WorldWideScience

Sample records for core melt progression

  1. A study on the late core melt progression in pressurized water reactor severe accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jae Hong; Jeun Gyoo Dong; Bang, Kwang Hyun; Park, Seh In; Lim, Jae Hyuck; Park, Seong Yong [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Back, Hyung Hmm [Korea Maritime Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-03-15

    After TMI-2 accidents, it has been paid much attention to severe accidents beyond the design basis accidents and the research on the progress of severe accidents and mitigation and the closure of severe accidents has been actively performed. In particular, a great deal of uncertainties yet exist in the phase of late core melt progression and thus the research on this phase of severe accident progress has a key role in obtaining in severe accident mitigation and nuclear reactor safety. In the present study, physics of late core melt progression, experimental data and the major phenomenological models of computer codes are reviewed and a direction of reducing the uncertainties in the late core melt progression os proposed.

  2. Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1 Uncertainty Analysis-Exploration of Core Melt Progression Uncertain Parameters-Volume II.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denman, Matthew R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brooks, Dusty Marie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has conducted an uncertainty analysi s (UA) on the Fukushima Daiichi unit (1F1) accident progression wit h the MELCOR code. Volume I of the 1F1 UA discusses the physical modeling details and time history results of the UA. Volume II of the 1F1 UA discusses the statistical viewpoint. The model used was developed for a previous accident reconstruction investigation jointly sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The goal of this work was to perform a focused evaluation of uncertainty in core damage progression behavior and its effect on key figures - of - merit (e.g., hydrogen production, fraction of intact fuel, vessel lower head failure) and in doing so assess the applicability of traditional sensitivity analysis techniques .

  3. Melting of the Earth's inner core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubbins, David; Sreenivasan, Binod; Mound, Jon; Rost, Sebastian

    2011-05-19

    The Earth's magnetic field is generated by a dynamo in the liquid iron core, which convects in response to cooling of the overlying rocky mantle. The core freezes from the innermost surface outward, growing the solid inner core and releasing light elements that drive compositional convection. Mantle convection extracts heat from the core at a rate that has enormous lateral variations. Here we use geodynamo simulations to show that these variations are transferred to the inner-core boundary and can be large enough to cause heat to flow into the inner core. If this were to occur in the Earth, it would cause localized melting. Melting releases heavy liquid that could form the variable-composition layer suggested by an anomaly in seismic velocity in the 150 kilometres immediately above the inner-core boundary. This provides a very simple explanation of the existence of this layer, which otherwise requires additional assumptions such as locking of the inner core to the mantle, translation from its geopotential centre or convection with temperature equal to the solidus but with composition varying from the outer to the inner core. The predominantly narrow downwellings associated with freezing and broad upwellings associated with melting mean that the area of melting could be quite large despite the average dominance of freezing necessary to keep the dynamo going. Localized melting and freezing also provides a strong mechanism for creating seismic anomalies in the inner core itself, much stronger than the effects of variations in heat flow so far considered.

  4. Melting and Crystallization at Core Mantle Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiquet, G.; Pradhan, G. K.; Siebert, J.; Auzende, A. L.; Morard, G.; Antonangeli, D.; Garbarino, G.

    2015-12-01

    Early crystallization of magma oceans may generate original compositional heterogeneities in the mantle. Dense basal melts may also be trapped in the lowermost mantle and explain mantle regions with ultralow seismic velocities (ULVZs) near the core-mantle boundary [1]. To test this hypothesis, we first constructed the solidus curve of a natural peridotite between 36 and 140 gigapascals using laser-heated diamond anvil cells. In our experiments, melting at core-mantle boundary pressures occurs around 4100 ± 150 K, which is a value that can match estimated mantle geotherms. Similar results were found for a chondritic mantle [2] whereas much lower pyrolitic melting temperatures were recently proposed from textural and chemical characterizations of quenched samples [3]. We also investigated the melting properties of natural mid ocean ridge basalt (MORB) up to core-mantle boundary (CMB) pressures. At CMB pressure (135 GPa), we obtain a MORB solidus temperature of 3950 ±150 K. If our solidus temperatures are in good agreement with recent results proposed for a similar composition [4], the textural and chemical characterizations of our recovered samples made by analytical transmission electron microscope indicate that CaSiO3 perovskite (CaPv) is the liquidus phase in the entire pressure range up to CMB. The partial melt composition is enriched in FeO, which suggests that such partial melts could be gravitationnally stable at the core mantle boundary. Our observations are tested against calculations made using a self-consistent thermodynamic database for the MgO-FeO-SiO2 system from 20 GPa to 140 GPa [5]. These observations and calculations provide a first step towards a consistent thermodynamic modelling of the crystallization sequence of the magma ocean, which shows that the existence of a dense iron rich and fusible layer above the CMB at the end of the crystallization is plausible [5], which is in contradiction with the conclusions drawn in [4]. [1] Williams

  5. Influence of Modelling Options in RELAP5/SCDAPSIM and MAAP4 Computer Codes on Core Melt Progression and Reactor Pressure Vessel Integrity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siniša Šadek

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available RELAP5/SCDAPSIM and MAAP4 are two widely used severe accident computer codes for the integral analysis of the core and the reactor pressure vessel behaviour following the core degradation. The objective of the paper is the comparison of code results obtained by application of different modelling options and the evaluation of influence of thermal hydraulic behaviour of the plant on core damage progression. The analysed transient was postulated station blackout in NPP Krško with a leakage from reactor coolant pump seals. Two groups of calculations were performed where each group had a different break area and, thus, a different leakage rate. Analyses have shown that MAAP4 results were more sensitive to varying thermal hydraulic conditions in the primary system. User-defined parameters had to be carefully selected when the MAAP4 model was developed, in contrast to the RELAP5/SCDAPSIM model where those parameters did not have any significant impact on final results.

  6. The study of core melting phenomena in reactor severe accident of PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jae Hong; Jeun, Gyoo Dong; Park, Seh In; Lim, Jae Hyuck; Park, Seong Yong [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Bang, Kwang Hyun; Kim, Ki Yong [Korea Maritime Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-03-15

    After TMI-2 accident, it has been paid much attention to severe accidents beyond the design basis accidents and the research on the progress of severe accidents and mitigation and the closure of severe accidents has been actively performed. In particular, a great deal of uncertainties yet exist in the phase of late core melt progression and thus the research on this phase of severe accident progress has a key role in obtaining confidence in severe accident mitigation and nuclear reactor safety. In the present study, physics of late core melt progression, experimental data and the major phenomenological models of computer codes are reviewed and a direction of reducing the uncertainties in the late core melt progression is proposed.

  7. The study of core melting phenomena in reactor severe accident of PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jae Hong; Jeun, Gyoo Dong; Park, Seh In; Lim, Jae Hyuck; Park, Seong Yong [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Bang, Kwang Hyun; Kim, Ki Yong [Korea Maritime Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-03-15

    After TMI-2 accident, it has been paid much attention to severe accidents beyond the design basis accidents and the research on the progress of severe accidents and mitigation and the closure of severe accidents has been actively performed. In particular, a great deal of uncertainties yet exist in the phase of late core melt progression and thus the research on this phase of severe accident progress has a key role in obtaining confidence in severe accident mitigation and nuclear reactor safety. In the present study, physics of late core melt progression, experimental data and the major phenomenological models of computer codes are reviewed and a direction of reducing the uncertainties in the late core melt progression is proposed.

  8. Ex-Vessel Core Melt Modeling Comparison between MELTSPREAD-CORQUENCH and MELCOR 2.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robb, Kevin R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Farmer, Mitchell [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Francis, Matthew W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-03-01

    System-level code analyses by both United States and international researchers predict major core melting, bottom head failure, and corium-concrete interaction for Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1 (1F1). Although system codes such as MELCOR and MAAP are capable of capturing a wide range of accident phenomena, they currently do not contain detailed models for evaluating some ex-vessel core melt behavior. However, specialized codes containing more detailed modeling are available for melt spreading such as MELTSPREAD as well as long-term molten corium-concrete interaction (MCCI) and debris coolability such as CORQUENCH. In a preceding study, Enhanced Ex-Vessel Analysis for Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1: Melt Spreading and Core-Concrete Interaction Analyses with MELTSPREAD and CORQUENCH, the MELTSPREAD-CORQUENCH codes predicted the 1F1 core melt readily cooled in contrast to predictions by MELCOR. The user community has taken notice and is in the process of updating their systems codes; specifically MAAP and MELCOR, to improve and reduce conservatism in their ex-vessel core melt models. This report investigates why the MELCOR v2.1 code, compared to the MELTSPREAD and CORQUENCH 3.03 codes, yield differing predictions of ex-vessel melt progression. To accomplish this, the differences in the treatment of the ex-vessel melt with respect to melt spreading and long-term coolability are examined. The differences in modeling approaches are summarized, and a comparison of example code predictions is provided.

  9. Melting of MORB at core-mantle boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Gopal K.; Fiquet, Guillaume; Siebert, Julien; Auzende, Anne-Line; Morard, Guillaume; Antonangeli, Daniele; Garbarino, Gaston

    2015-12-01

    We investigated the melting properties of natural mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) up to core-mantle boundary (CMB) pressures using laser-heated diamond anvil cell. Textural and chemical characterizations of quenched samples were performed by analytical transmission electron microscopy. We used in situ X-ray diffraction primarily for phase identification whereas our melting criterion based on laser power versus temperature plateau combined with textural analysis of recovered solidus and subsolidus samples is accurate and unambiguous. At CMB pressure (135 GPa), the MORB solidus temperature is 3970 (± 150) K. Quenched melt textures observed in recovered samples indicate that CaSiO3 perovskite (CaPv) is the liquidus phase in the entire pressure range up to CMB. The partial melt composition derived from the central melt pool is enriched in FeO, which suggests that such melt pockets may be gravitationally stable at the core mantle boundary.

  10. Continuous melting and ion chromatographic analyses of ice cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, T M; Schwikowski, M; Gäggele, H W

    2001-06-22

    A new method for determining concentrations of organic and inorganic ions in ice cores by continuous melting and contemporaneous ion chromatographic analyses was developed. A subcore is melted on a melting device and the meltwater produced is collected in two parallel sample loops and then analyzed simultaneously by two ion chromatographs, one for anions and one for cations. For most of the analyzed species, lower or equal blank values were achieved with the continuous melting and analysis technique compared to the conventional analysis. Comparison of the continuous melting and ion chromatographic analysis with the conventional analysis of a real ice core segment showed good agreement in concentration profiles and total amounts of ionic species. Thus, the newly developed method is well suited for ice core analysis and has the advantages of lower ice consumption, less time-consuming sample preparation and lower risk of contamination.

  11. Crust behavior and erosion rate prediction of EPR sacrificial material impinged by core melt jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Gen; Liu, Ming, E-mail: ming.liu@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Wang, Jinshi; Chong, Daotong; Yan, Junjie

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • A numerical code was developed to analyze melt jet-concrete interaction in the frame of MPS method. • Crust and ablated concrete layer at UO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} melt and concrete interface periodically developed and collapsed. • Concrete surface temperature fluctuated around a low temperature and ablation temperature. • Concrete erosion by Fe-Zr melt jet was significantly faster than that by UO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} melt jet. - Abstract: Sacrificial material is a special ferro-siliceous concrete, designed in the ex-vessel core melt stabilization system of European Pressurized water Reactor (EPR). Given a localized break of RPV lower head, the melt directly impinges onto the dry concrete in form of compact jet. The concrete erosion behavior influences the failure of melt plug, and further affects melt spreading. In this study, a numerical code was developed in the frame of Moving Particle Semi-implicit (MPS) method, to analyze the crust behavior and erosion rate of sacrificial concrete, impinged by prototypic melt jet. In validation of numerical modeling, the time-dependent erosion depth and erosion configuration matched well with the experimental data. Sensitivity study of sacrificial concrete erosion indicates that the crust and ablated concrete layer presented at UO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} melt and concrete interface, whereas no crust could be found in the interaction of Fe-Zr melt with concrete. The crust went through stabilization-fracture-reformation periodic process, accompanied with accumulating and collapsing of molten concrete layer. The concrete surface temperature fluctuated around a low temperature and ablation temperature. It increased as the concrete surface layer was heated to melting, and dropped down when the cold concrete was revealed. The erosion progression was fast in the conditions of small jet diameter and large concrete inclination angle, and it was significantly faster in the erosion by metallic melt jet than by oxidic melt jet.

  12. Melting of subducted basalt at the core-mantle boundary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrault, Denis; Pesce, Giacomo; Bouhifd, Mohamed Ali; Bolfan-Casanova, Nathalie; Hénot, Jean-Marc; Mezouar, Mohamed

    2014-05-23

    The geological materials in Earth's lowermost mantle control the characteristics and interpretation of seismic ultra-low velocity zones at the base of the core-mantle boundary. Partial melting of the bulk lower mantle is often advocated as the cause, but this does not explain the nonubiquitous character of these regional seismic features. We explored the melting properties of mid-oceanic ridge basalt (MORB), which can reach the lowermost mantle after subduction of oceanic crust. At a pressure representative of the core-mantle boundary (135 gigapascals), the onset of melting occurs at ~3800 kelvin, which is ~350 kelvin below the mantle solidus. The SiO2-rich liquid generated either remains trapped in the MORB material or solidifies after reacting with the surrounding MgO-rich mantle, remixing subducted MORB with the lowermost mantle.

  13. 2D model for melt progression through rods and debris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fichot, F. [IPSN/DRS, CEA Cadarache, St. Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2001-07-01

    During the degradation of a nuclear core in a severe accident scenario, the high temperatures reached lead to the melting of materials. The formation of liquid mixtures at various elevations is followed by the flow of molten materials through the core. Liquid mixture may flow under several configurations: axial relocation along the rods, horizontal motion over a plane surface such as the core support plate or a blockage of material, 2D relocation through a debris bed, etc.. The two-dimensional relocation of molten material through a porous debris bed, implemented for the simulation of late degradation phases, has opened a new way to the elaboration of the relocation model for the flow of liquid mixture along the rods. It is based on a volume averaging method, where wall friction and capillary effects are taken into account by introducing effective coefficients to characterize the solid matrix (rods, grids, debris, etc.). A local description of the liquid flow is necessary to derive the effective coefficients. Heat transfers are modelled in a similar way. The derivation of the conservation equations for the liquid mixture falling flow (momentum) in two directions (axial and radial-horizontal) and for the heat exchanges (energy) are the main points of this new model for simulating melt progression. In this presentation, the full model for the relocation and solidification of liquid materials through a rod bundle or a debris bed is described. It is implemented in the ICARE/CATHARE code, developed by IPSN in Cadarache. The main improvements and advantages of the new model are: A single formulation for liquid mixture relocation, in 2D, either through a rod bundle or a porous debris bed, Extensions to complex structures (grids, by-pass, etc..), The modeling of relocation of a liquid mixture over plane surfaces. (author)

  14. Quantifying signal dispersion in a hybrid ice core melting system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breton, Daniel J; Koffman, Bess G; Kurbatov, Andrei V; Kreutz, Karl J; Hamilton, Gordon S

    2012-11-06

    We describe a microcontroller-based ice core melting and data logging system allowing simultaneous depth coregistration of a continuous flow analysis (CFA) system (for microparticle and conductivity measurement) and a discrete sample analysis system (for geochemistry and microparticles), both supplied from the same melted ice core section. This hybrid melting system employs an ice parcel tracking algorithm which calculates real-time sample transport through all portions of the meltwater handling system, enabling accurate (1 mm) depth coregistration of all measurements. Signal dispersion is analyzed using residence time theory, experimental results of tracer injection tests and antiparallel melting of replicate cores to rigorously quantify the signal dispersion in our system. Our dispersion-limited resolution is 1.0 cm in ice and ~2 cm in firn. We experimentally observe the peak lead phenomenon, where signal dispersion causes the measured CFA peak associated with a given event to be depth assigned ~1 cm shallower than the true event depth. Dispersion effects on resolution and signal depth assignment are discussed in detail. Our results have implications for comparisons of chemistry and physical properties data recorded using multiple instruments and for deconvolution methods of enhancing CFA depth resolution.

  15. The modeling of core melting and in-vessel corium relocation in the APRIL code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim. S.W.; Podowski, M.Z.; Lahey, R.T. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    This paper is concerned with the modeling of severe accident phenomena in boiling water reactors (BWR). New models of core melting and in-vessel corium debris relocation are presented, developed for implementation in the APRIL computer code. The results of model testing and validations are given, including comparisons against available experimental data and parametric/sensitivity studies. Also, the application of these models, as parts of the APRIL code, is presented to simulate accident progression in a typical BWR reactor.

  16. Melting the core of giant planets: impact on tidal dissipation

    CERN Document Server

    Mathis, S

    2015-01-01

    Giant planets are believed to host central dense rocky/icy cores that are key actors in the core-accretion scenario for their formation. In the same time, some of their components are unstable in the temperature and pressure regimes of central regions of giant planets and only ab-initio EOS computations can address the question of the state of matter. In this framework, several works demonstrated that erosion and redistribution of core materials in the envelope must be taken into account. These complex mechanisms thus may deeply modify giant planet interiors for which signatures of strong tidal dissipation have been obtained for Jupiter and Saturn. The best candidates to explain this dissipation are the viscoelastic dissipation in the central dense core and turbulent friction acting on tidal inertial waves in their fluid convective envelope. In this work, we study the consequences of the possible melting of central regions for the efficiency of each of these mechanisms.

  17. In-Core-Instrumentation Methods for 3-Dimensional Distribution Information of Reactor Core Temperatures and Melt-down

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Yeong Cheol [KHNP, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Eun, Myoung; Kim, Sung Jun [Woojin Inc., Hwaseong (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    The tsunami-induced nuclear accident at Japanese Fukushima power plants in March 2011 has revealed some weaknesses in the severe accident monitoring system. The plant instrumentation did not provide utility, safety experts, and government officials with adequate and reliable information. The information on the reactor core damage and coolability is critical for making decisions correctly as well as in a timely manner during the course of the mitigation of severe accidents. Current Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR)s have an In-Core-Instrumentation (ICI) system that measures the temperature distribution of the top surface (i.e. Core Exit Temperatures) of the reactor core mainly to indicate when to begin Severe Accident Mitigation Guidelines (SAMG). This design concept giving only the core exit temperature has limitations in terms of sufficiency as well as availability of the information necessary for diagnosis on the status of the degraded core and the effectiveness of the measures taken as mitigation strategies. The reactor core exit temperatures are not sufficient to support the assessment of the degree of the core damage and the location of the molten core debris and recognition whether the core damage progresses on or it is mitigated. The ICI location being at the top of the reactor core also makes the ICI thermocouples vulnerable to melt-down because the upper part of the reactor core uncovers first, thereby melt down at the early stage of the accident. This means that direct indication of reactor core temperature will be lost and unavailable during the later stages of severe accident. To address the aforementioned weaknesses of the current ICIs, it is necessary to develop a new ICI system that provides information that is more expanded and more reliable for accident mitigation. With the enhanced information available, the SAMG can be prepared in more refined and effective way based on the direct and suitable indication of status of damages and the 3-dimensional

  18. Termination of light-water reactor core-melt accidents with a chemical core catcher: the core-melt source reduction system (COMSORS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Parker, G.W.; Rudolph, J.C.; Osborne-Lee, I.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kenton, M.A. [Dames and Moore, Westmont, IL (United States)

    1996-09-01

    The Core-Melt Source Reduction System (COMSORS) is a new approach to terminate light-water reactor core melt accidents and ensure containment integrity. A special dissolution glass is placed under the reactor vessel. If core debris is released onto the glass, the glass melts and the debris dissolves into the molten glass, thus creating a homogeneous molten glass. The molten glass, with dissolved core debris, spreads into a wide pool, distributing the heat for removal by radiation to the reactor cavity above or by transfer to water on top of the molten glass. Expected equilibrium glass temperatures are approximately 600 degrees C. The creation of a low-temperature, homogeneous molten glass with known geometry permits cooling of the glass without threatening containment integrity. This report describes the technology, initial experiments to measure key glass properties, and modeling of COMSORS operations.

  19. Models and correlations of the DEBRIS Late-Phase Melt Progression Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, R.C.; Gasser, R.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Reactor Safety Experiments Dept.

    1997-09-01

    The DEBRIS Late Phase Melt Progression Model is an assembly of models, embodied in a computer code, which is designed to treat late-phase melt progression in dry rubble (or debris) regions that can form as a consequence of a severe core uncover accident in a commercial light water nuclear reactor. The approach is fully two-dimensional, and incorporates a porous medium modeling framework together with conservation and constitutive relationships to simulate the time-dependent evolution of such regions as various physical processes act upon the materials. The objective of the code is to accurately model these processes so that the late-phase melt progression that would occur in different hypothetical severe nuclear reactor accidents can be better understood and characterized. In this report the models and correlations incorporated and used within the current version of DEBRIS are described. These include the global conservation equations solved, heat transfer and fission heating models, melting and refreezing models (including material interactions), liquid and solid relocation models, gas flow and pressure field models, and the temperature and compositionally dependent material properties employed. The specific models described here have been used in the experiment design analysis of the Phebus FPT-4 debris-bed fission-product release experiment. An earlier DEBRIS code version was used to analyze the MP-1 and MP-2 late-phase melt progression experiments conducted at Sandia National Laboratories for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

  20. Late-phase melt progression experiment: MP-2. Results and analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasser, R.D.; Gauntt, R.O.; Bourcier, S.C. [and others

    1997-05-01

    In-pile experiments addressing late-phase processes in Light Water Reactors (LWRs) were performed in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) at Sandia National Laboratories. Melt Progression (MP) experiments were designed to provide information to develop and verify computer models for analysis of LWR core damage in severe accidents. Experiments examine the formation and motion of ceramic molten pools in disrupted reactor core regions. The MP-2 experiment assembly consisted of: (1) a rubble bed of enriched UO{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2} simulating severely disrupted reactor core regions, (2) a ceramic/metallic crust representing blockage formed by early phase melting, relocation, and refreezing of core components, and (3) an intact rod stub region that remained in place below the blockage region. The test assembly was fission heated in the central cavity of the ACRR at an average rate of about 0.2 KA, reaching a peak molten pool temperature around 3400 K. Melting of the debris bed ceramic components was initiated near the center of the bed. The molten material relocated downward, refreezing to form a ceramic crust near the bottom of the rubble bed. As power levels were increased, the crust gradually remelted and reformed at progressively lower positions in the bed until late in the experiment when it penetrated into and attacked the ceramic/metallic blockage. The metallic components of the blockage region melted and relocated to the bottom of the intact rod stub region before the ceramic melt penetrated the blockage region from above. The ceramic pool penetrated halfway into the blockage region by the end of the experiment. Measurements of thermal response and material relocation are compared to the results of the computer simulations. Postexperiment examination of the assembly with the associated material interactions and metallurgy are also discussed in detail with the analyses and interpretation of results. 16 refs., 206 figs., 24 tabs.

  1. Water isotopic ratios from a continuously melted ice core sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Gkinis

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A new technique for on-line high resolution isotopic analysis of liquid water, tailored for ice core studies is presented. We build an interface between an Infra Red Cavity Ring Down Spectrometer (IR-CRDS and a Continuous Flow Analysis (CFA system. The system offers the possibility to perform simultaneuous water isotopic analysis of δ18O and δD on a continuous stream of liquid water as generated from a continuously melted ice rod. Injection of sub μl amounts of liquid water is achieved by pumping sample through a fused silica capillary and instantaneously vaporizing it with 100 % efficiency in a home made oven at a temperature of 170 °C. A calibration procedure allows for proper reporting of the data on the VSMOW scale. We apply the necessary corrections based on the assessed performance of the system regarding instrumental drifts and dependance on humidity levels. The melt rates are monitored in order to assign a depth scale to the measured isotopic profiles. Application of spectral methods yields the combined uncertainty of the system at below 0.1 ‰ and 0.5 ‰ for δ18O and δD, respectively. This performance is comparable to that achieved with mass spectrometry. Dispersion of the sample in the transfer lines limits the resolution of the technique. In this work we investigate and assess these dispersion effects. By using an optimal filtering method we show how the measured profiles can be corrected for the smoothing effects resulting from the sample dispersion. Considering the significant advantages the technique offers, i.e. simultaneuous measurement of δ18O and δD, potentially in combination with chemical components that are traditionally measured on CFA systems, notable reduction on analysis time and power consumption, we consider it as an alternative to traditional isotope ratio mass spectrometry with the possibility to be deployed for field ice core studies. We present data acquired in the

  2. Water isotopic ratios from a continuously melted ice core sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Gkinis

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A new technique for on-line high resolution isotopic analysis of liquid water, tailored for ice core studies is presented. We built an interface between a Wavelength Scanned Cavity Ring Down Spectrometer (WS-CRDS purchased from Picarro Inc. and a Continuous Flow Analysis (CFA system. The system offers the possibility to perform simultaneuous water isotopic analysis of δ18O and δD on a continuous stream of liquid water as generated from a continuously melted ice rod. Injection of sub μl amounts of liquid water is achieved by pumping sample through a fused silica capillary and instantaneously vaporizing it with 100% efficiency in a~home made oven at a temperature of 170 °C. A calibration procedure allows for proper reporting of the data on the VSMOW–SLAP scale. We apply the necessary corrections based on the assessed performance of the system regarding instrumental drifts and dependance on the water concentration in the optical cavity. The melt rates are monitored in order to assign a depth scale to the measured isotopic profiles. Application of spectral methods yields the combined uncertainty of the system at below 0.1‰ and 0.5‰ for δ18O and δD, respectively. This performance is comparable to that achieved with mass spectrometry. Dispersion of the sample in the transfer lines limits the temporal resolution of the technique. In this work we investigate and assess these dispersion effects. By using an optimal filtering method we show how the measured profiles can be corrected for the smoothing effects resulting from the sample dispersion. Considering the significant advantages the technique offers, i.e. simultaneuous measurement of δ18O and δD, potentially in combination with chemical components that are traditionally measured on CFA systems, notable reduction on analysis time and power consumption, we consider it as an alternative to traditional isotope ratio mass spectrometry with the possibility to

  3. The study of core melting phenomena in reactor severe accident of PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeun, Gyoo Dong; Cho, Sung Won; Bang, Kwang Hyun; Park, Shane; Park, Seong Yong; Kim, Jin Man; Lim, Jae Hyuck; Song, Myung Jin [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-03-15

    TMI-2 accident is more valuable than the related experiments in the point of view that it is a real accident offering huge information about the late phase of severe accident. Therefore it gives out good standards for evaluation of code performance and inputs suitableness by comparing the accident data and simulated outputs. In this study SCDAP/REALAP5/MOD3.4 was selected for accident simulation. And sensitivity analysis was performed on varied cases to find out the most proper input variable about the late phase of core meting phenomena. Other plants and experimental facilities input deck were collected and analyzed for the sensitivity study and the shortcomings proposed by SCDAP/RELAP5 peer review were considered to the simulation. As a result gamma heating fraction in the input affect the progress of core melting phenomena. About this a study on the related model itself will be carried out.

  4. Water isotopic ratios from a continuously melted ice core sample

    CERN Document Server

    Gkinis, V; Blunier, T; Bigler, M; Schüpbach, S; Kettner, E; Johnsen, S J

    2014-01-01

    A new technique for on-line high resolution isotopic analysis of liquid water, tailored for ice core studies is presented. We built an interface between a Wavelength Scanned Cavity Ring Down Spectrometer (WS-CRDS) purchased from Picarro Inc. and a Continuous Flow Analysis (CFA) system. The system offers the possibility to perform simultaneous water isotopic analysis of $\\delta^{18}$O and $\\delta$D on a continuous stream of liquid water as generated from a continuously melted ice rod. Injection of sub ${\\mu}$l amounts of liquid water is achieved by pumping sample through a fused silica capillary and instantaneously vaporizing it with 100% efficiency in a home made oven. A calibration procedure allows for proper reporting of the data on the VSMOW--SLAP scale. Application of spectral methods yields the combined uncertainty of the system at below 0.1 permil and 0.5 permil for $\\delta^{18}$O and $\\delta$D, respectively. This performance is comparable to that achieved with mass spectrometry. Dispersion of the sampl...

  5. A phenomenological analysis of melt progression in the lower head of a pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seiler, J.M., E-mail: jean-marie.seiler@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DTN, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Tourniaire, B. [EDF/Septen, Lyon (France)

    2014-03-15

    Highlights: • We propose a phenomenological description of melt progression into the lower head. • We examine changes in heat loads on the vessel. • Heat loads are more severe than emphasized by the bounding situation assumption. • Both primary circuit and ex-vessel reflooding are necessary for in-vessel retention. • Vessel failure conditions are examined. - Abstract: The analysis of in-vessel corium cooling (IVC) and retention (IVR) involves the description of very complex and transient physical phenomena. To get round this difficulty, “bounding” situations are often emphasized for the demonstration of corium coolability, by vessel flooding and/or by reactor pit flooding. This approach however comes up against its own limitations. More realistic melt progression scenarios are required to provide plausible corium configurations and vessel failure conditions. Work to develop more realistic melt progression scenarios has been done at CEA, in collaboration with EDF. Development has concentrated on the French 1300 MWe PWR, considering both dry scenarios and the possibility of flooding of the RPC (reactor primary circuit) and/or the reactor pit. The models used for this approach have been derived from the analysis of the TMI2 accident and take benefit from the lessons derived from several programs related to pool thermal hydraulics (BALI, COPO, ACOPO, etc.), material interactions (RASPLAV, MASCA), critical heat flux (CHF) on the external surface of the vessel (KAIST, SULTAN, ULPU), etc. Important conclusions of this work are as follows: (a)After the start of corium melting and onset of melt formation in the core at low pressure (∼1 to 5 bars), it seems questionable that RPV (reactor pressure vessel) reflooding alone would be sufficient to achieve corium retention in the vessel; (b)If the vessel is not cooled externally, it may fail due to local heat-up before the whole core fuel inventory is relocated in the lower head; (c)Even if the vessel is

  6. RESEARCH OF THE FEEDING SPEED ADOPTING CORED-WIRE METHOD TO SPHEROIDIZE DUCTILE IRON MELT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G.W.Chang; H.X.Wang; X.D.Yue; H.L.Zhang

    2008-01-01

    For settling the question of feeding speed in applying the cored-wire method to spheroidize ductile iron melt, ANSYS software was applied to simulate the heat transfer and mass transfer, and the melt time of the steel strip in the iron melt was determined by linking the heat transfer and mass transfer, and then the feeding speed was calculated. Conclusions have been drawn that the iron layer was formed on the surface of the cored-wire during the wire-feeding process. The thickness is 0.073 mm when the temperature of the iron melt is 1500℃, the time from formation to remelting of the iron layer is 0.063 s. When the temperature of the iron melt is below 1500℃, the time taken for the steel strip to melt is rapidly shortened. When the temperature of the iron melt is above 1500℃, the variation amplitude of the steel strip melt change with time is gradually diminished. The melt time of the steel strip is rapidly increased with the increase of the steel strip thickness. When the temperature of the iron melt is 1500℃ and the carbon content is 4%, the melt time of a steel strip, which has a thickness of 0.5 mm, is thrice that of a steel strip whose thickness is 0.3 mm. The calculation results of the feeding speed are basically in agreement with the applied feeding speed in the factory.

  7. Effect of periodic melting on geochemical and isotopic signals in an ice core from Lomonosovfonna, Svalbard

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pohjola, V.A.; Moore, J.C.; Isaksson, E.; Jauhiainen, T.; Wal, R.S.W. van de; Martma, T.; Meijer, H.A.J.; Vaikmäe, R.

    2002-01-01

    [1] We examine the quality of atmospherically deposited ion and isotope signals in an ice core taken from a periodically melting ice field, Lomonosovfonna in central Spitsbergen, Svalbard. The aim is to determine the degree to which the signals are altered by periodic melting of the ice. We use thre

  8. Effect of periodic melting on geochemical and isotopic signals in an ice core from Lomonosovfonna, Svalbard

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pohjola, V.A.; Moore, J.C.; Isaksson, E.; Jauhiainen, T.; Wal, R.S.W. van de; Martma, T.; Meijer, H.A.J.; Vaikmäe, R.

    2002-01-01

    [1] We examine the quality of atmospherically deposited ion and isotope signals in an ice core taken from a periodically melting ice field, Lomonosovfonna in central Spitsbergen, Svalbard. The aim is to determine the degree to which the signals are altered by periodic melting of the ice. We use thre

  9. Development of melting system for Measurement of trace elements and ions in ice core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Sang Bum; Lee, Khang Hyun; Hur, Soon Do; Soyol-Erene, Tseren-Ochir; Kim, Sun Mee; Chung, Ji Woong; Jun, Seong Joon [Korea Polar Research Institute, KIOST, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Sung Min [Dept. of Ocean Sciences, Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Chang Hee [Dept. of Chemistry and Research Institute for Basic Sciences, Jeju National University, Jeju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    We present a titanium (Ti) melting head divided into three zones as an improved melting system for decontaminating ice-core samples. This system was subjected to performance tests using short ice-core samples (4 × 4 cm{sup 2}, ⁓5 cm long). The procedural blanks (PBs) and detection limits of ionic species, with the exception of math formula, were comparable with published values, but for elements the experimental procedures should be refined to obtain valid Zn concentrations due to the PB of ⁓90.0 ± 16.2 ng/L. The improved melting system efficiently decontaminated the samples, as verified by the concentration profiles of elements and ions in the melted samples from the three melting-head zones. The recovery of trace elements in ice-core samples was ⁓70–120% at ⁓100 ng/L in artificial ice cores. Because of the memory effects between ice-core samples melted in series, the melting system should be rinsed at least 5–6 times (in a total volume of ⁓2.5 mL deionized water) after each melting procedure. Finally, as an application of this technique, trace elements were measured in ice-core samples recovered from the East Rongbuk Glacier, Mount Everest, (28°03′N, 86°96′E, 6518 m a.s.l.), and the concentrations of trace elements following mechanical chiseling and the melting method were compared.

  10. Ice core melt features in relation to Antarctic coastal climate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaczmarska, M.; Isaksson, E.; Karlöf, L.; Brandt, O.; Winther, J.G.; van de Wal, R.S.W.; van den Broeke, M.R.; Johnsen, S.J.

    2006-01-01

    Measurement of light intensity transmission was carried out on an ice core S100 from coastal Dronning Maud Land (DML). Ice lenses were observed in digital pictures of the core and recorded as peaks in the light transmittance record. The frequency of ice layer occurrence was compared with climate pro

  11. Crystallization of ion clouds in octupole traps: structural transitions, core melting, and scaling laws

    CERN Document Server

    Calvo, Florent; Yurtsever, Ersin

    2009-01-01

    The stable structures and melting properties of ion clouds in isotropic octupole traps are investigated using a combination of semi-analytical and numerical models, with a particular emphasis at finite size scaling effects. Small-size clouds are found to be hollow and arranged in shells corresponding approximately to the solutions of the Thomson problem. The shell structure is lost in clusters containing more than a few thousands of ions, the inner parts of the cloud becoming soft and amorphous. While melting is triggered in the core shells, the melting temperature unexpectedly follows the rule expected for three-dimensional dense particles, with a depression scaling linearly with the inverse radius.

  12. Melt spreading code assessment, modifications, and application to the EPR core catcher design.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, M. T .; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-03-30

    The Evolutionary Power Reactor (EPR) is under consideration by various utilities in the United States to provide base load electrical production, and as a result the design is undergoing a certification review by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The severe accident design philosophy for this reactor is based upon the fact that the projected power rating results in a narrow margin for in-vessel melt retention by external cooling of the reactor vessel. As a result, the design addresses ex-vessel core melt stabilization using a mitigation strategy that includes: (1) an external core melt retention system to temporarily hold core melt released from the vessel; (2) a layer of 'sacrificial' material that is admixed with the melt while in the core melt retention system; (3) a melt plug in the lower part of the retention system that, when failed, provides a pathway for the mixture to spread to a large core spreading chamber; and finally, (4) cooling and stabilization of the spread melt by controlled top and bottom flooding. The overall concept is illustrated in Figure 1.1. The melt spreading process relies heavily on inertial flow of a low-viscosity admixed melt to a segmented spreading chamber, and assumes that the melt mass will be distributed to a uniform height in the chamber. The spreading phenomenon thus needs to be modeled properly in order to adequately assess the EPR design. The MELTSPREAD code, developed at Argonne National Laboratory, can model segmented, and both uniform and nonuniform spreading. The NRC is thus utilizing MELTSPREAD to evaluate melt spreading in the EPR design. MELTSPREAD was originally developed to support resolution of the Mark I containment shell vulnerability issue. Following closure of this issue, development of MELTSPREAD ceased in the early 1990's, at which time the melt spreading database upon which the code had been validated was rather limited. In particular, the database that was utilized for initial

  13. Melting-induced stratification above the Earth's inner core due to convective translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alboussière, Thierry; Deguen, Renaud; Melzani, Mickaël

    2010-08-05

    In addition to its global North-South anisotropy, there are two other enigmatic seismological observations related to the Earth's inner core: asymmetry between its eastern and western hemispheres and the presence of a layer of reduced seismic velocity at the base of the outer core. This 250-km-thick layer has been interpreted as a stably stratified region of reduced composition in light elements. Here we show that this layer can be generated by simultaneous crystallization and melting at the surface of the inner core, and that a translational mode of thermal convection in the inner core can produce enough melting and crystallization on each hemisphere respectively for the dense layer to develop. The dynamical model we propose introduces a clear asymmetry between a melting and a crystallizing hemisphere which forms a basis for also explaining the East-West asymmetry. The present translation rate is found to be typically 100 million years for the inner core to be entirely renewed, which is one to two orders of magnitude faster than the growth rate of the inner core's radius. The resulting strong asymmetry of buoyancy flux caused by light elements is anticipated to have an impact on the dynamics of the outer core and on the geodynamo.

  14. Examination of offsite radiological emergency measures for nuclear reactor accidents involving core melt. [PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldrich, D.C.; McGrath, P.E.; Rasmussen, N.C.

    1978-06-01

    Evacuation, sheltering followed by population relocation, and iodine prophylaxis are evaluated as offsite public protective measures in response to nuclear reactor accidents involving core-melt. Evaluations were conducted using a modified version of the Reactor Safety Study consequence model. Models representing each measure were developed and are discussed. Potential PWR core-melt radioactive material releases are separated into two categories, ''Melt-through'' and ''Atmospheric,'' based upon the mode of containment failure. Protective measures are examined and compared for each category in terms of projected doses to the whole body and thyroid. Measures for ''Atmospheric'' accidents are also examined in terms of their influence on the occurrence of public health effects.

  15. Melting of iron at the Earth's core conditions by molecular dynamics simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. N. Wu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available By large scale molecular dynamics simulations of solid-liquid coexistence, we have investigated the melting of iron under pressures from 0 to 364 GPa. The temperatures of liquid and solid regions, and the pressure of the system are calculated to estimate the melting point of iron. We obtain the melting temperature of iron is about 6700±200K under the inner-outer core boundary, which is in good agreement with the result of Alfè et al. By the pair analysis technique, the microstructure of liquid iron under higher pressures is obviously different from that of lower pressures and ambient condition, indicating that the pressure-induced liquid-liquid phase transition may take place in iron melts.

  16. Melting-induced stratification above the Earth's inner core due to convective translation

    CERN Document Server

    Alboussiere, Thierry; Melzani, Mickael; 10.1038/nature09257

    2012-01-01

    In addition to its global North-South anisotropy(1), there are two other enigmatic seismological observations related to the Earth's inner core: asymmetry between its eastern and western hemispheres(2-6) and the presence of a layer of reduced seismic velocity at the base of the outer core(6-12). This 250-km-thick layer has been interpreted as a stably stratified region of reduced composition in light elements(13). Here we show that this layer can be generated by simultaneous crystallization and melting at the surface of the inner core, and that a translational mode of thermal convection in the inner core can produce enough melting and crystallization on each hemisphere respectively for the dense layer to develop. The dynamical model we propose introduces a clear asymmetry between a melting and a crystallizing hemisphere which forms a basis for also explaining the East-West asymmetry. The present translation rate is found to be typically 100 million years for the inner core to be entirely renewed, which is one...

  17. Silicate melt inclusions and glasses in lunar soil fragments from the Luna 16 core sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roedder, E.; Weiblen, P.W.

    1972-01-01

    More than 2000 fragments were studied microscopically, and electron microprobe analyses were made of 39 selected areas, from a few square mm of polished surface, through 75- to 425-??m fragments of lunar soil from two samples of the Luna 16 core. The silicate melt inclusions and glasses differ in important details from those observed earlier in the Apollo samples. Melt inclusions in olivine contain epitaxially oriented daughter crystals, but also show a similar epitaxy around the outside of the crystals not observed in previous lunar samples. Melt inclusions in ilmenite suggest trapping at successive stages in a differentiation sequence. There is abundant evidence for late-stage silicate liquid immiscibility, with melt compositions similar but not identical to those from Apollo 11 and 12. A comparison of the alkali ratio of any given bulk rock analysis with that of its late-stage, high-silica melt shows gross differences for different rocks. This is pertinent to understanding late-stage differentiation processes. Glass fragments and spherules exhibit a wide range of crystallization textures, reflecting their wide range of compositions and cooling histories. No significant differences were found between the two portions of core examined (Zones A and D). ?? 1972.

  18. Properties of liquid iron along the melting line up to Earth-core pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomin, Yu D; Ryzhov, V N; Brazhkin, V V

    2013-07-17

    We report a molecular dynamics study of the transport coefficients and the infinite frequency shear modulus of liquid iron at high temperatures and high pressures. We observe a simultaneous rise of both the shear viscosity and the diffusion coefficient along the melting line and estimate whether liquid iron can vitrify under Earth-core conditions. We show that in the conditions of the model studied in our work iron demonstrates a moderate increase of viscosity along the melting line. It is also demonstrated that at the limit of high temperatures and high pressures the liquid iron behaves similarly to the soft sphere system with exponent n ≈ 4.6.

  19. The melting curve of Ni to 125 GPa: implications for Earth's Fe rich core alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, O. T.; Wood, I. G.; Dobson, D. P.; Vocadlo, L.; Thomson, A. R.; Wann, E.; Wang, W.; Edgington, A.; Morard, G.; Mezouar, N.; Walter, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    The melting curve of Ni has been determined to 125 GPa using laser-heated diamond anvil cell (LH-DAC) experiments and two melting criteria: the appearance of liquid diffuse scattering (LDS) during in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) and simultaneous plateaux in temperature vs. laser power functions [1]. Our melting curve (Fig. 1) is in good agreement with most theoretical studies [e.g. 2] and the available shock wave data (Fig. 2). It is, however, dramatically steeper than the previous off-line LH-DAC studies in which the determination of melting was based on the visual observation of motion aided by the laser speckle method [e.g. 3]. We estimate the melting point of Ni at the inner-core boundary (ICB; 330 GPa) to be 5800±700 K (2σ), ~2500 K higher than the estimate based on the laser speckle method [3] and within error of Fe (6230±500 K) as determined in a similar in situ LH-DAC study [4]. We find that laser speckle based melting curves coincide with the onset of rapid sub-solidus recrystallization, suggesting that visual observations of motion may have misinterpreted dynamic recrystallization as melt convection. Our new melting curve suggests that the reduction in ICB temperature due to the alloying of Ni with Fe is likely to be significantly smaller than would be expected had the earlier experimental Ni melting studies been correct. We have applied our methodology to a range of other transition metals (Mo, Ti, V, Cu). In the case of Mo, Ti and V the melting curves are in good agreement with the shock compression and theoretical melting studies but hotter and steeper than those based on the laser speckle method, as with Ni. Cu is an exception in which all studies agree, including those employing the laser speckle method. These results go a long way toward resolving the the long-standing controversy over the phase diagrams of the transition metals as determined from static LH-DAC studies on the one hand, and theoretical and dynamic compression studies on the other

  20. The influence of melting on the kinematic development of the Himalayan crystalline core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Current hypotheses for the development and emplacement of the Himalayan crystalline core are 1) models with intense upper plate out-of-sequence activity (i.e., tunneling of channel flow, and some modes of critical taper wedge behavior) and 2) models in which the upper plate mainly records basal accretion of horses (i.e., duplexing). The two concepts can be considered end-members. A signal difference between these two models is the role of melting. The intense upper plate deformation envisioned in the first set of models has been hypothesized to be largely a product of partial melting, particularly in channel flow models. Specifically, the persistent presence of melt in the middle crust of the upper plate may dramatically lower the viscosity of these rocks, allowing distributed deformation. The second set of models - duplexing - predicts in-sequence thrusting with only minor out-of-sequence deformation. Stacking of a duplex acts like a deli cheese-slicing machine: slice after slice is cut from the intact block to a stack of slices, but neither the block (~down-going plate) nor the stack (~upper plate) features much internal deformation. In this model, partial melting produces no significant kinematic impact. The dominant preserved structural elements across the Himalayan crystalline core rocks are flattening and L-S fabrics. Structurally high portions of the crystalline core locally display complex outcrop-scale deformation associated with migmatitic rocks, and contain km-scale leucogranite bodies; both features developed in the early to middle Miocene. The flattening and L-S fabrics have been interpreted to record either (A) southwards channel tunneling across the upper plate, or (B) fabric development during metamorphism of the down-going plate, prior to accretion to the upper plate. The deformation of migmatitic rock and emplacement of leucogranite have been interpreted in support of widespread distributed deformation. Alternatively, these features may have

  1. Estimates of early containment loads from core melt accidents. Draft report for comment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1985-12-01

    The thermal-hydraulic processes and corium debris-material interactions that can result from core melting in a severe accident have been studied to evaluate the potential effect of such phenomena on containment integrity. Pressure and temperature loads associated with representative accident sequences have been estimated for the six various LWR containment types used within the United States. Summaries distilling the analyses are presented and an interpretation of the results provided. 13 refs., 68 figs., 39 tabs.

  2. Melting of iron close to Earth's inner core boundary conditions and beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Harmand, M; Mazevet, S; Bouchet, J; Denoeud, A; Dorchies, F; Feng, Y; Fourment, C; Galtier, E; Gaudin, J; Guyot, F; Kodama, R; Koenig, M; Lee, H J; Miyanishi, K; Morard, G; Musella, R; Nagler, B; Nakatsutsumi, M; Ozaki, N; Recoules, V; Toleikis, S; Vinci, T; Zastrau, U; Zhu, D; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A

    2014-01-01

    Several important geophysical features such as heat flux at the Core-Mantle Boundary or geodynamo production are intimately related with the temperature profile in the Earth's core. However, measuring the melting curve of iron at conditions corresponding to the Earth inner core boundary under pressure of 330 GPa has eluded scientists for several decades. Significant discrepancies in previously reported iron melting temperatures at high pressure have called into question the validity of dynamic measurements. We report measurements made with a novel approach using X-ray absorption spectroscopy using an X-ray free electron laser source coupled to a laser shock experiment. We determine the state of iron along the shock Hugoniot up to 420 GPa (+/- 50) and 10800 K (+/- 1390) and find an upper boundary for the melting curve of iron by detecting solid iron at 130 GPa and molten at 260, 380 and 420 GPa along the shock Hugoniot. Our result establishes unambiguous agreement between dynamic measurement and recent extrapo...

  3. Progress of research on corneal collagen cross-linking for corneal melting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke-Ren Xiao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Corneal collagen cross-linking(CXLcould increase the mechanical strength, biological stability and halt ectasia progression due to covalent bond formed by photochemical reaction between ultraviolet-A and emulsion of riboflavin between collagen fibers in corneal stroma. Corneal melting is an autoimmune related noninfectious corneal ulcer. The mechanism of corneal melting, major treatment, the basic fundamental of ultraviolet-A riboflavin induced CXL and the clinical researches status and experiment in CXL were summarized in the study.

  4. The role of partial melting and extensional strain rates in the development of metamorphic core complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, P. F.; Teyssier, C.; Whitney, D. L.

    2009-11-01

    Orogenic collapse involves extension and thinning of thick and hot (partially molten) crust, leading to the formation of metamorphic core complexes (MCC) that are commonly cored by migmatite domes. Two-dimensional thermo-mechanical Ellipsis models evaluate the parameters that likely control the formation and evolution of MCC: the nature and geometry of the heterogeneity that localizes MCC, the presence/absence of a partially molten layer in the lower crust, and the rate of extension. When the localizing heterogeneity is a normal fault in the upper crust, the migmatite core remains in the footwall of the fault, resulting in an asymmetric MCC; if the localizing heterogeneity is point like region within the upper crust, the MCC remains symmetric throughout its development. Therefore, asymmetrically located migmatite domes likely reflect the dip of the original normal fault system that generated the MCC. Modeling of a severe viscosity drop owing to the presence of a partially molten layer, compared to a crust with no melt, demonstrates that the presence of melt slightly enhances upward advection of material and heat. Our experiments show that, when associated with boundary-driven extension, far-field horizontal extension provides space for the domes. Therefore, the buoyancy of migmatite cores contributes little to the outer envelope of metamorphic core complexes, although it may play a significant role in the internal dynamics of the partially molten layer. The presence of melt also favors heterogeneous bulk pure shear of the dome as opposed to the bulk simple shear, which dominates in melt-absent experiments. Melt presence affects the shape of P-T-t paths only slightly for material located near the top of the low-viscosity layer but leads to more complex flow paths for material inside the layer. The effect of extension rate is significant: at high extension rate (cm yr - 1 in the core complex region), partially molten crust crystallizes and cools along a high

  5. Ice core evidence for extensive melting of the greenland ice sheet in the last interglacial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koerner, R M

    1989-05-26

    Evidence from ice at the bottom of ice cores from the Canadian Arctic Islands and Camp Century and Dye-3 in Greenland suggests that the Greenland ice sheet melted extensively or completely during the last interglacial period more than 100 ka (thousand years ago), in contrast to earlier interpretations. The presence of dirt particles in the basal ice has previously been thought to indicate that the base of the ice sheets had melted and that the evidence for the time of original growth of these ice masses had been destroyed. However, the particles most likely blew onto the ice when the dimensions of the ice caps and ice sheets were much smaller. Ice texture, gas content, and other evidence also suggest that the basal ice at each drill site is superimposed ice, a type of ice typical of the early growth stages of an ice cap or ice sheet. If the present-day ice masses began their growth during the last interglacial, the ice sheet from the earlier (Illinoian) glacial period must have competely or largely melted during the early part of the same interglacial period. If such melting did occur, the 6-meter higher-than-present sea level during the Sangamon cannot be attributed to disintegration of the West Antarctic ice sheet, as has been suggested.

  6. Core English KS3 real progress in reading

    CERN Document Server

    Belsey, David; Page, Emma

    2014-01-01

    Real Progress in Reading shares the core knowledge and skills that successful readers use in order to appreciate, understand and critically read a wide range of texts. Aligned to the new National Curriculum for English and with progression built into each unit, this book helps students to build a firm foundation in reading. Contents include:. - How to identify audience and purpose of texts. - How to select evidence from texts. - How to compare texts. - How to analyse features of form, structure and presentation.

  7. Investigation of the melt-down behaviour of massive radial core enclosures during LWR accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hering, W.; Sengpiel, W.; Messainguiral, C. [CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-les-Durance (France). DRN

    2000-11-01

    At the Institute for Reactor Safety (IRS) of the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (FZK) accident analyses were performed for the projected European pressurised water reactor (EPR) up to 1999 using the best estimate severe core damage code SCDAP/RELAP5 (S/R5). From various scenarios investigated with S/R5 the loss-of-offsite power (LOOP) and the 46 cm{sup 2} small break loss of coolant accident (SBLOCA) were selected to be discussed here in some detail. To simulate the heavy reflector (HR) and core barrel (CB) behaviour beyond the capabilities of S/R5 mod 3.2 a detailed stand alone analytical tool (LOWCOR2) was developed and used to determine the time of HR melting, its axial position, the melting velocity and the melt mass. Furthermore, results of MELCOR calculations performed at Siemens/KWU were used for the SBLOCA scenario. The analyses were extended by a feasibility study to find out whether ICARE2 and the commercial FEM code FIDAP are applicable. The axial position of HR and CB melt through strongly depends on the scenario an ranges between 1.0 m and 2.5 m core elevation. The time period to melt down the HR inner edges lasts up to 17 min and a complete melt through of HR and CB is in the order of magnitude of one hour. At melt through time LOWCOR2 calculated a molten steel mass between 10 Mg and 32 Mg and a melt relocation rate of 35 kg/s along the HR inner surface into the core cavity. (orig.) [German] Am Institut fuer Reaktorsicherheit (IRS) des Forschungszentrums Karlsruhe (FZK) wurden bis 1999 Unfallanalysen fuer den projektierten Europaeischen Druckwasser Reaktor (EPR) mit dem ''best estimate'' Kernschmelzcode SCDAP/RELAP5 (S/R5) durchgefuehrt. Von den verschiedenen mit S/R5 untersuchten Szenarien wurden der ''Ausfall der Wechselspannungsnetze'' (LOOP) und das kleine Leck (46 cm{sup 2}) im kalten Strang der Hauptkuehlmittelleitung (SBLOCA) fuer eine ausfuehrlichere Diskussion ausgewaehlt. Um das Verhalten des &apos

  8. Stabilization of Bilateral Progressive Rheumatoid Corneal Melt with Infliximab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheelah F. Antao

    2012-01-01

    Results. A patient with rheumatoid arthritis presented with bilateral PUK following a 2-month history of ocular discomfort and redness. His systemic prednisolone (PDN and methotrexate (MTX were increased and, despite an initial favorable response, bilateral recurrent corneal perforations ensued. Both eyes underwent cyanoacrylate glue repair, amniotic membrane transplantation (AMT, and penetrating keratoplasty (PKP. Recurrence of the disease and bilateral perforations of the second PKP in both eyes prompted administration of intravenous infliximab immediately after the fourth PKP. The disease activity rapidly settled in both eyes, and at eighteen-month followup, after 12 infliximab infusions, the PUK remains quiescent with no further graft thinning or perforation. Conclusion. Infliximab can be used to arrest the progression of severe bilateral rheumatoid PUK in cases that are refractory to conventional treatment.

  9. Partitioning of potassium between silicates and sulphide melts - Experiments relevant to the earth's core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goettel, K. A.

    1972-01-01

    The partitioning of potassium between roedderite, K2Mg5Si12O30 and an Fe-FeS melt was investigated at temperatures about 40 C above the Fe-FeS eutectic. Roedderite was considered a prime candidate for one of the potassium-bearing phases in the primitive earth because roedderite and merrihueite are the only two silicates containing essential potassium which have been identified in stony meteorites. Application of the results to a primitive chondritic earth is discussed, and it is concluded that extraction of most of the earth's potassium into the Fe-FeS core would occur under the conditions in the early earth.-

  10. Fission product release phenomena during core melt accidents in metal fueled heavy water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellison, P G; Hyder, M L; Monson, P R; Randolph, H W [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (USA); Hagrman, D L [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA); McClure, P R; Leonard, M T [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (USA)

    1990-01-01

    The phenomena that determine fission product release rates from a core melting accident in a metal-fueled, heavy water reactor are described in this paper. This information is obtained from the analysis of the current metal fuel experimental data base and from the results of analytical calculations. Experimental programs in place at the Savannah River Site are described that will provide information to resolve uncertainties in the data base. The results of the experiments will be incorporated into new severe accident computer codes recently developed for this reactor design. 47 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Diverse Melting Modes and Structural Collapse of Hollow Bimetallic Core-Shell Nanoparticles: A Perspective from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rao; Shao, Gui-Fang; Zeng, Xiang-Ming; Wen, Yu-Hua

    2014-11-01

    Introducing hollow structures into metallic nanoparticles has become a promising route to improve their catalytic performances. A fundamental understanding of thermal stability of these novel nanostructures is of significance for their syntheses and applications. In this article, molecular dynamics simulations have been employed to offer insights into the thermodynamic evolution of hollow bimetallic core-shell nanoparticles. Our investigation reveals that for hollow Pt-core/Au-shell nanoparticle, premelting originates at the exterior surface, and a typical two-stage melting behavior is exhibited, similar to the solid ones. However, since the interior surface provides facilitation for the premelting initiating at the core, the two-stage melting is also observed in hollow Au-core/Pt-shell nanoparticle, remarkably different from the solid one. Furthermore, the collapse of hollow structure is accompanied with the overall melting of the hollow Pt-core/Au-shell nanoparticle while it occurs prior to that of the hollow Au-core/Pt-shell nanoparticle and leads to the formation of a liquid-core/solid-shell structure, although both of them finally transform into a mixing alloy with Au-dominated surface. Additionally, the existence of stacking faults in the hollow Pt-core/Au-shell nanoparticle distinctly lowers its melting point. This study could be of great importance to the design and development of novel nanocatalysts with both high activity and excellent stability.

  12. Diverse Melting Modes and Structural Collapse of Hollow Bimetallic Core-Shell Nanoparticles: A Perspective from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rao; Shao, Gui-Fang; Zeng, Xiang-Ming; Wen, Yu-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Introducing hollow structures into metallic nanoparticles has become a promising route to improve their catalytic performances. A fundamental understanding of thermal stability of these novel nanostructures is of significance for their syntheses and applications. In this article, molecular dynamics simulations have been employed to offer insights into the thermodynamic evolution of hollow bimetallic core-shell nanoparticles. Our investigation reveals that for hollow Pt-core/Au-shell nanoparticle, premelting originates at the exterior surface, and a typical two-stage melting behavior is exhibited, similar to the solid ones. However, since the interior surface provides facilitation for the premelting initiating at the core, the two-stage melting is also observed in hollow Au-core/Pt-shell nanoparticle, remarkably different from the solid one. Furthermore, the collapse of hollow structure is accompanied with the overall melting of the hollow Pt-core/Au-shell nanoparticle while it occurs prior to that of the hollow Au-core/Pt-shell nanoparticle and leads to the formation of a liquid-core/solid-shell structure, although both of them finally transform into a mixing alloy with Au-dominated surface. Additionally, the existence of stacking faults in the hollow Pt-core/Au-shell nanoparticle distinctly lowers its melting point. This study could be of great importance to the design and development of novel nanocatalysts with both high activity and excellent stability. PMID:25394424

  13. Fate of MgSiO3 melts at core-mantle boundary conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petitgirard, Sylvain; Malfait, Wim J; Sinmyo, Ryosuke; Kupenko, Ilya; Hennet, Louis; Harries, Dennis; Dane, Thomas; Burghammer, Manfred; Rubie, Dave C

    2015-11-17

    One key for understanding the stratification in the deep mantle lies in the determination of the density and structure of matter at high pressures, as well as the density contrast between solid and liquid silicate phases. Indeed, the density contrast is the main control on the entrainment or settlement of matter and is of fundamental importance for understanding the past and present dynamic behavior of the deepest part of the Earth's mantle. Here, we adapted the X-ray absorption method to the small dimensions of the diamond anvil cell, enabling density measurements of amorphous materials to unprecedented conditions of pressure. Our density data for MgSiO3 glass up to 127 GPa are considerably higher than those previously derived from Brillouin spectroscopy but validate recent ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. A fourth-order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state reproduces our experimental data over the entire pressure regime of the mantle. At the core-mantle boundary (CMB) pressure, the density of MgSiO3 glass is 5.48 ± 0.18 g/cm(3), which is only 1.6% lower than that of MgSiO3 bridgmanite at 5.57 g/cm(3), i.e., they are the same within the uncertainty. Taking into account the partitioning of iron into the melt, we conclude that melts are denser than the surrounding solid phases in the lowermost mantle and that melts will be trapped above the CMB.

  14. USING HIGH Mg-CONTENT CORED-WIRE TO SPHEROIDIZE AND DESULPHURIZE DUCTILE IRON MELT IN INDUSTRIAL EXPERIMENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R.Z. Wu; B.D. Sun; H.J. Ni; Y.B. Wu; H.S. Wu; J.G. Ge

    2004-01-01

    40% Mg-content cored-wire was used to desulphurize and spheroidize ductile iron melt in industrial experiments. The optimal feeding speed and suitable treatment temperature were determined in the experiments. And cored-wire method and pouring method were compared.Conclusions have been drawn that, under these conditions in the experiments, the optimal feeding speed is 15m/min, treatment temperature should be as low as possible, 1400-1450℃ generally; and cored-wire method can act more effective in ductile iron melt desulphurization and spheroid than pouring method.

  15. Decontamination of metals by melt refining/slagging: First year progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizia, R.E. [ed.; Worcester, S.A.; Twidwell, L.G.; Paolini, D.J.; Weldon, T.A.

    1994-03-01

    As the number of nuclear installations undergoing decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) increases, current radioactive waste storage space is consumed and establishment of new waste storage areas becomes increasingly difficult. The problem of handling and storing radioactive scrap metal (RSM) gains increasing importance in the DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program. To alleviate present and future waste storage problems, Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company (WINCO) is managing a program for the recycling of RSM for beneficial use within the DOE complex. As part of that effort, Montana Tech has been awarded a contract to help optimize melting and refining technologies for the recycling of stainless steel RSM. The scope of the Montana Tech program includes a literature survey, a decontaminating slag design study, small scale melting studies to determine optimum slag compositions for removal of radioactive contaminant surrogates, analysis of preferred melting techniques, and coordination of pilot scale melting demonstrations (100-500 lbs) to be conducted at selected commercial facilities. This program will identify methods that can be used to recycle stainless steel RSM which will be used to fabricate high and low level waste canisters for the Idaho Waste Immobilization Facility. This report summarizes the results of an extensive literature review and the first year`s progress on slag design, small-scale melt refining of surrogate-containing stainless steel (presently only a three month effort), and pilot-scale preparation of surrogate master ingots.

  16. Partitioning of Moderately Siderophile Elements Among Olivine, Silicate Melt, and Sulfide Melt: Constraints on Core Formation in the Earth and Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaetani, Glenn A.; Grove, Timothy L.

    1997-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of Variations in the fugacities of oxygen and sulfur on the partitioning of first series transition metals (V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni. and Cu) and W among coexisting sulfide melt, silicate melt, and olivine. Experiments were performed at 1 atm pressure, 1350 C, with the fugacities of oxygen and sulfur controlled by mixing CO2, CO, and SO2 gases. Starting compositions consisted of a CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2-FeO-Na2O analog for a barred olivine chondrule from an ordinary chondrite and a synthetic komatiite. The f(sub O2)/f(sub S2), conditions ranged from log of f(sub O2) = -7.9 to - 10.6, with log of f(sub S2) values ranging from - 1.0 to -2.5. Our experimental results demonstrate that the f(sub O2)/f(sub S2) dependencies of sulfide melt/silicate melt partition coefficients for the first series transition metals arc proportional to their valence states. The f(sub O2)/f(sub S2) dependencies for the partitioning of Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu are weaker than predicted on the basis of their valence states. Variations in conditions have no significant effect on olivine/melt partitioning other than those resulting from f(sub O2)-induced changes in the valence state of a given element. The strong f(sub O2)/f(sub S2) dependence for the olivine/silicate melt partitioning of V is attributable to a change of valence state, from 4+ to 3+, with decreasing f(sub O2). Our experimentally determined partition coefficients are used to develop models for the segregation of sulfide and metal from the silicate portion of the early Earth and the Shergottite parent body (Mars). We find that the influence of S is not sufficient to explain the overabundance of siderophile and chalcophile elements that remained in the mantle of the Earth following core formation. Important constraints on core formation in Mars are provided by our experimental determination of the partitioning of Cu between silicate and sulfide melts. When combined with existing estimates for siderophile

  17. Hard-Core Bosons on the Kagome Lattice: Valence-Bond Solids and Their Quantum Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isakov, S. V.; Wessel, S.; Melko, R. G.; Sengupta, K.; Kim, Yong Baek

    2006-10-01

    Using large scale quantum Monte Carlo simulations and dual vortex theory, we analyze the ground state phase diagram of hard-core bosons on the kagome lattice with nearest-neighbor repulsion. In contrast with the case of a triangular lattice, no supersolid emerges for strong interactions. While a uniform superfluid prevails at half filling, two novel solid phases emerge at densities ρ=1/3 and ρ=2/3. These solids exhibit an only partial ordering of the bosonic density, allowing for local resonances on a subset of hexagons of the kagome lattice. We provide evidence for a weakly first-order phase transition at the quantum melting point between these solid phases and the superfluid.

  18. Methods to prevent the source term of methyl lodide during a core melt accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karhu, A. [VTT Energy (Finland)

    1999-11-01

    The purpose of this literature review is to gather available information of the methods to prevent a source term of methyl iodide during a core melt accident. The most widely studied methods for nuclear power plants include the impregnated carbon filters and alkaline additives and sprays. It is indicated that some deficiencies of these methods may emerge. More reactive impregnants and additives could make a great improvement. As a new method in the field of nuclear applications, the potential of transition metals to decompose methyl iodide, is introduced in this review. This area would require an additional research, which could elucidate the remaining questions of the reactions. The ionization of the gaseous methyl iodide by corona-discharge reactors is also shortly described. (au)

  19. Melting curve of the deep mantle applied to properties of early magma ocean and actual core-mantle boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrault, Denis; Lo Nigro, Giacomo; Bolfan-Casanova, Nathalie; Bouhifd, Mohamed A.; Garbarino, Gaston; Mezouar, Mohamed

    2010-05-01

    Our planet experienced partial melting early in its history as a consequence of energy release due to accretion. Partial mantle melting could still happen today in the lowermost mantle. Occurrence of melting is primordial for the chemical segregation between the different Earth's reservoirs and for the dynamics of the whole planet. Melting of iron-alloys is relatively easy to achieve, but the silicated mantle happens to be more refractory. We investigated experimentally melting properties of two starting material, forsterite and chondritic-mantle, at pressures ranging from 25 to 140 GPa, using laser-heated diamond anvil cell coupled with synchrotron radiation. We show that partial melting in the lowermost mantle, as suggested by seismology on the basis of the ultra-low velocity zones (ULVZ), requires temperatures above 4200 K at the core-mantle boundary. At low pressures, our curve plots significantly lower than previous reports. Compared to recent estimates of mantle geotherm, while this temperature remains possible if the Earth's core is very hot, it is more likely that ULVZs correspond to high concentration of incompatible elements driven down to the D"-layer by subducting slabs or extracted out from the outer core. When our chondritic melting curve is coupled with recent isentropic temperature profiles for a magma ocean, we obtain a correlation between magma ocean depth and the potential temperature (Tp) at its surface; an ocean depth of 1000 km (equivalent to ~40 GPa) corresponds to Tp=2000 K, which happens to be significantly hotter than the estimated surface temperature of a sustained magma ocean. It emphasizes the importance of a lid at the magma ocean surface at an epoch as early as that of core-mantle segregation.

  20. Studies of Behavior Melting Temperature Characteristics for Multi Thermocouple In-Core Instrument Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Donghyup; Chae, Myoungeun; Kim, Sungjin; Lee, Kyulim [Woojin inc, Hwasung (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Bottom-up type in-core instruments (ICIs) are used for the pressurized water reactors of OPR-1000, APR- 1400 in order to measure neutron flux and temperature in the reactor. It is a well-known technique and a proven design using years in the nuclear field. ICI consists of one pair of K-type thermocouple, five self-powered neutron detectors (SPNDs) and one back ground detector. K-type thermocouple's purpose is to measure the core exit temperature (CET) in the reactor. The CET is a very important factor for operating nuclear power plants and it is 327 .deg. C when generally operating the reactor in the nuclear power plant(NPP) in case of OPR- 1000. If the CET will exceed 650 .deg. C, Operators in the main control room should be considered to be an accident situation in accordance with a severe accident management guidance(SAMG). The Multi Thermocouple ICI is a new designed ICI assuming severe accident conditions. It consists of four more thermocouples than the existing design, so it has five Ktype thermocouples besides the thermocouple measuring CET is located in the same elevation as the ICI. Each thermocouple is able to be located in the desired location as required. The Multi Thermocouple ICI helps to measure the temperature distribution of the entire reactor. In addition, it will measure certain point of melted core because of the in-vessel debris of nuclear fuel when an accident occurs more seriously. In this paper, to simulate a circumstance such as a nuclear reactor severe accident was examined. In this study, the K-type thermocouples of Multi Thermocouple ICI was confirmed experimentally to be able to measure up to 1370 .deg. C before the thermocouples have been melted. And after the thermocouples were melted by debris, it was able to be monitored that the signal of EMF directed the infinite value of voltage. Therefore through the results of the test, it can be assumed that if any EMF data among the Multi Thermocouple ICI will direct the infinite value

  1. Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative 2 Clinical Core: Progress and plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aisen, Paul S; Petersen, Ronald C; Donohue, Michael; Weiner, Michael W

    2015-07-01

    This article reviews the current status of the Clinical Core of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI), and summarizes planning for the next stage of the project. Clinical Core activities and plans were synthesized based on discussions among the Core leaders and external advisors. The longitudinal data in ADNI-2 provide natural history data on a clinical trials population and continue to inform refinement and standardization of assessments, models of trajectories, and clinical trial methods that have been extended into sporadic preclinical Alzheimer's disease (AD). Plans for the next phase of the ADNI project include maintaining longitudinal follow-up of the normal and mild cognitive impairment cohorts, augmenting specific clinical cohorts, and incorporating novel computerized cognitive assessments and patient-reported outcomes. A major hypothesis is that AD represents a gradually progressive disease that can be identified precisely in its long presymptomatic phase, during which intervention with potentially disease-modifying agents may be most useful. Copyright © 2015 The Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. MELCOR 1.8.2 assessment: The MP-1 and MP-2 late phase melt progression experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tautges, T.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Thermal/Hydraulic Analysis Dept.

    1994-05-01

    MELCOR is a fully integrated, engineering-level computer code being developed at Sandia National Laboratories for the USNRC, that models the entire spectrum of severe accident phenomena in a unified framework for both BWRs and PWRs. As a part of an ongoing assessment program, MELCOR has been used to model the MP-1 and MP-2 experiments, which provided data for late-phase melt progression in PWR geometries. Core temperature predicted by MELCOR were within 250--500 K of measured data in both MP-1 and MP-2. Relocation in the debris bed and metallic crust regions of MP-2 was predicted accurately compared to PIE data. Temperature gradients in lower portions of the test bundle were not predicted well in both MP-1 and MP-2, due to the lack of modeling of the heat transfer path to the cooling jacket in those portions of the test bundles. Fifteen sensitivity studies were run on various core (COR), control volume hydrodynamics (CVH) and heat structures (HS) package parameters. No unexpected sensitivities were found, and in particular there were no sensitivities to reduced time step, finer nodalization or to computer platform. Calculations performed by the DEBRIS and TAC2D codes for MP-1 and MP-2 showed better agreement with measured data than those performed by MELCOR. This was expected, through, due to the fully 2-dimensional modeling used in the other codes.

  3. Natural convection of the oxide pool in a three-layer configuration of core melts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Su-Hyeon; Park, Hae-Kyun; Chung, Bum-Jin, E-mail: bjchung@khu.ac.kr

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Natural convection of oxide pool in 3-layer configuration during IVR was investigated. • High Ra was achieved by using mass transfer experiments based on analogy concept. • Heat ratio to light metal layer was 14% higher for 3-layer configuration than 2-layer one. • Heat transfer to heavy metal layer was poor and hence heat load to side wall increased. • Angular heat loads to side wall showed strengthened heat focusing at uppermost location. - Abstract: We investigated the natural convection of the oxide layer in a three-layer configuration of core melts in a severe accident. In order to achieve high modified Rayleigh numbers of 10{sup 12}–10{sup 13}, mass transfer experiments were performed using a copper sulfate electroplating system based upon the analogy between heat and mass transfer. Four different cooling conditions of the top and the bottom plates were tested. The upward heat ratios were 14% higher for three-layer than for two-layer due to the reduced heights and the downward heat ratios were lower the same amount. The local Nusselt numbers for the top and the bottom plates were measured and compared with the two layer configuration. To explore the heat load to the reactor vessel, the angle-dependent heat fluxes at the side wall, were measured and compared with the two-layer configuration. Heat load to the side wall and peak heat at the uppermost location were intensified for the three-layer configuration.

  4. EVIDENCE BASED PROGRESSIVE CORE STABILIZATION EXERCISE FORMATION FOR LOW CORE ENDURANCE INDIVIDUALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulandaivelan.S

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Low back pain (LBP is the commonest pain among individuals affecting more than half of the population. Segmental stabilization exercises gaining popularity among many treatment choices available to the therapist. Transverses abdominis (TA and Multifidi (MF are the two core muscles that were affected by LBP. This descriptive partial review study examines how various exercises recruits TA and MF? Then how do one to prognoses them progressively over short period of time? And what is the dose, volume needed? This review put an attempt to solve the above questions based on recent evidence based practice. Finally we have given exercise schedule for physiotherapists to follow.

  5. Size effect in the melting and freezing behaviors of Al/Ti core-shell nanoparticles using molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin-Ping, Zhang; Yang-Yang, Zhang; Er-Ping, Wang; Cui-Ming, Tang; Xin-Lu, Cheng; Qiu-Hui, Zhang

    2016-03-01

    The thermal stability of Ti@Al core/shell nanoparticles with different sizes and components during continuous heating and cooling processes is examined by a molecular dynamics simulation with embedded atom method. The thermodynamic properties and structure evolution during continuous heating and cooling processes are investigated through the characterization of the potential energy, specific heat distribution, and radial distribution function (RDF). Our study shows that, for fixed Ti core size, the melting temperature decreases with Al shell thickness, while the crystallizing temperature and glass formation temperature increase with Al shell thickness. Diverse melting mechanisms have been discovered for different Ti core sized with fixed Al shell thickness nanoparticles. The melting temperature increases with the Ti core radius. The trend agrees well with the theoretical phase diagram of bimetallic nanoparticles. In addition, the glass phase formation of Al-Ti nanoparticles for the fast cooling rate of 12 K/ps, and the crystal phase formation for the low cooling rate of 0.15 K/ps. The icosahedron structure is formed in the frozen 4366 Al-Ti atoms for the low cooling rate. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 21401064), the Science & Technology Development Program of Henan Province, China (Grant No. 142300410282), and the Program of Henan Educational Committee, China (Grant No. 13B140986).

  6. Anionic Pt in Silicate Melts at Low Oxygen Fugacity: Speciation, Partitioning and Implications for Core Formation Processes on Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medard, E.; Martin, A. M.; Righter, K.; Malouta, A.; Lee, C.-T.

    2017-01-01

    Most siderophile element concentrations in planetary mantles can be explained by metal/ silicate equilibration at high temperature and pressure during core formation. Highly siderophile elements (HSE = Au, Re, and the Pt-group elements), however, usually have higher mantle abundances than predicted by partitioning models, suggesting that their concentrations have been set by late accretion of material that did not equilibrate with the core. The partitioning of HSE at the low oxygen fugacities relevant for core formation is however poorly constrained due to the lack of sufficient experimental constraints to describe the variations of partitioning with key variables like temperature, pressure, and oxygen fugacity. To better understand the relative roles of metal/silicate partitioning and late accretion, we performed a self-consistent set of experiments that parameterizes the influence of oxygen fugacity, temperature and melt composition on the partitioning of Pt, one of the HSE, between metal and silicate melts. The major outcome of this project is the fact that Pt dissolves in an anionic form in silicate melts, causing a dependence of partitioning on oxygen fugacity opposite to that reported in previous studies.

  7. Recent progress in the melt-process technique of high-temperature superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Ikuta, H; Mizutani, U

    1999-01-01

    Recently, the performance of high-temperature super conductors prepared by the melt-process technique has been greatly improved. This progress was accomplished by the addition of Ag into the starting materials of the Sm-Ba-CuO $9 system, which prevents the formation of severe macro-sized cracks in the finished samples. The magnetic flux density trapped by this material has now reached 9 T at 25 K, which is comparable to the magnetic flux density produced by $9 ordinary superconducting magnets. The amount of magnetic flux density that can be trapped by the sample is limited by the mechanical strength rather than superconducting properties of the material. The increase in the mechanical $9 strength of the material is important both for further improvement of the material properties and for ensuring reliability of the material in practical applications. (20 refs).

  8. FY13 Annual Progress Report for SECA Core Technology Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Koeppel, Brian J.

    2014-01-31

    This progress report covers technical work performed during fiscal year 2013 at PNNL under Field Work Proposal (FWP) 40552. The report highlights and documents technical progress in tasks related to advanced cell and stack component materials development and computational design and simulation. Primary areas of emphasis for the materials development work were metallic interconnects and coatings, cathode and anode stability/degradation, glass seals, and advanced testing under realistic stack conditions: Metallic interconnects and coatings • Effects of surface modifications to AISI 441 (prior to application of protective spinel coatings) on oxide scale growth and adhesion were evaluated as a function of temperature and time. Cathode stability/degradation • Effects of cathode air humidity on performance and stability of SOFC cathodes were investigated by testing anode-supported cells as a function of time and temperature. • In-situ high temperature XRD measurements were used to correlate changes in cathode lattice structure and composition with performance of anode-supported button cells. Anode stability/degradation • Effects of high fuel steam content on Ni/YSZ anodes were investigated over a range of time and temperature. • Vapor infiltration and particulate additions were evaluated as a potential means of improving tolerance of Ni/YSZ anodes to sulfur-bearing fuel species. Glass seals • A candidate compliant glass-based seal materials were evaluated in terms of microstructural evolution and seal performance as a function of time and temperature. Stack fixture testing • The SECA CTP stack test fixture was used for intermediate and long-term evaluation of candidate materials and processes. Primary areas of emphasis for the computational modeling work were coarse methodology, degradation of stack components, and electrochemical modeling: Coarse methodology • Improvements were made to both the SOFC-MP and SOFC ROM simulation tools. Degradation of stack

  9. Recovering Paleo-Records from Antarctic Ice-Cores by Coupling a Continuous Melting Device and Fast Ion Chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severi, Mirko; Becagli, Silvia; Traversi, Rita; Udisti, Roberto

    2015-11-17

    Recently, the increasing interest in the understanding of global climatic changes and on natural processes related to climate yielded the development and improvement of new analytical methods for the analysis of environmental samples. The determination of trace chemical species is a useful tool in paleoclimatology, and the techniques for the analysis of ice cores have evolved during the past few years from laborious measurements on discrete samples to continuous techniques allowing higher temporal resolution, higher sensitivity and, above all, higher throughput. Two fast ion chromatographic (FIC) methods are presented. The first method was able to measure Cl(-), NO3(-) and SO4(2-) in a melter-based continuous flow system separating the three analytes in just 1 min. The second method (called Ultra-FIC) was able to perform a single chromatographic analysis in just 30 s and the resulting sampling resolution was 1.0 cm with a typical melting rate of 4.0 cm min(-1). Both methods combine the accuracy, precision, and low detection limits of ion chromatography with the enhanced speed and high depth resolution of continuous melting systems. Both methods have been tested and validated with the analysis of several hundred meters of different ice cores. In particular, the Ultra-FIC method was used to reconstruct the high-resolution SO4(2-) profile of the last 10,000 years for the EDML ice core, allowing the counting of the annual layers, which represents a key point in dating these kind of natural archives.

  10. Melting relations in the Fe-S-Si system at high pressure and temperature: Implications for the thermal structure of the planetary cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakairi, T.; Ohtani, E.; Sakai, T.; Kamada, S.; Sakamaki, T.; Hirao, N.

    2014-12-01

    It is widely accepted that the Earth's core is mainly composed of iron and contains light elements to account for its density deficit. Alloying with light elements significantly affects the physical properties of iron and depresses its melting temperature. Therefore, the melting relation of the Fe-light elements system is the key to clarify the thermal structure of the Earth's core. Although there are many candidates for light elements in the core, sulfur and silicon are considered to be the major light elements. Some geochemical models predicted that sulfur and silicon could be present not only in the core of the Earth but also in the core of other terrestrial planets such as Mars and Mercury. To better understand the properties of the planetary cores, we investigated the melting relations of the Fe-S-Si system under high-pressure conditions. Here, we report the melting relations in the Fe-S-Si system up to 60 GPa. Melting experiments were performed in the pressure range of 20-60 GPa and the temperature range of 1300-2500 K using a double-sided laser-heated diamond anvil cell combined with X-ray diffraction technique. In situ X-ray diffraction experiments were conducted at the BL10XU beamline of the SPring-8 facility. The melting detection was based on disappearance of the X-ray diffraction peaks of the sample. On the basis of X-ray diffraction patterns, we confirmed that iron-silicon alloy which hcp and fcc structure and Fe3S are stable phases under subsolidus conditions. Both solidus and liquidus temperatures are significantly lower than the melting temperature of pure Fe and increases with pressure in this study. In order to draw the melting curve as a function of pressure, we fitted the present results using the Simon's equation. Our results could provide important constraints on the thermal structure of the planetary cores.

  11. Superheating and melting within aluminum core-oxide shell nanoparticles for a broad range of heating rates: multiphysics phase field modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Yong Seok; Levitas, Valery I

    2016-10-19

    The external surface of metallic particles is usually covered by a thin and strong oxide shell, which significantly affects superheating and melting of particles. The effects of geometric parameters and heating rate on characteristic melting and superheating temperatures and melting behavior of aluminum nanoparticles covered by an oxide shell were studied numerically. For this purpose, the multiphysics model that includes the phase field model for surface melting, a dynamic equation of motion, a mechanical model for stress and strain simulations, interface and surface stresses, and the thermal conduction model including thermoelastic and thermo-phase transformation coupling as well as transformation dissipation rate was formulated. Several nontrivial phenomena were revealed. In comparison with a bare particle, the pressure generated in a core due to different thermal expansions of the core and shell and transformation volumetric expansion during melting, increases melting temperatures with the Clausius-Clapeyron factor of 60 K GPa(-1). For the heating rates Q ≤ 10(9) K s(-1), melting temperatures (surface and bulk start and finish melting temperatures, and maximum superheating temperature) are independent of Q. For Q ≥ 10(12) K s(-1), increasing Q generally increases melting temperatures and temperature for the shell fracture. Unconventional effects start for Q ≥ 10(12) K s(-1) due to kinetic superheating combined with heterogeneous melting and geometry. The obtained results are applied to shed light on the initial stage of the melt-dispersion-mechanism of the reaction of Al nanoparticles. Various physical phenomena that promote or suppress melting and affect melting temperatures and temperature of the shell fracture for different heating-rate ranges are summarized in the corresponding schemes.

  12. Using high resolution tritium profiles to quantify the effects of melt on two Spitsbergen ice cores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wel, L.G.; Streurman, H.J.; Isaksson, E.; Helsen, M.M.; van de Wal, R.S.W.; Martma, T.; Pohjola, V.A.; Moore, J.C.; Meijer, H.A.J.

    2011-01-01

    Ice cores from small ice caps provide valuable climatic information, additional to that of Greenland and Antarctica. However, their integrity is usually compromised by summer meltwater percolation. To determine to what extent this can affect such ice cores, we performed high-resolution tritium measu

  13. Using high resolution tritium profiles to quantify the effects of melt on two Spitsbergen ice cores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wel, L.G.; Streurman, H.J.; Isaksson, E.; Helsen, M.M.; van de Wal, R.S.W.; Martma, T.; Pohjola, V.A.; Moore, J.C.; Meijer, H.A.J.

    2011-01-01

    Ice cores from small ice caps provide valuable climatic information, additional to that of Greenland and Antarctica. However, their integrity is usually compromised by summer meltwater percolation. To determine to what extent this can affect such ice cores, we performed high-resolution tritium measu

  14. Using high resolution tritium profiles to quantify the effects of melt on two Spitsbergen ice cores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wel, L.G.; Streurman, H.J.; Isaksson, E.; Helsen, M.M.; van de Wal, R.S.W.; Martma, T.; Pohjola, V.A.; Moore, J.C.; Meijer, H.A.J.

    2011-01-01

    Ice cores from small ice caps provide valuable climatic information, additional to that of Greenland and Antarctica. However, their integrity is usually compromised by summer meltwater percolation. To determine to what extent this can affect such ice cores, we performed high-resolution tritium

  15. Melting-induced stratification above the Earth's inner core due to convective translation

    OpenAIRE

    Alboussiere, Thierry; Deguen, Renaud; Melzani, Mickael

    2010-01-01

    International audience; In addition to its global North-South anisotropy(1), there are two other enigmatic seismological observations related to the Earth's inner core: asymmetry between its eastern and western hemispheres(2-6) and the presence of a layer of reduced seismic velocity at the base of the outer core(6-12). This 250-km-thick layer has been interpreted as a stably stratified region of reduced composition in light elements(13). Here we show that this layer can be generated by simult...

  16. High Pressure Melting of Iron with Nonmetals Sulfur, Carbon, Oxygen, and Hydrogen: Implications for Planetary Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buono, Antonio Salvatore

    The earth's core consists of a solid metallic center surrounded by a liquid metallic outer layer. Understanding the compositions of the inner and outer cores allows us to better understand the dynamics of the earth's core, as well as the dynamics of the cores of other terrestrial planets and moons. The density and size of the earth's core indicate that it is approximately 90% metallic, predominantly iron, with about 10% light elements. Iron meteorites, believed to be the remnants of planetary cores, provide further constraints on the composition of the earth's core, indicating a composition of 86% iron, 4% nickel, and 10% light elements. Any potential candidate for the major light element core component must meet two criteria: first, it must have high cosmic abundances and second, it must be compatible with Fe. Given these two constraints there are five plausible elements that could be the major light element in the core: H, O, C, S, and Si. Of these five possible candidates this thesis focuses on S and C as well exploring the effect of minor amounts of O and H on the eutectic temperature in a Fe-FeS core. We look at two specific aspects of the Fe-FeS system: first, the shape of the liquidus as a function of pressure, second, a possible cause for the reported variations in the eutectic temperature, which draws on the effect of H and O. Finally we look at the effect of S and C on partitioning behavior of Ni, Pt, Re,Co, Os and W between cohenite and metallic liquid. We are interested in constraining the shape of the Fe-FeS liquidus because as a planet with a S-enriched core cools, the thermal and compositional evolution of its core is constrained by this liquidus. In Chapter 1 I present an equation that allows for calculation of the temperature along the liquidus as a function of pressure and composition for Fe-rich compositions and pressures from 1 bar to 10 GPa. One particularly interesting feature of the Fe --rich side of the Fe-FeS eutectic is the sigmoidal shape

  17. Melting and metallization of silica in the cores of gas giants, ice giants and super Earths

    CERN Document Server

    Mazevet, S; Taniuchi, T; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A; Guyot, F

    2014-01-01

    The physical state and properties of silicates at conditions encountered in the cores of gas giants, ice giants and of Earth like exoplanets now discovered with masses up to several times the mass of the Earth remains mostly unknown. Here, we report on theoretical predictions of the properties of silica, SiO$_2$, up to 4 TPa and about 20,000K using first principle molecular dynamics simulations based on density functional theory. For conditions found in the Super-Earths and in ice giants, we show that silica remains a poor electrical conductor up to 10 Mbar due to an increase in the Si-O coordination with pressure. For Jupiter and Saturn cores, we find that MgSiO$_3$ silicate has not only dissociated into MgO and SiO$_2$, as shown in previous studies, but that these two phases have likely differentiated to lead to a core made of liquid SiO$_2$ and solid (Mg,Fe)O.

  18. Progress towards accelerating HOMME on hybrid multi- core systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archibald, Richard K [ORNL; Carpenter, Ilene L [ORNL; Evans, Katherine J [ORNL; Larkin, Jeff [Cray, Inc.; Micikevicius, Paulius [ORNL; Rosinski, James [NOAA, Boulder, CO; Schwarzmeier, James L [ORNL; Taylor, Mark [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)

    2011-01-01

    The suitability of a spectral element based dynamical core (HOMME) within the Community Atmospheric Model (CAM) for GPU-based architectures is examined and initial performance results are reported. This work was done within a project to enable CAM to run at high resolution on next generation, multi-petaflop systems. The dynamical core is the present focus because it dominates the performance profile of our target problem. HOMME enjoys good scalability due to its underlying cubed-sphere mesh with full two-dimensional decomposition and the localization of all computational work within each element. The thread blocking and code changes that allow HOMME to effectively use GPUs are described along with a rewritten vertical remapping scheme which improves performance on both CPUs and GPUs. Validation of results in the full HOMME model is also described. Remaining issues affecting performance include optimizing the boundary exchanges for the case of multiple spectral elements being computed on the GPU and using multiple CUDA streams to overlap data transfers with computations.

  19. Recent Progress on Ascertaining the Core Collapse Supernova Explosion Mechanism

    CERN Document Server

    Mezzacappa, Anthony; Lentz, Eric J; Hix, W Raphael; Harris, J Austin; Messer, O E Bronson; Endeve, Eirik; Chertkow, Merek A; Blondin, John M; Marronetti, Pedro; Yakunin, Konstantin N

    2015-01-01

    We have been working within the fundamental paradigm that core collapse supernovae (CCSNe) may be neutrino driven, since the first suggestion of this by Colgate and White nearly five decades ago. Computational models have become increasingly sophisticated, first in one spatial dimension assuming spherical symmetry, then in two spatial dimensions assuming axisymmetry, and now in three spatial dimensions with no imposed symmetries. The increase in the number of spatial dimensions has been accompanied by an increase in the physics included in the models, and an increase in the sophistication with which this physics has been modeled. Computation has played an essential role in the development of CCSN theory, not simply for the obvious reason that such multidimensional, multi-physics, nonlinear events cannot possibly be fully captured analytically, but for its role in discovery. In particular, the discovery of the standing accretion shock instability (SASI) through computation about a decade ago has impacted all s...

  20. Pulverized coal firing of aluminum melting furnaces. First annual technical progress report, May 1978-June 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, C.E.; Hines, J.E.; Stewart, D.L. Jr.; Yu, H.

    1979-10-01

    The ultimate objective of this program is the commercial demonstration of an efficient, environmentally acceptable coal firing process suitable for implementation on melting furnaces throughout the aluminum industry. To achieve this goal, the program has been divided into two phases. Phase I has begun with the design and construction of a 350 lb/h (coal) staged slagging cyclone combustor (SSCC) attached to a 7-ft dia aluminum melting ladle furnace. Process development will culminate with a 1000 pph prototype SSCC firing a 40,000 lb capacity open hearth melting furnace at the Alcoa Laboratories. Phase II implementation is currently planned for Alcoa's Lafayette, IN, Works, where two of the ingot plant's five open hearth melting furnaces will be converted to utilize coal. In addition to confirmation of data gathered in Phase I, the effect of extended production schedule operation on equipment and efficiencies will be determined. This work would begin in 1982 pursuant to technical and economic evaluation of the process development at that time. A major design subcontract for assistance in the design of the SSCC is 80% completed.

  1. Core melt progression and consequence analysis methodology development in support of the Savannah River Reactor PSA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Kula, K.R.; Sharp, D.A. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)); Amos, C.N.; Wagner, K.C.; Bradley, D.R. (Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States))

    1992-01-01

    A three-level Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) of production reactor operation has been underway since 1985 at the US Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS). The goals of this analysis are to: Analyze existing margins of safety provided by the heavy-water reactor (HWR) design challenged by postulated severe accidents; Compare measures of risk to the general public and onsite workers to guideline values, as well as to those posed by commercial reactor operation; and Develop the methodology and database necessary to prioritize improvements to engineering safety systems and components, operator training, and engineering projects that contribute significantly to improving plant safety. PSA technical staff from the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) and Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) have performed the assessment despite two obstacles: A variable baseline plant configuration and power level; and a lack of technically applicable code methodology to model the SRS reactor conditions. This paper discusses the detailed effort necessary to modify the requisite codes before accident analysis insights for the risk assessment were obtained.

  2. A synthetic ice core approach to estimate ion relocation in an ice field site experiencing periodical melt; a case study on Lomonosovfonna, Svalbard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. P. Vega

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Physical and chemical properties of four different ice cores (LF-97, LF-08, LF-09 and LF-11 drilled at Lomonosovfonna, Svalbard, were compared to investigate the effects of meltwater percolation on the chemical and physical stratigraphy of these records. A synthetic ice core approach was employed as reference record to estimate the ionic relocation and meltwater percolation length at this site during the period 2007–2010. Using this method, the ion elution sequence obtained for Lomonosovfonna was SO42- > NO3- > NH4+ > Mg2+ > Cl-, K+ > Na+ > Ca2+, with acidic ions being the most mobile within the snowpack. The relocation length of most of the ions was in the order of 1 m, with the exception of SO42- showing relocation lengths > 2 m during this period. In addition, by using both a positive degree day (PDD and a snow-energy model approaches to estimate the percentage of melt at Lomonosovfonna, we have calculated a melt percentage (MP of the total annual accumulation within the range between 48 and 70 %, for the period between 2007 and 2010 which is above the MP range suggested by the ion relocation evidenced in the LF-syn core (i.e. MP = 30 %. Using a firn-densification model to constrain the melt range, a MP of 30 % was found over the same period which is consistent with the results of the synthetic ice core approach, and a 45 % of melt for the last 60 years. Considering the ionic relocation lengths and annual melt percentages, we estimate that the atmospheric ionic signal remains preserved in recently drilled Lomonosovfonna ice cores at an annual or bi-annual resolution.

  3. A synthetic ice core approach to estimate ion relocation in an ice field site experiencing periodical melt: a case study on Lomonosovfonna, Svalbard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Carmen P.; Pohjola, Veijo A.; Beaudon, Emilie; Claremar, Björn; van Pelt, Ward J. J.; Pettersson, Rickard; Isaksson, Elisabeth; Martma, Tõnu; Schwikowski, Margit; Bøggild, Carl E.

    2016-05-01

    Physical and chemical properties of four different ice cores (LF-97, LF-08, LF-09 and LF-11) drilled at Lomonosovfonna, Svalbard, were compared to investigate the effects of meltwater percolation on the chemical and physical stratigraphy of these records. A synthetic ice core approach was employed as reference record to estimate the ionic relocation and meltwater percolation length at this site during the period 2007-2010. Using this method, a partial ion elution sequence obtained for Lomonosovfonna was NO3- > SO42-, Mg2+, Cl-, K+, Na+ with nitrate being the most mobile within the snowpack. The relocation length of most of the ions was on the order of 1 m during this period. In addition, by using both a positive degree day (PDD) and a snow-energy model approaches to estimate the percentage of melt at Lomonosovfonna, we have calculated a melt percentage (MP) of the total annual accumulation within the range between 48 and 70 %, for the period between 2007 and 2010, which is above the MP range suggested by the ion relocation evidenced in the LF-syn core (i.e., MP = 30 %). Using a firn-densification model to constrain the melt range, a MP of 30 % was found over the same period, which is consistent with the results of the synthetic ice core approach, and a 45 % of melt for the last 60 years. Considering the ionic relocation lengths and annual melt percentages, we estimate that the atmospheric ionic signal remains preserved in recently drilled Lomonosovfonna ice cores at an annual or bi-annual resolution when weather conditions were similar to those during the 2007-2010 period.

  4. A synthetic ice core approach to estimate ion relocation in an ice field site experiencing periodical melt; a case study on Lomonosovfonna, Svalbard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, C. P.; Pohjola, V. A.; Beaudon, E.; Claremar, B.; van Pelt, W. J. J.; Pettersson, R.; Isaksson, E.; Martma, T.; Schwikowski, M.; Bøggild, C. E.

    2015-09-01

    Physical and chemical properties of four different ice cores (LF-97, LF-08, LF-09 and LF-11) drilled at Lomonosovfonna, Svalbard, were compared to investigate the effects of meltwater percolation on the chemical and physical stratigraphy of these records. A synthetic ice core approach was employed as reference record to estimate the ionic relocation and meltwater percolation length at this site during the period 2007-2010. Using this method, the ion elution sequence obtained for Lomonosovfonna was SO42- > NO3- > NH4+ > Mg2+ > Cl-, K+ > Na+ > Ca2+, with acidic ions being the most mobile within the snowpack. The relocation length of most of the ions was in the order of 1 m, with the exception of SO42- showing relocation lengths > 2 m during this period. In addition, by using both a positive degree day (PDD) and a snow-energy model approaches to estimate the percentage of melt at Lomonosovfonna, we have calculated a melt percentage (MP) of the total annual accumulation within the range between 48 and 70 %, for the period between 2007 and 2010 which is above the MP range suggested by the ion relocation evidenced in the LF-syn core (i.e. MP = 30 %). Using a firn-densification model to constrain the melt range, a MP of 30 % was found over the same period which is consistent with the results of the synthetic ice core approach, and a 45 % of melt for the last 60 years. Considering the ionic relocation lengths and annual melt percentages, we estimate that the atmospheric ionic signal remains preserved in recently drilled Lomonosovfonna ice cores at an annual or bi-annual resolution.

  5. Temperature of Earth's core constrained from melting of Fe and Fe0.9Ni0.1 at high pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongzhou; Jackson, Jennifer M.; Zhao, Jiyong; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Alp, E. Ercan; Hu, Michael Y.; Toellner, Thomas S.; Murphy, Caitlin A.; Prakapenka, Vitali B.

    2016-08-01

    The melting points of fcc- and hcp-structured Fe0.9Ni0.1 and Fe are measured up to 125 GPa using laser heated diamond anvil cells, synchrotron Mössbauer spectroscopy, and a recently developed fast temperature readout spectrometer. The onset of melting is detected by a characteristic drop in the time-integrated synchrotron Mössbauer signal which is sensitive to atomic motion. The thermal pressure experienced by the samples is constrained by X-ray diffraction measurements under high pressures and temperatures. The obtained best-fit melting curves of fcc-structured Fe and Fe0.9Ni0.1 fall within the wide region bounded by previous studies. We are able to derive the γ-ɛ-l triple point of Fe and the quasi triple point of Fe0.9Ni0.1 to be 110 ± 5GPa, 3345 ± 120K and 116 ± 5GPa, 3260 ± 120K, respectively. The measured melting temperatures of Fe at similar pressure are slightly higher than those of Fe0.9Ni0.1 while their one sigma uncertainties overlap. Using previously measured phonon density of states of hcp-Fe, we calculate melting curves of hcp-structured Fe and Fe0.9Ni0.1 using our (quasi) triple points as anchors. The extrapolated Fe0.9Ni0.1 melting curve provides an estimate for the upper bound of Earth's inner core-outer core boundary temperature of 5500 ± 200K. The temperature within the liquid outer core is then approximated with an adiabatic model, which constrains the upper bound of the temperature at the core side of the core-mantle boundary to be 4000 ± 200K. We discuss a potential melting point depression caused by light elements and the implications of the presented core-mantle boundary temperature bounds on phase relations in the lowermost part of the mantle.

  6. Fe-FeO and Fe-Fe3C melting relations at Earth's core-mantle boundary conditions: Implications for a volatile-rich or oxygen-rich core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morard, G.; Andrault, D.; Antonangeli, D.; Nakajima, Y.; Auzende, A. L.; Boulard, E.; Cervera, S.; Clark, A.; Lord, O. T.; Siebert, J.; Svitlyk, V.; Garbarino, G.; Mezouar, M.

    2017-09-01

    Eutectic melting temperatures in the Fe-FeO and Fe-Fe3C systems have been determined up to 150 GPa. Melting criteria include observation of a diffuse scattering signal by in situ X-Ray diffraction, and textural characterisation of recovered samples. In addition, compositions of eutectic liquids have been established by combining in situ Rietveld analyses with ex situ chemical analyses. Gathering these new results together with previous reports on Fe-S and Fe-Si systems allow us to discuss the specific effect of each light element (Si, S, O, C) on the melting properties of the outer core. Crystallization temperatures of Si-rich core compositional models are too high to be compatible with the absence of extensive mantle melting at the core-mantle boundary (CMB) and significant amounts of volatile elements such as S and/or C (>5 at%, corresponding to >2 wt%), or a large amount of O (>15 at% corresponding to ∼5 wt%) are required to reduce the crystallisation temperature of the core material below that of a peridotitic lower mantle.

  7. Wetting and dispersion in ceramic/polymer melt injection molding systems: Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sacks, M.D.; Williams, J.W.; Batich, C.D.

    1986-11-01

    Research progress is reported in the areas of rheological characterization, mixing/deagglomeration, ceramic/polymer interface modification, polymer matrix chemistry, and microstructure characterization. (DLC)

  8. Assessment of mass fraction and melting temperature for the application of limestone concrete and siliceous concrete to nuclear reactor basemat considering molten core-concrete interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ho Jae; Kim, Do Gyeum [Korea Institute of Civil Engineering and Building Technology, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Jae Leon [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Eui Sik [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Myung Suk [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    Severe accident scenarios in nuclear reactors, such as nuclear meltdown, reveal that an extremely hot molten core may fall into the nuclear reactor cavity and seriously affect the safety of the nuclear containment vessel due to the chain reaction caused by the reaction between the molten core and concrete. This paper reports on research focused on the type and amount of vapor produced during the reaction between a high-temperature molten core and concrete, as well as on the erosion rate of concrete and the heat transfer characteristics at its vicinity. This study identifies the mass fraction and melting temperature as the most influential properties of concrete necessary for a safety analysis conducted in relation to the thermal interaction between the molten core and the basemat concrete. The types of concrete that are actually used in nuclear reactor cavities were investigated. The H2O content in concrete required for the computation of the relative amount of gases generated by the chemical reaction of the vapor, the quantity of CO2 necessary for computing the cooling speed of the molten core, and the melting temperature of concrete are evaluated experimentally for the molten core-concrete interaction analysis.

  9. Black carbon concentrations from a Tibetan Plateau ice core spanning 1843–1982: recent increases due to emissions and glacier melt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Jenkins

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Black carbon (BC deposited on snow and glacier surfaces can reduce albedo and lead to accelerated melt. An ice core recovered from Guoqu glacier on Mt. Geladaindong and analyzed using a Single Particle Soot Photometer provides the first long-term (1843–1982 record of BC concentrations from the Central Tibetan Plateau. The highest concentrations are observed from 1975–1982, which corresponds to a 2.0-fold and 2.4-fold increase in average and median values, respectively, relative to 1843–1940. BC concentrations post-1940 are also elevated relative to the earlier portion of the record. Causes for the higher BC concentrations include increased regional BC emissions and subsequent deposition, and melt induced enrichment of BC, with the melt potentially accelerated due to the presence of BC at the glacier surface. A qualitative comparison of the BC and Fe (used as a dust proxy records suggests that if changes in the concentrations of absorbing impurities at the glacier surface have influenced recent glacial melt, the melt may be due to the presence of BC rather than dust. Guoqu glacier has received no net ice accumulation since the 1980s, and is a potential example of a glacier where an increase in the equilibrium line altitude is exposing buried high impurity layers. That BC concentrations in the uppermost layers of the Geladaindong ice core are not substantially higher relative to deeper in the ice core suggests that some of the BC that must have been deposited on Guoqu glacier via wet or dry deposition between 1983 and 2005 has been removed from the surface of the glacier, potentially via supraglacial or englacial meltwater.

  10. Evaluating core technology capacity based on an improved catastrophe progression method: the case of automotive industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shijia; Liu, Zongwei; Wang, Yue; Zhao, Fuquan

    2017-01-01

    Subjectivity usually causes large fluctuations in evaluation results. Many scholars attempt to establish new mathematical methods to make evaluation results consistent with actual objective situations. An improved catastrophe progression method (ICPM) is constructed to overcome the defects of the original method. The improved method combines the merits of the principal component analysis' information coherence and the catastrophe progression method's none index weight and has the advantage of highly objective comprehensive evaluation. Through the systematic analysis of the influencing factors of the automotive industry's core technology capacity, the comprehensive evaluation model is established according to the different roles that different indices play in evaluating the overall goal with a hierarchical structure. Moreover, ICPM is developed for evaluating the automotive industry's core technology capacity for the typical seven countries in the world, which demonstrates the effectiveness of the method.

  11. Melt layer statistic of two firn cores recently drilled at Dye3 and South dome in the dry snow zone of Southern Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitag, Johannes; Kipfstsuhl, Sepp; Hoerz, Sebastian; Eling, Lukas; Vinther, Bo; Popp, Trevor

    2014-05-01

    In the last couple of years remote sensing data have shown large areas of wet snow in the Southern part of the Greenland ice sheet. These melt features are attributed to the overall warming trend. Persistent warming implies changes in the firn layer as well. Even in areas of the dry snow zone one can observe sporadically a few ice lenses within the firn column indicating refrozen meltwater from warm events in the past. In our contribution we want to close the gap between investigations of firn cores drilled in the 70's and the observational record of remote sensing data over the last decade in South Greenland. The focus lies on firn of the dry snow zone which is sensitive against changes in a warming atmosphere and cold enough to prevent a longway percolation path of meltwater to several firn layers. To this end we had drilled two 45m-long firn cores at the former drilling sites of DYE3 (65°11'N, 43°49'W) and South Dome (SD) (63°32'N, 44°34'W) during a aircraft-supported field campaign 2012. The retrieved 3inch-firn core segments of 1m length are measured by a X-ray-scanning routine with the means of the core-scale AWI-ICE-CT. The 2d-density fields are calculated and allow to distinguish between refreezing meltwater and compacted firn. The depth-scales are converted to time-scales by using DEP (dielectric profiling) and (in case of DYE3) discrete sampled d18O measurements. Number density of melt layers and relative amount of melt show an synchronized behavior with an general increase over the last 30 years. Local maxima are observed in both sites at around 6-9m and 25m at DYE3 and 5-8m, 22m and 40m at SD.

  12. Hot-melt co-extrusion for the production of fixed-dose combination products with a controlled release ethylcellulose matrix core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vynckier, A-K; Dierickx, L; Saerens, L; Voorspoels, J; Gonnissen, Y; De Beer, T; Vervaet, C; Remon, J P

    2014-04-10

    In this study, hot-melt co-extrusion was evaluated as a technique for the production of fixed-dose combination products, using ethylcellulose as a core matrix former to control the release of metoprolol tartrate and a polyethylene oxide-based coat formulation to obtain immediate release of hydrochlorothiazide. By lowering the concentration of the hydrophilic additive polyethylene oxide in the plasticized ethylcellulose matrix or by lowering the drug load, the in vitro metoprolol tartrate release from the core was substantially sustained. The in vitro release of hydrochlorothiazide from the polyethylene oxide/polyethylene glycol coat was completed within 45 min for all formulations. Tensile testing of the core/coat mini-matrices revealed an adequate adhesion between the two layers. Raman mapping showed no migration of active substances. Solid state characterization indicated that the crystalline state of metoprolol tartrate was not affected by thermal processing via hot-melt extrusion, while hydrochlorothiazide was amorphous in the coat. These solid state characteristics were confirmed during the stability study. Considering the bioavailability of metoprolol tartrate after oral administration to dogs, the different co-extruded formulations offered a range of sustained release characteristics. Moreover, high metoprolol tartrate plasma concentrations were reached in dogs allowing the administered dose to be halved.

  13. Heave Compensated GLAD800 Coring from the R/V Knorr: a Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielson, D.; Mountain, G.; Pardey, M.; Austin, J.; Alexander, C.

    2001-12-01

    Despite potential applications to studies of stratal architecture, sea-level history, land-sea interaction, and rapid climate change, scientific drilling with high core recovery in shallow marine settings has been thwarted by several challenges. Among these has been the problem of maintaining hole stability while penetrating unconsolidated lithologies from a floating, open-ocean platform. We report on progress in overcoming this barrier. The GLAD800 coring system, originally developed as a joint venture between the International Scientific Drilling Program and DOSECC to collect long, high-resolution cores in modern lakes, has been adapted for deploying from the R/V Knorr. As in lake-based operations, the drilling system can continuously sample sediments of different composition and stiffness to a total depth of 800m below the rig floor using HWT drill rods and riser pipe. Core is collected in standard ODP-size plastic liners. A modular design provides inexpensive and easily transportable operations. The latest advance is the installation of an active heave compensation (AHC) system that accommodates as much as 8 feet of vertical rig motion. This minimizes excursions in the total weight of the bit at the cutting face, a major concern in achieving the high core recovery needed for scientific purposes. We show results of testing this AHC-equipped GLAD800 rig during a 5-day operation in November. We drilled through the existing 'moon pool' of the R/V Knorr on the outer shelf south of Martha's Vineyard. This technological development and ship time is funded by the Office of Naval Research, and if successful, will be extended to core numerous drill holes 10's to 100's of meters into the New Jersey shelf during 2002.

  14. Characterization of Machine Variability and Progressive Heat Treatment in Selective Laser Melting of Inconel 718

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prater, Tracie; Tilson, Will; Jones, Zack

    2015-01-01

    The absence of an economy of scale in spaceflight hardware makes additive manufacturing an immensely attractive option for propulsion components. As additive manufacturing techniques are increasingly adopted by government and industry to produce propulsion hardware in human-rated systems, significant development efforts are needed to establish these methods as reliable alternatives to conventional subtractive manufacturing. One of the critical challenges facing powder bed fusion techniques in this application is variability between machines used to perform builds. Even with implementation of robust process controls, it is possible for two machines operating at identical parameters with equivalent base materials to produce specimens with slightly different material properties. The machine variability study presented here evaluates 60 specimens of identical geometry built using the same parameters. 30 samples were produced on machine 1 (M1) and the other 30 samples were built on machine 2 (M2). Each of the 30-sample sets were further subdivided into three subsets (with 10 specimens in each subset) to assess the effect of progressive heat treatment on machine variability. The three categories for post-processing were: stress relief, stress relief followed by hot isostatic press (HIP), and stress relief followed by HIP followed by heat treatment per AMS 5664. Each specimen (a round, smooth tensile) was mechanically tested per ASTM E8. Two formal statistical techniques, hypothesis testing for equivalency of means and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), were applied to characterize the impact of machine variability and heat treatment on six material properties: tensile stress, yield stress, modulus of elasticity, fracture elongation, and reduction of area. This work represents the type of development effort that is critical as NASA, academia, and the industrial base work collaboratively to establish a path to certification for additively manufactured parts. For future

  15. Progress in hollow core photonic crystal fiber for atomic vapour based coherent optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, T. D.; Wang, Y. Y.; Alharbi, M.; Fourcade Dutin, C.; Mangan, B. J.; Wheeler, N. V.; Benabid, F.

    2012-03-01

    We report on progress in different hollow core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF) design and fabrication for atomic vapor based applications. We have fabricated a Photonic bandgap (PBG) guiding HC-PCF with a record loss of 107dB/km at 785nm in this class of fiber. A double photonic bandgap (DPBG) guiding HC-PCF with guidance bands centred at 780nm and 1064nm is reported. A 7-cell 3-ring Kagome HC-PCF with hypocycloid core is reported, the optical loss at 780nm has been reduced to 70dB/km which to the best of our knowledge is the lowest optical loss reported at this wavelength using HC-PCF. Details on experimental loading of alkali metal vapours using a far off red detuned laser are reported. This optical loading has been shown to decrease the necessary loading time for Rb into the hollow core of a fiber. The quantity of Rb within the fiber core has been enhanced by a maximum of 14% through this loading procedure.

  16. Effect of Lumbar Progressive Resistance Exercise on Lumbar Muscular Strength and Core Muscular Endurance in Soldiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, John M; Childs, John D; Neilson, Brett D; Chen, Henian; Koppenhaver, Shane L; Quillen, William S

    2016-11-01

    Low back pain is common, costly, and disabling for active duty military personnel and veterans. The evidence is unclear on which management approaches are most effective. The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of lumbar extensor high-intensity progressive resistance exercise (HIPRE) training versus control on improving lumbar extension muscular strength and core muscular endurance in soldiers. A randomized controlled trial was conducted with active duty U.S. Army Soldiers (n = 582) in combat medic training at Fort Sam Houston, Texas. Soldiers were randomized by platoon to receive the experimental intervention (lumbar extensor HIPRE training, n = 298) or control intervention (core stabilization exercise training, n = 284) at one set, one time per week, for 11 weeks. Lumbar extension muscular strength and core muscular endurance were assessed before and after the intervention period. At 11-week follow-up, lumbar extension muscular strength was 9.7% greater (p = 0.001) for HIPRE compared with control. No improvements in core muscular endurance were observed for HIPRE or control. Lumbar extensor HIPRE training is effective to improve isometric lumbar extension muscular strength in U.S. Army Soldiers. Research is needed to explore the clinical relevance of these gains. Reprint & Copyright © 2016 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  17. High-pressure melting experiments on Fe-Si alloys and implications for silicon as a light element in the core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Haruka; Hirose, Kei; Yonemitsu, Kyoko; Ohishi, Yasuo

    2016-12-01

    We carried out melting experiments on Fe-Si alloys to 127 GPa in a laser-heated diamond-anvil cell (DAC). On the basis of textural and chemical characterizations of samples recovered from a DAC, a change in eutectic liquid composition in the Fe-FeSi binary system was examined with increasing pressure. The chemical compositions of coexisting liquid and solid phases were quantitatively determined with field-emission-type electron microprobes. The results demonstrate that silicon content in the eutectic liquid decreases with increasing pressure to less than 1.5 ± 0.1 wt.% Si at 127 GPa. If silicon is a single light element in the core, 4.5 to 12 wt.% Si is required in the outer core in order to account for its density deficit from pure iron. However, such a liquid core, whose composition is on the Si-rich side of the eutectic point, crystallizes less dense solid, CsCl (B2)-type phase at the inner core boundary (ICB). Our data also show that the difference in silicon concentration between coexisting solid and liquid is too small to account for the observed density contrast across the ICB. These indicate that silicon cannot be the sole light element in the core. Previous geochemical and cosmochemical arguments, however, strongly require ∼6 wt.% Si in the core. It is possible that the Earth's core originally included ∼6 wt.% Si but then became depleted in silicon by crystallizing SiO2 or MgSiO3.

  18. Using high-resolution tritium profiles to quantify the effects of melt on two Spitsbergen ice cores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wel, L.G. van der; Streurman, H.J.; Isaksson, E.; Helsen, M.M.; Wal, R.S.W. van de; Martma, T.; Pohjola, V.A.; Moore, J.C.; Meijer, H.A.J.

    2011-01-01

    Ice cores from small ice caps provide valuable climatic information, additional to that of Greenland and Antarctica. However, their integrity is usually compromised by summer meltwater percolation. To determine to what extent this can affect such ice cores, we performed high-resolution tritium measu

  19. Using high-resolution tritium profiles to quantify the effects of melt on two Spitsbergen ice cores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wel, L.G. van der; Streurman, H.J.; Isaksson, E.; Helsen, M.M.; Wal, R.S.W. van de; Martma, T.; Pohjola, V.A.; Moore, J.C.; Meijer, H.A.J.

    2011-01-01

    Ice cores from small ice caps provide valuable climatic information, additional to that of Greenland and Antarctica. However, their integrity is usually compromised by summer meltwater percolation. To determine to what extent this can affect such ice cores, we performed high-resolution tritium measu

  20. Using high-resolution tritium profiles to quantify the effects of melt on two Spitsbergen ice cores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wel, L.G. van der; Streurman, H.J.; Isaksson, E.; Helsen, M.M.; Wal, R.S.W. van de; Martma, T.; Pohjola, V.A.; Moore, J.C.; Meijer, H.A.J.

    2011-01-01

    Ice cores from small ice caps provide valuable climatic information, additional to that of Greenland and Antarctica. However, their integrity is usually compromised by summer meltwater percolation. To determine to what extent this can affect such ice cores, we performed high-resolution tritium

  1. The explosion mechanism of core-collapse supernovae: progress in supernova theory and experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Foglizzo, Thierry; Guilet, Jérôme; Masset, Frédéric; González, Matthias; Krueger, Brendan K; Novak, Jérôme; Oertel, Micaela; Margueron, Jérôme; Faure, Julien; Martin, Noël; Blottiau, Patrick; Peres, Bruno; Durand, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    The explosion of core-collapse supernova depends on a sequence of events taking place in less than a second in a region of a few hundred kilometers at the center of a supergiant star, after the stellar core approaches the Chandrasekhar mass and collapses into a proto-neutron star, and before a shock wave is launched across the stellar envelope. Theoretical efforts to understand stellar death focus on the mechanism which transforms the collapse into an explosion. Progress in understanding this mechanism is reviewed with particular attention to its asymmetric character. We highlight a series of successful studies connecting observations of supernova remnants and pulsars properties to the theory of core-collapse using numerical simulations. The encouraging results from first principles models in axisymmetric simulations is tempered by new puzzles in 3D. The diversity of explosion paths and the dependence on the pre-collapse stellar structure is stressed, as well as the need to gain a better understanding of hydr...

  2. Evolution of EDFA from single-core to multi-core and related recent progress in optical communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, Masataka

    2014-11-01

    A compact 1.48 μm InGaAsP laser-diode (LD)-pumped erbium-doped optical fiber amplifier (EDFA) was invented in 1989 and it revolutionized optical communication in combination with a wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) technique. Recently, in addition to the existing single-core EDFA, a multi-core EDFA, which employs space division multiplexing (SDM), was developed to increase transmission capacity even further. The first half of this paper describes the evolution of the EDFA from a single-core to a multi-core device and the second half focuses on related topics in optical communication.

  3. Status of the MELTSPREAD-1 computer code for the analysis of transient spreading of core debris melts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, M.T.; Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W.; Chu, C.C.

    1992-01-01

    A transient, one dimensional, finite difference computer code (MELTSPREAD-1) has been developed to predict spreading behavior of high temperature melts flowing over concrete and/or steel surfaces submerged in water, or without the effects of water if the surface is initially dry. This paper provides a summary overview of models and correlations currently implemented in the code, code validation activities completed thus far, LWR spreading-related safety issues for which the code has been applied, and the status of documentation for the code.

  4. Status of the MELTSPREAD-1 computer code for the analysis of transient spreading of core debris melts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, M.T.; Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W.; Chu, C.C.

    1992-04-01

    A transient, one dimensional, finite difference computer code (MELTSPREAD-1) has been developed to predict spreading behavior of high temperature melts flowing over concrete and/or steel surfaces submerged in water, or without the effects of water if the surface is initially dry. This paper provides a summary overview of models and correlations currently implemented in the code, code validation activities completed thus far, LWR spreading-related safety issues for which the code has been applied, and the status of documentation for the code.

  5. Development of Physics-Based Numerical Models for Uncertainty Quantification of Selective Laser Melting Processes - 2015 Annual Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Delplanque, Jean-Pierre [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-10-08

    The primary goal of the proposed research is to characterize the influence of process parameter variability inherent to Selective Laser Melting (SLM) on components manufactured with the SLM technique for space flight systems and their performance.

  6. Melting Properties of Medium-Sized Silicon Nanoclusters: A Molecular Dynamics Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haipeng; Xu, Runfeng; Bi, Zetong; Shen, Xiaopeng; Han, Kui

    2017-07-01

    The structures and melting properties of the medium-sized silicon nanoclusters have been comparatively studied using the molecular dynamics method. Structural and thermodynamic parameters are used to characterize the melting properties of the clusters. The size dependence of the melting temperature of silicon nanoclusters is determined using the computation results. Different from the homogeneous melting of bulk silicon, melting of silicon nanoparticles proceeds over a finite temperature range due to surface effects, which shows the heterogeneous melting of nanoclusters. We found that the melting starts at the cluster surface and progressively shifts into the core region. This study provides a fundamental perspective on the melting behaviors of semiconductor silicon nanoclusters at the atomistic level.

  7. Testing the ureilite projectile hypothesis for the El'gygytgyn impact: Determination of siderophile element abundances and Os isotope ratios in ICDP drill core samples and melt rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goderis, S.; Wittmann, A.; Zaiss, J.; Elburg, M.; Ravizza, G.; Vanhaecke, F.; Deutsch, A.; Claeys, P.

    2013-07-01

    The geochemical nature of the impactites from International Continental Scientific Drilling Project—El'gygytgyn lake drill core 1C is compared with that of impact melt rock fragments collected near the western rim of the structure and literature data. Concentrations of major and trace elements, with special focus on siderophile metals Cr, Co, Ni, and the platinum group elements, and isotope ratios of osmium (Os), were determined to test the hypothesis of an ureilite impactor at El'gygytgyn. Least squares mixing calculations suggest that the upper volcanic succession of rhyolites, dacites, and andesites were the main contributors to the polymict impact breccias. Additions of 2-13.5 vol% of basaltic inclusions recovered from drill core intervals between 391.6 and 423.0 mblf can almost entirely account for the compositional differences observed for the bottom of a reworked fallout deposit at 318.9 mblf, a polymict impact breccia at 471.4 mblf, and three impact melt rock fragments. However, the measured Os isotope ratios and slightly elevated PGE content (up to 0.262 ng g-1 Ir) of certain impactite samples, for which the CI-normalized logarithmic PGE signature displays a relatively flat (i.e., chondritic) pattern, can only be explained by the incorporation of a small meteoritic contribution. This component is also required to explain the exceptionally high siderophile element contents and corresponding Ni/Cr, Ni/Co, and Cr/Co ratios of impact glass spherules and spherule fragments that were recovered from the reworked fallout deposits and from terrace outcrops of the Enmyvaam River approximately 10 km southeast of the crater center. Mixing calculations support the presence of approximately 0.05 wt% and 0.50-18 wt% of ordinary chondrite (possibly type-LL) in several impactites and in the glassy spherules, respectively. The heterogeneous distribution of the meteoritic component provides clues for emplacement mechanisms of the various impactite units.

  8. A CORE approach to progress monitoring and feedback: Enhancing evidence and improving practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkham, Michael; Mellor-Clark, John; Stiles, William B

    2015-12-01

    This article describes the Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation (CORE) System and reports on its scientific yield and practice impact. First, we describe the suite of CORE measures, including the centerpiece CORE-Outcome Measure (CORE-OM), its short forms, special purpose forms, translations, and psychometric properties, along with the pretreatment CORE Therapy Assessment Form and the CORE End of Therapy Form. Second, we provide an overview of the scientific yield arising from analyses of large CORE data sets collected in routine practice. Third, we describe the use of CORE measures for feedback in practice settings. Finally, we consider future directions for monitoring and feedback in research and practice.

  9. Research progress in laser melt-electrospinning process%激光熔体静电纺丝研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李秀艳; 刘会超; 李从举

    2011-01-01

    The historical development and research status of electrospinning process were briefly described. The advantages and disadvantages of solution electrospinning process and melt electrospinning process were compared. The superiority of laser melt electropsinning process was introduced in details. The effects of laser melt-electrospinning process conditions for micro-nanofiber prepared from different polymers and composites, such as laser output power, applied voltage, physical properties of polymers, on the fiber diameter were summerized. The line laser melt-electrospinning devices were briefly introduced. The single polymer fibers were dominantly prepared by laser melt-electrospinning process. It was pointed out that the development trend was to develop functional composite nanofibers and to increase the output by using line laser melt electrospinning technology.%简述了静电纺丝法的发展历程及研究概况,比较了溶液静电纺丝法和熔体静电纺丝法的优缺点;详细介绍了激光熔体静电纺丝法的优势,总结了目前激光熔体静电纺丝法制备聚合物及复合物微纳米纤维的工艺条件如激光输出功率、应用电压以及聚合物的物理性质等对纤维直径的影响;简要介绍了线激光熔体静电纺丝装置;指出目前激光熔体静电纺丝法制得的多为单一聚合物纤维,开发功能复合纳米纤维及采用线激光熔体静电纺丝技术提高产量是其未来的发展趋势.

  10. CORE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krigslund, Jeppe; Hansen, Jonas; Hundebøll, Martin

    2013-01-01

    different flows. Instead of maintaining these approaches separate, we propose a protocol (CORE) that brings together these coding mechanisms. Our protocol uses random linear network coding (RLNC) for intra- session coding but allows nodes in the network to setup inter- session coding regions where flows...... intersect. Routes for unicast sessions are agnostic to other sessions and setup beforehand, CORE will then discover and exploit intersecting routes. Our approach allows the inter-session regions to leverage RLNC to compensate for losses or failures in the overhearing or transmitting process. Thus, we...... increase the benefits of XORing by exploiting the underlying RLNC structure of individual flows. This goes beyond providing additional reliability to each individual session and beyond exploiting coding opportunistically. Our numerical results show that CORE outperforms both forwarding and COPE...

  11. CORE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krigslund, Jeppe; Hansen, Jonas; Hundebøll, Martin

    2013-01-01

    different flows. Instead of maintaining these approaches separate, we propose a protocol (CORE) that brings together these coding mechanisms. Our protocol uses random linear network coding (RLNC) for intra- session coding but allows nodes in the network to setup inter- session coding regions where flows...... intersect. Routes for unicast sessions are agnostic to other sessions and setup beforehand, CORE will then discover and exploit intersecting routes. Our approach allows the inter-session regions to leverage RLNC to compensate for losses or failures in the overhearing or transmitting process. Thus, we...... increase the benefits of XORing by exploiting the underlying RLNC structure of individual flows. This goes beyond providing additional reliability to each individual session and beyond exploiting coding opportunistically. Our numerical results show that CORE outperforms both forwarding and COPE...

  12. Temperature of Earth's core constrained from melting of Fe and Fe0.9Ni0.1 at high pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Dongzhou; Jackson, Jennifer M.; Zhao, Jiyong; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Alp, E. Ercan; Hu, Michael Y.; Toellner, Thomas S.; Murphy, Caitlin A.; Prakapenka, Vitali B.

    2016-08-01

    The melting points of fcc- and hcp-structured Fe0.9Ni0.1 and Fe are measured up to 125 GPa using laser heated diamond anvil cells, synchrotron Mossbauer spectroscopy, and a recently developed fast temperature readout spectrometer. The onset of melting is detected by a characteristic drop in the time integrated synchrotron Mfissbauer signal which is sensitive to atomic motion. The thermal pressure experienced by the samples is constrained by X-ray diffraction measurements under high pressures and temperatures. The obtained best-fit melting curves of fcc-structured Fe and Fe0.9Ni0.1 fall within the wide region bounded by previous studies. We are able to derive the gamma-is an element of-1 triple point of Fe and the quasi triple point of Fe0.9Ni0.1 to be 110 ± 5 GPa, 3345 ± 120 K and 116 ± 5 GPa, 3260 ± 120 K, respectively. The measured melting temperatures of Fe at similar pressure are slightly higher than those of Fe0.9Ni0.1 while their one sigma uncertainties overlap. Using previously measured phonon density of states of hcp-Fe, we calculate melting curves of hcp-structured Fe and Fe0.9Ni0.1 using our (quasi) triple points as anchors. The extrapolated Fe0.9Ni0.1 melting curve provides an estimate for the upper bound of Earth's inner core-outer core boundary temperature of 5500 ± 200 K. The temperature within the liquid outer core is then approximated with an adiabatic model, which constrains the upper bound of the temperature at the core side of the core -mantle boundary to be 4000 ± 200 K. We discuss a potential melting point depression caused by light elements and the implications of the presented core -mantle boundary temperature bounds on phase relations in the lowermost part of the mantle.

  13. Research Progress of Nurses' Core Competence%护士核心能力的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜黎黎; 李忆昔

    2016-01-01

    护士核心能力是护理人员从事护理工作的时具备的良好综合能力,即通科护士核心能力与专科护士核心能力。护理人员的核心能力能够为患者提供良好的护理服务,构建和谐的护患关系,提高患者治疗与护理的依从性,使患者的早日康复。通过对护士核心能力概念及意义进行介绍,综述国内外护士核心能力的研究现状及进展,总结我国护士核心能力的现状及面临的问题,以明确护士核心能力的意义。%The core competence is a good comprehensive ability of nursing staff in the nursing time, namely the core competence and the core competence of nurses nurses in general. The core ability of the nursing staff can provide good nursing service for patients, construct the harmonious nurse patient relationship, improve the patient's treatment and nursing compliance, so that the patient's early recovery. Based on the concept of core competence of nurses and signiifcance, research status and progress at home and abroad of nurses' core competence, summing up the status quo of Chinese nurses core competence and problems, in order to clear the signiifcance of the core competence of nurses.

  14. Recent progress on metal core@semiconductor shell nanocomposites as a promising type of photocatalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nan; Liu, Siqi; Xu, Yi-Jun

    2012-03-01

    The creation of core-shell nanocomposites (CSNs) has attracted considerable attention and developed into an increasingly important research area at the frontier of advanced materials chemistry. CSNs, which are nanoscaled assemblies with a chemical composition that is different on the surface compared to the core region, have found versatile applications in many fields, such as electrooptics, quantum dots, microscopy labels, drug delivery, chemical sensors, nanoreactors and catalysis. This review is primarily focused on the applications of metal core@semiconductor shell nanocomposites in heterogeneous photocatalysis, including photocatalytic nonselective processes for environmental remediation, selective organic transformations to fine chemicals and water splitting to clean hydrogen energy. It is hoped that this minireview can inspire multidisciplinary research interest in the precisely morphology-controlled synthesis of a variety of metal core@semiconductor shell nanoassemblies and their wide applications in the realm of heterogeneous photocatalysis.

  15. Work in Progress: Malleable Software Pipelines for Efficient Many-core System Utilization

    OpenAIRE

    Jahn, Janmartin; Kobbe, Sebastian; Pagani, Santiago; Chen, Jian-Jia; Henkel, Jörg

    2012-01-01

    International audience; This paper details our current research project on the efficient utilization of many-core systems by utilizing applications based on a novel kind of software pipelines. These pipelines form malleable applications that can change their degree of parallelism at runtime. This allows not only for a well-balanced load, but also for an efficient distribution of the cores to the individual, competing applications to maximize the overall system performance. We are convinced th...

  16. Studies on melt-water-structure interaction during severe accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sehgal, B.R.; Dinh, T.N.; Okkonen, T.J.; Bui, V.A.; Nourgaliev, R.R.; Andersson, J. [Royal Inst. of Technology, Div. of Nucl. Power Safety, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1996-10-01

    Results of a series of studies, on melt-water-structure interactions which occur during the progression of a core melt-down accident, are described. The emphasis is on the in-vessel interactions and the studies are both experimental and analytical. Since, the studies performed resulted in papers published in proceedings of the technical meetings, and in journals, copies of a set of selected papers are attached to provide details. A summary of the results obtained is provided for the reader who does not, or cannot, venture into the perusal of the attached papers. (au).

  17. Year 3 of Implementing the Common Core State Standards: An Overview of States' Progress and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rentner, Diane Stark

    2013-01-01

    States are in a crucial phase of implementing the Common Core State Standards (CCSS), which outline the knowledge and skills that students in grades kindergarten through 12 are expected to learn in mathematics and English language arts (ELA) to be prepared for college and careers. As of July 2013, 45 states and the District of Columbia have…

  18. Cretaceous shallow drilling, US Western Interior: Core research. Technical progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthur, M.A.

    1993-02-17

    This project is a continuing multidisciplinary study of middle to Upper Cretaceous marine carbonate and clastic rocks in the Utah-Colorado-Kansas corridor of the old Cretaceous seaway that extended from the Gulf Coast to the Arctic during maximum Cretaceous transgressions. It is collaborative between in the US Geological Survey (W.E. Dean, P.I.) and University researchers led by The Pennsylvania State University(M.A. Arthur, P.I.) and funded by DOE and the USGS, in part. Research focusses on the Greenhom, Niobrara and lower Pierre Shale units and their equivalents, combining biostratigraphic/paleoecologic studies, inorganic, organic and stable isotopic geochemical studies, mineralogical investigations and high-resolution geophysical logging. This research requires unweathered samples and continuous smooth ``exposures`` in the form of cores from at least 4 relatively shallow reference holes (i.e. < 1000m) in transect from east to west across the basin. The major initial effort was recovery in Year 1 of the project of continuous cores from each site in the transect. This drilling provided samples and logs of strata ranging from pelagic sequences that contain organic-carbon-rich marine source rocks to nearshore coal-bearing units. This transect also will provide information on the extent of thermal maturation and migration of hydrocarbons in organic-carbon-rich strata along a burial gradient.

  19. FY14 Q1 Progress Report for SECA Core Technology Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Koeppel, Brian J.

    2014-01-31

    This quarterly progress report was prepared under field work proposal (FWP) 40552 and covers technical work performed during the period October 1 through December 31, 2013 (FY14 1st quarter). The report highlights and documents technical progress and milestone status in tasks related to advanced cell and stack component materials development and computational design and simulation. Technical highlights related to cell and stack materials development and characterization include: • Surface modified, Ce-modified MC spinel-coated AISI 441 exhibited improved spallation resistance (compared to coated mill reference 441) after 30,000 hours of oxidation at 800ºC in air. Similar beneficial results from surface modification were observed after 26,000 hours of oxidation at 850ºC. • MnCo spinel coatings prepared from metallic powder precursors exhibited low area-specific resistance after 12,000 hours of testing at 800°C. • Long-term validation tests (6,000 hours of operation followed by 10 deep thermal cycles) of surface-blasted, spinel-coated AISI 441 interconnects were completed using PNNL’s SECA CTP stack test fixture. Results of post-test results will be reported in the next quarterly progress report. • Long-term evaluation of compliant glass seals (SCN-1 glass with YSZ fibers) was in progress using PNNL’s SECA CTP stack test fixture. • Baseline testing of LSCF-based cells from Fuel Cell Materials was performed in PNNL’s SECA CTP stack test fixture. Overall performance was similar to that previously obtained with similar cells from H.C. Starck. • A study on pore coarsening of compliant glass seals with and without inert fillers (ZrO2 short fibers or ZrO2 crushed hollow balls) has reached 2,000 hours of testing; results to date indicate that the addition of the fillers was partially effective in hindering the pore coalescence process. • Cell tests attempting to correlate effects of fuel water content on anode performance with previously observed

  20. Recent progress on the spectroscopy of rare earth ions in core-shells, nanowires, nanotubes, and other novel nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xueyuan; Liu, Liqin; Liu, Guokui

    2008-03-01

    Research and development of nanoscale luminescent and laser materials are part of the rapidly advancing nanoscience and nanotechnology. Because of unique spectroscopic properties and luminescent dynamics of f-electron states, doping luminescent rare earth ions into nano-hosts has been demonstrated as an optimistic approach to developing highly efficient and stable nanophosphors for various applications. In this article, we review the most recent progress in spectroscopic measurements of rare earth ion-activated low-dimensional nanostructures including nanolayers, core-shells, nanowires, nanotubes, and nanodisks. Among a large volume of work reported in the literature on many members of the rare earth series including Ce3+, Pr3+, Nd3+, Eu3+, and Er3+, we focus on recent findings in the spectroscopic and luminescence properties of Eu3+ doped nanolayers, core-shells, and nanotubes, because Eu3+ ions have been extensively studied and widely used as an ideal probe for fundamental understanding of nano-phenomena. Specifically, the dependence of the optical properties of rare earth ions on nanostructures is discussed in detail.

  1. Progressive dry-core-wet-rim hydration trend in a nested-ring topology of protein binding interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhenhua

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Water is an integral part of protein complexes. It shapes protein binding sites by filling cavities and it bridges local contacts by hydrogen bonds. However, water molecules are usually not included in protein interface models in the past, and few distribution profiles of water molecules in protein binding interfaces are known. Results In this work, we use a tripartite protein-water-protein interface model and a nested-ring atom re-organization method to detect hydration trends and patterns from an interface data set which involves immobilized interfacial water molecules. This data set consists of 206 obligate interfaces, 160 non-obligate interfaces, and 522 crystal packing contacts. The two types of biological interfaces are found to be drier than the crystal packing interfaces in our data, agreeable to a hydration pattern reported earlier although the previous definition of immobilized water is pure distance-based. The biological interfaces in our data set are also found to be subject to stronger water exclusion in their formation. To study the overall hydration trend in protein binding interfaces, atoms at the same burial level in each tripartite protein-water-protein interface are organized into a ring. The rings of an interface are then ordered with the core atoms placed at the middle of the structure to form a nested-ring topology. We find that water molecules on the rings of an interface are generally configured in a dry-core-wet-rim pattern with a progressive level-wise solvation towards to the rim of the interface. This solvation trend becomes even sharper when counterexamples are separated. Conclusions Immobilized water molecules are regularly organized in protein binding interfaces and they should be carefully considered in the studies of protein hydration mechanisms.

  2. Evaluation of Melt Behavior with initial Melt Velocity under SFR Severe Accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, Hyo; Bang, In Cheol [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Jerng, Dong Wook [Chung-Ang Univ, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In the current Korean sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) program, early dispersion of the molten metallic fuel within a subchannel is suggested as one of the inherent safety strategies for the initiating phase of hypothetical core disruptive accident (HCDA). The safety strategy provides negative reactivity driven by the melt dispersal, so it could reduce the possibility of the recriticality event under a severe triple or more fault scenario for SFR. Since the behavior of the melt dispersion is unpredictable, it depends on the accident condition, particularly core region. While the voided coolant channel region is usually developed in the inner core, the unvoided coolant channel region is formed in the outer core. It is important to confirm the fuel dispersion with the core region, but there are not sufficient existing studies for them. From the existing studies, the coolant vapor pressure is considered as one of driving force to move the melt towards outside of the core. There is a complexity of the phenomena during intermixing of the melt with the coolant after the horizontal melt injections. It is too difficult to understand the several combined mechanisms related to the melt dispersion and the fragmentation. Thus, it could be worthwhile to study the horizontal melt injections at lower temperature as a preliminary study in order to identify the melt dispersion phenomena. For this reason, it is required to clarify whether the coolant vapor pressure is the driving force of the melt dispersion with the core region. The specific conditions to be well dispersed for the molten metallic fuel were discussed in the experiments with the simulant materials. The each melt behavior was compared to evaluate the melt dispersion under the coolant void condition and the boiling condition. As the results, the following results are remarked: 1. The upward melt dispersion did not occur for a given melt and coolant temperature in the nonboiling range. Over current range of conditions

  3. Experimental study of in-and-ex-vessel melt cooling during a severe accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang Baik; Yoo, K. J.; Park, C. K.; Seok, S. D.; Park, R. J.; Yi, S. J.; Kang, K. H.; Ham, Y. S.; Cho, Y. R.; Kim, J. H.; Jeong, J. H.; Shin, K. Y.; Cho, J. S.; Kim, D. H.

    1997-07-01

    After code damage during a severe accident in a nuclear reactor, the degraded core has to be cooled down and the decay heat should be removed in order to cease the accident progression and maintain a stable state. The cooling of core melt is divided into in-vessel and ex-vessel cooling depending on the location of molten core which is dependent on the timing of vessel failure. Since the cooling mechanism varies with the conditions of molten core and surroundings and related phenomena, it contains many phenomenological uncertainties so far. In this study, an experimental study for verification of in-vessel corium cooling and several separate effect experiments for ex-vessel cooling are carried out to verify in- and ex-vessel cooling phenomena and finally to develop the accident management strategy and improve engineered reactor design for the severe accidents. SONATA-IV (Simulation of Naturally Arrested Thermal Attack in Vessel) program is set up for in-vessel cooling and a progression of the verification experiment has been done, and an integral verification experiment of the containment integrity for ex-vessel cooling is planned to be carried out based on the separate effect experiments performed in the first phase. First phase study of SONATA-IV is proof of principle experiment and it is composed of LALA (Lower-plenum Arrested Vessel Attack) experiment to find the gap between melt and the lower plenum during melt relocation and to certify melt quenching and CHFG (Critical Heat Flux in Gap) experiment to certify heat transfer mechanism in an artificial gap. As separate effect experiments for ex-vessel cooling, high pressure melt ejection experiment related to the initial condition for debris layer formation in the reactor cavity, crust formation and heat transfer experiment in the molten pool and molten core concrete interaction experiment are performed. (author). 150 refs., 24 tabs., 127 figs.

  4. Analysis of ex-vessel melt jet breakup and coolability. Part 1: Sensitivity on model parameters and accident conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriyama, Kiyofumi; Park, Hyun Sun, E-mail: hejsunny@postech.ac.kr; Hwang, Byoungcheol; Jung, Woo Hyun

    2016-06-15

    Highlights: • Application of JASMINE code to melt jet breakup and coolability in APR1400 condition. • Coolability indexes for quasi steady state breakup and cooling process. • Typical case in complete breakup/solidification, film boiling quench not reached. • Significant impact of water depth and melt jet size; weak impact of model parameters. - Abstract: The breakup of a melt jet falling in a water pool and the coolability of the melt particles produced by such jet breakup are important phenomena in terms of the mitigation of severe accident consequences in light water reactors, because the molten and relocated core material is the primary heat source that governs the accident progression. We applied a modified version of the fuel–coolant interaction simulation code, JASMINE, developed at Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) to a plant scale simulation of melt jet breakup and cooling assuming an ex-vessel condition in the APR1400, a Korean advanced pressurized water reactor. Also, we examined the sensitivity on seven model parameters and five initial/boundary condition variables. The results showed that the melt cooling performance of a 6 m deep water pool in the reactor cavity is enough for removing the initial melt enthalpy for solidification, for a melt jet of 0.2 m initial diameter. The impacts of the model parameters were relatively weak and that of some of the initial/boundary condition variables, namely the water depth and melt jet diameter, were very strong. The present model indicated that a significant fraction of the melt jet is not broken up and forms a continuous melt pool on the containment floor in cases with a large melt jet diameter, 0.5 m, or a shallow water pool depth, ≤3 m.

  5. 硅基陶瓷型芯的研究进展%Research Progress of Silica-Base Ceramic Core

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘继勇; 刘孝福; 何立明; 郭新力; 刘东辉; 李长春

    2012-01-01

    硅基陶瓷型芯广泛用于1 550℃以下的Ni、Co基高温合金的精密铸造.综述了硅基陶瓷型芯的研究现状.重点介绍了影响硅基陶瓷型芯的主要因素:方石英含量、矿化剂、粉料粒度、烧成温度,并对脱芯工艺进行了阐述.%Silica-base ceramic core is widely used in the investment casting of Ni- and Co-base superalloys below 1 550 ℃. The research status of silica-base ceramic core was reviewed in this paper. Key factors influencing the properties of the ceramic core, such as cristobalite content, mineralizer, granularity and sintering temperature, were presented. Core removal process was also introduced.

  6. Research Progress of Density Measurement for High Temperature Melt%高温熔体密度测量研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱桥; 王秀峰

    2013-01-01

    Density is one of the most important physical properties of high temperature melt,which can be measured by direct and indirect methods.The direct way includes sessile drop method,dilatometric technique and pycnometric method,while the indirect means includes Archimedes method,maximum bubble pressure method and γ-ray attenuation technique.In this paper,the principles and their recent applications of these methods were firstly introduced.Then the applicable scope,advantages and disadvantages were analyzed.Finally,the current problems and the perspective of the future research of the density measurement for high temperature melt were discussed.%高温熔体的密度是描述其性质的重要物理量之一,可通过直接和间接两种方式测定.静滴法、膨胀计法和比重瓶法属于直接测定,而阿基米德法、气泡最大压力法和γ射线吸收法属于间接测定.本文介绍了各种高温熔体密度测定方法的原理和近期的应用情况,分析了其适用范围和优缺点,并结合目前测试中存在的问题提出了今后的发展方向.

  7. 玻璃和熔体包裹体中水含量的拉曼光谱定量测定方面的进展评述%Progress in the determination of water in glasses and melt inclusions with Raman spectroscopy: A short review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rainer Thomas; Paul Davidson

    2007-01-01

    This paper is focused on the progress in the determination of water in glasses and melt inclusions with Raman spectroscopy. Using the presented "Comparator Technique" the water content of a sample is determined by simple comparison with a known standard. A calibration curve is not necessary. Furthermore, with this technique the water concentration in silicate melt inclusions can be determined without exposing the inclusions for measurements. This is very important for extremely water-rich melt inclusions, which would loose H2O on exposure.

  8. CFD Modeling of Melt Spreading on the Reactor Cavity Floor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeon, Wan Sik; Bang, Kwang Hyun [Korea Maritime University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Young Jo; Lee, Jae Gon [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-05-15

    In the very unlikely event of a severe reactor accident involving core melt and reactor pressure vessel failure, it is important to provide an accident management strategy that would allow the molten core material to cool down, resolidify and bring the core debris to a stable coolable state for Light Water Reactors (LWRs). One approach to achieve a stable coolable state is to quench the core melt after its relocation from the reactor pressure vessel into the reactor cavity. This approach typically requires a large cavity floor area on which a large amount of core melt spreads well and forms a shallow melt thickness for small thermal resistance across the melt pool. Spreading of high temperature (approx3000 K), low superheat (approx200 K) core melt over a wide cavity floor has been a key question to the success of the ex-vessel core coolability and it has brought a number of experimental work (CORINE, ECOKATS, VULCANO) and analytical work (CORFLOW, MELTSPREAD, THEMA). These computational models are currently able to predict well the spreading of stimulant materials but yet have shown a limitation for prototypic core melt of UO{sub 2}+ZrO{sub 2} mixture. A computational model for the melt spreading requires a multiphase treatment of liquid melt, solidified melt, and air. Also solidification and thermal radiation physics should be included. The present work uses ANSYS-CFX code to simulate core melt spreading on the reactor cavity. The CFX code is a general-purpose multiphase code and the present work is focused on exploring the code's capability to model melt spreading problem in a step by step approach

  9. A Study on Melt-able metal Core Process for Permanent Mould Casting of Ti3Al-based Alloy%可熔金属芯在金属型铸造Ti3Al基合金中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢华生; 杨洪涛; 赵军; 王君卿

    2001-01-01

    本文通过对空心可熔金属芯制造工艺及表面处理工艺的研究,成功地实现了Ti3Al基合金铸件的金属型铸造。研究结果表明:(1)利用金属型及可熔性金属芯可以铸出合格的Ti3Al基合金铸件;(2)该技术的重点在于可熔性金属芯的应用,可熔性金属芯既要能使合金液圆满充型,又要在充型结束后熔化以减少收缩阻力;(3)金属芯上的涂层是保证合金成分稳定与圆满充型的关键。%Based on an experimental study of the melt-able core and itssurface treatment technique, the castings with intermetallic compound Ti3Al-based alloy have been successfully cast in the permanent mold. The result shows that first, the Ti3Al castings can be manufactured by permanent mold casting; second, key of the technology is the use of a melt-able core which should not only bear pressure of the mold filling metal melt, but also could reduce the resistance of the core to metal contraction by the core being molten; and finally, the coating of the core is also one of the key technology for ensuring the alloy melt being successfully filled and against its composition being changed.

  10. 核壳吸波材料的研究进展∗%Progress in core-shell absorbing materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    俞梁; 王建江; 许宝才; 李志广; 蔡旭东

    2015-01-01

    As a new core-shell composite absorbing material,as compared with a single type of absorbing mate-rial in the structure,properties and applications of absorbing has obvious advantages,the paper summarizes the basic types of core-shell absorbing materials,preparation methods and proposed a new method for self-reactive quenching + surface modification method.Pointed out that the core-shell absorbing material absorbing material is expected to meet the new"thin,light,wide,strong"requirements,and core-shell absorbing materials re-search proposed future prospects.%核壳吸波材料作为一种新型复合吸波材料,与单一类型的吸波材料相比在结构、吸波性能和应用上有着明显优势,本文总结了核壳吸波材料的基本类型、制备方法及提出了一种新的制备方法-自反应淬熄+表面改性法。指出核壳吸波材料有望满足新型吸波材料“薄、轻、宽、强”的要求,并对今后核壳吸波材料的研究提出展望。

  11. Aberrant expression of mucin core proteins and o-linked glycans associated with progression of pancreatic cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Remmers, Neeley; Anderson, Judy M; Linde, Erin M;

    2013-01-01

    Mucin expression is a common feature of most adenocarcinomas and features prominently in current attempts to improve diagnosis and therapy for pancreatic cancer and other adenocarcinomas. We investigated the expression of a number of mucin core proteins and associated O-linked glycans expressed...

  12. Functional Rehabilitation of Low Back Pain With Core Stabilizations Exercises: Suggestions for Exercises and Progressions in Athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Low back pain is very common in the adult population and accounts for more time lost form work than other diagnoses. It also affects athlete's at all different levels of competition and results in missed practice and game time. Diagnosing and treating a specific pathology is often difficult and because clinical evaluation and raidologic studies are often unable to find a root cause. A popular treatment approach with a high volume of anecdotal evidence is the use of core stabiliz...

  13. Rise in central west Greenland surface melt unprecedented over the last three centuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trusel, Luke; Das, Sarah; Osman, Matthew; Evans, Matthew; Smith, Ben; McConnell, Joe; Noël, Brice; van den Broeke, Michiel

    2017-04-01

    Greenland Ice Sheet surface melting has intensified and expanded over the last several decades and is now a leading component of ice sheet mass loss. Here, we constrain the multi-century temporal evolution of surface melt across central west Greenland by quantifying layers of refrozen melt within well-dated firn and ice cores collected in 2014 and 2015, as well as from a core collected in 2004. We find significant agreement among ice core, satellite, and regional climate model melt datasets over recent decades, confirming the fidelity of the ice core melt stratigraphy as a reliable record of past variability in the magnitude of surface melt. We also find a significant correlation between the melt records derived from our new 100-m GC-2015 core (2436 m.a.s.l.) and the older (2004) 150-m D5 core (2472 m.a.s.l.) located 50 km to the southeast. This agreement demonstrates the robustness of the ice core-derived melt histories and the potential for reconstructing regional melt evolution from a single site, despite local variability in melt percolation and refreeze processes. Our array of upper percolation zone cores reveals that although the overall frequency of melt at these sites has not increased, the intensification of melt over the last three decades is unprecedented within at least the last 365 years. Utilizing the regional climate model RACMO 2.3, we show that this melt intensification is a nonlinear response to warming summer air temperatures, thus underscoring the heightened sensitivity of this sector of Greenland to further climate warming. Finally, we examine spatial correlations between the ice core melt records and modeled melt fields across the ice sheet to assess the broader representation of each ice core record. This analysis reveals wide-ranging significant correlations, including to modeled meltwater runoff. As such, our ice core melt records may furthermore offer unique, observationally-constrained insights into past variability in ice sheet mass loss.

  14. Building core capacities at the designated points of entry according to the International Health Regulations 2005: a review of the progress and prospects in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiao-Hsuan Chiu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: As designated points of entry (PoEs play a critical role in preventing the transmission of international public health risks, huge efforts have been invested in Taiwan to improve the core capacities specified in the International Health Regulations 2005 (IHR 2005. This article reviews how Taiwan strengthened the core capacities at the Taoyuan International Airport (TIA and the Port of Kaohsiung (PoK by applying a new, practicable model. Design: An IHR PoE program was initiated for implementing the IHR core capacities at designated PoEs. The main methods of this program were 1 identifying the designated PoEs according to the pre-determined criteria, 2 identifying the competent authority for each health measure, 3 building a close collaborative relationship between stakeholders from the central and PoE level, 4 designing three stages of systematic assessment using the assessment tool published by the World Health Organization (WHO, and 5 undertaking action plans targeting the gaps identified by the assessments. Results: Results of the self-assessment, preliminary external assessment, and follow-up external assessment revealed a continuous progressive trend at the TIA (86, 91, and 100%, respectively, and at the PoK (77, 97, and 99.9%, respectively. The results of the follow-up external assessment indicated that both these designated PoEs already conformed to the IHR requirements. These achievements were highly associated with strong collaboration, continuous empowerment, efficient resource integration, and sustained commitments. Conclusions: Considering that many countries had requested for an extension on the deadline to fulfill the IHR 2005 core capacity requirements, Taiwan's experiences can be a source of learning for countries striving to fully implement these requirements. Further, in order to broaden the scope of public health protection into promoting global security, Taiwan will keep its commitments on multisectoral cooperation

  15. Scoping assessments of ATF impact on late-stage accident progression including molten core-concrete interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, M. T.; Leibowitz, L.; Terrani, K. A.; Robb, K. R.

    2014-05-01

    Simple scoping models that can be used to evaluate ATF performance under severe accident conditions have been developed. The methodology provides a fundamental technical basis (a.k.a. metric) based on the thermodynamic boundary for evaluating performance relative to that of traditional Zr-based claddings. The initial focus in this study was on UO2 fuel with the advanced claddings 310 SS, D9, FeCrAl, and SiC. The evaluation considered only energy release with concurrent combustible gas production from fuel-cladding-coolant interactions and, separately, molten core-concrete interactions at high temperatures. Other important phenomenological effects that can influence the rate and extent of cladding decomposition (e.g., eutectic interactions, degradation of other core constituents) were not addressed. For the cladding types addressed, potential combustible gas production under both in-vessel and ex-vessel conditions was similar to that for Zr. However, exothermic energy release from cladding oxidation was substantially less for iron-based alloys (by at least a factor of 4), and modestly less (by ∼20%) for SiC. Data on SiC-clad UO2 fuel performance under severe accident conditions are sparse in the literature; thus, assumptions on the nature of the cladding decomposition process were made in order to perform this initial screening evaluation. Experimental data for this system under severe accident conditions is needed for a proper evaluation and comparison to iron-based claddings.

  16. Melting of superheated molecular crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubeta, Ulyana; Bhattacharya, Deepanjan; Sadtchenko, Vlad

    2017-07-01

    Melting dynamics of micrometer scale, polycrystalline samples of isobutane, dimethyl ether, methyl benzene, and 2-propanol were investigated by fast scanning calorimetry. When films are superheated with rates in excess of 105 K s-1, the melting process follows zero-order, Arrhenius-like kinetics until approximately half of the sample has transformed. Such kinetics strongly imply that melting progresses into the bulk via a rapidly moving solid-liquid interface that is likely to originate at the sample's surface. Remarkably, the apparent activation energies for the phase transformation are large; all exceed the enthalpy of vaporization of each compound and some exceed it by an order of magnitude. In fact, we find that the crystalline melting kinetics are comparable to the kinetics of dielectric α-relaxation in deeply supercooled liquids. Based on these observations, we conclude that the rate of non-isothermal melting for superheated, low-molecular-weight crystals is limited by constituent diffusion into an abnormally dense, glass-like, non-crystalline phase.

  17. Curriculum-based assessment of oral language and listening comprehension: a tool for intervention and progress monitoring in the Common Core State Standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Wendy

    2012-05-01

    The Common Core State Standards and a Response to Intervention framework are movements sweeping the nation. Speech-language pathologists are uniquely positioned to play a pivotal role in supporting successful implementation of these movements. This article explores the assessment tools speech-language pathologists SLPs will need to identify and progress monitor critical language/literacy skills such as listening comprehension and oral narratives skills. Foundational research demonstrates that communication units, total words spoken, and major story components are measures that will discriminate between students with adequate language skills and language disorders and are curriculum-based, sensitive to change, and useful to determine the effectiveness of language/literacy interventions. Speech-language pathologist can broaden the impact of their knowledge and skills to improve outcomes for all students.

  18. Variability in the precore and core promoter regions of HBV strains in Morocco: characterization and impact on liver disease progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouchra Kitab

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hepatitis B virus (HBV is one of the most common human pathogens that cause aggressive hepatitis and advanced liver disease (AdLD, including liver cirrhosis and Hepatocellular Carcinoma. The persistence of active HBV replication and liver damage after the loss of hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg has been frequently associated with mutations in the pre-core (pre-C and core promoter (CP regions of HBV genome that abolish or reduce HBeAg expression. The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of pre-C and CP mutations and their impact on the subsequent course of liver disease in Morocco. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A cohort of 186 patients with HBeAg-negative chronic HBV infection was studied (81 inactive carriers, 69 with active chronic hepatitis, 36 with AdLD. Pre-C and CP mutations were analyzed by PCR-direct sequencing method. The pre-C stop codon G1896A mutation was the most frequent (83.9% and was associated with a lower risk of AdLD development (OR, 0.4; 95% CI, 0.15-1.04; p = 0.04. HBV-DNA levels in patients with G1896A were not significantly different from the other patients carrying wild-type strains (p = 0.84. CP mutations C1653T, T1753V, A1762T/G1764A, and C1766T/T1768A were associated with higher HBV-DNA level and increased liver disease severity. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that older age (≥ 40 years, male sex, high viral load (>4.3 log(10 IU/mL and CP mutations C1653T, T1753V, A1762T/G1764A, and C1766T/T1768A were independent risk factors for AdLD development. Combination of these mutations was significantly associated with AdLD (OR, 7.52; 95% CI, 4.8-8; p<0.0001. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows for the first time the association of HBV viral load and CP mutations with the severity of liver disease in Moroccan HBV chronic carriers. The examination of CP mutations alone or in combination could be helpful for prediction of the clinical outcome.

  19. Variability in the Precore and Core Promoter Regions of HBV Strains in Morocco: Characterization and Impact on Liver Disease Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitab, Bouchra; Essaid El Feydi, Abdellah; Afifi, Rajaa; Trepo, Christian; Benazzouz, Mustapha; Essamri, Wafaa; Zoulim, Fabien; Chemin, Isabelle; Alj, Hanane Salih; Ezzikouri, Sayeh; Benjelloun, Soumaya

    2012-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is one of the most common human pathogens that cause aggressive hepatitis and advanced liver disease (AdLD), including liver cirrhosis and Hepatocellular Carcinoma. The persistence of active HBV replication and liver damage after the loss of hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) has been frequently associated with mutations in the pre-core (pre-C) and core promoter (CP) regions of HBV genome that abolish or reduce HBeAg expression. The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of pre-C and CP mutations and their impact on the subsequent course of liver disease in Morocco. Methods/Principal Findings A cohort of 186 patients with HBeAg-negative chronic HBV infection was studied (81 inactive carriers, 69 with active chronic hepatitis, 36 with AdLD). Pre-C and CP mutations were analyzed by PCR-direct sequencing method. The pre-C stop codon G1896A mutation was the most frequent (83.9%) and was associated with a lower risk of AdLD development (OR, 0.4; 95% CI, 0.15–1.04; p = 0.04). HBV-DNA levels in patients with G1896A were not significantly different from the other patients carrying wild-type strains (p = 0.84). CP mutations C1653T, T1753V, A1762T/G1764A, and C1766T/T1768A were associated with higher HBV-DNA level and increased liver disease severity. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that older age (≥40 years), male sex, high viral load (>4.3 log10 IU/mL) and CP mutations C1653T, T1753V, A1762T/G1764A, and C1766T/T1768A were independent risk factors for AdLD development. Combination of these mutations was significantly associated with AdLD (OR, 7.52; 95% CI, 4.8–8; pviral load and CP mutations with the severity of liver disease in Moroccan HBV chronic carriers. The examination of CP mutations alone or in combination could be helpful for prediction of the clinical outcome. PMID:22905181

  20. Progress Towards a Core Set of Outcome Measures in Small-vessel Vasculitis. Report from OMERACT 9

    Science.gov (United States)

    MERKEL, PETER A.; HERLYN, KAREN; MAHR, ALFRED D.; NEOGI, TUHINA; SEO, PHILIP; WALSH, MICHAEL; BOERS, MAARTEN; LUQMANI, RAASHID

    2011-01-01

    The past decade has seen a substantial increase in the number and quality of clinical trials of new therapies for vasculitis, including randomized, controlled, multicenter trials that have successfully incorporated measures of disease activity and toxicity. However, because current treatment regimens for severe disease effectively induce initial remission and reduce mortality, future trials will focus on any of several goals including: (a) treatment of mild—moderate disease; (b) prevention of chronic damage; (c) reduction in treatment toxicity; or (d) more subtle differences in remission induction or maintenance. Thus, new trials will require outcome measure instruments that are more precise and are better able to detect effective treatments for different disease states and measure chronic manifestations of disease. The OMERACT Vasculitis Working Group comprises international clinical investigators with expertise in vasculitis who, since 2002, have worked collaboratively to advance the refinement of outcome measures in vasculitis, create new measures to address domains of illness not covered by current research approaches, and harmonize outcome assessment in vasculitis. The focus of the OMERACT group to date has been on outcome measures in small-vessel vasculitis with an overall goal of creating a core set of outcome measures for vasculitis, each of which fulfills the OMERACT filter of truth, discrimination, feasibility, and identifying additional domains requiring further research. This process has been informed by several ongoing projects providing data on outcomes of disease activity, disease-related damage, multidimensional health-related quality of life, and patient-reported ratings of the burden of vasculitis. PMID:19820226

  1. Melting of Transition Metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, M; Japel, S; Boehler, R

    2005-04-11

    We review the transition melting studies carried out at Mainz, and describe a recently developed model used to explain that the relatively low melting slopes are due to the partially filled d-bands, and the persistence of the pressure induced s-d transition. The basic tenets of the model have now been reconfirmed by new measurements for Cu and Ni. The measurements show that Cu which has a filled 3d-band, has a melt slope that is about 2.5 greater than its neighbor Ni. In the case of Mo, the apparent discrepancy of DAC melting measurements with shock melting can be explained by accounting for the change in melt slope due to the bcc-cp transition observed in the shock studies. The Fe melt curve is revisited. The possible relevance of the Jahn-Teller effect and recently observed transition metal melts with Icosahedral Short-Range Order (ISRO) is discussed.

  2. Do Melt Inclusions Answer Big Questions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, A. W.; Sobolev, A. V.

    2009-12-01

    In a pioneering paper, Sobolev and Shimizu (1993) demonstrated the existence of ultra-depleted melt inclusions in olivine phenocrysts in MORB. They interpreted these as evidence for the preservation of parental melts formed by progressive near-fractional melting. Subsequently many cases have been described where melt inclusions from single basalt samples display enormous chemical and isotopic heterogeneity. The interpretation of these observations hinges critically on whether such melt inclusions can faithfully preserve primary or parental melt composition. If they do, melt inclusion data can truly answer big questions from small-scale observations. If they do not, they answer rather small questions. Favoring the second possibility, Danyushevsky et al. (2004) have suggested that much of the observed variability of highly incompatible trace elements in melt inclusions “may not represent geologically significant melts, but instead reflect localized, grain-scale reaction processes within the magmatic plumbing system.” We disagree and show that this mechanism cannot, for example, explain isotopic heterogeneity measured in several suites of melt inclusions, nor does it not account for the presence of ultra-depleted melts and "ghost" plagioclase signatures in other inclusions. More recently, Spandler et al. (2007) have suggested on the basis of experimental evidence that diffusion rates for REE in olivine are so rapid that parental melt compositions in melt inclusions are rapidly falsified by diffusional exchange with (evolved) host lava. We show that the very fact that extreme chemical and isotopic heterogeneities are routinely preserved in melt inclusions demonstrates that this conclusion is unwarranted, either because residence times of the olivine phenocrysts are much shorter than assumed by Spandler et al. or because the high experimental diffusion rates are caused by an unknown experimental artifact. Although there is no obvious flaw in design and execution of

  3. Mercury's core evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deproost, Marie-Hélène; Rivoldini, Attilio; Van Hoolst, Tim

    2016-10-01

    Remote sensing data of Mercury's surface by MESSENGER indicate that Mercury formed under reducing conditions. As a consequence, silicon is likely the main light element in the core together with a possible small fraction of sulfur. Compared to sulfur, which does almost not partition into solid iron at Mercury's core conditions and strongly decreases the melting temperature, silicon partitions almost equally well between solid and liquid iron and is not very effective at reducing the melting temperature of iron. Silicon as the major light element constituent instead of sulfur therefore implies a significantly higher core liquidus temperature and a decrease in the vigor of compositional convection generated by the release of light elements upon inner core formation.Due to the immiscibility in liquid Fe-Si-S at low pressure (below 15 GPa), the core might also not be homogeneous and consist of an inner S-poor Fe-Si core below a thinner Si-poor Fe-S layer. Here, we study the consequences of a silicon-rich core and the effect of the blanketing Fe-S layer on the thermal evolution of Mercury's core and on the generation of a magnetic field.

  4. Time-resolved synchrotron radiation X-ray solution scattering study of DNA melting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puigdomenech, J; Perez-Grau, L; Porta, J; Vega, M C; Sicre, P; Koch, M H

    1989-09-01

    Time resolved x-ray solution scattering measurements were made during thermal denaturation of DNA from various sources in the temperature range of 20-90 degrees C. Preliminary results on the influence of fragment length, ionic strength, and origin of the DNA on the time course of the scattering are described. Interpretation is based on model calculations of the scattering patterns. The results indicate that, for long DNA fragments at very low ionic strength, the melting process is a continuous phenomenon over the whole temperature range. It is accompanied by a progressive decrease of the radius of gyration of the cross section and of the mass per unit length. For short fragments of 146 base pair nucleosomal core DNA, stiffening of the DNA appears to precede a sharp melting transition.

  5. Glass-clad semiconductor core optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Stephanie Lynn

    Glass-clad optical fibers comprising a crystalline semiconductor core have garnered considerable recent attention for their potential utility as novel waveguides for applications in nonlinear optics, sensing, power delivery, and biomedicine. As research into these fibers has progressed, it has become evident that excessive losses are limiting performance and so greater understanding of the underlying materials science, coupled with advances in fiber processing, is needed. More specifically, the semiconductor core fibers possess three performance-limiting characteristics that need to be addressed: (a) thermal expansion mismatches between crystalline core and glass cladding that lead to cracks, (b) the precipitation of oxide species in the core upon fiber cooling, which results from partial dissolution of the cladding glass by the core melt, and (c) polycrystallinity; all of which lead to scattering and increased transmission losses. This dissertation systematically studies each of these effects and develops both a fundamental scientific understanding of and practical engineering methods for reducing their impact. With respect to the thermal expansion mismatch and, in part, the dissolution of oxides, for the first time to our knowledge, oxide and non-oxide glass compositions are developed for a series of semiconductor cores based on two main design criteria: (1) matching the thermal expansion coefficient between semiconductor core and glass cladding to minimize cracking and (2) matching the viscosity-temperature dependences, such that the cladding glass draws into fiber at a temperature slightly above the melting point of the semiconductor in order to minimize dissolution and improve the fiber draw process. The x[Na 2O:Al2O3] + (100 - 2x)SiO2 glass compositional family was selected due to the ability to tailor the glass properties to match the aforementioned targets through slight variations in composition and adjusting the ratios of bridging and non-bridging oxygen

  6. Comparative Study on Two Melting Simulation Methods: Melting Curve of Gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhong-Li; Sun, Jun-Sheng; Li, Rui; Zhang, Xiu-Lu; Cai, Ling-Cang

    2016-05-01

    Melting simulation methods are of crucial importance to determining melting temperature of materials efficiently. A high-efficiency melting simulation method saves much simulation time and computational resources. To compare the efficiency of our newly developed shock melting (SM) method with that of the well-established two-phase (TP) method, we calculate the high-pressure melting curve of Au using the two methods based on the optimally selected interatomic potentials. Although we only use 640 atoms to determine the melting temperature of Au in the SM method, the resulting melting curve accords very well with the results from the TP method using much more atoms. Thus, this shows that a much smaller system size in SM method can still achieve a fully converged melting curve compared with the TP method, implying the robustness and efficiency of the SM method. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 41574076 and the NSAF of China under Grant No. U1230201/A06, and the Young Core Teacher Scheme of Henan Province under Grant No. 2014GGJS-108

  7. Final report for the 'Melt-Vessel Interactions' Project. European Union R and TD Program 4th Framework. MVI project final research report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sehgal, B.R.; Dinh, T.N.; Nourgaliev, R.R.; Bui, V.A.; Green, J.; Kolb, G.; Karbojian, A.; Theerthan, S.A.; Gubaidulline, A. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Div. of Nuclear Power Safety; Helle, M.; Kymaelaeinen, O.; Tuomisto, H. [IVO Power Engineering Ltd., Vantaa (Finland); Bonnet, J.M.; Rouge, S.; Narcoux, M.; Liegeois, A. [CEA - Grenoble (France); Turland, B.D.; Dobson, G.P. [AEA Technology plc, Dorchester (United Kingdom); Siccama, A. [ECN Nuclear Research, Petten (Netherlands); Ikonen, K. [VTT Energy, Helsinki (Finland); Parozzi, F. [ENEL - SRI/PAM/GRA, Segrate, MI (Italy); Kolev, N. [Siemens AG, Erlangen (Germany); Caira, M. [Univ. of Roma (Italy)

    1999-04-01

    The Melt Vessel Interaction (MVI) project is concerned with the consequences of the interactions that a core melt, generated during a postulated severe accident in a light water reactor, may have with the pressure vessel. In particular, the issues concerned with the failure of the vessel bottom head are the focus of the research. The specific objectives of the project are to obtain data and develop validated models, which could be applied to prototypic plants, and accident conditions, for resolution of issues related to the melt vessel interactions. The project work has been performed by nine partners having varied responsibility. The work included a large number of experiments, with simulant materials, whose observations and results are employed, respectively, to understand the physical mechanisms and to develop validated models. Applications to the prototypic geometry and conditions have also been performed. This report is volume 1 of the Final Report for the Project, in which a summary of the progress achieved in the experimental program is provided. We have, however, included some aspects of the modeling activities. Volume 2 of the Final report describes the progress achieved in the modeling program. The progress achieved in the experimental and modeling parts of the Project has led to the resolution of some of the issues of melt vessel interaction. Considerable progress was also achieved towards resolution of the remaining issues.

  8. Research progress of maleic anhydride grafted polyethylene for hot melt adhesive%热熔胶用马来酸酐接枝聚乙烯研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李文; 张华华; 闫瑞涛; 周文娟; 陈艳军; 张超灿

    2016-01-01

    Maleic anhydride grafted polyethylene is widely used as hot melt adhesive in steel-plastic composite pipe,because of its excellent adhesive properties,and low cost. The grafted progress is always processed through twin-screw extrude. In this paper,the effect of reaction conditions on the graft reaction are summarized,such as initiation methods,reaction temperature,screw structure and speed. The influence of initiators,PE type,and modified monomers are also concluded. Then,the characterization methods of the grafting yield are summarized,such as chemical titration and infrared spectroscopy. The effects of surface treatment and coating process on the peeling strength are discussed too. Finally,we pointed out some drawbacks of traditional sample preparing methods in peeling strength and put forward a reliable way to obtain stable and reliable peeling strength data. The research prospects of PE hot melt adhesive of low maleic anhydride content,excellent adhesion property and environmental characteristics,are predicated.%通过双螺杆挤出机将马来酸酐熔融接枝聚乙烯,制备的聚乙烯热熔胶具有粘接性能强、价格低等优点,广泛地应用于钢塑复合管。本文根据近年来聚乙烯热熔胶的研究方向,综述了新型引发剂及引发方式对接枝反应的影响;比较了不同种类聚乙烯接枝效果的差异;总结了改性单体对热熔胶性能的改善以及温度、挤出机螺杆结构和转速等工艺条件对聚乙烯热熔胶的影响。分别总结了化学滴定法和红外光谱法对接枝率的表征;简述了材料表面处理和涂胶工艺对剥离强度的影响。分析了热熔胶剥离强度传统制样方法的不足,并总结了能得到稳定真实剥离强度的制样方案。展望了低马来酸酐含量、高粘接强度的绿色环保型聚乙烯热熔胶的研究前景。

  9. The Gao-Guenie impact melt breccia—Sampling a rapidly cooled impact melt dike on an H chondrite asteroid?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmieder, Martin; Kring, David A.; Swindle, Timothy D.; Bond, Jade C.; Moore, Carleton B.

    2016-06-01

    The Gao-Guenie H5 chondrite that fell on Burkina Faso (March 1960) has portions that were impact-melted on an H chondrite asteroid at ~300 Ma and, through later impact events in space, sent into an Earth-crossing orbit. This article presents a petrographic and electron microprobe analysis of a representative sample of the Gao-Guenie impact melt breccia consisting of a chondritic clast domain, quenched melt in contact with chondritic clasts, and an igneous-textured impact melt domain. Olivine is predominantly Fo80-82. The clast domain contains low-Ca pyroxene. Impact melt-grown pyroxene is commonly zoned from low-Ca pyroxene in cores to pigeonite and augite in rims. Metal-troilite orbs in the impact melt domain measure up to ~2 mm across. The cores of metal orbs in the impact melt domain contain ~7.9 wt% of Ni and are typically surrounded by taenite and Ni-rich troilite. The metallography of metal-troilite droplets suggest a stage I cooling rate of order 10 °C s-1 for the superheated impact melt. The subsolidus stage II cooling rate for the impact melt breccia could not be determined directly, but was presumably fast. An analogy between the Ni rim gradients in metal of the Gao-Guenie impact melt breccia and the impact-melted H6 chondrite Orvinio suggests similar cooling rates, probably on the order of ~5000-40,000 °C yr-1. A simple model of conductive heat transfer shows that the Gao-Guenie impact melt breccia may have formed in a melt injection dike ~0.5-5 m in width, generated during a sizeable impact event on the H chondrite parent asteroid.

  10. Experimental Results on Pouring and Underwater Liquid Melt Spreading and Energetic Melt-coolant Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Konovalenko, Alexander; Karbojian, Aram; Kudinov, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    In a hypothetical light water reactor (LWR) core-melt accident with corium release from the reactor  vessel,  the  ultimate  containment  integrity  is  contingent  on  coolability  of  the decay-heated core debris. Pouring of melt into a pool of water located in the reactor cavity is considered in several designs of existing and new LWRs  as a part of severe accident (SA) management strategies. At certain conditions of melt release into the pool (e.g. large ratio of the  vessel  breach  size...

  11. Melting experiments on peridotite to lowermost mantle conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateno, Shigehiko; Hirose, Kei; Ohishi, Yasuo

    2014-06-01

    Melting experiments on a pyrolitic mantle material were performed in a pressure range from 34 to 179 GPa based on laser-heated diamond-anvil cell (DAC) techniques. The textural and chemical characterizations of quenched samples were made by using field-emission-type electron microprobe (FE-EPMA). Melts formed by 46 to 77 wt.% partial melting in this study were ultrabasic in composition and became more depleted in SiO2 and more enriched in FeO with increasing pressure. Melting textures indicate that the liquidus phase changed from ferropericlase to MgSiO3-rich perovskite at least above 34 GPa and further to post-perovskite. The first phase to melt (disappear) changed from CaSiO3 perovskite to (Mg,Fe)O ferropericlase between 68 and 82 GPa. The stability of ferropericlase above solidus temperature shrinks with increasing pressure (melting last below 34 GPa and first 82 GPa), resulting in higher (MgO + FeO)/SiO2 ratio in partial melt at higher pressure. Additionally, the Fe-Mg distribution coefficients (KD) between perovskite/post-perovskite and melt decreased considerably with increasing pressure, leading to strong Fe-enrichment in partial melts. It supports dense partial melts in a deep lower mantle, which migrate downward to the core mantle boundary (CMB).

  12. HTGR fuels and core development program. Quarterly progress report for the period ending November 30, 1976. [Graphite and fuel irradiations; fission product release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-12-27

    The work reported includes studies of reactions between core materials and coolant impurities, basic fission product transport mechanisms, core graphite development and testing, the development and testing of recyclable fuel systems, and physics and fuel management studies. Materials studies include irradiation capsule tests of both fuel and graphite. Experimental procedures and results are discussed and the data are presented in tables, graphs, and photographs.

  13. HTGR Fuels and Core Development Program. Quarterly progress report for the period ending August 31, 1977. [Graphite and fuel irradiation; fission product release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-09-01

    The work reported includes studies of reactions between core materials and coolant impurities, basic fission product transport mechanisms, core graphite development and testing, the development and testing of recyclable fuel systems, and physics and fuel management studies. Materials studies include irradiation capsule tests of both fuel and graphite. Experimental procedures and results are discussed and data are presented.

  14. Signatures of nonthermal melting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Zier

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Intense ultrashort laser pulses can melt crystals in less than a picosecond but, in spite of over thirty years of active research, for many materials it is not known to what extent thermal and nonthermal microscopic processes cause this ultrafast phenomenon. Here, we perform ab-initio molecular-dynamics simulations of silicon on a laser-excited potential-energy surface, exclusively revealing nonthermal signatures of laser-induced melting. From our simulated atomic trajectories, we compute the decay of five structure factors and the time-dependent structure function. We demonstrate how these quantities provide criteria to distinguish predominantly nonthermal from thermal melting.

  15. Thermal Evolution And Core Formation In Planetesimals And Planetary Embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sramek, O.; Labrosse, S.; Ricard, Y. R.; milelli, L.

    2011-12-01

    Recent dating of iron meteorites shows that they were formed almost as early as the oldest known objects of the solar system, the CAIs. Moreover, several meteorites show a magnetization that is thought to originate from the action of a dynamo at the early stages of the planetesimals evolution. Core formation requires melting of the metal which then can percolate toward the center, providing the solid matrix deforms and compacts. The energy source for melting of the metal comes from a combination of short lived radionuclides, mostly 26Al, and accretion energy for bodies larger than about 1000 km. We considered a suite of numerical calculations solving for the coupled problem of thermal evolution, melt percolation and matrix compaction, systematically exploring the different accretion histories, final body size and initial concentration in 26Al. Our model handles simultaneously metal and silicates in both solid and liquid states. Depending on the accretion rate, melting occurs from the center outward, in a shallow outer shell progressing inward, or in the two locations. Segregation of the protocore decreases the efficiency of radiogenic heating by confining the 26Al in the outer silicate shell. Various types of planetesimals partly differentiated and sometimes differentiated in multiple metal-silicate layers can be obtained. We discuss the thermal profiles of the accreted bodies in relation to possible early dynamo action as evidenced by remanent magnetization observed on some meteorite samples.

  16. Melt Cast High Explosives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanisław Cudziło

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available [b]Abstract[/b]. This paper reviews the current state and future developments of melt-cast high explosives. First the compositions, properties and methods of preparation of trinitrotoluene based (TNT conventional mixtures with aluminum, hexogen (RDX or octogen (HMX are described. In the newer, less sensitive explosive formulations, TNT is replaced with dinitroanisole (DNANDNANDNAN and nitrotriazolone (NTONTONTO, nitroguanidine (NG or ammonium perchlorate (AP are the replacement for RDRDX and HMX. Plasticized wax or polymer-based binder systems for melt castable explosives are also included. Hydroxyl terminated polybutadiene (HPTB is the binder of choice, but polyethylene glycol, and polycaprolactone with energetic plasticizers are also used. The most advanced melt-cast explosives are compositions containing energetic thermoplastic elastomers and novel highly energetic compounds (including nitrogen rich molecules in whose particles are nanosized and practically defect-less.[b]Keywords[/b]: melt-cast explosives, detonation parameters

  17. Melting of sodium clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Reyes-Nava, J A; Beltran, M R; Michaelian, K

    2002-01-01

    Thermal stability properties and the melting-like transition of Na_n, n=13-147, clusters are studied through microcanonical molecular dynamics simulations. The metallic bonding in the sodium clusters is mimicked by a many-body Gupta potential based on the second moment approximation of a tight-binding Hamiltonian. The characteristics of the solid-to-liquid transition in the sodium clusters are analyzed by calculating physical quantities like caloric curves, heat capacities, and root-mean-square bond length fluctuations using simulation times of several nanoseconds. Distinct melting mechanisms are obtained for the sodium clusters in the size range investigated. The calculated melting temperatures show an irregular variation with the cluster size, in qualitative agreement with recent experimental results. However, the calculated melting point for the Na_55 cluster is about 40 % lower than the experimental value.

  18. Force induced DNA melting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santosh, Mogurampelly; Maiti, Prabal K [Center for Condensed Matter Theory, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore-12 (India)], E-mail: santosh@physics.iisc.ernet.in, E-mail: maiti@physics.iisc.ernet.in

    2009-01-21

    When pulled along the axis, double-strand DNA undergoes a large conformational change and elongates by roughly twice its initial contour length at a pulling force of about 70 pN. The transition to this highly overstretched form of DNA is very cooperative. Applying a force perpendicular to the DNA axis (unzipping), double-strand DNA can also be separated into two single-stranded DNA, this being a fundamental process in DNA replication. We study the DNA overstretching and unzipping transition using fully atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and argue that the conformational changes of double-strand DNA associated with either of the above mentioned processes can be viewed as force induced DNA melting. As the force at one end of the DNA is increased the DNA starts melting abruptly/smoothly above a critical force depending on the pulling direction. The critical force f{sub m}, at which DNA melts completely decreases as the temperature of the system is increased. The melting force in the case of unzipping is smaller compared to the melting force when the DNA is pulled along the helical axis. In the case of melting through unzipping, the double-strand separation has jumps which correspond to the different energy minima arising due to sequence of different base pairs. The fraction of Watson-Crick base pair hydrogen bond breaking as a function of force does not show smooth and continuous behavior and consists of plateaus followed by sharp jumps.

  19. Characterizing "Rotten" Ice: Changes in first-year Arctic sea ice during advanced summer melt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frantz, C. M.; Junge, K.; Light, B.; Orellana, M. V.; Carpenter, S.; Farley, S. M.; Crump, B. C.; Lieb-Lappen, R.; Courville, Z.

    2016-12-01

    Arctic melt seasons are lengthening; as this happens, more Arctic sea ice will undergo advanced stages of melt, becoming so-called "rotten" ice. However, very little is known about this increasingly important ice type. Here, we present results of a physical, optical, chemical, and biological characterization of rotten Arctic sea ice. Sea ice core samples and measurements were collected from landfast sea ice and summer ice floes near Barrow, Alaska during May-July of 2015. We captured a normal progression of ice warming and freshening from May-June which contrasted sharply to physical properties and biological composition of the "rotten" ice targeted in July. Rotten ice is approximately isothermal and highly permeable, a consequence of its characteristic multi-cm-scale brine channels, resulting in an ice that is largely drained of brine and flushed with seawater. 3D micro-CT images of the ice allow us to quantify the evolution of factors related to ice porosity and channel connectivity in May-June vs. rotten ice. Patterns in measured chemistry show an environment in rotten ice that is distinct from May-June ice as well as from the seawater that underlies and permeates the ice. The physical and chemical parameters taken together represent an entirely different microbial habitat than the saline ice of May and June. Correspondingly, the sea ice microbial community also changes significantly over the course of melt. The ice-bottom algal community that dominates the biomass of the cores in May and June was lost by July, yet in July samples some algae appear to remain embedded in or attached to the ice throughout the full core depth. In addition, bacterial counts in upper horizons of rotten ice were dramatically higher than those observed in May-June. Pending results from SSU rRNA amplicon sequencing and exopolymer/gel analyses will also be presented.

  20. MELTED BUTTER TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Golubeva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary. Melted butter is made from dairy butter by rendering the fat phase. It has specific taste and aroma, high-calorie content and good assimilability. Defects of butter which appeared during the storage causes by the development of microbiological processes or by the chemical oxidation. On the development of these processes influence quality and composition of fresh butter, its physical structure, content of the increased amount of gas phase and content of heavy metals, storage conditions. Microbiological spoilage of butter occurs generally due to damage of plasma which is good environment for the development of microorganisms. Defects of microbiological origin include: unclean, sour, moldy, yeasty, cheesy, bitter taste. Defects of test and smell chemical origin are formed due to hydrolytic digestion of lipids. It's prevailed at long storage of butter in the conditions of freezing temperatures. It's picked out the following main processes of spoiling: souring, acidifying and sallowness. Often these processes take place simultaneously.It has been investigated melted butter with lactated additive. The latter improves the microbiological and toxicological safety, prolongs the storage condition of the products. Technological efficiency of the additives is achieved by a multilayer products formation from the inactive bound water, preventing microorganisms growth and by the barrier layer with lactate inhibiting hydrolytic reactions. Oil samples were obtained with the batch-type butter maker application, then they were melted and after that lactated additive were supplemented. It has been studied organoleptic and physico-chemical indices of the melted butter samples. The fatty-acid composition of melted butter were studied. Comparative analysis of fatty-acid composition of cow's milk fat and produced melted butter has shown their similarity. Also in the last sample there is increased weight fraction of linoleic and linolenic acids. The obtained

  1. Viscosity of the earth's core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gans, R. F.

    1972-01-01

    Calculation of the viscosity of the core at the boundary of the inner and outer core. It is assumed that this boundary is a melting transition and the viscosity limits of the Andrade (1934,1952) hypothesis (3.7 to 18.5 cp) are adopted. The corresponding kinematic viscosities are such that the precessional system explored by Malkus (1968) would be unstable. Whether it would be sufficiently unstable to overcome a severely subadiabatic temperature gradient cannot be determined.

  2. Further development of the environment related sustainability indicators and environment core indicator system for balancing the progress in the German sustainability strategy; Weiterentwicklung der umweltbezogenen Nachhaltigkeitsindikatoren und des Umwelt-Kernindikatorensystems zur Bilanzierung der Fortschritte in der deutschen Nachhaltigkeitsstrategie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenthaler, Konstanze; Pieck, Sonja [Bosch und Partner GmbH, Muenchen (Germany)

    2013-05-15

    The Core Set of Environmental Indicators (KIS) presented by the Federal Environment Agency aims to inform policy makers and the interested public in an updated and concise form about environmental progress for a sustainable development in Germany. The Core Set completes the environmental indicators of the National Sustainability Indicator Set by several additional indicators describing environmental impacts and their causes. New legal regulations and political programs as well as innovations in the field of indicator development on the international and national level make a revision of the over ten-years-old Core Set of Environmental Indicators necessary. The project makes structural and content related proposals for such a revision. Following these proposals the Core Indicators shall cover a broader spectrum of environmental themes and problems in order to display cause-and-effect relationships in a more detailed way. The indicator set, which is proposed for the revised edition of KIS, comprises a total of 92 indicators, 49 out of them are directly focused on environmental issues. 43 indicators describe the activities of different economic sectors having relevant impacts on the environment. Furthermore the project offers a new thematic structure for the indicator set and a new classification of the indicators which shall facilitate the orientation and more effective search for themes and indicators within the system. A proposal for a metadata information system consisting of indicators and data factsheets was elaborated to better handle flow of information within the Federal Environment Agency.

  3. Building the Foundation: A Suggested Progression of Sub-Skills to Achieve the Reading Standards--Foundational Skills in the Common Core State Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosanovich, Marcia; Verhagen, Connie

    2012-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) initiative is a state-led effort that establishes a set of clear educational standards for English language arts and mathematics that states can voluntarily adopt. The standards have been informed by the best available evidence and the highest standards across the country and the world. They have been…

  4. InTASC Model Core Teaching Standards and Learning Progressions for Teachers 1.0: A Resource for Ongoing Teacher Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Council of Chief State School Officers, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO), through its Interstate Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (InTASC), offers this set of combined resources that define and support ongoing teacher effectiveness to ensure students reach college and career ready standards. This document includes the "InTASC Model Core Teaching…

  5. HTGR fuels and core development program. Quarterly progress report for the period ending November 30, 1977. [Graphite and fuel irradiation; fission product release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-12-01

    The work reported here includes studies of basic fission product transport mechanisms, core graphite development and testing, and the development and testing of recyclable fuel systems. Materials studied include irradiation capsule tests of both fuel and graphite. Experimental procedures and results are discussed and data are presented.

  6. GLASS MELTING PHENOMENA, THEIR ORDERING AND MELTING SPACE UTILISATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Němec L.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Four aspects of effective glass melting have been defined – namely the fast kinetics of partial melting phenomena, a consideration of the melting phenomena ordering, high utilisation of the melting space, and effective utilisation of the supplied energy. The relations were defined for the specific melting performance and specific energy consumption of the glass melting process which involve the four mentioned aspects of the process and indicate the potentials of effective melting. The quantity “space utilisation” has been treated in more detail as an aspect not considered in practice till this time. The space utilisation was quantitatively defined and its values have been determined for the industrial melting facility by mathematical modelling. The definitions of the specific melting performance and specific energy consumption have been used for assessment of the potential impact of a controlled melt flow and high space utilisation on the melting process efficiency on the industrial scale. The results have shown that even the partial control of the melt flow, leading to the partial increase of the space utilisation, may considerably increase the melting performance, whereas a decrease of the specific energy consumption was determined to be between 10 - 15 %.

  7. The research progress of cope-milled zirconia ceramic posts and cores%一体化氧化锆桩核的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓璐; 曾利伟

    2012-01-01

    Cast metal post-core and fiber post and composite resin core are commonly used to restore residual crown and root, but the color problems of metal post-core and the poor fracture resistance of fiber post restrict their application. Zirconia post and core have high elastic modulus, less deformation at the stress state,and the stress is reliable to distribute in post and root, less post broken than fiber post and no influence on the porcelain crown restoration of the aesthetic effect and on MRI examination. It is more valued in clinic . The purpose of this paper is to give a literature review on the characteristics of zirconia post- core and the application scope, manufacture requirements and its bonding of clinical application.%采用金属桩核和纤维桩树脂核修复残根残冠已很普遍,但由于金属桩核的颜色问题和纤维桩的抗折性差,其应用受到限制.氧化锆桩核具有较高弹性模量,在应力状态下形变较小,利于应力在桩和牙根之间传递,较纤维桩少发生桩折断且不影响全瓷冠修复的美学效果和MRI等影像学结果等特性,使其在临床上受到重视.本文对一体化氧化锆桩核的特性、应用范围、加工制作要求和临床粘接应用作一概述.

  8. Viscosity Measurement for Tellurium Melt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bochuan; Li, Chao; Ban, Heng; Scripa, Rosalia N.; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, Sandor L.

    2006-01-01

    The viscosity of high temperature Te melt was measured using a new technique in which a rotating magnetic field was applied to the melt sealed in a suspended ampoule, and the torque exerted by rotating melt flow on the ampoule wall was measured. Governing equations for the coupled melt flow and ampoule torsional oscillation were solved, and the viscosity was extracted from the experimental data by numerical fitting. The computational result showed good agreement with experimental data. The melt velocity transient initiated by the rotating magnetic field reached a stable condition quickly, allowing the viscosity and electrical conductivity of the melt to be determined in a short period.

  9. Effects of water, depth and temperature on partial melting of mantle-wedge fluxed by hydrous sediment-melt in subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallik, Ananya; Dasgupta, Rajdeep; Tsuno, Kyusei; Nelson, Jared

    2016-12-01

    This study investigates the partial melting of variable bulk H2O-bearing parcels of mantle-wedge hybridized by partial melt derived from subducted metapelites, at pressure-temperature (P-T) conditions applicable to the hotter core of the mantle beneath volcanic arcs. Experiments are performed on mixtures of 25% sediment-melt and 75% fertile peridotite, from 1200 to 1300 °C, at 2 and 3 GPa, with bulk H2O concentrations of 4 and 6 wt.%. Combining the results from these experiments with previous experiments containing 2 wt.% bulk H2O (Mallik et al., 2015), it is observed that all melt compositions, except those produced in the lowest bulk H2O experiments at 3 GPa, are saturated with olivine and orthopyroxene. Also, higher bulk H2O concentration increases melt fraction at the same P-T condition, and causes exhaustion of garnet, phlogopite and clinopyroxene at lower temperatures, for a given pressure. The activity coefficient of silica (ϒSiO2) for olivine-orthopyroxene saturated melt compositions (where the activity of silica, aSiO2 , is buffered by the reaction olivine + SiO2 = orthopyroxene) from this study and from mantle melting studies in the literature are calculated. In melt compositions generated at 2 GPa or shallower, with increasing H2O concentration, ϒSiO2 increases from transition from non-ideal mixing as OH- in the melt (ϒSiO2 2 GPa, ϒSiO2 >1 at higher H2O concentrations in the melt, indicate requirement of excess energy to incorporate molecular H2O in the silicate melt structure, along with a preference for bridging species and polyhedral edge decorations. With vapor saturation in the presence of melt, ϒSiO2 decreases indicating approach towards ideal mixing of H2O in silicate melt. For similar H2O concentrations in the melt, ϒSiO2 for olivine-orthopyroxene saturated melts at 3 GPa is higher than melts at 2 GPa or shallower. This results in melts generated at 3 GPa being more silica-poor than melts at 2 GPa. Thus, variable bulk H2O and pressure of

  10. Thermoacoustic Streaming and Ultrasonic Processing of Low Melting Melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, E. H.

    1997-01-01

    Ultrasonic levitation allows the processing of low melting materials both in 1 G as well as in microgravity. The free suspension of the melts also facilitates undercooling, permitting the measurements of the physical properties of the metastable liquids.

  11. Proteomics Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Proteomics Core is the central resource for mass spectrometry based proteomics within the NHLBI. The Core staff help collaborators design proteomics experiments in a...

  12. Proteomics Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Proteomics Core is the central resource for mass spectrometry based proteomics within the NHLBI. The Core staff help collaborators design proteomics experiments in...

  13. Timing And Processes Of Earth's Core Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegre, C. J.; Manhes, G.; Gopel, C.

    2004-12-01

    iron-sulphur compounds of 5 vol% solid olivine, through channel on triple junction between minerals. This study allows us to reconsider the precedent proposition (Stevenson, 1990) based on experimental and theoretical considerations suggesting that percolation of metallic iron rich liquid through a mostly solid silicate matrix is largely prevented because of the high surface tension of iron. During formation and segregation of the Fe-FeS eutectic, W isotopic equilibration is limited by the diffusion through the solid silicate matrix. During the further Earth's growth, impact melting increased and has induced a progressive melting of BSE up to the formation of magma ocean at the end of the planet's accretion. Before the occurrence of the magma ocean, W equilibration between impactors and BSE has not been complete This incomplete isotopic exchange between terrestrial metal and metal originating from impactors with solid part of BSE during early accretion of the Earth leads to the observed excess of 182W of present BSE. It occurs when the 182W production in BSE is most significant, due to the short half-life of 182Hf. The change of segregation mechanisms of Earth's core during planet's growth and short-sightedness of Hf-W chronometer focused to the early segregation of Earth's core make the divergence with the U-Pb and I-Xe terrestrial records. Yin et al. 2002, Nature 418, 949-952. Kleine et al. 2002, Nature 418, 952-955. Schoenberg et al. 2002, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 66, 3151-3160. Wetherill 1986, in Origin of the Moon, eds Hartmann et al., LPI, 519-550. Yoshino et al. 2003, Nature 422, 154-157. Stevenson 1990, in Origin of the Earth, eds Newson et al., LPI, 231-249.

  14. The Effect of Si on the Melting Temperature of Iron up to 24 GPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, H.; Fei, Y.

    2012-12-01

    The Earth's outer core consists of iron plus about 10wt% light elements, such as oxygen, sulfur, silicon, carbon, and hydrogen, based on geophysical and geochemical observations, cosmochemical arguments, and mineral physics data. Among the proposed light elements, silicon (Si) is considered as one of the leading candidates in the Earth's core. For Mercury, its core could contain substantial amount of Si if it is accreted under relatively reduced environment. Therefore, it is necessary to determine the effect of Si on the melting temperature of iron at high pressure in order to provide an estimate of the core temperature for a Si-bearing core. We have carried out a series of high-pressure melting experiments on Fe-17wt%Si in the multi-anvil apparatus. The experiments were conducted using an 8/3 assembly with rhenium heater and MgO capsule. The quenched samples were examined with the scanning electron microscope equipped with a silicon drift detector EDS. Quenching textures and composition mappings of the recovered samples were used as the melting criteria. The melting temperatures of Fe-17wt%Si are 1800K, 2070K, 2170K, and 2270K at 10GP, 15GPa, 20GPa and 24GPa respectively. The result is consistent with the melting curve at low pressure (up to 5.5 GPa) based on the measurements of the discontinuities in temperature and pressure dependence of electrical resistance. Compared with the melting temperature of fcc iron, the P-T slope of the melting curve of Fe-17wt%Si is larger than that of pure Fe, indicating that the melting temperature depression becomes smaller at high pressure which may lead to change of melting relations at higher pressure. The new data provide constraints on the thermal structure of Mercury's core and a basis for extrapolation to higher pressure. Key words: melting temperature, high pressure, Fe-Si, outer core

  15. Melting of metallic intermediate level waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huutoniemi, Tommi; Larsson, Arne; Blank, Eva [Studsvik Nuclear AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2013-08-15

    This report presents a feasibility study of a melting facility for core components and reactor internals. An overview is given of how such a facility for treatment of intermediate level waste might be designed, constructed and operated and highlights both the possibilities and challenges. A cost estimate and a risk analysis are presented in order to make a conclusion of the technical feasibility of such a facility. Based on the authors' experience in operating a low level waste melting facility, their conclusion is that without technical improvements such a facility is not feasible today. This is based on the cost of constructing and operating such a facility, in conjunction with the radiological risks associated with operation and the uncertain benefits to disposal and long term safety.

  16. Thermodynamics of Oligonucleotide Duplex Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber-Gosche, Sherrie; Edwards, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Melting temperatures of oligonucleotides are useful for a number of molecular biology applications, such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Although melting temperatures are often calculated with simplistic empirical equations, application of thermodynamics provides more accurate melting temperatures and an opportunity for students to apply…

  17. Melting of polydisperse hard disks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pronk, S.; Frenkel, D.

    2004-01-01

    The melting of a polydisperse hard-disk system is investigated by Monte Carlo simulations in the semigrand canonical ensemble. This is done in the context of possible continuous melting by a dislocation-unbinding mechanism, as an extension of the two-dimensional hard-disk melting problem. We find

  18. Melting of polydisperse hard disks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pronk, S.; Frenkel, D.

    2004-01-01

    The melting of a polydisperse hard-disk system is investigated by Monte Carlo simulations in the semigrand canonical ensemble. This is done in the context of possible continuous melting by a dislocation-unbinding mechanism, as an extension of the two-dimensional hard-disk melting problem. We find th

  19. Pavement Snow Melting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lund, John W.

    2005-01-01

    The design of pavement snow melting systems is presented based on criteria established by ASHRAE. The heating requirements depends on rate of snow fall, air temperature, relative humidity and wind velocity. Piping materials are either metal or plastic, however, due to corrosion problems, cross-linked polyethylene pipe is now generally used instead of iron. Geothermal energy is supplied to systems through the use of heat pipes, directly from circulating pipes, through a heat exchanger or by allowing water to flow directly over the pavement, by using solar thermal storage. Examples of systems in New Jersey, Wyoming, Virginia, Japan, Argentina, Switzerland and Oregon are presented. Key words: pavement snow melting, geothermal heating, heat pipes, solar storage, Wyoming, Virginia, Japan, Argentina, Klamath Falls.

  20. Core outcome measures for interventions to prevent or slow the progress of dementia for people living with mild to moderate dementia: Systematic review and consensus recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groskreutz, Derek; Grinbergs-Saull, Anna; Howard, Rob; O’Brien, John T.; Mountain, Gail; Woods, Bob; Perneczky, Robert; McCleery, Jenny; Pickett, James; Challis, David; Charlesworth, Georgina; Featherstone, Katie; Jones, Roy; Schneider, Justine; Shepperd, Sasha; Thompson-Coon, Jo; Ballard, Clive; Burns, Alistair; Garrard, Peter; Kehoe, Patrick; Passmore, Peter; Robinson, Louise

    2017-01-01

    Background There are no disease-modifying treatments for dementia. There is also no consensus on disease modifying outcomes. We aimed to produce the first evidence-based consensus on core outcome measures for trials of disease modification in mild-to-moderate dementia. Methods and findings We defined disease-modification interventions as those aiming to change the underlying pathology. We systematically searched electronic databases and previous systematic reviews for published and ongoing trials of disease-modifying treatments in mild-to-moderate dementia. We included 149/22,918 of the references found; with 81 outcome measures from 125 trials. Trials involved participants with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) alone (n = 111), or AD and mild cognitive impairment (n = 8) and three vascular dementia. We divided outcomes by the domain measured (cognition, activities of daily living, biological markers, neuropsychiatric symptoms, quality of life, global). We calculated the number of trials and of participants using each outcome. We detailed psychometric properties of each outcome. We sought the views of people living with dementia and family carers in three cities through Alzheimer’s society focus groups. Attendees at a consensus conference (experts in dementia research, disease-modification and harmonisation measures) decided on the core set of outcomes using these results. Recommended core outcomes were cognition as the fundamental deficit in dementia and to indicate disease modification, serial structural MRIs. Cognition should be measured by Mini Mental State Examination or Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive Subscale. MRIs would be optional for patients. We also made recommendations for measuring important, but non-core domains which may not change despite disease modification. Limitations Most trials were about AD. Specific instruments may be superseded. We searched one database for psychometric properties. Interpretation This is the first review to

  1. The melting curve of Ni to 1 Mbar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, Oliver T.; Wood, Ian G.; Dobson, David P.; Vočadlo, Lidunka; Wang, Weiwei; Thomson, Andrew R.; Wann, Elizabeth T. H.; Morard, Guillaume; Mezouar, Mohamed; Walter, Michael J.

    2014-12-01

    The melting curve of Ni has been determined to 125 GPa using laser-heated diamond anvil cell (LH-DAC) experiments in which two melting criteria were used: firstly, the appearance of liquid diffuse scattering (LDS) during in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) and secondly, plateaux in temperature vs. laser power functions in both in situ and off-line experiments. Our new melting curve, defined by a Simon-Glatzel fit to the data where TM (K) = [ (PM/18.78 ± 10.20 + 1) ]1/2.42 ± 0.66 × 1726, is in good agreement with the majority of the theoretical studies on Ni melting and matches closely the available shock wave melting data. It is however dramatically steeper than the previous off-line LH-DAC studies in which determination of melting was based on the visual observation of motion aided by the laser speckle method. We estimate the melting point (TM) of Ni at the inner-core boundary (ICB) pressure of 330 GPa to be TM = 5800 ± 700 K (2 σ), within error of the value for Fe of TM = 6230 ± 500 K determined in a recent in situ LH-DAC study by similar methods to those employed here. This similarity suggests that the alloying of 5-10 wt.% Ni with the Fe-rich core alloy is unlikely to have any significant effect on the temperature of the ICB, though this is dependent on the details of the topology of the Fe-Ni binary phase diagram at core pressures. Our melting temperature for Ni at 330 GPa is ∼2500 K higher than that found in previous experimental studies employing the laser speckle method. We find that those earlier melting curves coincide with the onset of rapid sub-solidus recrystallization, suggesting that visual observations of motion may have misinterpreted dynamic recrystallization as convective motion of a melt. This finding has significant implications for our understanding of the high-pressure melting behaviour of a number of other transition metals.

  2. Impact-induced melting during accretion of the Earth

    CERN Document Server

    de Vries, Jellie; Melosh, H Jay; Jacobson, Seth A; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Rubie, David C

    2016-01-01

    Because of the high energies involved, giant impacts that occur during planetary accretion cause large degrees of melting. The depth of melting in the target body after each collision determines the pressure and temperature conditions of metal-silicate equilibration and thus geochemical fractionation that results from core-mantle differentiation. The accretional collisions involved in forming the terrestrial planets of the inner Solar System have been calculated by previous studies using N-body accretion simulations. Here we use the output from such simulations to determine the volumes of melt produced and thus the pressure and temperature conditions of metal-silicate equilibration, after each impact, as Earth-like planets accrete. For these calculations a parametrised melting model is used that takes impact velocity, impact angle and the respective masses of the impacting bodies into account. The evolution of metal-silicate equilibration pressures (as defined by evolving magma ocean depths) during Earth's ac...

  3. Glacier melt on the Third Pole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, T.

    2015-12-01

    With an average elevation above 4,000 metres, the Third Pole (TP) is a unique region with many high mountains centered on the Tibetan Plateau stretching over 5 million square kilometers. Major environmental changes are taking place on the TP characterized by complex interactions of atmospheric, cryospheric, hydrological, geological and environmental processes. These processes are critical for the well-being of the three billion people inhabiting the plateau and the surrounding regions. Glacier melt is one of the most significant environmental changes observed on the TP. Over the past decade, most of the glaciers on the TP have undergone considerable melt. The Third Pole Environment (TPE) has focused on the causes of the glacier melt by conducting large-scale ground in-situ observation and monitoring, analyzing satellite images and remote sensing data, and applying numerical modeling to environmental research on the TP. The studies of long-term record of water stable isotopes in precipitation and ice core throughout the TP have revealed different features with regions, thus proposing significant influence of atmospheric circulations on spatial precipitation pattern over the TP. Validation of the result by isotope-equipped general circulation models confirms the spatial distribution of different atmospheric circulation dominances on the TP, with northern part dominated by the westerlies, southern part by the summer monsoon, and central part featuring the influences of both circulation systems. Such unique circulation patterns also bear directly on the status of glaciers and lakes over the TP and its surroundings. The studies therefore found the largest glacier melt in the monsoon-dominated southern part, moderate melt in the central part of transition, and the least melt, or even slight advance in the westerlies-dominated northern TP. It is clear that some mountains on the TP are undergoing rapid melt and the consequence of without ice and snow will be very soon. The

  4. KATS experiments to simulate corium spreading in the EPR core catcher concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eppinger, B.; Fieg, G.; Schuetz, W.; Stegmaier, U. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Insitute fur Kern- und Energietechnik, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    In future Light Water Reactors special devices (core catchers) might be required to prevent containment failure by basement erosion after reactor pressure vessel melt-through during a core meltdown accident. Quick freezing of the molten core masses is desirable to reduce release of radioactivity. Several concepts of core catcher de-vices have been proposed based on the spreading of corium melt onto flat surfaces with subsequent cooling by flooding with water. Therefore a series of experiments to investigate high temperature melt spreading on flat surfaces has been carried out using alumina-iron thermite melts as a simulant. The oxidic thermite melt is conditioned by adding other oxides to simulate a realistic corium melt as close as possible. Spreading of oxidic and metallic melts have been performed in one- and two-dimensional geometry. Substrates were chemically inert ceramic layers, dry concrete and concrete with a shallow water layer on top. (authors)

  5. Progress report on a new search for free e/3 quarks in the cores of 10(15) - 10(16) eV air showers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodson, A. L.; Bull, R. M.; Taylor, R. S.; Belford, C. H.

    1985-01-01

    The Leeds 3 sq m Wilson cloud chamber is being used in a new search for free e/3 quarks close to the axes of 10 to the 15th power - 10 to the 16th power eV air showers. A ratio trigger circuit is used to detect the incidence of air shower cores; the position of the shower center and the axis direction are determined from photographs of current-limited spark chambers. It is thus possible, for the first time, to know where we have looked for quarks in air showers and to select for scanning only those cloud chamber photographs where we have good evidence that the shower axis was close to the chamber. 250 g/sq cm of lead/concrete absorber above the cloud chamber serve to reduce particle densities and make a quark search possible very close to the shower axes. The current status of the search is given.

  6. Research Progress of Key Basic Issue in Selective Laser Melting of Metallic Powder%选择性激光熔化成形关键基础问题的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李瑞迪; 魏青松; 刘锦辉; 史玉升; 袁铁锤

    2012-01-01

    基于快速制造高性能复杂金属零件的需求,选择性激光熔化( Selective Laser Melting,SLM)快速成形技术诞生了,它是快速原型制造(Rapid Prototyping & Manufacturing,RP&M)的最新发展形式之一.SLM成形技术基于分层-叠加制造的思想,利用高能量激光束将金属粉末逐层熔化并成形为金属零件,具有制作形状复杂、相对密度高、节省材料等优点[1-2].SLM成形的基本思想与其他快速成形技术相同:首先建立零件的CAD模型,对零件原型逐层切片,每一层切片均包含截面的几何信息,并生成STL格式文件.然后在计算机控制下利用高能激光束熔化切片区域内的金属粉末,采用增长制造的原理成形出金属零件.

  7. Ice cores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Ice cores from Antarctica, from Greenland, and from a number of smaller glaciers around the world yield a wealth of information on past climates and environments. Ice cores offer unique records on past temperatures, atmospheric composition (including greenhouse gases), volcanism, solar activity......, dustiness, and biomass burning, among others. In Antarctica, ice cores extend back more than 800,000 years before present (Jouzel et al. 2007), whereas. Greenland ice cores cover the last 130,000 years...

  8. Ice cores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Ice cores from Antarctica, from Greenland, and from a number of smaller glaciers around the world yield a wealth of information on past climates and environments. Ice cores offer unique records on past temperatures, atmospheric composition (including greenhouse gases), volcanism, solar activity......, dustiness, and biomass burning, among others. In Antarctica, ice cores extend back more than 800,000 years before present (Jouzel et al. 2007), whereas. Greenland ice cores cover the last 130,000 years...

  9. Transient refractory material dissolution by a volumetrically-heated melt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seiler, Jean Marie, E-mail: jean-marie.seiler@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DTN, 17 Rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Ratel, Gilles [CEA, DEN, DTN, 17 Rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Combeau, Hervé [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR 7198, Lorraine University, Ecole des Mines de Nancy, Parc de Saurupt, 54042 Nancy Cedex (France); Gaus-Liu, Xiaoyang; Kretzschmar, Frank; Miassoedov, Alexei [Karlsruhe Institut of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • We describe a test investigating ceramic dissolution by a molten non-eutectic melt. • The evolution of the interface temperature between melt and refractory is measured. • A theoretical model describing dissolution kinetics is proposed. • When dissolution stops, interface temperature is the liquidus temperature of the melt. - Abstract: The present work addresses the question of corium–ceramic interaction in a core catcher during a core-melt accident in a nuclear power plant. It provides an original insight into transient aspects concerning dissolution of refractory material by a volumetrically heated pool. An experiment with simulant material (LIVECERAM) is presented. Test results clearly show that dissolution of solid refractory material can occur in a non-eutectic melt at a temperature which is lower than the melting temperature of the refractory material. During the dissolution transient, the interface temperature rises above the liquidus temperature, corresponding to the instantaneous average composition of the melt pool. With constant power dissipation in the melt and external cooling of the core-catcher, a final steady-state situation is reached. Dissolution stops when the heat flux (delivered by the melt to the refractory) can be removed by conduction through the residual thickness of the ceramic, with T{sub interface} = T{sub liquidus} (calculated for the average composition of the final liquid pool). The final steady state corresponds to a uniform pool composition and uniform interface temperature distribution. Convection in the pool is governed by natural thermal convection and the heat flux distribution is therefore similar to what would be obtained for a single component pool. An interpretation of the experiment with two model-based approaches (0D and 1D) is presented. The mass transfer kinetics between the interface and the bulk is controlled by a diffusion sublayer within the boundary layer. During the dissolution transient

  10. An integral approach to investigate planetary cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Y.

    2012-12-01

    The same core-mantle differentiation process was in operation during the early formation of the terrestrial planets, but it led to unique cores for the Earth, Venus, Mars, and Mercury, with different magnetic fields, reflecting their different dynamic, physical, and chemical states. Assuming all terrestrial planets shared the same materials of the building block, the differences must be resulted from the different conditions of the early accretion and the subsequent planetary evolution unique to each planet. The pressures at the core-mantle boundary of the terrestrial planets range from as low as 7 GPa to 136 GPa. The physical state (liquid or solid) for each planetary core is closely tied to the melting and chemical composition of the cores. In order to determine the minimal temperature of a liquid core or the maximal temperature of a solid core, we have systematically investigated melting relations in the binary systems Fe-FeS, Fe-C, and Fe-FeSi, move toward unravelling the crystallization sequence and element partitioning between solid and liquid metal in the ternary and quaternary systems up to 25 GPa, using multi-anvil apparatus. We have developed new techniques to analyze the quenched samples recovered from laser-heating diamond-anvil cell experiments using combination of focus ion beam (FIB) milling, high-resolution SEM imaging, and quantitative chemical analysis with silicon drift detector EDS. With precision milling of the laser-heating spot, we determined melting using quenching texture criteria imaged with high-resolution SEM and the sulfur partitioning between solid and liquid at submicron spatial resolution. We have also re-constructed 3D image of the laser-heating spot at multi-megabar pressures to better constrain melting point and understanding melting process. The new techniques allow us to extend precise measurements of melting relations to core pressures in the laser-heating diamond-anvil cell. In addition to the static experiments, we also used

  11. Crystallization behavior during melt-processing of ceramic waste forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumurugoti, Priyatham; Sundaram, S. K.; Misture, Scott T.; Marra, James C.; Amoroso, Jake

    2016-05-01

    Multiphase ceramic waste forms based on natural mineral analogs are of great interest for their high chemical durability, radiation resistance, and thermodynamic stability. Melt-processed ceramic waste forms that leverage existing melter technologies will broaden the available disposal options for high-level nuclear waste. This work reports on the crystallization behavior in selected melt-processed ceramics for waste immobilization. The phase assemblage and evolution of hollandite, zirconolite, pyrochlore, and perovskite type structures during melt processing were studied using thermal analysis, x-ray diffraction, and electron microscopy. Samples prepared by melting followed by annealing and quenching were analyzed to determine and measure the progression of the phase assemblage. Samples were melted at 1500 °C and heat-treated at crystallization temperatures of 1285 °C and 1325 °C corresponding to exothermic events identified from differential scanning calorimetry measurements. Results indicate that the selected multiphase composition partially melts at 1500 °C with hollandite coexisting as crystalline phase. Perovskite and zirconolite phases crystallized from the residual melt at temperatures below 1350 °C. Depending on their respective thermal histories, different quenched samples were found to have different phase assemblages including phases such as perovskite, zirconolite and TiO2.

  12. Finding a Path to Entrustment in Undergraduate Medical Education: A Progress Report From the AAMC Core Entrustable Professional Activities for Entering Residency Entrustment Concept Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, David R; Warren, Jamie B; Hyderi, Abbas; Drusin, Ronald E; Moeller, Jeremy; Rosenfeld, Melvin; Orlander, Philip R; Yingling, Sandra; Call, Stephanie; Terhune, Kyla; Bull, Janet; Englander, Robert; Wagner, Dianne P

    2017-06-01

    To better prepare graduating medical students to transition to the professional responsibilities of residency, 10 medical schools are participating in an Association of American Medical Colleges pilot to evaluate the feasibility of explicitly teaching and assessing 13 Core Entrustable Professional Activities for Entering Residency. The authors focused on operationalizing the concept of entrustment as part of this process. Starting in 2014, the Entrustment Concept Group, with representatives from each of the pilot schools, guided the development of the structures and processes necessary for formal entrustment decisions associated with students' increased responsibilities at the start of residency. Guiding principles developed by the group recommend that formal, summative entrustment decisions in undergraduate medical education be made by a trained group, be based on longitudinal performance assessments from multiple assessors, and incorporate day-to-day entrustment judgments by workplace supervisors. Key to entrustment decisions is evidence that students know their limits (discernment), can be relied on to follow through (conscientiousness), and are forthcoming despite potential personal costs (truthfulness), in addition to having the requisite knowledge and skills. The group constructed a developmental framework for discernment, conscientiousness, and truthfulness to pilot a model for transparent entrustment decision making. The pilot schools are studying a number of questions regarding the pathways to and decisions about entrustment. This work seeks to inform meaningful culture change in undergraduate medical education through a shared understanding of the assessment of trust and a shared trust in that assessment.

  13. Melting of Ice under Pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwegler, E; Sharma, M; Gygi, F; Galli, G

    2008-07-31

    The melting of ice under pressure is investigated with a series of first principles molecular dynamics simulations. In particular, a two-phase approach is used to determine the melting temperature of the ice-VII phase in the range of 10 to 50 GPa. Our computed melting temperatures are consistent with existing diamond anvil cell experiments. We find that for pressures between 10 to 40 GPa, ice melts as a molecular solid. For pressures above {approx}45 GPa there is a sharp increase in the slope of the melting curve due to the presence of molecular dissociation and proton diffusion in the solid, prior to melting. The onset of significant proton diffusion in ice-VII as a function of increasing temperature is found to be gradual and bears many similarities to that of a type-II superionic solid.

  14. INTEGRAL core programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, N.; Schoenfelder, V.; Ubertini, P.; Winkler, C.

    1997-01-01

    The International Gamma Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) mission is described with emphasis on the INTEGRAL core program. The progress made in the planning activities for the core program is reported on. The INTEGRAL mission has a nominal lifetime of two years with a five year extension option. The observing time will be divided between the core program (between 30 and 35 percent during the first two years) and general observations. The core program consists of three main elements: the deep survey of the Galactic plane in the central radian of the Galaxy; frequent scans of the Galactic plane in the search for transient sources, and pointed observations of several selected sources. The allocation of the observation time is detailed and the sensitivities of the observations are outlined.

  15. 金属零件选区激光熔化直接成型技术研究进展%Research Progress of Direct Manufacturing of Metal Parts by Selective Laser Melting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨永强; 王迪; 吴伟辉

    2011-01-01

    随着快速成型技术的进步,其研究热点转变到快速直接制造会属功能零件方面,应用范围也拓展到航空航天、医疗、汽车、模具等领域.针对选区激光熔化(SLM)技术更适合精密小批量金属零件的快速制造等特点,结合华南理工大学在该技术方面的研究进展,研究讨论了成型材料、成型工艺与过程控制、应用及其影响因素等,并对SLM技术现状、存在问题和发展趋势进行了分析.%With the development of rapid prototyping (RP) technology, the research interests change to direct manufacturing of metal parts with functions.The application fields of RP are expanded to the areas of aerospace,medical, motor vehicle, mould, etc.According to the characteristics of selective laser melting (SLM) applicable for rapid manufacturing of fine-structured and small-lot metal parts, powder materials, process, control, applications and affect factors are studied and discussed by combining the research work of the author's group.The status-in-art,problems and developing prospect of SLM technology are also discussed.

  16. MULTIPLE MELTING IN NYLON 1010

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Shuren; CHEN Taoyung

    1983-01-01

    Multiple melting behavior of nylon 1010 has been investigated by using DSC instrument. Effects of partial scanning, partial scanning and annealing, heating rate, cooling rate and stepwise annealing on the melting curve were studied. Experimental results indicate that the sample undergoes a process of continuous melting and recrystallization during DSC scanning. Nylon 1010 contains a distribution of crystallites of different degrees of perfection which is strongly dependent on its previous thermal history. From the structural reorganization point of view, the origin of double and multiple peaks of the melting curve is explained.

  17. Snow melt on sea ice surfaces as determined from passive microwave satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark R.

    1987-01-01

    SMMR data for the year 1979, 1980 and 1984 have been analyzed to determine the variability in the onset of melt for the Arctic seasonal sea ice zone. The results show melt commencing in either the Kara/Barents Seas or Chukchi Sea and progressing zonally towards the central Asian coast (Laptev Sea). Individual regions had interannual variations in melt onset in the 10-20 day range. To determine whether daily changes occur in the sea ice surface melt, the SMMR 18 and 37 GHz brightness temperature data are analyzed at day/night/twilight periods. Brightness temperatures illustrate diurnal variations in most regions during melt. In the East Siberian Sea, however, daily variations are observed in 1979, throughout the analysis period, well before any melt would usually have commenced. Understanding microwave responses to changing surface conditions during melt will perhaps give additional information about energy budgets during the winter to summer transition of sea ice.

  18. Invariant electrical resistivity of Co along the melting boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezenwa, Innocent C.; Secco, Richard A.

    2017-09-01

    The Earth's core is comprised mainly of Fe and Ni with some light alloying element(s) and the electrical resistivity behavior of these elements is an important property for characterizing geodynamo action, determining energy sources, and for understanding core thermal evolution. Knowledge of the electrical resistivity of solid and liquid transition metals with electronic structures similar to Fe reinforces our understanding of core properties. The electrical resistivity of high purity Co has been measured at pressures up to 5 GPa in a large volume press and at temperatures up to 100 K above the melting temperature. The results demonstrate that resistivity of Co is invariant along the melting boundary. This is interpreted in terms of the antagonistic effects of P-induced reduction in the amplitude of lattice vibrations tending to decrease resistivity, and the P-induced shift of the Fermi level closer to the d-resonance which tends to increase resistivity. We calculated the electronic thermal conductivity of Co using the Wiedemann-Franz law and show that it increases with pressure both in the solid and liquid states and decreases with temperature in the solid and increases in the liquid state. The pressure dependences of electrical resistivity and electronic thermal conductivity calculated from equations involving bulk modulus and the Gruneisen parameter are in reasonable agreement with values measured in this study. The constant resistivity of Co along its melting boundary found in our study portends similar behavior for its electronic structural analog, Fe. This prediction suggests that the electronic thermal conductivity of Fe at Earth's inner core boundary could be similar to its 1 atm value at the melting point. Using this value of thermal conductivity for the inner core boundary would admit thermal convection as an energy source for the geodynamo prior to the birth of the inner core.

  19. Investigating the translation of Earth's inner core

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Day, Elizabeth A; Cormier, Vernon F; Geballe, Zachary M;

    2012-01-01

    The Earth’s inner core provides unique insights into processes that are occurring deep within our Earth today, as well as processes that occurred in the past. The seismic structure of the inner core is complex, and is dominated by anisotropic and isotropic differences between the Eastern...... and Western ‘hemispheres’ of the inner core. Recent geodynamical models suggest that this hemispherical dichotomy can be explained by a fast translation of the inner core. In these models one side of the inner core is freezing, while the other side is melting, leading to the development of different seismic...... properties on either side of the inner core. A simple translating model of the inner core, however, does not seem to easily explain all of the seismically observed features, including the innermost inner core; the observed sharp lateral gradient in seismic properties between the two hemispheres...

  20. Drag Moderation by the Melting of an Ice Surface in Contact with Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakarelski, Ivan U.; Chan, Derek Y. C.; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T.

    2015-07-01

    We report measurements of the effects of a melting ice surface on the hydrodynamic drag of ice-shell-metal-core spheres free falling in water at a Reynolds of number Re ˜2 ×104- 3 ×105 and demonstrate that the melting surface induces the early onset of the drag crisis, thus reducing the hydrodynamic drag by more than 50%. Direct visualization of the flow pattern demonstrates the key role of surface melting. Our observations support the hypothesis that the drag reduction is due to the disturbance of the viscous boundary layer by the mass transfer from the melting ice surface.

  1. Drag Moderation by the Melting of an Ice Surface in Contact with Water

    KAUST Repository

    Vakarelski, Ivan Uriev

    2015-07-24

    We report measurements of the effects of a melting ice surface on the hydrodynamic drag of ice-shell-metal-core spheres free falling in water at a Reynolds of number Re∼2×104–3×105 and demonstrate that the melting surface induces the early onset of the drag crisis, thus reducing the hydrodynamic drag by more than 50%. Direct visualization of the flow pattern demonstrates the key role of surface melting. Our observations support the hypothesis that the drag reduction is due to the disturbance of the viscous boundary layer by the mass transfer from the melting ice surface.

  2. Responsiveness of the double limb lowering test and lower abdominal muscle progression to core stabilization exercise programs in healthy adults: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haladay, Douglas E; Miller, Sayers J; Challis, John H; Denegar, Craig R

    2014-07-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is one of the most prevalent and expensive health care problems in the United States. Studies suggest that stabilization exercise may be effective in the management of people with LBP. To accurately assess the effect of stabilization programs on muscle performance, clinicians need an objective measure that is both valid and reliable. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the double limb lowering test (DLLT) and lower abdominal muscle progression (LAMP) can detect a change in abdominal muscle performance after stabilization exercises. Eleven healthy participants (4 men and 7 women) were randomly assigned to either a specific stabilization exercise (SSE) or general stabilization exercise (GSE) group and were evaluated by the DLLT and LAMP before, during, and at the end of 8 weeks of training. Subjects attended exercise sessions twice per week over 8 weeks. No significant difference in pretest performance existed between the 2 groups. No significant difference was detected with the DLLT for either the SSE or GSE over time or when groups were combined. The LAMP detected a significant difference for the combined groups and GSE but not SSE over time. These data indicate that the LAMP is sensitive to change after a spinal stabilization program, whereas the DLLT does not detect a change after these programs. Furthermore, the GSE was more effective in producing these changes. Additional testing of these assessments is necessary to further validate these tests and to identify specific populations for which these tests may be most appropriate.

  3. In-vessel coolability and retention of a core melt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theofanous, T.G.; Liu, C.; Additon, S. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-02-01

    The efficacy of external flooding of a reactor vessel as a severe accident management strategy is assessed for an AP600-like reactor design. The overall approach is based on the Risk Oriented Accident Analysis Methodology (ROAAM), and the assessment includes consideration of bounding scenarios and sensitivity studies, as well as arbitrary parametric evaluations that allow the delineation of the failure boundaries. The technical treatment in this assessment includes: (a) new data on energy flow from either volumetrically heated pools or non-heated layers on top, boiling and critical heat flux in inverted, curved geometries, emissivity of molten (superheated) samples of steel, and chemical reactivity proof tests, (b) a simple but accurate mathematical formulation that allows prediction of thermal loads by means of convenient hand calculations, (c) a detailed model programmed on the computer to sample input parameters over the uncertainty ranges, and to produce probability distributions of thermal loads and margins for departure from nucleate boiling at each angular position on the lower head, and (d) detailed structural evaluations that demonstrate that departure from nucleate boiling is a necessary and sufficient criterion for failure. Quantification of the input parameters is carried out for an AP600-like design, and the results of the assessment demonstrate that lower head failure is {open_quotes}physically unreasonable.{close_quotes} Use of this conclusion for any specific application is subject to verifying the required reliability of the depressurization and cavity-flooding systems, and to showing the appropriateness (in relation to the database presented here, or by further testing as necessary) of the thermal insulation design and of the external surface properties of the lower head, including any applicable coatings.

  4. Investigations on sump cooling after core melt down

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knebel, J.U. [Forschungeszentrum Karlsruhe - Technik und Umwelt Institut fuer Angewandte Thermo- und Fluiddynamik, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    1995-09-01

    This article presents the basic physical phenomena and scaling criteria of decay heat removal from a large coolant pool by single-phase and two-phase natural circulation flow. The physical significance of the dimensionless similarity groups derived is evaluated. The above results are applied to the SUCO program that is performed at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe. The SUCO program is a three-step series of scaled model experiments investigating the possibility of an optional sump cooling concept for the European Pressurized Water Reactor EPR. This concept is entirely based on passive safety features within the containment. The work is supported by the German utilities and the Siemens dimensional SUCOS-2D test facility. The experimental results of the model geometry are transformed to prototypic conditions.

  5. Chicxulub Impact Melts: Geochemical Signatures of Target Lithology Mixing and Post-Impact Hydrothermal Fluid Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kring, David A.; Zurcher, Lukas; Horz, Freidrich; Mertzmann, Stanley A.

    2004-01-01

    Impact melts within complex impact craters are generally homogeneous, unless they differentiated, contain immiscible melt components, or were hydrothermally altered while cooling. The details of these processes, however, and their chemical consequences, are poorly understood. The best opportunity to unravel them may lie with the Chicxulub impact structure, because it is the world s most pristine (albeit buried) large impact crater. The Chicxulub Scientific Drilling Project recovered approx. 100 meters of impactites in a continuous core from the Yaxcopoil-1 (YAX-1) borehole. This dramatically increased the amount of melt available for analyses, which was previously limited to two small samples N17 and N19) recovered from the Yucatan-6 (Y-6) borehole and one sample (N10) recovered from the Chicxulub-1 (C-1) borehole. In this study, we describe the chemical compositions of six melt samples over an approx. 40 m section of the core and compare them to previous melt samples from the Y-6 and C-1 boreholes.

  6. Melt pool dynamics during selective electron beam melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharowsky, T.; Osmanlic, F.; Singer, R. F.; Körner, C.

    2014-03-01

    Electron beam melting is a promising additive manufacturing technique for metal parts. Nevertheless, the process is still poorly understood making further investigations indispensable to allow a prediction of the part's quality. To improve the understanding of the process especially the beam powder interaction, process observation at the relevant time scale is necessary. Due to the difficult accessibility of the building area, the high temperatures, radiation and the very high scanning speeds during the melting process the observation requires an augmented effort in the observation equipment. A high speed camera in combination with an illumination laser, band pass filter and mirror system is suitable for the observation of the electron beam melting process. The equipment allows to observe the melting process with a high spatial and temporal resolution. In this paper the adjustment of the equipment and results of the lifetime and the oscillation frequencies of the melt pool for a simple geometry are presented.

  7. Drain line melt through experiment under water-free condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakada, Kotaro [Nuclear Engineering Lab., Toshiba Corp., Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan); Jaeckel, Bernd; Hirschmann, Harald; Patorski, Jacek; Duijvestijn, Guus

    1999-07-01

    In order to investigate the behavior of a BWR drain line attacked by an oxidic melt, the experiment, CORVIS (Corium Reactor Vessel Interaction Studies) 03/2 was performed. The drain line tube was formed according to the design of an existing BWR. Aluminum oxide was used as the core melt substitute. The melt with an initial temperature of 2518 to 2543 K flowed into the water-free drain line and filled it on entire length of 7012 mm. The melt would have penetrated even further it the melt flow was not stopped by a steel plug at the tube end. The drain line did not fail but was distorted at the high temperature and elongated by 50 mm by thermoplastic deformation under its dead weight. Maximum surface temperature of 1323 K were measured near the drain line welding nozzle. It was concluded that the drain was torn off at higher internal pressure under the same thermal conditions. Temperature histories indicate that a crust was formed on the test plate screening temporarily the steel structures against melting. (author)

  8. Effect of Silicon on Activity Coefficients of Platinum in Liquid Fe-Si, With Application to Core Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righter, K.; Pando, K.; Danielson, L. R.; Humayun, M.

    2017-01-01

    Earth's core contains approximately 10% of a light element that is likely a combination of S, C, Si, and O, with Si possibly being the most abundant light element. Si dissolved into Fe liquids can have a large effect on the magnitude of the activity coefficient of siderophile elements (SE) in Fe liquids, and thus the partitioning behavior of those elements between core and mantle. The effect of Si can be small such as for Ni and Co, or large such as for Mo, Ge, Sb, As. The effect of Si on many siderophile elements is unknown yet could be an important, and as yet unquantified, influence on the core-mantle partitioning of SE. Here we report new experiments designed to quantify the effect of Si on the partitioning of Pt (with Re and Ru in progress or planned) between metal and silicate melt. The results will be applied to Earth, for which we have excellent constraints on the mantle Pt concentrations.

  9. Beyond the Melting Pot Reconsidered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Elijah

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the 1963 book, "Beyond the Melting Pot," which suggested that eventually the problem of different ethnicities in the U.S. would be resolved and society would become one melting pot. Examines how changes in immigration and economic structures have affected the issue, noting the devastating effect of the dominant culture's…

  10. A condensed review of the core catcher in the LMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yong Bum; Hahn, Do hee

    2001-03-01

    The overwhelming emphasis in reactor safety is on the prevention of core meltdown. Moreover, although there have been several accidents that have resulted in some fuel melting, to date there have been no accidents severe enough to cause the syndrome of core collapse, reactor vessel melt-through, containment penetration, and dispersal into the ground. Nevertheless, a number of proposals have been made for the design of core catcher systems to control or stop the motion of the molten core mass should such an accident take place. Core catchers may differ in both their location within the reactor system and in the mechanism that is used to cool and control the motion of the core debris. In this report the classification, configuration and main features of the core catcher are described. And also, the core catcher provisions in constructed and planned LMRs (Liquid Metal Reactors) are summarized.

  11. Fault rheology beyond frictional melting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavallée, Yan; Hirose, Takehiro; Kendrick, Jackie E; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Dingwell, Donald B

    2015-07-28

    During earthquakes, comminution and frictional heating both contribute to the dissipation of stored energy. With sufficient dissipative heating, melting processes can ensue, yielding the production of frictional melts or "pseudotachylytes." It is commonly assumed that the Newtonian viscosities of such melts control subsequent fault slip resistance. Rock melts, however, are viscoelastic bodies, and, at high strain rates, they exhibit evidence of a glass transition. Here, we present the results of high-velocity friction experiments on a well-characterized melt that demonstrate how slip in melt-bearing faults can be governed by brittle fragmentation phenomena encountered at the glass transition. Slip analysis using models that incorporate viscoelastic responses indicates that even in the presence of melt, slip persists in the solid state until sufficient heat is generated to reduce the viscosity and allow remobilization in the liquid state. Where a rock is present next to the melt, we note that wear of the crystalline wall rock by liquid fragmentation and agglutination also contributes to the brittle component of these experimentally generated pseudotachylytes. We conclude that in the case of pseudotachylyte generation during an earthquake, slip even beyond the onset of frictional melting is not controlled merely by viscosity but rather by an interplay of viscoelastic forces around the glass transition, which involves a response in the brittle/solid regime of these rock melts. We warn of the inadequacy of simple Newtonian viscous analyses and call for the application of more realistic rheological interpretation of pseudotachylyte-bearing fault systems in the evaluation and prediction of their slip dynamics.

  12. Transformer core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehendale, A.; Hagedoorn, Wouter; Lötters, Joost Conrad

    2010-01-01

    A transformer core includes a stack of a plurality of planar core plates of a magnetically permeable material, which plates each consist of a first and a second sub-part that together enclose at least one opening. The sub-parts can be fitted together via contact faces that are located on either side

  13. Transformer core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehendale, A.; Hagedoorn, Wouter; Lötters, Joost Conrad

    2008-01-01

    A transformer core includes a stack of a plurality of planar core plates of a magnetically permeable material, which plates each consist of a first and a second sub-part that together enclose at least one opening. The sub-parts can be fitted together via contact faces that are located on either side

  14. Experiments and analyses on melt-structure-water interactions during severe accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seghal, B.R.; Dinh, T.N.; Bui, V.A.; Green, J.A.; Nourgaliev, R.R.; Okkonen, T.O.; Dinh, A.T. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Div. of Nuclear Power Safety

    1998-04-01

    This report is the final report for the research project Melt Structure Water Interactions (MSWI). It describes results of analytical and experimental studies concerning MSWI during the course of a hypothetical core meltdown accident in a LWR. Emphasis has been placed on phenomena which govern vessel failure mode and timing and the mechanisms and properties which govern the fragmentation and breakup of melt jets and droplets. It was found that: 2-D effects significantly diminished the focusing effect of an overlying metallic layer on top of an oxide melt pool. This result improves the feasibility of in-vessel retention of a melt pool through external cooling of the lower head; phenomena related to hole ablation and melt discharge, in the event of vessel failure, are affected significantly by crust formation; the jet fragmentation process is a function of many related phenomena. The fragmentation rate depends not only on the traditional parameters but also on the melt physical properties, which change as the melt cools down from liquid to solid temperature; film boiling was investigated by developing a two-phase flow model and inserting it in a multi-D fluid dynamics code. It was concluded that the thickness of the film on the surface of a melt jet would be small and that the effects of the film on the process should not be large. This conclusion is contrary to the modeling employed in some other codes. The computer codes were developed and validated against the data obtained in the MSWI Project. The melt vessel interaction thermal analysis code describes the process of melt pool formation and convection and the resulting vessel thermal loadings. In addition, several innovative models were developed to describe the melt-water interaction process. The code MELT-3D treats the melt jet as a collection of particles whose movement is described with a three-dimensional Eulerian formulation. The model (SIPHRA) tracks the melt jet with an additional equation, using the

  15. Mobile Melt-Dilute Technology Development Project FY 2005 Test Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David A. Sell; Donald Fisher

    2006-01-01

    The adaptation of Melt-Dilute technology to a mobile and deployable platform progressed with the installation of the prototype air-cooled induction furnace and power generator in an ISO cargo container. Process equipment tests were conducted in FY’05 on two fronts: the melt container and its associated hardware and the mobile furnace and generator. Container design was validated through tests at elevated temperature and pressure, under vacuum, and subjected to impact. The Mobile Melt-Dilute (MMD) furnace and power source tests were completed per the plan. The tests provided information necessary to successfully melt and dilute HEU research reactor fuel assemblies.

  16. The Impact of Partial Melting in the Orogenic Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, P. F.; Teyssier, C.; Whitney, D. L.

    2010-12-01

    Open source, community driven numerical codes available at geodynamics.org allow geologists to model orogenic processes including partial melting and its consequences during orogenic cycles. Here we explore the role of partial melting during continental subduction and its impact on the evolution of orogenic plateaux and that of migmatite-cored metamorphic core complexes. Continental subduction and orogenic plateaux: Numerical experiments show that when continental slabs buried into the mantle meet their solidus, crustal melt is confined to the slab during its ascent and ponds at the Moho (Fig. 1a). The displaced overlying crust is extruded horizontally into the weak lower crust of the continent, resulting in Earth’s surface uplift to form an orogenic plateau, and Moho downward motion to accommodate the influx of material into the lower crust. This model suggests a link between continental subduction, melting and the build up of orogenic plateaux, and show that partial melting may be a significant process in exhumation of ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) rocks. Model results are consistent with the common association of UHP rocks and migmatite. Growth and destruction of orogenic plateaux: The lateral growth of orogenic plateaux is often attributed to the flow of the plateau weak partially melted lower crust into its foreland in some cases over a distance > 1500 km in 15 myr. Using pre-thickening temperatures compatible with Tibet’s uplift history, we show that mass redistribution processes are dynamically coupled, and that CFE velocities are limited to less than 1 cm.yr-1 (~150 km in 15 myr) by cooling and crystallization of the melted channel in the foreland and by any upward deviation into metamorphic domes of the melted channel by extension in the plateau (Fig. 1b). Gravitational collapse and metamorphic core complexes: Localization of extension in the upper crust triggers convergent flow in the partially molten deep crust channel. This convergent flow leads to the

  17. Electrical Conductivity of Cryolite Melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellner, P.; Grjotheim, K.; Kvande, H.

    1985-11-01

    This paper proposes an equation for the electrical conductivity of multicomponent cryolite-based mixtures. The equation is based on a physical model which assumes that the conductivity is proportional to the number density of the effective electric charges in the melt. The various authors in the available literature show a great discrepancy in conductivity data of cryolite-based melts. The equation based on the physical model enables determination of which set of data is preferable. Special consideration in this respect is given to the influence of magnesium flouride and lithium flouride additions to the melt.

  18. Modeling Core Collapse Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzacappa, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    Core collapse supernovae, or the death throes of massive stars, are general relativistic, neutrino-magneto-hydrodynamic events. The core collapse supernova mechanism is still not in hand, though key components have been illuminated, and the potential for multiple mechanisms for different progenitors exists. Core collapse supernovae are the single most important source of elements in the Universe, and serve other critical roles in galactic chemical and thermal evolution, the birth of neutron stars, pulsars, and stellar mass black holes, the production of a subclass of gamma-ray bursts, and as potential cosmic laboratories for fundamental nuclear and particle physics. Given this, the so called ``supernova problem'' is one of the most important unsolved problems in astrophysics. It has been fifty years since the first numerical simulations of core collapse supernovae were performed. Progress in the past decade, and especially within the past five years, has been exponential, yet much work remains. Spherically symmetric simulations over nearly four decades laid the foundation for this progress. Two-dimensional modeling that assumes axial symmetry is maturing. And three-dimensional modeling, while in its infancy, has begun in earnest. I will present some of the recent work from the ``Oak Ridge'' group, and will discuss this work in the context of the broader work by other researchers in the field. I will then point to future requirements and challenges. Connections with other experimental, observational, and theoretical efforts will be discussed, as well.

  19. High thermal stability of core-shell structures dominated by negative interface energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yong-Fu; Zhao, Ning; Jin, Bo; Zhao, Ming; Jiang, Qing

    2017-03-29

    Nanoscale core/shell structures are of interest in catalysis due to their superior catalytic properties. Here we investigated the thermal stability of the coherent core-shell structures in a thermodynamic way by considering the impact from the core with the bulk melting point Tm(∞) lower or higher than the shell. When a low-Tm(∞) core is adopted, core-shell melting induced by the melting depression of the core does not occur upon heating because of the superheating, although the melting depression of the core can be triggered ultimately by the preferential melting of the high-Tm(∞) shell for small cores. The superheating of the core is contributed by the negative solid-solid interface energy, while the depression is originated from the positive solid-liquid interface energy. Owing to the presence of the negative interface energy, moreover, the low-Tm(∞)-core structure possesses a low difference in thermal expansion between the core and the shell, high activation energy of outward atomic diffusion from the core to shell, and low heat capacity. This result is beneficial for the core-shell structure design for its application in catalysis.

  20. Melting of Bridgmanite to 135 Gpa: Toward a Coherent Model for the Melting Behavior in the Lower Mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrault, D.; Pesce, G.; Mezouar, N.

    2015-12-01

    Our knowledge on the melting behavior in the deep mantle remains based on a limited number of experimental and theoretical works. Today, thanks to (i) availability of very brilliant X-ray synchrotron sources and (ii) improved control of the P-T conditions in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell (LH-DAC), the experimental results should reach some agreement about the melting diagrams. However, it is not the case and major controversies remain. For example, liquidi of peridotitic (1) and chondritic-type (2) mantles are reported with a temperature difference of ~1000 K at a pressure of ~90 GPa (corresponding to ~2000 km depth), which cannot be explained by the relatively small compositional difference between these two materials. To bring new insights about the melting properties of the deep mantle, our strategy has been to study the melting curve of the end-member liquidus phase, the (Mg,Fe)(Al,Si)O3 bridgmanite (Bg), before applying a basic thermodynamical approach to the mineralogical system made of Bg, CaSiO3-perovskite and (Mg,Fe)O ferropericlase. Our approach cannot be as formal as currently done for melting in the shallow mantle, due to lack of major thermodynamical parameters. Still, our analysis yields original information, such as the degree of partial melting as a function of P, T and fraction of Bg in the geological material. The Mg/Si ratio in melts can also be addressed. Concerning the controversy between LH-DAC experiments, it can be solved taking into account migration in the temperature gradient of the pseudo-eutectic melt, when the sample starts to melt. This effect is expected to occur more extensively in absence of an insulating material between the sample and the diamond anvils. It yields an overestimation of the liquidus temperature for a given chemical composition, due to loss of the most fusing elements. References:1. Fiquet et al. (2010) Melting of Peridotite to 140 Gigapascals. Science 329, 1516-1518. 2. Andrault et al. (2011) Melting curve of

  1. Impact-induced melting during accretion of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Jellie; Nimmo, Francis; Melosh, H. Jay; Jacobson, Seth A.; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Rubie, David C.

    2016-12-01

    Because of the high energies involved, giant impacts that occur during planetary accretion cause large degrees of melting. The depth of melting in the target body after each collision determines the pressure and temperature conditions of metal-silicate equilibration and thus geochemical fractionation that results from core-mantle differentiation. The accretional collisions involved in forming the terrestrial planets of the inner Solar System have been calculated by previous studies using N-body accretion simulations. Here we use the output from such simulations to determine the volumes of melt produced and thus the pressure and temperature conditions of metal-silicate equilibration, after each impact, as Earth-like planets accrete. For these calculations a parameterised melting model is used that takes impact velocity, impact angle and the respective masses of the impacting bodies into account. The evolution of metal-silicate equilibration pressures (as defined by evolving magma ocean depths) during Earth's accretion depends strongly on the lifetime of impact-generated magma oceans compared to the time interval between large impacts. In addition, such results depend on starting parameters in the N-body simulations, such as the number and initial mass of embryos. Thus, there is the potential for combining the results, such as those presented here, with multistage core formation models to better constrain the accretional history of the Earth.

  2. Nitrogen Control in VIM Melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonski, P. D.; Hawk, J. A.

    NETL has developed a design and control philosophy for the addition of nitrogen to austenitic and ferritic steels. The design approach uses CALPHAD as the centerpiece to predict the level to which nitrogen is soluble in both the melt and the solid. Applications of this technique have revealed regions of "exclusion" in which the alloy, while within specification limits of prescribed, cannot be made by conventional melt processing. Furthermore, other investigations have found that substantial retrograde solubility of nitrogen exists, which can become problematic during subsequent melt processing and/or other finishing operations such as welding. Additionally, the CALPHAD method has been used to adjust primary melt conditions. To that end, nitrogen additions have been made using chrome nitride, silicon nitride, high-nitrogen ferrochrome as well as nitrogen gas. The advantages and disadvantages of each approach will be discussed and NETL experience in this area will be summarized with respect to steel structure.

  3. Ice Cores

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Records of past temperature, precipitation, atmospheric trace gases, and other aspects of climate and environment derived from ice cores drilled on glaciers and ice...

  4. Core BPEL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallwyl, Tim; Højsgaard, Espen

    extensions. Combined with the fact that the language definition does not provide a formal semantics, it is an arduous task to work formally with the language (e.g. to give an implementation). In this paper we identify a core subset of the language, called Core BPEL, which has fewer and simpler constructs......, does not allow omissions, and does not contain ignorable elements. We do so by identifying syntactic sugar, including default values, and ignorable elements in WS-BPEL. The analysis results in a translation from the full language to the core subset. Thus, we reduce the effort needed for working...... formally with WS-BPEL, as one, without loss of generality, need only consider the much simpler Core BPEL. This report may also be viewed as an addendum to the WS-BPEL standard specification, which clarifies the WS-BPEL syntax and presents the essential elements of the language in a more concise way...

  5. Core BPEL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallwyl, Tim; Højsgaard, Espen

    extensions. Combined with the fact that the language definition does not provide a formal semantics, it is an arduous task to work formally with the language (e.g. to give an implementation). In this paper we identify a core subset of the language, called Core BPEL, which has fewer and simpler constructs......, does not allow omissions, and does not contain ignorable elements. We do so by identifying syntactic sugar, including default values, and ignorable elements in WS-BPEL. The analysis results in a translation from the full language to the core subset. Thus, we reduce the effort needed for working...... formally with WS-BPEL, as one, without loss of generality, need only consider the much simpler Core BPEL. This report may also be viewed as an addendum to the WS-BPEL standard specification, which clarifies the WS-BPEL syntax and presents the essential elements of the language in a more concise way...

  6. Core benefits

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Keith, Brian W

    2010-01-01

    This SPEC Kit explores the core employment benefits of retirement, and life, health, and other insurance -benefits that are typically decided by the parent institution and often have significant governmental regulation...

  7. Laser melting of uranium carbides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utton, C. A.; De Bruycker, F.; Boboridis, K.; Jardin, R.; Noel, H.; Guéneau, C.; Manara, D.

    2009-03-01

    In the context of the material research aimed at supporting the development of nuclear plants of the fourth Generation, renewed interest has recently arisen in carbide fuels. A profound understanding of the behaviour of nuclear materials in extreme conditions is of prime importance for the analysis of the operation limits of nuclear fuels, and prediction of possible nuclear reactor accidents. In this context, the main goal of the present paper is to demonstrate the feasibility of laser induced melting experiments on stoichiometric uranium carbides; UC, UC1.5 and UC2. Measurements were performed, at temperatures around 3000 K, under a few bars of inert gas in order to minimise vaporisation and oxidation effects, which may occur at these temperatures. Moreover, a recently developed investigation method has been employed, based on in situ analysis of the sample surface reflectivity evolution during melting. Current results, 2781 K for the melting point of UC, 2665 K for the solidus and 2681 K for the liquidus of U2C3, 2754 K for the solidus and 2770 K for the liquidus of UC2, are in fair agreement with early publications where the melting behaviour of uranium carbides was investigated by traditional furnace melting methods. Further information has been obtained in the current research about the non-congruent (solidus-liquidus) melting of certain carbides, which suggest that a solidus-liquidus scheme is followed by higher ratio carbides, possibly even for UC2.

  8. Scaleable Clean Aluminum Melting Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Q.; Das, S.K. (Secat, Inc.)

    2008-02-15

    The project entitled 'Scaleable Clean Aluminum Melting Systems' was a Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs) between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Secat Inc. The three-year project was initially funded for the first year and was then canceled due to funding cuts at the DOE headquarters. The limited funds allowed the research team to visit industrial sites and investigate the status of using immersion heaters for aluminum melting applications. Primary concepts were proposed on the design of furnaces using immersion heaters for melting. The proposed project can continue if the funding agency resumes the funds to this research. The objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate integrated, retrofitable technologies for clean melting systems for aluminum in both the Metal Casting and integrated aluminum processing industries. The scope focused on immersion heating coupled with metal circulation systems that provide significant opportunity for energy savings as well as reduction of melt loss in the form of dross. The project aimed at the development and integration of technologies that would enable significant reduction in the energy consumption and environmental impacts of melting aluminum through substitution of immersion heating for the conventional radiant burner methods used in reverberatory furnaces. Specifically, the program would couple heater improvements with furnace modeling that would enable cost-effective retrofits to a range of existing furnace sizes, reducing the economic barrier to application.

  9. Magmatism vs mushmatism: Numerical modelling of melt migration and accumulation in partially molten crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roele, Katarina; Jackson, Matthew; Morgan, Joanna

    2016-04-01

    We present a quantitative model of heat and mass transport in a compacting crustal mush created by the repetitive intrusion of mantle-derived basaltic sills. At very low sill emplacement rates, we find that the maximum melt fraction remains small, far below that required to create an eruptible magma, and consistent with purely thermal models published previously. However, at intermediate (and realistic) sill emplacement rates, we observe the formation of a high melt fraction layer within a low melt fraction background. The high melt fraction layer migrates upwards towards the top of the mush (which is defined by the location of the solidus isotherm) and, despite occupying a high melt fraction, the melt in the layer has a composition corresponding to a progressively larger degree of fractionation during upwards migration, because it locally equilibrates with mush at progressively lower temperature. Thus the composition of the melt in the high melt fraction layer becomes progressively more evolved. The high melt fraction layer resembles a conventional magma chamber, but is produced by changes in bulk composition in response to melt migration, rather than the addition of heat. Indeed, such a layer can form even when the mush is cooling overall. The magma within the layer is at sufficiently high melt fraction to be eruptible, but is not located in the hottest region of the mush where the temperature is highest. This is a new method to produce a magma chamber within a crustal mush, and also to evolve the composition of the melt in the chamber. Our results show that high melt fractions need not be associated with high temperature; they also show that eruptible melt fractions can be created at much lower emplacement rates than predicted by purely thermal models. These high melt fractions are transient, and spatially localized within larger mush zones. Moreover, chemical differentiation does not require fractional crystallisation in a largely liquid magma chamber. Our

  10. Toward a coherent model for the melting behavior of the deep Earth's mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrault, D.; Bolfan-Casanova, N.; Bouhifd, M. A.; Boujibar, A.; Garbarino, G.; Manthilake, G.; Mezouar, M.; Monteux, J.; Parisiades, P.; Pesce, G.

    2017-04-01

    , F and DFeBg/melt. In the lower mantle, density inversions (i.e. sinking melts) appear to be restricted to low F values and highest mantle pressures. The coherent melting model has direct geophysical implications: (i) in the early Earth, the magma ocean crystallization could not occur for a core temperature higher than ∼5400 K at the core-mantle boundary (CMB). This temperature corresponds to the melting of pure Bg at 135 GPa. For a mantle composition more realistic than pure Bg, the right CMB temperature for magma ocean crystallization could have been as low as ∼4400 K. (ii) There are converging arguments for the formation of a relatively homogeneous mantle after magma ocean crystallization. In particular, we predict the bulk crystallization of a relatively large mantle fraction, when the temperature becomes lower than the pseudo-eutectic temperature. Some chemical segregation could still be possible as a result of some Bg segregation in the lowermost mantle during the first stage of the magma ocean crystallization, and due to a much later descent of very low F, Fe-enriched, melts toward the CMB. (iii) The descent of such melts could still take place today. There formation should to be related to incipient mantle melting due to the presence of volatile elements. Even though, these melts can only be denser than the mantle (at high mantle depths) if the controversial value of DFeBg/melt is indeed as low as suggested by some experimental studies. This type of melts could contribute to produce ultra-low seismic velocity anomalies in the lowermost mantle.

  11. Development of Sacrificial Material for the Eu-APR1400 Core Catcher

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Jung Soo; Kim, Mun Soo; Kim, Yong Soo [KHNP Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    To increase and diversify the export marker of the Korean nuclear reactor design, we developed the Eu- APR1400 reactor design based on the APR1400 reactor design, satisfying the European nuclear design requirements including the European Utility Requirements (EUR) and the Finnish requirements of YVL. As recommended by both requirements, the so called core-catcher molten core ex-vessel cooling facility was developed to manage a severe accident at the Eu-APR1400 reactor involving a core meltdown and to mitigate its consequences. Usually, sacrificial material (SM), which controls the melt properties and modifies melt conditions favorable to corium retention, can be employed to protect the core catcher body from the molten core and increase its cooling capability. The EPR reactor design (by Areva, France) core catcher consists of the initial corium retention space, the transportation channel and the wide spreading room for core melt cooling. The EPR used two kinds of SM to protect the initial core retention space from core melt and to spread the core melt across the wide spreading room using the different compositions. The VVER (Russia) ensures melt localization in a water-cooled vessel located directly beneath the reactor. SM is used to remove the thermal focusing effect by the layer inversion process between metallic and oxidic melts. The functional requirements for the SM determined for the present core catcher are (1) melting spreading improvement, (2) focusing effect prevention, (3) hydrogen explosion prevention, (4) FP (fission product) release decreasing, and (5) melt recriticality exclusion. The rest of the paper is organized as follows. The next section provides detailed descriptions of the composition of the present SM, which satisfies its functional requirements. Following this, the manufacturing process of the SM is presented

  12. Evidence for fractional crystallization of wadsleyite and ringwoodite from olivine melts in chondrules entrained in shock-melt veins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyahara, Masaaki; El Goresy, Ahmed; Ohtani, Eiji; Nagase, Toshiro; Nishijima, Masahiko; Vashaei, Zahra; Ferroir, Tristan; Gillet, Philippe; Dubrovinsky, Leonid; Simionovici, Alexandre

    2008-06-24

    Peace River is one of the few shocked members of the L-chondrites clan that contains both high-pressure polymorphs of olivine, ringwoodite and wadsleyite, in diverse textures and settings in fragments entrained in shock-melt veins. Among these settings are complete olivine porphyritic chondrules. We encountered few squeezed and flattened olivine porphyritic chondrules entrained in shock-melt veins of this meteorite with novel textures and composition. The former chemically unzoned (Fa(24-26)) olivine porphyritic crystals are heavily flattened and display a concentric intergrowth with Mg-rich wadsleyite of a very narrow compositional range (Fa(6)-Fa(10)) in the core. Wadsleyite core is surrounded by a Mg-poor and chemically stark zoned ringwoodite (Fa(28)-Fa(38)) belt. The wadsleyite-ringwoodite interface denotes a compositional gap of up to 32 mol % fayalite. A transmission electron microscopy study of focused ion beam slices in both regions indicates that the wadsleyite core and ringwoodite belt consist of granoblastic-like intergrowth of polygonal crystallites of both ringwoodite and wadsleyite, with wadsleyite crystallites dominating in the core and ringwoodite crystallites dominating in the belt. Texture and compositions of both high-pressure polymorphs are strongly suggestive of formation by a fractional crystallization of the olivine melt of a narrow composition (Fa(24-26)), starting with Mg-rich wadsleyite followed by the Mg-poor ringwoodite from a shock-induced melt of olivine composition (Fa(24-26)). Our findings could erase the possibility of the resulting unrealistic time scales of the high-pressure regime reported recently from other shocked L-6 chondrites.

  13. Quantifying melting and mobilistaion of interstitial melts in crystal mushes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veksler, Ilya; Dobson, Katherine; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Ertel-Ingrisch, Werner; Humphreys, Madeleine

    2015-04-01

    The deformation of crystals mushes and separation of melts and crystals in is critical to understanding the development of physical and chemical heterogeneity in magma chambers and has been invoked as an eruption trigger mechanism. Here we investigate the behaviour of the melt in the well characterised, classic crystal mush system of the Skaergaard intrusion by combining experimental petrology and the non-destructive 3D imaging methods. Starting materials for partial melting experiments were four samples from the upper Middle Zone of the Layered Series. Cylinders, 15 mm in diameter and 20 mm in length, were drilled out of the rock samples, placed in alumina crucibles and held for 5 days in electric furnaces at atmospheric pressure and 1050-1100 °C. Redox conditions set by the CO-CO2 gas mixture were kept close to those of the FMQ buffer. We then use spatially registered 3D x-ray computed tomography images, collected before and after the experiment, to determine the volume and distribution of the crystal framework and interstitial phases, and the volume, distribution and connectivity the interstitial phases that undergo melting and extraction while at elevated temperature. Image analysis has allowed us to quantify these physical changes with high spatial resolution. Our work is a first step towards quantitative understanding of the melt mobilisation and migration processes operating in notionally locked crystal rich magmatic systems.

  14. Methods for Melting Temperature Calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Qi-Jun

    Melting temperature calculation has important applications in the theoretical study of phase diagrams and computational materials screenings. In this thesis, we present two new methods, i.e., the improved Widom's particle insertion method and the small-cell coexistence method, which we developed in order to capture melting temperatures both accurately and quickly. We propose a scheme that drastically improves the efficiency of Widom's particle insertion method by efficiently sampling cavities while calculating the integrals providing the chemical potentials of a physical system. This idea enables us to calculate chemical potentials of liquids directly from first-principles without the help of any reference system, which is necessary in the commonly used thermodynamic integration method. As an example, we apply our scheme, combined with the density functional formalism, to the calculation of the chemical potential of liquid copper. The calculated chemical potential is further used to locate the melting temperature. The calculated results closely agree with experiments. We propose the small-cell coexistence method based on the statistical analysis of small-size coexistence MD simulations. It eliminates the risk of a metastable superheated solid in the fast-heating method, while also significantly reducing the computer cost relative to the traditional large-scale coexistence method. Using empirical potentials, we validate the method and systematically study the finite-size effect on the calculated melting points. The method converges to the exact result in the limit of a large system size. An accuracy within 100 K in melting temperature is usually achieved when the simulation contains more than 100 atoms. DFT examples of Tantalum, high-pressure Sodium, and ionic material NaCl are shown to demonstrate the accuracy and flexibility of the method in its practical applications. The method serves as a promising approach for large-scale automated material screening in which

  15. Apparatus for controlling molten core debris. [LMFBR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, M.P.; Tilbrook, R.W.; Heylmun, N.F.

    1977-07-19

    Disclosed is an apparatus for containing, cooling, diluting, dispersing and maintaining subcritical the molten core debris assumed to melt through the bottom of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel in the unlikely event of a core meltdown. The apparatus is basically a sacrificial bed system which includes an inverted conical funnel, a core debris receptacle including a spherical dome, a spherically layered bed of primarily magnesia bricks, a cooling system of zig-zag piping in graphite blocks about and below the bed and a cylindrical liner surrounding the graphite blocks including a steel shell surrounded by firebrick. Tantalum absorber rods are used in the receptacle and bed. 9 claims, 22 figures.

  16. Melting of iron determined by X-ray absorption spectroscopy to 100 GPa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquilanti, Giuliana; Trapananti, Angela; Karandikar, Amol; Kantor, Innokenty; Marini, Carlo; Mathon, Olivier; Pascarelli, Sakura; Boehler, Reinhard

    2015-09-29

    Temperature, thermal history, and dynamics of Earth rely critically on the knowledge of the melting temperature of iron at the pressure conditions of the inner core boundary (ICB) where the geotherm crosses the melting curve. The literature on this subject is overwhelming, and no consensus has been reached, with a very large disagreement of the order of 2,000 K for the ICB temperature. Here we report new data on the melting temperature of iron in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell to 103 GPa obtained by X-ray absorption spectroscopy, a technique rarely used at such conditions. The modifications of the onset of the absorption spectra are used as a reliable melting criterion regardless of the solid phase from which the solid to liquid transition takes place. Our results show a melting temperature of iron in agreement with most previous studies up to 100 GPa, namely of 3,090 K at 103 GPa.

  17. Continuous greenhouse gas measurements from ice cores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stowasser, Christopher

    -consuming and labor-intensive. This PhD thesis presents the development of a new method for measurements of greenhouse gas mixing ratios from ice cores based on a melting device of a continuous flow analysis (CFA) system. The coupling to a CFA melting device enables time-efficient measurements of high resolution......Ice cores offer the unique possibility to study the history of past atmospheric greenhouse gases over the last 800,000 years, since past atmospheric air is trapped in bubbles in the ice. Since the 1950s, paleo-scientists have developed a variety of techniques to extract the trapped air from...... individual ice core samples, and to measure the mixing ratio of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide in the extracted air. The discrete measurements have become highly accurate and reproducible, but require relatively large amounts of ice per measured species and are both time...

  18. Numerical Analysis of Mold Deformation Including Plastic Melt Flow During Injection Molding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Joon Tae; Lee, Bong-Kee [Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-15

    In the present study, a numerical analysis of an injection molding process was conducted for predicting the mold deformation considering non-Newtonian flow, heat transfer, and structural behavior. The accurate prediction of mold deformation during the filling stage is important to successfully design and manufacture a precision injection mold. While the local mold deformation can be caused by various factors, a pressure induced by the polymer melt is considered to be one of the most significant ones. In this regard, the numerical simulation considering both the melt filling and the mold deformation was carried out. A mold core for a 2D axisymmetric center-gated disk was used for the demonstration of the present study. The flow behavior inside the mold cavity and temperature distribution were analyzed along with the core displacement. Also, a Taguchi method was employed to investigate the influence of the relevant parameters including flow velocity, mold core temperature, and melt temperature.

  19. Origins of ultralow velocity zones through slab-derived metallic melt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiachao; Li, Jie; Hrubiak, Rostislav; Smith, Jesse S

    2016-05-17

    Understanding the ultralow velocity zones (ULVZs) places constraints on the chemical composition and thermal structure of deep Earth and provides critical information on the dynamics of large-scale mantle convection, but their origin has remained enigmatic for decades. Recent studies suggest that metallic iron and carbon are produced in subducted slabs when they sink beyond a depth of 250 km. Here we show that the eutectic melting curve of the iron-carbon system crosses the current geotherm near Earth's core-mantle boundary, suggesting that dense metallic melt may form in the lowermost mantle. If concentrated into isolated patches, such melt could produce the seismically observed density and velocity features of ULVZs. Depending on the wetting behavior of the metallic melt, the resultant ULVZs may be short-lived domains that are replenished or regenerated through subduction, or long-lasting regions containing both metallic and silicate melts. Slab-derived metallic melt may produce another type of ULVZ that escapes core sequestration by reacting with the mantle to form iron-rich postbridgmanite or ferropericlase. The hypotheses connect peculiar features near Earth's core-mantle boundary to subduction of the oceanic lithosphere through the deep carbon cycle.

  20. Climate change and forest fires synergistically drive widespread melt events of the Greenland Ice Sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, Kaitlin M; Albert, Mary R; McConnell, Joseph R; Baker, Ian

    2014-06-03

    In July 2012, over 97% of the Greenland Ice Sheet experienced surface melt, the first widespread melt during the era of satellite remote sensing. Analysis of six Greenland shallow firn cores from the dry snow region confirms that the most recent prior widespread melt occurred in 1889. A firn core from the center of the ice sheet demonstrated that exceptionally warm temperatures combined with black carbon sediments from Northern Hemisphere forest fires reduced albedo below a critical threshold in the dry snow region, and caused the melting events in both 1889 and 2012. We use these data to project the frequency of widespread melt into the year 2100. Since Arctic temperatures and the frequency of forest fires are both expected to rise with climate change, our results suggest that widespread melt events on the Greenland Ice Sheet may begin to occur almost annually by the end of century. These events are likely to alter the surface mass balance of the ice sheet, leaving the surface susceptible to further melting.

  1. Multi-stage melt-rock interaction in the Mt. Maggiore (Corsica, France) ophiolitic peridotites: microstructural and geochemical evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampone, Elisabetta; Piccardo, Giovanni B.; Hofmann, Albrecht W.

    2008-10-01

    Spinel and plagioclase peridotites from the Mt.Maggiore (Corsica, France) ophiolitic massif record a composite asthenosphere-lithosphere history of partial melting and subsequent multi-stage melt-rock interaction. Cpx-poor spinel lherzolites are consistent with mantle residues after low-degree fractional melting ( F = 5-10%). Opx + spinel symplectites at the rims of orthopyroxene porphyroclasts indicate post-melting lithospheric cooling ( T = 970-1,100°C); this was followed by formation of olivine embayments within pyroxene porphyroclasts by melt-rock interaction. Enrichment in modal olivine (up to 85 wt%) at constant bulk Mg values, and variable absolute REE contents (at constant LREE/HREE) indicate olivine precipitation and pyroxene dissolution during reactive porous melt flow. This stage occurred at spinel-facies depths, after incorporation of the peridotites in the thermal lithosphere. Plagioclase-enriched peridotites show melt impregnation microtextures, like opx + plag intergrowths replacing exsolved cpx porphyroclasts and interstitial gabbronoritic veinlets. This second melt-rock interaction stage caused systematic chemical changes in clinopyroxene (e.g. Ti, REE, Zr, Y increase), related to the concomitant effects of local melt-rock interaction at decreasing melt mass, and crystallization of small (<3%) trapped melt fractions. LREE depletion in minerals of the gabbronoritic veinlets indicates that the impregnating melts were more depleted than normal MORB. Preserved microtextural evidence of previous melt-rock interaction in the impregnated peridotites suggests that they were progressively uplifted in response to lithosphere extension and thinning. Migrating melts were likely produced by mantle upwelling and melting related to extension; they were modified from olivine-saturated to opx-saturated compositions, and caused different styles of melt-rock interaction (reactive spinel harzburgites, vs. impregnated plagioclase peridotites) depending on the

  2. Melt-rock interactions and fabric development of peridotites from North Pond in the Kane area, Mid-Atlantic Ridge: Implications of microstructural and petrological analyses of peridotite samples from IODP Hole U1382A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harigane, Yumiko; Abe, Natsue; Michibayashi, Katsuyoshi; Kimura, Jun-Ichi; Chang, Qing

    2016-06-01

    North Pond is an isolated sedimentary pond on the western flank of the Kane area along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Drill-hole U1382A of IODP Expedition 336 recovered peridotite and gabbro samples from a sedimentary breccia layer in the pond, from which we collected six fresh peridotite samples. The peridotite samples came from the southern slope of the North Pond where an oceanic core complex is currently exposed. The samples were classified as spinel harzburgite, plagioclase-bearing harzburgite, and a vein-bearing peridotite that contains tiny gabbroic veins. No obvious macroscopic shear deformation related to the formation of a detachment fault was observed. The spinel harzburgite with a protogranular texture was classified as refractory peridotite. The degree of partial melting of the spinel harzburgite is estimated to be ˜17%, and melt depletion would have occurred at high temperatures in the uppermost mantle beneath the spreading axis. The progressive melt-rock interactions between the depleted spinel harzburgite and the percolating melts of Normal-Mid Ocean Ridge Basalt (N-MORB) produced the plagioclase-bearing harzburgite and the vein-bearing peridotite at relatively low temperatures. This implies that the subsequent refertilization occurred in an extinct spreading segment of the North Pond after spreading at the axis. Olivine fabrics in the spinel and plagioclase-bearing harzburgites are of types AG, A, and D, suggesting the remnants of a mantle flow regime beneath the spreading axis. The initial olivine fabrics appear to have been preserved despite the later melt-rock interactions. The peridotite samples noted above preserve evidence of mantle flow and melt-rock interactions beneath a spreading ridge that formed at ˜8 Ma.

  3. The Effective Convectivity Model for Simulation and Analysis of Melt Pool Heat Transfer in a Light Water Reactor Pressure Vessel Lower Head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tran, Chi Thanh

    2009-09-15

    , is indispensable for scrutinizing flow physics, on the other hand, the validated CFD method can be used to generate necessary data for validation of the accident analysis models. Given the insights gained from the CFD study, physics-based models and computationally-efficient tools are developed for multi-dimensional simulations of transient thermal-hydraulic phenomena in the lower plenum of a LWR during the late phase of an in-vessel core melt progression. To describe natural convection heat transfer in an internally heated volume, and molten metal layer heated from below and cooled from the top (and side) walls, the Effective Convectivity Models (ECM) are developed and implemented in a commercial CFD code. The ECM uses directional heat transfer characteristic velocities to transport the heat to cooled boundaries. The heat transport and interactions are represented through an energy-conservation formulation. The ECM then enables 3D heat transfer simulations of a homogeneous (and stratified) melt pool formed in the LWR lower head. In order to describe phase-change heat transfer associated with core debris or binary mixture (e.g. in a molten metal layer), a temperature-based enthalpy formulation is employed in the Phase-change ECM (so called the PECM). The PECM is capable to represent natural convection heat transfer in a mushy zone. Simple formulation of the PECM method allows implementing different models of mushy zone heat transfer for non-eutectic mixtures. For a non-eutectic binary mixture, compositional convection associated with concentration gradients can be taken into account. The developed models are validated against both existing experimental data and the CFD-generated data. ECM and PECM simulations show a superior computational efficiency compared to the CFD simulation method. The ECM and PECM methods are applied to predict thermal loads imposed on the vessel wall and Control Rod Guide Tubes (CRGTs) during core debris heatup and melting in a Boiling Water

  4. Fundamentals of Melt-Water Interfacial Transport Phenomena: Improved Understanding for Innovative Safety Technologies in ALWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Anderson; M. Corradini; K.Y. Bank; R. Bonazza; D. Cho

    2005-04-26

    The interaction and mixing of high-temperature melt and water is the important technical issue in the safety assessment of water-cooled reactors to achieve ultimate core coolability. For specific advanced light water reactor (ALWR) designs, deliberate mixing of the core-melt and water is being considered as a mitigative measure, to assure ex-vessel core coolability. The goal of this work is to provide the fundamental understanding needed for melt-water interfacial transport phenomena, thus enabling the development of innovative safety technologies for advanced LWRs that will assure ex-vessel core coolability. The work considers the ex-vessel coolability phenomena in two stages. The first stage is the melt quenching process and is being addressed by Argonne National Lab and University of Wisconsin in modified test facilities. Given a quenched melt in the form of solidified debris, the second stage is to characterize the long-term debris cooling process and is being addressed by Korean Maritime University in via test and analyses. We then address the appropriate scaling and design methodologies for reactor applications.

  5. Experimental constraints on melting temperatures in the MgO-SiO2 system at lower mantle pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Marzena A.; Lord, Oliver T.; Myhill, Robert; Thomson, Andrew R.; Wang, Weiwei; Trønnes, Reidar G.; Walter, Michael J.

    2017-08-01

    Eutectic melting curves in the system MgO-SiO2 have been experimentally determined at lower mantle pressures using laser-heated diamond anvil cell (LH-DAC) techniques. We investigated eutectic melting of bridgmanite plus periclase in the MgO-MgSiO3 binary, and melting of bridgmanite plus stishovite in the MgSiO3-SiO2 binary, as analogues for natural peridotite and basalt, respectively. The melting curve of model basalt occurs at lower temperatures, has a shallower dT / dP slope and slightly less curvature than the model peridotitic melting curve. Overall, melting temperatures detected in this study are in good agreement with previous experiments and ab initio simulations at ∼25 GPa (Liebske and Frost, 2012; de Koker et al., 2013). However, at higher pressures the measured eutectic melting curves are systematically lower in temperature than curves extrapolated on the basis of thermodynamic modelling of low-pressure experimental data, and those calculated from atomistic simulations. We find that our data are inconsistent with previously computed melting temperatures and melt thermodynamic properties of the SiO2 endmember, and indicate a maximum in short-range ordering in MgO-SiO2 melts close to Mg2SiO4 composition. The curvature of the model peridotite eutectic relative to an MgSiO3 melt adiabat indicates that crystallization in a global magma ocean would begin at ∼100 GPa rather than at the bottom of the mantle, allowing for an early basal melt layer. The model peridotite melting curve lies ∼ 500 K above the mantle geotherm at the core-mantle boundary, indicating that it will not be molten unless the addition of other components reduces the solidus sufficiently. The model basalt melting curve intersects the geotherm at the base of the mantle, and partial melting of subducted oceanic crust is expected.

  6. Physical properties of molten core materials: Zr-Ni and Zr-Cr alloys measured by electrostatic levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohishi, Yuji; Kondo, Toshiki; Ishikawa, Takehiko; Okada, Junpei T.; Watanabe, Yuki; Muta, Hiroaki; Kurosaki, Ken; Yamanaka, Shinsuke

    2017-03-01

    It is important to understand the behaviors of molten core materials to investigate the progression of a core meltdown accident. In the early stages of bundle degradation, low-melting-temperature liquid phases are expected to form via the eutectic reaction between Zircaloy and stainless steel. The main component of Zircaloy is Zr and those of stainless steel are Fe, Ni, and Cr. Our group has previously reported physical property data such as viscosity, density, and surface tension for Zr-Fe liquid alloys using an electrostatic levitation technique. In this study, we report the viscosity, density, and surface tension of Zr-Ni and Zr-Cr liquid alloys (Zr1-xNix (x = 0.12 and 0.24) and Zr0.77Cr0.23) using the electrostatic levitation technique.

  7. A microscopic picture of the fast process in a polymer melt

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, W

    2002-01-01

    The picosecond process in a polymer melt is interpreted in terms of modes with a localized core, having an elastic dipole coupling to the viscoelastic medium. Fits of recent neutron scattering measurements of the fast process in (1,4)-polybutadiene at room temperature provide the dipole strength, together with a core diameter of about 0.6 nm. The result for the dipole strength is in good agreement with soft-potential fits of the low-temperature anomalies of polybutadiene. The finding suggests similar eigenvectors for the modes of the fast picosecond process in the melt and the tunneling modes in the glass phase. (orig.)

  8. Viscosity of Earth's Outer Core

    CERN Document Server

    Smylie, D E

    2007-01-01

    A viscosity profile across the entire fluid outer core is found by interpolating between measured boundary values, using a differential form of the Arrhenius law governing pressure and temperature dependence. The discovery that both the retrograde and prograde free core nutations are in free decay (Palmer and Smylie, 2005) allows direct measures of viscosity at the top of the outer core, while the reduction in the rotational splitting of the two equatorial translational modes of the inner core allows it to be measured at the bottom. We find 2,371 plus/minus 1,530 Pa.s at the top and 1.247 plus/minus 0.035 x 10^11 Pa.s at the bottom. Following Brazhkin (1998) and Brazhkin and Lyapin (2000) who get 10^2 Pa.s at the top, 10^11 Pa.s at the bottom, by an Arrhenius extrapolation of laboratory experiments, we use a differential form of the Arrhenius law to interpolate along the melting temperature curve to find a viscosity profile across the outer core. We find the variation to be closely log-linear between the meas...

  9. Investigation on Melt-Structure-Water Interactions (MSWI) during severe accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sehgal, B.R.; Yang, Z.L.; Dinh, T.N.; Nourgaliev, R.R.; Bui, V.A.; Haraldsson, H.O.; Li, H.X.; Konovakhin, M.; Paladino, D.; Leung, W.H [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Div. of Nuclear Power Safety

    1999-08-01

    This report is the final report for the work performed in 1998 in the research project Melt Structure Water Interactions (MSWI), under the auspices of the APRI Project, jointly funded by SKI, HSK, USNRC and the Swedish and Finnish power companies. The present report describes results of advanced analytical and experimental studies concerning melt-water-structure interactions during the course of a hypothetical severe core meltdown accident in a light water reactor (LWR). Emphasis has been placed on phenomena and properties which govern the fragmentation and breakup of melt jets and droplets, melt spreading and coolability, and thermal and mechanical loadings of a pressure vessel during melt-vessel interaction. Many of the investigations performed in support of this project have produced papers which have been published in the proceedings of technical meetings. A short summary of the results achieved in these papers is provided in this overview. Both experimental and analytical studies were performed to improve knowledge about phenomena of melt-structure-water interactions. We believe that significant technical advances have been achieved during the course of these studies. It was found that: the solidification has a strong effect on the drop deformation and breakup. Initially appearing at the drop surface and, later, thickening inwards, the solid crust layer dampens the instability waves on the drop surface and, therefore, hinders drop deformation and breakup. The drop thermal properties also affect the thermal behavior of the drop and, therefore, have impact on its deformation behavior. The jet fragmentation process is a function of many related phenomena. The fragmentation rate depends not only on the traditional parameters, e.g. the Weber number, but also on the melt physical properties, which change as the melt cools down from the liquidus to the solidus temperature. Additionally, the crust formed on the surface of the melt jet will also reduce the propensity

  10. Geochemistry: how well can Pb isotopes date core formation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamber, Balz S; Kramers, Jan D

    2006-11-02

    Timescale and the physics of planetary core formation are essential constraints for models of Earth's accretion and early differentiation. Wood and Halliday use the apparent mismatch in core-formation dates determined from tungsten (W) and lead (Pb) chrono-meters to argue for a two-stage core formation, involving an early phase of metal segregation followed by a protracted episode of sulphide melt addition. However, we show here that crust-;mantle Pb isotope systematics do not require diachronous core formation. Our observations indicate that very early (< or = 35 Myr) core formation and planet accretion remain the most plausible scenario.

  11. Magnetic Biocomposites for Remote Melting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Mengbo; Liebert, Tim; Müller, Robert; Dellith, Andrea; Gräfe, Christine; Clement, Joachim H; Heinze, Thomas

    2015-08-10

    A new approach toward the fabrication of biocompatible composites suitable for remote melting is presented. It is shown that magnetite nanoparticles (MNP) can be embedded into a matrix of biocompatible thermoplastic dextran esters. For that purpose, fatty acid esters of dextran with adjustable melting points in the range of 30-140 °C were synthesized. Esterification of the polysaccharide by activation of the acid as iminium chlorides guaranteed mild reaction conditions leading to high quality products as confirmed by FTIR- and NMR spectroscopy as well as by gel permeation chromatography (GPC). A method for the preparation of magnetically responsive bionanocomposites was developed consisting of combined dissolution/suspension of the dextran ester and hydrophobized MNPs in an organic solvent followed by homogenization with ultrasonication, casting of the solution, drying and melting of the composite for a defined shaping. This process leads to a uniform distribution of MNPs in nanocomposite as revealed by scanning electron microscope. Samples of different geometries were exposed to high frequency alternating magnetic field. It could be shown that defined remote melting of such biocompatible nanocomposites is possible for the first time. This may lead to a new class of magnetic remote control systems, which are suitable for controlled release applications or self-healing materials.

  12. UNCONSTRAINED MELTING AND SOLIDIFICATION INSIDE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-09-01

    Sep 1, 2015 ... Department of Mechanical Engineering, Sari Branch, Islamic Azad University, ... at initial time of melting process where the layer of liquid PCM near hot ... They carried out the simulation at different Rayleigh numbers ranging from 10 .... An enthalpy-porosity technique [28] is used in FLUENT for modeling the.

  13. Thermodynamics of freezing and melting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ulf Rørbæk; Costigliola, Lorenzo; Bailey, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    phases at a single thermodynamic state point provide the basis for calculating the pressure, density and entropy of fusion as functions of temperature along the melting line, as well as the variation along this line of the reduced crystalline vibrational mean-square displacement (the Lindemann ratio...

  14. Rock species formation due to deep-mantle melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomin, Ilya; Tackley, Paul

    2017-04-01

    Melting and melting migration are processes leading to chemically distinct rock species from a homogeneous substrate in the Earth mantle. Iron-rich melts and corresponding rock species are proposed to result from magma ocean progressive crystallization [Labrosse et al., 2007], and modern geophysical models of ULVZ (e.g. [Beuchert & Schmeling, 2013]) discuss their presence at around the CMB today. We perform long-term (tens of millions of years) numerical simulations of the Earth's mantle for a plausible range of CMB temperatures to understands the possibility of melting and it's consequences. Our model of melting is based on experimental data and ab initio simulations. Physical properties (liquid-solid density differences) are adjusted with data of [de Koker et al., 2013; Mosenfelder et al., 2007; Stixrude & Lithgow-Bertelloni, 2011; Thomas & Asimow, 2013]. This model is included in StagYY numerical code (e.g. [Tackley, 2008]) to simulate mass and thermal fluxes within the Earth mantle. Melt segregation (rocks' permeability and velocities) is considered using equations listed in [Abe, 1995; Solomatov, Stevenson, 1993; Martin & Nokes, 1989]. Thermal effects (adiabatic heating and viscous dissipation) are considered. Viscous dissipation term includes Darcy flux term, but omits highly non-linear Brinkman contribution [Nield, 2007]. Modeling predicts formation of melt if temperature at CMB exceeds 4000-4050K. It's segregation and reequilibration results in sufficient volumes of slightly iron-enriched melt lighter than solid counterpart and moving upward. However, it's propagation is strongly controlled by temperature. Partial melting atop the molten layer results in formation of refractory iron-poor restite which delaminates and sink down, so that a layer of iron-depleted material forms underneath the molten layer. Our model applied to homogeneous pyrolitic mantle results in formation of layers of iron-depleted material with average FeO around 4.6 mol.% and iron

  15. Grafted polymer chains suppress nanoparticle diffusion in athermal polymer melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chia-Chun; Griffin, Philip J.; Chao, Huikuan; Hore, Michael J. A.; Ohno, Kohji; Clarke, Nigel; Riggleman, Robert A.; Winey, Karen I.; Composto, Russell J.

    2017-05-01

    We measure the center-of-mass diffusion of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)-grafted nanoparticles (NPs) in unentangled to slightly entangled PMMA melts using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. These grafted NPs diffuse ˜100 times slower than predicted by the Stokes-Einstein relation assuming a viscosity equal to bulk PMMA and a hydrodynamic NP size equal to the NP core diameter, 2Rcore = 4.3 nm. This slow NP diffusion is consistent with an increased effective NP size, 2Reff ≈ 20 nm, nominally independent of the range of grafting density and matrix molecular weights explored in this study. Comparing these experimental results to a modified Daoud-Cotton scaling estimate for the brush thickness as well as dynamic mean field simulations of polymer-grafted NPs in athermal polymer melts, we find that 2Reff is in quantitative agreement with the size of the NP core plus the extended grafted chains. Our results suggest that grafted polymer chains of moderate molecular weight and grafting density may alter the NP diffusion mechanism in polymer melts, primarily by increasing the NP effective size.

  16. Core Java

    CERN Document Server

    Horstmann, Cay S

    2013-01-01

    Fully updated to reflect Java SE 7 language changes, Core Java™, Volume I—Fundamentals, Ninth Edition, is the definitive guide to the Java platform. Designed for serious programmers, this reliable, unbiased, no-nonsense tutorial illuminates key Java language and library features with thoroughly tested code examples. As in previous editions, all code is easy to understand, reflects modern best practices, and is specifically designed to help jumpstart your projects. Volume I quickly brings you up-to-speed on Java SE 7 core language enhancements, including the diamond operator, improved resource handling, and catching of multiple exceptions. All of the code examples have been updated to reflect these enhancements, and complete descriptions of new SE 7 features are integrated with insightful explanations of fundamental Java concepts.

  17. Physicians’ progress notes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bansler, Jørgen P.; Havn, Erling C.; Mønsted, Troels

    2013-01-01

    care, they have not dealt specifically with the role, structure, and content of the progress notes. As a consequence, CSCW research has not yet taken fully into account the fact that progress notes are coordinative artifacts of a rather special kind, an open-ended chain of prose texts, written...... sequentially by cooperating physicians for their own use as well as for that of their colleagues. We argue that progress notes are the core of the medical record, in that they marshal and summarize the overwhelming amount of data that is available in the modern hospital environment, and that their narrative...

  18. Possible in-vessel corium progression way in the Unit 1 of Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant using a phenomenological analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payot Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the field of severe accident, the description of corium progression events is mainly carried out by using integral calculation codes. However, these tools are usually based on bounding assumptions because of high complexity of phenomena. The limitations associated with bounding situations ([J.M. Seiler, B. Tourniaire, A phenomenological analysis of melt progression in the lower head of a pressurized water reactor, Nucl. Eng. Des. 268, 87 (2014] e.g. steady state situations and instantaneous whole core relocation in the lower head led CEA to develop an alternative approach in order to improve the phenomenological description of melt progression. The methodology used to describe the corium progression was designed to cover the accidental situations from the core meltdown to the molten core concrete interaction. This phenomenological approach is based on available data (including learnings from TMI2, on physical models and knowledge about the corium behavior. It provides emerging trends and best estimated intermediate situations. As different phenomena are unknown, but strongly coupled, uncertainties at large scale for the reactor application must be taken into account. Furthermore, the analysis is complicated by the fact that these configurations are most probably three dimensional, all the more so because 3D effects are expected to have significant consequences for the corium progression and the resulting vessel failure. Such an analysis of the in-vessel melt progression was carried out for the Unit 1 of the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant. The core uncovering kinetics governs the core degradation and impacts the appearance of the first molten corium inside the core. The initial conditions used to carry out this analysis are based on available results derived from codes like MELCOR calculation code [R. Ganntt, D. Kalinich, J. Cardoni, J. Phillips, A. Goldmann, S. Pickering, M. Francis, K. Robb, L. Ott, D. Wang, C. Smith, S. St. Germain

  19. Scanning electron microscopy investigations of laboratory-grown gas clathrate hydrates formed from melting ice, and comparison to natural hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.; Circone, S.; Durham, W.B.

    2004-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to investigate grain texture and pore structure development within various compositions of pure sI and sII gas hydrates synthesized in the laboratory, as well as in natural samples retrieved from marine (Gulf of Mexico) and permafrost (NW Canada) settings. Several samples of methane hydrate were also quenched after various extents of partial reaction for assessment of mid-synthesis textural progression. All laboratory-synthesized hydrates were grown under relatively high-temperature and high-pressure conditions from rounded ice grains with geometrically simple pore shapes, yet all resulting samples displayed extensive recrystallization with complex pore geometry. Growth fronts of mesoporous methane hydrate advancing into dense ice reactant were prevalent in those samples quenched after limited reaction below and at the ice point. As temperatures transgress the ice point, grain surfaces continue to develop a discrete "rind" of hydrate, typically 5 to 30 ??m thick. The cores then commonly melt, with rind microfracturing allowing migration of the melt to adjacent grain boundaries where it also forms hydrate. As the reaction continues under progressively warmer conditions, the hydrate product anneals to form dense and relatively pore-free regions of hydrate grains, in which grain size is typically several tens of micrometers. The prevalence of hollow, spheroidal shells of hydrate, coupled with extensive redistribution of reactant and product phases throughout reaction, implies that a diffusion-controlled shrinking-core model is an inappropriate description of sustained hydrate growth from melting ice. Completion of reaction at peak synthesis conditions then produces exceptional faceting and euhedral crystal growth along exposed pore walls. Further recrystallization or regrowth can then accompany even short-term exposure of synthetic hydrates to natural ocean-floor conditions, such that the final textures may closely mimic

  20. Melt-inclusion-hosted excess 40Ar in quartz crystals of the Bishop and Bandelier magma systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winick, J.A.; McIntosh, W.C.; Dunbar, N.W.

    2001-01-01

    40Ar/39Ar experiments on melt-inclusion-bearing quartz (MIBQ) from the Bishop and Bandelier Tuff Plinian deposits indicate high concentrations of excess 40Ar in melt inclusions. Two rhyolite glass melt inclusion populations are present in quartz; exposed melt inclusions and trapped melt inclusions. Air-abrasion mill grinding and hydrofluoric acid treatments progressively remove exposed melt inclusions while leaving trapped melt inclusions unaffected. Laser step-heating of MIBQ yields increasing apparent ages as a function of exposed melt inclusion removal, reflecting the higher nonatmospheric 40Ar concentrations hosted in trapped melt inclusions. Exposed melt inclusion-free MIBQ from the Bishop, Upper Bandelier, and Lower Bandelier Tufts yield total-gas ages of 3.70 ?? 1.00 Ma, 11.54 ?? 0.87 Ma, and 14.60 ?? 1.50 Ma, respectively. We interpret these old apparent ages as compelling evidence for the presence of excess 40Ar in MIBQ. Trapped melt inclusions in sanidine phenocrysts may contain excess 40Ar concentrations similar to those in MIBQ. This excess 40Ar has the potential to increase single-crystal laser-fusion ages of sanidine by tens of thousands of years, relative to the actual eruption age.

  1. Free energy and structure of dislocation cores in two-dimensional crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bladon, P.B.; Frenkel, D.

    2004-01-01

    The nature of the melting transition in two dimensions is critically dependent on the core energy of dislocations. In this paper, we report calculations of the core free energy and the core size of dislocations in two-dimensional solids of systems interacting via square well, hard disk, and r-12

  2. Molecular dynamics simulation study of the melting of Pd-Pt nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian K. R. S.; Bhethanabotla, Venkat R.; Joseph, Babu

    2005-05-01

    Bimetallic nanoclusters are of interest because of their utility in catalysis and sensors. The thermal characteristics of bimetallic Pt-Pd nanoclusters of different sizes and compositions were investigated through molecular dynamics simulations using quantum Sutton-Chen (QSC) many-body potentials. Monte Carlo simulations employing the bond order simulation model were used to generate minimum energy configurations, which were utilized as the starting point for molecular dynamics simulations. The calculated initial configurations of the Pt-Pd system consisted of surface segregated Pd atoms and a Pt-rich core. Melting characteristics were studied by following the changes in potential energy and heat capacity as functions of temperature. Structural changes accompanying the thermal evolution were studied by the bond order parameter method. The Pt-Pd clusters exhibited a two-stage melting: surface melting of the external Pd atoms followed by homogeneous melting of the Pt core. These transitions were found to depend on the composition and size of the nanocluster. Melting temperatures of the nanoclusters were found to be much lower than those of bulk Pt and Pd. Bulk melting temperatures of Pd and Pt simulated using periodic boundary conditions compare well with experimental values, thus providing justification for the use of QSC potentials in these simulations. Deformation parameters were calculated to characterize the structural evolution resulting from diffusion of Pd and Pt atoms. The results indicate that in Pd-Pt clusters, Pd atoms prefer to remain at the surface even after melting. In addition, Pt also tends to diffuse to the surface after melting due to reduction of its surface energy with temperature. This mixing pattern is different from those reported in some of the earlier studies on melting of bimetallics.

  3. 熔化处理温度对银包套带材中(Bi,Pb)-2223相熔化分解-再形成行为的影响%Effect of Melting Temperature on the Decomposition and Reformation Behavior of(Bi,Pb)-2223 Core in the Ag-sheathed Tape

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李敬勇; 郑会玲; 李成山; 卢亚锋; 周廉

    2007-01-01

    The effect of melting temperature on the decomposition and reformation of(Bi,Pb)-2223(abbreviated as 2223)phase in a Ag-sheathed mono-filamentary tape under 7.5%O2 flow balanced with argon have been investigated by means of ex-situ X-ray diffraction(XRD)and scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy(SEM/EDS).It is shown that a partial melting at an appropriate temperature range,which produce a 2212-like melt and alkaline earth cuprates(AEC),especially(Sr,Ca)14Cu24O41(14:24-AEC)and(Ca,Sr)2CuO3(2:1-AEC),as the main decomposition products of 2223,is very important for this high-Tc phase reformation.The melt composition evolved from that between 2223 and 2212 stoichiometries towards 2212,and then to 2201 stoichiometry as melting temperature increasing.It is demonstrated that 2223 could be easily formed from a 2212-like melt but Bi-2212 could be crystallized from a near 2201-like melt.The recrystallization of 2223 from the melt at an excessively high temperature might experience two different routes during the slow-cooling,one is that 2223 reformed directly from the melt and the other iS that 2223 iS transferred from the Bi-2212.%应用X射线衍射(XRD)和扫描电镜/能谱分析(SEM/EDS)研究了7.5%O2-Ar条件下,熔化处理温度对银包套单芯带材芯部(Bi,Pb)-2223(简称2223)相的分解及再形成行为的影响.结果表明,适当温度下,2223相部分熔化生成一种类似于(Bi,Pb)-2212的液相和碱土铜酸盐(AEC),主要是(Sr,Ca)14CU24O41(14:24-AEC)和(Ca,Sr)2CuO3(2:1-AEC),对于这一高温超导相的可逆再形成至关重要.随着熔化处理温度的升高,2223相熔化分解生成的液相的成分经历了从介于2223和2212计量比之间向2212,并进一步向2201计量比的演变过程.2223相易于从类似于2212的液相中析出,而从接近2201计量比的液相中更易于生成2212相.2223相从过度熔化生成的液相中再形成经历了两个途径:一是直接从液相中析出,二是

  4. Basal terraces on melting ice shelves

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dutrieux, Pierre; Stewart, Craig; Jenkins, Adrian; Nicholls, Keith W; Corr, Hugh F. J; Rignot, Eric; Steffen, Konrad

    2014-01-01

    Ocean waters melt the margins of Antarctic and Greenland glaciers, and individual glaciers' responses and the integrity of their ice shelves are expected to depend on the spatial distribution of melt...

  5. Core formation in silicate bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmo, F.; O'Brien, D. P.; Kleine, T.

    2008-12-01

    Differentiation of a body into a metallic core and silicate mantle occurs most efficiently if temperatures are high enough to allow at least the metal to melt [1], and is enhanced if matrix deformation occurs [2]. Elevated temperatures may occur due to either decay of short-lived radio-isotopes, or gravitational energy release during accretion [3]. For bodies smaller than the Moon, core formation happens primarily due to radioactive decay. The Hf-W isotopic system may be used to date core formation; cores in some iron meteorites and the eucrite parent body (probably Vesta) formed within 1 My and 1-4~My of solar system formation, respectively [4]. These formation times are early enough to ensure widespread melting and differentiation by 26Al decay. Incorporation of Fe60 into the core, together with rapid early mantle solidification and cooling, may have driven early dynamo activity on some bodies [5]. Iron meteorites are typically depleted in sulphur relative to chondrites, for unknown reasons [6]. This depletion contrasts with the apparently higher sulphur contents of cores in larger planetary bodies, such as Mars [7], and also has a significant effect on the timing of core solidification. For bodies of Moon-size and larger, gravitational energy released during accretion is probably the primary cause of core formation [3]. The final stages of accretion involve large, stochastic collisions [8] between objects which are already differentiated. During each collision, the metallic cores of the colliding objects merge on timescales of a few hours [9]. Each collision will reset the Hf-W isotopic signature of both mantle and core, depending on the degree to which the impactor core re-equilibrates with the mantle of the target [10]. The re-equilibration efficiency depends mainly on the degree to which the impactor emulsifies [11], which is very uncertain. Results from N-body simulations [8,12] suggest that significant degrees of re- equilibration are required [4,10]. Re

  6. Filament stretching rheometry of polymer melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassager, Ole; Nielsen, Jens Kromann; Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz

    2005-01-01

    The Filament Stretching Rheometry (FSR) method developed by Sridhar, McKinley and coworkers for polymer solutions has been extended to be used also for polymer melts. The design of a melt-FSR will be described and differences to conventional melt elongational rheometers will be pointed out. Results...

  7. Filament stretching rheometry of polymer melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassager, Ole; Nielsen, Jens Kromann; Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz

    2005-01-01

    The Filament Stretching Rheometry (FSR) method developed by Sridhar, McKinley and coworkers for polymer solutions has been extended to be used also for polymer melts. The design of a melt-FSR will be described and differences to conventional melt elongational rheometers will be pointed out. Results...

  8. The nature of the earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanloz, Raymond

    1990-01-01

    The properties of the earth's core are overviewed with emphasis on seismologically determined regions and pressures and seismologically measured density, elastic wave velocities, and gravitational acceleration. Attention is given to solid-state convection of the inner core, and it is noted that though seismological results do not conclusively prove that the inner core is convective, the occurrence and magnitude of seismic anisotropy are explained by the effects of solid-state convection. Igneous petrology and geochemistry of the inner core, a layer at the base of the mantle and contact metasomatism at the core-mantle boundary, and evolution of the core-mantle system are discussed. It is pointed out that high-pressure melting experiments indicate that the temperature of the core is ranging from 4500 to 6500 K, and a major implication of such high temperature is that the tectonics and convection of the mantle, as well as the resulting geological processes observed at the surface, are powered by heat from the core. As a result of the high temperatures, along with the compositional contrast between silicates and iron alloy, the core-mantle boundary is considered to be most chemically active region of the earth.

  9. Conjunctival-corneal melt in association with carotid artery stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalind MK Stewart

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Rosalind MK Stewart1, Say Aun Quah1, Dan Q Nguyen2, Stephen B Kaye11Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Liverpool, UK; 2Bristol Eye Hospital, Bristol, UKPurpose: To report a case of severe conjunctival-corneal melt in association with carotid artery stenosis.Methods: Observational case report.Results: A 76-year-old man with a history of bilateral severe carotid artery occlusion and nonarteritic ischemic optic neuropathy developed a spontaneous bulbar conjunctival defect. Despite intensive lubrication, and attempts at surgical closure including an amniotic membrane patch graft, it progressed with subsequent adjacent corneal perforation. Thorough investigations revealed no underlying disease, except markedly delayed episcleral vessel filling on anterior segment fluorescein angiography.Conclusions: Neovascularisation is a known factor in the inhibition of ulceration. In light of the findings in this report, ocular ischemia should be considered as a cause or contributing factor in the differential diagnosis of conjunctival-corneal melt.Keywords: conjunctival melt, corneal melt, ocular ischemia, carotid artery stenosis

  10. SURFACE MELTING OF ALUMINIUM ALLOYS

    OpenAIRE

    Veit, S.; Albert, D; Mergen, R.

    1987-01-01

    The wear properties of aluminium base alloys are relatively poor. Laser surface melting and alloying has proved successful in many alloy systems as a means of significantly improving the surface properties. The present work describes experiments designed to establish the scope of laser treatment of aluminium alloys. Aluminium does not absorb CO2 laser light as well as other metals which necessitated first a general study of absorption caotings. Aluminium alloys offer fewer opportunities than ...

  11. Thermal Stability of Co-Pt and Co-Au Core-Shell Structured Nanoparticles: Insights from Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yu-Hua; Huang, Rao; Shao, Gui-Fang; Sun, Shi-Gang

    2017-09-07

    Co-Pt and Co-Au core-shell nanoparticles were heated by molecular dynamics simulations to investigate their thermal stability. Two core structures, that is, hcp Co and fcc Co, have been addressed. The results demonstrate that the hcp-fcc phase transition happens in the hcp-Co-core/fcc-Pt-shell nanoparticle, while it is absent in the hcp-Co-core/fcc-Au-shell one. The stacking faults appear in both Pt and Au shells despite different structures of the Co core. The Co core and Pt shell concurrently melt and present an identical melting point in both Co-Pt core-shell nanoparticles. However, typical two-stage melting occurs in both Co-Au core-shell nanoparticles. Furthermore, the Au shell in the hcp-Co-core/fcc-Au-shell nanoparticle exhibits a lower melting point than that in the fcc-Co-core/fcc-Au-shell one, while the melting points are closely equal for both hcp and fcc Co cores. All of these observations suggest that their thermal stability strongly depends on the structure of the core and the element of the shell.

  12. Central core disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungbluth Heinz

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Central core disease (CCD is an inherited neuromuscular disorder characterised by central cores on muscle biopsy and clinical features of a congenital myopathy. Prevalence is unknown but the condition is probably more common than other congenital myopathies. CCD typically presents in infancy with hypotonia and motor developmental delay and is characterized by predominantly proximal weakness pronounced in the hip girdle; orthopaedic complications are common and malignant hyperthermia susceptibility (MHS is a frequent complication. CCD and MHS are allelic conditions both due to (predominantly dominant mutations in the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor (RYR1 gene, encoding the principal skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium release channel (RyR1. Altered excitability and/or changes in calcium homeostasis within muscle cells due to mutation-induced conformational changes of the RyR protein are considered the main pathogenetic mechanism(s. The diagnosis of CCD is based on the presence of suggestive clinical features and central cores on muscle biopsy; muscle MRI may show a characteristic pattern of selective muscle involvement and aid the diagnosis in cases with equivocal histopathological findings. Mutational analysis of the RYR1 gene may provide genetic confirmation of the diagnosis. Management is mainly supportive and has to anticipate susceptibility to potentially life-threatening reactions to general anaesthesia. Further evaluation of the underlying molecular mechanisms may provide the basis for future rational pharmacological treatment. In the majority of patients, weakness is static or only slowly progressive, with a favourable long-term outcome.

  13. Melting Behaviour of Ferronickel Slags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagadin, Christoph; Luidold, Stefan; Wagner, Christoph; Wenzl, Christine

    2016-12-01

    The industrial manufacturing of ferronickel in electric furnaces produces large amounts of slag with strong acidic character and high melting points, which seriously stresses the furnace refractory lining. In this study, the melting behavior of synthetically produced ferronickel slags on magnesia as refractory material was determined by means of a hot stage microscope. Therefore, slags comprising the main oxides SiO2 (35-70 wt.%), MgO (15-45 wt.%) and Fe2O3 (5-35 wt.%) were melted in a graphite crucible and afterwards analyzed by a hot stage microscope. The design of experiments, which was created by the statistic software MODDE®, included 20 experiments with varying slag compositions as well as atmospheres. The evaluation of the test results occurred at three different characteristic states of the samples like the softening point according to DIN 51730 and the temperatures at which the area of residual cross-section of the samples amounted to 30% and 40%, respectively, of the original value depending of their SiO2/MgO ratio and iron oxide content. Additionally, the thickness of the zone influenced by the slag was measured and evaluated.

  14. Optimization of the Brass Melting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biernat S.

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the optimization of the melting brass. Brasses, as one of the most popular alloys of copper, deserve special attention in the context of the processes of melting, which in turn would provide not only products of better quality, but also reduce the cost of their production or refining. For this purpose, several studies carried out deriatographic (DTA and thermogravimetric (TG using derivatograph. The results were confronted with the program SLAG - PROP used to evaluate the physicochemical properties of the coatings extraction. Based on the survey and analysis of the program can identify the most favorable physico - chemical properties, which should be carried out treatments. This allows for slag mixtures referred configurations oxide matrix containing specific stimulators of the reaction. Conducted empirical studies indicate a convergence of the areas proposed by the application. It should also be noted that the program also indicates additional areas in which to carry out these processes would get even better, to optimize the melting process, the results.

  15. Severe accident progression perspectives for Mark I containments based on the IPE results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, C.C.; Lehner, J.R.; Pratt, W.T. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Drouin, M. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, N. Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Based on level 2 analyses in IPE (Individual Plant Examination) submittals accident progression, perspectives were obtained for all containment types. These perspectives consisted of insights on containment failure modes, releases therein, and factors responsible for the results. To illustrate the types of perspectives acquired on severe accident progresssion, insights obtained for (BWR) Mark I containments are discussed here. Mark I containments have high strength but small volumes and rely on pressure suppression pools to condense steam released from the reactor coolant system during an accident. Accidents causing structural failure of the drywell shortly after the core debris melts through the reactor vessel were found to be dominant contributors to risk. Importance of individual containment failure mechanisms depends on plant features and in some cases on modeling assumptions; however the following mechanisms were found important: drywell shell melt-through caused by direct contact with core debris and drywell failure caused by rapid pressure/temperature pulses at time of vessel melt-through. Drywell failure caused by gradual pressure/temperature buildup due to gases and steam released during core/concrete interactions is important in some IPEs. In other IPEs vent was an important contributor. However, accidents that bypass containment (eg interfacing systems LOCA)or involve containment isolation failure were not important contributors to the CDF in any of the IPEs for Mark I plants. These accidents are also not important to risk (even though they can involve large fission product release) because their frequencies of occurrence are so much lower than frequencies of early structural failure caused by other accidents that dominate the CDF.

  16. Adakitic (tonalitic-trondhjemitic) magmas resulting from eclogite decompression and dehydration melting during exhumation in response to continental collision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Shuguang; Niu, Yaoling; Su, Li; Wei, Chunjing; Zhang, Lifei

    2014-04-01

    Modern adakite or adakitic rocks are thought to result from partial melting of younger and thus warmer subducting ocean crust in subduction zones, with the melt interacting with or without mantle wedge peridotite during ascent, or from melting of thickened mafic lower crust. Here we show that adakitic (tonalitic-trondhjemitic) melts can also be produced by eclogite decompression during exhumation of subducted and metamorphosed oceanic/continental crust in response to continental collision, as exemplified by the adakitic rocks genetically associated with the early Paleozoic North Qaidam ultra-high pressure metamorphic (UHPM) belt on the northern margin of the Greater Tibetan Plateau. We present field evidence for partial melting of eclogite and its products, including adakitic melt, volumetrically significant plutons evolved from the melt, cumulate rocks precipitated from the melt, and associated granulitic residues. This “adakitic assemblage” records a clear progression from eclogite decompression and heating to partial melting, to melt fractionation and ascent/percolation in response to exhumation of the UHPM package. The garnetite and garnet-rich layers in the adakitic assemblage are of cumulate origin from the adakitic melt at high pressure, and accommodate much of the Nb-Ta-Ti. Zircon SHRIMP U-Pb dating shows that partial melting of the eclogite took place at ∼435-410 Ma, which postdates the seafloor subduction (>440 Ma) and temporally overlaps the UHPM (∼440-425 Ma). While the geological context and the timing of adakite melt formation we observe differ from the prevailing models, our observations and documentations demonstrate that eclogite melting during UHPM exhumation may be important in contributing to crustal growth.

  17. Partial melting of secondary pyroxenite at 1 and 1.5 GPa, and its role in upwelling heterogeneous mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghini, G.; Fumagalli, P.; Rampone, E.

    2017-08-01

    We performed partial melting experiments at 1 and 1.5 GPa, and 1180-1400 °C, to investigate the melting under mantle conditions of an olivine-websterite (GV10), which represents a natural proxy of secondary (or stage 2) pyroxenite. Its subsolidus mineralogy consists of clinopyroxene, orthopyroxene, olivine and spinel (+garnet at 1.5 GPa). Solidus temperature is located between 1180 and 1200 °C at 1 GPa, and between 1230 and 1250 °C at 1.5 GPa. Orthopyroxene (±garnet), spinel and clinopyroxene are progressively consumed by melting reactions to produce olivine and melt. High coefficient of orthopyroxene in the melting reaction results in relatively high SiO2 content of low melt fractions. After orthopyroxene exhaustion, melt composition is controlled by the composition of coexisting clinopyroxene. At increasing melt fraction, CaO content of melt increases, whereas Na2O, Al2O3 and TiO2 behave as incompatible elements. Low Na2O contents reflect high partition coefficient of Na between clinopyroxene and melt (D_{{{Na}_{ 2} {O}}}^{{{cpx}/{liquid}}}). Melting of GV10 produces Quartz- to Hyperstene-normative basaltic melts that differ from peridotitic melts only in terms of lower Na2O and higher CaO contents. We model the partial melting of mantle sources made of different mixing of secondary pyroxenite and fertile lherzolite in the context of adiabatic oceanic mantle upwelling. At low potential temperatures ( T P element compositions matching those of primitive MORBs. This reinforces the notion that secondary pyroxenite may be potential hidden components in MORB mantle source.

  18. Surface energy budget of landfast sea ice during the transitions from winter to snowmelt and melt pond onset

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Else, B.G.T.; Papakyriakou, T.N.; Raddatz, R.

    2014-01-01

    Relatively few sea ice energy balance studies have successfully captured the transition season of warming, snowmelt, and melt pond formation. In this paper, we report a surface energy budget for landfast sea ice that captures this important period. The study was conducted in the Canadian Arctic......, but it delivered enough energy to significantly hasten melt onset had it occurred earlier in the season. Changes in the frequency, duration, and timing of synoptic-scale weather events that deliver clouds and/or strong turbulent heat fluxes may be important in explaining observed changes in sea ice melt onset......) combined with the seasonal increase in incoming shortwave radiation then triggered snowmelt onset. Melt progressed with a rapid reduction in albedo and attendant increases in shortwave energy absorption, resulting in melt pond formation 8 days later. The key role of longwave radiation in initiating melt...

  19. SWR 1000 severe accident control through in-vessel melt retention by external RPV cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolev, N.I. [Framatome Advanced Nuclear Power, NDSI, Erlangen (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    Framatome Advanced Nuclear Power is being designing a new generation NPP with boiling water reactor SWR1000. Besides of various of modern passive and active safety features the system is also designed for controlling of a postulated severe accident with extreme low probability of occurrence. This work presents the rationales behind the decision to select the external cooling as a safety management strategy during severe accident. Bounding scenery are analyzed regarding the core melting, melt-water interaction during relocation of the melt from the core region into the lower head and the external coolability of the lower head. The conclusion is reached that the external cooling for the SWR1000 is a valuable strategy for accident management during postulated severe accidents. (authors)

  20. Melt-Enhanced Rejuvenation of Lithospheric Mantle: Insights from the Colorado Plateau

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, Mousumi; Holtzman, Ben; Gaherty, James

    2012-01-01

    The stability of the lithospheric mantle beneath the ancient cratonic cores of continents is primarily a function of chemical modification during the process of melt extraction. Processes by which stable continental lithosphere may be destabilized are not well-understood, although destabilization by thickening and removal of negatively-buoyant lithospheric mantle in "delamination" events has been proposed in a number of tectonic settings. In this paper we explore an alternative process for destabilizing continents, namely, thermal and chemical modification during infiltration of metasomatic fluids and melts into the lithospheric column. We consider observations pertinent to the structure and evolution of the Colorado Plateau within the western United States to argue that the physical and chemical state of the margins of the plateau have been variably modified and destabilized by interaction with melts. In the melt-infiltration process explored here, the primary mechanism for weakening and rejuvenating the pla...

  1. Simulated Melting Curve of NaCl up to 200 kbar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程新路; 刘子江; 蔡灵仓; 张芳沛

    2003-01-01

    The melting curve of NaCl is studied up to 200 kbar by means of the shell-model molecular dynamics method,using massive shell core interaction potentials.The model for the interatomic interaction is shown to produce reasonable results at a wide range of pressures in bulk transitions.The pressure dependence of the melting curve of NaCl was calculated and the result was modified on the assumption of overheating due to the small system size and small time scale simulation.The final result is in good agreement with the corrected experimental values,accounting for melting mechanisms such as surface heating or superheating.Therefore,it is believed that bulk transition simulation at constant pressure indeed provides a useful tool for studying the melting transition.

  2. Melt-layer motion and droplet ejection under divertor-relevant plasma conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Temmerman, G.; Daniels, J.; Bystrov, K.; van den Berg, M. A.; Zielinski, J. J.

    2013-01-01

    Accidental melting of metallic plasma-facing materials in future fusion devices poses serious issues regarding the material lifetime and power-handling capabilities as well as core plasma performances. The behaviour of aluminium (as a proxy for beryllium) and tungsten materials was investigated in

  3. Recent progress in the study of core-shell-structured materials with metal organic frameworks (MOFs) as shell%金属有机骨架(MOFs)为壳的核壳结构材料研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    农洁静; 赵文波; 覃显业; 刘彪; 张政

    2015-01-01

    MOFs核壳结构材料是近十几年来化工材料领域的研究热点,其中MOFs可作核,亦可作壳。本文从不同的核出发综述了以 MOFs 为壳的核壳结构材料的合成方法,如外延生长法、后合成修饰法等;概述了其展现出优于核层与壳层的特性(如选择性分离、催化性、磁性等)及以 MOFs 为壳的核壳结构材料在气体吸附、催化剂、磁性分离等应用上的研究,这给MOFs复合材料的产业化带来很大的潜力;而内核主要包括单质金属及非金属类内核、氧化物类内核、MOFs类内核;最后对MOFs为壳的核壳结构复合材料合成方法的改进和拓展、结构均一稳定、多功能化的发展作了展望。%Core-shell-structure MOFs materials became a hot spot in the field of chemical and materials over the last decade,and MOFs can act as core or shell. This paper mainly reviews the synthesis methods of core-shell-structure material with MOFs as shell according to different nuclear types,such as epitaxial growth method,and post-synthetic modifications;and summarizes the performances which are better than single core or shell,such as separation selectivity,catalysis,magnetic performance, and the development of the core-shell-structure materials with MOFs as shell in gas adsorption, catalysts,magnetic separation,which bring a large potential for MOFs composite industrialization. The cores include metallic and non-metallic element core , oxides core , and MOFs core. And the core-shell-structure composites with MOFs as shell are prospected for the improvement and development of synthesis methods in order to obtain uniform and stable structure and multi-function.

  4. 3D spherical models of Martian mantle convection constrained by melting history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekhar, Pavithra; King, Scott D.

    2014-02-01

    While most of Tharsis rise was in place by end of the Noachian period, at least one volcano on Tharsis swell (Arsia Mons) has been active within the last 2 Ma. This places an important constraint on mantle convection and on the thermal evolution of Mars. The existence of recent volcanism on Mars implies that adiabatic decompression melting and, hence, upwelling convective flow in the mantle remains important on Mars at present. The thermal history on Mars can be constrained by the history of melt production, specifically generating sufficient melt in the first billion years of the planets history to produce Tharsis rise as well as present day melt to explain recent volcanism. In this work, mantle convection simulations were performed using finite element code CitcomS in a 3D sphere starting from a uniformly hot mantle and integrating forward in time for the age of the solar system. We implement constant and decaying radioactive heat sources; and vary the partitioning of heat sources between the crust and mantle, and consider decreasing core-mantle boundary temperature and latent heat of melting. The constant heat source calculations produce sufficient melt to create Tharsis early in Martian history and continue to produce significant melt to the present. Calculations with decaying radioactive heat sources generate excessive melt in the past, except when all the radiogenic elements are in the crust, and none produce melt after 2 Gyr. Producing a degree-1 or degree-2 structure may not be pivotal to explain the Tharsis rise: we present multi-plume models where not every plume produces melt. The Rayleigh number controls the timing of the first peak of volcanism while late-stage volcanism is controlled more by internal mantle heating. Decreasing the Rayleigh number increases the lithosphere thickness (i.e., depth), and increasing lithosphere thickness increases the mean mantle temperature. Increasing pressure reduces melt production while increasing temperature

  5. Numerical analysis of grid plate melting after a severe accident in a Fast-Breeder Reactor (FBR)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Jasmin Sudha; K Velusamy

    2013-12-01

    Fast breeder reactors (FBRs) are provided with redundant and diverse plant protection systems with a very low failure probability (<10-6/reactor year), making core disruptive accident (CDA), a beyond design basis event (BDBE). Nevertheless, safety analysis is carried out even for such events with a view to mitigate their consequences by providing engineered safeguards like the in-vessel core catcher. During a CDA, a significant fraction of the hot molten fuel moves downwards and gets relocated to the lower plate of grid plate. The ability of this plate to resist or delay relocation of core melt further has been investigated by developing appropriate mathematical models and translating them into a computer code HEATRAN-1. The core melt is a time dependent volumetric heat source because of the radioactive decay of the fission products which it contains. The code solves the nonlinear heat conduction equation including phase change. The analysis reveals that if the bottom of grid plate is considered to be adiabatic, melt-through of grid plate (i.e., melting of the entire thickness of the plate) occurs between 800 s and 1000 s depending upon the initial conditions. Knowledge of this time estimate is essential for defining the initial thermal load on the core catcher plate. If heat transfer from the bottom of grid plate to the underlying sodium is taken into account, then melt-through does not take place, but the temperature of grid plate is high enough to cause creep failure.

  6. Discussion on the Progressive Teaching Pattern with the Core of Skills Experience%以技能体验为核心的递进式教学模式探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王洪彬

    2015-01-01

    Training on college students’ skill is one of the important issues in the teaching reform of higher education in recent years,which teaching pattern we are supposed to choice is the core of the research. Combined with the skills of the formation of the common law, progressive teaching pattern can be divided into three stages,through the teaching task of every stage,and then they are divided into seven parts, they are:knowledge learning, concept conclusion, fragments of imitation, integration and the practice,multiple stereo type training,pre job and on-the-job training. The first phase of the main task is to make the students to have a clear image or recognition in their mind or operation;the second stage is to highlight the skills of each fragment,and then combined with the story, imitation and instruments and other methods to complete the integration of skills. The third stage is to achieve the comprehensive ability of the training,to achieve the pur-suit of practical skills. Studies suggest that this teaching model can provide a skill operation of the simulation space or skills training experience, which can make the students integrate into the workplace faster and better.%大学生技能培养是近年来高校教学改革探讨的重要议题之一,采用何种教学模式实现培养目标则是研究核心。本文结合技能形成的普遍规律,将递进式教学模式分为三个阶段,通过每一个阶段的教学任务,再划分成知识学习、概念建立、片段模仿、整合练习、多元立体式训练、岗前和顶岗实训七个模块。第一阶段主要任务是使学生在头脑中或操作上,对技能有一个清晰的映像或认知;第二阶段要凸显每个片段技能特点,然后再结合讲述、模仿和器械等方法完成技能的整合。第三阶段是通过特色的教学设计等,追求技能的实用化,实现综合能力的培养。研究认为,这种教学模式可以提供一个技能操作

  7. Physicians’ Progress Notes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bansler, Jørgen; Havn, Erling C.; Mønsted, Troels

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines physicians’ progress notes, an artifact that, in spite of its obvious importance in the coordination of cooperative work in clinical settings, has not been subjected to systematic study under CSCW auspices. While several studies have addressed the role of the medical record...... in patient care, they have not dealt specifically with the role, structure, and content of the progress notes. As a consequence, CSCW research has not yet taken fully into account the fact that progress notes are coordinative artifacts of a rather special kind, an open-ended chain of prose texts, written...... sequentially by cooperating physicians for their own use as well as for that of their colleagues. We argue that progress notes are the core of the medical record, in that they marshal and summarize the overwhelming amount of data that is available in the modern hospital environment, and that their narrative...

  8. Morphology of melt-rich channels formed during reaction infiltration experiments on partially molten mantle rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pec, Matej; Holtzman, Benjamin; Zimmerman, Mark; Kohlstedt, David

    2016-04-01

    planar and no channels develop. However, if the melt migration velocity exceeds ˜5 μm/s the reaction layer locally protrudes into the partially molten rock forming finger-like melt-rich channels. The morphology and spacing of the channels depends on the initial melt fraction. With 20 vol% melt, multiple and voluminous channels with an elliptical core formed of pure melt develop. At lower melt contents, fewer and thinner channels develop. Our experiments demonstrate that melt-rock reactions can lead to melt channelization in mantle lithologies. The morphology of the channels seems to depend on the initial permeability perturbations present in the starting material. The observed lithological transformations are in broad agreement with natural observations. However, the resulting channels lack the tabular anastomozing shapes which are likely caused by shear deformation in nature. Therefore, both reaction-driven as well as stress-driven melt segregation have to interact in nature to form the observed dunite channels. Szymczak, P., and A. J. C. Ladd (2014), Reactive-infiltration instabilities in rocks. Part 2. Dissolution of a porous matrix, J. Fluid Mech., 738, 591-630. Pec, M., B. K. Holtzman, M. Zimmerman, and D. L. Kohlstedt (2015), Reaction infiltration instabilities in experiments on partially molten mantle rocks, Geology, 43(7), 575-578, doi:10.1130/G36611.1.

  9. Rotation of melting ice disks due to melt fluid flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorbolo, S; Adami, N; Dubois, C; Caps, H; Vandewalle, N; Darbois-Texier, B

    2016-03-01

    We report experiments concerning the melting of ice disks (85 mm in diameter and 14 mm in height) at the surface of a thermalized water bath. During the melting, the ice disks undergo translational and rotational motions. In particular, the disks rotate. The rotation speed has been found to increase with the bath temperature. We investigated the flow under the bottom face of the ice disks by a particle image velocimetry technique. We find that the flow goes downwards and also rotates horizontally, so that a vertical vortex is generated under the ice disk. The proposed mechanism is the following. In the vicinity of the bottom face of the disk, the water eventually reaches the temperature of 4 °C for which the water density is maximum. The 4 °C water sinks and generates a downwards plume. The observed vertical vorticity results from the flow in the plume. Finally, by viscous entrainment, the horizontal rotation of the flow induces the solid rotation of the ice block. This mechanism seems generic: any vertical flow that generates a vortex will induce the rotation of a floating object.

  10. Comparison between direct and indirect cooling core catchers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Jung Soo; Lee, Jong Ho; Bae, Byung Hwan [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    The European nuclear design requirements, which should be satisfied by nuclear reactors in Europe, usually recommend a so called core catcher, which is a molten core ex vessel cooling facility, to manage a severe accident at a nuclear reactor. Two different types of core catcher concepts are compared to determine their abilities to manage severe accidents and cool core melts. The study reveals that direct cooling is better for cooling capacity and is convenient to construct, while indirect cooling is better for the management of a severe accident.

  11. Thermal convection in Earth's inner core with phase change at its boundary

    CERN Document Server

    Deguen, Renaud; Cardin, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Inner core translation, with solidification on one hemisphere and melting on the other, provides a promising basis for understanding the hemispherical dichotomy of the inner core, as well as the anomalous stable layer observed at the base of the outer core - the F-layer - which might be sustained by continuous melting of inner core material. In this paper, we study in details the dynamics of inner core thermal convection when dynamically induced melting and freezing of the inner core boundary (ICB) are taken into account. If the inner core is unstably stratified, linear stability analysis and numerical simulations consistently show that the translation mode dominates only if the viscosity $\\eta$ is large enough, with a critical viscosity value, of order $3 10^{18}$ Pas, depending on the ability of outer core convection to supply or remove the latent heat of melting or solidification. If $\\eta$ is smaller, the dynamical effect of melting and freezing is small. Convection takes a more classical form, with a one...

  12. Effect of melting conditions on striae in iron-bearing silicate melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2012-01-01

    Chemical striae are present in a broad range of glass products, but due to their negative impact on e.g., the optical and mechanical properties, elimination of striae from melts is a key issue in glass technology. By varying melting temperatures, retentions times and redox conditions of an iron......-bearing calciumaluminosilicate melt, we quantify the effect of each of the three melting parameters on the stria content in the melt. The quantification of the stria content in the melt is conducted by means of image analysis on casted melt samples. We find that in comparison to an extension of retention time an increase...... factors such as compositional fluctuation of melts and bubbling due to iron reduction on the stria content. During the melting process, striae with a chemical gradient in a more mobile species equilibrate faster than striae caused by a chemical gradient in a less mobile species. The temperature and time...

  13. Charge Transport in Dendrimer Melt using Multiscale Modeling Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Bag, Saientan; Maiti, Prabal K

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present a theoretical calculation of the charge carrier mobility in two different dendrimeric melt system (Dendritic phenyl azomethine with Triphenyl amine core and Dendritic Carbazole with Cyclic Phenylazomethine as core), which have recently been reported1 to increase the efficiency of Dye-Sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) by interface modification. Our mobility calculation, which is a combination of molecular dynamics simulation, first principles calculation and kinetic Monte Carlo simulation, leads to mobilities that are in quantitative agreement with available experimental data. We also show how the mobility depends on the dendrimer generation. Furthermore, we examine the variation of mobility with external electric field and external reorganization energy. Physical mechanisms behind observed electric field and generation dependencies of mobility are also explored.

  14. Surface Temperature and Melt on the Greenland Ice Sheet, 2000 - 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Dorothy K.; Comiso, Josefino C.; Shuman, Christopher A.; Koeing, Lora S.; Box, Jason E.; DiGirolamo, Nicolo E.

    2012-01-01

    Enhanced melting along with surface-temperature increases measured using infrared satellite data, have been documented for the Greenland Ice Sheet. Recently we developed a climate-quality data record of ice-surface temperature (IST) of the Greenland Ice Sheet using the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) IST product -- http://modis-snow-ice.gsfc.nasa.gov.Using daily and mean-monthly MODIS IST maps from the data record we show maximum extent of melt for the ice sheet and its six major drainage basins for a 12-year period extending from March of 2000 through December of 2011. The duration of the melt season on the ice sheet varies in different drainage basins with some basins melting progressively earlier over the study period. Some (but not all) of the basins also show a progressively-longer duration of melt. The short time of the study period (approx 12 years) precludes an evaluation of statistically-significant trends. However the dataset provides valuable information on natural variability of IST, and on the ability of the MODIS instrument to capture changes in IST and melt conditions in different drainage basins of the ice sheet.

  15. Variability of Surface Temperature and Melt on the Greenland Ice Sheet, 2000-2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Dorothy K.; Comiso, Josefino, C.; Shuman, Christopher A.; Koenig, Lora S.; DiGirolamo, Nicolo E.

    2012-01-01

    Enhanced melting along with surface-temperature increases measured using infrared satellite data, have been documented for the Greenland Ice Sheet. Recently we developed a climate-quality data record of ice-surface temperature (IST) of the Greenland Ice Sheet using the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) 1ST product -- http://modis-snow-ice.gsfc.nasa.gov. Using daily and mean monthly MODIS 1ST maps from the data record we show maximum extent of melt for the ice sheet and its six major drainage basins for a 12-year period extending from March of 2000 through December of 2011. The duration of the melt season on the ice sheet varies in different drainage basins with some basins melting progressively earlier over the study period. Some (but not all) of the basins also show a progressively-longer duration of melt. The short time of the study period (approximately 12 years) precludes an evaluation of statistically-significant trends. However the dataset provides valuable information on natural variability of IST, and on the ability of the MODIS instrument to capture changes in IST and melt conditions indifferent drainage basins of the ice sheet.

  16. Gas-Cooled Reactor Programs annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1973. [HTGR fuel reprocessing, fuel fabrication, fuel irradiation, core materials, and fission product distribution; GCFR fuel irradiation and steam generator modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasten, P.R.; Coobs, J.H.; Lotts, A.L.

    1976-04-01

    Progress is summarized in studies relating to HTGR fuel reprocessing, refabrication, and recycle; HTGR fuel materials development and performance testing; HTGR PCRV development; HTGR materials investigations; HTGR fuel chemistry; HTGR safety studies; and GCFR irradiation experiments and steam generator modeling.

  17. Rheology of Melt-bearing Crustal Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, C. L.; Medvedev, S.; Handy, M. R.

    2006-12-01

    A review and reinterpretation of previous experimental data on the deformation of melt-bearing crustal rocks (Rosenberg and Handy, 2005) revealed that the relationship of aggregate strength to melt fraction is non-linear, even if plotted on a linear ordinate and abscissa. At melt fractions, Φ 0.07, the dependence of aggregate strength on Φ is significantly greater than at Φ > 0.07. This melt fraction (Φ= 0.07) marks the transition from a significant increase in the proportion of melt-bearing grain boundaries up to this point to a minor increase thereafter. Therefore, we suggest that the increase of melt-interconnectivity causes the dramatic strength drop between the solidus and a melt fraction of 0.07. A second strength drop occurs at higher melt fractions and corresponds to the breakdown of the solid (crystal) framework, corresponding to the well-known "rheologically critical melt percentage" (RCMP; Arzi, 1978). Although the strength drop at the RCMP is about 4 orders of magnitude, the absolute value of this drop is small compared to the absolute strength of the unmelted aggregate, rendering the RCMP invisible in a linear aggregate strength vs. melt fraction diagram. Predicting the rheological properties and thresholds of melt-bearing crust on the basis of the results and interpretations above is very difficult, because the rheological data base was obtained from experiments performed at undrained conditions in the brittle field. These conditions are unlikely to represent the flow of partially melted crust. The measured strength of most of the experimentally deformed, partially-melted samples corresponds to their maximum differential stress, before the onset of brittle failure, not to their viscous strength during "ductile" (viscous) flow. To overcome these problems, we extrapolated a theoretically-derived flow law for partially melted granite deforming by diffusion-accommodated grain-boundary sliding (Paterson, 2001) and an experimentally-derived flow law for

  18. Viscosity model for aluminosilicate melt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang G.H.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The structurally based viscosity model proposed in our previous study is extended to include more components, e.g. SiO2, Al2O3, FeO, MnO, MgO, CaO, Na2O and K2O. A simple method is proposed to calculate the numbers of different types of oxygen ions classified by the different cations they bonded with, which is used to characterize the influence of composition on viscosity. When dealing with the aluminosilicate melts containing several basic oxides, the priority order is established for different cations for charge compensating Al3+ ions, according to the coulombic force between cation and oxygen anion. It is indicated that basic oxides have two paradox influences on viscosity: basic oxide with a higher basicity decreases viscosity more greatly by forming weaker non-bridging oxygen bond; while it increases viscosity more greatly by forming stronger bridging oxygen bond in tetrahedron after charge compensating Al3+ ion. The present model can extrapolate its application range to the system without SiO2. Furthermore, it could also give a satisfy interpretation to the abnormal phenomenon that viscosity increases when adding K2O to CaO-Al2O3-SiO2 melt within a certain composition range.

  19. COMSORS: A light water reactor chemical core catcher

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Parker, G.W.; Rudolph, J.C.; Osborne-Lee, I.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Chemical Technology Div.; Kenton, M.A. [Creare Inc., Hanover, NH (United States)

    1997-02-24

    The Core-Melt Source Reduction System (COMSORS) is a new approach to terminate lightwater reactor (LWR) core-melt accidents and ensure containment integrity. A special dissolution glass made of lead oxide (PbO) and boron oxide (B{sub 2}O{sub 3}) is placed under the reactor vessel. If molten core debris is released onto the glass, the following sequence happens: (1) the glass absorbs decay heat as its temperature increases and the glass softens; (2) the core debris dissolves into the molten glass; (3) molten glass convective currents create a homogeneous high-level waste (HLW) glass; (4) the molten glass spreads into a wider pool, distributing the heat for removal by radiation to the reactor cavity above or transfer to water on top of the molten glass; and (5) the glass solidifies as increased surface cooling area and decreasing radioactive decay heat generation allows heat removal to exceed heat generation.

  20. Annual layering in the NGRIP ice core during the Eemian

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Anders; Bigler, Matthias; Kettner, Ernesto

    2011-01-01

    records and visual stratigraphy, and stratigraphic layer counting has been performed back to 60 ka. In the deepest part of the core, however, the ice is close to the pressure melting point, the visual stratigraphy is dominated by crystal boundaries, and annual layering is not visible to the naked eye....... In this study, we apply a newly developed setup for high-resolution ice core impurity analysis to produce continuous records of dust, sodium and ammonium concentrations as well as conductivity of melt water. We analyzed three 2.2m sections of ice from the Eemian and the glacial inception. In all of the analyzed......The Greenland NGRIP ice core continuously covers the period from present day back to 123 ka before present, which includes several thousand years of ice from the previous interglacial period, MIS 5e or the Eemian. In the glacial part of the core, annual layers can be identified from impurity...

  1. Divergent trajectories of Antarctic surface melt under two twenty-first-century climate scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trusel, Luke D.; Frey, Karen E.; Das, Sarah B.; Karnauskas, Kristopher B.; Kuipers Munneke, Peter; van Meijgaard, Erik; van den Broeke, Michiel R.

    2015-12-01

    Ice shelves modulate Antarctic contributions to sea-level rise and thereby represent a critical, climate-sensitive interface between the Antarctic ice sheet and the global ocean. Following rapid atmospheric warming over the past decades, Antarctic Peninsula ice shelves have progressively retreated, at times catastrophically. This decay supports hypotheses of thermal limits of viability for ice shelves via surface melt forcing. Here we use a polar-adapted regional climate model and satellite observations to quantify the nonlinear relationship between surface melting and summer air temperature. Combining observations and multimodel simulations, we examine melt evolution and intensification before observed ice shelf collapse on the Antarctic Peninsula. We then assess the twenty-first-century evolution of surface melt across Antarctica under intermediate and high emissions climate scenarios. Our projections reveal a scenario-independent doubling of Antarctic-wide melt by 2050. Between 2050 and 2100, however, significant divergence in melt occurs between the two climate scenarios. Under the high emissions pathway by 2100, melt on several ice shelves approaches or surpasses intensities that have historically been associated with ice shelf collapse, at least on the northeast Antarctic Peninsula.

  2. Snow Melting and Freezing on Older Townhouses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anker; Claesson, Johan

    2011-01-01

    The snowy winter of 2009/2010 in Scandinavia prompted many newspaper articles on icicles falling from buildings and the risk this presented for people walking below. The problem starts with snow melting on the roof due to heat loss from the building. Melt water runs down the roof and some...... of it will freeze on the overhang. The rest of the water will either run off or freeze in gutters and downpipes or turn into icicles. This paper describes use of a model for the melting and freezing of snow on roofs. Important parameters are roof length, overhang length, heat resistance of roof and overhang......, outdoor and indoor temperature, snow thickness and thermal conductivity. If the snow thickness is above a specific limit value – the snow melting limit- some of the snow will melt. Another interesting limit value is the dripping limit. All the melt water will freeze on the overhang, if the snow thickness...

  3. RHEOLOGY FEATURE OF SIMPLE METAL MELT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C.J. Sun; H.R. Geng; Y.S. Shen; X.Y. Teng; Z.X. Yang

    2007-01-01

    The rheology feature of Sb, Bi melt and alloys was studied using coaxial cylinder high-temperature viscometer. The results showed that the curve of torsion-rotational speed for Sb melt presents a linear relation in all measured temperature ranges, whereas for the Bi melt, the curve presents obvious non-Newtonian feature within the low temperature range and at relative high shear stress. The rheology feature of Sb80Bi20 and Sb20Bi80, alloy melts was well correlated with that of Sb and Bi, respectively. It is considered that the rheology behavior of Sb melt plays a crucial role in Sb80Bi20, alloy and that of Bi melt plays a crucial role in Sb20Bi80 alloy.

  4. Multiscale Models of Melting Arctic Sea Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    1 Multiscale Models of Melting Arctic Sea Ice Kenneth M. Golden University of Utah, Department of Mathematics phone: (801) 581-6851...feedback has played a major role in the recent declines of the summer Arctic sea ice pack. However, understanding the evolution of melt ponds and sea...Models of Melting Arctic Sea Ice 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER

  5. The Origin of the Compositional Diversity of Mercury's Surface Constrained From Experimental Melting of Enstatite Chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boujibar, A.; Righter, K.; Pando, K.; Danielson, L.

    2015-01-01

    Mercury is known as an endmember planet as it is the most reduced terrestrial planet with the highest core/mantle ratio. MESSENGER spacecraft has shown that its surface is FeO-poor (2-4 wt%) and Srich (up to 6-7 wt%), which confirms the reducing nature of its silicate mantle. Moreover, high resolution images revealed large volcanic plains and abundant pyroclastic deposits, suggesting important melting stages of the Mercurian mantle. This interpretation was confirmed by the high crustal thickness (up to 100 km) derived from Mercury's gravity field. This is also corroborated by a recent experimental result that showed that Mercurian partial melts are expected to be highly buoyant within the Mercurian mantle and could have risen from depths as high as the core-mantle boundary. In addition MESSENGER spacecraft provided relatively precise data on major elemental compositions of Mercury's surface. These results revealed important chemical and mineralogical heterogeneities that suggested several stages of differentiation and re-melting processes. However, the extent and nature of compositional variations produced by partial melting remains poorly constrained for the particular compositions of Mercury (very reducing conditions, low FeO-contents and high sulfur-contents). Therefore, in this study, we investigated the processes that lead to the various compositions of Mercury's surface. Melting experiments with bulk Mercury-analogue compositions were performed and compared to the compositions measured by MESSENGER.

  6. Imaging transient melting of a nanocrystal using an X-ray laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Jesse N; Beitra, Loren; Xiong, Gang; Fritz, David M; Lemke, Henrik T; Zhu, Diling; Chollet, Matthieu; Williams, Garth J; Messerschmidt, Marc M; Abbey, Brian; Harder, Ross J; Korsunsky, Alexander M; Wark, Justin S; Reis, David A; Robinson, Ian K

    2015-06-16

    There is a fundamental interest in studying photoinduced dynamics in nanoparticles and nanostructures as it provides insight into their mechanical and thermal properties out of equilibrium and during phase transitions. Nanoparticles can display significantly different properties from the bulk, which is due to the interplay between their size, morphology, crystallinity, defect concentration, and surface properties. Particularly interesting scenarios arise when nanoparticles undergo phase transitions, such as melting induced by an optical laser. Current theoretical evidence suggests that nanoparticles can undergo reversible nonhomogenous melting with the formation of a core-shell structure consisting of a liquid outer layer. To date, studies from ensembles of nanoparticles have tentatively suggested that such mechanisms are present. Here we demonstrate imaging transient melting and softening of the acoustic phonon modes of an individual gold nanocrystal, using an X-ray free electron laser. The results demonstrate that the transient melting is reversible and nonhomogenous, consistent with a core-shell model of melting. The results have implications for understanding transient processes in nanoparticles and determining their elastic properties as they undergo phase transitions.

  7. Impact Melt in Small Lunar Highlands Craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plescia, J. B.; Cintala, M. J.; Robinson, M. S.; Barnouin, O.; Hawke, B. R.

    2011-01-01

    Impact-melt deposits are a typical characteristic of complex impact craters, occurring as thick pools on the crater floor, ponds on wall terraces, veneers on the walls, and flows outside and inside the rim. Studies of the distribution of impact melt suggested that such deposits are rare to absent in and around small (km to sub-km), simple impact craters. noted that the smallest lunar crater observed with impact melt was approximately 750 m in diameter. Similarly, theoretical models suggest that the amount of melt formed is a tiny fraction (crater volume and thus significant deposits would not be expected for small lunar craters. LRO LROC images show that impact-melt deposits can be recognized associated with many simple craters to diameters down to approximately 200 m. The melt forms pools on the crater floor, veneer on the crater walls or ejecta outside the crater. Such melt deposits are relatively rare, and can be recognized only in some fresh craters. These observations indicate that identifiable quantities of impact melt can be produced in small impacts and the presence of such deposits shows that the material can be aggregated into recognizable deposits. Further, the present of such melt indicates that small craters could be reliably radiometrically dated helping to constrain the recent impact flux.

  8. Low Melt Height Solidification of Superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montakhab, Mehdi; Bacak, Mert; Balikci, Ercan

    2016-06-01

    Effect of a reduced melt height in the directional solidification of a superalloy has been investigated by two methods: vertical Bridgman (VB) and vertical Bridgman with a submerged baffle (VBSB). The latter is a relatively new technique and provides a reduced melt height ahead of the solidifying interface. A low melt height leads to a larger primary dendrite arm spacing but a lower mushy length, melt-back transition length, and porosity. The VBSB technique yields up to 38 pct reduction in the porosity. This may improve a component's mechanical strength especially in a creep-fatigue type dynamic loading.

  9. Solute Redistribution in Directional Melting Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@The solute redistribution in directional melting process is theoretically studied. Based on quantitative evaluations, uniform solute distribution in liquid and a quasi-steady solute distribution in solid are supposed. The discussion on the solute balance comes to a simple model for the solute redistribution in directional melting process. As an example, the variation of liquid composition during melting process of carbon steel is quantitatively evaluated using the model. Results show that the melting of an alloy starts at solidus temperature, but approaches the liquidus temperature after a very short transient process.

  10. Preliminary design report for SCDAP/RELAP5 lower core plate model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coryell, E.W. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab.; Griffin, F.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1998-07-01

    The SCDAP/RELAP5 computer code is a best-estimate analysis tool for performing nuclear reactor severe accident simulations. Under primary sponsorship of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is responsible for overall maintenance of this code and for improvements for pressurized water reactor (PWR) applications. Since 1991, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been improving SCDAP/RELAP5 for boiling water reactor (BWR) applications. The RELAP5 portion of the code performs the thermal-hydraulic calculations for both normal and severe accident conditions. The structures within the reactor vessel and coolant system can be represented with either RELAP5 heat structures or SCDAP/RELAP5 severe accident structures. The RELAP5 heat structures are limited to normal operating conditions (i.e., no structural oxidation, melting, or relocation), while the SCDAP portion of the code is capable of representing structural degradation and core damage progression that can occur under severe accident conditions. DCDAP/RELAP5 currently assumes that molten material which leaves the core region falls into the lower vessel head without interaction with structural materials. The objective of this design report is to describe the modifications required for SCDAP/RELAP5 to treat the thermal response of the structures in the core plate region as molten material relocates downward from the core, through the core plate region, and into the lower plenum. This has been a joint task between INEEL and ORNL, with INEEL focusing on PWR-specific design, and ORNL focusing upon the BWR-specific aspects. Chapter 2 describes the structures in the core plate region that must be represented by the proposed model. Chapter 3 presents the available information about the damage progression that is anticipated to occur in the core plate region during a severe accident, including typical SCDAP/RELAP5 simulation results. Chapter 4 provides a

  11. Dual-core antiresonant hollow core fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuesong; Fan, Zhongwei; Shi, Zhaohui; Ma, Yunfeng; Yu, Jin; Zhang, Jing

    2016-07-25

    In this work, dual-core antiresonant hollow core fibers (AR-HCFs) are numerically demonstrated, based on our knowledge, for the first time. Two fiber structures are proposed. One is a composite of two single-core nested nodeless AR-HCFs, exhibiting low confinement loss and a circular mode profile in each core. The other has a relatively simple structure, with a whole elliptical outer jacket, presenting a uniform and wide transmission band. The modal couplings of the dual-core AR-HCFs rely on a unique mechanism that transfers power through the air. The core separation and the gap between the two cores influence the modal coupling strength. With proper designs, both of the dual-core fibers can have low phase birefringence and short modal coupling lengths of several centimeters.

  12. Melting and Sintering of Ashes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lone Aslaug

    1997-01-01

    The thesis contains an experimental study of the fusion and sintering of ashes collected during straw and coal/straw co-firing.A laboratory technique for quantitative determination of ash fusion has been developed based on Simultaneous Thermal Analysis (STA). By means of this method the fraction...... of melt in the investigated ashes has been determined as a function of temperature. Ash fusion results have been correlated to the chemical and mineralogical composition of the ashes, to results from a standard ash fusion test and to results from sintering experiments. Furthermore, the ash fusion results......-firing, the model only had a qualitative agreement with the measured ash deposit formation rates.Sintering measurements were carried out by means of compression strength testing of ash pellets. This method showed to not be applicable for the salt rich fly ash derived from straw combustion. For the fly ashes...

  13. Applications of liquid state physics to the earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, D. J.

    1980-01-01

    New results derived for application to the earth's outer core using the modern theory of liquids and the hard-sphere model of liquid structure are presented. An expression derived in terms of the incompressibility and pressure is valid for a high-pressure liquid near its melting point, provided that the pressure is derived from a strongly repulsive pair potential; a relation derived between the melting point and density leads to a melting curve law of essentially the same form as Lindemann's law. Finally, it is shown that the 'core paradox' of Higgins and Kennedy (1971) can occur only if the Gruneisen parameter is smaller than 2/3, and this constant is larger than this value in any liquid for which the pair potential is strongly repulsive.

  14. Surface Quality Research for Selective Laser Melting of Ti-6Al-4V Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Król M.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the innovative technology of producing the components is Selective Laser Melting (SLM belongs to additive manufacturing techniques. SLM technology has already been successfully applied in the automotive, aerospace and medical industries. Despite progress in material flexibility and mechanical performances, relatively poor surface finish still presents a significant weakness in the SLM process.

  15. Thermal evolution and core formation of planetesimals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwa, Taichi; Nagahara, Hiroko

    2017-04-01

    Planetesimals did not get an adequate thermal energy by accretion to form large scale magma ocean because of smaller radii, masses, gravity and accretion energy, however, there are various evidences for the presence of core in planetesimals: 4-Vesta has a core and non-magmatic iron meteorites were segregated metal in bodies that did not experience silicate melting. It has been pointed out that accretion time of planetesimals controls melting and differentiation, because short lived nuclides are plausible heat source. Other factors such as radiative cooling from the surface and thermal conductivity, would also affect thermal evolution of planetesimals. Furthermore, percolation of Fe-S melt through silicate matrix is controlled by the porosity and grain size of silicates and dihedral angle between the melt and silicates. Therefore, the interior structure of planetesimals should be considered by taking the accretion, growth, and thermal evolution of the interior simultaneously. We make a numerical simulation with a spherical 1D model on the basis of the model by Neuman, which is a non-stationary heat conduction equation. We specifically pay attention to the process at temperatures between eutectic temperature Fe-FeS (1213K) and silicate solidus (1425K) and the surface tension of the melt that governs percolation. The model contains three free parameters, formation time, accretion duration, and final size of the planetesimals. The results show that the interior structure can be divided to four types: Type A is undifferentiated, Type B is differentiated to core and mantle of which core was formed by Fe-S melt percolation, Type C is partially differentiated to FeS core and mantle, where mantle retains residual Fe metal, and Type D is differentiated to core and mantle by metal separation in silicate magma. Type A would correspond to the parent bodies of chondrites, and Type B (and Type C?) core would be the source of non-magmatic iron meteorites. Type D would be parent

  16. Patterns in new dimensionless quantities containing melting temperature, and their dependence on pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. WALZER

    1980-06-01

    Full Text Available The relationships existing between melting temperature and other
    macroscopic physical quantities are investigated. A new dimensionless
    quantity Q(1 not containing the Grtineisen parameter proves to be suited for serving in future studies as a tool for the determination of the melting temperature in the outer core of the Earth. The pressure dependence of more general dimensionless quantities Q„ is determined analytically and, for the chemical elements, numerically, too. The patterns of various interesting dimensionless quantities are shown in the Periodic Table and compared.

  17. Melting temperatures of MgO under high pressure by micro-texture analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, T.; Ohfuji, H.; Nishi, M.; Irifune, T.

    2017-06-01

    Periclase (MgO) is the second most abundant mineral after bridgmanite in the Earth's lower mantle, and its melting behaviour under pressure is important to constrain rheological properties and melting behaviours of the lower mantle materials. Significant discrepancies exist between the melting temperatures of MgO determined by laser-heated diamond anvil cell (LHDAC) and those based on dynamic compressions and theoretical predictions. Here we show the melting temperatures in earlier LHDAC experiments are underestimated due to misjudgment of melting, based on micro-texture observations of the quenched samples. The high melting temperatures of MgO suggest that the subducted cold slabs should have higher viscosities than previously thought, suggesting that the inter-connecting textural feature of MgO would not play important roles for the slab stagnation in the lower mantle. The present results also predict that the ultra-deep magmas produced in the lower mantle are peridotitic, which are stabilized near the core-mantle boundary.

  18. A benchmark initiative on mantle convection with melting and melt segregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeling, Harro; Dannberg, Juliane; Dohmen, Janik; Kalousova, Klara; Maurice, Maxim; Noack, Lena; Plesa, Ana; Soucek, Ondrej; Spiegelman, Marc; Thieulot, Cedric; Tosi, Nicola; Wallner, Herbert

    2016-04-01

    In recent years a number of mantle convection models have been developed which include partial melting within the asthenosphere, estimation of melt volumes, as well as melt extraction with and without redistribution at the surface or within the lithosphere. All these approaches use various simplifying modelling assumptions whose effects on the dynamics of convection including the feedback on melting have not been explored in sufficient detail. To better assess the significance of such assumptions and to provide test cases for the modelling community we carry out a benchmark comparison. The reference model is taken from the mantle convection benchmark, cases 1a to 1c (Blankenbach et al., 1989), assuming a square box with free slip boundary conditions, the Boussinesq approximation, constant viscosity and Rayleigh numbers of 104 to 10^6. Melting is modelled using a simplified binary solid solution with linearly depth dependent solidus and liquidus temperatures, as well as a solidus temperature depending linearly on depletion. Starting from a plume free initial temperature condition (to avoid melting at the onset time) five cases are investigated: Case 1 includes melting, but without thermal or dynamic feedback on the convection flow. This case provides a total melt generation rate (qm) in a steady state. Case 2 is identical to case 1 except that latent heat is switched on. Case 3 includes batch melting, melt buoyancy (melt Rayleigh number Rm) and depletion buoyancy, but no melt percolation. Output quantities are the Nusselt number (Nu), root mean square velocity (vrms), the maximum and the total melt volume and qm approaching a statistical steady state. Case 4 includes two-phase flow, i.e. melt percolation, assuming a constant shear and bulk viscosity of the matrix and various melt retention numbers (Rt). These cases are carried out using the Compaction Boussinseq Approximation (Schmeling, 2000) or the full compaction formulation. For cases 1 - 3 very good agreement

  19. Core Forensics: Earth's Accretion and Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badro, J.; Brodholt, J. P.; Siebert, J.; Piet, H.; Ryerson, F. J.

    2013-12-01

    Earth's accretion and its primitive differentiation are intimately interlinked processes. One way to constrain accretionary processes is by looking at the major differentiation event that took place during accretion: core formation. Understanding core formation and core composition can certainly shed a new light on early and late accretionary processes. On the other hand, testing certain accretionary models and hypothesis (fluxes, chemistries, timing) allows -short of validating them- at the very least to unambiguously refute them, through the 'filter'' of core formation and composition. Earth's core formed during accretion as a result of melting, phase-separation, and segregation of accretionary building blocks (from meteorites to planetesimals). The bulk composition of the core and mantle depends on the evolution (pressure, temperature, composition) of core extraction during accretion. The entire process left a compositional imprint on both reservoirs: (1) in the silicate Earth, in terms of siderophile trace-element (Ni, Co, V, Cr, among others) concentrations and isotopic fractionation (Si, Cu, among others), a record that is observed in present-day mantle rocks; and (2) on the core, in terms of major element composition and light elements dissolved in the metal, a record that is observed by seismology through the core density-deficit. This imprint constitutes actually a fairly impressive set of evidence (siderophile element concentration and fractionation, volatile and siderophile element isotopic fractionation), can be used today to trace back the primordial processes that occurred 4.5 billion years ago. We are seeking to provide an overhaul of the standard core formation/composition models, by using a new rationale that bridges geophysics and geochemistry. The new ingredients are (1) new laser-heated diamond anvil cell partitioning data, dramatically extending the previous P-T conditions for experimental work, (2) ab initio molecular dynamics calculations to

  20. A computational model for viscous fluid flow, heat transfer, and melting in in situ vitrification melt pools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHugh, P.R.; Ramshaw, J.D.

    1991-11-01

    MAGMA is a FORTRAN computer code designed to viscous flow in in situ vitrification melt pools. It models three-dimensional, incompressible, viscous flow and heat transfer. The momentum equation is coupled to the temperature field through the buoyancy force terms arising from the Boussinesq approximation. All fluid properties, except density, are assumed variable. Density is assumed constant except in the buoyancy force terms in the momentum equation. A simple melting model based on the enthalpy method allows the study of the melt front progression and latent heat effects. An indirect addressing scheme used in the numerical solution of the momentum equation voids unnecessary calculations in cells devoid of liquid. Two-dimensional calculations can be performed using either rectangular or cylindrical coordinates, while three-dimensional calculations use rectangular coordinates. All derivatives are approximated by finite differences. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved using a new fully implicit iterative technique, while the energy equation is differenced explicitly in time. Spatial derivatives are written in conservative form using a uniform, rectangular, staggered mesh based on the marker and cell placement of variables. Convective terms are differenced using a weighted average of centered and donor cell differencing to ensure numerical stability. Complete descriptions of MAGMA governing equations, numerics, code structure, and code verification are provided. 14 refs.

  1. Bubble Formation in Basalt-like Melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin; Keding, Ralf; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2011-01-01

    The effect of the melting temperature on bubble size and bubble formation in an iron bearing calcium aluminosilicate melt is studied by means of in-depth images acquired by optical microscopy. The bubble size distribution and the total bubble volume are determined by counting the number of bubble...

  2. Bubble Formation in Basalt-like Melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin; Keding, Ralf; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2011-01-01

    The effect of the melting temperature on bubble size and bubble formation in an iron bearing calcium aluminosilicate melt is studied by means of in-depth images acquired by optical microscopy. The bubble size distribution and the total bubble volume are determined by counting the number of bubbles...

  3. Disordering and Melting of Aluminum Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoltze, Per; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet; Landman, U.

    1988-01-01

    We report on a molecular-dynamics simulation of an Al(110) surface using the effective-medium theory to describe the interatomic interactions. The surface region is found to start melting ≅200 K below the bulk melting temperature with a gradual increase in the thickness of the disordered layer as...

  4. Uniaxial Elongational viscosity of bidisperse polystyrene melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Kromann; Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Hassager, Ole

    2006-01-01

    The startup and steady uniaxial elongational viscosity have been measured for three bidisperse polystyrene (PS) melts, consisting of blends of monodisperse PS with molecular weights of 52 kg/mole or 103 kg/mole and 390 kg/mole. The bidisperse melts have a maximum in the steady elongational...

  5. Uniaxial Elongational viscosity of bidisperse polystyrene melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Kromann; Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Hassager, Ole

    2006-01-01

    The startup and steady uniaxial elongational viscosity have been measured for three bidisperse polystyrene (PS) melts, consisting of blends of monodisperse PS with molecular weights of 52 kg/mole or 103 kg/mole and 390 kg/mole. The bidisperse melts have a maximum in the steady elongational viscos...

  6. Stability of foams in silicate melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proussevitch, Alexander A.; Sahagian, Dork L.; Kutolin, Vladislav A.

    1993-12-01

    Bubble coalescence and the spontaneous disruption of high-porosity foams in silicate melts are the result of physical expulsion of interpore melt (syneresis) leading to bubble coalescence, and diffusive gas exchange between bubbles. Melt expulsion can be achieved either along films between pairs of bubbles, or along Plateau borders which represent the contacts between 3 or more bubbles. Theoretical evaluation of these mechanisms is confirmed by experimental results, enabling us to quantify the relevant parameters and determine stable bubble size and critical film thickness in a foam as a function of melt viscosity, surface tension, and time. Foam stability is controlled primarily by melt viscosity and time. Melt transport leading to coalescence of bubbles proceeds along inter-bubble films for smaller bubbles, and along Plateau borders for larger bubbles. Thus the average bubble size accelerates with time. In silicate melts, the diffusive gas expulsion out of a region of foam is effective only for water (and even then, only at small length scales), as the diffusion of CO 2 is negligible. The results of our analyses are applicable to studies of vesicularity of lavas, melt degassing, and eruption mechanisms.

  7. Purification of Niobium by Electron Beam Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, M.; Mirji, K. V.; Prasad, V. V. Satya; Baligidad, R. G.; Gokhale, A. A.

    2016-06-01

    Pure niobium metal, produced by alumino-thermic reduction of niobium oxide, contains various impurities which need to be reduced to acceptable levels to obtain aerospace grade purity. In the present work, an attempt has been made to refine niobium metals by electron beam drip melting technique to achieve purity confirming to the ASTM standard. Input power to the electron gun and melt rate were varied to observe their combined effect on extend of refining and loss of niobium. Electron beam (EB) melting is shown to reduce alkali metals, trace elements and interstitial impurities well below the specified limits. The reduction in the impurities during EB melting is attributed to evaporation and degassing due to the combined effect of high vacuum and high melt surface temperature. The % removal of interstitial impurities is essentially a function of melt rate and input power. As the melt rate decreases or input power increases, the impurity levels in the solidified niobium ingot decrease. The EB refining process is also accompanied by considerable amount of niobium loss, which is attributed to evaporation of pure niobium and niobium sub-oxide. Like other impurities, Nb loss increases with decreasing melt rate or increase in input power.

  8. Shock-induced melting and rapid solidification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nellis, W.J.; Gourdin, W.H.; Maple, M.B.

    1987-08-01

    Model calculations are presented to estimate that approx.50 GPa is required to completely shock melt metal powders with quenching at rates up to 10/sup 8/ K/s. Experiments are discussed for powders of a Cu-Zr alloy compacted in the usual way at 16 GPa and melted by shocking to 60 GPa. 12 refs.

  9. Animal MRI Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Animal Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Core develops and optimizes MRI methods for cardiovascular imaging of mice and rats. The Core provides imaging expertise,...

  10. Size-dependent melting of Bi nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, E. A.; Efremov, M. Yu.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Z.; Allen, L. H.

    2005-02-01

    Nanocalorimetry was used to investigate the melting of Bi nanoparticles. The particles were formed by evaporating Bi onto a silicon nitride substrate, which was then heated. The particles self-assemble into truncated spherical particles. Below 5-nm average film thickness, mean particle sizes increased linearly with deposition thickness but increased rapidly for 10-nm-thick films. As expected, small particles were found to exhibit size-dependent melting temperatures less than the bulk melting temperature (e.g., ΔT =67K for a 3-nm radius particle). The measured melting temperatures for particles below ˜7nm in radius, however, were ˜50K above the value predicted by the homogeneous melting model. We discuss this discrepancy in terms of a possible size-dependent crystal structure change and the superheating of the solid phase.

  11. Nanotexturing of surfaces to reduce melting point.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Ernest J.; Zubia, David (University of Texas at El Paso El Paso, TX); Mireles, Jose (Universidad Aut%C3%94onoma de Ciudad Ju%C3%94arez Ciudad Ju%C3%94arez, Mexico); Marquez, Noel (University of Texas at El Paso El Paso, TX); Quinones, Stella (University of Texas at El Paso El Paso, TX)

    2011-11-01

    This investigation examined the use of nano-patterned structures on Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) material to reduce the bulk material melting point (1414 C). It has been found that sharp-tipped and other similar structures have a propensity to move to the lower energy states of spherical structures and as a result exhibit lower melting points than the bulk material. Such a reduction of the melting point would offer a number of interesting opportunities for bonding in microsystems packaging applications. Nano patterning process capabilities were developed to create the required structures for the investigation. One of the technical challenges of the project was understanding and creating the specialized conditions required to observe the melting and reshaping phenomena. Through systematic experimentation and review of the literature these conditions were determined and used to conduct phase change experiments. Melting temperatures as low as 1030 C were observed.

  12. Volatile diffusion in silicate melts and its effects on melt inclusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Scarlato

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available A compendium of diffusion measurements and their Arrhenius equations for water, carbon dioxide, sulfur, fluorine, and chlorine in silicate melts similar in composition to natural igneous rocks is presented. Water diffusion in silicic melts is well studied and understood, however little data exists for melts of intermediate to basic compositions. The data demonstrate that both the water concentration and the anhydrous melt composition affect the diffusion coefficient of water. Carbon dioxide diffusion appears only weakly dependent, at most, on the volatilefree melt composition and no effect of carbon dioxide concentration has been observed, although few experiments have been performed. Based upon one study, the addition of water to rhyolitic melts increases carbon dioxide diffusion by orders of magnitude to values similar to that of 6 wt% water. Sulfur diffusion in intermediate to silicic melts depends upon the anhydrous melt composition and the water concentration. In water-bearing silicic melts sulfur diffuses 2 to 3 orders of magnitude slower than water. Chlorine diffusion is affected by both water concentration and anhydrous melt composition; its values are typically between those of water and sulfur. Information on fluorine diffusion is rare, but the volatile-free melt composition exerts a strong control on its diffusion. At the present time the diffusion of water, carbon dioxide, sulfur and chlorine can be estimated in silicic melts at magmatic temperatures. The diffusion of water and carbon dioxide in basic to intermediate melts is only known at a limited set of temperatures and compositions. The diffusion data for rhyolitic melts at 800°C together with a standard model for the enrichment of incompatible elements in front of growing crystals demonstrate that rapid crystal growth, greater than 10-10 ms-1, can significantly increase the volatile concentrations at the crystal-melt interface and that any of that melt trapped

  13. Melt Rate Improvement for DWPF MB3: Melt Rate Furnace Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, M.E.

    2001-07-24

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) would like to increase its canister production rate. The goal of this study is to improve the melt rate in DWPF specifically for Macrobatch 3. However, the knowledge gained may result in improved melting efficiencies translating to future DWPF macrobatches and in higher throughput for other Department of Energy's (DOE) melters. Increased melting efficiencies decrease overall operational costs by reducing the immobilization campaign time for a particular waste stream. For melt rate limited systems, a small increase in melting efficiency translates into significant hard dollar savings by reducing life cycle operational costs.

  14. Partitioning coefficients between olivine and silicate melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bédard, J. H.

    2005-08-01

    Variation of Nernst partition coefficients ( D) between olivine and silicate melts cannot be neglected when modeling partial melting and fractional crystallization. Published natural and experimental olivine/liquidD data were examined for covariation with pressure, temperature, olivine forsterite content, and melt SiO 2, H 2O, MgO and MgO/MgO + FeO total. Values of olivine/liquidD generally increase with decreasing temperature and melt MgO content, and with increasing melt SiO 2 content, but generally show poor correlations with other variables. Multi-element olivine/liquidD profiles calculated from regressions of D REE-Sc-Y vs. melt MgO content are compared to results of the Lattice Strain Model to link melt MgO and: D0 (the strain compensated partition coefficient), EM3+ (Young's Modulus), and r0 (the size of the M site). Ln D0 varies linearly with Ln MgO in the melt; EM3+ varies linearly with melt MgO, with a dog-leg at ca. 1.5% MgO; and r0 remains constant at 0.807 Å. These equations are then used to calculate olivine/liquidD for these elements using the Lattice Strain Model. These empirical parameterizations of olivine/liquidD variations yield results comparable to experimental or natural partitioning data, and can easily be integrated into existing trace element modeling algorithms. The olivine/liquidD data suggest that basaltic melts in equilibrium with pure olivine may acquire small negative Ta-Hf-Zr-Ti anomalies, but that negative Nb anomalies are unlikely to develop. Misfits between results of the Lattice Strain Model and most light rare earth and large ion lithophile partitioning data suggest that kinetic effects may limit the lower value of D for extremely incompatible elements in natural situations characterized by high cooling/crystallization rates.

  15. Melt and Chemical Transport in the Mantle: Insights from Deglaciation-Induced Melting Perturbations in Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eason, D. E.; Ito, G.; Sinton, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    Eruptive products represent a time-averaged view of the melting region and melt migration processes, making numerous fundamental parameters of the melt system difficult to constrain. Temporal and spatial variations in melting provide potential windows into this obscure region of the Earth by preferentially sampling melts from different regions of the mantle or mixing melts over different length-scales. We present a newly extended geochemical time series from the Western Volcanic Zone (WVZ) of Iceland, which experienced a short-lived melting perturbation due to glacial unloading during the last major deglaciation (~15-10 ka). Glacial unloading during this period led to increased degrees of melting particularly in the shallow mantle, which is manifest as an observed increase in volcanic production up to 30 times the steady-state value, decreased levels of highly to moderately incompatible element ratios (e.g., a 35-50% decrease in Nb/Y, with the greatest change occurring in the northernmost WVZ), and elevated SiO2 and CaO concentrations (~0.8 wt. % and ~1.9 wt. % increase in average oxide concentrations respectively) during and immediately following deglaciation. Although eruptive productivity returns to steady-state values within ~3000 yr following deglaciation, the incompatible element concentrations in erupted lavas gradually increase throughout the post-glacial period. We exploit this short-lived melting perturbation to examine and constrain knowledge of fundamental characteristics of melt generation and transport, including mantle permeability, melt ascent rates, depth-dependent melting functions (dF/dP), and the nature of chemical transport and melt mixing in the system. Using conservation equations describing the generation and porous flow of melt in a viscous matrix, we model melt migration in the mantle during and after ice sheet removal, as well as trace element transport for both equilibrium and disequilibrium transport end members. The predicted

  16. Silicate melts density, buoyancy relations and the dynamics of magmatic processes in the upper mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Valle, Carmen; Malfait, Wim J.

    2016-04-01

    Although silicate melts comprise only a minor volume fraction of the present day Earth, they play a critical role on the Earth's geochemical and geodynamical evolution. Their physical properties, namely the density, are a key control on many magmatic processes, including magma chamber dynamics and volcanic eruptions, melt extraction from residual rocks during partial melting, as well as crystal settling and melt migration. However, the quantitative modeling of these processes has been long limited by the scarcity of data on the density and compressibility of volatile-bearing silicate melts at relevant pressure and temperature conditions. In the last decade, new experimental designs namely combining large volume presses and synchrotron-based techniques have opened the possibility for determining in situ the density of a wide range of dry and volatile-bearing (H2O and CO2) silicate melt compositions at high pressure-high temperature conditions. In this contribution we will illustrate some of these progresses with focus on recent results on the density of dry and hydrous felsic and intermediate melt compositions (rhyolite, phonolite and andesite melts) at crustal and upper mantle conditions (up to 4 GPa and 2000 K). The new data on felsic-intermediate melts has been combined with in situ data on (ultra)mafic systems and ambient pressure dilatometry and sound velocity data to calibrate a continuous, predictive density model for hydrous and CO2-bearing silicate melts with applications to magmatic processes down to the conditions of the mantle transition zone (up to 2773 K and 22 GPa). The calibration dataset consist of more than 370 density measurements on high-pressure and/or water-and CO2-bearing melts and it is formulated in terms of the partial molar properties of the oxide components. The model predicts the density of volatile-bearing liquids to within 42 kg/m3 in the calibration interval and the model extrapolations up to 3000 K and 100 GPa are in good agreement

  17. Dynamic melting and impurity particle tracking in continuously adjustable AC magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojarevics, V.; Pericleous, K.

    2016-07-01

    The analysis of semi-levitation melting is extended to account for the presence of particles (impurities, broken metal dendrite agglomerates, bubbles) during the full melting cycle simulated numerically using the pseudo-spectral schemes. The AC coil is dynamically moving with the melt front progress, while the generated Joule heat serves to enhance the melting rate. The electromagnetic force is decomposed into the time average and the oscillating parts. The time average effects on the particle transport are investigated previously using approximations derived for a locally uniform magnetic field. This paper presents expressions for the skin-layer type of the AC force containing also the pulsating part which contributes to the particle drag by the ‘history’ and ‘added mass’ contributions. The intense turbulence in the bulk of molten metal additionally contributes to the particle dispersion. The paper attempts to demonstrate the importance of each of the mentioned effects onto the particle transport during the melting until the final pouring stage. The method could be extended to similar AC field controlled melting/solidification processes.

  18. Observation of melt onset on multiyear Arctic sea ice using the ERS 1 synthetic aperture radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winebrenner, D. P.; Nelson, E. D.; Colony, R.; West, R. D.

    1994-01-01

    We present nearly coincident observations of backscattering from the Earth Remote-Sensing Satellite (ERS) 1 synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and of near-surface temperature from six drifting buoys in the Beaufort Sea, showing that the onset of melting in snow on multiyear sea ice is clearly detectable in the SAR data. Melt onset is marked by a clean, steep decrease in the backscattering cross section of multiyear ice at 5.3 GHz and VV polarization. We investigate the scattering physics responsible for the signature change and find that the cross section decrease is due solely to the appearance of liquid water in the snow cover overlying the ice. A thin layer of moist snow is sufficient to cause the observed decrease. We present a prototype algorithm to estimate the date of melt onset using the ERS 1 SAR and apply the algorithm first to the SAR data for which we have corresponding buoy temperatures. The melt onset dates estimated by the SAR algorithm agree with those obtained independently from the temperature data to within 4 days or less, with the exception of one case in which temperatures oscillated about 0 C for several weeks. Lastly, we apply the algorithm to the entire ERS 1 SAR data record acquired by the Alaska SAR Facility for the Beaufort Sea north of 73 deg N during the spring of 1992, to produce a map of the dates of melt onset over an area roughly 1000 km on a side. The progression of melt onset is primarily poleward but shows a weak meridional dependence at latitudes of approximately 76 deg-77 deg N. Melting begins in the southern part of the study region on June 13 and by June 20 has progressed to the northermost part of the region.

  19. Observation of melt onset on multiyear Arctic sea ice using the ERS 1 synthetic aperture radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winebrenner, D. P.; Nelson, E. D.; Colony, R.; West, R. D.

    1994-01-01

    We present nearly coincident observations of backscattering from the Earth Remote-Sensing Satellite (ERS) 1 synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and of near-surface temperature from six drifting buoys in the Beaufort Sea, showing that the onset of melting in snow on multiyear sea ice is clearly detectable in the SAR data. Melt onset is marked by a clean, steep decrease in the backscattering cross section of multiyear ice at 5.3 GHz and VV polarization. We investigate the scattering physics responsible for the signature change and find that the cross section decrease is due solely to the appearance of liquid water in the snow cover overlying the ice. A thin layer of moist snow is sufficient to cause the observed decrease. We present a prototype algorithm to estimate the date of melt onset using the ERS 1 SAR and apply the algorithm first to the SAR data for which we have corresponding buoy temperatures. The melt onset dates estimated by the SAR algorithm agree with those obtained independently from the temperature data to within 4 days or less, with the exception of one case in which temperatures oscillated about 0 C for several weeks. Lastly, we apply the algorithm to the entire ERS 1 SAR data record acquired by the Alaska SAR Facility for the Beaufort Sea north of 73 deg N during the spring of 1992, to produce a map of the dates of melt onset over an area roughly 1000 km on a side. The progression of melt onset is primarily poleward but shows a weak meridional dependence at latitudes of approximately 76 deg-77 deg N. Melting begins in the southern part of the study region on June 13 and by June 20 has progressed to the northermost part of the region.

  20. Viscosity of ring polymer melts

    KAUST Repository

    Pasquino, Rossana

    2013-10-15

    We have measured the linear rheology of critically purified ring polyisoprenes, polystyrenes, and polyethyleneoxides of different molar masses. The ratio of the zero-shear viscosities of linear polymer melts η0,linear to their ring counterparts η0,ring at isofrictional conditions is discussed as a function of the number of entanglements Z. In the unentangled regime η0,linear/η 0,ring is virtually constant, consistent with the earlier data, atomistic simulations, and the theoretical expectation η0,linear/ η0,ring = 2. In the entanglement regime, the Z-dependence of ring viscosity is much weaker than that of linear polymers, in qualitative agreement with predictions from scaling theory and simulations. The power-law extracted from the available experimental data in the rather limited range 1 < Z < 20, η0,linear/η0,ring ∼ Z 1.2±0.3, is weaker than the scaling prediction (η0,linear/η0,ring ∼ Z 1.6±0.3) and the simulations (η0,linear/ η0,ring ∼ Z2.0±0.3). Nevertheless, the present collection of state-of-the-art experimental data unambiguously demonstrates that rings exhibit a universal trend clearly departing from that of their linear counterparts, and hence it represents a major step toward resolving a 30-year-old problem. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  1. Core formation, evolution, and convection - A geophysical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruff, L.; Anderson, D. L.

    1980-01-01

    A model for the formation and evolution of the earth's core, which provides an adequate energy source for maintaining the geodynamo, is proposed. A modified inhomogeneous accretion model is proposed which leads to initial iron and refractory enrichment at the center of the planet. The probable heat source for melting of the core is the decay of Al-26. The refractory material is emplaced irregularly in the lowermost mantle with uranium and thorium serving as a long-lived heat source. Fluid motions in the core are driven by the differential heating from above and the resulting cyclonic motions may be the source of the geodynamo.

  2. Core formation, evolution, and convection: A geophysical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruff, L.; Anderson, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    A model is proposed for the formation and evolution of the Earth's core which provides an adequate energy source for maintaining the geodynamo. A modified inhomogeneous accretion model is proposed which leads to initial iron and refractory enrichment at the center of the planet. The probable heat source for melting of the core is the decay of Al. The refractory material is emplaced irregularly in the lowermost mantle with uranium and thorium serving as a long lived heat source. Fluid motions in the core are driven by the differential heating from above and the resulting cyclonic motions may be the source of the geodynamo.

  3. Progress in Fabrication of Gold and Silver Nanoparticles Coated Core-shell Microspheres%金、银纳米粒子包覆核壳结构微球的制备与研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晨; 古宏晨

    2011-01-01

    金、银纳米粒子包覆的核-壳结构微球在众多领域具有许多潜在的应用功能,也是近几年来的一个研究热点。本文分析和讨论了金、银纳米粒子包覆的核-壳结构微球的制备方法,包括静电自组装法、原位还原法、晶种生长法、化学镀法、超声法、一步合成法等;简述了金、银纳米粒子包覆的核壳结构微球的优异性能及其应用,并对其发展前景进行了展望。%Gold and silver nanoparticles coated core-shell microspheres have drew much attention in many areas due to their diverse potential applications.In this paper,several fabrication strategies are analyzed and discussed,including the electrostatic self-assembly,in-situ reduction,seeding,electroless plating,ultrasonic method,and one-pot synthesis method.The outstanding properties and applications of gold and silver nanoparticles coated core-shell microspheres are briefly summarized and their prospect is also addressed.

  4. OSCILLATORY SHEAR-ACCELERATED EXFOLIATION OF GRAPHITE IN POLYPROPYLENE MELT DURING INJECTION MOLDING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nan Li; Wei Cheng; Kun Ren; Feng Luo; Ke Wang; Qiang Fu

    2013-01-01

    In this study,good dispersion status of graphite in a nonpolar,intractable polymer,i.e.polypropylene (PP),was realized in melt processing by using a specific dynamic packing injection molding (DPIM) technique.The exfoliation extent of graphite increased remarkably from the skin zone to the core zone of the molded part,as confirmed by combination of WAXD,SEM and TEM analyses,indicating an accelerated exfoliation occurred during the DPIM processing.This phenomenon is due to decreased melt flow channel and increased melt viscosity as the solidification takes place from the wall into the center,which leads to greatly increased shear force.The good dispersion of graphite results in obvious reinforcements of both tensile strength and impact strength by adding moderate amount of graphite.The present study proposes a promising route for realizing the large-scale fabrication of structural parts of polymer/exfoliated-graphite nanocomposites with excellent mechanical properties.

  5. Eemian interglacial reconstructed from a Greenland folded ice core

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl-Jensen, D.; Albert, M.R.; Aldahan, A.

    2013-01-01

    , the thickness of the northwest Greenland ice sheet decreased by 400 ± 250 metres, reaching surface elevations 122,000 years ago of 130 ± 300 metres lower than the present. Extensive surface melt occurred at the NEEM site during the Eemian, a phenomenon witnessed when melt layers formed again at NEEM during......Efforts to extract a Greenland ice core with a complete record of the Eemian interglacial (130,000 to 115,000 years ago) have until now been unsuccessful. The response of the Greenland ice sheet to the warmer-than-present climate of the Eemian has thus remained unclear. Here we present the new...... North Greenland Eemian Ice Drilling ('NEEM') ice core and show only a modest ice-sheet response to the strong warming in the early Eemian. We reconstructed the Eemian record from folded ice using globally homogeneous parameters known from dated Greenland and Antarctic ice-core records. On the basis...

  6. Production of Integrated Automotive Part in High Pressure Diecasting Process Using Salt Core

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ki-Bae Kim; Hyun-Kwang Seok; Jun-Su Kim

    2004-01-01

    A new concept of salt core, a melting temperature of which is lower than the solidus temperature of cast alloy,was introduced to produce an integrated casting part having a complicated inner shape or requiring under-cut in high pressure die casting or squeeze casting process. A salt core, named a fusible core in this paper because the salt core can be easily extracted just as holding at a temperature under a solidus temperature of a casting alloy, was developed and applied to produce a fuel control part for automotive GDI engine in high pressure diecasting machine. A different salt material of a lower melting temperature than that of A1 alloy was mixed with a different ceramic particulate to improve a thermo-physical property of fusible core. The thermo-physical property of the fusible core was measured and a weight faction of the ceramic particulate was optimized. The selected core materials were poured in metallic mold by gravity to produce a fusible core for a fuel control part for automotive GDI engine. The fuel control part, which the fusible core was included inside, was successful to fabricate in a conventional diecasting machine with no melting of fusible core during casting.

  7. Deformation-aided segregation of Fe-S liquid from olivine under deep Earth conditions: Implications for core formation in the early solar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Madeleine T. L.; Bromiley, Geoffrey D.; Butler, Ian B.; Frost, Mungo; Bradley, Robert; Carr, James; Le Godec, Yann; Montési, Laurent G. J.; Zhu, Wenlu; Miller, Kevin; Perrillat, Jean-Philippe; Mariani, Elisabetta; Tatham, Daniel; Redfern, Simon A. T.

    2017-02-01

    The planets and larger rocky bodies of the inner solar system are differentiated, and consist of metallic, iron-rich cores surrounded by thick shells of silicate. Core formation in these bodies, i.e. the segregation of metal from silicate, was a key process in the early solar system, and one which left a lasting geochemical signature. It is commonly assumed that extensive silicate melting and formation of deep magma oceans was required to initiate core formation, due to the inability of iron-rich melts to segregate from a solid silicate matrix. Here we assess the role of deformation in aiding segregation of core-forming melts from solid silicate under conditions of planetary deep interiors. Low-strain rate, high-pressure/temperature deformation experiments and high-resolution 2-D and 3-D textural analysis demonstrate that deformation fundamentally alters iron-rich melt geometry, promoting wetting of silicate grain boundaries and formation of extensive micron to sub-micron width Fe-rich melt bands. Deformation-aided Fe-S melt networks noted here contrast those observed in higher finite strain experiments conducted at lower pressure, and may reveal either an alternative mechanism for melt segregation at higher pressures, or an early stage process of melt segregation. Results suggest, however, that core-mantle chemical equilibration cannot be assumed in models of planetary formation, and that instead, the chemistry of rocky planets may record a complex, multi-stage process of core formation.

  8. Simulation of heat and mass transfer processes in molten core debris-concrete systems. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felde, D K

    1979-01-01

    The heat and mass transport phenomena taking place in volumetrically-heated fluids have become of interest in recent years due to their significance in assessments of fast reactor safety and post-accident heat removal (PAHR). Following a hypothetical core disruptive accident (HCDA), the core and reactor internals may melt down. The core debis melting through the reactor vessel and guard vessel may eventually contact the concrete of the reactor cell floor. The interaction of the core debris with the concrete as well as the melting of the debris pool into the concrete will significantly affect efforts to prevent breaching of the containment and the resultant release of radioactive effluents to the environment.

  9. Rapidly solidified titanium alloys by melt overflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspar, Thomas A.; Bruce, Thomas J., Jr.; Hackman, Lloyd E.; Brasmer, Susan E.; Dantzig, Jonathan A.; Baeslack, William A., III

    1989-01-01

    A pilot plant scale furnace was designed and constructed for casting titanium alloy strips. The furnace combines plasma arc skull melting techniques with melt overflow rapid solidification technology. A mathematical model of the melting and casting process was developed. The furnace cast strip of a suitable length and width for use with honeycomb structures. Titanium alloys Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-14Al-21 Nb were successfully cast into strips. The strips were evaluated by optical metallography, microhardness measurements, chemical analysis, and cold rolling.

  10. Physics of the Lindemann melting rule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawson, Andrew C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the thermodynamics of melting for 74 distinct chemical elements including several actinides and rare earths. We find that the observed melting points are consistent with a linear relationship between the correlation entropy of the liquid and the Grueneisen constant of the solid, and that the Lindemann rule is well obeyed for the elements with simple structures and less well obeyed for the less symmetric more open structures. No special assumptions are required to explain the melting points of the rare earths or light actinides.

  11. Melt processed high-temperature superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    1993-01-01

    The achievement of large critical currents is critical to the applications of high-temperature superconductors. Recent developments have shown that melt processing is suitable for producing high J c oxide superconductors. Using magnetic forces between such high J c oxide superconductors and magnets, a person could be levitated.This book has grown largely out of research works on melt processing of high-temperature superconductors conducted at ISTEC Superconductivity Research Laboratory. The chapters build on melt processing, microstructural characterization, fundamentals of flux pinning, criti

  12. OECD MCCI project Melt Eruption Test (MET) design report, Rev. 2. April 15, 2003.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

    2011-05-23

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction (MCCI) program is pursuing separate effect tests to examine the viability of the melt coolability mechanisms identified as part of the MACE program. These mechanisms include bulk cooling, water ingression, volcanic eruptions, and crust breach. At the second PRG meeting held at ANL on 22-23 October 2002, a preliminary design1 for a separate effects test to investigate the melt eruption cooling mechanism was presented for PRG review. At this meeting, NUPEC made several recommendations on the experiment approach aimed at optimizing the chances of achieving a floating crust boundary condition in this test. The principal recommendation was to incorporate a mortar sidewall liner into the test design, since data from the COTELS experiment program indicates that corium does not form a strong mechanical bond with this material. Other recommendations included: (i) reduction of the electrode elevation to well below the melt upper surface elevation (since the crust may bond to these solid surfaces), and (ii) favorably taper the mortar liner to facilitate crust detachment and relocation during the experiment. Finally, as a precursor to implementing these modifications, the PRG recommended the development of a design for a small-scale scoping test intended to verify the ability of the mortar liner to preclude formation of an anchored bridge crust under core-concrete interaction conditions. This revised Melt Eruption Test (MET) plan is intended to

  13. Engineered Magnetic Core-Shell Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi Nikje, Mir Mohammad; Vakili, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, engineered magnetic core-shell structures are playing an important role in the wide range of various applications. These magnetic core-shell structures have attracted considerable attention because of their unique properties and various applications. Also, the synthesis of engineered magnetic core-shell structures has attracted practical interest because of potential applications in areas such as ferrofluids, medical imaging, drug targeting and delivery, cancer therapy, separations, and catalysis. So far a large number of engineered magnetic core-shell structures have been successfully synthesized. This review article focuses on the recent progress in synthesis and characterization of engineered magnetic core-shell structures. Also, this review gives a brief description of the various application of these structures. It is hoped that this review will play some small part in helping future developments in important field.

  14. Diffusive loss of argon in response to melt vein formation in polygenetic impact melt breccias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Cameron M.; Hodges, Kip V.

    2017-08-01

    Many planetary surfaces in the solar system have experienced prolonged bombardment. With each impact, new rocks can be assembled that incorporate freshly generated impact melts with fragments of older rocks. Some breccias can become polygenetic, containing multiple generations of impact melt products, and can potentially provide important insights into the extensive bombardment history of a region. However, the amount of chronological information that can be extracted from such samples depends on how well the mineral isotopic systems of geochronometers can preserve the ages of individual melt generations without being disturbed by younger events. We model the thermal evolution of impact melt veins and the resulting loss of Ar from K-bearing phases common in impact melt breccias to assess the potential for preserving the 40Ar/39Ar ages of individual melt generations. Our model results demonstrate that millimeter-scale, clast-free melt veins cause significant heating of adjacent host rock minerals and can cause detectable Ar loss in contact zones that are generally thinner than, and at most about the same thickness as, the vein width. The incorporation of cold clasts in melt veins reduces the magnitudes of heating and Ar loss in the host rocks, and Ar loss can be virtually undetectable for sufficiently clast-rich veins. Quantitative evidence of the timing of impacts, as measured with the 40Ar/39Ar method, can be preserved in polygenetic impact melt breccias, particularly for those containing millimeter-scale bodies of clast-bearing melt products.

  15. Oxidation effect on steel corrosion and thermal loads during corium melt in-vessel retention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granovsky, V.S.; Khabensky, V.B.; Krushinov, E.V.; Vitol, S.A.; Sulatsky, A.A.; Almjashev, V.I. [Alexandrov Scientific-Research Technology Institute (NITI), Sosnovy Bor (Russian Federation); Bechta, S.V. [KTH, Stockholm (Sweden); Gusarov, V.V. [SPb State Technology University (SPbGTU), St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Barrachin, M. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), St Paul lez Durance (France); Bottomley, P.D., E-mail: paul.bottomley@ec.europa.eu [EC-Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU), Karlsruhe (Germany); Fischer, M. [AREVA GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Piluso, P. [Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives (CEA), Cadarache, St Paul lez Durance (France)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • The METCOR facility simulates vessel steel corrosion in contact with corium. • Steel corrosion rates in UO{sub 2+x}–ZrO{sub 2}–FeO{sub y} coria accelerate above 1050 K. • However corrosion rates can also be limited by melt O{sub 2} supply. • The impact of this on in-vessel retention (IVR) strategy is discussed. - Abstract: During a severe accident with core meltdown, the in-vessel molten core retention is challenged by the vessel steel ablation due to thermal and physicochemical interaction of melt with steel. In accidents with oxidizing atmosphere above the melt surface, a low melting point UO{sub 2+x}–ZrO{sub 2}–FeO{sub y} corium pool can form. In this case ablation of the RPV steel interacting with the molten corium is a corrosion process. Experiments carried out within the International Scientific and Technology Center's (ISTC) METCOR Project have shown that the corrosion rate can vary and depends on both surface temperature of the RPV steel and oxygen potential of the melt. If the oxygen potential is low, the corrosion rate is controlled by the solid phase diffusion of Fe ions in the corrosion layer. At high oxygen potential and steel surface layer temperature of 1050 °C and higher, the corrosion rate intensifies because of corrosion layer liquefaction and liquid phase diffusion of Fe ions. The paper analyzes conditions under which corrosion intensification occurs and can impact on in-vessel melt retention (IVR)

  16. The Reaction of Carbonates in Contact with Superheated Silicate Melts: New Insights from MEMIN Laser Melting Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, C.; Hecht, L.; Schäffer, S.; Deutsch, A.; Lexow, B.

    2016-08-01

    The reaction of carbonates in contact with silicate impact melts is discussed quite controversially in the impact community. Here, we discuss four MEMIN laser melting experiments involving carbonates in contact with superheated silicate melts.

  17. Core cooling by subsolidus mantle convection. [thermal evolution model of earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, G.; Cassen, P.; Young, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    Although vigorous mantle convection early in the thermal history of the earth is shown to be capable of removing several times the latent heat content of the core, a thermal evolution model of the earth in which the core does not solidify can be constructed. The large amount of energy removed from the model earth's core by mantle convection is supplied by the internal energy of the core which is assumed to cool from an initial high temperature given by the silicate melting temperature at the core-mantle boundary. For the smaller terrestrial planets, the iron and silicate melting temperatures at the core-mantle boundaries are more comparable than for the earth; the models incorporate temperature-dependent mantle viscosity and radiogenic heat sources in the mantle. The earth models are constrained by the present surface heat flux and mantle viscosity and internal heat sources produce only about 55% of the earth model's present surface heat flow.

  18. Progress Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duer, Karsten

    1999-01-01

    Progress report describing the work carried out by the Danish participant in the ALTSET project in the period January 1999 to July 1999.......Progress report describing the work carried out by the Danish participant in the ALTSET project in the period January 1999 to July 1999....

  19. Geochemical Comparison of Four Cores from the Manson Impact Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korotev, Randy L.; Rockow, Kaylynn M.; Jolliff, Bradley L.; Haskin, Larry A.; McCarville, Peter; Crossey, Laura J.

    1996-01-01

    Concentrations of 33 elements were determined in relatively unaltered, matrix-rich samples of impact breccia at approximately 3-m-depth intervals in the M-1 core from the Manson impact structure, Iowa. In addition, 46 matrix-rich samples from visibly altered regions of the M-7, M-8, and M-10 cores were studied, along with 42 small clasts from all four cores. Major element compositions were determined for a subset of impact breccias from the M-1 core, including matrix-rich impact-melt breccia. Major- and trace-element compositions were also determined for a suite of likely target rocks. In the M-1 core, different breccia units identified from lithologic examination of cores are compositionally distinct. There is a sharp compositional discontinuity at the boundary between the Keweenawan-shale-clast breccia and the underlying unit of impact-melt breccia (IMB) for most elements, suggesting minimal physical mixing between the two units during emplacement. Samples from the 40-m-thick IMB (M-1) are all similar to each other in composition, although there are slight increases in concentration with depth for those elements that have high concentrations in the underlying fragmental-matrix suevite breccia (SB) (e.g., Na, Ca, Fe, Sc), presumably as a result of greater clast proportions at the bottom margin of the unit of impact-melt breccia. The high degree of compositional similarity we observe in the impact-melt breccias supports the interpretation that the matrix of this unit represents impact melt. That our analyses show such compositional similarity results in part from our technique for sampling these breccias: for each sample we analyzed a few small fragments (total mass: approximately 200 mg) selected to be relatively free of large clasts and visible signs of alteration instead of subsamples of powders prepared from a large mass of breccia. The mean composition of the matrix-rich part of impact-melt breccia from the M-1 core can be modeled as a mixture of approximately

  20. Experimental alteration of artificial and natural impact melt rock from the Chesapeake Bay impact structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Declercq, J.; Dypvik, H.; Aagaard, P.; Jahren, J.; Ferrell, R.E.; Horton, J. Wright

    2009-01-01

    The alteration or transformation of impact melt rock to clay minerals, particularly smectite, has been recognized in several impact structures (e.g., Ries, Chicxulub, Mj??lnir). We studied the experimental alteration of two natural impact melt rocks from suevite clasts that were recovered from drill cores into the Chesapeake Bay impact structure and two synthetic glasses. These experiments were conducted at hydrothermal temperature (265 ??C) in order to reproduce conditions found in meltbearing deposits in the first thousand years after deposition. The experimental results were compared to geochemical modeling (PHREEQC) of the same alteration and to original mineral assemblages in the natural melt rock samples. In the alteration experiments, clay minerals formed on the surfaces of the melt particles and as fine-grained suspended material. Authigenic expanding clay minerals (saponite and Ca-smectite) and vermiculite/chlorite (clinochlore) were identified in addition to analcime. Ferripyrophyllite was formed in three of four experiments. Comparable minerals were predicted in the PHREEQC modeling. A comparison between the phases formed in our experiments and those in the cores suggests that the natural alteration occurred under hydrothermal conditions similar to those reproduced in the experiment. ?? 2009 The Geological Society of America.

  1. Basal melting and Eemian ice along the main ice ridge in northern Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchardt, Susanne Lilja

    The variation of the basal melt rate and the location of the Eemian layer in the ice column are investigated along the ice divide between the NorthGRIP and NEEM ice core drill sites in northern Greenland. At NorthGRIP an ice core was drilled in the period 1996-2004, and the stable isotope record (d...... the line. A Dansgaard-Johnsen model is then used to simulate the ice flow along the flow line from NorthGRIP to NEEM. One- as well as two-dimensional approaches are taken. The basal melt rates and other unknown flow parameters are determined using a Monte Carlo method. The Monte Carlo solution...... is constrained by isochrones revealed in radio-echo sounding images of the ice. The obtained results indicate a high spatial variability in the basal melt rate in the area, and values between zero and 25 mm/yr are found. The results indicate that there is little or no basal melting at NEEM. The location...

  2. Cloud screening and melt water detection over melting sea ice using AATSR/SLSTR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istomina, Larysa; Heygster, Georg

    2014-05-01

    With the onset of melt in the Arctic Ocean, the fraction of melt water on sea ice, the melt pond fraction, increases. The consequences are: the reduced albedo of sea ice, increased transmittance of sea ice and affected heat balance of the system with more heat passing through the ice into the ocean, which facilitates further melting. The onset of melt, duration of melt season and melt pond fraction are good indicators of the climate state of the Arctic and its change. In the absence of reliable sea ice thickness retrievals in summer, melt pond fraction retrieval from satellite is in demand as input for GCM as an indicator of melt state of the sea ice. The retrieval of melt pond fraction with a moderate resolution radiometer as AATSR is, however, a non-trivial task due to a variety of subpixel surface types with very different optical properties, which give non-unique combinations if mixed. In this work this has been solved by employing additional information on the surface and air temperature of the pixel. In the current work, a concept of melt pond detection on sea ice is presented. The basis of the retrieval is the sensitivity of AATSR reflectance channels 550nm and 860nm to the amount of melt water on sea ice. The retrieval features extensive usage of a database of in situ surface albedo spectra. A tree of decisions is employed to select the feasible family of in situ spectra for the retrieval, depending on the melt stage of the surface. Reanalysis air temperature at the surface and brightness temperature measured by the satellite sensor are analyzed in order to evaluate the melting status of the surface. Case studies for FYI and MYI show plausible retrieved melt pond fractions, characteristic for both of the ice types. The developed retrieval can be used to process the historical AATSR (2002-2012) dataset, as well as for the SLSTR sensor onboard the future Sentinel-3 mission (scheduled for launch in 2015), to keep the continuity and obtain longer time sequence

  3. A benchmark initiative on mantle convection with melting and melt segregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeling, Harro; Dohmen, Janik; Wallner, Herbert; Noack, Lena; Tosi, Nicola; Plesa, Ana-Catalina; Maurice, Maxime

    2015-04-01

    In recent years a number of mantle convection models have been developed which include partial melting within the asthenosphere, estimation of melt volumes, as well as melt extraction with and without redistribution at the surface or within the lithosphere. All these approaches use various simplifying modelling assumptions whose effects on the dynamics of convection including the feedback on melting have not been explored in sufficient detail. To better assess the significance of such assumptions and to provide test cases for the modelling community we initiate a benchmark comparison. In the initial phase of this endeavor we focus on the usefulness of the definitions of the test cases keeping the physics as sound as possible. The reference model is taken from the mantle convection benchmark, case 1b (Blanckenbach et al., 1989), assuming a square box with free slip boundary conditions, the Boussinesq approximation, constant viscosity and a Rayleigh number of 1e5. Melting is modelled assuming a simplified binary solid solution with linearly depth dependent solidus and liquidus temperatures, as well as a solidus temperature depending linearly on depletion. Starting from a plume free initial temperature condition (to avoid melting at the onset time) three cases are investigated: Case 1 includes melting, but without thermal or dynamic feedback on the convection flow. This case provides a total melt generation rate (qm) in a steady state. Case 2 includes batch melting, melt buoyancy (melt Rayleigh number Rm), depletion buoyancy and latent heat, but no melt percolation. Output quantities are the Nusselt number (Nu), root mean square velocity (vrms) and qm approaching a statistical steady state. Case 3 includes two-phase flow, i.e. melt percolation, assuming a constant shear and bulk viscosity of the matrix and various melt retention numbers (Rt). These cases should be carried out using the Compaction Boussinseq Approximation (Schmeling, 2000) or the full compaction

  4. Investigation of Melting Dynamics of Hafnium Clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Wei Chun; Lim, Thong Leng; Yoon, Tiem Leong

    2017-03-27

    Melting dynamics of hafnium clusters are investigated using a novel approach based on the idea of the chemical similarity index. Ground state configurations of small hafnium clusters are first derived using Basin-Hopping and Genetic Algorithm in the parallel tempering mode, employing the COMB potential in the energy calculator. These assumed ground state structures are verified by using the Low Lying Structures (LLS) method. The melting process is carried out either by using the direct heating method or prolonged simulated annealing. The melting point is identified by a caloric curve. However, it is found that the global similarity index is much more superior in locating premelting and total melting points of hafnium clusters.

  5. Ice-shelf melting around Antarctica

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rignot, E; Jacobs, S; Mouginot, J; Scheuchl, B

    2013-01-01

    We compare the volume flux divergence of Antarctic ice shelves in 2007 and 2008 with 1979 to 2010 surface accumulation and 2003 to 2008 thinning to determine their rates of melting and mass balance...

  6. Energy-Efficient Glass Melting: Submerged Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2004-01-01

    Oxy-gas-fired submerged combustion melter offers simpler, improved performance. For the last 100 years, the domestic glass industry has used the same basic equipment for melting glass on an industrial scale.

  7. Principle of Melt-glue Cloth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈人豪; 曹建达; 李济群; 张利梅; 何洋

    2003-01-01

    This paper advances a new concept of textile-meltglue cloth, and introduces the readers to the basic principle of melt-glue cloth. On the basis of melt spinning, the spinneret can be replaced by a spinning device that consists of an outer spinneret (a loop)and an inner spinneret ( a round plate), and between them there is an interval circle on which the centers of the holes are evenly distributed. When the machine is running, the outer spinneret (or the inner one) is fixed, the inner spinneret (or the outer one)is spinning, and a columnar net will be obtained.Then it will be excided with the help of a cutter in transporting it. Finally the once-forming melt-glue cloth will be produced. Compared with the traditional woven fabric, melt-glue cloth has a lot of special features and a bright future of application.

  8. Ni(2+) doped glass ceramic fiber fabricated by melt-in-tube method and successive heat treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Zaijin; Zheng, Shupei; Peng, Wencai; Zhang, Hang; Ma, Zhijun; Dong, Guoping; Zhou, Shifeng; Chen, Danping; Qiu, Jianrong

    2015-11-02

    Glass ceramic fibers containing Ni(2+) doped LiGa(5)O(8) nanocrystals were fabricated by a melt-in-tube method and successive heat treatment. Fiber precursors were prepared by drawing at high temperature where fiber core glass was melted while fiber clad glass was softened. After heat treatment, LiGa(5)O(8) nanocrystals were precipitated in the fiber core. Excited by 980 nm laser, efficient broadband near-infrared emission was observed in the glass ceramic fiber compared to that of precursor fiber. The melt-in-tube method can realize controllable crystallization and is suitable for fabrication of novel glass ceramic fibers. The Ni(2+)-doped glass ceramic fiber is promising for broadband optical amplification.

  9. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT): Melting Efficiency Improvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Principal Investigator Kent Peaslee; Co-PI’s: Von Richards, Jeffrey Smith

    2012-07-31

    Steel foundries melt recycled scrap in electric furnaces and typically consume 35-100% excess energy from the theoretical energy requirement required to pour metal castings. This excess melting energy is multiplied by yield losses during casting and finishing operations resulting in the embodied energy in a cast product typically being three to six times the theoretical energy requirement. The purpose of this research project was to study steel foundry melting operations to understand energy use and requirements for casting operations, define variations in energy consumption, determine technologies and practices that are successful in reducing melting energy and develop new melting techniques and tools to improve the energy efficiency of melting in steel foundry operations.

  10. Thermal Modeling of Direct Digital Melt-Deposition Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, K. P.; Lambrakos, S. G.

    2011-02-01

    Additive manufacturing involves creating three-dimensional (3D) objects by depositing materials layer-by-layer. The freeform nature of the method permits the production of components with complex geometry. Deposition processes provide one more capability, which is the addition of multiple materials in a discrete manner to create "heterogeneous" objects with locally controlled composition and microstructure. The result is direct digital manufacturing (DDM) by which dissimilar materials are added voxel-by-voxel (a voxel is volumetric pixel) following a predetermined tool-path. A typical example is functionally gradient material such as a gear with a tough core and a wear-resistant surface. The inherent complexity of DDM processes is such that process modeling based on direct physics-based theory is difficult, especially due to a lack of temperature-dependent thermophysical properties and particularly when dealing with melt-deposition processes. In order to overcome this difficulty, an inverse problem approach is proposed for the development of thermal models that can represent multi-material, direct digital melt deposition. This approach is based on the construction of a numerical-algorithmic framework for modeling anisotropic diffusivity such as that which would occur during energy deposition within a heterogeneous workpiece. This framework consists of path-weighted integral formulations of heat diffusion according to spatial variations in material composition and requires consideration of parameter sensitivity issues.

  11. Electrochemical Studies in Aluminum Chloride Melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-07-31

    Molten Salt Systems", Symposium on Molten Salts, Symposium Volume, The Electrochemical Society , in press (1976). Manuscripts in Preparation--Related to...Fused Salt Technology, Electrochemical Society Meeting, Chicaao, May 8-13, 1973. R. A. Osteryoung, R. H. Abel, L. G. Boxall and B. H. Vassos, "An...aluminate Melts", Electrochemical Society , San Francisco, CA, May, 1974. R. A. Osteryoung, "Chemistry in Aluminum Chloride Melts", Fifth International

  12. Terrestrial analogues for lunar impact melt flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neish, C. D.; Hamilton, C. W.; Hughes, S. S.; Nawotniak, S. Kobs; Garry, W. B.; Skok, J. R.; Elphic, R. C.; Schaefer, E.; Carter, L. M.; Bandfield, J. L.; Osinski, G. R.; Lim, D.; Heldmann, J. L.

    2017-01-01

    Lunar impact melt deposits have unique physical properties. They have among the highest observed radar returns at S-Band (12.6 cm wavelength), implying that they are rough at the decimeter scale. However, they are also observed in high-resolution optical imagery to be quite smooth at the meter scale. These characteristics distinguish them from well-studied terrestrial analogues, such as Hawaiian pāhoehoe and ´a´ā lava flows. The morphology of impact melt deposits can be related to their emplacement conditions, so understanding the origin of these unique surface properties will help to inform us as to the circumstances under which they were formed. In this work, we seek to find a terrestrial analogue for well-preserved lunar impact melt flows by examining fresh lava flows on Earth. We compare the radar return and high-resolution topographic variations of impact melt flows to terrestrial lava flows with a range of surface textures. The lava flows examined in this work range from smooth Hawaiian pāhoehoe to transitional basaltic flows at Craters of the Moon (COTM) National Monument and Preserve in Idaho to rubbly and spiny pāhoehoe-like flows at the recent eruption at Holuhraun in Iceland. The physical properties of lunar impact melt flows appear to differ from those of all the terrestrial lava flows studied in this work. This may be due to (a) differences in post-emplacement modification processes or (b) fundamental differences in the surface texture of the melt flows due to the melts' unique emplacement and/or cooling environment. Information about the surface properties of lunar impact melt deposits will be critical for future landed missions that wish to sample these materials.

  13. k-core covers and the core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez-Rodriguez, E.; Borm, Peter; Estevez-Fernandez, A.; Fiestras-Janeiro, G.; Mosquera, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper extends the notion of individual minimal rights for a transferable utility game (TU-game) to coalitional minimal rights using minimal balanced families of a specific type, thus defining a corresponding minimal rights game. It is shown that the core of a TU-game coincides with the core of

  14. Academic Rigor: The Core of the Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Judy

    2013-01-01

    Some educators see the Common Core State Standards as reason for stress, most recognize the positive possibilities associated with them and are willing to make the professional commitment to implementing them so that academic rigor for all students will increase. But business leaders, parents, and the authors of the Common Core are not the only…

  15. k-core covers and the core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez-Rodriguez, E.; Borm, Peter; Estevez-Fernandez, A.; Fiestras-Janeiro, G.; Mosquera, M.A.

    This paper extends the notion of individual minimal rights for a transferable utility game (TU-game) to coalitional minimal rights using minimal balanced families of a specific type, thus defining a corresponding minimal rights game. It is shown that the core of a TU-game coincides with the core of

  16. Particles control in selective laser melting in-situ oxide dispersion strengthened method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xin; An, Zhibin; Shen, Zhijian; Liu, Wei; Yao, Chenguang

    2017-01-01

    Stainless steel selective laser melting (SLM) can be considered as a new possible approach for in-situ formation of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels because of the dispersion of amorphous oxide nano-particles due to the trace amounts of laser chamber oxygen and in-situ internal oxidation of reactive elements. In this paper it is demonstrated that the particle sizes and distributions can be adjusted by choosing different chamber oxygen level through controlling the quantity of initial reactive cores and the available reactive solutes of each core.

  17. Melting of Al Induced by Laser Excitation of 2p Holes

    OpenAIRE

    Rosandi, Y.; Cheenicode Kabeer, F.; Cherednikov, Y.; Zijlstra, E.; Garcia, M; Inogamov, N.; Urbassek, H.

    2015-01-01

    Novel photon sources—such as XUV- or X-ray lasers—allow to selectively excite core excitations in materials. We study the response of a simple metal, Al, to the excitation of 2p holes using molecular dynamics simulations. During the lifetime of the holes, the interatomic interactions in the slab are changed; we calculate these using WIEN2k. We find that the melting dynamics after core-hole excitation is dominated by classical electron–phonon dynamics. The effects of the changed potential surf...

  18. An experimental study of partial melting and fractional crystallization on the HED parent body

    CERN Document Server

    Ashcroft, Helen

    2015-01-01

    We have performed an experimental and modeling study of the partial melting behavior of the HED parent body and of the fractional crystallization of liquids derived from its mantle. We estimated the mantle composition by assuming chondritic ratios of refractory lithophile elements, adjusting the Mg# and core size to match the density and moment of inertia of Vesta, and the compositions of Mg-rich olivines found in diogenites. The liquidus of a mantle with Mg# (=100*(Mg/(Mg+Fe))) 80 is ~1625oC and, under equilibrium conditions the melt crystallises olivine alone until it is joined by orthopyroxene at 1350oC. We synthesized melt from our 1350oC experiment and simulated its fractional crystallization path. Orthopyroxene crystallizes until it is replaced by pigeonite at 1200oC. Liquids become eucritic and crystal assemblages resemble diogenites below 1250oC. MELTS correctly predicts the olivine liquidus but overestimates the orthopyroxene liquidus by ~70oC. Predicted melt compositions are in reasonable agreement ...

  19. The melting and solidification of nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florio, B. J.; Myers, T. G.

    2016-06-01

    A mathematical model is developed to describe the melting of nanowires. The first section of the paper deals with a standard theoretical situation, where the wire melts due to a fixed boundary temperature. This analysis allows us to compare with existing results for the phase change of nanospheres. The equivalent solidification problem is also examined. This shows that solidification is a faster process than melting; this is because the energy transfer occurs primarily through the solid rather than the liquid which is a poorer conductor of heat. This effect competes with the energy required to create new solid surface which acts to slow down the process, but overall conduction dominates. In the second section, we consider a more physically realistic boundary condition, where the phase change occurs due to a heat flux from surrounding material. This removes the singularity in initial melt velocity predicted in previous models of nanoparticle melting. It is shown that even with the highest possible flux the melting time is significantly slower than with a fixed boundary temperature condition.

  20. Melting behavior of large disordered sodium clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Aguado, A

    2000-01-01

    The melting-like transition in disordered sodium clusters Na_N, with N=92 and 142 is studied by using a first-principles constant-energy molecular dynamics simulation method. Na_142, whose atoms are distributed in two (surface and inner) main shells with different radial distances to the center of mass of the cluster, melts in two steps: the first one, at approx. 130 K, is characterized by a high intrashell mobility of the atoms, and the second, homogeneous melting, at approx. 270 K, involves diffusive motion of all the atoms across the whole cluster volume (both intrashell and intershell displacements are allowed). On the contrary, the melting of Na_92 proceeds gradually over a very wide temperature interval, without any abrupt step visible in the thermal or structural melting indicators. The occurrence of well defined steps in the melting transition is then shown to be related to the existence of a distribution of the atoms in shells. Thereby we propose a necessary condition for a cluster to be considered r...

  1. Manufacturing laser glass by continuous melting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, J H; Suratwala, T; krenitsky, S; Takeuchi, K

    2000-07-01

    A novel, continuous melting process is being used to manufacture meter-sized plates of laser glass at a rate 20-times faster, 5-times cheaper, and with 2-3 times better optical quality than with previous one-at-a-time, ''discontinuous'' technology processes. This new technology for manufacturing laser glass, which is arguably the most difficult continuously-melted optical material ever produced, comes as a result of a $60 million, six-year joint R&D program between government and industry. The glasses manufactured by the new continuous melting process are Nd-doped phosphate-based glasses and are marketed under the product names LG-770 (Schott Glass Technologies) and LHG-8 (Hoya Corporation USA). With this advance in glass manufacturing technology, it is now possible to construct high-energy, high-peak-power lasers for use in fusion energy development, national defense, and basic physics research that would have been impractical to build using the old melting technology. The development of continuously melted laser glass required technological advances that have lead to improvements in the manufacture of other optical glass products as well. For example, advances in forming, annealing, and conditioning steps of the laser glass continuous melting process are now being used in manufacture of other large-size optical glasses.

  2. On the thermal and magnetic histories of Earth and Venus: Influences of melting, radioactivity, and conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, P.; Bercovici, D.

    2014-11-01

    The study of the thermal evolution of Earth's interior is uncertain and controversial in many respects, from the interpretation of petrologic observations used to infer the temperature and dynamics of the interior, to the physics and material properties governing heat transport. The thermal history of Venus is even more uncertain, but the lack of a dynamo at present in an otherwise similar planet may provide additional constraints on terrestrial planet evolution. In this paper a one dimensional thermal history model is derived that includes heat loss due to mantle melt eruption at the surface to explore its influence on the thermal and magnetic history of Earth and Venus. We show that the thermal catastrophe of Earth's mantle, which occurs for a present day Urey ratio of 1/3 and convective heat loss exponent of β=1/3, can be avoided by assuming a rather high core heat flow of ∼15 TW. This core heat flow also avoids the new core paradox by allowing for the geodynamo to be thermally powered prior to inner core growth for core thermal conductivities as high as 130 Wm K. Dynamo regime diagrams demonstrate that the mantle melt eruption rate has a minor effect on the history of mobile lid planets due to the efficiency of plate tectonic convective heat loss. However, if Earth were in a stagnant lid regime prior to 2.5 Ga, as has been proposed, then at least ∼5% of mantle melt is required to erupt in order to thermally power the paleodynamo at that time. Dynamo regime diagrams for stagnant lid Venus models indicate that more than half of the melt generated in the mantle is required to erupt in order to overcome the insulation imposed by the stagnant lid and drive a dynamo. This implies that with an Earth-like mantle radioactivity the Venusian dynamo shut down ∼0.3 Ga for an eruption efficiency of 50%, and ∼3 Ga for an eruption efficiency of zero. Consequently, a stagnant lid alone does not prevent a core dynamo if melting of the upper mantle provides a substantial

  3. Primary crustal melt compositions: Insights into the controls, mechanisms and timing of generation from kinetics experiments and melt inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta-Vigil, Antonio; London, David; Morgan, George B.; Cesare, Bernardo; Buick, Ian; Hermann, Jörg; Bartoli, Omar

    2017-08-01

    We explore the controls, mechanisms and timing of generation of primary melts and their compositions, and show that the novel studies of melt inclusions in migmatites can provide important insights into the processes of crustal anatexis of a particular rock. Partial melting in the source region of granites is dependent on five main processes: (i) supply of heat; (ii) mineral-melt interface reactions associated with the detachment and supply of mineral components to the melt, (iii) diffusion in the melt, (iv) diffusion in minerals, and (v) recrystallization of minerals. As the kinetics of these several processes vary over several orders of magnitude, it is essential to evaluate in Nature which of these processes control the rate of melting, the composition of melts, and the extent to which residue-melt chemical equilibrium is attained under different circumstances. To shed light on these issues, we combine data from experimental and melt inclusion studies. First, data from an extensive experimental program on the kinetics of melting of crustal protoliths and diffusion in granite melt are used to set up the necessary framework that describes how primary melt compositions are established during crustal anatexis. Then, we use this reference frame and compare compositional trends from experiments with the composition of melt inclusions analyzed in particular migmatites. We show that, for the case of El Hoyazo anatectic enclaves in lavas, the composition of glassy melt inclusions provides important information on the nature and mechanisms of anatexis during the prograde suprasolidus history of these rocks, including melting temperatures and reactions, and extent of melt interconnection, melt homogenization and melt-residue equilibrium. Compositional trends in several of the rehomogenized melt inclusions in garnet from migmatites/granulites in anatectic terranes are consistent with diffusion in melt-controlled melting, though trace element compositions of melt inclusions

  4. Core size effects on safety performances of LMRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Byung Chan; Hahn, Do Hee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    An oxide fuel small size core (1200 MWt) was analyzed in comparison with a large size core (3600 MWt) in order to evaluate the size effects on transient safety performances of liquid-metal reactors (LMRs). In the first part of the study, main static safety parameters (i.e., Doppler coefficient, sodium void effect, etc.) of the two cores were characterized, and the second part of the study was focused on the dynamic behavior of the cores in two representative transient events: the unprotected loss-of-flow (ULOF) and the unprotected transient overpower (UTOP). Margins to fuel melting and sodium boiling have been evaluated for these representative transients. Results show that the small core has a generally better or equivalent level of safety performances during these events. 6 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs. (Author)

  5. Recent changes in Arctic sea ice melt onset, freezeup, and melt season length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markus, Thorsten; Stroeve, Julienne C.; Miller, Jeffrey

    2009-12-01

    In order to explore changes and trends in the timing of Arctic sea ice melt onset and freezeup, and therefore melt season length, we developed a method that obtains this information directly from satellite passive microwave data, creating a consistent data set from 1979 through present. We furthermore distinguish between early melt (the first day of the year when melt is detected) and the first day of continuous melt. A similar distinction is made for the freezeup. Using this method we analyze trends in melt onset and freezeup for 10 different Arctic regions. In all regions except for the Sea of Okhotsk, which shows a very slight and statistically insignificant positive trend (0.4 d decade-1), trends in melt onset are negative, i.e., toward earlier melt. The trends range from -1.0 d decade-1 for the Bering Sea to -7.3 d decade-1 for the East Greenland Sea. Except for the Sea of Okhotsk all areas also show a trend toward later autumn freeze onset. The Chukchi/Beaufort seas and Laptev/East Siberian seas observe the strongest trends with 7 d decade-1. For the entire Arctic, the melt season length has increased by about 20 days over the last 30 years. Largest trends of over 10 d decade-1 are seen for Hudson Bay, the East Greenland Sea, the Laptev/East Siberian seas, and the Chukchi/Beaufort seas. Those trends are statistically significant at the 99% level.

  6. Surface Melt and Firn Density Evolution in the Western Greenland Percolation Zone Over the Past 50 Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graeter, K.; Osterberg, E. C.; Hawley, R. L.; Thundercloud, Z. R.; Marshall, H. P.; Ferris, D. G.; Lewis, G.

    2016-12-01

    Predictions of the Greenland Ice Sheet's (GIS) contribution to sea-level rise in a warming climate depend on our ability to model the surface mass balance (SMB) processes occurring across the ice sheet. These processes are poorly constrained in the percolation zone, the region of the ice sheet where surface melt refreezes in the firn, thus preventing that melt from directly contributing to GIS mass loss. In this way, the percolation zone serves as a buffer to higher temperatures increasing mass loss. However, it is unknown how the percolation zone is evolving in a changing climate and to what extent the region will continue to serve as a buffer to future runoff. We collected seven shallow ( 22-30 m) firn cores from the Western Greenland percolation zone in May-June 2016 as part of the Greenland Traverse for Accumulation and Climate Studies (GreenTrACS) project. Here we present data on melt layer stratigraphy, density, and annual accumulation for each core to determine: (1) the temporal and spatial accumulation and melt refreeze patterns in the percolation zone of W. Greenland over the past 40 - 55 years, and (2) the impacts of changing melt and refreeze patterns on the near-surface density profile of the percolation zone. Three of the GreenTrACS firn cores re-occupy firn core sites collected in the 1970's-1990's, allowing us to more accurately quantify the evolution of the percolation zone surface melt and firn density during the most recent decades of summertime warming. This work is the basis for broader investigations into how changes in W. Greenland summertime climate are impacting the SMB of the Greenland Ice Sheet.

  7. Monoclinic tridymite in clast-rich impact melt rock from the Chesapeake Bay impact structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, J.C.; Horton, J.W.; Chou, I.-Ming; Belkin, H.E.

    2011-01-01

    X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy confirm a rare terrestrial occurrence of monoclinic tridymite in clast-rich impact melt rock from the Eyreville B drill core in the Chesapeake Bay impact structure. The monoclinic tridymite occurs with quartz paramorphs after tridymite and K-feldspar in a microcrystalline groundmass of devitrified glass and Fe-rich smectite. Electron-microprobe analyses revealed that the tridymite and quartz paramorphs after tridymite contain different amounts of chemical impurities. Inspection by SEM showed that the tridymite crystal surfaces are smooth, whereas the quartz paramorphs contain irregular tabular voids. These voids may represent microporosity formed by volume decrease in the presence of fluid during transformation from tridymite to quartz, or skeletal growth in the original tridymite. Cristobalite locally rims spherulites within the same drill core interval. The occurrences of tridymite and cristobalite appear to be restricted to the thickest clast-rich impact melt body in the core at 1402.02-1407.49 m depth. Their formation and preservation in an alkali-rich, high-silica melt rock suggest initially high temperatures followed by rapid cooling.

  8. Melting and freezing of spherical bismuth nanoparticles confined in a homogeneous sodium borate glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellermann, G.; Craievich, A. F.

    2008-08-01

    The melting temperature and the crystallization temperature of Bi nanoclusters confined in a sodium borate glass were experimentally determined as functions of the cluster radius. The results indicate that, on cooling, liquid Bi nanodroplets exhibit a strong undercooling effect for a wide range of radii. The difference between the melting temperature and the freezing temperature decreases for decreasing radius and vanishes for Bi nanoparticles with a critical radius R=1.9nm . The magnitude of the variation in density across the melting and freezing transitions for Bi nanoparticles with R=2nm is 40% smaller than for bulk Bi. These experimental results support a basic core-shell model for the structure of Bi nanocrystals consisting of a central crystalline volume surrounded by a structurally disordered shell. The volume fraction of the crystalline core decreases for decreasing nanoparticle radius and vanishes for R=1.9nm . Thus, on cooling, the liquid nanodroplets with R<1.9nm preserve, across the liquid-to-solid transformation, their homogeneous and disordered structure without crystalline core.

  9. Experimental investigation on melt coolability under bottom flooding with and without decay heat simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Nitendra [Homi Bhabha National Institute, Anushakti Nagar, Mumbai 400094, Maharashtra (India); Kulkarni, Parimal P. [Reactor Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085, Maharashtra (India); Nayak, Arun K., E-mail: arunths@barc.gov.in [Reactor Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085, Maharashtra (India)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • The effect of decay heat on melt coolability under bottom flooding was studied. • Decay heat of 0.5 MW/m{sup 3} was simulated. • A single simulant material with same mass and initial temperature was used. • Quenching of melt pool does not depend on decay heat. • Comparison of with and without decay heat experiments has been presented. - Abstract: Investigations on severe accident phenomena help us in understanding the realistic accidental phenomena for the assessment of associated risk. The societal impact of radiological leakage to the environment has demanded further robustness in the line of defence of nuclear safety. Thus, to ensure the cooling and stabilization of corium within reactor containment in case of severe accident scenarios, many new reactors have been envisaged with core catcher. In this regard, corium coolability still remains an unresolved issue in spite of several efforts being taken towards its understanding. After studying the various cooling strategies, it has been demonstrated that melt coolability using bottom flooding of water is one of the most efficient techniques so far. To study the effect of decay heat on melt pool coolability under bottom flooding condition, two experiments have been performed in this paper; one without the decay heat and the other with decay heat. The test section used for carrying out these experiments consisted of two parts viz. lower part for retaining the melt from furnace, water inlet and melt quenching, and upper part for steam expansion and its outlet. The total height of the test section was 1400 mm and was made of 33 mm thick carbon steel. Total six stainless steel nozzles of diameter 12 mm were used for injecting water at the bottom of the melt pool. The lower part was surrounded by 10 radiative heaters to simulate decay heat of 10 kW which corresponds to 0.5 MW/m{sup 3}. The experiments showed that quenching of about 25 l of melt at initial temperature of nearly 1200 °C took only a

  10. Progress of gold-coated core-shell magnetic nanoparticles%具有核-壳结构的金纳米包覆磁性纳米复合颗粒的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石运芹; 李梅金

    2012-01-01

    具有核-壳结构的金纳米包覆的磁性纳米粒子,既具有磁性纳米粒子的特点又增加了金纳米的表面化学性质,近年来受到研究人员的广泛关注。简要综述了近年来国内外制备2类核-壳结构的金包铁磁性纳米复合材料的研究进展及相关应用,并对其应用前景进行了展望。%Gold-coated core-shell magnetic nanoparticles,which have both the properties of magnetic nanoparticles and the surface chemical properties of Au nanoparticles,have attracted much attention in recent years.This review has summarized the preparation and the application of two kinds of these composite nanomaterials,and their prospect is also addressed.

  11. Progress on Ecological Tourism Research in China Based on the Literature of the Core Journals-measurement Analysis%国内生态旅游研究进展——基于核心期刊的文献计量分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶茜

    2012-01-01

    The datas from 1999 to 2011 in core journals published the 1699 paper measurement analysis, from the document Angle into our ecological tourism research progress. Ecological tourism research reveals the background of the subject distribution, institutions and regional distribution, and ecological tourism research to the core of the main research perspective and the authors, hot and funded is analyzed. Ecological Tourism Research Interdisciplinary Integration, regional distribution of imbalance, the core group of scholars not prominent research characteristics. The author presents view, proposed the ecological tourism research study to change attitude,enhance the academic team cooperation, funded to into ecological civilization social benefits.%通过对1999-2011年间发表在核心期刊上的1699篇论文进行计量分析,从文献学视角透视我国生态旅游研究的进展状况,揭示了生态旅游研究的学科背景分布、机构与地域分布特征,并且对生态旅游研究的核心作者群、主要研究角度与热点以及基金资助情况进行了分析。提出生态旅游研究具有学科交叉相融性、地域分布不均衡性、核心学者群不突出等研究特性,建议生态旅游研究亟待转变研究态度,加强学术团队合作,基金资助要转化为生态文明社会效益。

  12. A Critique of Core-Collapse Supernova Theory Circa 1997

    CERN Document Server

    Burrows, A

    1998-01-01

    There has been a new infusion of ideas in the study of the mechanism and early character of core--collapse supernovae. However, despite recent conceptual and computational progress, fundamental questions remain. Some are summarize herein.

  13. Progressive Business

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Christian O.

    2016-01-01

    Guest Post to the Society for U.S. Intellectual History Blog. Brief introduction to the book Progressive Business: An Intellectual History of the Role of Business in American Society, Oxford U.P., 2015.......Guest Post to the Society for U.S. Intellectual History Blog. Brief introduction to the book Progressive Business: An Intellectual History of the Role of Business in American Society, Oxford U.P., 2015....

  14. Study of diluting and absorber materials to control reactivity during a postulated core melt down accident in Generation IV reactors; Etude des materiaux sacrificiels absorbants et diluants pour le controle de la reactivite dans le cas d'un accidnet hypothetique de fusion du coeur de reacteurs de quatrieme generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plevacova, K.

    2010-12-16

    In order to limit the consequences of a hypothetical core meltdown accident in Generation IV Sodium Fast Reactors, absorber materials in or near the core, such as boron carbide B{sub 4}C, and diluting materials in the core catcher will be used to prevent recriticality within the mixture of molten oxide fuel and molten structures called corium. The aim of the PhD thesis was to select materials of both types and to understand their behaviour during their interaction with corium, from chemical and thermodynamic point of view. Concerning B{sub 4}C, thermodynamic calculations and experiments agree with the formation of two immiscible phases at high temperature in the B{sub 4}C - UO{sub 2} system: one oxide and one boride. This separation of phases can reduce the efficiency of the neutrons absorption inside the molten fuel contained in the oxide phase. Moreover, a volatilization of a part of the boron element can occur. According to these results, the necessary quantity of B{sub 4}C to be introduced should be reconsidered for postulated severe accident sequence. Other solution could be the use of Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3} or HfO{sub 2} as absorber material. These oxides form a solid solution with the oxide fuel. Concerning the diluting materials, mixed oxides Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} - HfO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} - Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3} were preselected. These systems being completely unknown to date at high temperature in association with UO{sub 2}, first points on the corresponding ternary phase diagrams were researched. Contrary to Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} - Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3} - UO{sub 2} system, the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} - HfO{sub 2} - UO{sub 2} mixture presents only one eutectic and thus only one solidification path which makes easier forecasting the behaviour of corium in the core catcher. (author) [French] Resume: Afin de limiter les consequences d'un accident grave avec la fusion du coeur dans un reacteur a neutrons rapides de generation IV refroidi au sodium, la recriticite doit

  15. Integral coolant channels supply made by melt-out method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escher, W. J. D.

    1964-01-01

    Melt-out method of constructing strong, pressure-tight fluid coolant channels for chambers is accomplished by cementing pins to the surface and by depositing a melt-out material on the surface followed by two layers of epoxy-resin impregnated glass fibers. The structure is heated to melt out the low-melting alloy.

  16. Continuous measurements of methane mixing ratios from ice cores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Stowasser

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a new, field-deployable technique for continuous, high-resolution measurements of methane mixing ratios from ice cores. The technique is based on a continuous flow analysis system, where ice core samples cut along the long axis of an ice core are melted continuously. The past atmospheric air contained in the ice is separated from the melt water stream via a system for continuous gas extraction. The extracted gas is dehumidified and then analyzed by a Wavelength Scanned-Cavity Ring Down Spectrometer for methane mixing ratios. We assess the performance of the new measurement technique in terms of precision (±0.8 ppbv, 1σ, accuracy (±8 ppbv, temporal (ca. 100 s, and spatial resolution (ca. 5 cm. Using a firn air transport model, we compare the resolution of the measurement technique to the resolution of the atmospheric methane signal as preserved in ice cores in Greenland. We conclude that our measurement technique can resolve all climatically relevant variations as preserved in the ice down to an ice depth of at least 1980 m (66 000 yr before present in the North Greenland Eemian Ice Drilling ice core. Furthermore, we describe the modifications, which are necessary to make a commercially available spectrometer suitable for continuous methane mixing ratio measurements from ice cores.

  17. Continuous measurements of methane mixing ratios from ice cores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Stowasser

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a new, field-deployable technique for continuous, high-resolution measurements of methane mixing ratios from ice cores. The technique is based on a continuous flow analysis system, where ice core samples cut along the long axis of an ice core are melted continuously. The past atmospheric air contained in the ice is separated from the melt water stream via a system for continuous gas extraction. The extracted gas is dehumidified and then analyzed by a Wavelength Scanned-Cavity Ring Down Spectrometer for methane mixing ratios. We assess the performance of the new measurement technique in terms of precision (±0.8 ppbv, 1 σ, accuracy (±8 ppbv, temporal (ca. 100 s and spatial resolution (ca. 6 cm. Using a firn air transport model, we compare the resolution of the measurement technique to the resolution of the atmospheric methane signal as preserved in ice cores in Greenland. We conclude that our measurement technique can resolve all climatically relevant variations as preserved in the ice down to an ice depth of at least 1980 m (66 000 yr before present in the North Greenland Eemian Ice Drilling ice core. Furthermore, we describe the modifications which are necessary to make a commercially available spectrometer suitable for continuous methane mixing ratio measurements from ice cores.

  18. Comodules over semiperfect corings

    CERN Document Server

    Caenepeel, S

    2011-01-01

    We discuss when the Rat functor associated to a coring satisfying the left $\\alpha$-condition is exact. We study the category of comodules over a semiperfect coring. We characterize semiperfect corings over artinian rings and over qF-rings.

  19. Coring Sample Acquisition Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Nicolas E.; Murray, Saben D.; Walkemeyer, Phillip E.; Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart; Bao, Xiaoqi; Kriechbaum, Kristopher L.; Richardson, Megan; Klein, Kerry J.

    2012-01-01

    A sample acquisition tool (SAT) has been developed that can be used autonomously to sample drill and capture rock cores. The tool is designed to accommodate core transfer using a sample tube to the IMSAH (integrated Mars sample acquisition and handling) SHEC (sample handling, encapsulation, and containerization) without ever touching the pristine core sample in the transfer process.

  20. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology: Melting Efficiency in Die Casting Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Schwam

    2012-12-15

    This project addressed multiple aspects of the aluminum melting and handling in die casting operations, with the objective of increasing the energy efficiency while improving the quality of the molten metal. The efficiency of melting has always played an important role in the profitability of aluminum die casting operations. Consequently, die casters need to make careful choices in selecting and operating melting equipment and procedures. The capital cost of new melting equipment with higher efficiency can sometimes be recovered relatively fast when it replaces old melting equipment with lower efficiency. Upgrades designed to improve energy efficiency of existing equipment may be well justified. Energy efficiency is however not the only factor in optimizing melting operations. Melt losses and metal quality are also very important. Selection of melting equipment has to take into consideration the specific conditions at the die casting shop such as availability of floor space, average quantity of metal used as well as the ability to supply more metal during peaks in demand. In all these cases, it is essential to make informed decisions based on the best available data.

  1. Microstructures and crystallographic preferred orientation of anorthosites from Oman ophiolite and the dynamics of melt lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Luiz F. G.; Boudier, FrançOise; Nicolas, Adolphe

    2011-04-01

    Microstructures and crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) of anorthosite samples interlayered in the upper and lower gabbro sections in the Oman ophiolite were analyzed in this paper. In the anorthosites registering the dynamics of the melt lenses, foliation is flat lying and starts to develop a few meters below the root zone of the sheeted dike complex (RZSDC). Microstructures and CPO of these rocks were developed in response to four different mechanisms: (1) density-controlled settling of plagioclase on the lens floor, (2) deposition of anorthosites related to convection currents, (3) melt compaction, and (4) uncompacted melt accumulation. In these anorthosites, the poles to (010) of plagioclase are parallel to the flow plane of convection, whereas the [100] axes and poles to (001) express the convection flow direction and the axis of convection rolls, respectively. The effect of subsidence of melt lens floor is recorded immediately below the RZSDC and is characterized by the rapid (but progressive) development of dipping foliation and lineation, reflecting the increase of deformation downsection. The degree of foliation and CPO development in the anorthosites is directly related to the distance of the center of the melt lenses before the subsidence starts. Despite the uncertain origin of the anorthosites from the lower gabbro section, all the samples lost the magmatic microstructural characteristics and presently are reequilibrated aggregates. However, they still preserve plagioclase CPO, where some of these patterns present similarities with the anorthosites from the upper gabbro section, but no evidence of intracrystalline deformation under high temperatures.

  2. Origin of impact melt rocks in the Bununu howardite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, L. C.; Hewins, R. H.

    1979-01-01

    The Bununu howardite is a polymict regolith breccia which contains impact melt that is largely restricted to a 1-cm thick intrusion containing residual glass. As in Malvern, the melt rock contains melt with meteoritic Ni-Co contents. The cooling rate, interpreted for forming glass from this composition, is a few tenths of a degree per minute. The intrusive melts rock, which is a feature unique to Bununu, may indicate that Bununu was consolidated at the time of impact melting.

  3. CRYSTALLIZATION AND MELTING OF NYLON 610

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry was used to study the crystallization and melting of nylon 610. For nylon 610 crystallized from the melt state (260℃), the overall rate of bulk crystallization can be described by a simple Avrami equation with Avrami exponent n≈2, independent of crystallization temperature. With the experimentally obtained Tm0 (235℃~255℃) of nylon 610, the fold surface free energy σe was determined to be 35~38 erg/cm2. The effects of annealing temperature and time on the melting of quenched nylon 610 were also investigated. For nylon 610 quenched at room temperature there is only one DSC endotherm peak DSC scans on annealed samples exhibited an endotherm peak at approximately 10℃ above the annealing temperature. The size and position of the endothermic peak is strongly related to annealing temperature and time. An additional third melting was observed when quenched nylon 610 was annealed at high temperature for a sufficiently long residence time. The existence of the third melting peak suggests that more than one kind of distribution of lamella thickness may occur when quenched nylon610 is annealed. The implications of these results in terms of crystal thickening mechanism were discussed.

  4. Polyether Based Thermoplastic Polyurethane Melt Blown Nonwovens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terezie Zapletalova

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available A series of melt blown samples were produced from three hardness grades of ether based thermoplastic polyurethane elastomers (TPU. The fabrics were tested to investigate their structure-property relationship in a melt blown process. Solution viscosities of the web were only 20-26% of there original values indicating a large loss in polymer molecular weight during melt blowing. Fiber diameter distributions measured on melt blown samples were found comparable to those made with more conventional polymers. The fiber orientation distribution functions (ODF suggest slight fiber orientation in machine direction. Tensile and elongation properties depended on die-to-collector distance (DCD, polymer hardness and fiber ODF. A strong relationship between the tensile strength and die-to-collector distance was identified and attributed to reduced interfiber adhesion in the web with increasing DCD. The reduction in adhesion was attributed to greater extents of solidification before reaching the forming belt for longer DCDs. This paper is the first in a series relating the influence of the melt blowing process parameters on the polymer properties and the nonwoven fabric properties for block thermoplastic elastomers.

  5. Melt electrospinning of biodegradable polyurethane scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karchin, Ari; Simonovsky, Felix I.; Ratner, Buddy D.; Sanders, Joan E.

    2014-01-01

    Electrospinning from the melt, in contrast to from solution, is an attractive tissue engineering scaffold manufacturing process as it allows for the formation of small diameter fibers while eliminating potentially cytotoxic solvents. Despite this, there is a dearth of literature on scaffold formation via melt electrospinning. This is likely due to the technical challenges related to the need for a well-controlled high temperature setup and the difficulty in developing an appropriate polymer. In this paper, a biodegradable and thermally stable polyurethane (PU) is described specifically for use in melt electrospinning. Polymer formulations of aliphatic PUs based on (CH2)4-content diisocyanates, polycaprolactone (PCL), 1,4-butanediamine and 1,4-butanediol (BD) were evaluated for utility in the melt electrospinning process. The final polymer formulation, a catalyst-purified PU based on 1,4-butane diisocyanate, PCL and BD in a 4/1/3 molar ratio with a weight-average molecular weight of about 40 kDa, yielded a nontoxic polymer that could be readily electrospun from the melt. Scaffolds electrospun from this polymer contained point bonds between fibers and mechanical properties analogous to many in vivo soft tissues. PMID:21640853

  6. Melt Flow Control in the Directional Solidification of Binary Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabaras, Nicholas

    2003-01-01

    Our main project objectives are to develop computational techniques based on inverse problem theory that can be used to design directional solidification processes that lead to desired temperature gradient and growth conditions at the freezing front at various levels of gravity. It is known that control of these conditions plays a significant role in the selection of the form and scale of the obtained solidification microstructures. Emphasis is given on the control of the effects of various melt flow mechanisms on the local to the solidification front conditions. The thermal boundary conditions (furnace design) as well as the magnitude and direction of an externally applied magnetic field are the main design variables. We will highlight computational design models for sharp front solidification models and briefly discuss work in progress toward the development of design techniques for multi-phase volume-averaging based solidification models.

  7. An empirical method for calculating melt compositions produced beneath mid-ocean ridges: Application for axis and off-axis (seamounts) melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Yaoling; Batiza, Rodey

    1991-12-01

    We present a new method for calculating the major element compositions of primary melts parental to mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB). This model is based on the experimental data of Jaques and Green (1980), Falloon et al. (1988), and Falloon and Green (1987, 1988) which are ideal for this purpose. Our method is empirical and employs solid-liquid partition coefficients (Di) from the experiments. We empirically determine Di = ƒ(P,F) and use this to calculate melt compositions produced by decompression-induced melting along an adiabat (column melting). Results indicate that most MORBs can be generated by 10-20% partial melting at initial pressures (P0) of 12-21 kbar. Our primary MORB melts have MgO = 10-12 wt %. We fractionate these at low pressure to an MgO content of 8.0 wt % in order to interpret natural MORB liquids. This model allows us to calculate Po, Pƒ, To, Tƒ, and F for natural MORB melts. We apply the model to interpret MORB compositions and mantle upwelling patterns beneath a fast ridge (East Pacific Rise (EPR)8°N to 14°N), a slow ridge (mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) at 26°S), and seamounts near the EPR (Lament seamount chain). We find mantle temperature differences of up to 50°-60°C over distances of 30-50 km both across axis and along axis at the EPR. We propose that these are due to upward mantle flow in a weakly conductive (versus adiabatic) temperature gradient. We suggest that the EPR is fed by a wide (-100 km) zone of upwelling due to plate separation but has a central core of faster buoyant flow. An along-axis thermal dome between the Siqueiros transform and the 11°45' Overlapping Spreading center (OSC) may represent such an upwelling; however, in general there is a poor correlation between mantle temperature, topography, and the segmentation pattern at the EPR. For the Lament seamounts we find regular across-axis changes in Po and F suggesting that the melt zone pinches out off axis. This observation supports the idea that the EPR is fed by a

  8. An empirical method for calculating melt compositions produced beneath mid-ocean ridges: for axis and off-axis (seamounts) melting application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batiza, Rodey

    1991-12-01

    We present a new method for calculating the major element compositions of primary melts parental to mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB). This model is based on the experimental data of Jaques and Green (1980), Falloon et al. (1988), and Falloon and Green (1987, 1988) which are ideal for this purpose. Our method is empirical and employs solid-liquid partition coefficients (Di) from the experiments. We empirically determine Di=f(P,F) and use this to calculate melt compositions produced by decompression-induced melting along an adiabat (column melting). Results indicate that most MORBs can be generated by 10-20% partial melting at initial pressures (P0) of 12-21 kbar. Our primary MORB melts have MgO=10-12 wt %. We fractionate these at low pressure to an MgO content of 8.0 wt% in order to interpret natural MORB liquids. This model allows us to calculate Po, Pf, To, Tf, and F for natural MORB melts. We apply the model to interpret MORB compositions and mantle upwelling patterns beneath a fast ridge (East Pacific Rise (EPR) 8°N to 14°N), a slow ridge (mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) at 26°S), and seamounts near the EPR (Lamont seamount chain). We find mantle temperature differences of up to 50°-60°C over distances of 30-50 km both across axis and along axis at the EPR. We propose that these are due to upward mantle flow in a weakly conductive (versus adiabatic) temperature gradient. We suggest that the EPR is fed by a wide (~100 km) zone of upwelling due to plate separation but has a central core of faster buoyant flow. An along-axis thermal dome between the Siqueiros transform and the 11°45' Overlapping Spreading Center (OSC) may represent such an upwelling; however, in general there is a poor correlation between mantle temperature, topography, and the segmentation pattern at the EPR. For the Lamont seamounts we find regular across-axis changes in Po and F suggesting that the melt zone pinches out off axis. This observation supports the idea that the EPR is fed by a broad

  9. Design, synthesis and applications of core-shell, hollow core, and nanorattle multifunctional nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Toni, Ahmed Mohamed; Habila, Mohamed A; Labis, Joselito Puzon; ALOthman, Zeid A; Alhoshan, Mansour; Elzatahry, Ahmed A; Zhang, Fan

    2016-02-01

    With the evolution of nanoscience and nanotechnology, studies have been focused on manipulating nanoparticle properties through the control of their size, composition, and morphology. As nanomaterial research has progressed, the foremost focus has gradually shifted from synthesis, morphology control, and characterization of properties to the investigation of function and the utility of integrating these materials and chemical sciences with the physical, biological, and medical fields, which therefore necessitates the development of novel materials that are capable of performing multiple tasks and functions. The construction of multifunctional nanomaterials that integrate two or more functions into a single geometry has been achieved through the surface-coating technique, which created a new class of substances designated as core-shell nanoparticles. Core-shell materials have growing and expanding applications due to the multifunctionality that is achieved through the formation of multiple shells as well as the manipulation of core/shell materials. Moreover, core removal from core-shell-based structures offers excellent opportunities to construct multifunctional hollow core architectures that possess huge storage capacities, low densities, and tunable optical properties. Furthermore, the fabrication of nanomaterials that have the combined properties of a core-shell structure with that of a hollow one has resulted in the creation of a new and important class of substances, known as the rattle core-shell nanoparticles, or nanorattles. The design strategies of these new multifunctional nanostructures (core-shell, hollow core, and nanorattle) are discussed in the first part of this review. In the second part, different synthesis and fabrication approaches for multifunctional core-shell, hollow core-shell and rattle core-shell architectures are highlighted. Finally, in the last part of the article, the versatile and diverse applications of these nanoarchitectures in

  10. Design, synthesis and applications of core-shell, hollow core, and nanorattle multifunctional nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Toni, Ahmed Mohamed; Habila, Mohamed A.; Labis, Joselito Puzon; Alothman, Zeid A.; Alhoshan, Mansour; Elzatahry, Ahmed A.; Zhang, Fan

    2016-01-01

    With the evolution of nanoscience and nanotechnology, studies have been focused on manipulating nanoparticle properties through the control of their size, composition, and morphology. As nanomaterial research has progressed, the foremost focus has gradually shifted from synthesis, morphology control, and characterization of properties to the investigation of function and the utility of integrating these materials and chemical sciences with the physical, biological, and medical fields, which therefore necessitates the development of novel materials that are capable of performing multiple tasks and functions. The construction of multifunctional nanomaterials that integrate two or more functions into a single geometry has been achieved through the surface-coating technique, which created a new class of substances designated as core-shell nanoparticles. Core-shell materials have growing and expanding applications due to the multifunctionality that is achieved through the formation of multiple shells as well as the manipulation of core/shell materials. Moreover, core removal from core-shell-based structures offers excellent opportunities to construct multifunctional hollow core architectures that possess huge storage capacities, low densities, and tunable optical properties. Furthermore, the fabrication of nanomaterials that have the combined properties of a core-shell structure with that of a hollow one has resulted in the creation of a new and important class of substances, known as the rattle core-shell nanoparticles, or nanorattles. The design strategies of these new multifunctional nanostructures (core-shell, hollow core, and nanorattle) are discussed in the first part of this review. In the second part, different synthesis and fabrication approaches for multifunctional core-shell, hollow core-shell and rattle core-shell architectures are highlighted. Finally, in the last part of the article, the versatile and diverse applications of these nanoarchitectures in

  11. Banded transformer cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mclyman, C. W. T. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A banded transformer core formed by positioning a pair of mated, similar core halves on a supporting pedestal. The core halves are encircled with a strap, selectively applying tension whereby a compressive force is applied to the core edge for reducing the innate air gap. A dc magnetic field is employed in supporting the core halves during initial phases of the banding operation, while an ac magnetic field subsequently is employed for detecting dimension changes occurring in the air gaps as tension is applied to the strap.

  12. The HOR HEU/LEU core conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibcus, H.P.M.; Vries, J.W. de [Department of HOR-Development, IRI, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Leege, P.F.A. de [Department of Reactor Physics, IRI, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands)

    1999-07-01

    On March 16, 1998 the first two LEU (low enriched uranium) fuel elements were introduced in the HOR reactor of the Interfaculty Reactor Institute (IRI). At the moment the core consists of 5 LEU and 19 HEU (highly enriched uranium) fuel elements. It is anticipated that after about 13 core reload operations the HOR will be fully converted from HEU to LEU to a so called LEU compact core consisting of about 21 LEU fuel assemblies and as many beryllium reflector elements. The HOR HEU/LEU core conversion program, progress of the step-by-step transition phase, including comparisons of calculations and measurements, as well as the impact on the utilization of the reactor are discussed. (author)

  13. Partial melting of ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic rocks during continental collision: Evidence, time, mechanism, and effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Xiang; Zhou, Kun; Gao, Xiao-Ying

    2017-09-01

    , depending on anatectic conditions. The extraction of such melts can greatly deplete the melt-mobile elements in residues of UHP metapelites and eclogites. The partial melting of an isotopically heterogeneous source can yield isotopic variations between melt and residue. This is primarily controlled by the type of anatectic reactions and the solubility of accessory minerals. Although much progress has been made in the partial melting of UHP metamorphic rocks during continental collision, there are still many key issues that remain to be resolved. These include discriminating peritectic minerals from metamorphic and magmatic minerals, tracing the behavior of accessory minerals during anatexis, determining the geochemical composition of melts formed at UHP conditions, and placing precise constraints on the timescale for melt-forming and melt-transport processes. The clarification of these issues may greatly advance our understanding of the intracrustal differentiation, crust-mantle interaction and crustal recycling at convergent plate margins and thus provides insights into the chemical geodynamics of subduction zones.

  14. Behavior of an heterogeneous annular FBR core during an unprotected loss of flow accident: Analysis of the primary phase with SAS-SFR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massara, S.; Schmitt, D.; Bretault, A.; Lemasson, D.; Darmet, G.; Verwaerde, D. [EDF R and D, 1, Avenue du General de Gaulle, 92141 Clamart (France); Struwe, D.; Pfrang, W.; Ponomarev, A. [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie KIT, Institut fuer Neutronenphysik und Reaktortechnik INR, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, Gebaude 521, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    In the framework of a substantial improvement on FBR core safety connected to the development of a new Gen IV reactor type, heterogeneous core with innovative features are being carefully analyzed in France since 2009. At EDF R and D, the main goal is to understand whether a strong reduction of the Na-void worth - possibly attempting a negative value - allows a significant improvement of the core behavior during an unprotected loss of flow accident. Also, the physical behavior of such a core is of interest, before and beyond the (possible) onset of Na boiling. Hence, a cutting-edge heterogeneous design, featuring an annular shape, a Na-plena with a B{sub 4}C plate and a stepwise modulation of fissile core heights, was developed at EDF by means of the SDDS methodology, with a total Na-void worth of -1 $. The behavior of such a core during the primary phase of a severe accident, initiated by an unprotected loss of flow, is analyzed by means of the SAS-SFR code. This study is carried-out at KIT and EDF, in the framework of a scientific collaboration on innovative FBR severe accident analyses. The results show that the reduction of the Na-void worth is very effective, but is not sufficient alone to avoid Na-boiling and, hence, to prevent the core from entering into the primary phase of a severe accident. Nevertheless, the grace time up to boiling onset is greatly enhanced in comparison to a more traditional homogeneous core design, and only an extremely low fraction of the fuel (<0.1%) enters into melting at the end of this phase. A sensitivity analysis shows that, due to the inherent neutronic characteristics of such a core, the gagging scheme plays a major role on the core behavior: indeed, an improved 4-zones gagging scheme, associated with an enhanced control rod drive line expansion feed-back effect, finally prevents the core from entering into sodium boiling. This major conclusion highlights both the progress already accomplished and the need for more detailed

  15. Core and Geodynamo Evolution and the Influence of Potassium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmo, F.; Price, G. D.; Brodholt, J.

    2002-12-01

    In his penultimate paragraph, Birch (1952) notes that the growth of the inner core is controlled by its melting curve, which ``. . . has implications for the `hydromagnetic' theories of the Earth's magnetism''. Although the terminology has changed, the relationship between the growth of the inner core and the geodynamo is still an area of active research, and is still limited by our imperfect understanding of core properties. The ability of the Earth's core to sustain a geodynamo depends on the entropy produced by core cooling and/or solidification [1,2]. The rate of cooling depends on the rate at which the mantle extracts heat from the core. In this contribution we model the coupled thermal evolution of the core and mantle [3,4,5] to investigate the circumstances under which the geodynamo can have been sustained for at least 3~Ga. In particular, we use improved estimates of core properties [6], and examine the effect of potassium in the core, as suggested by recent theoretical [7] and experimental [8] studies. Models without potassium in the core and with realistic present-day temperature and viscosity structures can sustain a geodynamo. However, for the nominal core parameters these models produce an inner core which is too large. For reasonable mantle viscosities, the core cools too rapidly; a reduced cooling rate produces a smaller inner core but requires unreasonable viscosities. The robustness of this result depends mainly on uncertainties in the solidus temperature of the core and the mean thermal expansivity of the mantle. Introducing potassium into the core retards the rate of core growth [7] and provides an additional source of entropy [1]. For a core potassium content of 100-400ppm [8], the criteria of mantle and core temperature and viscosity structure, inner core radius and geodynamo generation can all be satisfied. [1] Gubbins, D. et al., GJRAS 59, 57-99, 1979. [2] Buffett, B.A. et al., JGR 101, 7989-8006, 1996. [3] Mollett, S., GJRAS 76, 653

  16. Core Formation on Asteroid 4 Vesta: Iron Rain in a Silicate Magma Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Walter S.; Mittlefehldt, David W.

    2017-01-01

    Geochemical observations of the eucrite and diogenite meteorites, together with observations made by NASA's Dawn spacecraft, suggest that Vesta resembles H chondrites in bulk chemical composition, possibly with about 25% of a CM-chondrite like composition added in. For this model, the core is 15% by mass (or 8 volume %) of the asteroid. The abundances of moderately siderophile elements (Ni, Co, Mo, W, and P) in eucrites require that essentially all of the metallic phase in Vesta segregated to form a core prior to eucrite solidification. Melting in the Fe-Ni-S system begins at a cotectic temperature of 940 deg. C. Only about 40% of the total metal phase, or 3-4 volume % of Vesta, melts prior to the onset of silicate melting. Liquid iron in solid silicate initially forms isolated pockets of melt; connected melt channels, which are necessary if the metal is to segregate from the silicate, are only possible when the metal phase exceeds about 5 volume %. Thus, metal segregation to form a core does not occur prior to the onset of silicate melting.

  17. Analysis of picosecond pulsed laser melted graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinbeck, J.; Braunstein, G.; Speck, J.; Dresselhaus, M.S.; Huang, C.Y.; Malvezzi, A.M.; Bloembergen, N.

    1986-01-01

    A Raman microprobe and high resolution TEM have been used to analyze the resolidified region of liquid carbon generated by picosecond pulse laser radiation. From the relative intensities of the zone center Raman-allowed mode for graphite at 1582 cm/sup -1/ and the disorder-induced mode at 1360 cm/sup -1/, the average graphite crystallite size in the resolidified region is determined as a function of position. By comparison with Rutherford backscattering spectra and Raman spectra from nonosecond pulsed laser melting experiments, the disorder depth for picosecond pulsed laser melted graphite is determined as a function of irradiating energy density. Comparisons of TEM micrographs for nanosecond and picosecond pulsed laser melting experiments show that the structure of the laser disordered regions in graphite are similar and exhibit similar behavior with increasing laser pulse fluence.

  18. Analysis of Picosecond Pulsed Laser Melted Graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbeck, J.; Braunstein, G.; Speck, J.; Dresselhaus, M. S.; Huang, C. Y.; Malvezzi, A. M.; Bloembergen, N.

    1986-12-01

    A Raman microprobe and high resolution TEM have been used to analyze the resolidified region of liquid carbon generated by picosecond pulse laser radiation. From the relative intensities of the zone center Raman-allowed mode for graphite at 1582 cm{sup -1} and the disorder-induced mode at 1360 cm{sup -1}, the average graphite crystallite size in the resolidified region is determined as a function of position. By comparison with Rutherford backscattering spectra and Raman spectra from nanosecond pulsed laser melting experiments, the disorder depth for picosecond pulsed laser melted graphite is determined as a function of irradiating energy density. Comparisons of TEM micrographs for nanosecond and picosecond pulsed laser melting experiments show that the structure of the laser disordered regions in graphite are similar and exhibit similar behavior with increasing laser pulse fluence.

  19. Stress Relaxation in Entangled Polymer Melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Ji-Xuan; Svaneborg, Carsten; Everaers, Ralf

    2010-01-01

    We present an extensive set of simulation results for the stress relaxation in equilibrium and step-strained bead-spring polymer melts. The data allow us to explore the chain dynamics and the shear relaxation modulus, G(t), into the plateau regime for chains with Z=40 entanglements and into the t......We present an extensive set of simulation results for the stress relaxation in equilibrium and step-strained bead-spring polymer melts. The data allow us to explore the chain dynamics and the shear relaxation modulus, G(t), into the plateau regime for chains with Z=40 entanglements...... and into the terminal relaxation regime for Z=10. Using the known (Rouse) mobility of unentangled chains and the melt entanglement length determined via the primitive path analysis of the microscopic topological state of our systems, we have performed parameter-free tests of several different tube models. We find...

  20. A model for melting of confined DNA

    CERN Document Server

    Werner, E; Ambjörnsson, T; Mehlig, B

    2015-01-01

    When DNA molecules are heated they denature. This occurs locally so that loops of molten single DNA strands form, connected by intact double-stranded DNA pieces. The properties of this "melting" transition have been intensively investigated. Recently there has been a surge of interest in this question, caused by experiments determining the properties of partially bound DNA confined to nanochannels. But how does such confinement affect the melting transition? To answer this question we introduce, and solve a model predicting how confinement affects the melting transition for a simple model system by first disregarding the effect of self-avoidance. We find that the transition is smoother for narrower channels. By means of Monte-Carlo simulations we then show that a model incorporating self-avoidance shows qualitatively the same behaviour and that the effect of confinement is stronger than in the ideal case.

  1. Scleral melt following Retisert intravitreal fluocinolone implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgalas I

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Ilias Georgalas,1 Chrysanthi Koutsandrea,1 Dimitrios Papaconstantinou,1 Dimitrios Mpouritis,1 Petros Petrou1,2 1Ophthalmology Department, University of Athens, Athens, Greece; 2Moorfields Eye Hospital, London, UKAbstract: Intravitreal fluocinolone acetonide implant (Retisert has a high potency, a low solubility, and a very short duration of action in the systemic circulation, enabling the steroid pellet to be small and reducing the risk of systemic side effects. Scleral melt has not been reported as a possible complication of Retisert implant. The authors describe the occurrence of scleral melt 18 months after the implantation of fluocinolone acetonide implant in a 42-year-old Caucasian woman. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first report of this possible complication.Keywords: Retisert, scleral melt, complication, surgical management

  2. Early stages of core segregation recorded by Fe isotopes in an asteroidal mantle

    OpenAIRE

    Barrat, Jean-Alix; Rouxel, O; Wang, K; Moynier, F; Yamaguchi, A; Bischoff, A; Langlade, J

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Ureilites displays  56 Fe values higher than average chondrite. 29-Segregation of Fe-sulfide melts explains the high  56 Fe values in ureilites. 30-Formation of a core can begin at very low degrees of melting through the circulation of a Fe-S melt 31 through a silicate mantle. 32 33 Earth and Planetary Science Letters, in press (11/3/15). 34 2 35 Abstract 36 37 Ureilite meteorites are achondrites that are debris of the mantle of a now disrupted 38 differentiated aste...

  3. Investigation of micro-injection molding based on longitudinal ultrasonic vibration core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Zhongjun; Yang, Xue; Zheng, Hui; Gao, Shan; Fang, Fengzhou

    2015-10-01

    An ultrasound-assisted micro-injection molding method is proposed to improve the rheological behavior of the polymer melt radically, and a micro-injection molding system based on a longitudinal ultrasonic vibration core is developed and employed in the micro-injection molding process of Fresnel lenses. The verification experiments show that the filling mold area of the polymer melt is increased by 6.08% to 19.12%, and the symmetric deviation of the Fresnel lens is improved 15.62% on average. This method improved the filling performance and replication quality of the polymer melt in the injection molding process effectively.

  4. Estimates of olivine-basaltic melt electrical conductivity using a digital rock physics approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kevin J.; Montési, Laurent G. J.; Zhu, Wen-lu

    2015-12-01

    Estimates of melt content beneath fast-spreading mid-ocean ridges inferred from magnetotelluric tomography (MT) vary between 0.01 and 0.10. Much of this variation may stem from a lack of understanding of how the grain-scale melt geometry influences the bulk electrical conductivity of a partially molten rock, especially at low melt fraction. We compute bulk electrical conductivity of olivine-basalt aggregates over 0.02 to 0.20 melt fraction by simulating electric current in experimentally obtained partially molten geometries. Olivine-basalt aggregates were synthesized by hot-pressing San Carlos olivine and high-alumina basalt in a solid-medium piston-cylinder apparatus. Run conditions for experimental charges were 1.5 GPa and 1350 °C. Upon completion, charges were quenched and cored. Samples were imaged using synchrotron X-ray micro-computed tomography (μ-CT). The resulting high-resolution, 3-dimensional (3-D) image of the melt distribution constitutes a digital rock sample, on which numerical simulations were conducted to estimate material properties. To compute bulk electrical conductivity, we simulated a direct current measurement by solving the current continuity equation, assuming electrical conductivities for olivine and melt. An application of Ohm's Law yields the bulk electrical conductivity of the partially molten region. The bulk electrical conductivity values for nominally dry materials follow a power-law relationship σbulk = Cσmeltϕm with fit parameters m = 1.3 ± 0.3 and C = 0.66 ± 0.06. Laminar fluid flow simulations were conducted on the same partially molten geometries to obtain permeability, and the respective pathways for electrical current and fluid flow over the same melt geometry were compared. Our results indicate that the pathways for flow fluid are different from those for electric current. Electrical tortuosity is lower than fluid flow tortuosity. The simulation results are compared to existing experimental data, and the potential

  5. How to identify garnet lherzolite melts and distinguish them from pyroxenite melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, T. L.; Holbig, E.; Barr, J. A.; Till, C.; Krawczynski, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    Liquids form in equilibrium with garnet lherzolite sources when the Earth's mantle melts at depths of greater than ~ 60 km. We present a phase equilibrium investigation of Tibetan plateau olivine leucitites from 2.2 to 2.8 GPa and 1380 to 1480 °C. The resulting liquids were multiply saturated with spinel and garnet lherzolite assemblages (olivine, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene and spinel +/-garnet) under nominally anhydrous conditions. These SiO2-undersaturated liquids and published experimental data have been used to develop a new model that parameterizes the major element compositions of garnet lherzolite partial melts, allowing the prediction of melt compositions from depleted to metasomatically enriched peridotite. The model is calibrated over the pressure range of 1.9 to 6 GPa. The model also predicts the suprasolidus pressure and temperature of the spinel to garnet lherzolite phase transition for natural peridotite compositions. Combined with the recent parameterization of melting in the plagioclase- and spinel- lherzolite facies (Till et al., 2012, JGR, 117, B06206), the new model distinguishes between melts of garnet vs. spinel vs. plagioclase lherzolites, but can also be used to distinguish between melts of lherzolitic vs. pyroxenitic source regions, allowing source lithology to be uniquely identified. Pyroxenite melts fall into two compositionally distinct groups; an olivine-normative, SiO2-undersaturated group and quartz-normative, SiO2-oversaturated group. Melts of plagioclase, spinel, and garnet lherzolite plot between these two types of pyroxenitic melts in mineral normative composition space. When our model is applied to high-K lavas erupted in the Tibetan plateau, we find that these magmas are derived from both pyroxenite and lherzolite source regions. Distinctive enrichments in compatible trace elements (Ni, Cr) are observed in the lherzolite-derived magmas. Applied to Hawaiian basalts, our model suggests the transitional and weakly alkaline pre

  6. Chemical reactions in solvents and melts

    CERN Document Server

    Charlot, G

    1969-01-01

    Chemical Reactions in Solvents and Melts discusses the use of organic and inorganic compounds as well as of melts as solvents. This book examines the applications in organic and inorganic chemistry as well as in electrochemistry. Organized into two parts encompassing 15 chapters, this book begins with an overview of the general properties and the different types of reactions, including acid-base reactions, complex formation reactions, and oxidation-reduction reactions. This text then describes the properties of inert and active solvents. Other chapters consider the proton transfer reactions in

  7. Thermal melting studies of ligand DNA interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guédin, Aurore; Lacroix, Laurent; Mergny, Jean-Louis

    2010-01-01

    A simple thermal melting experiment may be used to demonstrate the stabilization of a given structure by a ligand (usually a small molecule, sometimes a peptide). Preparation of the sample is straightforward, and the experiment itself requires an inexpensive apparatus. Furthermore, reasonably low amounts of sample are required. A qualitative analysis of the data is simple: An increase in the melting temperature (T(m)) indicates preferential binding to the folded form as compared to the unfolded form. However, it is perilous to derive an affinity constant from an increase in T(m) as other factors play a role.

  8. Experimental observation of Minkowski spacetime melting

    CERN Document Server

    Smolyaninov, Igor I

    2015-01-01

    Cobalt nanoparticle-based ferrofluid in the presence of an external magnetic field forms a self-assembled hyperbolic metamaterial, which may be described as an effective 3D Minkowski spacetime for extraordinary photons. If the magnetic field is not strong enough, this effective Minkowski spacetime gradually melts under the influence of thermal fluctuations. On the other hand, it may restore itself if the magnetic field is increased back to its original value. Here we present direct microscopic visualization of such a Minkowski spacetime melting/crystallization, which is somewhat similar to hypothesized formation of the Minkowski spacetime in loop quantum cosmology.

  9. Influence of Grain Boundary on Melting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王暾; 周富信; 刘曰武

    2001-01-01

    The temperature behaviour of an Al bicrystal with surfaces consisting of (110) and (111) crystals is simulated using molecular dynamics. The result shows that the (110) crystal losses its crystalline order at 820K, whereas the disorder does not propagate through the (111) crystal at this temperature. Instead, some disordered atoms are recrystallized into the (111) crystal and the initial grain boundary changes into a stable order-disorder interface. Thus, it was discovered that at a temperature near its melting point, the (111) crystal grew and obstructed the propagation of disorder. Such an obstruction is helpfulfor understanding melting.

  10. Stress Relaxation in Entangled Polymer Melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Ji-Xuan; Svaneborg, Carsten; Everaers, Ralf

    2010-01-01

    and into the terminal relaxation regime for Z=10. Using the known (Rouse) mobility of unentangled chains and the melt entanglement length determined via the primitive path analysis of the microscopic topological state of our systems, we have performed parameter-free tests of several different tube models. We find......We present an extensive set of simulation results for the stress relaxation in equilibrium and step-strained bead-spring polymer melts. The data allow us to explore the chain dynamics and the shear relaxation modulus, G(t), into the plateau regime for chains with Z=40 entanglements...

  11. 3He melting pressure temperature scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halperin, W.P.; Archie, C.N.; Richardson, R.C.;

    1976-01-01

    The latent heat for solidification of **3He has been measured along the **3He melting curve between 23 and 1 mK. A temperature scale is established which depends only on measurements of heat, pressure and volume, and on the condition that the entropy of solid **3He approaches R ln 2 at high...... temperatures. The A feature of the melting curve which suggests itself as a thermometric fixed point is found to be T//A equals 2. 75 plus or minus 0. 11 mK. The agreement between this value and independent measurements of T//A, based on nuclear or electronic paramagnetism, Johnson noise thermometry...

  12. Analysis of ex-vessel melt jet breakup and coolability. Part 2: Uncertainty analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriyama, Kiyofumi; Park, Hyun Sun, E-mail: hejsunny@postech.ac.kr; Hwang, Byoungcheol; Jung, Woo Hyun

    2016-06-15

    Highlights: • Uncertainty analysis for quasi steady state melt jet breakup/cooling in APR1400. • Debris solidification reached in most of cases, film boiling quench never reached. • More than 1% molten pool formation in more than half probability. • Significant importance of accident conditions, weak impacts of model parameters. • Ratio of water depth to melt jet breakup length dominates the molten pool formation. - Abstract: An uncertainty analysis was performed on the molten core jet breakup and cooling by assuming the ex-vessel condition in APR1400, a Korean advanced pressurized water reactor, by probabilistic framework with the Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS) and a fuel–coolant interaction (FCI) simulation code, JASMINE, as a physics model. Eight input variables including four model parameters and four initial/boundary condition variables were chosen as uncertainty variables. Three sets of size 100 samples, in total 300 cases of inputs were produced and simulation results were obtained for each of them. Statistics of the output variables as coolability indexes: the ratio of removed heat to the enthalpy for quench and the fraction of molten pool on the floor, indicated that, in the assumed range of conditions, the debris bed is likely to be cooled in average to the solidification point by ∼85% probability; however, it is not cooled to the minimum film boiling temperature, ∼500 K; and, more than 1% of the melt mass is in a molten pool on the floor by ∼65% probability. The importance analysis showed that the ratio of water pool depth and the melt jet breakup length dominates the cooling performance during the melt discharge transient. The uncertainty of initial and boundary condition variables such as the melt jet size and water pool depth is much more important than that of the model parameters.

  13. A preliminary geochemical study of zircons and monazites from Deccan felsic dikes, Rajula, Gujarat, India: Implications for crustal melting

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nilanjan Chatterjee; Somdev Bhattacharji

    2004-12-01

    Zircons of 10–100 m size and monazites of up to 10 m size are present in rhyolite and trachyte dikes associated with Deccan basalts around Rajula in the southern Saurashtra Peninsula of Gujarat. On the basis of structural conformity of the felsic and basaltic dikes, K-Ar ages and trace element considerations, a previous study concluded that the felsic rocks are coeval with the Deccan Volcanics and originated by crustal anatexis. The felsic rocks contain two populations of zircons and monazites, one that crystallized from the felsic melt and the other that contains inherited crustal material. Trace element variations in the rhyolites and trachytes indicate that zircons and monazites crystallized from the felsic melts, but compositional analysis of a zircon indicates the presence of a small core possibly inherited from the crust. Hf compositional zoning profile of this zircon indicates that it grew from the host rhyolitic melt while the melt differentiated, and Y and LREE contents suggest that this zircon crystallized from the host melt. Pb contents of some monazites also suggest the presence of inherited crustal cores. Hence, any age determination by the U-Th-Pb isotopic method should be interpreted with due consideration to crustal inheritance. Temperatures estimated from zircon and monazite saturation thermometry indicate that the crust around Rajula may have been heated to a maximum of approximately 900°C by the intruding Deccan magma. Crustal melting models of other workers indicate that a 1-2 million year emplacement time for the Deccan Traps may be appropriate for crustal melting characteristics observed in the Rajula area through the felsic dikes.

  14. LANL technical progress update for US HJPRR working group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dombrowski, David E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-06

    The outline of this presentation is: (1) Collaboration on Master Alloy Melting; (2) Data for Safety Analysis, (3) HIP can development status, (4) Bond strength quality, (5) Plasma spraying results, and (6) Bare Rolling Larger Rolling Ingots. Significant near term progress has been made in five areas: (1) Collaboration on Master Alloy Melting; (2) HIP can development status; (3) Bond strength quality; (4) Plasma spraying results; and (5) Bare Rolling Larger Rolling Ingots. Significant progress is expected in the next month on several important areas: (1) Intrinsic bond strength of plasma sprayed Zr (2) Advanced Cleaning; (3) Residual Stress Collaboration with INL; and (4) Cost Metric Assessment.

  15. Recent Increases in Snow Accumulation and Decreases in Sea-Ice Concentration Recorded in a Coastal NW Greenland Ice Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterberg, E. C.; Thompson, J. T.; Wong, G. J.; Hawley, R. L.; Kelly, M. A.; Lutz, E.; Howley, J.; Ferris, D. G.

    2013-12-01

    A significant rise in summer temperatures over the past several decades has led to widespread retreat of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS) margin and surrounding sea ice. Recent observations from geodetic stations and GRACE show that ice mass loss progressed from South Greenland up to Northwest Greenland by 2005 (Khan et al., 2010). Observations from meteorological stations at the U.S. Thule Air Force Base, remote sensing platforms, and climate reanalyses indicate a 3.5C mean annual warming in the Thule region and a 44% decrease in summer (JJAS) sea-ice concentrations in Baffin Bay from 1980-2010. Mean annual precipitation near Thule increased by 12% over this interval, with the majority of the increase occurring in fall (SON). To improve projections of future ice loss and sea-level rise in a warming climate, we are currently developing multi-proxy records (lake sediment cores, ice cores, glacial geologic data, glaciological models) of Holocene climate variability and cryospheric response in NW Greenland, with a focus on past warm periods. As part of our efforts to develop a millennial-length ice core paleoclimate record from the Thule region, we collected and analyzed snow pit samples and short firn cores (up to 20 m) from the coastal region of the GIS (2Barrel site; 76.9317 N, 63.1467 W) and the summit of North Ice Cap (76.938 N, 67.671 W) in 2011 and 2012, respectively. The 2Barrel ice core was sampled using a continuous ice core melting system at Dartmouth, and subsequently analyzed for major anion and trace element concentrations and stable water isotope ratios. Here we show that the 2Barrel ice core spanning 1990-2010 records a 25% increase in mean annual snow accumulation, and is positively correlated (r = 0.52, p<0.01) with ERA-Interim precipitation. The 2Barrel annual sea-salt Na concentration is strongly correlated (r = 0.5-0.8, p<0.05) with summer and fall sea-ice concentrations in northern Baffin Bay near Thule (Figure 1). We hypothesize that the positive

  16. Evolution of melt-vapor surface tension in silicic volcanic systems: Experiments with hydrous melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangan, M.; Sisson, T.

    2005-01-01

    We evaluate the melt-vapor surface tension (??) of natural, water-saturated dacite melt at 200 MPa, 950-1055??C, and 4.8-5.7 wt % H2O. We experimentally determine the critical supersaturation pressure for bubble nucleation as a function of dissolved water and then solve for ?? at those conditions using classical nucleation theory. The solutions obtained give dacite melt-vapor surface tensions that vary inversely with dissolved water from 0.042 (??0.003) J m-2 at 5.7 wt% H2O to 0.060 (??0.007) J m-2 at 5.2 wt% H2O to 0.073 (??0.003) J m-2 at 4.8 wt% H2O. Combining our dacite results with data from published hydrous haplogranite and high-silica rhyolite experiments reveals that melt-vapor surface tension also varies inversely with the concentration of mafic melt components (e.g., CaO, FeOtotal, MgO). We develop a thermodynamic context for these observations in which melt-vapor surface tension is represented by a balance of work terms controlled by melt structure. Overall, our results suggest that cooling, crystallization, and vapor exsolution cause systematic changes in ?? that should be considered in dynamic modeling of magmatic processes.

  17. The influence of oxide on the electrochemical processes in K2NbF7-NaCl-KCl melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lantelme, F.; Berghoute, Y.; Barner, Jens H. Von;

    1995-01-01

    Transient electrochemical techniques showed that in NaCl-KCl melts the reduction of K2NbF7 occurs through atwo-step reaction Nb(V) --> Nb(IV) --> Nb. When oxide ions were introduced, cyclic voltammetry indicated that the wavescorresponding to reduction of the complex NbF72- progressively...

  18. Recent Changes in Arctic Sea Ice Melt Onset, Freeze-Up, and Melt Season Length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markus, Thorsten; Stroeve, Julienne C.; Miller, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    In order to explore changes and trends in the timing of Arctic sea ice melt onset and freeze-up and therefore melt season length, we developed a method that obtains this information directly from satellite passive microwave data, creating a consistent data set from 1979 through present. We furthermore distinguish between early melt (the first day of the year when melt is detected) and the first day of continuous melt. A similar distinction is made for the freeze-up. Using this method we analyze trends in melt onset and freeze-up for 10 different Arctic regions. In all regions except for the Sea of Okhotsk, which shows a very slight and statistically insignificant positive trend (O.4 days/decade), trends in melt onset are negative, i.e. towards earlier melt. The trends range from -1.0day/decade for the Bering Sea to -7.3 days/decade for the East Greenland Sea. Except for the Sea of Okhotsk all areas also show a trend towards later autumn freeze onset. The Chukchi/Beaufort Seas and Laptev/East Siberian Seas observe the strongest trends with 7 days/decade. For the entire Arctic, the melt season length has increased by about 20 days over the last 30 years. Largest trends of over 1O days/decade are seen for Hudson Bay, the East Greenland Sea the Laptev/East Siberian Seas, and the Chukchi/Beaufort Seas. Those trends are statistically significant a1 the 99% level.

  19. Recent Changes in Arctic Sea Ice Melt Onset, Freeze-Up, and Melt Season Length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markus, Thorsten; Stroeve, Julienne C.; Miller, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    In order to explore changes and trends in the timing of Arctic sea ice melt onset and freeze-up and therefore melt season length, we developed a method that obtains this information directly from satellite passive microwave data, creating a consistent data set from 1979 through present. We furthermore distinguish between early melt (the first day of the year when melt is detected) and the first day of continuous melt. A similar distinction is made for the freeze-up. Using this method we analyze trends in melt onset and freeze-up for 10 different Arctic regions. In all regions except for the Sea of Okhotsk, which shows a very slight and statistically insignificant positive trend (O.4 days/decade), trends in melt onset are negative, i.e. towards earlier melt. The trends range from -1.0day/decade for the Bering Sea to -7.3 days/decade for the East Greenland Sea. Except for the Sea of Okhotsk all areas also show a trend towards later autumn freeze onset. The Chukchi/Beaufort Seas and Laptev/East Siberian Seas observe the strongest trends with 7 days/decade. For the entire Arctic, the melt season length has increased by about 20 days over the last 30 years. Largest trends of over 1O days/decade are seen for Hudson Bay, the East Greenland Sea the Laptev/East Siberian Seas, and the Chukchi/Beaufort Seas. Those trends are statistically significant a1 the 99% level.

  20. Melting of CaO and CaSiO3 at Deep Mantle Condition Using First Principles Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajgain, S. K.; Ghosh, D. B.; Karki, B. B.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate prediction of melting temperatures of major mantle minerals at high pressures is important to understand the Hadean Earth as well as to explain the observed seismic anomalies at ultra-low velocity zone (ULVZ). To further investigate the geophysical implications of our recent first principles study of molten CaO and CaSiO­3, we calculated the melting temperatures of the corresponding solid phases by integrating the Clausius-Clapeyron equation. The melting behavior of their high-pressure phases can constrain the lower mantle solidus. Our calculations show melting temperature of 5700 ± 500 kelvins for CaSiO3 and 7800 ± 600 kelvins for CaO at the base of the lower mantle (136 GPa). The bulk sound velocities of CaO and CaSiO3 liquids at the core-mantle boundary are found to be 40 % lower than P-wave seismic velocity and 22 % lower than that of MgSiO3 liquid. With substantial decrease of melting temperature by freezing point depression and iron partitioning, the partial melting of multi-component silicate and its gravitational buoyancy at ULVZ cannot be ruled out.

  1. Planetary Lithosphere-Outer Core-Inner Core-Mantle Coupled Evolution Over the Entire Age of the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tackley, P. J.; Nakagawa, T.; Louro Lourenço, D. J.; Rozel, A.

    2016-12-01

    Core evolution is determined by the heat flux extracted by the mantle as a function of time, which is itself dependent on the tectonic mode of the lithosphere and its evolution with time (Nakagawa & Tackley, 2015), as well as other factors. Thus, lithosphere, mantle and core must be treated as a coupled system in order to understand long-term core evolution. We have performed coupled modelling of mantle and core using a 2D or 3D mantle convection code with parameterized core. By plastic yielding the lithosphere may develop plate tectonics, stagnant lid, or episodic lid modes of tectonics, and the mode can change with time. Our recent models demonstrate that crustal production arising from partial melting plays a major role in facilitating plate tectonics; when this is included plate tectonics or episodic lithospheric overturn can occur even when purely thermal models predict a stagnant lithosphere (Lourenco et al, 2016). These models also demonstrate transitions between tectonic models as the planet cools. Considering Earth's core evolution, there is only a limited parameter range in which the heat extracted from the core is large enough at all times for a geodynamo to exist, but small enough that the core did not cool more than observed, a balance that becomes even more difficult if the core thermal conductivity is as high as recently thought (Nakagawa & Tackley, 2013). Models typically predict too much core cooling, which can be reduced by dense layering above the CMB: in particular such a dense, compositionally-distinct layer existing from early times is important for avoiding early too-rapid core cooling (Nakagawa & Tackley, 2014). Our latest models treat Earth evolution from the magma ocean phase to the present day (Lourenco et al., presented at this meeting). In these models an initially very hot core cools extremely rapidly until it reaches the rheological transition of mantle rock ( 40% melt fraction). Therefore, it is difficult for the core temperature at

  2. Electrical conductivity measurements on silicate melts using the loop technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waff, H. S.

    1976-01-01

    A new method is described for measurement of the electrical conductivity of silicate melts under controlled oxygen partial pressure at temperatures to 1550 C. The melt samples are suspended as droplets on platinum-rhodium loops, minimizing iron loss from the melt due to alloying with platinum, and providing maximum surface exposure of the melt to the oxygen-buffering gas atmosphere. The latter provides extremely rapid equilibration of the melt with the imposed oxygen partial pressure. The loop technique involves a minimum of setup time and cost, provides reproducible results to within + or - 5% and is well suited to electrical conductivity studies on silicate melts containing redox cations.

  3. Electrodepositions on Tantalum in alkali halide melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barner, Jens H. Von; Jensen, Annemette Hindhede; Christensen, Erik

    2012-01-01

    in a single 4 electron step. By electrolyses at a constant potential of - 1.4 V vs. Pt in a NaCl-KCl-NaF-Na2CO3 melt at 800 °C coherent carbon containing surface layers could be obtained on tantalum substrates, when a CO2 atmosphere was applied. Copyright © 2012 by The Electrochemical Society....

  4. Catastrophic failure of polymer melts during extension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik K.

    2013-01-01

    Numerical flow modeling has been applied to study the break of monodisperse polymer melts during extension. These continuum mechanical based computations are within the ideas of the microstructural ’interchain pressure’ theory. Calculated breaks, a result of small initial sample imperfections, ag...

  5. Record Summer Melt in Greenland in 2010

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tedesco, M.; Fettweis, X.; van den Broeke, M.R.; van de Wal, R.S.W.; Smeets, C.J.P.P.; van de Berg, W.J.; Serreze, M.C.; Box, J.E.

    2011-01-01

    As Arctic temperatures increase, there is growing concern about the melting of the Greenland ice sheet, which reached a new record during the summer of 2010. Understanding the changing surface mass balance of the Greenland ice sheet requires appreciation of the close links among changes in surface a

  6. Intracavity DNA melting analysis with optofluidic lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wonsuk; Fan, Xudong

    2012-11-01

    DNA melting analysis holds great promise for simple and fast DNA sequence discrimination. However, conventional fluorescence-based methods suffer from a small differential signal and demanding melting curve analysis, both of which make it difficult to distinguish the target DNA from the mismatched one. Herein, we propose and demonstrate a highly specific intracavity DNA melting analysis scheme utilizing an optofluidic laser. The laser optically amplifies the small yet intrinsic thermal dynamic difference between the target and the single-base-mismatched DNA, resulting in a differential signal that is orders of magnitude greater than with fluorescence-based methods. In particular, the existence of a phase transition between the stimulated laser emission and fluorescence (i.e., spontaneous emission) enables accurate determination of the DNA transition temperature difference. Furthermore, the high differential signal in the intracavity detection allows for scanning of the laser excitation at a fixed temperature to distinguish two DNA sequences, which provides another means for rapid DNA analysis. In this paper, we first theoretically investigate DNA melting analysis using an optofluidic laser and then experimentally explore this scheme with a high-quality optofluidic ring resonator. Distinction of two DNA sequences of up to 100 bases long is demonstrated. The intracavity detection developed here will lead to novel optofluidic devices that enable rapid and simple analysis of DNAs with very long sequences.

  7. Glass forming ability of calcium aluminosilicate melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moesgaard, Mette; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2011-01-01

    The glass forming ability (GFA) of two series of calcium aluminosilicate melts is studied by measuring their viscous behavior and crystallization tendency. The first series consists of five compositions on the joining line between the eutectic point of anorthite-wollastonite-tridymite and that of...

  8. 3He melting pressure temperature scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halperin, W.P.; Archie, C.N.; Richardson, R.C.

    1976-01-01

    The latent heat for solidification of **3He has been measured along the **3He melting curve between 23 and 1 mK. A temperature scale is established which depends only on measurements of heat, pressure and volume, and on the condition that the entropy of solid **3He approaches R ln 2 at high...

  9. Analysis of an EBeam melting process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schunk, P. R.

    Electron-Beam (EBeam) melting furnaces are routinely used to minimize the occurrence of second-phase particles in the processing of segregation-sensitive alloys. As one part of the process, a circulating electron beam impinges the surface of a crucible melt pool to help control the shape of the solidification front below. By modeling melt pool hydrodynamics, heat transfer, and the shape of solidification boundaries, we plan to optimize the dwell pattern of the beam so that the material solidifies with a composition as spatially homogeneous as possible. Both two-and three-dimensional models are being pursued with FIDAP 5.02, the former serving as a test bed for various degrees of model sophistication. A heat flux distribution is specified on the top of the domain to simulate the EBeam dwell pattern. In two dimensions it is found that an inertially-driven recirculation in the melt pool interacts with a counter-rotating buoyancy-driven recirculation, and that both recirculation influence heavily the shape of the solidification front. In three dimensions the inertial cell decays quickly with distance from the position of the inlet stream. Because the Rayleigh number can exceed 10(exp 7) for materials and operating conditions of interest, stability and the possibility of spontaneous transients are explored.

  10. INVESTIGATION OF THE METAL MELTING PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Timoshpolskij

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The nonlinear mathematical model of calculation of temperature fields in the process of metal melting is formulated and solved using the method of equivalent source taking into account nonlinearity of thermophysical properties of material and variable terms of heat exchange.

  11. Hot-Melt Adhesive Attachment System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, R. L.; Frizzell, A. W.; Little, B. D.; Progar, D. J.; Coultrip, R. H.; Couch, R. H.; Stein, B. A.; Buckley, J. D.; St. Clair, T. L.; Gleason, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    Adhesive system is as effective on Earth as in space. Fiberglass cloth mounted in head assembly. When adhesive reaches melt temperature head is attached to metals composites, ceramics, and other materials. Once attached, head cooled rapidly for quick stick. Used to tether tools or attach temporary scaffolding to walls, buildings, or beams.

  12. Using Melting Ice to Teach Radiometric Dating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Donald Underkofler

    1990-01-01

    Presented is an activity in which a mystery setting is used to motivate students to construct their own decay curves of melting ice used as an analogy to radioactive decay. Procedures, materials, apparatus, discussion topics, presentation, and thermodynamics are discussed. (CW)

  13. Spontaneous Breakup of Extended Monodisperse Polymer Melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Yu, Kaijia

    2011-01-01

    We apply continuum mechanical based, numerical modeling to study the dynamics of extended monodisperse polymer melts during the relaxation. The computations are within the ideas of the microstructural ‘‘interchain pressure’’ theory. The computations show a delayed necking resulting in a rupture...

  14. Surface-Induced Melting of Metal Nanoclusters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Quan-Wen; ZHU Ru-Zeng; WEI Jiu-An; WEN Yu-Hua

    2004-01-01

    @@ We investigate the size effect on melting of metal nanoclusters by molecular dynamics simulation and thermodynamic theory based on Kofman's melt model. By the minimization of the free energy of metal nanoclusters with respect to the thickness of the surface liquid layer, it has been found that the nanoclusters of the same metal have the same premelting temperature Tpre = T0 - T0(γsv -γlv -γst)/(ρLξ) (T0 is the melting point of bulk metal, γsv the solid-vapour interfacial free energy, γlv the liquid-vapour interfacial free energy, γsl the solid-liquid interfacial free energy, ρ the density of metal, L the latent heat of bulk metal, and ξ the characteristic length of surface-interface interaction) to be independent of the size of nanoclusters, so that the characteristic length ξ ofa metal can be obtained easily by Tpre, which can be obtained by experiments or molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The premelting temperature Tpre of Cu is obtained by MD simulations, then ξ is obtained.The melting point Tcm is further predicted by free energy analysis and is in good agreement with the result of our MD simulations. We also predict the maximum premelting-liquid width of Cu nanoclusters with various sizes and the critical size, below which there is no premelting.

  15. Melting Metal on a Playing Card

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    Many of us are familiar with the demonstration of boiling water in a paper cup held over a candle or a Bunsen burner; the ignition temperature of paper is above the temperature of 100°C at which water boils under standard conditions. A more dramatic demonstration is melting tin held in a playing card. This illustration is from Tissandier's book on…

  16. Geometry and Combinatorics of Crystal Melting

    CERN Document Server

    Yamazaki, Masahito

    2011-01-01

    We survey geometrical and especially combinatorial aspects of generalized Donaldson-Thomas invariants (also called BPS invariants) for toric Calabi-Yau manifolds, emphasizing the role of plane partitions and their generalizations in the recently proposed crystal melting model. We also comment on equivalence with a vicious walker model and the matrix model representation of the partition function.

  17. The core paradox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, G. C.; Higgins, G. H.

    1973-01-01

    Rebuttal of suggestions from various critics attempting to provide an escape from the seeming paradox originated by Higgins and Kennedy's (1971) proposed possibility that the liquid in the outer core was thermally stably stratified and that this stratification might prove a powerful inhibitor to circulation of the outer core fluid of the kind postulated for the generation of the earth's magnetic field. These suggestions are examined and shown to provide no reasonable escape from the core paradox.

  18. K-core inflation

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander L. Wolman

    2011-01-01

    K-core inflation is a new class of underlying inflation measures. The two most popular measures of underlying inflation are core inflation and trimmed mean inflation. The former removes fixed categories of goods and services (food and energy) from the inflation calculation, and the latter removes fixed percentiles of the weighted distribution of price changes. In contrast, k-core inflation specifies a size of relative price change to be removed from the inflation calculation. Thus, the catego...

  19. Element Partitioning Constraints on Formation and Composition of the Earth's Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J.; Agee, C. B.; Fei, Y.

    1998-01-01

    Element partitioning study provides a number of constraints on the formation and composition of the core. First, partitioning of siderophile elements between the core and mantle should explain the "excess" siderophile elements in the mantle. Second, partitioning of light element(s) between the core and mantle should supply the core with the right amount of light element(s) to account for the density deficit in the core. Third, partitioning of light element(s) between the inner and outer core should be consistent with the observed difference in density deficits (relative to pure Fe) between these two reservoirs. In this study, high-pressure and high-temperature experiments have been conducted to investigate the pressure, temperature, and composition effects on partitioning of siderophile elements Ni and Co between core-forming Fe alloy and mantle silicate melt and minerals, partitioning of light elements S, O, and Si between core-forming Fe alloy and mantle silicate melt and minerals, and partitioning of light elements S and C between solid and liquid Fe. The implications of these results for mechanism of core formation and the composition of the core are discussed.

  20. Deep Martian Mantle Melting and Implications for the Source Regions of Martian Basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebske, C.

    2016-12-01

    The chemical compositions of Martian SNC meteorites (Shergotty, Nakhla and Chassigny types) show significant variations in major and trace element contents, suggesting that parental magmas originate from different geochemical reservoirs. Radiogenic isotope systematics further indicate that some reservoirs were strongly influenced by silicate differentiation processes about 4.5 Gyr ago, placing such events in tight vicinity to core formation, and therefore favour magma ocean crystallisation and differentiation as a plausible mechanism for generating a diversity of sources. However, any predictions of geochemical signatures resulting from large scale magma ocean differentiation require precise knowledge of melting relations of a primordial bulk silicate Mars composition to be known. The aim of this study is to investigate solidus and liquids temperatures, mineral modes and melt fractions for the bulk silicate Mars (BSM) composition proposed by Taylor (2013, Chemie der Erde 73, 401-420) in a self consistent set of experiments from ambient to core-mantle boundary (estimated at around 20 GPa) pressures. Specific emphasis is put on the presure range greater than 10 GPa to more rigorously investigate the potential role of majoritic garnet during magma ocean differentiation. The new results, combined with data from previous studies on phase relations and mineral-melt element partitioning, are being used to derive time-integrated geochemical models to discuss fractionation mechanisms that could lead to the distinct chemical signatures of source regions proposed for martian meteorites.

  1. Constraints on the Parental Melts of Enriched Shergottites from Image Analysis and High Pressure Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collinet, M.; Medard, E.; Devouard, B.; Peslier, A.

    2012-01-01

    Martian basalts can be classified in at least two geochemically different families: enriched and depleted shergottites. Enriched shergottites are characterized by higher incompatible element concentrations and initial Sr-87/Sr-86 and lower initial Nd-143/Nd-144 and Hf-176/Hf-177 than depleted shergottites [e.g. 1, 2]. It is now generally admitted that shergottites result from the melting of at least two distinct mantle reservoirs [e.g. 2, 3]. Some of the olivine-phyric shergottites (either depleted or enriched), the most magnesian Martian basalts, could represent primitive melts, which are of considerable interest to constrain mantle sources. Two depleted olivine-phyric shergottites, Yamato (Y) 980459 and Northwest Africa (NWA) 5789, are in equilibrium with their most magnesian olivine (Fig. 1) and their bulk rock compositions are inferred to represent primitive melts [4, 5]. Larkman Nunatak (LAR) 06319 [3, 6, 7] and NWA 1068 [8], the most magnesian enriched basalts, have bulk Mg# that are too high to be in equilibrium with their olivine megacryst cores. Parental melt compositions have been estimated by subtracting the most magnesian olivine from the bulk rock composition, assuming that olivine megacrysts have partially accumulated [3, 9]. However, because this technique does not account for the actual petrography of these meteorites, we used image analysis to study these rocks history, reconstruct their parent magma and understand the nature of olivine megacrysts.

  2. Sediment Core Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Provides instrumentation and expertise for physical and geoacoustic characterization of marine sediments. DESCRIPTION: The multisensor core logger measures...

  3. Sediment Core Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Provides instrumentation and expertise for physical and geoacoustic characterization of marine sediments.DESCRIPTION: The multisensor core logger measures...

  4. In Situ X-Ray Diffraction Study on Surface Melting of Bi Nanoparticles Embedded in a SiO2 Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-Ming; Huo, Kai-Tuo; Liu, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Bi nanoparticles embedded in a SiO2 matrix were prepared via the high energy ball milling method. The melting behavior of Bi nanoparticles was studied by means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and high-temperature in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD). DSC cannot distinguish the surface melting from ‘bulk’ melting of the Bi nanoparticles. The XRD intensity of the Bi nanoparticles decreases progressively during the in situ heating process. The variation in the normalized integrated XRD intensity versus temperature is related to the average grain size of Bi nanoparticles. Considering the effects of temperature on Debye—Waller factor and Lorentz-polarization factor, we discuss the XRD results in accordance with surface melting. Our results show that the in situ XRD technique is effective to explore the surface melting of nanoparticles.

  5. A quasimechanism of melt acceleration in the thermal decomposition of crystalline organic solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henson, Bryan F [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    It has been know for half a century that many crystalline organic solids undergo an acceleration in the rate of thermal decomposition as the melting temperature is approached. This acceleration terminates at the melting point, exhibiting an Arrhenius-like temperature dependence in the faster decomposition rate from the liquid phase. This observation has been modeled previously using various premelting behaviors based on e.g. freezing point depression induced by decomposition products or solvent impurities. These models do not, however, indicate a mechanism for liquid formation and acceleration which is an inherent function of the bulk thermodynamics of the molecule. Here we show that such an inherent thermodynamic mechanism for liquid formation exists in the form of the so-called quasi-liquid layer at the solid surface. We explore a kinetic mechanism which describes the acceleration of rate and is a function of the free energies of sublimation and vaporization. We construct a differential rate law from these thermodynamic free energies and a normalized progress variable. We further construct a reduced variable formulation of the model which is a simple function of the metastable liquid activity below the melting point, and show that it is applicable to the observed melt acceleration in several common organic crystalline solids. A component of the differential rate law, zero order in the progress variable, is shown to be proportional to the thickness of the quasiliquid layer predicted by a recent thermodynamic theory for this phenomenon. This work therefore serves not only to provide new insight into thermal decomposition in a broad class or organic crystalline solids, but also further validates the underlying thermodynamic nature of the phenomenon of liquid formation on the molecular surface at temperatures below the melting point.

  6. Visualization of Atomization Gas Flow and Melt Break-up Effects in Response to Nozzle Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Iver; Rieken, Joel; Meyer, John; Byrd, David; Heidloff, Andy

    2011-04-01

    Both powder particle size control and efficient use of gas flow energy are highly prized goals for gas atomization of metal and alloy powder to minimize off-size powder inventory (or 'reverb') and excessive gas consumption. Recent progress in the design of close-coupled gas atomization nozzles and the water model simulation of melt feed tubes were coupled with previous results from several types of gas flow characterization methods, e.g., aspiration measurements and gas flow visualization, to make progress toward these goals. Size distribution analysis and high speed video recordings of gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS) experiments on special ferritic stainless steel alloy powders with an Ar+O{sub 2} gas mixture were performed to investigate the operating mechanisms and possible advantages of several melt flow tube modifications with one specific gas atomization nozzle. In this study, close-coupled gas atomization under closed wake gas flow conditions was demonstrated to produce large yields of ultrafine (dia.<20 {mu}m) powders (up to 32%) with moderate standard deviations (1.62 to 1.99). The increased yield of fine powders is consistent with the dual atomization mechanisms of closed wake gas flow patterns in the near-field of the melt orifice. Enhanced size control by stabilized pre-filming of the melt with a slotted trumpet bell pour tube was not clearly demonstrated in the current experiments, perhaps confounded by the influence of the melt oxidation reaction that occurred simultaneously with the atomization process. For this GARS variation of close-coupled gas atomization, it may be best to utilize the straight cylindrical pour tube and closed wake operation of an atomization nozzle with higher gas mass flow to promote the maximum yields of ultrafine powders that are preferred for the oxide dispersion strengthened alloys made from these powders.

  7. Experimentally-determined carbon isotope fractionation in and between methane-bearing melt and fluid to upper mantle temperatures and pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mysen, Bjorn

    2016-07-01

    The behavior of melts and fluids is at the core of understanding formation and evolution of the Earth. To advance our understanding of their role, high-pressure/-temperature experiments were employed to determine melt and fluid structure together with carbon isotope partitioning within and between (CH4 +H2O +H2)-saturated aluminosilicate melts and (CH4 +H2O +H2)-fluids. The samples were characterized with vibrational spectroscopy while at temperatures and pressures from 475° to 850 °C and 92 to 1158 MPa, respectively. The solution equilibrium is 2CH4 +Qn = 2 CH3- +H2O +Q n + 1 where the superscript, n, in the Qn-notation describes silicate species where n denotes the number of bridging oxygen. The solution equilibrium affects the carbon isotope fractionation factor between melt and fluid, αmelt/fluid. Moreover, it is significantly temperature-dependent. The αmelt/fluid < 1 with temperatures less than about 1050 °C, and is greater than 1 at higher temperature. Methane-bearing melts can exist in the upper mantle at fO2 ≤fO2 (MW) (Mysen et al., 2011). Reduced (Csbnd H)-species in present-day upper mantle magma, therefore, are likely. During melting and crystallization in this environment, the δ13C of melts increases with temperature at a rate of ∼ 0.6 ‰ /°C. From the simple-system data presented here, at T ≤ 1050°C, melt in equilibrium with a peridotite-(CH4 +H2O +H2)-bearing mantle source will be isotopically lighter than fluid. At higher temperatures, melts will be isotopically heavier. Degassing at T ≤ 1050°C will shift δ13C of degassed magma to more positive values, whereas degassing at T ≥ 1050°C, will reduce the δ13C of the degassed magma.

  8. Communication: Theory of melt-memory in polymer crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthukumar, M.

    2016-07-01

    Details of crystallization processes of a polymer at the crystallization temperature Tc from its melt kept initially at the melt temperature Tm depend profoundly on the nature of the initial melt state and often are accompanied by memory effects. This phenomenon is in contrast to small molecular systems where the supercooling (Tm0-Tc), with Tm0 being the equilibrium melting temperature, and not (Tm - Tc), determines the nature of crystallization. In addressing this five-decade old puzzle of melt-memory in polymer crystallization, we present a theory to describe melt-memory effects, by invoking an intermediate inhomogeneous melt state in the pathway between the melt and crystalline states. Using newly introduced dissolution temperature T10 for the inhomogeneous melt state and the transition temperature Tt0 for the transition between the inhomogeneous melt and crystalline states, analytical formulas are derived for the nucleation rate as a function of the melt temperature. The theory is general to address different kinds of melt-memory effects depending on whether Tm is higher or lower than Tm0. The derived results are in qualitative agreement with known experimental data, while making predictions for further experiments on melt-memory.

  9. Lithospheric Architecture, Heterogenities, Instabilities, Melting - insight form numerical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorczyk, Weronika; Hobbs, Bruce; Ord, Alison; Gessner, Klaus; Gerya, Taras V.

    2010-05-01

    The seismological structure of the Earth's lithosphere is identified to be strongly heterogeneous in terms of thermal and rheological structures. Lithospheric discontinuities (sharp changes in the thermal and/or compositional structure) are thought to be long lived and are mostly correlated with major tectonic boundaries that commonly have been reactivated and which subsequently are the foci of magma intrusion and major mineralization. Resent studies have shown that mantle metasomatism is also controlled by such boundaries. This paper explores the control that lithospheric heterogeneity exerts on the thermal and chemical evolution during deformation subsequent to the development of the heterogeneity. We explore the behaviour of the rheological heterogeneous lithosphere in a compressional regime. The occurrence of such variations may be caused for instance by amalgamation of micro-continents such as is thought to be characteristic of the Yilgarn, Western Australia or South Africa. Theses micro-continents, due to diverse histories may be characterised by various thermal and rheological structures. The models are simplistic but illustrate the basic principles. The code used in this study is based on a conservative finite-difference, multi-grid, marker in cell method. Devolatilisation reactions and melting can affect the physical properties of rocks and are incorporated in a self-consistent manner. We use a petrological-thermomechanical modelling approach with all rock properties including mechanical properties calculated in the Lagrangian scheme for rock markers at every time step based on Gibbs free energy minimization as a function of the local pressure, temperature and rock composition. The results illustrate that initial structural complexity is necessary for and has a dramatic effect on fault and development, the growth of deep basins, core complex formation, melting and devolatilisation within the lithosphere. The horizontal and vertical variation in plastic

  10. The influence of partial melting and melt migration on the rheology of the continental crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcante, Geane Carolina G.; Viegas, Gustavo; Archanjo, Carlos José; da Silva, Marcos Egydio

    2016-11-01

    The presence of melt during deformation produces a drastic change in the rheological behavior of the continental crust; rock strength is decreased even for melt fractions as low as ∼7%. At pressure/temperature conditions typical of the middle to lower crust, melt-bearing systems may play a critical role in the process of strain localization and in the overall strength of the continental lithosphere. In this contribution we focus on the role and dynamics of melt flow in two different mid-crustal settings formed during the Brasiliano orogeny: (i) a large-scale anatectic layer in an orthogonal collision belt, represented by the Carlos Chagas anatexite in southeastern Brazil, and (ii) a strike-slip setting, in which the Espinho Branco anatexite in the Patos shear zone (northeast Brazil) serves as an analogue. Both settings, located in eastern Brazil, are part of the Neoproterozoic tectonics that resulted in widespread partial melting, shear zone development and the exhumation of middle to lower crustal layers. These layers consist of compositionally heterogeneous anatexites, with variable former melt fractions and leucosome structures. The leucosomes usually form thick interconnected networks of magma that reflect a high melt content (>30%) during deformation. From a comparison of previous work based on detailed petrostructural and AMS studies of the anatexites exposed in these areas, we discuss the rheological implications caused by the accumulation of a large volume of melt "trapped" in mid-crustal levels, and by the efficient melt extraction along steep shear zones. Our analyses suggest that rocks undergoing partial melting along shear settings exhibit layers with contrasting competence, implying successive periods of weakening and strengthening. In contrast, regions where a large amount of magma accumulates lack clear evidence of competence contrast between layers, indicating that they experienced only one major stage of dramatic strength drop. This comparative

  11. Modeling the Temperature Fields of Copper Powder Melting in the Process of Selective Laser Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saprykin, A. A.; Ibragimov, E. A.; Babakova, E. V.

    2016-08-01

    Various process variables influence on the quality of the end product when SLM (Selective Laser Melting) synthesizing items of powder materials. The authors of the paper suggest using the model of distributing the temperature fields when forming single tracks and layers of copper powder PMS-1. Relying on the results of modeling it is proposed to reduce melting of powder particles out of the scanning area.

  12. Heat storage system adapted for incongruently melting heat storage materials and congruently melting heat storage materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenfelder, J.L.

    1980-12-30

    A heat storage article adapted for prevention of stratification of incongruently melting heat storage materials, such as eutectic salts, and adapted for use with congruently melting heat storage materials, such as paraffins. The article is comprised of a concrete stone composition, a certain portion of which is comprised of metallic heat transfer materials in order to increase heat transfer through the concrete structure. The concrete structure has an internal cavity which is filled with either the eutectic salt material or the paraffin material.

  13. Phosphorus Zoning Patterns and the Formation of Olivine-Hosted Melt Inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milman-Barris, M. S.; Baker, M.; Beckett, J.; Sobolev, A.; Vielzeuf, D.; Stolper, E.

    2006-12-01

    Melt inclusions, common in Hawaiian olivine (ol) phenocrysts, are used to infer compositional characteristics of parental magmas [1,2]. Here we describe textural associations of melt inclusions in Mauna Kea ol with zoning in phosphorus in the ol host. EMP X-ray maps show that Hawaiian ol phenocrysts are generally unzoned in Fe/Mg, Ca, and Ni, but most are prominently zoned in P (from ~0.006 wt% P2O5, the detection limit, to ~0.2 wt%). P zoning, often oscillatory, generally parallels crystal edges, is texturally variable, and can be present from core to rim. Al and Cr zoning, when present, correlates with P. P-rich zones sometimes outline skeletal, hopper shapes similar to ol morphologies grown in high-cooling rate experiments. Preservation of delicate P zonation in ol phenocrysts likely reflects slow diffusion of P in ol. We studied ol phenocrysts with multiple melt inclusions varying significantly in P2O5 (e.g., 0.3-0.4 to >1 wt% in one ol) to establish whether high-P inclusions are enclosed in high-P ol. Some grains contain inclusions spanning a K/P range (e.g., 0.14-1.86 in one grain), suggesting they are not related to each other by simple crystal fractionation. Although all of our melt-inclusion-bearing ol show melt inclusions to be spatially associated with high-P regions of the crystals, the ol in direct contact with melt inclusions is nearly always low in P. This observation holds true even where both high- and low-P inclusions are associated with the same P-rich ol zone. Moreover, low-P ol zones directly surrounding melt inclusions often cross-cut (and appear to replace) high-P features. In one case, a chevron-shaped wedge of low-P ol surrounding a melt inclusion crosscuts high-P, oscillatory zoned ol. Low-P regions directly around melt inclusions vary from <10 to many 10s of μm across; i.e., most are too large to represent simple crystallization on the inclusion wall. 1-atm cooling rate experiments (15-30°C/hr) on a primitive Mauna Kea basalt

  14. Inhibited coupling hollow-core photonic crystal fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benabid, F.; Gérôme, F.; Vincetti, L.; Debord, B.; Alharbi, M.; Bradley, T.

    2014-02-01

    We review the recent progress on the enhanced inhibited coupling in kagome hollow-core photonic crystal fiber by introducing negative curvature in the fiber-core shape. We show that increasing the hypocycloid contour curvature leads to a dramatic decrease in transmission loss and optical overlap with the silica surround and to a single modedness. Fabricated hypocycloid-core hollow-core photonic crystal fibers with a transmission loss in the range of 20-40 dB/km and for a spectral range of 700 nm-2000 nm have now become typical.

  15. Formation of melt droplets, melt fragments, and accretionary impact lapilli during a hypervelocity impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, B. C.; Melosh, H. J.

    2014-01-01

    We present a model that describes the formation of melt droplets, melt fragments, and accretionary impact lapilli during a hypervelocity impact. Using the iSALE hydrocode, coupled to the ANEOS equation of state for silica, we create high-resolution two-dimensional impact models to track the motion of impact ejecta. We then estimate the size of the ejecta products using simple analytical expressions and information derived from our hydrocode models. Ultimately, our model makes predictions of how the size of the ejecta products depends on impactor size, impact velocity, and ejection velocity. In general, we find that larger impactor sizes result in larger ejecta products and higher ejection velocities result in smaller ejecta product sizes. We find that a 10 km diameter impactor striking at a velocity of 20 km/s creates millimeter scale melt droplets comparable to the melt droplets found in the Chicxulub ejecta curtain layer. Our model also predicts that melt droplets, melt fragments, and accretionary impact lapilli should be found together in well preserved ejecta curtain layers and that all three ejecta products can form even on airless bodies that lack significant volatile content. This prediction agrees with observations of ejecta from the Sudbury and Chicxulub impacts as well as the presence of accretionary impact lapilli in lunar breccia.

  16. Thermodynamic Calculations of Melt in Melt Pool During Laser Cladding High Silicon Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Dan-yang; LIU Chang-sheng; ZHANG Bin

    2008-01-01

    Based on the Miedema's formation heat model for binary alloys and the Toop's asymmetric model for terna-ry alloys, the formation heat, excess entropy, and activity coefficients of silicon ranging from 1 900 K to 4 100 K in the Fe-Si-C melt formed during the laser cladding high silicon coatings process were calculated. The results indicated that all values of InγOSi, εCSi, ρSiSi and ρCSi are negative in the temperature range and these values increase as the tempera-ture increases. And all values of εSiSi and ρSi-CSi are positive and these values decrease with increasing temperature. The iso-activity lines of silicon are distributed axisymmetrically to the incident laser beam in the melt pool vertical to the laser scanning direction. And the iso-activity lines of silicon in the front of the melt pool along the laser scanning direction are more intensive than those in the back of the melt pool. The activity of silicon on the bottom of the melt pool is lower than that in the effecting center of laser beam on the top surface of the melt pool and it may be the im-portant reason for the formation of the silicides and excellent metallurgical bonding between the laser cladding coating and the substrate.

  17. Melts at the Lithosphere-Asthenosphere Boundary beneath the Basin and Range, US (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plank, T.; Gazel, E.; Bendersky, C.; Forsyth, D. W.; Rau, C. J.; Lee, C.

    2010-12-01

    generally coincide with the top of the low velocity zone (LVZ), and not the velocity minimum, in these regions. The gradient in velocity at the top of the LVZ, transitioning to a high velocity lid, is consistent with the location of the LAB. Melts may equilibrate here because their upward progress is impeded by the rheological contrast, stalling below the stronger lithosphere. Melts formed at greater depths are likely responsible for velocities in the minimum, typically less than 4.1 km/s, too low to be caused by temperature alone without unreasonably high attenuation. These velocity constraints, along with temperatures of equilibration that are 1300-1400 C, support a melting region in upwelling asthenosphere, below the LAB. We do not find evidence for major melting within a cold, hydrous lithosphere, nor exclusively at the base of a thermally eroded or extended lithosphere.

  18. Modeling the summertime evolution of sea-ice melt ponds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lüthje, Mikael; Feltham, D.L.; Taylor, P.D.;

    2006-01-01

    We present a mathematical model describing the summer melting of sea ice. We simulate the evolution of melt ponds and determine area coverage and total surface ablation. The model predictions are tested for sensitivity to the melt rate of unponded ice, enhanced melt rate beneath the melt ponds......, vertical seepage, and horizontal permeability. The model is initialized with surface topographies derived from laser altimetry corresponding to first-year sea ice and multiyear sea ice. We predict that there are large differences in the depth of melt ponds and the area of coverage between the two types...... of ice. We also find that the vertical seepage rate and the melt rate of unponded ice are important in determining the total surface ablation and area covered by melt ponds....

  19. Modeling the summertime evolution of sea-ice melt ponds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lüthje, Mikael; Feltham, D.L.; Taylor, P.D.

    2006-01-01

    We present a mathematical model describing the summer melting of sea ice. We simulate the evolution of melt ponds and determine area coverage and total surface ablation. The model predictions are tested for sensitivity to the melt rate of unponded ice, enhanced melt rate beneath the melt ponds......, vertical seepage, and horizontal permeability. The model is initialized with surface topographies derived from laser altimetry corresponding to first-year sea ice and multiyear sea ice. We predict that there are large differences in the depth of melt ponds and the area of coverage between the two types...... of ice. We also find that the vertical seepage rate and the melt rate of unponded ice are important in determining the total surface ablation and area covered by melt ponds....

  20. Sea Ice Melt Pond Data from the Canadian Arctic

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains observations of albedo, depth, and physical characteristics of melt ponds on sea ice, taken during the summer of 1994. The melt ponds studied...

  1. Ice Core Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krim, Jessica; Brody, Michael

    2008-01-01

    What can glaciers tell us about volcanoes and atmospheric conditions? How does this information relate to our understanding of climate change? Ice Core Investigations is an original and innovative activity that explores these types of questions. It brings together popular science issues such as research, climate change, ice core drilling, and air…

  2. Making an Ice Core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopaska-Merkel, David C.

    1995-01-01

    Explains an activity in which students construct a simulated ice core. Materials required include only a freezer, food coloring, a bottle, and water. This hands-on exercise demonstrates how a glacier is formed, how ice cores are studied, and the nature of precision and accuracy in measurement. Suitable for grades three through eight. (Author/PVD)

  3. Ice Core Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krim, Jessica; Brody, Michael

    2008-01-01

    What can glaciers tell us about volcanoes and atmospheric conditions? How does this information relate to our understanding of climate change? Ice Core Investigations is an original and innovative activity that explores these types of questions. It brings together popular science issues such as research, climate change, ice core drilling, and air…

  4. Iowa Core Annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iowa Department of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    One central component of a great school system is a clear set of expectations, or standards, that educators help all students reach. In Iowa, that effort is known as the Iowa Core. The Iowa Core represents the statewide academic standards, which describe what students should know and be able to do in math, science, English language arts, and…

  5. Combustion and Engine-Core Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihme, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    The implementation of advanced low-emission aircraft engine technologies and the reduction of noise from airframe, fan, and jet exhaust have made noise contributions from an engine core increasingly important. Therefore, meeting future ambitious noise-reduction goals requires the consideration of engine-core noise. This article reviews progress on the fundamental understanding, experimental analysis, and modeling of engine-core noise; addresses limitations of current techniques; and identifies opportunities for future research. After identifying core-noise contributions from the combustor, turbomachinery, nozzles, and jet exhaust, they are examined in detail. Contributions from direct combustion noise, originating from unsteady combustion, and indirect combustion noise, resulting from the interaction of flow-field perturbations with mean-flow variations in turbine stages and nozzles, are analyzed. A new indirect noise-source contribution arising from mixture inhomogeneities is identified by extending the theory. Although typically omitted in core-noise analysis, the impact of mean-flow variations and nozzle-upstream perturbations on the jet-noise modulation is examined, providing potential avenues for future core-noise mitigation.

  6. Hybrid Analysis of Engine Core Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Jeffrey; Kim, Jeonglae; Ihme, Matthias

    2015-11-01

    Core noise, or the noise generated within an aircraft engine, is becoming an increasing concern for the aviation industry as other noise sources are progressively reduced. The prediction of core noise generation and propagation is especially challenging for computationalists since it involves extensive multiphysics including chemical reaction and moving blades in addition to the aerothermochemical effects of heated jets. In this work, a representative engine flow path is constructed using experimentally verified geometries to simulate the physics of core noise. A combustor, single-stage turbine, nozzle and jet are modeled in separate calculations using appropriate high fidelity techniques including LES, actuator disk theory and Ffowcs-Williams Hawkings surfaces. A one way coupling procedure is developed for passing fluctuations downstream through the flowpath. This method effectively isolates the core noise from other acoustic sources, enables straightforward study of the interaction between core noise and jet exhaust, and allows for simple distinction between direct and indirect noise. The impact of core noise on the farfield jet acoustics is studied extensively and the relative efficiency of different disturbance types and shapes is examined in detail.

  7. Magnetohydrodynamic Convection in the Outer Core and its Geodynamic Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Weijia; Chao, Benjamin F.; Fang, Ming

    2004-01-01

    The Earth's fluid outer core is in vigorous convection through much of the Earth's history. In addition to generating and maintaining Earth s time-varying magnetic field (geodynamo), the core convection also generates mass redistribution in the core and a dynamical pressure field on the core-mantle boundary (CMB). All these shall result in various core-mantle interactions, and contribute to surface geodynamic observables. For example, electromagnetic core-mantle coupling arises from finite electrically conducting lower mantle; gravitational interaction occurs between the cores and the heterogeneous mantle; mechanical coupling may also occur when the CMB topography is aspherical. Besides changing the mantle rotation via the coupling torques, the mass-redistribution in the core shall produce a spatial-temporal gravity anomaly. Numerical modeling of the core dynamical processes contributes in several geophysical disciplines. It helps explain the physical causes of surface geodynamic observables via space geodetic techniques and other means, e.g. Earth's rotation variation on decadal time scales, and secular time-variable gravity. Conversely, identification of the sources of the observables can provide additional insights on the dynamics of the fluid core, leading to better constraints on the physics in the numerical modeling. In the past few years, our core dynamics modeling efforts, with respect to our MoSST model, have made significant progress in understanding individual geophysical consequences. However, integrated studies are desirable, not only because of more mature numerical core dynamics models, but also because of inter-correlation among the geophysical phenomena, e.g. mass redistribution in the outer core produces not only time-variable gravity, but also gravitational core-mantle coupling and thus the Earth's rotation variation. They are expected to further facilitate multidisciplinary studies of core dynamics and interactions of the core with other

  8. Distribution of siderophile and other trace elements in melt rock at the Chicxulub impact structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuraytz, B. C.; Lindstrom, D. J.; Martinez, R. R.; Sharpton, V. L.; Marin, L. E.

    1994-01-01

    Recent isotopic and mineralogical studies have demonstrated a temporal and chemical link between the Chicxulub multiring impact basin and ejecta at the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary. A fundamental problem yet to be resolved, however, is identification of the projectile responsible for this cataclysmic event. Drill core samples of impact melt rock from the Chichxulub structure contain Ir and Os abundances and Re-Os isotopic ratios indicating the presence of up to approx. 3 percent meteoritic material. We have used a technique involving microdrilling and high sensitivity instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) in conjunction with electron microprobe analysis to characterize further the distribution of siderophile and other trace elements among phases within the C1-N10 melt rock.

  9. Melting behaviour of gold-platinum nanoalloy clusters by molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ong, Yee Pin; Yoon, Tiem Leong [School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 USM, Penang (Malaysia); Lim, Thong Leng [Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Multimedia University, Melaka Campus, 75450 Melaka (Malaysia)

    2015-04-24

    The melting behavior of bimetallic gold-platinum nanoclusters is studied by applying Brownian-type isothermal molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, a program modified from the cubic coupling scheme (CCS). The process begins with the ground-state structures obtained from global minimum search algorithm and proceeds with the investigation of the effect of temperature on the thermal properties of gold-platinum nanoalloy clusters. N-body Gupta potential has been employed in order to account for the interactions between gold and platinum atoms. The ground states of the nanoalloy clusters, which are core-shell segregated, are heated until they become thermally segregated. The detailed melting mechanism of the nanoalloy clusters is studied via this approach to provide insight into the thermal stability of the nanoalloy clusters.

  10. Geoantineutrino Spectrum and Slow Nuclear Burning on the Boundary of the Liquid and Solid Phases of the Earth's core

    CERN Document Server

    Rusov, V D; Khotyaintseva, E N; Kosenko, S I; Litvinov, D A; Pavlovich, V N; Tarasov, V A; Vaschenko, V N; Zelentsova, T N

    2004-01-01

    The problem of the geoantineutrino deficit and the experimental results of the interaction of uranium dioxide and carbide with iron-nickel and silica-alumina melts at high pressure (5-10 GPa) and temperature (1600- 22000 C) have induced us to consider the possible consequences of made by V. Anisichkin and A. Ershov supposition that there is an actinoid shell on boundary of liquid and solid phases of the Earth's core. We have shown that the activation of a natural nuclear reactor operating as the solitary waves of nuclear burning in 238U- and/or 232Th-medium (in particular, the neutron-fission progressive wave of Feoktistov and/or Teller-Ishikawa-Wood) such physical consequent can be. The simplified model of the kinetics of accumulation and burnup in U-Pu fuel cycle of Feoktistov is developed. The results of the numerical simulation of neutron-fission wave in two-phase UO2/Fe medium on a surface of the Earth's solid core are presented. On the basis of O'Nions-Ivensen-Hamilton model of the geochemical evolution...

  11. Mars' core and magnetism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, D J

    2001-07-12

    The detection of strongly magnetized ancient crust on Mars is one of the most surprising outcomes of recent Mars exploration, and provides important insight about the history and nature of the martian core. The iron-rich core probably formed during the hot accretion of Mars approximately 4.5 billion years ago and subsequently cooled at a rate dictated by the overlying mantle. A core dynamo operated much like Earth's current dynamo, but was probably limited in duration to several hundred million years. The early demise of the dynamo could have arisen through a change in the cooling rate of the mantle, or even a switch in convective style that led to mantle heating. Presently, Mars probably has a liquid, conductive outer core and might have a solid inner core like Earth.

  12. Analysis of Summer 2002 Melt Extent on the Greenland Ice Sheet using MODIS and SSM/I Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Dorothy K.; Williams, Richard S., Jr.; Steffen, Konrad; Chien, Y. L.; Foster, James L.; Robinson, David A.; Riggs, George A.

    2004-01-01

    Previous work has shown that the summer of 2002 had the greatest area of snow melt extent on the Greenland ice sheet ever recorded using passive-microwave data. In this paper, we compare the 0 degree isotherm derived from the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument, with Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I)-derived melt, at the time of the maximum melt extent in 2002. To validate the MODIS-derived land-surface temperatures (LSTs), we compared the MODIS LSTs with air temperatures from nine stations (using 11 different data points) and found that they agreed to within 2.3 plus or minus 2.09 C, with station temperatures consistently lower than the MODIS LSTs. According to the MODIS LST, the maximum surface melt extended to approximately 2300 m in southern Greenland; while the SSM/I measurements showed that the maximum melt extended to nearly 2700 m in southeastern Greenland. The MODIS and SSM/I data are complementary in providing detailed information about the progression of surface and near-surface melt on the Greenland ice sheet.

  13. In situ determination of binary alloy melt compositions in the LHDAC by X- Radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, O. T.; Walter, M. J.; Walker, D.; Clark, S. M.

    2008-12-01

    Constraining the light element in Earth's molten outer core requires an understanding of the melting phase relations in iron-light element binary systems. For example, it is critical to determine the composition of liquids at binary eutectics. Typically such measurements are carried out after the sample has been quenched in temperature and pressure. Such 'cook and look' methods possibly suffer from systematic errors introduced by exsolution of the light element from the melt on quench and error in the reintegration of the liquid composition [1]. Here, we present a novel method for the determination of melt compositions in iron-light element binary systems in situ in the LHDAC at simultaneous high-pressure, high-temperature conditions. Samples consist of a light element bearing compound, such as FeO, surrounded by a pure iron ring, forming a donut ~100 μm in diameter and ~15 μm thick. The donuts are loaded into stainless steel gaskets in the DAC, sandwiched between discs fabricated from sol-gel deposited nanocrystalline Al2O3 with similar dimensions to the donut. Pressure is monitored by ruby fluorescence during compression. The sample is heated at the boundary between the iron and light element compound using two 100 W IR lasers in a double-sided configuration at beamline 12.2.2 at the Advanced Light Source. Temperature is measured by spectroradiometry. Before, during and after melting, X-radiographic images of the sample are taken by shining a defocused beam of synchrotron X-rays through the sample and onto a CdWO4 phosphor. The visible light from the phosphor is then focused onto a high resolution CCD, where absorption contrast images are recorded. The absorption of the molten region is then determined, and it's composition calculated by linear interpolation between the absorption of the two solid end members. As a test of the reliability of the method we measured the Fe-FeS eutectic to 20 GPa and our results are in good agreement with previous studies that are

  14. The Global Array of Primitve Arc Melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, M. W.; Jagoutz, O. E.

    2015-12-01

    A longstanding question concerns the nature of the melts forming in the subarc mantle and giving rise to arc magmatism. The global array of primitive arc melts (1180 volcanic rocks in 25 arcs extracted from the georoc database, calculated to be in equilibrium with mantle olivine) yields five principal melt types: calc-alkaline basalts and high-Mg andesites, tholeiitic basalts and high-Mg andesites, and shoshonitic or alkaline arc melts; many arcs have more than one type. Primitive calc-alkaline basalts occur in 11 arcs but most strikingly, 8 continental arcs (incl. Aleutians, Cascades, Japan, Mexico, Kamtschatka) have a continuous range of calc-alkaline basalts to high-Mg andesites with mostly 48-58 wt% SiO2. In each arc, these are spatially congruent, trace element patterns overlap, and major elements form a continuum. Their Ca-Mg-Si systematics suggests saturation in olivine+opx+cpx. We hence interpret the large majority of high-Mg andesites as derived from primitive calc-alkaline basalts through fractionation and reaction in the shallower mantle. Removal of anhydrous mantle phases at lower pressures increases SiO2 and H2O-contents while Mg# and Ni remain buffered to mantle values. Primitive tholeiitic basalts (Cascades, Kermadec, Marianas, Izu-Bonin, Japan, Palau, Sunda) have a much lesser subduction signal (e.g. in LILE) than the calc-alkaline suite. These tholeiites have been interpreted to form through decompression melting, but also characterize young intraoceanic arcs. In the two continental arcs with both tholeiitic and calc-alkaline primitive basalts (clearly distinct in trace patterns), there is no clear spatial segregation (Casacades, Japan). Three intraoceanic arcs (Marianas, Izu-Bonin, Tonga) have primitive tholeiitic, highly depleted high-Mg andesites (boninites) with HFSE and HREE slightly above primitive mantle values. These deviate in majors from the array formed by the basalts and calc-alkaline andesites suggesting that only these formed from a

  15. Transition in the fractal geometry of Arctic melt ponds

    OpenAIRE

    Hohenegger, C.; B. Alali; K. R. Steffen; D. K. Perovich; K. M. Golden

    2012-01-01

    During the Arctic melt season, the sea ice surface undergoes a remarkable transformation from vast expanses of snow covered ice to complex mosaics of ice and melt ponds. Sea ice albedo, a key parameter in climate modeling, is determined by the complex evolution of melt pond configurations. In fact, ice–albedo feedback has played a major role in the recent declines of the summer Arctic sea ice pack. However, understanding melt pond evolution remains a significant challenge to improving climate...

  16. Multiple Melting Endotherms of Syndiotactic Polystyrene in β Crystalline Form

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A series of syndiotactic polystyrene (SPS) samples in β crystalline form were prepared by cooling from the melt at various cooling rates. The effects of cooling rate from the melt, and DSC heating rate on the multiple melting behaviors of β crystals were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and modulated differential scanning calorimetry (MDSC), from which the nature of the multiple melting behavior was ascribed to the occurring of a recrystallization process.

  17. Increased Melting of Glaciers during Cotopaxi volcano awakening in 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramon, Patricio; Vallejo, Silvia; Almeida, Marco; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Caceres, Bolivar

    2016-04-01

    Cotopaxi (5897 m), located about 50 km south of Quito (Ecuador), is one of the most active volcanoes in the Andes and its historical eruptions have caused a great impact on the population by the generation of lahars along its three main drainages (N, S, E). Starting on April 2015 the seismic monitoring networks and the SO2 gas detection network in May 2015 showed a significant increase from their background values, in June a geodetic instrument located in the NE flank started to record inflation; all this indicated the beginning of a new period of unrest. On August 14, five small phreatic explosions occurred, accompanied by large gas and ash emissions, ash falls were reported to the W of the volcano and to the S of Quito capital city. Three new episodes of ash and gas emissions occurred afterwards and towards the end of November 2015, the different monitoring parameters indicated a progressive reduction in the activity of the volcano. Since August 18 almost weekly overflights were made in order to conduct thermal (FLIR camera), visual and SO2 gas monitoring. Towards the end of August thermal measurements showed for the first time the presence of new thermal anomalies (13.5 to 16.3 °C) located in the crevices of the N glaciers, at the same time fumarolic gases were observed coming out from those fractures. On a flight made on September 3, the presence of water coming out from the basal fronts of the northern glaciers was clearly observed and the formation of narrow streams of water running downslope, while it was evident the appearance of countless new crevices in the majority of glacier ends, but also new cracks and rockslides on the upper flanks. All this led to the conclusion that an abnormal process was producing the melting of the glaciers around the volcano. Starting on September it was possible to observe the presence of small secondary lahars descending several streams and we estimated that many of them are due to increased glacier melting. Later

  18. The t-core of an s-core

    OpenAIRE

    Fayers, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    We consider the $t$-core of an $s$-core partition, when $s$ and $t$ are coprime positive integers. Olsson has shown that the $t$-core of an $s$-core is again an $s$-core, and we examine certain actions of the affine symmetric group on $s$-cores which preserve the $t$-core of an $s$-core. Along the way, we give a new proof of Olsson's result. We also give a new proof of a result of Vandehey, showing that there is a simultaneous $s$- and $t$-core which contains all others.

  19. The t-core of an s-core

    OpenAIRE

    Fayers, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    We consider the $t$-core of an $s$-core partition, when $s$ and $t$ are coprime positive integers. Olsson has shown that the $t$-core of an $s$-core is again an $s$-core, and we examine certain actions of the affine symmetric group on $s$-cores which preserve the $t$-core of an $s$-core. Along the way, we give a new proof of Olsson's result. We also give a new proof of a result of Vandehey, showing that there is a simultaneous $s$- and $t$-core which contains all others.

  20. Impact melt rocks from the Ries structure, Germany: an origin as impact melt flows?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osinski, Gordon R.

    2004-10-01

    The production of impact melt rocks and glasses is a characteristic feature of hypervelocity impact events on Earth and other planetary bodies. This investigation represents the first detailed study of an unusual series of coherent impact melt rocks intermittently exposed around the periphery of the ~24-km diameter, ~14.5 Ma Ries impact structure, Germany. Optical and analytical scanning electron microscopy (SEM) reveals that the groundmass comprises sanidine, plagioclase, quartz and ilmenite (decreasing order of abundance) with the interstices filled by either fresh or devitrified glassy mesostasis. Primary crystallites display skeletal, dendritic and/or spherulitic textures indicating rapid crystallization from a melt. The mesostasis is characterized by extreme chemical heterogeneity (e.g., FeO and Al 2O 3 contents from ~1 to ~62-80 wt.%). This is likely due to a combination of crystal-liquid fractionation during rapid cooling and crystallization of an originally incompletely homogenized melt. Vapor phase crystallization of sanidine and cristobalite occurred in miarolitic cavities during late-stage cooling of the impact melts. The most likely protolith for the impact melt rocks are granitic rocks present in the crystalline basement target. The high volatile content of the mesostasis suggests that a large volatile component was retained from this protolith. Field observations together with analytical data and micro-textures indicate that the Ries impact melt rocks were molten at the time of, and after, deposition. Field relations with other impactites also suggest that these rocks were emplaced subsequent to the excavation stage of crater formation and that they are not, therefore, ballistic ejecta. Thus, it is proposed that the Ries impact melt rocks were emplaced as ground-hugging impact melt flows that emanated from different regions of the evolving transient cavity during the modification stage of crater formation. This is consistent with, and in fact