WorldWideScience

Sample records for core complexes revision

  1. Spectroscopic properties of reaction center pigments in photosystem II core complexes: revision of the multimer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raszewski, Grzegorz; Diner, Bruce A; Schlodder, Eberhard; Renger, Thomas

    2008-07-01

    Absorbance difference spectra associated with the light-induced formation of functional states in photosystem II core complexes from Thermosynechococcus elongatus and Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (e.g., P(+)Pheo(-),P(+)Q(A)(-),(3)P) are described quantitatively in the framework of exciton theory. In addition, effects are analyzed of site-directed mutations of D1-His(198), the axial ligand of the special-pair chlorophyll P(D1), and D1-Thr(179), an amino-acid residue nearest to the accessory chlorophyll Chl(D1), on the spectral properties of the reaction center pigments. Using pigment transition energies (site energies) determined previously from independent experiments on D1-D2-cytb559 complexes, good agreement between calculated and experimental spectra is obtained. The only difference in site energies of the reaction center pigments in D1-D2-cytb559 and photosystem II core complexes concerns Chl(D1). Compared to isolated reaction centers, the site energy of Chl(D1) is red-shifted by 4 nm and less inhomogeneously distributed in core complexes. The site energies cause primary electron transfer at cryogenic temperatures to be initiated by an excited state that is strongly localized on Chl(D1) rather than from a delocalized state as assumed in the previously described multimer model. This result is consistent with earlier experimental data on special-pair mutants and with our previous calculations on D1-D2-cytb559 complexes. The calculations show that at 5 K the lowest excited state of the reaction center is lower by approximately 10 nm than the low-energy exciton state of the two special-pair chlorophylls P(D1) and P(D2) which form an excitonic dimer. The experimental temperature dependence of the wild-type difference spectra can only be understood in this model if temperature-dependent site energies are assumed for Chl(D1) and P(D1), reducing the above energy gap from 10 to 6 nm upon increasing the temperature from 5 to 300 K. At physiological temperature, there are

  2. Coolability of severely degraded CANDU cores. Revised

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meneley, D.A.; Blahnik, C.; Rogers, J.T.; Snell, V.G.; Nijhawan, S.

    1996-01-01

    Analytical and experimental studies have shown that the separately cooled moderator in a CANDU reactor provides an effective heat sink in the event of a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) accompanied by total failure of the emergency core cooling system (ECCS). The moderator heat sink prevents fuel melting and maintains the integrity of the fuel channels, therefore terminating this severe accident short of severe core damage. Nevertheless, there is a probability, however low, that the moderator heat sink could fail in such an accident. The pioneering work of Rogers (1984) for such a severe accident using simplified models showed that the fuel channels would fail and a bed of dry, solid debris would be formed at the bottom of the calandria which would heat up and eventually melt. However, the molten pool of core material would be retained in the calandria vessel, cooled by the independently cooled shield-tank water, and would eventually resolidify. Thus, the calandria vessel would act inherently as a 'core-catcher' as long as the shield tank integrity is maintained. The present paper reviews subsequent work on the damage to a CANDU core under severe accident conditions and describes an empirically based mechanistic model of this process. It is shown that, for such severe accident sequences in a CANDU reactor, the end state following core disassembly consists of a porous bed of dry solid, coarse debris, irrespective of the initiating event and the core disassembly process. (author)

  3. Training Revising Based Traversability Analysis of Complex Terrains for Mobile Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Song

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Traversability analysis is one of the core issues in the autonomous navigation for mobile robots to identify the accessible area by the information of sensors on mobile robots. This paper proposed a model to analyze the traversability of complex terrains based on rough sets and training revising. The model described the traversability for mobile robots by traversability cost. Through the experiment, the paper gets the conclusion that traversability analysis model based on rough sets and training revising can be used where terrain features are rich and complex, can effectively handle the unstructured environment, and can provide reliable and effective decision rules in the autonomous navigation for mobile robots.

  4. Organic complexant topical report. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meacham, J.E.; and others

    1997-06-26

    This document reviews the current understanding of hazards associated with the storage of organic complexant salts in Hanford Site high-level waste tanks. Two distinct hazards were evaluated: spontaneous self- accelerating decomposition reactions in the bulk material (bulk runaway) and ignition followed by condensed phase propagation (point source ignition). Results from the bulk runaway assessment showed that bulk runaway is not credible for all tanks except C-106. However, speciation of the organic in C-106 shows that it is almost all in the form of low energy oxalate, and there is little potential for a bulk runaway. Additional testing and evaluation would be necessary to definitely conclude that there is no potential for bulk runaway; therefore, controls are currently required for his tank. Temperature monitoring and controls (water addition and active ventilation) are adequate to prevent bulk runaway in C-106.

  5. Organic complexant topical report. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meacham, J.E.

    1997-01-01

    This document reviews the current understanding of hazards associated with the storage of organic complexant salts in Hanford Site high-level waste tanks. Two distinct hazards were evaluated: spontaneous self- accelerating decomposition reactions in the bulk material (bulk runaway) and ignition followed by condensed phase propagation (point source ignition). Results from the bulk runaway assessment showed that bulk runaway is not credible for all tanks except C-106. However, speciation of the organic in C-106 shows that it is almost all in the form of low energy oxalate, and there is little potential for a bulk runaway. Additional testing and evaluation would be necessary to definitely conclude that there is no potential for bulk runaway; therefore, controls are currently required for his tank. Temperature monitoring and controls (water addition and active ventilation) are adequate to prevent bulk runaway in C-106

  6. Cordilleran metamorphic core complexes and their uranium favorability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coney, P.J.; Reynolds, S.J.

    1980-11-01

    The objective of this report is to provide a descriptive body of knowledge on Cordilleran metamorphic core complexes including their lithologic and structural characteristics, their distribution within the Cordillera, and their evolutionary history and tectonic setting. The occurrence of uranium in the context of possibility for uranium concentration is also examined. This volume contains appendices of the following: annotated bibliography of Cordilleran metamorphic core complexes; annotated bibliography of the uranium favorability of Cordilleran metamorphic core complexes; uranium occurrences in the Cordilleran metamorphic core complex belt; and geology, uranium favorability, uranium occurrences and tectonic maps of individual Cordilleran metamorphic core complexes; and locations, lithologic descriptions, petrographic information and analytical data for geochemical samples

  7. Program plan for shipment, receipt, and storage of the TMI-2 core. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinn, G.J.; Reno, H.W.; Schmitt, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    This plan addresses the preparation and shipment of core debris from Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and receipt and storage of that core debris. The Manager of the Nuclear Materials Evaluation Programs Division of EG and G Idaho, Inc. will manage two separate but integrated programs, one located at TMI (Part 1) and the other at INEL (Part 2). The Technical Integration Office (at TMI) is responsible for developing and implementing Part 1, TMI-2 Core Shipment Program. The Technical Support Branch (at INEL) is responsible for developing and implementing Part 2, TMI-2 Core Receipt and Storage. The plan described herein is a revision of a previous document entitled Plan for Shipment, Storage, and Examination of TMI-2 Fuel. This revision was required to delineate changes, primarily in Part 2, Core Activities Program, of the previous document. That part of the earlier document related to core examination was reidentified in mid-FY-1984 as a separate trackable entity entitled Core Sample Acquisition and Examination Project, which is not included here

  8. Structure and Stability of Complex Coacervate Core Micelles with Lysozyme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindhoud, Saskia; de Vries, Renko; Norde, Willem; Cohen Stuart, Martinus Abraham

    2007-01-01

    Encapsulation of enzymes by polymers is a promising method to influence their activity and stability. Here, we explore the use of complex coacervate core micelles for encapsulation of enzymes. The core of the micelles consists of negatively charged blocks of the diblock copolymer PAA42PAAm417 and

  9. Structure and stability of complex coacervate core micelles with lysozyme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindhoud, Saskia; de Vries, Renko; Norde, Willem; Cohen Stuart, Martien A.

    Encapsulation of enzymes by polymers is a promising method to influence their activity and stability. Here, we explore the use of complex coacervate core micelles for encapsulation of enzymes. The core of the micelles consists of negatively charged blocks of the diblock copolymer PAA(42)PAAm(417)

  10. Cordilleran metamorphic core complexes and their uranium favorability. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coney, P.J.; Reynolds, S.J.

    1980-11-01

    The objective of this report is to provide a descriptive body of knowledge on Cordilleran metamorphic core complexes including their lithologic and structural characteristics, their distribution within the Cordillera, and their evolutionary history and tectonic setting. The occurrence of uranium in the context of possibility for uranium concentration is also examined. Chapter 1 is an overview of Cordilleran metamorphic core complexes which describes their physical characteristics, tectonic setting and geologic history. This overview is accompanied by a tectonic map. Chapter 2 is a discussion of the mantled gneiss dome concept. The purpose of including this work is to provide a basic history of this concept and to describe the characteristics and distribution of gneiss domes throughout the world to enable one to compare and contrast them with the metamorphic core complexes as discussed in this report. Some gneiss domes are known producers of uranium (as are also some core complexes). Chapter 3 is an examination of the effects of the core complex process on adjacent sedimentary and volcanic cover terranes. Also included is a discussion of the kinematic significance of these cover terranes as they are related to process within the cores of the complexes. Some of the cover terranes have uranium prospects in them. Chapter 4 is a detailed discussion of uranium in Cordilleran metamorphic core complexes and includes the conceptual basis for the various types of occurrences and the processes that might favor concentration of uranium. The report is supported by a 5-part Appendix. The majority of the core complexes discussed in this report either do not appear or are not recognizable on existing published geologic maps

  11. A revision of the New Zealand Kunzea ericoides (Myrtaceae complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter de Lange

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A revision of the New Zealand Kunzea ericoides complex is presented. This paper is the final of a series that has explored the systematics of the New Zealand Kunzea complex using cytological and molecular variation, as well as experimental hybridisations between postulated segregates. As a result of those studies ten species, all endemic to New Zealand, are recognised; seven of these are new. One species, K. triregensis sp. nov., is endemic to the Three Kings Islands and another species K. sinclairii, endemic to Aotea (Great Barrier Island. The North Island of New Zealand has seven species, K. amathicola sp. nov., K. salterae sp. nov., K. serotina sp. nov., K. robusta sp. nov., K. tenuicaulis sp. nov., K. toelkenii sp. nov., and K. linearis comb. nov. Of these, K. linearis, K. salterae, K. tenuicaulis and K. toelkenii are endemic to the North Island, and K. amathicola, K. robusta and K. serotina extend to the South Island which also supports one endemic, K. ericoides. Typifications are published for Leptospermum ericoides A.Rich., L. ericoides var. linearis Kirk, L. ericoides var. microflorum G.Simps., L. ericoides var. pubescens Kirk, and L. sinclairii Kirk, names here all referred to Kunzea. The ecology, conservation, extent of natural hybridisation and some aspects of the ethnobotany (vernacular names of these Kunzea are also discussed.

  12. Evaluating the core microbiota in complex communities: A systematic investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astudillo-García, Carmen; Bell, James J; Webster, Nicole S; Glasl, Bettina; Jompa, Jamaluddin; Montoya, Jose M; Taylor, Michael W

    2017-04-01

    The study of complex microbial communities poses unique conceptual and analytical challenges, with microbial species potentially numbering in the thousands. With transient or allochthonous microorganisms often adding to this complexity, a 'core' microbiota approach, focusing only on the stable and permanent members of the community, is becoming increasingly popular. Given the various ways of defining a core microbiota, it is prudent to examine whether the definition of the core impacts upon the results obtained. Here we used complex marine sponge microbiotas and undertook a systematic evaluation of the degree to which different factors used to define the core influenced the conclusions. Significant differences in alpha- and beta-diversity were detected using some but not all core definitions. However, findings related to host specificity and environmental quality were largely insensitive to major changes in the core microbiota definition. Furthermore, none of the applied definitions altered our perception of the ecological networks summarising interactions among bacteria within the sponges. These results suggest that, while care should still be taken in interpretation, the core microbiota approach is surprisingly robust, at least for comparing microbiotas of closely related samples. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Modularized Functions of the Fanconi Anemia Core Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaling Huang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The Fanconi anemia (FA core complex provides the essential E3 ligase function for spatially defined FANCD2 ubiquitination and FA pathway activation. Of the seven FA gene products forming the core complex, FANCL possesses a RING domain with demonstrated E3 ligase activity. The other six components do not have clearly defined roles. Through epistasis analyses, we identify three functional modules in the FA core complex: a catalytic module consisting of FANCL, FANCB, and FAAP100 is absolutely required for the E3 ligase function, and the FANCA-FANCG-FAAP20 and the FANCC-FANCE-FANCF modules provide nonredundant and ancillary functions that help the catalytic module bind chromatin or sites of DNA damage. Disruption of the catalytic module causes complete loss of the core complex function, whereas loss of any ancillary module component does not. Our work reveals the roles of several FA gene products with previously undefined functions and a modularized assembly of the FA core complex.

  14. GluR2 ligand-binding core complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasper, C; Lunn, M-L; Liljefors, T

    2002-01-01

    X-ray structures of the GluR2 ligand-binding core in complex with (S)-Des-Me-AMPA and in the presence and absence of zinc ions have been determined. (S)-Des-Me-AMPA, which is devoid of a substituent in the 5-position of the isoxazolol ring, only has limited interactions with the partly hydrophobic...

  15. Colorful packages : fluorescent proteins in complex coacervate core micelles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nolles, Antsje

    2018-01-01

    This thesis explores the encapsulation of fluorescent proteins (FPs) into complex coacervate core micelles (C3Ms) and features the impact of this encapsulation on the biophysical properties of the FPs. In total eight different FPs were investigated originating from two different classes

  16. Kinematics of the southern Rhodope Core Complex (North Greece).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brun, J.P.; Sokoutis, D.

    2007-01-01

    The Southern Rhodope Core Complex is a wide metamorphic dome exhumed in the northern Aegean as a result of large-scale extension from mid-Eocene to mid-Miocene times. Its roughly triangular shape is bordered on the SW by the Jurassic and Cretaceous metamorphic units of the Serbo-Macedonian in the

  17. Complex coacervate core micelles with a lysozyme-modified corona

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Danial, Maarten; Klok, Harm-Anton; Norde, Willem; Stuart, Martien A. Cohen

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the preparation, characterization, and enzymatic activity of complex coacervate core micelles (C3Ms) composed of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) and poly(N-methyl-2-vinyl pyridinium iodide)-b-poly(ethylene oxide) (PQ2VP-PEO) to which the antibacterial enzyme lysozyme is end-attached.

  18. Revised

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannsen, Vivian Kvist; Nord-Larsen, Thomas; Riis-Nielsen, Torben

    This report is a revised analysis of the Danish data on CO2 emissions from forest, afforestation and deforestation for the period 1990 - 2008 and a prognosis for the period until 2020. Revision have included measurements from 2009 in the estimations. The report is funded by the Ministry of Climate...

  19. Redefining the modular organization of the core Mediator complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuejuan; Sun, Qianqian; Ding, Zhenrui; Ji, Jinhua; Wang, Jianye; Kong, Xiao; Yang, Jianghong; Cai, Gang

    2014-07-01

    The Mediator complex plays an essential role in the regulation of eukaryotic transcription. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae core Mediator comprises 21 subunits, which are organized into Head, Middle and Tail modules. Previously, the Head module was assigned to a distinct dense domain at the base, and the Middle and Tail modules were identified to form a tight structure above the Head module, which apparently contradicted findings from many biochemical and functional studies. Here, we compared the structures of the core Mediator and its subcomplexes, especially the first 3D structure of the Head + Middle modules, which permitted an unambiguous assignment of the three modules. Furthermore, nanogold labeling pinpointing four Mediator subunits from different modules conclusively validated the modular assignment, in which the Head and Middle modules fold back on one another and form the upper portion of the core Mediator, while the Tail module forms a distinct dense domain at the base. The new modular model of the core Mediator has reconciled the previous inconsistencies between the structurally and functionally defined Mediator modules. Collectively, these analyses completely redefine the modular organization of the core Mediator, which allow us to integrate the structural and functional information into a coherent mechanism for the Mediator's modularity and regulation in transcription initiation.

  20. The Common Core State Standards' Quantitative Text Complexity Trajectory: Figuring out How Much Complexity Is Enough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Gary L.; Fitzgerald, Jill; Stenner, A. Jackson

    2013-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) set a controversial aspirational, quantitative trajectory for text complexity exposure for readers throughout the grades, aiming for all high school graduates to be able to independently read complex college and workplace texts. However, the trajectory standard is presented without reference to how the…

  1. The radiological consequences of degraded core accidents for the Sizewell PWR The impact of adopting revised frequencies of occurrence

    CERN Document Server

    Kelly, G N

    1983-01-01

    The radiological consequences of degraded core accidents postulated for the Sizewell PWR were assessed in an earlier study and the results published in NRPB-R137. Further analyses have since been made by the Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB) of degraded core accidents which have led to a revision of their predicted frequencies of occurrence. The implications of these revised frequencies, in terms of the risk to the public from degraded core accidents, are evaluated in this report. Increases, by factors typically within the range of about 1.5 to 7, are predicted in the consequences, compared with those estimated in the earlier study. However, the predicted risk from degraded core accidents, despite these increases, remains exceedingly small.

  2. Towards a Molecular Understanding of the Fanconi Anemia Core Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Hodson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fanconi Anemia (FA is a genetic disorder characterized by the inability of patient cells to repair DNA damage caused by interstrand crosslinking agents. There are currently 14 verified FA genes, where mutation of any single gene prevents repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs. The accumulation of ICL damage results in genome instability and patients having a high predisposition to cancers. The key event of the FA pathway is dependent on an eight-protein core complex (CC, required for the monoubiquitination of each member of the FANCD2-FANCI complex. Interestingly, the majority of patient mutations reside in the CC. The molecular mechanisms underlying the requirement for such a large complex to carry out a monoubiquitination event remain a mystery. This paper documents the extensive efforts of researchers so far to understand the molecular roles of the CC proteins with regard to its main function in the FA pathway, the monoubiquitination of FANCD2 and FANCI.

  3. Towards a Molecular Understanding of the Fanconi Anemia Core Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodson, Charlotte; Walden, Helen

    2012-01-01

    Fanconi Anemia (FA) is a genetic disorder characterized by the inability of patient cells to repair DNA damage caused by interstrand crosslinking agents. There are currently 14 verified FA genes, where mutation of any single gene prevents repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs). The accumulation of ICL damage results in genome instability and patients having a high predisposition to cancers. The key event of the FA pathway is dependent on an eight-protein core complex (CC), required for the monoubiquitination of each member of the FANCD2-FANCI complex. Interestingly, the majority of patient mutations reside in the CC. The molecular mechanisms underlying the requirement for such a large complex to carry out a monoubiquitination event remain a mystery. This paper documents the extensive efforts of researchers so far to understand the molecular roles of the CC proteins with regard to its main function in the FA pathway, the monoubiquitination of FANCD2 and FANCI. PMID:22675617

  4. Structural characterization of core-bradavidin in complex with biotin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Nitin; Määttä, Juha A. E.; Kulomaa, Markku S.; Hytönen, Vesa P.; Johnson, Mark S.; Airenne, Tomi T.

    2017-01-01

    Bradavidin is a tetrameric biotin-binding protein similar to chicken avidin and bacterial streptavidin, and was originally cloned from the nitrogen-fixing bacteria Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens. We have previously reported the crystal structure of the full-length, wild-type (wt) bradavidin with 138 amino acids, where the C-terminal residues Gly129-Lys138 (“Brad-tag”) act as an intrinsic ligand (i.e. Gly129-Lys138 bind into the biotin-binding site of an adjacent subunit within the same tetramer) and has potential as an affinity tag for biotechnological purposes. Here, the X-ray structure of core-bradavidin lacking the C-terminal residues Gly114-Lys138, and hence missing the Brad-tag, was crystallized in complex with biotin at 1.60 Å resolution [PDB:4BBO]. We also report a homology model of rhodavidin, an avidin-like protein from Rhodopseudomonas palustris, and of an avidin-like protein from Bradyrhizobium sp. Ai1a-2, both of which have the Brad-tag sequence at their C-terminus. Moreover, core-bradavidin V1, an engineered variant of the original core-bradavidin, was also expressed at high levels in E. coli, as well as a double mutant (Cys39Ala and Cys69Ala) of core-bradavidin (CC mutant). Our data help us to further engineer the core-bradavidin–Brad-tag pair for biotechnological assays and chemical biology applications, and provide deeper insight into the biotin-binding mode of bradavidin. PMID:28426764

  5. Structural characterization of core-bradavidin in complex with biotin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin Agrawal

    Full Text Available Bradavidin is a tetrameric biotin-binding protein similar to chicken avidin and bacterial streptavidin, and was originally cloned from the nitrogen-fixing bacteria Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens. We have previously reported the crystal structure of the full-length, wild-type (wt bradavidin with 138 amino acids, where the C-terminal residues Gly129-Lys138 ("Brad-tag" act as an intrinsic ligand (i.e. Gly129-Lys138 bind into the biotin-binding site of an adjacent subunit within the same tetramer and has potential as an affinity tag for biotechnological purposes. Here, the X-ray structure of core-bradavidin lacking the C-terminal residues Gly114-Lys138, and hence missing the Brad-tag, was crystallized in complex with biotin at 1.60 Å resolution [PDB:4BBO]. We also report a homology model of rhodavidin, an avidin-like protein from Rhodopseudomonas palustris, and of an avidin-like protein from Bradyrhizobium sp. Ai1a-2, both of which have the Brad-tag sequence at their C-terminus. Moreover, core-bradavidin V1, an engineered variant of the original core-bradavidin, was also expressed at high levels in E. coli, as well as a double mutant (Cys39Ala and Cys69Ala of core-bradavidin (CC mutant. Our data help us to further engineer the core-bradavidin-Brad-tag pair for biotechnological assays and chemical biology applications, and provide deeper insight into the biotin-binding mode of bradavidin.

  6. Westinghouse loading pattern search methodology for complex core designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, Y.A.; Alsop, B.H.; Johansen, B.J.; Morita, T.

    1991-01-01

    Pressurized water reactor core designs have become more complex and must meet a plethora of design constraints. Trends have been toward longer cycles with increased discharge burnup, increased burnable absorber (BA) number, mixed BA types, reduced radial leakage, axially blanketed fuel, and multiple-batch feed fuel regions. Obtaining economical reload core loading patterns (LPs) that meet design criteria is a difficult task to do manually. Automated LP search tools are needed. An LP search tool cannot possibly perform an exhaustive search because of the sheer size of the combinatorial problem. On the other hand, evolving complexity of the design features and constraints often invalidates expert rules based on past design experiences. Westinghouse has developed a sophisticated loading pattern search methodology. This methodology is embodied in the LPOP code, which Westinghouse nuclear designers use extensively. The LPOP code generates a variety of LPs meeting design constraints and performs a two-cycle economic evaluation of the generated LPs. The designer selects the most appropriate patterns for fine tuning and evaluation by the design codes. This paper describes the major features of the LPOP methodology that are relevant to fulfilling the aforementioned requirements. Data and examples are also provided to demonstrate the performance of LPOP in meeting the complex design needs

  7. Complexities of revision mastoid surgery in a migratory population cohort.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lennon, P

    2012-03-01

    We present a review of patients from Eastern Europe who have recently immigrated to Ireland with complicated otological disease. We carried out a retrospective chart review of these patients. These are a complicated cohort of 7 patients, 5 (71.4%) of whom had previous ear surgery, none had old notes and there was often a need for interpreters (3 or 42.8%) and challenging surgery. Follow up was also problematic with many of the patients. In summary this is a case series to highlight a relatively new group of patients to emphasize the need for pre-operative CT scans, facial nerve monitoring and the difficult nature of revision surgery with no old notes.

  8. VIPRE-01: a thermal-hydraulic code for reactor cores. Volume 2: user's manual (Revision 2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuta, J.M.; Koontz, A.S.; Stewart, C.W.; Montgomery, S.D.; Nomura, K.K.

    1985-07-01

    Revisions to the VIPRE code documents for Volume 2 are presented. These revisions conform to the changes made to VIPRE-01, CYCLE-00 to produce the new version of the code denoted by VIPRE-01, CYCLE-01. The first pages of the revisions specify where the replacement pages are to be inserted and which pages of the original documents should be retained

  9. REVIEW ARTICLE: Geophysical signatures of oceanic core complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackman, Donna K.; Canales, J. Pablo; Harding, Alistair

    2009-08-01

    Oceanic core complexes (OCCs) provide access to intrusive and ultramafic sections of young lithosphere and their structure and evolution contain clues about how the balance between magmatism and faulting controls the style of rifting that may dominate in a portion of a spreading centre for Myr timescales. Initial models of the development of OCCs depended strongly on insights available from continental core complexes and from seafloor mapping. While these frameworks have been useful in guiding a broader scope of studies and determining the extent of OCC formation along slow spreading ridges, as we summarize herein, results from the past decade highlight the need to reassess the hypothesis that reduced magma supply is a driver of long-lived detachment faulting. The aim of this paper is to review the available geophysical constraints on OCC structure and to look at what aspects of current models are constrained or required by the data. We consider sonar data (morphology and backscatter), gravity, magnetics, borehole geophysics and seismic reflection. Additional emphasis is placed on seismic velocity results (refraction) since this is where deviations from normal crustal accretion should be most readily quantified. However, as with gravity and magnetic studies at OCCs, ambiguities are inherent in seismic interpretation, including within some processing/analysis steps. We briefly discuss some of these issues for each data type. Progress in understanding the shallow structure of OCCs (within ~1 km of the seafloor) is considerable. Firm constraints on deeper structure, particularly characterization of the transition from dominantly mafic rock (and/or altered ultramafic rock) to dominantly fresh mantle peridotite, are not currently in hand. There is limited information on the structure and composition of the conjugate lithosphere accreted to the opposite plate while an OCC forms, commonly on the inside corner of a ridge-offset intersection. These gaps preclude full

  10. B Plant Complex waste management training plan. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beam, T.G.

    1994-01-01

    This training program is designed to comply with all applicable federal, state and US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office training requirements. The training program complies with requirements contained within WAC 173-303-330 for the development of a written dangerous waste training program. The training program is designed to prepare personnel to manage and maintain waste treatment, storage and disposal (TSD) units, as well as generator units, in a safe, effective, efficient and environmentally sound manner. In addition to preparing employees to manage and maintain TSD and generator units under normal conditions, the training program ensures that employees are prepared to respond in a prompt and effective manner should an emergency occur. The training plan also identifies specific individuals holding key waste management positions at B Plant Complex

  11. B Plant Complex pollution prevention plan. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beam, T.G.

    1994-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has directed Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to develop an effective strategy to minimize the generation of hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes at Hanford in compliance with state and federal regulations. WHC has formalized a pollution prevention program composed of management policies, management requirements and procedures. This plan addresses pollution prevention for B Plant Complex. A pollution prevention team is in place and has been assigned responsibility for implementing the plan. This plan includes actions and goals for reducing volume and toxicity of waste generated, as well as a basis for evaluation of progress. Descriptions of waste streams, current specific goals, general pollution prevention methods, and specific accomplishments are in the appendices of this plan

  12. Complex coacervate core micelles with a lysozyme-modified corona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danial, Maarten; Klok, Harm-Anton; Norde, Willem; Stuart, Martien A Cohen

    2007-07-17

    This paper describes the preparation, characterization, and enzymatic activity of complex coacervate core micelles (C3Ms) composed of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) and poly(N-methyl-2-vinyl pyridinium iodide)-b-poly(ethylene oxide) (PQ2VP-PEO) to which the antibacterial enzyme lysozyme is end-attached. C3Ms were prepared by polyelectrolyte complex formation between PAA and mixtures containing different ratios of aldehyde and hydroxyl end-functionalized PQ2VP-PEO. This resulted in the formation of C3Ms containing 0-40% (w/w) of the aldehyde end-functionalized PQ2VP-PEO block copolymer (PQ2VP-PEO-CHO). Chemical conjugation of lysozyme was achieved via reductive amination of the aldehyde groups, which are exposed at the surface of the C3M, with the amine groups present in the side chains of the lysine residues of the protein. Dynamic and static light scattering indicated that the conjugation of lysozyme to C3Ms prepared using 10 and 20% (w/w) PQ2VP-PEO-CHO resulted in the formation of unimicellar particles. Multimicellar aggregates, in contrast, were obtained when lysozyme was conjugated to C3Ms prepared using 30 or 40% (w/w) PQ2VP-PEO-CHO. The enzymatic activity of the unimicellar lysozyme-C3M conjugates toward the hydrolysis of the bacterial substrate Micrococcus lysodeikticus was comparable to that of free lysozyme. For the multimicellar particles, in contrast, significantly reduced enzymatic rates of hydrolysis, altered circular dichroism, and red-shifted tryptophan fluorescence spectra were measured. These results are attributed to the occlusion of lysozyme in the interior of the multimicellar conjugates.

  13. Core nucleosomes by digestion of reconstructed histone-DNA complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryan, P N; Wright, E B; Olins, D E

    1979-04-01

    Reconstructed complexes of the inner histones (H2A, H2B, H3, H4) and a variety of DNAs were digested with micrococcal nuclease to yield very homogeneous populations of core nucleosomes (..nu../sub 1/). Nucleosomes containing Micrococcus luteus DNA (72% G+C); chicken DNA (43% G+C), Clostridium perfringens DNA (29% G+C); or poly(dA-dT).poly(dA-dT) have been examined by circular dichroism, thermal denaturation, electron microscopy, and DNAse I digestion. Circular dichroism spectra of all particles show a typically suppressed ellipticity at 260 to 280 nm and a prominent ..cap alpha..-helix signal at 222 nm. All particles show biphasic melting except ..nu../sub 1/(dA-dT), which show three prominent melting transitions at ionic strength less than or equal to 1 mM. DNAse I digestion of ..nu../sub 1/ (dA-dT) produces a ladder of DNA fragments differing in length by one base residue. ..nu../sub 1/ (dA-dT) contain 146 base pairs of DNA and exhibit an average DNA helix pitch of 10.4 to 10.5 bases per turn. There appear to be two regions of different DNA pitch within ..nu../sub 1/ (dA-dT). It is suggested that the two regions of DNA pitch might correspond to the two regions of the melting profiles.

  14. Functional and structural analysis of photosystem II core complexes from spinach with high oxygen evolution capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haag, Elisabeth; Irrgang, Klaus-D.; Boekema, Egbert J.; Renger, Gernot

    1990-01-01

    Oxygen-evolving photo system II core complexes were prepared from spinach by solubilizing photosystem II membrane fragments with dodecyl-β-D-maltoside. The core complexes consist of the intrinsic 47-kDa, 43-kDa, D1 and D2 polypeptides, the two subunits of cytochrome b559 and the extrinsic 33-kDa

  15. Final report for Tank 241-B-101, push mode cores 90 and 91. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiber, R.D.

    1995-11-01

    This is the final report for tank 241-at sign 101, cores 90 and 91. Samples from these cores were analyzed for safety screening purposes in accordance with the Tank 241-B-101 Tank Characterization Plan (TCP) (Reference 1). This final report contains the results for three sets of TGA and gravimetric analyses performed after the 90-day report was issued. Two of these TGA/gravimetric percent water sets of analyses were done because low original TGA results were obtained for the lower half segment of core 90, segment 2 and the facie of core 91, segment 2; the third set of analyses were performed because the TGA and gravimetric percent water results for the upper half segment of core 90, segment 2 differed by approximately a factor of three and further investigation was warranted

  16. Tank 241-B-203 push mode core sampling and analysis plan. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jo, J.

    1995-01-01

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) identifies characterization objectives pertaining to sample collection, laboratory analytical evaluation, and reporting requirements for two push-mode core samples from tank 241-B-203 (B-203)

  17. Tank 241-B-204 push mode core sampling and analysis plan. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, L.M.

    1995-01-01

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) identifies characterization objectives pertaining to sample collection, laboratory analytical evaluation, and reporting requirements for two push-mode core samples from tank 241-B-204 (B-204)

  18. VENUS-2 MOX Core Benchmark: Results of ORNL Calculations Using HELIOS-1.4 - Revised Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, RJ

    2001-06-01

    The Task Force on Reactor-Based Plutonium Disposition (TFRPD) was formed by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA) to study reactor physics, fuel performance, and fuel cycle issues related to the disposition of weapons-grade (WG) plutonium as mixed-oxide (MOX) reactor fuel. To advance the goals of the TFRPD, 10 countries and 12 institutions participated in a major TFRPD activity: a blind benchmark study to compare code calculations to experimental data for the VENUS-2 MOX core at SCK-CEN in Mol, Belgium. At Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the HELIOS-1.4 code system was used to perform the comprehensive study of pin-cell and MOX core calculations for the VENUS-2 MOX core benchmark study.

  19. A core hSSB1–INTS complex participates in the DNA damage response

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Feng; Ma, Teng; Yu, Xiaochun

    2013-01-01

    Human single-stranded DNA-binding protein 1 (hSSB1) plays an important role in the DNA damage response and the maintenance of genomic stability. It has been shown that the core hSSB1 complex contains hSSB1, INTS3 and C9orf80. Using protein affinity purification, we have identified integrator complex subunit 6 (INTS6) as a major subunit of the core hSSB1 complex. INTS6 forms a stable complex with INTS3 and hSSB1 both in vitro and in vivo. In this complex, INTS6 directly interacts with INTS3. I...

  20. The Conceptual Complexity of Vocabulary in Elementary-Grades Core Science Program Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, W. Jill; Elmore, Jeff; Kung, Melody; Stenner, A. Jackson

    2017-01-01

    The researchers explored the conceptual complexity of vocabulary in contemporary elementary-grades core science program textbooks to address two research questions: (1) Can a progression of concepts' complexity level be described across grades? (2) Was there gradual developmental growth of the most complex concepts' networks of associated concepts…

  1. VIPRE-01: a thermal-hydraulic code for reactor cores. Volume 3: programmer's manual (Revision 2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, C.W.; Koontz, A.S.; Cuta, J.M.; Montgomery, S.D.

    1985-07-01

    The VIPRE thermal-hydraulic computer code for PWR and BWR core analysis has undergone a detailed design review by a committee of experts. A new version of the code, incorporating the committee's recommendations, has been submitted for NRC review and issuance of a safety evaluation report. The changes in the programmers's manual are given

  2. Stratigraphic and tectonic revision of Cerro Olivo Complex located of Southeastern of Uruguay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masquelin, E.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a stratigraphic and tectonic revision of Cerro Olivo Complex, located in the Southeastern part of the Uruguayan Predevonian Shield. This informal lithostratigraphic unit constitutes the country rock for the emplacement of late-orogenic granitoids, during Neoproterozoic to Cambrian times. This unit groups all the lithodemes affected by deformation and metamorphism. Recent studies indicate the presence of straight gneisses of quartzo-feldspathic composition in the coast of Maldonado Department. These rocks were interpreted as the result of intense deformation in high temperature. These tectonites base a new stratigraphic insight for the complex. They allow their lithotypes to be organized by petrotectonic features, being a function of PT conditions for every last strain process [es

  3. Has First-Grade Core Reading Program Text Complexity Changed across Six Decades?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Jill; Elmore, Jeff; Relyea, Jackie Eunjung; Hiebert, Elfrieda H.; Stenner, A. Jackson

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to address possible text complexity shifts across the past six decades for a continually best-selling first-grade core reading program. The anthologies of one publisher's seven first-grade core reading programs were examined using computer-based analytics, dating from 1962 to 2013. Variables were Overall Text…

  4. All-inside, anatomical lateral ankle stabilization for revision and complex primary lateral ankle stabilization: a technique guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prissel, Mark A; Roukis, Thomas S

    2014-12-01

    Lateral ankle instability is a common mechanical problem that often requires surgical management when conservative efforts fail. Historically, myriad open surgical approaches have been proposed. Recently, consideration for arthroscopic management of lateral ankle instability has become popular, with promising results. Unfortunately, recurrent inversion ankle injury following lateral ankle stabilization can occur and require revision surgery. To date, arthroscopic management for revision lateral ankle stabilization has not been described. We present a novel arthroscopic technique combining an arthroscopic lateral ankle stabilization kit with a suture anchor ligament augmentation system for revision as well as complex primary lateral ankle stabilization. © 2014 The Author(s).

  5. Architecture of the human mTORC2 core complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuttfeld, Edward; Aylett, Christopher Hs; Imseng, Stefan; Boehringer, Daniel; Scaiola, Alain; Sauer, Evelyn; Hall, Michael N; Maier, Timm; Ban, Nenad

    2018-02-09

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a key protein kinase controlling cellular metabolism and growth. It is part of the two structurally and functionally distinct multiprotein complexes mTORC1 and mTORC2. Dysregulation of mTOR occurs in diabetes, cancer and neurological disease. We report the architecture of human mTORC2 at intermediate resolution, revealing a conserved binding site for accessory proteins on mTOR and explaining the structural basis for the rapamycin insensitivity of the complex. © 2018, Stuttfeld et al.

  6. 3D Printing Aids Acetabular Reconstruction in Complex Revision Hip Arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. Hughes

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Revision hip arthroplasty requires comprehensive appreciation of abnormal bony anatomy. Advances in radiology and manufacturing technology have made three-dimensional (3D representation of osseous anatomy obtainable, which provide visual and tactile feedback. Such life-size 3D models were manufactured from computed tomography scans of three hip joints in two patients. The first patient had undergone multiple previous hip arthroplasties for bilateral hip infections, resulting in right-sided pelvic discontinuity and a severe left-sided posterosuperior acetabular deficiency. The second patient had a first-stage revision for infection and recurrent dislocations. Specific metal reduction protocols were used to reduce artefact. The images were imported into Materialise MIMICS 14.12®. The models were manufactured using selective laser sintering. Accurate templating was performed preoperatively. Acetabular cup, augment, buttress, and cage sizes were trialled using the models, before being adjusted, and resterilised, enhancing the preoperative decision-making process. Screw trajectory simulation was carried out, reducing the risk of neurovascular injury. With 3D printing technology, complex pelvic deformities were better evaluated and treated with improved precision. Life-size models allowed accurate surgical simulation, thus improving anatomical appreciation and preoperative planning. The accuracy and cost-effectiveness of the technique should prove invaluable as a tool to aid clinical practice.

  7. Revised estimates of Greenland ice sheet thinning histories based on ice-core records

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lecavalier, B.S.; Milne, G.A.; Fisher, D.A.

    2013-01-01

    -based reconstructions and, to some extent, the estimated elevation histories. A key component of the ice core analysis involved removing the influence of vertical surface motion on the dO signal measured from the Agassiz and Renland ice caps. We re-visit the original analysis with the intent to determine if the use...... of more accurate land uplift curves can account for some of the above noted discrepancy. To improve on the original analysis, we apply a geophysical model of glacial isostatic adjustment calibrated to sea-level records from the Queen Elizabeth Islands and Greenland to calculate the influence of land...... in this selection is further complicated by the possible influence of Innuitian ice during the early Holocene (12-8 ka BP). Our results indicate that a more accurate treatment of the uplift correction leads to elevation histories that are, in general, shifted down relative to the original curves at GRIP, NGRIP, DYE...

  8. Student Reading Growth Illuminates the Common Core Text-Complexity Standard: Raising Both Bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Gary L.; Fitzgerald, Jill; Stenner, Jackson A.

    2014-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) establish a challenging text-complexity standard for all high school graduates to read at college and workplace text-complexity levels. We argue that implementation of the CCSS standard requires concurrent examination of historical student reading-growth trends. An example of a historical student average…

  9. Complex permeability and core loss of soft magnetic Fe-based nanocrystalline powder cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Füzerová, Jana, E-mail: jana.fuzerova@tuke.sk [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University, Letná 1, 042 00 Košice (Slovakia); Füzer, Ján; Kollár, Peter [Institute of Physics, P.J. Šafárik University, Park Angelinum 9, 040 23 Košice (Slovakia); Bureš, Radovan; Fáberová, Mária [Institute of Materials Research, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Watsonova 47, 043 53 Košice (Slovakia)

    2013-11-15

    Rapidly quenched ribbons of Fe{sub 73}Cu{sub 1}Nb{sub 3}Si{sub 16}B{sub 7} were ball milled and cryomilled to get powder and warm consolidated to get bulk compacts. The data presented here are relative to different experimental procedures, one corresponding to milling at room temperature (sample R1) and the other corresponding to cryomilling at temperature of liquid nitrogen (sample L1). It was found that the properties of the initial powder influenced the density, the electrical resistivity and electromagnetic properties of the resulting bulk alloys. Permeability and core loss are structure sensitive and depend on factors such as powder size and shape, porosity, purity, and internal stress. Permeability spectra of sample R1 decreases with increasing the frequency and its values are larger than that for sample L1 at low frequencies. On the other hand the permeability of sample L1 remains steady up to 1 kHz and at certain frequency is larger than that for sample R1. Also there are different frequency dependences of the imaginary parts of permeability and loss factor, respectively. The cryomilling of the amorphous ribbon positively influences on the AC magnetic properties at higher frequencies (above 100 Hz) of resulting bulk sample. - Highlights: • We prepared two different amorphous powder vitroperm samples. • We have examined changes in the properties of the bulk samples prepared by compaction. • It was found that properties of the initial powder influence the density, the electrical resistivity and electromagnetic properties of the resulting bulk alloys.

  10. Identifying protein complex by integrating characteristic of core-attachment into dynamic PPI network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianjun Shen

    Full Text Available How to identify protein complex is an important and challenging task in proteomics. It would make great contribution to our knowledge of molecular mechanism in cell life activities. However, the inherent organization and dynamic characteristic of cell system have rarely been incorporated into the existing algorithms for detecting protein complexes because of the limitation of protein-protein interaction (PPI data produced by high throughput techniques. The availability of time course gene expression profile enables us to uncover the dynamics of molecular networks and improve the detection of protein complexes. In order to achieve this goal, this paper proposes a novel algorithm DCA (Dynamic Core-Attachment. It detects protein-complex core comprising of continually expressed and highly connected proteins in dynamic PPI network, and then the protein complex is formed by including the attachments with high adhesion into the core. The integration of core-attachment feature into the dynamic PPI network is responsible for the superiority of our algorithm. DCA has been applied on two different yeast dynamic PPI networks and the experimental results show that it performs significantly better than the state-of-the-art techniques in terms of prediction accuracy, hF-measure and statistical significance in biology. In addition, the identified complexes with strong biological significance provide potential candidate complexes for biologists to validate.

  11. Core science and technology development plan for indirect-drive ICF ignition. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, H.T.; Kilkenny, J.D. [eds.

    1995-12-01

    To define the development work needed to support inertial confinement fusion (ICF) program goals, the authors have assembled this Core Science and Technology (CS and T) Plan that encompasses nearly all science research and technology development in the ICF program. The objective of the CS and T Plan described here is to identify the development work needed to ensure the success of advanced ICF facilities, in particular the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This plan is intended as a framework to facilitate planning and coordination of future ICF programmatic activities. The CS and T Plan covers all elements of the ICF program including laser technology, optic manufacturing, target chamber, target diagnostics, target design and theory, target components and fabrication, and target physics experiments. The CS and T Plan has been divided into these seven different technology development areas, and they are used as level-1 categories in a work breakdown structure (WBS) to facilitate the organization of all activities in this plan. The scope of the CS and T Plan includes all research and development required to support the NIF leading up to the activation and initial operation as an indirect-drive facility. In each of the CS and T main development areas, the authors describe the technology and issues that need to be addressed to achieve NIF performance goals. To resolve all issues and achieve objectives, an extensive assortment of tasks must be performed in a coordinated and timely manner. The authors describe these activities and present planning schedules that detail the flow of work to be performed over a 10-year period corresponding to estimated time needed to demonstrate fusion ignition with the NIF. Besides the benefits to the ICF program, the authors also discuss how the commercial sector and the nuclear weapons science may profit from the proposed research and development program.

  12. Core science and technology development plan for indirect-drive ICF ignition. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, H.T.; Kilkenny, J.D.

    1995-12-01

    To define the development work needed to support inertial confinement fusion (ICF) program goals, the authors have assembled this Core Science and Technology (CS and T) Plan that encompasses nearly all science research and technology development in the ICF program. The objective of the CS and T Plan described here is to identify the development work needed to ensure the success of advanced ICF facilities, in particular the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This plan is intended as a framework to facilitate planning and coordination of future ICF programmatic activities. The CS and T Plan covers all elements of the ICF program including laser technology, optic manufacturing, target chamber, target diagnostics, target design and theory, target components and fabrication, and target physics experiments. The CS and T Plan has been divided into these seven different technology development areas, and they are used as level-1 categories in a work breakdown structure (WBS) to facilitate the organization of all activities in this plan. The scope of the CS and T Plan includes all research and development required to support the NIF leading up to the activation and initial operation as an indirect-drive facility. In each of the CS and T main development areas, the authors describe the technology and issues that need to be addressed to achieve NIF performance goals. To resolve all issues and achieve objectives, an extensive assortment of tasks must be performed in a coordinated and timely manner. The authors describe these activities and present planning schedules that detail the flow of work to be performed over a 10-year period corresponding to estimated time needed to demonstrate fusion ignition with the NIF. Besides the benefits to the ICF program, the authors also discuss how the commercial sector and the nuclear weapons science may profit from the proposed research and development program

  13. Revised results for geomechanical testing of MRIG-9 core for the potential SPR siting at the Richton Salt Dome.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broome, Scott Thomas; Bauer, Stephen J.

    2010-02-01

    This report is a revision of SAND2009-0852. SAND2009-0852 was revised because it was discovered that a gage used in the original testing was mis-calibrated. Following the recalibration, all affected raw data were recalculated and re-presented. Most revised data is similar to, but slightly different than, the original data. Following the data re-analysis, none of the inferences or conclusions about the data or site relative to the SAND2009-0852 data have been changed. A laboratory testing program was developed to examine the mechanical behavior of salt from the Richton salt dome. The resulting information is intended for use in design and evaluation of a proposed Strategic Petroleum Reserve storage facility in that dome. Core obtained from the drill hole MRIG-9 was obtained from the Texas Bureau of Economic Geology. Mechanical properties testing included: (1) acoustic velocity wave measurements; (2) indirect tensile strength tests; (3) unconfined compressive strength tests; (4) ambient temperature quasi-static triaxial compression tests to evaluate dilational stress states at confining pressures of 725, 1450, 2175, and 2900 psi; and (5) confined triaxial creep experiments to evaluate the time-dependent behavior of the salt at axial stress differences of 4000 psi, 3500 psi, 3000 psi, 2175 psi and 2000 psi at 55 C and 4000 psi at 35 C, all at a constant confining pressure of 4000 psi. All comments, inferences, discussions of the Richton characterization and analysis are caveated by the small number of tests. Additional core and testing from a deeper well located at the proposed site is planned. The Richton rock salt is generally inhomogeneous as expressed by the density and velocity measurements with depth. In fact, we treated the salt as two populations, one clean and relatively pure (> 98% halite), the other salt with abundant (at times) anhydrite. The density has been related to the insoluble content. The limited mechanical testing completed has allowed us to

  14. Analysis of the ENADE items complexity based on the Revised Bloom Taxonomy: contributions to physics teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Paulo de Castro Costa

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The National Student Performance Exam (ENADE is the main component of the National Higher Education Evaluation System (SINAES that deals with the Brazilian Higher Education Degrees. This article deals with 120 (one hundred and twenty objectives and discursive items from four ENADE editions for Teaching Physics Degree, applied in 2005, 2008, 2011 and 2014. We search for the Exam complexity throughout cognitive aspects mobilized to solve each item, according to the Bloom Taxonomy Revised (BTR. The BTR proposes a two-dimensional matrix classification that crosses a knowledge dimension, which means, “what” students must know in order to answer the questions, with the cognitive process involved in the task, reflecting “how” the problem was solved. According the BTR theory, the knowledge has been understood in the dimensions: effective, conceptual, procedure and metacognitive, which deals, respectively with basics terminology knowledge, concepts knowledge, procedure methodology knowledge and reflexive/analytical knowledge. The cognitive process described in verbs at the BTR presents the student´s skills in the resolutions ranked as: to remember, to understand, to apply, to analyze, to evaluate and to create. To classify discursive items, pattern answers were used, and to classify multiple choice items, our resolutions of the questions were used. The items were located at the two-dimensional BTR matrix, which gives us an Exam complexity overview. We observe that only 17 (14% items are in the effective knowledge domain, while 103 (86% items require the conceptual and procedure knowledge domain, which demands higher complexity. We consider these results compatible with the ENADE role as a Higher Brazilian Education quality referential. We intend to update Physics professors throughout Physics Teaching Examination in order to increase their commitment to the Higher Education Evaluation. We also believe that understanding the examination could

  15. Identification of Protein Complexes Using Weighted PageRank-Nibble Algorithm and Core-Attachment Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Wei; Wang, Jianxin; Zhao, Bihai; Wang, Lusheng

    2015-01-01

    Protein complexes play a significant role in understanding the underlying mechanism of most cellular functions. Recently, many researchers have explored computational methods to identify protein complexes from protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks. One group of researchers focus on detecting local dense subgraphs which correspond to protein complexes by considering local neighbors. The drawback of this kind of approach is that the global information of the networks is ignored. Some methods such as Markov Clustering algorithm (MCL), PageRank-Nibble are proposed to find protein complexes based on random walk technique which can exploit the global structure of networks. However, these methods ignore the inherent core-attachment structure of protein complexes and treat adjacent node equally. In this paper, we design a weighted PageRank-Nibble algorithm which assigns each adjacent node with different probability, and propose a novel method named WPNCA to detect protein complex from PPI networks by using weighted PageRank-Nibble algorithm and core-attachment structure. Firstly, WPNCA partitions the PPI networks into multiple dense clusters by using weighted PageRank-Nibble algorithm. Then the cores of these clusters are detected and the rest of proteins in the clusters will be selected as attachments to form the final predicted protein complexes. The experiments on yeast data show that WPNCA outperforms the existing methods in terms of both accuracy and p-value. The software for WPNCA is available at "http://netlab.csu.edu.cn/bioinfomatics/weipeng/WPNCA/download.html".

  16. Revision allograft reconstruction of the lateral collateral ligament complex in elbows with previous failed reconstruction and persistent posterolateral rotatory instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghdadi, Yaser M K; Morrey, Bernard F; O'Driscoll, Shawn W; Steinmann, Scott P; Sanchez-Sotelo, Joaquin

    2014-07-01

    Primary reconstruction of the lateral collateral ligament complex (LCLC) using graft tissue restores elbow stability in many, but not all, elbows with acute or chronic posterolateral rotatory instability (PLRI). Revision reconstruction using a tendon allograft is occasionally considered for persistent PLRI, but the outcome of revision ligament reconstruction in this setting is largely unknown. We determined whether revision allograft ligament reconstruction can (1) restore the stability and (2) result in improved elbow scores for patients with persistent PLRI of the elbow after a previous failed primary reconstructive attempt and in the context of the diverse pathology being addressed. Between 2001 and 2011, 160 surgical elbow procedures were performed at our institution for the LCLC reconstruction using allograft tissue. Only patients undergoing revision allograft reconstruction of the LCLC for persistent PLRI with a previous failed primary reconstructive attempt using graft tissue and at least I year of followup were included in the study. Eleven patients (11 elbows) fulfilled our inclusion criteria and formed our study cohort. The cohort consisted of six female patients and five male patients. The mean age at the time of revision surgery was 36 years (range, 14-59 years). The revision allograft reconstruction was carried out after a mean of 3 years (range, 2.5 months to 9 years) from a failed attempted reconstruction of the LCLC. Osseous deficiency to some extent was identified in the preoperative radiographs of eight elbows. Mean followup was 5 years (range, 1-12 years). Revision allograft reconstruction of the LCLC restored elbow stability in eight of the 11 elbows; two of the three elbows with persistent instability were operated on a third time (at 6 and 7 months after allograft revision reconstruction). For elbows with no persistent instability, the mean Mayo Elbow Performance Score at most recent followup was 83 points (range, 60-100 points), and

  17. The Andean Paepalanthus pilosus complex (Eriocaulaceae): a revision with three new taxa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensold, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A herbarium-based revision is provided for Paepalanthus pilosus and allies, five commonly confused species of cushion plants native to Andean paramo. These are placed in the recircumscribed Paepalanthus subsect. Cryptanthella Suess. The group includes Paepalanthus pilosus, Paepalanthus dendroides, and Paepalanthus lodiculoides. An additional two species and one variety are newly described: Paepalanthus caryonauta, Paepalanthus huancabambensis, and Paepalanthus pilosus var. leoniae. The latter two are Peruvian endemics, while Paepalanthus caryonauta is known from four countries, and has long been confused with other species. An additional, possibly undescribed taxon is noted from the Serrania de Perijá, Colombia. Five new synonyms and three lectotypes are proposed, and the common misapplication of some names is noted. Within the Paepalanthus pilosus complex, species differences were found in timing of peduncle elongation, sex ratio, and leaf, perianth, diaspore and nectary morphology. Ecological differences are suggested by specimen data and a review of ecological literature. Descriptions, photographs and maps are provided for all species, as is a key to the groups of eriocaulaceous cushion plants from Andean South America. PMID:27489483

  18. North Aegean core complexes, the gravity spreading of a thrust wedge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kydonakis, Konstantinos; Brun, Jean Pierre; Sokoutis, Dimitrios

    2015-01-01

    The North Aegean core complexes developed in middle Eocene soon after the end of continental block convergence and piling up of the Hellenic Thrust Wedge. They formed during back-arc extension, driven by the Hellenic slab rollback, at the back of the thrust wedge. A series of scaled laboratory

  19. Core Self-Evaluations as Causes of Satisfaction: The Mediating Role of Seeking Task Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Abhishek; Locke, Edwin A.; Judge, Timothy A.; Adams, John W.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the mediating role of task complexity in the relationship between core self-evaluations (CSE) and satisfaction. In Study 1, eighty three undergraduate business students worked on a strategic decision-making simulation. The simulated environment enabled us to verify the temporal sequence of variables, use an objective measure of…

  20. Reconstitution of active human core Mediator complex reveals a pivotal role of the MED14 subunit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevher, Murat A.; Shi, Yi; Li, Dan; Chait, Brian T.; Malik, Sohail; Roeder, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved Mediator complex is a critical coactivator for RNA polymerase II (Pol II)-mediated transcription. Here, we report the reconstitution of a functional 15-subunit human core Mediator complex and its characterization by functional assays and chemical cross-linking coupled to mass spectrometry (CX-MS). Whereas the reconstituted head and middle modules can stably associate, only with incorporation of MED14 into the bi-modular complex does it acquire basal and coactivator functions. This results from a dramatically enhanced ability of MED14-containing complexes to associate with Pol II. Altogether, our analyses identify MED14 as both an architectural and a functional backbone of the Mediator complex. We further establish a conditional requirement for metazoan-specific MED26 that becomes evident in the presence of heterologous nuclear factors. This general approach paves the way for systematically dissecting the multiple layers of functionalities associated with the Mediator complex. PMID:25383669

  1. Reconstitution of active human core Mediator complex reveals a critical role of the MED14 subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevher, Murat A; Shi, Yi; Li, Dan; Chait, Brian T; Malik, Sohail; Roeder, Robert G

    2014-12-01

    The evolutionarily conserved Mediator complex is a critical coactivator for RNA polymerase II (Pol II)-mediated transcription. Here we report the reconstitution of a functional 15-subunit human core Mediator complex and its characterization by functional assays and chemical cross-linking coupled to MS (CX-MS). Whereas the reconstituted head and middle modules can stably associate, basal and coactivator functions are acquired only after incorporation of MED14 into the bimodular complex. This results from a dramatically enhanced ability of MED14-containing complexes to associate with Pol II. Altogether, our analyses identify MED14 as both an architectural and a functional backbone of the Mediator complex. We further establish a conditional requirement for metazoan-specific MED26 that becomes evident in the presence of heterologous nuclear factors. This general approach paves the way for systematic dissection of the multiple layers of functionality associated with the Mediator complex.

  2. Cryo-EM Structure of the TOM Core Complex from Neurospora crassa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bausewein, Thomas; Mills, Deryck J; Langer, Julian D; Nitschke, Beate; Nussberger, Stephan; Kühlbrandt, Werner

    2017-08-10

    The TOM complex is the main entry gate for protein precursors from the cytosol into mitochondria. We have determined the structure of the TOM core complex by cryoelectron microscopy (cryo-EM). The complex is a 148 kDa symmetrical dimer of ten membrane protein subunits that create a shallow funnel on the cytoplasmic membrane surface. In the core of the dimer, the β-barrels of the Tom40 pore form two identical preprotein conduits. Each Tom40 pore is surrounded by the transmembrane segments of the α-helical subunits Tom5, Tom6, and Tom7. Tom22, the central preprotein receptor, connects the two Tom40 pores at the dimer interface. Our structure offers detailed insights into the molecular architecture of the mitochondrial preprotein import machinery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Protein kinases responsible for the phosphorylation of the nuclear egress core complex of human cytomegalovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonntag, Eric; Milbradt, Jens; Svrlanska, Adriana; Strojan, Hanife; Häge, Sigrun; Kraut, Alexandra; Hesse, Anne-Marie; Amin, Bushra; Sonnewald, Uwe; Couté, Yohann; Marschall, Manfred

    2017-10-01

    Nuclear egress of herpesvirus capsids is mediated by a multi-component nuclear egress complex (NEC) assembled by a heterodimer of two essential viral core egress proteins. In the case of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), this core NEC is defined by the interaction between the membrane-anchored pUL50 and its nuclear cofactor, pUL53. NEC protein phosphorylation is considered to be an important regulatory step, so this study focused on the respective role of viral and cellular protein kinases. Multiply phosphorylated pUL50 varieties were detected by Western blot and Phos-tag analyses as resulting from both viral and cellular kinase activities. In vitro kinase analyses demonstrated that pUL50 is a substrate of both PKCα and CDK1, while pUL53 can also be moderately phosphorylated by CDK1. The use of kinase inhibitors further illustrated the importance of distinct kinases for core NEC phosphorylation. Importantly, mass spectrometry-based proteomic analyses identified five major and nine minor sites of pUL50 phosphorylation. The functional relevance of core NEC phosphorylation was confirmed by various experimental settings, including kinase knock-down/knock-out and confocal imaging, in which it was found that (i) HCMV core NEC proteins are not phosphorylated solely by viral pUL97, but also by cellular kinases; (ii) both PKC and CDK1 phosphorylation are detectable for pUL50; (iii) no impact of PKC phosphorylation on NEC functionality has been identified so far; (iv) nonetheless, CDK1-specific phosphorylation appears to be required for functional core NEC interaction. In summary, our findings provide the first evidence that the HCMV core NEC is phosphorylated by cellular kinases, and that the complex pattern of NEC phosphorylation has functional relevance.

  4. FANCI Regulates Recruitment of the FA Core Complex at Sites of DNA Damage Independently of FANCD2.

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    Maria Castella

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The Fanconi anemia (FA-BRCA pathway mediates repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks. The FA core complex, a multi-subunit ubiquitin ligase, participates in the detection of DNA lesions and monoubiquitinates two downstream FA proteins, FANCD2 and FANCI (or the ID complex. However, the regulation of the FA core complex itself is poorly understood. Here we show that the FA core complex proteins are recruited to sites of DNA damage and form nuclear foci in S and G2 phases of the cell cycle. ATR kinase activity, an intact FA core complex and FANCM-FAAP24 were crucial for this recruitment. Surprisingly, FANCI, but not its partner FANCD2, was needed for efficient FA core complex foci formation. Monoubiquitination or ATR-dependent phosphorylation of FANCI were not required for the FA core complex recruitment, but FANCI deubiquitination by USP1 was. Additionally, BRCA1 was required for efficient FA core complex foci formation. These findings indicate that FANCI functions upstream of FA core complex recruitment independently of FANCD2, and alter the current view of the FA-BRCA pathway.

  5. Metamorphic core complex formation by density inversion and lower-crust extrusion.

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    Martinez, F; Goodliffe, A M; Taylor, B

    2001-06-21

    Metamorphic core complexes are domal uplifts of metamorphic and plutonic rocks bounded by shear zones that separate them from unmetamorphosed cover rocks. Interpretations of how these features form are varied and controversial, and include models involving extension on low-angle normal faults, plutonic intrusions and flexural rotation of initially high-angle normal faults. The D'Entrecasteaux islands of Papua New Guinea are actively forming metamorphic core complexes located within a continental rift that laterally evolves to sea-floor spreading. The continental rifting is recent (since approximately 6 Myr ago), seismogenic and occurring at a rapid rate ( approximately 25 mm yr-1). Here we present evidence-based on isostatic modelling, geological data and heat-flow measurements-that the D'Entrecasteaux core complexes accommodate extension through the vertical extrusion of ductile lower-crust material, driven by a crustal density inversion. Although buoyant extrusion is accentuated in this region by the geological structure present-which consists of dense ophiolite overlaying less-dense continental crust-this mechanism may be generally applicable to regions where thermal expansion lowers crustal density with depth.

  6. Meta-Review of CSF core biomarkers in Alzheimer’s disease: the state-of-the-art after the new revised diagnostic criteria

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    Daniel eFerreira

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Current research criteria for Alzheimer’s disease (AD include Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF biomarkers into the diagnostic algorithm. However, spreading their use to the clinical routine is still questionable. Objective: To provide an updated, systematic and critical review on the diagnostic utility of the CSF core biomarkers for AD. Data sources: MEDLINE, PreMedline, EMBASE, PsycInfo, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, and CRD.Eligibility criteria: 1a Systematic reviews with meta-analysis; 1b Primary studies published after the new revised diagnostic criteria; 2 Evaluation of the diagnostic performance of at least one CSF core biomarker.Results: The diagnostic performance of CSF biomarkers is generally satisfactory. They are optimal for discriminating AD patients from healthy controls. Their combination may also be suitable for Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI prognosis. However, CSF biomarkers fail to distinguish AD from other forms of dementia. Limitations: 1 use of clinical diagnosis as standard instead of pathological postmortem confirmation; 2 variability of methodological aspects; 3 insufficiently long follow-up periods in MCI studies; and 4 lower diagnostic accuracy in primary care compared with memory clinics. Conclusions: Additional work needs to be done to validate the application of CSF core biomarkers as they are proposed in the new revised diagnostic criteria. The use of CSF core biomarkers in clinical routine is more likely if these limitations are overcome. Early diagnosis is going to be of utmost importance when effective pharmacological treatment will be available and the CSF core biomarkers can also be implemented in clinical trials for drug development.

  7. Meta-Review of CSF Core Biomarkers in Alzheimer’s Disease: The State-of-the-Art after the New Revised Diagnostic Criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Daniel; Perestelo-Pérez, Lilisbeth; Westman, Eric; Wahlund, Lars-Olof; Sarría, Antonio; Serrano-Aguilar, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Background: Current research criteria for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) include cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers into the diagnostic algorithm. However, spreading their use to the clinical routine is still questionable. Objective: To provide an updated, systematic and critical review on the diagnostic utility of the CSF core biomarkers for AD. Data sources: MEDLINE, PreMedline, EMBASE, PsycInfo, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, and CRD. Eligibility criteria: (1a) Systematic reviews with meta-analysis; (1b) Primary studies published after the new revised diagnostic criteria; (2) Evaluation of the diagnostic performance of at least one CSF core biomarker. Results: The diagnostic performance of CSF biomarkers is generally satisfactory. They are optimal for discriminating AD patients from healthy controls. Their combination may also be suitable for mild cognitive impairment (MCI) prognosis. However, CSF biomarkers fail to distinguish AD from other forms of dementia. Limitations: (1) Use of clinical diagnosis as standard instead of pathological postmortem confirmation; (2) variability of methodological aspects; (3) insufficiently long follow-up periods in MCI studies; and (4) lower diagnostic accuracy in primary care compared with memory clinics. Conclusion: Additional work needs to be done to validate the application of CSF core biomarkers as they are proposed in the new revised diagnostic criteria. The use of CSF core biomarkers in clinical routine is more likely if these limitations are overcome. Early diagnosis is going to be of utmost importance when effective pharmacological treatment will be available and the CSF core biomarkers can also be implemented in clinical trials for drug development. PMID:24715863

  8. Simulation Based Optimization of Complex Monolithic Composite Structures Using Cellular Core Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickmott, Curtis W.

    Cellular core tooling is a new technology which has the capability to manufacture complex integrated monolithic composite structures. This novel tooling method utilizes thermoplastic cellular cores as inner tooling. The semi-rigid nature of the cellular cores makes them convenient for lay-up, and under autoclave temperature and pressure they soften and expand providing uniform compaction on all surfaces including internal features such as ribs and spar tubes. This process has the capability of developing fully optimized aerospace structures by reducing or eliminating assembly using fasteners or bonded joints. The technology is studied in the context of evaluating its capabilities, advantages, and limitations in developing high quality structures. The complex nature of these parts has led to development of a model using the Finite Element Analysis (FEA) software Abaqus and the plug-in COMPRO Common Component Architecture (CCA) provided by Convergent Manufacturing Technologies. This model utilizes a "virtual autoclave" technique to simulate temperature profiles, resin flow paths, and ultimately deformation from residual stress. A model has been developed simulating the temperature profile during curing of composite parts made with the cellular core technology. While modeling of composites has been performed in the past, this project will look to take this existing knowledge and apply it to this new manufacturing method capable of building more complex parts and develop a model designed specifically for building large, complex components with a high degree of accuracy. The model development has been carried out in conjunction with experimental validation. A double box beam structure was chosen for analysis to determine the effects of the technology on internal ribs and joints. Double box beams were manufactured and sectioned into T-joints for characterization. Mechanical behavior of T-joints was performed using the T-joint pull-off test and compared to traditional

  9. IODP Expedition 340T: Borehole Logging at Atlantis Massif Oceanic Core Complex

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    Donna Blackman

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP Expedition 340T returned to the 1.4-km-deep Hole U1309D at Atlantis Massif to carry out borehole logging including vertical seismic profiling (VSP. Seismic, resistivity, and temperature logs were obtained throughout the geologic section in the footwall of this oceanic core complex. Reliable downhole temperature measurements throughout and the first seismic coverage of the 800–1400 meters below seafloor (mbsf portionof the section were obtained. Distinct changes in velocity, resistivity, and magnetic susceptibility characterize the boundaries of altered, olivine-rich troctolite intervals within the otherwise dominantly gabbroic se-quence. Some narrow fault zones also are associated with downhole resistivity or velocity excursions. Small deviations in temperature were measured in borehole fluid adjacent to known faults at 750 mbsf and 1100 mbsf. This suggests that flow of seawater remains active along these zones of faulting and rock alteration. Vertical seismic profile station coverage at zero offsetnow extends the full length of the hole, including the uppermost 150 mbsf, where detachment processes are expected to have left their strongest imprint. Analysis of wallrock properties, together with alteration and structural characteristics of the cores from Site U1309, highlights the likely interplay between lithology, structure, lithospheric hydration, and core complex evolution.

  10. Fanconi anemia core complex gene promoters harbor conserved transcription regulatory elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Daniel; Schindler, Detlev

    2011-01-01

    The Fanconi anemia (FA) gene family is a recent addition to the complex network of proteins that respond to and repair certain types of DNA damage in the human genome. Since little is known about the regulation of this novel group of genes at the DNA level, we characterized the promoters of the eight genes (FANCA, B, C, E, F, G, L and M) that compose the FA core complex. The promoters of these genes show the characteristic attributes of housekeeping genes, such as a high GC content and CpG islands, a lack of TATA boxes and a low conservation. The promoters functioned in a monodirectional way and were, in their most active regions, comparable in strength to the SV40 promoter in our reporter plasmids. They were also marked by a distinctive transcriptional start site (TSS). In the 5' region of each promoter, we identified a region that was able to negatively regulate the promoter activity in HeLa and HEK 293 cells in isolation. The central and 3' regions of the promoter sequences harbor binding sites for several common and rare transcription factors, including STAT, SMAD, E2F, AP1 and YY1, which indicates that there may be cross-connections to several established regulatory pathways. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and siRNA experiments confirmed the shared regulatory responses between the prominent members of the TGF-β and JAK/STAT pathways and members of the FA core complex. Although the promoters are not well conserved, they share region and sequence specific regulatory motifs and transcription factor binding sites (TBFs), and we identified a bi-partite nature to these promoters. These results support a hypothesis based on the co-evolution of the FA core complex genes that was expanded to include their promoters.

  11. Fanconi anemia core complex gene promoters harbor conserved transcription regulatory elements.

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    Daniel Meier

    Full Text Available The Fanconi anemia (FA gene family is a recent addition to the complex network of proteins that respond to and repair certain types of DNA damage in the human genome. Since little is known about the regulation of this novel group of genes at the DNA level, we characterized the promoters of the eight genes (FANCA, B, C, E, F, G, L and M that compose the FA core complex. The promoters of these genes show the characteristic attributes of housekeeping genes, such as a high GC content and CpG islands, a lack of TATA boxes and a low conservation. The promoters functioned in a monodirectional way and were, in their most active regions, comparable in strength to the SV40 promoter in our reporter plasmids. They were also marked by a distinctive transcriptional start site (TSS. In the 5' region of each promoter, we identified a region that was able to negatively regulate the promoter activity in HeLa and HEK 293 cells in isolation. The central and 3' regions of the promoter sequences harbor binding sites for several common and rare transcription factors, including STAT, SMAD, E2F, AP1 and YY1, which indicates that there may be cross-connections to several established regulatory pathways. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and siRNA experiments confirmed the shared regulatory responses between the prominent members of the TGF-β and JAK/STAT pathways and members of the FA core complex. Although the promoters are not well conserved, they share region and sequence specific regulatory motifs and transcription factor binding sites (TBFs, and we identified a bi-partite nature to these promoters. These results support a hypothesis based on the co-evolution of the FA core complex genes that was expanded to include their promoters.

  12. Biochemical reconstitution and phylogenetic comparison of human SET1 family core complexes involved in histone methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinsky, Stephen A; Monteith, Kelsey E; Viggiano, Susan; Cosgrove, Michael S

    2015-03-06

    Mixed lineage leukemia protein-1 (MLL1) is a member of the SET1 family of histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) methyltransferases that are required for metazoan development. MLL1 is the best characterized human SET1 family member, which includes MLL1-4 and SETd1A/B. MLL1 assembles with WDR5, RBBP5, ASH2L, DPY-30 (WRAD) to form the MLL1 core complex, which is required for H3K4 dimethylation and transcriptional activation. Because all SET1 family proteins interact with WRAD in vivo, it is hypothesized they are regulated by similar mechanisms. However, recent evidence suggests differences among family members that may reflect unique regulatory inputs in the cell. Missing is an understanding of the intrinsic enzymatic activities of different SET1 family complexes under standard conditions. In this investigation, we reconstituted each human SET1 family core complex and compared subunit assembly and enzymatic activities. We found that in the absence of WRAD, all but one SET domain catalyzes at least weak H3K4 monomethylation. In the presence of WRAD, all SET1 family members showed stimulated monomethyltransferase activity but differed in their di- and trimethylation activities. We found that these differences are correlated with evolutionary lineage, suggesting these enzyme complexes have evolved to accomplish unique tasks within metazoan genomes. To understand the structural basis for these differences, we employed a "phylogenetic scanning mutagenesis" assay and identified a cluster of amino acid substitutions that confer a WRAD-dependent gain-of-function dimethylation activity on complexes assembled with the MLL3 or Drosophila trithorax proteins. These results form the basis for understanding how WRAD differentially regulates SET1 family complexes in vivo. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Coral Bacterial-Core Abundance and Network Complexity as Proxies for Anthropogenic Pollution

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    Deborah C. A. Leite

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Acclimatization via changes in the stable (core or the variable microbial diversity and/or abundance is an important element in the adaptation of coral species to environmental changes. Here, we explored the spatial-temporal dynamics, diversity and interactions of variable and core bacterial populations associated with the coral Mussismilia hispida and the surrounding water. This survey was performed on five reefs along a transect from the coast (Reef 1 to offshore (Reef 5, representing a gradient of influence of the river mouth, for almost 12 months (4 sampling times, in the dry and rainy seasons. A clear increasing gradient of organic-pollution proxies (nitrogen content and fecal coliforms was observed from Reef 1 to Reef 5, during both seasons, and was highest at the Buranhém River mouth (Reef 1. Conversely, a clear inverse gradient of the network analysis of the whole bacterial communities also revealed more-complex network relationships at Reef 5. Our data also indicated a higher relative abundance of members of the bacterial core, dominated by Acinetobacter sp., at Reef 5, and higher diversity of site-stable bacterial populations, likely related to the higher abundance of total coliforms and N content (proxies of sewage or organic pollution at Reef 1, during the rainy season. Thus, the less “polluted” areas may show a more-complex network and a high relative abundance of members of the bacterial core (almost 97% in some cases, resulting in a more-homogeneous and well-established bacteriome among sites/samples, when the influence of the river is stronger (rainy seasons.

  14. Alkali Metal Variation and Twisting of the FeNNFe Core in Bridging Diiron Dinitrogen Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliams, Sean F; Rodgers, Kenton R; Lukat-Rodgers, Gudrun; Mercado, Brandon Q; Grubel, Katarzyna; Holland, Patrick L

    2016-03-21

    Alkali metal cations can interact with Fe-N2 complexes, potentially enhancing back-bonding or influencing the geometry of the iron atom. These influences are relevant to large-scale N2 reduction by iron, such as in the FeMoco of nitrogenase and the alkali-promoted Haber-Bosch process. However, to our knowledge there have been no systematic studies of a large range of alkali metals regarding their influence on transition metal-dinitrogen complexes. In this work, we varied the alkali metal in [alkali cation]2[LFeNNFeL] complexes (L = bulky β-diketiminate ligand) through the size range from Na(+) to K(+), Rb(+), and Cs(+). The FeNNFe cores have similar Fe-N and N-N distances and N-N stretching frequencies despite the drastic change in alkali metal cation size. The two diketiminates twist relative to one another, with larger dihedral angles accommodating the larger cations. In order to explain why the twisting has so little influence on the core, we performed density functional theory calculations on a simplified LFeNNFeL model, which show that the two metals surprisingly do not compete for back-bonding to the same π* orbital of N2, even when the ligand planes are parallel. This diiron system can tolerate distortion of the ligand planes through compensating orbital energy changes, and thus, a range of ligand orientations can give very similar energies.

  15. Architecture of the RNA polymerase II-Mediator core initiation complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaschka, C; Larivière, L; Wenzeck, L; Seizl, M; Hemann, M; Tegunov, D; Petrotchenko, E V; Borchers, C H; Baumeister, W; Herzog, F; Villa, E; Cramer, P

    2015-02-19

    The conserved co-activator complex Mediator enables regulated transcription initiation by RNA polymerase (Pol) II. Here we reconstitute an active 15-subunit core Mediator (cMed) comprising all essential Mediator subunits from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The cryo-electron microscopic structure of cMed bound to a core initiation complex was determined at 9.7 Å resolution. cMed binds Pol II around the Rpb4-Rpb7 stalk near the carboxy-terminal domain (CTD). The Mediator head module binds the Pol II dock and the TFIIB ribbon and stabilizes the initiation complex. The Mediator middle module extends to the Pol II foot with a 'plank' that may influence polymerase conformation. The Mediator subunit Med14 forms a 'beam' between the head and middle modules and connects to the tail module that is predicted to bind transcription activators located on upstream DNA. The Mediator 'arm' and 'hook' domains contribute to a 'cradle' that may position the CTD and TFIIH kinase to stimulate Pol II phosphorylation.

  16. HCV Core Residues Critical for Infectivity Are Also Involved in Core-NS5A Complex Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawlik, Katarzyna; Baugh, James; Chatterji, Udayan; Lim, Precious J.; Bobardt, Michael D.; Gallay, Philippe A.

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of liver disease. The molecular machinery of HCV assembly and particle release remains obscure. A better understanding of the assembly events might reveal new potential antiviral strategies. It was suggested that the nonstructural protein 5A (NS5A), an attractive recent drug target, participates in the production of infectious particles as a result of its interaction with the HCV core protein. However, prior to the present study, the NS5A-binding site in the viral core remained unknown. We found that the D1 domain of core contains the NS5A-binding site with the strongest interacting capacity in the basic P38-K74 cluster. We also demonstrated that the N-terminal basic residues of core at positions 50, 51, 59 and 62 were required for NS5A binding. Analysis of all substitution combinations of R50A, K51A, R59A, and R62A, in the context of the HCVcc system, showed that single, double, triple, and quadruple mutants were fully competent for viral RNA replication, but deficient in secretion of viral particles. Furthermore, we found that the extracellular and intracellular infectivity of all the mutants was abolished, suggesting a defect in the formation of infectious particles. Importantly, we showed that the interaction between the single and quadruple core mutants and NS5A was impaired in cells expressing full-length HCV genome. Interestingly, mutations of the four basic residues of core did not alter the association of core or NS5A with lipid droplets. This study showed for the first time that basic residues in the D1 domain of core that are critical for the formation of infectious extracellular and intracellular particles also play a role in core-NS5A interactions. PMID:24533158

  17. Evolution of complex organic molecules in hot molecular cores. Synthetic spectra at (sub-)mm wavebands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, R.; Schilke, P.; Stéphan, G.; Bergin, E.; Möller, T.; Schmiedeke, A.; Zernickel, A.

    2015-03-01

    Context. Hot molecular cores (HMCs) are intermediate stages of high-mass star formation and are also known for their rich chemical reservoirs and emission line spectra at (sub-)mm wavebands. Complex organic molecules (COMs) such as methanol (CH3OH), ethanol (C2H5OH), dimethyl ether (CH3OCH3), and methyl formate (HCOOCH3) produce most of these observed lines. The observed spectral feature of HMCs such as total number of emission lines and associated line intensities are also found to vary with evolutionary stages. Aims: We aim to investigate the spectral evolution of these COMs to explore the initial evolutionary stages of high-mass star formation including HMCs. Methods: We developed various 3D models for HMCs guided by the evolutionary scenarios proposed by recent empirical and modeling studies. We then investigated the spatio-temporal variation of temperature and molecular abundances in HMCs by consistently coupling gas-grain chemical evolution with radiative transfer calculations. We explored the effects of varying physical conditions on molecular abundances including density distribution and luminosity evolution of the central protostar(s) among other parameters. Finally, we simulated the synthetic spectra for these models at different evolutionary timescales to compare with observations. Results: Temperature has a profound effect on the formation of COMs through the depletion and diffusion on grain surface to desorption and further gas-phase processing. The time-dependent temperature structure of the hot core models provides a realistic framework for investigating the spatial variation of ice mantle evaporation as a function of evolutionary timescales. We find that a slightly higher value (15 K) than the canonical dark cloud temperature (10 K) provides a more productive environment for COM formation on grain surface. With increasing protostellar luminosity, the water ice evaporation font (~100 K) expands and the spatial distribution of gas phase abundances of

  18. Haploinsufficiency for Core Exon Junction Complex Components Disrupts Embryonic Neurogenesis and Causes p53-Mediated Microcephaly.

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    Hanqian Mao

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The exon junction complex (EJC is an RNA binding complex comprised of the core components Magoh, Rbm8a, and Eif4a3. Human mutations in EJC components cause neurodevelopmental pathologies. Further, mice heterozygous for either Magoh or Rbm8a exhibit aberrant neurogenesis and microcephaly. Yet despite the requirement of these genes for neurodevelopment, the pathogenic mechanisms linking EJC dysfunction to microcephaly remain poorly understood. Here we employ mouse genetics, transcriptomic and proteomic analyses to demonstrate that haploinsufficiency for each of the 3 core EJC components causes microcephaly via converging regulation of p53 signaling. Using a new conditional allele, we first show that Eif4a3 haploinsufficiency phenocopies aberrant neurogenesis and microcephaly of Magoh and Rbm8a mutant mice. Transcriptomic and proteomic analyses of embryonic brains at the onset of neurogenesis identifies common pathways altered in each of the 3 EJC mutants, including ribosome, proteasome, and p53 signaling components. We further demonstrate all 3 mutants exhibit defective splicing of RNA regulatory proteins, implying an EJC dependent RNA regulatory network that fine-tunes gene expression. Finally, we show that genetic ablation of one downstream pathway, p53, significantly rescues microcephaly of all 3 EJC mutants. This implicates p53 activation as a major node of neurodevelopmental pathogenesis following EJC impairment. Altogether our study reveals new mechanisms to help explain how EJC mutations influence neurogenesis and underlie neurodevelopmental disease.

  19. The Tetramorium tortuosum species group (Hymenoptera, Formicidae, Myrmicinae revisited - taxonomic revision of the Afrotropical T. capillosum species complex

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    Francisco Hita Garcia

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study we revise the taxonomy of the Tetramorium tortuosum species group members encountered in the Afrotropical region, which we have placed in its own subgroup: the T. capillosum species complex. We re-describe the two previously known species T. capillosum Bolton and T. tabarum Bolton, and describe the new species T. hecate sp. n. The geographic distribution of the three species appears to be restricted to the equatorial rainforests of Central Africa. We provide a diagnosis of the T. capillosum species complex, an illustrated identification key to species level, and worker-based species descriptions, which include diagnoses, discussions, high-quality montage images, and distribution maps. Furthermore, we discuss biogeography and composition of the globally distributed T. tortuosum group.

  20. Possible origin and significance of extension-parallel drainages in Arizona's metamophic core complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, J.E.

    2000-01-01

    The corrugated form of the Harcuvar, South Mountains, and Catalina metamorphic core complexes in Arizona reflects the shape of the middle Tertiary extensional detachment fault that projects over each complex. Corrugation axes are approximately parallel to the fault-displacement direction and to the footwall mylonitic lineation. The core complexes are locally incised by enigmatic, linear drainages that parallel corrugation axes and the inferred extension direction and are especially conspicuous on the crests of antiformal corrugations. These drainages have been attributed to erosional incision on a freshly denuded, planar, inclined fault ramp followed by folding that elevated and preserved some drainages on the crests of rising antiforms. According to this hypothesis, corrugations were produced by folding after subacrial exposure of detachment-fault foot-walls. An alternative hypothesis, proposed here, is as follows. In a setting where preexisting drainages cross an active normal fault, each fault-slip event will cut each drainage into two segments separated by a freshly denuded fault ramp. The upper and lower drainage segments will remain hydraulically linked after each fault-slip event if the drainage in the hanging-wall block is incised, even if the stream is on the flank of an antiformal corrugation and there is a large component of strike-slip fault movement. Maintenance of hydraulic linkage during sequential fault-slip events will guide the lengthening stream down the fault ramp as the ramp is uncovered, and stream incision will form a progressively lengthening, extension-parallel, linear drainage segment. This mechanism for linear drainage genesis is compatible with corrugations as original irregularities of the detachment fault, and does not require folding after early to middle Miocene footwall exhumations. This is desirable because many drainages are incised into nonmylonitic crystalline footwall rocks that were probably not folded under low

  1. The effect of peculiar complex core balance training on isokinetic muscle functions of the knee and lumbus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myungsun; Han, Gunsoo

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the effect of peculiar complex core balance training on the isokinetic muscle function of the knee joint and lumbus to provide fundamental data for establishing a training program that focuses on improving the performance and prevention of injury by developing the core and low extremity muscles. [Subjects and Methods] The participants in this study included a total of ten high school athletes involved in a throwing event for over five years. The subjects were randomly divided into two groups: The experimental group (N=5) and the control group (N=5). The experimental group underwent peculiar complex core balance training. [Results] According to the analysis of covariance, there was a significant effect of peculiar complex core balance training. Therefore, the isokinetic muscle function of the knee joint and lumbus in the experimental group participating in peculiar complex core balance training was significantly increased compared to the control group. [Conclusion] It is concluded that peculiar complex core balance training had a positive effect on the isokinetic muscle function of the knee and lumbus in throwing event athletes.

  2. Complex inner core of the Earth: The last frontier of global seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkalčić, Hrvoje

    2015-03-01

    The days when the Earth's inner core (IC) was viewed as a homogeneous solid sphere surrounded by the liquid outer core (OC) are now behind us. Due to a limited number of data sampling the IC and a lack of experimentally controlled conditions in the deep Earth studies, it has been difficult to scrutinize competitive hypotheses in this active area of research. However, a number of new concepts linking IC structure and dynamics has been proposed lately to explain different types of seismological observations. A common denominator of recent observational work on the IC is increased complexity seen in IC physical properties such as its isotropic and anisotropic structure, attenuation, inner core boundary (ICB) topography, and its rotational dynamics. For example, small-scale features have been observed to exist as a widespread phenomenon in the uppermost inner core, probably superimposed on much longer-scale features. The characterization of small-scale features sheds light on the nature of the solidification process and helps in understanding seismologically observed hemispherical dichotomy of the IC. The existence of variations in the rate and level of solidification is a plausible physical outcome in an environment where vigorous compositional convection in the OC and variations in heat exchange across the ICB may control the process of crystal growth. However, further progress is hindered by the fact that the current traveltime data of PKIKP waves traversing the IC do not allow discriminating between variations in isotropic P wave velocity and velocity anisotropy. Future studies of attenuation in the IC might provide crucial information about IC structure, although another trade-off exists—that of the relative contribution of scattering versus viscoelastic attenuation and the connection with the material properties. Future installations of dense arrays, cross paths of waves that sample the IC, and corresponding array studies will be a powerful tool to image and

  3. Crystalline diuranium phosphinidiide and μ-phosphido complexes with symmetric and asymmetric UPU cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rookes, Thomas M.; Gardner, Benedict M.; Gregson, Matthew; Tuna, Floriana; Wooles, Ashley J.; Liddle, Stephen T. [School of Chemistry, The University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Balazs, Gabor; Scheer, Manfred [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Regensburg (Germany)

    2017-08-21

    Reaction of [U(Tren{sup TIPS})(PH{sub 2})] (1, Tren{sup TIPS}=N(CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}NSiPr{sup i}{sub 3}){sub 3}) with C{sub 6}H{sub 5}CH{sub 2}K and [U(Tren{sup TIPS})(THF)][BPh{sub 4}] (2) afforded a rare diuranium parent phosphinidiide complex [{U(Tren"T"I"P"S)}{sub 2}(μ-PH)] (3). Treatment of 3 with C{sub 6}H{sub 5}CH{sub 2}K and two equivalents of benzo-15-crown-5 ether (B15C5) gave the diuranium μ-phosphido complex [{U(Tren"T"I"P"S)}{sub 2}(μ-P)][K(B15C5){sub 2}] (4). Alternatively, reaction of [U(Tren{sup TIPS})(PH)][Na(12C4){sub 2}] (5, 12C4=12-crown-4 ether) with [U{N(CH_2CH_2NSiMe_2Bu"t)_2CH_2CH_2NSi(Me)(CH_2)(Bu"t)}] (6) produced the diuranium μ-phosphido complex [{U(Tren"T"I"P"S)}(μ-P){U(Tren"D"M"B"S)}][Na(12C4){sub 2}] [7, Tren{sup DMBS}=N(CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}NSiMe{sub 2}Bu{sup t}){sub 3}]. Compounds 4 and 7 are unprecedented examples of uranium phosphido complexes outside of matrix isolation studies, and they rapidly decompose in solution underscoring the paucity of uranium phosphido complexes. Interestingly, 4 and 7 feature symmetric and asymmetric UPU cores, respectively, reflecting their differing steric profiles. (copyright 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA.)

  4. Complex molecules in the hot core of the low-mass protostar NGC 1333 IRAS 4A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bottinelli, S; Ceccarelli, C; Lefloch, B; Williams, JP; Castets, A; Caux, E; Cazaux, S; Maret, S; Parise, B; Tielens, AGGM

    2004-01-01

    We report the detection of complex molecules (HCOOCH3, HCOOH, and CH3CN), signposts of a hot core like region, toward the low-mass Class 0 source NGC 1333 IRAS 4A. This is the second low-mass protostar in which such complex molecules have been searched for and reported, the other source being IRAS

  5. Engineering task plan for the annual revision of the rotary mode core sampling system safety equipment list

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BOGER, R.M.

    1999-01-01

    This Engineering Task Plan addresses an effort to provide an update to the RMCS Systems 3 and 4 SEL and DCM in order to incorporate the changes to the authorization basis implemented by HNF-SD-WM-BIO-001, Rev. 0 (Draft), Addendum 5 , Safety Analysis for Rotary Mode Core Sampling. Responsibilities, task description, cost estimate, and schedule are presented

  6. THE SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF COMPLEX ORGANIC MOLECULES IN THE L1544 PRE-STELLAR CORE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiménez-Serra, Izaskun [Astronomy Unit, School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Vasyunin, Anton I.; Caselli, Paola [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (MPE), Gießenbachstr., D-85741 Garching (Germany); Marcelino, Nuria [INAF, Osservatorio di Radioastronomia, Via P. Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Billot, Nicolas [Instituto de Radioastronomía Milimétrica, Avenida Divina Pastora 7, E-18012 Granada (Spain); Viti, Serena [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, 132 Hampstead Road, London NW1 2PS (United Kingdom); Testi, Leonardo [European Southern Observatory (ESO), Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Vastel, Charlotte [Université de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Lefloch, Bertrand [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, IPAG, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Bachiller, Rafael, E-mail: i.jimenez-serra@qmul.ac.uk [Observatorio Astronómico Nacional (OAN, IGN), Calle Alfonso XII 3, E-28014 Madrid (Spain)

    2016-10-10

    The detection of complex organic molecules (COMs) toward cold sources such as pre-stellar cores (with T < 10 K) has challenged our understanding of the formation processes of COMs in the interstellar medium. Recent modeling on COM chemistry at low temperatures has provided new insight into these processes predicting that COM formation depends strongly on parameters such as visual extinction and the level of CO freeze out. We report deep observations of COMs toward two positions in the L1544 pre-stellar core: the dense, highly extinguished continuum peak with A{sub V}≥ 30 mag within the inner 2700 au; and a low-density shell with average A{sub V}∼ 7.5–8 mag located at 4000 au from the core’s center and bright in CH{sub 3}OH. Our observations show that CH{sub 3}O, CH{sub 3}OCH{sub 3}, and CH{sub 3}CHO are more abundant (by factors of ∼2–10) toward the low-density shell than toward the continuum peak. Other COMs such as CH{sub 3}OCHO, c-C{sub 3}H{sub 2}O, HCCCHO, CH{sub 2}CHCN, and HCCNC show slight enhancements (by factors ≤3), but the associated uncertainties are large. This suggests that COMs are actively formed and already present in the low-density shells of pre-stellar cores. The modeling of the chemistry of O-bearing COMs in L1544 indicates that these species are enhanced in this shell because (i) CO starts freezing out onto dust grains driving an active surface chemistry; (ii) the visual extinction is sufficiently high to prevent the UV photo-dissociation of COMs by the external interstellar radiation field; and (iii) the density is still moderate to prevent severe depletion of COMs onto grains.

  7. THE SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF COMPLEX ORGANIC MOLECULES IN THE L1544 PRE-STELLAR CORE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiménez-Serra, Izaskun; Vasyunin, Anton I.; Caselli, Paola; Marcelino, Nuria; Billot, Nicolas; Viti, Serena; Testi, Leonardo; Vastel, Charlotte; Lefloch, Bertrand; Bachiller, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    The detection of complex organic molecules (COMs) toward cold sources such as pre-stellar cores (with T < 10 K) has challenged our understanding of the formation processes of COMs in the interstellar medium. Recent modeling on COM chemistry at low temperatures has provided new insight into these processes predicting that COM formation depends strongly on parameters such as visual extinction and the level of CO freeze out. We report deep observations of COMs toward two positions in the L1544 pre-stellar core: the dense, highly extinguished continuum peak with A_V≥ 30 mag within the inner 2700 au; and a low-density shell with average A_V∼ 7.5–8 mag located at 4000 au from the core’s center and bright in CH_3OH. Our observations show that CH_3O, CH_3OCH_3, and CH_3CHO are more abundant (by factors of ∼2–10) toward the low-density shell than toward the continuum peak. Other COMs such as CH_3OCHO, c-C_3H_2O, HCCCHO, CH_2CHCN, and HCCNC show slight enhancements (by factors ≤3), but the associated uncertainties are large. This suggests that COMs are actively formed and already present in the low-density shells of pre-stellar cores. The modeling of the chemistry of O-bearing COMs in L1544 indicates that these species are enhanced in this shell because (i) CO starts freezing out onto dust grains driving an active surface chemistry; (ii) the visual extinction is sufficiently high to prevent the UV photo-dissociation of COMs by the external interstellar radiation field; and (iii) the density is still moderate to prevent severe depletion of COMs onto grains.

  8. The Detection of Hot Cores and Complex Organic Molecules in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewiło, Marta; Indebetouw, Remy; Charnley, Steven B.; Zahorecz, Sarolta; Oliveira, Joana M.; van Loon, Jacco Th.; Ward, Jacob L.; Chen, C.-H. Rosie; Wiseman, Jennifer; Fukui, Yasuo; Kawamura, Akiko; Meixner, Margaret; Onishi, Toshikazu; Schilke, Peter

    2018-02-01

    We report the first extragalactic detection of the complex organic molecules (COMs) dimethyl ether (CH3OCH3) and methyl formate (CH3OCHO) with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). These COMs, together with their parent species methanol (CH3OH), were detected toward two 1.3 mm continuum sources in the N 113 star-forming region in the low-metallicity Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Rotational temperatures ({T}{rot}∼ 130 K) and total column densities ({N}{rot}∼ {10}16 cm‑2) have been calculated for each source based on multiple transitions of CH3OH. We present the ALMA molecular emission maps for COMs and measured abundances for all detected species. The physical and chemical properties of two sources with COMs detection, and the association with H2O and OH maser emission, indicate that they are hot cores. The fractional abundances of COMs scaled by a factor of 2.5 to account for the lower metallicity in the LMC are comparable to those found at the lower end of the range in Galactic hot cores. Our results have important implications for studies of organic chemistry at higher redshift.

  9. Core Mediator structure at 3.4 Å extends model of transcription initiation complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozawa, Kayo; Schneider, Thomas R; Cramer, Patrick

    2017-05-11

    Mediator is a multiprotein co-activator that binds the transcription pre-initiation complex (PIC) and regulates RNA polymerase (Pol) II. The Mediator head and middle modules form the essential core Mediator (cMed), whereas the tail and kinase modules play regulatory roles. The architecture of Mediator and its position on the PIC are known, but atomic details are limited to Mediator subcomplexes. Here we report the crystal structure of the 15-subunit cMed from Schizosaccharomyces pombe at 3.4 Å resolution. The structure shows an unaltered head module, and reveals the intricate middle module, which we show is globally required for transcription. Sites of known Mediator mutations cluster at the interface between the head and middle modules, and in terminal regions of the head subunits Med6 (ref. 16) and Med17 (ref. 17) that tether the middle module. The structure led to a model for Saccharomyces cerevisiae cMed that could be combined with the 3.6 Å cryo-electron microscopy structure of the core PIC (cPIC). The resulting atomic model of the cPIC-cMed complex informs on interactions of the submodules forming the middle module, called beam, knob, plank, connector, and hook. The hook is flexibly linked to Mediator by a conserved hinge and contacts the transcription initiation factor IIH (TFIIH) kinase that phosphorylates the carboxy (C)-terminal domain (CTD) of Pol II and was recently positioned on the PIC. The hook also contains residues that crosslink to the CTD and reside in a previously described cradle. These results provide a framework for understanding Mediator function, including its role in stimulating CTD phosphorylation by TFIIH.

  10. Structure of the dimeric PufX-containing core complex of Rhodobacter blasticus by in situ atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuring, Simon; Busselez, Johan; Lévy, Daniel

    2005-01-14

    We have studied photosynthetic membranes of wild type Rhodobacter blasticus, a closely related strain to the well studied Rhodobacter sphaeroides, using atomic force microscopy. High-resolution atomic force microscopy topographs of both cytoplasmic and periplasmic surfaces of LH2 and RC-LH1-PufX (RC, reaction center) complexes were acquired in situ. The LH2 is a nonameric ring inserted into the membrane with the 9-fold axis perpendicular to the plane. The core complex is an S-shaped dimer composed of two RCs, each encircled by 13 LH1 alpha/beta-heterodimers, and two PufXs. The LH1 assembly is an open ellipse with a topography-free gap of approximately 25 A. The two PufXs, one of each core, are located at the dimer center. Based on our data, we propose a model of the core complex, which provides explanation for the PufX-induced dimerization of the Rhodobacter core complex. The QB site is located facing a approximately 25-A wide gap within LH1, explaining the PufX-favored quinone passage in and out of the core complex.

  11. The Middlesex Fells Volcanic Complex: A Revised Tectonic Model based on Geochronology, Geochemistry, and Field Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampton, R.

    2017-12-01

    The Boston Bay area is composed of several terranes originating on the paleocontinent of Avalonia, an arc terrane that accreted onto the continent of Laurentia during the Devonian. Included in these terranes is the Middlesex Fells Volcanic Complex, a bimodal complex composed of both intrusive and extrusive igneous rocks. Initial studies suggested that this volcanic complex formed during a rift event as the Avalonian continent separated from its parent continent 700-900 Ma. New geochemical and geochronological data and field relationships observed in this study establishes a new tectonic model. U-Pb laser ablation zircon data on four samples from different units within the complex reveal that the complex erupted 600 Ma. ICP-MS geochemical analysis of the metabasalt member of the complex yield a trace element signature enriched in Rb, Pb, and Sr and depleted in Th, indicating a subduction component to the melt and interpreted as an eruption into a back-arc basin. The felsic units similarly have an arc related signature when plotted on trace element spider diagrams and tectonic discrimination diagrams. Combined with the field relationships, including an erosional unconformity, stratigraphic and intrusional relationships and large faults from episodic extension events, this data suggests that the Middlesex Fells Volcanic Complex was erupted as part of the arc-sequence of Avalonia and as part of the formation of a back-arc basin well after Avalonia separated from its parent continent. This model presents a significantly younger eruption scenario for the Middlesex Fells Volcanics than previously hypothesized and may be used to study and compare to other volcanics from Avalon terranes in localities such as Newfoundland and the greater Boston area.

  12. The EARP Complex and Its Interactor EIPR-1 Are Required for Cargo Sorting to Dense-Core Vesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irini Topalidou

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The dense-core vesicle is a secretory organelle that mediates the regulated release of peptide hormones, growth factors, and biogenic amines. Dense-core vesicles originate from the trans-Golgi of neurons and neuroendocrine cells, but it is unclear how this specialized organelle is formed and acquires its specific cargos. To identify proteins that act in dense-core vesicle biogenesis, we performed a forward genetic screen in Caenorhabditis elegans for mutants defective in dense-core vesicle function. We previously reported the identification of two conserved proteins that interact with the small GTPase RAB-2 to control normal dense-core vesicle cargo-sorting. Here we identify several additional conserved factors important for dense-core vesicle cargo sorting: the WD40 domain protein EIPR-1 and the endosome-associated recycling protein (EARP complex. By assaying behavior and the trafficking of dense-core vesicle cargos, we show that mutants that lack EIPR-1 or EARP have defects in dense-core vesicle cargo-sorting similar to those of mutants in the RAB-2 pathway. Genetic epistasis data indicate that RAB-2, EIPR-1 and EARP function in a common pathway. In addition, using a proteomic approach in rat insulinoma cells, we show that EIPR-1 physically interacts with the EARP complex. Our data suggest that EIPR-1 is a new interactor of the EARP complex and that dense-core vesicle cargo sorting depends on the EARP-dependent trafficking of cargo through an endosomal sorting compartment.

  13. The effect of peculiar complex core balance training on isokinetic muscle functions of the knee and lumbus

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Myungsun; Han, Gunsoo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the effect of peculiar complex core balance training on the isokinetic muscle function of the knee joint and lumbus to provide fundamental data for establishing a training program that focuses on improving the performance and prevention of injury by developing the core and low extremity muscles. [Subjects and Methods] The participants in this study included a total of ten high school athletes involved in a throwing event for over five years. The subje...

  14. B Plant Complex generator dangerous waste storage areas inspection plan: Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beam, T.G.

    1994-01-01

    This document contains the inspection plan for the <90 day dangerous/mixed waste storage areas and satellite accumulation areas at B Plant Complex. This inspection plan is designed to comply with all applicable federal, state and US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office training requirements. In particular, the requirements of WAC 173-303 ''Dangerous Waste Regulations'' are met by this inspection plan. This inspection plan is designed to provide B Plant Complex with the records and documentation showing that the waste storage and handling program is in compliance with applicable regulations. The plan also includes the requirements for becoming a qualified inspector of waste storage areas and the responsibilities of various individuals and groups at B Plant Complex

  15. A revision of the Schinia Volupia (Fitch) species complex Lepidoptera: Noctuidae: Heliothinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    DNA barcode analysis of cytochrome oxidase I (COI) could not differentiate between the species of the Schinia volupia (Fitch) complex including, S. volupia, S. masoni Smith, S. fulleri (McElvare), S. sanrafaeli (Opler), S. miniana (Grote), and S. biforma Smith. Genitalic characters could only differ...

  16. Documentation for the NCES Common Core of Data National Public Education Financial Survey (NPEFS), School Year 2008-09 (Fiscal Year 2009). Revised File Version 1b. NCES 2011-330rev

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornman, Stephen Q.; Zhou, Lei; Nakamoto, Nanae

    2012-01-01

    This documentation is for the revised file (Version 1b) of the National Center for Education Statistics' (NCES) Common Core of Data (CCD) National Public Education Financial Survey (NPEFS) for school year 2008-2009, fiscal year 2009 (FY 09). It contains a brief description of the data collection along with information required to understand and…

  17. DEPTH-CHARGE static and time-dependent perturbation/sensitivity system for nuclear reactor core analysis. Revision I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, J.R.

    1985-04-01

    This report provides the background theory, user input, and sample problems required for the efficient application of the DEPTH-CHARGE system - a code black for both static and time-dependent perturbation theory and data sensitivity analyses. The DEPTH-CHARGE system is of modular construction and has been implemented within the VENTURE-BURNER computational system at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The DEPTH module (coupled with VENTURE) solves for the three adjoint functions of Depletion Perturbation Theory and calculates the desired time-dependent derivatives of the response with respect to the nuclide concentrations and nuclear data utilized in the reference model. The CHARGE code is a collection of utility routines for general data manipulation and input preparation and considerably extends the usefulness of the system through the automatic generation of adjoint sources, estimated perturbed responses, and relative data sensitivity coefficients. Combined, the DEPTH-CHARGE system provides, for the first time, a complete generalized first-order perturbation/sensitivity theory capability for both static and time-dependent analyses of realistic multidimensional reactor models. This current documentation incorporates minor revisions to the original DEPTH-CHARGE documentation (ORNL/CSD-78) to reflect some new capabilities within the individual codes

  18. Application of the Intervention Mapping Framework to Develop an Integrated Twenty-First Century Core Curriculum-Part 1: Mobilizing the Community to Revise the Masters of Public Health Core Competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBate, Rita; Corvin, Jaime A; Wolfe-Quintero, Kate; Petersen, Donna J

    2017-01-01

    Twenty-first century health challenges have significantly altered the expanding role and functions of public health professionals. Guided by a call from the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health's (ASPPH) and the Framing the Future: The Second 100 Years of Education for Public Health report to adopt new and innovative approaches to prepare public health leaders, the University of South Florida College of Public Health aimed to self-assess the current Masters of Public Health (MPH) core curriculum with regard to preparing students to meet twenty-first century public health challenges. This paper describes how Intervention Mapping was employed as a framework to increase readiness and mobilize the COPH community for curricular change. Intervention Mapping provides an ideal framework, allowing organizations to access capacity, specify goals, and guide the change process from curriculum development to implementation and evaluation of competency-driven programs. The steps outlined in this paper resulted in a final set of revised MPH core competencies that are interdisciplinary in nature and fulfill the emergent needs to address changing trends in both public health education and challenges in population health approaches. Ultimately, the competencies developed through this process were agreed upon by the entire College of Public Health faculty, signaling one college's readiness for change, while providing the impetus to revolutionize the delivery of public health education at the University of South Florida.

  19. Revised South China Sea spreading history based on macrostructure analysis of IODP Expedition 349 core samples and geophysical data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Z.; Ding, W.; Zhao, X.; Qiu, N.; Lin, J.; Li, C.

    2017-12-01

    In Internaltional Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) Expedition 349, four sites were drilled and cored successfully in the South China Sea (SCS). Three of them are close to the central spreading ridge (Sites U1431, U1433 and U1434), and one (Site U1435) is located on an outer rise,,providingsignificant information on the spreading history of the SCS.In order to constrain the spreading historymore accurately with the core results, we analyzed the identifiable macrostructures (over 300 fractures, veins and slickensides)from all the consolidated samples of these four drill sites. Then we made a retrograde reconstruction of the SCS spreading history with the constraints of the estimated fractures and veins, post-spreading volcanism,seismic interpretation, as well as free-air gravity and magnetic anomaly and topography analysis. Our study indicates that the spreading of the SCS experienced at least one ridge jump event and two events of ridge orientation and spreading direction adjustment, which mademagnetic anomaly orientation, ridge positionand facture zone directionskeep changing in the South China Sea. During the last spreading stage, the spreading direction was north-southward but lasted for a very short time period. The oceanic crust is wider in the eastern SCS and tapers out toward west.Due to the subductionof SCS beneath the Philippine Sea plate, the seafloor began to develop new fractures:the NWW-to EW-trending R' shear faults and the NE-trending P faultsbecame dominant faults and controlled the eruption of post-drift volcanism.

  20. A Geothermochronologic Investigation of the Coyote Mountains Metamorphic Core Complex (AZ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borel, M.; Gottardi, R.; Casale, G.

    2017-12-01

    The Coyote Mountains metamorphic core complex (CM-MCC) makes up the northern end of the Baboquivari Mountain complex, which is composed of Mesozoic rocks, Tertiary granites, pegmatites, and metasediments. The CM-MCC expose the Pan Tak granite, a 58 Ma intrusive muscovite-biotite-garnet peraluminous granite. The Pan Tak and other intrusions within the Baboquivari Mountains have been interpreted as anatectic melts representing the culmination of a Laramide crustal shortening orogenic event started in the Late Cretaceous ( 70 Ma). Evidence of this magmatic episode includes polysynthetic twinning in plagioclase, myrmekitic texture in alkali feldspars, and garnet, mica and feldspar assemblages. The magmatic fabric is overprinted by a Tertiary tectonic fabric, associated with the exhumation of the CM-MCC along the Ajo road décollement and associated shear zone. In the shear zone, the Pan Tak mylonite display N-dipping foliation defined by gneissic layering and aligned muscovite, and N-trending mineral stretching lineation. Various shear sense indicators are all consistent with a top-to the-N shear sense. Preliminary argon geochronology results suggest that the shear zone was exhumed 29 Ma ago, an age similar to the onset of detachment faulting in other nearby MCCs (Catalina, Rincon, Pinaleño). In the Pan Tak mylonite, quartz grains display regime 2 to 3 microstructures and shows extensive recrystallization by subgrain rotation and grain boundary migration. The recrystallized grain size ranges between 20 and 50 µm in all samples. Quartz crystallographic preferred orientation measured using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) shows that recrystallization was accommodated by dominant prism and minor rhomb slip, suggesting deformation temperature ranging from 450°C to 550°C. These preliminary results constrain the timing of uplift and exhumation, and thermomechanical evolution of the CM-MCC, and improve our understanding of recycling of the continental crust in

  1. Paleomagnetic evidence for an inverse rotation history of Western Anatolia during the exhumation of Menderes core complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uzel, Bora; Langereis, Cornelis G.; Kaymakçı, Nuretdin; Sözbilir, Hasan; Özkaymak, Çağlar; Özkaptan, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Within the Aegean extensional system, the Izmir-Balikesir Transfer Zone (IBTZ) is a crucial element in the late Cenozoic evolution of western Anatolia since it accommodates the differential deformation between the Cycladic and the Menderes metamorphic core complexes. Here, we determine the

  2. Summary of micrographic analysis of fracture coating phases on drill cores from Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-12-01

    The flow path between Pahute Mesa and the groundwater discharge area in Oasis Valley (approximately 18 miles to the southwest) is of concern due to the relatively short travel distance between a recharge area where underground nuclear testing has been conducted and the off-site water users. Groundwater flow and transport modeling by IT Corporation (IT) has shown rapid tritium transport in the volcanic rock aquifers along this flow path. The resultant estimates of rapid transport were based on water level data, limited hydraulic conductivity data, estimates of groundwater discharge rates in Oasis Valley, assumed porosities, and estimated retardation rates. Many of these parameters are poorly constrained and may vary considerably. Sampling and analytical techniques are being applied as an independent means to determine transport rates by providing an understanding of the geochemical processes that control solute movement along the flow path. As part of these geochemical investigations, this report summarizes the analysis of fracture coating mineral phases from drill core samples from the Pahute mesa area of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Archived samples were collected based on the presence of natural fractures and on the types and abundance of secondary mineral phases present on those fracture surfaces. Mineral phases present along fracture surfaces are significant because, through the process of water-rock interaction, they can either contribute (as a result of dissolution) or remove (as a result of precipitation or adsorption) constituents from solution. Particular attention was paid to secondary calcite occurrences because they represent a potential source of exchangeable carbon and can interact with groundwater resulting in a modified isotopic signature and apparent water age

  3. A core MRB1 complex component is indispensable for RNA editing in insect and human infective stages of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle L Ammerman

    Full Text Available Uridine insertion/deletion RNA editing is a unique and vital process in kinetoplastids, required for creation of translatable open reading frames in most mitochondrially-encoded RNAs. Emerging as a key player in this process is the mitochondrial RNA binding 1 (MRB1 complex. MRB1 comprises an RNA-independent core complex of at least six proteins, including the GAP1/2 guide RNA (gRNA binding proteins. The core interacts in an RNA-enhanced or -dependent manner with imprecisely defined TbRGG2 subcomplexes, Armadillo protein MRB10130, and additional factors that comprise the dynamic MRB1 complex. Towards understanding MRB1 complex function in RNA editing, we present here functional characterization of the pentein domain-containing MRB1 core protein, MRB11870. Inducible RNAi studies demonstrate that MRB11870 is essential for proliferation of both insect vector and human infective stage T. brucei. MRB11870 ablation causes a massive defect in RNA editing, affecting both pan-edited and minimally edited mRNAs, but does not substantially affect mitochondrial RNA stability or processing of precursor transcripts. The editing defect in MRB1-depleted cells occurs at the initiation stage of editing, as pre-edited mRNAs accumulate. However, the gRNAs that direct editing remain abundant in the knockdown cells. To examine the contribution of MRB11870 to MRB1 macromolecular interactions, we tagged core complexes and analyzed their composition and associated proteins in the presence and absence of MRB11870. These studies demonstrated that MRB11870 is essential for association of GAP1/2 with the core, as well as for interaction of the core with other proteins and subcomplexes. Together, these data support a model in which the MRB1 core mediates functional interaction of gRNAs with the editing machinery, having GAP1/2 as its gRNA binding constituents. MRB11870 is a critical component of the core, essential for its structure and function.

  4. The cooling history and the depth of detachment faulting at the Atlantis Massif oceanic core complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoolmeesters, Nicole; Cheadle, Michael J.; John, Barbara E.; Reiners, Peter W.; Gee, Jeffrey; Grimes, Craig B.

    2012-10-01

    Oceanic core complexes (OCCs) are domal exposures of oceanic crust and mantle interpreted to be denuded to the seafloor by large slip oceanic detachment faults. We combine previously reported U-Pb zircon crystallization ages with (U-Th)/He zircon thermochronometry and multicomponent magnetic remanence data to determine the cooling history of the footwall to the Atlantis Massif OCC (30°N, MAR) and help establish cooling rates, as well as depths of detachment faulting and gabbro emplacement. We present nine new (U-Th)/He zircon ages for samples from IODP Hole U1309D ranging from 40 to 1415 m below seafloor. These data paired with U-Pb zircon ages and magnetic remanence data constrain cooling rates of gabbroic rocks from the upper 800 m of the central dome at Atlantis Massif as 2895 (+1276/-1162) °C Myr-1 (from ˜780°C to ˜250°C); the lower 600 m of the borehole cooled more slowly at mean rates of ˜500 (+125/-102) °C Myr-1(from ˜780°C to present-day temperatures). Rocks from the uppermost part of the hole also reveal a brief period of slow cooling at rates of ˜300°C Myr-1, possibly due to hydrothermal circulation to ˜4 km depth through the detachment fault zone. Assuming a fault slip rate of 20 mm/yr (from U-Pb zircon ages of surface samples) and a rolling hinge model for the sub-surface fault geometry, we predict that the 780°C isotherm lies at ˜7 km below the axial valley floor, likely corresponding both to the depth at which the semi-brittle detachment fault roots and the probable upper limit of significant gabbro emplacement.

  5. Shock-induced kelyphite formation in the core of a complex impact crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deseta, Natalie; Boonsue, Suporn; Gibson, Roger L.; Spray, John G.

    2017-10-01

    We present a compositional and textural analysis of shock-induced microtextures in garnet porphyroblasts in migmatitic garnet-cordierite-biotite paragneisses from the centre of the Vredefort impact structure, South Africa. Detailed imaging and major element analysis of deformation features in, and adjacent to, the garnet porphyroblasts record a complex, heterogeneous distribution of shock effects at the microscale. As the most competent silicate mineral in the assemblage, with the highest Hugoniot Elastic Limit and a wide pressure-temperature stability field, the porphyroblastic garnet preserves a more diverse shock deformation response compared to minerals such as quartz and feldspar, which underwent more comprehensive shock metamorphism and subsequent annealing. The garnet porphyroblasts display pre-impact fractures that are overprinted by later intra-granular Hertzian and distinctive planar fractures associated with the impact event. Shock-induced strain localization occurred along internal slip planes and defects, including pre-existing fractures and inclusion boundaries in the garnet. Symplectitic (kelyphitic) coronas commonly enclose the garnet porphyroblasts, and inhabit intra-granular fractures. The kelyphite assemblage in fractures with open communication beyond garnet grain boundaries is characterized by orthopyroxene—cordierite—sapphirine. Conversely, the kelyphite assemblage in closed-off intra-granular fractures is highly variable, comprising spatially restricted combinations of a secondary garnet phase with a majoritic component, Al-rich orthopyroxene, sapphirine and cordierite. The impedance contrast between garnet porphyroblasts and their inclusions further facilitated the formation of shock-induced features (Al-rich orthopyroxene coronas). Together, the textural and mineralogical data suggest that these features provide a record of oscillatory shock perturbations initiated under confining pressure beneath the transient crater floor. This

  6. Inert and stable erbium(III)-cored complexes based on metalloporphyrins bearing aryl-ether dendron for optical amplification: synthesis and emission enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Jae Buem; Kim, Yong Hee; Nah, Min Kook; Kim, Hwan Kyu

    2005-01-01

    We have developed novel inert and stable erbium (Er)(III)-cored complexes based on metalloporphyrins for optical amplification. The functionalized metalloporphyrin ligands have been designed and synthesized to provide enough coordination sites for the formation of inert and stable 9-coordinated Er(III)-cored complexes. Er 3+ ions were encapsulated by the metalloporphyrin ligands, such as Zn(II)- and Pt(II)-porphyrins. The near-infrared (IR) emission intensity of Er 3+ ion is much stronger in the Er(III)-cored complex based on Pt(II)-porphyrin than Er(III)-cored complex based on Zn(II)-porphyrin. Furthermore, we have incorporated a G2-aryl-ether functionalized dendron into the Er(III)-cored complex, yielding an Er(III)-cored dendrimer complex bearing the Pt(II)-porphyrin. The Er(III)-cored dendrimer complex shows the stronger near-IR emission intensity than the corresponding complex based on Pt(II)-porphyrin by seven times in solid state. The lifetimes of the emission band of Pt(II)-porphyrin ligands in the visible region were found to be 30 and 40 μs for the Er(III)-cored complex and the Er(III)-cored dendrimer complex based on Pt(II)-porphyrin in deoxygenated THF solution samples, respectively. Also, in both cases, the sensitized luminescence intensity is increased in deoxygenated solution. Therefore, it indicates that the energy transfer from the metalloporphyrins to Er 3+ ions takes places through the triplet state. In this paper, the synthesis and photophysical properties of novel Er(III)-cored complexes based on metalloporphyrins and Er(III)-cored dendrimer complex based on metalloporphyrin will be discussed

  7. Reconstituted TOM core complex and Tim9/Tim10 complex of mitochondria are sufficient for translocation of the ADP/ATP carrier across membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiljev, Andreja; Ahting, Uwe; Nargang, Frank E; Go, Nancy E; Habib, Shukry J; Kozany, Christian; Panneels, Valérie; Sinning, Irmgard; Prokisch, Holger; Neupert, Walter; Nussberger, Stephan; Rapaport, Doron

    2004-03-01

    Precursor proteins of the solute carrier family and of channel forming Tim components are imported into mitochondria in two main steps. First, they are translocated through the TOM complex in the outer membrane, a process assisted by the Tim9/Tim10 complex. They are passed on to the TIM22 complex, which facilitates their insertion into the inner membrane. In the present study, we have analyzed the function of the Tim9/Tim10 complex in the translocation of substrates across the outer membrane of mitochondria. The purified TOM core complex was reconstituted into lipid vesicles in which purified Tim9/Tim10 complex was entrapped. The precursor of the ADP/ATP carrier (AAC) was found to be translocated across the membrane of such lipid vesicles. Thus, these components are sufficient for translocation of AAC precursor across the outer membrane. Peptide libraries covering various substrate proteins were used to identify segments that are bound by Tim9/Tim10 complex upon translocation through the TOM complex. The patterns of binding sites on the substrate proteins suggest a mechanism by which portions of membrane-spanning segments together with flanking hydrophilic segments are recognized and bound by the Tim9/Tim10 complex as they emerge from the TOM complex into the intermembrane space.

  8. Multiple domains of fission yeast Cdc19p (MCM2) are required for its association with the core MCM complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, D A; Pasion, S G; Forsburg, S L

    1998-07-01

    The members of the MCM protein family are essential eukaryotic DNA replication factors that form a six-member protein complex. In this study, we use antibodies to four MCM proteins to investigate the structure of and requirements for the formation of fission yeast MCM complexes in vivo, with particular regard to Cdc19p (MCM2). Gel filtration analysis shows that the MCM protein complexes are unstable and can be broken down to subcomplexes. Using coimmunoprecipitation, we find that Mis5p (MCM6) and Cdc21p (MCM4) are tightly associated with one another in a core complex with which Cdc19p loosely associates. Assembly of Cdc19p with the core depends upon Cdc21p. Interestingly, there is no obvious change in Cdc19p-containing MCM complexes through the cell cycle. Using a panel of Cdc19p mutants, we find that multiple domains of Cdc19p are required for MCM binding. These studies indicate that MCM complexes in fission yeast have distinct substructures, which may be relevant for function.

  9. Dating an actively exhuming metamorphic core complex, the Suckling Dayman Massif in SE Papua New Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oesterle, J.; Seward, D.; Little, T.; Stockli, D. F.; Mizera, M.

    2016-12-01

    Low-temperature thermochronology is a powerful tool for revealing the thermal and kinematic evolution of metamorphic core complexes (MCCs). Most globally studied MCCs are ancient, partially eroded, and have been modified by deformation events that postdate their origin. The Mai'iu Fault is a rapidly slipping active low-angle normal fault (LANF) in the Woodlark Rift in Papua New Guinea that has exhumed a >25 km-wide (in the slip direction), and over 3 km-high domal fault surface in its footwall called the Suckling-Dayman massif. Some knowledge of the present-day thermal structure in the adjacent Woodlark Rift, and the pristine nature of this active MCC make it an ideal candidate for thermochronological study of a high finite-slip LANF. To constrain the thermal and kinematic evolution of this MCC we apply the U/Pb, fission-track (FT) and (U-Th)/He methods. Zircon U/Pb analyses from the syn-extensional Suckling Granite that intrudes the footwall of the MCC yield an intrusion age of 3.3 Ma. Preliminary zircon FT ages from the same body indicate cooling below 300 °C at 2.7 Ma. Ages decrease to 2.0 Ma with increasing proximity to the Mai'iu Fault and imply cooling controlled by tectonic exhumation. Almost coincident zircon U/Pb and FT ages from the nearby syn-extensional Mai'iu Monzonite, on the other hand, record extremely rapid cooling from magmatic temperatures to 300 °C at 2 Ma. As apparent from the preliminary He extraction stage, these syn-extensional plutons have young zircon and apatite (U-Th)/He ages. These initial results suggest that the Mai'iu Fault was initiated as an extensional structure by 3.3 Ma. We infer that it reactivated an older ophiolitic suture that had emplaced the Papuan Ultramafic body in the Paleogene. Rapid cooling of the Mai'iu Monzonite indicates that it was intruded into a part of the MCC's footwall that was already shallow in the crust by 2 Ma. This inference is further supported by the mineral andalusite occurring in the contact

  10. Thrusting and transpressional shearing in the Pan-African nappe southwest El-Sibai core complex, Central Eastern Desert, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Wahed, Mohamed A. Abd.

    2008-01-01

    The Wadi El-Shush area in the Central Eastern Desert (CED) of Egypt is occupied by the Sibai core complex and its surrounding Pan-African nappe complex. The sequence of metamorphic and structural events in the Sibai core complex and the enveloping Pan-African nappe can be summarized as follows: (1) high temperature metamorphism associated with partial melting of amphibolites and development of gneissic and migmatitic rocks, (2) between 740 and 660 Ma, oblique island arc accretion resulted in Pan-African nappe emplacement and the intrusion of syn-tectonic gneissic tonalite at about 680 ± 10 Ma. The NNW-SSE shortening associated with oblique island arc accretion produced low angle NNW-directed thrusts and open folds in volcaniclastic metasediments, schists and isolated serpentinite masses (Pan-African nappe) and created NNE-trending recumbent folds in syn-tectonic granites. The NNW-SSE shortening has produced imbricate structures and thrust duplexes in the Pan-African nappe, (3) NE-ward thrusting which deformed the Pan-African nappe into SW-dipping imbricate slices. The ENE-WSW compression event has created NE-directed thrusts, folded the NNW-directed thrusts and produced NW-trending major and minor folds in the Pan-African nappe. Prograde metamorphism (480-525 °C at 2-4.5 kbar) was synchronous with thrusting events, (4) retrograde metamorphism during sinistral shearing along NNW- to NW-striking strike-slip shear zones (660-580 Ma), marking the external boundaries of the Sibai core complex and related to the Najd Fault System. Sinistral shearing has produced steeply dipping mylonitic foliation and open plunging folds in the NNW- and NE-ward thrust planes. Presence of retrograde metamorphism supports the slow exhumation of Sibai core complex under brittle-ductile low temperature conditions. Arc-accretion caused thrusting, imbrication and crustal thickening, whereas gravitational collapse of a compressed and thickened lithosphere initiated the sinistral movement

  11. A study of core electron binding energies in technetium-99m complexes by internal conversion electron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, J.F.; Archer, C.M.; Wei Chiu, K.; Latham, I.A.; Egdell, R.G.

    1991-01-01

    Core electron binding energies in a series of 99m Tc complexes have been studied by internal conversion electron spectroscopy (ICES) in a conventional x-ray photoelectron spectrometer. In both 3d and 3p regions, a chemical shift of about 1 eV is observed per unit increase in oxidation state. The role of ICES in characterizing radiopharmaceutical agents is illustrated with studies of some novel 99m Tc-phosphine complexes that have been developed for myocardial perfusion imaging. (author)

  12. CoreFlow: A computational platform for integration, analysis and modeling of complex biological data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pasculescu, Adrian; Schoof, Erwin; Creixell, Pau

    2014-01-01

    between data generation, analysis and manuscript writing. CoreFlow is being released to the scientific community as an open-sourced software package complete with proteomics-specific examples, which include corrections for incomplete isotopic labeling of peptides (SILAC) or arginine-to-proline conversion......A major challenge in mass spectrometry and other large-scale applications is how to handle, integrate, and model the data that is produced. Given the speed at which technology advances and the need to keep pace with biological experiments, we designed a computational platform, CoreFlow, which...... provides programmers with a framework to manage data in real-time. It allows users to upload data into a relational database (MySQL), and to create custom scripts in high-level languages such as R, Python, or Perl for processing, correcting and modeling this data. CoreFlow organizes these scripts...

  13. Identification of protein W, the elusive sixth subunit of the Rhodopseudomonas palustris reaction center-light harvesting 1 core complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Philip J; Hitchcock, Andrew; Swainsbury, David J K; Qian, Pu; Martin, Elizabeth C; Farmer, David A; Dickman, Mark J; Canniffe, Daniel P; Hunter, C Neil

    2018-02-01

    The X-ray crystal structure of the Rhodopseudomonas (Rps.) palustris reaction center-light harvesting 1 (RC-LH1) core complex revealed the presence of a sixth protein component, variably referred to in the literature as helix W, subunit W or protein W. The position of this protein prevents closure of the LH1 ring, possibly to allow diffusion of ubiquinone/ubiquinol between the RC and the cytochrome bc 1 complex in analogous fashion to the well-studied PufX protein from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The identity and function of helix W have remained unknown for over 13years; here we use a combination of biochemistry, mass spectrometry, molecular genetics and electron microscopy to identify this protein as RPA4402 in Rps. palustris CGA009. Protein W shares key conserved sequence features with PufX homologs, and although a deletion mutant was able to grow under photosynthetic conditions with no discernible phenotype, we show that a tagged version of protein W pulls down the RC-LH1 complex. Protein W is not encoded in the photosynthesis gene cluster and our data indicate that only approximately 10% of wild-type Rps. palustris core complexes contain this non-essential subunit; functional and evolutionary consequences of this observation are discussed. The ability to purify uniform RC-LH1 and RC-LH1-protein W preparations will also be beneficial for future structural studies of these bacterial core complexes. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Granite intrusion in a metamorphic core complex: the example of the Mykonos laccolith (Cyclades, Greece)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denèle, Yoann; Lecomte, Emmanuel; Jolivet, Laurent; Huet, Benjamin; Labrousse, Loïc.; Le Pourhiet, Laetitia; Lacombe, Olivier

    2010-05-01

    Numerical and analogical modelling underlined the importance of a pre-existing anomaly of viscosity-density such as a granite or migmatitic body below the brittle-ductile transition as a primary cause of metamorphic core complex (MCC) developpement. While field studies of MCC show a spatial and temporal link between MCC formation and plutonic activity, thermochronological studies show that there is no link between the intrusion of granites and the velocity of slip on the detachement plane. The Aegean domain is a good natural laboratory for studying the formation of MCC and syn-tectonic granites. In the northern Cyclades, the Mykonos-Delos-Rhenia MCC is characterised by the intrusion of a plurikilometric Late Miocene pluton of I-type granite within a migmatitic gneiss dome. AMS (Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility) and microstructural studies in the Mykonos granites combined with recent cooling rate data allow us to use the granites as strain marker. The Mykonos granitoïds form a plurikilometric laccolith slightly deeping to the east and presenting an elliptical shape with a N170°E long axis. The laccolith is strongly asymmetrical with an outlying root zone in the SW cropping out on Delos and Rhenia islands and a major body mainly developed to the NE and cropping out on Mykonos Island. The laccolith consists of various petrographic facies presenting straight contacts that demonstrate emplacement by successive pulses of more or less differentiated magmas. The laccolith was developed at the interface between the Cycladic Basement and the Blueschists Unit and within the Blueschist Unit. Two events of deformation have been recorded in the granites. The first event is characterized by submagmatic and high to middle temperature protomylonite microstructures developped during or just after the intrusion. The second event of deformation characterized by low temperature mylonites and cataclasites close to the major detachment fault corresponds to the localization of

  15. Structural and functional aspects of winged-helix domains at the core of transcription initiation complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichmann, Martin; Dumay-Odelot, Hélène; Fribourg, Sébastien

    2012-01-01

    The winged helix (WH) domain is found in core components of transcription systems in eukaryotes and prokaryotes. It represents a sub-class of the helix-turn-helix motif. The WH domain participates in establishing protein-DNA and protein-protein-interactions. Here, we discuss possible explanations for the enrichment of this motif in transcription systems.

  16. Nucleoporins as components of the nuclear pore complex core structure and Tpr as the architectural element of the nuclear basket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krull, Sandra; Thyberg, Johan; Björkroth, Birgitta; Rackwitz, Hans-Richard; Cordes, Volker C

    2004-09-01

    The vertebrate nuclear pore complex (NPC) is a macromolecular assembly of protein subcomplexes forming a structure of eightfold radial symmetry. The NPC core consists of globular subunits sandwiched between two coaxial ring-like structures of which the ring facing the nuclear interior is capped by a fibrous structure called the nuclear basket. By postembedding immunoelectron microscopy, we have mapped the positions of several human NPC proteins relative to the NPC core and its associated basket, including Nup93, Nup96, Nup98, Nup107, Nup153, Nup205, and the coiled coil-dominated 267-kDa protein Tpr. To further assess their contributions to NPC and basket architecture, the genes encoding Nup93, Nup96, Nup107, and Nup205 were posttranscriptionally silenced by RNA interference (RNAi) in HeLa cells, complementing recent RNAi experiments on Nup153 and Tpr. We show that Nup96 and Nup107 are core elements of the NPC proper that are essential for NPC assembly and docking of Nup153 and Tpr to the NPC. Nup93 and Nup205 are other NPC core elements that are important for long-term maintenance of NPCs but initially dispensable for the anchoring of Nup153 and Tpr. Immunogold-labeling for Nup98 also results in preferential labeling of NPC core regions, whereas Nup153 is shown to bind via its amino-terminal domain to the nuclear coaxial ring linking the NPC core structures and Tpr. The position of Tpr in turn is shown to coincide with that of the nuclear basket, with different Tpr protein domains corresponding to distinct basket segments. We propose a model in which Tpr constitutes the central architectural element that forms the scaffold of the nuclear basket.

  17. A study of the Eocene S-type granites of Chapedony metamorphic core complex (northeast of Yazd province, Central Iran)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakipour, A.; Torabi, Gh.

    2016-01-01

    The Eocene Chapedony metamorphic core complex, is located in western part of the Posht-e-Badam block. This complex is consisting of migmatite, gneiss, amphibolite, marble, micaschist and various types of granitoids. In middle part of this complex (Kalut-e-Chapedony), an Eocene granitic rock unit cross cuts the other rocks. The minerals of this granite are plagioclase (An 9 Ab 8 7O r 4), potassium feldspars (orthoclase), quartz, euhedral garnet (Alm 7 7Sps 1 3Prp 9 Grs 1 ), zircon, apatite, fibrolitic sillimanite and muscovite. Petrology and geochemical studies reveal calc-alkaline, peraluminous and S-type nature of the studied granites. Chondrite-normalized REE patterns represent evident negative anomaly of Eu and low values of the REEs. Continental crust and North American shale composite (NASC) - normalized multi-elements spider diagrams indicate trace elements depletion. These granites are formed by melting of continental crust sedimentary rocks, resulted by emplacement of mantle-derived magma at the bottom of continental crust which formed the Chapedony metamorphic core complex. The source rock of these granites should be a clay-rich sedimentary rock with low amount of plagioclase and CaO/Na 2 O ratio.

  18. Spatial and temporal variation of heavy metals in sediment cores from the Calcasieu River/Lake Complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, C.S.; Ramelow, G.J.; Beck, J.N.

    1987-01-01

    Sediment cores were obtained from several locations in the Calcasieu River/Lake Complex, including Calcasieu Lake, Calcasieu River, two bayou tributaries, and Lake Charles during the period from November 1983 to November 1985. The cores were analyzed for Cu, Zn, Cr, and Pb. The approximate sedimentation rate and a core chronology were determined by the use of 137 Cs and 210 Pb isotopes. The increase in metal concentrations after 1933, particularly along Bayou d'Inde where most industries are located, points to anthropogenic input if these metals to the system. The fact that metal concentrations tend to merge to a common value prior to 1940 throughout the system suggests that geological factors do not contribute to the observed variations in metal concentrations in this area. The background concentrations of heavy metals found in this study for the Calcasieu River/Lake Complex were: Cu (10 mg kg -1 ), Cr (25 mg kg -1 ), Pb (8 mg kg -1 ), and Zn (40 mg kg -1 ). The main emphasis of the study focused along Bayou d'Inde due to the enhanced levels of heavy metals found

  19. CoreFlow: a computational platform for integration, analysis and modeling of complex biological data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasculescu, Adrian; Schoof, Erwin M; Creixell, Pau; Zheng, Yong; Olhovsky, Marina; Tian, Ruijun; So, Jonathan; Vanderlaan, Rachel D; Pawson, Tony; Linding, Rune; Colwill, Karen

    2014-04-04

    A major challenge in mass spectrometry and other large-scale applications is how to handle, integrate, and model the data that is produced. Given the speed at which technology advances and the need to keep pace with biological experiments, we designed a computational platform, CoreFlow, which provides programmers with a framework to manage data in real-time. It allows users to upload data into a relational database (MySQL), and to create custom scripts in high-level languages such as R, Python, or Perl for processing, correcting and modeling this data. CoreFlow organizes these scripts into project-specific pipelines, tracks interdependencies between related tasks, and enables the generation of summary reports as well as publication-quality images. As a result, the gap between experimental and computational components of a typical large-scale biology project is reduced, decreasing the time between data generation, analysis and manuscript writing. CoreFlow is being released to the scientific community as an open-sourced software package complete with proteomics-specific examples, which include corrections for incomplete isotopic labeling of peptides (SILAC) or arginine-to-proline conversion, and modeling of multiple/selected reaction monitoring (MRM/SRM) results. CoreFlow was purposely designed as an environment for programmers to rapidly perform data analysis. These analyses are assembled into project-specific workflows that are readily shared with biologists to guide the next stages of experimentation. Its simple yet powerful interface provides a structure where scripts can be written and tested virtually simultaneously to shorten the life cycle of code development for a particular task. The scripts are exposed at every step so that a user can quickly see the relationships between the data, the assumptions that have been made, and the manipulations that have been performed. Since the scripts use commonly available programming languages, they can easily be

  20. Syn-extensional plutonism and peak metamorphism in the albion-raft river-grouse creek metamorphic core complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, A.; Miller, E.L.; Wooden, J.L.; Kozdon, R.; Valley, J.W.

    2011-01-01

    The Cassia plutonic complex (CPC) is a group of variably deformed, Oligocene granitic plutons exposed in the lower plate of the Albion-Raft River- Grouse Creek (ARG) metamorphic core complex of Idaho and Utah. The plutons range from granodiorite to garnet-bearing, leucogranite, and during intrusion, sillimanite- grade peak metamorphism and ductile attenuation occurred in the country rocks and normal-sense, amphibolite-grade deformation took place along the Middle Mountain shear zone. U-Pb zircon geochronology from three variably deformed plutons exposed in the lower plate of the ARG metamorphic core complex revealed that each zircon is comprised of inherited cores (dominantly late Archean) and Oligocene igneous overgrowths. Within each pluton, a spread of concordant ages from the Oligocene zircon overgrowths is interpreted as zircon recycling within a long-lived magmatic system. The plutons of the CPC have very low negative whole rock ??Nd values of -26 to -35, and initial Sr values of 0.714 to 0.718, consistent with an ancient, crustal source. Oxygen isotope ratios of the Oligocene zircon overgrowths from the CPC have an average ??18O value of 5.40 ?? 0.63 permil (2SD, n = 65) with a slight trend towards higher ??18O values through time. The ??18O values of the inherited cores of the zircons are more variable at 5.93 ?? 1.51 permil (2SD, n = 29). Therefore, we interpret the plutons of the CPC as derived, at least in part, from melting Archean crust based on the isotope geochemistry. In situ partial melting of the exposed Archean basement that was intruded by the Oligocene plutons of the CPC is excluded as the source for the CPC based on field relationships, age and geochemistry. Correlations between Ti and Hf concentrations in zircons from the CPC suggest that the magmatic system may have become hotter (higher Ti concentration in zircon) and less evolved (lower Hf in zircon concentration) through time. Therefore, the CPC represents prolonged or episodic magmatism

  1. Clinical efficacy of anti-glycopeptidolipid-core IgA test for diagnosing Mycobacterium avium complex infection in lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numata, Takanori; Araya, Jun; Yoshii, Yutaka; Shimizu, Kenichiro; Hara, Hiromichi; Nakayama, Katsutoshi; Kuwano, Kazuyoshi

    2015-11-01

    It is difficult to verify the bacteriological diagnosis of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection. The anti-glycopeptidolipid (GPL)-core IgA antibody test was recently developed as a diagnostic method for MAC pulmonary disease. Only a few studies evaluate its clinical efficacy. We conducted retrospective evaluations of clinical characteristics of patients suspected of MAC infection to explore the usefulness of the anti-GPL-core IgA antibody test. We retrospectively evaluated 296 patients who were suspected to have MAC infection and underwent anti-GPL-core IgA antibody test between March 2013 and July 2014 in Jikei University hospital. A total of 29 patients were diagnosed with 'definite MAC' based on the American Thoracic Society (ATS) criteria with multiple identifications of MAC. On the other hand, 106 patients were diagnosed with other pulmonary diseases than MAC. The sensitivity and specificity of anti-GPL-core IgA antibody test for MAC diagnosis were 58.6% and 98.1%, respectively. The definite MAC group showed no significant differences in strains, treatment history or number of segments involved. The duration of MAC disease in the positive-antibody group was significantly longer than in the negative-antibody group (P = 0.046). A significant increase in the false-negative rate was observed in patients with malignant disease (P = 0.029). The anti-GPL-core IgA antibody test demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of MAC infection especially in patients without malignant diseases. © 2015 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  2. Exploring molecular complexity with ALMA (EMoCA): Detection of three new hot cores in Sagittarius B2(N)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfand, M.; Belloche, A.; Menten, K. M.; Garrod, R. T.; Müller, H. S. P.

    2017-08-01

    Context. The Sagittarius B2 molecular cloud contains several sites forming high-mass stars. Sgr B2(N) is one of its main centers of activity. It hosts several compact and ultra-compact HII regions, as well as two known hot molecular cores (Sgr B2(N1) and Sgr B2(N2)) in the early stage of the high-mass star formation process, where complex organic molecules (COMs) are detected in the gas phase. Aims: Our goal is to use the high sensitivity of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) to characterize the hot core population in Sgr B2(N) and thereby shed new light on the star formation process in this star-forming region. Methods: We use a complete 3 mm spectral line survey conducted with ALMA to search for faint hot cores in the Sgr B2(N) region. The chemical composition of the detected sources and the column densities are derived by modeling the whole spectra under the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium. Population diagrams are constructed to fit rotational temperatures. Integrated intensity maps are produced to derive the peak position and fit the size of each molecule's emission distribution. The kinematic structure of the hot cores is investigated by analyzing the line wing emission of typical outflow tracers. The H2 column densities are computed from ALMA and SMA continuum emission maps. Results: We report the discovery of three new hot cores in Sgr B2(N) that we call Sgr B2(N3), Sgr B2(N4), and Sgr B2(N5). The three sources are associated with class II methanol masers, well known tracers of high-mass star formation, and Sgr B2(N5), also with a UCHII region. Their H2 column densities are found to be between approximately 16 and 36 times lower than the one of the main hot core Sgr B2(N1). The spectra of these new hot cores have spectral line densities of 11 up to 31 emission lines per GHz above the 7σ level, assigned to 22-25 molecules plus 13-20 less abundant isotopologs. We derive rotational temperatures of approximately 140-180 K for

  3. Core Transcriptional Regulatory Circuit Controlled by the TAL1 Complex in Human T Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Sanda, Takaomi; Lawton, Lee N.; Barrasa, M. Inmaculada; Fan, Zi Peng; Kohlhammer, Holger; Gutierrez, Alejandro; Ma, Wenxue; Tatarek, Jessica; Ahn, Yebin; Kelliher, Michelle A.; Jamieson, Catriona H.M.; Staudt, Louis M.; Young, Richard A.; Look, A. Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The oncogenic transcription factor TAL1/SCL is aberrantly expressed in over 40% of cases of human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), emphasizing its importance in the molecular pathogenesis of T-ALL. Here we identify the core transcriptional regulatory circuit controlled by TAL1 and its regulatory partners HEB, E2A, LMO1/2, GATA3 and RUNX1. We show that TAL1 forms a positive interconnected auto-regulatory loop with GATA3 and RUNX1, and that the TAL1 complex directly activates the MY...

  4. Structure of the exon junction core complex with a trapped DEAD-box ATPase bound to RNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christian Brix Folsted; Ballut, Lionel; Johansen, Jesper Sanderhoff

    2006-01-01

    exon junction core complex containing the DEAD-box adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) eukaryotic initiation factor 4AIII (eIF4AIII) bound to an ATP analog, MAGOH, Y14, a fragment of MLN51, and a polyuracil mRNA mimic. eIF4AIII interacts with the phosphate-ribose backbone of six consecutive nucleotides...... and prevents part of the bound RNA from being double stranded. The MAGOH and Y14 subunits lock eIF4AIII in a prehydrolysis state, and activation of the ATPase probably requires only modest conformational changes in eIF4AIII motif I....

  5. A Genome-Wide Association Study and Complex Network Identify Four Core Hub Genes in Bipolar Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zengyan Xie

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Bipolar disorder is a common and severe mental illness with unsolved pathophysiology. A genome-wide association study (GWAS has been used to find a number of risk genes, but it is difficult for a GWAS to find genes indirectly associated with a disease. To find core hub genes, we introduce a network analysis after the GWAS was conducted. Six thousand four hundred fifty eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs with p < 0.01 were sifted out from Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC dataset and mapped to 2045 genes, which are then compared with the protein–protein network. One hundred twelve genes with a degree >17 were chosen as hub genes from which five significant modules and four core hub genes (FBXL13, WDFY2, bFGF, and MTHFD1L were found. These core hub genes have not been reported to be directly associated with BD but may function by interacting with genes directly related to BD. Our method engenders new thoughts on finding genes indirectly associated with, but important for, complex diseases.

  6. Hetero-metallic trigonal cage-shaped dimeric Ni3K core complex of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K(I) complex has a dimeric structure with nine coordinated potassium atoms and six coordinated nickel atoms. ... S Nagasubramanian et al. ..... Arnold L R, Kenneth D K and Rokita S E 2006 Inorg. ... Cremer D and Pople J A 1975 J. Am. Chem.

  7. Chemodynamics of metal ion complexation by charged nanoparticles: a dimensionless rationale for soft, core-shell and hard particle types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, Jérôme F L

    2017-05-17

    Soft nanoparticulate complexants are defined by a spatial confinement of reactive sites and electric charges inside their 3D body. In turn, their reactivity with metal ions differs significantly from that of simple molecular ligands. A revisited form of the Eigen mechanism recently elucidated the processes leading to metal/soft particle pair formation. Depending on e.g. particle size and metal ion nature, chemodynamics of nanoparticulate metal complexes is controlled by metal conductive diffusion to/from the particles, by intraparticulate complex formation/dissociation kinetics, or by both. In this study, a formalism is elaborated to achieve a comprehensive and systematic identification of the rate-limiting step governing the overall formation and dissociation of nanoparticulate metal complexes. The theory covers the different types of spherical particulate complexants, i.e. 3D soft/permeable and core-shell particles, and hard particles with reactive sites at the surface. The nature of the rate-limiting step is formulated by a dynamical criterion involving a power law function of the ratio between particle radius and an intraparticulate reaction layer thickness defined by the key electrostatic, diffusional and kinetic components of metal complex formation/dissociation. The analysis clarifies the intertwined contributions of particle properties (size, soft or hard type, charge, density or number of reactive sites) and aqueous metal ion dehydration kinetics in defining the chemodynamic behavior of nanoparticulate metal complexes. For that purpose, fully parameterized chemodynamic portraits involving the defining features of particulate ligand and metal ion as well as the physicochemical conditions in the local intraparticulate environment, are constructed and thoroughly discussed under conditions of practical interest.

  8. Assembly and stoichiometry of the core structure of the bacterial flagellar type III export gate complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukumura, Takuma; Makino, Fumiaki; Dietsche, Tobias; Kinoshita, Miki; Kato, Takayuki; Wagner, Samuel; Namba, Keiichi; Imada, Katsumi; Minamino, Tohru

    2017-08-01

    The bacterial flagellar type III export apparatus, which is required for flagellar assembly beyond the cell membranes, consists of a transmembrane export gate complex and a cytoplasmic ATPase complex. FlhA, FlhB, FliP, FliQ, and FliR form the gate complex inside the basal body MS ring, although FliO is required for efficient export gate formation in Salmonella enterica. However, it remains unknown how they form the gate complex. Here we report that FliP forms a homohexameric ring with a diameter of 10 nm. Alanine substitutions of conserved Phe-137, Phe-150, and Glu-178 residues in the periplasmic domain of FliP (FliPP) inhibited FliP6 ring formation, suppressing flagellar protein export. FliO formed a 5-nm ring structure with 3 clamp-like structures that bind to the FliP6 ring. The crystal structure of FliPP derived from Thermotoga maritia, and structure-based photo-crosslinking experiments revealed that Phe-150 and Ser-156 of FliPP are involved in the FliP-FliP interactions and that Phe-150, Arg-152, Ser-156, and Pro-158 are responsible for the FliP-FliO interactions. Overexpression of FliP restored motility of a ∆fliO mutant to the wild-type level, suggesting that the FliP6 ring is a functional unit in the export gate complex and that FliO is not part of the final gate structure. Copurification assays revealed that FlhA, FlhB, FliQ, and FliR are associated with the FliO/FliP complex. We propose that the assembly of the export gate complex begins with FliP6 ring formation with the help of the FliO scaffold, followed by FliQ, FliR, and FlhB and finally FlhA during MS ring formation.

  9. Porous metal cones: gold standard for massive bone loss in complex revision knee arthroplasty? A systematic review of current literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divano, Stefano; Cavagnaro, Luca; Zanirato, Andrea; Basso, Marco; Felli, Lamberto; Formica, Matteo

    2018-04-18

    Revision knee arthroplasty is increasing, and in that case, bone loss management is still a challenging problem. In the last years, the body of literature and interest surrounding porous metal cones has grown, but few systematic evaluations of the existing evidence have been performed. The aim of our systematic review is to collect and critically analyze the available evidence about metal cones in revision knee arthroplasty especially focusing our attention on indications, results, complications, and infection rate of these promising orthopaedic devices. We performed a systematic review of the available English literature, considering the outcomes and the complications of tantalum cones. The combinations of keyword were "porous metal cones", "knee revision", "bone loss", "knee arthroplasty", "periprosthetic joint infection", and "outcome". From the starting 312 papers available, 20 manuscripts were finally included. Only one included study has a control group. The main indication for metal cones is type IIb and III defects according AORI classification. Most of the papers show good clinical and radiological outcomes with low rate of complications. The examined studies provide encouraging clinical and radiological short-to-mid-term outcomes. Clinical studies have shown a low rate of aseptic loosening, intraoperative fractures, infection rate and a lower failure rate than the previous treatment methods. Higher quality papers are needed to draw definitive conclusions about porous metal cones.

  10. Recommendations for a first Core Outcome Measurement set for complex regional PAin syndrome Clinical sTudies (COMPACT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieve, Sharon; Perez, Roberto SGM; Birklein, Frank; Brunner, Florian; Bruehl, Stephen; Harden R, Norman; Packham, Tara; Gobeil, Francois; Haigh, Richard; Holly, Janet; Terkelsen, Astrid; Davies, Lindsay; Lewis, Jennifer; Thomassen, Ilona; Connett, Robyn; Worth, Tina; Vatine, Jean-Jacques; McCabe, Candida S

    2017-01-01

    Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) is a persistent pain condition that remains incompletely understood and challenging to treat. Historically, a wide range of different outcome measures have been used to capture the multidimensional nature of CRPS. This has been a significant limiting factor in the advancement of our understanding of the mechanisms and management of CRPS. In 2013, an international consortium of patients, clinicians, researchers and industry representatives was established, to develop and agree on a minimum core set of standardised outcome measures for use in future CRPS clinical research, including but not limited to clinical trials within adult populations The development of a core measurement set was informed through workshops and supplementary work, using an iterative consensus process. ‘What is the clinical presentation and course of CRPS, and what factors influence it?’ was agreed as the most pertinent research question that our standardised set of patient-reported outcome measures should be selected to answer. The domains encompassing the key concepts necessary to answer the research question were agreed as: pain, disease severity, participation and physical function, emotional and psychological function, self efficacy, catastrophizing and patient's global impression of change. The final core measurement set included the optimum generic or condition-specific patient-reported questionnaire outcome measures, which captured the essence of each domain, and one clinician reported outcome measure to capture the degree of severity of CRPS. The next step is to test the feasibility and acceptability of collecting outcome measure data using the core measurement set in the CRPS population internationally. PMID:28178071

  11. Human Cytomegalovirus Nuclear Capsids Associate with the Core Nuclear Egress Complex and the Viral Protein Kinase pUL97.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milbradt, Jens; Sonntag, Eric; Wagner, Sabrina; Strojan, Hanife; Wangen, Christina; Lenac Rovis, Tihana; Lisnic, Berislav; Jonjic, Stipan; Sticht, Heinrich; Britt, William J; Schlötzer-Schrehardt, Ursula; Marschall, Manfred

    2018-01-13

    The nuclear phase of herpesvirus replication is regulated through the formation of regulatory multi-component protein complexes. Viral genomic replication is followed by nuclear capsid assembly, DNA encapsidation and nuclear egress. The latter has been studied intensely pointing to the formation of a viral core nuclear egress complex (NEC) that recruits a multimeric assembly of viral and cellular factors for the reorganization of the nuclear envelope. To date, the mechanism of the association of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) capsids with the NEC, which in turn initiates the specific steps of nuclear capsid budding, remains undefined. Here, we provide electron microscopy-based data demonstrating the association of both nuclear capsids and NEC proteins at nuclear lamina budding sites. Specifically, immunogold labelling of the core NEC constituent pUL53 and NEC-associated viral kinase pUL97 suggested an intranuclear NEC-capsid interaction. Staining patterns with phospho-specific lamin A/C antibodies are compatible with earlier postulates of targeted capsid egress at lamina-depleted areas. Important data were provided by co-immunoprecipitation and in vitro kinase analyses using lysates from HCMV-infected cells, nuclear fractions, or infectious virions. Data strongly suggest that nuclear capsids interact with pUL53 and pUL97. Combined, the findings support a refined concept of HCMV nuclear trafficking and NEC-capsid interaction.

  12. Human Cytomegalovirus Nuclear Capsids Associate with the Core Nuclear Egress Complex and the Viral Protein Kinase pUL97

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Milbradt

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The nuclear phase of herpesvirus replication is regulated through the formation of regulatory multi-component protein complexes. Viral genomic replication is followed by nuclear capsid assembly, DNA encapsidation and nuclear egress. The latter has been studied intensely pointing to the formation of a viral core nuclear egress complex (NEC that recruits a multimeric assembly of viral and cellular factors for the reorganization of the nuclear envelope. To date, the mechanism of the association of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV capsids with the NEC, which in turn initiates the specific steps of nuclear capsid budding, remains undefined. Here, we provide electron microscopy-based data demonstrating the association of both nuclear capsids and NEC proteins at nuclear lamina budding sites. Specifically, immunogold labelling of the core NEC constituent pUL53 and NEC-associated viral kinase pUL97 suggested an intranuclear NEC-capsid interaction. Staining patterns with phospho-specific lamin A/C antibodies are compatible with earlier postulates of targeted capsid egress at lamina-depleted areas. Important data were provided by co-immunoprecipitation and in vitro kinase analyses using lysates from HCMV-infected cells, nuclear fractions, or infectious virions. Data strongly suggest that nuclear capsids interact with pUL53 and pUL97. Combined, the findings support a refined concept of HCMV nuclear trafficking and NEC-capsid interaction.

  13. The effects of lower crustal strength and preexisting midcrustal shear zones on the formation of continental core complexes and low-angle normal faults

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Guangliang; Lavier, Luc L.

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the formation of core complexes and low-angle normal faults, we devise thermomechanical simulations on a simplified wedge-like orogenic hinterland that has initial topography, Moho relief, and a preexisting midcrustal shear zone that can accommodate shear at very low angles (<20°). We mainly vary the strength of the lower crust and the frictional strength of the preexisting midcrustal shear zone. We find that the strength of the lower crust and the existence and strength of a preexisting shear zone significantly affect the formation and evolution of core complexes. With increasing lower crustal strength, we recognize varying extensional features with decreasing exhumation rate: these are characterized by bivergent metamorphic massifs, classic Cordilleran metamorphic core complexes, multiple consecutive core complexes (or boudinage structures), and a flexural core complex underlined by a large subsurface low-angle detachment fault with a small convex curvature. Topographic loading and mantle buoyancy forces, together with divergent boundaries, drive a regional lower crustal flow that leads to the exhumation of the lower crust where intensive upper crustal faulting induces strong unloading. The detachment fault is a decoupling zone that accommodates large displacement and accumulates sustained shear strain at very low angle between upper and lower crust. Though the regional stress is largely Andersonian, we find non-Andersonian stress in regions adjacent to the preexisting shear zone and those with high topographic gradient. Our new models provide a view that is generally consistent with geological and geophysical observations on how core complexes form and evolve.

  14. The effects of lower crustal strength and preexisting midcrustal shear zones on the formation of continental core complexes and low-angle normal faults

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Guangliang

    2016-08-22

    To investigate the formation of core complexes and low-angle normal faults, we devise thermomechanical simulations on a simplified wedge-like orogenic hinterland that has initial topography, Moho relief, and a preexisting midcrustal shear zone that can accommodate shear at very low angles (<20°). We mainly vary the strength of the lower crust and the frictional strength of the preexisting midcrustal shear zone. We find that the strength of the lower crust and the existence and strength of a preexisting shear zone significantly affect the formation and evolution of core complexes. With increasing lower crustal strength, we recognize varying extensional features with decreasing exhumation rate: these are characterized by bivergent metamorphic massifs, classic Cordilleran metamorphic core complexes, multiple consecutive core complexes (or boudinage structures), and a flexural core complex underlined by a large subsurface low-angle detachment fault with a small convex curvature. Topographic loading and mantle buoyancy forces, together with divergent boundaries, drive a regional lower crustal flow that leads to the exhumation of the lower crust where intensive upper crustal faulting induces strong unloading. The detachment fault is a decoupling zone that accommodates large displacement and accumulates sustained shear strain at very low angle between upper and lower crust. Though the regional stress is largely Andersonian, we find non-Andersonian stress in regions adjacent to the preexisting shear zone and those with high topographic gradient. Our new models provide a view that is generally consistent with geological and geophysical observations on how core complexes form and evolve.

  15. Dual core processing: MRB1 is an emerging kinetoplast RNA editing complex

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hashimi, Hassan; Zimmer, S.L.; Ammerman, M. L.; Read, L. K.; Lukeš, Julius

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 2 (2013), s. 91-99 ISSN 1471-4922 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/12/2261; GA ČR GA204/09/1667 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : kinetoplastida * trypanosome * RNA editing * protein complexes * RECC * MRB1 Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 6.217, year: 2013 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1471492212001985

  16. Nanosized complexation assemblies housed inside reverse micelles churn out monocytic delivery cores for bendamustine hydrochloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Yuvraj; Chandrashekhar, Anumandla; Meher, Jaya Gopal; Durga Rao Viswanadham, K K; Pawar, Vivek K; Raval, Kavit; Sharma, Komal; Singh, Pankaj K; Kumar, Animesh; Chourasia, Manish K

    2017-04-01

    We explore a plausible method of targeting bendamustine hydrochloride (BM) to circulatory monocytes by exploiting their intrinsic endocytic/phagocytic capability. We do so by complexation of sodium alginate and chitosan inside dioctyl sulfo succinate sodium (AOT) reverse micelles to form bendamustine hydrochloride loaded nanoparticles (CANPs). Dynamic light scattering, electrophoretic mobility and UV spectroscopy were used to detail intra-micellar complexation dynamics and to prove that drug was co-captured during interaction of carbohydrate polymers. A fluorescent conjugate of drug (RBM) was used to trace its intracellular fate after its loading into nanoparticles. CANPs were sized below 150nm, had 75% drug entrapment and negative zeta potential (-30mV). Confocal microscopy demonstrated that developed chitosan alginate nanoparticles had the unique capability to carry BM specifically to its site of action. Quantitative and mechanism based cell uptake studies revealed that monocytes had voracious capacity to internalize CANPs via simultaneous scavenger receptor based endocytic and phagocytic mechanism. Comparative in vitro pharmacokinetic studies revealed obtainment of significantly greater intracellular drug levels when cells were treated with CANPs. This caused reduction in IC 50 (22.5±2.1μg/mL), enhancement in G 2 M cell cycle arrest, greater intracellular reactive oxygen species generation, and increased apopotic potential of bendamustine hydrochloride in THP-1 cells. Selective monocytic targeting of bendamustine hydrochloride using carbohydrate constructs can prove advantageous in case of leukemic disorders displaying overabundance of such cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Core regulatory network motif underlies the ocellar complex patterning in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Hidalgo, D.; Lemos, M. C.; Córdoba, A.

    2015-03-01

    During organogenesis, developmental programs governed by Gene Regulatory Networks (GRN) define the functionality, size and shape of the different constituents of living organisms. Robustness, thus, is an essential characteristic that GRNs need to fulfill in order to maintain viability and reproducibility in a species. In the present work we analyze the robustness of the patterning for the ocellar complex formation in Drosophila melanogaster fly. We have systematically pruned the GRN that drives the development of this visual system to obtain the minimum pathway able to satisfy this pattern. We found that the mechanism underlying the patterning obeys to the dynamics of a 3-nodes network motif with a double negative feedback loop fed by a morphogenetic gradient that triggers the inhibition in a French flag problem fashion. A Boolean modeling of the GRN confirms robustness in the patterning mechanism showing the same result for different network complexity levels. Interestingly, the network provides a steady state solution in the interocellar part of the patterning and an oscillatory regime in the ocelli. This theoretical result predicts that the ocellar pattern may underlie oscillatory dynamics in its genetic regulation.

  18. Poly-phase Deformation Recorded in the Core of the Coast Plutonic Complex, Western British Columbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamblock, J. M.; Andronicos, C. L.; Hurtado, J. M.

    2006-05-01

    The Coast Plutonic Complex of western British Columbia constitutes the largest batholith within the North American Cordillera. The field area for this study is Mt. Gamsby, an unexplored region above the Kitlope River, east of the Coast Shear Zone and at the southern end of the Central Gneiss Complex. The dominant lithologies on Mt. Gamsby include amphibolite and metasedimentary gneiss, gabbro-diorite, and orthogneiss. The amphibolite gneiss contains alternating amphibolite and felsic layers, with chlorite and epidote pervasive in some regions and garnet rare. This unit is commonly migmatized and contains various folds, boudins, and shear zones. The metasedimentary gneiss contains quartz, k-spar, graphite, chlorite, and perhaps cordierite, but appears to lack muscovite and aluminosilicates. The gabbro-diorite is salt and pepper in color and contains ca. 50% pyroxene and plagioclase. The orthogneiss is light in color and plagioclase-rich, with a texture varying from coarse-grained and undeformed to mylonitic. In some regions, this unit contains abundant mafic enclaves. At least four deformational events (D1-4) are observed. The second generation of folding, F2, is dominant in the area and resulted in the production of a large synform during sinistral shearing. The S1 foliation is observed only in the amphibolite gneiss and is orthogonal to S2, creating mushroom- type fold interference patterns. S2 foliations strike NW-SE and dip steeply to the SW, suggesting SW-NE directed shortening. L2 lineations developed on S2 plunge shallowly to the NW and SE, implying strike-slip motion. Although both dextral and sinistral motions are indicated by shear band data, sinistral motion is dominant. The average right and left lateral shear band orientation is nearly identical to S2, suggesting that right and left lateral shearing were synchronous. Foliations within the orthogneiss are parallel to the axes of S2 folds and boudins in the amphibolite gneiss, suggesting that emplacement

  19. Evidence that the assembly of the yeast cytochrome bc1 complex involves the formation of a large core structure in the inner mitochondrial membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zara, Vincenzo; Conte, Laura; Trumpower, Bernard L

    2009-04-01

    The assembly status of the cytochrome bc(1) complex has been analyzed in distinct yeast deletion strains in which genes for one or more of the bc(1) subunits were deleted. In all the yeast strains tested, a bc(1) sub-complex of approximately 500 kDa was found when the mitochondrial membranes were analyzed by blue native electrophoresis. The subsequent molecular characterization of this sub-complex, carried out in the second dimension by SDS/PAGE and immunodecoration, revealed the presence of the two catalytic subunits, cytochrome b and cytochrome c(1), associated with the noncatalytic subunits core protein 1, core protein 2, Qcr7p and Qcr8p. Together, these bc(1) subunits build up the core structure of the cytochrome bc(1) complex, which is then able to sequentially bind the remaining subunits, such as Qcr6p, Qcr9p, the Rieske iron-sulfur protein and Qcr10p. This bc(1) core structure may represent a true assembly intermediate during the maturation of the bc(1) complex; first, because of its wide distribution in distinct yeast deletion strains and, second, for its characteristics of stability, which resemble those of the intact homodimeric bc(1) complex. By contrast, the bc(1) core structure is unable to interact with the cytochrome c oxidase complex to form respiratory supercomplexes. The characterization of this novel core structure of the bc(1) complex provides a number of new elements clarifying the molecular events leading to the maturation of the yeast cytochrome bc(1) complex in the inner mitochondrial membrane.

  20. Evidence that assembly of the yeast cytochrome bc1 complex involves formation of a large core structure in the inner mitochondrial membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zara, Vincenzo; Conte, Laura; Trumpower, Bernard L.

    2009-01-01

    The assembly status of the cytochrome bc1 complex has been analyzed in distinct yeast deletion strains in which genes for one or more of the bc1 subunits had been deleted. In all the yeast strains tested a bc1 sub-complex of about 500 kDa was found when the mitochondrial membranes were analyzed by blue native electrophoresis. The subsequent molecular characterization of this sub-complex, carried out in the second dimension by SDS-PAGE and immunodecoration, revealed the presence of the two catalytic subunits cytochrome b and cytochrome c1, associated with the non catalytic subunits core protein 1, core protein 2, Qcr7p and Qcr8p. Altogether these bc1 subunits build up the core structure of the cytochrome bc1 complex which is then able to sequentially bind the remaining subunits, such as Qcr6p, Qcr9p, the Rieske iron-sulfur protein and Qcr10p. This bc1 core structure may represent a true assembly intermediate during the maturation of the bc1 complex, first because of its wide distribution in distinct yeast deletion strains and second for its characteristics of stability which resemble those of the intact homodimeric bc1 complex. Differently from this latter, however, the bc1 core structure is not able to interact with the cytochrome c oxidase complex to form respiratory supercomplexes. The characterization of this novel core structure of the bc1 complex provides a number of new elements for clarification of the molecular events leading to the maturation of the yeast cytochrome bc1 complex in the inner mitochondrial membrane. PMID:19236481

  1. Core transcriptional regulatory circuit controlled by the TAL1 complex in human T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanda, Takaomi; Lawton, Lee N; Barrasa, M Inmaculada; Fan, Zi Peng; Kohlhammer, Holger; Gutierrez, Alejandro; Ma, Wenxue; Tatarek, Jessica; Ahn, Yebin; Kelliher, Michelle A; Jamieson, Catriona H M; Staudt, Louis M; Young, Richard A; Look, A Thomas

    2012-08-14

    The oncogenic transcription factor TAL1/SCL is aberrantly expressed in over 40% of cases of human T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), emphasizing its importance in the molecular pathogenesis of T-ALL. Here we identify the core transcriptional regulatory circuit controlled by TAL1 and its regulatory partners HEB, E2A, LMO1/2, GATA3, and RUNX1. We show that TAL1 forms a positive interconnected autoregulatory loop with GATA3 and RUNX1 and that the TAL1 complex directly activates the MYB oncogene, forming a positive feed-forward regulatory loop that reinforces and stabilizes the TAL1-regulated oncogenic program. One of the critical downstream targets in this circuitry is the TRIB2 gene, which is oppositely regulated by TAL1 and E2A/HEB and is essential for the survival of T-ALL cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Description and hydrogeologic implications of cored sedimentary material from the 1975 drilling program at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex, Idaho

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rightmire, C.T.

    1984-08-01

    Samples of sedimentary material from interbeds between basalt flows and from fractures in the flows, taken from two drill cores at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory were analyzed for (1) particle-size distribution, (2) bulk mineralogy, (3) clay mineralogy, (4) cation-exchange capacity, and (5) carbonate content. Thin sections of selected sedimentary material were made for petrographic examination. These analyses are needed for a characterization of paths and rates of movement of radionuclides transported by infiltrating water. Preliminary interpretations indicate that (1) it may be possible to distinguish the various sedimentary interbeds on the basis of their mineralogy, (2) the presence of carbonate horizons in sedimentary interbeds may be utilized to approximate the time of exposure and the climate while the surface was exposed, and (3) the type and orientation of fracture-filling material may be utilized to determine the mechanism by which fractures were filled. 9 references, 14 figures, 8 tables

  3. FOCUS, Neutron Transport System for Complex Geometry Reactor Core and Shielding Problems by Monte-Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoogenboom, J.E.

    1980-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: FOCUS enables the calculation of any quantity related to neutron transport in reactor or shielding problems, but was especially designed to calculate differential quantities, such as point values at one or more of the space, energy, direction and time variables of quantities like neutron flux, detector response, reaction rate, etc. or averages of such quantities over a small volume of the phase space. Different types of problems can be treated: systems with a fixed neutron source which may be a mono-directional source located out- side the system, and Eigen function problems in which the neutron source distribution is given by the (unknown) fundamental mode Eigen function distribution. Using Monte Carlo methods complex 3- dimensional geometries and detailed cross section information can be treated. Cross section data are derived from ENDF/B, with anisotropic scattering and discrete or continuous inelastic scattering taken into account. Energy is treated as a continuous variable and time dependence may also be included. 2 - Method of solution: A transformed form of the adjoint Boltzmann equation in integral representation is solved for the space, energy, direction and time variables by Monte Carlo methods. Adjoint particles are defined with properties in some respects contrary to those of neutrons. Adjoint particle histories are constructed from which estimates are obtained of the desired quantity. Adjoint cross sections are defined with which the nuclide and reaction type are selected in a collision. The energy after a collision is selected from adjoint energy distributions calculated together with the adjoint cross sections in advance of the actual Monte Carlo calculation. For multiplying systems successive generations of adjoint particles are obtained which will die out for subcritical systems with a fixed neutron source and will be kept approximately stationary for Eigen function problems. Completely arbitrary problems can

  4. Eocene and Miocene extension, meteoric fluid infiltration, and core complex formation in the Great Basin (Raft River Mountains, Utah)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methner, Katharina; Mulch, Andreas; Teyssier, Christian; Wells, Michael L.; Cosca, Michael A.; Gottardi, Raphael; Gebelin, Aude; Chamberlain, C. Page

    2015-01-01

    Metamorphic core complexes (MCCs) in the North American Cordillera reflect the effects of lithospheric extension and contribute to crustal adjustments both during and after a protracted subduction history along the Pacific plate margin. While the Miocene-to-recent history of most MCCs in the Great Basin, including the Raft River-Albion-Grouse Creek MCC, is well documented, early Cenozoic tectonic fabrics are commonly severely overprinted. We present stable isotope, geochronological (40Ar/39Ar), and microstructural data from the Raft River detachment shear zone. Hydrogen isotope ratios of syntectonic white mica (δ2Hms) from mylonitic quartzite within the shear zone are very low (−90‰ to −154‰, Vienna SMOW) and result from multiphase synkinematic interaction with surface-derived fluids. 40Ar/39Ar geochronology reveals Eocene (re)crystallization of white mica with δ2Hms ≥ −154‰ in quartzite mylonite of the western segment of the detachment system. These δ2Hms values are distinctively lower than in localities farther east (δ2Hms ≥ −125‰), where 40Ar/39Ar geochronological data indicate Miocene (18–15 Ma) extensional shearing and mylonitic fabric formation. These data indicate that very low δ2H surface-derived fluids penetrated the brittle-ductile transition as early as the mid-Eocene during a first phase of exhumation along a detachment rooted to the east. In the eastern part of the core complex, prominent top-to-the-east ductile shearing, mid-Miocene 40Ar/39Ar ages, and higher δ2H values of recrystallized white mica, indicate Miocene structural and isotopic overprinting of Eocene fabrics.

  5. Monomeric RC-LH1 core complexes retard LH2 assembly and intracytoplasmic membrane formation in PufX-minus mutants of Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Peter G; Mothersole, David J; Ng, Irene W; Olsen, John D; Hunter, C Neil

    2011-09-01

    In the model photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides domains of light-harvesting 2 (LH2) complexes surround and interconnect dimeric reaction centre-light-harvesting 1-PufX (RC-LH1-PufX) 'core' complexes, forming extensive networks for energy transfer and trapping. These complexes are housed in spherical intracytoplasmic membranes (ICMs), which are assembled in a stepwise process where biosynthesis of core complexes tends to dominate the early stages of membrane invagination. The kinetics of LH2 assembly were measured in PufX mutants that assemble monomeric core complexes, as a consequence of either a twelve-residue N-terminal truncation of PufX (PufXΔ12) or the complete removal of PufX (PufX(-)). Lower rates of LH2 assembly and retarded maturation of membrane invagination were observed for the larger and less curved ICM from the PufX(-) mutant, consistent with the proposition that local membrane curvature, initiated by arrays of bent RC-LH1-PufX dimers, creates a favourable environment for stable assembly of LH2 complexes. Transmission electron microscopy and high-resolution atomic force microscopy were used to examine ICM morphology and membrane protein organisation in these mutants. Some partitioning of core and LH2 complexes was observed in PufX(-) membranes, resulting in locally ordered clusters of monomeric RC-LH1 complexes. The distribution of core and LH2 complexes in the three types of membrane examined is consistent with previous models of membrane curvature and domain formation (Frese et al., 2008), which demonstrated that a combination of crowding and asymmetries in sizes and shapes of membrane protein complexes drives membrane organisation. 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Systematic technology evaluation program for SiC/SiC composite-based accident-tolerant LWR fuel cladding and core structures: Revision 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katoh, Yutai [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Terrani, Kurt A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Fuels and core structures in current light water reactors (LWR’s) are vulnerable to catastrophic failure in severe accidents as unfortunately evidenced by the March 2011 Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident. This vulnerability is attributed primarily to the rapid oxidation kinetics of zirconium alloys in a water vapor environment at very high temperatures. Zr alloys are the primary material in LWR cores except for the fuel itself. Therefore, alternative materials with reduced oxidation kinetics as compared to zirconium alloys are sought to enable enhanced accident-tolerant fuels and cores.

  7. The Marbat metamorphic core-complex (Southern Arabian Peninsula) : reassessment of the evolution of a Neoproterozoic island-arc from petrological, geochemical and U-Pb zircon data

    OpenAIRE

    Barbey, P.; Denele, Y.; Paquette, J. L.; Berger, J.; Ganne, Jérôme; Roques, D.

    2018-01-01

    The Marbat basement (Sultanate of Oman) belongs to the Neoproterozoic accretion domain of the Arabian-Nubian shield. We present new geochronological, petrological and geochemical data as an extension of our previous study (Denele et al., 2017) re-interpreting this basement as a metamorphic core complex (MCC). We showed that this MCC consists of a metamorphic unit (Juffa complex) separated by an extensional detachment from a plutonic unit (Sadh complex and Tonalite plutons). Geochemical data s...

  8. Palaeomagnetic constraints on the evolution of the Atlantis Massif oceanic core complex (Mid-Atlantic Ridge, 30°N)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, A.; Pressling, N.; Gee, J. S.

    2012-04-01

    Oceanic core complexes expose lower crustal and upper mantle rocks on the seafloor by tectonic unroofing in the footwalls of large-slip detachment faults. They represent a fundamental component of the seafloor spreading system at slow and ultraslow axes. One of the most extensively studied oceanic core complexes is Atlantis Massif, located at 30°N at the intersection of the Atlantis Transform Fault and the Mid Atlantic Ridge (MAR). The central dome of the massif exposes the corrugated detachment fault surface and was drilled during IODP Expedition 304/305 (Hole U1309D). This sampled a 1.4 km faulted and complexly layered footwall section dominated by gabbroic lithologies with minor ultramafic rocks. Palaeomagnetic analyses demonstrate that the gabbroic sequences at Atlantis Massif carry highly stable remanent magnetizations that provide valuable information on the evolution of the section. Thermal demagnetization experiments recover high unblocking temperature components of reversed polarity (R1) throughout the gabbroic sequences. Correlation of structures observed on oriented borehole (FMS) images and those recorded on unoriented core pieces allows reorientation of R1 remanences. The mean remanence direction in true geographic coordinates constrains the tectonic rotation experienced by the Atlantis Massif footwall, indicating a 46°±6° counterclockwise around a MAR-parallel horizontal axis trending 011°±6°. The detachment fault therefore initiated at a steep dip of >50° and then rotated flexurally to its present day low angle geometry (consistent with a 'rolling-hinge' model for detachment evolution). In a number of intervals, the gabbros exhibit a complex remanence structure with the presence of additional intermediate temperature normal (N1) and lower temperature reversed (R2) polarity components, suggesting an extended period of remanence acquisition during different polarity intervals. Sharp break-points between different polarity components suggest

  9. STRIP1, a core component of STRIPAK complexes, is essential for normal mesoderm migration in the mouse embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzi, Hisham; Soroka, Ekaterina; Alcorn, Heather L; Anderson, Kathryn V

    2017-12-19

    Regulated mesoderm migration is necessary for the proper morphogenesis and organ formation during embryonic development. Cell migration and its dependence on the cytoskeleton and signaling machines have been studied extensively in cultured cells; in contrast, remarkably little is known about the mechanisms that regulate mesoderm cell migration in vivo. Here, we report the identification and characterization of a mouse mutation in striatin-interacting protein 1 ( Strip1 ) that disrupts migration of the mesoderm after the gastrulation epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). STRIP1 is a core component of the biochemically defined mammalian striatin-interacting phosphatases and kinase (STRIPAK) complexes that appear to act through regulation of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), but their functions in mammals in vivo have not been examined. Strip1 -null mutants arrest development at midgestation with profound disruptions in the organization of the mesoderm and its derivatives, including a complete failure of the anterior extension of axial mesoderm. Analysis of cultured mesoderm explants and mouse embryonic fibroblasts from null mutants shows that the mesoderm migration defect is correlated with decreased cell spreading, abnormal focal adhesions, changes in the organization of the actin cytoskeleton, and decreased velocity of cell migration. The results show that STRIPAK complexes are essential for cell migration and tissue morphogenesis in vivo. Copyright © 2017 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  10. A revision of the history of the Colletotrichum acutatum species complex in the Nordic countries based on herbarium specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundelin, Thomas; Strømeng, Gunn Mari; Gjærum, Halvor B; Amby, Daniel Buchvaldt; Ørstad, Kari; Jensen, Birgit; Lund, Ole Søgaard; Stensvand, Arne

    2015-08-01

    Herbaria collections containing plants with disease symptoms are highly valuable, and they are often the only way to investigate outbreaks and epidemics from the past as the number of viable isolates in culture collections is often limited. Species belonging to the Colletotrichum acutatum complex infect a range of important crops. As members of the C. acutatum complex are easily confused with other Colletotrichum species, molecular methods are central for the correct identification. We performed molecular analyses on 21 herbaria specimens, displaying anthracnose symptoms, collected in Norway and Denmark before the first confirmed findings of C. acutatum complex members in this region. Sequencing parts of the fungal ITS regions showed that members of the species complex were present in 13 of the 21 specimens collected in different parts of Norway and Denmark between 1948 and 1991, representing seven plant hosts (three cherry species, apple, raspberry and rhododendron). This is the first time herbarium specimens have been used to study these pathogens under Nordic conditions. Differences in the ITS sequences suggest the presence of different genotypes within the complex, indicating a well-established population. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. United States Department of Energy's reactor core protection evaluation methodology for fires at RBMK and VVER nuclear power plants. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-06-01

    This document provides operators of Soviet-designed RBMK (graphite moderated light water boiling water reactor) and VVER (pressurized light water reactor) nuclear power plants with a systematic Methodology to qualitatively evaluate plant response to fires and to identify remedies to protect the reactor core from fire-initiated damage

  12. Ternary polyplex micelles with PEG shells and intermediate barrier to complexed DNA cores for efficient systemic gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junjie; Chen, Qixian; Zha, Zengshi; Li, Hui; Toh, Kazuko; Dirisala, Anjaneyulu; Matsumoto, Yu; Osada, Kensuke; Kataoka, Kazunori; Ge, Zhishen

    2015-07-10

    Simultaneous achievement of prolonged retention in blood circulation and efficient gene transfection activity in target tissues has always been a major challenge hindering in vivo applications of nonviral gene vectors via systemic administration. Herein, we constructed novel rod-shaped ternary polyplex micelles (TPMs) via complexation between the mixed block copolymers of poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly{N'-[N-(2-aminoethyl)-2-aminoethyl]aspartamide} (PEG-b-PAsp(DET)) and poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-b-PAsp(DET) (PNIPAM-b-PAsp(DET)) and plasmid DNA (pDNA) at room temperature, exhibiting distinct temperature-responsive formation of a hydrophobic intermediate layer between PEG shells and pDNA cores through facile temperature increase from room temperature to body temperature (~37 °C). As compared with binary polyplex micelles of PEG-b-PAsp(DET) (BPMs), TPMs were confirmed to condense pDNA into a more compact structure, which achieved enhanced tolerability to nuclease digestion and strong counter polyanion exchange. In vitro gene transfection results demonstrated TPMs exhibiting enhanced gene transfection efficiency due to efficient cellular uptake and endosomal escape. Moreover, in vivo performance evaluation after intravenous injection confirmed that TPMs achieved significantly prolonged blood circulation, high tumor accumulation, and promoted gene expression in tumor tissue. Moreover, TPMs loading therapeutic pDNA encoding an anti-angiogenic protein remarkably suppressed tumor growth following intravenous injection into H22 tumor-bearing mice. These results suggest TPMs with PEG shells and facilely engineered intermediate barrier to inner complexed pDNA have great potentials as systemic nonviral gene vectors for cancer gene therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Planting increases the abundance and structure complexity of soil core functional genes relevant to carbon and nitrogen cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Liang, Yuting; Jiang, Yuji; Yang, Yunfeng; Xue, Kai; Xiong, Jinbo; Zhou, Jizhong; Sun, Bo

    2015-09-23

    Plants have an important impact on soil microbial communities and their functions. However, how plants determine the microbial composition and network interactions is still poorly understood. During a four-year field experiment, we investigated the functional gene composition of three types of soils (Phaeozem, Cambisols and Acrisol) under maize planting and bare fallow regimes located in cold temperate, warm temperate and subtropical regions, respectively. The core genes were identified using high-throughput functional gene microarray (GeoChip 3.0), and functional molecular ecological networks (fMENs) were subsequently developed with the random matrix theory (RMT)-based conceptual framework. Our results demonstrated that planting significantly (P soils and 83.5% of microbial alpha-diversity can be explained by the plant factor. Moreover, planting had significant impacts on the microbial community structure and the network interactions of the microbial communities. The calculated network complexity was higher under maize planting than under bare fallow regimes. The increase of the functional genes led to an increase in both soil respiration and nitrification potential with maize planting, indicating that changes in the soil microbial communities and network interactions influenced ecological functioning.

  14. The N terminus of cGAS de-oligomerizes the cGAS:DNA complex and lifts the DNA size restriction of core-cGAS activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Arum; Park, Eun-Byeol; Lee, Janghyun; Choi, Byong-Seok; Kang, Suk-Jo

    2017-03-01

    Cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) is a DNA-sensing enzyme in the innate immune system. Recent studies using core-cGAS lacking the N terminus investigated the mechanism for binding of double-stranded (ds) DNA and synthesis of 2',3'-cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP), a secondary messenger that ultimately induces type I interferons. However, the function of the N terminus of cGAS remains largely unknown. Here, we found that the N terminus enhanced the activity of core-cGAS in vivo. Importantly, the catalytic activity of core-cGAS decreased as the length of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) increased, but the diminished activity was restored by addition of the N terminus. Furthermore, the N terminus de-oligomerized the 2 : 2 complex of core-cGAS and dsDNA into a 1 : 1 complex, suggesting that the N terminus enhanced the activity of core-cGAS by facilitating formation of a monomeric complex of cGAS and DNA. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  15. Limnephilid taxa revised by speciation traits: Rhadicoleptus, Isogamus, Melampophylax genera, Chaetopteryx rugulosa, Psilopteryx psorosa species groups, Drusus bolivari, Annitella kosciuszkii species complexes (Trichoptera: Limnephilidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oláh, J.

    2015-06-01

    redescription of Drusus bolivari (McLachlan, 1876, with species status resurrection of D. estrellensis (McLachlan, 1884 stat. restit., with description of five new species: D. carmenae Oláh, sp. nov., D. gonzalezi Oláh, sp. nov., D. grafi Oláh, sp. nov., D. gredosensis Oláh, sp. nov., D. jesusi Oláh, sp. nov., D. pyrenensis Oláh & Coppa, sp. nov. Genus Isogamus is revised with description of two new species: I. baloghi Oláh, sp. nov., I. balinti Oláh, sp. nov. Melampophylax genus revised with one new species cluster: M. nepos, with two new species descriptions: M. keses Coppa & Oláh, sp. nov. M. szczesnyorum Oláh & Chvojka, sp. nov., with three new species status: M. banaticus Botosaneanu, 1995 stat. nov., M. gutinicus Botosaneanu, 1995 stat. nov., M. triangulifera Botosaneanu, 1957 stat. nov. Rhadicoleptus genus revised with redescription of R. alpestris (Kolenati, 1848, with three new species status: R. macedonicus Botosaneanu & Riedel, 1965 stat. nov. R. meridiocarpaticus Botosaneanu & Riedel, 1965 stat. nov. R. sylvanocarpaticus Botosaneanu & Riedel, 1965 stat. nov., with one species status resurrection: R. spinifer (McLachlan, 1875 stat. restit. Based on paramere evolution the Rhadicoleptus genus is transferred from the tribe Limnephilini to Stenophylacini. Annitella kosciuszkii new species complex has been erected and revised with redescription of A. chomiacensis (Dziędzielewicz, 1908, A. lateroproducta (Botosaneanu, 1952, with one species status resurrection: A. kosciuszkii Klapálek, 1907 stat. restit., with description of a new species: A. wolosatka Oláh &Szczęsny, sp. nov., with two new synonyms: A. dziedzielewiczi Schmid, 1952 synonym of A. kosciuszkii. syn. nov., A. transylvanica Murgoci, 1957 synonym of A. kosciuszkii. syn. nov. Chaetopteryx rugulosa species group revised with description of five new species: C. balcanica Oláh, sp. nov., C. karima Oláh, sp. nov., C. kozarensis Oláh, sp. nov., C. psunjensis Oláh, sp. nov., C. tompa Oláh, sp. nov

  16. IGCSE core mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Wall, Terry

    2013-01-01

    Give your core level students the support and framework they require to get their best grades with this book dedicated to the core level content of the revised syllabus and written specifically to ensure a more appropriate pace. This title has been written for Core content of the revised Cambridge IGCSE Mathematics (0580) syllabus for first teaching from 2013. ? Gives students the practice they require to deepen their understanding through plenty of practice questions. ? Consolidates learning with unique digital resources on the CD, included free with every book. We are working with Cambridge

  17. Revising Translations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Kirsten Wølch; Schjoldager, Anne

    2011-01-01

    The paper explains the theoretical background and findings of an empirical study of revision policies, using Denmark as a case in point. After an overview of important definitions, types and parameters, the paper explains the methods and data gathered from a questionnaire survey and an interview...... survey. Results clearly show that most translation companies regard both unilingual and comparative revisions as essential components of professional quality assurance. Data indicate that revision is rarely fully comparative, as the preferred procedure seems to be a unilingual revision followed by a more...... or less comparative rereading. Though questionnaire data seem to indicate that translation companies use linguistic correctness and presentation as the only revision parameters, interview data reveal that textual and communicative aspects are also considered. Generally speaking, revision is not carried...

  18. Femtosecond visible/visible and visible/mid-IR pump-probe study of the photosystem II core antenna complex CP47

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, M.L.; Breton, J.; van Wilderen, L.; Dekker, J.P.; van Grondelle, R.

    2004-01-01

    CP47 is one of the two core antenna proteins of Photosystem II involved in the transfer of solar energy toward the photochemically active reaction center, the D1D2cytb559 complex. We have performed vis/vis and vis/mid-IR pump-probe experiments at room temperature as a first step in linking the

  19. Exhumation And Evolution Of Al-Taif Metamorphic Core Complex (Western Arabian Shield) During Dextral Transpressional Regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Fakharani, Abdelhamid; El-Shafei, Mohamed; Hamimi, Zakaria

    2013-04-01

    Al-Taif metamorphic belt is a NE-trending belt decorating steeply dipping major transpressional shear zone in western central Arabian Shield. It comprises gneisses and migmatites that were syn-kinematically invaded under relatively high-grade metamorphic conditions by voluminous granitic bodies and a confluence of pegmatitic veins. Field mapping and outcrop investigation reveal that the belt was evolved during at least three Neoproterozoic deformations (D1-D3). D1 and D2 were progressive deformations, took place during a contractional regime, and resulted in SW-mildly plunging isoclinal folds, superimposed by NE- gently to moderately plunging folds. The prevailed tectonic regime during D3was primordially plastic, accompanied with a NE-oriented oblique shearing that was subsequently evolved as semi ductile-semi brittle shearing during an episode of exhumation. Mesoscopic kinematic indicators, as well as microstructural analysis of the collected rock samples, reflect dextral sense of shearing. Such style of shearing is most probably the conjugate trend of the NNW- to NW- oriented sinistral Najd Fault System. Various cross cutting structures and overprinting relations were detected at both the outcrop- and microscopic scales, including; ductile S2folia with ESE-plunging amphibole mineral lineations; narrow, steeply dipping ductile D2 shear zones; and semi brittle to brittle fault zones. S-C' fabrics, asymmetric strain shadows around porphyroclasts and drag fault indicate a top-to-the-NE sense of shear for most structures. The geometry and style of deformation, together with map pattern highlighted in this study attest a simple shear rotational strain origin for the domed mylonitic foliation (S1) and mineral elongation lineation (L1). This result is in congruent with the landform pattern recorded in the inner parts of the metamorphic core complexes.

  20. DEPTH-CHARGE static and time-dependent perturbation/sensitivity system for nuclear reactor core analysis. Revision I. [DEPTH-CHARGE code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, J.R.

    1985-04-01

    This report provides the background theory, user input, and sample problems required for the efficient application of the DEPTH-CHARGE system - a code black for both static and time-dependent perturbation theory and data sensitivity analyses. The DEPTH-CHARGE system is of modular construction and has been implemented within the VENTURE-BURNER computational system at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The DEPTH module (coupled with VENTURE) solves for the three adjoint functions of Depletion Perturbation Theory and calculates the desired time-dependent derivatives of the response with respect to the nuclide concentrations and nuclear data utilized in the reference model. The CHARGE code is a collection of utility routines for general data manipulation and input preparation and considerably extends the usefulness of the system through the automatic generation of adjoint sources, estimated perturbed responses, and relative data sensitivity coefficients. Combined, the DEPTH-CHARGE system provides, for the first time, a complete generalized first-order perturbation/sensitivity theory capability for both static and time-dependent analyses of realistic multidimensional reactor models. This current documentation incorporates minor revisions to the original DEPTH-CHARGE documentation (ORNL/CSD-78) to reflect some new capabilities within the individual codes.

  1. Core-shell nanofibers of curcumin/cyclodextrin inclusion complex and polylactic acid: Enhanced water solubility and slow release of curcumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aytac, Zeynep; Uyar, Tamer

    2017-02-25

    Core-shell nanofibers were designed via electrospinning using inclusion complex (IC) of model hydrophobic drug (curcumin, CUR) with cyclodextrin (CD) in the core and polymer (polylactic acid, PLA) in the shell (cCUR/HPβCD-IC-sPLA-NF). CD-IC of CUR and HPβCD was formed at 1:2 molar ratio. The successful formation of core-shell nanofibers was revealed by TEM and CLSM images. cCUR/HPβCD-IC-sPLA-NF released CUR slowly but much more in total than PLA-CUR-NF at pH 1 and pH 7.4 due to the restriction of CUR in the core of nanofibers and solubility improvement shown in phase solubility diagram, respectively. Improved antioxidant activity of cCUR/HPβCD-IC-sPLA-NF in methanol:water (1:1) is related with the solubility enhancement achieved in water based system. The slow reaction of cCUR/HPβCD-IC-sPLA-NF in methanol is associated with the shell inhibiting the quick release of CUR. On the other hand, cCUR/HPβCD-IC-sPLA-NF exhibited slightly higher rate of antioxidant activity than PLA-CUR-NF in methanol:water (1:1) owing to the enhanced solubility. To conclude, slow release of CUR was achieved by core-shell nanofiber structure and inclusion complexation of CUR with HPβCD provides high solubility. Briefly, electrospinning of core-shell nanofibers with CD-IC core could offer slow release of drugs as well as solubility enhancement for hydrophobic drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Structural and magnetic characterization of three tetranuclear Cu(II) complexes with face-sharing-dicubane/double-open-cubane like core framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Aparup; Bertolasi, Valerio; Figuerola, Albert; Manna, Subal Chandra

    2017-05-01

    Three novel tetranuclear copper(II) complexes namely [Cu4(L1)4]•2(dmf) (1), [Cu4(L1)4] (2) and [Cu4(L2)2(HL2)2(H2O)2]•2(ClO4)·6(H2O) (3) (H2L1, (E)-2-((1-hydroxybutan-2-ylimino)methyl)phenol; H2L2, (E)-2-((1-hydroxybutan-2-ylimino)methyl)-6-methoxyphenol)) were synthesized from the self-assembly of copper(II) perchlorate and the tridentate Schiff base ligands. The structural determination reveals that complex 1 crystallizes in the monoclinic system with space group C2/c, whereas both the complexes 2 and 3 crystallize in the triclinic system with space group P-1. Complexes 1 and 2 possess face-sharing dicubane core, on the other hand complex 3 has double open cubane core structure. The copper(II) ions in the cubane core are in distorted square planar geometries, and weak π…π and C-H…π interactions lead to formation of a 2D supramolecular architecture for complexes 1 and 2. At room temperature complexes 1, 2 and 3, exhibit fluorescence with a quantum yield (Φs) of 0.47, 0.49 and 0.38, respectively. Variable temperature magnetic susceptibility measurements in the range 2-300 K indicate an overall weak antiferromagnetic exchange coupling in all complexes. The PHI program was used to study their magnetic behaviour. In agreement with their face-sharing dicubane structure, a Hamiltonian of the type H =- J1(S1S2+S1S2'+S1'S2+S1'S2') - J2S1S1', where S1 = S1' = S2 = S2' = SCu =1/2, was used for studying complexes 1 and 2. Simulations performed suggest magnetic exchange constants with values close to J1 =-20 cm-1 and J2 =0 cm-1 for these complexes. On the other hand, the spin Hamiltonian H =- J1(S1S4+S2S3) - J2(S1S3+S2S4) - J3S1S2, where S1 = S2 = S3 = S4 = SCu =1/2, was used to study the magnetic behaviour of the double open cubane core of complex 3 and a good agreement between the experimental and simulated results was found by using the parameters g1 = g2 =2.20, g3 = g4 =2.18, J1 =-36 cm-1, J2 =-44 cm-1 and J3 =0 cm-1.

  3. Characterization of the low-temperature triplet state of chlorophyll in photosystem II core complexes: Application of phosphorescence measurements and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabelin, Alexey A; Neverov, Konstantin V; Krasnovsky, Alexander A; Shkuropatova, Valentina A; Shuvalov, Vladimir A; Shkuropatov, Anatoly Ya

    2016-06-01

    Phosphorescence measurements at 77 K and light-induced FTIR difference spectroscopy at 95 K were applied to study of the triplet state of chlorophyll a ((3)Chl) in photosystem II (PSII) core complexes isolated from spinach. Using both methods, (3)Chl was observed in the core preparations with doubly reduced primary quinone acceptor QA. The spectral parameters of Chl phosphorescence resemble those in the isolated PSII reaction centers (RCs). The main spectral maximum and the lifetime of the phosphorescence corresponded to 955±1 nm and of 1.65±0.05 ms respectively; in the excitation spectrum, the absorption maxima of all core complex pigments (Chl, pheophytin a (Pheo), and β-carotene) were observed. The differential signal at 1667(-)/1628(+)cm(-1) reflecting a downshift of the stretching frequency of the 13(1)-keto C=O group of Chl was found to dominate in the triplet-minus-singlet FTIR difference spectrum of core complexes. Based on FTIR results and literature data, it is proposed that (3)Chl is mostly localized on the accessory chlorophyll that is in triplet equilibrium with P680. Analysis of the data suggests that the Chl triplet state responsible for the phosphorescence and the FTIR difference spectrum is mainly generated due to charge recombination in the reaction center radical pair P680(+)PheoD1(-), and the energy and temporal parameters of this triplet state as well as the molecular environment and interactions of the triplet-bearing Chl molecule are similar in the PSII core complexes and isolated PSII RCs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Strike-slip linked core complexes: A new kinematic model of basement rock exhumation in a crustal-scale fault system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Sven Erik; Passchier, Cees; Abu-Alam, Tamer; Stüwe, Kurt

    2014-05-01

    Metamorphic core complexes usually develop as extensional features during continental crustal thinning, such as the Basin and Range and the Aegean Terrane. The Najd fault system in Saudi Arabia is a 2000 km-long and 400 km-wide complex network of crustal-scale strike-slip shear zones in a Neoproterozoic collision zone. Locally, the anastomosing shear zones lead to exhumation of lower crustal segments and represent a new kinematic model for the development of core complexes. We report on two such structures: the Qazaz complex in Saudi Arabia and the Hafafit complex in Egypt. The 15 km-wide Qazaz complex is a triangular dome of gently dipping mylonitic foliations within the 140 km-long sinistral strike-slip Qazaz mylonite zone. The gneissic dome consists of high-grade rocks, surrounded by low-grade metasediments and metavolcanics. The main SE-trending strike-slip Qazaz shear zone splits southwards into two branches around the gneiss dome: the western branch is continuous with the shallow dipping mylonites of the dome core, without overprinting, and changes by more than 90 degrees from a NS-trending strike-slip zone to an EW-trending 40 degree south-dipping detachment that bounds the gneiss dome to the south. The eastern SE-trending sinistral strike-slip shear zone branch is slightly younger and transects the central dome fabrics. The gneiss dome appears to have formed along a jog in the strike-slip shear zone during 40 km of horizontal strike-slip motion, which caused local exhumation of lower crustal rocks by 25 km along the detachment. The eastern shear zone branch formed later during exhumation, transacted the gneiss dome and offset the two parts by another 70 km. The Hafafit core complex in Egypt is of similar shape and size to the Qazaz structure, but forms the northern termination of a sinistral strike-slip zone that is at least 100 km in length. This zone may continue into Saudi Arabia as the Ajjaj shear zone for another 100 km. The NW trending strike slip

  5. BWRVIP-123, Revision 1NP: BWR Vessel and Internals Project Removal and Analysis of Material Samples from Core Shroud and Top Guide at Susquehanna Unit 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howell, D.; Haertel, T.; Lindberg, J.; Oliver, B.; Greenwood, L.

    2005-01-01

    Fast and thermal fluence were determined by a laboratory analysis of the samples. Fluence in the upper regions of the shroud (between the H1 and H2 welds) was substantially lower than that in the belt line region (near the H4 weld). Fluence in the top guide was significantly higher than fluence on the core shroud. As expected, helium concentrations were highest in regions where fluence was highest. Estimates of the initial boron concentration were similar to measurements made on materials removed from other reactors. A technical justification evaluated the acceptability of the sampling process with respect to structural consequences of material removal and to increased cracking susceptibility due to the as-left condition. It was determined that the sampling process was acceptable on both counts

  6. A revised estimate of the distance to the clouds in the Chamaeleon complex using the Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voirin, Jordan; Manara, Carlo F.; Prusti, Timo

    2018-03-01

    Context. The determination of the distance to dark star-forming clouds is a key parameter to derive the properties of the cloud itself and of its stellar content. This parameter is still loosely constrained even in nearby star-forming regions. Aim. We want to determine the distances to the clouds in the Chamaeleon-Musca complex and explore the connection between these clouds and the large-scale cloud structures in the Galaxy. Methods: We used the newly estimated distances obtained from the parallaxes measured by the Gaia satellite and included in the Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution catalog. When known members of a region are included in this catalog we used their distances to infer the distance to the cloud. Otherwise, we analyzed the dependence of the color excess on the distance of the stars and looked for a turn-on of this excess, which is a proxy of the position of the front-edge of the star-forming cloud. Results: We are able to measure the distance to the three Chamaeleon clouds. The distance to Chamaeleon I is 179-10-10+11+11 pc, where the quoted uncertainties are statistical and systematic uncertainties, respectively, 20 pc further away than previously assumed. The Chamaeleon II cloud is located at the distance of 181-5-10+6+11 pc, which agrees with previous estimates. We are able to measure for the first time a distance to the Chamaeleon III cloud of 199-7-11+8+12 pc. Finally, the distance of the Musca cloud is smaller than 603-70-92+91+133 pc. These estimates do not allow us to distinguish between the possibility that the Chamaeleon clouds are part of a sheet of clouds parallel to the Galactic plane, or perpendicular to it. Conclusions: We measured a larger distance to the Chamaeleon I cloud than assumed in the past, confirmed the distance to the Chamaeleon II region, and measured for the first time the distance to the Chamaleon III cloud. These values are consistent with the scenario in which the three clouds are part of a single large-scale structure

  7. An oceanic core complex (OCC) in the Albanian Dinarides? Preliminary paleomagnetic and structural results from the Mirdita Ophiolite (northern Albania)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffione, M.; Morris, A.; Anderson, M.

    2010-12-01

    Oceanic core complexes (OCCs) are dome-shaped massifs commonly associated with the inside corners of the intersection of transform faults and slow (and ultra-slow) spreading centres. They represent the uplifted footwalls of large-slip oceanic detachment faults (e.g. Cann et al., 1997; Blackman et al., 1998) and are composed of mantle and lower crustal rocks exhumed during fault displacement (Smith et al., 2006, 2008). Recent paleomagnetic studies of core samples from OCCs in the Atlantic Ocean (Morris et al., 2009; MacLeod et al., in prep) have confirmed that footwall sections undergo substantial rotation around (sub-) horizontal axes. These studies, therefore, support “rolling hinge” models for the evolution of OCCs, whereby oceanic detachment faults initiate at a steep angle at depth and then “roll-over” to their present day low angle orientations during unroofing (Buck, 1988; Wernicke & Axen, 1988; Lavier et al., 1999). However, a fully integrated paleomagnetic and structural analysis of this process is hampered by the one-dimensional sampling provided by ocean drilling of OCC footwalls. Therefore, ancient analogues for OCCs in ophiolites are of great interest, as these potentially provide 3-D exposures of these important structures and hence a more complete understanding of footwall strain and kinematics (providing that emplacement-related phases of deformation can be accounted for). Recently, the relationship between outcropping crustal and upper mantle rocks led Tremblay et al. (2009) to propose that an OCC is preserved within the Mirdita ophiolite of the Albanian Dinarides (northern Albania). This is a slice of Jurassic oceanic lithosphere exposed along a N-S corridor which escaped the main late Cenozoic Alpine deformation (Robertson, 2002, 2004; Dilek et al., 2007). Though in the eastern portion of the Mirdita ophiolite a Penrose-type sequence is present, in the western portion mantle rocks are in tectonic contact with upper crustal lithologies

  8. Meteoric water circulation and rolling-hinge detachment faulting: Example of the Northern Snake Range core complex, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gébelin, Aude; Teyssier, Christian; Heizler, Matthew T.; Andreas, Mulch

    2014-05-01

    The Northern Snake Range metamorphic core complex developed as a consequence of Oligo-Miocene extension of the Basin and Range Province and is bounded by an arched detachment that separates the cold, brittle upper crust from the ductile middle crust. On the western and eastern limbs of the arch, the detachment footwall displays continuous sections of muscovite-bearing quartzite and schist from which we report new microfabrics, δD values, and 40Ar/39Ar ages. Results indicate that the two limbs record distinct stages of the metamorphic and kinematic Cenozoic events, including Eocene collapse of previously overthickned crust in the west, and one main Oligo-Miocene extensional event in the east. Quartzite from the western part of the range preserves Eocene fabrics (~49-45 Ma) that developed during coaxial deformation in the presence of metamorphic fluids. In contrast, those from the east reveal a large component of non coaxial strain, Oligo-Miocene ages (27-21 Ma) and contain recrystallized muscovite grains indicating that meteoric fluids sourced at high elevation (low-δD) infiltrated the brittle-ductile transition zone during deformation. Percolation of meteoric fluids down to the mylonitic detachment footwall was made possible by the development of an east-dipping rolling-hinge detachment system that controlled the timing and location of active faulting in the brittle upper crust and therefore the pathway of fluids from the surface to the brittle-ductile transition. Oligo-Miocene upper crustal extension was accommodated by a fan-shaped fault pattern that generated shear and tension fractures and channelized surface fluids, while top-to-the-east ductile shearing and advection of hot material in the lower plate allowed the system to be progressively exhumed. As extension proceeded, brittle normal faults active in the wedge of the hanging wall gradually rotated and translated above the detachment fault where, became inactive and precluded the circulation of fluids

  9. Paleomagnetic evidence for an inverse rotation history of Western Anatolia during the exhumation of Menderes core complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzel, Bora; Langereis, Cornelis G.; Kaymakci, Nuretdin; Sözbilir, Hasan; Özkaymak, Çağlar; Özkaptan, Murat

    2015-03-01

    Within the Aegean extensional system, the İzmir-Balıkesir Transfer Zone (İBTZ) is a crucial element in the late Cenozoic evolution of western Anatolia since it accommodates the differential deformation between the Cycladic and the Menderes metamorphic core complexes. Here, we determine the rotational history of western Anatolia using new paleomagnetic data from 87 sites in Miocene volcano-sedimentary rocks to better understand the role of the İBTZ. Our results reveal two discrete and opposite major rotational phases during the Miocene. The first phase is derived from early Miocene volcanic, sedimentary and granitic rocks and is controlled by detachment and strike-slip faults. It is characterized by an average (net) 23 ± 6 ° clockwise (CW) rotation within the İBTZ since the early Miocene. Our new data from the Menderes part on the other hand show an average - 23 ± 10 ° counter-clockwise (CCW) rotation. The data from the Cycladic part show no significant (net) rotation since the early Miocene. The second phase is derived from middle-late Miocene volcanic and sedimentary rocks and is controlled by high-angle normal and strike-slip faults. The rotations from this phase show a very consistent pattern of - 22 ± 11 ° CCW within the İBTZ, while now the Menderes part shows an average CW rotation of 25 ± 14 °. Our paleomagnetic results hence document a major change and inversion of rotation. Between the early and late Miocene the İBTZ region experienced a large 45° CW rotation, while during the same time interval the Menderes part outside the zone experienced a similar (48°) CCW rotation. After that, the İBTZ became narrower and the sense of rotation inverted to CCW (- 23 ± 10 ° since the late Miocene), while in the Menderes part it inverted to CW (25 ± 14 ° since the late Miocene). Our new results do therefore fit the hypotheses of two-stage-extension scenario, rather than a one-single-phase of extension. We also conclude that the observed rotations

  10. Simulating Valence-to-Core X-ray Emission Spectroscopy of Transition Metal Complexes with Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Mukamel, Shaul; Khalil, Munira; Govind, Niranjan

    2015-12-08

    Valence-to-core (VtC) X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) has emerged as a powerful technique for the structural characterization of complex organometallic compounds in realistic environments. Since the spectrum represents electronic transitions from the ligand molecular orbitals to the core holes of the metal centers, the approach is more chemically sensitive to the metal-ligand bonding character compared with conventional X-ray absorption techniques. In this paper we study how linear-response time-dependent density functional theory (LR-TDDFT) can be harnessed to simulate K-edge VtC X-ray emission spectra reliably. LR-TDDFT allows one to go beyond the single-particle picture that has been extensively used to simulate VtC-XES. We consider seven low- and high-spin model complexes involving chromium, manganese, and iron transition metal centers. Our results are in good agreement with experiment.

  11. Representational coexistence in the God concept: Core knowledge intuitions of God as a person are not revised by Christian theology despite lifelong experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlev, Michael; Mermelstein, Spencer; German, Tamsin C

    2018-01-25

    Previous research has shown that in the minds of young adult religious adherents, acquired theology about the extraordinary characteristics of God (e.g., omniscience) coexists with, rather than replaces, an initial concept of God formed by co-option of the person concept. We tested the hypothesis that representational coexistence holds even after extensive experience with Christian theology, as indexed by age. Christian religious adherents ranging in age from 18 to 87 years were asked to evaluate as true or false statements on which core knowledge intuitions about persons and Christian theology about God were consistent (both true or both false) or inconsistent (true on one and false on the other). Results showed, across adulthood, more theological errors in evaluating inconsistent versus consistent statements. Older adults also exhibited slower response times to inconsistent versus consistent statements. These findings show that despite extensive experience, indeed a lifetime of experience for some participants, the Christian theological God concept does not separate from the initial person concept from which it is formed. In fact, behavioral signatures of representational coexistence were not attenuated by experience. We discuss the broader implications of these findings to the acquisition of evolutionarily new concepts.

  12. Three-dimensional structure of the ligand-binding core of GluR2 in complex with the agonist (S)-ATPA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunn, Marie-Louise; Hogner, Anders; Stensbøl, Tine B

    2003-01-01

    Two X-ray structures of the GluR2 ligand-binding core in complex with (S)-2-amino-3-(5-tert-butyl-3-hydroxy-4-isoxazolyl)propionic acid ((S)-ATPA) have been determined with and without Zn(2+) ions. (S)-ATPA induces a domain closure of ca. 21 degrees compared to the apo form. The tert-butyl moiety...

  13. Interfacial charge separation and recombination in InP and quasi-type II InP/CdS core/shell quantum dot-molecular acceptor complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kaifeng; Song, Nianhui; Liu, Zheng; Zhu, Haiming; Rodríguez-Córdoba, William; Lian, Tianquan

    2013-08-15

    Recent studies of group II-VI colloidal semiconductor heterostuctures, such as CdSe/CdS core/shell quantum dots (QDs) or dot-in-rod nanorods, show that type II and quasi-type II band alignment can facilitate electron transfer and slow down charge recombination in QD-molecular electron acceptor complexes. To explore the general applicability of this wave function engineering approach for controlling charge transfer properties, we investigate exciton relaxation and dissociation dynamics in InP (a group III-V semiconductor) and InP/CdS core/shell (a heterostructure beween group III-V and II-VI semiconductors) QDs by transient absorption spectroscopy. We show that InP/CdS QDs exhibit a quasi-type II band alignment with the 1S electron delocalized throughout the core and shell and the 1S hole confined in the InP core. In InP-methylviologen (MV(2+)) complexes, excitons in the QD can be dissociated by ultrafast electron transfer to MV(2+) from the 1S electron level (with an average time constant of 11.4 ps) as well as 1P and higher electron levels (with a time constant of 0.39 ps), which is followed by charge recombination to regenerate the complex in its ground state (with an average time constant of 47.1 ns). In comparison, InP/CdS-MV(2+) complexes show similar ultrafast charge separation and 5-fold slower charge recombination rates, consistent with the quasi-type II band alignment in these heterostructures. This result demonstrates that wave function engineering in nanoheterostructures of group III-V and II-VI semiconductors provides a promising approach for optimizing their light harvesting and charge separation for solar energy conversion applications.

  14. Organic Light-Emitting Diodes Using Multifunctional Phosphorescent Dendrimers with Iridium-Complex Core and Charge-Transporting Dendrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuzuki, Toshimitsu; Shirasawa, Nobuhiko; Suzuki, Toshiyasu; Tokito, Shizuo

    2005-06-01

    We report a novel class of light-emitting materials for use in organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs): multifunctional phosphorescent dendrimers that have a phosphorescent core and dendrons based on charge-transporting building blocks. We synthesized first-generation and second-generation dendrimers consisting of a fac-tris(2-phenylpyridine)iridium [Ir(ppy)3] core and hole-transporting phenylcarbazole-based dendrons. Smooth amorphous films of these dendrimers were formed by spin-coating them from solutions. The OLEDs using the dendrimer exhibited bright green or yellowish-green emission from the Ir(ppy)3 core. The OLEDs using the film containing a mixture of the dendrimer and an electron-transporting material exhibited higher efficiency than those using the neat dendrimer film. The external quantum efficiency of OLEDs using the film containing a mixture of the first-generation dendrimer and an electron-transporting material was as high as 7.6%.

  15. Processing of complex N-glycans in IgG Fc-region is affected by core fucosylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilho, Alexandra; Gruber, Clemens; Thader, Andreas; Oostenbrink, Chris; Pechlaner, Maria; Steinkellner, Herta; Altmann, Friedrich

    2015-01-01

    We investigated N-glycan processing of immunoglobulin G1 using the monoclonal antibody cetuximab (CxMab), which has a glycosite in the Fab domain in addition to the conserved Fc glycosylation, as a reporter. Three GlcNAc (Gn) terminating bi-antennary glycoforms of CxMab differing in core fucosylation (α1,3- and α1,6-linkage) were generated in a plant-based expression platform. These GnGn, GnGnF3, and GnGnF6 CxMab variants were subjected in vivo to further processing toward sialylation and GlcNAc diversification (bisected and branching structures). Mass spectrometry-based glycan analyses revealed efficient processing of Fab glycans toward envisaged structures. By contrast, Fc glycan processing largely depend on the presence of core fucose. A particularly strong support of glycan processing in the presence of plant-specific core α1,3-fucose was observed. Consistently, molecular modeling suggests changes in the interactions of the Fc carbohydrate chain depending on the presence of core fucose, possibly changing the accessibility. Here, we provide data that reveal molecular mechanisms of glycan processing of IgG antibodies, which may have implications for the generation of glycan-engineered therapeutic antibodies with improved efficacies. PMID:26067753

  16. Microparticles obtained by complex coacervation: influence of the type of reticulation and the drying process on the release of the core material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Dutra Alvim

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Microparticles obtained by complex coacervation were crosslinked with glutaraldehyde or with transglutaminase and dried using freeze drying or spray drying. Moist samples presented Encapsulation Efficiency (%EE higher than 96%. The mean diameters ranged from 43.7 ± 3.4 to 96.4 ± 10.3 µm for moist samples, from 38.1 ± 5.36 to 65.2 ± 16.1 µm for dried samples, and from 62.5 ± 7.5 to 106.9 ± 26.1 µm for rehydrated microparticles. The integrity of the particles without crosslinking was maintained when freeze drying was used. After spray drying, only crosslinked samples were able to maintain the wall integrity. Microparticles had a round shape and in the case of dried samples rugged walls apparently without cracks were observed. Core distribution inside the particles was multinuclear and homogeneous and core release was evaluated using anhydrous ethanol. Moist particles crosslinked with glutaraldehyde at the concentration of 1.0 mM.g-1 protein (ptn, were more efficient with respect to the core retention compared to 0.1 mM.g-1 ptn or those crosslinked with transglutaminase (10 U.g-1 ptn. The drying processes had a strong influence on the core release profile reducing the amount released to all dry samples

  17. Structural and magnetic characterization of three tetranuclear Cu(II) complexes with face-sharing-dicubane/double-open-cubane like core framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, Aparup; Bertolasi, Valerio; Figuerola, Albert; Manna, Subal Chandra

    2017-01-01

    Three novel tetranuclear copper(II) complexes namely [Cu 4 (L 1 ) 4 ]∙2(dmf) (1), [Cu 4 (L 1 ) 4 ] (2) and [Cu 4 (L 2 ) 2 (HL 2 ) 2 (H 2 O) 2 ]∙2(ClO 4 )·6(H 2 O) (3) (H 2 L 1 , (E)−2-((1-hydroxybutan-2-ylimino)methyl)phenol; H 2 L 2 , (E)−2-((1-hydroxybutan-2-ylimino)methyl)−6-methoxyphenol)) were synthesized from the self-assembly of copper(II) perchlorate and the tridentate Schiff base ligands. The structural determination reveals that crystallizes in the monoclinic system with space group C2/c, whereas both the and crystallize in the triclinic system with space group P-1. and possess face-sharing dicubane core, on the other hand complex 3 has double open cubane core structure. The copper(II) ions in the cubane core are in distorted square planar geometries, and weak π…π and C–H…π interactions lead to formation of a 2D supramolecular architecture for and . At room temperature and , exhibit fluorescence with a quantum yield (Φ s ) of 0.47, 0.49 and 0.38, respectively. Variable temperature magnetic susceptibility measurements in the range 2–300 K indicate an overall weak antiferromagnetic exchange coupling in all complexes. The PHI program was used to study their magnetic behaviour. In agreement with their face-sharing dicubane structure, a Hamiltonian of the type H =– J 1 (S 1 S 2 +S 1 S 2’ +S 1' S 2 +S 1' S 2’ ) – J 2 S 1 S 1’ , where S 1 = S 1’ = S 2 = S 2’ = S Cu =1/2, was used for studying and . Simulations performed suggest magnetic exchange constants with values close to J 1 =−20 cm −1 and J 2 =0 cm -1 for these complexes. On the other hand, the spin Hamiltonian H =– J 1 (S 1 S 4 +S 2 S 3 ) – J 2 (S 1 S 3 +S 2 S 4 ) – J 3 S 1 S 2 , where S 1 = S 2 = S 3 = S 4 = S Cu =1/2, was used to study the magnetic behaviour of the double open cubane core of and a good agreement between the experimental and simulated results was found by using the parameters g 1 = g 2 =2.20, g 3 = g 4 =2.18, J 1 =−36 cm -1 , J 2

  18. The FA Core Complex Contains a Homo-dimeric Catalytic Module for the Symmetric Mono-ubiquitination of FANCI-FANCD2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Swuec

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Activation of the main DNA interstrand crosslink repair pathway in higher eukaryotes requires mono-ubiquitination of FANCI and FANCD2 by FANCL, the E3 ligase subunit of the Fanconi anemia core complex. FANCI and FANCD2 form a stable complex; however, the molecular basis of their ubiquitination is ill defined. FANCD2 mono-ubiquitination by FANCL is stimulated by the presence of the FANCB and FAAP100 core complex components, through an unknown mechanism. How FANCI mono-ubiquitination is achieved remains unclear. Here, we use structural electron microscopy, combined with crosslink-coupled mass spectrometry, to find that FANCB, FANCL, and FAAP100 form a dimer of trimers, containing two FANCL molecules that are ideally poised to target both FANCI and FANCD2 for mono-ubiquitination. The FANCC-FANCE-FANCF subunits bridge between FANCB-FANCL-FAAP100 and the FANCI-FANCD2 substrate. A transient interaction with FANCC-FANCE-FANCF alters the FANCI-FANCD2 configuration, stabilizing the dimerization interface. Our data provide a model to explain how equivalent mono-ubiquitination of FANCI and FANCD2 occurs.

  19. Comparison between results of detailed tectonic studies on borehole core vs microresistivity images of borehole wall from gas-bearing shale complexes, Baltic Basin, Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobek, Kinga; Jarosiński, Marek; Pachytel, Radomir

    2017-04-01

    , cemented with calcite, were clearly visible in scanner image. We have also observed significantly lower density of veins in core than in the XRMI that occurs systematically in one formation enriched with carbonate and dolomite. In this case, veins are not fractured in core and obliterated for bare eye by dolomitization, but are still contrastive in respect of electric resistance. Calculated density of bedding planes per 1 meter reveals systematically higher density of fractures observed on core than in the XRMI (depicted automatically by interpretation program). This difference may come from additional fracking due to relaxation of borehole core while recovery. Comparison of vertical joint fractures density with thickness of mechanical beds shows either lack of significant trends or a negative correlation (greater density of bedding fractures correspond to lower density of joints). This result, obtained for shale complexes contradict that derived for sandstone or limestone. Boundary between CLUs are visible on both: joint and bedding fracture density profiles. Considering small-scale faults and slickensides we have obtained good agreement between results of core and scanner interpretation. This study in the frame of ShaleMech Project funded by Polish Committee for Scientific Research is in progress and the results are preliminary.

  20. Complex New Product Development projects - How the Project Manager’s Information Sharing With Core Actors Changes Over Time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Lisbeth Brøde

    2013-01-01

    A heavily burdened project manager must ensure effective information sharing with actors inside and outside the organization because this is a necessary condition for a new product development (NPD) project to achieve its objectives. Knowledge, however, on who actually assists a project manager...... with the information sharing during NPD projects is limited; therefore, this study of longitudinal objective email data (4658 emails) during a NPD project contributes to theory and practice by advancing our understanding of when and how the project manager establishes relationships with different core actors inside...

  1. Dense SDM (12-core × 3-mode) transmission over 527 km with 33.2-ns mode-dispersion employing low-complexity parallel MIMO frequency-domain equalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shibahara, K.; Mizuno, T.; Takara, H.

    We demonstrate 12-core × 3-mode dense SDM transmission over 527 km graded-index multi-core few-mode fiber without mode-dispersion management. Employing low baud rate multi-carrier signal and frequency-domain equalization enables 33.2-ns DMD compensation with low computational complexity. © 2015 OSA...

  2. Update on the Health Services Research Doctoral Core Competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, James F; Menachemi, Nir; Maciejewski, Matthew L

    2018-03-13

    To present revised core competencies for doctoral programs in health services research (HSR), modalities to deliver these competencies, and suggested methods for assessing mastery of these competencies. Core competencies were originally developed in 2005, updated (but unpublished) in 2008, modestly updated for a 2016 HSR workforce conference, and revised based on feedback from attendees. Additional feedback was obtained from doctoral program directors, employer/workforce experts and attendees of presentation on these competencies at the AcademyHealth's June 2017 Annual Research Meeting. The current version (V2.1) competencies include the ethical conduct of research, conceptual models, development of research questions, study designs, data measurement and collection methods, statistical methods for analyzing data, professional collaboration, and knowledge dissemination. These competencies represent a core that defines what HSR researchers should master in order to address the complexities of microsystem to macro-system research that HSR entails. There are opportunities to conduct formal evaluation of newer delivery modalities (e.g., flipped classrooms) and to integrate new Learning Health System Researcher Core Competencies, developed by AHRQ, into the HSR core competencies. Core competencies in HSR are a continually evolving work in progress because new research questions arise, new methods are developed, and the trans-disciplinary nature of the field leads to new multidisciplinary and team building needs. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  3. Recent massive sulfide deposits of the Semenov ore district, Mid-Atlantic Ridge, 13°31' N: Associated rocks of the oceanic core complex and their hydrothermal alteration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pertsev, A. N.; Bortnikov, N. S.; Vlasov, E. A.; Beltenev, V. E.; Dobretsova, I. G.; Ageeva, O. A.

    2012-09-01

    The oceanic core complexes and large-offset detachment faults characteristic of the slow-spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge are crucial for the structural control of large hydrothermal systems, including those forming sub-seafloor polymetallic sulfide mineralization. The structural-geological, petrographic, and mineralogical data are considered for the oceanic core complex enclosing the Semenov-1, -2, -3, -4, and -5 inactive hydrothermal sulfide fields recently discovered on the Mid-Oceanic Ridge at 13°31' N. The oceanic core complex is composed of serpentinized and talc-replaced peridotites and sporadic gabbroic rocks, however, all hydrothermal fields reveal compositional indications of basaltic substrate. The volcanic structures superposed on the oceanic core complex are marked by outcrops of pillow lavas with fresh quenched glass. Dolerites regarded as volcanic conduits seem to represent separate dike swarms. The superposed volcanic structures develop largely along the near-latitudinal high-angle tectonic zone controlling the Semenov-1, -2, -5, and -3 hydrothermal sulfide fields. The manifestations of hydrothermal metasomatic alteration are diverse. The widespread talcose rocks with pyrrhotite-pyrite mineralization after serpentinite, as well as finding of talc-chlorite metabasalt are interpreted as products of hydrothermal activity in the permeable zone of detachment fault. Chloritization and brecciation of basalts with superposed quartz or opal, barite, and pyrite or chalcopyrite mineralization directly related to the sub-seafloor sulfide deposition. The native copper mineralization in almost unaltered basalts at the Semenov-4 field is suggested to precipitate from ore-forming fluids before they reach the level of sub-seafloor sulfide deposition. Amphibolites with plagiogranite veinlets are interpreted as tectonic fragments of the highest-temperature portions of hydrothermal systems, where partial melting of basic rocks in the presence of aqueous fluid with

  4. Core level photoelectron spectroscopy of LiGaS2 and Ga-S bonding in complex sulfides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atuchin, V.V.; Isaenko, L.I.; Kesler, V.G.; Lobanov, S.I.

    2010-01-01

    The electronic parameters of the lithium thiogallate LiGaS 2 have been evaluated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Spectral features of all constituent element core levels and Auger lines have been considered. The Ga-S bonding effects in Ga-bearing sulfide crystals have been discussed using binding energy difference Δ 2p (S-Ga) = BE(S 2p) - BE(Ga 3d) as a representative parameter to quantify the valence electron shift from gallium to sulfur atoms. The value Δ 2p (S-Ga) = 141.9 eV found for LiGaS 2 is very close to that evaluated for AgGaS 2 . This relation is an indicator of closely coincident ionicity of Ga-S bonds in LiGaS 2 and AgGaS 2 .

  5. Core level photoelectron spectroscopy of LiGaS{sub 2} and Ga-S bonding in complex sulfides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atuchin, V.V., E-mail: atuchin@thermo.isp.nsc.r [Laboratory of Optical Materials and Structures, Institute of Semiconductor Physics, SB RAS, 13, Lavrentieva Ave., Novosibirsk 90, 630090 (Russian Federation); Isaenko, L.I. [Laboratory of Crystal Growth, Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, SB RAS, Novosibirsk 90, 630090 (Russian Federation); Kesler, V.G. [Laboratory of Physical Bases of Integrated Microelectronics, Institute of Semiconductor Physics, SB RAS, Novosibirsk 90, 630090 (Russian Federation); Lobanov, S.I. [Laboratory of Crystal Growth, Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, SB RAS, Novosibirsk 90, 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2010-05-14

    The electronic parameters of the lithium thiogallate LiGaS{sub 2} have been evaluated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Spectral features of all constituent element core levels and Auger lines have been considered. The Ga-S bonding effects in Ga-bearing sulfide crystals have been discussed using binding energy difference {Delta}{sub 2p}(S-Ga) = BE(S 2p) - BE(Ga 3d) as a representative parameter to quantify the valence electron shift from gallium to sulfur atoms. The value {Delta}{sub 2p}(S-Ga) = 141.9 eV found for LiGaS{sub 2} is very close to that evaluated for AgGaS{sub 2}. This relation is an indicator of closely coincident ionicity of Ga-S bonds in LiGaS{sub 2} and AgGaS{sub 2}.

  6. Repair pathways independent of the Fanconi anemia nuclear core complex play a predominant role in mitigating formaldehyde-induced DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noda, Taichi; Takahashi, Akihisa; Kondo, Natsuko; Mori, Eiichiro; Okamoto, Noritomo; Nakagawa, Yosuke; Ohnishi, Ken; Zdzienicka, Malgorzata Z.; Thompson, Larry H.; Helleday, Thomas; Asada, Hideo

    2011-01-01

    The role of the Fanconi anemia (FA) repair pathway for DNA damage induced by formaldehyde was examined in the work described here. The following cell types were used: mouse embryonic fibroblast cell lines FANCA -/- , FANCC -/- , FANCA -/- C -/- , FANCD2 -/- and their parental cells, the Chinese hamster cell lines FANCD1 mutant (mt), FANCGmt, their revertant cells, and the corresponding wild-type (wt) cells. Cell survival rates were determined with colony formation assays after formaldehyde treatment. DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) were detected with an immunocytochemical γH2AX-staining assay. Although the sensitivity of FANCA -/- , FANCC -/- and FANCA -/- C -/- cells to formaldehyde was comparable to that of proficient cells, FANCD1mt, FANCGmt and FANCD2 -/- cells were more sensitive to formaldehyde than the corresponding proficient cells. It was found that homologous recombination (HR) repair was induced by formaldehyde. In addition, γH2AX foci in FANCD1mt cells persisted for longer times than in FANCD1wt cells. These findings suggest that formaldehyde-induced DSBs are repaired by HR through the FA repair pathway which is independent of the FA nuclear core complex. -- Research highlights: → We examined to clarify the repair pathways of formaldehyde-induced DNA damage. Formaldehyde induces DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). → DSBs are repaired through the Fanconi anemia (FA) repair pathway. → This pathway is independent of the FA nuclear core complex. → We also found that homologous recombination repair was induced by formaldehyde.

  7. Software concepts for the build-up of complex systems - selection and realization taking as example a program system for calculation of hypothetical core meltdown accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheuermann, W.

    1994-10-01

    Development and application of simulation systems for the analysis of complex processes require on the one hand and detailed engineering knowledge of the plant and the processes to be simulated and on the other hand a detailled knowledge about software engineering, numerics and data structures. The cooperation of specialists of both areas will become easier if it is possible to reduce the complexicity of the problems to be solved in a way that the analyses will not be disturbed and the communication between different disciplines will not become unnecessarily complicated. One solution to reduce the complexity is to consider computer science as an engineering discipline which provides mainly abstract elements and to allow engineers to build application systems based on these abstract elements. The principle of abstraction leads through the processes of modularisation and the solution of the interface problem to an almost problem independent system architecture where the elements of the system (modules, model components and models) operate only on those data assigned to them. In addition the development of abstract data types allows the formal description of the relations and interactions between system elements. This work describes how these ideas can be concretized to build complex systems which allow reliable and effective problem solutions. These ideas were applied successfully during the design, realization and application of the code system KESS, which allows the analysis of core melt down accidents in pressurized water reactors. (orig.) [de

  8. Age and significance of core complex formation in a very curved orogen: Evidence from fission track studies in the South Carpathians (Romania)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fügenschuh, B.; Schmid, S. M.

    2005-07-01

    Twenty-four new zircon and apatite fission track ages from the Getic and Danubian nappes in the South Carpathians are discussed in the light of a compilation of published fission track data. A total of 101 fission track ages indicates that the Getic nappes are generally characterized by Cretaceous zircon and apatite fission track ages, indicating cooling to near-surface temperatures of these units immediately following Late Cretaceous orogeny. The age distribution of the Danubian nappes, presently outcropping in the Danubian window below the Getic nappes, depends on the position with respect to the Cerna-Jiu fault. Eocene and Oligocene zircon and apatite central ages from the part of the Danubian core complex situated southeast of this fault monitor mid-Tertiary tectonic exhumation in the footwall of the Getic detachment, while zircon fission track data from northwest of this fault indicate that slow cooling started during the Latest Cretaceous. The change from extension (Getic detachment) to strike-slip dominated tectonics along the curved Cerna-Jiu fault allowed for further exhumation on the concave side of this strike-slip fault, while exhumation ceased on the convex side. The available fission track data consistently indicate that the change to fast cooling associated with tectonic denudation by core complex formation did not occur before Late Eocene times, i.e. long after the cessation of Late Cretaceous thrusting. Core complex formation in the Danubian window is related to a larger-scale scenario that is characterized by the NNW-directed translation, followed by a 90° clockwise rotation of the Tisza-Dacia "block" due to roll-back of the Carpathian embayment. This led to a complex pattern of strain partitioning within the Tisza-Dacia "block" adjacent to the western tip of the rigid Moesian platform. Our results suggest that the invasion of these southernmost parts of Tisza-Dacia started before the Late Eocene, i.e. significantly before the onset of Miocene

  9. AJUBA LIM Proteins Limit Hippo Activity in Proliferating Cells by Sequestering the Hippo Core Kinase Complex in the Cytosol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagannathan, Radhika; Schimizzi, Gregory V; Zhang, Kun; Loza, Andrew J; Yabuta, Norikazu; Nojima, Hitoshi; Longmore, Gregory D

    2016-10-15

    The Hippo pathway controls organ growth and is implicated in cancer development. Whether and how Hippo pathway activity is limited to sustain or initiate cell growth when needed is not understood. The members of the AJUBA family of LIM proteins are negative regulators of the Hippo pathway. In mammalian epithelial cells, we found that AJUBA LIM proteins limit Hippo regulation of YAP, in proliferating cells only, by sequestering a cytosolic Hippo kinase complex in which LATS kinase is inhibited. At the plasma membranes of growth-arrested cells, AJUBA LIM proteins do not inhibit or associate with the Hippo kinase complex. The ability of AJUBA LIM proteins to inhibit YAP regulation by Hippo and to associate with the kinase complex directly correlate with their capacity to limit Hippo signaling during Drosophila wing development. AJUBA LIM proteins did not influence YAP activity in response to cell-extrinsic or cell-intrinsic mechanical signals. Thus, AJUBA LIM proteins limit Hippo pathway activity in contexts where cell proliferation is needed. Copyright © 2016 Jagannathan et al.

  10. Multiple tectonic mode switches indicate short-duration heat pulses in a Mio-Pliocene metamorphic core complex, West Papua, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, L. T.; Hall, R.; Gunawan, I.

    2017-12-01

    The Wandaman Peninsula is a narrow (2 km) promontory in remote western New Guinea. The peninsula is almost entirely composed of medium- to high-grade metamorphic rocks considered to be associated with a Mio-Pliocene metamorphic core complex. Previous work has shown that the uplift and exhumation of the core complex has potentially brought some extremely young eclogite to the surface. These might be comparable to the world's youngest (4.3 Ma) eclogites found in the D'Entrecasteaux Islands at the opposite end of New Guinea. We show that tectonic history of this region is complex. This is because the metamorphic sequences in the Wandaman Peninsula record multiple phases of deformation, all within the last few million years. This is demonstrated through methodical collation of cross-cutting relations from field and microstructural studies across the peninsula. The first phase of deformation and metamorphism is associated with crustal extension and partial melting that took place at 5-7 Ma according to new U-Pb data from metamorphic zircons. This extensional phase ceased after a tectonic mode switch and the region was shortened. This is demonstrated by two phases of folding (1. recumbent and 2. open) that overprint the earlier extensional fabrics. All previous structures were later overprinted by brittle extensional faults and uplift. This extensional phase is still taking place today, as is indicated by submerged forests exposed along the coastline associated with recent earthquakes and hot springs. The sequence of metamorphic rocks that are exposed in the Wandaman Peninsula show that stress and thermal conditions can change rapidly. If we consider that the present is a key to the past, then such results can identify the duration of deformation and metamorphic events more accurately than in much older orogenic systems.

  11. Collaborative Observation and Research (CORE) Watersheds: new strategies for tracking the regional effects of climate change on complex systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdoch, P. S.

    2007-12-01

    The past 30 years of environmental research have shown that our world is not made up of discrete components acting independently, but rather of a mosaic of complex relations among air, land, water, living resources, and human activities. Recent warming of the climate is having a significant effect on the functioning of those systems. A national imperative is developing to quickly establish local, regional, and national systems for anticipating environmental degradation from a changing climate and developing cost-effective adaptation or mitigation strategies. In these circumstances, the debate over research versus monitoring becomes moot--there is a clear need for the integrated application of both across a range of temporal and spatial scales. A national framework that effectively addresses the multiple scales and complex multi-disciplinary processes of climate change is being assembled largely from existing programs through collaboration among Federal, State, local, and NGO organizations. The result will be an observation and research network capable of interpreting complex environmental changes at a range of spatial and temporal scales, but at less cost than if the network were funded as an independent initiative. A pilot implementation of the collaborative framework in the Delaware River Basin yielded multi-scale assessments of carbon storage and flux, and the effects of forest fragmentation and soil calcium depletion on ecosystem function. A prototype of a national climate-effects observation and research network linking research watersheds, regional surveys, remote sensing, and ecosystem modeling is being initiated in the Yukon River Basin where carbon flux associated with permafrost thaw could accelerate global warming.

  12. Structural and magnetic characterization of three tetranuclear Cu(II) complexes with face-sharing-dicubane/double-open-cubane like core framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, Aparup [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, Vidyasagar University, Midnapore 721102, West Bengal (India); Bertolasi, Valerio [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche e Farmaceutiche, Centro di Strutturistica Diffrattometrica, Università di Ferrara, Via L. Borsari, 46, 44100 Ferrara (Italy); Figuerola, Albert [Departament de Química Inorgànica i Orgànica (Secció de Química Inorgànica) and Institut de Nanociència i Nanotecnologia (IN2UB), Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès 1-11, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Manna, Subal Chandra, E-mail: scmanna@mail.vidyasagar.ac.in [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, Vidyasagar University, Midnapore 721102, West Bengal (India)

    2017-05-15

    Three novel tetranuclear copper(II) complexes namely [Cu{sub 4}(L{sup 1}){sub 4}]∙2(dmf) (1), [Cu{sub 4}(L{sup 1}){sub 4}] (2) and [Cu{sub 4}(L{sup 2}){sub 2}(HL{sup 2}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]∙2(ClO{sub 4})·6(H{sub 2}O) (3) (H{sub 2}L{sup 1}, (E)−2-((1-hydroxybutan-2-ylimino)methyl)phenol; H{sub 2}L{sup 2}, (E)−2-((1-hydroxybutan-2-ylimino)methyl)−6-methoxyphenol)) were synthesized from the self-assembly of copper(II) perchlorate and the tridentate Schiff base ligands. The structural determination reveals that crystallizes in the monoclinic system with space group C2/c, whereas both the and crystallize in the triclinic system with space group P-1. and possess face-sharing dicubane core, on the other hand complex 3 has double open cubane core structure. The copper(II) ions in the cubane core are in distorted square planar geometries, and weak π…π and C–H…π interactions lead to formation of a 2D supramolecular architecture for and . At room temperature and , exhibit fluorescence with a quantum yield (Φ{sub s}) of 0.47, 0.49 and 0.38, respectively. Variable temperature magnetic susceptibility measurements in the range 2–300 K indicate an overall weak antiferromagnetic exchange coupling in all complexes. The PHI program was used to study their magnetic behaviour. In agreement with their face-sharing dicubane structure, a Hamiltonian of the type H =– J{sub 1}(S{sub 1}S{sub 2}+S{sub 1}S{sub 2’}+S{sub 1'}S{sub 2}+S{sub 1'}S{sub 2’}) – J{sub 2}S{sub 1}S{sub 1’}, where S{sub 1} = S{sub 1’} = S{sub 2} = S{sub 2’} = S{sub Cu} =1/2, was used for studying and . Simulations performed suggest magnetic exchange constants with values close to J{sub 1} =−20 cm{sup −1} and J{sub 2} =0 cm{sup -1} for these complexes. On the other hand, the spin Hamiltonian H =– J{sub 1}(S{sub 1}S{sub 4}+S{sub 2}S{sub 3}) – J{sub 2}(S{sub 1}S{sub 3}+S{sub 2}S{sub 4}) – J{sub 3}S{sub 1}S{sub 2}, where S{sub 1} = S{sub 2} = S{sub 3} = S{sub 4

  13. High mobility group protein number17 cross-links primarily to histone H2A in the reconstituted HMG 17 - nucleosome core particle complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, G.R.; Yau, P.; Yasuda, H.; Traut, R.R.; Bradbury, E.M.

    1986-01-01

    The neighbor relationship of lamb thymus High Mobility Group (HMG) protein 17 to native HeLa nucleosome core particle histones in the reconstituted complex has been studied. 125 I-labeled HMG 17 was cross-linking to core histones using the protein-protein cross-linking reagent 2-iminothiolane. Specific cross-linked products were separated on a two-dimensional Triton-acid-urea/SDS gel system, located by autoradiography, excised and quantified. Disulfide bonds in the cross links were then cleaved and the protein constituents were identified by SDS gel electrophoresis. HMG 17 cross-linked primarily to histone H2A while lower levels of cross-linking occurred between HMG 17 and the other histones. In contrast, cross-linking between two HMG 17 molecules bound on the same nucleosome was relatively rare. It is concluded that the same nucleosome was relatively rare. It is concluded that H2A comprises part of the HMG 17 binding site but that HMG 17 is sufficiently elongated and mobile to permit cross-linking to the other histones and to a second HMG 17 molecule. These results are in agreement with the current model for the structure of the nucleosome and the proposed binding sites for HMG 17

  14. Repair pathways independent of the Fanconi anemia nuclear core complex play a predominant role in mitigating formaldehyde-induced DNA damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noda, Taichi [Department of Biology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan); Department of Dermatology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan); Takahashi, Akihisa [Department of Biology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan); Kondo, Natsuko [Particle Radiation Oncology Research Center, Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Mori, Eiichiro [Department of Biology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan); Okamoto, Noritomo [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan); Nakagawa, Yosuke [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan); Ohnishi, Ken [Department of Biology, Ibaraki Prefectual University of Health Sciences, 4669-2 Ami, Ami-mati, Inasiki-gun, Ibaraki 300-0394 (Japan); Zdzienicka, Malgorzata Z. [Department of Molecular Cell Genetics, Collegium Medicum in Bydgoszcz, Nicolaus-Copernicus-University in Torun, ul. Sklodowskiej-Curie 9, 85-094 Bydgoszcz (Poland); Thompson, Larry H. [Biosciences and Biotechnology Division, L452, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, CA 94551-0808 (United States); Helleday, Thomas [Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Old Road Campus Research Building, Off Roosevelt Drive, Oxford, OX3 7DQ (United Kingdom); Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Asada, Hideo [Department of Dermatology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan); and others

    2011-01-07

    The role of the Fanconi anemia (FA) repair pathway for DNA damage induced by formaldehyde was examined in the work described here. The following cell types were used: mouse embryonic fibroblast cell lines FANCA{sup -/-}, FANCC{sup -/-}, FANCA{sup -/-}C{sup -/-}, FANCD2{sup -/-} and their parental cells, the Chinese hamster cell lines FANCD1 mutant (mt), FANCGmt, their revertant cells, and the corresponding wild-type (wt) cells. Cell survival rates were determined with colony formation assays after formaldehyde treatment. DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) were detected with an immunocytochemical {gamma}H2AX-staining assay. Although the sensitivity of FANCA{sup -/-}, FANCC{sup -/-} and FANCA{sup -/-}C{sup -/-} cells to formaldehyde was comparable to that of proficient cells, FANCD1mt, FANCGmt and FANCD2{sup -/-} cells were more sensitive to formaldehyde than the corresponding proficient cells. It was found that homologous recombination (HR) repair was induced by formaldehyde. In addition, {gamma}H2AX foci in FANCD1mt cells persisted for longer times than in FANCD1wt cells. These findings suggest that formaldehyde-induced DSBs are repaired by HR through the FA repair pathway which is independent of the FA nuclear core complex. -- Research highlights: {yields} We examined to clarify the repair pathways of formaldehyde-induced DNA damage. Formaldehyde induces DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). {yields} DSBs are repaired through the Fanconi anemia (FA) repair pathway. {yields} This pathway is independent of the FA nuclear core complex. {yields} We also found that homologous recombination repair was induced by formaldehyde.

  15. Internal deformation in layered Zechstein-III K-Mg salts. Structures formed by complex deformation and high contrasts in viscosity observed in drill cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raith, Alexander; Urai, Janos L.

    2016-04-01

    During the evaporation of a massive salt body, alternations of interrupted and full evaporation sequences can form a complex layering of different lithologies. Viscosity contrasts of up to five orders of magnitude between these different lithologies are possible in this environment. During the late stage of an evaporation cycle potassium and magnesium (K-Mg) salts are precipitated. These K-Mg salts are of economic interest but also a known drilling hazard due to their very low viscosity. How up to 200m thick layers of these evaporites affect salt deformation at different scales is not well known. A better understanding of salt tectonics with extreme mechanical stratification is needed for better exploration and production of potassium-magnesium salts and to predict the internal structure of potential nuclear waste repositories in salt. To gain a better understanding of the internal deformation of these layers we analyzed K-Mg salt rich drill cores out of the Zechstein III-1b subunit from the Veendam Pillow 10 km southeast of Groningen, near the city Veendam in the NE Netherlands. The study area has a complex geological history with multiple tectonic phases of extension and compression forming internal deformation in the pillow but also conserving most of the original layering. Beside halite the most common minerals in the ZIII-1b are carnallite, kieserite, anhydrite and bischofite alternating in thin layers of simple composition. Seismic interpretation revealed that the internal structure of the Veendam Pillow shows areas, in which the K-Mg salt rich ZIII 1b layer is much thicker than elsewhere, as a result of salt deformation. The internal structure of the ZIII-1b on the other hand, remains unknown. The core analysis shows a strong strain concentration in the weaker Bischofite (MgCl2*6H20) and Carnallite (KMgCl3*6H20) rich layers producing tectonic breccias and highly strained layers completely overprinting the original layering. Layers formed by alternating beds

  16. Revised SRAC code system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchihashi, Keichiro; Ishiguro, Yukio; Kaneko, Kunio; Ido, Masaru.

    1986-09-01

    Since the publication of JAERI-1285 in 1983 for the preliminary version of the SRAC code system, a number of additions and modifications to the functions have been made to establish an overall neutronics code system. Major points are (1) addition of JENDL-2 version of data library, (2) a direct treatment of doubly heterogeneous effect on resonance absorption, (3) a generalized Dancoff factor, (4) a cell calculation based on the fixed boundary source problem, (5) the corresponding edit required for experimental analysis and reactor design, (6) a perturbation theory calculation for reactivity change, (7) an auxiliary code for core burnup and fuel management, etc. This report is a revision of the users manual which consists of the general description, input data requirements and their explanation, detailed information on usage, mathematics, contents of libraries and sample I/O. (author)

  17. Dopamine D1 receptor agonist treatment attenuates extinction of morphine conditioned place preference while increasing dendritic complexity in the nucleus accumbens core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobrin, Kendra L; Arena, Danielle T; Heinrichs, Stephen C; Nguyen, Olivia H; Kaplan, Gary B

    2017-03-30

    The dopamine D1 receptor (D1R) has a role in opioid reward and conditioned place preference (CPP), but its role in CPP extinction is undetermined. We examined the effect of D1R agonist SKF81297 on the extinction of opioid CPP and associated dendritic morphology in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), a region involved with reward integration and its extinction. During the acquisition of morphine CPP, mice received morphine and saline on alternate days; injections were given immediately before each of eight daily conditioning sessions. Mice subsequently underwent six days of extinction training designed to diminish the previously learned association. Mice were treated with either 0.5mg/kg SKF81297, 0.8mg/kg SKF81297, or saline immediately after each extinction session. There was a dose-dependent effect, with the highest dose of SKF81297 attenuating extinction, as mice treated with this dose had significantly higher CPP scores than controls. Analysis of medium spiny neuron morphology revealed that in the NAc core, but not in the shell, dendritic arbors were significantly more complex in the morphine conditioned, SKF81297-treated mice compared to controls. In separate experiments using mice conditioned with only saline, SKF81297 administration after extinction sessions had no effect on CPP and produced differing effects on dendritic morphology. At the doses used in our experiments, SKF81297 appears to maintain previously learned opioid conditioned behavior, even in the face of new information. The D1R agonist's differential, rather than unidirectional, effects on dendritic morphology in the NAc core suggests that it may be involved in encoding reward information depending on previously learned behavior. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. The timing of tertiary metamorphism and deformation in the Albion-Raft River-Grouse Creek metamorphic core complex, Utah and Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, A.; Miller, E.L.; Wooden, J.L.

    2011-01-01

    The Albion-Raft River-Grouse Creek metamorphic core complex of southern Idaho and northern Utah exposes 2.56-Ga orthogneisses and Neoproterozoic metasedimentary rocks that were intruded by 32-25-Ma granitic plutons. Pluton emplacement was contemporaneous with peak metamorphism, ductile thinning of the country rocks, and top-to-thewest, normal-sense shear along the Middle Mountain shear zone. Monazite and zircon from an attenuated stratigraphic section in the Middle Mountain were dated with U-Pb, using a SHRIMP-RG (reverse geometry) ion microprobe. Zircons from the deformed Archean gneiss preserve a crystallization age of 2532 ?? 33 Ma, while monazites range from 32.6 ?? 0.6 to 27.1 ?? 0.6 Ma. In the schist of the Upper Narrows, detrital zircons lack metamorphic overgrowths, and monazites produced discordant U-Pb ages that range from 52.8 ?? 0.6 to 37.5 ?? 0.3 Ma. From the structurally and stratigraphically highest unit sampled, the schist of Stevens Spring, narrow metamorphic rims on detrital zircons yield ages from 140-110 Ma, and monazite grains contained cores that yield an age of 141 ??2 Ma, whereas rims and some whole grains ranged from 35.5 ?? 0.5 to 30.0 ?? 0.4 Ma. A boudinaged pegmatite exposed in Basin Creek is deformed by the Middle Mountains shear zone and yields a monazite age of 27.6 ?? 0.2 Ma. We interpret these data to indicate two periods of monazite and metamorphic zircon growth: a poorly preserved Early Cretaceous period (???140 Ma) that is strongly overprinted by Oligocene metamorphism (???32-27 Ma) related to regional plutonism and extension. ?? 2011 by The University of Chicago.

  19. Timing of mid-crustal ductile extension in the northern Snake Range metamorphic core complex, Nevada: Evidence from U/Pb zircon ages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J.; Blackburn, T.; Johnston, S. M.

    2016-12-01

    Metamorphic core complexes (Mccs) within the western U.S. record a history of Cenozoic ductile and brittle extensional deformation, metamorphism, and magmatism, and exhumation within the footwall of high-angle Basin and Range normal faults. Documenting these histories within Mccs have been topics of research for over 40 years, yet there remains disagreement about: 1) whether the detachment fault formed and moved at low angles or initiated at high angles and rotated to a low angle; 2) whether brittle and ductile extensional deformation were linked in space and time; and 3) the temporal relationship of both modes of extension to the development of the detachment fault. The northern Snake Range metamorphic core complex (NSR), Nevada has been central to this debate. To address these issues, we report new U/Pb dates from zircon in deformed and undeformed rhyolite dikes emplaced into ductilely thinned and horizontally stretched lower plate rocks that provide tight bounds on the timing of ductile extension at between 38.2 ± 0.3 Ma and 22.50 ± 0.36 Ma. The maximum age constraint is from the Northern dike swarm (NDS), which was emplaced in the northwest part of the range pre- to syn-tectonic with ductile extension. The minimum age constraint is from the Silver Creek dike swarm (SDS) that was emplaced in the southern part of the range post ductile extensional deformation. Our field observations, petrography, and U/Pb zircon ages on the dikes combined with published data on the geology and kinematics of extension, moderate and low temperature thermochronology on lower plate rocks, and age and faulting histories of Cenozoic sedimentary basins adjacent to the NSR are interpreted as recording an episode of localized upper crustal brittle extension during the Eocene that drove upward ductile extensional flow of hot middle crustal rocks from beneath the NSR detachment soon after, or simultaneous with, emplacement of the NDS. Exhumation of the lower plate continued in a rolling

  20. Simple and complex hyperplastic papillary proliferations of the endometrium: a clinicopathologic study of nine cases of apparently localized papillary lesions with fibrovascular stromal cores and epithelial metaplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, M B; Hart, W R

    2001-11-01

    The clinicopathologic features of nine cases of papillary proliferation of the endometrium devoid of malignant nuclear features were studied. The patients ranged in age from 33 to 71 years (median 57 years). All were postmenopausal, except the youngest. The most common symptom was postmenopausal bleeding. Two patients were receiving hormonal replacement therapy and two were taking megestrol acetate. Two lesions were incidental findings in a hysterectomy specimen. Seven were diagnosed in endometrial biopsy or curettage specimens. In six cases (67%) the lesion involved an endometrial polyp. In all cases the papillae had fibrovascular stromal cores and variable degrees of branching. Two architectural patterns were found. A simple papillary pattern with involvement of only a few glands and little epithelial proliferation occurred in five cases, including three that were entirely intracystic. A complex papillary pattern with more extensive involvement of endometrial glands, a greater degree of branching of the papillae, and cellular tufting occurred in four cases. One or more metaplastic epithelial changes occurred in all cases, including endocervical-type mucinous metaplasia in nine cases (90%), eosinophilic cell change in eight (89%), ciliated cell change in seven (70%), focal squamous metaplasia in two cases (22%), and hobnail cell change in two (22%). Mitotic figures were found in three cases. In four lesions (44%), all with a complex papillary pattern, the proliferating cells had mild nuclear atypia. Three of these patients underwent hysterectomy within 5 months. Simple nonpapillary hyperplasia and two endometrial polyps were found in one patient, complex nonpapillary hyperplasia in one, and atrophic endometrium in the other. Two patients had additional endometrial samplings within 4 months that contained small residual simple papillary lesions. One of these had another biopsy at 16 months that showed only atrophy. One patient had no subsequent diagnostic or

  1. Proteomics Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Proteomics Core is the central resource for mass spectrometry based proteomics within the NHLBI. The Core staff help collaborators design proteomics experiments in a...

  2. THE GEOCHEMISTRY AND AGES OF ROCKS IN THE FOOTWALL OF THE BUTULIYN-NUR AND ZAGAN METAMORPHIC CORE COMPLEXES (NORTH MONGOLIA – WESTERN TRANSBAIKALIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Donskaya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews data on ages of rocks in the footwall of the Butuliyn-Nur and Zagan metamorphic core complexes (MCC and provides new data on the geochemistry of the rock complexes. It is noted that the oldest rocks are mylonitized gneisses on rhyolites (554 Ma in the footwall of the Butuliyn-Nur MCC. The Late Permian – Triassic (249–211 Ma igneous rocks are ubiquitous in the footwall of the Butuliyn-Nur and Zagan MCC. The youngest rocks in the studied MCC are the Jurassic granitoids (178–152 Ma of the Naushki and Verhnemangirtui massifs. In the footwall of the Butuliyn-Nur and Zagan MCC, the most common are granitoids and felsic volcanic rocks (249–211 Ma with many similar geochemical characteristics, such as high alkalinity, high contents of Sr and Ba, moderate and low concentrations of Nb and Y. Considering the contents of trace elements and REE, the granitoids and the felsic volcanic rocks are similar to I-type granites. Specific compositions of these rocks suggest that they might have formed in conditions of the active continental margin of the Siberian continent over the subducting oceanic plate of the Mongol-Okhotsk Ocean. The granitoids of the Naushki and Verhnemangirtui massifs, which are the youngest of the studied rocks (178–152 Ma, also have similar geochemical characteristics. In both massif, granitoids are ferriferous, mostly alkaline rocks. By contents of both major and trace elements, they are comparable to A-type granites. Such granitoids formed in conditions of intracontinental extension while subduction was replaced by collision. Based on ages and geochemical characteristics of the rocks in the footwall of the Butuliyn-Nur and Zagan MCC, a good correlation is revealed between the studied rocks  and the rock complexes of the Transbaikalian and North-Mongolian segments of the Central Asian fold belt (CAFB, and it can thus be suggested that the regions under study may have a common evolutionary history.

  3. A revision of the history of the Colletotrichum acutatum species complex in the Nordic countries based on herbarium specimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundelin, Thomas; Strømeng, Gunn Mari; Gjærum, Halvor B.

    2015-01-01

    infect a range of important crops. As members of the C. acutatum complex are easily confused with other Colletotrichum species, molecular methods are central for the correct identification. We performed molecular analyses on 21 herbaria specimens, displaying anthracnose symptoms, collected in Norway...

  4. Revision of fleas of the genus Plocopsylla belonging to the 'angusticeps-lewisi' complex in the Andean biogeographic region, with the description of a new species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, J; Beaucournu, J-C; Lareschi, M

    2015-06-01

    In Argentina, the Andean biogeographic region accommodates the most diverse population of fleas in the country. The Craneopsyllinae (Siphonaptera: Stephanocircidae) represent one of the most commonly found subfamilies in this region and show some endemism and high diversity. Plocopsylla is the most diverse genus of Craneopsyllinae; it includes 10 species mainly distributed in the Patagonian subregion, which parasitize sigmodontine rodents (Rodentia: Cricetidae). We describe and illustrate the morphology of the aedeagus in species of Plocopsylla that belong to the 'angusticeps-lewisi' complex. This character is of diagnostic value in differentiating among species. A new species of this complex, Plocopsylla (Plocopsylla) linardii sp. n., is described and identified by the shape and chaetotaxy of the distal arm of sternite IX, as well as by the shape of the median dorsal lobe of the aedeagus. New host associations for this complex and range extensions for most of its species are reported. Plocopsylla (P.) silewi is recorded for the first time in Argentina. The southern limits of the distributions of Plocopsylla (P.) lewisi and Plocopsylla (P.) wilesi are extended to Santa Cruz Province. The angusticeps-lewisi complex is found for the first time in San Juan Province. The information may be useful in epidemiological studies of flea-borne diseases. © 2015 The Royal Entomological Society.

  5. Tetranuclear copper(II) complexes bridged by alpha-D-glucose-1-phosphate and incorporation of sugar acids through the Cu4 core structural changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Merii; Sah, Ajay Kumar; Tanase, Tomoaki; Mikuriya, Masahiro

    2006-08-21

    Tetranuclear copper(II) complexes containing alpha-D-glucose-1-phosphate (alpha-D-Glc-1P), [Cu4(mu-OH){mu-(alpha-D-Glc-1P)}2(bpy)4(H2O)2]X3 [X = NO3 (1a), Cl (1b), Br (1c)], and [Cu4(mu-OH){mu-(alpha-D-Glc-1P)}2(phen)4(H2O)2](NO3)3 (2) were prepared by reacting the copper(II) salt with Na2[alpha-D-Glc-1P] in the presence of diimine ancillary ligands, and the structure of 2 was characterized by X-ray crystallography to comprise four {Cu(phen)}2+ fragments connected by the two sugar phosphate dianions in 1,3-O,O' and 1,1-O mu4-bridging fashion as well as a mu-hydroxo anion. The crystal structure of 2 involves two chemically independent complex cations in which the C2 enantiomeric structure for the trapezoidal tetracopper(II) framework is switched according to the orientation of the alpha-D-glucopyranosyl moieties. Temperature-dependent magnetic susceptibility data of 1a indicated that antiferromagnetic spin coupling is operative between the two metal ions joined by the hydroxo bridge (J = -52 cm(-1)) while antiferromagnetic interaction through the Cu-O-Cu sugar phosphate bridges is weak (J = -13 cm(-1)). Complex 1a readily reacted with carboxylic acids to afford the tetranuclear copper(II) complexes, [Cu4{mu-(alpha-D-Glc-1P)}2(mu-CA)2(bpy)4](NO3)2 [CA = CH3COO (3), o-C6H4(COO)(COOH) (4)]. Reactions with m-phenylenediacetic acid [m-C6H4(CH2COOH)2] also gave the discrete tetracopper(II) cationic complex [Cu4{mu-(alpha-D-Glc-1P)}2(mu-m-C6H4(CH2COO)(CH2COOH))2(bpy)4](NO3)2 (5a) as well as the cluster polymer formulated as {[Cu4{mu-(alpha-D-Glc-1P)}2(mu-m-C6H4(CH2COO)2)(bpy)4](NO3)2}n (5b). The tetracopper structure of 1a is converted into a symmetrical rectangular core in complexes 3, 4, and 5b, where the hydroxo bridge is dissociated and, instead, two carboxylate anions bridge another pair of Cu(II) ions in a 1,1-O monodentate fashion. The similar reactions were applied to incorporate sugar acids onto the tetranuclear copper(II) centers. Reactions of 1a with delta

  6. Formal Revision of the Alexandrium tamarense Species Complex (Dinophyceae) Taxonomy: The Introduction of Five Species with Emphasis on Molecular-based (rDNA) Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Uwe; Litaker, R. Wayne; Montresor, Marina; Murray, Shauna; Brosnahan, Michael L.; Anderson, Donald M.

    2015-01-01

    The Alexandrium tamarense species complex is one of the most studied marine dinoflagellate groups due to its ecological, toxicological and economic importance. Several members of this complex produce saxitoxin and its congeners – potent neurotoxins that cause paralytic shellfish poisoning. Isolates from this complex are assigned to A. tamarense, A. fundyense, or A. catenella based on two main morphological characters: the ability to form chains and the presence/absence of a ventral pore between Plates 1′ and 4′. However, studies have shown that these characters are not consistent and/or distinctive. Further, phylogenies based on multiple regions in the rDNA operon indicate that the sequences from morphologically indistinguishable isolates partition into five clades. These clades were initially named based on their presumed geographic distribution, but recently were renamed as Groups I–V following the discovery of sympatry among some groups. In this study we present data on morphology, ITS/5.8S genetic distances, ITS2 compensatory base changes, mating incompatibilities, toxicity, the sxtA toxin synthesis gene, and rDNA phylogenies. All results were consistent with each group representing a distinct cryptic species. Accordingly, the groups were assigned species names as follows: Group I, A. fundyense; Group II, A. mediterraneum; Group III, A. tamarense; Group IV, A. pacificum; Group V, A. australiense. PMID:25460230

  7. Core Hunter 3: flexible core subset selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Beukelaer, Herman; Davenport, Guy F; Fack, Veerle

    2018-05-31

    Core collections provide genebank curators and plant breeders a way to reduce size of their collections and populations, while minimizing impact on genetic diversity and allele frequency. Many methods have been proposed to generate core collections, often using distance metrics to quantify the similarity of two accessions, based on genetic marker data or phenotypic traits. Core Hunter is a multi-purpose core subset selection tool that uses local search algorithms to generate subsets relying on one or more metrics, including several distance metrics and allelic richness. In version 3 of Core Hunter (CH3) we have incorporated two new, improved methods for summarizing distances to quantify diversity or representativeness of the core collection. A comparison of CH3 and Core Hunter 2 (CH2) showed that these new metrics can be effectively optimized with less complex algorithms, as compared to those used in CH2. CH3 is more effective at maximizing the improved diversity metric than CH2, still ensures a high average and minimum distance, and is faster for large datasets. Using CH3, a simple stochastic hill-climber is able to find highly diverse core collections, and the more advanced parallel tempering algorithm further increases the quality of the core and further reduces variability across independent samples. We also evaluate the ability of CH3 to simultaneously maximize diversity, and either representativeness or allelic richness, and compare the results with those of the GDOpt and SimEli methods. CH3 can sample equally representative cores as GDOpt, which was specifically designed for this purpose, and is able to construct cores that are simultaneously more diverse, and either are more representative or have higher allelic richness, than those obtained by SimEli. In version 3, Core Hunter has been updated to include two new core subset selection metrics that construct cores for representativeness or diversity, with improved performance. It combines and outperforms the

  8. Metamorphic brines and no surficial fluids trapped in the detachment footwall of a Metamorphic Core Complex (Nevado-Filábride units, Betics, Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyja-Person, Vanessa; Tarantola, Alexandre; Richard, Antonin; Hibsch, Christian; Siebenaller, Luc; Boiron, Marie-Christine; Cathelineau, Michel; Boulvais, Philippe

    2018-03-01

    The ductile-brittle transition zone in extensional regimes can play the role of a hydrogeological barrier. Quartz veins developed within an orthogneiss body located in the detachment footwall of a Metamorphic Core Complex (MCC) in the Nevado-Filábride units (Betics, Spain). The detachment footwall is composed mainly of gneisses, schists and metacarbonates from the Bédar-Macael sub-unit. Schist and metacarbonate bodies show evidence of ductile deformation at the time the gneiss was already undergoing brittle deformation and vein opening during exhumation. The vein system provides the opportunity to investigate the origin, composition and PVTX conditions of the fluids that circulated in the detachment footwall while the footwall units were crossing the ductile-brittle transition. The analysis of fluid inclusions reveals the presence of a single type of fluid: 30-40 mass% NaCl > KCl > CaCl2 > MgCl2 brines, with trace amounts of CO2 and N2 and tens to thousands of ppm of metals such as Fe, Sr, Li, Zn, Ba, Pb and Cu. δDfluid values between -39.8 and -16.7‰ and δ18Ofluid values between 4.4 and 11.7 ± 0.5‰ show that the brines have undergone protracted interaction with the host orthogneissic body. Coupled salinity and Cl/Br ratios (200 to 4400) indicate that the brines originate from dissolution of Triassic metaevaporites by metamorphic fluids variably enriched in Br by interaction with graphitic schists. This study highlights the absence of any record of surficial fluids within the veins, despite the brittle deformation conditions prevailing in this orthogneiss body. The fact that fluids from the detachment footwall were isolated from surficial fluid reservoirs may result from the presence of overlying schists and metacarbonates that continued to be affected by ductile deformation during vein formation in the gneiss, preventing downward circulation of surface-derived fluids.

  9. Using global sensitivity analysis to understand higher order interactions in complex models: an application of GSA on the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) to quantify model sensitivity and implications for ecosystem services management in Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fremier, A. K.; Estrada Carmona, N.; Harper, E.; DeClerck, F.

    2011-12-01

    Appropriate application of complex models to estimate system behavior requires understanding the influence of model structure and parameter estimates on model output. To date, most researchers perform local sensitivity analyses, rather than global, because of computational time and quantity of data produced. Local sensitivity analyses are limited in quantifying the higher order interactions among parameters, which could lead to incomplete analysis of model behavior. To address this concern, we performed a GSA on a commonly applied equation for soil loss - the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation. USLE is an empirical model built on plot-scale data from the USA and the Revised version (RUSLE) includes improved equations for wider conditions, with 25 parameters grouped into six factors to estimate long-term plot and watershed scale soil loss. Despite RUSLE's widespread application, a complete sensitivity analysis has yet to be performed. In this research, we applied a GSA to plot and watershed scale data from the US and Costa Rica to parameterize the RUSLE in an effort to understand the relative importance of model factors and parameters across wide environmental space. We analyzed the GSA results using Random Forest, a statistical approach to evaluate parameter importance accounting for the higher order interactions, and used Classification and Regression Trees to show the dominant trends in complex interactions. In all GSA calculations the management of cover crops (C factor) ranks the highest among factors (compared to rain-runoff erosivity, topography, support practices, and soil erodibility). This is counter to previous sensitivity analyses where the topographic factor was determined to be the most important. The GSA finding is consistent across multiple model runs, including data from the US, Costa Rica, and a synthetic dataset of the widest theoretical space. The three most important parameters were: Mass density of live and dead roots found in the upper inch

  10. Computer Program for Calculation of Complex Chemical Equilibrium Compositions, Rocket Performance, Incident and Reflected Shocks, and Chapman-Jouguet Detonations. Interim Revision, March 1976

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, S.; Mcbride, B. J.

    1976-01-01

    A detailed description of the equations and computer program for computations involving chemical equilibria in complex systems is given. A free-energy minimization technique is used. The program permits calculations such as (1) chemical equilibrium for assigned thermodynamic states (T,P), (H,P), (S,P), (T,V), (U,V), or (S,V), (2) theoretical rocket performance for both equilibrium and frozen compositions during expansion, (3) incident and reflected shock properties, and (4) Chapman-Jouguet detonation properties. The program considers condensed species as well as gaseous species.

  11. The Composite Strain Index (COSI) and Cumulative Strain Index (CUSI): methodologies for quantifying biomechanical stressors for complex tasks and job rotation using the Revised Strain Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Arun; Moore, J Steven; Kapellusch, Jay M

    2017-08-01

    The Composite Strain Index (COSI) quantifies biomechanical stressors for complex tasks consisting of exertions at different force levels and/or with different exertion times. The Cumulative Strain Index (CUSI) further integrates biomechanical stressors from different tasks to quantify exposure for the entire work shift. The paper provides methodologies to compute COSI and CUSI along with examples. Complex task simulation produced 169,214 distinct tasks. Use of average, time-weighted average (TWA) and peak force and COSI classified 66.9, 28.2, 100 and 38.9% of tasks as hazardous, respectively. For job rotation the simulation produced 10,920 distinct jobs. TWA COSI, peak task COSI and CUSI classified 36.5, 78.1 and 66.6% jobs as hazardous, respectively. The results suggest that the TWA approach systematically underestimates the biomechanical stressors and peak approach overestimates biomechanical stressors, both at the task and job level. It is believed that the COSI and CUSI partially address these underestimations and overestimations of biomechanical stressors. Practitioner Summary: COSI quantifies exposure when applied hand force and/or duration of that force changes during a task cycle. CUSI integrates physical exposures from job rotation. These should be valuable tools for designing and analysing tasks and job rotation to determine risk of musculoskeletal injuries.

  12. Preparation, characterization, and luminescence properties of dysprosium perchlorate with MABA-Si and phen or dipy complexes as well as SiO{sub 2}@Dy(MABA-Si)L core-shell structure nanometermeter luminescent composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Wen-Xian, E-mail: nmglwx@163.com [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Inner Mongolia University, Hohhot 010021 (China); Zheng, Yu-Shan [Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region Product Quality Inspection Institute, Hohhot 010010 (China); Cao, Xiao-fang; Bai, Juan; Fu, Zhi-Fang; Bao, Jin-Rong; Li, Yi-Lian [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Inner Mongolia University, Hohhot 010021 (China)

    2016-10-15

    Two novel ternary rare earth complexes Dy(MABA-Si)·L{sub 2}(ClO{sub 4}){sub 3}·2H{sub 2}O (L= Phen or Dipy) were prepared using HOOCC{sub 6}H{sub 4}N(CONH(CH{sub 2}){sub 3}Si-(OCH{sub 2}CH{sub 3}){sub 3}){sub 2} which was abbreviated or denoted as MABA-Si. MABA-Si was the first ligand, L was the second ligand. The corresponding two SiO{sub 2}@Dy(MABA-Si)L nanometermeter luminescent composites were synthesized as well, and the silica spheres is the core, and the ternary rare earth complex Dy(MABA-Si)·L{sub 2}(ClO{sub 4}){sub 3}·2H{sub 2}O was the shell layer, who was abbreviated or denoted as Dy((MABA-Si)L). The ternary complexes have been characterized by element analysis, molar conductivity, IR spectra and {sup 1}HNMR spectra. The results showed that the chemical formula of the complex was Dy(MABA-Si)·L{sub 2}(ClO{sub 4}){sub 3}·2H{sub 2}O. The fluorescent spectra illustrated that the complexes displayed its characteristic luminescence in solid state, and the luminescence was superior than Dy{sup 3+}. The core-shell structure of SiO{sub 2}@Dy(MABA-Si)L nanometermeter luminescent composite was characterized by SEM, TEM and IR spectra. Based on the SEM photographs, the core-shell structure particles showed its regular microstructure including smooth surface, and good dispersity. The ternary complex coated on the mono-dispersed SiO{sub 2} spheres by self-assembly. The fluorescent spectra illustrated that the core-shell structure of SiO{sub 2}@Dy(MABA-Si)L nanometermeter luminescent composites exhibited stronger fluorescent than the ternary complexes. The fluorescence lifetime of the complexes and core-shell structure composites was measured as well.

  13. Loosening After Acetabular Revision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beckmann, Nicholas A.; Weiss, Stefan; Klotz, Matthias C.M.

    2014-01-01

    The best method of revision acetabular arthroplasty remains unclear. Consequently, we reviewed the literature on the treatment of revision acetabular arthroplasty using revision rings (1541 cases; mean follow-up (FU) 5.7 years) and Trabecular Metal, or TM, implants (1959 cases; mean FU 3.7 years...

  14. Improving the SMM and luminescence properties of lanthanide complexes with LnO9 cores in the presence of ZnII: an emissive Zn2Dy single ion magnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fondo, Matilde; Corredoira-Vázquez, Julio; Herrera-Lanzós, Antía; García-Deibe, Ana M; Sanmartín-Matalobos, Jesús; Herrera, Juan Manuel; Colacio, Enrique; Nuñez, Cristina

    2017-12-12

    Mononuclear complexes of stoichiometry [Ln(H 3 L)(H 2 O)(NO 3 )](NO 3 ) 2 (Ln = Tb, 1; Dy, 2, Er, 3), which crystallise with different solvates, and the heterotrinuclear compound [Zn 2 Dy(L)(NO 3 ) 3 (OH)] (4) can be obtained with the same H 3 L compartmental ligand. The single X-ray crystal structure of the mononuclear complexes shows a LnO 9 core with a muffin-like disposition while the geometry of the DyO 9 core in 4 seems to be closer to spherical capped square antiprism. The analysis of the magnetic properties of all the complexes demonstrates that the mononuclear lanthanide compounds do not show slow relaxation of the magnetization, even when the samples are diluted with a diamagnetic matrix and subjected to a dc applied field of 1000 Oe. Nevertheless, the heterotrinuclear dysprosium complex 4·3H 2 O is a field-induced single ion magnet, with an estimated U eff barrier of 59 K. The luminescence characterisation of all the metal complexes in methanol solution at 298 K also shows a notable increase in the fluorescence emission of the heterotrinuclear complex with respect to the mononuclear ones, in such a way that 4 can be defined as a fluorescent single ion magnet.

  15. Early Cretaceous overprinting of the Mesozoic Daqing Shan fold-and-thrust belt by the Hohhot metamorphic core complex, Inner Mongolia, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory A. Davis

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The Early Cretaceous Hohhot metamorphic core complex (mcc of the Daqing Shan (Mtns. of central Inner Mongolia is among the best exposed and most spectacular of the spatially isolated mcc’s that developed within the northern edge of the North China “craton”. All of these mcc’s were formed within the basement of a Late Paleozoic Andean-style arc and across older Mesozoic fold-and-thrust belts of variable age and tectonic vergence. The master Hohhot detachment fault roots southwards within the southern margin of the Daqing Shan for an along-strike distance of at least 120 km. Its geometry in the range to the north is complicated by interference patterns between (1 primary, large-scale NW-SE-trending convex and concave fault corrugations and (2 secondary ENE-WSW-trending antiforms and synforms that folded the detachment in its late kinematic history. As in the Whipple Mtns. of California, the Hohhot master detachment is not of the Wernicke (1981 simple rooted type; instead, it was spawned from a mid-crustal shear zone, the top of which is preserved as a mylonitic front within Carboniferous metasedimentary rocks in its exhumed lower plate. 40Ar–39Ar dating of siliceous volcanic rocks in basal sections of now isolated supradetachment basins suggest that crustal extension began at ca. 127 Ma, although lower-plate mylonitic rocks were not exposed to erosion until after ca. 119 Ma. Essentially synchronous cooling of hornblende, biotite, and muscovite in footwall mylonitic gneisses indicates very rapid exhumation and at ca. 122–120 Ma. Contrary to several recent reports, the master detachment clearly cuts across and dismembers older, north-directed thrust sheets of the Daqing Shan foreland fold-and-thrust belt. Folded and thrust-faulted basalts within its foredeep strata are as young as 132.6 ± 2.4 Ma, thus defining within 5–6 Ma the regional tectonic transition between crustal contraction and profound crustal extension.

  16. The influence of tectonic inheritance on crustal extension style following failed subduction of continental crust: applications to metamorphic core complexes in Papua New Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biemiller, J.; Ellis, S. M.; Little, T.; Mizera, M.; Wallace, L. M.; Lavier, L.

    2017-12-01

    The structural, mechanical and geometric evolution of rifted continental crust depends on the lithospheric conditions in the region prior to the onset of extension. In areas where tectonic activity preceded rift initiation, structural and physical properties of the previous tectonic regime may be inherited by the rift and influence its development. Many continental rifts form and exhume metamorphic core complexes (MCCs), coherent exposures of deep crustal rocks which typically surface as arched or domed structures. MCCs are exhumed in regions where the faulted upper crust is displaced laterally from upwelling ductile material along a weak detachment fault. Some MCCs form during extensional inversion of a subduction thrust following failed subduction of continental crust, but the degree to which lithospheric conditions inherited from the preceding subduction phase control the extensional style in these systems remains unclear. For example, the Dayman Dome in Southeastern Papua New Guinea exposes prehnite-pumpellyite to greenschist facies rocks in a smooth 3 km-high dome exhumed with at least 24 km of slip along one main detachment normal fault, the Mai'iu Fault, which dips 21° at the surface. The extension driving this exhumation is associated with the cessation of northward subduction of Australian continental crust beneath the oceanic lithosphere of the Woodlark Plate. We use geodynamic models to explore the effect of pre-existing crustal structures inherited from the preceding subduction phase on the style of rifting. We show that different geometries and strengths of inherited subduction shear zones predict three distinct modes of subsequent rift development: 1) symmetric rifting by newly formed high-angle normal faults; 2) asymmetric rifting along a weak low-angle detachment fault extending from the surface to the brittle-ductile transition; and 3) extension along a rolling-hinge structure which exhumes deep crustal rocks in coherent rounded exposures. We

  17. Constraints on the Lost City Hydrothermal System from borehole thermal data; 3-D models of heat flow and hydrothermal circulation in an oceanic core complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titarenko, S.; McCaig, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    A perennial problem in near-ridge hydrothermal circulation is that the only directly measurable data to test models is often vent fluid temperature. Surface heat flow measurements may be available but without the underlying thermal structure it is not known if they are transient and affected by local hydrothermal flow, or conductive. The Atlantis Massif oceanic core complex at 30 °N on the mid-Atlantic Ridge, offers a unique opportunity to better constrain hydrothermal circulation models. The temperature profile in gabbroic rocks of IODP Hole 1309D was measured in IODPExpedition 340T, and found to be near-conductive, but with a slight inflexion at ~750 mbsf indicating downward advection of fluid above that level. The lack of deep convection is especially remarkable given that the long-lived Lost City Hydrothermal Field (LCHF) is located only 5km to the south. We have modelled hydrothermal circulation in the Massif using Comsol Multiphysics, comparing 2-D and 3-D topographic models and using temperature-dependent conductivity to give the best estimate of heatflow into the Massif. We can constrain maximum permeability in gabbro below 750 mbsf to 5e-17 m2. The thermal gradient in the upper part of the borehole can be matched with a permeability of 3e-14 m2 in a 750 m thick layer parallel to the surface of the massif, with upflow occurring in areas of high topography and downflow at the location of the borehole. However in 3-D the precise flow pattern is quite model dependent, and the thermal structure can be matched either by downflow centred on the borehole at lower permeability or centred a few hundred metres from the borehole at higher permeability. The borehole gradient is compatible with the longevity (>120 kyr) and outflow temperature (40-90 °C) of the LCHF either with a deep more permeable (1e-14 m2 to 1e-15 m2) domain beneath the vent site in 2-D or a permeable fault slot 500 to 1000m wide and parallel to the transform fault in 3-D. In both cases topography

  18. Amphibole and felsic veins from the gabbroic oceanic core complex of Atlantis Bank (Southwest Indian Ridge, IODP Hole U1473A): when the fluids meets the melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanfilippo, A.; Tribuzio, R.; Antonicelli, M.; Zanetti, A.

    2017-12-01

    We present a petrological/geochemical investigation of brown amphibole and felsic veins drilled during IODP 360 expedition at Atlantis Bank, a gabbroic oceanic core complex from Southwest Indian Ridge. The main purpose of this study is to unravel the role of seawater and magmatic components in the origin of these veins. Brown amphibole veins were collected at 90-170 mbsf. These veins typically include minor modal amounts of plagioclase and are associated with alteration halos made up of brown amphibole and whitish milky plagioclase in host gabbros. Two sets of late magmatic felsic veins, which mostly consist of plagioclase and minor brown amphibole, were selected. Amphibole-plagioclase geothermometry (Holland and Blundy, 1994) documents that crystallization of brown amphibole and felsic veins occurred in the 850-700 °C interval. In the brown amphibole veins, amphibole and plagioclase have relatively low concentrations of incompatible trace elements and significant Cl (0.2-0.3 wt%). The development of these veins at near surface levels is therefore attributed to seawater-derived fluids migrating downward through cracks developing in the exhuming gabbro. To explain the high temperature estimates for the development of these shallow veins, however, the seawater-derived fluids must have interacted not only with the gabbros, but also with a high temperature magmatic component. This petrogenetic hypothesis is consistent with oxygen and hydrogen isotopic compositions of amphiboles from shallow veins in adjacent Hole 735B gabbros (Alt and Bach, 2006). Trace element compositions of amphibole and plagioclase from the felsic veins show formation by silicate melts rich in incompatible elements. In addition, Cl concentrations in amphibole from the felsic veins are low, thereby indicating that the melts feeding these veins had low or no seawater component. We cautiously propose that: (i) the felsic veins were generated by SiO2-rich melts residual after crystallization of Fe

  19. Contractor report to the Department of Energy on opportunities for integration of environmental management activities across the complex (predecisional draft). Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-03-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) program faces significant technical and financial challenges in cleaning up the environmental legacy of nuclear weapons production and research and development, while facing an uncertain future in obtaining the needed funding to perform this work. Many of these requirements, including State and Federal regulations and negotiated agreements, continue to be a significant contributor to EM program costs and schedules. Historically, the sites have managed their programs focusing on their individual site's needs. While this approach maximized successes at individual sites, it has resulted in a more costly program than if more integration across the DOE system occurred. In July 1996, the DOE Assistant Secretary for EM, Al Alm, chartered a contractor led effort to perform complex-wide integration in support of the ten-year plan process to develop a suite of technically defensible, integrated alternatives to meet the EM mission. This report documents opportunities for waste and nuclear materials management integration activities in six areas: transuranic (TRU) waste, mixed low-level waste (MLLW), low-level waste (LLW), environmental restoration (ER), high-level waste (HLW), and spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The opportunities represent technically defensible solutions which reduce cost, accelerate schedules, and result in no significant increase in risk

  20. Systematic revision of the marbled velvet geckos (Oedura marmorata species complex, Diplodactylidae) from the Australian arid and semi-arid zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Paul M; Doughty, Paul

    2016-03-08

    Lizards restricted to rocky habitats often comprise numerous deeply divergent lineages, reflecting the disjunct nature of their preferred habitat and the capacity of rocky habitats to function as evolutionary refugia. Here we review the systematics and diversity of the predominantly saxicoline Australian marbled velvet geckos (genus Oedura) in the Australian arid and semi-arid zones using newly-gathered morphological data and previously published genetic data. Earlier work showed that four largely allopatric and genetically divergent lineages are present: Western (Pilbara and Gascoyne regions), Gulf (west and south of the Gulf of Carpentaria), Central (central ranges) and Eastern (Cooper and Darling Basins). None of these four populations are conspecific with true O. marmorata, a seperate species complex that is restricted to the Top End region of the Northern Territory. Top End forms share a short, bulbous tail whereas the other four lineages treated here possess a long, tapering tail. Morphological differences among the arid and semi-arid lineages include smaller body size, tapering lamellae and a shorter tail for the Gulf population, and a partially divided rostral scale in the Western population compared to the Central and Eastern populations. Accordingly, we resurrect O. cincta de Vis from synonymy for the Central and Eastern lineages, and regard this species as being comprised of two evolutionary significant units. We also describe the Gulf and Western lineages as new species: Oedura bella sp. nov. and O. fimbria sp. nov., respectively. We note that a predominantly arboreal lineage (the Eastern lineage of O. cincta) is more widely distributed than the other lineages and is phylogenetically nested within a saxicoline clade, but tends to have a deeper head and shorter limbs, consistent with morphological variation observed in other lizard radiations including both saxicoline and arboreal taxa.

  1. Reconstrucción del complejo areola-pezón: revisión de 60 casos Nipple-areola complex reconstruction: revision of 60 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Fernández García

    2007-06-01

    hay ninguna cuyos resultados se sobrepongan a las demás, pero sí una vez que se reconstruye la areola siendo la técnica que más satisface la del injerto inguinal. A pesar de ello, el aspecto más notable a mejorar está en la reconstrucción del pezón, dada la frecuente disconformidad de las pacientes con la proyección conseguida a lo largo del tiempo por la posible reabsorción del mismo.The creation of the nipple-areola complex is the latest time in breast reconstruction, transforming the reconstruction of the breast mound into a real breast. We have to consider the reconstruction of the areola and the nipple as the culmination of breast reconstruction. There are a lot of documented techniques for nipple-areola complex reconstruction. The aim of this study is to determine the grade of psychological satisfaction of patients after this reconstruction This study was designed as a retrospective clinic review of 60 patients. After reviewing medical histories, the patients were interviewed and asked to complete a questionnaire. The most common desired aspect was to correct the absence/lost of nipple projection. However, 22% of patients answered they would not change anything regarding their reconstruction. The satisfaction with the mammary mound was excellent or good for 68%, normal for 23 % and poor for 9 %. On the other hand, satisfaction for the nippleareola complex reconstruction was excellent or good for 50%, normal for 45% and poor for 5%. There were no statistical differences among the different techniques depending on the time between the mastectomy intervention and the third reconstruction (p=0,06. For nipple reconstruction, the contralateral nipple donation technique offered more satisfaction (2.67 points and projection (7.23 points. In spite of the differences in their means, there were no statistically significant differences. Taking into account the technique used for the areola reconstruction, the donation-graft of inguinal skin was the one that

  2. Systematic revision of the Potamotrygon motoro (Müller & Henle, 1841 species complex in the Paraná-Paraguay basin, with description of two new ocellated species (Chondrichthyes: Myliobatiformes: Potamotrygonidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Silva Loboda

    Full Text Available A systematic revision of the Potamotrygon motoro (Müller & Henle, 1841 species complex in the Paraná-Paraguay basin based on morphological characters was undertaken. Morphological systems analyzed include external morphology, coloration, dermal denticles, and spines, canals of the ventral lateral-line system, and skeletal components. Potamotrygon motoro is widely distributed in the Paraná-Paraguay basin and some of its diagnostic characters are: ocelli present on dorsal disc tricolored, well-defined and evenly distributed, with diameter similar or greater than eye-length; ventral coloration with relatively large whitish central region, with gray or brown area predominant on outer ventral disc margins; dermal denticles well-developed and star-shaped over central disc; labial grooves absent; monognathic heterodonty present in upper and lower jaws of adults. Potamotrygon pauckei Castex, 1963 and Potamotrygon labradori Castex, Maciel & Achenbach, 1963, are synonymized with P. motoro; Potamotrygon alba Castex, 1963, is a nomen dubium in accordance with previous authors. Additionally, two new ocellated species of Potamotrygon from the Paraná-Paraguay basin are described: Potamotrygon pantanensis, sp. nov. and Potamotrygon amandae, sp. nov. These are described and compared with P. motoro and other congeners. Potamotrygon pantanensis, sp. nov. is described from the northern Pantanal region; Potamotrygon amandae, sp. nov. is widespread in the Paraná-Paraguay basin.

  3. JOYO MK-II core characteristics database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohkawachi, Yasushi; Maeda, Shigetaka; Sekine, Takashi; Aoyama, Takafumi

    2003-04-01

    The 'JOYO' MK-II core characteristics database was compiled and published in 1998. Comments and requests from many users led to the creation of a revised edition. The revisions include changes to the MAGI calculation code system to use the 70 group JFS-3-J3.2 constant set processed from the JENDL-3.2 library. Total control rod worth, reactor kinetic parameters and the MK-II core performance test results were included per user's requests. The core characteristics obtained from the 32 nd to 35 th operational cycles, which were conducted in the MK-III transition core, were newly added in this revised version. The MK-II core management data and core characteristics data were recorded to CD-ROM for user convenience. The Configuration Data' include the core arrangement and refueling record for each operational cycle. The 'Subassembly Library Data' include the atomic number density, neutron fluence, burn-up, integral power of 362 driver fuel subassemblies and 69 irradiation test subassemblies. The 'Output Data' contain the calculated neutron flux, gamma flux, power density, linear heat rate, coolant and fuel temperature distribution of all the fuel subassemblies at the beginning and end of each operational cycle. The 'Core Characteristics Data' include the measured excess reactivity, control rod worth calibration curve, and reactivity coefficients of temperature, power and burn-up. (author)

  4. Transformer core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehendale, A.; Hagedoorn, Wouter; Lötters, Joost Conrad

    2008-01-01

    A transformer core includes a stack of a plurality of planar core plates of a magnetically permeable material, which plates each consist of a first and a second sub-part that together enclose at least one opening. The sub-parts can be fitted together via contact faces that are located on either side

  5. Transformer core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehendale, A.; Hagedoorn, Wouter; Lötters, Joost Conrad

    2010-01-01

    A transformer core includes a stack of a plurality of planar core plates of a magnetically permeable material, which plates each consist of a first and a second sub-part that together enclose at least one opening. The sub-parts can be fitted together via contact faces that are located on either side

  6. Revising the Complex Economics of Patent Scope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howells, John

    Merges and Nelson claim to have provided an empirically grounded argument that pioneer patents of 'broad' scope are used to block technological development. It is widely understood in both law and economics that they have, as they claim, faulted Kitch's 'prospect theory' of patents, a theory...... that a function of patents is to enable the coordinated development of novel technical ideas. This article is a critical review of Merges and Nelson's historical empirical evidence. I find that, first, 'broad' scope is only implicated in one of the examples cited by Merges and Nelson as supportive evidence...... - the Wright brothers' warped-wing patent; second, that strict development block, defined as the prevention, or retardation of the development of technology understood to be capable of useful development, was not illustrated by any of their examples. Therefore I conclude that their general thesis...

  7. Standards for vision science libraries: 2014 revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motte, Kristin; Caldwell, C Brooke; Lamson, Karen S; Ferimer, Suzanne; Nims, J Chris

    2014-10-01

    This Association of Vision Science Librarians revision of the "Standards for Vision Science Libraries" aspires to provide benchmarks to address the needs for the services and resources of modern vision science libraries (academic, medical or hospital, pharmaceutical, and so on), which share a core mission, are varied by type, and are located throughout the world. Through multiple meeting discussions, member surveys, and a collaborative revision process, the standards have been updated for the first time in over a decade. While the range of types of libraries supporting vision science services, education, and research is wide, all libraries, regardless of type, share core attributes, which the standards address. The current standards can and should be used to help develop new vision science libraries or to expand the growth of existing libraries, as well as to support vision science librarians in their work to better provide services and resources to their respective users.

  8. Core lifter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlov, N G; Edel' man, Ya A

    1981-02-15

    A core lifter is suggested which contains a housing, core-clamping elements installed in the housing depressions in the form of semirings with projections on the outer surface restricting the rotation of the semirings in the housing depressions. In order to improve the strength and reliability of the core lifter, the semirings have a variable transverse section formed from the outside by the surface of the rotation body of the inner arc of the semiring aroung the rotation axis and from the inner a cylindrical surface which is concentric to the outer arc of the semiring. The core-clamping elements made in this manner have the possibility of freely rotating in the housing depressions under their own weight and from contact with the core sample. These semirings do not have weakened sections, have sufficient strength, are inserted into the limited ring section of the housing of the core lifter without reduction in its through opening and this improve the reliability of the core lifter in operation.

  9. Gap analysis: a method to assess core competency development in the curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fater, Kerry H

    2013-01-01

    To determine the extent to which safety and quality improvement core competency development occurs in an undergraduate nursing program. Rapid change and increased complexity of health care environments demands that health care professionals are adequately prepared to provide high quality, safe care. A gap analysis compared the present state of competency development to a desirable (ideal) state. The core competencies, Nurse of the Future Nursing Core Competencies, reflect the ideal state and represent minimal expectations for entry into practice from pre-licensure programs. Findings from the gap analysis suggest significant strengths in numerous competency domains, deficiencies in two competency domains, and areas of redundancy in the curriculum. Gap analysis provides valuable data to direct curriculum revision. Opportunities for competency development were identified, and strategies were created jointly with the practice partner, thereby enhancing relevant knowledge, attitudes, and skills nurses need for clinical practice currently and in the future.

  10. Bibliocable. Revised Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cable Television Information Center, Washington, DC.

    This selective, annotated bibliography is a revision of the original published in 1972 (ED 071 402). Some 104 books, articles, and reports included here deal with access, applications, franchising, regulation, technology, and other aspects of cable television. The listings are of two types in each category. First are revisions of the original…

  11. Reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azekura, Kazuo; Kurihara, Kunitoshi.

    1992-01-01

    In a BWR type reactor, a great number of pipes (spectral shift pipes) are disposed in the reactor core. Moderators having a small moderating cross section (heavy water) are circulated in the spectral shift pipes to suppress the excess reactivity while increasing the conversion ratio at an initial stage of the operation cycle. After the intermediate stage of the operation cycle in which the reactor core reactivity is lowered, reactivity is increased by circulating moderators having a great moderating cross section (light water) to extend the taken up burnup degree. Further, neutron absorbers such as boron are mixed to the moderator in the spectral shift pipe to control the concentration thereof. With such a constitution, control rods and driving mechanisms are no more necessary, to simplify the structure of the reactor core. This can increase the fuel conversion ratio and control great excess reactivity. Accordingly, a nuclear reactor core of high conversion and high burnup degree can be attained. (I.N.)

  12. Ice Cores

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Records of past temperature, precipitation, atmospheric trace gases, and other aspects of climate and environment derived from ice cores drilled on glaciers and ice...

  13. Designing Automated Guidance to Promote Productive Revision of Science Explanations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansomboon, Charissa; Gerard, Libby F.; Vitale, Jonathan M.; Linn, Marcia C.

    2017-01-01

    Supporting students to revise their written explanations in science can help students to integrate disparate ideas and develop a coherent, generative account of complex scientific topics. Using natural language processing to analyze student written work, we compare forms of automated guidance designed to motivate productive revision and help…

  14. 2 : 2 Fe(III): ligand and "adamantane core" 4 : 2 Fe(III): ligand (hydr)oxo complexes of an acyclic ditopic ligand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghiladi, Morten; Larsen, Frank B.; McKenzie, Christine J.

    2005-01-01

    A bis-hydroxo-bridged diiron(III) complex and a bis-mu-oxo-bis-mu-hydroxo-bridged tetrairon( III) complex are isolated from the reaction of 2,6-bis((N, N'-bis-(2-picolyl) amino) methyl)-4-tert-butylphenol (Hbpbp) with iron perchlorate in acidic and neutral solutions respectively. The X-ray struct......A bis-hydroxo-bridged diiron(III) complex and a bis-mu-oxo-bis-mu-hydroxo-bridged tetrairon( III) complex are isolated from the reaction of 2,6-bis((N, N'-bis-(2-picolyl) amino) methyl)-4-tert-butylphenol (Hbpbp) with iron perchlorate in acidic and neutral solutions respectively. The X...

  15. Matrix metalloproteinase-10/TIMP-2 structure and analyses define conserved core interactions and diverse exosite interactions in MMP/TIMP complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyotica Batra

    Full Text Available Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs play central roles in vertebrate tissue development, remodeling, and repair. The endogenous tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs regulate proteolytic activity by binding tightly to the MMP active site. While each of the four TIMPs can inhibit most MMPs, binding data reveal tremendous heterogeneity in affinities of different TIMP/MMP pairs, and the structural features that differentiate stronger from weaker complexes are poorly understood. Here we report the crystal structure of the comparatively weakly bound human MMP-10/TIMP-2 complex at 2.1 Å resolution. Comparison with previously reported structures of MMP-3/TIMP-1, MT1-MMP/TIMP-2, MMP-13/TIMP-2, and MMP-10/TIMP-1 complexes offers insights into the structural basis of binding selectivity. Our analyses identify a group of highly conserved contacts at the heart of MMP/TIMP complexes that define the conserved mechanism of inhibition, as well as a second category of diverse adventitious contacts at the periphery of the interfaces. The AB loop of the TIMP N-terminal domain and the contact loops of the TIMP C-terminal domain form highly variable peripheral contacts that can be considered as separate exosite interactions. In some complexes these exosite contacts are extensive, while in other complexes the AB loop or C-terminal domain contacts are greatly reduced and appear to contribute little to complex stability. Our data suggest that exosite interactions can enhance MMP/TIMP binding, although in the relatively weakly bound MMP-10/TIMP-2 complex they are not well optimized to do so. Formation of highly variable exosite interactions may provide a general mechanism by which TIMPs are fine-tuned for distinct regulatory roles in biology.

  16. Matrix metalloproteinase-10/TIMP-2 structure and analyses define conserved core interactions and diverse exosite interactions in MMP/TIMP complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batra, Jyotica; Soares, Alexei S; Mehner, Christine; Radisky, Evette S

    2013-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play central roles in vertebrate tissue development, remodeling, and repair. The endogenous tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) regulate proteolytic activity by binding tightly to the MMP active site. While each of the four TIMPs can inhibit most MMPs, binding data reveal tremendous heterogeneity in affinities of different TIMP/MMP pairs, and the structural features that differentiate stronger from weaker complexes are poorly understood. Here we report the crystal structure of the comparatively weakly bound human MMP-10/TIMP-2 complex at 2.1 Å resolution. Comparison with previously reported structures of MMP-3/TIMP-1, MT1-MMP/TIMP-2, MMP-13/TIMP-2, and MMP-10/TIMP-1 complexes offers insights into the structural basis of binding selectivity. Our analyses identify a group of highly conserved contacts at the heart of MMP/TIMP complexes that define the conserved mechanism of inhibition, as well as a second category of diverse adventitious contacts at the periphery of the interfaces. The AB loop of the TIMP N-terminal domain and the contact loops of the TIMP C-terminal domain form highly variable peripheral contacts that can be considered as separate exosite interactions. In some complexes these exosite contacts are extensive, while in other complexes the AB loop or C-terminal domain contacts are greatly reduced and appear to contribute little to complex stability. Our data suggest that exosite interactions can enhance MMP/TIMP binding, although in the relatively weakly bound MMP-10/TIMP-2 complex they are not well optimized to do so. Formation of highly variable exosite interactions may provide a general mechanism by which TIMPs are fine-tuned for distinct regulatory roles in biology.

  17. Core mechanics and configuration behavior of advanced LMFBR core restraint concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, J.N.; Wei, B.C.

    1978-02-01

    Core restraint systems in LMFBRs maintain control of core mechanics and configuration behavior. Core restraint design is complex due to the close spacing between adjacent components, flux and temperature gradients, and irradiation-induced material property effects. Since the core assemblies interact with each other and transmit loads directly to the core restraint structural members, the core assemblies themselves are an integral part of the core restraint system. This paper presents an assessment of several advanced core restraint system and core assembly concepts relative to the expected performance of currently accepted designs. A recommended order for the development of the advanced concepts is also presented

  18. Preparation and electrochemical properties of core-shell carbon coated Mn-Sn complex metal oxide as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruixue; Fang, Guoqing; Liu, Weiwei; Xia, Bingbo; Sun, Hongdan; Zheng, Junwei; Li, Decheng

    2014-02-01

    In this study, we synthesized a carbon coated Mn-Sn metal oxide composite with core-shell structure (MTO@C) via a simple glucose hydrothermal reaction and subsequent carbonization approach. When the MTO@C composite was applied as an anode material for lithium-ion batteries, it maintained a reversible capacity of 409 mA h g-1 after 200 cycles at a current density of 100 mA g-1. The uniformed and continuous carbon layer formed on the MTO nanoparticles, effectively buffered the volumetric change of the active material and increased electronic conductivity, which thus prolonged the cycling performance of the MTO@C electrode.

  19. Hot sample archiving. Revision 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McVey, C.B.

    1995-01-01

    This Engineering Study revision evaluated the alternatives to provide tank waste characterization analytical samples for a time period as recommended by the Tank Waste Remediation Systems Program. The recommendation of storing 40 ml segment samples for a period of approximately 18 months (6 months past the approval date of the Tank Characterization Report) and then composite the core segment material in 125 ml containers for a period of five years. The study considers storage at 222-S facility. It was determined that the critical storage problem was in the hot cell area. The 40 ml sample container has enough material for approximately 3 times the required amount for a complete laboratory re-analysis. The final result is that 222-S can meet the sample archive storage requirements. During the 100% capture rate the capacity is exceeded in the hot cell area, but quick, inexpensive options are available to meet the requirements

  20. Revision of the DELFIC Particle Activity Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooper, David A [ORNL; Jodoin, Vincent J [ORNL

    2010-09-01

    The Defense Land Fallout Interpretive Code (DELFIC) was originally released in 1968 as a tool for modeling fallout patterns and for predicting exposure rates. Despite the continual advancement of knowledge of fission yields, decay behavior of fission products, and biological dosimetry, the decay data and logic of DELFIC have remained mostly unchanged since inception. Additionally, previous code revisions caused a loss of conservation of radioactive nuclides. In this report, a new revision of the decay database and the Particle Activity Module is introduced and explained. The database upgrades discussed are replacement of the fission yields with ENDF/B-VII data as formatted in the Oak Ridge Isotope Generation (ORIGEN) code, revised decay constants, revised exposure rate multipliers, revised decay modes and branching ratios, and revised boiling point data. Included decay logic upgrades represent a correction of a flaw in the treatment of the fission yields, extension of the logic to include more complex decay modes, conservation of nuclides (including stable nuclides) at all times, and conversion of key variables to double precision for nuclide conservation. Finally, recommended future work is discussed with an emphasis on completion of the overall radiation physics upgrade, particularly for dosimetry, induced activity, decay of the actinides, and fractionation.

  1. Preparation and electrochemical properties of core-shell carbon coated Mn–Sn complex metal oxide as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ruixue [Key Laboratory of Lithium Battery Materials of Jiangsu Province, Institute of chemical power sources, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Fang, Guoqing; Liu, Weiwei [Key Laboratory of Lithium Battery Materials of Jiangsu Province, Institute of chemical power sources, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Changzhou Institute of Energy Storage Materials and Devices, Changzhou 213000 (China); Xia, Bingbo; Sun, Hongdan; Zheng, Junwei [Key Laboratory of Lithium Battery Materials of Jiangsu Province, Institute of chemical power sources, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Li, Decheng, E-mail: lidecheng@suda.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Lithium Battery Materials of Jiangsu Province, Institute of chemical power sources, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China)

    2014-02-15

    In this study, we synthesized a carbon coated Mn–Sn metal oxide composite with core-shell structure (MTO@C) via a simple glucose hydrothermal reaction and subsequent carbonization approach. When the MTO@C composite was applied as an anode material for lithium-ion batteries, it maintained a reversible capacity of 409 mA h g{sup −1} after 200 cycles at a current density of 100 mA g{sup −1}. The uniformed and continuous carbon layer formed on the MTO nanoparticles, effectively buffered the volumetric change of the active material and increased electronic conductivity, which thus prolonged the cycling performance of the MTO@C electrode.

  2. Preparation and electrochemical properties of core-shell carbon coated Mn–Sn complex metal oxide as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Ruixue; Fang, Guoqing; Liu, Weiwei; Xia, Bingbo; Sun, Hongdan; Zheng, Junwei; Li, Decheng

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we synthesized a carbon coated Mn–Sn metal oxide composite with core-shell structure (MTO@C) via a simple glucose hydrothermal reaction and subsequent carbonization approach. When the MTO@C composite was applied as an anode material for lithium-ion batteries, it maintained a reversible capacity of 409 mA h g −1 after 200 cycles at a current density of 100 mA g −1 . The uniformed and continuous carbon layer formed on the MTO nanoparticles, effectively buffered the volumetric change of the active material and increased electronic conductivity, which thus prolonged the cycling performance of the MTO@C electrode.

  3. The structure of a mixed GluR2 ligand-binding core dimer in complex with (S)-glutamate and the antagonist (S)-NS1209

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasper, Christina; Pickering, Darryl S; Mirza, Osman

    2006-01-01

    domains has been observed. (S)-NS1209 adopts a novel binding mode, including hydrogen bonding to Tyr450 and Gly451 of D1. Parts of (S)-NS1209 occupy new areas of the GluR2 ligand-binding cleft, and bind near residues that are not conserved among receptor subtypes. The affinities of (RS)-NS1209 at the Glu....... The thermodynamics of binding of the antagonists (S)-NS1209, DNQX and (S)-ATPO to the GluR2 ligand-binding core have been determined by displacement isothermal titration calorimetry. The displacement of (S)-glutamate by all antagonists was shown to be driven by enthalpy....

  4. SHRIMP U-Pb zircon dating of Archean core complex formatio and pancratonic strike-slip deformation in the East Pilbara Granite-Greenstone Terrain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zegers, T.E.; Nelson, D.R.; Wijbrans, J.R.; White, S.H.

    2001-01-01

    Sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP) U-Pb dating of zircons from granitic rocks in the East Pilbara Granite-Greenstone Terrain has provided time constraints for main tectonic events in the Shaw Granitoid Complex and has shown that deformation was intricately related to granitoid

  5. Publishing and Revising Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Editors and Webmasters can publish content without going through a workflow. Publishing times and dates can be set, and multiple pages can be published in bulk. Making an edit to published content created a revision.

  6. Letter of Map Revision

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL) data incorporates all Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map(DFIRM) databases published by FEMA, and any Letters Of Map Revision...

  7. Poorer survival after a primary implant during revision total knee arthroplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Marrigje F.; Reininga, Inge H. F.; Boerboom, Alexander L.; Stevens, Martin; Bulstra, Sjoerd K.

    Revision total knee arthroplasty (rTKA) is a complex procedure. Depending on the degree of ligament and bone damage, either primary or revision implants are used. The purpose of this study was to compare survival rates of primary implants with revision implants when used during rTKA. A retrospective

  8. Complex manifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Morrow, James

    2006-01-01

    This book, a revision and organization of lectures given by Kodaira at Stanford University in 1965-66, is an excellent, well-written introduction to the study of abstract complex (analytic) manifolds-a subject that began in the late 1940's and early 1950's. It is largely self-contained, except for some standard results about elliptic partial differential equations, for which complete references are given. -D. C. Spencer, MathSciNet The book under review is the faithful reprint of the original edition of one of the most influential textbooks in modern complex analysis and geometry. The classic

  9. MRB3010 is a core component of the MRB1 complex that facilitates an early step of the kinetoplastid RNA editing process

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ammerman, M. L.; Hashimi, Hassan; Novotná, Lucie; Číčová, Zdeňka; Mcevoy, S. M.; Lukeš, Julius; Read, L. K.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 5 (2011), 865-877 ISSN 1355-8382 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/09/1667; GA MŠk 2B06129; GA MŠk LC07032 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : RNA editing * trypanosome * MRB1 complex * mitochondria * kinetoplast Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.095, year: 2011

  10. Insight to the interaction of the dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase (E2) core with the peripheral components in the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase complex via multifaceted structural approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekhar, Krishnamoorthy; Wang, Junjie; Arjunan, Palaniappa; Sax, Martin; Park, Yun-Hee; Nemeria, Natalia S; Kumaran, Sowmini; Song, Jaeyoung; Jordan, Frank; Furey, William

    2013-05-24

    Multifaceted structural approaches were undertaken to investigate interaction of the E2 component with E3 and E1 components from the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex (PDHc), as a representative of the PDHc from Gram-negative bacteria. The crystal structure of E3 at 2.5 Å resolution reveals similarity to other E3 structures and was an important starting point for understanding interaction surfaces between E3 and E2. Biochemical studies revealed that R129E-E2 and R150E-E2 substitutions in the peripheral subunit-binding domain (PSBD) of E2 greatly diminished PDHc activity, affected interactions with E3 and E1 components, and affected reductive acetylation of E2. Because crystal structures are unavailable for any complete E2-containing complexes, peptide-specific hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry was used to identify loci of interactions between 3-lipoyl E2 and E3. Two peptides from the PSBD, including Arg-129, and three peptides from E3 displayed statistically significant reductions in deuterium uptake resulting from interaction between E3 and E2. Of the peptides identified on E3, two were from the catalytic site, and the third was from the interface domain, which for all known E3 structures is believed to interact with the PSBD. NMR clearly demonstrates that there is no change in the lipoyl domain structure on complexation with E3. This is the first instance where the entire wild-type E2 component was employed to understand interactions with E3. A model for PSBD-E3 binding was independently constructed and found to be consistent with the importance of Arg-129, as well as revealing other electrostatic interactions likely stabilizing this complex.

  11. Insight to the Interaction of the Dihydrolipoamide Acetyltransferase (E2) Core with the Peripheral Components in the Escherichia coli Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex via Multifaceted Structural Approaches*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekhar, Krishnamoorthy; Wang, Junjie; Arjunan, Palaniappa; Sax, Martin; Park, Yun-Hee; Nemeria, Natalia S.; Kumaran, Sowmini; Song, Jaeyoung; Jordan, Frank; Furey, William

    2013-01-01

    Multifaceted structural approaches were undertaken to investigate interaction of the E2 component with E3 and E1 components from the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex (PDHc), as a representative of the PDHc from Gram-negative bacteria. The crystal structure of E3 at 2.5 Å resolution reveals similarity to other E3 structures and was an important starting point for understanding interaction surfaces between E3 and E2. Biochemical studies revealed that R129E-E2 and R150E-E2 substitutions in the peripheral subunit-binding domain (PSBD) of E2 greatly diminished PDHc activity, affected interactions with E3 and E1 components, and affected reductive acetylation of E2. Because crystal structures are unavailable for any complete E2-containing complexes, peptide-specific hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry was used to identify loci of interactions between 3-lipoyl E2 and E3. Two peptides from the PSBD, including Arg-129, and three peptides from E3 displayed statistically significant reductions in deuterium uptake resulting from interaction between E3 and E2. Of the peptides identified on E3, two were from the catalytic site, and the third was from the interface domain, which for all known E3 structures is believed to interact with the PSBD. NMR clearly demonstrates that there is no change in the lipoyl domain structure on complexation with E3. This is the first instance where the entire wild-type E2 component was employed to understand interactions with E3. A model for PSBD-E3 binding was independently constructed and found to be consistent with the importance of Arg-129, as well as revealing other electrostatic interactions likely stabilizing this complex. PMID:23580650

  12. Elastic properties and seismic anisotropy of the Seve Nappe Complex - Laboratory core measurements from the International Continental Drilling Project COSC-1 well, Åre, Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenning, Q. C.; Almqvist, B. S. G.; Zappone, A. S.

    2015-12-01

    The COSC-1 scientific borehole was drilled in the summer of 2014 to ~2.5 km depth to study the structure and composition of the Middle Allochthon of the Central Scandinavian Caledonides. It crosscuts the amphibolite-grade lower part of the Seve nappe and intersects a mylonite zone in the lower 800 m of the borehole. We selected six core samples representing the primary lithologies in the COSC-1 borehole for laboratory investigation of elastic properties. The cores consisted of two amphibolites with differing grain sizes, a calc-silicate gneiss, a felsic gneiss, a coarse grained amphibole bearing gneiss, and a garnet bearing mylonitic schist from the basal shear zone. Both P- and S-waves were measured at ultrasonic frequency (1 MHz), and room temperature hydrostatic pressure conditions up to 260 MPa. Measurements were made along three mutually perpendicular directions, one perpendicular to foliation and two parallel to the foliation with one aligned with mineral lineation. Vp and Vs, anisotropy, and elastic properties are reported as an extrapolation of the high-pressure portion of the ultrasonic measurements back to the intersection with the zero pressure axis. The Vp and Vs in the direction perpendicular to foliation ranges from 5.51-6.67 km/s and 3.18-4.13 km/s, respectively. In the direction parallel to foliation the Vp and Vs ranges from 6.31-7.25 km/s and 3.52-4.35 km/s, respectively. Vp anisotropy ranges from 3% in the calc-silicate gneiss to 18% in mylonitic schist. Acoustic impedance estimations at lithostatic pressure conditions at base of the borehole (70 MPa) show that acoustic impedance contrast generating reflection coefficients between the basal shear zone and overlying units are significant enough to cause seismic reflections. Above the mylonite zone/shear zone, the reflectivity within the lower Seve nappe is due to the impedance contrast between the felsic gneiss and the amphibolite. This result fits with 3D seismic reflection imaging in the area of

  13. Reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Tetsuaki; Nomura, Teiji; Tokunaga, Kensuke; Okuda, Shin-ichi

    1990-01-01

    Fuel assemblies in the portions where the gradient of fast neutron fluxes between two opposing faces of a channel box is great are kept loaded at the outermost peripheral position of the reactor core also in the second operation cycle in the order to prevent interference between a control rod and the channel box due to bending deformation of the channel box. Further, the fuel assemblies in the second row from the outer most periphery in the first operation cycle are also kept loaded at the second row in the second operation cycle. Since the gradient of the fast neutrons in the reactor core is especially great at the outer circumference of the reactor core, the channel box at the outer circumference is bent such that the surface facing to the center of the reactor core is convexed and the channel box in the second row is also bent to the identical direction, the insertion of the control rod is not interfered. Further, if the positions for the fuels at the outermost periphery and the fuels in the second row are not altered in the second operation cycle, the gaps are not reduced to prevent the interference between the control rod and the channel box. (N.H.)

  14. Toward a Comprehensive Framework for Evaluating the Core Integration Features of Enterprise Integration Middleware Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Moradi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To achieve greater automation of their business processes, organizations face the challenge of integrating disparate systems. In attempting to overcome this problem, organizations are turning to different kinds of enterprise integration. Implementing enterprise integration is a complex task involving both technological and business challenges and requires appropriate middleware technologies. Different enterprise integration solutions provide various functions and features which lead to the complexity of their evaluation process. To overcome this complexity, appropriate tools for evaluating the core integration features of enterprise integration solutions is required. This paper proposes a new comprehensive framework for evaluating the core integration features of both intra-enterprise and inter-enterprise Integration's enabling technologies, which simplify the process of evaluating the requirements met by enterprise integration middleware technologies.The proposed framework for evaluating the core integration features of enterprise integration middleware technologies was enhanced using the structural and conceptual aspects of previous frameworks. It offers a new schema for which various enterprise integration middleware technologies are categorized in different classifications and are evaluated based on their supporting level for the core integration features' criteria. These criteria include the functional and supporting features. The proposed framework, which is a revised version of our previous framework in this area, has developed the scope, structure and content of the mentioned framework.

  15. Acetabular Cup Revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Ho

    2017-09-01

    The use of acetabular cup revision arthroplasty is on the rise as demands for total hip arthroplasty, improved life expectancies, and the need for individual activity increase. For an acetabular cup revision to be successful, the cup should gain stable fixation within the remaining supportive bone of the acetabulum. Since the patient's remaining supportive acetabular bone stock plays an important role in the success of revision, accurate classification of the degree of acetabular bone defect is necessary. The Paprosky classification system is most commonly used when determining the location and degree of acetabular bone loss. Common treatment options include: acetabular liner exchange, high hip center, oblong cup, trabecular metal cup with augment, bipolar cup, bulk structural graft, cemented cup, uncemented cup including jumbo cup, acetabular reinforcement device (cage), trabecular metal cup cage. The optimal treatment option is dependent upon the degree of the discontinuity, the amount of available bone stock and the likelihood of achieving stable fixation upon supportive host bone. To achieve successful acetabular cup revision, accurate evaluation of bone defect preoperatively and intraoperatively, proper choice of method of acetabular revision according to the evaluation of acetabular bone deficiency, proper technique to get primary stability of implant such as precise grafting technique, and stable fixation of implant are mandatory.

  16. Synthesis and characterization of organohydrazino complexes of technetium, rhenium, and molybdenum with the [M(η1-HxNNR)(η2-HyNNR)] core and their relationship to radiolabeled organohydrazine-derivatives chemotactic peptides with diagnostic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, D.J.; Maresca, K.P.; Nicholson, T.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, the authors present the details of the preparation of the imaging agent and its imaging properties. In order to define some structural possibilities for the coordination chemistry relevant to these reagents, they also present the results of investigations of the syntheses and structures of Tc, Mo, and Re complexes with hydrazinopyridine, which not only establish the formation of the robust unit, but also implicate chelate formation through the pyridine nitrogen as a significant structural determinant. The structures of the parent (bis)hydrazino-trichlorometalate core compounds are presented, allowing analysis of structural changes that occur when (2) protonation sites on the ligand change, (2) a different metal is employed, and (3) a different chelating hydrazine is utilized. The structures of the thiolate substitution products of these parent compounds are also presented. These derivatives demonstrate that rhenium and technetium have analogous substitution chemistry

  17. Core BPEL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallwyl, Tim; Højsgaard, Espen

    The Web Services Business Process Execution Language (WS-BPEL) is a language for expressing business process behaviour based on web services. The language is intentionally not minimal but provides a rich set of constructs, allows omission of constructs by relying on defaults, and supports language......, does not allow omissions, and does not contain ignorable elements. We do so by identifying syntactic sugar, including default values, and ignorable elements in WS-BPEL. The analysis results in a translation from the full language to the core subset. Thus, we reduce the effort needed for working...

  18. Revision of Pachycentria (Melastomataceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clausing, Gudrun

    2000-01-01

    A revision of Pachycentria Blume, which includes the monotypic Pogonanthera Blume, is presented. Pachycentria comprises eight species and one subspecies. Two species, P. vogelkopensis and P. hanseniana, are newly described. The genus is distinguished from other genera in the Medinillinae by a small

  19. Revision of Oxandra (Annonaceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Junikka, L.; Maas, P.J.M.; Maas-van de Kamer, H.; Westra, L.Y.Th.

    2016-01-01

    A taxonomic revision is given of the Neotropical genus Oxandra (Annonaceae). Within the genus 27 species are recognized, 4 of which are new to science. Most of the species are occurring in tropical South America, whereas a few (6) are found in Mexico and Central America and two in the West Indies

  20. Revision without ordinals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rivello, Edoardo

    2013-01-01

    We show that Herzberger’s and Gupta’s revision theories of truth can be recast in purely inductive terms, without any appeal neither to the transfinite ordinal numbers nor to the axiom of Choice. The result is presented in an abstract and general setting, emphasising both its validity for a wide

  1. Revising and editing for translators

    CERN Document Server

    Mossop, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Revising and Editing for Translators provides guidance and learning materials for translation students learning to edit texts written by others, and professional translators wishing to improve their self-revision ability or learning to revise the work of others. Editing is understood as making corrections and improvements to texts, with particular attention to tailoring them to the given readership. Revising is this same task applied to draft translations. The linguistic work of editors and revisers is related to the professional situations in which they work. Mossop offers in-depth coverage of a wide range of topics, including copyediting, style editing, structural editing, checking for consistency, revising procedures and principles, and translation quality assessment. This third edition provides extended coverage of computer aids for revisers, and of the different degrees of revision suited to different texts. The inclusion of suggested activities and exercises, numerous real-world examples, a proposed gra...

  2. Cambridge IGCSE mathematics core and extended

    CERN Document Server

    Pimentel, Ric

    2013-01-01

    The most cost effective and straightforward way to teach the revised syllabus, with all the core and extended content covered by a single book and accompanying free digital resources.  . This title has been written for the revised Cambridge IGCSE Mathematics (0580) syllabus, for first teaching from 2013.  . ·         Gives students the practice they require to deepen their understanding through plenty of questions. ·         Consolidates learning with unique digital resources on the CD, included free with every Student's Book.  . We are working with Cambridge International Examinations to gain

  3. The thesaurus review, renaissance, and revision

    CERN Document Server

    Roe, Sandra K

    2013-01-01

    Use this single source to uncover the origin and development of the thesaurus! The Thesaurus: Review, Renaissance, and Revision examines the historical development of the thesaurus and the standards employed for thesaurus construction. This book provides both the history of thesauri and tutorials on usage to increase your understanding of thesaurus creation, use, and evaluation. This reference tool offers essential information on thesauri in the digital environment, including Web sites, databases, and software. For 50 years, the thesaurus has been a core reference book; The Thesaurus: Review,

  4. Core calculations of JMTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagao, Yoshiharu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    In material testing reactors like the JMTR (Japan Material Testing Reactor) of 50 MW in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, the neutron flux and neutron energy spectra of irradiated samples show complex distributions. It is necessary to assess the neutron flux and neutron energy spectra of an irradiation field by carrying out the nuclear calculation of the core for every operation cycle. In order to advance core calculation, in the JMTR, the application of MCNP to the assessment of core reactivity and neutron flux and spectra has been investigated. In this study, in order to reduce the time for calculation and variance, the comparison of the results of the calculations by the use of K code and fixed source and the use of Weight Window were investigated. As to the calculation method, the modeling of the total JMTR core, the conditions for calculation and the adopted variance reduction technique are explained. The results of calculation are shown. Significant difference was not observed in the results of neutron flux calculations according to the difference of the modeling of fuel region in the calculations by K code and fixed source. The method of assessing the results of neutron flux calculation is described. (K.I.)

  5. The Taili-Yiwulüshan metamorphic core complex corridor: Diachronous exhumation and relationships to the adjacent basins based on new 40Ar/39Ar and (U-Th-Sm)/He mineral ages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Chenyue; Neubauer, Franz; Liu, Yongjiang; Genser, Johann; Dunkl, István; Heberer, Bianca; Jin, Wei; Zeng, Zuoxun; Li, Weimin; Wen, Quanbo; Li, Jing

    2015-04-01

    The Xingcheng-Taili ductile shear zone (western Liaoning Province in China) formed during latest Jurassic to Early Cretaceous crustal extension of the eastern North China craton, and exhumed low to medium metamorphic grade Archean, Upper Triassic and Upper Jurassic granitic rocks. The Mesozoic Yiwulüshan metamorphic core complex (Yiwulüshan MCC) is dominated by a NNE-SSW elongated dome with a left-lateral shear zone, which is located in the northeastern part of Xingcheng-Taili ductile shear zone, and combine as Taili-Yiwulüshan metamorphic core complex corridor. To the east, it is bounded by the NNE-trending Cretaceous to Eocene Liaohe basin (the northern extension of the Bohai Bay basin), and to the west by the Cretaceous-aged Fuxin-Yixian basin, which could potentially interpreted as supra-detachment basins. Here, we present results from a multi-method thermochronological study and coupled with structural investigations and sections of adjacent supra-detachment basins, which constrain the timing of regional deformation as well as the cooling history and exhumation processes of the low- to middle-grade metamorphic complex in the Taili-Yiwulüshan MCC corridor, in order to understand the mode of lithospheric scale reactivation, extension and thinning of the North China craton. The new40Ar/39Ar muscovite, biotite, K-feldspar and (U-Th)/He apatite ages from granitic rocks help constrain the thermal evolution during its exhumation. The thermochronologic studies have shown at least three stages of exhumation and cooling from late Jurassic to Eocene in Xingcheng-Taili shear zone should be distinguished, e.g., ~ 150-130 Ma, 130-115 Ma and 115-52 Ma, respectively. Diachronous onset and subsequent parallel cooling and exhumation characterize the early thermal history. The Yiwulüshan MCC has a similar exhumation history from 135 to 97 Ma with a similar cooling history. The development of Taili-Yiwulüshan MCC corridor is associated with synkinematic emplacement

  6. Tuning the Solubility of Copper Complex in Atom Transfer Radical Self-Condensing Vinyl Polymerizations to Control Polymer Topology via One-Pot to the Synthesis of Hyperbranched Core Star Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zong-Cheng Chen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a simple one-pot methodology for proceeding from atom transfer reaction-induced conventional free radical polymerization (AT-FRP to atom transfer self-condensing vinyl polymerization (AT-SCVP through manipulation of the catalyst phase homogeneity (i.e., CuBr/2,2'-bipyridine (CuBr/Bpy in a mixture of styrene (St, 4-vinyl benzyl chloride (VBC, and ethyl 2-bromoisobutyrate. Tests of the solubilities of CuBr/Bpy and CuBr2/Bpy under various conditions revealed that both temperature and solvent polarity were factors affecting the solubility of these copper complexes. Accordingly, we obtained different polymer topologies when performing AT-SCVP in different single solvents. We investigated two different strategies to control the polymer topology in one-pot: varying temperature and varying solvent polarity. In both cases, different fractions of branching revealed the efficacy of varying the polymer topology. To diversify the functionality of the peripheral space, we performed chain extensions of the resulting hyperbranched poly(St-co-VBC macroinitiator (name as: hbPSt MI with either St or tBA (tert-butyl acrylate. The resulting hyperbranched core star polymer had high molecular weights (hbPSt-g-PSt: Mn = 25,000, Đ = 1.77; hbPSt-g-PtBA: Mn = 27,000, Đ = 1.98; hydrolysis of the tert-butyl groups of the later provided a hyperbranched core star polymer featuring hydrophilic poly(acrylic acid segments.

  7. Rhinoplasty for the multiply revised nose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foda, Hossam M T

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the problems encountered on revising a multiply operated nose and the methods used in correcting such problems. The study included 50 cases presenting for revision rhinoplasty after having had 2 or more previous rhinoplasties. An external rhinoplasty approach was used in all cases. Simultaneous septal surgery was done whenever indicated. All cases were followed for a mean period of 32 months (range, 1.5-8 years). Evaluation of the surgical result depended on clinical examination, comparison of pre- and postoperative photographs, and degree of patients' satisfaction with their aesthetic and functional outcome. Functionally, 68% suffered nasal obstruction that was mainly caused by septal deviations and nasal valve problems. Aesthetically, the most common deformities of the upper two thirds of the nose included pollybeak (64%), dorsal irregularities (54%), dorsal saddle (44%), and open roof deformity (42%), whereas the deformities of lower third included depressed tip (68%), tip contour irregularities (60%), and overrotated tip (42%). Nasal grafting was necessary in all cases; usually more than 1 type of graft was used in each case. Postoperatively, 79% of the patients, with preoperative nasal obstruction, reported improved breathing; 84% were satisfied with their aesthetic result; and only 8 cases (16%) requested further revision to correct minor deformities. Revision of a multiply operated nose is a complex and technically demanding task, yet, in a good percentage of cases, aesthetic as well as functional improvement are still possible.

  8. Evidence for Cyclical Fractional Crystallization, Recharge, and Assimilation in Basalts of the Kimama Core, Central Snake River Plain, Idaho: A 5.5-million-year Highlight Reel of Petrogenetic processes in a Mid-Crustal Sill Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Katherine E.; Shervais, John W.; Christiansen, Eric H.; Vetter, Scott K.

    2018-02-01

    -Fe flows are compositionally unrelated to SROT magmas and represent highly fractionated basalt, probably accompanied by crustal assimilation. These evolved lavas may be sourced from the Craters of the Moon/Great Rift system to the northeast. The Kimama drill core is the longest record of geochemical variation in the central Snake River Plain and reinforces the concept of magma processing in a layered complex.

  9. Automated Core Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Yoko; Aiyoshi, Eitaro

    2005-01-01

    Multistate searching methods are a subfield of distributed artificial intelligence that aims to provide both principles for construction of complex systems involving multiple states and mechanisms for coordination of independent agents' actions. This paper proposes a multistate searching algorithm with reinforcement learning for the automatic core design of a boiling water reactor. The characteristics of this algorithm are that the coupling structure and the coupling operation suitable for the assigned problem are assumed and an optimal solution is obtained by mutual interference in multistate transitions using multiagents. Calculations in an actual plant confirmed that the proposed algorithm increased the convergence ability of the optimization process

  10. Investigating the translation of Earth's inner core

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Day, Elizabeth A; Cormier, Vernon F; Geballe, Zachary M

    2012-01-01

    The Earth’s inner core provides unique insights into processes that are occurring deep within our Earth today, as well as processes that occurred in the past. The seismic structure of the inner core is complex, and is dominated by anisotropic and isotropic differences between the Eastern...... for models of a translating inner core. Additionally, we investigate the structure at the base of the outer core and the inner core boundary by analyzing PKP-Cdiff waves. The search for observable PKP-Cdiff is particularly concentrated in regions that are predicted to be actively freezing and melting...... and Western ‘hemispheres’ of the inner core. Recent geodynamical models suggest that this hemispherical dichotomy can be explained by a fast translation of the inner core. In these models one side of the inner core is freezing, while the other side is melting, leading to the development of different seismic...

  11. Side core lifter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edelman, Ya A

    1982-01-01

    A side core lifter is proposed which contains a housing with guide slits and a removable core lifter with side projections on the support section connected to the core receiver. In order to preserve the structure of the rock in the core sample by means of guaranteeing rectilinear movement of the core lifter in the rock, the support and core receiver sections are hinged. The device is equipped with a spring for angular shift in the core-reception part.

  12. A revised Self- and Family Management Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grey, Margaret; Schulman-Green, Dena; Knafl, Kathleen; Reynolds, Nancy R

    2015-01-01

    Research on self- and family management of chronic conditions has advanced over the past 6 years, but the use of simple frameworks has hampered the understanding of the complexities involved. We sought to update our previously published model with new empirical, synthetic, and theoretical work. We used synthesis of previous studies to update the framework. We propose a revised framework that clarifies facilitators and barriers, processes, proximal outcomes, and distal outcomes of self- and family management and their relationships. We offer the revised framework as a model that can be used in studies aimed at advancing self- and family management science. The use of the framework to guide studies would allow for the design of studies that can address more clearly how self-management interventions work and under what conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Prediction and Optimization of Key Performance Indicators in the Production of Stator Core Using a GA-NN Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajora, M.; Zou, P.; Xu, W.; Jin, L.; Chen, W.; Liang, S. Y.

    2017-12-01

    With the rapidly changing demands of the manufacturing market, intelligent techniques are being used to solve engineering problems due to their ability to handle nonlinear complex problems. For example, in the conventional production of stator cores, it is relied upon experienced engineers to make an initial plan on the number of compensation sheets to be added to achieve uniform pressure distribution throughout the laminations. Additionally, these engineers must use their experience to revise the initial plans based upon the measurements made during the production of stator core. However, this method yields inconsistent results as humans are incapable of storing and analysing large amounts of data. In this article, first, a Neural Network (NN), trained using a hybrid Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) - Genetic Algorithm (GA), is developed to assist the engineers with the decision-making process. Next, the trained NN is used as a fitness function in an optimization algorithm to find the optimal values of the initial compensation sheet plan with the aim of minimizing the required revisions during the production of the stator core.

  14. Validation of reactor core protection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang-Hoon; Bae, Jong-Sik; Baeg, Seung-Yeob; Cho, Chang-Ho; Kim, Chang-Ho; Kim, Sung-Ho; Kim, Hang-Bae; In, Wang-Kee; Park, Young-Ho

    2008-01-01

    Reactor COre Protection System (RCOPS), an advanced core protection calculator system, is a digitized one which provides core protection function based on two reactor core operation parameters, Departure from Nucleate Boiling Ratio (DNBR) and Local Power Density (LPD). It generates a reactor trip signal when the core condition exceeds the DNBR or LPD design limit. It consists of four independent channels adapted a two-out-of-four trip logic. System configuration, hardware platform and an improved algorithm of the newly designed core protection calculator system are described in this paper. One channel of RCOPS was implemented as a single channel facility for this R and D project where we performed final integration software testing. To implement custom function blocks, pSET is used. Software test is performed by two methods. The first method is a 'Software Module Test' and the second method is a 'Software Unit Test'. New features include improvement of core thermal margin through a revised on-line DNBR algorithm, resolution of the latching problem of control element assembly signal and addition of the pre-trip alarm generation. The change of the on-line DNBR calculation algorithm is considered to improve the DNBR net margin by 2.5%-3.3%. (author)

  15. Observations of exotic inner core waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waszek, Lauren; Deuss, A.F.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/412396610

    2015-01-01

    The seismic structure of Earth’s inner core is highly complex, displaying strong anisotropy and further regional variations. However, few seismic waves are sensitive to the inner core and fundamental questions regarding the origin of the observed seismic features remain unanswered. Thus, new

  16. Grain Boundary Sliding (GBS) as a Plastic Instability Leading to Coeval Pseudotachylyte Development in Mylonites: an EBSD Study of the Seismic Cycle in Brittle-Ductile Transition Rocks of the South Mountains Core Complex, Arizona, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, E.; Stewart, C.

    2017-12-01

    Exposures of coeval pseudotachylytes and mylonites are relatively rare, but are crucial for understanding the seismic cycle in the vicinity of the brittle-ductile transition (BDT). We use both field observations and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analysis to investigate the coeval pseudotachylytes and granodiorite mylonites exposed in the footwall of the South Mountains core complex, Arizona, to evaluate how strain is localized both prior to and during pseudotachylyte development at the BDT. In the field, we observe numerous pseudotachylyte veins oriented parallel to mylonitic foliation; the veins have synthetic shear sense with adjacent mylonites, and are < 2 cm thick, laterally discontinuous, and confined to a few m in structural thickness. EBSD analysis reveals that deformation is strongly partitioned into quartz in mylonites, where quartz shows subgrain rotation overprinted by bulging recrystallization microstructures and lattice preferred orientation (LPO) patterns indicative of dislocation creep. Foliation-parallel zones of finely recrystallized, (< 5 μm diameter) bulge-nucleated grains in the mylonites show four-grain junctions and randomized LPO patterns consistent with grain boundary sliding (GBS). Pseudotachylyte veins have elongate polycrystalline quartz survivor clasts that also exhibit GBS traits, suggesting that pseudotachylytes form within GBS zones in mylonites. We interpret the onset of GBS as a triggering mechanism for coeval pseudotachylyte development, where the accompanying decrease in effective viscosity and increase in strain rate initiated seismic slip and pseudotachylyte formation within GBS zones. Strain became localized within the pseudotachylyte until crystallization of melt impeded flow, inducing pseudotachylyte development in other GBS zones. We associate the pseudotachylyte veins and host mylonites with the coseismic and interseismic parts of the seismic cycle, respectively, where the abundance and lateral discontinuity of

  17. Revised Rules for Concrete Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle; Jensen, F. M.; Middleton, C.

    This paper is based on research performed for the Highway Agency, London, UK under the project DPU/9/44 "Revision of Bridge Assessment Rules Based on Whole Life Performance: Concrete Bridges" It contains details of a methodology which can be used to generate Whole Life (WL) reliability profiles....... These WL reliability profiles may be used to establish revised rules for Concrete Bridges....

  18. Emotion Processes in Knowledge Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevors, Gregory J.; Kendeou, Panayiota; Butterfuss, Reese

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, a number of insights have been gained into the cognitive processes that explain how individuals overcome misconceptions and revise their previously acquired incorrect knowledge. The current study complements this line of research by investigating the moment-by-moment emotion processes that occur during knowledge revision using a…

  19. Deletion of Core-binding factor β (Cbfβ) in mesenchymal progenitor cells provides new insights into Cbfβ/Runxs complex function in cartilage and bone development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mengrui; Li, Chenguan; Zhu, Guochun; Wang, Yiping; Jules, Joel; Lu, Yun; McConnell, Matthew; Wang, Yong-Jun; Shao, Jian-Zhong; Li, Yi-Ping; Chen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Core-binding factor β (Cbfβ) is a subunit of the Cbf family of heterodimeric transcription factors which plays a critical role in skeletal development through its interaction with the Cbfα subunits, also known as Runt-related transcription factors (Runxs). However, the mechanism by which Cbfβ regulates cartilage and bone development remains unclear. Existing Cbfβ-deficient mouse models cannot specify the role of Cbfβ in skeletal cell lineage. Herein, we sought to specifically address the role of Cbfβ in cartilage and bone development by using a conditional knockout (CKO) approach. A mesenchymal-specific Cbfβ CKO mouse model was generated by using the Dermo1-Cre mouse line to specifically delete Cbfβ in mesenchymal stem cells, which give rise to osteoblasts and chondrocytes. Surprisingly, the mutant mice had under-developed larynx and tracheal cartilage causing alveolus defects which led to death shortly after birth from suffocation. Also, the mutant mice exhibited severe skeletal deformities from defective intramembranous and endochondral ossification, owing to delayed chondrocyte maturation and impaired osteoblast differentiation. Almost all bones of the mutant mice, including the calvariae, vertebrae, tibiae, femurs, ribs, limbs and sternums were defective. Importantly, we showed that Cbfβ was expressed throughout the skeleton during both embryonic and postnatal development, which explains the multiple-skeletal defects observed in the mutant mice. Consistently, Cbfβ deficiency impaired both chondrocyte proliferation and hypertrophy zone hypertrophy during growth-plate development in the long bones of mutant mice. Notably, Cbfβ, Runx1 and Runx2 displayed different expression patterns in the growth plates of the wildtype mice indicating that Cbfβ/Runx1 complex and Cbfβ/Runx2 complex may regulate chondrocyte proliferation and hypertrophy, respectively, in a spatial and temporal manner. Cbfβ deletion in the mesenchymal progenitors impacted bone

  20. Animal MRI Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Animal Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Core develops and optimizes MRI methods for cardiovascular imaging of mice and rats. The Core provides imaging expertise,...

  1. Philippines revises power plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, D.

    1988-02-01

    Following an unexpected surge in electricity demand the Philippines has revised its medium term power development programme. The sharp increase in electricity consumption follows three years of slack demand due to civil disturbances before the end of the Macros administration and the election of Corazon Aquino as President in 1986. Originally, the Aquino government's medium term power development plans called for about 500MW of generating capacity to be installed between 1986 and 1992. The three proposed plants were scheduled for commissioning in 1991 and 1992. However, a spurt in power demand growth during the past nine months has caused concern among industrialists that power shortages could occur by the end of the decade. So additional capacity will be installed to prevent an anticipated shortfall in electricity supplies by the early 1990s.

  2. Microcomputers and the Improvement of Revision Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balajthy, Ernest; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Discusses use of word processing software as an effective tool in writing and revision instruction, and describes the role of the teacher. Examples of exercises that encourage revision and of software designed to teach effective revision skills are reviewed. (MBR)

  3. Complex analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Freitag, Eberhard

    2005-01-01

    The guiding principle of this presentation of ``Classical Complex Analysis'' is to proceed as quickly as possible to the central results while using a small number of notions and concepts from other fields. Thus the prerequisites for understanding this book are minimal; only elementary facts of calculus and algebra are required. The first four chapters cover the essential core of complex analysis: - differentiation in C (including elementary facts about conformal mappings) - integration in C (including complex line integrals, Cauchy's Integral Theorem, and the Integral Formulas) - sequences and series of analytic functions, (isolated) singularities, Laurent series, calculus of residues - construction of analytic functions: the gamma function, Weierstrass' Factorization Theorem, Mittag-Leffler Partial Fraction Decomposition, and -as a particular highlight- the Riemann Mapping Theorem, which characterizes the simply connected domains in C. Further topics included are: - the theory of elliptic functions based on...

  4. 76 FR 72984 - Revised Application for a License To Export High-Enriched Uranium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-28

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Revised Application for a License To Export High-Enriched Uranium The application for a license to export high-enriched Uranium has been revised as noted below. Notice... fabricate fuel France. Security Complex; October 18, Uranium (93.35%). uranium (174.0 elements in France...

  5. Advance of core design method for ATR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Seiichirou; Ihara, Toshiteru; Iijima, Takashi; Seino, Hideaki; Kobayashi, Tetsurou; Takeuchi, Michio; Sugawara, Satoru; Matsumoto, Mitsuo.

    1995-01-01

    Core characteristics of ATR demonstration plant has been revised such as increasing the fuel burnup and the channel power, which is achieved by changing the number of fuel rod per fuel assembly from 28 to 36. The research and development concerning the core design method for ATR have been continued. The calculational errors of core analysis code have been evaluated using the operational data of FUGEN and the full scale simulated test results in DCA (Deuterium Critical Assembly) and HTL (Heat Transfer Loop) at O-arai engineering center. It is confirmed that the calculational error of power distribution is smaller than the design value of ATR demonstration plant. Critical heat flux correlation curve for 36 fuel rod cluster has been developed and the probability evaluation method based on its curve, which is more rational to evaluate the fuel dryout, has been adopted. (author)

  6. Adult educators' core competences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlgren, Bjarne

    2016-01-01

    ” requirements, organising them into four thematic subcategories: (1) communicating subject knowledge; (2) taking students’ prior learning into account; (3) supporting a learning environment; and (4) the adult educator’s reflection on his or her own performance. At the end of his analysis of different competence......Abstract Which competences do professional adult educators need? This research note discusses the topic from a comparative perspective, finding that adult educators’ required competences are wide-ranging, heterogeneous and complex. They are subject to context in terms of national and cultural...... environment as well as the kind of adult education concerned (e.g. basic education, work-related education etc.). However, it seems that it is possible to identify certain competence requirements which transcend national, cultural and functional boundaries. This research note summarises these common or “core...

  7. A study on scar revision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashutosh Talwar

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Scars are psychologically distressing for the patients and have an impact on the quality of life and self esteem of the patients. Scar revision is an aesthetic skill which is mastered by plastic surgeons and encroached now by dermatosurgeons. Scars on the face are aesthetically unacceptable and various techniques have been improvised for making a scar aesthetically acceptable. Various types of techniques are used for scar revision like W plasty, Z plasty and VY plasty. Aims: To see the efficacy of various scar revision techniques including Z plasty, VY plasty and W plasty in 30 patients with disfiguring scars. Methods: We selected twenty patients of disfiguring scars for the study. The scars from various causes including trauma and burns were included in our study. Various techniques of scar revision include Z plasty, W plasty and VY plasty were performed according to the type and site of scar. Results: Male: female was 1.5: 1. The scar revision surgery yielded excellent results with minimal complications including haematoma formation, secondary infection and delayed healing seen in 5% patients each. Regarding the efficacy of scar revision, excellent improvement was seen in 60% patients, moderate improvement was seen in 30% patients and mild improvement was seen in 10% patients. Conclusions: Dermatologists can employ a number of surgical scar revision techniques. While some are better suited to treat specific types of scars, they can be used in combination with each other or with adjunctive therapies to achieve optimal results.

  8. Challenges Regarding IP Core Functional Reliability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Melanie D.; LaBel, Kenneth A.

    2017-01-01

    For many years, intellectual property (IP) cores have been incorporated into field programmable gate array (FPGA) and application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) design flows. However, the usage of large complex IP cores were limited within products that required a high level of reliability. This is no longer the case. IP core insertion has become mainstream including their use in highly reliable products. Due to limited visibility and control, challenges exist when using IP cores and subsequently compromise product reliability. We discuss challenges and suggest potential solutions to critical application IP insertion.

  9. Complex Variables throughout the Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, John P.

    2017-01-01

    We offer many specific detailed examples, several of which are new, that instructors can use (in lecture or as student projects) to revitalize the role of complex variables throughout the curriculum. We conclude with three primary recommendations: revise the syllabus of Calculus II to allow early introductions of complex numbers and linear…

  10. Novel point mutations and mutational complexes in the enhancer II, core promoter and precore regions of hepatitis B virus genotype D1 associated with hepatocellular carcinoma in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Anis; Al Balwi, Mohammed A; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Hajeer, Ali; Sanai, Faisal M; Al Abdulkarim, Ibrahim; Al Ayyar, Latifah; Badri, Motasim; Saudi, Dib; Tamimi, Waleed; Mizokami, Masashi; Al Knawy, Bandar

    2013-12-15

    In this study, a cohort of 182 patients [55 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and 127 non-HCC] infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV) in Saudi Arabia was investigated to study the relationship between sequence variation in the enhancer II (EnhII), basal core promoter (BCP) and precore regions of HBV genotype D (HBV/D) and the risk of HCC. HBV genotypes were determined by sequencing analysis and/or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Variations in the EnhII, BCP and precore regions were compared between 107 non-HCC and 45 HCC patients infected with HBV/D, followed by age-matched analysis of 40 cases versus equal number of controls. Age and male gender were significantly associated with HCC (p = 0.0001 and p = 0.03, respectively). Serological markers such as aspartate aminotransferase, albumin and anti-HBe were significantly associated with HCC (p = 0.0001 for all), whereas HBeAg positivity was associated with non-HCC (p = 0.0001). The most prevalent HBV genotype was HBV/D (94%), followed by HBV/E (4%), HBV/A (1.6%) and HBV/C (0.5%). For HBV/D1, genomic mutations associated with HCC were T1673/G1679, G1727, C1741, C1761, A1757/T1764/G1766, T1773, T1773/G1775 and C1909. Age- and gender-adjusted stepwise logistic regression analysis indicated that mutations G1727 [odds ratio (OR) = 18.3; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.8-118.4; p = 0.002], A1757/T1764/G1766 (OR = 4.7; 95% CI = 1.3-17.2; p = 0.01) and T1773 (OR = 14.06; 95% CI = 2.3-84.8; p = 0.004) are independent predictors of HCC development. These results implicate novel individual and combination patterns of mutations in the X/precore region of HBV/D1 as predictors of HCC. Risk stratification based on these mutation complexes would be useful in determining high-risk patients and improving diagnostic and treatment strategies for HBV/D1. Copyright © 2013 UICC.

  11. Revision of ASCE 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, T.A.; Murray, R.C.; Short, S.A.

    1995-01-01

    The original version of ASCE Standard 4, ''Seismic Analysis of Safety-Related Nuclear Structures'' was published in September 1986. It is ASCE policy to update its standards on a five year interval and the Working Group on Seismic Analysis of Safety Related Nuclear Structures was reconvened to formulate the revisions. The goal in updating the standard is to make sure that it is still relevant and that it incorporates the state of the practice in seismic engineering or, in some cases, where it has been demonstrated that state-of-the-art improvements need to be made to standard practice; new improvements are included. The contents of the new standard cover the same areas as the original version, with some additions. The contents are as follows: Input - response spectra and time histories; modeling of structures; analysis of structures; soil-structure interaction; input for subsystem analysis; special structures - buried pipes and conduits, earth-retaining walls, above-ground vertical tanks, raceways, and base-isolated structures; and an appendix providing seismic probabilistic risk assessment and margin assessment

  12. Contact activation: a revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmaier, A H

    1997-07-01

    In conclusion, a revised view of the contact system has been presented. This system has little to do with the initiation of hemostasis. Like lupus anticoagulants, deficiencies of contact proteins give prolonged APTTs but may be risk factors for thrombosis. BK from kininogens is a potent modulator of vascular biology inducing vasodilation, tissue plasminogen activator release, and prostacyclin liberation. Kininogens, themselves, are selective inhibitors of alpha-thrombin-induced platelet activation preventing alpha-thrombin from cleaving the cloned thrombin receptor after arginine41. Kininogens' alpha-thrombin inhibitory activity exists in intact kininogens, BK, and all of BK's breakdown products. HK also is the pivotal protein for contact protein assembly on endothelium. It is the receptor for prekallikrein which when bound to HK becomes activated to kallikrein by an endothelial cell enzyme system independent of activated forms of plasma factor XII. Prekallikrein activation on endothelial cells results in kinetically favorable single chain urokinase and plasminogen activation. Thus the "physiologic, negatively charged surface" for contact system activation is really the assembly of these proteins on cell membranes and activation by membrane-associated enzymes.

  13. One Health Core Competency Domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebekah Frankson

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of complex global challenges at the convergence of human, animal, and environmental health has catalyzed a movement supporting ‘One Health’ approaches. Despite recognition of the importance of One Health approaches to address these complex challenges, little effort has been directed at identifying the seminal knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary for individuals to successfully contribute to One Health efforts. Between 2008 and 2011, three groups independently embarked on separate initiatives to identify core competencies for professionals involved with One Health approaches. Core competencies were considered critically important for guiding curriculum development and continuing professional education as they describe the knowledge, skills and attitudes required to be effective. A workshop was convened in 2012 to synthesize the various strands of work on One Health competencies. Despite having different mandates, participants, and approaches, all of these initiatives identified similar core competency domains: management; communication and informatics; values and ethics; leadership; teams and collaboration; roles and responsibilities; and systems thinking. These core competency domains have been used to develop new continuing professional education programs for One Health professionals and help university curricula prepare new graduates to be able to contribute more effectively to One Health approaches.

  14. One Health Core Competency Domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankson, Rebekah; Hueston, William; Christian, Kira; Olson, Debra; Lee, Mary; Valeri, Linda; Hyatt, Raymond; Annelli, Joseph; Rubin, Carol

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of complex global challenges at the convergence of human, animal, and environmental health has catalyzed a movement supporting "One Health" approaches. Despite recognition of the importance of One Health approaches to address these complex challenges, little effort has been directed at identifying the seminal knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for individuals to successfully contribute to One Health efforts. Between 2008 and 2011, three groups independently embarked on separate initiatives to identify core competencies for professionals involved with One Health approaches. Core competencies were considered critically important for guiding curriculum development and continuing professional education, as they describe the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required to be effective. A workshop was convened in 2012 to synthesize the various strands of work on One Health competencies. Despite having different mandates, participants, and approaches, all of these initiatives identified similar core competency domains: management; communication and informatics; values and ethics; leadership; teams and collaboration; roles and responsibilities; and systems thinking. These core competency domains have been used to develop new continuing professional education programs for One Health professionals and help university curricula prepare new graduates to be able to contribute more effectively to One Health approaches.

  15. Advantages of iron core in a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bettis, E.S.; Ballou, J.K.; Becraft, W.R.; Peng, Y.K.M.; Watts, H.L.

    1977-01-01

    A quantitative comparison of the iron core vs air core concepts was carried out on a preliminary basis by using a representative tokamak reactor design with the following self-consistent reference parameters. In the area of plasma engineering, poloidal field and MHD equilibrium considerations with an unsaturated iron core is discussed. The question of proper poloidal field coils to maintain D-shaped plasmas of relatively high anti β (7%) with a saturated iron core is also discussed. Estimates of the required iron core size, volt seconds, magnetic flux and its influence on force loading on the superconducting toroidal field coils are shown. Conceptual designs of the mechanical structure of an iron core device are presented. Favorable impacts on the OH power supply cost and complexity are indicated

  16. Circumcision revision in male children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed A. Al-Ghazo

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine indications for circumcision revision and to identify the specialty of the person who performed unsatisfactory primary circumcision. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The authors reviewed medical records of 52 cases that underwent circumcision revision over a 6-year period (1998 to 2004. Sleeve surgical technique was used for revision in patients with redundant foreskin or concealed penis, penoplasty for partial or complete degloving of the penis and meatotomy for external meatal stenosis. The mean age of children was 32 months (range 6 months to 9 years. RESULTS: Most of unsatisfactory primary circumcisions (86.7% were performed by laymen. All patients who underwent circumcision revision had good to excellent cosmetic results. CONCLUSION: Primary circumcision performed by laymen carry a high complication rate and serious complications may occur. A period of training and direct supervision by physicians is required before allowing laymen to perform circumcision independently.

  17. EPR first responders revision test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    In this revision test evaluates the acquired knowledge in case of radiological emergency confront. Actions to be taken in relation to people, equipment and the environment. Doses, radioactive sources, pollution

  18. Corporate Author Entries. Revision 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendricks, P.L.

    1986-05-01

    This reference authority has been created and is maintained to provide standard forms for recording the names of organizations consistently in bibliographic citations. This revision includes approximately 42,000 entries established since 1973

  19. k-core covers and the core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez-Rodriguez, E.; Borm, Peter; Estevez-Fernandez, A.; Fiestras-Janeiro, G.; Mosquera, M.A.

    This paper extends the notion of individual minimal rights for a transferable utility game (TU-game) to coalitional minimal rights using minimal balanced families of a specific type, thus defining a corresponding minimal rights game. It is shown that the core of a TU-game coincides with the core of

  20. Necrosome core machinery: MLKL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Yang, Yu; He, Wenyan; Sun, Liming

    2016-06-01

    In the study of regulated cell death, the rapidly expanding field of regulated necrosis, in particular necroptosis, has been drawing much attention. The signaling of necroptosis represents a sophisticated form of a death pathway. Anti-caspase mechanisms (e.g., using inhibitors of caspases, or genetic ablation of caspase-8) switch cell fate from apoptosis to necroptosis. The initial extracellular death signals regulate RIP1 and RIP3 kinase activation. The RIP3-associated death complex assembly is necessary and sufficient to initiate necroptosis. MLKL was initially identified as an essential mediator of RIP1/RIP3 kinase-initiated necroptosis. Recent studies on the signal transduction using chemical tools and biomarkers support the idea that MLKL is able to make more functional sense for the core machinery of the necroptosis death complex, called the necrosome, to connect to the necroptosis execution. The experimental data available now have pointed that the activated MLKL forms membrane-disrupting pores causing membrane leakage, which extends the prototypical concept of morphological and biochemical events following necroptosis happening in vivo. The key role of MLKL in necroptosis signaling thus sheds light on the logic underlying this unique "membrane-explosive" cell death pathway. In this review, we provide the general concepts and strategies that underlie signal transduction of this form of cell death, and then focus specifically on the role of MLKL in necroptosis.

  1. Training in Vocational Assessment: Preparing Rehabilitation Counselors and Meeting the Requirements of the CORE Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansey, Timothy N.

    2008-01-01

    Assessment represents a foundational component of rehabilitation counseling services. The revised Council on Rehabilitation Education (CORE) standards implemented in 2004 resulted in the redesign of the knowledge and outcomes under the Assessment standard. The author reviews the current CORE standard for training in assessment within the context…

  2. Core Data Necessary for Reporting Clinical Trials on Nutrition in Infancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koletzko, Berthold; Fewtrell, Mary; Gibson, Robert; van Goudoever, Johannes B.; Hernell, Olle; Shamir, Raanan; Szajewska, Hania

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an updated and revised summary of the 'core data set' that has been proposed to be recorded and reported in all clinical trials on infant nutrition by the recently formed Consensus Group on Outcome Measures Made in Paediatric Enteral Nutrition Clinical Trials (COMMENT). This core

  3. Core competencies for pain management: results of an interprofessional consensus summit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Scott M; Young, Heather M; Lucas Arwood, Ellyn; Chou, Roger; Herr, Keela; Murinson, Beth B; Watt-Watson, Judy; Carr, Daniel B; Gordon, Debra B; Stevens, Bonnie J; Bakerjian, Debra; Ballantyne, Jane C; Courtenay, Molly; Djukic, Maja; Koebner, Ian J; Mongoven, Jennifer M; Paice, Judith A; Prasad, Ravi; Singh, Naileshni; Sluka, Kathleen A; St Marie, Barbara; Strassels, Scott A

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this project was to develop core competencies in pain assessment and management for prelicensure health professional education. Such core pain competencies common to all prelicensure health professionals have not been previously reported. An interprofessional executive committee led a consensus-building process to develop the core competencies. An in-depth literature review was conducted followed by engagement of an interprofessional Competency Advisory Committee to critique competencies through an iterative process. A 2-day summit was held so that consensus could be reached. The consensus-derived competencies were categorized within four domains: multidimensional nature of pain, pain assessment and measurement, management of pain, and context of pain management. These domains address the fundamental concepts and complexity of pain; how pain is observed and assessed; collaborative approaches to treatment options; and application of competencies across the life span in the context of various settings, populations, and care team models. A set of values and guiding principles are embedded within each domain. These competencies can serve as a foundation for developing, defining, and revising curricula and as a resource for the creation of learning activities across health professions designed to advance care that effectively responds to pain. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Core Competencies for Pain Management: Results of an Interprofessional Consensus Summit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Scott M; Young, Heather M; Lucas Arwood, Ellyn; Chou, Roger; Herr, Keela; Murinson, Beth B; Watt-Watson, Judy; Carr, Daniel B; Gordon, Debra B; Stevens, Bonnie J; Bakerjian, Debra; Ballantyne, Jane C; Courtenay, Molly; Djukic, Maja; Koebner, Ian J; Mongoven, Jennifer M; Paice, Judith A; Prasad, Ravi; Singh, Naileshni; Sluka, Kathleen A; St Marie, Barbara; Strassels, Scott A

    2013-01-01

    Objective The objective of this project was to develop core competencies in pain assessment and management for prelicensure health professional education. Such core pain competencies common to all prelicensure health professionals have not been previously reported. Methods An interprofessional executive committee led a consensus-building process to develop the core competencies. An in-depth literature review was conducted followed by engagement of an interprofessional Competency Advisory Committee to critique competencies through an iterative process. A 2-day summit was held so that consensus could be reached. Results The consensus-derived competencies were categorized within four domains: multidimensional nature of pain, pain assessment and measurement, management of pain, and context of pain management. These domains address the fundamental concepts and complexity of pain; how pain is observed and assessed; collaborative approaches to treatment options; and application of competencies across the life span in the context of various settings, populations, and care team models. A set of values and guiding principles are embedded within each domain. Conclusions These competencies can serve as a foundation for developing, defining, and revising curricula and as a resource for the creation of learning activities across health professions designed to advance care that effectively responds to pain. PMID:23577878

  5. Revised accident source terms for light-water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soffer, L. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-02-01

    This paper presents revised accident source terms for light-water reactors incorporating the severe accident research insights gained in this area over the last 15 years. Current LWR reactor accident source terms used for licensing date from 1962 and are contained in Regulatory Guides 1.3 and 1.4. These specify that 100% of the core inventory of noble gases and 25% of the iodine fission products are assumed to be instantaneously available for release from the containment. The chemical form of the iodine fission products is also assumed to be predominantly elemental iodine. These assumptions have strongly affected present nuclear air cleaning requirements by emphasizing rapid actuation of spray systems and filtration systems optimized to retain elemental iodine. A proposed revision of reactor accident source terms and some im implications for nuclear air cleaning requirements was presented at the 22nd DOE/NRC Nuclear Air Cleaning Conference. A draft report was issued by the NRC for comment in July 1992. Extensive comments were received, with the most significant comments involving (a) release fractions for both volatile and non-volatile species in the early in-vessel release phase, (b) gap release fractions of the noble gases, iodine and cesium, and (c) the timing and duration for the release phases. The final source term report is expected to be issued in late 1994. Although the revised source terms are intended primarily for future plants, current nuclear power plants may request use of revised accident source term insights as well in licensing. This paper emphasizes additional information obtained since the 22nd Conference, including studies on fission product removal mechanisms, results obtained from improved severe accident code calculations and resolution of major comments, and their impact upon the revised accident source terms. Revised accident source terms for both BWRS and PWRS are presented.

  6. Complex dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Carleson, Lennart

    1993-01-01

    Complex dynamics is today very much a focus of interest. Though several fine expository articles were available, by P. Blanchard and by M. Yu. Lyubich in particular, until recently there was no single source where students could find the material with proofs. For anyone in our position, gathering and organizing the material required a great deal of work going through preprints and papers and in some cases even finding a proof. We hope that the results of our efforts will be of help to others who plan to learn about complex dynamics and perhaps even lecture. Meanwhile books in the field a. re beginning to appear. The Stony Brook course notes of J. Milnor were particularly welcome and useful. Still we hope that our special emphasis on the analytic side will satisfy a need. This book is a revised and expanded version of notes based on lectures of the first author at UCLA over several \\Vinter Quarters, particularly 1986 and 1990. We owe Chris Bishop a great deal of gratitude for supervising the production of cour...

  7. Delegation. Position Statement. Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    Board, Connie; Bushmiaer, Margo; Davis-Alldritt, Linda; Fekaris, Nina; Morgitan, Judith; Murphy, M. Kathleen; Yow, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that the delegation of nursing tasks in the school setting can be a valuable tool for the school nurse, when based on the nursing definition of delegation and in compliance with state nursing regulations and guidance. Delegation in school nursing is a complex process in which…

  8. Complexity in Picture Books

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierschynski, Jarek; Louie, Belinda; Pughe, Bronwyn

    2015-01-01

    One of the key requirements of Common Core State Standards (CCSS) in English Language Arts is that students are able to read and access complex texts across all grade levels. The CCSS authors emphasize both the limitations and lack of accuracy in the current CCSS model of text complexity, calling for the development of new frameworks. In response…

  9. Growth outside the core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zook, Chris; Allen, James

    2003-12-01

    Growth in an adjacent market is tougher than it looks; three-quarters of the time, the effort fails. But companies can change those odds dramatically. Results from a five-year study of corporate growth conducted by Bain & Company reveal that adjacency expansion succeeds only when built around strong core businesses that have the potential to become market leaders. And the best place to look for adjacency opportunities is inside a company's strongest customers. The study also found that the most successful companies were able to consistently, profitably outgrow their rivals by developing a formula for pushing out the boundaries of their core businesses in predictable, repeatable ways. Companies use their repeatability formulas to expand into any number of adjacencies. Some companies make repeated geographic moves, as Vodafone has done in expanding from one geographic market to another over the past 13 years, building revenues from $1 billion in 1990 to $48 billion in 2003. Others apply a superior business model to new segments. Dell, for example, has repeatedly adapted its direct-to-customer model to new customer segments and new product categories. In other cases, companies develop hybrid approaches. Nike executed a series of different types of adjacency moves: it expanded into adjacent customer segments, introduced new products, developed new distribution channels, and then moved into adjacent geographic markets. The successful repeaters in the study had two common characteristics. First, they were extraordinarily disciplined, applying rigorous screens before they made an adjacency move. This discipline paid off in the form of learning curve benefits, increased speed, and lower complexity. And second, in almost all cases, they developed their repeatable formulas by studying their customers and their customers' economics very, very carefully.

  10. Reactor core fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvennoinen, P.

    1976-01-01

    The subject is covered in chapters, entitled: concepts of reactor physics; neutron diffusion; core heat transfer; reactivity; reactor operation; variables of core management; computer code modules; alternative reactor concepts; methods of optimization; general system aspects. (U.K.)

  11. Nuclear reactor core catcher

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    A nuclear reactor core catcher is described for containing debris resulting from an accident causing core meltdown and which incorporates a method of cooling the debris by the circulation of a liquid coolant. (U.K.)

  12. The updated ESTRO core curricula 2011 for clinicians, medical physicists and RTTs in radiotherapy/radiation oncology.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eriksen, J.G.; Beavis, A.W.; Coffey, M.A.; Leer, J.W.H.; Magrini, S.M.; Benstead, K.; Boelling, T.; Hjalm-Eriksson, M.; Kantor, G.; Maciejewski, B.; Mezeckis, M.; Oliveira, A.; Thirion, P.; Vitek, P.; Olsen, D.R.; Eudaldo, T.; Enghardt, W.; Francois, P.; Garibaldi, C.; Heijmen, B.; Josipovic, M.; Major, T.; Nikoletopoulos, S.; Rijnders, A.; Waligorski, M.; Wasilewska-Radwanska, M.; Mullaney, L.; Boejen, A.; Vaandering, A.; Vandevelde, G.; Verfaillie, C.; Potter, R.

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In 2007 ESTRO proposed a revision and harmonisation of the core curricula for radiation oncologists, medical physicists and RTTs to encourage harmonised education programmes for the professional disciplines, to facilitate mobility between EU member states, to reflect the rapid

  13. Seismic core shroud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puri, A.; Mullooly, J.F.

    1981-01-01

    A core shroud is provided, comprising: a coolant boundary, following the shape of the core boundary, for channeling the coolant through the fuel assemblies; a cylindrical band positioned inside the core barrel and surrounding the coolant boundary; and support members extending from the coolant boundary to the band, for transferring load from the coolant boundary to the band. The shroud may be assembled in parts using automated welding techniques, and it may be adjusted to fit the reactor core easily

  14. Athletes and sports teams as complex adaptive system: A review of implications for learning design. [Atletas y equipos deportivos como sistemas adaptativos complejos: Una revision de las Implicaciones para el diseño del aprendizaje].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith Davids

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ecological dynamics is a systems-oriented theoretical framework which conceptualises sport performers as complex adaptive systems. It seeks to understand the adaptive relations that emerge during coordination of interactions between each performer and a specific performance environment. This approach has identified the individual-environment relationship as the relevant scale of analysis for explaining how processes of perception, cognition and action underpin expert performance in sport. This theoretical overview elucidates key ideas from previous work identifying functional characteristics of complex adaptive systems, such as co-adaptation, emergent coordination tendencies and capacity to utilise affordances, which underlie performance and learning in team and individual sports. The review of research focuses on how key principles of ecological dynamics inform our understanding of learning and transfer, and their impact on practice task design in sport development programmes. To support this analysis, data from research on performance of elite and developmental athletes in individual and team sports are presented to highlight important principles of learning design from an ecological dynamics perspective. Resumen La dinámica ecológica es un marco teórico orientado a los sistemas que conceptualiza a los athletas como sistemas complejos adaptativos. Con el objeto de comprender las relaciones adaptativas que surgen durante la coordinación de las interacciones entre cada uno de los athletas y un medio/ambiente de actuación específico. Este enfoque ha identificado la relación individuo-ambiente como la escala de análisis relevante para explicar cómo los procesos de la percepción, la cognición y la acción respaldan el rendimiento de expertos en el deporte. Este documento de posición teórica aclara características funcionales esenciales de los sistemas adaptativos complejos, tales como co-adaptación, tendencias emergentes de

  15. Core Values | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Core Values Core Values NREL's core values are rooted in a safe and supportive work environment guide our everyday actions and efforts: Safe and supportive work environment Respect for the rights physical and social environment Integrity Maintain the highest standard of ethics, honesty, and integrity

  16. Sidewall coring shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edelman, Ya A; Konstantinov, L P; Martyshin, A N

    1966-12-12

    A sidewall coring shell consists of a housing and a detachable core catcher. The core lifter is provided with projections, the ends of which are situated in another plane, along the longitudinal axis of the lifter. The chamber has corresponding projections.

  17. Technical specifications: Callaway Plant, Unit No. 1 (Docket No. STN 50-483). Appendix A to License No. NPF-30. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-10-01

    Revised specifications are presented concerning limiting safety system settings for control systems, power distribution, instrumentation, coolant system, emergency core cooling system, containment systems, plant systems, electrical systems, refueling operations, radioactive effluents, and radiation environmental monitoring

  18. Construction of a monoanionic S,N,S-pincer ligand with a pyrrole core by sequential [1,2] phospho-Fries rearrangement. Characterization of palladium and silver coordination complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fraix, A.; Lutz, M.; Spek, A.L.; Klein Gebbink, R.J.M.; van Koten, G.; Salaun, J. -Y; Jaffrès, P. -A

    2010-01-01

    The synthesis of an S,NH,S-pincer ligand possessing a pyrrole core and two O,O-diethylthiophosphonyl groups to design PS lateral coordination sites is reported. The synthetic procedure to produce this ligand makes use of the nitrogen atom of the pyrrole heterocycle to successively functionalize the

  19. On-Line Core Thermal-Hydraulic Model Improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In, Wang Kee; Chun, Tae Hyun; Oh, Dong Seok; Shin, Chang Hwan; Hwang, Dae Hyun; Seo, Kyung Won

    2007-02-01

    The objective of this project is to implement a fast-running 4-channel based code CETOP-D in an advanced reactor core protection calculator system(RCOPS). The part required for the on-line calculation of DNBR were extracted from the source of the CETOP-D code based on analysis of the CETOP-D code. The CETOP-D code was revised to maintain the input and output variables which are the same as in CPC DNBR module. Since the DNBR module performs a complex calculation, it is divided into sub-modules per major calculation step. The functional design requirements for the DNBR module is documented and the values of the database(DB) constants were decided. This project also developed a Fortran module(BEST) of the RCOPS Fortran Simulator and a computer code RCOPS-SDNBR to independently calculate DNBR. A test was also conducted to verify the functional design and DB of thermal-hydraulic model which is necessary to calculate the DNBR on-line in RCOPS. The DNBR margin is expected to increase by 2%-3% once the CETOP-D code is used to calculate the RCOPS DNBR. It should be noted that the final DNBR margin improvement could be determined in the future based on overall uncertainty analysis of the RCOPS

  20. On-Line Core Thermal-Hydraulic Model Improvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    In, Wang Kee; Chun, Tae Hyun; Oh, Dong Seok; Shin, Chang Hwan; Hwang, Dae Hyun; Seo, Kyung Won

    2007-02-15

    The objective of this project is to implement a fast-running 4-channel based code CETOP-D in an advanced reactor core protection calculator system(RCOPS). The part required for the on-line calculation of DNBR were extracted from the source of the CETOP-D code based on analysis of the CETOP-D code. The CETOP-D code was revised to maintain the input and output variables which are the same as in CPC DNBR module. Since the DNBR module performs a complex calculation, it is divided into sub-modules per major calculation step. The functional design requirements for the DNBR module is documented and the values of the database(DB) constants were decided. This project also developed a Fortran module(BEST) of the RCOPS Fortran Simulator and a computer code RCOPS-SDNBR to independently calculate DNBR. A test was also conducted to verify the functional design and DB of thermal-hydraulic model which is necessary to calculate the DNBR on-line in RCOPS. The DNBR margin is expected to increase by 2%-3% once the CETOP-D code is used to calculate the RCOPS DNBR. It should be noted that the final DNBR margin improvement could be determined in the future based on overall uncertainty analysis of the RCOPS.

  1. Rotary core drills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1967-11-30

    The design of a rotary core drill is described. Primary consideration is given to the following component parts of the drill: the inner and outer tube, the core bit, an adapter, and the core lifter. The adapter has the form of a downward-converging sleeve and is mounted to the lower end of the inner tube. The lifter, extending from the adapter, is split along each side so that it can be held open to permit movement of a core. It is possible to grip a core by allowing the lifter to assume a closed position.

  2. Technetium(V)-nitrido complexes of dithiocarbazic acid derivatives. Reactivity of [Tc≡N]2+ core towards Schiff bases derived from S-methyl dithiocarbazate. Crystal structures of [S-methyl 3-(2-hydroxyphenyl-methylene) dithiocarbazato]intrido(triphenylphosphine)technetium(V) and bis(S-methyl 3-isopropylidenedithiocarbazato)nitridotechnetium(V)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchi, A.; Duatti, A.; Rossi, R.; Magon, L.; Bertolasi, V.; Ferretti, V.; Gilli, G.; Pasqualini, R.

    1988-01-01

    As a potential alternative approach to lipophilic square-pyramidal technetium complexes, we investigate here the synthesis of new Tcsup(V) complexes, containing the [Tc''ident to''N] 2+ core, with bi- and tri-dentate Schiff bases derived from S-methyl dithiocarbazate, NH 2 NHC(=S)SCH 3 . Square-pyramidal complexes having an apical Tcsup(V) ≡ N group, with bis(quinoline-8-thiolato), [TcN(C 9 H 6 NS) 2 ], and bis(diethyldithiocarbamate), [TcN(S 2 CNEt 2 ) 2 ], have been reported. In this paper, we report the synthesis and characterization of a series of technetium(V)-nitrido complexes with the ligands illustrated, obtained by reduction of the technetium(VI) complex [TcNCl 4 ] - or by ligand substitution of the Tcsup(V) complex [TcNCl 2 (PPh 3 ) 2 ]. We discuss also the crystal structures of the complexes [TcNL 1 (PPh 3 )] [H 2 L 1 = S-methyl 3-(2-hydroxy-phenylmethylene)dithiocarbazate] and [TcN(L 12 ) 2 ] (HL 12 S-methyl 3-isopropylidenedithiocarbazate. (author)

  3. CORD, PWR Core Design and Fuel Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trkov, Andrej

    1996-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: CORD-2 is intended for core design applications of pressurised water reactors. The main objective was to assemble a core design system which could be used for simple calculations (such as frequently required for fuel management) as well as for accurate calculations (for example, core design after refuelling). 2 - Method of solution: The calculations are performed at the cell level with a lattice code in the supercell approximation to generate the single cell cross sections. Fuel assembly cross section homogenization is done in the diffusion approximation. Global core calculations can be done in the full three-dimensional cartesian geometry. Thermohydraulic feedbacks can be accounted for. The Effective Diffusion Homogenization method is used for generating the homogenized cross sections. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The complexity of the problem is selected by the user, depending on the capacity of his computer

  4. Superposed orogenic collision and core-complex formation at the present contact between the Dinarides and the Pannonian basin: The Bukulja and Cer Mountains in central and western Serbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matenco, Liviu; Toljic, Marinko; Ducea, Mihai; Stojadinovic, Uros

    2010-05-01

    basin. An Upper Cretaceous-Eocene phase of top-WSW shortening and metamorphism in the Sava zone and its subducting lower Adriatic plate was subsequently followed by massive core-complex exhumation and top-E directed extension during initiation of the Carpathians back-arc extension. Interestingly, the newly defined extensional detachments accompanying the Pannonian extension closely follow the pre-existing subduction zone and its associated duplications in the lower orogenic plate. This conclusion is compatible with observations in other areas of the Dinarides, such as the Prosara-Motajica in Bosnia/Croatia or Kopaonik-Studenica in southern Serbia (Schefer et al., 2008; Ustaszewski et al., 2009).

  5. Revised experimental program on the nuclear ship 'Mutsu'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Yuichi

    1985-01-01

    The experimental program on the nuclear ship ''Mutsu'' has been revised by the Government. And, the responsible organization for n. s. Mutsu was turned to Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) from Japan Nuclear-ship Development Agency. The revised, new experimental program is as follows. (1) Experimental navigation of n. s. Mutsu is made with the already loaded 1st reactor core for about one year. (2) The mooring port for n. s. Mutsu is in a minimum scale. (3) Upon termination of the experimental navigation, n. s. Mutsu is immediately decommissioned. (4) Power-up test and experimental navigation of n. s. Mutsu are made in fiscal 1989 to 1990. The policy of research and development with n. s. Mutsu and the works assigned to JAERI with n. s. Mutsu are described. (Mori, K.)

  6. Verification of computer code for calculation of coolant radiolysis in the VVER reactor core with regard for boiling in its upper part

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arkhipov, O.P.; Kabakchi, S.A. [OKB Gidropress, Podolsk, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2010-07-01

    Code Bora for WWER coolant radiolysis calculation considering single jets boiling in the reactor core top part is developed on the basis of computer codes MOPABA-H2 (radiolysis of aqueous solutions) and SteamRad (radiolysis of vapor). Physico-chemical processes taking place in boiling core coolant are complex and diversified. Still, for the solution of certain problems their simulation can be simplified. The approach of reasonable simplification was used for development of code Bora: mathematical model assumed is purposed for simulation of phenomena only in the area of interest; the number of simulated chemical reactions and particles shall be reasonably minimum; complexity of interphase mass transfer calculation procedure shall be adequate to actually available accuracy of modeling. The analysis of new experimental initial yields of water radiolysis products data and kinetic parameters of elementary chemical reactions with their participation has been carried out. Some changes have been introduced in the mechanism of liquid water and aqueous solutions of ammonia radiolysis have been significantly revised on the basis of this analysis. Examples of the calculations provided for code Bora verification are presented. Despite of very simple simulation of interphase mass transfer, Bora allows to obtain average chemical composition of two-phase coolant at BWR core outlet with the accuracy sufficient for engineering calculations. The report also presents the results of two-phase coolant chemical composition test calculation for reactor core top part coolant boiling in pressurized water reactor. (author)

  7. Revised licensee event report system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mays, G.T.; Poore, W.P.

    1985-01-01

    Licensee Event Reports (LERs) provide the basis for evaluating and assessing operating experience information from nuclear power plants. The reporting requirements for submitting LERs to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission have been revised. Effective Jan. 1, 1984, all events were to be submitted in accordance with 10 CFR 50.73 of the Code of Federal Regulations. Report NUREG-1022, Licensee Event Report System-Description of System and Guidelines for Reporting, describes the guidelines on reportability of events. This article summarizes the reporting requirements as presented in NUREG-1022, high-lights differences in data reported between the revised and previous LER systems, and presents results from a preliminary assessment of LERs submitted under the revised LER reporting system

  8. ROSA full-core and DNBR capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibcus, H.P.M.; Verhagen, F.C.M.; Wakker, P.H.

    2013-01-01

    The latest developments of the ROSA (Reloading Optimization by Simulated Annealing) code system with an emphasis on the first full-core version and the minimum DNBR (Departure from Nucleate Boiling Ratio) as a new optimization parameter are presented. Designing the core loading pattern of nuclear power plants is becoming a more and more complex task. This task becomes even more complicated if asymmetries in the core loading pattern arise, for instance due to damaged fuel assemblies. For over almost 2 decades ROSA, NRG's (Nuclear Research and consultancy Group) loading pattern optimization code system for PWRs, has proven to be a valuable tool to reactor operators in accomplishing this task. To improve the use of ROSA for designing asymmetric loading patterns, NRG has developed a full-core version of ROSA besides the original quarter-core version which requires rotational symmetry in the computational domain. The extension of ROSA with DNBR as an optimization parameter is part of ROSA's continuous development. (orig.)

  9. Dehydration of core/shell fruits

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Y.; Yang, Xiaosong; Cao, Y.; Wang, Z.; Chen, B.; Zhang, Jian J.; Zhang, H.

    2015-01-01

    Dehydrated core/shell fruits, such as jujubes, raisins and plums, show very complex buckles and wrinkles on their exocarp. It is a challenging task to model such complicated patterns and their evolution in a virtual environment even for professional animators. This paper presents a unified physically-based approach to simulate the morphological transformation for the core/shell fruits in the dehydration process. A finite element method (FEM), which is based on the multiplicative decomposition...

  10. HYDRATE CORE DRILLING TESTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John H. Cohen; Thomas E. Williams; Ali G. Kadaster; Bill V. Liddell

    2002-11-01

    The ''Methane Hydrate Production from Alaskan Permafrost'' project is a three-year endeavor being conducted by Maurer Technology Inc. (MTI), Noble, and Anadarko Petroleum, in partnership with the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The project's goal is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition. The project team plans to design and implement a program to safely and economically drill, core and produce gas from arctic hydrates. The current work scope includes drilling and coring one well on Anadarko leases in FY 2003 during the winter drilling season. A specially built on-site core analysis laboratory will be used to determine some of the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. Prior to going to the field, the project team designed and conducted a controlled series of coring tests for simulating coring of hydrate formations. A variety of equipment and procedures were tested and modified to develop a practical solution for this special application. This Topical Report summarizes these coring tests. A special facility was designed and installed at MTI's Drilling Research Center (DRC) in Houston and used to conduct coring tests. Equipment and procedures were tested by cutting cores from frozen mixtures of sand and water supported by casing and designed to simulate hydrate formations. Tests were conducted with chilled drilling fluids. Tests showed that frozen core can be washed out and reduced in size by the action of the drilling fluid. Washing of the core by the drilling fluid caused a reduction in core diameter, making core recovery very difficult (if not impossible). One successful solution was to drill the last 6 inches of core dry (without fluid circulation). These tests demonstrated that it will be difficult to capture core when drilling in permafrost or hydrates without implementing certain safeguards. Among the coring tests was a simulated hydrate

  11. Adult educators' core competences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlgren, Bjarne

    2016-06-01

    Which competences do professional adult educators need? This research note discusses the topic from a comparative perspective, finding that adult educators' required competences are wide-ranging, heterogeneous and complex. They are subject to context in terms of national and cultural environment as well as the kind of adult education concerned (e.g. basic education, work-related education etc.). However, it seems that it is possible to identify certain competence requirements which transcend national, cultural and functional boundaries. This research note summarises these common or "core" requirements, organising them into four thematic subcategories: (1) communicating subject knowledge; (2) taking students' prior learning into account; (3) supporting a learning environment; and (4) the adult educator's reflection on his or her own performance. At the end of his analysis of different competence profiles, the author notes that adult educators' ability to train adult learners in a way which then enables them to apply and use what they have learned in practice (thus performing knowledge transfer) still seems to be overlooked.

  12. Quantum interaction. Revised selected papers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Dawei; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Lei [Aberdeen Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Computing; Melucci, Massimo [Padua Univ., Padova (Italy). Dept. of Information Engineering; Frommholz, Ingo [Bedfordshire Univ. (United Kingdom); Arafat, Sachi (eds.) [Glasgow Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Computing Science

    2011-07-01

    This book constitutes the thoroughly refereed post-conference proceedings of the 5th International Symposium on Quantum Interaction, QI 2011, held in Aberdeen, UK, in June 2011. The 26 revised full papers and 6 revised poster papers, presented together with 1 tutorial and 1 invited talk were carefully reviewed and selected from numerous submissions during two rounds of reviewing and improvement. The papers show the cross-disciplinary nature of quantum interaction covering topics such as computation, cognition, mechanics, social interaction, semantic space and information representation and retrieval. (orig.)

  13. HEDR modeling approach: Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shipler, D.B.; Napier, B.A.

    1994-05-01

    This report is a revision of the previous Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project modeling approach report. This revised report describes the methods used in performing scoping studies and estimating final radiation doses to real and representative individuals who lived in the vicinity of the Hanford Site. The scoping studies and dose estimates pertain to various environmental pathways during various periods of time. The original report discussed the concepts under consideration in 1991. The methods for estimating dose have been refined as understanding of existing data, the scope of pathways, and the magnitudes of dose estimates were evaluated through scoping studies

  14. Quantum interaction. Revised selected papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Dawei; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Lei; Arafat, Sachi

    2011-01-01

    This book constitutes the thoroughly refereed post-conference proceedings of the 5th International Symposium on Quantum Interaction, QI 2011, held in Aberdeen, UK, in June 2011. The 26 revised full papers and 6 revised poster papers, presented together with 1 tutorial and 1 invited talk were carefully reviewed and selected from numerous submissions during two rounds of reviewing and improvement. The papers show the cross-disciplinary nature of quantum interaction covering topics such as computation, cognition, mechanics, social interaction, semantic space and information representation and retrieval. (orig.)

  15. Medical writing, revising and editing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilegaard, Morten

    2006-01-01

    The globalization of science makes medical writing, editing and revision a rapidly growing field of linguistic study and practice. Medical science texts are written according to uniform, general guidelines and medical genres have become highly conventionalized in terms of structure and linguistic...... form. Medical editing often takes the form of peer review and mainly addresses issues of contents and overall validity. Medical revision incorporates the checking of the macrostructure and the microstructure of the text, its language and style and its suitability for the target reader or client...

  16. Revising Nabokov Revising”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Bouchet

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Nabokov revised his works as he translated them and, on another plane, canon revisionism has been having its backlash and provoked other refracting waves. The purpose of the conference was to advance Nabokov studies through the discussion of how our view of Nabokov’s standing and his works today should be revised, especially after the publication of The Original of Laura. However the conference was not confined to just this theme, since “revising” is a word rich with implications. To borrow s...

  17. Failure of aseptic revision total knee arthroplasties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leta, Tesfaye H; Lygre, Stein Håkon L; Skredderstuen, Arne; Hallan, Geir; Furnes, Ove

    2015-02-01

    In Norway, the proportion of revision knee arthroplasties increased from 6.9% in 1994 to 8.5% in 2011. However, there is limited information on the epidemiology and causes of subsequent failure of revision knee arthroplasty. We therefore studied survival rate and determined the modes of failure of aseptic revision total knee arthroplasties. This study was based on 1,016 aseptic revision total knee arthroplasties reported to the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register between 1994 and 2011. Revisions done for infections were not included. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses were used to assess the survival rate and the relative risk of re-revision with all causes of re-revision as endpoint. 145 knees failed after revision total knee arthroplasty. Deep infection was the most frequent cause of re-revision (28%), followed by instability (26%), loose tibial component (17%), and pain (10%). The cumulative survival rate for revision total knee arthroplasties was 85% at 5 years, 78% at 10 years, and 71% at 15 years. Revision total knee arthroplasties with exchange of the femoral or tibial component exclusively had a higher risk of re-revision (RR = 1.7) than those with exchange of the whole prosthesis. The risk of re-revision was higher for men (RR = 2.0) and for patients aged less than 60 years (RR = 1.6). In terms of implant survival, revision of the whole implant was better than revision of 1 component only. Young age and male sex were risk factors for re-revision. Deep infection was the most frequent cause of failure of revision of aseptic total knee arthroplasties.

  18. The nuclear liability conventions revised

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyners, P.

    2004-01-01

    The signature on 12 February 2004 of the Protocols amending respectively the 1960 Paris Convention and the 1963 Brussels Supplementary Convention was the second step of the process of modernisation of the international nuclear liability regime after the adoption in September 1997 of a Protocol revising the 1963 Vienna Convention and of a new Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage. The common objective of the new instruments is to provide more funds to compensate a larger number of potential victims in respect of a broader range of damage. Another goal of the revision exercise was to maintain the compatibility between the Paris and Vienna based systems, a commitment enshrined in the 1988 Joint Protocol, as well as to ascertain that Paris/Brussels countries could also become a Party to the Convention on Supplementary Compensation. However, while generally consistent vis a vis the Joint Protocol, the provisions of the Paris and Vienna Conventions, as revised, differ on some significant aspects. Another remaining issue is whether the improved international nuclear liability regime will succeed in attracting in the future a larger number of countries, particularly outside Europe, and will so become truly universal. Therefore, the need for international co-operation to address these issues, to facilitate the adoption of new implementing legislation and to ensure that this special regime keeps abreast of economic and technological developments, is in no way diminished after the revision of the Conventions.(author)

  19. Concise revision of the Sarcospermataceae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lam, H.J.; Royen, van P.

    1952-01-01

    After the senior writer, together with W. W. Varossieau, had published a revision of this monogeneric family (Blumea III, 1938—’39 and IV, 1941), some more material has been examined by us and, moreover, some new species have been described. Thanks to the courtesy of Prof. F. Gagnepain of Paris, and

  20. Guidelines for Curriculum Development. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistler, K.; And Others

    The curriculum development process explained in this booklet was first implemented at College of the Redwoods in May 1986 and then revised in June 1989. First, information on the college's Curriculum Committee is provided, indicating that the committee was formed to plan credit/non-credit courses; evaluate and approve additions, modifications, or…

  1. Revised Accounting for Business Combinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Arlette C.; Key, Kimberly

    2008-01-01

    The Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) has recently issued Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 141 (Revised 2007) Business Combinations. The object of this Statement is to improve the relevance, representational faithfulness, and comparability of reported information about a business combination and its effects. This Statement…

  2. How Adults Learn. Revised Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, J. R.

    The book's emphasis is on learning during the years of adulthood and examines present-day practice of adult education for practitioners. This revised edition brings up to date advances in such areas of learning as controversial theory; the effects of environment; sensory processes; intellectual capacities; motivation and attitude; transactional…

  3. A revision of the Paronychiinae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chaudhri, Mohammad Nazeer

    1968-01-01

    This study was undertaken, in April 1964, at the suggestion of Prof. Dr. J. Lanjouw. The need for such a revision, was, however, stressed by the authors of the subtribe, viz. PAX et K. HOFFMANN, who, while delimiting these genera, remarked that the Systematics of both the (main) genera of this

  4. CUSTOMIZED ACETABULAR COMPONENTS IN REVISION HIP ARTHROPLASTY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Kavalersky

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there is a trend of increasing demand for revision hip arthroplasty. Among these patients there are many with complex acetabular defects, including patients with pelvic discontinuity. To ensure stability for revised acetabular components in such cases becomes a challenging or unachievable task. Such defects give indications for printing customized tri-flange acetabular component. The authors analysed own experience of creating and applying custom made acetabular components in 3 patients with complex acetabular defects. Material and methods. Among the patients there were 2 women and 1 man. Average age was 60,3±19,4 years (38 to 78 years. Two patients had III B defects with pelvic discontinuity and one patient had III A defect by Paprosky classification. As the first step, the authors in collaboration with engineers printed a plaster full size pelvic 3D model, as the second step a customized tri-flange acetabular component was designed and printed. Harris Hip Score was evaluated preoperatively and 3 months postoperatively. Results. Average follow-up period was 5,3±2,5 months (3 to 8 months. The authors observed no cases of implant loosening, dislocation or deep periprosthetic infection. Average Harris Hip Score before surgery was 27,13 and after surgery – 74,1 indicating a significant improvement in 3 months postoperatively. Conclusion. Indications for use of individual acetabular components in reported patients correspond to indications formulated by Berasi et al. The authors obtained encouraging early follow-up outcomes that correspond to data of other authors. In one patient certain difficulties were reported due to insufficient pelvic distraction. Component’s flanges prevented achieving adequate pelvic distraction. Nevertheless, good primary stability was achieved. Modern software and 3D metal printers can significantly reduce the production cost of customized acetabular components. Application of this technology can be

  5. Diet History Questionnaire: Database Revision History

    Science.gov (United States)

    The following details all additions and revisions made to the DHQ nutrient and food database. This revision history is provided as a reference for investigators who may have performed analyses with a previous release of the database.

  6. [Revised practice guideline 'Anaemia in midwifery practice'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beentjes, M.; Jans, S.M.P.J.

    2012-01-01

    The practice guideline of the Royal Dutch Organization of Midwives 'Anaemia in primary care midwifery practice' published in 2000, has recently been revised. The revised guideline takes physiological haemodilution during pregnancy into consideration and provides gestation specific reference values

  7. Revised Human Health Risk Assessment on Chlorpyrifos

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have revised our human health risk assessment and drinking water exposure assessment for chlorpyrifos that supported our October 2015 proposal to revoke all food residue tolerances for chlorpyrifos. Learn about the revised analysis.

  8. 75 FR 60485 - NRC Enforcement Policy Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-30

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2008-0497] NRC Enforcement Policy Revision AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Policy statement. SUMMARY: The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC or Commission) is publishing a major revision to its Enforcement Policy (Enforcement Policy or Policy) to...

  9. The core paradox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, G. C.; Higgins, G. H.

    1973-01-01

    Rebuttal of suggestions from various critics attempting to provide an escape from the seeming paradox originated by Higgins and Kennedy's (1971) proposed possibility that the liquid in the outer core was thermally stably stratified and that this stratification might prove a powerful inhibitor to circulation of the outer core fluid of the kind postulated for the generation of the earth's magnetic field. These suggestions are examined and shown to provide no reasonable escape from the core paradox.

  10. Nuclear reactor core flow baffling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berringer, R.T.

    1979-01-01

    A flow baffling arrangement is disclosed for the core of a nuclear reactor. A plurality of core formers are aligned with the grids of the core fuel assemblies such that the high pressure drop areas in the core are at the same elevations as the high pressure drop areas about the core periphery. The arrangement minimizes core bypass flow, maintains cooling of the structure surrounding the core, and allows the utilization of alternative beneficial components such as neutron reflectors positioned near the core

  11. Sediment Core Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Provides instrumentation and expertise for physical and geoacoustic characterization of marine sediments.DESCRIPTION: The multisensor core logger measures...

  12. Humeral windows in revision total elbow arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peach, Chris A; Salama, Amir; Stanley, David

    2016-04-01

    The use of cortical windows for revision elbow arthroplasty has not previously been widely reported. Their use aids safe revision of a well fixed humeral prosthesis and can be used in the setting of dislocation, periprosthetic fracture or aseptic loosening of the ulnar component. We describe our technique and results of cortical windows in the distal humerus for revision elbow arthroplasty surgery.

  13. A taxonomic revision of the genus Podocarpus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laubenfels, de D.J.

    1985-01-01

    In connection with the forthcoming revision of the Coniferae for the Flora Malesiana, the author thought it necessary to revise the genus Podocarpus. Although this genus has a substantial representation in Malesia (30 species), the revision is too involved to be appropriate with the Flora Malesiana

  14. 24 CFR 968.225 - Budget revisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Budget revisions. 968.225 Section... Fewer Than 250 Units) § 968.225 Budget revisions. (a) A PHA shall not incur any modernization cost in excess of the total HUD-approved CIAP budget. A PHA shall submit a budget revision, in a form prescribed...

  15. 7 CFR 3015.115 - Budget revisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Budget revisions. 3015.115 Section 3015.115..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE UNIFORM FEDERAL ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS Programmatic Changes and Budget Revisions § 3015.115 Budget revisions. (a) Nonconstruction projects. (1) Except as provided in paragraph (a)(2) of...

  16. 48 CFR 15.307 - Proposal revisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... AND CONTRACT TYPES CONTRACTING BY NEGOTIATION Source Selection 15.307 Proposal revisions. (a) If an... allow proposal revisions to clarify and document understandings reached during negotiations. At the... submit a final proposal revision. The contracting officer is required to establish a common cut-off date...

  17. Can Psychiatric Rehabilitation Be Core to CORE?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olney, Marjorie F.; Gill, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In this article, we seek to determine whether psychiatric rehabilitation principles and practices have been more fully incorporated into the Council on Rehabilitation Education (CORE) standards, the extent to which they are covered in four rehabilitation counseling "foundations" textbooks, and how they are reflected in the…

  18. Interpolymer complexes based on the core/shell micelles. Interaction of polystyrene-block-poly(methacrylic acid) micelles with linear poly(2-vinylpyridine) in 1,4-dioxane water mixtures and in aqueous media

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matějíček, P.; Uchman, M.; Lokajová, J.; Štěpánek, M.; Procházka, K.; Špírková, Milena

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 111, č. 29 (2007), s. 8394-8401 ISSN 1520-6106. [International Symposium on Polyelectrolytes /6./. Dresden, 04.09.2006-08.09.2006] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/04/0490; GA AV ČR IAA400500505 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : polystyrene-block-poly(methacrylic acid) * poly(2-vinylpyridine) * core/shell micelles * light scattering * atomic force microscopy Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 4.086, year: 2007

  19. A taxonomic revision of the Wallemia sebi species complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jančič, Sašo; Nguyen, Hai D. T.; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    2015-01-01

    Wallemia sebi is a xerophilic food- and air-borne fungus. The name has been used for strains that prevail in cold, temperate and tropical climates. In this study, multi-locus phylogenetic analyses, using the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions, DNA replication licensing factor (MCM7), pre...

  20. Complexity of nearshore strontium-to-calcium ratio variability in a core sample of the massive coral Siderastrea siderea obtained in Coral Bay, St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Christopher D.; Kuffner, Ilsa B.; Hickey, T. Don; Morrison, Jennifer M.; Flannery, Jennifer A.

    2013-01-01

    Strontium-to-calcium ratios (Sr/Ca) were measured on the skeletal matrix of a core sample from a colony of the massive coral Siderastrea siderea collected in Coral Bay, St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands. Strontium and calcium are incorporated into the coral skeleton during the precipitation of aragonite by the coral polyps and their ratio is highly temperature dependent. The robustness of this temperature dependence makes Sr/Ca a reliable proxy for sea surface temperature (SST). Details presented from the St. John S. siderea core indicate that terrestrial inputs of sediment and freshwater can disrupt the chemical balance and subsequently complicate the utility of Sr/Ca in reconstructing historical SST. An approximately 44-year-long record of Sr/Ca shows that an annual SST signal is recorded but with an increasing Sr/Ca trend from 1980 to present, which is likely the result of runoff from the mountainous terrain of St. John. The overwhelming influence of the terrestrial fingerprint on local seawater chemistry makes utilizing Sr/Ca as a SST proxy in nearshore environments very difficult.

  1. PWR core design calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trkov, A.; Ravnik, M.; Zeleznik, N.

    1992-01-01

    Functional description of the programme package Cord-2 for PWR core design calculations is presented. Programme package is briefly described. Use of the package and calculational procedures for typical core design problems are treated. Comparison of main results with experimental values is presented as part of the verification process. (author) [sl

  2. Replaceable LMFBR core components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, E.A.; Cunningham, G.W.

    1976-01-01

    Much progress has been made in understanding material and component performance in the high temperature, fast neutron environment of the LMFBR. Current data have provided strong assurance that the initial core component lifetime objectives of FFTF and CRBR can be met. At the same time, this knowledge translates directly into the need for improved core designs that utilize improved materials and advanced fuels required to meet objectives of low doubling times and extended core component lifetimes. An industrial base for the manufacture of quality core components has been developed in the US, and all procurements for the first two core equivalents for FFTF will be completed this year. However, the problem of fabricating recycled plutonium while dramatically reducing fabrication costs, minimizing personnel exposure, and protecting public health and safety must be addressed

  3. Lunar Core and Tides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J. G.; Boggs, D. H.; Ratcliff, J. T.

    2004-01-01

    Variations in rotation and orientation of the Moon are sensitive to solid-body tidal dissipation, dissipation due to relative motion at the fluid-core/solid-mantle boundary, and tidal Love number k2 [1,2]. There is weaker sensitivity to flattening of the core-mantle boundary (CMB) [2,3,4] and fluid core moment of inertia [1]. Accurate Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) measurements of the distance from observatories on the Earth to four retroreflector arrays on the Moon are sensitive to lunar rotation and orientation variations and tidal displacements. Past solutions using the LLR data have given results for dissipation due to solid-body tides and fluid core [1] plus Love number [1-5]. Detection of CMB flattening, which in the past has been marginal but improving [3,4,5], now seems significant. Direct detection of the core moment has not yet been achieved.

  4. Internal core tightener

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brynsvold, G.V.; Snyder, H.J. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    An internal core tightener is disclosed which is a linear actuated (vertical actuation motion) expanding device utilizing a minimum of moving parts to perform the lateral tightening function. The key features are: (1) large contact areas to transmit loads during reactor operation; (2) actuation cam surfaces loaded only during clamping and unclamping operation; (3) separation of the parts and internal operation involved in the holding function from those involved in the actuation function; and (4) preloaded pads with compliant travel at each face of the hexagonal assembly at the two clamping planes to accommodate thermal expansion and irradiation induced swelling. The latter feature enables use of a ''fixed'' outer core boundary, and thus eliminates the uncertainty in gross core dimensions, and potential for rapid core reactivity changes as a result of core dimensional change. 5 claims, 12 drawing figures

  5. Ideas to Design an in situ Diamond Drilling Core Splitter within Soft ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael O. Mensah

    2015-12-02

    Dec 2, 2015 ... the wireline system of core barrel assembly and the device used in splitting of core ... Keywords: Design, In situ, Diamond drilling, Core splitter, Wireline system .... This is the most complex part of the core barrel and has many.

  6. ASSET guidelines. Revised 1991 Edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-12-01

    The present publication is an updated version of the IAEA Assessment of Safety Significant Events Team (ASSET) Guidelines, IAEA-TECDOC-573, published in 1990. Sections 5 and 6 include revised definitions and investigation guidelines for identification of both direct and root causes. These revisions were recommended by a Consultants Meeting held in Vienna on 3-7 December 1990. This guidance is not intended to infringe an expert's prerogative to investigate additional items. Its main purpose is to provide a basic structure and ensure consistency in the assessments. Use of the ASSET guidelines should also facilitate comparison between the observations made in different nuclear power plants and harmonize the reporting of generic ASSET results. The guidelines should always be used with a critical attitude and a view to possible improvements

  7. Trust Revision for Conflicting Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    strategy is to first revise a priori trust assignments as a function of the degree of conflict, before the evidence is fused. This paper focuses on the...practical trust transitivity seems to be idiosyncratic for humans and animals, with no true analogue among non- living forms (and in the physical world ...visiting a foreign country Alice is looking for a restaurant where the locals go, because she would like to avoid places overrun by tourists. She meets a

  8. Clean Air Act. Revision 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-15

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Clean Air Act, as amended, and those regulations that implement the statute and appear to be most relevant to DOE activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. This Reference Book has been completely revised and is current through February 15, 1994.

  9. Earth's inner core: Innermost inner core or hemispherical variations?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lythgoe, K. H.; Deuss, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/412396610; Rudge, J. F.; Neufeld, J. A.

    2014-01-01

    The structure of Earth's deep inner core has important implications for core evolution, since it is thought to be related to the early stages of core formation. Previous studies have suggested that there exists an innermost inner core with distinct anisotropy relative to the rest of the inner core.

  10. Dependence of Core and Extended Flux on Core Dominance ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Based on two extragalactic radio source samples, the core dominance parameter is calculated, and the correlations between the core/extended flux density and core dominance parameter are investi- gated. When the core dominance parameter is lower than unity, it is linearly correlated with the core flux density, ...

  11. Korrelasjon mellom core styrke, core stabilitet og utholdende styrke i core

    OpenAIRE

    Berg-Olsen, Andrea Marie; Fugelsøy, Eivor; Maurstad, Ann-Louise

    2010-01-01

    Formålet med studien var å se hvilke korrelasjon det er mellom core styrke, core stabilitet og utholdende styrke i core. Testingen bestod av tre hoveddeler hvor vi testet core styrke, core stabilitet og utholdende styrke i core. Innenfor core styrke og utholdende styrke i core ble tre ulike tester utført. Ved måling av core stabilitet ble det gjennomført kun en test. I core styrke ble isometrisk abdominal fleksjon, isometrisk rygg ekstensjon og isometrisk lateral fleksjon testet. Sit-ups p...

  12. Revised dietary guidelines for Koreans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Young Ai; Lee, Haeng Shin; Kim, Bok Hee; Lee, Yoonna; Lee, Hae Jeung; Moon, Jae Jin; Kim, Cho-il

    2008-01-01

    With rapidly changing dietary environment, dietary guidelines for Koreans were revised and relevant action guides were developed. First, the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee was established with experts and government officials from the fields of nutrition, preventive medicine, health promotion, agriculture, education and environment. The Committee set dietary goals for Koreans aiming for a better nutrition state of all after a thorough review and analysis of recent information related to nutritional status and/or problems of Korean population, changes in food production/supply, disease pattern, health policy and agricultural policy. Then, the revised dietary guidelines were proposed to accomplish these goals in addition to 6 different sets of dietary action guides to accommodate specific nutrition and health problems of respective age groups. Subsequently, these guidelines and guides were subjected to the focus group review, consumer perception surveys, and a public hearing for general and professional comments. Lastly, the language was clarified in terms of public understanding and phraseology. The revised Dietary guidelines for Koreans are as follows: eat a variety of grains, vegetables, fruits, fish, meat, poultry and dairy products; choose salt-preserved foods less, and use less salt when you prepare foods; increase physical activity for a healthy weight, and balance what you eat with your activity; enjoy every meal, and do not skip breakfast; if you drink alcoholic beverages, do so in moderation; prepare foods properly, and order sensible amounts; enjoy our rice-based diet.

  13. The Fuzziness of Giant Planets’ Cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helled, Ravit; Stevenson, David

    2017-01-01

    Giant planets are thought to have cores in their deep interiors, and the division into a heavy-element core and hydrogen–helium envelope is applied in both formation and structure models. We show that the primordial internal structure depends on the planetary growth rate, in particular, the ratio of heavy elements accretion to gas accretion. For a wide range of likely conditions, this ratio is in one-to-one correspondence with the resulting post-accretion profile of heavy elements within the planet. This flux ratio depends sensitively on the assumed solid-surface density in the surrounding nebula. We suggest that giant planets’ cores might not be distinct from the envelope and includes some hydrogen and helium, and the deep interior can have a gradual heavy-element structure. Accordingly, Jupiter’s core may not be well defined. Accurate measurements of Jupiter’s gravitational field by Juno could put constraints on Jupiter’s core mass. However, as we suggest here, the definition of Jupiter’s core is complex, and the core’s physical properties (mass, density) depend on the actual definition of the core and on the planet’s growth history.

  14. The Fuzziness of Giant Planets’ Cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helled, Ravit [Institute for Computational Science, University of Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Stevenson, David [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, Caltech, Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Giant planets are thought to have cores in their deep interiors, and the division into a heavy-element core and hydrogen–helium envelope is applied in both formation and structure models. We show that the primordial internal structure depends on the planetary growth rate, in particular, the ratio of heavy elements accretion to gas accretion. For a wide range of likely conditions, this ratio is in one-to-one correspondence with the resulting post-accretion profile of heavy elements within the planet. This flux ratio depends sensitively on the assumed solid-surface density in the surrounding nebula. We suggest that giant planets’ cores might not be distinct from the envelope and includes some hydrogen and helium, and the deep interior can have a gradual heavy-element structure. Accordingly, Jupiter’s core may not be well defined. Accurate measurements of Jupiter’s gravitational field by Juno could put constraints on Jupiter’s core mass. However, as we suggest here, the definition of Jupiter’s core is complex, and the core’s physical properties (mass, density) depend on the actual definition of the core and on the planet’s growth history.

  15. DNA compaction by poly (amido amine) dendrimers of ammonia cored and ethylene diamine cored

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qamhieh, K.; Al-Shawwa, J.

    2017-06-01

    The complexes build-up of DNA and soft particles poly amidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers of ammonia cored of generations (G1-G6) and ethylenediamine cored of generations (G1-G10) have been studied, using a new theoretical model developed by Qamhieh and coworkers. The model describes the interaction between linear polyelectrolyte (LPE) chain and ion-penetrable spheres. Many factors affecting LPE/dendrimer complex have been investigated such as dendrimer generation, the Bjerrum length, salt concentration, and rigidity of the LPE chain represented by the persistence length. It is found that the wrapping chain length around dendrimer increases by increasing dendrimer`s generation, Bjerrum length, and salt concentration, while decreases by increasing the persistence length of the LPE chain. Also we can conclude that the wrapping length of LPE chain around ethylenediamine cored dendrimers is larger than its length around ammonia cored dendrimers.

  16. Windscale pile core surveys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, R.F.; Mathews, R.F.

    1996-01-01

    The two Windscale Piles were closed down, defueled as far as possible and mothballed for thirty years following a fire in the core of Pile 1 in 1957 resulting from the spontaneous release of stored Wigner energy in the graphite moderator. Decommissioning of the reactors commenced in 1987 and has reached the stage where the condition of both cores needs to be determined. To this end, non-intrusive and intrusive surveys and sampling of the cores have been planned and partly implemented. The objectives for each Pile differ slightly. The location and quantity of fuel remaining in the damaged core of Pile 1 needed to be established, whereas the removal of all fuel from Pile 2 needed to be confirmed. In Pile 1, the possible existence of a void in the core is to be explored and in Pile 2, the level of Wigner energy remaining required to be quantified. Levels of radioactivity in both cores needed to be measured. The planning of the surveys is described including strategy, design, safety case preparation and the remote handling and viewing equipment required to carry out the inspection, sampling and monitoring work. The results from the completed non-intrusive survey of Pile 2 are summarised. They confirm that the core is empty and the graphite is in good condition. The survey of Pile 1 has just started. (UK)

  17. Varying the Lewis base coordination of the Y2N2 core in the reduced dinitrogen complexes {[(Me3Si)2N]2(L)Y}2(μ-η2:η2-N2) (L = benzonitrile, pyridines, triphenylphosphine oxide, and trimethylamine N-oxide).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbey, Jordan F; Farnaby, Joy H; Bates, Jefferson E; Ziller, Joseph W; Furche, Filipp; Evans, William J

    2012-07-16

    The effect of the neutral donor ligand, L, on the Ln(2)N(2) core in the (N═N)(2-) complexes, [A(2)(L)Ln](2)(μ-η(2):η(2)-N(2)) (Ln = Sc, Y, lanthanide; A = monoanion; L = neutral ligand), is unknown since all of the crystallographically characterized examples were obtained with L = tetrahydrofuran (THF). To explore variation in L, displacement reactions between {[(Me(3)Si)(2)N](2)(THF)Y}(2)(μ-η(2):η(2)-N(2)), 1, and benzonitrile, pyridine (py), 4-dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP), triphenylphosphine oxide, and trimethylamine N-oxide were investigated. THF is displaced by all of these ligands to form {[(Me(3)Si)(2)N](2)(L)Y}(2)(μ-η(2):η(2)-N(2)) complexes (L = PhCN, 2; py, 3; DMAP, 4; Ph(3)PO, 5; Me(3)NO, 6) that were fully characterized by analytical, spectroscopic, density functional theory, and X-ray crystallographic methods. The crystal structures of the Y(2)N(2) cores in 2-5 are similar to that in 1 with N-N bond distances between 1.255(3) Å and 1.274(3) Å, but X-ray analysis of the N-N distance in 6 shows it to be shorter: 1.198(3) Å.

  18. Core shroud corner joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Charles B.; Forsyth, David R.

    2013-09-10

    A core shroud is provided, which includes a number of planar members, a number of unitary corners, and a number of subassemblies each comprising a combination of the planar members and the unitary corners. Each unitary corner comprises a unitary extrusion including a first planar portion and a second planar portion disposed perpendicularly with respect to the first planar portion. At least one of the subassemblies comprises a plurality of the unitary corners disposed side-by-side in an alternating opposing relationship. A plurality of the subassemblies can be combined to form a quarter perimeter segment of the core shroud. Four quarter perimeter segments join together to form the core shroud.

  19. s-core network decomposition: A generalization of k-core analysis to weighted networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eidsaa, Marius; Almaas, Eivind

    2013-12-01

    A broad range of systems spanning biology, technology, and social phenomena may be represented and analyzed as complex networks. Recent studies of such networks using k-core decomposition have uncovered groups of nodes that play important roles. Here, we present s-core analysis, a generalization of k-core (or k-shell) analysis to complex networks where the links have different strengths or weights. We demonstrate the s-core decomposition approach on two random networks (ER and configuration model with scale-free degree distribution) where the link weights are (i) random, (ii) correlated, and (iii) anticorrelated with the node degrees. Finally, we apply the s-core decomposition approach to the protein-interaction network of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the context of two gene-expression experiments: oxidative stress in response to cumene hydroperoxide (CHP), and fermentation stress response (FSR). We find that the innermost s-cores are (i) different from innermost k-cores, (ii) different for the two stress conditions CHP and FSR, and (iii) enriched with proteins whose biological functions give insight into how yeast manages these specific stresses.

  20. Heterogeneous gas core reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz, N.J.; Dugan, E.T.

    1983-01-01

    A heterogeneous gas core nuclear reactor is disclosed comprising a core barrel provided interiorly with an array of moderator-containing tubes and being otherwise filled with a fissile and/or fertile gaseous fuel medium. The fuel medium may be flowed through the chamber and through an external circuit in which heat is extracted. The moderator may be a fluid which is flowed through the tubes and through an external circuit in which heat is extracted. The moderator may be a solid which may be cooled by a fluid flowing within the tubes and through an external heat extraction circuit. The core barrel is surrounded by moderator/coolant material. Fissionable blanket material may be disposed inwardly or outwardly of the core barrel

  1. iPSC Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSC) Core was created in 2011 to accelerate stem cell research in the NHLBI by providing investigators consultation, technical...

  2. Core Flight Software

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The AES Core Flight Software (CFS) project purpose is to analyze applicability, and evolve and extend the reusability of the CFS system originally developed by...

  3. PWR degraded core analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gittus, J.H.

    1982-04-01

    A review is presented of the various phenomena involved in degraded core accidents and the ensuing transport of fission products from the fuel to the primary circuit and the containment. The dominant accident sequences found in the PWR risk studies published to date are briefly described. Then chapters deal with the following topics: the condition and behaviour of water reactor fuel during normal operation and at the commencement of degraded core accidents; the generation of hydrogen from the Zircaloy-steam and the steel-steam reactions; the way in which the core deforms and finally melts following loss of coolant; debris relocation analysis; containment integrity; fission product behaviour during a degraded core accident. (U.K.)

  4. WASTE CERTIFICATION PROGRAM PLAN - REVISION 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MORGAN, LK

    2002-01-01

    The primary changes that have been made to this revision reflect the relocation of the Waste Certification Official (WCO) organizationally from the Quality Services Division (QSD) into the Laboratory Waste Services (LWS) Organization. Additionally, the responsibilities for program oversight have been differentiated between the QSD and LWS. The intent of this effort is to ensure that those oversight functions, which properly belonged to the WCO, moved with that function; but retain an independent oversight function outside of the LWS Organization ensuring the potential for introduction of organizational bias, regarding programmatic and technical issues, is minimized. The Waste Certification Program (WCP) itself has been modified to allow the waste certification function to be performed by any of the personnel within the LWS Waste Acceptance/Certification functional area. However, a single individual may not perform both the technical waste acceptance review and the final certification review on the same 2109 data package. Those reviews must be performed by separate individuals in a peer review process. There will continue to be a designated WCO who will have lead programmatic responsibility for the WCP and will exercise overall program operational oversite as well as determine the overall requirements of the certification program. The quality assurance organization will perform independent, outside oversight to ensure that any organizational bias does not degrade the integrity of the waste certification process. The core elements of the previous WCP have been retained, however, the terms and process structure have been modified.. There are now two ''control points,'' (1) the data package enters the waste certification process with the signature of the Generator Interface/Generator Interface Equivalent (GI/GIE), (2) the package is ''certified'', thus exiting the process. The WCP contains three steps, (1) the technical review for waste acceptance, (2) a review of the

  5. Restraint system for core elements of a reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Class, G.

    1975-01-01

    In a nuclear reactor, a core element bundle formed of a plurality of side-by-side arranged core elements is surrounded by restraining elements that exert a radially inwardly directly restraining force generating friction forces between the core elements in a restraining plane that is transverse to the core element axes. The adjoining core elements are in rolling contact with one another in the restraining plane by virtue of rolling-type bearing elements supported in the core elements. (Official Gazette)

  6. Heterogeneous gas core reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, K.I.

    1977-01-01

    Preliminary investigations of a heterogeneous gas core reactor (HGCR) concept suggest that this potential power reactor offers distinct advantages over other existing or conceptual reactor power plants. One of the most favorable features of the HGCR is the flexibility of the power producing system which allows it to be efficiently designed to conform to a desired optimum condition without major conceptual changes. The arrangement of bundles of moderator/coolant channels in a fissionable gas or mixture of gases makes a truly heterogeneous nuclear reactor core. It is this full heterogeneity for a gas-fueled reactor core which accounts for the novelty of the heterogeneous gas core reactor concept and leads to noted significant advantages over previous gas core systems with respect to neutron and fuel economy, power density, and heat transfer characteristics. The purpose of this work is to provide an insight into the design, operating characteristics, and safety of a heterogeneous gas core reactor system. The studies consist mainly of neutronic, energetic and kinetic analyses of the power producing and conversion systems as a preliminary assessment of the heterogeneous gas core reactor concept and basic design. The results of the conducted research indicate a high potential for the heterogeneous gas core reactor system as an electrical power generating unit (either large or small), with an overall efficiency as high as 40 to 45%. The HGCR system is found to be stable and safe, under the conditions imposed upon the analyses conducted in this work, due to the inherent safety of ann expanding gaseous fuel and the intrinsic feedback effects of the gas and water coolant

  7. Dinuclear copper(II) complexes with {Cu2(mu-hydroxo)bis(mu-carboxylato)}+ cores and their reactions with sugar phosphate esters: A substrate binding model of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Merii; Tanase, Tomoaki; Mikuriya, Masahiro

    2006-04-03

    Reactions of CuX2.nH2O with the biscarboxylate ligand XDK (H2XDK = m-xylenediamine bis(Kemp's triacid imide)) in the presence of N-donor auxiliary ligands yielded a series of dicopper(II) complexes, [Cu2(mu-OH)(XDK)(L)2]X (L = N,N,N',N'-tetramethylethylenediamine (tetmen), X = NO3 (1a), Cl (1b); L = N,N,N'-trimethylethylenediamine (tmen), X = NO3 (2a), Cl (2b); L =2,2'-bipyridine (bpy), X = NO3 (3); L = 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), X = NO3 (4); L = 4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine (Me2bpy), X = NO3 (5); L = 4-methyl-1,10-phenanthroline (Mephen), X = NO3 (6)). Complexes 1-6 were characterized by X-ray crystallography (Cu...Cu = 3.1624(6)-3.2910(4) A), and the electrochemical and magnetic properties were also examined. Complexes 3 and 4 readily reacted with diphenyl phosphoric acid (HDPP) or bis(4-nitrophenyl) phosphoric acid (HBNPP) to give [Cu2(mu-phosphate)(XDK)(L)2]NO3 (L = bpy, phosphate = DPP (11); L = phen, phosphate = DPP (12), BNPP (13)), where the phsophate diester bridges the two copper ions in a mu-1,3-O,O' bidentate fashion (Cu...Cu = 4.268(3)-4.315(1) A). Complexes 4 and 6 with phen and Mephen have proven to be good precursors to accommodate a series of sugar monophosphate esters (Sugar-P) onto the biscarboxylate-bridged dicopper centers, yielding [Cu2(mu-Sugar-P)(XDK)(L)2] (Sugar-P = alpha-D-Glc-1-P (23a and b), D-Glc-6-P (24a and b), D-Man-6-P (25a), D-Fru-6-P (26a and b); L = phen (a), Mephen (b)) and [Cu2(mu-Gly-n-P)(XDK)(Mephen)2] (Gly-n-P = glycerol n-phosphate; n = 2 (21), 3 (22)), where Glc, Man, and Fru are glucose, mannose, and fructose, respectively. The structure of [Cu2(mu-MNPP)(XDK)(phen)2(CH3OH)] (20) was characterized as a reference compound (H2MNPP = 4-nitrophenyl phosphoric acid). Complexes 4 and 6 also reacted with d-fructose 1,6-bisphosphate (D-Fru-1,6-P2) to afford the tetranuclear copper(II) complexes formulated as [Cu4(mu-D-Fru-1,6-P2)(XDK)2(L)4] (L = phen (27a), Mephen (27b)). The detailed structure of 27a was determined by X

  8. FBR type reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamiya, Tadashi; Kawashima, Katsuyuki; Fujimura, Koji; Murakami, Tomoko.

    1995-01-01

    Neutron reflectors are disposed at the periphery of a reactor core fuel region and a blanket region, and a neutron shielding region is disposed at the periphery of them. The neutron reflector has a hollow duct structure having a sealed upper portion, a lower portion opened to cooling water, in which a gas and coolants separately sealed in the inside thereof. A driving pressure of a primary recycling pump is lowered upon reduction of coolant flow rate, then the liquid level of coolants in the neutron reflector is lowered due to imbalance between the driving pressure and a gas pressure, so that coolants having an effect as a reflector are eliminated from the outer circumference of the reactor core. Therefore, the amount of neutrons leaking from the reactor core is increased, and negative reactivity is charged to the reactor core. The negative reactivity of the neutron reflector is made greater than a power compensation reactivity. Since this enables reactor scram by using an inherent performance of the reactor core, the reactor core safety of an LMFBR-type reactor can be improved. (I.N.)

  9. The earths innermost core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanda, J.N.

    1989-01-01

    A new earth model is advanced with a solid innermost core at the centre of the Earth where elements heavier than iron, over and above what can be retained in solution in the iron core, are collected. The innermost core is separated from the solid iron-nickel core by a shell of liquid copper. The innermost core has a natural vibration measured on the earth's surface as the long period 26 seconds microseisms. The earth was formed initially as a liquid sphere with a relatively thin solid crust above the Byerly discontinuity. The trace elements that entered the innermost core amounted to only 0.925 ppm of the molten mass. Gravitational differentiation must have led to the separation of an explosive thickness of pure 235 U causing a fission explosion that could expel beyond the Roche limit a crustal scab which would form the centre piece of the moon. A reservoir of helium floats on the liquid copper. A small proportion of helium-3, a relic of the ancient fission explosion present there will spell the exciting magnetic field. The field is stable for thousands of years because of the presence of large quantity of helium-4 which accounts for most of the gaseous collisions that will not disturb the atomic spin of helium-3 atoms. This field is prone to sudden reversals after long periods of stability. (author). 14 refs

  10. CUSTOM TRIFLANGE ACETABULAR COMPONENTS IN REVISION HIP REPLACEMENT (EXPERIENCE REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Korytkin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Extensive defects of acetabulum especially accompanied by pelvis discontinuity at the level of acetabulum pose a serious challenge in revision hip replacement and create additional complexity in fixing the acetabular component. One of the perspective options to solve the above issue is the use of custom triflange acetabular components (CTAC designed based on preoperative computer tomography given the specifics of bone defects of the patient. Purpose of the study — to evaluate the outcomes of CTAC use in revision hip replacement.Materials and methods. The authors analyzed treatment outcomes of 12 patients after revision hip replacement using additive techniques of computer simulation and 3D printing CTAC. Follow up period after the surgery averaged 7±3 months (from one to ten months. 7 out of 12 patients had acetabular defects of Paprosky 3B type, 4 patients had defects of Paprosky 3A and in one patient — of Paprosky 2C.Results. Two out of twelve patients had prosthesis dislocations that required revision hip surgery, one of those patients underwent open reduction of dislocation with wound debridement, another patient underwent replacement of articulating couple of acetabular component. Total scores under Harris Hip Score and paint VAS score prior to treatment was 28±7 and 7±1 points respectively, postoperative scores were 76±9 and 3±1 respectively.Conclusion. The application of additive techniques for revision hip replacement in patients with extensive acetabular and pelvic defects allows to make a precise preoperative planning, to restore joint rotation center, to reconstruct bone defects and to securely fix triflange acetabular component that altogether significantly improve treatment outcomes and patients satisfaction with the surgery.

  11. Automated Diagnosis and Control of Complex Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurien, James; Plaunt, Christian; Cannon, Howard; Shirley, Mark; Taylor, Will; Nayak, P.; Hudson, Benoit; Bachmann, Andrew; Brownston, Lee; Hayden, Sandra; hide

    2007-01-01

    Livingstone2 is a reusable, artificial intelligence (AI) software system designed to assist spacecraft, life support systems, chemical plants, or other complex systems by operating with minimal human supervision, even in the face of hardware failures or unexpected events. The software diagnoses the current state of the spacecraft or other system, and recommends commands or repair actions that will allow the system to continue operation. Livingstone2 is an enhancement of the Livingstone diagnosis system that was flight-tested onboard the Deep Space One spacecraft in 1999. This version tracks multiple diagnostic hypotheses, rather than just a single hypothesis as in the previous version. It is also able to revise diagnostic decisions made in the past when additional observations become available. In such cases, Livingstone might arrive at an incorrect hypothesis. Re-architecting and re-implementing the system in C++ has increased performance. Usability has been improved by creating a set of development tools that is closely integrated with the Livingstone2 engine. In addition to the core diagnosis engine, Livingstone2 includes a compiler that translates diagnostic models written in a Java-like language into Livingstone2's language, and a broad set of graphical tools for model development.

  12. SCDAP/RELAP5 lower core plate model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coryell, E.W.; Griffin, F.P.

    1999-01-01

    The SCDAP/RELAP5 computer code is a best-estimate analysis tool for performing nuclear reactor severe accident simulations. This report describes the justification, theory, implementation, and testing of a new modeling capability which will refine the analysis of the movement of molten material from the core region to the vessel lower head. As molten material moves from the core region through the core support structures it may encounter conditions which will cause it to freeze in the region of the lower core plate, delaying its arrival to the vessel head. The timing of this arrival is significant to reactor safety, because during the time span for material relocation to the lower head, the core may be experiencing steam-limited oxidation. The time at which hot material arrives in a coolant-filled lower vessel head, thereby significantly increasing the steam flow rate through the core region, becomes significant to the progression and timing of a severe accident. This report is a revision of a report INEEL/EXT-00707, entitled ''Preliminary Design Report for SCDAP/RELAP5 Lower Core Plate Model''

  13. Decadal variability in core surface flows deduced from geomagnetic observatory monthly means

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whaler, K. A.; Olsen, Nils; Finlay, Chris

    2016-01-01

    . On the annual to decadal timescale, the SV is generated primarily by advection in the fluid outer core. We demonstrate the utility of the revised monthly means by calculating models of the core surface advective flow between 1997 and 2013 directly from the SV data. One set of models assumes flow......Monthly means of the magnetic field measurements at ground observatories are a key data source for studying temporal changes of the core magnetic field. However, when they are calculated in the usual way, contributions of external (magnetospheric and ionospheric) origin may remain, which make them...... less favourable for studying the field generated by dynamo action in the core. We remove external field predictions, including a new way of characterising the magnetospheric ring current, from the data and then calculate revised monthly means using robust methods. The geomagnetic secular variation (SV...

  14. Core Seismic Tests for a Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Gyeong Hoi; Lee, J. H

    2007-01-15

    This report describes the results of the comparison of the core seismic responses between the test and the analysis for the reduced core mock-up of a sodium-cooled fast reactor to verify the FAMD (Fluid Added Mass and Damping) code and SAC-CORE (Seismic Analysis Code for CORE) code, which implement the application algorithm of a consistent fluid added mass matrix including the coupling terms. It was verified that the narrow fluid gaps between the duct assemblies significantly affect the dynamic characteristics of the core duct assemblies and it becomes stronger as a number of duct increases within a certain level. As conclusion, from the comparison of the results between the tests and the analyses, it is verified that the FAMD code and the SAC-CORE code can give an accurate prediction of a complex core seismic behavior of the sodium-cooled fast reactor.

  15. Re-visions of rationality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, Ben R

    2005-01-01

    The appeal of simple algorithms that take account of both the constraints of human cognitive capacity and the structure of environments has been an enduring theme in cognitive science. A novel version of such a boundedly rational perspective views the mind as containing an 'adaptive toolbox' of specialized cognitive heuristics suited to different problems. Although intuitively appealing, when this version was proposed, empirical evidence for the use of such heuristics was scant. I argue that in the light of empirical studies carried out since then, it is time this 'vision of rationality' was revised. An alternative view based on integrative models rather than collections of heuristics is proposed.

  16. Revised hypothesis and future perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norsk, P; Drummer, C; Christensen, N J

    2001-01-01

    Results from space have been unexpected and not predictable from the results of ground-based simulations. Therefore, the concept of how weightlessness and gravity modulates the regulation of body fluids must be revised and a new simulation model developed. The main questions to ask in the future...... are the following: Does weightlessness induce a diuresis and natriuresis during the initial hours of space flight leading to an extracellular and intravascular fluid volume deficit? Can sodium in excess be stored in a hitherto unknown way, particularly during space flight? Why are fluid and sodium retaining systems...

  17. A taxonomic revision of the genus Podocarpus

    OpenAIRE

    Laubenfels, de, D.J.

    1985-01-01

    In connection with the forthcoming revision of the Coniferae for the Flora Malesiana, the author thought it necessary to revise the genus Podocarpus. Although this genus has a substantial representation in Malesia (30 species), the revision is too involved to be appropriate with the Flora Malesiana per se. One new subgenus and 17 new sections are described, and 94 species are enumerated, of which 11 species and 1 variety are described as new, and 3 varieties have been raised to specific rank....

  18. Influence of a {sup 99m}TcN core on the biological and physicochemical behavior of {sup 99m}Tc complexes of L,L-EC and L,L-ECD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangera, Kennedy O; Vanbilloen, Hubert P.; Bellande, Emmanuel; Pasqualini, Roberto; Verbruggen, Alfons M

    1996-11-01

    {sup 99m}Tc-nitrido complexes of L,L-ethylene dicysteine ({sup 99m}TcN-L,L-EC) and {sup 99m}TcN-L,L-ethylene dicysteine diethylester ({sup 99m}TcN-L,L-ECD) were prepared and their characteristics compared to those of the respective {sup 99m}Tc-oxo complexes. {sup 99m}TcN-L,L-EC and {sup 99m}TcO-L,L-EC migrate to similar extents during electrophoresis at pH 12, but, at pH 6, {sup 99m}TcN-L,L-EC migrates further than {sup 99m}TcO-L,L-EC. Renal excretion of {sup 99m}TcN-L,L-EC is inferior to that of {sup 99m}TcO-L,L-EC, indicating that the TcN-glycine sequence has lower affinity for the renal tubular system. Both {sup 99m}TcO-L,L-ECD and {sup 99m}TcN-L,L-ECD are neutral, but {sup 99m}TcN-L,L-ECD is hydrophilic and shows minimal brain uptake in both mice and the baboon.

  19. Dual-and quad-core tartarato-complexes of vanadium(V): quantum-chemical calculations of structural and spectroscopic parameters; Dvojjadrove a stvorjadrove tartaratokomplexy vanadu(V): kvantovochemicke vypocty strukturnych a spektroskopickych parametrov

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oreskova, G; Simunek, J; Noga, J [Univerzita Komenskeho v Bratislave, Prirodovedecka fakulta, Katedra anorganickej chemie, 84215 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2012-04-25

    Geometry and spectral properties of the complex anion [V4O8 ((R, R)-tart) 2] 4 - were theoretically investigated by quantum-chemical calculations in gas phase or by using PCM model. Geometry optimization was done by us using the functionals BP86, B3LYP as well as by functional class M06. The best match with experimental data was given by M06 functionals. In the optimal geometry we assigned to individual relation a type of vibration active in infrared spectra. Wave numbers calculated by BP86 method are in a very good agreement with experiment, unlike the M06 functionals. For anion in the experimental geometry, we determined an area of maximum absorption (UV-VIS spectra) by calculating excitation energies. The calculated values of the absorption maxima are in a very good agreement with experiment and they successfully explain the celerity of the complex. For geometry optimized by BP86 functional in a gas phase as well as including the solvent we calculated NMR chemical shifts by B3LYP and B3PW91 functionals. The best results with respect to the experiment were given by the method B3PW91 for optimized geometry in a gas phase. (authors)

  20. Revision of FMM-Yukawa: An adaptive fast multipole method for screened Coulomb interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Huang, Jingfang; Pitsianis, Nikos P.; Sun, Xiaobai

    2010-12-01

    revised and re-organized in data structure, software architecture, programming methods, and user interface. The revision enables more flexible use of the package and economic use of memory resources. It consists of five stages. The initial stage (stage 1) determines, based on the accuracy requirement and FMM theory, the length of multipole expansions and the number of quadrature points for diagonalization, and loads the quadrature nodes and weights that are computed off line. Stage 2 constructs the oct-tree and interaction lists, with adaptation to the sparsity or density of particles and employing a dynamic memory allocation scheme at every tree level. Stage 3 executes the core FMM subroutine for numerical calculation of the particle interactions. The subroutine can now be used iteratively as in a solver, while the particle locations remain the same. Stage 4 releases the memory allocated in Stage 2 for the adaptive tree and interaction lists. The user can modify the iterative routine easily. When the particle locations are changed such as in a molecular dynamics simulation, stage 2 to 4 can also be used together repeatedly. The final stage releases the memory space used for the quadrature and other remaining FMM parameters. Programs at the stage level and at the user interface are re-written in the C programming language, while most of the translation and interaction operations remain in FORTRAN. As a result of the change in data structures and memory allocation, the revised package can accommodate much larger particle ensembles while maintaining the same accuracy-efficiency performance. The new version is also developed as an important precursor to its parallel counterpart on multi-core or many core processors in a shared memory programming environment. Particularly, in order to ensure mutual exclusion in concurrent updates without incurring extra latency, we have replaced all the assignment statements at a source box that put its data to multiple target boxes with

  1. A hardness result for core stability in additive hedonic games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woeginger, G.J.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the computational complexity of a decision problem in hedonic coalition formation games. We prove that core stability in additive hedonic games is complete for the second level of the polynomial hierarchy.

  2. Uncertainty reevaluation of T/H parameters of HANARO core design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hark Rho; Park, Cheol; Kim, Heo Nil; Chae, Hee Taek

    1999-03-01

    HANARO core was designed by statistical thermal design method which was generally applied to power plant design. However, reevaluation of core thermal margin reflecting design changes as well as experiences through commissioning and operation is necessary for safe operation of reactor. For this objective, the revision of data for T/H design parameters and the reevaluation of their uncertainties were performed. (Author). 30 refs., 7 figs.

  3. Reactor core control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sano, Hiroki

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a reactor core control device, in which switching from a manual operation to an automatic operation, and the control for the parameter of an automatic operation device are facilitated. Namely, the hysteresis of the control for the operation parameter by an manual operation input means is stored. The hysteresis of the control for the operation parameter is collected. The state of the reactor core simulated by an operation control to which the collected operation parameters are manually inputted is determined as an input of the reactor core state to the automatic input means. The record of operation upon manual operation is stored as a hysteresis of control for the operation parameter, but the hysteresis information is not only the result of manual operation of the operation parameter. This is results of operation conducted by a skilled operator who judge the state of the reactor core to be optimum. Accordingly, it involves information relevant to the reactor core state. Then, it is considered that the optimum automatic operation is not deviated greatly from the manual operation. (I.S.)

  4. Revision Total Hip Arthoplasty: Factors Associated with Re-Revision Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Khatod, M; Cafri, G; Inacio, MCS; Schepps, AL; Paxton, EW; Bini, SA

    2015-01-01

    The survivorship of implants after revision total hip arthroplasty and risk factors associated with re-revision are not well defined. We evaluated the re-revision rate with use of the institutional total joint replacement registry. The purpose of this study was to determine patient, implant, and surgeon factors associated with re-revision total hip arthroplasty.A retrospective cohort study was conducted. The total joint replacement registry was used to identify patients who had undergone revi...

  5. Shapes of interacting RNA complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fu, Benjamin Mingming; Reidys, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Shapes of interacting RNA complexes are studied using a filtration via their topological genus. A shape of an RNA complex is obtained by (iteratively) collapsing stacks and eliminating hairpin loops.This shape-projection preserves the topological core of the RNA complex and for fixed topological...... genus there are only finitely many such shapes. Our main result is a new bijection that relates the shapes of RNA complexes with shapes of RNA structures. This allows to compute the shape polynomial of RNA complexes via the shape polynomial of RNA structures. We furthermore present a linear time uniform...... sampling algorithm for shapes of RNA complexes of fixed topological genus....

  6. Revised nonstochastic health effects models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaniv, S.S.; Scott, B.R.

    1991-01-01

    In 1989, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published a revision of the 1985 report, Health Effects Models for Nuclear Power Plant Accident Consequence Analysis, NUREG/CR-4214, that included models for early occurring and continuing nonstochastic effects, cancers and thyroid nodules, and genetic effects. This paper discusses specific models for lethality from early occurring and continuing effects. For brevity, hematopoietic-syndrome lethality is called hematopoietic death; pulmonary-syndrome lethality is called pulmonary death; and gastrointestinal syndrome lethality is called gastrointestinal death. Two-parameter Weibull risk functions are recommended for estimating the risk of hematopoietic, pulmonary, or gastrointestinal death. The risks are obtained indirectly by using hazard functions; as a result, this type of approach has been called hazard-function modeling and the models generated are called hazard-function models. In the 1989 NUREG/CR-4214 report, changes were made in the parameter values for a number of effects, and the models used to estimate hematopoietic and pulmonary deaths were substantially revised. Upper and lower estimates of model parameters are provided for all early health effects models. In this paper, we discuss the 1989 models for hematopoietic and pulmonary deaths, highlighting the differences between the 1989 and 1985 models. In addition, we give the reasons for which the 1985 models were modified

  7. Revising Lecture Notes: How Revision, Pauses, and Partners Affect Note Taking and Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Linlin; Kiewra, Kenneth A.; Samuelson, Lydia

    2016-01-01

    Note taking has been categorized as a two-stage process: the recording of notes and the review of notes. We contend that note taking might best involve a three-stage process where the missing stage is revision. This study investigated the benefits of revising lecture notes and addressed two questions: First, is revision more effective than…

  8. The PWR cores management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barral, J.C.; Rippert, D.; Johner, J.

    2000-01-01

    During the meeting of the 25 january 2000, organized by the SFEN, scientists and plant operators in the domain of the PWR debated on the PWR cores management. The five first papers propose general and economic information on the PWR and also the fast neutron reactors chains in the electric power market: statistics on the electric power industry, nuclear plant unit management, the ITER project and the future of the thermonuclear fusion, the treasurer's and chairman's reports. A second part offers more technical papers concerning the PWR cores management: performance and optimization, in service load planning, the cores management in the other countries, impacts on the research and development programs. (A.L.B.)

  9. Molten core retention assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lampe, R.F.

    1976-01-01

    Molten fuel produced in a core overheating accident is caught by a molten core retention assembly consisting of a horizontal baffle plate having a plurality of openings therein, heat exchange tubes having flow holes near the top thereof mounted in the openings, and a cylindrical imperforate baffle attached to the plate and surrounding the tubes. The baffle assembly is supported from the core support plate of the reactor by a plurality of hanger rods which are welded to radial beams passing under the baffle plate and intermittently welded thereto. Preferably the upper end of the cylindrical baffle terminates in an outwardly facing lip to which are welded a plurality of bearings having slots therein adapted to accept the hanger rods

  10. Core status computing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To calculate power distribution, flow rate and the like in the reactor core with high accuracy in a BWR type reactor. Constitution: Total flow rate signals, traverse incore probe (TIP) signals as the neutron detector signals, thermal power signals and pressure signals are inputted into a process computer, where the power distribution and the flow rate distribution in the reactor core are calculated. A function generator connected to the process computer calculates the absolute flow rate passing through optional fuel assemblies using, as variables, flow rate signals from the introduction part for fuel assembly flow rate signals, data signals from the introduction part for the geometrical configuration data at the flow rate measuring site of fuel assemblies, total flow rate signals for the reactor core and the signals from the process computer. Numerical values thus obtained are given to the process computer as correction signals to perform correction for the experimental data. (Moriyama, K.)

  11. Engineered inorganic core/shell nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mélinon, Patrice, E-mail: patrice.melinon@univ-lyon1.fr [Institut Lumière matière Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1 et CNRS et OMNT, Domaine Scientifique de la Doua, Bâtiment Léon Brillouin, 43 Boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918, F 69622 Villeurbanne (France); Begin-Colin, Sylvie [IPCMS et OMNT, 23 rue du Loess BP 43, 67034 STRASBOURG Cedex 2 (France); Duvail, Jean Luc [IMN UMR 6502 et OMNT Campus Sciences : 2 rue de la Houssinire, BP32229, 44322 Nantes Cedex3 (France); Gauffre, Fabienne [SPM et OMNT : Institut des sciences chimiques de Rennes - UMR 6226, 263 Avenue du General Leclerc, CS 74205, 35042 RENNES Cedex (France); Boime, Nathalie Herlin [IRAMIS-NIMBE, Laboratoire Francis Perrin (CEA CNRS URA 2453) et OMNT, Bat 522, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Ledoux, Gilles [Institut Lumière Matière Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1 et CNRS et OMNT, Domaine Scientifique de la Doua, Bâtiment Alfred Kastler 43 Boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918 F 69622 Villeurbanne (France); Plain, Jérôme [Universit de technologie de Troyes LNIO-ICD, CNRS et OMNT 12 rue Marie Curie - CS 42060 - 10004 Troyes cedex (France); Reiss, Peter [CEA Grenoble, INAC-SPrAM, UMR 5819 CEA-CNRS-UJF et OMNT, Grenoble cedex 9 (France); Silly, Fabien [CEA, IRAMIS, SPEC, TITANS, CNRS 2464 et OMNT, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Warot-Fonrose, Bénédicte [CEMES-CNRS, Université de Toulouse et OMNT, 29 rue Jeanne Marvig F 31055 Toulouse (France)

    2014-10-20

    It has been for a long time recognized that nanoparticles are of great scientific interest as they are effectively a bridge between bulk materials and atomic structures. At first, size effects occurring in single elements have been studied. More recently, progress in chemical and physical synthesis routes permitted the preparation of more complex structures. Such structures take advantages of new adjustable parameters including stoichiometry, chemical ordering, shape and segregation opening new fields with tailored materials for biology, mechanics, optics magnetism, chemistry catalysis, solar cells and microelectronics. Among them, core/shell structures are a particular class of nanoparticles made with an inorganic core and one or several inorganic shell layer(s). In earlier work, the shell was merely used as a protective coating for the core. More recently, it has been shown that it is possible to tune the physical properties in a larger range than that of each material taken separately. The goal of the present review is to discuss the basic properties of the different types of core/shell nanoparticles including a large variety of heterostructures. We restrict ourselves on all inorganic (on inorganic/inorganic) core/shell structures. In the light of recent developments, the applications of inorganic core/shell particles are found in many fields including biology, chemistry, physics and engineering. In addition to a representative overview of the properties, general concepts based on solid state physics are considered for material selection and for identifying criteria linking the core/shell structure and its resulting properties. Chemical and physical routes for the synthesis and specific methods for the study of core/shell nanoparticle are briefly discussed.

  12. TMI-2 core examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobbins, R.R.; MacDonald, P.E.; Owen, D.E.

    1983-01-01

    The examination of the damaged core at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor is structured to address the following safety issues: fission product release, transport, and deposition; core coolability; containment integrity; and recriticality during severe accidents; as well as zircaloy cladding ballooning and oxidation during so-called design basis accidents. The numbers of TMI-2 components or samples to be examined, the priority of each examination, the safety issue addressed by each examination, the principal examination techniques to be employed, and the data to be obtained and the principal uses of the data are discussed in this paper

  13. Superconducting tin core fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homa, Daniel; Liang, Yongxuan; Hill, Cary; Kaur, Gurbinder; Pickrell, Gary

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrated superconductivity in a fiber with a tin core and fused silica cladding. The fibers were fabricated via a modified melt-draw technique and maintained core diameters ranging from 50-300 microns and overall diameters of 125-800 microns. Superconductivity of this fiber design was validated via the traditional four-probe test method in a bath of liquid helium at temperatures on the order of 3.8 K. The synthesis route and fiber design are perquisites to ongoing research dedicated all-fiber optoelectronics and the relationships between superconductivity and the material structures, as well as corresponding fabrication techniques. (orig.)

  14. LMFBR core design analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, M.; Yang, J.C.; Yoh, K.C.; Suk, S.D.; Soh, D.S.; Kim, Y.M.

    1980-01-01

    The design parameters of a commercial-scale fast breeder reactor which is currently under construction by regeneration of these data is preliminary analyzed. The analysis of nuclear and thermal characteristics as well as safety features of this reactor is emphasized. And the evaluation of the initial core mentioned in the system description is carried out in the areas of its kinetics and control system, and, at the same time, the flow distribution of sodium and temperature distribution of the initial FBR core system are calculated. (KAERI INIS Section)

  15. Nuclear core catchers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golden, M.P.; Tilbrook, R.W.; Heylmun, N.F.

    1976-01-01

    A receptacle is described for taking the molten fragments of a nuclear reactor during a reactor core fusion accident. The receptacle is placed under the reactor. It includes at least one receptacle for the reactor core fragments, with a dome shaped part to distribute the molten fragments and at least one outside layer of alumina bricks around the dome. The characteristic of this receptacle is that the outer layer of bricks contains neutron poison rods which pass through the bricks and protrude in relation to them [fr

  16. Organizing Core Tasks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boll, Karen

    has remained much the same within the last 10 years. However, how the core task has been organized has changed considerable under the influence of various “organizing devices”. The paper focusses on how organizing devices such as risk assessment, output-focus, effect orientation, and treatment...... projects influence the organization of core tasks within the tax administration. The paper shows that the organizational transformations based on the use of these devices have had consequences both for the overall collection of revenue and for the employees’ feeling of “making a difference”. All in all...

  17. GREEN CORE HOUSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NECULAI Oana

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The Green Core House is a construction concept with low environmental impact, having as main central element a greenhouse. The greenhouse has the innovative role to use the biomass energy provided by plants to save energy. Although it is the central piece, the greenhouse is not the most innovative part of the Green Core House, but the whole building ensemble because it integrates many other sustainable systems as "waste purification systems", "transparent photovoltaic panels" or "double skin façades".

  18. PWR core design calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trkov, A; Ravnik, M; Zeleznik, N [Inst. Jozef Stefan, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    1992-07-01

    Functional description of the programme package Cord-2 for PWR core design calculations is presented. Programme package is briefly described. Use of the package and calculational procedures for typical core design problems are treated. Comparison of main results with experimental values is presented as part of the verification process. (author) [Slovenian] Opisali smo programski paket CORD-2, ki se uporablja pri projektnih izracunih sredice pri upravljanju tlacnovodnega reaktorja. Prikazana je uporaba paketa in racunskih postopkov za tipicne probleme, ki nastopajo pri projektiranju sredice. Primerjava glavnih rezultatov z eksperimentalnimi vrednostmi je predstavljena kot del preveritvenega procesa. (author)

  19. User`s guide for the irradiation of experiments in the FTR. Revision 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1990-07-01

    This document provides Revision 3 updates the FTR Users Guide. Revision 3 updates Appendix 1 (FFTF Technical Specifications) to include the following: Documentation of the acceptability of handling metal fuel assemblies in the Closed Loop Ex-Vessel Handling Machine (CLEM) and storing them in the Interim Decay Storage (IDS) vessel. Reactivity limit version (utilizing existing FSAR analysis bounds) to allow for the larger beta-effective associated with the addition of enriched uranium metal and oxide experiments to the core. Operational temperature limits for Open Test Assemblies (OTAs) have been expanded to differentiate between 40-foot experiment test articles, 28-foot Post Irradiation Open Test Assemblies (PIOTAs) and the 28-foot Loose Parts Monitor Assemblies (LMPAs) operating under FFTF core Engineering cognizance.

  20. Mn(II) complexes with bipyridine, phenanthroline and benzoic acid ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MS received 20 October 2015; revised 19 January 2016; accepted 28 January 2016 ... Manganese complex; catalase; biological activity; hydrogen peroxide; bipyridine; phenanthroline. 1. .... and control drugs were recorded as MIC values, in.

  1. Revision of the International Pharmaceutical Federation's Basel Statements on the future of hospital pharmacy: From Basel to Bangkok.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, Lee C; Moles, Rebekah J; Collins, Jack C; Gray, Andy; Sheikh, Abdul Latif; Surugue, Jacqueline; Moss, Robert J; Ivey, Marianne F; Stevenson, James G; Takeda, Yasuo; Ranjit, Eurek; Chaar, Betty; Penm, Jonathan

    2016-07-15

    The processes used to revise the 2008 Basel Statements on the future of hospital pharmacy are summarized, and the revised statements are presented. The process for revising the Basel Statements followed an approach similar to that used during their initial development. The Hospital Pharmacy Section (HPS) of the International Pharmaceutical Federation (FIP) revised the 2008 FIP Basel Statements in four phases, including a survey of hospital pharmacists worldwide, an internal review, online forums, and a face-to-face "World Café" workshop in Bangkok, Thailand. The global survey on the initial Basel Statements included input from 334 respondents from 62 countries. The majority of respondents agreed that most of the initial Basel Statements were acceptable as written and did not require revision. In total, 11 statements were judged by more than 10% of respondents as needing revision or deletion. The FIP HPS executive committee used the survey results to develop 69 initial revised draft statements. After an online discussion with the international hospital pharmacy community, including individuals from 28 countries representing all six World Health Organization regions, a final set of draft statements was prepared for the live discussion involving participants from 20 countries. The final 65 revised Basel Statements were voted on and accepted. Systematic revision of the FIP Basel Statements resulted in an updated reflection of aspirational goals for the future of hospital pharmacy practice. While this revision reflects the development of new goals for hospital pharmacy practice, the core principles of the Basel Statements remain an essential foundation for the discipline. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Maximum stellar iron core mass

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An analytical method of estimating the mass of a stellar iron core, just prior to core collapse, is described in this paper. The method employed depends, in part, upon an estimate of the true relativistic mass increase experienced by electrons within a highly compressed iron core, just prior to core collapse, and is significantly ...

  3. Management Science in U.S. AACSB International-Accredited Core Undergraduate Business School Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palocsay, Susan W.; Markham, Ina S.

    2014-01-01

    In 2003, accreditation standards were revised to require coverage of management science (MS) after previously removing it in 1991. Meanwhile, increasing awareness of the value of business analytics stimulated a renewed interest in MS. To examine its present status in undergraduate core business curricula, the authors conducted two studies to…

  4. International Spinal Cord Injury Core Data Set (version 2.0)-including standardization of reporting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biering-Sorensen, F.; DeVivo, M. J.; Charlifue, S.; Chen, Y.; New, P. W.; Noonan, V.; Post, M. W. M.; Vogel, L.

    Study design: The study design includes expert opinion, feedback, revisions and final consensus. Objectives: The objective of the study was to present the new knowledge obtained since the International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Core Data Set (Version 1.0) published in 2006, and describe the

  5. International Spinal Cord Injury Core Data Set (version 2.0)-including standardization of reporting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biering-Sørensen, F; DeVivo, M J; Charlifue, Susan; Chen, Y; New, P.W.; Noonan, V.; Post, M W M; Vogel, L.

    STUDY DESIGN: The study design includes expert opinion, feedback, revisions and final consensus. OBJECTIVES: The objective of the study was to present the new knowledge obtained since the International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Core Data Set (Version 1.0) published in 2006, and describe the

  6. Revised action plan of the Maintenance division for 1965, Annex 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolic, M.

    1965-01-01

    The action plan presented in this annex is a revised version of the plan adopted in January 1965. It includes tasks of the mechanics, electrical and electronic equipment services. It includes a detailed list of planned and preventive maintenance actions related to the heavy water system, technical water system, helium system, reactor core, transportation equipment, hot cells, heating and ventilation systems in the reactor building, power supply system, auxiliary systems in the RA reactor building [sr

  7. Sequenced Peer Revision: Creating Competence and Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Ingrid K.; Robertson, John

    2013-01-01

    Mastering techniques of self- and peer revision is a valuable tool for all writers, especially US-educated Generation 1.5 students, whose near fluency enables them to dialogue successfully about their writing. Using action research, 2 academic writing instructors systematically trained students to more responsibly and effectively revise their…

  8. Application of revised procedure on determining large excess reactivity of operating reactor. Fuel addition method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagao, Yoshiharu

    2002-01-01

    The fuel addition method or the neutron absorption substitution method have been used for determination of large excess multiplication factor of large sized reactors. It has been pointed out, however, that all the experimental methods are possibly not free from the substantially large systematic error up to 20%, when the value of the excess multiplication factor exceeds about 15%Δk. Then, a basic idea of a revised procedure was proposed to cope with the problem, which converts the increase of multiplication factor in an actual core to that in a virtual core by calculation, because its value is in principle defined not for the former but the latter core. This paper proves that the revised procedure is able to be applicable for large sized research and test reactors through the theoretical analyses on the measurements undertaken at the JMTRC and JMTR cores. The values of excess multiplication factor are accurately determined utilizing the whole core calculation by the Monte Carlo code MCNP4A. (author)

  9. Cause and countermeasure for heat up of HTTR core support plate at power rise tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimoto, Nozomu; Takada, Eiji; Nakagawa, Shigeaki; Tachibana, Yukio; Kawasaki, Kozo; Saikusa, Akio; Kojima, Takao; Iyoku, Tatuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment

    2002-01-01

    HTTR has carried out many kinds of tests as power rise tests in which reactor power rises step by step after attained the first criticality. In the tests, temperature of a core support plate reached higher than expected at each power level, the temperature was expected to be higher than the maximum working temperature at 100% power level. Therefore, tests under the high temperature test operation mode, in which the core flow rate was different, were carried out to predict the temperature at 100% power precisely, and investigate the cause of the temperature rise. From the investigation, it was clear that the cause was gap flow in the core support structure. Furthermore, it was estimated that the temperature of the core support plate rose locally due to change in gap width between the core support plate and a seal plate due to change in core pressure drop. The maximum working temperature of the core support plate was revised. The integrity of core support plate under the revised maximum working temperature condition was confirmed by stress analyses. (author)

  10. Evaluation of Students' Perceptions Towards An Innovative Teaching-Learning Method During Pharmacology Revision Classes: Autobiography of Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Anuradha; Ganjiwale, Jaishree

    2015-07-01

    Various studies in medical education have shown that active learning strategies should be incorporated into the teaching-learning process to make learning more effective, efficient and meaningful. The aim of this study was to evaluate student's perceptions on an innovative revision method conducted in Pharmacology i.e. in form of Autobiography of Drugs. The main objective of study was to help students revise the core topics in Pharmacology in an interesting way. Questionnaire based survey on a newer method of pharmacology revision in two batches of second year MBBS students of a tertiary care teaching medical college. Various sessions on Autobiography of Drugs were conducted amongst two batches of second year MBBS students, during their Pharmacology revision classes. Student's perceptions were documented with the help of a five point likert scale through a questionnaire regarding quality, content and usefulness of this method. Descriptive analysis. Students of both the batches appreciated the innovative method taken up for revision. The median scores in most of the domains in both batches were four out of five, indicative of good response. Feedback from open-ended questions also revealed that the innovative module on "Autobiography of Drugs" was taken as a positive learning experience by students. Autobiography of drugs has been used to help students recall topics that they have learnt through other teachings methods. Autobiography sessions in Pharmacology during revision slots, can be one of the interesting ways in helping students revise and recall topics which have already been taught in theory classes.

  11. Nuclear core baffling apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, F.W. Jr.; Silverblatt, B.L.; Knight, C.B.; Berringer, R.T.

    1979-01-01

    An apparatus for baffling the flow of reactor coolant fluid into and about the core of a nuclear reactor is described. The apparatus includes a plurality of longitudinally aligned baffle plates with mating surfaces that allow longitudinal growth with temperature increases while alleviating both leakage through the aligned plates and stresses on the components supporting the plates

  12. The Uncommon Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohler, Jason

    2013-01-01

    This author contends that the United States neglects creativity in its education system. To see this, he states, one may look at the Common Core State Standards. If one searches the English Language Arts and Literacy standards for the words "creative," "innovative," and "original"--and any associated terms, one will…

  13. Utah's New Mathematics Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utah State Office of Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Utah has adopted more rigorous mathematics standards known as the Utah Mathematics Core Standards. They are the foundation of the mathematics curriculum for the State of Utah. The standards include the skills and understanding students need to succeed in college and careers. They include rigorous content and application of knowledge and reflect…

  14. Some Core Contested Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomsky, Noam

    2015-01-01

    Core concepts of language are highly contested. In some cases this is legitimate: real empirical and conceptual issues arise. In other cases, it seems that controversies are based on misunderstanding. A number of crucial cases are reviewed, and an approach to language is outlined that appears to have strong conceptual and empirical motivation, and…

  15. Reactor core structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higashinakagawa, Emiko; Sato, Kanemitsu.

    1992-01-01

    Taking notice on the fact that Fe based alloys and Ni based alloys are corrosion resistant in a special atmosphere of a nuclear reactor, Fe or Ni based alloys are applied to reactor core structural components such as fuel cladding tubes, fuel channels, spacers, etc. On the other hand, the neutron absorption cross section of zirconium is 0.18 barn while that of iron is 2.52 barn and that of nickel is 4.6 barn, which amounts to 14 to 25 times compared with that of zirconium. Accordingly, if the reactor core structural components are constituted by the Fe or Ni based alloys, neutron economy is lowered. Since it is desirable that neutrons contribute to uranium fission with least absorption to the reactor core structural components, the reactor core structural components are constituted with the Fe or Ni based alloys of good corrosion resistance only at a portion in contact with reactor water, that is, at a surface portion, while the main body is constituted with zircalloy in the present invention. Accordingly, corrosion resistnace can be kept while keeping small neutron absorption cross section. (T.M.)

  16. Investigation of EAS cores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaulov S.B.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of nuclear-electromagnetic cascade models in air in the late forties have shown informational content of the study of cores of extensive air showers (EAS. These investigations were the main goal in different experiments which were carried out over many years by a variety of methods. Outcomes of such investigations obtained in the HADRON experiment using an X-ray emulsion chamber (XREC as a core detector are considered. The Ne spectrum of EAS associated with γ-ray families, spectra of γ-rays (hadrons in EAS cores and the Ne dependence of the muon number, ⟨Nμ⟩, in EAS with γ-ray families are obtained for the first time at energies of 1015–1017 eV with this method. A number of new effects were observed, namely, an abnormal scaling violation in hadron spectra which are fundamentally different from model predictions, an excess of muon number in EAS associated with γ-ray families, and the penetrating component in EAS cores. It is supposed that the abnormal behavior of γ-ray spectra and Ne dependence of the muon number are explained by the emergence of a penetrating component in the 1st PCR spectrum ‘knee’ range. Nuclear and astrophysical explanations of the origin of the penetrating component are discussed. The necessity of considering the contribution of a single close cosmic-ray source to explain the PCR spectrum in the knee range is noted.

  17. Plutonium cores of zenith

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barclay, F R; Cameron, I R; Drageset, A; Freemantle, R G; Wilson, D J

    1965-03-15

    The report describes a series of experiments carried out with plutonium fuel in the heated zero power reactor ZENITH, with the aim of testing current theoretical methods, with particular reference to excess reactivity, temperature coefficients, differential spectrum and reaction rate distributions. Two cores of widely different fissile/moderator atom ratios were loaded in order to test the theory under significantly varied spectrum conditions.

  18. Core damage risk indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szikszai, T.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to show a method for the fast recalculation of the PSA. To avoid the information loose, it is necessary to simplify the PSA models, or at least reorganize them. The method, introduced in this document, require that preparation, so we try to show, how to do that. This document is an introduction. This is the starting point of the work related to the development of the risk indicators. In the future, with the application of this method, we are going to show an everyday use of the PSA results to produce the indicators of the core damage risk. There are two different indicators of the plant safety performance, related to the core damage risk. The first is the core damage frequency indicator (CDFI), and the second is the core damage probability indicator (CDPI). Of course, we cannot describe all of the possible ways to use these indicators, rather we will try to introduce the requirements to establish such an indicator system and the calculation process

  19. Emergency core cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Ken.

    1989-01-01

    In PWR type reactors, a cooling water spray portion of emergency core cooling pipelines incorporated into pipelines on high temperature side is protruded to the inside of an upper plenum. Upon rupture of primary pipelines, pressure in a pressure vessel is abruptly reduced to generate a great amount of steams in the reactor core, which are discharged at a high flow rate into the primary pipelines on high temperature side. However, since the inside of the upper plenum has a larger area and the steam flow is slow, as compared with that of the pipelines on the high temperature side, ECCS water can surely be supplied into the reactor core to promote the re-flooding of the reactor core and effectively cool the reactor. Since the nuclear reactor can effectively be cooled to enable the promotion of pressure reduction and effective supply of coolants during the period of pressure reduction upon LOCA, the capacity of the pressure accumulation vessel can be decreased. Further, the re-flooding time for the reactor is shortened to provide an effect contributing to the improvement of the safety and the reduction of the cost. (N.H.)

  20. The use of a tripolar articulation in revision total hip arthroplasty: a minimum of 24 months' follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Brett R; Della Valle, Craig J; Deirmengian, Carl A; Breien, Kristoffer M; Weeden, Steven H; Sporer, Scott M; Paprosky, Wayne G

    2008-12-01

    A retrospective cohort study of 31 hips revised with a tripolar articular construct was performed. Patient demographics and preoperative and postoperative information were recorded. Indications for a tripolar construct were recurrent dislocation and the inability to attain intraoperative stability during hip revision. Nine patients (29%) were revised to the tripolar construct after failure of a constrained liner. Twenty patients (65%) had at least one episode of instability before the most recent revision. At a mean follow-up of 38 months, modified Postel scores improved from a mean of 5.28 to 9.64 (P tripolar construct was effective in eliminating or preventing instability in 93% of the complex cases treated. These early results support the use of a tripolar construct in treating recurrent instability or instability encountered at the time of revision hip arthroplasty.

  1. GFR fuel and core pre-conceptual design studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauvin, N.; Ravenet, A.; Lorenzo, D.; Pelletier, M.; Escleine, J.M.; Munoz, I.; Bonnerot, J.M.; Malo, J.Y.; Garnier, J.C.; Bertrand, F.; Bosq, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    The revision of the GFR core design - plate type - has been undertaken since previous core presented at Global'05. The self-breeding searched for has been achieved with an optimized design ('12/06 E'). The higher core pressure drop was a matter of concern. First of all, the core coolability in natural circulation for pressurized conditions has been studied and preliminary plant transient calculations have been performed. The design and safety criteria are met but no more margin remains. The project is also addressing the feasibility and the design of the fuel S/A. The hexagonal shape together with the principle of closed S/A (wrapper tube) is kept. Ceramic plate type fuel element combines a high enough core power density (minimization of the Pu inventory) and plutonium and minor actinides recycling capabilities. Innovative for many aspects, the fuel element is central to the GFR feasibility. It is supported already by a significant R and D effort also applicable to a pin concept that is considered as the other fuel element of interest. This combination of fuel/core feasibility and performance analysis, safety dispositions and performances analysis will compose the 'GFR preliminary feasibility' which is a project milestone at the end of the year 2007. (authors)

  2. Inflation targeting and core inflation

    OpenAIRE

    Julie Smith

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines the interaction of core inflation and inflation targeting as a monetary policy regime. Interest in core inflation has grown because of inflation targeting. Core inflation is defined in numerous ways giving rise to many potential measures; this paper defines core inflation as the best forecaster of inflation. A cross-country study finds before the start of inflation targeting, but not after, core inflation differs between non-inflation targeters and inflation targeters. Thr...

  3. Revised GCFR safety program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelley, A.P.; Boyack, B.E.; Torri, A.

    1980-05-01

    This paper presents a summary of the recently revised gas-cooled fast breeder reactor (GCFR) safety program plan. The activities under this plan are organized to support six lines of protection (LOPs) for protection of the public from postulated GCFR accidents. Each LOP provides an independent, sequential, quantifiable risk barrier between the public and the radiological hazards associated with postulated GCFR accidents. To implement a quantitative risk-based approach in identifying the important technology requirements for each LOP, frequency and consequence-limiting goals are allocated to each. To ensure that all necessary tasks are covered to achieve these goals, the program plan is broken into a work breakdown structure (WBS). Finally, the means by which the plan is being implemented are discussed

  4. Radiological control manual. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kloepping, R.

    1996-05-01

    This Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Radiological Control Manual (LBNL RCM) has been prepared to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements and interpretation of the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is one methodology to implement the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835 (10 CFR 835) and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. Information given in this manual is also intended to provide demonstration of compliance to specific requirements in 10 CFR 835. The LBNL RCM (Publication 3113) and LBNL Health and Safety Manual Publication-3000 form the technical basis for the LBNL RPP and will be revised as necessary to ensure that current requirements from Rules and Orders are represented. The LBNL RCM will form the standard for excellence in the implementation of the LBNL RPP.

  5. Potentialities of Revised Quantum Electrodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehnert B.

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The potentialities of a revised quantum electrodynamic theory (RQED earlier established by the author are reconsidered, also in respect to other fundamental theories such as those by Dirac and Higgs. The RQED theory is characterized by intrinsic linear symmetry breaking due to a nonzero divergence of the electric field strength in the vacuum state, as supported by the Zero Point Energy and the experimentally confirmed Casimir force. It includes the results of electron spin and antimatter by Dirac, as well as the rest mass of elementary particles predicted by Higgs in terms of spontaneous nonlinear symmetry breaking. It will here be put into doubt whether the approach by Higgs is the only theory which becomes necessary for explaining the particle rest masses. In addition, RQED theory leads to new results beyond those being available from the theories by Dirac, Higgs and the Standard Model, such as in applications to leptons and the photon.

  6. Radiological control manual. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kloepping, R.

    1996-05-01

    This Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Radiological Control Manual (LBNL RCM) has been prepared to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements and interpretation of the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is one methodology to implement the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835 (10 CFR 835) and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. Information given in this manual is also intended to provide demonstration of compliance to specific requirements in 10 CFR 835. The LBNL RCM (Publication 3113) and LBNL Health and Safety Manual Publication-3000 form the technical basis for the LBNL RPP and will be revised as necessary to ensure that current requirements from Rules and Orders are represented. The LBNL RCM will form the standard for excellence in the implementation of the LBNL RPP

  7. Determination of natural radionuclides from 238U and 232Th series, trace and major elements in sediment cores from baixada Santista and evaluation of impacted areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damatto, Sandra Regina

    2010-01-01

    that presented higher values for the cores that are under influence of the industrial complex and receive industrial and domestic effluents. The highest concentrations of 232 Th and 238 U were found in ecosystems that are under the influence of the industrial complex, indicating a probable contamination due to release of its industrial effluents. Taking under consideration CONAMA no 344/04 resolution, all the sediments can be considered as level 1, and are below the reference values for the decision to manage the dredged material. The data obtained in this work can be used as reference values for the revision of CONAMA no 344/04 Resolution. (author)

  8. CORE annual report 2006; CORE Jahresbericht 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gut, A

    2007-04-15

    This annual report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) summarises the activities of the Swiss Federal Commission on Energy Research CORE in 2006. The six main areas of work during the period 2004 - 2007 are examined, including a review of the SFOE's energy research programme, a road-map for the way towards the realisation of a 2000-watt society, the formulation of an energy research concept for 2008 - 2011, international co-operation, the dissemination of information and the assessment of existing and new instruments. International activities and Switzerland's involvement in energy research within the framework of the International Energy Agency IEA are discussed. New and existing projects are listed and the work done at the Competence Centre for Energy and Mobility noted. The Swiss Technology Award 2007 is presented. Information supplied to interested bodies to help improve knowledge on research work being done and to help make discussions on future energy supply more objective is discussed.

  9. Using Synchronous Online Peer Response Groups in EFL Writing: Revision-Related Discourse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Ya Liang

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, synchronous online peer response groups have been increasingly used in English as a foreign language (EFL writing. This article describes a study of synchronous online interaction among three small peer groups in a Taiwanese undergraduate EFL writing class. An environmental analysis of students’ online discourse in two writing tasks showed that meaning negotiation, error correction, and technical actions seldom occurred and that social talk, task management, and content discussion predominated the chat. Further analysis indicates that relationships among different types of online interaction and their connections with subsequent writing and revision are complex and depend on group makeup and dynamics. Findings suggest that such complex activity may not guarantee revision. Writing instructors may need to proactively model, scaffold and support revision-related online discourse if it is to be of benefit.

  10. Revision history aware repositories of computational models of biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Andrew K; Yu, Tommy; Britten, Randall; Cooling, Mike T; Lawson, James; Cowan, Dougal; Garny, Alan; Halstead, Matt D B; Hunter, Peter J; Nickerson, David P; Nunns, Geo; Wimalaratne, Sarala M; Nielsen, Poul M F

    2011-01-14

    , by building it on top of Mercurial, an existing DVCS. We have demonstrated the utility of this approach, when used in conjunction with the model composition facilities in CellML, to build and understand more complex models. We have also demonstrated the ability of the repository software to present version history to casual users over the web, and to highlight specific versions which are likely to be useful to users. Providing facilities for maintaining and using revision history information is an important part of building a useful repository of computational models, as this information is useful both for understanding the source of and justification for parts of a model, and to facilitate automated processes such as merges. The availability of fully revision history aware repositories, and associated tools, will therefore be of significant benefit to the community.

  11. Revision history aware repositories of computational models of biological systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nickerson David P

    2011-01-01

    Repository software to be fully revision history aware, by building it on top of Mercurial, an existing DVCS. We have demonstrated the utility of this approach, when used in conjunction with the model composition facilities in CellML, to build and understand more complex models. We have also demonstrated the ability of the repository software to present version history to casual users over the web, and to highlight specific versions which are likely to be useful to users. Conclusions Providing facilities for maintaining and using revision history information is an important part of building a useful repository of computational models, as this information is useful both for understanding the source of and justification for parts of a model, and to facilitate automated processes such as merges. The availability of fully revision history aware repositories, and associated tools, will therefore be of significant benefit to the community.

  12. Turbine component casting core with high resolution region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamel, Ahmed; Merrill, Gary B.

    2014-08-26

    A hollow turbine engine component with complex internal features can include a first region and a second, high resolution region. The first region can be defined by a first ceramic core piece formed by any conventional process, such as by injection molding or transfer molding. The second region can be defined by a second ceramic core piece formed separately by a method effective to produce high resolution features, such as tomo lithographic molding. The first core piece and the second core piece can be joined by interlocking engagement that once subjected to an intermediate thermal heat treatment process thermally deform to form a three dimensional interlocking joint between the first and second core pieces by allowing thermal creep to irreversibly interlock the first and second core pieces together such that the joint becomes physically locked together providing joint stability through thermal processing.

  13. Three Types of Earth's Inner Core Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, D.; Wen, L.

    2017-12-01

    The Earth's inner core boundary (ICB) is the site where the liquid outer core solidifies and the solid inner core grows. Thus, the fine-scale structure of the ICB is important for our understanding of the thermo-compositional state of the Earth's core. In this study, we collect a large set of seismic records with high-quality pre-critical PKiKP and PcP phase pairs, recorded by two dense seismic arrays, Hi-net in Japan and USArray in US. This dataset samples the ICB regions beneath East Asia, Mexico and the Bering Sea. We use differential travel times, amplitude ratios and waveform differences between PKiKP and PcP phases to constrain fine-scale structure of the ICB. The sampled ICB can be grouped into three types based on their seismic characteristics: (1) a simple ICB with a flat and sharp boundary, (2) a bumpy ICB with topographic height changes of 10 km, and (3) a localized mushy ICB with laterally varying thicknesses of 4-8 km. The laterally varying fine-scale structure of the ICB indicates existence of complex small-scale forces at the surface and a laterally varying solidification process of the inner core due to lateral variation of thermo-compositional condition near the ICB.

  14. Geodynamo Modeling of Core-Mantle Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Wei-Jia; Chao, Benjamin F.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Angular momentum exchange between the Earth's mantle and core influences the Earth's rotation on time scales of decades and longer, in particular in the length of day (LOD) which have been measured with progressively increasing accuracy for the last two centuries. There are four possible coupling mechanisms for transferring the axial angular momentum across the core-mantle boundary (CMB): viscous, magnetic, topography, and gravitational torques. Here we use our scalable, modularized, fully dynamic geodynamo model for the core to assess the importance of these torques. This numerical model, as an extension of the Kuang-Bloxham model that has successfully simulated the generation of the Earth's magnetic field, is used to obtain numerical results in various physical conditions in terms of specific parameterization consistent with the dynamical processes in the fluid outer core. The results show that depending on the electrical conductivity of the lower mantle and the amplitude of the boundary topography at CMB, both magnetic and topographic couplings can contribute significantly to the angular momentum exchange. This implies that the core-mantle interactions are far more complex than has been assumed and that there is unlikely a single dominant coupling mechanism for the observed decadal LOD variation.

  15. DOE Radiological Control Manual Core Training Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, H.L.; Maisler, J.

    1993-01-01

    Over the past year, the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Health (EH-40) has taken a leading role in the development of new standardized radiological control training programs for use throughout the DOE complex. The Department promulgated its Radiological Control (RadCon) Manual in June 1992. To ensure consistent application of the criteria presented in the RadCon Manual, standardized radiological control core training courses and training materials have been developed for implementation at all DOE facilities. In producing local training programs, standardized core courses are to be supplemented with site-specific lesson plans, viewgraphs, student handbooks, qualification standards, question banks, and wallet-sized training certificates. Training programs for General Employee Radiological Training, Radiological Worker I and II Training, and Radiological Control Technician Training have been disseminated. Also, training committees under the direction of the Office of Health (EH-40) have been established for the development of additional core training courses, development of examination banks, and the update of the existing core training courses. This paper discusses the current activities and future direction of the DOE radiological control core training program

  16. ROSA full-core and DNBR capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibcus, H.P.M.; Verhagen, F.C.M.; Wakker, P.H.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the latest developments of the ROSA (Reloading Optimization by Simulated Annealing) code system with an emphasis on the first full-core version and the minimum DNBR (Departure from Nucleate Boiling Ratio) as a new optimization parameter. Designing the core loading pattern of nuclear power plants is becoming a more and more complex task. This task becomes even more complicated if asymmetries in the core loading pattern arise, for instance due to damaged fuel assemblies. For over almost two decades ROSA, NRG's (Nuclear Research and consultancy Group) loading pattern optimization code system for PWRs, has proven to be a valuable tool to reactor operators in accomplishing this task. To improve the use of ROSA for designing asymmetric loading patterns, NRG has developed a full-core version of ROSA besides the original quarter-core version which requires rotational symmetry in the computational domain. The extension of ROSA with DNBR as an optimization parameter is part of ROSA's continuous development. (orig.)

  17. Ice cores and palaeoclimate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krogh Andersen, K.; Ditlevsen, P.; Steffensen, J.P.

    2001-01-01

    Ice cores from Greenland give testimony of a highly variable climate during the last glacial period. Dramatic climate warmings of 15 to 25 deg. C for the annual average temperature in less than a human lifetime have been documented. Several questions arise: Why is the Holocene so stable? Is climatic instability only a property of glacial periods? What is the mechanism behind the sudden climate changes? Are the increased temperatures in the past century man-made? And what happens in the future? The ice core community tries to attack some of these problems. The NGRIP ice core currently being drilled is analysed in very high detail, allowing for a very precise dating of climate events. It will be possible to study some of the fast changes on a year by year basis and from this we expect to find clues to the sequence of events during rapid changes. New techniques are hoped to allow for detection of annual layers as far back as 100,000 years and thus a much improved time scale over past climate changes. It is also hoped to find ice from the Eemian period. If the Eemian layers confirm the GRIP sequence, the Eemian was actually climatically unstable just as the glacial period. This would mean that the stability of the Holocene is unique. It would also mean, that if human made global warming indeed occurs, we could jeopardize the Holocene stability and create an unstable 'Eemian situation' which ultimately could start an ice age. Currenlty mankind is changing the composition of the atmosphere. Ice cores document significant increases in greenhouse gases, and due to increased emissions of sulfuric and nitric acid from fossil fuel burning, combustion engines and agriculture, modern Greenland snow is 3 - 5 times more acidic than pre-industrial snow (Mayewski et al., 1986). However, the magnitude and abruptness of the temperature changes of the past century do not exceed the magnitude of natural variability. It is from the ice core perspective thus not possible to attribute the

  18. Revised Cretaceous and Tertiary stratigraphic nomenclature in the Colville Basin, Northern Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mull, Charles G.; Houseknecht, David W.; Bird, Kenneth J.

    2003-01-01

    A revised stratigraphic nomenclature is proposed for Cretaceous and Tertiary geologic units of the central and western North Slope of Alaska. This revised nomenclature is a simplified and broadly applicable scheme suitable for a suite of digital geologic quadrangle maps being prepared jointly by the U.S. Geological Survey and the Alaska Department of Natural Resources, Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys and Division of Oil and Gas. This revised nomenclature scheme is a simplification of a complex stratigraphic terminology that developed piecemeal during five decades of geologic investigations of the North Slope. It is based on helicopter-supported geologic field investigations incorporating information from high-resolution aerial photography, satellite imagery, paleontology, reflection seismic records, and sequence stratigraphic concepts. This revised nomenclature proposes the abandonment of the Colville Group; demotion of the Nanushuk Group to formation status; abandonment of six formations (Kukpowruk, Tuktu, Grandstand, Corwin, Chandler, and Ninuluk); revision of four formations (Sagavanirktok, Prince Creek, Schrader Bluff, and Seabee); elevation of the Tuluvak Tongue of the Prince Creek Formation to formation status; revision of two members (Franklin Bluffs Member and Sagwon Member of the Sagavanirktok Formation); abandonment of eight members or tongues (Kogosukruk, Rogers Creek, Barrow Trail, Sentinel Hill, Ayiyak, Shale Wall, Niakogon, and Killik); and definition of one new member (White Hills Member of the Sagavanirktok Formation).

  19. Structured Head and Neck CT Angiography Reporting Reduces Resident Revision Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Tucker F; Brinjikji, Waleed; Doolittle, Derrick A; Nagelschneider, Alex A; Welch, Brian T; Kotsenas, Amy L

    2018-04-12

    This resident-driven quality improvement project was undertaken to assess the effectiveness of structured reporting to reduce revision rates for afterhours reports dictated by residents. The first part of the study assessed baseline revision rates for head and neck CT angiography (CTA) examinations dictated by residents during afterhours call. A structured report was subsequently created based on templates on the RSNA informatics reporting website and critical findings that should be assessed for on all CTA examinations. The template was made available to residents through the speech recognition software for all head and neck CTA examinations for a duration of 2 months. Report revision rates were then compared with and without use of the structured template. The structured template was found to reduce revision rates by approximately 50% with 10/41 unstructured reports revised and 2/17 structured reports revised. We believe that structured reporting can help reduce reporting errors, particularly in term of typographical errors, train residents to evaluate complex examinations in a systematic fashion, and assist them in recalling critical findings on these examinations. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. An Empirical Determination of Tasks Essential to Successful Performance as an Animal Health Assistant. Determination of a Common Core of Basic Skills in Agribusiness and Natural Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Fred C.; And Others

    To improve vocational educational programs in agriculture, occupational information on a common core of basic skills within the occupational area of the animal health assistant is presented in the revised task inventory survey. The purpose of the occupational survey was to identify a common core of basic skills which are performed and are…

  1. Emergency core cooling device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzaki, Kiyoshi; Inoue, Akihiro.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To improve core cooling effect by making the operation region for a plurality of water injection pumps more broader. Constitution: An emergency reactor core cooling device actuated upon failure of recycling pipe ways is adapted to be fed with cooling water through a thermal sleeve by way of a plurality of water injection pump from pool water in a condensate storage tank and a pressure suppression chamber as water feed source. Exhaust pipes and suction pipes of each of the pumps are connected by way of switching valves and the valves are switched so that the pumps are set to a series operation if the pressure in the pressure vessel is high and the pumps are set to a parallel operation if the pressure in the pressure vessel is low. (Furukawa, Y.)

  2. Birefringent hollow core fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roberts, John

    2007-01-01

    Hollow core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF), fabricated according to a nominally non-birefringent design, shows a degree of un-controlled birefringence or polarization mode dispersion far in excess of conventional non polarization maintaining fibers. This can degrade the output pulse in many...... applications, and places emphasis on the development of polarization maintaining (PM) HC-PCF. The polarization cross-coupling characteristics of PM HC-PCF are very different from those of conventional PM fibers. The former fibers have the advantage of suffering far less from stress-field fluctuations...... and an increased overlap between the polarization modes at the glass interfaces. The interplay between these effects leads to a wavelength for optimum polarization maintenance, lambda(PM), which is detuned from the wavelength of highest birefringence. By a suitable fiber design involving antiresonance of the core...

  3. Plasma core reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latham, T.S.; Rodgers, R.J.

    1976-01-01

    Analytical and experimental investigations are being conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of fissioning uranium plasma core reactors and to characterize space and terrestrial applications for such reactors. Uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) fuel is injected into core cavities and confined away from the surface by argon buffer gas injected tangentially from the peripheral walls. Power, in the form of thermal radiation emitted from the high-temperature nuclear fuel, is transmitted through fused-silica transparent walls to working fluids which flow in axial channels embedded in segments of the cavity walls. Radiant heat transfer calculations were performed for a six-cavity reactor configuration; each cavity is approximately 1 m in diameter by 4.35 m in length. Axial working fluid channels are located along a fraction of each cavity peripheral wall

  4. Reactor core cooling device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Masahiro.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To safely and effectively cool down the reactor core after it has been shut down but is still hot due to after-heat. Constitution: Since the coolant extraction nozzle is situated at a location higher than the coolant injection nozzle, the coolant sprayed from the nozzle, is free from sucking immediately from the extraction nozzle and is therefore used effectively to cool the reactor core. As all the portions from the top to the bottom of the reactor are cooled simultaneously, the efficiency of the reactor cooling process is increased. Since the coolant extraction nozzle can be installed at a point considerably higher than the coolant injection nozzle, the distance from the coolant surface to the point of the coolant extraction nozzle can be made large, preventing cavitation near the coolant extraction nozzle. Therefore, without increasing the capacity of the heat exchanger, the reactor can be cooled down after a shutdown safely and efficiently. (Kawakami, Y.)

  5. The revised APTA code of ethics for the physical therapist and standards of ethical conduct for the physical therapist assistant: theory, purpose, process, and significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swisher, Laura Lee; Hiller, Peggy

    2010-05-01

    In June 2009, the House of Delegates (HOD) of the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) passed a major revision of the APTA Code of Ethics for physical therapists and the Standards of Ethical Conduct for the Physical Therapist Assistant. The revised documents will be effective July 1, 2010. The purposes of this article are: (1) to provide a historical, professional, and theoretical context for this important revision; (2) to describe the 4-year revision process; (3) to examine major features of the documents; and (4) to discuss the significance of the revisions from the perspective of the maturation of physical therapy as a doctoring profession. PROCESS OF REVISION: The process for revision is delineated within the context of history and the Bylaws of APTA. FORMAT, STRUCTURE, AND CONTENT OF REVISED CORE ETHICS DOCUMENTS: The revised documents represent a significant change in format, level of detail, and scope of application. Previous APTA Codes of Ethics and Standards of Ethical Conduct for the Physical Therapist Assistant have delineated very broad general principles, with specific obligations spelled out in the Ethics and Judicial Committee's Guide for Professional Conduct and Guide for Conduct of the Physical Therapist Assistant. In contrast to the current documents, the revised documents address all 5 roles of the physical therapist, delineate ethical obligations in organizational and business contexts, and align with the tenets of Vision 2020. The significance of this revision is discussed within historical parameters, the implications for physical therapists and physical therapist assistants, the maturation of the profession, societal accountability and moral community, potential regulatory implications, and the inclusive and deliberative process of moral dialogue by which changes were developed, revised, and approved.

  6. Some core contested concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomsky, Noam

    2015-02-01

    Core concepts of language are highly contested. In some cases this is legitimate: real empirical and conceptual issues arise. In other cases, it seems that controversies are based on misunderstanding. A number of crucial cases are reviewed, and an approach to language is outlined that appears to have strong conceptual and empirical motivation, and to lead to conclusions about a number of significant issues that differ from some conventional beliefs.

  7. Schumpeter's core works revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Esben Sloth

    2012-01-01

    This paper organises Schumpeter’s core books in three groups: the programmatic duology,the evolutionaryeconomic duology,and the socioeconomic synthesis. By analysing these groups and their interconnections from the viewpoint of modern evolutionaryeconomics,the paper summarises resolved problems a...... and points at remaining challenges. Its analyses are based on distinctions between microevolution and macroevolution, between economic evolution and socioeconomic coevolution, and between Schumpeter’s three major evolutionary models (called Mark I, Mark II and Mark III)....

  8. BWR type reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatemichi, Shin-ichiro.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To eliminate the variation in the power distribution of a BWR type reactor core in the axial direction even if the flow rate is increased or decreased by providing a difference in the void coefficient between the upper part and the lower parts of the reactor core, and increasing the void coefficient at the lower part of the reactor core. Constitution: The void coefficient of the lower region from the center to the lower part along the axial direction of a nuclear fuel assembly is increased to decrease the dependence on the flow rate of the axial power distribution of the nuclear fuel assembly. That is, a water/fuel ratio is varied, the water in non-boiled region is increased or the neutron spectrum is varied so as to vary the void coefficient. In order to exemplify it, the rate of the internal pellets of the fuel rod of the nuclear fuel assembly or the shape of the channel box is varied. Accordingly, the power does not considerably vary even if the flow rate is altered since the power is varied in the power operation. (Yoshihara, H.)

  9. Emergency core cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Masaki.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To actuate an automatic pressure down system (ADS) and a low pressure emergency core cooling system (ECCS) upon water level reduction of a nuclear reactor other than loss of coolant accidents (LOCA). Constitution: ADS in a BWR type reactor is disposed for reducing the pressure in a reactor container thereby enabling coolant injection from a low pressure ECCS upon LOCA. That is, ADS has been actuated by AND signal for a reactor water level low signal and a dry well pressure high signal. In the present invention, ADS can be actuated further also by AND signal of the reactor water level low signal, the high pressure ECCS and not-operation signal of reactor isolation cooling system. In such an emergency core cooling system thus constituted, ADS operates in the same manner as usual upon LOCA and, further, ADS is operated also upon loss of feedwater accident in the reactor pressure vessel in the case where there is a necessity for actuating the low pressure ECCS, although other high pressure ECCS and reactor isolation cooling system are not operated. Accordingly, it is possible to improve the reliability upon reactor core accident and mitigate the operator burden. (Horiuchi, T.)

  10. The economic impact of revision otologic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadimi, Sahar; Leonetti, John P; Pontikis, George

    2016-03-01

    Revision otologic surgery places a significant economic burden on patients and the healthcare system. We conducted a retrospective chart analysis to estimate the economic impact of revision canal-wall-down (CWD) mastoidectomy. We reviewed the medical records of all 189 adults who had undergone CWD mastoidectomy performed by the senior author between June 2006 and August 2011 at Loyola University Medical Center in Maywood, Ill. Institutional charges and collections for all patients were extrapolated to estimate the overall healthcare cost of revision surgery in Illinois and at the national level. Of the 189 CWD mastoidectomies, 89 were primary and 100 were revision procedures. The total charge for the revision cases was $2,783,700, and the net reimbursement (collections) was $846,289 (30.4%). Using Illinois Hospital Association data, we estimated that reimbursement for 387 revision CWD mastoidectomies that had been performed in fiscal year 2011 was nearly $3.3 million. By extrapolating our data to the national level, we estimated that 9,214 patients underwent revision CWD mastoidectomy in the United States during 2011, which cost the national healthcare system roughly $76 million, not including lost wages and productivity. Known causes of failed CWD mastoidectomies that often result in revision surgery include an inadequate meatoplasty, a facial ridge that is too high, residual diseased air cells, and recurrent cholesteatoma. A better understanding of these factors can reduce the need for revision surgery, which could have a positive impact on the economic strain related to this procedure at the local, state, and national levels.

  11. Cochlear implant revision surgeries in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Maria Stella Arantes do; Reis, Ana Cláudia Mirândola B; Massuda, Eduardo T; Hyppolito, Miguel Angelo

    2018-02-16

    The surgery during which the cochlear implant internal device is implanted is not entirely free of risks and may produce problems that will require revision surgeries. To verify the indications for cochlear implantation revision surgery for the cochlear implant internal device, its effectiveness and its correlation with certain variables related to language and hearing. A retrospective study of patients under 18 years submitted to cochlear implant Surgery from 2004 to 2015 in a public hospital in Brazil. Data collected were: age at the time of implantation, gender, etiology of the hearing loss, audiological and oral language characteristics of each patient before and after Cochlear Implant surgery and any need for surgical revision and the reason for it. Two hundred and sixty-five surgeries were performed in 236 patients. Eight patients received a bilateral cochlear implant and 10 patients required revision surgery. Thirty-two surgeries were necessary for these 10 children (1 bilateral cochlear implant), of which 21 were revision surgeries. In 2 children, cochlear implant removal was necessary, without reimplantation, one with cochlear malformation due to incomplete partition type I and another due to trauma. With respect to the cause for revision surgery, of the 8 children who were successfully reimplanted, four had cochlear calcification following meningitis, one followed trauma, one exhibited a facial nerve malformation, one experienced a failure of the cochlear implant internal device and one revision surgery was necessary because the electrode was twisted. The incidence of the cochlear implant revision surgery was 4.23%. The period following the revision surgeries revealed an improvement in the subject's hearing and language performance, indicating that these surgeries are valid in most cases. Copyright © 2018 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  12. Revision of infected knee arthroplasties in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg-Larsen, Martin; Jørgensen, Christoffer C; Bagger, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose - The surgical treatment of periprosthetic knee infection is generally either a partial revision procedure (open debridement and exchange of the tibial insert) or a 2-stage exchange arthroplasty procedure. We describe the failure rates of these procedures on a nationwide...... basis. Patients and methods - 105 partial revisions (100 patients) and 215 potential 2-stage revision procedures (205 patients) performed due to infection from July 1, 2011 to June 30, 2013 were identified from the Danish Knee Arthroplasty Register (DKR). Failure was defined as surgically related death...

  13. Complexity explained

    CERN Document Server

    Erdi, Peter

    2008-01-01

    This book explains why complex systems research is important in understanding the structure, function and dynamics of complex natural and social phenomena. Readers will learn the basic concepts and methods of complex system research.

  14. 3D core burnup studies in 500 MWe Indian prototype fast breeder reactor to attain enhanced core burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choudhry, Nakul; Riyas, A.; Devan, K.; Mohanakrishnan, P.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Enhanced burnup potential of existing prototype fast breeder reactor core is studied. ► By increasing the Pu enrichment, fuel burnup can be increased in existing PFBR core. ► Enhanced burnup increase economy and reduce load of fuel fabrication and reprocessing. ► Beginning of life reactivity is suppressed by increasing the number of diluents. ► Absorber rod worth requirements can be achieved by increasing 10 B enrichment. -- Abstract: Fast breeder reactors are capable of producing high fuel burnup because of higher internal breeding of fissile material and lesser parasitic capture of neutrons in the core. As these reactors need high fissile enrichment, high fuel burnup is desirable to be cost effective and to reduce the load on fuel reprocessing and fabrication plants. A pool type, liquid sodium cooled, mixed (Pu–U) oxide fueled 500 MWe prototype fast breeder reactor (PFBR), under construction at Kalpakkam is designed for a peak burnup of 100 GWd/t. This limitation on burnup is purely due to metallurgical properties of structural materials like clad and hexcan to withstand high neutron fluence, and not by the limitation on the excess reactivity available in the core. The 3D core burnup studies performed earlier for approach to equilibrium core of PFBR is continued to demonstrate the burnup potential of existing PFBR core. To increase the fuel burnup of PFBR, plutonium oxide enrichment is increased from 20.7%/27.7% to 22.1%/29.4% of core-1/core-2 which resulted in cycle length increase from 180 to 250 effective full power days (efpd), so that the peak fuel burnup increases from 100 to 134 GWd/t, keeping all the core parameters under allowed safety limits. Number of diluents subassemblies is increased from eight to twelve at beginning of life core to bring down the initial core excess reactivity. PFBR refueling is revised to accommodate twelve diluents. Increase of 10 B enrichment in control safety rods (CSRs) and diverse safety rods (DSRs

  15. Using the Oscillation Test Method to test for Delay Faults in Embedded Cores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermaak, H.J.; Kerkhoff, Hans G.

    2004-01-01

    Continual advances In the manufacturing processes of integrated circuits provide designers the ability to create more complex and denser architectures and increased functionality on a single chip. The increased usage of embedded cores necessitates a core-based test strategy in which cores are also

  16. Individual questions of financial control and revision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В. М. Глібко

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Problem setting. In modern conditions at investigation and gathering of proofs in criminal proceedings according to item 93 CPC of Ukraine collecting of proofs which is carried out by the criminal proceedings parties, victim is important, the representative of the legal person, in which relation carries out manufacture, including a way истребования and receptions from public authorities, local governments, the enterprises, establishments and organisations, official and physical persons of things, documents, data, conclusions of experts, conclusions of revisions and certificates of checks. Recent research and publications analisis. In scientific sources questions of carrying out of revisions S. B.Zhivko, V.V.Akimov, G.Demjanchuk, J.Buzdugan is considered. Paper objective. Article purpose is studying and definition of a place of revision among forms of inspection of the state control and use of results of revision in criminal proceedings. Paper main body. Off-schedule exit revision that is revision which is not provided in plans of work of body of the state financial control is considered and is spent at presence at least one of the circumstances listed in item 11 of the Law of Ukraine «About main principles of realisation of the state financial control in Ukraine». If revision is carried out on request of investigating bodies it is spent on the basis of the petition of the inspector and accepted by the results of consideration of this petition of the decision of the investigatory judge. The primary goal of revision on request of investigating bodies or on the basis of court definition is reception of proofs on business. Therefore the revision certificate admits the written proof as on the basis of its conclusion of the inspector, the public prosecutor receives the information on a perfect crime, abusing, and also on the persons who have committed a crime, on the period of commission of crime and an amount of damage. In criminal

  17. Cosmic Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, John C.

    2012-01-01

    neutrons, liberating a little energy and creating complexity. Then, the expanding universe cooled some more, and neutrons and protons, no longer kept apart by immense temperatures, found themselves unstable and formed helium nuclei. Then, a little more cooling, and atomic nuclei and electrons were no longer kept apart, and the universe became transparent. Then a little more cooling, and the next instability began: gravitation pulled matter together across cosmic distances to form stars and galaxies. This instability is described as a "negative heat capadty" in which extracting energy from a gravitating system makes it hotter -- clearly the 2nd law of thermodynamics does not apply here! (This is the physicist's part of the answer to e e cummings' question: what is the wonder that's keeping the stars apart?) Then, the next instability is that hydrogen and helium nuclei can fuse together to release energy and make stars burn for billions of years. And then at the end of the fuel source, stars become unstable and explode and liberate the chemical elements back into space. And because of that, on planets like Earth, sustained energy flows support the development of additional instabilities and all kinds of complex patterns. Gravitational instability pulls the densest materials into the core of the Earth, leaving a thin skin of water and air, and makes the interior churn incessantly as heat flows outwards. And the heat from the sun, received mostly near the equator and flowing towards the poles, supports the complex atmospheric and oceanic circulations. And because or that, the physical Earth is full of natural chemical laboratories, concentrating elements here, mixing them there, raising and lowering temperatures, ceaselessly experimenting with uncountable events where new instabilities can arise. At least one of them was the new experiment called life. Now that we know that there are at least as many planets as there are stars, it is hard to imagine that nature's ceasess

  18. Organization of complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitsak, Maksim

    Many large complex systems can be successfully analyzed using the language of graphs and networks. Interactions between the objects in a network are treated as links connecting nodes. This approach to understanding the structure of networks is an important step toward understanding the way corresponding complex systems function. Using the tools of statistical physics, we analyze the structure of networks as they are found in complex systems such as the Internet, the World Wide Web, and numerous industrial and social networks. In the first chapter we apply the concept of self-similarity to the study of transport properties in complex networks. Self-similar or fractal networks, unlike non-fractal networks, exhibit similarity on a range of scales. We find that these fractal networks have transport properties that differ from those of non-fractal networks. In non-fractal networks, transport flows primarily through the hubs. In fractal networks, the self-similar structure requires any transport to also flow through nodes that have only a few connections. We also study, in models and in real networks, the crossover from fractal to non-fractal networks that occurs when a small number of random interactions are added by means of scaling techniques. In the second chapter we use k-core techniques to study dynamic processes in networks. The k-core of a network is the network's largest component that, within itself, exhibits all nodes with at least k connections. We use this k-core analysis to estimate the relative leadership positions of firms in the Life Science (LS) and Information and Communication Technology (ICT) sectors of industry. We study the differences in the k-core structure between the LS and the ICT sectors. We find that the lead segment (highest k-core) of the LS sector, unlike that of the ICT sector, is remarkably stable over time: once a particular firm enters the lead segment, it is likely to remain there for many years. In the third chapter we study how

  19. Complex chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Bong Gon; Kim, Jae Sang; Kim, Jin Eun; Lee, Boo Yeon

    2006-06-01

    This book introduces complex chemistry with ten chapters, which include development of complex chemistry on history coordination theory and Warner's coordination theory and new development of complex chemistry, nomenclature on complex with conception and define, chemical formula on coordination compound, symbol of stereochemistry, stereo structure and isomerism, electron structure and bond theory on complex, structure of complex like NMR and XAFS, balance and reaction on solution, an organo-metallic chemistry, biology inorganic chemistry, material chemistry of complex, design of complex and calculation chemistry.

  20. LeMMINGs - I. The eMERLIN legacy survey of nearby galaxies. 1.5-GHz parsec-scale radio structures and cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldi, R. D.; Williams, D. R. A.; McHardy, I. M.; Beswick, R. J.; Argo, M. K.; Dullo, B. T.; Knapen, J. H.; Brinks, E.; Muxlow, T. W. B.; Aalto, S.; Alberdi, A.; Bendo, G. J.; Corbel, S.; Evans, R.; Fenech, D. M.; Green, D. A.; Klöckner, H.-R.; Körding, E.; Kharb, P.; Maccarone, T. J.; Martí-Vidal, I.; Mundell, C. G.; Panessa, F.; Peck, A. B.; Pérez-Torres, M. A.; Saikia, D. J.; Saikia, P.; Shankar, F.; Spencer, R. E.; Stevens, I. R.; Uttley, P.; Westcott, J.

    2018-05-01

    We present the first data release of high-resolution (≤0.2 arcsec) 1.5-GHz radio images of 103 nearby galaxies from the Palomar sample, observed with the eMERLIN array, as part of the LeMMINGs survey. This sample includes galaxies which are active (low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions [LINER] and Seyfert) and quiescent (H II galaxies and absorption line galaxies, ALGs), which are reclassified based upon revised emission-line diagrams. We detect radio emission ≳0.2 mJy for 47/103 galaxies (22/34 for LINERS, 4/4 for Seyferts, 16/51 for H II galaxies, and 5/14 for ALGs) with radio sizes typically of ≲100 pc. We identify the radio core position within the radio structures for 41 sources. Half of the sample shows jetted morphologies. The remaining half shows single radio cores or complex morphologies. LINERs show radio structures more core-brightened than Seyferts. Radio luminosities of the sample range from 1032 to 1040 erg s-1: LINERs and H II galaxies show the highest and lowest radio powers, respectively, while ALGs and Seyferts have intermediate luminosities. We find that radio core luminosities correlate with black hole (BH) mass down to ˜107 M⊙, but a break emerges at lower masses. Using [O III] line luminosity as a proxy for the accretion luminosity, active nuclei and jetted H II galaxies follow an optical Fundamental Plane of BH activity, suggesting a common disc-jet relationship. In conclusion, LINER nuclei are the scaled-down version of FR I radio galaxies; Seyferts show less collimated jets; H II galaxies may host weak active BHs and/or nuclear star-forming cores; and recurrent BH activity may account for ALG properties.

  1. Dynamic response of a multielement HTGR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reich, M.; Bezler, P.; Koplik, B.; Curreri, J.; Goradia, H.; Lasker, L.

    1977-01-01

    One of the primary factors in determining the structural integrity and consequently the safety of a High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) is the dynamic response of the core when subjected to a seismic excitation. The HTGR core under consideration consists of several thousands of hexagonal elements arranged in vertical stacks containing about eight elements per stack. There are clearance gaps between adjacent elements, which can change substantially due to radiation effects produced during their active lifetime. Surrounding the outer periphery of the core are reflector blocks and restraining spring-pack arrangements which bear against the reactor vessel structure (PCRV). Earthquake input motions to this type of core arrangement will result in multiple impacts between adjacent elements as well as between the reflector blocks and the restraining spring packs. The highly complex nonlinear response associated with the multiple collisions across the clearance gaps and with the spring packs is the subject matter of this paper. Of particular importance is the ability to analyze a complex nonlinear system with gaps by employing a model with a reduced number of masses. This is necessary in order to obtain solutions in a time-frame and at a cost which is not too expensive. In addition the effect of variations in total clearance as well as the initial distribution of clearances between adjacent elements is of primary concern. Both of these aspects of the problem are treated in the present analysis. Finally, by constraining the motion of the reflector blocks, a more realistic description of the dynamic response of the multi-element HTGR core is obtained

  2. Molten salt reactors: reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    In this critical analysis of the MSBR I project are examined the problems concerning the reactor core. Advantages of breeding depend essentially upon solutions to technological problems like continuous reprocessing or graphite behavior under neutron irradiation. Graphite deformation, moderator unloading, control rods and core instrumentation require more studies. Neutronics of the core, influence of core geometry and salt composition, fuel evolution, and thermohydraulics are reviewed [fr

  3. WNP-2 core model upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golightly, C.E.; Ravindranath, T.K.; Belblidia, L.A.; O'Farrell, D.; Andersen, P.S.

    2006-01-01

    The paper describes the core model upgrade of the WNP-2 training simulator and the reasons for the upgrade. The core model as well as the interface with the rest of the simulator are briefly described . The paper also describes the procedure that will be used by WNP-2 to update the simulator core data after future core reloads. Results from the fully integrated simulator are presented. (author)

  4. On-line core monitoring with CORE MASTER / PRESTO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindahl, S.O.; Borresen, S.; Ovrum, S.

    1986-01-01

    Advanced calculational tools are instrumental in improving reactor plant capacity factors and fuel utilization. The computer code package CORE MASTER is an integrated system designed to achieve this objective. The system covers all main activities in the area of in-core fuel management for boiling water reactors; design, operation support, and on-line core monitoring. CORE MASTER operates on a common data base, which defines the reactor and documents the operating history of the core and of all fuel bundles ever used

  5. Taxation and Welfare: A Revision Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boden, Andrew

    1992-01-01

    Offers a revision exercise intended to remind students of some economic terminology associated with taxation and welfare. Provides a set of definitions for which students are to supply matching terms. Includes an answer list and suggests related exercises. (SG)

  6. Student-initiated revision in child health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfaham, M; Gray, O P; Davies, D P

    1994-03-01

    Most teaching of child health in Cardiff takes place in block attachments of 8 weeks. There is an introductory seminar of 2 days followed by a 6-week clinical attachment in a district general hospital in Wales, and then a revision period of one week designed to help students formalize and structure their basic knowledge and to clarify aspects of child health which they may have had difficulty in understanding. The revision programme has to take into account: the short time available, the small number of teaching staff, the most relevant basic knowledge and active participation by the student. This paper describes how this week has been improved through the use of student-initiated revision (SIR). The students' appraisal of this revision and in particular SIR is presented.

  7. New and revised standards for coke production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G.A. Kotsyuba; M.I. Alpatov; Y.G. Shapoval [Giprokoks, the State Institute for the Design of Coke-Industry Enterprises, Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2009-07-15

    The need for new and revised standards for coke production in Ukraine and Russia is outlined. Such standards should address improvements in plant operation, working conditions, environmental protection, energy conservation, fire and explosion safety, and economic indices.

  8. FFTF operations procedures preparation guide. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-12-01

    The Guide is intended to provide guidelines for the initial preparation of FFTF Operating Procedures. The Procedures Preparation Guide was developed from the plan presented and approved in the FFTF Reactor Plant Procedures Plan, PC-1, Revision 3

  9. Revising incompletely specified convex probabilistic belief bases

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Rens, G

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available revision employing the notion of optimum entropy, and point out some of the benefits and difficulties in those methods. Both the boundary distribution method and the optimum entropy method are reasonable, yet yield different results....

  10. Descriptor revision belief change through direct choice

    CERN Document Server

    Hansson, Sven Ove

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a critical examination of how the choice of what to believe is represented in the standard model of belief change. In particular the use of possible worlds and infinite remainders as objects of choice is critically examined. Descriptors are introduced as a versatile tool for expressing the success conditions of belief change, addressing both local and global descriptor revision. The book presents dynamic descriptors such as Ramsey descriptors that convey how an agent’s beliefs tend to be changed in response to different inputs. It also explores sentential revision and demonstrates how local and global operations of revision by a sentence can be derived as a special case of descriptor revision. Lastly, the book examines revocation, a generalization of contraction in which a specified sentence is removed in a process that may possibly also involve the addition of some new information to the belief set.

  11. Hollow-Core Fiber Lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Lin (Inventor); Tjoelker, Robert L. (Inventor); Burt, Eric A. (Inventor); Huang, Shouhua (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Hollow-core capillary discharge lamps on the millimeter or sub-millimeter scale are provided. The hollow-core capillary discharge lamps achieve an increased light intensity ratio between 194 millimeters (useful) and 254 millimeters (useless) light than conventional lamps. The capillary discharge lamps may include a cone to increase light output. Hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HCPCF) may also be used.

  12. Dual-core Itanium Processor

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Intel’s first dual-core Itanium processor, code-named "Montecito" is a major release of Intel's Itanium 2 Processor Family, which implements the Intel Itanium architecture on a dual-core processor with two cores per die (integrated circuit). Itanium 2 is much more powerful than its predecessor. It has lower power consumption and thermal dissipation.

  13. Maximum stellar iron core mass

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    60, No. 3. — journal of. March 2003 physics pp. 415–422. Maximum stellar iron core mass. F W GIACOBBE. Chicago Research Center/American Air Liquide ... iron core compression due to the weight of non-ferrous matter overlying the iron cores within large .... thermal equilibrium velocities will tend to be non-relativistic.

  14. Core TuLiP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Czenko, M.R.; Etalle, Sandro

    2007-01-01

    We propose CoreTuLiP - the core of a trust management language based on Logic Programming. CoreTuLiP is based on a subset of moded logic programming, but enjoys the features of TM languages such as RT; in particular clauses are issued by different authorities and stored in a distributed manner. We

  15. International Spinal Cord Injury Core Data Set (version 2.0)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, F; DeVivo, M J; Charlifue, S

    2017-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: The study design includes expert opinion, feedback, revisions and final consensus. OBJECTIVES: The objective of the study was to present the new knowledge obtained since the International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Core Data Set (Version 1.0) published in 2006, and describe the adjust......STUDY DESIGN: The study design includes expert opinion, feedback, revisions and final consensus. OBJECTIVES: The objective of the study was to present the new knowledge obtained since the International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Core Data Set (Version 1.0) published in 2006, and describe...... the adjustments made in Version 2.0, including standardization of data reporting. SETTING: International. METHODS: Comments received from the SCI community were discussed in a working group (WG); suggestions from the WG were reviewed and revisions were made. All suggested revisions were considered, and a final...... version was circulated for final approval. RESULTS: The International SCI Core Data Set (Version 2.0) consists of 25 variables. Changes made to this version include the deletion of one variable 'Total Days Hospitalized' and addition of two variables 'Date of Rehabilitation Admission' and 'Date of Death...

  16. NRC revision to 10 CFR Part 20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, R.E.; Cool, W.S.; Mills, W.A.

    1983-01-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission's pollution standards have been revised since publication in the late 1950s, but the basic approach has not changed. The revisions resulted in inaccuracies, conflicts, and ambiguities in requirements. The need for comprehensive updating including radiation-protection principles, risk, occupational exposure dose limits, standards for the public (including de minimis level), surveys and monitoring, disposal into sewerage systems, and records is discussed. 2 tables

  17. Revised data taking schedule with ion beams

    CERN Document Server

    Gazdzicki, Marek; Aduszkiewicz, A; Andrieu, B; Anticic, T; Antoniou, N; Argyriades, J; Asryan, A G; Baatar, B; Blondel, A; Blumer, J; Boldizsar, L; Bravar, A; Brzychczyk, J; Bubak, A; Bunyatov, S A; Choi, K U; Christakoglou, P; Chung, P; Cleymans, J; Derkach, D A; Diakonos, F; Dominik, W; Dumarchez, J; Engel, R; Ereditato, A; Feofilov, G A; Fodor, Z; Ferrero, A; Gazdzicki, M; Golubeva, M; Grebieszkow, K; Grzeszczuk, A; Guber, F; Hasegawa, T; Haungs, A; Igolkin, S; Ivanov, A S; Ivashkin, A; Kadija, K; Katrynska, N; Kielczewska, D; Kikola, D; Kisiel, J; Kobayashi, T; Kolesnikov, V I; Kolev, D; Kolevatov, R S; Kondratiev, V P; Kowalski, S; Kurepin, A; Lacey, R; Laszlo, A; Lyubushkin, V V; Majka, Z; I Malakhov, A; Marchionni, A; Marcinek, A; Maris, I; Matveev, V; Melkumov, G L; Meregaglia, A; Messina, M; Mijakowski, P; Mitrovski, M; Montaruli, T; Mrówczynski, St; Murphy, S; Nakadaira, T; Naumenko, P A; Nikolic, V; Nishikawa, K; Palczewski, T; Pálla, G; Panagiotou, A D; Peryt, W; Planeta, R; Pluta, J; Popov, B A; Posiadala, M; Przewlocki, P; Rauch, W; Ravonel, M; Renfordt, R; Röhrich, D; Rondio, E; Rossi, B; Roth, M; Rubbia, A; Rybczynski, M; Sadovskii, A; Sakashita, K; Schuster, T; Sekiguchi, T; Seyboth, P; Shibata, M; Sissakian, A N; Skrzypczak, E; Slodkowski, M; Sorin, A S; Staszel, P; Stefanek, G; Stepaniak, J; Strabel, C; Ströbele, H; Susa, T; Szentpétery, I; Szuba, M; Tada, M; Taranenko, A; Tsenov, R; Ulrich, R; Unger, M; Vassiliou, M; Vechernin, V V; Vesztergombi, G; Wlodarczyk, Z; Wojtaszek, A; Zipper, W; CERN. Geneva. SPS and PS Experiments Committee; SPSC

    2009-01-01

    This document presents the revised data taking schedule of NA61 with ion beams. The revision takes into account limitations due to the new LHC schedule as well as final results concerning the physics performance with secondary ion beams. It is proposed to take data with primary Ar and Xe beams in 2012 and 2014, respectively, and to test and use for physics a secondary B beam from primary Pb beam fragmentation in 2010, 2011 and 2013.

  18. Ice Sheets & Ice Cores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Troels Bøgeholm

    Since the discovery of the Ice Ages it has been evident that Earth’s climate is liable to undergo dramatic changes. The previous climatic period known as the Last Glacial saw large oscillations in the extent of ice sheets covering the Northern hemisphere. Understanding these oscillations known....... The first part concerns time series analysis of ice core data obtained from the Greenland Ice Sheet. We analyze parts of the time series where DO-events occur using the so-called transfer operator and compare the results with time series from a simple model capable of switching by either undergoing...

  19. Nuclear reactor core assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baxi, C.B.

    1978-01-01

    The object of the present invention is to provide a fast reactor core assembly design for use with a fluid coolant such as liquid sodium or carbon monoxide incorporating a method of increasing the percentage of coolant flow though the blanket elements relative to the total coolant flow through the blanket and fuel elements during shutdown conditions without using moving parts. It is claimed that deterioration due to reactor radiation or temperature conditions is avoided and ready modification or replacement is possible. (U.K.)

  20. Reload core safety verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svetlik, M.; Minarcin, M.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a brief look at the process of reload core safety evaluation and verification in Slovak Republic. It gives an overview of experimental verification of selected nuclear parameters in the course of physics testing during reactor start-up. The comparison of IAEA recommendations and testing procedures at Slovak and European nuclear power plants of similar design is included. An introduction of two level criteria for evaluation of tests represents an effort to formulate the relation between safety evaluation and measured values (Authors)