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Sample records for core group approach

  1. Core group approach to identify college students at risk for sexually transmitted infections "Core group" para identificar universitários em risco para infecções sexualmente transmissíveis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A Sánchez-Alemán

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze the core group for sexually transmitted infections (STI among college students. METHODS: Cross-sectional study carried out in a convenience sample comprising 711 college students of the public university of Morelos, Mexico, between 2001 and 2003. Sociodemographic and sexual behavior information were collected using self-applied questionnaires. Herpes simplex 2 (HSV-2 infection was tested in the blood. The number of sexual partners in the last year and cocaine consumption were used as indicators to construct the dependent variable "level of STI risk" in three categories: low, medium and high risk (core group. A multinomial analysis was conducted to evaluate whether different sex behaviors were associated with the variable "level of STI risk". RESULTS: There was significant association between HSV-2 seroprevalence and the variable "level of STI risk": 13%, 5.6% and 3.8% were found in high (core group, medium and low categories, respectively. There were gender differences regarding the core group. Men started having sexual intercourse earlier, had more sex partners, higher alcohol and drug consumption, higher frequency of sex intercourse with sex workers, exchanging sex for money, occasional and concurrent partners compared to women. CONCLUSIONS: The study findings suggest existing contextual characteristics in the study population that affect their sex behavior. In Mexico, the cultural conception of sexuality is determined mainly by gender differences where men engage in higher risky sexual behavior than women.OBJETIVO: Identificar al grupo core de infecciones de transmisión sexual (ITS en una población de estudiantes universitarios mexicanos. MÉTODOS: Se realizó un estudio transversal en una muestra por conveniencia que incluyó 711 estudiantes de una universidad pública de Morelos, México, entre 2001 y 2003. Las características sociodemográficas y de comportamiento sexual se obtuvieron mediante un cuestionario auto

  2. A multi-level surface rebalancing approach for efficient convergence acceleration of 3D full core multi-group fine grid nodal diffusion iterations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geemert, René van

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • New type of multi-level rebalancing approach for nodal transport. • Generally improved and more mesh-independent convergence behavior. • Importance for intended regime of 3D pin-by-pin core computations. - Abstract: A new multi-level surface rebalancing (MLSR) approach has been developed, aimed at enabling an improved non-linear acceleration of nodal flux iteration convergence in 3D steady-state and transient reactor simulation. This development is meant specifically for anticipating computational needs for solving envisaged multi-group diffusion-like SP N calculations with enhanced mesh resolution (i.e. 3D multi-box up to 3D pin-by-pin grid). For the latter grid refinement regime, the previously available multi-level coarse mesh rebalancing (MLCMR) strategy has been observed to become increasingly inefficient with increasing 3D mesh resolution. Furthermore, for very fine 3D grids that feature a very fine axial mesh as well, non-convergence phenomena have been observed to emerge. In the verifications pursued up to now, these problems have been resolved by the new approach. The novelty arises from taking the interface current balance equations defined over all Cartesian box edges, instead of the nodal volume-integrated process-rate balance equation, as an appropriate restriction basis for setting up multi-level acceleration of fine grid interface current iterations. The new restriction strategy calls for the use of a newly derived set of adjoint spectral equations that are needed for computing a limited set of spectral response vectors per node. This enables a straightforward determination of group-condensed interface current spectral coupling operators that are of crucial relevance in the new rebalancing setup. Another novelty in the approach is a new variational method for computing the neutronic eigenvalue. Within this context, the latter is treated as a control parameter for driving another, newly defined and numerically more fundamental

  3. Hunton Group core workshop and field trip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, K.S. [ed.

    1993-12-31

    The Late Ordovician-Silurian-Devonian Hunton Group is a moderately thick sequence of shallow-marine carbonates deposited on the south edge of the North American craton. This rock unit is a major target for petroleum exploration and reservoir development in the southern Midcontinent. The workshop described here was held to display cores, outcrop samples, and other reservoir-characterization studies of the Hunton Group and equivalent strata throughout the region. A field trip was organized to complement the workshop by allowing examination of excellent outcrops of the Hunton Group of the Arbuckle Mountains.

  4. Vegetables and other core food groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poelman, Astrid A.M.; Delahunty, Conor M.; Graaf, de Kees

    2017-01-01

    Vegetables are the food category least liked by children. This research investigated the sensory properties of vegetables vis-a-vis other core foods that comprise children's diets, to determine to what degree low acceptance of vegetables can be attributed to sensory properties. Vegetables (n =

  5. Core level shifts in group IV semiconductors and semimetals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, S.; Tosatti, E.

    1981-08-01

    We calculate the core level binding energy shift from the isolated atom to the crystalline solid, for group IV elemental semiconductors. This is done by simple extension of Johansson and Martensson's scheme for metals. We show that the core level energy in a nonmetal must be measured by the photo absorption (''core exciton'') threshold rather than by photo emission. As a byproduct, a simple scheme is also devised to evaluate impurity heats of solutions in semiconductors. (author)

  6. Children's science learning: A core skills approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolmie, Andrew K; Ghazali, Zayba; Morris, Suzanne

    2016-09-01

    Research has identified the core skills that predict success during primary school in reading and arithmetic, and this knowledge increasingly informs teaching. However, there has been no comparable work that pinpoints the core skills that underlie success in science. The present paper attempts to redress this by examining candidate skills and considering what is known about the way in which they emerge, how they relate to each other and to other abilities, how they change with age, and how their growth may vary between topic areas. There is growing evidence that early-emerging tacit awareness of causal associations is initially separated from language-based causal knowledge, which is acquired in part from everyday conversation and shows inaccuracies not evident in tacit knowledge. Mapping of descriptive and explanatory language onto causal awareness appears therefore to be a key development, which promotes unified conceptual and procedural understanding. This account suggests that the core components of initial science learning are (1) accurate observation, (2) the ability to extract and reason explicitly about causal connections, and (3) knowledge of mechanisms that explain these connections. Observational ability is educationally inaccessible until integrated with verbal description and explanation, for instance, via collaborative group work tasks that require explicit reasoning with respect to joint observations. Descriptive ability and explanatory ability are further promoted by managed exposure to scientific vocabulary and use of scientific language. Scientific reasoning and hypothesis testing are later acquisitions that depend on this integration of systems and improved executive control. © 2016 The British Psychological Society.

  7. MTR core loading pattern optimization using burnup dependent group constants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iqbal Masood

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A diffusion theory based MTR fuel management methodology has been developed for finding superior core loading patterns at any stage for MTR systems, keeping track of burnup of individual fuel assemblies throughout their history. It is based on using burnup dependent group constants obtained by the WIMS-D/4 computer code for standard fuel elements and control fuel elements. This methodology has been implemented in a computer program named BFMTR, which carries out detailed five group diffusion theory calculations using the CITATION code as a subroutine. The core-wide spatial flux and power profiles thus obtained are used for calculating the peak-to-average power and flux-ratios along with the available excess reactivity of the system. The fuel manager can use the BFMTR code for loading pattern optimization for maximizing the excess reactivity, keeping the peak-to-average power as well as flux-ratio within constraints. The results obtained by the BFMTR code have been found to be in good agreement with the corresponding experimental values for the equilibrium core of the Pakistan Research Reactor-1.

  8. The use of CORE model by metacognitive skill approach in developing characters junior high school students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Dahlia; Yaniawati, Poppy; Kusumah, Yaya Sukjaya

    2017-08-01

    This study aims to analyze the character of students who obtain CORE learning model using metacognitive approach. The method in this study is qualitative research and quantitative research design (Mixed Method Design) with concurrent embedded strategy. The research was conducted on two groups: an experimental group and the control group. An experimental group consists of students who had CORE model learning using metacognitive approach while the control group consists of students taught by conventional learning. The study was conducted the object this research is the seventh grader students in one the public junior high schools in Bandung. Based on this research, it is known that the characters of the students in the CORE model learning through metacognitive approach is: honest, hard work, curious, conscientious, creative and communicative. Overall it can be concluded that CORE model learning is good for developing characters of a junior high school student.

  9. Group theory approach to scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, J.

    1985-01-01

    For certain physical systems, there exists a dynamical group which contains the operators connecting states with the same energy but belonging to potentials with different strengths. This group is called the potential group of that system. The SO(2,1) potential groups structure is introduced to describe physical systems with mixed spectra, such as Morse and Poeschl-teller potentials. The discrete spectrum describes bound states and the continuous spectrum describes bound states and the continuous spectrum describes scattering states. A solvable class of one-dimensional potentials given by Natanzon belongs to this structure with an SO(2,2) potential group. The potential group structure provides us with an algebraic procedure generating the recursion relations for the scattering matrix, which can be formulated in a purely algebraic fashion, divorced from any differential realization. This procedure, when applied to the three-dimensional scattering problem with SO(3,1) symmetry, generates the scattering matrix of the Coulomb problem. Preliminary phenomenological models for elastic scattering in a heavy-ion collision are constructed on the basis. The results obtained here can be regarded as an important extension of the group theory techniques to scattering problems similar to that developed for bound state problems

  10. General presentation of the core mechanical behaviour approach in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, A.; Dorsselaere, J.P. van

    1984-01-01

    This French review paper presents the evolution along time of the FBR core mechanical behaviour approach, from RAPSODIE to SPX2, through PHENIX and SPX1: core designs, knowledge of the irradiation laws, project criterias, calculation codes, and R and D fields. (author)

  11. Modular approach to LWR in-core fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urli, N.; Pevec, D.; Coffou, E.; Petrovic, B.

    1980-01-01

    The most important methods in the LWR in-core fuel management are reviewed. A modular approach and optimization by use of infinite multiplication factor and power form-factor are favoured. A computer program for rotation of fuel assemblies at reloads has been developed which improves further fuel economy and reliability of nuclear power plants. The program has been tested on the PWR core and showed to decrease the power form-factors and flatten the radial power distribution. (author)

  12. Comparison of serpent and triton generated FEW group constants for APR1400 nuclear reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsawi, Mohamed A.; Alnoamani, Zainab

    2015-01-01

    The accuracy of full-core reactor power calculations using diffusion codes is strongly dependent on the quality of the homogenized cross sections and other few-group constants generated by lattice codes. For many years, deterministic lattice codes have been used to generate these constants using different techniques: the discrete ordinates, collision probability or the method of characteristics, just to name a few. These codes, however, show some limitations, for example, on complex geometries or near heavy absorbers as in modern pressurized water reactor (PWR) designs like the Korean Advanced Power Reactor 1400 (APR1400) core. The use of continuous-energy Monte Carlo (MC) codes to produce nuclear constants can be seen as an attractive option when dealing with fuel or reactor types that lie beyond the capabilities of conventional deterministic lattice transport codes. In this paper, the few-group constants generated by two of the state-of-the-art reactor physics codes, SERPENT and SCALE/TRITON, will be critically studied and their reliability for being used in subsequent diffusion calculations will be evaluated. SERPENT is a 3D, continuous-energy, Monte Carlo reactor physics code which has a built-in burn-up calculation capability. It has been developed at the Technical Research Center of Finland (VTT) since 2004. SCALE/TRITON, on the other hand, is a control module developed within the framework of SCALE package that enables performing deterministic 2-D transport calculations on nuclear reactor core lattices. The approach followed in this paper is as follows. First, the few-group nuclear constants for the APR1400 reactor core were generated using SERPENT (version 2.1.22) and NEWT (in SCALE version 6.1.2) codes. For both codes, the critical spectrum, calculated using the B1 method, was used as a weighting function. Second, 2-D diffusion calculations were performed using the US NRC core simulator PARCS employing the two few-group constant sets generated in the first

  13. A HYBRID GENETIC ALGORITHM-NEURAL NETWORK APPROACH FOR PRICING CORES AND REMANUFACTURED CORES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Seidi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    ENGLISH ABSTRACT:Sustainability has become a major issue in most economies, causing many leading companies to focus on product recovery and reverse logistics. Remanufacturing is an industrial process that makes used products reusable. One of the important aspects in both reverse logistics and remanufacturing is the pricing of returned and remanufactured products (called cores. In this paper, we focus on pricing the cores and remanufactured cores. First we present a mathematical model for this purpose. Since this model does not satisfy our requirements, we propose a simulation optimisation approach. This approach consists of a hybrid genetic algorithm based on a neural network employed as the fitness function. We use automata learning theory to obtain the learning rate required for training the neural network. Numerical results demonstrate that the optimal value of the acquisition price of cores and price of remanufactured cores is obtained by this approach.

    AFRIKAANSE OPSOMMING: Volhoubaarheid het ‘n belangrike saak geword in die meeste ekonomieë, wat verskeie maatskappye genoop het om produkherwinning en omgekeerde logistiek te onder oë te neem. Hervervaardiging is ‘n industriële proses wat gebruikte produkte weer bruikbaar maak. Een van die belangrike aspekte in beide omgekeerde logistiek en hervervaardiging is die prysbepaling van herwinne en hervervaardigde produkte. Hierdie artikel fokus op die prysbepalingsaspekte by wyse van ‘n wiskundige model.

  14. A Core Design Approach Aimed at Sustainability and Intrinsic Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grasso, Giacomo

    2013-01-01

    The comprehensive approach adopted for the core design of all LFRs investigated within the LEADER project, proved to effectively drive the design to the fulfillment of the aimed sustainability performances, and the respect of the design constraints for the robust implementation of the inherent safety principle: • the ELFR core is able to operate adiabatically, with a very narrow reactivity swing along a 2.5 y cycle; • wide margins are provided for protecting the fuel and the structures even in case of unprotected transients, allowing for very long grace times

  15. An automated approach for annual layer counting in ice cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winstrup, M.; Svensson, A.; Rasmussen, S. O.; Winther, O.; Steig, E.; Axelrod, A.

    2012-04-01

    The temporal resolution of some ice cores is sufficient to preserve seasonal information in the ice core record. In such cases, annual layer counting represents one of the most accurate methods to produce a chronology for the core. Yet, manual layer counting is a tedious and sometimes ambiguous job. As reliable layer recognition becomes more difficult, a manual approach increasingly relies on human interpretation of the available data. Thus, much may be gained by an automated and therefore objective approach for annual layer identification in ice cores. We have developed a novel method for automated annual layer counting in ice cores, which relies on Bayesian statistics. It uses algorithms from the statistical framework of Hidden Markov Models (HMM), originally developed for use in machine speech recognition. The strength of this layer detection algorithm lies in the way it is able to imitate the manual procedures for annual layer counting, while being based on purely objective criteria for annual layer identification. With this methodology, it is possible to determine the most likely position of multiple layer boundaries in an entire section of ice core data at once. It provides a probabilistic uncertainty estimate of the resulting layer count, hence ensuring a proper treatment of ambiguous layer boundaries in the data. Furthermore multiple data series can be incorporated to be used at once, hence allowing for a full multi-parameter annual layer counting method similar to a manual approach. In this study, the automated layer counting algorithm has been applied to data from the NGRIP ice core, Greenland. The NGRIP ice core has very high temporal resolution with depth, and hence the potential to be dated by annual layer counting far back in time. In previous studies [Andersen et al., 2006; Svensson et al., 2008], manual layer counting has been carried out back to 60 kyr BP. A comparison between the counted annual layers based on the two approaches will be presented

  16. Groups, matrices, and vector spaces a group theoretic approach to linear algebra

    CERN Document Server

    Carrell, James B

    2017-01-01

    This unique text provides a geometric approach to group theory and linear algebra, bringing to light the interesting ways in which these subjects interact. Requiring few prerequisites beyond understanding the notion of a proof, the text aims to give students a strong foundation in both geometry and algebra. Starting with preliminaries (relations, elementary combinatorics, and induction), the book then proceeds to the core topics: the elements of the theory of groups and fields (Lagrange's Theorem, cosets, the complex numbers and the prime fields), matrix theory and matrix groups, determinants, vector spaces, linear mappings, eigentheory and diagonalization, Jordan decomposition and normal form, normal matrices, and quadratic forms. The final two chapters consist of a more intensive look at group theory, emphasizing orbit stabilizer methods, and an introduction to linear algebraic groups, which enriches the notion of a matrix group. Applications involving symm etry groups, determinants, linear coding theory ...

  17. HEXAB-3D, 3-D Few-Group Diffusion for Hexagonal Core Geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apostolov, T.G.; Ivanov, K.N.; Manolova, M.A.

    2002-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: A three-dimensional few-group calculational model based on diffusion theory has been developed for calculating the basic neutron physical characteristics of power reactors which have a hexagonal core configuration with a heterogeneous region structure in axial direction. There are two versions of the model: - HEXAB-III-30 - the solution range in horizontal plane is 30 - sector of reactor core - HEXAB-III-360 - the solution range in horizontal plane is full core. 2 - Method of solution: In the HEXAB-3D code the nine-point mesh-centered finite-difference approximation of neutron diffusion equation is applied. The standard inner-outer iterative strategy is used. Inner iterations are solved using two different incomplete factorization techniques: AGA two-sweep iterative method and modified AGA two-sweep iterative method both accelerated by the double successive over-relaxation procedure. The power method, combined with two- or three-term Chebishev polynomial acceleration for outer iterations is applied in the code. To improve the accuracy of the calculated integral and local reactor parameters without significantly increasing computer time and storage an effective approach has been developed. It decreases errors due to the use of coarse mesh by means of correcting the coefficients of finite- difference scheme. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Maximum of 10 energy groups, 30 horizontal layers and 100 material compositions

  18. Core outcome sets in dermatology: report from the second meeting of the International Cochrane Skin Group Core Outcome Set Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottner, J; Jacobi, L; Hahnel, E; Alam, M; Balzer, K; Beeckman, D; Busard, C; Chalmers, J; Deckert, S; Eleftheriadou, V; Furlan, K; Horbach, S E R; Kirkham, J; Nast, A; Spuls, P; Thiboutot, D; Thorlacius, L; Weller, K; Williams, H C; Schmitt, J

    2018-04-01

    Results of clinical trials are the most important information source for generating external clinical evidence. The use of different outcomes across trials, which investigate similar interventions for similar patient groups, significantly limits the interpretation, comparability and clinical application of trial results. Core outcome sets (COSs) aim to overcome this limitation. A COS is an agreed standardized collection of outcomes that should be measured and reported in all clinical trials for a specific clinical condition. The Core Outcome Set Initiative within the Cochrane Skin Group (CSG-COUSIN) supports the development of core outcomes in dermatology. In the second CSG-COUSIN meeting held in 2017, 11 COS development groups working on skin diseases presented their current work. The presentations and discussions identified the following overarching methodological challenges for COS development in dermatology: it is not always easy to define the disease focus of a COS; the optimal method for outcome domain identification and level of detail needed to specify such domains is challenging to many; decision rules within Delphi surveys need to be improved; appropriate ways of patient involvement are not always clear. In addition, there appear to be outcome domains that may be relevant as potential core outcome domains for the majority of skin diseases. The close collaboration between methodologists in the Core Outcome Set Initiative and the international Cochrane Skin Group has major advantages for trialists, systematic reviewers and COS developers. © 2018 British Association of Dermatologists.

  19. An improved one-and-a-half group BWR core simulator for a new-generation core management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamoto, Tatsuya; Yamamoto, Munenari

    2000-01-01

    An improved one-and-a-half group core simulator method for a next-generation BWR core management system is presented. In the improved method, intranodal spectral index (thermal to fast flux ratio) is expanded with analytic solutions to the diffusion equation, and the nodal power density and the interface net current are calculated, taking the intranodal flux shape into consideration. A unique method was developed for assembly heterogeneity correction. Thus eliminating the insufficiencies of the conventional one-and-a-half group method, we can have accurate power distributions as well as local peaking factors for cores having large spectral mismatch between fuel assemblies. The historical effects of spectral mismatch are also considered in both nodal power and local peaking calculations. Although reflectors are not solved explicitly, there is essentially no need for core dependent adjustable parameters, since boundary conditions are derived in the same manner as in the interior nodes. Calculation time for nodal solutions is comparable to that for the conventional method, and is less than 1/10 of a few-group nodal simulator. Verifications of the present method were made by comparing the results with those obtained by heterogeneous fine-mesh multi-group core depletion calculations, and the accuracy was shown to be fairly good. (author)

  20. Quantum Computing: a Quantum Group Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Zhenghan

    2013-01-01

    There is compelling theoretical evidence that quantum physics will change the face of information science. Exciting progress has been made during the last two decades towards the building of a large scale quantum computer. A quantum group approach stands out as a promising route to this holy grail, and provides hope that we may have quantum computers in our future.

  1. Facile fabrication of siloxane @ poly (methylacrylic acid) core-shell microparticles with different functional groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Zheng-Bai; Tai, Li; Zhang, Da-Ming; Jiang, Yong, E-mail: yj@seu.edu.cn [Southeast University, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering (China)

    2017-02-15

    Siloxane @ poly (methylacrylic acid) core-shell microparticles with functional groups were prepared by a facile hydrolysis-condensation method in this work. Three different silane coupling agents 3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (MPS), 3-triethoxysilylpropylamine (APTES), and 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GPTMS) were added along with tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) into the polymethylacrylic acid (PMAA) microparticle ethanol dispersion to form the Si@PMAA core-shell microparticles with different functional groups. The core-shell structure and the surface special functional groups of the resulting microparticles were measured by transmission electron microscopy and FTIR. The sizes of these core-shell microparticles were about 350–400 nm. The corresponding preparation conditions and mechanism were discussed in detail. This hydrolysis-condensation method also could be used to functionalize other microparticles which contain active groups on the surface. Meanwhile, the Si@PMAA core-shell microparticles with carbon-carbon double bonds and amino groups have further been applied to prepare hydrophobic coatings.

  2. Facile fabrication of siloxane @ poly (methylacrylic acid) core-shell microparticles with different functional groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Zheng-Bai; Tai, Li; Zhang, Da-Ming; Jiang, Yong

    2017-01-01

    Siloxane @ poly (methylacrylic acid) core-shell microparticles with functional groups were prepared by a facile hydrolysis-condensation method in this work. Three different silane coupling agents 3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (MPS), 3-triethoxysilylpropylamine (APTES), and 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GPTMS) were added along with tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) into the polymethylacrylic acid (PMAA) microparticle ethanol dispersion to form the Si@PMAA core-shell microparticles with different functional groups. The core-shell structure and the surface special functional groups of the resulting microparticles were measured by transmission electron microscopy and FTIR. The sizes of these core-shell microparticles were about 350–400 nm. The corresponding preparation conditions and mechanism were discussed in detail. This hydrolysis-condensation method also could be used to functionalize other microparticles which contain active groups on the surface. Meanwhile, the Si@PMAA core-shell microparticles with carbon-carbon double bonds and amino groups have further been applied to prepare hydrophobic coatings.

  3. Few-Group Transport Analysis of the Core-Reflector Problem in Fast Reactor Cores via Equivalent Group Condensation and Local/Global Iteration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Won, Jong Hyuck; Cho, Nam Zin

    2011-01-01

    In deterministic neutron transport methods, a process called fine-group to few-group condensation is used to reduce the computational burden. However, recent results on the core-reflector problem in fast reactor cores show that use of a small number of energy groups has limitation to describe neutron flux around core reflector interface. Therefore, researches are still ongoing to overcome this limitation. Recently, the authors proposed I) direct application of equivalently condensed angle-dependent total cross section to discrete ordinates method to overcome the limitation of conventional multi-group approximations, and II) local/global iteration framework in which fine-group discrete ordinates calculation is used in local problems while few-group transport calculation is used in the global problem iteratively. In this paper, an analysis of the core-reflector problem is performed in few-group structure using equivalent angle-dependent total cross section with local/global iteration. Numerical results are obtained under S 12 discrete ordinates-like transport method with scattering cross section up to P1 Legendre expansion

  4. Core competencies for shared decision making training programs: insights from an international, interdisciplinary working group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Légaré, France; Moumjid-Ferdjaoui, Nora; Drolet, Renée; Stacey, Dawn; Härter, Martin; Bastian, Hilda; Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; Borduas, Francine; Charles, Cathy; Coulter, Angela; Desroches, Sophie; Friedrich, Gwendolyn; Gafni, Amiram; Graham, Ian D; Labrecque, Michel; LeBlanc, Annie; Légaré, Jean; Politi, Mary; Sargeant, Joan; Thomson, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Shared decision making is now making inroads in health care professionals' continuing education curriculum, but there is no consensus on what core competencies are required by clinicians for effectively involving patients in health-related decisions. Ready-made programs for training clinicians in shared decision making are in high demand, but existing programs vary widely in their theoretical foundations, length, and content. An international, interdisciplinary group of 25 individuals met in 2012 to discuss theoretical approaches to making health-related decisions, compare notes on existing programs, take stock of stakeholders concerns, and deliberate on core competencies. This article summarizes the results of those discussions. Some participants believed that existing models already provide a sufficient conceptual basis for developing and implementing shared decision making competency-based training programs on a wide scale. Others argued that this would be premature as there is still no consensus on the definition of shared decision making or sufficient evidence to recommend specific competencies for implementing shared decision making. However, all participants agreed that there were 2 broad types of competencies that clinicians need for implementing shared decision making: relational competencies and risk communication competencies. Further multidisciplinary research could broaden and deepen our understanding of core competencies for shared decision making training. Copyright © 2013 The Alliance for Continuing Education in the Health Professions, the Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education, and the Council on CME, Association for Hospital Medical Education.

  5. On-line core monitoring system based on buckling corrected modified one group model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freire, Fernando S.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear power reactors require core monitoring during plant operation. To provide safe, clean and reliable core continuously evaluate core conditions. Currently, the reactor core monitoring process is carried out by nuclear code systems that together with data from plant instrumentation, such as, thermocouples, ex-core detectors and fixed or moveable In-core detectors, can easily predict and monitor a variety of plant conditions. Typically, the standard nodal methods can be found on the heart of such nuclear monitoring code systems. However, standard nodal methods require large computer running times when compared with standards course-mesh finite difference schemes. Unfortunately, classic finite-difference models require a fine mesh reactor core representation. To override this unlikely model characteristic we can usually use the classic modified one group model to take some account for the main core neutronic behavior. In this model a course-mesh core representation can be easily evaluated with a crude treatment of thermal neutrons leakage. In this work, an improvement made on classic modified one group model based on a buckling thermal correction was used to obtain a fast, accurate and reliable core monitoring system methodology for future applications, providing a powerful tool for core monitoring process. (author)

  6. Summary on the activity of AERs Working Group on core monitoring (flux reconstruction, in-core measurements)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemes, I.

    2010-01-01

    Working Group C had a joint meeting with Group G in Balatonfuered, Hungary, 31 May-1 June, 2010. At the joint meeting 21 people from 10 AER member organisations of 4 countries - such as Russia, Czech Republic, Slovakia and Hungary - participated. In the 2 days of the program 15 papers were presented, 10 from these connected to the topic of working group C. The title of papers and the list of participants are attached. At the meeting the following topics were discussed:1-Gd fuel introduction and experiences;2-Reactor physical measurement and evaluation problems; 3-Code development and testing;4-In-core surveillance system developments. (Author)

  7. Renormalization group approach to superfluid neutron matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hebeler, K.

    2007-06-06

    In the present thesis superfluid many-fermion systems are investigated in the framework of the Renormalization Group (RG). Starting from an experimentally determined two-body interaction this scheme provides a microscopic approach to strongly correlated many-body systems at low temperatures. The fundamental objects under investigation are the two-point and the four-point vertex functions. We show that explicit results for simple separable interactions on BCS-level can be reproduced in the RG framework to high accuracy. Furthermore the RG approach can immediately be applied to general realistic interaction models. In particular, we show how the complexity of the many-body problem can be reduced systematically by combining different RG schemes. Apart from technical convenience the RG framework has conceptual advantage that correlations beyond the BCS level can be incorporated in the flow equations in a systematic way. In this case however the flow equations are no more explicit equations like at BCS level but instead a coupled set of implicit equations. We show on the basis of explicit calculations for the single-channel case the efficacy of an iterative approach to this system. The generalization of this strategy provides a promising strategy for a non-perturbative treatment of the coupled channel problem. By the coupling of the flow equations of the two-point and four-point vertex self-consistency on the one-body level is guaranteed at every cutoff scale. (orig.)

  8. A novel approach to preparing magnetic protein microspheres with core-shell structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Wei; Sun Zhendong; Li Fengsheng; Chen Kai; Liu Tianyu; Liu Jialing; Zhou Tianle; Guo Rui

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic protein microspheres with core-shell structure were prepared through a novel approach based on the sonochemical method and the emulsion solvent evaporation method. The microspheres are composed of the oleic acid and undecylenic acid modified Fe 3 O 4 cores and coated with globular bovine serum albumin (BSA). Under an optimized condition, up to 57.8 wt% of approximately 10 nm superparamagnetic Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles could be uniformly encapsulated into the BSA microspheres with the diameter of approximately 160 nm and the high saturation magnetization of 38.5 emu/g, besides of the abundant functional groups. The possible formation mechanism of magnetic microspheres was discussed in detail. - Research Highlights: → Magnetic protein microspheres with core-shell structure were prepared through a novel approach based on the sonochemical method and the emulsion solvent evaporation method.→ The microspheres are composed of the oleic acid and undecylenic acid modified Fe 3 O 4 cores and coated with globular bovine serum albumin (BSA).→ 57.8 wt% of approximately 10 nm superparamagnetic Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles could be uniformly encapsulated into the BSA microspheres with the diameter of approximately 160 nm and the high saturation magnetization of 38.5 emu/g, besides the abundant functional groups.

  9. A novel approach to preparing magnetic protein microspheres with core-shell structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang Wei, E-mail: climentjw@126.co [National Special Superfine Powder Engineering Research Center, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Sun Zhendong; Li Fengsheng [National Special Superfine Powder Engineering Research Center, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Chen Kai; Liu Tianyu; Liu Jialing [Department of Physics, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Zhou Tianle [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Guo Rui [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China)

    2011-03-15

    Magnetic protein microspheres with core-shell structure were prepared through a novel approach based on the sonochemical method and the emulsion solvent evaporation method. The microspheres are composed of the oleic acid and undecylenic acid modified Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} cores and coated with globular bovine serum albumin (BSA). Under an optimized condition, up to 57.8 wt% of approximately 10 nm superparamagnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles could be uniformly encapsulated into the BSA microspheres with the diameter of approximately 160 nm and the high saturation magnetization of 38.5 emu/g, besides of the abundant functional groups. The possible formation mechanism of magnetic microspheres was discussed in detail. - Research Highlights: Magnetic protein microspheres with core-shell structure were prepared through a novel approach based on the sonochemical method and the emulsion solvent evaporation method. The microspheres are composed of the oleic acid and undecylenic acid modified Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} cores and coated with globular bovine serum albumin (BSA). 57.8 wt% of approximately 10 nm superparamagnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles could be uniformly encapsulated into the BSA microspheres with the diameter of approximately 160 nm and the high saturation magnetization of 38.5 emu/g, besides the abundant functional groups.

  10. Measuring core inflation in India: An asymmetric trimmed mean approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naresh Kumar Sharma

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper seeks to obtain an optimal asymmetric trimmed mean-based core inflation measure in the class of trimmed mean measures when the distribution of price changes is leptokurtic and skewed to the right for any given period. Several estimators based on asymmetric trimmed mean approach are constructed and estimates generated by use of these estimators are evaluated on the basis of certain established empirical criteria. The paper also provides the method of trimmed mean expression “in terms of percentile score.” This study uses 69 monthly price indices which are constituent components of Wholesale Price Index for the period, April 1994 to April 2009, with 1993–1994 as the base year. Results of the study indicate that an optimally trimmed estimator is found when we trim 29.5% from the left-hand tail and 20.5% from the right-hand tail of the distribution of price changes.

  11. Nonlinear relativistic plasma resonance: Renormalization group approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metelskii, I. I., E-mail: metelski@lebedev.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation); Kovalev, V. F., E-mail: vfkvvfkv@gmail.com [Dukhov All-Russian Research Institute of Automatics (Russian Federation); Bychenkov, V. Yu., E-mail: bychenk@lebedev.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-15

    An analytical solution to the nonlinear set of equations describing the electron dynamics and electric field structure in the vicinity of the critical density in a nonuniform plasma is constructed using the renormalization group approach with allowance for relativistic effects of electron motion. It is demonstrated that the obtained solution describes two regimes of plasma oscillations in the vicinity of the plasma resonance— stationary and nonstationary. For the stationary regime, the spatiotemporal and spectral characteristics of the resonantly enhanced electric field are investigated in detail and the effect of the relativistic nonlinearity on the spatial localization of the energy of the plasma relativistic field is considered. The applicability limits of the obtained solution, which are determined by the conditions of plasma wave breaking in the vicinity of the resonance, are established and analyzed in detail for typical laser and plasma parameters. The applicability limits of the earlier developed nonrelativistic theories are refined.

  12. Renormalization group approach in the turbulence theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adzhemyan, L.Ts.; Vasil'ev, A.N.; Pis'mak, Yu.M.

    1983-01-01

    In the framework of the renormalization groUp approach in the turbulence theory sUggested in another paper, the problem of renormalization and evaluation of critical dimensions of composite operators is discussed. Renormalization of a system of operators of canonical dimension equal to 4, including the operator F=phiΔphi (where phi is the velocity field), is considered. It is shown that the critical dimension Δsub(F)=0. The appendice includes the brief proofs of two theorems: 1) the theorem on the equivalence between the arbitrary stochastic problem and quantum field theory; 2) the theorem which determines the reduction of Green functions of the stochastic problem to the hypersurface of coinciding times

  13. Nonperturbative Renormalization Group Approach to Polymerized Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essafi, Karim; Kownacki, Jean-Philippe; Mouhanna, Dominique

    2014-03-01

    Membranes or membrane-like materials play an important role in many fields ranging from biology to physics. These systems form a very rich domain in statistical physics. The interplay between geometry and thermal fluctuations lead to exciting phases such flat, tubular and disordered flat phases. Roughly speaking, membranes can be divided into two group: fluid membranes in which the molecules are free to diffuse and thus no shear modulus. On the other hand, in polymerized membranes the connectivity is fixed which leads to elastic forces. This difference between fluid and polymerized membranes leads to a difference in their critical behaviour. For instance, fluid membranes are always crumpled, whereas polymerized membranes exhibit a phase transition between a crumpled phase and a flat phase. In this talk, I will focus only on polymerized phantom, i.e. non-self-avoiding, membranes. The critical behaviour of both isotropic and anisotropic polymerized membranes are studied using a nonperturbative renormalization group approach (NPRG). This allows for the investigation of the phase transitions and the low temperature flat phase in any internal dimension D and embedding d. Interestingly, graphene behaves just as a polymerized membrane in its flat phase.

  14. Core drilling provides information about Santa Fe Group aquifer system beneath Albuquerque's West Mesa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, B.D.; Connell, S.D.; Hawley, J.W.; Stone, B.D.

    1998-01-01

    Core samples from the upper ???1500 ft of the Santa Fe Group in the Albuquerque West Mesa area provide a first-hand look at the sediments and at subsurface stratigraphic relationships in this important part of the basin-fill aquifer system. Two major hydrostratigraphic subunits consisting of a lower coarse-grained, sandy interval and an overlying fine-grained, interbedded silty sand and clay interval lie beneath the water table at the 98th St core hole. Borehole electrical conductivity measurements reproduce major textural changes observed in the recovered cores and support subsurface correlations of hydrostratigraphic units in the Santa Fe Group aquifer system based on geophysical logs. Comparison of electrical logs from the core hole and from nearby city wells reveals laterally consistent lithostratigraphic patterns over much of the metropolitan area west of the Rio Grande that may be used to delineate structural and related stratigraphic features that have a direct bearing on the availability of ground water.

  15. A group theoretic approach to quantum information

    CERN Document Server

    Hayashi, Masahito

    2017-01-01

    This textbook is the first one addressing quantum information from the viewpoint of group symmetry. Quantum systems have a group symmetrical structure. This structure enables to handle systematically quantum information processing. However, there is no other textbook focusing on group symmetry for quantum information although there exist many textbooks for group representation. After the mathematical preparation of quantum information, this book discusses quantum entanglement and its quantification by using group symmetry. Group symmetry drastically simplifies the calculation of several entanglement measures although their calculations are usually very difficult to handle. This book treats optimal information processes including quantum state estimation, quantum state cloning, estimation of group action and quantum channel etc. Usually it is very difficult to derive the optimal quantum information processes without asymptotic setting of these topics. However, group symmetry allows to derive these optimal solu...

  16. A New Approach to Group Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Jerry

    1976-01-01

    To help teachers plan strategy for working with a learning group, 12 factors affecting a learning group are discussed and a series of check points are identified as criteria for evaluation. Concepts and principles of group dynamics are drawn from sociology and the work of Carl Rogers. (Author/AJ)

  17. Core schemas across the continuum of psychosis: a comparison of clinical and non-clinical groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Hannah E; Stewart, Suzanne L K; Dunn, Graham; Parker, Sophie; Fowler, David; Morrison, Anthony P

    2014-11-01

    Research suggests that core schemas are important in both the development and maintenance of psychosis. The aim of the study was to investigate and compare core schemas in four groups along the continuum of psychosis and examine the relationships between schemas and positive psychotic symptomatology. A measure of core schemas was distributed to 20 individuals experiencing first-episode psychosis (FEP), 113 individuals with "at risk mental states" (ARMS), 28 participants forming a help-seeking clinical group (HSC), and 30 non-help-seeking individuals who endorse some psychotic-like experiences (NH). The clinical groups scored significantly higher than the NH group for negative beliefs about self and about others. No significant effects of group on positive beliefs about others were found. For positive beliefs about the self, the NH group scored significantly higher than the clinical groups. Furthermore, negative beliefs about self and others were related to positive psychotic symptomatology and to distress related to those experiences. Negative evaluations of the self and others appear to be characteristic of the appraisals of people seeking help for psychosis and psychosis-like experiences. The results support the literature that suggests that self-esteem should be a target for intervention. Future research would benefit from including comparison groups of people experiencing chronic psychosis and people who do not have any psychotic-like experiences.

  18. A novel approach to preparing magnetic protein microspheres with core-shell structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wei; Sun, Zhendong; Li, Fengsheng; Chen, Kai; Liu, Tianyu; Liu, Jialing; Zhou, Tianle; Guo, Rui

    2011-03-01

    Magnetic protein microspheres with core-shell structure were prepared through a novel approach based on the sonochemical method and the emulsion solvent evaporation method. The microspheres are composed of the oleic acid and undecylenic acid modified Fe 3O 4 cores and coated with globular bovine serum albumin (BSA). Under an optimized condition, up to 57.8 wt% of approximately 10 nm superparamagnetic Fe 3O 4 nanoparticles could be uniformly encapsulated into the BSA microspheres with the diameter of approximately 160 nm and the high saturation magnetization of 38.5 emu/g, besides of the abundant functional groups. The possible formation mechanism of magnetic microspheres was discussed in detail.

  19. Characterisation of Alternaria species-groups associated with core rot of apples in South Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serdani, M.; Kang, J.C.; Andersen, Birgitte

    2002-01-01

    Alternaria core rot of red apple cultivars is a serious post-harvest disease in South Africa. Thirty isolates of Alternaria spp. previously isolated from apple, together with reference isolates of A. alternata and A. infectoria, were characterised and grouped according to their sporulation patter...

  20. Photoluminescence effects of graphitic core size and surface functional groups in carbon dots: COO− induced red-shift emission

    KAUST Repository

    Hola, Katerina

    2014-04-01

    We present a simple molecular approach to control the lipophilic/ hydrophilic nature of photoluminescent carbon dots (CDs) based on pyrolysis of alkyl gallate precursors. Depending on the gallic acid derivative used, CDs with different alkyl groups (methyl, propyl, lauryl) on the surface can be obtained by isothermal heating at 270 C. This precursor-derived approach allows not only the control of lipophilicity but also the length of the particular alkyl chain enables the control over both the size and photoluminescence (PL) of the prepared CDs. Moreover, the alkyl chains on the CDs surface can be readily converted to carboxylate groups via a mild base hydrolysis to obtain water dispersible CDs with a record biocompatibility. The observed differences in PL properties of CDs and time-resolved PL data, including contributions from carbogenic cores and surface functional group, are rationalized and discussed in detail using time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Photoluminescence effects of graphitic core size and surface functional groups in carbon dots: COO− induced red-shift emission

    KAUST Repository

    Hola, Katerina; Bourlinos, Athanasios B.; Kozak, Ondrej; Berka, Karel; Siskova, Karolina M.; Havrdova, Marketa; Tucek, Jiri; Safarova, Klara; Otyepka, Michal; Giannelis, Emmanuel P.; Zboril, Radek

    2014-01-01

    We present a simple molecular approach to control the lipophilic/ hydrophilic nature of photoluminescent carbon dots (CDs) based on pyrolysis of alkyl gallate precursors. Depending on the gallic acid derivative used, CDs with different alkyl groups (methyl, propyl, lauryl) on the surface can be obtained by isothermal heating at 270 C. This precursor-derived approach allows not only the control of lipophilicity but also the length of the particular alkyl chain enables the control over both the size and photoluminescence (PL) of the prepared CDs. Moreover, the alkyl chains on the CDs surface can be readily converted to carboxylate groups via a mild base hydrolysis to obtain water dispersible CDs with a record biocompatibility. The observed differences in PL properties of CDs and time-resolved PL data, including contributions from carbogenic cores and surface functional group, are rationalized and discussed in detail using time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Taking a Comprehensive Approach to Common Core Rollout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illingworth, Amy

    2016-01-01

    One district, South Bay Union School District, devises and executes a comprehensive strategy that includes training for district staff, teachers and coaches, including using PLCs and professional development in the implementation of Common Core English language arts standards.

  3. Sharing solutions - The users' group approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kania, G.; Winter, K.

    1991-01-01

    Regulatory compliance, operating efficiency, and plant-life extension are common goals shared by all nuclear power plants. To achieve these goals, nuclear utilities must be proactive and responsive to the regulatory agencies, work together with each other in the sharing of operating experiences and solution to problems, and develop long-term working relationships with an even smaller number of quality suppliers. Users' and owners' groups are one of the most effective means of accomplishing these objectives. Users' groups facilitate communication between nuclear power plants and provide an interactive vendor interface. Both the utilities and suppliers benefit through shared information and improved customer feedback. This paper describes the evolution and experiences of the Sorrento Electronics (SE) Radiation Monitoring System (RMS) Users' Group. The authors highlight the group's past successes and plans for the future

  4. New renormalization group approach to multiscale problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Einhorn, M B; Jones, D R.T.

    1984-02-27

    A new renormalization group is presented which exploits invariance with respect to more than one scale. The method is illustrated by a simple model, and future applications to fields such as critical phenomena and supersymmetry are speculated upon.

  5. Group Counseling Optimization: A Novel Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eita, M. A.; Fahmy, M. M.

    A new population-based search algorithm, which we call Group Counseling Optimizer (GCO), is presented. It mimics the group counseling behavior of humans in solving their problems. The algorithm is tested using seven known benchmark functions: Sphere, Rosenbrock, Griewank, Rastrigin, Ackley, Weierstrass, and Schwefel functions. A comparison is made with the recently published comprehensive learning particle swarm optimizer (CLPSO). The results demonstrate the efficiency and robustness of the proposed algorithm.

  6. Designing Class Activities to Meet Specific Core Training Competencies: A Developmental Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guth, Lorraine J.; McDonnell, Kelly A.

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a developmental model for designing and utilizing class activities to meet specific Association for Specialists in Group Work (ASGW) core training competencies for group workers. A review of the relevant literature about teaching group work and meeting core training standards is provided. The authors suggest a process by…

  7. Ultrasound-guided diagnostic breast biopsy methodology: retrospective comparison of the 8-gauge vacuum-assisted biopsy approach versus the spring-loaded 14-gauge core biopsy approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Ultrasound-guided diagnostic breast biopsy technology represents the current standard of care for the evaluation of indeterminate and suspicious lesions seen on diagnostic breast ultrasound. Yet, there remains much debate as to which particular method of ultrasound-guided diagnostic breast biopsy provides the most accurate and optimal diagnostic information. The aim of the current study was to compare and contrast the 8-gauge vacuum-assisted biopsy approach and the spring-loaded 14-gauge core biopsy approach. Methods A retrospective analysis was done of all ultrasound-guided diagnostic breast biopsy procedures performed by either the 8-gauge vacuum-assisted biopsy approach or the spring-loaded 14-gauge core biopsy approach by a single surgeon from July 2001 through June 2009. Results Among 1443 ultrasound-guided diagnostic breast biopsy procedures performed, 724 (50.2%) were by the 8-gauge vacuum-assisted biopsy technique and 719 (49.8%) were by the spring-loaded 14-gauge core biopsy technique. The total number of false negative cases (i.e., benign findings instead of invasive breast carcinoma) was significantly greater (P = 0.008) in the spring-loaded 14-gauge core biopsy group (8/681, 1.2%) as compared to in the 8-gauge vacuum-assisted biopsy group (0/652, 0%), with an overall false negative rate of 2.1% (8/386) for the spring-loaded 14-gauge core biopsy group as compared to 0% (0/148) for the 8-gauge vacuum-assisted biopsy group. Significantly more (P guided diagnostic breast biopsy procedure. Significantly more (P guided diagnostic breast biopsy procedure. Conclusions In appropriately selected cases, the 8-gauge vacuum-assisted biopsy approach appears to be advantageous to the spring-loaded 14-gauge core biopsy approach for providing the most accurate and optimal diagnostic information. PMID:21835024

  8. Group Counseling Using the Gestalt Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneibel, Dan

    The phenomenological-existential therapy known as gestalt therapy sees awareness as its major goal. Clients are helped to become aware of what they are doing, how they are doing it, and how they can change themselves while, at the same time, learning to accept and value themselves. An important topic in the gestalt group process is the key…

  9. Fast three-dimensional core optimization based on modified one-group model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freire, Fernando S. [ELETROBRAS Termonuclear S.A. - ELETRONUCLEAR, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. GCN-T], e-mail: freire@eletronuclear.gov.br; Martinez, Aquilino S.; Silva, Fernando C. da [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear], e-mail: aquilino@con.ufrj.br, e-mail: fernando@con.ufrj.br

    2009-07-01

    The optimization of any nuclear reactor core is an extremely complex process that consumes a large amount of computer time. Fortunately, the nuclear designer can rely on a variety of methodologies able to approximate the analysis of each available core loading pattern. Two-dimensional codes are usually used to analyze the loading scheme. However, when particular axial effects are present in the core, two-dimensional analysis cannot produce good results and three-dimensional analysis can be required at all time. Basically, in this paper are presented the major advantages that can be found when one use the modified one-group diffusion theory coupled with a buckling correction model in optimization process. The results of the proposed model are very accurate when compared to benchmark results obtained from detailed calculations using three-dimensional nodal codes (author)

  10. Fast three-dimensional core optimization based on modified one-group model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freire, Fernando S.; Martinez, Aquilino S.; Silva, Fernando C. da

    2009-01-01

    The optimization of any nuclear reactor core is an extremely complex process that consumes a large amount of computer time. Fortunately, the nuclear designer can rely on a variety of methodologies able to approximate the analysis of each available core loading pattern. Two-dimensional codes are usually used to analyze the loading scheme. However, when particular axial effects are present in the core, two-dimensional analysis cannot produce good results and three-dimensional analysis can be required at all time. Basically, in this paper are presented the major advantages that can be found when one use the modified one-group diffusion theory coupled with a buckling correction model in optimization process. The results of the proposed model are very accurate when compared to benchmark results obtained from detailed calculations using three-dimensional nodal codes (author)

  11. The group manifold approach to unified gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regge, T.

    1984-01-01

    These lectures start with a synopsis of historical results in the construction of unified theories of gravity. The author keeps some mathematical rigour throughout the lectures. He gives a provisional description of supermanifolds and a set of formal rules intended to manipulate superforms or supermanifolds. Super Lie groups are discussed as well as the dimensional reduction of gravity theories, the Kaluza-Klein theory. A formal introduction of supersymmetry is given. (Auth.)

  12. Generalized Hubbard Hamiltonian: renormalization group approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cannas, S.A.; Tamarit, F.A.; Tsallis, C.

    1991-01-01

    We study a generalized Hubbard Hamiltonian which is closed within the framework of a Quantum Real Space Renormalization Group, which replaces the d-dimensional hypercubic lattice by a diamond-like lattice. The phase diagram of the generalized Hubbard Hamiltonian is analyzed for the half-filled band case in d = 2 and d = 3. Some evidence for superconductivity is presented. (author). 44 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs

  13. Chaotic renormalization group approach to disordered systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, P.M.C. de; Continentino, M.A.; Makler, S.S.; Anda, E.V.

    1984-01-01

    We study the eletronic properties of the disordered linear chain using a technique previously developed by some of the authors for an ordered chain. The equations of motion for the one electron Green function are obtained and the configuration average is done according to the GK scheme. The dynamical problem is transformed, using a renormalization group procedure, into a bidimensional map. The properties of this map are investigated and related to the localization properties of the eletronic system. (Author) [pt

  14. Bootstrap percolation: a renormalisation group approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Branco, N.S.; Santos, Raimundo R. dos; Queiroz, S.L.A. de.

    1984-02-01

    In bootstrap percolation, sites are occupied at random with probability p, but each site is considered active only if at least m of its neighbours are also active. Within an approximate position-space renormalization group framework on a square lattice we obtain the behaviour of the critical concentration p (sub)c and of the critical exponents ν and β for m = 0 (ordinary percolation), 1,2 and 3. We find that the bootstrap percolation problem can be cast into different universality classes, characterized by the values of m. (author) [pt

  15. Phylogenetic diversity in the core group of Peziza inferred from ITS sequences and morphology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, K.; Læssøe, Thomas; Pfister, D.H.

    2002-01-01

    Species delimitation within the core group of Peziza is highly controversial. The group, typified by P. vesiculosa, is morphologically coherent and in previous analyses of LSU rDNA sequences it formed a highly supported clade. Phylogenetic diversity and species limits were investigated within......), shallowly cup- to disc-shaped apothecia (A) and large (up to 15 cm), deeply cup-shaped to expanded apothecia (B). The overall exciple structure (a stratified or non-stratified medullary layer) and to some degree spore surface relief, likewise support the groupings. Clade A contains taxa with smooth...... that populations on a diverse array of substrates may be closely related, or indeed, conspecific....

  16. NMR-MPar: A Fault-Tolerance Approach for Multi-Core and Many-Core Processors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Vargas

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Multi-core and many-core processors are a promising solution to achieve high performance by maintaining a lower power consumption. However, the degree of miniaturization makes them more sensitive to soft-errors. To improve the system reliability, this work proposes a fault-tolerance approach based on redundancy and partitioning principles called N-Modular Redundancy and M-Partitions (NMR-MPar. By combining both principles, this approach allows multi-/many-core processors to perform critical functions in mixed-criticality systems. Benefiting from the capabilities of these devices, NMR-MPar creates different partitions that perform independent functions. For critical functions, it is proposed that N partitions with the same configuration participate of an N-modular redundancy system. In order to validate the approach, a case study is implemented on the KALRAY Multi-Purpose Processing Array (MPPA-256 many-core processor running two parallel benchmark applications. The traveling salesman problem and matrix multiplication applications were selected to test different device’s resources. The effectiveness of NMR-MPar is assessed by software-implemented fault-injection. For evaluation purposes, it is considered that the system is intended to be used in avionics. Results show the improvement of the application reliability by two orders of magnitude when implementing NMR-MPar on the system. Finally, this work opens the possibility to use massive parallelism for dependable applications in embedded systems.

  17. Renormalization group approach to soft gluon resummation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forte, Stefano; Ridolfi, Giovanni

    2003-01-01

    We present a simple proof of the all-order exponentiation of soft logarithmic corrections to hard processes in perturbative QCD. Our argument is based on proving that all large logs in the soft limit can be expressed in terms of a single dimensionful variable, and then using the renormalization group to resum them. Beyond the next-to-leading log level, our result is somewhat less predictive than previous all-order resummation formulae, but it does not rely on non-standard factorization, and it is thus possibly more general. We use our result to settle issues of convergence of the resummed series, we discuss scheme dependence at the resummed level, and we provide explicit resummed expressions in various factorization schemes

  18. Depletion Calculations for MTR Core Using MCNPX and Multi-Group Nodal Diffusion Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaradata, Mustafa K.; Park, Chang Je; Lee, Byungchul

    2013-01-01

    In order to maintain a self-sustaining steady-state chain reaction, more fuel than is necessary in order to maintain a steady state chain reaction must be loaded. The introduction of this excess fuel increases the net multiplication capability of the system. In this paper MCNPX and multi-group nodal diffusion theory will be used for depletion calculations for MTR core. The eigenvalue and power distribution in the core will be compared for different burnup. Multi-group nodal diffusion theory with combination of NEWT-TRITON system was used to perform depletion calculations for 3Χ3 MTR core. 2G and 6G approximations were used and compared with MCNPX results for 2G approximation the maximum difference from MCNPX was 40 mk and for 6G approximation was 6 mk which is comparable to the MCNPX results. The calculated power using nodal code was almost the same MCNPX results. Finally the results of the multi-group nodal theory were acceptable and comparable to the calculated using MCNPX

  19. Earth's core convection: Boussinesq approximation or incompressible approach?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Anufriev, A. P.; Hejda, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 104, č. 1 (2010), s. 65-83 ISSN 0309-1929 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300120704 Grant - others:INTAS(XE) 03-51-5807 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Keywords : geodynamic models * core convection * Boussinesq approximation Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 0.831, year: 2010

  20. Remodelling core group theory: the role of sustaining populations in HIV transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Charlotte; Zimmerman, Cathy; Foss, Anna M; Hossain, Mazeda; Cox, Andrew; Vickerman, Peter

    2010-12-01

    Core group theory describes the central role of groups with high rates of sexual partner change in HIV transmission. Research illustrates the heterogeneous and dynamic nature of commercial sex, and that some men involved in the organisation or policing of sex work regularly have sex with sex workers. These findings are used to explore gaps in core group theory. Evidence from developing countries on the duration that women sell and men buy sex was reviewed. Simple compartmental dynamic models were used to derive analytical expressions for the relative HIV equilibrium levels among sex workers and partners, incorporating partner change rates and duration in commercial sex settings. Simulations explored the degree to which HIV infection can be attributable to men with low partner change rates who remain in sex work settings for long periods, and their influence on the impact of HIV intervention. Partner change rates and duration of time in a setting determine equilibrium HIV levels. Modelling projections suggest that men with low mobility can substantially contribute to HIV prevalence among sex workers, especially in settings with prevalences group theory. Men who control the sex industry and regular clients may form an important 'sustaining population' that increases infection and undermines the impact of intervention. Intervention activities should include these groups, and examine the social organisation of sex work that underpins many of these relationships.

  1. The coma cluster after lunch: Has a galaxcy group passed through the cluster core?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Jack O.; Roettiger, Kurt; Ledlow, Michael; Klypin, Anatoly

    1994-01-01

    We propose that the Coma cluster has recently undergone a collision with the NGC 4839 galaxy group. The ROSAT X-ray morphology, the Coma radio halo, the presence of poststarburst galaxies in the bridge between Coma and NGC 4839, the usually high velocity dispersion for the NGC 4839 group, and the position of a large-scale galaxy filament to the NE of Coma are all used to argue that the NGC 4839 group passed through the core of Coma approximately 2 Gyr ago. We present a new Hydro/N-body simulation of the merger between a galaxy group and a rich cluster that reproduces many of the observed X-ray and optical properties of Coma/NGC 4839.

  2. A Creative Approach to the Common Core Standards: The Da Vinci Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaucer, Harry

    2012-01-01

    "A Creative Approach to the Common Core Standards: The Da Vinci Curriculum" challenges educators to design programs that boldly embrace the Common Core State Standards by imaginatively drawing from the genius of great men and women such as Leonardo da Vinci. A central figure in the High Renaissance, Leonardo made extraordinary contributions as a…

  3. Identifying Core Mobile Learning Faculty Competencies Based Integrated Approach: A Delphi Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbarbary, Rafik Said

    2015-01-01

    This study is based on the integrated approach as a concept framework to identify, categorize, and rank a key component of mobile learning core competencies for Egyptian faculty members in higher education. The field investigation framework used four rounds Delphi technique to determine the importance rate of each component of core competencies…

  4. An automated approach for annual layer counting in ice cores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Winstrup

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A novel method for automated annual layer counting in seasonally-resolved paleoclimate records has been developed. It relies on algorithms from the statistical framework of hidden Markov models (HMMs, which originally was developed for use in machine speech recognition. The strength of the layer detection algorithm lies in the way it is able to imitate the manual procedures for annual layer counting, while being based on statistical criteria for annual layer identification. The most likely positions of multiple layer boundaries in a section of ice core data are determined simultaneously, and a probabilistic uncertainty estimate of the resulting layer count is provided, ensuring an objective treatment of ambiguous layers in the data. Furthermore, multiple data series can be incorporated and used simultaneously. In this study, the automated layer counting algorithm has been applied to two ice core records from Greenland: one displaying a distinct annual signal and one which is more challenging. The algorithm shows high skill in reproducing the results from manual layer counts, and the resulting timescale compares well to absolute-dated volcanic marker horizons where these exist.

  5. Relative stability of core groups in pollination networks in a biodiversity hotspot over four years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Qiang; Huang, Shuang-Quan

    2012-01-01

    Plants and their pollinators form pollination networks integral to the evolution and persistence of species in communities. Previous studies suggest that pollination network structure remains nested while network composition is highly dynamic. However, little is known about temporal variation in the structure and function of plant-pollinator networks, especially in species-rich communities where the strength of pollinator competition is predicted to be high. Here we quantify temporal variation of pollination networks over four consecutive years in an alpine meadow in the Hengduan Mountains biodiversity hotspot in China. We found that ranked positions and idiosyncratic temperatures of both plants and pollinators were more conservative between consecutive years than in non-consecutive years. Although network compositions exhibited high turnover, generalized core groups--decomposed by a k-core algorithm--were much more stable than peripheral groups. Given the high rate of turnover observed, we suggest that identical plants and pollinators that persist for at least two successive years sustain pollination services at the community level. Our data do not support theoretical predictions of a high proportion of specialized links within species-rich communities. Plants were relatively specialized, exhibiting less variability in pollinator composition at pollinator functional group level than at the species level. Both specialized and generalized plants experienced narrow variation in functional pollinator groups. The dynamic nature of pollination networks in the alpine meadow demonstrates the potential for networks to mitigate the effects of fluctuations in species composition in a high biodiversity area.

  6. A novel approach to linearization of the electromagnetic parameters of tokamaks with an iron core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, P. E-mail: fupeng@mail.ipp.ac.cn; Liu, Z.Z.; Zou, J.H

    2002-05-01

    The equivalent model of an iron core tokamak is developed, in which the electromagnetic parameters of several pairs of coils in opposite series (PCOS) are not dependent on the saturation of the iron core during tokamak operation. With this the electromagnetic parameters of all the coils in an iron core tokamak can be linearized, As an example, the electromagnetic parameters of Hefei Super-conductive Tokamak with iron core (HT-7) are linearized, and it is in good agreement with the experimental results. The linearization approach can be applied in real time plasma control and electromagnetic analysis.

  7. A simple approach to the construction of the core structure present in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A simple approach to the construction of the core structure present in bielschowskysin and ... spongeHippospongia lachneelicited considerable interest amongst the organic ..... ogy, Government of India for financial support through. J. C. Bose ...

  8. ORGANIZATIONAL WORK GROUPS AND WORK TEAMS – APPROACHES AND DIFFERENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raluca ZOLTAN

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Work groups and work teams represents basic structures of traditional and modern organizations, and during the time they have been intensively researched. However, managers often do not always consider the fundamental differences between groups and teams, which will lead to unrealistic goals and results below expectations. Thus, in the present paper we propose a review of the main researching approaches on groups and teams (psychosocial, socio-technical, and behavioral approach, in the third part of the paper being detailed the fundamental differences between groups and teams in the light of these approaches.

  9. Group theoretic approaches to nuclear and hadronic collective motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biedenharn, L.C.

    1982-01-01

    Three approaches to nuclear and hadronic collective motion are reviewed, compared and contrasted: the standard symmetry approach as typified by the Interacting Boson Model, the kinematic symmetry group approach of Gell-Mann and Tomonaga, and the recent direct construction by Buck. 50 references

  10. Group theoretic approaches to nuclear and hadronic collective motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biedenharn, L.C.

    1982-01-01

    Three approaches to nuclear and hadronic collective motion are reviewed, compared and contrasted: the standard symmetry approach as typified by the Interacting Boson Model, the kinematic symmetry group approach of Gell-Mann and Tomonaga, and the recent direct construction by Buck. 50 references.

  11. A Preliminary Core Domain Set for Clinical Trials of Shoulder Disorders: A Report from the OMERACT 2016 Shoulder Core Outcome Set Special Interest Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchbinder, Rachelle; Page, Matthew J; Huang, Hsiaomin; Verhagen, Arianne P; Beaton, Dorcas; Kopkow, Christian; Lenza, Mario; Jain, Nitin B; Richards, Bethan; Richards, Pamela; Voshaar, Marieke; van der Windt, Danielle; Gagnier, Joel J

    2017-12-01

    The Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Shoulder Core Outcome Set Special Interest Group (SIG) was established to develop a core outcome set (COS) for clinical trials of shoulder disorders. In preparation for OMERACT 2016, we systematically examined all outcome domains and measurement instruments reported in 409 randomized trials of interventions for shoulder disorders published between 1954 and 2015. Informed by these data, we conducted an international Delphi consensus study including shoulder trial experts, clinicians, and patients to identify key domains that should be included in a shoulder disorder COS. Findings were discussed at a stakeholder premeeting of OMERACT. At OMERACT 2016, we sought consensus on a preliminary core domain set and input into next steps. There were 13 and 15 participants at the premeeting and the OMERACT 2016 SIG meeting, respectively (9 attended both meetings). Consensus was reached on a preliminary core domain set consisting of an inner core of 4 domains: pain, physical function/activity, global perceived effect, and adverse events including death. A middle core consisted of 3 domains: emotional well-being, sleep, and participation (recreation and work). An outer core of research required to inform the final COS was also formulated. Our next steps are to (1) analyze whether participation (recreation and work) should be in the inner core, (2) conduct a third Delphi round to finalize definitions and wording of domains and reach final endorsement for the domains, and (3) determine which instruments fulfill the OMERACT criteria for measuring each domain.

  12. CFD approach to modeling of core-concrete interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladimir V Chudanov; Anna E Aksenova; Valerii A Pervichko

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: A large attention is given to research behavior of concrete structures at high mechanical and thermal loadings, which those suffer at the severe accidents on Nuclear Power Plants with core melting and falling of the molten corium mass into reactor shaft. There are enough programs for analysis of heat and mass transfer processes at interaction of the molten corium with concrete. Most known among them CORCON and WECHSL, which were developed more than twenty years ago, allow considering a quasi-stationary phase decomposition of concrete and the some transition regimes. In opposing to the mentioned codes a new more generalized mathematical model and software are developed for modeling of a wide range of the heat and mass transfer processes under study of the molten core-concrete interaction. The developed mathematical model is based on the Navier-Stokes equations with variable properties with taking into account of a density jump under melting of concrete together with a heat transfer equation. The offered numerical technique is based on modern algorithms with small scheme diffusion, whose discrete approximations are constructed with use of finite-volume methods and the fully staggered grids. The developed software corresponds to modern level of development of computers and takes into account all phenomenology, used by mentioned codes, and allows to simulate the such phenomena and processes as: multidimensional heat transfer in concrete for modeling of transients for an intermediate thermal flux to concrete; direct erosion of concrete at a quasi-stationary regime of interaction with molten fuel masses; heat and mass transfer in corium and convective intermixing in a melt of corium with taking into account of its stratification on two layers of the metal and oxide components and heat transfer by radiation in a cavity of the reactor shaft; change physical properties of corium at concrete decomposition and release in corium of its

  13. A non-algorithmic approach to the In-core-fuel management problem of a PWR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimhy, Y.

    1992-03-01

    The primary objective of a commercial nuclear power plant operation is to produce electricity a low cost while satisfying safety constraints imposed on the operating conditions. Design of a fuel reload cycle for the current generation nuclear power plant represents a multistage process with a series of design decisions taken at various time points. Of these stages, reload core design is an important stage, due to its impact on safety and economic plant performance parameters. Overall. performance of the plant during the power production cycle depends on chosen fresh fuel parameters, as well as specific fuel configuration of the reactor core. The motivation to computerize generation and optimization of fuel reload configurations follows from some reasons: first, reload is performed periodically and requires manipulation of a large amount of data. second, in recent years, more complicated fuel loading patterns were developed and implemented following changes in fuel design and/or operational requirements, such as, longer cycles, advanced burnable poison designs, low leakage loading patterns and reduction of irradiation-induced damage of the pressure vessel. An algorithmic approach to the problem was generally adopted. The nature of the reload design process is a 'heuristic' search performed manually by a fuel manager. The knowledge used by the fuel manager is mostly accumulated experience in reactor physics and core calculations. These features of the problem and the inherent disadvantage of the algorithmic method are the main reasons to explore a non-algorithmic approach for solving the reload configuration problem. Several features of the 'solutions space' ( a collection of acceptable final configurations ) are emphasized in this work: 1) the space contain numerous number of entities (> 25) that are distributed un homogeneously, 2) the lack of a monotonic objective function decrease the probability to find an isolated optimum configuration by depth first search or

  14. Supporting Unemployed, Middle-Aged Men: A Psychoeducational Group Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphey, Charlotte M.; Shillingford, M. Ann

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a comprehensive group counseling approach to support unemployed, middle-aged men. An inclusive group curriculum designed to provide support and address potential mental health issues related to unemployment is introduced. The focus of the group is divided into 6 major areas that research has shown to have a significant impact…

  15. A Group Approach in a Community Empowerment: A Case Study of Waste Recycling Group in Jakarta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadiyanti, Puji

    2016-01-01

    This study reviews a group approach in empowering the community through waste recycling activities related to the development of human resources in Jakarta. The specific objectives to be achieved are the wish to understand and find: (1) Conditions of waste recycling empowerment in Jakarta, (2) Mechanisms of a group approach in empowering…

  16. Theoretical approach of the seismic behaviour of a LMFBR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parent, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    The vibratory behaviour of two one-degree-freedom mechanical systems, having known coupling and damping features, is investigated by transposition to two electrical circuits inductively coupled. This approach is carried out in two steps: the first one supposes that both circuits are identical, while the second one considers the general case where both circuits are unlike. It is shown that one or two resonant frequencies may occur, depending on the coupling and the damping conditions

  17. Different Approaches to Cross-Lingual Focus Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maira Quintanilha

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Focus groups are a useful data-generation strategy in qualitative health research when it is important to understand how social contexts shape participants’ health. However, when cross-lingual focus groups are conducted across cultural groups, and in languages in which the researcher is not fluent, questions regarding the usefulness and rigor of the findings can be raised. In this article, we will discuss three different approaches to cross-lingual focus groups used in a community-based participatory research project with pregnant and postpartum, African immigrant women in Alberta, Canada. In two approaches, we moderated focus groups in women’s mother tongue with the support of real-time interpreters, but in the first approach, audio recording was used and in the second approach, audio recording was not used. In the third approach, a bilingual moderator facilitated focus groups in women’s mother tongue, with transcription and translation of audio-recorded data upon completion of data generation. We will describe each approach in detail, including their advantages and challenges, and recontextualize what we have learned within the known literature. We expect the lessons learned in this project may assist others in planning and implementing cross-lingual focus groups, especially in the context of community-based participatory research.

  18. Developing an OMERACT Core Outcome Set for Assessing Safety Components in Rheumatology Trials: The OMERACT Safety Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klokker, Louise; Tugwell, Peter; Furst, Daniel E; Devoe, Dan; Williamson, Paula; Terwee, Caroline B; Suarez-Almazor, Maria E; Strand, Vibeke; Woodworth, Thasia; Leong, Amye L; Goel, Niti; Boers, Maarten; Brooks, Peter M; Simon, Lee S; Christensen, Robin

    2017-12-01

    Failure to report harmful outcomes in clinical research can introduce bias favoring a potentially harmful intervention. While core outcome sets (COS) are available for benefits in randomized controlled trials in many rheumatic conditions, less attention has been paid to safety in such COS. The Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Filter 2.0 emphasizes the importance of measuring harms. The Safety Working Group was reestablished at the OMERACT 2016 with the objective to develop a COS for assessing safety components in trials across rheumatologic conditions. The safety issue has previously been discussed at OMERACT, but without a consistent approach to ensure harms were included in COS. Our methods include (1) identifying harmful outcomes in trials of interventions studied in patients with rheumatic diseases by a systematic literature review, (2) identifying components of safety that should be measured in such trials by use of a patient-driven approach including qualitative data collection and statistical organization of data, and (3) developing a COS through consensus processes including everyone involved. Members of OMERACT including patients, clinicians, researchers, methodologists, and industry representatives reached consensus on the need to continue the efforts on developing a COS for safety in rheumatology trials. There was a general agreement about the need to identify safety-related outcomes that are meaningful to patients, framed in terms that patients consider relevant so that they will be able to make informed decisions. The OMERACT Safety Working Group will advance the work previously done within OMERACT using a new patient-driven approach.

  19. Nursing leadership in a chronic pain management group approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dysvik, Elin; Furnes, Bodil

    2012-03-01

    To explore and debate nursing leadership and challenges on organizational and group levels when conducting rehabilitation groups for people suffering from chronic pain. Group approaches based on cognitive behavioural therapy are generally described as effective. Leadership in group approaches offered to people suffering from chronic pain is a great challenge for nurses on an organizational as well as a group level. One overall leader and nine group leaders conducting 13 groups constituted the sample. Qualitative content analysis was used by identifying categories, subthemes and themes. The results from the content analysis revealed one main theme ('Complexity in nursing leadership') and three subthemes ('Challenges in leadership on organizational level', 'Challenges in leadership on teamwork level' and 'Challenges in leadership on group level'. The results show how important it is to have firm overall leadership and trained group leaders with a common purpose, interdependent roles and complementary skills, who are thus well prepared to prevent or deal with challenging group processes. The leaders of both levels, which are highly interrelated, should have a current theoretical understanding of pain theory, group leadership skills and a cognitive behavioural approach. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. A New Approach to Teaching Business Writing: Writing across the Core--A Document Based Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, Teresa D.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the transition that the Anisfield School of Business of Ramapo College of New Jersey made from a conventional Writing Across the Curriculum approach to a Writing Across the Business Core approach. The impetus for the change is explained as well as the creation and design of the program. The document driven program is analyzed,…

  1. A cultural psychological approach to evangelical faith healing groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Saane, J.W.

    2010-01-01

    From the perspective of Belzen, a cultural approach for the psychology of religion is necessary to cope with the multiplicity of the religious phenomenon. He presents research of specific - very closed - religious groups to illustrate this point. A cultural approach is not limited to these specific

  2. Status of degraded core issues. Synthesis paper prepared by G. Bandini in collaboration with the NEA task group on degraded core cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-02-01

    The in-vessel evolution of a severe accident in a nuclear reactor is characterised, generally, by core uncover and heat-up, core material oxidation and melting, molten material relocation and debris behaviour in the lower plenum up to vessel failure. The in-vessel core melt progression involves a large number of physical and chemical phenomena that may depend on the severe accident sequence and the reactor type under consideration. Core melt progression has been studied in the last twenty years through many experimental works. Since then, computer codes are being developed and validated to analyse different reactor accident sequences. The experience gained from the TMI-2 accident also constitutes an important source of data. The understanding of core degradation process is necessary to evaluate initial conditions for subsequent phases of the accident (ex-vessel and within the containment), and define accident management strategies and mitigative actions for operating and advanced reactors. This synthesis paper, prepared within the Task Group on Degraded Core Cooling (TG-DCC) of PWG2, contains a brief summary of current views on the status of degraded core issues regarding light water reactors. The in-vessel fission product release and transport issue is not addressed in this paper. The areas with remaining uncertainties and the needs for further experimental investigation and model development have been identified. The early phase of core melt progression is reasonably well understood. Remaining uncertainties may be addressed on the basis of ongoing experimental activities, e.g. on core quenching, and research programs foreseen in the near future. The late phase of core melt progression is less understood. Ongoing research programs are providing additional valuable information on corium molten pool behaviour. Confirmatory research is still required. The pool crust behaviour and material relocation into the lower plenum are the areas where additional research should

  3. Introducing Farouk's Process Consultation Group Approach in Irish Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Marie; Stringer, Phil

    2016-01-01

    Research has shown that teacher consultation groups increase teachers' behaviour management skills through discussion and collaborative problem-solving. Unlike the United Kingdom, at the time of this research consultation groups were not widely used in Irish schools. This research introduced Farouk's process consultation approach in three Irish…

  4. Approach to improve the axial power distribution for the application of a core protection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Bon Seung; Cho, Jin Young; Song, Jae Seung; Lee, Chung Chan

    2008-01-01

    A Core Protection Calculator System (CPCS) is a digital computer based on a safety system for generating trip signals based on a calculation of the Departure from Nucleate Boiling Ratio (DNBR) and the Local Power Density (LPD) by using several on-line measured system parameters including 3-level ex-core detector signals. A few approaches to improve the axial power distribution for the application of a core protection system were performed. For the Yonggwang unit 3 (cycle 1), axial power distributions were synthesized by applying the cubic spline method and compared with the neutronics code results. Several new cubic spline function sets were generated for the drastically distorted axial shapes for a 3-level ex-core detector system. In addition, synthesized axial shapes with a 5-level ex-core detector signals were compared with the conventional 3-level detector results. It demonstrates that the newly generated function sets appear to be better than that of the conventional CPC from the aspect of an axial power synthesis, particularly for the heavily distorted shapes. Moreover, synthesis of an axial power distribution using 5-level ex-core detector signals appears to be better than that of the 3-level ex-core detector signals. From the above results, improvement of the thermal margin is expected because of an uncertainty decreasing a core protection system. (authors)

  5. Extreme IR absorption in group IV-SiGeSn core-shell nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attiaoui, Anis; Wirth, Stephan; Blanchard-Dionne, André-Pierre; Meunier, Michel; Hartmann, J. M.; Buca, Dan; Moutanabbir, Oussama

    2018-06-01

    Sn-containing Si and Ge (Ge1-y-xSixSny) alloys are an emerging family of semiconductors with the potential to impact group IV material-based devices. These semiconductors provide the ability to independently engineer both the lattice parameter and bandgap, which holds the premise to develop enhanced or novel photonic and electronic devices. With this perspective, we present detailed investigations of the influence of Ge1-y-xSixSny layers on the optical properties of Si and Ge based heterostructures and nanowires. We found that by adding a thin Ge1-y-xSixSny capping layer on Si or Ge greatly enhances light absorption especially in the near infrared range, leading to an increase in short-circuit current density. For the Ge1-y-xSixSny structure at thicknesses below 30 nm, a 14-fold increase in the short-circuit current is observed with respect to bare Si. This enhancement decreases by reducing the capping layer thickness. Conversely, decreasing the shell thickness was found to improve the short-circuit current in Si/Ge1-y-xSixSny and Ge/Ge1-y-xSixSny core/shell nanowires. The optical absorption becomes very important by increasing the Sn content. Moreover, by exploiting an optical antenna effect, these nanowires show extreme light absorption, reaching an enhancement factor, with respect to Si or Ge nanowires, on the order of 104 in Si/Ge0.84Si0.04Sn0.12 and 12 in Ge/Ge0.84Si0.04Sn0.12. Furthermore, we analyzed the optical response after the addition of a dielectric layer of Si3N4 to the Si/Ge1-y-xSixSny core-shell nanowire and found approximatively a 50% increase in the short-circuit current density for a dielectric layer of thickness equal to 45 nm and both a core radius and a shell thickness greater than 40 nm. The core-shell optical antenna benefits from a multiplication of enhancements contributed by leaky mode resonances in the semiconductor part and antireflection effects in the dielectric part.

  6. Functional renormalization group approach to the two dimensional Bose gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinner, A; Kopietz, P [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Frankfurt, Max-von-Laue Strasse 1, 60438 Frankfurt (Germany); Hasselmann, N [International Center for Condensed Matter Physics, Universidade de BrasIlia, Caixa Postal 04667, 70910-900 BrasIlia, DF (Brazil)], E-mail: hasselma@itp.uni-frankfurt.de, E-mail: sinner@itp.uni-frankfurt.de

    2009-02-01

    We investigate the small frequency and momentum structure of the weakly interacting Bose gas in two dimensions using a functional renormalization group approach. The flow equations are derived within a derivative approximation of the effective action up to second order in spatial and temporal variables and investigated numerically. The truncation we employ is based on the perturbative structure of the theory and is well described as a renormalization group enhanced perturbation theory. It allows to calculate corrections to the Bogoliubov spectrum and to investigate the damping of quasiparticles. Our approach allows to circumvent the divergences which plague the usual perturbative approach.

  7. Ab initio effective core potentials for molecular calculations. Potentials for main group elements Na to Bi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadt, W.R.; Hay, P.J.

    1985-01-01

    A consistent set of ab initio effective core potentials (ECP) has been generated for the main group elements from Na to Bi using the procedure originally developed by Kahn. The ECP's are derived from all-electron numerical Hartree--Fock atomic wave functions and fit to analytical representations for use in molecular calculations. For Rb to Bi the ECP's are generated from the relativistic Hartree--Fock atomic wave functions of Cowan which incorporate the Darwin and mass--velocity terms. Energy-optimized valence basis sets of (3s3p) primitive Gaussians are presented for use with the ECP's. Comparisons between all-electron and valence-electron ECP calculations are presented for NaF, NaCl, Cl 2 , Cl 2 - , Br 2 , Br 2 - , and Xe 2 + . The results show that the average errors introduced by the ECP's are generally only a few percent

  8. Developing core elements and checklist items for global hospital antimicrobial stewardship programmes: a consensus approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulcini, C; Binda, F; Lamkang, A S; Trett, A; Charani, E; Goff, D A; Harbarth, S; Hinrichsen, S L; Levy-Hara, G; Mendelson, M; Nathwani, D; Gunturu, R; Singh, S; Srinivasan, A; Thamlikitkul, V; Thursky, K; Vlieghe, E; Wertheim, H; Zeng, M; Gandra, S; Laxminarayan, R

    2018-04-03

    With increasing global interest in hospital antimicrobial stewardship (AMS) programmes, there is a strong demand for core elements of AMS to be clearly defined on the basis of principles of effectiveness and affordability. To date, efforts to identify such core elements have been limited to Europe, Australia, and North America. The aim of this study was to develop a set of core elements and their related checklist items for AMS programmes that should be present in all hospitals worldwide, regardless of resource availability. A literature review was performed by searching Medline and relevant websites to retrieve a list of core elements and items that could have global relevance. These core elements and items were evaluated by an international group of AMS experts using a structured modified Delphi consensus procedure, using two-phased online in-depth questionnaires. The literature review identified seven core elements and their related 29 checklist items from 48 references. Fifteen experts from 13 countries in six continents participated in the consensus procedure. Ultimately, all seven core elements were retained, as well as 28 of the initial checklist items plus one that was newly suggested, all with ≥80% agreement; 20 elements and items were rephrased. This consensus on core elements for hospital AMS programmes is relevant to both high- and low-to-middle-income countries and could facilitate the development of national AMS stewardship guidelines and adoption by healthcare settings worldwide. Copyright © 2018 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. All rights reserved.

  9. Towards inclusive occupational therapy: Introducing the CORE approach for inclusive and occupation-focused practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Robert B

    2017-12-01

    Occupation is a human right and a social determinant of health. It is also taken for granted. Having access to, and participating in, occupation, is intricately linked to positive health and wellbeing. Despite theory and evidence to support the link between occupation, health and wellbeing, occupational therapists can struggle with applying an occupation focus in practice and knowing how to use occupational frameworks to enable occupation. The purpose of this paper is to introduce the Capabilities, Opportunities, Resources and Environments (CORE) approach for inclusive and occupation-focused practice. It provides occupational therapists with a means of operationalising occupational enablement and facilitating social inclusion. The CORE approach is introduced by linking its main ideas to Economist and Nobel Prize Laureate Amartya Sen's capabilities approach, as well as findings from the author's doctoral research into entrenched disadvantage and social inclusion. Practical questions guided by the CORE approach's acronym are given to explore how the approach can be utilised alongside other occupational models and frameworks to encourage strategies for effective enablement through occupation for social inclusion. As experts in enabling occupation, occupational therapists can use the CORE approach to design occupation-focused interventions and promote inclusive occupational therapy. © 2017 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  10. Analysis of core-periphery organization in protein contact networks reveals groups of structurally and functionally critical residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, Arnold Emerson; Sinha, Sitabhra

    2015-10-01

    The representation of proteins as networks of interacting amino acids, referred to as protein contact networks (PCN), and their subsequent analyses using graph theoretic tools, can provide novel insights into the key functional roles of specific groups of residues. We have characterized the networks corresponding to the native states of 66 proteins (belonging to different families) in terms of their core-periphery organization. The resulting hierarchical classification of the amino acid constituents of a protein arranges the residues into successive layers - having higher core order - with increasing connection density, ranging from a sparsely linked periphery to a densely intra-connected core (distinct from the earlier concept of protein core defined in terms of the three-dimensional geometry of the native state, which has least solvent accessibility). Our results show that residues in the inner cores are more conserved than those at the periphery. Underlining the functional importance of the network core, we see that the receptor sites for known ligand molecules of most proteins occur in the innermost core. Furthermore, the association of residues with structural pockets and cavities in binding or active sites increases with the core order. From mutation sensitivity analysis, we show that the probability of deleterious or intolerant mutations also increases with the core order. We also show that stabilization centre residues are in the innermost cores, suggesting that the network core is critically important in maintaining the structural stability of the protein. A publicly available Web resource for performing core-periphery analysis of any protein whose native state is known has been made available by us at http://www.imsc.res.in/ ~sitabhra/proteinKcore/index.html.

  11. A safety design approach for sodium cooled fast reactor core toward commercialization in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, Shigenobu

    2012-01-01

    JAEA’s safety approach for SFR core design is based on defence‐in‐depth concept, which includes DBAs and DECs (prevention and mitigation): • The reactor core is designed to have inherent reactivity feedback characteristics with negative power coefficient. • Operation temperature range is set sufficiently below the coolant boiling temperature so as to avoid coolant boiling against anticipated operational occurrences and DBAs. • If the plant state deviates from operational states, the safe reactor shutdown is achieved by automatic insertion of control rods. 2 active reactor shutdown systems are provided. • Failure of active reactor shutdown is assumed in a design extension condition . Passive shutdown capability is provided by SASS under such condition. • As a design extension condition, core disruptive accident is assumed. In order to prevent severe mechanical energy release which might cause containment function failure, core sodium void worth is limited below 6 dollars and molten fuel discharge capability is utilized by FAIDUS. (author)

  12. User and Document Group Approach of Clustering in Tagging Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pan, Rong; Xu, Guandong; Dolog, Peter

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a spectral clustering approach for users and documents group modeling in order to capture the common preference and relatedness of users and documents, and to reduce the time complexity of similarity calculations. In experiments, we investigate the selection of the optim...... amount of clusters. We also show a reduction of the time consuming in calculating the similarity for the recommender systems by selecting a centroid first, and then compare the inside item on behalf of each group....

  13. An Informal Overview of the Unitary Group Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonnad, V.; Escher, J.; Kruse, M.; Baker, R.

    2016-01-01

    The Unitary Groups Approach (UGA) is an elegant and conceptually unified approach to quantum structure calculations. It has been widely used in molecular structure calculations, and holds the promise of a single computational approach to structure calculations in a variety of different fields. We explore the possibility of extending the UGA to computations in atomic and nuclear structure as a simpler alternative to traditional Racah algebra-based approaches. We provide a simple introduction to the basic UGA and consider some of the issues in using the UGA with spin-dependent, multi-body Hamiltonians requiring multi-shell bases adapted to additional symmetries. While the UGA is perfectly capable of dealing with such problems, it is seen that the complexity rises dramatically, and the UGA is not at this time, a simpler alternative to Racah algebra-based approaches.

  14. Global calculation of PWR reactor core using the two group energy solution by the response matrix method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conti, C.F.S.; Watson, F.V.

    1991-01-01

    A computational code to solve a two energy group neutron diffusion problem has been developed base d on the Response Matrix Method. That method solves the global problem of PWR core, without using the cross sections homogenization process, thus it is equivalent to a pontwise core calculation. The present version of the code calculates the response matrices by the first order perturbative method and considers developments on arbitrary order Fourier series for the boundary fluxes and interior fluxes. (author)

  15. Vocational Didactics: Core Assumptions and Approaches from Denmark, Germany, Norway, Spain and Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessler, Michael; Moreno Herrera, Lázaro

    2015-01-01

    The design of vocational didactics has to meet special requirements. Six core assumptions are identified: outcome orientation, cultural-historical embedding, horizontal structure, vertical structure, temporal structure, and the changing nature of work. Different approaches and discussions from school-based systems (Spain and Sweden) and dual…

  16. A Practical Approach to Implementing the Core Competencies in a Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Residency Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingle, Arden D.; Sexson, Sandra B.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The authors describe the development and implementation of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's core competencies in a child and adolescent psychiatry residency program. Method: The authors identify the program's organizational approach and participants and detail various strategies and methods of defining,…

  17. Tobacco Cessation for Adolescents: Developing a Group Therapy Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moolchan, Eric T.; Ruckel, Susan J.

    2002-01-01

    Describes a cognitive-behavioral therapeutic approach to help teenagers better manage life stressors by using effective and adaptive coping skills, while identifying and addressing specific factors that lead either to smoking or maintaining abstinence from smoking behavior. Discusses specific group exercises that empower teens to take control of…

  18. Comparative regulatory approaches for groups of new plant breeding techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusser, Maria; Davies, Howard V

    2013-06-25

    This manuscript provides insights into ongoing debates on the regulatory issues surrounding groups of biotechnology-driven 'New Plant Breeding Techniques' (NPBTs). It presents the outcomes of preliminary discussions and in some cases the initial decisions taken by regulators in the following countries: Argentina, Australia, Canada, EU, Japan, South Africa and USA. In the light of these discussions we suggest in this manuscript a structured approach to make the evaluation more consistent and efficient. The issue appears to be complex as these groups of new technologies vary widely in both the technologies deployed and their impact on heritable changes in the plant genome. An added complication is that the legislation, definitions and regulatory approaches for biotechnology-derived crops differ significantly between these countries. There are therefore concerns that this situation will lead to non-harmonised regulatory approaches and asynchronous development and marketing of such crops resulting in trade disruptions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. A 17-billion-solar-mass black hole in a group galaxy with a diffuse core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jens; Ma, Chung-Pei; McConnell, Nicholas J; Greene, Jenny E; Blakeslee, John P; Janish, Ryan

    2016-04-21

    Quasars are associated with and powered by the accretion of material onto massive black holes; the detection of highly luminous quasars with redshifts greater than z = 6 suggests that black holes of up to ten billion solar masses already existed 13 billion years ago. Two possible present-day 'dormant' descendants of this population of 'active' black holes have been found in the galaxies NGC 3842 and NGC 4889 at the centres of the Leo and Coma galaxy clusters, which together form the central region of the Great Wall--the largest local structure of galaxies. The most luminous quasars, however, are not confined to such high-density regions of the early Universe; yet dormant black holes of this high mass have not yet been found outside of modern-day rich clusters. Here we report observations of the stellar velocity distribution in the galaxy NGC 1600--a relatively isolated elliptical galaxy near the centre of a galaxy group at a distance of 64 megaparsecs from Earth. We use orbit superposition models to determine that the black hole at the centre of NGC 1600 has a mass of 17 billion solar masses. The spatial distribution of stars near the centre of NGC 1600 is rather diffuse. We find that the region of depleted stellar density in the cores of massive elliptical galaxies extends over the same radius as the gravitational sphere of influence of the central black holes, and interpret this as the dynamical imprint of the black holes.

  20. Gas Sloshing and Radio Galaxy Dynamics in the Core of the 3C 449 Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Dharam V.; Kraft, Ralph P.; Randall, Scott W.; Forman, William R.; Nulsen, Paul E.; Roediger, Elke; ZuHone, John A.; Hardcastle, Martin J.; Jones, Christine; Croston, Judith H.

    2013-01-01

    We present results from a 140 ks Chandra/ACIS-S observation of the hot gas around the canonical FR I radio galaxy 3C 449. An earlier, shorter 30 ks Chandra observation of the group gas showed an unusual entropy distribution and a surface brightness edge in the gas that could be a strong shock around the inner radio lobes. In our deeper data we find no evidence for a temperature increase inside of the brightness edge, but a temperature decrease across part of the edge. This suggests that the edge is a "sloshing" cold front due to a merger within the last 1.3-1.6 Gyr. Both the northern and southern inner jets are bent slightly to the west in projection as they enter their respective lobes, suggesting that the sloshing core is moving to the east. The straight inner jet flares at approximately the position where it crosses the contact edge, suggesting that the jet is entraining and thermalizing some of the hot gas as it crosses the edge.We also detect filaments of X-ray emission around the southern inner radio jet and lobe which we attribute to low entropy entrained gas. The lobe flaring and gas entrainment were originally predicted in simulations of Loken et al. and are confirmed in our deep observation.

  1. The Difference Between Clusters and Groups: A Journey from Cluster Cores to Their Outskirts and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Richard G.; Balogh, Michael L.

    In this review, we take the reader on a journey. We start by looking at the properties of galaxies in the cores of rich clusters. We have focused on the overall picture: star formation in clusters is strongly suppressed relative to field galaxies at the same redshift. We will argue that the increasing activity and blue populations of clusters with redshift results from a greater level of activity in field galaxies rather than a change in the transformation imposed by the cluster environment. With this in mind, we travel out from the cluster, focusing first on the properties of galaxies in the outskirts of clusters and then on galaxies in isolated groups. At low redshift, we are able to efficiently probe these environments using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and 2dF redshift surveys. These allow an accurate comparison of galaxy star formation rates in different regions. The current results show a strong suppression of star formation above a critical threshold in local density. The threshold seems similar regardless of the overall mass of the system. At low redshift at least, only galaxies in close, isolated pairs have their star formation rate boosted above the global average. At higher redshift, work on constructing homogeneous catalogs of galaxies in groups and in the infall regions of clusters is still at an early stage. In the final section, we draw these strands together, summarizing what we can deduce about the mechanisms that transform star-forming field galaxies into their quiescent cluster counterparts. We discuss what we can learn about the impact of environment on the global star formation history of the Universe.

  2. Probing charge transfer dynamics in self-assembled monolayers by core hole clock approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zharnikov, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews recent progress in the application of core hole clock approach in the framework of resonant Auger electron spectroscopy to the monomolecular assembles of alkyl, oligophenyl, and oligo(phenylene–ethynylene) based molecules on Au(1 1 1) substrates, referring mostly to the work by the author et al. The major goal was to study electron transfer (ET) dynamics in these systems serving as prototypes of molecular electronics (ME) devices. The ET pathway to the conductive substrate was unambiguously defined by resonant excitation of the nitrile tailgroup attached to the molecular backbone. Characteristic ET times within the femtosecond domain were determined, along with the attenuation factors for the ET dynamics, analogous to the case of the static transport. The above parameters were found to exhibit strong dependence on the character of the molecular orbital which mediates the ET process. In addition, certain spectral features, which can be associated with an inverse ET from the molecular backbone to the excitation site, were observed upon exchange of the nitrile group by strongly electronegative nitro moiety. The reported results represent a valuable input for theory and a certain potential for applications such as ME devices where optimization of ET can have significant technological impact.

  3. LMFR core and heat exchanger thermohydraulic design: former USSR and present Russian approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The information presented in this report is dealing with liquid metal cooled fast reactors some of which are in operation (France, Japan, Russian federation) or under construction. Comprehensive thermal hydraulic research both experimental and numeric applied to such reactors was carried out in the Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE), Obninsk, Russian Federation. The IAEA Working Group on fast Reactors (IWGFR) recommended that IPPE should generalize its thermal hydraulic studies as well as results of other countries published previously in the field of liquid metal flow distribution and heat transfer in fuel pin and heat exchanger rod bundles (France, Germany, Japan, India, Russian Federation, United Kingdom and United States). The validity of computer codes and design approaches was proven by comparison of calculated results with measured values of velocity, pressure, temperature distributions in rod bundles cooled/heated by liquid metal, usually sodium. The report includes the methodology and philosophy of the analytical and experimental investigations when applied to core and heat exchanger thermal hydraulic design of Light Water Moderated Fast Reactors (LMFRs)

  4. Group manifold approach to gravity and supergravity theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    d'Auria, R.; Fre, P.; Regge, T.

    1981-05-01

    Gravity theories are presented from the point of view of group manifold formulation. The differential geometry of groups and supergroups is discussed first; the notion of connection and related Yang-Mills potentials is introduced. Then ordinary Einstein gravity is discussed in the Cartan formulation. This discussion provides a first example which will then be generalized to more complicated theories, in particular supergravity. The distinction between ''pure'' and ''impure' theories is also set forth. Next, the authors develop an axiomatic approach to rheonomic theories related to the concept of Chevalley cohomology on group manifolds, and apply these principles to N = 1 supergravity. Then the panorama of so far constructed pure and impure group manifold supergravities is presented. The pure d = 5 N = 2 case is discussed in some detail, and N = 2 and N = 3 in d = 4 are considered as examples of the impure theories. The way a pure theory becomes impure after dimensional reduction is illustrated. Next, the role of kinematical superspace constraints as a subset of the group-manifold equations of motion is discussed, and the use of this approach to obtain the auxiliary fields is demonstrated. Finally, the application of the group manifold method to supersymmetric Super Yang-Mills theories is addressed

  5. Data Collection for Mobile Group Consumption: An Asynchronous Distributed Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiping Zhu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Mobile group consumption refers to consumption by a group of people, such as a couple, a family, colleagues and friends, based on mobile communications. It differs from consumption only involving individuals, because of the complex relations among group members. Existing data collection systems for mobile group consumption are centralized, which has the disadvantages of being a performance bottleneck, having single-point failure and increasing business and security risks. Moreover, these data collection systems are based on a synchronized clock, which is often unrealistic because of hardware constraints, privacy concerns or synchronization cost. In this paper, we propose the first asynchronous distributed approach to collecting data generated by mobile group consumption. We formally built a system model thereof based on asynchronous distributed communication. We then designed a simulation system for the model for which we propose a three-layer solution framework. After that, we describe how to detect the causality relation of two/three gathering events that happened in the system based on the collected data. Various definitions of causality relations based on asynchronous distributed communication are supported. Extensive simulation results show that the proposed approach is effective for data collection relating to mobile group consumption.

  6. Data Collection for Mobile Group Consumption: An Asynchronous Distributed Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Weiping; Chen, Weiran; Hu, Zhejie; Li, Zuoyou; Liang, Yue; Chen, Jiaojiao

    2016-04-06

    Mobile group consumption refers to consumption by a group of people, such as a couple, a family, colleagues and friends, based on mobile communications. It differs from consumption only involving individuals, because of the complex relations among group members. Existing data collection systems for mobile group consumption are centralized, which has the disadvantages of being a performance bottleneck, having single-point failure and increasing business and security risks. Moreover, these data collection systems are based on a synchronized clock, which is often unrealistic because of hardware constraints, privacy concerns or synchronization cost. In this paper, we propose the first asynchronous distributed approach to collecting data generated by mobile group consumption. We formally built a system model thereof based on asynchronous distributed communication. We then designed a simulation system for the model for which we propose a three-layer solution framework. After that, we describe how to detect the causality relation of two/three gathering events that happened in the system based on the collected data. Various definitions of causality relations based on asynchronous distributed communication are supported. Extensive simulation results show that the proposed approach is effective for data collection relating to mobile group consumption.

  7. An approach to grouping species for ecological risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hampton, N.L.; VanHorn, R.L.; Morris, R.; Brewer, R.

    1994-01-01

    The ecological risk assessment (ERA) paradigm acknowledges all levels of ecological organization as having potential for defining assessment and measurement endpoints. However, assessment goals and endpoints are generally concentrated at individual species and population levels. As part of a sitewide, screening-level ERA process at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), a ''functional group'' approach was developed to incorporate assessment at a higher level of ecological organization into the risk analysis process. Functional groups demonstrating biological similarity and similar potential for contaminant exposure were developed using taxonomic, trophic and habitat parameters. As defined, all species are potential surrogates for the other members of the same functional group. Measurement endpoint data for several species may be integrated to address the risk to the group as a whole. The functional group concept was applied throughout the problem formulation, analysis, and risk characterization phases of the assessment process. This approach allows the ERA to be focused on risk to the integrity of individual functional groups, which can subsequently be related to guild and community integrity

  8. Cyclical convergence of Central and Eastern European countries to the Euro area core. New methodological approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ileana ALEXE

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The current paper develops an analysis on the degree of business cycle convergence of the new member states of the EU towards the Euro area core (Germany, France, Italy, Belgium, Netherlands and Luxembourg during 1996 – 2010.Unlike the previous research, the study takes into consideration the similarity of cycles, and not their synchronization. Furthermore, from the methodological point of view, it explores the use of survey indicators in the analysis of the cycles, thus in addition to the traditional approach that employs the GDP. The results obtained through clusterization show that the degree of convergence towards Euro area core remains modest.

  9. The French initiative for scientific cores virtual curating : a user-oriented integrated approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignol, Cécile; Godinho, Elodie; Galabertier, Bruno; Caillo, Arnaud; Bernardet, Karim; Augustin, Laurent; Crouzet, Christian; Billy, Isabelle; Teste, Gregory; Moreno, Eva; Tosello, Vanessa; Crosta, Xavier; Chappellaz, Jérome; Calzas, Michel; Rousseau, Denis-Didier; Arnaud, Fabien

    2016-04-01

    Managing scientific data is probably one the most challenging issue in modern science. The question is made even more sensitive with the need of preserving and managing high value fragile geological sam-ples: cores. Large international scientific programs, such as IODP or ICDP are leading an intense effort to solve this problem and propose detailed high standard work- and dataflows thorough core handling and curating. However most results derived from rather small-scale research programs in which data and sample management is generally managed only locally - when it is … The national excellence equipment program (Equipex) CLIMCOR aims at developing French facilities for coring and drilling investigations. It concerns indiscriminately ice, marine and continental samples. As part of this initiative, we initiated a reflexion about core curating and associated coring-data management. The aim of the project is to conserve all metadata from fieldwork in an integrated cyber-environment which will evolve toward laboratory-acquired data storage in a near future. In that aim, our demarche was conducted through an close relationship with field operators as well laboratory core curators in order to propose user-oriented solutions. The national core curating initiative currently proposes a single web portal in which all scientifics teams can store their field data. For legacy samples, this will requires the establishment of a dedicated core lists with associated metadata. For forthcoming samples, we propose a mobile application, under Android environment to capture technical and scientific metadata on the field. This application is linked with a unique coring tools library and is adapted to most coring devices (gravity, drilling, percussion, etc...) including multiple sections and holes coring operations. Those field data can be uploaded automatically to the national portal, but also referenced through international standards or persistent identifiers (IGSN, ORCID and INSPIRE

  10. A minimalist functional group (MFG) approach for surrogate fuel formulation

    KAUST Repository

    Abdul Jameel, Abdul Gani; Naser, Nimal; Issayev, Gani; Touitou, Jamal; Ghosh, Manik Kumer; Emwas, Abdul-Hamid M.; Farooq, Aamir; Dooley, Stephen; Sarathy, Mani

    2018-01-01

    Surrogate fuel formulation has drawn significant interest due to its relevance towards understanding combustion properties of complex fuel mixtures. In this work, we present a novel approach for surrogate fuel formulation by matching target fuel functional groups, while minimizing the number of surrogate species. Five key functional groups; paraffinic CH, paraffinic CH, paraffinic CH, naphthenic CH–CH and aromatic C–CH groups in addition to structural information provided by the Branching Index (BI) were chosen as matching targets. Surrogates were developed for six FACE (Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines) gasoline target fuels, namely FACE A, C, F, G, I and J. The five functional groups present in the fuels were qualitatively and quantitatively identified using high resolution H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. A further constraint was imposed in limiting the number of surrogate components to a maximum of two. This simplifies the process of surrogate formulation, facilitates surrogate testing, and significantly reduces the size and time involved in developing chemical kinetic models by reducing the number of thermochemical and kinetic parameters requiring estimation. Fewer species also reduces the computational expenses involved in simulating combustion in practical devices. The proposed surrogate formulation methodology is denoted as the Minimalist Functional Group (MFG) approach. The MFG surrogates were experimentally tested against their target fuels using Ignition Delay Times (IDT) measured in an Ignition Quality Tester (IQT), as specified by the standard ASTM D6890 methodology, and in a Rapid Compression Machine (RCM). Threshold Sooting Index (TSI) and Smoke Point (SP) measurements were also performed to determine the sooting propensities of the surrogates and target fuels. The results showed that MFG surrogates were able to reproduce the aforementioned combustion properties of the target FACE gasolines across a wide range of conditions

  11. A minimalist functional group (MFG) approach for surrogate fuel formulation

    KAUST Repository

    Abdul Jameel, Abdul Gani

    2018-03-20

    Surrogate fuel formulation has drawn significant interest due to its relevance towards understanding combustion properties of complex fuel mixtures. In this work, we present a novel approach for surrogate fuel formulation by matching target fuel functional groups, while minimizing the number of surrogate species. Five key functional groups; paraffinic CH, paraffinic CH, paraffinic CH, naphthenic CH–CH and aromatic C–CH groups in addition to structural information provided by the Branching Index (BI) were chosen as matching targets. Surrogates were developed for six FACE (Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines) gasoline target fuels, namely FACE A, C, F, G, I and J. The five functional groups present in the fuels were qualitatively and quantitatively identified using high resolution H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. A further constraint was imposed in limiting the number of surrogate components to a maximum of two. This simplifies the process of surrogate formulation, facilitates surrogate testing, and significantly reduces the size and time involved in developing chemical kinetic models by reducing the number of thermochemical and kinetic parameters requiring estimation. Fewer species also reduces the computational expenses involved in simulating combustion in practical devices. The proposed surrogate formulation methodology is denoted as the Minimalist Functional Group (MFG) approach. The MFG surrogates were experimentally tested against their target fuels using Ignition Delay Times (IDT) measured in an Ignition Quality Tester (IQT), as specified by the standard ASTM D6890 methodology, and in a Rapid Compression Machine (RCM). Threshold Sooting Index (TSI) and Smoke Point (SP) measurements were also performed to determine the sooting propensities of the surrogates and target fuels. The results showed that MFG surrogates were able to reproduce the aforementioned combustion properties of the target FACE gasolines across a wide range of conditions

  12. A study on the framework for selecting core R and D programmes in Energy Technology Roadmap by the DEA approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seong Kon; Mogi, Gento; Kim, Jong Wook

    2007-07-01

    South Korea is the 10th largest energy consumer in the world because of the poor country of natural resources such as petroleum, coal, and natural gas. It is essential to solve the energy difficulty of secure supply and demand of national energy. We established the energy technology roadmap to prepare for the next 10 years. We clustered 3 core technological sectors such as technology for high oil prices, the United nations framework for climate change, and the hydrogen economy. But we didn't prioritize the weights of energy technology development in energy technology roadmap. To allocate the finite resources efficiently, we cluster the preferred groups and non-preferred groups by the data envelopment analysis (DEA) approach. Through the scientific decision making approach, we can allocate R and D capacity, budget, and infrastructures efficiently to produce outstanding R and D outputs. (auth)

  13. Renormalization group approach to Sudakov resummation in prompt photon production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolzoni, Paolo; Forte, Stefano; Ridolfi, Giovanni

    2005-01-01

    We prove the all-order exponentiation of soft logarithmic corrections to prompt photon production in hadronic collisions, by generalizing an approach previously developed in the context of Drell-Yan production and deep-inelastic scattering. We show that all large logs in the soft limit can be expressed in terms of two dimensionful variables, and we use the renormalization group to resum them. The resummed results that we obtain are more general though less predictive than those proposed by other groups, in that they can accommodate for violations of Sudakov factorization

  14. Group investigation with scientific approach in mathematics learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indarti, D.; Mardiyana; Pramudya, I.

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this research is to find out the effect of learning model toward mathematics achievement. This research is quasi-experimental research. The population of research is all VII grade students of Karanganyar regency in the academic year of 2016/2017. The sample of this research was taken using stratified cluster random sampling technique. Data collection was done based on mathematics achievement test. The data analysis technique used one-way ANOVA following the normality test with liliefors method and homogeneity test with Bartlett method. The results of this research is the mathematics learning using Group Investigation learning model with scientific approach produces the better mathematics learning achievement than learning with conventional model on material of quadrilateral. Group Investigation learning model with scientific approach can be used by the teachers in mathematics learning, especially in the material of quadrilateral, which is can improve the mathematics achievement.

  15. Core fracture analysis applied to ground water flow systems: Chickamauga Group, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bittner, E.; Dreier, R.B.

    1989-01-01

    The objective of this study is to correlate hydrologic properties with detailed geologic fabrics and to investigate the influence of a complex geologic setting on ground water systems. The Chickamauga Group (CH) located in Bethel Valley on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation is comprised of limestones and interbedded shales. Five core holes (CH 1-5), oriented across strike, provide a cross section of the CH and were mapped for fracture density, orientation and cross-cutting relationships as well as lithologic variations. Correlation of structural and lithologic features with downhole geophysical logs and hydraulic conductivity values shows a relationship between lithology, fracture density and increased permeability in an otherwise low-permeability environment. Structures identified as influential in enhancing hydraulic conductivity include contractional bedding plane and tectonic stylolites and extensional fractures. Three sets of extensional fractures are indicated by cross-cutting relationships and various degrees of veining. Hydraulic conductivity values (K) for the five wells indicate two ground water flow systems in the valley. A shallow system (up to 150 feet deep) shows a range in K from 10E-4 centimeters per second to 10E-6 centimeters per second. Shallow horizons show more open fractures than are observed at depth, and these fractures appear to control the enhanced K in the shallow system. A subhorizontal interface that is not defined by pre-existing structures or a stratigraphic horizon separates the two flow systems. The deeper system ranges in K values from 10E-9 centimeters per second to 10E-5 centimeters per second. The higher K values at depth correspond to increased fracture density at lithologic contacts, zones of tectonic stylolitization and partially veined extension fractures. 11 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs

  16. Compaction of a Bacterial Group I Ribozyme Coincides with the Assembly of Core Helices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Salas, U.; Rangan, P.; Krueger, S.; Briber, R.; Thirumalai, D.; Woodson, S.

    2004-01-01

    Counterions are critical to the self-assembly of RNA tertiary structure because they neutralize the large electrostatic forces which oppose the folding process. Changes in the size and shape of the Azoarcus group I ribozyme as a function of Mg 2+ and Na + concentration were followed by small angle neutron scattering. In low salt buffer, the RNA was expanded, with an average radius of gyration (R g ) of 53 ± 1 Angstroms. A highly cooperative transition to a compact form (R g = 31.5 ± 0.5 Angstroms) was observed between 1.6 and 1.7 mM MgCl 2 . The collapse transition, which is unusually sharp in Mg 2+ , has the characteristics of a first-order phase transition. Partial digestion with ribonuclease T1 under identical conditions showed that this transition correlated with the assembly of double helices in the ribozyme core. Fivefold higher Mg 2+ concentrations were required for self-splicing, indicating that compaction occurs before native tertiary interactions are fully stabilized. No further decrease in Rg was observed between 1.7 and 20 mM MgCl 2 , indicating that the intermediates have the same dimensions as the native ribozyme, within the uncertainty of the data (± 1 Angstroms). A more gradual transition to a final R g of approximately 33.5 Angstroms was observed between 0.45 and 2 M NaCl. This confirms the expectation that monovalent ions not only are less efficient in charge neutralization but also contract the RNA less efficiently than multivalent ions

  17. A Two-Step Approach to Uncertainty Quantification of Core Simulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artem Yankov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available For the multiple sources of error introduced into the standard computational regime for simulating reactor cores, rigorous uncertainty analysis methods are available primarily to quantify the effects of cross section uncertainties. Two methods for propagating cross section uncertainties through core simulators are the XSUSA statistical approach and the “two-step” method. The XSUSA approach, which is based on the SUSA code package, is fundamentally a stochastic sampling method. Alternatively, the two-step method utilizes generalized perturbation theory in the first step and stochastic sampling in the second step. The consistency of these two methods in quantifying uncertainties in the multiplication factor and in the core power distribution was examined in the framework of phase I-3 of the OECD Uncertainty Analysis in Modeling benchmark. With the Three Mile Island Unit 1 core as a base model for analysis, the XSUSA and two-step methods were applied with certain limitations, and the results were compared to those produced by other stochastic sampling-based codes. Based on the uncertainty analysis results, conclusions were drawn as to the method that is currently more viable for computing uncertainties in burnup and transient calculations.

  18. Polarization effects on spectra of spherical core/shell nanostructures: Perturbation theory against finite difference approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibral, Asmaa; Zouitine, Asmaa; Assaid, El Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    Poisson equation is solved analytically in the case of a point charge placed anywhere in a spherical core/shell nanostructure, immersed in aqueous or organic solution or embedded in semiconducting or insulating matrix. Conduction and valence band-edge alignments between core and shell are described by finite height barriers. Influence of polarization charges induced at the surfaces where two adjacent materials meet is taken into account. Original expressions of electrostatic potential created everywhere in the space by a source point charge are derived. Expressions of self-polarization potential describing the interaction of a point charge with its own image–charge are deduced. Contributions of double dielectric constant mismatch to electron and hole ground state energies as well as nanostructure effective gap are calculated via first order perturbation theory and also by finite difference approach. Dependencies of electron, hole and gap energies against core to shell radii ratio are determined in the case of ZnS/CdSe core/shell nanostructure immersed in water or in toluene. It appears that finite difference approach is more efficient than first order perturbation method and that the effect of polarization charge may in no case be neglected as its contribution can reach a significant proportion of the value of nanostructure gap

  19. Polarization effects on spectra of spherical core/shell nanostructures: Perturbation theory against finite difference approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibral, Asmaa [Equipe d' Optique et Electronique du Solide, Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences, Université Chouaïb Doukkali, B. P. 20 El Jadida principale, El Jadida, Royaume du Maroc (Morocco); Laboratoire d' Instrumentation, Mesure et Contrôle, Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences, Université Chouaïb Doukkali, B. P. 20 El Jadida principale, El Jadida, Royaume du Maroc (Morocco); Zouitine, Asmaa [Département de Physique, Ecole Nationale Supérieure d' Enseignement Technique, Université Mohammed V Souissi, B. P. 6207 Rabat-Instituts, Rabat, Royaume du Maroc (Morocco); Assaid, El Mahdi, E-mail: eassaid@yahoo.fr [Equipe d' Optique et Electronique du Solide, Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences, Université Chouaïb Doukkali, B. P. 20 El Jadida principale, El Jadida, Royaume du Maroc (Morocco); Laboratoire d' Instrumentation, Mesure et Contrôle, Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences, Université Chouaïb Doukkali, B. P. 20 El Jadida principale, El Jadida, Royaume du Maroc (Morocco); and others

    2015-02-01

    Poisson equation is solved analytically in the case of a point charge placed anywhere in a spherical core/shell nanostructure, immersed in aqueous or organic solution or embedded in semiconducting or insulating matrix. Conduction and valence band-edge alignments between core and shell are described by finite height barriers. Influence of polarization charges induced at the surfaces where two adjacent materials meet is taken into account. Original expressions of electrostatic potential created everywhere in the space by a source point charge are derived. Expressions of self-polarization potential describing the interaction of a point charge with its own image–charge are deduced. Contributions of double dielectric constant mismatch to electron and hole ground state energies as well as nanostructure effective gap are calculated via first order perturbation theory and also by finite difference approach. Dependencies of electron, hole and gap energies against core to shell radii ratio are determined in the case of ZnS/CdSe core/shell nanostructure immersed in water or in toluene. It appears that finite difference approach is more efficient than first order perturbation method and that the effect of polarization charge may in no case be neglected as its contribution can reach a significant proportion of the value of nanostructure gap.

  20. Age groups related glioblastoma study based on radiomics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zeju; Wang, Yuanyuan; Yu, Jinhua; Guo, Yi; Zhang, Qi

    2017-12-01

    Glioblastoma is the most aggressive malignant brain tumor with poor prognosis. Radiomics is a newly emerging and promising technique to reveal the complex relationships between high-throughput medical image features and deep information of disease including pathology, biomarkers and genomics. An approach was developed to investigate the internal relationship between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features and the age-related origins of glioblastomas based on a quantitative radiomics method. A fully automatic image segmentation method was applied to segment the tumor regions from three dimensional MRI images. 555 features were then extracted from the image data. By analyzing large numbers of quantitative image features, some predictive and prognostic information could be obtained by the radiomics approach. 96 patients diagnosed with glioblastoma pathologically have been divided into two age groups (age groups (T test, p age difference (T test, p= .006). In conclusion, glioblastoma in different age groups present different radiomics-feature patterns with statistical significance, which indicates that glioblastoma in different age groups should have different pathologic, protein, or genic origins.

  1. Wetting transitions: A functional renormalization-group approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, D.S.; Huse, D.A.

    1985-01-01

    A linear functional renormalization group is introduced as a framework in which to treat various wetting transitions of films on substrates. A unified treatment of the wetting transition in three dimensions with short-range interactions is given. The results of Brezin, Halperin, and Leibler in their three different regimes are reproduced along with new results on the multicritical behavior connecting the various regimes. In addition, the critical behavior as the coexistence curve is approached at complete wetting is analyzed. Wetting in the presence of long-range substrate-film interactions that fall off as power laws is also studied. The possible effects of the nonlinear terms in the renormalization group are examined briefly and it appears that they do not alter the critical behavior found using the truncated linear renormalization group

  2. Group Evidential Reasoning Approach for MADA under Fuzziness and Uncertainties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Zhou

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Multiple attribute decision analysis (MADA problems often include both qualitative and quantitative attributes which may be either precise or inaccurate. The evidential reasoning (ER approach is one of reliable and rational methods for dealing with MADA problems and can generate aggregated assessments from a variety of attributes. In many real world decision situations, accurate assessments are difficult to provide such as in group decision situations. Extensive research in dealing with imprecise or uncertain belief structures has been conducted on the basis of the ER approach, such as interval belief degrees, interval weights and interval uncertainty. In this paper, the weights of attributes and utilities of evaluation grades are considered to be fuzzy numbers for the ER approach. Fuzzy analytic hierarchy process (FAHP is used for generating triangular fuzzy weights for attributes from a triangular fuzzy judgment matrix provided by an expert. The weighted arithmetic mean method is proposed to aggregate the triangular fuzzy weights of attributes from a group of experts. -cut is then used to transform the combined triangular fuzzy weights to interval weights for the purpose of dealing with the fuzzy type of weight and utility in a consistent way. Several pairs of group evidential reasoning based nonlinear programming models are then designed to calculate the global fuzzy belief degrees and the overall expected interval utilities of each alternative with interval weights and interval utilities as constraints. A case study is conducted to show the validity and effectiveness of the proposed approach and sensitivity analysis is also conducted on interval weights generated by different -cuts.

  3. Linear mixed-effects modeling approach to FMRI group analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gang; Saad, Ziad S; Britton, Jennifer C; Pine, Daniel S; Cox, Robert W

    2013-06-01

    Conventional group analysis is usually performed with Student-type t-test, regression, or standard AN(C)OVA in which the variance-covariance matrix is presumed to have a simple structure. Some correction approaches are adopted when assumptions about the covariance structure is violated. However, as experiments are designed with different degrees of sophistication, these traditional methods can become cumbersome, or even be unable to handle the situation at hand. For example, most current FMRI software packages have difficulty analyzing the following scenarios at group level: (1) taking within-subject variability into account when there are effect estimates from multiple runs or sessions; (2) continuous explanatory variables (covariates) modeling in the presence of a within-subject (repeated measures) factor, multiple subject-grouping (between-subjects) factors, or the mixture of both; (3) subject-specific adjustments in covariate modeling; (4) group analysis with estimation of hemodynamic response (HDR) function by multiple basis functions; (5) various cases of missing data in longitudinal studies; and (6) group studies involving family members or twins. Here we present a linear mixed-effects modeling (LME) methodology that extends the conventional group analysis approach to analyze many complicated cases, including the six prototypes delineated above, whose analyses would be otherwise either difficult or unfeasible under traditional frameworks such as AN(C)OVA and general linear model (GLM). In addition, the strength of the LME framework lies in its flexibility to model and estimate the variance-covariance structures for both random effects and residuals. The intraclass correlation (ICC) values can be easily obtained with an LME model with crossed random effects, even at the presence of confounding fixed effects. The simulations of one prototypical scenario indicate that the LME modeling keeps a balance between the control for false positives and the sensitivity

  4. Core Genome Multilocus Sequence Typing for Identification of Globally Distributed Clonal Groups and Differentiation of Outbreak Strains of Listeria monocytogenes

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yi; Gonzalez-Escalona, Narjol; Hammack, Thomas S.; Allard, Marc W.; Strain, Errol A.; Brown, Eric W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many listeriosis outbreaks are caused by a few globally distributed clonal groups, designated clonal complexes or epidemic clones, of Listeria monocytogenes, several of which have been defined by classic multilocus sequence typing (MLST) schemes targeting 6 to 8 housekeeping or virulence genes. We have developed and evaluated core genome MLST (cgMLST) schemes and applied them to isolates from multiple clonal groups, including those associated with 39 listeriosis outbreaks. The cgMLST...

  5. Quantum renormalization group approach to geometric phases in spin chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jafari, R.

    2013-01-01

    A relation between geometric phases and criticality of spin chains are studied using the quantum renormalization-group approach. I have shown how the geometric phase evolve as the size of the system becomes large, i.e., the finite size scaling is obtained. The renormalization scheme demonstrates how the first derivative of the geometric phase with respect to the field strength diverges at the critical point and maximum value of the first derivative, and its position, scales with the exponent of the system size

  6. Potts ferromagnet correlation length in hypercubic lattices: Renormalization - group approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curado, E.M.F.; Hauser, P.R.

    1984-01-01

    Through a real space renormalization group approach, the q-state Potts ferromagnet correlation length on hierarchical lattices is calculated. These hierarchical lattices are build in order to simulate hypercubic lattices. The high-and-low temperature correlation length asymptotic behaviours tend (in the Ising case) to the Bravais lattice correlation length ones when the size of the hierarchical lattice cells tends to infinity. It is conjectured that the asymptotic behaviours several values of q and d (dimensionality) so obtained are correct. Numerical results are obtained for the full temperature range of the correlation length. (Author) [pt

  7. An approach to development of structural design criteria for highly irradiated core components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, D.V.

    1980-01-01

    The advent of the fast breeder reactor presents novel challenges in structural design and materials engineering. For instance, the core components of these reactors experience high energy neutron irradiation at elevated temperature, which causes significant time-dependent changes in material behaviour, such as a progressive loss of ductility. New structural design criteria are needed to extend elevated temperature design-by-analysis to account for these changes. Alloys best able to cope with the demands of the core operating environment are being explored and their structural behaviour characterized. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate an approach used in the development of core component structural design criteria. To do this, several design rules, plus brief rationale, from draft RDT Standards F9-7, -8 and -9 will be presented. These recently completed standards ('Structural Design Guidelines for Breeder Reactor Core Components') were prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy and represent a consensus among most organizations participating in the U.S. breeder program. (author)

  8. Recent advances on thermohydraulic simulation of HTR-10 nuclear reactor core using realistic CFD approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Alexandro S., E-mail: alexandrossilva@ifba.edu.br [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia da Bahia (IFBA), Vitoria da Conquista, BA (Brazil); Mazaira, Leorlen Y.R., E-mail: leored1984@gmail.com, E-mail: cgh@instec.cu [Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas (INSTEC), La Habana (Cuba); Dominguez, Dany S.; Hernandez, Carlos R.G., E-mail: alexandrossilva@gmail.com, E-mail: dsdominguez@gmail.com [Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz (UESC), Ilheus, BA (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Modelagem Computacional; Lira, Carlos A.B.O., E-mail: cabol@ufpe.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    High-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) have the potential to be used as possible energy generation sources in the near future, owing to their inherently safe performance by using a large amount of graphite, low power density design, and high conversion efficiency. However, safety is the most important issue for its commercialization in nuclear energy industry. It is very important for safety design and operation of an HTGR to investigate its thermal-hydraulic characteristics. In this article, it was performed the thermal-hydraulic simulation of compressible flow inside the core of the pebble bed reactor HTR (High Temperature Reactor)-10 using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). The realistic approach was used, where every closely packed pebble is realistically modelled considering a graphite layer and sphere of fuel. Due to the high computational cost is impossible simulate the full core; therefore, the geometry used is a FCC (Face Centered Cubic) cell with the half height of the core, with 21 layers and 95 pebbles. The input data used were taken from the thermal-hydraulic IAEA Bechmark. The results show the profiles of velocity and temperature of the coolant in the core, and the temperature distribution inside the pebbles. The maximum temperatures in the pebbles do not exceed the allowable limit for this type of nuclear fuel. (author)

  9. Recent advances on thermohydraulic simulation of HTR-10 nuclear reactor core using realistic CFD approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Alexandro S.; Mazaira, Leorlen Y.R.; Dominguez, Dany S.; Hernandez, Carlos R.G.

    2015-01-01

    High-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) have the potential to be used as possible energy generation sources in the near future, owing to their inherently safe performance by using a large amount of graphite, low power density design, and high conversion efficiency. However, safety is the most important issue for its commercialization in nuclear energy industry. It is very important for safety design and operation of an HTGR to investigate its thermal-hydraulic characteristics. In this article, it was performed the thermal-hydraulic simulation of compressible flow inside the core of the pebble bed reactor HTR (High Temperature Reactor)-10 using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). The realistic approach was used, where every closely packed pebble is realistically modelled considering a graphite layer and sphere of fuel. Due to the high computational cost is impossible simulate the full core; therefore, the geometry used is a FCC (Face Centered Cubic) cell with the half height of the core, with 21 layers and 95 pebbles. The input data used were taken from the thermal-hydraulic IAEA Bechmark. The results show the profiles of velocity and temperature of the coolant in the core, and the temperature distribution inside the pebbles. The maximum temperatures in the pebbles do not exceed the allowable limit for this type of nuclear fuel. (author)

  10. Group-theoretical approach to relativistic eikonal physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leon, J; Quiros, M [Instituto de Enstructura de la Materia, C.S.I.C., Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Matematica, Universidad Complutense, Campus de Alcala (Spain)); Ramirez Mittelbrunn, J [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, C.S.I.C., Madrid (Spain)

    1977-09-01

    A contraction of the Poincare group is performed leading to the eikonal approximation. Invariants, one-particle states, spinning particles and some interaction problems are studied with the following results: momenta of ultrarelativistic particles behave as lightlike, the little group being E/sub 2/, spin behaves as that of zero-mass particles, helicity being conserved in the presence of interactions. The full eikonal results are rederived for Green's functions, wave functions, etc. The way for computing corrections due to transverse momenta and spin-dependent interactions is outlined. A parallel analysis is made for the infinite-momentum frame, the similarities and differences between this formalism and the eikonal approach being disclosed.

  11. An approach for coupled-code multiphysics core simulations from a common input

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, Rodney; Belcourt, Kenneth; Hooper, Russell; Pawlowski, Roger; Clarno, Kevin; Simunovic, Srdjan; Slattery, Stuart; Turner, John; Palmtag, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We describe an approach for coupled-code multiphysics reactor core simulations. • The approach can enable tight coupling of distinct physics codes with a common input. • Multi-code multiphysics coupling and parallel data transfer issues are explained. • The common input approach and how the information is processed is described. • Capabilities are demonstrated on an eigenvalue and power distribution calculation. - Abstract: This paper describes an approach for coupled-code multiphysics reactor core simulations that is being developed by the Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications (VERA) project in the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light-Water Reactors (CASL). In this approach a user creates a single problem description, called the “VERAIn” common input file, to define and setup the desired coupled-code reactor core simulation. A preprocessing step accepts the VERAIn file and generates a set of fully consistent input files for the different physics codes being coupled. The problem is then solved using a single-executable coupled-code simulation tool applicable to the problem, which is built using VERA infrastructure software tools and the set of physics codes required for the problem of interest. The approach is demonstrated by performing an eigenvalue and power distribution calculation of a typical three-dimensional 17 × 17 assembly with thermal–hydraulic and fuel temperature feedback. All neutronics aspects of the problem (cross-section calculation, neutron transport, power release) are solved using the Insilico code suite and are fully coupled to a thermal–hydraulic analysis calculated by the Cobra-TF (CTF) code. The single-executable coupled-code (Insilico-CTF) simulation tool is created using several VERA tools, including LIME (Lightweight Integrating Multiphysics Environment for coupling codes), DTK (Data Transfer Kit), Trilinos, and TriBITS. Parallel calculations are performed on the Titan supercomputer at Oak

  12. Rules for design of nuclear graphite core components - some considerations and approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svalbonas, V.; Stilwell, T.C.; Zudans, Z.

    1978-01-01

    The use of graphite as a structural element presents unusual problems both for the designer and stress analysist. When the structure happens to be a nuclear reactor core, these problems are significantly magnified both by the environment and the attendant safety requirements. In the high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) core a large number of elements are constructed of nuclear graphite. This paper discusses the attendant difficulties, and presents some approaches, for ASME code safety-consistent design and analysis. The statistical scatter of material properties, which complicates even the definitions of allowable stress, as well as the brittle, anisotropic, inhomogeneous nature of the graphite was considered. The study of this subject was undertaken under contract to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. (Auth.)

  13. Development and verification of a high performance multi-group SP3 transport capability in the ARTEMIS core simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Geemert, Rene

    2008-01-01

    For satisfaction of future global customer needs, dedicated efforts are being coordinated internationally and pursued continuously at AREVA NP. The currently ongoing CONVERGENCE project is committed to the development of the ARCADIA R next generation core simulation software package. ARCADIA R will be put to global use by all AREVA NP business regions, for the entire spectrum of core design processes, licensing computations and safety studies. As part of the currently ongoing trend towards more sophisticated neutronics methodologies, an SP 3 nodal transport concept has been developed for ARTEMIS which is the steady-state and transient core simulation part of ARCADIA R . For enabling a high computational performance, the SP N calculations are accelerated by applying multi-level coarse mesh re-balancing. In the current implementation, SP 3 is about 1.4 times as expensive computationally as SP 1 (diffusion). The developed SP 3 solution concept is foreseen as the future computational workhorse for many-group 3D pin-by-pin full core computations by ARCADIA R . With the entire numerical workload being highly parallelizable through domain decomposition techniques, associated CPU-time requirements that adhere to the efficiency needs in the nuclear industry can be expected to become feasible in the near future. The accuracy enhancement obtainable by using SP 3 instead of SP 1 has been verified by a detailed comparison of ARTEMIS 16-group pin-by-pin SP N results with KAERI's DeCart reference results for the 2D pin-by-pin Purdue UO 2 /MOX benchmark. This article presents the accuracy enhancement verification and quantifies the achieved ARTEMIS-SP 3 computational performance for a number of 2D and 3D multi-group and multi-box (up to pin-by-pin) core computations. (authors)

  14. Theory of transformation groups I general properties of continuous transformation groups a contemporary approach and translation

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This modern translation of Sophus Lie's and Friedrich Engel's “Theorie der Transformationsgruppen Band I” will allow readers to discover the striking conceptual clarity and remarkably systematic organizational thought of the original German text. Volume I presents a comprehensive introduction to the theory and is mainly directed towards the generalization of ideas drawn from the study of examples. The major part of the present volume offers an extremely clear translation of the lucid original. The first four chapters provide not only a translation, but also a contemporary approach, which will help present day readers to familiarize themselves with the concepts at the heart of the subject. The editor's main objective was to encourage a renewed interest in the detailed classification of Lie algebras in dimensions 1, 2 and 3, and to offer access to Sophus Lie's monumental Galois theory of continuous transformation groups, established at the end of the 19th Century. Lie groups are widespread in mathematics, p...

  15. Consensus clustering approach to group brain connectivity matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Rasero

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A novel approach rooted on the notion of consensus clustering, a strategy developed for community detection in complex networks, is proposed to cope with the heterogeneity that characterizes connectivity matrices in health and disease. The method can be summarized as follows: (a define, for each node, a distance matrix for the set of subjects by comparing the connectivity pattern of that node in all pairs of subjects; (b cluster the distance matrix for each node; (c build the consensus network from the corresponding partitions; and (d extract groups of subjects by finding the communities of the consensus network thus obtained. Different from the previous implementations of consensus clustering, we thus propose to use the consensus strategy to combine the information arising from the connectivity patterns of each node. The proposed approach may be seen either as an exploratory technique or as an unsupervised pretraining step to help the subsequent construction of a supervised classifier. Applications on a toy model and two real datasets show the effectiveness of the proposed methodology, which represents heterogeneity of a set of subjects in terms of a weighted network, the consensus matrix.

  16. Thermohydraulic simulation of HTR-10 nuclear reactor core using realistic CFD approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Alexandro S.; Dominguez, Dany S.; Mazaira, Leorlen Y. Rojas; Hernandez, Carlos R.G.; Lira, Carlos Alberto Brayner de Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    High-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) have the potential to be used as possible energy generation sources in the near future, owing to their inherently safe performance by using a large amount of graphite, low power density design, and high conversion efficiency. However, safety is the most important issue for its commercialization in nuclear energy industry. It is very important for safety design and operation of an HTGR to investigate its thermal–hydraulic characteristics. In this article, it was performed the thermal–hydraulic simulation of compressible flow inside the core of the pebble bed reactor HTR (High Temperature Reactor)-10 using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). The realistic approach was used, where every closely packed pebble is realistically modelled considering a graphite layer and sphere of fuel. Due to the high computational cost is impossible simulate the full core; therefore, the geometry used is a column of FCC (Face Centered Cubic) cells, with 41 layers and 82 pebbles. The input data used were taken from the thermohydraulic IAEA Benchmark (TECDOC-1694). The results show the profiles of velocity and temperature of the coolant in the core, and the temperature distribution inside the pebbles. The maximum temperatures in the pebbles do not exceed the allowable limit for this type of nuclear fuel. (author)

  17. Effective field renormalization group approach for Ising lattice spin systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fittipaldi, Ivon P.

    1994-03-01

    A new applicable real-space renormalization group framework (EFRG) for computing the critical properties of Ising lattice spin systems is presented. The method, which follows up the same strategy of the mean-field renormalization group scheme (MFRG), is based on rigorous Ising spin identities and utilizes a convenient differential operator expansion technique. Within this scheme, in contrast with the usual mean-field type of equation of state, all the relevant self-spin correlations are taken exactly into account. The results for the critical coupling and the critical exponent v, for the correlation length, are very satisfactory and it is shown that this technique leads to rather accurate results which represent a remarkable improvement on those obtained from the standard MFRG method. In particular, it is shown that the present EFRG approach correctly distinguishes the geometry of the lattice structure even when employing its simplest size-cluster version. Owing to its simplicity we also comment on the wide applicability of the present method to problems in crystalline and disordered Ising spin systems.

  18. An approach to model reactor core nodalization for deterministic safety analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Mohd Faiz; Samsudin, Mohd Rafie; Mamat @ Ibrahim, Mohd Rizal; Roslan, Ridha; Sadri, Abd Aziz; Farid, Mohd Fairus Abd

    2016-01-01

    Adopting good nodalization strategy is essential to produce an accurate and high quality input model for Deterministic Safety Analysis (DSA) using System Thermal-Hydraulic (SYS-TH) computer code. The purpose of such analysis is to demonstrate the compliance against regulatory requirements and to verify the behavior of the reactor during normal and accident conditions as it was originally designed. Numerous studies in the past have been devoted to the development of the nodalization strategy for small research reactor (e.g. 250kW) up to the bigger research reactor (e.g. 30MW). As such, this paper aims to discuss the state-of-arts thermal hydraulics channel to be employed in the nodalization for RTP-TRIGA Research Reactor specifically for the reactor core. At present, the required thermal-hydraulic parameters for reactor core, such as core geometrical data (length, coolant flow area, hydraulic diameters, and axial power profile) and material properties (including the UZrH1.6, stainless steel clad, graphite reflector) have been collected, analyzed and consolidated in the Reference Database of RTP using standardized methodology, mainly derived from the available technical documentations. Based on the available information in the database, assumptions made on the nodalization approach and calculations performed will be discussed and presented. The development and identification of the thermal hydraulics channel for the reactor core will be implemented during the SYS-TH calculation using RELAP5-3D® computer code. This activity presented in this paper is part of the development of overall nodalization description for RTP-TRIGA Research Reactor under the IAEA Norwegian Extra-Budgetary Programme (NOKEBP) mentoring project on Expertise Development through the Analysis of Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics for Malaysia, denoted as EARTH-M.

  19. An approach to model reactor core nodalization for deterministic safety analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salim, Mohd Faiz, E-mail: mohdfaizs@tnb.com.my; Samsudin, Mohd Rafie, E-mail: rafies@tnb.com.my [Nuclear Energy Department, Regulatory Economics & Planning Division, Tenaga Nasional Berhad (Malaysia); Mamat Ibrahim, Mohd Rizal, E-mail: m-rizal@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my [Prototypes & Plant Development Center, Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Malaysia); Roslan, Ridha, E-mail: ridha@aelb.gov.my; Sadri, Abd Aziz [Nuclear Installation Divisions, Atomic Energy Licensing Board (Malaysia); Farid, Mohd Fairus Abd [Reactor Technology Center, Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Malaysia)

    2016-01-22

    Adopting good nodalization strategy is essential to produce an accurate and high quality input model for Deterministic Safety Analysis (DSA) using System Thermal-Hydraulic (SYS-TH) computer code. The purpose of such analysis is to demonstrate the compliance against regulatory requirements and to verify the behavior of the reactor during normal and accident conditions as it was originally designed. Numerous studies in the past have been devoted to the development of the nodalization strategy for small research reactor (e.g. 250kW) up to the bigger research reactor (e.g. 30MW). As such, this paper aims to discuss the state-of-arts thermal hydraulics channel to be employed in the nodalization for RTP-TRIGA Research Reactor specifically for the reactor core. At present, the required thermal-hydraulic parameters for reactor core, such as core geometrical data (length, coolant flow area, hydraulic diameters, and axial power profile) and material properties (including the UZrH{sub 1.6}, stainless steel clad, graphite reflector) have been collected, analyzed and consolidated in the Reference Database of RTP using standardized methodology, mainly derived from the available technical documentations. Based on the available information in the database, assumptions made on the nodalization approach and calculations performed will be discussed and presented. The development and identification of the thermal hydraulics channel for the reactor core will be implemented during the SYS-TH calculation using RELAP5-3D{sup ®} computer code. This activity presented in this paper is part of the development of overall nodalization description for RTP-TRIGA Research Reactor under the IAEA Norwegian Extra-Budgetary Programme (NOKEBP) mentoring project on Expertise Development through the Analysis of Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics for Malaysia, denoted as EARTH-M.

  20. An approach to model reactor core nodalization for deterministic safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salim, Mohd Faiz; Samsudin, Mohd Rafie; Mamat Ibrahim, Mohd Rizal; Roslan, Ridha; Sadri, Abd Aziz; Farid, Mohd Fairus Abd

    2016-01-01

    Adopting good nodalization strategy is essential to produce an accurate and high quality input model for Deterministic Safety Analysis (DSA) using System Thermal-Hydraulic (SYS-TH) computer code. The purpose of such analysis is to demonstrate the compliance against regulatory requirements and to verify the behavior of the reactor during normal and accident conditions as it was originally designed. Numerous studies in the past have been devoted to the development of the nodalization strategy for small research reactor (e.g. 250kW) up to the bigger research reactor (e.g. 30MW). As such, this paper aims to discuss the state-of-arts thermal hydraulics channel to be employed in the nodalization for RTP-TRIGA Research Reactor specifically for the reactor core. At present, the required thermal-hydraulic parameters for reactor core, such as core geometrical data (length, coolant flow area, hydraulic diameters, and axial power profile) and material properties (including the UZrH 1.6 , stainless steel clad, graphite reflector) have been collected, analyzed and consolidated in the Reference Database of RTP using standardized methodology, mainly derived from the available technical documentations. Based on the available information in the database, assumptions made on the nodalization approach and calculations performed will be discussed and presented. The development and identification of the thermal hydraulics channel for the reactor core will be implemented during the SYS-TH calculation using RELAP5-3D ® computer code. This activity presented in this paper is part of the development of overall nodalization description for RTP-TRIGA Research Reactor under the IAEA Norwegian Extra-Budgetary Programme (NOKEBP) mentoring project on Expertise Development through the Analysis of Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics for Malaysia, denoted as EARTH-M

  1. A multi-cycle optimization approach for low leakage in-core fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Pingdong; Shen Wei

    1999-01-01

    A new approach was developed to optimize pressurized waster reactor (PWR) low-leakage multi-cycle reload core design. The multi-cycle optimization process is carried out by the following three steps: The first step is a linear programming in search for an optimum power sharing distribution and optimum cycle length distribution for the successive several cycles to yield maximum multi-cycle total cycle length. In the second step, the fuel arrangement and burnable poison (BP) assignment are decoupled by using Haling power distribution and the optimum fuel arrangement is determined at the EOL in the absence of all BPs by employing a linear programming method or direct search method with objective function to force the calculated cycle length to be as close as possible to the optimum single cycle length obtained in the first step and with optimum power sharing distribution as additional constraints during optimization. In the third step, the BP assignment is optimized by the Flexible Tolerance Method (FTM) or linear programming method using the number of BP rods as control variable. The technology employed in the second and third steps was the usual decoupling method used in low-leakage core design. The first step was developed specially for multi-cycle optimization design and discussed in detail. Based on the proposed method a computer code MCYCO was encoded and tested for Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant (QNPP) low leakage reload core design. The multi-cycle optimization method developed, together with the program MCYCO, provides an applicable tool for solving the PWR low leakage reload core design problem

  2. Soft timing closure for soft programmable logic cores: The ARGen approach

    OpenAIRE

    Bollengier , Théotime; Lagadec , Loïc; Najem , Mohamad; Le Lann , Jean-Christophe; Guilloux , Pierre

    2017-01-01

    International audience; Reconfigurable cores support post-release updates which shortens time-to-market while extending circuits’ lifespan. Reconfigurable cores can be provided as hard cores (ASIC) or soft cores (RTL). Soft reconfigurable cores outperform hard reconfigurable cores by preserving the ASIC synthesis flow, at the cost of lowering scalability but also exacerbating timing closure issues. This article tackles these two issues and introduces the ARGen generator that produces scalable...

  3. New core-substituted with electron-donating group 1,8-naphthalimides towards optoelectronic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schab-Balcerzak, Ewa, E-mail: eschab-balcerzak@cmpw-pan.edu.pl [Centre of Polymer and Carbon Materials, Polish Academy of Sciences, 34 M. Curie-Sklodowska Street, 41-819 Zabrze (Poland); Institute of Chemistry, University of Silesian, 9 Szkolna Street, 40-006 Katowice (Poland); Siwy, Mariola [Centre of Polymer and Carbon Materials, Polish Academy of Sciences, 34 M. Curie-Sklodowska Street, 41-819 Zabrze (Poland); Filapek, Michal; Kula, Slawomir; Malecki, Grzegorz [Institute of Chemistry, University of Silesian, 9 Szkolna Street, 40-006 Katowice (Poland); Laba, Katarzyna; Lapkowski, Mieczyslaw [Centre of Polymer and Carbon Materials, Polish Academy of Sciences, 34 M. Curie-Sklodowska Street, 41-819 Zabrze (Poland); Faculty of Chemistry, Silesian University of Technology, 9 Strzody Steet, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Janeczek, Henryk; Domanski, Marian [Centre of Polymer and Carbon Materials, Polish Academy of Sciences, 34 M. Curie-Sklodowska Street, 41-819 Zabrze (Poland)

    2015-10-15

    New 1,8-naphthalimides with thiophene or bithiophene structure attached by an imine linkage to naphthalene core were synthesized. The structures of obtained compounds were characterized by FTIR, {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy, elemental analysis and for elected compounds by HRMS (ESI) spectrometry. Thermal, optical and electrochemical properties of obtained 1,8-naphthalimides were investigated. Most of them exhibited glass-forming properties with glass transition temperatures in the range of 73–278 °C. Optical properties of the prepared compounds were examined by UV–vis and photoluminescence (PL) measurements. They emitted light in chloroform solution with emission maximum at ca. 500 nm with the highest quantum yield of fluorescence around 0.46 and green one in NMP solution. In blend with PMMA blue emission was observed with the highest quantum yield of fluorescence around 0.24. All compounds are electrochemically active, and undergo reversible reduction and irreversible or quasi-reversible oxidation process as was found in cyclic and differential pulse voltammetry (CV and DPV) studies. They showed electrochemical band gaps in the range 2.28–2.68 eV. Additionally, the electronic properties, that is, orbital energies and resulting energy gap were calculated by density functional theory (DFT). Additionally, selected compounds were preliminary tested as electroluminescence materials in devices with structure ITO/PVK:NI blend/Al. - Highlights: • We obtained new core substituted 1,8-naphthalimides. • They emitted light in CHCl{sub 3} with the largest PL quantum yield measure for these compounds of 0.46. • They emitted blue light in a blend with PMMA with the largest Φ{sub f} 0.24 measured for these compounds. • Their electrochemical energy band gap was in the range of 2.28–2.68 eV. • Preliminary investigations showed that green electroluminescence was observed.

  4. Group I-like ribozymes with a novel core organization perform obligate sequential hydrolytic cleavages at two processing sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Einvik, C; Nielsen, Henrik; Westhof, E

    1998-01-01

    A new category of self-splicing group I introns with conserved structural organization and function is found among the eukaryotic microorganisms Didymium and Naegleria. These complex rDNA introns contain two distinct ribozymes with different functions: a regular group I splicing...... available GIR1 sequences and propose a common RNA secondary structure resembling that of group I splicing-ribozymes, but with some important differences. The GIR1s lack most peripheral sequence components, as well as a P1 segment, and, at approximately 160-190 nt, they are the smallest functional group I...... ribozymes known from nature. All GIR1s were found to contain a novel 6-bp pseudoknot (P15) within their catalytic core region. Experimental support of the proposed structure was obtained from the Didymium GIR1 by RNA structure probing and site-directed mutagenesis. Three-dimensional modeling indicates...

  5. Core Genome Multilocus Sequence Typing for Identification of Globally Distributed Clonal Groups and Differentiation of Outbreak Strains of Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi; Gonzalez-Escalona, Narjol; Hammack, Thomas S; Allard, Marc W; Strain, Errol A; Brown, Eric W

    2016-10-15

    Many listeriosis outbreaks are caused by a few globally distributed clonal groups, designated clonal complexes or epidemic clones, of Listeria monocytogenes, several of which have been defined by classic multilocus sequence typing (MLST) schemes targeting 6 to 8 housekeeping or virulence genes. We have developed and evaluated core genome MLST (cgMLST) schemes and applied them to isolates from multiple clonal groups, including those associated with 39 listeriosis outbreaks. The cgMLST clusters were congruent with MLST-defined clonal groups, which had various degrees of diversity at the whole-genome level. Notably, cgMLST could distinguish among outbreak strains and epidemiologically unrelated strains of the same clonal group, which could not be achieved using classic MLST schemes. The precise selection of cgMLST gene targets may not be critical for the general identification of clonal groups and outbreak strains. cgMLST analyses further identified outbreak strains, including those associated with recent outbreaks linked to contaminated French-style cheese, Hispanic-style cheese, stone fruit, caramel apple, ice cream, and packaged leafy green salad, as belonging to major clonal groups. We further developed lineage-specific cgMLST schemes, which can include accessory genes when core genomes do not possess sufficient diversity, and this provided additional resolution over species-specific cgMLST. Analyses of isolates from different common-source listeriosis outbreaks revealed various degrees of diversity, indicating that the numbers of allelic differences should always be combined with cgMLST clustering and epidemiological evidence to define a listeriosis outbreak. Classic multilocus sequence typing (MLST) schemes targeting internal fragments of 6 to 8 genes that define clonal complexes or epidemic clones have been widely employed to study L. monocytogenes biodiversity and its relation to pathogenicity potential and epidemiology. We demonstrated that core genome MLST

  6. DIANA Code: Design and implementation of an analytic core calculus code by two group, two zone diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mochi, Ignacio

    2005-01-01

    The principal parameters of nuclear reactors are determined in the conceptual design stage.For that purpose, it is necessary to have flexible calculation tools that represent the principal dependencies of such parameters.This capability is of critical importance in the design of innovative nuclear reactors.In order to have a proper tool that could assist the conceptual design of innovative nuclear reactors, we developed and implemented a neutronic core calculus code: DIANA (Diffusion Integral Analytic Neutron Analysis).To calculate the required parameters, this code generates its own cross sections using an analytic two group, two zones diffusion scheme based only on a minimal set of data (i.e. 2200 m/s and fission averaged microscopic cross sections, Wescott factors and Effective Resonance Integrals).Both to calculate cross sections and core parameters, DIANA takes into account heterogeneity effects that are included when it evaluates each zone.Among them lays the disadvantage factor of each energy group.DIANA was totally implemented through Object Oriented Programming using C++ language. This eases source code understanding and would allow a quick expansion of its capabilities if needed.The final product is a versatile and easy-to-use code that allows core calculations with a minimal amount of data.It also contains the required tools needed to perform many variational calculations such as the parameterisation of effective multiplication factors for different radii of the core.The diffusion scheme s simplicity allows an easy following of the involved phenomena, making DIANA the most suitable tool to design reactors whose physics lays beyond the parameters of present reactors.All this reasons make DIANA a good candidate for future innovative reactor analysis

  7. Open Core Data approaches to exposing facility data to support FAIR principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fils, D.; Lehnert, K.; Noren, A. J.

    2017-12-01

    The Open Core Data (OCD) award from NSF is focused on exposing scientific drilling data from the JOIDES Resolution Science Operator (JRSO) and Continental Scientific Drilling Coordination Office (CSDCO) following guidance from the Force 11 FAIR principles and the W3C "best practices" recommendations and notes. The goal of this implementation is to provide the identification, access, citation and provenance of these data to support the research community. OCD employs Linked Open Data (LOD) patterns and HTML5 microdata publishing via JSON-LD using various vocabularies. These vocabularies include schema.org, GeoLink and other relevant community vocabularies. Attention is paid to enabling hypermedia navigation between resources to aid in fast and efficient harvesting of the metadata directly from the LOD approach using web architecture patterns. Further, the vocabularies are employed to address the need of both DOI assignment and creation of data citation entries following ESIP data citation recommendations. The use of LOD, community vocabularies and persistent identifiers has enabled linking between hosted and remote data resources. In addition to the semantic metadata and LOD pattern, OCD is implementing approaches to data packaging to facilitate data use. OCD is currently using the CSV for the Web approach but is moving to implement frictionless data packages. This data package model provide access to a large suite of tools, libraries and workbenches to support data utilization, validation and visualization. Further, a basic reference implementation of the W3C PROV-AQ pingback pattern is under testing. This work is done in coordination with the RDA Provenance Patterns WG and follows patterns already employed by Geoscience Australia. This development is also done in coordination with ESIP provenance work. As needed, more traditional Application Program Interfaces (APIs) are exposed following best practices in RESTful services. All these capabilities are implemented

  8. The BWR core simulator COSIMA with 2 group nodal flux expansion and control rod history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoejerup, C.F.

    1989-08-01

    The boiling water simulator NOTAM has been modified and improved in several aspects: - The ''1 1/2'' energy group TRILUX nodal flux solution method has been exchanged with a 2 group modal expansion method. - Control rod ''history'' has been introduced. - Precalculated instrument factors have been introduced. The paper describes these improvements, which were considered sufficiently large to justify a new name to the programme: COSIMA. (author)

  9. Customized Assessment Group Initiative: A Complementary Approach to Students' Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akindayomi, Akinloye

    2015-01-01

    This study, conducted in a US setting, examines the importance of group dynamics that emphasize cooperative team building through the proposed grouping strategy called Customized Assessment Group Initiative (CAGI). CAGI is a student grouping strategy designed to operationalize the mutual accountability concept central to the definition of teams by…

  10. Effects of core models and neutron energy group structures on xenon oscillation in large graphite-moderated reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamasita, Kiyonobu; Harada, Hiroo; Murata, Isao; Shindo, Ryuichi; Tsuruoka, Takuya.

    1993-01-01

    Xenon oscillations of large graphite-moderated reactors have been analyzed by a multi-group diffusion code with two- and three-dimensional core models to study the effects of the geometric core models and the neutron energy group structures on the evaluation of the Xe oscillation behavior. The study clarified the following. It is important for accurate Xe oscillation simulations to use the neutron energy group structure that describes well the large change in the absorption cross section of Xe in the thermal energy range of 0.1∼0.65 eV, because the energy structure in this energy range has significant influences on the amplitude and the period of oscillations in power distributions. Two-dimensional R-Z models can be used instead of three-dimensional R-θ-Z models for evaluation of the threshold power of Xe oscillation, but two-dimensional R-θ models cannot be used for evaluation of the threshold power. Although the threshold power evaluated with the R-θ-Z models coincides with that of the R-Z models, it does not coincide with that of the R-θ models. (author)

  11. Analysis of Students Ability on Creative Thinking Aspects in terms of Cognitive Style in Mathematics Learning with CORE Model Using Constructivism Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mita Konita

    2017-03-01

    that : (1 learning outcomes in the aspect of creative thinking abilities with CORE learning model use a constructivist approach achieve mastery of classical; (2 the mean result of learning on aspect of creative thinking abilities with CORE learning model use a constructivist approach is more than 75; (3 the record time of reflective cognitive style characteristics is least so that it has less answering frequency, while the record time of implusive cognitive style characteristics is fast, it has more answering frequency; (4 the students’ group in implusive cognitive learning fulfill the creative thinking indicator of flexibility and novelty, while the students’ group in implusive cognitive learning fulfill the indicator of flexible creative thinking in overcoming the problems.

  12. Delivery of core medical training: the role of a local faculty group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, David; Dewhurst, Graeme

    2011-10-01

    All physicians who are training young doctors of the future recognise the current challenge of doing this in the NHS. The recently published Temple Report documents the challenge and some of the solutions. For Kent, Surrey and Sussex (KSS) Deanery, one of the responses was to implement a new structure and process at local level--the local faculty groups (LFGs)--to ensure appropriate curriculum delivery. This paper sets out the history, structure and purpose of LFGs, describes what happens during a LFG meeting in both open and closed sessions and presents feedback of learning from two years in action across 11 acute trusts in the South East Coast (SEC) strategic health authority area. The experience of trainers in SEC is that the local faculty group structure and associated processes is one strand in the more effective delivery of education in the current NHS environment.

  13. Numerical studies of rotational core collapse in axisymmetry using the conformally flat metric approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimmelmeier, H.; Font, J.A.; Mueller, E.

    2001-01-01

    The numerical simulation of hydrodynamic processes in general relativity is a highly complex problem. In order to reduce the complexity of the gravitational field equations, Wilson and coworkers have proposed an approximation scheme, where the 3-metric γ ij is chosen to be conformally flat. In this approximation the Einstein equations reduce to a set of 5 coupled elliptic equations. In this paper we present an axisymmetric general relativistic hydrodynamic code which utilizes this approach together with high-resolution shock-capturing schemes to solve the hydrodynamic equations. We report on tests and preliminary applications of the code to rotating neutron stars and supernova core collapse in axisymmetry. The code promises good applicability to handle a variety of relativistic astrophysical situations, and is prepared to provide information about gravitational radiation from rotating gravitational collapse. (author)

  14. On-line thermal margin estimation of a PWR core using a neural network approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Soon Ok; Kim, Hyun Koon; Lee, Seung Hynk; Chang, Soon Heung

    1992-01-01

    A new approach for on-line thermal margin monitoring of a PWR Core is proposed in this paper, where a neural network model is introduced to predict the DNBR values at the given reactor operating conditions. The neural network is learned by the Back Propagation algorithm with the optimized random training data and is tested to investigate the generalized performance for the steady state operating region as well as for the transient situations where DNB is of the primary concern. The test results show that the high level of accuracy in predicting the DNBR can be achieved by the neural network model compared to the detailed code results. An insight has been gained from this study that the neural network model for estimating DNB performance can be a viable tool for on-line thermal margin monitoring of a nuclear power plant

  15. The action researcher as a reflective partner to a core group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Dorthe; Sriskandarajah, Nadarajah

    2006-01-01

    with rural stakeholders to achieve normatively desirable learning. It is suggested that in order to genuinely qualify the learning process and its outcome for all, the action researcher keeps an adequate balance between being “close to” or “inside” the stakeholder arena and “distanced to” or “outside......” this arena. A model for how this balance could be achieved is proposed.......The EU suggests applying bottom-up, participative learning approaches, such as Action Research, as steering instruments to meet the challenge of multifunctionality and its links with rural development. This paper focuses on the many demanding roles placed on an action researcher when working...

  16. A Delphi approach to developing a core competency framework for family practice registered nurses in Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moaveni, Azadeh; Gallinaro, Anna; Conn, Lesley Gotlib; Callahan, Sheilagh; Hammond, Melanie; Oandasan, Ivy

    2010-12-01

    This paper describes the results of a Delphi panel process to gain consensus on a role description and competency framework for family practice registered nurses (FP-RNs) in Ontario. Based on the findings from interviews and focus groups with family practice registered nurses and their inter-professional colleagues throughout Ontario, a core competency framework for FP-RNs emerged consisting of six distinct roles - Professional, Expert, Communicator, Synergist, Health Educator and Lifelong Learner - with accompanying enabling competency statements. This framework was refined and validated by a panel of experts from various nursing and family medicine associations and organizations through a Delphi consensus process. This core competency framework for FP-RNs was developed as a stepping stone for clarifying this very important and poorly understood role in family practice. As a result of this research, we expect a greater acknowledgement of the contributions and expertise of the FP-RN as well as the need to celebrate and profile this role. This work has already led to the establishment of a network of stakeholders from nursing organizations in Ontario who are considering opportunities to move the development and use of the competency framework forward.

  17. Antiferroelectric phase in liquid crystalline compounds with azo group in their molecular core

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kašpar, Miroslav; Novotná, Vladimíra; Hamplová, Věra; Podoliak, Natalia; Nonnenmacher, D.; Giesselmann, F.; Glogarová, Milada

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 3 (2011), s. 309-315 ISSN 0267-8292 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100100911; GA AV ČR(CZ) GA202/09/0047 Grant - others:German Czech bilateral program(DE) D4-CZ5/2010-2011; GA UK(CZ) SVV-2011-263303 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : liquid crystals * antiferroelectricity * azo linkage group * photosensitivity Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.858, year: 2011

  18. Vibrational spectra study of fluorescent dendrimers built from the cyclotriphosphazene core with terminal dansyl and carbamate groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furer, V. L.; Vandyukova, I. I.; Vandyukov, A. E.; Fuchs, S.; Majoral, J. P.; Caminade, A. M.; Kovalenko, V. I.

    2011-08-01

    The FTIR and FT Raman spectra of the "Janus"-type dendrimers, possessing five carbamate groups on one side and five fluorescent dansyl derivatives on the other side, with amide G1 and hydrazone G2 central linkages were studied. These surface-block dendrimers are obtained by the coupling of two different dendrons. The FTIR and FT-Raman spectra of the zero generation dendrons, built from the hexafunctional cyclotriphosphazene core, with five dansyl terminal groups and one carbamate G0 v and one oxybenzaldehyde function G0v have been recorded. The structural optimization and normal mode analysis were performed for dendron G0v on the basis of the density functional theory (DFT). The calculated geometrical parameters and harmonic vibrational frequencies are predicted in a good agreement with the experimental data. It was found that dendron molecule G0v has a concave lens structure with planar -O-C6H4-CHdbnd O fragments and slightly non-planar cyclotriphosphazene core. The experimental IR and Raman spectra of dendron G0v were interpreted by means of potential energy distributions. Relying on DFT calculations a complete vibrational assignment is proposed. The strong band 1597 cm -1 show marked changes of the optical density in dependence of substituents in the aromatic ring. The frequencies of ν(N-H) bands in the IR spectra reveal the presence of the different types of H-bonds in the dendrimers.

  19. New approach to the design of core support structures for large LMFBR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burelbach, J.P.; Kann, W.J.; Pan, Y.C.; Saiveau, J.G.; Seidensticker, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    The paper describes an innovative design concept for a LMFBR Core Support Structure. A hanging Core Support Structure is described and analyzed. The design offers inherent safety features, constructibility advantages, and potential cost reductions

  20. Sensitivity of core-level spectroscopy to electrostatic environments of nitrile groups: An ab initio study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abid Hussain

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Ab initio quantum chemistry calculations have been performed to probe the influence of hydrogen bonding on the electronic structure of hydrogen cyanide (HCN. Our calculations determine the origin of nitrogen-specific Raman spectral features from resonant inelastic X-ray scattering occurring in the presence of a water molecule and an electric dipole field. The similarity of the two interactions in altering the electronic structure of the nitrogen atom differs only in the covalent contributions from the water molecule. The CN stretching mode as a structural probe was also investigated to study the electronic origin of the anomalous frequency shift of the nitrile group when subjected to hydrogen bonding and an electrostatic dipole field. The major changes in the electronic structure of HCN are electrostatic in nature and originate from dipole-dipole interactions. The relative shifts of the CN stretching frequency are in good agreement with those experimentally observed.

  1. The effect of lactate unit number in compounds with azo group in the molecular core

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novotná, Vladimíra; Hamplová, Věra; Kašpar, Miroslav; Podoliak, Natalia; Bubnov, Alexej; Glogarová, Milada; Nonnenmacher, D.; Giesselmann, F.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 5 (2011), s. 649-655 ISSN 0267-8292 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100100911; GA AV ČR(CZ) GA202/09/0047; GA ČR(CZ) GAP204/11/0723 Grant - others:RFASI(RU) 02.740.11.5166; Společný projekt AV ČR-DAAD SNR(CZ) D4-CZ5/2010-2011; GA UK(CZ) SVV-2011-263303 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : liquid crystals * ferroelectricity * chirality * azo group * antiferroelectricity Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.858, year: 2011 http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02678292.2011.565426

  2. [MATCHE: Management Approach to Teaching Consumer and Homemaking Education.] Consumer Approach Strand: Core. Module I-A-3: Consumer Rights and Responsibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sharman

    This competency-based preservice home economics teacher education module on consumer rights and responsibilities is the third in a set of four core curriculum modules on consumer approach to homemaking education. (This set is part of a larger series of sixty-seven on the Management Approach to Teaching Consumer and Homemaking Education…

  3. Improving Student Group Marketing Presentations: A Modified Pecha Kucha Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Jason; Kowalczyk, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Student presentations can often seem like a formality rather than a lesson in representing oneself or group in a professional manner. To improve the quality of group presentations, the authors modified the popular presentation style of Pecha Kucha (20 slides, 20 seconds per slide) for marketing courses to help students prepare and deliver…

  4. A Psychoeducational Group Approach for Individuals Recovering from Anorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapp, Lisa

    Although in-depth, long-term group psychotherapy is a beneficial therapeutic experience for adolescent females suffering from anorexia nervosa, these clients are notoriously resistant to treatment and to long-term, open-ended group settings. This dissidence may stem from a motivational deficiency toward changing their eating patterns and…

  5. Quantitative Approaches to Group Research: Suggestions for Best Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Christopher J.; Whittaker, Tiffany A.; Boyle, Lauren H.; Eyal, Maytal

    2017-01-01

    Rigorous scholarship is essential to the continued growth of group work, yet the unique nature of this counseling specialty poses challenges for quantitative researchers. The purpose of this proposal is to overview unique challenges to quantitative research with groups in the counseling field, including difficulty in obtaining large sample sizes…

  6. Multiple Family Group Therapy: An Interpersonal/Postmodern Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorngren, Jill M.; Kleist, David M.

    2002-01-01

    Multiple Family Group Therapy has been identified as a viable treatment model for a variety of client populations. A combination of family systems theories and therapeutic group factors provide the opportunity to explore multiple levels of intrapersonal and interpersonal relationships between families. This article depicts a Multiple Family Group…

  7. Group Work in Schools: A Process Consultation Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farouk, Shaalan

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides a description of how an educational psychologist can consult with groups of teachers mostly in relation to their work with pupils who display emotional behavioural difficulties. The paper includes a review of the work on group consultation in schools, followed by a description of process consultation (Schein, 1988 ) and how the…

  8. Group size, grooming and fission in primates: a modeling approach based on group structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sueur, Cédric; Deneubourg, Jean-Louis; Petit, Odile; Couzin, Iain D

    2011-03-21

    In social animals, fission is a common mode of group proliferation and dispersion and may be affected by genetic or other social factors. Sociality implies preserving relationships between group members. An increase in group size and/or in competition for food within the group can result in decrease certain social interactions between members, and the group may split irreversibly as a consequence. One individual may try to maintain bonds with a maximum of group members in order to keep group cohesion, i.e. proximity and stable relationships. However, this strategy needs time and time is often limited. In addition, previous studies have shown that whatever the group size, an individual interacts only with certain grooming partners. There, we develop a computational model to assess how dynamics of group cohesion are related to group size and to the structure of grooming relationships. Groups' sizes after simulated fission are compared to observed sizes of 40 groups of primates. Results showed that the relationship between grooming time and group size is dependent on how each individual attributes grooming time to its social partners, i.e. grooming a few number of preferred partners or grooming equally or not all partners. The number of partners seemed to be more important for the group cohesion than the grooming time itself. This structural constraint has important consequences on group sociality, as it gives the possibility of competition for grooming partners, attraction for high-ranking individuals as found in primates' groups. It could, however, also have implications when considering the cognitive capacities of primates. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Small Launch Vehicle Design Approaches: Clustered Cores Compared with Multi-Stage Inline Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Eric D.; Beers, Benjamin; Esther, Elizabeth; Philips, Alan; Threet, Grady E., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    In an effort to better define small launch vehicle design options two approaches were investigated from the small launch vehicle trade space. The primary focus was to evaluate a clustered common core design against a purpose built inline vehicle. Both designs focused on liquid oxygen (LOX) and rocket propellant grade kerosene (RP-1) stages with the terminal stage later evaluated as a LOX/methane (CH4) stage. A series of performance optimization runs were done in order to minimize gross liftoff weight (GLOW) including alternative thrust levels, delivery altitude for payload, vehicle length to diameter ratio, alternative engine feed systems, re-evaluation of mass growth allowances, passive versus active guidance systems, and rail and tower launch methods. Additionally manufacturability, cost, and operations also play a large role in the benefits and detriments for each design. Presented here is the Advanced Concepts Office's Earth to Orbit Launch Team methodology and high level discussion of the performance trades and trends of both small launch vehicle solutions along with design philosophies that shaped both concepts. Without putting forth a decree stating one approach is better than the other; this discussion is meant to educate the community at large and let the reader determine which architecture is truly the most economical; since each path has such a unique set of limitations and potential payoffs.

  10. A Core Set Based Large Vector-Angular Region and Margin Approach for Novelty Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiusheng Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A large vector-angular region and margin (LARM approach is presented for novelty detection based on imbalanced data. The key idea is to construct the largest vector-angular region in the feature space to separate normal training patterns; meanwhile, maximize the vector-angular margin between the surface of this optimal vector-angular region and abnormal training patterns. In order to improve the generalization performance of LARM, the vector-angular distribution is optimized by maximizing the vector-angular mean and minimizing the vector-angular variance, which separates the normal and abnormal examples well. However, the inherent computation of quadratic programming (QP solver takes O(n3 training time and at least O(n2 space, which might be computational prohibitive for large scale problems. By (1+ε  and  (1-ε-approximation algorithm, the core set based LARM algorithm is proposed for fast training LARM problem. Experimental results based on imbalanced datasets have validated the favorable efficiency of the proposed approach in novelty detection.

  11. ASTRID core: Design objectives, design approach, and R&D in support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mignot, G.; Devictor, N.

    2012-01-01

    ASTRID core design is mainly guided by safety objectives: 1. Prevention of the core meltdown accident: To prevent meltdown accidents: - by a natural behavior of the core and the reactor (no actuation of the two shutdown systems); - with adding passive complementary systems if natural behavior is not sufficient for some transient cases. 2. Mitigation of the fusion accident: To garantee that core fusion accidents don’t lead to significant mechanical energy release, whatever initiator event: - by a natural core behavior; - with adding specific mitigation dispositions in case of natural behavior is not suffficient

  12. A model-based approach to operational event groups ranking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simic, Zdenko [European Commission Joint Research Centre, Petten (Netherlands). Inst. for Energy and Transport; Maqua, Michael [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit mbH (GRS), Koeln (Germany); Wattrelos, Didier [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2014-04-15

    The operational experience (OE) feedback provides improvements in all industrial activities. Identification of the most important and valuable groups of events within accumulated experience is important in order to focus on a detailed investigation of events. The paper describes the new ranking method and compares it with three others. Methods have been described and applied to OE events utilised by nuclear power plants in France and Germany for twenty years. The results show that different ranking methods only roughly agree on which of the event groups are the most important ones. In the new ranking method the analytical hierarchy process is applied in order to assure consistent and comprehensive weighting determination for ranking indexes. The proposed method allows a transparent and flexible event groups ranking and identification of the most important OE for further more detailed investigation in order to complete the feedback. (orig.)

  13. Licit and illicit drugs: a group approach with teenagers

    OpenAIRE

    Deborah Amaral Donnini; Darilene Rocha Cordeiro; Bruna Camargos de Lima; Selma Maria da Fonseca Viegas

    2017-01-01

    This work is an extension intervention arising from the results of an epidemiological cross-sectional study with 605 teenagers from 13 to 16 years old. The extension actions had as a method the group educational practice on licit and illicit drugs, with 2.012 teenagers from 22 municipal and state public schools of the urban region of Divinópolis, State of Minas Gerais, Brazil, from March 2015 to February 2016. It aimed to work with group educational practices on licit and illicit drugs in the...

  14. Strategic Approach to Group Anger Management with Incarcerated Murderers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napolitano, Susan; Brown, Lillian G.

    1991-01-01

    Incarcerated male murderers manifested consistent changes in attitudes toward treatment efficacy and their culpability as function of participating in 12-week anger management groups. Four qualitatively different stages were evident during treatment as prisoners' resistive responses were actively encouraged: initial apathy, emerging interest in…

  15. Real-space renormalization group approach to driven diffusive systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanney, T [SUPA and School of Physics, University of Edinburgh, Mayfield Road, Edinburgh, EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom); Stinchcombe, R B [Theoretical Physics, 1 Keble Road, Oxford, OX1 3NP (United Kingdom)

    2006-11-24

    We introduce a real-space renormalization group procedure for driven diffusive systems which predicts both steady state and dynamic properties. We apply the method to the boundary driven asymmetric simple exclusion process and recover exact results for the steady state phase diagram, as well as the crossovers in the relaxation dynamics for each phase.

  16. Real-space renormalization group approach to driven diffusive systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanney, T; Stinchcombe, R B

    2006-01-01

    We introduce a real-space renormalization group procedure for driven diffusive systems which predicts both steady state and dynamic properties. We apply the method to the boundary driven asymmetric simple exclusion process and recover exact results for the steady state phase diagram, as well as the crossovers in the relaxation dynamics for each phase

  17. Development of an Analytic Nodal Diffusion Solver in Multi-groups for 3D Reactor Cores with Rectangular or Hexagonal Assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lozano, Juan Andres; Aragones, Jose Maria; Garcia-Herranz, Nuria [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, 28006 Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, Madrid (Spain)

    2008-07-01

    More accurate modelling of physical phenomena involved in present and future nuclear reactors requires a multi-scale and multi-physics approach. This challenge can be accomplished by the coupling of best-estimate core-physics, thermal-hydraulics and multi-physics solvers. In order to make viable that coupling, the current trends in reactor simulations are along the development of a new generation of tools based on user-friendly, modular, easily linkable, faster and more accurate codes to be integrated in common platforms. These premises are in the origin of the NURESIM Integrated Project within the 6. European Framework Program, which is envisaged to provide the initial step towards a Common European Standard Software Platform for nuclear reactors simulations. In the frame of this project and to reach the above-mentioned goals, a 3-D multigroup nodal solver for neutron diffusion calculations called ANDES (Analytic Nodal Diffusion Equation Solver) has been developed and tested in-depth in this Thesis. ANDES solves the steady-state and time-dependent neutron diffusion equation in three-dimensions and any number of energy groups, utilizing the Analytic Coarse-Mesh Finite-Difference (ACMFD) scheme to yield the nodal coupling equations. It can be applied to both Cartesian and triangular-Z geometries, so that simulations of LWR as well as VVER, HTR and fast reactors can be performed. The solver has been implemented in a fully encapsulated way, enabling it as a module to be readily integrated in other codes and platforms. In fact, it can be used either as a stand-alone nodal code or as a solver to accelerate the convergence of whole core pin-by-pin code systems. Verification of performance has shown that ANDES is a code with high order definition for whole core realistic nodal simulations. In this paper, the methodology developed and involved in ANDES is presented. (authors)

  18. Reliability of core test – Critical assessment and proposed new approach

    OpenAIRE

    Shafik Khoury; Ali Abdel-Hakam Aliabdo; Ahmed Ghazy

    2014-01-01

    Core test is commonly required in the area of concrete industry to evaluate the concrete strength and sometimes it becomes the unique tool for safety assessment of existing concrete structures. Core test is therefore introduced in most codes. An extensive literature survey on different international codes’ provisions; including the Egyptian, British, European and ACI Codes, for core analysis is presented. All studied codes’ provisions seem to be unreliable for predicting the in-situ concrete ...

  19. Approaches to Demonstrating the Reliability and Validity of Core Diagnostic Criteria for Chronic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruehl, Stephen; Ohrbach, Richard; Sharma, Sonia; Widerstrom-Noga, Eva; Dworkin, Robert H; Fillingim, Roger B; Turk, Dennis C

    2016-09-01

    The Analgesic, Anesthetic, and Addiction Clinical Trial Translations, Innovations, Opportunities, and Networks-American Pain Society Pain Taxonomy (AAPT) is designed to be an evidence-based multidimensional chronic pain classification system that will facilitate more comprehensive and consistent chronic pain diagnoses, and thereby enhance research, clinical communication, and ultimately patient care. Core diagnostic criteria (dimension 1) for individual chronic pain conditions included in the initial version of AAPT will be the focus of subsequent empirical research to evaluate and provide evidence for their reliability and validity. Challenges to validating diagnostic criteria in the absence of clear and identifiable pathophysiological mechanisms are described. Based in part on previous experience regarding the development of evidence-based diagnostic criteria for psychiatric disorders, headache, and specific chronic pain conditions (fibromyalgia, complex regional pain syndrome, temporomandibular disorders, pain associated with spinal cord injuries), several potential approaches for documentation of the reliability and validity of the AAPT diagnostic criteria are summarized. The AAPT is designed to be an evidence-based multidimensional chronic pain classification system. Conceptual and methodological issues related to demonstrating the reliability and validity of the proposed AAPT chronic pain diagnostic criteria are discussed. Copyright © 2016 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Renormalization group approach to causal bulk viscous cosmological models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belinchon, J A; Harko, T; Mak, M K

    2002-01-01

    The renormalization group method is applied to the study of homogeneous and flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker type universes, filled with a causal bulk viscous cosmological fluid. The starting point of the study is the consideration of the scaling properties of the gravitational field equations, the causal evolution equation of the bulk viscous pressure and the equations of state. The requirement of scale invariance imposes strong constraints on the temporal evolution of the bulk viscosity coefficient, temperature and relaxation time, thus leading to the possibility of obtaining the bulk viscosity coefficient-energy density dependence. For a cosmological model with bulk viscosity coefficient proportional to the Hubble parameter, we perform the analysis of the renormalization group flow around the scale-invariant fixed point, thereby obtaining the long-time behaviour of the scale factor

  1. Failure mode and effects analysis A fuzzy group MCDM approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hadi-Vencheh

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new fuzzy group decision making (FGDM model based on alpha-level sets, is proposed to generate, more accurate fuzzy using, risk priority numbers (RPNs and ensure to be robust against the uncertainty. This model allows decision makers (DMs to evaluate FMEA risk factors using linguistic terms rather than precise numerical values, allows them to express their opinions independently. A case study is investigated using the proposed model to illustrate its applications in RPN assessment.

  2. Application of the Group Contribution Approach to Nafion Swelling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Randová, A.; Bartovská, L.; Hovorka, Š.; Poloncarzová, M.; Kolská, Z.; Izák, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 111, č. 4 (2009), s. 1745-1750 ISSN 0021-8995 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/08/0600; GA AV ČR IAA400720710 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : group contribution method * structure-property relations * swelling Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.203, year: 2009

  3. Temperature renormalization group approach to spontaneous symmetry breaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manesis, E.; Sakakibara, S.

    1985-01-01

    We apply renormalization group equations that describe the finite-temperature behavior of Green's functions to investigate thermal properties of spontaneous symmetry breaking. Specifically, in the O(N).O(N) symmetric model we study the change of symmetry breaking patterns with temperature, and show that there always exists the unbroken symmetry phase at high temperature, modifying the naive result of leading order in finite-temperature perturbation theory. (orig.)

  4. Thin film properties of triphenylamine-cored dendrimers: A molecular approach to control aggregation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vamvounis, George, E-mail: g.vamvounis@uq.edu.au; Pivrikas, Almantas; Shaw, Paul E.; Burn, Paul L.

    2013-12-02

    The solid-state photophysical and charge transport properties of two first-generation dendrimers are presented. The dendrimers are comprised of a triphenylamine core, dendrons containing a phenyl branching unit with thiophene (Dendrimer 1) or bithiophene (Dendrimer 2) moieties, and dodecyl surface groups. For Dendrimer 1, the excited state is located within the center of the dendrimer giving rise to a moderate solid-state photoluminescence quantum yield (Φ{sub pl}) (0.13) and significant charge trapping, with both observations due to the degree of overlap of the main electroactive chromophores on adjacent dendrimers. For Dendrimer 2, the excited state is located within the dendron and in the solid-state this leads to a strongly red-shifted and weakened emission (Φ{sub pl} ∼ 0.02) due to strong intermolecular chromophore interactions. For films of Dendrimer 2 the charge mobility was higher than Dendrimer 1 but was still limited by a low density of strongly interacting electroactive chromophores. The pronounced difference between the solid-state properties of the two dendrimers is simply engineered by the addition of an extra thiophene in each of the dendrons. - Highlights: • Photophysical and charge-transport properties of two dendrimers are investigated. • Excited-state is on the center for Dendrimer 1 and on the dendron for Dendrimer 2. • Film quantum yield of luminescence is higher for Dendrimer 1. • Dendrimer 1 displays greater charge trapping at high fields.

  5. Thin film properties of triphenylamine-cored dendrimers: A molecular approach to control aggregation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vamvounis, George; Pivrikas, Almantas; Shaw, Paul E.; Burn, Paul L.

    2013-01-01

    The solid-state photophysical and charge transport properties of two first-generation dendrimers are presented. The dendrimers are comprised of a triphenylamine core, dendrons containing a phenyl branching unit with thiophene (Dendrimer 1) or bithiophene (Dendrimer 2) moieties, and dodecyl surface groups. For Dendrimer 1, the excited state is located within the center of the dendrimer giving rise to a moderate solid-state photoluminescence quantum yield (Φ pl ) (0.13) and significant charge trapping, with both observations due to the degree of overlap of the main electroactive chromophores on adjacent dendrimers. For Dendrimer 2, the excited state is located within the dendron and in the solid-state this leads to a strongly red-shifted and weakened emission (Φ pl ∼ 0.02) due to strong intermolecular chromophore interactions. For films of Dendrimer 2 the charge mobility was higher than Dendrimer 1 but was still limited by a low density of strongly interacting electroactive chromophores. The pronounced difference between the solid-state properties of the two dendrimers is simply engineered by the addition of an extra thiophene in each of the dendrons. - Highlights: • Photophysical and charge-transport properties of two dendrimers are investigated. • Excited-state is on the center for Dendrimer 1 and on the dendron for Dendrimer 2. • Film quantum yield of luminescence is higher for Dendrimer 1. • Dendrimer 1 displays greater charge trapping at high fields

  6. Identification of Core Competencies for an Undergraduate Food Safety Curriculum Using a Modified Delphi Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Lynette M.; Wiedmann, Martin; Orta-Ramirez, Alicia; Oliver, Haley F.; Nightingale, Kendra K.; Moore, Christina M.; Stevenson, Clinton D.; Jaykus, Lee-Ann

    2014-01-01

    Identification of core competencies for undergraduates in food safety is critical to assure courses and curricula are appropriate in maintaining a well-qualified food safety workforce. The purpose of this study was to identify and refine core competencies relevant to postsecondary food safety education using a modified Delphi method. Twenty-nine…

  7. Licit and illicit drugs: a group approach with teenagers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Amaral Donnini

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This work is an extension intervention arising from the results of an epidemiological cross-sectional study with 605 teenagers from 13 to 16 years old. The extension actions had as a method the group educational practice on licit and illicit drugs, with 2.012 teenagers from 22 municipal and state public schools of the urban region of Divinópolis, State of Minas Gerais, Brazil, from March 2015 to February 2016. It aimed to work with group educational practices on licit and illicit drugs in the school environment with teenagers. The extension and research allowed us to understand the context in which adolescents were inserted through the communication kept with them and among them; to know the level of information the teenagers had about licit and illicit drugs; to provide new knowledges, attitudes and opportunities in the recreation of an own way of selfcare. It was stressed that education is an important tool for health promotion and prevention of risks and hazards, as well as plays a key role in the formation of the proactive subject.

  8. An Enhanced Genetic Approach to Composing Cooperative Learning Groups for Multiple Grouping Criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Gwo-Jen; Yin, Peng-Yeng; Hwang, Chi-Wei; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2008-01-01

    Cooperative learning is known to be an effective educational strategy in enhancing the learning performance of students. The goal of a cooperative learning group is to maximize all members' learning efficacy. This is accomplished via promoting each other's success, through assisting, sharing, mentoring, explaining, and encouragement. To achieve…

  9. Task Type and Group Motivation: Implications for a Behavioral Approach to Leadership in Small Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latham, Van M.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses a theory of leadership effectiveness in small discussion/decision making groups developed to facilitate discussion and goal efficacy. Develops four leadership styles (coordinator, inventor, enthusiast, and director) focusing on two critical questions the leader must address. Discusses implications of the model for leadership training and…

  10. Higgs inflation and quantum gravity: an exact renormalisation group approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saltas, Ippocratis D.

    2016-01-01

    We use the Wilsonian functional Renormalisation Group (RG) to study quantum corrections for the Higgs inflationary action including the effect of gravitons, and analyse the leading-order quantum gravitational corrections to the Higgs' quartic coupling, as well as its non-minimal coupling to gravity and Newton's constant, at the inflationary regime and beyond. We explain how within this framework the effect of Higgs and graviton loops can be sufficiently suppressed during inflation, and we also place a bound on the corresponding value of the infrared RG cut-off scale during inflation. Finally, we briefly discuss the potential embedding of the model within the scenario of Asymptotic Safety, while all main equations are explicitly presented

  11. Relativistic kinematics and dynamics: a new group theoretical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giovannini, N.

    1983-01-01

    The author reanalyzes the relationships between physical states and space-time symmetries with a view to describing relativistic extended and interacting systems. For this description he proposes to introduce, in space-time, an additional observable, related to a natural notion of simultaneity. The introduction of this new observable is justified on the basis of the operational meaning of the relations between state descriptions and symmetries in this case. The Poincare transformations are correspondingly split into two parts: the first one, kinematical, related to the symmetries of the description of the states, the other one, dynamical, related to the possible forms for the evolution. It is shown that the kinematical symmetries lead in a straightforward way to the expected classical and quantal state spaces for single particles of arbitrary spin and the author shows how the remaining symmetries can be related to the derivation of the possible forms for the dynamics. He finds as a particular case the usual dynamics of single particles in external fields (with some satisfactory improvements due to the corresponding new interpretation) and extends the method to the dynamics of N interacting particles. He also shows why this new approach and interpretation of relativistic states is necessary and how it allows a covariant description in the problems raised by the (recently measured) quantum correlations at-a-distance concerning the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox, something which seems quite impossible in the usual frameworks. (Auth.)

  12. Exploring the Impact of Students' Learning Approach on Collaborative Group Modeling of Blood Circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shinyoung; Kang, Eunhee; Kim, Heui-Baik

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the effect on group dynamics of statements associated with deep learning approaches (DLA) and their contribution to cognitive collaboration and model development during group modeling of blood circulation. A group was selected for an in-depth analysis of collaborative group modeling. This group constructed a model in a…

  13. Renormalization group approach to a p-wave superconducting model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Continentino, Mucio A.; Deus, Fernanda; Caldas, Heron

    2014-01-01

    We present in this work an exact renormalization group (RG) treatment of a one-dimensional p-wave superconductor. The model proposed by Kitaev consists of a chain of spinless fermions with a p-wave gap. It is a paradigmatic model of great actual interest since it presents a weak pairing superconducting phase that has Majorana fermions at the ends of the chain. Those are predicted to be useful for quantum computation. The RG allows to obtain the phase diagram of the model and to study the quantum phase transition from the weak to the strong pairing phase. It yields the attractors of these phases and the critical exponents of the weak to strong pairing transition. We show that the weak pairing phase of the model is governed by a chaotic attractor being non-trivial from both its topological and RG properties. In the strong pairing phase the RG flow is towards a conventional strong coupling fixed point. Finally, we propose an alternative way for obtaining p-wave superconductivity in a one-dimensional system without spin–orbit interaction.

  14. Dynamical renormalization group approach to relaxation in quantum field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyanovsky, D.; Vega, H.J. de

    2003-01-01

    The real time evolution and relaxation of expectation values of quantum fields and of quantum states are computed as initial value problems by implementing the dynamical renormalization group (DRG). Linear response is invoked to set up the renormalized initial value problem to study the dynamics of the expectation value of quantum fields. The perturbative solution of the equations of motion for the field expectation values of quantum fields as well as the evolution of quantum states features secular terms, namely terms that grow in time and invalidate the perturbative expansion for late times. The DRG provides a consistent framework to resum these secular terms and yields a uniform asymptotic expansion at long times. Several relevant cases are studied in detail, including those of threshold infrared divergences which appear in gauge theories at finite temperature and lead to anomalous relaxation. In these cases the DRG is shown to provide a resummation akin to Bloch-Nordsieck but directly in real time and that goes beyond the scope of Bloch-Nordsieck and Dyson resummations. The nature of the resummation program is discussed in several examples. The DRG provides a framework that is consistent, systematic, and easy to implement to study the non-equilibrium relaxational dynamics directly in real time that does not rely on the concept of quasiparticle widths

  15. Efficient approach for simulating response of multi-body structure in reactor core subjected to seismic loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hongkun; Cen Song; Wang Haitao; Cheng Huanyu

    2012-01-01

    An efficient 3D approach is proposed for simulating the complicated responses of the multi-body structure in reactor core under seismic loading. By utilizing the rigid-body and connector functions of the software Abaqus, the multi-body structure of the reactor core is simplified as a mass-point system interlinked by spring-dashpot connectors. And reasonable schemes are used for determining various connector coefficients. Furthermore, a scripting program is also complied for the 3D parametric modeling. Numerical examples show that, the proposed method can not only produce the results which satisfy the engineering requirements, but also improve the computational efficiency more than 100 times. (authors)

  16. Surgical Excision of Benign Papillomas Diagnosed with Core Biopsy: A Community Hospital Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozentsvayg, Eka; Carver, Kristen; Borkar, Sunita; Mathew, Melvy; Enis, Sean; Friedman, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Our goal was to assess the value of surgical excision of benign papillomas of the breast diagnosed on percutaneous core biopsy by determining the frequency of upgrade to malignancies and high risk lesions on a final surgical pathology. We reviewed 67 patients who had biopsies yielding benign papilloma and underwent subsequent surgical excision. Surgical pathology of the excised lesions was compared with initial core biopsy pathology results. 54 patients had concordant benign core and excisional pathology. Cancer (ductal carcinoma in situ and invasive ductal carcinoma) was diagnosed in five (7%) patients. Surgery revealed high-risk lesions in 8 (12%) patients, including atypical ductal hyperplasia, atypical lobular hyperplasia, and lobular carcinoma in situ. Cancer and high risk lesions accounted for 13 (19%) upstaging events from benign papilloma diagnosis. Our data suggests that surgical excision is warranted with core pathology of benign papilloma

  17. RNA localization in Xenopus oocytes uses a core group of trans-acting factors irrespective of destination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snedden, Donald D; Bertke, Michelle M; Vernon, Dominic; Huber, Paul W

    2013-07-01

    The 3' untranslated region of mRNA encoding PHAX, a phosphoprotein required for nuclear export of U-type snRNAs, contains cis-acting sequence motifs E2 and VM1 that are required for localization of RNAs to the vegetal hemisphere of Xenopus oocytes. However, we have found that PHAX mRNA is transported to the opposite, animal, hemisphere. A set of proteins that cross-link to the localization elements of vegetally localized RNAs are also cross-linked to PHAX and An1 mRNAs, demonstrating that the composition of RNP complexes that form on these localization elements is highly conserved irrespective of the final destination of the RNA. The ability of RNAs to bind this core group of proteins is correlated with localization activity. Staufen1, which binds to Vg1 and VegT mRNAs, is not associated with RNAs localized to the animal hemisphere and may determine, at least in part, the direction of RNA movement in Xenopus oocytes.

  18. Report on the combined meeting of the core confinement and internal transport barrier expert group, confinement database and modeling expert group and edge pedestal expert group, 12-16 April 1999, Garching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janeschitz, G.; Connor, J.W.; Cordey, G.; Kardaun, O.; Mukhovatov, V.; Stambaugh, R.; Ryter, F.; Wakatani, M.

    1999-01-01

    This contribution to the ITER EDA Newsletter reports on the combined meeting of the core confinement and internal transport barrier expert group, confinement database and modeling expert group and edge pedestal expert group in Garching, Germany. This is the first workshop of its kind after the re-organisation of the expert groups. The new scheme of the meetings, namely to permit more interaction between groups by arranging them at the same time and location turned out to be very successful. The main issues discussed were for the Confinement Database: merging of edge pedestal and confinement data, improvement of the density- and magnetic shape parameters, addition of new dedicated threshold data, the effect of different divertors in JET; for the H-Mode Power Threshold Database: assembly of a new version of the database with about 650 time points from 10 tokamaks; for the 1-D Modelling Workshop: management of the database after the re-organisation of the Joint Central Team an ongoing efforts in plasma transport modelling; for the newly formed pedestal group: issues of the H-mode shear layer at the plasma edge. There was also an executive summary given of a recent USA workshop on internal transport barriers and regimes with weak or negative magnetic shear

  19. The Role of Perceived In-group Moral Superiority in Reparative Intentions and Approach Motivation

    OpenAIRE

    Szabó, Zsolt P.; Mészáros, Noémi Z.; Csertő, István

    2017-01-01

    Three studies examined how members of a national group react to in-group wrongdoings. We expected that perceived in-group moral superiority would lead to unwillingness to repair the aggression. We also expected that internal-focused emotions such as group-based guilt and group-based shame would predict specific, misdeed-related reparative intentions but not general approach motivation toward the victim groups. In Study 1, facing the in-group’s recent aggression, participants who believed that...

  20. Development of a Draft Core Set of Domains for Measuring Shared Decision Making in Osteoarthritis: An OMERACT Working Group on Shared Decision Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toupin-April, Karine; Barton, Jennifer; Fraenkel, Liana; Li, Linda; Grandpierre, Viviane; Guillemin, Francis; Rader, Tamara; Stacey, Dawn; Légaré, France; Jull, Janet; Petkovic, Jennifer; Scholte-Voshaar, Marieke; Welch, Vivian; Lyddiatt, Anne; Hofstetter, Cathie; De Wit, Maarten; March, Lyn; Meade, Tanya; Christensen, Robin; Gaujoux-Viala, Cécile; Suarez-Almazor, Maria E; Boonen, Annelies; Pohl, Christoph; Martin, Richard; Tugwell, Peter S

    2015-12-01

    Despite the importance of shared decision making for delivering patient-centered care in rheumatology, there is no consensus on how to measure its process and outcomes. The aim of this Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) working group is to determine the core set of domains for measuring shared decision making in intervention studies in adults with osteoarthritis (OA), from the perspectives of patients, health professionals, and researchers. We followed the OMERACT Filter 2.0 method to develop a draft core domain set by (1) forming an OMERACT working group; (2) conducting a review of domains of shared decision making; and (3) obtaining opinions of all those involved using a modified nominal group process held at a session activity at the OMERACT 12 meeting. In all, 26 people from Europe, North America, and Australia, including 5 patient research partners, participated in the session activity. Participants identified the following domains for measuring shared decision making to be included as part of the draft core set: (1) identifying the decision, (2) exchanging information, (3) clarifying views, (4) deliberating, (5) making the decision, (6) putting the decision into practice, and (7) assessing the effect of the decision. Contextual factors were also suggested. We proposed a draft core set of shared decision-making domains for OA intervention research studies. Next steps include a workshop at OMERACT 13 to reach consensus on these proposed domains in the wider OMERACT group, as well as to detail subdomains and assess instruments to develop a core outcome measurement set.

  1. Development of a Draft Core Set of Domains for Measuring Shared Decision Making in Osteoarthritis: An OMERACT Working Group on Shared Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toupin April, Karine; Barton, Jennifer; Fraenkel, Liana; Li, Linda; Grandpierre, Viviane; Guillemin, Francis; Rader, Tamara; Stacey, Dawn; Légaré, France; Jull, Janet; Petkovic, Jennifer; Scholte Voshaar, Marieke; Welch, Vivian; Lyddiatt, Anne; Hofstetter, Cathie; De Wit, Maarten; March, Lyn; Meade, Tanya; Christensen, Robin; Gaujoux-Viala, Cécile; Suarez-Almazor, Maria E.; Boonen, Annelies; Pohl, Christoph; Martin, Richard; Tugwell, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Objective Despite the importance of shared decision making for delivering patient-centred care in rheumatology, there is no consensus on how to measure its process and outcomes. The aim of this OMERACT working group is to determine the core set of domains for measuring shared decision making in intervention studies in adults with osteoarthritis (OA), from the perspective of patients, health professionals and researchers. Methods We followed the OMERACT Filter 2.0 to develop a draft core domain set, which consisted of: (i) forming an OMERACT working group; (ii) conducting a review of domains of shared decision making; and (iii) obtaining the opinions of stakeholders using a modified nominal group process held at a session activity at the OMERACT 2014 meeting. Results 26 stakeholders from Europe, North America and Australia, including 5 patient research partners, participated in the session activity. Participants identified the following domains for measuring shared decision making to be included as part of the Draft Core Set: 1) Identifying the decision; 2) Exchanging Information; 3) Clarifying views; 4) Deliberating; 5) Making the decision; 6) Putting the decision into practice; and 7) Assessing the impact of the decision. Contextual factors were also suggested. Conclusion We propose a Draft Core Set of shared decision making domains for OA intervention research studies. Next steps include a workshop at OMERACT 2016 to reach consensus on these proposed domains in the wider OMERACT group, as well as detail sub-domains and assess instruments to develop a Core Outcome Measurement Set. PMID:25877502

  2. Approach to the HTGR core outlet temperature measurements in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franklin, R.; Rodriguez, C.

    1982-06-01

    The High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) constructed at Fort St. Vrain Colorado (330 MWe) used Geminol thermocouples to measure the primary coolant temperature at the core outlet. The primary coolant (helium) is heated by the graphite core to temperatures in the range of 700 deg. to 750 deg. C. The combination of the high temperature, high flow rate and radiation at the core outlet area makes it difficult to obtain accurate temperature measurements. The Geminol thermocouples installed in the Fort St. Vrain reactor have provided accurate data for several years of power operation without any failures. The indicated temperature of the core outlet thermocouples agrees with a ''traversing'' thermocouple measurement to within +-2 deg. C. The Geminol thermocouple wire was provided by the Driver-Harris Company and is similar to the chromel versus alumel thermocouple. Geminol wire is no longer distributed and on future designs, chromel versus alumel wire will be used. The next large HTGR design, which is being performed with funding support from the United States Department of Energy, will incorporate replaceable thermocouples. The thermocouples used in the Fort St. Vrain reactor were permanently installed and large in diameter (6.35 mm) to insure good reliability. The replaceable thermocouples to be used in the next large reactor will be smaller in diameter (3.18 mm). These replaceable thermocouples will be inserted into the core outlet area through long curved guide tubes that are permanently installed. These guide tubes are as long as 18 meters and must be curved to reach the core outlet regions. Tests were conducted to prove that the thermocouples could be inserted and removed through the long curved guide tubes. (author)

  3. "Non-equilibrium" block copolymer micelles with glassy cores: a predictive approach based on theory of equilibrium micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, Ramanathan

    2015-07-01

    Micelles generated in water from most amphiphilic block copolymers are widely recognized to be non-equilibrium structures. Typically, the micelles are prepared by a kinetic process, first allowing molecular scale dissolution of the block copolymer in a common solvent that likes both the blocks and then gradually replacing the common solvent by water to promote the hydrophobic blocks to aggregate and create the micelles. The non-equilibrium nature of the micelle originates from the fact that dynamic exchange between the block copolymer molecules in the micelle and the singly dispersed block copolymer molecules in water is suppressed, because of the glassy nature of the core forming polymer block and/or its very large hydrophobicity. Although most amphiphilic block copolymers generate such non-equilibrium micelles, no theoretical approach to a priori predict the micelle characteristics currently exists. In this work, we propose a predictive approach for non-equilibrium micelles with glassy cores by applying the equilibrium theory of micelles in two steps. In the first, we calculate the properties of micelles formed in the mixed solvent while true equilibrium prevails, until the micelle core becomes glassy. In the second step, we freeze the micelle aggregation number at this glassy state and calculate the corona dimension from the equilibrium theory of micelles. The condition when the micelle core becomes glassy is independently determined from a statistical thermodynamic treatment of diluent effect on polymer glass transition temperature. The predictions based on this "non-equilibrium" model compare reasonably well with experimental data for polystyrene-polyethylene oxide diblock copolymer, which is the most extensively studied system in the literature. In contrast, the application of the equilibrium model to describe such a system significantly overpredicts the micelle core and corona dimensions and the aggregation number. The non-equilibrium model suggests ways to

  4. Generation of multigroup cross-sections from micro-group ones in code system SUHAM-U used for VVER-1000 reactor core calculations with MOX loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyarinov, V.F.; Davidenko, V.D.; Polismakov, A.A.; Tsybulsky, V.F. [RRC Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2005-07-01

    At the present time, the new code system SUHAM-U for calculation of the neutron-physical processes in nuclear reactor core with triangular and square lattices based both on the modern micro-group (about 7000 groups) cross-sections library of code system UNK and on solving the multigroup (up to 89 groups) neutron transport equation by Surface Harmonics Method is elaborated. In this paper the procedure for generation of multigroup cross-sections from micro-group ones for calculation of VVER-1000 reactor core with MOX loading is described. The validation has consisted in computing VVER-1000 fuel assemblies with uranium and MOX fuel and has shown enough high accuracy under corresponding selection of the number and boundaries of the energy groups. This work has been fulfilled in the frame of ISTC project 'System Analyses of Nuclear Safety for VVER Reactors with MOX Fuels'.

  5. Thermal-hydraulic modeling of nanofluids as the coolant in VVER-1000 reactor core by the porous media approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahanfarnia, G.; Zarifi, E.; Veysi, F.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to perform a thermal-hydraulic analysis of nanofluids as coolant in the Bushehr VVER-1000 reactor core using the porous media approach. Water-based nanofluids containing various volume fractions of Al 2 O 3 and TiO 2 nanoparticles were analyzed. The conservation equations were discretized by the finite volume method and solved by numerical methods. To validate the approaches applied in this study, the results of the model and COBRA-EN code were compared for pure water. The achieved results show that the temperature of the coolant increases with the concentration of the nanoparticles. (authors)

  6. CopperCore: a service based approach towards implementing the IMS Learning Design specification.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogten, Hubert

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a service developed by the Open University of the Netherlands, called CopperCore which implements an IMS Learning Design engine as service. The overall architecture is described including a detailed description of the web service application programming interfaces.

  7. A simple approach to the construction of the core structure present

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A convenient route for the synthesis of oxacyclobutapentalene, the tricyclic bridged core structure present in bioactive marine diterpene bielschowskysin and the polyketide hippolachnin A, is reported. The key steps involve ring closing metathesis of a triene derived from D-mannitol to produce selectively the dihydrofuran ...

  8. A Comparison of Jungian, Person-Centered, and Gestalt Approaches to Personal Growth Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Bryon; Matthes, William

    1992-01-01

    Compares Jungian approach to personal growth groups to Person-centered and Gestalt approaches. Notes similarities, though Jungian approach adds dimension of "cognitive map" not found in other two. Notes that cognitive map uses constructs from Jung's theory of individuation process, hypothesizing that integration of these constructs into…

  9. Effects of electron-withdrawing group and electron-donating core combinations on physical properties and photovoltaic performance in D-pi-A star-shaped small molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luponosov, Yuriy N.; Min, Jie; Solodukhin, Alexander N.; Kozlov, Oleg V.; Obrezkova, Marina A.; Peregudova, Svetlana M.; Ameri, Tayebeh; Chvalun, Sergei N.; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S.; Brabec, Christoph J.; Ponomarenko, Sergei A.

    The first representatives of star-shaped molecules having 3-alkylrhodanine (alkyl-Rh) electron-withdrawing groups, linked through bithiophene pi-spacer with electron-donating either triphenylamine (TPA) or tris(2-methoxyphenyl)amine (m-TPA) core were synthesized. The physical properties and

  10. Level set method for optimal shape design of MRAM core. Micromagnetic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melicher, Valdemar; Cimrak, Ivan; Keer, Roger van

    2008-01-01

    We aim at optimizing the shape of the magnetic core in MRAM memories. The evolution of the magnetization during the writing process is described by the Landau-Lifshitz equation (LLE). The actual shape of the core in one cell is characterized by the coefficient γ. Cost functional f=f(γ) expresses the quality of the writing process having in mind the competition between the full-select and the half-select element. We derive an explicit form of the derivative F=∂f/∂γ which allows for the use of gradient-type methods for the actual computation of the optimized shape (e.g., steepest descend method). The level set method (LSM) is employed for the representation of the piecewise constant coefficient γ

  11. LDA+DMFT approach to core-level spectroscopy: Application to 3d transition metal compounds

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hariki, A.; Uozumi, T.; Kuneš, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 96, č. 4 (2017), s. 1-9, č. článku 045111. ISSN 2469-9950 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 646807 - EXMAG Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : core -level x-ray photoemission * dynamical mean-field theory Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 3.836, year: 2016

  12. The Accumulating Data to Optimally Predict Obesity Treatment (ADOPT) Core Measures Project: Rationale and Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, Paul S; Rothman, Alexander J; Nicastro, Holly L; Czajkowski, Susan M; Agurs-Collins, Tanya; Rice, Elise L; Courcoulas, Anita P; Ryan, Donna H; Bessesen, Daniel H; Loria, Catherine M

    2018-04-01

    Individual variability in response to multiple modalities of obesity treatment is well documented, yet our understanding of why some individuals respond while others do not is limited. The etiology of this variability is multifactorial; however, at present, we lack a comprehensive evidence base to identify which factors or combination of factors influence treatment response. This paper provides an overview and rationale of the Accumulating Data to Optimally Predict obesity Treatment (ADOPT) Core Measures Project, which aims to advance the understanding of individual variability in response to adult obesity treatment. This project provides an integrated model for how factors in the behavioral, biological, environmental, and psychosocial domains may influence obesity treatment responses and identify a core set of measures to be used consistently across adult weight-loss trials. This paper provides the foundation for four companion papers that describe the core measures in detail. The accumulation of data on factors across the four ADOPT domains can inform the design and delivery of effective, tailored obesity treatments. ADOPT provides a framework for how obesity researchers can collectively generate this evidence base and is a first step in an ongoing process that can be refined as the science advances. © 2018 The Obesity Society.

  13. A facile approach for cupric ion detection in aqueous media using polyethyleneimine/PMMA core-shell fluorescent nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jian; Zeng Fang; Wu Shuizhu; Su Junhua; Zhao Jianqing; Tong Zhen

    2009-01-01

    A facile approach was developed to produce a dye-doped core-shell nanoparticle chemosensor for detecting Cu 2+ in aqueous media. The core-shell nanoparticle sensor was prepared by a one-step emulsifier-free polymerization, followed by the doping of the fluorescent dye Nile red (9-diethylamino- 5H-benzo[alpha] phenoxazine-5-one, NR) into the particles. For the nanoparticles, the hydrophilic polyethyleneimine (PEI) chain segments serve as the shell and the hydrophobic polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) constitutes the core of the nanoparticles. The non-toxic and biocompatible PEI chain segments on the nanoparticle surface exhibit a high affinity for Cu 2+ ions in aqueous media, and the quenching of the NR fluorescence is observed upon binding of Cu 2+ ions. This makes the core-shell nanoparticle system a water-dispersible chemosensor for Cu 2+ ion detection. The quenching of fluorescence arises through intraparticle energy transfer (FRET) from the dye in the hydrophobic PMMA core to the Cu 2+ /PEI complexes on the nanoparticle surface. The energy transfer efficiency for PEI/PMMA particles with different diameters was determined, and it is found that the smaller nanoparticle sample exhibits higher quenching efficiency, and the limit for Cu 2+ detection is 1 μM for a nanoparticle sample with a diameter of ∼30 nm. The response of the fluorescent nanoparticle towards different metal ions was investigated and the nanoparticle chemosensor displays high selectivity and antidisturbance for the Cu 2+ ion among the metal ions examined (Na + , K + , Mg 2+ , Ca 2+ , Zn 2+ , Hg 2+ , Mn 2+ , Fe 2+ , Ni 2+ , Co 2+ and Pb 2+ ). This emulsifier-free, biocompatible and sensitive fluorescent nanoparticle sensor may find applications in cupric ion detection in the biological and environmental areas.

  14. A facile approach for cupric ion detection in aqueous media using polyethyleneimine/PMMA core-shell fluorescent nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Zeng, Fang; Wu, Shuizhu; Su, Junhua; Zhao, Jianqing; Tong, Zhen

    2009-09-09

    A facile approach was developed to produce a dye-doped core-shell nanoparticle chemosensor for detecting Cu(2+) in aqueous media. The core-shell nanoparticle sensor was prepared by a one-step emulsifier-free polymerization, followed by the doping of the fluorescent dye Nile red (9-diethylamino- 5H-benzo[alpha] phenoxazine-5-one, NR) into the particles. For the nanoparticles, the hydrophilic polyethyleneimine (PEI) chain segments serve as the shell and the hydrophobic polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) constitutes the core of the nanoparticles. The non-toxic and biocompatible PEI chain segments on the nanoparticle surface exhibit a high affinity for Cu(2+) ions in aqueous media, and the quenching of the NR fluorescence is observed upon binding of Cu(2+) ions. This makes the core-shell nanoparticle system a water-dispersible chemosensor for Cu(2+) ion detection. The quenching of fluorescence arises through intraparticle energy transfer (FRET) from the dye in the hydrophobic PMMA core to the Cu(2+)/PEI complexes on the nanoparticle surface. The energy transfer efficiency for PEI/PMMA particles with different diameters was determined, and it is found that the smaller nanoparticle sample exhibits higher quenching efficiency, and the limit for Cu(2+) detection is 1 microM for a nanoparticle sample with a diameter of approximately 30 nm. The response of the fluorescent nanoparticle towards different metal ions was investigated and the nanoparticle chemosensor displays high selectivity and antidisturbance for the Cu(2+) ion among the metal ions examined (Na(+), K(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Zn(2+), Hg(2+), Mn(2+), Fe(2+), Ni(2+), Co(2+) and Pb(2+)). This emulsifier-free, biocompatible and sensitive fluorescent nanoparticle sensor may find applications in cupric ion detection in the biological and environmental areas.

  15. A facile approach for cupric ion detection in aqueous media using polyethyleneimine/PMMA core-shell fluorescent nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Zeng, Fang; Wu, Shuizhu; Su, Junhua; Zhao, Jianqing; Tong, Zhen

    2009-09-01

    A facile approach was developed to produce a dye-doped core-shell nanoparticle chemosensor for detecting Cu2+ in aqueous media. The core-shell nanoparticle sensor was prepared by a one-step emulsifier-free polymerization, followed by the doping of the fluorescent dye Nile red (9-diethylamino- 5H-benzo[alpha] phenoxazine-5-one, NR) into the particles. For the nanoparticles, the hydrophilic polyethyleneimine (PEI) chain segments serve as the shell and the hydrophobic polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) constitutes the core of the nanoparticles. The non-toxic and biocompatible PEI chain segments on the nanoparticle surface exhibit a high affinity for Cu2+ ions in aqueous media, and the quenching of the NR fluorescence is observed upon binding of Cu2+ ions. This makes the core-shell nanoparticle system a water-dispersible chemosensor for Cu2+ ion detection. The quenching of fluorescence arises through intraparticle energy transfer (FRET) from the dye in the hydrophobic PMMA core to the Cu2+/PEI complexes on the nanoparticle surface. The energy transfer efficiency for PEI/PMMA particles with different diameters was determined, and it is found that the smaller nanoparticle sample exhibits higher quenching efficiency, and the limit for Cu2+ detection is 1 µM for a nanoparticle sample with a diameter of ~30 nm. The response of the fluorescent nanoparticle towards different metal ions was investigated and the nanoparticle chemosensor displays high selectivity and antidisturbance for the Cu2+ ion among the metal ions examined (Na+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Zn2+, Hg2+, Mn2+, Fe2+, Ni2+, Co2+ and Pb2+). This emulsifier-free, biocompatible and sensitive fluorescent nanoparticle sensor may find applications in cupric ion detection in the biological and environmental areas.

  16. Initial Comparison of Direct and Legacy Modeling Approaches for Radial Core Expansion Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shemon, Emily R.

    2016-01-01

    Radial core expansion in sodium-cooled fast reactors provides an important reactivity feedback effect. As the reactor power increases due to normal start up conditions or accident scenarios, the core and surrounding materials heat up, causing both grid plate expansion and bowing of the assembly ducts. When the core restraint system is designed correctly, the resulting structural deformations introduce negative reactivity which decreases the reactor power. Historically, an indirect procedure has been used to estimate the reactivity feedback due to structural deformation which relies upon perturbation theory and coupling legacy physics codes with limited geometry capabilities. With advancements in modeling and simulation, radial core expansion phenomena can now be modeled directly, providing an assessment of the accuracy of the reactivity feedback coefficients generated by indirect legacy methods. Recently a new capability was added to the PROTEUS-SN unstructured geometry neutron transport solver to analyze deformed meshes quickly and directly. By supplying the deformed mesh in addition to the base configuration input files, PROTEUS-SN automatically processes material adjustments including calculation of region densities to conserve mass, calculation of isotopic densities according to material models (for example, sodium density as a function of temperature), and subsequent re-homogenization of materials. To verify the new capability of directly simulating deformed meshes, PROTEUS-SN was used to compute reactivity feedback for a series of contrived yet representative deformed configurations for the Advanced Burner Test Reactor design. The indirect legacy procedure was also performed to generate reactivity feedback coefficients for the same deformed configurations. Interestingly, the legacy procedure consistently overestimated reactivity feedbacks by 35% compared to direct simulations by PROTEUS-SN. This overestimation indicates that the legacy procedures are in fact

  17. Initial Comparison of Direct and Legacy Modeling Approaches for Radial Core Expansion Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shemon, Emily R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-10-10

    Radial core expansion in sodium-cooled fast reactors provides an important reactivity feedback effect. As the reactor power increases due to normal start up conditions or accident scenarios, the core and surrounding materials heat up, causing both grid plate expansion and bowing of the assembly ducts. When the core restraint system is designed correctly, the resulting structural deformations introduce negative reactivity which decreases the reactor power. Historically, an indirect procedure has been used to estimate the reactivity feedback due to structural deformation which relies upon perturbation theory and coupling legacy physics codes with limited geometry capabilities. With advancements in modeling and simulation, radial core expansion phenomena can now be modeled directly, providing an assessment of the accuracy of the reactivity feedback coefficients generated by indirect legacy methods. Recently a new capability was added to the PROTEUS-SN unstructured geometry neutron transport solver to analyze deformed meshes quickly and directly. By supplying the deformed mesh in addition to the base configuration input files, PROTEUS-SN automatically processes material adjustments including calculation of region densities to conserve mass, calculation of isotopic densities according to material models (for example, sodium density as a function of temperature), and subsequent re-homogenization of materials. To verify the new capability of directly simulating deformed meshes, PROTEUS-SN was used to compute reactivity feedback for a series of contrived yet representative deformed configurations for the Advanced Burner Test Reactor design. The indirect legacy procedure was also performed to generate reactivity feedback coefficients for the same deformed configurations. Interestingly, the legacy procedure consistently overestimated reactivity feedbacks by 35% compared to direct simulations by PROTEUS-SN. This overestimation indicates that the legacy procedures are in fact

  18. Transport coefficients in neutron star cores in BHF approach. Comparison of different nucleon potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shternin, P. S.; Baldo, M.; Schulze, H.-J.

    2017-12-01

    Thermal conductivity and shear viscosity of npeµ matter in non-superfluid neutron star cores are considered in the framework of Brueckner-Hartree-Fock many-body theory. We extend our previous work (Shternin et al 2013 PRC 88 065803) by analysing different nucleon-nucleon potentials and different three-body forces. We find that the use of different potentials leads up to one order of magnitude variations in the values of the nucleon contribution to transport coefficients. The nucleon contribution dominates the thermal conductivity, but for all considered models the shear viscosity is dominated by leptons.

  19. Machine learning for adaptive many-core machines a practical approach

    CERN Document Server

    Lopes, Noel

    2015-01-01

    The overwhelming data produced everyday and the increasing performance and cost requirements of applications?are transversal to a wide range of activities in society, from science to industry. In particular, the magnitude and complexity of the tasks that Machine Learning (ML) algorithms have to solve are driving the need to devise adaptive many-core machines that scale well with the volume of data, or in other words, can handle Big Data.This book gives a concise view on how to extend the applicability of well-known ML algorithms in Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) with data scalability in mind.

  20. Symplectic no-core shell-model approach to intermediate-mass nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, G. K.; Ferriss, M. C.; Launey, K. D.; Dytrych, T.; Draayer, J. P.; Dreyfuss, A. C.; Bahri, C.

    2014-03-01

    We present a microscopic description of nuclei in the intermediate-mass region, including the proximity to the proton drip line, based on a no-core shell model with a schematic many-nucleon long-range interaction with no parameter adjustments. The outcome confirms the essential role played by the symplectic symmetry to inform the interaction and the winnowing of shell-model spaces. We show that it is imperative that model spaces be expanded well beyond the current limits up through 15 major shells to accommodate particle excitations, which appear critical to highly deformed spatial structures and the convergence of associated observables.

  1. The rise of China in the International Trade Network: a community core detection approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhen; Cerina, Federica; Chessa, Alessandro; Caldarelli, Guido; Riccaboni, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Theory of complex networks proved successful in the description of a variety of complex systems ranging from biology to computer science and to economics and finance. Here we use network models to describe the evolution of a particular economic system, namely the International Trade Network (ITN). Previous studies often assume that globalization and regionalization in international trade are contradictory to each other. We re-examine the relationship between globalization and regionalization by viewing the international trade system as an interdependent complex network. We use the modularity optimization method to detect communities and community cores in the ITN during the years 1995-2011. We find rich dynamics over time both inter- and intra-communities. In particular, the Asia-Oceania community disappeared and reemerged over time along with a switch in leadership from Japan to China. We provide a multilevel description of the evolution of the network where the global dynamics (i.e., communities disappear or reemerge) and the regional dynamics (i.e., community core changes between community members) are related. Moreover, simulation results show that the global dynamics can be generated by a simple dynamic-edge-weight mechanism.

  2. Group problem solving as a different participatory approach to Citizenship Education.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guérin, Laurence

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The main goal of this article is to define and justify group problem solving as an approach to citizenship education. It is demonstrated that the choice of theoretical framework of democracy has consequences for the chosen learning goals, educational approach and learning activities. The

  3. Stabilization of flail chest injuries: minimized approach techniques to treat the core of instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz-Drost, S; Grupp, S; Pachowsky, M; Oppel, P; Krinner, S; Mauerer, A; Hennig, F F; Langenbach, A

    2017-04-01

    Stabilizing techniques of flail chest injuries usually need wide approaches to the chest wall. Three main regions need to be considered when stabilizing the rib cage: median-anterior with dissection of pectoral muscle; lateral-axillary with dissection of musculi (mm) serratus, externus abdominis; posterior inter spinoscapular with division of mm rhomboidei, trapezius and latissimus dorsi. Severe morbidity due to these invasive approaches needs to be considered. This study discusses possibilities for minimized approaches to the shown regions. Fifteen patients were stabilized by locked plate osteosynthesis (MatrixRib ® ) between May 2012 and April 2014 and prospectively followed up. Flail chest injuries were managed through limited incisions to the anterior, the lateral, and the posterior parts of the chest wall or their combinations. Each approach was 4-10 cm using Alexis ® retractor. One minimized approach offered sufficient access at least to four ribs posterior and laterally, four pairs of ribs anterior in all cases. There was no need to divide latissimus dorsi muscle. Trapezius und rhomboid muscles were only limited divided, whereas a subcutaneous dissection of serratus and abdominis muscles was necessary. A follow-up showed sufficient consolidation. pneumothorax (2) and seroma (2). Minimized approaches allow sufficient stabilization of severe dislocated rib fractures without extensive dissection or division of the important muscles. Keeping the arm and, thus, the scapula mobile is very important for providing the largest reachable surface of the rib cage through each approach.

  4. Paramedic-Initiated CMS Sepsis Core Measure Bundle Prior to Hospital Arrival: A Stepwise Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walchok, Jason G; Pirrallo, Ronald G; Furmanek, Douglas; Lutz, Martin; Shope, Colt; Giles, Brandi; Gue, Greta; Dix, Aaron

    2017-01-01

    To improve patient outcomes, the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) implemented core measures that outline the initial treatment of the septic patient. These measures include initial blood culture collection prior to antibiotics, adequate intravenous fluid resuscitation, and early administration of broad spectrum antibiotics. We sought to determine if Paramedics can initiate the CMS sepsis core measure bundle in the prehospital field reliably. This is a retrospective, case series from a 3rd service EMS system model in Greenville, South Carolina between November 17, 2014 and February 20, 2016. An adult Prehospital Sepsis Assessment Tool was created using the 2012 Surviving Sepsis guidelines: 2 of 3 signs of systemic inflammatory response (heart rate, respiratory rate, oral temperature) and a known or suspected source of infection. A "Sepsis Alert" was called by paramedics and upon IV access a set of blood cultures and blood for lactate analysis was collected prior to field antibiotic administration. The Sepsis Alert was compared to serum lactate levels and ICD 9 or 10 admitting diagnosis of Sepsis, Severe Sepsis, or Septic Shock. Blood culture contamination, serum lactate, and antibiotic match were determined by in-hospital laboratory analysis. A total of 120 trained paramedics called 1,185 "Sepsis Alerts" on 56,643 patients (50.3% Male, mean age 70). Patients with missing discharge diagnosis were eliminated (n = 31). The admitting diagnosis of sepsis overall was 73.5% (848/1154): Sepsis 50% (578/1154), Severe Sepsis 14.6% (169/1154), Septic Shock 8.9% (101/1154). A total of 946 blood cultures were collected in the prehospital setting, with a 95.04% (899/946) no contamination rate. Contamination was found in 4.96% (47/946). A total of 179 (18.9%) of the uncontaminated blood cultures were found to have positive growth with 720 (76.1%) having no growth. EMS administered antibiotics matched blood culture positive growth in 72% of patients. The lactate

  5. Holocene eruptive activity of Yufu-Tsurumi volcano group found from piston cores in Beppu bay, Central Kyushu; Beppuwan core kara mita Yufu Tsurumi kazangun ni okeru kanshinsei no funka katsudo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umeda, K. [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Kusanagi, M. [Kobe University, Kobe (Japan); Furusawa, A. [Dia Consultants Co. Ltd., Nagoya (Japan); Ui, T. [Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan)

    1996-08-01

    With an objective to identify the Holocene eruptive activity of the Yufu-Tsurumi volcano group, analysis was made on the volcanic ash, Yufu-dake 1 (a product of the latest eruptive activity). The analysis used piston core samples collected in Beppu Bay. Volcanic ash deposited in lakes and inner bays are not subjected to erosion effect, hence remain in better condition than on-land deposits. A volcanic ash bed characteristically containing micro-crystal contained glass has existed, and so has a volcanic ash bed characteristically containing volcanic foam glass and polyhedral glass. The volcanic ash bed characteristically containing micro-crystal contained glass was found comparable with the Yufu-dake 1 volcanic ash bed originated in the Yufu-Tsurumi volcanic group, as proven from the stratigraphy, rock statement and refraction of the volcanic glass. As a result of performing a {sup 14}C age measurement on seashells in the core samples by using an accelerator mass analysis method, it was found that the eruption age of the Yufu-dake 1 volcanic ash dates back about 2,500 years ago. Core samples collected from lakes and inner bays contain much carbonic material used in the {sup 14}C age measurement. Therefore, investigation on volcanic ash deposited on ocean bottoms is effective. 25 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. An Approach to Supervision for Doctoral and Entry-Level Group Counseling Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Robyn; Bambacus, Elizabeth; Gibson, Donna

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide a supervision approach to experiential groups that replaces professors with doctoral students in the chain of supervision, enlists a faculty member to provide supervision of supervision to the doctoral students, and translates supervision theory to meet the unique needs of group counseling supervision.…

  7. Group Dynamics and Individual Roles: A Differentiated Approach to Social-Emotional Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugas, Daryl

    2017-01-01

    Differentiated instruction is a set of strategies to help teachers meet each child where he or she is in order to improve students' engagement, lead them to do their best work, and maximize their success. This article describes a differentiated classroom management approach based in group dynamics which focuses on the development of group norms…

  8. The Role of Perceived In-group Moral Superiority in Reparative Intentions and Approach Motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, Zsolt P; Mészáros, Noémi Z; Csertő, István

    2017-01-01

    Three studies examined how members of a national group react to in-group wrongdoings. We expected that perceived in-group moral superiority would lead to unwillingness to repair the aggression. We also expected that internal-focused emotions such as group-based guilt and group-based shame would predict specific, misdeed-related reparative intentions but not general approach motivation toward the victim groups. In Study 1, facing the in-group's recent aggression, participants who believed that the Hungarians have been more moral throughout their history than members of other nations, used more exonerating cognitions, experienced less in-group critical emotions and showed less willingness to provide reparations for the members of the victim group. Study 2 and Study 3 confirmed most findings of Study 1. Perceived in-group moral superiority directly or indirectly reduced willingness to provide either general or specific reparations, while internally focused in-group critical emotions predicted specific misdeed-related reparative intentions but not general approach motivation. The role of emotional attachment to the in-group is considered.

  9. A 3-Component Approach Incorporating Focus Groups in Strategic Planning for Sexual Violence Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Theresa H; Hess, Julia Meredith; Woelk, Leona; Bear, Samantha

    2016-01-01

    Sexual violence is of special concern in New Mexico because of the presence of large priority populations in which its prevalence is high. This article describes a 3-component approach to developing a strategic plan to prevent sexual violence in the state that consisted of an advisory group, subject matter experts, and focus groups from geographically and demographically diverse communities. Both common and community-specific themes emerged from the focus groups and were included in the strategic plan. By incorporating community needs and experiences, this approach fosters increased investment in plan implementation.

  10. Development of a core outcome set for orthodontic trials using a mixed-methods approach: protocol for a multicentre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsichlaki, Aliki; O'Brien, Kevin; Johal, Ama; Marshman, Zoe; Benson, Philip; Colonio Salazar, Fiorella B; Fleming, Padhraig S

    2017-08-04

    Orthodontic treatment is commonly undertaken in young people, with over 40% of children in the UK needing treatment and currently one third having treatment, at a cost to the National Health Service in England and Wales of £273 million each year. Most current research about orthodontic care does not consider what patients truly feel about, or want, from treatment, and a diverse range of outcomes is being used with little consistency between studies. This study aims to address these problems, using established methodology to develop a core outcome set for use in future clinical trials of orthodontic interventions in children and young people. This is a mixed-methods study incorporating four distinct stages. The first stage will include a scoping review of the scientific literature to identify primary and secondary outcome measures that have been used in previous orthodontic clinical trials. The second stage will involve qualitative interviews and focus groups with orthodontic patients aged 10 to 16 years to determine what outcomes are important to them. The outcomes elicited from these two stages will inform the third stage of the study in which a long-list of outcomes will be ranked in terms of importance using electronic Delphi surveys involving clinicians and patients. The final stage of the study will involve face-to-face consensus meetings with all stakeholders to discuss and agree on the outcome measures that should be included in the final core outcome set. This research will help to inform patients, parents, clinicians and commissioners about outcomes that are important to young people undergoing orthodontic treatment. Adoption of the core outcome set in future clinical trials of orthodontic treatment will make it easier for results to be compared, contrasted and combined. This should translate into improved decision-making by all stakeholders involved. The project has been registered on the Core Outcome Measures in Effectiveness Trials ( COMET ) website

  11. The Role of Perceived In-group Moral Superiority in Reparative Intentions and Approach Motivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsolt P. Szabó

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Three studies examined how members of a national group react to in-group wrongdoings. We expected that perceived in-group moral superiority would lead to unwillingness to repair the aggression. We also expected that internal-focused emotions such as group-based guilt and group-based shame would predict specific, misdeed-related reparative intentions but not general approach motivation toward the victim groups. In Study 1, facing the in-group’s recent aggression, participants who believed that the Hungarians have been more moral throughout their history than members of other nations, used more exonerating cognitions, experienced less in-group critical emotions and showed less willingness to provide reparations for the members of the victim group. Study 2 and Study 3 confirmed most findings of Study 1. Perceived in-group moral superiority directly or indirectly reduced willingness to provide either general or specific reparations, while internally focused in-group critical emotions predicted specific misdeed-related reparative intentions but not general approach motivation. The role of emotional attachment to the in-group is considered.

  12. Three-dimensional imaging of sediment cores: a multi-scale approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deprez, Maxim; Van Daele, Maarten; Boone, Marijn; Anselmetti, Flavio; Cnudde, Veerle

    2017-04-01

    Downscaling is a method used in building-material research, where several imaging methods are applied to obtain information on the petrological and petrophysical properties of materials from a centimetre to a sub-micrometre scale (De Boever et al., 2015). However, to reach better resolutions, the sample size is necessarily adjusted as well. If, for instance, X-ray micro computed tomography (µCT) is applied on the material, the resolution can increase as the sample size decreases. In sedimentological research, X-ray computed tomography (CT) is a commonly used technique (Cnudde & Boone, 2013). The ability to visualise materials with different X-ray attenuations reveals structures in sediment cores that cannot be seen with the bare eye. This results in discoveries of sedimentary structures that can lead to a reconstruction of parts of the depositional history in a sedimentary basin (Van Daele et al., 2014). Up to now, most of the CT data used for this kind of research are acquired with a medical CT scanner, of which the highest obtainable resolution is about 250 µm (Cnudde et al., 2006). As the size of most sediment grains is smaller than 250 µm, a lot of information, concerning sediment fabric, grain-size and shape, is not obtained when using medical CT. Therefore, downscaling could be a useful method in sedimentological research. After identifying a region of interest within the sediment core with medical CT, a subsample of several millimetres diameter can be taken and imaged with µCT, allowing images with a resolution of a few micrometres. The subsampling process, however, needs to be considered thoroughly. As the goal is to image the structure and fabric of the sediments, deformation of the sediments during subsampling should be avoided as much as possible. After acquiring the CT data, image processing and analysis are performed in order to retrieve shape and orientation parameters of single grains, mud clasts and organic material. This single-grain data can

  13. A Comparative Study of Effectiveness of Peer Assessment of Individuals' Contributions to Group Projects in Undergraduate Construction Management Core Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiao-Hua

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, various forms of group work have been introduced in university courses across various subject domains, including construction management courses. Although the use of group work in higher education has sound pedagogical reasons and advantages, group work has its own drawbacks. Therefore, the acceptance by students and the success…

  14. A Systematic Approach to Design Low-Power Video Codec Cores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corporaal Henk

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The higher resolutions and new functionality of video applications increase their throughput and processing requirements. In contrast, the energy and heat limitations of mobile devices demand low-power video cores. We propose a memory and communication centric design methodology to reach an energy-efficient dedicated implementation. First, memory optimizations are combined with algorithmic tuning. Then, a partitioning exploration introduces parallelism using a cyclo-static dataflow model that also expresses implementation-specific aspects of communication channels. Towards hardware, these channels are implemented as a restricted set of communication primitives. They enable an automated RTL development strategy for rigorous functional verification. The FPGA/ASIC design of an MPEG-4 Simple Profile video codec demonstrates the methodology. The video pipeline exploits the inherent functional parallelism of the codec and contains a tailored memory hierarchy with burst accesses to external memory. 4CIF encoding at 30 fps, consumes 71 mW in a 180 nm, 1.62 V UMC technology.

  15. A Systematic Approach to Design Low-Power Video Codec Cores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristof Denolf

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The higher resolutions and new functionality of video applications increase their throughput and processing requirements. In contrast, the energy and heat limitations of mobile devices demand low-power video cores. We propose a memory and communication centric design methodology to reach an energy-efficient dedicated implementation. First, memory optimizations are combined with algorithmic tuning. Then, a partitioning exploration introduces parallelism using a cyclo-static dataflow model that also expresses implementation-specific aspects of communication channels. Towards hardware, these channels are implemented as a restricted set of communication primitives. They enable an automated RTL development strategy for rigorous functional verification. The FPGA/ASIC design of an MPEG-4 Simple Profile video codec demonstrates the methodology. The video pipeline exploits the inherent functional parallelism of the codec and contains a tailored memory hierarchy with burst accesses to external memory. 4CIF encoding at 30 fps, consumes 71 mW in a 180 nm, 1.62 V UMC technology.

  16. A rough set approach for determining weights of decision makers in group decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qiang; Du, Ping-An; Wang, Yong; Liang, Bin

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to present a novel approach for determining the weights of decision makers (DMs) based on rough group decision in multiple attribute group decision-making (MAGDM) problems. First, we construct a rough group decision matrix from all DMs' decision matrixes on the basis of rough set theory. After that, we derive a positive ideal solution (PIS) founded on the average matrix of rough group decision, and negative ideal solutions (NISs) founded on the lower and upper limit matrixes of rough group decision. Then, we obtain the weight of each group member and priority order of alternatives by using relative closeness method, which depends on the distances from each individual group member' decision to the PIS and NISs. Through comparisons with existing methods and an on-line business manager selection example, the proposed method show that it can provide more insights into the subjectivity and vagueness of DMs' evaluations and selections.

  17. A Semiparametric Bayesian Approach for Analyzing Longitudinal Data from Multiple Related Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Kiranmoy; Afriyie, Prince; Spirko, Lauren

    2015-11-01

    Often the biological and/or clinical experiments result in longitudinal data from multiple related groups. The analysis of such data is quite challenging due to the fact that groups might have shared information on the mean and/or covariance functions. In this article, we consider a Bayesian semiparametric approach of modeling the mean trajectories for longitudinal response coming from multiple related groups. We consider matrix stick-breaking process priors on the group mean parameters which allows information sharing on the mean trajectories across the groups. Simulation studies are performed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach compared to the more traditional approaches. We analyze data from a one-year follow-up of nutrition education for hypercholesterolemic children with three different treatments where the children are from different age-groups. Our analysis provides more clinically useful information than the previous analysis of the same dataset. The proposed approach will be a very powerful tool for analyzing data from clinical trials and other medical experiments.

  18. Group Approach to the Quantization of Non-Abelian Stueckelberg Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldaya, V; Lopez-Ruiz, F F; Calixto, M

    2011-01-01

    The quantum field theory of Non-Linear Sigma Models on coadjoint orbits of a semi-simple group G are formulated in the framework of a Group Approach to Quantization. In this scheme, partial-trace Lagrangians are recovered from two-cocycles defined on the infinite-dimensional group of sections of the jet-gauge group J 1 (G). This construction is extended to the entire physical system coupled to Yang-Mills fields, thus constituting an algebraic formulation of the Non-Abelian Stueckelgerg formalism devoid of the unitarity/renormalizability obstruction that this theory finds in the standard Lagrangian formalism under canonical quantization.

  19. Group Approach to the Quantization of Non-Abelian Stueckelberg Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldaya, V; Lopez-Ruiz, F F [Instituto de Astrofisica de AndalucIa (IAA-CSIC), Apartado Postal 3004, 18080 Granada (Spain); Calixto, M, E-mail: valdaya@iaa.es, E-mail: Manuel.Calixto@upct.es, E-mail: flopez@iaa.es [Departamento de Matematica Aplicada y Estadistica, Universidad Politecnica de Cartagena, Paseo Alfonso XIII 56, 30203 Cartagena (Spain)

    2011-03-01

    The quantum field theory of Non-Linear Sigma Models on coadjoint orbits of a semi-simple group G are formulated in the framework of a Group Approach to Quantization. In this scheme, partial-trace Lagrangians are recovered from two-cocycles defined on the infinite-dimensional group of sections of the jet-gauge group J{sup 1} (G). This construction is extended to the entire physical system coupled to Yang-Mills fields, thus constituting an algebraic formulation of the Non-Abelian Stueckelgerg formalism devoid of the unitarity/renormalizability obstruction that this theory finds in the standard Lagrangian formalism under canonical quantization.

  20. Name It! Store It! Protect It!: A Systems Approach to Managing Data in Research Core Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVries, Matthew; Fenchel, Matthew; Fogarty, R E; Kim, Byong-Do; Timmons, Daniel; White, A Nicole

    2017-12-01

    As the capabilities of technology increase, so do the production of data and the need for data management. The need for data storage at many academic institutions is increasing exponentially. Technology is expanding rapidly, and institutions are recognizing the need to incorporate data management that can be available for future data sharing as a critical component of institutional services. The establishment of a process to manage the surge in data storage is complex and often hindered by not having a plan. Simple file naming-nomenclature-is also becoming ever more important to leave an established understanding of the contents in a file. This is especially the case as research experiences turnover from research projects and personnel. The indexing of files consistently also helps to identify past work. Finally, the protection of the data contents is becoming increasing challenging. As the genomic field expands, and medicine becomes more personalized, the identification of methods to protect the contents of data in both short- and long-term storage needs to be established so as not to risk the potential of revealing identifiable information. This is often something we do not consider in a nonclinical research environment. The need for establishing basic guidelines for institutions is critical, as individual research laboratories are unable to handle the scope of data storage required for their own research. In addition to the immediate needs for establishing guidelines on data storage and file naming and how to protect information, the recognition of the need for specialized support for data management supporting research cores and laboratories at academic institutions is becoming a critical component of institutional services. Here, we outline some case studies and methods that you may be able to adopt at your own institution.

  1. A group-based approach to stabilisation and symptom management in a phased treatment model for refugees and asylum seekers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary E. A. Robertson

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Traumatised asylum seekers and refugees may present with significant and complex mental health problems as a result of prolonged, extreme, and multiple traumatic events. This is further complicated by ongoing complex social circumstances. Concepts: In our work at the Traumatic Stress Clinic (TSC, the understanding afforded by the concept of complex posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD together with the related notion of a phased treatment model, provides a useful framework for organising our work with this population. Clinical Applications: An explication of complex PTSD as it applies to our client group is presented, followed by a description of our phased treatment model and an outline of the core principles, which guide our clinical approach. Our symptom management and stabilisation groups have been developed and refined over time and draw on techniques from a variety of cognitive behavioural therapies. These are described in some detail with illustrative clinical case vignettes. Conclusion: This paper concludes with some reflections on the challenges inherent to working with this complex client group.

  2. Task group of international union of radioecology 'ecosystem approach to environment protection'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuma, Shoichi

    2011-01-01

    An ecosystem approach is a holistic (i.e., top-down) strategy for protection of ecosystem structures and functions from perturbations. A task group of International Union of Radioecology 'Ecosystem Approach to Environment Protection' was launched in April, 2010. This task group is preparing a report on the following topics: (1) goals of environmental protection; (2) legislation about environmental protection; (3) assessment of the Reference Animals and Plants (RAP) concept in the general context of environmental protection; (4) limitations and uncertainties of the RAPs concept; (5) justification and merits of the ecosystem approach; (6) assessing the feasibility of the ecosystem approach; (7) research and development required for the ecosystem approach; and (8) recommendations with respect to radiation protection. The topics 1, 3, 4 and 5 have been almost completely prepared, and demonstrate that the ecosystem approach is required for radiation protection of the environment. On the other hand, methods of the ecosystem approach which should be adopted for radiation protection of the environment are not clear in the current draft report. They should be specified by reviewing the Convention on Biological Diversity, fish stock management and other activities where the ecosystem approach is already adopted. (author)

  3. Data structure techniques for the graphical special unitary group approach to arbitrary spin representations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kent, R.D.; Schlesinger, M.

    1987-01-01

    For the purpose of computing matrix elements of quantum mechanical operators in complex N-particle systems it is necessary that as much of each irreducible representation be stored in high-speed memory as possible in order to achieve the highest possible rate of computations. A graph theoretic approach to the representation of N-particle systems involving arbitrary single-particle spin is presented. The method involves a generalization of a technique employed by Shavitt in developing the graphical group approach (GUGA) to electronic spin-orbitals. The methods implemented in GENDRT and DRTDIM overcome many deficiencies inherent in other approaches, particularly with respect to utilization of memory resources, computational efficiency in the recognition and evaluation of non-zero matrix elements of certain group theoretic operators and complete labelling of all the basis states of the permutation symmetry (S N ) adapted irreducible representations of SU(n) groups. (orig.)

  4. Basis of integrated approach to sports and recreational activities of students of special medical groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.V. Zaharova

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : to prove the superiority of techniques integrated approach to sports and recreational activities of students of special medical groups in the educational institution. Material / methods : the annual pedagogical experiment conducted on three groups that have been formed based on the results of preliminary studies based on diagnosis. Learning process based on the principle of improving training. Results : the advantages of an integrated approach to sports and recreational activities of students with disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Recommended approaches to increase physical and functional training. Also - the formation of a stable demand of motor activity, leading healthy lifestyles, in the acquisition of social status in the educational activity. Conclusions : the integrated approach will meet the educational needs of students to form a cultural competence of the individual in the preservation and conservation of health, ability to adapt and successfully implement their professional activities.

  5. Identifying target groups for environmentally sustainable transport: assessment of different segmentation approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haustein, Sonja; Hunecke, Marcel

    2013-01-01

    Recently, the use of attitude-based market segmentation to promote environmentally sustainable transport has significantly increased. The segmentation of the population into meaningful groups sharing similar attitudes and preferences provides valuable information about how green measures should...... and behavioural segmentations are compared regarding marketing criteria. Although none of the different approaches can claim absolute superiority, attitudinal approaches show advantages in providing startingpoints for interventions to reduce car use....

  6. Funding intensive care - approaches in systems using diagnosis-related groups.

    OpenAIRE

    Ettelt, S; Nolte, E

    2010-01-01

    This report reviews approaches to funding intensive care in health systems that use activitybased payment mechanisms based on diagnosis-related groups (DRGs) to reimburse hospital care. The report aims to inform the current debate about options for funding intensive care services for adults, children and newborns in England. Funding mechanisms reviewed here include those in Australia (Victoria), Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Sweden and the United States (Medicare). Approaches to org...

  7. BLIG: A New Approach for Sensor Identification, Grouping,and Authorisation in Body Sensor Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jacob; Bardram, Jakob Eyvind

    2007-01-01

    Using body sensor networks (BSN) in critical clinical settings like emergency units in hospitals or in accidents requires that such a network can be deployed, configured, and started in a fast and easy way, while maintaining trust in the network. In this paper we present a novel approach called...... BLIG (Blinking Led Indicated Grouping) for easy deployment of BSNs on patients in critical situations, including mechanisms for uniquely identifying and grouping sensor nodes belonging to a patient in a secure and trusted way. This approach has been designed in close cooperation with users, and easy...

  8. Platinum-group elements in the cores of potassium feldspar spherules from the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary at Caravaca (Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palomo, I.

    1994-04-01

    Full Text Available The abundant spherules present in the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary layer at Caravaca are diagenetically transformed to potassium feldspar. Before our study no possible relicts of the precursor material had been reported. but in this paper we describe the presence of cores in these spherules that could represent a relict of the «unknown precursor». These cores are made up of C mixed with Si. Mg. AL Cr. Ca among other elements. Laser Ablation System analysis also reveals an enrichment in pe;E could suggest an extraterrestrial origin for this material. PI. Pd and Ir do not show a chondritic ratio: however. asevere modification of their concentration could be expected during the early diagenetic processes.Las esférulas existentes en la lámina de sedimento del tránsito Cretácico-Terciario de la sección de Caravaca han sido transformadas diagenéticamente a feldespato potásico. En este trabajo se describe la existencia de núcleos encontrados en el interior de las esférulas. los cuales' pueden representar relictos del material precursor. Dichos núcleos están constituidos por C. Si. Mg, AL Cr y Ca entre otros elementos. Se pone de relieve, por vez primera, su notable enriquecimiento en elementos del grupo del platino, cuyas relaciones no condríticas pueden ser debidas a la existencia de importantes modificaciones en su concentración inicial causadas por los procesos diagenéticos y por la existencia de materia orgánica.

  9. The "Project": Putting Student Controlled, Small Group Work and Transferable Skills at the Core of a Geography Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindle, Brian Paul

    1993-01-01

    Describes how a cooperative group project has become a foundation of the first two years of a three-year program in college-level geography. Discusses the origin, development, and topic selection for each of the cohort groups working in the program. Asserts that the program has been favorably received by both students and faculty members. (CFR)

  10. Outcomes of polio eradication activities in Uttar Pradesh, India: the Social Mobilization Network (SM Net and Core Group Polio Project (CGPP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Vibha

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The primary strategy to interrupt transmission of wild poliovirus in India is to improve supplemental immunization activities and routine immunization coverage in priority districts with a focus on 107 high-risk blocks of western Uttar Pradesh and central Bihar. Villages or urban areas with a history of wild poliovirus transmission, or hard-to-reach or resistant populations are categorized as high-risk areas within blocks. The Social Mobilization Network (SM Net was formed in Uttar Pradesh in 2003 to support polio eradication efforts through improved planning, implementation and monitoring of social mobilization activities in those high-risk areas. In this paper, we examine the vaccination outcomes in districts of SM Net where the CORE Group works. Methods We carried out a secondary data analysis of routine monitoring information collected by the SM Net and the Government of India. These data include information about vaccination outcomes in SM Net areas and non-SM Net areas within the districts where the CORE Group operates. Statistical analysis was used to compare, between SM Net and non-SM Net areas, vaccination outcomes considered sensitive to social mobilization efforts of the SM Net. We employed Generalized Estimating Equations (GEE statistical method to account for Intra-cluster Correlation (ICC, and used 'Quasi-likelihood under the independence model criterion (QIC' as the model selection method. Results Vaccination outcomes in SM Net areas were as high as or higher than in non-SM Net areas. There was considerable variation in vaccination outcomes between districts. Conclusions While not conclusive, the results suggest that the social mobilization efforts of the SM Net and the CORE Group are helping to increase vaccination levels in high-risk areas of Uttar Pradesh. Vaccination outcomes in CORE Group areas were equal or higher than in non-CORE, non-SM Net areas. This occurred even though SM Net areas are those with

  11. A strategic conflict avoidance approach based on cooperative coevolutionary with the dynamic grouping strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Xiangmin; Zhang, Xuejun; Wei, Jian; Hwang, Inseok; Zhu, Yanbo; Cai, Kaiquan

    2016-07-01

    Conflict avoidance plays a crucial role in guaranteeing the safety and efficiency of the air traffic management system. Recently, the strategic conflict avoidance (SCA) problem has attracted more and more attention. Taking into consideration the large-scale flight planning in a global view, SCA can be formulated as a large-scale combinatorial optimisation problem with complex constraints and tight couplings between variables, which is difficult to solve. In this paper, an SCA approach based on the cooperative coevolution algorithm combined with a new decomposition strategy is proposed to prevent the premature convergence and improve the search capability. The flights are divided into several groups using the new grouping strategy, referred to as the dynamic grouping strategy, which takes full advantage of the prior knowledge of the problem to better deal with the tight couplings among flights through maximising the chance of putting flights with conflicts in the same group, compared with existing grouping strategies. Then, a tuned genetic algorithm (GA) is applied to different groups simultaneously to resolve conflicts. Finally, the high-quality solutions are obtained through cooperation between different groups based on cooperative coevolution. Simulation results using real flight data from the China air route network and daily flight plans demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can reduce the number of conflicts and the average delay effectively, outperforming existing approaches including GAs, the memetic algorithm, and the cooperative coevolution algorithms with different well-known grouping strategies.

  12. Catalytic cleavage activities of 10–23 DNAzyme analogs functionalized with an amino group in its catalytic core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Wang

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Functionalization of the catalytic loop of 10–23 DNAzyme with an amino group was performed by incorporation of 7-(3-aminopropyl-8-aza-7-deaza-2′-deoxyadenosine in different single positions. Among the nine modified positions in the catalytic loop, A9 is the unique position with positive contribution by such modification. These results indicated that more efficient deoxyribozymes remain to be explored by introduction of exogenous functional groups in an appropriate position in the catalytic loop of 10–23 DNAzyme, such as the combination of 7-functional group substituted 8-aza-7-deaza-2′-deoxyadenosine analogs and A9 position.

  13. A core phylogeny of Dictyostelia inferred from genomes representative of the eight major and minor taxonomic divisions of the group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Reema; Schilde, Christina; Schaap, Pauline

    2016-11-17

    Dictyostelia are a well-studied group of organisms with colonial multicellularity, which are members of the mostly unicellular Amoebozoa. A phylogeny based on SSU rDNA data subdivided all Dictyostelia into four major groups, but left the position of the root and of six group-intermediate taxa unresolved. Recent phylogenies inferred from 30 or 213 proteins from sequenced genomes, positioned the root between two branches, each containing two major groups, but lacked data to position the group-intermediate taxa. Since the positions of these early diverging taxa are crucial for understanding the evolution of phenotypic complexity in Dictyostelia, we sequenced six representative genomes of early diverging taxa. We retrieved orthologs of 47 housekeeping proteins with an average size of 890 amino acids from six newly sequenced and eight published genomes of Dictyostelia and unicellular Amoebozoa and inferred phylogenies from single and concatenated protein sequence alignments. Concatenated alignments of all 47 proteins, and four out of five subsets of nine concatenated proteins all produced the same consensus phylogeny with 100% statistical support. Trees inferred from just two out of the 47 proteins, individually reproduced the consensus phylogeny, highlighting that single gene phylogenies will rarely reflect correct species relationships. However, sets of two or three concatenated proteins again reproduced the consensus phylogeny, indicating that a small selection of genes suffices for low cost classification of as yet unincorporated or newly discovered dictyostelid and amoebozoan taxa by gene amplification. The multi-locus consensus phylogeny shows that groups 1 and 2 are sister clades in branch I, with the group-intermediate taxon D. polycarpum positioned as outgroup to group 2. Branch II consists of groups 3 and 4, with the group-intermediate taxon Polysphondylium violaceum positioned as sister to group 4, and the group-intermediate taxon Dictyostelium polycephalum

  14. Time-dependent London approach: Dissipation due to out-of-core normal excitations by moving vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogan, V. G.

    2018-03-01

    The dissipative currents due to normal excitations are included in the London description. The resulting time-dependent London equations are solved for a moving vortex and a moving vortex lattice. It is shown that the field distribution of a moving vortex loses its cylindrical symmetry. It experiences contraction that is stronger in the direction of the motion than in the direction normal to the velocity v . The London contribution of normal currents to dissipation is small relative to the Bardeen-Stephen core dissipation at small velocities, but it approaches the latter at high velocities, where this contribution is no longer proportional to v2. To minimize the London contribution to dissipation, the vortex lattice is oriented so as to have one of the unit cell vectors along the velocity. This effect is seen in experiments and predicted within the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau theory.

  15. Glocalized Production - A Holistic Approach for Future Manufacturing at The LEGO Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hadar, Ronen

    2014-01-01

    ) and Rapid Manufacturing (RM). RMS is a manufacturing system that is designed for rapid changes. It is based on core characteristics such as modularity, convertibility, customized flexibility, etc.. RM is the use of Additive Manufacturing (AM –commonly referred to as 3D printing) for the production......Global production is changing. Changes in production paradigms, global competition, manufacturing technologies, and new mega trends such as individualization, inflict immense challenges on global manufacturers. A new holistic approach for facing supply chain and production challenges is proposed...... facilities, the establishment of production close to main markets, and the creation of a global network of independent factories and supply chains with local manufacturing. Doing so will potentially increase responsiveness, cut transportation costs, reduce complexity, enable production to demand rather than...

  16. How to make friends: A logical approach to social group creation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smets, S.; Velázquez-Quesada, F.R.; Baltag, A.; Seligman, J.; Yamada, T.

    2017-01-01

    This paper studies the logical features of social group creation. We focus on the mechanisms which indicate when agents can form a team based on the correspondence in their set of features (behavior, opinions, etc.). Our basic approach uses a semi-metric on the set of agents, which is used to

  17. The decays Psub(c) -> VP in the group theoretical and quark diagrammatic approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuan, S.F.; Xiaoyuan Li.

    1983-08-01

    Decays of charmed meson into one vector meson and one pseudoscalar meson Psub(c) -> VP in both the group theoretical and quark diagrammatic approaches are considered. A complete decay amplitude analysis is given. The present available experimental data can be accomodated if the contributions from exotic final states and exotic piece of weak Hamiltonian are also taken into account. (orig.)

  18. Fuzzy Group Decision Making Approach for Ranking Work Stations Based on Physical Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Salmanzadeh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a Fuzzy Group Decision Making approach for ranking work stations based on physical pressure. Fuzzy group decision making approach allows experts to evaluate different ergonomic factors using linguistic terms such as very high, high, medium, low, very low, rather than precise numerical values. In this way, there is no need to measure parameters and evaluation can be easily made in a group. According to ergonomics much work contents and situations, accompanied with multiple parameters and uncertainties, fuzzy group decision making is the best way to evaluate such a chameleon of concept. A case study was down to utilize the approach and illustrate its application in ergonomic assessment and ranking the work stations based on work pressure and found that this approach provides flexibility, practicality, efficiency in making decision around ergonomics areas. The normalized defuzzification numbers which are resulted from this method are compared with result of quantitative assessment of Automotive Assembly Work Sheet auto, it’s demonstrated that the proposed method result is 10% less than Automotive Assembly Work Sheet, approximately.

  19. The Interrelationship of Emotion and Cognition when Students Undertake Collaborative Group Work Online: An Interdisciplinary Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Kathy

    2013-01-01

    In order to determine how emotions and cognition are experienced during collaborative group work online students' descriptions of their learning experience were interpreted using a qualitative approach. A common feature of these accounts was reference to difficulties and problems. Four main themes were identified from this data set. Two of the…

  20. The Effect of Group Works and Demonstrative Experiments Based on Conceptual Change Approach: Photosynthesis and Respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibik, Ayse Sert; Diken, Emine Hatun; Darcin, Emine Selcen

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of the use of group works and demonstration experiments based on conceptual change approach in the elimination of misconception about the subject of photosynthesis and respiration in plants in pre-service science teachers. This study was conducted with 78 pre-service science teachers including…

  1. Cultural Differences in how an Engagement-Seeking Robot should Approach a Group of People

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosse, M.P.; Poppe, Ronald Walter; Lohse, M.; Evers, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    In our daily life everything and everyone occupies an amount of space, simply by “being there‿. Edward Hall coined the term proxemics for the studies of man’s use of this space. This paper presents a study on proxemics in Human-Robot Interaction and particularly on robot’s approaching groups of

  2. Cultural differences in how an engagement-seeking robot should approach a group of people

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosse, Michiel P.; Poppe, Ronald|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/317771345; Lohse, Manja; Evers, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    In our daily life everything and everyone occupies an amount of space, simply by "being there". Edward Hall coined the term proxemics for the studies of man's use of this space. This paper presents a study on proxemics in Human-Robot Interaction and particularly on robot's approaching groups of

  3. High Demand, Core Geosciences, and Meeting the Challenges through Online Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Christopher; Leahy, P. Patrick; Houlton, Heather; Wilson, Carolyn

    2014-05-01

    As the geosciences has evolved over the last several decades, so too has undergraduate geoscience education, both from a standpoint of curriculum and educational experience. In the United States, we have been experiencing very strong growth in enrollments in geoscience, as well as employment demand for the last 7 years. That growth has been largely fueled by all aspects of the energy boom in the US, both from the energy production side and the environmental management side. Interestingly the portfolio of experiences and knowledge required are strongly congruent as evidenced from results of the American Geosciences Institute's National Geoscience Exit Survey. Likewise, the demand for new geoscientists in the US is outstripping even the nearly unprecedented growth in enrollments and degrees, which is calling into question the geosciences' inability to effectively reach into the largest growing segments of the U.S. College population - underrepresented minorities. We will also examine the results of the AGI Survey on Geoscience Online Learning and examine how the results of that survey are rectified with Peter Smith's "Middle Third" theory on "wasted talent" because of spatial, economic, and social dislocation. In particular, the geosciences are late to the online learning game in the United States and most faculty engaged in such activities are "lone wolves" in their department operating with little knowledge of the support structures that exist in such development. Yet the most cited barriers for faculty not engaging actively in online learning is the assertion that laboratory and field experiences will be lost and thus fight engaging in this medium. However, the survey shows that faculty are discovering novel approaches to address these issues, many of which have great application to enabling geoscience programs in the United States to meet the expanding demand for geoscience degrees.

  4. In-vessel core degradation code validation matrix update 1996-1999. Report by an OECD/NEA group of experts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-02-01

    In 1991 the Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) issued a State-of-the-Art Report (SOAR) on In-Vessel Core Degradation in Light Water Reactor (LWR) Severe Accidents. Based on the recommendations of this report a Validation Matrix for severe accident modelling codes was produced. Experiments performed up to the end of 1993 were considered for this validation matrix. To include recent experiments and to enlarge the scope, an update was formally inaugurated in January 1999 by the Task Group on Degraded Core Cooling, a sub-group of Principal Working Group 2 (PWG-2) on Coolant System Behaviour, and a selection of writing group members was commissioned. The present report documents the results of this study. The objective of the Validation Matrix is to define a basic set of experiments, for which comparison of the measured and calculated parameters forms a basis for establishing the accuracy of test predictions, covering the full range of in-vessel core degradation phenomena expected in light water reactor severe accident transients. The emphasis is on integral experiments, where interactions amongst key phenomena as well as the phenomena themselves are explored; however separate-effects experiments are also considered especially where these extend the parameter ranges to cover those expected in postulated LWR severe accident transients. As well as covering PWR and BWR designs of Western origin, the scope of the review has been extended to Eastern European (VVER) types. Similarly, the coverage of phenomena has been extended, starting as before from the initial heat-up but now proceeding through the in-core stage to include introduction of melt into the lower plenum and further to core coolability and retention to the lower plenum, with possible external cooling. Items of a purely thermal hydraulic nature involving no core degradation are excluded, having been covered in other validation matrix studies. Concerning fission product behaviour, the effect

  5. Data Collection for Mobile Group Consumption: An Asynchronous Distributed Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Weiping; Chen, Weiran; Hu, Zhejie; Li, Zuoyou; Liang, Yue; Chen, Jiaojiao

    2016-01-01

    Mobile group consumption refers to consumption by a group of people, such as a couple, a family, colleagues and friends, based on mobile communications. It differs from consumption only involving individuals, because of the complex relations among group members. Existing data collection systems for mobile group consumption are centralized, which has the disadvantages of being a performance bottleneck, having single-point failure and increasing business and security risks. Moreover, these data collection systems are based on a synchronized clock, which is often unrealistic because of hardware constraints, privacy concerns or synchronization cost. In this paper, we propose the first asynchronous distributed approach to collecting data generated by mobile group consumption. We formally built a system model thereof based on asynchronous distributed communication. We then designed a simulation system for the model for which we propose a three-layer solution framework. After that, we describe how to detect the causality relation of two/three gathering events that happened in the system based on the collected data. Various definitions of causality relations based on asynchronous distributed communication are supported. Extensive simulation results show that the proposed approach is effective for data collection relating to mobile group consumption. PMID:27058544

  6. Improved Membership Probability for Moving Groups: Bayesian and Machine Learning Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jinhee; Song, Inseok

    2018-01-01

    Gravitationally unbound loose stellar associations (i.e., young nearby moving groups: moving groups hereafter) have been intensively explored because they are important in planet and disk formation studies, exoplanet imaging, and age calibration. Among the many efforts devoted to the search for moving group members, a Bayesian approach (e.g.,using the code BANYAN) has become popular recently because of the many advantages it offers. However, the resultant membership probability needs to be carefully adopted because of its sensitive dependence on input models. In this study, we have developed an improved membership calculation tool focusing on the beta-Pic moving group. We made three improvements for building models used in BANYAN II: (1) updating a list of accepted members by re-assessing memberships in terms of position, motion, and age, (2) investigating member distribution functions in XYZ, and (3) exploring field star distribution functions in XYZUVW. Our improved tool can change membership probability up to 70%. Membership probability is critical and must be better defined. For example, our code identifies only one third of the candidate members in SIMBAD that are believed to be kinematically associated with beta-Pic moving group.Additionally, we performed cluster analysis of young nearby stars using an unsupervised machine learning approach. As more moving groups and their members are identified, the complexity and ambiguity in moving group configuration has been increased. To clarify this issue, we analyzed ~4,000 X-ray bright young stellar candidates. Here, we present the preliminary results. By re-identifying moving groups with the least human intervention, we expect to understand the composition of the solar neighborhood. Moreover better defined moving group membership will help us understand star formation and evolution in relatively low density environments; especially for the low-mass stars which will be identified in the coming Gaia release.

  7. Group decision-making approach for flood vulnerability identification using the fuzzy VIKOR method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, G.; Jun, K. S.; Chung, E.-S.

    2015-04-01

    This study proposes an improved group decision making (GDM) framework that combines the VIKOR method with data fuzzification to quantify the spatial flood vulnerability including multiple criteria. In general, GDM method is an effective tool for formulating a compromise solution that involves various decision makers since various stakeholders may have different perspectives on their flood risk/vulnerability management responses. The GDM approach is designed to achieve consensus building that reflects the viewpoints of each participant. The fuzzy VIKOR method was developed to solve multi-criteria decision making (MCDM) problems with conflicting and noncommensurable criteria. This comprising method can be used to obtain a nearly ideal solution according to all established criteria. This approach effectively can propose some compromising decisions by combining the GDM method and fuzzy VIKOR method. The spatial flood vulnerability of the southern Han River using the GDM approach combined with the fuzzy VIKOR method was compared with the spatial flood vulnerability using general MCDM methods, such as the fuzzy TOPSIS and classical GDM methods (i.e., Borda, Condorcet, and Copeland). As a result, the proposed fuzzy GDM approach can reduce the uncertainty in the data confidence and weight derivation techniques. Thus, the combination of the GDM approach with the fuzzy VIKOR method can provide robust prioritization because it actively reflects the opinions of various groups and considers uncertainty in the input data.

  8. Effect of alkyl chains length on properties of ferroelectric liquid crystals with the keto group attached to the molecule core

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bubnov, Alexej; Novotná, Vladimíra; Pociecha, D.; Hamplová, Věra; Kašpar, Miroslav

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 85, č. 10 (2012), s. 849-860 ISSN 0141-1594 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP204/11/0723 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) M100101211; AV ČR(CZ) M100101204 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : ferroelectric liquid crystal * keto group * lactic acid derivative * spontaneous quantities * SAXS * helix pitch Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.863, year: 2012 http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/01411594.asp

  9. Core/shell-type nanorods of Tb{sup 3+}-doped LaPO{sub 4}, modified with amine groups, revealing reduced cytotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Runowski, Marcin [Adam Mickiewicz University, Department of Rare Earths, Faculty of Chemistry (Poland); Dąbrowska, Krystyna [Polish Academy of Sciences, Bacteriophage Laboratory, Institute of Immunology and Experimental Therapy (Poland); Grzyb, Tomasz [Adam Mickiewicz University, Department of Rare Earths, Faculty of Chemistry (Poland); Miernikiewicz, Paulina [Polish Academy of Sciences, Bacteriophage Laboratory, Institute of Immunology and Experimental Therapy (Poland); Lis, Stefan, E-mail: blis@amu.edu.pl [Adam Mickiewicz University, Department of Rare Earths, Faculty of Chemistry (Poland)

    2013-11-15

    A simple co-precipitation reaction between Ln{sup 3+} cations (Ln = lanthanide) and phosphate ions in the presence of polyethylene glycol (PEG), including post-treatment under hydrothermal conditions, leads to the formation of Tb{sup 3+}-doped LaPO{sub 4} crystalline nanorods. The nanoparticles obtained can be successfully coated with amorphous and porous silica, forming core/shell-type nanorods. Both products reveal intensive green luminescence under UV lamp irradiation. The surface of the core/shell-type product can also be modified with –NH{sub 2} groups via silylation procedure, using 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane as a modifier. Powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy confirm the desired structure and needle-like shape of the products synthesized. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and specific surface area measurements by Brunauer–Emmett–Teller method reveal a successful surface modification with amine groups of the core/shell-type nanoparticles prepared. The nanomaterials synthesized exhibit green luminescence characteristic of Tb{sup 3+} ions, as solid powders and aqueous colloids, examined by spectrofluorometry. The in vitro cytotoxicity studies reveal different degree toxicity of the products. LaPO{sub 4}:Tb{sup 3+}@SiO{sub 2}@NH{sub 2} exhibits the smallest toxicity against B16F0 mouse melanoma cancer cells and human skin microvascular endothelial cell lines, in contrast to the most toxic LaPO{sub 4}:Tb{sup 3+}@SiO{sub 2}.Graphical Abstract.

  10. Quantum group structure and local fields in the algebraic approach to 2D gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Schnittger, Jens

    1994-01-01

    This review contains a summary of work by J.-L. Gervais and the author on the operator approach to 2d gravity. Special emphasis is placed on the construction of local observables -the Liouville exponentials and the Liouville field itself - and the underlying algebra of chiral vertex operators. The double quantum group structure arising from the presence of two screening charges is discussed and the generalized algebra and field operators are derived. In the last part, we show that our construction gives rise to a natural definition of a quantum tau function, which is a noncommutative version of the classical group-theoretic representation of the Liouville fields by Leznov and Saveliev.

  11. Group theoretic approach for solving the problem of diffusion of a drug through a thin membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-El-Malek, Mina B.; Kassem, Magda M.; Meky, Mohammed L. M.

    2002-03-01

    The transformation group theoretic approach is applied to study the diffusion process of a drug through a skin-like membrane which tends to partially absorb the drug. Two cases are considered for the diffusion coefficient. The application of one parameter group reduces the number of independent variables by one, and consequently the partial differential equation governing the diffusion process with the boundary and initial conditions is transformed into an ordinary differential equation with the corresponding conditions. The obtained differential equation is solved numerically using the shooting method, and the results are illustrated graphically and in tables.

  12. STARS experiential group intervention: a complex trauma treatment approach for survivors of human trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopper, Elizabeth K; Azar, Naomi; Bhattacharyya, Sriya; Malebranche, Dominique A; Brennan, Kelsey E

    2018-01-01

    This is the abstract that was submitted online with the paper: Despite the fact that many survivors of human trafficking have experienced complex trauma, there are no established interventions designed to specifically address these impacts. Leaders in the field of complex trauma have advocated for the need for somatic approaches to intervention. This paper presents STARS Experiential Group treatment, the first structured bodybased group intervention that has been designed to address complex trauma in survivors of human trafficking. Three pilot groups were run in residential settings with adolescent and adult survivors of sex trafficking. Two adaptations were utilized, with one focusing on application of expressive arts modalities and the other incorporating theater games. Qualitative results, using thematic analysis, identified several themes related to challenges and potential benefits of these groups. Potential benefits of the STARS groups were found in the areas of Interpersonal Relationships, Regulation, and Self/ Identity, with fourteen sub-themes further describing positive impacts. Challenges within these areas are explored, to inform the development of group interventions for trafficking survivors. The results of this paper suggest that experiential, somatically-oriented group treatment shows promise as an important element of holistic intervention with trafficking survivors.

  13. The Einsteinian T(3)-gauge approach and the stress tensor of the screw dislocation in the second order: avoiding the cut-off at the core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malyshev, C

    2007-01-01

    A translational gauge approach of the Einstein type is proposed for obtaining the stresses that are due to non-singular screw dislocation. The stress distribution of the second order around the screw dislocation is classically known for the hollow circular cylinder with traction-free external and internal boundaries. The inner boundary surrounds the dislocation's core, which is not captured by the conventional solution. The present gauge approach enables us to continue the classically known quadratic stresses inside the core. The gauge equation is chosen in the Hilbert-Einstein form, and it plays the role of non-conventional incompatibility law. The stress function method is used, and it leads to the modified stress potential given by two constituents: the conventional one, say, the 'background' and a short-ranged gauge contribution. The latter just causes additional stresses, which are localized. The asymptotic properties of the resulting stresses are studied. Since the gauge contributions are short-ranged, the background stress field dominates sufficiently far from the core. The outer cylinder's boundary is traction-free. At sufficiently moderate distances, the second-order stresses acquire regular continuation within the core region, and the cut-off at the core does not occur. Expressions for the asymptotically far stresses provide self-consistently new length scales dependent on the elastic parameters. These lengths could characterize an exteriority of the dislocation core region

  14. Liquid-liquid reductive extraction in molten fluoride salt/liquid aluminium as a core of process for the An/Ln group separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conocar, O.

    2007-06-01

    This report concerns a pyrochemical process based on liquid-liquid extraction in a molten fluoride/liquid aluminium system as a core process for actinide (An)/lanthanide (Ln) group separation, studied at CEA. The basic and demonstrative experiments have established the feasibility of the An/Ln group separation in the molten fluoride/liquid aluminium system (U, Pu, Np, Am, Cm traces from Nd, Ce, Eu, Sm, Eu, La - An/Ln separation factors over 1000 - An recovery yield over 98 % in one batch). The main experimental efforts must now be targeted on the recovery of actinides from the Al matrix. A thermodynamic and bibliographical survey has been done. It shows that back-extraction in a molten chloride melt could be a promising technique for this purpose

  15. Liquid-liquid reductive extraction in molten fluoride salt/liquid aluminium as a core of process for the An/Ln group separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conocar, O

    2007-06-15

    This report concerns a pyrochemical process based on liquid-liquid extraction in a molten fluoride/liquid aluminium system as a core process for actinide (An)/lanthanide (Ln) group separation, studied at CEA. The basic and demonstrative experiments have established the feasibility of the An/Ln group separation in the molten fluoride/liquid aluminium system (U, Pu, Np, Am, Cm traces from Nd, Ce, Eu, Sm, Eu, La - An/Ln separation factors over 1000 - An recovery yield over 98 % in one batch). The main experimental efforts must now be targeted on the recovery of actinides from the Al matrix. A thermodynamic and bibliographical survey has been done. It shows that back-extraction in a molten chloride melt could be a promising technique for this purpose.

  16. Student perceptions of independent versus facilitated small group learning approaches to compressed medical anatomy education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, Alexander; Leddy, John J; Mindra, Sean; Matthew Hughes, J D; El-Bialy, Safaa; Ramnanan, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare student perceptions regarding two, small group learning approaches to compressed (46.5 prosection-based laboratory hours), integrated anatomy education at the University of Ottawa medical program. In the facilitated active learning (FAL) approach, tutors engage students and are expected to enable and balance both active learning and progression through laboratory objectives. In contrast, the emphasized independent learning (EIL) approach stresses elements from the "flipped classroom" educational model: prelaboratory preparation, independent laboratory learning, and limited tutor involvement. Quantitative (Likert-style questions) and qualitative data (independent thematic analysis of open-ended commentary) from a survey of students who had completed the preclerkship curriculum identified strengths from the EIL (promoting student collaboration and communication) and FAL (successful progression through objectives) approaches. However, EIL led to student frustration related to a lack of direction and impaired completion of objectives, whereas active learning opportunities in FAL were highly variable and dependent on tutor teaching style. A "hidden curriculum" was also identified, where students (particularly EIL and clerkship students) commonly compared their compressed anatomy education or their anatomy learning environment with other approaches. Finally, while both groups highly regarded the efficiency of prosection-based learning and expressed value for cadaveric-based learning, student commentary noted that the lack of grade value dedicated to anatomy assessment limited student accountability. This study revealed critical insights into small group learning in compressed anatomy education, including the need to balance student active learning opportunities with appropriate direction and feedback (including assessment). © 2015 American Association of Anatomists.

  17. A Group Theoretic Approach to Metaheuristic Local Search for Partitioning Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-05-01

    Tabu Search. Mathematical and Computer Modeling 39: 599-616. 107 Daskin , M.S., E. Stern. 1981. A Hierarchical Objective Set Covering Model for EMS... A Group Theoretic Approach to Metaheuristic Local Search for Partitioning Problems by Gary W. Kinney Jr., B.G.S., M.S. Dissertation Presented to the...DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A Approved for Public Release Distribution Unlimited The University of Texas at Austin May, 2005 20050504 002 REPORT

  18. Competition between direct interaction and Kondo effect: Renormalization-group approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allub, R.

    1988-03-01

    Via the Wilson renormalization-group approach, the effect of the competition between direct interaction (J L ) and Kondo coupling is studied, in the magnetic susceptibility of a model with two different magnetic impurities. For the ferromagnetic interaction (J L > 0) between the localized impurities, we find a magnetic ground state and a divergent susceptibility at low temperatures. For (J L < 0), two different Kondo temperatures and a non-magnetic ground state are distinguished. (author). 12 refs, 1 fig

  19. A general analytical approach to the one-group, one-dimensional transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barichello, L.B.; Vilhena, M.T.

    1993-01-01

    The main feature of the presented approach to solve the neutron transport equation consists in the application of the Laplace transform to the discrete ordinates equations, which yields a linear system of order N to be solved (LTS N method). In this paper this system is solved analytically and the inversion is performed using the Heaviside expansion technique. The general formulation achieved by this procedure is then applied to homogeneous and heterogeneous one-group slab-geometry problems. (orig.) [de

  20. INFRARED AND RADIO OBSERVATIONS OF A SMALL GROUP OF PROTOSTELLAR OBJECTS IN THE MOLECULAR CORE, L1251-C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jungha; Lee, Jeong-Eun [School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, Yongin-Si, Gyeonggi-Do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Minho; Kang, Miju [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, 776 Daedeokdaero, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Bourke, Tyler L. [Square Kilometre Array Organisation, Jodrell Bank Observatory, Lower Withington, Cheshire SK11 9DL (United Kingdom); II, Neal J. Evans [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 2515 Speedway, Stop C1400, Austin, TX 78712-1205 (United States); Francesco, James Di [National Research Council Canada, Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, Victoria, BC (Canada); Cieza, Lucas A. [Universidad Diego Portales, Facultad de Ingeniera, Av. Ejército 441, Santiago (Chile); Dunham, Michael M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    We present a multi-wavelength observational study of a low-mass star-forming region, L1251-C, with observational results at wavelengths from the near-infrared to the millimeter. Spitzer Space Telescope observations confirmed that IRAS 22343+7501 is a small group of protostellar objects. The extended emission in the east–west direction with its intensity peak at the center of L1251A has been detected at 350 and 850 μm with the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory and James Clerk Maxwell telescopes, tracing dense envelope material around L1251A. The single-dish data from the Korean VLBI Network and TRAO telescopes show inconsistencies between the intensity peaks of several molecular emission lines and that of the continuum emission, suggesting complex distributions of molecular abundances around L1251A. The Submillimeter Array interferometer data, however, show intensity peaks of CO 2–1 and {sup 13}CO 2–1 located at the position of IRS 1, which is both the brightest source in the Infrared Array Camera image and the weakest source in the 1.3 mm dust-continuum map. IRS 1 is the strongest candidate for the driving source of the newly detected compact CO 2–1 outflow. Over the entire region (14′ × 14′) of L125l-C, 3 Class I and 16 Class II sources have been detected, including three young stellar objects (YSOs) in L1251A. A comparison between the average projected distance among the 19 YSOs in L1251-C and that among the 3 YSOs in L1251A suggests that L1251-C is an example of low-mass cluster formation where protostellar objects form in a small group.

  1. Applications of the renormalization group approach to problems in quantum field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renken, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    The presence of fluctuations at many scales of length complicates theories of quantum fields. However, interest is often focused on the low-energy consequences of a theory rather than the short distance fluctuations. In the renormalization-group approach, one takes advantage of this by constructing an effective theory with identical low-energy behavior, but without short distance fluctuations. Three problems of this type are studied here. In chapter 1, an effective lagrangian is used to compute the low-energy consequences of theories of technicolor. Corrections to weak-interaction parameters are found to be small, but conceivably measurable. In chapter 2, the renormalization group approach is applied to second order phase transitions in lattice gauge theories such as the deconfining transition in the U(1) theory. A practical procedure for studying the critical behavior based on Monte Carlo renormalization group methods is described in detail; no numerical results are presented. Chapter 3 addresses the problem of computing the low-energy behavior of atoms directly from Schrodinger's equation. A straightforward approach is described, but is found to be impractical

  2. Core Values in Nursing Care Based on the Experiences of Nurses Engaged in Neonatal Nursing: A Text-mining Approach for Analyzing Reflection Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Hiromi; Okuda, Reiko; Hagino, Hiroshi

    2018-01-01

    Background Strong feelings about and enthusiasm for nursing care are reflected in nurses’ thoughts and behaviors in clinical practice and affect their profession. This study was conducted to identify the characteristics of core values in nursing care based on the experiences of nurses engaged in neonatal nursing through a process for recognizing the conceptualization of nursing. Methods We conceptualized nursing care in 43 nurses who were involved in neonatal nursing using a reflection sheet. We classified descriptions on a sheet based on the Three-Staged Recognition scheme and analyzed them using a text-mining approach. Results Nurses involved in neonatal nursing recognized that they must take care of the “child,” “mother,” and “family.” Important elements of nursing in nurses with less than 5 years versus 5 or more years of neonatal nursing experience were classified into seven clusters, respectively. These elements were mainly related to family members in both groups. In nurses with less than 5 years of experience, four clusters of one-way communication by nurses were observed in the analysis of the key elements in nursing. On the other hand, five clusters of mutual relationships between patients, their family members, and nurses were observed in nurses with 5 or more years of experience. Conclusion In conclusion, the core value of nurses engaged in neonatal nursing is family-oriented nursing. Nurses with 5 or more years of neonatal nursing experience understand patients and their family members well through establishing relationships and providing comfort and safety while taking care of them. PMID:29599621

  3. Stress transfer from pile group in saturated and unsaturated soil using theoretical and experimental approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    al-Omari Raid R.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Piles are often used in groups, and the behavior of pile groups under the applied loads is generally different from that of single pile due to the interaction of neighboring piles, therefore, one of the main objectives of this paper is to investigate the influence of pile group (bearing capacity, load transfer sharing for pile shaft and tip in comparison to that of single piles. Determination of the influence of load transfer from the pile group to the surrounding soil and the mechanism of this transfer with increasing the load increment on the tip and pile shaft for the soil in saturated and unsaturated state (when there is a negative pore water pressure. Different basic properties are used that is (S = 90%, γd = 15 kN / m3, S = 90%, γd = 17 kN / m3 and S = 60%, γd =15 kN / m3. Seven model piles were tested, these was: single pile (compression and pull out test, 2×1, 3×1, 2×2, 3×2 and 3×3 group. The stress was measured with 5 cm diameter soil pressure transducer positioned at a depth of 5 cm below the pile tip for all pile groups. The measured stresses below the pile tip using a soil pressure transducer positioned at a depth of 0.25L (where L is the pile length below the pile tip are compared with those calculated using theoretical and conventional approaches. These methods are: the conventional 2V:1H method and the method used the theory of elasticity. The results showed that the method of measuring the soil stresses with soil pressure transducer adopted in this study, gives in general, good results of stress transfer compared with the results obtained from the theoretical and conventional approaches.

  4. Grouping and Read-Across Approaches for Risk Assessment of Nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oomen, Agnes G; Bleeker, Eric A J; Bos, Peter M J; van Broekhuizen, Fleur; Gottardo, Stefania; Groenewold, Monique; Hristozov, Danail; Hund-Rinke, Kerstin; Irfan, Muhammad-Adeel; Marcomini, Antonio; Peijnenburg, Willie J G M; Rasmussen, Kirsten; Jiménez, Araceli Sánchez; Scott-Fordsmand, Janeck J; van Tongeren, Martie; Wiench, Karin; Wohlleben, Wendel; Landsiedel, Robert

    2015-10-26

    Physicochemical properties of chemicals affect their exposure, toxicokinetics/fate and hazard, and for nanomaterials, the variation of these properties results in a wide variety of materials with potentially different risks. To limit the amount of testing for risk assessment, the information gathering process for nanomaterials needs to be efficient. At the same time, sufficient information to assess the safety of human health and the environment should be available for each nanomaterial. Grouping and read-across approaches can be utilised to meet these goals. This article presents different possible applications of grouping and read-across for nanomaterials within the broader perspective of the MARINA Risk Assessment Strategy (RAS), as developed in the EU FP7 project MARINA. Firstly, nanomaterials can be grouped based on limited variation in physicochemical properties to subsequently design an efficient testing strategy that covers the entire group. Secondly, knowledge about exposure, toxicokinetics/fate or hazard, for example via properties such as dissolution rate, aspect ratio, chemical (non-)activity, can be used to organise similar materials in generic groups to frame issues that need further attention, or potentially to read-across. Thirdly, when data related to specific endpoints is required, read-across can be considered, using data from a source material for the target nanomaterial. Read-across could be based on a scientifically sound justification that exposure, distribution to the target (fate/toxicokinetics) and hazard of the target material are similar to, or less than, the source material. These grouping and read-across approaches pave the way for better use of available information on nanomaterials and are flexible enough to allow future adaptations related to scientific developments.

  5. Grouping and Read-Across Approaches for Risk Assessment of Nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes G. Oomen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Physicochemical properties of chemicals affect their exposure, toxicokinetics/fate and hazard, and for nanomaterials, the variation of these properties results in a wide variety of materials with potentially different risks. To limit the amount of testing for risk assessment, the information gathering process for nanomaterials needs to be efficient. At the same time, sufficient information to assess the safety of human health and the environment should be available for each nanomaterial. Grouping and read-across approaches can be utilised to meet these goals. This article presents different possible applications of grouping and read-across for nanomaterials within the broader perspective of the MARINA Risk Assessment Strategy (RAS, as developed in the EU FP7 project MARINA. Firstly, nanomaterials can be grouped based on limited variation in physicochemical properties to subsequently design an efficient testing strategy that covers the entire group. Secondly, knowledge about exposure, toxicokinetics/fate or hazard, for example via properties such as dissolution rate, aspect ratio, chemical (non-activity, can be used to organise similar materials in generic groups to frame issues that need further attention, or potentially to read-across. Thirdly, when data related to specific endpoints is required, read-across can be considered, using data from a source material for the target nanomaterial. Read-across could be based on a scientifically sound justification that exposure, distribution to the target (fate/toxicokinetics and hazard of the target material are similar to, or less than, the source material. These grouping and read-across approaches pave the way for better use of available information on nanomaterials and are flexible enough to allow future adaptations related to scientific developments.

  6. Social management of laboratory rhesus macaques housed in large groups using a network approach: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCowan, Brenda; Beisner, Brianne; Hannibal, Darcy

    2017-12-07

    Biomedical facilities across the nation and worldwide aim to develop cost-effective methods for the reproductive management of macaque breeding groups, typically by housing macaques in large, multi-male multi-female social groups that provide monkey subjects for research as well as appropriate socialization for their psychological well-being. One of the most difficult problems in managing socially housed macaques is their propensity for deleterious aggression. From a management perspective, deleterious aggression (as opposed to less intense aggression that serves to regulate social relationships) is undoubtedly the most problematic behavior observed in group-housed macaques, which can readily escalate to the degree that it causes social instability, increases serious physical trauma leading to group dissolution, and reduces psychological well-being. Thus for both welfare and other management reasons, aggression among rhesus macaques at primate centers and facilities needs to be addressed with a more proactive approach.Management strategies need to be instituted that maximize social housing while also reducing problematic social aggression due to instability using efficacious methods for detection and prevention in the most cost effective manner. Herein we review a new proactive approach using social network analysis to assess and predict deleterious aggression in macaque groups. We discovered three major pathways leading to instability, such as unusually high rates and severity of trauma and social relocations.These pathways are linked either directly or indirectly to network structure in rhesus macaque societies. We define these pathways according to the key intrinsic and extrinsic variables (e.g., demographic, genetic or social factors) that influence network and behavioral measures of stability (see Fig. 1). They are: (1) presence of natal males, (2) matrilineal genetic fragmentation, and (3) the power structure and conflict policing behavior supported by this

  7. Interface engineered ferrite@ferroelectric core-shell nanostructures: A facile approach to impart superior magneto-electric coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Ann Rose; Raneesh, B.; Das, Dipankar; Oluwafemi, Oluwatobi Samuel; Thomas, Sabu; Kalarikkal, Nandakumar

    2018-04-01

    The electric field control of magnetism in multiferroics is attractive for the realization of ultra-fast and miniaturized low power device applications like nonvolatile memories. Room temperature hybrid multiferroic heterostructures with core-shell (0-0) architecture (ferrite core and ferroelectric shell) were developed via a two-step method. High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) images confirm the core-shell structure. The temperature dependant magnetization measurements and Mossbauer spectra reveal superparamagnetic nature of the core-shell sample. The ferroelectric hysteresis loops reveal leaky nature of the samples. The results indicate the promising applications of the samples for magneto-electric memories and spintronics.

  8. The environmental management problem of Pohorje, Slovenia: A new group approach within ANP - SWOT framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grošelj, Petra; Zadnik Stirn, Lidija

    2015-09-15

    Environmental management problems can be dealt with by combining participatory methods, which make it possible to include various stakeholders in a decision-making process, and multi-criteria methods, which offer a formal model for structuring and solving a problem. This paper proposes a three-phase decision making approach based on the analytic network process and SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats) analysis. The approach enables inclusion of various stakeholders or groups of stakeholders in particular stages of decision making. The structure of the proposed approach is composed of a network consisting of an objective cluster, a cluster of strategic goals, a cluster of SWOT factors and a cluster of alternatives. The application of the suggested approach is applied to a management problem of Pohorje, a mountainous area in Slovenia. Stakeholders from sectors that are important for Pohorje (forestry, agriculture, tourism and nature protection agencies) who can offer a wide range of expert knowledge were included in the decision-making process. The results identify the alternative of "sustainable development" as the most appropriate for development of Pohorje. The application in the paper offers an example of employing the new approach to an environmental management problem. This can also be applied to decision-making problems in various other fields. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Physical Layer Multi-Core Prototyping A Dataflow-Based Approach for LTE eNodeB

    CERN Document Server

    Pelcat, Maxime; Piat, Jonathan; Nezan, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    Base stations developed according to the 3GPP Long Term Evolution (LTE) standard require unprecedented processing power. 3GPP LTE enables data rates beyond hundreds of Mbits/s by using advanced technologies, necessitating a highly complex LTE physical layer. The operating power of base stations is a significant cost for operators, and is currently optimized using state-of-the-art hardware solutions, such as heterogeneous distributed systems. The traditional system design method of porting algorithms to heterogeneous distributed systems based on test-and-refine methods is a manual, thus time-expensive, task.   Physical Layer Multi-Core Prototyping: A Dataflow-Based Approach for LTE eNodeB provides a clear introduction to the 3GPP LTE physical layer and to dataflow-based prototyping and programming. The difficulties in the process of 3GPP LTE physical layer porting are outlined, with particular focus on automatic partitioning and scheduling, load balancing and computation latency reduction, specifically in sys...

  10. Severe accident management development program for VVER-1000 and VVER-440/213 based on the westinghouse owners group approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felix, E.; Dessars, N.

    2003-01-01

    The development of the Westinghouse Owners Group Severe Accident Management Guidelines (WOG SAMG) between 1991 and 1994 was initiated in response to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requirement for addressing the regulatory severe accident concerns. Hence, the WOG SAMG is designed to interface with other existing procedures at the plant and is used in accident sequences that have progressed to the point where these other procedures are not applicable any longer, i.e. following core damage. The primary purpose of the WOG SAMG is to reach a controlled stable state, which can be declared when fission product releases are controlled, challenges to the confinement fission product boundary have been mitigated, and adequate heat removal is provided to the core and the containment. Although the WOG SAMG is a generic severe accident management guidance developed for use by the entirety of the operating Westinghouse PWR plants, provisions have been made in their development to address specific features of individual plants such as confinement type and the feasibility of reactor cavity flooding. Similarly, the generic SAMG does not address unique plant features and equipment, but rather allows for consideration of plant specific features and strategies. This adaptable approach has led to several SAMG development programs for VVER-1000 and VVER-440 type of power plants, under Westinghouse' s lead. The first of these programs carried out to completion was for Temelin NPP - VVER-1000 - in the first quarter of 2003. Other ongoing programs aim at providing a similar work for VVER-440 design, namely Dukovany, Mochovce and Bohunice NPPs. The challenge of adapting the existing generic WOG material to plants other than PWRs mainly arises for VVER-440 because of important differences in confinement design, making it more vulnerable to ex-vessel phenomena such as hydrogen burn. Also, for both eastern designs, cavity flooding strategy requires special consideration and

  11. Evaluation of a Core Team Centred Professional Development Programme for Building a Whole-School Cooperative Problem Solving Approach to Conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Andrew Jonathan; Wertheim, Eleanor H.; Freeman, Elizabeth; Trinder, Margot

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated a professional learning approach using a core team (CT) model to assist primary (elementary) schools to develop whole-school collaborative conflict resolution processes. Thirteen schools were matched and randomly assigned to the enhancing relationships in school communities programme ("n"?=?10) or a non-programme…

  12. Tattoos, body piercings, and self-injury: is there a connection? Investigations on a core group of participants practicing body modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirn, Aglaja; Hinz, Andreas

    2008-05-01

    Reliable psychosocial data about practitioners of body piercing and tattooing are few and controversial. The goal of this study was to reinvestigate the issue by studying a large sample of individuals with body modifications (BMs), focusing on the motives and relations to biographical events. A 55-item anonymous self-report questionnaire was distributed among volunteers of what is considered to be a core group of individuals wearing BMs (N=432). Results show that BMs changed the participants' attitude toward their body considerably, and 34% of all participants reported BM practices in conjunction with decisive biographical events. Twenty-seven percent of the participants admitted self-cutting during childhood. This group differed from the group without self-cutting with respect to several features before, during, and after BM. The rate of medical complications of BM was 16% in the total sample, with a remarkably higher rate (26%) among participants with a history of self-cutting. The data suggest that the significance of BMs ranges from simple peer group imitations to highly informative symptoms of possibly severe psychopathological conditions. In the latter case, BMs sometimes serve as therapeutic substitutes.

  13. A first approach to a faunistic crenon typology based on functional feeding groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter NAGEL

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Springs are ecomorphologically and faunistically diverse freshwater ecosystems. Their limnological classification has been a focus of interest since crenic research began. Despite many attempts to include the crenic fauna in the classification of springs, there is no faunistic crenon typology. Over a three-year period we investigated the macroinvertebrate assemblages and the physical, chemical and ecomorphological conditions of 82 springs in the Swiss Jura Mountains, north-western Switzerland. Based on these data we selected the 25 least-disturbed springs to develop a faunistic crenon classification. Based on functional feeding groups we differentiated three crenon groups. An analysis of similarities and nonmetric multidimensional scaling for the substratum types supported the crenon groupings. In general we can distinguish between springs that are dominated by scrapers and characterized by a lotic environment, and those that are mostly inhabited by filtering collectors, associated with a lentic environment. Those two crenon types are the extremes of a continuum. Particular crenon forms, such as those with extensive carbonate deposits, lie between these extremes. This third group is characterized by gathering collectors and shredders. Using this approach we can distinguish faunistic crenon types, based on functional feeding groups, which reflect the abiotic conditions within the springs. We provide a foundation for a faunistic crenon typology which now can be tested in other landscapes and will then be applicable to other low mountain ranges in Europe.

  14. Testing principle working mechanisms of the health action process approach for subjective physical age groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wienert, Julian; Kuhlmann, Tim; Fink, Sebastian; Hambrecht, Rainer; Lippke, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated differences in social-cognitive predictors and self-regulatory planning, as proposed by the health action process approach (HAPA), across three different subjective physical age groups for physical activity. With a cross-sectional design, 521 participants across the chronological age span from 25 to 86 years (M = 48.79; SD = 12.66) were separated into three groups: those who feel physically younger than they are in terms of chronological age, the same perceived and chronological age, and feeling physically older compared to their chronological age. Participants were assessed regarding their perceived vulnerability, outcome expectancies, general intentions, planning, self-efficacy, and stages of physical activity (non-intenders, intenders, and actors). Data were analysed via mean comparison and multigroup structural equation modelling. Mean differences for all but one construct were eminent in all groups, generally showing that those feeling physically younger also report better social-cognitive predictors of physical activity (e.g. lower perceived vulnerability) in comparison to those who feel the same age or older. The model showed that basic working mechanisms of the HAPA can be applied to all groups. With that, the results provide for the first time evidence that principle working mechanism of the HAPA can be applied to all subjective physical age groups. These may be used to tailor health promoting interventions according to participants' needs as a more suitable proxy than chronological age.

  15. Systems approach to studying animal sociality: individual position versus group organization in dynamic social network models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karlo Hock

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Social networks can be used to represent group structure as a network of interacting components, and also to quantify both the position of each individual and the global properties of a group. In a series of simulation experiments based on dynamic social networks, we test the prediction that social behaviors that help individuals reach prominence within their social group may conflict with their potential to benefit from their social environment. In addition to cases where individuals were able to benefit from improving both their personal relative importance and group organization, using only simple rules of social affiliation we were able to obtain results in which individuals would face a trade-off between these factors. While selection would favor (or work against social behaviors that concordantly increase (or decrease, respectively fitness at both individual and group level, when these factors conflict with each other the eventual selective pressure would depend on the relative returns individuals get from their social environment and their position within it. The presented results highlight the importance of a systems approach to studying animal sociality, in which the effects of social behaviors should be viewed not only through the benefits that those provide to individuals, but also in terms of how they affect broader social environment and how in turn this is reflected back on an individual's fitness.

  16. Detecting groups of coevolving positions in a molecule: a clustering approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galtier Nicolas

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the patterns of co-substitutions in RNA is now well characterized, detection of coevolving positions in proteins remains a difficult task. It has been recognized that the signal is typically weak, due to the fact that (i amino-acid are characterized by various biochemical properties, so that distinct amino acids changes are not functionally equivalent, and (ii a given mutation can be compensated by more than one mutation, at more than one position. Results We present a new method based on phylogenetic substitution mapping. The two above-mentioned problems are addressed by (i the introduction of a weighted mapping, which accounts for the biochemical effects (volume, polarity, charge of amino-acid changes, (ii the use of a clustering approach to detect groups of coevolving sites of virtually any size, and (iii the distinction between biochemical compensation and other coevolutionary mechanisms. We apply this methodology to a previously studied data set of bacterial ribosomal RNA, and to three protein data sets (myoglobin of vertebrates, S-locus Receptor Kinase and Methionine Amino-Peptidase. Conclusion We succeed in detecting groups of sites which significantly depart the null hypothesis of independence. Group sizes range from pairs to groups of size ≃ 10, depending on the substitution weights used. The structural and functional relevance of these groups of sites are assessed, and the various evolutionary processes potentially generating correlated substitution patterns are discussed.

  17. High mobility group protein number17 cross-links primarily to histone H2A in the reconstituted HMG 17 - nucleosome core particle complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, G.R.; Yau, P.; Yasuda, H.; Traut, R.R.; Bradbury, E.M.

    1986-01-01

    The neighbor relationship of lamb thymus High Mobility Group (HMG) protein 17 to native HeLa nucleosome core particle histones in the reconstituted complex has been studied. 125 I-labeled HMG 17 was cross-linking to core histones using the protein-protein cross-linking reagent 2-iminothiolane. Specific cross-linked products were separated on a two-dimensional Triton-acid-urea/SDS gel system, located by autoradiography, excised and quantified. Disulfide bonds in the cross links were then cleaved and the protein constituents were identified by SDS gel electrophoresis. HMG 17 cross-linked primarily to histone H2A while lower levels of cross-linking occurred between HMG 17 and the other histones. In contrast, cross-linking between two HMG 17 molecules bound on the same nucleosome was relatively rare. It is concluded that the same nucleosome was relatively rare. It is concluded that H2A comprises part of the HMG 17 binding site but that HMG 17 is sufficiently elongated and mobile to permit cross-linking to the other histones and to a second HMG 17 molecule. These results are in agreement with the current model for the structure of the nucleosome and the proposed binding sites for HMG 17

  18. Developing hybrid approaches to predict pKa values of ionizable groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witham, Shawn; Talley, Kemper; Wang, Lin; Zhang, Zhe; Sarkar, Subhra; Gao, Daquan; Yang, Wei

    2011-01-01

    Accurate predictions of pKa values of titratable groups require taking into account all relevant processes associated with the ionization/deionization. Frequently, however, the ionization does not involve significant structural changes and the dominating effects are purely electrostatic in origin allowing accurate predictions to be made based on the electrostatic energy difference between ionized and neutral forms alone using a static structure. On another hand, if the change of the charge state is accompanied by a structural reorganization of the target protein, then the relevant conformational changes have to be taken into account in the pKa calculations. Here we report a hybrid approach that first predicts the titratable groups, which ionization is expected to cause conformational changes, termed “problematic” residues, then applies a special protocol on them, while the rest of the pKa’s are predicted with rigid backbone approach as implemented in multi-conformation continuum electrostatics (MCCE) method. The backbone representative conformations for “problematic” groups are generated with either molecular dynamics simulations with charged and uncharged amino acid or with ab-initio local segment modeling. The corresponding ensembles are then used to calculate the pKa of the “problematic” residues and then the results are averaged. PMID:21744395

  19. Functional renormalization group approach to electronic structure calculations for systems without translational symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, Christian; Evers, Ferdinand

    2016-10-01

    A formalism for electronic-structure calculations is presented that is based on the functional renormalization group (FRG). The traditional FRG has been formulated for systems that exhibit a translational symmetry with an associated Fermi surface, which can provide the organization principle for the renormalization group (RG) procedure. We here advance an alternative formulation, where the RG flow is organized in the energy-domain rather than in k space. This has the advantage that it can also be applied to inhomogeneous matter lacking a band structure, such as disordered metals or molecules. The energy-domain FRG (ɛ FRG) presented here accounts for Fermi-liquid corrections to quasiparticle energies and particle-hole excitations. It goes beyond the state of the art G W -BSE , because in ɛ FRG the Bethe-Salpeter equation (BSE) is solved in a self-consistent manner. An efficient implementation of the approach that has been tested against exact diagonalization calculations and calculations based on the density matrix renormalization group is presented. Similar to the conventional FRG, also the ɛ FRG is able to signalize the vicinity of an instability of the Fermi-liquid fixed point via runaway flow of the corresponding interaction vertex. Embarking upon this fact, in an application of ɛ FRG to the spinless disordered Hubbard model we calculate its phase boundary in the plane spanned by the interaction and disorder strength. Finally, an extension of the approach to finite temperatures and spin S =1 /2 is also given.

  20. 8 Different approaches needed to manage ED demand among different age-groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimmer, Melanie; Ablard, Suzanne; O'Keeffe, Colin; Mason, Suzanne

    2017-12-01

    A variety of interventions have been proposed to manage rising demand for Emergency and Urgent Care, described by an NHS England review as unsustainable in the long term. However it is unlikely that any suggested approach will be equally suitable for the diverse population of ED users.We aimed to understand the patterns of demand amongst different types of patients attending ED. We also sought to understand the intended and unintended effects of demand management initiatives. Our study combined insights from routine data, a survey of ED patients, and qualitative interviews with ED staff. This paper describes the results of our analysis of the interviews. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 25 ED and Urgent Care Centre staff across 7 hospital sites in Yorkshire and Humber between 25 April and 11 July 2016. The interview topic guide asked about 4 broad areas; job role, description of patients and their impact on demand, description of inappropriate attendance, and current/future initiatives to deal with rising demand. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using framework analysis. We analysed the results to identify groups of patients with different patterns of use of ED services. We also explored ED staff experiences of demand management initiatives, and their suggestions for future initiatives. Although we did not ask specifically about patients' age, our analysis revealed that ED staff categorised attenders as children and young people, working age people, and older people. These groups had different reasons for attendance, different routes to the ED, different rate of non-urgent attendance, and different issues driving demand. Staff also described variation in the time taken to treat patients of different ages, with the oldest and youngest patients described as requiring the most time.There was no consensus amongst staff about the effectiveness of initiatives for managing demand. A strikingly wide variety of initiatives were mentioned

  1. Fluorescence lifetime measurements to determine the core-shell nanostructure of FITC-doped silica nanoparticles: An optical approach to evaluate nanoparticle photostability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santra, Swadeshmukul; Liesenfeld, Bernd; Bertolino, Chiara; Dutta, Debamitra; Cao Zehui; Tan Weihong; Moudgil, Brij M.; Mericle, Robert A.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we described a novel fluorescence lifetime-based approach to determine the core-shell nanostructure of FITC-(fluorescein isothiocyanate, isomer I) doped fluorescent silica nanoparticles (FSNPs). Because of phase homogeneity between the core and the shell, electron microscopic technique could not be used to characterize such core-shell nanostructure. Our optical approach not only revealed the core-shell nanostructure of FSNPs but also evaluated photobleaching of FSNPs both in the solvated and non-solvated (dry) states. The FSNPs were produced via Stoeber's method by hydrolysis and co-condensation reaction of tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) and fluorescein linked (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (FITC-APTS conjugate) in the presence of ammonium hydroxide catalyst. To obtain a pure silica surface coating, FSNPs were then post-coated with TEOS. The average particle size was 135 nm as determined by TEM (transmission electron microscope) measurements. Fluorescence excitation and emission spectral data demonstrated successful doping of FITC dye molecules in FSNPs. Fluorescence lifetime data revealed that approximately 62% of dye molecules remained in the solvated silica shell, while 38% of dye molecules remained in the non-solvated (dry) silica core. Photobleaching experiments of FSNPs were conducted both in DI water (solution state) and in air (dry state). Severe photobleaching of FSNPs was observed in air. However, FSNPs were moderately photostable in the solution state. Photostability of FSNPs in both solution and dry states was explained on the basis of fluorescence lifetime data

  2. In-Medium Similarity Renormalization Group Approach to the Nuclear Many-Body Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hergert, Heiko; Bogner, Scott K.; Lietz, Justin G.; Morris, Titus D.; Novario, Samuel J.; Parzuchowski, Nathan M.; Yuan, Fei

    We present a pedagogical discussion of Similarity Renormalization Group (SRG) methods, in particular the In-Medium SRG (IMSRG) approach for solving the nuclear many-body problem. These methods use continuous unitary transformations to evolve the nuclear Hamiltonian to a desired shape. The IMSRG, in particular, is used to decouple the ground state from all excitations and solve the many-body Schrödinger equation. We discuss the IMSRG formalism as well as its numerical implementation, and use the method to study the pairing model and infinite neutron matter. We compare our results with those of Coupled cluster theory (Chap. 8), Configuration-Interaction Monte Carlo (Chap. 9), and the Self-Consistent Green's Function approach discussed in Chap. 11 The chapter concludes with an expanded overview of current research directions, and a look ahead at upcoming developments.

  3. An algebraic approach to the inverse eigenvalue problem for a quantum system with a dynamical group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.J.

    1993-04-01

    An algebraic approach to the inverse eigenvalue problem for a quantum system with a dynamical group is formulated for the first time. One dimensional problem is treated explicitly in detail for both the finite dimensional and infinite dimensional Hilbert spaces. For the finite dimensional Hilbert space, the su(2) algebraic representation is used; while for the infinite dimensional Hilbert space, the Heisenberg-Weyl algebraic representation is employed. Fourier expansion technique is generalized to the generator space, which is suitable for analysis of irregular spectra. The polynormial operator basis is also used for complement, which is appropriate for analysis of some simple Hamiltonians. The proposed new approach is applied to solve the classical inverse Sturn-Liouville problem and to study the problems of quantum regular and irregular spectra. (orig.)

  4. Open problems and results in the group theoretic approach to quantum gravity via the BMS group and its generalizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melas, Evangelos

    2011-01-01

    The Bondi-Metzner-Sachs group B is the common asymptotic group of all asymptotically flat (lorentzian) space-times, and is the best candidate for the universal symmetry group of General Relativity. However, in quantum gravity, complexified or euclidean versions of General Relativity are frequently considered. McCarthy has shown that there are forty-two generalizations of B for these versions of the theory and a variety of further ones, either real in any signature, or complex. A firm foundation for quantum gravity can be laid by following through the analogue of Wigner's programme for special relativity with B replacing the Poincare group P. Here the main results which have been obtained so far in this research programme are reported and the more important open problems are stated.

  5. Design approaches for heating reactors. Report of an advisory group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-09-01

    The largest fraction of all energy consumed by society is in the form of heat at a temperature below 150 deg. C, and the use of nuclear energy to provide this sort of energy has been examined for the past several years. Accordingly the IAEA has been involved in related activities ever since the various technical approaches were first discussed in the late 1970s within the Nuclear Power Programme. A number of meetings, such as Technical Committee meetings and Advisory Group meetings have been held, and their results have usually been published in IAEA-TECDOCs, the last of in 1991. Refs, figs, tabs

  6. Renormalisation group approach to the ideal Bose gas in d dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, K.K.

    1981-01-01

    Critical behaviour of a d-dimensional ideal Bose gas is investigated from the point of view of the renormalisation-group approach. Rescaling of quantum-field amplitudes is avoided by introducing a scaling variable inversely proportional to the thermal momentum of the particles. The scaling properties of various thermodynamic quantities are seen to emerge as a consequence of the irrelevant nature of this variable. Critical behaviour is discussed at fixed particle density as well as at fixed pressure. Connection between susceptibility and correlation function of the order-parameter for a quantum system is elucidated. (author)

  7. Design approaches for heating reactors. Report of an advisory group meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    The largest fraction of all energy consumed by society is in the form of heat at a temperature below 150 deg. C, and the use of nuclear energy to provide this sort of energy has been examined for the past several years. Accordingly the IAEA has been involved in related activities ever since the various technical approaches were first discussed in the late 1970s within the Nuclear Power Programme. A number of meetings, such as Technical Committee meetings and Advisory Group meetings have been held, and their results have usually been published in IAEA-TECDOCs, the last of in 1991. Refs, figs, tabs.

  8. Core Content for Undergraduate Medical Education in Spain: Recommendations of the Instructors' Group of the Spanish Academy of Dermatology and Venereology (AEDV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova, J M; Pujol, R M; Ferrándiz, C; Betlloch, I; Bosch, R J; Fernández, V; Martí, R M; Requena, L; Moreno, J C; Alegre, V; Vilata, J J; Vilar, N; Jaén, P; Bielsa, I; Querol, I; Azón, T; Borrego, L; Mascaró, J M; Alsina, M; Díaz, R M; Suarez, R; García-Bustinduy, M; García-Patos, V; Estrach, T

    2016-03-01

    Skin problems are among the most frequent reasons for seeking medical attention in primary care. In recent years, as a result of the process of adapting medical curricula to the requirements of the European Higher Education Area, the amount of time students spend learning the concepts of dermatology has been reduced in many universities. In order to reach a consensus on core content for undergraduate education in dermatology, we sent a survey to the 57 members of the instructors' group of the Spanish Academy of Dermatology and Venereology (AEDV), asking their opinions on what objectives should be set for a dermatology course in Spain. A total of 131 previously selected objectives were listed. We then applied the Delphi method to achieve consensus on which ones the respondents considered important or very important (score≥4 on a Likert scale). Nineteen responses (33%) were received. On the second round of the Delphi process, 68 objectives achieved average scores of at least 4. The respondents emphasized that graduates should understand the structure and functions of the skin and know about bacterial, viral, and fungal skin infections, the most common sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), and the 4 main inflammatory dermatoses. Students should also learn about common complaints, such as itching and bald patches; the management of dermatologic emergencies; purpura and erythema nodosum as signs of internal disease; and the prevention of STDs and skin cancer. During clinical clerkships students should acquire the communication skills they will need to interview patients, write up a patient's medical history, and refer the patient to a specialist. The AEDV's group of instructors have defined their recommendations on the core content that medical faculties should adopt for the undergraduate subject of dermatology in Spain. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  9. The application of constructivism to concepts of occupation using a group process approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederer, J M

    2001-01-01

    Students in an undergraduate occupational therapy program used the concepts of constructivism and the group process to select and decoupage chairs depicting varieties of occupations for one of four life span segments: infancy, adolescence, young adulthood and older adulthood. Students were not provided a set of specific guidelines to follow during the process but constructed their learning according to their creativity and hands-on application of classroom concepts. Student feedback indicated that, while they found the experience challenging, they enjoyed the process and learned a great deal not only about the group process but also about how to approach and solve unfamiliar problems. Results suggest the similarity between principles underlying good education and those underlying occupational performance. Implications for classroom instruction are discussed.

  10. Quantum group structure and local fields in the algebraic approach to 2D gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnittger, J.

    1995-07-01

    This review contains a summary of the work by J.-L. Gervais and the author on the operator approach to 2d gravity. Special emphasis is placed on the construction of local observables — the Liouville exponentials and the Liouville field itself — and the underlying algebra of chiral vertex operators. The double quantum group structure arising from the presence of two screening charges is discussed and the generalized algebra and field operators are derived. In the last part, we show that our construction gives rise to a natural definition of a quantum tau function, which is a noncommutative version of the classical group-theoretic representation of the Liouville fields by Leznov and Saveliev.

  11. Quantum renormalization group approach to quantum coherence and multipartite entanglement in an XXZ spin chain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Wei [Zhejiang Institute of Modern Physics and Department of Physics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Beijing 100193 (China); Xu, Jing-Bo, E-mail: xujb@zju.edu.cn [Zhejiang Institute of Modern Physics and Department of Physics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2017-01-30

    We investigate the performances of quantum coherence and multipartite entanglement close to the quantum critical point of a one-dimensional anisotropic spin-1/2 XXZ spin chain by employing the real-space quantum renormalization group approach. It is shown that the quantum criticality of XXZ spin chain can be revealed by the singular behaviors of the first derivatives of renormalized quantum coherence and multipartite entanglement in the thermodynamics limit. Moreover, we find the renormalized quantum coherence and multipartite entanglement obey certain universal exponential-type scaling laws in the vicinity of the quantum critical point of XXZ spin chain. - Highlights: • The QPT of XXZ chain is studied by renormalization group. • The renormalized coherence and multiparticle entanglement is investigated. • Scaling laws of renormalized coherence and multiparticle entanglement are revealed.

  12. Nuclear fuel cycle. Which way forward for multilateral approaches? An international expert group examines options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellaud, Bruno

    2005-01-01

    For several years now, the debate on the proliferation of nuclear weapons has been dominated by individuals and countries that violate rules of good behaviour - as sellers or acquirers of clandestine nuclear technology. As a result, the 1968 Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) has been declared to be 'inadequate' by some, 'full of loopholes' by others. Two basic approaches have been put forward to tighten up the NPT; both seek to ensure that the nuclear non-proliferation regime maintains its authority and credibility in the face of these very real challenges. One calls for non-nuclear weapon States to accept a partial denial of technology through a reinterpretation of the NPT's provisions governing the rights of access to nuclear technologies. The unwillingness of most non-nuclear-weapon States to accept additional restrictions under the NPT makes this approach difficult. The other approach would apply multinational alternatives to the national operation of uranium-enrichment and plutonium-separation technologies, and to the disposal of spent nuclear fuel. In this perspective, IAEA Director General Mohamed ElBaradei proposed in 2003 to revisit the concept of multilateral nuclear approaches (MNA) that was intensively discussed several decades ago. Several such approaches were adopted at that time in Europe, which became the true homeland of MNAs. Nonetheless, MNAs have failed so far to materialise outside Europe due to different political and economic perceptions. In June 2004, the Director General appointed an international group of experts to consider possible multilateral approaches to the nuclear fuel cycle. The overall purpose was to assess MNAs in the framework of a double objective: strengthening the international nuclear non-proliferation regime and making the peaceful uses of nuclear energy more economical and attractive. In the report submitted to the Director General in February 2005, the Group identified a number of options - options

  13. Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer: successful systematic implementation of a group approach to genetic counselling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benusiglio, Patrick R; Di Maria, Marina; Dorling, Leila; Jouinot, Anne; Poli, Antoine; Villebasse, Sophie; Le Mentec, Marine; Claret, Béatrice; Boinon, Diane; Caron, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    The increase in referrals to cancer genetics clinics, partially associated with the "Angelina Jolie effect", presents a challenge to existing services, many are already running at full capacity. More efficient ways to deliver genetic counselling are therefore urgently needed. We now systematically offer group instead of standard individual counselling to patients with suspected Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer. Group sessions last 30 min. The first twenty consist of a presentation by the genetic counsellor, the next ten of a discussion involving a cancer geneticist and a psychologist. A short individual consultation ensues, where personal and family issues are addressed and consent obtained. Blood is drawn afterwards. Satisfaction and knowledge are evaluated. We report data for the Oct-2014-Aug-2015 period. 210 patients attended group counselling, up to eight simultaneously. We always fitted them within a 4-h time frame. Mean satisfaction score was 41/43. Knowledge scores increased from 3.1/6 to 4.9/6 post-counselling (p value group counselling, we have withstood increases in referrals without compromising care. The "Angelina Jolie effect" and rapid developments in personalized medicine threaten to overwhelm cancer genetics clinics. In this context, our innovative approach should ensure that all patients have access to approved services.

  14. Models of gas-grain chemistry in interstellar cloud cores with a stochastic approach to surface chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stantcheva, T.; Herbst, E.

    2004-08-01

    We present a gas-grain model of homogeneous cold cloud cores with time-independent physical conditions. In the model, the gas-phase chemistry is treated via rate equations while the diffusive granular chemistry is treated stochastically. The two phases are coupled through accretion and evaporation. A small network of surface reactions accounts for the surface production of the stable molecules water, formaldehyde, methanol, carbon dioxide, ammonia, and methane. The calculations are run for a time of 107 years at three different temperatures: 10 K, 15 K, and 20 K. The results are compared with those produced in a totally deterministic gas-grain model that utilizes the rate equation method for both the gas-phase and surface chemistry. The results of the different models are in agreement for the abundances of the gaseous species except for later times when the surface chemistry begins to affect the gas. The agreement for the surface species, however, is somewhat mixed. The average abundances of highly reactive surface species can be orders of magnitude larger in the stochastic-deterministic model than in the purely deterministic one. For non-reactive species, the results of the models can disagree strongly at early times, but agree to well within an order of magnitude at later times for most molecules. Strong exceptions occur for CO and H2CO at 10 K, and for CO2 at 20 K. The agreement seems to be best at a temperature of 15 K. As opposed to the use of the normal rate equation method of surface chemistry, the modified rate method is in significantly better agreement with the stochastic-deterministic approach. Comparison with observations of molecular ices in dense clouds shows mixed agreement.

  15. Gas-grain chemistry in cold interstellar cloud cores with a microscopic Monte Carlo approach to surface chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Q.; Cuppen, H. M.; Herbst, E.

    2007-07-01

    Aims:We have recently developed a microscopic Monte Carlo approach to study surface chemistry on interstellar grains and the morphology of ice mantles. The method is designed to eliminate the problems inherent in the rate-equation formalism to surface chemistry. Here we report the first use of this method in a chemical model of cold interstellar cloud cores that includes both gas-phase and surface chemistry. The surface chemical network consists of a small number of diffusive reactions that can produce molecular oxygen, water, carbon dioxide, formaldehyde, methanol and assorted radicals. Methods: The simulation is started by running a gas-phase model including accretion onto grains but no surface chemistry or evaporation. The starting surface consists of either flat or rough olivine. We introduce the surface chemistry of the three species H, O and CO in an iterative manner using our stochastic technique. Under the conditions of the simulation, only atomic hydrogen can evaporate to a significant extent. Although it has little effect on other gas-phase species, the evaporation of atomic hydrogen changes its gas-phase abundance, which in turn changes the flux of atomic hydrogen onto grains. The effect on the surface chemistry is treated until convergence occurs. We neglect all non-thermal desorptive processes. Results: We determine the mantle abundances of assorted molecules as a function of time through 2 × 105 yr. Our method also allows determination of the abundance of each molecule in specific monolayers. The mantle results can be compared with observations of water, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and methanol ices in the sources W33A and Elias 16. Other than a slight underproduction of mantle CO, our results are in very good agreement with observations.

  16. A contextual approach to social skills assessment in the peer group: who is the best judge?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Kyongboon; Kim, Elizabeth Moorman; Sheridan, Susan M

    2012-09-01

    Using a contextual approach to social skills assessment in the peer group, this study examined the criterion-related validity of contextually relevant social skills and the incremental validity of peers and teachers as judges of children's social skills. Study participants included 342 (180 male and 162 female) students and their classroom teachers (N = 22) from rural communities. As expected, contextually relevant social skills were significantly related to a variety of social status indicators (i.e., likability, peer- and teacher-assessed popularity, reciprocated friendships, clique centrality) and positive school functioning (i.e., school liking and academic competence). Peer-assessed social skills, not teacher-assessed social skills, demonstrated consistent incremental validity in predicting various indicators of social status outcomes; peer- and teacher-assessed social skills alike showed incremental validity in predicting positive school functioning. The relation between contextually relevant social skills and study outcomes did not vary by child gender. Findings are discussed in terms of the significance of peers in the assessment of children's social skills in the peer group as well as the usefulness of a contextual approach to social skills assessment.

  17. Socioeconomic and Gender Group Differences in Early Literacy Skills: A Multiple-Group Confirmatory Factor Analysis Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Julia Ai Cheng; Al Otaiba, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Socioeconomic status and gender are important demographic variables that strongly relate to academic achievement. This study examined the early literacy skills differences between 4 sociodemographic groups, namely, boys ineligible for free or reduced-price lunch (FRL), girls ineligible for FRL, boys eligible for FRL, and girls eligible for FRL.…

  18. When we enjoy bad news about other groups : A social identity approach to out-group schadenfreude

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouwerkerk, Jaap W.; van Dijk, Wilco W.; Vonkeman, Charlotte C.; Spears, Russell

    Two studies investigate schadenfreude (pleasure at the misfortune of others) as an emotional response to news about out-group misfortunes in a political and consumer context by analyzing reactions of voters for opposition parties to the downfall of a Dutch coalition government (Study 1), and of

  19. When we enjoy bad news about other groups: A social identity approach to out-group schadenfreude

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouwerkerk, J.W.; van Dijk, W.W.; Vonkeman, C.C.; Spears, R.

    2018-01-01

    Two studies investigate schadenfreude (pleasure at the misfortune of others) as an emotional response to news about out-group misfortunes in a political and consumer context by analyzing reactions of voters for opposition parties to the downfall of a Dutch coalition government (Study 1), and of

  20. Assessing the children's views on foods and consumption of selected food groups: outcome from focus group approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif Ishak, Sharifah Intan Zainun; Shohaimi, Shamarina; Kandiah, Mirnalini

    2013-04-01

    The food choices in childhood have high a probability of being carried through into their adulthood life, which then contributes to the risk of many non-communicable diseases. Therefore, there is a need to gather some information about children's views on foods which may influence their food choices for planning a related dietary intervention or programme. This paper aimed to explore the views of children on foods and the types of foods which are usually consumed by children under four food groups (snacks, fast foods, cereals and cereal products; and milk and dairy products) by using focus group discussions. A total of 33 school children aged 7-9 years old from Selangor and Kuala Lumpur participated in the focus groups. Focus groups were audio-taped, transcribed and analyzed according to the listed themes. The outcomes show that the children usually consumed snacks such as white bread with spread or as a sandwich, local cakes, fruits such as papaya, mango and watermelon, biscuits or cookies, tea, chocolate drink and instant noodles. Their choices of fast foods included pizza, burgers, French fries and fried chicken. For cereal products, they usually consumed rice, bread and ready-to-eat cereals. Finally, their choices of dairy products included milk, cheese and yogurt. The reasons for the food liking were taste, nutritional value and the characteristics of food. The outcome of this study may provide additional information on the food choices among Malaysian children, especially in urban areas with regard to the food groups which have shown to have a relationship with the risk of childhood obesity.

  1. Assessing the children's views on foods and consumption of selected food groups: outcome from focus group approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif Ishak, Sharifah Intan Zainun; Kandiah, Mirnalini

    2013-01-01

    The food choices in childhood have high a probability of being carried through into their adulthood life, which then contributes to the risk of many non-communicable diseases. Therefore, there is a need to gather some information about children's views on foods which may influence their food choices for planning a related dietary intervention or programme. This paper aimed to explore the views of children on foods and the types of foods which are usually consumed by children under four food groups (snacks, fast foods, cereals and cereal products; and milk and dairy products) by using focus group discussions. A total of 33 school children aged 7-9 years old from Selangor and Kuala Lumpur participated in the focus groups. Focus groups were audio-taped, transcribed and analyzed according to the listed themes. The outcomes show that the children usually consumed snacks such as white bread with spread or as a sandwich, local cakes, fruits such as papaya, mango and watermelon, biscuits or cookies, tea, chocolate drink and instant noodles. Their choices of fast foods included pizza, burgers, French fries and fried chicken. For cereal products, they usually consumed rice, bread and ready-to-eat cereals. Finally, their choices of dairy products included milk, cheese and yogurt. The reasons for the food liking were taste, nutritional value and the characteristics of food. The outcome of this study may provide additional information on the food choices among Malaysian children, especially in urban areas with regard to the food groups which have shown to have a relationship with the risk of childhood obesity. PMID:23610606

  2. One Health Core Competency Domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebekah Frankson

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of complex global challenges at the convergence of human, animal, and environmental health has catalyzed a movement supporting ‘One Health’ approaches. Despite recognition of the importance of One Health approaches to address these complex challenges, little effort has been directed at identifying the seminal knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary for individuals to successfully contribute to One Health efforts. Between 2008 and 2011, three groups independently embarked on separate initiatives to identify core competencies for professionals involved with One Health approaches. Core competencies were considered critically important for guiding curriculum development and continuing professional education as they describe the knowledge, skills and attitudes required to be effective. A workshop was convened in 2012 to synthesize the various strands of work on One Health competencies. Despite having different mandates, participants, and approaches, all of these initiatives identified similar core competency domains: management; communication and informatics; values and ethics; leadership; teams and collaboration; roles and responsibilities; and systems thinking. These core competency domains have been used to develop new continuing professional education programs for One Health professionals and help university curricula prepare new graduates to be able to contribute more effectively to One Health approaches.

  3. One Health Core Competency Domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankson, Rebekah; Hueston, William; Christian, Kira; Olson, Debra; Lee, Mary; Valeri, Linda; Hyatt, Raymond; Annelli, Joseph; Rubin, Carol

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of complex global challenges at the convergence of human, animal, and environmental health has catalyzed a movement supporting "One Health" approaches. Despite recognition of the importance of One Health approaches to address these complex challenges, little effort has been directed at identifying the seminal knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for individuals to successfully contribute to One Health efforts. Between 2008 and 2011, three groups independently embarked on separate initiatives to identify core competencies for professionals involved with One Health approaches. Core competencies were considered critically important for guiding curriculum development and continuing professional education, as they describe the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required to be effective. A workshop was convened in 2012 to synthesize the various strands of work on One Health competencies. Despite having different mandates, participants, and approaches, all of these initiatives identified similar core competency domains: management; communication and informatics; values and ethics; leadership; teams and collaboration; roles and responsibilities; and systems thinking. These core competency domains have been used to develop new continuing professional education programs for One Health professionals and help university curricula prepare new graduates to be able to contribute more effectively to One Health approaches.

  4. A new approach to assess the spasticity in hamstrings muscles using mechanomyography antagonist muscular group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Eddy; Scheeren, Eduardo M; Nogueira-Neto, Guilherme N; Button, Vera Lúcia da S N; Nohama, Percy

    2012-01-01

    Several pathologies can cause muscle spasticity. Modified Ashworth scale (MAS) can rank spasticity, however its results depend on the physician subjective evaluation. This study aims to show a new approach to spasticity assessment by means of MMG analysis of hamstrings antagonist muscle group (quadriceps muscle). Four subjects participated in the study, divided into two groups regarding MAS (MAS0 and MAS1). MMG sensors were positioned over the muscle belly of rectus femoris (RF), vastus lateralis (VL) and vastus medialis (VM) muscles. The range of movement was acquired with an electrogoniometer placed laterally to the knee. The system was based on a LabVIEW acquisition program and the MMG sensors were built with triaxial accelerometers. The subjects were submitted to stretching reflexes and the integral of the MMG (MMG(INT)) signal was calculated to analysis. The results showed that the MMG(INT) was greater to MAS1 than to MAS0 [muscle RF (p = 0.004), VL (p = 0.001) and VM (p = 0.007)]. The results showed that MMG was viable to detect a muscular tonus increase in antagonist muscular group (quadriceps femoris) of spinal cord injured volunteers.

  5. Dynamical renormalization group approach to transport in ultrarelativistic plasmas: The electrical conductivity in high temperature QED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyanovsky, Daniel; Vega, Hector J. de; Wang Shangyung

    2003-01-01

    The dc electrical conductivity of an ultrarelativistic QED plasma is studied in real time by implementing the dynamical renormalization group. The conductivity is obtained from the real-time dependence of a dissipative kernel closely related to the retarded photon polarization. Pinch singularities in the imaginary part of the polarization are manifest as secular terms that grow in time in the perturbative expansion of this kernel. The leading secular terms are studied explicitly and it is shown that they are insensitive to the anomalous damping of hard fermions as a result of a cancellation between self-energy and vertex corrections. The resummation of the secular terms via the dynamical renormalization group leads directly to a renormalization group equation in real time, which is the Boltzmann equation for the (gauge invariant) fermion distribution function. A direct correspondence between the perturbative expansion and the linearized Boltzmann equation is established, allowing a direct identification of the self-energy and vertex contributions to the collision term. We obtain a Fokker-Planck equation in momentum space that describes the dynamics of the departure from equilibrium to leading logarithmic order in the coupling. This equation determines that the transport time scale is given by t tr =24 π/e 4 T ln(1/e). The solution of the Fokker-Planck equation approaches asymptotically the steady-state solution as ∼e -t/(4.038...t tr ) . The steady-state solution leads to the conductivity σ=15.698 T/e 2 ln(1/e) to leading logarithmic order. We discuss the contributions beyond leading logarithms as well as beyond the Boltzmann equation. The dynamical renormalization group provides a link between linear response in quantum field theory and kinetic theory

  6. The resonating group method three cluster approach to the ground state 9 Li nucleus structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filippov, G.F.; Pozdnyakov, Yu.A.; Terenetsky, K.O.; Verbitsky, V.P.

    1994-01-01

    The three-cluster approach for light atomic nuclei is formulated in frame of the algebraic version of resonating group method. Overlap integral and Hamiltonian matrix elements on generating functions are obtained for 9 Li nucleus. All permissible by Pauli principle 9 Li different cluster nucleon permutations were taken into account in the calculations. The results obtained can be easily generalised on any three-cluster system up to 12 C. Matrix elements obtained in the work were used in the variational calculations of the ground state energetic and geometric 9 Li characteristics. It is shown that 9 Li ground state is not adequate to the shell model limit and has pronounced three-cluster structure. (author). 16 refs., 4 tab., 2 figs

  7. Improving the Grade Point Average of Our At-Risk Students: A Collaborative Group Action Research Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saurino, Dan R.; Hinson, Kenneth; Bouma, Amy

    This paper focuses on the use of a group action research approach to help student teachers develop strategies to improve the grade point average of at-risk students. Teaching interventions such as group work and group and individual tutoring were compared to teaching strategies already used in the field. Results indicated an improvement in the…

  8. Renormalization group-theoretic approach to electron localization in disordered systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, N.; Heinrichs, J.

    1977-06-01

    The localization problem for the Anderson tight-binding model with site-diagonal (gaussian) disorder is studied, using a previously established analogy between this problem and the statistical mechanics of a zero-component classical field. The equivalent free-energy functional turns out to have complex coefficients in the bilinear terms but involves a real repulsive quartic interaction. The averaged one-electron propagator corresponds to the two-point correlation function for the equivalent statistical problem and the critical point gives the mobility edge, which is identified with the (real) fixed point energy of the associated renormalization group. Since for convergence reasons the conventional perturbative treatment of Wilson's formula is invalid, it is resorted to a non-perturbative approach which leads to a physical fixed point corresponding to a repulsive quartic interaction. The results for the mobility edge in three dimensions and for the critical disorder for an Anderson transition in two dimensions agree well with previous detailed predictions. The critical indices describing the approach of the transition at the mobility edge of various physical quantities, within the epsilon-expansion are also discussed. The more general problem where both diagonal and off-diagonal disorder is present in the Anderson hamiltonian is considered. In this case it is shown that the Hamilton function for the equivalent zero-component classical field model involves an additional biquadratic exchange term. From a simple generalization of Wilson's recursion relation and its non-perturbative solution explicit expressions for the mobility edges for weak diagonal and off-diagonal disorder in two and three dimensions are obtained. Our treatment casts doubts on the validity of recent conclusions about electron localization based on the renormalization group study of the nm-component spin model

  9. A two-step approach for the preliminary evaluation of the thermal-hydraulics and safety of the ELSY open square core design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meloni, Paride; Bandini, Giacomino; Polidori, Massimiliano; Cervone, Antonio; Manservisi, Sandro

    2009-01-01

    Several innovative solutions for a liquid metal fast reactor design have been investigated in the EURATOM Sixth Framework Programme and an open-assembly core design for the ELSY (European Lead-cooled System) reactor has been proposed by ENEA. The development of this new reactor, based on innovative neutronic and safety considerations, requires a new approach to the thermal-hydraulic (T/H) core design. In this paper a new two-step approach of the T/H analysis for this open-assembly core is presented and, in particular is used for the evaluation of the preliminary core design of a 1500 MW lead fast reactor with open square lattice and three fuel radial zones with different levels of enrichment. In the first step a preliminary thermal-hydraulic and safety evaluation of the core neutronic design is investigated by using a one-dimensional RELAP5 model for independent channel analysis. Then two and three-dimensional effects are taken into account by using a dedicated tool for the evaluation of assembly mixing effects. The RELAP5 model, based on pressure loss and heat transfer correlations available for heavy liquid metal flows in rod bundle, consists of completely independent assemblies and therefore it can be used for a conservative evaluation of the thermal-hydraulics of the core reactor. Due to the open-lattice configuration, the two and three-dimensional effects are important and they are taken into account by using a simplified three-dimensional numerical model of an open square lattice reactor core, developed with the purpose of analyzing the whole core behavior. The numerical simulation is performed at assembly length level taking into account the local fluctuations of turbulent viscosity and energy exchange coefficients at sub-channel level through transfer operators based on parametric coefficients. A preliminary evaluation of the mixing effects between assembly flows on the temperature field has been performed by using an average assembly turbulent viscosity

  10. Review of Developing Quantitative Literacy Skills in History and the Social Sciences: A Web-Based Common Core Approach by Kathleen W. Craver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor J. Ricchezza

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Kathleen W. Craver. Developing Quantitative Literacy Skills in History and Social Sciences: A Web-Based Common Core Standards Approach (Lantham MD: Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Group, Inc., 2014. 191 pp. ISBN 978-1-4758-1050-9 (cloth; ISBN …-1051-6 (pbk; ISBN…-1052-3 (electronic. This book could be a breakthrough for teachers in the trenches who are interested in or need to know about quantitative literacy (QL. It is a resource providing 85 topical pieces, averaging 1.5 pages, in which a featured Web site is presented, described, and accompanied by 2-4 critical-thinking questions purposefully drawing on data from the Web site. The featured Web sites range from primary documents (e.g., All about California and the Inducements to Settle There, 1870 to modern databases (e.g., city-data.com. The 85 pieces are organized under three headings (Social Science Sites; U.S. History Sites; World History Sites following three chapters introducing QL, quantitative sources, and communicating with data. The QL skills in the questions are the usual suspects such as making comparisons, graph reading, table reading, and calculating and thinking about ratios. The author, the Head Librarian at the National Cathedral School (Washington DC, clearly aims the book at high school teachers who wish to comply with the Common Core Standards, which call for making communication with data a part of English Language Arts. The authors of this review believe the book will be of great value for college-level teachers too, whether they be interested in finding context (e.g., history and social science topics for their QL-math courses, or adding QL-type questions to their in-discipline courses. Moreover, we fervently wish that this book will inspire others to create and compile similar resources in such a way that, in the future, there will be a vast open-access library of such collections of QL questions coupled to data sources – with updated links – available on the

  11. An approach to solve group-decision-making problems with ordinal interval numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhi-Ping; Liu, Yang

    2010-10-01

    The ordinal interval number is a form of uncertain preference information in group decision making (GDM), while it is seldom discussed in the existing research. This paper investigates how the ranking order of alternatives is determined based on preference information of ordinal interval numbers in GDM problems. When ranking a large quantity of ordinal interval numbers, the efficiency and accuracy of the ranking process are critical. A new approach is proposed to rank alternatives using ordinal interval numbers when every ranking ordinal in an ordinal interval number is thought to be uniformly and independently distributed in its interval. First, we give the definition of possibility degree on comparing two ordinal interval numbers and the related theory analysis. Then, to rank alternatives, by comparing multiple ordinal interval numbers, a collective expectation possibility degree matrix on pairwise comparisons of alternatives is built, and an optimization model based on this matrix is constructed. Furthermore, an algorithm is also presented to rank alternatives by solving the model. Finally, two examples are used to illustrate the use of the proposed approach.

  12. Dynamics of safety performance and culture: a group model building approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Yang Miang; Love, Peter E D; Stagbouer, Greg; Annesley, Chris

    2012-09-01

    The management of occupational health and safety (OHS) including safety culture interventions is comprised of complex problems that are often hard to scope and define. Due to the dynamic nature and complexity of OHS management, the concept of system dynamics (SD) is used to analyze accident prevention. In this paper, a system dynamics group model building (GMB) approach is used to create a causal loop diagram of the underlying factors influencing the OHS performance of a major drilling and mining contractor in Australia. While the organization has invested considerable resources into OHS their disabling injury frequency rate (DIFR) has not been decreasing. With this in mind, rich individualistic knowledge about the dynamics influencing the DIFR was acquired from experienced employees with operations, health and safety and training background using a GMB workshop. Findings derived from the workshop were used to develop a series of causal loop diagrams that includes a wide range of dynamics that can assist in better understanding the causal influences OHS performance. The causal loop diagram provides a tool for organizations to hypothesize the dynamics influencing effectiveness of OHS management, particularly the impact on DIFR. In addition the paper demonstrates that the SD GMB approach has significant potential in understanding and improving OHS management. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. In core-fuel management in approach to equilibrium of WWER-440 reactor; Prelazni rezim iskoriscenja goriva u nuklearnom reaktoru tipa VVER-440

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marinkovic, N [Boris Kidric Institute of nuclear sciences, Vinca, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    1978-07-01

    For the need of in core fuel management and prediction of fuel cycle costs as well as operating of a nuclear power plant behaviour of main physical parameters and refueling scheme during approach to equilibrium operation are indispensable. An estimation of a refueling scheme during forst six years of exploitation for a commercially proven PWR reactor of WWER-440 type is shown in this paper. (author)

  14. Algebraic and group treatments to nonlinear displaced number states and their nonclassicality features: A new approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asili Firouzabadi, N; Tavassoly, M K; Faghihi, M J

    2015-01-01

    Recently, nonlinear displaced number states (NDNSs) have been manually introduced, in which the deformation function f(n) has been artificially added to the previously well-known displaced number states (DNSs). Indeed, just a simple comparison has been performed between the standard coherent state and nonlinear coherent state for the formation of NDNSs. In the present paper, after expressing enough physical motivation of our procedure, four distinct classes of NDNSs are presented by applying algebraic and group treatments. To achieve this purpose, by considering the DNSs and recalling the nonlinear coherent states formalism, the NDNSs are logically defined through an algebraic consideration. In addition, by using a particular class of Gilmore–Perelomov-type of SU(1, 1) and a class of SU(2) coherent states, the NDNSs are introduced via group-theoretical approach. Then, in order to examine the nonclassical behavior of these states, sub-Poissonian statistics by evaluating Mandel parameter and Wigner quasi-probability distribution function associated with the obtained NDNSs are discussed, in detail. (paper)

  15. Cold homes, fuel poverty and energy efficiency improvements: A longitudinal focus group approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grey, Charlotte N B; Schmieder-Gaite, Tina; Jiang, Shiyu; Nascimento, Christina; Poortinga, Wouter

    2017-08-01

    Cold homes and fuel poverty have been identified as factors in health and social inequalities that could be alleviated through energy efficiency interventions. Research on fuel poverty and the health impacts of affordable warmth initiatives have to date primarily been conducted using quantitative and statistical methods, limiting the way how fuel poverty is understood. This study took a longitudinal focus group approach that allowed exploration of lived experiences of fuel poverty before and after an energy efficiency intervention. Focus group discussions were held with residents from three low-income communities before (n = 28) and after (n = 22) they received energy efficiency measures funded through a government-led scheme. The results show that improving the energy efficiency of homes at risk of fuel poverty has a profound impact on wellbeing and quality of life, financial stress, thermal comfort, social interactions and indoor space use. However, the process of receiving the intervention was experienced by some as stressful. There is a need for better community engagement and communication to improve the benefits delivered by fuel poverty programmes, as well as further qualitative exploration to better understand the wider impacts of fuel poverty and policy-led intervention schemes.

  16. A unified effective-field renormalization-group framework approach for the quenched diluted Ising models

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Albuquerque, Douglas F.; Fittipaldi, I. P.

    1994-05-01

    A unified effective-field renormalization-group framework (EFRG) for both quenched bond- and site-diluted Ising models is herein developed by extending recent works. The method, as in the previous works, follows up the same strategy of the mean-field renormalization-group scheme (MFRG), and is achieved by introducing an alternative way for constructing classical effective-field equations of state, based on rigorous Ising spin identities. The concentration dependence of the critical temperature, Tc(p), and the critical concentrations of magnetic atoms, pc, at which the transition temperature goes to zero, are evaluated for several two- and three-dimensional lattice structures. The obtained values of Tc and pc and the resulting phase diagrams for both bond and site cases are much more accurate than those estimated by the standard MFRG approach. Although preserving the same level of simplicity as the MFRG, it is shown that the present EFRG method, even by considering its simplest size-cluster version, provides results that correctly distinguishes those lattices that have the same coordination number, but differ in dimensionality or geometry.

  17. Properties of Sub-Wavelength Spherical Antennas With Arbitrarily Lossy Magnetodielectric Cores Approaching the Chu Lower Bound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Troels Vejle; Kim, Oleksiy S.; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2014-01-01

    For a spherical antenna exciting any arbitrary spherical mode, we derive exact closed-form expressions for the dissipated power and stored energy inside (and outside) the lossy magneto-dielectric spherical core, as well as the radiated power, radiation efficiency, and thus the radiation quality...... an increasing magnetic loss tangent initially leads to a decreasing radiation quality factor, but in the limit of a perfect magnetic conductor (PMC) core the dissipated power tends to zero and the radiation quality factor reaches the fundamental Chu lower bound....

  18. A DFT and semiempirical model-based study of opioid receptor affinity and selectivity in a group of molecules with a morphine structural core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruna-Larenas, Tamara; Gómez-Jeria, Juan S

    2012-01-01

    We report the results of a search for model-based relationships between mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptor binding affinity and molecular structure for a group of molecules having in common a morphine structural core. The wave functions and local reactivity indices were obtained at the ZINDO/1 and B3LYP/6-31G(∗∗) levels of theory for comparison. New developments in the expression for the drug-receptor interaction energy expression allowed several local atomic reactivity indices to be included, such as local electronic chemical potential, local hardness, and local electrophilicity. These indices, together with a new proposal for the ordering of the independent variables, were incorporated in the statistical study. We found and discussed several statistically significant relationships for mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptor binding affinity at both levels of theory. Some of the new local reactivity indices incorporated in the theory appear in several equations for the first time in the history of model-based equations. Interaction pharmacophores were generated for mu, delta, and kappa receptors. We discuss possible differences regulating binding and selectivity in opioid receptor subtypes. This study, contrarily to the statistically backed ones, is able to provide a microscopic insight of the mechanisms involved in the binding process.

  19. A DFT and Semiempirical Model-Based Study of Opioid Receptor Affinity and Selectivity in a Group of Molecules with a Morphine Structural Core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Bruna-Larenas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the results of a search for model-based relationships between mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptor binding affinity and molecular structure for a group of molecules having in common a morphine structural core. The wave functions and local reactivity indices were obtained at the ZINDO/1 and B3LYP/6-31 levels of theory for comparison. New developments in the expression for the drug-receptor interaction energy expression allowed several local atomic reactivity indices to be included, such as local electronic chemical potential, local hardness, and local electrophilicity. These indices, together with a new proposal for the ordering of the independent variables, were incorporated in the statistical study. We found and discussed several statistically significant relationships for mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptor binding affinity at both levels of theory. Some of the new local reactivity indices incorporated in the theory appear in several equations for the first time in the history of model-based equations. Interaction pharmacophores were generated for mu, delta, and kappa receptors. We discuss possible differences regulating binding and selectivity in opioid receptor subtypes. This study, contrarily to the statistically backed ones, is able to provide a microscopic insight of the mechanisms involved in the binding process.

  20. Spinel Ferrite Core-Shell Nanostructures by a Versatile Solvothermal Seed-Mediated Growth Approach and Study of Their Nanointerfaces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Angotzi, M. S.; Musinu, A.; Mameli, V.; Ardu, A.; Cara, C.; Nižňanský, Daniel; Xin, H. L.; Cannas, C.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 8 (2017), s. 7889-7900 ISSN 1936-0851 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : ferrite * core-shell nanoparticles * cofe2o4/nife2o4 * EELS * EDX Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry OBOR OECD: Inorganic and nuclear chemistry Impact factor: 13.942, year: 2016

  1. Small Core, Big Network: A Comprehensive Approach to GIS Teaching Practice Based on Digital Three-Dimensional Campus Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Liang; Zhang, Wen; Wang, Jiechen; Li, Manchun; Zhong, Lishan

    2014-01-01

    Geographic information science (GIS) features a wide range of disciplines and has broad applicability. Challenges associated with rapidly developing GIS technology and the currently limited teaching and practice materials hinder universities from cultivating highly skilled GIS graduates. Based on the idea of "small core, big network," a…

  2. Teaching to Exceed the English Language Arts Common Core State Standards: A Literacy Practices Approach for 6-12 Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Richard; Thein, Amanda Haertling; Webb, Allen

    2012-01-01

    As the new English Language Arts Common Core State Standards take hold across the United States, the need grows for pre-service and in-service teachers to be ready to develop curriculum and instruction that addresses their requirements. This timely, thoughtful, and comprehensive text directly meets this need. It delineates a literacy practices and…

  3. Proteomics Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Proteomics Core is the central resource for mass spectrometry based proteomics within the NHLBI. The Core staff help collaborators design proteomics experiments in a...

  4. When is success not satisfying? Integrating regulatory focus and approach/avoidance motivation theories to explain the relation between core self-evaluation and job satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, D Lance; Johnson, Russell E; Rosen, Christopher C; Djurdjevic, Emilija; Chang, Chu-Hsiang Daisy; Tan, James A

    2013-03-01

    Integrating implications from regulatory focus and approach/avoidance motivation theories, we present a framework wherein motivational orientations toward positive (approach motivation orientation) or negative (avoidance motivation orientation) stimuli interact with workplace success to mediate the relation of core self-evaluation (CSE) with job satisfaction. Using data collected from supervisor-subordinate dyads (Sample 1) and time-lagged data (Sample 2), we found that the results from two studies indicated that the interaction of workplace success and avoidance motivation orientation mediated relations of CSE with job satisfaction. Although approach motivation orientation did not interact with workplace success, it did mediate the CSE-job satisfaction relation on its own. Implications for the CSE and approach/avoidance literatures are discussed.

  5. Matrix Elements of One- and Two-Body Operators in the Unitary Group Approach (I)-Formalism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Lian-Rong; PAN Feng

    2001-01-01

    The tensor algebraic method is used to derive general one- and two-body operator matrix elements within the Un representations, which are useful in the unitary group approach to the configuration interaction problems of quantum many-body systems.

  6. GP leadership in clinical commissioning groups: a qualitative multi-case study approach across England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Martin; Holti, Richard; Hartley, Jean; Matharu, Tatum; Storey, John

    2018-06-01

    Clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) were established in England in 2013 to encourage GPs to exert greater influence over the processes of service improvement and redesign in the NHS. Little is known about the extent and the ways in which GPs have assumed these leadership roles. To explore the nature of clinical leadership of GPs in CCGs, and to examine the enablers and barriers to implementing a policy of clinical leadership in the NHS. A qualitative multi-case study approach in six localities across England. The case studies were purposefully sampled to represent different geographical localities and population demographics, and for their commitment to redesigning specified clinical or service areas. Data were collected from the case study CCGs and their partner organisations using a review of relevant documents, semi-structured individual or group interviews, and observations of key meetings. The data were analysed thematically and informed by relevant theories. GPs prefer a collaborative style of leadership that may be unlikely to produce rapid or radical change. Leadership activities are required at all levels in the system from strategy to frontline delivery, and the leadership behaviours of GPs who are not titular leaders are as important as formal leadership roles. A new alliance is emerging between clinicians and managers that draws on their different skillsets and creates new common interests. The uncertain policy environment in the English NHS is impacting on the willingness and the focus of GP leaders. GPs are making an important contribution as leaders of health service improvement and redesign but there are significant professional and political barriers to them optimising a leadership role. © British Journal of General Practice 2018.

  7. Using Cooperative Small Groups in Introductory Accounting Classes: A Practical Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miglietti, Cynthia

    2002-01-01

    Effective use of cooperative learning groups requires the following: attention to group formation, orientation that sets clear expectations and guidelines, activities to develop teamwork skills, peer evaluation, and other assessments that recognize and measure individual effort on group projects. (SK)

  8. HIGH: A Hexagon-based Intelligent Grouping Approach in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FAN, C.-S.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In a random deployment or uniform deployment strategy, sensor nodes are scattered randomly or uniformly in the sensing field, respectively. Hence, the coverage ratio cannot be guaranteed. The coverage ratio of uniform deployment, in general, is larger than that of the random deployment strategy. However, a random deployment or uniform deployment strategy may cause unbalanced traffic pattern in wireless sensor networks (WSNs. Therefore, cluster heads (CHs around the sink have larger loads than those farther away from the sink. That is, CHs close to the sink exhaust their energy earlier. In order to overcome the above problem, we propose a Hexagon-based Intelligent Grouping approacH in WSNs (called HIGH. The coverage, energy consumption and data routing issues are well investigated and taken into consideration in the proposed HIGH scheme. The simulation results validate our theoretical analysis and show that the proposed HIGH scheme achieves a satisfactory coverage ratio, balances the energy consumption among sensor nodes, and extends network lifetime significantly.

  9. Functional renormalization group approach to interacting three-dimensional Weyl semimetals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anand; Scammell, Arthur; Krieg, Jan; Kopietz, Peter

    2018-03-01

    We investigate the effect of long-range Coulomb interaction on the quasiparticle properties and the dielectric function of clean three-dimensional Weyl semimetals at zero temperature using a functional renormalization group (FRG) approach. The Coulomb interaction is represented via a bosonic Hubbard-Stratonovich field which couples to the fermionic density. We derive truncated FRG flow equations for the fermionic and bosonic self-energies and for the three-legged vertices with two fermionic and one bosonic external legs. We consider two different cutoff schemes—cutoff in fermionic or bosonic propagators—in order to calculate the renormalized quasiparticle velocity and the dielectric function for an arbitrary number of Weyl nodes and the interaction strength. If we approximate the dielectric function by its static limit, our results for the velocity and the dielectric function are in good agreement with that of A. A. Abrikosov and S. D. Beneslavskiĭ [Sov. Phys. JETP 32, 699 (1971)] exhibiting slowly varying logarithmic momentum dependence for small momenta. We extend their result for an arbitrary number of Weyl nodes and finite frequency by evaluating the renormalized velocity in the presence of dynamic screening and calculate the wave function renormalization.

  10. Group theoretical approach to quantum fields in de Sitter space II. The complementary and discrete series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joung, Euihun; Mourad, Jihad; Parentani, Renaud

    2007-01-01

    We use an algebraic approach based on representations of de Sitter group to construct covariant quantum fields in arbitrary dimensions. We study the complementary and the discrete series which correspond to light and massless fields and which lead new feature with respect to the massive principal series we previously studied (hep-th/0606119). When considering the complementary series, we make use of a non-trivial scalar product in order to get local expressions in the position representation. Based on these, we construct a family of covariant canonical fields parametrized by SU(1, 1)/U(1). Each of these correspond to the dS invariant alpha-vacua. The behavior of the modes at asymptotic times brings another difficulty as it is incompatible with the usual definition of the in and out vacua. We propose a generalized notion of these vacua which reduces to the usual conformal vacuum in the conformally massless limit. When considering the massless discrete series we find that no covariant field obeys the canonical commutation relations. To further analyze this singular case, we consider the massless limit of the complementary scalar fields we previously found. We obtain canonical fields with a deformed representation by zero modes. The zero modes have a dS invariant vacuum with singular norm. We propose a regularization by a compactification of the scalar field and a dS invariant definition of the vertex operators. The resulting two-point functions are dS invariant and have a universal logarithmic infrared divergence

  11. A low-cost approach to electronic excitation energies based on the driven similarity renormalization group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chenyang; Verma, Prakash; Hannon, Kevin P.; Evangelista, Francesco A.

    2017-08-01

    We propose an economical state-specific approach to evaluate electronic excitation energies based on the driven similarity renormalization group truncated to second order (DSRG-PT2). Starting from a closed-shell Hartree-Fock wave function, a model space is constructed that includes all single or single and double excitations within a given set of active orbitals. The resulting VCIS-DSRG-PT2 and VCISD-DSRG-PT2 methods are introduced and benchmarked on a set of 28 organic molecules [M. Schreiber et al., J. Chem. Phys. 128, 134110 (2008)]. Taking CC3 results as reference values, mean absolute deviations of 0.32 and 0.22 eV are observed for VCIS-DSRG-PT2 and VCISD-DSRG-PT2 excitation energies, respectively. Overall, VCIS-DSRG-PT2 yields results with accuracy comparable to those from time-dependent density functional theory using the B3LYP functional, while VCISD-DSRG-PT2 gives excitation energies comparable to those from equation-of-motion coupled cluster with singles and doubles.

  12. New approach to the adjustment of group cross sections fitting integral measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, Y.A.

    1979-01-01

    The adjustment of group cross sections fitting integral measurements is viewed as a process of estimating theoretical and/or experimental negligence errors to bring statistical consistency to the integral and differential data so that they can be combined to form an enlarged ensemble, based on which an improved estimation of the physical constants can be made. A three-step approach is suggested, and its formalism of general validity is developed. In step one, the data of negligence error are extracted from the given integral and differential data. The method of extraction is based on the concepts of prior probability and information entropy. It automatically leads to vanishing negligence error as the two sets of data are statistically consistent. The second step is to identify the sources of negligence error and adjust the data by an amount compensating for the extracted negligence discrepancy. In the last step, the two data sets, already adjusted to mutual consistency are combined as a single unified ensemble. Standard methods of statistics can then be applied to reestimate the physical constants. 1 figure

  13. New approach to the adjustment of group cross-sections fitting integral measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, Y.A.

    1979-01-01

    The adjustment of group cross-sections fitting integral measurements is viewed as a process of uncovering theoretical and/or experimental negligence errors to bring statistical consistency to the integral and differential data so that they can be combined to form an enlarged ensemble, on which an improved estimation of the physical constants can be based. An approach with three steps is suggested, and its formalism of general validity is developed. In step one, the data of negligence error are extracted from the given integral and differential data. The method of extraction is based on the concepts of prior probability and information entropy. It automatically leads to vanishing negligence error as the two sets of data are statistically consistent. The second step is to identify the sources of negligence error and adjust the data by an amount compensating the extracted negligence discrepancy. In the last step the two data sets, already adjusted to mutual consistency, are combined as a single unified ensemble. Standard methods of statistics can then be applied to re-estimate the physical constants. A simple example is shown as a demonstration of the method. 1 figure

  14. Renormalization group theory outperforms other approaches in statistical comparison between upscaling techniques for porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanasoge, Shravan; Agarwal, Umang; Tandon, Kunj; Koelman, J. M. Vianney A.

    2017-09-01

    Determining the pressure differential required to achieve a desired flow rate in a porous medium requires solving Darcy's law, a Laplace-like equation, with a spatially varying tensor permeability. In various scenarios, the permeability coefficient is sampled at high spatial resolution, which makes solving Darcy's equation numerically prohibitively expensive. As a consequence, much effort has gone into creating upscaled or low-resolution effective models of the coefficient while ensuring that the estimated flow rate is well reproduced, bringing to the fore the classic tradeoff between computational cost and numerical accuracy. Here we perform a statistical study to characterize the relative success of upscaling methods on a large sample of permeability coefficients that are above the percolation threshold. We introduce a technique based on mode-elimination renormalization group theory (MG) to build coarse-scale permeability coefficients. Comparing the results with coefficients upscaled using other methods, we find that MG is consistently more accurate, particularly due to its ability to address the tensorial nature of the coefficients. MG places a low computational demand, in the manner in which we have implemented it, and accurate flow-rate estimates are obtained when using MG-upscaled permeabilities that approach or are beyond the percolation threshold.

  15. [Tailored Care for Functional Vertigo/Dizziness - An Integrative Group Psychotherapy Approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radziej, Katharina; Schmid-Mühlbauer, Gabriele; Limburg, Karina; Lahmann, Claas

    2017-06-01

    Functional vertigo and dizziness (VD) symptoms are highly prevalent and usually accompanied by a strong impairment of quality in everyday and working life. The complaints are often associated with various psychiatric disorders, particularly phobic and other anxiety disorders, depressive or somatoform disorders. Despite this clinical relevance of VD symptoms, studies towards psychotherapeutic treatment options for patients with functional VD are still rare. Thus, the present study outlines a manual for outpatient group therapy for patients with functional VD symptoms. Our approach aims to assist patients in developing an understanding of the interaction between bodily complaints and psychosocial factors while detracting from a purely symptom based focus. The integrative-psychotherapeutic treatment program consists of 16 weekly sessions and includes a regular vestibular rehabilitation training as well as disorder-oriented modules towards anxiety and panic disorder, depression, and somatisation. We are currently conducting a randomised controlled trial in order to evaluate the short- and long-term effectiveness of the program in reducing VD and further bodily symptoms, vertigo-related social and physical handicap as well as anxiety and depressive complaints. A previously completed pilot trial has led to small to large pre-follow-up-effects on primary and secondary outcome measures. Conclusions regarding acceptance and feasibility of the therapy concept are discussed. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Weakly interacting topological insulators: Quantum criticality and the renormalization group approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei

    2018-03-01

    For D -dimensional weakly interacting topological insulators in certain symmetry classes, the topological invariant can be calculated from a D - or (D +1 ) -dimensional integration over a certain curvature function that is expressed in terms of single-particle Green's functions. Based on the divergence of curvature function at the topological phase transition, we demonstrate how a renormalization group approach circumvents these integrations and reduces the necessary calculation to that for the Green's function alone, rendering a numerically efficient tool to identify topological phase transitions in a large parameter space. The method further unveils a number of statistical aspects related to the quantum criticality in weakly interacting topological insulators, including correlation function, critical exponents, and scaling laws, that can be used to characterize the topological phase transitions driven by either interacting or noninteracting parameters. We use 1D class BDI and 2D class A Dirac models with electron-electron and electron-phonon interactions to demonstrate these principles and find that interactions may change the critical exponents of the topological insulators.

  17. The Mediating Role of Maximizer Decision Makin g Approach in Core Self - Evaluations and Entrepreneurial Persona lity Relationship: Konya Sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aykut Arslan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A lot of effort has been put to increase the number of entrepreneurs, the engines of the countries’ economic progress, and to promote entrepreneurship. In this regard, within the recent years in particular, studies, based on psychology and personality relationship are done to understand the entrepreneurial personality. To contribute to this topic and after searching the relevant literature, variables that might predict entrepreneurship have been incorporated into the model. It has been argued that one ofhese theories, core self-evaluations, may determine the entrepreneurial personality by enhancing their self-perceptions and awareness regarding their skills to utilize the opportunities. Moreover, it has also been investigated if the maximizer decision- making, one of the cognitive psychology theories, play a role as a mediator. Core self-evaluations account for 72% of the variance on entrepreneurship; but when maximizer decision-making is added, the amount of variance decreased to 65%. It may assumed to be an important result that entrepreneurial personality and maximizer decision-making cannot co-exist when the negative but statistical significant relationship between maximizer decision-making and core self-evaluations are considered

  18. Prediction and Optimization of Key Performance Indicators in the Production of Stator Core Using a GA-NN Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajora, M.; Zou, P.; Xu, W.; Jin, L.; Chen, W.; Liang, S. Y.

    2017-12-01

    With the rapidly changing demands of the manufacturing market, intelligent techniques are being used to solve engineering problems due to their ability to handle nonlinear complex problems. For example, in the conventional production of stator cores, it is relied upon experienced engineers to make an initial plan on the number of compensation sheets to be added to achieve uniform pressure distribution throughout the laminations. Additionally, these engineers must use their experience to revise the initial plans based upon the measurements made during the production of stator core. However, this method yields inconsistent results as humans are incapable of storing and analysing large amounts of data. In this article, first, a Neural Network (NN), trained using a hybrid Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) - Genetic Algorithm (GA), is developed to assist the engineers with the decision-making process. Next, the trained NN is used as a fitness function in an optimization algorithm to find the optimal values of the initial compensation sheet plan with the aim of minimizing the required revisions during the production of the stator core.

  19. The Effectiveness of Group Social Work Intervention With Developmental Approach on Psychosocial Empowerment of Female-Headed Households

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Torabi Momen

    2017-10-01

    Conclusion According to the study results, group social work intervention sessions with psychosocial developmental approach to empowering female-headed households is effective. The wider use of this type of intervention by professionals can empower and improve the lives of this group of people.

  20. Stellar kinematics and structural properties of virgo cluster dwarf early-type galaxies from the SMAKCED project. I. Kinematically decoupled cores and implications for infallen groups in clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toloba, E.; Guhathakurta, P. [UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Van de Ven, G. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Boissier, S.; Boselli, A. [Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille-LAM, Université d' Aix-Marseille and CNRS, UMR 7326, 38 rue F. Joliot-Curie, F-13388 Marseille Cedex 13 (France); Den Brok, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Falcón-Barroso, J.; Ryś, A. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, Vía Láctea s/n, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Hensler, G. [Department of Astrophysics, University of Vienna, Türkenschanzstraße 17, 1180 Vienna (Austria); Janz, J.; Lisker, T. [Astronomisches Rechen-Institut, Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, Mönchhofstraße 12-14, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Laurikainen, E.; Salo, H. [Division of Astronomy, Department of Physics, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 3000, FI-90014 Oulu (Finland); Paudel, S. [Laboratoire AIM Paris-Saclay, CNRS/INSU, Université Paris Diderot, CEA/IRFU/SAp, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Peletier, R. F., E-mail: toloba@ucolick.org [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, Postbus 800, 9700 AV Groningen (Netherlands)

    2014-03-10

    We present evidence for kinematically decoupled cores (KDCs) in two dwarf early-type (dE) galaxies in the Virgo cluster, VCC 1183 and VCC 1453, studied as part of the SMAKCED stellar absorption-line spectroscopy and imaging survey. These KDCs have radii of 1.''8 (0.14 kpc) and 4.''2 (0.33 kpc), respectively. Each of these KDCs is distinct from the main body of its host galaxy in two ways: (1) inverted sense of rotation and (2) younger (and possibly more metal-rich) stellar population. The observed stellar population differences are probably associated with the KDC, although we cannot rule out the possibility of intrinsic radial gradients in the host galaxy. We describe a statistical analysis method to detect, quantify the significance of, and characterize KDCs in long-slit rotation curve data. We apply this method to the two dE galaxies presented in this paper and to five other dEs for which KDCs have been reported in the literature. Among these seven dEs, there are four significant KDC detections, two marginal KDC detections, and one dE with an unusual central kinematic anomaly that may be an asymmetric KDC. The frequency of occurrence of KDCs and their properties provide important constraints on the formation history of their host galaxies. We discuss different formation scenarios for these KDCs in cluster environments and find that dwarf-dwarf wet mergers or gas accretion can explain the properties of these KDCs. Both of these mechanisms require that the progenitor had a close companion with a low relative velocity. This suggests that KDCs were formed in galaxy pairs residing in a poor group environment or in isolation whose subsequent infall into the cluster quenched star formation.

  1. CT-guided core needle biopsy of mediastinal nodes through a transpulmonary approach: retrospective analysis of the procedures conducted over six years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Zhongyuan; Liang, Zhiwen; Li, Pengcheng; Wang, Qiong

    2017-08-01

    To retrospectively evaluate the diagnostic performance and complications of a CT-guided core needle cutting biopsy of mediastinal nodes through a transpulmonary approach. From January 2009 to December 2014, we used a coaxial positioning system and an 18G cutting-type biopsy device to perform CT-guided percutaneous transpulmonary needle biopsies of mediastinal nodes for 127 patients. The diagnostic performance, complication rate, influencing factors, distribution of mediastinal nodes and pathological diagnoses were investigated. Among 127 patients, pathologic analyses showed that all of the biopsies were technically successful. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were all 100%. As for complications, the ratios for pneumothorax and hemoptysis were 33.9% and 4.7%, respectively. Multivariate analyses revealed that the distance from the pleura to the target lesion (P = 0.008) and the numbers of visceral pleura injuries (P = 0.006) were the two most significant risk factors for pneumothorax, and that the distance from the pleura to the target lesion (P = 0.004) was the most significant risk factor for hemoptysis. CT-guided core needle cutting biopsy of mediastinal nodes through a transpulmonary approach is a safe and efficient diagnostic method. • CT-guided core needle biopsy is an accurate technique for diagnosing mediastinal nodes. • The rates of complications are similar to those for pulmonary lesion biopsy. • Pneumothorax risk factors include distance from pleura to target lesion and number of visceral pleura. • Distance from pleura to target lesion is the risk factor for hemoptysis. • CT-guided core needle biopsy is an important diagnostic method for mediastinal nodes.

  2. The TSCA interagency testing committee`s approaches to screening and scoring chemicals and chemical groups: 1977-1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, J.D. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    1990-12-31

    This paper describes the TSCA interagency testing committee`s (ITC) approaches to screening and scoring chemicals and chemical groups between 1977 and 1983. During this time the ITC conducted five scoring exercises to select chemicals and chemical groups for detailed review and to determine which of these chemicals and chemical groups should be added to the TSCA Section 4(e) Priority Testing List. 29 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  3. Different groups, different threats: a multi-threat approach to the experience of stereotype threats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Jenessa R

    2011-04-01

    Two studies demonstrated that different negatively stereotyped groups are at risk for distinct forms of stereotype threats. The Multi-Threat Framework articulates six distinct stereotype threats and the unique constellations of variables (e.g., group identification, stereotype endorsement) that elicit each stereotype threat. Previous research suggests that different negatively stereotyped groups systematically vary across these stereotype threat elicitors; a pilot study confirms these differences. Across two studies, groups that tend to elicit low stereotype endorsement (religion, race/ethnicity, congenital blindness) were less likely to report experiencing self-as-source stereotype threats (stereotype threats requiring stereotype endorsement) and groups that tend to elicit low group identification (mental illness, obesity, blindness later in life) were less likely to report experiencing group-as-target stereotype threats (stereotype threats requiring group identification). This research suggests that traditional models may overlook the experiences of stereotype threats within some groups and that interventions tailored to address differences between stereotype threats will be most effective.

  4. A polarizable QM/MM approach to the molecular dynamics of amide groups solvated in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwörer, Magnus; Wichmann, Christoph; Tavan, Paul, E-mail: tavan@physik.uni-muenchen.de [Lehrstuhl für BioMolekulare Optik, Ludwig-Maximilians Universität München, Oettingenstr. 67, 80538 München (Germany)

    2016-03-21

    The infrared (IR) spectra of polypeptides are dominated by the so-called amide bands. Because they originate from the strongly polar and polarizable amide groups (AGs) making up the backbone, their spectral positions sensitively depend on the local electric fields. Aiming at accurate computations of these IR spectra by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, which derive atomic forces from a hybrid quantum and molecular mechanics (QM/MM) Hamiltonian, here we consider the effects of solvation in bulk liquid water on the amide bands of the AG model compound N-methyl-acetamide (NMA). As QM approach to NMA we choose grid-based density functional theory (DFT). For the surrounding MM water, we develop, largely based on computations, a polarizable molecular mechanics (PMM) model potential called GP6P, which features six Gaussian electrostatic sources (one induced dipole, five static partial charge distributions) and, therefore, avoids spurious distortions of the DFT electron density in hybrid DFT/PMM simulations. Bulk liquid GP6P is shown to have favorable properties at the thermodynamic conditions of the parameterization and beyond. Lennard-Jones (LJ) parameters of the DFT fragment NMA are optimized by comparing radial distribution functions in the surrounding GP6P liquid with reference data obtained from a “first-principles” DFT-MD simulation. Finally, IR spectra of NMA in GP6P water are calculated from extended DFT/PMM-MD trajectories, in which the NMA is treated by three different DFT functionals (BP, BLYP, B3LYP). Method-specific frequency scaling factors are derived from DFT-MD simulations of isolated NMA. The DFT/PMM-MD simulations with GP6P and with the optimized LJ parameters then excellently predict the effects of aqueous solvation and deuteration observed in the IR spectra of NMA. As a result, the methods required to accurately compute such spectra by DFT/PMM-MD also for larger peptides in aqueous solution are now at hand.

  5. Toward a qualitative understanding of binge-watching behaviors: A focus group approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flayelle, Maèva; Maurage, Pierre; Billieux, Joël

    2017-12-01

    Background and aims Binge-watching (i.e., seeing multiple episodes of the same TV series in a row) now constitutes a widespread phenomenon. However, little is known about the psychological factors underlying this behavior, as reflected by the paucity of available studies, most merely focusing on its potential harmfulness by applying the classic criteria used for other addictive disorders without exploring the uniqueness of binge-watching. This study thus aimed to take the opposite approach as a first step toward a genuine understanding of binge-watching behaviors through a qualitative analysis of the phenomenological characteristics of TV series watching. Methods A focus group of regular TV series viewers (N = 7) was established to explore a wide range of aspects related to TV series watching (e.g., motives, viewing practices, and related behaviors). Results A content analysis identified binge-watching features across three dimensions: TV series watching motivations, TV series watching engagement, and structural characteristics of TV shows. Most participants acknowledged that TV series watching can become addictive, but they all agreed having trouble recognizing themselves as truly being an "addict." Although obvious connections could be established with substance addiction criteria and symptoms, such parallelism appeared to be insufficient, as several distinctive facets emerged (e.g., positive view, transient overinvolvement, context dependency, and low everyday life impact). Discussion and conclusion The research should go beyond the classic biomedical and psychological models of addictive behaviors to account for binge-watching in order to explore its specificities and generate the first steps toward an adequate theoretical rationale for these emerging problematic behaviors.

  6. Strong-coupling Bose polarons out of equilibrium: Dynamical renormalization-group approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grusdt, Fabian; Seetharam, Kushal; Shchadilova, Yulia; Demler, Eugene

    2018-03-01

    When a mobile impurity interacts with a surrounding bath of bosons, it forms a polaron. Numerous methods have been developed to calculate how the energy and the effective mass of the polaron are renormalized by the medium for equilibrium situations. Here, we address the much less studied nonequilibrium regime and investigate how polarons form dynamically in time. To this end, we develop a time-dependent renormalization-group approach which allows calculations of all dynamical properties of the system and takes into account the effects of quantum fluctuations in the polaron cloud. We apply this method to calculate trajectories of polarons following a sudden quench of the impurity-boson interaction strength, revealing how the polaronic cloud around the impurity forms in time. Such trajectories provide additional information about the polaron's properties which are challenging to extract directly from the spectral function measured experimentally using ultracold atoms. At strong couplings, our calculations predict the appearance of trajectories where the impurity wavers back at intermediate times as a result of quantum fluctuations. Our method is applicable to a broader class of nonequilibrium problems. As a check, we also apply it to calculate the spectral function and find good agreement with experimental results. At very strong couplings, we predict that quantum fluctuations lead to the appearance of a dark continuum with strongly suppressed spectral weight at low energies. While our calculations start from an effective Fröhlich Hamiltonian describing impurities in a three-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensate, we also calculate the effects of additional terms in the Hamiltonian beyond the Fröhlich paradigm. We demonstrate that the main effect of these additional terms on the attractive side of a Feshbach resonance is to renormalize the coupling strength of the effective Fröhlich model.

  7. A Multiproxy Approach to Unraveling Climate and Human Demography in the Peruvian Altiplano from a 5000 year Lake Sediment Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaught-Mijares, R. M.; Hillman, A. L.; Abbott, M. B.; Werne, J. P.; Arkush, E.

    2017-12-01

    Drought and flood events are thought to have shaped the ways in which Andean societies have adapted to life in the Titicaca Basin region, particularly with regard to land use practices and settlement patterns. This study examines a small lake in the region, Laguna Orurillo. Water isotopes suggest that the lake primarily loses water through evaporation, making it hydrologically sensitive. In 2015, a 3.4 m overlapping sediment record was collected and inspected for evidence of shallow water facies and erosional unconformities to reconstruct paleohydrology. Sediment core chronology was established using 7 AMS radiocarbon dates and 210Pb dating and indicates that the core spans 5000 years. Additional sediment core measurements include magnetic susceptibility, bulk density, organic/carbonate content, and XRD. Results show a pronounced change in sediment composition from brittle, angular salt deposits to massive calcareous silt and clay around 5000 years BP. Multiple transitions from clay to sand show potential lake level depressions at 1540, 2090, and 2230, yr BP that are supported by a drastic increase in carbonate composition from 2760-1600 yr BP. Additional shallow-water periods may be reflected in the presence of rip-up clasts from 4000 to 3000 yr BP. These early interpretations align well with existing hydrologic records from Lake Titicaca. In order to develop a more detailed climate and land use record, isotope analyses of authigenic carbonate minerals using δ13C and δ18O and leaf waxes using δD are being developed. Ultimately, this record will be linked with records from nearby Lagunas Arapa and Umayo. Additional proxies for human population such as fecal 5β-stanols and proximal anthropologic surveys will be synthesized to contribute to a regional understanding of Holocene climate variability and human demography in the Peruvian Altiplano.

  8. Basurto-IGPP. A manual-directed approach of integrative group psychotherapy in psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Parra, Eduardo; González-Torres, M A; Eguiluz, I; de la Sierra, E; Trojaola, B; Catalán, A

    2010-01-01

    A manual on Integrative Group Psychotherapy for outpatients with schizophrenia and other psychoses (Basurto-PGIP) is presented. The model takes into account group specific therapeutic factors. It integrates influences from other integrative psychotherapeutic models, interpersonal group therapy, group analysis and recent developments in cognitive behavioural therapy for psychotic symptoms. The manual is structured in levels of different complexity that can be applied in a progressive manner. The intervention tries to adapt to patients features, therapists ability and training, and centres resources. It can be applied in two possible settings: a short term closed group and a long term open group. Advantages and disadvantages of the model are described.

  9. The fuzzy clearing approach for a niching genetic algorithm applied to a nuclear reactor core design optimization problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sacco, Wagner F.; Machado, Marcelo D.; Pereira, Claudio M.N.A.; Schirru, Roberto

    2004-01-01

    This article extends previous efforts on genetic algorithms (GAs) applied to a core design optimization problem. We introduce the application of a new Niching Genetic Algorithm (NGA) to this problem and compare its performance to these previous works. The optimization problem consists in adjusting several reactor cell parameters, such as dimensions, enrichment and materials, in order to minimize the average peak-factor in a three-enrichment zone reactor, considering restrictions on the average thermal flux, criticality and sub-moderation. After exhaustive experiments we observed that our new niching method performs better than the conventional GA due to a greater exploration of the search space

  10. The CORE programme in Belarus. A new approach to the rehabilitation of living conditions in contaminated areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trafimchik, Z.

    2005-01-01

    Topical Project provides training in practical radioactive protection for pregnant women subjected to chronic low-dose radiation exposure. The CORE Programme Topical Projects include: Establishment of an association for development of bee-keeping in Slavgorod district The goal is to create an enabling environment for the development of bee-keeping in the affected district, Preservation and development of pottery-making traditions on the territory of the village Gorodnaia (Stolin district) The Project aims to create a Pottery Centre as a way to improve the living conditions of the affected population. In this case the community designed projects on their immediate needs and mobilised resources for its implementation

  11. Discovering Symmetry in Everyday Environments: A Creative Approach to Teaching Symmetry and Point Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchigami, Kei; Schrandt, Matthew; Miessler, Gary L.

    2016-01-01

    A hands-on symmetry project is proposed as an innovative way of teaching point groups to undergraduate chemistry students. Traditionally, courses teaching symmetry require students to identify the point group of a given object. This project asks the reverse: students are instructed to identify an object that matches each point group. Doing so…

  12. Quantitative Approach to Collaborative Learning: Performance Prediction, Individual Assessment, and Group Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cen, Ling; Ruta, Dymitr; Powell, Leigh; Hirsch, Benjamin; Ng, Jason

    2016-01-01

    The benefits of collaborative learning, although widely reported, lack the quantitative rigor and detailed insight into the dynamics of interactions within the group, while individual contributions and their impacts on group members and their collaborative work remain hidden behind joint group assessment. To bridge this gap we intend to address…

  13. Backtrack Programming: A Computer-Based Approach to Group Problem Solving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Michael D.; Bodaken, Edward M.

    Backtrack problem-solving appears to be a viable alternative to current problem-solving methodologies. It appears to have considerable heuristic potential as a conceptual and operational framework for small group communication research, as well as functional utility for the student group in the small group class or the management team in the…

  14. An Ontology Engineering Approach to the Realization of Theory-Driven Group Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isotani, Seiji; Inaba, Akiko; Ikeda, Mitsuru; Mizoguchi, Riichiro

    2009-01-01

    One of the main difficulties during the design of collaborative learning activities is adequate group formation. In any type of collaboration, group formation plays a critical role in the learners' acceptance of group activities, as well as the success of the collaborative learning process. Nevertheless, to propose both an effective and…

  15. Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism Fingerprinting for Identification of a Core Group of Neisseria gonorrhoeae Transmitters in the Population Attending a Clinic for Treatment of Sexually Transmitted Diseases in Amsterdam, The Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Spaargaren, Joke; Stoof, Jeroen; Fennema, Han; Coutinho, Roel; Savelkoul, Paul

    2001-01-01

    Amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis seems well suited for studying the epidemiology of isolates of Neisseria gonorrhoeae obtained from patients attending the Sexually Transmitted Disease Outpatient Clinic in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. It shows potential to identify the core group of transmitters.

  16. Pan-Genome Analysis of Human Gastric Pathogen H. pylori: Comparative Genomics and Pathogenomics Approaches to Identify Regions Associated with Pathogenicity and Prediction of Potential Core Therapeutic Targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ali, Amjad; Naz, Anam; Soares, Siomar C.

    2015-01-01

    -genome approach; the predicted conserved gene families (1,193) constitute similar to 77% of the average H. pylori genome and 45% of the global gene repertoire of the species. Reverse vaccinology strategies have been adopted to identify and narrow down the potential core-immunogenic candidates. Total of 28 nonhost....... Pan-genome analyses of the global representative H. pylori isolates consisting of 39 complete genomes are presented in this paper. Phylogenetic analyses have revealed close relationships among geographically diverse strains of H. pylori. The conservation among these genomes was further analyzed by pan...

  17. Thermohydraulic simulation of HTR-10 nuclear reactor core using realistic CFD approach; Simulacao termohidraulica do nucleo do reator nuclear HTR-10 com o uso da abordagem realistica CFD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Alexandro S.; Dominguez, Dany S., E-mail: alexandrossilva@gmail.com, E-mail: dsdominguez@gmail.com [Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz (UESC), Ilheus, BA (Brazil); Mazaira, Leorlen Y. Rojas; Hernandez, Carlos R.G., E-mail: leored1984@gmail.com, E-mail: cgh@instec.cu [Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas, La Habana (Cuba); Lira, Carlos Alberto Brayner de Oliveira, E-mail: cabol@ufpe.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    High-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) have the potential to be used as possible energy generation sources in the near future, owing to their inherently safe performance by using a large amount of graphite, low power density design, and high conversion efficiency. However, safety is the most important issue for its commercialization in nuclear energy industry. It is very important for safety design and operation of an HTGR to investigate its thermal–hydraulic characteristics. In this article, it was performed the thermal–hydraulic simulation of compressible flow inside the core of the pebble bed reactor HTR (High Temperature Reactor)-10 using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). The realistic approach was used, where every closely packed pebble is realistically modelled considering a graphite layer and sphere of fuel. Due to the high computational cost is impossible simulate the full core; therefore, the geometry used is a column of FCC (Face Centered Cubic) cells, with 41 layers and 82 pebbles. The input data used were taken from the thermohydraulic IAEA Benchmark (TECDOC-1694). The results show the profiles of velocity and temperature of the coolant in the core, and the temperature distribution inside the pebbles. The maximum temperatures in the pebbles do not exceed the allowable limit for this type of nuclear fuel. (author)

  18. Thermodynamics, core-level spectroscopy, morphology, and work function study of different TiCl3 crystalline phases: A theoretical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Lei; Li, Wenpo; Feng, Wenjiang; Zhang, Zhipeng; Zhang, Shengtao

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Three TiCl 3 polymorphs materials were systematically investigated. • Structural results agree well with experimental and available theoretical data. • Morphological and thermodynamic properties were computed and analyzed. • Core-level spectroscopy and work function were obtained. - Abstract: Computer simulation has been widely applied in many research fields owing to its superiority in revealing an insight understanding of the phenomena. In this work, the thermodynamics, core-level spectroscopy, morphology, and work function of TiCl 3 with three different crystalline phases (α, β, and γ) have been comprehensively computed employing the Materials Studio package. Our computational DFT-D approach gives a structural description of the TiCl 3 phases in good agreement with experiment. The core-level spectroscopy confirmed that α, β, and γ modifications for TiCl 3 have lightly affected on the valences of the constitutional elements. A series of possible growth faces (h k l) were deduced using the classic Bravais–Friedel–Donnay–Harker (BFDH) model. We conclude that the sequence of work function for (0 0 1) surface was α > β ≈ γ

  19. The Effect of Group Therapy With Transactional Analysis Approach on Emotional Intelligence, Executive Functions and Drug Dependency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forghani, Masoomeh; Ghanbari Hashem Abadi, Bahram Ali

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of group psychotherapy with transactional analysis (TA) approach on emotional intelligence (EI), executive functions and substance dependency among drug-addicts at rehabilitation centers in Mashhad city, Iran, in 2013. In this quasi-experimental study with pretest, posttest, case- control stages, 30 patients were selected from a rehabilitation center and randomly divided into two groups. The case group received 12 sessions of group psychotherapy with transactional analysis approach. Then the effects of independent variable (group psychotherapy with TA approach) on EI, executive function and drug dependency were assessed. The Bar-on test was used for EI, Stroop test for measuring executive function and morphine test, meth-amphetamines and B2 test for evaluating drug dependency. Data were analyzed using multifactorial covariance analysis, Levenes' analysis, MANCOVA, t-student and Pearson correlation coefficient tests t with SPSS software. Our results showed that group psychotherapy with the TA approach was effective in improving EI, executive functions and decreasing drug dependency (P addicts and prevents addiction recurrence by improving the coping capabilities and some mental functions of the subjects. However, there are some limitations regarding this study including follow-up duration and sample size.

  20. Group-Wise Herding Behavior in Financial Markets: An Agent-Based Modeling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minsung; Kim, Minki

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we shed light on the dynamic characteristics of rational group behaviors and the relationship between monetary policy and economic units in the financial market by using an agent-based model (ABM), the Hurst exponent, and the Shannon entropy. First, an agent-based model is used to analyze the characteristics of the group behaviors at different levels of irrationality. Second, the Hurst exponent is applied to analyze the characteristics of the trend-following irrationality group. Third, the Shannon entropy is used to analyze the randomness and unpredictability of group behavior. We show that in a system that focuses on macro-monetary policy, steep fluctuations occur, meaning that the medium-level irrationality group has the highest Hurst exponent and Shannon entropy among all of the groups. However, in a system that focuses on micro-monetary policy, all group behaviors follow a stable trend, and the medium irrationality group thus remains stable, too. Likewise, in a system that focuses on both micro- and macro-monetary policies, all groups tend to be stable. Consequently, we find that group behavior varies across economic units at each irrationality level for micro- and macro-monetary policy in the financial market. Together, these findings offer key insights into monetary policy. PMID:24714635

  1. WWER-440 reactor thermal power increase. Up-to-date approaches to substantiation of the core heat-engineering reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilchenko, I.; Lushin, V.; Zubtsov, D.

    2006-01-01

    Increasing the Units power is an urgent problem for nuclear power plants with WWER-440 reactors. Improving the fuel assembly designs and calculated codes creates all prerequisites to fulfil this purpose. The decrease in the core power peaking is reached by using the profiled fuel assemblies, burnable absorber integrated into the fuel, the FA with the modernized interface attachment, modern calculated codes that allows to reduce conservatism of the RP safety substantiation. A wide spectrum of experimental study of behaviour of the fuel having reached burn-up (50-60) MW days / kg U under the transients and accident conditions was carried out, the post-irradiated examination of the fuel assemblies, fuel rods and fuel pellets with four and five annual operating fuel cycle were performed as well and confirmed the high reliability of the fuel, the presence of large margins of the fuel stack state that contributes to reactor operation at the increased power. The results of the carried out experiments on implementing the five and six annual fuel cycles show that the limiting fuel state as to its serviceability in the WWER-440 reactors is far from being reached. Presently there is an experience of the increased power operation of Kola NPP, Units 1, 2, 4 and Rovno NPP, Unit 2. The Loviisa NPP Units are operated at 109 % power. The Russian experts had gained an experience in substantiating the core operation at 108 % power for Paks NPP, Unit 4. In this paper the additional conditions for increasing the power of the Kola NPP, Units 1 and 2 and the main results of substantiation of increase in power of the Paks NPP, Unit 4 up to 1485 MW are presented in details

  2. Analysis Of Masamo Catfish Marketing By Analytical Approach At Farmer Group “Sumber Lancar”, Blimbing, Malang City

    OpenAIRE

    Abidin, Zainal; Handayani, Wahyu; Fattah, Mochammad

    2016-01-01

    Masamo as new variety of catfish cultivated by the farmer group "Sumber Lancar" in Blimbing, Malang currently has a lot of demand due to increasing consumers who like to eat fish to meet the need for protein for the body. Increasing of Masamo catfish demand followed by production and marketing efforts. This study wants to know whether the marketing efficient. Therefore, this study uses analytical approach approach in order to identify institutional and channel of Masamo Catfish marketing perf...

  3. An ethnographic investigation of healthcare providers' approaches to facilitating person-centredness in group-based diabetes education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenov, Vibeke; Hempler, Nana Folmann; Reventlow, Susanne; Wind, Gitte

    2017-08-22

    To investigate approaches among healthcare providers (HCPs) that support or hinder person-centredness in group-based diabetes education programmes targeting persons with type 2 diabetes. Ethnographic fieldwork in a municipal and a hospital setting in Denmark. The two programmes included 21 participants and 10 HCPs and were observed over 5 weeks. Additionally, 10 in-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with patients (n = 7) and HCPs (n = 3). Data were analysed using systematic text condensation. Hindering approaches included a teacher-centred focus on delivering disease-specific information. Communication was dialog based, but HCPs primarily asked closed-ended questions with one correct answer. Additional hindering approaches included ignoring participants with suboptimal health behaviours and a tendency to moralize that resulted in feelings of guilt among participants. Supporting approaches included letting participants set the agenda using broad, open-ended questions. Healthcare providers are often socialized into a biomedical approach and trained to be experts. However, person-centredness involves redefined roles and responsibilities. Applying person-centredness in practice requires continuous training and supervision, but HCPs often have minimum support for developing person-centred communication skills. Techniques based on motivational communication, psychosocial methods and facilitating group processes are effective person-centred approaches in a group context. Teacher-centredness undermined person-centredness because HCPs primarily delivered disease-specific recommendations, leading to biomedical information overload for participants. © 2017 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  4. Application of methodological approach to selection of sportswomen to calisthenics teams for group exercises, considering compatibility factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.S. Kozhanova

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: motivation of methodological approach to selection of sportswomen to calisthenics teams for group exercises considering compatibility factor. Material: in the research 40 high qualification sportswomen of 17-23 yrs age with sport experience of 11-16 years participated. With cluster analysis 10 gymnasts with morphological indicators, meeting modern standards of group exercises were selected. Results: we found 5 generalized factors, which characterize structure of selection to teams and determines 72% of dispersion. Influence of kinds and connected with them criteria of compatibility on efficiency of gymnasts’ competition functioning were also determined. The authors substantiated methodological approach to selection of sportswomen to calisthenics teams for group exercises, considering compatibility factor. Conclusions: in selection to calisthenics teams for group exercises it is purposeful to realize complex registration of compatibility kinds, considering gymnasts’ similar features by recommended indicators.

  5. Study of the functionalization of cross sections of cell in multi groups for calculations in best-estimate 3D pin-by-pin of PWR cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hueso, C.; Sanchez-Cervera, S.; Herrero, J. J.

    2011-01-01

    One of the objectives of the European project NURISP (Nuclear Reactor Integrated Platform) of 7th framework Programme is to advance the simulation of light water reactors by coupling the best-estimate codes to deepen core physics, thermal-hydraulic behaviour of biphasic and fuel.

  6. Psychodrama: A Creative Approach for Addressing Parallel Process in Group Supervision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkle, Michelle Gimenez

    2008-01-01

    This article provides a model for using psychodrama to address issues of parallel process during group supervision. Information on how to utilize the specific concepts and techniques of psychodrama in relation to group supervision is discussed. A case vignette of the model is provided.

  7. A Psychodynamic Approach on Group Career Counseling: A Brazilian Experience of 40 Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, Yvette Piha; Ribeiro, Marcelo Afonso; da Conceição Coropos Uvaldo, Maria; da Silva, Fabiano Fonseca

    2015-01-01

    Career guidance and career counselling have traditionally been conducted in an individualized fashion focusing on the counsellor-client relationship. Specialized literature, however, points to the potential use of group strategies. This article seeks to contribute to the advancement of studies in group career counselling practices, by introducing…

  8. A diagram approach to character formulae for finite and compact groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kibler, M.; Elbaz, E.

    1978-06-01

    Some basic relations for the representation theory and the Wigner-Racah algebra of a finite or compact continuous group are discussed and transcribed in terms of diagrams. Special emphasis is placed on the case of a simply reducible group and all the diagrams are applicable to SU 2 without any change

  9. A differential-geometric approach to generalized linear models with grouped predictors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Augugliaro, Luigi; Mineo, Angelo M.; Wit, Ernst C.

    We propose an extension of the differential-geometric least angle regression method to perform sparse group inference in a generalized linear model. An efficient algorithm is proposed to compute the solution curve. The proposed group differential-geometric least angle regression method has important

  10. An integrated approach for determining the size of hardwood group-selection openings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chris B. LeDoux

    1999-01-01

    The use of group-selection methods is becoming more widespread as landowners and forest managers attempt to respond to public pressure to reduce the size of clearcut blocks. Several studies have shown that harvesting timber in smaller groups or clumps increases the cost of operations for both cable and ground-based logging systems. Recent regeneration studies have...

  11. Assessing the Impact of a School-Based Group Approach with Adolescent Males

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddell, T. Michael; Kurpius, Sharon Robinson

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed the impact of a school-based group intervention, "The Council for Boys and Young Men," specifically designed for adolescent males. The participants who attended an alternative school in a metropolitan area were randomly assigned to the intervention or to waitlist control groups. Measures assessed self-esteem, future…

  12. A Problem and Project-Based Learning (PBL) Approach to Motivate Group Creativity in Engineering Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Chunfang; Kolmos, Anette; Nielsen, Jens Frederik Dalsgaard

    2012-01-01

    in multiple ways in a PBL environment, such as formal and informal group discussions, regular supervisor meetings and sharing leadership. Furthermore, factors such as common goals, support of peers and openness stimulate motivation. However, the students think that a time schedule is a barrier to group...

  13. Acceptability of smoke from prescribed forest burning in the northern inland west: a focus group approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brad R. Weisshaupt; Matthew S. Carroll; Keith A. Blatner; William D. Robinson; Pamela J. Jakes

    2005-01-01

    Focus groups were used to gauge tolerance of smoke from broadcast prescribed forest burning in the wildland-urban interface of the northern Inland West. Focus group participants worked through issues surrounding prescribed burning as a management tool to determine if the origin of smoke made a difference in the acceptance of that smoke. Participant responses across...

  14. Whiter, brighter, and more stable cellulose paper coated with TiO2 /SiO2 core/shell nanoparticles using a layer-by-layer approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Fei; Lorch, Mark; Sajedin, Seyed Mani; Kelly, Stephen M; Kornherr, Andreas

    2013-08-01

    To inhibit the photocatalytic degradation of organic material supports induced by small titania (TiO2 ) nanoparticles, four kinds of TiO2 nanoparticles, that is, commercial P25-TiO2 , commercial rutile phase TiO2 , rutile TiO2 nanorods and rutile TiO2 spheres, prepared from TiCl4 , were coated with a thin, but dense, coating of silica (SiO2 ) using a conventional sol-gel technique to form TiO2 /SiO2 core/shell nanoparticles. These core/shell particles were deposited and fixed as a very thin coating onto the surface of cellulose paper samples by a wet-chemistry polyelectrolyte layer-by-layer approach. The TiO2 /SiO2 nanocoated paper samples exhibit higher whiteness and brightness and greater stability to UV-bleaching than comparable samples of blank paper. There are many potential applications for this green chemistry approach to protect cellulosic fibres from UV-bleaching in sunlight and to improve their whiteness and brightness. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. CT-guided core needle biopsy of mediastinal nodes through a transpulmonary approach: retrospective analysis of the procedures conducted over six years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Zhongyuan; Liang, Zhiwen; Li, Pengcheng; Wang, Qiong [Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Cancer Center, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Wuhan (China)

    2017-08-15

    To retrospectively evaluate the diagnostic performance and complications of a CT-guided core needle cutting biopsy of mediastinal nodes through a transpulmonary approach. From January 2009 to December 2014, we used a coaxial positioning system and an 18G cutting-type biopsy device to perform CT-guided percutaneous transpulmonary needle biopsies of mediastinal nodes for 127 patients. The diagnostic performance, complication rate, influencing factors, distribution of mediastinal nodes and pathological diagnoses were investigated. Among 127 patients, pathologic analyses showed that all of the biopsies were technically successful. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were all 100%. As for complications, the ratios for pneumothorax and hemoptysis were 33.9% and 4.7%, respectively. Multivariate analyses revealed that the distance from the pleura to the target lesion (P = 0.008) and the numbers of visceral pleura injuries (P = 0.006) were the two most significant risk factors for pneumothorax, and that the distance from the pleura to the target lesion (P = 0.004) was the most significant risk factor for hemoptysis. CT-guided core needle cutting biopsy of mediastinal nodes through a transpulmonary approach is a safe and efficient diagnostic method. (orig.)

  16. Group attributional training as an effective approach to human resource development under team work systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z M

    1994-07-01

    An experimental programme of group attributional training under team work system was conducted as part of human resource development in Chinese industrial enterprises. One hundred and ten shopfloor employees participated in the study. Among them, 58 employees took part in the factorial-designed experiment to find out the effects of attributions on performance, and 52 employees of ten work groups participated in the group attributional training programme twice a week for two months. The results showed that the group attributional training was effective in modifying employees' attributional patterns and enhancing group performance and satisfaction. On the basis of the results, an attributional model of work motivation is proposed, and its theoretical and practical implications for human resource management discussed.

  17. An ethnographic investigation of healthcare providers' approaches to facilitating person-centredness in group-based diabetes education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenov, Vibeke; Hempler, Nana Folmann; Reventlow, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    AIM: To investigate approaches among healthcare providers (HCPs) that support or hinder person-centredness in group-based diabetes education programmes targeting persons with type 2 diabetes. METHODS: Ethnographic fieldwork in a municipal and a hospital setting in Denmark. The two programmes....... Applying person-centredness in practice requires continuous training and supervision, but HCPs often have minimum support for developing person-centred communication skills. Techniques based on motivational communication, psychosocial methods and facilitating group processes are effective person...

  18. Discovery and publishing of primary biodiversity data associated with multimedia resources: The Audubon Core strategies and approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A Morris

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The Audubon Core Multimedia Resource Metadata Schema is a representation-free vocabulary for the description of biodiversity multimedia resources and collections, now in the final stages as a proposed Biodiversity Informatics Standards (TDWG standard. By defining only six terms as mandatory, it seeks to lighten the burden for providing or using multimedia useful for biodiversity science. At the same time it offers rich optional metadata terms that can help curators of multimedia collections provide authoritative media that document species occurrence, ecosystems, identification tools, ontologies, and many other kinds of biodiversity documents or data. About half of the vocabulary is re-used from other relevant controlled vocabularies that are often already in use for multimedia metadata, thereby reducing the mapping burden on existing repositories. A central design goal is to allow consuming applications to have a high likelihood of discovering suitable resources, reducing the human examination effort that might be required to decide if the resource is fit for the purpose of the application.

  19. Group theory approach to unification of gravity with internal symmetry gauge interactions. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samokhvalov, S.E.; Vanyashin, V.S.

    1990-12-01

    The infinite group of deformed diffeomorphisms of space-time continuum is put into the basis of the Gauge Theory of Gravity. This gives rise to some new ways for unification of gravity with other gauge interactions. (author). 7 refs

  20. Testing Black Market vs. Official PPP: A Pooled Mean Group Estimation Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Goswami, Gour Gobinda; Hossain, Mohammad Zariab

    2013-01-01

    Testing purchasing power parity (PPP) using black market exchange rate data has gained popularity in recent times. It is claimed that black market exchange rate data more often support the PPP than the official exchange rate data. In this study, to assess both the long run stability of exchange rate and the short run dynamics, we employ Pooled Mean Group (PMG) Estimation developed by Pesaran et al. (1999) on eight groups of countries based on different criteria. Using the famous Reinhart and ...

  1. A Large Group Decision Making Approach Based on TOPSIS Framework with Unknown Weights Information

    OpenAIRE

    Li Yupeng; Lian Xiaozhen; Lu Cheng; Wang Zhaotong

    2017-01-01

    Large group decision making considering multiple attributes is imperative in many decision areas. The weights of the decision makers (DMs) is difficult to obtain for the large number of DMs. To cope with this issue, an integrated multiple-attributes large group decision making framework is proposed in this article. The fuzziness and hesitation of the linguistic decision variables are described by interval-valued intuitionistic fuzzy sets. The weights of the DMs are optimized by constructing a...

  2. Bifunctional silica nanospheres with 3-aminopropyl and phenyl groups. Synthesis approach and prospects of their applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsyuda, Sofiya S.; Tomina, Veronika V.; Zub, Yuriy L.; Furtat, Iryna M.; Lebed, Anastasia P.; Vaclavikova, Miroslava; Melnyk, Inna V.

    2017-10-01

    Spherical silica particles with bifunctional (tbnd Si(CH2)3NH2/tbnd SiC6H5) surface layers were synthesized by the Stöber method using ternary alkoxysilanes systems. The influence of the synthesis conditions, such as temperature and stirring time on the process of nanoparticles formation was studied. The presence of introduced functional groups was confirmed by FTIR. The composition of the surface layers examined by elemental analysis and acid-base titration was shown to be independent from the synthesis temperature. However, the size of the obtained particles depends on the synthesis temperature and, according to photon cross-correlation spectroscopy, can be varied from 50 to 846 nm. The variation of electric charges of N-functional groups was disclosed in obtained nanospheres and attributed to different surface location of these groups and their surrounding with other groups. The sorption of Cu(II) ions by functionalized silicas depends on the concentration of amino groups, which correlates with the isoelectric point values (determined to vary from 8.26 to 9.21). Bifunctional nanoparticles adsorb 99.0 mg/g of methylene blue, compared with 48.0 mg/g by silica sample with only amino groups. The nanospheres, both with and without adsorbed Cu2+, demonstrate reasonable antibacterial activity against S. aureus ATCC 25923, depending on particle concentration in water suspension.

  3. One-Particle vs. Two-Particle Crossover in Weakly Coupled Hubbard Chains and Ladders: Perturbative Renormalization Group Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Kishine, Jun-ichiro; Yonemitsu, Kenji

    1997-01-01

    Physical nature of dimensional crossovers in weakly coupled Hubbard chains and ladders has been discussed within the framework of the perturbative renormalization-group approach. The difference between these two cases originates from different universality classes which the corresponding isolated systems belong to.

  4. A Cross-Cultural Approach to the Negotiation of Individual and Group Identities: Parliamentary Debates and Editorial Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Miranda

    2012-01-01

    This article draws on interactional pragmatics and a cross-cultural approach (UK, France, Spain) to investigate the negotiation of individual and group identities in two different speech events, parliamentary debates and editorial meetings. The cross-cultural examination of the use of linguistic resources for signalling "social role,…

  5. Mindfulness-Based Group Approach for Undergraduate Students with Disordered Eating or Body Image Issues: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia Stumpf

    2017-11-01

    Conclusions: A mindfulness-based group approach to treatment of disordered eating or body image issues shows promise for improving the quality of life for college-aged students. Undergraduate institutions have the advantage of using social interaction to facilitate healthy behavioral change. Future research with larger and more diverse samples is suggested, and implications regarding practice and education are also discussed.

  6. A group approach to genetic counselling of cardiomyopathy patients: satisfaction and psychological outcomes sufficient for further implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otten, Ellen; Birnie, Erwin; Ranchor, Adelita V; van Tintelen, J Peter; van Langen, Irene M

    2015-11-01

    The introduction of next-generation sequencing in everyday clinical genetics practise is increasing the number of genetic disorders that can be confirmed at DNA-level, and consequently increases the possibilities for cascade screening. This leads to a greater need for genetic counselling, whereas the number of professionals available to provide this is limited. We therefore piloted group genetic counselling for symptomatic cardiomyopathy patients at regional hospitals, to assess whether this could be an acceptable alternative to individual counselling. We performed a cohort study with pre- and post-counselling patient measurements using questionnaires, supplemented with evaluations of the group counselling format by the professionals involved. Patients from eight regional hospitals in the northern part of the Netherlands were included. Questionnaires comprised patient characteristics, psychological measures (personal perceived control (PPC), state and trait anxiety inventory (STAI)), and satisfaction with counsellors, counselling content and design. In total, 82 patients (mean age 57.5 year) attended one of 13 group sessions. Median PPC and STAI scores showed significantly higher control and lower anxiety after the counselling. Patients reported they were satisfied with the counsellors, and almost 75% of patients were satisfied with the group counselling. Regional professionals were also, overall, satisfied with the group sessions. The genetics professionals were less satisfied, mainly because of their perceived large time investment and less-than-expected group interaction. Hence, a group approach to cardiogenetic counselling is feasible, accessible, and psychologically effective, and could be one possible approach to counselling the increasing patient numbers in cardiogenetics.

  7. Continuous Training and Wages: An Empirical Analysis Using a Comparison-Group Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorlitz, Katja

    2011-01-01

    Using German linked employer-employee data, this paper investigates the short-term impact of on-the-job training on wages. The applied estimation approach was first introduced by Leuven and Oosterbeek (2008). Wages of employees who intended to participate in training but did not do so because of a random event are compared to wages of training…

  8. Qualitative Organic Analysis: An Efficient, Safer, and Economical Approach to Preliminary Tests and Functional Group Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhingra, Sunita; Angrish, Chetna

    2011-01-01

    Qualitative organic analysis of an unknown compound is an integral part of the university chemistry laboratory curriculum. This type of training is essential as students learn to approach a problem systematically and to interpret the results logically. However, considerable quantities of waste are generated by using conventional methods of…

  9. Why Failing Terrorist Groups Persist Revisited: A Social Network Approach to AQIM Network Resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    the approach and methods used in this analysis to organize, analyze, and explore the geospatial, statistical , and social network data...requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE IN INFORMATION STRATEGY AND POLITICAL WARFARE from the NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL December...research utilizes both descriptive statistics and regression analysis of social network data to explore the changes within the AQIM network 2012

  10. A Qualitative Analysis of NASA’s Human Computer Interaction Group Examining the Root Causes of Focusing on Derivative System Improvements Versus Core User Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    toward qualitative analysis methods where they excelled at user research and workflow process analysis consistent with their formal training, rather...to a single one (e.g., one type of user research or graphic design) at larger Silicon Valley firms. The core competency of the design team tended...NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA MBA PROFESSIONAL REPORT A QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS OF NASA’S HUMAN COMPUTER

  11. The Effect of Temperature and Injection Rate during Water Flooding Using Carbonate Core Samples: An Experimental Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaser Ahmadi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In many reservoirs, after water flooding, a large volume of oil is still left behind. Hot water injection is the most basic type of thermal recovery which increase recovery by improved sweep efficiency and thermal expansion of crude.In the present work, the effects of injection rate and the temperature of the injected water were surveyed by using core flooding apparatus. Water flooding was performed at different rates (0.2, 0.3, and 0.4 cc/min and temperatures (20 and 90 °C, and the reservoir temperature was about 63 °C. Oil recovery during hot water injection was more than water injection. Moreover, it was concluded that at injection rates of 0.2, 0.3, and 0.4 cc/min breakthrough time in hot water injection occurred 10 min later in comparison to water injection. The results showed that higher oil recovery and longer breakthrough time were obtained as a result of reducing injection rate. In the first 50 minutes, the oil recovery at injection rates of 0.2, 0.3 and 0.4 cc/min was 27.5, 34, and 46% respectively. It was found that at the beginning of injection, thermal and non-thermal injection recovery factors are approximately equal. Moreover, according to the results, recovery factor at the lowest rate in hot water (T=90 °C and q=0.2 cc/min is the best condition to obtain the highest recovery.

  12. Local Action Groups and Rural Sustainable Development. A spatial multiple criteria approach for efficient territorial planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palmisano, Giovanni Ottomano; Govindan, M.E., PhD.,, Kannan; Boggia, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Local Action Groups in order to promote the objectives of Rural Sustainable Development within rural municipalities. Each Local Action Group applies the Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats analysis in order to identify for its own rural municipalities the strategic elements to which...... and a Weakness factors and decision alternatives, as well as impossibility of ranking the decision alternatives. Thus, this research aims to overcome the drawbacks of the Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats analysis and to support Local Action Group partnerships in the sustainability evaluation...... of their rural municipalities, and therefore to aid the identification of a common Rural Sustainable Development strategy to allocate the European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development budget. This decision problem was tackled by applying a Multiple Criteria Spatial Decision Support System that integrates...

  13. Aprendizagem em grupo operativo de diabetes: uma abordagem etnográfica Learning through diabetes operative groups: an ethnographical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley Pereira de Almeida

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho, elaborado a partir da dissertação, aborda um dos núcleos temáticos que emergiu da pesquisa durante o curso de mestrado na Escola de Enfermagem da Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais. Para a compreensão da aprendizagem em grupo, utilizamos como referencial teórico Pichon-Riviére. Para esse autor, aprendizagem é um dos indicadores de fundamental importância no processo grupal. A partir do processo interacional, estabelece-se uma situação de aprendizagem, que permite aos integrantes apropriarem-se da realidade, mutuamente, e compartilhar pensamentos e conhecimentos. A concepção dos entrevistados de que o grupo proporciona o aprendizado no manejo do diabetes pode ser observado na maioria dos depoimentos. O núcleo temático "Grupo como espaço de aprendizagem e transformação" desvela concepções e significados que traduziram a experiência que as pessoas vivenciaram no grupo. Trata-se de um estudo etnográfico desenvolvido junto a treze pessoas diabéticas participantes de grupo de uma Unidade Básica de Saúde da Prefeitura Municipal de Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais. Os dados foram coletados por meio de entrevista semi-estruturada, observação participante e análise documental. A análise dos dados foi orientada pela análise de conteúdo de Bardin.This work has emerged from one of the core themes of research undergone in my masters' course at the Federal University of Minas Gerais - School of Nursing. In order to understand group learning, we used the theoretical references of Pichon-Riviére. According to this author, learning is an indicator of uttermost importance in group processes. Through process interactions, a learning mechanism unfolds allowing participants to mutually appropriate reality, share thoughts and knowledge. In most statements, interviewees have highlighted that the group allows them to learn how to deal with diabetes. The core theme, "Group as a space for learning and transformation

  14. Organizational leadership perspectives in implementation of the One Health approach: A case of the Zoonotic Disease Unit and core One Health implementers in Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Manyibe Nyariki

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study examined organizational leadership as a cross-sectoral collaboration factor in the implementation of the One Health (OH approach using Kenya’s Zoonotic Disease Unit and its core OH implementers as an example. Materials and Method: The study used a mixed methods research design. A semi-structured questionnaire was administered to 71 respondents, and key informants were interviewed using an interview guide. All the seven key informants and 53 (74% of the respondents participated in the study. Data were checked for consistency, coded, entered into the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, and analyzed using descriptive and correlational statistics. Interview data were transcribed and analyzed thematically. Results: From the analysis, 41/53 (77.2% of the respondents were senior personnel, 51/53 (85% of them had worked for 5 years and above in their organizations, and 38/53 (71.7% had at least a Master’s degree. The study established that although most leaders in the organizations had embraced the OH approach, they were not actively involved in its implementation due to constraints such as inadequate funding. There were moderate and statistically significant positive correlations between participation in leadership roles in implementing the OH approach and the level of awareness (Rs (51=0.54, p<0.001 as well as level of sensitization (Rs (51=0.52, p<0.001. Majority (86% of respondents acknowledged that top government leaders were not well sensitized about the OH approach. Conclusion: Organizational leadership plays an important role in the implementation of the OH approach. However, sensitization of leaders about the OH approach needs to be enhanced and expanded.

  15. Network Approach to Autistic Traits: Group and Subgroup Analyses of ADOS Item Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, George M.; Montazeri, Farhad; de Bildt, Annelies

    2015-01-01

    A network conceptualization might contribute to understanding the occurrence and interacting nature of behavioral traits in the autism realm. Networks were constructed based on correlations of item scores of the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule for Modules 1, 2 and 3 obtained for a group of 477 Dutch individuals with developmental disorders.…

  16. Interest Groups, the Courts, and Educational Equality: A Policy Regimes Approach to "Vergara v. California"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Superfine, Benjamin Michael; Thompson, Alea R.

    2016-01-01

    In "Vergara v. California" (2014), a trial-level court ruled that California laws governing teacher tenure and dismissal were unconstitutional. This study analyzes "Vergara" in light of the shifting use of the courts to promote equal educational opportunities and the changing power bases of educational interest groups,…

  17. Structure of Symmetry Groups via Cartan's Method: Survey of Four Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg I. Morozov

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available In this review article we discuss four recent methods for computing Maurer-Cartan structure equations of symmetry groups of differential equations. Examples include solution of the contact equivalence problem for linear hyperbolic equations and finding a contact transformation between the generalized Hunter-Saxton equation and the Euler-Poisson equation.

  18. Peer Facilitated Writing Groups: A Programmatic Approach to Doctoral Student Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vijay; Aitchison, Claire

    2018-01-01

    Very few empirical studies have investigated programmes in which doctoral students act as peer facilitators in faculty writing groups. We report on the development of a centrally delivered doctoral student writing programme in which twenty student participants were mentored and provided with the resources to initiate their own faculty-based…

  19. OER Approach for Specific Student Groups in Hardware-Based Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackovska, Nevena; Ristov, Sasko

    2014-01-01

    Hardware-based courses in computer science studies require much effort from both students and teachers. The most important part of students' learning is attending in person and actively working on laboratory exercises on hardware equipment. This paper deals with a specific group of students, those who are marginalized by not being able to…

  20. Gender Gaps in Group Listening and Speaking: Issues in Social Constructivist Approaches to Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Darryl; Gambell, Trevor; Randhawa, Bikkar

    2005-01-01

    Because of its centrality to school success, social status, and workplace effectiveness, oral and aural skills development has been increasingly emphasized in Canadian curricula, classrooms and, very recently, large-scale assessment. The corresponding emphasis on group processes and collaborative learning has aimed to address equity issues in…

  1. Phase diagram of the Hubbard model with arbitrary band filling: renormalization group approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cannas, Sergio A.; Cordoba Univ. Nacional; Tsallis, Constantino.

    1991-01-01

    The finite temperature phase diagram of the Hubbard model in d = 2 and d = 3 is calculated for arbitrary values of the parameter U/t and chemical potential μ using a quantum real space renormalization group. Evidence for a ferromagnetic phase at low temperatures is presented. (author). 15 refs., 5 figs

  2. Network Approach to Autistic Traits : Group and Subgroup Analyses of ADOS Item Scores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anderson, George M.; Montazeri, Farhad; de Bildt, Annelies

    2015-01-01

    A network conceptualization might contribute to understanding the occurrence and interacting nature of behavioral traits in the autism realm. Networks were constructed based on correlations of item scores of the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule for Modules 1, 2 and 3 obtained for a group of

  3. A polyphasic approach to the taxonomy of the Alternaria infectoria species-group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Birgitte; Sørensen, Jens Laurids; Nielsen, Kristian Fog

    2009-01-01

    Different taxa in the species-group of Alternaria infectoria (teleomorph Lewia spp.) are often isolated from various cereals including barley, maize and wheat grain, ornamental plants and skin lesions from animals and humans. In the present study we made a polyphasic characterization of 39 strains...

  4. A protecting group approach toward synthesis of Au–silica Janus nanostars

    OpenAIRE

    D. Rodríguez-Fernández; T. Altantzis; H. Heidari; S. Bals; L.M. Liz-Marzán

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: The concept of protecting groups, widely used in organic chemistry, has been applied for the synthesis of Au-silica Janus stars, in which gold branches protrude from one half of Au-silica Janus spheres. This configuration opens up new possibilities to apply the plasmonic properties of gold nanostars, as well as a variety of chemical functionalizations on the silica component.

  5. A protecting group approach toward synthesis of Au-silica Janus nanostars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Fernández, Denis; Altantzis, Thomas; Heidari, Hamed; Bals, Sara; Liz-Marzán, Luis M

    2014-01-04

    The concept of protecting groups, widely used in organic chemistry, has been applied for the synthesis of Au-silica Janus stars, in which gold branches protrude from one half of Au-silica Janus spheres. This configuration opens up new possibilities to apply the plasmonic properties of gold nanostars, as well as a variety of chemical functionalizations on the silica component.

  6. Group differences in the aesthetic evaluation of nature development plans : A multilevel approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, A.E.; Vlek, CAJ; Coeterier, JF

    The study presented here addresses theoretical, methodological and practical aspects of the issue of group differences in the aesthetic evaluation of natural landscapes. Beauty ratings of an agrarian landscape and five computer simulations of nature development plans in this landscape were collected

  7. Criminal characteristics of a group of primary criminals diagnosed with aspd: approach to criminal recidivis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Larrotta-Castillo

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Antisocial personality disorder (ASPD is commonly associated with the risk of criminal recidivism. Knowing more about the factors associated with this pattern of behaviour can help with the design of effective prevention strategies. The purpose of this article is to establish if there are differences in socio-criminogenic variables of a group of criminals sentenced for the first time and with APSD compared to another group of first-time offenders who do not present this disorder. Materials and methods: Analytical observation study of 70 men classified into 2 groups according to the presence of ASPD TPA (n=47; age: 29.98±7.8 years or absence of ASPD (n=23; age: 32.35±8.7 years. Results: The inmates with ASPD showed higher frequencies of current consumption of psychoactive substances (31.9%, criminal associations and simultaneous use of psychoactive substances (70.2%, having committed the crime under the effects of a psychoactive substance (55.3%, not having the possibility of distancing themselves from criminal associations (83% and a lack of legal resources for proceedings for defence and release (76.6%. Discussion: This sample contains a group of variables called dynamic that are more commonly present amongst first time offenders with ASPD; said variables have been associated as major predictors of recidivism. Given that they are regarded as dynamic, they may well be modifiable.

  8. Strong Military Families Program: A Multifamily Group Approach to Strengthening Family Resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblum, Kate; Muzik, Maria; Waddell, Rachel; Thompson, Stephanie; Rosenberg, Lauren; Masini, Gabriella; Smith, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Military families frequently display remarkable resilience in the face of significant challenges, and yet deployment and parental separation are significant stressors for parents, particularly those with infants and young children. The Strong Military Families preventive intervention is a multifamily parenting and self-care skills group that aims…

  9. Anterior sagittal transanorectal approach to the posterior urethra in the pediatric age group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, F; De Castro, R; Ceccarelli, P L; Dòmini, R

    1998-09-01

    Surgical access to the posterior urethra is often difficult and several surgical solutions have been proposed. We suggest an anterior sagittal transanorectal approach based on splitting the anterior rectal wall only. This alternative technique provides excellent exposure to the retrourethral region, permitting simple and safe surgery. Between 1994 and 1996 we performed surgery via the anterior sagittal transanorectal approach in 8 patients with a mean age of 9.06 years. Patients included 1 girl with a posttraumatic urethrovaginal fistula, 3 with intersex disorders (2 with mixed gonadal dysgenesis raised as boys and 1 with male dysgenetic pseudohermaphroditism with an enlarged urtricle) and 4 boys (1 with penile agenesis raised as girl, 2 with urethral duplication and 1 with prostatic rhabdomyosarcoma). The patient was placed in a knee-chest position. A midline sagittal incision was made through the anterior anorectal wall only and deepened through the perineal body to expose the posterior urethra and retrovesical space. After the pathological condition was corrected the anterior rectal wall and perineal body were reconstructed. The operation was completed with protective colostomy. In our final patient with prostatic rhabdomyosarcoma the anterior sagittal transanorectal approach was used without colostomy. Anorectal manometry was done 6 months postoperatively. All patients were completely continent of stool and urine. Convalescence was unremarkable in all cases. Postoperative manometry in 7 patients revealed no differences from preoperative measurements. This procedure should be considered a useful alternative to other techniques for various congenital and acquired pelvic disorders.

  10. Determination of equivalent breast phantoms for different age groups of Taiwanese women: An experimental approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Shang-Lung; Chu, Tieh-Chi; Lin, Yung-Chien; Lan, Gong-Yau; Yeh, Yu-Hsiu; Chen, Sharon; Chuang, Keh-Shih

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) slab is one of the mostly used phantoms for studying breast dosimetry in mammography. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the equivalence between exposure factors acquired from PMMA slabs and patient cases of different age groups of Taiwanese women in mammography. Methods: This study included 3910 craniocaudal screen/film mammograms on Taiwanese women acquired on one mammographic unit. The tube loading, compressed breast thickness (CBT), compression force, tube voltage, and target/filter combination for each mammogram were collected for all patients. The glandularity and the equivalent thickness of PMMA were determined for each breast using the exposure factors of the breast in combination with experimental measurements from breast-tissue-equivalent attenuation slabs. Equivalent thicknesses of PMMA to the breasts of Taiwanese women were then estimated. Results: The average ± standard deviation CBT and breast glandularity in this study were 4.2 ± 1.0 cm and 54% ± 23%, respectively. The average equivalent PMMA thickness was 4.0 ± 0.7 cm. PMMA slabs producing equivalent exposure factors as in the breasts of Taiwanese women were determined for the age groups 30-49 yr and 50-69 yr. For the 4-cm PMMA slab, the CBT and glandularity values of the equivalent breast were 4.1 cm and 65%, respectively, for the age group 30-49 yr and 4.4 cm and 44%, respectively, for the age group 50-69 yr. Conclusions: The average thickness of PMMA slabs producing the same exposure factors as observed in a large group of Taiwanese women is less than that reported for American women. The results from this study can provide useful information for determining a suitable thickness of PMMA for mammographic dose survey in Taiwan. The equivalence of PMMA slabs and the breasts of Taiwanese women is provided to allow average glandular dose assessment in clinical practice.

  11. Determination of equivalent breast phantoms for different age groups of Taiwanese women: An experimental approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Shang-Lung; Chu, Tieh-Chi; Lin, Yung-Chien; Lan, Gong-Yau; Yeh, Yu-Hsiu; Chen, Sharon; Chuang, Keh-Shih [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, 101 Section 2, Kuang-Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiology, Cheng Hsin General Hospital, 45 Cheng Hsin Street, Pai-Tou District, Taipei 11220, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Kaohsiung Medical University, 100 Shih-Chuan 1st Road, Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan (China); Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, 101 Section 2, Kuang-Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) slab is one of the mostly used phantoms for studying breast dosimetry in mammography. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the equivalence between exposure factors acquired from PMMA slabs and patient cases of different age groups of Taiwanese women in mammography. Methods: This study included 3910 craniocaudal screen/film mammograms on Taiwanese women acquired on one mammographic unit. The tube loading, compressed breast thickness (CBT), compression force, tube voltage, and target/filter combination for each mammogram were collected for all patients. The glandularity and the equivalent thickness of PMMA were determined for each breast using the exposure factors of the breast in combination with experimental measurements from breast-tissue-equivalent attenuation slabs. Equivalent thicknesses of PMMA to the breasts of Taiwanese women were then estimated. Results: The average {+-} standard deviation CBT and breast glandularity in this study were 4.2 {+-} 1.0 cm and 54% {+-} 23%, respectively. The average equivalent PMMA thickness was 4.0 {+-} 0.7 cm. PMMA slabs producing equivalent exposure factors as in the breasts of Taiwanese women were determined for the age groups 30-49 yr and 50-69 yr. For the 4-cm PMMA slab, the CBT and glandularity values of the equivalent breast were 4.1 cm and 65%, respectively, for the age group 30-49 yr and 4.4 cm and 44%, respectively, for the age group 50-69 yr. Conclusions: The average thickness of PMMA slabs producing the same exposure factors as observed in a large group of Taiwanese women is less than that reported for American women. The results from this study can provide useful information for determining a suitable thickness of PMMA for mammographic dose survey in Taiwan. The equivalence of PMMA slabs and the breasts of Taiwanese women is provided to allow average glandular dose assessment in clinical practice.

  12. A unified approach to the minimal unitary realizations of noncompact groups and supergroups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenaydin, Murat; Pavlyk, Oleksandr

    2006-01-01

    We study the minimal unitary representations of non-compact groups and supergroups obtained by quantization of their geometric realizations as quasi-conformal groups and supergroups. The quasi-conformal groups G leave generalized light-cones defined by a quartic norm invariant and have maximal rank subgroups of the form H x SL(2, R) such that G/H x SL(2, R) are para-quaternionic symmetric spaces. We give a unified formulation of the minimal unitary representations of simple non-compact groups of type A 2 , G 2 , D 4 , F 4 , E 6 , E 7 , E 8 and Sp(2n, R). The minimal unitary representations of Sp(2n, R) are simply the singleton representations and correspond to a degenerate limit of the unified construction. The minimal unitary representations of the other noncompact groups SU(m, n), SO(m, n), SO*(2n) and SL(m, R) are also given explicitly. We extend our formalism to define and construct the corresponding minimal representations of non-compact supergroups G whose even subgroups are of the form H x SL(2, R). If H is noncompact then the supergroup G does not admit any unitary representations, in general. The unified construction with H simple or Abelian leads to the minimal representations of G(3), F(4) and O Sp(n|2, R) (in the degenerate limit). The minimal unitary representations of O Sp(n|2, R) with even subgroups SO(n) x SL(2, R) are the singleton representations. We also give the minimal realization of the one parameter family of Lie superalgebras D(2, 1; σ)

  13. University Students’ Reflections on Representations in Genetics and Stereochemistry Revealed by a Focus Group Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inger Edfors

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Genetics and organic chemistry are areas of science that students regard as difficult to learn. Part of this difficulty is derived from the disciplines having representations as part of their discourses. In order to optimally support students’ meaning-making, teachers need to use representations to structure the meaning-making experience in thoughtful ways that consider the variation in students’ prior knowledge. Using a focus group setting, we explored 43 university students’ reasoning on representations in introductory chemistry and genetics courses. Our analysis of eight focus group discussions revealed how students can construct somewhat bewildered relations with disciplinary-specific representations. The students stated that they preferred familiar representations, but without asserting the meaning-making affordances of those representations. Also, the students were highly aware of the affordances of certain representations, but nonetheless chose not to use those representations in their problem solving. We suggest that an effective representation is one that, to some degree, is familiar to the students, but at the same time is challenging and not too closely related to “the usual one”. The focus group discussions led the students to become more aware of their own and others ways of interpreting different representations. Furthermore, feedback from the students’ focus group discussions enhanced the teachers’ awareness of the students’ prior knowledge and limitations in students’ representational literacy. Consequently, we posit that a focus group setting can be used in a university context to promote both student meaning-making and teacher professional development in a fruitful way.

  14. Induced representations of the affine group and intertwining operators: I. Analytical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elmabrok, Abdelhamid S; Hutník, Ondrej

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the construction and origin of unitary operators describing the structure of the space of continuous wavelet transforms inside the space L 2 (G,dν L ) of all square-integrable functions on the affine group G with respect to the left-invariant Haar measure from the viewpoint of induced representations of G. We show that these operators are, in fact, intertwining operators among pairs of induced representations of the affine group G. A characterization of the space of wavelet transforms using the Cauchy–Riemann-type equations is given. This article is part of a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical devoted to ‘Coherent states: mathematical and physical aspects’. (paper)

  15. A target group-specific approach to ''green'' power retailing: students as consumers of renewable energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gossling, S.; Kunkel, T.; Schumacher, K.; Heck, N.; Birkemeyer, J.; Froese, J.; Naber, N.; Schliermann, E.

    2005-01-01

    An extensive body of literature exists on the obstacles that have to be overcome in green power retailing. In this article, target group-specific marketing is evaluated as a strategy to increase the share of residential customers of green power. A sample of students in the city of Freiburg, Germany was interviewed in order to assess their awareness of environmental issues, their willingness to change to green power products, and to better understand individual hindrances in changing the power supplier. The analysis shows that students are highly positive towards green power products, but for several reasons difficult to reach in marketing campaigns. Aspects to be considered in addressing this consumer-group include the students' particular expectations towards green products, their living-conditions, price sensitivity, and their perception of the relative effort involved in changing the power provider. (author)

  16. Multilateral approaches to the nuclear fuel cycle. Expert group report to the Director General of the IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-04-01

    An international expert group has been appointed to consider options for possible multilateral approaches to the nuclear fuel cycle. The terms of reference for the Expert Group were to: 1)Identify and provide an analysis of issues and options relevant to multilateral approaches to the front and back ends of the nuclear fuel cycle; 2)Provide an overview of the policy, legal, security, economic and technological incentives and disincentives for cooperation in multilateral arrangements for the front and back ends of the nuclear fuel cycle; and 3)Provide a brief review of the historical and current experience in this area, and of the various analyses relating to multilateral fuel cycle arrangements relevant to the work of the Expert Group. The Group examined the nuclear fuel cycle and multinational approaches at meetings convened over a seven month period. Their report, presented in the paper, was released on 22 February 2005, and circulated for discussion among the IAEA Member States, as well as others, as an IAEA Information Circular (INFCIRC/640)

  17. Mobility Behavior of the Elderly: an attitude-based segmentation approach for a heterogeneous target group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haustein, Sonja

    2012-01-01

    The western population is ageing. Based on the assumption that the elderly are a quite heterogeneous population group with an increasing impact on the transport system, mobility types of the elderly were identified. By means of 1,500 standardized telephone interviews, mobility behavior and possib...... of the diverse lifestyles, attitudes, travel behavior and needs of the elderly. Furthermore, it identifies starting points for the reduction of car use....

  18. The hydrogen atom in a magnetic field. Spectrum from the Coulomb dynamical group approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delande, D.; Gay, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    Some sample results are presented for the problems of the hydrogen atom in a magnetic field. The energies have been computed for a typical Rydberg situation of atomic physics interest using limited computer facilities. The use of the Coulomb dynamical group allows a complete description of the symmetries and a rational choice of a Sturmian type basis set. Moreover, comparison with Rayleigh-Schrodinger perturbative expansions of the energies is performed. (author)

  19. The application of the extending symmetry group approach in optical soliton communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruan Hangyu; Li Huijun; Chen Yixin

    2005-01-01

    A systematic method which is based on the classical Lie group reduction is used to find the novel exact solution of the nonlinear Schroedinger equation (NLS) with distributed dispersion, nonlinearity and gain or loss. We study the transformations between the standard NLS equation and the NLS equations with distributed dispersion, nonlinearity and gain or loss. Appropriate solitary wave solutions can be applied to discuss soliton propagation in optical fibres, and the amplification and compression of pulses in optical fibre amplifiers

  20. On the mixed symmetry irreducible representations of the Poincare group in the BRST approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burdik, C.; Pashnev, A.; Tsulaya, M.

    2001-01-01

    The Lagrangian description of irreducible massless representations of the Poincare group with the corresponding Young tableaux having two rows along with some explicit examples including the notoph and Weyl tensor is given. For this purpose the method of the BRST constructions is used adopted to the systems of the second class constraints by the construction of auxiliary representations of the algebras of constraints in terms of Verma modules

  1. An Integrated Approach with Group Decision-Making for Strategy Selection in SWOT Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    İhsan Yüksel

    2012-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to improve the analytical dimension of SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats) analysis with group decision-making, which underlines the analysis of internal and external environments that in turn, will improve the definition of corporate strategy within the strategic planning process. The main issue of the study was how to select the most appropriate strategy by taking into consideration different effects of each factor of SWOT analysis on strat...

  2. A Theatre Laboratory Approach to Pedagogy and Creativity: Odin Teatret and Group Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chemi, Tatiana

    This book considers the pedagogy of the theatre laboratory, focusing on seminal theatre group Odin Teatret. It provides a detailed discussion of the historical background to theatre laboratories, including their conception, before moving on to specific examples of how the work at Odin Teatret cro...... to establish inquiry-based learning laboratories, in order to re-think higher education. It will be an invaluable resource for students and academics working on performance, creativity studies and pedagogy...

  3. Low-temperature approach to the renormalization-group study of critical phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suranyi, P.

    1977-01-01

    A new method of exploring the contents of the renormalization-group equations for discrete spins is introduced. The equations are expanded in low-temperature series and the truncated series are used to obtain the critical exponents and critical temperature of a system. The method is demonstrated on the planar triangular Ising lattice and the critical parameters are found to be within a few percent of the exactly known values in third nonvanishing order of approximation

  4. Nonperturbative renormalization-group approach preserving the momentum dependence of correlation functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, F.; Dupuis, N.

    2018-05-01

    We present an approximation scheme of the nonperturbative renormalization group that preserves the momentum dependence of correlation functions. This approximation scheme can be seen as a simple improvement of the local potential approximation (LPA) where the derivative terms in the effective action are promoted to arbitrary momentum-dependent functions. As in the LPA, the only field dependence comes from the effective potential, which allows us to solve the renormalization-group equations at a relatively modest numerical cost (as compared, e.g., to the Blaizot-Mendéz-Galain-Wschebor approximation scheme). As an application we consider the two-dimensional quantum O(N ) model at zero temperature. We discuss not only the two-point correlation function but also higher-order correlation functions such as the scalar susceptibility (which allows for an investigation of the "Higgs" amplitude mode) and the conductivity. In particular, we show how, using Padé approximants to perform the analytic continuation i ωn→ω +i 0+ of imaginary frequency correlation functions χ (i ωn) computed numerically from the renormalization-group equations, one can obtain spectral functions in the real-frequency domain.

  5. Identifying critical nutrient intake in groups at risk of poverty in Europe: the CHANCE project approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolić, Marina; Glibetić, Maria; Gurinović, Mirjana; Milešević, Jelena; Khokhar, Santosh; Chillo, Stefania; Abaravicius, Jonas Algis; Bordoni, Alessandra; Capozzi, Francesco

    2014-04-02

    The aim of the CHANCE project is to develop novel and affordable nutritious foods to optimize the diet and reduce the risk of diet-related diseases among groups at risk of poverty (ROP). This paper describes the methodology used in the two initial steps to accomplish the project's objective as follows: 1. a literature review of existing data and 2. an identification of ROP groups with which to design and perform the CHANCE nutritional survey, which will supply new data that is useful for formulating the new CHANCE food. Based on the literature review, a low intake of fruit and vegetables, whole grain products, fish, energy, fiber, vitamins B1, B2, B3, B6, B12 and C, folate, calcium, magnesium, iron, potassium and zinc and a high intake of starchy foods, processed meat and sodium were apparent. However, the available data appeared fragmented because of the different methodologies used in the studies. A more global vision of the main nutritional problems that are present among low-income people in Europe is needed, and the first step to achieve this goal is the use of common criteria to define the risk of poverty. The scoring system described here represents novel criteria for defining at-risk-of-poverty groups not only in the CHANCE-participating countries but also all over Europe.

  6. Alara and countermeasures: the approach proposed by the article 31 group of experts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaul, A.

    1989-01-01

    Based upon ICRP Publication 40 of 1984 and the Radiological Protection Criteria for Controlling Doses to the Public in the Event of Accidental Releases of Radioactive Material of the Commission of the European Communities of 1982, the Group of Experts according to Article 31 has derived reference Levels for the activity of foodstuffs. There have been established three categories of radionuclides - radioisotopes of iodine and strontium, alpha-emitting radioisotopes of plutonium and transplutonium elements, radionuclides of half-lives longer than 10 days - and food groups such as dairy produce, other major foodstuffs, drinking water and beverages (liquid foodstuffs) as well as baby foods ready for consumption. The values of the Derived Reference Level of activity have been calculated on the basis of a lower limit of 5 mSv committed effective dose equivalent or 50 mSv committed organ dose equivalent, age-dependent yearly food consumption rates and dose factors. The relative contamination of a foodstuff was assumed to be 10% of the full value of the Derived Reference Level of the activity for the whole of one year. The results of the calculations of the Group of Experts are compared to the maximum permitted levels according to the Council Regulation (EEC) of Dec. 22, 1987

  7. Identifying Critical Nutrient Intake in Groups at Risk of Poverty in Europe: The CHANCE Project Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolić, Marina; Glibetić, Maria; Gurinović, Mirjana; Milešević, Jelena; Khokhar, Santosh; Chillo, Stefania; Abaravicius, Jonas Algis; Bordoni, Alessandra; Capozzi, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the CHANCE project is to develop novel and affordable nutritious foods to optimize the diet and reduce the risk of diet-related diseases among groups at risk of poverty (ROP). This paper describes the methodology used in the two initial steps to accomplish the project’s objective as follows: 1. a literature review of existing data and 2. an identification of ROP groups with which to design and perform the CHANCE nutritional survey, which will supply new data that is useful for formulating the new CHANCE food. Based on the literature review, a low intake of fruit and vegetables, whole grain products, fish, energy, fiber, vitamins B1, B2, B3, B6, B12 and C, folate, calcium, magnesium, iron, potassium and zinc and a high intake of starchy foods, processed meat and sodium were apparent. However, the available data appeared fragmented because of the different methodologies used in the studies. A more global vision of the main nutritional problems that are present among low-income people in Europe is needed, and the first step to achieve this goal is the use of common criteria to define the risk of poverty. The scoring system described here represents novel criteria for defining at-risk-of-poverty groups not only in the CHANCE-participating countries but also all over Europe. PMID:24699195

  8. Identifying Critical Nutrient Intake in Groups at Risk of Poverty in Europe: The CHANCE Project Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Nikolić

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the CHANCE project is to develop novel and affordable nutritious foods to optimize the diet and reduce the risk of diet-related diseases among groups at risk of poverty (ROP. This paper describes the methodology used in the two initial steps to accomplish the project’s objective as follows: 1. a literature review of existing data and 2. an identification of ROP groups with which to design and perform the CHANCE nutritional survey, which will supply new data that is useful for formulating the new CHANCE food. Based on the literature review, a low intake of fruit and vegetables, whole grain products, fish, energy, fiber, vitamins B1, B2, B3, B6, B12 and C, folate, calcium, magnesium, iron, potassium and zinc and a high intake of starchy foods, processed meat and sodium were apparent. However, the available data appeared fragmented because of the different methodologies used in the studies. A more global vision of the main nutritional problems that are present among low-income people in Europe is needed, and the first step to achieve this goal is the use of common criteria to define the risk of poverty. The scoring system described here represents novel criteria for defining at-risk-of-poverty groups not only in the CHANCE-participating countries but also all over Europe.

  9. An Approach to User Interface Design with Two Indigenous Groups in Namibia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodil, Kasper; Winschiers-Theophilus, Heike; Stanley, Colin

    2014-01-01

    indigenous knowledge practices with digital object taxonomies. We present a method (picture card sorting) of discovering taxonomies that influence the users' interaction with a prototype system to preserve indigenous knowledge. Finally we describe the design implications, a new design approach based...... a user interface of a tablet based system aimed at preserving Indigenous Knowledge for rural Herero communities, we present findings from two sites in Namibia, complementing prior research. Participants who had little or no previous experience with technologies informed our endeavour of aligning local...

  10. Organic petrography:An approach for identification of maceral groups in Gheshlagh coal area, Eastern Alborz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh Rabani

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Maceral is a term to introduce organic components visible under a microscope (Stopes, 1935. The physical and chemical characteristics of macerals such as elemental composition, moisture content, hardness, density and petrographic characteristics differ. The differences in the physical and chemical characteristics of macerals are reflected in their industrial behavior.(Parkash, 1985. Petrographic analysis provides information on the various physical components of coals (Suwarna and Hemanto, 2007 and determination of quality of coal, coalification rate, composition and characteristics of coke and paleoenvironmental deposition (Taylor et al., 1998. Sampling and methodology Coal samples were collected from freshly mined coal from 11 coal seams of 4 active coal mines (Cheshlagh, Zemestan Yourt, Narges Chal and Cheshmehsaran for organic petrography in the Gheshlagh coal deposits. All samples were collected and stored in plastic bags to prevent contamination and weathering. Samples were prepared for microscopic analysis by reflected light following ASTM Standard procedure D2797-04. For microscopic study, coal samples were crushed to1-mm size fraction (18 mesh size, mounted in epoxy resin and polished. Three polished samples were prepared for each coal seam. The petrographic composition was obtained by maceral analyses under standard conditions (ISO 7404/3, 2009, for maceral analysis. Maceral point counting (based on 400 points analyses were performed using an Olympus BX51 reflected light microscope. The terminology used to identify and describe the organic matter particles is the one proposed by the International Committee for Coal and Organic Petrology (ICCP, 1998; ICCP, 2001; Scott and Glasspool, 2007; Taylor et al., 1998; Stach et al., 1982; Hower et al., 2009; Hower and Wagner, 2012. Organic petrography of theGheshlagh coal seams The vitrinite maceral group is dominant in all coal seams (66.2 to 87.2 vol.% and includes collodetrinite

  11. s-core network decomposition: A generalization of k-core analysis to weighted networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eidsaa, Marius; Almaas, Eivind

    2013-12-01

    A broad range of systems spanning biology, technology, and social phenomena may be represented and analyzed as complex networks. Recent studies of such networks using k-core decomposition have uncovered groups of nodes that play important roles. Here, we present s-core analysis, a generalization of k-core (or k-shell) analysis to complex networks where the links have different strengths or weights. We demonstrate the s-core decomposition approach on two random networks (ER and configuration model with scale-free degree distribution) where the link weights are (i) random, (ii) correlated, and (iii) anticorrelated with the node degrees. Finally, we apply the s-core decomposition approach to the protein-interaction network of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the context of two gene-expression experiments: oxidative stress in response to cumene hydroperoxide (CHP), and fermentation stress response (FSR). We find that the innermost s-cores are (i) different from innermost k-cores, (ii) different for the two stress conditions CHP and FSR, and (iii) enriched with proteins whose biological functions give insight into how yeast manages these specific stresses.

  12. Application of risk-informed in-service inspection approach. Pilot study on low pressure emergency core cooling system of NPP Temelin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horacek, L.; Palyza, J.; Zdarek, J.; Vizina, M.

    2004-01-01

    In-service inspection (ISI) programme of piping systems based on Riskinformed In-service Inspections (RI-ISI) approach represents for the WWER NPP licensee first overall systematic conceptual solution of the problems associated with design and design modifications of ISI programme for piping systems. The approach enables to consider possible savings and comparison of in-service inspection programmes according to more objective criteria including those calculated in PSA, in contrast to present much empiric experience collected by manufacturers, operators and ISI vendors in the past. Service experience has shown limited correlation between the deterministic ISI requirements and actual field failures or degradation mechanisms. Where field failures have been observed in piping, they have generally been due to either material concerns (e.g., Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking) or stress/cycling mechanisms not identified in the original design basis documents (e.g., thermal stratification), and therefore would not be selected for inspection under current requirements. Risk-informed in-service inspections represent integrated multidisciplinary approach to the in-service inspection programme fulfilling the enhanced requirements of the Czech Regulatory Body (SUJB) for defence in depth concept applied to weld joints of safety related components, application of qualified NDT methods/techniques and introducing of inspections for cause approach. Inspections for cause take into account analysis of both active and potential degradation mechanisms specific to piping system concerned. Simultaneously, this approach enables the licensee to reach, in cases justified from safety point of view, economic savings resulting from lowering of both number and extent of performed in-service inspections and optimisation of their performance. RI ISI pilot study based in majority on EPRI methodology implemented for WWER type reactors has been performed for LP ECCS (Low Pressure Emergency

  13. An organic group contribution approach to radiative efficiency estimation of organic working fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xinxin; Kobayashi, Noriyuki; He, Maogang; Wang, Jingfu

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • We use group contribution method to estimate radiative efficiency. • CFC, HCFC, HFC, HFE, and PFC were estimated using this method. • In most cases, the estimation value has a good precision. • The method is reliable for the estimation of molecule with a symmetric structure. • This estimation method can offer good reference for working fluid development. - Abstract: The ratification of the Montreal Protocol in 1987 and the Kyoto Protocol in 1997 mark an environment protection era of the development of organic working fluid. Ozone depletion potential (ODP) and global warming potential (GWP) are two most important indices for the quantitative comparison of organic working fluid. Nowadays, more and more attention has been paid to GWP. The calculation of GWP is an extremely complicated process which involves interactions between surface and atmosphere such as atmospheric radiative transfer and atmospheric chemical reactions. GWP of a substance is related to its atmospheric abundance and is a variable in itself. However, radiative efficiency is an intermediate parameter for GWP calculation and it is a constant value used to describe inherent property of a substance. In this paper, the group contribution method was adopted to estimate the radiative efficiency of the organic substance which contains more than one carbon atom. In most cases, the estimation value and the standard value are in a good agreement. The biggest estimation error occurs in the estimation of the radiative efficiency of fluorinated ethers due to its plenty of structure groups and its complicated structure compared with hydrocarbon. This estimation method can be used to predict the radiative efficiency of newly developed organic working fluids.

  14. Does the interpersonal model apply across eating disorder diagnostic groups? A structural equation modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Iryna V; Tasca, Giorgio A; Proulx, Geneviève; Bissada, Hany

    2015-11-01

    Interpersonal model has been validated with binge-eating disorder (BED), but it is not yet known if the model applies across a range of eating disorders (ED). The goal of this study was to investigate the validity of the interpersonal model in anorexia nervosa (restricting type; ANR and binge-eating/purge type; ANBP), bulimia nervosa (BN), BED, and eating disorder not otherwise specified (EDNOS). Data from a cross-sectional sample of 1459 treatment-seeking women diagnosed with ANR, ANBP, BN, BED and EDNOS were examined for indirect effects of interpersonal problems on ED psychopathology mediated through negative affect. Findings from structural equation modeling demonstrated the mediating role of negative affect in four of the five diagnostic groups. There were significant, medium to large (.239, .558), indirect effects in the ANR, BN, BED and EDNOS groups but not in the ANBP group. The results of the first reverse model of interpersonal problems as a mediator between negative affect and ED psychopathology were nonsignificant, suggesting the specificity of these hypothesized paths. However, in the second reverse model ED psychopathology was related to interpersonal problems indirectly through negative affect. This is the first study to find support for the interpersonal model of ED in a clinical sample of women with diverse ED diagnoses, though there may be a reciprocal relationship between ED psychopathology and relationship problems through negative affect. Negative affect partially explains the relationship between interpersonal problems and ED psychopathology in women diagnosed with ANR, BN, BED and EDNOS. Interpersonal psychotherapies for ED may be addressing the underlying interpersonal-affective difficulties, thereby reducing ED psychopathology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A Mathematical Framework for the Complex System Approach to Group Dynamics: The Case of Recovery House Social Integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Light, John M; Jason, Leonard A; Stevens, Edward B; Callahan, Sarah; Stone, Ariel

    2016-03-01

    The complex system conception of group social dynamics often involves not only changing individual characteristics, but also changing within-group relationships. Recent advances in stochastic dynamic network modeling allow these interdependencies to be modeled from data. This methodology is discussed within a context of other mathematical and statistical approaches that have been or could be applied to study the temporal evolution of relationships and behaviors within small- to medium-sized groups. An example model is presented, based on a pilot study of five Oxford House recovery homes, sober living environments for individuals following release from acute substance abuse treatment. This model demonstrates how dynamic network modeling can be applied to such systems, examines and discusses several options for pooling, and shows how results are interpreted in line with complex system concepts. Results suggest that this approach (a) is a credible modeling framework for studying group dynamics even with limited data, (b) improves upon the most common alternatives, and (c) is especially well-suited to complex system conceptions. Continuing improvements in stochastic models and associated software may finally lead to mainstream use of these techniques for the study of group dynamics, a shift already occurring in related fields of behavioral science.

  16. Random walks on a fluctuating lattice: A renormalization group approach applied in one dimension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levermore, C.D.; Nadler, W.; Stein, D.L.

    1995-01-01

    We study the problem of a random walk on a lattice in which bonds connecting nearest-neighbor sites open and close randomly in time, a situation often encountered in fluctuating media. We present a simple renormalization group technique to solve for the effective diffusive behavior at long times. For one-dimensional lattices we obtain better quantitative agreement with simulation data than earlier effective medium results. Our technique works in principle in any dimension, although the amount of computation required rises with the dimensionality of the lattice

  17. Density matrix renormalization group for a highly degenerate quantum system: Sliding environment block approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitteckert, Peter

    2018-04-01

    We present an infinite lattice density matrix renormalization group sweeping procedure which can be used as a replacement for the standard infinite lattice blocking schemes. Although the scheme is generally applicable to any system, its main advantages are the correct representation of commensurability issues and the treatment of degenerate systems. As an example we apply the method to a spin chain featuring a highly degenerate ground-state space where the new sweeping scheme provides an increase in performance as well as accuracy by many orders of magnitude compared to a recently published work.

  18. New approach to the adjustment of group cross sections fitting integral measurements - 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, Y.A.

    1980-01-01

    The method developed in the first paper concerning group cross sections fitting integral measurements is generalized to cover the case when the source of the extracted negligence discrepancy cannot be identified and the theoretical relation between the integral and differential measurements is also subject to uncertainty. The question of how to divide in such a case the negligence discrepancy between the integral and differential data is resolved. Application to a specific problem with real experimental data is shown as a demonstration of the method. 4 refs

  19. Participatory Common Learning in Groups of Dairy Farmers in Uganda (FFS approach) and Danish Stable Schools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaarst, Mette

    on a Master Thesis in Health Anthropology and a mini manual to the so-called Stable Schools. Improvements of farming practices should be based on the context of the individual farm and include the goals of the farmer and the farming system. This should be the case in all types of farming systems. Viewing...... learning as a social phenomenon and process, as well as an interaction between the learner and the learning environment (including other farmers) may give opportunities for context based innovations and developments towards a common goal in a group of farmers....

  20. A note on the environmental Kuznets curve for CO2: A pooled mean group approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwata, Hiroki; Okada, Keisuke; Samreth, Sovannroeun

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates whether the environmental Kuznets curve (EKC) hypothesis for CO 2 emissions is satisfied using the panel data of 28 countries by taking nuclear energy into account. Using the pooled mean group (PMG) estimation method, our main results indicate that (1) the impacts of nuclear energy on CO 2 emissions are significantly negative, (2) CO 2 emissions actually increase monotonically within the sample period in all cases: the full sample, OECD countries, and non-OECD countries, and (3) the growth rate in CO 2 emissions with income is decreasing in OECD countries and increasing in non-OECD countries.

  1. Group fitness activities for the elderly: an innovative approach to reduce falls and injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Antonino; Patti, Antonino; Bellafiore, Marianna; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Sahin, Fatma Nese; Paoli, Antonio; Cataldo, Maria Concetta; Mammina, Caterina; Palma, Antonio

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the opportunity to adopt, for the elderly, already validated function ability tests to better understand how to prevent falls and injuries and to better plan group fitness activities like ballroom dance classes (e.g., Valzer, Polka, Mazurka). A cross-sectional study was conducted. The Berg Balance Scale (BBS) and the Barthel Index (BI) were administered and the occurrence of falls during the previous 2 years was evaluated by anamnesis. One hundred and twenty-two elderly subjects living in Palermo city participated to the study. According to the anamnesis, subjects were divided into two groups: experimental group (EG) and control group (CG). The EG consisted of 75 subjects attending classes of ballroom dancing (73.0 ± 5.6 years 26.1 ± 3.9 BMI), while the CG included 47 volunteers (74.3 ± 5.4 years, 26.8 ± 4.4 BMI). A threshold of 70 % for both scales (BBS-70 and BI-70 %) was set, according to the aims of the study. STATISTICA software was adopted to perform an unpaired t test. A P value lower than 0.05 was considered to be statistically relevant. The BI and BBS of CG were 76.7 ± 33.08 and 30.9 ± 14.9, respectively, while the BI and BBS of EG were 98.1 ± 6.9 and 50.5 ± 54. In EG the BBS-70 % showed 96.0 % of cases compared to 27.6 % of the CG. The BI showed a similar trend to BBS. In EG the BI-70 % showed 98.6 % of cases, while the BI-70 % of CG showed 70.2 % of cases. Moreover, only 36.0 % of EG reported falls previously, while CG reported 53.2 % of falls during the same period of time. The BBS seems to be a valid and reliable tool able to be adopted also by professionals of the ballroom dancing sector (e.g., Valzer, Polka and Mazurka classes). Instructors may evaluate the functional ability of their attendees through BBS to easily obtain more information and better plan ballroom dance classes. Moreover, we highlight that these conclusions need to be supported by other studies with different

  2. Imaging and therapeutic approach of hemangiomas and vascular malformations in the pediatric age group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubois, J; Garel, L [Dept. of Medical Imaging, Hopital Sainte-Justine, Montreal, QB (Canada)

    1999-12-01

    Terminology regarding the vascular lesions of the soft tissues remains confusing. A single classification is necessary in order to decide on the proper investigation and the best treatment. At the Workshop on Vascular Anomalies in Rome in June 1996, the membership accepted the Mulliken and Glowacki classification, which differentiates vascular lesions into vascular tumors, including hemangiomas and vascular malformations. At Sainte-Justine, we have set up a multidisciplinary clinic for the discussion of problem patients with vascular anomalies, both in terms of diagnosis and treatment. In this review, we present our experience regarding the classification, the imaging modalities and the treatment of vascular anomalies. In our experience, Doppler ultrasound should be the initial imaging modality for recognizing vascular tumors from vascular malformations. CT scan or magnetic resonance imaging is best to evaluate the extent of the lesions prior to treatment. A multidisciplinary approach is essential to establish a correct diagnosis and define accordingly the appropriate treatment and follow-up. (orig.)

  3. Invariance of actions, rheonomy, and the new minimal N = 1 supergravity in the group manifold approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Auria, R.; Fre, P.; Townsend, P.K.; van Nieuwenhuizen, P.

    1984-01-01

    A new definition of rheonomy is proposed based on Bianchi identifies instead of field equations. For theories with auxiliary fields, the transformation rules are obtained in a completely geometrical way and invariance of the action is equilivalent to d'L = 0, which means surface-independence of the action integral. For theories without auxiliary fields, the transformation rules are found by requiring that the action be invariant, just as in the component approach. Previous methods of obtaining the transformation rules which start from rhenomy of field equations and use certain recipes to find the off-shell extensions of the rules are abandoned. New minimal supergravity is worked out in detail; it is the gauge theory based on a free differential algebra which includes the auxiliary fields

  4. Improving High-Throughput Sequencing Approaches for Reconstructing the Evolutionary Dynamics of Upper Paleolithic Human Groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seguin-Orlando, Andaine

    the development and testing of innovative molecular approaches aiming at improving the amount of informative HTS data one can recover from ancient DNA extracts. We have characterized important ligation and amplification biases in the sequencing library building and enrichment steps, which can impede further...... been mainly driven by the development of High-Throughput DNA Sequencing (HTS) technologies but also by the implementation of novel molecular tools tailored to the manipulation of ultra short and damaged DNA molecules. Our ability to retrieve traces of genetic material has tremendously improved, pushing......, that impact on the overall efficacy of the method. In a second part, we implemented some of these molecular tools to the processing of five Upper Paleolithic human samples from the Kostenki and Sunghir sites in Western Eurasia, in order to reconstruct the deep genomic history of European populations...

  5. Perturbative Field-Theoretical Renormalization Group Approach to Driven-Dissipative Bose-Einstein Criticality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe C. Täuber

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The universal critical behavior of the driven-dissipative nonequilibrium Bose-Einstein condensation transition is investigated employing the field-theoretical renormalization group method. Such criticality may be realized in broad ranges of driven open systems on the interface of quantum optics and many-body physics, from exciton-polariton condensates to cold atomic gases. The starting point is a noisy and dissipative Gross-Pitaevski equation corresponding to a complex-valued Landau-Ginzburg functional, which captures the near critical nonequilibrium dynamics, and generalizes model A for classical relaxational dynamics with nonconserved order parameter. We confirm and further develop the physical picture previously established by means of a functional renormalization group study of this system. Complementing this earlier numerical analysis, we analytically compute the static and dynamical critical exponents at the condensation transition to lowest nontrivial order in the dimensional ε expansion about the upper critical dimension d_{c}=4 and establish the emergence of a novel universal scaling exponent associated with the nonequilibrium drive. We also discuss the corresponding situation for a conserved order parameter field, i.e., (subdiffusive model B with complex coefficients.

  6. The uranium institute transport working group: a common approach to global issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tissot-Colle, C.

    1998-01-01

    With more than 442 nuclear power plants in operation all over the world delivering clean and safe electricity on a daily basis, nuclear energy is and will undoubtedly be one of the most promising way to cope with present and future economic, demographic, and environmental challenges. Nuclear materials transportation business links the various nuclear actors: research institutes, utilities, fuel cycle industries, and waste management agencies. As pipelines or tankers for the petroleum industry, transportation gives nuclear energy its consistency. Still, conversely to other industrial areas, transportation volumes and figures are rather low in the nuclear business. For instance, transport of dangerous goods in France represents around 15 million packages per year. Out of this, only 15,000 or 0.1 % are nuclear fuel cycle materials. When applied to the USA, this figure is even more striking: 100 million of dangerous goods containers are shipped each year. Only 10,000 pertains to nuclear fuel cycle materials. Even so, in our world of economic and cultural globalization, transport of nuclear materials is no longer a domestic issue. It crosses boundaries and appeals to various areas ranging from safety to communication. That is why the Uranium Institute decided, in 1995, to set up a working group dedicated to transport issues. This paper covers the Uranium Institute Transport Working Group, from its creation to its most recent achievements. (author)

  7. The mixed waste focus area mercury working group: an integrated approach for mercury treatment and disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conley, T.B.; Morris, M.I.; Holmes-Burns, H.; Petersell, J.; Schwendiman, L.

    1997-01-01

    In May 1996, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) initiated the Mercury Work Group (HgWG), which was established to address and resolve the issues associated with mercury- contaminated mixed wastes. Three of the first four technology deficiencies identified during the MWFA technical baseline development process were related to mercury amalgamation, stabilization, and separation/removal. The HgWG will assist the MWFA in soliciting, identifying, initiating, and managing all the efforts required to address these deficiencies. The focus of the HgWG is to better establish the mercury-related treatment needs at the DOE sites, refine the MWFA technical baseline as it relates to mercury treatment, and make recommendations to the MWFA on how to most effectively address these needs. The team will initially focus on the sites with the most mercury-contaminated mixed wastes, whose representatives comprise the HgWG. However, the group will also work with the sites with less inventory to maximize the effectiveness of these efforts in addressing the mercury- related needs throughout the entire complex

  8. Electromagnetic field enhancement effects in group IV semiconductor nanowires. A Raman spectroscopy approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pura, J. L.; Anaya, J.; Souto, J.; Prieto, A. C.; Rodríguez, A.; Rodríguez, T.; Periwal, P.; Baron, T.; Jiménez, J.

    2018-03-01

    Semiconductor nanowires (NWs) are the building blocks of future nanoelectronic devices. Furthermore, their large refractive index and reduced dimension make them suitable for nanophotonics. The study of the interaction between nanowires and visible light reveals resonances that promise light absorption/scattering engineering for photonic applications. Micro-Raman spectroscopy has been used as a characterization tool for semiconductor nanowires. The light/nanowire interaction can be experimentally assessed through the micro-Raman spectra of individual nanowires. As compared to both metallic and dielectric nanowires, semiconductor nanowires add additional tools for photon engineering. In particular, one can grow heterostructured nanowires, both axial and radial, and also one could modulate the doping level and the surface condition among other factors than can affect the light/NW interaction. We present herein a study of the optical response of group IV semiconductor nanowires to visible photons. The study is experimentally carried out through micro-Raman spectroscopy of different group IV nanowires, both homogeneous and axially heterostructured (SiGe/Si). The results are analyzed in terms of the electromagnetic modelling of the light/nanowire interaction using finite element methods. The presence of axial heterostructures is shown to produce electromagnetic resonances promising new photon engineering capabilities of semiconductor nanowires.

  9. A Large Group Decision Making Approach Based on TOPSIS Framework with Unknown Weights Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yupeng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Large group decision making considering multiple attributes is imperative in many decision areas. The weights of the decision makers (DMs is difficult to obtain for the large number of DMs. To cope with this issue, an integrated multiple-attributes large group decision making framework is proposed in this article. The fuzziness and hesitation of the linguistic decision variables are described by interval-valued intuitionistic fuzzy sets. The weights of the DMs are optimized by constructing a non-linear programming model, in which the original decision matrices are aggregated by using the interval-valued intuitionistic fuzzy weighted average operator. By solving the non-linear programming model with MATLAB®, the weights of the DMs and the fuzzy comprehensive decision matrix are determined. Then the weights of the criteria are calculated based on the information entropy theory. At last, the TOPSIS framework is employed to establish the decision process. The divergence between interval-valued intuitionistic fuzzy numbers is calculated by interval-valued intuitionistic fuzzy cross entropy. A real-world case study is constructed to elaborate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed methodology.

  10. Transformer core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehendale, A.; Hagedoorn, Wouter; Lötters, Joost Conrad

    2008-01-01

    A transformer core includes a stack of a plurality of planar core plates of a magnetically permeable material, which plates each consist of a first and a second sub-part that together enclose at least one opening. The sub-parts can be fitted together via contact faces that are located on either side

  11. Transformer core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehendale, A.; Hagedoorn, Wouter; Lötters, Joost Conrad

    2010-01-01

    A transformer core includes a stack of a plurality of planar core plates of a magnetically permeable material, which plates each consist of a first and a second sub-part that together enclose at least one opening. The sub-parts can be fitted together via contact faces that are located on either side

  12. Water distribution network segmentation based on group multi-criteria decision approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcele Elisa Fontana

    Full Text Available Abstract A correct Network Segmentation (NS is necessary to perform proper maintenance activities in water distribution networks (WDN. For this, usually, isolation valves are allocating near the ends of pipes, blocking the flow of water. However, the allocation of valves increases costs substantially for the water supply companies. Additionally, other criteria should be taking account to analyze the benefits of the valves allocation. Thus, the problem is to define an alternative of NS which shows a good compromise in these different criteria. Moreover, usually, in this type of decision, there is more than one decision-maker involved, who can have different viewpoints. Therefore, this paper presents a model to support group decision-making, based on a multi-criteria method, in order to support the decision making procedure in the NS problem. As result, the model is able to find a solution that shows the best compromise regarding the benefits, costs, and the decision makers' preferences.

  13. Comparing the group theoretical approaches to the description of dipole and quadrupole collectivity in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgieva, A I

    2013-01-01

    The comparison of the two types of collectivity in nuclear dynamics is based on the equal realizations of their basic symmetries, represented by the algebra-chain u(3) superset of su(3) superset of so(3). We illustrate this on the example of two phenomenological algebraic models: the semimicroscopic algebraic cluster model (SACM) with one of the clusters considered as a scalar and the interacting two vector boson model (IVBM). In both of them the root group structure that leads to the above chain is based on the coupling of two different U(3) representations, with different physical interpretations. These similarities allow for the use of the same mathematical tools in building the theory, but there are important differences that come from the different higher symmetries in which this equal substructures are embedded.

  14. Experience Exchange Group (EEG) Approach as a Means for Research to be rooted in Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Peter

    1997-01-01

    of preliminary studies found interesting to set up an EEG composed of representatives from industry and a researcher. In the paper some general research methods pertinent to the area industrial management are discussed. The EEG concept is introduced and characterised in comparison with the other methods. EEG...... activities are described and a tentative coupling to the phases in a research process is proposed. Following this is a discussion of methodological and quality requirements. It is considered how EEG activities could possibly contribute to an industrial rooted research. The paper ends up looking at future......The intention of this paper is to clarify if and how an Experience Exchange Group(EEG) can be involved in a research process in the area of industrial management. For exemplification of the topic an ongoing research in global manufacturing is referred to. In this research it was after a series...

  15. The FARMING approach: main results and perspectives of the French FARMING groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jullien, T.; Reales, N.; Gallay, F.; Lepicard, S.

    2005-01-01

    The Chernobyl accident led to a long-term crisis that affected agriculture, food and living conditions in complex ways, and that modified the usual economical, political and social relations between public and private stakeholders at local, national and international level. The EC FARMING project aims to create a European stakeholder network to consider possible rehabilitation strategies for rural areas contaminated after a nuclear accident. The Institute of Patrimonial Strategies of the National Institute on Agronomy had responsibility for setting up the French stakeholder group. The objective was to develop favourable conditions and ways whereby stakeholders could deal with such a complex situation as a nuclear emergency and develop rehabilitation strategies. The results from the 3-year work programme on both strategic and technical aspects, showed an increasing commitment from the stakeholders that led to the building up of a common understanding of what a nuclear accident could be and how it could be dealt with

  16. Space-group approach to two-electron states in unconventional superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yarzhemsky, V. G.

    2008-01-01

    The direct application of the space-group representation theory, makes possible to obtain limitations for the symmetry of SOP on lines and planes of symmetry in one-electron Brillouin zone. In the case of highly symmetric UPt 3 only theoretical nodal structure of IR E 2u is in agreement with all the experimental results. On the other hand, in the case of high-T c superconductors the two electron description of Cooper pairs in D 2h symmetry is not sufficient to describe experimental nodal structure. It was shown that in this case, the nodal structure is the result of underlying interactions between two-electron states and hidden symmetry D-4 h . (author)

  17. Using the Stereotype Content Model to examine group depictions in Fascism: An Archival Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durante, Federica; Volpato, Chiara; Fiske, Susan T

    2010-04-01

    The Stereotype Content Model (SCM) suggests potentially universal intergroup depictions. If universal, they should apply across history in archival data. Bridging this gap, we examined social groups descriptions during Italy's Fascist era. In Study 1, articles published in a Fascist magazine- La Difesa della Razza -were content analyzed, and results submitted to correspondence analysis. Admiration prejudice depicted ingroups; envious and contemptuous prejudices depicted specific outgroups, generally in line with SCM predictions. No paternalistic prejudice appeared; historical reasons might explain this finding. Results also fit the recently developed BIAS Map of behavioral consequences. In Study 2, ninety-six undergraduates rated the content-analysis traits on warmth and competence, without knowing their origin. They corroborated SCM's interpretations of the archival data.

  18. Functional renormalization group approach to the Yang-Lee edge singularity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, X. [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Chicago,845 W. Taylor St., Chicago, IL 60607 (United States); Mesterházy, D. [Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, University of Bern,Sidlerstrasse 5, 3012 Bern (Switzerland); Stephanov, M.A. [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Chicago,845 W. Taylor St., Chicago, IL 60607 (United States)

    2016-07-08

    We determine the scaling properties of the Yang-Lee edge singularity as described by a one-component scalar field theory with imaginary cubic coupling, using the nonperturbative functional renormalization group in 3≤d≤6 Euclidean dimensions. We find very good agreement with high-temperature series data in d=3 dimensions and compare our results to recent estimates of critical exponents obtained with the four-loop ϵ=6−d expansion and the conformal bootstrap. The relevance of operator insertions at the corresponding fixed point of the RG β functions is discussed and we estimate the error associated with O(∂{sup 4}) truncations of the scale-dependent effective action.

  19. Leveraging ethnic group incidence variation to investigate genetic susceptibility to glioma: A novel candidate SNP approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Ian Jacobs

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Using a novel candidate SNP approach, we aimed to identify a possible genetic basis for the higher glioma incidence in Whites relative to East Asians and African-Americans. Methods: We hypothesized that genetic regions containing SNPs with extreme differences in allele frequencies across ethnicities are most likely to harbor susceptibility variants. We used International HapMap Project data to identify 3,961 candidate SNPs with the largest allele frequency differences in Whites compared to East Asians and Africans and tested these SNPs for association with glioma risk in a set of White cases and controls. Top SNPs identified in the discovery dataset were tested for association with glioma in five independent replication datasets. Results: No SNP achieved statistical significance in either the discovery or replication datasets after accounting for multiple testing. However, the most strongly associated SNP, rs879471, was found to be in linkage disequilibrium with a previously identified risk SNP, rs6010620, in RTEL1. We estimate rs6010620 to account for a glioma incidence rate ratio of 1.34 for Whites relative to East Asians. Conclusions: We explored genetic susceptibility to glioma using a novel candidate SNP method which may be applicable to other diseases with appropriate epidemiologic patterns.

  20. True 'core' splitting. Trade unions and citizens' groups in conflict over nuclear power. Die eigentliche Kernspaltung. Gewerkschaften und Buergerinitiativen im Streit um die Atomkraft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallerbach, J [ed.

    1978-01-01

    Massive unemployment and the fear of a barred future put at present the unions and civil initiative to the apparent alternatives; securing work places or securing life and future. How the 'atomic fight' is fought and its result can have considerable consequences for our society. This volume presents a dialogue: Firstly the situation and environment must be understood giving rise to the controversial arguments. Reports, analyses and interviews are presented on this as basic structure for the future discussion. The quality and direction of the technical progress are dealt with in the core of the discussion. Is atomic technology acceptable. Who should decide and whom does it serve. What is progress going to look like anyway.

  1. Surgery and Medicine Residents' Perspectives of Morbidity and Mortality Conference: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Improve ACGME Core Competency Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn-O'Brien, Katherine T; Mandell, Samuel P; Eaton, Erik Van; Schleyer, Anneliese M; McIntyre, Lisa K

    2015-01-01

    Morbidity and mortality conferences (MMCs) are often used to fulfill the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education practice-based learning and improvement (PBLI) competency, but there is variation among institutions and disciplines in their approach to MMCs. The objective of this study is to examine the trainees' perspective and experience with MMCs and adverse patient event (APE) reporting across disciplines to help guide the future implementation of an institution-wide, workflow-embedded, quality improvement (QI) program for PBLI. Between April 1, 2013, and May 8, 2013, surgical and medical residents were given a confidential survey about APE reporting practices and experience with and attitudes toward MMCs and other QI/patient safety initiatives. Descriptive statistics and univariate analyses using the chi-square test for independence were calculated for all variables. Logistic regression and ordered logistic regression were used for nominal and ordinal categorical dependent variables, respectively, to calculate odds of reporting APEs. Qualitative content analysis was used to code free-text responses. A large, multihospital, tertiary academic training program in the Pacific Northwest. Residents in all years of training from the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited programs in surgery and internal medicine. Survey response rate was 46.2% (126/273). Although most respondents agreed or strongly agreed that knowledge of and involvement in QI/patient safety activities was important to their training (88.1%) and future career (91.3%), only 10.3% regularly or frequently reported APEs to the institution's established electronic incident reporting system. Senior-level residents in both surgery and medicine were more likely to report APEs than more junior-level residents were (odds ratio = 4.8, 95% CI: 3.1-7.5). Surgery residents had a 4.9 (95% CI: 2.3-10.5) times higher odds than medicine residents had to have reported an APE to

  2. A Cloud Computing Approach to Personal Risk Management: The Open Hazards Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, W. R.; Holliday, J. R.; Rundle, J. B.

    2010-12-01

    According to the California Earthquake Authority, only about 12% of current California residences are covered by any form of earthquake insurance, down from about 30% in 1996 following the 1994, M6.7 Northridge earthquake. Part of the reason for this decreasing rate of insurance uptake is the high deductible, either 10% or 15% of the value of the structure, and the relatively high cost of the premiums, as much as thousands of dollars per year. The earthquake insurance industry is composed of the CEA, a public-private partnership; modeling companies that produce damage and loss models similar to the FEMA HAZUS model; and financial companies such as the insurance, reinsurance, and investment banking companies in New York, London, the Cayman Islands, Zurich, Dubai, Singapore, and elsewhere. In setting earthquake insurance rates, financial companies rely on models like HAZUS, that calculate on risk and exposure. In California, the process begins with an official earthquake forecast by the Working Group on California Earthquake Probabilities. Modeling companies use these 30 year earthquake probabilities as inputs to their attenuation and damage models to estimate the possible damage factors from scenario earthquakes. Economic loss is then estimated from processes such as structural failure, lost economic activity, demand surge, and fire following the earthquake. Once the potential losses are known, rates can be set so that a target ruin probability of less than 1% or so can be assured. Open Hazards Group was founded with the idea that the global public might be interested in a personal estimate of earthquake risk, computed using data supplied by the public, with models running in a cloud computing environment. These models process data from the ANSS catalog, updated at least daily, to produce rupture forecasts that are backtested with standard Reliability/Attributes and Receiver Operating Characteristic tests, among others. Models for attenuation and structural damage

  3. Detecting concealed information from groups using a dynamic questioning approach: simultaneous skin conductance measurement and immediate feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewout H Meijer

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Lie detection procedures typically aim at determining the guilt or innocence of a single suspect. The Concealed Information Test (CIT, for example, has been shown to be highly successful in detecting the presence or absence of crime-related information in a suspect’s memory. Many of today’s security threats, however, do not come from individuals, but from organized groups such as criminal organizations or terrorist networks. In this study, we tested whether a plan of an upcoming mock terrorist attack could be extracted from a group of suspects using a dynamic questioning approach. One-hundred participants were tested in 20 groups of 5. Each group was asked to plan a mock terrorist attack based on a list of potential countries, cities and streets. Next, three questions referring to the country, city, and street were presented, each with 5 options. Skin conductance in all 5 members of the group was measured simultaneously during this presentation. The dynamic questioning approach entailed direct analysis of the data, and if the average skin conductance of the group to a certain option exceeded a threshold, this option was followed up. E.g., if the reaction to the option ‘Italy’ exceeded the threshold, this was followed up by presenting 5 cities in Italy. Results showed that in 19 of the 20 groups the country was correctly detected using this procedure. In 13 of these remaining 19 groups the city was correctly detected. In 7 of these 13, the street was also correctly detected. The question about the country resulted in no false positives (out of 20, the question about the city resulted in 2 false positives (out of 19, while the question about the streets resulted in 2 false positives (out of 13. Furthermore, the 2 false positives at the city level also yielded a false positive at the street level. Taken together these results indicate our dynamic questioning approach can help to unveil plans about a mock terrorist attack.

  4. First-principle approach based bandgap engineering for cubic boron nitride doped with group IIA elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yubo; Wang, Pengtao; Hua, Fei; Zhan, Shijie; Wang, Xiaozhi; Luo, Jikui; Yang, Hangsheng

    2018-03-01

    Electronic properties of cubic boron nitride (c-BN) doped with group IIA elements were systematically investigated using the first principle calculation based on density functional theory. The electronic bandgap of c-BN was found to be narrowed when the impurity atom substituted either the B (IIA→B) or the N (IIA→N) atom. For IIA→B, a shallow accept level degenerated into valence band (VB); while for IIA→N, a shallow donor level degenerated conduction band (CB). In the cases of IIBe→N and IIMg→N, deep donor levels were also induced. Moreover, a zigzag bandgap narrowing pattern was found, which is in consistent with the variation pattern of dopants' radius of electron occupied outer s-orbital. From the view of formation energy, the substitution of B atom under N-rich conditions and the substitution of N atom under B-rich conditions were energetically favored. Our simulation results suggested that Mg and Ca are good candidates for p-type dopants, and Ca is the best candidate for n-type dopant.

  5. Mixed Waste Focus Area Mercury Working Group: An integrated approach to mercury waste treatment and disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conley, T.B.; Morris, M.I.; Osborne-Lee, I.W.

    1998-03-01

    In May 1996, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) initiated the Mercury Working Group (HgWG). The HgWG was established to address and resolve the issues associated with mercury contaminated mixed wastes. During the MWFA's initial technical baseline development process, three of the top four technology deficiencies identified were related to the need for amalgamation, stabilization, and separation removal technologies for the treatment of mercury and mercury contaminated mixed waste. The HgWG is assisting the MWFA in soliciting, identifying, initiating, and managing efforts to address these areas. The focus of the HgWG is to better establish the mercury related treatment technologies at the DOE sites, refine the MWFA technical baseline as it relates to mercury treatment, and make recommendations to the MWFA on how to most effectively address these needs. Based on the scope and magnitude of the mercury mixed waste problem, as defined by HgWG, solicitations and contract awards have been made to the private sector to demonstrate both the amalgamation and stabilization processes using actual mixed wastes. Development efforts are currently being funded that will address DOE's needs for separation removal processes. This paper discusses the technology selection process, development activities, and the accomplishments of the HgWG to date through these various activities

  6. Approaches to influencing food choice across the age groups: from children to the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Julian G; Johnstone, Alexandra M; Halford, Jason C G

    2015-05-01

    Nutrition across the lifespan encompasses both preventative and treatment options to maintain health and vitality. This review will focus on the challenge of overconsumption of energy relative to energy expenditure and the consequent development of overweight and obesity, since they are responsible for much of the burden of chronic disease in the developed world. Understanding the mechanisms of hunger and satiety and how particular foodstuffs and nutrients affect appetite and motivation to eat is important for evidence-based interventions to achieve weight control and design of community-wide dietary strategies that reach across the lifespan. Food reformulation for appetite control and weight management requires a knowledge of the mechanisms of hunger and satiety, how food interacts with peripheral and central regulatory systems, and how these interactions change across the lifecourse, allied to the technical capability to generate, evaluate and develop new ingredients and foods with enhanced biological potency based on these mechanisms. Two European Union-funded research projects, Full4Health and SATIN, are adopting these complementary approaches. These research projects straddle the sometimes conflicted ground between justifiable public health concerns on the one hand and the food and drink industry on the other. These multi-disciplinary projects pull together expertise in nutrition, neuroimaging, psychology and food technology that combines with food industry partners to maximise expected impact of the research. Better knowledge of mechanisms regulating hunger/satiety will lead to evidence base for preventive strategies for the European population, to reduction of chronic disease burden and to increased competitiveness of European food industry through the development of new food products.

  7. A Dynamic Combinatorial Approach for Identifying Side Groups that Stabilize DNA-Templated Supramolecular Self-Assemblies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delphine Paolantoni

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available DNA-templated self-assembly is an emerging strategy for generating functional supramolecular systems, which requires the identification of potent multi-point binding ligands. In this line, we recently showed that bis-functionalized guanidinium compounds can interact with ssDNA and generate a supramolecular complex through the recognition of the phosphodiester backbone of DNA. In order to probe the importance of secondary interactions and to identify side groups that stabilize these DNA-templated self-assemblies, we report herein the implementation of a dynamic combinatorial approach. We used an in situ fragment assembly process based on reductive amination and tested various side groups, including amino acids. The results reveal that aromatic and cationic side groups participate in secondary supramolecular interactions that stabilize the complexes formed with ssDNA.

  8. The Progressive Approach to EMDR Group Therapy for Complex Trauma and Dissociation: A Case-Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana I. Gonzalez-Vazquez

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing is a psychotherapeutic approach with recognized efficiency in treating post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD, which is being used and studied in other psychiatric diagnoses partially based on adverse and traumatic life experiences. Nevertheless, there is not enough empirical evidence at the moment to support its usefulness in a diagnosis other than PTSD. It is commonly accepted that the use of EMDR in severely traumatized patients requires an extended stabilization phase. Some authors have proposed integrating both the theory of structural dissociation of the personality and the adaptive information processing model guiding EMDR therapy. One of these proposals is the Progressive Approach. Some of these EMDR procedures will be evaluated in a group therapy format, integrating them along with emotional regulation, dissociation, and trauma-oriented psychoeducational interventions. Patients presenting a history of severe traumatization, mostly early severe and interpersonal trauma, combined with additional significant traumatizing events in adulthood were included. In order to discriminate the specific effect of EMDR procedures, two types of groups were compared: TAU (treatment as usual: psychoeducational intervention only vs. TAU+EMDR (the same psychoeducational intervention plus EMDR specific procedures. In pre-post comparison, more variables presented positive changes in the group including EMDR procedures. In the TAU+EMDR group, 4 of the 5 measured variables presented significant and positive changes: general health (GHQ, general satisfaction (Schwartz, subjective well-being, and therapy session usefulness assessment. On the contrary, only 2 of the 5 variables in the TAU group showed statistically significant changes: general health (GHQ, and general satisfaction (Schwartz. Regarding post-test inter-group comparison, improvement in subjective well-being was related to belonging to the group that

  9. Core lifter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlov, N G; Edel' man, Ya A

    1981-02-15

    A core lifter is suggested which contains a housing, core-clamping elements installed in the housing depressions in the form of semirings with projections on the outer surface restricting the rotation of the semirings in the housing depressions. In order to improve the strength and reliability of the core lifter, the semirings have a variable transverse section formed from the outside by the surface of the rotation body of the inner arc of the semiring aroung the rotation axis and from the inner a cylindrical surface which is concentric to the outer arc of the semiring. The core-clamping elements made in this manner have the possibility of freely rotating in the housing depressions under their own weight and from contact with the core sample. These semirings do not have weakened sections, have sufficient strength, are inserted into the limited ring section of the housing of the core lifter without reduction in its through opening and this improve the reliability of the core lifter in operation.

  10. GALA: Group Analysis Leads to Accuracy, a novel approach for solving the inverse problem in exploratory analysis of group MEG recordings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir eKozunov

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Although MEG/EEG signals are highly variable between subjects, they allow characterizing systematic changes of cortical activity in both space and time. Traditionally a two-step procedure is used. The first step is a transition from sensor to source space by the means of solving an ill-posed inverse problem for each subject individually. The second is mapping of cortical regions consistently active across subjects. In practice the first step often leads to a set of active cortical regions whose location and timecourses display a great amount of interindividual variability hindering the subsequent group analysis.We propose Group Analysis Leads to Accuracy (GALA - a solution that combines the two steps into one. GALA takes advantage of individual variations of cortical geometry and sensor locations. It exploits the ensuing variability in electromagnetic forward model as a source of additional information. We assume that for different subjects functionally identical cortical regions are located in close proximity and partially overlap and their timecourses are correlated. This relaxed similarity constraint on the inverse solution can be expressed within a probabilistic framework, allowing for an iterative algorithm solving the inverse problem jointly for all subjects.A systematic simulation study showed that GALA, as compared with the standard min-norm approach, improves accuracy of true activity recovery, when accuracy is assessed both in terms of spatial proximity of the estimated and true activations and correct specification of spatial extent of the activated regions. This improvement obtained without using any noise normalization techniques for both solutions, preserved for a wide range of between-subject variations in both spatial and temporal features of regional activation. The corresponding activation timecourses exhibit significantly higher similarity across subjects. Similar results were obtained for a real MEG dataset of face

  11. Al2O3 - TiO2-A simple sol-gel strategy to the synthesis of low temperature sintered alumina-aluminium titanate composites through a core-shell approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayasankar, M.; Ananthakumar, S.; Mukundan, P.; Wunderlich, W.; Warrier, K.G.K.

    2008-01-01

    A simple sol-gel based core-shell approach for the synthesis of alumina-aluminium titanate composite is reported. Alumina is the core and titania is the shell. The coating of titania has been performed in aqueous medium on alumina particle by means of heterocoagulation of titanyl chloride. Further heat treatment results in low temperature formation of aluminium titanate as well as low temperature sintering of alumina-aluminium titanate composites. The lowering of the reaction temperature can be attributed to the maximisation of the contact surface between the reactants due to the core-shell approach involving nanoparticles. The mechanism of formation of aluminium titanate and the observations on densification features in the present process are compared with that of mixture of oxides under identical conditions. The sintered alumina-aluminium titanate composite has an average grain size of 2 μm. - Graphical abstract: The article presents a simple sol-gel process through core-shell approach to the synthesis of low temperature sintered alumina-aluminium titanate. The lowering of the reaction temperature can be attributed to the maximisation of the contact surface between the reactant due to the core-shell approach. This material showed the better microstructure control compared to the standard solid-state mixing route

  12. Tailored dendritic core-multishell nanocarriers for efficient dermal drug delivery: A systematic top-down approach from synthesis to preclinical testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hönzke, Stefan; Gerecke, Christian; Elpelt, Anja; Zhang, Nan; Unbehauen, Michael; Kral, Vivian; Fleige, Emanuel; Paulus, Florian; Haag, Rainer; Schäfer-Korting, Monika; Kleuser, Burkhard; Hedtrich, Sarah

    2016-11-28

    Drug loaded dendritic core-multishell (CMS) nanocarriers are of especial interest for the treatment of skin diseases, owing to their striking dermal delivery efficiencies following topical applications. CMS nanocarriers are composed of a polyglycerol core, connected by amide-bonds to an inner alkyl shell and an outer methoxy poly(ethylene glycol) shell. Since topically applied nanocarriers are subjected to biodegradation, the application of conventional amide-based CMS nanocarriers (10-A-18-350) has been limited by the potential production of toxic polyglycerol amines. To circumvent this issue, three tailored ester-based CMS nanocarriers (10-E-12-350, 10-E-15-350, 10-E-18-350) of varying inner alkyl chain length were synthesized and comprehensively characterized in terms of particle size, drug loading, biodegradation and dermal drug delivery efficiency. Dexamethasone (DXM), a potent drug widely used for the treatment of inflammatory skin diseases, was chosen as a therapeutically relevant test compound for the present study. Ester- and amide-based CMS nanocarriers delivered DXM more efficiently into human skin than a commercially available DXM cream. Subsequent in vitro and in vivo toxicity studies identified CMS (10-E-15-350) as the most biocompatible carrier system. The anti-inflammatory potency of DXM-loaded CMS (10-E-15-350) nanocarriers was assessed in TNFα supplemented skin models, where a significant reduction of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-8 was seen, with markedly greater efficacy than commercial DXM cream. In summary, we report the rational design and characterization of tailored, biodegradable, ester-based CMS nanocarriers, and their subsequent stepwise screening for biocompatibility, dermal delivery efficiency and therapeutic efficacy in a top-down approach yielding the best carrier system for topical applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Performance characteristics of a combined hepatitis C virus core antigen and anti–hepatitis C virus antibody test in different patient groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeng-Fu Yang

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the performance of a hepatitis C virus (HCV antigen/antibody combination test [Murex HCV Antigen/Antibody Combination Test (Murex Ag/Ab test] by comparing it with the current third-generation HCV antibody enzyme immunoassay (anti-HCV. A total of 403 serum samples were consecutively collected from four patient groups: healthy controls (n=100; HCV-infected patients (HCV group, n=102; Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV/HCV-infected patients (HIV/HCV group, n=100; and patients with uremia (uremia group, n=101. Performances were evaluated for the Murex Ag/Ab, anti-HCV, and HCV RNA in the HIV/HCV and uremia patient groups. In the HCV group, all 102 samples showed concordant positive and negative results for anti-HCV, Murex Ag/Ab, and HCV RNA tests. In the HIV/HCV group, all 100 samples were positive for both anti-HCV and Murex Ag/Ab tests, whereas 88 patients (88% were HCV RNA positive. In the uremia group, 14 (69.0% of the 23 anti-HCV-positive patients were HCV RNA positive, whereas 14 (77.8% of the 18 Murex Ag/Ab–positive patients were HCV RNA positive. None of anti-HCV-negative or Murex Ag/Ab–negative patients were HCV RNA positive. Based on the HCV RNA assay, the sensitivities for both anti-HCV and Murex Ag/Ab assays were 100%, whereas the specificities of these two assays were 89.7% and 95.4%, respectively. With good sensitivity and specificity, the Murex Ag/Ab assay could be a useful alternative diagnostic tool, especially in immunocompromised populations, such as patients with uremia or those infected with HIV.

  14. Reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azekura, Kazuo; Kurihara, Kunitoshi.

    1992-01-01

    In a BWR type reactor, a great number of pipes (spectral shift pipes) are disposed in the reactor core. Moderators having a small moderating cross section (heavy water) are circulated in the spectral shift pipes to suppress the excess reactivity while increasing the conversion ratio at an initial stage of the operation cycle. After the intermediate stage of the operation cycle in which the reactor core reactivity is lowered, reactivity is increased by circulating moderators having a great moderating cross section (light water) to extend the taken up burnup degree. Further, neutron absorbers such as boron are mixed to the moderator in the spectral shift pipe to control the concentration thereof. With such a constitution, control rods and driving mechanisms are no more necessary, to simplify the structure of the reactor core. This can increase the fuel conversion ratio and control great excess reactivity. Accordingly, a nuclear reactor core of high conversion and high burnup degree can be attained. (I.N.)

  15. Ice Cores

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Records of past temperature, precipitation, atmospheric trace gases, and other aspects of climate and environment derived from ice cores drilled on glaciers and ice...

  16. A novel continuous colour mapping approach for visualization of facial skin hydration and transepidermal water loss for four ethnic groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voegeli, R; Rawlings, A V; Seroul, P; Summers, B

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this exploratory study was to develop a novel colour mapping approach to visualize and interpret the complexity of facial skin hydration and barrier properties of four ethnic groups (Caucasians, Indians, Chinese and Black Africans) living in Pretoria, South Africa. We measured transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and skin capacitance on 30 pre-defined sites on the forehead, cheek, jaw and eye areas of sixteen women (four per ethnic group) and took digital images of their faces. Continuous colour maps were generated by interpolating between each measured value and superimposing the values on the digital images. The complexity of facial skin hydration and skin barrier properties is revealed by these measurements and visualized by the continuous colour maps of the digital images. Overall, the Caucasian subjects had the better barrier properties followed by the Black African subjects, Chinese subjects and Indian subjects. Nevertheless, the two more darkly pigmented ethnic groups had superior skin hydration properties. Subtle differences were seen when examining the different facial sites. There exists remarkable skin capacitance and TEWL gradients within short distances on selected areas of the face. These gradients are distinctive in the different ethnic groups. In contrast to other reports, we found that darkly pigmented skin does not always have a superior barrier function and differences in skin hydration values are complex on the different parts of the face among the different ethnic groups. © 2015 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  17. Statement on gender-affirmative approach to care from the pediatric endocrine society special interest group on transgender health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Ximena; Marinkovic, Maja; Eimicke, Toni; Rosenthal, Stephen M; Olshan, Jerrold S

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this Position Statement is to emphasize the importance of an affirmative approach to the health care of transgender individuals, as well as to improve the understanding of the rights of transgender youth. Transgender youth have optimal outcomes when affirmed in their gender identity, through support by their families and their environment, as well as appropriate mental health and medical care. The Pediatric Endocrine Society Special Interest Group on Transgender Health joins other academic societies involved in the care of children and adolescents in supporting policies that promote a safe and accepting environment for gender nonconforming/transgender youth, as well as adequate mental health and medical care. This document provides a summary of relevant definitions, information and current literature on which the medical management and affirmative approach to care of transgender youth are based.

  18. Unravelling source regions of ice rafted debris within three NE Atlantic marine sediment cores during the deglacial interval: a multi-proxy approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, David; Hibbert, Fiona; Austin, Bill

    2010-05-01

    Ice-rafted debris (IRD) within marine sediments of the North Atlantic provide an important archive of glacial activity on adjacent landmasses and attest to the activity of multiple calving ice margins during the last glacial cycle. IRD records therefore provide a means to reconstruct ice sheet dynamics and their interaction with the climate system, providing evidence of both the source of the ice and the location of melting (e.g. Ruddiman, 1977; Bond and Lotti, 1995). The complex interaction of the circum-Atlantic ice sheets and limitations of individual techniques often hinders firm source designations (i.e. IRD may be derived from multiple sources which cannot be differentiated by, for example, visual characterisation). Initial work identified diagnostic grain types that could be attributed to source areas of palaeo ice-sheets (eg: Bond & Lotti 1995) however, for the BIS, "diagnostic" basalt may be derived from sources to the east and west of the cores (Hibbert et al 2009, Scourse et al 2009). We therefore, utilise a multi-proxy approach to investigate the deglacial dynamics of the last British Ice Sheet (BIS) using inter alia lithic characterisation, fluxes of IRD to the core sites, magnetic susceptibility and a magnetic un-mixing model. A novel application of major element geochemistry of garnets contained within ice-rafted debris of the three high resolution marine sediment cores is presented. Garnets can be used to infer provenance (e.g. Oliver 2001) as major element composition may be assigned to specific metamorphic terranes. The IRD present within these cores is believed to be predominantly sourced from the BIS (cf: Knutz et al 2001, Hibbert et al 2009). This assertion is tested through multiple analytical techniques used and replication of records across the Hebridean shelf into the deep ocean. References • Bond, G.C. & Lotti, R., 1995. Iceberg discharges into the North Atlantic on millennial timescales during the last glaciation. Science 267. pp. 1005

  19. DiGIR1 and NaGIR1: naturally occurring group I-like ribozymes with unique core organization and evolved biological role

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Steinar; Einvik, Christer; Nielsen, Henrik

    2002-01-01

    introns (twin-ribozyme introns) in distantly related organisms. The Didymium GIR1 (DiGIR1) and Naegleria GIR1 (NaGIR1) share fundamental features in structural organization and reactivity, and display significant differences when compared to the related group I splicing ribozymes. GIR1 lacks...

  20. Nuclear reactor core stabilizing arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jabsen, F.S.

    1976-01-01

    A nuclear reactor core stabilizing arrangement is described wherein a plurality of actuators, disposed in a pattern laterally surrounding a group of elongated fuel assemblies, press against respective contiguous fuel assemblies on the periphery of the group to reduce the clearance between adjacent fuel assemblies thereby forming a more compacted, vibration resistant core structure. 7 claims, 4 drawing figures