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Sample records for core melt accidents

  1. The study of core melting phenomena in reactor severe accident of PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jae Hong; Jeun, Gyoo Dong; Park, Seh In; Lim, Jae Hyuck; Park, Seong Yong [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Bang, Kwang Hyun; Kim, Ki Yong [Korea Maritime Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-03-15

    After TMI-2 accident, it has been paid much attention to severe accidents beyond the design basis accidents and the research on the progress of severe accidents and mitigation and the closure of severe accidents has been actively performed. In particular, a great deal of uncertainties yet exist in the phase of late core melt progression and thus the research on this phase of severe accident progress has a key role in obtaining confidence in severe accident mitigation and nuclear reactor safety. In the present study, physics of late core melt progression, experimental data and the major phenomenological models of computer codes are reviewed and a direction of reducing the uncertainties in the late core melt progression is proposed.

  2. The study of core melting phenomena in reactor severe accident of PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jae Hong; Jeun, Gyoo Dong; Park, Seh In; Lim, Jae Hyuck; Park, Seong Yong [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Bang, Kwang Hyun; Kim, Ki Yong [Korea Maritime Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-03-15

    After TMI-2 accident, it has been paid much attention to severe accidents beyond the design basis accidents and the research on the progress of severe accidents and mitigation and the closure of severe accidents has been actively performed. In particular, a great deal of uncertainties yet exist in the phase of late core melt progression and thus the research on this phase of severe accident progress has a key role in obtaining confidence in severe accident mitigation and nuclear reactor safety. In the present study, physics of late core melt progression, experimental data and the major phenomenological models of computer codes are reviewed and a direction of reducing the uncertainties in the late core melt progression is proposed.

  3. A study on the late core melt progression in pressurized water reactor severe accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jae Hong; Jeun Gyoo Dong; Bang, Kwang Hyun; Park, Seh In; Lim, Jae Hyuck; Park, Seong Yong [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Back, Hyung Hmm [Korea Maritime Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-03-15

    After TMI-2 accidents, it has been paid much attention to severe accidents beyond the design basis accidents and the research on the progress of severe accidents and mitigation and the closure of severe accidents has been actively performed. In particular, a great deal of uncertainties yet exist in the phase of late core melt progression and thus the research on this phase of severe accident progress has a key role in obtaining in severe accident mitigation and nuclear reactor safety. In the present study, physics of late core melt progression, experimental data and the major phenomenological models of computer codes are reviewed and a direction of reducing the uncertainties in the late core melt progression os proposed.

  4. Estimates of early containment loads from core melt accidents. Draft report for comment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1985-12-01

    The thermal-hydraulic processes and corium debris-material interactions that can result from core melting in a severe accident have been studied to evaluate the potential effect of such phenomena on containment integrity. Pressure and temperature loads associated with representative accident sequences have been estimated for the six various LWR containment types used within the United States. Summaries distilling the analyses are presented and an interpretation of the results provided. 13 refs., 68 figs., 39 tabs.

  5. The study of core melting phenomena in reactor severe accident of PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeun, Gyoo Dong; Cho, Sung Won; Bang, Kwang Hyun; Park, Shane; Park, Seong Yong; Kim, Jin Man; Lim, Jae Hyuck; Song, Myung Jin [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-03-15

    TMI-2 accident is more valuable than the related experiments in the point of view that it is a real accident offering huge information about the late phase of severe accident. Therefore it gives out good standards for evaluation of code performance and inputs suitableness by comparing the accident data and simulated outputs. In this study SCDAP/REALAP5/MOD3.4 was selected for accident simulation. And sensitivity analysis was performed on varied cases to find out the most proper input variable about the late phase of core meting phenomena. Other plants and experimental facilities input deck were collected and analyzed for the sensitivity study and the shortcomings proposed by SCDAP/RELAP5 peer review were considered to the simulation. As a result gamma heating fraction in the input affect the progress of core melting phenomena. About this a study on the related model itself will be carried out.

  6. Examination of offsite radiological emergency measures for nuclear reactor accidents involving core melt. [PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldrich, D.C.; McGrath, P.E.; Rasmussen, N.C.

    1978-06-01

    Evacuation, sheltering followed by population relocation, and iodine prophylaxis are evaluated as offsite public protective measures in response to nuclear reactor accidents involving core-melt. Evaluations were conducted using a modified version of the Reactor Safety Study consequence model. Models representing each measure were developed and are discussed. Potential PWR core-melt radioactive material releases are separated into two categories, ''Melt-through'' and ''Atmospheric,'' based upon the mode of containment failure. Protective measures are examined and compared for each category in terms of projected doses to the whole body and thyroid. Measures for ''Atmospheric'' accidents are also examined in terms of their influence on the occurrence of public health effects.

  7. Termination of light-water reactor core-melt accidents with a chemical core catcher: the core-melt source reduction system (COMSORS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Parker, G.W.; Rudolph, J.C.; Osborne-Lee, I.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kenton, M.A. [Dames and Moore, Westmont, IL (United States)

    1996-09-01

    The Core-Melt Source Reduction System (COMSORS) is a new approach to terminate light-water reactor core melt accidents and ensure containment integrity. A special dissolution glass is placed under the reactor vessel. If core debris is released onto the glass, the glass melts and the debris dissolves into the molten glass, thus creating a homogeneous molten glass. The molten glass, with dissolved core debris, spreads into a wide pool, distributing the heat for removal by radiation to the reactor cavity above or by transfer to water on top of the molten glass. Expected equilibrium glass temperatures are approximately 600 degrees C. The creation of a low-temperature, homogeneous molten glass with known geometry permits cooling of the glass without threatening containment integrity. This report describes the technology, initial experiments to measure key glass properties, and modeling of COMSORS operations.

  8. Fission product release phenomena during core melt accidents in metal fueled heavy water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellison, P G; Hyder, M L; Monson, P R; Randolph, H W [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (USA); Hagrman, D L [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA); McClure, P R; Leonard, M T [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (USA)

    1990-01-01

    The phenomena that determine fission product release rates from a core melting accident in a metal-fueled, heavy water reactor are described in this paper. This information is obtained from the analysis of the current metal fuel experimental data base and from the results of analytical calculations. Experimental programs in place at the Savannah River Site are described that will provide information to resolve uncertainties in the data base. The results of the experiments will be incorporated into new severe accident computer codes recently developed for this reactor design. 47 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Investigation of the melt-down behaviour of massive radial core enclosures during LWR accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hering, W.; Sengpiel, W.; Messainguiral, C. [CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-les-Durance (France). DRN

    2000-11-01

    At the Institute for Reactor Safety (IRS) of the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (FZK) accident analyses were performed for the projected European pressurised water reactor (EPR) up to 1999 using the best estimate severe core damage code SCDAP/RELAP5 (S/R5). From various scenarios investigated with S/R5 the loss-of-offsite power (LOOP) and the 46 cm{sup 2} small break loss of coolant accident (SBLOCA) were selected to be discussed here in some detail. To simulate the heavy reflector (HR) and core barrel (CB) behaviour beyond the capabilities of S/R5 mod 3.2 a detailed stand alone analytical tool (LOWCOR2) was developed and used to determine the time of HR melting, its axial position, the melting velocity and the melt mass. Furthermore, results of MELCOR calculations performed at Siemens/KWU were used for the SBLOCA scenario. The analyses were extended by a feasibility study to find out whether ICARE2 and the commercial FEM code FIDAP are applicable. The axial position of HR and CB melt through strongly depends on the scenario an ranges between 1.0 m and 2.5 m core elevation. The time period to melt down the HR inner edges lasts up to 17 min and a complete melt through of HR and CB is in the order of magnitude of one hour. At melt through time LOWCOR2 calculated a molten steel mass between 10 Mg and 32 Mg and a melt relocation rate of 35 kg/s along the HR inner surface into the core cavity. (orig.) [German] Am Institut fuer Reaktorsicherheit (IRS) des Forschungszentrums Karlsruhe (FZK) wurden bis 1999 Unfallanalysen fuer den projektierten Europaeischen Druckwasser Reaktor (EPR) mit dem ''best estimate'' Kernschmelzcode SCDAP/RELAP5 (S/R5) durchgefuehrt. Von den verschiedenen mit S/R5 untersuchten Szenarien wurden der ''Ausfall der Wechselspannungsnetze'' (LOOP) und das kleine Leck (46 cm{sup 2}) im kalten Strang der Hauptkuehlmittelleitung (SBLOCA) fuer eine ausfuehrlichere Diskussion ausgewaehlt. Um das Verhalten des &apos

  10. Methods to prevent the source term of methyl lodide during a core melt accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karhu, A. [VTT Energy (Finland)

    1999-11-01

    The purpose of this literature review is to gather available information of the methods to prevent a source term of methyl iodide during a core melt accident. The most widely studied methods for nuclear power plants include the impregnated carbon filters and alkaline additives and sprays. It is indicated that some deficiencies of these methods may emerge. More reactive impregnants and additives could make a great improvement. As a new method in the field of nuclear applications, the potential of transition metals to decompose methyl iodide, is introduced in this review. This area would require an additional research, which could elucidate the remaining questions of the reactions. The ionization of the gaseous methyl iodide by corona-discharge reactors is also shortly described. (au)

  11. A study of core melting phenomena in reactor severe accident of PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeun, Gyoo Dong; Park, Shane; Kim, Jong Sun; Kim, Sung Joong [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Man [Korea Maritime Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-03-15

    In the 4th year, SCDAP/RELAP5 best estimate input data obtained from the TMI-2 accident analysis were applied to the analysis of domestic nuclear power plant. Ulchin nuclear power plant unit 3, 4 were selected as reference plant and steam generator tube rupture, station blackout SCDAP/RELAP5 calculation were performed to verify the adequacy of the best estimate input parameters and the adequacy of related models. Also, System 80+ EVSE simulation was executed to study steam explosion phenomena in the reactor cavity and EVSE load test was performed on the simplified reactor cavity geometry using TRACER-II code.

  12. Evaluation of Melt Behavior with initial Melt Velocity under SFR Severe Accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, Hyo; Bang, In Cheol [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Jerng, Dong Wook [Chung-Ang Univ, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In the current Korean sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) program, early dispersion of the molten metallic fuel within a subchannel is suggested as one of the inherent safety strategies for the initiating phase of hypothetical core disruptive accident (HCDA). The safety strategy provides negative reactivity driven by the melt dispersal, so it could reduce the possibility of the recriticality event under a severe triple or more fault scenario for SFR. Since the behavior of the melt dispersion is unpredictable, it depends on the accident condition, particularly core region. While the voided coolant channel region is usually developed in the inner core, the unvoided coolant channel region is formed in the outer core. It is important to confirm the fuel dispersion with the core region, but there are not sufficient existing studies for them. From the existing studies, the coolant vapor pressure is considered as one of driving force to move the melt towards outside of the core. There is a complexity of the phenomena during intermixing of the melt with the coolant after the horizontal melt injections. It is too difficult to understand the several combined mechanisms related to the melt dispersion and the fragmentation. Thus, it could be worthwhile to study the horizontal melt injections at lower temperature as a preliminary study in order to identify the melt dispersion phenomena. For this reason, it is required to clarify whether the coolant vapor pressure is the driving force of the melt dispersion with the core region. The specific conditions to be well dispersed for the molten metallic fuel were discussed in the experiments with the simulant materials. The each melt behavior was compared to evaluate the melt dispersion under the coolant void condition and the boiling condition. As the results, the following results are remarked: 1. The upward melt dispersion did not occur for a given melt and coolant temperature in the nonboiling range. Over current range of conditions

  13. Studies on melt-water-structure interaction during severe accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sehgal, B.R.; Dinh, T.N.; Okkonen, T.J.; Bui, V.A.; Nourgaliev, R.R.; Andersson, J. [Royal Inst. of Technology, Div. of Nucl. Power Safety, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1996-10-01

    Results of a series of studies, on melt-water-structure interactions which occur during the progression of a core melt-down accident, are described. The emphasis is on the in-vessel interactions and the studies are both experimental and analytical. Since, the studies performed resulted in papers published in proceedings of the technical meetings, and in journals, copies of a set of selected papers are attached to provide details. A summary of the results obtained is provided for the reader who does not, or cannot, venture into the perusal of the attached papers. (au).

  14. SWR 1000 severe accident control through in-vessel melt retention by external RPV cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolev, N.I. [Framatome Advanced Nuclear Power, NDSI, Erlangen (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    Framatome Advanced Nuclear Power is being designing a new generation NPP with boiling water reactor SWR1000. Besides of various of modern passive and active safety features the system is also designed for controlling of a postulated severe accident with extreme low probability of occurrence. This work presents the rationales behind the decision to select the external cooling as a safety management strategy during severe accident. Bounding scenery are analyzed regarding the core melting, melt-water interaction during relocation of the melt from the core region into the lower head and the external coolability of the lower head. The conclusion is reached that the external cooling for the SWR1000 is a valuable strategy for accident management during postulated severe accidents. (authors)

  15. Assessment of CRBR core disruptive accident energetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theofanous, T.G.; Bell, C.R.

    1984-03-01

    The results of an independent assessment of core disruptive accident energetics for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor are presented in this document. This assessment was performed for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission under the direction of the CRBR Program Office within the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. It considered in detail the accident behavior for three accident initiators that are representative of three different classes of events; unprotected loss of flow, unprotected reactivity insertion, and protected loss of heat sink. The primary system's energetics accommodation capability was realistically, yet conservatively, determined in terms of core events. This accommodation capability was found to be equivalent to an isentropic work potential for expansion to one atmosphere of 2550 MJ or a ramp rate of about 200 $/s applied to a classical two-phase disassembly.

  16. Melting of the Earth's inner core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubbins, David; Sreenivasan, Binod; Mound, Jon; Rost, Sebastian

    2011-05-19

    The Earth's magnetic field is generated by a dynamo in the liquid iron core, which convects in response to cooling of the overlying rocky mantle. The core freezes from the innermost surface outward, growing the solid inner core and releasing light elements that drive compositional convection. Mantle convection extracts heat from the core at a rate that has enormous lateral variations. Here we use geodynamo simulations to show that these variations are transferred to the inner-core boundary and can be large enough to cause heat to flow into the inner core. If this were to occur in the Earth, it would cause localized melting. Melting releases heavy liquid that could form the variable-composition layer suggested by an anomaly in seismic velocity in the 150 kilometres immediately above the inner-core boundary. This provides a very simple explanation of the existence of this layer, which otherwise requires additional assumptions such as locking of the inner core to the mantle, translation from its geopotential centre or convection with temperature equal to the solidus but with composition varying from the outer to the inner core. The predominantly narrow downwellings associated with freezing and broad upwellings associated with melting mean that the area of melting could be quite large despite the average dominance of freezing necessary to keep the dynamo going. Localized melting and freezing also provides a strong mechanism for creating seismic anomalies in the inner core itself, much stronger than the effects of variations in heat flow so far considered.

  17. Experimental study of in-and-ex-vessel melt cooling during a severe accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang Baik; Yoo, K. J.; Park, C. K.; Seok, S. D.; Park, R. J.; Yi, S. J.; Kang, K. H.; Ham, Y. S.; Cho, Y. R.; Kim, J. H.; Jeong, J. H.; Shin, K. Y.; Cho, J. S.; Kim, D. H.

    1997-07-01

    After code damage during a severe accident in a nuclear reactor, the degraded core has to be cooled down and the decay heat should be removed in order to cease the accident progression and maintain a stable state. The cooling of core melt is divided into in-vessel and ex-vessel cooling depending on the location of molten core which is dependent on the timing of vessel failure. Since the cooling mechanism varies with the conditions of molten core and surroundings and related phenomena, it contains many phenomenological uncertainties so far. In this study, an experimental study for verification of in-vessel corium cooling and several separate effect experiments for ex-vessel cooling are carried out to verify in- and ex-vessel cooling phenomena and finally to develop the accident management strategy and improve engineered reactor design for the severe accidents. SONATA-IV (Simulation of Naturally Arrested Thermal Attack in Vessel) program is set up for in-vessel cooling and a progression of the verification experiment has been done, and an integral verification experiment of the containment integrity for ex-vessel cooling is planned to be carried out based on the separate effect experiments performed in the first phase. First phase study of SONATA-IV is proof of principle experiment and it is composed of LALA (Lower-plenum Arrested Vessel Attack) experiment to find the gap between melt and the lower plenum during melt relocation and to certify melt quenching and CHFG (Critical Heat Flux in Gap) experiment to certify heat transfer mechanism in an artificial gap. As separate effect experiments for ex-vessel cooling, high pressure melt ejection experiment related to the initial condition for debris layer formation in the reactor cavity, crust formation and heat transfer experiment in the molten pool and molten core concrete interaction experiment are performed. (author). 150 refs., 24 tabs., 127 figs.

  18. Experiments and analyses on melt-structure-water interactions during severe accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seghal, B.R.; Dinh, T.N.; Bui, V.A.; Green, J.A.; Nourgaliev, R.R.; Okkonen, T.O.; Dinh, A.T. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Div. of Nuclear Power Safety

    1998-04-01

    This report is the final report for the research project Melt Structure Water Interactions (MSWI). It describes results of analytical and experimental studies concerning MSWI during the course of a hypothetical core meltdown accident in a LWR. Emphasis has been placed on phenomena which govern vessel failure mode and timing and the mechanisms and properties which govern the fragmentation and breakup of melt jets and droplets. It was found that: 2-D effects significantly diminished the focusing effect of an overlying metallic layer on top of an oxide melt pool. This result improves the feasibility of in-vessel retention of a melt pool through external cooling of the lower head; phenomena related to hole ablation and melt discharge, in the event of vessel failure, are affected significantly by crust formation; the jet fragmentation process is a function of many related phenomena. The fragmentation rate depends not only on the traditional parameters but also on the melt physical properties, which change as the melt cools down from liquid to solid temperature; film boiling was investigated by developing a two-phase flow model and inserting it in a multi-D fluid dynamics code. It was concluded that the thickness of the film on the surface of a melt jet would be small and that the effects of the film on the process should not be large. This conclusion is contrary to the modeling employed in some other codes. The computer codes were developed and validated against the data obtained in the MSWI Project. The melt vessel interaction thermal analysis code describes the process of melt pool formation and convection and the resulting vessel thermal loadings. In addition, several innovative models were developed to describe the melt-water interaction process. The code MELT-3D treats the melt jet as a collection of particles whose movement is described with a three-dimensional Eulerian formulation. The model (SIPHRA) tracks the melt jet with an additional equation, using the

  19. Investigation on Melt-Structure-Water Interactions (MSWI) during severe accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sehgal, B.R.; Yang, Z.L.; Dinh, T.N.; Nourgaliev, R.R.; Bui, V.A.; Haraldsson, H.O.; Li, H.X.; Konovakhin, M.; Paladino, D.; Leung, W.H [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Div. of Nuclear Power Safety

    1999-08-01

    This report is the final report for the work performed in 1998 in the research project Melt Structure Water Interactions (MSWI), under the auspices of the APRI Project, jointly funded by SKI, HSK, USNRC and the Swedish and Finnish power companies. The present report describes results of advanced analytical and experimental studies concerning melt-water-structure interactions during the course of a hypothetical severe core meltdown accident in a light water reactor (LWR). Emphasis has been placed on phenomena and properties which govern the fragmentation and breakup of melt jets and droplets, melt spreading and coolability, and thermal and mechanical loadings of a pressure vessel during melt-vessel interaction. Many of the investigations performed in support of this project have produced papers which have been published in the proceedings of technical meetings. A short summary of the results achieved in these papers is provided in this overview. Both experimental and analytical studies were performed to improve knowledge about phenomena of melt-structure-water interactions. We believe that significant technical advances have been achieved during the course of these studies. It was found that: the solidification has a strong effect on the drop deformation and breakup. Initially appearing at the drop surface and, later, thickening inwards, the solid crust layer dampens the instability waves on the drop surface and, therefore, hinders drop deformation and breakup. The drop thermal properties also affect the thermal behavior of the drop and, therefore, have impact on its deformation behavior. The jet fragmentation process is a function of many related phenomena. The fragmentation rate depends not only on the traditional parameters, e.g. the Weber number, but also on the melt physical properties, which change as the melt cools down from the liquidus to the solidus temperature. Additionally, the crust formed on the surface of the melt jet will also reduce the propensity

  20. The modeling of core melting and in-vessel corium relocation in the APRIL code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim. S.W.; Podowski, M.Z.; Lahey, R.T. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    This paper is concerned with the modeling of severe accident phenomena in boiling water reactors (BWR). New models of core melting and in-vessel corium debris relocation are presented, developed for implementation in the APRIL computer code. The results of model testing and validations are given, including comparisons against available experimental data and parametric/sensitivity studies. Also, the application of these models, as parts of the APRIL code, is presented to simulate accident progression in a typical BWR reactor.

  1. Development of MPS Method for Analyzing Melt Spreading Behavior and MCCI in Severe Accidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaji, Akifumi; Li, Xin

    2016-08-01

    Spreading of molten core (corium) on reactor containment vessel floor and molten corium-concrete interaction (MCCI) are important phenomena in the late phase of a severe accident for assessment of the containment integrity and managing the severe accident. The severe accident research at Waseda University has been advancing to show that simulations with moving particle semi-implicit (MPS) method (one of the particle methods) can greatly improve the analytical capability and mechanical understanding of the melt behavior in severe accidents. MPS models have been developed and verified regarding calculations of radiation and thermal field, solid-liquid phase transition, buoyancy, and temperature dependency of viscosity to simulate phenomena, such as spreading of corium, ablation of concrete by the corium, crust formation and cooling of the corium by top flooding. Validations have been conducted against experiments such as FARO L26S, ECOKATS-V1, Theofanous, and SPREAD for spreading, SURC-2, SURC-4, SWISS-1, and SWISS-2 for MCCI. These validations cover melt spreading behaviors and MCCI by mixture of molten oxides (including prototypic UO2-ZrO2), metals, and water. Generally, the analytical results show good agreement with the experiment with respect to the leading edge of spreading melt and ablation front history of concrete. The MPS results indicate that crust formation may play important roles in melt spreading and MCCI. There is a need to develop a code for two dimensional MCCI experiment simulation with MPS method as future study, which will be able to simulate anisotropic ablation of concrete.

  2. In-Core-Instrumentation Methods for 3-Dimensional Distribution Information of Reactor Core Temperatures and Melt-down

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Yeong Cheol [KHNP, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Eun, Myoung; Kim, Sung Jun [Woojin Inc., Hwaseong (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    The tsunami-induced nuclear accident at Japanese Fukushima power plants in March 2011 has revealed some weaknesses in the severe accident monitoring system. The plant instrumentation did not provide utility, safety experts, and government officials with adequate and reliable information. The information on the reactor core damage and coolability is critical for making decisions correctly as well as in a timely manner during the course of the mitigation of severe accidents. Current Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR)s have an In-Core-Instrumentation (ICI) system that measures the temperature distribution of the top surface (i.e. Core Exit Temperatures) of the reactor core mainly to indicate when to begin Severe Accident Mitigation Guidelines (SAMG). This design concept giving only the core exit temperature has limitations in terms of sufficiency as well as availability of the information necessary for diagnosis on the status of the degraded core and the effectiveness of the measures taken as mitigation strategies. The reactor core exit temperatures are not sufficient to support the assessment of the degree of the core damage and the location of the molten core debris and recognition whether the core damage progresses on or it is mitigated. The ICI location being at the top of the reactor core also makes the ICI thermocouples vulnerable to melt-down because the upper part of the reactor core uncovers first, thereby melt down at the early stage of the accident. This means that direct indication of reactor core temperature will be lost and unavailable during the later stages of severe accident. To address the aforementioned weaknesses of the current ICIs, it is necessary to develop a new ICI system that provides information that is more expanded and more reliable for accident mitigation. With the enhanced information available, the SAMG can be prepared in more refined and effective way based on the direct and suitable indication of status of damages and the 3-dimensional

  3. TMI-2 accident: core heat-up analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ardron, K.H.; Cain, D.G.

    1981-01-01

    This report summarizes NSAC study of reactor core thermal conditions during the accident at Three Mile Island, Unit 2. The study focuses primarily on the time period from core uncovery (approximately 113 minutes after turbine trip) through the initiation of sustained high pressure injection (after 202 minutes). The transient analysis is based upon established sequences of events; plant data; post-accident measurements; interpretation or indirect use of instrument responses to accident conditions.

  4. Melting and Crystallization at Core Mantle Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiquet, G.; Pradhan, G. K.; Siebert, J.; Auzende, A. L.; Morard, G.; Antonangeli, D.; Garbarino, G.

    2015-12-01

    Early crystallization of magma oceans may generate original compositional heterogeneities in the mantle. Dense basal melts may also be trapped in the lowermost mantle and explain mantle regions with ultralow seismic velocities (ULVZs) near the core-mantle boundary [1]. To test this hypothesis, we first constructed the solidus curve of a natural peridotite between 36 and 140 gigapascals using laser-heated diamond anvil cells. In our experiments, melting at core-mantle boundary pressures occurs around 4100 ± 150 K, which is a value that can match estimated mantle geotherms. Similar results were found for a chondritic mantle [2] whereas much lower pyrolitic melting temperatures were recently proposed from textural and chemical characterizations of quenched samples [3]. We also investigated the melting properties of natural mid ocean ridge basalt (MORB) up to core-mantle boundary (CMB) pressures. At CMB pressure (135 GPa), we obtain a MORB solidus temperature of 3950 ±150 K. If our solidus temperatures are in good agreement with recent results proposed for a similar composition [4], the textural and chemical characterizations of our recovered samples made by analytical transmission electron microscope indicate that CaSiO3 perovskite (CaPv) is the liquidus phase in the entire pressure range up to CMB. The partial melt composition is enriched in FeO, which suggests that such partial melts could be gravitationnally stable at the core mantle boundary. Our observations are tested against calculations made using a self-consistent thermodynamic database for the MgO-FeO-SiO2 system from 20 GPa to 140 GPa [5]. These observations and calculations provide a first step towards a consistent thermodynamic modelling of the crystallization sequence of the magma ocean, which shows that the existence of a dense iron rich and fusible layer above the CMB at the end of the crystallization is plausible [5], which is in contradiction with the conclusions drawn in [4]. [1] Williams

  5. Ex-Vessel Core Melt Modeling Comparison between MELTSPREAD-CORQUENCH and MELCOR 2.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robb, Kevin R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Farmer, Mitchell [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Francis, Matthew W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-03-01

    System-level code analyses by both United States and international researchers predict major core melting, bottom head failure, and corium-concrete interaction for Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1 (1F1). Although system codes such as MELCOR and MAAP are capable of capturing a wide range of accident phenomena, they currently do not contain detailed models for evaluating some ex-vessel core melt behavior. However, specialized codes containing more detailed modeling are available for melt spreading such as MELTSPREAD as well as long-term molten corium-concrete interaction (MCCI) and debris coolability such as CORQUENCH. In a preceding study, Enhanced Ex-Vessel Analysis for Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1: Melt Spreading and Core-Concrete Interaction Analyses with MELTSPREAD and CORQUENCH, the MELTSPREAD-CORQUENCH codes predicted the 1F1 core melt readily cooled in contrast to predictions by MELCOR. The user community has taken notice and is in the process of updating their systems codes; specifically MAAP and MELCOR, to improve and reduce conservatism in their ex-vessel core melt models. This report investigates why the MELCOR v2.1 code, compared to the MELTSPREAD and CORQUENCH 3.03 codes, yield differing predictions of ex-vessel melt progression. To accomplish this, the differences in the treatment of the ex-vessel melt with respect to melt spreading and long-term coolability are examined. The differences in modeling approaches are summarized, and a comparison of example code predictions is provided.

  6. Analysis of ex-vessel melt jet breakup and coolability. Part 1: Sensitivity on model parameters and accident conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriyama, Kiyofumi; Park, Hyun Sun, E-mail: hejsunny@postech.ac.kr; Hwang, Byoungcheol; Jung, Woo Hyun

    2016-06-15

    Highlights: • Application of JASMINE code to melt jet breakup and coolability in APR1400 condition. • Coolability indexes for quasi steady state breakup and cooling process. • Typical case in complete breakup/solidification, film boiling quench not reached. • Significant impact of water depth and melt jet size; weak impact of model parameters. - Abstract: The breakup of a melt jet falling in a water pool and the coolability of the melt particles produced by such jet breakup are important phenomena in terms of the mitigation of severe accident consequences in light water reactors, because the molten and relocated core material is the primary heat source that governs the accident progression. We applied a modified version of the fuel–coolant interaction simulation code, JASMINE, developed at Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) to a plant scale simulation of melt jet breakup and cooling assuming an ex-vessel condition in the APR1400, a Korean advanced pressurized water reactor. Also, we examined the sensitivity on seven model parameters and five initial/boundary condition variables. The results showed that the melt cooling performance of a 6 m deep water pool in the reactor cavity is enough for removing the initial melt enthalpy for solidification, for a melt jet of 0.2 m initial diameter. The impacts of the model parameters were relatively weak and that of some of the initial/boundary condition variables, namely the water depth and melt jet diameter, were very strong. The present model indicated that a significant fraction of the melt jet is not broken up and forms a continuous melt pool on the containment floor in cases with a large melt jet diameter, 0.5 m, or a shallow water pool depth, ≤3 m.

  7. A study on the recriticality possibilities of fast reactor cores after a hypothetical core meltdown accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Byung Chan; Han, Do Hee; Kim, Young Cheol

    1997-04-01

    The preliminary and parametric sensitivity study on recriticality risk of fast reactor cores after a hypothetical total core meltdown accident was performed. Only the neutronic aspects of the accident was considered for this study, independent of the accident scenario. Estimation was made for the quantities of molten fuel which must be ejected out of the core in order to assure a sub-critical state. Diverse parameters were examined: molten pool type (homogenized or stratified), fuel temperature, conditions of the reactor core, core size (small or large), and fuel type (oxide, nitride, metal) (author). 7 refs.

  8. Numerical analysis of grid plate melting after a severe accident in a Fast-Breeder Reactor (FBR)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Jasmin Sudha; K Velusamy

    2013-12-01

    Fast breeder reactors (FBRs) are provided with redundant and diverse plant protection systems with a very low failure probability (<10-6/reactor year), making core disruptive accident (CDA), a beyond design basis event (BDBE). Nevertheless, safety analysis is carried out even for such events with a view to mitigate their consequences by providing engineered safeguards like the in-vessel core catcher. During a CDA, a significant fraction of the hot molten fuel moves downwards and gets relocated to the lower plate of grid plate. The ability of this plate to resist or delay relocation of core melt further has been investigated by developing appropriate mathematical models and translating them into a computer code HEATRAN-1. The core melt is a time dependent volumetric heat source because of the radioactive decay of the fission products which it contains. The code solves the nonlinear heat conduction equation including phase change. The analysis reveals that if the bottom of grid plate is considered to be adiabatic, melt-through of grid plate (i.e., melting of the entire thickness of the plate) occurs between 800 s and 1000 s depending upon the initial conditions. Knowledge of this time estimate is essential for defining the initial thermal load on the core catcher plate. If heat transfer from the bottom of grid plate to the underlying sodium is taken into account, then melt-through does not take place, but the temperature of grid plate is high enough to cause creep failure.

  9. Comparison of the behaviour of two core designs for ASTRID in case of severe accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertrand, F., E-mail: frederic.bertrand@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DER, F-13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France); Marie, N.; Prulhière, G.; Lecerf, J. [CEA, DEN, DER, F-13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France); Seiler, J.M. [CEA, DEN, DTN, F-38054 Grenoble (France)

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • Low void worth CFV and SFRv2 cores are compared for ASTRID pre-conceptual design. • Severe accident behaviour is assessed with a simplified calculation approach and tools. • Mitigation to limit reactivity inserted by core compaction is easier for CFV than for SFRv2 core. • When facing arbitrary reactivity ramps, CFV core would lead to lower energy release than SFRv2 core. • Time scale for core degradation is one order of magnitude larger for CFV than for SFRv2. - Abstract: The present paper is dedicated to the studies carried out during the first stage of the pre-conceptual design of the French demonstrator of fourth generation SFR reactors (ASTRID) in order to compare the behaviour of two envisaged core concepts under severe accident transients. Among the two studied core concepts, whose powers are 1500 MWth, the first one is a classical homogeneous core (called SFRv2) with large pin diameter whose the sodium overall voiding reactivity effect is 5 $. The second concept is an axially heterogeneous core (called CFV) whose global void reactivity effect is negative (−1.2 $ at the end of cycle at the equilibrium). The comparison of the cores relies on two typical accident families: a reactivity insertion (unprotected transient overpower, UTOP) and an overall loss of core cooling (unprotected loss of flow, ULOF). In the first part of the comparison, the primary phase of an UTOP is studied in order to assess typical features of the transient behaviour: power and reactivity evolutions, material heating and melting/vaporization and mechanical energy release due to fuel vapor expansion. The second part of the comparison deals with the calculation of the reactivity potential for degraded states (molten pools) representative of the secondary phase of a mild UTOP and of a strong UTOP (strong or mild qualifies the reactivity ramp inserted). According to the reactivity potential, the amount of fuel to extract from the core and the amount of absorber

  10. Development of severe accident analysis code - A study on the molten core-concrete interaction under severe accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Chang Hyun; Lee, Byung Chul; Huh, Chang Wook; Kim, Doh Young; Kim, Ju Yeul [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand the phenomena of the molten core/concrete interaction during the hypothetical severe accident, and to develop the model for heat transfer and physical phenomena in MCCIs. The contents of this study are analysis of mechanism in MCCIs and assessment of heat transfer models, evaluation of model in CORCON code and verification in CORCON using SWISS and SURC Experiments, and 1000 MWe PWR reactor cavity coolability, and establishment a model for prediction of the crust formation and temperature of melt-pool. The properties and flow condition of melt pool covering with the conditions of severe accident are used to evaluate the heat transfer coefficients in each reviewed model. Also, the scope and limitation of each model for application is assessed. A phenomenological analysis is performed with MELCOR 1.8.2 and MELCOR 1.8.3 And its results is compared with corresponding experimental reports of SWISS and SURC experiments. And the calculation is performed to assess the 1000 MWe PWR reactor cavity coolability. To improve the heat transfer model between melt-pool and overlying coolant and analyze the phase change of melt-pool, 2 dimensional governing equations are established using the enthalpy method and computational program is accomplished in this study. The benchmarking calculation is performed and its results are compared to the experiment which has not considered effects of the coolant boiling and the gas injection. Ultimately, the model shall be developed for considering the gas injection effect and coolant boiling effect. 66 refs., 10 tabs., 29 refs. (author)

  11. Melting of MORB at core-mantle boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Gopal K.; Fiquet, Guillaume; Siebert, Julien; Auzende, Anne-Line; Morard, Guillaume; Antonangeli, Daniele; Garbarino, Gaston

    2015-12-01

    We investigated the melting properties of natural mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) up to core-mantle boundary (CMB) pressures using laser-heated diamond anvil cell. Textural and chemical characterizations of quenched samples were performed by analytical transmission electron microscopy. We used in situ X-ray diffraction primarily for phase identification whereas our melting criterion based on laser power versus temperature plateau combined with textural analysis of recovered solidus and subsolidus samples is accurate and unambiguous. At CMB pressure (135 GPa), the MORB solidus temperature is 3970 (± 150) K. Quenched melt textures observed in recovered samples indicate that CaSiO3 perovskite (CaPv) is the liquidus phase in the entire pressure range up to CMB. The partial melt composition derived from the central melt pool is enriched in FeO, which suggests that such melt pockets may be gravitationally stable at the core mantle boundary.

  12. Continuous melting and ion chromatographic analyses of ice cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, T M; Schwikowski, M; Gäggele, H W

    2001-06-22

    A new method for determining concentrations of organic and inorganic ions in ice cores by continuous melting and contemporaneous ion chromatographic analyses was developed. A subcore is melted on a melting device and the meltwater produced is collected in two parallel sample loops and then analyzed simultaneously by two ion chromatographs, one for anions and one for cations. For most of the analyzed species, lower or equal blank values were achieved with the continuous melting and analysis technique compared to the conventional analysis. Comparison of the continuous melting and ion chromatographic analysis with the conventional analysis of a real ice core segment showed good agreement in concentration profiles and total amounts of ionic species. Thus, the newly developed method is well suited for ice core analysis and has the advantages of lower ice consumption, less time-consuming sample preparation and lower risk of contamination.

  13. Numerical interpretation of the MARA 8 experiment simulating a hypothetical core disruptive accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robbe, M.F. E-mail: mfrobbe@cea.fr; Lepareux, M.; Cariou, Y

    2003-03-01

    In the case of a hypothetical core disruptive accident (HCDA) in a liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR), it is assumed that the core of the nuclear reactor has melted partially and that the chemical interaction between the molten fuel and the liquid sodium has created a high-pressure gas bubble in the core. The violent expansion of this bubble loads and deforms the reactor vessel, thus endangering the safety of the nuclear plant. The experimental test MARA 8 simulates the explosive phenomenon in a mock-up included in a flexible vessel with a flexible roof. This paper presents a numerical simulation of the test and a comparison of the computed results with the experimental results and previous numerical ones.

  14. Melting of subducted basalt at the core-mantle boundary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrault, Denis; Pesce, Giacomo; Bouhifd, Mohamed Ali; Bolfan-Casanova, Nathalie; Hénot, Jean-Marc; Mezouar, Mohamed

    2014-05-23

    The geological materials in Earth's lowermost mantle control the characteristics and interpretation of seismic ultra-low velocity zones at the base of the core-mantle boundary. Partial melting of the bulk lower mantle is often advocated as the cause, but this does not explain the nonubiquitous character of these regional seismic features. We explored the melting properties of mid-oceanic ridge basalt (MORB), which can reach the lowermost mantle after subduction of oceanic crust. At a pressure representative of the core-mantle boundary (135 gigapascals), the onset of melting occurs at ~3800 kelvin, which is ~350 kelvin below the mantle solidus. The SiO2-rich liquid generated either remains trapped in the MORB material or solidifies after reacting with the surrounding MgO-rich mantle, remixing subducted MORB with the lowermost mantle.

  15. Melt spreading code assessment, modifications, and application to the EPR core catcher design.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, M. T .; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-03-30

    The Evolutionary Power Reactor (EPR) is under consideration by various utilities in the United States to provide base load electrical production, and as a result the design is undergoing a certification review by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The severe accident design philosophy for this reactor is based upon the fact that the projected power rating results in a narrow margin for in-vessel melt retention by external cooling of the reactor vessel. As a result, the design addresses ex-vessel core melt stabilization using a mitigation strategy that includes: (1) an external core melt retention system to temporarily hold core melt released from the vessel; (2) a layer of 'sacrificial' material that is admixed with the melt while in the core melt retention system; (3) a melt plug in the lower part of the retention system that, when failed, provides a pathway for the mixture to spread to a large core spreading chamber; and finally, (4) cooling and stabilization of the spread melt by controlled top and bottom flooding. The overall concept is illustrated in Figure 1.1. The melt spreading process relies heavily on inertial flow of a low-viscosity admixed melt to a segmented spreading chamber, and assumes that the melt mass will be distributed to a uniform height in the chamber. The spreading phenomenon thus needs to be modeled properly in order to adequately assess the EPR design. The MELTSPREAD code, developed at Argonne National Laboratory, can model segmented, and both uniform and nonuniform spreading. The NRC is thus utilizing MELTSPREAD to evaluate melt spreading in the EPR design. MELTSPREAD was originally developed to support resolution of the Mark I containment shell vulnerability issue. Following closure of this issue, development of MELTSPREAD ceased in the early 1990's, at which time the melt spreading database upon which the code had been validated was rather limited. In particular, the database that was utilized for initial

  16. Quantifying signal dispersion in a hybrid ice core melting system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breton, Daniel J; Koffman, Bess G; Kurbatov, Andrei V; Kreutz, Karl J; Hamilton, Gordon S

    2012-11-06

    We describe a microcontroller-based ice core melting and data logging system allowing simultaneous depth coregistration of a continuous flow analysis (CFA) system (for microparticle and conductivity measurement) and a discrete sample analysis system (for geochemistry and microparticles), both supplied from the same melted ice core section. This hybrid melting system employs an ice parcel tracking algorithm which calculates real-time sample transport through all portions of the meltwater handling system, enabling accurate (1 mm) depth coregistration of all measurements. Signal dispersion is analyzed using residence time theory, experimental results of tracer injection tests and antiparallel melting of replicate cores to rigorously quantify the signal dispersion in our system. Our dispersion-limited resolution is 1.0 cm in ice and ~2 cm in firn. We experimentally observe the peak lead phenomenon, where signal dispersion causes the measured CFA peak associated with a given event to be depth assigned ~1 cm shallower than the true event depth. Dispersion effects on resolution and signal depth assignment are discussed in detail. Our results have implications for comparisons of chemistry and physical properties data recorded using multiple instruments and for deconvolution methods of enhancing CFA depth resolution.

  17. Studies of Behavior Melting Temperature Characteristics for Multi Thermocouple In-Core Instrument Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Donghyup; Chae, Myoungeun; Kim, Sungjin; Lee, Kyulim [Woojin inc, Hwasung (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Bottom-up type in-core instruments (ICIs) are used for the pressurized water reactors of OPR-1000, APR- 1400 in order to measure neutron flux and temperature in the reactor. It is a well-known technique and a proven design using years in the nuclear field. ICI consists of one pair of K-type thermocouple, five self-powered neutron detectors (SPNDs) and one back ground detector. K-type thermocouple's purpose is to measure the core exit temperature (CET) in the reactor. The CET is a very important factor for operating nuclear power plants and it is 327 .deg. C when generally operating the reactor in the nuclear power plant(NPP) in case of OPR- 1000. If the CET will exceed 650 .deg. C, Operators in the main control room should be considered to be an accident situation in accordance with a severe accident management guidance(SAMG). The Multi Thermocouple ICI is a new designed ICI assuming severe accident conditions. It consists of four more thermocouples than the existing design, so it has five Ktype thermocouples besides the thermocouple measuring CET is located in the same elevation as the ICI. Each thermocouple is able to be located in the desired location as required. The Multi Thermocouple ICI helps to measure the temperature distribution of the entire reactor. In addition, it will measure certain point of melted core because of the in-vessel debris of nuclear fuel when an accident occurs more seriously. In this paper, to simulate a circumstance such as a nuclear reactor severe accident was examined. In this study, the K-type thermocouples of Multi Thermocouple ICI was confirmed experimentally to be able to measure up to 1370 .deg. C before the thermocouples have been melted. And after the thermocouples were melted by debris, it was able to be monitored that the signal of EMF directed the infinite value of voltage. Therefore through the results of the test, it can be assumed that if any EMF data among the Multi Thermocouple ICI will direct the infinite value

  18. Melting the core of giant planets: impact on tidal dissipation

    CERN Document Server

    Mathis, S

    2015-01-01

    Giant planets are believed to host central dense rocky/icy cores that are key actors in the core-accretion scenario for their formation. In the same time, some of their components are unstable in the temperature and pressure regimes of central regions of giant planets and only ab-initio EOS computations can address the question of the state of matter. In this framework, several works demonstrated that erosion and redistribution of core materials in the envelope must be taken into account. These complex mechanisms thus may deeply modify giant planet interiors for which signatures of strong tidal dissipation have been obtained for Jupiter and Saturn. The best candidates to explain this dissipation are the viscoelastic dissipation in the central dense core and turbulent friction acting on tidal inertial waves in their fluid convective envelope. In this work, we study the consequences of the possible melting of central regions for the efficiency of each of these mechanisms.

  19. ASTEC adaptation for PHWR limited core damage accident analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majumdar, P., E-mail: pmajum@barc.gov.in [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Reactor Safety Division, Mumbai 400085 (India); Chatterjee, B.; Lele, H.G. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Reactor Safety Division, Mumbai 400085 (India); Guillard, G.; Fichot, F. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), PSN-RES/SAG, Cadarache, 13115 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2014-06-01

    Under limited core damage accidents (LCDAs) of Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR), coolable geometry of the channel might be retained thanks to the presence of moderator heat sink. Indeed, the pressure tube is amenable to creep deformation at high temperature due to internal pressure and fuel bundles weight. Partial or complete circumferential contact between pressure tube and calandria tube aids heat dissipation to the moderator. A new module has been developed by Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) for simulating this phenomenon which is specific to horizontal-type of reactors. It requires additional calculation of pressure tube sagging/ballooning and temperature field in the circumferential direction. The module is well validated with available experimental results concerning pressure tube deformation and the associated heat transfer in the area of contact. It is then used in analysing typical LCDAs scenarios in Indian PHWR under low and medium internal pressure conditions. This module is implemented in the ASTEC IRSN-GRS severe accident code version under development and will thus be available in the next major version V2.1.

  20. Neutronic analysis of LMFBRs during severe core disruptive accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomlinson, E.T.

    1979-01-01

    A number of numerical experiments were performed to assess the validity of diffusion theory and various perturbation methods for calculating the reactivity state of a severely disrupted liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor (LMFBR). The disrupted configurations correspond, in general, to phases through which an LMFBR core could pass during a core disruptive accident (CDA). Two-reactor models were chosen for this study, the two zone, homogeneous Clinch River Breeder Reactor and the Large Heterogeneous Reactor Design Study Core. The various phases were chosen to approximate the CDA results predicted by the safety analysis code SAS3D. The calculational methods investigated in this study include the eigenvalue difference technique based on both discrete ordinate transport theory and diffusion theory, first-order perturbation theory, exact perturbation theory, and a new hybrid perturbation theory. Selected cases were analyzed using Monte Carlo methods. It was found that in all cases, diffusion theory and perturbation theory yielded results for the change in reactivity that significantly disagreed with both the discrete ordinate and Monte Carlo results. These differences were, in most cases, in a nonconservative direction.

  1. Stability Analysis of the EBR-I Mark-II Core Meltdown Accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Jae-Yong; Kang, Chang Mu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze the stability of the EBR-I core meltdown accident using the NuSTAB code. The result of NuSTAB analysis is compared with previous stability analysis by Sandmeier using the root locus method. The Experimental Breeder Reactor I (EBR-1) at Argonne National Laboratory was designed to demonstrate fast reactor breeding and to prove the use of liquid-metal coolant for power production and reached criticality in August 1951. The EBR-I reactor was undergoing a series of physics experiments and the Mark-II core was melted accidentally on Nov. 29, 1955. The experiment was going to increase core temperature to 500C to see if the reactor loses reactivity, and scram when the power reached 1500 kW or doubling of fission rate per second. However the operator scrammed with a slow moving control and missed the shutdown by two seconds and caused the core meltdown. The NuSTAB code has an advantage of analyzing space-dependent fast reactors and predicting regional oscillations compared to the point kinetics. Also, NuSTAB can be useful when the coupled neutronic-thermal-hydraulic codes cannot be used for stability analysis. Future work includes analyses of the PGSFR for various operating conditions as well as further validation of the NuSTAB calculations against SFR stability experiments when such experiments become available.

  2. Phenomenological studies on melt-structure-water interactions (MSWI) during severe accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sehgal, B.R.; Yang, Z.L.; Haraldsson, H.O.; Nourgaliev, R.R.; Konovalikhin, M.; Paladino, D.; Gubaidullin, A.A.; Kolb, G.; Theerthan, A. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Div. of Nuclear Power Safety

    2000-05-01

    This is the annual report for the work performed in 1999 in the research project Melt-Structure-Water Interactions During Severe Accidents in LWRs, under the auspices of the APRI Project, jointly funded by SKI, HSK, USNRC and the Swedish and Finnish power companies. The emphasis of the work is placed on phenomena and properties which govern the fragmentation and breakup of melt jets and droplets, melt spreading and coolability, and thermal and mechanical loadings of a pressure vessel during melt-vessel interaction. We believe that significant technical advances have been achieved during the course of these studies. It was found that: The coolant temperature has significant influence on the characteristics of debris fragments produced from the breakup of an oxidic melt jet. At low subcooling the fragments are relatively large and irregular compared to the smaller particles produced at high subcooling. The melt jet density has considerable effect on the fragment size produced. As the melt density increases the fragment size becomes smaller. The mass mean size of the debris changes proportionally to the square root of the coolant to melt density ratio. The melt superheat has little effect on the debris particle size distribution produced during the melt jet fragmentation. The impingement velocity of the jet has significant impact on the fragmentation process. At lower jet velocity the melt fragments agglomerate and form a cake of large size debris. When the jet velocity is increased more complete fragmentation is obtained. The scaling methodology for melt spreading, developed during 1998, has been further validated against almost all of the spreading experimental data available so far. Experimental results for the dryout heat flux of homogeneous particulate debris beds with top flooding compare well with the Lipinski correlation. For the stratified particle beds, the fine particle layer resting on the top of another particle layer dominates the dryout processes

  3. A study on the core analysis methodology for SMART CEA ejection accident-I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zee, Sung Kyun; Lee, Chung Chan; Kim, Kyo Yoon; Cho, Byung Oh

    1999-04-01

    A methodology to analyze the fuel enthalpy is developed based on MASTER that is a time dependent 3 dimensional core analysis code. Using the proposed methodology, SMART CEA ejection accident is analyzed. Moreover, radiation doses are estimated at the exclusion area boundary and low population zone to confirm the criteria for the accident. (Author). 31 refs., 13 tabs., 18 figs.

  4. Water isotopic ratios from a continuously melted ice core sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Gkinis

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A new technique for on-line high resolution isotopic analysis of liquid water, tailored for ice core studies is presented. We build an interface between an Infra Red Cavity Ring Down Spectrometer (IR-CRDS and a Continuous Flow Analysis (CFA system. The system offers the possibility to perform simultaneuous water isotopic analysis of δ18O and δD on a continuous stream of liquid water as generated from a continuously melted ice rod. Injection of sub μl amounts of liquid water is achieved by pumping sample through a fused silica capillary and instantaneously vaporizing it with 100 % efficiency in a home made oven at a temperature of 170 °C. A calibration procedure allows for proper reporting of the data on the VSMOW scale. We apply the necessary corrections based on the assessed performance of the system regarding instrumental drifts and dependance on humidity levels. The melt rates are monitored in order to assign a depth scale to the measured isotopic profiles. Application of spectral methods yields the combined uncertainty of the system at below 0.1 ‰ and 0.5 ‰ for δ18O and δD, respectively. This performance is comparable to that achieved with mass spectrometry. Dispersion of the sample in the transfer lines limits the resolution of the technique. In this work we investigate and assess these dispersion effects. By using an optimal filtering method we show how the measured profiles can be corrected for the smoothing effects resulting from the sample dispersion. Considering the significant advantages the technique offers, i.e. simultaneuous measurement of δ18O and δD, potentially in combination with chemical components that are traditionally measured on CFA systems, notable reduction on analysis time and power consumption, we consider it as an alternative to traditional isotope ratio mass spectrometry with the possibility to be deployed for field ice core studies. We present data acquired in the

  5. Water isotopic ratios from a continuously melted ice core sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Gkinis

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A new technique for on-line high resolution isotopic analysis of liquid water, tailored for ice core studies is presented. We built an interface between a Wavelength Scanned Cavity Ring Down Spectrometer (WS-CRDS purchased from Picarro Inc. and a Continuous Flow Analysis (CFA system. The system offers the possibility to perform simultaneuous water isotopic analysis of δ18O and δD on a continuous stream of liquid water as generated from a continuously melted ice rod. Injection of sub μl amounts of liquid water is achieved by pumping sample through a fused silica capillary and instantaneously vaporizing it with 100% efficiency in a~home made oven at a temperature of 170 °C. A calibration procedure allows for proper reporting of the data on the VSMOW–SLAP scale. We apply the necessary corrections based on the assessed performance of the system regarding instrumental drifts and dependance on the water concentration in the optical cavity. The melt rates are monitored in order to assign a depth scale to the measured isotopic profiles. Application of spectral methods yields the combined uncertainty of the system at below 0.1‰ and 0.5‰ for δ18O and δD, respectively. This performance is comparable to that achieved with mass spectrometry. Dispersion of the sample in the transfer lines limits the temporal resolution of the technique. In this work we investigate and assess these dispersion effects. By using an optimal filtering method we show how the measured profiles can be corrected for the smoothing effects resulting from the sample dispersion. Considering the significant advantages the technique offers, i.e. simultaneuous measurement of δ18O and δD, potentially in combination with chemical components that are traditionally measured on CFA systems, notable reduction on analysis time and power consumption, we consider it as an alternative to traditional isotope ratio mass spectrometry with the possibility to

  6. Water isotopic ratios from a continuously melted ice core sample

    CERN Document Server

    Gkinis, V; Blunier, T; Bigler, M; Schüpbach, S; Kettner, E; Johnsen, S J

    2014-01-01

    A new technique for on-line high resolution isotopic analysis of liquid water, tailored for ice core studies is presented. We built an interface between a Wavelength Scanned Cavity Ring Down Spectrometer (WS-CRDS) purchased from Picarro Inc. and a Continuous Flow Analysis (CFA) system. The system offers the possibility to perform simultaneous water isotopic analysis of $\\delta^{18}$O and $\\delta$D on a continuous stream of liquid water as generated from a continuously melted ice rod. Injection of sub ${\\mu}$l amounts of liquid water is achieved by pumping sample through a fused silica capillary and instantaneously vaporizing it with 100% efficiency in a home made oven. A calibration procedure allows for proper reporting of the data on the VSMOW--SLAP scale. Application of spectral methods yields the combined uncertainty of the system at below 0.1 permil and 0.5 permil for $\\delta^{18}$O and $\\delta$D, respectively. This performance is comparable to that achieved with mass spectrometry. Dispersion of the sampl...

  7. Analysis of Core Degradation in Fukushima Unit 1 Accident with MELCOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Il; Kim, Tae Woon; Ha, Kwang Soon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    In this study, an accident analysis of Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1 was performed using MELCOR 1.8.6. The behavior of the initial stage of the accident was focused during 30 hours after the reactor scram, because it was predicted that the vessel failure (severe accident) occurred before 20 hours. A hydrogen explosion also occurred at about 24 hours after the accident, and thus the phenomenon of core degradation before 30 hours was highlighted. Moreover, the effect of the amount of fresh water injection on the core degradation was performed by changing the amount of injection water. It was expected that a large portion of the injection water could not reach the core because of leakage. Thus, core damage was observed according to the amount of water that reached the core. The plant geometries and operating conditions were obtained from TEPCO (Tokyo Electric Power Company) through the OECD/NEA BSAF (Benchmark Study of the Accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station) Project. An analysis of the Fukushima accident was also performed by Sandia National Laboratories, but several conditions were revised and added in this study. First, the flow rate of the steam into turbine and water into downcomer were considered at the initial stage of accident. The water level followed well the measured data by adding this mechanism. Second, SRV stuck open was included in this calculation. SRV stuck open can occur due to high temperature and frequent operation, and was modeled in calculation. The timing of SRV stuck open was closed to the timing of MSL failure, and thus the depressurization of RPV could have originated from both of MSL failure and SRV stuck open. The effect of injection water was observed, and it was found that the proper water injection can prevent a severe accident at the initial stage of the accident. In conclusion, an analysis of the severe accident occurring in Fukushima Unit 1 was conducted by using MELCOR. The analysis results were consistent with the

  8. Evaluation of long-term post-accident core cooling of Three Mile Island Unit 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-04-15

    On the basis of current understanding of the accident scenario and available data, the staff reports here on its evaluation of the condition of the core and the core flow resistance as it might affect ability to cool the core by natural circulation. The natural circulation cooling capability of TMI-2 for the estimated core flow resistance and a variety of other conditions is evaluated and a comparison of the Base Case and off-nominal plant configurations is presented. The potential for and effects of natural convection core cooling are addressed, and the staff recommendations for reactor performance acceptance criteria upon initiation of natural convection are presented.

  9. Chernobyl nuclear accident revealed from the 7010 m Muztagata ice core record

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN LiDe; YAO TanDong; WU GuangJian; LI Zhen; XU BaiQing; LI YueFang

    2007-01-01

    The total activity variation with depth from a 41.6 m Muztagata ice core drilled at 7010 m,recorded not only the 1963 radioactive layer due to the thermonuclear test,but also clearly the radioactive peak released by the Chernobyl accident in 1986.This finding indicates that the Chernobyl nuclear accident was clearly recorded in alpine glaciers in the Pamirs of west China,and the layer can be potentially used for ice core dating in other high alpine glaciers in the surrounding regions.

  10. Natural convection of the oxide pool in a three-layer configuration of core melts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Su-Hyeon; Park, Hae-Kyun; Chung, Bum-Jin, E-mail: bjchung@khu.ac.kr

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Natural convection of oxide pool in 3-layer configuration during IVR was investigated. • High Ra was achieved by using mass transfer experiments based on analogy concept. • Heat ratio to light metal layer was 14% higher for 3-layer configuration than 2-layer one. • Heat transfer to heavy metal layer was poor and hence heat load to side wall increased. • Angular heat loads to side wall showed strengthened heat focusing at uppermost location. - Abstract: We investigated the natural convection of the oxide layer in a three-layer configuration of core melts in a severe accident. In order to achieve high modified Rayleigh numbers of 10{sup 12}–10{sup 13}, mass transfer experiments were performed using a copper sulfate electroplating system based upon the analogy between heat and mass transfer. Four different cooling conditions of the top and the bottom plates were tested. The upward heat ratios were 14% higher for three-layer than for two-layer due to the reduced heights and the downward heat ratios were lower the same amount. The local Nusselt numbers for the top and the bottom plates were measured and compared with the two layer configuration. To explore the heat load to the reactor vessel, the angle-dependent heat fluxes at the side wall, were measured and compared with the two-layer configuration. Heat load to the side wall and peak heat at the uppermost location were intensified for the three-layer configuration.

  11. RESEARCH OF THE FEEDING SPEED ADOPTING CORED-WIRE METHOD TO SPHEROIDIZE DUCTILE IRON MELT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G.W.Chang; H.X.Wang; X.D.Yue; H.L.Zhang

    2008-01-01

    For settling the question of feeding speed in applying the cored-wire method to spheroidize ductile iron melt, ANSYS software was applied to simulate the heat transfer and mass transfer, and the melt time of the steel strip in the iron melt was determined by linking the heat transfer and mass transfer, and then the feeding speed was calculated. Conclusions have been drawn that the iron layer was formed on the surface of the cored-wire during the wire-feeding process. The thickness is 0.073 mm when the temperature of the iron melt is 1500℃, the time from formation to remelting of the iron layer is 0.063 s. When the temperature of the iron melt is below 1500℃, the time taken for the steel strip to melt is rapidly shortened. When the temperature of the iron melt is above 1500℃, the variation amplitude of the steel strip melt change with time is gradually diminished. The melt time of the steel strip is rapidly increased with the increase of the steel strip thickness. When the temperature of the iron melt is 1500℃ and the carbon content is 4%, the melt time of a steel strip, which has a thickness of 0.5 mm, is thrice that of a steel strip whose thickness is 0.3 mm. The calculation results of the feeding speed are basically in agreement with the applied feeding speed in the factory.

  12. Numerical simulation of a Hypothetical Core Disruptive Accident in a small-scale model of a nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robbe, M.F. E-mail: robbe@aquilon.cea.frmfrobbe@cea.fr; Lepareux, M.; Treille, E.; Cariou, Y

    2003-08-01

    In the case of a Hypothetical Core Disruptive Accident (HCDA) in a Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor, it is assumed that the core of the nuclear reactor has melted partially and that the chemical interaction between molten fuel and liquid sodium has created a high-pressure gas bubble in the core. The violent expansion of this bubble loads and deforms the reactor vessel and the internal structures, thus endangering the safety of the nuclear plant. The MARA 10 experimental test simulates a HCDA in a 1/30-scale mock-up schematising a reactor block. In the mock-up, the liquid sodium cooling the reactor core is replaced by water and the argon blanket laying below the reactor roof is simulated by an air blanket. The explosion is triggered by an explosive charge. This paper presents a numerical simulation of the test with the EUROPLEXUS code and an analysis of the computed results. In particular, the evolution of the fluid flows and the deformations of the internal and external structures are analysed in detail. Finally, the current computed results are compared with the experimental ones and with previous numerical results computed with the SIRIUS and CASTEM-PLEXUS codes.

  13. Incorporation of phenomenological uncertainties in probabilistic safety analysis - application to LMFBR core disruptive accident energetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Najafi, B; Theofanous, T G; Rumble, E T; Atefi, B

    1984-08-01

    This report describes a method for quantifying frequency and consequence uncertainty distribution associated with core disruptive accidents (CDAs). The method was developed to estimate the frequency and magnitude of energy impacting the reactor vessel head of the Clinch River Breeder Plant (CRBRP) given the occurrence of hypothetical CDAs. The methodology is illustrated using the CRBR example.

  14. Effect of periodic melting on geochemical and isotopic signals in an ice core from Lomonosovfonna, Svalbard

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pohjola, V.A.; Moore, J.C.; Isaksson, E.; Jauhiainen, T.; Wal, R.S.W. van de; Martma, T.; Meijer, H.A.J.; Vaikmäe, R.

    2002-01-01

    [1] We examine the quality of atmospherically deposited ion and isotope signals in an ice core taken from a periodically melting ice field, Lomonosovfonna in central Spitsbergen, Svalbard. The aim is to determine the degree to which the signals are altered by periodic melting of the ice. We use thre

  15. Effect of periodic melting on geochemical and isotopic signals in an ice core from Lomonosovfonna, Svalbard

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pohjola, V.A.; Moore, J.C.; Isaksson, E.; Jauhiainen, T.; Wal, R.S.W. van de; Martma, T.; Meijer, H.A.J.; Vaikmäe, R.

    2002-01-01

    [1] We examine the quality of atmospherically deposited ion and isotope signals in an ice core taken from a periodically melting ice field, Lomonosovfonna in central Spitsbergen, Svalbard. The aim is to determine the degree to which the signals are altered by periodic melting of the ice. We use thre

  16. Teaching to the Common Core by Design, Not Accident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Vicki; Wong, Carina

    2012-01-01

    The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation has created tools and supports intended to help teachers adapt to the Common Core State Standards in English language arts and mathematics. The tools seek to find the right balance between encouraging teachers' creativity and giving them enough guidance to ensure quality. They are the product of two years of…

  17. Reactor Core Coolability Analysis during Hypothesized Severe Accidents of OPR1000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yongjae; Seo, Seungwon; Kim, Sung Joong [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Kwang Soon; Kim, Hwan-Yeol [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Assessment of the safety features over the hypothesized severe accidents may be performed experimentally or numerically. Due to the considerable time and expenditures, experimental assessment is implemented only to the limited cases. Therefore numerical assessment has played a major role in revisiting severe accident analysis of the existing or newly designed power plants. Computer codes for the numerical analysis of severe accidents are categorized as the fast running integral code and detailed code. Fast running integral codes are characterized by a well-balanced combination of detailed and simplified models for the simulation of the relevant phenomena within an NPP in the case of a severe accident. MAAP, MELCOR and ASTEC belong to the examples of fast running integral codes. Detailed code is to model as far as possible all relevant phenomena in detail by mechanistic models. The examples of detailed code is SCDAP/RELAP5. Using the MELCOR, Carbajo. investigated sensitivity studies of Station Black Out (SBO) using the MELCOR for Peach Bottom BWR. Park et al. conduct regulatory research of the PWR severe accident. Ahn et al. research sensitivity analysis of the severe accident for APR1400 with MELCOR 1.8.4. Lee et al. investigated RCS depressurization strategy and developed a core coolability map for independent scenarios of Small Break Loss-of-Coolant Accident (SBLOCA), SBO, and Total Loss of Feed Water (TLOFW). In this study, three initiating cases were selected, which are SBLOCA without SI, SBO, and TLOFW. The initiating cases exhibit the highest probability of transitioning into core damage according to PSA 1 of OPR 1000. The objective of this study is to investigate the reactor core coolability during hypothesized severe accidents of OPR1000. As a representative indicator, we have employed Jakob number and developed JaCET and JaMCT using the MELCOR simulation. Although the RCS pressures for the respective accident scenarios were different, the JaMCT and Ja

  18. Study of diluting and absorber materials to control reactivity during a postulated core melt down accident in Generation IV reactors; Etude des materiaux sacrificiels absorbants et diluants pour le controle de la reactivite dans le cas d'un accidnet hypothetique de fusion du coeur de reacteurs de quatrieme generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plevacova, K.

    2010-12-16

    In order to limit the consequences of a hypothetical core meltdown accident in Generation IV Sodium Fast Reactors, absorber materials in or near the core, such as boron carbide B{sub 4}C, and diluting materials in the core catcher will be used to prevent recriticality within the mixture of molten oxide fuel and molten structures called corium. The aim of the PhD thesis was to select materials of both types and to understand their behaviour during their interaction with corium, from chemical and thermodynamic point of view. Concerning B{sub 4}C, thermodynamic calculations and experiments agree with the formation of two immiscible phases at high temperature in the B{sub 4}C - UO{sub 2} system: one oxide and one boride. This separation of phases can reduce the efficiency of the neutrons absorption inside the molten fuel contained in the oxide phase. Moreover, a volatilization of a part of the boron element can occur. According to these results, the necessary quantity of B{sub 4}C to be introduced should be reconsidered for postulated severe accident sequence. Other solution could be the use of Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3} or HfO{sub 2} as absorber material. These oxides form a solid solution with the oxide fuel. Concerning the diluting materials, mixed oxides Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} - HfO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} - Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3} were preselected. These systems being completely unknown to date at high temperature in association with UO{sub 2}, first points on the corresponding ternary phase diagrams were researched. Contrary to Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} - Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3} - UO{sub 2} system, the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} - HfO{sub 2} - UO{sub 2} mixture presents only one eutectic and thus only one solidification path which makes easier forecasting the behaviour of corium in the core catcher. (author) [French] Resume: Afin de limiter les consequences d'un accident grave avec la fusion du coeur dans un reacteur a neutrons rapides de generation IV refroidi au sodium, la recriticite doit

  19. Development of melting system for Measurement of trace elements and ions in ice core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Sang Bum; Lee, Khang Hyun; Hur, Soon Do; Soyol-Erene, Tseren-Ochir; Kim, Sun Mee; Chung, Ji Woong; Jun, Seong Joon [Korea Polar Research Institute, KIOST, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Sung Min [Dept. of Ocean Sciences, Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Chang Hee [Dept. of Chemistry and Research Institute for Basic Sciences, Jeju National University, Jeju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    We present a titanium (Ti) melting head divided into three zones as an improved melting system for decontaminating ice-core samples. This system was subjected to performance tests using short ice-core samples (4 × 4 cm{sup 2}, ⁓5 cm long). The procedural blanks (PBs) and detection limits of ionic species, with the exception of math formula, were comparable with published values, but for elements the experimental procedures should be refined to obtain valid Zn concentrations due to the PB of ⁓90.0 ± 16.2 ng/L. The improved melting system efficiently decontaminated the samples, as verified by the concentration profiles of elements and ions in the melted samples from the three melting-head zones. The recovery of trace elements in ice-core samples was ⁓70–120% at ⁓100 ng/L in artificial ice cores. Because of the memory effects between ice-core samples melted in series, the melting system should be rinsed at least 5–6 times (in a total volume of ⁓2.5 mL deionized water) after each melting procedure. Finally, as an application of this technique, trace elements were measured in ice-core samples recovered from the East Rongbuk Glacier, Mount Everest, (28°03′N, 86°96′E, 6518 m a.s.l.), and the concentrations of trace elements following mechanical chiseling and the melting method were compared.

  20. Severe accident modeling of a PWR core with different cladding materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, S. C. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, 5801 Bluff Road, Columbia, SC 29209 (United States); Henry, R. E.; Paik, C. Y. [Fauske and Associates, Inc., 16W070 83rd Street, Burr Ridge, IL 60527 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The MAAP v.4 software has been used to model two severe accident scenarios in nuclear power reactors with three different materials as fuel cladding. The TMI-2 severe accident was modeled with Zircaloy-2 and SiC as clad material and a SBO accident in a Zion-like, 4-loop, Westinghouse PWR was modeled with Zircaloy-2, SiC, and 304 stainless steel as clad material. TMI-2 modeling results indicate that lower peak core temperatures, less H 2 (g) produced, and a smaller mass of molten material would result if SiC was substituted for Zircaloy-2 as cladding. SBO modeling results indicate that the calculated time to RCS rupture would increase by approximately 20 minutes if SiC was substituted for Zircaloy-2. Additionally, when an extended SBO accident (RCS creep rupture failure disabled) was modeled, significantly lower peak core temperatures, less H 2 (g) produced, and a smaller mass of molten material would be generated by substituting SiC for Zircaloy-2 or stainless steel cladding. Because the rate of SiC oxidation reaction with elevated temperature H{sub 2}O (g) was set to 0 for this work, these results should be considered preliminary. However, the benefits of SiC as a more accident tolerant clad material have been shown and additional investigation of SiC as an LWR core material are warranted, specifically investigations of the oxidation kinetics of SiC in H{sub 2}O (g) over the range of temperatures and pressures relevant to severe accidents in LWR 's. (authors)

  1. Ice core melt features in relation to Antarctic coastal climate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaczmarska, M.; Isaksson, E.; Karlöf, L.; Brandt, O.; Winther, J.G.; van de Wal, R.S.W.; van den Broeke, M.R.; Johnsen, S.J.

    2006-01-01

    Measurement of light intensity transmission was carried out on an ice core S100 from coastal Dronning Maud Land (DML). Ice lenses were observed in digital pictures of the core and recorded as peaks in the light transmittance record. The frequency of ice layer occurrence was compared with climate pro

  2. Crust behavior and erosion rate prediction of EPR sacrificial material impinged by core melt jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Gen; Liu, Ming, E-mail: ming.liu@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Wang, Jinshi; Chong, Daotong; Yan, Junjie

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • A numerical code was developed to analyze melt jet-concrete interaction in the frame of MPS method. • Crust and ablated concrete layer at UO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} melt and concrete interface periodically developed and collapsed. • Concrete surface temperature fluctuated around a low temperature and ablation temperature. • Concrete erosion by Fe-Zr melt jet was significantly faster than that by UO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} melt jet. - Abstract: Sacrificial material is a special ferro-siliceous concrete, designed in the ex-vessel core melt stabilization system of European Pressurized water Reactor (EPR). Given a localized break of RPV lower head, the melt directly impinges onto the dry concrete in form of compact jet. The concrete erosion behavior influences the failure of melt plug, and further affects melt spreading. In this study, a numerical code was developed in the frame of Moving Particle Semi-implicit (MPS) method, to analyze the crust behavior and erosion rate of sacrificial concrete, impinged by prototypic melt jet. In validation of numerical modeling, the time-dependent erosion depth and erosion configuration matched well with the experimental data. Sensitivity study of sacrificial concrete erosion indicates that the crust and ablated concrete layer presented at UO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} melt and concrete interface, whereas no crust could be found in the interaction of Fe-Zr melt with concrete. The crust went through stabilization-fracture-reformation periodic process, accompanied with accumulating and collapsing of molten concrete layer. The concrete surface temperature fluctuated around a low temperature and ablation temperature. It increased as the concrete surface layer was heated to melting, and dropped down when the cold concrete was revealed. The erosion progression was fast in the conditions of small jet diameter and large concrete inclination angle, and it was significantly faster in the erosion by metallic melt jet than by oxidic melt jet.

  3. Design analysis of the molten core confinement within the reactor vessel in the case of severe accidents at nuclear power plants equipped with a reactor of the VVER type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zvonaryov, Yu. A.; Budaev, M. A.; Volchek, A. M.; Gorbaev, V. A.; Zagryazkin, V. N.; Kiselyov, N. P.; Kobzar', V. L.; Konobeev, A. V.; Tsurikov, D. F.

    2013-12-01

    The present paper reports the results of the preliminary design estimate of the behavior of the core melt in vessels of reactors of the VVER-600 and VVER-1300 types (a standard optimized and informative nuclear power unit based on VVER technology—VVER TOI) in the case of beyond-design-basis severe accidents. The basic processes determining the state of the core melt in the reactor vessel are analyzed. The concept of molten core confinement within the vessel based on the idea of outside cooling is discussed. Basic assumptions and models, as well as the results of calculation of the interaction between molten materials of the core and the wall of the reactor vessel performed by means of the SOCRAT severe accident code, are presented and discussed. On the basis of the data obtained, the requirements on the operation of the safety systems are determined, upon the fulfillment of which there will appear potential prerequisites for implementing the concept of the confinement of the core melt within the reactor in cases of severe accidents at nuclear power plants equipped with VVER reactors.

  4. Core damage frequency estimation using accident sequence precursor data: 1990--1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martz, H.F.

    1998-12-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC`s) ongoing Accident Sequence Precursor (ASP) program uses probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) techniques to assess the potential for severe core damage (henceforth referred to simply as core damage) based on operating events. The types of operating events considered include accident sequence initiators, safety equipment failures, and degradation of plant conditions that could increase the probability that various postulated accident sequences occur. Such operating events potentially reduce the margin of safety available for prevention of core damage an thus can be considered as precursors to core damage. The current process for identifying, analyzing, and documenting ASP events is described in detail in Vanden Heuval et al. The significance of a Licensee Event Report (LER) event (or events) is measured by means of the conditional probability that the event leads to core damage, the so-called conditional core damage probability or, simply, CCDP. When the first ASP study results were published in 1982, it covered the period 1969--1979. In addition to identification and ranking of precursors, the original study attempted to estimate core damage frequency (CDF) based on the precursor events. The purpose of this paper is to compare the average annual CDF estimates calculated using the CCDP sum, Cooke-Goossens, Bier, and Abramson estimators for various reactor classes using the combined ASP data for the four years, 1990--1993. An important outcome of this comparison is an answer to the persistent question regarding the degree and effect of the positive bias of the CCDP sum method in practice. Note that this paper only compares the estimators with each other. Because the true average CDF is unknown, the estimation error is also unknown. Therefore, any observations or characterizations of bias are based on purely theoretical considerations.

  5. A view of treatment process of melted nuclear fuel on a severe accident plant using a molten salt system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujita, R.; Takahashi, Y.; Nakamura, H.; Mizuguchi, K. [Power and Industrial Research and Development Center, Toshiba Corporation Power Systems Company, 4-1 Ukishima-cho, Kawasaki-ku, Kawasaki 210-0862 (Japan); Oomori, T. [Chemical System Design and Engineering Department, Toshiba Corporation Power Systems Company, 8 Shinsugita-cho, Isogo-ku, Yokohama 235-8523 (Japan)

    2013-07-01

    At severe accident such as Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident, the nuclear fuels in the reactor would melt and form debris which contains stable UO2-ZrO2 mixture corium and parts of vessel such as zircaloy and iron component. The requirements for solution of issues are below; -) the reasonable treatment process of the debris should be simple and in-situ in Fukushima Daiichi power plant, -) the desirable treatment process is to take out UO{sub 2} and PuO{sub 2} or metallic U and TRU metal, and dispose other fission products as high level radioactive waste; and -) the candidate of treatment process should generate the smallest secondary waste. Pyro-process has advantages to treat the debris because of the high solubility of the debris and its total process feasibility. Toshiba proposes a new pyro-process in molten salts using electrolysing Zr before debris fuel being treated.

  6. Safety evaluation of accident-tolerant FCM fueled core with SiC-coated zircalloy cladding for design-basis-accidents and beyond DBAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Ji-Han, E-mail: chunjh@kaeri.re.kr; Lim, Sung-Won; Chung, Bub-Dong; Lee, Won-Jae

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Thermal conductivity model of the FCM fuel was developed and adopted in the MARS. • Scoping analysis for candidate FCM FAs was performed to select feasible FA. • Preliminary safety criteria for FCM fuel and SiC/Zr cladding were set up. • Enhanced safety margin and accident tolerance for FCM-SiC/Zr core were demonstrated. - Abstract: The FCM fueled cores proposed as an accident tolerant concept is assessed against the design-basis-accident (DBA) and the beyond-DBA (BDBA) scenarios using MARS code. A thermal conductivity model of FCM fuel is incorporated in the MARS code to take into account the effects of irradiation and temperature that was recently measured by ORNL. Preliminary analyses regarding the initial stored energy and accident tolerant performance were carried out for the scoping of various cladding material candidates. A 16 × 16 FA with SiC-coated Zircalloy cladding was selected as the feasible conceptual design through a preliminary scoping analysis. For a selected design, safety analyses for DBA and BDBA scenarios were performed to demonstrate the accident tolerance of the FCM fueled core. A loss of flow accident (LOFA) scenario was selected for a departure-from-nucleate-boiling (DNB) evaluation, and large-break loss of coolant accident (LBLOCA) scenario for peak cladding temperature (PCT) margin evaluation. A control element assembly (CEA) ejection accident scenario was selected for peak fuel enthalpy and temperature. Moreover, a station blackout (SBO) and LBLOCA without a safety injection (SI) scenario were selected as a BDBA. It was demonstrated that the DBA safety margin of the FCM core is satisfied and the time for operator actions for BDBA s is evaluated.

  7. Accident source terms for boiling water reactors with high burnup cores.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauntt, Randall O.; Powers, Dana Auburn; Leonard, Mark Thomas

    2007-11-01

    The primary objective of this report is to provide the technical basis for development of recommendations for updates to the NUREG-1465 Source Term for BWRs that will extend its applicability to accidents involving high burnup (HBU) cores. However, a secondary objective is to re-examine the fundamental characteristics of the prescription for fission product release to containment described by NUREG-1465. This secondary objective is motivated by an interest to understand the extent to which research into the release and behaviors of radionuclides under accident conditions has altered best-estimate calculations of the integral response of BWRs to severe core damage sequences and the resulting radiological source terms to containment. This report, therefore, documents specific results of fission product source term analyses that will form the basis for the HBU supplement to NUREG-1465. However, commentary is also provided on observed differences between the composite results of the source term calculations performed here and those reflected NUREG-1465 itself.

  8. Behavior of an heterogeneous annular FBR core during an unprotected loss of flow accident: Analysis of the primary phase with SAS-SFR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massara, S.; Schmitt, D.; Bretault, A.; Lemasson, D.; Darmet, G.; Verwaerde, D. [EDF R and D, 1, Avenue du General de Gaulle, 92141 Clamart (France); Struwe, D.; Pfrang, W.; Ponomarev, A. [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie KIT, Institut fuer Neutronenphysik und Reaktortechnik INR, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, Gebaude 521, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    In the framework of a substantial improvement on FBR core safety connected to the development of a new Gen IV reactor type, heterogeneous core with innovative features are being carefully analyzed in France since 2009. At EDF R and D, the main goal is to understand whether a strong reduction of the Na-void worth - possibly attempting a negative value - allows a significant improvement of the core behavior during an unprotected loss of flow accident. Also, the physical behavior of such a core is of interest, before and beyond the (possible) onset of Na boiling. Hence, a cutting-edge heterogeneous design, featuring an annular shape, a Na-plena with a B{sub 4}C plate and a stepwise modulation of fissile core heights, was developed at EDF by means of the SDDS methodology, with a total Na-void worth of -1 $. The behavior of such a core during the primary phase of a severe accident, initiated by an unprotected loss of flow, is analyzed by means of the SAS-SFR code. This study is carried-out at KIT and EDF, in the framework of a scientific collaboration on innovative FBR severe accident analyses. The results show that the reduction of the Na-void worth is very effective, but is not sufficient alone to avoid Na-boiling and, hence, to prevent the core from entering into the primary phase of a severe accident. Nevertheless, the grace time up to boiling onset is greatly enhanced in comparison to a more traditional homogeneous core design, and only an extremely low fraction of the fuel (<0.1%) enters into melting at the end of this phase. A sensitivity analysis shows that, due to the inherent neutronic characteristics of such a core, the gagging scheme plays a major role on the core behavior: indeed, an improved 4-zones gagging scheme, associated with an enhanced control rod drive line expansion feed-back effect, finally prevents the core from entering into sodium boiling. This major conclusion highlights both the progress already accomplished and the need for more detailed

  9. In-vessel coolability and retention of a core melt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theofanous, T.G.; Liu, C.; Additon, S. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-02-01

    The efficacy of external flooding of a reactor vessel as a severe accident management strategy is assessed for an AP600-like reactor design. The overall approach is based on the Risk Oriented Accident Analysis Methodology (ROAAM), and the assessment includes consideration of bounding scenarios and sensitivity studies, as well as arbitrary parametric evaluations that allow the delineation of the failure boundaries. The technical treatment in this assessment includes: (a) new data on energy flow from either volumetrically heated pools or non-heated layers on top, boiling and critical heat flux in inverted, curved geometries, emissivity of molten (superheated) samples of steel, and chemical reactivity proof tests, (b) a simple but accurate mathematical formulation that allows prediction of thermal loads by means of convenient hand calculations, (c) a detailed model programmed on the computer to sample input parameters over the uncertainty ranges, and to produce probability distributions of thermal loads and margins for departure from nucleate boiling at each angular position on the lower head, and (d) detailed structural evaluations that demonstrate that departure from nucleate boiling is a necessary and sufficient criterion for failure. Quantification of the input parameters is carried out for an AP600-like design, and the results of the assessment demonstrate that lower head failure is {open_quotes}physically unreasonable.{close_quotes} Use of this conclusion for any specific application is subject to verifying the required reliability of the depressurization and cavity-flooding systems, and to showing the appropriateness (in relation to the database presented here, or by further testing as necessary) of the thermal insulation design and of the external surface properties of the lower head, including any applicable coatings.

  10. Qualification of the numerical simulation of a core disruptive accident on the mars mock-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robbe, M.F.; Lepareux, M. [CEA Saclay, Dept. de Mecanique et de Technologie, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Cariou, Y. [Novatome, NVPM, 69 - Lyon (France); Treille, E. [Socotec Industrie, 78 - Montigny le Bretonneux (France)

    2001-07-01

    In case of a Hypothetical Core Disruptive Accident (HCDA) in a Liquid Metal Reactor, the interaction between fuel and liquid sodium creates a high pressure gas bubble in the core. The violent expansion of this bubble loads the vessel and the internal structures, whose deformation is important. A simulation was undertaken using the fluid-structure improvements and the description of the peripheral structures (heat exchangers and pumps) by means of the porosity model. This paper presents the comparison of the results of the third numerical simulation with the experimental results and the numerical results of the previous simulations, as well as a synthesis of all the results of the simulation. (authors)

  11. Crystallization of ion clouds in octupole traps: structural transitions, core melting, and scaling laws

    CERN Document Server

    Calvo, Florent; Yurtsever, Ersin

    2009-01-01

    The stable structures and melting properties of ion clouds in isotropic octupole traps are investigated using a combination of semi-analytical and numerical models, with a particular emphasis at finite size scaling effects. Small-size clouds are found to be hollow and arranged in shells corresponding approximately to the solutions of the Thomson problem. The shell structure is lost in clusters containing more than a few thousands of ions, the inner parts of the cloud becoming soft and amorphous. While melting is triggered in the core shells, the melting temperature unexpectedly follows the rule expected for three-dimensional dense particles, with a depression scaling linearly with the inverse radius.

  12. Phenomenological Studies on Melt-Structure-Water Interactions (MSWI) during Postulated Severe Accidents: Year 2004 Activity. APRI 5 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sehgal, B.R.; Park, H.S.; Nayak, A.K.; Hansson, R.C.; Chiferaw, D.; Stepanyan, A.; Rao, R.S.; Karbojian, A. [Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Div. of Nuclear Power Safety

    2005-04-01

    This report presents descriptions of the major results obtained in the research program 'Melt-Structure-Water Interaction (MSWI)' at NPS/RIT during the year 2004. The primary objectives of the MSWI Project in year 2004 were to study (1) the in-vessel and exvessel melt/debris bed coolability process when melt is flooded with water, and (2) the energetics and characteristics of steam explosions. Our general approaches are to establish scaling relationships so that the data obtained in the experiments could be extended to prototypical accident geometries and conditions, develop phenomenological or computational models for the processes under investigation and validate the existing and newly developed models against data obtained at RIT and at other laboratories. In 2004, several experimental programs, such as the COMECO (Corium MElt COolability), POMECO (POrous MEdia COolability) and MISTEE (Micro-Interactions in STeam Explosion Experiments) programs were continued. The SIMECO (Simulation of MElt Coolability) program was restarted in 2004. The construction of the POMECO-GRAND (POrous MEdia COolability) facility was delayed due to lack of finances. However, existing POMECO facility was modified to study 3-D effects on debris coolability. In this report, the results from the COMECO experiment with high temperature oxidic melt, from the POMECO experiments for the multi-dimensional effects on debris bed coolability, from the SIMECO experiment for three-layer pool configuration and from the MISTEE experiments for steam explosion characteristics and loads are described. For analytical efforts, results from the COMETA code for the entire process of the steam explosions are discussed.

  13. The radiological consequences of degraded core accidents for the Sizewell PWR The impact of adopting revised frequencies of occurrence

    CERN Document Server

    Kelly, G N

    1983-01-01

    The radiological consequences of degraded core accidents postulated for the Sizewell PWR were assessed in an earlier study and the results published in NRPB-R137. Further analyses have since been made by the Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB) of degraded core accidents which have led to a revision of their predicted frequencies of occurrence. The implications of these revised frequencies, in terms of the risk to the public from degraded core accidents, are evaluated in this report. Increases, by factors typically within the range of about 1.5 to 7, are predicted in the consequences, compared with those estimated in the earlier study. However, the predicted risk from degraded core accidents, despite these increases, remains exceedingly small.

  14. Melting-induced stratification above the Earth's inner core due to convective translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alboussière, Thierry; Deguen, Renaud; Melzani, Mickaël

    2010-08-05

    In addition to its global North-South anisotropy, there are two other enigmatic seismological observations related to the Earth's inner core: asymmetry between its eastern and western hemispheres and the presence of a layer of reduced seismic velocity at the base of the outer core. This 250-km-thick layer has been interpreted as a stably stratified region of reduced composition in light elements. Here we show that this layer can be generated by simultaneous crystallization and melting at the surface of the inner core, and that a translational mode of thermal convection in the inner core can produce enough melting and crystallization on each hemisphere respectively for the dense layer to develop. The dynamical model we propose introduces a clear asymmetry between a melting and a crystallizing hemisphere which forms a basis for also explaining the East-West asymmetry. The present translation rate is found to be typically 100 million years for the inner core to be entirely renewed, which is one to two orders of magnitude faster than the growth rate of the inner core's radius. The resulting strong asymmetry of buoyancy flux caused by light elements is anticipated to have an impact on the dynamics of the outer core and on the geodynamo.

  15. 严重事故条件下堆芯升温模拟%Simulation of Core Heating up During Severe Accident Sequence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王佳赟; 樊普

    2012-01-01

    The core heating up of API000 reactor during a severe accident sequence was simulated numerically by FLUENT. The objective was to study the uniformity of the heating up after the uncover but before significant melting of the core in more detail than that was possible using integral severe accident codes and obtain the temperature of shroud and baffle, also to assess the MAAP core heating up calculation. The results show that before significant core damaging, the shroud and baffle have melted causing an side relocation of the debris. Furthermore, the MAAP calculation of core heating up is also acceptable.%使用FLUENT计算流体程序数值模拟了AP1000在严重事故条件下的堆芯升温过程,目的是对堆芯裸露后并在其显著熔化前对堆芯升温的均匀程度进行比一体化事故程序MAAP更为详尽的研究,进行围筒和吊篮温度分析,同时评估MAAP程序堆芯升温计算结果.分析结果表明:在堆芯显著熔化时刻,堆芯围筒和吊篮已熔化,因此熔融堆芯将从侧面迁移进入下封头,同时对比证明MAAP程序关于堆芯升温的计算结果也是可接受的.

  16. Assessment of mass fraction and melting temperature for the application of limestone concrete and siliceous concrete to nuclear reactor basemat considering molten core-concrete interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ho Jae; Kim, Do Gyeum [Korea Institute of Civil Engineering and Building Technology, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Jae Leon [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Eui Sik [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Myung Suk [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    Severe accident scenarios in nuclear reactors, such as nuclear meltdown, reveal that an extremely hot molten core may fall into the nuclear reactor cavity and seriously affect the safety of the nuclear containment vessel due to the chain reaction caused by the reaction between the molten core and concrete. This paper reports on research focused on the type and amount of vapor produced during the reaction between a high-temperature molten core and concrete, as well as on the erosion rate of concrete and the heat transfer characteristics at its vicinity. This study identifies the mass fraction and melting temperature as the most influential properties of concrete necessary for a safety analysis conducted in relation to the thermal interaction between the molten core and the basemat concrete. The types of concrete that are actually used in nuclear reactor cavities were investigated. The H2O content in concrete required for the computation of the relative amount of gases generated by the chemical reaction of the vapor, the quantity of CO2 necessary for computing the cooling speed of the molten core, and the melting temperature of concrete are evaluated experimentally for the molten core-concrete interaction analysis.

  17. Melting of iron at the Earth's core conditions by molecular dynamics simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. N. Wu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available By large scale molecular dynamics simulations of solid-liquid coexistence, we have investigated the melting of iron under pressures from 0 to 364 GPa. The temperatures of liquid and solid regions, and the pressure of the system are calculated to estimate the melting point of iron. We obtain the melting temperature of iron is about 6700±200K under the inner-outer core boundary, which is in good agreement with the result of Alfè et al. By the pair analysis technique, the microstructure of liquid iron under higher pressures is obviously different from that of lower pressures and ambient condition, indicating that the pressure-induced liquid-liquid phase transition may take place in iron melts.

  18. Melting-induced stratification above the Earth's inner core due to convective translation

    CERN Document Server

    Alboussiere, Thierry; Melzani, Mickael; 10.1038/nature09257

    2012-01-01

    In addition to its global North-South anisotropy(1), there are two other enigmatic seismological observations related to the Earth's inner core: asymmetry between its eastern and western hemispheres(2-6) and the presence of a layer of reduced seismic velocity at the base of the outer core(6-12). This 250-km-thick layer has been interpreted as a stably stratified region of reduced composition in light elements(13). Here we show that this layer can be generated by simultaneous crystallization and melting at the surface of the inner core, and that a translational mode of thermal convection in the inner core can produce enough melting and crystallization on each hemisphere respectively for the dense layer to develop. The dynamical model we propose introduces a clear asymmetry between a melting and a crystallizing hemisphere which forms a basis for also explaining the East-West asymmetry. The present translation rate is found to be typically 100 million years for the inner core to be entirely renewed, which is one...

  19. Silicate melt inclusions and glasses in lunar soil fragments from the Luna 16 core sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roedder, E.; Weiblen, P.W.

    1972-01-01

    More than 2000 fragments were studied microscopically, and electron microprobe analyses were made of 39 selected areas, from a few square mm of polished surface, through 75- to 425-??m fragments of lunar soil from two samples of the Luna 16 core. The silicate melt inclusions and glasses differ in important details from those observed earlier in the Apollo samples. Melt inclusions in olivine contain epitaxially oriented daughter crystals, but also show a similar epitaxy around the outside of the crystals not observed in previous lunar samples. Melt inclusions in ilmenite suggest trapping at successive stages in a differentiation sequence. There is abundant evidence for late-stage silicate liquid immiscibility, with melt compositions similar but not identical to those from Apollo 11 and 12. A comparison of the alkali ratio of any given bulk rock analysis with that of its late-stage, high-silica melt shows gross differences for different rocks. This is pertinent to understanding late-stage differentiation processes. Glass fragments and spherules exhibit a wide range of crystallization textures, reflecting their wide range of compositions and cooling histories. No significant differences were found between the two portions of core examined (Zones A and D). ?? 1972.

  20. Properties of liquid iron along the melting line up to Earth-core pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomin, Yu D; Ryzhov, V N; Brazhkin, V V

    2013-07-17

    We report a molecular dynamics study of the transport coefficients and the infinite frequency shear modulus of liquid iron at high temperatures and high pressures. We observe a simultaneous rise of both the shear viscosity and the diffusion coefficient along the melting line and estimate whether liquid iron can vitrify under Earth-core conditions. We show that in the conditions of the model studied in our work iron demonstrates a moderate increase of viscosity along the melting line. It is also demonstrated that at the limit of high temperatures and high pressures the liquid iron behaves similarly to the soft sphere system with exponent n ≈ 4.6.

  1. Review of core disruptive accident analysis for liquid-metal cooled fast reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Y. C.; Na, B. C.; Hahn, D. H

    1997-04-01

    Analysis methodologies of core disruptive accidents (CDAs) are reviewed. The role of CDAS in the overall safety evaluation of fast reactors has not always been well defined nor universally agreed upon. However, they have become a traditional issue in LMR safety, design, and licensing. The study is for the understanding of fast reactor behavior under CDA conditions to establish the consequences of such conditions and to provide a basis for evaluating consequence limiting design features for the KALIMER developments. The methods used to analyze CDAs from initiating event to complete core disruption are described. Two examples of CDA analyses for CRBRP and ALMR are given and R and D needed for better understanding of CDA phenomena are proposed. (author). 10 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs

  2. Computation of a core disruptive accident in the MARS mock-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robbe, M.F. [CEA Saclay, Bat 118, 91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France)]. E-mail: marie-france.robbe@cea.fr; Lepareux, M. [CEA Saclay, Bat 118, 91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Seinturier, E. [Socotec Industrie, 1 av. du Parc, 78180 Montigny le Bretonneux (France)

    2005-06-01

    A hypothetical core disruptive accident in a liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) results from the interaction between molten fuel and liquid sodium, which creates a high-pressure bubble of gas in the core. The violent expansion of this bubble loads and deforms the vessel and the internal structures. The MARS experimental test simulates a HCDA in a small-scale mock-up containing all the significant internal components of a fast breeder reactor. The mock-up is filled with water, topped by an argon blanket, and the explosion is generated by an explosive charge. This paper presents a numerical simulation of the test with the EUROPLEXUS code. The top closure is represented by massive structures and the main internal structures are described by shells. The current numerical results are described and compared with the experimental ones, and previous computations with the CASTEM-PLEXUS code.

  3. Fluid-structure interaction analysis of a hypothetical core disruptive accident in LMFBRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Chuang [Department of Engineering Mechanics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)]. E-mail: lch98@mails.tsinghua.edu.cn; Zhang Xiong [Department of Engineering Mechanics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Lu Mingwan [Department of Engineering Mechanics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2005-03-01

    To ensure safety, it is necessary to assess the integrity of a reactor vessel of liquid-metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) under HCDA. Several important problems for a fluid-structural interaction analysis of HCDA are discussed in the present paper. Various loading models of hypothetical core disruptive accident (HCDA) are compared and the polytropic processes of idea gas (PPIG) law is recommended. In order to define a limited total energy release, a '5% truncation criterion' is suggested. The relationship of initial pressure of gas bubble and the total energy release is given. To track the moving interfaces and to avoid the severe mesh distortion an arbitrary Lagrangrian-Eulerian (ALE) approach is adopted in the finite element modeling (FEM) analysis. Liquid separation and splash from a free surface are discussed. By using an elasticity solution under locally uniform pressure, two simplified analytical solutions for 3D and axi-symmetric case of the liquid impact pressure on roof slab are derived. An axi-symmetric finite elements code FRHCDA for fluid-structure interaction analysis of hypothetical core disruptive accident in LMFBR is developed. The CONT benchmark problem is calculated. The numerical results agree well with those from published papers.

  4. Evaluation of Physical Characteristics of PWR Cores with Accident Tolerant Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Dae Hee; Hong, Ser Gi [Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); In, Wang Kee [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The accident tolerant fuels (ATF) considered in this work includes metallic microcell UO{sub 2} pellets and outer Cr-based alloy coating on cladding, which is being developed in KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute). Chromium metals have been used in many fields because of its hardness and corrosion-resistance. The use of the chromium metal in nuclear fuel rod can enhance the conductivity of pellets and corrosion-resistance of cladding. The objective of this work is to study the neutronic performances and characteristics of the commercial PWR core loaded the ATF-bearing assemblies. In this work, we studied the PWR cores which are loaded with ATF assemblies to improve the safety of reactor core. The ATF rod consists of the metallic microcell UO2 pellet which includes chromium of 3.34 wt% and the outer 0.05mm thick coating of Cr-based alloy with atomic number ratio of 85:15. We performed the cycle-by-cycle reload core analysis from the cycle 8 at which the ATF fuel assemblies start to be loaded into the core. The target nuclear power plant is the Hanbit-3 nuclear power plant. From the analysis, it was found that 1) the uranium enrichment is required to be increased up to 5.20/4.70 wt% in order to satisfy a required cycle length of 480 EFPDs, 2) the cycle length for the core using ATF fuel assemblies with the same uranium enrichments as those in the reference UO{sub 2} fueled core is decreased from 480 EFPDs to 430 EFPDs.

  5. Precursors to potential severe core damage accidents, 1986: A status report: Main report and Appendixes A,B, and C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minarick, J W; Harris, J D; Austin, P N; Cletcher, J W; Hagen, E W

    1988-05-01

    The Accident Sequence Precursor Program reviews licensee event reports of operational events that have occurred at LWRs to identify and categorize precursors to potential severe core-damage accidents. Accident sequences considered in the study are those associated with inadequate core cooling. Accident sequence precursors are events that are important elements in such sequences. Such precursors could be infrequent initiating events or equipment failures that, when coupled with one or more postulated events, could result in a plant condition with inadequate core cooling. Originally proposed in the Risk Assessment Review Group Report (Lewis Committee report) in 1978, the study - subsequently named the Accident Sequence Precursor Program - was initiated at the Nuclear Operations Analysis Center in 1979. Earlier reports by the program involved assessment of events that occurred in 1969-1981 and 1984-1985. The present report involves the assessment of events that occurred during 1986. A nuclear plant has safety systems for mitigating the consequences of accidents or off-normal initiating events that may occur during the course of plant operation. These systems are built to high-quality standards and are redundant; nonetheless, they have a nonzero probability of failing or being in a failed state when required to operate. This report uses LERs and other plant data, estimated system unavailabilities, the expected average frequency of initiating events (LOFWs, LOOPs, LOCAs), and event details to evaluate the potential impact of the following two situations.

  6. The melting curve of Ni to 125 GPa: implications for Earth's Fe rich core alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, O. T.; Wood, I. G.; Dobson, D. P.; Vocadlo, L.; Thomson, A. R.; Wann, E.; Wang, W.; Edgington, A.; Morard, G.; Mezouar, N.; Walter, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    The melting curve of Ni has been determined to 125 GPa using laser-heated diamond anvil cell (LH-DAC) experiments and two melting criteria: the appearance of liquid diffuse scattering (LDS) during in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) and simultaneous plateaux in temperature vs. laser power functions [1]. Our melting curve (Fig. 1) is in good agreement with most theoretical studies [e.g. 2] and the available shock wave data (Fig. 2). It is, however, dramatically steeper than the previous off-line LH-DAC studies in which the determination of melting was based on the visual observation of motion aided by the laser speckle method [e.g. 3]. We estimate the melting point of Ni at the inner-core boundary (ICB; 330 GPa) to be 5800±700 K (2σ), ~2500 K higher than the estimate based on the laser speckle method [3] and within error of Fe (6230±500 K) as determined in a similar in situ LH-DAC study [4]. We find that laser speckle based melting curves coincide with the onset of rapid sub-solidus recrystallization, suggesting that visual observations of motion may have misinterpreted dynamic recrystallization as melt convection. Our new melting curve suggests that the reduction in ICB temperature due to the alloying of Ni with Fe is likely to be significantly smaller than would be expected had the earlier experimental Ni melting studies been correct. We have applied our methodology to a range of other transition metals (Mo, Ti, V, Cu). In the case of Mo, Ti and V the melting curves are in good agreement with the shock compression and theoretical melting studies but hotter and steeper than those based on the laser speckle method, as with Ni. Cu is an exception in which all studies agree, including those employing the laser speckle method. These results go a long way toward resolving the the long-standing controversy over the phase diagrams of the transition metals as determined from static LH-DAC studies on the one hand, and theoretical and dynamic compression studies on the other

  7. The influence of melting on the kinematic development of the Himalayan crystalline core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Current hypotheses for the development and emplacement of the Himalayan crystalline core are 1) models with intense upper plate out-of-sequence activity (i.e., tunneling of channel flow, and some modes of critical taper wedge behavior) and 2) models in which the upper plate mainly records basal accretion of horses (i.e., duplexing). The two concepts can be considered end-members. A signal difference between these two models is the role of melting. The intense upper plate deformation envisioned in the first set of models has been hypothesized to be largely a product of partial melting, particularly in channel flow models. Specifically, the persistent presence of melt in the middle crust of the upper plate may dramatically lower the viscosity of these rocks, allowing distributed deformation. The second set of models - duplexing - predicts in-sequence thrusting with only minor out-of-sequence deformation. Stacking of a duplex acts like a deli cheese-slicing machine: slice after slice is cut from the intact block to a stack of slices, but neither the block (~down-going plate) nor the stack (~upper plate) features much internal deformation. In this model, partial melting produces no significant kinematic impact. The dominant preserved structural elements across the Himalayan crystalline core rocks are flattening and L-S fabrics. Structurally high portions of the crystalline core locally display complex outcrop-scale deformation associated with migmatitic rocks, and contain km-scale leucogranite bodies; both features developed in the early to middle Miocene. The flattening and L-S fabrics have been interpreted to record either (A) southwards channel tunneling across the upper plate, or (B) fabric development during metamorphism of the down-going plate, prior to accretion to the upper plate. The deformation of migmatitic rock and emplacement of leucogranite have been interpreted in support of widespread distributed deformation. Alternatively, these features may have

  8. Consequence analysis of core meltdown accidents in liquid metal fast reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suk, S.D.; Hahn, D. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-07-01

    Core disruptive accidents have been investigated at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute(KAERI) as part of work to demonstrate the inherent and ultimate safety of the conceptual design of the Korea Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor(KALIMER), a 150 Mw pool-type sodium cooled prototype fast reactor that uses U-Pu-Zr metallic fuel. In this study, a simple method was developed using a modified Bethe-Tait method to simulate the kinetics and hydraulic behavior of a homogeneous spherical core over the period of the super-prompt critical power excursion induced by the ramp reactivity insertion. Calculations of energy release during excursions in the sodium-voided core of the KALIMER were subsequently performed using the method for various reactivity insertion rates up to 100 $/s, which has been widely considered to be the upper limit of ramp rates due to fuel compaction. Benchmark calculations were made to compare with the results of more detailed analysis for core meltdown energetics of the oxide fuelled fast reactor. A set of parametric studies was also performed to investigate the sensitivity of the results on the various thermodynamics and reactor parameters. (author)

  9. Using the Star CCM+ software system for modeling the thermal state and natural convection in the melt metal layer during severe accidents in VVER reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochetov, N. A.; Loktionov, V. D.; Sidorov, A. S.

    2015-09-01

    The possibility of using the Star CCM+ software system for analyzing the thermal state of the melt pool metal layer generated as a result of melt stratification during a severe accident in pressure-vessel nuclear reactors is considered. In order to verify and substantiate the possibility of using this software system for modeling the natural convection processes in the melt at high values of the Rayleigh number, test problems were solved. The obtained results were found to be in good agreement with the known solutions and with the experimental data. The behavior of the melt metal layer was subjected to a parametric analysis for different melt heating conditions, the results of which showed that certain parameters have a determining influence on the so-called focusing effect and on the specific features of current in this layer.

  10. Estimation of the mechanical effects of a core disruptive accident on a LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robbe, M.F.; Lepareux, M. [CEA Saclay, Dept. de Mecanique et de Technologie, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Treille, E. [Socotec Industrie, 78 - Montigny le Bretonneux (France)

    2001-07-01

    In case of a Hypothetical Core Disruptive Accident (HCDA) in a Liquid Metal Reactor, the interaction between fuel and liquid sodium creates a high pressure gas bubble in the core. The violent expansion of this bubble loads the vessel and the internal structures, whose deformation is important. In order to demonstrate the CASTEM-PLEXUS capability to predict the behaviour of real reactors, axisymmetric computations of the MARA series were confronted with the experimental results. The computations performed at the beginning of the years 90 showed a rather good agreement between the experimental and computed results for the MARA 8 and MARA 10 tests even if there were some discrepancies which might be eliminated by increasing the fineness of the mesh. On the contrary, the prediction of the MARS structure displacements and strains was overestimated. This conservatism was supposed to come from the fact that several MARS non axisymmetric structures like core elements, pumps and heat exchangers were not represented in the CASTEM-PLEXUS model. These structures, acting as porous barriers, had a protective effect on the containment by absorbing energy and slowing down the fluid impacting the containment. For these reasons, we developed in CASTEM-PLEXUS a new HCDA constitutive law taking into account the presence of the internal structures (without meshing them) by means of an equivalent porosity method and we simulated the MARS test another time with the new HCDA constitutive law. This paper presents the numerical results relative to the structure behaviour during the accident. The results are described through the evolution of several variables versus time: deformed shape of the structures and the mesh, displacements, stresses and plastic strains. (author)

  11. Review of Severe Accident Phenomena in LWR and Related Severe Accident Analysis Codes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Hashim

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Firstly, importance of severe accident provision is highlighted in view of Fukushima Daiichi accident. Then, extensive review of the past researches on severe accident phenomena in LWR is presented within this study. Various complexes, physicochemical and radiological phenomena take place during various stages of the severe accidents of Light Water Reactor (LWR plants. The review deals with progression of the severe accidents phenomena by dividing into core degradation phenomena in reactor vessel and post core melt phenomena in the containment. The development of various computer codes to analyze these severe accidents phenomena is also summarized in the review. Lastly, the need of international activity is stressed to assemble various severe accidents related knowledge systematically from research organs and compile them on the open knowledge base via the internet to be available worldwide.

  12. Melting of iron close to Earth's inner core boundary conditions and beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Harmand, M; Mazevet, S; Bouchet, J; Denoeud, A; Dorchies, F; Feng, Y; Fourment, C; Galtier, E; Gaudin, J; Guyot, F; Kodama, R; Koenig, M; Lee, H J; Miyanishi, K; Morard, G; Musella, R; Nagler, B; Nakatsutsumi, M; Ozaki, N; Recoules, V; Toleikis, S; Vinci, T; Zastrau, U; Zhu, D; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A

    2014-01-01

    Several important geophysical features such as heat flux at the Core-Mantle Boundary or geodynamo production are intimately related with the temperature profile in the Earth's core. However, measuring the melting curve of iron at conditions corresponding to the Earth inner core boundary under pressure of 330 GPa has eluded scientists for several decades. Significant discrepancies in previously reported iron melting temperatures at high pressure have called into question the validity of dynamic measurements. We report measurements made with a novel approach using X-ray absorption spectroscopy using an X-ray free electron laser source coupled to a laser shock experiment. We determine the state of iron along the shock Hugoniot up to 420 GPa (+/- 50) and 10800 K (+/- 1390) and find an upper boundary for the melting curve of iron by detecting solid iron at 130 GPa and molten at 260, 380 and 420 GPa along the shock Hugoniot. Our result establishes unambiguous agreement between dynamic measurement and recent extrapo...

  13. Precursors to potential severe core damage accidents: 1997 -- A status report. Volume 26

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belles, R.J.; Cletcher, J.W.; Copinger, D.A.; Muhlheim, M.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Dolan, B.W.; Minarick, J.W. [Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1998-11-01

    This report describes the five operational events in 1997 that affected five commercial light-water reactors (LWRs) and that are considered to be precursors to potential severe core damage accidents. All these events had conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage greater than or equal to 1.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}6}. These events were identified by first computer-screening the 1997 licensee event reports from commercial LWRs to identify those events that could be precursors. Candidate precursors were selected and evaluated in a process similar to that used in previous assessments. Selected events underwent engineering evaluation that identified, analyzed, and documented the precursors. Other events designated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) also underwent a similar evaluation. Finally, documented precursors were submitted for review by licensees and NRC headquarters to ensure that the plant design and its response to the precursor were correctly characterized. This study is a continuation of earlier work, which evaluated 1969--1996 events. The report discusses the general rationale for this study, the selection and documentation of events as precursors, and the estimation of conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage for the events.

  14. Precursors to potential severe core damage accidents: 1997 -- A status report. Volume 26

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belles, R.J.; Cletcher, J.W.; Copinger, D.A.; Muhlheim, M.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Dolan, B.W.; Minarick, J.W. [Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1998-11-01

    This report describes the five operational events in 1997 that affected five commercial light-water reactors (LWRs) and that are considered to be precursors to potential severe core damage accidents. All these events had conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage greater than or equal to 1.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}6}. These events were identified by first computer-screening the 1997 licensee event reports from commercial LWRs to identify those events that could be precursors. Candidate precursors were selected and evaluated in a process similar to that used in previous assessments. Selected events underwent engineering evaluation that identified, analyzed, and documented the precursors. Other events designated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) also underwent a similar evaluation. Finally, documented precursors were submitted for review by licensees and NRC headquarters to ensure that the plant design and its response to the precursor were correctly characterized. This study is a continuation of earlier work, which evaluated 1969--1996 events. The report discusses the general rationale for this study, the selection and documentation of events as precursors, and the estimation of conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage for the events.

  15. The role of partial melting and extensional strain rates in the development of metamorphic core complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, P. F.; Teyssier, C.; Whitney, D. L.

    2009-11-01

    Orogenic collapse involves extension and thinning of thick and hot (partially molten) crust, leading to the formation of metamorphic core complexes (MCC) that are commonly cored by migmatite domes. Two-dimensional thermo-mechanical Ellipsis models evaluate the parameters that likely control the formation and evolution of MCC: the nature and geometry of the heterogeneity that localizes MCC, the presence/absence of a partially molten layer in the lower crust, and the rate of extension. When the localizing heterogeneity is a normal fault in the upper crust, the migmatite core remains in the footwall of the fault, resulting in an asymmetric MCC; if the localizing heterogeneity is point like region within the upper crust, the MCC remains symmetric throughout its development. Therefore, asymmetrically located migmatite domes likely reflect the dip of the original normal fault system that generated the MCC. Modeling of a severe viscosity drop owing to the presence of a partially molten layer, compared to a crust with no melt, demonstrates that the presence of melt slightly enhances upward advection of material and heat. Our experiments show that, when associated with boundary-driven extension, far-field horizontal extension provides space for the domes. Therefore, the buoyancy of migmatite cores contributes little to the outer envelope of metamorphic core complexes, although it may play a significant role in the internal dynamics of the partially molten layer. The presence of melt also favors heterogeneous bulk pure shear of the dome as opposed to the bulk simple shear, which dominates in melt-absent experiments. Melt presence affects the shape of P-T-t paths only slightly for material located near the top of the low-viscosity layer but leads to more complex flow paths for material inside the layer. The effect of extension rate is significant: at high extension rate (cm yr - 1 in the core complex region), partially molten crust crystallizes and cools along a high

  16. Degraded core accidents for the Sizewell PWR A sensitivity analysis of the radiological consequences

    CERN Document Server

    Kelly, G N; Clarke, R H; Ferguson, L; Haywood, S M; Hemming, C R; Jones, J A

    1982-01-01

    The radiological impact of degraded core accidents postulated for the Sizewell PWR was assessed in an earlier study. In this report the sensitivity of the predicted consequences to variation in the values of a number of important parameters is investigated for one of the postulated accidental releases. The parameters subjected to sensitivity analyses are the dose-mortality relationship for bone marrow irradiation, the energy content of the release, the warning time before the release to the environment, and the dry deposition velocity for airborne material. These parameters were identified as among the more important in determining the uncertainty in the results obtained in the initial study. With a few exceptions the predicted consequences were found to be not very sensitive to the parameter values investigated, the range of variation in the consequences for the limiting values of each parameter rarely exceeded a factor of a few and in many cases was considerably less. The conclusions reached are, however, p...

  17. Ice core evidence for extensive melting of the greenland ice sheet in the last interglacial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koerner, R M

    1989-05-26

    Evidence from ice at the bottom of ice cores from the Canadian Arctic Islands and Camp Century and Dye-3 in Greenland suggests that the Greenland ice sheet melted extensively or completely during the last interglacial period more than 100 ka (thousand years ago), in contrast to earlier interpretations. The presence of dirt particles in the basal ice has previously been thought to indicate that the base of the ice sheets had melted and that the evidence for the time of original growth of these ice masses had been destroyed. However, the particles most likely blew onto the ice when the dimensions of the ice caps and ice sheets were much smaller. Ice texture, gas content, and other evidence also suggest that the basal ice at each drill site is superimposed ice, a type of ice typical of the early growth stages of an ice cap or ice sheet. If the present-day ice masses began their growth during the last interglacial, the ice sheet from the earlier (Illinoian) glacial period must have competely or largely melted during the early part of the same interglacial period. If such melting did occur, the 6-meter higher-than-present sea level during the Sangamon cannot be attributed to disintegration of the West Antarctic ice sheet, as has been suggested.

  18. Radiological consequence assessments of degraded core accident scenarios derived from a generic Level 2 PSA of a BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homma, Toshimitsu; Ishikawa, Jun; Tomita, Kenichi; Muramatsu, Ken [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2000-12-01

    The radiological consequence assessments have been made of postulated core damage accidents with source terms derived from a generic Level 2 PSA of a BWR carried out by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). The source terms used were for the five core damage accident sequences with the drywell and wetwell failure cases, the release control case by venting of the containment and the accident termination case by the containment spray. The radiological consequences have been assessed for individual dose, collective dose, individual risk of early health effects and individual risk of late health effects by a probabilistic accident consequence assessment code, OSCAAR developed in JAERI. Following conclusions were obtained for the assumed source terms. In case of the over pressure failures of the primary containment vessel, the early fatalities can be mitigated through the implementation of early countermeasures, and the late cancer fatalities remains small. For the release control and accident termination cases, the individual and collective doses to the public can be reduced without any countermeasures due to the release reduction of the volatile radionuclides such as iodine and cesium. (author)

  19. Partitioning of potassium between silicates and sulphide melts - Experiments relevant to the earth's core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goettel, K. A.

    1972-01-01

    The partitioning of potassium between roedderite, K2Mg5Si12O30 and an Fe-FeS melt was investigated at temperatures about 40 C above the Fe-FeS eutectic. Roedderite was considered a prime candidate for one of the potassium-bearing phases in the primitive earth because roedderite and merrihueite are the only two silicates containing essential potassium which have been identified in stony meteorites. Application of the results to a primitive chondritic earth is discussed, and it is concluded that extraction of most of the earth's potassium into the Fe-FeS core would occur under the conditions in the early earth.-

  20. Diverse Melting Modes and Structural Collapse of Hollow Bimetallic Core-Shell Nanoparticles: A Perspective from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rao; Shao, Gui-Fang; Zeng, Xiang-Ming; Wen, Yu-Hua

    2014-11-01

    Introducing hollow structures into metallic nanoparticles has become a promising route to improve their catalytic performances. A fundamental understanding of thermal stability of these novel nanostructures is of significance for their syntheses and applications. In this article, molecular dynamics simulations have been employed to offer insights into the thermodynamic evolution of hollow bimetallic core-shell nanoparticles. Our investigation reveals that for hollow Pt-core/Au-shell nanoparticle, premelting originates at the exterior surface, and a typical two-stage melting behavior is exhibited, similar to the solid ones. However, since the interior surface provides facilitation for the premelting initiating at the core, the two-stage melting is also observed in hollow Au-core/Pt-shell nanoparticle, remarkably different from the solid one. Furthermore, the collapse of hollow structure is accompanied with the overall melting of the hollow Pt-core/Au-shell nanoparticle while it occurs prior to that of the hollow Au-core/Pt-shell nanoparticle and leads to the formation of a liquid-core/solid-shell structure, although both of them finally transform into a mixing alloy with Au-dominated surface. Additionally, the existence of stacking faults in the hollow Pt-core/Au-shell nanoparticle distinctly lowers its melting point. This study could be of great importance to the design and development of novel nanocatalysts with both high activity and excellent stability.

  1. Diverse Melting Modes and Structural Collapse of Hollow Bimetallic Core-Shell Nanoparticles: A Perspective from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rao; Shao, Gui-Fang; Zeng, Xiang-Ming; Wen, Yu-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Introducing hollow structures into metallic nanoparticles has become a promising route to improve their catalytic performances. A fundamental understanding of thermal stability of these novel nanostructures is of significance for their syntheses and applications. In this article, molecular dynamics simulations have been employed to offer insights into the thermodynamic evolution of hollow bimetallic core-shell nanoparticles. Our investigation reveals that for hollow Pt-core/Au-shell nanoparticle, premelting originates at the exterior surface, and a typical two-stage melting behavior is exhibited, similar to the solid ones. However, since the interior surface provides facilitation for the premelting initiating at the core, the two-stage melting is also observed in hollow Au-core/Pt-shell nanoparticle, remarkably different from the solid one. Furthermore, the collapse of hollow structure is accompanied with the overall melting of the hollow Pt-core/Au-shell nanoparticle while it occurs prior to that of the hollow Au-core/Pt-shell nanoparticle and leads to the formation of a liquid-core/solid-shell structure, although both of them finally transform into a mixing alloy with Au-dominated surface. Additionally, the existence of stacking faults in the hollow Pt-core/Au-shell nanoparticle distinctly lowers its melting point. This study could be of great importance to the design and development of novel nanocatalysts with both high activity and excellent stability. PMID:25394424

  2. Iodine-paint interactions during a core fusion accident; Les interactions iode-peinture au cours d'un accident de fusion du coeur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simondi-Teisseire, B. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Service d' etude et de recherche experimentale sur la chimie, 13 - Cadarache (France); Cantrel, L. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Laboratoire d' Etudes du corium et du Transfert de Radioelements, 13 - Cadarache (France); Fillet, S. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Laboratoire d' Experimentation environnement et chimie, 13 - Cadarache (France)

    2011-01-15

    If a core fusion accident should occur, radioactive iodine would be released from the fuel and would reach the reactor containment building, and then react with wall paintings to form organic iodine compounds, i.e. volatile compounds which are difficult to filtrate and therefore would be released in the environment. This article briefly reports investigations of the formation/destruction mechanisms of these volatile iodine compounds, notably through the Epicur program. This program focused on two prevailing phenomena: the radiolytic oxidation of iodine present in sump water, and the production of volatile organic iodides from painted surfaces where iodine adsorption occurs. Iodine behaviour is modelled by using the Astec code

  3. Fate of MgSiO3 melts at core-mantle boundary conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petitgirard, Sylvain; Malfait, Wim J; Sinmyo, Ryosuke; Kupenko, Ilya; Hennet, Louis; Harries, Dennis; Dane, Thomas; Burghammer, Manfred; Rubie, Dave C

    2015-11-17

    One key for understanding the stratification in the deep mantle lies in the determination of the density and structure of matter at high pressures, as well as the density contrast between solid and liquid silicate phases. Indeed, the density contrast is the main control on the entrainment or settlement of matter and is of fundamental importance for understanding the past and present dynamic behavior of the deepest part of the Earth's mantle. Here, we adapted the X-ray absorption method to the small dimensions of the diamond anvil cell, enabling density measurements of amorphous materials to unprecedented conditions of pressure. Our density data for MgSiO3 glass up to 127 GPa are considerably higher than those previously derived from Brillouin spectroscopy but validate recent ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. A fourth-order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state reproduces our experimental data over the entire pressure regime of the mantle. At the core-mantle boundary (CMB) pressure, the density of MgSiO3 glass is 5.48 ± 0.18 g/cm(3), which is only 1.6% lower than that of MgSiO3 bridgmanite at 5.57 g/cm(3), i.e., they are the same within the uncertainty. Taking into account the partitioning of iron into the melt, we conclude that melts are denser than the surrounding solid phases in the lowermost mantle and that melts will be trapped above the CMB.

  4. USING HIGH Mg-CONTENT CORED-WIRE TO SPHEROIDIZE AND DESULPHURIZE DUCTILE IRON MELT IN INDUSTRIAL EXPERIMENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R.Z. Wu; B.D. Sun; H.J. Ni; Y.B. Wu; H.S. Wu; J.G. Ge

    2004-01-01

    40% Mg-content cored-wire was used to desulphurize and spheroidize ductile iron melt in industrial experiments. The optimal feeding speed and suitable treatment temperature were determined in the experiments. And cored-wire method and pouring method were compared.Conclusions have been drawn that, under these conditions in the experiments, the optimal feeding speed is 15m/min, treatment temperature should be as low as possible, 1400-1450℃ generally; and cored-wire method can act more effective in ductile iron melt desulphurization and spheroid than pouring method.

  5. Core burnup calculation and accidents analyses of a pressurized water reactor partially loaded with rock-like oxide fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akie, H.; Sugo, Y.; Okawa, R.

    2003-06-01

    A rock-like oxide (ROX) fuel - light water reactor (LWR) burning system has been studied for efficient plutonium transmutation. For the improvement of small negative reactivity coefficients and severe transient behaviors of ROX fueled LWRs, a partial loading core of ROX fuel assemblies with conventional UO 2 assemblies was considered. As a result, although the reactivity coefficients could be improved, the power peaking tends to be large in this heterogeneous core configuration. The reactivity initiated accident (RIA) and loss of coolant accident (LOCA) behaviors were not sufficiently improved. In order to reduce the power peaking, the fuel composition and the assembly design of the ROX fuel were modified. Firstly, erbium burnable poison was added as Er 2O 3 in the ROX fuel to reduce the burnup reactivity swing. Then pin-by-pin Pu enrichment and Er content distributions within the ROX fuel assembly were considered. In addition, the Er content distribution was also considered in the axial direction of the ROX fuel pin. With these modifications, a power peaking factor even lower than the one in a conventional UO 2 fueled core can be obtained. The RIA and LOCA analyses of the modified core have also shown the comparable transient behaviors of ROX partial loading core to those of the UO 2 core.

  6. Systematic technology evaluation program for SiC/SiC composite-based accident-tolerant LWR fuel cladding and core structures: Revision 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katoh, Yutai [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Terrani, Kurt A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Fuels and core structures in current light water reactors (LWR’s) are vulnerable to catastrophic failure in severe accidents as unfortunately evidenced by the March 2011 Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident. This vulnerability is attributed primarily to the rapid oxidation kinetics of zirconium alloys in a water vapor environment at very high temperatures. Zr alloys are the primary material in LWR cores except for the fuel itself. Therefore, alternative materials with reduced oxidation kinetics as compared to zirconium alloys are sought to enable enhanced accident-tolerant fuels and cores.

  7. Partitioning of Moderately Siderophile Elements Among Olivine, Silicate Melt, and Sulfide Melt: Constraints on Core Formation in the Earth and Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaetani, Glenn A.; Grove, Timothy L.

    1997-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of Variations in the fugacities of oxygen and sulfur on the partitioning of first series transition metals (V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni. and Cu) and W among coexisting sulfide melt, silicate melt, and olivine. Experiments were performed at 1 atm pressure, 1350 C, with the fugacities of oxygen and sulfur controlled by mixing CO2, CO, and SO2 gases. Starting compositions consisted of a CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2-FeO-Na2O analog for a barred olivine chondrule from an ordinary chondrite and a synthetic komatiite. The f(sub O2)/f(sub S2), conditions ranged from log of f(sub O2) = -7.9 to - 10.6, with log of f(sub S2) values ranging from - 1.0 to -2.5. Our experimental results demonstrate that the f(sub O2)/f(sub S2) dependencies of sulfide melt/silicate melt partition coefficients for the first series transition metals arc proportional to their valence states. The f(sub O2)/f(sub S2) dependencies for the partitioning of Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu are weaker than predicted on the basis of their valence states. Variations in conditions have no significant effect on olivine/melt partitioning other than those resulting from f(sub O2)-induced changes in the valence state of a given element. The strong f(sub O2)/f(sub S2) dependence for the olivine/silicate melt partitioning of V is attributable to a change of valence state, from 4+ to 3+, with decreasing f(sub O2). Our experimentally determined partition coefficients are used to develop models for the segregation of sulfide and metal from the silicate portion of the early Earth and the Shergottite parent body (Mars). We find that the influence of S is not sufficient to explain the overabundance of siderophile and chalcophile elements that remained in the mantle of the Earth following core formation. Important constraints on core formation in Mars are provided by our experimental determination of the partitioning of Cu between silicate and sulfide melts. When combined with existing estimates for siderophile

  8. Hard-Core Bosons on the Kagome Lattice: Valence-Bond Solids and Their Quantum Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isakov, S. V.; Wessel, S.; Melko, R. G.; Sengupta, K.; Kim, Yong Baek

    2006-10-01

    Using large scale quantum Monte Carlo simulations and dual vortex theory, we analyze the ground state phase diagram of hard-core bosons on the kagome lattice with nearest-neighbor repulsion. In contrast with the case of a triangular lattice, no supersolid emerges for strong interactions. While a uniform superfluid prevails at half filling, two novel solid phases emerge at densities ρ=1/3 and ρ=2/3. These solids exhibit an only partial ordering of the bosonic density, allowing for local resonances on a subset of hexagons of the kagome lattice. We provide evidence for a weakly first-order phase transition at the quantum melting point between these solid phases and the superfluid.

  9. Severe accident simulation at Olkiuoto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tirkkonen, H.; Saarenpaeae, T. [Teollisuuden Voima Oy (TVO), Olkiluoto (Finland); Cliff Po, L.C. [Micro-Simulation Technology, Montville, NJ (United States)

    1995-09-01

    A personal computer-based simulator was developed for the Olkiluoto nuclear plant in Finland for training in severe accident management. The generic software PCTRAN was expanded to model the plant-specific features of the ABB Atom designed BWR including its containment over-pressure protection and filtered vent systems. Scenarios including core heat-up, hydrogen generation, core melt and vessel penetration were developed in this work. Radiation leakage paths and dose rate distribution are presented graphically for operator use in diagnosis and mitigation of accidents. Operating on an graphically for operator use in diagnosis and mitigation of accidents. Operating on an 486 DX2-66, PCTRAN-TVO achieves a speed about 15 times faster than real-time. A convenient and user-friendly graphic interface allows full interactive control. In this paper a review of the component models and verification runs are presented.

  10. Simulation of a hypothetical core disruptive accident in the mars test-facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robbe, M.F.; Lepareux, M. [CEA Saclay, Dept. de Mecanique et de Technologie, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2001-07-01

    In France, a large experimental programme MARA/MARS was undertaken in the 80's to estimate the mechanical consequences of an HCDA (Hypothetical Core Disruptive Accident) and to validate the SIRIUS computer code used at that time for the numerical simulations. At the end of the 80's, it was preferred to add a HCDA sodium-bubble-argon tri-component constitutive law to the general ALE fast dynamics finite element CASTEM-PLEXUS code rather than going on developing and using the specialized SIRIUS code. The experimental results of the MARA programme were used in the 90's to validate and qualify the CASTEM-PLEXUS code. A first series of computations of the tests MARA 8, MARA 10 and MARS was realised. The simulations showed a rather good agreement between the experimental and computed results for the MARA 8 and MARA 10 tests - even if there were some discrepancies - but the prediction of the MARS structure displacements and strains was overestimated. This conservatism was supposed to come from the fact that several MARS non axisymmetric structures like core elements, pumps and heat exchangers were not represented in the CASTEM-PLEXUS model. These structures, acting as porous barriers, had a protective effect on the mock-up containment by absorbing energy and slowing down the fluid impacting the containment. For these reasons, we developed in CASTEM-PLEXUS a new HCDA constitutive law taking into account the presence of the internal structures (without meshing them) by means of an equivalent porosity method. In other respects, the process used for dealing with the fluid-structure coupling in CASTEM-PLEXUS was improved. Thus a second series of simulations of the tests MARA8 and MARA10 was realised. A simulation of the test MARS was carried out too with the same simplified representation of the peripheral structures as in order to estimate the improvement provided by the new fluid-structure coupling. This paper presents a third numerical simulation of the MARS

  11. Melting curve of the deep mantle applied to properties of early magma ocean and actual core-mantle boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrault, Denis; Lo Nigro, Giacomo; Bolfan-Casanova, Nathalie; Bouhifd, Mohamed A.; Garbarino, Gaston; Mezouar, Mohamed

    2010-05-01

    Our planet experienced partial melting early in its history as a consequence of energy release due to accretion. Partial mantle melting could still happen today in the lowermost mantle. Occurrence of melting is primordial for the chemical segregation between the different Earth's reservoirs and for the dynamics of the whole planet. Melting of iron-alloys is relatively easy to achieve, but the silicated mantle happens to be more refractory. We investigated experimentally melting properties of two starting material, forsterite and chondritic-mantle, at pressures ranging from 25 to 140 GPa, using laser-heated diamond anvil cell coupled with synchrotron radiation. We show that partial melting in the lowermost mantle, as suggested by seismology on the basis of the ultra-low velocity zones (ULVZ), requires temperatures above 4200 K at the core-mantle boundary. At low pressures, our curve plots significantly lower than previous reports. Compared to recent estimates of mantle geotherm, while this temperature remains possible if the Earth's core is very hot, it is more likely that ULVZs correspond to high concentration of incompatible elements driven down to the D"-layer by subducting slabs or extracted out from the outer core. When our chondritic melting curve is coupled with recent isentropic temperature profiles for a magma ocean, we obtain a correlation between magma ocean depth and the potential temperature (Tp) at its surface; an ocean depth of 1000 km (equivalent to ~40 GPa) corresponds to Tp=2000 K, which happens to be significantly hotter than the estimated surface temperature of a sustained magma ocean. It emphasizes the importance of a lid at the magma ocean surface at an epoch as early as that of core-mantle segregation.

  12. Scoping assessments of ATF impact on late-stage accident progression including molten core-concrete interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, M. T.; Leibowitz, L.; Terrani, K. A.; Robb, K. R.

    2014-05-01

    Simple scoping models that can be used to evaluate ATF performance under severe accident conditions have been developed. The methodology provides a fundamental technical basis (a.k.a. metric) based on the thermodynamic boundary for evaluating performance relative to that of traditional Zr-based claddings. The initial focus in this study was on UO2 fuel with the advanced claddings 310 SS, D9, FeCrAl, and SiC. The evaluation considered only energy release with concurrent combustible gas production from fuel-cladding-coolant interactions and, separately, molten core-concrete interactions at high temperatures. Other important phenomenological effects that can influence the rate and extent of cladding decomposition (e.g., eutectic interactions, degradation of other core constituents) were not addressed. For the cladding types addressed, potential combustible gas production under both in-vessel and ex-vessel conditions was similar to that for Zr. However, exothermic energy release from cladding oxidation was substantially less for iron-based alloys (by at least a factor of 4), and modestly less (by ∼20%) for SiC. Data on SiC-clad UO2 fuel performance under severe accident conditions are sparse in the literature; thus, assumptions on the nature of the cladding decomposition process were made in order to perform this initial screening evaluation. Experimental data for this system under severe accident conditions is needed for a proper evaluation and comparison to iron-based claddings.

  13. Phenomenological and mechanistic modeling of melt-structure-water interactions in a light water reactor severe accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bui, V.A

    1998-10-01

    The objective of this work is to address the modeling of the thermal hydrodynamic phenomena and interactions occurring during the progression of reactor severe accidents. Integrated phenomenological models are developed to describe the accident scenarios, which consist of many processes, while mechanistic modeling, including direct numerical simulation, is carried out to describe separate effects and selected physical phenomena of particular importance 88 refs, 54 figs, 7 tabs

  14. Summary of a workshop on severe accident management for BWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kastenberg, W.E. [ed.; Apostolakis, G.; Jae, M.; Milici, T.; Park, H.; Xing, L.; Dhir, V.K.; Lim, H.; Okrent, D.; Swider, J.; Yu, D. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering

    1991-11-01

    Severe accident management can be defined as the use of existing and/or alternative resources, systems and actions to prevent or mitigate a core-melt accident. For each accident sequence and each combination of strategies there may be several options available to the operator; and each involves phenomenological and operational considerations regarding uncertainty. Operational uncertainties include operator, system and instrument behavior during an accident. During the period September 26--28, 1990, a workshop was held at the University of California, Los Angeles, to address these uncertainties for Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs). This report contains a summary of the workshop proceedings.

  15. CFD Modeling of Melt Spreading on the Reactor Cavity Floor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeon, Wan Sik; Bang, Kwang Hyun [Korea Maritime University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Young Jo; Lee, Jae Gon [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-05-15

    In the very unlikely event of a severe reactor accident involving core melt and reactor pressure vessel failure, it is important to provide an accident management strategy that would allow the molten core material to cool down, resolidify and bring the core debris to a stable coolable state for Light Water Reactors (LWRs). One approach to achieve a stable coolable state is to quench the core melt after its relocation from the reactor pressure vessel into the reactor cavity. This approach typically requires a large cavity floor area on which a large amount of core melt spreads well and forms a shallow melt thickness for small thermal resistance across the melt pool. Spreading of high temperature (approx3000 K), low superheat (approx200 K) core melt over a wide cavity floor has been a key question to the success of the ex-vessel core coolability and it has brought a number of experimental work (CORINE, ECOKATS, VULCANO) and analytical work (CORFLOW, MELTSPREAD, THEMA). These computational models are currently able to predict well the spreading of stimulant materials but yet have shown a limitation for prototypic core melt of UO{sub 2}+ZrO{sub 2} mixture. A computational model for the melt spreading requires a multiphase treatment of liquid melt, solidified melt, and air. Also solidification and thermal radiation physics should be included. The present work uses ANSYS-CFX code to simulate core melt spreading on the reactor cavity. The CFX code is a general-purpose multiphase code and the present work is focused on exploring the code's capability to model melt spreading problem in a step by step approach

  16. The effects of applying silicon carbide coating on core reactivity of pebble-bed HTR in water ingress accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuhair, S.; Setiadipura, Topan [National Nuclear Energy Agency of Indonesia, Serpong Tagerang Selatan (Indonesia). Center for Nuclear Reactor Technology and Safety; Su' ud, Zaki [Bandung Institute of Technology (Indonesia). Dept. of Physics

    2017-03-15

    Graphite is used as the moderator, fuel barrier material, and core structure in High Temperature Reactors (HTRs). However, despite its good thermal and mechanical properties below the radiation and high temperatures, it cannot avoid corrosion as a consequence of an accident of water/air ingress. Degradation of graphite as a main HTR material and the formation of dangerous CO gas is a serious problem in HTR safety. One of the several steps that can be adopted to avoid or prevent the corrosion of graphite by the water/air ingress is the application of a thin layer of silicon carbide (SiC) on the surface of the fuel element. This study investigates the effect of applying SiC coating on the fuel surfaces of pebble-bed HTR in water ingress accident from the reactivity points of view. A series of reactivity calculations were done with the Monte Carlo transport code MCNPX and continuous energy nuclear data library ENDF/B-VII at temperature of 1200 K. Three options of UO{sub 2}, PuO{sub 2}, and ThO{sub 2}/UO{sub 2} fuel kernel were considered to obtain the inter comparison of the core reactivity of pebble-bed HTR in conditions of water/air ingress accident. The calculation results indicated that the UO{sub 2}-fueled pebble-bed HTR reactivity was slightly reduced and relatively more decreased when the thickness of the SiC coating increased. The reactivity characteristic of ThO{sub 2}/UO{sub 2}-fueled pebble-bed HTR showed a similar trend to that of UO{sub 2}, but did not show reactivity peak caused by water ingress. In contrast with UO{sub 2}- and ThO{sub 2}-fueled pebble-bed HTR, although the reactivity of PuO{sub 2}-fueled pebble-bed HTR was the lowest, its characteristics showed a very high reactivity peak (0.33 Δk/k) and this introduction of positive reactivity is difficult to control. SiC coating on the surface of the plutonium fuel pebble has no significant impact. From the comparison between reactivity characteristics of uranium, thorium and plutonium cores with 0

  17. Development of analytical code for core disruptive accident of metallic fuel core and evaluation of upper limitation of coolant void reactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueda, Nobuyuki [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Komae, Tokyo (Japan). Komae Research Lab

    2001-06-01

    In the event of HCDA (Hypothetical Core Damage Accident) the safety of the metallic core must be ensured. Coolant void reactivity, which produces a positive reactivity effect, must be restrained to exclude 'energetic sequence' (uncontrollable power generation). As this reactivity and the core performance are in a state of confrontation, an upper limit must be determined through safety analyses. The larger the coolant void reactivity becomes, the more the core performance improves. A core dynamics analysis code named CANIS has been developed to analysis metallic fuel properties, irradiation behavior, and transient behavior in the initiating phase of HCDA. ULOF (Unprotected Loss Of Flow) events, which are considered major HCDA initiators, are analyzed with various parameters of cladding failure conditions and molten fuel dispersion velocities. The results indicate, the cladding failure condition is the most sensitive safety parameter. The coolant void reactivity of 12$ is acceptable in the condition that cladding fails at 1,000 degC. And the upper value is limited to 8$ for the conservative condition of a 1,200 degC failure criteria. (author)

  18. Size effect in the melting and freezing behaviors of Al/Ti core-shell nanoparticles using molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin-Ping, Zhang; Yang-Yang, Zhang; Er-Ping, Wang; Cui-Ming, Tang; Xin-Lu, Cheng; Qiu-Hui, Zhang

    2016-03-01

    The thermal stability of Ti@Al core/shell nanoparticles with different sizes and components during continuous heating and cooling processes is examined by a molecular dynamics simulation with embedded atom method. The thermodynamic properties and structure evolution during continuous heating and cooling processes are investigated through the characterization of the potential energy, specific heat distribution, and radial distribution function (RDF). Our study shows that, for fixed Ti core size, the melting temperature decreases with Al shell thickness, while the crystallizing temperature and glass formation temperature increase with Al shell thickness. Diverse melting mechanisms have been discovered for different Ti core sized with fixed Al shell thickness nanoparticles. The melting temperature increases with the Ti core radius. The trend agrees well with the theoretical phase diagram of bimetallic nanoparticles. In addition, the glass phase formation of Al-Ti nanoparticles for the fast cooling rate of 12 K/ps, and the crystal phase formation for the low cooling rate of 0.15 K/ps. The icosahedron structure is formed in the frozen 4366 Al-Ti atoms for the low cooling rate. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 21401064), the Science & Technology Development Program of Henan Province, China (Grant No. 142300410282), and the Program of Henan Educational Committee, China (Grant No. 13B140986).

  19. Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1 Uncertainty Analysis-Exploration of Core Melt Progression Uncertain Parameters-Volume II.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denman, Matthew R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brooks, Dusty Marie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has conducted an uncertainty analysi s (UA) on the Fukushima Daiichi unit (1F1) accident progression wit h the MELCOR code. Volume I of the 1F1 UA discusses the physical modeling details and time history results of the UA. Volume II of the 1F1 UA discusses the statistical viewpoint. The model used was developed for a previous accident reconstruction investigation jointly sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The goal of this work was to perform a focused evaluation of uncertainty in core damage progression behavior and its effect on key figures - of - merit (e.g., hydrogen production, fraction of intact fuel, vessel lower head failure) and in doing so assess the applicability of traditional sensitivity analysis techniques .

  20. A condensed review of the core catcher in the LMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yong Bum; Hahn, Do hee

    2001-03-01

    The overwhelming emphasis in reactor safety is on the prevention of core meltdown. Moreover, although there have been several accidents that have resulted in some fuel melting, to date there have been no accidents severe enough to cause the syndrome of core collapse, reactor vessel melt-through, containment penetration, and dispersal into the ground. Nevertheless, a number of proposals have been made for the design of core catcher systems to control or stop the motion of the molten core mass should such an accident take place. Core catchers may differ in both their location within the reactor system and in the mechanism that is used to cool and control the motion of the core debris. In this report the classification, configuration and main features of the core catcher are described. And also, the core catcher provisions in constructed and planned LMRs (Liquid Metal Reactors) are summarized.

  1. Anionic Pt in Silicate Melts at Low Oxygen Fugacity: Speciation, Partitioning and Implications for Core Formation Processes on Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medard, E.; Martin, A. M.; Righter, K.; Malouta, A.; Lee, C.-T.

    2017-01-01

    Most siderophile element concentrations in planetary mantles can be explained by metal/ silicate equilibration at high temperature and pressure during core formation. Highly siderophile elements (HSE = Au, Re, and the Pt-group elements), however, usually have higher mantle abundances than predicted by partitioning models, suggesting that their concentrations have been set by late accretion of material that did not equilibrate with the core. The partitioning of HSE at the low oxygen fugacities relevant for core formation is however poorly constrained due to the lack of sufficient experimental constraints to describe the variations of partitioning with key variables like temperature, pressure, and oxygen fugacity. To better understand the relative roles of metal/silicate partitioning and late accretion, we performed a self-consistent set of experiments that parameterizes the influence of oxygen fugacity, temperature and melt composition on the partitioning of Pt, one of the HSE, between metal and silicate melts. The major outcome of this project is the fact that Pt dissolves in an anionic form in silicate melts, causing a dependence of partitioning on oxygen fugacity opposite to that reported in previous studies.

  2. Neutronics aspects associated to the prevention and mitigation of severe accidents in sodium cooled reactor cores; Aspects de neutronique associes a la prevention et a la reduction des accidents graves dans les coeurs de reacteurs a caloporteur sodium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poumerouly, S.

    2010-12-15

    Among all the types of accidents to be considered for the safety licensing of a plant, some have a very low probability of occurrence but might have very important consequences: the severe accidents or Hypothetical Core Disruptive Accidents (HCDA). The studies on the scenario of these accidents are performed in parallel to the prevention studies. In this PhD report, two representative safety cases are studied: the Unprotected Loss Of Flow (ULOF) and the Total Instantaneous Blockage (TIB). The objectives are to understand what causes the reactivity increase during these accidents and to find means to reduce the energetic release of the scenario (ULOF) or to find ways to trigger the core prior to the propagation of the accident (TIB). At first, the accidents are studied in static calculations with the ERANOS code system. The accidents are divided into several steps and the reactivity insertions at each step are explained. This study shows the importance of the removal of the structures as well as of the radial leakage changes during the core slumping-down. The study also gives the amounts of fuel to be ejected or of absorber to be injected in both accidents. These values give tracks to the following more accurate studies, the transient studies. The transient studies were performed with the SIMMER code system, coupling thermo-hydraulics and neutronics. SIMMER data and algorithms have been improved so as to better predict ERANOS results (former discrepancies were up to 1.5$). The SIMMER reactivity calculation is improved by 0.8$ with variations of reactivity due to the motion of materials correctly predicted. A new algorithm for the {beta}-effective was implemented in SIMMER so as to be more accurate and easier to manage. SIMMER is then used to calculate the secondary phase of the ULOF, while the primary phase is calculated with ERANOS thanks to some assumptions. The assumptions are very much based on the fact that the movement of materials stops whenever the energy

  3. A framework for the assessment of severe accident management strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kastenberg, W.E. [ed.; Apostolakis, G.; Dhir, V.K. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering] [and others

    1993-09-01

    Severe accident management can be defined as the use of existing and/or altemative resources, systems and actors to prevent or mitigate a core-melt accident. For each accident sequence and each combination of severe accident management strategies, there may be several options available to the operator, and each involves phenomenological and operational considerations regarding uncertainty. Operational uncertainties include operator, system and instrumentation behavior during an accident. A framework based on decision trees and influence diagrams has been developed which incorporates such criteria as feasibility, effectiveness, and adverse effects, for evaluating potential severe accident management strategies. The framework is also capable of propagating both data and model uncertainty. It is applied to several potential strategies including PWR cavity flooding, BWR drywell flooding, PWR depressurization and PWR feed and bleed.

  4. Simulation of the core degradation phase of the Fukushima accidents using the ASTEC code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonneville, H., E-mail: herve.bonneville@irsn.fr; Luciani, A.

    2014-06-01

    The French Institute for Nuclear Safety and Radioprotection (IRSN) attempts to simulate the Fukushima accidents using the ASTEC integral code. This paper summarizes the main results of the simulations conducted before the beginning of the OECD/NEA/CSNI Benchmark Study of the Accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (BSAF) project. The first analysis carried out concerned the unit 2 transient. Results were considered as satisfactory being quite consistent with measures reported by TEPCO and similar computations performed with MELCOR or MAAP. Knowledge gained from PWR practice and different lectures available in the open literature for BWR provided valuable technical elements to explain observations or to validate assumptions. Leakage model from the containment up to the refuelling bay through the head flange seal was very efficient to retrieve pressure evolution inside the dry well. Extension of the model to reactor number 3 gave also results quite consistent with what similar codes computed. However for both reactors some figures characteristic of the transient as hydrogen production are liable to vary a lot if models for bottom and top nozzles are added which has not been done in reference computation due to present lack of data. Uncertainties with simulation of accident on reactor number 1 are rather large due to the scarcity of data. Further, as the measurement points were quasi absent for most of the first 24 h there is no reference to compare to simulation results. Bottom vessel head failure is predicted but due to the high number of penetrations the mechanical failure models developed for PWR may not be so relevant for BWR.

  5. Comparison between direct and indirect cooling core catchers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Jung Soo; Lee, Jong Ho; Bae, Byung Hwan [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    The European nuclear design requirements, which should be satisfied by nuclear reactors in Europe, usually recommend a so called core catcher, which is a molten core ex vessel cooling facility, to manage a severe accident at a nuclear reactor. Two different types of core catcher concepts are compared to determine their abilities to manage severe accidents and cool core melts. The study reveals that direct cooling is better for cooling capacity and is convenient to construct, while indirect cooling is better for the management of a severe accident.

  6. Precursors to potential severe core damage accidents. A status report, 1982--1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forester, J.A.; Mitchell, D.B.; Whitehead, D.W. [and others

    1997-04-01

    This study is a continuation of earlier work that evaluated 1969-1981 and 1984-1994 events affecting commercial light-water reactors. One-hundred nine operational events that affected 51 reactors during 1982 and 1983 and that are considered to be precursors to potential severe core damage are described. All these events had conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage greater than or equal to 1.0 x 10{sup {minus}6}. These events were identified by first computer screening the 1982-83 licensee event reports from commercial light-water reactors to select events that could be precursors to core damage. Candidates underwent engineering evaluation that identified, analyzed, and documented the precursors. This report discusses the general rationale for the study, the selection and documentation of events as precursors, and the estimation of conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage for the events.

  7. Thermodynamic evaluation of the solidification phase of molten core-concrete under estimated Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagaki, Toru; Yano, Kimihiko; Ogino, Hideki; Washiya, Tadahiro

    2017-04-01

    The solidification phases of molten core-concrete under the estimated molten core-concrete interaction (MCCI) conditions in the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Unit 1 were predicted using the thermodynamic equilibrium calculation tool, FactSage 6.2, and the NUCLEA database in order to contribute toward the 1F decommissioning work and to understand the accident progression via the analytical results for the 1F MCCI products. We showed that most of the U and Zr in the molten core-concrete forms (U,Zr)O2 and (Zr,U)SiO4, and the formation of other phases with these elements is limited. However, the formation of (Zr,U)SiO4 requires a relatively long time because it involves a change in the crystal structure from fcc-(U,Zr)O2 to tet-(U,Zr)O2, followed by the formation of (Zr,U)SiO4 by reaction with SiO2. Therefore, the formation of (Zr,U)SiO4 is limited under quenching conditions. Other common phases are the oxide phases, CaAl2Si2O8, SiO2, and CaSiO3, and the metallic phases of the Fe-Si and Fe-Ni alloys. The solidification phenomenon of the crust under quenching conditions and that of the molten pool under thermodynamic equilibrium conditions in the 1F MCCI progression are discussed.

  8. BNL program in support of LWR degraded-core accident analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginsberg, T.; Greene, G.A.

    1982-01-01

    Two major sources of loading on dry watr reactor containments are steam generatin from core debris water thermal interactions and molten core-concrete interactions. Experiments are in progress at BNL in support of analytical model development related to aspects of the above containment loading mechanisms. The work supports development and evaluation of the CORCON (Muir, 1981) and MARCH (Wooton, 1980) computer codes. Progress in the two programs is described in this paper. 8 figures.

  9. Experimental Results on Pouring and Underwater Liquid Melt Spreading and Energetic Melt-coolant Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Konovalenko, Alexander; Karbojian, Aram; Kudinov, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    In a hypothetical light water reactor (LWR) core-melt accident with corium release from the reactor  vessel,  the  ultimate  containment  integrity  is  contingent  on  coolability  of  the decay-heated core debris. Pouring of melt into a pool of water located in the reactor cavity is considered in several designs of existing and new LWRs  as a part of severe accident (SA) management strategies. At certain conditions of melt release into the pool (e.g. large ratio of the  vessel  breach  size...

  10. Source term analyses under severe accidents for KNGR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Yong Mann; Park, Soo Yong

    2001-03-01

    In this study, in-containment source term for LOFW (Loss of Feed Water), which has appeared the most frequent core melt accident, is calculated and compared with NUREG-1465 source term. This study provides not only new source term data using MELCOR1.8.4 and its state-of-the-art models but also evaluating basis of KNGR design and its mitigation capability under severe accidents. As the selected accident is identical with LOFW-S17, which has been analyzed using MAAP by KEPCO with only difference of 2 SITs, mutual comparison of the results is especially expected.

  11. In-vessel melt retention as a severe accident management strategy for the Loviisa Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kymaelaeinen, O.; Tuomisto, H. [IVO International Ltd., Vantaa (Finland); Theofanous, T.G. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    1997-02-01

    The concept of lower head coolability and in-vessel retention of corium has been approved as a basic element of the severe accident management strategy for IVO`s Loviisa Plant (VVER-440) in Finland. The selected approach takes advantage of the unique features of the plant such as low power density, reactor pressure vessel without penetrations at the bottom and ice-condenser containment which ensures flooded cavity in all risk significant sequences. The thermal analyses, which are supported by experimental program, demonstrate that in Loviisa the molten corium on the lower head of the reactor vessel is coolable externally with wide margins. This paper summarizes the approach and the plant modifications being implemented. During the approval process some technical concerns were raised, particularly with regard to thermal loadings caused by contact of cool cavity water and hot corium with the reactor vessel. Resolution of these concerns is also discussed.

  12. Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) / Emergency Core Coolant System (ECCS Evaluation of Risk-Informed Margins Management Strategies for a Representative Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szilard, Ronaldo Henriques [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    A Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) toolkit and methodology are proposed for investigating nuclear power plant core, fuels design and safety analysis, including postulated Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) analysis. This toolkit, under an integrated evaluation model framework, is name LOCA toolkit for the US (LOTUS). This demonstration includes coupled analysis of core design, fuel design, thermal hydraulics and systems analysis, using advanced risk analysis tools and methods to investigate a wide range of results.

  13. Recovering Paleo-Records from Antarctic Ice-Cores by Coupling a Continuous Melting Device and Fast Ion Chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severi, Mirko; Becagli, Silvia; Traversi, Rita; Udisti, Roberto

    2015-11-17

    Recently, the increasing interest in the understanding of global climatic changes and on natural processes related to climate yielded the development and improvement of new analytical methods for the analysis of environmental samples. The determination of trace chemical species is a useful tool in paleoclimatology, and the techniques for the analysis of ice cores have evolved during the past few years from laborious measurements on discrete samples to continuous techniques allowing higher temporal resolution, higher sensitivity and, above all, higher throughput. Two fast ion chromatographic (FIC) methods are presented. The first method was able to measure Cl(-), NO3(-) and SO4(2-) in a melter-based continuous flow system separating the three analytes in just 1 min. The second method (called Ultra-FIC) was able to perform a single chromatographic analysis in just 30 s and the resulting sampling resolution was 1.0 cm with a typical melting rate of 4.0 cm min(-1). Both methods combine the accuracy, precision, and low detection limits of ion chromatography with the enhanced speed and high depth resolution of continuous melting systems. Both methods have been tested and validated with the analysis of several hundred meters of different ice cores. In particular, the Ultra-FIC method was used to reconstruct the high-resolution SO4(2-) profile of the last 10,000 years for the EDML ice core, allowing the counting of the annual layers, which represents a key point in dating these kind of natural archives.

  14. Melting relations in the Fe-S-Si system at high pressure and temperature: Implications for the thermal structure of the planetary cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakairi, T.; Ohtani, E.; Sakai, T.; Kamada, S.; Sakamaki, T.; Hirao, N.

    2014-12-01

    It is widely accepted that the Earth's core is mainly composed of iron and contains light elements to account for its density deficit. Alloying with light elements significantly affects the physical properties of iron and depresses its melting temperature. Therefore, the melting relation of the Fe-light elements system is the key to clarify the thermal structure of the Earth's core. Although there are many candidates for light elements in the core, sulfur and silicon are considered to be the major light elements. Some geochemical models predicted that sulfur and silicon could be present not only in the core of the Earth but also in the core of other terrestrial planets such as Mars and Mercury. To better understand the properties of the planetary cores, we investigated the melting relations of the Fe-S-Si system under high-pressure conditions. Here, we report the melting relations in the Fe-S-Si system up to 60 GPa. Melting experiments were performed in the pressure range of 20-60 GPa and the temperature range of 1300-2500 K using a double-sided laser-heated diamond anvil cell combined with X-ray diffraction technique. In situ X-ray diffraction experiments were conducted at the BL10XU beamline of the SPring-8 facility. The melting detection was based on disappearance of the X-ray diffraction peaks of the sample. On the basis of X-ray diffraction patterns, we confirmed that iron-silicon alloy which hcp and fcc structure and Fe3S are stable phases under subsolidus conditions. Both solidus and liquidus temperatures are significantly lower than the melting temperature of pure Fe and increases with pressure in this study. In order to draw the melting curve as a function of pressure, we fitted the present results using the Simon's equation. Our results could provide important constraints on the thermal structure of the planetary cores.

  15. Superheating and melting within aluminum core-oxide shell nanoparticles for a broad range of heating rates: multiphysics phase field modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Yong Seok; Levitas, Valery I

    2016-10-19

    The external surface of metallic particles is usually covered by a thin and strong oxide shell, which significantly affects superheating and melting of particles. The effects of geometric parameters and heating rate on characteristic melting and superheating temperatures and melting behavior of aluminum nanoparticles covered by an oxide shell were studied numerically. For this purpose, the multiphysics model that includes the phase field model for surface melting, a dynamic equation of motion, a mechanical model for stress and strain simulations, interface and surface stresses, and the thermal conduction model including thermoelastic and thermo-phase transformation coupling as well as transformation dissipation rate was formulated. Several nontrivial phenomena were revealed. In comparison with a bare particle, the pressure generated in a core due to different thermal expansions of the core and shell and transformation volumetric expansion during melting, increases melting temperatures with the Clausius-Clapeyron factor of 60 K GPa(-1). For the heating rates Q ≤ 10(9) K s(-1), melting temperatures (surface and bulk start and finish melting temperatures, and maximum superheating temperature) are independent of Q. For Q ≥ 10(12) K s(-1), increasing Q generally increases melting temperatures and temperature for the shell fracture. Unconventional effects start for Q ≥ 10(12) K s(-1) due to kinetic superheating combined with heterogeneous melting and geometry. The obtained results are applied to shed light on the initial stage of the melt-dispersion-mechanism of the reaction of Al nanoparticles. Various physical phenomena that promote or suppress melting and affect melting temperatures and temperature of the shell fracture for different heating-rate ranges are summarized in the corresponding schemes.

  16. Precursors to potential severe core damage accidents: 1994, a status report. Volume 22: Appendix I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belles, R.J.; Cletcher, J.W.; Copinger, D.A.; Vanden Heuvel, L.N. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Dolan, B.W.; Minarick, J.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)]|[Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1995-12-01

    Nine operational events that affected eleven commercial light-water reactors (LWRs) during 1994 and that are considered to be precursors to potential severe core damage are described. All these events had conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage greater than or equal to 1.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}6}. These events were identified by computer-screening the 1994 licensee event reports from commercial LWRs to identify those that could be potential precursors. Candidate precursors were then selected and evaluated in a process similar to that used in previous assessments. Selected events underwent engineering evaluation that identified, analyzed, and documented the precursors. Other events designated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) also underwent a similar evaluation. Finally, documented precursors were submitted for review by licensees and NRC headquarters and regional offices to ensure that the plant design and its response to the precursor were correctly characterized. This study is a continuation of earlier work, which evaluated 1969--1981 and 1984--1993 events. The report discusses the general rationale for this study, the selection and documentation of events as precursors, and the estimation of conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage for events. This document is bound in two volumes: Vol. 21 contains the main report and Appendices A--H; Vol. 22 contains Appendix 1.

  17. Precursors to potential severe core damage accidents: 1995 A status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belles, R.J.; Cletcher, J.W.; Copinger, D.A. [and others

    1997-04-01

    Ten operational events that affected 10 commercial light-water reactors during 1995 and that are considered to be precursors to potential severe core damage are described. All these events had conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage greater than or equal to 1.0 x 10{sup {minus}6}. These events were identified by first computer-screening the 1995 licensee event reports from commercial light-water reactors to identify those events that could potentially be precursors. Candidate precursors were selected and evaluated in a process similar to that used in previous assessments. Selected events underwent engineering evaluation that identified, analyzed, and documented the precursors. Other events designated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) also underwent a similar evaluation. Finally, documented precursors were submitted for review by licensees and NRC headquarters and regional offices to ensure the plant design and its response to the precursor were correctly characterized. This study is a continuation of earlier work, which evaluated 1969-1981 and 1984-1994 events. The report discusses the general rationale for this study, the selection and documentation of events as precursors, and the estimation of conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage for the events.

  18. Development of a parametric containment event tree model for a severe BWR accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okkonen, T. [OTO-Consulting Ay, Helsinki (Finland)

    1995-04-01

    A containment event tree (CET) is built for analysis of severe accidents at the TVO boiling water reactor (BWR) units. Parametric models of severe accident progression and fission product behaviour are developed and integrated in order to construct a compact and self-contained Level 2 PSA model. The model can be easily updated to correspond to new research results. The analyses of the study are limited to severe accidents starting from full-power operation and leading to core melting, and are focused mainly on the use and effects of the dedicated severe accident management (SAM) systems. Severe accident progression from eight plant damage states (PDS), involving different pre-core-damage accident evolution, is examined, but the inclusion of their relative or absolute probabilities, by integration with Level 1, is deferred to integral safety assessments. (33 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs.).

  19. Validation of GAMMA+ model for Evaluating Heat Transfer of VHTR core in Accident Conditions by CFD analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Dongho; Yoon, Sujong; Park, Gooncherl; Cho, Hyoungkyu [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    KAERI has established a plan to demonstrate massive production of hydrogen using a VHTR by the early 2020s. In addition the GAMMA+ code is developed to analyze VHTR thermo-fluid transients at KAERI. One of the candidate reactor designs for VHTR is prismatic modular reactor (PMR), of which reference reactor is the 600MWth GT-MHR. This type of reactor has a passive safety system. During the High Pressure Conduction Cooling (HPCC) or Low Pressure Conduction Cooling (LPCC) accident, the core heats up by decay heat and then starts to cool down by conduction and radiation cooling to the Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS) through the prismatic core. In this mechanism, the solid conduction occurs in graphite and fuel blocks, and the gas conduction and radiation occurs in coolant holes and bypass gaps. It is important to predict conduction and radiation heat transfer in the core for safety analysis. Effective thermal conductivity is derived by Maxwell's far-field methodology Radiation effect is expressed as corresponding conductivity and added to gas conductivity. In this study, ETC model used in GAMMA+ code is validated with the commercial CFD code, CFX-13. In this study, the effective thermal conductivity model of the GAMMA+ was evaluated by comparison of CFD analysis. The CFD analysis was conducted for various numbers and volume fractions of coolant holes and temperatures. Although slight disagreement was shown for the cases run with small number of holes, the result of GAMMA+ model is accurate for the large numbers of holes sufficiently. Since there are 102 coolant holes and 210 fuel holes in a fuel block, it is concluded that GAMMA+ model is proper formula for predicting effective thermal conductivity of the VHTR fuel block. However, in high temperature region above 500 .deg. C, the GAMMA+ model underestimates the effective thermal conductivity since radiation heat transfer is not reflected precisely. Further researches on it seem to be necessary.

  20. Using high resolution tritium profiles to quantify the effects of melt on two Spitsbergen ice cores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wel, L.G.; Streurman, H.J.; Isaksson, E.; Helsen, M.M.; van de Wal, R.S.W.; Martma, T.; Pohjola, V.A.; Moore, J.C.; Meijer, H.A.J.

    2011-01-01

    Ice cores from small ice caps provide valuable climatic information, additional to that of Greenland and Antarctica. However, their integrity is usually compromised by summer meltwater percolation. To determine to what extent this can affect such ice cores, we performed high-resolution tritium measu

  1. Using high resolution tritium profiles to quantify the effects of melt on two Spitsbergen ice cores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wel, L.G.; Streurman, H.J.; Isaksson, E.; Helsen, M.M.; van de Wal, R.S.W.; Martma, T.; Pohjola, V.A.; Moore, J.C.; Meijer, H.A.J.

    2011-01-01

    Ice cores from small ice caps provide valuable climatic information, additional to that of Greenland and Antarctica. However, their integrity is usually compromised by summer meltwater percolation. To determine to what extent this can affect such ice cores, we performed high-resolution tritium measu

  2. Using high resolution tritium profiles to quantify the effects of melt on two Spitsbergen ice cores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wel, L.G.; Streurman, H.J.; Isaksson, E.; Helsen, M.M.; van de Wal, R.S.W.; Martma, T.; Pohjola, V.A.; Moore, J.C.; Meijer, H.A.J.

    2011-01-01

    Ice cores from small ice caps provide valuable climatic information, additional to that of Greenland and Antarctica. However, their integrity is usually compromised by summer meltwater percolation. To determine to what extent this can affect such ice cores, we performed high-resolution tritium

  3. Radiation protection: an analysis of thyroid blocking. [Effectiveness of KI in reducing radioactive uptake following potential reactor accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldrich, D C; Blond, R M

    1980-01-01

    An analysis was performed to provide guidance to policymakers concerning the effectiveness of potassium iodide (KI) as a thyroid blocking agent in potential reactor accident situations, the distance to which (or area within which) it should be distributed, and its relative effectiveness compared to other available protective measures. The analysis was performed using the Reactor Safety Study (WASH-1400) consequence model. Four categories of accidents were addressed: gap activity release accident (GAP), GAP without containment isolation, core melt with a melt-through release, and core melt with an atmospheric release. Cost-benefit ratios (US $/thyroid nodule prevented) are given assuming that no other protective measures are taken. Uncertainties due to health effects parameters, accident probabilities, and costs are assessed. The effects of other potential protective measures, such as evacuation and sheltering, and the impact on children (critical population) are evaluated. Finally, risk-benefit considerations are briefly discussed.

  4. Modeling of BWR core meltdown accidents - for application in the MELRPI. MOD2 computer code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, B R; Kim, S H; Taleyarkhan, R P; Podowski, M Z; Lahey, Jr, R T

    1985-04-01

    This report summarizes improvements and modifications made in the MELRPI computer code. A major difference between this new, updated version of the code, called MELRPI.MOD2, and the one reported previously, concerns the inclusion of a model for the BWR emergency core cooling systems (ECCS). This model and its computer implementation, the ECCRPI subroutine, account for various emergency injection modes, for both intact and rubblized geometries. Other changes to MELRPI deal with an improved model for canister wall oxidation, rubble bed modeling, and numerical integration of system equations. A complete documentation of the entire MELRPI.MOD2 code is also given, including an input guide, list of subroutines, sample input/output and program listing.

  5. In-vessel coolability and retention of a core melt. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theofanous, T.G.; Liu, C.; Additon, S.; Angelini, S.; Kymaelaeinen, O.; Salmassi, T. [California Univ., Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Center for Risk Studies and Safety

    1996-10-01

    The efficacy of external flooding of a reactor vessel as a severe accident management strategy is assessed for an AP600-like reactor design. The overall approach is based on the Risk Oriented Accident Analysis Methodology (ROAAM), and the assessment includes consideration of bounding scenarios and sensitivity studies, as well as arbitrary parametric evaluations that allow the delineation of the failure boundaries. Quantification of the input parameters is carried out for an AP600-like design, and the results of the assessment demonstrate that lower head failure is physically unreasonable. Use of this conclusion for any specific application is subject to verifying the required reliability of the depressurization and cavity-flooding systems, and to showing the appropriateness (in relation to the database presented here, or by further testing as necessary) of the thermal insulation design and of the external surface properties of the lower head, including any applicable coatings. The AP600 is particularly favorable to in-vessel retention. Some ideas to enhance the assessment basis as well as performance in this respect, for applications to larger and/or higher power density reactors are also provided.

  6. In-vessel coolability and retention of a core melt. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theofanous, T.G.; Liu, C.; Additon, S.; Angelini, S.; Kymaelaeinen, O.; Salmassi, T. [California Univ., Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Center for Risk Studies and Safety

    1996-10-01

    The efficacy of external flooding of a reactor vessel as a severe accident management strategy is assessed for an AP600-like reactor design. The overall approach is based on the Risk Oriented Accident Analysis Methodology (ROAAM), and the assessment includes consideration of bounding scenarios and sensitivity studies, as well as arbitrary parametric evaluations that allow the delineation of the failure boundaries. Quantification of the input parameters is carried out for an AP600-like design, and the results of the assessment demonstrate that lower head failure is physically unreasonable. Use of this conclusion for any specific application is subject to verifying the required reliability of the depressurization and cavity-flooding systems, and to showing the appropriateness (in relation to the database presented here, or by further testing as necessary) of the thermal insulation design and of the external surface properties of the lower head, including any applicable coatings. The AP600 is particularly favorable to in-vessel retention. Some ideas to enhance the assessment basis as well as performance in this respect, for applications to larger and/or higher power density reactors are also provided.

  7. Core melt progression and consequence analysis methodology development in support of the Savannah River Reactor PSA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Kula, K.R.; Sharp, D.A. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)); Amos, C.N.; Wagner, K.C.; Bradley, D.R. (Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States))

    1992-01-01

    A three-level Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) of production reactor operation has been underway since 1985 at the US Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS). The goals of this analysis are to: Analyze existing margins of safety provided by the heavy-water reactor (HWR) design challenged by postulated severe accidents; Compare measures of risk to the general public and onsite workers to guideline values, as well as to those posed by commercial reactor operation; and Develop the methodology and database necessary to prioritize improvements to engineering safety systems and components, operator training, and engineering projects that contribute significantly to improving plant safety. PSA technical staff from the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) and Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) have performed the assessment despite two obstacles: A variable baseline plant configuration and power level; and a lack of technically applicable code methodology to model the SRS reactor conditions. This paper discusses the detailed effort necessary to modify the requisite codes before accident analysis insights for the risk assessment were obtained.

  8. Experimental investigation of material chemical effects on emergency core cooling pump suction filter performance after loss of coolant accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong Woon, E-mail: parkjw@dongguk.ac.k [Dongguk University, 707 Seokjang-Dong, Gyeongju, 780-714 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Byung Gi [Soonchunhyang University, Asan, Chungnam, 336-745 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chang Hyun [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd. 25-1, Jang-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-343 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-15

    Integral tests of head loss through an emergency core cooling filter screen are conducted, simulating reactor building environmental conditions for 30 days after a loss of coolant accident. A test rig with five individual loops each of whose chamber is established to test chemical product formation and measure the head loss through a sample filter. The screen area at each chamber and the amounts of reactor building materials are scaled down according to specific plant condition. A series of tests have been performed to investigate the effects of calcium-silicate, reactor building spray, existence of calcium-silicate with tri-sodium phosphate (TSP), and composition of materials. The results showed that head loss across the chemical bed with even a small amount of calcium-silicate insulation instantaneously increased as soon as TSP was added to the test solution. Also, the head loss across the filter screen is strongly affected by spray duration and the head loss increase is rapid at the early stage, because of high dissolution and precipitation of aluminum and zinc. After passivation of aluminum and zinc by corrosion, the head loss increase is much slowed down and is mainly induced by materials such as calcium, silicon, and magnesium leached from NUKON{sup TM} and concrete. Furthermore, it is newly found that the spay buffer agent, tri-sodium phosphate, to form protective coating on the aluminum surface and reduce aluminum leaching is not effective for a large amount of aluminum and a long spray.

  9. Analysis of Credible Accidents for Argonaut Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawley, S. C.; Kathern, R. L.; Robkin, M. A.

    1981-04-01

    Five areas of potential accidents have been evaluated for the Argonaut-UTR reactors. They are: • insertion of excess reactivity • catastrophic rearrangement of the core • explosive chemical reaction • graphite fire • fuel-handling accident. A nuclear excursion resulting from the rapid insertion of the maximum available excess reactivity would produce only 12 MWs which is insufficient to cause fuel melting even with conservative assumptions. Although precise structural rearrangement of the core would create a potential hazard, it is simply not credible to assume that such an arrangement would result from the forces of an earthquake or other catastrophic event. Even damage to the fuel from falling debris or other objects is unlikely given the normal reactor structure. An explosion from a metal-water reaction could not occur because there is no credible source of sufficient energy to initiate the reaction. A graphite fire could conceivably create some damage to the reactor but not enough to melt any fuel or initiate a metal-water reaction. The only credible accident involving offsite doses was determined to be a fuel-handling accident which, given highly conservative assumptions, would produce a whole-body dose equivalent of 2 rem from noble gas immersion and a lifetime dose equivalent commitment to the thyroid of 43 rem from radioiodines.

  10. Severe accident research and management in Nordic Countries - A status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frid, W. [Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, SKI (Sweden)] (ed.)

    2002-01-01

    The report describes the status of severe accident research and accident management development in Finland, Sweden, Norway and Denmark. The emphasis is on severe accident phenomena and issues of special importance for the severe accident management strategies implemented in Sweden and in Finland. The main objective of the research has been to verify the protection provided by the accident mitigation measures and to reduce the uncertainties in risk dominant accident phenomena. Another objective has been to support validation and improvements of accident management strategies and procedures as well as to contribute to the development of level 2 PSA, computerised operator aids for accident management and certain aspects of emergency preparedness. Severe accident research addresses both the in-vessel and the ex-vessel accident progression phenomena and issues. Even though there are differences between Sweden and Finland as to the scope and content of the research programs, the focus of the research in both countries is on in-vessel coolability, integrity of the reactor vessel lower head and core melt behaviour in the containment, in particular the issues of core debris coolability and steam explosions. Notwithstanding that our understanding of these issues has significantly improved, and that experimental data base has been largely expanded, there are still important uncertainties which motivate continued research. Other important areas are thermal-hydraulic phenomena during reflooding of an overheated partially degraded core, fission product chemistry, in particular formation of organic iodine, and hydrogen transport and combustion phenomena. The development of severe accident management has embraced, among other things, improvements of accident mitigating procedures and strategies, further work at IFE Halden on Computerised Accident Management Support (CAMS) system, as well as plant modifications, including new instrumentation. Recent efforts in Sweden in this area

  11. Application of the Severe Accident Code ATHLET-CD. Coolant injection to primary circuit of a PWR by mobile pump system in case of SBLOCA severe accident scenario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jobst, Matthias; Wilhelm, Polina; Kliem, Soeren; Kozmenkov, Yaroslav [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Reactor Safety

    2017-06-01

    The improvement of the safety of nuclear power plants is a continuously on-going process. The analysis of transients and accidents is an important research topic, which significantly contributes to safety enhancements of existing power plants. In case of an accident with multiple failures of safety systems, core uncovery and heat-up can occur. In order to prevent the accident to turn into a severe one or to mitigate the consequences of severe accidents, different accident management measures can be applied. By means of numerical analyses performed with the compute code ATHLET-CD, the effectiveness of coolant injection with a mobile pump system into the primary circuit of a PWR was studied. According to the analyses, such a system can stop the melt progression if it is activated prior to 10 % of total core is molten.

  12. Assessment of the thermal-hydraulic technology of the transition phase of a core-disruptive accident in a LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greene, G.A.; Ginsberg, T.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1982-11-01

    The technology of thermal hydraulic aspects of the transition phase accident sequence in liquid metal fast breeder reactors has been reviewed. Previous analyses of the transition phase accident sequence have been reviewed and the current understanding of major thermal hydraulic phenomenology has been assessed. As a result of the foregoing, together with a scoping analysis of the transition phase accident sequence, major transition phase issues have been defined and research needs have been identified. The major conclusion of transition phase scoping analysis is that fuel dispersal cannot be relied upon to rule out the possibility of recriticalities during this stage of the accident.

  13. Melting-induced stratification above the Earth's inner core due to convective translation

    OpenAIRE

    Alboussiere, Thierry; Deguen, Renaud; Melzani, Mickael

    2010-01-01

    International audience; In addition to its global North-South anisotropy(1), there are two other enigmatic seismological observations related to the Earth's inner core: asymmetry between its eastern and western hemispheres(2-6) and the presence of a layer of reduced seismic velocity at the base of the outer core(6-12). This 250-km-thick layer has been interpreted as a stably stratified region of reduced composition in light elements(13). Here we show that this layer can be generated by simult...

  14. High Pressure Melting of Iron with Nonmetals Sulfur, Carbon, Oxygen, and Hydrogen: Implications for Planetary Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buono, Antonio Salvatore

    The earth's core consists of a solid metallic center surrounded by a liquid metallic outer layer. Understanding the compositions of the inner and outer cores allows us to better understand the dynamics of the earth's core, as well as the dynamics of the cores of other terrestrial planets and moons. The density and size of the earth's core indicate that it is approximately 90% metallic, predominantly iron, with about 10% light elements. Iron meteorites, believed to be the remnants of planetary cores, provide further constraints on the composition of the earth's core, indicating a composition of 86% iron, 4% nickel, and 10% light elements. Any potential candidate for the major light element core component must meet two criteria: first, it must have high cosmic abundances and second, it must be compatible with Fe. Given these two constraints there are five plausible elements that could be the major light element in the core: H, O, C, S, and Si. Of these five possible candidates this thesis focuses on S and C as well exploring the effect of minor amounts of O and H on the eutectic temperature in a Fe-FeS core. We look at two specific aspects of the Fe-FeS system: first, the shape of the liquidus as a function of pressure, second, a possible cause for the reported variations in the eutectic temperature, which draws on the effect of H and O. Finally we look at the effect of S and C on partitioning behavior of Ni, Pt, Re,Co, Os and W between cohenite and metallic liquid. We are interested in constraining the shape of the Fe-FeS liquidus because as a planet with a S-enriched core cools, the thermal and compositional evolution of its core is constrained by this liquidus. In Chapter 1 I present an equation that allows for calculation of the temperature along the liquidus as a function of pressure and composition for Fe-rich compositions and pressures from 1 bar to 10 GPa. One particularly interesting feature of the Fe --rich side of the Fe-FeS eutectic is the sigmoidal shape

  15. Use of detailed thermochemical databases to model chemical interactions in the Severe Accident codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrachin, M. [IPSN/DRS, CEA Cadarache (France)

    2001-07-01

    For the prevention, mitigation and management of severe accidents, many problems related to core melt have to be solved: fuel degradation, melting and relocation, convection in the core melt(s), coolability of the core melt(s), fission product release, hydrogen production, behavior of the materials of the protective layers, ex-vessel spreading of the core melt(s).. To solve these problems such properties like thermal conductivity, heat capacity, density, viscosity, evaporation or sublimation of melts, the solidification behavior (solid/liquid fraction), the tendency to trap or to release the fission products, the stratification of melts notably metallic and oxide, must be known. However most of these properties are delicate to measure directly at high temperature and/or in the radio-active environment produced by the fission products. Therefore some of them must be derived by calculations from the physical-chemical description of the melt: number of phases, phase compositions, proportions of solids and liquids and their respective oxidation state, miscibility of the liquids, solubility of one phase in another, etc. This information is given by the phase diagrams of the materials in presence. Since more than ten years, IPSN has developed in collaboration with THERMODATA (Grenoble, France) a very detailed thermochemical database for the complex system U-O-Zr-Fe-Ni-La-Ba-Ru-Sr-Si-Mg-Ca-Al-(H-Ar). The direct coupling between the severe accident (SA) Codes and a thermochemical code with its database is not actually possible because of the computer time consuming and the size of the database. For this reason, most of the Severe Accident codes usually have a very simplified description for the phase diagrams which are not in agreement with the status of the art. In this presentation, alternative methodologies are detailed with their respective difficulties, the goal being to build an interface between a thermochemical database and a SA Code and to get a fast, accurate and

  16. Accidents - Chernobyl accident; Accidents - accident de Tchernobyl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    This file is devoted to the Chernobyl accident. It is divided in four parts. The first part concerns the accident itself and its technical management. The second part is relative to the radiation doses and the different contaminations. The third part reports the sanitary effects, the determinists ones and the stochastic ones. The fourth and last part relates the consequences for the other European countries with the case of France. Through the different parts a point is tackled with the measures taken after the accident by the other countries to manage an accident, the cooperation between the different countries and the groups of research and studies about the reactors safety, and also with the international medical cooperation, specially for the children, everything in relation with the Chernobyl accident. (N.C.)

  17. APRI-6. Accident Phenomena of Risk Importance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garis, Ninos; Ljung, J (eds.) (Swedish Radiation Safety Authority, Stockholm (Sweden)); Agrenius, Lennart (ed.) (Agrenius Ingenjoersbyraa AB, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2009-06-15

    Since the early 1980s, nuclear power utilities in Sweden and the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority (SSM) collaborate on the research in severe reactor accidents. In the beginning focus was mostly on strengthening protection against environmental impacts after a severe reactor accident, for example by develop systems for the filtered relief of the reactor containment. Since the early 90s, this focus has shifted to the phenomenological issues of risk-dominant significance. During the years 2006-2008, the partnership continued in the research project APRI-6. The aim was to show whether the solutions adopted in the Swedish strategy for incident management provides adequate protection for the environment. This is done by studying important phenomena in the core melt estimating the amount of radioactivity that can be released to the atmosphere in a severe accident. To achieve these objectives the research has included monitoring of international research on severe accidents and evaluation of results and continued support for research of severe accidents at the Royal Inst. of Technology (KTH) and Chalmers University. The follow-up of international research has promoted the exchange of knowledge and experience and has given access to a wealth of information on various phenomena relevant to events in severe accidents. The continued support to KTH has provided increased knowledge about the possibility of cooling the molten core in the reactor tank and the processes associated with coolability in the confinement and about steam explosions. Support for Chalmers has increased knowledge of the accident chemistry, mainly the behavior of iodine and ruthenium in the containment after an accident.

  18. Severe Accident Recriticality Analyses (SARA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frid, W. [Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden); Hoejerup, F. [Risoe National Lab. (Denmark); Lindholm, I.; Miettinen, J.; Puska, E.K. [VTT Energy, Helsinki (Finland); Nilsson, Lars [Studsvik Eco and Safety AB, Nykoeping (Sweden); Sjoevall, H. [Teoliisuuden Voima Oy (Finland)

    1999-11-01

    Recriticality in a BWR has been studied for a total loss of electric power accident scenario. In a BWR, the B{sub 4}C control rods would melt and relocate from the core before the fuel during core uncovery and heat-up. If electric power returns during this time-window unborated water from ECCS systems will start to reflood the partly control rod free core. Recriticality might take place for which the only mitigating mechanisms are the Doppler effect and void formation. In order to assess the impact of recriticality on reactor safety, including accident management measures, the following issues have been investigated in the SARA project: 1. the energy deposition in the fuel during super-prompt power burst, 2. the quasi steady-state reactor power following the initial power burst and 3. containment response to elevated quasi steady-state reactor power. The approach was to use three computer codes and to further develop and adapt them for the task. The codes were SIMULATE-3K, APROS and RECRIT. Recriticality analyses were carried out for a number of selected reflooding transients for the Oskarshamn 3 plant in Sweden with SIMULATE-3K and for the Olkiluoto 1 plant in Finland with all three codes. The core state initial and boundary conditions prior to recriticality have been studied with the severe accident codes SCDAP/RELAP5, MELCOR and MAAP4. The results of the analyses show that all three codes predict recriticality - both superprompt power bursts and quasi steady-state power generation - for the studied range of parameters, i. e. with core uncovery and heat-up to maximum core temperatures around 1800 K and water flow rates of 45 kg/s to 2000 kg/s injected into the downcomer. Since the recriticality takes place in a small fraction of the core the power densities are high which results in large energy deposition in the fuel during power burst in some accident scenarios. The highest value, 418 cal/g, was obtained with SIMULATE-3K for an Oskarshamn 3 case with reflooding

  19. Melting and metallization of silica in the cores of gas giants, ice giants and super Earths

    CERN Document Server

    Mazevet, S; Taniuchi, T; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A; Guyot, F

    2014-01-01

    The physical state and properties of silicates at conditions encountered in the cores of gas giants, ice giants and of Earth like exoplanets now discovered with masses up to several times the mass of the Earth remains mostly unknown. Here, we report on theoretical predictions of the properties of silica, SiO$_2$, up to 4 TPa and about 20,000K using first principle molecular dynamics simulations based on density functional theory. For conditions found in the Super-Earths and in ice giants, we show that silica remains a poor electrical conductor up to 10 Mbar due to an increase in the Si-O coordination with pressure. For Jupiter and Saturn cores, we find that MgSiO$_3$ silicate has not only dissociated into MgO and SiO$_2$, as shown in previous studies, but that these two phases have likely differentiated to lead to a core made of liquid SiO$_2$ and solid (Mg,Fe)O.

  20. KATS experiments to simulate corium spreading in the EPR core catcher concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eppinger, B.; Fieg, G.; Schuetz, W.; Stegmaier, U. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Insitute fur Kern- und Energietechnik, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    In future Light Water Reactors special devices (core catchers) might be required to prevent containment failure by basement erosion after reactor pressure vessel melt-through during a core meltdown accident. Quick freezing of the molten core masses is desirable to reduce release of radioactivity. Several concepts of core catcher de-vices have been proposed based on the spreading of corium melt onto flat surfaces with subsequent cooling by flooding with water. Therefore a series of experiments to investigate high temperature melt spreading on flat surfaces has been carried out using alumina-iron thermite melts as a simulant. The oxidic thermite melt is conditioned by adding other oxides to simulate a realistic corium melt as close as possible. Spreading of oxidic and metallic melts have been performed in one- and two-dimensional geometry. Substrates were chemically inert ceramic layers, dry concrete and concrete with a shallow water layer on top. (authors)

  1. Vertical distributions of plutonium isotopes in marine sediment cores off the Fukushima coast after the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. T. Bu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP accident led to the release of large amounts of radionuclides into the atmosphere as well as direct discharges into the sea. In contrast to the intensive studies on the distribution of the released high volatility fission products, such as 131I, 134Cs and 137Cs, similar studies of the actinides, especially the Pu isotopes, are limited. To obtain the vertical distribution of Pu isotopes in marine sediments and to better assess the possible contamination of Pu from the FDNPP accident in the marine environment, we determined the activities of 239+240Pu and 241Pu as well as the atom ratios of 240Pu/239Pu and 241Pu/239Pu in sediment core samples collected in the western North Pacific off Fukushima from July 2011 to July 2012. We also measured surface sediment samples collected from seven Japanese estuaries before the FNDPP accident to establish the comprehensive background baseline data. The observed results of both the Pu activities and the Pu atom ratios for the sediments in the western North Pacific were comparable to the baseline data, suggesting that the FDNPP accident did not cause detectable Pu contamination to the studied regions prior to the sampling time. The Pu isotopes in the western North Pacific 30 km off the Fukushima coast originated from global fallout and Pacific Proving Ground close-in fallout.

  2. Study of top reflooding in case of severe accident and in particular oxidation of Uranium, Zirconium, Oxygen melts; Etude du renoyage par le haut en cas d'accident grave et en particulier oxydation des melanges (U,Zr,O)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunet-Thibault, E

    2006-12-15

    In 1979, the Three Mile Island (TMI) accident occurred in United States and accelerated research activities in the field of severe accidents. Severe accident management procedures imply massive water injections to flood the core. The work of this thesis bent principally over this reflooding. The first part of the study concerns the core oxidation enhancement during the reflooding phase which leads to a rough increase of the concentration of burnable hydrogen in the containment. This is why the study carried on the analysis of the contribution of the oxidation of U-Zr-O mixtures, towards the total production of hydrogen during reflooding. In the second part, the study concerns top flooding modelling i.e.: with injection of water in the hot legs. Here, we attempted to define bases and realize a model allowing to describe this type of reflooding. These models were validated on the simulation of the parameter with MAAP4 code. (author)

  3. Accident Analysis and Precaution Measures of Zinc Melting Furnace Settling Chamber Explosion%熔锌反射炉沉降室爆炸事故分析与防范措施

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    项洪刚

    2014-01-01

    T he article takes the example of explosion accident of Zinc melting furnace settling chamber in a smelting plant , introduces the material , products , production technique and the conditions that cause the zinc dust explosive accident , applies the fault tree analysis method , comprehensively analyzes the reasons of zinc dust explosion inside zinc melting furnace settling chamber and presents the precaution measures to avoid personal injury accidents .%通过某冶炼厂熔锌反射炉沉降室爆炸事故案例,在介绍生产原料、产品、生产工艺过程及锌粉产生爆炸的条件的基础上,应用事故树分析法,比较全面的分析了熔锌反射炉沉降室锌粉爆炸的原因,并提出了防范措施,避免人身伤亡事故的发生。

  4. Joint research project WASA-BOSS: Further development and application of severe accident codes. Assessment and optimization of accident management measures. Project B: Accident analyses for pressurized water reactors with the application of the ATHLET-CD code; Verbundprojekt WASA-BOSS: Weiterentwicklung und Anwendung von Severe Accident Codes. Bewertung und Optimierung von Stoerfallmassnahmen. Teilprojekt B: Druckwasserreaktor-Stoerfallanalysen unter Verwendung des Severe-Accident-Codes ATHLET-CD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jobst, Matthias; Kliem, Soeren; Kozmenkov, Yaroslav; Wilhelm, Polina

    2017-02-15

    Within the framework of the project an ATHLET-CD input deck for a generic German PWR of type KONVOI has been created. This input deck was applied to the simulation of severe accidents from the accident categories station blackout (SBO) and small-break loss-of-coolant accidents (SBLOCA). The complete accident transient from initial event at full power until the damage of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) is covered and all relevant severe accident phenomena are modelled: start of core heat up, fission product release, melting of fuel and absorber material, oxidation and release of hydrogen, relocation of molten material inside the core, relocation to the lower plenum, damage and failure of the RPV. The model has been applied to the analysis of preventive and mitigative accident management measures for SBO and SBLOCA transients. Therefore, the measures primary side depressurization (PSD), injection to the primary circuit by mobile pumps and for SBLOCA the delayed injection by the cold leg hydro-accumulators have been investigated and the assumptions and start criteria of these measures have been varied. The time evolutions of the transients and time margins for the initiation of additional measures have been assessed. An uncertainty and sensitivity study has been performed for the early phase of one SBO scenario with PSD (until the start of core melt). In addition to that, a code -to-code comparison between ATHLET-CD and the severe accident code MELCOR has been carried out.

  5. A synthetic ice core approach to estimate ion relocation in an ice field site experiencing periodical melt; a case study on Lomonosovfonna, Svalbard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. P. Vega

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Physical and chemical properties of four different ice cores (LF-97, LF-08, LF-09 and LF-11 drilled at Lomonosovfonna, Svalbard, were compared to investigate the effects of meltwater percolation on the chemical and physical stratigraphy of these records. A synthetic ice core approach was employed as reference record to estimate the ionic relocation and meltwater percolation length at this site during the period 2007–2010. Using this method, the ion elution sequence obtained for Lomonosovfonna was SO42- > NO3- > NH4+ > Mg2+ > Cl-, K+ > Na+ > Ca2+, with acidic ions being the most mobile within the snowpack. The relocation length of most of the ions was in the order of 1 m, with the exception of SO42- showing relocation lengths > 2 m during this period. In addition, by using both a positive degree day (PDD and a snow-energy model approaches to estimate the percentage of melt at Lomonosovfonna, we have calculated a melt percentage (MP of the total annual accumulation within the range between 48 and 70 %, for the period between 2007 and 2010 which is above the MP range suggested by the ion relocation evidenced in the LF-syn core (i.e. MP = 30 %. Using a firn-densification model to constrain the melt range, a MP of 30 % was found over the same period which is consistent with the results of the synthetic ice core approach, and a 45 % of melt for the last 60 years. Considering the ionic relocation lengths and annual melt percentages, we estimate that the atmospheric ionic signal remains preserved in recently drilled Lomonosovfonna ice cores at an annual or bi-annual resolution.

  6. A synthetic ice core approach to estimate ion relocation in an ice field site experiencing periodical melt: a case study on Lomonosovfonna, Svalbard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Carmen P.; Pohjola, Veijo A.; Beaudon, Emilie; Claremar, Björn; van Pelt, Ward J. J.; Pettersson, Rickard; Isaksson, Elisabeth; Martma, Tõnu; Schwikowski, Margit; Bøggild, Carl E.

    2016-05-01

    Physical and chemical properties of four different ice cores (LF-97, LF-08, LF-09 and LF-11) drilled at Lomonosovfonna, Svalbard, were compared to investigate the effects of meltwater percolation on the chemical and physical stratigraphy of these records. A synthetic ice core approach was employed as reference record to estimate the ionic relocation and meltwater percolation length at this site during the period 2007-2010. Using this method, a partial ion elution sequence obtained for Lomonosovfonna was NO3- > SO42-, Mg2+, Cl-, K+, Na+ with nitrate being the most mobile within the snowpack. The relocation length of most of the ions was on the order of 1 m during this period. In addition, by using both a positive degree day (PDD) and a snow-energy model approaches to estimate the percentage of melt at Lomonosovfonna, we have calculated a melt percentage (MP) of the total annual accumulation within the range between 48 and 70 %, for the period between 2007 and 2010, which is above the MP range suggested by the ion relocation evidenced in the LF-syn core (i.e., MP = 30 %). Using a firn-densification model to constrain the melt range, a MP of 30 % was found over the same period, which is consistent with the results of the synthetic ice core approach, and a 45 % of melt for the last 60 years. Considering the ionic relocation lengths and annual melt percentages, we estimate that the atmospheric ionic signal remains preserved in recently drilled Lomonosovfonna ice cores at an annual or bi-annual resolution when weather conditions were similar to those during the 2007-2010 period.

  7. A synthetic ice core approach to estimate ion relocation in an ice field site experiencing periodical melt; a case study on Lomonosovfonna, Svalbard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, C. P.; Pohjola, V. A.; Beaudon, E.; Claremar, B.; van Pelt, W. J. J.; Pettersson, R.; Isaksson, E.; Martma, T.; Schwikowski, M.; Bøggild, C. E.

    2015-09-01

    Physical and chemical properties of four different ice cores (LF-97, LF-08, LF-09 and LF-11) drilled at Lomonosovfonna, Svalbard, were compared to investigate the effects of meltwater percolation on the chemical and physical stratigraphy of these records. A synthetic ice core approach was employed as reference record to estimate the ionic relocation and meltwater percolation length at this site during the period 2007-2010. Using this method, the ion elution sequence obtained for Lomonosovfonna was SO42- > NO3- > NH4+ > Mg2+ > Cl-, K+ > Na+ > Ca2+, with acidic ions being the most mobile within the snowpack. The relocation length of most of the ions was in the order of 1 m, with the exception of SO42- showing relocation lengths > 2 m during this period. In addition, by using both a positive degree day (PDD) and a snow-energy model approaches to estimate the percentage of melt at Lomonosovfonna, we have calculated a melt percentage (MP) of the total annual accumulation within the range between 48 and 70 %, for the period between 2007 and 2010 which is above the MP range suggested by the ion relocation evidenced in the LF-syn core (i.e. MP = 30 %). Using a firn-densification model to constrain the melt range, a MP of 30 % was found over the same period which is consistent with the results of the synthetic ice core approach, and a 45 % of melt for the last 60 years. Considering the ionic relocation lengths and annual melt percentages, we estimate that the atmospheric ionic signal remains preserved in recently drilled Lomonosovfonna ice cores at an annual or bi-annual resolution.

  8. Temperature of Earth's core constrained from melting of Fe and Fe0.9Ni0.1 at high pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongzhou; Jackson, Jennifer M.; Zhao, Jiyong; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Alp, E. Ercan; Hu, Michael Y.; Toellner, Thomas S.; Murphy, Caitlin A.; Prakapenka, Vitali B.

    2016-08-01

    The melting points of fcc- and hcp-structured Fe0.9Ni0.1 and Fe are measured up to 125 GPa using laser heated diamond anvil cells, synchrotron Mössbauer spectroscopy, and a recently developed fast temperature readout spectrometer. The onset of melting is detected by a characteristic drop in the time-integrated synchrotron Mössbauer signal which is sensitive to atomic motion. The thermal pressure experienced by the samples is constrained by X-ray diffraction measurements under high pressures and temperatures. The obtained best-fit melting curves of fcc-structured Fe and Fe0.9Ni0.1 fall within the wide region bounded by previous studies. We are able to derive the γ-ɛ-l triple point of Fe and the quasi triple point of Fe0.9Ni0.1 to be 110 ± 5GPa, 3345 ± 120K and 116 ± 5GPa, 3260 ± 120K, respectively. The measured melting temperatures of Fe at similar pressure are slightly higher than those of Fe0.9Ni0.1 while their one sigma uncertainties overlap. Using previously measured phonon density of states of hcp-Fe, we calculate melting curves of hcp-structured Fe and Fe0.9Ni0.1 using our (quasi) triple points as anchors. The extrapolated Fe0.9Ni0.1 melting curve provides an estimate for the upper bound of Earth's inner core-outer core boundary temperature of 5500 ± 200K. The temperature within the liquid outer core is then approximated with an adiabatic model, which constrains the upper bound of the temperature at the core side of the core-mantle boundary to be 4000 ± 200K. We discuss a potential melting point depression caused by light elements and the implications of the presented core-mantle boundary temperature bounds on phase relations in the lowermost part of the mantle.

  9. Advanced computational methods for the assessment of reactor core behaviour during reactivity initiated accidents. Final report; Fortschrittliche Rechenmethoden zum Kernverhalten bei Reaktivitaetsstoerfaellen. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pautz, A.; Perin, Y.; Pasichnyk, I.; Velkov, K.; Zwermann, W.; Seubert, A.; Klein, M.; Gallner, L.; Krzycacz-Hausmann, B.

    2012-05-15

    The document at hand serves as the final report for the reactor safety research project RS1183 ''Advanced Computational Methods for the Assessment of Reactor Core Behavior During Reactivity-Initiated Accidents''. The work performed in the framework of this project was dedicated to the development, validation and application of advanced computational methods for the simulation of transients and accidents of nuclear installations. These simulation tools describe in particular the behavior of the reactor core (with respect to neutronics, thermal-hydraulics and thermal mechanics) at a very high level of detail. The overall goal of this project was the deployment of a modern nuclear computational chain which provides, besides advanced 3D tools for coupled neutronics/ thermal-hydraulics full core calculations, also appropriate tools for the generation of multi-group cross sections and Monte Carlo models for the verification of the individual calculational steps. This computational chain shall primarily be deployed for light water reactors (LWR), but should beyond that also be applicable for innovative reactor concepts. Thus, validation on computational benchmarks and critical experiments was of paramount importance. Finally, appropriate methods for uncertainty and sensitivity analysis were to be integrated into the computational framework, in order to assess and quantify the uncertainties due to insufficient knowledge of data, as well as due to methodological aspects.

  10. Fe-FeO and Fe-Fe3C melting relations at Earth's core-mantle boundary conditions: Implications for a volatile-rich or oxygen-rich core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morard, G.; Andrault, D.; Antonangeli, D.; Nakajima, Y.; Auzende, A. L.; Boulard, E.; Cervera, S.; Clark, A.; Lord, O. T.; Siebert, J.; Svitlyk, V.; Garbarino, G.; Mezouar, M.

    2017-09-01

    Eutectic melting temperatures in the Fe-FeO and Fe-Fe3C systems have been determined up to 150 GPa. Melting criteria include observation of a diffuse scattering signal by in situ X-Ray diffraction, and textural characterisation of recovered samples. In addition, compositions of eutectic liquids have been established by combining in situ Rietveld analyses with ex situ chemical analyses. Gathering these new results together with previous reports on Fe-S and Fe-Si systems allow us to discuss the specific effect of each light element (Si, S, O, C) on the melting properties of the outer core. Crystallization temperatures of Si-rich core compositional models are too high to be compatible with the absence of extensive mantle melting at the core-mantle boundary (CMB) and significant amounts of volatile elements such as S and/or C (>5 at%, corresponding to >2 wt%), or a large amount of O (>15 at% corresponding to ∼5 wt%) are required to reduce the crystallisation temperature of the core material below that of a peridotitic lower mantle.

  11. Black carbon concentrations from a Tibetan Plateau ice core spanning 1843–1982: recent increases due to emissions and glacier melt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Jenkins

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Black carbon (BC deposited on snow and glacier surfaces can reduce albedo and lead to accelerated melt. An ice core recovered from Guoqu glacier on Mt. Geladaindong and analyzed using a Single Particle Soot Photometer provides the first long-term (1843–1982 record of BC concentrations from the Central Tibetan Plateau. The highest concentrations are observed from 1975–1982, which corresponds to a 2.0-fold and 2.4-fold increase in average and median values, respectively, relative to 1843–1940. BC concentrations post-1940 are also elevated relative to the earlier portion of the record. Causes for the higher BC concentrations include increased regional BC emissions and subsequent deposition, and melt induced enrichment of BC, with the melt potentially accelerated due to the presence of BC at the glacier surface. A qualitative comparison of the BC and Fe (used as a dust proxy records suggests that if changes in the concentrations of absorbing impurities at the glacier surface have influenced recent glacial melt, the melt may be due to the presence of BC rather than dust. Guoqu glacier has received no net ice accumulation since the 1980s, and is a potential example of a glacier where an increase in the equilibrium line altitude is exposing buried high impurity layers. That BC concentrations in the uppermost layers of the Geladaindong ice core are not substantially higher relative to deeper in the ice core suggests that some of the BC that must have been deposited on Guoqu glacier via wet or dry deposition between 1983 and 2005 has been removed from the surface of the glacier, potentially via supraglacial or englacial meltwater.

  12. Heat up and potential failure of BWR upper internals during a severe accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robb, Kevin R [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-01-01

    In boiling water reactors, the steam dome, steam separators, and dryers above the core are comprised of approximately 100 tons of stainless steel. During a severe accident in which the coolant boils away and exothermic oxidation of zirconium occurs, gases (steam and hydrogen) are superheated in the core region and pass through the upper internals. Historically, the upper internals have been modeled using severe accident codes with relatively simple approximations. The upper internals are typically modeled in MELCOR as two lumped volumes with simplified heat transfer characteristics, with no structural integrity considerations, and with limited ability to oxidize, melt, and relocate. The potential for and the subsequent impact of the upper internals to heat up, oxidize, fail, and relocate during a severe accident was investigated. A higher fidelity representation of the shroud dome, steam separators, and steam driers was developed in MELCOR v1.8.6 by extending the core region upwards. This modeling effort entailed adding 45 additional core cells and control volumes, 98 flow paths, and numerous control functions. The model accounts for the mechanical loading and structural integrity, oxidation, melting, flow area blockage, and relocation of the various components. The results indicate that the upper internals can reach high temperatures during a severe accident; they are predicted to reach a high enough temperature such that they lose their structural integrity and relocate. The additional 100 tons of stainless steel debris influences the subsequent in-vessel and ex-vessel accident progression.

  13. Severe accident research in the core degradation area: An example of effective international cooperation between the European Union (EU) and the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) by the International Science and Technology Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bottomley, D., E-mail: paul.bottomley@ec.europa.eu [ITU Institut fuer Transurane, PO box 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Stuckert, J.; Hofmann, P. [KIT Campus Nord, Hermann-von-Helmholtz Pl. 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Tocheny, L. [ISTC Krasnoproletarskaya 32-34, PO Box 20, 127473 Moscow (Russian Federation); Hugon, M. [European Commission DG - Research and Tech. Development, Sq. de Meeus, B-1049 Brussels (Belgium); Journeau, C. [CEA, DEN, Cadarache, F13108 St Paul lez Durance (France); Clement, B. [IRSN PSN-RES/SAG Cadarache, BP3 F13115, St Paul lez Durance (France); Weber, S. [GRS Muenchen, Thermal Hydraulics Div., Garching 85748,Germany (Germany); Guentay, S. [PSI NES/LTH OHSA C11, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Hozer, Z. [AEKI Fuel Department, P.O. Box 49, Budapest H-1525 (Hungary); Herranz, L. [CIEMAT, Energy -Nuclear Fission Division, Complutense 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Schumm, A. [EDF - R and D, SINETICS, Avenue du General de Gaulle 1, Clamart 92140 (France); Oriolo, F. [Pisa University, Ing. Mecc. Nucl. Prod., Largo Lazarino 2, Pisa 56126 (Italy); Altstadt, E. [HZDR Structural Matls, Rossendorf, Postfach 51 01 19, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Krause, M. [AECL - Reactor Safety, Chalk River, Ontario, Canada K0J 1J0 (Canada); Fischer, M. [AREVA NP GMBH, Dept. PEPA-G, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Khabensky, V.B. [Alexandrov Institute of Technologies (NITI), Sosnovy Bor (Russian Federation); Bechta, S.V. [Kungliga Tekniska Hoegskolan (KTH), AlbaNova University Centre, Roslagstullsbacken 21, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Veshchunov, M.S. [Nuclear Safety Institute (IBRAE), Russian Academy of Sciences, 52 B. Tulskaya, Moscow 115191 (Russian Federation); Palagin, A.V. [KIT Campus Nord, Hermann-von-Helmholtz Pl. 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); and others

    2012-11-15

    temperature; (2) Reactor Core Degradation; a modelling project simulating the fuel rod degradation and loss of geometry from IBRAE, Moscow; (3) METCOR projects from NITI, St. Petersburg on the interaction of core melt with reactor vessel steel; (4) INVECOR project, NNE Kurchatov City, Kazakhstan; this is a large-scale facility to examine the vessel steel retention of 60 kg corium during the decay heat; and finally, (5) CORPHAD and PRECOS projects, NITI, St. Petersburg undertook a systematic examination of refractory ceramics relevant to in-vessel and ex-vessel coria, particularly examining poorly characterised, limited data or experimentally difficult systems.

  14. Code assessment and modelling for Design Basis Accident analysis of the European Sodium Fast Reactor design. Part II: Optimised core and representative transients analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazaro, A., E-mail: aulach@iqn.upv.es [JRC-IET European Commission, Westerduinweg 3, PO BOX 2, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Schikorr, M. [KIT, Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Mikityuk, K. [PSI, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Ammirabile, L. [JRC-IET European Commission, Westerduinweg 3, PO BOX 2, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Bandini, G. [ENEA, Via Martiri di Monte Sole 4, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Darmet, G.; Schmitt, D. [EDF, 1 Avenue du Général de Gaulle, 92141 Clamart (France); Dufour, Ph.; Tosello, A. [CEA, St. Paul lez Durance, 13108 Cadarache (France); Gallego, E.; Jimenez, G. [UPM, José Gutiérrez Abascal, 2, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Bubelis, E.; Ponomarev, A.; Kruessmann, R.; Struwe, D. [KIT, Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Stempniewicz, M. [NRG, Utrechtseweg 310, P.O. Box-9034, 6800 ES Arnhem (Netherlands)

    2014-10-01

    Highlights: • Benchmarked models have been applied for the analysis of DBA transients of the ESFR design. • Two system codes are able to simulate the behavior of the system beyond sodium boiling. • The optimization of the core design and its influence in the transients’ evolution is described. • The analysis has identified peak values and grace times for the protection system design. - Abstract: The new reactor concepts proposed in the Generation IV International Forum require the development and validation of computational tools able to assess their safety performance. In the first part of this paper the models of the ESFR design developed by several organisations in the framework of the CP-ESFR project were presented and their reliability validated via a benchmarking exercise. This second part of the paper includes the application of those tools for the analysis of design basis accident (DBC) scenarios of the reference design. Further, this paper also introduces the main features of the core optimisation process carried out within the project with the objective to enhance the core safety performance through the reduction of the positive coolant density reactivity effect. The influence of this optimised core design on the reactor safety performance during the previously analysed transients is also discussed. The conclusion provides an overview of the work performed by the partners involved in the project towards the development and enhancement of computational tools specifically tailored to the evaluation of the safety performance of the Generation IV innovative nuclear reactor designs.

  15. Accident source terms for pressurized water reactors with high-burnup cores calculated using MELCOR 1.8.5.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauntt, Randall O.; Powers, Dana Auburn; Ashbaugh, Scott G.; Leonard, Mark Thomas; Longmire, Pamela

    2010-04-01

    In this study, risk-significant pressurized-water reactor severe accident sequences are examined using MELCOR 1.8.5 to explore the range of fission product releases to the reactor containment building. Advances in the understanding of fission product release and transport behavior and severe accident progression are used to render best estimate analyses of selected accident sequences. Particular emphasis is placed on estimating the effects of high fuel burnup in contrast with low burnup on fission product releases to the containment. Supporting this emphasis, recent data available on fission product release from high-burnup (HBU) fuel from the French VERCOR project are used in this study. The results of these analyses are treated as samples from a population of accident sequences in order to employ approximate order statistics characterization of the results. These trends and tendencies are then compared to the NUREG-1465 alternative source term prescription used today for regulatory applications. In general, greater differences are observed between the state-of-the-art calculations for either HBU or low-burnup (LBU) fuel and the NUREG-1465 containment release fractions than exist between HBU and LBU release fractions. Current analyses suggest that retention of fission products within the vessel and the reactor coolant system (RCS) are greater than contemplated in the NUREG-1465 prescription, and that, overall, release fractions to the containment are therefore lower across the board in the present analyses than suggested in NUREG-1465. The decreased volatility of Cs2MoO4 compared to CsI or CsOH increases the predicted RCS retention of cesium, and as a result, cesium and iodine do not follow identical behaviors with respect to distribution among vessel, RCS, and containment. With respect to the regulatory alternative source term, greater differences are observed between the NUREG-1465 prescription and both HBU and LBU predictions than exist between HBU and LBU

  16. Severe Accident Simulation of the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto Espinosa-Paredes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA simulation in the boiling water reactor (BWR of Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant (LVNPP at 105% of rated power is analyzed in this work. The LVNPP model was developed using RELAP/SCDAPSIM code. The lack of cooling water after the LOCA gets to the LVNPP to melting of the core that exceeds the design basis of the nuclear power plant (NPP sufficiently to cause failure of structures, materials, and systems that are needed to ensure proper cooling of the reactor core by normal means. Faced with a severe accident, the first response is to maintain the reactor core cooling by any means available, but in order to carry out such an attempt is necessary to understand fully the progression of core damage, since such action has effects that may be decisive in accident progression. The simulation considers a LOCA in the recirculation loop of the reactor with and without cooling water injection. During the progression of core damage, we analyze the cooling water injection at different times and the results show that there are significant differences in the level of core damage and hydrogen production, among other variables analyzed such as maximum surface temperature, fission products released, and debris bed height.

  17. Severe accident progression perspectives for Mark I containments based on the IPE results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, C.C.; Lehner, J.R.; Pratt, W.T. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Drouin, M. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, N. Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Based on level 2 analyses in IPE (Individual Plant Examination) submittals accident progression, perspectives were obtained for all containment types. These perspectives consisted of insights on containment failure modes, releases therein, and factors responsible for the results. To illustrate the types of perspectives acquired on severe accident progresssion, insights obtained for (BWR) Mark I containments are discussed here. Mark I containments have high strength but small volumes and rely on pressure suppression pools to condense steam released from the reactor coolant system during an accident. Accidents causing structural failure of the drywell shortly after the core debris melts through the reactor vessel were found to be dominant contributors to risk. Importance of individual containment failure mechanisms depends on plant features and in some cases on modeling assumptions; however the following mechanisms were found important: drywell shell melt-through caused by direct contact with core debris and drywell failure caused by rapid pressure/temperature pulses at time of vessel melt-through. Drywell failure caused by gradual pressure/temperature buildup due to gases and steam released during core/concrete interactions is important in some IPEs. In other IPEs vent was an important contributor. However, accidents that bypass containment (eg interfacing systems LOCA)or involve containment isolation failure were not important contributors to the CDF in any of the IPEs for Mark I plants. These accidents are also not important to risk (even though they can involve large fission product release) because their frequencies of occurrence are so much lower than frequencies of early structural failure caused by other accidents that dominate the CDF.

  18. Precursors to potential severe core damage accidents: 1992, A status report. Volume 17, Main report and Appendix A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, D.F.; Cletcher, J.W.; Copinger, D.A.; Cross-Dial, A.E.; Morris, R.H.; Vanden Heuvel, L.N. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Dolan, B.W.; Jansen, J.M.; Minarick, J.W. [Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lau, W.; Salyer, W.D. [Reliability and Performance Associates (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Twenty-seven operational events with conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage of 1.0 {times} 10E-06 or higher occurring at commercial light-water reactors during 1992 are considered to be precursors to potential core damage. These are described along with associated significance estimates, categorization, and subsequent analyses. The report discusses (1) the general rationale for this study, (2) the selection and documentation of events as precursors, (3) the estimation and use of conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage to rank precursor events, and (4) the plant models used in the analysis process.

  19. Safety against releases in severe accidents. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindholm, I.; Berg, Oe.; Nonboel, E. [eds.

    1997-12-01

    The work scope of the RAK-2 project has involved research on quantification of the effects of selected severe accident phenomena for Nordic nuclear power plants, development and testing of a computerised accident management support system and data collection and description of various mobile reactors and of different reactor types existing in the UK. The investigations of severe accident phenomena focused mainly on in-vessel melt progression, covering a numerical assessment of coolability of a degraded BWR core, the possibility and consequences of a BWR reactor to become critical during reflooding and the core melt behavior in the reactor vessel lower plenum. Simulant experiments were carried out to investigate lower head hole ablation induced by debris discharge. In addition to the in-vessel phenomena, a limited study on containment response to high pressure melt ejection in a BWR and a comparative study on fission product source term behaviour in a Swedish PWR were performed. An existing computerised accident management support system (CAMS) was further developed in the area of tracking and predictive simulation, signal validation, state identification and user interface. The first version of a probabilistic safety analysis module was developed and implemented in the system. CAMS was tested in practice with Barsebaeck data in a safety exercise with the Swedish nuclear authority. The descriptions of the key features of British reactor types, AGR, Magnox, FBR and PWR were published as data reports. Separate reports were issued also on accidents in nuclear ships and on description of key features of satellite reactors. The collected data were implemented in a common Nordic database. (au) 39 refs.

  20. Melt layer statistic of two firn cores recently drilled at Dye3 and South dome in the dry snow zone of Southern Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitag, Johannes; Kipfstsuhl, Sepp; Hoerz, Sebastian; Eling, Lukas; Vinther, Bo; Popp, Trevor

    2014-05-01

    In the last couple of years remote sensing data have shown large areas of wet snow in the Southern part of the Greenland ice sheet. These melt features are attributed to the overall warming trend. Persistent warming implies changes in the firn layer as well. Even in areas of the dry snow zone one can observe sporadically a few ice lenses within the firn column indicating refrozen meltwater from warm events in the past. In our contribution we want to close the gap between investigations of firn cores drilled in the 70's and the observational record of remote sensing data over the last decade in South Greenland. The focus lies on firn of the dry snow zone which is sensitive against changes in a warming atmosphere and cold enough to prevent a longway percolation path of meltwater to several firn layers. To this end we had drilled two 45m-long firn cores at the former drilling sites of DYE3 (65°11'N, 43°49'W) and South Dome (SD) (63°32'N, 44°34'W) during a aircraft-supported field campaign 2012. The retrieved 3inch-firn core segments of 1m length are measured by a X-ray-scanning routine with the means of the core-scale AWI-ICE-CT. The 2d-density fields are calculated and allow to distinguish between refreezing meltwater and compacted firn. The depth-scales are converted to time-scales by using DEP (dielectric profiling) and (in case of DYE3) discrete sampled d18O measurements. Number density of melt layers and relative amount of melt show an synchronized behavior with an general increase over the last 30 years. Local maxima are observed in both sites at around 6-9m and 25m at DYE3 and 5-8m, 22m and 40m at SD.

  1. Rehabilitation of the living environment in Belarus territories affected by the Chernobyl accident: the Core programme; Rehabilitation des conditions de vie dans les territoires de Bielorussie affectes par l'accident de Tchernobyl: le programme CORE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trafimchik, Z. [Cooperation pour la Rehabilitation des Conditions de Vie dans les Territoires Contamines par la Catastrophe de Tchernobyl (Russian Federation)

    2008-07-15

    The paper is a description of the CORE Programme that is testing since 2003 in the Republic of Belarus for the duration of 5 years an innovative approach of rehabilitation of the living conditions after the Chernobyl catastrophe based on the involvement of the affected population. The background information on the Chernobyl catastrophe consequences in the Republic of Belarus is presented. The paper contains the description of the CORE organizational structures, application in practice of the participatory approach, the Programme achievements and perspectives. (author)

  2. Simulation of heat and mass transfer processes in molten core debris-concrete systems. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felde, D K

    1979-01-01

    The heat and mass transport phenomena taking place in volumetrically-heated fluids have become of interest in recent years due to their significance in assessments of fast reactor safety and post-accident heat removal (PAHR). Following a hypothetical core disruptive accident (HCDA), the core and reactor internals may melt down. The core debis melting through the reactor vessel and guard vessel may eventually contact the concrete of the reactor cell floor. The interaction of the core debris with the concrete as well as the melting of the debris pool into the concrete will significantly affect efforts to prevent breaching of the containment and the resultant release of radioactive effluents to the environment.

  3. Global risk of radioactive fallout after nuclear reactor accidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkel, D.; Lelieveld, J.; Lawrence, M. G.

    2012-04-01

    Reactor core meltdowns of nuclear power plants are rare, yet the consequences are catastrophic. But what is meant by "rare"? And what can be learned from the Chernobyl and Fukushima incidents? Here we assess the risk of exposure to radioactivity due to atmospheric dispersion of gases and particles following severe nuclear accidents, using particulate 137Cs and gaseous 131I as proxies for the fallout. It appears that previously the occurrence of major accidents and the risks of radioactive contamination have been underestimated. Using a global model of the atmosphere we compute that on average, in the event of a core melt of any nuclear power plant worldwide, more than 90 % of emitted 137Cs would be transported beyond 50 km and about 50 % beyond 1000 km distance. This corroborates that such accidents have large-scale and trans-boundary impacts. Although the emission strengths and atmospheric removal processes of 137Cs and 131I are quite different, the radioactive contamination patterns over land and the human deposition exposure are computed to be similar. High human exposure risks occur around reactors in densely populated regions, notably in southern Asia where a core melt can subject 55 million people to radioactive contamination. The recent decision by Germany to phase out its nuclear reactors will reduce the national risk, though a large risk will still remain from the reactors in neighbouring countries.

  4. Hot-melt co-extrusion for the production of fixed-dose combination products with a controlled release ethylcellulose matrix core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vynckier, A-K; Dierickx, L; Saerens, L; Voorspoels, J; Gonnissen, Y; De Beer, T; Vervaet, C; Remon, J P

    2014-04-10

    In this study, hot-melt co-extrusion was evaluated as a technique for the production of fixed-dose combination products, using ethylcellulose as a core matrix former to control the release of metoprolol tartrate and a polyethylene oxide-based coat formulation to obtain immediate release of hydrochlorothiazide. By lowering the concentration of the hydrophilic additive polyethylene oxide in the plasticized ethylcellulose matrix or by lowering the drug load, the in vitro metoprolol tartrate release from the core was substantially sustained. The in vitro release of hydrochlorothiazide from the polyethylene oxide/polyethylene glycol coat was completed within 45 min for all formulations. Tensile testing of the core/coat mini-matrices revealed an adequate adhesion between the two layers. Raman mapping showed no migration of active substances. Solid state characterization indicated that the crystalline state of metoprolol tartrate was not affected by thermal processing via hot-melt extrusion, while hydrochlorothiazide was amorphous in the coat. These solid state characteristics were confirmed during the stability study. Considering the bioavailability of metoprolol tartrate after oral administration to dogs, the different co-extruded formulations offered a range of sustained release characteristics. Moreover, high metoprolol tartrate plasma concentrations were reached in dogs allowing the administered dose to be halved.

  5. Post-facta Analyses of Fukushima Accident and Lessons Learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanabe, Fumiya [Sociotechnical Systems Safety Research Institute, Ichige (Japan)

    2014-08-15

    Independent analyses have been performed of the core melt behavior of the Unit 1, Unit 2 and Unit 3 reactors of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station on 11-15 March 2011. The analyses are based on a phenomenological methodology with measured data investigation and a simple physical model calculation. Estimated are time variation of core water level, core material temperature and hydrogen generation rate. The analyses have revealed characteristics of accident process of each reactor. In the case of Unit 2 reactor, the calculated result suggests little hydrogen generation because of no steam generation in the core for zirconium-steam reaction during fuel damage process. It could be the reason of no hydrogen explosion in the Unit 2 reactor building. Analyses have been performed also on the core material behavior in another chaotic period of 19-31 March 2011, and it resulted in a re-melt hypothesis that core material in each reactor should have melted again due to shortage of cooling water. The hypothesis is consistent with many observed features of radioactive materials dispersion into the environment.

  6. Modeling and analysis framework for core damage propagation during flow-blockage-initiated accidents in the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Navarro-Valenti, S.; Georgevich, V.

    1995-09-01

    This paper describes modeling and analysis to evaluate the extent of core damage during flow blockage events in the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor planned to be built at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Damage propagation is postulated to occur from thermal conduction between damaged and undamaged plates due to direct thermal contact. Such direct thermal contact may occur because of fuel plate swelling during fission product vapor release or plate buckling. Complex phenomena of damage propagation were modeled using a one-dimensional heat transfer model. A scoping study was conducted to learn what parameters are important for core damage propagation, and to obtain initial estimates of core melt mass for addressing recriticality and steam explosion events. The study included investigating the effects of the plate contact area, the convective heat transfer coefficient, thermal conductivity upon fuel swelling, and the initial temperature of the plate being contacted by the damaged plate. Also, the side support plates were modeled to account for their effects on damage propagation. The results provide useful insights into how various uncertain parameters affect damage propagation.

  7. A Basic Study on the Ejection of ICI Nozzle under Severe Accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jong Rae; Bae, Ji Hoon; Bang, Kwang Hyun [Korea Maritime and Ocean University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jong Woong [Dongguk University, Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Nozzle injection should be blocked because it affect to the environment if its melting core exposes outside. The purpose of this study is to carry out the thermos mechanical analysis due to debris relocation under severe accidents and to predict the nozzle ejection calculated considering the contact between the nozzle and lower head, and the supports of pipe cables. As a result of analyzing process of severe accidents, there was melting reaction between nozzle and the lower head. In this situation, we might predict the non-uniform contact region of nozzle hole of lower head and nozzle outside, delaying ejection of nozzles. But after melting, the average remaining length of the nozzle was 120mm and the maximum vertical displacement of lower nozzle near the weld is 3.3mm so there would be no nozzle this model, because the cable supports restrains the vertical displacement of nozzle.

  8. Precursors to potential severe core damage accidents: 1994, a status report. Volume 21: Main report and appendices A--H

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belles, R.J.; Cletcher, J.W.; Copinger, D.A.; Vanden Heuvel, L.N. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Dolan, B.W.; Minarick, J.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)]|[Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1995-12-01

    Nine operational events that affected eleven commercial light-water reactors (LWRs) during 1994 and that are considered to be precursors to potential severe core damage are described. All these events had conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage greater than or equal to 1.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}6}. These events were identified by computer-screening the 1994 licensee event reports from commercial LWRs to identify those that could be potential precursors. Candidate precursors were then selected and evaluated in a process similar to that used in previous assessments. Selected events underwent engineering evaluation that identified, analyzed, and documented the precursors. Other events designated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) also underwent a similar evaluation. Finally, documented precursors were submitted for review by licensees and NRC headquarters and regional offices to ensure that the plant design and its response to the precursor were correctly characterized. This study is a continuation of earlier work, which evaluated 1969--1981 and 1984--1993 events. The report discusses the general rationale for this study, the selection and documentation of events as precursors, and the estimation of conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage for events. This document is bound in two volumes: Vol. 21 contains the main report and Appendices A--H; Vol. 22 contains Appendix 1.

  9. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit 1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events during mid-loop operations, Appendices A--D. Volume 2, Part 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, T.L.; Musicki, Z.; Kohut, P. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [and others

    1994-06-01

    During 1989, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to carefully examine the Potential risks during low Power and shutdown operations. The program includes two parallel projects being performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the Plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The objective of this report is to document the approach utilized in the Surry plant and discuss the results obtained. A parallel report for the Grand Gulf plant is prepared by SNL. This study shows that the core-damage frequency during mid-loop operation at the Surry plant is comparable to that of power operation. We recognize that there is very large uncertainty in the human error probabilities in this study. This study identified that only a few procedures are available for mitigating accidents that may occur during shutdown. Procedures written specifically for shutdown accidents would be useful. This document, Volume 2, Pt. 2 provides appendices A through D of this report.

  10. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit 1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events during mid-loop operations, Appendices E (Sections E.1--E.8). Volume 2, Part 3A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, T.L.; Musicki, Z.; Kohut, P. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [and others

    1994-06-01

    During 1989, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to carefully examine the potential risks during low power and shutdown operations. The program includes two parallel projects being performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The objective of this report is to document the approach utilized in the Surry plant and discuss the results obtained. A parallel report for the Grand Gulf plant is prepared by SNL. This study shows that the core-damage frequency during mid-loop operation at the Surry plant is comparable to that of power operation. The authors recognize that there is very large uncertainty in the human error probabilities in this study. This study identified that only a few procedures are available for mitigating accidents that may occur during shutdown. Procedures written specifically for shutdown accidents would be useful.

  11. High-pressure melting experiments on Fe-Si alloys and implications for silicon as a light element in the core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Haruka; Hirose, Kei; Yonemitsu, Kyoko; Ohishi, Yasuo

    2016-12-01

    We carried out melting experiments on Fe-Si alloys to 127 GPa in a laser-heated diamond-anvil cell (DAC). On the basis of textural and chemical characterizations of samples recovered from a DAC, a change in eutectic liquid composition in the Fe-FeSi binary system was examined with increasing pressure. The chemical compositions of coexisting liquid and solid phases were quantitatively determined with field-emission-type electron microprobes. The results demonstrate that silicon content in the eutectic liquid decreases with increasing pressure to less than 1.5 ± 0.1 wt.% Si at 127 GPa. If silicon is a single light element in the core, 4.5 to 12 wt.% Si is required in the outer core in order to account for its density deficit from pure iron. However, such a liquid core, whose composition is on the Si-rich side of the eutectic point, crystallizes less dense solid, CsCl (B2)-type phase at the inner core boundary (ICB). Our data also show that the difference in silicon concentration between coexisting solid and liquid is too small to account for the observed density contrast across the ICB. These indicate that silicon cannot be the sole light element in the core. Previous geochemical and cosmochemical arguments, however, strongly require ∼6 wt.% Si in the core. It is possible that the Earth's core originally included ∼6 wt.% Si but then became depleted in silicon by crystallizing SiO2 or MgSiO3.

  12. Using high-resolution tritium profiles to quantify the effects of melt on two Spitsbergen ice cores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wel, L.G. van der; Streurman, H.J.; Isaksson, E.; Helsen, M.M.; Wal, R.S.W. van de; Martma, T.; Pohjola, V.A.; Moore, J.C.; Meijer, H.A.J.

    2011-01-01

    Ice cores from small ice caps provide valuable climatic information, additional to that of Greenland and Antarctica. However, their integrity is usually compromised by summer meltwater percolation. To determine to what extent this can affect such ice cores, we performed high-resolution tritium measu

  13. Using high-resolution tritium profiles to quantify the effects of melt on two Spitsbergen ice cores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wel, L.G. van der; Streurman, H.J.; Isaksson, E.; Helsen, M.M.; Wal, R.S.W. van de; Martma, T.; Pohjola, V.A.; Moore, J.C.; Meijer, H.A.J.

    2011-01-01

    Ice cores from small ice caps provide valuable climatic information, additional to that of Greenland and Antarctica. However, their integrity is usually compromised by summer meltwater percolation. To determine to what extent this can affect such ice cores, we performed high-resolution tritium measu

  14. Using high-resolution tritium profiles to quantify the effects of melt on two Spitsbergen ice cores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wel, L.G. van der; Streurman, H.J.; Isaksson, E.; Helsen, M.M.; Wal, R.S.W. van de; Martma, T.; Pohjola, V.A.; Moore, J.C.; Meijer, H.A.J.

    2011-01-01

    Ice cores from small ice caps provide valuable climatic information, additional to that of Greenland and Antarctica. However, their integrity is usually compromised by summer meltwater percolation. To determine to what extent this can affect such ice cores, we performed high-resolution tritium

  15. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit-1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events during mid-loop operations. Appendix I, Volume 2, Part 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, T.L.; Musicki, Z.; Kohut, P.; Yang, J.; Bozoki, G.; Hsu, C.J.; Diamond, D.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Bley, D.; Johnson, D. [PLG Inc., Newport Beach, CA (United States); Holmes, B. [AEA Technology, Dorset (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1994-06-01

    Traditionally, probabilistic risk assessments (PRA) of severe accidents in nuclear power plants have considered initiating events potentially occurring only during full power operation. Some previous screening analyses that were performed for other modes of operation suggested that risks during those modes were small relative to full power operation. However, more recent studies and operational experience have implied that accidents during low power and shutdown could be significant contributors to risk. During 1989, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to carefully examine the potential risks during low power and shutdown operations. The program includes two parallel projects being performed by Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL) and Sandia National Labs. (SNL). Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The objective of this volume of the report is to document the approach utilized in the level-1 internal events PRA for the Surry plant, and discuss the results obtained. A phased approach was used in the level-1 program. In phase 1, which was completed in Fall 1991, a coarse screening analysis examining accidents initiated by internal events (including internal fire and flood) was performed for all plant operational states (POSs). The objective of the phase 1 study was to identify potential vulnerable plant configurations, to characterize (on a high, medium, or low basis) the potential core damage accident scenarios, and to provide a foundation for a detailed phase 2 analysis.

  16. The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident final report of the AESJ investigation committee

    CERN Document Server

    Atomic Energy Society of Japan

    2015-01-01

    The Magnitude 9 Great East Japan Earthquake on March 11, 2011, followed by a massive tsunami struck  TEPCO’s Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station and triggered an unprecedented core melt/severe accident in Units 1 – 3. The radioactivity release led to the evacuation of local residents, many of whom still have not been able to return to their homes. As a group of nuclear experts, the Atomic Energy Society of Japan established the Investigation Committee on the Nuclear Accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station, to investigate and analyze the accident from scientific and technical perspectives for clarifying the underlying and fundamental causes, and to make recommendations. The results of the investigation by the AESJ Investigation Committee has been compiled herewith as the Final Report. Direct contributing factors of the catastrophic nuclear incident at Fukushima Daiichi NPP initiated by an unprecedented massive earthquake/ tsunami – inadequacies in tsunami measures, severe accident ma...

  17. Test Data for USEPR Severe Accident Code Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. L. Rempe

    2007-05-01

    This document identifies data that can be used for assessing various models embodied in severe accident analysis codes. Phenomena considered in this document, which were limited to those anticipated to be of interest in assessing severe accidents in the USEPR developed by AREVA, include: • Fuel Heatup and Melt Progression • Reactor Coolant System (RCS) Thermal Hydraulics • In-Vessel Molten Pool Formation and Heat Transfer • Fuel/Coolant Interactions during Relocation • Debris Heat Loads to the Vessel • Vessel Failure • Molten Core Concrete Interaction (MCCI) and Reactor Cavity Plug Failure • Melt Spreading and Coolability • Hydrogen Control Each section of this report discusses one phenomenon of interest to the USEPR. Within each section, an effort is made to describe the phenomenon and identify what data are available modeling it. As noted in this document, models in US accident analysis codes (MAAP, MELCOR, and SCDAP/RELAP5) differ. Where possible, this report identifies previous assessments that illustrate the impact of modeling differences on predicting various phenomena. Finally, recommendations regarding the status of data available for modeling USEPR severe accident phenomena are summarized.

  18. Influence of Modelling Options in RELAP5/SCDAPSIM and MAAP4 Computer Codes on Core Melt Progression and Reactor Pressure Vessel Integrity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siniša Šadek

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available RELAP5/SCDAPSIM and MAAP4 are two widely used severe accident computer codes for the integral analysis of the core and the reactor pressure vessel behaviour following the core degradation. The objective of the paper is the comparison of code results obtained by application of different modelling options and the evaluation of influence of thermal hydraulic behaviour of the plant on core damage progression. The analysed transient was postulated station blackout in NPP Krško with a leakage from reactor coolant pump seals. Two groups of calculations were performed where each group had a different break area and, thus, a different leakage rate. Analyses have shown that MAAP4 results were more sensitive to varying thermal hydraulic conditions in the primary system. User-defined parameters had to be carefully selected when the MAAP4 model was developed, in contrast to the RELAP5/SCDAPSIM model where those parameters did not have any significant impact on final results.

  19. Assessment of accident risks in the CRBRP. Volume 2. Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-03-01

    Appendices to Volume I include core-related accident-sequence definition, CRBRP risk-assessment sequence-probability determinations, failure-probability data, accident scenario evaluation, radioactive material release analysis, ex-core accident analysis, safety philosophy and design features, calculation of reactor accident consequences, sensitivity study, and risk from fires.

  20. Assessment of two BWR accident management strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodge, S.A.; Petek, M.

    1991-01-01

    Candidate mitigative strategies for management of in-vessel events during the late phase (after core degradation has occurred) of postulated BWR severe accidents were considered at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during 1990. The identification of new strategies was subject to the constraint that they should, to the maximum extent possible, make use of the existing equipment and water resources of the BWR facilities and not require major equipment modifications or additions. As a result of this effort, two of these candidate strategies were recommended for additional assessment. The first is a strategy for containment flooding to maintain the core and structural debris within the reactor vessel in the event that vessel injection cannot be restored to terminate a severe accident sequence. The second strategy pertains to the opposite case, for which vessel injection would be restored after control blade melting had begun; its purpose is to provide an injection source of borated water at the concentration necessary to preclude criticality upon recovering a damaged BWR core. Assessments of these two strategies have been performed during 1991 under the auspices of the Detailed Assessment of BWR In-Vessel Strategies Program. This paper provides a discussion of the motivation for and purpose of these strategies and the potential for their success. 33 refs., 9 figs.

  1. Instrument Fault Detection Sensitivity of an Empirical Model under Accident Condition in NPPs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Hwan; Hur, Seop; Cheon, Se Woo; Kim, Jung Taek [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    After the recent accident in Fukushima, Japan, it has been proven that we cannot obtain fully reliable information from instruments during severe accident conditions. Although the reactor core really melted down, the RV water level indicator showed a more optimistic value than the actual conditions. Accordingly, plant operators were under the misunderstanding that the core was not exposed. This caused confusion for the incident response. Therefore, it is necessary to be equipped with a function that informs operators of the status of the instrument integrity in real time. If plant operators verify that the instruments are working properly during accident conditions, they able to make safer decisions. In an effort to solve this problem, we considered an empirical model using a Process Equipment Monitoring (PEM) tool as a method of instrument diagnosis in a nuclear power plant.

  2. Review of the TMI-2 accident evaluation and vessel investigation projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladekarl Thomsen, Knud

    1998-03-01

    The results of the TMI-2 Accident Evaluation Programme and the Vessel Investigation Project have been reviewed as part of a literature study on core meltdown and in-vessel coolability. The emphasis is placed on the late phase melt progression, which is of special relevance to the NKS-sponsored RAK-2.1 project on Severe Accident Phenomenology. The body of the report comprises three main sections, The TMI-2 Accident Scenario, Core Region and Relocation Path Investigations, and Lower Head Investigations. In the final discussion, the lower head gap formation mechanism is explained in terms of thermal contraction and fracturing of the debris crust. This model seems more plausible than the MAAP model based on creep expansion of the lower head. (au) 1 tab., 33 ills., 31 refs.

  3. Simulation of reactivity accidents utilizing the IGR reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asmolov, V.G.; Tukhvatulin, Sh.T.; Cherepnin, Yu.S.

    1994-12-31

    The Impulse Graphite Reactor (IGR) is located on the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site - 50 km southwest of the town of Kurchatov (Semipalatinsk-21), Republic of Kazakhstan. The reactor has been in operation since January 8, 1961. One of the principal objectives of the IGR program has been to obtain direct experimental data on the behavior of fuel elements and reactor components under accident conditions. Measurements include determination of threshold destructive characteristics. These data are then used to develop and verify the computational models used to analyze accident consequences. The IGR has a cubical core assembled from uranium-loaded graphite blocks. The core is reflected with the same graphite blocks but without the uranium loading. The reactor has a negative temperature coefficient and is operated by a system of vertical control and safety rods. Two vertical chambers, one within the reactor core and one at the core-reflector interface, provide two channels to carry out experimental studies of materials and systems under accident conditions. The central channel can accommodate hardened capsules that allow melting and destruction of fuel assemblies. The IGR parameters are provided.

  4. A study of different cases of VVER reactor core flooding in a large break loss of coolant accident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bezrukov Yury Alekseevich

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper covers the results of VVER core reflooding studies in fuel assembly (FA mockup of 126 fuel rod simulators with axial power peaking. The experiments were performed for two types of flooding. The first type is top flooding of the empty (steamed FA mockup. The second type is bottom flooding of the FA mockup with level of boiling water. The test parameters are as follows: the range of the supplied power to the bundle is from 40 to 320 kW, the cooling water flow rate is from 0.04 to 1.1 kg/s, the maximum temperature of the fuel rod simulator is 800 °C and the linear heat flux is from 0.1 to 1.0 kW/m. The test results were used for computer code validation.

  5. Status of the MELTSPREAD-1 computer code for the analysis of transient spreading of core debris melts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, M.T.; Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W.; Chu, C.C.

    1992-01-01

    A transient, one dimensional, finite difference computer code (MELTSPREAD-1) has been developed to predict spreading behavior of high temperature melts flowing over concrete and/or steel surfaces submerged in water, or without the effects of water if the surface is initially dry. This paper provides a summary overview of models and correlations currently implemented in the code, code validation activities completed thus far, LWR spreading-related safety issues for which the code has been applied, and the status of documentation for the code.

  6. Status of the MELTSPREAD-1 computer code for the analysis of transient spreading of core debris melts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, M.T.; Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W.; Chu, C.C.

    1992-04-01

    A transient, one dimensional, finite difference computer code (MELTSPREAD-1) has been developed to predict spreading behavior of high temperature melts flowing over concrete and/or steel surfaces submerged in water, or without the effects of water if the surface is initially dry. This paper provides a summary overview of models and correlations currently implemented in the code, code validation activities completed thus far, LWR spreading-related safety issues for which the code has been applied, and the status of documentation for the code.

  7. Development of MAAP5.0.3 Spent Fuel Pool Model for Severe Accident Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Mi Ro [KHNP-CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    After the Fukushima accident, the severe accident phenomena in the Spent Fuel Pool (SFP) have been the great issues in the nuclear industry. Generally, during full power operation status, the decay heat of the spent fuel in the SFP is not high enough to cause the severe accident that is the say, the melting of fuel and fuel rack. In addition to this, the SFP of the PWR is not isolated within the containment like the SFP of the old BWR plant, there are so many possible measures to prevent and mitigate severe accidents in the SFP. On the other hand, in the low power shutdown status (fuel refueling), all the core is transferred into the SFP during the refueling period. At this period, if some accidents happen such as the loss of SFP cooling and the failure of SFP integrity then the accidents may be developed into severe accident because the decay heat is high enough. So, the analysis of severe accidents in the SFP during low power shutdown state is greatly affected to the establishment of the major strategies in the severe accident management guideline (SAMG). However, the status of the domestic technical background for those analyses is very weak. it is known that the decay heat of the spent fuel in the SFP is not high enough to cause the severe accident qualitatively. However, there are some possibilities that can cause the severe accidents in the SFP if the loss of SFP cooling and integrity happens simultaneously. The severe accident phenomena in SFP themselves are not much different from those in the containment. However, since the structure of SFP cannot be isolated during the accidents like the containment, the consequence can be extremely significant. So, in terms of the establishment of the severe accident management strategy, it is necessary that the quantitative analysis for the severe accident progression in the SFP should be performed. In this study, the general behavior which can be appeared during the severe accidents in the SFP was analyzed using the

  8. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit-1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events during mid-loop operations. Appendices F-H, Volume 2, Part 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, T.L.; Musicki, Z.; Kohut, P.; Yang, J.; Bozoki, G.; Hsu, C.J.; Diamond, D.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Bley, D.; Johnson, D. [PLG Inc., Newport Beach, CA (United States); Holmes, B. [AEA Technology, Dorset (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1994-06-01

    Traditionally, probabilistic risk assessments (PRA) of severe accidents in nuclear power plants have considered initiating events potentially occurring only during full power operation. Some previous screening analyses that were performed for other modes of operation suggested that risks during those modes were small relative to full power operation. However, more recent studies and operational experience have implied that accidents during low power and shutdown could be significant contributors to risk. Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The scope of the program includes that of a level-3 PRA. In phase 2, mid-loop operation was selected as the plant configuration to be analyzed based on the results of the phase 1 study. The objective of the phase 2 study is to perform a detailed analysis of the potential accident scenarios that may occur during mid-loop operation, and compare the results with those of NUREG-1150. The scope of the level-1 study includes plant damage state analysis, and uncertainty analysis. Volume 1 summarizes the results of the study. Internal events analysis is documented in Volume 2. It also contains an appendix that documents the part of the phase 1 study that has to do with POSs other than mid-loop operation. Internal fire and internal flood analyses are documented in Volumes 3 and 4. A separate study on seismic analysis, documented in Volume 5, was performed for the NRC by Future Resources Associates, Inc. Volume 6 documents the accident progression, source terms, and consequence analysis.

  9. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit 1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events during mid-loop operations. Appendix E (Sections E.9-E.16), Volume 2, Part 3B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, T.L.; Musicki, Z.; Kohut, P.; Yang, J.; Bozoki, G.; Hsu, C.J.; Diamond, D.J.; Wong, S.M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Bley, D.; Johnson, D. [PLG Inc., Newport Beach, CA (United States)] [and others

    1994-06-01

    Traditionally, probabilistic risk assessments (PRA) of severe accidents in nuclear power plants have considered initiating events potentially occurring only during full power operation. Some previous screening analyses that were performed for other modes of operation suggested that risks during those modes were small relative to full power operation. However, more recent studies and operational experience have implied that accidents during low power and shutdown could be significant contributors to risk. Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The scope of the program includes that of a level-3 PRA. In phase 2, mid-loop operation was selected as the plant configuration to be analyzed based on the results of the phase 1 study. The objective of the phase 2 study is to perform a detailed analysis of the potential accident scenarios that may occur during mid-loop operation, and compare the results with those of NUREG-1150. The scope of the level-1 study includes plant damage state analysis, and uncertainty analysis. Volume 1 summarizes the results of the study. Internal events analysis is documented in Volume 2. It also contains an appendix that documents the part of the phase 1 study that has to do with POSs other than mid-loop operation. Internal fire and internal flood analyses are documented in Volumes 3 and 4. A separate study on seismic analysis, documented in Volume 5, was performed for the NRC by Future Resources Associates, Inc. Volume 6 documents the accident progression, source terms, and consequence analysis.

  10. Transient refractory material dissolution by a volumetrically-heated melt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seiler, Jean Marie, E-mail: jean-marie.seiler@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DTN, 17 Rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Ratel, Gilles [CEA, DEN, DTN, 17 Rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Combeau, Hervé [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR 7198, Lorraine University, Ecole des Mines de Nancy, Parc de Saurupt, 54042 Nancy Cedex (France); Gaus-Liu, Xiaoyang; Kretzschmar, Frank; Miassoedov, Alexei [Karlsruhe Institut of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • We describe a test investigating ceramic dissolution by a molten non-eutectic melt. • The evolution of the interface temperature between melt and refractory is measured. • A theoretical model describing dissolution kinetics is proposed. • When dissolution stops, interface temperature is the liquidus temperature of the melt. - Abstract: The present work addresses the question of corium–ceramic interaction in a core catcher during a core-melt accident in a nuclear power plant. It provides an original insight into transient aspects concerning dissolution of refractory material by a volumetrically heated pool. An experiment with simulant material (LIVECERAM) is presented. Test results clearly show that dissolution of solid refractory material can occur in a non-eutectic melt at a temperature which is lower than the melting temperature of the refractory material. During the dissolution transient, the interface temperature rises above the liquidus temperature, corresponding to the instantaneous average composition of the melt pool. With constant power dissipation in the melt and external cooling of the core-catcher, a final steady-state situation is reached. Dissolution stops when the heat flux (delivered by the melt to the refractory) can be removed by conduction through the residual thickness of the ceramic, with T{sub interface} = T{sub liquidus} (calculated for the average composition of the final liquid pool). The final steady state corresponds to a uniform pool composition and uniform interface temperature distribution. Convection in the pool is governed by natural thermal convection and the heat flux distribution is therefore similar to what would be obtained for a single component pool. An interpretation of the experiment with two model-based approaches (0D and 1D) is presented. The mass transfer kinetics between the interface and the bulk is controlled by a diffusion sublayer within the boundary layer. During the dissolution transient

  11. The Fukushima accident; Accident nucleaire a Fukushima

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delbecq, D.

    2012-02-15

    The Fukushima accident is characterized by a sequence of natural disasters: earthquake and tsunamis that deprived simultaneously 3 reactors from cooling and electrical power for quite a long time. A series of hydrogen explosion has added to the mess. Experts agree to say that certainly nuclear fuel has melt to form corium in all 3 reactors. The accident has contaminated tens of thousand acres of land around the plant and has jeopardized local coastal fishery. The human toll is unexpectedly low: no direct casualty in the population but several suicides among the people that was forced to leave their home. 5 people from the plant staff died certainly from the consequences of the tsunami. (A.C.)

  12. Development of Sacrificial Material for the Eu-APR1400 Core Catcher

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Jung Soo; Kim, Mun Soo; Kim, Yong Soo [KHNP Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    To increase and diversify the export marker of the Korean nuclear reactor design, we developed the Eu- APR1400 reactor design based on the APR1400 reactor design, satisfying the European nuclear design requirements including the European Utility Requirements (EUR) and the Finnish requirements of YVL. As recommended by both requirements, the so called core-catcher molten core ex-vessel cooling facility was developed to manage a severe accident at the Eu-APR1400 reactor involving a core meltdown and to mitigate its consequences. Usually, sacrificial material (SM), which controls the melt properties and modifies melt conditions favorable to corium retention, can be employed to protect the core catcher body from the molten core and increase its cooling capability. The EPR reactor design (by Areva, France) core catcher consists of the initial corium retention space, the transportation channel and the wide spreading room for core melt cooling. The EPR used two kinds of SM to protect the initial core retention space from core melt and to spread the core melt across the wide spreading room using the different compositions. The VVER (Russia) ensures melt localization in a water-cooled vessel located directly beneath the reactor. SM is used to remove the thermal focusing effect by the layer inversion process between metallic and oxidic melts. The functional requirements for the SM determined for the present core catcher are (1) melting spreading improvement, (2) focusing effect prevention, (3) hydrogen explosion prevention, (4) FP (fission product) release decreasing, and (5) melt recriticality exclusion. The rest of the paper is organized as follows. The next section provides detailed descriptions of the composition of the present SM, which satisfies its functional requirements. Following this, the manufacturing process of the SM is presented

  13. Testing the ureilite projectile hypothesis for the El'gygytgyn impact: Determination of siderophile element abundances and Os isotope ratios in ICDP drill core samples and melt rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goderis, S.; Wittmann, A.; Zaiss, J.; Elburg, M.; Ravizza, G.; Vanhaecke, F.; Deutsch, A.; Claeys, P.

    2013-07-01

    The geochemical nature of the impactites from International Continental Scientific Drilling Project—El'gygytgyn lake drill core 1C is compared with that of impact melt rock fragments collected near the western rim of the structure and literature data. Concentrations of major and trace elements, with special focus on siderophile metals Cr, Co, Ni, and the platinum group elements, and isotope ratios of osmium (Os), were determined to test the hypothesis of an ureilite impactor at El'gygytgyn. Least squares mixing calculations suggest that the upper volcanic succession of rhyolites, dacites, and andesites were the main contributors to the polymict impact breccias. Additions of 2-13.5 vol% of basaltic inclusions recovered from drill core intervals between 391.6 and 423.0 mblf can almost entirely account for the compositional differences observed for the bottom of a reworked fallout deposit at 318.9 mblf, a polymict impact breccia at 471.4 mblf, and three impact melt rock fragments. However, the measured Os isotope ratios and slightly elevated PGE content (up to 0.262 ng g-1 Ir) of certain impactite samples, for which the CI-normalized logarithmic PGE signature displays a relatively flat (i.e., chondritic) pattern, can only be explained by the incorporation of a small meteoritic contribution. This component is also required to explain the exceptionally high siderophile element contents and corresponding Ni/Cr, Ni/Co, and Cr/Co ratios of impact glass spherules and spherule fragments that were recovered from the reworked fallout deposits and from terrace outcrops of the Enmyvaam River approximately 10 km southeast of the crater center. Mixing calculations support the presence of approximately 0.05 wt% and 0.50-18 wt% of ordinary chondrite (possibly type-LL) in several impactites and in the glassy spherules, respectively. The heterogeneous distribution of the meteoritic component provides clues for emplacement mechanisms of the various impactite units.

  14. CORE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krigslund, Jeppe; Hansen, Jonas; Hundebøll, Martin

    2013-01-01

    different flows. Instead of maintaining these approaches separate, we propose a protocol (CORE) that brings together these coding mechanisms. Our protocol uses random linear network coding (RLNC) for intra- session coding but allows nodes in the network to setup inter- session coding regions where flows...... intersect. Routes for unicast sessions are agnostic to other sessions and setup beforehand, CORE will then discover and exploit intersecting routes. Our approach allows the inter-session regions to leverage RLNC to compensate for losses or failures in the overhearing or transmitting process. Thus, we...... increase the benefits of XORing by exploiting the underlying RLNC structure of individual flows. This goes beyond providing additional reliability to each individual session and beyond exploiting coding opportunistically. Our numerical results show that CORE outperforms both forwarding and COPE...

  15. CORE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krigslund, Jeppe; Hansen, Jonas; Hundebøll, Martin

    2013-01-01

    different flows. Instead of maintaining these approaches separate, we propose a protocol (CORE) that brings together these coding mechanisms. Our protocol uses random linear network coding (RLNC) for intra- session coding but allows nodes in the network to setup inter- session coding regions where flows...... intersect. Routes for unicast sessions are agnostic to other sessions and setup beforehand, CORE will then discover and exploit intersecting routes. Our approach allows the inter-session regions to leverage RLNC to compensate for losses or failures in the overhearing or transmitting process. Thus, we...... increase the benefits of XORing by exploiting the underlying RLNC structure of individual flows. This goes beyond providing additional reliability to each individual session and beyond exploiting coding opportunistically. Our numerical results show that CORE outperforms both forwarding and COPE...

  16. Bicycle accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, M G; Wollin, S

    1986-01-01

    Information concerning 520 bicycle accidents and their victims was obtained from medical records and the victims' replies to questionnaires. The analyzed aspects included risk of injury, completeness of accident registrations by police and in hospitals, types of injuries and influence of the cyclists' age and sex, alcohol, fatigue, hunger, haste, physical disability, purpose of cycling, wearing of protective helmet and other clothing, type and quality of road surface, site of accident (road junctions, separate cycle paths, etc.) and turning manoeuvres.

  17. 中国百万千瓦级核电站严重事故下堆芯损伤评价%Core Damage Assessment for Chinese 1 000 MWe NPP Under Severe Accident Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏玮; 周志伟

    2011-01-01

    By simulation analysis with the integral severe accident analysis code MELCOR1.8.5, the applicability of the Westinghouse Owners Group Core Damage Assessment Guidance (CDAG) to estimate the status and extent of the core damage in the early phase of the accident for a typical Chinese 1 000 MWe NPP was investigated. The preliminary analysis results show that CDAG can reasonably evaluate the core damage status and extent for the 1 000 MWe NPP in a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) without mitigation measures. The insights gained from the present study are of significant values for further studing and validating the comprehensive assessment capability and applicability of the CDAG, and for advancing the establishment of the severe accident management guidelines (SAMGs) of existing plants in China.%应用-体化严重事故分析程序MELCORL 8.5进行模拟分析,研究了由西屋公司制定、经美国NRC(Nuclear Regulatory Commission)认证的"堆芯损伤评价导则(CDAG )"应用于中国百万千瓦级核电站在严重事故初期评价堆芯损伤状态和程度的有效性.初步分析结果表明,CDAG可较好地评价百万千瓦级核电站无缓解措施的冷却剂丧失事故(LOCA)堆芯损伤状况和损伤程度,对进-步研究和验证CDAG的综合评价能力和适用性、推进现有核电厂建立严重事故管理导则具有重要的参考价值.

  18. SAMPSON Parallel Computation for Sensitivity Analysis of TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, M.; Bautista Gomez, L.; Maruyama, N.; Naitoh, M.; Matsuoka, S.; Cappello, F.

    2014-06-01

    On March 11th 2011 a high magnitude earthquake and consequent tsunami struck the east coast of Japan, resulting in a nuclear accident unprecedented in time and extents. After scram started at all power stations affected by the earthquake, diesel generators began operation as designed until tsunami waves reached the power plants located on the east coast. This had a catastrophic impact on the availability of plant safety systems at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi, leading to the condition of station black-out from unit 1 to 3. In this article the accident scenario is studied with the SAMPSON code. SAMPSON is a severe accident computer code composed of hierarchical modules to account for the diverse physics involved in the various phases of the accident evolution. A preliminary parallelization analysis of the code was performed using state-of-the-art tools and we demonstrate how this work can be beneficial to the nuclear safety analysis. This paper shows that inter-module parallelization can reduce the time to solution by more than 20%. Furthermore, the parallel code was applied to a sensitivity study for the alternative water injection into TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi unit 3. Results show that the core melting progression is extremely sensitive to the amount and timing of water injection, resulting in a high probability of partial core melting for unit 3.

  19. Physicochemical processes taking place in the reactor core under severe accident conditions. Procesos fisicoquimicos que tienen lugar en el Nucleo de un reactor en conditiones de accidente severo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esteban Hernandez, J.A.; Diaz Arocas, P.P.; Carrion Martin, J.G. (1-652-450 (Spain))

    1990-01-01

    Information is provided on UO[sup 2]-ZRY, ZRY steam and UO[sup 2] steam interactions. Performance of grid spacers. Integrated codes for analysis of accidents. Damage evolution of the Central module of the experiment LP-FP-2-Fission products generation. Physicochemical state of the fission products within oxide-type fuels. Solid radionuclide migration Behaviour of volatile fission products inside the fuel rods. Fission products release out of the fuel rods. Fission products behaviour under red and simulated accidents.

  20. CDF modeling of flow and transport processes in the reactor core of a modular high temperature reactor during an air ingress accident; CFD-Modellierung der Stroemungs- und Transportprozesse im Reaktorkern eines modularen Hochtemperaturreaktors waehrend eines Lufteinbruchstoerfalls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baggemann, Johannes

    2015-05-22

    Generation IV of reactor design is supposed to include inherent safety systems that allow accident management using passive processes (without external energy). The VTR (very high temperature reactor) is graphite moderated with helium cooling. The design concept assumes that in any operational situation the after heat is removed by thermal conduction and radiation. Air ingress is beyond-design accident assuming a leak in the primary circuit triggering oxygen reaction with the hot graphite that could damage the barriers for fission product release. Using 3D CFD (computational fluid dynamics) codes the air ingress scenario is simulated, the flow and transport processes in the reactor core are analyzed. For validation of the modeling heat transport processes were investigated in specific test facilities.

  1. Temperature of Earth's core constrained from melting of Fe and Fe0.9Ni0.1 at high pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Dongzhou; Jackson, Jennifer M.; Zhao, Jiyong; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Alp, E. Ercan; Hu, Michael Y.; Toellner, Thomas S.; Murphy, Caitlin A.; Prakapenka, Vitali B.

    2016-08-01

    The melting points of fcc- and hcp-structured Fe0.9Ni0.1 and Fe are measured up to 125 GPa using laser heated diamond anvil cells, synchrotron Mossbauer spectroscopy, and a recently developed fast temperature readout spectrometer. The onset of melting is detected by a characteristic drop in the time integrated synchrotron Mfissbauer signal which is sensitive to atomic motion. The thermal pressure experienced by the samples is constrained by X-ray diffraction measurements under high pressures and temperatures. The obtained best-fit melting curves of fcc-structured Fe and Fe0.9Ni0.1 fall within the wide region bounded by previous studies. We are able to derive the gamma-is an element of-1 triple point of Fe and the quasi triple point of Fe0.9Ni0.1 to be 110 ± 5 GPa, 3345 ± 120 K and 116 ± 5 GPa, 3260 ± 120 K, respectively. The measured melting temperatures of Fe at similar pressure are slightly higher than those of Fe0.9Ni0.1 while their one sigma uncertainties overlap. Using previously measured phonon density of states of hcp-Fe, we calculate melting curves of hcp-structured Fe and Fe0.9Ni0.1 using our (quasi) triple points as anchors. The extrapolated Fe0.9Ni0.1 melting curve provides an estimate for the upper bound of Earth's inner core-outer core boundary temperature of 5500 ± 200 K. The temperature within the liquid outer core is then approximated with an adiabatic model, which constrains the upper bound of the temperature at the core side of the core -mantle boundary to be 4000 ± 200 K. We discuss a potential melting point depression caused by light elements and the implications of the presented core -mantle boundary temperature bounds on phase relations in the lowermost part of the mantle.

  2. Material effects on multiphase phenomena in late phases of severe accidents of nuclear reactors; Effets des materiaux sur les phenomenes multiphasiques se produisant lors des phases avancees d'accident grave de reacteur nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seiler, J.M.; Froment, K

    2003-07-01

    This paper reviews and presents work carried out in the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) on the subject of nuclear severe accidents, i.e. those which are accompanied by melting of the nuclear core material. The emphasis is on the (crucial) thermodynamic and material behaviour of corium melts in the solidus-liquidus temperature interval, which is linked to the thermal hydraulic description. A global model approach is proposed. The work is presented in the context of the overall international effort in the area. (authors)

  3. COMSORS: A light water reactor chemical core catcher

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Parker, G.W.; Rudolph, J.C.; Osborne-Lee, I.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Chemical Technology Div.; Kenton, M.A. [Creare Inc., Hanover, NH (United States)

    1997-02-24

    The Core-Melt Source Reduction System (COMSORS) is a new approach to terminate lightwater reactor (LWR) core-melt accidents and ensure containment integrity. A special dissolution glass made of lead oxide (PbO) and boron oxide (B{sub 2}O{sub 3}) is placed under the reactor vessel. If molten core debris is released onto the glass, the following sequence happens: (1) the glass absorbs decay heat as its temperature increases and the glass softens; (2) the core debris dissolves into the molten glass; (3) molten glass convective currents create a homogeneous high-level waste (HLW) glass; (4) the molten glass spreads into a wider pool, distributing the heat for removal by radiation to the reactor cavity above or transfer to water on top of the molten glass; and (5) the glass solidifies as increased surface cooling area and decreasing radioactive decay heat generation allows heat removal to exceed heat generation.

  4. Outline of the Desktop Severe Accident Graphic Simulator Module for OPR-1000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, S. Y.; Ahn, K. I. [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    occurring during accident including core heatup, cladding oxidation and hydrogen generation, core melt progression, vessel failure, fission product release, transport and deposition, and containment failure. Output results are displayed in user friendly graphical format by using text-based (numerical) output of MAAP program.. Window-based simulator of VMAAP is designed to provide graphical displays of the results during the transient simulation so that the users can easily follow the plant dynamics. Figure 1 through 4 show an example of VMAAP graphic display for the reactor coolant system, reactor vessel, containment building, and plotting of important parameters. VMAAP is able to simulate various scenarios very easily and quickly from the input deck of the scenario database of the SARDB. Since hundreds of input decks for severe core damage scenarios are available in SARDB, the simulation for a user-defined scenario can be performed very quickly by using a sub-module of VMAAP Input-editor which is a window-based MAAPspecific input deck generation program. VMAAP consists of following sub-modules: - System menu and tool bar - Project view - Event summary - Interactive control - Parameter help view - Input editor - Reactor vessel view - Reactor coolant system view - Containment building view The plant model used in VMAAP module is oriented to severe accident phenomena and thus it can simulate the in-vessel and ex-vessel behavior for a severe accident. Even though it may not be compatible with the desire to have a best-estimate analysis of an ongoing event, it can be a supporting or supplementary measure to understand the trends of accident progression.

  5. Severe accident analysis in a two-loop PWR nuclear power plant with the ASTEC code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadek, Sinisa; Amizic, Milan; Grgic, Davor [Zagreb Univ. (Croatia). Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computing

    2013-12-15

    The ASTEC/V2.0 computer code was used to simulate a hypothetical severe accident sequence in the nuclear power plant Krsko, a 2-loop pressurized water reactor (PWR) plant. ASTEC is an integral code jointly developed by Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN, France) and Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS, Germany) to assess nuclear power plant behaviour during a severe accident. The analysis was conducted in 2 steps. First, the steady state calculation was performed in order to confirm the applicability of the plant model and to obtain correct initial conditions for the accident analysis. The second step was the calculation of the station blackout accident with a leakage of the primary coolant through degraded reactor coolant pump seals, which was a small LOCA without makeup capability. Two scenarios were analyzed: one with and one without the auxiliary feedwater (AFW). The latter scenario, without the AFW, resulted in earlier core damage. In both cases, the accident ended with a core melt and a reactor pressure vessel failure with significant release of hydrogen. In addition, results of the ASTEC calculation were compared with results of the RELAP5/SCDAPSIM calculation for the same transient scenario. The results comparison showed a good agreement between predictions of those 2 codes. (orig.)

  6. Incorporation of severe accidents in the licensing of nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarenga, Marco Antonio Bayout; Rabello, Sidney Luiz, E-mail: bayout@cnen.gov.b, E-mail: sidney@cnen.gov.b [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN) Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Severe accidents are the result of multiple faults that occur in nuclear power plants as a consequence from the combination of latent failures and active faults, such as equipment, procedures and operator failures, which leads to partial or total melting of the reactor core. Regardless of active and latent failures related to the plant management and maintenance, aspects of the latent failures related to the plant design still remain. The lessons learned from the TMI accident in the U.S.A., Chernobyl in the former Soviet Union and, more recently, in Fukushima, Japan, suggest that severe accidents must necessarily be part of design-basis of nuclear power plants. This paper reviews the normative basis of the licensing of nuclear power plants concerning to severe accidents in countries having nuclear power plants under construction or in operation. It was addressed not only the new designs of nuclear power plants in the world, but also the design changes in plants that are in operation for decades. Included in this list are the Brazilian nuclear power plants, Angra-1, Angra-2, and Angra-3. This paper also reviews the current status of licensing in Brazil and Brazilian standards related to severe accidents. It also discusses the impact of severe accidents in the emergency plans of nuclear power plants. (author)

  7. Accident Statistics

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Accident statistics available on the Coast Guard’s website by state, year, and one variable to obtain tables and/or graphs. Data from reports has been loaded for...

  8. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Grand Gulf, Unit 1. Volume 5: Analysis of core damage frequency from seismic events for plant operational state 5 during a refueling outage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budnitz, R.J. [Future Resources Associates, Inc., Berkeley, CA (United States); Davis, P.R. [PRD Consulting (United States); Ravindra, M.K.; Tong, W.H. [EQE International, Inc., Irvine, CA (United States)

    1994-08-01

    In 1989 the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to examine carefully the potential risks during low-power and shutdown operations. The program included two parallel projects, one at Sandia National Laboratories studying a boiling water reactor (Grand Gulf), and the other at Brookhaven National Laboratory studying a pressurized water reactor (Surry Unit 1). Both the Sandia and Brookhaven projects have examined only accidents initiated by internal plant faults---so-called ``internal initiators.`` This project, which has explored the likelihood of seismic-initiated core damage accidents during refueling outage conditions, is complementary to the internal-initiator analyses at Brookhaven and Sandia. This report covers the seismic analysis at Grand Gulf. All of the many systems modeling assumptions, component non-seismic failure rates, and human effort rates that were used in the internal-initiator study at Grand Gulf have been adopted here, so that the results of the study can be as comparable as possible. Both the Sandia study and this study examine only one shutdown plant operating state (POS) at Grand Gulf, namely POS 5 representing cold shutdown during a refueling outage. This analysis has been limited to work analogous to a level-1 seismic PRA, in which estimates have been developed for the core-damage frequency from seismic events during POS 5. The results of the analysis are that the core-damage frequency for earthquake-initiated accidents during refueling outages in POS 5 is found to be quite low in absolute terms, less than 10{sup {minus}7}/year.

  9. Sports Accidents

    CERN Multimedia

    Kiebel

    1972-01-01

    Le Docteur Kiebel, chirurgien à Genève, est aussi un grand ami de sport et de temps en temps médecin des classes genevoises de ski et également médecin de l'équipe de hockey sur glace de Genève Servette. Il est bien qualifié pour nous parler d'accidents de sport et surtout d'accidents de ski.

  10. Models and correlations of the DEBRIS Late-Phase Melt Progression Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, R.C.; Gasser, R.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Reactor Safety Experiments Dept.

    1997-09-01

    The DEBRIS Late Phase Melt Progression Model is an assembly of models, embodied in a computer code, which is designed to treat late-phase melt progression in dry rubble (or debris) regions that can form as a consequence of a severe core uncover accident in a commercial light water nuclear reactor. The approach is fully two-dimensional, and incorporates a porous medium modeling framework together with conservation and constitutive relationships to simulate the time-dependent evolution of such regions as various physical processes act upon the materials. The objective of the code is to accurately model these processes so that the late-phase melt progression that would occur in different hypothetical severe nuclear reactor accidents can be better understood and characterized. In this report the models and correlations incorporated and used within the current version of DEBRIS are described. These include the global conservation equations solved, heat transfer and fission heating models, melting and refreezing models (including material interactions), liquid and solid relocation models, gas flow and pressure field models, and the temperature and compositionally dependent material properties employed. The specific models described here have been used in the experiment design analysis of the Phebus FPT-4 debris-bed fission-product release experiment. An earlier DEBRIS code version was used to analyze the MP-1 and MP-2 late-phase melt progression experiments conducted at Sandia National Laboratories for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

  11. The SAM software system for modeling severe accidents at nuclear power plants equipped with VVER reactors on full-scale and analytic training simulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osadchaya, D. Yu.; Fuks, R. L.

    2014-04-01

    The architecture of the SAM software package intended for modeling beyond-design-basis accidents at nuclear power plants equipped with VVER reactors evolving into a severe stage with core melting and failure of the reactor pressure vessel is presented. By using the SAM software package it is possible to perform comprehensive modeling of the entire emergency process from the failure initiating event to the stage of severe accident involving meltdown of nuclear fuel, failure of the reactor pressure vessel, and escape of corium onto the concrete basement or into the corium catcher with retention of molten products in it.

  12. Failure Assessment Methodologies for Pressure-Retaining Components under Severe Accident Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Arndt

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available During postulated high-pressure core melt accident scenarios, temperature values of more than 800°C can be reached in the reactor coolant line and the surge line of a pressurised water reactor (PWR, before the bottom of the reactor pressure vessel experiences a significant temperature increase due to core melting. For the assessment of components of the primary cooling circuit, two methods are used by GRS. One is the simplified method ASTOR (approximated structural time of rupture. This method employs the hypothesis of linear damage accumulation for modeling damage progression. A failure time surface which is generated by structural finite element (FE analysis of varying pressure and temperature loads serves as a basis for estimations of failure times. The second method is to perform thermohydraulic and structure mechanic calculations for the accident scenario under consideration using complex calculation models. The paper shortly describes both assessment procedures. Validation of the ASTOR method concerning a large-scale test on a pipe section with geometric properties similar to a reactor coolant line is presented as well as severe accident scenarios investigated with both methods.

  13. Investigation of a hydrogen mitigation system during large break loss-of-coolant accident for a two-loop pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dehjourian, Mehdi; Rahgoshay, Mohmmad; Jahanfamia, Gholamreza [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sayareh, Reza [Faculty of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Kerman Graduate University of Technology, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shirani, Amir Saied [Faculty of Engineering, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Hydrogen release during severe accidents poses a serious threat to containment integrity. Mitigating procedures are necessary to prevent global or local explosions, especially in large steel shell containments. The management of hydrogen safety and prevention of over-pressurization could be implemented through a hydrogen reduction system and spray system. During the course of the hypothetical large break loss-of-coolant accident in a nuclear power plant, hydrogen is generated by a reaction between steam and the fuel-cladding inside the reactor pressure vessel and also core concrete interaction after ejection of melt into the cavity. The MELCOR 1.8.6 was used to assess core degradation and containment behavior during the large break loss-of-coolant accident without the actuation of the safety injection system except for accumulators in Beznau nuclear power plant. Also, hydrogen distribution in containment and performance of hydrogen reduction system were investigated.

  14. Comparison of the accident process, radioactivity release and ground contamination between Chernobyl and Fukushima-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imanaka, Tetsuji; Hayashi, Gohei; Endo, Satoru

    2015-12-01

    In this report, we have reviewed the basic features of the accident processes and radioactivity releases that occurred in the Chernobyl accident (1986) and in the Fukushima-1 accident (2011). The Chernobyl accident was a power-surge accident that was caused by a failure of control of a fission chain reaction, which instantaneously destroyed the reactor and building, whereas the Fukushima-1 accident was a loss-of-coolant accident in which the reactor cores of three units were melted by decay heat after losing the electricity supply. Although the quantity of radioactive noble gases released from Fukushima-1 exceeded the amount released from Chernobyl, the size of land area severely contaminated by (137)Cesium ((137)Cs) was 10 times smaller around Fukushima-1 compared with around Chernobyl. The differences in the accident process are reflected in the composition of the discharged radioactivity as well as in the composition of the ground contamination. Volatile radionuclides (such as (132)Te-(132)I, (131)I, (134)Cs and (137)Cs) contributed to the gamma-ray exposure from the ground contamination around Fukishima-1, whereas a greater variety of radionuclides contributed significantly around Chernobyl. When radioactivity deposition occurred, the radiation exposure rate near Chernobyl is estimated to have been 770 μGy h(-1) per initial (137)Cs deposition of 1000 kBq m(-2), whereas it was 100 μGy h(-1) around Fukushima-1. Estimates of the cumulative exposure for 30 years are 970 and 570 mGy per initial deposition of 1000 kBq m(-2) for Chernobyl and Fukusima-1, respectively. Of these exposures, 49 and 98% were contributed by radiocesiums ((134)Cs + (137)Cs) around Chernobyl and Fukushima-1, respectively. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  15. Comparison of the accident process, radioactivity release and ground contamination between Chernobyl and Fukushima-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imanaka, Tetsuji; Hayashi, Gohei; Endo, Satoru

    2015-01-01

    In this report, we have reviewed the basic features of the accident processes and radioactivity releases that occurred in the Chernobyl accident (1986) and in the Fukushima-1 accident (2011). The Chernobyl accident was a power-surge accident that was caused by a failure of control of a fission chain reaction, which instantaneously destroyed the reactor and building, whereas the Fukushima-1 accident was a loss-of-coolant accident in which the reactor cores of three units were melted by decay heat after losing the electricity supply. Although the quantity of radioactive noble gases released from Fukushima-1 exceeded the amount released from Chernobyl, the size of land area severely contaminated by 137Cesium (137Cs) was 10 times smaller around Fukushima-1 compared with around Chernobyl. The differences in the accident process are reflected in the composition of the discharged radioactivity as well as in the composition of the ground contamination. Volatile radionuclides (such as 132Te-132I, 131I, 134Cs and 137Cs) contributed to the gamma-ray exposure from the ground contamination around Fukishima-1, whereas a greater variety of radionuclides contributed significantly around Chernobyl. When radioactivity deposition occurred, the radiation exposure rate near Chernobyl is estimated to have been 770 μGy h−1 per initial 137Cs deposition of 1000 kBq m−2, whereas it was 100 μGy h−1 around Fukushima-1. Estimates of the cumulative exposure for 30 years are 970 and 570 mGy per initial deposition of 1000 kBq m−2 for Chernobyl and Fukusima-1, respectively. Of these exposures, 49 and 98% were contributed by radiocesiums (134Cs + 137Cs) around Chernobyl and Fukushima-1, respectively. PMID:26568603

  16. Precursors to potential severe core damage accidents: 1992, a status report; Volume 18: Appendices B, C, D, E, F, and G

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-01

    This document is part of a report which documents 1992 operational events selected as accident sequence precursors. This report describes the 27 precursors identified from the 1992 licensee event reports. It also describe containment-related events; {open_quote}interesting{close_quote} events; potentially significant events that were considered impractical to analyze; copies of the licensee event reports which were cited in the cases above; and comments from the licensee and NRC in response to the preliminary reports.

  17. Validation and application of the system code ATHLET-CD for BWR severe accident analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Marcello, Valentino, E-mail: valentino.marcello@kit.edu; Imke, Uwe; Sanchez, Victor

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • We present the application of the system code ATHLET-CD code for BWR safety analyses. • Validation of core in-vessel models is performed based on KIT CORA experiments. • A SB-LOCA scenario is simulated on a generic German BWR plant up to vessel failure. • Different core reflooding possibilities are investigated to mitigate the accident consequences. • ATHLET-CD modelling features reflect the current state of the art of severe accident codes. - Abstract: This paper is aimed at the validation and application of the system code ATHLET-CD for the simulation of severe accident phenomena in Boiling Water Reactors (BWR). The corresponding models for core degradation behaviour e.g., oxidation, melting and relocation of core structural components are validated against experimental data available from the CORA-16 and -17 bundle tests. Model weaknesses are discussed along with needs for further code improvements. With the validated ATHLET-CD code, calculations are performed to assess the code capabilities for the prediction of in-vessel late phase core behaviour and reflooding of damaged fuel rods. For this purpose, a small break LOCA scenario for a generic German BWR with postulated multiple failures of the safety systems was selected. In the analysis, accident management measures represented by cold water injection into the damaged reactor core are addressed to investigate the efficacy in avoiding or delaying the failure of the reactor pressure vessel. Results show that ATHLET-CD is applicable to the description of BWR plant behaviour with reliable physical models and numerical methods adopted for the description of key in-vessel phenomena.

  18. Oxidation effect on steel corrosion and thermal loads during corium melt in-vessel retention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granovsky, V.S.; Khabensky, V.B.; Krushinov, E.V.; Vitol, S.A.; Sulatsky, A.A.; Almjashev, V.I. [Alexandrov Scientific-Research Technology Institute (NITI), Sosnovy Bor (Russian Federation); Bechta, S.V. [KTH, Stockholm (Sweden); Gusarov, V.V. [SPb State Technology University (SPbGTU), St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Barrachin, M. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), St Paul lez Durance (France); Bottomley, P.D., E-mail: paul.bottomley@ec.europa.eu [EC-Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU), Karlsruhe (Germany); Fischer, M. [AREVA GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Piluso, P. [Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives (CEA), Cadarache, St Paul lez Durance (France)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • The METCOR facility simulates vessel steel corrosion in contact with corium. • Steel corrosion rates in UO{sub 2+x}–ZrO{sub 2}–FeO{sub y} coria accelerate above 1050 K. • However corrosion rates can also be limited by melt O{sub 2} supply. • The impact of this on in-vessel retention (IVR) strategy is discussed. - Abstract: During a severe accident with core meltdown, the in-vessel molten core retention is challenged by the vessel steel ablation due to thermal and physicochemical interaction of melt with steel. In accidents with oxidizing atmosphere above the melt surface, a low melting point UO{sub 2+x}–ZrO{sub 2}–FeO{sub y} corium pool can form. In this case ablation of the RPV steel interacting with the molten corium is a corrosion process. Experiments carried out within the International Scientific and Technology Center's (ISTC) METCOR Project have shown that the corrosion rate can vary and depends on both surface temperature of the RPV steel and oxygen potential of the melt. If the oxygen potential is low, the corrosion rate is controlled by the solid phase diffusion of Fe ions in the corrosion layer. At high oxygen potential and steel surface layer temperature of 1050 °C and higher, the corrosion rate intensifies because of corrosion layer liquefaction and liquid phase diffusion of Fe ions. The paper analyzes conditions under which corrosion intensification occurs and can impact on in-vessel melt retention (IVR)

  19. Quantification of the ex-vessel severe accident risks for the Swedish boiling water reactors. A scoping study performed for the APRI project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okkonen, T.; Dinh, T.N.; Bui, V.A.; Sehgal, B.R. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Energy Systems Technology

    1995-07-01

    Results of a scoping study to quantify the ex-vessel severe accident risks for the Swedish BWRs are reported. The study considers that a pool of water is established in the containment prior to vessel failure, as prescribed by the accident management scheme for the newer Swedish BWRs. The integrated methodology developed and employed combines probabilistic and deterministic treatment of the various melt-structure-water interaction processes occurring in sequence. The potential steam explosion, and the melt attack on the containment basemat, are treated with enveloping analyses. Uncertain parameters in the models and the initial conditions are treated with Monte Carlo simulations. Independent models are developed for melt coolability and possible attack on the concrete basemat. It is found that, with current models, the melt discharge scenarios, in which a large amount of accumulated melt may be released from the vessel, could subject the containment to large steam explosion loads. However, the uncertainties are so large that no definite conclusion can be drawn. The assessment of ex-vessel core debris coolability is disturbed by similar phenomenological uncertainties. Presently, coolability of the core debris can not be demonstrated. 133 refs.

  20. Accident: Reminder

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    There is no left turn to Point 1 from the customs, direction CERN. A terrible accident happened last week on the Route de Meyrin just outside Entrance B because traffic regulations were not respected. You are reminded that when travelling from the customs, direction CERN, turning left to Point 1 is forbidden. Access to Point 1 from the customs is only via entering CERN, going down to the roundabout and coming back up to the traffic lights at Entrance B

  1. Effect of emergency core cooling system flow reduction on channel temperature during recirculation phase of large break loss-of-coolant accident at Wolsong unit 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seon Oh Yu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The feasibility of cooling in a pressurized heavy water reactor after a large break loss-of-coolant accident has been analyzed using Multidimensional Analysis of Reactor Safety-KINS Standard code during the recirculation phase. Through evaluation of sensitivity of the fuel channel temperature to various effective recirculation flow areas, it is determined that proper cooling of the fuel channels in the broken loop is feasible if the effective flow area remains above approximately 70% of the nominal flow area. When the flow area is reduced by more than approximately 25% of the nominal value, however, incipience of boiling is expected, after which the thermal integrity of the fuel channel can be threatened. In addition, if a dramatic reduction of the recirculation flow occurs, excursions and frequent fluctuations of temperature in the fuel channels are likely to be unavoidable, and thus damage to the fuel channels would be anticipated. To resolve this, emergency coolant supply through the newly installed external injection path can be used as one alternative means of cooling, enabling fuel channel integrity to be maintained and permanently preventing severe accident conditions. Thus, the external injection flow required to guarantee fuel channel coolability has been estimated.

  2. Use of decision trees for evaluating severe accident management strategies in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jae, Moosung [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Nuclerar Engineering; Lee, Yongjin; Jerng, Dong Wook [Chung-Ang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). School of Energy Systems Engineering

    2016-07-15

    Accident management strategies are defined to innovative actions taken by plant operators to prevent core damage or to maintain the sound containment integrity. Such actions minimize the chance of offsite radioactive substance leaks that lead to and intensify core damage under power plant accident conditions. Accident management extends the concept of Defense in Depth against core meltdown accidents. In pressurized water reactors, emergency operating procedures are performed to extend the core cooling time. The effectiveness of Severe Accident Management Guidance (SAMG) became an important issue. Severe accident management strategies are evaluated with a methodology utilizing the decision tree technique.

  3. Key Characteristics of Combined Accident including TLOFW accident for PSA Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bo Gyung; Kang, Hyun Gook [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Ho Joon [Khalifa University of Science, Technology and Research, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates)

    2015-05-15

    The conventional PSA techniques cannot adequately evaluate all events. The conventional PSA models usually focus on single internal events such as DBAs, the external hazards such as fire, seismic. However, the Fukushima accident of Japan in 2011 reveals that very rare event is necessary to be considered in the PSA model to prevent the radioactive release to environment caused by poor treatment based on lack of the information, and to improve the emergency operation procedure. Especially, the results from PSA can be used to decision making for regulators. Moreover, designers can consider the weakness of plant safety based on the quantified results and understand accident sequence based on human actions and system availability. This study is for PSA modeling of combined accidents including total loss of feedwater (TLOFW) accident. The TLOFW accident is a representative accident involving the failure of cooling through secondary side. If the amount of heat transfer is not enough due to the failure of secondary side, the heat will be accumulated to the primary side by continuous core decay heat. Transients with loss of feedwater include total loss of feedwater accident, loss of condenser vacuum accident, and closure of all MSIVs. When residual heat removal by the secondary side is terminated, the safety injection into the RCS with direct primary depressurization would provide alternative heat removal. This operation is called feed and bleed (F and B) operation. Combined accidents including TLOFW accident are very rare event and partially considered in conventional PSA model. Since the necessity of F and B operation is related to plant conditions, the PSA modeling for combined accidents including TLOFW accident is necessary to identify the design and operational vulnerabilities.The PSA is significant to assess the risk of NPPs, and to identify the design and operational vulnerabilities. Even though the combined accident is very rare event, the consequence of combined

  4. A defense in depth approach for nuclear power plant accident management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chih-Yao Hsieh; Hwai-Pwu Chou [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, TW (China)

    2015-07-01

    An initiating event may lead to a severe accident if the plant safety functions have been challenged or operators do not follow the appropriate accident management procedures. Beyond design basis accidents are those corresponding to events of very low occurrence probability but such an accident may lead to significant consequences. The defense in depth approach is important to assure nuclear safety even in a severe accident. Plant Damage States (PDS) can be defined by the combination of the possible values for each of the PDS parameters which are showed on the nuclear power plant simulator. PDS is used to identify what the initiating event is, and can also give the information of safety system's status whether they are bypassed, inoperable or not. Initiating event and safety system's status are used in the construction of Containment Event Tree (CET) to determine containment failure modes by using probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) technique. Different initiating events will correspond to different CETs. With these CETs, the core melt frequency of an initiating event can be found. The use of Plant Damage States (PDS) is a symptom-oriented approach. On the other hand, the use of Containment Event Tree (CET) is an event-oriented approach. In this study, the Taiwan's fourth nuclear power plants, the Lungmen nuclear power station (LNPS), which is an advanced boiling water reactor (ABWR) with fully digitized instrumentation and control (I and C) system is chosen as the target plant. The LNPS full scope engineering simulator is used to generate the testing data for method development. The following common initiating events are considered in this study: loss of coolant accidents (LOCA), total loss of feedwater (TLOFW), loss of offsite power (LOOP), station blackout (SBO). Studies have indicated that the combination of the symptom-oriented approach and the event-oriented approach can be helpful to find mitigation strategies and is useful for the accident

  5. Control Rod Ejection Accident while Using 6- and 8-Tube IRT-4M Fuel Assemblies in WWR-SM Research Reactor Core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baytelesov, S.; Kungurov, F.; Safarov, A.; Salikhbaev, U.

    2011-07-01

    The WWR-SM reactor at the Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Academy of Sciences (INP AS) in Uzbekistan was converted to 6-tube IRT-4M LEU (19.7%) fuel in 2009. Presently, INP intends to also use IRT-4M 8-tube FA, and a safety analysis for these 'mixed' (8-tube and 6-tube FA) cores is required by the regulatory authorities. This paper presents results of control rod ejection transient analysis for these mixed cores

  6. Numerical simulation of radioisotope's dependency on containment performance for large dry PWR containment under severe accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehboob, Khurram, E-mail: khurramhrbeu@gmail.com [College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Harbin Engineering University, 145-31 Nantong Street, Nangang District, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150001 (China); Xinrong, Cao [College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Harbin Engineering University, 145-31 Nantong Street, Nangang District, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150001 (China); Ahmed, Raheel [College of Automation, Harbin Engineering University, 145-31 Nantong Street, Nangang District, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150001 (China); Ali, Majid [College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Harbin Engineering University, 145-31 Nantong Street, Nangang District, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150001 (China)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • Calculation and comparison of activity of BURN-UP code with ORIGEN2 code. • Development of SASTC computer code. • Radioisotopes dependency on containment ESFs. • Mitigation in atmospheric release with ESFs operation. • Variation in radioisotopes source term with spray flow and pH value. -- Abstract: During the core melt accidents large amount of fission products can be released into the containment building. These fission products escape into the environment to contribute in accident source term. The mitigation in environmental release is demanded for such radiological consequences. Thus, countermeasures to source term, mitigations of release of radioactivity have been studied for 1000 MWe PWR reactor. The procedure of study is divided into five steps: (1) calculation and verification of core inventory, evaluated by BURN-UP code, (2) containment modeling based on radioactivity removal factors, (3) selection of potential accidents initiates the severe accident, (4) calculation of release of radioactivity, (5) study the dependency of release of radioactivity on containment engineering safety features (ESFs) inducing mitigation. Loss of coolant accident (LOCA), small break LOCA and flow blockage accidents (FBA) are selected as initiating accidents. The mitigation effect of ESFs on source term has been studied against ESFs performance. Parametric study of release of radioactivity has been carried out by modeling and simulating the containment parameters in MATLAB, which takes BURN-UP outcomes as input along with the probabilistic data. The dependency of iodine and aerosol source term on boric and caustic acid spray has been determined. The variation in source term mitigation with the variation of containment spray flow rate and pH values have been studied. The variation in containment retention factor (CRF) has also been studied with the ESF performance. A rapid decrease in source term is observed with the increase in pH value.

  7. Late-phase melt progression experiment: MP-2. Results and analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasser, R.D.; Gauntt, R.O.; Bourcier, S.C. [and others

    1997-05-01

    In-pile experiments addressing late-phase processes in Light Water Reactors (LWRs) were performed in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) at Sandia National Laboratories. Melt Progression (MP) experiments were designed to provide information to develop and verify computer models for analysis of LWR core damage in severe accidents. Experiments examine the formation and motion of ceramic molten pools in disrupted reactor core regions. The MP-2 experiment assembly consisted of: (1) a rubble bed of enriched UO{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2} simulating severely disrupted reactor core regions, (2) a ceramic/metallic crust representing blockage formed by early phase melting, relocation, and refreezing of core components, and (3) an intact rod stub region that remained in place below the blockage region. The test assembly was fission heated in the central cavity of the ACRR at an average rate of about 0.2 KA, reaching a peak molten pool temperature around 3400 K. Melting of the debris bed ceramic components was initiated near the center of the bed. The molten material relocated downward, refreezing to form a ceramic crust near the bottom of the rubble bed. As power levels were increased, the crust gradually remelted and reformed at progressively lower positions in the bed until late in the experiment when it penetrated into and attacked the ceramic/metallic blockage. The metallic components of the blockage region melted and relocated to the bottom of the intact rod stub region before the ceramic melt penetrated the blockage region from above. The ceramic pool penetrated halfway into the blockage region by the end of the experiment. Measurements of thermal response and material relocation are compared to the results of the computer simulations. Postexperiment examination of the assembly with the associated material interactions and metallurgy are also discussed in detail with the analyses and interpretation of results. 16 refs., 206 figs., 24 tabs.

  8. Experiments on silver-indium-cadmium control rod failure during severe accident sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinbrueck, M.; Stegmaier, U. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2010-05-15

    Silver-indium-cadmium (SIC) alloy is used as neutron absorber material in control rods (CR) of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR). It is the material with the lowest melting temperature (approx. 1100 K) among all metallic and ceramic materials applied in nuclear reactors. During a hypothetical severe accident the SIC melt is kept in its stainless steel (SS) cladding tube as long as this is intact. After failure of the cladding tube by eutectic interaction with the Zircaloy-4 (Zry-4) guide tube or latest by reaching the SS melting temperature SIC elements are released and may interact with other core components. Furthermore, Ag-In-Cd are one of the main contributors to aerosol release in the reactor cooling system and may strongly influence nature and transport of fission products in the primary circuit and later on in the containment. The bundle experiment QUENCH-13 with prototypical SIC control rod as well as two series of single-rod tests with 10-cm long CR segments were performed at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT, former FZK) in order to improve the data base on SIC CR degradation and aerosol release. This paper concentrates on the degradation and failure mechanisms of SIC CRs as well as on the interaction between SIC absorber melt with other core components. (orig.)

  9. Analysis of local subassembly accident in KALIMER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Young Min; Jeong, Kwan Seong; Hahn, Do Hee

    2000-10-01

    Subassembly Accidents (S-A) in the Liquid Metal Reactor (LMR) may cause extensive clad and fuel melting and are thus regarded as a potential whole core accident initiator. The possibility of S-A occurrence must be very low frequency by the design features, and reactor must have specific instrumentation to interrupt the S-A sequences by causing a reactor shutdown. The evaluation of the relevant initiators, the event sequences which follow them, and their detection are the essence of the safety issue. Particularly, the phenomena of flow blockage caused by foreign materials and/or the debris from the failed fuel pin have been researched world-widely. The foreign strategies for dealing with the S-A and the associated safety issues with experimental and theoretical R and D results are reviewed. This report aims at obtaining information to reasonably evaluate the thermal-hydraulic effect of S-A for a wire-wrapped LMR fuel pin bundle. The mechanism of blockage formation and growth within a pin bundle and at the subassembly entrance is reviewed in the phenomenological aspect. Knowledge about the recent LMR subassembly design and operation procedure to prevent flow blockage will be reflected for KALIMER design later. The blockage analysis method including computer codes and related analytical models are reviewed. Especially SABRE4 code is discussed in detail. Preliminary analyses of flow blockage within a 271-pin driver subassembly have been performed using the SABRE4 computer code. As a result no sodium boiling occurred for the central 24-subchannel blockage as well as 6-subchannel blockage.

  10. An Entry Point of the Emergency Response Robot for Management of Severe Accident of the Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jaiwan; Jeong, Kyungmin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    In this paper, from the view point of DID (defense-in depth), we discuss the entry point of the nuclear emergency response robot to cope with a nuclear disaster. A Japanese nuclear disaster preparedness robot system was developed, after the JCO criticality accident in 1999, to cope with INES (International Nuclear and Radiological Event Scale) Level 3 serious incidents. INES Level 3 means the loss of DID (defense-in-depth) functions. It also indicates that ESF (engineered safety features) and ECCS (emergency core cooling system) resources, which are used to prevent serious incidents from escalating to severe accidents (core melt-down), have been almost exhausted. In the unit 1 reactor accident of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, escalation from INES Level 1 (Out of Limiting Condition for Operation) to INES Level 5 (serious core melting-down) took less than two hours. Major facts are briefly described here in based on data gathered immediately after the tsunami over Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Ο 15:35 on March 11, 2nd tsunami arrived. - 15:37, SBO (station black out) Ο 15:42, Interprets as a SBO (INES Level 1) - Loss of DC power for Instrumentation (Unknown of reactor water level) Ο 16:36, Loss of ECCS function (INELS Level 5) (Entry into a BDBA status) The Moni ROBO-A robot of the Japan Nuclear Safety Technology Center (NUSTEC) was a nuclear disaster preparedness robot developed after the JCO criticality accident. It was the only robot that had been steadily maintained and was available at the time of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. However, it was not helpful in mitigating the accident because it is assumed to have arrived at J-Village after the accident had been escalated to INES Level 5 or higher. Based on the paper by S. Kawatsuma of JAEA and response data gathered immediately after the tsunami, it is estimated that the NUSTEC's Moni ROBO-A arrived at J-Village after the designed entry point for INES Level 3

  11. Evaluation of In-Vessel Corium Retention under a Severe Accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Rae-Joon; Kang, Kyung-Ho; Ha, Kwang-Soon; Kim, Jong-Tae; Koo, Kil-Mo; Cho, Young-Ro; Hong, Seong-Wan; Kim, Sang-Baik; Kim, Hee-Dong

    2008-02-15

    The current study on In-Vessel corium Retention and its application activities to the actual nuclear power plant have been reviewed and discussed in this study. Severe accident sequence which determines an initial condition of the IVR has been evaluated and late phase melt progression, heat transfer on the outer reactor vessel, and in-vessel corium cooling mechanism have been estimated in detail. During the high pressure sequence of the reactor coolant system, a natural circulation flow of the hot steam leads to a failure of the pressurizer surge line before the reactor vessel failure, which leads to a rapid decrease of the reactor coolant system pressure. The results of RASPLAV/MASCA study by OECD/NEA have shown that a melt stratification has occurred in the lower plenum of the reactor vessel. In particular, laver inversion has occurred, which is that a high density of the metal melt moves to the lower part of the oxidic melt layer. A method of heat transfer enhancement on the outer reactor vessel is an optimal design of the reactor vessel insulation for an increase of the natural circulation flow between the outer reactor vessel and the its insulation, and an increase of the critical Heat flux on the outer reactor vessel by using various method, such as Nono fluid, coated reactor vessel, and so on. An increase method of the in-vessel melt cooling is a development of the In-vessel core catcher and a decrease of focusing effect in the metal layer.

  12. Self-reported accidents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Katrine Meltofte; Andersen, Camilla Sloth

    2016-01-01

    The main idea behind the self-reporting of accidents is to ask people about their traffic accidents and gain knowledge on these accidents without relying on the official records kept by police and/or hospitals.......The main idea behind the self-reporting of accidents is to ask people about their traffic accidents and gain knowledge on these accidents without relying on the official records kept by police and/or hospitals....

  13. Fukushima accident study using MELCOR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Randall O Gauntt

    2013-01-01

    The accidents at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station stunned the world as the sequences played out over severals days and videos of hydrogen explosions were televised as they took place.The accidents all resulted in severe damage to the reactor cores and releases of radioactivity to the environment despite heroic measures had taken by the operating personnel.The following paper provides some background into the development of these accidents and their root causes,chief among them,the prolonged station blackout conditions that isolated the reactors from their ultimate heat sink — the ocean.The interpretations given in this paper are summarized from a recently completed report funded by the United States Department of Energy (USDOE).

  14. Fessenheim plant - Report on the complementary safety assessment of nuclear facilities in the light of the Fukushima accident; Fessenheim - Rapport d'evaluation complementaire de la surete des installations nucleaires au regard de l'accident de Fukushima

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-09-15

    This CSA (Complementary Safety Assessment) analyses the robustness of the Fessenheim plant to extreme situations such as those that led to the Fukushima accident and proposes a series of improvements. Robustness is the ability for the plant to withstand events beyond the level for which the plant was designed. Robustness is linked to safety margins but also to the situations leading to a sudden deterioration of the accident sequence. Safety is not only a matter of design or of engineered systems, it is also a matter of organization. So issues like EDF's crisis organization, the organization of radiation protection, and work organization via subcontracting are also taken into consideration. The creation of a nuclear rapid action force (FARN) is proposed: this will be a national emergency force made up of specialized teams equipped to intervene in less than 24 hours on a nuclear site hit by an accident. This report is divided into 8 main chapters: 1) features of the site, 2) earthquake risk, 3) flooding risk, 4) risks due to other extreme natural disasters, 5) the loss of electrical power supplies and of heat sink, 6) management of severe accidents (accidents with core melt), 7) task subcontracting policy, 8) synthesis and list of improvements. 4 following appendices review: EDF's crisis organization, the FARN, radiation protection organization and accidental event trees. (A.C.)

  15. Development of a parametric containment event tree model of a severe PWR accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okkonen, T. [OTO-Consulting Ay, Helsinki (Finland)

    1996-06-01

    The study supports the development project of STUK on `Living` PSA Level 2. The main work objective is to develop review tools for the Level 2 PSA studies underway at the utilities. The SPSA (STUK PSA) code is specifically designed for the purpose. In this work, SPSA is utilized as the Level 2 programming and calculation tool. A containment event tree (CET) model is built for analysis of severe accidents at the Loviisa pressurized water reactor (PWR) units. Parametric models of severe accident progression and fission product behaviour are developed and integrated in order to construct a compact and self-contained Level 2 PSA model. The model can be easily updated to include new research results, and so it facilitates the Living PSA concept on Level 2 as well. The analyses of the study are limited to severe accidents starting from full-power operation and leading to core melting at a low primary system pressure. Severe accident progression from five plant damage states (PDSs) is examined, however the integration with Level 1 is deferred to more definitive, integrated, safety assessments. (34 refs., 5 figs., 9 tabs.).

  16. The influence of the crust layer on RPV structural failure under severe accident condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Jianfeng, E-mail: jianfeng-mao@163.com [Institute of Process Equipment and Control Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310032 (China); Engineering Research Center of Process Equipment and Re-manufacturing, Ministry of Education (China); Li, Xiangqing [Institute of Process Equipment and Control Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310032 (China); Bao, Shiyi [Institute of Process Equipment and Control Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310032 (China); Engineering Research Center of Process Equipment and Re-manufacturing, Ministry of Education (China); Luo, Lijia [Institute of Process Equipment and Control Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310032 (China); Gao, Zengliang [Institute of Process Equipment and Control Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310032 (China); Engineering Research Center of Process Equipment and Re-manufacturing, Ministry of Education (China)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • The crust layer greatly affects the RPV structural behavior. • The RPV failure is investigated in depth under severe accident. • The creep and plastic damage mainly contribute to RPV failure. • An elastic core in RPV wall is essential for ensuring RPV integrity. • The multiaxial state of stress accelerates the total damage evolution. - Abstract: The so called ‘in-vessel retention (IVR)’ is regarded as a severe accident (SA) mitigation strategy, which is widely used in most of advanced nuclear power plants. The effectiveness of IVR strategy is to employ the external water flooding to cool the reactor pressure vessel (RPV). The RPV integrity has to be maintained within a required period during the IVR period. The degraded melting core is assumed to be arrested in the lower head (LH) to form the melting pool that is bounded by upper, side and lower crusts. Consequently, the existence of the crust layer greatly affects the RPV structural behavior as well as failure process. In order to disclose this influence caused by the crust layer, a detailed investigation is conducted by using numerical simulation on the two RPVs with and without crust layer respectively. Taking the RPV without crust layer as a basis for the comparison, the present study assesses the likelihood and potential failure location, time and mode of the LH under the loadings of the critical heat flux (CHF) and slight internal pressure. Due to the high temperature melt on the inside and nucleate boiling on the outside, the RPV integrity is found to be compromised by melt-through, creep, elasticity, plasticity as well as thermal expansion. Through in-depth investigation, it is found that the creep and plasticity are of vital importance to the final structural failure, and the introduction of crust layer results in a significant change on field parameters in terms of temperature, deformation, stress(strain), triaxiality factor and total damage.

  17. Post test calculations of a severe accident experiment for VVER-440 reactors by the ATHLET code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gyoergy, Hunor [Budapest Univ. of Technology and Economics (Hungary). Inst. of Nuclear Techniques (BME NTI); Trosztel, Istvan [Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest (Hungary). Centre for Energy Research (MTA EK)

    2013-09-15

    Severe accident - if no mitigation action is taken - leads to core melt. An effective severe accident management strategy can be the external reactor pressure vessel cooling for corium localization and stabilization. For some time discussion was going on, whether the in-vessel retention can be applied for the VVER-440 type reactors. It had to be demonstrated that the available space between the reactor vessel and biological protection allows sufficient cooling to keep the melted core in the vessel, without the reactor pressure vessel losing its integrity. In order to demonstrate the feasibility of the concept an experimental facility was realized in Hungary. The facility called Cooling Effectiveness on the Reactor External Surface (CERES) is modeling the vessel external surface and the biological protection of Paks NPP. A model of the CERES facility for the ATHLET TH system code was developed. The results of the ATHLET calculation agree well with the measurements showing that the vessel cooling can be insured for a long time in a VVER-440 reactor. (orig.)

  18. Analysis of a hypothetical loss of coolant accident in a Konvoi type NPP by GASFLOW and COCOSYS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benz, Stefan; Royl, Peter [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Band, Sebastian [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit mbH (GRS), Koeln (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    The 3D computational fluid dynamics code GASFLOW and the German containment code system COCOSYS, which is based on a lumped-parameter approach, are used to simulate the hydrogen-air-steam distribution and hydrogen mitigation in a Konvoi type nuclear power plant in a postulated hypothetical core melt accident. A break in a coolant loop and the subsequent loss of the coolant causes a strong heat-up of the core. As a consequence hydrogen is produced by oxidation of cladding tubes. The residual steam and the produced hydrogen are released into the containment through the break in the coolant loop. Without suitable counter measures, sensitive mixtures can build up with a combustion potential which could threaten the integrity of the containment. A model of a Konvoi type nuclear power plant which is equipped with passive autocatalytic recombiners is used to simulate such accident scenario. COCOSYS allows comprehensive simulation of all relevant processes of severe accidents, whereas GASFLOW is primarily designed to simulate the distribution of steam and hydrogen within the containment. This paper presents the comparison of GASFLOW and COCOSYS simulation results for the in-vessel phase of the selected accident. (orig.)

  19. Mitigative techniques and analysis of generic site conditions for ground-water contamination associated with severe accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shafer, J.M.; Oberlander, P.L.; Skaggs, R.L.

    1984-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of using ground-water contaminant mitigation techniques to control radionuclide migration following a severe commercial nuclear power reactor accident. The two types of severe commercial reactor accidents investigated are: (1) containment basemat penetration of core melt debris which slowly cools and leaches radionuclides to the subsurface environment, and (2) containment basemat penetration of sump water without full penetration of the core mass. Six generic hydrogeologic site classifications are developed from an evaluation of reported data pertaining to the hydrogeologic properties of all existing and proposed commercial reactor sites. One-dimensional radionuclide transport analyses are conducted on each of the individual reactor sites to determine the generic characteristics of a radionuclide discharge to an accessible environment. Ground-water contaminant mitigation techniques that may be suitable, depending on specific site and accident conditions, for severe power plant accidents are identified and evaluated. Feasible mitigative techniques and associated constraints on feasibility are determined for each of the six hydrogeologic site classifications. The first of three case studies is conducted on a site located on the Texas Gulf Coastal Plain. Mitigative strategies are evaluated for their impact on contaminant transport and results show that the techniques evaluated significantly increased ground-water travel times. 31 references, 118 figures, 62 tables.

  20. Sharp reduction in maximum fuel temperatures during loss of coolant accidents in a PBMR DPP-400 core, by means of optimised placement of neutron poisons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serfontein, Dawid E., E-mail: Dawid.Serfontein@nwu.ac.za

    2014-05-01

    In a preceding study, coupled neutronics and thermo-hydraulic simulations were performed with the VSOP-A diffusion code for the standard 9.6 wt% enriched 9 g uranium fuel spheres in the 400 MWth Pebble Bed Modular Reactor Demonstration Power Plant. The axial power profile peaked at about a third from the top of the fuel core and the radial profile peaked directly adjacent to the central graphite reflector. The maximum temperature during a Depressurised Loss of Coolant (DLOFC) incident was 1581.0 °C, which is close to the limit of 1600 °C above which the leakage of radioactive fission products through the TRISO coatings around the fuel kernels may become unacceptable. This may present licensing challenges and also limits the total power output of the reactor. In this article the results of an optimisation study of the axial and radial power profiles for this reactor are reported. The main aim was to minimise the maximum DLOFC temperature. Reducing the maximum equilibrium temperature during normal operation was a lesser aim. Minimising the maximum DLOFC temperature was achieved by placing an optimised distribution of {sup 10}B neutron poison in the central reflector. The standard power profiles are sub-optimal with respect to the passive leakage of decay heat during a DLOFC. Since the radial power profile peaks directly adjacent to the central reflector, the distance that the decay heat needs to be conducted toward the outside of the reactor and the ultimate heat sink is at a maximum. The sharp axial power profile peak means that most of the decay power is concentrated in a small part of the core volume, thereby sharply increasing the required outward heat flux in this hotspot region. Both these features sharply increase the maximum DLOFC temperatures in this hotspot. Therefore the axial distribution of the neutron poisons in the central reflector was optimised so as to push the equilibrium power density profile radially outward and to suppress the axial power peak

  1. Accident analyses in nuclear power plants following external initiating events and in the shutdown state. Final report; Unfallanalysen in Kernkraftwerken nach anlagenexternen ausloesenden Ereignissen und im Nichtleistungsbetrieb. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loeffler, Horst; Kowalik, Michael; Mildenberger, Oliver; Hage, Michael

    2016-06-15

    The work which is documented here provides the methodological basis for improvement of the state of knowledge for accident sequences after plant external initiating events and for accident sequences which begin in the shutdown state. The analyses have been done for a PWR and for a BWR reference plant. The work has been supported by the German federal ministry BMUB under the label 3612R01361. Top objectives of the work are: - Identify relevant event sequences in order to define characteristic initial and boundary conditions - Perform accident analysis of selected sequences - Evaluate the relevance of accident sequences in a qualitative way The accident analysis is performed with the code MELCOR 1.8.6. The applied input data set has been significantly improved compared to previous analyses. The event tree method which is established in PSA level 2 has been applied for creating a structure for a unified summarization and evaluation of the results from the accident analyses. The computer code EVNTRE has been applied for this purpose. In contrast to a PSA level 2, the branching probabilities of the event tree have not been determined with the usual accuracy, but they are given in an approximate way only. For the PWR, the analyses show a considerable protective effect of the containment also in the case of beyond design events. For the BWR, there is a rather high probability for containment failure under core melt impact, but nevertheless the release of radionuclides into the environment is very limited because of plant internal retention mechanisms. This report concludes with remarks about existing knowledge gaps and with regard to core melt sequences, and about possible improvements of the plant safety.

  2. Estimation of thermal loads on the VVER vessel under conditions of inversion of the stratified molten pool in a severe accident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loktionov, V. D.; Mukhtarov, E. S.

    2016-09-01

    Analysis of the thermal state of molten pools that can be formed on the vessel bottom of the VVER-600 medium-power reactor during a severe anticipated accident with melting of the core is represented. Two types of the molten pool of core materials, with the two-layer and inverse three-layer stratification, are considered. Thermal loads acting on the reactor vessel from the melt are estimated depending on its formation time. Features of the thermal state of the melt in the case of its inverse stratification are analyzed. It is shown that thermal loads on the reactor vessel exceed the critical heat flux (CHF) when forming the two-layer stratified molten pool 10 and 24 h after its shutdown, and the thermal load is close to the corresponding CHF or somewhat exceeds it in 72 h. In the case of the formation of the inverse structure of the melt, one can observe a decrease by more than 2.5 times (in comparison with the two-layer stratified structure) in the thermal load on the reactor vessel in the region of its contact with the upper layer of the steel melt. Analysis of results showed that maximum densities of heat flux to the reactor vessel from the bottom metallic layer with the melt inversion did not exceed corresponding CHFs 24 and 72 h after the reactor shutdown. Because the thermal load on the reactor vessel can be localized in the region of its bottom, where the CHF is relatively small, during the inverse stratification of the melt, there is a need to carry out further in-depth experimental and analytical investigations of conditions for formation of the stratified molten pool and to obtain corrected experimental CHFs for conditions and outlines of cooling the external surface of the VVER-600 vessel in a severe accident.

  3. Experimental investigation on melt coolability under bottom flooding with and without decay heat simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Nitendra [Homi Bhabha National Institute, Anushakti Nagar, Mumbai 400094, Maharashtra (India); Kulkarni, Parimal P. [Reactor Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085, Maharashtra (India); Nayak, Arun K., E-mail: arunths@barc.gov.in [Reactor Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085, Maharashtra (India)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • The effect of decay heat on melt coolability under bottom flooding was studied. • Decay heat of 0.5 MW/m{sup 3} was simulated. • A single simulant material with same mass and initial temperature was used. • Quenching of melt pool does not depend on decay heat. • Comparison of with and without decay heat experiments has been presented. - Abstract: Investigations on severe accident phenomena help us in understanding the realistic accidental phenomena for the assessment of associated risk. The societal impact of radiological leakage to the environment has demanded further robustness in the line of defence of nuclear safety. Thus, to ensure the cooling and stabilization of corium within reactor containment in case of severe accident scenarios, many new reactors have been envisaged with core catcher. In this regard, corium coolability still remains an unresolved issue in spite of several efforts being taken towards its understanding. After studying the various cooling strategies, it has been demonstrated that melt coolability using bottom flooding of water is one of the most efficient techniques so far. To study the effect of decay heat on melt pool coolability under bottom flooding condition, two experiments have been performed in this paper; one without the decay heat and the other with decay heat. The test section used for carrying out these experiments consisted of two parts viz. lower part for retaining the melt from furnace, water inlet and melt quenching, and upper part for steam expansion and its outlet. The total height of the test section was 1400 mm and was made of 33 mm thick carbon steel. Total six stainless steel nozzles of diameter 12 mm were used for injecting water at the bottom of the melt pool. The lower part was surrounded by 10 radiative heaters to simulate decay heat of 10 kW which corresponds to 0.5 MW/m{sup 3}. The experiments showed that quenching of about 25 l of melt at initial temperature of nearly 1200 °C took only a

  4. A model for the analysis of loss of decay heat removal during loss of coolant accident in MTR pool type research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bousbia-salah, Anis [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, Nucleari e della Produzione, Facolta di Ingegneria, Universita di Pisa, Via Diotisalvi, 2, 56126 Pisa (Italy)]. E-mail: b.salah@ing.unipi.it; Meftah, Brahim [Division Reacteur - Centre de Recherche Nucleaire Draria (CRND), BP 43 Sebala DRARIA - Algiers (Algeria); Hamidouche, Tewfik [Laboratoire des Analyses de Surete, Centre de Recherche Nucleaire d' Alger (CRNA), 02 Boulevard Frantz Fanon, B.P. 399, 16000 Algiers (Algeria)]. E-mail: thamidouche@comena-dz.org; Si-Ahmed, El Khider [Laboratoire des Ecoulements Polyhpasiques, Universite des Sciences et de la Technologie d' Alger, Algiers (Algeria)

    2006-03-15

    During a loss of coolant accident leading to total emptying of the reactor pool, the decay heat could be removed through air natural convection. However, under partial pool emptying the core is partially submerged and the coolant circulation inside the fuel element could no more be possible. Under such conditions, a core overheat takes place, and the thermal energy is essentially diffused from the core to its periphery by combined thermal radiation and conduction. In order to predict fuel element temperature evolution under such conditions a mathematical model is performed. The model is based on a 3D geometry and takes into account a variety of core configurations including fuel elements (standard and control), reflector elements and grid plates. The homogeneous flow model is used and the fluid conservation equations are solved using a semi-implicit finite difference method. Preliminary tests of the developed model were made by considering a series of hypothetical accidents. In the current framework a loss of decay heat removal accidents in the IAEA benchmark open pool MTR-type research reactor is considered. It is shown that in the case of a low core immersion height no water boiling is observed and the fuel surface temperature rise remains below the melting point of the aluminium cladding.

  5. Laser melting of uranium carbides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utton, C. A.; De Bruycker, F.; Boboridis, K.; Jardin, R.; Noel, H.; Guéneau, C.; Manara, D.

    2009-03-01

    In the context of the material research aimed at supporting the development of nuclear plants of the fourth Generation, renewed interest has recently arisen in carbide fuels. A profound understanding of the behaviour of nuclear materials in extreme conditions is of prime importance for the analysis of the operation limits of nuclear fuels, and prediction of possible nuclear reactor accidents. In this context, the main goal of the present paper is to demonstrate the feasibility of laser induced melting experiments on stoichiometric uranium carbides; UC, UC1.5 and UC2. Measurements were performed, at temperatures around 3000 K, under a few bars of inert gas in order to minimise vaporisation and oxidation effects, which may occur at these temperatures. Moreover, a recently developed investigation method has been employed, based on in situ analysis of the sample surface reflectivity evolution during melting. Current results, 2781 K for the melting point of UC, 2665 K for the solidus and 2681 K for the liquidus of U2C3, 2754 K for the solidus and 2770 K for the liquidus of UC2, are in fair agreement with early publications where the melting behaviour of uranium carbides was investigated by traditional furnace melting methods. Further information has been obtained in the current research about the non-congruent (solidus-liquidus) melting of certain carbides, which suggest that a solidus-liquidus scheme is followed by higher ratio carbides, possibly even for UC2.

  6. Analysis of credible accidents for Argonaut reactors. Report for October 1980-April 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawley, S.C.; Kathren, R.L.; Robkin, M.A.

    1981-04-01

    Five areas of potential accidents have been evaluated for the Argonaut-UTR reactors. They are: insertion of excess reactivity, catastrophic rearrangement of the core, explosive chemical reaction, graphite fire, and a fuel-handling accident.

  7. Contribution of prototypic material tests on the Plinius platform to the study of nuclear reactor severe accident; Contribution des essais en materiaux prototypiques sur la plate-forme Plinius a l'etude des accidents graves de reacteurs nucleaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Journeau, Ch

    2008-01-15

    The PLINIUS experimental platform at CEA Cadarache is dedicated to the experimental study of nuclear reactor severe accidents thanks to experiments between 2000 and 3500 K with prototypic corium. Corium is the mixture that would be formed by an hypothetical core melting and its mixing with structural materials. Prototypical corium has the same chemical composition as the corium corresponding to a given accident scenario but has a different isotopic composition (use of depleted uranium,...). Research programs and test series have been performed to study corium thermophysical properties, fission product behaviour, corium spreading, solidification and interaction with concrete as well as its coolability. It was the frame of research training of many students and was realized within national, European and international collaborations. (author)

  8. Studying the effects of dynamical parameters on reactor core temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Khodabakhsh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to increase productivity, reduce depreciation, and avoid possible accidents in a system such as fuel rods' melting and overpressure, control of temperature changes in the reactor core is an important factor. There are several methods for solving and analysing the stability of point kinetics equations. In most previous analyses, the effects of various factors on the temperature of the reactor core have been ignored. In this work, the effects of various dynamical parameters on the temperature of the reactor core and stability of the system in the presence of temperature feedback reactivity with external reactivity step, ramp and sinusoidal for six groups of delayed neutrons were studied using the method of Lyapunov exponent. The results proved to be in good agreement with other works

  9. Exploratory study of molten core material/concrete interactions, July 1975--March 1977. [BWR; PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, D.A.; Dahlgren, D.A.; Muir, J.F.; Murfin, W.D.

    1978-02-01

    An experimental study of the interaction between high-temperature molten materials and structural concrete is described. The experimental efforts focused on the interaction of melts of reactor core materials weighing 12 to 200 kg at temperatures 1700 to 2800/sup 0/C with calcareous and basaltic concrete representative of that found in existing light-water nuclear reactors. Observations concerning the rate and mode of melt penetration into concrete, the nature and generation rate of gases liberated during the interaction, and heat transfer from the melt to the concrete are described. Concrete erosion is shown to be primarily a melting process with little contribution from mechanical spallation. Water and carbon dioxide thermally released from the concrete are extensively reduced to hydrogen and carbon monoxide. Heat transfer from the melt to the concrete is shown to be dependent on gas generation rate and crucible geometry. Interpretation of results from the interaction experiments is supported by separate studies of the thermal decomposition of concretes, response of bulk concrete to intense heat fluxes (28 to 280 W/cm/sup 2/), and heat transfer from molten materials to decomposing solids. The experimental results are compared to assumptions made in previous analytic studies of core meltdown accidents in light-water nuclear reactors. A preliminary computer code, INTER, which models and extrapolates results of the experimental program is described. The code allows estimation of the effect of physical parameters on the nature of the melt/concrete interaction.

  10. Degraded core analysis for the PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gittus, J.H.

    1987-10-01

    The paper presents an analysis of the probability and consequences of degraded core accidents for the PWR. The article is based on a paper which was presented by the author to the Sizewell-B public inquiry. Degraded core accidents are examined with respect to:- the initiating events, safety plant failure, and processes with a bearing on containment failure. Accident types and frequencies are discussed, as well as the dispersion of radionuclides. Accident risks, i.e. individual and societal risks in degraded core accidents are assessed from:- the amount of radionuclides released, the weather, the population distribution, and the accident frequencies. Uncertainties in the assessment of degraded core accidents are also summarized. (U.K.).

  11. Recent numerical simulations and experiments on coolability of debris beds during severe accidents of light water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starflinger, J., E-mail: joerg.starflinger@ike.uni-stuttgart.de; Buck, M.; Hartmann, A.; Kulenovic, R.; Leininger, S.; Rahman, S.; Rashid, M.

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • Investigation on coolability of three-dimensional debris beds has been performed. • Computer code MEWA (Melt Water) is introduced and described briefly. • Validation experiments have been carried out in DEBRIS facility. • Comparison of MEWA simulations and DEBRIS experiments show good agreement. • Example simulation on reactor scale was performed to explain the analysis method. - Abstract: In the course of a severe accident in light water reactors with core degradation, so-called debris beds can be formed inside the reactor pressure vessel or in the reactor cavity. The strategy to analyse the coolability of such debris beds with both experiments and numerical simulations is discussed. The numerical simulations are carried out with MEWA (MElt WAter) code, being developed at the institute for the prediction of the thermal-hydraulic conditions inside a debris bed, including the prediction of dryout heat flux. The simulations show good agreement with experimental data of the DEBRIS experiments.

  12. Severe accident analysis of a small LOCA accident using MAAP-CANDU support level 2 PSA for the Point Lepreau station refurbishment project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petoukhov, S.M.; Brown, M.J.; Mathew, P.M. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-07-01

    A Level 2 Probabilistic Safety Assessment was performed for the Point Lepreau Generating Station. The MAAP4-CANDU code was used to calculate the progression of postulated severe core damage accidents and fission product releases. Five representative severe core damage accidents were selected: Station Blackout, Small Loss-of-Coolant Accident, Stagnation Feeder Break, Steam Generator Tube Rupture, and Shutdown State Accident. Analysis results for only the reference Small LOCA Accident scenario (which is a very low probability event) are discussed in this paper. (author)

  13. Identification of the security threshold by logistic regression applied to fuel under accident conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Daniel de Souza; Baptista Filho, Benedito; Oliveira, Fabio Branco de, E-mail: dsgomes@ipen.br, E-mail: bdbfilho@ipen.br, E-mail: fabio@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Giovedi, Claudia, E-mail: claudia.giovedi@labrisco.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (POLI/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Analise, Avaliacao e Gerenciamento de Risco

    2015-07-01

    A reactivity-initiated Accident (RIA) is a disastrous failure, which occurs because of an unexpected rise in the fission rate and reactor power. This sudden increase in the reactor power may activate processes that might lead to the failure of fuel cladding. In severe accidents, a disruption of fuel and core melting can occur. The purpose of the present research is to study the patterns of such accidents using exploratory data analysis techniques. A study based on applied statistics was used for simulations. Then, we chose peak enthalpy, pulse width, burnup, fission gas release, and the oxidation of zirconium as input parameters and set the safety boundary conditions. This new approach includes the logistic regression. With this, the present research aims also to develop the ability to identify the conditions and the probability of failures. Zirconium-based alloys fabricating the cladding of the fuel rod elements with niobium 1% were analyzed for high burnup limits at 65 MWd/kgU. The data based on six decades of investigations from experimental programs. In test, perform in American reactors such as the transient reactor test (TREAT), and power Burst Facility (PBF). In experiments realized in Japanese program at nuclear in the safety research reactor (NSRR), and in Kazakhstan as impulse graphite reactor (IGR). The database obtained from the tests and served as a support for our study. (author)

  14. Accident progression event tree analysis for postulated severe accidents at N Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyss, G.D.; Camp, A.L.; Miller, L.A.; Dingman, S.E.; Kunsman, D.M. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Medford, G.T. (Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

    1990-06-01

    A Level II/III probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) has been performed for N Reactor, a Department of Energy (DOE) production reactor located on the Hanford reservation in Washington. The accident progression analysis documented in this report determines how core damage accidents identified in the Level I PRA progress from fuel damage to confinement response and potential releases the environment. The objectives of the study are to generate accident progression data for the Level II/III PRA source term model and to identify changes that could improve plant response under accident conditions. The scope of the analysis is comprehensive, excluding only sabotage and operator errors of commission. State-of-the-art methodology is employed based largely on the methods developed by Sandia for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission in support of the NUREG-1150 study. The accident progression model allows complex interactions and dependencies between systems to be explicitly considered. Latin Hypecube sampling was used to assess the phenomenological and systemic uncertainties associated with the primary and confinement system responses to the core damage accident. The results of the analysis show that the N Reactor confinement concept provides significant radiological protection for most of the accident progression pathways studied.

  15. 2D model for melt progression through rods and debris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fichot, F. [IPSN/DRS, CEA Cadarache, St. Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2001-07-01

    During the degradation of a nuclear core in a severe accident scenario, the high temperatures reached lead to the melting of materials. The formation of liquid mixtures at various elevations is followed by the flow of molten materials through the core. Liquid mixture may flow under several configurations: axial relocation along the rods, horizontal motion over a plane surface such as the core support plate or a blockage of material, 2D relocation through a debris bed, etc.. The two-dimensional relocation of molten material through a porous debris bed, implemented for the simulation of late degradation phases, has opened a new way to the elaboration of the relocation model for the flow of liquid mixture along the rods. It is based on a volume averaging method, where wall friction and capillary effects are taken into account by introducing effective coefficients to characterize the solid matrix (rods, grids, debris, etc.). A local description of the liquid flow is necessary to derive the effective coefficients. Heat transfers are modelled in a similar way. The derivation of the conservation equations for the liquid mixture falling flow (momentum) in two directions (axial and radial-horizontal) and for the heat exchanges (energy) are the main points of this new model for simulating melt progression. In this presentation, the full model for the relocation and solidification of liquid materials through a rod bundle or a debris bed is described. It is implemented in the ICARE/CATHARE code, developed by IPSN in Cadarache. The main improvements and advantages of the new model are: A single formulation for liquid mixture relocation, in 2D, either through a rod bundle or a porous debris bed, Extensions to complex structures (grids, by-pass, etc..), The modeling of relocation of a liquid mixture over plane surfaces. (author)

  16. Modeling in fast dynamics of accidents in the primary circuit of PWR type reactors; Modelisation en dynamique rapide d'accidents dans le circuit primaire des reacteurs a eau pressurisee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robbe, M.F

    2003-12-01

    Two kinds of accidents, liable to occur in the primary circuit of a Pressurized Water Reactor and involving fast dynamic phenomena, are analyzed. The Loss Of Coolant Accident (LOCA) is the accident used to define the current PWR. It consists in a large-size break located in a pipe of the primary circuit. A blowdown wave propagates through the circuit. The pressure differences between the different zones of the reactor induce high stresses in the structures of the lower head and may degrade the reactor core. The primary circuit starts emptying from the break opening. Pressure decreases very quickly, involving a large steaming. Two thermal-hydraulic simulations of the blowdown phase of a LOCA are computed with the Europlexus code. The primary circuit is represented by a pipe-model including the hydraulic peculiarities of the circuit. The main differences between both computations concern the kind of reactor, the break location and model, and the initialization of the accidental operation. Steam explosion is a hypothetical severe accident liable to happen after a core melting. The molten part of the core (called corium) falls in the lower part of the reactor. The interaction between the hot corium and the cold water remaining at the bottom of the vessel induces a massive and violent vaporization of water, similar to an explosive phenomenon. A shock wave propagates in the vessel. what can damage seriously the neighbouring structures or drill the vessel. This work presents a synthesis of in-vessel parametrical studies carried out with the Europlexus code, the linkage of the thermal-hydraulic code Mc3d dedicated to the pre-mixing phase with the Europlexus code dealing with the explosion, and finally a benchmark between the Cigalon and Europlexus codes relative to the Vulcano mock-up. (author)

  17. Icare/Cathare coupling: three-dimensional thermal hydraulics of severe LWR accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillard, V.; Fichot, F. [CEA Fontenay aux Roses, Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, Dept. de Recherches en Securite, DRS, 92 (France); Boudier, P.; Parent, M. [CEA Grenoble, Dir. des Reacteurs Nucleaires, DRN, 38 (France); Roser, R. [Communication et Systemes Systemes d' Information, CS SI, 38 - Fontaine (France)

    2001-07-01

    In the phenomenology of severe LWR accidents considered in safety studies, the accidental sequences can be divided into three phases: the initial phase, where no severe damage of fuel or control rods and structures occurs; the early core degradation phase, where limited material melting and relocation takes place; and the late core degradation phase during which substantial material relocation happens, molten pools and debris beds can form and corium may fall into the lower plenum and, in case of vessel failure, come into the containment. The CATHARE2 code is a system code which has been developed by CEA for IPSN, EDF and FRAMATOME to describe the thermal-hydraulics behavior of a whole PWR circuit during the first of these three phases, with a core degradation model limited to clad rupture. The ICARE2 code, developed by IPSN, allows the complete description of early and late core degradation phases, with a thermal-hydraulics model limited to the vessel, initial and boundary conditions being provided by a system code. The aim of this paper is to present the main features of the new version of the coupling, ICARE/CATHARE V2. First, the general characteristics of ICARE2 V3mod1 and CATHARE2 V1.5 standard codes, dealing with physical models and numerical aspects, are described. Second, the technical features of the coupling between the two codes are detailed. At last, some results of ICARE/CATHARE V2 calculations are presented which demonstrate the ability of the code to simulate a severe accident in a PWR and notably to describe multi-dimensional effects occurring in the core during the LOCA and degradation phases. (authors)

  18. Final report for the 'Melt-Vessel Interactions' Project. European Union R and TD Program 4th Framework. MVI project final research report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sehgal, B.R.; Dinh, T.N.; Nourgaliev, R.R.; Bui, V.A.; Green, J.; Kolb, G.; Karbojian, A.; Theerthan, S.A.; Gubaidulline, A. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Div. of Nuclear Power Safety; Helle, M.; Kymaelaeinen, O.; Tuomisto, H. [IVO Power Engineering Ltd., Vantaa (Finland); Bonnet, J.M.; Rouge, S.; Narcoux, M.; Liegeois, A. [CEA - Grenoble (France); Turland, B.D.; Dobson, G.P. [AEA Technology plc, Dorchester (United Kingdom); Siccama, A. [ECN Nuclear Research, Petten (Netherlands); Ikonen, K. [VTT Energy, Helsinki (Finland); Parozzi, F. [ENEL - SRI/PAM/GRA, Segrate, MI (Italy); Kolev, N. [Siemens AG, Erlangen (Germany); Caira, M. [Univ. of Roma (Italy)

    1999-04-01

    The Melt Vessel Interaction (MVI) project is concerned with the consequences of the interactions that a core melt, generated during a postulated severe accident in a light water reactor, may have with the pressure vessel. In particular, the issues concerned with the failure of the vessel bottom head are the focus of the research. The specific objectives of the project are to obtain data and develop validated models, which could be applied to prototypic plants, and accident conditions, for resolution of issues related to the melt vessel interactions. The project work has been performed by nine partners having varied responsibility. The work included a large number of experiments, with simulant materials, whose observations and results are employed, respectively, to understand the physical mechanisms and to develop validated models. Applications to the prototypic geometry and conditions have also been performed. This report is volume 1 of the Final Report for the Project, in which a summary of the progress achieved in the experimental program is provided. We have, however, included some aspects of the modeling activities. Volume 2 of the Final report describes the progress achieved in the modeling program. The progress achieved in the experimental and modeling parts of the Project has led to the resolution of some of the issues of melt vessel interaction. Considerable progress was also achieved towards resolution of the remaining issues.

  19. HTGR severe accident sequence analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrington, R.M.; Ball, S.J.; Kornegay, F.C.

    1982-01-01

    Thermal-hydraulic, fission product transport, and atmospheric dispersion calculations are presented for hypothetical severe accident release paths at the Fort St. Vrain (FSV) high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR). Off-site radiation exposures are calculated for assumed release of 100% of the 24 hour post-shutdown core xenon and krypton inventory and 5.5% of the iodine inventory. The results show conditions under which dose avoidance measures would be desirable and demonstrate the importance of specific release characteristics such as effective release height. 7 tables.

  20. Visualization of Traffic Accidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie; Shen, Yuzhong; Khattak, Asad

    2010-01-01

    Traffic accidents have tremendous impact on society. Annually approximately 6.4 million vehicle accidents are reported by police in the US and nearly half of them result in catastrophic injuries. Visualizations of traffic accidents using geographic information systems (GIS) greatly facilitate handling and analysis of traffic accidents in many aspects. Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), Inc. is the world leader in GIS research and development. ArcGIS, a software package developed by ESRI, has the capabilities to display events associated with a road network, such as accident locations, and pavement quality. But when event locations related to a road network are processed, the existing algorithm used by ArcGIS does not utilize all the information related to the routes of the road network and produces erroneous visualization results of event locations. This software bug causes serious problems for applications in which accurate location information is critical for emergency responses, such as traffic accidents. This paper aims to address this problem and proposes an improved method that utilizes all relevant information of traffic accidents, namely, route number, direction, and mile post, and extracts correct event locations for accurate traffic accident visualization and analysis. The proposed method generates a new shape file for traffic accidents and displays them on top of the existing road network in ArcGIS. Visualization of traffic accidents along Hampton Roads Bridge Tunnel is included to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  1. Sensitivity Analysis of Core Damage from Reactor Coolant Pump Seal Leakage during Extended Loss of All AC Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Da Hee; Kim, Min Gi; Lee, Kyung Jin; Hwang, Su hyun; Lee, Byung Chul [FNC Technology Co. Ltd., Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Duk Joo; Lee, Seung Chan [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co. Ltd., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In this study, in order to comprehend the Fukushima accident, the sensitivity analysis was performed to analyze the behavior of Reactor Coolant System (RCS) during ELAP using the RELAP5/MOD3.3 code. The Fukushima accident was caused by tsunami resulted in Station Black Out (SBO) followed by the reactor core melt-down and release of radioactive materials. After the accident, the equipment and strategies for the Extended Loss of All AC Power (ELAP) were recommended strongly. In this analysis, sensitivity studies for the RCP seal failure of the OPR1000 type NPP were performed by using RELAP5/MOD3.3 code. Six cases with different leakage rate of RCP seal were studied for ELAP with operator action or not. The main findings are summarized as follows: (1) Without the operator action, the core uncovery time is determined by the leakage rate of RCP seal. When the leakage rate per RCP seal are 5 gpm, 50 gpm, and 300 gpm respectively, the core uncovery time are 1.62 hr, 1.58 hr, and 1.29 hr respectively. Namely, If the leakage rate of RCP seal was much bigger, the uncover time of core would be shorter. (2) In case that the cooling by SG secondary side was performed using the TDAFP and SG ADV, the core uncovery time was significantly extended.

  2. The Effective Convectivity Model for Simulation and Analysis of Melt Pool Heat Transfer in a Light Water Reactor Pressure Vessel Lower Head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tran, Chi Thanh

    2009-09-15

    Severe accidents in a Light Water Reactor (LWR) have been a subject of intense research for the last three decades. The research in this area aims to reach understanding of the inherent physical phenomena and reduce the uncertainties in their quantification, with the ultimate goal of developing models that can be applied to safety analysis of nuclear reactors, and to evaluation of the proposed accident management schemes for mitigating the consequences of severe accidents. In a hypothetical severe accident there is likelihood that the core materials will be relocated to the lower plenum and form a decay-heated debris bed (debris cake) or a melt pool. Interactions of core debris or melt with the reactor structures depend to a large extent on the debris bed or melt pool thermal hydraulics. In case of inadequate cooling, the excessive heat would drive the structures' overheating and ablation, and hence govern the vessel failure mode and timing. In turn, threats to containment integrity associated with potential ex-vessel steam explosions and ex-vessel debris uncoolability depend on the composition, superheat, and amount of molten corium available for discharge upon the vessel failure. That is why predictions of transient melt pool heat transfer in the reactor lower head, subsequent vessel failure modes and melt characteristics upon the discharge are of paramount importance for plant safety assessment. The main purpose of the present study is to develop a method for reliable prediction of melt pool thermal hydraulics, namely to establish a computational platform for cost-effective, sufficiently-accurate numerical simulations and analyses of core Melt-Structure-Water Interactions in the LWR lower head during a postulated severe core-melting accident. To achieve the goal, an approach to efficient use of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) has been proposed to guide and support the development of models suitable for accident analysis. The CFD method, on the one hand

  3. Analysis of ex-vessel melt jet breakup and coolability. Part 2: Uncertainty analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriyama, Kiyofumi; Park, Hyun Sun, E-mail: hejsunny@postech.ac.kr; Hwang, Byoungcheol; Jung, Woo Hyun

    2016-06-15

    Highlights: • Uncertainty analysis for quasi steady state melt jet breakup/cooling in APR1400. • Debris solidification reached in most of cases, film boiling quench never reached. • More than 1% molten pool formation in more than half probability. • Significant importance of accident conditions, weak impacts of model parameters. • Ratio of water depth to melt jet breakup length dominates the molten pool formation. - Abstract: An uncertainty analysis was performed on the molten core jet breakup and cooling by assuming the ex-vessel condition in APR1400, a Korean advanced pressurized water reactor, by probabilistic framework with the Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS) and a fuel–coolant interaction (FCI) simulation code, JASMINE, as a physics model. Eight input variables including four model parameters and four initial/boundary condition variables were chosen as uncertainty variables. Three sets of size 100 samples, in total 300 cases of inputs were produced and simulation results were obtained for each of them. Statistics of the output variables as coolability indexes: the ratio of removed heat to the enthalpy for quench and the fraction of molten pool on the floor, indicated that, in the assumed range of conditions, the debris bed is likely to be cooled in average to the solidification point by ∼85% probability; however, it is not cooled to the minimum film boiling temperature, ∼500 K; and, more than 1% of the melt mass is in a molten pool on the floor by ∼65% probability. The importance analysis showed that the ratio of water pool depth and the melt jet breakup length dominates the cooling performance during the melt discharge transient. The uncertainty of initial and boundary condition variables such as the melt jet size and water pool depth is much more important than that of the model parameters.

  4. Introduction of the Amendment of IAEA Safety Requirements Reflected Lessons Learned from Fukushima Nuclear Accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Sang-Kyu; Ahn, Hyung-Joon; Kim, Sun-Hae; Cheong, Jae-Hak [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The following five Safety Requirements publications were amended: Governmental, Legal and Regulatory Framework for Safety (GSR Part 1, 2010), Site Evaluation for Nuclear Installations (NS-R-3, 2003), Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Design (SSR-2/1, 2012), Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Commissioning and Operation (SSR-2/2, 2011), and Safety Assessment for Facilities and Activities (GSR Part 4, 2009). Figure 1 shows IAEA Safety Standards Categories Major amendments of five Safety Requirements publications were introduced and analyzed in this study. The five IAEA safety requirements publications which are GSR Part 1 and 4, NS-R-3 and SSR-2/1 and 2, were amended to reflect the lesson learned from the Fukushima accident and other operating experiences. Specially, 36 provisions were modified and the new 29 provision with 1 requirement (No. 67: Emergency response facilities on the site) of the SSR-2/1 were established. Since the Fukushima accident happened, a new word, design extension conditions (DECs) which cover substantially the beyond design basis accidents (BDBA), including severe accident conditions, was created and more elaborated by the world nuclear experts. Design extension conditions could include conditions in events without significant fuel degradation and conditions with core melting. Figure 2 shows the range of the DECs. The amendment of the five IAEA safety requirements publications are focused at the prevention of initiating events, which would lead to the DECs, and mitigation of the consequences of DECs by the enhanced defense in depth principle. The following examples of the IAEA requirements to prevent the initiating events are: margins for withstanding external events; margins for avoiding cliff edge effects; safety assessment for multiple facilities or activities at a single site; safety assessment in cases where resources at a facility are shared; consideration of the potential occurrence of events in combination; establishing levels of hazard

  5. Radiative heat transfer modelling in a PWR severe accident sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magali Zabiego; Florian Fichot [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire - BP 3 - 13115 Saint-paul-Lez-Durance (France); Pablo Rubiolo [Westinghouse Science and Technology - 1344 Beulah Road - Pittsburgh - PA 15235 (United States)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: The present study is devoted to the estimation of the radiative heat transfers during a severe accident sequence in a Pressurized Water Reactor. In such a situation, the residual nuclear power released by the fuel rods can not be evacuated and heats up the core. As a result, the cylindrical rods and the structures initially composing the core undergo a degradation process: swelling, breaking or melting of the rods and structures and eventual collapse to form a heap of fragments called a debris bed. As the solid matrix loses its original shape, the core geometry continuously evolves from standing, regularly-spaced cylinders to a non-homogeneous system including deformed remaining rods and structures and debris particles. To predict this type of sequence, the ICARE/CATHARE software [1] is developed by IRSN. Since the temperatures can reach values greater than 3000 K, it was of major interest to provide the code with an accurate radiative transfer model usable whatever the geometry of the system. Considering the size of a reactor core compared to the mean penetration length of radiation, the core can be seen as an optically thick medium. This observation led us to use the diffusion approximation to treat the radiation propagation. In this approach, the radiative flux is calculated in a way similar to thermal conduction: q{sub r} = [K{sub e}].{nabla}T where [K{sub e}] is the equivalent conductivity tensor of the system accounting for thermal and radiative transfer. An homogenization technique is applied to estimate the equivalent conductivity. Given the temperature level, the radiative contribution to the equivalent conductivity tensor quickly becomes dominant. This model was described earlier in [2] in which it was shown that an equivalent conductivity can be continuously calculated in the system when the geometry evolves from standing regular cylinder rods to swollen or broken ones, surrounded or not by a film of liquid materials, to

  6. Assessment of severe accident source terms in pressurized-water reactors with a 40% mixed-oxide and 60% low-enriched uranium core using MELCOR 1.8.5.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauntt, Randall O.; Goldmann, Andrew S. (Texas A& M University, College Station, TX); Wagner, Kenneth C.; Powers, Dana Auburn; Ashbaugh, Scott G.; Longmire, Pamela

    2010-04-01

    As part of a Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) research program to evaluate the impact of using mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel in commercial nuclear power plants, a study was undertaken to evaluate the impact of the usage of MOX fuel on the consequences of postulated severe accidents. A series of 23 severe accident calculations was performed using MELCOR 1.8.5 for a four-loop Westinghouse reactor with an ice condenser containment. The calculations covered five basic accident classes that were identified as the risk- and consequence-dominant accident sequences in plant-specific probabilistic risk assessments for the McGuire and Catawba nuclear plants, including station blackouts and loss-of-coolant accidents of various sizes, with both early and late containment failures. Ultimately, the results of these MELCOR simulations will be used to provide a supplement to the NRC's alternative source term described in NUREG-1465. Source term magnitude and timing results are presented consistent with the NUREG-1465 format. For each of the severe accident release phases (coolant release, gap release, in-vessel release, ex-vessel release, and late in-vessel release), source term timing information (onset of release and duration) is presented. For all release phases except for the coolant release phase, magnitudes are presented for each of the NUREG-1465 radionuclide groups. MELCOR results showed variation of noble metal releases between those typical of ruthenium (Ru) and those typical of molybdenum (Mo); therefore, results for the noble metals were presented for Ru and Mo separately. The collection of the source term results can be used as the basis to develop a representative source term (across all accident types) that will be the MOX supplement to NUREG-1465.

  7. Laser accidents: Being Prepared

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barat, K

    2003-01-24

    The goal of the Laser Safety Officer and any laser safety program is to prevent a laser accident from occurring, in particular an injury to a person's eyes. Most laser safety courses talk about laser accidents, causes, and types of injury. The purpose of this presentation is to present a plan for safety offices and users to follow in case of accident or injury from laser radiation.

  8. Proceedings of the workshop on severe accident research held in Japan (SARJ-97)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, Jun [ed.

    1998-05-01

    The Workshop on Severe Accident Research held in Japan (SARJ-97) was taken place at Pacifico Yokohama on October 6 - 8, 1997, and attended by 180 participants from 15 countries and one international organizations. The 59 papers, which cover wide areas of severe accident research both in experiments and analysis, such as in-vessel melt retention, fuel-coolant interaction, fission products behavior, structural integrity, containment behavior, computer simulations, and accident management, are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  9. Proceedings of the workshop on severe accident research held in Japan (SARJ-98)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, Jun [ed.

    1999-07-01

    The Workshop on Severe Accident Research held in Japan (SARJ-98) was taken place at Hotel Lungwood on November 4-6, 1998, and attended by 181 participants from 13 countries. The 63 papers, which cover wide areas of severe accident research both in experiments and analyses, such as in-vessel melt retention, fuel-coolant interaction, fission products behavior, structural integrity, containment behavior, computer simulations, and accident management, are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  10. [Accidents with the "paraglider"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, T H; Dengg, C; Gabl, M

    1988-09-01

    With a collective of 46 patients we show the details and kinds of accidents caused by paragliding. The base for the casuistry of the accidents was a questionnaire which was answered by most of the injured persons. These were questions about the theoretical and practical training, the course of the flight during the different phases, and the subjective point of view of the course of the accident. The patterns of the injuries showed a high incidence of injuries of the spinal column and high risks for the ankles. At the end, we give some advice how to prevent these accidents.

  11. Accidents (FARS) (National)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — Accident - (1975-current): This data file (NTAD) contains information about crash characteristics and environmental conditions at the time of the crash. There is one...

  12. Identification and evaluation of PWR in-vessel severe accident management strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dukelow, J S [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Harrison, D G [Jason Associates, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Morgenstern, M [Battelle Human Affairs Research Center, Seattle, WA (United States)

    1992-03-01

    This reports documents work performed the NRC/RES Accident Management Guidance Program to evaluate possible strategies for mitigating the consequences of PWR severe accidents. The selection and evaluation of strategies was limited to the in-vessel phase of the severe accident, i.e., after the initiation of core degradation and prior to RPV failure. A parallel project at BNL has been considering strategies applicable to the ex-vessel phase of PWR severe accidents.

  13. A Study on Melt-able metal Core Process for Permanent Mould Casting of Ti3Al-based Alloy%可熔金属芯在金属型铸造Ti3Al基合金中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢华生; 杨洪涛; 赵军; 王君卿

    2001-01-01

    本文通过对空心可熔金属芯制造工艺及表面处理工艺的研究,成功地实现了Ti3Al基合金铸件的金属型铸造。研究结果表明:(1)利用金属型及可熔性金属芯可以铸出合格的Ti3Al基合金铸件;(2)该技术的重点在于可熔性金属芯的应用,可熔性金属芯既要能使合金液圆满充型,又要在充型结束后熔化以减少收缩阻力;(3)金属芯上的涂层是保证合金成分稳定与圆满充型的关键。%Based on an experimental study of the melt-able core and itssurface treatment technique, the castings with intermetallic compound Ti3Al-based alloy have been successfully cast in the permanent mold. The result shows that first, the Ti3Al castings can be manufactured by permanent mold casting; second, key of the technology is the use of a melt-able core which should not only bear pressure of the mold filling metal melt, but also could reduce the resistance of the core to metal contraction by the core being molten; and finally, the coating of the core is also one of the key technology for ensuring the alloy melt being successfully filled and against its composition being changed.

  14. Accident tolerant fuels for LWRs: A perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinkle, S. J.; Terrani, K. A.; Gehin, J. C.; Ott, L. J.; Snead, L. L.

    2014-05-01

    The motivation for exploring the potential development of accident tolerant fuels in light water reactors to replace existing Zr alloy clad monolithic (U, Pu) oxide fuel is outlined. The evaluation includes a brief review of core degradation processes under design-basis and beyond-design-basis transient conditions. Three general strategies for accident tolerant fuels are being explored: modification of current state-of-the-art zirconium alloy cladding to further improve oxidation resistance (including use of coatings), replacement of Zr alloy cladding with an alternative oxidation-resistant high-performance cladding, and replacement of the monolithic ceramic oxide fuel with alternative fuel forms.

  15. Nuclear reactor melt arrest and coolability device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theofanous, Theo G.; Dinh, Nam Truc; Wachowiak, Richard M.

    2016-06-14

    Example embodiments provide a Basemat-Internal Melt Arrest and Coolability device (BiMAC) that offers improved spatial and mechanical characteristics for use in damage prevention and risk mitigation in accident scenarios. Example embodiments may include a BiMAC having an inclination of less than 10-degrees from the basemat floor and/or coolant channels of less than 4 inches in diameter, while maintaining minimum safety margins required by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

  16. Communication and industrial accidents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    As, Sicco van

    2001-01-01

    This paper deals with the influence of organizational communication on safety. Accidents are actually caused by individual mistakes. However the underlying causes of accidents are often organizational. As a link between these two levels - the organizational failures and mistakes - I suggest the conc

  17. Accidents - personal factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaitsev, S.L.; Tsygankov, A.V.

    1982-03-01

    This paper evaluates influence of selected personal factors on accident rate in underground coal mines in the USSR. Investigations show that so-called organizational factors cause from 80 to 85% of all accidents. About 70% of the organizational factors is associated with social, personal and economic features of personnel. Selected results of the investigations carried out in Donbass mines are discussed. Causes of miner dissatisfaction are reviewed: 14% is caused by unsatisfactory working conditions, 21% by repeated machine failures, 16% by forced labor during days off, 14% by unsatisfactory material supply, 16% by hard physical labor, 19% by other reasons. About 25% of miners injured during work accidents are characterized as highly professionally qualified with automatic reactions, and about 41% by medium qualifications. About 60% of accidents is caused by miners with less than a 3 year period of service. About 15% of accidents occurs during the first month after a miner has returned from a leave. More than 30% of accidents occurs on the first work day after a day or days off. Distribution of accidents is also presented: 19% of accidents occurs during the first 2 hours of a shift, 36% from the second to the fourth hour, and 45% occurs after the fourth hour and before the shift ends.

  18. Accident investigation and analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampen, J. van; Drupsteen, L.

    2013-01-01

    Many organisations and companies take extensive proactive measures to identify, evaluate and reduce occupational risks. However, despite these efforts things still go wrong and unintended events occur. After a major incident or accident, conducting an accident investigation is generally the next ste

  19. Rise in central west Greenland surface melt unprecedented over the last three centuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trusel, Luke; Das, Sarah; Osman, Matthew; Evans, Matthew; Smith, Ben; McConnell, Joe; Noël, Brice; van den Broeke, Michiel

    2017-04-01

    Greenland Ice Sheet surface melting has intensified and expanded over the last several decades and is now a leading component of ice sheet mass loss. Here, we constrain the multi-century temporal evolution of surface melt across central west Greenland by quantifying layers of refrozen melt within well-dated firn and ice cores collected in 2014 and 2015, as well as from a core collected in 2004. We find significant agreement among ice core, satellite, and regional climate model melt datasets over recent decades, confirming the fidelity of the ice core melt stratigraphy as a reliable record of past variability in the magnitude of surface melt. We also find a significant correlation between the melt records derived from our new 100-m GC-2015 core (2436 m.a.s.l.) and the older (2004) 150-m D5 core (2472 m.a.s.l.) located 50 km to the southeast. This agreement demonstrates the robustness of the ice core-derived melt histories and the potential for reconstructing regional melt evolution from a single site, despite local variability in melt percolation and refreeze processes. Our array of upper percolation zone cores reveals that although the overall frequency of melt at these sites has not increased, the intensification of melt over the last three decades is unprecedented within at least the last 365 years. Utilizing the regional climate model RACMO 2.3, we show that this melt intensification is a nonlinear response to warming summer air temperatures, thus underscoring the heightened sensitivity of this sector of Greenland to further climate warming. Finally, we examine spatial correlations between the ice core melt records and modeled melt fields across the ice sheet to assess the broader representation of each ice core record. This analysis reveals wide-ranging significant correlations, including to modeled meltwater runoff. As such, our ice core melt records may furthermore offer unique, observationally-constrained insights into past variability in ice sheet mass loss.

  20. Severe accident recriticality analyses (SARA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frid, W.; Højerup, C.F.; Lindholm, I.

    2001-01-01

    three computer codes and to further develop and adapt them for the task. The codes were SIMULATE-3K, APROS and RECRIT. Recriticality analyses were carried out for a number of selected reflooding transients for the Oskarshamn 3 plant in Sweden with SIMULATE-3K and for the Olkiluoto I plant in Finland...... with all three codes. The core initial and boundary conditions prior to recriticality have been studied with the severe accident codes SCDAP/RELAP5, MELCOR and MAAP4. The results of the analyses show that all three codes predict recriticality-both super-prompt power bursts and quasi steady-state power...... generation-for the range of parameters studied, i.e. with core uncovering and heat-up to maximum core temperatures of approximately 1800 K, and water flow rates of 45-2000 kg s(-1) injected into the downcomer. Since recriticality takes place in a small fraction of the core, the power densities are high...

  1. SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD 3.1 code manual: MATPRO, A library of materials properties for Light-Water-Reactor accident analysis. Volume 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagrman, D.T. [ed.; Allison, C.M.; Berna, G.A. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)] [and others

    1995-06-01

    The SCDAP/RELAP5 code has been developed for best estimate transient simulation of light -- water-reactor coolant systems during a severe accident. The code models the coupled behavior of the reactor coolant system, the core, fission products released during a severe accident transient as well as large and small break loss of coolant accidents, operational transients such as anticipated transient without SCRAM, loss of offsite power, loss of feedwater, and loss of flow. A generic modeling approach is used that permits as much of a particular system to be modeled as necessary. Control system and secondary system components are included to permit modeling of plant controls, turbines, condensers, and secondary feedwater conditioning systems. This volume, Volume IV, describes the material properties correlations and computer subroutines (MATPRO) used by SCDAP/RELAP5. formulation of the materials properties are generally semi-empirical in nature. The materials property subroutines contained in this document are for uranium, uranium dioxide, mixed uranium-plutonium dioxide fuel, zircaloy cladding, zirconium dioxide, stainless steel, stainless steel oxide, silver-indium-cadmium alloy, cadmium, boron carbide, Inconel 718, zirconium-uranium-oxygen melts, fill gas mixtures, carbon steel, and tungsten. This document also contains descriptions of the reaction and solution rate models needed to analyze a reactor accident.

  2. Persistence of airline accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Carlos Pestana; Faria, Joao Ricardo; Gil-Alana, Luis Alberiko

    2010-10-01

    This paper expands on air travel accident research by examining the relationship between air travel accidents and airline traffic or volume in the period from 1927-2006. The theoretical model is based on a representative airline company that aims to maximise its profits, and it utilises a fractional integration approach in order to determine whether there is a persistent pattern over time with respect to air accidents and air traffic. Furthermore, the paper analyses how airline accidents are related to traffic using a fractional cointegration approach. It finds that airline accidents are persistent and that a (non-stationary) fractional cointegration relationship exists between total airline accidents and airline passengers, airline miles and airline revenues, with shocks that affect the long-run equilibrium disappearing in the very long term. Moreover, this relation is negative, which might be due to the fact that air travel is becoming safer and there is greater competition in the airline industry. Policy implications are derived for countering accident events, based on competition and regulation. © 2010 The Author(s). Journal compilation © Overseas Development Institute, 2010.

  3. Accidents with sulfuric acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajković Miloš B.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Sulfuric acid is an important industrial and strategic raw material, the production of which is developing on all continents, in many factories in the world and with an annual production of over 160 million tons. On the other hand, the production, transport and usage are very dangerous and demand measures of precaution because the consequences could be catastrophic, and not only at the local level where the accident would happen. Accidents that have been publicly recorded during the last eighteen years (from 1988 till the beginning of 2006 are analyzed in this paper. It is very alarming data that, according to all the recorded accidents, over 1.6 million tons of sulfuric acid were exuded. Although water transport is the safest (only 16.38% of the total amount of accidents in that way 98.88% of the total amount of sulfuric acid was exuded into the environment. Human factor was the common factor in all the accidents, whether there was enough control of the production process, of reservoirs or transportation tanks or the transport was done by inadequate (old tanks, or the accidents arose from human factor (inadequate speed, lock of caution etc. The fact is that huge energy, sacrifice and courage were involved in the recovery from accidents where rescue teams and fire brigades showed great courage to prevent real environmental catastrophes and very often they lost their lives during the events. So, the phrase that sulfuric acid is a real "environmental bomb" has become clearer.

  4. Design requirements for innovative homogeneous reactor, lesson learned from Fukushima accident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbie, Bakri; Pinem, Suryan; Sembiring, Tagor; Subki, Iyos

    2012-06-01

    The Fukushima disaster is the largest nuclear accident since the 1986 Chernobyl disaster, but it is more complex as multiple reactors and spent fuel pools are involved. The severity of the nuclear accident is rated 7 in the International Nuclear Events Scale. Expert said that "Fukushima is the biggest industrial catastrophe in the history of mankind". According to Mitsuru Obe, in The Wall Street Journal, May 16th of 2011, TEPCO estimates the nuclear fuel was exposed to the air less than five hours after the earthquake struck. Fuel rods melted away rapidly as the temperatures inside the core reached 2800 C within six hours. In less than 16 hours, the reactor core melted and dropped to the bottom of the pressure vessel. The information should be evaluated in detail. In Germany several nuclear power plant were shutdown, Italy postponed it's nuclear power program and China reviewed their nuclear power program. Different news come from Britain, in October 11, 2011, the Safety Committee said all clear for nuclear power in Britain, because there are no risk of strong earthquake and tsunami in the region. Due to this severe fact, many nuclear scientists and engineer from all over the world are looking for a new approach, such as homogeneous reactor which was developed in Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 1960-ies, during Dr. Alvin Weinberg tenure as the Director of ORNL. The paper will describe the design requirement that will be used as the basis for innovative homogeneous reactor. Innovative Homogeneous Reactor is expected to reduce core melt by two decades (4), since the fuel is intermix homogeneously with coolant and secondly we eliminate the used fuel rod which need to be cooled for a long period of time. In order to be successful for its implementation of the innovative system, testing and validation, three phases of development will be introduced. The first phase is Low Level Goals is really the proof of concept;the Medium Level Goal is Technical Goalsand the High

  5. Ablation characteristics of special concrete due to an impinging zirconium-dioxide melt jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, S.M., E-mail: sangmoan@kaeri.re.kr; Ha, K.S.; Min, B.T.; Kim, H.Y.; Song, J.H.

    2015-04-01

    Highlights: • The jet impingement tests were performed for a special concrete of core-catcher. • The ablation rate and depth were measured 1.59 mm/s and 4.33 mm, respectively. • The experimental results were estimated well between the model prediction bounds. • The material ablation was described reasonably by a convective heat transfer model. - Abstract: Jet impingement experiments were performed to investigate the ablation characteristics of special concrete, which has been developed as one of the candidate protecting materials for the EU-APR1400 ex-vessel core catcher. In order to simulate the jet impingement phenomenon owing to the reactor vessel failure during a severe core meltdown accident, the experimental facility was established and the experimental conditions were determined based on parametric studies. The special concrete specimen was manufactured in accordance with the standard procedures, and its microstructures and physicochemical properties were analyzed to verify the requirements for the qualification. An induction melting technique in a cold crucible was employed to generate the zirconium-dioxide melt as a simulant of the corium melt. The special concrete was ablated uniformly over the impact area by jet impingement, and the average ablation depth was measured to be 4.33 mm. The average ablation rate in depth was evaluated as 1.59 mm/s using the temperature measurements of the specimen. As compared with the predictions by the models based on the convective and radiative heat transfer analysis, both the measured ablation rate and depth were estimated appropriately within the bounds of their limits. However, the convective heat transfer model turned out to predict the ablation characteristics of the special concrete more reasonably during the jet impingement even though some water content within the special concrete could lead to a sudden generation of the steam layer through which the material ablation is attenuated substantially by the

  6. Porosity effects during a severe accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cazares R, R. I. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, Posgrado en Energia y Medio Ambiente, San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico); Espinosa P, G.; Vazquez R, A., E-mail: ricardo-cazares@hotmail.com [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, Area de Ingenieria en Recursos Energeticos, San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    The aim of this work is to study the behaviour of porosity effects on the temporal evolution of the distributions of hydrogen concentration and temperature profiles in a fuel assembly where a stream of steam is flowing. The analysis considers the fuel element without mitigation effects. The mass transfer phenomenon considers that the hydrogen generated diffuses in the steam by convection and diffusion. Oxidation of the cladding, rods and other components in the core constructed in zirconium base alloy by steam is a critical issue in LWR accident producing severe core damage. The oxygen consumed by the zirconium is supplied by the up flow of steam from the water pool below the uncovered core, supplemented in the case of PWR by gas recirculation from the cooler outer regions of the core to hotter zones. Fuel rod cladding oxidation is then one of the key phenomena influencing the core behavior under high-temperature accident conditions. The chemical reaction of oxidation is highly exothermic, which determines the hydrogen rate generation and the cladding brittleness and degradation. The heat transfer process in the fuel assembly is considered with a reduced order model. The Boussinesq approximation was applied in the momentum equations for multicomponent flow analysis that considers natural convection due to buoyancy forces, which is related with thermal and hydrogen concentration effects. The numerical simulation was carried out in an averaging channel that represents a core reactor with the fuel rod with its gap and cladding and cooling steam of a BWR. (Author)

  7. Analysis of main steam isolation valve leakage in design basis accidents using MELCOR 1.8.6 and RADTRAD.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salay, Michael (United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, D.C.); Kalinich, Donald A.; Gauntt, Randall O.; Radel, Tracy E.

    2008-10-01

    Analyses were performed using MELCOR and RADTRAD to investigate main steam isolation valve (MSIV) leakage behavior under design basis accident (DBA) loss-of-coolant (LOCA) conditions that are presumed to have led to a significant core melt accident. Dose to the control room, site boundary and LPZ are examined using both approaches described in current regulatory guidelines as well as analyses based on best estimate source term and system response. At issue is the current practice of using containment airborne aerosol concentrations as a surrogate for the in-vessel aerosol concentration that exists in the near vicinity of the MSIVs. This study finds current practice using the AST-based containment aerosol concentrations for assessing MSIV leakage is non-conservative and conceptually in error. A methodology is proposed that scales the containment aerosol concentration to the expected vessel concentration in order to preserve the simplified use of the AST in assessing containment performance under assumed DBA conditions. This correction is required during the first two hours of the accident while the gap and early in-vessel source terms are present. It is general practice to assume that at {approx}2hrs, recovery actions to reflood the core will have been successful and that further core damage can be avoided. The analyses performed in this study determine that, after two hours, assuming vessel reflooding has taken place, the containment aerosol concentration can then conservatively be used as the effective source to the leaking MSIV's. Recommendations are provided concerning typical aerosol removal coefficients that can be used in the RADTRAD code to predict source attenuation in the steam lines, and on robust methods of predicting MSIV leakage flows based on measured MSIV leakage performance.

  8. Traffic Accidents on Slippery Roads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonnesbech, J. K.; Bolet, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Police registrations from 65 accidents on slippery roads in normally Danish winters have been studied. The study showed: • 1 accident per 100 km when using brine spread with nozzles • 2 accidents per 100 km when using pre wetted salt • 3 accidents per 100 km when using kombi spreaders The results...

  9. Boating Accident Statistics

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Accident statistics available on the Coast Guard’s website by state, year, and one variable to obtain tables and/or graphs. Data from reports has been loaded for...

  10. Accident resistant transport container

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, John A.; Cole, James K.

    1980-01-01

    The invention relates to a container for the safe air transport of plutonium having several intermediate wood layers and a load spreader intermediate an inner container and an outer shell for mitigation of shock during a hypothetical accident.

  11. Development and first application of a new tool for the simulation of the initiating phase of a severe accident on SFR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyot, M.; Gubernatis, P.; Suteau, C.

    2014-06-01

    In order to improve the safety level of Sodium Fast Reactors, low probability events such as Hypothetical Core Disruptive Accident (HCDA) are analyzed for their potential consequences. The initiating phase of such accidents is of particular interest both for the prevention and the mitigation of routes leading to a large core disruption and recriticalities. Up to now, analysis of the initiating phase of HCDA has been performed with the SAS4A code. The SAS4A accident calculations are based on a multiple-channel approach, which requires that subassemblies or groups of similar subassemblies be represented together as independent channels. The SAS4A severe accident calculation scheme resorts to a simplified treatment in which an average pin is used to represent a channel. A point kinetics model coupled with a feedback reactivity model is also used to provide an estimate of the reactor power level. Both to increase the accuracy and decrease the uncertainties in the prediction of reactor safety margins, a new computational tool is currently under development at CEA Cadarache. The main features of this tool are the ability to provide a detailed sub-channel meshing of the sub-assembly as well as three-dimensional kinetics during severe accident conditions. To fulfill these goals, the fluid-dynamics SIMMER-III code has been coupled to the SNATCH solver using a MPI environment. This coupling allows both to compute the multi-phase and multi-component flows encountered in severe accident conditions and to model the power shape variation during voiding and melting of the different reactor materials. This new calculation scheme relies on a SAS-like multiple-channel treatment, where channel-to-channel heat and momentum exchanges are neglected. In this paper, an overview of the SIMMER-III/SNATCH coupled tool capabilities is provided. A first application of this new tool is also performed and compared with a SAS4A reference calculation. The new SIMMER-III/SNATCH tool proved to be

  12. Accidents with sulfuric acid

    OpenAIRE

    Rajković Miloš B.

    2006-01-01

    Sulfuric acid is an important industrial and strategic raw material, the production of which is developing on all continents, in many factories in the world and with an annual production of over 160 million tons. On the other hand, the production, transport and usage are very dangerous and demand measures of precaution because the consequences could be catastrophic, and not only at the local level where the accident would happen. Accidents that have been publicly recorded during the last eigh...

  13. Preliminary design report for SCDAP/RELAP5 lower core plate model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coryell, E.W. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab.; Griffin, F.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1998-07-01

    The SCDAP/RELAP5 computer code is a best-estimate analysis tool for performing nuclear reactor severe accident simulations. Under primary sponsorship of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is responsible for overall maintenance of this code and for improvements for pressurized water reactor (PWR) applications. Since 1991, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been improving SCDAP/RELAP5 for boiling water reactor (BWR) applications. The RELAP5 portion of the code performs the thermal-hydraulic calculations for both normal and severe accident conditions. The structures within the reactor vessel and coolant system can be represented with either RELAP5 heat structures or SCDAP/RELAP5 severe accident structures. The RELAP5 heat structures are limited to normal operating conditions (i.e., no structural oxidation, melting, or relocation), while the SCDAP portion of the code is capable of representing structural degradation and core damage progression that can occur under severe accident conditions. DCDAP/RELAP5 currently assumes that molten material which leaves the core region falls into the lower vessel head without interaction with structural materials. The objective of this design report is to describe the modifications required for SCDAP/RELAP5 to treat the thermal response of the structures in the core plate region as molten material relocates downward from the core, through the core plate region, and into the lower plenum. This has been a joint task between INEEL and ORNL, with INEEL focusing on PWR-specific design, and ORNL focusing upon the BWR-specific aspects. Chapter 2 describes the structures in the core plate region that must be represented by the proposed model. Chapter 3 presents the available information about the damage progression that is anticipated to occur in the core plate region during a severe accident, including typical SCDAP/RELAP5 simulation results. Chapter 4 provides a

  14. Analysis of Severe Accident for the SFP under the Condition of Drainage using MELCOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Jung-Min; Pack, Jae-Woo [Jeju National University, Jeju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    This study aims to analyze the effect of a LOCA of the spent fuel pool. We use the MECORE 1.8.6 code to compute the variation of the fuel cladding temperature after a completer loss of the cooling water in the spent fuel pool. A loss of coolant accident in a typical spent fuel pool has been simulated using the MELCOR 1.8.6 code to see the variation of key parameters such as the oxygen concentration in the fuel assembly region and the cladding temperature. In a commercial nuclear power plant, highly radioactive spent fuel assemblies unloaded from the nuclear reactor core are typically stored for a period of time in the spent fuel pool to reduce the radioactivity. The spent fuel assemblies are usually placed in long square racks. It is known that in the progress of the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident, the cooling water in the spent fuel storage was completely lost and the fuel was heated up and damaged. The simulation result shows that the cladding temperature exceeds the rupture temperature in most of the fuel rods and some part of the fuel rods suffers melting of the cladding.

  15. Cyclical Fluctuations in Workplace Accidents

    OpenAIRE

    Boone, J.; J. C. VAN OURS

    2002-01-01

    This Paper presents a theory and an empirical investigation on cyclical fluctuations in workplace accidents. The theory is based on the idea that reporting an accident dents the reputation of a worker and raises the probability that he is fired. Therefore a country with a high or an increasing unemployment rate has a low (reported) workplace accident rate. The empirical investigation concerns workplace accidents in OECD countries. The analysis confirms that workplace accident rates are invers...

  16. OECD/MCCI 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : final report February 28, 2006.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

    2011-05-23

    Although extensive research has been conducted over the last several years in the areas of Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) and debris coolability, two important issues warrant further investigation. The first issue concerns the effectiveness of water in terminating a CCI by flooding the interacting masses from above, thereby quenching the molten core debris and rendering it permanently coolable. This safety issue was investigated in the EPRI-sponsored Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program. The approach was to conduct large scale, integral-type reactor materials experiments with core melt masses ranging up to two metric tons. These experiments provided unique, and for the most part repeatable, indications of heat transfer mechanism(s) that could provide long term debris cooling. However, the results did not demonstrate definitively that a melt would always be completely quenched. This was due to the fact that the crust anchored to the test section sidewalls in every test, which led to melt/crust separation, even at the largest test section lateral span of 1.20 m. This decoupling is not expected for a typical reactor cavity, which has a span of 5-6 m. Even though the crust may mechanically bond to the reactor cavity walls, the weight of the coolant and the crust itself is expected to periodically fracture the crust and restore contact with the melt. Although crust fracturing does not ensure that coolability will be achieved, it nonetheless provides a pathway for water to recontact the underlying melt, thereby allowing other debris cooling mechanisms to proceed. A related task of the current program, which is not addressed in this particular report, is to measure crust strength to check the hypothesis that a corium crust would not be strong enough to sustain melt/crust separation in a plant accident. The second important issue concerns long-term, two-dimensional concrete ablation by a prototypic core oxide melt. As discussed by Foit the existing

  17. Severe accident analysis of a station blackout accident using MAAP-CANDU for the Point Lepreau station refurbishment project level 2 PSA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, M.J.; Petoukhov, S.M. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-07-01

    A Level 2 Probabilistic Safety Assessment was performed for the Point Lepreau Generating Station, using the MAAP-CANDU code to simulate the progression of severe core damage accidents and fission product releases. Five representative severe accidents were selected: Station Blackout, Small Loss-of-Coolant, Stagnation Feeder Break, Steam Generator Tube Rupture, and Shutdown State. Analysis results for the reference station blackout accident are discussed in this paper. (author)

  18. Upgrading the electrical system of the IEA-R1 reactor to avoid triggering event of accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mello, Jose Roberto de; Madi Filho, Tufic, E-mail: jrmello@ipen.br, E-mail: tmfilho@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The IEA-R1 research reactor at the Institute of Energy and Nuclear Research (IPEN) is a research reactor open pool type, built and designed by the American firm 'Babcox and Wilcox', having as coolant and moderator demineralized light water and Beryllium and graphite, as reflectors. The power supply system is designed to meet the electricity demand required by the loads of the reactor (Security systems and systems not related to security) in different situations the plant can meet, such as during startup, normal operation at power, shutdown, maintenance, exchange of fuel elements and accident situations. Studies have been done on possible accident initiating events and deterministic techniques were applied to assess the consequences of such incidents. Thus, the methods used to identify and select the accident initiating events, the methods of analysis of accidents, including sequence of events, transient analysis and radiological consequences, have been described. Finally, acceptance criteria of radiological doses are described. Only a brief summary of the item concerning loss of electrical power will be presented. The loss of normal electrical power at the IEA-R1 reactor is very common. In the case of Electric External Power Loss, at the IEA-R1 reactor building, there may be different sequences of events, as described below. When the supply of external energy in the IEA-R1 facility fails, the Electrical Distribution Vital System, consisting of 4 (four) generators type 'UPS', starts operation, immediately and it will continue supplying power to the reactor control table, core cooling system and other security systems. To contribute to security, in the electric power failure, starts to operate the Emergency Cooling System (SRE). SRE has the function of removing residual heat from the core to prevent the melting of fuel elements in the event of loss of refrigerant to the core. Adding to the generators with batteries group system, new auxiliary

  19. Prediction of Melting Penetration of Armco Iron by Liquid Uranium Using MPS_LER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustari, A. P. A.; Iksal; Sumiati; Syeilendra; Irwanto, Dwi; Aprianti, N. A.

    2017-01-01

    Given the nuclear reactor severe accident, molten uranium may relocate and contact with iron based structural material which could result in melting of iron based material. According to binary phase diagram, contact between Fe and U may include eutectic phenomenon where melting temperature of the material drop sharply. Information of melting penetration rate of iron based material by uranium is important for melting relocation investigation during severe accident. MPS_LER has been developed and validated to simulate eutectic phenomena of Fe-U system. In the present study, the MPS_LER was used to predict melting penetration of Armco Iron by liquid uranium that has not been experimentally recorded. The present results show MPS_LER’s prediction on melting penetration rate of Fe-U system at high temperature.

  20. Accidents in nuclear ships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oelgaard, P.L. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)]|[Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark)

    1996-12-01

    This report starts with a discussion of the types of nuclear vessels accidents, in particular accidents which involve the nuclear propulsion systems. Next available information on 61 reported nuclear ship events in considered. Of these 6 deals with U.S. ships, 54 with USSR ships and 1 with a French ship. The ships are in almost all cases nuclear submarines. Only events that involve the sinking of vessels, the nuclear propulsion plants, radiation exposures, fires/explosions, sea-water leaks into the submarines and sinking of vessels are considered. For each event a summary of available information is presented, and comments are added. In some cases the available information is not credible, and these events are neglected. This reduces the number of events to 5 U.S. events, 35 USSR/Russian events and 1 French event. A comparison is made between the reported Soviet accidents and information available on dumped and damaged Soviet naval reactors. It seems possible to obtain good correlation between the two types of events. An analysis is made of the accident and estimates are made of the accident probabilities which are found to be of the order of 10{sup -3} per ship reactor years. It if finally pointed out that the consequences of nuclear ship accidents are fairly local and does in no way not approach the magnitude of the Chernobyl accident. It is emphasized that some of the information on which this report is based, may not be correct. Consequently some of the results of the assessments made may not be correct. (au).

  1. Preliminary assessment of accident-tolerant fuels on LWR performance during normal operation and under DB and BDB accident conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, L. J.; Robb, K. R.; Wang, D.

    2014-05-01

    Following the severe accidents at the Japanese Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station in 2011, the US Department of Energy initiated research and development on the enhancement of the accident tolerance of light water reactors by the development of fuels/cladding that, in comparison with the standard UO2/Zircaloy (Zr) system, can tolerate loss of active cooling in the core for a considerably longer time period while maintaining or improving the fuel performance during normal operations. Analyses are presented that illustrate the impact of these new candidate fuel/cladding materials on the fuel performance at normal operating conditions and on the reactor system under DB and BDB accident conditions.

  2. A phenomenological analysis of melt progression in the lower head of a pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seiler, J.M., E-mail: jean-marie.seiler@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DTN, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Tourniaire, B. [EDF/Septen, Lyon (France)

    2014-03-15

    Highlights: • We propose a phenomenological description of melt progression into the lower head. • We examine changes in heat loads on the vessel. • Heat loads are more severe than emphasized by the bounding situation assumption. • Both primary circuit and ex-vessel reflooding are necessary for in-vessel retention. • Vessel failure conditions are examined. - Abstract: The analysis of in-vessel corium cooling (IVC) and retention (IVR) involves the description of very complex and transient physical phenomena. To get round this difficulty, “bounding” situations are often emphasized for the demonstration of corium coolability, by vessel flooding and/or by reactor pit flooding. This approach however comes up against its own limitations. More realistic melt progression scenarios are required to provide plausible corium configurations and vessel failure conditions. Work to develop more realistic melt progression scenarios has been done at CEA, in collaboration with EDF. Development has concentrated on the French 1300 MWe PWR, considering both dry scenarios and the possibility of flooding of the RPC (reactor primary circuit) and/or the reactor pit. The models used for this approach have been derived from the analysis of the TMI2 accident and take benefit from the lessons derived from several programs related to pool thermal hydraulics (BALI, COPO, ACOPO, etc.), material interactions (RASPLAV, MASCA), critical heat flux (CHF) on the external surface of the vessel (KAIST, SULTAN, ULPU), etc. Important conclusions of this work are as follows: (a)After the start of corium melting and onset of melt formation in the core at low pressure (∼1 to 5 bars), it seems questionable that RPV (reactor pressure vessel) reflooding alone would be sufficient to achieve corium retention in the vessel; (b)If the vessel is not cooled externally, it may fail due to local heat-up before the whole core fuel inventory is relocated in the lower head; (c)Even if the vessel is

  3. Computational modeling for hexcan failure under core distruptive accidental conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawada, T.; Ninokata, H.; Shimizu, A. [Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan)

    1995-09-01

    This paper describes the development of computational modeling for hexcan wall failures under core disruptive accident conditions of fast breeder reactors. A series of out-of-pile experiments named SIMBATH has been analyzed by using the SIMMER-II code. The SIMBATH experiments were performed at KfK in Germany. The experiments used a thermite mixture to simulate fuel. The test geometry of SIMBATH ranged from single pin to 37-pin bundles. In this study, phenomena of hexcan wall failure found in a SIMBATH test were analyzed by SIMMER-II. Although the original model of SIMMER-II did not calculate any hexcan failure, several simple modifications made it possible to reproduce the hexcan wall melt-through observed in the experiment. In this paper the modifications and their significance are discussed for further modeling improvements.

  4. ACR-1000 design provisions for severe accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popov, N.K.; Santamaura, P.; Shapiro, H.; Snell, V.G. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Mississauga, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: popovn@aecl.ca

    2006-07-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) developed the Advanced CANDU Reactor-700 (ACR-700) as an evolutionary advancement of the current CANDU 6 reactor. As a further advancement of the ACR design, AECL is currently developing the ACR-1000 for the Canadian and international market. The ACR-1000 is aimed at producing electrical power for a capital cost and a unit-energy cost significantly less than that of the current generation of operating nuclear plants, while achieving enhanced safety features, shorter construction schedule, high plant capacity factor, improved operations and maintenance, and increased operating life. The reference ACR-1000 plant design is based on an integrated two-unit plant, using enriched fuel and light-water coolant, with each unit having a nominal gross output of about 1200 MWe. The ACR-1000 design meets Canadian regulatory requirements and follows established international practice with respect to severe accident prevention and mitigation. This paper presents the ACR-1000 features that are designed to mitigate limited core damage and severe core damage states, including core retention within vessel, core damage termination, and containment integrity maintenance. While maintaining existing structures of CANDU reactors that provide inherent prevention and retention of core debris, the ACR-1000 design includes additional features for prevention and mitigation of severe accidents. Core retention within vessel in CANDU-type reactors includes both retention within fuel channels, and retention within the calandria vessel. The ACR-1000 calandria vessel design permits for passive rejection of decay heat from the moderator to the shield water. Also, the calandria vessel is designed for debris retention by minimizing penetrations at the bottom periphery and by accommodating thermal and weight loads of the core debris. The ACR-1000 containment is required to withstand external events such as earthquakes, tornados, floods and aircraft crashes

  5. Melting of Transition Metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, M; Japel, S; Boehler, R

    2005-04-11

    We review the transition melting studies carried out at Mainz, and describe a recently developed model used to explain that the relatively low melting slopes are due to the partially filled d-bands, and the persistence of the pressure induced s-d transition. The basic tenets of the model have now been reconfirmed by new measurements for Cu and Ni. The measurements show that Cu which has a filled 3d-band, has a melt slope that is about 2.5 greater than its neighbor Ni. In the case of Mo, the apparent discrepancy of DAC melting measurements with shock melting can be explained by accounting for the change in melt slope due to the bcc-cp transition observed in the shock studies. The Fe melt curve is revisited. The possible relevance of the Jahn-Teller effect and recently observed transition metal melts with Icosahedral Short-Range Order (ISRO) is discussed.

  6. Who by accident? The social morphology of car accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Factor, Roni; Yair, Gad; Mahalel, David

    2010-09-01

    Prior studies in the sociology of accidents have shown that different social groups have different rates of accident involvement. This study extends those studies by implementing Bourdieu's relational perspective of social space to systematically explore the homology between drivers' social characteristics and their involvement in specific types of motor vehicle accident. Using a large database that merges official Israeli road-accident records with socioeconomic data from two censuses, this research maps the social order of road accidents through multiple correspondence analysis. Extending prior studies, the results show that different social groups indeed tend to be involved in motor vehicle accidents of different types and severity. For example, we find that drivers from low socioeconomic backgrounds are overinvolved in severe accidents with fatal outcomes. The new findings reported here shed light on the social regularity of road accidents and expose new facets in the social organization of death. © 2010 Society for Risk Analysis.

  7. MELTSPREAD-1 calculations of the transient spreading of core materials in the KNGR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Yong Mann; Park, Soo Yong

    1999-03-01

    Major purpose of the report is to predict whether or not the melt will spread to cover the full floor area under severe accident conditions in KNGR (Korea Next Generation Reactor) cavity and to determine the local distribution of spread material depth as well as concrete attack upon the cavity floor. For this analysis, MELTSPREAD-1 computer code developed at ANL (Argonne National Laboratory) is first applied domestically. This code was originally developed to model the discharge of corium from the vessel and its spreading on the floor of a prototypical BWR Mark 1 containment, but is known to have the flexibility of LWR application via user-specified nodalization scheme. The analysis methodology in this report is assessed to be valid by independent ABB-CE review [ABB-CE 1988]. For the conservative analysis of melt spreading and erosion characteristics, a medium LOCA (loss of coolant accident) as the typical in-vessel low pressure accident, with 100% core mass release into the wet cavity is chosen as the basic sequence. For specified conditions of release from the failed reactor vessel lower head, the core materials are calculated to spread within a very short time and cover the full accessible cavity floor area. The spreading profiles are shown as a scene view according to time with detailed predictions of the extent of local melting-induced erosion of the concrete floor. The MELTSPREAD-1 results are important to the assessment of melt coolability following the transients spreading phase, and the results of the basic LOCA sequence can serve as the bounding calculation in the melt spreading and ablation for the KNGR cavity. In addition to this, sensitivity studies are made for important factors and crust formation and heat transfer models together with initial cavity condition and initial corium mass/temperature are appeared to be significant for the results. For the last, both MELTSPREAD-1 code input deck and calculation note used for the sequence analysis are

  8. Severe Accident Test Station Activity Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pint, Bruce A [ORNL; Terrani, Kurt A [ORNL

    2015-06-01

    Enhancing safety margins in light water reactor (LWR) severe accidents is currently the focus of a number of international R&D programs. The current UO2/Zr-based alloy fuel system is particularly susceptible since the Zr-based cladding experiences rapid oxidation kinetics in steam at elevated temperatures. Therefore, alternative cladding materials that offer slower oxidation kinetics and a smaller enthalpy of oxidation can significantly reduce the rate of heat and hydrogen generation in the core during a coolant-limited severe accident. In the U.S. program, the high temperature steam oxidation performance of accident tolerant fuel (ATF) cladding solutions has been evaluated in the Severe Accident Test Station (SATS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since 2012. This report summarizes the capabilities of the SATS and provides an overview of the oxidation kinetics of several candidate cladding materials. A suggested baseline for evaluating ATF candidates is a two order of magnitude reduction in the steam oxidation resistance above 1000ºC compared to Zr-based alloys. The ATF candidates are categorized based on the protective external oxide or scale that forms during exposure to steam at high temperature: chromia, alumina, and silica. Comparisons are made to literature and SATS data for Zr-based alloys and other less-protective materials.

  9. ALICE Injected Beam Accidents

    CERN Document Server

    Appleby, R B

    2009-01-01

    The ALICE (point 2) interaction region is sensitive to beam orbit errors arising from magnet setting errors on injection. In this report, beam accident scenarios under injection for ALICE are described, focusing on ultra- fast error injection scenarios for the interaction straight correctors and dipoles. Beam 1 and beam 2 accident scenarios are considered, where the errors can lead to beam orbits striking the ALICE vacuum chamber or elements of the machine. The required thresholds for magnet current interlocks are calculated to avoid machine and detector risk.

  10. LHCb Injected Beam Accidents

    CERN Document Server

    Appleby, R B

    2009-01-01

    The LHCb (point 8) interaction region is sensitive to beam orbit errors arising from magnet setting errors on injection. In this report, beam accident scenarios under injection for LHCb are described, focusing on ultra- fast error injection scenarios for the interaction straight correctors and dipoles. Beam 1 and beam 2 accident scenarios are considered, where the errors can lead to beam orbits striking the LHCb vacuum chamber or elements of the machine. The required thresholds for magnet current interlocks are calculated to avoid machine and detector risk.

  11. A Study on the Operation Strategy for Combined Accident including TLOFW accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bo Gyung; Kang, Gook Young [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Ho Joon [Khalifa University, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates)

    2014-10-15

    It is difficult for operators to recognize the necessity of a feed-and-bleed (F-B) operation when the loss of coolant accident and failure of secondary side occur. An F-B operation directly cools down the reactor coolant system (RCS) using the primary cooling system when residual heat removal by the secondary cooling system is not available. The plant is not always necessary the F-B operation when the secondary side is failed. It is not necessary to initiate an F-B operation in the case of a medium or large break because these cases correspond to low RCS pressure sequences when the secondary side is failed. If the break size is too small to sufficiently decrease the RCS pressure, the F-B operation is necessary. Therefore, in the case of a combined accident including a secondary cooling system failure, the provision of clear information will play a critical role in the operators' decision to initiate an F-B operation. This study focuses on the how we establish the operation strategy for combined accident including the failure of secondary side in consideration of plant and operating conditions. Previous studies have usually focused on accidents involving a TLOFW accident. The plant conditions to make the operators confused seriously are usually the combined accident because the ORP only focuses on a single accident and FRP is less familiar with operators. The relationship between CET and PCT under various plant conditions is important to decide the limitation of initiating the F-B operation to prevent core damage.

  12. Severe accident approach - final report. Evaluation of design measures for severe accident prevention and consequence mitigation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tentner, A. M.; Parma, E.; Wei, T.; Wigeland, R.; Nuclear Engineering Division; SNL; INL

    2010-03-01

    An important goal of the US DOE reactor development program is to conceptualize advanced safety design features for a demonstration Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR). The treatment of severe accidents is one of the key safety issues in the design approach for advanced SFR systems. It is necessary to develop an in-depth understanding of the risk of severe accidents for the SFR so that appropriate risk management measures can be implemented early in the design process. This report presents the results of a review of the SFR features and phenomena that directly influence the sequence of events during a postulated severe accident. The report identifies the safety features used or proposed for various SFR designs in the US and worldwide for the prevention and/or mitigation of Core Disruptive Accidents (CDA). The report provides an overview of the current SFR safety approaches and the role of severe accidents. Mutual understanding of these design features and safety approaches is necessary for future collaborations between the US and its international partners as part of the GEN IV program. The report also reviews the basis for an integrated safety approach to severe accidents for the SFR that reflects the safety design knowledge gained in the US during the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) and Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) programs. This approach relies on inherent reactor and plant safety performance characteristics to provide additional safety margins. The goal of this approach is to prevent development of severe accident conditions, even in the event of initiators with safety system failures previously recognized to lead directly to reactor damage.

  13. Neutronic evaluation of coating and cladding materials for accident tolerant fuels

    OpenAIRE

    Younker, I; Fratoni, M

    2016-01-01

    © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. In severe accident conditions with loss of active cooling in the core, zirconium alloys, used as fuel cladding materials for current light water reactors (LWR), undergo a rapid oxidation by high temperature steam with consequent hydrogen generation. Novel fuel technologies, named accident tolerant fuels (ATF), seek to improve the endurance of severe accident conditions in LWRs by eliminating or at least mitigating such detrimental steam-cladding inter...

  14. Lessons learned from accidents investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuniga-Bello, P. [Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnologia (CONACYT), Mexico City (Mexico); Croft, J. [National Radiological Protection Board (United Kingdom); Glenn, J

    1997-12-31

    Accidents from three main practices: medical applications, industrial radiography and industrial irradiators are used to illustrate some common causes of accidents and the main lessons to be learned. A brief description of some of these accidents is given. Lessons learned from the described accidents are approached by subjects covering: safety culture, quality assurance, human factors, good engineering practice, defence in depth, security of sources, safety assessment and monitoring and verification compliance. (author)

  15. Authority structure and industrial accidents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    As, Sicco van

    2001-01-01

    This paper deals with the influence of organizational characteristics on safety. Accidents are actually caused by individual mistakes. However the underlying causes of accidents are often organizational. The general hypothesis is that the authority structure is a main cause of accident-proneness

  16. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit 1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal floods during mid-loop operations. Volume 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohut, P. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-07-01

    The major objective of the Surry internal flood analysis was to provide an improved understanding of the core damage scenarios arising from internal flood-related events. The mean core damage frequency of the Surry plant due to internal flood events during mid-loop operations is 4.8E-06 per year, and the 5th and 95th percentiles are 2.2E-07 and 1.8E-05 per year, respectively. Some limited sensitivity calculations were performed on three plant improvement options. The most significant result involves modifications of intake-level structure on the canal, which reduced core damage frequency contribution from floods in mid-loop by about 75%.

  17. Mercury's core evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deproost, Marie-Hélène; Rivoldini, Attilio; Van Hoolst, Tim

    2016-10-01

    Remote sensing data of Mercury's surface by MESSENGER indicate that Mercury formed under reducing conditions. As a consequence, silicon is likely the main light element in the core together with a possible small fraction of sulfur. Compared to sulfur, which does almost not partition into solid iron at Mercury's core conditions and strongly decreases the melting temperature, silicon partitions almost equally well between solid and liquid iron and is not very effective at reducing the melting temperature of iron. Silicon as the major light element constituent instead of sulfur therefore implies a significantly higher core liquidus temperature and a decrease in the vigor of compositional convection generated by the release of light elements upon inner core formation.Due to the immiscibility in liquid Fe-Si-S at low pressure (below 15 GPa), the core might also not be homogeneous and consist of an inner S-poor Fe-Si core below a thinner Si-poor Fe-S layer. Here, we study the consequences of a silicon-rich core and the effect of the blanketing Fe-S layer on the thermal evolution of Mercury's core and on the generation of a magnetic field.

  18. An analysis on the severe accident progression with operator recovery actions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vo, T.H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 989-111 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Korea University of Science and Technology (UST), 217 Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Song, J.H., E-mail: dosa@kaeri.re.kr [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 989-111 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Korea University of Science and Technology (UST), 217 Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, T.W.; Kim, D.H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 989-111 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Severe accident progression for the station blackout and SBLOCA accident. • Analyses on APR1400 using MELCOR. • Operator recovery actions for decay heat removal and inventory make up. • Determine the time allowed for the operator to prevent reactor vessel failure. • Insight for the operator recovery actions for the severe accident management. - Abstract: Analyses on the severe accident progressions for the station blackout (SBO) accident and small break LOCA (SBLOCA) initiated severe accident were performed for APR1400 by using MELCOR computer code. Operator recovery actions for decay heat removal and inventory make up using a depressurization system and safety injection pump were simulated in parallel with a simulation of the severe accident progression. Sensitivity studies on the operator actions were performed to investigate the changes in the timing of the reactor vessel failure and to determine the time allowed for the operator to prevent reactor vessel failure. Sensitivity analyses on the effect of major modeling parameters were performed additionally to quantify the uncertainties in timing. It is found that the operator has about 2 h for the recovery actions after the indication of core damage by the signal of core exit thermocouple (CET) for the SBLOCA initiated severe accident, while the operator has to take immediate actions after the indication of core damage by CET for the SBO accident.

  19. Effect of boiling regime on melt stream breakup in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, B.W.; Gabor, J.D.; Cassulo, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    A study has been performed examining the breakup and mixing behavior of an initially coherent stream of high-density melt as it flows downward through water. This work has application to the quenching of molten core materials as they drain downward during a postulated severe reactor accident. The study has included examination of various models of breakup distances based upon interfacial instabilities dominated either by liquid-liquid contact or by liquid-vapor contact. A series of experiments was performed to provide a data base for assessment of the various modeling approaches. The experiments involved Wood's metal (T/sub m/ = 73/sup 0/C, rho = 9.2 g/cm/sup 3/, d/sub j/ = 20 mm) poured into a deep pool of water. The temperature of the water and wood's metal were varied to span the range from single-phase, liquid-liquid contact to the film boiling regime. Experiment results showed that breakup occurred largely as a result of the spreading and entrainment from the leading edge of the jet. However, for streams of sufficient lengths a breakup length could be discerned at which there was no longer a coherent central core of the jet to feed the leading edge region. The erosion of the vertical trailing column is by Kelvin-Helmoltz instabilities and related disengagement of droplets from the jet into the surrounding fluid. For conditions of liquid-liquid contact, the breakup length has been found to be about 20 jet diameters; when substantial vapor is produced at the interface due to heat transfer from the jet to the water, the breakup distance was found to range to as high as 50 jet diameters. The former values are close to the analytical prediction of Taylor, whereas the latter values are better predicted by the model of Epstein and Fauske.

  20. Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1 Ex-Vessel Prediction: Core Concrete Interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robb, Kevin R [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Farmer, Mitchell [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Francis, Matthew W [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Lower head failure and corium concrete interaction were predicted to occur at Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1 (1F1) by several different system-level code analyses, including MELCOR v2.1 and MAAP5. Although these codes capture a wide range of accident phenomena, they do not contain detailed models for ex-vessel core melt behavior. However, specialized codes exist for analysis of ex-vessel melt spreading (e.g., MELTSPREAD) and long-term debris coolability (e.g., CORQUENCH). On this basis, an analysis was carried out to further evaluate ex-vessel behavior for 1F1 using MELTSPREAD and CORQUENCH. Best-estimate melt pour conditions predicted by MELCOR v2.1 and MAAP5 were used as input. MELTSPREAD was then used to predict the spatially dependent melt conditions and extent of spreading during relocation from the vessel. The results of the MELTSPREAD analysis are reported in a companion paper. This information was used as input for the long-term debris coolability analysis with CORQUENCH.

  1. Preliminary Calculation on a Spent Fuel Pool Accident using GOTHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jaehwan; Choi, Yu Jung; Hong, Tae Hyub; Kim, Hyeong-Taek [KHNP-CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The probability of an accident happening at the spent fuel pool was believed to be quite low until the 2011 Fukushima accident occurred. Notably, large amount of spent fuel are normally stored in the spent fuel pool for a long time compared to the amount of fuel in the reactor core and the total heat released from the spent fuel is high enough to boil the water of the spent fuel pool when the cooling system does not operate. In addition, the enrichment and the burnup of the fuel have both increased in the past decade and heat generation from the spent fuel thereby has also increased. The failure of the cooling system at the spent fuel pool (hereafter, a loss-of-cooling accident) is one of the principal hypothetical causes of an accident that could occur at the spent fuel pool. In this paper, the preliminary calculation of a loss-of-cooling accident was performed. In this paper, the preliminary calculation of a loss-of cooling accident was performed with GOTHIC. The calculation results show boiling away of water in the spent fuel pool due to the loss-of-cooling accident and similar thermal performance of the spent fuel pool with previous research results.

  2. Experimental and analytical studies of melt jet-coolant interactions: a synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinh, T.N.; Bui, V.A.; Nourgaliev, R.R.; Green, J.A.; Sehgal, B.R. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Div. of Nuclear Power Safety

    1998-01-01

    Instability and fragmentation of a core melt jet in water have been actively studied during the past ten years. Several models, and a few computer codes, have been developed. However, there are, still, large uncertainties, both, in interpreting experimental results and in predicting reactor-scale processes. Steam explosion and debris coolability, as reactor safety issues, are related to the jet fragmentation process. A better understanding of the physics of jet instability and fragmentation is crucial for assessments of fuel-coolant interactions (FCIs). This paper presents research, conducted at the Division of Nuclear Power Safety, Royal Institute of Technology (RIT/NPS), Stockholm, concerning molten jet-coolant interactions, as a precursor for premixing. First, observations were obtained from scoping experiments with simulant fluids. Second, the linear perturbation method was extended and applied to analyze the interfacial-instability characteristics. Third, two innovative approachs to CFD modeling of jet fragmentation were developed and employed for analysis. The focus of the studies was placed on (a) identifying potential factors, which may affect the jet instability, (b) determining the scaling laws, and (c) predicting the jet behavior for severe accidents conditions. In particular, the effects of melt physical properties, and the thermal hydraulics of the mixing zone, on jet fragmentation were investigated. Finally, with the insights gained from a synthesis of the experimental results and analysis results, a new phenomenological concept, named `macrointeractions concept of jet fragmentation` is proposed. (author)

  3. Chernobyl accident and its consequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gittus, J.H.

    1987-06-01

    The paper concerns the Chernobyl reactor accident, with emphasis on the design of the RBMK reactor and nuclear safety. A description is given of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant, including details of the RMBK reactor and safety systems. Comments on the design of the RBMK by UK experts prior to the accident are summarized, along with post-accident design changes to improve RBMK safety. Events of the Chernobyl accident are described, as well as design deficiencies highlighted by the accident. Differences between the USSR and UK approaches to nuclear safety are commented on. Finally source terms, release periods and environmental consequences are briefly discussed.

  4. Comparative Study on Two Melting Simulation Methods: Melting Curve of Gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhong-Li; Sun, Jun-Sheng; Li, Rui; Zhang, Xiu-Lu; Cai, Ling-Cang

    2016-05-01

    Melting simulation methods are of crucial importance to determining melting temperature of materials efficiently. A high-efficiency melting simulation method saves much simulation time and computational resources. To compare the efficiency of our newly developed shock melting (SM) method with that of the well-established two-phase (TP) method, we calculate the high-pressure melting curve of Au using the two methods based on the optimally selected interatomic potentials. Although we only use 640 atoms to determine the melting temperature of Au in the SM method, the resulting melting curve accords very well with the results from the TP method using much more atoms. Thus, this shows that a much smaller system size in SM method can still achieve a fully converged melting curve compared with the TP method, implying the robustness and efficiency of the SM method. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 41574076 and the NSAF of China under Grant No. U1230201/A06, and the Young Core Teacher Scheme of Henan Province under Grant No. 2014GGJS-108

  5. Occupational accidents aboard merchant ships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, H.L.; Nielsen, D.; Frydenberg, Morten

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the frequency, circumstances, and causes of occupational accidents aboard merchant ships in international trade, and to identify risk factors for the occurrence of occupational accidents as well as dangerous working situations where possible preventive measures may...... be initiated. Methods: The study is a historical follow up on occupational accidents among crew aboard Danish merchant ships in the period 1993–7. Data were extracted from the Danish Maritime Authority and insurance data. Exact data on time at risk were available. Results: A total of 1993 accidents were...... rate of accidents than Danish citizens. Age was a major risk factor for accidents causing permanent disability. Change of ship and the first period aboard a particular ship were identified as risk factors. Walking from one place to another aboard the ship caused serious accidents. The most serious...

  6. [Drowning accidents in childhood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krandick, G; Mantel, K

    1990-09-30

    This is a report on five boys aged between 1 and 5 years who, after prolonged submersion in cold water, were treated at our department. On being taken out of the water, all the patients were clinically dead. After 1- to 3-hour successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation, with a rectal temperature of about 27 degrees C, they were rewarmed at a rate of 1 degree/hour. Two patients died within a few hours after the accident. One patient survived with an apallic syndrome, 2 children survived with no sequelae. In the event of a water-related accident associated with hypothermia, we consider suitable resuscitation to have preference over rewarming measures. The most important treatment guidelines and prognostic factors are discussed.

  7. RENEB accident simulation exercise

    OpenAIRE

    Brzozowska, Beata; Ainsbury, Elizabeth; Baert, Annelot; Beaton-Green, Lindsay; Barrios, Leonardo; Barquinero, Joan Francesc; Bassinet, Celine; Beinke, Christina; Benedek, Anett; Beukes, Philip; Bortolin, Emanuela; Buraczewska, Iwona; Burbidge, Christopher; De Amicis, Andrea; De Angelis, Cinzia

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The RENEB accident exercise was carried out in order to train the RENEB participants in coordinating and managing potentially large data sets that would be generated in case of a major radiological event. Materials and methods: Each participant was offered the possibility to activate the network by sending an alerting email about a simulated radiation emergency. The same participant had to collect, compile and report capacity, triage categorization and exposure scenario results ob...

  8. PREVENTION OF OCCUPATIONAL ACCIDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovica Jovanovic

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Medical services, physicians and nurses play an essential role in the plant safety program through primary treatment of injured workers and by helping to identify workplace hazards. The physician and nurse should participate in the worksite investigations to identify specific hazard or stresses potentially causing the occupational accidents and injuries and in planning the subsequent hazard control program. Physicians and nurses must work closely and cooperatively with supervisors to ensure the prompt reporting and treatment of all work related health and safety problems. Occupational accidents, work related injuries and fatalities result from multiple causes, affect different segments of the working population, and occur in a myriad of occupations and industrial settings. Multiple factors and risks contribute to traumatic injuries, such as hazardous exposures, workplace and process design, work organization and environment, economics, and other social factors. With such a diversity of theories, it will not be difficult to understand that there does not exist one single theory that is considered right or correct and is universally accepted. These theories are nonetheless necessary, but not sufficient, for developing a frame of reference for understanding accident occurrences. Prevention strategies are also varied, and multiple strategies may be applicable to many settings, including engineering controls, protective equipment and technologies, management commitment to and investment in safety, regulatory controls, and education and training. Research needs are thus broad, and the development and application of interventions involve many disciplines and organizations.

  9. APRI - Accident Phenomena of Risk Importance. Final Report; APRI - Accident Phenomena of Risk Importance. Slutrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frid, W. [Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden); Hammar, L.; Soederman, E. [ES-konsult, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1996-12-01

    The APRI-project started in 1992 with participation of the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI) and the Swedish utilities. The Finnish utility TVO joined the project in 1993. The aim of the project has been to work with phenomenological questions in severe accidents, concentrating on the risk-dominating issues. The work is reported in separate sub-project reports, the present is the final report of the methodological studies as well as a final report for the total project. The research has led to clarifications of the risk complex, and ameliorated the basis for advanced probabilistic safety analyses, specially for the emission risks (PSA level 2) which are being studied at the Swedish plants. A new method has been tried for analysis of complicated accident courses, giving a possibility for systematic evaluation of the impact of different important phenomena (e.g. melt-through, high pressure melt-through with direct heating of the containment atmosphere, steam explosions). In this method, the phenomena are looked upon as top events of a `phenomena-tree`, illustrating how various conditions must be met before the top-event can happen. This method has been useful, in particular for applying `expert estimates`. 47 refs.

  10. A Brief Review of Past INL Work Assessing Radionuclide Content in TMI-2 Melted Fuel Debris: The Use of 144Ce as a Surrogate for Pu Accountancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. L. Chichester; S. J. Thompson

    2013-09-01

    This report serves as a literature review of prior work performed at Idaho National Laboratory, and its predecessor organizations Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), studying radionuclide partitioning within the melted fuel debris of the reactor of the Three Mile Island 2 (TMI-2) nuclear power plant. The purpose of this review is to document prior published work that provides supporting evidence of the utility of using 144Ce as a surrogate for plutonium within melted fuel debris. When the TMI-2 accident occurred no quantitative nondestructive analysis (NDA) techniques existed that could assay plutonium in the unconventional wastes from the reactor. However, unpublished work performed at INL by D. W. Akers in the late 1980s through the 1990s demonstrated that passive gamma-ray spectrometry of 144Ce could potentially be used to develop a semi-quantitative correlation for estimating plutonium content in these materials. The fate and transport of radioisotopes in fuel from different regions of the core, including uranium, fission products, and actinides, appear to be well characterized based on the maximum temperature reached by fuel in different parts of the core and the melting point, boiling point, and volatility of those radioisotopes. Also, the chemical interactions between fuel, fuel cladding, control elements, and core structural components appears to have played a large role in determining when and how fuel relocation occurred in the core; perhaps the most important of these reaction appears to be related to the formation of mixed-material alloys, eutectics, in the fuel cladding. Because of its high melting point, low volatility, and similar chemical behavior to plutonium, the element cerium appears to have behaved similarly to plutonium during the evolution of the TMI-2 accident. Anecdotal evidence extrapolated from open-source literature strengthens this logical feasibility for

  11. Safety Analysis Results for Cryostat Ingress Accidents in ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, B. J.; Cadwallader, L. C.; Petti, D. A.

    1997-06-01

    Accidents involving the ingress of air, helium, or water into the cryostat of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) tokamak design have been analyzed with a modified version of the MELCOR code for the ITER Non-site Specific Safety Report (NSSR-1). The air ingress accident is the result of a postulated breach of the cryostat boundary into an adjoining room. MELCOR results for this accident demonstrate that the condensed air mass and increased heat loads are not a magnet safety concern, but that the partial vacuum in the adjoining room must be accommodated in the building design. The water ingress accident is the result of a postulated magnet arc that results in melting of a Primary Heat Transport System (PHTS) coolant pipe, discharging PHTS water and PHTS water activated corrosion products and HTO into the cryostat. MELCOR results for this accident demonstrate that the condensed water mass and increased heat loads are not a magnet safety concern, that the cryostat pressure remains below design limits, and that the corrosion product and HTO releases are well within the ITER release limits.

  12. OECD 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : CCI-2 test plan, Rev. 0 January 31, 2004.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Lomperski, S.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2011-05-23

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two program objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of satisfying these objectives, the Management Board (MB) approved the conduct of two long-term 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) experiments designed to provide information in several areas, including: (i) lateral vs. axial power split during dry core-concrete interaction, (ii) integral debris coolability data following late phase flooding, and (iii) data regarding the nature and extent of the cooling transient following breach of the crust formed at the melt-water interface. The first of these two tests, CCI-1, was conducted on December 19, 2003. This test investigated the interaction of a fully oxidized 400 kg PWR core melt, initially containing 8 wt % calcined siliceous concrete, with a specially designed two

  13. The Gao-Guenie impact melt breccia—Sampling a rapidly cooled impact melt dike on an H chondrite asteroid?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmieder, Martin; Kring, David A.; Swindle, Timothy D.; Bond, Jade C.; Moore, Carleton B.

    2016-06-01

    The Gao-Guenie H5 chondrite that fell on Burkina Faso (March 1960) has portions that were impact-melted on an H chondrite asteroid at ~300 Ma and, through later impact events in space, sent into an Earth-crossing orbit. This article presents a petrographic and electron microprobe analysis of a representative sample of the Gao-Guenie impact melt breccia consisting of a chondritic clast domain, quenched melt in contact with chondritic clasts, and an igneous-textured impact melt domain. Olivine is predominantly Fo80-82. The clast domain contains low-Ca pyroxene. Impact melt-grown pyroxene is commonly zoned from low-Ca pyroxene in cores to pigeonite and augite in rims. Metal-troilite orbs in the impact melt domain measure up to ~2 mm across. The cores of metal orbs in the impact melt domain contain ~7.9 wt% of Ni and are typically surrounded by taenite and Ni-rich troilite. The metallography of metal-troilite droplets suggest a stage I cooling rate of order 10 °C s-1 for the superheated impact melt. The subsolidus stage II cooling rate for the impact melt breccia could not be determined directly, but was presumably fast. An analogy between the Ni rim gradients in metal of the Gao-Guenie impact melt breccia and the impact-melted H6 chondrite Orvinio suggests similar cooling rates, probably on the order of ~5000-40,000 °C yr-1. A simple model of conductive heat transfer shows that the Gao-Guenie impact melt breccia may have formed in a melt injection dike ~0.5-5 m in width, generated during a sizeable impact event on the H chondrite parent asteroid.

  14. [Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident and Tokaimura criticality accident].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Jun

    2012-03-01

    It is clear from inspection of historical incidents that the scale of disasters in a nuclear power plant accident is quite low level overwhelmingly compared with a nuclear explosion in nuclear war. Two cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki were destroyed by nuclear blast with about 20 kt TNT equivalent and then approximately 100,000 people have died respectively. On the other hand, the number of acute death is 30 in the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident. In this chapter, we review health hazards and doses in two historical nuclear incidents of Chernobyl and Tokaimura criticality accident and then understand the feature of the radiation accident in peaceful utilization of nuclear power.

  15. Accident-tolerant oxide fuel and cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariani, Robert D.

    2017-05-30

    Systems and methods for accident tolerant oxide fuel. One or more disks can be placed between fuel pellets comprising UO.sub.2, wherein such disks possess a higher thermal conductivity material than that of the UO.sub.2 to provide enhanced heat rejection thereof. Additionally, a cladding coating comprising zircaloy coated with a material that provides stability and high melting capability can be provided. The pellets can be configured as annular pellets having an annulus filled with the higher thermal conductivity material. The material coating the zircaloy can be, for example, Zr.sub.5Si.sub.4 or another silicide such as, for example, a Zr-Silicide that limits corrosion. The aforementioned higher thermal conductivity material can be, for example, Si, Zr.sub.xSi.sub.y, Zr, or Al.sub.2O.sub.3.

  16. Experimental simulation of fragmentation and stratification of core debris on the core catcher of a fast breeder reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pillai, Dipin S.; Vignesh, R. [Indian Institute of Technology, Chennai, Tamil Nadu (India); Sudha, A. Jasmin, E-mail: jasmin@igcar.gov.in [Safety Engineering Division, Reactor Design Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102, Tamil Nadu (India); Pushpavanam, S.; Sundararajan, T. [Indian Institute of Technology, Chennai, Tamil Nadu (India); Nashine, B.K.; Selvaraj, P. [Safety Engineering Division, Reactor Design Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Fragmentation of two simultaneous metals jets in a bulk coolant analysed. • Particle size from experiments compared with theoretical analysis. • Jet breakup modes explained using dimensionless numbers. • Settling aspects of aluminium and lead debris on collector plate studied. • Results analysed in light of core debris settling on core catcher in a FBR. - Abstract: The complex and coupled phenomena of two simultaneous molten metal jets fragmenting inside a quiescent liquid pool and settling on a collector plate are experimentally analysed in the context of safety analysis of a fast breeder reactor (FBR) in the post accident heat removal phase. Following a hypothetical core melt down accident in a FBR, a major portion of molten nuclear fuel and clad/structural material which are collectively termed as ‘corium’ undergoes fragmentation in the bulk coolant sodium in the lower plenum of the reactor main vessel and settles on the core catcher plate. The coolability of this decay heat generating debris bed is dependent on the particle size distribution and its layering i.e., stratification. Experiments have been conducted with two immiscible molten metals of different densities poured inside a coolant medium to understand their fragmentation behaviour and to assess the possibility of formation of a stratified debris bed. Molten aluminium and lead have been used as simulants in place of molten stainless steel and nuclear fuel to facilitate easy handling. This paper summarizes the major findings from these experiments. The fragmentation of the two molten metals are explained in the light of relevant dimensionless numbers such as Reynolds number and Weber Number. The mass median diameter of the fragmented debris is predicted from nonlinear stability analysis of slender jets for lead jet and using Rayleigh's classical theory of jet breakup for aluminium jet. The agreement of the predicted values with the experimental results is good. These

  17. Development of Scaling Approach for Prediction of Terminal Spread Thickness of Melt Poured into a Pool of Water

    OpenAIRE

    Konovalenko, Alexander; Kudinov, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Corium melt stabilization and long term cooling in a pool of water located beneath reactor vessel is adopted in several existing designs of light water reactors (LWRs) as an element in severe accident (SA) mitigation strategy. At certain conditions of melt release into the pool (e.g. large ratio of the vessel breach size to the pool depth), liquid melt can spread under water and reach a coolable configuration. Coolability of the melt is contingent on terminal spread thickness of the melt laye...

  18. Physical properties of molten core materials: Zr-Ni and Zr-Cr alloys measured by electrostatic levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohishi, Yuji; Kondo, Toshiki; Ishikawa, Takehiko; Okada, Junpei T.; Watanabe, Yuki; Muta, Hiroaki; Kurosaki, Ken; Yamanaka, Shinsuke

    2017-03-01

    It is important to understand the behaviors of molten core materials to investigate the progression of a core meltdown accident. In the early stages of bundle degradation, low-melting-temperature liquid phases are expected to form via the eutectic reaction between Zircaloy and stainless steel. The main component of Zircaloy is Zr and those of stainless steel are Fe, Ni, and Cr. Our group has previously reported physical property data such as viscosity, density, and surface tension for Zr-Fe liquid alloys using an electrostatic levitation technique. In this study, we report the viscosity, density, and surface tension of Zr-Ni and Zr-Cr liquid alloys (Zr1-xNix (x = 0.12 and 0.24) and Zr0.77Cr0.23) using the electrostatic levitation technique.

  19. Analysis of Fukushima unit 2 accident considering the operating conditions of RCIC system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Il, E-mail: sikim@kaeri.re.kr; Park, Jong Hwa; Ha, Kwang Soon; Cho, Song-Won; Song, JinHo

    2016-03-15

    Highlights: • Fukushima unit 2 accident was analyzed using MELCOR 1.8.6. • RCIC operating conditions were assumed and best case was selected. • Effect of RCIC operating condition on accident scenario was found. - Abstract: A severe accident in Fukushima occurred on March 11, 2011 and units 1, 2 and 3 were damaged severely. A tsunami following an earthquake made the supply of electricity power stop, and the safety systems, which use AC or DC power in plants could not operate properly. It is supposed that the degree of core degradation of unit 2 is less serious than in the other plants, and it was estimated that the operation of reactor core isolation cooling (RCIC) system at the initial stage of the accident minimized the core damage through decay heat removal. Although the operating conditions of the RCIC system are not known clearly, it can be important to analyze the accident scenario of unit 2. In this study, best case of the Fukushima unit 2 accident was presented considering the operating conditions of the RCIC system. The effects of operating condition on core degradation and fission product release rate to environment were also examined. In addition, importance of torus room flooding level in the accident analysis was discussed. MELCOR 1.8.6 was used in this research, and the geometries of plant and operating conditions of safety system were obtained from TEPCO through OECD/NEA BSAF Project.

  20. Desktop Severe Accident Graphic Simulator Module for CANDU6 : PSAIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, S. Y.; Song, Y. M. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The ISAAC ((Integrated Severe Accident Analysis Code for CANDU Plant) code is a system level computer code capable of performing integral analyses of potential severe accident progressions in nuclear power plants, whose main purpose is to support a Level 2 probabilistic safety assessment or severe accident management strategy developments. The code has the capability to predict a severe accident progression by modeling the CANDU6- specific systems and the expected physical phenomena based on the current understanding of the unique accident progressions. The code models the sequence of accident progressions from a core heatup, pressure tube/calandria tube rupture after an uncovery from inside and outside, a relocation of the damaged fuel to the bottom of the calandria, debris behavior in the calandria, corium quenching after a debris relocation from the calandria to the calandria vault and an erosion of the calandria vault concrete floor, a hydrogen burn, and a reactor building failure. Along with the thermal hydraulics, the fission product behavior is also considered in the primary system as well as in the reactor building.

  1. Severe Accident Scoping Simulations of Accident Tolerant Fuel Concepts for BWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robb, Kevin R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Accident-tolerant fuels (ATFs) are fuels and/or cladding that, in comparison with the standard uranium dioxide Zircaloy system, can tolerate loss of active cooling in the core for a considerably longer time period while maintaining or improving the fuel performance during normal operations [1]. It is important to note that the currently used uranium dioxide Zircaloy fuel system tolerates design basis accidents (and anticipated operational occurrences and normal operation) as prescribed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Previously, preliminary simulations of the plant response have been performed under a range of accident scenarios using various ATF cladding concepts and fully ceramic microencapsulated fuel. Design basis loss of coolant accidents (LOCAs) and station blackout (SBO) severe accidents were analyzed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for boiling water reactors (BWRs) [2]. Researchers have investigated the effects of thermal conductivity on design basis accidents [3], investigated silicon carbide (SiC) cladding [4], as well as the effects of ATF concepts on the late stage accident progression [5]. These preliminary analyses were performed to provide initial insight into the possible improvements that ATF concepts could provide and to identify issues with respect to modeling ATF concepts. More recently, preliminary analyses for a range of ATF concepts have been evaluated internationally for LOCA and severe accident scenarios for the Chinese CPR1000 [6] and the South Korean OPR-1000 [7] pressurized water reactors (PWRs). In addition to these scoping studies, a common methodology and set of performance metrics were developed to compare and support prioritizing ATF concepts [8]. A proposed ATF concept is based on iron-chromium-aluminum alloys (FeCrAl) [9]. With respect to enhancing accident tolerance, FeCrAl alloys have substantially slower oxidation kinetics compared to the zirconium alloys typically employed. During a severe accident, Fe

  2. Evaluation Metrics Applied to Accident Tolerant Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shannon M. Bragg-Sitton; Jon Carmack; Frank Goldner

    2014-10-01

    The safe, reliable, and economic operation of the nation’s nuclear power reactor fleet has always been a top priority for the United States’ nuclear industry. Continual improvement of technology, including advanced materials and nuclear fuels, remains central to the industry’s success. Decades of research combined with continual operation have produced steady advancements in technology and have yielded an extensive base of data, experience, and knowledge on light water reactor (LWR) fuel performance under both normal and accident conditions. One of the current missions of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) is to develop nuclear fuels and claddings with enhanced accident tolerance for use in the current fleet of commercial LWRs or in reactor concepts with design certifications (GEN-III+). Accident tolerance became a focus within advanced LWR research upon direction from Congress following the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake, resulting tsunami, and subsequent damage to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant complex. The overall goal of ATF development is to identify alternative fuel system technologies to further enhance the safety, competitiveness and economics of commercial nuclear power. Enhanced accident tolerant fuels would endure loss of active cooling in the reactor core for a considerably longer period of time than the current fuel system while maintaining or improving performance during normal operations. The U.S. DOE is supporting multiple teams to investigate a number of technologies that may improve fuel system response and behavior in accident conditions, with team leadership provided by DOE national laboratories, universities, and the nuclear industry. Concepts under consideration offer both evolutionary and revolutionary changes to the current nuclear fuel system. Mature concepts will be tested in the Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory beginning in Summer 2014 with additional concepts being

  3. Heating of reactor pressure vessel bottom head and penetrations in a severe reactor accident; Reaktoripaineastian pohjan ja laepivientien kuumeneminen sydaemen sulamisonnettomuudessa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikonen, K. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Nuclear Energy

    1997-10-01

    The report describes the fundamentals of heat conductivity and convection and numerical methods like finite difference and control volume method for calculation of the thermal history of a reactor pressure vessel bottom head and penetrations. Phase changes from solids to liquids are considered. Time integration is performed by explicit or implicit method. Developed computer codes for thermal conductivity and convection analyses and codes for graphical visualization are described. The codes are applied to two practical cases. They deal with analyses of Swiss CORVIS-experiments and analyses of control rod and instrument penetrations in a BWR bottom head. A model for calculation of effective thermal conductivity of granular corium is developed. The work is also related to EU MVI-project (Core Melt-Pressure Vessel Interactions During a Light Water Reactor Severe Accident), whose coordinator is Prof. B. R. Sehgal at Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm. (orig.) (11 refs.).

  4. Effect of In-Vessel Retention Strategies under Postulated SGTR Accidents of OPR1000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Wonjun; Lee, Yongjae; Kim, Sung Joong [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hwan-Yeol; Park, Rae-Joon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In this study, MELCOR code was used to simulate the severe accident of the OPR1000. MELCOR code is computer code which enables to simulate the progression of the severe accident for light water reactors. It has been developed by Sandia National Laboratories for plant risk assessment and source term analysis since 1982. According to the probabilistic safety analysis (PSA) Level 1 of OPR1000, typical severe accident scenarios of high probability of a transition to severe accident for OPR1000 were identified as Small Break Loss of Coolant Accident (SBLOCA), Station Black out (SBO), Total Loss of Feed Water (TLOFW), and Steam Generator Tube Rupture. While the first three accidents are expected to result in the generation and transportation of the radioactive nuclides within the containment building as consequence of the core damage and subsequent reactor pressure vessel (RPV) failure, the latter accident scenario may be progressed with possible direct release of the radioactive nuclides to the environment by bypassing the containment building. Thus it is of significance to investigate the SGTR accident with a sophisticated severe accident code. This code can simulate the whole phenomena of a severe accident such as thermal-hydraulic response, core heat-up, oxidation and relocation, and fission product release and transport. Thus many researchers have used MELCOR in severe accident studies. In this study, in-vessel retention strategies were applied for postulated SGTR accidents. Mitigation effect and adverse effect of in-vessel strategies was studied in aspect of RPV failure, fission product release and containment thermal-hydraulic and hydrogen behavior. Base case of SGTR accident and three mitigation cases were simulated using MELCOR code 1.8.6. For each mitigation cases, mitigation effect and adverse effect were investigated. Conclusions can be summarized as follows: (1) RPV failure of SGTR base case occurred at 5.62 hours and fission product of RCS released to

  5. Melting experiments on peridotite to lowermost mantle conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateno, Shigehiko; Hirose, Kei; Ohishi, Yasuo

    2014-06-01

    Melting experiments on a pyrolitic mantle material were performed in a pressure range from 34 to 179 GPa based on laser-heated diamond-anvil cell (DAC) techniques. The textural and chemical characterizations of quenched samples were made by using field-emission-type electron microprobe (FE-EPMA). Melts formed by 46 to 77 wt.% partial melting in this study were ultrabasic in composition and became more depleted in SiO2 and more enriched in FeO with increasing pressure. Melting textures indicate that the liquidus phase changed from ferropericlase to MgSiO3-rich perovskite at least above 34 GPa and further to post-perovskite. The first phase to melt (disappear) changed from CaSiO3 perovskite to (Mg,Fe)O ferropericlase between 68 and 82 GPa. The stability of ferropericlase above solidus temperature shrinks with increasing pressure (melting last below 34 GPa and first 82 GPa), resulting in higher (MgO + FeO)/SiO2 ratio in partial melt at higher pressure. Additionally, the Fe-Mg distribution coefficients (KD) between perovskite/post-perovskite and melt decreased considerably with increasing pressure, leading to strong Fe-enrichment in partial melts. It supports dense partial melts in a deep lower mantle, which migrate downward to the core mantle boundary (CMB).

  6. Development of the severe accident risk information database management system SARD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Kwang Il; Kim, Dong Ha

    2003-01-01

    The main purpose of this report is to introduce essential features and functions of a severe accident risk information management system, SARD (Severe Accident Risk Database Management System) version 1.0, which has been developed in Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, and database management and data retrieval procedures through the system. The present database management system has powerful capabilities that can store automatically and manage systematically the plant-specific severe accident analysis results for core damage sequences leading to severe accidents, and search intelligently the related severe accident risk information. For that purpose, the present database system mainly takes into account the plant-specific severe accident sequences obtained from the Level 2 Probabilistic Safety Assessments (PSAs), base case analysis results for various severe accident sequences (such as code responses and summary for key-event timings), and related sensitivity analysis results for key input parameters/models employed in the severe accident codes. Accordingly, the present database system can be effectively applied in supporting the Level 2 PSA of similar plants, for fast prediction and intelligent retrieval of the required severe accident risk information for the specific plant whose information was previously stored in the database system, and development of plant-specific severe accident management strategies.

  7. Revised accident source terms for light-water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soffer, L. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-02-01

    This paper presents revised accident source terms for light-water reactors incorporating the severe accident research insights gained in this area over the last 15 years. Current LWR reactor accident source terms used for licensing date from 1962 and are contained in Regulatory Guides 1.3 and 1.4. These specify that 100% of the core inventory of noble gases and 25% of the iodine fission products are assumed to be instantaneously available for release from the containment. The chemical form of the iodine fission products is also assumed to be predominantly elemental iodine. These assumptions have strongly affected present nuclear air cleaning requirements by emphasizing rapid actuation of spray systems and filtration systems optimized to retain elemental iodine. A proposed revision of reactor accident source terms and some im implications for nuclear air cleaning requirements was presented at the 22nd DOE/NRC Nuclear Air Cleaning Conference. A draft report was issued by the NRC for comment in July 1992. Extensive comments were received, with the most significant comments involving (a) release fractions for both volatile and non-volatile species in the early in-vessel release phase, (b) gap release fractions of the noble gases, iodine and cesium, and (c) the timing and duration for the release phases. The final source term report is expected to be issued in late 1994. Although the revised source terms are intended primarily for future plants, current nuclear power plants may request use of revised accident source term insights as well in licensing. This paper emphasizes additional information obtained since the 22nd Conference, including studies on fission product removal mechanisms, results obtained from improved severe accident code calculations and resolution of major comments, and their impact upon the revised accident source terms. Revised accident source terms for both BWRS and PWRS are presented.

  8. Signatures of nonthermal melting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Zier

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Intense ultrashort laser pulses can melt crystals in less than a picosecond but, in spite of over thirty years of active research, for many materials it is not known to what extent thermal and nonthermal microscopic processes cause this ultrafast phenomenon. Here, we perform ab-initio molecular-dynamics simulations of silicon on a laser-excited potential-energy surface, exclusively revealing nonthermal signatures of laser-induced melting. From our simulated atomic trajectories, we compute the decay of five structure factors and the time-dependent structure function. We demonstrate how these quantities provide criteria to distinguish predominantly nonthermal from thermal melting.

  9. Graphite Oxidation Simulation in HTR Accident Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Genk, Mohamed

    2012-10-19

    Massive air and water ingress, following a pipe break or leak in steam-generator tubes, is a design-basis accident for high-temperature reactors (HTRs). Analysis of these accidents in both prismatic and pebble bed HTRs requires state-of-the-art capability for predictions of: 1) oxidation kinetics, 2) air helium gas mixture stratification and diffusion into the core following the depressurization, 3) transport of multi-species gas mixture, and 4) graphite corrosion. This project will develop a multi-dimensional, comprehensive oxidation kinetics model of graphite in HTRs, with diverse capabilities for handling different flow regimes. The chemical kinetics/multi-species transport model for graphite burning and oxidation will account for temperature-related changes in the properties of graphite, oxidants (O2, H2O, CO), reaction products (CO, CO2, H2, CH4) and other gases in the mixture (He and N2). The model will treat the oxidation and corrosion of graphite in geometries representative of HTR core component at temperatures of 900°C or higher. The developed chemical reaction kinetics model will be user-friendly for coupling to full core analysis codes such as MELCOR and RELAP, as well as computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes such as CD-adapco. The research team will solve governing equations for the multi-dimensional flow and the chemical reactions and kinetics using Simulink, an extension of the MATLAB solver, and will validate and benchmark the model's predictions using reported experimental data. Researchers will develop an interface to couple the validated model to a commercially available CFD fluid flow and thermal-hydraulic model of the reactor , and will perform a simulation of a pipe break in a prismatic core HTR, with the potential for future application to a pebble-bed type HTR.

  10. Development of an accident sequence precursor methodology and its application to significant accident precursors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Seung Hyun; Park, Sung Hyun; Jae, Moo Sung [Dept. of of Nuclear Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    The systematic management of plant risk is crucial for enhancing the safety of nuclear power plants and for designing new nuclear power plants. Accident sequence precursor (ASP) analysis may be able to provide risk significance of operational experience by using probabilistic risk assessment to evaluate an operational event quantitatively in terms of its impact on core damage. In this study, an ASP methodology for two operation mode, full power and low power/shutdown operation, has been developed and applied to significant accident precursors that may occur during the operation of nuclear power plants. Two operational events, loss of feedwater and steam generator tube rupture, are identified as ASPs. Therefore, the ASP methodology developed in this study may contribute to identifying plant risk significance as well as to enhancing the safety of nuclear power plants by applying this methodology systematically.

  11. Radiation accident grips Goiania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, L.

    1987-11-20

    On 13 September two young scavengers in Goiania, Brazil, removed a stainless steel cylinder from a cancer therapy machine in an abandoned clinic, touching off a radiation accident second only to Chernobyl in its severity. On 18 September they sold the cylinder, the size of a 1-gallon paint can, to a scrap dealer for $25. At the junk yard an employee dismantled the cylinder and pried open the platinum capsule inside to reveal a glowing blue salt-like substance - 1400 curies of cesium-137. Fascinated by the luminescent powder, several people took it home with them. Some children reportedly rubbed in on their bodies like carnival glitter - an eerie image of how wrong things can go when vigilance over radioactive materials lapses. In all, 244 people in Goiania, a city of 1 million in central Brazil, were contaminated. The eventual toll, in terms of cancer or genetic defects, cannot yet be estimated. Parts of the city are cordoned off as radiation teams continue washing down buildings and scooping up radioactive soil. The government is also grappling with the political fallout from the accident.

  12. Melt Cast High Explosives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanisław Cudziło

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available [b]Abstract[/b]. This paper reviews the current state and future developments of melt-cast high explosives. First the compositions, properties and methods of preparation of trinitrotoluene based (TNT conventional mixtures with aluminum, hexogen (RDX or octogen (HMX are described. In the newer, less sensitive explosive formulations, TNT is replaced with dinitroanisole (DNANDNANDNAN and nitrotriazolone (NTONTONTO, nitroguanidine (NG or ammonium perchlorate (AP are the replacement for RDRDX and HMX. Plasticized wax or polymer-based binder systems for melt castable explosives are also included. Hydroxyl terminated polybutadiene (HPTB is the binder of choice, but polyethylene glycol, and polycaprolactone with energetic plasticizers are also used. The most advanced melt-cast explosives are compositions containing energetic thermoplastic elastomers and novel highly energetic compounds (including nitrogen rich molecules in whose particles are nanosized and practically defect-less.[b]Keywords[/b]: melt-cast explosives, detonation parameters

  13. Melting of sodium clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Reyes-Nava, J A; Beltran, M R; Michaelian, K

    2002-01-01

    Thermal stability properties and the melting-like transition of Na_n, n=13-147, clusters are studied through microcanonical molecular dynamics simulations. The metallic bonding in the sodium clusters is mimicked by a many-body Gupta potential based on the second moment approximation of a tight-binding Hamiltonian. The characteristics of the solid-to-liquid transition in the sodium clusters are analyzed by calculating physical quantities like caloric curves, heat capacities, and root-mean-square bond length fluctuations using simulation times of several nanoseconds. Distinct melting mechanisms are obtained for the sodium clusters in the size range investigated. The calculated melting temperatures show an irregular variation with the cluster size, in qualitative agreement with recent experimental results. However, the calculated melting point for the Na_55 cluster is about 40 % lower than the experimental value.

  14. Management of a severe accident on a pressurised water reactor in France; La gestion d'un accident grave sur un reacteur a eau sous pression en France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    This brief document defines what a severe accident is on a nuclear reactor, indicates the different failure modes which have been defined (vapour explosion in the reactor vessel, hydrogen explosion, and so on). It describes the management of a core fusion accident for pressurized water reactors, for which a guide has been designed, the GIAG (intervention guide for a severe accident situation). The principles of such an intervention are described, and then the approach for an EPR reactor

  15. Fatal motorcycle accidents and alcohol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, C F; Hardt-Madsen, M

    1987-01-01

    A series of fatal motorcycle accidents from a 7-year period (1977-1983) has been analyzed. Of the fatalities 30 were operators of the motorcycle, 11 pillion passengers and 8 counterparts. Of 41 operators 37% were sober at the time of accident, 66% had measurable blood alcohol concentration (BAC...

  16. Learning from incidents and accidents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drupsteen, L.; Kampen, J. van

    2014-01-01

    There are many different definitions for what constitutes an incident or an accident, however the focus is always on unintended and often unforeseen events that cause unintended consequences. This article is focused on the process of learning from incidents and accidents. The focus is on making sure

  17. [Practical management of CPB accident].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depoix, J-P; Fenet, L; Provenchere, S

    2012-05-01

    Accident of CPB is a reality. It is important to be prepared for discussion with the family, with the hospital administration, eventually with the justice. But we have also to support perfusionnist and anesthetic team in charge of the patient during accident.

  18. Learning from incidents and accidents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drupsteen, L.; Kampen, J. van

    2014-01-01

    There are many different definitions for what constitutes an incident or an accident, however the focus is always on unintended and often unforeseen events that cause unintended consequences. This article is focused on the process of learning from incidents and accidents. The focus is on making sure

  19. Coupled simulation of steam line break accident; Simulation couplee d'un accident de rupture de tuyauterie vapeur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Royer, E.; Raimond, E.; Caruge, D

    2000-07-01

    The steam line break is a PWR type reactor design accident, which concerns coupled physical phenomena. To control these problems simulation are needed to define and validate the operating procedures. The benchmark OECD PWR MSLB (Main Steam Line Break) has been proposed by the OECD to validate the feasibility and the contribution of the multi-dimensional tools in the simulation of the core transients. First the benchmark OECD PWR MSLB is presented. Then the analysis of the three exercises (system with pinpoint kinetic, three-dimensional core and whole system with three-dimensional core) are discussed. (A.L.B.)

  20. Force induced DNA melting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santosh, Mogurampelly; Maiti, Prabal K [Center for Condensed Matter Theory, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore-12 (India)], E-mail: santosh@physics.iisc.ernet.in, E-mail: maiti@physics.iisc.ernet.in

    2009-01-21

    When pulled along the axis, double-strand DNA undergoes a large conformational change and elongates by roughly twice its initial contour length at a pulling force of about 70 pN. The transition to this highly overstretched form of DNA is very cooperative. Applying a force perpendicular to the DNA axis (unzipping), double-strand DNA can also be separated into two single-stranded DNA, this being a fundamental process in DNA replication. We study the DNA overstretching and unzipping transition using fully atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and argue that the conformational changes of double-strand DNA associated with either of the above mentioned processes can be viewed as force induced DNA melting. As the force at one end of the DNA is increased the DNA starts melting abruptly/smoothly above a critical force depending on the pulling direction. The critical force f{sub m}, at which DNA melts completely decreases as the temperature of the system is increased. The melting force in the case of unzipping is smaller compared to the melting force when the DNA is pulled along the helical axis. In the case of melting through unzipping, the double-strand separation has jumps which correspond to the different energy minima arising due to sequence of different base pairs. The fraction of Watson-Crick base pair hydrogen bond breaking as a function of force does not show smooth and continuous behavior and consists of plateaus followed by sharp jumps.

  1. Traffic Accidents on Slippery Roads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonnesbech, J. K.; Bolet, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Police registrations from 65 accidents on slippery roads in normally Danish winters have been studied. The study showed: • 1 accident per 100 km when using brine spread with nozzles • 2 accidents per 100 km when using pre wetted salt • 3 accidents per 100 km when using kombi spreaders The results...... of accidents in normally Danish winter seasons are remarkable alike the amount of salt used in praxis in the winter 2011/2012. • 2.7 ton NaCl/km when using brine spread with nozzles • 5 ton NaCl/km when using pre wetted salt. • 5.7 ton NaCl/km when using kombi spreaders The explanation is that spreading...

  2. Corporate Cost of Occupational Accidents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rikhardsson, Pall M.; Impgaard, M.

    2004-01-01

    method could be used in all of the companies without revisions. The evaluation of accident cost showed that 2/3 of the costs of occupational accidents are visible in the Danish corporate accounting systems reviewed while 1/3 is hidden from management view. The highest cost of occupational accidents......The systematic accident cost analysis (SACA) project was carried out during 2001 by The Aarhus School of Business and PricewaterhouseCoopers Denmark with financial support from The Danish National Working Environment Authority. Its focused on developing and testing a method for evaluating...... occupational costs of companies for use by occupational health and safety professionals. The method was tested in nine Danish companies within three different industry sectors and the costs of 27 selected occupational accidents in these companies were calculated. One of the main conclusions is that the SACA...

  3. Industrial accidents triggered by lightning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renni, Elisabetta; Krausmann, Elisabeth; Cozzani, Valerio

    2010-12-15

    Natural disasters can cause major accidents in chemical facilities where they can lead to the release of hazardous materials which in turn can result in fires, explosions or toxic dispersion. Lightning strikes are the most frequent cause of major accidents triggered by natural events. In order to contribute towards the development of a quantitative approach for assessing lightning risk at industrial facilities, lightning-triggered accident case histories were retrieved from the major industrial accident databases and analysed to extract information on types of vulnerable equipment, failure dynamics and damage states, as well as on the final consequences of the event. The most vulnerable category of equipment is storage tanks. Lightning damage is incurred by immediate ignition, electrical and electronic systems failure or structural damage with subsequent release. Toxic releases and tank fires tend to be the most common scenarios associated with lightning strikes. Oil, diesel and gasoline are the substances most frequently released during lightning-triggered Natech accidents.

  4. Typologie des Accidents Cyclistes

    OpenAIRE

    Amoros, Emmanuelle; BILLOT-GRASSET, Alice; Hours, Martine

    2015-01-01

    L'usage du vélo est en hausse en ville ; cette pratique est encouragée dans le cadre du développement durable et de la lutte contre la sédentarité. Pour accompagner cela, il faut réduire les risques d'accident, et pour ce faire, mieux les connaître. Nous utilisons le Registre des victimes de la circulation routière du Rhône, basé sur les services hospitaliers (dont les urgences) ; il est quasi-exhaustif : env. 1100 blessés à vélo/an versus 120 dans les données officielles. L'ensemble des cycl...

  5. Coolability of corium debris under severe accident conditions in light water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, Saidur

    2013-11-15

    The debris bed which may be formed in different stages of a severe accident will be hot and heated by decay heat from the radioactive fission products. In order to establish a steady state of long-term cooling, this hot debris needs to be quenched at first. If quenching by water ingression into the dry bed is not rapid enough then heat-up by decay heat in still dry regions may again yield melting. Thus, chances of coolability must be investigated considering quenching against heat-up due to decay heat, in the context of reactor safety research. As a basis of the present investigations, models for simulation of two phase flow through porous medium were already available in the MEWA code, being under development at IKE. The objective of this thesis is to apply the code in essential phases of severe accidents and to investigate the chances, options and measures for coolability. Further, within the tasks, improvements to remove weaknesses in modeling and implementation of extensions concerning missing parts are included. It was identified previously that classical models without explicit considering the interfacial friction, can predict dryout heat flux (DHF) well under top fed condition but under-predict DHF values under bottom flooding conditions. Tung and Dhir introduced an interfacial friction term in their model, but this model has deficits for smaller particles considered as relevant for reactor conditions. Therefore, some modification of Tung and Dhir model is proposed in the present work to extent it for smaller particles. A significant improvement with the new friction description (Modified Tung and Dhir, MTD) is obtained considering the aim of a unified description for both top and bottom flooding conditions and for broad bandwidth of bed conditions. Calculations for reactor conditions are carried out in order to explore whether or to which degree coolability can be concluded, how strong the trend to coolability is and where major limits occur. The general

  6. Analysis of Postulated Core Meltdown of an SRP Reactor - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durant, W.S.; Brown, R.J.

    1970-10-01

    An analysis was made to determine the consequences of a postulated accident in which the core of a Savannah River Plant reactor melts down following the loss of coolant. The study was made to determine (1) the potential damage to the reactor building that could impair its integrity for confining activity and (2) the need for additional facilities to prevent the activity confinement system from being overheated by the decay heat in the debris. A preliminary report on this analysis was issued previously. The sequence of events during and following the loss of coolant has now been studied in more detail, and a computer program has been written and used to investigate transient heating effects. This is the final report of the analysis and presents the conclusions.

  7. MELTED BUTTER TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Golubeva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary. Melted butter is made from dairy butter by rendering the fat phase. It has specific taste and aroma, high-calorie content and good assimilability. Defects of butter which appeared during the storage causes by the development of microbiological processes or by the chemical oxidation. On the development of these processes influence quality and composition of fresh butter, its physical structure, content of the increased amount of gas phase and content of heavy metals, storage conditions. Microbiological spoilage of butter occurs generally due to damage of plasma which is good environment for the development of microorganisms. Defects of microbiological origin include: unclean, sour, moldy, yeasty, cheesy, bitter taste. Defects of test and smell chemical origin are formed due to hydrolytic digestion of lipids. It's prevailed at long storage of butter in the conditions of freezing temperatures. It's picked out the following main processes of spoiling: souring, acidifying and sallowness. Often these processes take place simultaneously.It has been investigated melted butter with lactated additive. The latter improves the microbiological and toxicological safety, prolongs the storage condition of the products. Technological efficiency of the additives is achieved by a multilayer products formation from the inactive bound water, preventing microorganisms growth and by the barrier layer with lactate inhibiting hydrolytic reactions. Oil samples were obtained with the batch-type butter maker application, then they were melted and after that lactated additive were supplemented. It has been studied organoleptic and physico-chemical indices of the melted butter samples. The fatty-acid composition of melted butter were studied. Comparative analysis of fatty-acid composition of cow's milk fat and produced melted butter has shown their similarity. Also in the last sample there is increased weight fraction of linoleic and linolenic acids. The obtained

  8. Review of accident analyses of RB experimental reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pešić Milan P.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The RB reactor is a uranium fuel heavy water moderated critical assembly that has been put and kept in operation by the VTNCA Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade, Serbia and Montenegro, since April 1958. The first complete Safety Analysis Report of the RB reactor was prepared in 1961/62 yet, the first accident analysis had been made in late 1958 with the aim to examine a power transition and the total equivalent doses received by the staff during the reactivity accident that occurred on October 15, 1958. Since 1960, the RB reactor has been modified a few times. Beside the initial natural uranium metal fuel rods, new types of fuel (TVR-S types of Russian origin consisting of 2% enriched uranium metal and 80% enriched UO2 dispersed in aluminum matrix, have been available since 1962 and 1976 respectively. Modifications of the control and safety systems of the reactor were made occasionally. Special reactor cores were designed and constructed using all three types of fuel elements as well as the coupled fast-thermal ones. The Nuclear Safety Committee of the VINĆA Institute, an independent regulatory body, approved for usage all these modifications of the RB reactor on the basis of the Preliminary Safety Analysis Reports, which, beside proposed technical modifications and new regulation rules, included safety analyses of various possible accidents. A special attention was given (and a new safety methodology was proposed to thorough analyses of the design-based accidents related to the coupled fast-thermal cores that included central zones of the reactor filled by the fuel elements without any moderator. In this paper, an overview of some accidents, methodologies and computation tools used for the accident analyses of the RB reactor is given.

  9. Characterization of PWR vessel steel tearing under severe accident condition temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matheron, Philippe, E-mail: philippe.matheron@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DM2S, SEMT, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Chapuliot, Stephane, E-mail: stephane.chapuliot@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DM2S, SEMT, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Nicolas, Laetitia, E-mail: laetitia.nicolas@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DM2S, SEMT, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Laboratoire de Mecanique des Structures Industrielles Durables, UMR CNRS-EDF 2832, 1 avenue du General de Gaulle, F-92141 Clamart (France); Koundy, Vincent, E-mail: vincent.koundy@irsn.fr [IRSN-DSR, Service d' evaluation des Accidents Graves et des Rejets radioactifs B.P. 17, 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses Cedex (France); Caroli, Cataldo, E-mail: cataldo.caroli@irsn.fr [IRSN-DSR, Service d' evaluation des Accidents Graves et des Rejets radioactifs B.P. 17, 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses Cedex (France)

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We characterized French PWR vessel steel tearing resistance at high temperatures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tearing tests on Compact Tension (CT) specimens were carried out. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The variability of tearing properties with PWR vessels specifications was studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We propose a tearing criterion (energy parameter Gfr) at high temperatures. - Abstract: In the event of a severe core meltdown accident in a pressurised water reactor (PWR), core material can relocate into the lower head of the vessel resulting in significant thermal and pressure loads being imposed on the vessel. In the event of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) failure there is the possibility of core material being released towards the containment. On the basis of the loading conditions and the temperature distribution, the determination of the mode, timing, and size of lower head failure is of prime importance in the assessment of core melt accidents. This is because they define the initial conditions for ex-vessel events such as core/basemat interactions, fuel/coolant interactions, and direct containment heating. When lower head failure occurs (i) the understanding of the mechanism of lower head creep deformation; (ii) breach stability and its kinetic of propagation leading to the failure; (iii) and developing predictive modelling capabilities to better assess the consequences of ex-vessel processes, are of equal importance. The objective of this paper is to present an original characterization programme of vessel steel tearing properties by carrying out high temperature tearing tests on Compact Tension (CT) specimens. The influence of metallurgical composition on the kinetics of tearing is investigated as previous work on different RPV steels has shown a possible loss of ductility at high temperatures depending on the initial chemical composition of the vessel material. Small changes in the composition can lead

  10. Chernobyl accident and its consequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gittus, J.H.; Bonell, P.G.; Hicks, D.

    1987-01-01

    The USSR power reactor programme is first described. The reasons for the accident at the Chernobyl-4 RBMK nuclear reactor on 26 April 1986, the sequence of events that took place, and the immediate and long-term consequences are considered. A description of the RBMK-type reactors is given and the design changes resulting from the experience of the accident are explained. The source terms describing the details of the radioactivity release associated with the accident and the environmental consequences are covered in the last two sections of the report. Throughout the text comments referring to the UK Nuclear Installations Inspectorate Safety assessment principles have been inserted. (U.K.).

  11. Development Status of Accident Tolerant Fuel Cladding for LWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun-Gil; Kim, Il-Hyun; Jung, Yang-Il; Park, Dong-Jun; Park, Jung-Hwan; Yang, Jae-Ho; Koo, Yang-Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Hydrogen explosions and the release of radionuclides are caused by severe damage of current nuclear fuels, which are composed of fuel pellets and fuel cladding, during an accident. To reduce the damage to the public, the fuels have to enhance their integrity under an accident environment. Enhanced accident tolerance fuels (ATFs) can tolerate a loss of active cooling in the reactor core for a considerably longer time period during design-basis and beyond design-basis events while maintaining or improving the fuel performance during normal operations as well as operational transients, in comparison with the current UO{sub 2}-Zr alloy system used in the LWR. Surface modified Zr cladding as a new concept was suggested to apply an enhanced ATF cladding. The aim of the partial ODS treatment is to increase the high-temperature strength to suppress the ballooning/rupture behavior of fuel cladding during an accident event. The target of the surface coating is to increase the corrosion resistance during normal operation and increase the oxidation resistance during an accident event. The partial ODS treatment of Zircaloy-4 cladding can be produced using a laser beam scanning method with Y2O3 powder, and the surface Cr-alloy and Cr/FeCrAl coating on Zircaloy-4 cladding can be obtained after the development of 3D laser coating and arc ion plating technologies.

  12. OECD MCCI project long-term 2-D molten core concrete interaction test design report, Rev. 0. September 30, 2002.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Lomperski, S.; Aeschliman, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

    2011-05-23

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following two technical objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of the first program objective, the Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength (SSWICS) test series has been initiated to provide fundamental information on the ability of water to ingress into cracks and fissures that form in the debris during quench, thereby augmenting the otherwise conduction-limited heat transfer process. A test plan for Melt Eruption Separate Effects Tests (MESET) has also been developed to provide information on the extent of crust growth and melt eruptions as a function of gas sparging rate under well-controlled experiment conditions. In terms of the second program objective, the project Management Board (MB) has approved startup activities required to carry out

  13. Viscosity of the earth's core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gans, R. F.

    1972-01-01

    Calculation of the viscosity of the core at the boundary of the inner and outer core. It is assumed that this boundary is a melting transition and the viscosity limits of the Andrade (1934,1952) hypothesis (3.7 to 18.5 cp) are adopted. The corresponding kinematic viscosities are such that the precessional system explored by Malkus (1968) would be unstable. Whether it would be sufficiently unstable to overcome a severely subadiabatic temperature gradient cannot be determined.

  14. [Prevention of bicycle accidents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwipp, H; Barthel, P; Bönninger, J; Bürkle, H; Hagemeister, C; Hannawald, L; Huhn, R; Kühn, M; Liers, H; Maier, R; Otte, D; Prokop, G; Seeck, A; Sturm, J; Unger, T

    2015-04-01

    For a very precise analysis of all injured bicyclists in Germany it would be important to have definitions for "severely injured", "seriously injured" and "critically injured". By this, e.g., two-thirds of surgically treated bicyclists who are not registered by the police could become available for a general analysis. Elderly bicyclists (> 60 years) are a minority (10 %) but represent a majority (50 %) of all fatalities. They profit most by wearing a helmet and would be less injured by using special bicycle bags, switching on their hearing aids and following all traffic rules. E-bikes are used more and more (145 % more in 2012 vs. 2011) with 600,000 at the end of 2011 and are increasingly involved in accidents but still have a lack of legislation. So even for pedelecs 45 with 500 W and a possible speed of 45 km/h there is still no legislative demand for the use of a protecting helmet. 96 % of all injured cyclists in Germany had more than 0.5 ‰ alcohol in their blood, 86 % more than 1.1 ‰ and 59 % more than 1.7 ‰. Fatalities are seen in 24.2 % of cases without any collision partner. Therefore the ADFC calls for a limit of 1.1 ‰. Some virtual studies conclude that integrated sensors in bicycle helmets which would interact with sensors in cars could prevent collisions or reduce the severity of injury by stopping the cars automatically. Integrated sensors in cars with opening angles of 180° enable about 93 % of all bicyclists to be detected leading to a high rate of injury avoidance and/or mitigation. Hanging lamps reduce with 35 % significantly bicycle accidents for children, traffic education for children and special trainings for elderly bicyclists are also recommended as prevention tools. As long as helmet use for bicyclists in Germany rates only 9 % on average and legislative orders for using a helmet will not be in force in the near future, coming up campaigns seem to be necessary to be promoted by the Deutscher

  15. Ruthenium release modelling in air under severe accident conditions using the MAAP4 code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beuzet, E.; Lamy, J.S. [EDF R and D, 1 avenue du General de Gaulle, F-92140 Clamart (France); Perron, H. [EDF R and D, Avenue des Renardieres, Ecuelles, F-77818 Moret sur Loing (France); Simoni, E. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, Universite de Paris Sud XI, F-91406 Orsay (France)

    2010-07-01

    In a nuclear power plant (NPP), in some situations of low probability of severe accidents, an air ingress into the vessel occurs. Air is a highly oxidizing atmosphere that can lead to an enhanced core degradation affecting the release of Fission Products (FPs) to the environment (source term). Indeed, Zircaloy-4 cladding oxidation by air yields 85% more heat than by steam. Besides, UO{sub 2} can be oxidised to UO{sub 2+x} and mixed with Zr, which may lead to a decrease of the fuel melting temperature. Finally, air atmosphere can enhance the FPs release, noticeably that of ruthenium. Ruthenium is of particular interest for two main reasons: first, its high radiotoxicity due to its short and long half-life isotopes ({sup 103}Ru and {sup 106}Ru respectively) and second, its ability to form highly volatile compounds such as ruthenium gaseous tetra-oxide (RuO{sub 4}). Considering that the oxygen affinity decreases between cladding, fuel and ruthenium inclusions, it is of great need to understand the phenomena governing fuel oxidation by air and ruthenium release as prerequisites for the source term issues. A review of existing data on ruthenium release, controlled by fuel oxidation, leads us to implement a new model in the EDF version of MAAP4 severe accident code (Modular Accident Analysis Program). This model takes into account the fuel stoichiometric deviation and the oxygen partial pressure evolution inside the fuel to simulate its oxidation by air. Ruthenium is then oxidised. Its oxides are released by volatilisation above the fuel. All the different ruthenium oxides formed and released are taken into consideration in the model, in terms of their particular reaction constants. In this way, partial pressures of ruthenium oxides are given in the atmosphere so that it is possible to know the fraction of ruthenium released in the atmosphere. This new model has been assessed against an analytical test of FPs release in air atmosphere performed at CEA (VERCORS RT8). The

  16. OECD/MCCI 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : final report February 28, 2006.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

    2011-05-23

    Although extensive research has been conducted over the last several years in the areas of Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) and debris coolability, two important issues warrant further investigation. The first issue concerns the effectiveness of water in terminating a CCI by flooding the interacting masses from above, thereby quenching the molten core debris and rendering it permanently coolable. This safety issue was investigated in the EPRI-sponsored Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program. The approach was to conduct large scale, integral-type reactor materials experiments with core melt masses ranging up to two metric tons. These experiments provided unique, and for the most part repeatable, indications of heat transfer mechanism(s) that could provide long term debris cooling. However, the results did not demonstrate definitively that a melt would always be completely quenched. This was due to the fact that the crust anchored to the test section sidewalls in every test, which led to melt/crust separation, even at the largest test section lateral span of 1.20 m. This decoupling is not expected for a typical reactor cavity, which has a span of 5-6 m. Even though the crust may mechanically bond to the reactor cavity walls, the weight of the coolant and the crust itself is expected to periodically fracture the crust and restore contact with the melt. Although crust fracturing does not ensure that coolability will be achieved, it nonetheless provides a pathway for water to recontact the underlying melt, thereby allowing other debris cooling mechanisms to proceed. A related task of the current program, which is not addressed in this particular report, is to measure crust strength to check the hypothesis that a corium crust would not be strong enough to sustain melt/crust separation in a plant accident. The second important issue concerns long-term, two-dimensional concrete ablation by a prototypic core oxide melt. As discussed by Foit the existing

  17. Three Mile Island Accident Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Three Mile Island Accident Data consists of mostly upper air and wind observations immediately following the nuclear meltdown occurring on March 28, 1979, near...

  18. Nuclear fuel cycle facility accident analysis handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayer, J E; Clark, A T; Loysen, P; Ballinger, M Y; Mishima, J; Owczarski, P C; Gregory, W S; Nichols, B D

    1988-05-01

    The Accident Analysis Handbook (AAH) covers four generic facilities: fuel manufacturing, fuel reprocessing, waste storage/solidification, and spent fuel storage; and six accident types: fire, explosion, tornado, criticality, spill, and equipment failure. These are the accident types considered to make major contributions to the radiological risk from accidents in nuclear fuel cycle facility operations. The AAH will enable the user to calculate source term releases from accident scenarios manually or by computer. A major feature of the AAH is development of accident sample problems to provide input to source term analysis methods and transport computer codes. Sample problems and illustrative examples for different accident types are included in the AAH.

  19. Paragliding accidents in remote areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasching, G; Schippinger, G; Pretscher, R

    1997-08-01

    Paragliding is an increasingly popular hobby, as people try to find new and more adventurous activities. However, there is an increased and inherent danger with this sport. For this reason, as well as the inexperience of many operators, injuries occur frequently. This retrospective study centers on the helicopter rescue of 70 individuals in paragliding accidents. All histories were examined, and 43 patients answered a questionnaire. Nineteen (42%) pilots were injured when taking off, 20 (44%) during the flight, and six (13%) when landing. Routine and experience did not affect the prevalence of accident. Analysis of the causes of accident revealed pilot errors in all but three cases. In 34 rescue operations a landing of the helicopter near the site of the accident was possible. Half of the patients had to be rescued by a cable winch or a long rope fixed to the helicopter. Seven (10%) of the pilots suffered multiple trauma, 38 (54%) had injuries of the lower extremities, and 32 (84%) of them sustained fractures. Injuries to the spine were diagnosed in 34 cases with a fracture rate of 85%. One patient had an incomplete paraplegia. Injuries to the head occurred in 17 patients. No paraglider pilot died. The average hospitalization was 22 days, and average time of working inability was 14 weeks. Fourteen (34%) patients suffered from a permanent damage to their nerves or joints. Forty-three percent of the paragliders continued their sport despite the accident; two of them had another accident. An improved training program is necessary to lower the incidence of paragliding accidents. Optimal equipment to reduce injuries in case of accidents is mandatory. The helicopter emergency physician must perform a careful examination, provide stabilization of airways and circulation, give analgesics, splint fractured extremities, and transport the victim on a vacuum mattress to the appropriate hospital.

  20. iROCS: Integrated accident management framework for coping with beyond-design-basis external events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jaewhan; Park, Soo-Yong; Ahn, Kwang-Il, E-mail: kiahn@kaeri.re.kr; Yang, Joon-Eon

    2016-03-15

    Highlights: • An integrated mitigating strategy to cope with extreme external events, iROCS, is proposed. • The strategy aims to preserve the integrity of the reactor vessel as well as core cooling. • A case study for an extreme damage state is performed to assess the effectiveness and feasibility of candidate mitigation strategies under an extreme event. - Abstract: The Fukushima Daiichi accident induced by the Great East Japan earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011, poses a new challenge to the nuclear society, especially from an accident management viewpoint. This paper presents a new accident management framework called an integrated, RObust Coping Strategy (iROCS) to cope with beyond-design-basis external events (BDBEEs). The iROCS approach is characterized by classification of various plant damage conditions (PDCs) that might be impacted by BDBEEs and corresponding integrated coping strategies for each of PDCs, aiming to maintain and restore core cooling (i.e., to prevent core damage) and to maintain the integrity of the reactor pressure vessel if it is judged that core damage may not be preventable in view of plant conditions. From a case study for an extreme damage condition, it showed that candidate accident management strategies should be evaluated from the viewpoint of effectiveness and feasibility against accident scenarios and extreme damage conditions of the site, especially when employing mobile or portable equipment under BDBEEs within the limited time available to achieve desired goals such as prevention of core damage as well as a reactor vessel failure.

  1. Development of ultrasonic high temperature system for severe accidents research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Kil Mo; Kang, Kyung Ho; Kim, Young Ro and others

    2000-07-01

    The aims of this study are to find a gap formation between corium melt and the reactor lower head vessel, to verify the principle of the gap formation and to analyze the effect of the gap formation on the thermal behavior of corium melt and the lower plenum. This report aims at suggesting development of a new high temperature measuring system using an ultrasonic method which overcomes the limitations of the present thermocouple method used for severe accident experiments. Also, this report describes the design and manufacturing method of the ultrasonic system. At that time, the sensor element is fabricated to a reflective element using 1mm diameter and 50 mm and 80 mm long tungsten alloy wires. This temperature measuring system is intended to measure up to 2800 deg C.

  2. GLASS MELTING PHENOMENA, THEIR ORDERING AND MELTING SPACE UTILISATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Němec L.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Four aspects of effective glass melting have been defined – namely the fast kinetics of partial melting phenomena, a consideration of the melting phenomena ordering, high utilisation of the melting space, and effective utilisation of the supplied energy. The relations were defined for the specific melting performance and specific energy consumption of the glass melting process which involve the four mentioned aspects of the process and indicate the potentials of effective melting. The quantity “space utilisation” has been treated in more detail as an aspect not considered in practice till this time. The space utilisation was quantitatively defined and its values have been determined for the industrial melting facility by mathematical modelling. The definitions of the specific melting performance and specific energy consumption have been used for assessment of the potential impact of a controlled melt flow and high space utilisation on the melting process efficiency on the industrial scale. The results have shown that even the partial control of the melt flow, leading to the partial increase of the space utilisation, may considerably increase the melting performance, whereas a decrease of the specific energy consumption was determined to be between 10 - 15 %.

  3. Melting Properties of Medium-Sized Silicon Nanoclusters: A Molecular Dynamics Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haipeng; Xu, Runfeng; Bi, Zetong; Shen, Xiaopeng; Han, Kui

    2017-07-01

    The structures and melting properties of the medium-sized silicon nanoclusters have been comparatively studied using the molecular dynamics method. Structural and thermodynamic parameters are used to characterize the melting properties of the clusters. The size dependence of the melting temperature of silicon nanoclusters is determined using the computation results. Different from the homogeneous melting of bulk silicon, melting of silicon nanoparticles proceeds over a finite temperature range due to surface effects, which shows the heterogeneous melting of nanoclusters. We found that the melting starts at the cluster surface and progressively shifts into the core region. This study provides a fundamental perspective on the melting behaviors of semiconductor silicon nanoclusters at the atomistic level.

  4. MELCOR modeling of Fukushima unit 2 accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sevon, Tuomo [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    2014-12-15

    A MELCOR model of the Fukushima Daiichi unit 2 accident was created in order to get a better understanding of the event and to improve severe accident modeling methods. The measured pressure and water level could be reproduced relatively well with the calculation. This required adjusting the RCIC system flow rates and containment leak area so that a good match to the measurements is achieved. Modeling of gradual flooding of the torus room with water that originated from the tsunami was necessary for a satisfactory reproduction of the measured containment pressure. The reactor lower head did not fail in this calculation, and all the fuel remained in the RPV. 13 % of the fuel was relocated from the core area, and all the fuel rods lost their integrity, releasing at least some volatile radionuclides. According to the calculation, about 90 % of noble gas inventory and about 0.08 % of cesium inventory was released to the environment. The release started 78 h after the earthquake, and a second release peak came at 90 h. Uncertainties in the calculation are very large because there is scarce public data available about the Fukushima power plant and because it is not yet possible to inspect the status of the reactor and the containment. Uncertainty in the calculated cesium release is larger than factor of ten.

  5. Viscosity Measurement for Tellurium Melt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bochuan; Li, Chao; Ban, Heng; Scripa, Rosalia N.; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, Sandor L.

    2006-01-01

    The viscosity of high temperature Te melt was measured using a new technique in which a rotating magnetic field was applied to the melt sealed in a suspended ampoule, and the torque exerted by rotating melt flow on the ampoule wall was measured. Governing equations for the coupled melt flow and ampoule torsional oscillation were solved, and the viscosity was extracted from the experimental data by numerical fitting. The computational result showed good agreement with experimental data. The melt velocity transient initiated by the rotating magnetic field reached a stable condition quickly, allowing the viscosity and electrical conductivity of the melt to be determined in a short period.

  6. Severe accident analysis using dynamic accident progression event trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakobyan, Aram P.

    In present, the development and analysis of Accident Progression Event Trees (APETs) are performed in a manner that is computationally time consuming, difficult to reproduce and also can be phenomenologically inconsistent. One of the principal deficiencies lies in the static nature of conventional APETs. In the conventional event tree techniques, the sequence of events is pre-determined in a fixed order based on the expert judgments. The main objective of this PhD dissertation was to develop a software tool (ADAPT) for automated APET generation using the concept of dynamic event trees. As implied by the name, in dynamic event trees the order and timing of events are determined by the progression of the accident. The tool determines the branching times from a severe accident analysis code based on user specified criteria for branching. It assigns user specified probabilities to every branch, tracks the total branch probability, and truncates branches based on the given pruning/truncation rules to avoid an unmanageable number of scenarios. The function of a dynamic APET developed includes prediction of the conditions, timing, and location of containment failure or bypass leading to the release of radioactive material, and calculation of probabilities of those failures. Thus, scenarios that can potentially lead to early containment failure or bypass, such as through accident induced failure of steam generator tubes, are of particular interest. Also, the work is focused on treatment of uncertainties in severe accident phenomena such as creep rupture of major RCS components, hydrogen burn, containment failure, timing of power recovery, etc. Although the ADAPT methodology (Analysis of Dynamic Accident Progression Trees) could be applied to any severe accident analysis code, in this dissertation the approach is demonstrated by applying it to the MELCOR code [1]. A case study is presented involving station blackout with the loss of auxiliary feedwater system for a

  7. Effects of water, depth and temperature on partial melting of mantle-wedge fluxed by hydrous sediment-melt in subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallik, Ananya; Dasgupta, Rajdeep; Tsuno, Kyusei; Nelson, Jared

    2016-12-01

    This study investigates the partial melting of variable bulk H2O-bearing parcels of mantle-wedge hybridized by partial melt derived from subducted metapelites, at pressure-temperature (P-T) conditions applicable to the hotter core of the mantle beneath volcanic arcs. Experiments are performed on mixtures of 25% sediment-melt and 75% fertile peridotite, from 1200 to 1300 °C, at 2 and 3 GPa, with bulk H2O concentrations of 4 and 6 wt.%. Combining the results from these experiments with previous experiments containing 2 wt.% bulk H2O (Mallik et al., 2015), it is observed that all melt compositions, except those produced in the lowest bulk H2O experiments at 3 GPa, are saturated with olivine and orthopyroxene. Also, higher bulk H2O concentration increases melt fraction at the same P-T condition, and causes exhaustion of garnet, phlogopite and clinopyroxene at lower temperatures, for a given pressure. The activity coefficient of silica (ϒSiO2) for olivine-orthopyroxene saturated melt compositions (where the activity of silica, aSiO2 , is buffered by the reaction olivine + SiO2 = orthopyroxene) from this study and from mantle melting studies in the literature are calculated. In melt compositions generated at 2 GPa or shallower, with increasing H2O concentration, ϒSiO2 increases from transition from non-ideal mixing as OH- in the melt (ϒSiO2 2 GPa, ϒSiO2 >1 at higher H2O concentrations in the melt, indicate requirement of excess energy to incorporate molecular H2O in the silicate melt structure, along with a preference for bridging species and polyhedral edge decorations. With vapor saturation in the presence of melt, ϒSiO2 decreases indicating approach towards ideal mixing of H2O in silicate melt. For similar H2O concentrations in the melt, ϒSiO2 for olivine-orthopyroxene saturated melts at 3 GPa is higher than melts at 2 GPa or shallower. This results in melts generated at 3 GPa being more silica-poor than melts at 2 GPa. Thus, variable bulk H2O and pressure of

  8. Improving Accident Tolerance of Nuclear Fuel with Coated Mo-alloy Cladding

    OpenAIRE

    Bo Cheng; Young-Jin Kim; Peter Chou

    2016-01-01

    In severe loss of coolant accidents (LOCA), similar to those experienced at Fukushima Daiichi and Three Mile Island Unit 1, the zirconium alloy fuel cladding materials are rapidly heated due to nuclear decay heating and rapid exothermic oxidation of zirconium with steam. This heating causes the cladding to rapidly react with steam, lose strength, burst or collapse, and generate large quantities of hydrogen gas. Although maintaining core cooling remains the highest priority in accident managem...

  9. Thermoacoustic Streaming and Ultrasonic Processing of Low Melting Melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, E. H.

    1997-01-01

    Ultrasonic levitation allows the processing of low melting materials both in 1 G as well as in microgravity. The free suspension of the melts also facilitates undercooling, permitting the measurements of the physical properties of the metastable liquids.

  10. Accident sequence precursor analysis level 2/3 model development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lui, C.H. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States); Galyean, W.J.; Brownson, D.A. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)] [and others

    1997-02-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Accident Sequence Precursor (ASP) program currently uses simple Level 1 models to assess the conditional core damage probability for operational events occurring in commercial nuclear power plants (NPP). Since not all accident sequences leading to core damage will result in the same radiological consequences, it is necessary to develop simple Level 2/3 models that can be used to analyze the response of the NPP containment structure in the context of a core damage accident, estimate the magnitude of the resulting radioactive releases to the environment, and calculate the consequences associated with these releases. The simple Level 2/3 model development work was initiated in 1995, and several prototype models have been completed. Once developed, these simple Level 2/3 models are linked to the simple Level 1 models to provide risk perspectives for operational events. This paper describes the methods implemented for the development of these simple Level 2/3 ASP models, and the linkage process to the existing Level 1 models.

  11. Advanced accident sequence precursor analysis level 2 models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galyean, W.J.; Brownson, D.A.; Rempe, J.L. [and others

    1996-03-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Accident Sequence Precursor program pursues the ultimate objective of performing risk significant evaluations on operational events (precursors) occurring in commercial nuclear power plants. To achieve this objective, the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research is supporting the development of simple probabilistic risk assessment models for all commercial nuclear power plants (NPP) in the U.S. Presently, only simple Level 1 plant models have been developed which estimate core damage frequencies. In order to provide a true risk perspective, the consequences associated with postulated core damage accidents also need to be considered. With the objective of performing risk evaluations in an integrated and consistent manner, a linked event tree approach which propagates the front end results to back end was developed. This approach utilizes simple plant models that analyze the response of the NPP containment structure in the context of a core damage accident, estimate the magnitude and timing of a radioactive release to the environment, and calculate the consequences for a given release. Detailed models and results from previous studies, such as the NUREG-1150 study, are used to quantify these simple models. These simple models are then linked to the existing Level 1 models, and are evaluated using the SAPHIRE code. To demonstrate the approach, prototypic models have been developed for a boiling water reactor, Peach Bottom, and a pressurized water reactor, Zion.

  12. Proteomics Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Proteomics Core is the central resource for mass spectrometry based proteomics within the NHLBI. The Core staff help collaborators design proteomics experiments in a...

  13. Proteomics Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Proteomics Core is the central resource for mass spectrometry based proteomics within the NHLBI. The Core staff help collaborators design proteomics experiments in...

  14. Modeling and Simulation of Release of Radiation in Flow Blockage Accident for Two Loops PWR

    OpenAIRE

    Khurram Mehboob; Cao Xinrong; Majid Ali

    2012-01-01

    In this study modeling and simulation of release of radiation form two loops PWR has been carried out for flow blockage accident. For this purpose, a MATLAB based program “Source Term Evaluator for Flow Blockage Accident” (STEFBA) has been developed, which uses the core inventory as its primary input. The TMI-2 reactor is considered as the reference plant for this study. For 1100 reactor operation days, the core inventory has been evaluated under the core design constrains at average reactor ...

  15. Root causes and impacts of severe accidents at large nuclear power plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Högberg, Lars

    2013-04-01

    The root causes and impacts of three severe accidents at large civilian nuclear power plants are reviewed: the Three Mile Island accident in 1979, the Chernobyl accident in 1986, and the Fukushima Daiichi accident in 2011. Impacts include health effects, evacuation of contaminated areas as well as cost estimates and impacts on energy policies and nuclear safety work in various countries. It is concluded that essential objectives for reactor safety work must be: (1) to prevent accidents from developing into severe core damage, even if they are initiated by very unlikely natural or man-made events, and, recognizing that accidents with severe core damage may nevertheless occur; (2) to prevent large-scale and long-lived ground contamination by limiting releases of radioactive nuclides such as cesium to less than about 100 TBq. To achieve these objectives the importance of maintaining high global standards of safety management and safety culture cannot be emphasized enough. All three severe accidents discussed in this paper had their root causes in system deficiencies indicative of poor safety management and poor safety culture in both the nuclear industry and government authorities.

  16. Radionuclide Release after Channel Flow Blockage Accident in CANDU-6 Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hoon; Jun, Hwang Yong [Korea Electric Power Corporation Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    The channel flow blockage accident is one of the in core loss of coolant accidents, the release path of radionuclide is very different from conventional loss of coolant accidents. The large amount of radionuclide released from broken channel is being washed during it passes through the moderator in Calandria. The objective of containment behavior analysis for channel flow blockage event is to assess the amount of radionuclide release to the ambient atmosphere. Radionuclide release rates in case of channel flow blockage with all safety system available, that is containment building is intact, as well as with containment system impairment are analyzed with GOTHIC and SMART code

  17. Severe accident research activities at Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilhelm, Polina; Jobst, Matthias; Schaefer, Frank; Kliem, Soeren [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    In the frame of the nuclear safety research program of the Helmholtz Association HZDR performs fundamental and applied research to assess and to reduce the risks related to the nuclear fuel cycle and the production of electricity in nuclear power plants. One of the research topics focuses on the safety aspects of current and future reactor designs. This includes the development and application of methods for analyses of transients and postulated accidents, covering the whole spectrum from normal operation till severe accident sequences including core degradation. This paper gives an overview of the severe accident research activities at the Reactor Safety Division at the Institute of Resource Ecology.

  18. Accident tolerant fuel analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Curtis [Idaho National Laboratory; Chichester, Heather [Idaho National Laboratory; Johns, Jesse [Texas A& M University; Teague, Melissa [Idaho National Laboratory; Tonks, Michael Idaho National Laboratory; Youngblood, Robert [Idaho National Laboratory

    2014-09-01

    Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Consequently, the ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin holds the key to improved decision making about light water reactor design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margins management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. The purpose of the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Pathway research and development (R&D) is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margins management by improving economics and reliability, and sustaining safety, of current NPPs. Goals of the RISMC Pathway are twofold: (1) Develop and demonstrate a risk-assessment method coupled to safety margin quantification that can be used by NPP decision makers as part of their margin recovery strategies. (2) Create an advanced ''RISMC toolkit'' that enables more accurate representation of NPP safety margin. In order to carry out the R&D needed for the Pathway, the Idaho National Laboratory is performing a series of case studies that will explore methods- and tools-development issues, in addition to being of current interest in their own right. One such study is a comparative analysis of safety margins of plants using different fuel cladding types: specifically, a comparison between current-technology Zircaloy cladding and a notional ''accident-tolerant'' (e.g., SiC-based) cladding. The present report begins the process of applying capabilities that are still under development to the problem of assessing new fuel designs. The approach and lessons learned from this case study will be included in future Technical Basis Guides produced by the RISMC Pathway. These guides will be the mechanism for developing the specifications for RISMC tools and for defining how plant

  19. [Accidents of fulguration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virenque, C; Laguerre, J

    1976-01-01

    Fulguration, first electric accident in which the man was a victim, is to day better known. A clap of thunder is decomposed in two elements: lightning, and thunder. Lightning is caused by an electrical discharge, either within a cloud, or between two clouds, or, above all, between a cloud and the surface of the ground. Experimental equipments owned by the French Electricity Company and by the Atomic Energy Commission, have allowed to photograph lightnings and to measure certain physical characteristics (Intensity variable between 25 to 100 kA, voltage variable between 20 to 1 000 kV). The frequency of storms was learned: the isokeraunic level, in France, is about 20, meaning that thunder is heard twenty days during one year. Man may be stricken by thunder by direct hit, by sudden bursting, by earth current, or through various conductors. The electric charge which reached him may go to the earth directly by contact with the ground or may dissipate in the air through a bony promontory (elbow). The total number of victims, "wounded" or deceased, is not now known by statistics. Death comes by insulation breakdown of one of several anatomic cephalic formations: skull, meninx, brain. Many various lesions may happen in survivors: loss of consciousness, more or less long, sensorial or motion deficiencies. All these signs are momentary and generally reversible. Besides one may observe much more intense lesions on the skin: burns and, over all, characteristic aborescence (skin effect by high frequency current). The heart is protected, contrarily to what happens with industrial electrocution. The curative treatment is merely symptomatic : reanimation, surgery for burns or associated traumatic lesions. A prevention is researched to help the lonely man, in the country or in the mountains in the houses (lightning conductor, Faraday cage), in vehicles (aircraft, cars, ships). The mysterious and unforseeable character of lightning still stays, leaving a door opened for numerous

  20. Accident Tolerant Fuel Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis Smith; Heather Chichester; Jesse Johns; Melissa Teague; Michael Tonks; Robert Youngblood

    2014-09-01

    Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Consequently, the ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin holds the key to improved decision making about light water reactor design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margins management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. The purpose of the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Pathway research and development (R&D) is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margins management by improving economics and reliability, and sustaining safety, of current NPPs. Goals of the RISMC Pathway are twofold: (1) Develop and demonstrate a risk-assessment method coupled to safety margin quantification that can be used by NPP decision makers as part of their margin recovery strategies. (2) Create an advanced “RISMC toolkit” that enables more accurate representation of NPP safety margin. In order to carry out the R&D needed for the Pathway, the Idaho National Laboratory is performing a series of case studies that will explore methods- and tools-development issues, in addition to being of current interest in their own right. One such study is a comparative analysis of safety margins of plants using different fuel cladding types: specifically, a comparison between current-technology Zircaloy cladding and a notional “accident-tolerant” (e.g., SiC-based) cladding. The present report begins the process of applying capabilities that are still under development to the problem of assessing new fuel designs. The approach and lessons learned from this case study will be included in future Technical Basis Guides produced by the RISMC Pathway. These guides will be the mechanism for developing the specifications for RISMC tools and for defining how plant decision makers should propose and

  1. The Effect of Si on the Melting Temperature of Iron up to 24 GPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, H.; Fei, Y.

    2012-12-01

    The Earth's outer core consists of iron plus about 10wt% light elements, such as oxygen, sulfur, silicon, carbon, and hydrogen, based on geophysical and geochemical observations, cosmochemical arguments, and mineral physics data. Among the proposed light elements, silicon (Si) is considered as one of the leading candidates in the Earth's core. For Mercury, its core could contain substantial amount of Si if it is accreted under relatively reduced environment. Therefore, it is necessary to determine the effect of Si on the melting temperature of iron at high pressure in order to provide an estimate of the core temperature for a Si-bearing core. We have carried out a series of high-pressure melting experiments on Fe-17wt%Si in the multi-anvil apparatus. The experiments were conducted using an 8/3 assembly with rhenium heater and MgO capsule. The quenched samples were examined with the scanning electron microscope equipped with a silicon drift detector EDS. Quenching textures and composition mappings of the recovered samples were used as the melting criteria. The melting temperatures of Fe-17wt%Si are 1800K, 2070K, 2170K, and 2270K at 10GP, 15GPa, 20GPa and 24GPa respectively. The result is consistent with the melting curve at low pressure (up to 5.5 GPa) based on the measurements of the discontinuities in temperature and pressure dependence of electrical resistance. Compared with the melting temperature of fcc iron, the P-T slope of the melting curve of Fe-17wt%Si is larger than that of pure Fe, indicating that the melting temperature depression becomes smaller at high pressure which may lead to change of melting relations at higher pressure. The new data provide constraints on the thermal structure of Mercury's core and a basis for extrapolation to higher pressure. Key words: melting temperature, high pressure, Fe-Si, outer core

  2. OECD MCCI 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : CCI-2 test data report-thermalhydraulic results, Rev. 0 October 15, 2004.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

    2011-05-23

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two program objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of satisfying these objectives, the Management Board (MB) approved the conduct of two long-term 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) experiments designed to provide information in several areas, including: (i) lateral vs. axial power split during dry core-concrete interaction, (ii) integral debris coolability data following late phase flooding, and (iii) data regarding the nature and extent of the cooling transient following breach of the crust formed at the melt-water interface. This data report provides thermal hydraulic test results from the CCI-2 experiment, which was conducted on August 24, 2004. Test specifications for CCI-2 are provided in Table 1-1. This experiment investigated the interaction of a fully oxidized 400 kg

  3. OECD MCCI project 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : CCI-3 test data report-thermalhydraulic results. Rev. 0 October 15, 2005.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

    2011-05-23

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two program objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of satisfying these objectives, the Management Board (MB) approved the conduct of a third long-term 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) experiment designed to provide information in several areas, including: (i) lateral vs. axial power split during dry core-concrete interaction, (ii) integral debris coolability data following late phase flooding, and (iii) data regarding the nature and extent of the cooling transient following breach of the crust formed at the melt-water interface. This data report provides thermal hydraulic test results from the CCI-3 experiment, which was conducted on September 22, 2005. Test specifications for CCI-3 are provided in Table 1-1. This experiment investigated the interaction of a fully oxidized 375

  4. OECD MCCI 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : CCI-2 test data report-thermalhydraulic results, Rev. 0 October 15, 2004.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

    2011-05-23

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two program objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of satisfying these objectives, the Management Board (MB) approved the conduct of two long-term 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) experiments designed to provide information in several areas, including: (i) lateral vs. axial power split during dry core-concrete interaction, (ii) integral debris coolability data following late phase flooding, and (iii) data regarding the nature and extent of the cooling transient following breach of the crust formed at the melt-water interface. This data report provides thermal hydraulic test results from the CCI-2 experiment, which was conducted on August 24, 2004. Test specifications for CCI-2 are provided in Table 1-1. This experiment investigated the interaction of a fully oxidized 400 kg

  5. A Eutectic Melting Study of Double Wall Cladding Tubes of FeCrAl and Zircaloy-4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Woojin; Son, Seongmin; Lee, You Ho; Lee, Jeong Ik; Ryu, Ho Jin [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Eun [Kyunghee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The eutectic melting behavior of FeCrAl/Zircaloy-4 double wall cladding tubes was investigated by annealing at various temperatures ranging from 900 .deg. C to 1300 .deg. C. It was found that significant eutectic melting occurred after annealing at temperatures equal to or higher than 1150 .deg. C. It means that an additional diffusion barrier layer is necessary to limit the eutectic melting between FeCrAl and Zircaloy-4 alloy cladding tubes. Coating of FeCrAl layers on the Zr alloy cladding tube is being investigated for the development of accident tolerant fuel by exploiting of both the oxidation resistance of FeCrAl alloys and the neutronic advantages of Zr alloys. Coating of FeCrAl alloys on Zr alloy cladding tubes can be performed by various techniques including thermal spray, laser cladding, and co-extrusion. Son et al. also reported the fabrication of FeCrAl/Zr ally double wall cladding by the shrink fit method. For the double layered cladding tubes, the thermal expansion mismatch between the dissimilar materials, severe deformation or mechanical failure due to the evolution of thermal stresses can occur when there is a thermal cycling. In addition to the thermal stress problems, chemical compatibilities between the two different alloys should be investigated in order to check the stability and thermal margin of the double wall cladding at a high temperature. Generally, it is considered that Zr alloy cladding will maintain its mechanical integrity up to 1204 .deg. C (2200 .deg. F) to satisfy the acceptance criteria for emergency core cooling systems.

  6. MELCOR 1.8.2 assessment: The MP-1 and MP-2 late phase melt progression experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tautges, T.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Thermal/Hydraulic Analysis Dept.

    1994-05-01

    MELCOR is a fully integrated, engineering-level computer code being developed at Sandia National Laboratories for the USNRC, that models the entire spectrum of severe accident phenomena in a unified framework for both BWRs and PWRs. As a part of an ongoing assessment program, MELCOR has been used to model the MP-1 and MP-2 experiments, which provided data for late-phase melt progression in PWR geometries. Core temperature predicted by MELCOR were within 250--500 K of measured data in both MP-1 and MP-2. Relocation in the debris bed and metallic crust regions of MP-2 was predicted accurately compared to PIE data. Temperature gradients in lower portions of the test bundle were not predicted well in both MP-1 and MP-2, due to the lack of modeling of the heat transfer path to the cooling jacket in those portions of the test bundles. Fifteen sensitivity studies were run on various core (COR), control volume hydrodynamics (CVH) and heat structures (HS) package parameters. No unexpected sensitivities were found, and in particular there were no sensitivities to reduced time step, finer nodalization or to computer platform. Calculations performed by the DEBRIS and TAC2D codes for MP-1 and MP-2 showed better agreement with measured data than those performed by MELCOR. This was expected, through, due to the fully 2-dimensional modeling used in the other codes.

  7. Melting of metallic intermediate level waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huutoniemi, Tommi; Larsson, Arne; Blank, Eva [Studsvik Nuclear AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2013-08-15

    This report presents a feasibility study of a melting facility for core components and reactor internals. An overview is given of how such a facility for treatment of intermediate level waste might be designed, constructed and operated and highlights both the possibilities and challenges. A cost estimate and a risk analysis are presented in order to make a conclusion of the technical feasibility of such a facility. Based on the authors' experience in operating a low level waste melting facility, their conclusion is that without technical improvements such a facility is not feasible today. This is based on the cost of constructing and operating such a facility, in conjunction with the radiological risks associated with operation and the uncertain benefits to disposal and long term safety.

  8. Thermal Hydraulic design parameters study for severe accidents using neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roh, Chang Hyun; Chang, Soon Heung [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Keun Sun [Sunmoon University, Asan (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    To provide the information on severe accident progression is very important for advanced or new type of nuclear power plant (NPP) design. A parametric study, therefore, was performed to investigate the effect of thermal hydraulic design parameters on severe accident progression of pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Nine parameters, which are considered important in NPP design or severe accident progression, were selected among the various thermal hydraulic design parameters. The backpropagation neural network (BPN) was used to determine parameters, which might more strongly affect the severe accident progression, among nine parameters. For training, different input patterns were generated by the latin hypercube sampling (LHS) technique and then different target patterns that contain core uncovery time and vessel failure time were obtained for Young Gwang Nuclear (YGN) Units 3 and 4 using modular accident analysis program (MAAP) 3.0B code. Three different severe accident scenarios, such as two loss of coolant accidents (LOCAs) and station blackout (SBO), were considered in this analysis. Results indicated that design parameters related to refueling water storage tank (RWST), accumulator and steam generator (S/G) have more dominant effects on the progression of severe accidents investigated, compared to the other six parameters. 9 refs., 5 tabs. (Author)

  9. Thermodynamics of Oligonucleotide Duplex Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber-Gosche, Sherrie; Edwards, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Melting temperatures of oligonucleotides are useful for a number of molecular biology applications, such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Although melting temperatures are often calculated with simplistic empirical equations, application of thermodynamics provides more accurate melting temperatures and an opportunity for students to apply…

  10. Melting of polydisperse hard disks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pronk, S.; Frenkel, D.

    2004-01-01

    The melting of a polydisperse hard-disk system is investigated by Monte Carlo simulations in the semigrand canonical ensemble. This is done in the context of possible continuous melting by a dislocation-unbinding mechanism, as an extension of the two-dimensional hard-disk melting problem. We find

  11. Melting of polydisperse hard disks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pronk, S.; Frenkel, D.

    2004-01-01

    The melting of a polydisperse hard-disk system is investigated by Monte Carlo simulations in the semigrand canonical ensemble. This is done in the context of possible continuous melting by a dislocation-unbinding mechanism, as an extension of the two-dimensional hard-disk melting problem. We find th

  12. Accident knowledge and emergency management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, B.; Groenberg, C.D.

    1997-03-01

    The report contains an overall frame for transformation of knowledge and experience from risk analysis to emergency education. An accident model has been developed to describe the emergency situation. A key concept of this model is uncontrolled flow of energy (UFOE), essential elements are the state, location and movement of the energy (and mass). A UFOE can be considered as the driving force of an accident, e.g., an explosion, a fire, a release of heavy gases. As long as the energy is confined, i.e. the location and movement of the energy are under control, the situation is safe, but loss of confinement will create a hazardous situation that may develop into an accident. A domain model has been developed for representing accident and emergency scenarios occurring in society. The domain model uses three main categories: status, context and objectives. A domain is a group of activities with allied goals and elements and ten specific domains have been investigated: process plant, storage, nuclear power plant, energy distribution, marine transport of goods, marine transport of people, aviation, transport by road, transport by rail and natural disasters. Totally 25 accident cases were consulted and information was extracted for filling into the schematic representations with two to four cases pr. specific domain. (au) 41 tabs., 8 ills.; 79 refs.

  13. Radioactive materials transport accident analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McSweeney, T.I.; Maheras, S.J.; Ross, S.B. [Battelle Memorial Inst. (United States)

    2004-07-01

    Over the last 25 years, one of the major issues raised regarding radioactive material transportation has been the risk of severe accidents. While numerous studies have shown that traffic fatalities dominate the risk, modeling the risk of severe accidents has remained one of the most difficult analysis problems. This paper will show how models that were developed for nuclear spent fuel transport accident analysis can be adopted to obtain estimates of release fractions for other types of radioactive material such as vitrified highlevel radioactive waste. The paper will also show how some experimental results from fire experiments involving low level waste packaging can be used in modeling transport accident analysis with this waste form. The results of the analysis enable an analyst to clearly show the differences in the release fractions as a function of accident severity. The paper will also show that by placing the data in a database such as ACCESS trademark, it is possible to obtain risk measures for transporting the waste forms along proposed routes from the generator site to potential final disposal sites.

  14. Nuclear accident dosimetry intercomparison studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, C S

    1989-09-01

    Twenty-two nuclear accident dosimetry intercomparison studies utilizing the fast-pulse Health Physics Research Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory have been conducted since 1965. These studies have provided a total of 62 different organizations a forum for discussion of criticality accident dosimetry, an opportunity to test their neutron and gamma-ray dosimetry systems under a variety of simulated criticality accident conditions, and the experience of comparing results with reference dose values as well as with the measured results obtained by others making measurements under identical conditions. Sixty-nine nuclear accidents (27 with unmoderated neutron energy spectra and 42 with eight different shielded spectra) have been simulated in the studies. Neutron doses were in the 0.2-8.5 Gy range and gamma doses in the 0.1-2.0 Gy range. A total of 2,289 dose measurements (1,311 neutron, 978 gamma) were made during the intercomparisons. The primary methods of neutron dosimetry were activation foils, thermoluminescent dosimeters, and blood sodium activation. The main methods of gamma dose measurement were thermoluminescent dosimeters, radiophotoluminescent glass, and film. About 68% of the neutron measurements met the accuracy guidelines (+/- 25%) and about 52% of the gamma measurements met the accuracy criterion (+/- 20%) for accident dosimetry.

  15. Pavement Snow Melting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lund, John W.

    2005-01-01

    The design of pavement snow melting systems is presented based on criteria established by ASHRAE. The heating requirements depends on rate of snow fall, air temperature, relative humidity and wind velocity. Piping materials are either metal or plastic, however, due to corrosion problems, cross-linked polyethylene pipe is now generally used instead of iron. Geothermal energy is supplied to systems through the use of heat pipes, directly from circulating pipes, through a heat exchanger or by allowing water to flow directly over the pavement, by using solar thermal storage. Examples of systems in New Jersey, Wyoming, Virginia, Japan, Argentina, Switzerland and Oregon are presented. Key words: pavement snow melting, geothermal heating, heat pipes, solar storage, Wyoming, Virginia, Japan, Argentina, Klamath Falls.

  16. Analysis of process of ship blackout accident based on surge tube failure%全船断电叠加波动管失效事故分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王伟; 陈力生; 张帆; 刘海鹏; 晏峰

    2014-01-01

    利用 MELCOR 程序建立了船用堆计算模型,通过模拟船用堆全船断电事故进程,分析了全船断电事故的热工水力及堆芯失效过程。建立了稳压器波动管蠕变失效模型,实现了 MELCOR 程序对稳压器波动管蠕变失效问题的计算分析。对波动管破口尺寸进行了敏感性分析,结果表明:破口尺寸越大,事故进程越快。全船断电事故舱底的熔穿及稳压器波动管的失效,给船用堆的抗沉性及船内人员健康带来潜在的危害。%A computation model of the marine reactor is established by use of the MELCOR program . The simulation of the process of blackout accident resulting from the marine reactor helps analyze the cause of the thermodynamic and reactor core failure leading to the ship electricity cutoff .Therefore , the creep failure model of pressurizer surge tube is established to make a computation and analysis of the problem of creep failure in the pressurizer surge tube .The sensibility analysis of the breaking size of the surge tube proves that the bigger the breaking ,the faster the accident progresses .It will bring potential hazards to the sinking resistant capability of the marine reactor and to the health of the ship ′s crew because of the melt penetration of the cabin bottom and the failure of pressurizer surge tube in the ship blackout accident .

  17. Study on Severe Accident Induced by Total Loss of Power Supply for Small PWR%小型压水堆完全丧失电源引发的严重事故研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张龙飞; 舒礼伟; 陆古兵

    2012-01-01

    With the use of best estimate computer code RELAP/SCDAPS1M/MOD3. 4 of pressure water reactor severe accident, a three-channel along radial and ten-nodal along axis nuclear reactor severe accident calculation model was established based on a hypothetical small PWR. The severe accident induced by total loss of power supply was studied, and mitigation measure with 300 s continuation of the steam generator auxiliary feedwater was analyzed. The calculation results show that the steam generator auxiliary feedwater plays an important part in delaying core melt progression and mitigating severe accident consequences.%以压水堆严重事故最佳估算程序RELAP/SCDAPSIM/MOD3.4为核心软件,以假想的小型压水堆为研究对象,建立了1个径向3通道、轴向10节块的核反应堆严重事故计算模型,研究了完全丧失电源初因事件引发的严重事故过程,并对事故停堆后蒸汽发生器给水持续300 s的缓解措施进行了分析.计算结果表明:蒸汽发生器辅助给水对于延迟事故进程,缓解事故后果具有重要作用.

  18. The child accident repeater: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J G

    1980-04-01

    The child accident repeater is defined as one who has at least three accidents that come to medical attention within a year. The accident situation has features in common with those of the child who has a single accident through simple "bad luck", but other factors predispose him to repeated injury. In the child who has a susceptible personality, a tendency for accident repetition may be due to a breakdown in adjustment to a stressful environment. Prevention of repeat accidents should involve the usual measures considered appropriate for all children as well as an attempt to provide treatment of significant maladjustment and modification of a stressful environment.

  19. Hindsight Bias in Cause Analysis of Accident

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Atsuo Murata; Yasunari Matsushita

    2014-01-01

    It is suggested that hindsight becomes an obstacle to the objective investigation of an accident, and that the proper countermeasures for the prevention of such an accident is impossible if we view the accident with hindsight. Therefore, it is important for organizational managers to prevent hindsight from occurring so that hindsight does not hinder objective and proper measures to be taken and this does not lead to a serious accident. In this study, a basic phenomenon potentially related to accidents, that is, hindsight was taken up, and an attempt was made to explore the phenomenon in order to get basically insights into the prevention of accidents caused by such a cognitive bias.

  20. Modification of MELCOR for severe accident analysis of candidate accident tolerant cladding materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merrill, Brad J., E-mail: brad.merrill@inl.gov; Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M., E-mail: shannon.bragg-sitton@inl.gov; Humrickhouse, Paul W., E-mail: paul.humrickhouse@inl.gov

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Accident tolerant fuels (ATF) systems are currently under development for LWRs. • Many performance analysis tools are specifically developed for UO{sub 2}–Zr alloy fuel. • Modifications were made to the MELCOR code for candidate ATF cladding. • Preliminary analysis results for SiC and FeCrAl cladding concepts are presented. - Abstract: A number of materials are currently under development as candidate accident tolerant fuel and cladding for application in the current fleet of commercial light water reactors (LWRs). The safe, reliable and economic operation of the nation’s nuclear power reactor fleet has always been a top priority for the nuclear industry. Continual improvement of technology, including advanced materials and nuclear fuels, remains central to the industry’s success. Enhancing the accident tolerance of light water reactors became a topic of serious discussion following the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake, resulting tsunami, and subsequent damage to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant complex. The overall goal for the development of accident tolerant fuel (ATF) systems for LWRs is to identify alternative fuel system technologies to further enhance the safety, competitiveness, and economics of commercial nuclear power. Designed for use in the current fleet of commercial LWRs, or in reactor concepts with design certifications (GEN-III+), to achieve their goal enhanced ATF must endure loss of active cooling in the reactor core for a considerably longer period of time than the current fuel system, while maintaining or improving performance during normal operation. Many available nuclear fuel performance analysis tools are specifically developed for the current UO{sub 2}–Zirconium alloy fuel system. The MELCOR severe-accident analysis code, under development at the Sandia National Laboratory in New Mexico (SNL-NM) for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), is one of these tools. This paper describes modifications

  1. Qualification of the nuclear reactor core model DYN3D coupled to the thermohydraulic system code ATHLET, applied as an advanced tool for accident analysis of VVER-type reactors. Final report; Qualifizierung des Kernmodells DYN3D im Komplex mit dem Stoerfallcode ATHLET als fortgeschrittenes Werkzeug fuer die Stoerfallanalyse von WWER-Reaktoren. T. 1. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grundmann, U.; Kliem, S.; Krepper, E.; Mittag, S; Rohde, U.; Schaefer, F.; Seidel, A.

    1998-03-01

    The nuclear reactor core model DYN3D with 3D neutron kinetics has been coupled to the thermohydraulic system code ATHLET. In the report, activities on qualification of the coupled code complex ATHLET-DYN3D as a validated tool for the accident analysis of russian VVER type reactors are described. That includes: - Contributions to the validation of the single codes ATHLET and DYN3D by the analysis of experiments on natural circulation behaviour in thermohydraulic test facilities and solution of benchmark tasks on reactivity initiated transients, - the acquisition and evaluation of measurement data on transients in nuclear power plants, the validation of ATHLET-DYN3D by calculating an accident with delayed scram and a pump trip in VVER plants, - the complementary improvement of the code DYN3D by extension of the neutron physical data base, implementation of an improved coolant mixing model, consideration of decay heat release and xenon transients, - the analysis of steam leak scenarios for VVER-440 type reactors with failure of different safety systems, investigation of different model options. The analyses showed, that with realistic coolant mixing modelling in the downcomer and the lower plenum, recriticality of the scramed reactor due to overcooling can be reached. The application of the code complex ATHLET-DYN3D in Czech Republic, Bulgaria and the Ukraine has been started. Future work comprises the verification of ATHLET-DYN3D with a DYN3D version for the square fuel element geometry of western PWR. (orig.) [Deutsch] Das Reaktorkernmodell DYN3D mit 3D Neutronenkinetik wurde an den Thermohydraulik-Systemcode ATHLET angekoppelt. Im vorliegenden Bericht werden Arbeiten zur Qualifizierung des gekoppelten Codekomplexes zu einem validierten Hilfsmittel fuer Stoerfallablaufanalysen zu Reaktoren des russischen Typs WWER dargestellt. Diese umfassten im einzelnen: - Beitraege zur Validierung der Einzelcodes ATHLET und DYN3D anhand der Nachrechnung von Experimenten zum

  2. Road characteristics and bicycle accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyberg, P; Björnstig, U; Bygren, L O

    1996-12-01

    In Umeå, Sweden, defects in the physical road surface contributed to nearly half of the single bicycle accidents. The total social cost of these injuries to people amount to at least SEK 20 million (SEK 60,000 or about USD 8,500 per accident), which corresponds to the estimated loss of "eight life equivalents a year". Improved winter maintenance seems to have the greatest injury prevention potential and would probably reduce the number of injuries considerably, whereas improved road quality and modification of kerbs would reduce the most severe injuries. A local traffic safety program should try to prevent road accidents instead of handling the consequences of them. In accordance with Parliament decisions on traffic we would like to see increased investment in measures favoring bicycle traffic, where cycling is seen as a solution, not as a problem.

  3. Bathtub immersion accidents involving children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearn, J; Nixon, J

    1977-02-12

    A review of 19 consecutive serious bathtub immersion accidents (11 survivals, 8 fatalities) is presented. In all instances, consciousness was lost in the water. Unlike other childhood accidents which usually show a male predominance, the sexes are equally affected. The modal age is 11 months. Six separate causes of bath drownings and near-drownings have been identified, and in 14 of the 19 accidents, two or more causes were operating concurrently. Median estimated immersion time for survivals was four minutes, and five minutes for fatalities. The median depth of water was eight inches. An 'at risk' profile for home bathtub drownings is presented; this includes the youngest or second youngest child of a large family, a family of grade 4 to 7 sociooccupational status (congalton) and a family in which routine is temporarily broken.

  4. Internal Accident Report on EDH

    CERN Multimedia

    SC Department

    2006-01-01

    The A2 Safety Code requires that, the Internal Accident Report form must be filled in by the person concerned or any witness to ensure that all the relevant services are informed. Please note that an electronic version of this form has been elaborated in collaboration with SC-IE, HR-OPS-OP and IT-AIS. Whenever possible, the electronic form shall be used. The relative icon is available on the EDH Desktop, Other tasks page, under the Safety heading, or directly here: https://edh.cern.ch/Document/Accident/. If you have any questions, please contact the SC Secretariat, tel. 75097 Please notice that the Internal Accident Report is an integral part of the Safety Code A2 and does not replace the HS50.

  5. Accident analysis of heavy water cooled thorium breeder reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yulianti, Yanti; Su'ud, Zaki; Takaki, Naoyuki

    2015-04-01

    Thorium has lately attracted considerable attention because it is accumulating as a by-product of large scale rare earth mining. The objective of research is to analyze transient behavior of a heavy water cooled thorium breeder that is designed by Tokai University and Tokyo Institute of Technology. That is oxide fueled, PWR type reactor with heavy water as primary coolant. An example of the optimized core has relatively small moderator to fuel volume ratio (MFR) of 0.6 and the characteristics of the core are burn-up of 67 GWd/t, breeding ratio of 1.08, burn-up reactivity loss during cycles of nuclear reactor accidents types examined here is Unprotected Transient over Power (UTOP) due to withdrawing of the control rod that result in the positive reactivity insertion so that the reactor power will increase rapidly. Another accident type is Unprotected Loss of Flow (ULOF) that caused by failure of coolant pumps. To analyze the reactor accidents, neutron distribution calculation in the nuclear reactor is the most important factor. The best expression for the neutron distribution is the Boltzmann transport equation. However, solving this equation is very difficult so that the space-time diffusion equation is commonly used. Usually, space-time diffusion equation is solved by employing a point kinetics approach. However, this approach is less accurate for a spatially heterogeneous nuclear reactor and the nuclear reactor with quite large reactivity input. Direct method is therefore used to solve space-time diffusion equation which consider spatial factor in detail during nuclear reactor accident simulation. Set of equations that obtained from full implicit finite-difference method is solved by using iterative methods. The indication of UTOP accident is decreasing macroscopic absorption cross-section that results large external reactivity, and ULOF accident is indicated by decreasing coolant flow. The power reactor has a peak value before reactor has new balance condition

  6. The melting curve of Ni to 1 Mbar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, Oliver T.; Wood, Ian G.; Dobson, David P.; Vočadlo, Lidunka; Wang, Weiwei; Thomson, Andrew R.; Wann, Elizabeth T. H.; Morard, Guillaume; Mezouar, Mohamed; Walter, Michael J.

    2014-12-01

    The melting curve of Ni has been determined to 125 GPa using laser-heated diamond anvil cell (LH-DAC) experiments in which two melting criteria were used: firstly, the appearance of liquid diffuse scattering (LDS) during in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) and secondly, plateaux in temperature vs. laser power functions in both in situ and off-line experiments. Our new melting curve, defined by a Simon-Glatzel fit to the data where TM (K) = [ (PM/18.78 ± 10.20 + 1) ]1/2.42 ± 0.66 × 1726, is in good agreement with the majority of the theoretical studies on Ni melting and matches closely the available shock wave melting data. It is however dramatically steeper than the previous off-line LH-DAC studies in which determination of melting was based on the visual observation of motion aided by the laser speckle method. We estimate the melting point (TM) of Ni at the inner-core boundary (ICB) pressure of 330 GPa to be TM = 5800 ± 700 K (2 σ), within error of the value for Fe of TM = 6230 ± 500 K determined in a recent in situ LH-DAC study by similar methods to those employed here. This similarity suggests that the alloying of 5-10 wt.% Ni with the Fe-rich core alloy is unlikely to have any significant effect on the temperature of the ICB, though this is dependent on the details of the topology of the Fe-Ni binary phase diagram at core pressures. Our melting temperature for Ni at 330 GPa is ∼2500 K higher than that found in previous experimental studies employing the laser speckle method. We find that those earlier melting curves coincide with the onset of rapid sub-solidus recrystallization, suggesting that visual observations of motion may have misinterpreted dynamic recrystallization as convective motion of a melt. This finding has significant implications for our understanding of the high-pressure melting behaviour of a number of other transition metals.

  7. Accident Analysis for the NIST Research Reactor Before and After Fuel Conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek J.; Diamond D.; Cuadra, A.; Hanson, A.L.; Cheng, L-Y.; Brown, N.R.

    2012-09-30

    Postulated accidents have been analyzed for the 20 MW D2O-moderated research reactor (NBSR) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The analysis has been carried out for the present core, which contains high enriched uranium (HEU) fuel and for a proposed equilibrium core with low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The analyses employ state-of-the-art calculational methods. Three-dimensional Monte Carlo neutron transport calculations were performed with the MCNPX code to determine homogenized fuel compositions in the lower and upper halves of each fuel element and to determine the resulting neutronic properties of the core. The accident analysis employed a model of the primary loop with the RELAP5 code. The model includes the primary pumps, shutdown pumps outlet valves, heat exchanger, fuel elements, and flow channels for both the six inner and twenty-four outer fuel elements. Evaluations were performed for the following accidents: (1) control rod withdrawal startup accident, (2) maximum reactivity insertion accident, (3) loss-of-flow accident resulting from loss of electrical power with an assumption of failure of shutdown cooling pumps, (4) loss-of-flow accident resulting from a primary pump seizure, and (5) loss-of-flow accident resulting from inadvertent throttling of a flow control valve. In addition, natural circulation cooling at low power operation was analyzed. The analysis shows that the conversion will not lead to significant changes in the safety analysis and the calculated minimum critical heat flux ratio and maximum clad temperature assure that there is adequate margin to fuel failure.

  8. Impact-induced melting during accretion of the Earth

    CERN Document Server

    de Vries, Jellie; Melosh, H Jay; Jacobson, Seth A; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Rubie, David C

    2016-01-01

    Because of the high energies involved, giant impacts that occur during planetary accretion cause large degrees of melting. The depth of melting in the target body after each collision determines the pressure and temperature conditions of metal-silicate equilibration and thus geochemical fractionation that results from core-mantle differentiation. The accretional collisions involved in forming the terrestrial planets of the inner Solar System have been calculated by previous studies using N-body accretion simulations. Here we use the output from such simulations to determine the volumes of melt produced and thus the pressure and temperature conditions of metal-silicate equilibration, after each impact, as Earth-like planets accrete. For these calculations a parametrised melting model is used that takes impact velocity, impact angle and the respective masses of the impacting bodies into account. The evolution of metal-silicate equilibration pressures (as defined by evolving magma ocean depths) during Earth's ac...

  9. Glacier melt on the Third Pole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, T.

    2015-12-01

    With an average elevation above 4,000 metres, the Third Pole (TP) is a unique region with many high mountains centered on the Tibetan Plateau stretching over 5 million square kilometers. Major environmental changes are taking place on the TP characterized by complex interactions of atmospheric, cryospheric, hydrological, geological and environmental processes. These processes are critical for the well-being of the three billion people inhabiting the plateau and the surrounding regions. Glacier melt is one of the most significant environmental changes observed on the TP. Over the past decade, most of the glaciers on the TP have undergone considerable melt. The Third Pole Environment (TPE) has focused on the causes of the glacier melt by conducting large-scale ground in-situ observation and monitoring, analyzing satellite images and remote sensing data, and applying numerical modeling to environmental research on the TP. The studies of long-term record of water stable isotopes in precipitation and ice core throughout the TP have revealed different features with regions, thus proposing significant influence of atmospheric circulations on spatial precipitation pattern over the TP. Validation of the result by isotope-equipped general circulation models confirms the spatial distribution of different atmospheric circulation dominances on the TP, with northern part dominated by the westerlies, southern part by the summer monsoon, and central part featuring the influences of both circulation systems. Such unique circulation patterns also bear directly on the status of glaciers and lakes over the TP and its surroundings. The studies therefore found the largest glacier melt in the monsoon-dominated southern part, moderate melt in the central part of transition, and the least melt, or even slight advance in the westerlies-dominated northern TP. It is clear that some mountains on the TP are undergoing rapid melt and the consequence of without ice and snow will be very soon. The

  10. Reactor safety study. An assessment of accident risks in U. S. commercial nuclear power plants. Appendix VI. Calculation of reactor accident consequences. [PWR and BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1975-10-01

    Information is presented concerning the radioactive releases from the containment following accidents; radioactive inventory of the reactor core; atmospheric dispersion; reactor sites and meteorological data; radioactive decay and deposition from plumes; finite distance of plume travel; dosimetric models; health effects; demographic data; mitigation of radiation exposure; economic model; and calculated results with consequence model.

  11. On severe accident hydrogen behaviour in Loviisa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okkonen, T. [OTO-Consulting Ay, Helsinki (Finland)

    1996-02-01

    This study is related to the hydrogen management strategy of the Loviisa ice-condenser containments. A synthetic survey is conducted of the various parts of the subject by using compact `back-of-the-envelope` analysis methods. The analysed cases are consistent with the principal hydrogen management approaches proposed by the utility Imatran Voima Oy (IVO). The study begins by introduction of the Loviisa plant features and various severe accident types. Hydrogen generation characteristics are analysed mainly for the core degradation phase, but the hydrogen sources from molten fuel-coolant interactions and reflooding of a degraded core are discussed, as well. The hydrogen generation and release rates are compared with the overall gas convection and mixing conditions in order to estimate hydrogen concentrations in the containment. The natural convection currents are examined also from the scaling point of view, concerning the scaled-down VICTORIA tests of IVO. Finally, the potential for large deflagration loadings or local detonations is examined for the Loviisa containments. The study is concluded by preliminary subjective judgments about the most critical factors of the Loviisa hydrogen problematics and about any issues that may require additional confirmative research. (orig.) (47 refs., 4 figs., 24 tabs.).

  12. A study of fuel behavior under reactivity initiated accident conditions — review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Michio; Shiozawa, Shusaku

    1980-11-01

    Results obtained in the 400 tests performed to simulate reactivity initiated accidents since 1975 in the Japanese Nuclear Safety Research Reactor, are described. Tests included the effects of cooling environment, defective fuel elements, fuel design parameters, the behaviour of fuel elements for various reactor types, all done for a wide range of energy deposition. Four types of basic fuel failure mechanisms have been established, and are discussed in detail: cladding melt failure, UO 2 melt failure, high temperature burst failure and low temperature burst failure. Future test plans up to 1990 are out-lined and features requiring particular attention are pointed out.

  13. OECD MMCI 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : CCCI-1 test data report-thermalhydraulic results. Rev 0 January 31, 2004.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2011-05-23

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten coreconcrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two program objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of satisfying these objectives, the Management Board (MB) approved the conduct of two long-term 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) experiments designed to provide information in several areas, including: (i) lateral vs. axial power split during dry core-concrete interaction, (ii) integral debris coolability data following late phase flooding, and (iii) data regarding the nature and extent of the cooling transient following breach of the crust formed at the melt-water interface. This data report provides thermal hydraulic test results from the CCI-1 experiment, which was conducted on December 19, 2003. Test specifications for CCI-1 are provided in Table 1-1. This experiment investigated the interaction of a fully oxidized 400 kg

  14. Analysis of the FeCrAl Accident Tolerant Fuel Concept Benefits during BWR Station Blackout Accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robb, Kevin R [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) alloys are being considered for fuel concepts with enhanced accident tolerance. FeCrAl alloys have very slow oxidation kinetics and good strength at high temperatures. FeCrAl could be used for fuel cladding in light water reactors and/or as channel box material in boiling water reactors (BWRs). To estimate the potential safety gains afforded by the FeCrAl concept, the MELCOR code was used to analyze a range of postulated station blackout severe accident scenarios in a BWR/4 reactor employing FeCrAl. The simulations utilize the most recently known thermophysical properties and oxidation kinetics for FeCrAl. Overall, when compared to the traditional Zircaloy-based cladding and channel box, the FeCrAl concept provides a few extra hours of time for operators to take mitigating actions and/or for evacuations to take place. A coolable core geometry is retained longer, enhancing the ability to stabilize an accident. Finally, due to the slower oxidation kinetics, substantially less hydrogen is generated, and the generation is delayed in time. This decreases the amount of non-condensable gases in containment and the potential for deflagrations to inhibit the accident response.

  15. How to reduce the number of accidents

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    Among the safety objectives that the Director-General has established for CERN in 2012 is a reduction in the number of workplace accidents.   The best way to prevent workplace accidents is to learn from experience. This is why any accident, fire, instance of pollution, or even a near-miss, should be reported using the EDH form that can be found here. All accident reports are followed up. The departments investigate all accidents that result in sick leave, as well as all the more common categories of accidents at CERN, essentially falls (slipping, falling on stairs, etc.), regardless of whether or not they lead to sick leave. By studying the accident causes that come to light in this way, it is possible to take preventive action to avoid such accidents in the future. If you have any questions, the HSE Unit will be happy to answer them. Contact us at safety-general@cern.ch. HSE Unit

  16. Trismus: An unusual presentation following road accident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thakur Jagdeep

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Trismus due to trauma usually follows road accidents leading to massive faciomaxillary injury. In the literature there is no report of a foreign body causing trismus following a road accident, this rare case is an exception. We present a case of isolated presentation of trismus following a road accident. This case report stresses on the thorough evaluation of patients presenting with trismus following a road accident.

  17. Development of a fuel-rod simulator and small-diameter thermocouples for high-temperature, high-heat-flux tests in the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor Core Flow Test Loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCulloch, R.W.; MacPherson, R.E.

    1983-03-01

    The Core Flow Test Loop was constructed to perform many of the safety, core design, and mechanical interaction tests in support of the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR) using electrically heated fuel rod simulators (FRSs). Operation includes many off-normal or postulated accident sequences including transient, high-power, and high-temperature operation. The FRS was developed to survive: (1) hundreds of hours of operation at 200 W/cm/sup 2/, 1000/sup 0/C cladding temperature, and (2) 40 h at 40 W/cm/sup 2/, 1200/sup 0/C cladding temperature. Six 0.5-mm type K sheathed thermocouples were placed inside the FRS cladding to measure steady-state and transient temperatures through clad melting at 1370/sup 0/C.

  18. The Physics of Traffic Accidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Peter

    1975-01-01

    Shows how physics can be used to analyze and prevent traffic accidents by determining critical speeds on curves, the behavior of motor cycles and stability of articulated vehicles, and the visibility that is needed to make a minor road junction safe. (MLH)

  19. Work Accidents and Professional Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doru Hauptmann

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The major accident is defined as “any event occurred, like an emission of dangerous materials or agents, which emerges from uncontrolled evolutions along the exploitation of any objective that leads to the immediate or delayed occurrence of serious dangers with impact over human health or over the environment, inside or outside the objective in which are involved one or more than one dangerous materials”.The dangerous phenomenon is a potential source of harms. In the ambit of industrial risks of accidental origins, this expression more frequently refers to physical phenomena like conflagrations, explosions, toxic gases dispersion, etc.Any accident scenario relates itself to the potential effects at the level of environmental “targets”. In the case of major accidents, we can distinguish the following categories of “targets”: human (employees of the objective, working or resident people in the nearby of the emplacement; the installation or equipments that may stay at the origin of the accidents (dangerous equipments; certain all-important equipments to ensure the safety level of the installation (critical security equipments: control rooms, civil fire brigade headquarters, etc; goods and structures situated in the installation’ environment (ground water, rivers, soil, flora, fauna.

  20. New technology for accident prevention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byne, P. [Shiftwork Solutions, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    This power point presentation examined the effects of fatigue in the workplace and presented 3 technologies designed to prevent or monitor fatigue. The relationship between mental fatigue, circadian rhythms and cognitive performance was explored. Details of vigilance related degradations in the workplace were presented, as well as data on fatigue-related accidents and a time-line of meter-reading errors. It was noted that the direct cause of the Exxon Valdez disaster was sleep deprivation. Fatigue related accidents during the Gulf War were reviewed. The effects of fatigue on workplace performance include impaired logical reasoning and decision-making; impaired vigilance and attention; slowed mental operations; loss of situational awareness; slowed reaction time; and short cuts and lapses in optional or self-paced behaviours. New technologies to prevent fatigue-related accidents include (1) the driver fatigue monitor, an infra-red camera and computer that tracks a driver's slow eye-lid closures to prevent fatigue related accidents; (2) a fatigue avoidance scheduling tool (FAST) which collects actigraphs of sleep activity; and (3) SAFTE, a sleep, activity, fatigue and effectiveness model. refs., tabs., figs.

  1. Corporate Cost of Occupational Accidents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rikhardsson, Pall M.; Impgaard, M.

    2004-01-01

    The systematic accident cost analysis (SACA) project was carried out during 2001 by The Aarhus School of Business and PricewaterhouseCoopers Denmark with financial support from The Danish National Working Environment Authority. Its focused on developing and testing a method for evaluating...

  2. Crime, accidents and social control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Junger, Marianne; Terlouw, Gert-Jan; van der Heijden, Peter G.M.

    1995-01-01

    This paper addresses to questions. (1) Is there a demonstrable relation between accidents and crime, does this relation hold for each type of crime and each means of transport, and does it subsist after controlling for age and gender? (2) Can social control theory explain involvements in both

  3. Detection and analysis of accident black spots with even small accident figures.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oppe, S.

    1982-01-01

    Accident black spots are usually defined as road locations with high accident potentials. In order to detect such hazardous locations we have to know the probability of an accident for a traffic situation of some kind, or the mean number of accidents for some unit of time. In almost all procedures

  4. Detection and analysis of accident black spots with even small accident figures.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oppe, S.

    1982-01-01

    Accident black spots are usually defined as road locations with high accident potentials. In order to detect such hazardous locations we have to know the probability of an accident for a traffic situation of some kind, or the mean number of accidents for some unit of time. In almost all procedures

  5. Ice cores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Ice cores from Antarctica, from Greenland, and from a number of smaller glaciers around the world yield a wealth of information on past climates and environments. Ice cores offer unique records on past temperatures, atmospheric composition (including greenhouse gases), volcanism, solar activity......, dustiness, and biomass burning, among others. In Antarctica, ice cores extend back more than 800,000 years before present (Jouzel et al. 2007), whereas. Greenland ice cores cover the last 130,000 years...

  6. Ice cores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Ice cores from Antarctica, from Greenland, and from a number of smaller glaciers around the world yield a wealth of information on past climates and environments. Ice cores offer unique records on past temperatures, atmospheric composition (including greenhouse gases), volcanism, solar activity......, dustiness, and biomass burning, among others. In Antarctica, ice cores extend back more than 800,000 years before present (Jouzel et al. 2007), whereas. Greenland ice cores cover the last 130,000 years...

  7. Intersection layout, traffic volumes and accidents.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poppe, F.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports on the accident research carried out as a part of a large project started in 1983. For this accident research an inventory was made of a large number of intersections.Recorded were layout features, accident data and estimates of traffic volumes. Attention will be given to the

  8. 48 CFR 836.513 - Accident prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Accident prevention. 836... prevention. The contracting officer must insert the clause at 852.236-87, Accident Prevention, in solicitations and contracts for construction that contain the clause at FAR 52.236-13, Accident Prevention....

  9. 48 CFR 1836.513 - Accident prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Accident prevention. 1836... 1836.513 Accident prevention. The contracting officer must insert the clause at 1852.223-70, Safety and Health, in lieu of FAR clause 52.236-13, Accident Prevention, and its Alternate I....

  10. 48 CFR 636.513 - Accident prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Accident prevention. 636... CONTRACTING CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Contract Clauses 636.513 Accident prevention. (a) In... contracting activities shall insert DOSAR 652.236-70, Accident Prevention, in lieu of FAR clause...

  11. Barriers to learning from incidents and accidents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dechy, N.; Dien, Y.; Drupsteen, L.; Felicio, A.; Cunha, C.; Roed-Larsen, S.; Marsden, E.; Tulonen, T.; Stoop, J.; Strucic, M.; Vetere Arellano, A.L.; Vorm, J.K.J. van der; Benner, L.

    2015-01-01

    This document provides an overview of knowledge concerning barriers to learning from incidents and accidents. It focuses on learning from accident investigations, public inquiries and operational experience feedback, in industrial sectors that are exposed to major accident hazards. The document disc

  12. Analysing truck position data to study roundabout accident risk

    OpenAIRE

    Kamla, Jwan Jameel Shekh Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    In order to reduce accident risk, highway authorities prioritise maintenance budgets partly based upon previous accident history. However, as accident rates have continued to fall in most contexts, this approach has become problematic as accident ‘black spots’ have been treated and the number of accidents at any individua