WorldWideScience

Sample records for core component-based modelling

  1. Integration of Simulink Models with Component-based Software Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marian, Nicolae

    2008-01-01

    Model based development aims to facilitate the development of embedded control systems by emphasizing the separation of the design level from the implementation level. Model based design involves the use of multiple models that represent different views of a system, having different semantics...... of abstract system descriptions. Usually, in mechatronics systems, design proceeds by iterating model construction, model analysis, and model transformation. Constructing a MATLAB/Simulink model, a plant and controller behavior is simulated using graphical blocks to represent mathematical and logical...... constraints. COMDES (Component-based Design of Software for Distributed Embedded Systems) is such a component-based system framework developed by the software engineering group of Mads Clausen Institute for Product Innovation (MCI), University of Southern Denmark. Once specified, the software model has...

  2. Integration of Simulink Models with Component-based Software Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIAN, N.

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Model based development aims to facilitate the development of embedded control systems by emphasizing the separation of the design level from the implementation level. Model based design involves the use of multiple models that represent different views of a system, having different semantics of abstract system descriptions. Usually, in mechatronics systems, design proceeds by iterating model construction, model analysis, and model transformation. Constructing a MATLAB/Simulink model, a plant and controller behavior is simulated using graphical blocks to represent mathematical and logical constructs and process flow, then software code is generated. A Simulink model is a representation of the design or implementation of a physical system that satisfies a set of requirements. A software component-based system aims to organize system architecture and behavior as a means of computation, communication and constraints, using computational blocks and aggregates for both discrete and continuous behavior, different interconnection and execution disciplines for event-based and time-based controllers, and so on, to encompass the demands to more functionality, at even lower prices, and with opposite constraints. COMDES (Component-based Design of Software for Distributed Embedded Systems is such a component-based system framework developed by the software engineering group of Mads Clausen Institute for Product Innovation (MCI, University of Southern Denmark. Once specified, the software model has to be analyzed. One way of doing that is to integrate in wrapper files the model back into Simulink S-functions, and use its extensive simulation features, thus allowing an early exploration of the possible design choices over multiple disciplines. The paper describes a safe translation of a restricted set of MATLAB/Simulink blocks to COMDES software components, both for continuous and discrete behavior, and the transformation of the software system into the S

  3. Algorithmic fault tree construction by component-based system modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majdara, Aref; Wakabayashi, Toshio

    2008-01-01

    Computer-aided fault tree generation can be easier, faster and less vulnerable to errors than the conventional manual fault tree construction. In this paper, a new approach for algorithmic fault tree generation is presented. The method mainly consists of a component-based system modeling procedure an a trace-back algorithm for fault tree synthesis. Components, as the building blocks of systems, are modeled using function tables and state transition tables. The proposed method can be used for a wide range of systems with various kinds of components, if an inclusive component database is developed. (author)

  4. Component based modelling of piezoelectric ultrasonic actuators for machining applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleem, A; Ahmed, N; Salah, M; Silberschmidt, V V

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasonically Assisted Machining (UAM) is an emerging technology that has been utilized to improve the surface finishing in machining processes such as turning, milling, and drilling. In this context, piezoelectric ultrasonic transducers are being used to vibrate the cutting tip while machining at predetermined amplitude and frequency. However, modelling and simulation of these transducers is a tedious and difficult task. This is due to the inherent nonlinearities associated with smart materials. Therefore, this paper presents a component-based model of ultrasonic transducers that mimics the nonlinear behaviour of such a system. The system is decomposed into components, a mathematical model of each component is created, and the whole system model is accomplished by aggregating the basic components' model. System parameters are identified using Finite Element technique which then has been used to simulate the system in Matlab/SIMULINK. Various operation conditions are tested and performed to demonstrate the system performance

  5. A probabilistic model for component-based shape synthesis

    KAUST Repository

    Kalogerakis, Evangelos

    2012-07-01

    We present an approach to synthesizing shapes from complex domains, by identifying new plausible combinations of components from existing shapes. Our primary contribution is a new generative model of component-based shape structure. The model represents probabilistic relationships between properties of shape components, and relates them to learned underlying causes of structural variability within the domain. These causes are treated as latent variables, leading to a compact representation that can be effectively learned without supervision from a set of compatibly segmented shapes. We evaluate the model on a number of shape datasets with complex structural variability and demonstrate its application to amplification of shape databases and to interactive shape synthesis. © 2012 ACM 0730-0301/2012/08-ART55.

  6. An ontology for component-based models of water resource systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elag, Mostafa; Goodall, Jonathan L.

    2013-08-01

    Component-based modeling is an approach for simulating water resource systems where a model is composed of a set of components, each with a defined modeling objective, interlinked through data exchanges. Component-based modeling frameworks are used within the hydrologic, atmospheric, and earth surface dynamics modeling communities. While these efforts have been advancing, it has become clear that the water resources modeling community in particular, and arguably the larger earth science modeling community as well, faces a challenge of fully and precisely defining the metadata for model components. The lack of a unified framework for model component metadata limits interoperability between modeling communities and the reuse of models across modeling frameworks due to ambiguity about the model and its capabilities. To address this need, we propose an ontology for water resources model components that describes core concepts and relationships using the Web Ontology Language (OWL). The ontology that we present, which is termed the Water Resources Component (WRC) ontology, is meant to serve as a starting point that can be refined over time through engagement by the larger community until a robust knowledge framework for water resource model components is achieved. This paper presents the methodology used to arrive at the WRC ontology, the WRC ontology itself, and examples of how the ontology can aid in component-based water resources modeling by (i) assisting in identifying relevant models, (ii) encouraging proper model coupling, and (iii) facilitating interoperability across earth science modeling frameworks.

  7. Towards a Component Based Model for Database Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octavian Paul ROTARU

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Due to their effectiveness in the design and development of software applications and due to their recognized advantages in terms of reusability, Component-Based Software Engineering (CBSE concepts have been arousing a great deal of interest in recent years. This paper presents and extends a component-based approach to object-oriented database systems (OODB introduced by us in [1] and [2]. Components are proposed as a new abstraction level for database system, logical partitions of the schema. In this context, the scope is introduced as an escalated property for transactions. Components are studied from the integrity, consistency, and concurrency control perspective. The main benefits of our proposed component model for OODB are the reusability of the database design, including the access statistics required for a proper query optimization, and a smooth information exchange. The integration of crosscutting concerns into the component database model using aspect-oriented techniques is also discussed. One of the main goals is to define a method for the assessment of component composition capabilities. These capabilities are restricted by the component’s interface and measured in terms of adaptability, degree of compose-ability and acceptability level. The above-mentioned metrics are extended from database components to generic software components. This paper extends and consolidates into one common view the ideas previously presented by us in [1, 2, 3].[1] Octavian Paul Rotaru, Marian Dobre, Component Aspects in Object Oriented Databases, Proceedings of the International Conference on Software Engineering Research and Practice (SERP’04, Volume II, ISBN 1-932415-29-7, pages 719-725, Las Vegas, NV, USA, June 2004.[2] Octavian Paul Rotaru, Marian Dobre, Mircea Petrescu, Integrity and Consistency Aspects in Component-Oriented Databases, Proceedings of the International Symposium on Innovation in Information and Communication Technology (ISIICT

  8. Integration of Simulink Models with Component-based Software Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marian, Nicolae; Top, Søren

    2008-01-01

    , communication and constraints, using computational blocks and aggregates for both discrete and continuous behaviour, different interconnection and execution disciplines for event-based and time-based controllers, and so on, to encompass the demands to more functionality, at even lower prices, and with opposite...... to be analyzed. One way of doing that is to integrate in wrapper files the model back into Simulink S-functions, and use its extensive simulation features, thus allowing an early exploration of the possible design choices over multiple disciplines. The paper describes a safe translation of a restricted set...... of MATLAB/Simulink blocks to COMDES software components, both for continuous and discrete behaviour, and the transformation of the software system into the S-functions. The general aim of this work is the improvement of multi-disciplinary development of embedded systems with the focus on the relation...

  9. Exploring component-based approaches in forest landscape modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. S. He; D. R. Larsen; D. J. Mladenoff

    2002-01-01

    Forest management issues are increasingly required to be addressed in a spatial context, which has led to the development of spatially explicit forest landscape models. The numerous processes, complex spatial interactions, and diverse applications in spatial modeling make the development of forest landscape models difficult for any single research group. New...

  10. PyCatch: Component based hydrological catchment modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lana-Renault, N.; Karssenberg, D.J.

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic numerical models are powerful tools for representing and studying environmental processes through time. Usually they are constructed with environmental modelling languages, which are high-level programming languages that operate at the level of thinking of the scientists. In this paper we

  11. Hirabayashi, Satoshi; Kroll, Charles N.; Nowak, David J. 2011. Component-based development and sensitivity analyses of an air pollutant dry deposition model. Environmental Modelling & Software. 26(6): 804-816.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoshi Hirabayashi; Chuck Kroll; David Nowak

    2011-01-01

    The Urban Forest Effects-Deposition model (UFORE-D) was developed with a component-based modeling approach. Functions of the model were separated into components that are responsible for user interface, data input/output, and core model functions. Taking advantage of the component-based approach, three UFORE-D applications were developed: a base application to estimate...

  12. Feedback loops and temporal misalignment in component-based hydrologic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elag, Mostafa M.; Goodall, Jonathan L.; Castronova, Anthony M.

    2011-12-01

    In component-based modeling, a complex system is represented as a series of loosely integrated components with defined interfaces and data exchanges that allow the components to be coupled together through shared boundary conditions. Although the component-based paradigm is commonly used in software engineering, it has only recently been applied for modeling hydrologic and earth systems. As a result, research is needed to test and verify the applicability of the approach for modeling hydrologic systems. The objective of this work was therefore to investigate two aspects of using component-based software architecture for hydrologic modeling: (1) simulation of feedback loops between components that share a boundary condition and (2) data transfers between temporally misaligned model components. We investigated these topics using a simple case study where diffusion of mass is modeled across a water-sediment interface. We simulated the multimedia system using two model components, one for the water and one for the sediment, coupled using the Open Modeling Interface (OpenMI) standard. The results were compared with a more conventional numerical approach for solving the system where the domain is represented by a single multidimensional array. Results showed that the component-based approach was able to produce the same results obtained with the more conventional numerical approach. When the two components were temporally misaligned, we explored the use of different interpolation schemes to minimize mass balance error within the coupled system. The outcome of this work provides evidence that component-based modeling can be used to simulate complicated feedback loops between systems and guidance as to how different interpolation schemes minimize mass balance error introduced when components are temporally misaligned.

  13. Refinement and verification in component-based model-driven design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Zhenbang; Liu, Zhiming; Ravn, Anders Peter

    2009-01-01

    Modern software development is complex as it has to deal with many different and yet related aspects of applications. In practical software engineering this is now handled by a UML-like modelling approach in which different aspects are modelled by different notations. Component-based and object-o...... be integrated in computer-aided software engineering (CASE) tools for adding formally supported checking, transformation and generation facilities.......Modern software development is complex as it has to deal with many different and yet related aspects of applications. In practical software engineering this is now handled by a UML-like modelling approach in which different aspects are modelled by different notations. Component-based and object...

  14. Design and Application of an Ontology for Component-Based Modeling of Water Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elag, M.; Goodall, J. L.

    2012-12-01

    Many Earth system modeling frameworks have adopted an approach of componentizing models so that a large model can be assembled by linking a set of smaller model components. These model components can then be more easily reused, extended, and maintained by a large group of model developers and end users. While there has been a notable increase in component-based model frameworks in the Earth sciences in recent years, there has been less work on creating framework-agnostic metadata and ontologies for model components. Well defined model component metadata is needed, however, to facilitate sharing, reuse, and interoperability both within and across Earth system modeling frameworks. To address this need, we have designed an ontology for the water resources community named the Water Resources Component (WRC) ontology in order to advance the application of component-based modeling frameworks across water related disciplines. Here we present the design of the WRC ontology and demonstrate its application for integration of model components used in watershed management. First we show how the watershed modeling system Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) can be decomposed into a set of hydrological and ecological components that adopt the Open Modeling Interface (OpenMI) standard. Then we show how the components can be used to estimate nitrogen losses from land to surface water for the Baltimore Ecosystem study area. Results of this work are (i) a demonstration of how the WRC ontology advances the conceptual integration between components of water related disciplines by handling the semantic and syntactic heterogeneity present when describing components from different disciplines and (ii) an investigation of a methodology by which large models can be decomposed into a set of model components that can be well described by populating metadata according to the WRC ontology.

  15. Generalized structured component analysis a component-based approach to structural equation modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Hwang, Heungsun

    2014-01-01

    Winner of the 2015 Sugiyama Meiko Award (Publication Award) of the Behaviormetric Society of Japan Developed by the authors, generalized structured component analysis is an alternative to two longstanding approaches to structural equation modeling: covariance structure analysis and partial least squares path modeling. Generalized structured component analysis allows researchers to evaluate the adequacy of a model as a whole, compare a model to alternative specifications, and conduct complex analyses in a straightforward manner. Generalized Structured Component Analysis: A Component-Based Approach to Structural Equation Modeling provides a detailed account of this novel statistical methodology and its various extensions. The authors present the theoretical underpinnings of generalized structured component analysis and demonstrate how it can be applied to various empirical examples. The book enables quantitative methodologists, applied researchers, and practitioners to grasp the basic concepts behind this new a...

  16. New component-based normalization method to correct PET system models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinouchi, Shoko; Miyoshi, Yuji; Suga, Mikio; Yamaya, Taiga; Yoshida, Eiji; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Tashima, Hideaki

    2011-01-01

    Normalization correction is necessary to obtain high-quality reconstructed images in positron emission tomography (PET). There are two basic types of normalization methods: the direct method and component-based methods. The former method suffers from the problem that a huge count number in the blank scan data is required. Therefore, the latter methods have been proposed to obtain high statistical accuracy normalization coefficients with a small count number in the blank scan data. In iterative image reconstruction methods, on the other hand, the quality of the obtained reconstructed images depends on the system modeling accuracy. Therefore, the normalization weighing approach, in which normalization coefficients are directly applied to the system matrix instead of a sinogram, has been proposed. In this paper, we propose a new component-based normalization method to correct system model accuracy. In the proposed method, two components are defined and are calculated iteratively in such a way as to minimize errors of system modeling. To compare the proposed method and the direct method, we applied both methods to our small OpenPET prototype system. We achieved acceptable statistical accuracy of normalization coefficients while reducing the count number of the blank scan data to one-fortieth that required in the direct method. (author)

  17. A Component-Based Modeling and Validation Method for PLC Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Wang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Programmable logic controllers (PLCs are complex embedded systems that are widely used in industry. This paper presents a component-based modeling and validation method for PLC systems using the behavior-interaction-priority (BIP framework. We designed a general system architecture and a component library for a type of device control system. The control software and hardware of the environment were all modeled as BIP components. System requirements were formalized as monitors. Simulation was carried out to validate the system model. A realistic example from industry of the gates control system was employed to illustrate our strategies. We found a couple of design errors during the simulation, which helped us to improve the dependability of the original systems. The results of experiment demonstrated the effectiveness of our approach.

  18. Research on development model of nuclear component based on life cycle management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao Shiyi; Zhou Yu; He Shuyan

    2005-01-01

    At present the development process of nuclear component, even nuclear component itself, is more and more supported by computer technology. This increasing utilization of the computer and software has led to the faster development of nuclear technology on one hand and also brought new problems on the other hand. Especially, the combination of hardware, software and humans has increased nuclear component system complexities to an unprecedented level. To solve this problem, Life Cycle Management technology is adopted in nuclear component system. Hence, an intensive discussion on the development process of a nuclear component is proposed. According to the characteristics of the nuclear component development, such as the complexities and strict safety requirements of the nuclear components, long-term design period, changeable design specifications and requirements, high capital investment, and satisfaction for engineering codes/standards, the development life-cycle model of nuclear component is presented. The development life-cycle model is classified at three levels, namely, component level development life-cycle, sub-component development life-cycle and component level verification/certification life-cycle. The purposes and outcomes of development processes are stated in detailed. A process framework for nuclear component based on system engineering and development environment of nuclear component is discussed for future research work. (authors)

  19. An adaptive neuro fuzzy model for estimating the reliability of component-based software systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirti Tyagi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although many algorithms and techniques have been developed for estimating the reliability of component-based software systems (CBSSs, much more research is needed. Accurate estimation of the reliability of a CBSS is difficult because it depends on two factors: component reliability and glue code reliability. Moreover, reliability is a real-world phenomenon with many associated real-time problems. Soft computing techniques can help to solve problems whose solutions are uncertain or unpredictable. A number of soft computing approaches for estimating CBSS reliability have been proposed. These techniques learn from the past and capture existing patterns in data. The two basic elements of soft computing are neural networks and fuzzy logic. In this paper, we propose a model for estimating CBSS reliability, known as an adaptive neuro fuzzy inference system (ANFIS, that is based on these two basic elements of soft computing, and we compare its performance with that of a plain FIS (fuzzy inference system for different data sets.

  20. Principal components based support vector regression model for on-line instrument calibration monitoring in NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, In Yong; Ha, Bok Nam; Lee, Sung Woo; Shin, Chang Hoon; Kim, Seong Jun

    2010-01-01

    In nuclear power plants (NPPs), periodic sensor calibrations are required to assure that sensors are operating correctly. By checking the sensor's operating status at every fuel outage, faulty sensors may remain undetected for periods of up to 24 months. Moreover, typically, only a few faulty sensors are found to be calibrated. For the safe operation of NPP and the reduction of unnecessary calibration, on-line instrument calibration monitoring is needed. In this study, principal component based auto-associative support vector regression (PCSVR) using response surface methodology (RSM) is proposed for the sensor signal validation of NPPs. This paper describes the design of a PCSVR-based sensor validation system for a power generation system. RSM is employed to determine the optimal values of SVR hyperparameters and is compared to the genetic algorithm (GA). The proposed PCSVR model is confirmed with the actual plant data of Kori Nuclear Power Plant Unit 3 and is compared with the Auto-Associative support vector regression (AASVR) and the auto-associative neural network (AANN) model. The auto-sensitivity of AASVR is improved by around six times by using a PCA, resulting in good detection of sensor drift. Compared to AANN, accuracy and cross-sensitivity are better while the auto-sensitivity is almost the same. Meanwhile, the proposed RSM for the optimization of the PCSVR algorithm performs even better in terms of accuracy, auto-sensitivity, and averaged maximum error, except in averaged RMS error, and this method is much more time efficient compared to the conventional GA method

  1. ROSMOD: A Toolsuite for Modeling, Generating, Deploying, and Managing Distributed Real-time Component-based Software using ROS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranav Srinivas Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the Robot Operating System Model-driven development tool suite, (ROSMOD an integrated development environment for rapid prototyping component-based software for the Robot Operating System (ROS middleware. ROSMOD is well suited for the design, development and deployment of large-scale distributed applications on embedded devices. We present the various features of ROSMOD including the modeling language, the graphical user interface, code generators, and deployment infrastructure. We demonstrate the utility of this tool with a real-world case study: an Autonomous Ground Support Equipment (AGSE robot that was designed and prototyped using ROSMOD for the NASA Student Launch competition, 2014–2015.

  2. Component-based modeling of systems for automated fault tree generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majdara, Aref; Wakabayashi, Toshio

    2009-01-01

    One of the challenges in the field of automated fault tree construction is to find an efficient modeling approach that can support modeling of different types of systems without ignoring any necessary details. In this paper, we are going to represent a new system of modeling approach for computer-aided fault tree generation. In this method, every system model is composed of some components and different types of flows propagating through them. Each component has a function table that describes its input-output relations. For the components having different operational states, there is also a state transition table. Each component can communicate with other components in the system only through its inputs and outputs. A trace-back algorithm is proposed that can be applied to the system model to generate the required fault trees. The system modeling approach and the fault tree construction algorithm are applied to a fire sprinkler system and the results are presented

  3. WNP-2 core model upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golightly, C.E.; Ravindranath, T.K.; Belblidia, L.A.; O'Farrell, D.; Andersen, P.S.

    2006-01-01

    The paper describes the core model upgrade of the WNP-2 training simulator and the reasons for the upgrade. The core model as well as the interface with the rest of the simulator are briefly described . The paper also describes the procedure that will be used by WNP-2 to update the simulator core data after future core reloads. Results from the fully integrated simulator are presented. (author)

  4. Multiple Scattering Principal Component-based Radiative Transfer Model (PCRTM) from Far IR to UV-Vis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X.; Wu, W.; Yang, Q.

    2017-12-01

    Modern satellite hyperspectral satellite remote sensors such as AIRS, CrIS, IASI, CLARREO all require accurate and fast radiative transfer models that can deal with multiple scattering of clouds and aerosols to explore the information contents. However, performing full radiative transfer calculations using multiple stream methods such as discrete ordinate (DISORT), doubling and adding (AD), successive order of scattering order of scattering (SOS) are very time consuming. We have developed a principal component-based radiative transfer model (PCRTM) to reduce the computational burden by orders of magnitudes while maintain high accuracy. By exploring spectral correlations, the PCRTM reduce the number of radiative transfer calculations in frequency domain. It further uses a hybrid stream method to decrease the number of calls to the computational expensive multiple scattering calculations with high stream numbers. Other fast parameterizations have been used in the infrared spectral region reduce the computational time to milliseconds for an AIRS forward simulation (2378 spectral channels). The PCRTM has been development to cover spectral range from far IR to UV-Vis. The PCRTM model have been be used for satellite data inversions, proxy data generation, inter-satellite calibrations, spectral fingerprinting, and climate OSSE. We will show examples of applying the PCRTM to single field of view cloudy retrievals of atmospheric temperature, moisture, traces gases, clouds, and surface parameters. We will also show how the PCRTM are used for the NASA CLARREO project.

  5. Models of the earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    Combined inferences from seismology, high-pressure experiment and theory, geomagnetism, fluid dynamics, and current views of terrestrial planetary evolution lead to models of the earth's core with five basic properties. These are that core formation was contemporaneous with earth accretion; the core is not in chemical equilibrium with the mantle; the outer core is a fluid iron alloy containing significant quantities of lighter elements and is probably almost adiabatic and compositionally uniform; the more iron-rich inner solid core is a consequence of partial freezing of the outer core, and the energy release from this process sustains the earth's magnetic field; and the thermodynamic properties of the core are well constrained by the application of liquid-state theory to seismic and labroatory data.

  6. Modeling Elevation and Aspect Controls on Emerging Ecohydrologic Processes and Ecosystem Patterns Using the Component-based Landlab Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nudurupati, S. S.; Istanbulluoglu, E.; Adams, J. M.; Hobley, D. E. J.; Gasparini, N. M.; Tucker, G. E.; Hutton, E. W. H.

    2014-12-01

    Topography plays a commanding role on the organization of ecohydrologic processes and resulting vegetation patterns. In southwestern United States, climate conditions lead to terrain aspect- and elevation-controlled ecosystems, with mesic north-facing and xeric south-facing vegetation types; and changes in biodiversity as a function of elevation from shrublands in low desert elevations, to mixed grass/shrublands in mid elevations, and forests at high elevations and ridge tops. These observed patterns have been attributed to differences in topography-mediated local soil moisture availability, micro-climatology, and life history processes of plants that control chances of plant establishment and survival. While ecohydrologic models represent local vegetation dynamics in sufficient detail up to sub-hourly time scales, plant life history and competition for space and resources has not been adequately represented in models. In this study we develop an ecohydrologic cellular automata model within the Landlab component-based modeling framework. This model couples local vegetation dynamics (biomass production, death) and plant establishment and competition processes for resources and space. This model is used to study the vegetation organization in a semiarid New Mexico catchment where elevation and hillslope aspect play a defining role on plant types. Processes that lead to observed plant types across the landscape are examined by initializing the domain with randomly assigned plant types and systematically changing model parameters that couple plant response with soil moisture dynamics. Climate perturbation experiments are conducted to examine the plant response in space and time. Understanding the inherently transient ecohydrologic systems is critical to improve predictions of climate change impacts on ecosystems.

  7. Component-Based Modelling for Scalable Smart City Systems Interoperability: A Case Study on Integrating Energy Demand Response Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomar, Esther; Chen, Xiaohong; Liu, Zhiming; Maharjan, Sabita; Bowen, Jonathan

    2016-10-28

    Smart city systems embrace major challenges associated with climate change, energy efficiency, mobility and future services by embedding the virtual space into a complex cyber-physical system. Those systems are constantly evolving and scaling up, involving a wide range of integration among users, devices, utilities, public services and also policies. Modelling such complex dynamic systems' architectures has always been essential for the development and application of techniques/tools to support design and deployment of integration of new components, as well as for the analysis, verification, simulation and testing to ensure trustworthiness. This article reports on the definition and implementation of a scalable component-based architecture that supports a cooperative energy demand response (DR) system coordinating energy usage between neighbouring households. The proposed architecture, called refinement of Cyber-Physical Component Systems (rCPCS), which extends the refinement calculus for component and object system (rCOS) modelling method, is implemented using Eclipse Extensible Coordination Tools (ECT), i.e., Reo coordination language. With rCPCS implementation in Reo, we specify the communication, synchronisation and co-operation amongst the heterogeneous components of the system assuring, by design scalability and the interoperability, correctness of component cooperation.

  8. Structural analysis and incipient failure detection of primary circuit components based on correlation-analysis and finite-element models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olma, B.J.

    1977-01-01

    A method is presented to compute vibrational power spectral densities (VPSD's) of primary circuit components based on a finite-element representation of the primary circuit. First this method has been applied to the sodium cooled reactor KNK, Karlsruhe. Now a further application is being developed for a BWR-nuclear power plant. The experimentally determined VPSD's can be considered as the output of a multiple input-output system. They have to be explained as the frequency response of a multidimensional mechanical system, which is excited by stochastic and deterministic mechanical driving forces. The stochastic mechanical forces are generated by the dynamic pressure fluctuations of the fluid. The deterministic mechanical forces are caused by the pressure fluctuations, which are induced by the main coolant pumps or by standing waves. The excitation matrix can be obtained from measured pressure fluctuations. The vibration transfer function matrix can be computed from the mass matrix, damping matrix and stiffness matrix of a theoretical finite-element model or mass-spring model. Based on this theory the computer code 'STAMPO' has been established. This program has been applied to the KNK reactor. The excitation matrix was created from measured jet-noise pressure fluctuations. The mass-, stiffness- and damping matrix has been extracted from a SAP-IV-model of the primary system. Sequentially for each frequency point the complete VPSD matrix has been computed. The diagonal elements of this matrix represent the vibrational auto-power spectral densities, the off-diagonal elements represent the vibrational cross-power spectral densities. The calculations give good agreement with measured VPSD's. The comparison shows that the measured jet-noise pressure fluctuations act nearly uncorrelated on the structure, whereas the output VPSD's are well correlated

  9. Models of the earth's core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, D.J.

    1981-01-01

    The combination of seismology, high pressure experiment and theory, geomagnetism, fluid dynamics, and current views of terrestrial planetary evolution lead to strong constraints on core models. The synthesis presented here is devoted to the defense of the following properties: (1) core formation was contemporaneous with earth accretion; (2) the outer, liquid core is predominately iron but cannot be purely iron; (3) the inner core-outer core boundary represents a thermodynamic equilibrium between a liquid alloys and a predominanately iron solid; (4) thermodynamic and transport properties of outer core can be estimated from liquid-state theories; and (5) the outer core is probably adiabatic and uniform in composition. None of these propositions are universally accepted by geophysicists. But, the intent of this paper is to present a coherent picture which explains most of the data with the fewest ad hoc assumptions. Areas in which future progress is both essential and likely are geo- and cosmochronology, seismological determinations of core structure, fluid dynamics of the core and mantle, and condensed matter physics

  10. One dimensional reactor core model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostadinov, V.; Stritar, A.; Radovo, M.; Mavko, B.

    1984-01-01

    The one dimensional model of neutron dynamic in reactor core was developed. The core was divided in several axial nodes. The one group neutron diffusion equation for each node is solved. Feedback affects of fuel and water temperatures is calculated. The influence of xenon, boron and control rods is included in cross section calculations for each node. The system of equations is solved implicitly. The model is used in basic principle Training Simulator of NPP Krsko. (author)

  11. Spatially-Distributed Stream Flow and Nutrient Dynamics Simulations Using the Component-Based AgroEcoSystem-Watershed (AgES-W) Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascough, J. C.; David, O.; Heathman, G. C.; Smith, D. R.; Green, T. R.; Krause, P.; Kipka, H.; Fink, M.

    2010-12-01

    The Object Modeling System 3 (OMS3), currently being developed by the USDA-ARS Agricultural Systems Research Unit and Colorado State University (Fort Collins, CO), provides a component-based environmental modeling framework which allows the implementation of single- or multi-process modules that can be developed and applied as custom-tailored model configurations. OMS3 as a “lightweight” modeling framework contains four primary foundations: modeling resources (e.g., components) annotated with modeling metadata; domain specific knowledge bases and ontologies; tools for calibration, sensitivity analysis, and model optimization; and methods for model integration and performance scalability. The core is able to manage modeling resources and development tools for model and simulation creation, execution, evaluation, and documentation. OMS3 is based on the Java platform but is highly interoperable with C, C++, and FORTRAN on all major operating systems and architectures. The ARS Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP) Watershed Assessment Study (WAS) Project Plan provides detailed descriptions of ongoing research studies at 14 benchmark watersheds in the United States. In order to satisfy the requirements of CEAP WAS Objective 5 (“develop and verify regional watershed models that quantify environmental outcomes of conservation practices in major agricultural regions”), a new watershed model development approach was initiated to take advantage of OMS3 modeling framework capabilities. Specific objectives of this study were to: 1) disaggregate and refactor various agroecosystem models (e.g., J2K-S, SWAT, WEPP) and implement hydrological, N dynamics, and crop growth science components under OMS3, 2) assemble a new modular watershed scale model for fully-distributed transfer of water and N loading between land units and stream channels, and 3) evaluate the accuracy and applicability of the modular watershed model for estimating stream flow and N dynamics. The

  12. Evaluation of chemical transport model predictions of primary organic aerosol for air masses classified by particle-component-based factor analysis

    OpenAIRE

    C. A. Stroud; M. D. Moran; P. A. Makar; S. Gong; W. Gong; J. Zhang; J. G. Slowik; J. P. D. Abbatt; G. Lu; J. R. Brook; C. Mihele; Q. Li; D. Sills; K. B. Strawbridge; M. L. McGuire

    2012-01-01

    Observations from the 2007 Border Air Quality and Meteorology Study (BAQS-Met 2007) in Southern Ontario, Canada, were used to evaluate predictions of primary organic aerosol (POA) and two other carbonaceous species, black carbon (BC) and carbon monoxide (CO), made for this summertime period by Environment Canada's AURAMS regional chemical transport model. Particle component-based factor analysis was applied to aerosol mass spectrometer measurements made at one urban site (Windsor, ON) and two...

  13. Test model of WWER core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tikhomirov, A. V.; Gorokhov, A. K.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this paper is creation of precision test model for WWER RP neutron-physics calculations. The model is considered as a tool for verification of deterministic computer codes that enables to reduce conservatism of design calculations and enhance WWER RP competitiveness. Precision calculations were performed using code MCNP5/1/ (Monte Carlo method). Engineering computer package Sapfir 9 5andRC V VER/2/ is used in comparative analysis of the results, it was certified for design calculations of WWER RU neutron-physics characteristic. The object of simulation is the first fuel loading of Volgodon NPP RP. Peculiarities of transition in calculation using MCNP5 from 2D geometry to 3D geometry are shown on the full-scale model. All core components as well as radial and face reflectors, automatic regulation in control and protection system control rod are represented in detail description according to the design. The first stage of application of the model is assessment of accuracy of calculation of the core power. At the second stage control and protection system control rod worth was assessed. Full scale RP representation in calculation using code MCNP5 is time consuming that calls for parallelization of computational problem on multiprocessing computer (Authors)

  14. Computer-aided process planning in prismatic shape die components based on Standard for the Exchange of Product model data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awais Ahmad Khan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Insufficient technologies made good integration between the die components in design, process planning, and manufacturing impossible in the past few years. Nowadays, the advanced technologies based on Standard for the Exchange of Product model data are making it possible. This article discusses the three main steps for achieving the complete process planning for prismatic parts of the die components. These three steps are data extraction, feature recognition, and process planning. The proposed computer-aided process planning system works as part of an integrated system to cover the process planning of any prismatic part die component. The system is built using Visual Basic with EWDraw system for visualizing the Standard for the Exchange of Product model data file. The system works successfully and can cover any type of sheet metal die components. The case study discussed in this article is taken from a large design of progressive die.

  15. Microservices as an Evolutionary Architecture of Component-Based Development: A Think-aloud Study

    OpenAIRE

    Parizi, Reza M.

    2018-01-01

    Microservices become a fast growing and popular architectural style based on service-oriented development. One of the major advantages using component-based approaches is to support reuse. In this paper, we present a study of microservices and how these systems are related to the traditional abstract models of component-based systems. This research focuses on the core properties of microservices including their scalability, availability and resilience, consistency, coupling and cohesion, and ...

  16. Identification and analysis of labor productivity components based on ACHIEVE model (case study: staff of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziapour, Arash; Khatony, Alireza; Kianipour, Neda; Jafary, Faranak

    2014-12-15

    Identification and analysis of the components of labor productivity based on ACHIEVE model was performed among employees in different parts of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences in 2014. This was a descriptive correlational study in which the population consisted of 270 working personnel in different administrative groups (contractual, fixed- term and regular) at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences (872 people) that were selected among 872 people through stratified random sampling method based on Krejcie and Morgan sampling table. The survey tool included labor productivity questionnaire of ACHIEVE. Questionnaires were confirmed in terms of content and face validity, and their reliability was calculated using Cronbach's alpha coefficient. The data were analyzed by SPSS-18 software using descriptive and inferential statistics. The mean scores for labor productivity dimensions of the employees, including environment (environmental fit), evaluation (training and performance feedback), validity (valid and legal exercise of personnel), incentive (motivation or desire), help (organizational support), clarity (role perception or understanding), ability (knowledge and skills) variables and total labor productivity were 4.10±0.630, 3.99±0.568, 3.97±0.607, 3.76±0.701, 3.63±0.746, 3.59±0.777, 3.49±0.882 and 26.54±4.347, respectively. Also, the results indicated that the seven factors of environment, performance assessment, validity, motivation, organizational support, clarity, and ability were effective in increasing labor productivity. The analysis of the current status of university staff in the employees' viewpoint suggested that the two factors of environment and evaluation, which had the greatest impact on labor productivity in the viewpoint of the staff, were in a favorable condition and needed to be further taken into consideration by authorities.

  17. Identification and Analysis of Labor Productivity Components Based on ACHIEVE Model (Case Study: Staff of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziapour, Arash; Khatony, Alireza; Kianipour, Neda; Jafary, Faranak

    2015-01-01

    Identification and analysis of the components of labor productivity based on ACHIEVE model was performed among employees in different parts of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences in 2014. This was a descriptive correlational study in which the population consisted of 270 working personnel in different administrative groups (contractual, fixed- term and regular) at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences (872 people) that were selected among 872 people through stratified random sampling method based on Krejcie and Morgan sampling table. The survey tool included labor productivity questionnaire of ACHIEVE. Questionnaires were confirmed in terms of content and face validity, and their reliability was calculated using Cronbach’s alpha coefficient. The data were analyzed by SPSS-18 software using descriptive and inferential statistics. The mean scores for labor productivity dimensions of the employees, including environment (environmental fit), evaluation (training and performance feedback), validity (valid and legal exercise of personnel), incentive (motivation or desire), help (organizational support), clarity (role perception or understanding), ability (knowledge and skills) variables and total labor productivity were 4.10±0.630, 3.99±0.568, 3.97±0.607, 3.76±0.701, 3.63±0.746, 3.59±0.777, 3.49±0.882 and 26.54±4.347, respectively. Also, the results indicated that the seven factors of environment, performance assessment, validity, motivation, organizational support, clarity, and ability were effective in increasing labor productivity. The analysis of the current status of university staff in the employees’ viewpoint suggested that the two factors of environment and evaluation, which had the greatest impact on labor productivity in the viewpoint of the staff, were in a favorable condition and needed to be further taken into consideration by authorities. PMID:25560364

  18. Nuclear reactor core modelling in multifunctional simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puska, E.K.

    1999-01-01

    The thesis concentrates on the development of nuclear reactor core models for the APROS multifunctional simulation environment and the use of the core models in various kinds of applications. The work was started in 1986 as a part of the development of the entire APROS simulation system. The aim was to create core models that would serve in a reliable manner in an interactive, modular and multifunctional simulator/plant analyser environment. One-dimensional and three-dimensional core neutronics models have been developed. Both models have two energy groups and six delayed neutron groups. The three-dimensional finite difference type core model is able to describe both BWR- and PWR-type cores with quadratic fuel assemblies and VVER-type cores with hexagonal fuel assemblies. The one- and three-dimensional core neutronics models can be connected with the homogeneous, the five-equation or the six-equation thermal hydraulic models of APROS. The key feature of APROS is that the same physical models can be used in various applications. The nuclear reactor core models of APROS have been built in such a manner that the same models can be used in simulator and plant analyser applications, as well as in safety analysis. In the APROS environment the user can select the number of flow channels in the three-dimensional reactor core and either the homogeneous, the five- or the six-equation thermal hydraulic model for these channels. The thermal hydraulic model and the number of flow channels have a decisive effect on the calculation time of the three-dimensional core model and thus, at present, these particular selections make the major difference between a safety analysis core model and a training simulator core model. The emphasis on this thesis is on the three-dimensional core model and its capability to analyse symmetric and asymmetric events in the core. The factors affecting the calculation times of various three-dimensional BWR, PWR and WWER-type APROS core models have been

  19. Nuclear reactor core modelling in multifunctional simulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puska, E.K. [VTT Energy, Nuclear Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1999-06-01

    The thesis concentrates on the development of nuclear reactor core models for the APROS multifunctional simulation environment and the use of the core models in various kinds of applications. The work was started in 1986 as a part of the development of the entire APROS simulation system. The aim was to create core models that would serve in a reliable manner in an interactive, modular and multifunctional simulator/plant analyser environment. One-dimensional and three-dimensional core neutronics models have been developed. Both models have two energy groups and six delayed neutron groups. The three-dimensional finite difference type core model is able to describe both BWR- and PWR-type cores with quadratic fuel assemblies and VVER-type cores with hexagonal fuel assemblies. The one- and three-dimensional core neutronics models can be connected with the homogeneous, the five-equation or the six-equation thermal hydraulic models of APROS. The key feature of APROS is that the same physical models can be used in various applications. The nuclear reactor core models of APROS have been built in such a manner that the same models can be used in simulator and plant analyser applications, as well as in safety analysis. In the APROS environment the user can select the number of flow channels in the three-dimensional reactor core and either the homogeneous, the five- or the six-equation thermal hydraulic model for these channels. The thermal hydraulic model and the number of flow channels have a decisive effect on the calculation time of the three-dimensional core model and thus, at present, these particular selections make the major difference between a safety analysis core model and a training simulator core model. The emphasis on this thesis is on the three-dimensional core model and its capability to analyse symmetric and asymmetric events in the core. The factors affecting the calculation times of various three-dimensional BWR, PWR and WWER-type APROS core models have been

  20. Modeling of the reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    In order to improve technical - economical parameters fuel with 2.4% enrichment and burnable absorber is started to be used at Ignalina NPP. Using code QUABOX/CUBBOX the main neutronic - physical characteristics were calculated for selected reactor core conditions

  1. Nonlinear Model of Tape Wound Core Transformers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Vahedi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, tape wound cores due to their excellent magnetic properties, are widely used in different types of transformers. Performance prediction of these transformers needs an accurate model with ability to determine flux distribution within the core and magnetic loss. Spiral structure of tape wound cores affects the flux distribution and always cause complication of analysis. In this paper, a model based on reluctance networks method is presented for analysis of magnetic flux in wound cores. Using this model, distribution of longitudinal and transverse fluxes within the core can be determined. To consider the nonlinearity of the core, a dynamic hysteresis model is included in the presented model. Having flux density in different points of the core, magnetic losses can be calculated. To evaluate the validity of the model, results are compared with 2-D FEM simulations. In addition, a transformer designed for series-resonant converter and simulation results are compared with experimental measurements. Comparisons show accuracy of the model besides simplicity and fast convergence

  2. The artifacts of component-based development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizwan, M.; Qureshi, J.; Hayat, S.A.

    2007-01-01

    Component based development idea was floated in a conference name Mass Produced Software Components in 1968 (1). Since then engineering and scientific libraries are developed to reuse the previously developed functions. This concept is now widely used in SW development as component based development (CBD). Component-based software engineering (CBSE) is used to develop/ assemble software from existing components (2). Software developed using components is called component where (3). This paper presents different architectures of CBD such as Active X, common object request broker architecture (CORBA), remote method invocation (RMI) and simple object access protocol (SOAP). The overall objective of this paper is to support the practice of CBD by comparing its advantages and disadvantages. This paper also evaluates object oriented process model to adapt it for CBD. (author)

  3. A Core Language for Separate Variability Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iosif-Lazăr, Alexandru Florin; Wasowski, Andrzej; Schaefer, Ina

    2014-01-01

    Separate variability modeling adds variability to a modeling language without requiring modifications of the language or the supporting tools. We define a core language for separate variability modeling using a single kind of variation point to define transformations of software artifacts in object...... hierarchical dependencies between variation points via copying and flattening. Thus, we reduce a model with intricate dependencies to a flat executable model transformation consisting of simple unconditional local variation points. The core semantics is extremely concise: it boils down to two operational rules...

  4. Core monitoring with analytical model adaption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linford, R.B.; Martin, C.L.; Parkos, G.R.; Rahnema, F.; Williams, R.D.

    1992-01-01

    The monitoring of BWR cores has evolved rapidly due to more capable computer systems, improved analytical models and new types of core instrumentation. Coupling of first principles diffusion theory models such as applied to design to the core instrumentation has been achieved by GE with an adaptive methodology in the 3D Minicore system. The adaptive methods allow definition of 'leakage parameters' which are incorporated directly into the diffusion models to enhance monitoring accuracy and predictions. These improved models for core monitoring allow for substitution of traversing in-core probe (TIP) and local power range monitor (LPRM) with calculations to continue monitoring with no loss of accuracy or reduction of thermal limits. Experience in small BWR cores has shown that with one out of three TIP machines failed there was no operating limitation or impact from the substitute calculations. Other capabilities exist in 3D Monicore to align TIPs more accurately and accommodate other types of system measurements or anomalies. 3D Monicore also includes an accurate predictive capability which uses the adaptive results from previous monitoring calculations and is used to plan and optimize reactor maneuvers/operations to improve operating efficiency and reduce support requirements

  5. Evaluation of chemical transport model predictions of primary organic aerosol for air masses classified by particle component-based factor analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Stroud

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Observations from the 2007 Border Air Quality and Meteorology Study (BAQS-Met 2007 in Southern Ontario, Canada, were used to evaluate predictions of primary organic aerosol (POA and two other carbonaceous species, black carbon (BC and carbon monoxide (CO, made for this summertime period by Environment Canada's AURAMS regional chemical transport model. Particle component-based factor analysis was applied to aerosol mass spectrometer measurements made at one urban site (Windsor, ON and two rural sites (Harrow and Bear Creek, ON to derive hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA factors. A novel diagnostic model evaluation was performed by investigating model POA bias as a function of HOA mass concentration and indicator ratios (e.g. BC/HOA. Eight case studies were selected based on factor analysis and back trajectories to help classify model bias for certain POA source types. By considering model POA bias in relation to co-located BC and CO biases, a plausible story is developed that explains the model biases for all three species.

    At the rural sites, daytime mean PM1 POA mass concentrations were under-predicted compared to observed HOA concentrations. POA under-predictions were accentuated when the transport arriving at the rural sites was from the Detroit/Windsor urban complex and for short-term periods of biomass burning influence. Interestingly, the daytime CO concentrations were only slightly under-predicted at both rural sites, whereas CO was over-predicted at the urban Windsor site with a normalized mean bias of 134%, while good agreement was observed at Windsor for the comparison of daytime PM1 POA and HOA mean values, 1.1 μg m−3 and 1.2 μg m−3, respectively. Biases in model POA predictions also trended from positive to negative with increasing HOA values. Periods of POA over-prediction were most evident at the urban site on calm nights due to an overly-stable model surface layer

  6. Modeling in the Common Core State Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Kai Chung

    2011-01-01

    The inclusion of modeling and applications into the mathematics curriculum has proven to be a challenging task over the last fifty years. The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) has made mathematical modeling both one of its Standards for Mathematical Practice and one of its Conceptual Categories. This article discusses the need for mathematical…

  7. Structured Performance Analysis for Component Based Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Salmi , N.; Moreaux , Patrice; Ioualalen , M.

    2012-01-01

    International audience; The Component Based System (CBS) paradigm is now largely used to design software systems. In addition, performance and behavioural analysis remains a required step for the design and the construction of efficient systems. This is especially the case of CBS, which involve interconnected components running concurrent processes. % This paper proposes a compositional method for modeling and structured performance analysis of CBS. Modeling is based on Stochastic Well-formed...

  8. Integrated core-edge-divertor modeling studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stacey, W.M.

    2001-01-01

    An integrated calculation model for simulating the interaction of physics phenomena taking place in the plasma core, in the plasma edge and in the SOL and divertor of tokamaks has been developed and applied to study such interactions. The model synthesises a combination of numerical calculations (1) the power and particle balances for the core plasma, using empirical confinement scaling laws and taking into account radiation losses (2), the particle, momentum and power balances in the SOL and divertor, taking into account the effects of radiation and recycling neutrals, (3) the transport of feeling and recycling neutrals, explicitly representing divertor and pumping geometry, and (4) edge pedestal gradient scale lengths and widths, evaluation of theoretical predictions (5) confinement degradation due to thermal instabilities in the edge pedestals, (6) detachment and divertor MARFE onset, (7) core MARFE onsets leading to a H-L transition, and (8) radiative collapse leading to a disruption and evaluation of empirical fits (9) power thresholds for the L-H and H-L transitions and (10) the width of the edge pedestals. The various components of the calculation model are coupled and must be iterated to a self-consistent convergence. The model was developed over several years for the purpose of interpreting various edge phenomena observed in DIII-D experiments and thereby, to some extent, has been benchmarked against experiment. Because the model treats the interactions of various phenomena in the core, edge and divertor, yet is computationally efficient, it lends itself to the investigation of the effects of different choices of various edge plasma operating conditions on overall divertor and core plasma performance. Studies of the effect of feeling location and rate, divertor geometry, plasma shape, pumping and over 'edge parameters' on core plasma properties (line average density, confinement, density limit, etc.) have been performed for DIII-D model problems. A

  9. Geodynamo Modeling of Core-Mantle Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Wei-Jia; Chao, Benjamin F.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Angular momentum exchange between the Earth's mantle and core influences the Earth's rotation on time scales of decades and longer, in particular in the length of day (LOD) which have been measured with progressively increasing accuracy for the last two centuries. There are four possible coupling mechanisms for transferring the axial angular momentum across the core-mantle boundary (CMB): viscous, magnetic, topography, and gravitational torques. Here we use our scalable, modularized, fully dynamic geodynamo model for the core to assess the importance of these torques. This numerical model, as an extension of the Kuang-Bloxham model that has successfully simulated the generation of the Earth's magnetic field, is used to obtain numerical results in various physical conditions in terms of specific parameterization consistent with the dynamical processes in the fluid outer core. The results show that depending on the electrical conductivity of the lower mantle and the amplitude of the boundary topography at CMB, both magnetic and topographic couplings can contribute significantly to the angular momentum exchange. This implies that the core-mantle interactions are far more complex than has been assumed and that there is unlikely a single dominant coupling mechanism for the observed decadal LOD variation.

  10. Enhanced Core Noise Modeling for Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, James R.; Krejsa, Eugene A.; Clark, Bruce J.

    2011-01-01

    This report describes work performed by MTC Technologies (MTCT) for NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) under Contract NAS3-00178, Task Order No. 15. MTCT previously developed a first-generation empirical model that correlates the core/combustion noise of four GE engines, the CF6, CF34, CFM56, and GE90 for General Electric (GE) under Contract No. 200-1X-14W53048, in support of GRC Contract NAS3-01135. MTCT has demonstrated in earlier noise modeling efforts that the improvement of predictive modeling is greatly enhanced by an iterative approach, so in support of NASA's Quiet Aircraft Technology Project, GRC sponsored this effort to improve the model. Since the noise data available for correlation are total engine noise spectra, it is total engine noise that must be predicted. Since the scope of this effort was not sufficient to explore fan and turbine noise, the most meaningful comparisons must be restricted to frequencies below the blade passage frequency. Below the blade passage frequency and at relatively high power settings jet noise is expected to be the dominant source, and comparisons are shown that demonstrate the accuracy of the jet noise model recently developed by MTCT for NASA under Contract NAS3-00178, Task Order No. 10. At lower power settings the core noise became most apparent, and these data corrected for the contribution of jet noise were then used to establish the characteristics of core noise. There is clearly more than one spectral range where core noise is evident, so the spectral approach developed by von Glahn and Krejsa in 1982 wherein four spectral regions overlap, was used in the GE effort. Further analysis indicates that the two higher frequency components, which are often somewhat masked by turbomachinery noise, can be treated as one component, and it is on that basis that the current model is formulated. The frequency scaling relationships are improved and are now based on combustor and core nozzle geometries. In conjunction with the Task

  11. Preliminary model for core/concrete interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murfin, W.B.

    1977-08-01

    A preliminary model is described for computing the rate of penetration of concrete by a molten LWR core. Among the phenomena included are convective stirring of the melt by evolved gases, admixture of concrete decomposition products to the melt, chemical reactions, radiative heat loss, and variation of heat transfer coefficients with local pressure. The model is most applicable to a two-phase melt (metallic plus oxidic) having a fairly high metallic content

  12. Nuclear clustering - a cluster core model study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul Selvi, G.; Nandhini, N.; Balasubramaniam, M.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear clustering, similar to other clustering phenomenon in nature is a much warranted study, since it would help us in understanding the nature of binding of the nucleons inside the nucleus, closed shell behaviour when the system is highly deformed, dynamics and structure at extremes. Several models account for the clustering phenomenon of nuclei. We present in this work, a cluster core model study of nuclear clustering in light mass nuclei

  13. CHARACTERIZING AND MODELING FERRITE-CORE PROBES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabbagh, Harold A.; Murphy, R. Kim; Sabbagh, Elias H.; Aldrin, John C.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we accurately and carefully characterize a ferrite-core probe that is widely used for aircraft inspections. The characterization starts with the development of a model that can be executed using the proprietary volume-integral code, VIC-3D(c), and then the model is fitted to measured multifrequency impedance data taken with the probe in freespace and over samples of a titanium alloy and aluminum. Excellent results are achieved, and will be discussed.

  14. Modelling characteristics of ferromagnetic cores with the influence of temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Górecki, K; Rogalska, M; Zarȩbski, J; Detka, K

    2014-01-01

    The paper is devoted to modelling characteristics of ferromagnetic cores with the use of SPICE software. Some disadvantages of the selected literature models of such cores are discussed. A modified model of ferromagnetic cores taking into account the influence of temperature on the magnetizing characteristics and the core losses is proposed. The form of the elaborated model is presented and discussed. The correctness of this model is verified by comparing the calculated and the measured characteristics of the selected ferromagnetic cores.

  15. Conceptual Models Core to Good Design

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    People make use of software applications in their activities, applying them as tools in carrying out tasks. That this use should be good for people--easy, effective, efficient, and enjoyable--is a principal goal of design. In this book, we present the notion of Conceptual Models, and argue that Conceptual Models are core to achieving good design. From years of helping companies create software applications, we have come to believe that building applications without Conceptual Models is just asking for designs that will be confusing and difficult to learn, remember, and use. We show how Concept

  16. Conceptual core model for the reactor core test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swenson, L.D.

    1970-01-01

    Several design options for the ZrH Flight System Reactor were investigated which involved tradeoffs of core excess reactivity, reactor control, coolant mixing and cladding thickness. A design point was selected which is to be the basis for more detailed evaluation in the preliminary design phase. The selected design utilizes 295 elements with 0.670 inch element-to-element pitch, 32 mil thick Incoloy cladding, 18.00 inches long fuel meat, hydrogen content of 6.3 x 10 22 atoms/cc fuel, 10.5 w/o uranium, and a spiraled fin configuration with alternate elements having fins with spiral to the right, spiral to the left, and no fin at all (R-L-N fin configuration). Fin height is 30 mils for the center region of the core and 15 mils for the outer region. (U.S.)

  17. Testing the HTA core model: experiences from two pilot projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pasternack, Iris; Anttila, Heidi; Mäkelä, Marjukka

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to analyze and describe process and outcomes of two pilot assessments based on the HTA Core Model, discuss the applicability of the model, and explore areas of development. METHODS: Data were gathered from HTA Core Model and pilot Core HTA documents, their va...

  18. Modelling of thermohydraulic emergency core cooling phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadigaroglu, G.; Andreani, M.; Lewis, M.J.

    1990-10-01

    The codes used in the early seventies for safety analysis and licensing were based either on the homogeneous model of two-phase flow or on the so-called separate-flow models, which are mixture models accounting, however, for the difference in average velocity between the two phases. In both cases the behavior of the mixture is prescribed a priori as a function of local parameters such as the mass flux and the quality. The modern best-estimate codes used for analyzing LWR LOCA's and transients are often based on a two-fluid or 6-equation formulation of the conservation equations. In this case the conservation equations are written separately for each phase; the mixture is allowed to evolve on its own, governed by the interfacial exchanges of mass, momentum and energy between the phases. It is generally agreed that such relatively sophisticated 6-equation formulations of two-phase flow are necessary for the correct modelling of a number of phenomena and situations arising in LWR accidental situations. They are in particular indispensible for the analysis of stratified or countercurrent flows and of situations in which large departures from thermal and velocity equilibrium exist. This report will be devoted to a discussion of the need for, the capacity and the limitations of the two-phase flow models (with emphasis on the 6-equation formulations) in modelling these two-phase flow and heat transfer phenomena and/or different core cooling situations. 18 figs., 1 tab., 72 refs

  19. Improvement of core degradation model in ISAAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Ha; Kim, See Darl; Park, Soo Yong

    2004-02-01

    If water inventory in the fuel channels depletes and fuel rods are exposed to steam after uncover in the pressure tube, the decay heat generated from fuel rods is transferred to the pressure tube and to the calandria tube by radiation, and finally to the moderator in the calandria tank by conduction. During this process, the cladding will be heated first and ballooned when the fuel gap internal pressure exceeds the primary system pressure. The pressure tube will be also ballooned and will touch the calandria tube, increasing heat transfer rate to the moderator. Although these situation is not desirable, the fuel channel is expected to maintain its integrity as long as the calandria tube is submerged in the moderator, because the decay heat could be removed to the moderator through radiation and conduction. Therefore, loss of coolant and moderator inside and outside the channel may cause severe core damage including horizontal fuel channel sagging and finally loss of channel integrity. The sagged channels contact with the channels located below and lose their heat transfer area to the moderator. As the accident goes further, the disintegrated fuel channels will be heated up and relocated onto the bottom of the calandria tank. If the temperature of these relocated materials is high enough to attack the calandria tank, the calandria tank would fail and molten material would contact with the calandria vault water. Steam explosion and/or rapid steam generation from this interaction may threaten containment integrity. Though a detailed model is required to simulate the severe accident at CANDU plants, complexity of phenomena itself and inner structures as well as lack of experimental data forces to choose a simple but reasonable model as the first step. ISAAC 1.0 was developed to model the basic physicochemical phenomena during the severe accident progression. At present, ISAAC 2.0 is being developed for accident management guide development and strategy evaluation. In

  20. No-Core Shell Model and Reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navratil, P; Ormand, W E; Caurier, E; Bertulani, C

    2005-01-01

    There has been a significant progress in ab initio approaches to the structure of light nuclei. Starting from realistic two- and three-nucleon interactions the ab initio no-core shell model (NCSM) can predict low-lying levels in p-shell nuclei. It is a challenging task to extend ab initio methods to describe nuclear reactions. In this contribution, we present a brief overview of the NCSM with examples of recent applications as well as the first steps taken toward nuclear reaction applications. In particular, we discuss cross section calculations of p+ 6 Li and 6 He+p scattering as well as a calculation of the astrophysically important 7 Be(p, γ) 8 B S-factor

  1. Comparative study between single core model and detail core model of CFD modelling on reactor core cooling behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darmawan, R.

    2018-01-01

    Nuclear power industry is facing uncertainties since the occurrence of the unfortunate accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. The issue of nuclear power plant safety becomes the major hindrance in the planning of nuclear power program for new build countries. Thus, the understanding of the behaviour of reactor system is very important to ensure the continuous development and improvement on reactor safety. Throughout the development of nuclear reactor technology, investigation and analysis on reactor safety have gone through several phases. In the early days, analytical and experimental methods were employed. For the last four decades 1D system level codes were widely used. The continuous development of nuclear reactor technology has brought about more complex system and processes of nuclear reactor operation. More detailed dimensional simulation codes are needed to assess these new reactors. Recently, 2D and 3D system level codes such as CFD are being explored. This paper discusses a comparative study on two different approaches of CFD modelling on reactor core cooling behaviour.

  2. Thermal hydraulic model validation for HOR mixed core fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibcus, H.P.M.; Vries, J.W. de; Leege, P.F.A. de

    1997-01-01

    A thermal-hydraulic core management model has been developed for the Hoger Onderwijsreactor (HOR), a 2 MW pool-type university research reactor. The model was adopted for safety analysis purposes in the framework of HEU/LEU core conversion studies. It is applied in the thermal-hydraulic computer code SHORT (Steady-state HOR Thermal-hydraulics) which is presently in use in designing core configurations and for in-core fuel management. An elaborate measurement program was performed for establishing the core hydraulic characteristics for a variety of conditions. The hydraulic data were obtained with a dummy fuel element with special equipment allowing a.o. direct measurement of the true core flow rate. Using these data the thermal-hydraulic model was validated experimentally. The model, experimental tests, and model validation are discussed. (author)

  3. Construction and utilization of linear empirical core models for PWR in-core fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okafor, K.C.

    1988-01-01

    An empirical core-model construction procedure for pressurized water reactor (PWR) in-core fuel management is developed that allows determining the optimal BOC k ∞ profiles in PWRs as a single linear-programming problem and thus facilitates the overall optimization process for in-core fuel management due to algorithmic simplification and reduction in computation time. The optimal profile is defined as one that maximizes cycle burnup. The model construction scheme treats the fuel-assembly power fractions, burnup, and leakage as state variables and BOC zone enrichments as control variables. The core model consists of linear correlations between the state and control variables that describe fuel-assembly behavior in time and space. These correlations are obtained through time-dependent two-dimensional core simulations. The core model incorporates the effects of composition changes in all the enrichment control zones on a given fuel assembly and is valid at all times during the cycle for a given range of control variables. No assumption is made on the geometry of the control zones. A scatter-composition distribution, as well as annular, can be considered for model construction. The application of the methodology to a typical PWR core indicates good agreement between the model and exact simulation results

  4. A component-based groupware development methodology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guareis de farias, Cléver; Ferreira Pires, Luis; van Sinderen, Marten J.

    2000-01-01

    Software development in general and groupware applications in particular can greatly benefit from the reusability and interoperability aspects associated with software components. Component-based software development enables the construction of software artefacts by assembling prefabricated,

  5. Thermal margin model for transition core of KSNP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nahm, Kee Yil; Lim, Jong Seon; Park, Sung Kew; Chun, Chong Kuk; Hwang, Sun Tack

    2004-01-01

    The PLUS7 fuel was developed with mixing vane grids for KSNP. For the transition core partly loaded with the PLUS7 fuels, the procedure to set up the optimum thermal margin model of the transition core was suggested by introducing AOPM concept into the screening method which determines the limiting assembly. According to the procedure, the optimum thermal margin model of the first transition core was set up by using a part of nuclear data for the first transition and the homogeneous core with PLUS7 fuels. The generic thermal margin model of PLUS7 fuel was generated with the AOPM of 138%. The overpower penalties on the first transition core were calculated to be 1.0 and 0.98 on the limiting assembly and the generic thermal margin model, respectively. It is not usual case to impose the overpower penalty on reload cores. It is considered that the lack of channel flow due to the difference of pressure drop between PLUS7 and STD fuels results in the decrease of DNBR. The AOPM of the first transition core is evaluated to be about 135% by using the optimum generic thermal margin model which involves the generic thermal margin model and the total overpower penalty. The STD fuel is not included among limiting assembly candidates in the second transition core, because they have much lower pin power than PLUS7 fuels. The reduced number of STD fuels near the limiting assembly candidates the flow from the limiting assembly to increase the thermal margin for the second transition core. It is expected that cycle specific overpower penalties increase the thermal margin for the transition core. Using the procedure to set up the optimum thermal margin model makes sure that the enhanced thermal margin of PLUS7 fuel can be sufficiently applied to not only the homogeneous core but also the transition core

  6. Scaling of Core Material in Rubble Mound Breakwater Model Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; Liu, Z.; Troch, P.

    1999-01-01

    The permeability of the core material influences armour stability, wave run-up and wave overtopping. The main problem related to the scaling of core materials in models is that the hydraulic gradient and the pore velocity are varying in space and time. This makes it impossible to arrive at a fully...... correct scaling. The paper presents an empirical formula for the estimation of the wave induced pressure gradient in the core, based on measurements in models and a prototype. The formula, together with the Forchheimer equation can be used for the estimation of pore velocities in cores. The paper proposes...... that the diameter of the core material in models is chosen in such a way that the Froude scale law holds for a characteristic pore velocity. The characteristic pore velocity is chosen as the average velocity of a most critical area in the core with respect to porous flow. Finally the method is demonstrated...

  7. APROS 3-D core models for simulators and plant analyzers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puska, E.K.

    1999-01-01

    The 3-D core models of APROS simulation environment can be used in simulator and plant analyzer applications, as well as in safety analysis. The key feature of APROS models is that the same physical models can be used in all applications. For three-dimensional reactor cores the APROS models cover both quadratic BWR and PWR cores and the hexagonal lattice VVER-type cores. In APROS environment the user can select the number of flow channels in the core and either five- or six-equation thermal hydraulic model for these channels. The thermal hydraulic model and the channel description have a decisive effect on the calculation time of the 3-D core model and thus just these selection make at present the major difference between a safety analysis model and a training simulator model. The paper presents examples of various types of 3-D LWR-type core descriptions for simulator and plant analyzer use and discusses the differences of calculation speed and physical results between a typical safety analysis model description and a real-time simulator model description in transients. (author)

  8. Thermohydraulic model of WWER-1000 core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maroti, L.; Szabados, L.

    1987-11-01

    Safe and economic operation of the WWER-1000 type reactor requires more accurate calculation of the thermohydraulic processes than the one satisfactory for the 440 type cores. The high degree of accuracy is needed both for reactor physics calculations and for the determination of the operational safety limits of the core. The paper illustrates the most important differences between the 1000 and 440 type reactors and presents the main fields of the development work necessary to reach the required accuracy. A prediction for the capability of the computer programs after the proposed development is also given and some suggestions for the further improvement is outlined. (author) 7 refs

  9. Component-Based Cartoon Face Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saman Sepehri Nejad

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a cartoon face generation method that stands on a component-based facial feature extraction approach. Given a frontal face image as an input, our proposed system has the following stages. First, face features are extracted using an extended Active Shape Model. Outlines of the components are locally modified using edge detection, template matching and Hermit interpolation. This modification enhances the diversity of output and accuracy of the component matching required for cartoon generation. Second, to bring cartoon-specific features such as shadows, highlights and, especially, stylish drawing, an array of various face photographs and corresponding hand-drawn cartoon faces are collected. These cartoon templates are automatically decomposed into cartoon components using our proposed method for parameterizing cartoon samples, which is fast and simple. Then, using shape matching methods, the appropriate cartoon component is selected and deformed to fit the input face. Finally, a cartoon face is rendered in a vector format using the rendering rules of the selected template. Experimental results demonstrate effectiveness of our approach in generating life-like cartoon faces.

  10. Nonlinear Dynamic Model of PMBLDC Motor Considering Core Losses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fasil, Muhammed; Mijatovic, Nenad; Jensen, Bogi Bech

    2017-01-01

    The phase variable model is used commonly when simulating a motor drive system with a three-phase permanent magnet brushless DC (PMBLDC) motor. The phase variable model neglects core losses and this affects its accuracy when modelling fractional-slot machines. The inaccuracy of phase variable mod...... on the detailed analysis of the flux path and the variation of flux in different components of the machine. A prototype of fractional slot axial flux PMBLDC in-wheel motor is used to assess the proposed nonlinear dynamic model....... of fractional-slot machines can be attributed to considerable armature flux harmonics, which causes an increased core loss. This study proposes a nonlinear phase variable model of PMBLDC motor that considers the core losses induced in the stator and the rotor. The core loss model is developed based...

  11. Modification of Core Model for KNTC 2 Simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y.K.; Lee, J.G.; Park, J.E.; Bae, S.N.; Chin, H.C. [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    KNTC 2 simulator was developed in 1986 referencing YGN 1. Since the YGN 1 has changed its fuel cycle to long term cycle(cycle 9), the data such as rod worth, boron worth, moderator temperature coefficient, and etc. of the simulator and those of the YGN 1 became different. To incorporate these changes into the simulator and make the simulator more close to the reference plant, core model upgrade became a necessity. During this research, core data for the simulator was newly generated using APA of the WH. And to make it easy tuning and verification of the key characteristics of the reactor model, PC-Based tool was also developed. And to facilitate later core model upgrade, two procedures-`the Procedures for core characteristic generation` and `the Procedures for core characteristic modification`-were also developed. (author). 16 refs., 22 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Modelling guidelines for core exit temperature simulations with system codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freixa, J., E-mail: jordi.freixa-terradas@upc.edu [Department of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Technical University of Catalonia (UPC) (Spain); Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Martínez-Quiroga, V., E-mail: victor.martinez@nortuen.com [Department of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Technical University of Catalonia (UPC) (Spain); Zerkak, O., E-mail: omar.zerkak@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Reventós, F., E-mail: francesc.reventos@upc.edu [Department of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Technical University of Catalonia (UPC) (Spain)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Core exit temperature is used in PWRs as an indication of core heat up. • Modelling guidelines of CET response with system codes. • Modelling of heat transfer processes in the core and UP regions. - Abstract: Core exit temperature (CET) measurements play an important role in the sequence of actions under accidental conditions in pressurized water reactors (PWR). Given the difficulties in placing measurements in the core region, CET readings are used as criterion for the initiation of accident management (AM) procedures because they can indicate a core heat up scenario. However, the CET responses have some limitation in detecting inadequate core cooling and core uncovery simply because the measurement is not placed inside the core. Therefore, it is of main importance in the field of nuclear safety for PWR power plants to assess the capabilities of system codes for simulating the relation between the CET and the peak cladding temperature (PCT). The work presented in this paper intends to address this open question by making use of experimental work at integral test facilities (ITF) where experiments related to the evolution of the CET and the PCT during transient conditions have been carried out. In particular, simulations of two experiments performed at the ROSA/LSTF and PKL facilities are presented. The two experiments are part of a counterpart exercise between the OECD/NEA ROSA-2 and OECD/NEA PKL-2 projects. The simulations are used to derive guidelines in how to correctly reproduce the CET response during a core heat up scenario. Three aspects have been identified to be of main importance: (1) the need for a 3-dimensional representation of the core and Upper Plenum (UP) regions in order to model the heterogeneity of the power zones and axial areas, (2) the detailed representation of the active and passive heat structures, and (3) the use of simulated thermocouples instead of steam temperatures to represent the CET readings.

  13. Solid charged-core model of ball lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muldrew, D. B.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, ball lightning (BL) is assumed to have a solid, positively-charged core. According to this underlying assumption, the core is surrounded by a thin electron layer with a charge nearly equal in magnitude to that of the core. A vacuum exists between the core and the electron layer containing an intense electromagnetic (EM) field which is reflected and guided by the electron layer. The microwave EM field applies a ponderomotive force (radiation pressure) to the electrons preventing them from falling into the core. The energetic electrons ionize the air next to the electron layer forming a neutral plasma layer. The electric-field distributions and their associated frequencies in the ball are determined by applying boundary conditions to a differential equation given by Stratton (1941). It is then shown that the electron and plasma layers are sufficiently thick and dense to completely trap and guide the EM field. This model of BL is exceptional in that it can explain all or nearly all of the peculiar characteristics of BL. The ES energy associated with the core charge can be extremely large which can explain the observations that occasionally BL contains enormous energy. The mass of the core prevents the BL from rising like a helium-filled balloon - a problem with most plasma and burning-gas models. The positively charged core keeps the negatively charged electron layer from diffusing away, i.e. it holds the ball together; other models do not have a mechanism to do this. The high electrical charges on the core and in the electron layer explains why some people have been electrocuted by BL. Experiments indicate that BL radiates microwaves upon exploding and this is consistent with the model. The fact that this novel model of BL can explain these and other observations is strong evidence that the model should be taken seriously.

  14. Modelling the core magnetic field of the earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, C. G. A.; Carle, H. M.

    1982-01-01

    It is suggested that radial off-center dipoles located within the core of the earth be used instead of spherical harmonics of the magnetic potential in modeling the core magnetic field. The off-center dipoles, in addition to more realistically modeling the physical current systems within the core, are if located deep within the core more effective at removing long wavelength signals of either potential or field. Their disadvantage is that their positions and strengths are more difficult to compute, and such effects as upward and downward continuation are more difficult to manipulate. It is nevertheless agreed with Cox (1975) and Alldredge and Hurwitz (1964) that physical realism in models is more important than mathematical convenience. A radial dipole model is presented which agrees with observations of secular variation and excursions.

  15. Improvement of Cycle Dependent Core Model for NPP Simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, J. S.; Koo, B. S.; Kim, H. Y. and others

    2003-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to establish automatic core model generation system and to develop 4 cycle real time core analysis methodology with 5% power distribution and 500 pcm reactivity difference criteria for nuclear power plant simulator. The standardized procedure to generate database from ROCS and ANC, which are used for domestic PWR core design, was established for the cycle specific simulator core model generation. An automatic data interface system to generate core model also established. The system includes ARCADIS which edits group constant and DHCGEN which generates interface coupling coefficient correction database. The interface coupling coefficient correction method developed in this study has 4 cycle real time capability and accuracies of which the maximum differences between core design results are within 103 pcm reactivity, 1% relative power distribution and 6% control rod worth. A nuclear power plant core simulation program R-MASTER was developed using the methodology and applied by the concept of distributed client system in simulator. The performance was verified by site acceptance test in Simulator no. 2 in Kori Training Center for 30 initial condition generation and 27 steady state, transient and postulated accident situations

  16. Improvement of Cycle Dependent Core Model for NPP Simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, J. S.; Koo, B. S.; Kim, H. Y. and others

    2003-11-15

    The purpose of this study is to establish automatic core model generation system and to develop 4 cycle real time core analysis methodology with 5% power distribution and 500 pcm reactivity difference criteria for nuclear power plant simulator. The standardized procedure to generate database from ROCS and ANC, which are used for domestic PWR core design, was established for the cycle specific simulator core model generation. An automatic data interface system to generate core model also established. The system includes ARCADIS which edits group constant and DHCGEN which generates interface coupling coefficient correction database. The interface coupling coefficient correction method developed in this study has 4 cycle real time capability and accuracies of which the maximum differences between core design results are within 103 pcm reactivity, 1% relative power distribution and 6% control rod worth. A nuclear power plant core simulation program R-MASTER was developed using the methodology and applied by the concept of distributed client system in simulator. The performance was verified by site acceptance test in Simulator no. 2 in Kori Training Center for 30 initial condition generation and 27 steady state, transient and postulated accident situations.

  17. Toward a mineral physics reference model for the Moon's core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonangeli, Daniele; Morard, Guillaume; Schmerr, Nicholas C; Komabayashi, Tetsuya; Krisch, Michael; Fiquet, Guillaume; Fei, Yingwei

    2015-03-31

    The physical properties of iron (Fe) at high pressure and high temperature are crucial for understanding the chemical composition, evolution, and dynamics of planetary interiors. Indeed, the inner structures of the telluric planets all share a similar layered nature: a central metallic core composed mostly of iron, surrounded by a silicate mantle, and a thin, chemically differentiated crust. To date, most studies of iron have focused on the hexagonal closed packed (hcp, or ε) phase, as ε-Fe is likely stable across the pressure and temperature conditions of Earth's core. However, at the more moderate pressures characteristic of the cores of smaller planetary bodies, such as the Moon, Mercury, or Mars, iron takes on a face-centered cubic (fcc, or γ) structure. Here we present compressional and shear wave sound velocity and density measurements of γ-Fe at high pressures and high temperatures, which are needed to develop accurate seismic models of planetary interiors. Our results indicate that the seismic velocities proposed for the Moon's inner core by a recent reanalysis of Apollo seismic data are well below those of γ-Fe. Our dataset thus provides strong constraints to seismic models of the lunar core and cores of small telluric planets. This allows us to propose a direct compositional and velocity model for the Moon's core.

  18. Modelling of magnetostriction of transformer magnetic core for vibration analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Janis; Vitolina, Sandra

    2017-12-01

    Magnetostriction is a phenomenon occurring in transformer core in normal operation mode. Yet in time, it can cause the delamination of magnetic core resulting in higher level of vibrations that are measured on the surface of transformer tank during diagnostic tests. The aim of this paper is to create a model for evaluating elastic deformations in magnetic core that can be used for power transformers with intensive vibrations in order to eliminate magnetostriction as a their cause. Description of the developed model in Matlab and COMSOL software is provided including restrictions concerning geometry and properties of materials, and the results of performed research on magnetic core anisotropy are provided. As a case study modelling of magnetostriction for 5-legged 200 MVA power transformer with the rated voltage of 13.8/137kV is conducted, based on which comparative analysis of vibration levels and elastic deformations is performed.

  19. Modelling of magnetostriction of transformer magnetic core for vibration analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marks Janis

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Magnetostriction is a phenomenon occurring in transformer core in normal operation mode. Yet in time, it can cause the delamination of magnetic core resulting in higher level of vibrations that are measured on the surface of transformer tank during diagnostic tests. The aim of this paper is to create a model for evaluating elastic deformations in magnetic core that can be used for power transformers with intensive vibrations in order to eliminate magnetostriction as a their cause. Description of the developed model in Matlab and COMSOL software is provided including restrictions concerning geometry and properties of materials, and the results of performed research on magnetic core anisotropy are provided. As a case study modelling of magnetostriction for 5-legged 200 MVA power transformer with the rated voltage of 13.8/137kV is conducted, based on which comparative analysis of vibration levels and elastic deformations is performed.

  20. Geomagnetic core field models in the satellite era

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lesur, Vincent; Olsen, Nils; Thomson, Alan W. P.

    2011-01-01

    After a brief review of the theoretical basis and difficulties that modelers are facing, we present three recent models of the geomagnetic field originating in the Earth’s core. All three modeling approaches are using recent observatory and near-Earth orbiting survey satellite data. In each case...

  1. SCDAP/RELAP5 lower core plate model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coryell, E.W.; Griffin, F.P.

    1999-01-01

    The SCDAP/RELAP5 computer code is a best-estimate analysis tool for performing nuclear reactor severe accident simulations. This report describes the justification, theory, implementation, and testing of a new modeling capability which will refine the analysis of the movement of molten material from the core region to the vessel lower head. As molten material moves from the core region through the core support structures it may encounter conditions which will cause it to freeze in the region of the lower core plate, delaying its arrival to the vessel head. The timing of this arrival is significant to reactor safety, because during the time span for material relocation to the lower head, the core may be experiencing steam-limited oxidation. The time at which hot material arrives in a coolant-filled lower vessel head, thereby significantly increasing the steam flow rate through the core region, becomes significant to the progression and timing of a severe accident. This report is a revision of a report INEEL/EXT-00707, entitled ''Preliminary Design Report for SCDAP/RELAP5 Lower Core Plate Model''

  2. Real-time advanced nuclear reactor core model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koclas, J.; Friedman, F.; Paquette, C.; Vivier, P.

    1990-01-01

    The paper describes a multi-nodal advanced nuclear reactor core model. The model is based on application of modern equivalence theory to the solution of neutron diffusion equation in real time employing the finite differences method. The use of equivalence theory allows the application of the finite differences method to cores divided into hundreds of nodes, as opposed to the much finer divisions (in the order of ten thousands of nodes) where the unmodified method is currently applied. As a result the model can be used for modelling of the core kinetics for real time full scope training simulators. Results of benchmarks, validate the basic assumptions of the model and its applicability to real-time simulation. (orig./HP)

  3. Modeling of the core of Atucha II nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco, Anibal

    2007-01-01

    This work is part of a Nuclear Engineer degree thesis of the Instituto Balseiro and it is carried out under the development of an Argentinean Nuclear Power Plant Simulator. To obtain the best representation of the reactor physical behavior using the state of the art tools this Simulator should couple a 3D neutronics core calculation code with a thermal-hydraulics system code. Focused in the neutronic nature of this job, using PARCS, we modeled and performed calculations of the nuclear power plant Atucha 2 core. Whenever it is possible, we compare our results against results obtained with PUMA (the official core code for Atucha 2). (author) [es

  4. Summary of multi-core hardware and programming model investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, Suzanne Marie; Pedretti, Kevin Thomas Tauke; Levenhagen, Michael J.

    2008-05-01

    This report summarizes our investigations into multi-core processors and programming models for parallel scientific applications. The motivation for this study was to better understand the landscape of multi-core hardware, future trends, and the implications on system software for capability supercomputers. The results of this study are being used as input into the design of a new open-source light-weight kernel operating system being targeted at future capability supercomputers made up of multi-core processors. A goal of this effort is to create an agile system that is able to adapt to and efficiently support whatever multi-core hardware and programming models gain acceptance by the community.

  5. The QCD model of hadron cores of the meson theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pokrovskii, Y.E.

    1985-01-01

    It was shown that in the previously proposed QCD model of hadron cores the exchange and self-energy contributions of the virtual quark-antiquark-gluon cloud on the outside of a bag which radius coincides with the hardon core radius of the meson theory (∼ 0.4 Fm) have been taken into account at the phenomenological level. Simulation of this cloud by the meson field results in realistic estimations of the nucleon's electroweak properties, moment fractions carried by gluons, quarks, antiquarks and hadron-hadron interaction cross-sections within a wide range of energies. The authors note that the QCD hadron core model proposed earlier not only realistically reflects the hadron masses, but reflects self-consistently main elements of the structure and interaction of hadrons at the quark-gluon bag radius (R - 0.4Fm) being close to the meson theory core radius

  6. Modelling perspectives on radiation chemistry in BWR reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibe, Eishi

    1991-01-01

    Development of a full-system boiling water reactor core model started in 1982. The model included a two-region reactor core, one with and one without boiling. Key design parameters consider variable dose rates in a three-layer liquid downcomer. Dose rates in the core and downcomer include both generation and recombination reactions of species. Agreement is good between calculations and experimental data of oxygen concentration as a function of hydrogen concentration for different bubble sizes. Oxygen concentration is reduced in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) by increasing bubble size. The multilayer model follows the oxygen data better than a single-layered model at high concentrations of hydrogen. Key reactions are reduced to five radiolysis reactions and four decomposition reactions for hydrogen peroxide. Calculations by the DOT 3 code showed dose rates from neutrons and gamma rays in various parts of the core. Concentrations of oxygen, hydrogen peroxide, and hydrogen were calculated by the model as a function of time from core inlet. Similar calculations for NWC and HWC were made as a function of height from core inlet both in the boiling channel an the bypass channel. Finally the model was applied to calculate the oxygen plus half the hydrogen peroxide concentrations as a function of hydrogen concentration to compare with data from five plants. Power density distribution with core height was given for an early stage and an end stage of a cycle. Increases of dose rates in the turbine for seven plants were shown as a function of increased hydrogen concentration in the reactor water

  7. Core seismic behaviour: linear and non-linear models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, M.; Van Dorsselaere, M.; Gauvain, M.; Jenapierre-Gantenbein, M.

    1981-08-01

    The usual methodology for the core seismic behaviour analysis leads to a double complementary approach: to define a core model to be included in the reactor-block seismic response analysis, simple enough but representative of basic movements (diagrid or slab), to define a finer core model, with basic data issued from the first model. This paper presents the history of the different models of both kinds. The inert mass model (IMM) yielded a first rough diagrid movement. The direct linear model (DLM), without shocks and with sodium as an added mass, let to two different ones: DLM 1 with independent movements of the fuel and radial blanket subassemblies, and DLM 2 with a core combined movement. The non-linear (NLM) ''CORALIE'' uses the same basic modelization (Finite Element Beams) but accounts for shocks. It studies the response of a diameter on flats and takes into account the fluid coupling and the wrapper tube flexibility at the pad level. Damping consists of one modal part of 2% and one part due to shocks. Finally, ''CORALIE'' yields the time-history of the displacements and efforts on the supports, but damping (probably greater than 2%) and fluid-structures interaction are still to be precised. The validation experiments were performed on a RAPSODIE core mock-up on scale 1, in similitude of 1/3 as to SPX 1. The equivalent linear model (ELM) was developed for the SPX 1 reactor-block response analysis and a specified seismic level (SB or SM). It is composed of several oscillators fixed to the diagrid and yields the same maximum displacements and efforts than the NLM. The SPX 1 core seismic analysis with a diagrid input spectrum which corresponds to a 0,1 g group acceleration, has been carried out with these models: some aspects of these calculations are presented here

  8. Computational models of stellar collapse and core-collapse supernovae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, Christian D; O'Connor, Evan; Schnetter, Erik; Loeffler, Frank; Burrows, Adam; Livne, Eli

    2009-01-01

    Core-collapse supernovae are among Nature's most energetic events. They mark the end of massive star evolution and pollute the interstellar medium with the life-enabling ashes of thermonuclear burning. Despite their importance for the evolution of galaxies and life in the universe, the details of the core-collapse supernova explosion mechanism remain in the dark and pose a daunting computational challenge. We outline the multi-dimensional, multi-scale, and multi-physics nature of the core-collapse supernova problem and discuss computational strategies and requirements for its solution. Specifically, we highlight the axisymmetric (2D) radiation-MHD code VULCAN/2D and present results obtained from the first full-2D angle-dependent neutrino radiation-hydrodynamics simulations of the post-core-bounce supernova evolution. We then go on to discuss the new code Zelmani which is based on the open-source HPC Cactus framework and provides a scalable AMR approach for 3D fully general-relativistic modeling of stellar collapse, core-collapse supernovae and black hole formation on current and future massively-parallel HPC systems. We show Zelmani's scaling properties to more than 16,000 compute cores and discuss first 3D general-relativistic core-collapse results.

  9. Computational models of stellar collapse and core-collapse supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, Christian D; O' Connor, Evan [TAPIR, Mailcode 350-17, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Schnetter, Erik; Loeffler, Frank [Center for Computation and Technology, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Burrows, Adam [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ (United States); Livne, Eli, E-mail: cott@tapir.caltech.ed [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem (Israel)

    2009-07-01

    Core-collapse supernovae are among Nature's most energetic events. They mark the end of massive star evolution and pollute the interstellar medium with the life-enabling ashes of thermonuclear burning. Despite their importance for the evolution of galaxies and life in the universe, the details of the core-collapse supernova explosion mechanism remain in the dark and pose a daunting computational challenge. We outline the multi-dimensional, multi-scale, and multi-physics nature of the core-collapse supernova problem and discuss computational strategies and requirements for its solution. Specifically, we highlight the axisymmetric (2D) radiation-MHD code VULCAN/2D and present results obtained from the first full-2D angle-dependent neutrino radiation-hydrodynamics simulations of the post-core-bounce supernova evolution. We then go on to discuss the new code Zelmani which is based on the open-source HPC Cactus framework and provides a scalable AMR approach for 3D fully general-relativistic modeling of stellar collapse, core-collapse supernovae and black hole formation on current and future massively-parallel HPC systems. We show Zelmani's scaling properties to more than 16,000 compute cores and discuss first 3D general-relativistic core-collapse results.

  10. VHTR core modeling: coupling between neutronic and thermal-hydraulics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limaiem, I.; Damian, F.; Raepsaet, X.; Studer, E.

    2005-01-01

    Following the present interest in the next generation nuclear power plan (NGNP), Cea is deploying special effort to develop new models and qualify its research tools for this next generation reactors core. In this framework, the Very High Temperature Reactor concept (VHTR) has an increasing place in the actual research program. In such type of core, a strong interaction exists between neutronic and thermal-hydraulics. Consequently, the global core modelling requires accounting for the temperature feedback in the neutronic models. The purpose of this paper is to present the new neutronic and thermal-hydraulics coupling model dedicated to the High Temperature Reactors (HTR). The coupling model integrates a new version of the neutronic scheme calculation developed in collaboration between Cea and Framatome-ANP. The neutronic calculations are performed using a specific calculation processes based on the APOLLO2 transport code and CRONOS2 diffusion code which are part of the French reactor physics code system SAPHYR. The thermal-hydraulics model is characterised by an equivalent porous media and 1-D fluid/3-D thermal model implemented in the CAST3M/ARCTURUS code. The porous media approach involves the definition of both homogenous and heterogeneous models to ensure a correct temperature feedback. This study highlights the sensitivity of the coupling system's parameters (radial/axial meshing and data exchange strategy between neutronic and thermal-hydraulics code). The parameters sensitivity study leads to the definition of an optimal coupling system specification for the VHTR. Besides, this work presents the first physical analysis of the VHTR core in steady-state condition. The analysis gives information about the 3-D power peaking and the temperature coefficient. Indeed, it covers different core configurations with different helium distribution in the core bypass. (authors)

  11. Modeling of Core Competencies in the Registrar's Office

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikowsky, Reta

    2009-01-01

    The Office of the Registrar at the Georgia Institute of Technology, in cooperation with the Office of Human Resources, has been engaged since February 2008 in a pilot project to model core competencies for the leadership team and the staff. It is the hope of the office of Human resources that this pilot will result in a model that can be used…

  12. Core/corona modeling of diode-imploded annular loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, R. E.; Guillory, J. U.

    1980-11-01

    The effects of a tenuous exterior plasma corona with anomalous resistivity on the compression and heating of a hollow, collisional aluminum z-pinch plasma are predicted by a one-dimensional code. As the interior ("core") plasma is imploded by its axial current, the energy exchange between core and corona determines the current partition. Under the conditions of rapid core heating and compression, the increase in coronal current provides a trade-off between radial acceleration and compression, which reduces the implosion forces and softens the pitch. Combined with a heuristic account of energy and momentum transport in the strongly coupled core plasma and an approximate radiative loss calculation including Al line, recombination and Bremsstrahlung emission, the current model can provide a reasonably accurate description of imploding annular plasma loads that remain azimuthally symmetric. The implications for optimization of generator load coupling are examined.

  13. Digital Core Modelling for Clastic Oil and Gas Reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belozerov, I.; Berezovsky, V.; Gubaydullin, M.; Yur’ev, A.

    2018-05-01

    "Digital core" is a multi-purpose tool for solving a variety of tasks in the field of geological exploration and production of hydrocarbons at various stages, designed to improve the accuracy of geological study of subsurface resources, the efficiency of reproduction and use of mineral resources, as well as applying the results obtained in production practice. The actuality of the development of the "Digital core" software is that even a partial replacement of natural laboratory experiments with mathematical modelling can be used in the operative calculation of reserves in exploratory drilling, as well as in the absence of core material from wells. Or impossibility of its research by existing laboratory methods (weakly cemented, loose, etc. rocks). 3D-reconstruction of the core microstructure can be considered as a cheap and least time-consuming method for obtaining petrophysical information about the main filtration-capacitive properties and fluid motion in reservoir rocks.

  14. A calculation model for a HTR core seismic response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buland, P.; Berriaud, C.; Cebe, E.; Livolant, M.

    1975-01-01

    The paper presents the experimental results obtained at Saclay on a HTGR core model and comparisons with analytical results. Two series of horizontal tests have been performed on the shaking table VESUVE: sinusoidal test and time history response. Acceleration of graphite blocks, forces on the boundaries, relative displacement of the core and PCRB model, impact velocity of the blocks on the boundaries were recorded. These tests have shown the strongly non-linear dynamic behaviour of the core. The resonant frequency of the core is dependent on the level of the excitation. These phenomena have been explained by a computer code, which is a lumped mass non-linear model. Good correlation between experimental and analytical results was obtained for impact velocities and forces on the boundaries. This comparison has shown that the damping of the core is a critical parameter for the estimation of forces and velocities. Time history displacement at the level of PCRV was reproduced on the shaking table. The analytical model was applied to this excitation and good agreement was obtained for forces and velocities. (orig./HP) [de

  15. AGR core models and their application to HTRs and RBMKs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baylis, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    EDF Energy operates 14 AGRs, commissioned between 1976 and 1989. The graphite moderators of these gas cooled reactors are subjected to a number of ageing processes under fast neutron irradiation in a high temperature CO2 environment. As the graphite ages, continued safe operation requires an advanced whole-core modeling capability to enable accurate assessments of the core’s ability to fulfil fundamental nuclear safety requirements. This is also essential in evaluating the reactor's remaining economic lifetime, and similar assessments are useful for HTRs in the design stage. A number of computational and physical models of AGR graphite cores have been developed or are in development, allowing simulation of the reactors in normal, fault and seismic conditions. Many of the techniques developed are applicable to other graphite moderated reactors. Modeling of the RBMK allows validation against a core in a more advanced state of ageing than the AGRs, while there is also an opportunity to adapt the models for high temperature reactors. As an example, a finite element model of the HTR-PM side reflector based on rigid bodies and nonlinear springs is developed, allowing rapid assessments of distortion in the structure to be made. A model of the RBMK moderator has also been produced using an established AGR code based on similar methods. In addition, this paper discusses the limitations of these techniques and the development of more complex core models that address these limitations, along with the lessons that can be applied to HTRs. (author)

  16. Secure wireless embedded systems via component-based design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, T.; Torbensen, R.

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces the method secure-by-design as a way of constructing wireless embedded systems using component-based modeling frameworks. This facilitates design of secure applications through verified, reusable software. Following this method we propose a security framework with a secure c......, with full support for confidentiality, authentication, and integrity using keypairs. The approach has been demonstrated in a multi-platform home automation prototype that can remotely unlock a door using a PDA over the Internet....

  17. Evaluating nuclear physics inputs in core-collapse supernova models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentz, E.; Hix, W. R.; Baird, M. L.; Messer, O. E. B.; Mezzacappa, A.

    Core-collapse supernova models depend on the details of the nuclear and weak interaction physics inputs just as they depend on the details of the macroscopic physics (transport, hydrodynamics, etc.), numerical methods, and progenitors. We present preliminary results from our ongoing comparison studies of nuclear and weak interaction physics inputs to core collapse supernova models using the spherically-symmetric, general relativistic, neutrino radiation hydrodynamics code Agile-Boltztran. We focus on comparisons of the effects of the nuclear EoS and the effects of improving the opacities, particularly neutrino--nucleon interactions.

  18. Mathematical Modeling, Sense Making, and the Common Core State Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Alan H.

    2013-01-01

    On October 14, 2013 the Mathematics Education Department at Teachers College hosted a full-day conference focused on the Common Core Standards Mathematical Modeling requirements to be implemented in September 2014 and in honor of Professor Henry Pollak's 25 years of service to the school. This article is adapted from my talk at this conference…

  19. Vibration tests on some models of PEC reactor core elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonacina, G.; Castoldi, A.; Zola, M.; Cecchini, F.; Martelli, A.; Vincenzi, D.

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes the aims of the experimental tests carried out at ISMES, within an agreement with the Department of Fast Reactors of ENEA, on some models of the elements of PEC Fast Nuclear Reactor Core in the frame of the activities for the seismic verification of the PEC core. The seismic verification is briefly described with particular attention to the problems arising from the shocks among the various elements during an earthquake, as well as the computer code used, the purpose and the techniques used to perform tests, some results and the first comparison between the theory and the experimental data

  20. Development of local TDC model in core thermal hydraulic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, H.S.; Park, J.R.; Hwang, D.H.; Lee, S.K.

    2004-01-01

    The local TDC model consisting of natural mixing and forced mixing part was developed to obtain more realistic local fluid properties in the core subchannel analysis. To evaluate the performance of local TDC model, the CHF prediction capability was tested with the various CHF correlations and local fluid properties at CHF location which are based on the local TDC model. The results show that the standard deviation of measured to predicted CHF ratio (M/P) based on local TDC model can be reduced by about 7% compared to those based on global TDC model when the CHF correlation has no term to account for distance from the spacer grid. (author)

  1. Modeling of impurity transport in the core plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulse, R.A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a brief overview of computer modeling of impurity transport in the core region of controlled thermonuclear fusion plasmas. The atomic processes of importance in these high temperature plasmas and the numerical formulation of the model are described. Selected modeling examples are then used to highlight some features of the physics of impurity behavior in large tokamak fusion devices, with an emphasis on demonstrating the sensitivity of such modeling to uncertainties in the rate coefficients used for the atomic processes. This leads to a discussion of current requirements and opportunities for generating the improved sets of comprehensive atomic data needed to support present and future fusion impurity modeling studies

  2. Modeling of reflood of severely damaged reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachrata, A.

    2012-01-01

    The TMI-2 accident and recently Fukushima accident demonstrated that the nuclear safety philosophy has to cover accident sequences involving massive core melt in order to develop reliable mitigation strategies for both, existing and advanced reactors. Although severe accidents are low likelihood and might be caused only by multiple failures, accident management is implemented for controlling their course and mitigating their consequences. In case of severe accident, the fuel rods may be severely damaged and oxidized. Finally, they collapse and form a debris bed on core support plate. Removal of decay heat from a damaged core is a challenging issue because of the difficulty for water to penetrate inside a porous medium. The reflooding (injection of water into core) may be applied only if the availability of safety injection is recovered during accident. If the injection becomes available only in the late phase of accident, water will enter a core configuration that will differ from original rod bundle geometry and will resemble to the severe damaged core observed in TMI-2. The higher temperatures and smaller hydraulic diameters in a porous medium make the coolability more difficult than for intact fuel rods under typical loss of coolant accident conditions. The modeling of this kind of hydraulic and heat transfer is a one of key objectives of this. At IRSN, part of the studies is realized using an European thermo-hydraulic computer code for severe accident analysis ICARE-CATHARE. The objective of this thesis is to develop a 3D reflood model (implemented into ICARE-CATHARE) that is able to treat different configurations of degraded core in a case of severe accident. The proposed model is characterized by treating of non-equilibrium thermal between the solid, liquid and gas phase. It includes also two momentum balance equations. The model is based on a previously developed model but is improved in order to take into account intense boiling regimes (in particular

  3. Thermal hydraulics model for Sandia's annular core research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, Dasari V.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Rubio, Reuben A.; Bryson, James W.; Foushee, Fabian C.

    1988-01-01

    A thermal hydraulics model was developed for the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) at Sandia National Laboratories. The coupled mass, momentum and energy equations for the core were solved simultaneously using an explicit forward marching numerical technique. The model predictions of the temperature rise across the central channel of the ACRR core were within ± 10 percent agreement with the in-core temperature measurements. The model was then used to estimate the coolant mass flow rate and the axial distribution of the cladding surface temperature in the central and average channels as functions of the operating power and the water inlet subcooling. Results indicated that subcooled boiling occurs at the cladding surface in the central channels of the ACRR at power levels in excess of 0.5 MW. However, the high heat transfer coefficient due to subcooled boiling causes the cladding temperature along most of the active fuel rod region to be quite uniform and to increase very little with the reactor power. (author)

  4. Core Organizational Stakeholder Impact – An assessment model

    OpenAIRE

    Carvalho, João M. S.

    2013-01-01

    Measurement of organizational social impact is a pressing issue in corporate social responsibility research. This paper proposes an alternative measurement modelCore Organizational Stakeholder Impact (COSI) – based on economic, legal and ethical responsibilities of organizations. The model allows understanding organizational social footprint, i.e., how organizations impact each stakeholder. It has 40 indicators, easy to apply, dividing internal and external stakeholders in equa...

  5. Accelerating Atmospheric Modeling Through Emerging Multi-core Technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Linford, John Christian

    2010-01-01

    The new generations of multi-core chipset architectures achieve unprecedented levels of computational power while respecting physical and economical constraints. The cost of this power is bewildering program complexity. Atmospheric modeling is a grand-challenge problem that could make good use of these architectures if they were more accessible to the average programmer. To that end, software tools and programming methodologies that greatly simplify the acceleration of atmospheric modeling...

  6. A simple model for induction core voltage distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briggs, Richard J.; Fawley, William M.

    2004-01-01

    In fall 2003 T. Hughes of MRC used a full EM simulation code (LSP) to show that the electric field stress distribution near the outer radius of the longitudinal gaps between the four Metglas induction cores is very nonuniform in the original design of the DARHT-2 accelerator cells. In this note we derive a simple model of the electric field distribution in the induction core region to provide physical insights into this result. The starting point in formulating our model is to recognize that the electromagnetic fields in the induction core region of the DARHT-2 accelerator cells should be accurately represented within a quasi-static approximation because the timescale for the fields to change is much longer than the EM wave propagation time. The difficulty one faces is the fact that the electric field is a mixture of both a ''quasi-magnetostatic field'' (having a nonzero curl, with Bdot the source) and a ''quasi-electrostatic field'' (the source being electric charges on the various metal surfaces). We first discuss the EM field structure on the ''micro-scale'' of individual tape windings in Section 2. The insights from that discussion are then used to formulate a ''macroscopic'' description of the fields inside an ''equivalent homogeneous tape wound core region'' in Section 3. This formulation explicitly separates the nonlinear core magnetics from the quasi-electrostatic components of the electric field. In Section 4 a physical interpretation of the radial dependence of the electrostatic component of the electric field derived from this model is presented in terms of distributed capacitances, and the voltage distribution from gap to gap is related to various ''equivalent'' lumped capacitances. Analytic solutions of several simple multi-core cases are presented in Sections 5 and 6 to help provide physical insight into the effect of various proposed changes in the geometrical parameters of the DARHT-2 accelerator cell. Our results show that over most of the gap

  7. VIPRE modeling of VVER-1000 reactor core for DNB analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Y.; Nguyen, Q. [Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Cizek, J. [Nuclear Research Institute, Prague, (Czech Republic)

    1995-09-01

    Based on the one-pass modeling approach, the hot channels and the VVER-1000 reactor core can be modeled in 30 channels for DNB analyses using the VIPRE-01/MOD02 (VIPRE) code (VIPRE is owned by Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, California). The VIPRE one-pass model does not compromise any accuracy in the hot channel local fluid conditions. Extensive qualifications include sensitivity studies of radial noding and crossflow parameters and comparisons with the results from THINC and CALOPEA subchannel codes. The qualifications confirm that the VIPRE code with the Westinghouse modeling method provides good computational performance and accuracy for VVER-1000 DNB analyses.

  8. The hard-core model on random graphs revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbier, Jean; Krzakala, Florent; Zhang, Pan; Zdeborová, Lenka

    2013-01-01

    We revisit the classical hard-core model, also known as independent set and dual to vertex cover problem, where one puts particles with a first-neighbor hard-core repulsion on the vertices of a random graph. Although the case of random graphs with small and very large average degrees respectively are quite well understood, they yield qualitatively different results and our aim here is to reconciliate these two cases. We revisit results that can be obtained using the (heuristic) cavity method and show that it provides a closed-form conjecture for the exact density of the densest packing on random regular graphs with degree K ≥ 20, and that for K > 16 the nature of the phase transition is the same as for large K. This also shows that the hard-code model is the simplest mean-field lattice model for structural glasses and jamming

  9. Model of coupling with core in the Green function method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamerdzhiev, S.P.; Tselyaev, V.I.

    1983-01-01

    Models of coupling with core in the method of the Green functions, presenting generalization of conventional method of chaotic phases, i.e. account of configurations of more complex than monoparticle-monohole (1p1h) configurations, have been considered. Odd nuclei are studied only to the extent when the task of odd nucleus is solved for even-even nucleus. Microscopic model of the account of delay effects in mass operator M=M(epsilon), which corresponds to the account of the effects influence only on the change of quasiparticle behaviour in magic nucleus as compared with their behaviour, described by pure model of cores, has been considered. The change results in fragmentation of monoparticle levels, which is the main effect, and in the necessity to use new basis as compared with the shell one, corresponding to inoculative quasiparticles. When formulas have been devived concrete type of mass operator M(epsilon) is not used

  10. CFD to modeling molten core behavior simultaneously with chemical phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladimir V Chudanov; Anna E Aksenova; Valerii A Pervichko

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: This paper deals with the basic features of a computing procedure, which can be used for modeling of destruction and melting of a core with subsequent corium retaining into the reactor vessel. The destruction and melting of core mean the account of the following phenomena: a melting, draining (moving of the melt through a porous layer of core debris), freezing with release of an energy, change of geometry, formation of the molten pool, whose convective intermixing and distribution influence on a mechanism of borders destruction. It is necessary to take into account that during of heating molten pool and development in it of convective fluxes a stratification of a multi-component melt on two layers of metal light and of oxide heavy components is observed. These layers are in interaction, they can exchange by the separate components as result of diffusion or oxidizing reactions. It can have an effect considerably on compositions, on a specific weight, and on properties of molten interacting phases, and on a structure of the molten stratified pool. In turn, the retaining of the formed molten masses in reactor vessel requires the solution of a matched heat exchange problem, namely, of a natural convection in a heat generating fluid in partially or completely molten corium and of heat exchange problem with taking into account of a melting of the reactor vessel. In addition, it is necessary to take into account phase segregation, caused by influence of local and of global natural convective flows and thermal lag of heated up boundaries. The mathematical model for simulation of the specified phenomena is based on the Navier-Stokes equations with variable properties together with the heat transfer equation. For modeling of a corium moving through a porous layer of core debris, the special computing algorithm to take into account density jump on interface between a melt and a porous layer of core debris is designed. The model was

  11. EFEKTIVITAS STRATEGI PENGELOMPOKAN BERPASANGAN DALAM PEMBELAJARAN MATEMATIKA MODEL CORE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endah Retnowati

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak: Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk menguji keefektifan pembelajaran CORE (Connect, Organize, Reflect, Extend pada pembelajaran geometri transformasi dengan strategi pengelompokan yang berbeda ditinjau dari kemampuan penalaran, prestasi, dan self efficacy. Penelitian ini merupakan penelitian eksperimen semu dengan populasi siswa kelas XI IPA SMA yang baru pertama kali mempelajari materi geometri transformasi. Sampel penelitian sebanyak dua kelas masing-masing terdiri atas 40 siswa. Siswa belajar dengan dikelompokkan secara berpasangan atau kelompok kecil. Data dikumpulkan dengan teknik tes dan nontes serta dianalisis dengan teknik statistik deskriptif dan inferensial (Manova. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa pembelajaran CORE strategi berpasangan maupun kelompok kecil efektif ditinjau dari Kriteria Ketuntasan Minimum kemampuan penalaran, prestasi dan self efficacy yang ditetapkan, tetapi tidak terdapat perbedaan yang signifikan di antara kedua strategi pengelompokan tersebut. Repeated measures analysis of variance menunjukkan bahwa kompleksitas materi pembelajaran memengaruhi prestasi belajar secara signifikan. Semakin kompleks materi pembelajaran, penggunaan strategi kelompok kecil lebih baik daripada berpasangan. Kata kunci: CORE, kemampuan penalaran, prestasi belajar, self efficacy THE EFFECTIVENESS OF DYAD STRATEGY DURING MATHEMATICS LEARNING BASED ON CORE MODEL Abstract: The purpose of this study is to test the effectiveness of an instruction, namely CORE (Connect, Organize, Reflect, Extend model, for learning geometry transformation in different grouping strategies (by dyads and small-group work, in terms of reasoning ability, achievement, and self-efficacy. This study was a quasi-experimental research with the entire population of science 11th graders who were novices in geometry transformation. The research samples were two classes which respectively consist of 40 students. Students learned all material either in dyads or small

  12. Generalized model for k -core percolation and interdependent networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panduranga, Nagendra K.; Gao, Jianxi; Yuan, Xin; Stanley, H. Eugene; Havlin, Shlomo

    2017-09-01

    Cascading failures in complex systems have been studied extensively using two different models: k -core percolation and interdependent networks. We combine the two models into a general model, solve it analytically, and validate our theoretical results through extensive simulations. We also study the complete phase diagram of the percolation transition as we tune the average local k -core threshold and the coupling between networks. We find that the phase diagram of the combined processes is very rich and includes novel features that do not appear in the models studying each of the processes separately. For example, the phase diagram consists of first- and second-order transition regions separated by two tricritical lines that merge and enclose a two-stage transition region. In the two-stage transition, the size of the giant component undergoes a first-order jump at a certain occupation probability followed by a continuous second-order transition at a lower occupation probability. Furthermore, at certain fixed interdependencies, the percolation transition changes from first-order → second-order → two-stage → first-order as the k -core threshold is increased. The analytic equations describing the phase boundaries of the two-stage transition region are set up, and the critical exponents for each type of transition are derived analytically.

  13. On the thermodynamic properties of the generalized Gaussian core model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.M.Mladek

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We present results of a systematic investigation of the properties of the generalized Gaussian core model of index n. The potential of this system interpolates via the index n between the potential of the Gaussian core model and the penetrable sphere system, thereby varying the steepness of the repulsion. We have used both conventional and self-consistent liquid state theories to calculate the structural and thermodynamic properties of the system; reference data are provided by computer simulations. The results indicate that the concept of self-consistency becomes indispensable to guarantee excellent agreement with simulation data; in particular, structural consistency (in our approach taken into account via the zero separation theorem is obviously a very important requirement. Simulation results for the dimensionless equation of state, β P / ρ, indicate that for an index-value of 4, a clustering transition, possibly into a structurally ordered phase might set in as the system is compressed.

  14. Core-level satellites and outer core-level multiplet splitting in Mn model compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, A. J.; Reynolds, John G.; Roos, Joseph W.

    2000-01-01

    We report a systematic study of the Mn 2p, 3s, and 3p core-level photoemission and satellite structures for Mn model compounds. Charge transfer from the ligand state to the 3d metal state is observed and is distinguished by prominent shake-up satellites. We also observe that the Mn 3s multiplet splitting becomes smaller as the Mn oxidation state increases, and that 3s-3d electron correlation reduces the branching ratio of the 7 S: 5 S states in the Mn 3s spectra. In addition, as the ligand electronegativity decreases, the spin-state purity is lost in the 3s spectra, as evidenced by peak broadening. Our results are best understood in terms of the configuration-interaction model including intrashell electron correlation, charge transfer, and final-state screening. (c) 2000 American Vacuum Society

  15. Core flow inversion tested with numerical dynamo models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, Steffen; Christensen, Ulrich; Jackson, Andrew; Wicht, Johannes

    2000-05-01

    We test inversion methods of geomagnetic secular variation data for the pattern of fluid flow near the surface of the core with synthetic data. These are taken from self-consistent 3-D models of convection-driven magnetohydrodynamic dynamos in rotating spherical shells, which generate dipole-dominated magnetic fields with an Earth-like morphology. We find that the frozen-flux approximation, which is fundamental to all inversion schemes, is satisfied to a fair degree in the models. In order to alleviate the non-uniqueness of the inversion, usually a priori conditions are imposed on the flow; for example, it is required to be purely toroidal or geostrophic. Either condition is nearly satisfied by our model flows near the outer surface. However, most of the surface velocity field lies in the nullspace of the inversion problem. Nonetheless, the a priori constraints reduce the nullspace, and by inverting the magnetic data with either one of them we recover a significant part of the flow. With the geostrophic condition the correlation coefficient between the inverted and the true velocity field can reach values of up to 0.65, depending on the choice of the damping parameter. The correlation is significant at the 95 per cent level for most spherical harmonic degrees up to l=26. However, it degrades substantially, even at long wavelengths, when we truncate the magnetic data sets to l currents, similar to those seen in core-flow models derived from geomagnetic data, occur in the equatorial region. However, the true flow does not contain this flow component. The results suggest that some meaningful information on the core-flow pattern can be retrieved from secular variation data, but also that the limited resolution of the magnetic core field could produce serious artefacts.

  16. Verifying Embedded Systems using Component-based Runtime Observers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guan, Wei; Marian, Nicolae; Angelov, Christo K.

    against formally specified properties. This paper presents a component-based design method for runtime observers, which are configured from instances of prefabricated reusable components---Predicate Evaluator (PE) and Temporal Evaluator (TE). The PE computes atomic propositions for the TE; the latter...... is a reconfigurable component processing a data structure, representing the state transition diagram of a non-deterministic state machine, i.e. a Buchi automaton derived from a system property specified in Linear Temporal Logic (LTL). Observer components have been implemented using design models and design patterns...

  17. A systematic approach for component-based software development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guareis de farias, Cléver; van Sinderen, Marten J.; Ferreira Pires, Luis

    2000-01-01

    Component-based software development enables the construction of software artefacts by assembling prefabricated, configurable and independently evolving building blocks, called software components. This paper presents an approach for the development of component-based software artefacts. This

  18. A Combined Approach for Component-based Software Design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guareis de farias, Cléver; van Sinderen, Marten J.; Ferreira Pires, Luis; Quartel, Dick; Baldoni, R.

    2001-01-01

    Component-based software development enables the construction of software artefacts by assembling binary units of production, distribution and deployment, the so-called software components. Several approaches addressing component-based development have been proposed recently. Most of these

  19. Quasi-exactly solvable relativistic soft-core Coulomb models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agboola, Davids, E-mail: davagboola@gmail.com; Zhang, Yao-Zhong, E-mail: yzz@maths.uq.edu.au

    2012-09-15

    By considering a unified treatment, we present quasi exact polynomial solutions to both the Klein-Gordon and Dirac equations with the family of soft-core Coulomb potentials V{sub q}(r)=-Z/(r{sup q}+{beta}{sup q}){sup 1/q}, Z>0, {beta}>0, q{>=}1. We consider cases q=1 and q=2 and show that both cases are reducible to the same basic ordinary differential equation. A systematic and closed form solution to the basic equation is obtained using the Bethe ansatz method. For each case, the expressions for the energies and the allowed parameters are obtained analytically and the wavefunctions are derived in terms of the roots of a set of Bethe ansatz equations. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The relativistic bound-state solutions of the soft-core Coulomb models. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quasi-exact treatments of the Dirac and Klein-Gordon equations for the soft-core Coulomb models. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solutions obtained in terms of the roots to the Bethe ansatz equations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The hidden Lie algebraic structure discussed for the models. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results useful in describing mesonic atoms and interaction of intense laser fields with atom.

  20. The development of component-based information systems

    CERN Document Server

    Cesare, Sergio de; Macredie, Robert

    2015-01-01

    This work provides a comprehensive overview of research and practical issues relating to component-based development information systems (CBIS). Spanning the organizational, developmental, and technical aspects of the subject, the original research included here provides fresh insights into successful CBIS technology and application. Part I covers component-based development methodologies and system architectures. Part II analyzes different aspects of managing component-based development. Part III investigates component-based development versus commercial off-the-shelf products (COTS), includi

  1. Cycle length maximization in PWRs using empirical core models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okafor, K.C.; Aldemir, T.

    1987-01-01

    The problem of maximizing cycle length in nuclear reactors through optimal fuel and poison management has been addressed by many investigators. An often-used neutronic modeling technique is to find correlations between the state and control variables to describe the response of the core to changes in the control variables. In this study, a set of linear correlations, generated by two-dimensional diffusion-depletion calculations, is used to find the enrichment distribution that maximizes cycle length for the initial core of a pressurized water reactor (PWR). These correlations (a) incorporate the effect of composition changes in all the control zones on a given fuel assembly and (b) are valid for a given range of control variables. The advantage of using such correlations is that the cycle length maximization problem can be reduced to a linear programming problem

  2. Ab Initio Symmetry-Adapted No-Core Shell Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draayer, J P; Dytrych, T; Launey, K D

    2011-01-01

    A multi-shell extension of the Elliott SU(3) model, the SU(3) symmetry-adapted version of the no-core shell model (SA-NCSM), is described. The significance of this SA-NCSM emerges from the physical relevance of its SU(3)-coupled basis, which – while it naturally manages center-of-mass spuriosity – provides a microscopic description of nuclei in terms of mixed shape configurations. Since typically configurations of maximum spatial deformation dominate, only a small part of the model space suffices to reproduce the low-energy nuclear dynamics and hence, offers an effective symmetry-guided framework for winnowing of model space. This is based on our recent findings of low-spin and high-deformation dominance in realistic NCSM results and, in turn, holds promise to significantly enhance the reach of ab initio shell models.

  3. Modelling of the Molten Core Concrete Interaction (MCCI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillaume, M.

    2008-01-01

    Severe accidents of nuclear power plants are very unlikely to occur, yet it is necessary to be able to predict the evolution of the accident. In some situations, heat generation due to the disintegration of fission products could lead to the melting of the core. If the molten core falls on the floor of the building, it would provoke the melting of the concrete floor. The objective of the studies is to calculate the melting rate of the concrete floor. The work presented in this report is in the continuity of the segregation phase model of Seiler and Froment. It is based on the results of the ARTEMIS experiments. Firstly, we have developed a new model to simulate the transfers within the interfacial area. The new model explains how heat is transmitted to concrete: by conduction, convection and latent heat generation. Secondly, we have modified the coupled modelling of the pool and the interfacial area. We have developed two new models: the first one is the 'liquidus model', whose main hypothesis is that there is no resistance to solute transfer between the pool and the interfacial area. The second one is 'the thermal resistance model', whose main hypothesis is that there is no solute transfer and no dissolution of the interfacial area. The second model is able to predict the evolution of the pool temperature and the melting rate in the tests 3 and 4, with the condition that the obstruction time of the interfacial area is about 10 5 s. The model is not able to explain precisely the origin of this value. The liquidus model is able to predict correctly the evolution of the pool temperature and the melting rate in the tests 2 and 6. (author) [fr

  4. Evaluation of core modeling effect on transients for multi-flow zone design of SFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Andong; Choi, Yong Won

    2016-01-01

    SFR core is composed of different types of assemblies including fuel driver, reflector, blanket, control, safety drivers and other drivers. Modeling of different types of assemblies is inevitable in general. But modeling of core flow zones of with different channels needs a lot of effort and could be a challenge for system code modeling due to its limitation on the number of modeling components. In this study, core modeling effect on SFR transient was investigated with flow-zone model and averaged inner core channel model to improve modeling efficiency and validation of simplified core model for EBR-II loss of flow transient case with the modified TRACE code for SFRs. Core modeling effect on the loss flow transient was analyzed with flow-zoned channel model, single averaged inner core model and highest flow channel with averaged inner core channel model for EBR-II SHRT-17 test core. Case study showed that estimations of transient pump and channel flow as well as channel outlet temperatures were similar for all cases macroscopically. Comparing the result of the base case (flow-zone channel inner core model) and the case 2 (highest flow channel considered averaged inner core channel model), flow and channel outlet temperature response were closer than the case1 (single averaged inner core model)

  5. Evaluation of core modeling effect on transients for multi-flow zone design of SFR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Andong; Choi, Yong Won [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    SFR core is composed of different types of assemblies including fuel driver, reflector, blanket, control, safety drivers and other drivers. Modeling of different types of assemblies is inevitable in general. But modeling of core flow zones of with different channels needs a lot of effort and could be a challenge for system code modeling due to its limitation on the number of modeling components. In this study, core modeling effect on SFR transient was investigated with flow-zone model and averaged inner core channel model to improve modeling efficiency and validation of simplified core model for EBR-II loss of flow transient case with the modified TRACE code for SFRs. Core modeling effect on the loss flow transient was analyzed with flow-zoned channel model, single averaged inner core model and highest flow channel with averaged inner core channel model for EBR-II SHRT-17 test core. Case study showed that estimations of transient pump and channel flow as well as channel outlet temperatures were similar for all cases macroscopically. Comparing the result of the base case (flow-zone channel inner core model) and the case 2 (highest flow channel considered averaged inner core channel model), flow and channel outlet temperature response were closer than the case1 (single averaged inner core model)

  6. Progress and problems in modelling HTR core dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scherer, W.; Gerwin, H.

    1991-01-01

    In recent years greater effort has been made to establish theoretical models for HTR core dynamics. At KFA Juelich the TINTE (TIme dependent Neutronics and TEmperatures) code system has been developed, which is able to model the primary circuit of an HTR plant using modern numerical techniques and taking into account the mutual interference of the relevant physical variables. The HTR core is treated in 2-D R-Z geometry for both nucleonics and thermo-fluid-dynamics. 2-energy-group diffusion theory is used in the nuclear part including 6 groups of delayed neutron precursors and 14 groups of decay heat producers. Local and non-local heat sources are incorporated, thus simulating gamma ray transport. The thermo-fluid-dynamics module accounts for heterogeneity effects due to the pebble bed structure. Pipes and other components of the primary loop are modelled in 1-D geometry. Forced convection may be treated as well as natural convection in case of blower breakdown accidents. Validation of TINTE has started using the results of a comprehensive experimental program that has been performed at the Arbeitsgemeinschaft Versuchsreaktor GmbH (AVR) high temperature pebble bed reactor at Juelich. In the frame of this program power transients were initiated by varying the helium blower rotational speed or by moving the control rods. In most cases a good accordance between experiment and calculation was found. Problems in modelling the special AVR reactor geometry in two dimensions are described and suggestions for overcoming the uncertainties of experimentally determined control rod reactivities are given. The influence of different polynomial expansions of xenon cross sections to long term transients is discussed together with effects of burnup during that time. Up to now the TINTE code has proven its general applicability to operational core transients of HTR. The effects of water ingress on reactivity, fuel element corrosion and cooling gas properties are now being

  7. Modelling the carbonation of cementitious matrixes by means of the unreacted-core model, UR-CORE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellote, M.; Andrade, C.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a model for the carbonation of cementitious matrixes (UR-CORE). The model is based on the principles of the 'unreacted-core' systems, typical of chemical engineering processes, in which the reacted product remains in the solid as a layer of inert ash, adapted for the specific case of carbonation. Development of the model has been undertaken in three steps: 1) Establishment of the controlling step in the global carbonation rate, by using data of fractional conversion of different phases of the cementitious matrixes, obtained by the authors through neutron diffraction data experiments, and reported in [M. Castellote, C. Andrade, X. Turrillas, J. Campo, G. Cuello, Accelerated carbonation of cement pastes in situ monitored by neutron diffraction, Cem. Concr. Res. (2008), doi:10.1016/j.cemconres.2008.07.002]. 2) Then, the model has been adapted and applied to the cementitious materials using different concentrations of CO 2 , with the introduction of the needed assumptions and factors. 3) Finally, the model has been validated with laboratory data at different concentrations (taken from literature) and for long term natural exposure of concretes. As a result, the model seems to be reliable enough to be applied to cementitious materials, being able to extrapolate the results from accelerated tests in any conditions to predict the rate of carbonation in natural exposure, being restricted, at present stage, to conditions with a constant relative humidity

  8. The Effects of Earth's Outer Core's Viscosity on Geodynamo Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, C.; Jiao, L.; Zhang, H.

    2017-12-01

    Geodynamo process is controlled by mathematic equations and input parameters. To study effects of parameters on geodynamo system, MoSST model has been used to simulate geodynamo outputs under different outer core's viscosity ν. With spanning ν for nearly three orders when other parameters fixed, we studied the variation of each physical field and its typical length scale. We find that variation of ν affects the velocity field intensely. The magnetic field almost decreases monotonically with increasing of ν, while the variation is no larger than 30%. The temperature perturbation increases monotonically with ν, but by a very small magnitude (6%). The averaged velocity field (u) of the liquid core increases with ν as a simple fitted scaling relation: u∝ν0.49. The phenomenon that u increases with ν is essentially that increasing of ν breaks the Taylor-Proudman constraint and drops the critical Rayleigh number, and thus u increases under the same thermal driving force. Forces balance is analyzed and balance mode shifts with variation of ν. When compared with former studies of scaling laws, this study supports the conclusion that in a certain parameter range, the magnetic field strength doesn't vary much with the viscosity, but opposes to the assumption that the velocity field has nothing to do with the outer core viscosity.

  9. A Global Model for Circumgalactic and Cluster-core Precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voit, G. Mark; Meece, Greg; Li, Yuan; O'Shea, Brian W.; Bryan, Greg L.; Donahue, Megan

    2017-08-01

    We provide an analytic framework for interpreting observations of multiphase circumgalactic gas that is heavily informed by recent numerical simulations of thermal instability and precipitation in cool-core galaxy clusters. We start by considering the local conditions required for the formation of multiphase gas via two different modes: (1) uplift of ambient gas by galactic outflows, and (2) condensation in a stratified stationary medium in which thermal balance is explicitly maintained. Analytic exploration of these two modes provides insights into the relationships between the local ratio of the cooling and freefall timescales (I.e., {t}{cool}/{t}{ff}), the large-scale gradient of specific entropy, and the development of precipitation and multiphase media in circumgalactic gas. We then use these analytic findings to interpret recent simulations of circumgalactic gas in which global thermal balance is maintained. We show that long-lasting configurations of gas with 5≲ \\min ({t}{cool}/{t}{ff})≲ 20 and radial entropy profiles similar to observations of cool cores in galaxy clusters are a natural outcome of precipitation-regulated feedback. We conclude with some observational predictions that follow from these models. This work focuses primarily on precipitation and AGN feedback in galaxy-cluster cores, because that is where the observations of multiphase gas around galaxies are most complete. However, many of the physical principles that govern condensation in those environments apply to circumgalactic gas around galaxies of all masses.

  10. Gas dynamics models for an oscillating gaseous core fission reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuijper, J.C.; Dam, H. van; Hoogenboom, J.E. (Interuniversitair Reactor Inst., Delft (Netherlands))

    1991-01-01

    Two one-dimensional models are developed for the investigation of the gas dynamical behaviour of the fuel gas in a cylindrical gaseous core fission reactor. By numerical and analytical calculations, it is shown that, for the case where a direct energy extraction mechanism (such as magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD)) is not present, increasing density oscillations occur in the gas. Also an estimate is made of the attainable direct energy conversion efficiency, for the case where a direct energy extraction mechanism is present. (author).

  11. A refinement driven component-based design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Zhenbang; Liu, Zhiming; Ravn, Anders Peter

    2007-01-01

    the work on the Common Component Modelling Example (CoCoME). This gives evidence that the formal techniques developed in rCOS can be integrated into a model-driven development process and shows where it may be integrated in computer-aided software engineering (CASE) tools for adding formally supported...

  12. Shell model in-water frequencies of the core barrel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, K.; De Santo, D.F.

    1980-01-01

    Natural frequencies of a 1/24th-scale core barrel/vessel model in air and in water are measured by determining frequency responses to applied forces. The measured data are analyzed by the use of the one-dimensional fluid-structure computer code, MULTIFLEX, developed to calculate the hydraulic force. The fluid-structure interaction in the downcomer annulus is computed with a one-dimensional network model formed to be equivalent to two-dimensional fluid-structure interaction. The structural model incorporated in MULTIFLEX is substantially simpler than that necessary for structural analyses. Proposed for computation of structural dynamics is the projector method than can deal with the beam mode by modal analysis and the other shell modes by a direct integration method. Computed in-air and in-water frequencies agree fairly well with the experimental data, verifying the above MULTIFLEX technique

  13. Computational modeling for hexcan failure under core distruptive accidental conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawada, T.; Ninokata, H.; Shimizu, A. [Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan)

    1995-09-01

    This paper describes the development of computational modeling for hexcan wall failures under core disruptive accident conditions of fast breeder reactors. A series of out-of-pile experiments named SIMBATH has been analyzed by using the SIMMER-II code. The SIMBATH experiments were performed at KfK in Germany. The experiments used a thermite mixture to simulate fuel. The test geometry of SIMBATH ranged from single pin to 37-pin bundles. In this study, phenomena of hexcan wall failure found in a SIMBATH test were analyzed by SIMMER-II. Although the original model of SIMMER-II did not calculate any hexcan failure, several simple modifications made it possible to reproduce the hexcan wall melt-through observed in the experiment. In this paper the modifications and their significance are discussed for further modeling improvements.

  14. A nodal model for the simulation of a PWR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza Pinto, R. de.

    1981-06-01

    A computer program FORTRAN language was developed to simulate the neutronic and thermal-hydraulic transient behaviour of a PWR reactor core. The reator power is calculated using a point kinectics model with six groups of delayed neutron precursors. The fission product decay heat was considered assuming three effective decay heat groups. A nodal model was employed for the treatment of heat transfer in the fuel rod, with integration of the heat equation by the lumped parameter technique. Axial conduction was neglected. A single-channel nodal model was developed for the thermo-hydrodynamic simulation using mass and energy conservation equations for the control volumes. The effect of the axial pressure variation was neglected. The computer program was tested, with good results, through the simulation of the transient behaviour of postulated accidents in a typical PWR. (Author) [pt

  15. Core competency model for the family planning public health nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Caroline M; Roye, Carol; Gebbie, Kristine M

    2014-01-01

    A core competency model for family planning public health nurses has been developed, using a three stage Delphi Method with an expert panel of 40 family planning senior administrators, community/public health nursing faculty and seasoned family planning public health nurses. The initial survey was developed from the 2011 Title X Family Planning program priorities. The 32-item survey was distributed electronically via SurveyMonkey(®). Panelist attrition was low, and participation robust resulting in the final 28-item model, suggesting that the Delphi Method was a successful technique through which to achieve consensus. Competencies with at least 75% consensus were included in the model and those competencies were primarily related to education/counseling and administration of medications and contraceptives. The competencies identified have implications for education/training, certification and workplace performance. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Feasibility analysis of real-time physical modeling using WaveCore processor technology on FPGA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verstraelen, Martinus Johannes Wilhelmina; Pfeifle, Florian; Bader, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    WaveCore is a scalable many-core processor technology. This technology is specifically developed and optimized for real-time acoustical modeling applications. The programmable WaveCore soft-core processor is silicon-technology independent and hence can be targeted to ASIC or FPGA technologies. The

  17. Component-based framework for subsurface simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, B J; Fang, Yilin; Hammond, Glenn; Gurumoorthi, Vidhya

    2007-01-01

    Simulations in the subsurface environment represent a broad range of phenomena covering an equally broad range of scales. Developing modelling capabilities that can integrate models representing different phenomena acting at different scales present formidable challenges both from the algorithmic and computer science perspective. This paper will describe the development of an integrated framework that will be used to combine different models into a single simulation. Initial work has focused on creating two frameworks, one for performing smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of fluid systems, the other for performing grid-based continuum simulations of reactive subsurface flow. The SPH framework is based on a parallel code developed for doing pore scale simulations, the continuum grid-based framework is based on the STOMP (Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases) code developed at PNNL Future work will focus on combining the frameworks together to perform multiscale, multiphysics simulations of reactive subsurface flow

  18. A dynamic model for helium core heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiesser, W.E.; Shih, H.J.; Hartozog, D.G.; Herron, D.M.; Nahmias, D.; Stuber, W.G.; Hindmarsh, A.C.

    1990-04-01

    To meet the helium (He) requirements of the superconducting supercollider (SSC), the cryogenic plants must be able to respond to time-varying loads. Thus the design and simulation of the cryogenic plants requires dynamic models of their principal components, and in particular, the core heat exchangers. In this paper, we detail the derivation and computer implementation of a model for core heat exchangers consisting of three partial differential equations (PDES) for each fluid stream (the continuity, energy and momentum balances for the He), and one PDE for each parting sheet (the energy balance for the parting sheet metal); the PDEs have time and axial position along the exchanger as independent variables. The computer code can accommodate any number of fluid streams and parting sheets in an adiabatic group. Features of the code include: rigorous or approximate thermodynamic properties for He, upwind and downwind approximation of the PDE spatial derivatives, and sparse matrix time integration. The outputs from the code include the time-dependent axial profiles of the fluid He mass flux, density, pressure, temperature, internal energy and enthalpy. The code is written in transportable Fortran 77, and can therefore be executed on essentially any computer

  19. A dynamic model for helium core heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiesser, W.E.; Shih, H.J.; Hartzog, D.G.; Herron, D.M.; Nahmias, D.; Stuber, W.G.; Hindmarsh, A.C.

    1990-01-01

    To meet the helium (He) requirements of the superconducting supercollider (SSC), the cryogenic plants must be able to respond to time-varying loads. Thus the design and simulation of the cryogenic plants requires dynamic models of their principal components, and in particular, the core heat exchangers. In this paper, we detail the derivation and computer implementation of a model for core heat exchangers consisting of three partial differential equations (PDEs) for each fluid stream (the continuity, energy and momentum balances for the He), and one PDE for each parting sheet (the energy balance for the parting sheet metal); the PDEs have time and axial position along the exchanger as independent variables. The computer code can accommodate any number of fluid streams and parting sheets in an adiabatic group. Features of the code include: rigorous or approximate thermodynamic properties for He, upwind and downwind approximation of the PDE spatial derivatives, and sparse matrix time integration. The outputs from the code include the time-dependent axial profiles of the fluid He mass flux, density, pressure, temperature, internal energy and enthalpy. The code is written in transportable Fortran 77, and can therefore be executed on essentially any computer. 10 refs., 10 figs

  20. Recent Developments in No-Core Shell-Model Calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navratil, P.; Quaglioni, S.; Stetcu, I.; Barrett, B.R.

    2009-01-01

    We present an overview of recent results and developments of the no-core shell model (NCSM), an ab initio approach to the nuclear many-body problem for light nuclei. In this aproach, we start from realistic two-nucleon or two- plus three-nucleon interactions. Many-body calculations are performed using a finite harmonic-oscillator (HO) basis. To facilitate convergence for realistic inter-nucleon interactions that generate strong short-range correlations, we derive effective interactions by unitary transformations that are tailored to the HO basis truncation. For soft realistic interactions this might not be necessary. If that is the case, the NCSM calculations are variational. In either case, the ab initio NCSM preserves translational invariance of the nuclear many-body problem. In this review, we, in particular, highlight results obtained with the chiral two- plus three-nucleon interactions. We discuss efforts to extend the applicability of the NCSM to heavier nuclei and larger model spaces using importance-truncation schemes and/or use of effective interactions with a core. We outline an extension of the ab initio NCSM to the description of nuclear reactions by the resonating group method technique. A future direction of the approach, the ab initio NCSM with continuum, which will provide a complete description of nuclei as open systems with coupling of bound and continuum states is given in the concluding part of the review.

  1. Recent Developments in No-Core Shell-Model Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navratil, P; Quaglioni, S; Stetcu, I; Barrett, B R

    2009-03-20

    We present an overview of recent results and developments of the no-core shell model (NCSM), an ab initio approach to the nuclear many-body problem for light nuclei. In this aproach, we start from realistic two-nucleon or two- plus three-nucleon interactions. Many-body calculations are performed using a finite harmonic-oscillator (HO) basis. To facilitate convergence for realistic inter-nucleon interactions that generate strong short-range correlations, we derive effective interactions by unitary transformations that are tailored to the HO basis truncation. For soft realistic interactions this might not be necessary. If that is the case, the NCSM calculations are variational. In either case, the ab initio NCSM preserves translational invariance of the nuclear many-body problem. In this review, we, in particular, highlight results obtained with the chiral two- plus three-nucleon interactions. We discuss efforts to extend the applicability of the NCSM to heavier nuclei and larger model spaces using importance-truncation schemes and/or use of effective interactions with a core. We outline an extension of the ab initio NCSM to the description of nuclear reactions by the resonating group method technique. A future direction of the approach, the ab initio NCSM with continuum, which will provide a complete description of nuclei as open systems with coupling of bound and continuum states is given in the concluding part of the review.

  2. A numerical strategy for modelling rotating stall in core compressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahdati, M.

    2007-03-01

    The paper will focus on one specific core-compressor instability, rotating stall, because of the pressing industrial need to improve current design methods. The determination of the blade response during rotating stall is a difficult problem for which there is no reliable procedure. During rotating stall, the blades encounter the stall cells and the excitation depends on the number, size, exact shape and rotational speed of these cells. The long-term aim is to minimize the forced response due to rotating stall excitation by avoiding potential matches between the vibration modes and the rotating stall pattern characteristics. Accurate numerical simulations of core-compressor rotating stall phenomena require the modelling of a large number of bladerows using grids containing several tens of millions of points. The time-accurate unsteady-flow computations may need to be run for several engine revolutions for rotating stall to get initiated and many more before it is fully developed. The difficulty in rotating stall initiation arises from a lack of representation of the triggering disturbances which are inherently present in aeroengines. Since the numerical model represents a symmetric assembly, the only random mechanism for rotating stall initiation is provided by numerical round-off errors. In this work, rotating stall is initiated by introducing a small amount of geometric mistuning to the rotor blades. Another major obstacle in modelling flows near stall is the specification of appropriate upstream and downstream boundary conditions. Obtaining reliable boundary conditions for such flows can be very difficult. In the present study, the low-pressure compression (LPC) domain is placed upstream of the core compressor. With such an approach, only far field atmospheric boundary conditions are specified which are obtained from aircraft speed and altitude. A chocked variable-area nozzle, placed after the last compressor bladerow in the model, is used to impose boundary

  3. BR2 reactor core steady state transient modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makarenko, A.; Petrova, T.

    2000-01-01

    A coupled neutronics/hydraulics/heat-conduction model of the BR2 reactor core is under development at SCK-CEN. The neutron transport phenomenon has been implemented as steady state and time dependent nodal diffusion. The non-linear heat conduction equation in-side fuel elements is solved with a time dependent finite element method. To allow coupling between functional modules and to simulate subcooled regimes, a simple single-phase hydraulics has been introduced, while the two-phase hydraulics is under development. Multiple tests, general benchmark cases as well as calculation/experiment comparisons demonstrated a good accuracy of both neutronic and thermal hydraulic models, numerical reliability and full code portability. A refinement methodology has been developed and tested for better neutronic representation in hexagonal geometry. Much effort is still needed to complete the development of an extended cross section library with kinetic data and two-phase flow representation. (author)

  4. Development of CFD model for augmented core tripropellant rocket engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kenneth M.

    1994-10-01

    The Space Shuttle era has made major advances in technology and vehicle design to the point that the concept of a single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) vehicle appears more feasible. NASA presently is conducting studies into the feasibility of certain advanced concept rocket engines that could be utilized in a SSTO vehicle. One such concept is a tripropellant system which burns kerosene and hydrogen initially and at altitude switches to hydrogen. This system will attain a larger mass fraction because LOX-kerosene engines have a greater average propellant density and greater thrust-to-weight ratio. This report describes the investigation to model the tripropellant augmented core engine. The physical aspects of the engine, the CFD code employed, and results of the numerical model for a single modular thruster are discussed.

  5. Multigroup models of the convective epoch in core collapse supernovae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swesty, F Douglas; Myra, Eric S

    2005-01-01

    Understanding the explosion mechanism of core collapse supernovae is a problem that has plagued nuclear astrophysicists since the first computational models of this phenomenon were carried out in the 1960s. Our current theories of this violent phenomenon center around multi-dimensional effects involving radiation-hydrodynamic flows of hot, dense matter and neutrinos. Modeling these multi-dimensional radiative flows presents a computational challenge that will continue to stress high-performance computing beyond the teraflops to the petaflop level. In this paper we describe a few of the scientific discoveries that we have made via terascale computational simulations of supernovae under the auspices of the SciDAC-funded Terascale Supernova Initiative

  6. Core surface flow modelling from high-resolution secular variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holme, R.; Olsen, Nils

    2006-01-01

    -flux hypothesis, but the spectrum of the SV implies that a conclusive test of frozen-flux is not possible. We parametrize the effects of diffusion as an expected misfit in the flow prediction due to departure from the frozen-flux hypothesis; at low spherical harmonic degrees, this contribution dominates...... the expected departure of the SV predictions from flow to the observed SV, while at high degrees the SV model uncertainty is dominant. We construct fine-scale core surface flows to model the SV. Flow non-uniqueness is a serious problem because the flows are sufficiently small scale to allow flow around non......-series of magnetic data and better parametrization of the external magnetic field....

  7. Systems Modeling for Crew Core Body Temperature Prediction Postlanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Cynthia; Ochoa, Dustin

    2010-01-01

    The Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle, NASA s latest crewed spacecraft project, presents many challenges to its designers including ensuring crew survivability during nominal and off nominal landing conditions. With a nominal water landing planned off the coast of San Clemente, California, off nominal water landings could range from the far North Atlantic Ocean to the middle of the equatorial Pacific Ocean. For all of these conditions, the vehicle must provide sufficient life support resources to ensure that the crew member s core body temperatures are maintained at a safe level prior to crew rescue. This paper will examine the natural environments, environments created inside the cabin and constraints associated with post landing operations that affect the temperature of the crew member. Models of the capsule and the crew members are examined and analysis results are compared to the requirement for safe human exposure. Further, recommendations for updated modeling techniques and operational limits are included.

  8. Baryon-Baryon Interactions ---Nijmegen Extended-Soft-Core Models---

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijken, T. A.; Nagels, M. M.; Yamamoto, Y.

    We review the Nijmegen extended-soft-core (ESC) models for the baryon-baryon (BB) interactions of the SU(3) flavor-octet of baryons (N, Lambda, Sigma, and Xi). The interactions are basically studied from the meson-exchange point of view, in the spirit of the Yukawa-approach to the nuclear force problem [H. Yukawa, ``On the interaction of Elementary Particles I'', Proceedings of the Physico-Mathematical Society of Japan 17 (1935), 48], using generalized soft-core Yukawa-functions. These interactions are supplemented with (i) multiple-gluon-exchange, and (ii) structural effects due to the quark-core of the baryons. We present in some detail the most recent extended-soft-core model, henceforth referred to as ESC08, which is the most complete, sophisticated, and successful interaction-model. Furthermore, we discuss briefly its predecessor the ESC04-model [Th. A. Rijken and Y. Yamamoto, Phys. Rev. C 73 (2006), 044007; Th. A. Rijken and Y. Yamamoto, Ph ys. Rev. C 73 (2006), 044008; Th. A. Rijken and Y. Yamamoto, nucl-th/0608074]. For the soft-core one-boson-exchange (OBE) models we refer to the literature [Th. A. Rijken, in Proceedings of the International Conference on Few-Body Problems in Nuclear and Particle Physics, Quebec, 1974, ed. R. J. Slobodrian, B. Cuec and R. Ramavataram (Presses Universitè Laval, Quebec, 1975), p. 136; Th. A. Rijken, Ph. D. thesis, University of Nijmegen, 1975; M. M. Nagels, Th. A. Rijken and J. J. de Swart, Phys. Rev. D 17 (1978), 768; P. M. M. Maessen, Th. A. Rijken and J. J. de Swart, Phys. Rev. C 40 (1989), 2226; Th. A. Rijken, V. G. J. Stoks and Y. Yamamoto, Phys. Rev. C 59 (1999), 21; V. G. J. Stoks and Th. A. Rijken, Phys. Rev. C 59 (1999), 3009]. All ingredients of these latter models are also part of ESC08, and so a description of ESC08 comprises all models so far in principle. The extended-soft-core (ESC) interactions consist of local- and non-local-potentials due to (i) one-boson-exchanges (OBE), which are the members of nonets of

  9. Applications for coupled core neutronics and thermal-hydraulic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eller, J.

    1996-01-01

    The unprecedented increases in computing capacity that have occurred during the last decade have affected our sciences, and thus our lives, to an extent that is difficult to overstate. All indications are that this trend will continue for years to come. Nuclear reactor systems analysis is one of many areas of engineering that has changed dramatically as a result of this evolution. Our ability to model the various mechanical and physical systems in greater and greater detail has allowed significant improvements in operational efficiency in spite of increasing regulatory requirements. Many of these efficiencies result from the use of more complex and geometrically detailed computer modeling, which is used to justify a reduction or elimination of some of the conservatisms required by earlier, less sophisticated analyses. And more recently, as our industries open-quotes downsize,close quotes efforts are being made to find ways to use the ever-increasing computing capacity to design systems that accomplish more work, in less time, and with fewer people. The balance of this paper discusses some of the visions that Duke Power Company feels would most benefit their particular methodologies. One of the concepts receiving a lot of attention involves an automated coupling of a thermal-hydraulic plant systems analysis model to a three-dimensional core neutronics program. The thermal-hydraulic analysis of several postulated system transients incorporates large conservatisms because of limited ability to model complex time-dependent asymmetric heat sources in adequate geometric detail. For these transients, the core behavior is closely coupled with the thermal-hydraulic behavior of the total plant system and vice versa. Steam-line break, uncontrolled rod withdrawal, and rod drop anayses are likely to benefit most from this type of linked process

  10. The 3-dimensional core model DYN3D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grundmann, U.; Mittag, S.; Rohde, U.

    1999-01-01

    Analyzing the safety margins in transients and accidents of nuclear reactors 3-dimensional models of the core were used to avoid conservative assumptions needed for point kinetics or 1-dimensional models. Therefore, the 3D code DYN3D has been developed for the analysis of reactivity initiated accidents (RIA) in thermal nuclear reactors. The power distributions are calculated with the help of nodal expansion methods (NEM) for hexagonal and Cartesian geometry. The fuel rod model and the thermohydraulic part provide fuel temperatures, coolant temperatures and densities as well as boron concentrations for the calculation of feedback effects on the basis of cross section libraries generated by cell codes. Safety relevant parameters like maximum fuel and cladding temperatures, critical heat flux and degree of cladding oxidation are estimated. DYN3D can analyze RIA initiated by moved control rods and/or perturbations of the coolant flow. Stationary and transient boundary conditions for the coolant flow, the core inlet temperatures and boron concentrations at the core inlet have to be given. For analyzing more complex transients the code DYN3D is coupled with the plant model ATHLET of the GRS. The extensive validation work accomplished for DYN3D is presented in several examples. Some applications of the code are described. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die Verwendung 3-dimensionaler Kernmodelle zur Untersuchung der Sicherheitsreserven bei Uebergangsprozessen und Stoerfaellen in Kernreaktoren vermeidet konservative Annahmen, die bei der Benutzung des Punktmodells oder 1-dimensionaler Modelle erforderlich sind. Aus diesen Gruenden wurde das 3-dimensionale Rechenprogramm DYN3D fuer die Untersuchung von Reaktivitaetsstoerfaellen in thermischen Reaktoren entwickelt. Die Leistungsverteilung wird mit nodalen Methoden fuer hexagonale oder kartesische Geometrie berechnet. Das Brennstabmodell und der thermohydraulische Teil von DYN3D liefert die Brennstofftemperaturen, Kuehlmitteltemperaturen

  11. Testing Numerical Models of Cool Core Galaxy Cluster Formation with X-Ray Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Jason W.; Gantner, Brennan; Burns, Jack O.; Hallman, Eric J.

    2009-12-01

    Using archival Chandra and ROSAT data along with numerical simulations, we compare the properties of cool core and non-cool core galaxy clusters, paying particular attention to the region beyond the cluster cores. With the use of single and double β-models, we demonstrate a statistically significant difference in the slopes of observed cluster surface brightness profiles while the cluster cores remain indistinguishable between the two cluster types. Additionally, through the use of hardness ratio profiles, we find evidence suggesting cool core clusters are cooler beyond their cores than non-cool core clusters of comparable mass and temperature, both in observed and simulated clusters. The similarities between real and simulated clusters supports a model presented in earlier work by the authors describing differing merger histories between cool core and non-cool core clusters. Discrepancies between real and simulated clusters will inform upcoming numerical models and simulations as to new ways to incorporate feedback in these systems.

  12. Robust LOD scores for variance component-based linkage analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blangero, J; Williams, J T; Almasy, L

    2000-01-01

    The variance component method is now widely used for linkage analysis of quantitative traits. Although this approach offers many advantages, the importance of the underlying assumption of multivariate normality of the trait distribution within pedigrees has not been studied extensively. Simulation studies have shown that traits with leptokurtic distributions yield linkage test statistics that exhibit excessive Type I error when analyzed naively. We derive analytical formulae relating the deviation from the expected asymptotic distribution of the lod score to the kurtosis and total heritability of the quantitative trait. A simple correction constant yields a robust lod score for any deviation from normality and for any pedigree structure, and effectively eliminates the problem of inflated Type I error due to misspecification of the underlying probability model in variance component-based linkage analysis.

  13. Reactor core modeling practice: Operational requirements, model characteristics, and model validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zerbino, H.

    1997-01-01

    The physical models implemented in power plant simulators have greatly increased in performance and complexity in recent years. This process has been enabled by the ever increasing computing power available at affordable prices. This paper describes this process from several angles: First the operational requirements which are more critical from the point of view of model performance, both for normal and off-normal operating conditions; A second section discusses core model characteristics in the light of the solutions implemented by Thomson Training and Simulation (TT and S) in several full-scope simulators recently built and delivered for Dutch, German, and French nuclear power plants; finally we consider the model validation procedures, which are of course an integral part of model development, and which are becoming more and more severe as performance expectations increase. As a conclusion, it may be asserted that in the core modeling field, as in other areas, the general improvement in the quality of simulation codes has resulted in a fairly rapid convergence towards mainstream engineering-grade calculations. This is remarkable performance in view of the stringent real-time requirements which the simulation codes must satisfy as well as the extremely wide range of operating conditions that they are called upon to cover with good accuracy. (author)

  14. Development of an automated core model for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosteller, R.D.

    1998-01-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this project was to develop an automated package of computer codes that can model the steady-state behavior of nuclear-reactor cores of various designs. As an added benefit, data produced for steady-state analysis also can be used as input to the TRAC transient-analysis code for subsequent safety analysis of the reactor at any point in its operating lifetime. The basic capability to perform steady-state reactor-core analysis already existed in the combination of the HELIOS lattice-physics code and the NESTLE advanced nodal code. In this project, the automated package was completed by (1) obtaining cross-section libraries for HELIOS, (2) validating HELIOS by comparing its predictions to results from critical experiments and from the MCNP Monte Carlo code, (3) validating NESTLE by comparing its predictions to results from numerical benchmarks and to measured data from operating reactors, and (4) developing a linkage code to transform HELIOS output into NESTLE input

  15. Edge and coupled core/edge transport modelling in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lodestro, L.L.; Casper, T.A.; Cohen, R.H.

    1999-01-01

    Recent advances in the theory and modelling of tokamak edge, scrape-off-layer (SOL) and divertor plasmas are described. The effects of the poloidal E x B drift on inner/outer divertor-plate asymmetries within a 1D analysis are shown to be in good agreement with experimental trends; above a critical v ExB , the model predicts transitions to supersonic flow at the inboard midplane. 2D simulations show the importance of E x B flow in the private-flux region and of ∇ B-drifts. A theory of rough plasma-facing surfaces is given, predicting modifications to the SOL plasma. The parametric dependence of detached-plasma states in slab geometry has been explored; with sufficient pumping, the location of the ionization front can be controlled; otherwise only fronts near the plate or the X-point are stable. Studies with a more accurate Monte-Carlo neutrals model and a detailed non-LTE radiation-transport code indicate various effects are important for quantitative modelling. Detailed simulations of the DIII-D core and edge are presented; impurity and plasma flow are discussed and shown to be well modelled with UEDGE. (author)

  16. Edge and coupled core-edge transport modelling in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lodestro, L.L.; Casper, T.A.; Cohen, R.H.

    2001-01-01

    Recent advances in the theory and modelling of tokamak edge, scrape-off-layer (SOL) and divertor plasmas are described. The effects of the poloidal ExB drift on inner/outer divertor-plate asymmetries within a 1D analysis are shown to be in good agreement with experimental trends; above a critical v ExB, the model predicts transitions to supersonic SOL flow at the inboard midplane. 2D simulations show the importance of ExB flow in the private-flux region and of ∇ B-drifts. A theory of rough plasma-facing surfaces is given, predicting modifications to the SOL plasma. The parametric dependence of detached-plasma states in slab geometry has been explored; with sufficient pumping, the location of the ionization front can be controlled; otherwise only fronts near the plate or the X-point are stable. Studies with a more accurate Monte-Carlo neutrals model and a detailed non-LTE radiation-transport code indicate various effects are important for quantitative modelling. Detailed simulations of the DIII-D core and edge are presented; impurity and plasma flow are discussed and shown to be well modelled with UEDGE. (author)

  17. Modelling Pressurized Water Reactor cores in terms of porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricciardi, G.; Collard, B.; Ricciardi, G.; Bellizzi, S.; Cochelin, B.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a tractable model of a nuclear reactor core taking the complexity of the structure (including its nonlinear behaviour) and fluid flow coupling into account. The mechanical behaviour modelling includes the dynamics of both the fuel assemblies and the fluid. Each rod bundle is modelled in the form of a deformable porous medium; then, the velocity field of the fluid and the displacement field of the structure are defined over the whole domain. The fluid and the structure are first modelled separately, before being linked together. The equations of motion for the structure are obtained using a Lagrangian approach and, to be able to link up the fluid and the structure, the equations of motion for the fluid are obtained using an arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian approach. The finite element method is applied to spatially discretize the equations. Simulations are performed to analyse the effects of the characteristics of the fluid and of the structure. Finally, the model is validated with a test involving two fuel assemblies, showing good agreement with the experimental data. (authors)

  18. CFD approach to modeling of core-concrete interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladimir V Chudanov; Anna E Aksenova; Valerii A Pervichko

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: A large attention is given to research behavior of concrete structures at high mechanical and thermal loadings, which those suffer at the severe accidents on Nuclear Power Plants with core melting and falling of the molten corium mass into reactor shaft. There are enough programs for analysis of heat and mass transfer processes at interaction of the molten corium with concrete. Most known among them CORCON and WECHSL, which were developed more than twenty years ago, allow considering a quasi-stationary phase decomposition of concrete and the some transition regimes. In opposing to the mentioned codes a new more generalized mathematical model and software are developed for modeling of a wide range of the heat and mass transfer processes under study of the molten core-concrete interaction. The developed mathematical model is based on the Navier-Stokes equations with variable properties with taking into account of a density jump under melting of concrete together with a heat transfer equation. The offered numerical technique is based on modern algorithms with small scheme diffusion, whose discrete approximations are constructed with use of finite-volume methods and the fully staggered grids. The developed software corresponds to modern level of development of computers and takes into account all phenomenology, used by mentioned codes, and allows to simulate the such phenomena and processes as: multidimensional heat transfer in concrete for modeling of transients for an intermediate thermal flux to concrete; direct erosion of concrete at a quasi-stationary regime of interaction with molten fuel masses; heat and mass transfer in corium and convective intermixing in a melt of corium with taking into account of its stratification on two layers of the metal and oxide components and heat transfer by radiation in a cavity of the reactor shaft; change physical properties of corium at concrete decomposition and release in corium of its

  19. Linac beam core modeling from wire-scanner data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Law, A.G.

    1977-08-01

    This study introduces mathematical modeling of accelerator beams from data collected by wire scanners. Details about a beam core D(x,x',y,y') are examined in several situations: (a) for a discretization of the projection into xy-space, a maximum-entropy solution and a minimum-norm solution are developed and discussed, (b) for undiscretized xy-subspace, a two-dimensional Gaussian approximation D(x,.,y,.) = a exp [α(x-x 0 ) 2 + β(x-x 0 )(y-y 0 ) + γ(y-y 0 ) 2 ] is obtained by least squares, and (c) for four-dimensional space, the fit of a single Gaussian to data from a succession of wire scanners is investigated

  20. THE CUSP/CORE PROBLEM AND THE SECONDARY INFALL MODEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Popolo, A.

    2009-01-01

    We study the cusp/core problem using a secondary infall model that takes into account the effect of ordered and random angular momentum, dynamical friction, and baryons adiabatic contraction (AC). The model is applied to structures on galactic scales (normal and dwarfs spiral galaxies) and on clusters of galaxies scales. Our analysis suggest that angular momentum and dynamical friction are able, on galactic scales, to overcome the competing effect of AC eliminating the cusp. The slope of density profile of inner halos flattens with decreasing halo mass and the profile is well approximated by a Burkert's profile. In order to obtain the Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profile, starting from the profiles obtained from our model, the magnitude of angular momentum and dynamical friction must be reduced with respect to the values predicted by the model itself. The rotation curves of four lower sideband galaxies from Gentile et al. are compared to the rotation curves obtained by the model in the present paper obtaining a good fit to the observational data. The time evolution of the density profile of a galaxy of 10 8 -10 9 M sun shows that after a transient steepening, due to the AC, the density profile flattens to α ≅ 0. On cluster scales we observe a similar evolution of the dark matter (DM) density profile but in this case the density profile slope flattens to α ≅ 0.6 for a cluster of ≅10 14 M sun . The total mass profile, differently from that of DM, shows a central cusp well fitted by an NFW model.

  1. Four-fluid model of PWR degraded cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dearing, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes the new two-dimensional, four-fluid fluid dynamics and heat transfer (FLUIDS) module of the MELPROG code. MELPROG is designed to give an integrated, mechanistic treatment of pressurized water reactor (PWR) core meltdown accidents from accident initiation to vessel melt-through. The code has a modular data storage and transfer structure, with each module providing the others with boundary conditions at each computational time step. Thus the FLUIDS module receives mass and energy source terms from the fuel pin module, the structures module, and the debris bed module, and radiation energy source terms from the radiation module. MELPROG, which models the reactor vessel, is also designed to model the vessel as a component in the TRAC/PF1 networking solution of a PWR reactor coolant system (RCS). The coupling between TRAC and MELPROG is implicit in the fluid dynamics of the reactor coolant (liquid water and steam) allowing an accurate simulation of the coupling between the vessel and the rest of the RCS during an accident. This paper deals specifically with the numerical model of fluid dynamics and heat transfer within the reactor vessel, which allows a much more realistic simulation (with less restrictive assumptions on physical behavior) of the accident than has been possible before

  2. 3D Core Model for simulation of nuclear power plants: Simulation requirements, model features, and validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zerbino, H.

    1999-01-01

    In 1994-1996, Thomson Training and Simulation (TT and S) earned out the D50 Project, which involved the design and construction of optimized replica simulators for one Dutch and three German Nuclear Power Plants. It was recognized early on that the faithful reproduction of the Siemens reactor control and protection systems would impose extremely stringent demands on the simulation models, particularly the Core physics and the RCS thermohydraulics. The quality of the models, and their thorough validation, were thus essential. The present paper describes the main features of the fully 3D Core model implemented by TT and S, and its extensive validation campaign, which was defined in extremely positive collaboration with the Customer and the Core Data suppliers. (author)

  3. Fuel requirements for experimental devices in MTR reactors. A perturbation model for reactor core analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beeckmans de West-Meerbeeck, A.

    1991-01-01

    Irradiation in neutron absorbing devices, requiring high fast neutron fluxes in the core or high thermal fluxes in the reflector and flux traps, lead to higher density fuel and larger core dimensions. A perturbation model of the reactor core helps to estimate the fuel requirements. (orig.)

  4. On-line core monitoring system based on buckling corrected modified one group model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freire, Fernando S.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear power reactors require core monitoring during plant operation. To provide safe, clean and reliable core continuously evaluate core conditions. Currently, the reactor core monitoring process is carried out by nuclear code systems that together with data from plant instrumentation, such as, thermocouples, ex-core detectors and fixed or moveable In-core detectors, can easily predict and monitor a variety of plant conditions. Typically, the standard nodal methods can be found on the heart of such nuclear monitoring code systems. However, standard nodal methods require large computer running times when compared with standards course-mesh finite difference schemes. Unfortunately, classic finite-difference models require a fine mesh reactor core representation. To override this unlikely model characteristic we can usually use the classic modified one group model to take some account for the main core neutronic behavior. In this model a course-mesh core representation can be easily evaluated with a crude treatment of thermal neutrons leakage. In this work, an improvement made on classic modified one group model based on a buckling thermal correction was used to obtain a fast, accurate and reliable core monitoring system methodology for future applications, providing a powerful tool for core monitoring process. (author)

  5. Flexible optical network components based on densely integrated microring resonators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geuzebroek, D.H.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis addresses the design, realization and characterization of reconfigurable optical network components based on multiple microring resonators. Since thermally tunable microring resonators can be used as wavelength selective space switches, very compact devices with high complexity and

  6. Component-Based Software Engineering and Runtime Type Definition

    OpenAIRE

    A. R. Shakurov

    2011-01-01

    The component-based approach to software engineering, its current implementations and their limitations are discussed. A new extended architecture for such systems is presented. Its main architectural concepts and principles are considered.

  7. Normal Mode Derived Models of the Physical Properties of Earth's Outer Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irving, J. C. E.; Cottaar, S.; Lekic, V.; Wu, W.

    2017-12-01

    Earth's outer core, the largest reservoir of metal in our planet, is comprised of an iron alloy of an uncertain composition. Its dynamical behaviour is responsible for the generation of Earth's magnetic field, with convection driven both by thermal and chemical buoyancy fluxes. Existing models of the seismic velocity and density of the outer core exhibit some variation, and there are only a small number of models which aim to represent the outer core's density.It is therefore important that we develop a better understanding of the physical properties of the outer core. Though most of the outer core is likely to be well mixed, it is possible that the uppermost outer core is stably stratified: it may be enriched in light elements released during the growth of the solid, iron enriched, inner core; by elements dissolved from the mantle into the outer core; or by exsolution of compounds previously dissolved in the liquid metal which will eventually be swept into the mantle. The stratified layer may host MAC or Rossby waves and it could impede communication between the chemically differentiated mantle and outer core, including screening out some of the geodynamo's signal. We use normal mode center frequencies to estimate the physical properties of the outer core in a Bayesian framework. We estimate the mineral physical parameters needed to best produce velocity and density models of the outer core which are consistent with the normal mode observations. We require that our models satisfy realistic physical constraints. We create models of the outer core with and without a distinct uppermost layer and assess the importance of this region.Our normal mode-derived models are compared with observations of body waves which travel through the outer core. In particular, we consider SmKS waves which are especially sensitive to the uppermost outer core and are therefore an important way to understand the robustness of our models.

  8. On-Line Core Thermal-Hydraulic Model Improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In, Wang Kee; Chun, Tae Hyun; Oh, Dong Seok; Shin, Chang Hwan; Hwang, Dae Hyun; Seo, Kyung Won

    2007-02-01

    The objective of this project is to implement a fast-running 4-channel based code CETOP-D in an advanced reactor core protection calculator system(RCOPS). The part required for the on-line calculation of DNBR were extracted from the source of the CETOP-D code based on analysis of the CETOP-D code. The CETOP-D code was revised to maintain the input and output variables which are the same as in CPC DNBR module. Since the DNBR module performs a complex calculation, it is divided into sub-modules per major calculation step. The functional design requirements for the DNBR module is documented and the values of the database(DB) constants were decided. This project also developed a Fortran module(BEST) of the RCOPS Fortran Simulator and a computer code RCOPS-SDNBR to independently calculate DNBR. A test was also conducted to verify the functional design and DB of thermal-hydraulic model which is necessary to calculate the DNBR on-line in RCOPS. The DNBR margin is expected to increase by 2%-3% once the CETOP-D code is used to calculate the RCOPS DNBR. It should be noted that the final DNBR margin improvement could be determined in the future based on overall uncertainty analysis of the RCOPS

  9. On-Line Core Thermal-Hydraulic Model Improvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    In, Wang Kee; Chun, Tae Hyun; Oh, Dong Seok; Shin, Chang Hwan; Hwang, Dae Hyun; Seo, Kyung Won

    2007-02-15

    The objective of this project is to implement a fast-running 4-channel based code CETOP-D in an advanced reactor core protection calculator system(RCOPS). The part required for the on-line calculation of DNBR were extracted from the source of the CETOP-D code based on analysis of the CETOP-D code. The CETOP-D code was revised to maintain the input and output variables which are the same as in CPC DNBR module. Since the DNBR module performs a complex calculation, it is divided into sub-modules per major calculation step. The functional design requirements for the DNBR module is documented and the values of the database(DB) constants were decided. This project also developed a Fortran module(BEST) of the RCOPS Fortran Simulator and a computer code RCOPS-SDNBR to independently calculate DNBR. A test was also conducted to verify the functional design and DB of thermal-hydraulic model which is necessary to calculate the DNBR on-line in RCOPS. The DNBR margin is expected to increase by 2%-3% once the CETOP-D code is used to calculate the RCOPS DNBR. It should be noted that the final DNBR margin improvement could be determined in the future based on overall uncertainty analysis of the RCOPS.

  10. Ekofisk chalk: core measurements, stochastic reconstruction, network modeling and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talukdar, Saifullah

    2002-07-01

    This dissertation deals with (1) experimental measurements on petrophysical, reservoir engineering and morphological properties of Ekofisk chalk, (2) numerical simulation of core flood experiments to analyze and improve relative permeability data, (3) stochastic reconstruction of chalk samples from limited morphological information, (4) extraction of pore space parameters from the reconstructed samples, development of network model using pore space information, and computation of petrophysical and reservoir engineering properties from network model, and (5) development of 2D and 3D idealized fractured reservoir models and verification of the applicability of several widely used conventional up scaling techniques in fractured reservoir simulation. Experiments have been conducted on eight Ekofisk chalk samples and porosity, absolute permeability, formation factor, and oil-water relative permeability, capillary pressure and resistivity index are measured at laboratory conditions. Mercury porosimetry data and backscatter scanning electron microscope images have also been acquired for the samples. A numerical simulation technique involving history matching of the production profiles is employed to improve the relative permeability curves and to analyze hysteresis of the Ekofisk chalk samples. The technique was found to be a powerful tool to supplement the uncertainties in experimental measurements. Porosity and correlation statistics obtained from backscatter scanning electron microscope images are used to reconstruct microstructures of chalk and particulate media. The reconstruction technique involves a simulated annealing algorithm, which can be constrained by an arbitrary number of morphological parameters. This flexibility of the algorithm is exploited to successfully reconstruct particulate media and chalk samples using more than one correlation functions. A technique based on conditional simulated annealing has been introduced for exact reproduction of vuggy

  11. A Practical Core Loss Model for Filter Inductors of Power Electronic Converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matsumori, Hiroaki; Shimizu, Toshihisa; Wang, Xiongfei

    2018-01-01

    This paper proposes a core loss model for filter inductors of power electronic converters. The model allows a computationally efficient analysis on the core loss of the inductor under the square voltage excitation and the premagnetization condition. First, the core loss of the filter inductor under...... buck chopper excitation is evaluated with the proposed model and compared with the conventional methods. The comparison shows that the proposed method results in a better core loss prediction under the premagnetized condition than that of conventional alternatives. Then, the core loss of the filter...... inductor with the pulsewidth modulated inverter excitation is evaluated, which shows that the proposed model not only accurately predicts the core loss but also identifies the hysteresis loss part. These results demonstrate that the approach can further be used for the development of magnetic materials...

  12. Two-dimensional horizontal model seismic test and analysis for HTGR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikushima, Takeshi; Honma, Toshiaki.

    1988-05-01

    The resistance against earthquakes of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) core with block-type fuels is not fully ascertained yet. Seismic studies must be made if such a reactor plant is to be installed in areas with frequent earthquakes. The paper presented the test results of seismic behavior of a half scale two-dimensional horizontal slice core model and analysis. The following is a summary of the more important results. (1) When the core is subjected to the single axis excitation and simultaneous two-axis excitations to the core across-corners, it has elliptical motion. The core stays lumped motion at the low excitation frequencies. (2) When the load is placed on side fixed reflector blocks from outside to the core center, the core displacement and reflector impact reaction force decrease. (3) The maximum displacement occurs at simultaneous two-axis excitations. The maximum displacement occurs at the single axis excitation to the core across-flats. (4) The results of two-dimensional horizontal slice core model was compared with the results of two-dimensional vertical one. It is clarified that the seismic response of actual core can be predicted from the results of two-dimensional vertical slice core model. (5) The maximum reflector impact reaction force for seismic waves was below 60 percent of that for sinusoidal waves. (6) Vibration behavior and impact response are in good agreement between test and analysis. (author)

  13. Component-Based Development of Runtime Observers in the COMDES Framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guan, Wei; Li, Gang; Angelov, Christo K.

    2013-01-01

    against formally specified properties. This paper presents a component-based design method for runtime observers in the context of COMDES framework—a component-based framework for distributed embedded system and its supporting tools. Therefore, runtime verification is facilitated by model......Formal verification methods, such as exhaustive model checking, are often infeasible because of high computational complexity. Runtime observers (monitors) provide an alternative, light-weight verification method, which offers a non-exhaustive but still feasible approach to monitor system behavior...

  14. A simplified geometrical model for transient corium propagation in core for LWR with heavy reflector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saas Laurent

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the context of the simulation of the Severe Accidents (SA in Light Water Reactors (LWR, we are interested on the in-core corium pool propagation transient in order to evaluate the corium relocation in the vessel lower head. The goal is to characterize the corium and debris flows from the core to accurately evaluate the corium pool propagation transient in the lower head and so the associated risk of vessel failure. In the case of LWR with heavy reflector, to evaluate the corium relocation into the lower head, we have to study the risk associated with focusing effect and the possibility to stabilize laterally the corium in core with a flooded down-comer. It is necessary to characterize the core degradation and the stratification of the corium pool that is formed in core. We assume that the core degradation until the corium pool formation and the corium pool propagation could be modeled separately. In this document, we present a simplified geometrical model (0D model for the in-core corium propagation transient. A degraded core with a formed corium pool is used as an initial state. This state can be obtained from a simulation computed with an integral code. This model does not use a grid for the core as integral codes do. Geometrical shapes and 0D models are associated with the corium pool and the other components of the degraded core (debris, heavy reflector, core plate…. During the transient, these shapes evolve taking into account the thermal and stratification behavior of the corium pool and the melting of the core surrounding components. Some results corresponding to the corium pool propagation in core transients obtained with this model on a LWR with a heavy reflector are given and compared to grid approach of the integral codes MAAP4.

  15. A HARDCORE model for constraining an exoplanet's core size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suissa, Gabrielle; Chen, Jingjing; Kipping, David

    2018-05-01

    The interior structure of an exoplanet is hidden from direct view yet likely plays a crucial role in influencing the habitability of the Earth analogues. Inferences of the interior structure are impeded by a fundamental degeneracy that exists between any model comprising more than two layers and observations constraining just two bulk parameters: mass and radius. In this work, we show that although the inverse problem is indeed degenerate, there exists two boundary conditions that enables one to infer the minimum and maximum core radius fraction, CRFmin and CRFmax. These hold true even for planets with light volatile envelopes, but require the planet to be fully differentiated and that layers denser than iron are forbidden. With both bounds in hand, a marginal CRF can also be inferred by sampling in-between. After validating on the Earth, we apply our method to Kepler-36b and measure CRFmin = (0.50 ± 0.07), CRFmax = (0.78 ± 0.02), and CRFmarg = (0.64 ± 0.11), broadly consistent with the Earth's true CRF value of 0.55. We apply our method to a suite of hypothetical measurements of synthetic planets to serve as a sensitivity analysis. We find that CRFmin and CRFmax have recovered uncertainties proportional to the relative error on the planetary density, but CRFmarg saturates to between 0.03 and 0.16 once (Δρ/ρ) drops below 1-2 per cent. This implies that mass and radius alone cannot provide any better constraints on internal composition once bulk density constraints hit around a per cent, providing a clear target for observers.

  16. Modeling analysis of pulsed magnetization process of magnetic core based on inverse Jiles-Atherton model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Zhang, He; Liu, Siwei; Lin, Fuchang

    2018-05-01

    The J-A (Jiles-Atherton) model is widely used to describe the magnetization characteristics of magnetic cores in a low-frequency alternating field. However, this model is deficient in the quantitative analysis of the eddy current loss and residual loss in a high-frequency magnetic field. Based on the decomposition of magnetization intensity, an inverse J-A model is established which uses magnetic flux density B as an input variable. Static and dynamic core losses under high frequency excitation are separated based on the inverse J-A model. Optimized parameters of the inverse J-A model are obtained based on particle swarm optimization. The platform for the pulsed magnetization characteristic test is designed and constructed. The hysteresis curves of ferrite and Fe-based nanocrystalline cores at high magnetization rates are measured. The simulated and measured hysteresis curves are presented and compared. It is found that the inverse J-A model can be used to describe the magnetization characteristics at high magnetization rates and to separate the static loss and dynamic loss accurately.

  17. Little Earth Experiment: An instrument to model planetary cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aujogue, Kélig; Pothérat, Alban; Bates, Ian; Debray, François; Sreenivasan, Binod

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we present a new experimental facility, Little Earth Experiment, designed to study the hydrodynamics of liquid planetary cores. The main novelty of this apparatus is that a transparent electrically conducting electrolyte is subject to extremely high magnetic fields (up to 10 T) to produce electromagnetic effects comparable to those produced by moderate magnetic fields in planetary cores. This technique makes it possible to visualise for the first time the coupling between the principal forces in a convection-driven dynamo by means of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) in a geometry relevant to planets. We first present the technology that enables us to generate these forces and implement PIV in a high magnetic field environment. We then show that the magnetic field drastically changes the structure of convective plumes in a configuration relevant to the tangent cylinder region of the Earth's core.

  18. Performance modeling and analysis of parallel Gaussian elimination on multi-core computers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadi N. Sibai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gaussian elimination is used in many applications and in particular in the solution of systems of linear equations. This paper presents mathematical performance models and analysis of four parallel Gaussian Elimination methods (precisely the Original method and the new Meet in the Middle –MiM– algorithms and their variants with SIMD vectorization on multi-core systems. Analytical performance models of the four methods are formulated and presented followed by evaluations of these models with modern multi-core systems’ operation latencies. Our results reveal that the four methods generally exhibit good performance scaling with increasing matrix size and number of cores. SIMD vectorization only makes a large difference in performance for low number of cores. For a large matrix size (n ⩾ 16 K, the performance difference between the MiM and Original methods falls from 16× with four cores to 4× with 16 K cores. The efficiencies of all four methods are low with 1 K cores or more stressing a major problem of multi-core systems where the network-on-chip and memory latencies are too high in relation to basic arithmetic operations. Thus Gaussian Elimination can greatly benefit from the resources of multi-core systems, but higher performance gains can be achieved if multi-core systems can be designed with lower memory operation, synchronization, and interconnect communication latencies, requirements of utmost importance and challenge in the exascale computing age.

  19. DCMIP2016: a review of non-hydrostatic dynamical core design and intercomparison of participating models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullrich, Paul A.; Jablonowski, Christiane; Kent, James; Lauritzen, Peter H.; Nair, Ramachandran; Reed, Kevin A.; Zarzycki, Colin M.; Hall, David M.; Dazlich, Don; Heikes, Ross; Konor, Celal; Randall, David; Dubos, Thomas; Meurdesoif, Yann; Chen, Xi; Harris, Lucas; Kühnlein, Christian; Lee, Vivian; Qaddouri, Abdessamad; Girard, Claude; Giorgetta, Marco; Reinert, Daniel; Klemp, Joseph; Park, Sang-Hun; Skamarock, William; Miura, Hiroaki; Ohno, Tomoki; Yoshida, Ryuji; Walko, Robert; Reinecke, Alex; Viner, Kevin

    2017-12-01

    Atmospheric dynamical cores are a fundamental component of global atmospheric modeling systems and are responsible for capturing the dynamical behavior of the Earth's atmosphere via numerical integration of the Navier-Stokes equations. These systems have existed in one form or another for over half of a century, with the earliest discretizations having now evolved into a complex ecosystem of algorithms and computational strategies. In essence, no two dynamical cores are alike, and their individual successes suggest that no perfect model exists. To better understand modern dynamical cores, this paper aims to provide a comprehensive review of 11 non-hydrostatic dynamical cores, drawn from modeling centers and groups that participated in the 2016 Dynamical Core Model Intercomparison Project (DCMIP) workshop and summer school. This review includes a choice of model grid, variable placement, vertical coordinate, prognostic equations, temporal discretization, and the diffusion, stabilization, filters, and fixers employed by each system.

  20. DCMIP2016: a review of non-hydrostatic dynamical core design and intercomparison of participating models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Ullrich

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric dynamical cores are a fundamental component of global atmospheric modeling systems and are responsible for capturing the dynamical behavior of the Earth's atmosphere via numerical integration of the Navier–Stokes equations. These systems have existed in one form or another for over half of a century, with the earliest discretizations having now evolved into a complex ecosystem of algorithms and computational strategies. In essence, no two dynamical cores are alike, and their individual successes suggest that no perfect model exists. To better understand modern dynamical cores, this paper aims to provide a comprehensive review of 11 non-hydrostatic dynamical cores, drawn from modeling centers and groups that participated in the 2016 Dynamical Core Model Intercomparison Project (DCMIP workshop and summer school. This review includes a choice of model grid, variable placement, vertical coordinate, prognostic equations, temporal discretization, and the diffusion, stabilization, filters, and fixers employed by each system.

  1. Rapid core field variations during the satellite era: Investigations using stochastic process based field models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finlay, Chris; Olsen, Nils; Gillet, Nicolas

    We present a new ensemble of time-dependent magnetic field models constructed from satellite and observatory data spanning 1997-2013 that are compatible with prior information concerning the temporal spectrum of core field variations. These models allow sharper field changes compared to tradition...... physical hypotheses can be tested by asking questions of the entire ensemble of core field models, rather than by interpreting any single model.......We present a new ensemble of time-dependent magnetic field models constructed from satellite and observatory data spanning 1997-2013 that are compatible with prior information concerning the temporal spectrum of core field variations. These models allow sharper field changes compared to traditional...... regularization methods based on minimizing the square of second or third time derivative. We invert satellite and observatory data directly by adopting the external field and crustal field modelling framework of the CHAOS model, but apply the stochastic process method of Gillet et al. (2013) to the core field...

  2. High energy pp and anti-pp elastic scattering in nucleon valence core model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Islam, M.M.; Fearnley, T.

    1986-01-01

    Connection between the valence core model and the effective QCD models of nucleon structure is pointed out. Also, implication of recent anti-pp differential cross section measurements at 53 GeV on our previous calculations is discussed

  3. Evolution dynamics modeling and simulation of logistics enterprise's core competence based on service innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo; Tong, Yuting

    2017-04-01

    With the rapid development of economy, the development of logistics enterprises in China is also facing a huge challenge, especially the logistics enterprises generally lack of core competitiveness, and service innovation awareness is not strong. Scholars in the process of studying the core competitiveness of logistics enterprises are mainly from the perspective of static stability, not from the perspective of dynamic evolution to explore. So the author analyzes the influencing factors and the evolution process of the core competence of logistics enterprises, using the method of system dynamics to study the cause and effect of the evolution of the core competence of logistics enterprises, construct a system dynamics model of evolution of core competence logistics enterprises, which can be simulated by vensim PLE. The analysis for the effectiveness and sensitivity of simulation model indicates the model can be used as the fitting of the evolution process of the core competence of logistics enterprises and reveal the process and mechanism of the evolution of the core competence of logistics enterprises, and provide management strategies for improving the core competence of logistics enterprises. The construction and operation of computer simulation model offers a kind of effective method for studying the evolution of logistics enterprise core competence.

  4. Modeling the Power Variability of Core Speed Scaling on Homogeneous Multicore Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihui Du

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a family of power models that can capture the nonuniform power effects of speed scaling among homogeneous cores on multicore processors. These models depart from traditional ones, which assume that individual cores contribute to power consumption as independent entities. In our approach, we remove this independence assumption and employ statistical variables of core speed (average speed and the dispersion of the core speeds to capture the comprehensive heterogeneous impact of subtle interactions among the underlying hardware. We systematically explore the model family, deriving basic and refined models that give progressively better fits, and analyze them in detail. The proposed methodology provides an easy way to build power models to reflect the realistic workings of current multicore processors more accurately. Moreover, unlike the existing lower-level power models that require knowledge of microarchitectural details of the CPU cores and the last level cache to capture core interdependency, ours are easier to use and scalable to emerging and future multicore architectures with more cores. These attributes make the models particularly useful to system users or algorithm designers who need a quick way to estimate power consumption. We evaluate the family of models on contemporary x86 multicore processors using the SPEC2006 benchmarks. Our best model yields an average predicted error as low as 5%.

  5. Organizational Models for Non-Core Processes Management: A Classification Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto F. De Toni

    2012-12-01

    The framework enables the identification and the explanation of the main advantages and disadvantages of each strategy and to highlight how a company should coherently choose an organizational model on the basis of: (a the specialization/complexity of the non‐core processes, (b the focus on core processes, (c its inclination towards know‐how outsourcing, and (d the desired level of autonomy in the management of non‐core processes.

  6. A probabilistic model for component-based shape synthesis

    KAUST Repository

    Kalogerakis, Evangelos; Chaudhuri, Siddhartha; Koller, Daphne; Koltun, Vladlen

    2012-01-01

    represents probabilistic relationships between properties of shape components, and relates them to learned underlying causes of structural variability within the domain. These causes are treated as latent variables, leading to a compact representation

  7. Component-Based Approach in Learning Management System Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitseva, Larisa; Bule, Jekaterina; Makarov, Sergey

    2013-01-01

    The paper describes component-based approach (CBA) for learning management system development. Learning object as components of e-learning courses and their metadata is considered. The architecture of learning management system based on CBA being developed in Riga Technical University, namely its architecture, elements and possibilities are…

  8. Management of Globally Distributed Component-Based Software Development Projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Kotlarsky (Julia)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractGlobally Distributed Component-Based Development (GD CBD) is expected to become a promising area, as increasing numbers of companies are setting up software development in a globally distributed environment and at the same time are adopting CBD methodologies. Being an emerging area, the

  9. Monitoring extensions for component-based distributed software

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diakov, N.K.; Papir, Z.; van Sinderen, Marten J.; Quartel, Dick

    2000-01-01

    This paper defines a generic class of monitoring extensions to component-based distributed enterprise software. Introducing a monitoring extension to a legacy application system can be very costly. In this paper, we identify the minimum support for application monitoring within the generic

  10. Component-based development of software language engineering tools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ssanyu, J.; Hemerik, C.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we outline how Software Language Engineering (SLE) could benefit from Component-based Software Development (CBSD) techniques and present an architecture aimed at developing a coherent set of lightweight SLE components, fitting into a general-purpose component framework. In order to

  11. Component-based development process and component lifecycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crnkovic, I.; Chaudron, M.R.V.; Larsson, S.

    2006-01-01

    The process of component- and component-based system development differs in many significant ways from the "classical" development process of software systems. The main difference is in the separation of the development process of components from the development process of systems. This fact has a

  12. Transformer core modeling for magnetizing inrush current investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.Yahiou

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The inrush currents generated during an energization of power transformer can reach very high values and may cause many problems in power system. This magnetizing inrush current which occurs at the time of energization of a transformer is due to temporary overfluxing in the transformer core. Its magnitude mainly depends on switching parameters such as the resistance of the primary winding and the point-on-voltage wave (switching angle. This paper describes a system for measuring the inrush current which is composed principally of an acquisition card (EAGLE, and LabVIEW code. The system is also capable of presetting various combinations of switching parameters for the energization of a 2 kVA transformer via an electronic card. Moreover, an algorithm for calculating the saturation curve is presented taking the iron core reactive losses into account, thereby producing a nonlinear inductance. This curve is used to simulate the magnetizing inrush current using the ATP-EMTP software.

  13. A simplified geometrical model for transient corium propagation in core for LWR with heavy reflector - 15271

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saas, L.; Le Tellier, R.; Bajard, S.

    2015-01-01

    In this document, we present a simplified geometrical model (0D model) for both the in-core corium propagation transient and the characterization of the mode of corium transfer from the core to the vessel. A degraded core with a formed corium pool is used as an initial state. This initial state can be obtained from a simulation computed with an integral code. This model does not use a grid for the core as integral codes do. Geometrical shapes and 0D models are associated with the corium pool and the other components of the degraded core (debris, heavy reflector, core plate...). During the transient, these shapes evolve taking into account the thermal and stratification behavior of the corium pool and the melting of the core surrounding components. Some results corresponding to the corium pool propagation in core transients obtained with this model on a LWR with a heavy reflector are given and compared to grid approach of the integral codes MAAP4

  14. Towards Core Modelling Practices in Integrated Water Resource Management: An Interdisciplinary View of the Modelling Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakeman, A. J.; Elsawah, S.; Pierce, S. A.; Ames, D. P.

    2016-12-01

    The National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center (SESYNC) Core Modelling Practices Pursuit is developing resources to describe core practices for developing and using models to support integrated water resource management. These practices implement specific steps in the modelling process with an interdisciplinary perspective; however, the particular practice that is most appropriate depends on contextual aspects specific to the project. The first task of the pursuit is to identify the various steps for which implementation practices are to be described. This paper reports on those results. The paper draws on knowledge from the modelling process literature for environmental modelling (Jakeman et al., 2006), engaging stakeholders (Voinov and Bousquet, 2010) and general modelling (Banks, 1999), as well as the experience of the consortium members. We organise the steps around the four modelling phases. The planning phase identifies what is to be achieved, how and with what resources. The model is built and tested during the construction phase, and then used in the application phase. Finally, models that become part of the ongoing policy process require a maintenance phase. For each step, the paper focusses on what is to be considered or achieved, rather than how it is performed. This reflects the separation of the steps from the practices that implement them in different contexts. We support description of steps with a wide range of examples. Examples are designed to be generic and do not reflect any one project or context, but instead are drawn from common situations or from extremely different ones so as to highlight some of the issues that may arise at each step. References Banks, J. (1999). Introduction to simulation. In Proceedings of the 1999 Winter Simulation Conference. Jakeman, A. J., R. A. Letcher, and J. P. Norton (2006). Ten iterative steps in development and evaluation of environmental models. Environmental Modelling and Software 21, 602-614. Voinov, A

  15. F.B.R. Core mock-up RAPSODIE - II - numerical models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brochard, D.; Hammami, L.; Gantenbein, F.

    1990-01-01

    To study the behaviour of LMFBR cores excited by a seism, tests have been performed on the RAPSODIE core mock-up. The aim of this paper is to present the numerical models used to interprete these tests and the comparisons between calculations and experimental results

  16. Discussion about modeling the effects of neutron flux exposure for nuclear reactor core analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vondy, D.R.

    1986-04-01

    Methods used to calculate the effects of exposure to a neutron flux are described. The modeling of the nuclear-reactor core history presents an analysis challenge. The nuclide chain equations must be solved, and some of the methods in use for this are described. Techniques for treating reactor-core histories are discussed and evaluated

  17. Modelling of reactor control and protection systems in the core simulator program GARLIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beraha, D.; Lupas, O.; Ploegert, K.

    1984-01-01

    For analysis of the interaction between control and limitation systems and the power distribution in the reactor core, a valuable tool is provided by the joint simulation of the core and the interacting systems. To this purpose, the core simulator GARLIC has been enhanced by models of the systems for controlling and limiting the reactor power and the power distribution in the core as well as by modules for calculating safety related core parameters. The computer-based core protection system, first installed in the Grafenrheinfeld NPP, has been included in the simulation. In order to evaluate the accuracy of GARLIC-simulations, the code has been compared with a design code in the train of a verification phase. The report describes the program extensions and the results of the verification. (orig.) [de

  18. A macroscopic cross-section model for BWR pin-by-pin core analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Tatsuya; Endo, Tomohiro; Yamamoto, Akio

    2014-01-01

    A macroscopic cross-section model used in boiling water reactor (BWR) pin-by-pin core analysis is studied. In the pin-by-pin core calculation method, pin-cell averaged cross sections are calculated for many combinations of core state and depletion history variables and are tabulated prior to core calculations. Variations of cross sections in a core simulator are caused by two different phenomena (i.e. instantaneous and history effects). We treat them through the core state variables and the exposure-averaged core state variables, respectively. Furthermore, the cross-term effect among the core state and the depletion history variables is considered. In order to confirm the calculation accuracy and discuss the treatment of the cross-term effect, the k-infinity and the pin-by-pin fission rate distributions in a single fuel assembly geometry are compared. Some cross-term effects could be negligible since the impacts of them are sufficiently small. However, the cross-term effects among the control rod history (or the void history) and other variables have large impacts; thus, the consideration of them is crucial. The present macroscopic cross-section model, which considers such dominant cross-term effects, well reproduces the reference results and can be a candidate in practical applications for BWR pin-by-pin core analysis on the normal operations. (author)

  19. Core-shell particles as model compound for studying fouling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Morten Lykkegaard; Nielsen, Troels Bach; Andersen, Morten Boel Overgaard

    2008-01-01

    Synthetic colloidal particles with hard cores and soft, water-swollen shells were used to study cake formation during ultrafiltration. The total cake resistance was lowest for particles with thick shells, which indicates that interparticular forces between particles (steric hindrance...... and electrostatic repulsion) influenced cake formation. At low pressure the specific cake resistance could be predicted from the Kozeny-Carman equation. At higher pressures, the resistance increased due to cake compression. Both cake formation and compression were reversible. For particles with thick shells...

  20. [Construction of the addiction prevention core competency model for preventing addictive behavior in adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyun Sook; Jung, Sun Young

    2013-12-01

    This study was done to provide fundamental data for the development of competency reinforcement programs to prevent addictive behavior in adolescents through the construction and examination of an addiction prevention core competency model. In this study core competencies for preventing addictive behavior in adolescents through competency modeling were identified, and the addiction prevention core competency model was developed. It was validated methodologically. Competencies for preventing addictive behavior in adolescents as defined by the addiction prevention core competency model are as follows: positive self-worth, self-control skill, time management skill, reality perception skill, risk coping skill, and positive communication with parents and with peers or social group. After construction, concurrent cross validation of the addiction prevention core competency model showed that this model was appropriate. The study results indicate that the addiction prevention core competency model for the prevention of addictive behavior in adolescents through competency modeling can be used as a foundation for an integral approach to enhance adolescent is used as an adjective and prevent addictive behavior. This approach can be a school-centered, cost-efficient strategy which not only reduces addictive behavior in adolescents, but also improves the quality of their resources.

  1. Improvement of Axial Reflector Cross Section Generation Model for PWR Core Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Cheon Bo; Lee, Kyung Hoon; Cho, Jin Young [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    This paper covers the study for improvement of axial reflector XS generation model. In the next section, the improved 1D core model is represented in detail. Reflector XS generated by the improved model is compared to that of the conventional model in the third section. Nuclear design parameters generated by these two XS sets are also covered in that section. Significant of this study is discussed in the last section. Two-step procedure has been regarded as the most practical approach for reactor core designs because it offers core design parameters quite rapidly within acceptable range. Thus this approach is adopted for SMART (System-integrated Modular Advanced Reac- Tor) core design in KAERI with the DeCART2D1.1/ MASTER4.0 (hereafter noted as DeCART2D/ MASTER) code system. Within the framework of the two-step procedure based SMART core design, various researches have been studied to improve the core design reliability and efficiency. One of them is improvement of reflector cross section (XS) generation models. While the conventional FA/reflector two-node model used for most core designs to generate reflector XS cannot consider the actual configuration of fuel rods that intersect at right angles to axial reflectors, the revised model reflects the axial fuel configuration by introducing the radially simplified core model. The significance of the model revision is evaluated by observing HGC generated by DeCART2D, reflector XS, and core design parameters generated by adopting the two models. And it is verified that about 30 ppm CBC error can be reduced and maximum Fq error decreases from about 6 % to 2.5 % by applying the revised model. Error of AO and axial power shapes are also reduced significantly. Therefore it can be concluded that the simplified 1D core model improves the accuracy of the axial reflector XS and leads to the two-step procedure reliability enhancement. Since it is hard for core designs to be free from the two-step approach, it is necessary to find

  2. Interfacing high-fidelity core neutronics models to whole plant models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEllin, M.

    1999-01-01

    Until recently available computer power dictated that whole-plant models of nuclear power stations have typically employed simple models of the reactor core which can not match the fidelity of safety-qualified 2-group, 3D neutronics models. As a result the treatment of situations involving strong coupling between the core and the rest of the plant has inevitably been somewhat approximate, requiring conservative modelling assumptions, or manual iteration between cases, to bound worse case scenarios. Such techniques not only place heavy demands on the engineers involved, they may also result in potentially unnecessary operational constraints. Hardware is today no longer the limiting factor, but the cost of developing and validating high-quality software is now such that it appears attractive to build new systems with a wider simulation scope by using existing stand-alone codes as sub-components. This is not always as straightforward as it might at first appear. This paper illustrates some of the pitfalls, and discusses more sophisticated and robust strategies. (author)

  3. The use of CORE model by metacognitive skill approach in developing characters junior high school students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Dahlia; Yaniawati, Poppy; Kusumah, Yaya Sukjaya

    2017-08-01

    This study aims to analyze the character of students who obtain CORE learning model using metacognitive approach. The method in this study is qualitative research and quantitative research design (Mixed Method Design) with concurrent embedded strategy. The research was conducted on two groups: an experimental group and the control group. An experimental group consists of students who had CORE model learning using metacognitive approach while the control group consists of students taught by conventional learning. The study was conducted the object this research is the seventh grader students in one the public junior high schools in Bandung. Based on this research, it is known that the characters of the students in the CORE model learning through metacognitive approach is: honest, hard work, curious, conscientious, creative and communicative. Overall it can be concluded that CORE model learning is good for developing characters of a junior high school student.

  4. Ab Initio Study of 40Ca with an Importance Truncated No-Core Shell Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, R; Navratil, P

    2007-05-22

    We propose an importance truncation scheme for the no-core shell model, which enables converged calculations for nuclei well beyond the p-shell. It is based on an a priori measure for the importance of individual basis states constructed by means of many-body perturbation theory. Only the physically relevant states of the no-core model space are considered, which leads to a dramatic reduction of the basis dimension. We analyze the validity and efficiency of this truncation scheme using different realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions and compare to conventional no-core shell model calculations for {sup 4}He and {sup 16}O. Then, we present the first converged calculations for the ground state of {sup 40}Ca within no-core model spaces including up to 16{h_bar}{Omega}-excitations using realistic low-momentum interactions. The scheme is universal and can be easily applied to other quantum many-body problems.

  5. An Integrated Modeling Suite for Simulating the Core Induction and Kinetic Effects in Mercury's Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, X.; Slavin, J.; Chen, Y.; Poh, G.; Toth, G.; Gombosi, T.

    2018-05-01

    We present results from state-of-the-art global models of Mercury's space environment capable of self-consistently simulating the induction effect at the core and resolving kinetic physics important for magnetic reconnection.

  6. Adjustment of cast metal post/cores modeled with different acrylic resins

    OpenAIRE

    Gusmão, João Milton Rocha; Pereira, Renato Piai; Alves, Guilhermino Oliveira; Pithon, Matheus Melo; Moreira, David Costa

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Evaluate the performance of four commercially available chemically-activated acrylic resins (CAARs) by measuring the level of displacement of the cores following casting. Materials and Methods: Two devices were constructed to model the cores based on a natural tooth. Forty post/cores were modeled, 10 in each of the following CAARs: Duralay (Reliance Dental, Illinois, USA), Pattern Resin (GC, Tokyo, Japan), Dencrilay (Dencril, Sao Paulo, Brazil), and Jet (Clássico, Sao Paulo, Brazil). Two...

  7. Study and application of microscopic depletion model in core simulator of COSINE project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Xiaoyu; Wang Su; Yan Yuhang; Liu Zhanquan; Chen Yixue; Huang Kai

    2013-01-01

    Microscopic depletion correction is one of the commonly used techniques that could improve the historical effect and attain higher precision of diffusion calculation and alleviate the inaccuracy caused by historical effect. Core simulator of COSINE project (core and system integrated engine for design and analysis) has developed a hybrid macroscopic-microscopic depletion model to track important isotopes during each depletion history and correct the macro cross sections. The basic theory was discussed in this paper. The effect and results of microscopic depletion correction were also analyzed. The preliminary test results demonstrate that the microscopic depletion model is effective and practicable for improving the precision of core calculation. (authors)

  8. Synchronizing early Eocene deep-sea and continental records - cyclostratigraphic age models for the Bighorn Basin Coring Project drill cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerhold, Thomas; Röhl, Ursula; Wilkens, Roy H.; Gingerich, Philip D.; Clyde, William C.; Wing, Scott L.; Bowen, Gabriel J.; Kraus, Mary J.

    2018-03-01

    A consistent chronostratigraphic framework is required to understand the effect of major paleoclimate perturbations on both marine and terrestrial ecosystems. Transient global warming events in the early Eocene, at 56-54 Ma, show the impact of large-scale carbon input into the ocean-atmosphere system. Here we provide the first timescale synchronization of continental and marine deposits spanning the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) and the interval just prior to the Eocene Thermal Maximum 2 (ETM-2). Cyclic variations in geochemical data come from continental drill cores of the Bighorn Basin Coring Project (BBCP, Wyoming, USA) and from marine deep-sea drilling deposits retrieved by the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP). Both are dominated by eccentricity-modulated precession cycles used to construct a common cyclostratigraphic framework. Integration of age models results in a revised astrochronology for the PETM in deep-sea records that is now generally consistent with independent 3He age models. The duration of the PETM is estimated at ˜ 200 kyr for the carbon isotope excursion and ˜ 120 kyr for the associated pelagic clay layer. A common terrestrial and marine age model shows a concurrent major change in marine and terrestrial biota ˜ 200 kyr before ETM-2. In the Bighorn Basin, the change is referred to as Biohorizon B and represents a period of significant mammalian turnover and immigration, separating the upper Haplomylus-Ectocion Range Zone from the Bunophorus Interval Zone and approximating the Wa-4-Wa-5 land mammal zone boundary. In sediments from ODP Site 1262 (Walvis Ridge), major changes in the biota at this time are documented by the radiation of a second generation of apical spine-bearing sphenolith species (e.g., S. radians and S. editus), the emergence of T. orthostylus, and the marked decline of D. multiradiatus.

  9. IAEA CRP on HTGR Uncertainties in Modeling: Assessment of Phase I Lattice to Core Model Uncertainties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rouxelin, Pascal Nicolas [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Strydom, Gerhard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Best-estimate plus uncertainty analysis of reactors is replacing the traditional conservative (stacked uncertainty) method for safety and licensing analysis. To facilitate uncertainty analysis applications, a comprehensive approach and methodology must be developed and applied. High temperature gas cooled reactors (HTGRs) have several features that require techniques not used in light-water reactor analysis (e.g., coated-particle design and large graphite quantities at high temperatures). The International Atomic Energy Agency has therefore launched the Coordinated Research Project on HTGR Uncertainty Analysis in Modeling to study uncertainty propagation in the HTGR analysis chain. The benchmark problem defined for the prismatic design is represented by the General Atomics Modular HTGR 350. The main focus of this report is the compilation and discussion of the results obtained for various permutations of Exercise I 2c and the use of the cross section data in Exercise II 1a of the prismatic benchmark, which is defined as the last and first steps of the lattice and core simulation phases, respectively. The report summarizes the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) best estimate results obtained for Exercise I 2a (fresh single-fuel block), Exercise I 2b (depleted single-fuel block), and Exercise I 2c (super cell) in addition to the first results of an investigation into the cross section generation effects for the super-cell problem. The two dimensional deterministic code known as the New ESC based Weighting Transport (NEWT) included in the Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation (SCALE) 6.1.2 package was used for the cross section evaluation, and the results obtained were compared to the three dimensional stochastic SCALE module KENO VI. The NEWT cross section libraries were generated for several permutations of the current benchmark super-cell geometry and were then provided as input to the Phase II core calculation of the stand alone neutronics Exercise

  10. Development of the Monju core safety analysis numerical models by super-COPD code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Fumiaki; Minami, Masaki

    2010-12-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency constructed a computational model for safety analysis of Monju reactor core to be built into a modularized plant dynamics analysis code Super-COPD code, for the purpose of heat removal capability evaluation at the in total 21 defined transients in the annex to the construction permit application. The applicability of this model to core heat removal capability evaluation has been estimated by back to back result comparisons of the constituent models with conventionally applied codes and by application of the unified model. The numerical model for core safety analysis has been built based on the best estimate model validated by the actually measured plant behavior up to 40% rated power conditions, taking over safety analysis models of conventionally applied COPD and HARHO-IN codes, to be capable of overall calculations of the entire plant with the safety protection and control systems. Among the constituents of the analytical model, neutronic-thermal model, heat transfer and hydraulic models of PHTS, SHTS, and water/steam system are individually verified by comparisons with the conventional calculations. Comparisons are also made with the actually measured plant behavior up to 40% rated power conditions to confirm the calculation adequacy and conservativeness of the input data. The unified analytical model was applied to analyses of in total 8 anomaly events; reactivity insertion, abnormal power distribution, decrease and increase of coolant flow rate in PHTS, SHTS and water/steam systems. The resulting maximum values and temporal variations of the key parameters in safety evaluation; temperatures of fuel, cladding, in core sodium coolant and RV inlet and outlet coolant have negligible discrepancies against the existing analysis result in the annex to the construction permit application, verifying the unified analytical model. These works have enabled analytical evaluation of Monju core heat removal capability by Super-COPD utilizing the

  11. Development of the core-model implementation technology for YGN1 simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, J. H.; Lee, M. S.; Lee, Y. K.; Su, I. Y.

    2004-01-01

    The existing core models for the domestic nuclear power plant simulators for PWRs are entirely imported from the foreign simulator vendor. To solve the time-accuracy problem in the poor capabilities in the computer in the early 1990s, several simplifications and assumptions for the neutronics governing equations were indispensible for the realtime calculations of nuclear phenomena in the core region. To overcome the shortages, a new core model based on the MASTER code certified by the domestic regulatory body (KINS) instead of the existing core models is now being developed especially for the realtime core solver for the YGN-1 simulator. This code is named R-MASTER (Realtime MASTER code). Due to the deficiency of the host computer, it is quitely required to run the R-MASTER code on the separate computer with high performance from the host computer on which all the other models than the core model are running. This paper deals with the applied protocols and procedures to guarantee the realtime communication and calculation of the R-MASTER code

  12. Overall feature of EAST operation space by using simple Core-SOL-Divertor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiwatari, R.; Hatayama, A.; Zhu, S.; Takizuka, T.; Tomita, Y.

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a simple Core-SOL-Divertor (C-S-D) model to investigate qualitatively the overall features of the operational space for the integrated core and edge plasma. To construct the simple C-S-D model, a simple core plasma model of ITER physics guidelines and a two-point SOL-divertor model are used. The simple C-S-D model is applied to the study of the EAST operational space with lower hybrid current drive experiments under various kinds of trade-off for the basic plasma parameters. Effective methods for extending the operation space are also presented. As shown by this study for the EAST operation space, it is evident that the C-S-D model is a useful tool to understand qualitatively the overall features of the plasma operation space. (author)

  13. Validation of ASTEC core degradation and containment models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruse, Philipp; Brähler, Thimo; Koch, Marco K.

    2014-01-01

    Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum performed in a German funded project validation of in-vessel and containment models of the integral code ASTEC V2, jointly developed by IRSN (France) and GRS (Germany). In this paper selected results of this validation are presented. In the in-vessel part, the main point of interest was the validation of the code capability concerning cladding oxidation and hydrogen generation. The ASTEC calculations of QUENCH experiments QUENCH-03 and QUENCH-11 show satisfactory results, despite of some necessary adjustments in the input deck. Furthermore, the oxidation models based on the Cathcart–Pawel and Urbanic–Heidrick correlations are not suitable for higher temperatures while the ASTEC model BEST-FIT based on the Prater–Courtright approach at high temperature gives reliable enough results. One part of the containment model validation was the assessment of three hydrogen combustion models of ASTEC against the experiment BMC Ix9. The simulation results of these models differ from each other and therefore the quality of the simulations depends on the characteristic of each model. Accordingly, the CPA FRONT model, corresponding to the simplest necessary input parameters, provides the best agreement to the experimental data

  14. Gyro-Landau fluid model of tokamak core fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leboeuf, J.N.; Carreras, B.A.; Dominguez, N.; Hedrick, C.L.; Sidikman, K.L.; Lynch, V.E.; Drake, J.B.; Walker, D.W.

    1992-01-01

    Dissipative trapped electron modes (DTEM) may be one of the causes of deterioration of confinement in tokamak and stellatator plasmas. We have implemented a fluid model to study DTEM turbulence in slab geometry. The electron dynamics include in addition to the adiabatic part, a non-adiabatic piece modeled with an i-delta-type response. The ion dynamics include Landau damping and FLR corrections through Landau fluid approximate techniques and Pade approximants for Γ 0 (b)=I 0 (b)e -b . The model follows from the gyrokinetic equation. Evolution equations, which closely resemble those used in standard reduced MHD, are presented since these are better suited to non-linear calculations. The numerical results of radially resolved calculations will be discussed. A recently developed hybrid model, which consists of a gyrokinetic implementation for the ions using particles and the same description for the electron dynamics as in the fluid model, will also be presented

  15. Experimental Study and Mathematical Modeling of Asphaltene Deposition Mechanism in Core Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafari Behbahani T.

    2015-11-01

    increased. The experimental results show that the amount of remaining asphaltene in carbonate core samples is higher than those in sandstone core samples. Also, SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy micrographs of carbonate core samples showed the formation of large clusters of asphaltene in comparison with sandstone core samples during natural depletion. It can be seen from the modeling results that the proposed model based on the multilayer adsorption equilibrium mechanism and four material balance equations is more accurate than those obtained from the monolayer adsorption equilibrium adsorption mechanism and two material balance equations, and is in agreement with the experimental data of natural depletion reported in this work and with those reported in the literature.

  16. NUCORE - A system for nuclear structure calculations with cluster-core models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heras, C.A.; Abecasis, S.M.

    1982-01-01

    Calculation of nuclear energy levels and their electromagnetic properties, modelling the nucleus as a cluster of a few particles and/or holes interacting with a core which in turn is modelled as a quadrupole vibrator (cluster-phonon model). The members of the cluster interact via quadrupole-quadrupole and pairing forces. (orig.)

  17. Structure and thermodynamics of core-softened models for alcohols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munaò, Gianmarco; Urbic, Tomaz

    2015-01-01

    The phase behavior and the fluid structure of coarse-grain models for alcohols are studied by means of reference interaction site model (RISM) theory and Monte Carlo simulations. Specifically, we model ethanol and 1-propanol as linear rigid chains constituted by three (trimers) and four (tetramers) partially fused spheres, respectively. Thermodynamic properties of these models are examined in the RISM context, by employing closed formulæ for the calculation of free energy and pressure. Gas-liquid coexistence curves for trimers and tetramers are reported and compared with already existing data for a dimer model of methanol. Critical temperatures slightly increase with the number of CH 2 groups in the chain, while critical pressures and densities decrease. Such a behavior qualitatively reproduces the trend observed in experiments on methanol, ethanol, and 1-propanol and suggests that our coarse-grain models, despite their simplicity, can reproduce the essential features of the phase behavior of such alcohols. The fluid structure of these models is investigated by computing radial distribution function g ij (r) and static structure factor S ij (k); the latter shows the presence of a low−k peak at intermediate-high packing fractions and low temperatures, suggesting the presence of aggregates for both trimers and tetramers

  18. Modeling the Formation of Giant Planet Cores I: Evaluating Key Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Levison, H. F.; Thommes, E.; Duncan, M. J.

    2009-01-01

    One of the most challenging problems we face in our understanding of planet formation is how Jupiter and Saturn could have formed before the the solar nebula dispersed. The most popular model of giant planet formation is the so-called 'core accretion' model. In this model a large planetary embryo formed first, mainly by two-body accretion. This is then followed by a period of inflow of nebular gas directly onto the growing planet. The core accretion model has an Achilles heel, namely the very...

  19. Component-based software for high-performance scientific computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexeev, Yuri; Allan, Benjamin A; Armstrong, Robert C; Bernholdt, David E; Dahlgren, Tamara L; Gannon, Dennis; Janssen, Curtis L; Kenny, Joseph P; Krishnan, Manojkumar; Kohl, James A; Kumfert, Gary; McInnes, Lois Curfman; Nieplocha, Jarek; Parker, Steven G; Rasmussen, Craig; Windus, Theresa L

    2005-01-01

    Recent advances in both computational hardware and multidisciplinary science have given rise to an unprecedented level of complexity in scientific simulation software. This paper describes an ongoing grass roots effort aimed at addressing complexity in high-performance computing through the use of Component-Based Software Engineering (CBSE). Highlights of the benefits and accomplishments of the Common Component Architecture (CCA) Forum and SciDAC ISIC are given, followed by an illustrative example of how the CCA has been applied to drive scientific discovery in quantum chemistry. Thrusts for future research are also described briefly.

  20. Component-based software for high-performance scientific computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexeev, Yuri; Allan, Benjamin A; Armstrong, Robert C; Bernholdt, David E; Dahlgren, Tamara L; Gannon, Dennis; Janssen, Curtis L; Kenny, Joseph P; Krishnan, Manojkumar; Kohl, James A; Kumfert, Gary; McInnes, Lois Curfman; Nieplocha, Jarek; Parker, Steven G; Rasmussen, Craig; Windus, Theresa L

    2005-01-01

    Recent advances in both computational hardware and multidisciplinary science have given rise to an unprecedented level of complexity in scientific simulation software. This paper describes an ongoing grass roots effort aimed at addressing complexity in high-performance computing through the use of Component-Based Software Engineering (CBSE). Highlights of the benefits and accomplishments of the Common Component Architecture (CCA) Forum and SciDAC ISIC are given, followed by an illustrative example of how the CCA has been applied to drive scientific discovery in quantum chemistry. Thrusts for future research are also described briefly

  1. The equivalent thermal conductivity of lattice core sandwich structure: A predictive model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Xiangmeng; Wei, Kai; He, Rujie; Pei, Yongmao; Fang, Daining

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A predictive model of the equivalent thermal conductivity was established. • Both the heat conduction and radiation were considered. • The predictive results were in good agreement with experiment and FEM. • Some methods for improving the thermal protection performance were proposed. - Abstract: The equivalent thermal conductivity of lattice core sandwich structure was predicted using a novel model. The predictive results were in good agreement with experimental and Finite Element Method results. The thermal conductivity of the lattice core sandwich structure was attributed to both core conduction and radiation. The core conduction caused thermal conductivity only relied on the relative density of the structure. And the radiation caused thermal conductivity increased linearly with the thickness of the core. It was found that the equivalent thermal conductivity of the lattice core sandwich structure showed a highly dependent relationship on temperature. At low temperatures, the structure exhibited a nearly thermal insulated behavior. With the temperature increasing, the thermal conductivity of the structure increased owing to radiation. Therefore, some attempts, such as reducing the emissivity of the core or designing multilayered structure, are believe to be of benefit for improving the thermal protection performance of the structure at high temperatures.

  2. Competency Model 101. The Process of Developing Core Competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichelberger, Lisa Wright; Hewlett, Peggy O'Neill

    1999-01-01

    The Mississippi Competency Model defines nurses' roles as provider (caregiver, teacher, counselor, advocate), professional (scholar, collaborator, ethicist, researcher), and manager (leader, facilitator, intrapreneur, decision maker, technology user) for four levels of nursing: licensed practical nurse, associate degree, bachelor's degree, and…

  3. Modeling Snow Regime in Cores of Small Planetary Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukaré, C. E.; Ricard, Y. R.; Parmentier, E.; Parman, S. W.

    2017-12-01

    Observations of present day magnetic field on small planetary bodies such as Ganymede or Mercury challenge our understanding of planetary dynamo. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the origin of magnetic fields. Among the proposed scenarios, one family of models relies on snow regime. Snow regime is supported by experimental studies showing that melting curves can first intersect adiabats in regions where the solidifying phase is not gravitationaly stable. First solids should thus remelt during their ascent or descent. The effect of the snow zone on magnetic field generation remains an open question. Could magnetic field be generated in the snow zone? If not, what is the depth extent of the snow zone? How remelting in the snow zone drive compositional convection in the liquid layer? Several authors have tackled this question with 1D-spherical models. Zhang and Schubert, 2012 model sinking of the dense phase as internally heated convection. However, to our knowledge, there is no study on the convection structure associated with sedimentation and phase change at planetary scale. We extend the numerical model developped in [Boukare et al., 2017] to model snow dynamics in 2D Cartesian geometry. We build a general approach for modeling double diffusive convection coupled with solid-liquid phase change and phase separation. We identify several aspects that may govern the convection structure of the solidifying system: viscosity contrast between the snow zone and the liquid layer, crystal size, rate of melting/solidification and partitioning of light components during phase change.

  4. The HTA core model: a novel method for producing and reporting health technology assessments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lampe, Kristian; Mäkelä, Marjukka; Garrido, Marcial Velasco

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to develop and test a generic framework to enable international collaboration for producing and sharing results of health technology assessments (HTAs). METHODS: Ten international teams constructed the HTA Core Model, dividing information contained...... for diagnostic technologies. Two Core HTAs were produced in parallel with developing the model, providing the first real-life testing of the Model and input for further development. The results of formal validation and public feedback were primarily positive. Development needs were also identified and considered....... An online Handbook is available. CONCLUSIONS: The HTA Core Model is a novel approach to HTA. It enables effective international production and sharing of HTA results in a structured format. The face validity of the Model was confirmed during the project, but further testing and refining are needed to ensure...

  5. State space modeling of reactor core in a pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashaari, A.; Ahmad, T.; M, Wan Munirah W. [Department of Mathematical Science, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Shamsuddin, Mustaffa [Institute of Ibnu Sina, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Abdullah, M. Adib [Swinburne University of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Computing and Science, Jalan Simpang Tiga, 93350 Kuching, Sarawak (Malaysia)

    2014-07-10

    The power control system of a nuclear reactor is the key system that ensures a safe operation for a nuclear power plant. However, a mathematical model of a nuclear power plant is in the form of nonlinear process and time dependent that give very hard to be described. One of the important components of a Pressurized Water Reactor is the Reactor core. The aim of this study is to analyze the performance of power produced from a reactor core using temperature of the moderator as an input. Mathematical representation of the state space model of the reactor core control system is presented and analyzed in this paper. The data and parameters are taken from a real time VVER-type Pressurized Water Reactor and will be verified using Matlab and Simulink. Based on the simulation conducted, the results show that the temperature of the moderator plays an important role in determining the power of reactor core.

  6. An Intuitionistic Fuzzy Methodology for Component-Based Software Reliability Optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henrik; Grigore, Albeanu; Popenţiuvlǎdicescu, Florin

    2012-01-01

    Component-based software development is the current methodology facilitating agility in project management, software reuse in design and implementation, promoting quality and productivity, and increasing the reliability and performability. This paper illustrates the usage of intuitionistic fuzzy...... degree approach in modelling the quality of entities in imprecise software reliability computing in order to optimize management results. Intuitionistic fuzzy optimization algorithms are proposed to be used for complex software systems reliability optimization under various constraints....

  7. Matérn's hard core models of types I and II with arbitrary compact grains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiderlen, Markus; Hörig, Mario

    Matérn's classical hard core models can be interpreted as models obtained from a stationary marked Poisson process by dependent thinning. The marks are balls of fixed radius, and a point is retained when its associated ball does not hit any other balls (type I) or when its random birth time is st...... of this model with the process of intact grains of the dead leaves model and the Stienen model leads to analogous results for the latter....

  8. Co Modeling and Co Synthesis of Safety Critical Multi threaded Embedded Software for Multi Core Embedded Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-20

    Kaiserslautern Kaiserslautern, Germany Sandeep Shukla FERMAT Lab Electrical and Computer Engineering Department Virginia Tech 900 North Glebe Road...Software Engineering , Software Producibility, Component-based software design, behavioral types, behavioral type inference, Polychronous model of...near future, many embedded applications including safety critical ones as used in avionics, automotive , mission control systems will run on

  9. A simple reactivity feedback model accounting for radial core expansion effects in the liquid metal fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Young Min; Lee, Yong Bum; Chang, Won Pyo; Haha, Do Hee

    2002-01-01

    The radial core expansion due to the structure temperature rise is one of major negative reactivity insertion mechanisms in metallic fueled reactor. Thermal expansion is a result of both the laws of nature and the particular core design and it causes negative reactivity feedback by the combination of increased core volume captures and increased core surface leakage. The simple radial core expansion reactivity feedback model developed for the SSC-K code was evaluated by the code-to-code comparison analysis. From the comparison results, it can be stated that the radial core expansion reactivity feedback model employed into the SSC-K code may be reasonably accurate in the UTOP analysis

  10. A simple reactivity feedback model accounting for radial core expansion effects in the liquid metal fast reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Young Min; Lee, Yong Bum; Chang, Won Pyo; Haha, Do Hee [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-10-01

    The radial core expansion due to the structure temperature rise is one of major negative reactivity insertion mechanisms in metallic fueled reactor. Thermal expansion is a result of both the laws of nature and the particular core design and it causes negative reactivity feedback by the combination of increased core volume captures and increased core surface leakage. The simple radial core expansion reactivity feedback model developed for the SSC-K code was evaluated by the code-to-code comparison analysis. From the comparison results, it can be stated that the radial core expansion reactivity feedback model employed into the SSC-K code may be reasonably accurate in the UTOP analysis.

  11. Theoretical approach to the WWER core thermomechanical modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Likhatchev, Y.; Troyanov, V.; Folomeev, V.; Demishonkov, A.

    2003-01-01

    The paper presents studies on the analysis of root causes of fuel assembly bowing under operating conditions; developing of a methodology for fuel assemblies thermomechanical simulation; developing of a calculation technique for thermomechanical modelling of the fuel assemblies bowing in operational conditions. Some examples of calculation results are given

  12. Application of the pertubation theory to a two channels model for sensitivity calculations in PWR cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, A.C.J.G. de; Andrade Lima, F.R. de

    1989-01-01

    The present work is an application of the perturbation theory (Matricial formalism) to a simplified two channels model, for sensitivity calculations in PWR cores. Expressions for some sensitivity coefficients of thermohydraulic interest were developed from the proposed model. The code CASNUR.FOR was written in FORTRAN to evaluate these sensitivity coefficients. The comparison between results obtained from the matrical formalism of pertubation theory with those obtained directly from the two channels model, makes evident the efficiency and potentiality of this perturbation method for nuclear reactor cores sensitivity calculations. (author) [pt

  13. Thermal Analysis of the Driving Component Based on the Thermal Network Method in a Lunar Drilling System and Experimental Verification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewei Tang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The main task of the third Chinese lunar exploration project is to obtain soil samples that are greater than two meters in length and to acquire bedding information from the surface of the moon. The driving component is the power output unit of the drilling system in the lander; it provides drilling power for core drilling tools. High temperatures can cause the sensors, permanent magnet, gears, and bearings to suffer irreversible damage. In this paper, a thermal analysis model for this driving component, based on the thermal network method (TNM was established and the model was solved using the quasi-Newton method. A vacuum test platform was built and an experimental verification method (EVM was applied to measure the surface temperature of the driving component. Then, the TNM was optimized, based on the principle of heat distribution. Through comparative analyses, the reasonableness of the TNM is validated. Finally, the static temperature field of the driving component was predicted and the “safe working times” of every mode are given.

  14. A model for the design and programming of multi-cores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jesshope, C.; Grandinetti, L.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a machine/programming model for the era of multi-core chips. It is derived from the sequential model but replaces sequential composition with concurrent composition at all levels in the program except at the level where the compiler is able to make deterministic decisions on

  15. Design of homogeneous trench-assisted multi-core fibers based on analytical model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ye, Feihong; Tu, Jiajing; Saitoh, Kunimasa

    2016-01-01

    We present a design method of homogeneous trench-assisted multicore fibers (TA-MCFs) based on an analytical model utilizing an analytical expression for the mode coupling coefficient between two adjacent cores. The analytical model can also be used for crosstalk (XT) properties analysis, such as ...

  16. Muscle spindles exhibit core lesions and extensive degeneration of intrafusal fibers in the Ryr1I4895T/wt mouse model of core myopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zvaritch, Elena; MacLennan, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Muscle spindles from the hind limb muscles of adult Ryr1 I4895T/wt (IT/+) mice exhibit severe structural abnormalities. Up to 85% of the spindles are separated from skeletal muscle fascicles by a thick layer of connective tissue. Many intrafusal fibers exhibit degeneration, with Z-line streaming, compaction and collapse of myofibrillar bundles, mitochondrial clumping, nuclear shrinkage and pyknosis. The lesions resemble cores observed in the extrafusal myofibers of this animal model and of core myopathy patients. Spindle abnormalities precede those in extrafusal fibers, indicating that they are a primary pathological feature in this murine Ryr1-related core myopathy. Muscle spindle involvement, if confirmed for human core myopathy patients, would provide an explanation for an array of devastating clinical features characteristic of these diseases and provide novel insights into the pathology of RYR1-related myopathies. - Highlights: • Muscle spindles exhibit structural abnormalities in a mouse model of core myopathy. • Myofibrillar collapse and mitochondrial clumping is observed in intrafusal fibers. • Myofibrillar degeneration follows a pattern similar to core formation in extrafusal myofibers. • Muscle spindle abnormalities are a part of the pathological phenotype in the mouse model of core myopathy. • Direct involvement of muscle spindles in the pathology of human RYR1-related myopathies is proposed

  17. Generalized Thermohydraulics Module GENFLO for Combining With the PWR Core Melting Model, BWR Recriticality Neutronics Model and Fuel Performance Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miettinen, Jaakko; Hamalainen, Anitta; Pekkarinen, Esko

    2002-01-01

    Thermal hydraulic simulation capability for accident conditions is needed at present in VTT in several programs. Traditional thermal hydraulic models are too heavy for simulation in the analysis tasks, where the main emphasis is the rapid neutron dynamics or the core melting. The GENFLO thermal hydraulic model has been developed at VTT for special applications in the combined codes. The basic field equations in GENFLO are for the phase mass, the mixture momentum and phase energy conservation equations. The phase separation is solved with the drift flux model. The basic variables to be solved are the pressure, void fraction, mixture velocity, gas enthalpy, liquid enthalpy, and concentration of non-condensable gas fractions. The validation of the thermohydraulic solution alone includes large break LOCA reflooding experiments and in specific for the severe accident conditions QUENCH tests. In the recriticality analysis the core neutronics is simulated with a two-dimensional transient neutronics code TWODIM. The recriticality with one rapid prompt peak is expected during a severe accident scenario, where the control rods have been melted and ECCS reflooding is started after the depressurization. The GENFLO module simulates the BWR thermohydraulics in this application. The core melting module has been developed for the real time operator training by using the APROS engineering simulators. The core heatup, oxidation, metal and fuel pellet relocation and corium pool formation into the lower plenum are calculated. In this application the GENFLO model simulates the PWR vessel thermohydraulics. In the fuel performance analysis the fuel rod transient behavior is simulated with the FRAPTRAN code. GENFLO simulates the subchannel around a single fuel rod and delivers the heat transfer on the cladding surface for the FRAPTRAN. The transient boundary conditions for the subchannel are transmitted from the system code for operational transient, loss of coolant accidents and

  18. TRANTHAC-1: transient thermal-hydraulic analysis code for HTGR core of multi-channel model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Sadao; Miyamoto, Yoshiaki

    1980-08-01

    The computer program TRANTHAC-1 is for predicting thermal-hydraulic transient behavior in HTGR's core of pin-in-block type fuel elements, taking into consideration of the core flow distribution. The program treats a multi-channel model, each single channel representing the respective column composed of fuel elements. The fuel columns are grouped in flow control regions; each region is provided with an orifice assembly. In the region, all channels are of the same shape except one channel. Core heat is removed by downward flow of the control through the channel. In any transients, for given time-dependent power, total core flow, inlet coolant temperature and coolant pressure, the thermal response of the core can be determined. In the respective channels, the heat conduction in radial and axial direction are represented. And the temperature distribution in each channel with the components is calculated. The model and usage of the program are described. The program is written in FORTRAN-IV for computer FACOM 230-75 and it is composed of about 4,000 cards. The required core memory is about 75 kilowords. (author)

  19. Modeling of melt retention in EU-APR1400 ex-vessel core catcher

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granovsky, V. S.; Sulatsky, A. A.; Khabensky, V. B.; Sulatskaya, M. B. [Alexandrov Research Inst. of Technology NITI, Sosnovy Bor (Russian Federation); Gusarov, V. V.; Almyashev, V. I.; Komlev, A. A. [Saint Petersburg State Technological Univ. SPbSTU, St.Petersburg (Russian Federation); Bechta, S. [KTH, Stockholm (Sweden); Kim, Y. S. [KHNP, 1312 Gil 70, Yuseongdaero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, R. J.; Kim, H. Y.; Song, J. H. [KAERI, 989 Gil 111, Daedeokdaero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-01

    A core catcher is adopted in the EU-APR1400 reactor design for management and mitigation of severe accidents with reactor core melting. The core catcher concept incorporates a number of engineering solutions used in the catcher designs of European EPR and Russian WER-1000 reactors, such as thin-layer corium spreading for better cooling, retention of the melt in a water-cooled steel vessel, and use of sacrificial material (SM) to control the melt properties. SM is one of the key elements of the catcher design and its performance is critical for melt retention efficiency. This SM consists of oxide components, but the core catcher also includes sacrificial steel which reacts with the metal melt of the molten corium to reduce its temperature. The paper describes the required properties of SM. The melt retention capability of the core catcher can be confirmed by modeling the heat fluxes to the catcher vessel to show that it will not fail. The fulfillment of this requirement is demonstrated on the example of LBLOCA severe accident. Thermal and physicochemical interactions between the oxide and metal melts, interactions of the melts with SM, sacrificial steel and vessel, core catcher external cooling by water and release of non-condensable gases are modeled. (authors)

  20. MODELLING CHALCOPYRITE LEACHING BY Fe+3 IONS WITH THE SHRINKING CORE MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Rangel Porcaro

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Chalcopyrite leaching by ferric iron is considered a slow process with low copper recovery; a phenomenon ascribed to the passivation of the mineral surface during leaching. Thus, the current study investigated the leaching kinetics of a high purity chalcopyrite sample in the presence of ferric sulfate as oxidant. The effects of the stirring rate, temperature, Eh and Fe3+ concentration on copper extraction were assessed. The leaching data could be described by the shirking core model (SCM for particles of unchanging size and indicated diffusion in the ash layer as the rate-controlling step with a high activation energy (103.9±6.5kJ/mol; likely an outcome of neglecting the effect of particle size distribution (PSD on the kinetics equations. Both the application of the quasi-steady-state assumption to solid-liquid systems and the effect of the particle size distribution on the interpretation of kinetics data are also discussed.

  1. The modeling of core melting and in-vessel corium relocation in the APRIL code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim. S.W.; Podowski, M.Z.; Lahey, R.T. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    This paper is concerned with the modeling of severe accident phenomena in boiling water reactors (BWR). New models of core melting and in-vessel corium debris relocation are presented, developed for implementation in the APRIL computer code. The results of model testing and validations are given, including comparisons against available experimental data and parametric/sensitivity studies. Also, the application of these models, as parts of the APRIL code, is presented to simulate accident progression in a typical BWR reactor.

  2. Modelling high-resolution electron microscopy based on core-loss spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, L.J.; Findlay, S.D.; Oxley, M.P.; Witte, C.; Zaluzec, N.J.

    2006-01-01

    There are a number of factors affecting the formation of images based on core-loss spectroscopy in high-resolution electron microscopy. We demonstrate unambiguously the need to use a full nonlocal description of the effective core-loss interaction for experimental results obtained from high angular resolution electron channelling electron spectroscopy. The implications of this model are investigated for atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy. Simulations are used to demonstrate that core-loss spectroscopy images formed using fine probes proposed for future microscopes can result in images that do not correspond visually with the structure that has led to their formation. In this context, we also examine the effect of varying detector geometries. The importance of the contribution to core-loss spectroscopy images by dechannelled or diffusely scattered electrons is reiterated here

  3. Evaluation of nuclear power plant component failure probability and core damage probability using simplified PSA model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Yoshio

    2000-01-01

    It is anticipated that the change of frequency of surveillance tests, preventive maintenance or parts replacement of safety related components may cause the change of component failure probability and result in the change of core damage probability. It is also anticipated that the change is different depending on the initiating event frequency or the component types. This study assessed the change of core damage probability using simplified PSA model capable of calculating core damage probability in a short time period, which is developed by the US NRC to process accident sequence precursors, when various component's failure probability is changed between 0 and 1, or Japanese or American initiating event frequency data are used. As a result of the analysis, (1) It was clarified that frequency of surveillance test, preventive maintenance or parts replacement of motor driven pumps (high pressure injection pumps, residual heat removal pumps, auxiliary feedwater pumps) should be carefully changed, since the core damage probability's change is large, when the base failure probability changes toward increasing direction. (2) Core damage probability change is insensitive to surveillance test frequency change, since the core damage probability change is small, when motor operated valves and turbine driven auxiliary feed water pump failure probability changes around one figure. (3) Core damage probability change is small, when Japanese failure probability data are applied to emergency diesel generator, even if failure probability changes one figure from the base value. On the other hand, when American failure probability data is applied, core damage probability increase is large, even if failure probability changes toward increasing direction. Therefore, when Japanese failure probability data is applied, core damage probability change is insensitive to surveillance tests frequency change etc. (author)

  4. Ex-Vessel Core Melt Modeling Comparison between MELTSPREAD-CORQUENCH and MELCOR 2.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robb, Kevin R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Farmer, Mitchell [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Francis, Matthew W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-03-01

    System-level code analyses by both United States and international researchers predict major core melting, bottom head failure, and corium-concrete interaction for Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1 (1F1). Although system codes such as MELCOR and MAAP are capable of capturing a wide range of accident phenomena, they currently do not contain detailed models for evaluating some ex-vessel core melt behavior. However, specialized codes containing more detailed modeling are available for melt spreading such as MELTSPREAD as well as long-term molten corium-concrete interaction (MCCI) and debris coolability such as CORQUENCH. In a preceding study, Enhanced Ex-Vessel Analysis for Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1: Melt Spreading and Core-Concrete Interaction Analyses with MELTSPREAD and CORQUENCH, the MELTSPREAD-CORQUENCH codes predicted the 1F1 core melt readily cooled in contrast to predictions by MELCOR. The user community has taken notice and is in the process of updating their systems codes; specifically MAAP and MELCOR, to improve and reduce conservatism in their ex-vessel core melt models. This report investigates why the MELCOR v2.1 code, compared to the MELTSPREAD and CORQUENCH 3.03 codes, yield differing predictions of ex-vessel melt progression. To accomplish this, the differences in the treatment of the ex-vessel melt with respect to melt spreading and long-term coolability are examined. The differences in modeling approaches are summarized, and a comparison of example code predictions is provided.

  5. Context sensitivity and ambiguity in component-based systems design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bespalko, S.J.; Sindt, A.

    1997-10-01

    Designers of components-based, real-time systems need to guarantee to correctness of soft-ware and its output. Complexity of a system, and thus the propensity for error, is best characterized by the number of states a component can encounter. In many cases, large numbers of states arise where the processing is highly dependent on context. In these cases, states are often missed, leading to errors. The following are proposals for compactly specifying system states which allow the factoring of complex components into a control module and a semantic processing module. Further, the need for methods that allow for the explicit representation of ambiguity and uncertainty in the design of components is discussed. Presented herein are examples of real-world problems which are highly context-sensitive or are inherently ambiguous.

  6. Integrating 3D CAD data for manufacturing and fabrication the core model of reactor TRIGA PUSPATI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abu Bakar Harun

    2005-01-01

    This paper describe the intrigue integration of digital 3 Dimensional Computer Aided Design (3D CAD) data manipulation for the Core Model fabrication of REAKTOR TRIGA PUSPATI and ready for mass manufacturing. 3 Dimensional CAD data from Computer Aided Design program will be used as an interpreter in the fabrication of this project. The Core Model of REAKTOR TRIGA PUSPATI will be fabricated with the aid of 3D CAD drawings and digital files. The components will be segregated and divided into 2 categories namely Conventional d Rapid Fabrication. (Author)

  7. 300 kWt core conceptual model thermal/hydraulic characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moody, E.

    1971-01-01

    The 300 kW(t), 199 element NASA-Lewis/AEC core conceptual model, has been analyzed to determine it's thermal-hydraulic characteristics using the GEOM-3 code. Stack-ups of tolerances and fuel rod asymmetry patterns were used to ascertain cross element Δ T's. Both zoned and uniform spacing were analyzed with a somewhat lower fuel temperature and cross element ΔT found for zoned spacing. With the models considered, the core design appears adequate to limit thermal gradients to approximately 32 0 F. Bypass flow should be controlled to prevent excessive edge element ΔT's. 11 references. (U.S.)

  8. CORCON-MOD3: An integrated computer model for analysis of molten core-concrete interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, D.R.; Gardner, D.R.; Brockmann, J.E.; Griffith, R.O.

    1993-10-01

    The CORCON-Mod3 computer code was developed to mechanistically model the important core-concrete interaction phenomena, including those phenomena relevant to the assessment of containment failure and radionuclide release. The code can be applied to a wide range of severe accident scenarios and reactor plants. The code represents the current state of the art for simulating core debris interactions with concrete. This document comprises the user's manual and gives a brief description of the models and the assumptions and limitations in the code. Also discussed are the input parameters and the code output. Two sample problems are also given

  9. Investigation of Large Scale Cortical Models on Clustered Multi-Core Processors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Playstation 3 with 6 available SPU cores outperforms the Intel Xeon processor (with 4 cores) by about 1.9 times for the HTM model and by 2.4 times...runtime breakdowns of the HTM and Dean models respectively on the Cell processor (on the Playstation 3) and the Intel Xeon processor ( 4 thread...YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ORGANIZATION. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4 . TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER

  10. Vibration mode and vibration shape under excitation of a three phase model transformer core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabe, Seiji; Ishigaki, Yusuke; Omura, Takeshi

    2018-04-01

    Structural vibration characteristics and vibration shapes under three-phase excitation of a archetype transformer core were investigated to consider their influences on transformer noise. Acoustic noise and vibration behavior were measured in a three-limb model transformer core. Experimental modal analysis by impact test was performed. The vibration shapes were measured by a laser scanning vibrometer at different exciting frequencies. Vibration amplitude of the core in out-of-plane direction were relatively larger than those in other two in-plane directions. It was consistent with the result that the frequency response function of the core in out-of-plane direction was larger by about 20 dB or more than those in in-plane directions. There were many vibration modes having bending deformation of limbs in out-of-plane direction. The vibration shapes of the core when excited at 50 Hz and 60 Hz were almost the same because the fundamental frequencies of the vibration were not close to the resonance frequencies. When excitation frequency was 69 Hz which was half of one of the resonance frequencies, the vibration shape changed to the one similar to the resonance vibration mode. Existence of many vibration modes in out-of-plane direction of the core was presumed to be a reason why frequency characteristics of magnetostriction and transformer noise do not coincide.

  11. Scale model study of the seismic response of a nuclear reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dove, R.C.; Dunwoody, W.E.; Rhorer, R.L.

    1983-01-01

    The use of scale models to study the dynamics of a system of graphite core blocks used in certain nuclear reactor designs is described. Scaling laws, material selecton, model instrumentation to measure collision forces, and the response of several models to simulated seismic excitation are covered. The effects of Coulomb friction between the blocks and the clearance gaps between the blocks on the system response to seismic excitation are emphasized

  12. Development of seismic analysis model for HTGR core on commercial FEM code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, Nobumasa; Ohashi, Kazutaka

    2015-01-01

    The aftermath of the Great East Japan Earthquake prods to revise the design basis earthquake intensity severely. In aseismic design of block-type HTGR, the securement of structural integrity of core blocks and other structures which are made of graphite become more important. For the aseismic design of block-type HTGR, it is necessary to predict the motion of core blocks which are collided with adjacent blocks. Some seismic analysis codes have been developed in 1970s, but these codes are special purpose-built codes and have poor collaboration with other structural analysis code. We develop the vertical 2 dimensional analytical model on multi-purpose commercial FEM code, which take into account the multiple impacts and friction between block interfaces and rocking motion on contact with dowel pins of the HTGR core by using contact elements. This model is verified by comparison with the experimental results of 12 column vertical slice vibration test. (author)

  13. Fast three-dimensional core optimization based on modified one-group model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freire, Fernando S. [ELETROBRAS Termonuclear S.A. - ELETRONUCLEAR, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. GCN-T], e-mail: freire@eletronuclear.gov.br; Martinez, Aquilino S.; Silva, Fernando C. da [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear], e-mail: aquilino@con.ufrj.br, e-mail: fernando@con.ufrj.br

    2009-07-01

    The optimization of any nuclear reactor core is an extremely complex process that consumes a large amount of computer time. Fortunately, the nuclear designer can rely on a variety of methodologies able to approximate the analysis of each available core loading pattern. Two-dimensional codes are usually used to analyze the loading scheme. However, when particular axial effects are present in the core, two-dimensional analysis cannot produce good results and three-dimensional analysis can be required at all time. Basically, in this paper are presented the major advantages that can be found when one use the modified one-group diffusion theory coupled with a buckling correction model in optimization process. The results of the proposed model are very accurate when compared to benchmark results obtained from detailed calculations using three-dimensional nodal codes (author)

  14. Assessment of core thermo-hydrodynamic models of REFLA-1D with CCTF data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okubo, Tsutomu; Murao, Yoshio

    1983-07-01

    In order to assess the core thermo-hydrodynamic models of REFLA-1D/MODE3, which is the latest version of REFLA-1D, several calculations of the core thermo-hydrodynamics have been performed for the CCTF Core-I series tests. The measured initial and boundary conditions were used for these calculations. The calculational results showed that the water accumulation model of Case 2 could predict the CCTF results fairly well as it could for the JAERI small scale facility. The calculated results for the base case and the EM tests were in good agreement with the CCTF data. The parameter effects, such as system pressure, initial clad temperature, Acc injection rate, LPCI injection rate and initial down-comer wall temperature, were predicted correctly, except for the high system pressure and the high LPCI injection rate tests. (author)

  15. A benchmark for coupled thermohydraulics system/three-dimensional neutron kinetics core models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kliem, S.

    1999-01-01

    During the last years 3D neutron kinetics core models have been coupled to advanced thermohydraulics system codes. These coupled codes can be used for the analysis of the whole reactor system. Although the stand-alone versions of the 3D neutron kinetics core models and of the thermohydraulics system codes generally have a good verification and validation basis, there is a need for additional validation work. This especially concerns the interaction between the reactor core and the other components of a nuclear power plant (NPP). In the framework of the international 'Atomic Energy Research' (AER) association on VVER Reactor Physics and Reactor Safety, a benchmark for these code systems was defined. (orig.)

  16. CoreFlow: A computational platform for integration, analysis and modeling of complex biological data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pasculescu, Adrian; Schoof, Erwin; Creixell, Pau

    2014-01-01

    between data generation, analysis and manuscript writing. CoreFlow is being released to the scientific community as an open-sourced software package complete with proteomics-specific examples, which include corrections for incomplete isotopic labeling of peptides (SILAC) or arginine-to-proline conversion......A major challenge in mass spectrometry and other large-scale applications is how to handle, integrate, and model the data that is produced. Given the speed at which technology advances and the need to keep pace with biological experiments, we designed a computational platform, CoreFlow, which...... provides programmers with a framework to manage data in real-time. It allows users to upload data into a relational database (MySQL), and to create custom scripts in high-level languages such as R, Python, or Perl for processing, correcting and modeling this data. CoreFlow organizes these scripts...

  17. Fast three-dimensional core optimization based on modified one-group model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freire, Fernando S.; Martinez, Aquilino S.; Silva, Fernando C. da

    2009-01-01

    The optimization of any nuclear reactor core is an extremely complex process that consumes a large amount of computer time. Fortunately, the nuclear designer can rely on a variety of methodologies able to approximate the analysis of each available core loading pattern. Two-dimensional codes are usually used to analyze the loading scheme. However, when particular axial effects are present in the core, two-dimensional analysis cannot produce good results and three-dimensional analysis can be required at all time. Basically, in this paper are presented the major advantages that can be found when one use the modified one-group diffusion theory coupled with a buckling correction model in optimization process. The results of the proposed model are very accurate when compared to benchmark results obtained from detailed calculations using three-dimensional nodal codes (author)

  18. The treatment of mixing in core helium-burning models - III. Suppressing core breathing pulses with a new constraint on overshoot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantino, Thomas; Campbell, Simon W.; Lattanzio, John C.

    2017-12-01

    Theoretical predictions for the core helium burning phase of stellar evolution are highly sensitive to the uncertain treatment of mixing at convective boundaries. In the last few years, interest in constraining the uncertain structure of their deep interiors has been renewed by insights from asteroseismology. Recently, Spruit proposed a limit for the rate of growth of helium-burning convective cores based on the higher buoyancy of material ingested from outside the convective core. In this paper we test the implications of such a limit for stellar models with a range of initial mass and metallicity. We find that the constraint on mixing beyond the Schwarzschild boundary has a significant effect on the evolution late in core helium burning, when core breathing pulses occur and the ingestion rate of helium is fastest. Ordinarily, core breathing pulses prolong the core helium burning lifetime to such an extent that models are at odds with observations of globular cluster populations. Across a wide range of initial stellar masses (0.83 ≤ M/M⊙ ≤ 5), applying the Spruit constraint reduces the core helium burning lifetime because core breathing pulses are either avoided or their number and severity reduced. The constraint suggested by Spruit therefore helps to resolve significant discrepancies between observations and theoretical predictions. Specifically, we find improved agreement for R2 (the observed ratio of asymptotic giant branch to horizontal branch stars in globular clusters), the luminosity difference between these two groups, and in asteroseismology, the mixed-mode period spacing detected in red clump stars in the Kepler field.

  19. A computationally efficient method for full-core conjugate heat transfer modeling of sodium fast reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Rui, E-mail: rhu@anl.gov; Yu, Yiqi

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Developed a computationally efficient method for full-core conjugate heat transfer modeling of sodium fast reactors. • Applied fully-coupled JFNK solution scheme to avoid the operator-splitting errors. • The accuracy and efficiency of the method is confirmed with a 7-assembly test problem. • The effects of different spatial discretization schemes are investigated and compared to the RANS-based CFD simulations. - Abstract: For efficient and accurate temperature predictions of sodium fast reactor structures, a 3-D full-core conjugate heat transfer modeling capability is developed for an advanced system analysis tool, SAM. The hexagon lattice core is modeled with 1-D parallel channels representing the subassembly flow, and 2-D duct walls and inter-assembly gaps. The six sides of the hexagon duct wall and near-wall coolant region are modeled separately to account for different temperatures and heat transfer between coolant flow and each side of the duct wall. The Jacobian Free Newton Krylov (JFNK) solution method is applied to solve the fluid and solid field simultaneously in a fully coupled fashion. The 3-D full-core conjugate heat transfer modeling capability in SAM has been demonstrated by a verification test problem with 7 fuel assemblies in a hexagon lattice layout. Additionally, the SAM simulation results are compared with RANS-based CFD simulations. Very good agreements have been achieved between the results of the two approaches.

  20. A review of MAAP4 code structure and core T/H model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Yong Mann; Park, Soo Yong

    1998-03-01

    The modular accident analysis program (MAAP) version 4 is a computer code that can simulate the response of LWR plants during severe accident sequences and includes models for all of the important phenomena which might occur during accident sequences. In this report, MAAP4 code structure and core thermal hydraulic (T/H) model which models the T/H behavior of the reactor core and the response of core components during all accident phases involving degraded cores are specifically reviewed and then reorganized. This reorganization is performed via getting the related models together under each topic whose contents and order are same with other two reports for MELCOR and SCDAP/RELAP5 to be simultaneously published. Major purpose of the report is to provide information about the characteristics of MAAP4 core T/H models for an integrated severe accident computer code development being performed under the one of on-going mid/long-term nuclear developing project. The basic characteristics of the new integrated severe accident code includes: 1) Flexible simulation capability of primary side, secondary side, and the containment under severe accident conditions, 2) Detailed plant simulation, 3) Convenient user-interfaces, 4) Highly modularization for easy maintenance/improvement, and 5) State-of-the-art model selection. In conclusion, MAAP4 code has appeared to be superior for 3) and 4) items but to be somewhat inferior for 1) and 2) items. For item 5), more efforts should be made in the future to compare separated models in detail with not only other codes but also recent world-wide work. (author). 17 refs., 1 tab., 12 figs

  1. Noise variation by compressive stress on the model core of power transformers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizokami, Masato, E-mail: mizokami.g76.masato@jp.nssmc.com; Kurosaki, Yousuke

    2015-05-01

    The reduction of audible noise generated by cores for power transformers has been required due to environmental concern. It is known that compressive stress in the rolling direction of electrical steel affects magnetostriction and it can result in an increase in noise level. In this research, the effect of compressive stress to noise was investigated on a 3-phase 3-limb model core. Compressive stress was applied in the rolling direction of the limbs from the outside of the core. It increased the sound pressure levels and the slope of the rise was about 2 dBA/MPa. Magnetostriction on single sheet samples was also measured under compressive stress and the harmonic components of the magnetostriction were compared with those of noise. It revealed that the variation in magnetostriction with compressive stress did not entirely correspond to that in noise. In one of the experiments, localized bending happened on one limb during compressing the core. While deformation of the core had not been intended, the noise was measured. The deformation increased the noise by more than 10 dBA and it occurred on most of the harmonic components. - Highlights: • Audible noise was measured on a model core to which compressive stress was applied. • The stress in the rolling direction of the steel causes a rise in noise level. • The slope of the rise in sound pressure level up to 2.5 MPa is about 2 dBA/MPa. • Variation in magnetostriction by stress does not entirely agree with that in noise. • Bend arisen in the core causes an extreme increase in noise.

  2. Noise variation by compressive stress on the model core of power transformers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizokami, Masato; Kurosaki, Yousuke

    2015-01-01

    The reduction of audible noise generated by cores for power transformers has been required due to environmental concern. It is known that compressive stress in the rolling direction of electrical steel affects magnetostriction and it can result in an increase in noise level. In this research, the effect of compressive stress to noise was investigated on a 3-phase 3-limb model core. Compressive stress was applied in the rolling direction of the limbs from the outside of the core. It increased the sound pressure levels and the slope of the rise was about 2 dBA/MPa. Magnetostriction on single sheet samples was also measured under compressive stress and the harmonic components of the magnetostriction were compared with those of noise. It revealed that the variation in magnetostriction with compressive stress did not entirely correspond to that in noise. In one of the experiments, localized bending happened on one limb during compressing the core. While deformation of the core had not been intended, the noise was measured. The deformation increased the noise by more than 10 dBA and it occurred on most of the harmonic components. - Highlights: • Audible noise was measured on a model core to which compressive stress was applied. • The stress in the rolling direction of the steel causes a rise in noise level. • The slope of the rise in sound pressure level up to 2.5 MPa is about 2 dBA/MPa. • Variation in magnetostriction by stress does not entirely agree with that in noise. • Bend arisen in the core causes an extreme increase in noise

  3. Modeling the Conducting Stably-Stratified Layer of the Earth's Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petitdemange, L.; Philidet, J.; Gissinger, C.

    2017-12-01

    Observations of the Earth magnetic field as well as recent theoretical works tend to show that the Earth's outer liquid core is mostly comprised of a convective zone in which the Earth's magnetic field is generated - likely by dynamo action -, but also features a thin, stably stratified layer at the top of the core.We carry out direct numerical simulations by modeling this thin layer as an axisymmetric spherical Couette flow for a stably stratified fluid embedded in a dipolar magnetic field. The dynamo region is modeled by a conducting inner core rotating slightly faster than the insulating mantle due to magnetic torques acting on it, such that a weak differential rotation (low Rossby limit) can develop in the stably stratified layer.In the case of a non-stratified fluid, the combined action of the differential rotation and the magnetic field leads to the well known regime of `super-rotation', in which the fluid rotates faster than the inner core. Whereas in the classical case, this super-rotation is known to vanish in the magnetostrophic limit, we show here that the fluid stratification significantly extends the magnitude of the super-rotation, keeping this phenomenon relevant for the Earth core. Finally, we study how the shear layers generated by this new state might give birth to magnetohydrodynamic instabilities or waves impacting the secular variations or jerks of the Earth's magnetic field.

  4. Modelling of core protection and monitoring system for PWR nuclear power plant simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung Kun Lee; Byoung Sung Han

    1997-01-01

    A nuclear power plant simulator was developed for Younggwang units 3 and 4 nuclear power plant (YGN Nos 3 and 4) in Korea; it has been in operation on training center since November 1996. The core protection calculator (CPC) and the core operating limit supervisory system (COLSS) for the simulator were also developed. The CPC is a digital computer-based core protection system, which performs on-line calculation of departure from nucleate boiling ratio (DNBR) and local power density (LPD). It initiates reactor trip when the core conditions exceed designated DNBR or LPD limitations. The COLSS is designed to assist operators by implementing the limiting conditions for operations in the technical specifications. With these systems, it is possible to increase capacity factor and safety of nuclear power plants, because the COLSS data can show accurate operation margin to plant operators and the CPC can protect reactor core. In this study, the function of CPC/COLSS is analyzed in detail, and then simulation model for CPC/COLSS is presented based on the function. Compared with the YGN Nos 3 and 4 plant operation data and CEDIPS/COLSS FORTRAN code test results, the predictions with the model show reasonable results. (Author)

  5. Effect of superconducting solenoid model cores on spanwise iron magnet roll control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britcher, C. P.

    1985-01-01

    Compared with conventional ferromagnetic fuselage cores, superconducting solenoid cores appear to offer significant reductions in the projected cost of a large wind tunnel magnetic suspension and balance system. The provision of sufficient magnetic roll torque capability has been a long-standing problem with all magnetic suspension and balance systems; and the spanwise iron magnet scheme appears to be the most powerful system available. This scheme utilizes iron cores which are installed in the wings of the model. It was anticipated that the magnetization of these cores, and hence the roll torque generated, would be affected by the powerful external magnetic field of the superconducting solenoid. A preliminary study has been made of the effect of the superconducting solenoid fuselage model core concept on the spanwise iron magnet roll torque generation schemes. Computed data for one representative configuration indicate that reductions in available roll torque occur over a range of applied magnetic field levels. These results indicate that a 30-percent increase in roll electromagnet capacity over that previously determined will be required for a representative 8-foot wind tunnel magnetic suspension and balance system design.

  6. Development of a 3-dimensional calculation model of the Danish research reactor DR3 to analyse a proposal to a new core design called ring-core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nonboel, E

    1985-07-01

    A 3-dimensional calculation model of the Danish research reactor DR3 has been developed. Demands of a more effective utilization of the reactor and its facilities has required a more detailed calculation tool than applied so far. A great deal of attention has been devoted to the treatment of the coarse control arms. The model has been tested against measurements with satisfying results. Furthermore the model has been used to analyse a proposal to a new core design called ring-core where 4 central fuel elements are replaced by 4 dummy elements to increase the thermal flux in the center of the reactor. (author)

  7. Thermal-Hydraulics analysis of pressurized water reactor core by using single heated channel model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Akbari

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Thermal hydraulics of nuclear reactor as a basis of reactor safety has a very important role in reactor design and control. The thermal-hydraulic analysis provides input data to the reactor-physics analysis, whereas the latter gives information about the distribution of heat sources, which is needed to perform the thermal-hydraulic analysis. In this study single heated channel model as a very fast model for predicting thermal hydraulics behavior of pressurized water reactor core has been developed. For verifying the results of this model, we used RELAP5 code as US nuclear regulatory approved thermal hydraulics code. The results of developed single heated channel model have been checked with RELAP5 results for WWER-1000. This comparison shows the capability of single heated channel model for predicting thermal hydraulics behavior of reactor core.

  8. Model-based temperature noise monitoring methods for LMFBR core anomaly detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamaoki, Tetsuo; Sonoda, Yukio; Sato, Masuo; Takahashi, Ryoichi.

    1994-01-01

    Temperature noise, measured by thermocouples mounted at each core fuel subassembly, is considered to be the most useful signal for detecting and locating local cooling anomalies in an LMFBR core. However, the core outlet temperature noise contains background noise due to fluctuations in the operating parameters including reactor power. It is therefore necessary to reduce this background noise for highly sensitive anomaly detection by subtracting predictable components from the measured signal. In the present study, both a physical model and an autoregressive model were applied to noise data measured in the experimental fast reactor JOYO. The results indicate that the autoregressive model has a higher precision than the physical model in background noise prediction. Based on these results, an 'autoregressive model modification method' is proposed, in which a temporary autoregressive model is generated by interpolation or extrapolation of reference models identified under a small number of different operating conditions. The generated autoregressive model has shown sufficient precision over a wide range of reactor power in applications to artificial noise data produced by an LMFBR noise simulator even when the coolant flow rate was changed to keep a constant power-to-flow ratio. (author)

  9. Ground states and formal duality relations in the Gaussian core model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohn, H.; Kumar, A.; Schürmann, A.

    2009-01-01

    We study dimensional trends in ground states for soft-matter systems. Specifically, using a high-dimensional version of Parrinello-Rahman dynamics, we investigate the behavior of the Gaussian core model in up to eight dimensions. The results include unexpected geometric structures, with surprising

  10. Core-SOL modelling of neon seeded JET discharges with the ITER-like wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Telesca, G. [Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University (Belgium); EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Ivanova-Stanik, I.; Zagoerski, R.; Czarnecka, A. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland); EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Brezinsek, S.; Huber, A.; Wiesen, S. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Institut fuer Klima- und Energieforschung-Plasmaphysik, Juelich (Germany); EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Drewelow, P. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Greifswald (Germany); EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Giroud, C. [CCFE Culham, Abingdon (United Kingdom); EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Collaboration: JET EFDA contributors

    2016-08-15

    Five ELMy H-mode Ne seeded JET pulses have been simulated with the self-consistent core-SOL model COREDIV. In this five pulse series only the Ne seeding rate was changed shot by shot, allowing a thorough study of the effect of Ne seeding on the total radiated power and of its distribution between core and SOL tobe made. The increase in the simulations of the Ne seeding rate level above that achieved in experiments shows saturation of the total radiated power at a relatively low radiated-heating power ratio (f{sub rad} = 0.60) and a further increase of the ratio of SOL to core radiation, in agreement with the reduction of W release at high Ne seeding level. In spite of the uncertainties caused by the simplified SOL model of COREDIV (neutral model, absence of ELMs and slab model for the SOL), the increase of the perpendicular transport in the SOL with increasing Ne seeding rate, which allows to reproduce numerically the experimental distribution core-SOL of the radiated power, appears to be of general applicability. (copyright 2016 The Authors. Contributions to Plasma Physics published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA Weinheim. This)

  11. Development of high frequency spice models for ferrite core inductors and transformers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muyshondt, G. Patrick; Portnoy, William M.

    In this work high frequency SPICE models were developed to simulate the hysteresis and saturation effects of toroidal shaped ferrite core inductors and transformers. The models include the nonlinear, multi-valued B-H characteristic of the core material, leakage flux, stray capacitances, and core losses. The saturation effects were modeled using two diode clamping arrangements in conjunction with nonlinear dependent sources. Two possible controlling schemes were developed for the saturation switch. One of the arrangements used the current flowing through a series RC branch to control the switch, while the other used a NAND gate. The NAND gate implementation of the switch proved to be simpler and the parameters associated with it were easier to determine from the measurements and the B-H characteristics of the material. Lumped parameters were used to simulate the parasitic effects. Techniques for measuring these effects are described. The models were verified using manganese-zinc ferrite-type toroidal cores and they have general applicability to all circuit analysis codes equivalent function blocks such as multipliers, adders, and logic components.

  12. First-Principles Modeling of Core/Shell Quantum Dot Sensitized Solar Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Azpiroz, Jon Mikel; Infante, Ivan; De Angelis, Filippo

    2015-01-01

    We report on the density functional theory (DFT) modeling of core/shell quantum dot (QD) sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs), a device architecture that holds great potential in photovoltaics but has not been fully exploited so far. To understand the working mechanisms of this kind of solar cells, we

  13. Exchange bias and asymmetric hysteresis loops from a microscopic model of core/shell nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iglesias, Oscar; Batlle, Xavier; Labarta, Amilcar

    2007-01-01

    We present Monte Carlo simulations of hysteresis loops of a model of a magnetic nanoparticle with a ferromagnetic core and an antiferromagnetic shell with varying values of the core/shell interface exchange coupling which aim to clarify the microscopic origin of exchange bias observed experimentally. We have found loop shifts in the field direction as well as displacements along the magnetization axis that increase in magnitude when increasing the interfacial exchange coupling. Overlap functions computed from the spin configurations along the loops have been obtained to explain the origin and magnitude of these features microscopically

  14. Code package {open_quotes}SVECHA{close_quotes}: Modeling of core degradation phenomena at severe accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veshchunov, M.S.; Kisselev, A.E.; Palagin, A.V. [Nuclear Safety Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    The code package SVECHA for the modeling of in-vessel core degradation (CD) phenomena in severe accidents is being developed in the Nuclear Safety Institute, Russian Academy of Science (NSI RAS). The code package presents a detailed mechanistic description of the phenomenology of severe accidents in a reactor core. The modules of the package were developed and validated on separate effect test data. These modules were then successfully implemented in the ICARE2 code and validated against a wide range of integral tests. Validation results have shown good agreement with separate effect tests data and with the integral tests CORA-W1/W2, CORA-13, PHEBUS-B9+.

  15. Modeling of Thermal Phase Noise in a Solid Core Photonic Crystal Fiber-Optic Gyroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ningfang; Ma, Kun; Jin, Jing; Teng, Fei; Cai, Wei

    2017-10-26

    A theoretical model of the thermal phase noise in a square-wave modulated solid core photonic crystal fiber-optic gyroscope has been established, and then verified by measurements. The results demonstrate a good agreement between theory and experiment. The contribution of the thermal phase noise to the random walk coefficient of the gyroscope is derived. A fiber coil with 2.8 km length is used in the experimental solid core photonic crystal fiber-optic gyroscope, showing a random walk coefficient of 9.25 × 10 -5 deg/√h.

  16. α Centauri A as a potential stellar model calibrator: establishing the nature of its core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nsamba, B.; Monteiro, M. J. P. F. G.; Campante, T. L.; Cunha, M. S.; Sousa, S. G.

    2018-05-01

    Understanding the physical process responsible for the transport of energy in the core of α Centauri A is of the utmost importance if this star is to be used in the calibration of stellar model physics. Adoption of different parallax measurements available in the literature results in differences in the interferometric radius constraints used in stellar modelling. Further, this is at the origin of the different dynamical mass measurements reported for this star. With the goal of reproducing the revised dynamical mass derived by Pourbaix & Boffin, we modelled the star using two stellar grids varying in the adopted nuclear reaction rates. Asteroseismic and spectroscopic observables were complemented with different interferometric radius constraints during the optimisation procedure. Our findings show that best-fit models reproducing the revised dynamical mass favour the existence of a convective core (≳ 70% of best-fit models), a result that is robust against changes to the model physics. If this mass is accurate, then α Centauri A may be used to calibrate stellar model parameters in the presence of a convective core.

  17. RELAP5 model for advanced neutron source reactor thermal-hydraulic transients, three-element-core design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, N.C.J.; Wendel, M.W.; Yoder, G.L.

    1996-02-01

    In order to utilize reduced enrichment fuel, the three-element-core design has been proposed. The proposed core configuration consists of inner, middle, and outer elements, with the middle element offset axially beneath the inner and outer elements, which are axially aligned. The three-element-core RELAP5 model assumes that the reactor hardware is changed only within the core region, so that the loop piping, heat exchangers, and pumps remain as assumed for the two-element-core configuration. However, the total flow rate through the core is greater and the pressure drop across the core is less so that the primary coolant pumps and heat exchangers are operating at a different point in their performance curves. This report describes the new RELAP5 input for the core components.

  18. Investigation on macroscopic cross section model for BWR pin-by-pin core analysis - 118

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, T.; Tada, K.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamane, Y.; Kosaka, S.; Hirano, G.

    2010-01-01

    A cross section model used in the pin-by-pin core analysis for BWR is investigated. In the pin-by-pin core calculation method, pin-cell averaged cross sections are calculated for many combinations of state and history variables that have influences on the cross section and are tabulated prior to the core calculations. Variation of a cross section in a core simulator is classified into two different types, i.e., the instantaneous effect and the history effect. The instantaneous effect is incorporated by the variation of cross section which is caused by the instantaneous change of state variables. For this effect, the exposure, the void fraction, the fuel temperature, the moderator temperature and the control rod are used as indexes. The history effect is the cumulative effect of state variables. We treat this effect with a unified approach using the spectral history. To confirm accuracy of the cross section model, the pin-by-pin fission rate distribution and the k-infinity of fuel assembly which are obtained with the tabulated and the reference cross sections are compared. For the instantaneous effect, the present cross section model well reproduces the reference results for all off-nominal conditions. For the history effect, however, considerable differences both on the pin-by-pin fission rate distribution and the k-infinity are observed at high exposure points. (authors)

  19. VIPRE-01. a thermal-hydraulic analysis code for reactor cores. Volume 1. Mathematical modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, C.W.; Cuta, J.M.; Koontz, A.S.; Kelly, J.M.; Basehore, K.L.; George, T.L.; Rowe, D.S.

    1983-04-01

    VIPRE (Versatile Internals and Component Program for Reactors; EPRI) has been developed for nuclear power utility thermal-hydraulic analysis applications. It is designed to help evaluate nuclear reactor core safety limits including minimum departure from nucleate boiling ratio (MDNBR), critical power ratio (CPR), fuel and clad temperatures, and coolant state in normal operation and assumed accident conditions. This volume (Volume 1: Mathematical Modeling) explains the major thermal hydraulic models and supporting correlations in detail

  20. Final Report: Legion Core Object Model, March 1, 1996 - September 30, 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimshaw, Andrew S.

    1999-09-30

    The model specifies the composition and functionality of Legion's core objects - those objects that cooperate to create, locate, manage, and remove objects from the legion project. In particular, the object model facilitates a flexible extensible implementation, provides a single persistent name space, grants site autonomy to participating organizations, and scales to millions of sites and trillions of objects. Further, it offers a framework that is well suited to providing mechanisms for high performance, security, fault tolerance and commerce.

  1. Observation and excitation of magnetohydrodynamic waves in numerical models of Earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teed, R.; Hori, K.; Tobias, S.; Jones, C. A.

    2017-12-01

    Several types of magnetohydrodynamic waves are theorised to operate in Earth's outer core but their detection is limited by the inability to probe the fluid core directly. Secular variation data and periodic changes in Earth's length-of-day provide evidence for the possible existence of waves. Numerical simulations of core dynamics enable us to search directly for waves and determine their properties. With this information it is possible to consider whether they can be the origin of features observed in observational data. We focus on two types of wave identified in our numerical experiments: i) torsional waves and ii) slow magnetic Rossby waves. Our models display periodic, Earth-like torsional waves that travel outwards from the tangent cylinder circumscribing the inner core. We discuss the properties of these waves and their similarites to observational data. Excitation is via a matching of the Alfvén frequency with that of small modes of convection focused at the tangent cylinder. The slow magnetic Rossby waves observed in our simulations show that these waves may account for some geomagnetic westward drifts observed at mid-latitudes. We present analysis showing excitation of waves by the convective instability and we discuss how the detection of these waves could also provide an estimate of the strength of the toroidal component of the magnetic field within the planetary fluid core.

  2. Introducing FACETS, the Framework Application for Core-Edge Transport Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cary, John R.; Candy, Jeff; Cohen, Ronald H.; Krasheninnikov, Sergei I.; McCune, Douglas C.; Estep, Donald J.; Larson, Jay W.; Malony, Allen; Worley, Patrick H.; Carlsson, Johann Anders; Hakim, A.H.; Hamill, P.; Kruger, Scott E.; Muzsala, S.; Pletzer, Alexander; Shasharina, Svetlana; Wade-Stein, D.; Wang, N.; McInnes, Lois C.; Wildey, T.; Casper, T.A.; Diachin, Lori A.; Epperly, Thomas; Rognlien, T.D.; Fahey, Mark R.; Kuehn, Jeffery A.; Morris, A.; Shende, Sameer; Feibush, E.; Hammett, Gregory W.; Indireshkumar, K.; Ludescher, C.; Randerson, L.; Stotler, D.; Pigarov, A.; Bonoli, P.; Chang, C.S.; D'Ippolito, D.A.; Colella, Philip; Keyes, David E.; Bramley, R.

    2007-01-01

    The FACETS (Framework Application for Core-Edge Transport Simulations) project began in January 2007 with the goal of providing core to wall transport modeling of a tokamak fusion reactor. This involves coupling previously separate computations for the core, edge, and wall regions. Such a coupling is primarily through connection regions of lower dimensionality. The project has started developing a component-based coupling framework to bring together models for each of these regions. In the first year, the core model will be a 1 dimensional model (1D transport across flux surfaces coupled to a 2D equilibrium) with fixed equilibrium. The initial edge model will be the fluid model, UEDGE, but inclusion of kinetic models is planned for the out years. The project also has an embedded Scientific Application Partnership that is examining embedding a full-scale turbulence model for obtaining the crosssurface fluxes into a core transport code.

  3. Studies of mixed HEU-LEU-MTR cores using 3D models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haenggi, P.; Lehmann, E.; Hammer, J.; Christen, R. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-08-01

    Several different core loadings were assembled at the SAPHIR research reactor in Switzerland combining the available types of MTR-type fuel elements, consisting mainly of both HEU and LEU fuel. Bearing in mind the well known problems which can occur in such configurations (especially power peaking), investigations have been carried out for each new loading with a 2D neutron transport code (BOXER). The axial effects were approximated by a global buckling value and therefore the radial effects could be studied in considerably detail. Some of the results were reported at earlier RERTR meetings and were compared to those obtained by other methods and with experimental values. For the explicit study of the third dimension of the core, another code (SILWER), which has been developed in PSI for LWR power plant cores, has been selected. With the help of an adapted model for the MTR-core of SAPHIR, several important questions have been addressed. Among other aspects, the estimation of the axial contribution to the hot channel factors, the influence of the control rod position and of the Xe-poisoning on the power distribution were studied. Special attention was given to a core position where a new element was assumed placed near a empty, water filled position. The comparison of elements of low and high enrichments at this position was made in terms of the induced power peaks, with explicit consideration of axial effects. The program SILWER has proven to be applicable to MTR-cores for the investigation of axial effects. For routine use as for the support of reactor operation, this 3D code is a good supplement to the standard 2D model.

  4. A model for osmium isotopic evolution of metallic solids at the core-mantle boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humayun, Munir

    2011-03-01

    Some plumes are thought to originate at the core-mantle boundary, but geochemical evidence of core-mantle interaction is limited to Os isotopes in samples from Hawaii, Gorgona (89 Ma), and Kostomuksha (2.7 Ga). The Os isotopes have been explained by physical entrainment of Earth's liquid outer core into mantle plumes. This model has come into conflict with geophysical estimates of the timing of core formation, high-pressure experimental determinations of the solid metal-liquid metal partition coefficients (D), and the absence of expected 182W anomalies. A new model is proposed where metallic liquid from the outer core is partially trapped in a compacting cumulate pile of Fe-rich nonmetallic precipitates (FeO, FeS, Fe3Si, etc.) at the top of the core and undergoes fractional crystallization precipitating solid metal grains, followed by expulsion of the residual metallic liquid back to the outer core. The Os isotopic composition of the solids and liquids in the cumulate pile is modeled as a function of the residual liquid remaining and the emplacement age using 1 bar D values, with variable amounts of oxygen (0-10 wt %) as the light element. The precipitated solids evolve Os isotope compositions that match the trends for Hawaii (at an emplacement age of 3.5-4.5 Ga; 5%-10% oxygen) and Gorgona (emplacement age < 1.5 Ga; 0%-5% oxygen). The Fe-rich matrix of the cumulate pile dilutes the precipitated solid metal decoupling the Fe/Mn ratio from Os and W isotopes. The advantages to using precipitated solid metal as the Os host include a lower platinum group element and Ni content to the mantle source region relative to excess iron, miniscule anomalies in 182W (<0.1 ɛ), and no effects for Pb isotopes, etc. A gradual thermomechanical erosion of the cumulate pile results in incorporation of this material into the base of the mantle, where mantle plumes subsequently entrain it. Fractional crystallization of metallic liquids within the CMB provides a consistent explanation of

  5. Modeling the reactor core of MNSR to simulate its dynamic behavior using the code PARET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hainoun, A.; Alhabet, F.

    2004-02-01

    Using the computer code PARET the core of the MNSR reactor was modelled and the neutronics and thermal hydraulic behaviour of the reactor core for the steady state and selected transients, that deal with step change of reactivity including control rod withdraw starting from steady state at various low power level, were simulated. For this purpose a PARET input model for the core of MNSR reactor has been developed enabling the simulation of neutron kinetic and thermal hydraulic of reactor core including reactivity feedback effects. The neutron kinetic model depends on the point kinetic with 15 groups delayed neutrons including photo neutrons of beryllium reflector. In this regard the effect of photo neutron on the dynamic behaviour has been analysed through two additional calculation. In the first the yield of photo neutrons was neglected completely and in the second its share was added to the sixth group of delayed neutrons. In the thermal hydraulic model the fuel elements with their cooling channels were distributed to 4 different groups with various radial power factors. The pressure lose factors for friction, flow direction change, expansion and contraction were estimated using suitable approaches. The post calculations of the relative neutron flux change and core average temperature were found to be consistent with the experimental measurements. Furthermore, the simulation has indicated the influence of photo neutrons of the Beryllium reflector on the neutron flux behaviour. For the reliability of the results sensitivity analysis was carried out to consider the uncertainty in some important parameters like temperature feedback coefficient and flow velocity. On the other hand the application of PARET in simulation of void formation in the subcooled boiling regime were tested. The calculation indicates the capability of PARET in modelling this phenomenon. However, big discrepancy between calculation results and measurement of axial void distribution were observed

  6. Probabilistic fatigue life prediction methodology for notched components based on simple smooth fatigue tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Z. R.; Li, Z. X. [Dept.of Engineering Mechanics, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Engineering Mechanics, Southeast University, Nanjing (China); Hu, X. T.; Xin, P. P.; Song, Y. D. [State Key Laboratory of Mechanics and Control of Mechanical Structures, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing (China)

    2017-01-15

    The methodology of probabilistic fatigue life prediction for notched components based on smooth specimens is presented. Weakestlink theory incorporating Walker strain model has been utilized in this approach. The effects of stress ratio and stress gradient have been considered. Weibull distribution and median rank estimator are used to describe fatigue statistics. Fatigue tests under different stress ratios were conducted on smooth and notched specimens of titanium alloy TC-1-1. The proposed procedures were checked against the test data of TC-1-1 notched specimens. Prediction results of 50 % survival rate are all within a factor of two scatter band of the test results.

  7. Assessment of TRAC-PD2 reflood core thermo-hydraulic model by CCTF Test C1-16

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Jun

    1982-11-01

    The TRAC-PD2 reflood core thermo-hydraulic model was assessed by CCTF Test C1-16. The measured data were utilized as core boundary conditions in the TRAC calculations. The results indicate that the core inlet liquid temperature and the core heater rod temperatures are in reasonable agreement with data, but the pressure distribution in the core and water pool formation in the upper plenum are not in good agreement. The parametric effects of the droplet critical Weber number, the material properties of the heater rod, the noding of the upper plenum, and the minimum stable film boiling temperature are also discussed. (author)

  8. Support for Programming Models in Network-on-Chip-based Many-core Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Morten Sleth

    This thesis addresses aspects of support for programming models in Network-on- Chip-based many-core architectures. The main focus is to consider architectural support for a plethora of programming models in a single system. The thesis has three main parts. The first part considers parallelization...... models to be supported by a single architecture. The architecture features a specialized network interface processor which allows extensive configurability of the memory system. Based on this architecture, a detailed implementation of the cache coherent shared memory programming model is presented...

  9. Modeling Polarized Emission from Black Hole Jets: Application to M87 Core Jet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Mościbrodzka

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We combine three-dimensional general-relativistic numerical models of hot, magnetized Advection Dominated Accretion Flows around a supermassive black hole and the corresponding outflows from them with a general relativistic polarized radiative transfer model to produce synthetic radio images and spectra of jet outflows. We apply the model to the underluminous core of M87 galaxy. The assumptions and results of the calculations are discussed in context of millimeter observations of the M87 jet launching zone. Our ab initio polarized emission and rotation measure models allow us to address the constrains on the mass accretion rate onto the M87 supermassive black hole.

  10. Model stars with degenerate dwarf cores and helium-burning shells - A stationary-burning approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iben, I. Jr.; Tutukov, A.V. (Illinois Univ., Urbana (USA); Astronomicheskii Sovet, Moscow (USSR))

    1989-07-01

    The characteristics of model stars consisting of a degenerate dwarf core and an envelope which is burning a nuclear fuel or fuels in its interior are explored. The models are relevant to stars which are accreting matter from a companion, to single stars in late stages of evolution, to stripped noninteracting remnants of binary star evolution, and to merging and merged degenerate dwarfs. For any given mass and choice of nuclear fuels, a sequence of models is constructed which differ with respect to the mass of the degenerate core and the envelope characteristics. Each sequence has at least three distinct branches: a degenerate dwarf branch along which envelope mass increases with decreasing luminosity, a plateau branch characterized by a very small envelope mass and by a nearly constant luminosity which reaches the maximum achievable value for the sequence, and an asymptotic giant branch which is at the lowest temperatures achievable and along which envelope mass decreases with increasing luminosity. 78 refs.

  11. Model stars with degenerate dwarf cores and helium-burning shells - A stationary-burning approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iben, I. Jr.; Tutukov, A.V.

    1989-01-01

    The characteristics of model stars consisting of a degenerate dwarf core and an envelope which is burning a nuclear fuel or fuels in its interior are explored. The models are relevant to stars which are accreting matter from a companion, to single stars in late stages of evolution, to stripped noninteracting remnants of binary star evolution, and to merging and merged degenerate dwarfs. For any given mass and choice of nuclear fuels, a sequence of models is constructed which differ with respect to the mass of the degenerate core and the envelope characteristics. Each sequence has at least three distinct branches: a degenerate dwarf branch along which envelope mass increases with decreasing luminosity, a plateau branch characterized by a very small envelope mass and by a nearly constant luminosity which reaches the maximum achievable value for the sequence, and an asymptotic giant branch which is at the lowest temperatures achievable and along which envelope mass decreases with increasing luminosity. 78 refs

  12. PENGARUH TECHNOLOGY ACCEPTANCE MODEL DAN PENGEMBANGANNYA DALAM PERILAKU MENGGUNAKAN CORE BANKING SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dessanti Putri Sekti Ari

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the antecedents that affected the acceptance of individuals in using theCore Banking System through the constructs Technology Acceptance Model and its development. Constructsused in this study were perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, attitude, social influences, behavioral inten-tion, facilitating conditions, and behavior. Data were collected through survey methods. The samples of thisstudy were employees working in commercial banks in Malang Raya. This study used 136 respondents and wasanalyzed by smart PLS. The result of this study was that the construct of perceived usefulness and perceived easeof use in the Technology Acceptance Model affected attitude and behavior. Attitude and behavior in the Technol-ogy Acceptance Model and social influence which was the development of the Technology Acceptance Modelaffected behavioral intention to use the Core Banking System, as well as the construct of behavioral intention inTechnology Acceptance Model affected behavior, whereas construct of facilitating conditions which was thedevelopment of the Technology Acceptance Model did not affect the behavior on using the Core Banking System.

  13. Multiregional coupled conduction--convection model for heat transfer in an HTGR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giles, G.E. Jr.; Childs, K.W.; Sanders, J.P.

    1978-01-01

    HEXEREI is a three-dimensional, coupled conduction-convection heat transfer and multichannel fluid dynamic analysis computer code with both steady-state and transient capabilities. The program was developed to provide thermal-fluid dynamic analysis of a core following the general design for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs); its purpose was to provide licensing evaluations for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. In order to efficiently model the HTGR core, the nodal geometry of HEXEREI was chosen as a regular hexagonal array perpendicular to the axis of and bounded by a right circular cylinder. The cylindrical nodal geometry surrounds the hexagonal center portion of the mesh; these two different types of nodal geometries must be connected by interface nodes to complete the accurate modeling of the HTGR core. HEXEREI will automatically generate a nodal geometry that will accurately model a complex assembly of hexagonal and irregular prisms. The accuracy of the model was proven by a comparison of computed values with analytical results for steady-state and transient heat transfer problems. HEXEREI incorporates convective heat transfer to the coolant in many parallel axial flow channels. Forced and natural convection (which permits different flow directions in parallel channels) is included in the heat transfer and fluid dynamic models. HEXEREI incorporates a variety of steady-state and transient solution techniques that can be matched with a particular problem to minimize the computational time. HEXEREI was compared with a code of similar capabilities that was based on a Cartesian mesh. This code modeled only one specific core design, and the mesh spacing was closer than that generated by HEXEREI. Good agreement was obtained with the detail provided by the representations

  14. Application of an enhanced cross-section interpolation model for highly poisoned LWR core calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palau, J.M.; Cathalau, S.; Hudelot, J.P.; Barran, F.; Bellanger, V.; Magnaud, C.; Moreau, F.

    2011-01-01

    Burnable poisons are extensively used by Light Water Reactor designers in order to preserve the fuel reactivity potential and increase the cycle length (without increasing the uranium enrichment). In the industrial two-steps (assembly 2D transport-core 3D diffusion) calculation schemes these heterogeneities yield to strong flux and cross-sections perturbations that have to be taken into account in the final 3D burn-up calculations. This paper presents the application of an enhanced cross-section interpolation model (implemented in the French CRONOS2 code) to LWR (highly poisoned) depleted core calculations. The principle is to use the absorbers (or actinide) concentrations as the new interpolation parameters instead of the standard local burnup/fluence parameters. It is shown by comparing the standard (burnup/fluence) and new (concentration) interpolation models and using the lattice transport code APOLLO2 as a numerical reference that reactivity and local reaction rate prediction of a 2x2 LWR assembly configuration (slab geometry) is significantly improved with the concentration interpolation model. Gains on reactivity and local power predictions (resp. more than 1000 pcm and 20 % discrepancy reduction compared to the reference APOLLO2 scheme) are obtained by using this model. In particular, when epithermal absorbers are inserted close to thermal poison the 'shadowing' ('screening') spectral effects occurring during control operations are much more correctly modeled by concentration parameters. Through this outstanding example it is highlighted that attention has to be paid to the choice of cross-section interpolation parameters (burnup 'indicator') in core calculations with few energy groups and variable geometries all along the irradiation cycle. Actually, this new model could be advantageously applied to steady-state and transient LWR heterogeneous core computational analysis dealing with strong spectral-history variations under

  15. [Development and application of component-based Chinese medicine theory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun-Hua; Fan, Guan-Wei; Zhang, Han; Fan, Xiao-Hui; Wang, Yi; Liu, Li-Mei; Li, Chuan; Gao, Yue; Gao, Xiu-Mei; Zhang, Bo-Li

    2017-11-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) prescription is the main therapies for disease prevention and treatment in Chinese medicine. Following the guidance of the theory of TCM and developing drug by composing prescriptions of TCM materials and pieces, it is a traditional application mode of TCM, and still widely used in clinic. TCM prescription has theoretical advantages and rich clinical application experience in dealing with multi-factor complex diseases, but scientific research is relatively weak. The lack of scientific cognition of the effective substances and mechanism of Chinese medicine leads to insufficient understanding of the efficacy regularity, which affects the stability of effect and hinders the improvement of quality of Chinese medicinal products. Component-based Chinese medicine (CCM) is an innovation based on inheritance, which breaks through the tradition of experience-based prescription and realize the transformation of compatibility from herbal pieces to components. CCM is an important achievement during the research process of modernization of Chinese medicine. Under the support of three national "973" projects, in order to reveal the scientific connotation of the prescription compatibility theory and develop innovative Chinese drugs, we have launched theoretical innovation and technological innovation around the "two relatively clear", and opened up the research field of CCM. CCM is an innovation based on inheritance, breaking through the tradition of experience based prescription, and realizing the transformation from compatibility of herbal pieces to component compatibility, which is an important achievement of the modernization of traditional Chinese medicine. In the past more than 10 years, with the deepening of research and the expansion of application, the theory and methods of CCM and efficacy-oriented compatibility have been continuously improved. The value of CCM is not only in developing new drug, more important is to build a

  16. Simulating High Flux Isotope Reactor Core Thermal-Hydraulics via Interdimensional Model Coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Travis, Adam R [ORNL

    2014-05-01

    A coupled interdimensional model is presented for the simulation of the thermal-hydraulic characteristics of the High Flux Isotope Reactor core at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The model consists of two domains a solid involute fuel plate and the surrounding liquid coolant channel. The fuel plate is modeled explicitly in three-dimensions. The coolant channel is approximated as a twodimensional slice oriented perpendicular to the fuel plate s surface. The two dimensionally-inconsistent domains are linked to one another via interdimensional model coupling mechanisms. The coupled model is presented as a simplified alternative to a fully explicit, fully three-dimensional model. Involute geometries were constructed in SolidWorks. Derivations of the involute construction equations are presented. Geometries were then imported into COMSOL Multiphysics for simulation and modeling. Both models are described in detail so as to highlight their respective attributes in the 3D model, the pursuit of an accurate, reliable, and complete solution; in the coupled model, the intent to simplify the modeling domain as much as possible without affecting significant alterations to the solution. The coupled model was created with the goal of permitting larger portions of the reactor core to be modeled at once without a significant sacrifice to solution integrity. As such, particular care is given to validating incorporated model simplifications. To the greatest extent possible, the decrease in solution time as well as computational cost are quantified versus the effects such gains have on the solution quality. A variant of the coupled model which sufficiently balances these three solution characteristics is presented alongside the more comprehensive 3D model for comparison and validation.

  17. Modelling mechanical properties of the multilayer composite materials with the polyamide core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talaśka Krzysztof

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the wide range of application for belt conveyors, engineers look for many different combinations of mechanical properties of conveyor and transmission belts. It can be made by creating multilayer or fibre reinforced composite materials from base thermoplastic or thermosetting polymers. In order to gain high strength with proper elasticity and friction coefficient, the core of the composite conveyor belt is made of polyamide film core, which can be combined with various types of polymer fabrics, films or even rubbers. In this paper authors show the complex model of multilayer composite belt with the polyamide core, which can be used in simulation analyses. The following model was derived based on the experimental research, which consisted of tensile, compression and shearing tests. In order to achieve the most accurate model, proper simulations in ABAQUS were made and then the results were compared with empirical mechanical characteristics of a conveyor belt. The main goal of this research is to fully describe the perforation process of conveyor and transmission belts for vacuum belt conveyors. The following model will help to develop design briefs for machines used for mechanical perforation.

  18. Lamination effects on a 3D model of the magnetic core of power transformers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poveda-Lerma Antonio

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the lamination effect on the model of a power transformer’s core with stacked E-I structure is analyzed. The distribution of the magnetic flux in the laminations depends on the stacking method. In this work it is shown, using a 3D FEM model and an experimental prototype, that the non-uniform distribution of the flux in a laminated E-I core with alternate-lap joint stack increases substantially the average value of the magnetic flux density in the core, compared with a butt joint stack. Both the simulated model and the experimental tests show that the presence of constructive air-gaps in the E-I junctions gives rise to a zig-zag flux in the depth direction. This inter-lamination flux reduces the magnetic flux density in the I-pieces and increases substantially the magnetic flux density in the E-pieces, with highly saturated points that traditional 2D analysis cannot reproduce. The relation between the number of laminations included in the model, and the computational resourses needed to build it, is also evaluated in this work.

  19. Analytical investigation of a one-dimensional homogenized model for a pressurized water reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benner, J.; Schumann, U.

    1981-01-01

    A one-dimensional homogenized model for dynamic fluid-structure interaction in a pressurized water reactor core is used to study the influence of the virtual density and spacer's stiffness. The model consists of a linear system of partial differential equations for fluid velocity, rod velocity and pressure. For these equations analytical solutions are deduced for boundary conditions prescribing either periodic wall oscillations or linearly growing wall accelerations from rest. The theoretical model for the virtual density is verified by comparison to an experiment. For zero spacer stiffness, purely acoustic oscillations appear. For positive spacer stiffness, additional oscillations arise with relative rod motions. The wavelengths of the latter oscillations are small for weak spacers. Large numerical effort would be required in a more complete three-dimensional core-model to resolve such short wave lengths. In fact in a typical core the spacer's stiffness csub(S) is small in comparison to the fluid bulk modulus K. For csub(s)/K <= 0.1 it might be appropriate to neglect the influence of the spacers. (orig.)

  20. Development of Reactor Core Model based on Optimal Analysis for Shinhanul no. 1, 2 Simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyung-min [Korea Hydro Nuclear Power Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    As one of the outputs of 'Development of the Shin Hanul Nuclear Plant(SHN) 1,2 Simulator' project which is being done by KHNP Central Research Institute, the SHN1,2 Simulator is being developed including the KNICS methodology and advanced Alarm Systems first applied to the Nuclear Power Plant in Korea, and the SHN 1,2 simulator adopts the virtually stimulated HMI(Human-Machine Interface) for the non-safety MMIS system, whose key-programs are identical to those applied to the real SHN 1,2 plants. The purpose of this paper is to develop localization core model by integrating the Simulator system with the Simulator core model though technology agreement of KAERI. To develop ShinHanul 1 and 2 reactor core simulator model, KHNP and KAERI create MASTER-SIM model and tried validation. And calculations of MASSIM{sub S}S program for MASTER{sub S}IM validation, are within tolerance range. Test has not yet been completed. And many verification will be conducted MASTER-SIM software is expected to be the highest economic software and satisfy international simulator standards.

  1. On Input Vector Representation for the SVR model of Reactor Core Loading Pattern Critical Parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trontl, K.; Pevec, D.; Smuc, T.

    2008-01-01

    Determination and optimization of reactor core loading pattern is an important factor in nuclear power plant operation. The goal is to minimize the amount of enriched uranium (fresh fuel) and burnable absorbers placed in the core, while maintaining nuclear power plant operational and safety characteristics. The usual approach to loading pattern optimization involves high degree of engineering judgment, a set of heuristic rules, an optimization algorithm and a computer code used for evaluating proposed loading patterns. The speed of the optimization process is highly dependent on the computer code used for the evaluation. Recently, we proposed a new method for fast loading pattern evaluation based on general robust regression model relying on the state of the art research in the field of machine learning. We employed Support Vector Regression (SVR) technique. SVR is a supervised learning method in which model parameters are automatically determined by solving a quadratic optimization problem. The preliminary tests revealed a good potential of the SVR method application for fast and accurate reactor core loading pattern evaluation. However, some aspects of model development are still unresolved. The main objective of the work reported in this paper was to conduct additional tests and analyses required for full clarification of the SVR applicability for loading pattern evaluation. We focused our attention on the parameters defining input vector, primarily its structure and complexity, and parameters defining kernel functions. All the tests were conducted on the NPP Krsko reactor core, using MCRAC code for the calculation of reactor core loading pattern critical parameters. The tested input vector structures did not influence the accuracy of the models suggesting that the initially tested input vector, consisted of the number of IFBAs and the k-inf at the beginning of the cycle, is adequate. The influence of kernel function specific parameters (σ for RBF kernel

  2. Understanding variability of the Southern Ocean overturning circulation in CORE-II models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downes, S. M.; Spence, P.; Hogg, A. M.

    2018-03-01

    The current generation of climate models exhibit a large spread in the steady-state and projected Southern Ocean upper and lower overturning circulation, with mechanisms for deep ocean variability remaining less well understood. Here, common Southern Ocean metrics in twelve models from the Coordinated Ocean-ice Reference Experiment Phase II (CORE-II) are assessed over a 60 year period. Specifically, stratification, surface buoyancy fluxes, and eddies are linked to the magnitude of the strengthening trend in the upper overturning circulation, and a decreasing trend in the lower overturning circulation across the CORE-II models. The models evolve similarly in the upper 1 km and the deep ocean, with an almost equivalent poleward intensification trend in the Southern Hemisphere westerly winds. However, the models differ substantially in their eddy parameterisation and surface buoyancy fluxes. In general, models with a larger heat-driven water mass transformation where deep waters upwell at the surface ( ∼ 55°S) transport warmer waters into intermediate depths, thus weakening the stratification in the upper 2 km. Models with a weak eddy induced overturning and a warm bias in the intermediate waters are more likely to exhibit larger increases in the upper overturning circulation, and more significant weakening of the lower overturning circulation. We find the opposite holds for a cool model bias in intermediate depths, combined with a more complex 3D eddy parameterisation that acts to reduce isopycnal slope. In summary, the Southern Ocean overturning circulation decadal trends in the coarse resolution CORE-II models are governed by biases in surface buoyancy fluxes and the ocean density field, and the configuration of the eddy parameterisation.

  3. Review of the SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3.1 code structure and core T/H model before core damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, See Darl; Kim, Dong Ha

    1998-04-01

    The SCDAP/RELAP5 code has been developed for best estimate transient simulation of light water reactor coolant systems during a severe accident. The code is being developed at the INEL under the primary sponsorship of the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research of the U.S. NRC. As The current time, the SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3.1 code is the result of merging the RELAP5/MOD3 and SCDAP models. The code models the coupled behavior of the reactor coolant system, core, fission product released during a severe accident transient as well as large and small break loss of coolant accidents, operational transients such as anticipated transient without SCRAM, loss of offsite power, loss of feedwater, and loss of flow. Major purpose of the report is to provide information about the characteristics of SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3.1 core T/H models for an integrated severe accident computer code being developed under the mid/long-term project. This report analyzes the overall code structure which consists of the input processor, transient controller, and plot file handler. The basic governing equations to simulate the thermohydraulics of the primary system are also described. As the focus is currently concentrated in the core, core nodalization parameters of the intact geometry and the phenomenological subroutines for the damaged core are summarized for the future usage. In addition, the numerical approach for the heat conduction model is investigated along with heat convection model. These studies could provide a foundation for input preparation and model improvement. (author). 6 refs., 3 tabs., 4 figs

  4. Steady State Modelling of Three-core Wire Armoured Submarine Cables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baù, Matteo; Viafora, Nicola; Hansen, Chris Skovgaard

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces Finite Element Method mod-elling techniques applied to wire armoured submarine three-core cables, whose nominal voltages range from 36 to 245 kV. The analysis is focused on the implementation of the net voltage cancellation principle in a 2D environment. The model is utilised...... confirm that the wire armour stranding is not accounted for, but also suggest that the ampacity underrating might be due to other inaccuracies in the IEC modelling indications. Overall, the difference in terms of current rating between the FEM and the IEC approach is found to be voltage dependent and more...

  5. Symplectic no-core shell-model approach to intermediate-mass nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, G. K.; Ferriss, M. C.; Launey, K. D.; Dytrych, T.; Draayer, J. P.; Dreyfuss, A. C.; Bahri, C.

    2014-03-01

    We present a microscopic description of nuclei in the intermediate-mass region, including the proximity to the proton drip line, based on a no-core shell model with a schematic many-nucleon long-range interaction with no parameter adjustments. The outcome confirms the essential role played by the symplectic symmetry to inform the interaction and the winnowing of shell-model spaces. We show that it is imperative that model spaces be expanded well beyond the current limits up through 15 major shells to accommodate particle excitations, which appear critical to highly deformed spatial structures and the convergence of associated observables.

  6. Drilling induced damage of core samples. Evidences from laboratory testing and numerical modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanaro, Flavio

    2008-01-01

    Extensive sample testing in uniaxial and Brazilian test conditions were carried out for the Shobasama and MIU Research Laboratory Site (Gifu Pref., Japan). The compressive and tensile strength of the samples was observed to be negatively correlated to the in-situ stress components. Such correlation was interpreted as stress-release induced sample damage. Similar stress conditions were then numerically simulated by means of the BEM-DDM code FRACOD 2D in plane strain conditions. This method allows for explicitly consider the influence of newly initiated or propagating fractures on the stress field and deformation of the core during drilling process. The models show that already at moderate stress levels some fracturing of the core during drilling might occur leading to reduced laboratory strength of the samples. Sample damage maps were produced independently from the laboratory test results and from the numerical models and show good agreement with each other. (author)

  7. Network evolution model for supply chain with manufactures as the core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Dali; Fang, Ling; Yang, Jian; Li, Wu; Zhao, Jing

    2018-01-01

    Building evolution model of supply chain networks could be helpful to understand its development law. However, specific characteristics and attributes of real supply chains are often neglected in existing evolution models. This work proposes a new evolution model of supply chain with manufactures as the core, based on external market demand and internal competition-cooperation. The evolution model assumes the external market environment is relatively stable, considers several factors, including specific topology of supply chain, external market demand, ecological growth and flow conservation. The simulation results suggest that the networks evolved by our model have similar structures as real supply chains. Meanwhile, the influences of external market demand and internal competition-cooperation to network evolution are analyzed. Additionally, 38 benchmark data sets are applied to validate the rationality of our evolution model, in which, nine manufacturing supply chains match the features of the networks constructed by our model. PMID:29370201

  8. Network evolution model for supply chain with manufactures as the core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Haiyang; Jiang, Dali; Yang, Tinghong; Fang, Ling; Yang, Jian; Li, Wu; Zhao, Jing

    2018-01-01

    Building evolution model of supply chain networks could be helpful to understand its development law. However, specific characteristics and attributes of real supply chains are often neglected in existing evolution models. This work proposes a new evolution model of supply chain with manufactures as the core, based on external market demand and internal competition-cooperation. The evolution model assumes the external market environment is relatively stable, considers several factors, including specific topology of supply chain, external market demand, ecological growth and flow conservation. The simulation results suggest that the networks evolved by our model have similar structures as real supply chains. Meanwhile, the influences of external market demand and internal competition-cooperation to network evolution are analyzed. Additionally, 38 benchmark data sets are applied to validate the rationality of our evolution model, in which, nine manufacturing supply chains match the features of the networks constructed by our model.

  9. Network evolution model for supply chain with manufactures as the core.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyang Fang

    Full Text Available Building evolution model of supply chain networks could be helpful to understand its development law. However, specific characteristics and attributes of real supply chains are often neglected in existing evolution models. This work proposes a new evolution model of supply chain with manufactures as the core, based on external market demand and internal competition-cooperation. The evolution model assumes the external market environment is relatively stable, considers several factors, including specific topology of supply chain, external market demand, ecological growth and flow conservation. The simulation results suggest that the networks evolved by our model have similar structures as real supply chains. Meanwhile, the influences of external market demand and internal competition-cooperation to network evolution are analyzed. Additionally, 38 benchmark data sets are applied to validate the rationality of our evolution model, in which, nine manufacturing supply chains match the features of the networks constructed by our model.

  10. State-space model predictive control method for core power control in pressurized water reactor nuclear power stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Guo Xu; Wu, Jie; Zeng, Bifan; Wu, Wangqiang; Ma, Xiao Qian [School of Electric Power, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou (China); Xu, Zhibin [Electric Power Research Institute of Guangdong Power Grid Corporation, Guangzhou (China)

    2017-02-15

    A well-performed core power control to track load changes is crucial in pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power stations. It is challenging to keep the core power stable at the desired value within acceptable error bands for the safety demands of the PWR due to the sensitivity of nuclear reactors. In this paper, a state-space model predictive control (MPC) method was applied to the control of the core power. The model for core power control was based on mathematical models of the reactor core, the MPC model, and quadratic programming (QP). The mathematical models of the reactor core were based on neutron dynamic models, thermal hydraulic models, and reactivity models. The MPC model was presented in state-space model form, and QP was introduced for optimization solution under system constraints. Simulations of the proposed state-space MPC control system in PWR were designed for control performance analysis, and the simulation results manifest the effectiveness and the good performance of the proposed control method for core power control.

  11. EVALUATION OF THE HTA CORE MODEL FOR NATIONAL HEALTH TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT REPORTS: COMPARATIVE STUDY AND EXPERIENCES FROM EUROPEAN COUNTRIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kõrge, Kristina; Berndt, Nadine; Hohmann, Juergen; Romano, Florence; Hiligsmann, Mickael

    2017-01-01

    The health technology assessment (HTA) Core Model® is a tool for defining and standardizing the elements of HTA analyses within several domains for producing structured reports. This study explored the parallels between the Core Model and a national HTA report. Experiences from various European HTA agencies were also investigated to determine the Core Model's adaptability to national reports. A comparison between a national report on Genetic Counseling, produced by the Cellule d'expertise médicale Luxembourg, and the Core Model was performed to identify parallels in terms of relevant and comparable assessment elements (AEs). Semi-structured interviews with five representatives from European HTA agencies were performed to assess their user experiences with the Core Model. The comparative study revealed that 50 percent of the total number (n = 144) of AEs in the Core Model were relevant for the national report. Of these 144 AEs from the Core Model, 34 (24 percent) were covered in the national report. Some AEs were covered only partly. The interviewees emphasized flexibility in using the Core Model and stated that the most important aspects to be evaluated include characteristics of the disease and technology, clinical effectiveness, economic aspects, and safety. In the present study, the national report covered an acceptable number of AEs of the Core Model. These results need to be interpreted with caution because only one comparison was performed. The Core Model can be used in a flexible manner, applying only those elements that are relevant from the perspective of the technology assessment and specific country context.

  12. Enterprise Architecture Modeling of Core Administrative Systems at KTH : A Modifiability Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Rosell, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This project presents a case study of modifiability analysis on the Information Systems which are central to the core business processes of Royal Institution of Technology in Stockholm, Sweden by creating, updating and using models. The case study was limited to modifiability regarding only specified Information Systems. The method selected was Enterprise Architecture together with Enterprise Architecture Analysis research results and tools from the Industrial Information and Control Systems ...

  13. Nuclear structure calculations in $^{20}$Ne with No-Core Configuration-Interaction model

    OpenAIRE

    Konieczka, Maciej; Satuła, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Negative parity states in $^{20}$Ne and Gamow-Teller strength distribution for the ground-state beta-decay of $^{20}$Na are calculated for the very first time using recently developed No-Core Configuration-Interaction model. The approach is based on multi-reference density functional theory involving isospin and angular-momentum projections. Advantages and shortcomings of the method are briefly discussed.

  14. Simulation tests for temperature mixing in a core bottom model of the HTR-module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damm, G.; Wehrlein, R.

    1992-01-01

    Interatom and Siemens are developing a helium-cooled Modular High Temperature Reactor. Under nominal operating conditions temperature differences of up to 120deg C will occur in the 700deg C hot helium flow leaving the core. In addition, cold gas leakages into the hot gas header can produce even higher temperature differences in the coolant flow. At the outlet of the reactor only a very low temperature difference of maximum ± 15deg C is allowed in order to avoid damages at the heat exchanging components due to alternating thermal loads. Since it is not possible to calculate the complex flow behaviour, experimental investigations of the temperature mixing in the core bottom had to be carried out in order to guarantee the necessary reduction of temperature differences in the helium. The presented air simulation tests in a 1:2.9 scaled plexiglas model of the core bottom showed an extremely high mixing rate of the hot gas header and the hot gas duct of the reactor. The temperature mixing of the simulated coolant flow as well as the leakage flows was larger than 95%. Transfered to reactor conditions this means a temperature difference of only ± 3deg C for the main flow at a quite resonable pressure drop. For the cold gas leakages temperature differences in the hot gas up to 400deg C proved to be permissible. The results of the simulation experiments in the Aerodynamic Test Facility of Interatom permitted to design a shorter bottom reflector of the core. (orig.)

  15. An analytical model for the study of a small LFR core dynamics: development and benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bortot, S.; Cammi, A.; Lorenzi, S.; Moisseytsev, A.

    2011-01-01

    An analytical model for the study of a small Lead-cooled Fast Reactor (LFR) control-oriented dynamics has been developed aimed at providing a useful, very flexible and straightforward, though accurate, tool allowing relatively quick transient design-basis and stability analyses. A simplified lumped-parameter approach has been adopted to couple neutronics and thermal-hydraulics: the point-kinetics approximation has been employed and an average-temperature heat-exchange model has been implemented. The reactor transient responses following postulated accident initiators such as Unprotected Control Rod Withdrawal (UTOP), Loss of Heat Sink (ULOHS) and Loss of Flow (ULOF) have been studied for a MOX and a metal-fuelled core at the Beginning of Cycle (BoC) and End of Cycle (EoC) configurations. A benchmark analysis has been then performed by means of the SAS4A/SASSYS-1 Liquid Metal Reactor Code System, in which a core model based on three representative channels has been built with the purpose of providing verification for the analytical outcomes and indicating how the latter relate to more realistic one-dimensional calculations. As a general result, responses concerning the main core characteristics (namely, power, reactivity, etc.) have turned out to be mutually consistent in terms of both steady-state absolute figures and transient developments, showing discrepancies of the order of only some percents, thus confirming a very satisfactory agreement. (author)

  16. A goodness of fit and validity study of the Korean radiological technologists' core job competency model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Chang Seon; Cho, A Ra; Hur, Yera; Choi, Seong Youl

    2017-01-01

    Radiological Technologists deals with the life of a person which means professional competency is essential for the job. Nevertheless, there have been no studies in Korea that identified the job competence of radiologists. In order to define the core job competencies of Korean radiologists and to present the factor models, 147 questionnaires on job competency of radiology were analyzed using 'PASW Statistics Version 18.0' and 'AMOS Version 18.0'. The valid model consisted of five core job competencies ('Patient management', 'Health and safety', 'Operation of equipment', 'Procedures and management') and 17 sub – competencies. As a result of the factor analysis, the RMSEA value was 0.1 and the CFI, and TLI values were close to 0.9 in the measurement model of the five core job competencies. The validity analysis showed that the mean variance extraction was 0.5 or more and the conceptual reliability value was 0.7 or more , And there was a high correlation between subordinate competencies included in each subordinate competencies. The results of this study are expected to provide specific information necessary for the training and management of human resources centered on competence by clearly showing the job competence required for radiologists in Korea's health environment

  17. Fluid-structure-interaction of the pressurized water reactor core internals during blowdown - numerical simulation with a homogenization model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benner, J.

    1984-03-01

    A method for the numerical simulation of the Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) core internal's behaviour during a blowdown accident is described, by which the motion of the reactor core and the interaction of the fuel elements with the core barrel and the coolant medium is calculated. Furthermore, some simple models for the support columns, lower and upper core support and the grid plate are provided. All these models have been implemented into the code Flux-4. For the solution of the very complex, coupled equations of motions for fluid and fuel rods an efficient numerical solution technique has been developed. With the new code-version Flux-5 the PWR-blowdown is parametically investigated. The calculated core barrel loadings are compared with Flux-4 results, simulating the core's inertia by a mass ring of HDR type. (orig.) [de

  18. Failure Predictions for VHTR Core Components using a Probabilistic Contiuum Damage Mechanics Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fok, Alex

    2013-10-30

    The proposed work addresses the key research need for the development of constitutive models and overall failure models for graphite and high temperature structural materials, with the long-term goal being to maximize the design life of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). To this end, the capability of a Continuum Damage Mechanics (CDM) model, which has been used successfully for modeling fracture of virgin graphite, will be extended as a predictive and design tool for the core components of the very high- temperature reactor (VHTR). Specifically, irradiation and environmental effects pertinent to the VHTR will be incorporated into the model to allow fracture of graphite and ceramic components under in-reactor conditions to be modeled explicitly using the finite element method. The model uses a combined stress-based and fracture mechanics-based failure criterion, so it can simulate both the initiation and propagation of cracks. Modern imaging techniques, such as x-ray computed tomography and digital image correlation, will be used during material testing to help define the baseline material damage parameters. Monte Carlo analysis will be performed to address inherent variations in material properties, the aim being to reduce the arbitrariness and uncertainties associated with the current statistical approach. The results can potentially contribute to the current development of American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) codes for the design and construction of VHTR core components.

  19. CoreFlow: a computational platform for integration, analysis and modeling of complex biological data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasculescu, Adrian; Schoof, Erwin M; Creixell, Pau; Zheng, Yong; Olhovsky, Marina; Tian, Ruijun; So, Jonathan; Vanderlaan, Rachel D; Pawson, Tony; Linding, Rune; Colwill, Karen

    2014-04-04

    A major challenge in mass spectrometry and other large-scale applications is how to handle, integrate, and model the data that is produced. Given the speed at which technology advances and the need to keep pace with biological experiments, we designed a computational platform, CoreFlow, which provides programmers with a framework to manage data in real-time. It allows users to upload data into a relational database (MySQL), and to create custom scripts in high-level languages such as R, Python, or Perl for processing, correcting and modeling this data. CoreFlow organizes these scripts into project-specific pipelines, tracks interdependencies between related tasks, and enables the generation of summary reports as well as publication-quality images. As a result, the gap between experimental and computational components of a typical large-scale biology project is reduced, decreasing the time between data generation, analysis and manuscript writing. CoreFlow is being released to the scientific community as an open-sourced software package complete with proteomics-specific examples, which include corrections for incomplete isotopic labeling of peptides (SILAC) or arginine-to-proline conversion, and modeling of multiple/selected reaction monitoring (MRM/SRM) results. CoreFlow was purposely designed as an environment for programmers to rapidly perform data analysis. These analyses are assembled into project-specific workflows that are readily shared with biologists to guide the next stages of experimentation. Its simple yet powerful interface provides a structure where scripts can be written and tested virtually simultaneously to shorten the life cycle of code development for a particular task. The scripts are exposed at every step so that a user can quickly see the relationships between the data, the assumptions that have been made, and the manipulations that have been performed. Since the scripts use commonly available programming languages, they can easily be

  20. Linear and nonlinear modeling of light propagation in hollow-core photonic crystal fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roberts, John; Lægsgaard, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    Hollow core photonic crystal fibers (HC-PCFs) find applications which include quantum and non-linear optics, gas detection and short high-intensity laser pulse delivery. Central to most applications is an understanding of the linear and nonlinear optical properties. These require careful modeling....... The intricacies of modeling various forms of HC-PCF are reviewed. An example of linear dispersion engineering, aimed at reducing and flattening the group velocity dispersion, is then presented. Finally, a study of short high intensity pulse delivery using HC-PCF in both dispersive and nonlinear (solitonic...

  1. Low-temperature behavior of core-softened models: Water and silica behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jagla, E. A.

    2001-01-01

    A core-softened model of a glass forming fluid is numerically studied in the limit of very low temperatures. The model shows two qualitatively different behaviors depending on the strength of the attraction between particles. For no or low attraction, the changes of density as a function of pressure are smooth, although hysteretic due to mechanical metastabilities. For larger attraction, sudden changes of density upon compressing and decompressing occur. This global mechanical instability is correlated to the existence of a thermodynamic first-order amorphous-amorphous transition. The two different behaviors obtained correspond qualitatively to the different phenomenology observed in silica and water

  2. GCFR 1/20-scale PCRV central core cavity closure model test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, G.C.; Dougan, J.R.

    1981-06-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been conducting structural response tests of the prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV) closures for the 300-MW(e) gas-cooled fast reactor demonstration power plant. This report describes the third in a series of tests of small-scale closure plug models. The model represents a redesign of the central core cavity closure plug. The primary objective was to demonstrate structural performance and ultimate load capacity of the closure plug. Secondary objectives included obtaining data on crack development and propagation and on mode of failure of the composite structure

  3. Experimental modelling of core debris dispersion from the vault under a PWR pressure vessel: Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macbeth, R.V.; Trenberth, R.

    1987-12-01

    Modelling experiments have been done on a 1/25 scale model in Perspex of the vault under a PWR pressure vessel. Various liquids have been used to simulate molten core debris assumed to have fallen on to the vault floor from a breach at the bottom of the pressure vessel. High pressure air and helium have been used to simulate the discharge of steam and gas from the breach. The dispersion of liquid via the vault access shafts has been measured. Photographs have been taken of fluid flow patterns and velocity profiles have been obtained. The requirements for further experiments are indicated. (author)

  4. IP cores design from specifications to production modeling, verification, optimization, and protection

    CERN Document Server

    Mohamed, Khaled Salah

    2016-01-01

    This book describes the life cycle process of IP cores, from specification to production, including IP modeling, verification, optimization, and protection. Various trade-offs in the design process are discussed, including  those associated with many of the most common memory cores, controller IPs  and system-on-chip (SoC) buses. Readers will also benefit from the author’s practical coverage of new verification methodologies. such as bug localization, UVM, and scan-chain.  A SoC case study is presented to compare traditional verification with the new verification methodologies. ·         Discusses the entire life cycle process of IP cores, from specification to production, including IP modeling, verification, optimization, and protection; ·         Introduce a deep introduction for Verilog for both implementation and verification point of view.  ·         Demonstrates how to use IP in applications such as memory controllers and SoC buses. ·         Describes a new ver...

  5. Advanced Test Reactor Core Modeling Update Project Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahmat Aryaeinejad; Douglas S. Crawford; Mark D. DeHart; George W. Griffith; D. Scott Lucas; Joseph W. Nielsen; David W. Nigg; James R. Parry; Jorge Navarro

    2010-09-01

    Legacy computational reactor physics software tools and protocols currently used for support of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) core fuel management and safety assurance and, to some extent, experiment management are obsolete, inconsistent with the state of modern nuclear engineering practice, and are becoming increasingly difficult to properly verify and validate (V&V). Furthermore, the legacy staff knowledge required for application of these tools and protocols from the 1960s and 1970s is rapidly being lost due to staff turnover and retirements. In 2009 the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) initiated a focused effort to address this situation through the introduction of modern high-fidelity computational software and protocols, with appropriate V&V, within the next 3-4 years via the ATR Core Modeling and Simulation and V&V Update (or “Core Modeling Update”) Project. This aggressive computational and experimental campaign will have a broad strategic impact on the operation of the ATR, both in terms of improved computational efficiency and accuracy for support of ongoing DOE programs as well as in terms of national and international recognition of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF).

  6. COMDES-II: A Component-Based Framework for Generative Development of Distributed Real-Time Control Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ke, Xu; Sierszecki, Krzysztof; Angelov, Christo K.

    2007-01-01

    The paper presents a generative development methodology and component models of COMDES-II, a component-based software framework for distributed embedded control systems with real-time constraints. The adopted methodology allows for rapid modeling and validation of control software at a higher lev...... methodology for COMDES-II from a general perspective, describes the component models in details and demonstrates their application through a DC-Motor control system case study.......The paper presents a generative development methodology and component models of COMDES-II, a component-based software framework for distributed embedded control systems with real-time constraints. The adopted methodology allows for rapid modeling and validation of control software at a higher level...

  7. Efficient n-gram, Skipgram and Flexgram Modelling with Colibri Core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten van Gompel

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Counting n-grams lies at the core of any frequentist corpus analysis and is often considered a trivial matter. Going beyond consecutive n-grams to patterns such as skipgrams and flexgrams increases the demand for efficient solutions. The need to operate on big corpus data does so even more. Lossless compression and non-trivial algorithms are needed to lower the memory demands, yet retain good speed. Colibri Core is software for the efficient computation and querying of n-grams, skipgrams and flexgrams from corpus data. The resulting pattern models can be analysed and compared in various ways. The software offers a programming library for C++ and Python, as well as command-line tools.

  8. Analytical Model of Thermo-electrical Behaviour in Superconducting Resistive Core Cables

    CERN Document Server

    Calvi, M; Breschi, M; Coccoli, M; Granieri, P; Iriart, G; Lecci, F; Siemko, A

    2006-01-01

    High field superconducting Nb$_{3}$Sn accelerators magnets above 14 T, for future High Energy Physics applications, call for improvements in the design of the protection system against resistive transitions. The longitudinal quench propagation velocity (vq) is one of the parameters defining the requirements of the protection. Up to now vq has been always considered as a physical parameter defined by the operating conditions (the bath temperature, cooling conditions, the magnetic field and the over all current density) and the type of superconductor and stabilizer used. It is possible to enhance the quench propagation velocity by segregating a percent of the stabilizer into the core, although keeping the total amount constant and tuning the contact resistance between the superconducting strands and the core. Analytical model and computer simulations are presented to explain the phenomenon. The consequences with respect to minimum quench energy are evidenced and the strategy to optimize the cable designed is di...

  9. Influence of core model parameters on the characteristics of neutron beams of the research reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Khafizova

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available IRT MEPhI reactor is equipped with a number of facilities at horizontal experimental channels (HEC. Knowing of parameters influencing spatio-angular distribution of irradiation fields is essential for each application area. The research for neutron capture therapy (NCT facility at HEC of the reactor was made. Calculation methods have been used to estimate how the reactor core parameters influence neutron beam characteristics at the HEC output. The impact of neutron source model in Monte Carlo calculations by MCNP code on the parameters of neutron and secondary photon field at the output of irradiation beam tubes of research reactor is estimated. The study shows that specifying neutron source with fission reaction rate distribution in SDEF option gives almost the same results as criticality calculation considered the most accurate. Our calculations show that changes of the core operational parameters have insignificant influence on characteristics of neutron beams at HEC output.

  10. Interface between Core/TH Model and Simulator for OPR1000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Do Hyun; Lee, Myeong Soo; Hong, Jin Hyuk; Lee, Seung Ho; Suh, Jung Kwan [KEPRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-15

    OPR1000 simulator for ShinKori-Unit 1, which will be operated at 2815MWt of thermal core power, is being developed while the ShinKori-Unit 1 and 2 is being built. OPR1000 simulator adopted the RELAP5 R/T code, which is the adaptation of RELAP5 and NESTLE codes to run in real-time mode with graphical visualization, to model Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) Thermal-Hydraulics (TH) and Reactor Core. The RELAP5 is an advanced, best estimate, reactor TH simulation code developed at Idaho National Engineering and Environment Laboratory(INEEL) and the NESTLE is a true two-energy group neutronics code that computes the neutron flux and power for each node at every time step. As a simulator environment, the 3KEYMASTER{sup TM}, a commercial environment tool of WSC is used.

  11. Interface between Core/TH Model and Simulator for OPR1000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Do Hyun; Lee, Myeong Soo; Hong, Jin Hyuk; Lee, Seung Ho; Suh, Jung Kwan

    2009-01-01

    OPR1000 simulator for ShinKori-Unit 1, which will be operated at 2815MWt of thermal core power, is being developed while the ShinKori-Unit 1 and 2 is being built. OPR1000 simulator adopted the RELAP5 R/T code, which is the adaptation of RELAP5 and NESTLE codes to run in real-time mode with graphical visualization, to model Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) Thermal-Hydraulics (TH) and Reactor Core. The RELAP5 is an advanced, best estimate, reactor TH simulation code developed at Idaho National Engineering and Environment Laboratory(INEEL) and the NESTLE is a true two-energy group neutronics code that computes the neutron flux and power for each node at every time step. As a simulator environment, the 3KEYMASTER TM , a commercial environment tool of WSC is used

  12. CQPSO scheduling algorithm for heterogeneous multi-core DAG task model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Wenzheng; Hu, Yue-Li; Ran, Feng

    2017-07-01

    Efficient task scheduling is critical to achieve high performance in a heterogeneous multi-core computing environment. The paper focuses on the heterogeneous multi-core directed acyclic graph (DAG) task model and proposes a novel task scheduling method based on an improved chaotic quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization (CQPSO) algorithm. A task priority scheduling list was built. A processor with minimum cumulative earliest finish time (EFT) was acted as the object of the first task assignment. The task precedence relationships were satisfied and the total execution time of all tasks was minimized. The experimental results show that the proposed algorithm has the advantage of optimization abilities, simple and feasible, fast convergence, and can be applied to the task scheduling optimization for other heterogeneous and distributed environment.

  13. Initial Comparison of Direct and Legacy Modeling Approaches for Radial Core Expansion Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shemon, Emily R.

    2016-01-01

    Radial core expansion in sodium-cooled fast reactors provides an important reactivity feedback effect. As the reactor power increases due to normal start up conditions or accident scenarios, the core and surrounding materials heat up, causing both grid plate expansion and bowing of the assembly ducts. When the core restraint system is designed correctly, the resulting structural deformations introduce negative reactivity which decreases the reactor power. Historically, an indirect procedure has been used to estimate the reactivity feedback due to structural deformation which relies upon perturbation theory and coupling legacy physics codes with limited geometry capabilities. With advancements in modeling and simulation, radial core expansion phenomena can now be modeled directly, providing an assessment of the accuracy of the reactivity feedback coefficients generated by indirect legacy methods. Recently a new capability was added to the PROTEUS-SN unstructured geometry neutron transport solver to analyze deformed meshes quickly and directly. By supplying the deformed mesh in addition to the base configuration input files, PROTEUS-SN automatically processes material adjustments including calculation of region densities to conserve mass, calculation of isotopic densities according to material models (for example, sodium density as a function of temperature), and subsequent re-homogenization of materials. To verify the new capability of directly simulating deformed meshes, PROTEUS-SN was used to compute reactivity feedback for a series of contrived yet representative deformed configurations for the Advanced Burner Test Reactor design. The indirect legacy procedure was also performed to generate reactivity feedback coefficients for the same deformed configurations. Interestingly, the legacy procedure consistently overestimated reactivity feedbacks by 35% compared to direct simulations by PROTEUS-SN. This overestimation indicates that the legacy procedures are in fact

  14. Initial Comparison of Direct and Legacy Modeling Approaches for Radial Core Expansion Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shemon, Emily R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-10-10

    Radial core expansion in sodium-cooled fast reactors provides an important reactivity feedback effect. As the reactor power increases due to normal start up conditions or accident scenarios, the core and surrounding materials heat up, causing both grid plate expansion and bowing of the assembly ducts. When the core restraint system is designed correctly, the resulting structural deformations introduce negative reactivity which decreases the reactor power. Historically, an indirect procedure has been used to estimate the reactivity feedback due to structural deformation which relies upon perturbation theory and coupling legacy physics codes with limited geometry capabilities. With advancements in modeling and simulation, radial core expansion phenomena can now be modeled directly, providing an assessment of the accuracy of the reactivity feedback coefficients generated by indirect legacy methods. Recently a new capability was added to the PROTEUS-SN unstructured geometry neutron transport solver to analyze deformed meshes quickly and directly. By supplying the deformed mesh in addition to the base configuration input files, PROTEUS-SN automatically processes material adjustments including calculation of region densities to conserve mass, calculation of isotopic densities according to material models (for example, sodium density as a function of temperature), and subsequent re-homogenization of materials. To verify the new capability of directly simulating deformed meshes, PROTEUS-SN was used to compute reactivity feedback for a series of contrived yet representative deformed configurations for the Advanced Burner Test Reactor design. The indirect legacy procedure was also performed to generate reactivity feedback coefficients for the same deformed configurations. Interestingly, the legacy procedure consistently overestimated reactivity feedbacks by 35% compared to direct simulations by PROTEUS-SN. This overestimation indicates that the legacy procedures are in fact

  15. Development of Sodium Two Phase Flow Model for Kalimer Core Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, W.P.; Hahn, Dohee

    2002-01-01

    An algorithm for sodium boiling is developed in order to extend the applicability of SSC-K, which is a main system analysis code for the KALIMER (Korea Advanced LIquid Metal Reactor) conceptual design. As the capability of the current SSC-K version is limited to simulation of only a single-phase sodium flow, its applicable range should not be enough to assess the fuel integrity under some of HCDA (Hypothetical Core Disruptive Accident) initiating events where sodium boiling is anticipated. The two-phase flow model similar to that used for the light water system is known to be no more effective directly to liquid metal reactors, because the phenomena observed between two reactor coolant systems are definitely different. The developing algorithm is based on a multiple-bubble slug ejection model, which allows a finite number of bubbles in a channel at any time. The present work is a continuous effort following the former study to confirm a qualitative acceptance on the model. Since the model has been applied only to the active fuel region in the former study, a part of its qualification seems to have already been demonstrated. For its application to the whole KALIMER core channel, however, the model needs to be examined the applicability to the fuel regions other than the active fuel. The present study primarily focuses on that point. In a result, although the model may be improved in a sense through the present study over the previous modeling, a clear limitation is also confirmed with the validity of the model. The further development, therefore, is required for this model to achieve its goal by resolving such limitations. (authors)

  16. MODELING THE FORMATION OF GIANT PLANET CORES. I. EVALUATING KEY PROCESSES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levison, Harold F.; Thommes, Edward; Duncan, Martin J.

    2010-01-01

    One of the most challenging problems we face in our understanding of planet formation is how Jupiter and Saturn could have formed before the solar nebula dispersed. The most popular model of giant planet formation is the so-called core accretion model. In this model a large planetary embryo formed first, mainly by two-body accretion. This is then followed by a period of inflow of nebular gas directly onto the growing planet. The core accretion model has an Achilles heel, namely the very first step. We have undertaken the most comprehensive study of this process to date. In this study, we numerically integrate the orbits of a number of planetary embryos embedded in a swarm of planetesimals. In these experiments, we have included a large number of physical processes that might enhance accretion. In particular, we have included (1) aerodynamic gas drag, (2) collisional damping between planetesimals, (3) enhanced embryo cross sections due to their atmospheres, (4) planetesimal fragmentation, and (5) planetesimal-driven migration. We find that the gravitational interaction between the embryos and the planetesimals leads to the wholesale redistribution of material-regions are cleared of material and gaps open near the embryos. Indeed, in 90% of our simulations without fragmentation, the region near those embryos is cleared of planetesimals before much growth can occur. Thus, the widely used assumption that the surface density distribution of planetesimals is smooth can lead to misleading results. In the remaining 10% of our simulations, the embryos undergo a burst of outward migration that significantly increases growth. On timescales of ∼10 5 years, the outer embryo can migrate ∼6 AU and grow to roughly 30 M + . This represents a largely unexplored mode of core formation. We also find that the inclusion of planetesimal fragmentation tends to inhibit growth except for a narrow range of fragment migration rates.

  17. An Exact Solution to the Central Core Model of the Renal Medulla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickens, Ronald E.

    1998-11-01

    The central core model of the renal medulla provides a mathematical representation of the urine concentration mechanism. The model consists of eight coupled, nonlinear ODE's subject to certain initial and boundary conditions. Many investigators have studied the properties of the solutions to these equations, however no general analytic solution is known to exist. Thus, special exact solutions assume a position of significance by providing a basis for insight into the understanding of more realistic models used to analyze actual data. We calculate an exact solution for the case in which the water permeabilities are zero and a particular, but realistic, functional form is used for the metabolic pump. A detailed discussion will be given for the results obtained on the four cencentration and four flux functions that define the model. If invited to do so, the author is willing to expand the talk for the above abstract to twenty minutes.

  18. Constraints on geomagnetic secular variation modeling from electromagnetism and fluid dynamics of the Earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton, E. R.

    1986-01-01

    A spherical harmonic representation of the geomagnetic field and its secular variation for epoch 1980, designated GSFC(9/84), is derived and evaluated. At three epochs (1977.5, 1980.0, 1982.5) this model incorporates conservation of magnetic flux through five selected patches of area on the core/mantle boundary bounded by the zero contours of vertical magnetic field. These fifteen nonlinear constraints are included like data in an iterative least squares parameter estimation procedure that starts with the recently derived unconstrained field model GSFC (12/83). Convergence is approached within three iterations. The constrained model is evaluated by comparing its predictive capability outside the time span of its data, in terms of residuals at magnetic observatories, with that for the unconstrained model.

  19. Modeling of BWR core meltdown accidents - for application in the MELRPI. MOD2 computer code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, B R; Kim, S H; Taleyarkhan, R P; Podowski, M Z; Lahey, Jr, R T

    1985-04-01

    This report summarizes improvements and modifications made in the MELRPI computer code. A major difference between this new, updated version of the code, called MELRPI.MOD2, and the one reported previously, concerns the inclusion of a model for the BWR emergency core cooling systems (ECCS). This model and its computer implementation, the ECCRPI subroutine, account for various emergency injection modes, for both intact and rubblized geometries. Other changes to MELRPI deal with an improved model for canister wall oxidation, rubble bed modeling, and numerical integration of system equations. A complete documentation of the entire MELRPI.MOD2 code is also given, including an input guide, list of subroutines, sample input/output and program listing.

  20. Advanced Test Reactor Core Modeling Update Project Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David W. Nigg; Devin A. Steuhm

    2011-09-01

    Legacy computational reactor physics software tools and protocols currently used for support of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) core fuel management and safety assurance and, to some extent, experiment management are obsolete, inconsistent with the state of modern nuclear engineering practice, and are becoming increasingly difficult to properly verify and validate (V&V). Furthermore, the legacy staff knowledge required for application of these tools and protocols from the 1960s and 1970s is rapidly being lost due to staff turnover and retirements. In 2009 the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) initiated a focused effort to address this situation through the introduction of modern high-fidelity computational software and protocols, with appropriate V&V, within the next 3-4 years via the ATR Core Modeling and Simulation and V&V Update (or 'Core Modeling Update') Project. This aggressive computational and experimental campaign will have a broad strategic impact on the operation of the ATR, both in terms of improved computational efficiency and accuracy for support of ongoing DOE programs as well as in terms of national and international recognition of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). The ATR Core Modeling Update Project, targeted for full implementation in phase with the anticipated ATR Core Internals Changeout (CIC) in the 2014 time frame, began during the last quarter of Fiscal Year 2009, and has just completed its first full year. Key accomplishments so far have encompassed both computational as well as experimental work. A new suite of stochastic and deterministic transport theory based reactor physics codes and their supporting nuclear data libraries (SCALE, KENO-6, HELIOS, NEWT, and ATTILA) have been installed at the INL under various permanent sitewide license agreements and corresponding baseline models of the ATR and ATRC are now operational, demonstrating the basic feasibility of these code packages for their intended purpose. Furthermore

  1. Advanced Test Reactor Core Modeling Update Project Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nigg, David W.; Steuhm, Devin A.

    2011-01-01

    Legacy computational reactor physics software tools and protocols currently used for support of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) core fuel management and safety assurance and, to some extent, experiment management are obsolete, inconsistent with the state of modern nuclear engineering practice, and are becoming increasingly difficult to properly verify and validate (V and V). Furthermore, the legacy staff knowledge required for application of these tools and protocols from the 1960s and 1970s is rapidly being lost due to staff turnover and retirements. In 2009 the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) initiated a focused effort to address this situation through the introduction of modern high-fidelity computational software and protocols, with appropriate V and V, within the next 3-4 years via the ATR Core Modeling and Simulation and V and V Update (or 'Core Modeling Update') Project. This aggressive computational and experimental campaign will have a broad strategic impact on the operation of the ATR, both in terms of improved computational efficiency and accuracy for support of ongoing DOE programs as well as in terms of national and international recognition of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). The ATR Core Modeling Update Project, targeted for full implementation in phase with the anticipated ATR Core Internals Changeout (CIC) in the 2014 time frame, began during the last quarter of Fiscal Year 2009, and has just completed its first full year. Key accomplishments so far have encompassed both computational as well as experimental work. A new suite of stochastic and deterministic transport theory based reactor physics codes and their supporting nuclear data libraries (SCALE, KENO-6, HELIOS, NEWT, and ATTILA) have been installed at the INL under various permanent sitewide license agreements and corresponding baseline models of the ATR and ATRC are now operational, demonstrating the basic feasibility of these code packages for their intended purpose

  2. A simplified model of aerosol scrubbing by a water pool overlying core debris interacting with concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, D.A.; Sprung, J.L.

    1993-11-01

    A classic model of aerosol scrubbing from bubbles rising through water is applied to the decontamination of gases produced during core debris interactions with concrete. The model, originally developed by Fuchs, describes aerosol capture by diffusion, sedimentation, and inertial impaction. This original model for spherical bubbles is modified to account for ellipsoidal distortion of the bubbles. Eighteen uncertain variables are identified in the application of the model to the decontamination of aerosols produced during core debris interactions with concrete by a water pool of specified depth and subcooling. These uncertain variables include properties of the aerosols, the bubbles, the water and the ambient pressure. Results are analyzed using a nonparametric, order statistical analysis that allows quantitative differentiation of stochastic and phenomenological uncertainty. The sampled values of the decontamination factors are used to construct estimated probability density functions for the decontamination factor at confidence levels of 50%, 90% and 95%. The decontamination factors for pools 30, 50, 100, 200, 300, and 500 cm deep and subcooling levels of 0, 2, 5, 10, 20, 30, 50, and 70 degrees C are correlated by simple polynomial regression. These polynomial equations can be used to estimate decontamination factors at prescribed confidence levels

  3. Development of a simplified calculational model for the transient core bowing effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoo, Takeshi

    1997-01-01

    A simplified method to analyze the transient core radial deformation has been developed based on a model that calculates the shape of a single representative fuel assembly on the outermost row. The plant transient code CERES has been revised utilizing this method so that a integrated calculational process for the core neutronics, thermal-hydraulics and deformation can be realized. Using CERES, the responses of a 1000MWe class pool type metal fuel FBR plant during a ULOF event are calculated. According to the results, it is clarified that a passive shutdown without coolant boiling is attainable by selecting appropriate values for major design parameters such as the gap width between load-pad and the pad material properties. The maximum coolant temperature during ULOF is found to be 790C when the above core load-pad gap is set to 0.05 mm, which can be regarded as the most likely valued. The temperature increases to 915C but is still lower than the boiling point when 40% of uncertainty is taken into account. (author)

  4. Two-dimensional vertical model seismic test and analysis for HTGR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikushima, Takeshi; Honma, Toshiaki.

    1983-02-01

    The resistance against earthquakes of high-temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) core with block-type fuels is not fully ascertained yet. Seismic studies must be made if such a reactor plant is to be installed in areas with frequent earthquakes. In the paper the test results of seismic behavior of a half-scale two-dimensional vertical slice core model and analysis are presented. The following results were obtained: (1) With soft spring support of the fixed side reflector structure, the relative column displacement is larger than that for hand support but the impact reaction force is smaller. (2) In the case of hard spring support the dowel force is smaller than for soft support. (3) The relative column displacement is larger in the core center than at the periphery. The impact acceleration (force) in the center is smaller than at the periphery. (4) The relative column displacement and impact reaction force are smaller with the gas pressure simulation spring than without. (5) With decreasing gap width between the top blocks of columns, the relative column displacement and impact reaction force decrease. (6) The column damping ratio was estimated as 4 -- 10% of critical. (7) The maximum impact reaction force for random waves such as seismic was below 60% that for a sinusoidal wave. (8) Vibration behavior and impact response are in good agreement between test and analysis. (author)

  5. Development of a New core/reflector model for coarse-mesh nodal methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pogosbekyan, Leonid; Cho, Jin Young; Kim, Young Il; Kim, Young Jin; Joo, Hyung Kuk; Chang, Moon Hee.

    1997-10-01

    This work presents two approaches for reflector simulation in coarse-mesh nodal methods. The first approach is called Interface Matrix Technique (IMT), which simulates the baffle as a banishingly thin layer having the property of reflection and transmission. We applied this technique within the frame of AFEN (Analytic Function Expansion Nodal) method, and developed the AFEN-IM (Interface Matrix) method. AFEN-IM method shows 1.24% and 0.42 % in maximum and RMS (Root Mean Square) assemblywise power error for ZION-1 benchmark problem. The second approach is L-shaped reflector homogenization method. This method is based on the integral response conservation along the L-shaped core-reflector interface. The reference reflector response is calculated from 2-dimensional spectral calculation and the response of the homogenized reflector is derived from the one-node 2-dimensional AFEN problem solution. This method shows 5 times better accuracy than the 1-dimensional homogenization technique in the assemblywise power. Also, the concept of shroud/reflector homogenization for hexagonal core have been developed. The 1-dimensional spectral calculation was used for the determination of 2 group cross sections. The essence of homogenization concept consists in the calculation of equivalent shroud width, which preserve albedo for the fast neutrons in 2-dimensional reflector. This method shows a relative error less than 0.42% in assemblywise power and a difference of 9x10 -5 in multiplication factor for full-core model. (author). 9 refs., 3 tabs., 28 figs

  6. The quark model and the nature of the repulsive core of the nucleon-nucleon interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faessler, A.; Fernandez, F.; Luebeck, G.; Shimizu, K.

    1982-01-01

    The nature of the repulsive core of the nucleon-nucleon is studied in the quark model. The resonating group equation for nucleon-nucleon scattering is solved with the colour Fermi-Breit interaction including further a linear or quadratic confinement potential. It is shown that the colour magnetic interaction which is adjusted to the Δ-nucleon mass splitting favours the orbital symmetry and disfavours the completely symmetric orbital state. For the important orbital symmetry the relative S wave function between the two nucleons has to have a node. In the framework of the resonating group including the NN, ΔΔ and the hidden colour (CC) channels it is shown that this node produces a 3 S and 1 S phase shift which is identical to a hard core phase shift with a hard core radius γ 0 between 0.3 and 0.6 fm depending on the assumed root mean square radius of the quark part of the nucleon. (orig./HSI)

  7. Impact of the dynamical core on the direct simulation of tropical cyclones in a high-resolution global model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, K. A.

    2015-01-01

    Our paper examines the impact of the dynamical core on the simulation of tropical cyclone (TC) frequency, distribution, and intensity. The dynamical core, the central fluid flow component of any general circulation model (GCM), is often overlooked in the analysis of a model's ability to simulate TCs compared to the impact of more commonly documented components (e.g., physical parameterizations). The Community Atmosphere Model version 5 is configured with multiple dynamics packages. This analysis demonstrates that the dynamical core has a significant impact on storm intensity and frequency, even in the presence of similar large-scale environments. In particular, the spectral element core produces stronger TCs and more hurricanes than the finite-volume core using very similar parameterization packages despite the latter having a slightly more favorable TC environment. Furthermore, these results suggest that more detailed investigations into the impact of the GCM dynamical core on TC climatology are needed to fully understand these uncertainties. Key Points The impact of the GCM dynamical core is often overlooked in TC assessments The CAM5 dynamical core has a significant impact on TC frequency and intensity A larger effort is needed to better understand this uncertainty

  8. Analysis of safety culture components based on site interviews

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueno, Akira; Nagano, Yuko; Matsuura, Shojiro

    2002-01-01

    Safety culture of an organization is influenced by many factors such as employee's moral, safety policy of top management and questioning attitude among site staff. First this paper analyzes key factors of safety culture on the basis of site interviews. Then the paper presents a safety culture composite model and its applicability in various contexts. (author)

  9. Component-based analysis of embedded control applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelov, Christo K.; Guan, Wei; Marian, Nicolae

    2011-01-01

    instances of reusable, executable components—function blocks (FBs). System actors operate in accordance with a timed multitasking model of computation, whereby I/O signals are exchanged with the controlled plant at precisely specified time instants, resulting in the elimination of I/O jitter. The paper...

  10. An approach to model reactor core nodalization for deterministic safety analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Mohd Faiz; Samsudin, Mohd Rafie; Mamat @ Ibrahim, Mohd Rizal; Roslan, Ridha; Sadri, Abd Aziz; Farid, Mohd Fairus Abd

    2016-01-01

    Adopting good nodalization strategy is essential to produce an accurate and high quality input model for Deterministic Safety Analysis (DSA) using System Thermal-Hydraulic (SYS-TH) computer code. The purpose of such analysis is to demonstrate the compliance against regulatory requirements and to verify the behavior of the reactor during normal and accident conditions as it was originally designed. Numerous studies in the past have been devoted to the development of the nodalization strategy for small research reactor (e.g. 250kW) up to the bigger research reactor (e.g. 30MW). As such, this paper aims to discuss the state-of-arts thermal hydraulics channel to be employed in the nodalization for RTP-TRIGA Research Reactor specifically for the reactor core. At present, the required thermal-hydraulic parameters for reactor core, such as core geometrical data (length, coolant flow area, hydraulic diameters, and axial power profile) and material properties (including the UZrH1.6, stainless steel clad, graphite reflector) have been collected, analyzed and consolidated in the Reference Database of RTP using standardized methodology, mainly derived from the available technical documentations. Based on the available information in the database, assumptions made on the nodalization approach and calculations performed will be discussed and presented. The development and identification of the thermal hydraulics channel for the reactor core will be implemented during the SYS-TH calculation using RELAP5-3D® computer code. This activity presented in this paper is part of the development of overall nodalization description for RTP-TRIGA Research Reactor under the IAEA Norwegian Extra-Budgetary Programme (NOKEBP) mentoring project on Expertise Development through the Analysis of Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics for Malaysia, denoted as EARTH-M.

  11. An approach to model reactor core nodalization for deterministic safety analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salim, Mohd Faiz, E-mail: mohdfaizs@tnb.com.my; Samsudin, Mohd Rafie, E-mail: rafies@tnb.com.my [Nuclear Energy Department, Regulatory Economics & Planning Division, Tenaga Nasional Berhad (Malaysia); Mamat Ibrahim, Mohd Rizal, E-mail: m-rizal@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my [Prototypes & Plant Development Center, Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Malaysia); Roslan, Ridha, E-mail: ridha@aelb.gov.my; Sadri, Abd Aziz [Nuclear Installation Divisions, Atomic Energy Licensing Board (Malaysia); Farid, Mohd Fairus Abd [Reactor Technology Center, Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Malaysia)

    2016-01-22

    Adopting good nodalization strategy is essential to produce an accurate and high quality input model for Deterministic Safety Analysis (DSA) using System Thermal-Hydraulic (SYS-TH) computer code. The purpose of such analysis is to demonstrate the compliance against regulatory requirements and to verify the behavior of the reactor during normal and accident conditions as it was originally designed. Numerous studies in the past have been devoted to the development of the nodalization strategy for small research reactor (e.g. 250kW) up to the bigger research reactor (e.g. 30MW). As such, this paper aims to discuss the state-of-arts thermal hydraulics channel to be employed in the nodalization for RTP-TRIGA Research Reactor specifically for the reactor core. At present, the required thermal-hydraulic parameters for reactor core, such as core geometrical data (length, coolant flow area, hydraulic diameters, and axial power profile) and material properties (including the UZrH{sub 1.6}, stainless steel clad, graphite reflector) have been collected, analyzed and consolidated in the Reference Database of RTP using standardized methodology, mainly derived from the available technical documentations. Based on the available information in the database, assumptions made on the nodalization approach and calculations performed will be discussed and presented. The development and identification of the thermal hydraulics channel for the reactor core will be implemented during the SYS-TH calculation using RELAP5-3D{sup ®} computer code. This activity presented in this paper is part of the development of overall nodalization description for RTP-TRIGA Research Reactor under the IAEA Norwegian Extra-Budgetary Programme (NOKEBP) mentoring project on Expertise Development through the Analysis of Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics for Malaysia, denoted as EARTH-M.

  12. Core competency requirements among extension workers in peninsular Malaysia: Use of Borich's needs assessment model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umar, Sulaiman; Man, Norsida; Nawi, Nolila Mohd; Latif, Ismail Abd; Samah, Bahaman Abu

    2017-06-01

    The study described the perceived importance of, and proficiency in core agricultural extension competencies among extension workers in Peninsular Malaysia; and evaluating the resultant deficits in the competencies. The Borich's Needs Assessment Model was used to achieve the objectives of the study. A sample of 298 respondents was randomly selected and interviewed using a pre-tested structured questionnaire. Thirty-three core competency items were assessed. Instrument validity and reliability were ensured. The cross-sectional data obtained was analysed using SPSS for descriptive statistics including mean weighted discrepancy score (MWDS). Results of the study showed that on a scale of 5, the most important core extension competency items according to respondents' perception were: "Making good use of information and communication technologies/access and use of web-based resources" (M=4.86, SD=0.23); "Conducting needs assessments" (M=4.84, SD=0.16); "organizing extension campaigns" (M=4.82, SD=0.47) and "Managing groups and teamwork" (M=4.81, SD=0.76). In terms of proficiency, the highest competency identified by the respondents was "Conducting farm and home visits (M=3.62, SD=0.82) followed by 'conducting meetings effectively' (M=3.19, SD=0.72); "Conducting focus group discussions" (M=3.16, SD=0.32) and "conducting community forums" (M=3.13, SD=0.64). The discrepancies implying competency deficits were widest in "Acquiring and allocating resources" (MWDS=12.67); use of information and communication technologies (ICTs) and web-based resources in agricultural extension (MWDS=12.59); and report writing and sharing the results and impacts (MWDS=11.92). It is recommended that any intervention aimed at developing the capacity of extension workers in Peninsular Malaysia should prioritize these core competency items in accordance with the deficits established in this study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. An approach to model reactor core nodalization for deterministic safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salim, Mohd Faiz; Samsudin, Mohd Rafie; Mamat Ibrahim, Mohd Rizal; Roslan, Ridha; Sadri, Abd Aziz; Farid, Mohd Fairus Abd

    2016-01-01

    Adopting good nodalization strategy is essential to produce an accurate and high quality input model for Deterministic Safety Analysis (DSA) using System Thermal-Hydraulic (SYS-TH) computer code. The purpose of such analysis is to demonstrate the compliance against regulatory requirements and to verify the behavior of the reactor during normal and accident conditions as it was originally designed. Numerous studies in the past have been devoted to the development of the nodalization strategy for small research reactor (e.g. 250kW) up to the bigger research reactor (e.g. 30MW). As such, this paper aims to discuss the state-of-arts thermal hydraulics channel to be employed in the nodalization for RTP-TRIGA Research Reactor specifically for the reactor core. At present, the required thermal-hydraulic parameters for reactor core, such as core geometrical data (length, coolant flow area, hydraulic diameters, and axial power profile) and material properties (including the UZrH 1.6 , stainless steel clad, graphite reflector) have been collected, analyzed and consolidated in the Reference Database of RTP using standardized methodology, mainly derived from the available technical documentations. Based on the available information in the database, assumptions made on the nodalization approach and calculations performed will be discussed and presented. The development and identification of the thermal hydraulics channel for the reactor core will be implemented during the SYS-TH calculation using RELAP5-3D ® computer code. This activity presented in this paper is part of the development of overall nodalization description for RTP-TRIGA Research Reactor under the IAEA Norwegian Extra-Budgetary Programme (NOKEBP) mentoring project on Expertise Development through the Analysis of Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics for Malaysia, denoted as EARTH-M

  14. Modelling of Equilibrium Between Mantle and Core: Refractory, Volatile, and Highly Siderophile Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righter, K.; Danielson, L.; Pando, K.; Shofner, G.; Lee, C. -T.

    2013-01-01

    Siderophile elements have been used to constrain conditions of core formation and differentiation for the Earth, Mars and other differentiated bodies [1]. Recent models for the Earth have concluded that the mantle and core did not fully equilibrate and the siderophile element contents of the mantle can only be explained under conditions where the oxygen fugacity changes from low to high during accretion and the mantle and core do not fully equilibrate [2,3]. However these conclusions go against several physical and chemical constraints. First, calculations suggest that even with the composition of accreting material changing from reduced to oxidized over time, the fO2 defined by metal-silicate equilibrium does not change substantially, only by approximately 1 logfO2 unit [4]. An increase of more than 2 logfO2 units in mantle oxidation are required in models of [2,3]. Secondly, calculations also show that metallic impacting material will become deformed and sheared during accretion to a large body, such that it becomes emulsified to a fine scale that allows equilibrium at nearly all conditions except for possibly the length scale for giant impacts [5] (contrary to conclusions of [6]). Using new data for D(Mo) metal/silicate at high pressures, together with updated partitioning expressions for many other elements, we will show that metal-silicate equilibrium across a long span of Earth s accretion history may explain the concentrations of many siderophile elements in Earth's mantle. The modeling includes refractory elements Ni, Co, Mo, and W, as well as highly siderophile elements Au, Pd and Pt, and volatile elements Cd, In, Bi, Sb, Ge and As.

  15. COLLAPSING HOT MOLECULAR CORES: A MODEL FOR THE DUST SPECTRUM AND AMMONIA LINE EMISSION OF THE G31.41+0.31 HOT CORE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osorio, Mayra; Anglada, Guillem; Lizano, Susana; D'Alessio, Paola

    2009-01-01

    We present a model aimed to reproduce the observed spectral energy distribution (SED) as well as the ammonia line emission of the G31.41+0.31 hot core. The hot core is modeled as an infalling envelope onto a massive star that is undergoing an intense accretion phase. We assume an envelope with a density and velocity structure resulting from the dynamical collapse of a singular logatropic sphere. The stellar and envelope physical properties are determined by fitting the observed SED. From these physical conditions, the emerging ammonia line emission is calculated and compared with subarcsecond resolution VLA data of the (4,4) transition taken from the literature. The only free parameter in this line fitting is the ammonia abundance. The observed intensities of the main and satellite ammonia (4,4) lines and their spatial distribution can be well reproduced provided the steep increase of the gas-phase ammonia abundance in the hotter (>100 K), inner regions of the core produced by the sublimation of icy mantles where ammonia molecules are trapped is taken into account. The model predictions for the (2,2), (4,4), and (5,5) transitions, obtained with the same set of parameters, are also reasonably in agreement, given the observational uncertainties, with the single-dish spectra of the region available in the literature. The best fit is obtained for a model with a central star of ∼25M sun , a mass accretion rate of ∼3 x 10 -3 M sun yr -1 , and a total luminosity of ∼2 x 10 5 L sun . The outer radius of the envelope is 30,000 AU, where kinetic temperatures as high as ∼40 K are reached. The gas-phase ammonia abundance ranges from ∼2 x 10 -8 in the outer region to ∼3 x 10 -6 in the inner region. To our knowledge, this is the first time that the dust and molecular line data of a hot molecular core, including subarcsecond resolution data that spatially resolve the structure of the core, have been simultaneously explained by a detailed, physically self

  16. Development of 3D ferromagnetic model of tokamak core withstrong toroidal asymmetry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Markovič, Tomáš; Gryaznevich, M.; Ďuran, Ivan; Svoboda, V.; Pánek, Radomír

    96-97, October (2015), s. 302-305 ISSN 0920-3796. [Symposium on Fusion Technology 2014(SOFT-28)/28./. San Sebastián, 29.09.2014-03.10.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/11/2341; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011021 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : tokamak * ferromagnetic core * model of ferromagnet * integral method * tokamak GOLEM Subject RIV: JF - Nuclear Energetics OBOR OECD: Nuclear related engineering Impact factor: 1.301, year: 2015 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0920379615002100

  17. Phase-field model and its numerical solution for coring and microstructure evolution studies in alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turchi, Patrice E. A.; Fattebert, Jean-Luc; Dorr, Milo R.; Wickett, Michael E.; Belak, James F.

    2011-03-01

    We describe an algorithm for the numerical solution of a phase-field model (PFM) of microstructure evolution in alloys using physical parameters from thermodynamic (CALPHAD) and kinetic databases. The coupled system of PFM equations includes a local order parameter, a quaternion representation of local crystal orientation and a species composition parameter. Time evolution of microstructures and alloy composition is obtained using an implicit time integration of the system. Physical parameters in databases can be obtained either through experiment or first-principles calculations. Application to coring studies and microstructure evolution of Au-Ni will be presented. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344

  18. Inverse stochastic-dynamic models for high-resolution Greenland ice core records

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boers, Niklas; Chekroun, Mickael D.; Liu, Honghu

    2017-01-01

    as statistical properties such as probability density functions, waiting times and power spectra, with no need for any external forcing. The crucial ingredients for capturing these properties are (i) high-resolution training data, (ii) cubic drift terms, (iii) nonlinear coupling terms between the 18O and dust......Proxy records from Greenland ice cores have been studied for several decades, yet many open questions remain regarding the climate variability encoded therein. Here, we use a Bayesian framework for inferring inverse, stochastic-dynamic models from 18O and dust records of unprecedented, subdecadal...

  19. Whole core neutronics modeling of a TRIGA reactor using integral transport theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwinkendorf, K.N.; Toffer, H.

    1990-01-01

    An innovative analysis approach for performing whole core reactor physics calculations for TRIGA reactors has been employed recently at the Westinghouse Hanford Company. A deterministic transport theory model with sufficient geometric complexity to evaluate asymmetric loading patterns was used. Calculations of this complexity have been performed in the past using Monte Carlo simulation, such as the MCNP code. However, the Monte Carlo calculations are more difficult to prepare and require more computer time. On the Hanford Site CRAY XMP-18 computer, the new methods required less than one-third of the central processing unit time per calculation as compared to an MCNP calculation using 100,000 neutron histories

  20. Modeling and simulation in the systems engineering life cycle core concepts and accompanying lectures

    CERN Document Server

    Loper, Margaret L

    2015-01-01

    This easy to read text/reference provides a broad introduction to the fundamental concepts of modeling and simulation (M&S) and systems engineering, highlighting how M&S is used across the entire systems engineering lifecycle. Each chapter corresponds to a short lecture covering a core topic in M&S or systems engineering.  Topics and features: reviews the full breadth of technologies, methodologies and uses of M&S, rather than just focusing on a specific aspect of the field; presents contributions from renowned specialists in each topic covered; introduces the foundational elements and proce

  1. Core-state models for fuel management of equilibrium and transition cycles in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aragones, J.M.; Martinez-Val, J.M.; Corella, M.R.

    1977-01-01

    Fuel management requires that mass, energy, and reactivity balance be satisfied in each reload cycle. Procedures for selection of alternatives, core-state models, and fuel cost calculations have been developed for both equilibrium and transition cycles. Effective cycle lengths and fuel cycle variables--namely, reload batch size, schedule of incore residence for the fuel, feed enrichments, energy sharing cycle by cycle, and discharge burnup and isotopics--are the variables being considered for fuel management planning with a given energy generation plan, fuel design, recycling strategy, and financial assumptions

  2. No-Core Shell Model for A = 47 and A = 49

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vary, J P; Negoita, A G; Stoica, S

    2006-11-13

    We apply the no-core shell model to the nuclear structure of odd-mass nuclei straddling {sup 48}Ca. Starting with the NN interaction, that fits two-body scattering and bound state data, we evaluate the nuclear properties of A = 47 and A = 49 nuclei while preserving all the underlying symmetries. Due to model space limitations and the absence of three-body interactions, we incorporate phenomenological interaction terms determined by fits to A = 48 nuclei in a previous effort. Our modified Hamiltonian produces reasonable spectra for these odd-mass nuclei. In addition to the differences in single-particle basis states, the absence of a single-particle Hamiltonian in our no-core approach complicates comparisons with valence effective NN interactions. We focus on purely off-diagonal two-body matrix elements since they are not affected by ambiguities in the different roles for one-body potentials and we compare selected sets of fp-shell matrix elements of our initial and modified Hamiltonians in the harmonic oscillator basis with those of a recent model fp-shell interaction, the GXPF1 interaction of Honma et al. While some significant differences emerge from these comparisons, there is an overall reasonably good correlation between our off-diagonal matrix elements and those of GXPF1.

  3. Modeling of molten core-concrete interactions and fission-product release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norkus, J.K.; Corradini, M.L.

    1991-09-01

    The study of molten core-concrete interaction is important in estimating the possible consequences of a severe nuclear reactor accident. CORCON-Mod2 is a computer program which models the thermal, chemical, and physical phenomena associated with molten core-concrete interactions. Models have been added to extend and improve the modeling of these phenomena. An ideal solution chemical equilibrium methodology is presented to predict the fission-product vaporization release. Additional chemical species have been added, and the calculation of chemical equilibrium has been expanded to the oxidic layer and to the mixed layer configuration. Recent experiments performed at Argonne National Laboratory are compared to CORCON predictions of melt temperature, erosion depth, and release fraction of fission products. The results consistently underpredicted the melt temperatures and erosion rates. However, the predictions of release of Te, Ba, Sr, and U were good. A sensitivity study of the effects of initial temperature, concrete type, use of the mixing option, degree of zirconium oxidation, cavity size, and amount of control material on erosion, gas production, and release of radioactive materials was performed for a PWR and a BWR. The initial melt temperature had the greatest effect on the results of interest. Concrete type and cavity size also had important effects. 78 refs., 35 figs., 40 tabs

  4. Real time thermal hydraulic model for high temperature gas-cooled reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sui Zhe; Sun Jun; Ma Yuanle; Zhang Ruipeng

    2013-01-01

    A real-time thermal hydraulic model of the reactor core was described and integrated into the simulation system for the high temperature gas-cooled pebble bed reactor nuclear power plant, which was developed in the vPower platform, a new simulation environment for nuclear and fossil power plants. In the thermal hydraulic model, the helium flow paths were established by the flow network tools in order to obtain the flow rates and pressure distributions. Meanwhile, the heat structures, representing all the solid heat transfer elements in the pebble bed, graphite reflectors and carbon bricks, were connected by the heat transfer network in order to solve the temperature distributions in the reactor core. The flow network and heat transfer network were coupled and calculated in real time. Two steady states (100% and 50% full power) and two transients (inlet temperature step and flow step) were tested that the quantitative comparisons of the steady results with design data and qualitative analysis of the transients showed the good applicability of the present thermal hydraulic model. (authors)

  5. A fast converging CFD model for thermal hydraulic analysis of gas cooled reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Gary; Anghaie, Samim

    1999-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach to the solution of Navier-Stokes equations for the thermal and flow fields of gas cooled reactor cores is presented. An implicit-explicit MacCormack method based on finite volume discretization scheme, in conjunction with the Gauss-Seidel line iteration procedure is utilized to solve axisymmetric, thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations. This numerical method requires only the inversion of block bidiagonal systems rather than block tridiagonal systems, thus yielding savings in computer time and storage requirements. A two-layer algebraic eddy viscosity turbulence model is used in this study. The effects of turbulence are simulated in terms of the eddy viscosity coefficient, which is calculated for an inner and an outer region separately. An enthalpy-rebalancing scheme is implemented to allow the convergence solutions to be obtained with the application of a wall heat flux. The detailed computational analysis developed in this work is used to evaluate many different Nusselt number equations, property corrections, and axial distance corrections. The calculation based on this CFD model is compared with other published results. The good agreement indicates the usefulness of the presented model for the prediction of flow and temperature distributions for gas cooled reactor cores. (author)

  6. Modeling Stress Strain Relationships and Predicting Failure Probabilities For Graphite Core Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duffy, Stephen [Cleveland State Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2013-09-09

    This project will implement inelastic constitutive models that will yield the requisite stress-strain information necessary for graphite component design. Accurate knowledge of stress states (both elastic and inelastic) is required to assess how close a nuclear core component is to failure. Strain states are needed to assess deformations in order to ascertain serviceability issues relating to failure, e.g., whether too much shrinkage has taken place for the core to function properly. Failure probabilities, as opposed to safety factors, are required in order to capture the bariability in failure strength in tensile regimes. The current stress state is used to predict the probability of failure. Stochastic failure models will be developed that can accommodate possible material anisotropy. This work will also model material damage (i.e., degradation of mechanical properties) due to radiation exposure. The team will design tools for components fabricated from nuclear graphite. These tools must readily interact with finite element software--in particular, COMSOL, the software algorithm currently being utilized by the Idaho National Laboratory. For the eleastic response of graphite, the team will adopt anisotropic stress-strain relationships available in COMSO. Data from the literature will be utilized to characterize the appropriate elastic material constants.

  7. Modeling Stress Strain Relationships and Predicting Failure Probabilities For Graphite Core Components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffy, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    This project will implement inelastic constitutive models that will yield the requisite stress-strain information necessary for graphite component design. Accurate knowledge of stress states (both elastic and inelastic) is required to assess how close a nuclear core component is to failure. Strain states are needed to assess deformations in order to ascertain serviceability issues relating to failure, e.g., whether too much shrinkage has taken place for the core to function properly. Failure probabilities, as opposed to safety factors, are required in order to capture the bariability in failure strength in tensile regimes. The current stress state is used to predict the probability of failure. Stochastic failure models will be developed that can accommodate possible material anisotropy. This work will also model material damage (i.e., degradation of mechanical properties) due to radiation exposure. The team will design tools for components fabricated from nuclear graphite. These tools must readily interact with finite element software--in particular, COMSOL, the software algorithm currently being utilized by the Idaho National Laboratory. For the eleastic response of graphite, the team will adopt anisotropic stress-strain relationships available in COMSO. Data from the literature will be utilized to characterize the appropriate elastic material constants.

  8. A coupling model for the two-stage core calculation method with subchannel analysis for boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsuyasu, Takeshi; Aoyama, Motoo; Yamamoto, Akio

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A coupling model of the two-stage core calculation with subchannel analysis. • BWR fuel assembly parameters are assumed and verified. • The model was evaluated for heterogeneous problems. - Abstract: The two-stage core analysis method is widely used for BWR core analysis. The purpose of this study is to develop a core analysis model coupled with subchannel analysis within the two-stage calculation scheme using an assembly-based thermal-hydraulics calculation in the core analysis. The model changes the 2D lattice physics scheme, and couples with 3D subchannel analysis which evaluates the thermal-hydraulics characteristics within the coolant flow area divided as some subchannel regions. In order to couple with these two analyses, some BWR fuel assembly parameters are assumed and verified. The developed model is evaluated for the heterogeneous problem with and without a control rod. The present model is especially effective for the control rod inserted condition. The present model can incorporate the subchannel effect into the current two-stage core calculation method.

  9. Proposed model for fuel-coolant mixing during a core-melt accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corradini, M.L.

    1983-01-01

    If complete failure of normal and emergency coolant flow occurs in a light water reactor, fission product decay heat would eventually cause melting of the reactor fuel and cladding. The core melt may then slump into the lower plenum and later into the reactor cavity and contact residual liquid water. A model is proposed to describe the fuel-coolant mixing process upon contact. The model is compared to intermediate scale experiments being conducted at Sandia. The modelling of this mixing process will aid in understanding three important processes: (1) fuel debris sizes upon quenching in water, (2) the hydrogen source term during fuel quench, and (3) the rate of steam production. Additional observations of Sandia data indicate that the steam explosion is affected by this mixing process

  10. Inference of ICF Implosion Core Mix using Experimental Data and Theoretical Mix Modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welser-Sherrill, L.; Haynes, D.A.; Mancini, R.C.; Cooley, J.H.; Tommasini, R.; Golovkin, I.E.; Sherrill, M.E.; Haan, S.W.

    2009-01-01

    The mixing between fuel and shell materials in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) implosion cores is a current topic of interest. The goal of this work was to design direct-drive ICF experiments which have varying levels of mix, and subsequently to extract information on mixing directly from the experimental data using spectroscopic techniques. The experimental design was accomplished using hydrodynamic simulations in conjunction with Haan's saturation model, which was used to predict the mix levels of candidate experimental configurations. These theoretical predictions were then compared to the mixing information which was extracted from the experimental data, and it was found that Haan's mix model performed well in predicting trends in the width of the mix layer. With these results, we have contributed to an assessment of the range of validity and predictive capability of the Haan saturation model, as well as increased our confidence in the methods used to extract mixing information from experimental data.

  11. Using the graphs models for evaluating in-core monitoring systems reliability by the method of imiting simulaton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golovanov, M.N.; Zyuzin, N.N.; Levin, G.L.; Chesnokov, A.N.

    1987-01-01

    An approach for estimation of reliability factors of complex reserved systems at early stages of development using the method of imitating simulation is considered. Different types of models, their merits and lacks are given. Features of in-core monitoring systems and advosability of graph model and graph theory element application for estimating reliability of such systems are shown. The results of investigation of the reliability factors of the reactor monitoring, control and core local protection subsystem are shown

  12. Advanced Test Reactor Core Modeling Update Project Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David W. Nigg, Principal Investigator; Kevin A. Steuhm, Project Manager

    2012-09-01

    Legacy computational reactor physics software tools and protocols currently used for support of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) core fuel management and safety assurance, and to some extent, experiment management, are inconsistent with the state of modern nuclear engineering practice, and are difficult, if not impossible, to properly verify and validate (V&V) according to modern standards. Furthermore, the legacy staff knowledge required for application of these tools and protocols from the 1960s and 1970s is rapidly being lost due to staff turnover and retirements. In late 2009, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) initiated a focused effort, the ATR Core Modeling Update Project, to address this situation through the introduction of modern high-fidelity computational software and protocols. This aggressive computational and experimental campaign will have a broad strategic impact on the operation of the ATR, both in terms of improved computational efficiency and accuracy for support of ongoing DOE programs as well as in terms of national and international recognition of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). The ATR Core Modeling Update Project, targeted for full implementation in phase with the next anticipated ATR Core Internals Changeout (CIC) in the 2014-2015 time frame, began during the last quarter of Fiscal Year 2009, and has just completed its third full year. Key accomplishments so far have encompassed both computational as well as experimental work. A new suite of stochastic and deterministic transport theory based reactor physics codes and their supporting nuclear data libraries (HELIOS, KENO6/SCALE, NEWT/SCALE, ATTILA, and an extended implementation of MCNP5) has been installed at the INL under various licensing arrangements. Corresponding models of the ATR and ATRC are now operational with all five codes, demonstrating the basic feasibility of the new code packages for their intended purpose. Of particular importance, a set of as-run core

  13. Structural health monitoring of power plant components based on a local temperature measurement concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudolph, Juergen; Bergholz, S.; Hilpert, R.; Jouan, B.; Goetz, A.

    2012-01-01

    The fatigue assessment of power plant components based on fatigue monitoring approaches is an essential part of the integrity concept and modern lifetime management. It is comparable to structural health monitoring approaches in other engineering fields. The methods of fatigue evaluation of nuclear power plant components based on realistic thermal load data measured on the plant are addressed. In this context the Fast Fatigue Evaluation (FFE) and Detailed Fatigue Calculation (DFC) of nuclear power plant components are parts of the three staged approach to lifetime assessment and lifetime management of the AREVA Fatigue Concept (AFC). The three stages Simplified Fatigue Estimation (SFE), Fast Fatigue Evaluation (FFE) and Detailed Fatigue Calculation (DFC) are characterized by increasing calculation effort and decreasing degree of conservatism. Their application is case dependent. The quality of the fatigue lifetime assessment essentially depends on one hand on the fatigue model assumptions and on the other hand on the load data as the basic input. In the case of nuclear power plant components thermal transient loading is most fatigue relevant. Usual global fatigue monitoring approaches rely on measured data from plant instrumentation. As an extension, the application of a local fatigue monitoring strategy (to be described in detail within the scope of this paper) paves the way of delivering continuously (nowadays at a frequency of 1 Hz) realistic load data at the fatigue relevant locations. Methods of qualified processing of these data are discussed in detail. Particularly, the processing of arbitrary operational load sequences and the derivation of representative model transients is discussed. This approach related to realistic load-time histories is principally applicable for all fatigue relevant components and ensures a realistic fatigue evaluation. (orig.)

  14. Development of whole core thermal-hydraulic analysis program ACT. 4. Simplified fuel assembly model and parallelization by MPI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohshima, Hiroyuki

    2001-10-01

    A whole core thermal-hydraulic analysis program ACT is being developed for the purpose of evaluating detailed in-core thermal hydraulic phenomena of fast reactors including the effect of the flow between wrapper-tube walls (inter-wrapper flow) under various reactor operation conditions. As appropriate boundary conditions in addition to a detailed modeling of the core are essential for accurate simulations of in-core thermal hydraulics, ACT consists of not only fuel assembly and inter-wrapper flow analysis modules but also a heat transport system analysis module that gives response of the plant dynamics to the core model. This report describes incorporation of a simplified model to the fuel assembly analysis module and program parallelization by a message passing method toward large-scale simulations. ACT has a fuel assembly analysis module which can simulate a whole fuel pin bundle in each fuel assembly of the core and, however, it may take much CPU time for a large-scale core simulation. Therefore, a simplified fuel assembly model that is thermal-hydraulically equivalent to the detailed one has been incorporated in order to save the simulation time and resources. This simplified model is applied to several parts of fuel assemblies in a core where the detailed simulation results are not required. With regard to the program parallelization, the calculation load and the data flow of ACT were analyzed and the optimum parallelization has been done including the improvement of the numerical simulation algorithm of ACT. Message Passing Interface (MPI) is applied to data communication between processes and synchronization in parallel calculations. Parallelized ACT was verified through a comparison simulation with the original one. In addition to the above works, input manuals of the core analysis module and the heat transport system analysis module have been prepared. (author)

  15. A Component Based Approach to Scientific Workflow Management

    CERN Document Server

    Le Goff, Jean-Marie; Baker, Nigel; Brooks, Peter; McClatchey, Richard

    2001-01-01

    CRISTAL is a distributed scientific workflow system used in the manufacturing and production phases of HEP experiment construction at CERN. The CRISTAL project has studied the use of a description driven approach, using meta- modelling techniques, to manage the evolving needs of a large physics community. Interest from such diverse communities as bio-informatics and manufacturing has motivated the CRISTAL team to re-engineer the system to customize functionality according to end user requirements but maximize software reuse in the process. The next generation CRISTAL vision is to build a generic component architecture from which a complete software product line can be generated according to the particular needs of the target enterprise. This paper discusses the issues of adopting a component product line based approach and our experiences of software reuse.

  16. A component based approach to scientific workflow management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, N.; Brooks, P.; McClatchey, R.; Kovacs, Z.; LeGoff, J.-M.

    2001-01-01

    CRISTAL is a distributed scientific workflow system used in the manufacturing and production phases of HEP experiment construction at CERN. The CRISTAL project has studied the use of a description driven approach, using meta-modelling techniques, to manage the evolving needs of a large physics community. Interest from such diverse communities as bio-informatics and manufacturing has motivated the CRISTAL team to re-engineer the system to customize functionality according to end user requirements but maximize software reuse in the process. The next generation CRISTAL vision is to build a generic component architecture from which a complete software product line can be generated according to the particular needs of the target enterprise. This paper discusses the issues of adopting a component product line based approach and our experiences of software reuse

  17. GrowYourIC: A Step Toward a Coherent Model of the Earth's Inner Core Seismic Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasbleis, Marine; Waszek, Lauren; Day, Elizabeth A.

    2017-11-01

    A complex inner core structure has been well established from seismic studies, showing radial and lateral heterogeneities at various length scales. Yet no geodynamic model is able to explain all the features observed. One of the main limits for this is the lack of tools to compare seismic observations and numerical models successfully. We use here a new Python tool called GrowYourIC to compare models of inner core structure. We calculate properties of geodynamic models of the inner core along seismic raypaths, for random or user-specified data sets. We test kinematic models which simulate fast lateral translation, superrotation, and differential growth. We explore first the influence on a real inner core data set, which has a sparse coverage of the inner core boundary. Such a data set is however able to successfully constrain the hemispherical boundaries due to a good sampling of latitudes. Combining translation and rotation could explain some of the features of the boundaries separating the inner core hemispheres. The depth shift of the boundaries, observed by some authors, seems unlikely to be modeled by a fast translation but could be produced by slow translation associated with superrotation.

  18. A core stochastic population projection model for Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runge, Michael C.; Sanders-Reed, Carol A.; Fonnesbeck, Christopher J.

    2007-01-01

    threats are likely to result in a long-term decline in the statewide population and a change in the regional distribution of manatees. Analyses of sensitivity and variance contribution highlight the importance of reducing uncertainty in some life-history parameters, particularly adult survival, temporal variance of adult survival, and long-term warm-water capacity. This core biological model is expected to evolve over time, as better information becomes available about manatees and their habitat, and as new assessment needs arise. We anticipate that this core model will be customized for other state and federal assessments in the near future.

  19. TWO-DIMENSIONAL CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA MODELS WITH MULTI-DIMENSIONAL TRANSPORT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolence, Joshua C.; Burrows, Adam; Zhang, Weiqun

    2015-01-01

    We present new two-dimensional (2D) axisymmetric neutrino radiation/hydrodynamic models of core-collapse supernova (CCSN) cores. We use the CASTRO code, which incorporates truly multi-dimensional, multi-group, flux-limited diffusion (MGFLD) neutrino transport, including all relevant O(v/c) terms. Our main motivation for carrying out this study is to compare with recent 2D models produced by other groups who have obtained explosions for some progenitor stars and with recent 2D VULCAN results that did not incorporate O(v/c) terms. We follow the evolution of 12, 15, 20, and 25 solar-mass progenitors to approximately 600 ms after bounce and do not obtain an explosion in any of these models. Though the reason for the qualitative disagreement among the groups engaged in CCSN modeling remains unclear, we speculate that the simplifying ''ray-by-ray'' approach employed by all other groups may be compromising their results. We show that ''ray-by-ray'' calculations greatly exaggerate the angular and temporal variations of the neutrino fluxes, which we argue are better captured by our multi-dimensional MGFLD approach. On the other hand, our 2D models also make approximations, making it difficult to draw definitive conclusions concerning the root of the differences between groups. We discuss some of the diagnostics often employed in the analyses of CCSN simulations and highlight the intimate relationship between the various explosion conditions that have been proposed. Finally, we explore the ingredients that may be missing in current calculations that may be important in reproducing the properties of the average CCSNe, should the delayed neutrino-heating mechanism be the correct mechanism of explosion

  20. Proposed Core Competencies and Empirical Validation Procedure in Competency Modeling: Confirmation and Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baczyńska, Anna K; Rowiński, Tomasz; Cybis, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Competency models provide insight into key skills which are common to many positions in an organization. Moreover, there is a range of competencies that is used by many companies. Researchers have developed core competency terminology to underline their cross-organizational value. The article presents a theoretical model of core competencies consisting of two main higher-order competencies called performance and entrepreneurship. Each of them consists of three elements: the performance competency includes cooperation, organization of work and goal orientation, while entrepreneurship includes innovativeness, calculated risk-taking and pro-activeness. However, there is lack of empirical validation of competency concepts in organizations and this would seem crucial for obtaining reliable results from organizational research. We propose a two-step empirical validation procedure: (1) confirmation factor analysis, and (2) classification of employees. The sample consisted of 636 respondents (M = 44.5; SD = 15.1). Participants were administered a questionnaire developed for the study purpose. The reliability, measured by Cronbach's alpha, ranged from 0.60 to 0.83 for six scales. Next, we tested the model using a confirmatory factor analysis. The two separate, single models of performance and entrepreneurial orientations fit quite well to the data, while a complex model based on the two single concepts needs further research. In the classification of employees based on the two higher order competencies we obtained four main groups of employees. Their profiles relate to those found in the literature, including so-called niche finders and top performers. Some proposal for organizations is discussed.

  1. Asteroseismic Constraints on the Models of Hot B Subdwarfs: Convective Helium-Burning Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Jan-Torge; Green, Elizabeth M.; Arnett, W. David

    2017-10-01

    Asteroseismology of non-radial pulsations in Hot B Subdwarfs (sdB stars) offers a unique view into the interior of core-helium-burning stars. Ground-based and space-borne high precision light curves allow for the analysis of pressure and gravity mode pulsations to probe the structure of sdB stars deep into the convective core. As such asteroseismological analysis provides an excellent opportunity to test our understanding of stellar evolution. In light of the newest constraints from asteroseismology of sdB and red clump stars, standard approaches of convective mixing in 1D stellar evolution models are called into question. The problem lies in the current treatment of overshooting and the entrainment at the convective boundary. Unfortunately no consistent algorithm of convective mixing exists to solve the problem, introducing uncertainties to the estimates of stellar ages. Three dimensional simulations of stellar convection show the natural development of an overshooting region and a boundary layer. In search for a consistent prescription of convection in one dimensional stellar evolution models, guidance from three dimensional simulations and asteroseismological results is indispensable.

  2. The Use of Hidden Markov Models for Anomaly Detection in Nuclear Core Condition Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, Bruce; West, Graeme M.; Galloway, Stuart; McArthur, Stephen D. J.; McDonald, James R.; Towle, Dave

    2009-04-01

    Unplanned outages can be especially costly for generation companies operating nuclear facilities. Early detection of deviations from expected performance through condition monitoring can allow a more proactive and managed approach to dealing with ageing plant. This paper proposes an anomaly detection framework incorporating the use of the Hidden Markov Model (HMM) to support the analysis of nuclear reactor core condition monitoring data. Fuel Grab Load Trace (FGLT) data gathered within the UK during routine refueling operations has been seen to provide information relating to the condition of the graphite bricks that comprise the core. Although manual analysis of this data is time consuming and requires considerable expertise, this paper demonstrates how techniques such as the HMM can provide analysis support by providing a benchmark model of expected behavior against which future refueling events may be compared. The presence of anomalous behavior in candidate traces is inferred through the underlying statistical foundation of the HMM which gives an observation likelihood averaged along the length of the input sequence. Using this likelihood measure, the engineer can be alerted to anomalous behaviour, indicating data which might require further detailed examination. It is proposed that this data analysis technique is used in conjunction with other intelligent analysis techniques currently employed to analyse FGLT to provide a greater confidence measure in detecting anomalous behaviour from FGLT data.

  3. Inverse stochastic–dynamic models for high-resolution Greenland ice core records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Boers

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Proxy records from Greenland ice cores have been studied for several decades, yet many open questions remain regarding the climate variability encoded therein. Here, we use a Bayesian framework for inferring inverse, stochastic–dynamic models from δ18O and dust records of unprecedented, subdecadal temporal resolution. The records stem from the North Greenland Ice Core Project (NGRIP, and we focus on the time interval 59–22 ka b2k. Our model reproduces the dynamical characteristics of both the δ18O and dust proxy records, including the millennial-scale Dansgaard–Oeschger variability, as well as statistical properties such as probability density functions, waiting times and power spectra, with no need for any external forcing. The crucial ingredients for capturing these properties are (i high-resolution training data, (ii cubic drift terms, (iii nonlinear coupling terms between the δ18O and dust time series, and (iv non-Markovian contributions that represent short-term memory effects.

  4. Inverse stochastic-dynamic models for high-resolution Greenland ice core records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boers, Niklas; Chekroun, Mickael D.; Liu, Honghu; Kondrashov, Dmitri; Rousseau, Denis-Didier; Svensson, Anders; Bigler, Matthias; Ghil, Michael

    2017-12-01

    Proxy records from Greenland ice cores have been studied for several decades, yet many open questions remain regarding the climate variability encoded therein. Here, we use a Bayesian framework for inferring inverse, stochastic-dynamic models from δ18O and dust records of unprecedented, subdecadal temporal resolution. The records stem from the North Greenland Ice Core Project (NGRIP), and we focus on the time interval 59-22 ka b2k. Our model reproduces the dynamical characteristics of both the δ18O and dust proxy records, including the millennial-scale Dansgaard-Oeschger variability, as well as statistical properties such as probability density functions, waiting times and power spectra, with no need for any external forcing. The crucial ingredients for capturing these properties are (i) high-resolution training data, (ii) cubic drift terms, (iii) nonlinear coupling terms between the δ18O and dust time series, and (iv) non-Markovian contributions that represent short-term memory effects.

  5. 3-D core modelling of RIA transient: the TMI-1 benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferraresi, P.; Studer, E.; Avvakumov, A.; Malofeev, V.; Diamond, D.; Bromley, B.

    2001-01-01

    The increase of fuel burn up in core management poses actually the problem of the evaluation of the deposited energy during Reactivity Insertion Accidents (RIA). In order to precisely evaluate this energy, 3-D approaches are used more and more frequently in core calculations. This 'best-estimate' approach requires the evaluation of code uncertainties. To contribute to this evaluation, a code benchmark has been launched. A 3-D modelling for the TMI-1 central Ejected Rod Accident with zero and intermediate initial powers was carried out with three different methods of calculation for an inserted reactivity respectively fixed at 1.2 $ and 1.26 $. The studies implemented by the neutronics codes PARCS (BNL) and CRONOS (IPSN/CEA) describe an homogeneous assembly, whereas the BARS (KI) code allows a pin-by-pin representation (CRONOS has both possibilities). All the calculations are consistent, the variation in figures resulting mainly from the method used to build cross sections and reflectors constants. The maximum rise in enthalpy for the intermediate initial power (33 % P N ) calculation is, for this academic calculation, about 30 cal/g. This work will be completed in a next step by an evaluation of the uncertainty induced by the uncertainty on model parameters, and a sensitivity study of the key parameters for a peripheral Rod Ejection Accident. (authors)

  6. Comparison of CORA and MELCOR core degradation simulation and the MELCOR oxidation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jun; Corradini, Michael L.; Fu, Wen; Haskin, Troy; Tian, Wenxi; Zhang, Yapei; Su, Guanghui; Qiu, Suizheng

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Oxidation model of MELCOR is analyzed and the improving suggestion is provided. • MELCOR core degradation calculating results are compared with CORA experiment. • Flow rate of argon and steam, the generating rate of hydrogen is calculated and compared. • Temperature spatial variation and temperature history is calculated and presented. - Abstract: MELCOR is widely used and sufficiently trusted for severe accident analysis. However, the occurrence of Fukushima has increased the focus on severe accident codes and their use. A MELCOR core degradation calculation was conducted at the University of Wisconsin–Madison under the help of Sandia. The calculation results were checked by comparing with a past CORA experiment. MELCOR calculation results included the flow rate of argon and steam, the generation rate of hydrogen. Through this work, the performance of MELCOR COR package was reviewed in detail. This paper compares the hydrogen generation rates predicted by MELCOR to the CORA test data. While agreement is reasonable it could be improved. Additionally, the MELCOR zirconium oxidation model was analyzed

  7. Comparison of CORA and MELCOR core degradation simulation and the MELCOR oxidation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jun [College of Engineering, The University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Flow in Power Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Corradini, Michael L., E-mail: corradini@engr.wisc.edu [College of Engineering, The University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Fu, Wen [College of Engineering, The University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Haskin, Troy [College of Engineering, The University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Tian, Wenxi; Zhang, Yapei; Su, Guanghui; Qiu, Suizheng [State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Flow in Power Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Oxidation model of MELCOR is analyzed and the improving suggestion is provided. • MELCOR core degradation calculating results are compared with CORA experiment. • Flow rate of argon and steam, the generating rate of hydrogen is calculated and compared. • Temperature spatial variation and temperature history is calculated and presented. - Abstract: MELCOR is widely used and sufficiently trusted for severe accident analysis. However, the occurrence of Fukushima has increased the focus on severe accident codes and their use. A MELCOR core degradation calculation was conducted at the University of Wisconsin–Madison under the help of Sandia. The calculation results were checked by comparing with a past CORA experiment. MELCOR calculation results included the flow rate of argon and steam, the generation rate of hydrogen. Through this work, the performance of MELCOR COR package was reviewed in detail. This paper compares the hydrogen generation rates predicted by MELCOR to the CORA test data. While agreement is reasonable it could be improved. Additionally, the MELCOR zirconium oxidation model was analyzed.

  8. 3-D core modelling of RIA transient: the TMI-1 benchmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferraresi, P. [CEA Cadarache, Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, Dept. de Recherches en Securite, 13 - Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Studer, E. [CEA Saclay, Dept. Modelisation de Systemes et Structures, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Avvakumov, A.; Malofeev, V. [Nuclear Safety Institute of Russian Research Center, Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Diamond, D.; Bromley, B. [Nuclear Energy and Infrastructure Systems Div., Brookhaven National Lab., BNL, Upton, NY (United States)

    2001-07-01

    The increase of fuel burn up in core management poses actually the problem of the evaluation of the deposited energy during Reactivity Insertion Accidents (RIA). In order to precisely evaluate this energy, 3-D approaches are used more and more frequently in core calculations. This 'best-estimate' approach requires the evaluation of code uncertainties. To contribute to this evaluation, a code benchmark has been launched. A 3-D modelling for the TMI-1 central Ejected Rod Accident with zero and intermediate initial powers was carried out with three different methods of calculation for an inserted reactivity respectively fixed at 1.2 $ and 1.26 $. The studies implemented by the neutronics codes PARCS (BNL) and CRONOS (IPSN/CEA) describe an homogeneous assembly, whereas the BARS (KI) code allows a pin-by-pin representation (CRONOS has both possibilities). All the calculations are consistent, the variation in figures resulting mainly from the method used to build cross sections and reflectors constants. The maximum rise in enthalpy for the intermediate initial power (33 % P{sub N}) calculation is, for this academic calculation, about 30 cal/g. This work will be completed in a next step by an evaluation of the uncertainty induced by the uncertainty on model parameters, and a sensitivity study of the key parameters for a peripheral Rod Ejection Accident. (authors)

  9. Different Paths to Core Pathology: The Equifinal Model of the Schizophrenia Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Isobel W; Glausier, Jill R

    2016-05-01

    Schizophrenia is a clinically heterogeneous disorder that is perhaps more accurately characterized as "the schizophrenia syndrome." This clinical heterogeneity is reflected in the heterogeneous neurobiological presentations associated with the illness. Moreover, even highly specific neural aberrations that are associated with distinct symptoms of schizophrenia are linked to a wide range of risk factors. As such, any individual with schizophrenia likely has a particular set of risk factors that interact and converge to cross the disease threshold, forming a particular etiology that ultimately generates a core pathophysiology. This core pathophysiology may then produce 1 or more symptoms of schizophrenia, leading to common symptoms across individuals in spite of disparate etiologies. As such, the schizophrenia syndrome can be considered as anequifinalentity: a state of dysfunction that can arise from different upstream etiologies. Moreover, schizophrenia etiologies are multifactorial and can involve the interactive effects of a broad range of genetic, environmental, and developmental risk factors. Through a consideration of how disparate etiologies, caused by different sets of risk factors, converge on the same net dysfunction, this paper aims to model the equifinal nature of schizophrenia symptoms. To demonstrate the equifinal model, we discuss how maternal infection and adolescent cannabis use, 2 recognized schizophrenia risk factors, may interact with other genetic, environmental, and/or developmental risk factors to cause the conserved clinical presentation of impaired working memory. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Comparison of the SASSYS/SAS4A radial core expansion reactivity feedback model and the empirical correlation for FFTF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wigeland, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    The present emphasis on inherent safety for LMR designs has resulted in a need to represent the various reactivity feedback mechanisms as accurately as possible. The dominant negative reactivity feedback has been found to result from radial expansion of the core for most postulated ATWS events. For this reason, a more detailed model for calculating the reactivity feedback from radial core expansion has been recently developed for use with the SASSYS/SAS4A Code System. The purpose of this summary is to present an extension to the model so that it is more suitable for handling a core restraint design as used in FFTF, and to compare the SASSYS/SAS4A results using this model to the empirical correlation presently being used to account for radial core expansion reactivity feedback to FFTF

  11. Evaluating the Efficiency of a Multi-core Aware Multi-objective Optimization Tool for Calibrating the SWAT Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, X. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Izaurralde, R. C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zong, Z. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhao, K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Thomson, A. M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2012-08-20

    The efficiency of calibrating physically-based complex hydrologic models is a major concern in the application of those models to understand and manage natural and human activities that affect watershed systems. In this study, we developed a multi-core aware multi-objective evolutionary optimization algorithm (MAMEOA) to improve the efficiency of calibrating a worldwide used watershed model (Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT)). The test results show that MAMEOA can save about 1-9%, 26-51%, and 39-56% time consumed by calibrating SWAT as compared with sequential method by using dual-core, quad-core, and eight-core machines, respectively. Potential and limitations of MAMEOA for calibrating SWAT are discussed. MAMEOA is open source software.

  12. A combined Component-Based Approach for the Design of Distributed Software Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guareis de farias, Cléver; Ferreira Pires, Luis; van Sinderen, Marten J.; Quartel, Dick; Yang, H.; Gupta, S.

    2001-01-01

    Component-based software development enables the construction of software artefacts by assembling binary units of production, distribution and deployment, the so-called components. Several approaches to component-based development have been proposed recently. Most of these approaches are based on

  13. Modelling of RPV lower head under core melt severe accident condition using OpenFOAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madokoro, Hiroshi; Kretzschmar, Frank; Miassoedov, Alexei

    2017-01-01

    Although six years have been passed since the tragic severe accident at Fukushima Daiichi, still large uncertainties exist in modeling of core degradation and reactor pressure vessel (RPV) failure. It is extremely important to obtain a better understanding of complex phenomena in the lower head in order to improve accident management measures. The possible failure mode of reactor pressure vessel and its failure time are especially a matter of importance. Thermal behavior of the molten pool can be simulated by the Phase-change Effective Convectivity Model (PECM), which is a distributed-parameter model developed in the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Sweden. The model calculates convective currents not using a pure CFD approach but based on so called “characteristic velocities” that are determined by empirical correlations depending on the geometry and physical properties of the molten pool. At the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), the PECM has been implemented in the open-source CFD software OpenFOAM in order to receive detailed predictions of a core melt behavior in the RPV lower head under severe accident conditions. An advantage of using OpenFOAM is that it is very flexible to add and modify models and physical properties. In the current work, the solver is extended to couple PECM with a structure analysis model of the vessel wall. The model considers thermal expansion, plasticity, creep and damage. The model and physical properties are based on those implemented in ANSYS. Although the previous implementation had restriction that the amount of and geometry of the melt cannot be changed, our coupled model allows flexibility of the melt amount and geometry. The extended solver was used to simulate the LIVE-L1 and -L7V experiments and has demonstrated good prediction of the temperature distribution in the molten pool and heat flux distribution through the vessel wall. Regarding the vessel failure the model was applied to one of the FOREVER tests

  14. Magnetic model for a horse-spleen ferritin with a three-phase core structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, J.H.; Eom, T.W. [Quantum Photonic Science Research Center, Department of Physics and Research Institute for Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Y.P., E-mail: yplee@hanyang.ac.kr [Quantum Photonic Science Research Center, Department of Physics and Research Institute for Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Rhee, J.Y. [Department of Physics, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, E.H. [Kwangwoon University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    The increasing interests in magnetic nanoparticles has prompted research on ferritin, which is naturally a well-defined iron-storage protein in most living organisms. However, the exact magnetic behavior of ferritin is not well understood, because the crystal structures of ferritin and ferrihydrite, its major component, are not fully understood. Briefly, we discuss the previous magnetization models of ferritin and ferrihydrite and we present a new model ({Sigma}3L) of the initial magnetization of ferritin, considering its different phases. The new model includes three Langevin-function terms, which represent three different magnetic moments provided by the likely hydroxide and oxide mineral phases in ferritin. Compared to previous models, our simple model fits the experimental data 12 times better in terms of the sum of least squares. The magnetic independence of each component supports the multi-phase compositional model of the mineral core of horse-spleen ferritin. This {Sigma}3L model gives a quantization of the amounts of the different phases within horse-spleen ferritins that matches other published experimental data: 60-80% ferrihydrite, 15-25% maghemite/magnetite, and 1-10% hematite. - Highlights: > We present a new model ({Sigma}3L) of the initial magnetization of ferritin, considering its different phases. > New model includes three Langevin-function terms, which represent three different magnetic moments provided by ferritin phases. > Compared to previous models, our simple model fits the experimental data 12 times better in terms of the sum of least square. > The magnetic independence of each component supports that ferritin and ferrihydrite are composed of different phases.

  15. Experimental modelling of core debris dispersion from the vault under a PWR pressure vessel. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, P.W.

    1987-12-01

    In previous experiments, done on a 1/25 scale model in Perspex of the vault under a PWR pressure vessel, the instrument tubes support structure built into the vault was not included. It consists of a number of grids made up of fairly massive steel girders. These have now been added to the model and experiments performed using water to simulate molten core debris assumed to have fallen on to the vault floor and high-pressure air to simulate the discharge of steam or gas from the assumed breach at the bottom of the pressure vessel. The results show that the tubes support structure considerably reduces the carry-over of liquid via the vault access shafts. (author)

  16. Low-Temperature Crystal Structures of the Hard Core Square Shoulder Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Gabriëlse

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In many cases, the stability of complex structures in colloidal systems is enhanced by a competition between different length scales. Inspired by recent experiments on nanoparticles coated with polymers, we use Monte Carlo simulations to explore the types of crystal structures that can form in a simple hard-core square shoulder model that explicitly incorporates two favored distances between the particles. To this end, we combine Monte Carlo-based crystal structure finding algorithms with free energies obtained using a mean-field cell theory approach, and draw phase diagrams for two different values of the square shoulder width as a function of the density and temperature. Moreover, we map out the zero-temperature phase diagram for a broad range of shoulder widths. Our results show the stability of a rich variety of crystal phases, such as body-centered orthogonal (BCO lattices not previously considered for the square shoulder model.

  17. Gas Core Reactor Numerical Simulation Using a Coupled MHD-MCNP Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazeminezhad, F.; Anghaie, S.

    2008-01-01

    Analysis is provided in this report of using two head-on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shocks to achieve supercritical nuclear fission in an axially elongated cylinder filled with UF4 gas as an energy source for deep space missions. The motivation for each aspect of the design is explained and supported by theory and numerical simulations. A subsequent report will provide detail on relevant experimental work to validate the concept. Here the focus is on the theory of and simulations for the proposed gas core reactor conceptual design from the onset of shock generations to the supercritical state achieved when the shocks collide. The MHD model is coupled to a standard nuclear code (MCNP) to observe the neutron flux and fission power attributed to the supercritical state brought about by the shock collisions. Throughout the modeling, realistic parameters are used for the initial ambient gaseous state and currents to ensure a resulting supercritical state upon shock collisions.

  18. STEADY STATE MODELING OF THE MINIMUM CRITICAL CORE OF THE TRANSIENT REACTOR TEST FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthony L. Alberti; Todd S. Palmer; Javier Ortensi; Mark D. DeHart

    2016-05-01

    With the advent of next generation reactor systems and new fuel designs, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has identified the need for the resumption of transient testing of nuclear fuels. The DOE has decided that the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is best suited for future testing. TREAT is a thermal neutron spectrum, air-cooled, nuclear test facility that is designed to test nuclear fuels in transient scenarios. These specific scenarios range from simple temperature transients to full fuel melt accidents. DOE has expressed a desire to develop a simulation capability that will accurately model the experiments before they are irradiated at the facility. It is the aim for this capability to have an emphasis on effective and safe operation while minimizing experimental time and cost. The multi physics platform MOOSE has been selected as the framework for this project. The goals for this work are to identify the fundamental neutronics properties of TREAT and to develop an accurate steady state model for future multiphysics transient simulations. In order to minimize computational cost, the effect of spatial homogenization and angular discretization are investigated. It was found that significant anisotropy is present in TREAT assemblies and to capture this effect, explicit modeling of cooling channels and inter-element gaps is necessary. For this modeling scheme, single element calculations at 293 K gave power distributions with a root mean square difference of 0.076% from those of reference SERPENT calculations. The minimum critical core configuration with identical gap and channel treatment at 293 K resulted in a root mean square, total core, radial power distribution 2.423% different than those of reference SERPENT solutions.

  19. Tungsten Transport in the Core of JET H-mode Plasmas, Experiments and Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angioni, Clemente

    2014-10-01

    The physics of heavy impurity transport in tokamak plasmas plays an essential role towards the achievement of practical fusion energy. Reliable predictions of the behavior of these impurities require the development of realistic theoretical models and a complete understanding of present experiments, against which models can be validated. Recent experimental campaigns at JET with the ITER-like wall, with a W divertor, provide an extremely interesting and relevant opportunity to perform this combined experimental and theoretical research. Theoretical models of both neoclassical and turbulent transport must consistently include the impact of any poloidal asymmetry of the W density to enable quantitative predictions of the 2D W density distribution over the poloidal cross section. The agreement between theoretical predictions and experimentally reconstructed 2D W densities allows the identification of the main mechanisms which govern W transport in the core of JET H-mode plasmas. Neoclassical transport is largely enhanced by centrifugal effects and the neoclassical convection dominates, leading to central accumulation in the presence of central peaking of the density profiles and insufficiently peaked ion temperature profiles. The strength of the neoclassical temperature screening is affected by poloidal asymmetries. Only around mid-radius, turbulent diffusion offsets neoclassical transport. Consistently with observations in other devices, ion cyclotron resonance heating in the plasma center can flatten the electron density profile and peak the ion temperature profile and provide a means to reverse the neoclassical convection. MHD activity may hamper or speed up the accumulation process depending on mode number and plasma conditions. Finally, the relationship of JET results to a parallel modelling activity of the W behavior in the core of ASDEX Upgrade plasmas is presented. This project has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation

  20. Aquarius' Object-Oriented, Plug and Play Component-Based Flight Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Alexander; Shahabuddin, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    The Aquarius mission involves a combined radiometer and radar instrument in low-Earth orbit, providing monthly global maps of Sea Surface Salinity. Operating successfully in orbit since June, 2011, the spacecraft bus was furnished by the Argentine space agency, Comision Nacional de Actividades Espaciales (CONAE). The instrument, built jointly by NASA's Caltech/JPL and Goddard Space Flight Center, has been successfully producing expectation-exceeding data since it was powered on in August of 2011. In addition to the radiometer and scatterometer, the instrument contains an command & data-handling subsystem with a computer and flight software (FSW) that is responsible for managing the instrument, its operation, and its data. Aquarius' FSW is conceived and architected as a Component-based system, in which the running software consists of a set of Components, each playing a distinctive role in the subsystem, instantiated and connected together at runtime. Component architectures feature a well-defined set of interfaces between the Components, visible and analyzable at the architectural level (see [1]). As we will describe, this kind of an architecture offers significant advantages over more traditional FSW architectures, which often feature a monolithic runtime structure. Component-based software is enabled by Object-Oriented (OO) techniques and languages, the use of which again is not typical in space mission FSW. We will argue in this paper that the use of OO design methods and tools (especially the Unified Modeling Language), as well as the judicious usage of C++, are very well suited to FSW applications, and we will present Aquarius FSW, describing our methods, processes, and design, as a successful case in point.

  1. A heat transfer correlation based on a surface renewal model for molten core concrete interaction study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tourniaire, B. . E-mail bruno.tourniaire@cea.fr

    2006-01-01

    The prediction of heat transfer between corium pool and concrete basemat is of particular significance in the framework of the study of PWR's severe accident. Heat transfer directly governs the ablation velocity of concrete in case of molten core concrete interaction (MCCI) and, consequently, the time delay when the reactor cavity may fail. From a restricted hydrodynamic point of view, this issue is related to heat transfer between a heated bubbling pool and a porous wall with gas injection. Several experimental studies have been performed with simulant materials and many correlations have been provided to address this issue. The comparisons of the results of these correlations with the measurements and their extrapolation to reactor materials show that strong discrepancies between the results of these models are obtained which probably means that some phenomena are not well taken into account. The main purpose of this paper is to present an alternative heat transfer model which was originally developed for chemical engineering applications (bubble columns) by Deckwer. A part of this work is devoted to the presentation of this model, which is based on a surface renewal assumption. Comparison of the results of this model with available experimental data in different systems are presented and discussed. These comparisons clearly show that this model can be used to deal with the particular problem of MCCI. The analyses also lead to enrich the original model by taking into account the thermal resistance of the wall: a new formulation of the Deckwer's correlation is finally proposed

  2. Preservice Secondary Teachers' Conceptions from a Mathematical Modeling Activity and Connections to the Common Core State Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stohlmann, Micah; Maiorca, Cathrine; Olson, Travis A.

    2015-01-01

    Mathematical modeling is an essential integrated piece of the Common Core State Standards. However, researchers have shown that mathematical modeling activities can be difficult for teachers to implement. Teachers are more likely to implement mathematical modeling activities if they have their own successful experiences with such activities. This…

  3. An Iron-Rain Model for Core Formation on Asteroid 4 Vesta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Walter S.; Mittlefehldt, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Asteroid 4 Vesta is differentiated into a crust, mantle, and core, as demonstrated by studies of the eucrite and diogenite meteorites and by data from NASA's Dawn spacecraft. Most models for the differentiation and thermal evolution of Vesta assume that the metal phase completely melts within 20 degrees of the eutectic temperature, well before the onset of silicate melting. In such a model, core formation initially happens by Darcy flow, but this is an inefficient process for liquid metal and solid silicate. However, the likely chemical composition of Vesta, similar to H chondrites with perhaps some CM or CV chondrite, has 13-16 weight percent S. For such compositions, metal-sulfide melting will not be complete until a temperature of at least 1350 degrees Centigrade. The silicate solidus for Vesta's composition is between 1100 and 1150 degrees Centigrade, and thus metal and silicate melting must have substantially overlapped in time on Vesta. In this chemically and physically more likely view of Vesta's evolution, metal sulfide drops will sink by Stokes flow through the partially molten silicate magma ocean in a process that can be envisioned as "iron rain". Measurements of eucrites show that moderately siderophile elements such as Ni, Mo, and W reached chemical equilibrium between the metal and silicate phases, which is an important test for any Vesta differentiation model. The equilibration time is a function of the initial metal grain size, which we take to be 25-45 microns based on recent measurements of H6 chondrites. For these sizes and reasonable silicate magma viscosities, equilibration occurs after a fall distance of just a few meters through the magma ocean. Although metal drops may grow in size by merger with other drops, which increases their settling velocities and decreases the total core formation time, the short equilibration distance ensures that the moderately siderophile elements will reach chemical equilibrium between metal and silicate before

  4. In-medium no-core shell model for ab initio nuclear structure calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebrerufael, Eskendr

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we merge two successful ab initio nuclear-structure methods, the no-core shell model (NCSM) and the multi-reference in-medium similarity renormalization group (IM-SRG), to define a novel many-body approach for the comprehensive description of ground and excited states of closed- and open-shell medium-mass nuclei. Building on the key advantages of the two methods - the decoupling of excitations at the many-body level in the IM-SRG, and the exact diagonalization in the NCSM applicable up to medium-light nuclei - their combination enables fully converged no-core calculations for an unprecedented range of nuclei and observables at moderate computational cost. The efficiency and rapid model-space convergence of the new approach make it ideally suited for ab initio studies of ground and low-lying excited states of nuclei up to the medium-mass regime. Interactions constructed within the framework of chiral effective field theory provide an excellent opportunity to describe properties of nuclei from first principles, i.e., rooted in quantum chromodynamics, they overcome the lack of predictive power of phenomenological potentials. The hard core of these interactions causes strong short-range correlations, which we soften by using the similarity-renormalization-group transformation that accelerates the model-space convergence of many-body calculations. Three-nucleon effects, which are mandatory for the correct description of bulk properties of nuclei, are included in our calculations by using the normal-ordered two-body approximation, which has been shown to be sufficient to capture the main effects of the three-nucleon interaction. Using these interactions, we analyze energies of ground and excited states in the carbon and oxygen isotopic chains, where conventional NCSM calculations are still feasible and provide an important benchmark. Furthermore, we study the Hoyle state in 12 C - a three-alpha cluster state that cannot be converged in standard NCSM

  5. Scalable geocomputation: evolving an environmental model building platform from single-core to supercomputers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Oliver; de Jong, Kor; Karssenberg, Derek

    2017-04-01

    There is an increasing demand to run environmental models on a big scale: simulations over large areas at high resolution. The heterogeneity of available computing hardware such as multi-core CPUs, GPUs or supercomputer potentially provides significant computing power to fulfil this demand. However, this requires detailed knowledge of the underlying hardware, parallel algorithm design and the implementation thereof in an efficient system programming language. Domain scientists such as hydrologists or ecologists often lack this specific software engineering knowledge, their emphasis is (and should be) on exploratory building and analysis of simulation models. As a result, models constructed by domain specialists mostly do not take full advantage of the available hardware. A promising solution is to separate the model building activity from software engineering by offering domain specialists a model building framework with pre-programmed building blocks that they combine to construct a model. The model building framework, consequently, needs to have built-in capabilities to make full usage of the available hardware. Developing such a framework providing understandable code for domain scientists and being runtime efficient at the same time poses several challenges on developers of such a framework. For example, optimisations can be performed on individual operations or the whole model, or tasks need to be generated for a well-balanced execution without explicitly knowing the complexity of the domain problem provided by the modeller. Ideally, a modelling framework supports the optimal use of available hardware whichsoever combination of model building blocks scientists use. We demonstrate our ongoing work on developing parallel algorithms for spatio-temporal modelling and demonstrate 1) PCRaster, an environmental software framework (http://www.pcraster.eu) providing spatio-temporal model building blocks and 2) parallelisation of about 50 of these building blocks using

  6. A UML profile for code generation of component based distributed systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiozzi, G.; Karban, R.; Andolfato, L.; Tejeda, A.

    2012-01-01

    A consistent and unambiguous implementation of code generation (model to text transformation) from UML (must rely on a well defined UML (Unified Modelling Language) profile, customizing UML for a particular application domain. Such a profile must have a solid foundation in a formally correct ontology, formalizing the concepts and their relations in the specific domain, in order to avoid a maze or set of wildly created stereotypes. The paper describes a generic profile for the code generation of component based distributed systems for control applications, the process to distill the ontology and define the profile, and the strategy followed to implement the code generator. The main steps that take place iteratively include: defining the terms and relations with an ontology, mapping the ontology to the appropriate UML meta-classes, testing the profile by creating modelling examples, and generating the code. This has allowed us to work on the modelling of E-ELT (European Extremely Large Telescope) control system and instrumentation without knowing what infrastructure will be finally used

  7. A component-based system for agricultural drought monitoring by remote sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Heng; Li, Jun; Yuan, Yanbin; You, Lin; Chen, Chao

    2017-01-01

    In recent decades, various kinds of remote sensing-based drought indexes have been proposed and widely used in the field of drought monitoring. However, the drought-related software and platform development lag behind the theoretical research. The current drought monitoring systems focus mainly on information management and publishing, and cannot implement professional drought monitoring or parameter inversion modelling, especially the models based on multi-dimensional feature space. In view of the above problems, this paper aims at fixing this gap with a component-based system named RSDMS to facilitate the application of drought monitoring by remote sensing. The system is designed and developed based on Component Object Model (COM) to ensure the flexibility and extendibility of modules. RSDMS realizes general image-related functions such as data management, image display, spatial reference management, image processing and analysis, and further provides drought monitoring and evaluation functions based on internal and external models. Finally, China's Ningxia region is selected as the study area to validate the performance of RSDMS. The experimental results show that RSDMS provide an efficient and scalable support to agricultural drought monitoring.

  8. A component-based system for agricultural drought monitoring by remote sensing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng Dong

    Full Text Available In recent decades, various kinds of remote sensing-based drought indexes have been proposed and widely used in the field of drought monitoring. However, the drought-related software and platform development lag behind the theoretical research. The current drought monitoring systems focus mainly on information management and publishing, and cannot implement professional drought monitoring or parameter inversion modelling, especially the models based on multi-dimensional feature space. In view of the above problems, this paper aims at fixing this gap with a component-based system named RSDMS to facilitate the application of drought monitoring by remote sensing. The system is designed and developed based on Component Object Model (COM to ensure the flexibility and extendibility of modules. RSDMS realizes general image-related functions such as data management, image display, spatial reference management, image processing and analysis, and further provides drought monitoring and evaluation functions based on internal and external models. Finally, China's Ningxia region is selected as the study area to validate the performance of RSDMS. The experimental results show that RSDMS provide an efficient and scalable support to agricultural drought monitoring.

  9. Core discrete event simulation model for the evaluation of health care technologies in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vataire, Anne-Lise; Aballéa, Samuel; Antonanzas, Fernando; Roijen, Leona Hakkaart-van; Lam, Raymond W; McCrone, Paul; Persson, Ulf; Toumi, Mondher

    2014-03-01

    A review of existing economic models in major depressive disorder (MDD) highlighted the need for models with longer time horizons that also account for heterogeneity in treatment pathways between patients. A core discrete event simulation model was developed to estimate health and cost outcomes associated with alternative treatment strategies. This model simulated short- and long-term clinical events (partial response, remission, relapse, recovery, and recurrence), adverse events, and treatment changes (titration, switch, addition, and discontinuation) over up to 5 years. Several treatment pathways were defined on the basis of fictitious antidepressants with three levels of efficacy, tolerability, and price (low, medium, and high) from first line to third line. The model was populated with input data from the literature for the UK setting. Model outputs include time in different health states, quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs), and costs from National Health Service and societal perspectives. The codes are open source. Predicted costs and QALYs from this model are within the range of results from previous economic evaluations. The largest cost components from the payer perspective were physician visits and hospitalizations. Key parameters driving the predicted costs and QALYs were utility values, effectiveness, and frequency of physician visits. Differences in QALYs and costs between two strategies with different effectiveness increased approximately twofold when the time horizon increased from 1 to 5 years. The discrete event simulation model can provide a more comprehensive evaluation of different therapeutic options in MDD, compared with existing Markov models, and can be used to compare a wide range of health care technologies in various groups of patients with MDD. Copyright © 2014 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Fluid structure interaction in LMFBR cores modelling by an homogenization method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brochard, D.

    1988-01-01

    The upper plenum of the internals of PWR, the steam generator bundle, the nuclear reactor core, may be schematically represented by a beam bundle immersed in a fluid. The dynamical study of such a system needs to take into account fluid structure interaction. A refined model at the scale of the tubes can be used but leads to a very difficult problem to solve even on the largest computers. The homogenization method allows to have an approximation of the fluid structure interaction for the global behaviour of the bundle. It consists of replacing the heterogeneous physical medium (tubes and fluid) by an equivalent homogeneous medium whose characteristics are determined from the resolution of a set of problems on the elementary cell. The aim of this paper is to present the main steps of the determination of this equivalent medium in the case of small displacements (acoustic behaviour of the fluid). Then an application to LMFBR core geometry has been realised, which shows the lowering effect on eigenfrequencies due to the fluid. Some comparisons with test results will be presented. 6 refs, 7 figs, 2 tabs

  11. Characterization and identification of microRNA core promoters in four model species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuefeng Zhou

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs are short, noncoding RNAs that play important roles in post-transcriptional gene regulation. Although many functions of microRNAs in plants and animals have been revealed in recent years, the transcriptional mechanism of microRNA genes is not well-understood. To elucidate the transcriptional regulation of microRNA genes, we study and characterize, in a genome scale, the promoters of intergenic microRNA genes in Caenorhabditis elegans, Homo sapiens, Arabidopsis thaliana, and Oryza sativa. We show that most known microRNA genes in these four species have the same type of promoters as protein-coding genes have. To further characterize the promoters of microRNA genes, we developed a novel promoter prediction method, called common query voting (CoVote, which is more effective than available promoter prediction methods. Using this new method, we identify putative core promoters of most known microRNA genes in the four model species. Moreover, we characterize the promoters of microRNA genes in these four species. We discover many significant, characteristic sequence motifs in these core promoters, several of which match or resemble the known cis-acting elements for transcription initiation. Among these motifs, some are conserved across different species while some are specific to microRNA genes of individual species.

  12. A transmission line model for propagation in elliptical core optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgantzos, E.; Papageorgiou, C.; Boucouvalas, A. C.

    2015-12-01

    The calculation of mode propagation constants of elliptical core fibers has been the purpose of extended research leading to many notable methods, with the classic step index solution based on Mathieu functions. This paper seeks to derive a new innovative method for the determination of mode propagation constants in single mode fibers with elliptic core by modeling the elliptical fiber as a series of connected coupled transmission line elements. We develop a matrix formulation of the transmission line and the resonance of the circuits is used to calculate the mode propagation constants. The technique, used with success in the case of cylindrical fibers, is now being extended for the case of fibers with elliptical cross section. The advantage of this approach is that it is very well suited to be able to calculate the mode dispersion of arbitrary refractive index profile elliptical waveguides. The analysis begins with the deployment Maxwell's equations adjusted for elliptical coordinates. Further algebraic analysis leads to a set of equations where we are faced with the appearance of harmonics. Taking into consideration predefined fixed number of harmonics simplifies the problem and enables the use of the resonant circuits approach. According to each case, programs have been created in Matlab, providing with a series of results (mode propagation constants) that are further compared with corresponding results from the ready known Mathieu functions method.

  13. A transmission line model for propagation in elliptical core optical fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgantzos, E.; Boucouvalas, A. C.; Papageorgiou, C.

    2015-01-01

    The calculation of mode propagation constants of elliptical core fibers has been the purpose of extended research leading to many notable methods, with the classic step index solution based on Mathieu functions. This paper seeks to derive a new innovative method for the determination of mode propagation constants in single mode fibers with elliptic core by modeling the elliptical fiber as a series of connected coupled transmission line elements. We develop a matrix formulation of the transmission line and the resonance of the circuits is used to calculate the mode propagation constants. The technique, used with success in the case of cylindrical fibers, is now being extended for the case of fibers with elliptical cross section. The advantage of this approach is that it is very well suited to be able to calculate the mode dispersion of arbitrary refractive index profile elliptical waveguides. The analysis begins with the deployment Maxwell’s equations adjusted for elliptical coordinates. Further algebraic analysis leads to a set of equations where we are faced with the appearance of harmonics. Taking into consideration predefined fixed number of harmonics simplifies the problem and enables the use of the resonant circuits approach. According to each case, programs have been created in Matlab, providing with a series of results (mode propagation constants) that are further compared with corresponding results from the ready known Mathieu functions method

  14. Advanced Test Reactor Core Modeling Update Project Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nigg, David W. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Legacy computational reactor physics software tools and protocols currently used for support of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) core fuel management and safety assurance, and to some extent, experiment management, are inconsistent with the state of modern nuclear engineering practice, and are difficult, if not impossible, to verify and validate (V&V) according to modern standards. Furthermore, the legacy staff knowledge required for effective application of these tools and protocols from the 1960s and 1970s is rapidly being lost due to staff turnover and retirements. In late 2009, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) initiated a focused effort, the ATR Core Modeling Update Project, to address this situation through the introduction of modern high-fidelity computational software and protocols. This aggressive computational and experimental campaign will have a broad strategic impact on the operation of the ATR, both in terms of improved computational efficiency and accuracy for support of ongoing DOE programs as well as in terms of national and international recognition of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF).

  15. Thermal modeling of core sampling in flammable gas waste tanks. Part 1: Push-mode sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unal, C.; Stroh, K.; Pasamehmetoglu, K.O.

    1997-01-01

    The radioactive waste stored in underground storage tanks at Hanford site is routinely being sampled for waste characterization purposes. The push- and rotary-mode core sampling is one of the sampling methods employed. The waste includes mixtures of sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite with organic compounds that can produce violent exothermic reactions if heated above 160 C during core sampling. A self-propagating waste reaction would produce very high temperatures that eventually result in failure of the tank and radioactive material releases to environment. A two-dimensional thermal model based on a lumped finite volume analysis method is developed. The enthalpy of each node is calculated from the first law of thermodynamics. A flash temperature and effective contact area concept were introduced to account the interface temperature rise. No maximum temperature rise exceeding the critical value of 60 C was found in the cases studied for normal operating conditions. Several accident conditions are also examined. In these cases it was found that the maximum drill bit temperature remained below the critical reaction temperature as long as a 30 scfm purge flow is provided the push-mode drill bit during sampling in rotary mode. The failure to provide purge flow resulted in exceeding the limiting temperatures in a relatively short time

  16. The comparison of numerical models of a sandwich panel in the context of the core deformations at the supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozorska, Jolanta; Pozorski, Zbigniew

    2018-01-01

    The paper presents the problem of static structural behavior of sandwich panels at the supports. The panels have a soft core and correspond to typical structures applied in civil engineering. To analyze the problem, five different 3-D numerical models were created. The results were compared in the context of core compression and stress redistribution. The numerical solutions verify methods of evaluating the capacity of the sandwich panel that are known from the literature.

  17. A three-dimensional stratigraphic model for aggrading submarine channels based on laboratory experiments, numerical modeling, and sediment cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limaye, A. B.; Komatsu, Y.; Suzuki, K.; Paola, C.

    2017-12-01

    Turbidity currents deliver clastic sediment from continental margins to the deep ocean, and are the main driver of landscape and stratigraphic evolution in many low-relief, submarine environments. The sedimentary architecture of turbidites—including the spatial organization of coarse and fine sediments—is closely related to the aggradation, scour, and lateral shifting of channels. Seismic stratigraphy indicates that submarine, meandering channels often aggrade rapidly relative to lateral shifting, and develop channel sand bodies with high vertical connectivity. In comparison, the stratigraphic architecture developed by submarine, braided is relatively uncertain. We present a new stratigraphic model for submarine braided channels that integrates predictions from laboratory experiments and flow modeling with constraints from sediment cores. In the laboratory experiments, a saline density current developed subaqueous channels in plastic sediment. The channels aggraded to form a deposit with a vertical scale of approximately five channel depths. We collected topography data during aggradation to (1) establish relative stratigraphic age, and (2) estimate the sorting patterns of a hypothetical grain size distribution. We applied a numerical flow model to each topographic surface and used modeled flow depth as a proxy for relative grain size. We then conditioned the resulting stratigraphic model to observed grain size distributions using sediment core data from the Nankai Trough, offshore Japan. Using this stratigraphic model, we establish new, quantitative predictions for the two- and three-dimensional connectivity of coarse sediment as a function of fine-sediment fraction. Using this case study as an example, we will highlight outstanding challenges in relating the evolution of low-relief landscapes to the stratigraphic record.

  18. Nonlinear mixed effects modelling for the analysis of longitudinal body core temperature data in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seng, Kok-Yong; Chen, Ying; Wang, Ting; Ming Chai, Adam Kian; Yuen Fun, David Chiok; Teo, Ya Shi; Sze Tan, Pearl Min; Ang, Wee Hon; Wei Lee, Jason Kai

    2016-04-01

    Many longitudinal studies have collected serial body core temperature (T c) data to understand thermal work strain of workers under various environmental and operational heat stress environments. This provides the opportunity for the development of mathematical models to analyse and forecast temporal T c changes across populations of subjects. Such models can reduce the need for invasive methods that continuously measure T c. This current work sought to develop a nonlinear mixed effects modelling framework to delineate the dynamic changes of T c and its association with a set of covariates of interest (e.g. heart rate, chest skin temperature), and the structure of the variability of T c in various longitudinal studies. Data to train and evaluate the model were derived from two laboratory investigations involving male soldiers who participated in either a 12 (N  =  18) or 15 km (N  =  16) foot march with varied clothing, load and heat acclimatisation status. Model qualification was conducted using nonparametric bootstrap and cross validation procedures. For cross validation, the trajectory of a new subject's T c was simulated via Bayesian maximum a posteriori estimation when using only the baseline T c or using the baseline T c as well as measured T c at the end of every work (march) phase. The final model described T c versus time profiles using a parametric function with its main parameters modelled as a sigmoid hyperbolic function of the load and/or chest skin temperature. Overall, T c predictions corresponded well with the measured data (root mean square deviation: 0.16 °C), and compared favourably with those provided by two recently published Kalman filter models.

  19. Coupling of the 3D neutron kinetic core model DYN3D with the CFD software ANSYS-CFX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grahn, Alexander; Kliem, Sören; Rohde, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Improved thermal hydraulic description of nuclear reactor cores. • Possibility of three-dimensional flow phenomena in the core, such as cross flow, flow reversal, flow around obstacles. • Simulation at higher spatial resolution as compared to system codes. - Abstract: This article presents the implementation of a coupling between the 3D neutron kinetic core model DYN3D and the commercial, general purpose computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software ANSYS-CFX. In the coupling approach, parts of the thermal hydraulic calculation are transferred to CFX for its better ability to simulate the three-dimensional coolant redistribution in the reactor core region. The calculation of the heat transfer from the fuel into the coolant remains with DYN3D, which incorporates well tested and validated heat transfer models for rod-type fuel elements. On the CFX side, the core region is modeled based on the porous body approach. The implementation of the code coupling is verified by comparing test case results with reference solutions of the DYN3D standalone version. Test cases cover mini and full core geometries, control rod movement and partial overcooling transients

  20. Vorticity-divergence semi-Lagrangian global atmospheric model SL-AV20: dynamical core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolstykh, Mikhail; Shashkin, Vladimir; Fadeev, Rostislav; Goyman, Gordey

    2017-05-01

    SL-AV (semi-Lagrangian, based on the absolute vorticity equation) is a global hydrostatic atmospheric model. Its latest version, SL-AV20, provides global operational medium-range weather forecast with 20 km resolution over Russia. The lower-resolution configurations of SL-AV20 are being tested for seasonal prediction and climate modeling. The article presents the model dynamical core. Its main features are a vorticity-divergence formulation at the unstaggered grid, high-order finite-difference approximations, semi-Lagrangian semi-implicit discretization and the reduced latitude-longitude grid with variable resolution in latitude. The accuracy of SL-AV20 numerical solutions using a reduced lat-lon grid and the variable resolution in latitude is tested with two idealized test cases. Accuracy and stability of SL-AV20 in the presence of the orography forcing are tested using the mountain-induced Rossby wave test case. The results of all three tests are in good agreement with other published model solutions. It is shown that the use of the reduced grid does not significantly affect the accuracy up to the 25 % reduction in the number of grid points with respect to the regular grid. Variable resolution in latitude allows us to improve the accuracy of a solution in the region of interest.

  1. ANDREA 2.2 and 2.3. Advances in modelling of VVER cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Havluj, Frantisek; Hejzlar, Jonatan; Vocka, Radim; Vysoudil, Jiri [UJV Rez, Husinec-Rez (Czech Republic)

    2017-09-15

    In 2016 a new version of code ANDREA for core design and reload safety analysis of VVER reactors has been released. The new code version includes several major improvements. The first of them is a seamless incorporation of short time kinetics calculations (without temperature feedback) into the code. This new feature accompanied by the possibility of excore detector signal predictions enables precise interpretation of dynamic measurements of control assembly weight during the reactor startup. Second important enhancement resides in new flexible format of cross section libraries and in new fuel temperature model based on results of TRANSURANUS fuel performance code. The new code version has been thoroughly tested and validated for both VVER440 and VVER-1000 reactors. Furthermore for the new version 2.3 which is to be released shortly we have implemented the possibility of fluent control assemblies' motion and of non-equidistant axial nodalization schemes in VVER-440 calculations.

  2. Mathematical Methodology for New Modeling of Water Hammer in Emergency Core Cooling System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seungchan; Yoon, Dukjoo; Ha, Sangjun

    2013-01-01

    In engineering insight, the water hammer study has carried out through the experimental work and the fluid mechanics. In this study, a new access methodology is introduced by Newton mechanics and a mathematical method. Also, NRC Generic Letter 2008-01 requires nuclear power plant operators to evaluate the effect of water-hammer for the protection of pipes of the Emergency Core Cooling System, which is related to the Residual Heat Removal System and the Containment Spray System. This paper includes modeling, the processes of derivation of the mathematical equations and the comparison with other experimental work. To analyze the effect of water-hammer, this mathematical methodology is carried out. This study is in good agreement with other experiment results as above. This method is very efficient to explain the water-hammer phenomena

  3. Homogenization of some radiative heat transfer models: application to gas-cooled reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Ganaoui, K.

    2006-09-01

    In the context of homogenization theory we treat some heat transfer problems involving unusual (according to the homogenization) boundary conditions. These problems are defined in a solid periodic perforated domain where two scales (macroscopic and microscopic) are to be taken into account and describe heat transfer by conduction in the solid and by radiation on the wall of each hole. Two kinds of radiation are considered: radiation in an infinite medium (non-linear problem) and radiation in cavity with grey-diffuse walls (non-linear and non-local problem). The derived homogenized models are conduction problems with an effective conductivity which depend on the considered radiation. Thus we introduce a framework (homogenization and validation) based on mathematical justification using the two-scale convergence method and numerical validation by simulations using the computer code CAST3M. This study, performed for gas cooled reactors cores, can be extended to other perforated domains involving the considered heat transfer phenomena. (author)

  4. Harmonic Domain Modelling of Transformer Core Nonlinearities Using the DIgSILENT PowerFactory Software

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Claus Leth; Bak-Jensen, Birgitte; Wiechowski, Wojciech

    2008-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the results of implementation and verification of an already existing algorithm that allows for calculating saturation characteristics of singlephase power transformers. The algorithm was described for the first time in 1993. Now this algorithm has been implemented using...... the DIgSILENT Programming Language (DPL) as an external script in the harmonic domain calculations of a power system analysis tool PowerFactory [10]. The algorithm is verified by harmonic measurements on a single-phase power transformer. A theoretical analysis of the core nonlinearities phenomena...... in single and three-phase transformers is also presented. This analysis leads to the conclusion that the method can be applied for modelling nonlinearities of three-phase autotransformers....

  5. Mathematical Methodology for New Modeling of Water Hammer in Emergency Core Cooling System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seungchan; Yoon, Dukjoo; Ha, Sangjun [Korea Hydro Nuclear Power Co. Ltd, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    In engineering insight, the water hammer study has carried out through the experimental work and the fluid mechanics. In this study, a new access methodology is introduced by Newton mechanics and a mathematical method. Also, NRC Generic Letter 2008-01 requires nuclear power plant operators to evaluate the effect of water-hammer for the protection of pipes of the Emergency Core Cooling System, which is related to the Residual Heat Removal System and the Containment Spray System. This paper includes modeling, the processes of derivation of the mathematical equations and the comparison with other experimental work. To analyze the effect of water-hammer, this mathematical methodology is carried out. This study is in good agreement with other experiment results as above. This method is very efficient to explain the water-hammer phenomena.

  6. Development of a computer program for solving the neutronics equations of a multidimensional HTR core model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, A.

    1979-02-01

    A new code for efficient solution of the multidimensional stationary multi-group, diffusion equation, to be used within a HTGR-code model, is presented. The approximation and iteration methods are described. Spacial approximation is based on the QUABOX-coarse-mesh method, but iteration methods are different from QUABOX to give linear dependence of computation time on the number of energy groups. Results for various multidimensional multi-group problems, among them the THTR pebble bed reactor are analyzed. It is shown, that computational labor for a 3D-case is reduced by about a factor 30 in comparison with conventional finite-difference-methods. Thus 3D-full-core calculations appear to be feasible for large HTGR's. (orig.) [de

  7. A STRONGLY COUPLED REACTOR CORE ISOLATION COOLING SYSTEM MODEL FOR EXTENDED STATION BLACK-OUT ANALYSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Haihua [Idaho National Laboratory; Zhang, Hongbin [Idaho National Laboratory; Zou, Ling [Idaho National Laboratory; Martineau, Richard Charles [Idaho National Laboratory

    2015-03-01

    The reactor core isolation cooling (RCIC) system in a boiling water reactor (BWR) provides makeup cooling water to the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) when the main steam lines are isolated and the normal supply of water to the reactor vessel is lost. The RCIC system operates independently of AC power, service air, or external cooling water systems. The only required external energy source is from the battery to maintain the logic circuits to control the opening and/or closure of valves in the RCIC systems in order to control the RPV water level by shutting down the RCIC pump to avoid overfilling the RPV and flooding the steam line to the RCIC turbine. It is generally considered in almost all the existing station black-out accidents (SBO) analyses that loss of the DC power would result in overfilling the steam line and allowing liquid water to flow into the RCIC turbine, where it is assumed that the turbine would then be disabled. This behavior, however, was not observed in the Fukushima Daiichi accidents, where the Unit 2 RCIC functioned without DC power for nearly three days. Therefore, more detailed mechanistic models for RCIC system components are needed to understand the extended SBO for BWRs. As part of the effort to develop the next generation reactor system safety analysis code RELAP-7, we have developed a strongly coupled RCIC system model, which consists of a turbine model, a pump model, a check valve model, a wet well model, and their coupling models. Unlike the traditional SBO simulations where mass flow rates are typically given in the input file through time dependent functions, the real mass flow rates through the turbine and the pump loops in our model are dynamically calculated according to conservation laws and turbine/pump operation curves. A simplified SBO demonstration RELAP-7 model with this RCIC model has been successfully developed. The demonstration model includes the major components for the primary system of a BWR, as well as the safety

  8. The development of learning materials based on core model to improve students’ learning outcomes in topic of Chemical Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avianti, R.; Suyatno; Sugiarto, B.

    2018-04-01

    This study aims to create an appropriate learning material based on CORE (Connecting, Organizing, Reflecting, Extending) model to improve students’ learning achievement in Chemical Bonding Topic. This study used 4-D models as research design and one group pretest-posttest as design of the material treatment. The subject of the study was teaching materials based on CORE model, conducted on 30 students of Science class grade 10. The collecting data process involved some techniques such as validation, observation, test, and questionnaire. The findings were that: (1) all the contents were valid, (2) the practicality and the effectiveness of all the contents were good. The conclusion of this research was that the CORE model is appropriate to improve students’ learning outcomes for studying Chemical Bonding.

  9. Spectroscopic properties of reaction center pigments in photosystem II core complexes: revision of the multimer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raszewski, Grzegorz; Diner, Bruce A; Schlodder, Eberhard; Renger, Thomas

    2008-07-01

    Absorbance difference spectra associated with the light-induced formation of functional states in photosystem II core complexes from Thermosynechococcus elongatus and Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (e.g., P(+)Pheo(-),P(+)Q(A)(-),(3)P) are described quantitatively in the framework of exciton theory. In addition, effects are analyzed of site-directed mutations of D1-His(198), the axial ligand of the special-pair chlorophyll P(D1), and D1-Thr(179), an amino-acid residue nearest to the accessory chlorophyll Chl(D1), on the spectral properties of the reaction center pigments. Using pigment transition energies (site energies) determined previously from independent experiments on D1-D2-cytb559 complexes, good agreement between calculated and experimental spectra is obtained. The only difference in site energies of the reaction center pigments in D1-D2-cytb559 and photosystem II core complexes concerns Chl(D1). Compared to isolated reaction centers, the site energy of Chl(D1) is red-shifted by 4 nm and less inhomogeneously distributed in core complexes. The site energies cause primary electron transfer at cryogenic temperatures to be initiated by an excited state that is strongly localized on Chl(D1) rather than from a delocalized state as assumed in the previously described multimer model. This result is consistent with earlier experimental data on special-pair mutants and with our previous calculations on D1-D2-cytb559 complexes. The calculations show that at 5 K the lowest excited state of the reaction center is lower by approximately 10 nm than the low-energy exciton state of the two special-pair chlorophylls P(D1) and P(D2) which form an excitonic dimer. The experimental temperature dependence of the wild-type difference spectra can only be understood in this model if temperature-dependent site energies are assumed for Chl(D1) and P(D1), reducing the above energy gap from 10 to 6 nm upon increasing the temperature from 5 to 300 K. At physiological temperature, there are

  10. Clinical practice breastfeeding recommendations for primary care: applying a tri-core breastfeeding conceptual model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Deborah W; Logan, Kathleen; Wilkinson, Ashley

    2014-01-01

    Promotional practice efforts are needed in primary care to support and foster breastfeeding as the first and natural choice of nutrition for all infants regardless of race, ethnicity, educational, or income demographics in the United States. Societal awareness is increasing with regard to the significant protective qualities that human milk bestows upon public health. An estimated 75% of American mothers attempt to breastfeed, but according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, just 13% are able to exclusively breastfeed by 6 months. Early identification of lactation issues is crucial to establishing and sustaining breastfeeding for the first 6 to 12 months of the child's life and beyond. We propose a set of primary care guidelines, applying a Tri-Core Model approach, to promote and foster breastfeeding efforts in the postpartum period. Breastfeeding promotion is a fundamental public health endeavor, and pediatric nurse practitioners and other advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) are uniquely qualified to become specialists and experts in lactation care and management. Lactation support, which should be an integral facet of an APRN's practice and education, will aid in improving national breastfeeding rates and patient care outcomes. Application of the Tri-Core Model approach will help APRNs develop and implement evidence-based practice efforts that incorporate the mother-baby dyad and other multiprofessionals who are vested in successful breastfeeding outcomes. The goal of pediatric health care is provide safe and effective health care to all infants, children, and adolescents, and lactation care is an integral and crucial component of this effort. Copyright © 2014 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Core Mediator structure at 3.4 Å extends model of transcription initiation complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozawa, Kayo; Schneider, Thomas R; Cramer, Patrick

    2017-05-11

    Mediator is a multiprotein co-activator that binds the transcription pre-initiation complex (PIC) and regulates RNA polymerase (Pol) II. The Mediator head and middle modules form the essential core Mediator (cMed), whereas the tail and kinase modules play regulatory roles. The architecture of Mediator and its position on the PIC are known, but atomic details are limited to Mediator subcomplexes. Here we report the crystal structure of the 15-subunit cMed from Schizosaccharomyces pombe at 3.4 Å resolution. The structure shows an unaltered head module, and reveals the intricate middle module, which we show is globally required for transcription. Sites of known Mediator mutations cluster at the interface between the head and middle modules, and in terminal regions of the head subunits Med6 (ref. 16) and Med17 (ref. 17) that tether the middle module. The structure led to a model for Saccharomyces cerevisiae cMed that could be combined with the 3.6 Å cryo-electron microscopy structure of the core PIC (cPIC). The resulting atomic model of the cPIC-cMed complex informs on interactions of the submodules forming the middle module, called beam, knob, plank, connector, and hook. The hook is flexibly linked to Mediator by a conserved hinge and contacts the transcription initiation factor IIH (TFIIH) kinase that phosphorylates the carboxy (C)-terminal domain (CTD) of Pol II and was recently positioned on the PIC. The hook also contains residues that crosslink to the CTD and reside in a previously described cradle. These results provide a framework for understanding Mediator function, including its role in stimulating CTD phosphorylation by TFIIH.

  12. Design of a Data Distribution Core Model for Seafloor Observatories in East China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H.; Qin, R.; Xu, H.

    2017-12-01

    High loadings of nutrients and pollutants from agriculture, industries and city waste waters are carried by Changjiang (Yangtze) River and transformed into the foodweb in the river freshwater plume. Understanding these transport and transformation processes is essential for the ecosystem protection, fisheries resources management, seafood safety and human health. As Xiaoqushan Seafloor Observatory and Zhujiajian Seafloor Observatory built in East China Sea, it is an opportunity and a new way for the research of Changjiang River plume. Data collected by seafloor observatory should be accessed conveniently by end users in real time or near real time, which can make it play a better role. Therefore, data distribution is one of major issues for seafloor observatory characterized by long term, real time, high resolution and continuous observation. This study describes a Data Distribution core Model for Seafloor Observatories in East China Sea (ESDDM) containing Data Acquisition Module (DAM), Data Interpretation Module (DIM), Data Transmission Module (DTM) and Data Storage Module (DTM), which enables acquiring, interpreting, transmitting and storing various types of data in real time. A Data Distribution Model Makeup Language (DDML) based on XML is designed to enhance the expansibility and flexibility of the system implemented by ESDDM. Network sniffer is used to acquire data by IP address and port number in DAM promising to release the operating pressure of junction boxes. Data interface, core data processing plugins and common libraries consist of DIM helping it interpret data in a hot swapping way. DTM is an external module in ESDDM transmitting designated raw data packets to Secondary Receiver Terminal. The technology of database connection pool used in DSM facilitates the efficiency of large volumes of continuous data storage. Given a successful scenario in Zhujiajian Seafloor Observatory, the protosystem based on ESDDM running up to 1500h provides a reference for

  13. Improvement of molten core-concrete interaction model of the debris spreading analysis model in the SAMPSON code - 15193

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidaka, M.; Fujii, T.; Sakai, T.

    2015-01-01

    A debris spreading analysis (DSA) module has been developed and improved. The module is used in the severe accident analysis code SAMPSON and it has models for 3-dimensional natural convection with simultaneous spreading, melting and solidification. The existing analysis method of the quasi-3D boundary transportation to simulate downward concrete erosion for evaluation of molten-core concrete interaction (MCCI) was improved to full-3D to solve, for instance, debris lateral erosion under concrete floors at the bottom of the sump pit. In the advanced MCCI model, buffer cells were defined in order to solve numerical problems in case of trammel formation. Mass, momentum, and the advection term of energy between the debris melt cells and the buffer cells are solved. On the other hand, only the heat transfer and thermal conduction are solved between the debris melt cells and the structure cells, and the crust cells and the structure cells. As a preliminary analysis, a validation calculation was performed for erosion that occurred in the core-concrete interaction (CCI-2) test in the OECD/MCCI program. Comparison between the calculation and the CCI-2 test results showed the analysis has the ability to simulate debris lateral erosion under concrete floors. (authors)

  14. Parameter Sensitivity Study of the Unreacted-Core Shrinking Model: A Computer Activity for Chemical Reaction Engineering Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudela, Ignacio; Bonete, Pedro; Fullana, Andres; Conesa, Juan Antonio

    2011-01-01

    The unreacted-core shrinking (UCS) model is employed to characterize fluid-particle reactions that are important in industry and research. An approach to understand the UCS model by numerical methods is presented, which helps the visualization of the influence of the variables that control the overall heterogeneous process. Use of this approach in…

  15. Investigating the Theoretical Structure of the DAS-II Core Battery at School Age Using Bayesian Structural Equation Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombrowski, Stefan C.; Golay, Philippe; McGill, Ryan J.; Canivez, Gary L.

    2018-01-01

    Bayesian structural equation modeling (BSEM) was used to investigate the latent structure of the Differential Ability Scales-Second Edition core battery using the standardization sample normative data for ages 7-17. Results revealed plausibility of a three-factor model, consistent with publisher theory, expressed as either a higher-order (HO) or a…

  16. Integrated predictive modeling of high-mode tokamak plasmas using a combination of core and pedestal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bateman, Glenn; Bandres, Miguel A.; Onjun, Thawatchai; Kritz, Arnold H.; Pankin, Alexei

    2003-01-01

    A new integrated modeling protocol is developed using a model for the temperature and density pedestal at the edge of high-mode (H-mode) plasmas [Onjun et al., Phys. Plasmas 9, 5018 (2002)] together with the Multi-Mode core transport model (MMM95) [Bateman et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 1793 (1998)] in the BALDUR integrated modeling code to predict the temperature and density profiles of 33 H-mode discharges. The pedestal model is used to provide the boundary conditions in the simulations, once the heating power rises above the H-mode power threshold. Simulations are carried out for 20 discharges in the Joint European Torus and 13 discharges in the DIII-D tokamak. These discharges include systematic scans in normalized gyroradius, plasma pressure, collisionality, isotope mass, elongation, heating power, and plasma density. The average rms deviation between experimental data and the predicted profiles of temperature and density, normalized by central values, is found to be about 10%. It is found that the simulations tend to overpredict the temperature profiles in discharges with low heating power per plasma particle and to underpredict the temperature profiles in discharges with high heating power per particle. Variations of the pedestal model are used to test the sensitivity of the simulation results

  17. A component-based open hypermedia approach to integreting structure services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbæk, Kaj; Nürnberg, Peter J.; Bucka-Lassen, Dirk

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the issue of integrating different structure services within a component-based open hypermedia system. We do so by considering the task of collaborative editing, which calls for a variety of different structures traditionally supplied by different structure services. We...... discuss the nature of collaborative editing and how it can be supported by a combination of spatial and navigational hypermedia services. We then present a component-based open hypermedia system architecture and describe various methods of integrating different structure services provided within...... such an architecture. We show the advantages of integration within a component-based framework over other means of integration, highlighting some of the main advantages of the component-based approach to open hypermedia system design and implementation....

  18. A service component-based accounting and charging architecture to support interim mechanisms across multiple domains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le, M. van; Beijnum, B.J.F. van; Huitema, G.B.

    2004-01-01

    Today, telematics services are often compositions of different chargeable service components offered by different service providers. To enhance component-based accounting and charging, the service composition information is used to match with the corresponding charging structure of a service

  19. Uniframe: A Unified Framework for Developing Service-Oriented, Component-Based Distributed Software Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Raje, Rajeev R; Olson, Andrew M; Bryant, Barrett R; Burt, Carol C; Auguston, Makhail

    2005-01-01

    .... It describes how this approach employs a unifying framework for specifying such systems to unite the concepts of service-oriented architectures, a component-based software engineering methodology...

  20. Leveraging Existing Mission Tools in a Re-Usable, Component-Based Software Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Kevin; Grenander, Sven; Kurien, James; z,s (fshir. z[orttr); z,scer; O'Reilly, Taifun

    2006-01-01

    Emerging methods in component-based software development offer significant advantages but may seem incompatible with existing mission operations applications. In this paper we relate our positive experiences integrating existing mission applications into component-based tools we are delivering to three missions. In most operations environments, a number of software applications have been integrated together to form the mission operations software. In contrast, with component-based software development chunks of related functionality and data structures, referred to as components, can be individually delivered, integrated and re-used. With the advent of powerful tools for managing component-based development, complex software systems can potentially see significant benefits in ease of integration, testability and reusability from these techniques. These benefits motivate us to ask how component-based development techniques can be relevant in a mission operations environment, where there is significant investment in software tools that are not component-based and may not be written in languages for which component-based tools even exist. Trusted and complex software tools for sequencing, validation, navigation, and other vital functions cannot simply be re-written or abandoned in order to gain the advantages offered by emerging component-based software techniques. Thus some middle ground must be found. We have faced exactly this issue, and have found several solutions. Ensemble is an open platform for development, integration, and deployment of mission operations software that we are developing. Ensemble itself is an extension of an open source, component-based software development platform called Eclipse. Due to the advantages of component-based development, we have been able to vary rapidly develop mission operations tools for three surface missions by mixing and matching from a common set of mission operation components. We have also had to determine how to

  1. Validation of PWR core seismic models with shaking table tests on interacting scale 1 fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viallet, E.; Bolsee, G.; Ladouceur, B.; Goubin, T.; Rigaudeau, J.

    2003-01-01

    The fuel assembly mechanical strength must be justified with respect to the lateral loads under accident conditions, in particular seismic loads. This justification is performed by means of time-history analyses with dynamic models of an assembly row in the core, allowing for assembly deformations, impacts at grid locations and reactor coolant effects. Due to necessary simplifications, the models include 'equivalent' parameters adjusted with respect to dynamic characterisation tests of the fuel assemblies. Complementing such tests on isolated assemblies by an overall model validation with shaking table tests on interacting assemblies is obviously desirable. Seismic tests have been performed by French CEA (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique) on a row of six full scale fuel assemblies, including two types of 17 x 17 12ft design. The row models are built according to the usual procedure, with preliminary characterisation tests performed on a single assembly. The test-calculation comparisons are made for two test configurations : in air and in water. The relatively large number of accelerograms (15, used for each configuration) is also favourable to significant comparisons. The results are presented for the impact forces at row ends, displacements at mid assembly, and also 'statistical' parameters. Despite a non-negligible scattering in the results obtained with different accelerograms, the calculations prove realistic, and the modelling process is validated with a good confidence level. This satisfactory validation allows to evaluate precisely the margins in the seismic design methodology of the fuel assemblies, and thus to confirm the safety of the plants in case of seismic event. (author)

  2. Universal core model for multiple-gate field-effect transistors with short channel and quantum mechanical effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Yong Hyeon; Bae, Min Soo; Park, Chuntaek; Park, Joung Won; Park, Hyunwoo; Lee, Yong Ju; Yun, Ilgu

    2018-06-01

    A universal core model for multiple-gate (MG) field-effect transistors (FETs) with short channel effects (SCEs) and quantum mechanical effects (QMEs) is proposed. By using a Young’s approximation based solution for one-dimensional Poisson’s equations the total inversion charge density (Q inv ) in the channel is modeled for double-gate (DG) and surrounding-gate SG (SG) FETs, following which a universal charge model is derived based on the similarity of the solutions, including for quadruple-gate (QG) FETs. For triple-gate (TG) FETs, the average of DG and QG FETs are used. A SCEs model is also proposed considering the potential difference between the channel’s surface and center. Finally, a QMEs model for MG FETs is developed using the quantum correction compact model. The proposed universal core model is validated on commercially available three-dimensional ATLAS numerical simulations.

  3. The design of multi-core DSP parallel model based on message passing and multi-level pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Jingyu; Hu, Jian; He, Wenjing; Meng, Fanrong; Li, Chuanrong

    2017-10-01

    Currently, the design of embedded signal processing system is often based on a specific application, but this idea is not conducive to the rapid development of signal processing technology. In this paper, a parallel processing model architecture based on multi-core DSP platform is designed, and it is mainly suitable for the complex algorithms which are composed of different modules. This model combines the ideas of multi-level pipeline parallelism and message passing, and summarizes the advantages of the mainstream model of multi-core DSP (the Master-Slave model and the Data Flow model), so that it has better performance. This paper uses three-dimensional image generation algorithm to validate the efficiency of the proposed model by comparing with the effectiveness of the Master-Slave and the Data Flow model.

  4. Selection of core animals in the Algorithm for Proven and Young using a simulation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, H L; Pocrnić, I; Fragomeni, B O; Lourenco, D A L; Misztal, I

    2017-12-01

    The Algorithm for Proven and Young (APY) enables the implementation of single-step genomic BLUP (ssGBLUP) in large, genotyped populations by separating genotyped animals into core and non-core subsets and creating a computationally efficient inverse for the genomic relationship matrix (G). As APY became the choice for large-scale genomic evaluations in BLUP-based methods, a common question is how to choose the animals in the core subset. We compared several core definitions to answer this question. Simulations comprised a moderately heritable trait for 95,010 animals and 50,000 genotypes for animals across five generations. Genotypes consisted of 25,500 SNP distributed across 15 chromosomes. Genotyping errors and missing pedigree were also mimicked. Core animals were defined based on individual generations, equal representation across generations, and at random. For a sufficiently large core size, core definitions had the same accuracies and biases, even if the core animals had imperfect genotypes. When genotyped animals had unknown parents, accuracy and bias were significantly better (p ≤ .05) for random and across generation core definitions. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Animal Breeding and Genetics Published by Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  5. Contribution to the modelling of flows and heat transfers during the reflooding phase of a PWR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colas, D.

    1984-01-01

    This thesis contributes to modelise thermohydraulic phenomena occuring in a pressurized water nuclear reactor core during the reflood phase of a LOCA. The reference accident and phenomena occuring during reflooding are described as well as flow regime and heat transfer proposed models. With these models, we developed a code to compute fluid conditions and fuel rods temperatures in a reactor core chanel. In order to test this code, results of computation are compared with experiments (FLECHT Skewed Tests) and a conclusion is drawn [fr

  6. Shaking table testing of a HTGR reactor core, comparison with the results obtained using a nonlinear mathematical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berriaud, C.; Cebe, E.; Livolant, M.; Buland, P.

    1975-01-01

    Two series of horizontal tests have been performed at Saclay on the shaking table VESUVE: sinusoidal test and time history response. Sinusoidal tests have shown the strongly nonlinear dynamic behavior of the core. The resonant frequency of the core is dependent on the level of the excitation. These phenomena have been explained by a computer code, which is a lumped mass nonlinear model. El Centro time history displacement at the level of PCRV was reproduced on the shaking table. The analytical model was applied to this excitation and good comparison was obtained for forces and velocities [fr

  7. Three-dimensional model of the thermo-hydrodynamic neutron interaction in the core of water reactors (stationary states)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mastrangelo, Victor.

    1977-01-01

    A thermo-hydrodynamic neutron interaction model for permanent working conditions is developed in the case of closed circuits (boiling water reactors) and open circuits (pressurized water reactors). Two numerical convergence acceleration methods are then worked out for the resolution of linear problems by successive iterations. A physical study is devoted to the convergence of the thermo-hydrodynamic neutron interaction process. The model developed is applied to the calculation of the power distribution for the core of a 980 MWe BWR-6 type boiling water power station and to the study of normal and accidental working configurations of the pressurized water core of a 900 MWe PWR-CP1 unit [fr

  8. Lane-Emden equation with inertial force and general polytropic dynamic model for molecular cloud cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, DaLei; Lou, Yu-Qing; Esimbek, Jarken

    2018-01-01

    We study self-similar hydrodynamics of spherical symmetry using a general polytropic (GP) equation of state and derive the GP dynamic Lane-Emden equation (LEE) with a radial inertial force. In reference to Lou & Cao, we solve the GP dynamic LEE for both polytropic index γ = 1 + 1/n and the isothermal case n → +∞; our formalism is more general than the conventional polytropic model with n = 3 or γ = 4/3 of Goldreich & Weber. For proper boundary conditions, we obtain an exact constant solution for arbitrary n and analytic variable solutions for n = 0 and n = 1, respectively. Series expansion solutions are derived near the origin with the explicit recursion formulae for the series coefficients for both the GP and isothermal cases. By extensive numerical explorations, we find that there is no zero density at a finite radius for n ≥ 5. For 0 ≤ n 0 for monotonically decreasing density from the origin and vanishing at a finite radius for c being less than a critical value Ccr. As astrophysical applications, we invoke our solutions of the GP dynamic LEE with central finite boundary conditions to fit the molecular cloud core Barnard 68 in contrast to the static isothermal Bonnor-Ebert sphere by Alves et al. Our GP dynamic model fits appear to be sensibly consistent with several more observations and diagnostics for density, temperature and gas pressure profiles.

  9. A kinetics study of acetic acid on cobalt leaching of spent LIBs: Shrinking Core Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setiawan Hendrik

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Lithium-ion batteries (LIBs are secondary rechargeable power sources which increasing production also leads to large amount of waste. In order to environmentally friendly reduce the waste, this work aimed to use acetic acid as a substitute leaching agent to leach Co metals which constitutes about 72.39% wt of the battery cathode. The leaching process was done in a three-necked-flask where calcined LIB cathode powder was mixed with acetic acid solution. The variables of the leaching process under investigation were solution pH, concentration of H2O2 in the solution, S/L ratio, temperature and reaction time. Experimental results showed that only temperature significantly influenced the leaching rate of Co. Since the process was exothermic, the maximum recovery decreased as temperature increased. Conventional shrinking core model that considers diffusion and irreversible surface reaction resistances was found not sufficient to predict the kinetics of the Co leaching with acetic acid. A more representative kinetics model that considers a reversible reaction of Co complex formation needs to be further developed.

  10. Modeling of heat and mass transfer processes during core melt discharge from a reactor pressure vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinh, T.N.; Bui, V.A.; Nourgaliev, R.R. [Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    The objective of the paper is to study heat and mass transfer processes related to core melt discharge from a reactor vessel is a severe light water reactor accident. The phenomenology of the issue includes (1) melt convection in and heat transfer from the melt pool in contact with the vessel lower head wall; (2) fluid dynamics and heat transfer of the melt flow in the growing discharge hole; and (3) multi-dimensional heat conduction in the ablating lower head wall. A program of model development, validation and application is underway (i) to analyse the dominant physical mechanisms determining characteristics of the lower head ablation process; (ii) to develop and validate efficient analytic/computational methods for estimating heat and mass transfer under phase-change conditions in irregular moving-boundary domains; and (iii) to investigate numerically the melt discharge phenomena in a reactor-scale situation, and, in particular, the sensitivity of the melt discharge transient to structural differences and various in-vessel melt progression scenarios. The paper presents recent results of the analysis and model development work supporting the simulant melt-structure interaction experiments.

  11. Light neutron-rich hypernuclei from the importance-truncated no-core shell model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Wirth

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available We explore the systematics of ground-state and excitation energies in singly-strange hypernuclei throughout the helium and lithium isotopic chains — from HeΛ5 to HeΛ11 and from LiΛ7 to LiΛ12 — in the ab initio no-core shell model with importance truncation. All calculations are based on two- and three-baryon interaction from chiral effective field theory and we employ a similarity renormalization group transformation consistently up to the three-baryon level to improve the model-space convergence. While the absolute energies of hypernuclear states show a systematic variation with the regulator cutoff of the hyperon–nucleon interaction, the resulting neutron separation energies are very stable and in good agreement with available data for both nucleonic parents and their daughter hypernuclei. We provide predictions for the neutron separation energies and the spectra of neutron-rich hypernuclei that have not yet been observed experimentally. Furthermore, we find that the neutron drip lines in the helium and lithium isotopic chains are not changed by the addition of a hyperon. Keywords: Hypernuclei, Ab-initio methods, Neutron-rich nuclei, Neutron separation energies, Neutron drip line

  12. Hydrogel core flexible matrix composite (H-FMC) actuators: theory and preliminary modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dicker, M P M; Weaver, P M; Bond, I P; Rossiter, J M

    2014-01-01

    The underlying theory of a new actuator concept based on hydrogel core flexible matrix composites (H-FMC) is presented. The key principle that underlines the H-FMC actuator operation is that the three-dimensional swelling of a hydrogel is partially constrained in order to improve the amount of useful work done. The partial constraint is applied to the hydrogel by a flexible matrix composite (FMC) that minimizes the hydrogel's volume expansion while swelling. This constraint serves to maximize the fixed charge density and resulting osmotic pressure, the driving force behind actuation. In addition, for certain FMC fibre orientations the Poisson's ratio of the anisotropic FMC laminate converts previously unused hydrogel swelling in the radial and circumferential directions into useful axial strains. The potential benefit of the H-FMC concept to hydrogel actuator performance is shown through comparison of force–stroke curves and evaluation of improvements in useful actuation work. The model used to achieve this couples chemical and electrical components, represented with the Nernst–Plank and Poisson equations, as well as a linear elastic mechanical material model, encompassing limited geometric nonlinearities. It is found that improvements in useful actuation work in the order of 1500% over bare hydrogel performance are achieved by the H-FMC concept. A parametric study is also undertaken to determine the effect of various FMC design parameters on actuator free strain and blocking stress. A comparison to other actuator concepts is also included. (paper)

  13. Hepatitis B virus core antigen determines viral persistence in a C57BL/6 mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Jiun; Huang, Li-Rung; Yang, Hung-Chih; Tzeng, Horng-Tay; Hsu, Ping-Ning; Wu, Hui-Lin; Chen, Pei-Jer; Chen, Ding-Shinn

    2010-05-18

    We recently developed a mouse model of hepatitis B virus (HBV) persistence, in which a single i.v. hydrodynamic injection of HBV DNA to C57BL/6 mice allows HBV replication and induces a partial immune response, so that about 20-30% of the mice carry HBV for more than 6 months. The model was used to identify the viral antigen crucial for HBV persistence. We knocked out individual HBV genes by introducing a premature termination codon to the HBV core, HBeAg, HBx, and polymerase ORFs. The specific-gene-deficient HBV mutants were hydrodynamically injected into mice and the HBV profiles of the mice were monitored. About 90% of the mice that received the HBcAg-mutated HBV plasmid exhibited high levels of hepatitis B surface antigenemia and maintained HBsAg expression for more than 6 months after injection. To map the region of HBcAg essential for viral clearance, we constructed a set of serial HBcAg deletion mutants for hydrodynamic injection. We localized the essential region of HBcAg to the carboxyl terminus, specifically to the 10 terminal amino acids (HBcAg176-185). The majority of mice receiving this HBV mutant DNA did not elicit a proper HBcAg-specific IFN-gamma response and expressed HBV virions for 6 months. These results indicate that the immune response triggered in mice by HBcAg during exposure to HBV is important in determining HBV persistence.

  14. Light neutron-rich hypernuclei from the importance-truncated no-core shell model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Roland; Roth, Robert

    2018-04-01

    We explore the systematics of ground-state and excitation energies in singly-strange hypernuclei throughout the helium and lithium isotopic chains - from He5Λ to He11Λ and from Li7Λ to Li12Λ - in the ab initio no-core shell model with importance truncation. All calculations are based on two- and three-baryon interaction from chiral effective field theory and we employ a similarity renormalization group transformation consistently up to the three-baryon level to improve the model-space convergence. While the absolute energies of hypernuclear states show a systematic variation with the regulator cutoff of the hyperon-nucleon interaction, the resulting neutron separation energies are very stable and in good agreement with available data for both nucleonic parents and their daughter hypernuclei. We provide predictions for the neutron separation energies and the spectra of neutron-rich hypernuclei that have not yet been observed experimentally. Furthermore, we find that the neutron drip lines in the helium and lithium isotopic chains are not changed by the addition of a hyperon.

  15. Modeling of the Reactor Core Isolation Cooling Response to Beyond Design Basis Operations - Interim Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, Kyle; Cardoni, Jeffrey N.; Wilson, Chisom Shawn; Morrow, Charles; Osborn, Douglas; Gauntt, Randall O.

    2015-01-01

    Efforts are being pursued to develop and qualify a system-level model of a reactor core isolation (RCIC) steam-turbine-driven pump. The model is being developed with the intent of employing it to inform the design of experimental configurations for full-scale RCIC testing. The model is expected to be especially valuable in sizing equipment needed in the testing. An additional intent is to use the model in understanding more fully how RCIC apparently managed to operate far removed from its design envelope in the Fukushima Daiichi Unit 2 accident. RCIC modeling is proceeding along two avenues that are expected to complement each other well. The first avenue is the continued development of the system-level RCIC model that will serve in simulating a full reactor system or full experimental configuration of which a RCIC system is part. The model reasonably represents a RCIC system today, especially given design operating conditions, but lacks specifics that are likely important in representing the off-design conditions a RCIC system might experience in an emergency situation such as a loss of all electrical power. A known specific lacking in the system model, for example, is the efficiency at which a flashing slug of water (as opposed to a concentrated jet of steam) could propel the rotating drive wheel of a RCIC turbine. To address this specific, the second avenue is being pursued wherein computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses of such a jet are being carried out. The results of the CFD analyses will thus complement and inform the system modeling. The system modeling will, in turn, complement the CFD analysis by providing the system information needed to impose appropriate boundary conditions on the CFD simulations. The system model will be used to inform the selection of configurations and equipment best suitable of supporting planned RCIC experimental testing. Preliminary investigations with the RCIC model indicate that liquid water ingestion by the turbine

  16. Modeling of the Reactor Core Isolation Cooling Response to Beyond Design Basis Operations - Interim Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, Kyle [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Cardoni, Jeffrey N. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wilson, Chisom Shawn [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Morrow, Charles [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Osborn, Douglas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gauntt, Randall O. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Efforts are being pursued to develop and qualify a system-level model of a reactor core isolation (RCIC) steam-turbine-driven pump. The model is being developed with the intent of employing it to inform the design of experimental configurations for full-scale RCIC testing. The model is expected to be especially valuable in sizing equipment needed in the testing. An additional intent is to use the model in understanding more fully how RCIC apparently managed to operate far removed from its design envelope in the Fukushima Daiichi Unit 2 accident. RCIC modeling is proceeding along two avenues that are expected to complement each other well. The first avenue is the continued development of the system-level RCIC model that will serve in simulating a full reactor system or full experimental configuration of which a RCIC system is part. The model reasonably represents a RCIC system today, especially given design operating conditions, but lacks specifics that are likely important in representing the off-design conditions a RCIC system might experience in an emergency situation such as a loss of all electrical power. A known specific lacking in the system model, for example, is the efficiency at which a flashing slug of water (as opposed to a concentrated jet of steam) could propel the rotating drive wheel of a RCIC turbine. To address this specific, the second avenue is being pursued wherein computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses of such a jet are being carried out. The results of the CFD analyses will thus complement and inform the system modeling. The system modeling will, in turn, complement the CFD analysis by providing the system information needed to impose appropriate boundary conditions on the CFD simulations. The system model will be used to inform the selection of configurations and equipment best suitable of supporting planned RCIC experimental testing. Preliminary investigations with the RCIC model indicate that liquid water ingestion by the turbine

  17. Effects of recent modeling developments in prompt burst hypothetical core disruptive accident calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sienicki, J.J.; Abramson, P.B.

    1978-01-01

    The main objective of the development of multifield, multicomponent thermohydrodynamic computer codes is the detailed study of hypothetical core disruptive accidents (HCDAs) in liquid-metal fast breeder reactors. The main contributions such codes are expected to make are the inclusion of detailed modeling of the relative motion of liquid and vapor (slip), the inclusion of modeling of nonequilibrium/nonsaturation thermodynamics, and the use of more detailed neutronics methods. Scoping studies of the importance of including these phenomena performed with the parametric two-field, two-component coupled neutronic/thermodynamic/hydrodynamic code FX2-TWOPOOL indicate for the prompt burst portion of an HCDA that: (1) Vapor-liquid slip plays a relatively insignificant role in establishing energetics, implying that analyses that do not model vapor-liquid slip may be adequate. Furthermore, if conditions of saturation are assumed to be maintained, calculations that do not permit vapor-liquid slip appear to be conservative. (2) The modeling of conduction-limited fuel vaporization and condensation causes the energetics to be highly sensitive to variations in the droplet size (i.e., in the parametric values) for the sizes of interest in HCDA analysis. Care must therefore be exercised in the inclusion of this phenomenon in energetics calculations. (3) Insignificant differences are observed between the use of space-time kinetics (quasi-static diffusion theory) and point kinetics, indicating again that point kinetics is normally adequate for analysis of the prompt burst portion of an HCDA. (4) No significant differences were found to result from assuming that delayed neutron precursors remain stationary where they are created rather than assuming that they move together with fuel. (5) There is no need for implicit coupling between the neutronics and the hydrodynamics/thermodynamics routines, even outside the prompt burst portion

  18. Development of real-time core monitoring system models with accuracy-enhanced neural network and its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Bon Hyun

    1994-02-01

    In a complicated system like pressurized water reactor, a number of key safety parameters need to be selected to represent the reactor systems safety. It could be more effective for the reactor safety to make the key safety parameters in real-time available directly to the reactor operator. Direct representation of key safety parameters is also desirable in the view of reactor core design since it could reduce unnecessary margins for various components of uncertainties. In this thesis, real-time core monitoring system models have been developed with use of artificial neural networks for the prediction of nuclear hot channel factor (HCF) and core departure from nucleate boiling ratio (DNBR) which are known to be the fundamental core safety parameters for pressurized water reactors. Artificial neural network algorithm, has been shown to be successful for the conservative and accurate prediction of the HCF and DNBR. For the development of system models, training patterns were generated using the FLAIR and COBRAIV-i computer codes for the HCF and DNBR. The selected input variables were the core power, reactor coolant flow, temperature, pressure, power distribution, boron concentration, and rod position. The developed system models could replace the existing core monitoring systems and then afford a better efficiency by using the additional margin which otherwise needs to be reserved for various unidentified uncertainties. Several variations of the neural network technique have been proposed and compared based on numerical experiments. The neural network can be augmented by use of a functional link to improve the performance of the network model. The functional link is found to be very effective especially when the relationship between the input parameters and the output parameters is overly complicated such as in the core HCF and DNBR. For the further enhancement of DNBR accuracy, two-fold weight sets were used. The coarse weight set can provide a quick and

  19. Time-invariant component-based normalization for a simultaneous PET-MR scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belzunce, M A; Reader, A J

    2016-05-07

    Component-based normalization is a method used to compensate for the sensitivity of each of the lines of response acquired in positron emission tomography. This method consists of modelling the sensitivity of each line of response as a product of multiple factors, which can be classified as time-invariant, time-variant and acquisition-dependent components. Typical time-variant factors are the intrinsic crystal efficiencies, which are needed to be updated by a regular normalization scan. Failure to do so would in principle generate artifacts in the reconstructed images due to the use of out of date time-variant factors. For this reason, an assessment of the variability and the impact of the crystal efficiencies in the reconstructed images is important to determine the frequency needed for the normalization scans, as well as to estimate the error obtained when an inappropriate normalization is used. Furthermore, if the fluctuations of these components are low enough, they could be neglected and nearly artifact-free reconstructions become achievable without performing a regular normalization scan. In this work, we analyse the impact of the time-variant factors in the component-based normalization used in the Biograph mMR scanner, but the work is applicable to other PET scanners. These factors are the intrinsic crystal efficiencies and the axial factors. For the latter, we propose a new method to obtain fixed axial factors that was validated with simulated data. Regarding the crystal efficiencies, we assessed their fluctuations during a period of 230 d and we found that they had good stability and low dispersion. We studied the impact of not including the intrinsic crystal efficiencies in the normalization when reconstructing simulated and real data. Based on this assessment and using the fixed axial factors, we propose the use of a time-invariant normalization that is able to achieve comparable results to the standard, daily updated, normalization factors used in this

  20. A concept of a component based system to determine pot-plant shelf-life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Körner, Oliver; Skou, Anne-Marie Thonning; Aaslyng, Jesper Peter Mazanti

    2006-01-01

    to calculate the expected keeping quality, or it will be able to apply the system as decision support during plant cultivation. In the latter case, the model-based system can be implemented in a greenhouse climate computer. The concept contains information on climate control strategies, controlled stress......, the keeping quality of a plant after removal from the greenhouse could be estimated. A concept of a system that describes a model based knowledge system aiming at determination of the last selling date for pot plants is presented. The core of the conceptual system is a tool that can either be used......, diseases, nutrient management and substrates....

  1. Built-In Data-Flow Integration Testing in Large-Scale Component-Based Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piel, Éric; Gonzalez-Sanchez, Alberto; Gross, Hans-Gerhard

    Modern large-scale component-based applications and service ecosystems are built following a number of different component models and architectural styles, such as the data-flow architectural style. In this style, each building block receives data from a previous one in the flow and sends output data to other components. This organisation expresses information flows adequately, and also favours decoupling between the components, leading to easier maintenance and quicker evolution of the system. Integration testing is a major means to ensure the quality of large systems. Their size and complexity, together with the fact that they are developed and maintained by several stake holders, make Built-In Testing (BIT) an attractive approach to manage their integration testing. However, so far no technique has been proposed that combines BIT and data-flow integration testing. We have introduced the notion of a virtual component in order to realize such a combination. It permits to define the behaviour of several components assembled to process a flow of data, using BIT. Test-cases are defined in a way that they are simple to write and flexible to adapt. We present two implementations of our proposed virtual component integration testing technique, and we extend our previous proposal to detect and handle errors in the definition by the user. The evaluation of the virtual component testing approach suggests that more issues can be detected in systems with data-flows than through other integration testing approaches.

  2. Experiences modeling ocean circulation problems on a 30 node commodity cluster with 3840 GPU processor cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, C.

    2008-12-01

    Low cost graphic cards today use many, relatively simple, compute cores to deliver support for memory bandwidth of more than 100GB/s and theoretical floating point performance of more than 500 GFlop/s. Right now this performance is, however, only accessible to highly parallel algorithm implementations that, (i) can use a hundred or more, 32-bit floating point, concurrently executing cores, (ii) can work with graphics memory that resides on the graphics card side of the graphics bus and (iii) can be partially expressed in a language that can be compiled by a graphics programming tool. In this talk we describe our experiences implementing a complete, but relatively simple, time dependent shallow-water equations simulation targeting a cluster of 30 computers each hosting one graphics card. The implementation takes into account the considerations (i), (ii) and (iii) listed previously. We code our algorithm as a series of numerical kernels. Each kernel is designed to be executed by multiple threads of a single process. Kernels are passed memory blocks to compute over which can be persistent blocks of memory on a graphics card. Each kernel is individually implemented using the NVidia CUDA language but driven from a higher level supervisory code that is almost identical to a standard model driver. The supervisory code controls the overall simulation timestepping, but is written to minimize data transfer between main memory and graphics memory (a massive performance bottle-neck on current systems). Using the recipe outlined we can boost the performance of our cluster by nearly an order of magnitude, relative to the same algorithm executing only on the cluster CPU's. Achieving this performance boost requires that many threads are available to each graphics processor for execution within each numerical kernel and that the simulations working set of data can fit into the graphics card memory. As we describe, this puts interesting upper and lower bounds on the problem sizes

  3. Clinical data integration model. Core interoperability ontology for research using primary care data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethier, J-F; Curcin, V; Barton, A; McGilchrist, M M; Bastiaens, H; Andreasson, A; Rossiter, J; Zhao, L; Arvanitis, T N; Taweel, A; Delaney, B C; Burgun, A

    2015-01-01

    This article is part of the Focus Theme of METHODS of Information in Medicine on "Managing Interoperability and Complexity in Health Systems". Primary care data is the single richest source of routine health care data. However its use, both in research and clinical work, often requires data from multiple clinical sites, clinical trials databases and registries. Data integration and interoperability are therefore of utmost importance. TRANSFoRm's general approach relies on a unified interoperability framework, described in a previous paper. We developed a core ontology for an interoperability framework based on data mediation. This article presents how such an ontology, the Clinical Data Integration Model (CDIM), can be designed to support, in conjunction with appropriate terminologies, biomedical data federation within TRANSFoRm, an EU FP7 project that aims to develop the digital infrastructure for a learning healthcare system in European Primary Care. TRANSFoRm utilizes a unified structural / terminological interoperability framework, based on the local-as-view mediation paradigm. Such an approach mandates the global information model to describe the domain of interest independently of the data sources to be explored. Following a requirement analysis process, no ontology focusing on primary care research was identified and, thus we designed a realist ontology based on Basic Formal Ontology to support our framework in collaboration with various terminologies used in primary care. The resulting ontology has 549 classes and 82 object properties and is used to support data integration for TRANSFoRm's use cases. Concepts identified by researchers were successfully expressed in queries using CDIM and pertinent terminologies. As an example, we illustrate how, in TRANSFoRm, the Query Formulation Workbench can capture eligibility criteria in a computable representation, which is based on CDIM. A unified mediation approach to semantic interoperability provides a

  4. GrowYourIC: an open access Python code to facilitate comparison between kinematic models of inner core evolution and seismic observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasbleis, M.; Day, E. A.; Waszek, L.

    2017-12-01

    The complex nature of inner core structure has been well-established from seismic studies, with heterogeneities at various length scales, both radially and laterally. Despite this, no geodynamic model has successfully explained all of the observed seismic features. To facilitate comparisons between seismic observations and geodynamic models of inner core growth we have developed a new, open access Python tool - GrowYourIC - that allows users to compare models of inner core structure. The code allows users to simulate different evolution models of the inner core, with user-defined rates of inner core growth, translation and rotation. Once the user has "grown" an inner core with their preferred parameters they can then explore the effect of "their" inner core's evolution on the relative age and growth rate in different regions of the inner core. The code will convert these parameters into seismic properties using either built-in mineral physics models, or user-supplied ones that calculate these seismic properties with users' own preferred mineralogical models. The 3D model of isotropic inner core properties can then be used to calculate the predicted seismic travel time anomalies for a random, or user-specified, set of seismic ray paths through the inner core. A real dataset of inner core body-wave differential travel times is included for the purpose of comparing user-generated models of inner core growth to actual observed travel time anomalies in the top 100km of the inner core. Here, we explore some of the possibilities of our code. We investigate the effect of the limited illumination of the inner core by seismic waves on the robustness of kinematic model interpretation. We test the impact on seismic differential travel time observations of several kinematic models of inner core growth: fast lateral translation; slow differential growth; and inner core super-rotation. We find that a model of inner core evolution incorporating both differential growth and slow

  5. Final Report, Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) Project: An Innovative Reactor Analysis Methodology Based on a Quasidiffusion Nodal Core Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anistratov, Dmitriy Y.; Adams, Marvin L.; Palmer, Todd S.; Smith, Kord S.; Clarno, Kevin; Hikaru Hiruta; Razvan Nes

    2003-01-01

    OAK (B204) Final Report, NERI Project: ''An Innovative Reactor Analysis Methodology Based on a Quasidiffusion Nodal Core Model'' The present generation of reactor analysis methods uses few-group nodal diffusion approximations to calculate full-core eigenvalues and power distributions. The cross sections, diffusion coefficients, and discontinuity factors (collectively called ''group constants'') in the nodal diffusion equations are parameterized as functions of many variables, ranging from the obvious (temperature, boron concentration, etc.) to the more obscure (spectral index, moderator temperature history, etc.). These group constants, and their variations as functions of the many variables, are calculated by assembly-level transport codes. The current methodology has two main weaknesses that this project addressed. The first weakness is the diffusion approximation in the full-core calculation; this can be significantly inaccurate at interfaces between different assemblies. This project used the nodal diffusion framework to implement nodal quasidiffusion equations, which can capture transport effects to an arbitrary degree of accuracy. The second weakness is in the parameterization of the group constants; current models do not always perform well, especially at interfaces between unlike assemblies. The project developed a theoretical foundation for parameterization and homogenization models and used that theory to devise improved models. The new models were extended to tabulate information that the nodal quasidiffusion equations can use to capture transport effects in full-core calculations

  6. Feasibility study of applying a multi-channel analysis model to on-line core monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In, W. K.; Yoo, Y. J.; Hwang, D. H.; Jun, T. H.

    1998-01-01

    A feasibility study was performed to evaluate the effect of implementing a multi-channel analysis model in on-line core monitoring system. A simplified thermal-hydraulic model has been used in the on-line core monitoring system of digital PWR. The design procedure, core thermal margin and computation time were investigated in case of replacing the simplified model with the multi-channel analysis model. For the given ranges of limiting conditions for operation in Yonggwang Unit 3 Cycle 1, the minimum DNBR of the simplified thermal-hydraulic code CETOP-D was compared to that of the multi-channel analysis code MATRA. A CETOP-D tuning is additionally required to ensure the accurate and conservative DNBR calculation but the MATRA tuning is not necessary. MATRA appeared to increase the DNBR overpower margin from 2.5% to 6% over the CETOP-D margin. MATRA took approximately 1 second to compute DNBR on the HP9000 workstation system, which is longer than the DNBR computation time of CETOP-D. It is, however, fast enough to perform the on-line monitoring of DNBR. It can be therefore concluded that the application of the multi-channel analysis model MATRA in the on-line core monitoring system is feasible

  7. Effects of different per translational kinetics on the dynamics of a core circadian clock model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, Paula S; Revelli, Jorge A; Garbarino-Pico, Eduardo; Condat, Carlos A; Guido, Mario E; Tamarit, Francisco A

    2015-01-01

    Living beings display self-sustained daily rhythms in multiple biological processes, which persist in the absence of external cues since they are generated by endogenous circadian clocks. The period (per) gene is a central player within the core molecular mechanism for keeping circadian time in most animals. Recently, the modulation PER translation has been reported, both in mammals and flies, suggesting that translational regulation of clock components is important for the proper clock gene expression and molecular clock performance. Because translational regulation ultimately implies changes in the kinetics of translation and, therefore, in the circadian clock dynamics, we sought to study how and to what extent the molecular clock dynamics is affected by the kinetics of PER translation. With this objective, we used a minimal mathematical model of the molecular circadian clock to qualitatively characterize the dynamical changes derived from kinetically different PER translational mechanisms. We found that the emergence of self-sustained oscillations with characteristic period, amplitude, and phase lag (time delays) between per mRNA and protein expression depends on the kinetic parameters related to PER translation. Interestingly, under certain conditions, a PER translation mechanism with saturable kinetics introduces longer time delays than a mechanism ruled by a first-order kinetics. In addition, the kinetic laws of PER translation significantly changed the sensitivity of our model to parameters related to the synthesis and degradation of per mRNA and PER degradation. Lastly, we found a set of parameters, with realistic values, for which our model reproduces some experimental results reported recently for Drosophila melanogaster and we present some predictions derived from our analysis.

  8. What are the advantages of a three body model with core excitation for 21Ne and 21Na?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nunes, F.M.; Thompson, I.J.

    2004-01-01

    21 Ne and 21 Na are well bound nuclei and there is a large amount of data available up to considerable excitation energy, and this imposes a severe test on the structure models. Preliminary results for the structure of these nuclei based on three body models ( 21 Ne= 16 O+α+n and 21 Na= 16 O+α+p) are presented. Three-body calculations without core excitation produce the positive parity states in fair agreement with experiment, while slightly overbinding the systems. As expected, these models fail to reproduce the low lying negative parity states, which are predicted by shell model to have mainly core excited configurations. As a first step we have included the 3 - state of 16 O in our model. Convergence issues will be discussed. Results suggest that more excited states may be required to describe the system

  9. Cluster form factor calculation in the ab initio no-core shell model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navratil, Petr

    2004-01-01

    We derive expressions for cluster overlap integrals or channel cluster form factors for ab initio no-core shell model (NCSM) wave functions. These are used to obtain the spectroscopic factors and can serve as a starting point for the description of low-energy nuclear reactions. We consider the composite system and the target nucleus to be described in the Slater determinant (SD) harmonic oscillator (HO) basis while the projectile eigenstate to be expanded in the Jacobi coordinate HO basis. This is the most practical case. The spurious center of mass components present in the SD bases are removed exactly. The calculated cluster overlap integrals are translationally invariant. As an illustration, we present results of cluster form factor calculations for 5 He vertical bar 4 He+n>, 5 He vertical bar 3 H+d>, 6 Li vertical bar 4 He+d>, 6 Be vertical bar 3 He+ 3 He>, 7 Li vertical bar 4 He+ 3 H>, 7 Li vertical bar 6 Li+n>, 8 Be vertical bar 6 Li+d>, 8 Be vertical bar 7 Li+p>, 9 Li vertical bar 8 Li+n>, and 13 C vertical bar 12 C+n>, with all the nuclei described by multi-(ℎ/2π)Ω NCSM wave functions

  10. ON THE REQUIREMENTS FOR REALISTIC MODELING OF NEUTRINO TRANSPORT IN SIMULATIONS OF CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lentz, Eric J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1200 (United States); Mezzacappa, Anthony; Hix, W. Raphael [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6354 (United States); Messer, O. E. Bronson [Computer Science and Mathematics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6164 (United States); Liebendoerfer, Matthias [Department of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Bruenn, Stephen W., E-mail: elentz@utk.edu, E-mail: mezzacappaa@ornl.gov [Department of Physics, Florida Atlantic University, 777 Glades Road, Boca Raton, FL 33431-0991 (United States)

    2012-03-01

    We have conducted a series of numerical experiments with the spherically symmetric, general relativistic, neutrino radiation hydrodynamics code AGILE-BOLTZTRAN to examine the effects of several approximations used in multidimensional core-collapse supernova simulations. Our code permits us to examine the effects of these approximations quantitatively by removing, or substituting for, the pieces of supernova physics of interest. These approximations include: (1) using Newtonian versus general relativistic gravity, hydrodynamics, and transport; (2) using a reduced set of weak interactions, including the omission of non-isoenergetic neutrino scattering, versus the current state-of-the-art; and (3) omitting the velocity-dependent terms, or observer corrections, from the neutrino Boltzmann kinetic equation. We demonstrate that each of these changes has noticeable effects on the outcomes of our simulations. Of these, we find that the omission of observer corrections is particularly detrimental to the potential for neutrino-driven explosions and exhibits a failure to conserve lepton number. Finally, we discuss the impact of these results on our understanding of current, and the requirements for future, multidimensional models.

  11. ANALISIS PENGARUH KESUKSESAN IMPLEMENTASI CORE BANKING SYSTEM (CBS DENGAN BERBASIS MODEL DELONE DAN MCLEAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mardiana Andarwati

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available AbstractCore Banking System (CBS is banking application system implementation to improve service customers, but whether the bank knew that CBS was categorized applied successfully or not.The purpose of theseresearch are determine the successful implementation of CBS using models DeLone and Mclean IS Success consisting of six variables are system quality , information quality, usage , user satisfaction , individual impact , and impact organizations. Test the hypothesis using the Partial Least Suare (PLS.The results of this study are the quality of the system on the intensity of use and user satisfaction are positive and significant,the quality of information on the intensity of use is positive and significant and then user satisfaction isnegative and not significant, the influence of the intensity of use of the employment impacts of individual positive and significant, user satisfaction to the impact of individual positivel and significant, the intensity of use of the user satisfaction the positive and significant, and the impact individual on the impact of the organizationis positive and significant. So, as to impact individual the best relationship of the impact organization 

  12. Testing of Technology Acceptance Model on Core Banking System: A Perspective on Mandatory Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burhan Suryo Ambodo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to examine the acceptance of Core Banking System (CBS which is mandatory use software. The objects of this research are teller, customer service, and back office Branch of Bank BPD DIY Wonosari. Data were measured using Likert scale in five range value. A number of 49 data were analyzed using Partial Least Square (PLS. The results showed that ease of use had no positive effect on symbolic adoption; attitudes toward usage and perceived conformance has a positive effect on symbolic adoption, ease of use and perceived compatibility has no effect on attitudes towards usage. Usability, satisfaction and compatibility that are felt to positively affect attitude toward usage. In the information technology model that is mandatory use, it is important to note the symbolic adoption of information technology therefore the performance of the user (employee/employee can remain good. In particular for banking institutions that using CBS, it is important to improve the use of CBS, user satisfaction and CBS conformity with business processes, given the current banking business processes that are constantly expanding, there is no possibility of adjusting CBS to business processes at later.

  13. ON THE REQUIREMENTS FOR REALISTIC MODELING OF NEUTRINO TRANSPORT IN SIMULATIONS OF CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lentz, Eric J.; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Hix, W. Raphael; Messer, O. E. Bronson; Liebendörfer, Matthias; Bruenn, Stephen W.

    2012-01-01

    We have conducted a series of numerical experiments with the spherically symmetric, general relativistic, neutrino radiation hydrodynamics code AGILE-BOLTZTRAN to examine the effects of several approximations used in multidimensional core-collapse supernova simulations. Our code permits us to examine the effects of these approximations quantitatively by removing, or substituting for, the pieces of supernova physics of interest. These approximations include: (1) using Newtonian versus general relativistic gravity, hydrodynamics, and transport; (2) using a reduced set of weak interactions, including the omission of non-isoenergetic neutrino scattering, versus the current state-of-the-art; and (3) omitting the velocity-dependent terms, or observer corrections, from the neutrino Boltzmann kinetic equation. We demonstrate that each of these changes has noticeable effects on the outcomes of our simulations. Of these, we find that the omission of observer corrections is particularly detrimental to the potential for neutrino-driven explosions and exhibits a failure to conserve lepton number. Finally, we discuss the impact of these results on our understanding of current, and the requirements for future, multidimensional models.

  14. Core/shell CdS/ZnS nanoparticles: Molecular modelling and characterization by photocatalytic decomposition of Methylene Blue

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Praus, P.; Svoboda, L.; Tokarský, J.; Hospodková, Alice; Klemm, V.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 292, Feb (2014), s. 813-822 ISSN 0169-4332 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : core/shell nanoparticles * CdS/ZnS * molecular modelling * electron tunnelling * photocatalysis Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.711, year: 2014

  15. Development of Pipeline Database and CAD Model for Selection of Core Security Zone in Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Seong Soo; Kwon, Tae Gyun; Baek, Hun Hyun; Kwon, Min Jin

    2008-07-01

    The objective of the project is to develop the pipeline database which can be used for selection of core security zones considering safety significance of pipes and to develop CAD model for 3-dimensional visualization of core security zones, for the purpose of minimizing damage and loss, enforcing security and protection on important facilities, and improving plant design preparing against emergency situations such as physical terrors in nuclear power plants. In this study, the pipeline database is developed for selection of core security zones considering safety significance of safety class 1 and 2 pipes. The database includes the information on 'pipe-room information-surrogate component' mapping, initiating events which may occur and accident mitigation functions which may be damaged by the pipe failure, and the drawing information related to 2,270 pipe segments of 30 systems. For the 3-dimensional visualization of core security zones, the CAD models on the containment building and the auxiliary building are developed using 3-D MAX tool and the demo program which can visualize the direct-X model converted from the 3-D MAX model is also developed. In addition to this, the coordinate information of all the buildings and their rooms is generated using AUTO CAD tool in order to be used as an input for 3-dimensional browsing of the VIP program

  16. The Relationship of Core Self-Evaluations and Life Satisfaction in College Students with Disabilities: Evaluation of a Mediator Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smedema, Susan Miller; Chan, Fong; Yaghmaian, Rana A.; Cardoso, Elizabeth DaSilva; Muller, Veronica; Keegan, John; Dutta, Alo; Ebener, Deborah J.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the factorial structure of the construct core self-evaluations (CSE) and tested a mediational model of the relationship between CSE and life satisfaction in college students with disabilities. We conducted a quantitative descriptive design using exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis and multiple regression analysis.…

  17. Modelling of DEMO core plasma consistent with SOL/divertor simulations for long-pulse scenarios with impurity seeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacher, G.W.; Pacher, H.D.; Janeschitz, G.; Kukushkin, A.S.; Kotov, V.; Reiter, D.

    2007-01-01

    The integrated core-pedestal-SOL model is applied to the simulation of a typical DEMO operation. Impurity seeding is used to reduce the power load on the divertor to acceptable levels. The influence on long-pulse operation of impurity seeding with various impurities is investigated. DEMO operation at acceptable peak power loads and long-pulse lengths is demonstrated

  18. An examination of the shrinking-core model of sub-micron aluminum combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckmaster, John; Jackson, Thomas L.

    2013-04-01

    We revisit the shrinking-core model of sub-micron aluminum combustion with particular attention to the mass flux balance at the reaction front which necessarily leads to a displacement velocity of the alumina shell surrounding the liquid aluminum. For the planar problem this displacement simply leads to an equal displacement of the entire alumina layer, and therefore a straightforward mathematical framework can be constructed. In this way we are able to construct a single curve which defines the burn time for arbitrary values of the diffusion coefficient of O atoms, the reaction rate, the characteristic length of the combustion field, and the O atom mass concentration within the alumina provided that it is much smaller than the aluminum density. This demonstrates a transition between a 'd 2-t' law for fast chemistry and a 'd-t' law for slow chemistry. For the spherical geometry, the one of physical interest, the outward displacement velocity creates not a simple displacement, but a stress field which, when examined within the framework of linear elasticity, strongly suggests the creation of internal cracking. We note that if the molten aluminum is pushed into these cracks by the high internal pressure characteristic of the stress field, its surface, where reaction occurs, could be fractal in nature and affect the fundamental nature of the burning law. Indeed, if this ingredient is added to the planar model, a single curve for the burn time can again be derived, and this describes a transition from a 'd 2-t' law to a 'd ν-t' law, where 0<ν<1.

  19. Outcrop - core correlation and seismic modeling of the Athabasca Oil Sands Deposit, Fort McMurray area, northeast Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hein, F.J. [Alberta Geological Survey, Calgary, AB (Canada); Langenberg, C.W.; Cotterill, D.C.; Berhane, H. [Alberta Geological Survey, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Lawton, D.; Cunningham, J. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada)

    1999-11-01

    A joint study between the Alberta Geological Survey and the University of Calgary was conducted which involved a detailed facies analysis of cores and outcrops from the Athabasca Oil Sands Deposit in Alberta`s Steepbank area. A unified facies classification for the deposit was developed. Larger scale facies associations were also determined, as well as proxy sonic logs for outcrops used in seismic modeling. The cores which were displayed exhibited detailed sedimentological and stratigraphic analysis of 10 outcrops in the area. 7 refs.

  20. Sensitivity of physics parameters for establishment of a burned CANDU full-core model for decommissioning waste characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Dong-Keun; Sun, Gwang-Min; Choi, Jongwon; Hwang, Dong-Hyun; Hwang, Tae-Won; Yang, Ho-Yeon; Park, Dong-Hwan

    2011-01-01

    The sensitivity of parameters related with reactor physics on the source terms of decommissioning wastes from a CANDU reactor was investigated in order to find a viable, simplified burned core model of a Monte Carlo simulation for decommissioning waste characterization. First, a sensitivity study was performed for the level of nuclide consideration in an irradiated fuel and implicit geometry modeling, the effects of side structural components of the core, and structural supporters for reactive devices. The overall effects for computation memory, calculation time, and accuracy were then investigated with a full-core model. From the results, it was revealed that the level of nuclide consideration and geometry homogenization are not important factors when the ratio of macroscopic neutron absorption cross section (MNAC) relative to a total value exceeded 0.95. The most important factor affecting the neutron flux of the pressure tube was shown to be the structural supporters for reactivity devices, showing an 10% difference. Finally, it was concluded that a bundle-average homogeneous model considering a MNAC of 0.95, which is the simplest model in this study, could be a viable approximate model, with about 25% lower computation memory, 40% faster simulation time, and reasonable engineering accuracy compared with a model with an explicit geometry employing an MNAC of 0.99. (author)

  1. Developing a Core Competency Model for Information Systems Management Officers in the United States Army

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hunt, P

    2000-01-01

    ...) to implement that vision. The challenge then becomes, what exactly are the core competencies, or more plainly put, what knowledge, skills and attributes must these officers possess, in order to be successful in carrying...

  2. Modeled and Measured Dynamics of a Composite Beam with Periodically Varying Foam Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabell, Randolph H.; Cano, Roberto J.; Schiller, Noah H.; Roberts Gary D.

    2012-01-01

    The dynamics of a sandwich beam with carbon fiber composite facesheets and foam core with periodic variations in material properties are studied. The purpose of the study is to compare finite element predictions with experimental measurements on fabricated beam specimens. For the study, three beams were fabricated: one with a compliant foam core, a second with a stiffer core, and a third with the two cores alternating down the length of the beam to create a periodic variation in properties. This periodic variation produces a bandgap in the frequency domain where vibrational energy does not readily propagate down the length of the beam. Mode shapes and natural frequencies are compared, as well as frequency responses from point force input to velocity response at the opposite end of the beam.

  3. Importance-truncated no-core shell model for fermionic many-body systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spies, Helena

    2017-03-15

    The exact solution of quantum mechanical many-body problems is only possible for few particles. Therefore, numerical methods were developed in the fields of quantum physics and quantum chemistry for larger particle numbers. Configuration Interaction (CI) methods or the No-Core Shell Model (NCSM) allow ab initio calculations for light and intermediate-mass nuclei, without resorting to phenomenology. An extension of the NCSM is the Importance-Truncated No-Core Shell Model, which uses an a priori selection of the most important basis states. The importance truncation was first developed and applied in quantum chemistry in the 1970s and latter successfully applied to models of light and intermediate mass nuclei. Other numerical methods for calculations for ultra-cold fermionic many-body systems are the Fixed-Node Diffusion Monte Carlo method (FN-DMC) and the stochastic variational approach with Correlated Gaussian basis functions (CG). There are also such method as the Coupled-Cluster method, Green's Function Monte Carlo (GFMC) method, et cetera, used for calculation of many-body systems. In this thesis, we adopt the IT-NCSM for the calculation of ultra-cold Fermi gases at unitarity. Ultracold gases are dilute, strongly correlated systems, in which the average interparticle distance is much larger than the range of the interaction. Therefore, the detailed radial dependence of the potential is not resolved, and the potential can be replaced by an effective contact interaction. At low energy, s-wave scattering dominates and the interaction can be described by the s-wave scattering length. If the scattering length is small and negative, Cooper-pairs are formed in the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) regime. If the scattering length is small and positive, these Cooper-pairs become strongly bound molecules in a Bose-Einstein-Condensate (BEC). In between (for large scattering lengths) is the unitary limit with universal properties. Calculations of the energy spectra

  4. CORE SELF-EVALUATIONS, JOB SATISFACTION, TRANSFORMATIONAL AND SERVANT LEADERSHIP MODEL IN THE ROMAN CATHOLIC EDUCATION SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Caroline N. Castano

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Core self-evaluations, effective leadership styles and employee job satisfaction are essential factors for organizational success. This paper aims to determine the relationship of the leader’s core self-evaluations, transformational leadership and servant leadership styles to their follower’s job satisfaction in selected Parochial Schools in Manila, Philippines under the Roman Catholic Education System. The respondents were selected according to certain criteria. Descriptive correlational design was used. In total, 308 individuals from the teaching and non-teaching personnel participated. The data were collected using survey questionnaires. Data were analyzed using Partial Least Squares-Structural Equation Modeling (PLS-SEM. Research findings revealed that a positive relationship exists between leader’s core self-evaluations and transformational leadership; core self-evaluations to servant leadership; transformational leadership to job satisfaction; and servant leadership to job satisfaction. These relationships are statistically significant. The relationship of the leader’s core self-evaluations to the follower’s job satisfaction indicated a direct effect but were statistically non-significant on the basis of its p-value. The major contribution of the current study is to extend the limited literature regarding the antecedents of the four (4 selected variables. The researcher recommends to the school leaders to create a motivating environment through a more transformational and servant leadership behavior that will enhance their follower’s work satisfaction.

  5. A Component-Based Study of the Effect of Diameter on Bond and Anchorage Characteristics of Blind-Bolted Connections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Nasir Amin

    Full Text Available Structural hollow sections are gaining worldwide importance due to their structural and architectural advantages over open steel sections. The only obstacle to their use is their connection with other structural members. To overcome the obstacle of tightening the bolt from one side has given birth to the concept of blind bolts. Blind bolts, being the practical solution to the connection hindrance for the use of hollow and concrete filled hollow sections play a vital role. Flowdrill, the Huck High Strength Blind Bolt and the Lindapter Hollobolt are the well-known commercially available blind bolts. Although the development of blind bolts has largely resolved this issue, the use of structural hollow sections remains limited to shear resistance. Therefore, a new modified version of the blind bolt, known as the "Extended Hollo-Bolt" (EHB due to its enhanced capacity for bonding with concrete, can overcome the issue of low moment resistance capacity associated with blind-bolted connections. The load transfer mechanism of this recently developed blind bolt remains unclear, however. This study uses a parametric approach to characterising the EHB, using diameter as the variable parameter. Stiffness and load-carrying capacity were evaluated at two different bolt sizes. To investigate the load transfer mechanism, a component-based study of the bond and anchorage characteristics was performed by breaking down the EHB into its components. The results of the study provide insight into the load transfer mechanism of the blind bolt in question. The proposed component-based model was validated by a spring model, through which the stiffness of the EHB was compared to that of its components combined. The combined stiffness of the components was found to be roughly equivalent to that of the EHB as a whole, validating the use of this component-based approach.

  6. A Component-Based Study of the Effect of Diameter on Bond and Anchorage Characteristics of Blind-Bolted Connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Muhammad Nasir; Zaheer, Salman; Alazba, Abdulrahman Ali; Saleem, Muhammad Umair; Niazi, Muhammad Umar Khan; Khurram, Nauman; Amin, Muhammad Tahir

    2016-01-01

    Structural hollow sections are gaining worldwide importance due to their structural and architectural advantages over open steel sections. The only obstacle to their use is their connection with other structural members. To overcome the obstacle of tightening the bolt from one side has given birth to the concept of blind bolts. Blind bolts, being the practical solution to the connection hindrance for the use of hollow and concrete filled hollow sections play a vital role. Flowdrill, the Huck High Strength Blind Bolt and the Lindapter Hollobolt are the well-known commercially available blind bolts. Although the development of blind bolts has largely resolved this issue, the use of structural hollow sections remains limited to shear resistance. Therefore, a new modified version of the blind bolt, known as the "Extended Hollo-Bolt" (EHB) due to its enhanced capacity for bonding with concrete, can overcome the issue of low moment resistance capacity associated with blind-bolted connections. The load transfer mechanism of this recently developed blind bolt remains unclear, however. This study uses a parametric approach to characterising the EHB, using diameter as the variable parameter. Stiffness and load-carrying capacity were evaluated at two different bolt sizes. To investigate the load transfer mechanism, a component-based study of the bond and anchorage characteristics was performed by breaking down the EHB into its components. The results of the study provide insight into the load transfer mechanism of the blind bolt in question. The proposed component-based model was validated by a spring model, through which the stiffness of the EHB was compared to that of its components combined. The combined stiffness of the components was found to be roughly equivalent to that of the EHB as a whole, validating the use of this component-based approach.

  7. Multistage Core Formation in Planetesimals Revealed by Numerical Modeling and Hf-W Chronometry of Iron Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, W.; Kruijer, T. S.; Breuer, D.; Kleine, T.

    2018-02-01

    Iron meteorites provide some of the most direct insights into the processes and timescales of core formation in planetesimals. Of these, group IVB irons stand out by having one of the youngest 182Hf-182W model ages for metal segregation (2.9 ± 0.6 Ma after solar system formation), as well as the lowest bulk sulfur content and hence highest liquidus temperature. Here, using a new model for the internal evolution of the IVB parent body, we show that a single stage of metal-silicate separation cannot account for the complete melting of pure Fe metal at the relatively late time given by the Hf-W model age. Instead, a complex metal-silicate separation scenario is required that includes migration of partial silicate melts, formation of a shallow magma ocean, and core formation in two distinct stages of metal segregation. In the first stage, a protocore formed at ≈1.5 Ma via settling of metal particles in a mantle magma ocean, followed by metal segregation from a shallow magma ocean at ≈5.4 Ma. As these stages of metal segregation occurred at different times, the two metal fractions had different 182W compositions. Consequently, the final 182W composition of the IVB core does not correspond to a single differentiation event, but represents the average composition of early- and late-segregated core fractions. Our best fit model indicates an ≈100 km radius for the IVB parent body and provides an accretion age of ≈0.1-0.5 Ma after solar system formation. The computed solidification time is, furthermore, consistent with the Re-Os age for crystallization of the IVB core.

  8. Long core model apparatus for laboratory investigation of oil recovery processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milley, Gy; Bukta, B; Jonap, K; Lovei, J; Wagner, O

    1982-01-01

    In studying the secondary and Tertiary processes of intensifying oil output, an analysis was made of the following main factors: behavior of multiple-phase and multiple-component system in the porous medium, their stability, mobility, effect of viscosity and pressure differential in the system, configuration of the displacement front, influence of chemical additives on optimizing the surface energy, economic characteristics of the processes. All of these factors can be studied on a laboratory unit with core samples up to 120 cm long with temperatures to 120/sup 0/C, pressures to 30 MPa and consumption of reagents to 100 cm/sup 3//h. The unit contains feed vessels of high pressure for water, oil and gas in different reagents. There is a pumping unit of two-stage type, and in the first loop there is a piston pump which feeds the cylinder of the pump of the second stage of the plunger type. The outlet stage of this pump through the valve system is connected to the corresponding vessel for pressing the necessary reagent through the core sample. One can continually change the pressure to 100 MPa. The core is placed in a special core carrier and using special high temperature resins, it is packed in it in order to exclude side overflows. There is a technology of packing of comparatively soft rocks (clay). Sketches are presented of the sealing assemblies, and also the plans for inserting cables for the sensors. The sensor system is arranged over the entire length of the core and generates signals which are proportional to the magnitude of water saturation. The outlet of the core carrier has devices for resetting pressure, collecting filtrate, measurement of its composition and consumption. The core carrier is thermostatically controlled and contains two kW electrical heater for taking measurements at different temperatures. With a change in the system modes, the equilibrium is reached in 2-3 h.

  9. Intercomparison of radiocarbon bomb pulse and 210Pb age models. A study in a peat bog core from North Poland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piotrowska, Natalia; Vleeschouwer, Francois De; Sikorski, Jaroslaw; Pawlyta, Jacek; Fagel, Nathalie; Roux, Gael Le; Pazdur, Anna

    2010-01-01

    Radiocarbon and 210 Pb were measured on the uppermost 40 cm of a Wardenaar peat core retrieved from a Baltic raised bog at Slowinskie Blota (Pomerania, North Poland). This site is the subject of ongoing multiproxy studies covering the last 1300 years. Radiocarbon age model was constructed on the basis of 14 AMS dates obtained on selected Sphagnum spp. fragments, with use of P S equence tool. We present here a comparison of this model with the age model obtained using CRS model classically applied to 210 Pb measurements.

  10. Intercomparison of radiocarbon bomb pulse and 210Pb age models. A study in a peat bog core from North Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowska, Natalia; De Vleeschouwer, François; Sikorski, Jarosław; Pawlyta, Jacek; Fagel, Nathalie; Le Roux, Gaël; Pazdur, Anna

    2010-04-01

    Radiocarbon and 210Pb were measured on the uppermost 40 cm of a Wardenaar peat core retrieved from a Baltic raised bog at Słowińskie Błota (Pomerania, North Poland). This site is the subject of ongoing multiproxy studies covering the last 1300 years. Radiocarbon age model was constructed on the basis of 14 AMS dates obtained on selected Sphagnum spp. fragments, with use of P_Sequence tool. We present here a comparison of this model with the age model obtained using CRS model classically applied to 210Pb measurements.

  11. The core-quasiparticle model for odd-odd nuclei and applications to candidates for gamma-ray lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strottman, D.D.

    1988-01-01

    A reliable estimate of the properties of isomers that may be viable candidates for a gamma-ray laser requires the use of the most accurate save functions possible. The majority of models that have been used to estimate the properties of isomers are applicable to only selected regions of the nuclear mass table. In particular, the Bohr-Mottelson model of odd-A and odd-odd nuclei will fail if the even-even core is not strongly deformed or if the deformations are changing strongly as a function of mass. This paper reports how the problem is overcome in a new core- quasiparticle model for odd-odd nuclei. The model introduces the pairing interaction ab initio; the odd-A states are mixtures of particle and hole states. The core may be soft towards deformation or axial asymmetry and may change rapidly as a function of mass. Thus, the model is ideally suited for application to the region of transitional nuclei such as the Te, La, and Os regions

  12. Modeling and analysis of neutron noise from an ex-core detector at a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, R.T.; Perez, R.B.

    1991-01-01

    Two applications of a noise diagnostic methodology were performed using ex-core neutron detector data from a pressurized water reactor (PWR). A feedback dynamics model of the neutron power spectral density (PSD) was derived from a low-order whole-plant physical model made stochastic using the Langevin technique. From a functional fit to plant data, the response of the dynamic system to changes in important physical parameters was evaluated by a direct sensitivity analysis. In addition, changes in monitored spectra were related to changes in physical parameters and detection thresholds using common surveillance discriminants were determined. A resonance model was developed from perturbation theory to give the ex-core neutron detector response for small in-core mechanical motions in terms of a pole-strength factor, a resonance asymmetry (or skewness) factor, a vibration damping factor, and a frequency of vibration. The mechanical motion parameters for several resonances were determined by a functional fit of the model to plant data taken at various times during a fuel cycle and were tracked to determine trends that indicated vibrational changes of reactor internals. In addition, the resonance model gave the ability to separate the resonant components of the PSD after the parameters had been identified. As a result, the behavior of several vibration peaks were monitored over a fuel cycle. 9 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  13. Three-dimensional transport coefficient model and prediction-correction numerical method for thermal margin analysis of PWR cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, C.

    1981-01-01

    Combustion Engineering Inc. designs its modern PWR reactor cores using open-core thermal-hydraulic methods where the mass, momentum and energy equations are solved in three dimensions (one axial and two lateral directions). The resultant fluid properties are used to compute the minimum Departure from Nuclear Boiling Ratio (DNBR) which ultimately sets the power capability of the core. The on-line digital monitoring and protection systems require a small fast-running algorithm of the design code. This paper presents two techniques used in the development of the on-line DNB algorithm. First, a three-dimensional transport coefficient model is introduced to radially group the flow subchannel into channels for the thermal-hydraulic fluid properties calculation. Conservation equations of mass, momentum and energy for this channels are derived using transport coefficients to modify the calculation of the radial transport of enthalpy and momentum. Second, a simplified, non-iterative numerical method, called the prediction-correction method, is applied together with the transport coefficient model to reduce the computer execution time in the determination of fluid properties. Comparison of the algorithm and the design thermal-hydraulic code shows agreement to within 0.65% equivalent power at a 95/95 confidence/probability level for all normal operating conditions of the PWR core. This algorithm accuracy is achieved with 1/800th of the computer processing time of its parent design code. (orig.)

  14. Constructing a Shared Mental Model for Faculty Development for the Core Entrustable Professional Activities for Entering Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favreau, Michele A; Tewksbury, Linda; Lupi, Carla; Cutrer, William B; Jokela, Janet A; Yarris, Lalena M

    2017-06-01

    In 2014, the Association of American Medical Colleges identified 13 Core Entrustable Professional Activities for Entering Residency (Core EPAs), which are activities that entering residents might be expected to perform without direct supervision. This work included the creation of an interinstitutional concept group focused on faculty development efforts, as the processes and tools for teaching and assessing entrustability in undergraduate medical education (UME) are still evolving. In this article, the authors describe a conceptual framework for entrustment that they developed to better prepare all educators involved in entrustment decision making in UME. This framework applies to faculty with limited or longitudinal contact with medical students and to those who contribute to entrustment development or render summative entrustment decisions.The authors describe a shared mental model for entrustment that they developed, based on a critical synthesis of the EPA literature, to serve as a guide for UME faculty development efforts. This model includes four dimensions for Core EPA faculty development: (1) observation skills in authentic settings (workplace-based assessments), (2) coaching and feedback skills, (3) self-assessment and reflection skills, and (4) peer guidance skills developed through a community of practice. These dimensions form a conceptual foundation for meaningful faculty participation in entrustment decision making.The authors also differentiate between the UME learning environment and the graduate medical education learning environment to highlight distinct challenges and opportunities for faculty development in UME settings. They conclude with recommendations and research questions for future Core EPA faculty development efforts.

  15. Downscale cascades in tracer transport test cases: an intercomparison of the dynamical cores in the Community Atmosphere Model CAM5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kent

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The accurate modeling of cascades to unresolved scales is an important part of the tracer transport component of dynamical cores of weather and climate models. This paper aims to investigate the ability of the advection schemes in the National Center for Atmospheric Research's Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5 to model this cascade. In order to quantify the effects of the different advection schemes in CAM5, four two-dimensional tracer transport test cases are presented. Three of the tests stretch the tracer below the scale of coarse resolution grids to ensure the downscale cascade of tracer variance. These results are compared with a high resolution reference solution, which is simulated on a resolution fine enough to resolve the tracer during the test. The fourth test has two separate flow cells, and is designed so that any tracer in the western hemisphere should not pass into the eastern hemisphere. This is to test whether the diffusion in transport schemes, often in the form of explicit hyper-diffusion terms or implicit through monotonic limiters, contains unphysical mixing.

    An intercomparison of three of the dynamical cores of the National Center for Atmospheric Research's Community Atmosphere Model version 5 is performed. The results show that the finite-volume (CAM-FV and spectral element (CAM-SE dynamical cores model the downscale cascade of tracer variance better than the semi-Lagrangian transport scheme of the Eulerian spectral transform core (CAM-EUL. Each scheme tested produces unphysical mass in the eastern hemisphere of the separate cells test.

  16. New finite element