-ice melt ponds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lüthje, Mikael; Feltham, D.L.; Taylor, P.D.

    2006-01-01

    We present a mathematical model describing the summer melting of sea ice. We simulate the evolution of melt ponds and determine area coverage and total surface ablation. The model predictions are tested for sensitivity to the melt rate of unponded ice, enhanced melt rate beneath the melt ponds...

  1. LACOMERA - large scale experiments on core degradation, melt retention and coolability at the Forschungszentrum Karslruhe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miassoedov, A.; Alsmeyer, H.; Meyer, L.

    2003-01-01

    The LACOMERA project at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe is a 3 year shared-cost action within the Fifth Framework Programme which started in September 2002. The overall objectives of the LACOMERA project are to provide research institutions from the EU member countries and associated states access to large scale experimental facilities at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe which shall be used to increase the knowledge of the quenching of a degraded core and regaining melt coolability in the reactor pressure vessel, of possible melt dispersion to the cavity, of molten core concrete interaction and of ex-vessel melt coolability. One major aspect is to understand how these events affect the safety of European reactors so as to lead to soundly-based accident management procedures. The project will bring together interested partners of different European member states in the area of severe accident analysis and control, with the goal to increase the public confidence in the use of nuclear energy. Moreover, partners from the newly associated states should be included as far as possible, and therefore the needs of Eastern, as well as Western, reactors will be considered in LACOMERA project. The project offers a unique opportunity to get involved in the networks and activities supporting VVER safety, and for Eastern experts to get an access to large scale experimental facilities in a Western research organisation to improve understanding of material properties and core behaviour under severe accident conditions. As a result of the first call for proposals a project on air ingress test in the QUENCH facility has been selected. A second call for proposals is opened with a deadline of 31 December 2003. (author)

  2. Melt cooling by bottom flooding. The COMET core-catcher concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foit, Jerzy Jan; Alsmeyer, Hans; Tromm, Walter; Buerger, Manfred; Journeau, Christophe

    2009-01-01

    overpressure of 0.2 bar. An important step in validating the concept was the use of the reactor typical oxide melt (UO 2 + ZrO 2 + molten concrete). Experiments were performed at ANL (USA) and CEA (France) in which cooling of UO 2 rich oxide melt was successfully demonstrated. Here, results of the experiments in the VULCANO facility (CEA, Cadarache, France) with about 40 kg corium melt are considered. A unit cell of the CometPCA device was used. The melt was internally heated by sustained induction power until complete cooling was achieved. The melt was safely arrested, solidified and quenched within a period of less than 20 minutes without any energetic event, as expected from previous experiments with simulant melts. The conceptual and experimental work was accompanied by theoretical investigations at IKE, University of Stuttgart. These investigations address porosity formation as well as quenching and long-term coolability of layers with resulting porosities. A model for porosity formation is presented, which assumes that this process is essentially determined by strong local pressure buildup from strong evaporation due to water injection from below and the restriction of steam removal by friction in the melt. The effect of key parameters is investigated and compared to experimental findings. (author)

  3. Results of out-of-pile experiments to investigate the possibilities of cooling a core melt with internal heat production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fieg, G.

    1976-01-01

    After serious hypothetical reactor accidents, melted core materials with internal heat production can occur in large quantities. A retention of these molten core masses within the containment must be ensured. The knowledge of the heat transport from volume-heated layers is necessary to clarify this matter. (orig./LH) [de

  4. SCDAP/RELAP5 Modeling of Movement of Melted Material Through Porous Debris in Lower Head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siefken, L. J.

    1998-01-01

    Designs are described for implementing models for calculating the movement of melted material through the interstices in a matrix of porous debris in the lower head of a reactor vessel. The COUPLE model in SCDAP/RELAP5 represents both the porous and nonporous debris that results from core material slumping into the lower head during a severe accident in a Light Water Reactor. Currently, the COUPLE model has no capability to model the movement of material that melts within a matrix of porous material. The COUPLE model also does not have the capability to model the movement of liquefied core plate material that slumps onto a porous debris bed in the lower head. In order to advance beyond the assumption the liquefied material always remains stationary, designs are developed for calculations of the movement of liquefied material through the interstices in a matrix of porous material. Correlations are identified for calculating the permeability of the porous debris and for calculating the rate of flow of liquefied material through the interstices in the debris bed. Correlations are also identified for calculating the relocation of solid debris that has a large amount of cavities due to the flowing away of melted material. Equations are defined for calculating the effect on the temperature distribution in the debris bed of heat transported by moving material and for changes in effective thermal conductivity and heat capacity due to the movement of material. The implementation of these models is expected to improve the calculation of the material distribution and temperature distribution of debris in the lower head for cases in which the debris is porous and liquefied material is present within the porous debris

  5. Nuclear Power Reactor Core Melt Accidents. Current State of Knowledge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentaib, Ahmed; Bonneville, Herve; Clement, Bernard; Cranga, Michel; Fichot, Florian; Koundy, Vincent; Meignen, Renaud; Corenwinder, Francois; Leteinturier, Denis; Monroig, Frederique; Nahas, Georges; Pichereau, Frederique; Van-Dorsselaere, Jean-Pierre; Cenerino, Gerard; Jacquemain, Didier; Raimond, Emmanuel; Ducros, Gerard; Journeau, Christophe; Magallon, Daniel; Seiler, Jean-Marie; Tourniaire, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    For over thirty years, IPSN and subsequently IRSN has played a major international role in the field of nuclear power reactor core melt accidents through the undertaking of important experimental programmes (the most significant being the Phebus- FP programme), the development of validated simulation tools (the ASTEC code that is today the leading European tool for modelling severe accidents), and the coordination of the SARNET (Severe Accident Research Network) international network of excellence. These accidents are described as 'severe accidents' because they can lead to radioactive releases outside the plant concerned, with serious consequences for the general public and for the environment. This book compiles the sum of the knowledge acquired on this subject and summarises the lessons that have been learnt from severe accidents around the world for the prevention and reduction of the consequences of such accidents, without addressing those from the Fukushima accident, where knowledge of events is still evolving. The knowledge accumulated by the Institute on these subjects enabled it to play an active role in informing public authorities, the media and the public when this accident occurred, and continues to do so to this day

  6. In-situ rock melting applied to lunar base construction and for exploration drilling and coring on the moon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowley, J.C.; Neudecker, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    An excavation technology based upon melting of rock and soil has been extensively developed at the prototype hardware and conceptual design levels for terrestrial conditions. Laboratory and field tests of rock-melting penetration have conclusively indicated that this excavation method is insensitive to rock, soil types, and conditions. Especially significant is the ability to form in-place glass linings or casings on the walls of boreholes, tunnels, and shafts. These factors indicate the unique potential for in situ construction of primary lunar base facilities. Drilling and coring equipment for resource exploration on the moon can also be devised that are largely automated and remotely operated. It is also very likely that lunar melt-glasses will have changed mechanical properties when formed in anhydrous and hard vacuum conditions. Rock melting experiments and prototype hardware designs for lunar rock-melting excavation applications are suggested

  7. Final results of the XR2-1 BWR metallic melt relocation experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauntt, R.O.; Humphries, L.L.

    1997-08-01

    This report documents the final results of the XR2-1 boiling water reactor (BWR) metallic melt relocation experiment, conducted at Sandia National Laboratories for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The objective of this experiment was to investigate the material relocation processes and relocation pathways in a dry BWR core following a severe nuclear reactor accident such as an unrecovered station blackout accident. The imposed test conditions (initial thermal state and the melt generation rates) simulated the conditions for the postulated accident scenario and the prototypic design of the lower core test section (in composition and in geometry) ensured that thermal masses and physical flow barriers were modeled adequately. The experiment has shown that, under dry core conditions, the metallic core materials that melt and drain from the upper core regions can drain from the core region entirely without formation of robust coherent blockages in the lower core. Temporary blockages that suspended pools of molten metal later melted, allowing the metals to continue draining downward. The test facility and instrumentation are described in detail. The test progression and results are presented and compared to MERIS code analyses. 6 refs., 55 figs., 4 tabs

  8. Planetesimal core formation with partial silicate melting using in-situ high P, high T, deformation x-ray microtomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzures, B. A.; Watson, H. C.; Yu, T.; Wang, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Differentiation is a defining moment in formation of terrestrial planets and asteroids. Smaller planetesimals likely didn't reach high enough temperatures for widescale melting. However, we infer that core formation must have occurred within a few million years from Hf-W dating. In lieu of a global magma ocean, planetesimals likely formed through inefficient percolation. Here, we used in-situ high temperature, high pressure, x-ray microtomography to track the 3-D evolution of the sample at mantle conditions as it underwent shear deformation. Lattice-Boltzmann simulations for permeability were used to characterize the efficiency of melt percolation. Mixtures of KLB1 peridotite plus 6.0 to 12.0 vol% FeS were pre-sintered to achieve an initial equilibrium microstructure, and then imaged through several consecutive cycles of heating and deformation. The maximum calculated melt segregation velocity was found to be 0.37 cm/yr for 6 vol.% FeS and 0.61 cm/year for 12 vol.% FeS, both below the minimum velocity of 3.3 cm/year required for a 100km planetesimal to fully differentiate within 3 million years. However, permeability is also a function of grain size and thus the samples having smaller grains than predicted for small planetesimals could have contributed to low permeability and also low migration velocity. The two-phase (sulfide melt and silicate melt) flow at higher melt fractions (6 vol.% and 12 vol.% FeS) was an extension of a similar study1 containing only sulfide melt at lower melt fraction (4.5 vol.% FeS). Contrary to the previous study, deformation did result in increased permeability until the sample was sheared by twisting the opposing Drickamer anvils by 360 degrees. Also, the presence of silicate melt caused the FeS melt to coalesce into less connected pathways as the experiment with 6 vol.% FeS was found to be less permeable than the one with 4.5 vol.% FeS but without any partial melt. The preliminary data from this study suggests that impacts as well as

  9. The Effective Convectivity Model for Simulation and Analysis of Melt Pool Heat Transfer in a Light Water Reactor Pressure Vessel Lower Head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran, Chi Thanh

    2009-09-01

    Severe accidents in a Light Water Reactor (LWR) have been a subject of intense research for the last three decades. The research in this area aims to reach understanding of the inherent physical phenomena and reduce the uncertainties in their quantification, with the ultimate goal of developing models that can be applied to safety analysis of nuclear reactors, and to evaluation of the proposed accident management schemes for mitigating the consequences of severe accidents. In a hypothetical severe accident there is likelihood that the core materials will be relocated to the lower plenum and form a decay-heated debris bed (debris cake) or a melt pool. Interactions of core debris or melt with the reactor structures depend to a large extent on the debris bed or melt pool thermal hydraulics. In case of inadequate cooling, the excessive heat would drive the structures' overheating and ablation, and hence govern the vessel failure mode and timing. In turn, threats to containment integrity associated with potential ex-vessel steam explosions and ex-vessel debris uncoolability depend on the composition, superheat, and amount of molten corium available for discharge upon the vessel failure. That is why predictions of transient melt pool heat transfer in the reactor lower head, subsequent vessel failure modes and melt characteristics upon the discharge are of paramount importance for plant safety assessment. The main purpose of the present study is to develop a method for reliable prediction of melt pool thermal hydraulics, namely to establish a computational platform for cost-effective, sufficiently-accurate numerical simulations and analyses of core Melt-Structure-Water Interactions in the LWR lower head during a postulated severe core-melting accident. To achieve the goal, an approach to efficient use of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) has been proposed to guide and support the development of models suitable for accident analysis. The CFD method, on the one hand, is

  10. Analysis of ex-vessel melt jet breakup and coolability. Part 1: Sensitivity on model parameters and accident conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriyama, Kiyofumi; Park, Hyun Sun, E-mail: hejsunny@postech.ac.kr; Hwang, Byoungcheol; Jung, Woo Hyun

    2016-06-15

    Highlights: • Application of JASMINE code to melt jet breakup and coolability in APR1400 condition. • Coolability indexes for quasi steady state breakup and cooling process. • Typical case in complete breakup/solidification, film boiling quench not reached. • Significant impact of water depth and melt jet size; weak impact of model parameters. - Abstract: The breakup of a melt jet falling in a water pool and the coolability of the melt particles produced by such jet breakup are important phenomena in terms of the mitigation of severe accident consequences in light water reactors, because the molten and relocated core material is the primary heat source that governs the accident progression. We applied a modified version of the fuel–coolant interaction simulation code, JASMINE, developed at Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) to a plant scale simulation of melt jet breakup and cooling assuming an ex-vessel condition in the APR1400, a Korean advanced pressurized water reactor. Also, we examined the sensitivity on seven model parameters and five initial/boundary condition variables. The results showed that the melt cooling performance of a 6 m deep water pool in the reactor cavity is enough for removing the initial melt enthalpy for solidification, for a melt jet of 0.2 m initial diameter. The impacts of the model parameters were relatively weak and that of some of the initial/boundary condition variables, namely the water depth and melt jet diameter, were very strong. The present model indicated that a significant fraction of the melt jet is not broken up and forms a continuous melt pool on the containment floor in cases with a large melt jet diameter, 0.5 m, or a shallow water pool depth, ≤3 m.

  11. A simplified geometrical model for transient corium propagation in core for LWR with heavy reflector - 15271

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saas, L.; Le Tellier, R.; Bajard, S.

    2015-01-01

    In this document, we present a simplified geometrical model (0D model) for both the in-core corium propagation transient and the characterization of the mode of corium transfer from the core to the vessel. A degraded core with a formed corium pool is used as an initial state. This initial state can be obtained from a simulation computed with an integral code. This model does not use a grid for the core as integral codes do. Geometrical shapes and 0D models are associated with the corium pool and the other components of the degraded core (debris, heavy reflector, core plate...). During the transient, these shapes evolve taking into account the thermal and stratification behavior of the corium pool and the melting of the core surrounding components. Some results corresponding to the corium pool propagation in core transients obtained with this model on a LWR with a heavy reflector are given and compared to grid approach of the integral codes MAAP4

  12. CFD approach to modeling of core-concrete interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladimir V Chudanov; Anna E Aksenova; Valerii A Pervichko

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: A large attention is given to research behavior of concrete structures at high mechanical and thermal loadings, which those suffer at the severe accidents on Nuclear Power Plants with core melting and falling of the molten corium mass into reactor shaft. There are enough programs for analysis of heat and mass transfer processes at interaction of the molten corium with concrete. Most known among them CORCON and WECHSL, which were developed more than twenty years ago, allow considering a quasi-stationary phase decomposition of concrete and the some transition regimes. In opposing to the mentioned codes a new more generalized mathematical model and software are developed for modeling of a wide range of the heat and mass transfer processes under study of the molten core-concrete interaction. The developed mathematical model is based on the Navier-Stokes equations with variable properties with taking into account of a density jump under melting of concrete together with a heat transfer equation. The offered numerical technique is based on modern algorithms with small scheme diffusion, whose discrete approximations are constructed with use of finite-volume methods and the fully staggered grids. The developed software corresponds to modern level of development of computers and takes into account all phenomenology, used by mentioned codes, and allows to simulate the such phenomena and processes as: multidimensional heat transfer in concrete for modeling of transients for an intermediate thermal flux to concrete; direct erosion of concrete at a quasi-stationary regime of interaction with molten fuel masses; heat and mass transfer in corium and convective intermixing in a melt of corium with taking into account of its stratification on two layers of the metal and oxide components and heat transfer by radiation in a cavity of the reactor shaft; change physical properties of corium at concrete decomposition and release in corium of its

  13. Calculation of individual and population doses on Danish territory resulting from hypothetical core-melt accidents at the Barsebaeck reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Individual and population doses within Danish territory are calculated from hypothetical, severe core-melt accidents at the Swedish nuclear plant at Barsebaeck. The fission product inventory of the Barsebaeck reactor is calculated. The release fractions for the accidents are taken from WASH-1400. Based on parametric studies, doses are calculated for very unfavourable, but not incredible weather conditions. The probability of such conditions in combination with wind direction towards Danish territory is estimated. Doses to bone marrow, lungs, GI-tract and thyroid are calculated based on dose models developed at Risoe. These doses are found to be consistent with doses calculated with the models used in WASH-1400. (author)

  14. Multiscale approach to equilibrating model polymer melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svaneborg, Carsten; Ali Karimi-Varzaneh, Hossein; Hojdis, Nils

    2016-01-01

    We present an effective and simple multiscale method for equilibrating Kremer Grest model polymer melts of varying stiffness. In our approach, we progressively equilibrate the melt structure above the tube scale, inside the tube and finally at the monomeric scale. We make use of models designed...

  15. Recent progress in the LACOMERA Project (Large-Scale Experiments on Core Degradation, Melt Retention and Coolability) at the Forschungszentrum Karslruhe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miassoedov, A.; Alsmeyer, H.; Eppinger, B.; Meyer, L.; Steinbrueck, M.

    2004-01-01

    The LACOMERA Project at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (FZK) is a 3 year action within the 5 th Framework Programme of the EU. The overall objective of the project is to offer research institutions from the EU member countries and associated states access to four large-scale experimental facilities QUENCH, LIVE, DISCO-H, and COMET which can be used to investigate core melt scenarios from the beginning of core degradation to melt formation and relocation in the vessel, possible melt dispersion to the reactor cavity, and finally corium concrete interaction and corium coolability in the reactor cavity. As a result of two calls for proposals, seven organisations from four countries are expected to profit from the LACOMERA Project participating in preparation, conduct and analysis of the following experiments: QUENCH-L1: Air ingression impact on core degradation. The test has provided unique data for the investigation of air ingress phenomenology in conditions as representative as possible of the reactor case regarding the source term. QUENCH-L2: Boil-off of a flooded bundle. The test will be of a generic interest for all reactor types, providing a link between the severe accident and design basis areas, and would deliver oxidation and thermal hydraulic data at high temperatures. LIVE-L1: Simulation of melt relocation into the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) lower head for VVER conditions. The experiment will provide important information on the melt pool behaviour during the stages of air circulation at the outer RPV surface with a subsequent flooding of the lower head. LIVE-L2: Transient corium spreading and its impact on the heat fluxes to the RPV wall and on the final shape of the melt in the RPV lower head. The test will address the questions of melt stabilisation and the effects of crust formation near the RPV wall for a nonsymmetrical melt pool shape. COMET-L1: Long-term 2D concrete ablation in siliceous concrete cavity at intermediate decay heat power level with

  16. Assessment of uncertainties in core melt phenomenology and their impact on risk at the Z/IP facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pratt, W.T.; Ludewig, H.; Bari, R.A.; Meyer, J.F.

    1983-01-01

    An evaluation of core meltdown accidents in the Z/IP facilities has been performed. Containment event trees have been developed to relate the progression of a given accident to various potential containment building failure modes. An extensive uncertainty analysis related to core melt phenomenology has been performed. A major conclusion of the study is that large variations in parameters associated with major phenomenological uncertainties have a relatively minor impact on risk when external initiators are considered. This is due to the inherent capability fo the Z/IP containment buildings to contain a wide range of core meltdown accidents. 12 references, 2 tables

  17. Improvement of molten core-concrete interaction model of the debris spreading analysis model in the SAMPSON code - 15193

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidaka, M.; Fujii, T.; Sakai, T.

    2015-01-01

    A debris spreading analysis (DSA) module has been developed and improved. The module is used in the severe accident analysis code SAMPSON and it has models for 3-dimensional natural convection with simultaneous spreading, melting and solidification. The existing analysis method of the quasi-3D boundary transportation to simulate downward concrete erosion for evaluation of molten-core concrete interaction (MCCI) was improved to full-3D to solve, for instance, debris lateral erosion under concrete floors at the bottom of the sump pit. In the advanced MCCI model, buffer cells were defined in order to solve numerical problems in case of trammel formation. Mass, momentum, and the advection term of energy between the debris melt cells and the buffer cells are solved. On the other hand, only the heat transfer and thermal conduction are solved between the debris melt cells and the structure cells, and the crust cells and the structure cells. As a preliminary analysis, a validation calculation was performed for erosion that occurred in the core-concrete interaction (CCI-2) test in the OECD/MCCI program. Comparison between the calculation and the CCI-2 test results showed the analysis has the ability to simulate debris lateral erosion under concrete floors. (authors)

  18. Modelling of the controlled melt flow in a glass melting space – Its melting performance and heat losses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jebavá, Marcela; Dyrčíková, Petra; Němec, Lubomír

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 430, DEC 15 (2015), s. 52-63 ISSN 0022-3093 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : glass melt flow * mathematical modelling * energy distribution * space utilizatios * melting performance Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 1.825, year: 2015

  19. Melts of garnet lherzolite: experiments, models and comparison to melts of pyroxenite and carbonated lherzolite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, Timothy L.; Holbig, Eva S.; Barr, Jay A.; Till, Christy B.; Krawczynski, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Phase equilibrium experiments on a compositionally modified olivine leucitite from the Tibetan plateau have been carried out from 2.2 to 2.8 GPa and 1,380–1,480 °C. The experiments-produced liquids multiply saturated with spinel and garnet lherzolite phase assemblages (olivine, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene and spinel ± garnet) under nominally anhydrous conditions. These SiO2-undersaturated liquids and published experimental data are utilized to develop a predictive model for garnet lherzolite melting of compositionally variable mantle under anhydrous conditions over the pressure range of 1.9–6 GPa. The model estimates the major element compositions of garnet-saturated melts for a range of mantle lherzolite compositions and predicts the conditions of the spinel to garnet lherzolite phase transition for natural peridotite compositions at above-solidus temperatures and pressures. We compare our predicted garnet lherzolite melts to those of pyroxenite and carbonated lherzolite and develop criteria for distinguishing among melts of these different source types. We also use the model in conjunction with a published predictive model for plagioclase and spinel lherzolite to characterize the differences in major element composition for melts in the plagioclase, spinel and garnet facies and develop tests to distinguish between melts of these three lherzolite facies based on major elements. The model is applied to understand the source materials and conditions of melting for high-K lavas erupted in the Tibetan plateau, basanite–nephelinite lavas erupted early in the evolution of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii, as well as younger tholeiitic to alkali lavas from Kilauea.

  20. The influence of chemistry on core melt accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liljenzin, J.O.

    1990-01-01

    Chemical reactions play an important role in assessing the safety of nuclear power plants. The main source of heat in the early stage of an accident is due to a chemical reaction between steam and the circonium encapsulating the nuclear fuel. The heating and melting of fuel leads to a release of fission products which rapidly condense to form particles suspended in the surrounding gas. These aerosols are the main carriers of radioactivity as they may transport active material from the reactor vessel into the reactor containment building where it is deposited. The content of fission products in the aerosol particles and their chemical form determine their interaction with water molecules. Chemical forces laed to an absorption of water in the particles which transforms them into droplets with increased mass. The particles become spherical and hence deposit more rapidly on surrounding surfaces. There is a rapid reaction between boron carbide and stainless steel in the control blades of boiling water reactors. There is only a small formation of boric acid. This leads to a smaller formation of volatile iodine compounds. But the alloying process is likely to cause melting of the control blades so the are removed from the reactor core, a process which may have negative secondary effects. It has been found that a series of materials that are present in the reactor containment are likely to participate in various chemical reactions during an accident. Among these are electric cables, motors, thermal insulation, surface coatings and sheet metal. Metallic surface coatings and sheet metal can be some of the main sources of hydrogen. Effects from chemical reactions can be more accurately predicted by the new SHMAPP code, developed within this project, combining thermal, hydraulic and chemical phenomena. (AB)

  1. State of the Art Report for the In-Vessel Late Core Melt Progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hee Dong; Kang, Kyoung Ho; Park, Rae Joon

    2009-04-01

    The formation of corium pool in the reactor vessel lower head and its behavior is still an important issue. This issue is closely related to understanding of the core melting, its course, critical phases and timing during severe accidents and the influence of these processes on the accident progression, especially the evaluation of in-vessel retention by external reactor vessel cooling (IVR-ERVC) as a severe accident management strategy. The previous researches focused on the quisi-steady state behavior of molten corium pool in the lower head and related in-vessel retention problem. However, questions of the feasibility of the in-vessel retention concept for high power density reactor and uncertainties due to layering effect require further studies. These researches are rather essential to consider the whole evolution of the accident including formation and growth of the molten pool and the characteristic of corium arrival in the lower head and molten pool behavior after the core debris remelting. The general objective of the LIVE program performed at FzK is to study the corium pool formation and behavior with emphasis on the transient behavior through the large scale 3-D experiments. In this report, description of LIVE experimental facility and results of performance test are briefly summarized and the process to select the simulant is depicted. Also, the results of LIVE L1 and L2 tests and analytical models are included. These experimental results are very useful to development and verification of the model of molten corium pool behavior

  2. Studies of Behavior Melting Temperature Characteristics for Multi Thermocouple In-Core Instrument Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Donghyup; Chae, Myoungeun; Kim, Sungjin; Lee, Kyulim [Woojin inc, Hwasung (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Bottom-up type in-core instruments (ICIs) are used for the pressurized water reactors of OPR-1000, APR- 1400 in order to measure neutron flux and temperature in the reactor. It is a well-known technique and a proven design using years in the nuclear field. ICI consists of one pair of K-type thermocouple, five self-powered neutron detectors (SPNDs) and one back ground detector. K-type thermocouple's purpose is to measure the core exit temperature (CET) in the reactor. The CET is a very important factor for operating nuclear power plants and it is 327 .deg. C when generally operating the reactor in the nuclear power plant(NPP) in case of OPR- 1000. If the CET will exceed 650 .deg. C, Operators in the main control room should be considered to be an accident situation in accordance with a severe accident management guidance(SAMG). The Multi Thermocouple ICI is a new designed ICI assuming severe accident conditions. It consists of four more thermocouples than the existing design, so it has five Ktype thermocouples besides the thermocouple measuring CET is located in the same elevation as the ICI. Each thermocouple is able to be located in the desired location as required. The Multi Thermocouple ICI helps to measure the temperature distribution of the entire reactor. In addition, it will measure certain point of melted core because of the in-vessel debris of nuclear fuel when an accident occurs more seriously. In this paper, to simulate a circumstance such as a nuclear reactor severe accident was examined. In this study, the K-type thermocouples of Multi Thermocouple ICI was confirmed experimentally to be able to measure up to 1370 .deg. C before the thermocouples have been melted. And after the thermocouples were melted by debris, it was able to be monitored that the signal of EMF directed the infinite value of voltage. Therefore through the results of the test, it can be assumed that if any EMF data among the Multi Thermocouple ICI will direct the infinite value

  3. Studies of Behavior Melting Temperature Characteristics for Multi Thermocouple In-Core Instrument Assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Donghyup; Chae, Myoungeun; Kim, Sungjin; Lee, Kyulim

    2015-01-01

    Bottom-up type in-core instruments (ICIs) are used for the pressurized water reactors of OPR-1000, APR- 1400 in order to measure neutron flux and temperature in the reactor. It is a well-known technique and a proven design using years in the nuclear field. ICI consists of one pair of K-type thermocouple, five self-powered neutron detectors (SPNDs) and one back ground detector. K-type thermocouple's purpose is to measure the core exit temperature (CET) in the reactor. The CET is a very important factor for operating nuclear power plants and it is 327 .deg. C when generally operating the reactor in the nuclear power plant(NPP) in case of OPR- 1000. If the CET will exceed 650 .deg. C, Operators in the main control room should be considered to be an accident situation in accordance with a severe accident management guidance(SAMG). The Multi Thermocouple ICI is a new designed ICI assuming severe accident conditions. It consists of four more thermocouples than the existing design, so it has five Ktype thermocouples besides the thermocouple measuring CET is located in the same elevation as the ICI. Each thermocouple is able to be located in the desired location as required. The Multi Thermocouple ICI helps to measure the temperature distribution of the entire reactor. In addition, it will measure certain point of melted core because of the in-vessel debris of nuclear fuel when an accident occurs more seriously. In this paper, to simulate a circumstance such as a nuclear reactor severe accident was examined. In this study, the K-type thermocouples of Multi Thermocouple ICI was confirmed experimentally to be able to measure up to 1370 .deg. C before the thermocouples have been melted. And after the thermocouples were melted by debris, it was able to be monitored that the signal of EMF directed the infinite value of voltage. Therefore through the results of the test, it can be assumed that if any EMF data among the Multi Thermocouple ICI will direct the infinite value

  4. Evaluation of an experiment modelling heat transfer from the melt pool for use in VVER 440/213 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skop, J.

    2003-12-01

    The strategy of confining core melt within the reactor vessel is among promising strategies to mitigate severe accidents of VVER 440/213 reactors. This strategy consists in residual heat removal from the melt by external vessel cooling from the outside, using water from the flooded reactor downcomer. This approach can only be successful if the critical heat flux on the external vessel surface is not exceeded. This can be assessed based on the parameters of heat transfer from the core melt pool in the conditions of natural circulation within the pool. Those parameters are the subject of the report. A basic description of the terms and physical basis of the strategy of confining core melt inside the vessel is given in Chapter 2, which also briefly explains similarity theory, based on which the results obtained on experimental facilities, using simulation materials, can be related to the actual situation inside a real reactor. Chapter 3 presents an overview of experimental work addressing the characteristics of heat transfer from the core melt pool in natural circulation conditions and a description of the experimental facilities. An overview of the results emerging from the experiments and their evaluation with respect to their applicability to reactors in Czech nuclear power plants are given in Chapter 4

  5. Models and observations of Arctic melt ponds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, K. M.

    2016-12-01

    During the Arctic melt season, the sea ice surface undergoes a striking transformation from vast expanses of snow covered ice to complex mosaics of ice and melt ponds. Sea ice albedo, a key parameter in climate modeling, is largely determined by the complex evolution of melt pond configurations. In fact, ice-albedo feedback has played a significant role in the recent declines of the summer Arctic sea ice pack. However, understanding melt pond evolution remains a challenge to improving climate projections. It has been found that as the ponds grow and coalesce, the fractal dimension of their boundaries undergoes a transition from 1 to about 2, around a critical length scale of 100 square meters in area. As the ponds evolve they take complex, self-similar shapes with boundaries resembling space-filling curves. I will outline how mathematical models of composite materials and statistical physics, such as percolation and Ising models, are being used to describe this evolution and predict key geometrical parameters that agree very closely with observations.

  6. Numerical simulation of hot-melt extrusion processes for amorphous solid dispersions using model-based melt viscosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochmann, Esther S; Steffens, Kristina E; Gryczke, Andreas; Wagner, Karl G

    2018-03-01

    Simulation of HME processes is a valuable tool for increased process understanding and ease of scale-up. However, the experimental determination of all required input parameters is tedious, namely the melt rheology of the amorphous solid dispersion (ASD) in question. Hence, a procedure to simplify the application of hot-melt extrusion (HME) simulation for forming amorphous solid dispersions (ASD) is presented. The commercial 1D simulation software Ludovic ® was used to conduct (i) simulations using a full experimental data set of all input variables including melt rheology and (ii) simulations using model-based melt viscosity data based on the ASDs glass transition and the physical properties of polymeric matrix only. Both types of HME computation were further compared to experimental HME results. Variation in physical properties (e.g. heat capacity, density) and several process characteristics of HME (residence time distribution, energy consumption) among the simulations and experiments were evaluated. The model-based melt viscosity was calculated by using the glass transition temperature (T g ) of the investigated blend and the melt viscosity of the polymeric matrix by means of a T g -viscosity correlation. The results of measured melt viscosity and model-based melt viscosity were similar with only few exceptions, leading to similar HME simulation outcomes. At the end, the experimental effort prior to HME simulation could be minimized and the procedure enables a good starting point for rational development of ASDs by means of HME. As model excipients, Vinylpyrrolidone-vinyl acetate copolymer (COP) in combination with various APIs (carbamazepine, dipyridamole, indomethacin, and ibuprofen) or polyethylene glycol (PEG 1500) as plasticizer were used to form the ASDs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Structure of a mushy layer at the inner core boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deguen, R.; Huguet, L.; Bergman, M. I.; Labrosse, S.; Alboussiere, T.

    2015-12-01

    We present experimental results on the solidification of ammonium chloride from an aqueous solution, yielding a mushy zone, under hyper-gravity. A commercial centrifuge has been equipped with a slip-ring so that electric power, temperature and ultrasonic signals could be transmitted between the experimental setup and the laboratory. A Peltier element provides cooling at the bottom of the cell. Probes monitor the temperature along the height of the cell. Ultrasound measurements (2 to 6 MHz) is used to detect the position of the front of the mushy zone and to determine attenuation in the mush. A significant increase of solid fraction (or decrease of mushy layer thickness) and attenuation in the mush is observed as gravity is increased. Kinetic undercooling is significant in our experiments and has been included in a macroscopic mush model. The other ingredients of the model are conservation of energy and chemical species, along with heat/species transfer between the mush and the liquid phase: boundary-layer exchanges at the top of the mush and bulk convection within the mush (formation of chimneys). The outputs of the model compare well with our experiments. We have then run the model in a range of parameters suitable for the Earth's inner core, which has shown the role of bulk mush convection for the inner core and the reason why a solid fraction very close to unity should be expected. We have also run melting experiments: after crystallization of a mush, the liquid has been heated from above until the mush started to melt, while the bottom cold temperature was maintained. These melting experiments were motivated by the possible local melting at the inner core boundary that has been invoked to explain the formation of the anomalously slow F-layer at the bottom of the outer core or inner core hemispherical asymmetry. Oddly, the consequences of melting are an increase in solid fraction and a decrease in attenuation. It is hence possible that surface seismic velocity

  8. Electrical resistivity discontinuity of iron along the melting curve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagle, Fabian; Steinle-Neumann, Gerd

    2018-04-01

    Discontinuous changes of electrical resistivity ρel (increase), density ϱ and isothermal compressibility βT (decrease) occur across the melting temperature of metals and can be directly related by Ziman's theory in the long-wavelength approximation. By evaluating experimental data at ambient pressure, we show that Ziman's approximation holds for iron and other simple and transition metals. Using a thermodynamic model to determine βT for γ-, ɛ- and liquid Fe and a previously published model for ρel of liquid Fe, we apply Ziman's approximation to calculate ρel of solid Fe along the melting curve. For pure Fe, we find the discontinuity in ρel to decrease with pressure and to be negligibly small at inner core boundary conditions. However, if we account for light element enrichment in the liquid outer core, the electrical resistivity decrease across the inner core boundary is predicted to be as large as 36 per cent.

  9. Core degradation and fission product release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, R.W.; Hagen, S.J.L.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments on core degradation and melt progression in severe LWR accidents have provided reasonable understanding of the principal processes involved in the early phase of melt progression that extends through core degradation and metallic material melting and relocation. A general but not a quantitative understanding of late phase melt progression that involves ceramic material melting and relocation has also been obtained, primarily from the TMI-2 core examination. A summary is given of the current state of knowledge on core degradation and melt progression obtained from these integral experiments and of the principal remaining significant uncertainties. A summary is also given of the principal results on in-vessel fission product release obtained from these experiments. (author). 8 refs, 5 figs, 3 tabs

  10. Coolability in the frame of core melt accidents in light water reactors. Model development and validation for ATHLET-CD and ASTEC. Final report; Kuehlbarkeit im Rahmen von Kernschmelzunfaellen bei Leichtwasserreaktoren. Modellentwicklung und Validierung fuer ATHLET-CD und ASTEC. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buck, Michael; Pohlner, Georg; Rahman, Saidur; Berkhan, Ana

    2015-07-15

    The code system ATHLET/ATHLET-CD is being developed in the frame of the reactor safety research of the German Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi) within the topic analysis of transients and accident sequences. It serves for simulation of transients and accidents to be used in safety analyses for light water reactors. In the present project the development and validation of models for ATHLET-CD for description of the processes during severe accidents are continued. These works should enable broad safety analyses by a mechanistic description of the processes even during late phases of a degrading core and by this a profound estimation on coolability and accident management options during every phase. With the actual status of modelling in ATHLET-CD analyses on coolability are made to give a solid base for estimates about stabilization by cooling or accident progression, dependent on the scenario. The modeling in the MEWA module, describing the processes in a severely degraded core in ATHLET-CD, is extended on the processes in the lower plenum. For this, the model on melt pool behavior is extended and linked to the RPV wall. The coupling between MEWA and the thermal-hydraulics of ATHLET-CD is improved. The validation of the models is continued by calculations on new experiments and comparing analyses done in the frame of the European Network SARNET-2. For the European integral code ASTEC contributions from the modeling for ATHLET-CD will be done, especially by providing a model for the melt behavior in the lower plenum of a LWR. This report illustrates the work carried out in the frame of this project, and shows results of calculations and the status of validation by recalculations on experiments for debris bed coolability, melt pool behavior as well as jet fragmentation and debris bed formation.

  11. Melt cooling by bottom flooding: The experiment CometPC-H3. Ex-vessel core melt stabilization research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alsmeyer, H.; Cron, T.; Merkel, G.; Schmidt-Stiefel, S.; Tromm, W.; Wenz, T.

    2003-03-01

    The CometPC-H3 experiment was performed to investigate melt cooling by water addition to the bottom of the melt. The experiment was performed with a melt mass of 800 kg, 50% metal and 50% oxide, and 300 kW typical decay heat were simulated in the melt. As this was the first experiment after repair of the induction coil, attention was given to avoid overload of the induction coil and to keep the inductor voltage below critical values. Therefore, the height of the sacrificial concrete layer was reduced to 5 cm only, and the height of the porous concrete layers was also minimized to have a small distance and good coupling between heated melt and induction coil. After quite homogeneous erosion of the upper sacrificial concrete layer, passive bottom flooding started from the porous concrete after 220 s with 1.3 liter water/s. The melt was safely stopped, arrested and cooled. The porous, water filled concrete was only slightly attacked by the hot melt in the upper 25 mm of one sector of the coolant device. The peak cooling rate in the early contact phase of coolant water and melt was 4 MW/m 2 , and exceeded the decay heat by one order of magnitude. The cooling rate remarkably dropped, when the melt was covered by the penetrating water and a surface crust was formed. Volcanic eruptions from the melt during the solidification process were observed from 360 - 510 s and created a volcanic dome some 25 cm high, but had only minor effect on the generation of a porous structure, as the expelled melt solidified mostly with low porosity. Unfortunately, decay heat simulation in the melt was interrupted at 720 s by an incorrect safety signal, which excluded further investigation of the long term cooling processes. At that time, the melt was massively flooded by a layer of water, about 80 cm thick, and coolant water inflow was still 1 l/s. The melt had reached a stable situation: Downward erosion was stopped by the cooling process from the water filled, porous concrete layer. Top

  12. The matter of probability controlling melting of nuclear ship reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pihowicz, W.; Sobczyk, S.

    2008-01-01

    In the first part of this work beside description of split power, power of radioactivity disintegration and afterpower and its ability to extinguish, the genera condition of melting nuclear reactor core and its detailed versions were described. This paper also include the description of consequences melting nuclear reactor core both in case of stationary and mobile (ship) reactor and underline substantial differences. Next, fulfilled with succeed, control under melting of stationary nuclear reactor core was characterized.The middle part describe author's idea of controlling melting of nuclear ship reactor core. It is based on: - the suggestion of prevention pressure's untightness in safety tank of nuclear ship reactor by '' corium '' - and the suggestion of preventing walls of this tank from melting by '' corium ''. In the end the technological and construction barriers of the prevention from melting nuclear ship reactor and draw conclusions was presented. (author)

  13. Acoustic detection of melt particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costley, R.D. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The Reactor Safety Research Department at Sandia National Laboratories is investigating a type of Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA). In this particular type of accident, core meltdown occurs while the pressure within the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) is high. If one of the instrument tube penetrations in the lower head fails, melt particles stream through the cavity and into the containment vessel. This experiment, which simulates this type accident, was performed in the Surtsev Direct Heating Test Facility which is approximately a 1:10 linear scaling of a large dry containment volume. A 1:10 linear scale model of the reactor cavity was placed near the bottom of the Surtsey vessel so that the exit of the cavity was at the vertical centerline of the vessel. A pressure vessel used to create the simulated molten core debris was located at the scaled height of the RPV. In order to better understand how the melt leaves the cavity and streams into the containment an array of five acoustic sensors was placed directly in the path of the melt particles about 30 feet from the exit of the sealed cavity. Highly damped, broadband sensors were chosen to minimize ringing so that individual particle hits could be detected. The goal was to count the signals produced by the individual particle hits to get some idea of how the melt particles left the cavity. This document presents some of the results of the experiment. 9 figs

  14. Multistage Core Formation in Planetesimals Revealed by Numerical Modeling and Hf-W Chronometry of Iron Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, W.; Kruijer, T. S.; Breuer, D.; Kleine, T.

    2018-02-01

    Iron meteorites provide some of the most direct insights into the processes and timescales of core formation in planetesimals. Of these, group IVB irons stand out by having one of the youngest 182Hf-182W model ages for metal segregation (2.9 ± 0.6 Ma after solar system formation), as well as the lowest bulk sulfur content and hence highest liquidus temperature. Here, using a new model for the internal evolution of the IVB parent body, we show that a single stage of metal-silicate separation cannot account for the complete melting of pure Fe metal at the relatively late time given by the Hf-W model age. Instead, a complex metal-silicate separation scenario is required that includes migration of partial silicate melts, formation of a shallow magma ocean, and core formation in two distinct stages of metal segregation. In the first stage, a protocore formed at ≈1.5 Ma via settling of metal particles in a mantle magma ocean, followed by metal segregation from a shallow magma ocean at ≈5.4 Ma. As these stages of metal segregation occurred at different times, the two metal fractions had different 182W compositions. Consequently, the final 182W composition of the IVB core does not correspond to a single differentiation event, but represents the average composition of early- and late-segregated core fractions. Our best fit model indicates an ≈100 km radius for the IVB parent body and provides an accretion age of ≈0.1-0.5 Ma after solar system formation. The computed solidification time is, furthermore, consistent with the Re-Os age for crystallization of the IVB core.

  15. Diffusion of hydrous species in model basaltic melt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Guo, Xuan; Wang, Qinxia; Ding, Jiale; Ni, Huaiwei

    2017-10-01

    Water diffusion in Fe-free model basaltic melt with up to 2 wt% H2O was investigated at 1658-1846 K and 1 GPa in piston-cylinder apparatus using both hydration and diffusion couple techniques. Diffusion profiles measured by FTIR are consistent with a model in which both molecular H2O (H2Om) and hydroxyl (OH) contribute to water diffusion. OH diffusivity is roughly 13% of H2Om diffusivity, showing little dependence on temperature or water concentration. Water diffusion is dominated by the motion of OH until total H2O (H2Ot) concentration reaches 1 wt%. The dependence of apparent H2Ot diffusivity on H2Ot concentration appears to be overestimated by a previous study on MORB melt, but H2Ot diffusivity at 1 wt% H2Ot in basaltic melt is still greater than those in rhyolitic to andesitic melts. The appreciable contribution of OH to water diffusion in basaltic melt can be explained by enhanced mobility of OH, probably associated with the development of free hydroxyl bonded with network-modifying cations, as well as higher OH concentration. Calculation based on the Nernst-Einstein equation demonstrates that OH may serve as an effective charge carrier in hydrous basaltic melt, which could partly account for the previously observed strong influence of water on electrical conductivity of basaltic melt.

  16. Simulant - water experiments to characterize the debris bed formed in severe core melt accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathai, Amala M.; Anandan, J.; Sharma, Anil Kumar; Murthy, S.S.; Malarvizhi, B.; Lydia, G.; Das, Sanjay Kumar; Nashine, B.K.; Selvaraj, P.

    2015-01-01

    Molten Fuel Coolant Interaction (WO) and debris bed configuration on the core catcher plate assumes importance in assessing the Post Accident Heat Removal (PARR) of a heat generating debris bed. The key factors affecting the coolability of the debris bed are the bed porosity, morphology of the fragmented particles, degree of spreading/heaping of the debris on the core catcher and the fraction of lump formed. Experiments are conducted to understand the fragmentation kinetics and subsequent debris bed formation of molten woods metal in water at interface temperatures near the spontaneous nucleation temperature of water. Morphology of the debris particles is investigated to understand the fragmentation mechanisms involved. The spreading behavior of the debris on the catcher plate and the particle size distribution are presented for 5 kg and 10 kg melt inventories. Porosity of the undisturbed bed on the catcher plate is evaluated using a LASER sensor technique. (author)

  17. Corium melt researches at VESTA test facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwan Yeol Kim

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available VESTA (Verification of Ex-vessel corium STAbilization and VESTA-S (-small test facilities were constructed at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute in 2010 to perform various corium melt experiments. Since then, several tests have been performed for the verification of an ex-vessel core catcher design for the EU-APR1400. Ablation tests of an impinging ZrO2 melt jet on a sacrificial material were performed to investigate the ablation characteristics. ZrO2 melt in an amount of 65–70 kg was discharged onto a sacrificial material through a well-designed nozzle, after which the ablation depths were measured. Interaction tests between the metallic melt and sacrificial material were performed to investigate the interaction kinetics of the sacrificial material. Two types of melt were used: one is a metallic corium melt with Fe 46%, U 31%, Zr 16%, and Cr 7% (maximum possible content of U and Zr for C-40, and the other is a stainless steel (SUS304 melt. Metallic melt in an amount of 1.5–2.0 kg was delivered onto the sacrificial material, and the ablation depths were measured. Penetration tube failure tests were performed for an APR1400 equipped with 61 in-core instrumentation penetration nozzles and extended tubes at the reactor lower vessel. ZrO2 melt was generated in a melting crucible and delivered down into an interaction crucible where the test specimen is installed. To evaluate the tube ejection mechanism, temperature distributions of the reactor bottom head and in-core instrumentation penetration were measured by a series of thermocouples embedded along the specimen. In addition, lower vessel failure tests for the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant are being performed. As a first step, the configuration of the molten core in the plant was investigated by a melting and solidification experiment. Approximately 5 kg of a mixture, whose composition in terms of weight is UO2 60%, Zr 10%, ZrO2 15%, SUS304 14%, and B4C 1%, was melted in a

  18. The MELTSPREAD Code for Modeling of Ex-Vessel Core Debris Spreading Behavior, Code Manual – Version3-beta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, M. T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-09-01

    MELTSPREAD3 is a transient one-dimensional computer code that has been developed to predict the gravity-driven flow and freezing behavior of molten reactor core materials (corium) in containment geometries. Predictions can be made for corium flowing across surfaces under either dry or wet cavity conditions. The spreading surfaces that can be selected are steel, concrete, a user-specified material (e.g., a ceramic), or an arbitrary combination thereof. The corium can have a wide range of compositions of reactor core materials that includes distinct oxide phases (predominantly Zr, and steel oxides) plus metallic phases (predominantly Zr and steel). The code requires input that describes the containment geometry, melt “pour” conditions, and cavity atmospheric conditions (i.e., pressure, temperature, and cavity flooding information). For cases in which the cavity contains a preexisting water layer at the time of RPV failure, melt jet breakup and particle bed formation can be calculated mechanistically given the time-dependent melt pour conditions (input data) as well as the heatup and boiloff of water in the melt impingement zone (calculated). For core debris impacting either the containment floor or previously spread material, the code calculates the transient hydrodynamics and heat transfer which determine the spreading and freezing behavior of the melt. The code predicts conditions at the end of the spreading stage, including melt relocation distance, depth and material composition profiles, substrate ablation profile, and wall heatup. Code output can be used as input to other models such as CORQUENCH that evaluate long term core-concrete interaction behavior following the transient spreading stage. MELTSPREAD3 was originally developed to investigate BWR Mark I liner vulnerability, but has been substantially upgraded and applied to other reactor designs (e.g., the EPR), and more recently to the plant accidents at Fukushima Daiichi. The most recent round of

  19. Radioactive contamination of Danish territory after core-melt accidents at the Barsebaeck power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gjoerup, H.L.; Jensen, N.O.; Hedemann Jensen, P.; Kristensen, L.; Nielsen, O.J.; Petersen, E.L.; Petersen, T.; Roed, J.; Thykier-Nielsen, S.; Heikel Vinter, F.; Warming, L.; Aarkrog, A.

    1982-03-01

    An assessment is made of the radioactive contamination of Danish territory in the event of a core-melt accident at the Barsebaeck nuclear power plant in Sweden. Accidents including both core melt-down and containment failure are considered. Consequences are calculated for a BWR-3 release under common meteorological conditions and for a BWR-2 release under extreme meteorological conditions. Calculations are based on experiments and theoretical work relating to deposition velocities for different types of surface, shielding effect of structures, and weathering. The effects are described of different dose-reducing measures, e.g., decontamination, relocation, destruction of contaminated foodstuffs. The collective effective dose equivalent from external gamma radiation from deposited activity integrated over a time period of 30 years, is calculated to be 3.6 Megamanrem in the BWR-3 case without dose-reducing measures. For the BWR-2 case, the corresponding dose is approx. 41 Megamanrem. A combination of temporary relocation, hosing of roads etc. and digging of gardens is estimated to reduce these doses to approx. 2.5 Megamanrem and approx. 15 Megamanrem, respectively. The collective committed effective dose equivalent from the consumption of contaminated foodstuffs is calculated to 23 Megamanrem in the BWR-3 case without dose-reducing measures. This dose could be reduced to 0.2 Megamanrem if contaminated crops are destroyed during the first year after the accident and if changes are made in agricultural production in the contaminated area. The corresponding doses in the BWR-2 case would be 197 Megamanrem and 1.4 Megmanrem, respectively. (author)

  20. A multi-component evaporation model for beam melting processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klassen, Alexander; Forster, Vera E.; Körner, Carolin

    2017-02-01

    In additive manufacturing using laser or electron beam melting technologies, evaporation losses and changes in chemical composition are known issues when processing alloys with volatile elements. In this paper, a recently described numerical model based on a two-dimensional free surface lattice Boltzmann method is further developed to incorporate the effects of multi-component evaporation. The model takes into account the local melt pool composition during heating and fusion of metal powder. For validation, the titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V is melted by selective electron beam melting and analysed using mass loss measurements and high-resolution microprobe imaging. Numerically determined evaporation losses and spatial distributions of aluminium compare well with experimental data. Predictions of the melt pool formation in bulk samples provide insight into the competition between the loss of volatile alloying elements from the irradiated surface and their advective redistribution within the molten region.

  1. Calculations with ANSYS/FLOTRAN to a core catcher benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willschuetz, H.G.

    1999-01-01

    There are numerous experiments for the exploration of the corium spreading behaviour, but comparable data have not been available up to now in the field of the long-term behaviour of a corium expanded in a core catcher. For the calculations a pure liquid oxidic melt with a homogeneous internal heat source was assumed. The melt was distributed uniformly over the spreading area of the EPR core catcher. All codes applied the well known k-ε-turbulence-model to simulate the turbulent flow regime of this melt configuration. While the FVM-code calculations were performed with three dimensional models using a simple symmetry, the problem was modelled two-dimensionally with ANSYS due to limited CPU performance. In addition, the 2D results of ANSYS should allow a comparison for the planned second stage of the calculations. In this second stage, the behaviour of a segregated metal oxide melt should be examined. However, first estimates and pre-calculations showed that a 3D simulation of the problem is not possible with any of the codes due to lacking computer performance. (orig.)

  2. Transient refractory material dissolution by a volumetrically-heated melt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seiler, Jean Marie, E-mail: jean-marie.seiler@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DTN, 17 Rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Ratel, Gilles [CEA, DEN, DTN, 17 Rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Combeau, Hervé [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR 7198, Lorraine University, Ecole des Mines de Nancy, Parc de Saurupt, 54042 Nancy Cedex (France); Gaus-Liu, Xiaoyang; Kretzschmar, Frank; Miassoedov, Alexei [Karlsruhe Institut of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • We describe a test investigating ceramic dissolution by a molten non-eutectic melt. • The evolution of the interface temperature between melt and refractory is measured. • A theoretical model describing dissolution kinetics is proposed. • When dissolution stops, interface temperature is the liquidus temperature of the melt. - Abstract: The present work addresses the question of corium–ceramic interaction in a core catcher during a core-melt accident in a nuclear power plant. It provides an original insight into transient aspects concerning dissolution of refractory material by a volumetrically heated pool. An experiment with simulant material (LIVECERAM) is presented. Test results clearly show that dissolution of solid refractory material can occur in a non-eutectic melt at a temperature which is lower than the melting temperature of the refractory material. During the dissolution transient, the interface temperature rises above the liquidus temperature, corresponding to the instantaneous average composition of the melt pool. With constant power dissipation in the melt and external cooling of the core-catcher, a final steady-state situation is reached. Dissolution stops when the heat flux (delivered by the melt to the refractory) can be removed by conduction through the residual thickness of the ceramic, with T{sub interface} = T{sub liquidus} (calculated for the average composition of the final liquid pool). The final steady state corresponds to a uniform pool composition and uniform interface temperature distribution. Convection in the pool is governed by natural thermal convection and the heat flux distribution is therefore similar to what would be obtained for a single component pool. An interpretation of the experiment with two model-based approaches (0D and 1D) is presented. The mass transfer kinetics between the interface and the bulk is controlled by a diffusion sublayer within the boundary layer. During the dissolution transient

  3. Comparison of the effect of hazard and response/fragility uncertainties on core melt probability uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mensing, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    This report proposes a method for comparing the effects of the uncertainty in probabilistic risk analysis (PRA) input parameters on the uncertainty in the predicted risks. The proposed method is applied to compare the effect of uncertainties in the descriptions of (1) the seismic hazard at a nuclear power plant site and (2) random variations in plant subsystem responses and component fragility on the uncertainty in the predicted probability of core melt. The PRA used is that developed by the Seismic Safety Margins Research Program

  4. Petrological Geodynamics of Mantle Melting I. AlphaMELTS + Multiphase Flow: Dynamic Equilibrium Melting, Method and Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Tirone

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The complex process of melting in the Earth's interior is studied by combining a multiphase numerical flow model with the program AlphaMELTS which provides a petrological description based on thermodynamic principles. The objective is to address the fundamental question of the effect of the mantle and melt dynamics on the composition and abundance of the melt and the residual solid. The conceptual idea is based on a 1-D description of the melting process that develops along an ideal vertical column where local chemical equilibrium is assumed to apply at some level in space and time. By coupling together the transport model and the chemical thermodynamic model, the evolution of the melting process can be described in terms of melt distribution, temperature, pressure and solid and melt velocities but also variation of melt and residual solid composition and mineralogical abundance at any depth over time. In this first installment of a series of three contributions, a two-phase flow model (melt and solid assemblage is developed under the assumption of complete local equilibrium between melt and a peridotitic mantle (dynamic equilibrium melting, DEM. The solid mantle is also assumed to be completely dry. The present study addresses some but not all the potential factors affecting the melting process. The influence of permeability and viscosity of the solid matrix are considered in some detail. The essential features of the dynamic model and how it is interfaced with AlphaMELTS are clearly outlined. A detailed and explicit description of the numerical procedure should make this type of numerical models less obscure. The general observation that can be made from the outcome of several simulations carried out for this work is that the melt composition varies with depth, however the melt abundance not necessarily always increases moving upwards. When a quasi-steady state condition is achieved, that is when melt abundance does not varies significantly

  5. Rapid, dynamic segregation of core forming melts: Results from in-situ High Pressure- High Temperature X-ray Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, H. C.; Yu, T.; Wang, Y.

    2011-12-01

    The timing and mechanisms of core formation in the Earth, as well as in Earth-forming planetesimals is a problem of significant importance in our understanding of the early evolution of terrestrial planets . W-Hf isotopic signatures in meteorites indicate that core formation in small pre-differentiated planetesimals was relatively rapid, and occurred over the span of a few million years. This time scale is difficult to achieve by percolative flow of the metallic phase through a silicate matrix in textural equilibrium. It has been suggested that during this active time in the early solar system, dynamic processes such as impacts may have caused significant deformation in the differentiating planetesimals, which could lead to much higher permeability of the core forming melts. Here, we have measured the change in permeability of core forming melts in a silicate matrix due to deformation. Mixtures of San Carlos olivine and FeS close to the equilibrium percolation threshold (~5 vol%FeS) were pre-synthesized to achieve an equilibrium microstructure, and then loaded into the rotational Drickamer apparatus at GSE-CARS, sector 13-BMD, at the Advanced Photon Source (Argonne National Laboratory). The samples were subsequently pressed to ~2GPa, and heated to 1100°C. Alternating cycles of rotation to collect X-ray tomography images, and twisting to deform the sample were conducted until the sample had been twisted by 1080°. Qualitative and quantitative analyses were performed on the resulting 3-dimensional x-ray tomographic images to evaluate the effect of shear deformation on permeability and migration velocity. Lattice-Boltzmann simulations were conducted, and show a marked increase in the permeability with increasing deformation, which would allow for much more rapid core formation in planetesimals.

  6. Analysis of natural convection in volumetrically-heated melt pools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sehgal, B.R.; Dinh, T.N.; Nourgaliev, R.R.

    1996-12-01

    Results of series of studies on natural convection heat transfer in decay-heated core melt pools which form in a reactor lower plenum during the progression of a core meltdown accident are described. The emphasis is on modelling and prediction of turbulent heat transfer characteristics of natural convection in a liquid pool with an internal energy source. Methods of computational fluid dynamics, including direct numerical simulation, were applied for investigation

  7. Residence time modeling of hot melt extrusion processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, Elena; Podhaisky, Helmut; Ely, David; Thommes, Markus

    2013-11-01

    The hot melt extrusion process is a widespread technique to mix viscous melts. The residence time of material in the process frequently determines the product properties. An experimental setup and a corresponding mathematical model were developed to evaluate residence time and residence time distribution in twin screw extrusion processes. The extrusion process was modeled as the convolution of a mass transport process described by a Gaussian probability function, and a mixing process represented by an exponential function. The residence time of the extrusion process was determined by introducing a tracer at the extruder inlet and measuring the tracer concentration at the die. These concentrations were fitted to the residence time model, and an adequate correlation was found. Different parameters were derived to characterize the extrusion process including the dead time, the apparent mixing volume, and a transport related axial mixing. A 2(3) design of experiments was performed to evaluate the effect of powder feed rate, screw speed, and melt viscosity of the material on the residence time. All three parameters affect the residence time of material in the extruder. In conclusion, a residence time model was developed to interpret experimental data and to get insights into the hot melt extrusion process. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Prediction of thermoplastic failure of a reactor pressure vessel under a postulated core melt accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duijvestijn, G.; Birchley, J.; Reichlin, K.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents the lower head failure calculations performed for a postulated accident scenario in a commercial nuclear power plant. A postulated one inch break in the primary coolant circuit leads to dryout and subsequent meltdown of the core. The reference plant is a pressurized water reactor without penetrations in the reactor vessel lower head. The molten core material accumulates in the lower head, eventually causing failure of the vessel. The analysis investigates flow conditions in the melt pool, temperature evolution in the reactor vessel wall, and structure mechanical evaluation of the vessel under strong thermal loads and a range of internal pressures. The calculations were performed using the ADINA finite element codes. The analysis focusses on the failure processes, time and mode of failure. The most likely mode of failure at low pressure is global rupture due to gradual accumulation of creep strain over a large part of the heated area. In contrast, thermoplasticity becomes important at high pressure or following a pressure spike and can lead to earlier local failure. In situations in which part of the heat load is concentrated over a small area, resulting in a hot spot, local failure occurs, but not until the temperatures are close to the melting point. At low pressure, in particular, the hot spot area remains intact until the structure is molten across more than half of the thickness. (author) 14 figs., 16 refs

  9. Application of multicomponent medium model for numerical simulation of reactor element melting and melt relocation under severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladimir Ya Kumaev

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Numerical simulation of the melting processes is necessary in substantiating the safety of new generation reactors to determine the quantitative characteristics of the melt formed, destruction of reactor vessel and components, melt interaction processes in the melt localization systems (MLS), formation and transport of hydrogen, radioactive aerosols under severe accidents. The results of computations will be applied in developing the procedures for severe accident management and mitigation of its consequences and designing melt localization systems. The report is devoted to the development and application of the two-dimensional and three-dimensional versions of the DINCOR code intended for numerical simulation of the thermal hydraulic processes in a multicomponent medium with solid-liquid phase changes. The basic set of equations of multicomponent medium is presented. The numerical method to solve the governing equations is discussed. Some examples of two-dimensional code applications are presented. The experience of application of the code has shown that joint calculations of hydrodynamics, heat transfer, stratification and chemical interaction enable the process description accuracy to be significantly increased and the number of initial experimental data to be reduced. The multicomponent medium model can be used as the base for the development of a three-dimensional version of the code. At the same time, it was established that the models being used need be further developed. The most important problems are the following: -development of the local mathematical models of liquefaction and solidification of materials under front melting and melting due to the action of internal sources; -development of the model of incompressible components separation; -development of the models of dissolution and chemical interaction of multicomponent medium components. In conclusion possible verification of the computer code is discussed. (author)

  10. Petrological Geodynamics of Mantle Melting II. AlphaMELTS + Multiphase Flow: Dynamic Fractional Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirone, Massimiliano

    2018-03-01

    In this second installment of a series that aims to investigate the dynamic interaction between the composition and abundance of the solid mantle and its melt products, the classic interpretation of fractional melting is extended to account for the dynamic nature of the process. A multiphase numerical flow model is coupled with the program AlphaMELTS, which provides at the moment possibly the most accurate petrological description of melting based on thermodynamic principles. The conceptual idea of this study is based on a description of the melting process taking place along a 1-D vertical ideal column where chemical equilibrium is assumed to apply in two local sub-systems separately on some spatial and temporal scale. The solid mantle belongs to a local sub-system (ss1) that does not interact chemically with the melt reservoir which forms a second sub-system (ss2). The local melt products are transferred in the melt sub-system ss2 where the melt phase eventually can also crystallize into a different solid assemblage and will evolve dynamically. The main difference with the usual interpretation of fractional melting is that melt is not arbitrarily and instantaneously extracted from the mantle, but instead remains a dynamic component of the model, hence the process is named dynamic fractional melting (DFM). Some of the conditions that may affect the DFM model are investigated in this study, in particular the effect of temperature, mantle velocity at the boundary of the mantle column. A comparison is made with the dynamic equilibrium melting (DEM) model discussed in the first installment. The implications of assuming passive flow or active flow are also considered to some extent. Complete data files of most of the DFM simulations, four animations and two new DEM simulations (passive/active flow) are available following the instructions in the supplementary material.

  11. Penetration of a heated pool into a melting miscible substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eck, G.; Werle, H.

    1986-01-01

    Core-catchers have been proposed, which, after a core disruptive accident in a nuclear reactor, prevent containment failure caused by contact of the molten debris with the underlying ex-vessel structural materials. Most of these core-catchers are provided with sacrificial layers which on melting consume some fraction of the decay heat and dilute the heat sources and the fissionable material as the core masses are dissolved by the molten sacrificial material. Dilution of the core masses results in relatively low heat fluxes and temperatures at the wall of the core-catcher and, in addition, reduces the probability of recriticality. An experimental study was conducted on melting systems consisting of a liquid over-lying a solid substrate, which after melting of the solid, are mutually miscible. To initiate melting, the liquid was heated either by a planar heater from above or internally by an ac current. The density of the liquid was varied systematically, and it was found that downward heat transfer increases strongly with this parameter. In addition to heat transfer, mass transfer was studied by measuring the local concentration of the molten material in the liquid. A few experiments were performed in which sideward melting and two-dimensional pool growth were investigated

  12. Assessment of mass fraction and melting temperature for the application of limestone concrete and siliceous concrete to nuclear reactor basemat considering molten core-concrete interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ho Jae; Kim, Do Gyeum [Korea Institute of Civil Engineering and Building Technology, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Jae Leon [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Eui Sik [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Myung Suk [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    Severe accident scenarios in nuclear reactors, such as nuclear meltdown, reveal that an extremely hot molten core may fall into the nuclear reactor cavity and seriously affect the safety of the nuclear containment vessel due to the chain reaction caused by the reaction between the molten core and concrete. This paper reports on research focused on the type and amount of vapor produced during the reaction between a high-temperature molten core and concrete, as well as on the erosion rate of concrete and the heat transfer characteristics at its vicinity. This study identifies the mass fraction and melting temperature as the most influential properties of concrete necessary for a safety analysis conducted in relation to the thermal interaction between the molten core and the basemat concrete. The types of concrete that are actually used in nuclear reactor cavities were investigated. The H2O content in concrete required for the computation of the relative amount of gases generated by the chemical reaction of the vapor, the quantity of CO2 necessary for computing the cooling speed of the molten core, and the melting temperature of concrete are evaluated experimentally for the molten core-concrete interaction analysis.

  13. Structural Investigation of Fe-Ni-S and Fe-Ni-Si Melts by High-temperature Fluorescence XAFS Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manghnani, Murli H.; Balogh, John; Hong Xinguo; Newville, Matthew; Amulele, G.

    2007-01-01

    Iron-nickel (Fe-Ni) alloy is regarded as the most abundant constituent of Earth's core, with an amount of 5.5 wt% Ni in the core based on geochemical and cosmochemical models. The structural role of nickel in liquid Fe-Ni alloys with light elements such as S or Si is poorly understood, largely because of the experimental difficulties of high-temperature melts. Recently, we have succeeded in acquiring Ni K-edge fluorescence x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectra of Fe-Ni-S and Fe-Ni-Si melts and alloys. Different structural environment of Ni atoms in Fe-Ni-S and Fe-Ni-Si melts is observed, supporting the effect of light elements in Fe-Ni melts

  14. Viscosity of Heterogeneous Silicate Melts: A Non-Newtonian Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhuangzhuang; Blanpain, Bart; Guo, Muxing

    2017-12-01

    The recently published viscosity data of heterogeneous silicate melts with well-documented structure and experimental conditions are critically re-analyzed and tabulated. By using these data, a non-Newtonian viscosity model incorporating solid fraction, solid shape, and shear rate is proposed on the basis of the power-law equation. This model allows calculating the viscosity of the heterogeneous silicate melts with solid fraction up to 34 vol pct. The error between the calculated and measured data is evaluated to be 32 pct, which is acceptable considering the large error in viscosity measurement of the completely liquid silicate melt.

  15. Modeling of nuclear waste disposal by rock melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuze, F.E.

    1982-04-01

    Today, the favored option for disposal of high-level nuclear wastes is their burial in mined caverns. As an alternative, the concept of deep disposal by rock melting (DRM) also has received some attention. DRM entails the injection of waste, in a cavity or borehole, 2 to 3 kilometers down in the earth crust. Granitic rocks are the prime candidate medium. The high thermal loading initially will melt the rock surrounding the waste. Following resolidification, a rock/waste matrix is formed, which should provide isolation for many years. The complex thermal, mechanical, and hydraulic aspects of DRM can be studied best by means of numerical models. The models must accommodate the coupling of the physical processes involved, and the temperature dependency of the granite properties, some of which are subject to abrupt discontinuities, during α-β phase transition and melting. This paper outlines a strategy for such complex modeling

  16. Analysis of natural convection in volumetrically-heated melt pools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sehgal, B.R.; Dinh, T.N.; Nourgaliev, R.R. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Div. of Nuclear Power Safety

    1996-12-01

    Results of series of studies on natural convection heat transfer in decay-heated core melt pools which form in a reactor lower plenum during the progression of a core meltdown accident are described. The emphasis is on modelling and prediction of turbulent heat transfer characteristics of natural convection in a liquid pool with an internal energy source. Methods of computational fluid dynamics, including direct numerical simulation, were applied for investigation. Refs, figs, tabs.

  17. A simplified geometrical model for transient corium propagation in core for LWR with heavy reflector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saas Laurent

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the context of the simulation of the Severe Accidents (SA in Light Water Reactors (LWR, we are interested on the in-core corium pool propagation transient in order to evaluate the corium relocation in the vessel lower head. The goal is to characterize the corium and debris flows from the core to accurately evaluate the corium pool propagation transient in the lower head and so the associated risk of vessel failure. In the case of LWR with heavy reflector, to evaluate the corium relocation into the lower head, we have to study the risk associated with focusing effect and the possibility to stabilize laterally the corium in core with a flooded down-comer. It is necessary to characterize the core degradation and the stratification of the corium pool that is formed in core. We assume that the core degradation until the corium pool formation and the corium pool propagation could be modeled separately. In this document, we present a simplified geometrical model (0D model for the in-core corium propagation transient. A degraded core with a formed corium pool is used as an initial state. This state can be obtained from a simulation computed with an integral code. This model does not use a grid for the core as integral codes do. Geometrical shapes and 0D models are associated with the corium pool and the other components of the degraded core (debris, heavy reflector, core plate…. During the transient, these shapes evolve taking into account the thermal and stratification behavior of the corium pool and the melting of the core surrounding components. Some results corresponding to the corium pool propagation in core transients obtained with this model on a LWR with a heavy reflector are given and compared to grid approach of the integral codes MAAP4.

  18. Model and simulation for melt flow in micro-injection molding based on the PTT model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Wei; Kong, Lingchao; Li, Qian; Ying, Jin; Shen, Changyu

    2011-01-01

    Unsteady viscoelastic flows were studied using the finite element method in this work. The Phan-Thien–Tanner (PTT) model was used to represent the rheological behavior of viscoelastic fluids. To effectively describe the microscale effects, the slip boundary condition and surface tension were added to the mathematical model for melt flow in micro-injection molding. The new variational equation of pressure, including the viscoelastic parameters and slip boundary condition, was generalized using integration by parts. A computer code based on the finite element method and finite difference method was developed to solve the melt flow problem. Numerical simulation revealed that the melt viscoelasticity plays an important role in the prediction of melt pressure, temperature at the gate and the succeeding melt front advancement in the cavity. Using the viscoelastic model one can also control the rapid increase in simulated pressure, temperature, and reduce the filling difference among different cavities. The short shot experiments of micro-motor shaft showed that the predicted melt front from the viscoelastic model is in fair agreement with the corresponding experimental results

  19. Modeling of reflood of severely damaged reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachrata, A.

    2012-01-01

    The TMI-2 accident and recently Fukushima accident demonstrated that the nuclear safety philosophy has to cover accident sequences involving massive core melt in order to develop reliable mitigation strategies for both, existing and advanced reactors. Although severe accidents are low likelihood and might be caused only by multiple failures, accident management is implemented for controlling their course and mitigating their consequences. In case of severe accident, the fuel rods may be severely damaged and oxidized. Finally, they collapse and form a debris bed on core support plate. Removal of decay heat from a damaged core is a challenging issue because of the difficulty for water to penetrate inside a porous medium. The reflooding (injection of water into core) may be applied only if the availability of safety injection is recovered during accident. If the injection becomes available only in the late phase of accident, water will enter a core configuration that will differ from original rod bundle geometry and will resemble to the severe damaged core observed in TMI-2. The higher temperatures and smaller hydraulic diameters in a porous medium make the coolability more difficult than for intact fuel rods under typical loss of coolant accident conditions. The modeling of this kind of hydraulic and heat transfer is a one of key objectives of this. At IRSN, part of the studies is realized using an European thermo-hydraulic computer code for severe accident analysis ICARE-CATHARE. The objective of this thesis is to develop a 3D reflood model (implemented into ICARE-CATHARE) that is able to treat different configurations of degraded core in a case of severe accident. The proposed model is characterized by treating of non-equilibrium thermal between the solid, liquid and gas phase. It includes also two momentum balance equations. The model is based on a previously developed model but is improved in order to take into account intense boiling regimes (in particular

  20. Correlation for downward melt penetration into a miscible low-density substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, L.J.; Cheung, F.B.; Pedersen, D.R.; Linehan, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    Downward penetration of a sacrificial bed material or a concrete basemat structure by an overlying layer of core melt resulting from a hypothetical core disruptive accident has been a major issue in post accident heat removal studies. One characteristic feature of this problem is that the solid substrate, when molten, is miscible with and lighter than the core melt so that the rate of penetration is strongly dependent upon the motion of natural convection in the melt layer driven by the density difference between the core melt and the molten substrate. This fundamentally interesting and technologically important problem has been investigated by a number of researchers. Significantly different melting rates, however, were observed in these studies. Questions concerning the occurrence of flow transition and its effect on melt penetration remain to be answered. To promote the understanding of the phenomena and to strengthen the data base of melt penetration, simulation experiments were conducted using various kinds of salt solutions (KI, NaCl, CaCl 2 , and MgCl 2 solutions) as the working fluid and an air-bubble-free ice slab as the solid substrate

  1. Modeling the impact of melt on seismic properties during mountain building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Amicia L.; Walker, Andrew M.; Lloyd, Geoffrey E.; Torvela, Taija

    2017-03-01

    Initiation of partial melting in the mid/lower crust causes a decrease in P wave and S wave velocities; recent studies imply that the relationship between these velocities and melt is not simple. We have developed a modeling approach to assess the combined impact of various melt and solid phase properties on seismic velocities and anisotropy. The modeling is based on crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) data measured from migmatite samples, allowing quantification of the variation of seismic velocities with varying melt volumes, shapes, orientations, and matrix anisotropy. The results show nonlinear behavior of seismic properties as a result of the interaction of all of these physical properties, which in turn depend on lithology, stress regime, strain rate, preexisting rock fabrics, and pressure-temperature conditions. This nonlinear behavior is evident when applied to a suite of samples from a traverse across a migmatitic shear zone in the Seiland Igneous Province, Northern Norway. Critically, changes in solid phase composition and CPO, and melt shape and orientation with respect to the wave propagation direction can result in huge variations in the same seismic property even if the melt fraction remains the same. A comparison with surface wave interpretations from tectonically active regions highlights the issues in current models used to predict melt percentages or partially molten regions. Interpretation of seismic data to infer melt percentages or extent of melting should, therefore, always be underpinned by robust modeling of the underlying geological parameters combined with examination of multiple seismic properties in order to reduce uncertainty of the interpretation.

  2. Simple models for the simulation of submarine melt for a Greenland glacial system model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Johanna; Perrette, Mahé; Ganopolski, Andrey

    2018-01-01

    Two hundred marine-terminating Greenland outlet glaciers deliver more than half of the annually accumulated ice into the ocean and have played an important role in the Greenland ice sheet mass loss observed since the mid-1990s. Submarine melt may play a crucial role in the mass balance and position of the grounding line of these outlet glaciers. As the ocean warms, it is expected that submarine melt will increase, potentially driving outlet glaciers retreat and contributing to sea level rise. Projections of the future contribution of outlet glaciers to sea level rise are hampered by the necessity to use models with extremely high resolution of the order of a few hundred meters. That requirement in not only demanded when modeling outlet glaciers as a stand alone model but also when coupling them with high-resolution 3-D ocean models. In addition, fjord bathymetry data are mostly missing or inaccurate (errors of several hundreds of meters), which questions the benefit of using computationally expensive 3-D models for future predictions. Here we propose an alternative approach built on the use of a computationally efficient simple model of submarine melt based on turbulent plume theory. We show that such a simple model is in reasonable agreement with several available modeling studies. We performed a suite of experiments to analyze sensitivity of these simple models to model parameters and climate characteristics. We found that the computationally cheap plume model demonstrates qualitatively similar behavior as 3-D general circulation models. To match results of the 3-D models in a quantitative manner, a scaling factor of the order of 1 is needed for the plume models. We applied this approach to model submarine melt for six representative Greenland glaciers and found that the application of a line plume can produce submarine melt compatible with observational data. Our results show that the line plume model is more appropriate than the cone plume model for simulating

  3. XPS and EPXMA investigation and chemical speciation of aerosol samples formed in LWR core melting experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moers, H.; Jenett, H.; Kaufmann, R.; Klewe-Nebenius, H.; Pfennig, G.; Ache, H.J.

    1985-09-01

    Aerosol samples consisting of fission products and elements of light water reactor structural materials were collected during simulating in a laboratory scale the heat-up phase of a core melt accident. The aerosol particles were formed in a steam atmosphere at temperatures between 1200 and 1900 0 C of the melting charge. The investigation of the samples by use of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) permitted the chemical speciation of the detected aerosol constituents silver, cadmium, indium, tellurium, iodine, and cesium. A comparison of the elemental analysis results obtained from XPS with those achieved from electron probe X-ray micro analysis (EPXMA) revealed that aerosol particle surface and aerosol particle bulk are principally composed of the same elements and that these compositions vary with release temperature. In addition, quantitative differences between the composition of surface and bulk have only been observed for those aerosol samples which were collected at higher melting charge temperatures. In order to obtain direct information on chemical species below the surface selected samples were argon ion bombarded. Changes in composition and chemistry were monitored by XPS, and the results were interpreted in light of the effects, which were observed when appropriate standard samples were sputtered. (orig.) [de

  4. Melting behavior of a model molecular crystalline GeI4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchizaki, Kazuhiro; Asano, Yuta

    2015-01-01

    A model molecular crystalline GeI 4 was examined using molecular dynamics simulation. The model was constructed in such a way that rigid tetrahedral molecules interact with each other via Lennard-Jones potentials whose centers are located at the vertices of a tetrahedron. Because no other interaction that can “soften” the intermolecular interaction was introduced, the melting curve of the model crystalline material does not exhibit the anomaly that was found for the real substance. However, the current investigation is useful in that it could settle the upper bound of pressure below which the model can predict properties of the molecular liquid. Moreover, singularity-free nature of the melting curve allowed us to analytically treat the melting curve in the light of the Kumari-Dass-Kechin equation. As a result, we could definitely conclude that the well-known Simon equation for the melting curve is merely an approximate expression. The condition for the validity of Simon’s equation was identified. (author)

  5. Reentrainment of aerosols during the filtered venting after a severe core melt accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, M.

    1997-01-01

    The major objective of this project is the experimental determination of the aerosol reentrainment from boiling pool during controlled filtered venting of the containment vessel after a severe core melt accident. For this reason a linear downscaled (1:20) model containment with an inner free volume of 5 m 3 is provided. Both, water soluble and unsoluble model substances are used as fission product simulants. The major advantage of the pilot plant is the ability to run it at steady state conditions of any period of time. Further, modelling of the aerosol reentrainment from boiling pool allows upscaling of results on nuclear power plants. The deterministic aerosol reentrainment model can also be used to calculate entrainment phenomena in the process industries such at distillation columns or at flash evaporators. Steady state experiments with water soluble model substances clearly reveal enhanced aerosol reentrainment from boiling pool due to increasing boiling pool concentration of fission product simulants and due to increasing gas velocities above the boiling pool surface. But there can be seen no influence of corium concrete interactions on the aerosol reentrainment. Compared to the steam production due to the decay heat the resulting gas volume flux is negligible. Next, there can be seen aerosol reentrainment from boiling pool only above boiling pool areas. Further, experiments under steady state conditions with unsoluble fission product simulants show on the one hand scrubbing effects in the boiling pool, on the other hand no aerosol reentrainment of solid particles 3 μm. The so called reentrainment factor - ratio between fission product simulant in the venting system and in the boiling pool - is for water soluble model substances in the range of 10 -5 , for unsoluble fission product simulants in the range of 10 -6 . (author) figs., tabs., 57 refs

  6. Computational modeling for hexcan failure under core distruptive accidental conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawada, T.; Ninokata, H.; Shimizu, A. [Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan)

    1995-09-01

    This paper describes the development of computational modeling for hexcan wall failures under core disruptive accident conditions of fast breeder reactors. A series of out-of-pile experiments named SIMBATH has been analyzed by using the SIMMER-II code. The SIMBATH experiments were performed at KfK in Germany. The experiments used a thermite mixture to simulate fuel. The test geometry of SIMBATH ranged from single pin to 37-pin bundles. In this study, phenomena of hexcan wall failure found in a SIMBATH test were analyzed by SIMMER-II. Although the original model of SIMMER-II did not calculate any hexcan failure, several simple modifications made it possible to reproduce the hexcan wall melt-through observed in the experiment. In this paper the modifications and their significance are discussed for further modeling improvements.

  7. Core Formation on Asteroid 4 Vesta: Iron Rain in a Silicate Magma Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Walter S.; Mittlefehldt, David W.

    2017-01-01

    Geochemical observations of the eucrite and diogenite meteorites, together with observations made by NASA's Dawn spacecraft, suggest that Vesta resembles H chondrites in bulk chemical composition, possibly with about 25% of a CM-chondrite like composition added in. For this model, the core is 15% by mass (or 8 volume %) of the asteroid. The abundances of moderately siderophile elements (Ni, Co, Mo, W, and P) in eucrites require that essentially all of the metallic phase in Vesta segregated to form a core prior to eucrite solidification. Melting in the Fe-Ni-S system begins at a cotectic temperature of 940 deg. C. Only about 40% of the total metal phase, or 3-4 volume % of Vesta, melts prior to the onset of silicate melting. Liquid iron in solid silicate initially forms isolated pockets of melt; connected melt channels, which are necessary if the metal is to segregate from the silicate, are only possible when the metal phase exceeds about 5 volume %. Thus, metal segregation to form a core does not occur prior to the onset of silicate melting.

  8. Investigation on Melt-Structure-Water Interactions (MSWI) during severe accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sehgal, B.R.; Yang, Z.L.; Dinh, T.N.; Nourgaliev, R.R.; Bui, V.A.; Haraldsson, H.O.; Li, H.X.; Konovakhin, M.; Paladino, D.; Leung, W.H [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Div. of Nuclear Power Safety

    1999-08-01

    to fragment. The molten fuel-coolant mixtures with a binary oxidic core melt (UO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2}) may feature low triggerability and low explosivity. The mechanical-to-thermal conversion ratio may be very low. The presence of metallic component in the melt may significantly enhance triggerability and explosivity of molten corium. The characteristics of melt spreading into 2-D channel are much different from those into 1-D channel. The evaluations of spreading parameters in reactor accident situations would be strongly affected by the uncertainties in the boundary conditions of the melt spreading process, such as downward heat removal and of upward heat removal in case of core melt spreading under water. Computer codes were developed and validated against the data obtained in the MSWI Project. The Multiphase Eulerian Lagrangian Transport code (MELT-313) was validated to investigate the hydrodynamics during the premixing process of jet penetrating into a water pool. The FlowLab code employing the multi-fluid multi-phase Lattice-Boltzmann method was developed and validated. In the Lattice-Boltzmann approach, no special treatment is needed to track the interface. A scaling technology was developed to describe the spreading efficiency of melt into I -D channel. The melt vessel interaction thermal analysis (MVITA) code describes the process of melt pool formation, melt pool convection and the resulting vessel thermal loadings. A gap cooling model and model representing penetrations were incorporated into this code. The code was coupled with ANSYS code, which performs structure analysis. Thus a coupled thermal and mechanical analysis of the loadings of a pressure vessel during the melt-vessel interaction, could be performed.

  9. Investigation on Melt-Structure-Water Interactions (MSWI) during severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sehgal, B.R.; Yang, Z.L.; Dinh, T.N.; Nourgaliev, R.R.; Bui, V.A.; Haraldsson, H.O.; Li, H.X.; Konovakhin, M.; Paladino, D.; Leung, W.H

    1999-08-01

    to fragment. The molten fuel-coolant mixtures with a binary oxidic core melt (UO 2 -ZrO 2 ) may feature low triggerability and low explosivity. The mechanical-to-thermal conversion ratio may be very low. The presence of metallic component in the melt may significantly enhance triggerability and explosivity of molten corium. The characteristics of melt spreading into 2-D channel are much different from those into 1-D channel. The evaluations of spreading parameters in reactor accident situations would be strongly affected by the uncertainties in the boundary conditions of the melt spreading process, such as downward heat removal and of upward heat removal in case of core melt spreading under water. Computer codes were developed and validated against the data obtained in the MSWI Project. The Multiphase Eulerian Lagrangian Transport code (MELT-313) was validated to investigate the hydrodynamics during the premixing process of jet penetrating into a water pool. The FlowLab code employing the multi-fluid multi-phase Lattice-Boltzmann method was developed and validated. In the Lattice-Boltzmann approach, no special treatment is needed to track the interface. A scaling technology was developed to describe the spreading efficiency of melt into I -D channel. The melt vessel interaction thermal analysis (MVITA) code describes the process of melt pool formation, melt pool convection and the resulting vessel thermal loadings. A gap cooling model and model representing penetrations were incorporated into this code. The code was coupled with ANSYS code, which performs structure analysis. Thus a coupled thermal and mechanical analysis of the loadings of a pressure vessel during the melt-vessel interaction, could be performed

  10. Applications of liquid state physics to the earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, D. J.

    1980-01-01

    New results derived for application to the earth's outer core using the modern theory of liquids and the hard-sphere model of liquid structure are presented. An expression derived in terms of the incompressibility and pressure is valid for a high-pressure liquid near its melting point, provided that the pressure is derived from a strongly repulsive pair potential; a relation derived between the melting point and density leads to a melting curve law of essentially the same form as Lindemann's law. Finally, it is shown that the 'core paradox' of Higgins and Kennedy (1971) can occur only if the Gruneisen parameter is smaller than 2/3, and this constant is larger than this value in any liquid for which the pair potential is strongly repulsive.

  11. Structure of a mushy layer under hypergravity with implications for Earth's inner core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huguet, Ludovic; Alboussière, Thierry; Bergman, Michael I.; Deguen, Renaud; Labrosse, Stéphane; Lesœur, Germain

    2016-03-01

    Crystallization experiments in the dendritic regime have been carried out in hypergravity conditions (from 1 to 1300 g) from an ammonium chloride solution (NH4Cl and H2O). A commercial centrifuge was equipped with a slip ring so that electric power (needed for a Peltier device and a heating element), temperature and ultrasonic signals could be transmitted between the experimental setup and the laboratory. Ultrasound measurements (2-6 MHz) were used to detect the position of the front of the mushy zone and to determine attenuation in the mush. Temperature measurements were used to control a Peltier element extracting heat from the bottom of the setup and to monitor the evolution of crystallization in the mush and in the liquid. A significant increase of solid fraction and attenuation in the mush is observed as gravity is increased. Kinetic undercooling is significant in our experiments and has been included in a macroscopic mush model. The other ingredients of the model are conservation of energy and chemical species, along with heat/species transfer between the mush and the liquid phase: boundary-layer exchanges at the top of the mush and bulk convection within the mush (formation of chimneys). The outputs of the model compare well with our experiments. We have then run the model in a range of parameters suitable for the Earth's inner core. This has shown the role of bulk mush convection for the inner core and the reason why a solid fraction very close to unity should be expected. We have also run melting experiments: after crystallization of a mush, the liquid has been heated from above until the mush started to melt, while the bottom cold temperature was maintained. These melting experiments were motivated by the possible local melting at the inner core boundary that has been invoked to explain the formation of the anomalously slow F-layer at the bottom of the outer core or inner core hemispherical asymmetry. Oddly, the consequences of melting are an increase in

  12. Interpretation of the results of the CORA-33 dry core BWR test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, L.J.; Hagen, S.

    1993-01-01

    All BWR degraded core experiments performed prior to CORA-33 were conducted under ''wet'' core degradation conditions for which water remains within the core and continuous steaming feeds metal/steam oxidation reactions on the in-core metallic surfaces. However, one dominant set of accident scenarios would occur with reduced metal oxidation under ''dry'' core degradation conditions and, prior to CORA-33, this set had been neglected experimentally. The CORA-33 experiment was designed specifically to address this dominant set of BWR ''dry'' core severe accident scenarios and to partially resolve phenomenological uncertainties concerning the behavior of relocating metallic melts draining into the lower regions of a ''dry'' BWR core. CORA-33 was conducted on October 1, 1992, in the CORA tests facility at KfK. Review of the CORA-33 data indicates that the test objectives were achieved; that is, core degradation occurred at a core heatup rate and a test section axial temperature profile that are prototypic of full-core nuclear power plant (NPP) simulations at ''dry'' core conditions. Simulations of the CORA-33 test at ORNL have required modification of existing control blade/canister materials interaction models to include the eutectic melting of the stainless steel/Zircaloy interaction products and the heat of mixing of stainless steel and Zircaloy. The timing and location of canister failure and melt intrusion into the fuel assembly appear to be adequately simulated by the ORNL models. This paper will present the results of the posttest analyses carried out at ORNL based upon the experimental data and the posttest examination of the test bundle at KfK. The implications of these results with respect to degraded core modeling and the associated safety issues are also discussed

  13. Some factors affecting radiative heat transport in PWR cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, A.N.

    1989-04-01

    This report discusses radiative heat transport in Pressurized Water Reactor cores, using simple models to illustrate basic features of the transport process. Heat transport by conduction and convection is ignored in order to focus attention on the restrictions on radiative heat transport imposed by the geometry of the heat emitting and absorbing structures. The importance of the spacing of the emitting and absorbing structures is emphasised. Steady state temperature distributions are found for models of cores which are uniformly heated by fission product decay. In all of the models, a steady state temperature distribution can only be obtained if the central core temperature is in excess of the melting point of UO 2 . It has recently been reported that the MIMAS computer code, which takes into account radiative heat transport, has been used to model the heat-up of the Three Mile Island-2 reactor core, and the computations indicate that the core could not have reached the melting point of UO 2 at any time or any place. We discuss this result in the light of the calculations presented in this paper. It appears that the predicted stabilisation of the core temperatures at ∼ 2200 0 C may be a consequence of the artificially large spacing between the radial rings employed in the MIMAS code, rather than a result of physical significance. (author)

  14. Visualization Study of Melt Dispersion Behavior for SFR with a Metallic Fuel under Severe Accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, Hyo Heo; Park, Seong Dae; Bang, In Cheol [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Jerng, Dong Wook [Jungang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The safety strategy provides negative reactivity driven by the melt dispersal, so it could reduce the possibility of the recriticality event under a severe triple or more fault scenario for SFR. Since the behavior of the melt dispersion is unpredictable, it depends on the accident condition, particularly core region. While the voided coolant channel region is usually developed in the inner core, the unvoided coolant channel region is formed in the outer core. It is important to confirm the fuel dispersion with the core region, but there are not sufficient existing studies for them. From the existing studies, the coolant vapor pressure is considered as one of driving force to move the melt towards outside of the core. There is a complexity of the phenomena during intermixing of the melt with the coolant after the horizontal melt injections. It is too difficult to understand the several combined mechanisms related to the melt dispersion and the fragmentation. The specific conditions to be well dispersed for the molten metallic fuel were discussed in the experiments with the simulant materials. The each melt behavior was compared to evaluate the melt dispersion under the coolant void condition and the boiling condition.

  15. Nuclear reactor melt-retention structure to mitigate direct containment heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutu, Narinder K.; Ginsberg, Theodore; Klages, John R.

    1991-01-01

    A light water nuclear reactor melt-retention structure to mitigate the extent of direct containment heating of the reactor containment building. The structure includes a retention chamber for retaining molten core material away from the upper regions of the reactor containment building when a severe accident causes the bottom of the pressure vessel of the reactor to fail and discharge such molten material under high pressure through the reactor cavity into the retention chamber. In combination with the melt-retention chamber there is provided a passageway that includes molten core droplet deflector vanes and has gas vent means in its upper surface, which means are operable to deflect molten core droplets into the retention chamber while allowing high pressure steam and gases to be vented into the upper regions of the containment building. A plurality of platforms are mounted within the passageway and the melt-retention structure to direct the flow of molten core material and help retain it within the melt-retention chamber. In addition, ribs are mounted at spaced positions on the floor of the melt-retention chamber, and grid means are positioned at the entrance side of the retention chamber. The grid means develop gas back pressure that helps separate the molten core droplets from discharged high pressure steam and gases, thereby forcing the steam and gases to vent into the upper regions of the reactor containment building.

  16. Core-melting accidents in Chernobyl and Harrisburg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loon, A.J. van; Vonderen, A.C.M. van

    1987-01-01

    This publication deals with the essences of the reactor accident in Chernobylsk and the conclusions to be drawn from these with regard to reactor safety. Therein the technical differences between the reactor types in the West and the East play an important role. Also attention is spent to the now generally accepted philosophy that by simplification and making use of proven technologies, a further deminishing of the risks can be achieved step by step. In ch.'s 2 and 4 the origin and course of the accidents in respectively Chernobylsk and Harrisburg are analyzed; in the analysis of the Chernobylsk accident also date have been used which were provided by the Sovjet-Union, supplied with results of studies of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In ch. 3 this information is compared with the insights which have grown at KEMA about these on the base of reactor physical and thermohydraulic considerations and of computer calculations reproducing the course of the accident. An important question is if, and if so: to which extent, an accident such as the one in Chernobylsk also can take place in the West. In order to answer that question as accurate as possible the consequences of core meltings accidents and the risk for such an accident taking place are pursued. In ch. 6 the legal frameworks are indicated by which the risk may be limited and by which eventually yet occurring damage may be arranged. Ch. 7 finally deals with the lessons which the accidents in Chernobylsk and Harrisburg have learnt us and with the possible consequences of these for the further application of nuclear power in the Netherlands. (H.W.). 105 refs.; 42 figs.; 17 refs

  17. High-pressure anatectic paragneisses from the Namche Barwa, Eastern Himalayan Syntaxis: Textural evidence for partial melting, phase equilibria modeling and tectonic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilmette, C.; Indares, A.; Hébert, R.

    2011-05-01

    Rare kyanite-bearing anatectic paragneisses are found as boudins within sillimanite-bearing paragneisses of the core of the Namche Barwa Antiform, Tibet. In the present study, we document an occurrence from the NW side of the Yarlung Zangbo River. These rocks mainly consist of the assemblage garnet + K-feldspar + kyanite ± biotite + quartz + rutile ± plagioclase with kyanite locally pseudomorphed by sillimanite. The documented textures are consistent with the rocks having undergone biotite-dehydration melting in the kyanite stability field, under high-P granulite facies conditions, and having experienced melt extraction. However textures related to melt crystallization are ubiquitous both in polymineralic inclusions in garnet and in the matrix, suggesting that a melt fraction had remained in these rocks. Phase equilibria modelling was undertaken in the NCKFMASTHO system with THERMOCALC. P-T pseudosections built with the bulk compositions of one aluminous and one sub-aluminous paragneiss samples predict a biotite-kyanite-garnet-quartz-plagioclase-K-feldspar-liquid-rutile ± ilmenite field, in which biotite-dehydration melting occurs, located in the P-T range of ~ 800-875 °C and ~ 10-17 kbar. In addition, the topologies of these pseudosections are consistent with substantial melt loss during prograde metamorphism. A second set of P-T pseudosections with melt-reintegrated model bulk compositions were thus constructed to evaluate the effect of melt loss. The integration of textural information, precise mineral modes, mineral chemistry, and phase equilibria modelling allowed to constrain a P-T path where the rocks are buried to lower crustal depths at peak P-T conditions higher than 14 kbar and 825 °C, possibly in the order of 15-16 kbar and 850 °C, followed by decompression and cooling to P-T conditions of around 9 kbar and 810 °C, under which the remaining melt was solidified. The implications for granite production at the NBA and for Himalayan tectonic models

  18. Core catcher concepts future PWR-Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alsmeyer, H.; Werle, H.

    1994-01-01

    Light water reactors of the next generation should have still greater passive safety, even in the most serious accidents. This includes the long term safe inclusion of the core inventory in the case of core meltdown accidents. The three concepts for cooling the liquefied core outside the reactor pressure vessel examined by KfK should remove the post-shutdown heat by direct contact of the melt with water. The geometric distribution of the melt increases its surface area, so that favourable conditions for heat removal from the poorly thermally-conducting melt are created and complete quick solidification occurs. The experiments examine both the relocation and distribution mechanisms of the melt and the reactions occurring when water enters. As strong interaction is possible on direct contact of the melt with water, an important aim is experimental determination and limitation of any resulting mechanical stresses. (orig./HP) [de

  19. Material properties influence on steam explosion efficiency. Prototypic versus simulant melts, eutectic versus non-eutectic melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leskovar, M.; Mavko, B.

    2006-01-01

    A steam explosion may occur during a severe nuclear reactor accident if the molten core comes into contact with the coolant water. A strong enough steam explosion in a nuclear power plant could jeopardize the containment integrity and so lead to a direct release of radioactive material to the environment. Details of processes taking place prior and during the steam explosion have been experimentally studied for a number of years with adjunct efforts in modelling these processes to address the scaling of these experiments. Steam explosion experiments have shown that there are important differences of behaviour between simulant and prototypical melts, and that also at prototypical melts the fuel coolant interactions depend on the composition of the corium. In experiments with prototypic materials no spontaneous steam explosions occurred (except with an eutectic composition), whereas with simulant materials the steam explosions were triggered spontaneously. The energy conversion ratio of steam explosions with prototypic melts is at least one order of magnitude lower than the energy conversion ratio of steam explosions with simulant melts. Although the different behaviour of prototypic and simulant melts has been known for a number of years, there is no reliable explanation for these differences. Consequently it is not possible to reliably estimate whether corium would behave so non-explosive also in reactor conditions, where the mass of poured melt is nearly three orders of magnitude larger than in experimental conditions. An even more fascinating material effect was observed recently at corium experiments with eutectic and non-eutectic compositions. It turned out that eutectic corium always exploded spontaneously, whereas non-eutectic corium never exploded spontaneously. In the paper, a possible explanation of both material effects (prototypic/simulant melts, eutectic/non-eutectic corium) on the steam explosion is provided. A model for the calculation of the

  20. Analysis of core degradation and relocation phenomena and scenarios in a Nordic-type BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galushin, Sergey, E-mail: galushin@kth.se; Kudinov, Pavel, E-mail: pkudinov@kth.se

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • A data base of the debris properties in lower plenum generated using MELCOR code. • The timing of safety systems has significant effect on the relocated debris properties. • Loose coupling between core relocation and vessel failure analyses was established. - Abstract: Severe Accident Management (SAM) in Nordic Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) employs ex-vessel cooling of core melt debris. The melt is released from the failed vessel and poured into a deep pool of water located under the reactor. The melt is expected to fragment, quench, and form a debris bed, coolable by a natural circulation and evaporation of water. Success of the strategy is contingent upon melt release conditions from the vessel and melt-coolant interaction that determine (i) properties of the debris bed and its coolability (ii) potential for energetic melt-coolant interactions (steam explosions). Risk Oriented Accident Analysis Methodology (ROAAM+) framework is currently under development for quantification of the risks associated with formation of non-coolable debris bed and occurrence of steam explosions, both presenting a credible threats to containment integrity. The ROAAM+ framework consist of loosely coupled models that describe each stage of the accident progression. Core relocation analysis framework provides initial conditions for melt vessel interaction, vessel failure and melt release frameworks. The properties of relocated debris and melt release conditions, including in-vessel and ex-vessel pressure, lower drywell pool depth and temperature, are sensitive to the accident scenarios and timing of safety systems recovery and operator actions. This paper illustrates a methodological approach and relevant data for establishing a connection between core relocation and vessel failure analysis in ROAAM+ approach. MELCOR code is used for analysis of core degradation and relocation phenomena. Properties of relocated debris are obtained as functions of the accident scenario

  1. Lattice Boltzmann model for melting with natural convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huber, Christian; Parmigiani, Andrea; Chopard, Bastien; Manga, Michael; Bachmann, Olivier

    2008-01-01

    We develop a lattice Boltzmann method to couple thermal convection and pure-substance melting. The transition from conduction-dominated heat transfer to fully-developed convection is analyzed and scaling laws and previous numerical results are reproduced by our numerical method. We also investigate the limit in which thermal inertia (high Stefan number) cannot be neglected. We use our results to extend the scaling relations obtained at low Stefan number and establish the correlation between the melting front propagation and the Stefan number for fully-developed convection. We conclude by showing that the model presented here is particularly well-suited to study convection melting in geometrically complex media with many applications in geosciences

  2. Status of degraded core issues. Synthesis paper prepared by G. Bandini in collaboration with the NEA task group on degraded core cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-02-01

    The in-vessel evolution of a severe accident in a nuclear reactor is characterised, generally, by core uncover and heat-up, core material oxidation and melting, molten material relocation and debris behaviour in the lower plenum up to vessel failure. The in-vessel core melt progression involves a large number of physical and chemical phenomena that may depend on the severe accident sequence and the reactor type under consideration. Core melt progression has been studied in the last twenty years through many experimental works. Since then, computer codes are being developed and validated to analyse different reactor accident sequences. The experience gained from the TMI-2 accident also constitutes an important source of data. The understanding of core degradation process is necessary to evaluate initial conditions for subsequent phases of the accident (ex-vessel and within the containment), and define accident management strategies and mitigative actions for operating and advanced reactors. This synthesis paper, prepared within the Task Group on Degraded Core Cooling (TG-DCC) of PWG2, contains a brief summary of current views on the status of degraded core issues regarding light water reactors. The in-vessel fission product release and transport issue is not addressed in this paper. The areas with remaining uncertainties and the needs for further experimental investigation and model development have been identified. The early phase of core melt progression is reasonably well understood. Remaining uncertainties may be addressed on the basis of ongoing experimental activities, e.g. on core quenching, and research programs foreseen in the near future. The late phase of core melt progression is less understood. Ongoing research programs are providing additional valuable information on corium molten pool behaviour. Confirmatory research is still required. The pool crust behaviour and material relocation into the lower plenum are the areas where additional research should

  3. Experiments and analyses on melt-structure-water interactions during severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seghal, B.R.; Dinh, T.N.; Bui, V.A.; Green, J.A.; Nourgaliev, R.R.; Okkonen, T.O.; Dinh, A.T.

    1998-04-01

    This report is the final report for the research project Melt Structure Water Interactions (MSWI). It describes results of analytical and experimental studies concerning MSWI during the course of a hypothetical core meltdown accident in a LWR. Emphasis has been placed on phenomena which govern vessel failure mode and timing and the mechanisms and properties which govern the fragmentation and breakup of melt jets and droplets. It was found that: 2-D effects significantly diminished the focusing effect of an overlying metallic layer on top of an oxide melt pool. This result improves the feasibility of in-vessel retention of a melt pool through external cooling of the lower head; phenomena related to hole ablation and melt discharge, in the event of vessel failure, are affected significantly by crust formation; the jet fragmentation process is a function of many related phenomena. The fragmentation rate depends not only on the traditional parameters but also on the melt physical properties, which change as the melt cools down from liquid to solid temperature; film boiling was investigated by developing a two-phase flow model and inserting it in a multi-D fluid dynamics code. It was concluded that the thickness of the film on the surface of a melt jet would be small and that the effects of the film on the process should not be large. This conclusion is contrary to the modeling employed in some other codes. The computer codes were developed and validated against the data obtained in the MSWI Project. The melt vessel interaction thermal analysis code describes the process of melt pool formation and convection and the resulting vessel thermal loadings. In addition, several innovative models were developed to describe the melt-water interaction process. The code MELT-3D treats the melt jet as a collection of particles whose movement is described with a three-dimensional Eulerian formulation. The model (SIPHRA) tracks the melt jet with an additional equation, using the

  4. Coolability of severely degraded CANDU cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meneley, D.A.; Blahnik, C.; Rogers, J.T.; Snell, V.G.; Mijhawan, S.

    1995-07-01

    Analytical and experimental studies have shown that the separately cooled moderator in a CANDU reactor provides an effective heat sink in the event of a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) accompanied by total failure of the emergency core cooling system (ECCS). The moderator heat sink prevents fuel melting and maintains the integrity of the fuel channels, therefore terminating this severe accident short of severe core damage. Nevertheless, there is a probability, however low, that the moderator heat sink could fail in such an accident. The pioneering work of Rogers (1984) for such a severe accident using simplified models showed that the fuel channels would fail and a bed of dry, solid debris would be formed at the bottom of the calandria which would heat up and eventually melt. However, the molten pool of core material would be retained in the calandria vessel, cooled by the independently cooled shield-tank water, and would eventually re solidify. Thus, the calandria vessel would act inherently as a core-catcher as long as the shield tank integrity is maintained. The present paper reviews subsequent work on the damage to a CANDU core under severe accident conditions and describes an empirically based mechanistic model of this process. It is shown that, for such severe accident sequences in a CANDU reactor, the end state following core disassembly consists of a porous bed of dry solid, coarse debris, irrespective of the initiating event and the core disassembly process. (author). 48 refs., 3 tabs., 18 figs

  5. Coolability of severely degraded CANDU cores. Revised

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meneley, D.A.; Blahnik, C.; Rogers, J.T.; Snell, V.G.; Nijhawan, S.

    1996-01-01

    Analytical and experimental studies have shown that the separately cooled moderator in a CANDU reactor provides an effective heat sink in the event of a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) accompanied by total failure of the emergency core cooling system (ECCS). The moderator heat sink prevents fuel melting and maintains the integrity of the fuel channels, therefore terminating this severe accident short of severe core damage. Nevertheless, there is a probability, however low, that the moderator heat sink could fail in such an accident. The pioneering work of Rogers (1984) for such a severe accident using simplified models showed that the fuel channels would fail and a bed of dry, solid debris would be formed at the bottom of the calandria which would heat up and eventually melt. However, the molten pool of core material would be retained in the calandria vessel, cooled by the independently cooled shield-tank water, and would eventually resolidify. Thus, the calandria vessel would act inherently as a 'core-catcher' as long as the shield tank integrity is maintained. The present paper reviews subsequent work on the damage to a CANDU core under severe accident conditions and describes an empirically based mechanistic model of this process. It is shown that, for such severe accident sequences in a CANDU reactor, the end state following core disassembly consists of a porous bed of dry solid, coarse debris, irrespective of the initiating event and the core disassembly process. (author)

  6. Melt Fragmentation Characteristics of Metal Fuel with Melt Injection Mass during Initiating Phase of SFR Severe Accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, Hyo; Lee, Min Ho; Bang, In Cheol [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Jerng, Dong Wook [Chung-Ang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The PGSFR has adopted the metal fuel for its inherent safety under severe accident conditions. However, this fuel type is not demonstrated clearly yet under the such severe accident conditions. Additional experiments for examining these issues should be performed to support its licensing activities. Under initiating phase of hypothetic core disruptive accident (HCDA) conditions, the molten metal could be better dispersed and fragmented into the coolant channel than in the case of using oxide fuel. This safety strategy provides negative reactivity driven by a good dispersion of melt. If the coolant channel does not sufficient coolability, the severe recriticality would occur within the core region. Thus, it is important to examine the extent of melt fragmentation. The fragmentation behaviors of melt are closely related to a formation of debris shape. Once the debris shape is formed through the fragmentation process, its coolability is determined by the porosity or thermal conductivity of the melt. There were very limited studies for transient irradiation experiments of the metal fuel. These studies were performed by Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT) M series tests in U.S. The TREAT M series tests provided basic information of metal fuel performance under transient conditions. The effect of melt injection mass was evaluated in terms of the fragmentation behaviors of melt. These behaviors seemed to be similar between single-pin and multi-pins failure condition. However, the more melt was agglomerated in case of multi-pins failure.

  7. Methods to prevent the source term of methyl lodide during a core melt accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karhu, A. [VTT Energy (Finland)

    1999-11-01

    The purpose of this literature review is to gather available information of the methods to prevent a source term of methyl iodide during a core melt accident. The most widely studied methods for nuclear power plants include the impregnated carbon filters and alkaline additives and sprays. It is indicated that some deficiencies of these methods may emerge. More reactive impregnants and additives could make a great improvement. As a new method in the field of nuclear applications, the potential of transition metals to decompose methyl iodide, is introduced in this review. This area would require an additional research, which could elucidate the remaining questions of the reactions. The ionization of the gaseous methyl iodide by corona-discharge reactors is also shortly described. (au)

  8. Effect of controlling recrystallization from the melt on the residual stress and structural properties of the Silica-clad Ge core fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ziwen; Cheng, Xueli; He, Ting; Xue, Fei; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Na; Wen, Jianxiang; Zeng, Xianglong; Wang, Tingyun

    2017-09-01

    Effect of controlling recrystallization from the melt (1000 °C) on the residual stress and structural properties of a Ge core fiber via molten core drawing (MCD) method is investigated. Ge core fibers is investigated using Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope (SEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Compared with the as-drawn Ge fiber, the Raman peak of the recrystallized Ge fiber shift from 300 cm-1 to 300.6 cm-1 and full width at half maximum (FWHM) decreased from 5.36 cm-1 to 4.48 cm-1. The Ge crystal grains which sizes are of 200-600 nm were formed during the process of recrystallization; the XRD peak of (1 1 1) plane is observed after recrystallization. These results show that controlling recrystallization allows the release of the thermal stress, and improvement of the crystal quality of Ge core.

  9. An assessment of Class-9 (core-melt) accidents for PWR dry-containment systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theofanous, T.G.; Saito, M.

    1981-01-01

    The phenomenology of core-melt accidents in dry containments was examined for the purpose of identifying the margins of safety in such Class-9 situations. The scale (geometry) effects appear to crucially limit the extent (severity) of steam explosions. This together with the established reduced explosivity of the corium-A/water system, and the inherently high capability of dry containments (redinforced concrete, and shields in some cases, seismic design etc.) lead to the conclusion that failure due to steam explosions may be considered essentially incredible. These premixture scaling considerations also impact ultimate debris disposition and coolability and need additional development. A water-flooded reactor cavity would have beneficial effects in limiting (but not necessarily eliminating) melt-concrete interactions. Independently of the initial degree of quenching and/or scale of fragmentation, mechanisms exist that drive the system towards ultimate stability (coolability). Additional studies, with intermediate-scale prototypic materials are recommended to better explore these mechanisms. Containment heat removal systems must provide the crucial capability of mitigating such accidents. Passive systems should be explored and assessed against currently available and/or improved active systems taking into account the rather loose time constraints required for activation. It appears that containment margins for accommodating the hydrogen problem are limited. This problem appears to stand out not only in terms of potential consequences but also in terms of lack of any readily available and clear cut solutions at this time. (orig.)

  10. A Structural Molar Volume Model for Oxide Melts Part III: Fe Oxide-Containing Melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibodeau, Eric; Gheribi, Aimen E.; Jung, In-Ho

    2016-04-01

    As part III of this series, the model is extended to iron oxide-containing melts. All available experimental data in the FeO-Fe2O3-Na2O-K2O-MgO-CaO-MnO-Al2O3-SiO2 system were critically evaluated based on the experimental condition. The variations of FeO and Fe2O3 in the melts were taken into account by using FactSage to calculate the Fe2+/Fe3+ distribution. The molar volume model with unary and binary model parameters can be used to predict the molar volume of the molten oxide of the Li2O-Na2O-K2O-MgO-CaO-MnO-PbO-FeO-Fe2O3-Al2O3-SiO2 system in the entire range of compositions, temperatures, and oxygen partial pressures from Fe saturation to 1 atm pressure.

  11. State-of-the-Art Report on Molten Corium Concrete Interaction and Ex-Vessel Molten Core Coolability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnet, Jean-Michel; Cranga, Michel; Vola, Didier; Marchetto, Cathy; Kissane, Martin; ); Robledo, Fernando; Farmer, Mitchel T.; Spengler, Claus; Basu, Sudhamay; Atkhen, Kresna; Fargette, Andre; Fisher, Manfred; Foit, Jerzi; Hotta, Akitoshi; Morita, Akinobu; Journeau, Christophe; Moiseenko, Evgeny; Polidoro, Franco; Zhou, Quan

    2017-01-01

    Activities carried out over the last three decades in relation to core-concrete interactions and melt coolability, as well as related containment failure modes, have significantly increased the level of understanding in this area. In a severe accident with little or no cooling of the reactor core, the residual decay heat in the fuel can cause the core materials to melt. One of the challenges in such cases is to determine the consequences of molten core materials causing a failure of the reactor pressure vessel. Molten corium will interact, for example, with structural concrete below the vessel. The reaction between corium and concrete, commonly referred to as MCCI (molten core concrete interaction), can be extensive and can release combustible gases. The cooling behaviour of ex-vessel melts through sprays or flooding is also complex. This report summarises the current state of the art on MCCI and melt coolability, and thus should be useful to specialists seeking to predict the consequences of severe accidents, to model developers for severe-accident computer codes and to designers of mitigation measures

  12. Translation and convection of Earth's inner core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnereau, M.; Calvet, M.; Margerin, L.; Mizzon, H.; Souriau, A.

    2012-12-01

    The image of the inner core growing slowly at the center of the Earth by gradual cooling and solidification of the surrounding liquid outer core is being replaced by the more vigorous image of a ``deep foundry'', where melting and crystallization rates exceed by many times the net growth rate. Recently, a particular mode of convection, called translation, has been put forward as an important mode of inner core dynamics because this mechanism is able to explain the observed East-West asymmetry of P-wave velocity and attenuation (Monnereau et al. 2010). Translation is a pure solid displacement of the inner core material (solid iron) within its envelop, implying crystallization of entering iron on one side of the inner core and melting on the opposite side. Translation is consistent with multiple scattering models of wave propagation. If they do not experience deformation, iron crystals grow as they transit from one hemisphere to the other. Larger crystals constituting a faster and more attenuating medium, a translation velocity of some cm/yr (about ten times the growth rate) is enough to account for the superficial asymmetry observed for P-wave velocity and attenuation, with grains of a few hundred meters on the crystallizing side (West) growing up to a few kilometers before melting on the East side, and a drift direction located in the equatorial plane. Among all hypotheses that have been proposed to account for the seismic asymmetry, translation is the only one based on a demonstrated link between the seismic data and the proposed dynamics, notably through a model of seismic wave propagation. This mechanism was also proposed to be responsible for the formation of a dense layer at the bottom of the outer core, since the high rate of melting and crystallization would release a liquid depleted in light elements at the surface of the inner core (Alboussiere et al 2010). This would explain the anomalously low gradient of P wave velocity in the lowermost 200 km of the

  13. Mathematical model of melt flow channel granulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Kiselev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Granulation of carbohydrate-vitamin-mineral supplements based on molasses is performed at a high humidity (26 %, so for a stable operation of granulator it is necessary to reveal its melt flow pattern. To describe melt non-isothermal flow in the granulator a mathematical model with following initial equations: continuity equation, motion equation and rheological equation – was developed. The following assumptions were adopted: the melt flow in the granulator is a steady laminar flow; inertial and gravity forces can be ignored; melt is an incompressible fluid; velocity gradient in the flow direction is much smaller than in the transverse direction; the pressure gradient over the cross section of the channel is constant; the flow is hydrodynamically fully developed; effects impact on the channel inlet and outlet may be neglected. Due to the assumptions adopted, it can be considered that in this granulator only velocity components in the x-direction are significant and all the members of the equation with the components and their derivatives with respect to the coordinates y and z can be neglected. The resulting solutions were obtained: the equation for the mean velocity, the equation for determining the volume flow, the formula for calculating of mean time of the melt being in the granulator, the equation for determining the shear stress, the equation for determining the shear rate and the equation for determining the pressure loss. The results of calculations of the equations obtained are in complete agreement with the experimental data; deviation range is 16–19 %. The findings about the melt movement pattern in granulator allowed developing a methodology for calculating a rational design of the granulator molding unit.

  14. Modeling and simulation of melt-layer erosion during a plasma disruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassanein, A.; Belan, V.; Konkashbaev, I.; Nikandrov, L.; Safronov, V.; Zhitlukhin, A.; Litunovsky, V.

    1997-01-01

    Metallic plasma-facing components (PFCs) e.g. beryllium and tungsten, will be subjected to severe melting during plasma instabilities such as disruptions, edge-localized modes and high power excursions. Because of the greater thickness of the resulting melt layers relative to that of the surface vaporization, the potential loss of the developing melt-layer can significantly shorten PFC lifetime, severely contaminate the plasma and potentially prevent successful operation of the tokamak reactor. Mechanisms responsible for melt-layer loss during plasma instabilities are being modeled and evaluated. Of particular importance are hydrodynamic instabilities developed in the liquid layer due to various forces such as those from magnetic fields, plasma impact momentum, vapor recoil and surface tension. Another mechanism found to contribute to melt-layer splashing loss is volume bubble boiling, which can result from overheating of the liquid layer. To benchmark these models, several new experiments were designed and performed in different laboratory devices for this work; the SPLASH codes) are generally in good agreement with the experimental results. The effect of in-reactor disruption conditions, which do not exist in simulation experiments, on melt-layer erosion is discussed. (orig.)

  15. Earth's core formation due to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ida, S.; Nakagawa, Y.; Nakazawa, K.

    1987-01-01

    A protoearth accretion stage configuration consisting of an undifferentiated solid core, an intermediate metal-melt layer, and an outer silicate-melt layer, is presently taken as the initial state in an investigation of Rayleigh-Taylor instability-induced core formation. The Ida et al. (to be published) quantitative results on the instability in a self-gravitating fluid sphere are used. The instability is found to occur through the translational mode on a time-scale of about 10 hr, in the case where the metal-melt layer is greater than about 1 km; this implies that the earth's core formed due to the undifferentiated solid core's translation upon the outer layer's melting. Differentiation would then have occurred in the late accretion stage. 17 references

  16. Volume dependence of the melting temperature for alkali metals with Debye's model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soma, T.; Kagaya, H.M.; Nishigaki, M.

    1983-01-01

    Using the volume dependence of the Grueneisen constant at higher temperatures, the volume effect on the melting temperature of alkali metals is studied by Lindeman's melting law and Debye's model. The obtained melting curve increases as a function of the compressed volume and shows the maximum of the melting point at the characteristic volume. The resultant data are qualitatively in agreement with the observed tendency for alkali metals. (author)

  17. Mathematical modeling of quartz particle melting process in plasma-chemical reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volokitin, Oleg, E-mail: volokitin-oleg@mail.ru; Volokitin, Gennady, E-mail: vgg-tomsk@mail.ru; Skripnikova, Nelli, E-mail: nks2003@mai.ru; Shekhovtsov, Valentin, E-mail: shehovcov2010@yandex.ru [Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2, Solyanaya Sq., 634003, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Vlasov, Viktor, E-mail: rector@tsuab.ru [Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2, Solyanaya Sq., 634003, Tomsk (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30, Lenin Ave., 634050, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    Among silica-based materials vitreous silica has a special place. The paper presents the melting process of a quartz particle under conditions of low-temperature plasma. A mathematical model is designed for stages of melting in the experimental plasma-chemical reactor. As calculation data show, quartz particles having the radius of 0.21≤ r{sub p} ≤0.64 mm completely melt at W = 0.65 l/s particle feed rate depending on the Nusselt number, while 0.14≤ r{sub p} ≤0.44 mm particles melt at W = 1.4 l/s. Calculation data showed that 2 mm and 0.4 mm quartz particles completely melted during and 0.1 s respectively. Thus, phase transformations occurred in silicon dioxide play the important part in its heating up to the melting temperature.

  18. Experimental studies on melt spreading, bubbling heat transfer, and coolant layer boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, G.A.; Finfrock, C.; Klages, J.; Schwarz, C.E.; Burson, S.B.

    1988-01-01

    Melt spreading studies have been undertaken to investigate the extent to which molten core debris may be expected to spread under gravity forces in a BWR drywell geometry. The objectives are to determine the extent of melt spreading as a function of melt mass,melt superheat, and water depth. These studies will enable an objective determination of whether or not core debris can spread up to and contact containment structures or boundaries upon vessel failure. Results indicate that the most important variables are the melt superheat and the water depth. Studies have revealed five distinct regimes of melt spreading ranging from hydrodynamically-limited to heat transfer-limited. A single parameter dimensionless correlation is presented which identified the spreading regime and allows for mechanistic calculation of the average thickness to which the melt will spread. 7 refs., 12 figs

  19. Thermal-hydraulic studies on molten core-concrete interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, G.A.

    1986-10-01

    This report discusses studies carried out in connection with light water power reactor accidents. Recent assessments have indicated that the consequences of molten-core concrete interactions dominate the considerations of severe accidents. The two areas of interest that have been investigated are interlayer heat and mass transfer and liquid-liquid boiling. Interlayer heat and mass transfer refers to processes that occur within a core melt between the stratified, immiscible phases of core oxides and metals. Liquid-liquid boiling refers to processes that occur at the melt-concrete on melt-coolant interface

  20. Discrete elastic model for two-dimensional melting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansac, Yves; Glaser, Matthew A; Clark, Noel A

    2006-04-01

    We present a network model for the study of melting and liquid structure in two dimensions, the first in which the presence and energy of topological defects (dislocations and disclinations) and of geometrical defects (elemental voids) can be independently controlled. Interparticle interaction is via harmonic springs and control is achieved by Monte Carlo moves which springs can either be orientationally "flipped" between particles to generate topological defects, or can be "popped" in force-free shape, to generate geometrical defects. With the geometrical defects suppressed the transition to the liquid phase occurs via disclination unbinding, as described by the Kosterlitz-Thouless-Halperin-Nelson-Young model and found in soft potential two-dimensional (2D) systems, such as the dipole-dipole potential [H. H. von Grünberg, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 255703 (2004)]. By contrast, with topological defects suppressed, a disordering transition, the Glaser-Clark condensation of geometrical defects [M. A. Glaser and N. A. Clark, Adv. Chem. Phys. 83, 543 (1993); M. A. Glaser, (Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 1990), Vol. 52, p. 141], produces a state that accurately characterizes the local liquid structure and first-order melting observed in hard-potential 2D systems, such as hard disk and the Weeks-Chandler-Andersen (WCA) potentials (M. A. Glaser and co-workers, see above). Thus both the geometrical and topological defect systems play a role in melting. The present work introduces a system in which the relative roles of topological and geometrical defects and their interactions can be explored. We perform Monte Carlo simulations of this model in the isobaric-isothermal ensemble, and present the phase diagram as well as various thermodynamic, statistical, and structural quantities as a function of the relative populations of geometrical and topological defects. The model exhibits a rich phase behavior including hexagonal and square crystals, expanded crystal, dodecagonal quasicrystal

  1. Melting Penetration Simulation of Fe-U System at High Temperature Using MPS-LER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mustari, A P A; Irwanto, Dwi; Yamaji, A

    2016-01-01

    Melting penetration information of Fe-U system is necessary for simulating the molten core behavior during severe accident in nuclear power plants. For Fe-U system, the information is mainly obtained from experiment, i.e. TREAT experiment. However, there is no reported data on SS304 at temperature above 1350°C. The MPS-LER has been developed and validated to simulate melting penetration on Fe-U system. The MPS-LER modelled the eutectic phenomenon by solving the diffusion process and by applying the binary phase diagram criteria. This study simulates the melting penetration of the system at higher temperature using MPS-LER. Simulations were conducted on SS304 at 1400, 1450 and 1500°C. The simulation results show rapid increase of melting penetration rate. (paper)

  2. Modeling the kinetics of volatilization from glass melts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerkens, R.G.C.

    2001-01-01

    A model description for the evaporation kinetics from glass melts in direct contact with static atmospheres or flowing gas phases is presented. The derived models and equations are based on the solution of the second Ficks' diffusion law and quasi-steady-state mass transfer relations, taking into

  3. Oxidation during reflood of reactor core with melting cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siefken, L.J.; Allison, C.M.; Davis, K.L. [and others

    1995-09-01

    Models were recently developed and incorporated into the SCDAP/RELAP5 code for calculating the oxidation of fuel rods during cladding meltdown and reflood. Experiments have shown that a period of intense oxidation may occur when a hot partially oxidized reactor core is reflooded. This paper offers an explanation of the cladding meltdown and oxidation processes that cause this intense period of oxidation. Models for the cladding meltdown and oxidation processes are developed. The models are assessed by simulating a severe fuel damage experiment that involved reflood. The models for cladding meltdown and oxidation were found to improve calculation of the temperature and oxidation of fuel rods during the period in which hot fuel rods are reflooded.

  4. Eutectic melting temperature of the lowermost Earth's mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrault, D.; Lo Nigro, G.; Bolfan-Casanova, N.; Bouhifd, M.; Garbarino, G.; Mezouar, M.

    2009-12-01

    Partial melting of the Earth's deep mantle probably occurred at different stages of its formation as a consequence of meteoritic impacts and seismology suggests that it even continues today at the core-mantle boundary. Melts are important because they dominate the chemical evolution of the different Earth's reservoirs and more generally the dynamics of the whole planet. Unfortunately, the most critical parameter, that is the temperature profile inside the deep Earth, remains poorly constrained accross the planet history. Experimental investigations of the melting properties of materials representative of the deep Earth at relevant P-T conditions can provide anchor points to refine past and present temperature profiles and consequently determine the degree of melting at the different geological periods. Previous works report melting relations in the uppermost lower mantle region, using the multi-anvil press [1,2]. On the other hand, the pyrolite solidus was determined up to 65 GPa using optical observations in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell (LH-DAC) [3]. Finally, the melting temperature of (Mg,Fe)2SiO4 olivine is documented at core-mantle boundary (CMB) conditions by shock wave experiments [4]. Solely based on these reports, experimental data remain too sparse to draw a definite melting curve for the lower mantle in the relevant 25-135 GPa pressure range. We reinvestigated melting properties of lower mantle materials by means of in-situ angle dispersive X-ray diffraction measurements in the LH-DAC at the ESRF [5]. Experiments were performed in an extended P-T range for two starting materials: forsterite and a glass with chondrite composition. In both cases, the aim was to determine the onset of melting, and thus the eutectic melting temperatures as a function of pressure. Melting was evidenced from drastic changes of diffraction peak shape on the image plate, major changes in diffraction intensities in the integrated pattern, disappearance of diffraction rings

  5. Four-fluid model of PWR degraded cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dearing, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes the new two-dimensional, four-fluid fluid dynamics and heat transfer (FLUIDS) module of the MELPROG code. MELPROG is designed to give an integrated, mechanistic treatment of pressurized water reactor (PWR) core meltdown accidents from accident initiation to vessel melt-through. The code has a modular data storage and transfer structure, with each module providing the others with boundary conditions at each computational time step. Thus the FLUIDS module receives mass and energy source terms from the fuel pin module, the structures module, and the debris bed module, and radiation energy source terms from the radiation module. MELPROG, which models the reactor vessel, is also designed to model the vessel as a component in the TRAC/PF1 networking solution of a PWR reactor coolant system (RCS). The coupling between TRAC and MELPROG is implicit in the fluid dynamics of the reactor coolant (liquid water and steam) allowing an accurate simulation of the coupling between the vessel and the rest of the RCS during an accident. This paper deals specifically with the numerical model of fluid dynamics and heat transfer within the reactor vessel, which allows a much more realistic simulation (with less restrictive assumptions on physical behavior) of the accident than has been possible before

  6. KATS experiments to simulate corium spreading in the EPR core catcher concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eppinger, B.; Fieg, G.; Schuetz, W.; Stegmaier, U.

    2001-01-01

    In future Light Water Reactors special devices (core catchers) might be required to prevent containment failure by basement erosion after reactor pressure vessel melt-through during a core meltdown accident. Quick freezing of the molten core masses is desirable to reduce release of radioactivity. Several concepts of core catcher de-vices have been proposed based on the spreading of corium melt onto flat surfaces with subsequent cooling by flooding with water. Therefore a series of experiments to investigate high temperature melt spreading on flat surfaces has been carried out using alumina-iron thermite melts as a simulant. The oxidic thermite melt is conditioned by adding other oxides to simulate a realistic corium melt as close as possible. Spreading of oxidic and metallic melts have been performed in one- and two-dimensional geometry. Substrates were chemically inert ceramic layers, dry concrete and concrete with a shallow water layer on top. (authors)

  7. Bubble removal and sand dissolution in an electrically heated glass melting channel with defined melt flow examined by mathematical modelling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrbek, L.; Kocourková, P.; Jebavá, Marcela; Cincibusová, P.; Němec, Lubomír

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 456, JAN 15 (2017), s. 101-113 ISSN 0022-3093 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : glass melt flow * mathematical modelling * energy distribution * space utilization * melting performance Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass OBOR OECD: Ceramics Impact factor: 2.124, year: 2016

  8. WNP-2 core model upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golightly, C.E.; Ravindranath, T.K.; Belblidia, L.A.; O'Farrell, D.; Andersen, P.S.

    2006-01-01

    The paper describes the core model upgrade of the WNP-2 training simulator and the reasons for the upgrade. The core model as well as the interface with the rest of the simulator are briefly described . The paper also describes the procedure that will be used by WNP-2 to update the simulator core data after future core reloads. Results from the fully integrated simulator are presented. (author)

  9. The melting curve of iron to 250 gigapascals - A constraint on the temperature at earth's center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Quentin; Jeanloz, Raymond; Bass, Jay; Svendsen, Bob; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1987-01-01

    The melting curve of iron, the primary constituent of earth's core, has been measured to pressures of 250 gigapascals with a combination of static and dynamic techniques. The melting temperature of iron at the pressure of the core-mantle boundary (136 GPa) is 4800 + or - 200 K, whereas at the inner core-outer core boundary (330 GPa), it is 7600 + or - 500 K. A melting temperature for iron-rich alloy of 6600 K at the inner core-outer core boundary and a maximum temperature of 6900 K at earth's center are inferred. This latter value is the first experimental upper bound on the temperature at earth's center, and these results imply that the temperature of the lower mantle is significantly less than that of the outer core.

  10. Trace Elements in Basalts From the Siqueiros Fracture Zone: Implications for Melt Migration Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickle, R. C.; Forsyth, D. W.; Saal, A. E.; Nagle, A. N.; Perfit, M. R.

    2008-12-01

    Incompatible trace element (ITE) ratios in MORB from a variety of locations may provide insights into the melt migration process by constraining aggregated melt compositions predicted by mantle melting and flow models. By using actual plate geometries to create a 3-D thermodynamic mantle model, melt volumes and compositions at all depths and locations may be calculated and binned into cubes using the pHMELTS algorithm [Asimow et al., 2004]. These melts can be traced from each cube to the surface assuming several migration models, including a simplified pressure gradient model and one in which melt is guided upwards by a low permeability compacted layer. The ITE ratios of all melts arriving at the surface are summed, averaged, and compared to those of the actual sample compositions from the various MOR locales. The Siqueiros fracture zone at 8° 20' N on the East Pacific Rise (EPR) comprises 4 intra-transform spreading centers (ITSCs) across 140 km of offset between two longer spreading ridges, and is an excellent study region for several reasons. First, an abundance of MORB data is readily available, and the samples retrieved from ITSCs are unlikely to be aggregated in a long-lived magma chamber or affected by along-axis transport, so they represent melts extracted locally from the mantle. Additionally, samples at Siqueiros span a compositional range from depleted to normal MORB within the fracture zone yet have similar isotopic compositions to samples collected from the 9-10° EPR. This minimizes the effect of assuming a uniform source composition in our melting model despite a heterogeneous mantle, allowing us to consistently compare the actual lava composition with that predicted by our model. Finally, it has been demonstrated with preliminary migration models that incipient melts generated directly below an ITSC may not necessarily erupt at that ITSC but migrate laterally towards a nearby ridge due to enhanced pressure gradients. The close proximity of the

  11. Simulant melt experiments on performance of the in-vessel core catcher

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Kyoung-Ho; Park, Rae-Joon; Kim, Sang-Baik; Suh, K.Y.; Cheung, F.B.; Rempe, J.L.

    2007-01-01

    In order to enhance the feasibility of in-vessel retention (IVR) of molten core material during a severe accident for high-power reactors, an in-vessel core catcher (IVCC) was designed and evaluated as part of a joint United States-Korean International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (INERI). The proposed IVCC is expected to increase the thermal margin for success of IVR by providing an 'engineered gap' for heat transfer from materials that relocate during a severe accident and potentially serving as a sacrificial material under a severe accident. In this study, LAVA-GAP experiments were performed to investigate the thermal and mechanical performance of the IVCC using the alumina melt as simulant. The LAVA-GAP experiments aim to examine the feasibility and sustainability of the IVCC under the various test conditions using 1/8th scale hemispherical test sections. As a feasibility test of the proposed IVCC in this INERI project, the effects of IVCC base steel materials, internal coating materials, and gap size between the IVCC and the vessel lower head were examined. The test results indicated that the internally coated IVCC has high thermal performance compared with the uncoated IVCC. In terms of integrity of the base steel, carbon steel is superior to stainless steel and the effect of bond coat is found to be trivial for the tests performed in this study. The thermal load is mitigated via boiling heat removal in the gap between the IVCC and the vessel lower head. The current test results imply that gaps less than 10 mm are not enough to guarantee effective cooling induced by water ingression and steam venting there through. Selection of endurable material and pertinent gap size is needed to implement the proposed IVCC concept into advanced reactor designs

  12. Nuclear reactor core modelling in multifunctional simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puska, E.K.

    1999-01-01

    The thesis concentrates on the development of nuclear reactor core models for the APROS multifunctional simulation environment and the use of the core models in various kinds of applications. The work was started in 1986 as a part of the development of the entire APROS simulation system. The aim was to create core models that would serve in a reliable manner in an interactive, modular and multifunctional simulator/plant analyser environment. One-dimensional and three-dimensional core neutronics models have been developed. Both models have two energy groups and six delayed neutron groups. The three-dimensional finite difference type core model is able to describe both BWR- and PWR-type cores with quadratic fuel assemblies and VVER-type cores with hexagonal fuel assemblies. The one- and three-dimensional core neutronics models can be connected with the homogeneous, the five-equation or the six-equation thermal hydraulic models of APROS. The key feature of APROS is that the same physical models can be used in various applications. The nuclear reactor core models of APROS have been built in such a manner that the same models can be used in simulator and plant analyser applications, as well as in safety analysis. In the APROS environment the user can select the number of flow channels in the three-dimensional reactor core and either the homogeneous, the five- or the six-equation thermal hydraulic model for these channels. The thermal hydraulic model and the number of flow channels have a decisive effect on the calculation time of the three-dimensional core model and thus, at present, these particular selections make the major difference between a safety analysis core model and a training simulator core model. The emphasis on this thesis is on the three-dimensional core model and its capability to analyse symmetric and asymmetric events in the core. The factors affecting the calculation times of various three-dimensional BWR, PWR and WWER-type APROS core models have been

  13. Nuclear reactor core modelling in multifunctional simulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puska, E.K. [VTT Energy, Nuclear Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1999-06-01

    The thesis concentrates on the development of nuclear reactor core models for the APROS multifunctional simulation environment and the use of the core models in various kinds of applications. The work was started in 1986 as a part of the development of the entire APROS simulation system. The aim was to create core models that would serve in a reliable manner in an interactive, modular and multifunctional simulator/plant analyser environment. One-dimensional and three-dimensional core neutronics models have been developed. Both models have two energy groups and six delayed neutron groups. The three-dimensional finite difference type core model is able to describe both BWR- and PWR-type cores with quadratic fuel assemblies and VVER-type cores with hexagonal fuel assemblies. The one- and three-dimensional core neutronics models can be connected with the homogeneous, the five-equation or the six-equation thermal hydraulic models of APROS. The key feature of APROS is that the same physical models can be used in various applications. The nuclear reactor core models of APROS have been built in such a manner that the same models can be used in simulator and plant analyser applications, as well as in safety analysis. In the APROS environment the user can select the number of flow channels in the three-dimensional reactor core and either the homogeneous, the five- or the six-equation thermal hydraulic model for these channels. The thermal hydraulic model and the number of flow channels have a decisive effect on the calculation time of the three-dimensional core model and thus, at present, these particular selections make the major difference between a safety analysis core model and a training simulator core model. The emphasis on this thesis is on the three-dimensional core model and its capability to analyse symmetric and asymmetric events in the core. The factors affecting the calculation times of various three-dimensional BWR, PWR and WWER-type APROS core models have been

  14. Three-dimensional model of heat transport during In Situ Vitrification with melting and cool down

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkes, G.L.

    1993-01-01

    A potential technology for permanent remediation of buried wastes is the In Situ Vitrification (ISV) process. This process uses electrical resistance heating to melt waste and contaminated soil in place to produce a durable, glasslike material that encapsulates and immobilizes buried wastes. The magnitude of the resulting electrical resistance heating is sufficient to cause soil melting. As the molten region grows, surface heat losses cause the soil near the surface to re solidify. This paper presents numerical results obtained by considering heat transport and melting when solving the conservation of mass and energy equations using finite element methods. A local heat source is calculated by solving the electric field equation and calculating a Joule Heat source term. The model considered is a three-dimensional model of the electrodes and surrounding soil. Also included in the model is subsidence; where the surface of the melted soil subsides due to the change in density when the soil melts. A power vs. time profile is implemented for typical ISV experiments. The model agrees well with experimental data for melt volume and melt shape

  15. A model for the latent heat of melting in free standing metal nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Jeong-Heon; Deinert, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticles of many metals are known to exhibit scale dependent latent heats of melting. Analytical models for this phenomenon have so far failed to completely capture the observed phenomena. Here we present a thermodynamic analysis for the melting of metal nanoparticles in terms of their internal energy and a scale dependent surface tension proposed by Tolman. The resulting model predicts the scale dependence of the latent heat of melting and is confirmed using published data for tin and aluminum

  16. Laboratory studies of the meltfront propagation in a borax core-catcher

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalle Donne, M.; Werle, H.

    1980-08-01

    A series of seven laboratory experiments concerning the meltdown of a borax core catcher have been performed. By the selection of the simulant materials the most important thermophysical properties of the core catcher materials were taken into account. Fission product heating of the molten core masses was simulated by electrolytically heating of the molten region. The experiments reveal interesting details of the phenomena to be expected during melt-down of a borax core catcher, especially on the flow pattern, the mixing processes of molten materials and the layer formation the melt. The most interesting result is that the ratio of downward to sideward melting rate is heavily reduced by high melting barriers and that a cubic structure of barriers will not equalize downward and sideward melting rates. A super 8 film is available as additional information. (orig.) [de

  17. Phase behavior and reactive transport of partial melt in heterogeneous mantle model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, J.; Hesse, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    The reactive transport of partial melt is the key process that leads to the chemical and physical differentiation of terrestrial planets and smaller celestial bodies. The essential role of the lithological heterogeneities during partial melting of the mantle is increasingly recognized. How far can enriched melts propagate while interacting with the ambient mantle? Can the melt flow emanating from a fertile heterogeneity be localized through a reactive infiltration feedback in a model without exogenous factors or contrived initial conditions? A full understanding of the role of heterogeneities requires reactive melt transport models that account for the phase behavior of major elements. Previous work on reactive transport in the mantle focuses on trace element partitioning; we present the first nonlinear chromatographic analysis of reactive melt transport in systems with binary solid solution. Our analysis shows that reactive melt transport in systems with binary solid solution leads to the formation of two separate reaction fronts: a slow melting/freezing front along which enthalpy change is dominant and a fast dissolution/precipitation front along which compositional changes are dominated by an ion-exchange process over enthalpy change. An intermediate state forms between these two fronts with a bulk-rock composition and enthalpy that are not necessarily bounded by the bulk-rock composition and enthalpy of either the enriched heterogeneity or the depleted ambient mantle. The formation of this intermediate state makes it difficult to anticipate the porosity changes and hence the stability of reaction fronts. Therefore, we develop a graphical representation for the solution that allows identification of the intermediate state by inspection, for all possible bulk-rock compositions and enthalpies of the heterogeneity and the ambient mantle. We apply the analysis to the partial melting of an enriched heterogeneity. This leads to the formation of moving precipitation

  18. GLASS MELTING PHENOMENA, THEIR ORDERING AND MELTING SPACE UTILISATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Němec L.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Four aspects of effective glass melting have been defined – namely the fast kinetics of partial melting phenomena, a consideration of the melting phenomena ordering, high utilisation of the melting space, and effective utilisation of the supplied energy. The relations were defined for the specific melting performance and specific energy consumption of the glass melting process which involve the four mentioned aspects of the process and indicate the potentials of effective melting. The quantity “space utilisation” has been treated in more detail as an aspect not considered in practice till this time. The space utilisation was quantitatively defined and its values have been determined for the industrial melting facility by mathematical modelling. The definitions of the specific melting performance and specific energy consumption have been used for assessment of the potential impact of a controlled melt flow and high space utilisation on the melting process efficiency on the industrial scale. The results have shown that even the partial control of the melt flow, leading to the partial increase of the space utilisation, may considerably increase the melting performance, whereas a decrease of the specific energy consumption was determined to be between 10 - 15 %.

  19. Melt/concrete interactions: the Sandia experimental program, model development, and code comparison test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, D.A.; Muir, J.F.

    1979-01-01

    High temperature melt/concrete interactions have been studied both experimentally and analytically at Sandia under sponsorship of Reactor Safety Research of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The purpose of these studies has been to develop an understanding of these interactions suitable for risk assessment. Results of the experimental program are summarized and a computer model of melt/concrete interactions is described. A melt/concrete interaction test that will allow this and other models of the interaction to be compared is also described

  20. Load histories from steam explosions during core melt accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, H.; Kolev, N.I.

    1992-01-01

    For the analysis of steam explosions a multicomponent multiphase thermohydraulic code is required which describes at least the motions of melt, water, and steam by separate velocity fields. One example of these very rare codes is the IVA3 code the development of which was brought to an interim close in 1991. As an example of a typical application of this code, precalculations of the FARO LWR Scoping Test 2 performed at Ispra are discussed. Unfortunately, the calculation results cannot be compared directly to the test results because of important differences between planned and achieved test parameters. Above all, only about one third of the planned melt mass actually entered the water. The test was performed in a closed vessel at an initial pressure of 50 bar. The water was saturated at this temperature and its level was at 1 m height. The simulation starts with the release of 50 kg of simulated corium from an intermediate catcher at about 3.2 m height. The calculation predicts a gradual pressure rise without fast transients worth mentioning from 50 to about 76 bar within roughly one second and stabilizes slightly below the maximum. Also described are the material distributions predicted during the process and the 'mixed' masses according to two different criteria. The former indicate that the melt jet penetrates the water without desintegrating while being surrounded by a thick vapor layer. Subsequently the melt collects at the level bottom and much of the liquid water is blown upwards by the steam being produced. The amounts of mass being 'mixed' with liquid water (and thus are thought to potentially participate in a steam explosion) remain below 10% for the known Theofanous criterion and below 30% for a more conservative criterion. It is however more important that the calculation demonstrates that further mixing could be the result of the onset of a steam explosion. This may strongly limit the usefulness of local mixing criteria. (orig./DG)

  1. An assessment of the radiological consequences of releases to groundwater following a core-melt accident at the Sizewell PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maul, P.R.

    1984-03-01

    In the extremely unlikely event of a degraded core accident at the proposed Sizewell PWR it is theoretically possible for the core to melt through the containment, after which activity could enter groundwater directly or as a result of subsequent leaching of the core in the ground. The radiological consequences of such an event are analysed and compared with the analysis undertaken by the NRPB for the corresponding releases to atmosphere. It is concluded that the risks associated with the groundwater route are much less important than those associated with the atmospheric route. The much longer transport times in the ground compared with those in the atmosphere enable countermeasures to be taken, if necessary, to restrict doses to members of the public to very low levels in the first few years following the accident. The entry of long-lived radionuclides into the sea over very long timescales results in the largest contribution to population doses, but these are delivered at extremely low dose rates which would be negligible compared with background exposure. (author)

  2. The thermo-elastic instability model of melting of alkali halides in the Debye approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Frank J.

    2018-05-01

    The Debye model of lattice vibrations of alkali halides is used to show that there is a temperature below the melting temperature where the vibrational pressure exceeds the electrostatic pressure. The onset temperature of this thermo-elastic instability scales as the melting temperature of NaCl, KCl, and KBr, suggesting its role in the melting of the alkali halides in agreement with a previous more rigorous model.

  3. Modelling and parameterizing the influence of tides on ice-shelf melt rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jourdain, N.; Molines, J. M.; Le Sommer, J.; Mathiot, P.; de Lavergne, C.; Gurvan, M.; Durand, G.

    2017-12-01

    Significant Antarctic ice sheet thinning is observed in several sectors of Antarctica, in particular in the Amundsen Sea sector, where warm circumpolar deep waters affect basal melting. The later has the potential to trigger marine ice sheet instabilities, with an associated potential for rapid sea level rise. It is therefore crucial to simulate and understand the processes associated with ice-shelf melt rates. In particular, the absence of tides representation in ocean models remains a caveat of numerous ocean hindcasts and climate projections. In the Amundsen Sea, tides are relatively weak and the melt-induced circulation is stronger than the tidal circulation. Using a regional 1/12° ocean model of the Amundsen Sea, we nonetheless find that tides can increase melt rates by up to 36% in some ice-shelf cavities. Among the processes that can possibly affect melt rates, the most important is an increased exchange at the ice/ocean interface resulting from the presence of strong tidal currents along the ice drafts. Approximately a third of this effect is compensated by a decrease in thermal forcing along the ice draft, which is related to an enhanced vertical mixing in the ocean interior in presence of tides. Parameterizing the effect of tides is an alternative to the representation of explicit tides in an ocean model, and has the advantage not to require any filtering of ocean model outputs. We therefore explore different ways to parameterize the effects of tides on ice shelf melt. First, we compare several methods to impose tidal velocities along the ice draft. We show that getting a realistic spatial distribution of tidal velocities in important, and can be deduced from the barotropic velocities of a tide model. Then, we explore several aspects of parameterized tidal mixing to reproduce the tide-induced decrease in thermal forcing along the ice drafts.

  4. Event course analysis of core disruptive accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hering, W.; Homann, C.; Sengpiel, W.; Struwe, D.; Messainguiral, C.

    1995-01-01

    The theortical studies of the behavior of a PWR core in a meltdown accident are focused on hydrogen release, materials redistribution in the core area including forming of an oxide melt pool, quantity of melt and its composition, and temperatures attained by the RPV internals (esp. in the upper plenum) during the accident up to the time of melt relocation into the lower plenum. The calculations are done by the SCDAP/RELAP5 code. For its validation selected CORA results and Phebus FPTO results have been used. (orig.)

  5. Geotechnical modeling of high-level nuclear waste disposal by rock melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuze, F.E.

    1981-12-01

    A new strategy has been developed for the geotechnical modeling of nuclear waste disposal by rock melting (DRM). Three seeparate tasks were performed to reach this objective: a review of the four scenarios which have been proposed for DRM, to date; an evaluation of computer-based numerical models which could be used to analyze the mechanical, thermal, and hydraulic processes involved in DRM; and a critical review of rock mass properties which are relevant to the design and safety of waste disposal by rock melting. It is concluded that several geotechnical aspects of DRM can be studied realistically with current state-of-the-art model capabilities and knowledge of material properties. The next step in the feasibility study of DRM should be a best-estimate calculation of the four cavity-melt and canister-burial concepts. These new analyses will indicate the most critical areas for subsequent research

  6. Fundamentals of Melt-Water Interfacial Transport Phenomena: Improved Understanding for Innovative Safety Technologies in ALWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Anderson; M. Corradini; K.Y. Bank; R. Bonazza; D. Cho

    2005-04-26

    The interaction and mixing of high-temperature melt and water is the important technical issue in the safety assessment of water-cooled reactors to achieve ultimate core coolability. For specific advanced light water reactor (ALWR) designs, deliberate mixing of the core-melt and water is being considered as a mitigative measure, to assure ex-vessel core coolability. The goal of this work is to provide the fundamental understanding needed for melt-water interfacial transport phenomena, thus enabling the development of innovative safety technologies for advanced LWRs that will assure ex-vessel core coolability. The work considers the ex-vessel coolability phenomena in two stages. The first stage is the melt quenching process and is being addressed by Argonne National Lab and University of Wisconsin in modified test facilities. Given a quenched melt in the form of solidified debris, the second stage is to characterize the long-term debris cooling process and is being addressed by Korean Maritime University in via test and analyses. We then address the appropriate scaling and design methodologies for reactor applications.

  7. Fundamentals of Melt-Water Interfacial Transport Phenomena: Improved Understanding for Innovative Safety Technologies in ALWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, M.; Corradini, M.; Bank, K.Y.; Bonazza, R.; Cho, D.

    2005-01-01

    The interaction and mixing of high-temperature melt and water is the important technical issue in the safety assessment of water-cooled reactors to achieve ultimate core coolability. For specific advanced light water reactor (ALWR) designs, deliberate mixing of the core-melt and water is being considered as a mitigative measure, to assure ex-vessel core coolability. The goal of this work is to provide the fundamental understanding needed for melt-water interfacial transport phenomena, thus enabling the development of innovative safety technologies for advanced LWRs that will assure ex-vessel core coolability. The work considers the ex-vessel coolability phenomena in two stages. The first stage is the melt quenching process and is being addressed by Argonne National Lab and University of Wisconsin in modified test facilities. Given a quenched melt in the form of solidified debris, the second stage is to characterize the long-term debris cooling process and is being addressed by Korean Maritime University in via test and analyses. We then address the appropriate scaling and design methodologies for reactor applications

  8. Heat transfer model and finite element formulation for simulation of selective laser melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Souvik; Juha, Mario; Shephard, Mark S.; Maniatty, Antoinette M.

    2017-10-01

    A novel approach and finite element formulation for modeling the melting, consolidation, and re-solidification process that occurs in selective laser melting additive manufacturing is presented. Two state variables are introduced to track the phase (melt/solid) and the degree of consolidation (powder/fully dense). The effect of the consolidation on the absorption of the laser energy into the material as it transforms from a porous powder to a dense melt is considered. A Lagrangian finite element formulation, which solves the governing equations on the unconsolidated reference configuration is derived, which naturally considers the effect of the changing geometry as the powder melts without needing to update the simulation domain. The finite element model is implemented into a general-purpose parallel finite element solver. Results are presented comparing to experimental results in the literature for a single laser track with good agreement. Predictions for a spiral laser pattern are also shown.

  9. A rheological model for glassforming silicate melts in the systems CAS, MAS, MCAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giordano, Daniele; Russell, J K

    2007-01-01

    Viscosity is the single most important property governing the efficacy, rates, and nature of melt transport. Viscosity is intimately related to the structure and thermodynamics properties of the melts and is a reflection of the mechanisms of single atoms slipping over potential energy barriers. The ability to predict melt viscosity accurately is, therefore, of critical importance for gaining new insights into the structure of silicate melts. Simple composition melts, having a reduced number of components, offer an advantage for understanding the relationships between the chemical composition, structural organization and the rheological properties of a melt. Here we have compiled a large database of ∼970 experimental measurements of melt viscosity for the simple chemical systems MAS, CAS and MCAS. These data are used to create a single chemical model for predicting the non-Arrhenian viscosity as a function of temperature (T) and composition (X) across the entire MCAS system. The T-dependence of viscosity is accounted for by the three parameters in each of the model functions: (i) Vogel-Fulcher-Tamman (VFT); (ii) Adam-Gibbs (AG); and (iii) Avramov (AV). The literature shows that, in these systems, viscosity converges to a common value of the pre-exponential factors (A) that can be assumed to be independent of composition. The other two adjustable parameters in each equation are expanded to capture the effects of composition. The resulting models are continuous across T-X space. The values and implications of the optimal parameters returned for each model are compared and discussed. A similar approach is likely to be applicable to a variety of non-silicate multicomponent glassforming systems

  10. MELT-IIIB: an updated version of the melt code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabb, K.K.; Lewis, C.H.; O'Dell, L.D.; Padilla, A. Jr.; Smith, D.E.; Wilburn, N.P.

    1979-04-01

    The MELT series is a reactor modeling code designed to investigate a wide variety of hypothetical accident conditions, particularly the transient overpower sequence. MELT-IIIB is the latest in the series

  11. Experiments and analyses on melt jet impingement during severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sehgal, B.R.; Green, J.A.; Dinh, T.N.; Dong, W.

    1997-01-01

    Relocation of melt from the core region, during a nuclear reactor severe accident, presents the potential for erosion of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) wall as a result of melt jet impingement. The extent of vessel erosion will depend upon a variety of parameters, including jet diameter, velocity, composition, superheat, angle of inclination, and the presence of an overlying water or melt pool. Experiments have been conducted at the Royal Institute of Technology Division of Nuclear Power Safety (RIT/NPS) which employ a variety of melt and pressure vessel simulant materials, such as water, salt-ice, Cerrobend alloy and molten salt. These experiments have revealed that the erosion depth of the vessel simulant in the jet stagnation zone can be adequately predicted by the Saito correlation, which is based on turbulent heat transfer, while initial erosion rates are seen to be in line with the laminar-stagnation-zone model. A transition between the laminar and turbulent regimes was realized in most cases and is attributed to the roughness of the surface in the eroded cavity formed

  12. The melting mechanism in binary Pd0.25Ni0.75 nanoparticles: molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domekeli, U.; Sengul, S.; Celtek, M.; Canan, C.

    2018-02-01

    The melting mechanism for Pd0.25Ni0.75 alloy nanoparticles (NPs) was investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with quantum Sutton-Chen many-body potentials. NPs of six different sizes ranging from 682 to 22,242 atoms were studied to observe the effect of size on the melting point. The melting temperatures of the NPs were estimated by following the changes in both the thermodynamic and structural quantities such as the total energy, heat capacity and Lindemann index. We also used a thermodynamics model to better estimate the melting point and to check the accuracy of MD simulations. We observed that the melting points of the NPs decreased as their sizes decreased. Although the MD simulations for the bulk system yielded higher melting temperatures because of the lack of a seed for the liquid phase, the melting temperatures determined for both the bulk material and the NPs are in good agreement with those predicted from the thermodynamics model. The melting mechanism proceeds in two steps: firstly, a liquid-like shell is formed in the outer regions of the NP with increasing temperature. The thickness of the liquid-like shell increases with increasing temperature until the shell reaches a critical thickness. Then, the entire Pd-Ni NP including core-related solid-like regions melts at once.

  13. Nonlinear Model of Tape Wound Core Transformers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Vahedi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, tape wound cores due to their excellent magnetic properties, are widely used in different types of transformers. Performance prediction of these transformers needs an accurate model with ability to determine flux distribution within the core and magnetic loss. Spiral structure of tape wound cores affects the flux distribution and always cause complication of analysis. In this paper, a model based on reluctance networks method is presented for analysis of magnetic flux in wound cores. Using this model, distribution of longitudinal and transverse fluxes within the core can be determined. To consider the nonlinearity of the core, a dynamic hysteresis model is included in the presented model. Having flux density in different points of the core, magnetic losses can be calculated. To evaluate the validity of the model, results are compared with 2-D FEM simulations. In addition, a transformer designed for series-resonant converter and simulation results are compared with experimental measurements. Comparisons show accuracy of the model besides simplicity and fast convergence

  14. Modeling and Experimental Validation of the Electron Beam Selective Melting Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wentao Yan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Electron beam selective melting (EBSM is a promising additive manufacturing (AM technology. The EBSM process consists of three major procedures: ① spreading a powder layer, ② preheating to slightly sinter the powder, and ③ selectively melting the powder bed. The highly transient multi-physics phenomena involved in these procedures pose a significant challenge for in situ experimental observation and measurement. To advance the understanding of the physical mechanisms in each procedure, we leverage high-fidelity modeling and post-process experiments. The models resemble the actual fabrication procedures, including ① a powder-spreading model using the discrete element method (DEM, ② a phase field (PF model of powder sintering (solid-state sintering, and ③ a powder-melting (liquid-state sintering model using the finite volume method (FVM. Comprehensive insights into all the major procedures are provided, which have rarely been reported. Preliminary simulation results (including powder particle packing within the powder bed, sintering neck formation between particles, and single-track defects agree qualitatively with experiments, demonstrating the ability to understand the mechanisms and to guide the design and optimization of the experimental setup and manufacturing process.

  15. Nitrogen partitioning during core-mantle differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speelmanns, I. M.; Schmidt, M. W.; Liebske, C.

    2016-12-01

    This study investiagtes nitrogen partitioing between metal and silicate melts as relevant for core segregation during the accretion of planetesimals into the Earth. On present day Earth, N belongs to the most important elements, as it is one of the key constituents of our atmosphere and forms the basis of life. However, the geochemistry of N, i.e. its distribution and isotopic fractionation between Earth's deep reservoirs is not well constrained. In order to determine the partitioning behaviour of N, a centrifuging piston cylinder was used to euqilibrate and then gravitationally separate metal-silicate melt pairs at 1250 °C, 1 GPa over the range of oxygen fugacities thought to have prevailied druing core segreagtion (IW-4 to IW). Complete segregation of the two melts was reached within 3 hours at 1000 g, the interface showing a nice meniscus The applied double capsule technique, using an outer metallic and inner non-metallic (mostly graphite) capsule, minimizes volatile loss over the course of the experiment compared to single non-metallic capsules. The two quenched melts were cut apart, cleaned at the outside and N concentrations of the melts were analysed on bulk samples by an elemental analyser. Nevertheless, the low amount of sample material and the N yield in the high pressure experiments required the developement of new analytical routines. Despite these experimental and analytical difficulties, we were able to determine a DNmetal/silicateof 13±0.25 at IW-1, N partitioning into the core froming metal. The few availible literature data [1],[2] suggest that N changes its compatibility favoring the silicate melt or magma ocean at around IW-2.5. In order to asses how much N may effectively be contained in the core and the silicate Earth, experiments characterizing N behaviour over the entire range of core formation condtitions are well under way. [1] Kadik et al., (2011) Geochemistry International 49.5: 429-438. [2] Roskosz et al., (2013) GCA 121: 15-28.

  16. Radionuclide release and aerosol generation during core debris interactions with concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    During severe accidents at nuclear power plants, it is possible for the reactor fuel to melt and penetrate the reactor vessel. This can lead to vigorous interaction of core materials (UO 2 , ZrO 2 , Zr, and stainless steel) with structural concrete. Sparging of the molten core debris by gases (H 2 O and CO 2 ) liberated from the concrete can lead to rapid release of radionuclides from the core debris. A theoretical description of this release process has been developed and is called the VANESA model. The treatments in the VANESA model of the thermodynamics of radionuclide vaporization and the kinetic barriers to vaporization will be described. Predictions obtained from the model will be compared to the results of tests of core debris/concrete interactions

  17. Influence of Modelling Options in RELAP5/SCDAPSIM and MAAP4 Computer Codes on Core Melt Progression and Reactor Pressure Vessel Integrity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siniša Šadek

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available RELAP5/SCDAPSIM and MAAP4 are two widely used severe accident computer codes for the integral analysis of the core and the reactor pressure vessel behaviour following the core degradation. The objective of the paper is the comparison of code results obtained by application of different modelling options and the evaluation of influence of thermal hydraulic behaviour of the plant on core damage progression. The analysed transient was postulated station blackout in NPP Krško with a leakage from reactor coolant pump seals. Two groups of calculations were performed where each group had a different break area and, thus, a different leakage rate. Analyses have shown that MAAP4 results were more sensitive to varying thermal hydraulic conditions in the primary system. User-defined parameters had to be carefully selected when the MAAP4 model was developed, in contrast to the RELAP5/SCDAPSIM model where those parameters did not have any significant impact on final results.

  18. The WECHSL-Mod3 code: A computer program for the interaction of a core melt with concrete including the long term behavior. Model description and user's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foit, J.J.; Adroguer, B.; Cenerino, G.; Stiefel, S.

    1995-02-01

    The WECHSL-Mod3 code is a mechanistic computer code developed for the analysis of the thermal and chemical interaction of initially molten reactor materials with concrete in a two-dimensional as well as in a one-dimensional, axisymmetrical concrete cavity. The code performs calculations from the time of initial contact of a hot molten pool over start of solidification processes until long term basemat erosion over several days with the possibility of basemat penetration. It is assumed that an underlying metallic layer exists covered by an oxidic layer or that only one oxidic layer is present which can contain a homogeneously dispersed metallic phase. Heat generation in the melt is by decay heat and chemical reactions from metal oxidation. Energy is lost to the melting concrete and to the upper containment by radiation or evaporation of sumpwater possibly flooding the surface of the melt. Thermodynamic and transport properties as well as criteria for heat transfer and solidification processes are internally calculated for each time step. Heat transfer is modelled taking into account the high gas flux from the decomposing concrete and the heat conduction in the crusts possibly forming in the long term at the melt/concrete interface. The CALTHER code (developed at CEA, France) which models the radiative heat transfer from the upper surface of the corium melt to the surrounding cavity is implemented in the present WECHSL version. The WECHSL code in its present version was validated by the BETA, ACE and SURC experiments. The test samples include a BETA and the SURC2 post test calculations and a WECHSL application to a reactor accident. (orig.) [de

  19. Melt quenching and coolability by water injection from below: Co-injection of water and non-condensable gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Dae H.; Page, Richard J.; Abdulla, Sherif H.; Anderson, Mark H.; Klockow, Helge B.; Corradini, Michael L.

    2006-01-01

    The interaction and mixing of high-temperature melt and water is the important technical issue in the safety assessment of water-cooled reactors to achieve ultimate core coolability. For specific advanced light water reactor (ALWR) designs, deliberate mixing of the core melt and water is being considered as a mitigative measure, to assure ex-vessel core coolability. The goal of our work is to provide the fundamental understanding needed for melt-water interfacial transport phenomena, thus enabling the development of innovative safety technologies for advanced LWRs that will assure ex-vessel core coolability. The work considers the ex-vessel coolability phenomena in two stages. The first stage is the melt quenching process and is being addressed by Argonne National Lab and University of Wisconsin in modified test facilities. Given a quenched melt in the form of solidified debris, the second stage is to characterize the long-term debris cooling process and is being addressed by Korean Maritime University via test and analyses. In this paper, experiments on melt quenching by the injection of water from below are addressed. The test section represented one-dimensional flow-channel simulation of the bottom injection of water into a core melt in the reactor cavity. The melt simulant was molten lead or a lead alloy (Pb-Bi). For the experimental conditions employed (i.e., melt depth and water flow rates), it was found that: (1) the volumetric heat removal rate increased with increasing water mass flow rate and (2) the non-condensable gas mixed with the injected water had no impairing effect on the overall heat removal rate. Implications of these current experimental findings for ALWR ex-vessel coolability are discussed

  20. A vapour bubble collapse model to describe the fragmentation of low-melting materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benz, R.; Schober, P.

    1977-11-01

    By means of a model, the fragmentation of a hot melt of metal in consequence of collapsing vapour-bubbles is investigated. In particular the paper deals with the development of the physical model-ideas for calculation of the temperature of contact that adjusts between the temperature of the melt and the coolant, of the waiting-time until bubble-nucleation occurs and of the maximal obtainable vapour-bubble-radius in dependence of the coolant-temperature. After that follows the description of the computing-program belonging to this model and of the results of an extensive parameter-study. The study examined the influence of the temperature of melt and coolant, the melted mass, the nucleation-site-density, the average maximum bubble-radius, the duration of film-breakdown and the coefficient of heat-transition. The calculation of the process of fragmentation turns out to be according to expectation, whereas the duration of this process seems to be somewhat too long. The dependence of the surface-enlargement on the subcooling of the water-bath and the initial temperature of the melt is not yet reproduced satisfactorily by the model. The reasons for this are the temperature-increase of the water-bath as well as the fact that the coupling of heat-flux-density and nucleation-site-density are not taken into consideration. Further improvement of the model is necessary and may improve the results in the sense of the experimental observations. (orig.) [de

  1. Zircon (Hf, O isotopes) as melt indicator: Melt infiltration and abundant new zircon growth within melt rich layers of granulite-facies lenses versus solid-state recrystallization in hosting amphibolite-facies gneisses (central Erzgebirge, Bohemian Massif)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tichomirowa, Marion; Whitehouse, Martin; Gerdes, Axel; Schulz, Bernhard

    2018-03-01

    In the central Erzgebirge within the Bohemian Massif, lenses of high pressure and ultrahigh pressure felsic granulites occur within meta-sedimentary and meta-igneous amphibolite-facies felsic rocks. In the felsic granulite, melt rich parts and restite form alternating layers, and were identified by petrology and bulk rock geochemistry. Mineral assemblages representing the peak P-T conditions were best preserved in melanocratic restite layers. In contrast, in the melt rich leucocratic layers, garnet and related HP minerals as kyanite are almost completely resorbed. Both layers display differences in accessory minerals: melanosomes have frequent and large monazite and Fe-Ti-minerals but lack xenotime and apatite; leucosomes have abundant apatite and xenotime while monazite is rare. Here we present a detailed petrographic study of zircon grains (abundance, size, morphology, inclusions) in granulite-facies and amphibolite-facies felsic gneisses, along with their oxygen and hafnium isotope compositions. Our data complement earlier Usbnd Pb ages and trace element data (REE, Y, Hf, U) on zircons from the same rocks (Tichomirowa et al., 2005). Our results show that the degree of melting determines the behaviour of zircon in different layers of the granulites and associated amphibolite-facies rocks. In restite layers of the granulite lenses, small, inherited, and resorbed zircon grains are preserved and new zircon formation is very limited. In contrast, new zircons abundantly grew in the melt rich leucocratic layers. In these layers, the new zircons (Usbnd Pb age, trace elements, Hf, O isotopes) best preserve the information on peak metamorphic conditions due to intense corrosion of other metamorphic minerals. The new zircons often contain inherited cores. Compared to cores, the new zircons and rims show similar or slightly lower Hf isotope values, slightly higher Hf model ages, and decreased oxygen isotope ratios. The isotope compositions (Hf, O) of new zircons indicate

  2. Production, pathways and budgets of melts in mid-ocean ridges: An enthalpy based thermo-mechanical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Nibir; Sarkar, Shamik; Baruah, Amiya; Dutta, Urmi

    2018-04-01

    Using an enthalpy based thermo-mechanical model we provide a theoretical evaluation of melt production beneath mid-ocean ridges (MORs), and demonstrate how the melts subsequently develop their pathways to sustain the major ridge processes. Our model employs a Darcy idealization of the two-phase (solid-melt) system, accounting enthalpy (ΔH) as a function of temperature dependent liquid fraction (ϕ). Random thermal perturbations imposed in this model set in local convection that drive melts to flow through porosity controlled pathways with a typical mushroom-like 3D structure. We present across- and along-MOR axis model profiles to show the mode of occurrence of melt-rich zones within mushy regions, connected to deeper sources by single or multiple feeders. The upwelling of melts experiences two synchronous processes: 1) solidification-accretion, and 2) eruption, retaining a large melt fraction in the framework of mantle dynamics. Using a bifurcation analysis we determine the threshold condition for melt eruption, and estimate the potential volumes of eruptible melts (∼3.7 × 106 m3/yr) and sub-crustal solidified masses (∼1-8.8 × 106 m3/yr) on an axis length of 500 km. The solidification process far dominates over the eruption process in the initial phase, but declines rapidly on a time scale (t) of 1 Myr. Consequently, the eruption rate takes over the solidification rate, but attains nearly a steady value as t > 1.5 Myr. We finally present a melt budget, where a maximum of ∼5% of the total upwelling melt volume is available for eruption, whereas ∼19% for deeper level solidification; the rest continue to participate in the sub-crustal processes.

  3. Development of the inductive ring susceptor technique for sustaining oxide melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copus, E.R.

    1983-09-01

    A method for melting and sustaining large volumes of UO 2 has been developed at Sandia. This capability will greatly enhance reactor safety studies in the areas of ex-vessel interactions and degraded core retention by providing out-of-pile simulation for the decay heat process that is inherent to reactor core debris. The method, referred to as the Inductive Ring Susceptor Technique, melts UO 2 powder via inductively heated susceptor rings fashioned from highly conductive refractory metal. These rings are embedded in the non-conductive charge material. Placement of the rings is designed for optimum heat transfer and a controlled pool-type geometry. The technique has been demonstrated by a series of sustained oxide melt experiments

  4. In-core fuel disruption experiments simulating LOF accidents for homogeneous and heterogeneous core LMFBRs: FD2/4 series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, S.A.; Mast, P.K.; Schumacher, Gustav; Fischer, E.A.

    1982-01-01

    A series of Fuel Disruption (FD) experiments simulating LOF accidents transients for homogeneous- and heterogeneous-core LMFBRs is currently being performed in the Annular Core Research Reactor at SNL. The test fuel is observed with high-speed cinematography to determine the timing and the mode of the fuel disruption. The five experiments performed to date show that the timing and mode of fuel disruption depend on the power level, fuel temperature (after preheat and at disruption), and the fuel temperature gradient. Two basic modes of fuel disruption were observed; solid-state disruption and liquid-state swelling followed by slumping. Solid-state dispersive fuel behavior (several hundred degrees prior to fuel melting) is only observed at high power levels (6P 0 ), low preheat temperatures (2000 K), and high thermal gradients (2800 K/mm). The swelling/slumping behavior was observed in all cases near the time of fuel melting. Computational models have been developed that predict the fuel disruption modes and timing observed in the experiments

  5. A computational model for viscous fluid flow, heat transfer, and melting in in situ vitrification melt pools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHugh, P.R.; Ramshaw, J.D.

    1991-11-01

    MAGMA is a FORTRAN computer code designed to viscous flow in in situ vitrification melt pools. It models three-dimensional, incompressible, viscous flow and heat transfer. The momentum equation is coupled to the temperature field through the buoyancy force terms arising from the Boussinesq approximation. All fluid properties, except density, are assumed variable. Density is assumed constant except in the buoyancy force terms in the momentum equation. A simple melting model based on the enthalpy method allows the study of the melt front progression and latent heat effects. An indirect addressing scheme used in the numerical solution of the momentum equation voids unnecessary calculations in cells devoid of liquid. Two-dimensional calculations can be performed using either rectangular or cylindrical coordinates, while three-dimensional calculations use rectangular coordinates. All derivatives are approximated by finite differences. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved using a new fully implicit iterative technique, while the energy equation is differenced explicitly in time. Spatial derivatives are written in conservative form using a uniform, rectangular, staggered mesh based on the marker and cell placement of variables. Convective terms are differenced using a weighted average of centered and donor cell differencing to ensure numerical stability. Complete descriptions of MAGMA governing equations, numerics, code structure, and code verification are provided. 14 refs

  6. A computational model for viscous fluid flow, heat transfer, and melting in in situ vitrification melt pools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHugh, P.R.; Ramshaw, J.D.

    1991-11-01

    MAGMA is a FORTRAN computer code designed to viscous flow in in situ vitrification melt pools. It models three-dimensional, incompressible, viscous flow and heat transfer. The momentum equation is coupled to the temperature field through the buoyancy force terms arising from the Boussinesq approximation. All fluid properties, except density, are assumed variable. Density is assumed constant except in the buoyancy force terms in the momentum equation. A simple melting model based on the enthalpy method allows the study of the melt front progression and latent heat effects. An indirect addressing scheme used in the numerical solution of the momentum equation voids unnecessary calculations in cells devoid of liquid. Two-dimensional calculations can be performed using either rectangular or cylindrical coordinates, while three-dimensional calculations use rectangular coordinates. All derivatives are approximated by finite differences. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved using a new fully implicit iterative technique, while the energy equation is differenced explicitly in time. Spatial derivatives are written in conservative form using a uniform, rectangular, staggered mesh based on the marker and cell placement of variables. Convective terms are differenced using a weighted average of centered and donor cell differencing to ensure numerical stability. Complete descriptions of MAGMA governing equations, numerics, code structure, and code verification are provided. 14 refs.

  7. Rapakivi texture formation via disequilibrium melting in a contact partial melt zone, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currier, R. M.

    2017-12-01

    In the McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica, a Jurassic aged dolerite sill induced partial melting of granite in the shallow crust. The melt zone can be traced in full, from high degrees of melting (>60%) along the dolerite contact, to no apparent signs of melting, 10s of meters above the contact. Within this melt zone, the well-known rapakivi texture is found, arrested in various stages of development. High above the contact, and at low degrees of melting, K-feldspar crystals are slightly rounded and unmantled. In the lower half of the melt zone, mantles of cellular textured plagioclase appear on K-feldspar, and thicken towards the contact heat source. At the highest degrees of melting, cellular-textured plagioclase completely replaces restitic K-feldspar. Because of the complete exposure and intact context, the leading models of rapakivi texture formation can be tested against this system. The previously proposed mechanisms of subisothermal decompression, magma-mixing, and hydrothermal exsolution all fail to adequately describe rapakivi generation in this melt zone. Preferred here is a closed system model that invokes the production of a heterogeneous, disequilibrium melt through rapid heating, followed by calcium and sodium rich melt reacting in a peritectic fashion with restitic K-feldspar crystals. This peritectic reaction results in the production of plagioclase of andesine-oligoclase composition—which is consistent with not just mantles in the melt zone, but globally as well. The thickness of the mantle is diffusion limited, and thus a measure of the diffusive length scale of sodium and calcium over the time scale of melting. Thermal modeling provides a time scale of melting that is consistent with the thickness of observed mantles. Lastly, the distribution of mantled feldspars is highly ordered in this melt zone, but if it were mobilized and homogenized—mixing together cellular plagioclase, mantled feldspars, and unmantled feldspars—the result would be

  8. Fundamental experiment on simulated molten core/concrete interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toda, S.; Katsumura, Y.

    1994-01-01

    If a complete and prolonged failure of coolant flow were to occur in a LWR or FBR, fission product decay heat would cause the fuel to overheat. If no available action to cool the fuel were taken, it would eventually melt. Ibis could lead to slumping of the molten core material and to the failure of the reactor pressure vessel and deposition of these materials into the concrete reactor cavity. Consequently, the molten core could melt and decompose the concrete. Vigorous agitation of the molten core pool by concrete decomposition gases is expected to enhance the convective heat transfer process. Besides the decomposition gases, melting concrete (slag) generated under the molten core pool will be buoyed up, and will also affect the downward heat transfer. Though, in this way, the heat transfer process across the interface is complicated by the slag and the gases evolved from the decomposed concrete, it is very important to make its process clear for the safety evaluation of nuclear reactors. Therefore, in this study, fundamental experiments were performed using simulated materials to observe the behaviors of the hot pool, slag and gases at the interface. Moreover, from the experimental observation, a correlation without empirical constants was proposed to calculate the interface heat transfer. The heat transfer across the interface would depend on thermo-physical interactions between the pool, slag and concrete which are changed by their thermal properties and interface temperature and so on. For example, the molten concrete is miscible in molten oxidic core debris, but is immiscible in metallic core debris. If a contact temperature between the molten core pool and the concrete falls below the solidus of the pool, solidification of the pool will occur. In this study, the case of immiscible slag in the pool is treated and solidification of the pool does not occur. Thus, water, paraffin and air were selected as the simulated molten core pool, concrete, and decomposition

  9. New finite element-based modeling of reactor core support plate failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandazis, Peter; Lovasz, Liviusz [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit gGmbH, Garching (Germany). Forschungszentrum; Babcsany, Boglarka [Budapest Univ. of Technology and Economics, Budapest (Hungary). Inst. of Nuclear Techniques; Hajas, Tamas

    2017-12-15

    ATHLET-CD is the severe accident module of the code system AC{sup 2} that is designed to simulate the core degradation phenomena including fission product release and transport in the reactor circuit, as well as the late phase processes in the lower plenum. In case of a severe accident degradation of the reactor core occurs, the fuel assemblies start to melt. The evolution of such processes is usually accompanied with the failure of the core support plate and relocation of the molten core to the lower plenum. Currently, the criterion for the failure of the support plate applied by ATHLET-CD is a user-defined signal which can be a specific time or process variable like mass, temperature, etc. A new method, based on FEM approach, was developed that could lead in the future to a more realistic criterion for the failure of the core support plate. This paper presents the basic idea and theory of this new method as well as preliminary verification calculations and an outlook on the planned future development.

  10. Materials problems related to the core catcher of sodium cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goetzmann, O.

    1975-05-01

    There are in principal two possible solutions for the external core catcher as far as materials are concerned. 1) A barrier consisting of a material with a high melting point, 2) a tray of comparatively low melting material with a high solubility for the fuel. In case of the first concept one has to look for materials whose melting temperatures are above the temperature of the molten core. Based on metallurgical reasons it seems very likely that the molten core does not exceed a temperature in the range between 2,500 and 2,800 0 C. Due to the compatibility situation with the molten core only a few high melting oxides will be suitable as liner materials for a core catcher. In the second case basalt or concrete, if free of water and lime, are suitable materials. Graphite is a high melting material, however, due to its behaviour with the molten core it should be listed under the second group. By the reaction of graphite with the core materials the melt can be kept liquid down to temperatures of around 1,100 0 C. The evolution of CO by this reaction should be supportable. It is an endothermal reaction. Experiments on the behaviour of core catcher materials have shown that sodium is capable of penetrating into sintered bodies of UO 2 with densities of 90% TD at temperatures higher than 200 0 C. This may lead to the desintegration of these bodies. The exposure to moist air has not done much harm to UO 2 pellets of densities from 80 to 90% TD. Even after one year of exposure, swelling or desintegration could not be observed. Sodium is also capable of penetrating into bodies of synthetic carbon and graphite. Only well graphitized material will not be destroyed. (orig.) [de

  11. Metamorphism and partial melting of ordinary chondrites: Calculated phase equilibria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, T. E.; Benedix, G. K.; Bland, P. A.

    2016-01-01

    Constraining the metamorphic pressures (P) and temperatures (T) recorded by meteorites is key to understanding the size and thermal history of their asteroid parent bodies. New thermodynamic models calibrated to very low P for minerals and melt in terrestrial mantle peridotite permit quantitative investigation of high-T metamorphism in ordinary chondrites using phase equilibria modelling. Isochemical P-T phase diagrams based on the average composition of H, L and LL chondrite falls and contoured for the composition and abundance of olivine, ortho- and clinopyroxene, plagioclase and chromite provide a good match with values measured in so-called equilibrated (petrologic type 4-6) samples. Some compositional variables, in particular Al in orthopyroxene and Na in clinopyroxene, exhibit a strong pressure dependence when considered over a range of several kilobars, providing a means of recognising meteorites derived from the cores of asteroids with radii of several hundred kilometres, if such bodies existed at that time. At the low pressures (recorders of peak conditions. The intersection of isopleths of these variables may allow pressures to be quantified, even at low P, permitting constraints on the minimum size of parent asteroid bodies. The phase diagrams predict the onset of partial melting at 1050-1100 °C by incongruent reactions consuming plagioclase, clinopyroxene and orthopyroxene, whose compositions change abruptly as melting proceeds. These predictions match natural observations well and support the view that type 7 chondrites represent a suprasolidus continuation of the established petrologic types at the extremes of thermal metamorphism. The results suggest phase equilibria modelling has potential as a powerful quantitative tool in investigating, for example, progressive oxidation during metamorphism, the degree of melting and melt loss or accumulation required to produce the spectrum of differentiated meteorites, and whether the onion shell or rubble pile

  12. Photoinduced charge-order melting dynamics in a one-dimensional interacting Holstein model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Hiroshi; Ishihara, Sumio

    2017-07-01

    Transient quantum dynamics in an interacting fermion-phonon system are investigated with a focus on a charge order (CO) melting after a short optical-pulse irradiation and the roles of the quantum phonons in the transient dynamics. A spinless-fermion model in a one-dimensional chain coupled with local phonons is analyzed numerically. The infinite time-evolving block decimation algorithm is adopted as a reliable numerical method for one-dimensional quantum many-body systems. Numerical results for the photoinduced CO melting dynamics without phonons are well interpreted by the soliton picture for the CO domains. This interpretation is confirmed by numerical simulation of an artificial local excitation and the classical soliton model. In the case of large phonon frequencies corresponding to the antiadiabatic condition, CO melting is induced by propagations of the polaronic solitons with the renormalized soliton velocity. On the other hand, in the case of small phonon frequencies corresponding to the adiabatic condition, the first stage of the CO melting dynamics occurs due to the energy transfer from the fermionic to phononic systems, and the second stage is brought about by the soliton motions around the bottom of the soliton band. The analyses provide a standard reference for photoinduced CO melting dynamics in one-dimensional many-body quantum systems.

  13. Possible Role of Hydrogen in the Earth Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, E.; Imai, T.

    2011-12-01

    Possible role of hydrogen in the Earth core has been discussed by Stevenson (1977) and demonstrated experimentally by Fukai (1984), Okuchi (1997) and others. Planetary theory proposes a possibility of hydrogen incorporation in Earth's magma ocean from ambient solar nebula gas (Ikoma & Genda 2005, Genda & Ikoma 2008). More recently, migration of snow line during planet formation was examined (Min et al., 2010; Oka et al, 2011) and it was proposed that the Earth building material originally contained abundant water as ice and hydrous minerals. Therefore, it is very important to investigate the fate of water in the planet building process and clarify the role of hydrogen in the planetary core. Using SPring-8 synchrotron (NaCl capsule, LiAlH4 as hydrogen source), we determined the melting curve of FeH up to 20 GPa under hydrogen saturated conditions (Sakamaki, Takahashi et al, 2009). Observed melting point is below 1300C and has a very small dT/dP slope. By extrapolating the melting curve using Lindeman's law, we proposed that hydrogen could lower the melting temperature of the Earth core by more than 1500K than current estimate. Here we report our new experiments using SPring-8 synchrotron (single crystal diamond capsule, water as hydrogen source). Hydrogen concentration and melting temperature of FeHx that coexists with hydrous mantle minerals were determined at 15-20GPa and 1000-1600C. We show that 1) hydrogen concentration in FeHx at 1000C, coexisting with hydrous-B and ringwoodite is approximately X=0.6. 2) Upon heating, hydrous-B decomposes and hydrogen strongly partitions into FeHx (X=0.8~1.0) than ringwoodite. 3) FeHx that coexists with ringwoodite melts between ~1300C (solidus) and ~1600C (liquidus). Combined our new experiments with those by Sakamaki et al (2009) and Shibazaki et al (2009), partitioning of hydrogen between proto-core and primitive mantle is discussed. We propose that >90% of water in the source material may have entered the Earth core. Given

  14. Numerical Model based Reliability Estimation of Selective Laser Melting Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohanty, Sankhya; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2014-01-01

    Selective laser melting is developing into a standard manufacturing technology with applications in various sectors. However, the process is still far from being at par with conventional processes such as welding and casting, the primary reason of which is the unreliability of the process. While...... of the selective laser melting process. A validated 3D finite-volume alternating-direction-implicit numerical technique is used to model the selective laser melting process, and is calibrated against results from single track formation experiments. Correlation coefficients are determined for process input...... parameters such as laser power, speed, beam profile, etc. Subsequently, uncertainties in the processing parameters are utilized to predict a range for the various outputs, using a Monte Carlo method based uncertainty analysis methodology, and the reliability of the process is established....

  15. Early planetesimal melting from an age of 4.5662 Gyr for differentiated meteorites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, J.; Bizzarro, Martin; Wittig, N.

    2005-01-01

    for these meteorites, however, are typically younger than age constraints for planetesimal differentiation. Such young ages indicate that the energy required to melt their parent bodies could not have come from the most likely heat source-radioactive decay of short-lived nuclides (Al and Fe) injected from a nearby...... decay could have triggered planetesimal melting. Small Mg excesses in bulk angrite samples confirm that Al decay contributed to the melting of their parent body. These results indicate that the accretion of differentiated planetesimals pre-dated that of undifferentiated planetesimals, and reveals......Long- and short-lived radioactive isotopes and their daughter products in meteorites are chronometers that can test models for Solar System formation. Differentiated meteorites come from parent bodies that were once molten and separated into metal cores and silicate mantles. Mineral ages...

  16. Using mathematical modeling to control topographical properties of poly (ε-caprolactone) melt electrospun scaffolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, J; Bhullar, S K; Mohtaram, N K; Willerth, S M; Jun, M B G

    2014-01-01

    Melt electrospinning creates fibrous scaffolds using direct deposition. The main challenge of melt electrospinning is controlling the topography of the scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. Mathematical modeling enables a better understanding of the parameters that determine the topography of scaffolds. The objective of this study is to build two types of mathematical models. First, we modeled the melt electrospinning process by incorporating parameters such as nozzle size, counter electrode distance and applied voltage that influence fiber diameter and scaffold porosity. Our second model describes the accumulation of the extruded microfibers on flat and round surfaces using data from the microfiber modeling. These models were validated through the use of experimentally obtained data. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to image the scaffolds and the fiber diameters were measured using Quartz-PCI Image Management Systems® in SEM to measure scaffold porosity. (paper)

  17. Validating predictions made by a thermo-mechanical model of melt segregation in sub-volcanic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roele, Katarina; Jackson, Matthew; Morgan, Joanna

    2014-05-01

    A quantitative understanding of the spatial and temporal evolution of melt distribution in the crust is crucial in providing insights into the development of sub-volcanic crustal stratigraphy and composition. This work aims to relate numerical models that describe the base of volcanic systems with geophysical observations. Recent modelling has shown that the repetitive emplacement of mantle-derived basaltic sills, at the base of the lower crust, acts as a heat source for anatectic melt generation, buoyancy-driven melt segregation and mobilisation. These processes form the lowermost architecture of complex sub-volcanic networks as upward migrating melt produces high melt fraction layers. These 'porosity waves' are separated by zones with high compaction rates and have distinctive polybaric chemical signatures that suggest mixed crust and mantle origins. A thermo-mechanical model produced by Solano et al in 2012 has been used to predict the temperatures and melt fractions of successive high porosity layers within the crust. This model was used as it accounts for the dynamic evolution of melt during segregation and migration through the crust; a significant process that has been neglected in previous models. The results were used to input starting compositions for each of the layers into the rhyolite-MELTS thermodynamic simulation. MELTS then determined the approximate bulk composition of the layers once they had cooled and solidified. The mean seismic wave velocities of the polymineralic layers were then calculated using the relevant Voight-Reuss-Hill mixture rules, whilst accounting for the pressure and temperature dependence of seismic wave velocity. The predicted results were then compared with real examples of reflectivity for areas including the UK, where lower crustal layering is observed. A comparison between the impedance contrasts at compositional boundaries is presented as it confirms the extent to which modelling is able to make predictions that are

  18. Seasonal monitoring of melt and accumulation within the deep percolation zone of the Greenland Ice Sheet and comparison with simulations of regional climate modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilig, Achim; Eisen, Olaf; MacFerrin, Michael; Tedesco, Marco; Fettweis, Xavier

    2018-06-01

    Increasing melt over the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) recorded over the past several years has resulted in significant changes of the percolation regime of the ice sheet. It remains unclear whether Greenland's percolation zone will act as a meltwater buffer in the near future through gradually filling all pore space or if near-surface refreezing causes the formation of impermeable layers, which provoke lateral runoff. Homogeneous ice layers within perennial firn, as well as near-surface ice layers of several meter thickness have been observed in firn cores. Because firn coring is a destructive method, deriving stratigraphic changes in firn and allocation of summer melt events is challenging. To overcome this deficit and provide continuous data for model evaluations on snow and firn density, temporal changes in liquid water content and depths of water infiltration, we installed an upward-looking radar system (upGPR) 3.4 m below the snow surface in May 2016 close to Camp Raven (66.4779° N, 46.2856° W) at 2120 m a.s.l. The radar is capable of quasi-continuously monitoring changes in snow and firn stratigraphy, which occur above the antennas. For summer 2016, we observed four major melt events, which routed liquid water into various depths beneath the surface. The last event in mid-August resulted in the deepest percolation down to about 2.3 m beneath the surface. Comparisons with simulations from the regional climate model MAR are in very good agreement in terms of seasonal changes in accumulation and timing of onset of melt. However, neither bulk density of near-surface layers nor the amounts of liquid water and percolation depths predicted by MAR correspond with upGPR data. Radar data and records of a nearby thermistor string, in contrast, matched very well for both timing and depth of temperature changes and observed water percolations. All four melt events transferred a cumulative mass of 56 kg m-2 into firn beneath the summer surface of 2015. We find that

  19. Development and assessment of modular models of calculation for the interpretation of rod-melting experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuerk, W.

    1980-01-01

    By the example of recalculations of rod-melting experiment it is shown how a modular simulation model for complex systems can be formulated within the scope of RSYST1. The procedure of code development as well as the physical and numerical methods and approximations of the simulation model are described. To each important physical process a code module is assigned. The individual moduls describe heat production, rod heat-up, rod oxidation, rod environment, rod deformation by thermal expansion and can buckling, melting of the rod, rod failure, and flowing off of the melted mass. A comparison of the results for the overall model with the result of different experiments indicates that the phenomena during heat-up and melting of the rod are treated in agreement with the experiments. The results of the calculation model and its submodels are thus largely supported by experiments. Therefore further predictions with a high level of confidence can be made with the model within the scope of reactor safety research. (orig.) [de

  20. Core monitoring with analytical model adaption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linford, R.B.; Martin, C.L.; Parkos, G.R.; Rahnema, F.; Williams, R.D.

    1992-01-01

    The monitoring of BWR cores has evolved rapidly due to more capable computer systems, improved analytical models and new types of core instrumentation. Coupling of first principles diffusion theory models such as applied to design to the core instrumentation has been achieved by GE with an adaptive methodology in the 3D Minicore system. The adaptive methods allow definition of 'leakage parameters' which are incorporated directly into the diffusion models to enhance monitoring accuracy and predictions. These improved models for core monitoring allow for substitution of traversing in-core probe (TIP) and local power range monitor (LPRM) with calculations to continue monitoring with no loss of accuracy or reduction of thermal limits. Experience in small BWR cores has shown that with one out of three TIP machines failed there was no operating limitation or impact from the substitute calculations. Other capabilities exist in 3D Monicore to align TIPs more accurately and accommodate other types of system measurements or anomalies. 3D Monicore also includes an accurate predictive capability which uses the adaptive results from previous monitoring calculations and is used to plan and optimize reactor maneuvers/operations to improve operating efficiency and reduce support requirements

  1. Models for mean bonding length, melting point and lattice thermal expansion of nanoparticle materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omar, M.S.

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Three models are derived to explain the nanoparticles size dependence of mean bonding length, melting temperature and lattice thermal expansion applied on Sn, Si and Au. The following figures are shown as an example for Sn nanoparticles indicates hilly applicable models for nanoparticles radius larger than 3 nm. Highlights: ► A model for a size dependent mean bonding length is derived. ► The size dependent melting point of nanoparticles is modified. ► The bulk model for lattice thermal expansion is successfully used on nanoparticles. -- Abstract: A model, based on the ratio number of surface atoms to that of its internal, is derived to calculate the size dependence of lattice volume of nanoscaled materials. The model is applied to Si, Sn and Au nanoparticles. For Si, that the lattice volume is increases from 20 Å 3 for bulk to 57 Å 3 for a 2 nm size nanocrystals. A model, for calculating melting point of nanoscaled materials, is modified by considering the effect of lattice volume. A good approach of calculating size-dependent melting point begins from the bulk state down to about 2 nm diameter nanoparticle. Both values of lattice volume and melting point obtained for nanosized materials are used to calculate lattice thermal expansion by using a formula applicable for tetrahedral semiconductors. Results for Si, change from 3.7 × 10 −6 K −1 for a bulk crystal down to a minimum value of 0.1 × 10 −6 K −1 for a 6 nm diameter nanoparticle.

  2. Models for mean bonding length, melting point and lattice thermal expansion of nanoparticle materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omar, M.S., E-mail: dr_m_s_omar@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, College of Science, University of Salahaddin-Erbil, Arbil, Kurdistan (Iraq)

    2012-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Three models are derived to explain the nanoparticles size dependence of mean bonding length, melting temperature and lattice thermal expansion applied on Sn, Si and Au. The following figures are shown as an example for Sn nanoparticles indicates hilly applicable models for nanoparticles radius larger than 3 nm. Highlights: ► A model for a size dependent mean bonding length is derived. ► The size dependent melting point of nanoparticles is modified. ► The bulk model for lattice thermal expansion is successfully used on nanoparticles. -- Abstract: A model, based on the ratio number of surface atoms to that of its internal, is derived to calculate the size dependence of lattice volume of nanoscaled materials. The model is applied to Si, Sn and Au nanoparticles. For Si, that the lattice volume is increases from 20 Å{sup 3} for bulk to 57 Å{sup 3} for a 2 nm size nanocrystals. A model, for calculating melting point of nanoscaled materials, is modified by considering the effect of lattice volume. A good approach of calculating size-dependent melting point begins from the bulk state down to about 2 nm diameter nanoparticle. Both values of lattice volume and melting point obtained for nanosized materials are used to calculate lattice thermal expansion by using a formula applicable for tetrahedral semiconductors. Results for Si, change from 3.7 × 10{sup −6} K{sup −1} for a bulk crystal down to a minimum value of 0.1 × 10{sup −6} K{sup −1} for a 6 nm diameter nanoparticle.

  3. A simple model for the evolution of melt pond coverage on permeable Arctic sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popović, Predrag; Abbot, Dorian

    2017-05-01

    As the melt season progresses, sea ice in the Arctic often becomes permeable enough to allow for nearly complete drainage of meltwater that has collected on the ice surface. Melt ponds that remain after drainage are hydraulically connected to the ocean and correspond to regions of sea ice whose surface is below sea level. We present a simple model for the evolution of melt pond coverage on such permeable sea ice floes in which we allow for spatially varying ice melt rates and assume the whole floe is in hydrostatic balance. The model is represented by two simple ordinary differential equations, where the rate of change of pond coverage depends on the pond coverage. All the physical parameters of the system are summarized by four strengths that control the relative importance of the terms in the equations. The model both fits observations and allows us to understand the behavior of melt ponds in a way that is often not possible with more complex models. Examples of insights we can gain from the model are that (1) the pond growth rate is more sensitive to changes in bare sea ice albedo than changes in pond albedo, (2) ponds grow slower on smoother ice, and (3) ponds respond strongest to freeboard sinking on first-year ice and sidewall melting on multiyear ice. We also show that under a global warming scenario, pond coverage would increase, decreasing the overall ice albedo and leading to ice thinning that is likely comparable to thinning due to direct forcing. Since melt pond coverage is one of the key parameters controlling the albedo of sea ice, understanding the mechanisms that control the distribution of pond coverage will help improve large-scale model parameterizations and sea ice forecasts in a warming climate.

  4. Models of the earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    Combined inferences from seismology, high-pressure experiment and theory, geomagnetism, fluid dynamics, and current views of terrestrial planetary evolution lead to models of the earth's core with five basic properties. These are that core formation was contemporaneous with earth accretion; the core is not in chemical equilibrium with the mantle; the outer core is a fluid iron alloy containing significant quantities of lighter elements and is probably almost adiabatic and compositionally uniform; the more iron-rich inner solid core is a consequence of partial freezing of the outer core, and the energy release from this process sustains the earth's magnetic field; and the thermodynamic properties of the core are well constrained by the application of liquid-state theory to seismic and labroatory data.

  5. Computationally efficient thermal-mechanical modelling of selective laser melting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Y.; Ayas, C.; Brabazon, Dermot; Naher, Sumsun; Ul Ahad, Inam

    2017-01-01

    The Selective laser melting (SLM) is a powder based additive manufacturing (AM) method to produce high density metal parts with complex topology. However, part distortions and accompanying residual stresses deteriorates the mechanical reliability of SLM products. Modelling of the SLM process is

  6. What Models and Satellites Tell Us (and Don't Tell Us) About Arctic Sea Ice Melt Season Length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlert, A.; Jahn, A.

    2017-12-01

    Melt season length—the difference between the sea ice melt onset date and the sea ice freeze onset date—plays an important role in the radiation balance of the Arctic and the predictability of the sea ice cover. However, there are multiple possible definitions for sea ice melt and freeze onset in climate models, and none of them exactly correspond to the remote sensing definition. Using the CESM Large Ensemble model simulations, we show how this mismatch between model and remote sensing definitions of melt and freeze onset limits the utility of melt season remote sensing data for bias detection in models. It also opens up new questions about the precise physical meaning of the melt season remote sensing data. Despite these challenges, we find that the increase in melt season length in the CESM is not as large as that derived from remote sensing data, even when we account for internal variability and different definitions. At the same time, we find that the CESM ensemble members that have the largest trend in sea ice extent over the period 1979-2014 also have the largest melt season trend, driven primarily by the trend towards later freeze onsets. This might be an indication that an underestimation of the melt season length trend is one factor contributing to the generally underestimated sea ice loss within the CESM, and potentially climate models in general.

  7. Computer Simulation To Assess The Feasibility Of Coring Magma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, J.; Eichelberger, J. C.

    2017-12-01

    Lava lakes on Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii have been successfully cored many times, often with nearly complete recovery and at temperatures exceeding 1100oC. Water exiting nozzles on the diamond core bit face quenches melt to glass just ahead of the advancing bit. The bit readily cuts a clean annulus and the core, fully quenched lava, passes smoothly into the core barrel. The core remains intact after recovery, even when there are comparable amounts of glass and crystals with different coefficients of thermal expansion. The unique resulting data reveal the rate and sequence of crystal growth in cooling basaltic lava and the continuous liquid line of descent as a function of temperature from basalt to rhyolite. Now that magma bodies, rather than lava pooled at the surface, have been penetrated by geothermal drilling, the question arises as to whether similar coring could be conducted at depth, providing fundamentally new insights into behavior of magma. This situation is considerably more complex because the coring would be conducted at depths exceeding 2 km and drilling fluid pressures of 20 MPa or more. Criteria that must be satisfied include: 1) melt is quenched ahead of the bit and the core itself must be quenched before it enters the barrel; 2) circulating drilling fluid must keep the temperature of the coring assembling cooled to within operational limits; 3) the drilling fluid column must nowhere exceed the local boiling point. A fluid flow simulation was conducted to estimate the process parameters necessary to maintain workable temperatures during the coring operation. SolidWorks Flow Simulation was used to estimate the effect of process parameters on the temperature distribution of the magma immediately surrounding the borehole and of drilling fluid within the bottom-hole assembly (BHA). A solid model of the BHA was created in SolidWorks to capture the flow behavior around the BHA components. Process parameters used in the model include the fluid properties and

  8. Modelling snow accumulation and snow melt in a continuous hydrological model for real-time flood forecasting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanzel, Ph; Haberl, U; Nachtnebel, H P

    2008-01-01

    Hydrological models for flood forecasting in Alpine basins need accurate representation of snow accumulation and snow melt processes. A continuous, semi-distributed rainfall-runoff model with snow modelling procedures using only precipitation and temperature as input is presented. Simulation results from an application in an Alpine Danube tributary watershed are shown and evaluated with snow depth measurements and MODIS remote sensing snow cover information. Seasonal variations of runoff due to snow melt were simulated accurately. Evaluation of simulated snow depth and snow covered area showed strengths and limitations of the model and allowed an assessment of input data quality. MODIS snow cover images were found to be valuable sources of information for hydrological modelling in alpine areas, where ground observations are scarce.

  9. Modelling snow accumulation and snow melt in a continuous hydrological model for real-time flood forecasting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanzel, Ph; Haberl, U; Nachtnebel, H P [Institute of Water Management, Hydrology and Hydraulic Engineering, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Muthgasse 18, 1190 Vienna (Austria)], E-mail: philipp.stanzel@boku.ac.at

    2008-11-01

    Hydrological models for flood forecasting in Alpine basins need accurate representation of snow accumulation and snow melt processes. A continuous, semi-distributed rainfall-runoff model with snow modelling procedures using only precipitation and temperature as input is presented. Simulation results from an application in an Alpine Danube tributary watershed are shown and evaluated with snow depth measurements and MODIS remote sensing snow cover information. Seasonal variations of runoff due to snow melt were simulated accurately. Evaluation of simulated snow depth and snow covered area showed strengths and limitations of the model and allowed an assessment of input data quality. MODIS snow cover images were found to be valuable sources of information for hydrological modelling in alpine areas, where ground observations are scarce.

  10. On high-pressure melting of tantalum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Sheng-Nian; Swift, Damian C.

    2007-01-01

    The issues related to high-pressure melting of Ta are discussed within the context of diamond-anvil cell (DAC) and shock wave experiments, theoretical calculations and common melting models. The discrepancies between the extrapolations of the DAC melting curve and the melting point inferred from shock wave experiments, cannot be reconciled either by superheating or solid-solid phase transition. The failure to reproduce low-pressure DAC melting curve by melting models such as dislocation-mediated melting and the Lindemann law, and molecular dynamics and quantum mechanics-based calculations, undermines their predictions at moderate and high pressures. Despite claims to the contrary, the melting curve of Ta (as well as Mo and W) remains inconclusive at high pressures.

  11. A Dynamic Mesh-Based Approach to Model Melting and Shape of an ESR Electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi-Sibaki, E.; Kharicha, A.; Bohacek, J.; Wu, M.; Ludwig, A.

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents a numerical method to investigate the shape of tip and melt rate of an electrode during electroslag remelting process. The interactions between flow, temperature, and electromagnetic fields are taken into account. A dynamic mesh-based approach is employed to model the dynamic formation of the shape of electrode tip. The effect of slag properties such as thermal and electrical conductivities on the melt rate and electrode immersion depth is discussed. The thermal conductivity of slag has a dominant influence on the heat transfer in the system, hence on melt rate of electrode. The melt rate decreases with increasing thermal conductivity of slag. The electrical conductivity of slag governs the electric current path that in turn influences flow and temperature fields. The melting of electrode is a quite unstable process due to the complex interaction between the melt rate, immersion depth, and shape of electrode tip. Therefore, a numerical adaptation of electrode position in the slag has been implemented in order to achieve steady state melting. In fact, the melt rate, immersion depth, and shape of electrode tip are interdependent parameters of process. The generated power in the system is found to be dependent on both immersion depth and shape of electrode tip. In other words, the same amount of power was generated for the systems where the shapes of tip and immersion depth were different. Furthermore, it was observed that the shape of electrode tip is very similar for the systems running with the same ratio of power generation to melt rate. Comparison between simulations and experimental results was made to verify the numerical model.

  12. Modeling of evaporation processes in glass melting furnaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Limpt, van J.A.C.

    2007-01-01

    The majority of glass furnaces worldwide, apply fossil fuel combustion to transfer heat directly by radiation from the combustion processes to the melting batch and glass melt. During these high temperature melting processes, some glass components, such as: sodium, potassium, boron and lead species

  13. On the influence of debris in glacier melt modelling: a new temperature-index model accounting for the debris thickness feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carenzo, Marco; Mabillard, Johan; Pellicciotti, Francesca; Reid, Tim; Brock, Ben; Burlando, Paolo

    2013-04-01

    The increase of rockfalls from the surrounding slopes and of englacial melt-out material has led to an increase of the debris cover extent on Alpine glaciers. In recent years, distributed debris energy-balance models have been developed to account for the melt rate enhancing/reduction due to a thin/thick debris layer, respectively. However, such models require a large amount of input data that are not often available, especially in remote mountain areas such as the Himalaya. Some of the input data such as wind or temperature are also of difficult extrapolation from station measurements. Due to their lower data requirement, empirical models have been used in glacier melt modelling. However, they generally simplify the debris effect by using a single melt-reduction factor which does not account for the influence of debris thickness on melt. In this paper, we present a new temperature-index model accounting for the debris thickness feedback in the computation of melt rates at the debris-ice interface. The empirical parameters (temperature factor, shortwave radiation factor, and lag factor accounting for the energy transfer through the debris layer) are optimized at the point scale for several debris thicknesses against melt rates simulated by a physically-based debris energy balance model. The latter has been validated against ablation stake readings and surface temperature measurements. Each parameter is then related to a plausible set of debris thickness values to provide a general and transferable parameterization. The new model is developed on Miage Glacier, Italy, a debris cover glacier in which the ablation area is mantled in near-continuous layer of rock. Subsequently, its transferability is tested on Haut Glacier d'Arolla, Switzerland, where debris is thinner and its extension has been seen to expand in the last decades. The results show that the performance of the new debris temperature-index model (DETI) in simulating the glacier melt rate at the point scale

  14. Simulation experiments concerning core meltdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werle, H.

    1979-01-01

    A gas stream causes a remarkable increase in the interfacial heat flux (by a factor of 8 for v = 0.63 cm/s, v = gas volume flux/horizontal area). The most important characteristics of the system investigated (silicon oil/wood metal) are relatively similar to those of a core melt, Therefore a remarkable increase of the interfacial heat transfer by the gas release may be expected also for a core melt, compared with earlier investigations at the system silicon oil/water the influence of a gas stream is nevertheless remarkably lower for silicon oil/wood metal. This shows that the density ratio plays an important role. (orig./RW) [de

  15. Kinetic approach in numerical modeling of melting and crystallization at laser cladding with powder injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirzade, F. Kh., E-mail: fmirzade@rambler.ru [Institute on Laser and Information Technology, Russian Academy of Sciences, 1 Svyatoozerskaya Street, Shatura, Moscow Region 140700 (Russian Federation); Niziev, V.G.; Panchenko, V. Ya.; Khomenko, M.D.; Grishaev, R.V. [Institute on Laser and Information Technology, Russian Academy of Sciences, 1 Svyatoozerskaya Street, Shatura, Moscow Region 140700 (Russian Federation); Pityana, S.; Rooyen, Corney van [CSIR-National Laser Centre, Building 46A, Meiring Nauder Road, Brummeria, Pretoria (South Africa)

    2013-08-15

    The numerical model of laser cladding with coaxial powder injection includes the equations for heat transfer, melting and crystallization kinetics. It has been shown that the main parameters influencing the melt pool dynamics and medium maximum temperature are mass feed rate, laser power and scanning velocity. It has been observed that, due to the phase change occurring with superheating/undercooling, the melt zone has the boundary distinguished from melting isotherm. The calculated melt pool dimensions and dilution are in a good agreement with the experimental results for cladding of 431 martensitic stainless steel onto carbon steel substrate.

  16. SAXS study of transient pre-melting in chain-folded alkanes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ungar, G.; Wills, H.H.

    1990-01-01

    A pronounced pre-melting effect is observed in chain-folded crystals of pure monodisperse n-alkane C 246 H 494 . The effect is reversible on a short time scale, but at longer times the once-folded chain crystals are irreversibly lost as slow chain extension proceeds by solid diffusion well below the melting point. The melting process is thus monitored by rapid time-resolved small-angle X-ray (SAXS) measurements, using synchrotron radiation. The results show that the observed pronounced broadening of the DSC melting endotherm for chain-folded crystals is entirely due to genuine pre-melting of lamellar surfaces. Although a significant portion of material is already molten below the final melting point of chain-folded crystals T F , no recrystallization in the chain-extended form can occur until the cores of the crystalline lamellae melt at T F . Pre-melting of extended chain crystals is significantly less pronounced than that of folded chain crystals

  17. Experimental study of in-and-ex-vessel melt cooling during a severe accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang Baik; Yoo, K J; Park, C K; Seok, S D; Park, R J; Yi, S J; Kang, K H; Ham, Y S; Cho, Y R; Kim, J H; Jeong, J H; Shin, K Y; Cho, J S; Kim, D H

    1997-07-01

    After code damage during a severe accident in a nuclear reactor, the degraded core has to be cooled down and the decay heat should be removed in order to cease the accident progression and maintain a stable state. The cooling of core melt is divided into in-vessel and ex-vessel cooling depending on the location of molten core which is dependent on the timing of vessel failure. Since the cooling mechanism varies with the conditions of molten core and surroundings and related phenomena, it contains many phenomenological uncertainties so far. In this study, an experimental study for verification of in-vessel corium cooling and several separate effect experiments for ex-vessel cooling are carried out to verify in- and ex-vessel cooling phenomena and finally to develop the accident management strategy and improve engineered reactor design for the severe accidents. SONATA-IV (Simulation of Naturally Arrested Thermal Attack in Vessel) program is set up for in-vessel cooling and a progression of the verification experiment has been done, and an integral verification experiment of the containment integrity for ex-vessel cooling is planned to be carried out based on the separate effect experiments performed in the first phase. First phase study of SONATA-IV is proof of principle experiment and it is composed of LALA (Lower-plenum Arrested Vessel Attack) experiment to find the gap between melt and the lower plenum during melt relocation and to certify melt quenching and CHFG (Critical Heat Flux in Gap) experiment to certify heat transfer mechanism in an artificial gap. As separate effect experiments for ex-vessel cooling, high pressure melt ejection experiment related to the initial condition for debris layer formation in the reactor cavity, crust formation and heat transfer experiment in the molten pool and molten core concrete interaction experiment are performed. (author). 150 refs., 24 tabs., 127 figs.

  18. Differentiation of Asteroid 4 Vesta: Core Formation by Iron Rain in a Silicate Magma Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Walter S.; Mittlefehldt, David W.

    2017-01-01

    Geochemical observations of the eucrite and diogenite meteorites, together with observations made by NASA's Dawn spacecraft while orbiting asteroid 4 Vesta, suggest that Vesta resembles H chondrites in bulk chemical composition, possible with about 25 percent of a CM-chondrite like composition added in. For this model, the core is 15 percent by mass (or 8 percent by volume) of the asteroid, with a composition of 73.7 percent by weight Fe, 16.0 percent by weight S, and 10.3 percent by weight Ni. The abundances of moderately siderophile elements (Ni, Co, Mo, W, and P) in eucrites require that essentially all of the metallic phase in Vesta segregated to form a core prior to eucrite solidification. The combination of the melting phase relationships for the silicate and metal phases, together with the moderately siderophile element concentrations together require that complete melting of the metal phase occurred (temperature is greater than1350 degrees Centigrade), along with substantial (greater than 40 percent) melting of the silicate material. Thus, core formation on Vesta occurs as iron rain sinking through a silicate magma ocean.

  19. Characterisation of Ceramic-Coated 316LN Stainless Steel Exposed to High-Temperature Thermite Melt and Molten Sodium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi Shankar, A.; Vetrivendan, E.; Shukla, Prabhat Kumar; Das, Sanjay Kumar; Hemanth Rao, E.; Murthy, S. S.; Lydia, G.; Nashine, B. K.; Mallika, C.; Selvaraj, P.; Kamachi Mudali, U.

    2017-11-01

    Currently, stainless steel grade 316LN is the material of construction widely used for core catcher of sodium-cooled fast reactors. Design philosophy for core catcher demands its capability to withstand corium loading from whole core melt accidents. Towards this, two ceramic coatings were investigated for its application as a layer of sacrificial material on the top of core catcher to enhance its capability. Plasma-sprayed thermal barrier layer of alumina and partially stabilised zirconia (PSZ) with an intermediate bond coat of NiCrAlY are selected as candidate material and deposited over 316LN SS substrates and were tested for their suitability as thermal barrier layer for core catcher. Coated specimens were exposed to high-temperature thermite melt to simulate impingement of molten corium. Sodium compatibility of alumina and PSZ coatings were also investigated by exposing samples to molten sodium at 400 °C for 500 h. The surface morphology of high-temperature thermite melt-exposed samples and sodium-exposed samples was examined using scanning electron microscope. Phase identification of the exposed samples was carried out by x-ray diffraction technique. Observation from sodium exposure tests indicated that alumina coating offers better protection compared to PSZ coating. However, PSZ coating provided better protection against high-temperature melt exposure, as confirmed during thermite melt exposure test.

  20. VOLATILECALC: A silicate melt-H2O-CO2 solution model written in Visual Basic for excel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, S.; Lowenstern, J. B.

    2002-01-01

    We present solution models for the rhyolite-H2O-CO2 and basalt-H2O-CO2 systems at magmatic temperatures and pressures below ~ 5000 bar. The models are coded as macros written in Visual Basic for Applications, for use within MicrosoftR Excel (Office'98 and 2000). The series of macros, entitled VOLATILECALC, can calculate the following: (1) Saturation pressures for silicate melt of known dissolved H2O and CO2 concentrations and the corresponding equilibrium vapor composition; (2) open- and closed-system degassing paths (melt and vapor composition) for depressurizing rhyolitic and basaltic melts; (3) isobaric solubility curves for rhyolitic and basaltic melts; (4) isoplethic solubility curves (constant vapor composition) for rhyolitic and basaltic melts; (5) polybaric solubility curves for the two end members and (6) end member fugacities of H2O and CO2 vapors at magmatic temperatures. The basalt-H2O-CO2 macros in VOLATILECALC are capable of calculating melt-vapor solubility over a range of silicate-melt compositions by using the relationships provided by Dixon (American Mineralogist 82 (1997) 368). The output agrees well with the published solution models and experimental data for silicate melt-vapor systems for pressures below 5000 bar. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. OECD MCCI project Melt Eruption Test (MET) design report, Rev. 2. April 15, 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmer, M.T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D.J.; Aeschlimann, R.W.; Basu, S.

    2011-01-01

    satisfy these PRG recommendations. Specifically, the revised plan focuses on providing data on the extent of crust growth and melt eruptions as a function of gas sparging rate under well-controlled experiment conditions, including a floating crust boundary condition. The overall objective of MET is to determine to what extent core debris is rendered coolable by eruptive-type processes that breach the crust that rests upon the melt. The specific objectives of this test are as follows: (1) Evaluate the augmentation in surface heat flux during periods of melt eruption; (2) Evaluate the melt entrainment coefficient from the heat flux and gas flow rate data for input into models that calculate ex-vessel debris coolability; (3) Characterize the morphology and coolability of debris resulting from eruptive processes that transport melt into overlying water; and (4) Discriminate between periods when eruptions take the form of particle ejections into overlying water, leading to a porous particle bed, and single-phase extrusions, which lead to volcano-type structures.

  2. Event course analysis of core disruptive accidents; Ereignisablaufanalyse kernzerstoerender Unfaelle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hering, W.; Homann, C.; Sengpiel, W.; Struwe, D.; Messainguiral, C.

    1995-08-01

    The theortical studies of the behavior of a PWR core in a meltdown accident are focused on hydrogen release, materials redistribution in the core area including forming of an oxide melt pool, quantity of melt and its composition, and temperatures attained by the RPV internals (esp. in the upper plenum) during the accident up to the time of melt relocation into the lower plenum. The calculations are done by the SCDAP/RELAP5 code. For its validation selected CORA results and Phebus FPTO results have been used. (orig.)

  3. Construction and utilization of linear empirical core models for PWR in-core fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okafor, K.C.

    1988-01-01

    An empirical core-model construction procedure for pressurized water reactor (PWR) in-core fuel management is developed that allows determining the optimal BOC k ∞ profiles in PWRs as a single linear-programming problem and thus facilitates the overall optimization process for in-core fuel management due to algorithmic simplification and reduction in computation time. The optimal profile is defined as one that maximizes cycle burnup. The model construction scheme treats the fuel-assembly power fractions, burnup, and leakage as state variables and BOC zone enrichments as control variables. The core model consists of linear correlations between the state and control variables that describe fuel-assembly behavior in time and space. These correlations are obtained through time-dependent two-dimensional core simulations. The core model incorporates the effects of composition changes in all the enrichment control zones on a given fuel assembly and is valid at all times during the cycle for a given range of control variables. No assumption is made on the geometry of the control zones. A scatter-composition distribution, as well as annular, can be considered for model construction. The application of the methodology to a typical PWR core indicates good agreement between the model and exact simulation results

  4. A characterization of Greenland Ice Sheet surface melt and runoff in contemporary reanalyses and a regional climate model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard eCullather

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available For the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS, large-scale melt area has increased in recent years and is detectable via remote sensing, but its relation to runoff is not known. Historical, modeled melt area and runoff from Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA-Replay, the Interim Re-Analysis of the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ERA-I, the Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR, the Modèle Atmosphérique Régional (MAR, and the Arctic System Reanalysis (ASR are examined. These sources compare favorably with satellite-derived estimates of surface melt area for the period 2000-2012. Spatially, the models markedly disagree on the number of melt days in the interior of the southern part of the ice sheet, and on the extent of persistent melt areas in the northeastern GrIS. Temporally, the models agree on the mean seasonality of daily surface melt and on the timing of large-scale melt events in 2012. In contrast, the models disagree on the amount, seasonality, spatial distribution, and temporal variability of runoff. As compared to global reanalyses, time series from MAR indicate a lower correlation between runoff and melt area (r2 = 0.805. Runoff in MAR is much larger in the second half of the melt season for all drainage basins, while the ASR indicates larger runoff in the first half of the year. This difference in seasonality for the MAR and to an extent for the ASR provide a hysteresis in the relation between runoff and melt area, which is not found in the other models. The comparison points to a need for reliable observations of surface runoff.

  5. Models of the earth's core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, D.J.

    1981-01-01

    The combination of seismology, high pressure experiment and theory, geomagnetism, fluid dynamics, and current views of terrestrial planetary evolution lead to strong constraints on core models. The synthesis presented here is devoted to the defense of the following properties: (1) core formation was contemporaneous with earth accretion; (2) the outer, liquid core is predominately iron but cannot be purely iron; (3) the inner core-outer core boundary represents a thermodynamic equilibrium between a liquid alloys and a predominanately iron solid; (4) thermodynamic and transport properties of outer core can be estimated from liquid-state theories; and (5) the outer core is probably adiabatic and uniform in composition. None of these propositions are universally accepted by geophysicists. But, the intent of this paper is to present a coherent picture which explains most of the data with the fewest ad hoc assumptions. Areas in which future progress is both essential and likely are geo- and cosmochronology, seismological determinations of core structure, fluid dynamics of the core and mantle, and condensed matter physics

  6. On heat transfer characteristics of real and simulant melt pool experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinh, T.N.; Nourgaliev R.R.; Sehgal, B.R. [Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1995-09-01

    The paper presents results of analytical studies of natural convection heat transfer in scaled and/or simulant melt pool experiments related to the PWR in-vessel melt retention issue. Specific reactor-scale effects of a large decay-heated core melt pool in the reactor pressure vessel lower plenum are first reviewed, and then the current analytical capability of describing physical processes under prototypical situations is examined. Experiments and experimental approaches are analysed by focusing on their ability to represent prototypical situations. Calculations are carried out in order to assess the significance of some selected effects, including variations in melt properties, pool geometry and heating conditions. Rayleigh numbers in the present analysis are limited to 10{sup 12}, where uncertainties in turbulence modeling are not overriding other uncertainties. The effects of fluid Prandtl number on heat transfer to the lowermost part of cooled pool walls are examined for square and semicircular cavities. Calculations are performed also to explore limitations of using side-wall heating and direct electrical heating in reproducing the physical picture of interest. Needs for further experimental and analytical efforts are discussed as well.

  7. Climate change and forest fires synergistically drive widespread melt events of the Greenland Ice Sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, Kaitlin M; Albert, Mary R; McConnell, Joseph R; Baker, Ian

    2014-06-03

    In July 2012, over 97% of the Greenland Ice Sheet experienced surface melt, the first widespread melt during the era of satellite remote sensing. Analysis of six Greenland shallow firn cores from the dry snow region confirms that the most recent prior widespread melt occurred in 1889. A firn core from the center of the ice sheet demonstrated that exceptionally warm temperatures combined with black carbon sediments from Northern Hemisphere forest fires reduced albedo below a critical threshold in the dry snow region, and caused the melting events in both 1889 and 2012. We use these data to project the frequency of widespread melt into the year 2100. Since Arctic temperatures and the frequency of forest fires are both expected to rise with climate change, our results suggest that widespread melt events on the Greenland Ice Sheet may begin to occur almost annually by the end of century. These events are likely to alter the surface mass balance of the ice sheet, leaving the surface susceptible to further melting.

  8. Theoretical melting curve of caesium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simozar, S.; Girifalco, L.A.; Pennsylvania Univ., Philadelphia

    1983-01-01

    A statistical-mechanical model is developed to account for the complex melting curve of caesium. The model assumes the existence of three different species of caesium defined by three different electronic states. On the basis of this model, the free energy of melting and the melting curve are computed up to 60 kbar, using the solid-state data and the initial slope of the fusion curve as input parameters. The calculated phase diagram agrees with experiment to within the experimental error. Other thermodynamic properties including the entropy and volume of melting were also computed, and they agree with experiment. Since the theory requires only one adjustable constant, this is taken as strong evidence that the three-species model is satisfactory for caesium. (author)

  9. Development of the BWR Dry Core Initial and Boundary Conditions for the SNL XR2 Experiments; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, L.J.

    1994-01-01

    The objectives of the Boiling Water Reactor Experimental Analysis and Model Development for Severe Accidents (BEAMD) Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are: (1) the development of a sound quantitative understanding of boiling water reactor (BWR) core melt progression; this includes control blade and channel box effects, metallic melt relocation and possible blockage formation under severe accident conditions, and (2) provision of BWR melt progression modeling capabilities in SCDAP/RELAP5 (consistent with the BWR experimental data base). This requires the assessment of current modeling of BWR core melt progression against the expanding BWR data base. Emphasis is placed upon data from the BWR tests in the German CORA test facility and from the ex-reactor experiments[Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)] on metallic melt relocation and blockage formation in BWRs, as well as upon in-reactor data from the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) DF-4 BWR test (conducted in 1986 at SNL). The BEAMD Program is a derivative of the BWR Severe Accident Technology Programs at ORNL. The ORNL BWR programs have studied postulated severe accidents in BWRs and have developed a set of models specific to boiling water reactor response under severe accident conditions. These models, in an experiment-specific format, have been successfully applied to both pretest and posttest analyses of the DF-4 experiment, and the BWR severe fuel damage (SFD) experiments performed in the CORA facility at the Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (KfK) in Germany, resulting in excellent agreement between model prediction and experiment. The ORNL BWR models have provided for more precise predictions of the conditions in the BWR experiments than were previously available. This has provided a basis for more accurate interpretation of the phenomena for which the experiments are performed. The experiment-specific models, as used in the ORNL DF-4 and CORA BWR experimental analyses, also provide a basis

  10. Solid charged-core model of ball lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muldrew, D. B.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, ball lightning (BL) is assumed to have a solid, positively-charged core. According to this underlying assumption, the core is surrounded by a thin electron layer with a charge nearly equal in magnitude to that of the core. A vacuum exists between the core and the electron layer containing an intense electromagnetic (EM) field which is reflected and guided by the electron layer. The microwave EM field applies a ponderomotive force (radiation pressure) to the electrons preventing them from falling into the core. The energetic electrons ionize the air next to the electron layer forming a neutral plasma layer. The electric-field distributions and their associated frequencies in the ball are determined by applying boundary conditions to a differential equation given by Stratton (1941). It is then shown that the electron and plasma layers are sufficiently thick and dense to completely trap and guide the EM field. This model of BL is exceptional in that it can explain all or nearly all of the peculiar characteristics of BL. The ES energy associated with the core charge can be extremely large which can explain the observations that occasionally BL contains enormous energy. The mass of the core prevents the BL from rising like a helium-filled balloon - a problem with most plasma and burning-gas models. The positively charged core keeps the negatively charged electron layer from diffusing away, i.e. it holds the ball together; other models do not have a mechanism to do this. The high electrical charges on the core and in the electron layer explains why some people have been electrocuted by BL. Experiments indicate that BL radiates microwaves upon exploding and this is consistent with the model. The fact that this novel model of BL can explain these and other observations is strong evidence that the model should be taken seriously.

  11. Volatile diffusion in silicate melts and its effects on melt inclusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Scarlato

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available A compendium of diffusion measurements and their Arrhenius equations for water, carbon dioxide, sulfur, fluorine, and chlorine in silicate melts similar in composition to natural igneous rocks is presented. Water diffusion in silicic melts is well studied and understood, however little data exists for melts of intermediate to basic compositions. The data demonstrate that both the water concentration and the anhydrous melt composition affect the diffusion coefficient of water. Carbon dioxide diffusion appears only weakly dependent, at most, on the volatilefree melt composition and no effect of carbon dioxide concentration has been observed, although few experiments have been performed. Based upon one study, the addition of water to rhyolitic melts increases carbon dioxide diffusion by orders of magnitude to values similar to that of 6 wt% water. Sulfur diffusion in intermediate to silicic melts depends upon the anhydrous melt composition and the water concentration. In water-bearing silicic melts sulfur diffuses 2 to 3 orders of magnitude slower than water. Chlorine diffusion is affected by both water concentration and anhydrous melt composition; its values are typically between those of water and sulfur. Information on fluorine diffusion is rare, but the volatile-free melt composition exerts a strong control on its diffusion. At the present time the diffusion of water, carbon dioxide, sulfur and chlorine can be estimated in silicic melts at magmatic temperatures. The diffusion of water and carbon dioxide in basic to intermediate melts is only known at a limited set of temperatures and compositions. The diffusion data for rhyolitic melts at 800°C together with a standard model for the enrichment of incompatible elements in front of growing crystals demonstrate that rapid crystal growth, greater than 10-10 ms-1, can significantly increase the volatile concentrations at the crystal-melt interface and that any of that melt trapped

  12. Heat transfer modelling and stability analysis of selective laser melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gusarov, A.V.; Yadroitsev, I.; Bertrand, Ph.; Smurov, I.

    2007-01-01

    The process of direct manufacturing by selective laser melting basically consists of laser beam scanning over a thin powder layer deposited on a dense substrate. Complete remelting of the powder in the scanned zone and its good adhesion to the substrate ensure obtaining functional parts with improved mechanical properties. Experiments with single-line scanning indicate, that an interval of scanning velocities exists where the remelted tracks are uniform. The tracks become broken if the scanning velocity is outside this interval. This is extremely undesirable and referred to as the 'balling' effect. A numerical model of coupled radiation and heat transfer is proposed to analyse the observed instability. The 'balling' effect at high scanning velocities (above ∼20 cm/s for the present conditions) can be explained by the Plateau-Rayleigh capillary instability of the melt pool. Two factors stabilize the process with decreasing the scanning velocity: reducing the length-to-width ratio of the melt pool and increasing the width of its contact with the substrate

  13. Exploratory study of molten core material/concrete interactions, July 1975--March 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, D.A.; Dahlgren, D.A.; Muir, J.F.; Murfin, W.D.

    1978-02-01

    An experimental study of the interaction between high-temperature molten materials and structural concrete is described. The experimental efforts focused on the interaction of melts of reactor core materials weighing 12 to 200 kg at temperatures 1700 to 2800 0 C with calcareous and basaltic concrete representative of that found in existing light-water nuclear reactors. Observations concerning the rate and mode of melt penetration into concrete, the nature and generation rate of gases liberated during the interaction, and heat transfer from the melt to the concrete are described. Concrete erosion is shown to be primarily a melting process with little contribution from mechanical spallation. Water and carbon dioxide thermally released from the concrete are extensively reduced to hydrogen and carbon monoxide. Heat transfer from the melt to the concrete is shown to be dependent on gas generation rate and crucible geometry. Interpretation of results from the interaction experiments is supported by separate studies of the thermal decomposition of concretes, response of bulk concrete to intense heat fluxes (28 to 280 W/cm 2 ), and heat transfer from molten materials to decomposing solids. The experimental results are compared to assumptions made in previous analytic studies of core meltdown accidents in light-water nuclear reactors. A preliminary computer code, INTER, which models and extrapolates results of the experimental program is described. The code allows estimation of the effect of physical parameters on the nature of the melt/concrete interaction

  14. Melting spectral functions of the scalar and vector mesons in a holographic QCD model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Mitsutoshi; Kikuchi, Toru; Fukushima, Kenji; Misumi, Tatsuhiro; Murata, Masaki

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the finite-temperature spectral functions of heavy quarkonia by using the soft-wall anti-de Sitter/QCD model. We discuss the scalar, the pseudoscalar, the vector, and the axial-vector mesons and compare their qualitative features of the melting temperature and growing width. We find that the axial-vector meson melts earlier than the vector meson, while there appears only a slight difference between the scalar and pseudoscalar mesons, which also melt earlier than the vector meson.

  15. How to demonstrate adequacy of protection against a core melt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hock, R.

    1996-01-01

    After the Chernobyl accident the public - and consequently the politicians - in Western countries requested improvements in safety for future reactors even in those designs where the type of accident which had destroyed the Chernobyl plant is excluded by fundamental physics. When the major German and French suppliers of nuclear power stations, Siemens and Framatome, decided to develop jointly a next generation reactor type, this political 'request' had to be taken into account. It was decided to include safety features to mitigate the consequences of a core melt - the severest type of accident in a western light water reactor - should it occur despite the many other safety features which are included in this design in order to reduce the probability of occurrence of this type of event to extremely low values. The question arose: How to demonstrate the adequacy of his additional protection? It was evident that the methodology proposed by ICRP namely to demonstrate that the risk of individual members of the public caused by 'probabilistic events' is sufficiently low, could not be used: Due to the low probability of occurrence the contribution of this kind of accident to the risk of any average member of a critical group would already be sufficiently low even if there were no additional countermeasures. In addition, this approach would not cover severe societal effects potentially caused by such an accident. We therefore introduced a different methodology in order to demonstrate the adequacy of additional design features which are only required 'just in case': The consequences of such an unlikely but nevertheless very severe event shall be restricted to the plant itself. Severe consequences outside the immediate vicinity of the plant shall be excluded by the design. (author)

  16. One dimensional reactor core model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostadinov, V.; Stritar, A.; Radovo, M.; Mavko, B.

    1984-01-01

    The one dimensional model of neutron dynamic in reactor core was developed. The core was divided in several axial nodes. The one group neutron diffusion equation for each node is solved. Feedback affects of fuel and water temperatures is calculated. The influence of xenon, boron and control rods is included in cross section calculations for each node. The system of equations is solved implicitly. The model is used in basic principle Training Simulator of NPP Krsko. (author)

  17. Analysis and modeling of flow-blockage-induced steam explosion events in the high-flux isotope reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Georgevich, V.; Nestor, C.W.; Gat, U.; Lepard, B.L.; Cook, D.H.; Freels, J.; Chang, S.J.; Luttrell, C.; Gwaltney, R.C.

    1994-01-01

    This article provides a perspective overview of the analysis and modeling work done to evaluate the threat from steam explosion loads in the High-Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) during flow blockage events. The overall work scope included modeling and analysis of core-melt initiation, melt propagation, bounding and best-estimate steam explosion energetics, vessel failure from fracture, bolts failure from exceedance of elastic limits, and, finally, missile evolution and transport. Aluminum ignition was neglected. Evaluations indicated that a thermally driven steam explosion with more than 65 MJ of energy insertion in the core region over several milliseconds would be needed to cause a sufficiently energetic missile with a capacity to cause early confinement failure. This amounts to about 65% of the HFIR core mass melting and participating in a steam explosion. Conservative melt propagation analyses have indicated that at most only 24% of the HFIR core mass could melt during flow blockage events under full-power conditions. 19 refs., 11 figs

  18. A finite volume alternate direction implicit approach to modeling selective laser melting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hattel, Jesper Henri; Mohanty, Sankhya

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade, several studies have attempted to develop thermal models for analyzing the selective laser melting process with a vision to predict thermal stresses, microstructures and resulting mechanical properties of manufactured products. While a holistic model addressing all involved...... to accurately simulate the process, are constrained by either the size or scale of the model domain. A second challenging aspect involves the inclusion of non-linear material behavior into the 3D implicit FE models. An alternating direction implicit (ADI) method based on a finite volume (FV) formulation...... is proposed for modeling single-layer and few-layers selective laser melting processes. The ADI technique is implemented and applied for two cases involving constant material properties and non-linear material behavior. The ADI FV method consume less time while having comparable accuracy with respect to 3D...

  19. Flow Boiling on a Downward-Facing Inclined Plane Wall of Core Catcher

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyoung Tak; Bang, Kwang Hyun; Suh, Jung Soo

    2013-01-01

    In order to investigate boiling behavior on downward-facing inclined heated wall prior to the CHF condition, an experiment was carried out with 1.2 m long rectangular channel, inclined by 10 .deg. from the horizontal plane. High speed video images showed that the bubbles were sliding along the heated wall, continuing to grow and combining with the bubbles growing at their nucleation sites in the downstream. These large bubbles continued to slide along the heated wall and formed elongated slug bubbles. Under this slug bubble thin liquid film layer on the heated wall was observed and this liquid film prevents the wall from dryout. The length, velocity and frequency of slug bubbles sliding on the heated wall were measured as a function of wall heat flux and these parameters were used to develop wall boiling model for inclined, downward-facing heated wall. One approach to achieve coolable state of molten core in a PWR-like reactor cavity during a severe accident is to retain the core melt on a so-called core catcher residing on the reactor cavity floor after its relocation from the reactor pressure vessel. The core melt retained in the core catcher is cooled by water coolant flowing in an inclined cooling channel underneath as well as the water pool overlaid on the melt layer. Two-phase flow boiling with downward-facing heated wall such as this core catcher cooling channel has drawn a special attention because this orientation of heated wall may reach boiling crisis at lower heat flux than that of a vertical or upward-facing heated wall. Nishikawa and Fujita, Howard and Mudawar, Qiu and Dhir have conducted experiments to study the effect of heater orientation on boiling heat transfer and CHF. SULTAN experiment was conducted to study inclined large-scale structure coolability by water in boiling natural convection. In this paper, high-speed visualization of boiling behavior on downward-facing heated wall inclined by 10 .deg. is presented and wall boiling model for the

  20. Model of coordination melting of crystals and anisotropy of physical and chemical properties of the surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokarev, Valery P.; Krasnikov, Gennady Ya

    2018-02-01

    Based on the evaluation of the properties of crystals, such as surface energy and its anisotropy, the surface melting temperature, the anisotropy of the work function of the electron, and the anisotropy of adsorption, were shown the advantages of the model of coordination melting (MCM) in calculating the surface properties of crystals. The model of coordination melting makes it possible to calculate with an acceptable accuracy the specific surface energy of the crystals, the anisotropy of the surface energy, the habit of the natural crystals, the temperature of surface melting of the crystal, the anisotropy of the electron work function and the anisotropy of the adhesive properties of single-crystal surfaces. The advantage of our model is the simplicity of evaluating the surface properties of the crystal based on the data given in the reference literature. In this case, there is no need for a complex mathematical tool, which is used in calculations using quantum chemistry or modeling by molecular dynamics.

  1. Rock Magnetic Study of IODP/ICDP Expedition 364 Site M0077A Drill Cores: Post-Impact Sediments, Impact Breccias, Melt, Granitic Basement and Dikes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fucugauchi, J. U.; Perez-Cruz, L. L.; Rebolledo-Vieyra, M.; Tikoo, S.; Zylberman, W.; Lofi, J.

    2017-12-01

    Drilling at Site M0077 sampled post-impact sediments overlying a peak ring consisting of impact breccias, melt rock and granitoids. Here we focus on characterizing the peak ring using magnetic properties, which vary widely and depend on mineralogy, depositional and emplacement conditions and secondary alterations. Rock magnetic properties are integrated with Multi-Sensor Core Logger (MSCL) data, vertical seismic profile, physical properties, petrographic and chemical analyses and geophysical models. We measure low-field magnetic susceptibility at low- and high-frequencies, intensity and direction of natural remanent magnetization (NRM) and laboratory-induced isothermal (IRM) and anhysteretic (ARM) magnetizations, alternating-field demagnetization of NRM, IRM and NRM, susceptibility variation with temperature, anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility, hysteresis and IRM back-field demagnetization. Post-impact carbonates show low susceptibilities and NRM intensities, variable frequency-dependent susceptibilities and multivectorial remanences residing in low and high coercivity minerals. Hysteresis loops show low coercivity saturation magnetizations and variable paramagnetic mineral contents. Impact breccias (suevites) and melt rock show higher susceptibilities, low frequency-dependent susceptibilities, high NRM, ARM and IRM intensities and moderate ARM intensity/susceptibility ratios. Magnetic signal is dominated by fine-grained magnetite and titanomagnetites with PSD domain states. Melt rocks at the base of impactite section show the highest susceptibilities and remanence intensities. Basement section is characterized by low susceptibilities in the granites and higher values in the dikes, with NRM and ARM intensities increasing towards the base. The high susceptibilities and remanence intensities correlate with high seismic velocities, density and decreased porosity and electrical resistivity. Fracturing and alteration account for the reduced seismic velocities

  2. Study of corium radial spreading between fuel rods in a PWR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, S.; Gatt, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    In the framework of severe accident studies for PWR like Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2), the reactor core essentially constituted of fuel rods begins to heat and then to melt. During the early degradation phase, a melt (essentially UO2 and ZrO2) that constitutes the corium flows first along the rods, and after a blockage formation, may radially propagate towards the core periphery. A simplified model has been elaborated to study the corium freezing phenomena during its crossflow between the fuel rods. The corium spreads on an horizontal support made, of either a corium crust, or a grid assembly. The model solves numerically the interface energy balance equation at the solid-liquid corium interface and the monodimensional heat balance equation in transient process with convective terms and heat source (residual power). ''Zukauskas'' correlations are used to calculate heat transfer coefficients. The model can be integrated in severe accident codes like ICARE II (IPSN) describing the in-vessel degradation scenarios. (author). 5 refs, 10 figs

  3. Post-accident core coolability of light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michio, I.; Teruo, I.; Tomio, Y.; Tsutao, H.

    1983-01-01

    A study on post-accident core coolability of LWR is discussed based on the practical fuel failure behavior experienced in NSRR, PBF, PNS and others. The fuel failure behavior at LOCA, RIA and PCM conditions are reviewed, and seven types of fuel failure modes are extracted as the basic failure mechanism at accident conditions. These are: cladding melt or brittle failure, molten UO 2 failure, high temperature cladding burst, low temperature cladding burst, failure due to swelling of molten UO 2 , failure due to cracks of embrittled cladding for irradiated fuel rods, and TMI-2 core failure. The post-accident core coolability at each failure mode is discussed. The fuel failures caused actual flow blockage problems. A characteristic which is common among these types is that the fuel rods are in the conditions violating the present safety criteria for accidents, and UO 2 pellets are in melting or near melting hot conditions when the fuel rods failed

  4. Two-dimensional model of laser alloying of binary alloy powder with interval of melting temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knyzeva, A. G.; Sharkeev, Yu. P.

    2017-10-01

    The paper contains two-dimensional model of laser beam melting of powders from binary alloy. The model takes into consideration the melting of alloy in some temperature interval between solidus and liquidus temperatures. The external source corresponds to laser beam with energy density distributed by Gauss law. The source moves along the treated surface according to given trajectory. The model allows investigating the temperature distribution and thickness of powder layer depending on technological parameters.

  5. Thermal margin model for transition core of KSNP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nahm, Kee Yil; Lim, Jong Seon; Park, Sung Kew; Chun, Chong Kuk; Hwang, Sun Tack

    2004-01-01

    The PLUS7 fuel was developed with mixing vane grids for KSNP. For the transition core partly loaded with the PLUS7 fuels, the procedure to set up the optimum thermal margin model of the transition core was suggested by introducing AOPM concept into the screening method which determines the limiting assembly. According to the procedure, the optimum thermal margin model of the first transition core was set up by using a part of nuclear data for the first transition and the homogeneous core with PLUS7 fuels. The generic thermal margin model of PLUS7 fuel was generated with the AOPM of 138%. The overpower penalties on the first transition core were calculated to be 1.0 and 0.98 on the limiting assembly and the generic thermal margin model, respectively. It is not usual case to impose the overpower penalty on reload cores. It is considered that the lack of channel flow due to the difference of pressure drop between PLUS7 and STD fuels results in the decrease of DNBR. The AOPM of the first transition core is evaluated to be about 135% by using the optimum generic thermal margin model which involves the generic thermal margin model and the total overpower penalty. The STD fuel is not included among limiting assembly candidates in the second transition core, because they have much lower pin power than PLUS7 fuels. The reduced number of STD fuels near the limiting assembly candidates the flow from the limiting assembly to increase the thermal margin for the second transition core. It is expected that cycle specific overpower penalties increase the thermal margin for the transition core. Using the procedure to set up the optimum thermal margin model makes sure that the enhanced thermal margin of PLUS7 fuel can be sufficiently applied to not only the homogeneous core but also the transition core

  6. A review of the core catcher design in LMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yong Bum; Hahn, Do Hee

    2001-08-01

    The overwhelming emphasis in reactor safety is on the prevention of core meltdown. Moreover, although there have been several accidents that have resulted in some fuel melting, to date there have been no accidents severe enough to cause the syndrome of core collapse, reactor vessel melt-through, containment penetration, and dispersal into the ground. Nevertheless, a number of proposals have been made for the design of core catcher systems to control or stop the motion of the molten core mass should such an accident take place. Core catchers may differ in both their location within the reactor system and in the mechanism that is used to cool and control the motion of the core debris. In this report the classification, configuration and main features of the core catcher are described. And also, The core catcher design technologies and processes are presented. Finally the core catcher provisions in constructed and planned LMRs (Liquid Metal Reactors) are summarized and the preliminary assessment on the core catcher installation in KALIMER is presented

  7. Population balance modelling of fluidized bed melt granulation: an overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, H.S.; Goldschmidt, M.J.V.; Boerefijn, R.; Hounslow, M.J.; Salman, A.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the work undertaken by our group to identify and quantify the rates processes active in fluidized bed melt granulation (FBMG). The process involves the identification and development of physically representative models to mechanistically describe FBMG using both

  8. Infrared laser-induced chaos and conformational disorder in a model polymer crystal: Melting vs ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumpter, B.G.; Noid, D.W.; Voth, G.A.; Wunderlich, B.

    1990-01-01

    Molecular dynamics-based computer simulations are presented for the interaction of one and two infrared (IR) laser beams with a model polymer surface. When a single laser beam system is studied over a wide range of intensities, only melting of the polymer, or melting followed by bond dissociation, is observed for up to 100 picoseconds. In contrast, the two-laser simulation results exhibit a marked difference in the energy absorption behavior of the irradiated polymer which, in turn, results in multiple bond dissociations. The results for the one- and two-laser cases studied can be divided into four different classes of physical behavior: (a) the polymer remains in the solid state; (b) the polymer crystal melts; (c) the polymer ablates, but with significant melting (charring); or (d) the polymer ablates with minimal melting. Damage to the model polymer crystal from absorption of energy from either one or two lasers occurs through a mechanism that involves the competition between the absorption of energy and internal energy redistribution. The rate of energy loss from the absorption site(s) relative to the rate of absorption of energy from the radiation field determines rather the polymer melts or ablates (low absorption rates lead to melting or no change and high rates lead to ablation). A sufficiently large rate of energy absorption is only obtainable through the use of two lasers. Two lasers also significantly decrease the total laser intensity required to cause polymer crystal melting. The differences between the one- and two-laser cases are studied by adapting novel signal/subspace techniques to analyze the dynamical changes in the mode spectrum of the polymer as it melts

  9. Modeling and analysis framework for core damage propagation during flow-blockage-initiated accidents in the advanced neutron source reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Navarro-Valenti, S.; Georgevich, V. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-09-01

    This paper describes modeling and analysis to evaluate the extent of core damage during flow blockage events in the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor planned to be built at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Damage propagation is postulated to occur from thermal conduction between damaged and undamaged plates due to direct thermal contact. Such direct thermal contact may occur because of fuel plate swelling during fission product vapor release or plate buckling. Complex phenomena of damage propagation were modeled using a one-dimensional heat transfer model. A scoping study was conducted to learn what parameters are important for core damage propagation, and to obtain initial estimates of core melt mass for addressing recriticality and steam explosion events. The study included investigating the effect of the plate contact area, the convective heat transfer coefficient, thermal conductivity upon fuel swelling, and the initial temperature of the plate being contacted by the damaged plate. Also, the side support plates were modeled to account for their effects on damage propagation. The results provide useful insights into how various uncertain parameters affect damage propagation.

  10. Geodynamo Modeling of Core-Mantle Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Wei-Jia; Chao, Benjamin F.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Angular momentum exchange between the Earth's mantle and core influences the Earth's rotation on time scales of decades and longer, in particular in the length of day (LOD) which have been measured with progressively increasing accuracy for the last two centuries. There are four possible coupling mechanisms for transferring the axial angular momentum across the core-mantle boundary (CMB): viscous, magnetic, topography, and gravitational torques. Here we use our scalable, modularized, fully dynamic geodynamo model for the core to assess the importance of these torques. This numerical model, as an extension of the Kuang-Bloxham model that has successfully simulated the generation of the Earth's magnetic field, is used to obtain numerical results in various physical conditions in terms of specific parameterization consistent with the dynamical processes in the fluid outer core. The results show that depending on the electrical conductivity of the lower mantle and the amplitude of the boundary topography at CMB, both magnetic and topographic couplings can contribute significantly to the angular momentum exchange. This implies that the core-mantle interactions are far more complex than has been assumed and that there is unlikely a single dominant coupling mechanism for the observed decadal LOD variation.

  11. A condensed review of the core catcher in the LMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yong Bum; Hahn, Do hee

    2001-03-01

    The overwhelming emphasis in reactor safety is on the prevention of core meltdown. Moreover, although there have been several accidents that have resulted in some fuel melting, to date there have been no accidents severe enough to cause the syndrome of core collapse, reactor vessel melt-through, containment penetration, and dispersal into the ground. Nevertheless, a number of proposals have been made for the design of core catcher systems to control or stop the motion of the molten core mass should such an accident take place. Core catchers may differ in both their location within the reactor system and in the mechanism that is used to cool and control the motion of the core debris. In this report the classification, configuration and main features of the core catcher are described. And also, the core catcher provisions in constructed and planned LMRs (Liquid Metal Reactors) are summarized

  12. Investigations of model polymers: Dynamics of melts and statics of a long chain in a dilute melt of shorter chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishop, M.; Ceperley, D.; Frisch, H.L.; Kalos, M.H.

    1982-01-01

    We report additional results on a simple model of polymers, namely the diffusion in concentrated polymer systems and the static properties of one long chain in a dilute melt of shorter chains. It is found, for the polymer sizes and time scales amenable to our computer calculations, that there is as yet no evidence for a ''reptation'' regime in a melt. There is some indication of reptation in the case of a single chain moving through fixed obstacles. No statistically significant effect of the change, from excluded volume behavior of the long chain to ideal behavior as the shorter chains grow, is observed

  13. Melt coolability modeling and comparison to MACE test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmer, M.T.; Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W.

    1992-01-01

    An important question in the assessment of severe accidents in light water nuclear reactors is the ability of water to quench a molten corium-concrete interaction and thereby terminate the accident progression. As part of the Melt Attack and Coolability Experiment (MACE) Program, phenomenological models of the corium quenching process are under development. The modeling approach considers both bulk cooldown and crust-limited heat transfer regimes, as well as criteria for the pool thermal hydraulic conditions which separate the two regimes. The model is then compared with results of the MACE experiments

  14. Simulation of heat and mass transfer processes in molten core debris-concrete systems. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felde, D K

    1979-01-01

    The heat and mass transport phenomena taking place in volumetrically-heated fluids have become of interest in recent years due to their significance in assessments of fast reactor safety and post-accident heat removal (PAHR). Following a hypothetical core disruptive accident (HCDA), the core and reactor internals may melt down. The core debis melting through the reactor vessel and guard vessel may eventually contact the concrete of the reactor cell floor. The interaction of the core debris with the concrete as well as the melting of the debris pool into the concrete will significantly affect efforts to prevent breaching of the containment and the resultant release of radioactive effluents to the environment.

  15. The high-pressure phase diagram of Fe(0.94)O - A possible constituent of the earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knittle, Elise; Jeanloz, Raymond

    1991-01-01

    Electrical resistivity measurements to pressures of 83 GPa and temperatures ranging from 300 K to 4300 K confirm the presence of both crystalline and liquid metallic phases of FeO at pressures above 60-70 GPa and temperatures above 1000 K. By experimentally determinig the melting temperature of FeO to 100 GPa and of a model-core composition at 83 GPa, it is found that the solid-melt equilibria can be described by complete solid solution across the Fe-FeO system at pressures above 70 GPa. The results indicate that oxygen is a viable and likely candidate for the major light alloying element of the earth's liquid outer core. The data suggest that the temperature at the core-mantle boundary is close to 4800 K and that heat lost out of the core accounts for more than 20 percent of the heat flux observed at the surface.

  16. Size and temperature consideration in the liquid layer growth from nanovoids and the melting model construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, H.; Liang, X.H.; Li, M.

    2014-01-01

    A new model for the solid melting point T m (D) from nanovoids is proposed through considering the liquid layer growth behavior. This model, which does not have any adjustable parameter, introduces the classical thermodynamic treatment, i.e., the liquid nucleation and growth theory, for nanoparticle melting. With increased void diameter D, T m (D) approaches to T m0 . Moreover, T m (D) > T m0 for a small void (T m0 is the bulk melting point). In other words, the solid can be significantly superheated especially when D decreases, even if the difference of interface energy is larger than zero. This finding can be expected from the negatively curved surface of the void. The model predictions are consistent with the molecular dynamic (MD) simulation results for argon solids. Moreover, the growth of liquid layer from void surface relies on both size and temperature, which directly determine liquid layer thickness, and only when liquid layer thickness reaches to a critical value, can void become instable. - Highlights: • A united model for the crystal melting point from nanovoids is established. • Melting point increases with decreased void size. • The result is expected from the negatively curved surface of the void. • The prediction is agreed well with the MD simulation results

  17. A fast running method for predicting the efficiency of core melt spreading for application in ASTEC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spengler, C.

    2010-01-01

    The integral Accident Source Term Evaluation Code (ASTEC) is jointly developed by the French Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN) and the German Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH to simulate the complete scenario of a hypothetical severe accident in a nuclear light water reactor, from the initial event until the possible radiological release of fission products out of the containment. In the frame of the new series of ASTEC V2 versions appropriate model extensions to the European Pressurised Water Reactor (EPR) are under development. With view to assessing with ASTEC the proper operation of the ex-vessel melt retention and coolability concept of the EPR with regard to melt spreading an approximation of the area finally covered by the corium and of the distance run by the corium front before freezing is required. A necessary capability of ASTEC is in a first step to identify such boundary cases, for which there is a potential that the melt will freeze before the spreading area is completely filled. This paper presents a fast running method for estimating the final extent of the area covered with melt on which a simplified criterion in ASTEC for detecting such boundary cases will be based. If a boundary case is detected the application of a more-detailed method might be necessary to assess further the consequences for the accident sequence. The major objective here is to provide a reliable method for estimating the final result of the spreading and not to provide highly detailed methods to simulate the dynamics of the transient process. (orig.)

  18. High-pressure melting curve of KCl: Evidence against lattice-instability theories of melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, M.; Wolf, G.

    1986-01-01

    We show that the large curvature in the T-P melting curve of KCl is the result of a reordering of the liquid to a more densely packed arrangement. As a result theories of melting, such as the instability model, which do not take into account the structure of the liquid fail to predict the correct pressure dependence of the melting curve

  19. Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1 Ex-Vessel Prediction: Core Concrete Interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robb, Kevin R; Farmer, Mitchell; Francis, Matthew W

    2015-01-01

    Lower head failure and corium concrete interaction were predicted to occur at Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1 (1F1) by several different system-level code analyses, including MELCOR v2.1 and MAAP5. Although these codes capture a wide range of accident phenomena, they do not contain detailed models for ex-vessel core melt behavior. However, specialized codes exist for analysis of ex-vessel melt spreading (e.g., MELTSPREAD) and long-term debris coolability (e.g., CORQUENCH). On this basis, an analysis was carried out to further evaluate ex-vessel behavior for 1F1 using MELTSPREAD and CORQUENCH. Best-estimate melt pour conditions predicted by MELCOR v2.1 and MAAP5 were used as input. MELTSPREAD was then used to predict the spatially dependent melt conditions and extent of spreading during relocation from the vessel. The results of the MELTSPREAD analysis are reported in a companion paper. This information was used as input for the long-term debris coolability analysis with CORQUENCH.

  20. Real-time advanced nuclear reactor core model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koclas, J.; Friedman, F.; Paquette, C.; Vivier, P.

    1990-01-01

    The paper describes a multi-nodal advanced nuclear reactor core model. The model is based on application of modern equivalence theory to the solution of neutron diffusion equation in real time employing the finite differences method. The use of equivalence theory allows the application of the finite differences method to cores divided into hundreds of nodes, as opposed to the much finer divisions (in the order of ten thousands of nodes) where the unmodified method is currently applied. As a result the model can be used for modelling of the core kinetics for real time full scope training simulators. Results of benchmarks, validate the basic assumptions of the model and its applicability to real-time simulation. (orig./HP)

  1. Siderophile Volatile Element Partitioning during Core Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loroch, D. C.; Hackler, S.; Rohrbach, A.; Klemme, S.

    2017-12-01

    Since the nineteen sixties it is known, that the Earth's mantle is depleted relative to CI chondrite in numerous elements as a result of accretion and core-mantle differentiation. Additionally, if we take the chondritic composition as the initial solar nebular element abundances, the Earth lacks 85 % of K and up to 98 % of other volatiles. However one potentially very important group of elements has received considerably less attention in this context and these elements are the siderophile but volatile elements (SVEs). SVEs perhaps provide important information regarding the timing of volatile delivery to Earth. Especially for the SVEs the partitioning between metal melt and silicate melt (Dmetal/silicate) at core formation conditions is poorly constrained, never the less they are very important for most of the core formation models. This study is producing new metal-silicate partitioning data for a wide range of SVEs (S, Se, Te, Tl, Ag, As, Au, Cd, Bi, Pb, Sn, Cu, Ge, Zn, In and Ga) with a focus on the P, T and fO2dependencies. The initial hypothesis that we are aiming to test uses the accretion of major portions of volatile elements while the core formation was still active. The key points of this study are: - What are the effects of P, T and fO2 on SVE metal-silicate partioning? - What is the effect of compositional complexity on SVE metal-silicate partioning? - How can SVE's D-values fit into current models of core formation? The partitioning experiments will be performed using a Walker type multi anvil apparatus in a pressure range between 10 and 20 GPa and temperatures of 1700 up to 2100 °C. To determine the Dmetal/silicate values we are using a field emission high-resolution JEOL JXA-8530F EPMA for major elements and a Photon Machines Analyte G2 Excimer laser (193 nm) ablation system coupled to a Thermo Fisher Element 2 single-collector ICP-MS (LA-ICP-MS) for the trace elements. We recently finished the first sets of experiments and can provide the

  2. Development of coring, consolidating, subterrene penetrators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, H.D.; Neudecker, J.W.; Cort, G.E.; Turner, W.C.; McFarland, R.D.; Griggs, J.E.

    1976-02-01

    Coring penetrators offer two advantages over full face-melting penetrators, i.e., formation of larger boreholes with no increase in power and the production of glass-lined, structurally undisturbed cores which can be recovered with conventional core-retrieval systems. These cores are of significant value in geological exploratory drilling programs. The initial design details and fabrication features of a 114-mm-diam coring penetrator are discussed; significant factors for design optimization are also presented. Results of laboratory testing are reported and compared with performance predictions, and an initial field trial is described

  3. Two phase modeling of nanofluid flow in existence of melting heat transfer by means of HAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikholeslami, M.; Jafaryar, M.; Bateni, K.; Ganji, D. D.

    2018-02-01

    In this article, Buongiorno Model is applied for investigation of nanofluid flow over a stretching plate in existence of magnetic field. Radiation and Melting heat transfer are taken into account. Homotopy analysis method (HAM) is selected to solve ODEs which are obtained from similarity transformation. Roles of Brownian motion, thermophoretic parameter, Hartmann number, porosity parameter, Melting parameter and Eckert number are presented graphically. Results indicate that nanofluid velocity and concentration enhance with rise of melting parameter. Nusselt number reduces with increase of porosity and melting parameters.

  4. Study on coolability of melt pool with different strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulkarni, P.P.; Nayak, A.K.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Experiments have been performed to test quenching of molten pool with different schemes. • Top flooding, bottom flooding and indirect cooling schemes were used. • A single simulant material with same mass and initial temperature was used. • Bottom flooding technique is found to be the most effective technique. • A comparison of all the three techniques has been presented. - Abstract: After the Fukushima accident, there have been a lot of concerns regarding long term core melt stabilization following a severe accident in nuclear reactors. Several strategies have been contemplated for quenching and stabilization of core melt like top flooding, bottom flooding, indirect cooling, etc. However, the effectiveness of these schemes is yet to be determined properly, for which, lot of experiments are needed. Several experiments have been performed for coolability of molten pool under top flooding condition. A few experiments have been performed for study of coolability of melt pool under bottom flooding as well as for indirect cooling. Besides, these tests are very scattered because they involve different simulant materials, initial temperatures and masses of melt, which makes it very difficult to judge the effectiveness of a particular technique and advantage over the other. In the present paper we have carried out different experiments wherein a single simulant material with same mass was cooled with different techniques starting from the same initial temperature. The result showed that, while top flooding and indirect cooling took several hours to cool, bottom flooding took a few minutes to cool the melt which makes it the most effective technique

  5. Integrated core-edge-divertor modeling studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stacey, W.M.

    2001-01-01

    An integrated calculation model for simulating the interaction of physics phenomena taking place in the plasma core, in the plasma edge and in the SOL and divertor of tokamaks has been developed and applied to study such interactions. The model synthesises a combination of numerical calculations (1) the power and particle balances for the core plasma, using empirical confinement scaling laws and taking into account radiation losses (2), the particle, momentum and power balances in the SOL and divertor, taking into account the effects of radiation and recycling neutrals, (3) the transport of feeling and recycling neutrals, explicitly representing divertor and pumping geometry, and (4) edge pedestal gradient scale lengths and widths, evaluation of theoretical predictions (5) confinement degradation due to thermal instabilities in the edge pedestals, (6) detachment and divertor MARFE onset, (7) core MARFE onsets leading to a H-L transition, and (8) radiative collapse leading to a disruption and evaluation of empirical fits (9) power thresholds for the L-H and H-L transitions and (10) the width of the edge pedestals. The various components of the calculation model are coupled and must be iterated to a self-consistent convergence. The model was developed over several years for the purpose of interpreting various edge phenomena observed in DIII-D experiments and thereby, to some extent, has been benchmarked against experiment. Because the model treats the interactions of various phenomena in the core, edge and divertor, yet is computationally efficient, it lends itself to the investigation of the effects of different choices of various edge plasma operating conditions on overall divertor and core plasma performance. Studies of the effect of feeling location and rate, divertor geometry, plasma shape, pumping and over 'edge parameters' on core plasma properties (line average density, confinement, density limit, etc.) have been performed for DIII-D model problems. A

  6. Devon island ice cap: core stratigraphy and paleoclimate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koerner, R M

    1977-04-01

    Valuable paleoclimatic information can be gained by studying the distribution of melt layers in deep ice cores. A profile representing the percentage of ice in melt layers in a core drilled from the Devon Island ice cap plotted against both time and depth shows that the ice cap has experienced a period of very warm summers since 1925, following a period of colder summers between about 1600 and 1925. The earlier period was coldest between 1680 and 1730. There is a high correlation between the melt-layer ice percentage and the mass balance of the ice cap. The relation between them suggests that the ice cap mass balance was zero (accumulation equaled ablation) during the colder period but is negative in the present warmer one. There is no firm evidence of a present cooling trend in the summer conditions on the ice cap. A comparison with the melt-layer ice percentage in cores from the other major Canadian Arctic ice caps shows that the variation of summer conditions found for the Devon Island ice cap is representative for all the large ice caps for about 90 percent of the time. There is also a good correlation between melt-layer percentage and summer sea-ice conditions in the archipelago. This suggests that the search for the northwest passage was influenced by changing climate, with the 19th-century peak of the often tragic exploration coinciding with a period of very cold summers.

  7. Thermal Evolution and Crystallisation Regimes of the Martian Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, C. J.; Pommier, A.

    2015-12-01

    Though it is accepted that Mars has a sulfur-rich metallic core, its chemical and physical state as well as its time-evolution are still unconstrained and debated. Several lines of evidence indicate that an internal magnetic field was once generated on Mars and that this field decayed around 3.7-4.0 Gyrs ago. The standard model assumes that this field was produced by a thermal (and perhaps chemical) dynamo operating in the Martian core. We use this information to construct parameterized models of the Martian dynamo in order to place constraints on the thermochemical evolution of the Martian core, with particular focus on its crystallization regime. Considered compositions are in the FeS system, with S content ranging from ~10 and 16 wt%. Core radius, density and CMB pressure are varied within the errors provided by recent internal structure models that satisfy the available geodetic constraints (planetary mass, moment of inertia and tidal Love number). We also vary the melting curve and adiabat, CMB heat flow and thermal conductivity. Successful models are those that match the dynamo cessation time and fall within the bounds on present-day CMB temperature. The resulting suite of over 500 models suggest three possible crystallization regimes: growth of a solid inner core starting at the center of the planet; freezing and precipitation of solid iron (Fe- snow) from the core-mantle boundary (CMB); and freezing that begins midway through the core. Our analysis focuses on the effects of core properties that are expected to be constrained during the forthcoming Insight mission.

  8. Performances of the snow accumulation melting model SAMM: results in the Northern Apennines test area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagomarsino, Daniela; Martelloni, Gianluca; Segoni, Samuele; Catani, Filippo; Fanti, Riccardo

    2013-04-01

    In this work we propose a snow accumulation-melting model (SAMM) to forecast the snowpack height and we compare the results with a simple temperature index model and an improved version of the latter.For this purpose we used rainfall, temperature and snowpack thickness 5-years data series from 7 weather stations in the Northern Apennines (Emilia Romagna Region, Italy). SAMM is based on two modules modelling the snow accumulation and the snowmelt processes. Each module is composed by two equations: a mass conservation equation is solved to model snowpack thickness and an empirical equation is used for the snow density. The processes linked to the accumulation/depletion of the snowpack (e.g. compression of the snowpack due to newly fallen snow and effects of rainfall) are modelled identifying limiting and inhibitory factors according to a kinetic approach. The model depends on 13 empirical parameters, whose optimal values were defined with an optimization algorithm (simplex flexible) using calibration measures of snowpack thickness. From an operational point of view, SAMM uses as input data only temperature and rainfall measurements, bringing the additional advantage of a relatively easy implementation. In order to verify the improvement of SAMM with respect to a temperature-index model, the latter was applied considering, for the amount of snow melt, the following equation: M = fm(T-T0), where M is hourly melt, fm is the melting factor and T0 is a threshold temperature. In this case the calculation of the depth of the snowpack requires the use of 3 parameters: fm, T0 and ?0 (the mean density of the snowpack). We also performed a simulation by replacing the SAMM melting module with the above equation and leaving unchanged the accumulation module: in this way we obtained a model with 9 parameters. The simulations results suggest that any further extension of the simple temperature index model brings some improvements with a consequent decrease of the mean error

  9. Advanced One-Dimensional Entrained-Flow Gasifier Model Considering Melting Phenomenon of Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinsu Kim

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A one-dimensional model is developed to represent the ash-melting phenomenon, which was not considered in the previous one-dimensional (1-D entrained-flow gasifier model. We include sensible heat of slag and the fusion heat of ash in the heat balance equation. To consider the melting of ash, we propose an algorithm that calculates the energy balance for three scenarios based on temperature. We also use the composition and the thermal properties of anorthite mineral to express ash. gPROMS for differential equations is used to solve this algorithm in a simulation; the results include coal conversion, gas composition, and temperature profile. Based on the Texaco pilot plant gasifier, we validate our model. Our results show good agreement with previous experimental data. We conclude that the sensible heat of slag and the fusion heat of ash must be included in the entrained flow gasifier model.

  10. Method of reducing the hazard which may occur as a consequence of a reactor core meltdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donne, M.D.; Dorner, S.; Schumacher, G.

    1978-01-01

    The core melt resulting from a meltdown accident of a GFB, LWR or LMFRR is collected by a core catcher from graphite placed below the core. The core melt is penetrating step by step into a borate store in the collecting vessel and is dissolving in it. Therefore the borate at the same time will absorb the decay heat. In order to remove the solidified and cooled down melted mass water is applied eliminating the borate. The remaining oxide state of the powdery core is sucked off again from the core catcher together with the water. The borate store (e.g. alkali borate) itself consists of separate layers with shaped parts, the coverings of which are made of steel, iron, cast iron, nickel, iron or nickel alloys, ceramic material or glass. (DG) [de

  11. Method of reducing the hazard which may occur as a consequence of a reactor core meltdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donne, M.D.; Dorner, S.; Schumacher, G.

    1985-01-01

    The core melt resulting from a meltdown accident of a GFB, LWR or LMFRR is collected by a core catcher from graphite placed below the core. The core melt is penetrating step by step into a borate store in the collecting vessel and is dissolving in it. Therefore the borate at the same time will absorb the decay heat. In order to remove the solidified and cooled down melted mass water is applied eliminating the borate. The remaining oxide states of the powdery core is sucked off again from the core catcher together with the water. The borate store (e.g. alkali borate) itself consists of separate layers with shaped parts, the coverings of which are made of steel, iron, cast iron, nickel, iron or nickel alloys, ceramic material or glass. (orig./PW)

  12. SWR 1000 severe accident control through in-vessel melt retention by external RPV cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolev, N.I. [Framatome Advanced Nuclear Power, NDSI, Erlangen (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    Framatome Advanced Nuclear Power is being designing a new generation NPP with boiling water reactor SWR1000. Besides of various of modern passive and active safety features the system is also designed for controlling of a postulated severe accident with extreme low probability of occurrence. This work presents the rationales behind the decision to select the external cooling as a safety management strategy during severe accident. Bounding scenery are analyzed regarding the core melting, melt-water interaction during relocation of the melt from the core region into the lower head and the external coolability of the lower head. The conclusion is reached that the external cooling for the SWR1000 is a valuable strategy for accident management during postulated severe accidents. (authors)

  13. SWR 1000 severe accident control through in-vessel melt retention by external RPV cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolev, N.I.

    2001-01-01

    Framatome Advanced Nuclear Power is being designing a new generation NPP with boiling water reactor SWR1000. Besides of various of modern passive and active safety features the system is also designed for controlling of a postulated severe accident with extreme low probability of occurrence. This work presents the rationales behind the decision to select the external cooling as a safety management strategy during severe accident. Bounding scenery are analyzed regarding the core melting, melt-water interaction during relocation of the melt from the core region into the lower head and the external coolability of the lower head. The conclusion is reached that the external cooling for the SWR1000 is a valuable strategy for accident management during postulated severe accidents. (authors)

  14. The thermal evolution of Mercury's Fe-Si core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knibbe, Jurriën Sebastiaan; van Westrenen, Wim

    2018-01-01

    We have studied the thermal and magnetic field evolution of planet Mercury with a core of Fe-Si alloy to assess whether an Fe-Si core matches its present-day partially molten state, Mercury's magnetic field strength, and the observed ancient crustal magnetization. The main advantages of an Fe-Si core, opposed to a previously assumed Fe-S core, are that a Si-bearing core is consistent with the highly reduced nature of Mercury and that no compositional convection is generated upon core solidification, in agreement with magnetic field indications of a stable layer at the top of Mercury's core. This study also present the first implementation of a conductive temperature profile in the core where heat fluxes are sub-adiabatic in a global thermal evolution model. We show that heat migrates from the deep core to the outer part of the core as soon as heat fluxes at the outer core become sub-adiabatic. As a result, the deep core cools throughout Mercury's evolution independent of the temperature evolution at the core-mantle boundary, causing an early start of inner core solidification and magnetic field generation. The conductive layer at the outer core suppresses the rate of core growth after temperature differences between the deep and shallow core are relaxed, such that a magnetic field can be generated until the present. Also, the outer core and mantle operate at higher temperatures than previously thought, which prolongs mantle melting and mantle convection. The results indicate that S is not a necessary ingredient of Mercury's core, bringing bulk compositional models of Mercury more in line with reduced meteorite analogues.

  15. A study on transient heat transfer of the EU-ABWR external core catcher using the phase-change effective convectivity model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran Chi Thanh; Nguyen Viet Hung; Tahara, Mika; Kojima, Yoshihiro; Hamazaki, Ryoichi; Kudinov, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    In advanced designs of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs), for mitigation of severe accident consequences, on the one hand, the In-Vessel Retention (IVR) concept has been implemented. On the other hand in other new NPP designs (Generation III and III+) with large power reactors, the External Core Catcher (ECC) has been widely adopted. Assessment of ECC design robustness is largely based on analysis of heat transfer of a melt pool formed in the ECC. Transient heat transfer analysis of an ECC is challenging due to (i) uncertainty in the in-vessel accident progression and subsequent vessel failure modes; (ii) long transient, (iii) high Rayleigh number and complex flows involving phase change of the melt pool formed in an ECC. The present paper is concerned with analysis of transient melt pool heat transfer in the ECC of new Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) designed by Toshiba Corporation (Japan). According to the ABWR severe accident management strategy, the ECC is initially dry. In order to prevent steam explosion flooding is initiated after termination of melt relocation from the vessel. The ECC full of melt is cooled from the top directly by water and from the bottom through the ECC walls. In order to assess sustainability of the ECC, heat transfer simulation of a stratified melt pool formed in the ECC is carried out. The problem addressed in this work is heat flux distribution at ECC boundaries when cooling is applied (i) from the bottom, (ii) from the top and from the bottom. To perform melt pool heat transfer simulation, we employ Phase-change Effective Convectivity Model (PECM) which was originally developed as a computationally efficient, sufficiently accurate, 2D/3D accident analysis tools for simulation of transient melt pool heat transfer in the reactor lower plenum. Thermal loads from the melt pool to ECC boundaries are determined for selected ex-vessel accident scenarios. Performance of the ECC, efficiency of severe accident management (SAM) measures and

  16. Density Determination of Metallic Melts from Diffuse X-Ray Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauser, N.; Davis, A.; Greenberg, E.; Prakapenka, V. B.; Campbell, A.

    2017-12-01

    Liquids comprise several important structural components of the deep Earth, for example, the present outer core and a hypothesized magma ocean early in Earth history. However, the physical properties of the constituent materials of these structures at high pressures and temperatures are less well constrained than their crystalline counterparts. Determination of the physical properties of these liquids can inform geophysical models of the composition and structure of the Earth, but methods for studying the physical properties of liquids at high pressure and temperatures are underdeveloped. One proposed method for direct determination of density of a melt requires analysis of the diffuse scattered X-ray signal of the liquid. Among the challenges to applying this technique to high-pressure melts within a laser heated diamond anvil cell are the low signal-to-noise ratio and overlapping diffraction peaks from the crystalline components of the sample assembly interfering with the diffuse scattering from the liquid. Recent advances in instrumentation at synchrotron X-ray sources have made this method more accessible for determination of density of melted material. In this work we present the technique and report the densities of three high-pressure melts of the FCC metals iron, nickel, and gold derived from diffuse scattered X-ray spectra collected from in situ laser-heated diamond anvil cell synchrotron experiments. The results are compared to densities derived from shock wave experiments.

  17. Frictional melt generated by the 2008 Mw 7.9 Wenchuan earthquake and its faulting mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H.; Li, H.; Si, J.; Sun, Z.; Zhang, L.; He, X.

    2017-12-01

    Fault-related pseudotachylytes are considered as fossil earthquakes, conveying significant information that provide improved insight into fault behaviors and their mechanical properties. The WFSD project was carried out right after the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake, detailed research was conducted in the drilling cores. 2 mm rigid black layer with fresh slickenlines was observed at 732.6 m in WFSD-1 cores drilled at the southern Yingxiu-Beichuan fault (YBF). Evidence of optical microscopy, FESEM and FIB-TEM show it's frictional melt (pseudotachylyte). In the northern part of YBF, 4 mm fresh melt was found at 1084 m with similar structures in WFSD-4S cores. The melts contain numerous microcracks. Considering that (1) the highly unstable property of the frictional melt (easily be altered or devitrified) under geological conditions; (2) the unfilled microcracks; (3) fresh slickenlines and (4) recent large earthquake in this area, we believe that 2-4 mm melt was produced by the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake. This is the first report of fresh pseudotachylyte with slickenlines in natural fault that generated by modern earthquake. Geochemical analyses show that fault rocks at 732.6 m are enriched in CaO, Fe2O3, FeO, H2O+ and LOI, whereas depleted in SiO2. XRF results show that Ca and Fe are enriched obviously in the 2.5 cm fine-grained fault rocks and Ba enriched in the slip surface. The melt has a higher magnetic susceptibility value, which may due to neoformed magnetite and metallic iron formed in fault frictional melt. Frictional melt visible in both southern and northern part of YBF reveals that frictional melt lubrication played a major role in the Wenchuan earthquake. Instead of vesicles and microlites, numerous randomly oriented microcracks in the melt, exhibiting a quenching texture. The quenching texture suggests the frictional melt was generated under rapid heat-dissipation condition, implying vigorous fluid circulation during the earthquake. We surmise that during

  18. Melting under shock compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, B.I.

    1980-10-01

    A simple model, using experimentally measured shock and particle velocities, is applied to the Lindemann melting formula to predict the density, temperature, and pressure at which a material will melt when shocked from room temperature and zero pressure initial conditions

  19. The extreme melt across the Greenland ice sheet in 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Hall, D. K.; Mote, T. L.; Tedesco, M.; Albert, M. R.; Keegan, K.; Shuman, C. A.; DiGirolamo, N. E.; Neumann, G.

    2012-10-01

    The discovery of the 2012 extreme melt event across almost the entire surface of the Greenland ice sheet is presented. Data from three different satellite sensors - including the Oceansat-2 scatterometer, the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, and the Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder - are combined to obtain composite melt maps, representing the most complete melt conditions detectable across the ice sheet. Satellite observations reveal that melt occurred at or near the surface of the Greenland ice sheet across 98.6% of its entire extent on 12 July 2012, including the usually cold polar areas at high altitudes like Summit in the dry snow facies of the ice sheet. This melt event coincided with an anomalous ridge of warm air that became stagnant over Greenland. As seen in melt occurrences from multiple ice core records at Summit reported in the published literature, such a melt event is rare with the last significant one occurring in 1889 and the next previous one around seven centuries earlier in the Medieval Warm Period. Given its rarity, the 2012 extreme melt across Greenland provides an exceptional opportunity for new studies in broad interdisciplinary geophysical research.

  20. Partial melting of lower oceanic crust gabbro: Constraints from poikilitic clinopyroxene primocrysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuthold, Julien; Lissenberg, C. Johan; O'Driscoll, Brian; Karakas, Ozge; Falloon, Trevor; Klimentyeva, Dina N.; Ulmer, Peter

    2018-03-01

    Successive magma batches underplate, ascend, stall and erupt along spreading ridges, building the oceanic crust. It is therefore important to understand the processes and conditions under which magma differentiates at mid ocean ridges. Although fractional crystallization is considered to be the dominant mechanism for magma differentiation, open-system igneous complexes also experience Melting-Assimilation-Storage-Hybridization (MASH, Hildreth and Moorbath, 1988) processes. Here, we examine crystal-scale records of partial melting in lower crustal gabbroic cumulates from the slow-spreading Atlantic oceanic ridge (Kane Megamullion; collected with Jason ROV) and the fast-spreading East Pacific Rise (Hess Deep; IODP expedition 345). Clinopyroxene oikocrysts in these gabbros preserve marked intra-crystal geochemical variations that point to crystallization-dissolution episodes of the gabbro eutectic assemblage. Kane Megamullion and Hess Deep clinopyroxene core1 primocrysts and their plagioclase inclusions indicate crystallization from high temperature basalt (>1160 and >1200°C, respectively), close to clinopyroxene saturation temperature (fundamental mechanisms for generating the wide compositional variation observed in mid-ocean ridge basalts. We furthermore propose that such processes operate at both slow- and fast-spreading ocean ridges. Thermal numerical modelling shows that the degree of lower crustal partial melting at slow-spreading ridges can locally increase up to 50%, but the overall crustal melt volume is low (less than ca. 5% of total mantle-derived and crustal melts; ca. 20% in fast-spreading ridges).

  1. Modelling characteristics of ferromagnetic cores with the influence of temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Górecki, K; Rogalska, M; Zarȩbski, J; Detka, K

    2014-01-01

    The paper is devoted to modelling characteristics of ferromagnetic cores with the use of SPICE software. Some disadvantages of the selected literature models of such cores are discussed. A modified model of ferromagnetic cores taking into account the influence of temperature on the magnetizing characteristics and the core losses is proposed. The form of the elaborated model is presented and discussed. The correctness of this model is verified by comparing the calculated and the measured characteristics of the selected ferromagnetic cores.

  2. SCDAP/RELAP5 lower core plate model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coryell, E.W.; Griffin, F.P.

    1999-01-01

    The SCDAP/RELAP5 computer code is a best-estimate analysis tool for performing nuclear reactor severe accident simulations. This report describes the justification, theory, implementation, and testing of a new modeling capability which will refine the analysis of the movement of molten material from the core region to the vessel lower head. As molten material moves from the core region through the core support structures it may encounter conditions which will cause it to freeze in the region of the lower core plate, delaying its arrival to the vessel head. The timing of this arrival is significant to reactor safety, because during the time span for material relocation to the lower head, the core may be experiencing steam-limited oxidation. The time at which hot material arrives in a coolant-filled lower vessel head, thereby significantly increasing the steam flow rate through the core region, becomes significant to the progression and timing of a severe accident. This report is a revision of a report INEEL/EXT-00707, entitled ''Preliminary Design Report for SCDAP/RELAP5 Lower Core Plate Model''

  3. Nuclear reactor core safety device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colgate, S.A.

    1977-01-01

    The danger of a steam explosion from a nuclear reactor core melt-down can be greatly reduced by adding a gasifying agent to the fuel that releases a large amount of gas at a predetermined pre-melt-down temperature that ruptures the bottom end of the fuel rod and blows the finely divided fuel into a residual coolant bath at the bottom of the reactor. This residual bath should be equipped with a secondary cooling loop

  4. APROS 3-D core models for simulators and plant analyzers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puska, E.K.

    1999-01-01

    The 3-D core models of APROS simulation environment can be used in simulator and plant analyzer applications, as well as in safety analysis. The key feature of APROS models is that the same physical models can be used in all applications. For three-dimensional reactor cores the APROS models cover both quadratic BWR and PWR cores and the hexagonal lattice VVER-type cores. In APROS environment the user can select the number of flow channels in the core and either five- or six-equation thermal hydraulic model for these channels. The thermal hydraulic model and the channel description have a decisive effect on the calculation time of the 3-D core model and thus just these selection make at present the major difference between a safety analysis model and a training simulator model. The paper presents examples of various types of 3-D LWR-type core descriptions for simulator and plant analyzer use and discusses the differences of calculation speed and physical results between a typical safety analysis model description and a real-time simulator model description in transients. (author)

  5. Corium spreading: hydrodynamics, rheology and solidification of a high-temperature oxide melt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Journeau, Ch.

    2006-06-01

    In the hypothesis of a nuclear reactor severe accident, the core could melt and form a high- temperature (2000-3000 K) mixture called corium. In the hypothesis of vessel rupture, this corium would spread in the reactor pit and adjacent rooms as occurred in Chernobyl or in a dedicated core-catcher s in the new European Pressurized reactor, EPR. This thesis is dedicated to the experimental study of corium spreading, especially with the prototypic corium material experiments performed in the VULCANO facility at CEA Cadarache. The first step in analyzing these tests consists in interpreting the material analyses, with the help of thermodynamic modelling of corium solidification. Knowing for each temperature the phase repartition and composition, physical properties can be estimated. Spreading termination is controlled by corium rheological properties in the solidification range, which leads to studying them in detail. The hydrodynamical, rheological and solidification aspects of corium spreading are taken into account in models and computer codes which have been validated against these tests and enable the assessment of the EPR spreading core-catcher concept. (author)

  6. Comparison of SAS3A and MELT-III predictions for a transient overpower hypothetical accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilburn, N.P.

    1976-01-01

    A comparison is made of the predictions of the two major codes SAS3A and MELT-III for the hypothetical unprotected transient overpower accident in the FFTF. The predictions of temperatures, fuel restructuring, fuel melting, reactivity feedbacks, and core power are compared

  7. Tin in granitic melts: The role of melting temperature and protolith composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Mathias; Romer, Rolf L.; Franz, Leander; López-Moro, Francisco Javier

    2018-06-01

    Granite bound tin mineralization typically is seen as the result of extreme magmatic fractionation and late exsolution of magmatic fluids. Mineralization, however, also could be obtained at considerably less fractionation if initial melts already had enhanced Sn contents. We present chemical data and results from phase diagram modeling that illustrate the dominant roles of protolith composition, melting conditions, and melt extraction/evolution for the distribution of Sn between melt and restite and, thus, the Sn content of melts. We compare the element partitioning between leucosome and restite of low-temperature and high-temperature migmatites. During low-temperature melting, trace elements partition preferentially into the restite with the possible exception of Sr, Cd, Bi, and Pb, that may be enriched in the melt. In high-temperature melts, Ga, Y, Cd, Sn, REE, Pb, Bi, and U partition preferentially into the melt whereas Sc, V, Cr, Co, Ni, Mo, and Ba stay in the restite. This contrasting behavior is attributed to the stability of trace element sequestering minerals during melt generation. In particular muscovite, biotite, titanite, and rutile act as host phases for Sn and, therefore prevent Sn enrichment in the melt as long as they are stable phases in the restite. As protolith composition controls both the mineral assemblage and modal contents of the various minerals, protolith composition eventually also controls the fertility of a rock during anatexis, restite mineralogy, and partitioning behavior of trace metals. If a particular trace element is sequestered in a phase that is stable during partial melting, the resulting melt is depleted in this element whereas the restite becomes enriched. Melt generation at high temperature may release Sn when Sn-hosts become unstable. If melt has not been lost before the breakdown of Sn-hosts, Sn contents in the melt will increase but never will be high. In contrast, if melt has been lost before the decomposition of Sn

  8. An Experimental Investigation on APR1400 Penetration Weld Failure by Metallic Melt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Sang Mo; Ha, Kwang Soon; Kim, Hwan Yeol

    2014-01-01

    The penetrations are considered as the most vulnerable parts with respect to the reactor vessel failure when a core melt severe accident occurs and the corium reaches the lower head. Penetration tube failure modes can be divided into two categories; tube ejection out of the vessel lower head and rupture of the penetration tube outside the vessel. Tube ejection begins with degrading the penetration tube weld strength to zero as the weld is exposed to temperatures as high as the weld melting temperature, which is called weld failure, and then overcoming any binding force in the hole in the vessel wall that results from differential thermal expansion of the tube and vessel wall. Tube rupture assumes that the debris bed has melted the instrument tube inside the reactor and melt migrates down into the tube to a location outside the vessel wall where a pressure rupture can occur, thus breaching the pressure boundary. In the present paper, we have a focus on the tube ejection failure mode, specifically on the APR1400 weld failure by direct contact with a metallic melt. The objective is to investigate experimentally the ablation kinetics of an APR1400 penetration weld during the interactions with a metallic melt and to suggest the modification of the existing weld failure model. This paper involves the interaction experiments of two different metallic melts (metallic corium and stainless steel melts) with a weld specimen, and rough estimation of weld failure time. The interaction experiments between the metallic melts and an APR1400 penetration weld were performed to investigate the ablation kinetics of the penetration weld. Metallic corium and stainless steel melts were generated using an induction heating technique and interacted with a penetration weld specimen. The ablation rate of the weld specimen showed a range from 0.109 to 0..244 mm/s and thus the APR1400 penetration weld was estimated to be failed at hundreds of times after the interaction with the melt

  9. Drag Moderation by the Melting of an Ice Surface in Contact with Water

    KAUST Repository

    Vakarelski, Ivan Uriev; Chan, Derek Y.  C.; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T

    2015-01-01

    We report measurements of the effects of a melting ice surface on the hydrodynamic drag of ice-shell-metal-core spheres free falling in water at a Reynolds of number Re∼2×104–3×105 and demonstrate that the melting surface induces the early onset of the drag crisis, thus reducing the hydrodynamic drag by more than 50%. Direct visualization of the flow pattern demonstrates the key role of surface melting. Our observations support the hypothesis that the drag reduction is due to the disturbance of the viscous boundary layer by the mass transfer from the melting ice surface.

  10. Drag Moderation by the Melting of an Ice Surface in Contact with Water

    KAUST Repository

    Vakarelski, Ivan Uriev

    2015-07-24

    We report measurements of the effects of a melting ice surface on the hydrodynamic drag of ice-shell-metal-core spheres free falling in water at a Reynolds of number Re∼2×104–3×105 and demonstrate that the melting surface induces the early onset of the drag crisis, thus reducing the hydrodynamic drag by more than 50%. Direct visualization of the flow pattern demonstrates the key role of surface melting. Our observations support the hypothesis that the drag reduction is due to the disturbance of the viscous boundary layer by the mass transfer from the melting ice surface.

  11. Modeling of velocity field for vacuum induction melting process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Bo; JIANG Zhi-guo; LIU Kui; LI Yi-yi

    2005-01-01

    The numerical simulation for the recirculating flow of melting of an electromagnetically stirred alloy in a cylindrical induction furnace crucible was presented. Inductive currents and electromagnetic body forces in the alloy under three different solenoid frequencies and three different melting powers were calculated, and then the forces were adopted in the fluid flow equations to simulate the flow of the alloy and the behavior of the free surface. The relationship between the height of the electromagnetic stirring meniscus, melting power, and solenoid frequency was derived based on the law of mass conservation. The results show that the inductive currents and the electromagnetic forces vary with the frequency, melting power, and the physical properties of metal. The velocity and the height of the meniscus increase with the increase of the melting power and the decrease of the solenoid frequency.

  12. Modeling of beam-target interaction during pulsed electron beam ablation of graphite: Case of melting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Muddassir, E-mail: mx1_ali@laurentian.ca; Henda, Redhouane

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • Modeling of ablation stage induced during pulsed electron beam ablation (PEBA). • Thermal model to describe heating, melting and vaporization of a graphite target. • Model results show good accordance with reported data in the literature. - Abstract: A one-dimensional thermal model based on a two-stage heat conduction equation is employed to investigate the ablation of graphite target during nanosecond pulsed electron beam ablation. This comprehensive model accounts for the complex physical phenomena comprised of target heating, melting and vaporization upon irradiation with a polyenergetic electron beam. Melting and vaporization effects induced during ablation are taken into account by introducing moving phase boundaries. Phase transition induced during ablation is considered through the temperature dependent thermodynamic properties of graphite. The effect of electron beam efficiency, power density, and accelerating voltage on ablation is analyzed. For an electron beam operating at an accelerating voltage of 15 kV and efficiency of 0.6, the model findings show that the target surface temperature can reach up to 7500 K at the end of the pulse. The surface begins to melt within 25 ns from the pulse start. For the same process conditions, the estimated ablation depth and ablated mass per unit area are about 0.60 μm and 1.05 μg/mm{sup 2}, respectively. Model results indicate that ablation takes place primarily in the regime of normal vaporization from the surface. The results obtained at an accelerating voltage of 15 kV and efficiency factor of 0.6 are satisfactorily in good accordance with available experimental data in the literature.

  13. COMSORS: A light water reactor chemical core catcher

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Parker, G.W.; Rudolph, J.C.; Osborne-Lee, I.W.

    1997-01-01

    The Core-Melt Source Reduction System (COMSORS) is a new approach to terminate lightwater reactor (LWR) core-melt accidents and ensure containment integrity. A special dissolution glass made of lead oxide (PbO) and boron oxide (B 2 O 3 ) is placed under the reactor vessel. If molten core debris is released onto the glass, the following sequence happens: (1) the glass absorbs decay heat as its temperature increases and the glass softens; (2) the core debris dissolves into the molten glass; (3) molten glass convective currents create a homogeneous high-level waste (HLW) glass; (4) the molten glass spreads into a wider pool, distributing the heat for removal by radiation to the reactor cavity above or transfer to water on top of the molten glass; and (5) the glass solidifies as increased surface cooling area and decreasing radioactive decay heat generation allows heat removal to exceed heat generation

  14. Melting temperature of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korobenko, V.N.; Savvatimskiy, A.I.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text: Pulse of electrical current is used for fast heating (∼ 1 μs) of metal and graphite specimens placed in dielectric solid media. Specimen consists of two strips (90 μm in thick) placed together with small gap so they form a black body model. Quasy-monocrystal graphite specimens were used for uniform heating of graphite. Temperature measurements were fulfilled with fast pyrometer and with composite 2-strip black body model up to melting temperature. There were fulfilled experiments with zirconium and tungsten of the same black body construction. Additional temperature measurements of liquid zirconium and liquid tungsten are made. Specific heat capacity (c P ) of liquid zirconium and of liquid tungsten has a common feature in c P diminishing just after melting. It reveals c P diminishing after melting in both cases over the narrow temperature range up to usual values known from steady state measurements. Over the next wide temperature range heat capacity for W (up to 5000 K) and Zr (up to 4100 K) show different dependencies of heat capacity on temperature in liquid state. The experiments confirmed a high quality of 2-strip black body model used for graphite temperature measurements. Melting temperature plateau of tungsten (3690 K) was used for pyrometer calibration area for graphite temperature measurement. As a result, a preliminary value of graphite melting temperature of 4800 K was obtained. (author)

  15. PWR degraded core analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gittus, J.H.

    1982-04-01

    A review is presented of the various phenomena involved in degraded core accidents and the ensuing transport of fission products from the fuel to the primary circuit and the containment. The dominant accident sequences found in the PWR risk studies published to date are briefly described. Then chapters deal with the following topics: the condition and behaviour of water reactor fuel during normal operation and at the commencement of degraded core accidents; the generation of hydrogen from the Zircaloy-steam and the steel-steam reactions; the way in which the core deforms and finally melts following loss of coolant; debris relocation analysis; containment integrity; fission product behaviour during a degraded core accident. (U.K.)

  16. Tomographic location of potential melt-bearing phenocrysts in lunar glass spherules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebel, D.S.; Fogel, R.A.; Rivers, M.L.

    2005-01-01

    Apollo 17 orange glass spherules contain olivine phenocrysts with melt inclusions from depth. Tomography ( 200 spherules located 1 phenocryst. We will try to find melt inclusions and obtain original magma volatiles and compositions. In 1971, Apollo 17 astronauts collected a 10 cm soil sample (74220) comprised almost entirely of orange glass spherules. Below this, a double drive-tube core sampled a 68 cm thick horizon comprised of orange glass and black beads (crystallized equivalents of orange glass). Primitive lunar glass spherules (e.g.-A17 orange glasses) are thought to represent ejecta from lunar mare fire fountains. The fire-fountains were apparently driven by a combination of C-O gas exsolution from orange glass melt and the oxidation of graphite. Upon eruption, magmas lost their volatiles (e.g., S, CO, CO 2 ) to space. Evidence for volatile escape remains as volatile-rich coatings on the exteriors of many spherules. Moreover, it showed that Type I and II Fe-Ni-rich metal particles found within orange glass olivine phenocrysts, or free-floating in the glass itself, are powerful evidence for the volatile driving force for lunar fire fountains. More direct evidence for the volatile mechanism has yet to be uncovered. Issues remaining include: the exact composition of magmatic volatiles; the hypothesized existence of graphite in the magma; the oxygen fugacity of the magma and of the lunar interior. In 1996 reported a single ∼450 micron, equant olivine phenocryst, containing four glassy melt inclusions (or inclusion cores), the largest ∼30micron in size, in a thin section of the 74001/2 drill core. The melt is assumed to sample the parent magma of the lunar basalts at depth, evidenced by the S content of the inclusion (600 ppm) which is 400 ppm greater than that of the orange glass host. Such melts potentially contain a full complement of the volatile components of the parent magma, which can be analyzed by infrared spectroscopy. Although the A17 orange glass

  17. A Core Language for Separate Variability Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iosif-Lazăr, Alexandru Florin; Wasowski, Andrzej; Schaefer, Ina

    2014-01-01

    Separate variability modeling adds variability to a modeling language without requiring modifications of the language or the supporting tools. We define a core language for separate variability modeling using a single kind of variation point to define transformations of software artifacts in object...... hierarchical dependencies between variation points via copying and flattening. Thus, we reduce a model with intricate dependencies to a flat executable model transformation consisting of simple unconditional local variation points. The core semantics is extremely concise: it boils down to two operational rules...

  18. FARO tests corium-melt cooling in water pool: Roles of melt superheat and sintering in sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Gisuk [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Wichita State University, Wichita, KS 67260 (United States); Kaviany, Massoud [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Division of Advance Nuclear Engineering, POSTECH, Pohang, Gyeongbuk 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Moriyama, Kiyofumi [Division of Advance Nuclear Engineering, POSTECH, Pohang, Gyeongbuk 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hyun Sun, E-mail: hejsunny@postech.ac.kr [Division of Advance Nuclear Engineering, POSTECH, Pohang, Gyeongbuk 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Byoungcheol; Lee, Mooneon; Kim, Eunho; Park, Jin Ho [Division of Advance Nuclear Engineering, POSTECH, Pohang, Gyeongbuk 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Nasersharifi, Yahya [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Wichita State University, Wichita, KS 67260 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • The numerical approach for FARO experimental data is suggested. • The cooling mechanism of ex-vessel corium is suggested. • The predicted minimum pool depth for no cake formation is suggested. - Abstract: The FARO tests have aimed at understanding an important severe accident mitigation action in a light water reactor when the accident progresses from the reactor pressure vessel boundary. These tests have aimed to measure the coolability of a molten core material (corium) gravity dispersed as jet into a water pool, quantifying the loose particle diameter distribution and fraction converted to cake under range of initial melt superheat and pool temperature and depth. Under complete hydrodynamic breakup of corium and consequent sedimentation in the pool, the initially superheated corium can result in debris bed consisting of discrete solid particles (loose debris) and/or a solid cake at the bottom of the pool. The success of the debris bed coolability requires cooling of the cake, and this is controlled by the large internal resistance. We postulate that the corium cake forms when there is a remelting part in the sediment. We show that even though a solid shell forms around the melt particles transiting in the water pool due to film-boiling heat transfer, the superheated melt allows remelting of the large particles in the sediment (depending on the water temperature and the transit time) using the COOLAP (Coolability Analysis with Parametric fuel-cooant interaction models) code. With this remelting and its liquid-phase sintering of the non-remelted particles, we predict the fraction of the melt particles converting to a cake through liquid sintering. Our predictions are in good agreement with the existing results of the FARO experiments. We address only those experiments with pool depths sufficient/exceeding the length required for complete breakup of the molten jet. Our analysis of the fate of molten corium aimed at devising the effective

  19. Dynamics of Melting and Melt Migration as Inferred from Incompatible Trace Element Abundance in Abyssal Peridotites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Q.; Liang, Y.

    2008-12-01

    To better understand the melting processes beneath the mid-ocean ridge, we developed a simple model for trace element fractionation during concurrent melting and melt migration in an upwelling steady-state mantle column. Based on petrologic considerations, we divided the upwelling mantle into two regions: a double- lithology upper region where high permeability dunite channels are embedded in a lherzolite/harzburgite matrix, and a single-lithology lower region that consists of partially molten lherzolite. Melt generated in the single lithology region migrates upward through grain-scale diffuse porous flow, whereas melt in the lherzolite/harzburgite matrix in the double-lithology region is allowed to flow both vertically through the overlying matrix and horizontally into its neighboring dunite channels. There are three key dynamic parameters in our model: degree of melting experienced by the single lithology column (Fd), degree of melting experienced by the double lithology column (F), and a dimensionless melt suction rate (R) that measures the accumulated rate of melt extraction from the matrix to the channel relative to the accumulated rate of matrix melting. In terms of trace element fractionation, upwelling and melting in the single lithology column is equivalent to non-modal batch melting (R = 0), whereas melting and melt migration in the double lithology region is equivalent to a nonlinear combination of non-modal batch and fractional melting (0 abyssal peridotite, we showed, with the help of Monte Carlo simulations, that it is difficult to invert for all three dynamic parameters from a set of incompatible trace element data with confidence. However, given Fd, it is quite possible to constrain F and R from incompatible trace element abundances in residual peridotite. As an illustrative example, we used the simple melting model developed in this study and selected REE and Y abundance in diopside from abyssal peridotites to infer their melting and melt migration

  20. Modification of Core Model for KNTC 2 Simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y.K.; Lee, J.G.; Park, J.E.; Bae, S.N.; Chin, H.C. [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    KNTC 2 simulator was developed in 1986 referencing YGN 1. Since the YGN 1 has changed its fuel cycle to long term cycle(cycle 9), the data such as rod worth, boron worth, moderator temperature coefficient, and etc. of the simulator and those of the YGN 1 became different. To incorporate these changes into the simulator and make the simulator more close to the reference plant, core model upgrade became a necessity. During this research, core data for the simulator was newly generated using APA of the WH. And to make it easy tuning and verification of the key characteristics of the reactor model, PC-Based tool was also developed. And to facilitate later core model upgrade, two procedures-`the Procedures for core characteristic generation` and `the Procedures for core characteristic modification`-were also developed. (author). 16 refs., 22 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Modelling the core magnetic field of the earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, C. G. A.; Carle, H. M.

    1982-01-01

    It is suggested that radial off-center dipoles located within the core of the earth be used instead of spherical harmonics of the magnetic potential in modeling the core magnetic field. The off-center dipoles, in addition to more realistically modeling the physical current systems within the core, are if located deep within the core more effective at removing long wavelength signals of either potential or field. Their disadvantage is that their positions and strengths are more difficult to compute, and such effects as upward and downward continuation are more difficult to manipulate. It is nevertheless agreed with Cox (1975) and Alldredge and Hurwitz (1964) that physical realism in models is more important than mathematical convenience. A radial dipole model is presented which agrees with observations of secular variation and excursions.

  2. Melting of metallic intermediate level waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huutoniemi, Tommi; Larsson, Arne; Blank, Eva [Studsvik Nuclear AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2013-08-15

    This report presents a feasibility study of a melting facility for core components and reactor internals. An overview is given of how such a facility for treatment of intermediate level waste might be designed, constructed and operated and highlights both the possibilities and challenges. A cost estimate and a risk analysis are presented in order to make a conclusion of the technical feasibility of such a facility. Based on the authors' experience in operating a low level waste melting facility, their conclusion is that without technical improvements such a facility is not feasible today. This is based on the cost of constructing and operating such a facility, in conjunction with the radiological risks associated with operation and the uncertain benefits to disposal and long term safety.

  3. Melting of metallic intermediate level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huutoniemi, Tommi; Larsson, Arne; Blank, Eva

    2013-08-01

    This report presents a feasibility study of a melting facility for core components and reactor internals. An overview is given of how such a facility for treatment of intermediate level waste might be designed, constructed and operated and highlights both the possibilities and challenges. A cost estimate and a risk analysis are presented in order to make a conclusion of the technical feasibility of such a facility. Based on the authors' experience in operating a low level waste melting facility, their conclusion is that without technical improvements such a facility is not feasible today. This is based on the cost of constructing and operating such a facility, in conjunction with the radiological risks associated with operation and the uncertain benefits to disposal and long term safety

  4. Multiphysics modeling of selective laser sintering/melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganeriwala, Rishi Kumar

    A significant percentage of total global employment is due to the manufacturing industry. However, manufacturing also accounts for nearly 20% of total energy usage in the United States according to the EIA. In fact, manufacturing accounted for 90% of industrial energy consumption and 84% of industry carbon dioxide emissions in 2002. Clearly, advances in manufacturing technology and efficiency are necessary to curb emissions and help society as a whole. Additive manufacturing (AM) refers to a relatively recent group of manufacturing technologies whereby one can 3D print parts, which has the potential to significantly reduce waste, reconfigure the supply chain, and generally disrupt the whole manufacturing industry. Selective laser sintering/melting (SLS/SLM) is one type of AM technology with the distinct advantage of being able to 3D print metals and rapidly produce net shape parts with complicated geometries. In SLS/SLM parts are built up layer-by-layer out of powder particles, which are selectively sintered/melted via a laser. However, in order to produce defect-free parts of sufficient strength, the process parameters (laser power, scan speed, layer thickness, powder size, etc.) must be carefully optimized. Obviously, these process parameters will vary depending on material, part geometry, and desired final part characteristics. Running experiments to optimize these parameters is costly, energy intensive, and extremely material specific. Thus a computational model of this process would be highly valuable. In this work a three dimensional, reduced order, coupled discrete element - finite difference model is presented for simulating the deposition and subsequent laser heating of a layer of powder particles sitting on top of a substrate. Validation is provided and parameter studies are conducted showing the ability of this model to help determine appropriate process parameters and an optimal powder size distribution for a given material. Next, thermal stresses upon

  5. Core-shell polymer nanorods by a two-step template wetting process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dougherty, S; Liang, J

    2009-01-01

    One-dimensional core-shell polymer nanowires offer many advantages and great potential for many different applications. In this paper we introduce a highly versatile two-step template wetting process to fabricate two-component core-shell polymer nanowires with controllable shell thickness. PLLA and PMMA were chosen as model polymers to demonstrate the feasibility of this process. Solution wetting with different concentrations of polymer solutions was used to fabricate the shell layer and melt wetting was used to fill the shell with the core polymer. The shell thickness was analyzed as a function of the polymer solution concentration and viscosity, and the core-shell morphology was observed with TEM. This paper demonstrates the feasibility of fabricating polymer core-shell nanostructures using our two-step template wetting process and opens the arena for optimization and future experiments with polymers that are desirable for specific applications.

  6. Enthalpy model for heating, melting, and vaporization in laser ablation

    OpenAIRE

    Vasilios Alexiades; David Autrique

    2010-01-01

    Laser ablation is used in a growing number of applications in various areas including medicine, archaeology, chemistry, environmental and materials sciences. In this work the heat transfer and phase change phenomena during nanosecond laser ablation of a copper (Cu) target in a helium (He) background gas at atmospheric pressure are presented. An enthalpy model is outlined, which accounts for heating, melting, and vaporization of the target. As far as we know, this is the first model th...

  7. Ice core melt features in relation to Antarctic coastal climate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaczmarska, M.; Isaksson, E.; Karlöf, L.; Brandt, O.; Winther, J.G.; van de Wal, R.S.W.; van den Broeke, M.R.; Johnsen, S.J.

    2006-01-01

    Measurement of light intensity transmission was carried out on an ice core S100 from coastal Dronning Maud Land (DML). Ice lenses were observed in digital pictures of the core and recorded as peaks in the light transmittance record. The frequency of ice layer occurrence was compared with climate

  8. Experiments on the behaviour of thermite melt injected into sodium: Final report on the THINA test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huber, F.; Kaiser, A.; Peppler, W.

    1994-01-01

    During hypothetical accidents of fast breeder reactors the core melts and part of the core material inventory is ejected into the upper coolant plenum. As a consequence, a fuel to coolant thermal interaction occurs between the melt and the sodium. A series of simulating experiments was carried out in KfK/IRS to improve the knowledge about the phenomenology of molten fuel/coolant interactions and to support theoretical work on the safety of fast breeder reactors. In the tests, a thermite melt of up to 3270 K is injected from below into a sodium pool the temperature of which is between 770 and 820 K. The masses of the melt and the sodium are about five and 150 kg, respectively. Thermal interactions have been observed to occur as a sequence of small local pressure events mainly during the melt injection. Large-scale vapour explosions have not been observed. Generally, the conversion ratios of thermal to mechanical energy have been low. (author)

  9. Enhanced Core Noise Modeling for Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, James R.; Krejsa, Eugene A.; Clark, Bruce J.

    2011-01-01

    This report describes work performed by MTC Technologies (MTCT) for NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) under Contract NAS3-00178, Task Order No. 15. MTCT previously developed a first-generation empirical model that correlates the core/combustion noise of four GE engines, the CF6, CF34, CFM56, and GE90 for General Electric (GE) under Contract No. 200-1X-14W53048, in support of GRC Contract NAS3-01135. MTCT has demonstrated in earlier noise modeling efforts that the improvement of predictive modeling is greatly enhanced by an iterative approach, so in support of NASA's Quiet Aircraft Technology Project, GRC sponsored this effort to improve the model. Since the noise data available for correlation are total engine noise spectra, it is total engine noise that must be predicted. Since the scope of this effort was not sufficient to explore fan and turbine noise, the most meaningful comparisons must be restricted to frequencies below the blade passage frequency. Below the blade passage frequency and at relatively high power settings jet noise is expected to be the dominant source, and comparisons are shown that demonstrate the accuracy of the jet noise model recently developed by MTCT for NASA under Contract NAS3-00178, Task Order No. 10. At lower power settings the core noise became most apparent, and these data corrected for the contribution of jet noise were then used to establish the characteristics of core noise. There is clearly more than one spectral range where core noise is evident, so the spectral approach developed by von Glahn and Krejsa in 1982 wherein four spectral regions overlap, was used in the GE effort. Further analysis indicates that the two higher frequency components, which are often somewhat masked by turbomachinery noise, can be treated as one component, and it is on that basis that the current model is formulated. The frequency scaling relationships are improved and are now based on combustor and core nozzle geometries. In conjunction with the Task

  10. Annual layering in the NGRIP ice core during the Eemian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Svensson

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The Greenland NGRIP ice core continuously covers the period from present day back to 123 ka before present, which includes several thousand years of ice from the previous interglacial period, MIS 5e or the Eemian. In the glacial part of the core, annual layers can be identified from impurity records and visual stratigraphy, and stratigraphic layer counting has been performed back to 60 ka. In the deepest part of the core, however, the ice is close to the pressure melting point, the visual stratigraphy is dominated by crystal boundaries, and annual layering is not visible to the naked eye. In this study, we apply a newly developed setup for high-resolution ice core impurity analysis to produce continuous records of dust, sodium and ammonium concentrations as well as conductivity of melt water. We analyzed three 2.2 m sections of ice from the Eemian and the glacial inception. In all of the analyzed ice, annual layers can clearly be recognized, most prominently in the dust and conductivity profiles. Part of the samples is, however, contaminated in dust, most likely from drill liquid. It is interesting that the annual layering is preserved despite a very active crystal growth and grain boundary migration in the deep and warm NGRIP ice. Based on annual layer counting of the new records, we determine a mean annual layer thickness close to 11 mm for all three sections, which, to first order, confirms the modeled NGRIP time scale (ss09sea. The counting does, however, suggest a longer duration of the climatically warmest part of the NGRIP record (MIS5e of up to 1 ka as compared to the model estimate. Our results suggest that stratigraphic layer counting is possible basically throughout the entire NGRIP ice core, provided sufficiently highly-resolved profiles become available.

  11. Model of fracture of metal melts and the strength of melts under dynamic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, P. N.; Mayer, A. E.

    2015-01-01

    The development of a continuum model of deformation and fracture of melts is needed for the description of the behavior of metals in extreme states, in particular, under high-current electron and ultrashort laser irradiation. The model proposed includes the equations of mechanics of a two-phase continuum and the equations of the kinetics of phase transitions. The change (exchange) of the volumes of dispersed and carrier phases and of the number of dispersed particles is described, and the energy and mass exchange between the phases due to phase transitions is taken into account. Molecular dynamic (MD) calculations are carried out with the use of the LAMMPS program. The continuum model is verified by MD, computational, and experimental data. The strength of aluminum, copper, and nickel is determined at various temperatures and strain rates. It is shown that an increase in the strain rate leads to an increase in the strength of a liquid metal, while an increase in temperature leads to a decrease in its strength

  12. Model of fracture of metal melts and the strength of melts under dynamic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, P. N., E-mail: polina.nik@mail.ru; Mayer, A. E., E-mail: mayer@csu.ru [Chelyabinsk State University (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-15

    The development of a continuum model of deformation and fracture of melts is needed for the description of the behavior of metals in extreme states, in particular, under high-current electron and ultrashort laser irradiation. The model proposed includes the equations of mechanics of a two-phase continuum and the equations of the kinetics of phase transitions. The change (exchange) of the volumes of dispersed and carrier phases and of the number of dispersed particles is described, and the energy and mass exchange between the phases due to phase transitions is taken into account. Molecular dynamic (MD) calculations are carried out with the use of the LAMMPS program. The continuum model is verified by MD, computational, and experimental data. The strength of aluminum, copper, and nickel is determined at various temperatures and strain rates. It is shown that an increase in the strain rate leads to an increase in the strength of a liquid metal, while an increase in temperature leads to a decrease in its strength.

  13. Studies on melt-water-structure interaction during severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sehgal, B.R.; Dinh, T.N.; Okkonen, T.J.; Bui, V.A.; Nourgaliev, R.R.; Andersson, J.

    1996-10-01

    Results of a series of studies, on melt-water-structure interactions which occur during the progression of a core melt-down accident, are described. The emphasis is on the in-vessel interactions and the studies are both experimental and analytical. Since, the studies performed resulted in papers published in proceedings of the technical meetings, and in journals, copies of a set of selected papers are attached to provide details. A summary of the results obtained is provided for the reader who does not, or cannot, venture into the perusal of the attached papers. (au)

  14. Studies on melt-water-structure interaction during severe accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sehgal, B.R.; Dinh, T.N.; Okkonen, T.J.; Bui, V.A.; Nourgaliev, R.R.; Andersson, J. [Royal Inst. of Technology, Div. of Nucl. Power Safety, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1996-10-01

    Results of a series of studies, on melt-water-structure interactions which occur during the progression of a core melt-down accident, are described. The emphasis is on the in-vessel interactions and the studies are both experimental and analytical. Since, the studies performed resulted in papers published in proceedings of the technical meetings, and in journals, copies of a set of selected papers are attached to provide details. A summary of the results obtained is provided for the reader who does not, or cannot, venture into the perusal of the attached papers. (au).

  15. Theoretical investigations on the fragmentation of drops of melt with respect to the description of thermal detonations (vapor explosions) and their application in the code Frademo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burger, M.; Carachalios, C.; Kim, D.S.; Unger, H.

    1986-01-01

    Vapor explosions caused by the contact of molten core material with coolant are an important issue within reactor safety analysis, because they could produce an early threat to the containment during a core melt accident. The case of steady-state propagation of a detonation wave through a coarse premixture of melt and coolant represents the most severe case of a large scale vapor explosion under reactor conditions with the highest rate and largest heat release and therefore also the highest yield of mechanical energy. The present contribution starts with the description of the integral model of the detonation wave. The fragmentation processes, which are decisive for these exchange terms and the detonation process as a whole, are dealt with also. Hydrodynamic fragmentation processes as well as a thermally induced one are considered. The processes which take place inside a detonation wave, especially the fragmentation of the drops of melt and the velocity equilibration between the melt and the coolant, determine the behavior of the wave. In the present model these processes are described within a three-phase approach, considering the drops of melt, the fragments and the coolant as separate flow phases. In the frame of this work, the computer code FRADEMO has been developed. It consists of an overall description of the processes inside a steady-state detonation wave in combination with a full description of the detailed models on hydrodynamic and thermal fragmentation presented in this report. Some useful information for the potential code user is given in the appendix of the detailed report also

  16. Penetration of molten core materials into basaltic and limestone concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutherland, H.J.

    1978-01-01

    In conjunction with the small-scale, melt-concrete interaction tests being conducted at Sandia Laboratories, an acoustic technique has been used to monitor the penetration of molten core materials into basaltic and limestone concrete. Real time plots of the position of the melt/concrete interface have been obtained, and they illustrate that the initial penetration rate of the melt may be of the order of 80 mm/min. Phenomena deduced by the technique include a non-wetted melt/concrete interface

  17. Level-Ice Melt Ponds in the Los Alamos Sea Ice Model, CICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-06

    terms obtained using the Bitz and Lips- comb (1999) thermodynamic model. The thickness distribution ( Thorndike et al., 1975) employs 5 ice thickness...D.L., 2004. A model of melt pond evolution on sea ice. J. Geophys. Res. 109, C12007. http://dx.doi.org/10.1029/2004JC002361. Thorndike , A.S., Rothrock

  18. The WECHSL-Mod2 code: A computer program for the interaction of a core melt with concrete including the long term behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reimann, M.; Stiefel, S.

    1989-06-01

    The WECHSL-Mod2 code is a mechanistic computer code developed for the analysis of the thermal and chemical interaction of initially molten LWR reactor materials with concrete in a two-dimensional, axisymmetrical concrete cavity. The code performs calculations from the time of initial contact of a hot molten pool over start of solidification processes until long term basemat erosion over several days with the possibility of basemat penetration. The code assumes that the metallic phases of the melt pool form a layer at the bottom overlayed by the oxide melt atop. Heat generation in the melt is by decay heat and chemical reactions from metal oxidation. Energy is lost to the melting concrete and to the upper containment by radiation or evaporation of sumpwater possibly flooding the surface of the melt. Thermodynamic and transport properties as well as criteria for heat transfer and solidification processes are internally calculated for each time step. Heat transfer is modelled taking into account the high gas flux from the decomposing concrete and the heat conduction in the crusts possibly forming in the long term at the melt/concrete interface. The WECHSL code in its present version was validated by the BETA experiments. The test samples include a typical BETA post test calculation and a WECHSL application to a reactor accident. (orig.) [de

  19. Analysis and modeling of flow blockage-induced steam explosion events in the High-Flux Isotope Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Georgevich, V.; Lestor, C.W.; Gat, U.; Lepard, B.L.; Cook, D.H.; Freels, J.; Chang, S.J.; Luttrell, C.; Gwaltney, R.C.; Kirkpatrick, J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper provides a perspective overview of the analysis and modeling work done to evaluate the threat from steam explosion loads in the High-Flux Isotope Reactor during flow blockage events. The overall workscope included modeling and analysis of core melt initiation, melt propagation, bounding and best-estimate steam explosion energetics, vessel failure from fracture, bolts failure from exceedance of elastic limits, and finally, missile evolution and transport. Aluminum ignition was neglected. Evaluations indicated that a thermally driven steam explosion with more than 65 MJ of energy insertion in the core region over several miliseconds would be needed to cause a sufficiently energetic missile with a capacity to cause early confinement failure. This amounts to about 65% of the HFIR core mass melting and participating in a steam explosion. Conservative melt propagation analyses have indicated that at most only 24% of the HFIR core mass could melt during flow blockage events under full-power conditions. Therefore, it is judged that the HFIR vessel and top head structure will be able to withstand loads generated from thermally driven steam explosions initiated by any credible flow blockage event. A substantial margin to safety was demonstrated

  20. Fe-based nanocrystalline powder cores with ultra-low core loss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiangyue, E-mail: wangxiangyue1986@163.com [China Iron and Steel Research Institute Group, Beijing 100081 (China); Center of Advanced Technology and Materials Co., Ltd., Beijing 100081 (China); Lu, Zhichao; Lu, Caowei; Li, Deren [China Iron and Steel Research Institute Group, Beijing 100081 (China); Center of Advanced Technology and Materials Co., Ltd., Beijing 100081 (China)

    2013-12-15

    Melt-spun amorphous Fe{sub 73.5}Cu{sub 1}Nb{sub 3}Si{sub 15.5}B{sub 7} alloy strip was crushed to make flake-shaped fine powders. The passivated powders by phosphoric acid were mixed with organic and inorganic binder, followed by cold compaction to form toroid-shaped bonded powder-metallurgical magnets. The powder cores were heat-treated to crystallize the amorphous structure and to control the nano-grain structure. Well-coated phosphate-oxide insulation layer on the powder surface decreased the the core loss with the insulation of each powder. FeCuNbSiB nanocrystalline alloy powder core prepared from the powder having phosphate-oxide layer exhibits a stable permeability up to high frequency range over 2 MHz. Especially, the core loss could be reduced remarkably. At the other hand, the softened inorganic binder in the annealing process could effectively improve the intensity of powder cores. - Highlights: • Fe-based nanocrystalline powder cores were prepared with low core loss. • Well-coated phosphate-oxide insulation layer on the powder surface decreased the core loss. • Fe-based nanocrystalline powder cores exhibited a stable permeability up to high frequency range over 2 MHz. • The softened inorganic binder in the annealing process could effectively improve the intensity of powder cores.

  1. Thermal hydraulic model validation for HOR mixed core fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibcus, H.P.M.; Vries, J.W. de; Leege, P.F.A. de

    1997-01-01

    A thermal-hydraulic core management model has been developed for the Hoger Onderwijsreactor (HOR), a 2 MW pool-type university research reactor. The model was adopted for safety analysis purposes in the framework of HEU/LEU core conversion studies. It is applied in the thermal-hydraulic computer code SHORT (Steady-state HOR Thermal-hydraulics) which is presently in use in designing core configurations and for in-core fuel management. An elaborate measurement program was performed for establishing the core hydraulic characteristics for a variety of conditions. The hydraulic data were obtained with a dummy fuel element with special equipment allowing a.o. direct measurement of the true core flow rate. Using these data the thermal-hydraulic model was validated experimentally. The model, experimental tests, and model validation are discussed. (author)

  2. Continuous greenhouse gas measurements from ice cores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stowasser, Christopher

    Ice cores offer the unique possibility to study the history of past atmospheric greenhouse gases over the last 800,000 years, since past atmospheric air is trapped in bubbles in the ice. Since the 1950s, paleo-scientists have developed a variety of techniques to extract the trapped air from...... individual ice core samples, and to measure the mixing ratio of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide in the extracted air. The discrete measurements have become highly accurate and reproducible, but require relatively large amounts of ice per measured species and are both time......-consuming and labor-intensive. This PhD thesis presents the development of a new method for measurements of greenhouse gas mixing ratios from ice cores based on a melting device of a continuous flow analysis (CFA) system. The coupling to a CFA melting device enables time-efficient measurements of high resolution...

  3. Overturn of magma ocean ilmenite cumulate layer: Implications for lunar magmatic evolution and formation of a lunar core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, P. C.; Parmentier, E. M.

    1993-01-01

    We explore a model for the chemical evolution of the lunar interior that explains the origin and evolution of lunar magmatism and possibly the existence of a lunar core. A magma ocean formed during accretion differentiates into the anorthositic crust and chemically stratified cumulate mantle. The cumulative mantle is gravitationally unstable with dense ilmenite cumulate layers overlying olivine-orthopyroxene cumulates with Fe/Mg that decreases with depth. The dense ilmenite layer sinks to the center of the moon forming the core. The remainder of the gravitationally unstable cumulate pile also overturns. Any remaining primitive lunar mantle rises to its level of neutral buoyancy in the cumulate pile. Perhaps melting of primitive lunar mantle due to this decompression results in early lunar Mg-rich magmatism. Because of its high concentration of incompatible heat producing elements, the ilmenite core heats the overlying orthopyroxene-bearing cumulates. As a conductively thickening thermal boundary layer becomes unstable, the resulting mantle plumes rise, decompress, and partially melt to generate the mare basalts. This model explains both the timing and chemical characteristics of lunar magmatism.

  4. Core seismic behaviour: linear and non-linear models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, M.; Van Dorsselaere, M.; Gauvain, M.; Jenapierre-Gantenbein, M.

    1981-08-01

    The usual methodology for the core seismic behaviour analysis leads to a double complementary approach: to define a core model to be included in the reactor-block seismic response analysis, simple enough but representative of basic movements (diagrid or slab), to define a finer core model, with basic data issued from the first model. This paper presents the history of the different models of both kinds. The inert mass model (IMM) yielded a first rough diagrid movement. The direct linear model (DLM), without shocks and with sodium as an added mass, let to two different ones: DLM 1 with independent movements of the fuel and radial blanket subassemblies, and DLM 2 with a core combined movement. The non-linear (NLM) ''CORALIE'' uses the same basic modelization (Finite Element Beams) but accounts for shocks. It studies the response of a diameter on flats and takes into account the fluid coupling and the wrapper tube flexibility at the pad level. Damping consists of one modal part of 2% and one part due to shocks. Finally, ''CORALIE'' yields the time-history of the displacements and efforts on the supports, but damping (probably greater than 2%) and fluid-structures interaction are still to be precised. The validation experiments were performed on a RAPSODIE core mock-up on scale 1, in similitude of 1/3 as to SPX 1. The equivalent linear model (ELM) was developed for the SPX 1 reactor-block response analysis and a specified seismic level (SB or SM). It is composed of several oscillators fixed to the diagrid and yields the same maximum displacements and efforts than the NLM. The SPX 1 core seismic analysis with a diagrid input spectrum which corresponds to a 0,1 g group acceleration, has been carried out with these models: some aspects of these calculations are presented here

  5. The Microwave Properties of Simulated Melting Precipitation Particles: Sensitivity to Initial Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, B. T.; Olson, W. S.; Skofronick-Jackson, G.

    2016-01-01

    A simplified approach is presented for assessing the microwave response to the initial melting of realistically shaped ice particles. This paper is divided into two parts: (1) a description of the Single Particle Melting Model (SPMM), a heuristic melting simulation for ice-phase precipitation particles of any shape or size (SPMM is applied to two simulated aggregate snow particles, simulating melting up to 0.15 melt fraction by mass), and (2) the computation of the single-particle microwave scattering and extinction properties of these hydrometeors, using the discrete dipole approximation (via DDSCAT), at the following selected frequencies: 13.4, 35.6, and 94.0GHz for radar applications and 89, 165.0, and 183.31GHz for radiometer applications. These selected frequencies are consistent with current microwave remote-sensing platforms, such as CloudSat and the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission. Comparisons with calculations using variable-density spheres indicate significant deviations in scattering and extinction properties throughout the initial range of melting (liquid volume fractions less than 0.15). Integration of the single-particle properties over an exponential particle size distribution provides additional insight into idealized radar reflectivity and passive microwave brightness temperature sensitivity to variations in size/mass, shape, melt fraction, and particle orientation.

  6. Nonlinear Dynamic Model of PMBLDC Motor Considering Core Losses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fasil, Muhammed; Mijatovic, Nenad; Jensen, Bogi Bech

    2017-01-01

    The phase variable model is used commonly when simulating a motor drive system with a three-phase permanent magnet brushless DC (PMBLDC) motor. The phase variable model neglects core losses and this affects its accuracy when modelling fractional-slot machines. The inaccuracy of phase variable mod...... on the detailed analysis of the flux path and the variation of flux in different components of the machine. A prototype of fractional slot axial flux PMBLDC in-wheel motor is used to assess the proposed nonlinear dynamic model....... of fractional-slot machines can be attributed to considerable armature flux harmonics, which causes an increased core loss. This study proposes a nonlinear phase variable model of PMBLDC motor that considers the core losses induced in the stator and the rotor. The core loss model is developed based...

  7. CORCON: a computer program for modelling molten fuel/concrete interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muir, J.F.

    1980-01-01

    A computer program modelling the interaction between molten core materials and structural concrete is being developed to provide a capability for making quantitative estimates of reactor fuel-melt accidents. The principal phenomenological models, inter-component heat transfer, concrete erosion, and melt/gas chemical reactions, are described. A code test comparison calculation is discussed

  8. Finite element modeling of melting and fluid flow in the laser-heated diamond-anvil cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Perez, N.; Rodriguez, J. F.; McWilliams, R. S.

    2017-04-01

    The laser-heated diamond anvil cell is widely used in the laboratory study of materials behavior at high-pressure and high-temperature, including melting curves and liquid properties at extreme conditions. Laser heating in the diamond cell has long been associated with fluid-like motion in samples, which is routinely used to determine melting points and is often described as convective in appearance. However, the flow behavior of this system is poorly understood. A quantitative treatment of melting and flow in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell is developed here to physically relate experimental motion to properties of interest, including melting points and viscosity. Numerical finite-element models are used to characterize the temperature distribution, melting, buoyancy, and resulting natural convection in samples. We find that continuous fluid motion in experiments can be explained most readily by natural convection. Fluid velocities, peaking near values of microns per second for plausible viscosities, are sufficiently fast to be detected experimentally, lending support to the use of convective motion as a criterion for melting. Convection depends on the physical properties of the melt and the sample geometry and is too sluggish to detect for viscosities significantly above that of water at ambient conditions, implying an upper bound on the melt viscosity of about 1 mPa s when convective motion is detected. A simple analytical relationship between melt viscosity and velocity suggests that direct viscosity measurements can be made from flow speeds, given the basic thermodynamic and geometric parameters of samples are known.

  9. Modeling radar backscattering from melting snowflakes using spheroids with nonuniform distribution of water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyynelä, Jani; Leinonen, Jussi; Moisseev, Dmitri; Nousiainen, Timo; Lerber, Annakaisa von

    2014-01-01

    In a number of studies it is reported that at the early stages, melting of aggregate snowflakes is enhanced at lower parts. In this paper, the manifestation of the resulting nonuniform distribution of water is studied for radar backscattering cross sections at C, Ku, Ka and W bands. The melting particles are described as spheroids with a mixture of water and air at the bottom part of the particle and a mixture of ice and air at the upper part. The radar backscattering is modeled using the discrete-dipole approximation in a horizontally pointing geometry. The results are compared to the T-matrix method, Mie theory, and the Rayleigh approximation using the Maxwell Garnett mixing formula. We find that the differential reflectivity and the linear depolarization ratio show systematic differences between the discrete-dipole approximation and the T-matrix method, but that the differences are relatively small. The horizontal cross sections show only small differences between the methods with the aspect ratio and the presence of resonance peaks having a larger effect on it than the nonuniform distribution of water. Overall, the effect of anisotropic distribution of water, reported for early stages of melting, is not significant for radar observations at the studied frequencies. -- Highlights: • We model backscattering from spheroidal melting snowflakes at C, Ku, Ka, and W bands. • We study the effect of anisotropic distribution of meltwater in the snow particles. • We find systematic, but relatively small differences for the backscattering properties. • We find that the aspect ratio and resonance peaks have a bigger effect than anisotropic distribution of water. • Anisotropic distribution of water is not significant for radar observations at early stages of melting

  10. Effect Of Turbulence Modelling In Numerical Analysis Of Melting Process In An Induction Furnace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buliński P.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the velocity field and turbulence effects that occur inside a crucible of a typical induction furnace were investigated. In the first part of this work, a free surface shape of the liquid metal was measured in a ceramic crucible. Then a numerical model of aluminium melting process was developed. It took into account coupling of electromagnetic and thermofluid fields that was performed using commercial codes. In the next step, the sensitivity analysis of turbulence modelling in the liquid domain was performed. The obtained numerical results were compared with the measurement data. The performed analysis can be treated as a preliminary approach for more complex mathematical modelling for the melting process optimisation in crucible induction furnaces of different types.

  11. The melting and solidification of nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florio, B. J.; Myers, T. G.

    2016-01-01

    A mathematical model is developed to describe the melting of nanowires. The first section of the paper deals with a standard theoretical situation, where the wire melts due to a fixed boundary temperature. This analysis allows us to compare with existing results for the phase change of nanospheres. The equivalent solidification problem is also examined. This shows that solidification is a faster process than melting; this is because the energy transfer occurs primarily through the solid rather than the liquid which is a poorer conductor of heat. This effect competes with the energy required to create new solid surface which acts to slow down the process, but overall conduction dominates. In the second section, we consider a more physically realistic boundary condition, where the phase change occurs due to a heat flux from surrounding material. This removes the singularity in initial melt velocity predicted in previous models of nanoparticle melting. It is shown that even with the highest possible flux the melting time is significantly slower than with a fixed boundary temperature condition.

  12. The melting and solidification of nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florio, B. J.; Myers, T. G.

    2016-06-01

    A mathematical model is developed to describe the melting of nanowires. The first section of the paper deals with a standard theoretical situation, where the wire melts due to a fixed boundary temperature. This analysis allows us to compare with existing results for the phase change of nanospheres. The equivalent solidification problem is also examined. This shows that solidification is a faster process than melting; this is because the energy transfer occurs primarily through the solid rather than the liquid which is a poorer conductor of heat. This effect competes with the energy required to create new solid surface which acts to slow down the process, but overall conduction dominates. In the second section, we consider a more physically realistic boundary condition, where the phase change occurs due to a heat flux from surrounding material. This removes the singularity in initial melt velocity predicted in previous models of nanoparticle melting. It is shown that even with the highest possible flux the melting time is significantly slower than with a fixed boundary temperature condition.

  13. The melting and solidification of nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Florio, B. J., E-mail: brendan.florio@ul.ie [University of Limerick, Mathematics Applications Consortium for Science and Industry (MACSI), Department of Mathematics and Statistics (Ireland); Myers, T. G., E-mail: tmyers@crm.cat [Centre de Recerca Matemàtica (Spain)

    2016-06-15

    A mathematical model is developed to describe the melting of nanowires. The first section of the paper deals with a standard theoretical situation, where the wire melts due to a fixed boundary temperature. This analysis allows us to compare with existing results for the phase change of nanospheres. The equivalent solidification problem is also examined. This shows that solidification is a faster process than melting; this is because the energy transfer occurs primarily through the solid rather than the liquid which is a poorer conductor of heat. This effect competes with the energy required to create new solid surface which acts to slow down the process, but overall conduction dominates. In the second section, we consider a more physically realistic boundary condition, where the phase change occurs due to a heat flux from surrounding material. This removes the singularity in initial melt velocity predicted in previous models of nanoparticle melting. It is shown that even with the highest possible flux the melting time is significantly slower than with a fixed boundary temperature condition.

  14. A phenomenological analysis of melt progression in the lower head of a pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seiler, J.M., E-mail: jean-marie.seiler@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DTN, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Tourniaire, B. [EDF/Septen, Lyon (France)

    2014-03-15

    Highlights: • We propose a phenomenological description of melt progression into the lower head. • We examine changes in heat loads on the vessel. • Heat loads are more severe than emphasized by the bounding situation assumption. • Both primary circuit and ex-vessel reflooding are necessary for in-vessel retention. • Vessel failure conditions are examined. - Abstract: The analysis of in-vessel corium cooling (IVC) and retention (IVR) involves the description of very complex and transient physical phenomena. To get round this difficulty, “bounding” situations are often emphasized for the demonstration of corium coolability, by vessel flooding and/or by reactor pit flooding. This approach however comes up against its own limitations. More realistic melt progression scenarios are required to provide plausible corium configurations and vessel failure conditions. Work to develop more realistic melt progression scenarios has been done at CEA, in collaboration with EDF. Development has concentrated on the French 1300 MWe PWR, considering both dry scenarios and the possibility of flooding of the RPC (reactor primary circuit) and/or the reactor pit. The models used for this approach have been derived from the analysis of the TMI2 accident and take benefit from the lessons derived from several programs related to pool thermal hydraulics (BALI, COPO, ACOPO, etc.), material interactions (RASPLAV, MASCA), critical heat flux (CHF) on the external surface of the vessel (KAIST, SULTAN, ULPU), etc. Important conclusions of this work are as follows: (a)After the start of corium melting and onset of melt formation in the core at low pressure (∼1 to 5 bars), it seems questionable that RPV (reactor pressure vessel) reflooding alone would be sufficient to achieve corium retention in the vessel; (b)If the vessel is not cooled externally, it may fail due to local heat-up before the whole core fuel inventory is relocated in the lower head; (c)Even if the vessel is

  15. Modelling the geometry of a moving laser melt pool and deposition track via energy and mass balances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinkerton, Andrew J; Li Lin [Laser Processing Research Centre, Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology, PO Box 88, Sackville Street, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-21

    The additive manufacturing technique of laser direct metal deposition allows multiple tracks of full density metallic material to be built to form complex parts for rapid tooling and manufacture. Practical results and theoretical models have shown that the geometries of the tracks are governed by multiple factors. Original work with single layer cladding identified three basic clad profiles but, so far, models of multiple layer, powder-feed deposition have been based on only two of them. At higher powder mass flow rates, experimental results have shown that a layer's width can become greater than the melt pool width at the substrate surface, but previous analytical models have not been able to accommodate this. In this paper, a model based on this third profile is established and experimentally verified. The model concentrates on mathematical analysis of the melt pool and establishes mass and energy balances based on one-dimensional heat conduction to the substrate. Deposition track limits are considered as arcs of circles rather than of ellipses, as used in most established models, reflecting the dominance of surface tension forces in the melt pool, and expressions for elongation of the melt pool with increasing traverse speed are incorporated. Trends in layer width and height with major process parameters are captured and predicted layer dimensions correspond well to the experimental values.

  16. Testing the HTA core model: experiences from two pilot projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pasternack, Iris; Anttila, Heidi; Mäkelä, Marjukka

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to analyze and describe process and outcomes of two pilot assessments based on the HTA Core Model, discuss the applicability of the model, and explore areas of development. METHODS: Data were gathered from HTA Core Model and pilot Core HTA documents, their va...

  17. Modelling present-day basal melt rates for Antarctic ice shelves using a parametrization of buoyant meltwater plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazeroms, Werner M. J.; Jenkins, Adrian; Hilmar Gudmundsson, G.; van de Wal, Roderik S. W.

    2018-01-01

    Basal melting below ice shelves is a major factor in mass loss from the Antarctic Ice Sheet, which can contribute significantly to possible future sea-level rise. Therefore, it is important to have an adequate description of the basal melt rates for use in ice-dynamical models. Most current ice models use rather simple parametrizations based on the local balance of heat between ice and ocean. In this work, however, we use a recently derived parametrization of the melt rates based on a buoyant meltwater plume travelling upward beneath an ice shelf. This plume parametrization combines a non-linear ocean temperature sensitivity with an inherent geometry dependence, which is mainly described by the grounding-line depth and the local slope of the ice-shelf base. For the first time, this type of parametrization is evaluated on a two-dimensional grid covering the entire Antarctic continent. In order to apply the essentially one-dimensional parametrization to realistic ice-shelf geometries, we present an algorithm that determines effective values for the grounding-line depth and basal slope in any point beneath an ice shelf. Furthermore, since detailed knowledge of temperatures and circulation patterns in the ice-shelf cavities is sparse or absent, we construct an effective ocean temperature field from observational data with the purpose of matching (area-averaged) melt rates from the model with observed present-day melt rates. Our results qualitatively replicate large-scale observed features in basal melt rates around Antarctica, not only in terms of average values, but also in terms of the spatial pattern, with high melt rates typically occurring near the grounding line. The plume parametrization and the effective temperature field presented here are therefore promising tools for future simulations of the Antarctic Ice Sheet requiring a more realistic oceanic forcing.

  18. STEADY STATE MODELING OF THE MINIMUM CRITICAL CORE OF THE TRANSIENT REACTOR TEST FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthony L. Alberti; Todd S. Palmer; Javier Ortensi; Mark D. DeHart

    2016-05-01

    With the advent of next generation reactor systems and new fuel designs, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has identified the need for the resumption of transient testing of nuclear fuels. The DOE has decided that the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is best suited for future testing. TREAT is a thermal neutron spectrum, air-cooled, nuclear test facility that is designed to test nuclear fuels in transient scenarios. These specific scenarios range from simple temperature transients to full fuel melt accidents. DOE has expressed a desire to develop a simulation capability that will accurately model the experiments before they are irradiated at the facility. It is the aim for this capability to have an emphasis on effective and safe operation while minimizing experimental time and cost. The multi physics platform MOOSE has been selected as the framework for this project. The goals for this work are to identify the fundamental neutronics properties of TREAT and to develop an accurate steady state model for future multiphysics transient simulations. In order to minimize computational cost, the effect of spatial homogenization and angular discretization are investigated. It was found that significant anisotropy is present in TREAT assemblies and to capture this effect, explicit modeling of cooling channels and inter-element gaps is necessary. For this modeling scheme, single element calculations at 293 K gave power distributions with a root mean square difference of 0.076% from those of reference SERPENT calculations. The minimum critical core configuration with identical gap and channel treatment at 293 K resulted in a root mean square, total core, radial power distribution 2.423% different than those of reference SERPENT solutions.

  19. Gas Atomization of Aluminium Melts: Comparison of Analytical Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios Antipas

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A number of analytical models predicting the size distribution of particles during atomization of Al-based alloys by N2, He and Ar gases were compared. Simulations of liquid break up in a close coupled atomizer revealed that the finer particles are located near the center of the spray cone. Increasing gas injection pressures led to an overall reduction of particle diameters and caused a migration of the larger powder particles towards the outer boundary of the flow. At sufficiently high gas pressures the spray became monodisperse. The models also indicated that there is a minimum achievable mean diameter for any melt/gas system.

  20. Using an Ablation Gradient Model to Characterize Annual Glacial Melt Contribution to Major Rivers in High Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodzik, M. J.; Armstrong, R. L.; Khalsa, S. J. S.; Painter, T. H.; Racoviteanu, A.; Rittger, K.

    2014-12-01

    Ice melt from mountain glaciers can represent a significant contribution to freshwater hydrological budgets, along with seasonal snow melt, rainfall and groundwater. In the rivers of High Asia, understanding the proportion of glacier ice melt is critical for water resource management of irrigation and planning for hydropower generation and human consumption. Current climate conditions are producing heterogeneous glacier responses across the Hindu Kush-Karakoram-Himalayan ranges. However, it is not yet clear how contrasting glacier patterns affect regional water resources. For example, in the Upper Indus basin, estimates of glacial contribution to runoff are often not distinguished from seasonal snow contribution, and vary widely, from as little as 15% to as much as 55%. While many studies are based on reasonable concepts, most are based on assumptions uninformed by actual snow or ice cover measurements. While straightforward temperature index models have been used to estimate glacier runoff in some Himalayan basins, application of these models in larger Himalayan basins is limited by difficulties in estimating key model parameters, particularly air temperature. Estimating glacial area from the MODIS Permanent Snow and Ice Extent (MODICE) product for the years 2000-2013, with recently released Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTMGL3) elevation data, we use a simple ablation gradient approach to calculate an upper limit on the contribution of clean glacier ice melt to streamflow data. We present model results for the five major rivers with glaciated headwaters in High Asia: the Bramaputra, Ganges, Indus, Amu Darya and Syr Darya. Using GRDC historical discharge records, we characterize the annual contribution from glacier ice melt. We use MODICE interannual trends in each basin to estimate glacier ice melt uncertainties. Our results are being used in the USAID project, Contribution to High Asia Runoff from Ice and Snow (CHARIS), to inform regional-scale planning for

  1. Considerations in modelling the melting of fuel containing fission products and solute oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akbari, F.; Welland, M.J.; Lewis, B.J.; Thompson, W.T.

    2005-01-01

    It is well known that the oxidation of a defected fuel element by steam gives rise to an increase in O/U ratio with a consequent lowering of the incipient melting temperature. Concurrently, the hyperstoichiometry reduces the thermal conductivity thereby raising the centerline fuel pellet temperature for a fixed linear power. The development of fission products soluble in the UO 2 phase or, more important, the deliberate introduction of additive oxides in advanced CANDU fuel bundle designs further affects and generally lowers the incipient melting temperature. For these reasons, the modeling of the molten (hyperstoichiometric) UO 2 phase containing several solute oxides (ZrO 2 , Ln 2 O 3 and AnO 2 ) is advancing in the expectation of developing a moving boundary heat and mass transfer model aimed at better defining the limits of safe operating practice as burnup advances. The paper describes how the molten phase stability model is constructed. The redistribution of components across the solid-liquid interface that attends the onset of melting of a non-stoichiometric UO 2 containing several solutes will be discussed. The issues of how to introduce boundary conditions into heat transfer calculations consistent with the requirements of the Phase Rule will be addressed. The Stefan problem of a moving boundary associated with the solid/liquid interface sets this treatment apart from conventional heat and mass transfer problems. (author)

  2. Proceedings of the Workshop on in-vessel core debris retention and coolability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    This conference on in-vessel core debris retention and coolability is composed of 37 papers grouped in three sessions: session 1 (Keynote papers: Key phenomena of late phase core melt progression, accident management strategies and status quo of severe fuel damage codes, In-vessel retention as a severe accident management scheme, GAREC analyses in support of in-vessel retention concept, Latest findings of RASPLAV project); session 2 - Experiments and model development with five sub-sessions: sub-session 1 (Debris bed heat transfer: Debris and Pool Formation/Heat Transfer in FARO-LWR: Experiments and Analyses, Evaporation and Flow of Coolant at the Bottom of a Particle-Bed modelling Relocated Debris, Investigations on the Coolability of Debris in the Lower Head with WABE-2D and MESOCO-2D, Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analysis of the Heat Transfer Mechanisms in the Lower Head, Simulation of the Arrival and Evolution of Debris in a PWR Lower Head with the SFD ICARE2 code), sub-session 2 (Corium properties, molten pool natural convection, and crust formation: Physico-chemistry and corium properties for in-vessel retention, Experimental data on heat flux distribution from volumetrically heated pool with frozen boundaries, Thermal hydraulic phenomena in corium pools - numerical simulation with TOLBIAC and experimental validation with BALI, TOLBIAC code simulations of some molten salt RASPLAV experiments, SIMECO experiments on in-vessel melt pool formation and heat transfer with and without a metallic layer, Numerical investigation of turbulent natural convection heat transfer in an internally-heated melt pool and metallic layer, Current status and validation of CON2D and 3D code, Free convection of heat-generating fluid in a constrained during experimental simulation of heat transfer in slice geometry), sub-session 3 (Gap formation and gap cooling: Quench of molten aluminum oxide associated with in-vessel debris retention by RPV internal water, Experimental investigations

  3. Study of melting of molecular crystals by a modified Pople-Karasz model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazıcı, Mustafa; Özgan, Şükrü; Keskin, Mustafa

    2005-02-01

    A new modified model that combines the modified models of Chandrasekhar et al. with those of Keskin and Özgan, which are based on the Pople-Karasz theory, is applied to study the thermodynamics of melting and solid-solid transitions of molecular crystals. The thermodynamic properties of the disordered system are evaluated relative to those of the perfectly ordered one using the lowest approximation of the cluster-variation method, which is identical to the mean-field approximation. A good agreement is found between the present modified theory and the available experimental data. For melting transitions the agreement is excellent and much better than with the calculations of the Pople-Karasz theory and its previous modified theories. Approximate agreement is obtained for the solid-solid transitions. However, for these transition the experimental agreement with the present modified theory is still better than previous modified theories except at zero and low pressures.

  4. Modelling perspectives on radiation chemistry in BWR reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibe, Eishi

    1991-01-01

    Development of a full-system boiling water reactor core model started in 1982. The model included a two-region reactor core, one with and one without boiling. Key design parameters consider variable dose rates in a three-layer liquid downcomer. Dose rates in the core and downcomer include both generation and recombination reactions of species. Agreement is good between calculations and experimental data of oxygen concentration as a function of hydrogen concentration for different bubble sizes. Oxygen concentration is reduced in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) by increasing bubble size. The multilayer model follows the oxygen data better than a single-layered model at high concentrations of hydrogen. Key reactions are reduced to five radiolysis reactions and four decomposition reactions for hydrogen peroxide. Calculations by the DOT 3 code showed dose rates from neutrons and gamma rays in various parts of the core. Concentrations of oxygen, hydrogen peroxide, and hydrogen were calculated by the model as a function of time from core inlet. Similar calculations for NWC and HWC were made as a function of height from core inlet both in the boiling channel an the bypass channel. Finally the model was applied to calculate the oxygen plus half the hydrogen peroxide concentrations as a function of hydrogen concentration to compare with data from five plants. Power density distribution with core height was given for an early stage and an end stage of a cycle. Increases of dose rates in the turbine for seven plants were shown as a function of increased hydrogen concentration in the reactor water

  5. Slab and Sediment Melting during Subduction Initiation: Mantle Plagiogranites from the Oman Ophiolite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollinson, H. R.

    2014-12-01

    Granitoid dykes up to several hundred metres wide and 2 km long are found in depleted harzburgites in the mantle section of the Oman ophiolite. They vary in composition from tonalite to potassic granite and are generally more potassic than the crustal plagiogranites found within the sheeted dyke complex higher up within the ophiolite stratigraphy. Some granites are strongly peraluminous and contain garnet and andalusite. They are geochemically variable, some with REE that are relatively unfractionated ((La/Yb)n= 3.5-6.0, flat middle to heavy REE, steep light REE) to those which are highly fractionated ((La/Yb)n= 28-220). On primitive-mantle normalised plots some have very high concentrations of fluid-mobile elements - Cs, Rb, Th, U and Pb. Few have significant Ta-Nb anomalies. On the Ca-Fe-Mg-Ti discrimination diagram of Patino Douce (J. Petrol., 1999) whole-rock compositions define a spectrum between felsic-pelite derived melts and amphibolite-derived melts. There is a chemical similarity between the least REE fractionated plagiogranites (generally tonalites and granodiorites) and melts of an amphibolitic parent. This is supported by the occurrence of mafic xenoliths in some dykes, the presence of hornblende and highly calcic cores (up to An85) in some plagioclase grains. Trace element modelling using Oman Geotimes lavas as the starting composition indicates that melting took place in the garnet stability field, although enrichment in the melt in Cs, Rb, Ba and Pb suggests that there was another component present in addition to the mafic parent. Other plagiogranites (trondhjemites and granites) have a strongly peraluminous chemistry and mineralogy and geochemical similarities with the Himalayan leucogranites implying that they were derived from a sedimentary protolith. These mantle plagiogranites are more prevalent in the northern outcrops of the ophiolite. The volume of granitoid melt and the depth of melting preclude their derivation from the sole of the

  6. Nitrogen partitioning during Earth's accretion and core-mantle differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speelmanns, I. M.; Schmidt, M. W.; Liebske, C.

    2017-12-01

    On present day Earth, N is one of the key constituents of our atmosphere and forms the basis of life. However, the deep Earth geochemistry of N, i.e. its distribution and isotopic fractionation between Earth's deep reservoirs is not well constrained. This study investigates nitrogen partitioning between metal and silicate melts as relevant for core segregation during the accretion of planetesimals into the Earth. We have determined N-partitioning coefficients over a wide range of temperatures (1250-2000 °C), pressures (15-35 kbar) and oxygen fugacity's, the latter in the relevant range of core segregation (IW-5 to IW). Centrifuging piston cylinders were used to equilibrate and then gravitationally separate metal-silicate melt pairs. Separation of the two melts is necessary to avoid micro nugget contamination in the silicate melt at reducing conditions double capsule technique in all experiments, using an outer metallic (Pt) and inner non-metallic capsule (graphite or Al2O3), minimizes N-loss over the course of the experiments compared to single non-metallic capsules. The two quenched melts were cut apart mechanically, cleaned at the outside, their N concentrations were then analysed on bulk samples by an elemental analyser, the low abslute masses requiring careful development of analytical routines. Despite these difficulties, we were able to determine a DNmetal/silicate of 13±0.3 at IW-1 decreasing to 2.0±0.2 at IW-5.5, at 1250°C and 15 kbar, N partitioning into the core forming metal. Increasing temperature dramatically lowers the DNmetal/silicate to e.g. 0.5±0.15 at IW-4, during early core formation N was hence mildly incompatible in the metal. The results suggest that under magma ocean conditions (> 2000 oC and fO2 IW-2.5), N-partition coefficents were within a factor of 2 of unity. Hence, N did not partition into the core, which should contain negliligible quantities of N. The few available literature data [1],[2],[3] support N changing compatibility with

  7. Review of the Technical Status on the Debris Bed Cooling Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eui Kwang; Cho, Chung Ho; Lee, Yong Bum

    2007-09-15

    Preliminary safety analyses of the KALIMER-600 design have shown that the design has inherent safety characteristics and is capable of accommodating double-fault initiators such as ATWS events without coolant boiling or fuel melting. However, for the future design of sodium cooled fast reactor, the evaluation of the safety performance and the determination of containment requirements may be worth due consideration of triple-fault accident sequences of extremely low probability of occurrence that leads to core melting. For any postulated accident sequence which leads to core melting, in-vessel retention of the core debris will be required as a design requirement for the future design of sodium cooled fast reactor. Also, proof of the capacity of the debris bed cooling is an essential condition to solve the problem of in-vessel retention of the core debris. In this study, review of the technical status on the debris bed cooling model was carried out for in-vessel retention of the core debris0.

  8. Review of the Technical Status on the Debris Bed Cooling Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eui Kwang; Cho, Chung Ho; Lee, Yong Bum

    2007-09-01

    Preliminary safety analyses of the KALIMER-600 design have shown that the design has inherent safety characteristics and is capable of accommodating double-fault initiators such as ATWS events without coolant boiling or fuel melting. However, for the future design of sodium cooled fast reactor, the evaluation of the safety performance and the determination of containment requirements may be worth due consideration of triple-fault accident sequences of extremely low probability of occurrence that leads to core melting. For any postulated accident sequence which leads to core melting, in-vessel retention of the core debris will be required as a design requirement for the future design of sodium cooled fast reactor. Also, proof of the capacity of the debris bed cooling is an essential condition to solve the problem of in-vessel retention of the core debris. In this study, review of the technical status on the debris bed cooling model was carried out for in-vessel retention of the core debris

  9. Free energy and structure of dislocation cores in two-dimensional crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bladon, P.B.; Frenkel, D.

    2004-01-01

    The nature of the melting transition in two dimensions is critically dependent on the core energy of dislocations. In this paper, we report calculations of the core free energy and the core size of dislocations in two-dimensional solids of systems interacting via square well, hard disk, and r-12

  10. Disorder effect on heat capacity, self-diffusion coefficient, and choosing best potential model for melting temperature, in gold–copper bimetallic nanocluster with 55 atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taherkhani, Farid; Akbarzadeh, Hamed; Feyzi, Mostafa; Rafiee, Hamid Reza

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation has been implemented for doping effect on melting temperature, heat capacity, self-diffusion coefficient of gold–copper bimetallic nanostructure with 55 total gold and copper atom numbers and its bulk alloy. Trend of melting temperature for gold–copper bimetallic nanocluster is not same as melting temperature copper–gold bulk alloy. Molecular dynamics simulation of our result regarding bulk melting temperature is consistence with available experimental data. Molecular dynamics simulation shows that melting temperature of gold–copper bimetallic nanocluster increases with copper atom fraction. Semi-empirical potential model and quantum Sutton–Chen potential models do not change melting temperature trend with copper doping of gold–copper bimetallic nanocluster. Self-diffusion coefficient of copper atom is greater than gold atom in gold–copper bimetallic nanocluster. Semi-empirical potential within the tight-binding second moment approximation as new application potential model for melting temperature of gold–copper bulk structure shows better result in comparison with EAM, Sutton–Chen potential, and quantum Sutton–Chen potential models

  11. Disorder effect on heat capacity, self-diffusion coefficient, and choosing best potential model for melting temperature, in gold–copper bimetallic nanocluster with 55 atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taherkhani, Farid, E-mail: faridtaherkhani@gmail.com, E-mail: f.taherkhani@razi.ac.ir [Razi University, Department of Physical Chemistry (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Akbarzadeh, Hamed [Hakim Sabzevari University, Department of Chemistry (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Feyzi, Mostafa; Rafiee, Hamid Reza [Razi University, Department of Physical Chemistry (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    Molecular dynamics simulation has been implemented for doping effect on melting temperature, heat capacity, self-diffusion coefficient of gold–copper bimetallic nanostructure with 55 total gold and copper atom numbers and its bulk alloy. Trend of melting temperature for gold–copper bimetallic nanocluster is not same as melting temperature copper–gold bulk alloy. Molecular dynamics simulation of our result regarding bulk melting temperature is consistence with available experimental data. Molecular dynamics simulation shows that melting temperature of gold–copper bimetallic nanocluster increases with copper atom fraction. Semi-empirical potential model and quantum Sutton–Chen potential models do not change melting temperature trend with copper doping of gold–copper bimetallic nanocluster. Self-diffusion coefficient of copper atom is greater than gold atom in gold–copper bimetallic nanocluster. Semi-empirical potential within the tight-binding second moment approximation as new application potential model for melting temperature of gold–copper bulk structure shows better result in comparison with EAM, Sutton–Chen potential, and quantum Sutton–Chen potential models.

  12. Influence of gas generation on high-temperature melt/concrete interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, D.A.

    1979-01-01

    Accidents involving fuel melting and eventual contact between the high temperature melt and structural concrete may be hypothesized for both light water thermal reactors and liquid metal cooled breeder reactors. Though these hypothesized accidents have a quite low probability of occurring, it is necessary to investigate the probable natures of the accidents if an adequate assessment of the risks associated with the use of nuclear reactors is to be made. A brief description is given of a program addressing the nature of melt/concrete interactions which has been underway for three years at Sandia Laboratories. Emphasis in this program has been toward the behavior of prototypic melts of molten core materials with concrete representative of that found in existing or proposed reactors. The goals of the experimentation have been to identify phenomena particularly pertinent to questions of reactor safety, and phenomena particularly pertinent to questions of reactor safety, and provide quantitative data suitable for the purposes of risk assessment

  13. Improvement of Cycle Dependent Core Model for NPP Simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, J. S.; Koo, B. S.; Kim, H. Y. and others

    2003-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to establish automatic core model generation system and to develop 4 cycle real time core analysis methodology with 5% power distribution and 500 pcm reactivity difference criteria for nuclear power plant simulator. The standardized procedure to generate database from ROCS and ANC, which are used for domestic PWR core design, was established for the cycle specific simulator core model generation. An automatic data interface system to generate core model also established. The system includes ARCADIS which edits group constant and DHCGEN which generates interface coupling coefficient correction database. The interface coupling coefficient correction method developed in this study has 4 cycle real time capability and accuracies of which the maximum differences between core design results are within 103 pcm reactivity, 1% relative power distribution and 6% control rod worth. A nuclear power plant core simulation program R-MASTER was developed using the methodology and applied by the concept of distributed client system in simulator. The performance was verified by site acceptance test in Simulator no. 2 in Kori Training Center for 30 initial condition generation and 27 steady state, transient and postulated accident situations

  14. Improvement of Cycle Dependent Core Model for NPP Simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, J. S.; Koo, B. S.; Kim, H. Y. and others

    2003-11-15

    The purpose of this study is to establish automatic core model generation system and to develop 4 cycle real time core analysis methodology with 5% power distribution and 500 pcm reactivity difference criteria for nuclear power plant simulator. The standardized procedure to generate database from ROCS and ANC, which are used for domestic PWR core design, was established for the cycle specific simulator core model generation. An automatic data interface system to generate core model also established. The system includes ARCADIS which edits group constant and DHCGEN which generates interface coupling coefficient correction database. The interface coupling coefficient correction method developed in this study has 4 cycle real time capability and accuracies of which the maximum differences between core design results are within 103 pcm reactivity, 1% relative power distribution and 6% control rod worth. A nuclear power plant core simulation program R-MASTER was developed using the methodology and applied by the concept of distributed client system in simulator. The performance was verified by site acceptance test in Simulator no. 2 in Kori Training Center for 30 initial condition generation and 27 steady state, transient and postulated accident situations.

  15. Core-concrete molten pool dynamics and interfacial heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benjamin, A.S.

    1980-01-01

    Theoretical models are derived for the heat transfer from molten oxide pools to an underlying concrete surface and from molten steel pools to a general concrete containment. To accomplish this, two separate effects models are first developed, one emphasizing the vigorous agitation of the molten pool by gases evolving from the concrete and the other considering the insulating effect of a slag layer produced by concrete melting. The resulting algebraic expressions, combined into a general core-concrete heat transfer representation, are shown to provide very good agreement with experiments involving molten steel pours into concrete crucibles

  16. Modelling of molten fuel/concrete interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muir, J.F.; Benjamin, A.S.

    1980-01-01

    A computer program modelling the interaction between molten core materials and structural concrete (CORCON) is being developed to provide quantitative estimates of fuel-melt accident consequences suitable for risk assessment of light water reactors. The principal features of CORCON are reviewed. Models developed for the principal interaction phenomena, inter-component heat transfer, concrete erosion, and melt/gas chemical reactions, are described. Alternative models for the controlling phenomenon, heat transfer from the molten pool to the surrounding concrete, are presented. These models, formulated in conjunction with the development of CORCON, are characterized by the presence or absence of either a gas film or viscous layer of molten concrete at the melt/concrete interface. Predictions of heat transfer based on these models compare favorably with available experimental data

  17. Measuring technique of super high temperature thermal properties of reactor core materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Akira; Baba, Tetsuya; Watanabe, Hideo; Matsumoto, Tsuyoshi

    1998-01-01

    In this study, thermal properties of reactor core materials used for water cooled reactors and FBR were tried to develop a technique to measure their melt states at less than 3,000degC in order to contribute more correct evaluation of the reactor core behavior at severe accident. Then, a thermal property measuring method of high temperature melt by using floating method was investigated and its fundamental design was begun to investigate under a base of optimum judgement on the air flow floating throw-down method. And, in order to measure emissivity of melt specimen surface essential for correct temperature measurement using the throw down method, a spectroscopic emissivity measuring unit using an ellipsometer was prepared and induced. On the thermal properties measurement using the holding method, a specimen container to measure thermal diffusiveness of the high temperature melts by using laser flashing method was tried to prepare. (G.K.)

  18. Natural Convection Heat Transfer of Oxide Pool During In-Vessel Retention of Core Melts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hae-Kyun; Chung, Bum-Jin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The integrity of reactor vessel may be threatened by the heat generation at the oxide pool and to the natural convection heat transfer to the reactor vessel by those two layers. Therefore, External Reactor Vessel Cooling (ERVC) is performed in order to secure the integrity of the reactor vessel. Whether the IVR(In-Vessel Retention) Strategy can be applicable to a larger reactor is the technical concern, which nourished the research interest for the natural convection heat transfer of metal and oxide pool and ERVC performance. Especially, it is hard to simulate oxide pool by experimentally due to the high level of buoyancy. Moreover, the volumetrically exothermic working fluid should be adopted to simulate the behavior of the core melts. Therefore, the volumetric heat sources that immersed in the working fluid have been adopted to simulate oxide pool by experiment. We investigated oxide pool with two different designs of the volumetric heat sources that adopted previous experiments. The investigation was performed by mass transfer experiment using analogy between heat and mass transfers. The results were compared to previous studies. We simulated the natural convection heat transfer of the oxide pool by mass transfer experiment. The isothermally cooled condition was established by limiting current technique firstly. The results were compared to previous studies under identical design of the volumetric heat sources. The average Nu's of the curvature and the top plate were close to the previous studies.

  19. Natural convection of the oxide pool in a three-layer configuration of core melts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Su-Hyeon; Park, Hae-Kyun; Chung, Bum-Jin, E-mail: bjchung@khu.ac.kr

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Natural convection of oxide pool in 3-layer configuration during IVR was investigated. • High Ra was achieved by using mass transfer experiments based on analogy concept. • Heat ratio to light metal layer was 14% higher for 3-layer configuration than 2-layer one. • Heat transfer to heavy metal layer was poor and hence heat load to side wall increased. • Angular heat loads to side wall showed strengthened heat focusing at uppermost location. - Abstract: We investigated the natural convection of the oxide layer in a three-layer configuration of core melts in a severe accident. In order to achieve high modified Rayleigh numbers of 10{sup 12}–10{sup 13}, mass transfer experiments were performed using a copper sulfate electroplating system based upon the analogy between heat and mass transfer. Four different cooling conditions of the top and the bottom plates were tested. The upward heat ratios were 14% higher for three-layer than for two-layer due to the reduced heights and the downward heat ratios were lower the same amount. The local Nusselt numbers for the top and the bottom plates were measured and compared with the two layer configuration. To explore the heat load to the reactor vessel, the angle-dependent heat fluxes at the side wall, were measured and compared with the two-layer configuration. Heat load to the side wall and peak heat at the uppermost location were intensified for the three-layer configuration.

  20. A calculation model for a HTR core seismic response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buland, P.; Berriaud, C.; Cebe, E.; Livolant, M.

    1975-01-01

    The paper presents the experimental results obtained at Saclay on a HTGR core model and comparisons with analytical results. Two series of horizontal tests have been performed on the shaking table VESUVE: sinusoidal test and time history response. Acceleration of graphite blocks, forces on the boundaries, relative displacement of the core and PCRB model, impact velocity of the blocks on the boundaries were recorded. These tests have shown the strongly non-linear dynamic behaviour of the core. The resonant frequency of the core is dependent on the level of the excitation. These phenomena have been explained by a computer code, which is a lumped mass non-linear model. Good correlation between experimental and analytical results was obtained for impact velocities and forces on the boundaries. This comparison has shown that the damping of the core is a critical parameter for the estimation of forces and velocities. Time history displacement at the level of PCRV was reproduced on the shaking table. The analytical model was applied to this excitation and good agreement was obtained for forces and velocities. (orig./HP) [de

  1. Bond particle model for semiconductor melts and its application to liquid structure germanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrante, A.; Tosi, M.P.

    1988-08-01

    A simple type of liquid state model is proposed to describe on a primitive level the melt of an elemental group IV semiconductor as a mixture of atoms and bond particles. The latter, on increase of a coupling strength parameter becomes increasingly localized between pairs of atoms up to local tetrahedral coordination of atoms by bond particles. Angular interatomic correlations are built into the model as bond particle localization grows, even though the bare interactions between the components of the liquid are formally described solely in terms of central pair potentials. The model is solved for liquid structure by standard integral equation techniques of liquid state theory and by Monte Carlo simulation, for values of the parameters which are appropriate to liquid germanium down to strongly supercooled states. The calculated liquid structure is compared with the results of diffraction experiments on liquid germanium near freezing and discussed in relation to diffraction data on amorphous germanium. The model suggests simple melting criteria for elemental and polar semiconductors, which are empirically verified. (author). 25 refs, 9 figs, 3 tabs

  2. The possibility and the effects of a steam explosion in the BWR lower head on recriticality of a BWR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sehgal, B.R.; Dinh, T.N.

    2002-12-01

    The report describes an analysis considering a BWR postulated severe accident scenario during which the late vessel automatic depressurization brings the water below the level of the bottom core plate. The subsequent lack of ECCS leads to core heat up during which the control rods melt and the melt deposits on the core plate. At that point of time in the scenario, the core fuel bundles are still intact and the Zircaloy clad oxidation is about to start. The objective of the study is to provide the conditions of reflood into the hot core due to the level swell or a slug delivered from the lower head as the control rod melt drops into the water. These conditions are employed in the neutronic analysis with the RECRIT code to determine if the core recriticality may be achieved. (au)

  3. Degenerate Ising model for atomistic simulation of crystal-melt interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schebarchov, D., E-mail: Dmitri.Schebarchov@gmail.com [University Chemical Laboratories, Lensfield Road, Cambridge CB2 1EW (United Kingdom); Schulze, T. P., E-mail: schulze@math.utk.edu [Department of Mathematics, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-1300 (United States); Hendy, S. C. [The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington 6140 (New Zealand); Department of Physics, University of Auckland, Auckland 1010 (New Zealand)

    2014-02-21

    One of the simplest microscopic models for a thermally driven first-order phase transition is an Ising-type lattice system with nearest-neighbour interactions, an external field, and a degeneracy parameter. The underlying lattice and the interaction coupling constant control the anisotropic energy of the phase boundary, the field strength represents the bulk latent heat, and the degeneracy quantifies the difference in communal entropy between the two phases. We simulate the (stochastic) evolution of this minimal model by applying rejection-free canonical and microcanonical Monte Carlo algorithms, and we obtain caloric curves and heat capacity plots for square (2D) and face-centred cubic (3D) lattices with periodic boundary conditions. Since the model admits precise adjustment of bulk latent heat and communal entropy, neither of which affect the interface properties, we are able to tune the crystal nucleation barriers at a fixed degree of undercooling and verify a dimension-dependent scaling expected from classical nucleation theory. We also analyse the equilibrium crystal-melt coexistence in the microcanonical ensemble, where we detect negative heat capacities and find that this phenomenon is more pronounced when the interface is the dominant contributor to the total entropy. The negative branch of the heat capacity appears smooth only when the equilibrium interface-area-to-volume ratio is not constant but varies smoothly with the excitation energy. Finally, we simulate microcanonical crystal nucleation and subsequent relaxation to an equilibrium Wulff shape, demonstrating the model's utility in tracking crystal-melt interfaces at the atomistic level.

  4. Degenerate Ising model for atomistic simulation of crystal-melt interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schebarchov, D.; Schulze, T. P.; Hendy, S. C.

    2014-01-01

    One of the simplest microscopic models for a thermally driven first-order phase transition is an Ising-type lattice system with nearest-neighbour interactions, an external field, and a degeneracy parameter. The underlying lattice and the interaction coupling constant control the anisotropic energy of the phase boundary, the field strength represents the bulk latent heat, and the degeneracy quantifies the difference in communal entropy between the two phases. We simulate the (stochastic) evolution of this minimal model by applying rejection-free canonical and microcanonical Monte Carlo algorithms, and we obtain caloric curves and heat capacity plots for square (2D) and face-centred cubic (3D) lattices with periodic boundary conditions. Since the model admits precise adjustment of bulk latent heat and communal entropy, neither of which affect the interface properties, we are able to tune the crystal nucleation barriers at a fixed degree of undercooling and verify a dimension-dependent scaling expected from classical nucleation theory. We also analyse the equilibrium crystal-melt coexistence in the microcanonical ensemble, where we detect negative heat capacities and find that this phenomenon is more pronounced when the interface is the dominant contributor to the total entropy. The negative branch of the heat capacity appears smooth only when the equilibrium interface-area-to-volume ratio is not constant but varies smoothly with the excitation energy. Finally, we simulate microcanonical crystal nucleation and subsequent relaxation to an equilibrium Wulff shape, demonstrating the model's utility in tracking crystal-melt interfaces at the atomistic level

  5. Enhanced ice sheet melting driven by volcanic eruptions during the last deglaciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muschitiello, Francesco; Pausata, Francesco S R; Lea, James M; Mair, Douglas W F; Wohlfarth, Barbara

    2017-10-24

    Volcanic eruptions can impact the mass balance of ice sheets through changes in climate and the radiative properties of the ice. Yet, empirical evidence highlighting the sensitivity of ancient ice sheets to volcanism is scarce. Here we present an exceptionally well-dated annual glacial varve chronology recording the melting history of the Fennoscandian Ice Sheet at the end of the last deglaciation (∼13,200-12,000 years ago). Our data indicate that abrupt ice melting events coincide with volcanogenic aerosol emissions recorded in Greenland ice cores. We suggest that enhanced ice sheet runoff is primarily associated with albedo effects due to deposition of ash sourced from high-latitude volcanic eruptions. Climate and snowpack mass-balance simulations show evidence for enhanced ice sheet runoff under volcanically forced conditions despite atmospheric cooling. The sensitivity of past ice sheets to volcanic ashfall highlights the need for an accurate coupling between atmosphere and ice sheet components in climate models.

  6. The coupled response to slope-dependent basal melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, C. M.; Goldberg, D. N.; Sergienko, O. V.; Gnanadesikan, A.

    2009-12-01

    Ice shelf basal melting is likely to be strongly controlled by basal slope. If ice shelves steepen in response to intensified melting, it suggests instability in the coupled ice-ocean system. The dynamic response of ice shelves governs what stable morphologies are possible, and thus the influence of melting on buttressing and grounding line migration. Simulations performed using a 3-D ocean model indicate that a simple form of slope-dependent melting is robust under more complex oceanographic conditions. Here we utilize this parameterization to investigate the shape and grounding line evolution of ice shelves, using a shallow-shelf approximation-based model that includes lateral drag. The distribution of melting substantially affects the shape and aspect ratio of unbuttressed ice shelves. Slope-dependent melting thins the ice shelf near the grounding line, reducing velocities throughout the shelf. Sharp ice thickness gradients evolve at high melting rates, yet grounding lines remain static. In foredeepened, buttressed ice shelves, changes in grounding line flux allow two additional options: stable or unstable retreat. Under some conditions, slope-dependent melting results in stable configurations even at high melt rates.

  7. Enthalpy model for heating, melting, and vaporization in laser ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasilios Alexiades

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Laser ablation is used in a growing number of applications in various areas including medicine, archaeology, chemistry, environmental and materials sciences. In this work the heat transfer and phase change phenomena during nanosecond laser ablation of a copper (Cu target in a helium (He background gas at atmospheric pressure are presented. An enthalpy model is outlined, which accounts for heating, melting, and vaporization of the target. As far as we know, this is the first model that connects the thermodynamics and underlying kinetics of this challenging phase change problem in a self-consistent way.

  8. Waterlike anomalies in a two-dimensional core-softened potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordin, José Rafael; Barbosa, Marcia C.

    2018-02-01

    We investigate the structural, thermodynamic, and dynamic behavior of a two-dimensional (2D) core-corona system using Langevin dynamics simulations. The particles are modeled by employing a core-softened potential which exhibits waterlike anomalies in three dimensions. In previous studies in a quasi-2D system a new region in the pressure versus temperature phase diagram of structural anomalies was observed. Here we show that for the two-dimensional case two regions in the pressure versus temperature phase diagram with structural, density, and diffusion anomalies are observed. Our findings indicate that, while the anomalous region at lower densities is due the competition between the two length scales in the potential at higher densities, the anomalous region is related to the reentrance of the melting line.

  9. Optical properties of melting first-year Arctic sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Light, Bonnie; Perovich, Donald K.; Webster, Melinda A.; Polashenski, Christopher; Dadic, Ruzica

    2015-11-01

    The albedo and transmittance of melting, first-year Arctic sea ice were measured during two cruises of the Impacts of Climate on the Eco-Systems and Chemistry of the Arctic Pacific Environment (ICESCAPE) project during the summers of 2010 and 2011. Spectral measurements were made for both bare and ponded ice types at a total of 19 ice stations in the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas. These data, along with irradiance profiles taken within boreholes, laboratory measurements of the optical properties of core samples, ice physical property observations, and radiative transfer model simulations are employed to describe representative optical properties for melting first-year Arctic sea ice. Ponded ice was found to transmit roughly 4.4 times more total energy into the ocean, relative to nearby bare ice. The ubiquitous surface-scattering layer and drained layer present on bare, melting sea ice are responsible for its relatively high albedo and relatively low transmittance. Light transmittance through ponded ice depends on the physical thickness of the ice and the magnitude of the scattering coefficient in the ice interior. Bare ice reflects nearly three-quarters of the incident sunlight, enhancing its resiliency to absorption by solar insolation. In contrast, ponded ice absorbs or transmits to the ocean more than three-quarters of the incident sunlight. Characterization of the heat balance of a summertime ice cover is largely dictated by its pond coverage, and light transmittance through ponded ice shows strong contrast between first-year and multiyear Arctic ice covers.

  10. Experimental Melting Study of Basalt-Peridotite Hybrid Source: Melting model of Hawaiian plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, E.; Gao, S.

    2015-12-01

    Eclogite component entrained in ascending plume is considered to be essentially important in producing flood basalts (e.g., Columbia River basalt, Takahashi et al., 1998 EPSL), alkalic OIBs (e.g., Kogiso et al.,2003), ferro-picrites (Tuff et al.,2005) and Hawaiian shield lavas (e.g., Hauri, 1996; Takahashi & Nakajima, 2002, Sobolev et al.,2005). Size of the entrained eclogite, which controls the reaction rates with ambient peridotite, however, is very difficult to constrain using geophysical observation. Among Hawaiian shield volcanoes, Koolau is the most enriched end-member in eclogite component (Frey et al, 1994). Reconstruction of Koolau volcano based on submarine study on Nuuanu landslide (AGU Monograph vol.128, 2002, Takahashi Garcia Lipman eds.) revealed that silica-rich tholeiite appeared only at the last stage (Makapuu stage) of Koolau volcano. Chemical compositions of lavas as well as isotopes change abruptly and coherently across a horizon (Shinozaki et al. and Tanaka et al. ibid.). Based on these observation, Takahashi & Nakajima (2002 ibid) proposed that the Makapuu stage lava in Koolau volcano was supplied from a single large eclogite block. In order to study melting process in Hawaiian plume, high-pressure melting experiments were carried out under dry and hydrous conditions with layered eclogite/peridotite starting materials. Detail of our experiments will be given by Gao et al (2015 AGU). Combined previous field observation with new set of experiments, we propose that variation in SiO2 among Hawaiian tholeiites represent varying degree of wall-rock interaction between eclogite and ambient peridotite. Makapuu stage lavas in Koolau volcano represents eclogite partial melts formed at ~3 GPa with various amount of xenocrystic olivines derived from Pacific plate. In other words, we propose that "primary magma" in the melting column of Hawaiian plume ranges from basaltic andesite to ferro-picrite depending on the lithology of the source. Solidus of

  11. Simulation of steam explosion in stratified melt-coolant configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leskovar, Matjaž; Centrih, Vasilij; Uršič, Mitja

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Strong steam explosions may develop spontaneously in stratified configurations. • Considerable melt-coolant premixed layer formed in subcooled water with hot melts. • Analysis with MC3D code provided insight into stratified steam explosion phenomenon. • Up to 25% of poured melt was mixed with water and available for steam explosion. • Better instrumented experiments needed to determine dominant mixing process. - Abstract: A steam explosion is an energetic fuel coolant interaction process, which may occur during a severe reactor accident when the molten core comes into contact with the coolant water. In nuclear reactor safety analyses steam explosions are primarily considered in melt jet-coolant pool configurations where sufficiently deep coolant pool conditions provide complete jet breakup and efficient premixture formation. Stratified melt-coolant configurations, i.e. a molten melt layer below a coolant layer, were up to now believed as being unable to generate strong explosive interactions. Based on the hypothesis that there are no interfacial instabilities in a stratified configuration it was assumed that the amount of melt in the premixture is insufficient to produce strong explosions. However, the recently performed experiments in the PULiMS and SES (KTH, Sweden) facilities with oxidic corium simulants revealed that strong steam explosions may develop spontaneously also in stratified melt-coolant configurations, where with high temperature melts and subcooled water conditions a considerable melt-coolant premixed layer is formed. In the article, the performed study of steam explosions in a stratified melt-coolant configuration in PULiMS like conditions is presented. The goal of this analytical work is to supplement the experimental activities within the PULiMS research program by addressing the key questions, especially regarding the explosivity of the formed premixed layer and the mechanisms responsible for the melt-water mixing. To

  12. Preparation of acetaminophen capsules containing beads prepared by hot-melt direct blend coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Loan; Christensen, John M

    2014-02-01

    Twelve hydrophobic coating agents were assessed for their effects on drug release after coating sugar cores by a flexible hot-melt coating method using direct blending. Drug-containing pellets were also produced and used as cores. The cores were coated with single or double wax layers containing acetaminophen (APAP). The harder the wax, the slower the resultant drug releases from single-coated beads. Wax coating can be deposited on cores up to 28% of the beads final weight and reaching 58% with wax and drug. Carnauba-coated beads dissolved in approximately 6 h releasing 80% of the loaded drug. Applying another wax layer extended drug release over 20 h, while still delivering 80% of the loaded drug. When drug-containing pellets (33-58% drug loading) were used as cores, double wax-coated pellets exhibited a near zero-order drug release for 16 h, releasing 80% of the loaded drug delivering 18 mg/h. The simple process of hot-melt coating by direct blending of pellet-containing drug-coated formulations provides excellent options for immediate and sustained release formulations when higher lipid coating or drug loading is warranted. Predicted plasma drug concentration time profiles using convolution and in vitro drug release properties of the beads were performed for optimal formulations.

  13. Final report for the 'Melt-Vessel Interactions' Project. European Union R and TD Program 4th Framework. MVI project final research report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sehgal, B.R.; Dinh, T.N.; Nourgaliev, R.R.; Bui, V.A.; Green, J.; Kolb, G.; Karbojian, A.; Theerthan, S.A.; Gubaidulline, A.; Bonnet, J.M.; Rouge, S.; Narcoux, M.; Liegeois, A.; Turland, B.D.; Dobson, G.P.; Siccama, A.; Ikonen, K.; Parozzi, F.; Kolev, N.; Caira, M.

    1999-04-01

    The Melt Vessel Interaction (MVI) project is concerned with the consequences of the interactions that a core melt, generated during a postulated severe accident in a light water reactor, may have with the pressure vessel. In particular, the issues concerned with the failure of the vessel bottom head are the focus of the research. The specific objectives of the project are to obtain data and develop validated models, which could be applied to prototypic plants, and accident conditions, for resolution of issues related to the melt vessel interactions. The project work has been performed by nine partners having varied responsibility. The work included a large number of experiments, with simulant materials, whose observations and results are employed, respectively, to understand the physical mechanisms and to develop validated models. Applications to the prototypic geometry and conditions have also been performed. This report is volume 1 of the Final Report for the Project, in which a summary of the progress achieved in the experimental program is provided. We have, however, included some aspects of the modeling activities. Volume 2 of the Final report describes the progress achieved in the modeling program. The progress achieved in the experimental and modeling parts of the Project has led to the resolution of some of the issues of melt vessel interaction. Considerable progress was also achieved towards resolution of the remaining issues

  14. Continuum model of tensile fracture of metal melts and its application to a problem of high-current electron irradiation of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, Alexander E.; Mayer, Polina N.

    2015-01-01

    A continuum model of the metal melt fracture is formulated on the basis of the continuum mechanics and theory of metastable liquid. A character of temperature and strain rate dependences of the tensile strength that is predicted by the continuum model is verified, and parameters of the model are fitted with the use of the results of the molecular dynamics simulations for ultra-high strain rates (≥1–10/ns). A comparison with experimental data from literature is also presented for Al and Ni melts. Using the continuum model, the dynamic tensile strength of initially uniform melts of Al, Cu, Ni, Fe, Ti, and Pb within a wide range of strain rates (from 1–10/ms to 100/ns) and temperatures (from melting temperature up to 70–80% of critical temperature) is calculated. The model is applied to numerical investigation of a problem of the high-current electron irradiation of Al, Cu, and Fe targets

  15. The results of the CCI-3 reactor material experiment investigating 2-D core-concrete interaction and debris coolability with a siliceous concrete crucible

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmer, M.T.; Basu, S.

    2006-01-01

    The OECD-sponsored Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction (MCCI) program is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis with the objectives of resolving the ex-vessel debris coolability issue, and to address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. Despite years of international research, there are remaining uncertainties in the models that evaluate the lateral vs. axial power split during core-concrete interaction because of a lack of truly two-dimensional experiment data. As a result, there are differences in the 2-D cavity erosion predicted by codes such as MELCOR, WECHSL, and COSACO. In the continuing effort to bridge this data gap, the third in a series of large scale Core-Concrete Interaction experiments (CCI-3) has been conducted as part of the MCCI program. This test involved the interaction of a 375 kg core-oxide melt within a two-dimensional siliceous concrete crucible. The initial phase of the test was conducted under dry conditions. After a predetermined ablation depth was reached, the cavity was flooded to obtain data on the coolability of a core melt after core-concrete interaction has progressed for some time. This paper provides a summary description of the test facility and an overview of test results

  16. The 1988-2003 Greenland ice sheet melt extent using passive microwave satellite data and a regional climate model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fettweis, Xavier; Ypersele, Jean-Pascal van [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Institut d' Astronomie et de Geophysique de G. Lemaitre, Louvain-La-Neuve (Belgium); Gallee, Hubert [CNRS, Laboratoire de Glaciologie et Geophysique de l' Environnement, Grenoble (France); Lefebre, Filip [Vito-IMS (Flemish Institute for Technological Research-Integral Environmental Studies), Mol (Belgium)

    2006-10-15

    Measurements from ETH-Camp and JAR1 AWS (West Greenland) as well as coupled atmosphere-snow regional climate simulations have highlighted flaws in the cross-polarized gradient ratio (XPGR) technique used to identify melt from passive microwave satellite data. It was found that dense clouds (causing notably rainfall) on the ice sheet severely perturb the XPGR melt signal. Therefore, the original XPGR melt detection algorithm has been adapted to better incorporate atmospheric variability over the ice sheet and an updated melt trend for the 1988-2003 period has been calculated. Compared to the original algorithm, the melt zone area increase is eight times higher (from 0.2 to 1.7% year{sup -1}). The increase is higher with the improved XPGR technique because rainfall also increased during this period. It is correlated to higher atmospheric temperatures. Finally, the model shows that the total ice sheet runoff is directly proportional to the melt extent surface detected by satellites. These results are important for the understanding of the effect of Greenland melting on the stability of the thermohaline circulation. (orig.)

  17. VHTR core modeling: coupling between neutronic and thermal-hydraulics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limaiem, I.; Damian, F.; Raepsaet, X.; Studer, E.

    2005-01-01

    Following the present interest in the next generation nuclear power plan (NGNP), Cea is deploying special effort to develop new models and qualify its research tools for this next generation reactors core. In this framework, the Very High Temperature Reactor concept (VHTR) has an increasing place in the actual research program. In such type of core, a strong interaction exists between neutronic and thermal-hydraulics. Consequently, the global core modelling requires accounting for the temperature feedback in the neutronic models. The purpose of this paper is to present the new neutronic and thermal-hydraulics coupling model dedicated to the High Temperature Reactors (HTR). The coupling model integrates a new version of the neutronic scheme calculation developed in collaboration between Cea and Framatome-ANP. The neutronic calculations are performed using a specific calculation processes based on the APOLLO2 transport code and CRONOS2 diffusion code which are part of the French reactor physics code system SAPHYR. The thermal-hydraulics model is characterised by an equivalent porous media and 1-D fluid/3-D thermal model implemented in the CAST3M/ARCTURUS code. The porous media approach involves the definition of both homogenous and heterogeneous models to ensure a correct temperature feedback. This study highlights the sensitivity of the coupling system's parameters (radial/axial meshing and data exchange strategy between neutronic and thermal-hydraulics code). The parameters sensitivity study leads to the definition of an optimal coupling system specification for the VHTR. Besides, this work presents the first physical analysis of the VHTR core in steady-state condition. The analysis gives information about the 3-D power peaking and the temperature coefficient. Indeed, it covers different core configurations with different helium distribution in the core bypass. (authors)

  18. Oxidation effect on steel corrosion and thermal loads during corium melt in-vessel retention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granovsky, V.S.; Khabensky, V.B.; Krushinov, E.V.; Vitol, S.A.; Sulatsky, A.A.; Almjashev, V.I. [Alexandrov Scientific-Research Technology Institute (NITI), Sosnovy Bor (Russian Federation); Bechta, S.V. [KTH, Stockholm (Sweden); Gusarov, V.V. [SPb State Technology University (SPbGTU), St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Barrachin, M. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), St Paul lez Durance (France); Bottomley, P.D., E-mail: paul.bottomley@ec.europa.eu [EC-Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU), Karlsruhe (Germany); Fischer, M. [AREVA GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Piluso, P. [Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives (CEA), Cadarache, St Paul lez Durance (France)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • The METCOR facility simulates vessel steel corrosion in contact with corium. • Steel corrosion rates in UO{sub 2+x}–ZrO{sub 2}–FeO{sub y} coria accelerate above 1050 K. • However corrosion rates can also be limited by melt O{sub 2} supply. • The impact of this on in-vessel retention (IVR) strategy is discussed. - Abstract: During a severe accident with core meltdown, the in-vessel molten core retention is challenged by the vessel steel ablation due to thermal and physicochemical interaction of melt with steel. In accidents with oxidizing atmosphere above the melt surface, a low melting point UO{sub 2+x}–ZrO{sub 2}–FeO{sub y} corium pool can form. In this case ablation of the RPV steel interacting with the molten corium is a corrosion process. Experiments carried out within the International Scientific and Technology Center's (ISTC) METCOR Project have shown that the corrosion rate can vary and depends on both surface temperature of the RPV steel and oxygen potential of the melt. If the oxygen potential is low, the corrosion rate is controlled by the solid phase diffusion of Fe ions in the corrosion layer. At high oxygen potential and steel surface layer temperature of 1050 °C and higher, the corrosion rate intensifies because of corrosion layer liquefaction and liquid phase diffusion of Fe ions. The paper analyzes conditions under which corrosion intensification occurs and can impact on in-vessel melt retention (IVR)

  19. Superconducting tin core fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homa, Daniel; Liang, Yongxuan; Hill, Cary; Kaur, Gurbinder; Pickrell, Gary

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrated superconductivity in a fiber with a tin core and fused silica cladding. The fibers were fabricated via a modified melt-draw technique and maintained core diameters ranging from 50-300 microns and overall diameters of 125-800 microns. Superconductivity of this fiber design was validated via the traditional four-probe test method in a bath of liquid helium at temperatures on the order of 3.8 K. The synthesis route and fiber design are perquisites to ongoing research dedicated all-fiber optoelectronics and the relationships between superconductivity and the material structures, as well as corresponding fabrication techniques. (orig.)

  20. A thermodynamic model for predicting surface melting and overheating of different crystal planes in BCC, FCC and HCP pure metallic thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahangir, Vafa; Riahifar, Reza; Sahba Yaghmaee, Maziar

    2016-01-01

    In order to predict as well as study the surface melting phenomena in contradiction to surface overheating, a generalized thermodynamics model including the surface free energy of solid and the melt state along with the interfacial energy of solid–liquid (melt on substrate) has been introduced. In addition, the effect of different crystal structures of surfaces in fcc, bcc and hcp metals was included in surface energies as well as in the atomistic model. These considerations lead us to predict surface melting and overheating as two contradictory melting phenomena. The results of the calculation are demonstrated on the example of Pb and Al thin films in three groups of (100), (110) and (111) surface planes. Our conclusions show good agreement with experimental results and other theoretical investigations. Moreover, a computational algorithm has been developed which enables users to investigate the surface melt or overheating of single component metallic thin film with variable crystal structures and different crystalline planes. This model and developed software can be used for studying all related surface phenomena. - Highlights: • Investigating the surface melting and overheating phenomena • Effect of crystal orientations, surface energies, geometry and different atomic surface layers • Developing a computational algorithm and its related code (free-software SMSO-Ver1) • Thickness and orientation of surface plane dominate the surface melting or overheating. • Total excess surface energy as a function of thickness and temperature explains melting.

  1. A thermodynamic model for predicting surface melting and overheating of different crystal planes in BCC, FCC and HCP pure metallic thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jahangir, Vafa, E-mail: vafa.jahangir@yahoo.com; Riahifar, Reza, E-mail: reza_rfr@yahoo.com; Sahba Yaghmaee, Maziar, E-mail: fkmsahba@uni-miskolc.hu

    2016-03-31

    In order to predict as well as study the surface melting phenomena in contradiction to surface overheating, a generalized thermodynamics model including the surface free energy of solid and the melt state along with the interfacial energy of solid–liquid (melt on substrate) has been introduced. In addition, the effect of different crystal structures of surfaces in fcc, bcc and hcp metals was included in surface energies as well as in the atomistic model. These considerations lead us to predict surface melting and overheating as two contradictory melting phenomena. The results of the calculation are demonstrated on the example of Pb and Al thin films in three groups of (100), (110) and (111) surface planes. Our conclusions show good agreement with experimental results and other theoretical investigations. Moreover, a computational algorithm has been developed which enables users to investigate the surface melt or overheating of single component metallic thin film with variable crystal structures and different crystalline planes. This model and developed software can be used for studying all related surface phenomena. - Highlights: • Investigating the surface melting and overheating phenomena • Effect of crystal orientations, surface energies, geometry and different atomic surface layers • Developing a computational algorithm and its related code (free-software SMSO-Ver1) • Thickness and orientation of surface plane dominate the surface melting or overheating. • Total excess surface energy as a function of thickness and temperature explains melting.

  2. Summary of multi-core hardware and programming model investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, Suzanne Marie; Pedretti, Kevin Thomas Tauke; Levenhagen, Michael J.

    2008-05-01

    This report summarizes our investigations into multi-core processors and programming models for parallel scientific applications. The motivation for this study was to better understand the landscape of multi-core hardware, future trends, and the implications on system software for capability supercomputers. The results of this study are being used as input into the design of a new open-source light-weight kernel operating system being targeted at future capability supercomputers made up of multi-core processors. A goal of this effort is to create an agile system that is able to adapt to and efficiently support whatever multi-core hardware and programming models gain acceptance by the community.

  3. The Density Jump at the Inner Core Boundary in the Eastern and Western Hemispheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnoshchekov, D. N.; Ovtchinnikov, V. M.

    2018-02-01

    The results of analysis of more than 1300 new PKiKP/PcP amplitude ratios measured in Southeast Asia and South America at the epicentral distances of 3.2°-35.2° are presented. The density jump in the Eastern Hemisphere of the Earth's inner core (IC) is 0.3 g/cm3, and it is 0.9 g/cm3 in the Western one. Taking the large discrepancy in the obtained estimates into consideration, maintenance of such large lateral variations in the mosaic properties of the IC reflecting surface requires considerable variations in the thermodynamic parameters (mostly temperature) of the inner-outer core transition. However, if the observed asymmetry in the density jump distribution is of a global character, the data presented support the translation model of the IC dynamics. This model implies IC crystallization in the Western Hemisphere and melting in the Eastern one, not vice versa, as suggested by another geodynamic model based on thermochemical convection in the outer core and the thermal balance of the core-mantle system.

  4. Supercoil Formation During DNA Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayar, Mehmet; Avsaroglu, Baris; Kabakcioglu, Alkan

    2009-03-01

    Supercoil formation plays a key role in determining the structure-function relationship in DNA. Biological and technological processes, such as protein synthesis, polymerase chain reaction, and microarrays relys on separation of the two strands in DNA, which is coupled to the unwinding of the supercoiled structure. This problem has been studied theoretically via Peyrard-Bishop and Poland-Scheraga type models, which include a simple representation of the DNA structural properties. In recent years, computational models, which provide a more realtistic representaion of DNA molecule, have been used to study the melting behavior of short DNA chains. Here, we will present a new coarse-grained model of DNA which is capable of simulating sufficiently long DNA chains for studying the supercoil formation during melting, without sacrificing the local structural properties. Our coarse-grained model successfully reproduces the local geometry of the DNA molecule, such as the 3'-5' directionality, major-minor groove structure, and the helical pitch. We will present our initial results on the dynamics of supercoiling during DNA melting.

  5. Property-Composition-Temperature Modeling of Waste Glass Melt Data Subject to a Randomization Restriction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piepel, Gregory F.; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Cooley, Scott K.

    2008-01-01

    Properties such as viscosity and electrical conductivity of glass melts are functions of melt temperature as well as glass composition. When measuring such a property for several glasses, the property is typically measured at several temperatures for one glass, then at several temperatures for the next glass, and so on. This data-collection process involves a restriction on randomization, which is referred to as split-plot experiment. The split-plot data structure must be accounted for in developing property-composition-temperature models and the corresponding uncertainty equations for model predictions. Instead of ordinary least squares (OLS) regression methods, generalized least squares (GLS) regression methods using restricted maximum likelihood (REML) estimation must be used. This article describes the methodology for developing property-composition-temperature models and corresponding prediction uncertainty equations using the GLS/REML regression approach. Viscosity data collected on 197 simulated nuclear waste glasses are used to illustrate the GLS/REML methods for developing a viscosity-composition-temperature model and corresponding equations for model prediction uncertainties. The correct results using GLS/REML regression are compared to the incorrect results obtained using OLS regression

  6. Status of the MELTSPREAD-1 computer code for the analysis of transient spreading of core debris melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmer, M.T.; Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W.; Chu, C.C.

    1992-01-01

    A transient, one dimensional, finite difference computer code (MELTSPREAD-1) has been developed to predict spreading behavior of high temperature melts flowing over concrete and/or steel surfaces submerged in water, or without the effects of water if the surface is initially dry. This paper provides a summary overview of models and correlations currently implemented in the code, code validation activities completed thus far, LWR spreading-related safety issues for which the code has been applied, and the status of documentation for the code

  7. Incorporation of a physically based melt pond scheme into the sea ice component of a climate model

    OpenAIRE

    Flocco, Daniela; Feltham, Danny; Turner, Adrian K.

    2010-01-01

    The extent and thickness of the Arctic sea ice cover has decreased dramatically in the past few decades with minima in sea ice extent in September 2005 and 2007. These minima have not been predicted in the IPCC AR4 report, suggesting that the sea ice component of climate models should more realistically represent the processes controlling the sea ice mass balance. One of the processes poorly represented in sea ice models is the formation and evolution of melt ponds. Melt ponds accumulate on t...

  8. Research activities at JAERI on core material behaviour under severe accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uetsuka, H.; Katanashi, S.; Ishijima, K.

    1996-01-01

    At the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), experimental studies on physical phenomena under the condition of a severe accident have been conducted. This paper presents the progress of the experimental studies on fuel and core materials behaviour such as the thermal shock fracture of fuel cladding due to quenching, the chemical interaction of core materials at high temperatures and the examination of TMI-2 debris. The mechanical behaviour of fuel rod with heavily embrittled cladding tube due to the thermal shock during delayed reflooding have been investigated at the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSSR) of JAERI. A test fuel rod was heated in steam atmosphere by both electric and nuclear heating using the NSSR, then the rod was quenched by reflooding at the test section. Melting of core component materials having relatively low melting points and their eutectic reaction with other materials significantly influence on the degradation and melt down of fuel bundles during severe accidents. Therefore basic information on the reaction of core materials is necessary to understand and analyze the progress of core melting and relocation. Chemical interactions have been widely investigated at high temperatures for various binary systems of core component materials including absorber materials such as Zircaloy/Inconel, Zircaloy/stainless steel, Zircaloy/(Ag-In-Cd), stainless steel B 4 C and Zircaloy/B 4 C. It was found that the reaction generally obeyed a parabolic rate law and the reaction rate was determined for each reaction system. Many debris samples obtained from the degraded core of TMI-2 were transported to JAERI for numerous examinations and analyses. The microstructural examination revealed that the most part of debris was ceramic and it was not homogeneous in a microscopic sense. The thermal diffusivity data was also obtained for the temperature range up to about 1800K. The data from the large scale integral experiments were also obtained through the

  9. Evaluation of core modeling effect on transients for multi-flow zone design of SFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Andong; Choi, Yong Won

    2016-01-01

    SFR core is composed of different types of assemblies including fuel driver, reflector, blanket, control, safety drivers and other drivers. Modeling of different types of assemblies is inevitable in general. But modeling of core flow zones of with different channels needs a lot of effort and could be a challenge for system code modeling due to its limitation on the number of modeling components. In this study, core modeling effect on SFR transient was investigated with flow-zone model and averaged inner core channel model to improve modeling efficiency and validation of simplified core model for EBR-II loss of flow transient case with the modified TRACE code for SFRs. Core modeling effect on the loss flow transient was analyzed with flow-zoned channel model, single averaged inner core model and highest flow channel with averaged inner core channel model for EBR-II SHRT-17 test core. Case study showed that estimations of transient pump and channel flow as well as channel outlet temperatures were similar for all cases macroscopically. Comparing the result of the base case (flow-zone channel inner core model) and the case 2 (highest flow channel considered averaged inner core channel model), flow and channel outlet temperature response were closer than the case1 (single averaged inner core model)

  10. Evaluation of core modeling effect on transients for multi-flow zone design of SFR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Andong; Choi, Yong Won [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    SFR core is composed of different types of assemblies including fuel driver, reflector, blanket, control, safety drivers and other drivers. Modeling of different types of assemblies is inevitable in general. But modeling of core flow zones of with different channels needs a lot of effort and could be a challenge for system code modeling due to its limitation on the number of modeling components. In this study, core modeling effect on SFR transient was investigated with flow-zone model and averaged inner core channel model to improve modeling efficiency and validation of simplified core model for EBR-II loss of flow transient case with the modified TRACE code for SFRs. Core modeling effect on the loss flow transient was analyzed with flow-zoned channel model, single averaged inner core model and highest flow channel with averaged inner core channel model for EBR-II SHRT-17 test core. Case study showed that estimations of transient pump and channel flow as well as channel outlet temperatures were similar for all cases macroscopically. Comparing the result of the base case (flow-zone channel inner core model) and the case 2 (highest flow channel considered averaged inner core channel model), flow and channel outlet temperature response were closer than the case1 (single averaged inner core model)

  11. SCDAP: a light water reactor computer code for severe core damage analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marino, G.P.; Allison, C.M.; Majumdar, D.

    1982-01-01

    Development of the first code version (MODO) of the Severe Core Damage Analysis Package (SCDAP) computer code is described, and calculations made with SCDAP/MODO are presented. The objective of this computer code development program is to develop a capability for analyzing severe disruption of a light water reactor core, including fuel and cladding liquefaction, flow, and freezing; fission product release; hydrogen generation; quenched-induced fragmentation; coolability of the resulting geometry; and ultimately vessel failure due to vessel-melt interaction. SCDAP will be used to identify the phenomena which control core behavior during a severe accident, to help quantify uncertainties in risk assessment analysis, and to support planning and evaluation of severe fuel damage experiments and data. SCDAP/MODO addresses the behavior of a single fuel bundle. Future versions will be developed with capabilities for core-wide and vessel-melt interaction analysis

  12. Scaling of Core Material in Rubble Mound Breakwater Model Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; Liu, Z.; Troch, P.

    1999-01-01

    The permeability of the core material influences armour stability, wave run-up and wave overtopping. The main problem related to the scaling of core materials in models is that the hydraulic gradient and the pore velocity are varying in space and time. This makes it impossible to arrive at a fully...... correct scaling. The paper presents an empirical formula for the estimation of the wave induced pressure gradient in the core, based on measurements in models and a prototype. The formula, together with the Forchheimer equation can be used for the estimation of pore velocities in cores. The paper proposes...... that the diameter of the core material in models is chosen in such a way that the Froude scale law holds for a characteristic pore velocity. The characteristic pore velocity is chosen as the average velocity of a most critical area in the core with respect to porous flow. Finally the method is demonstrated...

  13. Non-chondritic iron isotope ratios in planetary mantles as a result of core formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elardo, Stephen M.; Shahar, Anat

    2017-02-01

    Information about the materials and conditions involved in planetary formation and differentiation in the early Solar System is recorded in iron isotope ratios. Samples from Earth, the Moon, Mars and the asteroid Vesta reveal significant variations in iron isotope ratios, but the sources of these variations remain uncertain. Here we present experiments that demonstrate that under the conditions of planetary core formation expected for the Moon, Mars and Vesta, iron isotopes fractionate between metal and silicate due to the presence of nickel, and enrich the bodies' mantles in isotopically light iron. However, the effect of nickel diminishes at higher temperatures: under conditions expected for Earth's core formation, we infer little fractionation of iron isotopes. From our experimental results and existing conceptual models of magma ocean crystallization and mantle partial melting, we find that nickel-induced fractionation can explain iron isotope variability found in planetary samples without invoking nebular or accretionary processes. We suggest that near-chondritic iron isotope ratios of basalts from Mars and Vesta, as well as the most primitive lunar basalts, were achieved by melting of isotopically light mantles, whereas the heavy iron isotope ratios of terrestrial ocean floor basalts are the result of melting of near-chondritic Earth mantle.

  14. Test model of WWER core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tikhomirov, A. V.; Gorokhov, A. K.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this paper is creation of precision test model for WWER RP neutron-physics calculations. The model is considered as a tool for verification of deterministic computer codes that enables to reduce conservatism of design calculations and enhance WWER RP competitiveness. Precision calculations were performed using code MCNP5/1/ (Monte Carlo method). Engineering computer package Sapfir 9 5andRC V VER/2/ is used in comparative analysis of the results, it was certified for design calculations of WWER RU neutron-physics characteristic. The object of simulation is the first fuel loading of Volgodon NPP RP. Peculiarities of transition in calculation using MCNP5 from 2D geometry to 3D geometry are shown on the full-scale model. All core components as well as radial and face reflectors, automatic regulation in control and protection system control rod are represented in detail description according to the design. The first stage of application of the model is assessment of accuracy of calculation of the core power. At the second stage control and protection system control rod worth was assessed. Full scale RP representation in calculation using code MCNP5 is time consuming that calls for parallelization of computational problem on multiprocessing computer (Authors)

  15. CFD-calculations to a core catcher benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willschuetz, H.G.

    1999-04-01

    There are numerous experiments for the exploration of the corium spreading behaviour, but comparable data have not been available up to now in the field of the long term behaviour of a corium expanded in a core catcher. The difficulty consists in the experimental simulation of the decay heat that can be neglected for the short-run course of events like relocation and spreading, which must, however, be considered during investigation of the long time behaviour. Therefore the German GRS, defined together with Battelle Ingenieurtechnik a benchmark problem in order to determine particular problems and differences of CFD codes simulating an expanded corium and from this, requirements for a reasonable measurement of experiments, that will be performed later. First the finite-volume-codes Comet 1.023, CFX 4.2 and CFX-TASCflow were used. To be able to make comparisons to a finite-element-code, now calculations are performed at the Institute of Safety Research at the Forschungszentrum Rossendorf with the code ANSYS/FLOTRAN. For the benchmark calculations of stage 1 a pure and liquid melt with internal heat sources was assumed uniformly distributed over the area of the planned core catcher of a EPR plant. Using the Standard-k-ε-turbulence model and assuming an initial state of a motionless superheated melt several large convection rolls will establish within the melt pool. The temperatures at the surface do not sink to a solidification level due to the enhanced convection heat transfer. The temperature gradients at the surface are relatively flat while there are steep gradients at the ground where the no slip condition is applied. But even at the ground no solidification temperatures are observed. Although the problem in the ANSYS-calculations is handled two-dimensional and not three-dimensional like in the finite-volume-codes, there are no fundamental deviations to the results of the other codes. (orig.)

  16. Core catcher cooling for a gas-cooled fast breeder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalle Donne, M.; Dorner, S.; Schretzmann, K.

    1976-01-01

    Water, molten salts, and liquid metals are under discussion as coolants for the core catcher of a gas-cooled fast breeder. The authors state that there is still no technically mature method of cooling a core melt. However, the investigations carried out so far suggest that there is a solution to this problem. (RW/AK) [de

  17. Emerging melt quality control solution technologies for aluminium melt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo Pascual, Jr

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The newly developed “MTS 1500” Melt Treatment System is performing the specifi cally required melt treatment operations like degassing, cleaning, modification and/or grain refinement by an automated process in one step and at the same location. This linked process is saving time, energy and metal losses allowing - by automated dosage of the melt treatment agents - the production of a consistent melt quality batch after batch. By linking the MTS Metal Treatment System with sensors operating on-line in the melt, i.e., with a hydrogen sensor “Alspek H”, a fully automated control of parts of the process chain like degassing is possible. This technology does guarantee a pre-specifi ed and documented melt quality in each melt treatment batch. Furthermore, to ensure that castings are consistent and predictable there is a growing realization that critical parameters such as metal cleanliness must be measured prior to casting. There exists accepted methods for measuring the cleanliness of an aluminum melt but these can be both slow and costly. A simple, rapid and meaningful method of measuring and bench marking the cleanliness of an aluminum melt has been developed to offer the foundry a practical method of measuring melt cleanliness. This paper shows the structure and performance of the integrated MTS melt treatment process and documents achieved melt quality standards after degassing, cleaning, modifi cation and grain refi nement operations under real foundry conditions. It also provides an insight on a melt cleanliness measuring device “Alspek MQ” to provide foundry men better tools in meeting the increasing quality and tighter specifi cation demand from the industry.

  18. Constant electrical resistivity of Ni along the melting boundary up to 9 GPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silber, Reynold E.; Secco, Richard A.; Yong, Wenjun

    2017-07-01

    Characterization of transport properties of liquid Ni at high pressures has important geophysical implications for terrestrial planetary interiors, because Ni is a close electronic analogue of Fe and it is also integral to Earth's core. We report measurements of the electrical resistivity of solid and liquid Ni at pressures 3-9 GPa using a 3000 t multianvil large volume press. A four-wire method, in conjunction with a rapid acquisition meter and polarity switch, was used to overcome experimental challenges such as melt containment and maintaining sample geometry and to mitigate the extreme reactivity/solubility of liquid Ni with most thermocouple and electrode materials. Thermal conductivity is calculated using the Wiedemann-Franz law. Electrical resistivity of solid Ni exhibits the expected P dependence and is consistent with earlier experimental values. Within experimental uncertainties, our results indicate that resistivity of liquid Ni remains invariant along the P-dependent melting boundary, which is in disagreement with earlier prediction for liquid transition metals. The potential reasons for such behavior are examined qualitatively through the impact of P-independent local short-range ordering on electron mean free path and the possibility of constant Fermi surface at the onset of Ni melting. Correlation among metals obeying the Kadowaki-Woods ratio and the group of late transition metals with unfilled d-electron band displaying anomalously shallow melting curves suggests that on the melting boundary, Fe may exhibit the same resistivity behavior as Ni. This could have important implications for the heat flow in the Earth's core.

  19. Fragmentation of low-melting metals by collapsing steam bubbles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benz, R.

    1979-08-01

    When a hot melt meets a vaporable liquid of lower temperature, explosive vaporisation of the cooler liquid may be the result. This is called a steam explosion if a substantial amount of thermal energy is converted into mechanical energy. One important step in understanding about steam explosions is to explain the surface increase of the hot melt. There are several competing fragmentation hypotheses, but so far there has been no model to describe fragmentation criteria as well as the time curve of surface increase on the basis of physical processes. An overall model is now given for one of the possible fragmentation mechanisms, i.e. the division of the melt by collapsing steam bubbles. The model estimates the surface increase of the melt on the basis of heavy supercooled boiling, the heat transfer connected with it, the transfer of mechanical energy during steam bubble collapse, and the solidification of the melt. The results of the calculations have shown that basic experimental observations, e.g. time and extent of fragmentation, are well presented in the model with regard to their order of magnitude. The model presents a qualitatively correct description of the effects of important influencing factors, e.g. supercooling of the coolant or initial temperature of the melt. (orig.) [de

  20. An empirical model for the melt viscosity of polymer blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrescu, V.

    1981-01-01

    On the basis of experimental data for blends of polyethylene with different polymers an empirical equation is proposed to describe the dependence of melt viscosity of blends on component viscosities and composition. The model ensures the continuity of viscosity vs. composition curves throughout the whole composition range, the possibility of obtaining extremum values higher or lower than the viscosities of components, allows the calculation of flow curves of blends from the flow curves of components and their volume fractions. (orig.)

  1. Basal melting driven by turbulent thermal convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbanipour Esfahani, Babak; Hirata, Silvia C.; Berti, Stefano; Calzavarini, Enrico

    2018-05-01

    Melting and, conversely, solidification processes in the presence of convection are key to many geophysical problems. An essential question related to these phenomena concerns the estimation of the (time-evolving) melting rate, which is tightly connected to the turbulent convective dynamics in the bulk of the melt fluid and the heat transfer at the liquid-solid interface. In this work, we consider a convective-melting model, constructed as a generalization of the Rayleigh-Bénard system, accounting for the basal melting of a solid. As the change of phase proceeds, a fluid layer grows at the heated bottom of the system and eventually reaches a turbulent convection state. By means of extensive lattice-Boltzmann numerical simulations employing an enthalpy formulation of the governing equations, we explore the model dynamics in two- and three-dimensional configurations. The focus of the analysis is on the scaling of global quantities like the heat flux and the kinetic energy with the Rayleigh number, as well as on the interface morphology and the effects of space dimensionality. Independently of dimensionality, we find that the convective-melting system behavior shares strong resemblances with that of the Rayleigh-Bénard one, and that the heat flux is only weakly enhanced with respect to that case. Such similarities are understood, at least to some extent, considering the resulting slow motion of the melting front (with respect to the turbulent fluid velocity fluctuations) and its generally little roughness (compared to the height of the fluid layer). Varying the Stefan number, accounting for the thermodynamical properties of the material, also seems to have only a mild effect, which implies the possibility of extrapolating results in numerically delicate low-Stefan setups from more convenient high-Stefan ones. Finally, we discuss the implications of our findings for the geophysically relevant problem of modeling Arctic ice melt ponds.

  2. Determination of the bulk melting temperature of nickel using Monte Carlo simulations: Inaccuracy of extrapolation from cluster melting temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Los, J. H.; Pellenq, R. J. M.

    2010-02-01

    We have determined the bulk melting temperature Tm of nickel according to a recent interatomic interaction model via Monte Carlo simulation by two methods: extrapolation from cluster melting temperatures based on the Pavlov model (a variant of the Gibbs-Thompson model) and by calculation of the liquid and solid Gibbs free energies via thermodynamic integration. The result of the latter, which is the most reliable method, gives Tm=2010±35K , to be compared to the experimental value of 1726 K. The cluster extrapolation method, however, gives a 325° higher value of Tm=2335K . This remarkable result is shown to be due to a barrier for melting, which is associated with a nonwetting behavior.

  3. Investigation of activity release during light water reactor core meltdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albrecht, H.; Matschoss, V.; Wild, H.

    1978-01-01

    A test facility was developed for the determination of activity release and of aerosol characteristics under realistic light water reactor core melting conditions. It is composed of a high-frequency induction furnace, a ThO 2 crucible system, and a collection apparatus consisting of membrane and particulate filters. Thirty-gram samples of a representative core material mixture (corium) were melted under air, argon, or steam at 0.8 to 2.2 bar. In air at 2700 0 C, for example, the relative release was 0.4 to 0.7% for iron, chromium, and cobalt and 4 to 11% for tin, antimony, and manganese. Higher release values of 20 to 40% at lower temperatures (2150 0 C, air) were found for selenium, cadmium, tellurium, and cesium. The size distribution of the aerosol particles was trimodal with maxima at diameters of 0.17, 0.30, and 0.73 μm. The result of a qualitative x-ray microanalysis was that the main elements of the melt were contained in each aerosol particle. Further investigations will include larger melt masses and the additional influence of concrete on the release and aerosol behavior

  4. Modeling and simulation of Si crystal growth from melt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Lijun; Liu, Xin; Li, Zaoyang [National Engineering Research Center for Fluid Machinery and Compressors, School of Energy and Power Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710049 (China); Miyazawa, Hiroaki; Nakano, Satoshi; Kakimoto, Koichi [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Kasuga 816-8580 (Japan)

    2009-07-01

    A numerical simulator was developed with a global model of heat transfer for any crystal growth taking place at high temperature. Convective, conductive and radiative heat transfers in the furnace are solved together in a conjugated way by a finite volume method. A three-dimensional (3D) global model was especially developed for simulation of heat transfer in any crystal growth with 3D features. The model enables 3D global simulation be conducted with moderate requirement of computer resources. The application of this numerical simulator to a CZ growth and a directional solidification process for Si crystals, the two major production methods for crystalline Si for solar cells, was introduced. Some typical results were presented, showing the importance and effectiveness of numerical simulation in analyzing and improving these kinds of Si crystal growth processes from melt. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  5. The synergy of modeling and novel experiments for melt crystal growth research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derby, Jeffrey J.

    2018-05-01

    Computational modeling and novel experiments, when performed together, can enable the identification of new, fundamental mechanisms important for the growth of bulk crystals from the melt. In this paper, we present a compelling example of this synergy via the discovery of previously unascertained physical mechanisms that govern the engulfment of silicon carbide particles during the growth of crystalline silicon.

  6. Development of the core-model implementation technology for YGN1 simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, J. H.; Lee, M. S.; Lee, Y. K.; Su, I. Y.

    2004-01-01

    The existing core models for the domestic nuclear power plant simulators for PWRs are entirely imported from the foreign simulator vendor. To solve the time-accuracy problem in the poor capabilities in the computer in the early 1990s, several simplifications and assumptions for the neutronics governing equations were indispensible for the realtime calculations of nuclear phenomena in the core region. To overcome the shortages, a new core model based on the MASTER code certified by the domestic regulatory body (KINS) instead of the existing core models is now being developed especially for the realtime core solver for the YGN-1 simulator. This code is named R-MASTER (Realtime MASTER code). Due to the deficiency of the host computer, it is quitely required to run the R-MASTER code on the separate computer with high performance from the host computer on which all the other models than the core model are running. This paper deals with the applied protocols and procedures to guarantee the realtime communication and calculation of the R-MASTER code

  7. Apparatus for controlling molten core debris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golden, M.P.; Tilbrook, R.W.; Heylmun, N.F.

    1972-01-01

    Disclosed is an apparatus for containing, cooling, diluting, dispersing and maintaining subcritical the molten core debris assumed to melt through the bottom of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel in the unlikely event of a core meltdown. The apparatus is basically a sacrificial bed system which includes an inverted conical funnel, a core debris receptacle including a spherical dome, a spherically layered bed of primarily magnesia bricks, a cooling system of zig-zag piping in graphite blocks about and below the bed and a cylindrical liner surrounding the graphite blocks including a steel shell surrounded by firebrick. Tantalum absorber rods are used in the receptacle and bed. 9 claims, 22 figures

  8. Modelling the carbonation of cementitious matrixes by means of the unreacted-core model, UR-CORE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellote, M.; Andrade, C.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a model for the carbonation of cementitious matrixes (UR-CORE). The model is based on the principles of the 'unreacted-core' systems, typical of chemical engineering processes, in which the reacted product remains in the solid as a layer of inert ash, adapted for the specific case of carbonation. Development of the model has been undertaken in three steps: 1) Establishment of the controlling step in the global carbonation rate, by using data of fractional conversion of different phases of the cementitious matrixes, obtained by the authors through neutron diffraction data experiments, and reported in [M. Castellote, C. Andrade, X. Turrillas, J. Campo, G. Cuello, Accelerated carbonation of cement pastes in situ monitored by neutron diffraction, Cem. Concr. Res. (2008), doi:10.1016/j.cemconres.2008.07.002]. 2) Then, the model has been adapted and applied to the cementitious materials using different concentrations of CO 2 , with the introduction of the needed assumptions and factors. 3) Finally, the model has b