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  1. Diet and Mobility in the Corded Ware of Central Europe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl-Göran Sjögren

    Full Text Available Isotopic investigations of two cemetery populations from the Corded Ware Culture in southern Germany reveal new information on the dating of these graves, human diet during this period, and individual mobility. Corded Ware Culture was present across much of temperate Europe ca. 2800-2200 cal. BC and is represented by distinctive artifacts and burial practices. Corded Ware was strongly influenced by the Yamnaya Culture that arose in the steppes of eastern Europe and western Eurasia after 3000 BC, as indicated by recent aDNA research. However, the development of CW on different chronological and spatial scales has to be evaluated. Examination of the CW burials from southern Germany supports an argument for substantial human mobility in this period. Several burials from gravefields and larger samples from two large cemeteries at Lauda-Königshofen "Wöllerspfad" and at Bergheinfeld "Hühnerberg" contributed the human remains for our study of bone and tooth enamel from the Corded Ware Culture. Our results suggest that Corded Ware groups in this region at least were subsisting on a mix of plant and animal foods and were highly mobile, especially the women. We interpret this as indicating a pattern of female exogamy, involving different groups with differing economic strategies.

  2. Diet and Mobility in the Corded Ware of Central Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjögren, Karl-Göran; Price, T Douglas; Kristiansen, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Isotopic investigations of two cemetery populations from the Corded Ware Culture in southern Germany reveal new information on the dating of these graves, human diet during this period, and individual mobility. Corded Ware Culture was present across much of temperate Europe ca. 2800-2200 cal. BC and is represented by distinctive artifacts and burial practices. Corded Ware was strongly influenced by the Yamnaya Culture that arose in the steppes of eastern Europe and western Eurasia after 3000 BC, as indicated by recent aDNA research. However, the development of CW on different chronological and spatial scales has to be evaluated. Examination of the CW burials from southern Germany supports an argument for substantial human mobility in this period. Several burials from gravefields and larger samples from two large cemeteries at Lauda-Königshofen "Wöllerspfad" and at Bergheinfeld "Hühnerberg" contributed the human remains for our study of bone and tooth enamel from the Corded Ware Culture. Our results suggest that Corded Ware groups in this region at least were subsisting on a mix of plant and animal foods and were highly mobile, especially the women. We interpret this as indicating a pattern of female exogamy, involving different groups with differing economic strategies.

  3. Re-theorising mobility and the formation of culture and language among the Corded Ware Culture in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Kristian; Allentoft, Morten E.; Frei, Karin M.

    2017-01-01

    North European Neolithic cultures. The original herding economy of the Yamnaya migrants gradually gave way to new practices of crop cultivation, which led to the adoption of new words for those crops. The result of this hybridisation process was the formation of a new material culture, the Corded Ware......Recent genetic, isotopic and linguistic research has dramatically changed our understanding of how the Corded Ware Culture in Europe was formed. Here the authors explain it in terms of local adaptations and interactions between migrant Yamnaya people from the Pontic-Caspian steppe and indigenous...... Culture, and of a new dialect, Proto-Germanic. Despite a degree of hostility between expanding Corded Ware groups and indigenous Neolithic groups, stable isotope data suggest that exogamy provided a mechanism facilitating their integration. This article should be read in conjunction with that by Heyd...

  4. Re-theorising mobility and the formation of culture and language among the Corded Ware Culture in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Kristian; Allentoft, Morten E.; Frei, Karin M.

    2017-01-01

    Recent genetic, isotopic and linguistic research has dramatically changed our understanding of how the Corded Ware Culture in Europe was formed. Here the authors explain it in terms of local adaptations and interactions between migrant Yamnaya people from the Pontic-Caspian steppe and indigenous ...

  5. Analysis of late mid-Neolithic pottery illuminates the presenceof a Corded Ware Culture on the Baltic Island of Gotland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Palmgren

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we discuss variations seen in the ornamentation and modes of manufacturing pottery from the end of the mid-Neolithic 4600–4300 BP on the Island of Gotland in the Baltic Sea. The Pitted Ware cultural groups have been discussed as a western influence from the Swedish mainland, but the aDNA on skeletal remains point to eastern influences. We analyse and discuss pottery from the well-investigated Ajvide Pitted Ware site and what these variations mean in term of intra- and inter-island relationships, ethnicity and change, and we suggest the development of what could be described as a hybrid culture.

  6. Spinal-cord swelling in acute multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Seiji; Tashiro, Kunio; Naganuma, Mutsuo; Hida, Kazutoshi; Iwasaki, Yoshinobu; Abe, Hiroshi; Miyasaka, Kazuo

    1986-01-01

    Despite the frequent involvement of the spinal cord by multiple sclerosis, reports concerning neuroradiological findings regarding these lesions have been limited; most of them have demonstrated a normal or small spinal cord. Two cases of acute paraparesis showed evidence of spinal-cord swelling on myelography and CT myelography, initially suggesting the diagnosis of an intramedullary tumor. Spinal-cord swelling was demonstrated more clearly on CT myelography than on conventional myelography. The diagnosis of multiple sclerosis was made with the aid of the CSF findings, the clinical course, and the contracting-cord sign. The ''contracting-cord sign'' means the diminution of the spinal-cord diameter in the chronic stage. Since acute multiple sclerosis may produce spinal-cord swelling simulating a tumor, careful investigations are necessary to avoid unwarranted surgical interventions. (author)

  7. MR imaging of multiple sclerosis in the cervical cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakudo, Miyuki; Takemoto, Kazumasa; Inoue, Yuichi; Onoyama, Yasuto; Nishimura, Masataka; Fujita, Masayuki.

    1987-01-01

    This is a case of a 34-year-old woman with multiple sclerosis (MS) in whom an enlarged cervical spinal cord with long T 1 and T 2 relaxation times was demonstrated on MR images. This report seems to be the first description of MR imaging of MS with an enlarged spinal cord. (author)

  8. Left thoracotomy HeartWare implantation with outflow graft anastomosis to the descending aorta: a simplified bridge for patients with multiple previous sternotomies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umakanthan, Ramanan; Haglund, Nicholas A; Stulak, John M; Joyce, Lyle D; Ahmad, Rashid; Keebler, Mary E; Maltais, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Advances in mechanical circulatory support have been critical in bridging patients awaiting heart transplantation. In addition, improvement in device durability has enabled left ventricular assist device therapy to be applied as destination therapy in those not felt to be transplant candidate. Because of the increasing complexity of patients, there continues to be a need for alternative strategies for device implantation to bridge high-risk patients awaiting heart transplantation, wherein the risks of numerous previous sternotomies may be prohibitive. We present a unique technique for placement of the HeartWare ventricular assist device via left anterior thoracotomy to the descending aorta in a patient awaiting heart transplantation with a history of multiple previous sternotomies.

  9. Spinal cord magnetic resonance imaging in suspected multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lycklama a Nijeholt, G.J.; Bergers, E.; Castelijns, J.A.; Barkhof, F.; Uitdehaag, B.M.J.; Polman, C.H.

    2000-01-01

    We examined the value of spinal cord magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnostic work-up of multiple sclerosis (MS). Forty patients suspected of having MS were examined within 24 months after the start of symptoms. Disability was assessed, and symptoms were categorized as either brain or spinal cord. Work-up further included cerebrospinal fluid analysis and standard proton-density, T2-, and T1-weighted gadolinium-enhanced brain and spinal cord MRI. Patients were categorized as either clinically definite MS (n = 13), laboratory-supported definite MS (n = 14), or clinically probable MS (n = 4); four patients had clinically probable MS, and in nine MS was suspected. Spinal cord abnormalities were found in 35 of 40 patients (87.5 %), consisting of focal lesions in 31, only diffuse abnormalities in two, and both in two. Asymptomatic spinal cord lesions occurred in six patients. All patients with diffuse spinal cord abnormality had clear spinal cord symptoms and a primary progressive disease course. In clinically definite MS, the inclusion of spinal imaging increased the sensitivity of MRI to 100 %. Seven patients without a definite diagnosis had clinically isolated syndromes involving the spinal cord. Brain MRI was inconclusive, while all had focal spinal cord lesions which explained symptoms and ruled out other causes. Two other patients had atypical brain abnormalities suggesting ischemic/vascular disease. No spinal cord abnormalities were found, and during follow-up MS was ruled out. Spinal cord abnormalities are common in suspected MS, and may occur asymptomatic. Although diagnostic classification is seldom changed, spinal cord imaging increases diagnostic sensitivity of MRI in patients with suspected MS. In addition, patients with primary progressive MS may possibly be earlier diagnosed. Finally, differentiation with atypical lesions may be improved. (orig.)

  10. High-field MR imaging of spinal cord multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De La Paz, R.L.; Floris, R.; Norman, D.; Enzmann, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    Fifty-one high-field MR imaging studies (1.5 T, General Electric Signa) of the spinal cord were performed in 42 patients (27 female, 15 male; mean age, 40 years) with clinically definitive (n = 34) or probable (n = 8) multiple sclerosis and suspected spinal cord lesions. MR imaging showed focal spinal cord abnormalities in 38 (75%) of 51 studies. T2-weighted images were abnormal (showing foci of high signal intensity) in 38 studies, T1-weighted images were abnormal (showing areas of low signal intensity or mass effect) in 16 (42%) of 38, and GRASS images were abnormal (showing foci of high signal intensity) in 9 (82%) of 11 cases. Brain MR imaging showed periventricular lesions typical of multiple sclerosis in 34 (81%) of 42 studies. Spinal cord studies were positive in eight cases with normal brain MR images, and brain studies were positive in 13 instances of normal spinal cord MR images. Four lesions were at the cervicomedullary junction, 44 in the cervical spinal cord, and three in the thoracic cord. Mass effect in cord lesions, simulating neoplasm, was seen in seven patients during the acute symptomatic phase. Serial studies in three patients with decreasing symptoms showed a reduction after 3-4 weeks and resolution of the mass effect after 2-6 months

  11. Spinal cord normalization in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jiwon; Seigo, Michaela; Saidha, Shiv; Sotirchos, Elias; Zackowski, Kathy; Chen, Min; Prince, Jerry; Diener-West, Marie; Calabresi, Peter A; Reich, Daniel S

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord (SC) pathology is common in multiple sclerosis (MS), and measures of SC-atrophy are increasingly utilized. Normalization reduces biological variation of structural measurements unrelated to disease, but optimal parameters for SC volume (SCV)-normalization remain unclear. Using a variety of normalization factors and clinical measures, we assessed the effect of SCV normalization on detecting group differences and clarifying clinical-radiological correlations in MS. 3T cervical SC-MRI was performed in 133 MS cases and 11 healthy controls (HC). Clinical assessment included expanded disability status scale (EDSS), MS functional composite (MSFC), quantitative hip-flexion strength ("strength"), and vibration sensation threshold ("vibration"). SCV between C3 and C4 was measured and normalized individually by subject height, SC-length, and intracranial volume (ICV). There were group differences in raw-SCV and after normalization by height and length (MS vs. HC; progressive vs. relapsing MS-subtypes, P normalization by length (EDSS:r = -.43; MSFC:r = .33; strength:r = .38; vibration:r = -.40), and height (EDSS:r = -.26; MSFC:r = .28; strength:r = .22; vibration:r = -.29), but diminished with normalization by ICV (EDSS:r = -.23; MSFC:r = -.10; strength:r = .23; vibration:r = -.35). In relapsing MS, normalization by length allowed statistical detection of correlations that were not apparent with raw-SCV. SCV-normalization by length improves the ability to detect group differences, strengthens clinical-radiological correlations, and is particularly relevant in settings of subtle disease-related SC-atrophy in MS. SCV-normalization by length may enhance the clinical utility of measures of SC-atrophy. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of spinal cord lesions in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Shigeyuki; Yagishita, Toshiyuki; Fukutake, Toshio; Hirayama, Keizo; Fukuda, Nobuo.

    1987-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used in three patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) to demonstrate the longitudinal distribution of demyelinating plaques in the spinal cord and to measure their T1 relaxation time values in these disease processes. Neurological examination allowed the detection of the superior limit of the spinal cord lesions in the three patients, but did not permit detection of the inferior limit in two of the patients. With MRI, however, it was possible to demonstrate the longitudinal distribution of demyelinating plaques in all three patients from coronal or sagittal images using spin echo and inversion recovery pulse sequences. In two patients treated with prednisolone, serial T1 relaxation time values of MS spinal cord lesions were measured from T1 calculated images. In one patient with transverse myelopathy, the T1 relaxation time values of MS spinal cord lesions were significantly increased at a stage of acute exacerbation. This is apparently in contrast with the values at the stage of remission. In the patient with localized cervical myelopathy, the increase in T1 relaxation time values of MS spinal cord lesions at the acute stage was small and significantly different from the values at the remission stage. Several recent reports have indicated that MRI is extremely sensitive in the detection of MS plaques, but most efforts to use MRI in the diagnosis of MS have been concentrated on brain lesions in spite of their frequent associations with spinal cord involvements. It is concluded from our case studies that MRI coronal or sagittal image is useful in demonstrating the longitudinal distribution of MS spinal cord lesions. In addition, serial observations of T1 relaxation time values of MS plaques may be important in assessing the activity of MS plaques and evaluation of the steroid therapy in MS processes. (author)

  13. Axonal loss in the multiple sclerosis spinal cord revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, Natalia; Carassiti, Daniele; Altmann, Daniel R; Baker, David; Schmierer, Klaus

    2018-05-01

    Preventing chronic disease deterioration is an unmet need in people with multiple sclerosis, where axonal loss is considered a key substrate of disability. Clinically, chronic multiple sclerosis often presents as progressive myelopathy. Spinal cord cross-sectional area (CSA) assessed using MRI predicts increasing disability and has, by inference, been proposed as an indirect index of axonal degeneration. However, the association between CSA and axonal loss, and their correlation with demyelination, have never been systematically investigated using human post mortem tissue. We extensively sampled spinal cords of seven women and six men with multiple sclerosis (mean disease duration= 29 years) and five healthy controls to quantify axonal density and its association with demyelination and CSA. 396 tissue blocks were embedded in paraffin and immuno-stained for myelin basic protein and phosphorylated neurofilaments. Measurements included total CSA, areas of (i) lateral cortico-spinal tracts, (ii) gray matter, (iii) white matter, (iv) demyelination, and the number of axons within the lateral cortico-spinal tracts. Linear mixed models were used to analyze relationships. In multiple sclerosis CSA reduction at cervical, thoracic and lumbar levels ranged between 19 and 24% with white (19-24%) and gray (17-21%) matter atrophy contributing equally across levels. Axonal density in multiple sclerosis was lower by 57-62% across all levels and affected all fibers regardless of diameter. Demyelination affected 24-48% of the gray matter, most extensively at the thoracic level, and 11-13% of the white matter, with no significant differences across levels. Disease duration was associated with reduced axonal density, however not with any area index. Significant association was detected between focal demyelination and decreased axonal density. In conclusion, over nearly 30 years multiple sclerosis reduces axonal density by 60% throughout the spinal cord. Spinal cord cross sectional area

  14. Economic Analyses of Ware Yam Production in Orlu Agricultural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Economic Analyses of Ware Yam Production in Orlu Agricultural Zone of Imo State. ... International Journal of Agriculture and Rural Development ... statistics, gross margin analysis, marginal analysis and multiple regression analysis. Results ...

  15. External radiation in spinal cord compression in multiple myeloma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, G.H.; Ayyagiri, S.; Dutta, T.K.; Gupta, B.D.; Gulati, D.R.

    1978-01-01

    The place of radiotherapy in 14 cases of spinal cord compression in multiple myeloma is outlined. The modalities of treatment and the role of surgery and radiation as decompression methods are emphasised. Complete recovery is seen in 50 percent of the patients in this small group with judicious combination of surgical and/or radiation decompression. Chemotherapy as systematic treatment must be given in all the cases after decompression procedures. It is suggested that reactive oedema after irradiation is only speculative and radiation alone as primary treatment may be recommended in selected cases. (author)

  16. External radiation in spinal cord compression in multiple myeloma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, G H; Ayyagiri, S; Dutta, T K; Gupta, B D; Gulati, D R [Post-Graduate Inst. of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh (India). Dept. of Radiotherapy

    1978-02-01

    The place of radiotherapy in 14 cases of spinal cord compression in multiple myeloma is outlined. The modalities of treatment and the role of surgery and radiation as decompression methods are emphasised. Complete recovery is seen in 50 percent of the patients in this small group with judicious combination of surgical and/or radiation decompression. Chemotherapy as systematic treatment must be given in all the cases after decompression procedures. It is suggested that reactive oedema after irradiation is only speculative and radiation alone as primary treatment may be recommended in selected cases.

  17. MR spectroscopy of cervical spinal cord in patients with multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendi, Ayse Tuba Karaguelle; Kendi, Mustafa; Tan, Funda Uysal; Tellioglu, Serdar; Huvaj, Sinef

    2004-01-01

    MR spectroscopy (MRS) of the brain in patients with multiple sclerosis has been well studied. However, in vivo MRS of the spinal cord in patients with MR spectroscopy has not been reported to our knowledge. We performed MRS of normal-appearing cervical spinal cords in multiple sclerosis patients and in healthy controls. N-acetyl aspartate was shown to be reduced within the cervical spinal cord of multiple sclerosis patients when compared with healthy controls. This finding supports axonal loss and damage within even normal-appearing spinal cords of multiple sclerosis patients. (orig.)

  18. Internet ware cloud computing :Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Qamar, S; Lal, Niranjan; Singh, Mrityunjay

    2010-01-01

    After decades of engineering development and infrastructural investment, Internet connections have become commodity product in many countries, and Internet scale “cloud computing” has started to compete with traditional software business through its technological advantages and economy of scale. Cloud computing is a promising enabling technology of Internet ware Cloud Computing is termed as the next big thing in the modern corporate world. Apart from the present day software and technologies,...

  19. KeyWare: an open wireless distributed computing environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpantzer, Isaac; Schoenfeld, Larry; Grindahl, Merv; Kelman, Vladimir

    1995-12-01

    Deployment of distributed applications in the wireless domain lack equivalent tools, methodologies, architectures, and network management that exist in LAN based applications. A wireless distributed computing environment (KeyWareTM) based on intelligent agents within a multiple client multiple server scheme was developed to resolve this problem. KeyWare renders concurrent application services to wireline and wireless client nodes encapsulated in multiple paradigms such as message delivery, database access, e-mail, and file transfer. These services and paradigms are optimized to cope with temporal and spatial radio coverage, high latency, limited throughput and transmission costs. A unified network management paradigm for both wireless and wireline facilitates seamless extensions of LAN- based management tools to include wireless nodes. A set of object oriented tools and methodologies enables direct asynchronous invocation of agent-based services supplemented by tool-sets matched to supported KeyWare paradigms. The open architecture embodiment of KeyWare enables a wide selection of client node computing platforms, operating systems, transport protocols, radio modems and infrastructures while maintaining application portability.

  20. Serial changes of magnetic resonance imaging of spinal cord lesions in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimura, Kimiya; Sekimoto, Yoichi; Koike, Yasuo; Takahashi, Akira

    1987-01-01

    Serial changes of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of spinal cord lesions in multiple sclerosis (MS) were demonstrated. Two inpatients of MS were followed-up for 8 and 5 months respectively. The first case was a 38-year-old housewife with lesions in upper cervical cord, medulla oblongata and visual nerve. The second case was a 45-year-old man with middle thracic spinal cord and brain stem lesions. Both cases were successfully induced into the remission by peroral prednisolone therapy. In the first case, in early stage of the disease, low signal (in IR method) and high signal (in T 2 -weighted SE method) intensities with enlarged lower dorsal medulla were demonstrated. The second MRI in this case specially in horizontal sections revealed round high intensity lesions (in T 2 -weighted SE) with clear margins, which appeared to push away the normal spinal cord tissue. In the third MRI, T 2 weighted SE revealed localized narrowing in C 2 and C 3 cervical cord, and even no signal lesions in IR method were shown in the central of the spinal cord. The forth and fifth MRI, however, showed almost normally recovered spinal cord and medulla oblongata. In the second case, the first MRI revealed high intensity lesions in the middle thracic spinal cord in T 2 weight SE, and moreover, the spinal cord looked very enlarged. In IR method, localized patchy low intensity lesions were seen in the enlarged spinal cord, but in this case, the MRI demonstrated that localized patchy high intensity lesions without cord swelling in SE remained long after the clinically complete recovery of the disease. (author)

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of spinal cord lesions in 22 multiple sclerosis patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Hiroshi; Funakawa, Itaru; Hara, Kenji; Yasuda, Takeshi; Terao, Akira

    1994-01-01

    We reviewed MRI findings in 22 patients (37 cases) with clinically diagnosed multiple sclerosis (MS) with spinal cord lesions. The spinal cord lesions were detected in 17 (46%) of these 37 cases on MRI. The cervical cord lesions were more detectable than other spinal cord lesions. At the thoracic level, the upper lesions were more detectable than the lower ones. In this study, no correlation was found between the disease duration, the rate of functional disturbance and the detectable rate of spinal cord lesions. The characteristic findings of the lesions were swelling and the enhancement effect of Gd-DTPA in the patient group with a disease duration of less than three years, and atrophic change in the patient group with a disease duration of greater than seven years. The period of the enhancement effect of Gd-DTPA varied in each case, and it may reflect the clinical course. Syrinx-like lesions were found in four cases. In one of them, atrophic change was found in the same region six months after the follow up study. Although the precise reason for the syrinx-like lesion was unclear, a relationship between syrinx-like lesion and atrophy of the spinal cord was suggested. The MRI findings of the spinal cord lesions in MS varied in each case and in each stage of the disease. (author)

  2. Spinal cord atrophy in anterior-posterior direction reflects impairment in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundell, H; Svolgaard, O; Dogonowski, A-M

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate how atrophy is distributed over the cross section of the upper cervical spinal cord and how this relates to functional impairment in multiple sclerosis (MS). METHODS: We analysed the structural brain MRI scans of 54 patients with relapsing-remitting MS (n=22), primary...... progressive MS (n=9), secondary progressive MS (n=23) and 23 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. We measured the cross-sectional area (CSA), left-right width (LRW) and anterior-posterior width (APW) of the spinal cord at the segmental level C2. We tested for a nonparametric linear relationship between...... and specific MSIS subscores. CONCLUSION: In patients with MS, atrophy of the upper cervical cord is most evident in the antero-posterior direction. As APW of the cervical cord can be readily derived from standard structural MRI of the brain, APW constitutes a clinically useful neuroimaging marker of disease...

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging features of the spinal cord in pediatric multiple sclerosis: a preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verhey, Leonard H. [Hospital for Sick Children, Neuroscience and Mental Health, Toronto, ON (Canada); University of Toronto, Institute of Medical Science, Faculty of Medicine, Toronto, ON (Canada); Branson, Helen M.; Shroff, Manohar [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging (Neuroradiology), Toronto, ON (Canada); University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Makhija, Monica [Hospital for Sick Children, Neuroscience and Mental Health, Toronto, ON (Canada); Banwell, Brenda [Hospital for Sick Children, Neuroscience and Mental Health, Toronto, ON (Canada); University of Toronto, Institute of Medical Science, Faculty of Medicine, Toronto, ON (Canada); University of Toronto, Department of Pediatrics (Neurology), Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2010-12-15

    Spinal cord lesions in adults with multiple sclerosis (MS) are thought to contribute to disability. The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance and clinical correlates of spinal cord lesions in children with MS have not been reported. T1-weighted pre- and post-gadolinium and T2-weighted TSE/FSE spine MR images of 36 children (age, 14.3 {+-} 3.3) with relapsing-remitting MS (annualized relapse rate, 0.7; disease duration, 7.5 {+-} 3.3 years) were analyzed for total lesion count, lesion location and length, intramedullary extent, and gadolinium enhancement. Clinical, demographic, laboratory, and MRI data were correlated. Lesions preferentially involved the cervical region, were predominantly focal, and involved only a portion of the transverse cord diameter. However, ten of 36 patients demonstrated longitudinally extensive lesions. Children with the highest clinical relapse rate also tended to have more spinal cord lesions and were more likely to accrue new lesions on serial spinal scans. These preliminary data suggest that MS lesions of the spinal cord in children are radiographically similar to that of adult-onset MS - supporting a common biology of pediatric- and adult-onset disease. However, children with relapsing-remitting MS can also develop longitudinally extensive lesions, suggesting that such lesions may be less specific for diseases such as neuromyelitis optica in pediatric patients. All patients recovered well from spinal cord attacks, and the presence of spinal cord lesions in the first few years of disease did not correlate with physical disability. Measures of spinal cord atrophy and longer periods of observation are required to determine the impact of spinal cord involvement in pediatric-onset MS. (orig.)

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging features of the spinal cord in pediatric multiple sclerosis: a preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verhey, Leonard H.; Branson, Helen M.; Shroff, Manohar; Makhija, Monica; Banwell, Brenda

    2010-01-01

    Spinal cord lesions in adults with multiple sclerosis (MS) are thought to contribute to disability. The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance and clinical correlates of spinal cord lesions in children with MS have not been reported. T1-weighted pre- and post-gadolinium and T2-weighted TSE/FSE spine MR images of 36 children (age, 14.3 ± 3.3) with relapsing-remitting MS (annualized relapse rate, 0.7; disease duration, 7.5 ± 3.3 years) were analyzed for total lesion count, lesion location and length, intramedullary extent, and gadolinium enhancement. Clinical, demographic, laboratory, and MRI data were correlated. Lesions preferentially involved the cervical region, were predominantly focal, and involved only a portion of the transverse cord diameter. However, ten of 36 patients demonstrated longitudinally extensive lesions. Children with the highest clinical relapse rate also tended to have more spinal cord lesions and were more likely to accrue new lesions on serial spinal scans. These preliminary data suggest that MS lesions of the spinal cord in children are radiographically similar to that of adult-onset MS - supporting a common biology of pediatric- and adult-onset disease. However, children with relapsing-remitting MS can also develop longitudinally extensive lesions, suggesting that such lesions may be less specific for diseases such as neuromyelitis optica in pediatric patients. All patients recovered well from spinal cord attacks, and the presence of spinal cord lesions in the first few years of disease did not correlate with physical disability. Measures of spinal cord atrophy and longer periods of observation are required to determine the impact of spinal cord involvement in pediatric-onset MS. (orig.)

  5. Substantial Early, But Nonprogressive Neuronal Loss in Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Spinal Cord

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schirmer, Lucas; Albert, Monika; Buss, Armin; Schulz-Schaeffer, Walter J.; Antel, Jack P.; Brueck, Wolfgang; Stadelmann, Christine

    2009-01-01

    Research in multiple sclerosis (MS) has recently been focusing on the extent of neuroaxonal damage and its contribution to disease outcome. In the present Study, we examined spinal cord tissue from 30 clinically well-characterized MS patients. MS, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and control

  6. Spinal cord atrophy in anterior-posterior direction reflects impairment in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundell, H; Svolgaard, O; Dogonowski, A-M; Romme Christensen, J; Selleberg, F; Soelberg Sørensen, P; Blinkenberg, M; Siebner, H R; Garde, E

    2017-10-01

    To investigate how atrophy is distributed over the cross section of the upper cervical spinal cord and how this relates to functional impairment in multiple sclerosis (MS). We analysed the structural brain MRI scans of 54 patients with relapsing-remitting MS (n=22), primary progressive MS (n=9), secondary progressive MS (n=23) and 23 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. We measured the cross-sectional area (CSA), left-right width (LRW) and anterior-posterior width (APW) of the spinal cord at the segmental level C2. We tested for a nonparametric linear relationship between these atrophy measures and clinical impairments as reflected by the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) and Multiple Sclerosis Impairment Scale (MSIS). In patients with MS, CSA and APW but not LRW were reduced compared to healthy controls (P<.02) and showed significant correlations with EDSS, MSIS and specific MSIS subscores. In patients with MS, atrophy of the upper cervical cord is most evident in the antero-posterior direction. As APW of the cervical cord can be readily derived from standard structural MRI of the brain, APW constitutes a clinically useful neuroimaging marker of disease-related neurodegeneration in MS. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Short-term evolution of spinal cord damage in multiple sclerosis: a diffusion tensor MRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theaudin, M.; Denier, C.; Adams, D. [AP-HP, CHU Bicetre, Service de Neurologie Adultes, Le Kremlin-Bicetre (France); INSERM, UMR788, Faculte de Medecine Paris Sud, Le Kremlin-Bicetre (France); Saliou, G. [AP-HP, CHU Bicetre, Service de Neuroradiologie, Le Kremlin-Bicetre (France); Ducot, B. [INSERM, U1018, CESP Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health, Faculte de Medecine Paris Sud, Le Kremlin-Bicetre (France); Deiva, K. [Service de Neuropediatrie, Le Kremlin-Bicetre (France); Ducreux, D. [INSERM, UMR788, Faculte de Medecine Paris Sud, Le Kremlin-Bicetre (France); AP-HP, CHU Bicetre, Service de Neuroradiologie, Le Kremlin-Bicetre (France)

    2012-10-15

    The potential of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to detect spinal cord abnormalities in patients with multiple sclerosis has already been demonstrated. The objective of this study was to apply DTI techniques to multiple sclerosis patients with a recently diagnosed spinal cord lesion, in order to demonstrate a correlation between variations of DTI parameters and clinical outcome, and to try to identify DTI parameters predictive of outcome. A prospective single-centre study of patients with spinal cord relapse treated by intravenous steroid therapy was made. Patients were assessed clinically and by conventional MRI with DTI sequences at baseline and at 3 months. Sixteen patients were recruited. At 3 months, 12 patients were clinically improved. All but one patient had lower fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values than normal subjects in either inflammatory lesions or normal-appearing spinal cord. Patients who improved at 3 months presented a significant reduction in the radial diffusivity (p = 0.05) in lesions during the follow-up period. They also had a significant reduction in the mean ADC (p = 0.002), axial diffusivity (p = 0.02), radial diffusivity (p = 0.02) and a significant increase in FA values (p = 0.02) in normal-appearing spinal cord. Patients in whom the American Spinal Injury Association sensory score improved at 3 months showed a significantly higher FA (p = 0.009) and lower radial diffusivity (p = 0.04) in inflammatory lesion at baseline compared to patients with no improvement. DTI MRI detects more extensive abnormalities than conventional T2 MRI. A less marked decrease in FA value and more marked decreased in radial diffusivity inside the inflammatory lesion were associated with better outcome. (orig.)

  8. Short-term evolution of spinal cord damage in multiple sclerosis: a diffusion tensor MRI study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theaudin, M.; Denier, C.; Adams, D.; Saliou, G.; Ducot, B.; Deiva, K.; Ducreux, D.

    2012-01-01

    The potential of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to detect spinal cord abnormalities in patients with multiple sclerosis has already been demonstrated. The objective of this study was to apply DTI techniques to multiple sclerosis patients with a recently diagnosed spinal cord lesion, in order to demonstrate a correlation between variations of DTI parameters and clinical outcome, and to try to identify DTI parameters predictive of outcome. A prospective single-centre study of patients with spinal cord relapse treated by intravenous steroid therapy was made. Patients were assessed clinically and by conventional MRI with DTI sequences at baseline and at 3 months. Sixteen patients were recruited. At 3 months, 12 patients were clinically improved. All but one patient had lower fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values than normal subjects in either inflammatory lesions or normal-appearing spinal cord. Patients who improved at 3 months presented a significant reduction in the radial diffusivity (p = 0.05) in lesions during the follow-up period. They also had a significant reduction in the mean ADC (p = 0.002), axial diffusivity (p = 0.02), radial diffusivity (p = 0.02) and a significant increase in FA values (p = 0.02) in normal-appearing spinal cord. Patients in whom the American Spinal Injury Association sensory score improved at 3 months showed a significantly higher FA (p = 0.009) and lower radial diffusivity (p = 0.04) in inflammatory lesion at baseline compared to patients with no improvement. DTI MRI detects more extensive abnormalities than conventional T2 MRI. A less marked decrease in FA value and more marked decreased in radial diffusivity inside the inflammatory lesion were associated with better outcome. (orig.)

  9. Intrathecal baclofen in multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury: complications and long-term dosage evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draulans, Nathalie; Vermeersch, Kristof; Degraeuwe, Bart; Meurrens, Tom; Peers, Koen; Nuttin, Bart; Kiekens, Carlotte

    2013-12-01

    To investigate the long-term dosage evolution and complication rate of intrathecal baclofen use in multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury patients, based on a large population with a long follow-up. Retrospective data analysis. Academic hospital. Patients with multiple sclerosis (n = 81) or spinal cord injury (n = 49) having an intrathecal baclofen pump implanted at the University Hospitals Leuven between 1988 and 2009. Medical records review of included patients in August 2010. Complications linked to intrathecal baclofen therapy. Daily baclofen dosage after 3 and 6 months, and yearly thereafter. Data on dosage evolution were analysed using a mixed-effect linear model. In 130 patients with a mean follow-up of 63 months, comprising 797 pump years, 104 complications were recorded. This corresponds to a complication rate of 0.011 per month, equally divided among both groups. Seventy-eight of these complications were catheter related. The mean dosage of baclofen stabilizes two years after implantation at 323 µg/day in the multiple sclerosis population. In spinal cord injury patients the daily dose only stabilizes after five years at a significantly higher dosage (504 µg/day). No significant increase in dosage is seen in the long term. In multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury patients, intrathecal baclofen therapy has a complication rate of 1% per month. Complications are mainly due to catheter-related problems (74%). The intrathecal baclofen dosage stabilizes in the long term, indicating that long-term tolerance, defined as progressive diminution of the susceptibility to the effects of a drug, is not present.

  10. Magnetisation transfer ratio measurement in the cervical spinal cord: a preliminary study in multiple sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silver, N.C. [NMR Research Unit and Department of Clinical Neurology, Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG (United Kingdom); Barker, G.J. [NMR Research Unit and Department of Clinical Neurology, Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG (United Kingdom); Losseff, N.A. [NMR Research Unit and Department of Clinical Neurology, Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG (United Kingdom); Gawne-Cain, M.L. [NMR Research Unit and Department of Clinical Neurology, Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG (United Kingdom); MacManus, D.G. [NMR Research Unit and Department of Clinical Neurology, Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG (United Kingdom); Thompson, A.J. [NMR Research Unit and Department of Clinical Neurology, Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG (United Kingdom); Miller, D.H. [NMR Research Unit and Department of Clinical Neurology, Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG (United Kingdom)

    1997-06-01

    MRI readily detects the lesions of multiple sclerosis (MS) in the brain and spinal cord. Conventional MRI sequences do not, however, permit distinction between the various pathological characteristics (oedema, demyelination, axonal loss and gliosis) of lesions in MS. Magnetisation transfer (MT) imaging may be more specific in distinguishing the pathologies responsible for disability in MS, namely demyelination and axonal loss, and therefore may have a potential role in monitoring treatment. We have applied MT imaging to the cervical spinal cord to see if it is feasible to measure MT ratios (MTR) in this region where pathological changes may result in considerable disability. We studied 12 patients with MS and 12 age- and sex-matched normal controls using a sagittal T2-weighted fast spin-echo sequence with and without an MT pulse. The median value for cervical cord mean MTR measurement in normal controls was 19.30 % units (interquartile range 19.05-19.55), whereas values were significantly lower in MS patients (median = 17.95 % units, interquartile range 17.25-19.00, P = 0.0004). There was a low intrarater variability for repeated mean MTR measurements. We conclude that it is possible to measure MTR in the cervical spinal cord, that a significant reduction occurs in patients with MS, and that there may be a role for this measure in future MS treatment trials. (orig.). With 2 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Magnetisation transfer ratio measurement in the cervical spinal cord: a preliminary study in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, N.C.; Barker, G.J.; Losseff, N.A.; Gawne-Cain, M.L.; MacManus, D.G.; Thompson, A.J.; Miller, D.H.

    1997-01-01

    MRI readily detects the lesions of multiple sclerosis (MS) in the brain and spinal cord. Conventional MRI sequences do not, however, permit distinction between the various pathological characteristics (oedema, demyelination, axonal loss and gliosis) of lesions in MS. Magnetisation transfer (MT) imaging may be more specific in distinguishing the pathologies responsible for disability in MS, namely demyelination and axonal loss, and therefore may have a potential role in monitoring treatment. We have applied MT imaging to the cervical spinal cord to see if it is feasible to measure MT ratios (MTR) in this region where pathological changes may result in considerable disability. We studied 12 patients with MS and 12 age- and sex-matched normal controls using a sagittal T2-weighted fast spin-echo sequence with and without an MT pulse. The median value for cervical cord mean MTR measurement in normal controls was 19.30 % units (interquartile range 19.05-19.55), whereas values were significantly lower in MS patients (median = 17.95 % units, interquartile range 17.25-19.00, P 0.0004). There was a low intrarater variability for repeated mean MTR measurements. We conclude that it is possible to measure MTR in the cervical spinal cord, that a significant reduction occurs in patients with MS, and that there may be a role for this measure in future MS treatment trials. (orig.). With 2 figs., 1 tab

  12. Functional Brain Connectivity during Multiple Motor Imagery Tasks in Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alkinoos Athanasiou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Reciprocal communication of the central and peripheral nervous systems is compromised during spinal cord injury due to neurotrauma of ascending and descending pathways. Changes in brain organization after spinal cord injury have been associated with differences in prognosis. Changes in functional connectivity may also serve as injury biomarkers. Most studies on functional connectivity have focused on chronic complete injury or resting-state condition. In our study, ten right-handed patients with incomplete spinal cord injury and ten age- and gender-matched healthy controls performed multiple visual motor imagery tasks of upper extremities and walking under high-resolution electroencephalography recording. Directed transfer function was used to study connectivity at the cortical source space between sensorimotor nodes. Chronic disruption of reciprocal communication in incomplete injury could result in permanent significant decrease of connectivity in a subset of the sensorimotor network, regardless of positive or negative neurological outcome. Cingulate motor areas consistently contributed the larger outflow (right and received the higher inflow (left among all nodes, across all motor imagery categories, in both groups. Injured subjects had higher outflow from left cingulate than healthy subjects and higher inflow in right cingulate than healthy subjects. Alpha networks were less dense, showing less integration and more segregation than beta networks. Spinal cord injury patients showed signs of increased local processing as adaptive mechanism. This trial is registered with NCT02443558.

  13. Motor conduction velocity in the human spinal cord: slowed conduction in multiple sclerosis and radiation myelopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snooks, S.J.; Swash, M.

    1985-01-01

    Transcutaneous electrical stimulation of the central nervous system was used to measure motor conduction velocity in the human spinal cord in 21 subjects aged 22 to 75 years (mean 55 years), none of whom had neurological disease. The motor conduction velocity between the sixth cervical (C6) and first lumbar (L1) vertebral levels was 67.4+-9.1 m/s. This probably represents conduction velocity in the corticospinal tracts. In these subjects the motor conduction velocity in the cauda equina, between the first lumbar (L1) and fourth lumbar (L4) vertebral levels, was 57.9+-10.3 m/s. In four of five patients with multiple sclerosis, all with corticospinal signs in the legs, motor conduction velocity between C6 and L1 was slowed (41.8+-16.8 m/s), but cauda equina conduction was normal (55.8+-7.8 m/s). Similar slowing of spinal cord motor conduction was found in a patient with radiation myelopathy. This method should provide a relevant, simple clinical test in patients with spinal cord disease. (author)

  14. The cuisine of the Pitted Ware Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philippsen, Bente; Persson, Per

    The Pitted Ware Culture is a Middle Neolithic culture in southwestern Scandinavia. It appears about thousand years after the introduction of agriculture to this area. In some regions, it is characterized by an almost fully “Mesolithic” economy with a heavy reliance on seal hunting. In Djursland, ...

  15. Waring's Problem and the Circle Method

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    other interests include classical music and mountaineering. the problems they worked on. Their proof of a slightly. Keywords weaker form of Ramanujan's original formula was pub-. Waring's problem, circle method, ... arc is fairly simple while it is the minor arc estimation that accounts for the 'major' amount of work involved!

  16. THE COMPLEX TREATMENT OF THE PATIENT WITH MULTIPLE SPINE AND SPINAL CORD MALFORMATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Vissarionov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical case of the patient with the congenital deformation of thoracic and lumbar parts of the spine due to multiple congenital anomalies of vertebrae (disturbance of formation, fusion and segmentation, a terminale filum lipoma at the level of L5, tethered cord, rightside lower leg monoparesis. Multistage surgical treatment was performed: removing of intracanal deformity, correction and stabilization of the deformity at the thoracic and lumbar part of the spine. Patient was followed up during 2,5 years after the last step of the surgical operation. No evidence of recurrence or neurological deterioration were observed.

  17. Imaging spinal cord atrophy in progressive myelopathies: HTLV-I-associated neurological disease (HAM/TSP) and multiple sclerosis (MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azodi, Shila; Nair, Govind; Enose-Akahata, Yoshimi; Charlip, Emily; Vellucci, Ashley; Cortese, Irene; Dwyer, Jenifer; Billioux, B Jeanne; Thomas, Chevaz; Ohayon, Joan; Reich, Daniel S; Jacobson, Steven

    2017-11-01

    Previous work measures spinal cord thinning in chronic progressive myelopathies, including human T-lymphotropic virus 1 (HTLV-1)-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) and multiple sclerosis (MS). Quantitative measurements of spinal cord atrophy are important in fully characterizing these and other spinal cord diseases. We aimed to investigate patterns of spinal cord atrophy and correlations with clinical markers. Spinal cord cross-sectional area was measured in individuals (24 healthy controls [HCs], 17 asymptomatic carriers of HTLV-1 (AC), 47 HAM/TSP, 74 relapsing-remitting MS [RRMS], 17 secondary progressive MS [SPMS], and 40 primary progressive MS [PPMS]) from C1 to T10. Clinical disability scores, viral markers, and immunological parameters were obtained for patients and correlated with representative spinal cord cross-sectional area regions at the C2 to C3, C4 to C5, and T4 to T9 levels. In 2 HAM/TSP patients, spinal cord cross-sectional area was measured over 3 years. All spinal cord regions are thinner in HAM/TSP (56 mm 2 [standard deviation, 10], 59 [10], 23 [5]) than in HC (76 [7], 83 [8], 38 [4]) and AC (71 [7], 78 [9], 36 [7]). SPMS (62 [9], 66 [9], 32 [6]) and PPMS (65 [11], 68 [10], 35 [7]) have thinner cervical cords than HC and RRMS (73 [9], 77 [10], 37 [6]). Clinical disability scores (Expanded Disability Status Scale [p = 0.009] and Instituto de Pesquisas de Cananeia [p = 0.03]) and CD8 + T-cell frequency (p = 0.04) correlate with T4 to T9 spinal cord cross-sectional area in HAM/TSP. Higher cerebrospinal fluid HTLV-1 proviral load (p = 0.01) was associated with thinner spinal cord cross-sectional area. Both HAM/TSP patients followed longitudinally showed thoracic thinning followed by cervical thinning. Group average spinal cord cross-sectional area in HAM/TSP and progressive MS show spinal cord atrophy. We further hypothesize in HAM/TSP that is possible that neuroglial loss from a thoracic inflammatory

  18. Neurogenic bowel dysfunction in patients with spinal cord injury, myelomeningocele, multiple sclerosis and Parkinson's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Richard A Awad

    2011-01-01

    Exciting new features have been described concerning neurogenic bowel dysfunction, including interactions between the central nervous system, the enteric nervous system, axonal injury, neuronal loss, neurotransmission of noxious and non-noxious stimuli, and the fields of gastroenterology and neurology. Patients with spinal cord injury, myelomeningocele, multiple sclerosis and Parkinson's disease present with serious upper and lower bowel dysfunctions characterized by constipation, incontinence, gastrointestinal motor dysfunction and altered visceral sensitivity. Spinal cord injury is associated with severe autonomic dysfunction, and bowel dysfunction is a major physical and psychological burden for these patients. An adult myelomeningocele patient commonly has multiple problems reflecting the multisystemic nature of the disease. Multiple sclerosis is a neurodegenerative disorder in which axonal injury, neuronal loss, and atrophy of the central nervous system can lead to permanent neurological damage and clinical disability. Parkinson's disease is a multisystem disorder involving dopaminergic, noradrenergic, serotoninergic and cholinergic systems, characterized by motor and non-motor symptoms. Parkinson's disease affects several neuronal structures outside the substantia nigra, among which is the enteric nervous system. Recent reports have shown that the lesions in the enteric nervous system occur in very early stages of the disease, even before the involvement of the central nervous system. This has led to the postulation that the enteric nervous system could be critical in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease, as it could represent the point of entry for a putative environmental factor to initiate the pathological process. This review covers the data related to the etiology, epidemiology, clinical expression, pathophysiology, genetic aspects, gastrointestinal motor dysfunction, visceral sensitivity, management, prevention and prognosis of neurogenic bowel

  19. Acrolein detection: potential theranostic utility in multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tully, Melissa; Zheng, Lingxing; Shi, Riyi

    2014-06-01

    Oxidative stress has been implicated as a major pathological process underlying CNS disease and trauma. More specifically, acrolein, an unsaturated aldehyde, produced by way of lipid peroxidation, has been shown to play a crucial role in initiating and perpetuating detrimental effects associated with multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury. In light of these findings, quantification of acrolein levels both systemically and locally could allow for the use of acrolein as a biomarker to aid in diagnosis and guide treatment regimens. The three main approaches currently available are acrolein derivatization followed by LC/GC-MS, application of an acrolein antibody and subsequent immunoblotting, and the 3-hydroxypropylmercapturic acid-based method. Of these three strategies, the 3-hydroxypropylmercapturic acid-based method is the least invasive allowing for rapid translation of acrolein detection into a clinical setting.

  20. RBE for late spinal cord injury following multiple fractions of neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geraci, J.P.; Jackson, K.L.; Christensen, G.M.; Thrower, P.D.; Mariano, M.

    1978-01-01

    Using the length of the time interval between the irradiation of lumbosacral spinal cord of mice with ten fractions of either x rays or neutrons, and the onset of hindquarter paralysis, a fast neutron RBE of 3.5 for spinal cord damage at a neutron dose per fraction of 100 rad has been measured. This RBE for spinal cord injury is significant because it is larger than the RBE being used to calculate treatment doses in neutron radiotherapy

  1. Community integration outcomes of people with spinal cord injury and multiple matched controls: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaway, Libby; Enticott, Joanne; Farnworth, Louise; McDonald, Rachael; Migliorini, Christine; Willer, Barry

    2017-06-01

    Australia's National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) is designed to influence home, social and economic participation for Scheme participants. Given the major disability reform underway, this pilot study aimed to: (i) examine community integration outcomes of people with spinal cord injury (SCI); (ii) compare findings with multiple matched controls and (iii) consider findings within the context of Australia's NDIS. Setting: Victoria, Australia. Matched analysis (people with and without SCI). Community Integration Questionnaire (CIQ). n = 40 adults with SCI (M age = 52.8 years; 61% male; 77% traumatic SCI). Matched analyses from each SCI subject aged integration (ρ = 0.02). Relative risk of low home integration was significant in the SCI cohort (conditional RR (95% CI) = 3.1 (1.5-6.3), ρ = 0.001). Relative risk of low CIQ total, social integration and productivity scores did not reach significance. This cohort of SCI participants was less integrated into home and productive occupations than matched norms, holding implications for planning and allocation of supports to influence outcomes within an NDIS. Further research is necessary to understand community integration outcomes in larger matched samples. © 2016 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  2. Extending technology-aided leisure and communication programs to persons with spinal cord injury and post-coma multiple disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancioni, Giulio E; Singh, Nirbhay N; O'Reilly, Mark F; Sigafoos, Jeff; Ricciuti, Riccardo A; Trignani, Roberto; Oliva, Doretta; Signorino, Mario; D'Amico, Fiora; Sasanelli, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    These two studies extended technology-aided programs to promote leisure and communication opportunities to a man with cervical spinal cord injury and a post-coma man with multiple disabilities. The studies involved the use of ABAB designs, in which A and B represented baseline and intervention phases, respectively. The programs focused on enabling the participants to activate songs, videos, requests, text messages, and telephone calls. These options were presented on a computer screen and activated through a small pressure microswitch by the man with spinal cord injury and a special touch screen by the post-coma man. To help the latter participant, who had no verbal skills, with requests and telephone calls, series of words and phrases were made available that he could activate in those situations. Data showed that both participants were successful in managing the programs arranged for them. The man with spinal cord injury activated mean frequencies of above five options per 10-min session. The post-coma man activated mean frequencies of about 12 options per 20-min session. Technology-aided programs for promoting leisure and communication opportunities might be successfully tailored to persons with spinal cord injury and persons with post-coma multiple disabilities. Implications for Rehabilitation Technology-aided programs may be critical to enable persons with pervasive motor impairment to engage in leisure activities and communication events independently. Persons with spinal cord injury, post-coma extended brain damage, and forms of neurodegenerative disease, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, may benefit from those programs. The programs could be adapted to the participants' characteristics, both in terms of technology and contents, so as to improve their overall impact on the participants' functioning and general mood.

  3. Spinal cord lesion by minor trauma as an early sign of Multiple System Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa Tavares Brum

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Multiple System Atrophy (MSA is characterized clinically by parkinsonism, cerebellar, autonomic and corticospinal features of variable severity. When the presentation is only parkinsonism, the disease might be difficult to differentiate from Parkinson´s Disease (PD. We present a case of an 80-year-old man with previous diagnosis of PD. One year after diagnosis he had a whiplash cervical trauma due to a tricycle accident caused by a hole in the road. This low-energy trauma caused an unstable C4-C5 cervical fracture with spinal cord injury which required surgical decompression and stabilization. Neurological examination showed marked postural instability, no rest and postural tremor, finger tapping slowed on the right, spastic tetraparesis (ASIA D—predominantly on the left side—, brisk deep tendon reflexes in the upper and lower extremities and bilateral extensor plantar response. He also presented with vertical gaze restriction, mild hypometria in horizontal saccades, moderate dysphagia and dysphonia. As atypical parkinsonism was suspected he underwent an MRI which revealed conjunction of findings suggestive of parkinsonian-type multiple system atrophy (MSA. In our case we hypothesise that the loss of postural reflexes, as an early manifestation of MSA, did not allow the patient to have an effective reaction response to a low-energy trauma, resulting in a more severe injury. With this case report we speculate that the severe spinal lesions caused by minor accidents can be an early sign of postural instability, which may lead to clinical suspicion of neurodegenerative disorder manifested by postural reflexes impairment.

  4. Understanding suicide and disability through three major disabling conditions: Intellectual disability, spinal cord injury, and multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannini, Margaret J; Bergmark, Brian; Kreshover, Samantha; Elias, Eileen; Plummer, Caitlin; O'Keefe, Eileen

    2010-04-01

    Disability is not a category of disease but rather relates to the physical, sensory, cognitive, and/or mental disorders that substantially limit one or more major life activities. These functional limitations have been found to be predictive of suicide, with psychiatric comorbidities increasing the risk for suicide. Enormous gaps exist in the understanding of the relationship between disability and suicide. We reviewed the current literature addressing the prevalence of and risk factors for suicide among persons with three major disabling conditions and identify priorities for future research. We performed a literature review investigating the relationship between three major disabilities (intellectual disability, spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis) and suicide. To ensure thorough evaluation of the available literature, we searched PubMed, the Cochrane Library, and Google Scholar with terms including "suicide," "disability," "intellectual disability," "spinal cord injury," "multiple sclerosis," and permutations thereof. By this method we evaluated 110 articles and included 21 in the review. Suicide rates are significantly higher among persons with multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury than in the general population. A more nuanced picture of suicide rates and risk factors exists for the intellectual disability population, in which it appears that rates of suicide risk factors are higher than among the general population while suicide rates may be lower. The highest rates of suicide are reported among study populations of persons with multiple sclerosis, followed by persons with spinal cord injury, and then individuals with intellectual disability. Suicide among persons with disabilities is a complex and pressing public health concern. Urgent research priorities include (1) valid estimates of suicide rates among persons with disabilities by age cohort; (2) assessment of the predictive importance of suicide risk factors; and (3) determination of best

  5. The cervical spinal cord in neuromyelitis optica patients: A comparative study with multiple sclerosis using diffusion tensor imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pessôa, Fernanda Miraldi Clemente, E-mail: fernandamiraldi@hotmail.com [Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Medical Student, Rua Rodolpho Paulo Rocco, 255, Cidade Universitária, Ilha do Fundão, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Lopes, Fernanda Cristina Rueda, E-mail: frueda81@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Avenida das Américas, 4666 sl 325, Barra da Tijuca, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Costa, João Victor Altamiro, E-mail: victoraltamiro@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rua Rodolpho Paulo Rocco, 255, Cidade Universitária, Ilha do Fundão, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Leon, Soniza Vieira Alves, E-mail: sonizavleon@globo.com [Department of Neurology, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rua Rodolpho Paulo Rocco, 255, Cidade Universitária, Ilha do Fundão, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Domingues, Romeu Côrtes, E-mail: romeu@CDPi.com.br [CDPI – Clínica de Diagnóstico Por Imagem, Avenida das Américas, 4666 sl 325, Barra da Tijuca, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Gasparetto, Emerson Leandro, E-mail: egasparetto@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Avenida das Américas, 4666 sl 325, Barra da Tijuca, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); CDPI – Clínica de Diagnóstico Por Imagem, Avenida das Américas, 4666 sl 325, Barra da Tijuca, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-10-15

    Introduction: This study aims to evaluate “in vivo” the integrity of the normal-appearing spinal cord in patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO), using diffusion tensor MR imaging, comparing to controls and patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Materials and methods: We studied 8 patients with NMO and 17 without any neurologic disorder. Also, 32 MS patients were selected. Fractional anisotropy (FA), axial diffusivity (AD), radial diffusivity (RD) and mean diffusivity (MD) were calculated within regions of interest at C2 and C7 levels in the four columns of the spinal cord. Results: At C2, the FA value was decreased in NMO patients compared to MS and controls in the anterior column. Also in this column, RD value showed increase in NMO compared to MS and to controls. The FA value of the posterior column was decreased in NMO in comparison to controls. At C7, AD value was higher in NMO than in MS in the right column. At the same column, MD values were increased in NMO compared to MS and to controls. Conclusions: There is extensive NASC damage in NMO patients, including peripheral areas of the cervical spinal cord, affecting the white matter, mainly caused by demyelination. This suggests a new spinal cord lesion pattern in NMO in comparison to MS.

  6. The cervical spinal cord in neuromyelitis optica patients: A comparative study with multiple sclerosis using diffusion tensor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pessôa, Fernanda Miraldi Clemente; Lopes, Fernanda Cristina Rueda; Costa, João Victor Altamiro; Leon, Soniza Vieira Alves; Domingues, Romeu Côrtes; Gasparetto, Emerson Leandro

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: This study aims to evaluate “in vivo” the integrity of the normal-appearing spinal cord in patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO), using diffusion tensor MR imaging, comparing to controls and patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Materials and methods: We studied 8 patients with NMO and 17 without any neurologic disorder. Also, 32 MS patients were selected. Fractional anisotropy (FA), axial diffusivity (AD), radial diffusivity (RD) and mean diffusivity (MD) were calculated within regions of interest at C2 and C7 levels in the four columns of the spinal cord. Results: At C2, the FA value was decreased in NMO patients compared to MS and controls in the anterior column. Also in this column, RD value showed increase in NMO compared to MS and to controls. The FA value of the posterior column was decreased in NMO in comparison to controls. At C7, AD value was higher in NMO than in MS in the right column. At the same column, MD values were increased in NMO compared to MS and to controls. Conclusions: There is extensive NASC damage in NMO patients, including peripheral areas of the cervical spinal cord, affecting the white matter, mainly caused by demyelination. This suggests a new spinal cord lesion pattern in NMO in comparison to MS

  7. Structural abnormalities and altered regional brain activity in multiple sclerosis with simple spinal cord involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ping; Liu, Yi; Xiong, Hua; Han, Yongliang; Sah, Shambhu Kumar; Zeng, Chun; Wang, Jingjie; Li, Yongmei

    2018-02-01

    To assess the changes of the structural and functional abnormalities in multiple sclerosis with simple spinal cord involvement (MS-SSCI) by using resting-state functional MRI (RS-fMRI), voxel based morphology (VBM) and diffusion tensor tractography. The amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF) of 22 patients with MS-SSCI and 22 healthy controls (HCs) matched for age, gender and education were compared by using RS-fMRI. We also compared the volume, fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient of the brain regions in baseline brain activity by using VBM and diffusion tensor imaging. The relationships between the expanded disability states scale (EDSS) scores, changed parameters of structure and function were further explored. (1) Compared with HCs, the ALFF of the bilateral hippocampus and right middle temporal gyrus in MS-SSCI decreased significantly. However, patients exhibited increased ALFF in the left middle frontal gyrus, left posterior cingulate gyrus and right middle occipital gyrus ( two-sample t-test, after AlphaSim correction, p 40). The volume of right middle frontal gyrus reduced significantly (p right hippocampus, the FA of left hippocampus and right middle temporal gyrus were significantly different. (2) A significant correlation between EDSS scores and ALFF was noted only in the left posterior cingulate gyrus. Our results detected structural and functional abnormalities in MS-SSCI and functional parameters were associated with clinical abnormalities. Multimodal imaging plays an important role in detecting structural and functional abnormalities in MS-SSCI. Advances in knowledge: This is the first time to apply RS-fMRI, VBM and diffusion tensor tractography to study the structural and functional abnormalities in MS-SSCI, and to explore its correlation with EDSS score.

  8. 78 FR 60245 - Privacy Act Systems of Records; LabWare Laboratory Information Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    ... of Records; LabWare Laboratory Information Management System AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health... system of records, entitled LabWare Laboratory Information Management System (LabWare LIMS), to maintain... Affairs, OMB. Thomas J. Vilsack, Secretary. SYSTEM NAME: LabWare Laboratory Information Management System...

  9. Comparison of MRI sequences for evaluation of multiple sclerosis of the cervical spinal cord at 3 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philpott, Cristina; Brotchie, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Debate remains regarding the utility of the traditional STIR (short inversion time recovery) sequence in aiding MRI diagnosis of spinal cord lesions in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and this sequence is not included in the current imaging guidelines. A recent study proposed a T1 weighted STIR as a superior alternative to the traditional STIR and T2 fast spin echo (FSE). Thus, the aim of this study was to compare the sensitivity of T2, standard STIR and T1 weighted STIR sequences in the evaluation of MS plaques on our 3 T system. Methods and materials: A retrospective analysis of patients with multiple sclerosis who presented to our institution over a period of 5 months and who had cervical cord lesions was undertaken. Patients had been examined with our institutional protocol which included T2 FSE, STIR and the recommended T1 STIR. Quantitative analysis of the lesions versus background cord using sample T-tests was performed for each sequence, and comparative analysis of the lesion contrast:background cord ratios of the 3 sequences (using two-way ANOVA tests) was performed. Results: The T2 sequence was not as sensitive in detecting lesions versus the traditional STIR and T1 weighted STIR, with 10% of lesions not detected using statistical analysis (p < 0.05). The traditional STIR also demonstrated greater contrast ratios than the T2 sequence (p < 0.05) suggesting increased sensitivity. However, the T1 STIR demonstrated even greater contrast ratios than both the traditional STIR and T2 sequences (p < 0.05). Conclusion: This study confirms earlier findings of the traditional STIRs increased sensitivity versus the T2 sequence. However, the new “T1 weighted STIR” appears to be even more sensitive than both these sequences showing potential promise as an alternative method to monitor demyelinating plaques of MS.

  10. Archaeological and chemical analysis of Tell el Yahudiyeh ware

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, M.F.; Harbottle, G.; Sayre, E.V.

    1978-01-01

    Typological and geographic analyses indicate that Tell el Yahudiyeh ware (found in Cyprus, Egypt, Nubia, and the Levant during the Middle Bronze period, c. 1750-1550 B.C.) were probably manufactured in two areas, the Nile Valley and the Levant. Activation analysis was carried out and correlated with the archaeological analyses. Results confirm the two ''families'' of the ware, one Egyptian and one Levantine. Speculations are offered on the social interaction of the period. 11 figures, 2 tables

  11. MRI in multiple sclerosis of the spinal cord: evaluation of fast short-tan inversion-recovery and spin-echo sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietemann, J.L.; Thibaut-Menard, A.; Neugroschl, C.; Gillis, C.; Abu Eid, M.; Bogorin, A.; Warter, J.M.; Tranchant, C.

    2000-01-01

    We compared the sensitivity of T2-weighted spin-echo (FSE) and fast short-tau inversion-recovery (fSTIR) sequences in detection of multiple sclerosis of the spinal cord in 100 consecutive patients with clinically confirmed multiple sclerosis (MS); 86 patients underwent also brain MRI. In all, 310 focal lesions were detected on fSTIR and 212 on T2-weighted FSE, spinal cord lesions were seen better on fSTIR images, with a higher contrast between the lesion and the normal spinal cord. In 24 patients in whom cord plaques were shown with both sequences, the cranial study was normal or inconclusive. Assessment of spinal plaques can be particularly important when MRI of the brain is inconclusive, and in there situations fSTIR can be helpful. (orig.)

  12. Multiple actions of iontophoretically applied serotonin on motorneurones in the turtle spinal cord in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skydsgaard, Morten Arnika; Hounsgaard, J

    1996-01-01

    The effects of focal activation of serotonergic receptors in motorneurones were investigated in a slice preparation of the turtle spinal cord. The test response to glutamate evoked from a dendrite by iontophoresis was attenuated by serotonin or 8-hydroxy-dipropyl-aminotetralin (8-OH-DPAT) applied...

  13. Multiple roles for apoptosis facilitating condensation of the Drosophila ventral nerve cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Damon T; Olofsson, Birgitta

    2008-02-01

    At the end of embryogenesis, the ventral nerve cord (VNC) of Drosophila undergoes a shape change, termed condensation. During condensation the length of the VNC shortens by 25%, a process dependent on extracellular matrix deposited by hemocytes, an intact cytoskeleton of glia and neurons and neural activity. Here we show that cell death contributes to nerve cord shortening. Firstly, apoptosis occurs at the interface of the epidermis and the nerve cord where it plays a role in the separation of these two tissues. Separation precedes condensation and in conditions where separation is prevented, condensation fails. Secondly, many cells undergo apoptosis within VNC during condensation. This cell death is localized mainly to the posterior part of the nerve cord where more than half of all cell death occurs. Preventing apoptosis either in neurons or glia partially inhibits VNC shortening during condensation. Despite the importance of midline glia in axon tract development, preventing midline glia cell death results in normal hatching and adult formation. We find that undead midline glia are eliminated from the midline and become mispositioned or expelled from the nervous system. We suggest that this represent a form of pattern repair that operates to reduce the impact of the additional cells. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Distinguishing active from passive components of ankle plantar flexor stiffness in stroke, spinal cord injury and multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorentzen, Jakob; Grey, Michael James; Crone, Clarissa

    2010-01-01

    to distinguish the contribution of active reflex mechanisms from passive muscle properties to ankle joint stiffness in 31 healthy, 10 stroke, 30 multiple sclerosis and 16 spinal cord injured participants. The results were compared to routine clinical evaluation of spasticity. METHODS: A computer...... (Ashworth score1) showed normal reflex torque without normalization. With normalization this was only the case in 11 participants. Increased reflex mediated stiffness was detected in only 64% participants during clinical examination. CONCLUSION: The findings confirm that the clinical diagnosis of spasticity...

  15. 76 FR 2708 - Porcelain-on-Steel Cooking Ware From Taiwan; Top-of-the-Stove Stainless Steel Cooking Ware From...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-14

    .... 701- TA-267 and 731-TA-304 (Third Review)] Porcelain-on-Steel Cooking Ware From Taiwan; Top-of-the-Stove Stainless Steel Cooking Ware From Korea AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission...-steel cooking ware from Taiwan and the antidumping and countervailing duty orders on imports of top-of...

  16. Improving the Performance of Highly Constrained Water Resource Systems using Multiobjective Evolutionary Algorithms and RiverWare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R.; Kasprzyk, J. R.; Zagona, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    Instead of building new infrastructure to increase their supply reliability, water resource managers are often tasked with better management of current systems. The managers often have existing simulation models that aid their planning, and lack methods for efficiently generating and evaluating planning alternatives. This presentation discusses how multiobjective evolutionary algorithm (MOEA) decision support can be used with the sophisticated water infrastructure model, RiverWare, in highly constrained water planning environments. We first discuss a study that performed a many-objective tradeoff analysis of water supply in the Tarrant Regional Water District (TRWD) in Texas. RiverWare is combined with the Borg MOEA to solve a seven objective problem that includes systemwide performance objectives and individual reservoir storage reliability. Decisions within the formulation balance supply in multiple reservoirs and control pumping between the eastern and western parts of the system. The RiverWare simulation model is forced by two stochastic hydrology scenarios to inform how management changes in wet versus dry conditions. The second part of the presentation suggests how a broader set of RiverWare-MOEA studies can inform tradeoffs in other systems, especially in political situations where multiple actors are in conflict over finite water resources. By incorporating quantitative representations of diverse parties' objectives during the search for solutions, MOEAs may provide support for negotiations and lead to more widely beneficial water management outcomes.

  17. Determine Multiple Elements Simultaneously in the Sera of Umbilical Cord Blood Samples-a Very Simple Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Chunmei; Li, Zhijuan; Xia, Xun; Wang, Qunan; Tao, Ruiwen; Tao, Yiran; Xiang, Haiyun; Tong, Shilu; Tao, Fangbiao

    2017-05-01

    Analyzing the concentrations of heavy metals in the sera of umbilical cord blood samples can provide useful information about prenatal exposure to environmental agents. An analytical method based on ICP-MS to simultaneously determine multiple elements in umbilical cord blood samples was developed for assessing the in utero exposure to metallic and metalloid elements. The method only required as little as 100 μL of serum diluted 1:25 for direct analysis. Matrix-matched protocol was used to eliminate mass matrix interference and kinetic energy discrimination mode was used to eliminate the polyatomic ion interference. The assay was completed on average within 4 min with the detection limits ranging from 0.0002 to 44.4 μg/L for all the targeted elements. The detection rates for most of elements were 100 % other than cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb), and mercury (Hg). The testing results of the certified reference materials were ideal. The method is simple and sensitive, so it is suitable for the monitoring of large quantities of samples.

  18. Haemorrhagic necrosis of the grey matter of the spinal cord due to accidental injection of iopamidol in a patient with multiple neurofibromas; a clinico-pathological study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roos, R.A.C.; Wintzen, A.R.; Voormolen, J.H.C.; Vielvoye, G.J.; Bots, G.T.A.M.

    1988-01-01

    Cervical laminectomy was performed in a 34-year old man with multiple spinal neurofibromas because of a slowly progressive medullary compression. Four weeks later a rapid deterioration necessitated iopamidol myelography by left lateral cervical puncture at C2 level. Despite the establishment of adequate spinal fluid contact, resulting in imaging of the subarachnoid space, part of the contrast medium entered the spinal cord, thus delineating a syrinx from the upper cervical extending to the upper thoracic level. After the puncture the patient developed triplegia, involving the left arm and both legs and a paresis of the right arm. He died from aspiration pneumonia. Autopsy revealed haemorrhagic necrosis of the spinal grey matter. This adverse effect of myelography is argued to have been conditioned by the extreme immobility and displacement of the spinal cord due to the presence of multiple neurofibromas. The deterioration four weeks after the operation was probably caused by a further compression of the spinal cord. (orig.)

  19. Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging may show abnormalities in the normal-appearing cervical spinal cord from patients with multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Miraldi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective This study aims to evaluate “in vivo” the integrity of the normal-appearing spinal cord (NASC in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS compared to controls, using diffusion tensor MR imaging. Methods We studied 32 patients with MS and 17 without any neurologic disorder. Fractional anisotropy (FA, axial diffusivity (AD, radial diffusivity (RD and mean diffusivity (MD were calculated within regions of interest at C2 and C7 levels in the four columns of the spinal cord. Results At C2, FA value was decreased in MS patients. Besides, RD value was higher in MS than in controls. At C7, MD values were increased in MS. Conclusion The NASC in the right column of the cervical spinal cord showed abnormal FA, RD and MD values, which is possibly related to demyelination, since the FA abnormality was related to the RD and not to the AD.

  20. Surgical management of symptomatic spinal cord and intracerebral cavernomas in a multiple cavernomas case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorgan R.M.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Multiple cavernous malformations are associated with familial cases and are present in 10-20% of all cavernoma cases. 5% of cavernomas are located intramedullary and of these only 10% present multiple cavernomas. With the availability of echo gradient MRI the cases of multiple cavernomas are diagnosed earlier and it is not rare that it uncovers multiple cavernomas in cases where only a single lesion can be identified on regular MRI sequences. We present the case of a 55 years old woman presented with a two years history of mild backache, followed by progressive lower legs motor deficit and urinary retention. The spine MRI showed an intramedullary T2/3 lesion and the cerebral MRI established the diagnosis of multiple cavernomas. One year after the intramedullary cavernoma was operated with success, she developed generalized seizures and a new cerebral MRI showed bleeding and volume growth of one right temporal pole cavernoma. The cerebral lesion was resected successfully and the patient was discharged free of seizures. This familial type multiple cavernomas cases should be screened and followed with repeated brain and spine MRI’s every year.

  1. Neonatal Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia Presenting with Leukemia Cutis and Multiple Intracranial Lesions Successfully Treated with Unrelated Cord Blood Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Tsujimoto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal acute megakaryoblastic leukemia (AMKL without Down syndrome (DS is an extremely rare disorder. We report of a one-day-old male infant without DS who developed AMKL with leukemia cutis and right facial nerve palsy. Magnetic resonance imaging of the patient’s brain revealed multiple intracranial tumors. A biopsy specimen of the skin lesion was suggestive of AMKL, but the bone marrow leukemic cells were less than 5% of the marrow nucleated cells. The skin and intracranial lesions had spontaneously regressed within one and a half months, but the patient’s anemia and thrombocytopenia gradually worsened and the leukemic cells in the bone marrow gradually increased to more than 20% of the nucleated cells. In addition, multiple intracranial lesions reappeared at 72 days of life. We diagnosed the patient with AMKL, and chemotherapy followed by unrelated cord blood transplantation after a reduced-intensity conditioning regimen resulted in sustained complete remission. At present, the patient is well, and he has demonstrated normal development for five years.

  2. A systematic review and comparison of questionnaires in the management of spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis and the neurogenic bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, B; Stothers, L; Macnab, A; Lazare, D; Nigro, M

    2016-03-01

    Validated questionnaires are increasingly the preferred method used to obtain historical information. Specialized questionnaires exist validated for patients with neurogenic disease including neurogenic bladder. Those currently available are systematically reviewed and their potential for clinical and research use are described. A systematic search via Medline and PubMed using the key terms questionnaire(s) crossed with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) for the years 1946 to January 22, 2014 inclusive. Additional articles were selected from review of references in the publications identified. Only peer reviewed articles published in English were included. 18 questionnaires exist validated for patients with neurogenic bladder; 14 related to MS, 3 for SCI, and 1 for neurogenic bladder in general; with 4 cross-validated in both MS and SCI. All 18 are validated for both male and female patients; 59% are available only in English. The domains of psychological impact and physical function are represented in 71% and 76% of questionnaires, respectively. None for the female population included elements to measure symptoms of prolapse. The last decade has seen an expansion of validated questionnaires to document bladder symptoms in neurogenic disease. Disease specific instruments are available for incorporation into the clinical setting for MS and SCI patients with neurogenic bladder. The availability of caregiver and interview options enhances suitability in clinical practice as they can be adapted to various extents of disability. Future developments should include expanded language validation to the top 10 global languages reported by the World Health Organization. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Quantitative study of the cervical spinal cord damage in patients with multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica using diffusion tensor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou Huanxin; Li Yongmei; Lu Fajin; Luo Tianyou; Ouyang Yu; Zeng Chun; Zhang Zhiwei

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the changes of the cervical spinal cord in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) and relapsing neuromyelitis optica (RNMO) using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and to analyze its correlations with clinical disability scores. Methods: Thirty patients with MS (MS group),28 patients with NMO (NMO group) and 20 healthy volunteers were imaged using DTI on a 3.0 Tesla scanner. DTI indices of cervical spinal cord from all participants were measured, including mean diffusivity (MD) and fractional anisotropy (FA), and the correlations between the DTI metrics and the expanded disability status scale (EDSS) scores were assessed. One-way ANOVA, Dunnett-t test and Spearman correlation analysis were used for statistics. Results: (1) The values of MD among three groups were different at C3 level for left lateral and dorsal columns, C4 level for the central gray substance and dorsal columns, and C5-C6 level for all structures. There were significant differences among them (F=4.006-36.814, P<0.05). The values of FA were significantly different at all levels (F=5.561-98.128, P<0.05). (2) Compared with the control group, the values of MD were increased and FA were decreased for both MS and NMO groups, there were significant differences among them (t=-0.320-3.138, P<0.05). In MS and NMO groups, there were no significant differences of MD (t=-1.183-0.069, P>0.05), while the FA at C4-C6 levels (including the central gray substance, dorsal columns,right lateral columns and left lateral columns) for NMO group were 0.57 ± 0.09, 0.56 ± 0.11, 0.54 ±0.10, 0.57±0.09, 0.55 ±0.11, 0.52 ±0.13, 0.55 ±0.11, 0.54 ±0.13, 0.54±0.10, 0.54±0.11, 0.53 ±0.13, 0.52 ±0.11; and for MS group were 0.67 ±0.10, 0.68 ±0.10, 0.68 ±0.10, 0.70 ±0.12, 0.68 ±0.11, 0.69±0.10, 0.68 ±0.11, 0.69 ±0.12, 0.67 ±0.14, 0.68 ±0.15, 0.69 ±0.14, 0.69 ±0.16, and there were significant differences between two groups (t=-0.011-0.169, P<0.05). (3) Univariate

  4. Phase and Micro-Structural Characterization of Sanitary-Ware Fired at Different Temperature

    OpenAIRE

    ATHER HASSAN; YASEEN IQBAL; SYED ZAFAR ILYAS

    2017-01-01

    The three main ingredients of sanitary-ware are clay, feldspar and quartz. This ware is being widely used and has therefore, attracted the attention of researchers from time to time. Consequently, it has been extensively investigated. The present study describes the phase and micro-structural analysis of sanitary-ware samples collected from local (Durr Ceramics Peshawar) industry. XRD (X-Ray Diffraction) of samples fired at 1100oC reveals the presence of ? ? ? ? ?-quartz and primary mullite o...

  5. Falls among full-time wheelchair users with spinal cord injury and multiple sclerosis: a comparison of characteristics of fallers and circumstances of falls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, JongHun; Trace, Yarden; Peterson, Elizabeth W; Sosnoff, Jacob J; Rice, Laura A

    2017-10-25

    The purpose of this study is to (1) explore and (2) compare circumstances of falls among full-time wheelchair users with spinal cord injury (SCI) and multiple sclerosis (MS). A mixed method approach was used to explore and compare the circumstances of falls of 41 full-time wheelchair users with SCI (n = 23) and MS (n = 18). In addition to collecting participants' demographic information (age, gender, type of wheelchair used, duration of wheelchair use, and duration of disability), self-reported fall frequency in the past 6 months, self-reported restriction in activity due to fear of falling and the Spinal Cord Injury-Fall Concerns Scale (SCI-FCS) was collected. Qualitative data in the form of participants' responses to an open-ended question yielding information regarding the circumstances of the most recent fall were also collected. To examine differences in survey outcomes and demographic characteristics between participants with SCI and MS, independent t-tests and Pearson's Chi-square tests were used. Qualitative data were analyzed with a thematic analysis. Statistical analysis revealed that individuals with MS (mean =3.3) had significantly higher average SCI-FCS than individuals with SCI (mean =2.4). The analysis of the participants' descriptions of the circumstances of their most recent falls resulted in three main categories: action-related fall contributors (e.g., transfer), (2) location of falls (e.g., bathroom), and (3) fall attributions (e.g., surface condition). The results from this study helped to understand fall circumstances among full-time wheelchair users with MS and SCI. Findings from this study can inform the development of evidenced-based interventions to improve the effectiveness of clinically based treatment protocols. Implications for rehabilitation Falls are a common health concern in full-time wheelchair users living with multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury. The circumstances surrounding falls reported by full

  6. Fixed cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, L.M.; DiChiro, G.; DeSouza, B.; McCullough, D.C.; McVeigh, E.; Hefffez, D.

    1989-01-01

    Pulsatile longitudinal motion of the spinal cord was examined with MR phase imaging in healthy subjects and in cases involving cord tethering and compression. Asymptomatic patients with a low conus medullaris demonstrated normal cord motion. Clinical improvement was associated with improved cord motion after surgical untethering, provided permanent neurologic damage had not occurred. Decreased and unchanged cord motion was associated with unchanged neurologic deficits. In cases of normal cord motion and possible retethering versus syringomyelia, clinical improvement occurred after shunting only. MR imaging of pulsatile cord motion can be clinically useful in the evaluation of diseases restricting motion of the neuraxis

  7. 5-HT modulation of multiple inward rectifiers in motoneurons in intact preparations of the neonatal rat spinal cord

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaerulff, Ole; Kiehn, Ole

    2001-01-01

    This study introduces novel aspects of inward rectification in neonatal rat spinal motoneurons (MNs) and its modulation by serotonin (5-HT). Whole cell tight-seal recordings were made from MNs in an isolated lumbar spinal cord preparation from rats 1-2 days of age. In voltage clamp, hyperpolarizi...

  8. Tell el Yahudiyeh Ware: a re-evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, M.F.; Harbottle, G.; Sayre, E.V.

    1980-01-01

    The TY (Tell el Yahudiyeh ware) project has implications for understanding the cultural interactions. The Second Intermediate Period (1750-1550 B.C.), one during which centraized government in Egypt collapses and, it is generally assumed, so does her trade network. Foreigners - the Hyksos - are able to enter the country and rule at least part of it. Results of this study (which includes activation analysis), however, indicate the TY is primarily an Egyptian pottery which appeared before the Hyksos entered and may have continued in use after they left. It cannot, therefore, be tightly associated with the Hyksos nor can it be used to judge the extent of their influence. Its wide distribution shows that Egypt continued to trade goods outside her boundaries throughout this period. Finally, not only goods travelled between what were generally considered to have been hostile neighbors, but the trade appears to have included ideas and technology as well

  9. JS-X syndrome: A multiple congenital malformation with vocal cord paralysis, ear deformity, hearing loss, shoulder musculature underdevelopment, and X-linked recessive inheritance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeve, Hans L J; Brooks, Alice S; Smit, Liesbeth S

    2015-07-01

    We report on a family with a not earlier described multiple congenital malformation. Several male family members suffer from laryngeal obstruction caused by bilateral vocal cord paralysis, outer and middle ear deformity with conductive and sensorineural hearing loss, facial dysmorphisms, and underdeveloped shoulder musculature. The affected female members only have middle ear deformity and hearing loss. The pedigree is suggestive of an X-linked recessive inheritance pattern. SNP-array revealed a deletion and duplication on Xq28 in the affected family members. A possible aetiology is a neurocristopathy with most symptoms expressed in structures derived from branchial arches. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparison of a conventional cardiac-triggered dual spin-echo and a fast STIR sequence in detection of spinal cord lesions in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bot, J.C.J.; Barkhof, F.; Lycklama a Nijeholt, G.J.; Bergers, E.; Castelijns, J.A.; Polman, C.H.; Ader, H.J.

    2000-01-01

    The current optimal imaging protocol in spinal cord MR imaging in patients with multiple sclerosis includes a long TR conventional spin-echo (CSE) sequence, requiring long acquisition times. Using short tau inversion recovery fast spin-echo (fast STIR) sequences both acquisition time can be shortened and sensitivity in the detection of multiple sclerosis (MS) abnormalities can be increased. This study compares both sequences for the potential to detect both focal and diffuse spinal abnormalities. Spinal cords of 5 volunteers and 20 MS patients were studied at 1.0 T. Magnetic resonance imaging included cardiac-gated sagittal dual-echo CSE and a cardiac-gated fast STIR sequence. Images were scored regarding number, size, and location of focal lesions, diffuse abnormalities and presence/hindrance of artifacts by two experienced radiologists. Examinations were scored as being definitely normal, indeterminate, or definitely abnormal. Interobserver agreement regarding focal lesions was higher for CSE (κ=0.67) than for fast STIR (κ=0.57) but did not differ significantly. Of all focal lesions scored in consensus, 47 % were scored on both sequences, 31 % were only detected by fast STIR, and 22 % only by dual-echo CSE (n. s.). Interobserver agreement for diffuse abnormalities was lower with fast STIR (κ=0.48) than dual-echo CSE (κ=0.65; n. s.). After consensus, fast STIR showed in 10 patients diffuse abnormalities and dual-echo CSE in 3. After consensus, in 19 of 20 patients dual-echo CSE scans were considered as definitely abnormal compared with 17 for fast STIR. The fast STIR sequence is a useful adjunct to dual-echo CSE in detecting focal abnormalities and is helpful in detecting diffuse MS abnormalities in the spinal cord. Due to the frequent occurrence of artifacts and the lower observer concordance, fast STIR cannot be used alone. (orig.)

  11. Study on ancient Chinese imitated GE ware by INAA and WDXRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Guoxi; Feng Songlin; Feng Xiangqian; Wang Yanqing; Zhu Jihao; Yan Lingtong; Li Yongqiang; Han Hongye

    2007-01-01

    Imitated GE ware was one of the most famous products of Jingdezhen porcelain field in Ming dynasty (AD 1368-1644). The exterior features of its body and glaze are very marvelous. Black foot, purple mouth and crazing glaze are the main features of imitated GE ware. Until now, the key conditions of resulting these features are not clearly identified. In order to find the critical elements for firing these features, instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WDXRF) were used to determine the element abundance patterns of imitated GE ware body and glaze. The experimental data was compared with that of imitated Longquan celadon and of Longquan celadon. The analytical results indicated that Fe, Ti and Na were the critical elements. The body of imitated GE ware which contains high Fe and Ti are the basic conditions of firing its black body, black foot and purple mouth. The glaze of imitated GE ware which contains high Na is the main condition of producing its crazing glaze. Na is the critical element which enlarges the difference in expansion coefficients between the glaze and body of imitated GE ware. Furthermore, Zijin soil was added into kaolin to make the body rich in Fe and Ti. And something which was rich in Na was used to produce crazing glaze in the manufacturing process of imitated GE ware

  12. Study on ancient Chinese imitated GE ware by INAA and WDXRF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Guoxi; Feng, Songlin; Feng, Xiangqian; Wang, Yanqing; Zhu, Jihao; Yan, Lingtong; Li, Yongqiang; Han, Hongye

    2007-11-01

    Imitated GE ware was one of the most famous products of Jingdezhen porcelain field in Ming dynasty (AD 1368-1644). The exterior features of its body and glaze are very marvelous. Black foot, purple mouth and crazing glaze are the main features of imitated GE ware. Until now, the key conditions of resulting these features are not clearly identified. In order to find the critical elements for firing these features, instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WDXRF) were used to determine the element abundance patterns of imitated GE ware body and glaze. The experimental data was compared with that of imitated Longquan celadon and of Longquan celadon. The analytical results indicated that Fe, Ti and Na were the critical elements. The body of imitated GE ware which contains high Fe and Ti are the basic conditions of firing its black body, black foot and purple mouth. The glaze of imitated GE ware which contains high Na is the main condition of producing its crazing glaze. Na is the critical element which enlarges the difference in expansion coefficients between the glaze and body of imitated GE ware. Furthermore, Zijin soil was added into kaolin to make the body rich in Fe and Ti. And something which was rich in Na was used to produce crazing glaze in the manufacturing process of imitated GE ware.

  13. Study on ancient Chinese imitated GE ware by INAA and WDXRF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie Guoxi [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19 Yu Quan Lu, Beijing 100049 (China); Graduated University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Feng Songlin [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19 Yu Quan Lu, Beijing 100049 (China)], E-mail: fengsl@ihep.ac.cn; Feng Xiangqian; Wang Yanqing; Zhu Jihao; Yan Lingtong [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19 Yu Quan Lu, Beijing 100049 (China); Li Yongqiang; Han Hongye [Beijing Institute of Cultural Relics, Beijing 100009 (China)

    2007-11-15

    Imitated GE ware was one of the most famous products of Jingdezhen porcelain field in Ming dynasty (AD 1368-1644). The exterior features of its body and glaze are very marvelous. Black foot, purple mouth and crazing glaze are the main features of imitated GE ware. Until now, the key conditions of resulting these features are not clearly identified. In order to find the critical elements for firing these features, instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WDXRF) were used to determine the element abundance patterns of imitated GE ware body and glaze. The experimental data was compared with that of imitated Longquan celadon and of Longquan celadon. The analytical results indicated that Fe, Ti and Na were the critical elements. The body of imitated GE ware which contains high Fe and Ti are the basic conditions of firing its black body, black foot and purple mouth. The glaze of imitated GE ware which contains high Na is the main condition of producing its crazing glaze. Na is the critical element which enlarges the difference in expansion coefficients between the glaze and body of imitated GE ware. Furthermore, Zijin soil was added into kaolin to make the body rich in Fe and Ti. And something which was rich in Na was used to produce crazing glaze in the manufacturing process of imitated GE ware.

  14. Treatment of Neuropathic Pain and Functional Limitations Associated With Multiple Sclerosis Using an MRI-Compatible Spinal Cord Stimulator: A Case Report With Two Year Follow-Up and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provenzano, David A; Williams, Joseph R; Jarzabek, Gaye; DeRiggi, Leonard A; Scott, Thomas F

    2016-06-01

    To report a case with two years follow-up of neuropathic pain and functional limitations associated with multiple sclerosis (MS) effectively treated with an MRI conditional spinal cord stimulator (SCS) system that allowed for spinal imaging. To present a comprehensive literature review of spinal cord stimulator utilization in the treatment of multiple sclerosis. Case report and literature review. Treatment was a spinal cord stimulation implant after successful trial. Pain scores, medication utilization, and functional outcomes were reviewed. Pre- and post-SCS implant MRI spine images were obtained. At 24 months follow-up, the patient has had a 77% reduction in pain and a 99% reduction in opioid use. Furthermore, he had improvement in reported tactile sensation, spasticity levels, and ambulation. Post-SCS implant, MRI images at 18 months follow-up provided the ability to review the spinal cord with minimal artifact. No new MS documented plaques occurred during this time period. A literature review demonstrated 33 published reports including a total of 496 trialed and 744 implanted patients. Only 3 of the reports occurred after the year 2000. We report the successful treatment of MS-associated pain and functional limitations with an MRI conditional spinal cord stimulator system. The ability to obtain post-implant MRI imaging of not only the brain but also the spinal cord in MS patients allows for the continued need to document and follow disease progression, especially with the advancements in pharmacological therapy. © 2016 International Neuromodulation Society.

  15. Total dissolved gas prediction and optimization in RiverWare

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, Kevin M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Witt, Adam M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hadjerioua, Boualem [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Management and operation of dams within the Columbia River Basin (CRB) provides the region with irrigation, hydropower production, flood control, navigation, and fish passage. These various system-wide demands can require unique dam operations that may result in both voluntary and involuntary spill, thereby increasing tailrace levels of total dissolved gas (TDG) which can be fatal to fish. Appropriately managing TDG levels within the context of the systematic demands requires a predictive framework robust enough to capture the operationally related effects on TDG levels. Development of the TDG predictive methodology herein attempts to capture the different modes of hydro operation, thereby making it a viable tool to be used in conjunction with a real-time scheduling model such as RiverWare. The end result of the effort will allow hydro operators to minimize system-wide TDG while meeting hydropower operational targets and constraints. The physical parameters such as spill and hydropower flow proportions, accompanied by the characteristics of the dam such as plant head levels and tailrace depths, are used to develop the empirically-based prediction model. In the broader study, two different models are developed a simplified and comprehensive model. The latter model incorporates more specific bubble physics parameters for the prediction of tailrace TDG levels. The former model is presented herein and utilizes an empirically based approach to predict downstream TDG levels based on local saturation depth, spillway and powerhouse flow proportions, and entrainment effects. Representative data collected from each of the hydro projects is used to calibrate and validate model performance and the accuracy of predicted TDG uptake. ORNL, in conjunction with IIHR - Hydroscience & Engineering, The University of Iowa, carried out model adjustments to adequately capture TDG levels with respect to each plant while maintaining a generalized model configuration. Validation results

  16. Spinal cord tumor in a patient with multiple sclerosis: case report Tumor de medula espinal em paciente com esclerose múltipla: relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Augusto Taricco

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The association between multiple (MS sclerosis and cerebral gliomas has been sporadically reported in the literature, causing a long lasting discussion if these lesions occur coincidentally or if MS plaques may actually lead to the genesis of gliomas. We report a 36 year old man who developed a rapid onset of right side weakness and loss of vision, having established a diagnosis of MS which was confirmed by CSF analysis and MRI. Nine years later he developed progressive tetraparesis, leading initially to suspicion of illness relapse and a demyelinating plaque in the spinal cord. However, after MRI investigation, a spinal cord tumor was diagnosed. The patient underwent cervical spine laminotomy for microsurgical removal of the spinal cord tumor diagnosed as ependimoma. The neurological deficits improved significantly.A associação entre esclerose múltipla (EM e gliomas cerebrais foi relatada esporadicamente na literatura, levando a longa discussão quanto à possibilidade das placas de esclerose estarem envolvidas na etiologia dos gliomas ou dessas lesões ocorrerem coincidentemente. Relatamos um paciente de 36 anos que desenvolveu hemiparesia direita rapidamente progressiva e perda visual, sendo estabelecido o diagnóstico de EM após análise do LCR e imagens de RM de encéfalo. Após nove anos o paciente desenvolveu tetraparesia lentamente progressiva, levantando inicialmente a hipótese de atividade da doença e aparecimento de placa de EM na medula espinal. Contudo, após investigação com RM de coluna, um tumor medular foi diagnosticado. Foi então submetido a laminectomia cervical para ressecção microcirúrgica do tumor, que foi diagnosticado como ependimoma. Os déficits neurológicos melhoraram significativamente.

  17. Research and development of intelligent controller for high-grade sanitary ware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Kongjun; Shen, Qingping

    2013-03-01

    With the social and economic development and people's living standards improve, more and more emphasis on modern society, people improve the quality of family life, the use of intelligent controller applications in high-grade sanitary ware physiotherapy students. Analysis of high-grade sanitary ware physiotherapy common functions pointed out in the production and use of the possible risks, proposed implementation of the system hardware and matching, given the system software implementation process. High-grade sanitary ware physiotherapy intelligent controller not only to achieve elegant and beautiful, simple, physical therapy, water power, deodorant, multi-function, intelligent control, to meet the consumers, the high-end sanitary ware market, strong demand, Accelerate the enterprise product Upgrade and improve the competitiveness of enterprises.

  18. Ceramic ware waste as coarse aggregate for structural concrete production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-González, Julia; Rodríguez-Robles, Desirée; Juan-Valdés, Andrés; Morán-Del Pozo, Julia M; Guerra-Romero, M Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    The manufacture of any kind of product inevitably entails the production of waste. The quantity of waste generated by the ceramic industry, a very important sector in Spain, is between 5% and 8% of the final output and it is therefore necessary to find an effective waste recovery method. The aim of the study reported in the present article was to seek a sustainable means of managing waste from the ceramic industry through the incorporation of this type of waste in the total replacement of conventional aggregate (gravel) used in structural concrete. Having verified that the recycled ceramic aggregates met all the technical requirements imposed by current Spanish legislation, established in the Code on Structural Concrete (EHE-08), then it is prepared a control concrete mix and the recycled concrete mix using 100% recycled ceramic aggregate instead of coarse natural aggregate. The concretes obtained were subjected to the appropriate tests in order to conduct a comparison of their mechanical properties. The results show that the concretes made using ceramic sanitary ware aggregate possessed the same mechanical properties as those made with conventional aggregate. It is therefore possible to conclude that the reuse of recycled ceramic aggregate to produce recycled concrete is a feasible alternative for the sustainable management of this waste.

  19. Provenance studies of Sgraffiato and Late Green Glazed wares from Siraf, Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michel, H.V.; Asaro, F.; Frierman, J.D.

    1975-03-01

    Results of neutron activation analyses of 23 elements in ceramic archaeological specimens are given. Various wares are divided into the following categories: early Sgraffiato, late Sgraffiato, late Green A, late Green B, and Samarra ware. Results are given on the following elements: Al, Ca, Dy, Mn, Na, K, U, Sm, La, Ti, Lu, Co, Sc, Fe, Cs, Cr, Ni, Eu, Ce, Hf, Ta, Th, and Yb. (JGB)

  20. Human dental pulp-derived stem cells promote locomotor recovery after complete transection of the rat spinal cord by multiple neuro-regenerative mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Kiyoshi; Yamamoto, Akihito; Matsubara, Kohki; Nakamura, Shoko; Naruse, Mami; Yamagata, Mari; Sakamoto, Kazuma; Tauchi, Ryoji; Wakao, Norimitsu; Imagama, Shiro; Hibi, Hideharu; Kadomatsu, Kenji; Ishiguro, Naoki; Ueda, Minoru

    2012-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) often leads to persistent functional deficits due to loss of neurons and glia and to limited axonal regeneration after injury. Here we report that transplantation of human dental pulp stem cells into the completely transected adult rat spinal cord resulted in marked recovery of hind limb locomotor functions. Transplantation of human bone marrow stromal cells or skin-derived fibroblasts led to substantially less recovery of locomotor function. The human dental pulp stem cells exhibited three major neuroregenerative activities. First, they inhibited the SCI-induced apoptosis of neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes, which improved the preservation of neuronal filaments and myelin sheaths. Second, they promoted the regeneration of transected axons by directly inhibiting multiple axon growth inhibitors, including chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan and myelin-associated glycoprotein, via paracrine mechanisms. Last, they replaced lost cells by differentiating into mature oligodendrocytes under the extreme conditions of SCI. Our data demonstrate that tooth-derived stem cells may provide therapeutic benefits for treating SCI through both cell-autonomous and paracrine neuroregenerative activities.

  1. Cord Blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Abroun

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available   Stem cells are naïve or master cells. This means they can transform into special 200 cell types as needed by body, and each of these cells has just one function. Stem cells are found in many parts of the human body, although some sources have richer concentrations than others. Some excellent sources of stem cells, such as bone marrow, peripheral blood, cord blood, other tissue stem cells and human embryos, which last one are controversial and their use can be illegal in some countries. Cord blood is a sample of blood taken from a newborn baby's umbilical cord. It is a rich source of stem cells, umbilical cord blood and tissue are collected from material that normally has no use following a child’s birth. Umbilical cord blood and tissue cells are rich sources of stem cells, which have been used in the treatment of over 80 diseases including leukemia, lymphoma and anemia as bone marrow stem cell potency.  The most common disease category has been leukemia. The next largest group is inherited diseases. Patients with lymphoma, myelodysplasia and severe aplastic anemia have also been successfully transplanted with cord blood. Cord blood is obtained by syringing out the placenta through the umbilical cord at the time of childbirth, after the cord has been detached from the newborn. Collecting stem cells from umbilical blood and tissue is ethical, pain-free, safe and simple. When they are needed to treat your child later in life, there will be no rejection or incompatibility issues, as the procedure will be using their own cells. In contrast, stem cells from donors do have these potential problems. By consider about cord blood potency, cord blood banks (familial or public were established. In IRAN, four cord blood banks has activity, Shariati BMT center cord blood bank, Royan familial cord blood banks, Royan public cord blood banks and Iranian Blood Transfusion Organ cord blood banks. Despite 50,000 sample which storage in these banks, but the

  2. Perceived quality of care and outcomes following spinal cord injury: minority status in the context of multiple predictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Mark V; Wood, Kenneth; Millis, Scott; Page, Steve; Chen, David

    2004-01-01

    To determine whether patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) who are members of minority groups experience a disadvantage with regard to quality of care, and investigate predictors of perceived quality of care and indicators of outcome. Correlational analysis of longitudinal data. One hundred and forty-three individuals with SCI in the first year following injury (43.3% tetraplegia, 56.7% paraplegia; 53.6% of total had complete injuries). Hospital and postdischarge (usually outpatient) care at 3 SCI model systems. Perceived quality of acute, rehabilitative, and continuing care rated by patients according to standard format. Objective indicators of amount of care (eg, length of stay [LOS], charges) and outcomes (eg, medical complications, Functional Independence Measure [FIM] scores, a life satisfaction measure [the Diener Scale], and the Craig Handicap and Reporting Technique [CHART; a community participation scale]). Minorities did not report statistically significant differences in perceived quality of care or other indicators (eg, amount of care, medical complications, FIM gain, life satisfaction, and CHART scores) compared with other groups. Severity of injury affected LOS and activity outcomes. Satisfaction with medical care before the injury significantly predicted perceived quality of acute hospital care, inpatient rehabilitation, and continuing care (P satisfaction with previous care can assist in distinguishing satisfaction with current care from pre-existing biases.

  3. Sensory neuronopathy involves the spinal cord and brachial plexus: a quantitative study employing multiple-echo data image combination (MEDIC) and turbo inversion recovery magnitude (TIRM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, Yi-Fang; Tang, Wei-Jun; Li, Yu-Xin; Geng, Dao-Ying [Fudan University, Department of Radiology, Huashan Hospital, Shanghai (China); Zhu, Dong-Qing; Chen, Xiang-Jun [Fudan University, Department of Neurology, Huashan Hospital, Shanghai (China); Zee, Chi-Shing [University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Sensory neuronopathy (SNN) is a distinctive subtype of peripheral neuropathies, specifically targeting dorsal root ganglion (DRG). We utilized MRI to demonstrate the imaging characteristics of DRG, spinal cord (SC), and brachial plexus at C7 level in SNN. We attempted multiple-echo data image combination (MEDIC) and turbo inversion recovery magnitude (TIRM) methods in nine patients with sensory neuronopathy and compared with those in 16 disease controls and 20 healthy volunteers. All participants underwent MRI for the measurement of DRG, posterior column (PC), lateral column, and spinal cord area (SCA) at C7 level. DRG diameters were obtained through its largest cross section, standardized by dividing sagittal diameter of mid-C7 vertebral canal. We also made comparisons of standardized anteroposterior diameter (APD) and left-right diameters of SC and PC in these groups. Signal intensity and diameter of C7 spinal nerve were assessed on TIRM. Compared to control groups, signal intensities of DRG and PC were higher in SNN patients when using MEDIC, but the standardized diameters were shorter in either DRG or PC. Abnormal PC signal intensities were identified in eight out of nine SNN patients (89 %) with MEDIC and five out of nine (56 %) with T2-weighted images. SCA, assessed with MEDIC, was smaller in SNN patients than in the other groups, with significant reduction of its standardized APD. C7 nerve root diameters, assessed with TIRM, were decreased in SNN patients. MEDIC and TIRM sequences demonstrate increased signal intensities and decreased area of DRG and PC, and decreased diameter of nerve roots in patients with SNN, which can play a significant role in early diagnosis. (orig.)

  4. Sensory neuronopathy involves the spinal cord and brachial plexus: a quantitative study employing multiple-echo data image combination (MEDIC) and turbo inversion recovery magnitude (TIRM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao, Yi-Fang; Tang, Wei-Jun; Li, Yu-Xin; Geng, Dao-Ying; Zhu, Dong-Qing; Chen, Xiang-Jun; Zee, Chi-Shing

    2013-01-01

    Sensory neuronopathy (SNN) is a distinctive subtype of peripheral neuropathies, specifically targeting dorsal root ganglion (DRG). We utilized MRI to demonstrate the imaging characteristics of DRG, spinal cord (SC), and brachial plexus at C7 level in SNN. We attempted multiple-echo data image combination (MEDIC) and turbo inversion recovery magnitude (TIRM) methods in nine patients with sensory neuronopathy and compared with those in 16 disease controls and 20 healthy volunteers. All participants underwent MRI for the measurement of DRG, posterior column (PC), lateral column, and spinal cord area (SCA) at C7 level. DRG diameters were obtained through its largest cross section, standardized by dividing sagittal diameter of mid-C7 vertebral canal. We also made comparisons of standardized anteroposterior diameter (APD) and left-right diameters of SC and PC in these groups. Signal intensity and diameter of C7 spinal nerve were assessed on TIRM. Compared to control groups, signal intensities of DRG and PC were higher in SNN patients when using MEDIC, but the standardized diameters were shorter in either DRG or PC. Abnormal PC signal intensities were identified in eight out of nine SNN patients (89 %) with MEDIC and five out of nine (56 %) with T2-weighted images. SCA, assessed with MEDIC, was smaller in SNN patients than in the other groups, with significant reduction of its standardized APD. C7 nerve root diameters, assessed with TIRM, were decreased in SNN patients. MEDIC and TIRM sequences demonstrate increased signal intensities and decreased area of DRG and PC, and decreased diameter of nerve roots in patients with SNN, which can play a significant role in early diagnosis. (orig.)

  5. Pericytes Make Spinal Cord Breathless after Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Viviani M; Paiva, Ana E; Sena, Isadora F G; Mintz, Akiva; Magno, Luiz Alexandre V; Birbrair, Alexander

    2017-09-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury is a devastating condition that leads to significant neurological deficits and reduced quality of life. Therapeutic interventions after spinal cord lesions are designed to address multiple aspects of the secondary damage. However, the lack of detailed knowledge about the cellular and molecular changes that occur after spinal cord injury restricts the design of effective treatments. Li and colleagues using a rat model of spinal cord injury and in vivo microscopy reveal that pericytes play a key role in the regulation of capillary tone and blood flow in the spinal cord below the site of the lesion. Strikingly, inhibition of specific proteins expressed by pericytes after spinal cord injury diminished hypoxia and improved motor function and locomotion of the injured rats. This work highlights a novel central cellular population that might be pharmacologically targeted in patients with spinal cord trauma. The emerging knowledge from this research may provide new approaches for the treatment of spinal cord injury.

  6. Pathogenesis of spinal cord injury induced edema and neuropathic pain: expression of multiple isoforms of wnk1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mostafa M; Lee, HyunKyung; Clark, Zach; Miranpuri, Gurwattan S; Nacht, Carrie; Patel, Kush; Liu, Lisa; Joslin, Jiliian; Kintner, Douglus; Resnick, Daniel K

    2014-07-01

    Neuropathic pain (NP) is a common occurrence following spinal cord injury (SCI). Identification of specific molecular pathways that are involved in pain syndromes has become a major priority in current SCI research. We have investigated the role of a cation-dependent chloride transporter, Cl-regulatory protein Na(+)-K(+)-Cl(-) 1 (NKCC1), phosphorylation profile of NKCC1 and its specific involvement in neuropathic pain following contusion SCI (cSCI) using a rat model. Administration of the NKCC1 inhibitor bumetanide (BU) increases the mean hindpaw withdrawal latency time (WLT), thermal hyperalgesia (TH) following cSCI. These results demonstrate implication of NKCC1 co-transporter and BUin SCI-induced neuropathic pain. The with-no-lysine (K)-1 (WNK1) kinase has been shown to be an important regulator of NKCC1 phosphorylation in many systems, including nocioception. Mutations in a neuronal-specific exon of WNK1 (HSN2) was identified in patients that have hereditary sensory neuropathy type II (HSANII) also implicates WNK1 in nocioception, such that these patients have loss of perception to pain, touch and heat. In our ongoing research we proposed two studies utilizing our contusion SCI (cSCI) NP model of rat. Study 1 aimed at NKCC1 expression and activity is up-regulated following cSCI in the early edema and chronic neuropathic pain phases. Study 2 aimed at identifying the expression profile of alternatively spliced WNK1 isoforms in animals exhibiting thermal hyperalgesia (TH) following cSCI. Adult male Sprague Dawley rats (275-300 g) following laminectomy received cSCI at T9 with the NYU impactor-device II by dropping 10 g weight from the height of 12.5 mm. Control rats obtained laminectomy but no impaction. Following injury, functional recovery was assessed by BBB locomotor scores on day 1, 7, 14, 21, 35, and 42 and development of thermal hyperalgesia on day 21, 28, 35, and 42 day of injury by monitoring hind paw withdraw latency time (WLT) in seconds compared with

  7. The Effect of the Flipped Classroom Approach to OpenCourseWare Instruction on Students' Self-Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jerry Chih-Yuan; Wu, Yu-Ting; Lee, Wei-I

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of the flipped classroom approach to OpenCourseWare instruction on students' self-regulation. OpenCourseWare was integrated into the flipped classroom model (experimental group) and distance learning (control group). Overall, 181 freshmen taking a physics course were allowed to choose their…

  8. 75 FR 49549 - ABC & D Recycling, Inc.-Lease and Operation Exemption-a Line of Railroad in Ware, MA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board [Docket No. FD 35397] ABC & D Recycling, Inc.--Lease and Operation Exemption--a Line of Railroad in Ware, MA ABC & D Recycling, Inc. (ABC & D..., ABC & D Recycling, Inc.--Lease and Operation Exemption--a Line of Railroad in Ware, Massachusetts (STB...

  9. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury What is a Spinal Cord Injury Levels of Injury and What They Mean Animated Spinal ... Cord Injury What is a Spinal Cord Injury Levels of Injury and What They Mean Animated Spinal ...

  10. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available menu Understanding Spinal Cord Injury What is a Spinal Cord Injury Levels of Injury and What They Mean Animated Spinal Cord Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal ...

  11. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal ... Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal ...

  12. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal Cord Injuries Video Library SCI Medical Experts People Living with SCI Personal ... Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal Cord Injuries Video Library SCI Medical Experts People Living with SCI Personal ...

  13. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Animated Spinal Cord Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal ... Animated Spinal Cord Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal ...

  14. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation ... Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation ...

  15. Analysis of seed and ware potato production systems and yield constraints in Argentina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caldiz, D.O.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to analyze the seed and ware potato production systems in Argentina and their possible yield constraints in order to develop specific strategies to increase seed quality and tuber yield.

    This thesis starts with a survey of the actual potato

  16. Soft ware upgrade for Mobile Laboratories in Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bargholz, Kim; Andersen, Frank

    1998-01-01

    In July-August 1998 the soft ware for controlling the measurements in the mobile laboratories have been upgraded. The mobile laboratories are sponsored by Danish east aid projects in cooperation with Rotaray Denmark.The equipment used is 4 L NaI(Tl) detectors mounted on the roof of the cars toget...

  17. Business plan Locally produced and branded ware potato, Zambezi Valley, Mozambique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haverkort, A.J.; Saavedra Gonzalez, Y.R.

    2015-01-01

    This business plan has been prepared for local entrepreneurs who would like to expand their business portfolio or to start an agricultural value chain business in the potato sector in the region of Tete. The four-year business plan intends to create a locally produced and branded ware potato value

  18. 75 FR 62144 - Porcelain-on-Steel Cooking Ware From China and Taiwan; Top-of-the-Stove Stainless Steel Cooking...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-07

    ...); (Investigation Nos. 701-TA-267 and 731-TA-304 (Third Review))] Porcelain-on-Steel Cooking Ware From China and Taiwan; Top-of- the-Stove Stainless Steel Cooking Ware From Korea AGENCY: United States International... porcelain-on-steel cooking ware from China and Taiwan and the antidumping and countervailing duty orders on...

  19. Modeling Dissolved Solids in the Rincon Valley, New Mexico Using RiverWare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abudu, S.; Ahn, S. R.; Sheng, Z.

    2017-12-01

    Simulating transport and storage of dissolved solids in surface water and underlying alluvial aquifer is essential to evaluate the impacts of surface water operations, groundwater pumping, and climate variability on the spatial and temporal variability of salinity in the Rio Grande Basin. In this study, we developed a monthly RiverWare water quantity and quality model to simulate the both concentration and loads of dissolved solids for the Rincon Valley, New Mexico from Caballo Reservoir to Leasburg Dam segment of the Rio Grande. The measured flows, concentration and loads of dissolved solids in the main stream and drains were used to develop RiveWare model using 1980-1988 data for calibration, and 1989-1995 data for validation. The transport of salt is tracked using discretized salt and post-process approaches. Flow and salt exchange between the surface water and adjacent groundwater objects is computed using "soil moisture salt with supplemental flow" method in the RiverWare. In the groundwater objects, the "layered salt" method is used to simulate concentration of the dissolved solids in the shallow groundwater storage. In addition, the estimated local inflows under different weather conditions by using a calibrated Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) were fed into the RiverWare to refine the simulation of the flow and dissolved solids. The results show the salt concentration and loads increased at Leasburg Dam, which indicates the river collects salts from the agricultural return flow and the underlying aquifer. The RiverWare model with the local inflow fed by SWAT delivered the better quantification of temporal and spatial salt exchange patterns between the river and the underlying aquifer. The results from the proposed modeling approach can be used to refine the current mass-balance budgets for dissolved-solids transport in the Rio Grande, and provide guidelines for planning and decision-making to control salinity in arid river environment.

  20. Intelligent Middle-Ware Architecture for Mobile Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayana, Rayene Ben; Bonnin, Jean-Marie

    Recent advances in electronic and automotive industries as well as in wireless telecommunication technologies have drawn a new picture where each vehicle became “fully networked”. Multiple stake-holders (network operators, drivers, car manufacturers, service providers, etc.) will participate in this emerging market, which could grow following various models. To free the market from technical constraints, it is important to return to the basics of the Internet, i.e., providing embarked devices with a fully operational Internet connectivity (IPv6).

  1. Multiple intracerebroventricular injections of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells delay motor neurons loss but not disease progression of SOD1G93A mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sironi, Francesca; Vallarola, Antonio; Violatto, Martina Bruna; Talamini, Laura; Freschi, Mattia; De Gioia, Roberta; Capelli, Chiara; Agostini, Azzurra; Moscatelli, Davide; Tortarolo, Massimo; Bigini, Paolo; Introna, Martino; Bendotti, Caterina

    2017-12-01

    Stem cell therapy is considered a promising approach in the treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) seem to be the most effective in ALS animal models. The umbilical cord (UC) is a source of highly proliferating fetal MSCs, more easily collectable than other MSCs. Recently we demonstrated that human (h) UC-MSCs, double labeled with fluorescent nanoparticles and Hoechst-33258 and transplanted intracerebroventricularly (ICV) into SOD1G93A transgenic mice, partially migrated into the spinal cord after a single injection. This prompted us to assess the effect of repeated ICV injections of hUC-MSCs on disease progression in SOD1G93A mice. Although no transplanted cells migrated to the spinal cord, a partial but significant protection of motor neurons (MNs) was found in the lumbar spinal cord of hUC-MSCs-treated SOD1G93A mice, accompanied by a shift from a pro-inflammatory (IL-6, IL-1β) to anti-inflammatory (IL-4, IL-10) and neuroprotective (IGF-1) environment in the lumbar spinal cord, probably linked to the activation of p-Akt survival pathway in both motor neurons and reactive astrocytes. However, this treatment neither prevented the muscle denervation nor delayed the disease progression of mice, emphasizing the growing evidence that protecting the motor neuron perikarya is not sufficient to delay the ALS progression. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a nervous system disease that affects your brain and spinal cord. It damages the myelin sheath, the material that surrounds and protects your nerve cells. This damage slows down ...

  3. Provenience studies of the Ko-Kutani ware by neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawashima, Tatsuro.

    1990-01-01

    The instrumental neutron activation analysis has been applied to the multielemental analysis of eight samples of the Ko-Kutani ware including the Aote's that is one of semi-porcelain body. Each sample was compared with concentration of the useful index element, such as Ta, Sc, Ba, Hf, Th and rare earth, to discriminate the Arita group from the Kutani group. Eight samples were judged as products of the Arita, just as in previous paper. (author)

  4. Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration (CORD): Evaluation plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration (CORD) project evaluation will determine the extent to which the CORD model of linking primary care (PC) interventions to public health (PH) interventions in multiple community sectors affects BMI and behavior in children (2 to 12 years). The evaluation c...

  5. Cord Blood and Transplants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... donate their baby’s umbilical cord blood to a public cord blood bank. We have more than 249,000 cord blood ... stored as a cord blood unit at a public cord blood bank for future use. It can then be listed ...

  6. Spinal Cord Diseases - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information Translations Russian (Русский) Expand Section Myelogram - Русский (Russian) Bilingual ... Health Information Translations Characters not displaying correctly on this page? See language display issues . Return to the MedlinePlus Health Information ...

  7. KnoWare: A System for Citizen-based Environmental Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph T. Chao

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Non-expert scientists are frequently involved in research requiring data acquisition over large geographic areas. Despite mutual benefits for such “citizen science”, barriers also exist, including 1 difficulty maintaining user engagement with timely feedback, and 2 the challenge of providing non-experts with the means to generate reliable data. We have developed a system that addresses these barriers. Our technologies, KnoWare and InSpector, allow users to: collect reliable scientific measurements, map geo-tagged data, and intuitively visualize the results in real-time. KnoWare comprises a web portal and an iOS app with two core functions. First, users can generate scientific ‘queries’ that entail a call for information posed to a crowd with customized options for participant responses and viewing data. Second, users can respond to queries with their GPS-enabled mobile device, which results in their geo- and time-stamped responses populating a web-accessible map in real time. KnoWare can also interface with additional applications to diversify the types of data that can be reported. We demonstrate this capability with a second iOS app called InSpector that performs quantitative water quality measurements. When used in combina-tion, these technologies create a workflow to facilitate the collection, sharing and interpretation of scientific data by non-expert scientists.

  8. Mineralogy and microstructure of hydrated phases during the pozzolanic reaction in the sanitary ware waste/Ca(OH)2 system

    OpenAIRE

    Medina, César; Sáez del Bosque, Isabel F.; Asensio, Eloy; Frías, Moisés; Sánchez de Rojas, M Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Despite technological improvements in its production process, the sanitary ware industry inevitably generates a certain volume of discards, products whose quality is not up to standard. The present paper is the first to scientifically explore claybased sanitary ware waste (SW) with a view to its valorization as an addition in the design of new, more environmentally friendly cements. The focus is on characterization of the waste and its pozzolanicity, as well as the struct...

  9. Advantages and disadvantages of using intravenous tissue Plasminogen activator as salvage therapy for inoperable HeartWare thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basken, Robyn; Bazzell, Charles M; Smith, Richard; Janardhanan, Rajesh; Khalpey, Zain

    2017-07-01

    Device thrombosis is a devastating complication of left ventricular assist devices. The definitive treatment has been device exchange or explant. Evidence of increasing morbidity and mortality with device exchange has shifted strategies toward conservative management. In this report, we detail the use of thrombolytics as salvage therapy in a patient with an occlusive HeartWare ventricular assist device (HeartWare Inc., Framingham, MA) thrombus, resulting in long-term survival without further intervention. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. FDTD simulation of induction heating of conducting ceramic ware

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, M.J.; Iskander, M.F.; Bringhurst, S. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Electrical Engineering Dept.

    1996-12-31

    Induction heating for the treatment of metals has been in commercial use since the mid 1960`s. Traditional advantages of induction heating over the convection or radiation processes include speed of heating, possible energy savings, and the ability to customize the coil design to optimize the heating process. In this paper the authors used the Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) technique to simulate and analyze the induction heating process for highly conducting ceramics. In order to analyze frequency effects, simulations were performed at 300 kHz, 2 MHz, and 25 MHz. It is found that at higher frequencies coils with a pitch of 2 in. or greater became capacitive and generate a large, axial, electric-field component. This new axial electric field, in addition to the normally encountered azimuthal field, causes an improvement in the uniformity of the power deposition in the ceramic sample. If the sample occupies a large portion of the coil, uniformity may also be improved by using a variable-pitch coil, or by extending the length of the coil a few turns beyond the length of the sample. In a production-line arrangement, where multiple samples are placed inside the coil, it is shown that maximum uniformity is achieved when the samples are placed coaxially.

  11. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... spinal cord injury? play_arrow What kind of surgery is common after a spinal cord injury? play_ ... How soon after a spinal cord injury should surgery be performed? play_arrow Is it common to ...

  12. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... L Sarah Harrison, OT Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury ... a spinal cord injury important? play_arrow What role does “compression” play in a spinal cord injury? ...

  13. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury Diane M. Rowles, MS, NP How Family Life Changes After Spinal Cord Injury Nancy Rosenberg, ... Children with Spinal Cord Injury Patricia Mucia, RN Family Life After Pediatric Spinal Injury Dawn Sheaffer, MSW ...

  14. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Spinal Cord Injury ... Jennifer Piatt, PhD David Chen, MD Read Bio Medical Director, Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Program, Rehabilitation Institute ...

  15. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Spinal Cord Injury 101 ... arrow What is the “Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems” program? play_arrow What are the most promising ...

  16. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Spinal Cord Injury 101 Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 David ...

  17. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Spinal Cord Injury 101 Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 ...

  18. Spinal Cord Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your spinal cord is a bundle of nerves that runs down the middle of your back. It carries signals back ... of the spine, this can also injure the spinal cord. Other spinal cord problems include Tumors Infections such ...

  19. Spinal cord contusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Gong; Wang, Jian; Wang, Yazhou; Zhao, Xianghui

    2014-04-15

    Spinal cord injury is a major cause of disability with devastating neurological outcomes and limited therapeutic opportunities, even though there are thousands of publications on spinal cord injury annually. There are two major types of spinal cord injury, transaction of the spinal cord and spinal cord contusion. Both can theoretically be treated, but there is no well documented treatment in human being. As for spinal cord contusion, we have developed an operation with fabulous result.

  20. Usefulness of laser-evoked potentials and quantitative sensory testing in the diagnosis of neuropathic spinal cord injury pain: a multiple case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landmann, G; Berger, M F; Stockinger, L; Opsommer, E

    2017-06-01

    A retrospective study. The aim of this study was to investigate the contribution of laser-evoked potentials (LEPs) and quantitative sensory testing (QST) to the diagnosis of neuropathic pain in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) and inconclusive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. A multidisciplinary pain center. QST (DFNS protocol) and Tm-YAG-laser stimulation of the skin were applied within the pain site corresponding with dermatomes of altered sensation. Available MRI scans were reviewed. Thirteen individuals (50±16 years) with SCI were examined. In four cases with no detectable neural lesion on MRI, all QST but three LEP were abnormal. In four patients with poorly defined spinal lesion on MRI, all QST but three LEP only were abnormal. In four cases where pain was not matching adequately with MRI lesions, all patients had abnormal LEP and QST. In one patient showing a spinal cord atrophy, LEP was normal but QST was abnormal. Findings supported the diagnoses at-level (n=5) and below-level (n=8) SCI pain. Spinothalamic tract function assessed by LEP was normal in three cases, but QST was abnormal in all cases. As QST is a psychophysical examination depending on patient cooperation, we suggest that the combination of QST and LEP might be a valuable diagnostic tool to detect lesions of the somatosensory system in a subgroup of patients with neuropathic spinal cord injury pain and inconclusive MRI findings.

  1. SeqWare Query Engine: storing and searching sequence data in the cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merriman Barry

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since the introduction of next-generation DNA sequencers the rapid increase in sequencer throughput, and associated drop in costs, has resulted in more than a dozen human genomes being resequenced over the last few years. These efforts are merely a prelude for a future in which genome resequencing will be commonplace for both biomedical research and clinical applications. The dramatic increase in sequencer output strains all facets of computational infrastructure, especially databases and query interfaces. The advent of cloud computing, and a variety of powerful tools designed to process petascale datasets, provide a compelling solution to these ever increasing demands. Results In this work, we present the SeqWare Query Engine which has been created using modern cloud computing technologies and designed to support databasing information from thousands of genomes. Our backend implementation was built using the highly scalable, NoSQL HBase database from the Hadoop project. We also created a web-based frontend that provides both a programmatic and interactive query interface and integrates with widely used genome browsers and tools. Using the query engine, users can load and query variants (SNVs, indels, translocations, etc with a rich level of annotations including coverage and functional consequences. As a proof of concept we loaded several whole genome datasets including the U87MG cell line. We also used a glioblastoma multiforme tumor/normal pair to both profile performance and provide an example of using the Hadoop MapReduce framework within the query engine. This software is open source and freely available from the SeqWare project (http://seqware.sourceforge.net. Conclusions The SeqWare Query Engine provided an easy way to make the U87MG genome accessible to programmers and non-programmers alike. This enabled a faster and more open exploration of results, quicker tuning of parameters for heuristic variant calling filters

  2. SeqWare Query Engine: storing and searching sequence data in the cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Since the introduction of next-generation DNA sequencers the rapid increase in sequencer throughput, and associated drop in costs, has resulted in more than a dozen human genomes being resequenced over the last few years. These efforts are merely a prelude for a future in which genome resequencing will be commonplace for both biomedical research and clinical applications. The dramatic increase in sequencer output strains all facets of computational infrastructure, especially databases and query interfaces. The advent of cloud computing, and a variety of powerful tools designed to process petascale datasets, provide a compelling solution to these ever increasing demands. Results In this work, we present the SeqWare Query Engine which has been created using modern cloud computing technologies and designed to support databasing information from thousands of genomes. Our backend implementation was built using the highly scalable, NoSQL HBase database from the Hadoop project. We also created a web-based frontend that provides both a programmatic and interactive query interface and integrates with widely used genome browsers and tools. Using the query engine, users can load and query variants (SNVs, indels, translocations, etc) with a rich level of annotations including coverage and functional consequences. As a proof of concept we loaded several whole genome datasets including the U87MG cell line. We also used a glioblastoma multiforme tumor/normal pair to both profile performance and provide an example of using the Hadoop MapReduce framework within the query engine. This software is open source and freely available from the SeqWare project (http://seqware.sourceforge.net). Conclusions The SeqWare Query Engine provided an easy way to make the U87MG genome accessible to programmers and non-programmers alike. This enabled a faster and more open exploration of results, quicker tuning of parameters for heuristic variant calling filters, and a common data

  3. Hard Ware Implementation of Diamond Search Algorithm for Motion Estimation and Object Tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimaa, S.M.; Mahmoud, I.I.; Elazm, A.A.

    2009-01-01

    Object tracking is very important task in computer vision. Fast search algorithms emerged as important search technique to achieve real time tracking results. To enhance the performance of these algorithms, we advocate the hardware implementation of such algorithms. Diamond search block matching motion estimation has been proposed recently to reduce the complexity of motion estimation. In this paper we selected the diamond search algorithm (DS) for implementation using FPGA. This is due to its fundamental role in all fast search patterns. The proposed architecture is simulated and synthesized using Xilinix and modelsim soft wares. The results agree with the algorithm implementation in Matlab environment.

  4. SeqWare Query Engine: storing and searching sequence data in the cloud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Brian D; Merriman, Barry; Nelson, Stanley F

    2010-12-21

    Since the introduction of next-generation DNA sequencers the rapid increase in sequencer throughput, and associated drop in costs, has resulted in more than a dozen human genomes being resequenced over the last few years. These efforts are merely a prelude for a future in which genome resequencing will be commonplace for both biomedical research and clinical applications. The dramatic increase in sequencer output strains all facets of computational infrastructure, especially databases and query interfaces. The advent of cloud computing, and a variety of powerful tools designed to process petascale datasets, provide a compelling solution to these ever increasing demands. In this work, we present the SeqWare Query Engine which has been created using modern cloud computing technologies and designed to support databasing information from thousands of genomes. Our backend implementation was built using the highly scalable, NoSQL HBase database from the Hadoop project. We also created a web-based frontend that provides both a programmatic and interactive query interface and integrates with widely used genome browsers and tools. Using the query engine, users can load and query variants (SNVs, indels, translocations, etc) with a rich level of annotations including coverage and functional consequences. As a proof of concept we loaded several whole genome datasets including the U87MG cell line. We also used a glioblastoma multiforme tumor/normal pair to both profile performance and provide an example of using the Hadoop MapReduce framework within the query engine. This software is open source and freely available from the SeqWare project (http://seqware.sourceforge.net). The SeqWare Query Engine provided an easy way to make the U87MG genome accessible to programmers and non-programmers alike. This enabled a faster and more open exploration of results, quicker tuning of parameters for heuristic variant calling filters, and a common data interface to simplify development of

  5. Torakal Ventral Cord Herniation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sermin Tok

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available  Ventral cord herniation is a rare cause of focal myelopathy due to herniation of the thoracic cord through a dural defect.It is also known by a variety of other terms such as spontaneous thoracic cord herniation or idiopathic spinal cord herniation.The key feature is focal distortion and rotation of the cord with no CSF seen between it and the ventral theca.

  6. High quality voice synthesis middle ware; Kohinshitsu onsei gosei middle war

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    Toshiba Corp. newly developed a natural voice synthesis system, TOS Drive TTS (TOtally speaker Driven Text-To-Speech) system, in which natural high-quality read-aloud is greatly improved, and also developed as its application a voice synthesis middle ware. In the newly developed system, using as a model a narrator's voice recorded preliminarily, a metrical control dictionary is automatically learned that reproduces the characteristics of metrical patters such as intonation or rhythm of a human voice, as is a voice bases dictionary that reproduces the characteristics of a voice quality, enabling natural voice synthesis to be realized that picks up human voice characteristics. The system is high quality and also very compact, while the voice synthesis middle ware utilizing this technology is adaptable to various platforms such as MPU or OS. The system is very suitable for audio response in the ITS field having car navigation systems as the core; besides, expanded application is expected to an audio response system that used to employ a sound recording and reproducing system. (translated by NEDO)

  7. Provenance analysis of the Pliocene Ware Formation in the Guajira Peninsula, northern Colombia: Paleodrainage implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Consuegra, Nicolás; Parra, Mauricio; Jaramillo, Carlos; Silvestro, Daniele; Echeverri, Sebastián; Montes, Camilo; Jaramillo, José María; Escobar, Jaime

    2018-01-01

    The Cocinetas Basin in the Guajira Peninsula, the northernmost tip of South America, today has a dry climate with low rainfall (ten months) and no year-long rivers or permanent standing bodies of fresh water. In contrast, the fossil and geological record indicate that the Cocinetas Basin was much wetter during the Miocene-Pliocene (∼17-2.8 Ma). Water needed to sustain the paleofauna could either have originated from local sources or been brought by a larger river system (e.g. proto Magdalena/Orinoco river) with headwaters either in Andean ranges or the Guyana shield. We present a provenance study of the Pliocene Ware Formation, using petrographic analysis of conglomerate clasts and heavy minerals, and U-Pb dating of 140 detrital zircons. Clasts and heavy minerals are typical of ensialic metamorphic and igneous sources. The detrital zircon age distribution indicates the Guajira ranges as the most probable sediment source. The overall results indicate that the fluvial system of the Ware Formation drained the surrounding ranges. The water was probably derived by local precipitation onto the Guajira peninsula.

  8. A Study of the Evaluation Dimensions and Criteria for OpenCourseWare Websites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Ju Wang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OpenCourseWare (OCW, a set of free-of-use learning materials established by universities, became quite a success over the years and aroused the users’ willingness to learn online. However, the design of OCW websites, including the structure, organization of learning resources and interfaces is multi-variant and disordered. The system and arrangement are still lacking of an evaluation standard. The goal of this study is to establish and verify the dimensions and the criteria that are suitable for evaluation of OCW websites. To achieve the research goal, the researchers performed document analysis and the Delphi Method. Sixteen experts in a total took part in the Delphi panel. By giving three rounds of questionnaire to those experts in the self-developed e-Delphi system, the researcher gathered their opinions then analyzed them back and forth. The final edition of the Evaluation Dimensions and Criteria for OpenCourseWare Website includes seven dimensions with fifty-seven criteria. Finally, concrete suggestions for OCW website establishment and administration were provided. Implications and recommendations for future research were also addressed.

  9. Spinal cord involvement in tuberculous meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, R K; Malhotra, H S; Gupta, R

    2015-09-01

    To summarize the incidence and spectrum of spinal cord-related complications in patients of tuberculous meningitis. Reports from multiple countries were included. An extensive review of the literature, published in English, was carried out using Scopus, PubMed and Google Scholar databases. Tuberculous meningitis frequently affects the spinal cord and nerve roots. Initial evidence of spinal cord involvement came from post-mortem examination. Subsequent advancement in neuroimaging like conventional lumbar myelography, computed tomographic myelography and gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance-myelography have contributed immensely. Spinal involvement manifests in several forms, like tuberculous radiculomyelitis, spinal tuberculoma, myelitis, syringomyelia, vertebral tuberculosis and very rarely spinal tuberculous abscess. Frequently, tuberculous spinal arachnoiditis develops paradoxically. Infrequently, spinal cord involvement may even be asymptomatic. Spinal cord and spinal nerve involvement is demonstrated by diffuse enhancement of cord parenchyma, nerve roots and meninges on contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. High cerebrospinal fluid protein content is often a risk factor for arachnoiditis. The most important differential diagnosis of tuberculous arachnoiditis is meningeal carcinomatosis. Anti-tuberculosis therapy is the main stay of treatment for tuberculous meningitis. Higher doses of corticosteroids have been found effective. Surgery should be considered only when pathological confirmation is needed or there is significant spinal cord compression. The outcome in these patients has been unpredictable. Some reports observed excellent recovery and some reported unfavorable outcomes after surgical decompression and debridement. Tuberculous meningitis is frequently associated with disabling spinal cord and radicular complications. Available treatment options are far from satisfactory.

  10. A single dose of a neuron-binding human monoclonal antibody improves brainstem NAA concentrations, a biomarker for density of spinal cord axons, in a model of progressive multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wootla, Bharath; Denic, Aleksandar; Watzlawik, Jens O; Warrington, Arthur E; Rodriguez, Moses

    2015-04-29

    Intracerebral infection of susceptible mouse strains with Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) results in chronic demyelinating disease with progressive axonal loss and neurologic dysfunction similar to progressive forms of multiple sclerosis (MS). We previously showed that as the disease progresses, a marked decrease in brainstem N-acetyl aspartate (NAA; metabolite associated with neuronal integrity) concentrations, reflecting axon health, is measured. We also demonstrated stimulation of neurite outgrowth by a neuron-binding natural human antibody, IgM12. Treatment with either the serum-derived or recombinant human immunoglobulin M 12 (HIgM12) preserved functional motor activity in the TMEV model. In this study, we examined IgM-mediated changes in brainstem NAA concentrations and central nervous system (CNS) pathology. (1)H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) showed that treatment with HIgM12 significantly increased brainstem NAA concentrations compared to controls in TMEV-infected mice. Pathologic analysis demonstrated a significant preservation of axons in the spinal cord of animals treated with HIgM12. This study links drug efficacy of slowing deficits with axon preservation and NAA concentrations in the brainstem in a model of progressive MS. HIgM12-mediated changes of NAA concentrations in the brainstem are a surrogate marker of axon injury/preservation throughout the spinal cord. This study provides proof-of-concept that a neuron-reactive human IgM can be therapeutic and provides a biomarker for clinical trials.

  11. Deletion of beta-2-microglobulin ameliorates spinal cord lesion load and promotes recovery of brainstem NAA levels in a murine model of multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denic, Aleksandar; Pirko, Istvan; Wootla, Bharath; Bieber, Allan; Macura, Slobodan; Rodriguez, Moses

    2012-09-01

    We used genetic deletion of β2-microglobulin to study the influence of CD8(+) T cells on spinal cord demyelination, remyelination, axonal loss and brainstem N-acetyl aspartate levels during the acute and chronic phases of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) infection. We used β2m(-/-) and β2m(+/+) B10.Q mice (of H-2(q) background) normally susceptible to TMEV-induced demyelination. Over the disease course, β2m(+/+) mice had increasing levels of demyelination and minimal late-onset remyelination. In contrast, β2m(-/-) mice had steady levels of demyelination from 45-390 dpi and remyelination was extensive and more complete. Early in the disease, brainstem NAA levels drop in both strains, but accordingly with remyelination and axonal preservation, NAA recover in β2m(-/-) mice despite equivalent brainstem pathology. At 270 dpi, β2m(+/+) mice had significantly fewer spinal cord axons than β2m(-/-) mice (up to 28% less). In addition, β2m(+/+) mice lost axons of all calibers, whereas β2m(-/-) mice had a modest loss of only medium- and large-caliber axons. This study further supports the hypothesis that CD8(+) T cells are involved in demyelination, and axonal loss following Theiler's virus-induced demyelination. © 2012 The Authors; Brain Pathology © 2012 International Society of Neuropathology.

  12. Llums i ombres de l’Open Course Ware: envers l’OCW 2.0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosanna Mestre

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available El Open Course Ware es una altruista iniciativa orientada a la educación superior que aporta beneficios tanto a estudiantes y profesores, como a las instituciones que la promueven. Pero también tiene ciertas limitaciones que podrían ser paliadas parcialmente si sus gestores miraran al futuro desde una perspectiva más ambiciosa con el fin de garantizar no sólo repositorios abiertos, sino también apoyo pedagógico y reconocimiento de títulos. Exigiría soluciones imaginativas y comprometidas para algunas cuestiones clave pero podría convertirse en una respuesta accesible para la inminente demanda global de formación universitaria. Las bases de esta especie de OCW 2.0 ya están construidas.Open Course Ware is an altruistic initiative for higher education that has benefits for both students and professors, and institutions that promote it. But it also has certain limitations that might be diminished partly if decision makers looked at the future from a more ambitious perspective in order to guarantee not only open repositories, but also teaching assessment and degreegranting. It would require imaginative and engaged solutions to some key issues, but it could be a reasonable answer for the impending worldwide demand for higher education. The bases for this sort of OCW 2.0 are built already.L’Open Course Ware és una altruista iniciativa orientada a l’educació superior que aporta beneficis tant a estudiants i professors, com a les institucions que la promouen. Però també té certes limitacions que podrien ser pal·liades parcialment si els seus gestors miraren al futur des d’una perspectiva més ambiciosa per tal de garantir no sols repositoris oberts, sinó també suport pedagògic i reconeixement de títols. Exigiria solucions imaginatives i compromeses per a algunes qu?estions clau, però podria esdevenir una resposta accessible per a la imminent demanda global de formació universitària. Les bases d’aquesta mena d

  13. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos ... Home Kim Eberhardt Muir, MS Coping with a New Injury Robin Dorman, PsyD Sex and Fertility After Spinal Cord Injury Diane M. ...

  14. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Kristine Cichowski, MS Occupational Therapy after Spinal Cord Injury Katie Powell, OT ... does not provide medical advice, recommend or endorse health care products or services, or control the information ...

  15. Spinal Cord Dysfunction (SCD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Spinal Cord Dysfunction (SCD) module supports the maintenance of local and national registries for the tracking of patients with spinal cord injury and disease...

  16. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal Cord Injuries Video Library SCI Medical Experts People Living with SCI Personal Experiences ...

  17. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? play_arrow When can we expect stem-cell treatments to become available for spinal cord injuries? ...

  18. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? play_arrow When can we expect stem-cell treatments to become available for spinal cord injuries? ...

  19. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injuries Video Library SCI Medical Experts People Living with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources ... Spinal Cord Injuries Video Library SCI Medical Experts People Living with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources ...

  20. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... play_arrow What are the chances of regaining feeling and mobility after a spinal cord injury? play_arrow How long does it usually take for feeling and movement to return after a spinal cord ...

  1. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... RN Pediatric Injuries Pediatric Spinal Cord Injury 101 Lawrence Vogel, MD The Basics of Pediatric SCI Rehabilitation ... Rogers, PT Recreational Therapy after Spinal Cord Injury Jennifer Piatt, PhD David Chen, MD Read Bio Medical ...

  2. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About Us Expert Videos Contact Us Personal Experience Videos Blog Videos By Topic Media Resources Donate to support families facing spinal cord ...

  3. Tethered Spinal Cord Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cord over time and may be exacerbated during sports or pregnancy, or may be due to narrowing of the ... cord over time and may be exacerbated during sports or pregnancy, or may be due to narrowing of the ...

  4. Spinal cord stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007560.htm Spinal cord stimulation To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Spinal cord stimulation is a treatment for pain that uses ...

  5. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injury 101 Lawrence Vogel, MD The Basics of Pediatric SCI Rehabilitation Sara Klaas, MSW Transitions for Children with Spinal Cord Injury Patricia Mucia, RN Family Life After Pediatric Spinal Injury Dawn Sheaffer, MSW Rehabilitation ...

  6. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injury 101 David Chen, MD Preventing Pressure Sores Mary Zeigler, MS Transition from Hospital to ... a spinal cord injury? play_arrow Why are high-dose steroids often used right after an injury? ...

  7. 76 FR 7534 - Porcelain-on-Steel Cooking Ware from the People's Republic of China: Final Results of the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-10

    ... Ware from the People's Republic of China: Final Results of the Expedited Sunset Review of the... People's Republic of China (``PRC'') pursuant to section 751(c) of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended (``Act''). See Initiation of Five-Year (``Sunset'') Review, 75 FR 60731 (October 1, 2010) (``Sunset...

  8. Understanding the Self-Directed Online Learning Preferences, Goals, Achievements, and Challenges of MIT OpenCourseWare Subscribers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonk, Curtis J.; Lee, Mimi Miyoung; Kou, Xiaojing; Xu, Shuya; Sheu, Feng-Ru

    2015-01-01

    This research targeted the learning preferences, goals and motivations, achievements, challenges, and possibilities for life change of self-directed online learners who subscribed to the monthly OpenCourseWare (OCW) e-newsletter from MIT. Data collection included a 25-item survey of 1,429 newsletter subscribers; 613 of whom also completed an…

  9. Pots, plates and provenance: sourcing Indian coarse wares from Mleiha using X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, A; Attaelmanan, A G; Mouton, M

    2012-01-01

    The identification of more than 25% of the pottery sherds from the late PIR.D period (ca. 2nd - mid. 3rd c. AD) assemblage from the recently excavated building H at Mleiha as Indian is based on form and fabric, but using only visual assessment. Petrographic analysis of the fabrics can provide more precise indicators of the geographical origin of the wares. In this study, a total of 21 sherds from various key sites in Western India were compared with 7 different 'Indian' coarse-ware vessels sampled at Mleiha using X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry. The analyses were conducted on powdered samples collected from the core of each sherd. Each sample was irradiated for 1000 seconds using a 1.2 mm diameter X-ray beam. The resulting spectra were used for quantification of the X-ray intensity and elemental concentration. Levels of correlation in the elemental ratios of the sherds were statistically tested using an F-test as well as a Chi-test. Initial review of the XRF results indicates that the Maharashtra and Gujarat regions of India are probable source areas for at least two of the types of wares. Collection of additional samples from these areas and other regions of India, and further statistical analysis through methods such as Principal Component Analysis will help to isolate groups of wares from India and correlate them with types of vessels imported into the Oman peninsula in antiquity.

  10. 77 FR 60119 - Proposed Consent Agreements: DesignerWare, LLC, Timothy Kelly and Ronald P. Koller, Aspen Way...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-02

    ... the news release describing it. The FTC Act and other laws that the Commission administers permit the...' private information would not be possible. RTO stores also used Detective Mode to send fake ``software.... DesignerWare created several different fake registration forms that its servers displayed on consumers...

  11. 75 FR 11991 - ABC & D Recycling, Inc.-Lease and Operation Exemption-a Line of Railroad in Ware, MA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-12

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board [STB Finance Docket No. 35356] ABC & D Recycling, Inc.--Lease and Operation Exemption--a Line of Railroad in Ware, MA ABC & D Recycling, Inc. (ABC & D), a noncarrier, has filed a verified notice of exemption under 49 CFR 1150.31 to lease from O...

  12. OpenCourseWare and Open Educational Resources: The Next Big Thing in Technology-Enhanced Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caudill, Jason G.

    2012-01-01

    OpenCourseWare (OCW) and Open Educational Resources (OER) are two new and closely related educational technologies. Both provide open access to learning materials for students and instructors via the Internet. These are for the moment still very young technologies. While they have grown dramatically in just ten years there is still relatively…

  13. Surface Coating Technique of Northern Black Polished Ware by the Microscopic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilruba Sharmin

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available An organic substance has been identified in the top layer of Northern Black Polished Ware (NBPW excavated from the Wari-Boteshwar and Mahasthangarh sites in Bangladesh. NBPW is the most distinctive ceramic of Early Historic period and the technique of its surface gloss acquired numerous theories. This particular paper is an analytical study of collected NBPW sherds from these two sites including surface observations using binocular and scanning electron microscopes and Thin Section Analysis of potsherds. Thin section analysis identified two different layers of coating on the surface of the NBPW. One layer is a ‘slip’ (ground coat and the other is a ‘top layer or top coat ’. The slip was made from refined clay and the top layer was derived from organic substance. Microscopic analysis confirmed the solid and non-clayey characteristics of the top coat.

  14. The new inter process communication middle-ware for the ATLAS Trigger and Data Acquisition system

    CERN Document Server

    Kolos, Serguei; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS Trigger & Data Acquisition (TDAQ) project was started almost twenty years ago with the aim of providing scalable distributed data collection system for the experiment. While the software dealing with physics data flow was implemented by directly using the low-level communication protocols, like TCP and UDP, the control and monitoring infrastructure services for the TDAQ system were implemented on top of the CORBA communication middle-ware. CORBA provides a high-level object oriented abstraction for the inter process communication, hiding communication complexity from the developers. This approach speeds up and simplifies development of communication services but incurs some extra cost in terms of performance and resources overhead. Our experience of using CORBA for control and monitoring data exchange in the distributed TDAQ system was very successful, mostly due to the outstanding quality of the CORBA brokers, which have been used in the project: omniORB for C++ and JacORB for Java. However, du...

  15. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the spinal cord work? play_arrow Why is the level of a spinal cord injury important? play_arrow What role does “compression” play in a spinal cord injury? play_arrow Why are high-dose steroids often used right after an injury? play_arrow What is meant ...

  16. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... arrow What is the “Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems” program? play_arrow What are the most promising new treatments for spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What are the latest developments in the use of electrical stimulation for spinal cord injuries? play_arrow ...

  17. Spinal Cord Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... forth between your body and your brain. A spinal cord injury disrupts the signals. Spinal cord injuries usually begin with a blow that fractures or ... down on the nerve parts that carry signals. Spinal cord injuries can be complete or incomplete. With a complete ...

  18. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... injury? play_arrow How does the spinal cord work? play_arrow Why is the level of a spinal cord injury important? play_arrow What role does “compression” play in a spinal cord injury? play_arrow Why are high-dose steroids often used right after an injury? play_arrow What is meant ...

  19. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Abuse and Spinal Cord Injury Allen Heinemann, PhD How Peer Counseling Works Julie Gassaway, MS, RN Pediatric Injuries Pediatric Spinal ... What is a spinal cord injury? play_arrow How does the spinal cord work? play_arrow Why is the level of a ...

  20. Star Ware: The Amateur Astronomer's Guide to Choosing, Buying, and Using Telescopes and Accessories, 3rd Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Philip S.

    2002-05-01

    Praise for the Second Edition of Star Ware "Star Ware is still a tour de force that any experienced amateur will find invaluable, and which hardware-minded beginners will thoroughly enjoy." -Robert Burnham, Sky & Telescope magazine "Star Ware condenses between two covers what would normally take a telescope buyer many months to accumulate." -John Shibley, Astronomy magazine Now more than ever, the backyard astronomer has a dazzling array of choices when it comes to telescope shopping-which can make choosing just the right sky-watching equipment a formidable challenge. In this revised and updated edition of Star Ware, the essential guide to buying astronomical equipment, award-winning astronomy writer Philip Harrington does the work for you, analyzing and exploring today's astronomy market and offering point-by-point comparisons of everything you need. Whether you're an experienced amateur astronomer or just getting started, Star Ware, Third Edition will prepare you to explore the farthest reaches of space with: Extensive, expanded reviews of leading models and accessories, including dozens of new products, to help you buy smart A clear, step-by-step guide to all aspects of purchasing everything from telescopes and binoculars to filters, mounts, lenses, cameras, film, star charts, guides and references, and much more Eleven new do-it-yourself projects for making unique astronomical equipment at home Easy tips on maintenance, photography, and star-mapping to help you get the most out of your telescope Lists of where to find everything astronomical, including Internet sites and Web resources; distributors, dealers, and conventions; and corporate listings for products and services

  1. Spinal cord toxoplasmosis in AIDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carteret, M.; Petit, E.; Granat, O.; Marichez, M.; Gilquin, J.

    1995-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is the most common brain parasitic infection in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Spinal cord localizations are still rare (2 cases with cerebral involvement, 2 cases without). A case of both spinal cord and cerebral involvement is reported. Magnetic resonance imaging (MR imaging) was performed because of sensory level (L 1). A focal conus medullaris enlargement was seen, iso intense on T 1 weighted images. This lesion was hyperintense on T 2 weighted sequence, and was homogeneously enhanced after Gadolinium on T 1 weighted images. A medullary oedema was noted. A toxoplasmosis treatment was initiated, without cortico therapy. MR imaging performed one month later (D 30), while important clinical improvements were seen, pointed out normal thickness of conus medullaris, without enhancement after Gadolinium. Disease lesions in AIDS with focal spinal cord processes are reviewed, and diagnostic work-up is discussed. Spinal cord single lesion, associated or not with brain involvements should be treated as a toxoplasmic infection, with MR imaging follow up. This work up should avoid medullary biopsy, still required in case of treatment failure. Cerebral involvements, with multiples lesions can mask medullary localization. (authors). 8 refs., 2 figs

  2. Preliminary clinical applications of DTI in human cervical spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Ting; Mai Weiwen; Liang Biling; Shen Jun; Huang Suiqiao; Hu Chunhong

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To condcut preliminary study of the value of DTI(diffusion tensor imaging) in human cervical spinal cord. Methods: Twenty-one patients suffering from cervical spondylotic myelopathy and twenty volunteers without any clinical symptoms underwent routine MRI and DTI examination. DTI was performed in six non-collinear directions with single-shot fast spin echo echo, planar imaging sequence(b value = 400 s·mm -2 ). ADC(apparent diffusion coefficient) and FA(fractional anisotropy)values were measured by ROIs(regions of interest) in 4 different level segment spinal cord (C 2/3 , C 3/4 , C 4/5 , C 5/6 ) in normal volunteers, in lesions and normal segmental spinal cord in clinical cases respectively. DTI original images were automatically processed by using IDL (Version 5.6) soft- ware to produce color tensor images. SPSS11.0 software for windows was used for t-test and one-way ANOVA analysis. The difference was considered statistically significant if P 2/3 , C 3/4 , C 4/5 , C 5/6 , were analyzed and it was found that FA value between them had a significant difference by ANOVA, F=159.24, P 2/3 level. However, ADC value between 4 segments had no significant difference(F=2.191, P>0.05). (2)In patients of cervical spondylotic myelopathy, routine MRI T2WI showed abnormal signal in 9 cases, and showed no abnormal signal in 12 dases. In sixteen cases it was found that abnormal patchy green signal on colorized tensor maps appeared on the normal blue spinal cord. Also, in patients of cervical spondylotic myelopathy, there was significant difference in ADC and FA value between lesions and normal spinal cord (paired t test, for ADC, t=2.88, P 2/3 level segment spinal cord in normal volunteers (0.85 ± 0.03) is the highest among other segments. FA value decreases gradually along cervical spinal cord towards the caudal direction. However, the difference of ADC values amongst 4 segments is not significant. DTI colorized tensor maps can show more lesions than routine MRI

  3. Settlement duration and materiality: formal chronological models for the development of Barnhouse, a Grooved Ware settlement in Orkney

    OpenAIRE

    Richards, Colin; Jones, Andrew Meirion; MacSween, Ann; Sheridan, Alison; Dunbar, Elaine; Reimer, Paula; Bayliss, Alex; Griffiths, Seren; Whittle, Alasdair

    2016-01-01

    Radiocarbon dating and Bayesian chronological modelling, undertaken as part of the investigation by the Times of Their Lives project into the development of Late Neolithic settlement and pottery in Orkney, has provided precise new dating for the Grooved Ware settlement of Barnhouse, excavated in 1985–91. Previous understandings of the site and its pottery are presented. A Bayesian model based on 70 measurements on 62 samples (of which 50 samples are thought to date accurately the deposits fro...

  4. Retention of Employees in Ceramic Sanitary Ware Factories in India: Role of Work Life Balance, Career Development and Supervisor Support

    OpenAIRE

    S. Umamaheswari; Jayasree Krishnan

    2016-01-01

    The study examines the role of work life balance, career development and supervisor support on organization commitment over employees of unattended, ceramic sanitary ware factories in India. It also verifies the influence of organization commitment on retention and its mediating role. Findings reveal that organization commitment influences retention and all the above factors enhance it. Moreover, organization commitment partially mediates the relationship between proposed factors and retentio...

  5. Migration of formaldehyde from melamine-ware: UK 2008 survey results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, E L J; Bradley, E L; Davies, C R; Barnes, K A; Castle, L

    2010-06-01

    Fifty melamine-ware articles were tested for the migration of formaldehyde - with hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA) expressed as formaldehyde - to see whether the total specific migration limit (SML(T)) was being observed. The SML(T), given in European Commission Directive 2002/72/EC as amended, is 15 mg kg(-1). Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy was carried out on the articles to confirm the plastic type. Articles were exposed to the food simulant 3% (w/v) aqueous acetic acid under conditions representing their worst foreseeable use. Formaldehyde and HMTA in food simulants were determined by a spectrophotometric derivatization procedure. Positive samples were confirmed by a second spectrophotometric procedure using an alternative derivatization agent. As all products purchased were intended for repeat use, three sequential exposures to the simulant were carried out. Formaldehyde was detected in the simulant exposed to 43 samples. Most of the levels found were well below the limits set in law such that 84% of the samples tested were compliant. However, eight samples had formaldehyde levels that were clearly above the legal maximum at six to 65 times the SML(T).

  6. Image simulation for HardWare In the Loop simulation in EO domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cathala, Thierry; Latger, Jean

    2015-10-01

    Infrared camera as a weapon sub system for automatic guidance is a key component for military carrier such as missile for example. The associated Image Processing, that controls the navigation, needs to be intensively assessed. Experimentation in the real world is very expensive. This is the main reason why hybrid simulation also called HardWare In the Loop (HWIL) is more and more required nowadays. In that field, IR projectors are able to cast IR fluxes of photons directly onto the IR camera of a given weapon system, typically a missile seeker head. Though in laboratory, the missile is so stimulated exactly like in the real world, provided a realistic simulation tool enables to perform synthetic images to be displayed by the IR projectors. The key technical challenge is to render the synthetic images at the required frequency. This paper focuses on OKTAL-SE experience in this domain through its product SE-FAST-HWIL. It shows the methodology and Return of Experience from OKTAL-SE. Examples are given, in the frame of the SE-Workbench. The presentation focuses on trials on real operational complex 3D cases. In particular, three important topics, that are very sensitive with regards to IG performance, are detailed: first the 3D sea surface representation, then particle systems rendering especially to simulate flares and at last sensor effects modelling. Beyond "projection mode", some information will be given on the SE-FAST-HWIL new capabilities dedicated to "injection mode".

  7. Hydrogeologic data from the US Geological Survey test wells near Waycross, Ware County, Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, S.E.; Krause, R.E.

    1983-01-01

    Two wells were constructed near Waycross, Ware County, Georgia, from July 1980 to May 1981 to collect stratigraphic, structural, geophysical, hydrologic, hydraulic, and geochemical information for the U.S. Geological Survey Tertiary Limestone Regional Aquifer-System Analysis. Data collection included geologic sampling and coring, borehole geophysical logging, packer testing, water-level measuring, water-quality sampling, and aquifer testing. In the study area, the Tertiary limestone aquifer system is about 1,300 feet thick and is confined and overlain by about 610 feet of clastic sediments. The aquifer system consists of limestone, dolomite, and minor evaporites and has high porosity and permeability. A 4-day continuous discharge aquifer test was conducted, from which a transmissivity of about 1 million feet squared per day and a storage coefficient of 0.0001 were calculated. Water from the upper part of the aquifer is of a calcium bicarbonate type. The deeper highly mineralized zone produces a sodium bicarbonate type water in which concentrations of magnesium, sulfate, chloride, sodium, and some trace metals increase with depth. (USGS)

  8. Experiences in messaging middle-ware for high-level control applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wanga, N.; Shasharina, S.; Matykiewicz, J.; Rooparani Pundaleeka

    2012-01-01

    Existing high-level applications in accelerator control and modeling systems leverage many different languages, tools and frameworks that do not inter-operate with one another. As a result, the accelerator control community is moving toward the proven Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) approach to address the inter-operability challenges among heterogeneous high-level application modules. Such SOA approach enables developers to package various control subsystems and activities into 'services' with well-defined 'interfaces' and make leveraging heterogeneous high-level applications via flexible composition possible. Examples of such applications include presentation panel clients based on Control System Studio (CSS) and middle-layer applications such as model/data servers. This paper presents our experiences in developing a demonstrative high-level application environment using emerging messaging middle-ware standards. In particular, we utilize new features in EPICS v4 and other emerging standards such as Data Distribution Service (DDS) and Extensible Type Interface by the Object Management Group. We first briefly review examples we developed previously. We then present our current effort in integrating DDS into such a SOA environment for control systems. Specifically, we illustrate how we are integrating DDS into CSS and develop a Python DDS mapping. (authors)

  9. OpenCourseWare, Global Access and the Right to Education: Real access or marketing ploy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henk Huijser

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the potential opportunities that OpenCourseWare (OCW offers in providing wider access to tertiary education, based on the ideal of ‘the right to education’. It first discusses the wider implications of OCW, and its underlying philosophy, before using a case study of a tertiary preparation program (TPP at the University of Southern Queensland (USQ to draw out the issues involved in offering a program that is created in a particular national and social context on a global scale. This paper draws specific attention to the digital divide, its effects in national and global contexts, and the particular obstacles this presents with regards to OCW. This paper argues that OCW provides many opportunities, both in terms of access to education and in terms of student recruitment and marketing for universities. To take full advantage of those opportunities, however, requires a concerted effort on the part of tertiary education institutions, and it requires a vision that is fundamentally informed by, and committed to, the principle of ‘the right to education’.

  10. Docencia y libre acceso: el Open Course Ware de la Universitat de València

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Gallardo Paúls

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo presentamos la Oficina OCW de la Universitat de València atendiendo al contexto general de aparición y sus características específicas. En primer lugar, contextualizamos el Open Course Ware en el ámbito de los movimientos Open y repasamos algunas de sus iniciativas. Después nos centramos en la caracterización de los usuarios/destinatarios prototípicos del OCW como “nativos digitales”, atendiendo a la distinción de dos modelos epistemológicos: la inteligencia colectiva (nativos y el paradigma del experto (inmigrantes digitales, algunas de cuyas premisas básicas se explican solamente por la aparición de las tecnologías digitales. Tras esta contextualización teórica, exponemos las características que definen el proyecto OCW, de la Universitat de València

  11. Impact of OpenCourseWare Publication on Higher Education Participation and Student Recruitment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Carson

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The free and open publication of course materials (OpenCourseWare or OCW was initially undertaken by Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT and other universities primarily to share educational resources among educators (Abelson, 2007. OCW, however, and more in general open educational resources (OER1, have also provided well-documented opportunities for all learners, including the so-called “informal learners” and “independent learners” (Carson, 2005; Mulder, 2006, p. 35. Universities have also increasingly documented clear benefits for specific target groups such as secondary education students and lifelong learners seeking to enter formal postsecondary education programs.In addition to benefitting learners, OCW publication has benefitted the publishing institutions themselves by providing recruiting advantages. Finally enrollment figures from some institutions indicate that even in the case of the free and open publication of materials from online programs, OCW does not negatively affect enrollment. This paper reviews evaluation conducted at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health (JHSPH, and Open Universiteit Nederland (OUNL concerning OCW effects on higher education participation and student recruitment.

  12. Open Course Ware, Distance Education, and 21st Century Geoscience Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, M. G.

    2010-12-01

    Open Course Ware (OCW) allows the highest quality educational materials (including videos of lectures from the best classroom lecturers) to find a wide audience. This audience may include many who wish to obtain credentials for formal study yet who are unable to be campus-based students. This opens a role for formal, credentialed and accredited distance education (DE) to efficiently integrate OCW into DE courses. OCW materials will in this manner be able to be used for education of credential-seeking students who would not otherwise benefit from them. Modern presentation methods using the Internet and video (including mobile device) technologies may offer pedagogical advantages over even traditional classroom learning. A detailed analysis of the development of Athabasca University’s PHYS 302 Vibrations and Waves course (based mainly on MIT’s OCW), and application of lessons learned to development of PHYS 305 Electromagnetism is presented. These courses are relevant to the study of geophysics, but examples of GEOL (Geology) courses will also be mentioned, along with an broad overview of OCW resources in Geoscience.

  13. Development of a community-ware for social confidence building for HLW disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Hiroshi; Furuta, Kazuo; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2004-01-01

    Performance assessment (PA), as a tool to support decisions associated with geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste, requires the facilitation of various views of stakeholders. We believe that the key benefit of using the information technologies in the context of PA lies in the possibility of accelerating knowledge interaction among interested individuals and facilitating a wider spectrum of views into PA, and we propose the 'collaborative' approach using the computer network. We have initiated a voluntary PA community to test validity of such an approach in guiding and supporting discussions and decisions concerning geological disposal. To expedite such activities, we have also developed community-ware', which enables members of the PA network community to grasp relative positions of themselves in an 'opinion space' so that they can find possible partners to collaborate with, and allows newcomers to recapture a summary of the previous discussions. In addition, the history of past discussions together with the results of iterative PA calculations will provide useful insight for understanding and modeling the process of consensus building. A PA network community consisting of around 20 members was formed and a pilot application was carried out which resulted in demonstration of potential advantage of a PA network community in expediting knowledge evolution concerning long term safety of geological disposal. On the other hand it highlighted issues for further research and development. (author)

  14. Informal Education of Adults in the Land of WoodenWare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojan Žnidaršič

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available The fundamental aim of the project entitled the Land of Wooden Ware is developing a healthy environment and improving the conditions of life and work in rural areas. The project covers topographically varied, scarcely populated and demographically endangered areas in 11 municipalities (around 140,000 hectares. With respect to various standards, the entire expanse is a homogeneous region. Through a holistic approach, including education for permanent progress, direct expert help and other forms of help, the project aims to change the nega tive demographic curve and preserve the environment. The practical method used to achieve the goals set is direct work with people. The introductory phase includes exhibitions, articles in local and national media, etc., and will be followed by an extensive opinion poll among households. The results will serve as the basis for the preparation of lectures and workshops. The educational phase will dose with a study circle which will provide deeper insight into the subject. The entire effort (which includes the inhabitants, the municipality and VITRA is based on the desire to present rural regions as business opportunities for eco­farming, ecotourism, efficient use of renewable sources of energy, etc.

  15. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About ... Your email address * This iframe contains the logic required to ...

  16. Umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells reversed the suppressive deficiency of T regulatory cells from peripheral blood of patients with multiple sclerosis in a co-culture – a preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongna; Sun, Jinhua; Wang, Feng; Li, Yan; Bi, Jianzhong; Qu, Tingyu

    2016-01-01

    The immunoregulatory function of T regulatory cells (Tregs) is impaired in multiple sclerosis (MS). Recent studies have shown that umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs) exert regulatory effect on the functions of immune cells. Thus, we investigated whether UC-MSCs could improve the impaired function of Tregs from MS patients. Co-cultures of UC-MSCs with PBMCs of MS patients were performed for 3 days. Flow cytometry was used to determine the frequency of Tregs. A cell proliferation assay was used to evaluate the suppressive capacity of Tregs. ELISA was conducted for cytokine analysis in the co-cultures. Our results showed that UC-MSCs significantly increased the frequency of CD4+CD25+CD127low/− Tregs in resting CD4+ T cells (pUC-MSC-primed Tregs of MS patients significantly inhibited the proliferation of PHA-stimulated autologous and allogeneic CD4+CD25− T effector cells (Teffs) from MS patients and healthy individuals compared to non-UC-MSC-primed (naïve) Tregs from the same MS patients (pUC-MSC-primed Tregs from MS patients and naïve Tregs from healthy subjects. The impaired suppressive function of Tregs from MS can be completely reversed in a co-culture by UC-MSC modulation. This report is the first to demonstrate that functional defects of Tregs in MS can be repaired in vitro using a simple UC-MSC priming approach. PMID:27705922

  17. Elevated Expression of Fractalkine (CX3CL1 and Fractalkine Receptor (CX3CR1 in the Dorsal Root Ganglia and Spinal Cord in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis: Implications in Multiple Sclerosis-Induced Neuropathic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjun Zhu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a central nervous system (CNS disease resulting from a targeted autoimmune-mediated attack on myelin proteins in the CNS. The release of Th1 inflammatory mediators in the CNS activates macrophages, antibodies, and microglia resulting in myelin damage and the induction of neuropathic pain (NPP. Molecular signaling through fractalkine (CX3CL1, a nociceptive chemokine, via its receptor (CX3CR1 is thought to be associated with MS-induced NPP. An experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE model of MS was utilized to assess time dependent gene and protein expression changes of CX3CL1 and CX3CR1. Results revealed significant increases in mRNA and the protein expression of CX3CL1 and CX3CR1 in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG and spinal cord (SC 12 days after EAE induction compared to controls. This increased expression correlated with behavioural thermal sensory abnormalities consistent with NPP. Furthermore, this increased expression correlated with the peak neurological disability caused by EAE induction. This is the first study to identify CX3CL1 signaling through CX3CR1 via the DRG /SC anatomical connection that represents a critical pathway involved in NPP induction in an EAE model of MS.

  18. The value of contrast media in spinal cord abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumasa Takahashi

    1995-01-01

    The contents are intramedullary tumors, inflammatry lesions, demyelinating diseases - multiple sclerosis (MS), radiation myelitis, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM); vascular lesions - spinal cord infarct, arteriovenous malformation, cavernous haemangioma (24 refs.)

  19. The value of contrast media in spinal cord abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Matsumasa [Kumamoto Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1996-12-31

    The contents are intramedullary tumors, inflammatry lesions, demyelinating diseases - multiple sclerosis (MS), radiation myelitis, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM); vascular lesions - spinal cord infarct, arteriovenous malformation, cavernous haemangioma (24 refs.).

  20. The role of MRI of the brain and spinal cord, and CSF examination for the diagnosis of primary progressive multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, P; Sandberg-Wollheim, M; Norrving, B

    2007-01-01

    The clinical applicability of the revised McDonald diagnostic criteria of primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS) was assessed in 17 patients with a longstanding PPMS diagnosis (mean 15 years). All patients were re-evaluated with clinical examinations, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI...... the revised McDonald criteria for positive scans. No contrast-enhancing lesion was observed despite administration of triple doses of gadolinium. In total, 12 patients fulfilled the revised McDonald MRI criteria for PPMS. Of the remaining five patients who incompletely fulfilled the revised MRI criteria, all...

  1. Phase sensitive reconstruction of T1-weighted inversion recovery in the evaluation of the cervical cord lesions in multiple Sclerosis; is it similarly eligible in 1.5 T magnet fields?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shayganfar, A; Sarrami, A H; Fathi, S; Shaygannejad, V; Shamsian, S

    2018-04-22

    In primary studies with 3 T Magnets, phase sensitive reconstruction of T1-weighted inversion recovery (PSIR) have showed ability to depict the cervical multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions some of which may not be detected by short tau inversion recovery (STIR). Regarding to more availability of 1.5 T MRI, this study was designed to evaluate the eligibility of PSIR in 1.5 T for detection of spinal cord MS lesions. In a study between September 2016 till March 2017 the patients with proven diagnosis of MS enrolled to the study. The standard protocol (sagittal STIR and T2W FSE and axial T2W FSE) as well as sagittal PSIR sequences were performed using a 1.5 T magnet. The images were studied and the lesions were localized and recorded as sharp or faint on each sequence. Of 25 patients (22 females and 3 males, with mean age of 33.5 ± 9.8 years and mean disease duration of 5.4 ± 3.9 years) 69 lesions in STIR, 53 lesions in T2W FSE, 47 lesions in Magnitude reconstruction of PSIR (Magnitude), and 30 lesions in phase sensitive (real) reconstruction PSIR were detected. A Wilcoxon signed-rank test showed STIR has a statistically significant higher detection rate of the plaques rather than other three sequences. (STIR and T2W FSE, Z = -4.000, p definition of the plaques rather than other three sequences. This study shows that in the setting of a 1.5 T magnet field, STIR significantly has a superiority over both of the PSIR reconstructions (i.e. real and magnitude) for the detection as well as the boundary definition of the cervical cord lesions of MS. These results have a good relevance to clinical practice by using MRI scanners and sequences routinely available, however, it is discrepant with other reports performed by 3 T Magnet fields. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What is “Braingate” research? play_arrow How would stem-cell therapies work ... cord injuries? play_arrow What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? play_arrow When can ...

  3. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury Allen Heinemann, PhD How Peer Counseling Works Julie Gassaway, MS, RN Pediatric Injuries Pediatric Spinal ... injury? play_arrow How does the spinal cord work? play_arrow Why is the level of a ...

  4. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... arrow What are the latest developments in the use of electrical stimulation for spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What is “Braingate” research? play_arrow How would stem-cell therapies work in the treatment of spinal cord ...

  5. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injury Guy W. Fried, MD Substance Abuse and Spinal Cord Injury Allen Heinemann, PhD How ... arrow Why are high-dose steroids often used right after an injury? play_arrow What is meant ...

  6. Effect of preparation variables of plaster molds for slip casting of sanitary ware

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael E. Ochoa

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A full factorial design was used to evaluate the effect of various preparation conditions for making plaster molds for slip casting of sanitary ware. We investigated the relationships between the processing conditions, microstructure, and final properties of the plaster molds. The results showed that the rheological behavior, and hence, the time during which the plaster suspension is pourable for making the plaster molds (before an important increase in viscosity due to the precipitation of gypsum crystals were dependent on the preparation conditions. Variations in the chemical composition, pore size distribution, and microstructure explained the statistically significant effect of preparation variables (including the mixing time, water temperature, and water quality. Preparation conditions that promoted high initial viscosity of the plaster suspension (accelerative effect of the setting time developed less porous structure in the mold that principally increased the compressive strength (16%, deionized water instead of tap water and the casting rate (9%, water at 25 °C instead of 38 °C. According to the results are proposed optimum conditions to make the molds while avoiding unnecessary energy use. Resumen: Mediante un diseño factorial completo se evaluaron diferentes condiciones de preparación de moldes de yeso para colado tradicional de muebles sanitarios. Se investigó la relación entre procesamiento, microestructura y propiedades del molde. Los resultados mostraron que el comportamiento reológico y por lo tanto el tiempo durante el cual la suspensión de yeso se puede verter para conformar los moldes (antes de un incremento importante de viscosidad debido a la formación de cristales de yeso fueron dependientes de las condiciones de preparación. Variaciones en composición química, distribución de tamaño de poro y microestructura explicaron el efecto estadísticamente significativo de las variables de preparación (que incluyeron

  7. Characterization of Concrete made with Recycled Aggregate from Ceramic Sanitary Ware

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medina, C.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the possibility of reusing the ceramic wastes of sanitary ware as coarse aggregate, in partial substitution (15, 20 y 25 % of natural coarse aggregates. Firstly, the characterization of recycled coarse ceramic aggregate was carried out subsequently proceeded to establish the parameters of dosage and manufacture of different concretes. Lastly, tests were conducted using these mixes to characterize physical and mechanical, and a study was carried out to identify the crystalline phases. Results showed that as the substitution proportion increased, the mechanical properties of the concrete improved, whilst physical properties remained practically constant. In view of these results, we conclude that it is possible to use this type of ceramic waste as coarse aggregate when mixing concrete destined for structural purposes.

    En este estudio se plantea la posibilidad de reutilizar los residuos cerámicos de sanitarios como árido grueso sustituyendo de forma parcial (15, 20 y 25 % al árido grueso natural. Para ello, se llevó a cabo la caracterización del árido cerámico reciclado y posteriormente se procedió a establecer los parámetros de dosificación y fabricación de los distintos hormigones. Finalmente, se realizó sobre los mismos unos ensayos de caracterización de las propiedades físicas y mecánicas, y un estudio de las fases cristalinas. Los resultados indican que a medida que se aumenta el porcentaje de sustitución se ven mejoradas las propiedades mecánicas de estos, mientras que las propiedades físicas se mantienen prácticamente constantes. A la vista de estos resultados se puede concluir que es posible la utilización de este tipo de residuo cerámico como árido grueso en la elaboración de hormigones con fines estructurales.

  8. Master Middle Ware: A Tool to Integrate Water Resources and Fish Population Dynamics Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, S.; Sandoval Solis, S.; Thompson, L. C.; Kilduff, D. P.

    2017-12-01

    Linking models that investigate separate components of ecosystem processes has the potential to unify messages regarding management decisions by evaluating potential trade-offs in a cohesive framework. This project aimed to improve the ability of riparian resource managers to forecast future water availability conditions and resultant fish habitat suitability, in order to better inform their management decisions. To accomplish this goal, we developed a middleware tool that is capable of linking and overseeing the operations of two existing models, a water resource planning tool Water Evaluation and Planning (WEAP) model and a habitat-based fish population dynamics model (WEAPhish). First, we designed the Master Middle Ware (MMW) software in Visual Basic for Application® in one Excel® file that provided a familiar framework for both data input and output Second, MMW was used to link and jointly operate WEAP and WEAPhish, using Visual Basic Application (VBA) macros to implement system level calls to run the models. To demonstrate the utility of this approach, hydrological, biological, and middleware model components were developed for the Butte Creek basin. This tributary of the Sacramento River, California is managed for both hydropower and the persistence of a threatened population of spring-run Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tschawytscha). While we have demonstrated the use of MMW for a particular watershed and fish population, MMW can be customized for use with different rivers and fish populations, assuming basic data requirements are met. This model integration improves on ad hoc linkages for managing data transfer between software programs by providing a consistent, user-friendly, and familiar interface across different model implementations. Furthermore, the data-viewing capabilities of MMW facilitate the rapid interpretation of model results by hydrologists, fisheries biologists, and resource managers, in order to accelerate learning and management decision

  9. THE INTERNATIONALIZATION PROCESS OF THE SALES OPERATIONS OF THE PRODUCTS OF A SANITARY WARE INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emerson Antonio Maccari

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Internationalization consists of extending an organization's operations abroad. It involves decisions based on objective criteria and on an evaluation of strategies for entering the foreign market. The problem addressed in this study concerns a Brazilian firm’s difficulties developing its operations abroad. Thus, the purpose of this study was to identify the internationalization process of an industry in the sanitary ware segment in the development of its operations in another country. The research method employed was the single case study and data was collected by means of a semi-structured research script applied to company executives. The results showed that the internationalization process is characterized by the dynamic learning model (Uppsala Model, according to which an organization develops its activities abroad gradually, as it acquires experience and expertise in the market. The company is attempting to overcome cultural barriers and psychic distance in a slow internationalization process, aligned with the differentiation strategy and focus that it uses in the Brazilian market. This strategy comprises a sequence of planned and deliberate steps, with low investment exposure and risk. It was found that the firm adopts a strategy of exporting through distributors, this being a critical success factor, but that the distributor approval and development process lacks robust and formalized structuring. There are opportunities for improvement in the process of competitive intelligence in order to systematize the search and interpretation of information about the markets in which the company wants to operate.  Key-words: Internationalization of companies. Uppsala Model. Strategy. Competitive intelligence. 

  10. Umbilical cord length in singleton gestations: a Finnish population-based retrospective register study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiadis, L; Keski-Nisula, L; Harju, M; Räisänen, S; Georgiadis, S; Hannila, M-L; Heinonen, S

    2014-04-01

    Many complications of pregnancy and delivery are associated with umbilical cord length. It is important to examine the variation in length, in order to identify normal and abnormal conditions. Moreover, the factors influencing cord growth and development are not precisely known. The main objectives were to provide updated reference charts for umbilical cord length in singleton pregnancies and to evaluate potential factors affecting cord length. Birth register data of 47,284 singleton pregnant women delivering in Kuopio University Hospital, Finland was collected prospectively. Gender-specific centile charts for cord length from 22 to 44 gestational weeks were obtained using generalized additive models for location, scale, and shape (GAMLSS). Gestational, fetal, and maternal factors were studied for their potential influence on cord length with single variable analysis and stepwise multiple linear regression analysis. Cord length increased according to gestational age, while the growth decelerated post-term. Birth weight, placental weight, pregravid maternal body mass index, parity, and maternal age correlated to cord length. Gestational diabetes and previous miscarriages were associated with longer cords, while female gender and placental abruption were associated with shorter cords. Girls had shorter cords throughout gestation although there was substantial variation in length in both genders. Cord length associated significantly with birth weight, placental weight, and gestational age. Significantly shorter cords were found in women with placental abruption. This important finding requires further investigation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Primary multifocal gliosarcoma of the spinal cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh M. Kumar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Gliosarcoma (GS is a rare and exceedingly malignant neoplasm of the central nervous system. It displays clinical features similar to glioblastoma, yet is histologically unique as it harbors both gliomatous and sarcomatous cellular components. Involvement of the neuroaxis is predominantly limited to the cerebral parenchyma and meninges. Primary GS of the spinal cord is rarely encountered. We report a case of a 54 year old male who presented with 2 months of progressive, bilateral lower extremity sensory deficits. Magnetic resonance imaging of the neuro-axis revealed multiple intradural lesions involving the cervical and thoracic spinal cord without evidence of intracranial involvement. Surgical resection of a dural based, extramedullary cervical lesion and two exophytic, intramedullary thoracic lesions revealed gliosarcoma, WHO grade IV. The patient died approximately 11 months after presentation. This report confirms that GS is not limited to supratentorial involvement and can primarily affect the spinal cord.

  12. Multifocal Spinal Cord Nephroblastoma in a Dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henker, L C; Bianchi, R M; Vargas, T P; de Oliveira, E C; Driemeier, D; Pavarini, S P

    2018-01-01

    A 1-year-old male American pit bull terrier was presented with a history of proprioceptive deficits and mild lameness of the right hindlimb, which progressed after 5 months to paraparesis, culminating in tetraparesis after 2 weeks. Necropsy findings were limited to the spinal cord and consisted of multiple, intradural, extramedullary, slightly red masses which produced segmental areas of medullary swelling located in the cervical intumescence, thoracolumbar column, sacral segment and cauda equina. Histological evaluation revealed a tumour, composed of epithelial, stromal and blastemal cells, with structures resembling tubules, acini and embryonic glomeruli. Immunohistochemical labelling for vimentin, cytokeratin and S100 was positive for the stromal, epithelial and blastemal cells, respectively. A final diagnosis of multifocal spinal cord nephroblastoma was established. This is the first report of such a tumour showing concomitant involvement of the cervicothoracic, thoracolumbar, sacral and cauda equina areas of the spinal cord. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Trauma: Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Matthew J; Martin, Matthew J

    2017-10-01

    Injuries to the spinal column and spinal cord frequently occur after high-energy mechanisms of injury, or with lower-energy mechanisms, in select patient populations like the elderly. A focused yet complete neurologic examination during the initial evaluation will guide subsequent diagnostic procedures and early supportive measures to help prevent further injury. For patients with injury to bone and/or ligaments, the initial focus should be spinal immobilization and prevention of inducing injury to the spinal cord. Spinal cord injury is associated with numerous life-threatening complications during the acute and long-term phases of care that all acute care surgeons must recognize. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Minimally Invasive Implantation of HeartWare Assist Device and Simultaneous Tricuspid Valve Reconstruction Through Partial Upper Sternotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillebrand, Julia; Hoffmeier, Andreas; Djie Tiong Tjan, Tonny; Sindermann, Juergen R; Schmidt, Christoph; Martens, Sven; Scherer, Mirela

    2017-05-01

    Left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation is a well-established therapy to support patients with end-stage heart failure. However, the operative procedure is associated with severe trauma. Third generation LVADs like the HeartWare assist device (HeartWare, Inc., Framingham, MA, USA) are characterized by enhanced technology despite smaller size. These devices offer new minimally invasive surgical options. Tricuspid regurgitation requiring valve repair is frequent in patients with the need for mechanical circulatory support as it is strongly associated with ischemic and nonischemic cardiomyopathy. We report on HeartWare LVAD implantation and simultaneous tricuspid valve reconstruction through minimally invasive access by partial upper sternotomy to the fifth left intercostal space. Four male patients (mean age 51.72 ± 11.95 years) suffering from chronic heart failure due to dilative (three patients) and ischemic (one patient) cardiomyopathy and also exhibiting concomitant tricuspid valve insufficiency due to annular dilation underwent VAD implantation and tricuspid valve annuloplasty. Extracorporeal circulation was established via the ascending aorta, superior vena cava, and right atrium. In all four cases the LVAD implantation and tricuspid valve repair via partial median sternotomy was successful. During the operative procedure, no conversion to full sternotomy was necessary. One patient needed postoperative re-exploration because of pericardial effusion. No postoperative focal neurologic injury was observed. New generation VADs are advantageous because of the possibility of minimally invasive implantation procedure which can therefore minimize surgical trauma. Concomitant tricuspid valve reconstruction can also be performed simultaneously through partial upper sternotomy. Nevertheless, minimally invasive LVAD implantation is a challenging operative technique. © 2016 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals

  15. Arrowheads as indicators of interpersonal violence and group identity among the Neolithic Pitted Ware hunters of southwestern Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Rune

    2016-01-01

    millennium BC. Based on a study of more than 1500 arrowheads from Denmark and western Sweden, this paper explains the stylistic variation of the Pitted Ware arrowheads as functional determined representing two main categories: relatively short and wide hunting arrowheads (type A) and long and slender war...... arrowheads (type C). Type B represents a multifunctional group of arrowheads that mixes features from type A and C. Furthermore, diverging production schemes (schema opératoire) used for the shaping of hunting arrowheads has helped to identify social groupings within the larger southwestern Scandinavian...

  16. Retention of Employees in Ceramic Sanitary Ware Factories in India: Role of Work Life Balance, Career Development and Supervisor Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Umamaheswari

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The study examines the role of work life balance, career development and supervisor support on organization commitment over employees of unattended, ceramic sanitary ware factories in India. It also verifies the influence of organization commitment on retention and its mediating role. Findings reveal that organization commitment influences retention and all the above factors enhance it. Moreover, organization commitment partially mediates the relationship between proposed factors and retention. It also found that organization’s career development provision alone is not enough and need to be modified according to the employer’s expectation. Managerial implications and suggestions for future research were discussed.

  17. Management issues during HeartWare left ventricular assist device implantation and the role of transesophageal echocardiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Orathi Patangi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Left ventricular assist devices (LVAD are increasingly used for mechanical circulatory support of patients with severe heart failure, primarily as a bridge to heart transplantation. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE plays a major role in the clinical decision making during insertion of the devices and in the post-operative management of these patients. The detection of structural and device-related mechanical abnormalities is critical for optimal functioning of assist device. In this review article, we describe the usefulness of TEE for optimal perioperative management of patients presenting for HeartWare LVAD insertion.

  18. Optimizing Water Use and Hydropower Production in Operational Reservoir System Scheduling with RiverWare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, T. M.; Zagona, E. A.

    2017-12-01

    Practical operational optimization of multipurpose reservoir systems is challenging for several reasons. Each purpose has its own constraints which may conflict with those of other purposes. While hydropower generation typically provides the bulk of the revenue, it is also among the lowest priority purposes. Each river system has important details that are specific to the location such as hydrology, reservoir storage capacity, physical limitations, bottlenecks, and the continuing evolution of operational policy. In addition, reservoir operations models include discrete, nonlinear, and nonconvex physical processes and if-then operating policies. Typically, the forecast horizon for scheduling needs to be extended far into the future to avoid near term (e.g., a few hours or a day) scheduling decisions that result in undesirable future states; this makes the computational effort much larger than may be expected. Put together, these challenges lead to large and customized mathematical optimization problems which must be solved efficiently to be of practical use. In addition, the solution process must be robust in an operational setting. We discuss a unique modeling approach in RiverWare that meets these challenges in an operational setting. The approach combines a Preemptive Linear Goal Programming optimization model to handle prioritized policies complimented by preprocessing and postprocessing with Rulebased Simulation to improve the solution with regard to nonlinearities, discrete issues, and if-then logic. An interactive policy language with a graphical user interface allows modelers to customize both the optimization and simulation based on the unique aspects of the policy for their system while the routine physical aspect of operations are modeled automatically. The modeler is aided by a set of compiled predefined functions and functions shared by other modelers. We illustrate the success of the approach with examples from daily use at the Tennessee Valley

  19. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About Us Expert ... Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC close close

  20. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Life in a Wheelchair Lisa Rosen, MS Spasticity, Physical Therapy-Lokomat T. George Hornby, PhD, PT Empowering ... Rogers, SW Marguerite David, MSW Kathy Hulse, MSW Physical Therapy after Spinal Cord Injury Laura Wehrli, PT ...

  1. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... How Peer Counseling Works Julie Gassaway, MS, RN Pediatric Injuries Pediatric Spinal Cord Injury 101 Lawrence Vogel, MD The Basics of Pediatric SCI Rehabilitation Sara Klaas, MSW Transitions for Children ...

  2. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... com is an informational and support website for families facing spinal cord injuries. The website does not provide medical advice, recommend or endorse health care products or ...

  3. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... OT Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury Patti Rogers, SW Marguerite ... play_arrow What are the latest developments in the use of electrical stimulation for spinal ...

  4. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Diane M. Rowles, MS, NP How Family Life Changes After Spinal Cord Injury Nancy Rosenberg, PsyD Understanding SCI Rehabilitation Donald Peck Leslie, MD Adjusting to Social Life in a Wheelchair Lisa Rosen, MS Spasticity, ...

  5. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate close search Understanding Spinal ... with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical ...

  6. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... does not provide medical advice, recommend or endorse health care products or services, or control the information ... With Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About Us ...

  7. Parachute Cord Tension Sensor

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To design and fabricate a light weight (few oz), very small (~2 inch length) parachute cord tension sensor demonstrator device.A major challenge for the CPAS (The...

  8. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate close search Understanding Spinal Cord Injury What is a Spinal ... health care products or services, or control the information found on external websites. The Hill Foundation is ...

  9. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury Patti Rogers, SW Marguerite ... arrow Why are high-dose steroids often used right after an injury? play_arrow What is meant ...

  10. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Living with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate close search Understanding ... Living with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury ...

  11. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Injury Diane M. Rowles, MS, NP How Family Life Changes After Spinal Cord Injury Nancy Rosenberg, PsyD ... Rehabilitation Donald Peck Leslie, MD Adjusting to Social Life in a Wheelchair Lisa Rosen, MS Spasticity, Physical ...

  12. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... With Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About Us ... With Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC close close

  13. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury Patti Rogers, SW Marguerite ... or endorse health care products or services, or control the information found on external websites. The Hill ...

  14. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    ... With Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About Us Expert ... With Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC close close

  15. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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  16. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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  17. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... OT Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury Patti Rogers, SW ... Experiences By Topic Resources Blog Peer Counseling About Media Donate Contact Us Terms of Use Site Map ...

  18. Cord-Blood Banking

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cord blood mainly because of the promise that stem cell research holds for the future. Most of us would have little use for stem cells now, but research into using them to treat diseases is ongoing — ...

  19. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... SCI Rehabilitation Donald Peck Leslie, MD Adjusting to Social Life in a Wheelchair Lisa Rosen, MS Spasticity, ... OT Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury Patti Rogers, SW ...

  20. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Living with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer ... Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 David Chen, MD Preventing Pressure Sores Mary Zeigler, MS Transition from Hospital to ...

  1. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... arrow What is the “Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems” program? play_arrow ... recommend or endorse health care products or services, or control the information found on external websites. The Hill Foundation is ...

  2. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... arrow What is the “Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems” program? play_arrow What are the most promising ... health care products or services, or control the information found on external websites. The Hill Foundation is ...

  3. Efficacies of sodium hypochlorite and quaternary ammonium sanitizers for reduction of norovirus and selected bacteria during ware-washing operations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizanel Feliciano

    Full Text Available Cross-contamination of ready-to-eat (RTE foods with pathogens on contaminated tableware and food preparation utensils is an important factor associated with foodborne illnesses. To prevent this, restaurants and food service establishments are required to achieve a minimum microbial reduction of 5 logs from these surfaces. This study evaluated the sanitization efficacies of ware-washing protocols (manual and mechanical used in restaurants to clean tableware items. Ceramic plates, drinking glasses and stainless steel forks were used as the food contact surfaces. These were contaminated with cream cheese and reduced-fat milk inoculated with murine norovirus (MNV-1, Escherichia coli K-12 and Listeria innocua. The sanitizing solutions tested were sodium hypochlorite (chlorine, quaternary ammonium (QAC and tap water (control. During the study, the survivability and response to the experimental conditions of the bacterial species was compared with that of MNV-1. The results showed that current ware-washing protocols used to remove bacteria from tableware items were not sufficient to achieve a 5 log reduction in MNV-1 titer. After washing, a maximum of 3 log reduction in the virus were obtained. It was concluded that MNV-1 appeared to be more resistant to both the washing process and the sanitizers when compared with E. coli K-12 and L. innocua.

  4. Work force retention: Role of work environment, organization commitment, supervisor support and training & development in ceramic sanitary ware industries in India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umamaheswari S, Jayasree Krishnan

    2016-07-01

    Although retention of employees has become hot topic in this career turbulent era, practically no empirical research is carried out in the fast growing ceramic sector till now and this research fills the gap in the literature. The literatures surveys reported that organization commitment is an important determinant of retention and work environment, supervisor support and training and development are the most relevant antecedents increasing commitment towards organization. This paper examines the impact of the above factors over organization commitment and explores the effects of organization commitment on retention, and verifies the mediating effect of organization commitment on the relationship between proposed factors and retention. Design/methodology/approach: A survey was completed by 416 employees working in five ceramic sanitary ware factories located at different places in India. Questionnaire consisting of items adopted from previous researches were used to collect data. The selection of respondents was based on the simple random sampling. Findings: Findings reveals that organization commitment influences retention and all the above factors enhances it. Moreover organization commitment partially mediates the relationship between proposed factors and retention. However multiple regression analysis indicated that training and development did not have any notable influence on retention. Limitations: This study was conducted in a particular country and also in a particular sector of manufacturing industry, which limits generalization .Possibility of bias towards their organization and assumption that respondents know about their organization are other limitations. Implications: This paper offers recommendations to HR(Human resource) managers that they should extend their support to work environment, supervisor support and training and development in order to generate better relationship with employees and to reduce their likelihood of leaving the company

  5. Work force retention: Role of work environment, organization commitment, supervisor support and training & development in ceramic sanitary ware industries in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umamaheswari S

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Although retention of employees has become hot topic in this career turbulent era, practically no empirical research is carried out in the fast growing ceramic sector till now and this research fills the gap in the literature. The literatures surveys reported that organization commitment is an important determinant of retention and work environment, supervisor support and training and development are the most relevant antecedents increasing commitment towards organization. This paper examines the impact of the above factors over organization commitment and explores the effects of organization commitment on retention, and verifies the mediating effect of organization commitment on the relationship between proposed factors and retention. Design/methodology/approach: A survey was completed by 416 employees working in five ceramic sanitary ware factories located at different places in India. Questionnaire consisting of items adopted from previous researches were used to collect data. The selection of respondents was based on the simple random sampling. Findings: Findings reveals that organization commitment influences retention and all the above factors enhances it. Moreover organization commitment partially mediates the relationship between proposed factors and retention. However multiple regression analysis indicated that training and development did not have any notable   influence on retention. Limitations: This study was conducted in a particular country and also in a particular sector of manufacturing industry, which limits generalization .Possibility of bias towards their organization and assumption that respondents know about their organization are other limitations. Implications: This paper offers recommendations to HR(Human resource managers that they should extend their support to work environment, supervisor support and training and development in order to generate better relationship with employees and to reduce their

  6. Pregnancy Complications: Umbilical Cord Abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Umbilical cord abnormalities Umbilical cord abnormalities Now playing: E-mail to a friend Please fill in all fields. ... blood supply) to the baby. The two arteries transport waste from the baby to the placenta (where ...

  7. Cord blood buffy coat DNA methylation is comparable to whole cord blood methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, John; Schmidt, Rebecca J; Benke, Kelly S; Newschaffer, Craig; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva; Croen, Lisa A; Iosif, Ana-Maria; LaSalle, Janine M; Fallin, M Daniele; Bakulski, Kelly M

    2018-01-01

    Cord blood DNA methylation is associated with numerous health outcomes and environmental exposures. Whole cord blood DNA reflects all nucleated blood cell types, while centrifuging whole blood separates red blood cells, generating a white blood cell buffy coat. Both sample types are used in DNA methylation studies. Cell types have unique methylation patterns and processing can impact cell distributions, which may influence comparability. We evaluated differences in cell composition and DNA methylation between cord blood buffy coat and whole cord blood samples. Cord blood DNA methylation was measured with the Infinium EPIC BeadChip (Illumina) in eight individuals, each contributing buffy coat and whole blood samples. We analyzed principal components (PC) of methylation, performed hierarchical clustering, and computed correlations of mean-centered methylation between pairs. We conducted moderated t-tests on single sites and estimated cell composition. DNA methylation PCs were associated with individual (P PC1 = 1.4 × 10 -9 ; P PC2 = 2.9 × 10 -5 ; P PC3 = 3.8 × 10 -5 ; P PC4 = 4.2 × 10 -6 ; P PC5 = 9.9 × 10 -13 , P PC6 = 1.3 × 10 -11 ) and not with sample type (P PC1-6 >0.7). Samples hierarchically clustered by individual. Pearson correlations of mean-centered methylation between paired samples ranged from r = 0.66 to r = 0.87. No individual site significantly differed between buffy coat and whole cord blood when adjusting for multiple comparisons (five sites had unadjusted Pcoat and whole cord blood are much lower than inter-individual variation, demonstrating that both sample preparation types can be analytically combined and compared.

  8. Spinal cord swelling and candidiasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, K.; Gronseth, G.; Aldrich, M.; Williams, A.

    1982-01-01

    Fusiform swelling of the spinal cord was noted myelographically in a patient with Hodgkin's disease. Autopsy revealed that the swelling was cauused by Candida infection of the spinal cord. It is suggested that fungal infection be included in the differential diagnosis of spinal cord swelling in the immunsupporessed cancer patient. (orig.)

  9. Spinal cord swelling and candidiasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, K.; Gronseth, G.; Aldrich, M.; Williams, A.

    1982-11-01

    Fusiform swelling of the spinal cord was noted myelographically in a patient with Hodgkin's disease. Autopsy revealed that the swelling was caused by Candida infection of the spinal cord. It is suggested that fungal infection be included in the differential diagnosis of spinal cord swelling in the immunosuppressed cancer patient.

  10. Distribution of corded ware in the areas north of the Gulf of Finland - an update/ Kerkko Nordqvist, Piritta Häkälä

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Nordqvist, Kerkko

    2014-01-01

    Artiklis käsitletakse nöörkeraamika leiukohti Soomes ja Loode-Venemaal. Leiukohad jagatakse kolme peamisse rühma: matuse- ja asulakohad ning venekirveste juhuleiukohad. Soome lahest põhja poole jäävad alad paistavad silma rohkete asulakohtade ja väheste kalmistutega

  11. Spinal Cord Stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Kaare

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is a surgical treatment for chronic neuropathic pain that is refractory to other treatment. Originally described by Shealy et al. in 1967(1), it is used to treat a range of conditions such as complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS I)(2), angina pectoris(3), radicular...... pain after failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS)(4), pain due to peripheral nerve injury, stump pain(5), peripheral vascular disease(6) and diabetic neuropathy(7,8); whereas phantom pain(9), postherpetic neuralgia(10), chronic visceral pain(11), and pain after partial spinal cord injury(12) remain more...

  12. The meanings of consent to the donation of cord blood stem cells: perspectives from an interview-based study of a public cord blood bank in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busby, Helen

    2010-03-01

    This paper explores the perspectives of women who have agreed that their umbilical cord blood may be collected for a public 'cord blood bank', for use in transplant medicine or research. Drawing on interview data from 27 mothers who agreed to the collection and use of their umbilical cord blood, these choices and the informed consent process are explored. It is shown that the needs of sick children requiring transplants are prominent in narrative accounts of cord blood banking, together with high expectations for future applications of stem cells. Given this dynamic, a concern arises that the complex and multiple uses of tissues and related data might be oversimplified in the consent process. In conclusion, the positive finding of a commitment to mutuality in cord blood banking among these women is underlined, and its implications for the wider debate on cord blood banking are discussed.

  13. It Is More than Knowledge Seeking: Examining the Effects of OpenCourseWare Lectures on Vocabulary Acquisition in English as a Foreign Language (EFL) Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui-Chi; Sun, Yu-Chih

    2013-01-01

    OpenCourseWare (OCW) has received increasing attention over the past few years in higher education. These courses provide appealing opportunities to view classes taught in well-established universities worldwide. The current study aims to examine how OCW lectures can serve as authentic learning materials to facilitate vocabulary acquisition for…

  14. Fixed cord in spinal stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, L.M.; Wang, H.; Francomano, C.; Hurko, O.; Carson, B.; Heffez, D.S.; DiChiro, G.; Bryan, R.N.

    1990-01-01

    This paper evaluates patients with cervical spinal canal compromise due to congenital anomalies (achondroplasia, Chiari malformation) and degenerative diseases using MR cord motion and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow studies. Pulsatile longitudinal motion of the cervical cord was determined by means of cardiac-gated velocity phase contrast methods, including cine. Pathology included dwarfism (n = 15), Chiari malformation (n = 10), spondylosis (n = 10), and acute cord compression (n = 9). Symptomatic cases of congenital cervical stenosis had decreased cord motion, although CSF flow was not always significantly compromised. Postoperative cases demonstrated good cord and CSF motion, unless compression or obstruction was present

  15. Vocal Cord Paralysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Viral infections. Some viral infections, such as Lyme disease, Epstein-Barr and herpes, can cause inflammation and damage directly to the nerves in the larynx. Neurological conditions. If you have certain ... disease, you may experience vocal cord paralysis. Risk factors ...

  16. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Home Kim Eberhardt Muir, MS Coping with a New Injury Robin Dorman, PsyD Sex and Fertility After ... program? play_arrow What are the most promising new treatments for spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What ...

  17. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... What is “Braingate” research? play_arrow How would stem-cell therapies work in the treatment of spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? play_arrow When ...

  18. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is “Braingate” research? play_arrow How would stem-cell therapies work in the treatment of spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? play_arrow When ...

  19. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Braingate” research? play_arrow How would stem-cell therapies work in the treatment of spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? play_arrow When can we expect ...

  20. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury Patti Rogers, SW Marguerite David, ... injuries. The website does not provide medical advice, recommend or endorse health care products or services, or control the information ...

  1. Anterior spinal cord syndrome of unknown etiology

    OpenAIRE

    Klakeel, Merrine; Thompson, Justin; Srinivasan, Rajashree; McDonald, Frank

    2015-01-01

    A spinal cord injury encompasses a physical insult to the spinal cord. In the case of anterior spinal cord syndrome, the insult is a vascular lesion at the anterior spinal artery. We present the cases of two 13-year-old boys with anterior spinal cord syndrome, along with a review of the anatomy and vasculature of the spinal cord and an explanation of how a lesion in the cord corresponds to anterior spinal cord syndrome.

  2. SCT: Spinal Cord Toolbox, an open-source software for processing spinal cord MRI data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Leener, Benjamin; Lévy, Simon; Dupont, Sara M; Fonov, Vladimir S; Stikov, Nikola; Louis Collins, D; Callot, Virginie; Cohen-Adad, Julien

    2017-01-15

    For the past 25 years, the field of neuroimaging has witnessed the development of several software packages for processing multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) to study the brain. These software packages are now routinely used by researchers and clinicians, and have contributed to important breakthroughs for the understanding of brain anatomy and function. However, no software package exists to process mpMRI data of the spinal cord. Despite the numerous clinical needs for such advanced mpMRI protocols (multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injury, cervical spondylotic myelopathy, etc.), researchers have been developing specific tools that, while necessary, do not provide an integrative framework that is compatible with most usages and that is capable of reaching the community at large. This hinders cross-validation and the possibility to perform multi-center studies. In this study we introduce the Spinal Cord Toolbox (SCT), a comprehensive software dedicated to the processing of spinal cord MRI data. SCT builds on previously-validated methods and includes state-of-the-art MRI templates and atlases of the spinal cord, algorithms to segment and register new data to the templates, and motion correction methods for diffusion and functional time series. SCT is tailored towards standardization and automation of the processing pipeline, versatility, modularity, and it follows guidelines of software development and distribution. Preliminary applications of SCT cover a variety of studies, from cross-sectional area measures in large databases of patients, to the precise quantification of mpMRI metrics in specific spinal pathways. We anticipate that SCT will bring together the spinal cord neuroimaging community by establishing standard templates and analysis procedures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Correlation between spinal cord MRI and clinical features in patients with demyelinating disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papadopoulos, A.; Gatzonis, S.; Gouliamos, A.; Trakadas, S.; Kalovidouris, A.; Sgouropoulos, P.; Vlachos, L.; Papavasiliou, C.

    1994-01-01

    Localisation of spinal cord lesions by MRI was correlated with neurological symptoms and signs in 16 patients with clinical and laboratory evidence of multiple sclerosis. There was good correspondence between spinal cord lesions and motor tract signs. On the other hand, superficial or deep sensory disturbances correlated with spinal cord lesions in only about a quarter of the patients. MRI of the spinal cord appeared to explain the myelopathy in 11 patients, while in 3 there was strong clinical evidence of more extensive demyelinating lesions. In 7 of the 16 patients MRI of the brain was normal. (orig.)

  4. Multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadashima, Hiromichi; Kusaka, Hirofumi; Imai, Terukuni; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Matsumoto, Sadayuki; Yamamoto, Toru; Yamasaki, Masahiro; Maya, Kiyomi

    1986-01-01

    Eleven patients with a definite diagnosis of multiple sclerosis were examined in terms of correlations between the clinical features and the results of cranial computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Results: In 5 of the 11 patients, both CT and MRI demonstrated lesions consistent with a finding of multiple sclerosis. In 3 patients, only MRI demonstrated lesions. In the remaining 3 patients, neither CT nor MRI revealed any lesion in the brain. All 5 patients who showed abnormal findings on both CT and MRI had clinical signs either of cerebral or brainstem - cerebellar lesions. On the other hand, two of the 3 patients with normal CT and MRI findings had optic-nerve and spinal-cord signs. Therefore, our results suggested relatively good correlations between the clinical features, CT, and MRI. MRI revealed cerebral lesions in two of the four patients with clinical signs of only optic-nerve and spinal-cord lesions. MRI demonstrated sclerotic lesions in 3 of the 6 patients whose plaques were not detected by CT. In conclusion, MRI proved to be more helpful in the demonstration of lesions attributable to chronic multiple sclerosis. (author)

  5. Acute spinal cord injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, M.; Izunaga, H.; Sato, R.; Shinzato, I.; Korogi, Y.; Yamashita, Y.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on sequential MR images and neurologic findings that were correlated in 40 acute spinal cord injuries. Within 1 week after injury, frequent initial MR changes appeared isointense on both T1- and T2-weighted images and isointense on T1- and hyperintense on T2-weighted images. After 2 months, hypointensity appeared on T1-weighted images and hyperintensity persisted or appeared on T2-weighted images. Clinical improvements were observed in patients with isointensity on both T1- and T2-weighted images at the initial examination. A larger area of hyperintensity on subsequent T2-weighted images was correlated with no neurologic improvement. MR findings were good indicators of the spinal cord injury

  6. International Spinal Cord Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dvorak, M F; Itshayek, E; Fehlings, M G

    2015-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Survey of expert opinion, feedback and final consensus. OBJECTIVE: To describe the development and the variables included in the International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Spinal Interventions and Surgical Procedures Basic Data set. SETTING: International working group. METHODS......: A committee of experts was established to select and define data elements. The data set was then disseminated to the appropriate committees and organizations for comments. All suggested revisions were considered and both the International Spinal Cord Society and the American Spinal Injury Association endorsed...... spinal intervention and procedure is coded (variables 1 through 7) and the spinal segment level is described (variables 8 and 9). Sample clinical cases were developed to illustrate how to complete it. CONCLUSION: The International SCI Spinal Interventions and Surgical Procedures Basic Data Set...

  7. Mutiple sclerosios of the spinal cord: MR imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Hoon; Chang, Kee Hyun; Kim, Sam Soo; Park, Byung Kwan; Seong, Chang Kyu; Han, Moon Hee; Cho, Yong Jin; Jeon, Beom Seok

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate the MR appearance of multiple sclerosis in the spinal cord. Between January 1990 and December 1996, we retrospectively analyzed 27 spinal MR images of 18 patients in whom-on the basis of Poser's diagnostic critera-multiple sclerosis of the spinal cord had been diagnosed. Eleven patients were men and seven were women, and they were aged between 18 and 58(mean, 37) years. Using T1-weighted sagittal(n=3D27), T2-weighted axial(n=3D26) and sagittal(n=3D27), and contrast enhanced T1-weighted(n=3D14) images, lesions were analyzed for multiplicity, location, length, cross-sectional area and location, cord size, and enhancement pattern. Brain MR images(n=3D15) were also evaluated. In 14 of 18 patients, a solitary lesion was seen on initial MR imaging. Four of the 14 had double lesions, and on follow-up MR imaging at 2-5 months, five were seen to have double lesions. Eleven lesions were found in the cervical cord, and 12 in the thoracic cord, two were in the cervicothoracic and two in the thoracolumbar region. The length of 12 lesions was less than two vertebral heights, while 15 extended for more than two vertebral heights. Six lesions occupied less than 50% of the cross-sectional area of the cord and the other 20 occupied more than 50% of this area. Cord size was enlarged in 17 cases, unchanged in eight, and atrophic in two. Eight lesions in 14 patients who underwent enhanced MR imaging showed focal contrast enhancement; there was patchy enhacement in two, nodular enhancement in two, and linear enhancement in four. Among 15 MR images of the brain, high-signal intensity lesions, compatible with multiple sclerosis, were demonstrated in seven cases. Multiple sclerosis plaques in the spinal cord frequently extend for more than two vertebral body heights of either the cervical or thoracic level, occupy more than 50% of the cross-sectional area and manifest as enlarged cord. But the MR imaging findings, however, are nonspecific. Abnormalities were seen in

  8. Posttraumatic spinal cord cysts: clinical features and characterization with metrizamide computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quencer, R.M.; Green, B.A.; Eismont, F.J.

    1983-01-01

    Sixteen patients with posttraumatic spinal cord cysts (PTSCC) were evaluated clinically and studied with metrizamide computed tomography (MCT). These patients presented months to years following a severe spinal cord injury, usually with new or progressively worsening neurological symptoms. The development of the PTSCC was unrelated to the location, type, and severity of injury, or to the time interval from the original injury. MCT showed that these cysts occur most frequently in normal or atrophic cords, they may be multiple, they most frequently are found in the dorsal portion of the cord, and they may vary along their length in width and position within the cord. Knowledge of this radiographic morphology is crucial to the surgical planning. The location of the cysts and the mode of their enlargement are correlated with anatomic features of the spinal cord and changes in cerebrospinal fluid dynamics. Cyst-to-subarachnoid space shunting relieves the majority of symptoms

  9. Fetal demise by umbilical cord around abdomen and stricture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Shun-Jen; Chen, Chi-Huang; Wu, Gwo-Jang; Chen, Wei-Hwa; Chang, Cheng-Chang

    2010-01-01

    Umbilical cord abnormalities are accepted as conditions associated with intrauterine fetal demise (IUFD), and umbilical cord stricture is most frequently encountered. In addition, although cord entanglement with multiple loops rarely increases the perinatal mortality, it is associated with a significant increase in variable kind of morbidity such as growth restriction. We describe a 27-year-old woman, with a missed abortion history at about 10 weeks' gestation in her first pregnancy, who presented to our outpatient department at 34 4/7 weeks of gestation due to decreased fetal activity during the preceding week. No fetal heart activity and blood flow had been detected by ultrasonography and pulsed-wave Doppler. A demised fetus with umbilical cord stricture and three loops around abdomen was delivered and was weighted 1,830 g that was below the tenth percentile for the gestational age. Either umbilical cord stricture or entanglement around the body can affect the development of the fetus and even be lethal. The former might play a more important role in this case. Their etiology and the sequence of the events are still undetermined, and additional evaluation such as autopsy and further research may be needed. In addition, counsel and frequent fetal surveillance should be done in patients with previous IUFD attributed to cord stricture during next pregnancy because of undetermined risk of recurrence.

  10. Quantitative analysis of multiple kappa-opioid receptors by selective and nonselective ligand binding in guinea pig spinal cord: Resolution of high and low affinity states of the kappa 2 receptors by a computerized model-fitting technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiberi, M.; Magnan, J.

    1990-01-01

    The binding characteristics of selective and nonselective opioids have been studied in whole guinea pig spinal cord, using a computer fitting method to analyze the data obtained from saturation and competition studies. The delineation of specific binding sites labeled by the mu-selective opioid [3H]D-Ala2,MePhe4,Gly-ol5-enkephalin (Kd = 2.58 nM, R = 4.52 pmol/g of tissue) and by the delta-selective opioid [3H]D-Pen2, D-Pen5-enkephalin (Kd = 2.02 nM, R = 1.47 pmol/g of tissue) suggests the presence of mu and delta-receptors in the spinal cord tissue. The presence of kappa receptors was probed by the kappa-selective opioid [3H]U69593 (Kd = 3.31 nM, R = 2.00 pmol/g of tissue). The pharmacological characterization of the sites labeled by [3H]U69593 confirms the assumption that this ligand discriminates kappa receptors in guinea pig spinal cord. The benzomorphan [3H]ethylketazocine labels a population of receptors with one homogeneous affinity state (Kd = 0.65 nM, R = 7.39 pmol/g of tissue). The total binding capacity of this ligand was not different from the sum of the binding capacities of mu, delta-, and kappa-selective ligands. Under mu- and delta-suppressed conditions, [3H]ethylketazocine still binds to receptors with one homogeneous affinity state (Kd = 0.45 nM, R = 1.69 pmol/g of tissue). Competition studies performed against the binding of [3H]ethylketazocine under these experimental conditions reveal that the pharmacological profile of the radiolabeled receptors is similar to the profile of the kappa receptors labeled with [3H]U69593. Saturation studies using the nonselective opioid [3H]bremazocine demonstrate that this ligand binds to spinal cord membranes with heterogeneous affinities (Kd1 = 0.28 nM, R1 = 7.91 pmol/g of tissue; Kd2 = 3.24 nM, R2 = 11.2 pmol/g of tissue)

  11. Quantitative analysis of multiple kappa-opioid receptors by selective and nonselective ligand binding in guinea pig spinal cord: Resolution of high and low affinity states of the kappa 2 receptors by a computerized model-fitting technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiberi, M.; Magnan, J. (Universite de Montreal, Quebec (Canada))

    1990-05-01

    The binding characteristics of selective and nonselective opioids have been studied in whole guinea pig spinal cord, using a computer fitting method to analyze the data obtained from saturation and competition studies. The delineation of specific binding sites labeled by the mu-selective opioid (3H)D-Ala2,MePhe4,Gly-ol5-enkephalin (Kd = 2.58 nM, R = 4.52 pmol/g of tissue) and by the delta-selective opioid (3H)D-Pen2, D-Pen5-enkephalin (Kd = 2.02 nM, R = 1.47 pmol/g of tissue) suggests the presence of mu and delta-receptors in the spinal cord tissue. The presence of kappa receptors was probed by the kappa-selective opioid (3H)U69593 (Kd = 3.31 nM, R = 2.00 pmol/g of tissue). The pharmacological characterization of the sites labeled by (3H)U69593 confirms the assumption that this ligand discriminates kappa receptors in guinea pig spinal cord. The benzomorphan (3H)ethylketazocine labels a population of receptors with one homogeneous affinity state (Kd = 0.65 nM, R = 7.39 pmol/g of tissue). The total binding capacity of this ligand was not different from the sum of the binding capacities of mu, delta-, and kappa-selective ligands. Under mu- and delta-suppressed conditions, (3H)ethylketazocine still binds to receptors with one homogeneous affinity state (Kd = 0.45 nM, R = 1.69 pmol/g of tissue). Competition studies performed against the binding of (3H)ethylketazocine under these experimental conditions reveal that the pharmacological profile of the radiolabeled receptors is similar to the profile of the kappa receptors labeled with (3H)U69593. Saturation studies using the nonselective opioid (3H)bremazocine demonstrate that this ligand binds to spinal cord membranes with heterogeneous affinities (Kd1 = 0.28 nM, R1 = 7.91 pmol/g of tissue; Kd2 = 3.24 nM, R2 = 11.2 pmol/g of tissue).

  12. Is early cord clamping, delayed cord clamping or cord milking best?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatansever, Binay; Demirel, Gamze; Ciler Eren, Elif; Erel, Ozcan; Neselioglu, Salim; Karavar, Hande Nur; Gundogdu, Semra; Ulfer, Gozde; Bahadir, Selcen; Tastekin, Ayhan

    2018-04-01

    To compare the antioxidant status of three cord clamping procedures (early clamping, delayed clamping and milking) by analyzing the thiol-disulfide balance. This randomized controlled study enrolled 189 term infants who were divided into three groups according to the cord clamping procedure: early clamping, delayed clamping and milking. Blood samples were collected from the umbilical arteries immediately after clamping, and the thiol/disulfide homeostasis was analyzed. The native and total thiol levels were significantly (p total thiol ratio was significantly (p = .026) lower in the delayed cord clamping and milking groups compared with the early clamping groups. Early cord clamping causes the production of more disulfide bonds and lower thiol levels, indicating that oxidation reactions are increased in the early cord clamping procedure compared with the delayed cord clamping and milking procedures. The oxidant capacity is greater with early cord clamping than with delayed clamping or cord milking. Delayed cord clamping or milking are beneficial in neonatal care, and we suggest that they be performed routinely in all deliveries.

  13. An investigation of pottery production technology for the West Slope wares from Dorylaion (Eski ehir/Turkey)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Issi, A.; Kara, A.

    2013-02-01

    Researches in the field of pottery production technology in ancient times, done in different settlements during the same period, may contribute to know relationships established within the different cultural communities. In ancient times, Anatolia (Asia Minor) was the crossroads of ancient civilizations. There are several ancient settlements and artifacts belonging to Hellenistic culture (330-30 BC). West Slope wares from Dorylaion (Eski ehir/Turkey) excavations are the main Hellenistic culture findings. In this study, different analytical techniques were employed for the characterization of these findings in order to enlighten the pottery production technology. Wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WDXRF) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were employed to study the chemical and mineralogical composition of the bodies, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX) were also performed for the microstructural and microchemical characterization of body and slip layers of the selected potsherds. The raw materials used, firing temperatures and atmosphere and related microstructural characteristics were discussed. (Author) 22 refs.

  14. Docencia y libre acceso: el Open Course Ware de la Universitat de València

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo presentamos la Oficina OCW de la Universitat de València atendiendo al contexto general de aparición y sus características específicas. En primer lugar, contextualizamos el Open Course Ware en el ámbito de los movimientos Open y repasamos algunas de sus iniciativas. Después nos centramos en la caracterización de los usuarios/destinatarios prototípicos del OCW como “nativos digitales”, atendiendo a la distinción de dos modelos epistemológicos: la inteligencia colectiva (nativos y el paradigma del experto (inmigrantes digitales, algunas de cuyas premisas básicas se explican solamente por la aparición de las tecnologías digitales. Tras esta contextualización teórica, exponemos las características que definen el proyecto OCW, de la Universitat de València

  15. An investigation of pottery production technology for the West Slope wares from Dorylaion (Eski ehir/Turkey)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Issi, A.; Kara, A.

    2013-01-01

    Researches in the field of pottery production technology in ancient times, done in different settlements during the same period, may contribute to know relationships established within the different cultural communities. In ancient times, Anatolia (Asia Minor) was the crossroads of ancient civilizations. There are several ancient settlements and artifacts belonging to Hellenistic culture (330-30 BC). West Slope wares from Dorylaion (Eski ehir/Turkey) excavations are the main Hellenistic culture findings. In this study, different analytical techniques were employed for the characterization of these findings in order to enlighten the pottery production technology. Wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WDXRF) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were employed to study the chemical and mineralogical composition of the bodies, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX) were also performed for the microstructural and microchemical characterization of body and slip layers of the selected potsherds. The raw materials used, firing temperatures and atmosphere and related microstructural characteristics were discussed. (Author) 22 refs.

  16. Petrography of the Nimun and Baca pottery (Ware Celestun Roja): Canbalam Ceramic Sphere of the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obando, Luis G.; Jimenez Alvarez, Socorro del Pilar

    2016-01-01

    The ware Celestun Red (of the Nimun and Baca ceramic typologies) is one of the most diagnosis ceramics of the northwestern coast of Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula and subject of ongoing debate regarding its distribution and origin. Although ceramics from coastal Campeche and Yucatan have been the focus of years of investigation, scholars still do not know if Celestun Red was manufactured locally during the Late Classic (A.D. 600-900) or was made and exchanged by the regional elite. The first petrographic description of Celestun Red are provide, and use to contribute to a formal definition of the Cambalan Ceramic Sphere. These petrographic observations show that the detrital components were rhyolite fragments, vitroclastic tuffs, pumice, shards of glass, quartzes, plagioclase, calcite, hematite, magnetite and other minor contributors. The clay matrix is phyllomorphic, with a parallel, rectilinear fabric of fine grains. granulometricaly, the detrital components have been characterized as fine to medium sands. The pastes pastes present evidence of diagenetic processes, most notably porosity in the primary ceramic matrix. These space are in some cases filled by secondary calcite deposits. Evidence of manufacturing was also observed, such as the fracture and bending of the paste that took place to produce the rims of these ceramic objects. (author) [es

  17. Cutting the Cord-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    This animation shows the view from the rear hazard avoidance cameras on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit as the rover turns 45 degrees clockwise. This maneuver is the first step in a 3-point turn that will rotate the rover 115 degrees to face west. The rover must make this turn before rolling off the lander because airbags are blocking it from exiting from the front lander petal. Before this crucial turn took place, engineers instructed the rover to cut the final cord linking it to the lander. The turn took around 30 minutes to complete.

  18. Cutting the Cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    This animation shows the view from the front hazard avoidance cameras on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit as the rover turns 45 degrees clockwise. This maneuver is the first step in a 3-point turn that will rotate the rover 115 degrees to face west. The rover must make this turn before rolling off the lander because airbags are blocking it from exiting off the front lander petal. Before this crucial turn could take place, engineers instructed the rover to cut the final cord linking it to the lander. The turn took around 30 minutes to complete.

  19. Vocal cord dysfunction in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyes, Blakeslee E; Kemp, James S

    2007-06-01

    Vocal cord dysfunction is characterised by paradoxical vocal cord adduction that occurs during inspiration, resulting in symptoms of dyspnoea, wheeze, chest or throat tightness and cough. Although the condition is well described in children and adults, confusion with asthma often triggers the use of an aggressive treatment regimen directed against asthma. The laryngoscopic demonstration of vocal cord adduction during inspiration has been considered the gold standard for the diagnosis of vocal cord dysfunction, but historical factors and pulmonary function findings may provide adequate clues to the correct diagnosis. Speech therapy, and in some cases psychological counselling, is often beneficial in this disorder. The natural course and prognosis of vocal cord dysfunction are still not well described in adults or children.

  20. Behavior Intention towards the Adoption of Innovative Household Sanitary Ware: A Case Study of Jakarta, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akbar Adhiutama

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study tried to describe the behavior intention factors related to adopt the innovative bidet toilet seats in the households. The increase of the middle class population in Indonesia creates a new demand for adopting innovative products to enhance lifestyles. There were many electronic home appliance products have been easily adopted in Jakarta households, however there has been low adoption for electronic bidet toilet seats in household bathrooms. This study aims to identify and analyse the critical factors involved in adopting these seats in households and to explore the relative significance of each of these factors. It reports the results of empirical tests conducted regarding the non users’ adoption of these seats, based on the extended Theory of Planned Behavior. This study was administrated to 115 participants in Jakarta. Descriptive statistic, correlation analysis and multiple regressions were performed to determine the important factors. The results indicate that intention, voluntariness, observability, water usage and age are positively influence the adoption of the seats in urban households in Jakarta. Keywords: behavior adoption, electronic bidet toilet seats, urban households, jakarta

  1. So ware-Defined Network Solutions for Science Scenarios: Performance Testing Framework and Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Settlemyer, Bradley [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Kettimuthu, R. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Boley, Josh [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Katramatos, Dimitrios [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Rao, Nageswara S. [ORNL; Sen, Satyabrata [ORNL; Liu, Qiang [ORNL

    2018-01-01

    High-performance scientific work flows utilize supercomputers, scientific instruments, and large storage systems. Their executions require fast setup of a small number of dedicated network connections across the geographically distributed facility sites. We present Software-Defined Network (SDN) solutions consisting of site daemons that use dpctl, Floodlight, ONOS, or OpenDaylight controllers to set up these connections. The development of these SDN solutions could be quite disruptive to the infrastructure, while requiring a close coordination among multiple sites; in addition, the large number of possible controller and device combinations to investigate could make the infrastructure unavailable to regular users for extended periods of time. In response, we develop a Virtual Science Network Environment (VSNE) using virtual machines, Mininet, and custom scripts that support the development, testing, and evaluation of SDN solutions, without the constraints and expenses of multi-site physical infrastructures; furthermore, the chosen solutions can be directly transferred to production deployments. By complementing VSNE with a physical testbed, we conduct targeted performance tests of various SDN solutions to help choose the best candidates. In addition, we propose a switching response method to assess the setup times and throughput performances of different SDN solutions, and present experimental results that show their advantages and limitations.

  2. Looking Like Gold: Chlorite and Talc Transformation in the Golden Slip Ware Production (Swat Valley, North-Western Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara Maritan

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The archaeometric study of the “golden slip” ware (second century BCE—fourth century CE at the site of Barikot (Swat, north-western Pakistan aimed to define its manufacturing technology and provenance of the raw materials used. For this reason, a multianalytical approach consisting of the microscopic, microstructural and mineralogical analysis of both the golden slip and the ceramic paste was adopted. The slip was found to be composed by platy minerals, microchemically identified as talc and chlorite; their intimate association indicated clearly that they derived from a chlorite-talc schist. This rock is geologically available near the site in the “green stones” lenses within the Mingora ophiolites outcropping in the Swat valley. Due to the use of this stone also for the production of stone tools, it cannot be excluded that the chlorite-talc schist used for the golden slip can be derived from manufacturing residues of the Gandharan sculptures. In order to constrain the firing production technology, laboratory replicas were produced using a locally collected clay and coating them with ground chlorite-talc schist. On the basis of the mineralogical association observed in both the slip and the ceramic paste and the thermodynamic stability of the pristine mineral phases, the golden slip pottery underwent firing under oxidising conditions in the temperature interval between 800 °C and 850 °C. The golden and shining looks of the slip were here interpreted as the result of the combined light reflectance of the platy structure of the talc-based coating and the uniform, bright red colour of the oxidized ceramic background.

  3. Motivating Cord Blood Donation with Information and Behavioral Nudges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieco, Daniela; Lacetera, Nicola; Macis, Mario; Di Martino, Daniela

    2018-01-10

    Umbilical cord blood is a source of hematopoietic stem cells essential to treat life-threatening diseases, such as leukemia and lymphoma. However, only a very small percentage of parents donate upon delivery. The decision to donate the cord blood occurs at a very specific time and when parents likely experience emotional, informational, and decisional overloads; these features of cord blood donation make it different from other pro-social activities. In collaboration with an OB-GYN clinic in Milan, Italy, we conducted the first randomized controlled trial that applies tools from behavioral science to foster cord blood donation, and quantified the gains that informational and behavioral "nudges" can achieve. We found that information and "soft" commitments increased donations; approaching expecting parents closer to the delivery date and providing them with multiple reminders, moreover, had the strongest impact. However, a significant portion of women who expressed consent to donate could not do so because of organizational constraints. We conclude that simple, non-invasive behavioral interventions that address information gaps and procrastination, and that increase the salience of the activity can substantially enhance altruistic donations of cord blood, especially when coupled with organizational support.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of malignant extradural tumors with acute spinal cord compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lien, H.H.; Blomlie, V.; Heimdal, K.; Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo; Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo

    1990-01-01

    Thirty-six cancer patients with extradural spinal metastatic disease and acute symptoms of spinal cord compression underwent magnetic resonance (MR) imaging at 1.5 T. Cord involvement was found in all 36, 7 of whom had lesions at 2 different sites. Vertebral metastases in addition to those corresponding to the cord compressions were detected in 27 patients, and 18 of these had widespread deposits. MR displayed the extent of the tumors in the craniocaudal and lateral directions. The ability to identify multiple sites of cord and vertebral involvement and to delineate tumor accurately makes MR the examination of choice in cancer patients with suspected spinal cord compression. It obviates the need for myelography and postmyelography CT in this group of patients. (orig.)

  5. The Role of Core Self-Evaluations in the Relationship between Stress and Depression in Persons with Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeAngelis, Jesse B.; Yaghmaian, Rana; Smedema, Susan Miller

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the role of core self-evaluations (CSE) in the relationship between perceived stress and depression in persons with spinal cord injury. Method: Two hundred forty-seven adults with spinal cord injury completed an online survey measuring perceived stress, CSE, and depressive symptoms. Results: A multiple regression analysis…

  6. Attachment Style, Social Support, and Coping as Psychosocial Correlates of Happiness in Persons with Spinal Cord Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Lisa; Catalano, Denise; Sung, Connie; Phillips, Brian; Chou, Chih-Chin; Chan, Jacob Yui Chung; Chan, Fong

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To examine the roles of attachment, social support, and coping as psychosocial correlates in predicting happiness in people with spinal cord injuries. Design: Quantitative descriptive research design using multiple regression and correlation techniques. Participants: 274 individuals with spinal cord injuries. Outcome Measures: Happiness…

  7. Spinal cord: motor neuron diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezania, Kourosh; Roos, Raymond P

    2013-02-01

    Spinal cord motor neuron diseases affect lower motor neurons in the ventral horn. This article focuses on the most common spinal cord motor neuron disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, which also affects upper motor neurons. Also discussed are other motor neuron diseases that only affect the lower motor neurons. Despite the identification of several genes associated with familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, the pathogenesis of this complex disease remains elusive. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The differentiation process of the I-type granitoids in southwest Japan and New South Wares in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakatsu, K.; Iwamoto, Y.; Ebisu, S.; Hasegawa, M.; Hiraiwa, N.; Kawakatsu, T.; Kitano, A.; Masuta, T.; Ootsubo, H.; Wakazono, R.

    2013-12-01

    Cretaceous-Paleogene Granitoids in the inner zone of southwest Japan have been divided into two series: the magnetite series that is distributed mainly in the San-in belt and the ilmenite series that is distributed mainly in San-yo belt. For 8 years, we have been investigating the two series to clear their processes of magmatic differentiation. Recently, we discovered oscillatory zoned structure, exsolution lamellae of amphibole, and relics of pyroxene left in the core of amphibole from Harima granodiorite, Nunobiki granodiorite (San-yo belt) and Daito-Yokota quartz diorite (San-in belt). The amphibole that has microstructure coexists with magnetite, ilmenite and pyrrhotite. We compared the two series for crystallization and re-equilibrium by ion substitution using the microstructure of the amphibole as 'time measure' during the differentitation process of acidic magma. While magnetites and ilmenites coexist with the core of the amphiboles, the oxygen fugacity of the San-yo belt magma was low until the later stage of magmatic differentiation where H2S from the Earth's crust mixed with it. In the subsolidus process, hydrothermal solutions circulated. On the other hand, the oxygen fugacity of the San-in belt magma began to rise in the early stage of magmatic differentiation. In the later stage, mafic magma was contaminated with SO2. The rims of amphiboles coexist with pyrrhotites in both of belts. Furthermore, the re-equilibrium of minerals underwent progressive oxidation and hydrothermal fluid circulated actively in the subsolidus process. Bingie Bingie Point at New South Wares (Eurobodalla National Park) is a peninsula about a meter around. The plutonic rocks were formed in the Devonian period and belong to the magnetite series. They are classified I-type granitoids such as those found in the inner zone of southwest Japan. They have only trace amounts of oxide minerals and pyrrhotite. The amphiboles of the granitoids have oscillatory zoned structures at pale green

  9. An investigation of pottery production technology for the West Slope wares from Dorylaion (Eskişehir/Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kara, A.

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Researches in the field of pottery production technology in ancient times, done in different settlements during the same period, may contribute to know relationships established within the different cultural communities. In ancient times, Anatolia (Asia Minor was the crossroads of ancient civilizations. There are several ancient settlements and artifacts belonging to Hellenistic culture (330-30 BC. West Slope wares from Dorylaion (Eskişehir/Turkey excavations are the main Hellenistic culture findings. In this study, different analytical techniques were employed for the characterization of these findings in order to enlighten the pottery production technology. Wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WDXRF and X-ray diffraction (XRD were employed to study the chemical and mineralogical composition of the bodies, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX were also performed for the microstructural and microchemical characterization of body and slip layers of the selected potsherds. The raw materials used, firing temperatures and atmosphere and related microstructural characteristics were discussed.La investigación de la tecnología utilizada por distintas civilizaciones en la producción de piezas cerámicas encontradas de un mismo asentamiento arqueológico, puede contribuir al conocimiento de relaciones establecidas entre distintas comunidades culturales. Anatolia (Asia Menor es considerada una importante encrucijada de antiguas civilizaciones que abarcan del Periodo de Bronce al imperio Otomano. Las piezas conocidas como West Slope son los principales restos de la cultura helenística (330-30 A.C. encontrados en las excavaciones de Dorylaion (Eskişehir/ Turquía. En este estudio, diferentes técnicas analíticas han sido empleadas en la caracterización de estas piezas, a fin de dilucidar la tecnología utilizada en su produción.. Fluorescencia de rayos X por onda dispersa (WDXRF y

  10. Numerical Analysis of Blood Damage Potential of the HeartMate II and HeartWare HVAD Rotary Blood Pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thamsen, Bente; Blümel, Bastian; Schaller, Jens; Paschereit, Christian O; Affeld, Klaus; Goubergrits, Leonid; Kertzscher, Ulrich

    2015-08-01

    Implantable left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) became the therapy of choice in treating end-stage heart failure. Although survival improved substantially and is similar in currently clinically implanted LVADs HeartMate II (HM II) and HeartWare HVAD, complications related to blood trauma are frequently observed. The aim of this study was to compare these two pumps regarding their potential blood trauma employing computational fluid dynamics. High-resolution structured grids were generated for the pumps. Newtonian flow was calculated, solving Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations with a sliding mesh approach and a k-ω shear stress transport turbulence model for the operating point of 4.5 L/min and 80 mm Hg. The pumps were compared in terms of volumes subjected to certain viscous shear stress thresholds, below which no trauma was assumed (von Willebrand factor cleavage: 9 Pa, platelet activation: 50 Pa, and hemolysis: 150 Pa), and associated residence times. Additionally, a hemolysis index was calculated based on a Eulerian transport approach. Twenty-two percent of larger volumes above 9 Pa were observed in the HVAD; above 50 Pa and 150 Pa the differences between the two pumps were marginal. Residence times were higher in the HVAD for all thresholds. The hemolysis index was almost equal for the HM II and HVAD. Besides the gap regions in both pumps, the inlet regions of the rotor and diffuser blades have a high hemolysis production in the HM II, whereas in the HVAD, the volute tongue is an additional site for hemolysis production. Thus, in this study, the comparison of the HM II and the HVAD using numerical methods indicated an overall similar tendency to blood trauma in both pumps. However, influences of turbulent shear stresses were not considered and effects of the pivot bearing in the HM II were not taken into account. Further in vitro investigations are required. Copyright © 2015 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and

  11. Anne Elizabeth Ware | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accumulation in Leaves of Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench: A Source of Natural Food Pigment," J. Agricultural Deoxygenation of Triglycerides to Hydrocarbons Over Supported Nickel Catalysts," Chemical Engineering

  12. SmartCityWare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohamed, Nader; Al-Jaroodi, Jameela; Jawhar, Imad

    2017-01-01

    Smart cities are becoming a reality. Various aspects of modern cities are being automated and integrated with information and communication technologies to achieve higher functionality, optimized resources utilization, and management, and improved quality of life for the residents. Smart cities...... rely heavily on utilizing various software, hardware, and communication technologies to improve the operations in areas, such as healthcare, transportation, energy, education, logistics, and many others, while reducing costs and resources consumption. One of the promising technologies to support...... technology is Fog Computing, which extends the traditional Cloud Computing paradigm to the edge of the network to enable localized and real-time support for operating-enhanced smart city services. However, proper integration and efficient utilization of CoT and Fog Computing is not an easy task. This paper...

  13. SPINAL CORD- A CADAVERIC STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayamma K. N

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Spinal cord is situated within the vertebral canal extending from the lower end of the medulla oblongata at the upper border of first cervical vertebra. In early foetal life, it extends throughout the length of the vertebral canal, and at the time of birth, it reaches the level of third lumbar vertebra. In adult, it ends at the lower border of first lumbar vertebra and thereafter continued as filum terminale, which gets attached to tip of coccyx. Spinal cord is covered by three protective membranes called spinal meninges, diameter, arachnoid and pia mater. The diameter and arachnoid mater extent up to second sacral vertebra and the pia mater forms filum terminale and extend at the tip of coccyx. MATERIALS AND METHODS Forty spinal cord cadaveric specimen were studied by dissection method after exposing the vertebral canal. The roots of spinal nerve were sectioned on both sides and the cord is released along with its coverings. The dura and arachnoid mater were incised longitudinally and the subarachnoid space, blood vessels, nerve roots, ligament denticulata, cervical and lumbar enlargements were observed. The blood vessels including radicular arteries were also studied photographed. RESULTS The spinal cord is a highly vascular structure situated within the vertebral canal, covered by diameter, arachnoid mater and pia mater. Spinal dura is thicker anteriorly than posteriorly. The pia mater forms linea splendens, which extend along the whole length of the cord in front of the anterior median fissure. The average length of the cord is 38 cm. The length and breadth of cervical enlargement was more compared to lumbar enlargement. The number of rootlets in both dorsal and ventral roots accounts more in cervical compared to other regions of the cord. The ligament denticulata is a thin transparent bands of pia mater attached on either sides of the cord between the dorsal and ventral roots of spinal nerves. The tooth like extensions are well

  14. Cord Blood Chimerism And Relapse After Haplo-Cord Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Besien, Koen; Koshy, Nebu; Gergis, Usama; Mayer, Sebastian; Cushing, Melissa; Rennert, Hannah; Slotky, Ronit; Mark, Tomer; Pearse, Roger; Rossi, Adriana; Phillips, Adrienne; Vasovic, Liljana; Ferrante, Rosanna; Hsu, Michael; Shore, Tsiporah

    2018-01-01

    Haplo-cord stem cell transplantation combines the infusion of CD34 selected hematopoietic progenitors from a haplo-identical donor with an umbilical cord blood graft from an unrelated donor and allows faster count recovery, with low rates of disease recurrence and chronic GVHD. But the contribution of the umbilical cord blood graft to long-term transplant outcome remains unclear. We analyzed 39 recipients of haplo-cord transplants with AML and MDS, engrafted and in remission at 2 months. Median age was 66 (18-72) and all had intermediate, high, or very high risk disease. Less than 20% UCB chimerism in the CD33 lineage was associated with an increased rate of disease recurrence (54% vs 11% Pdisease recurrence (46% vs 12%, P=0.007) Persistent haplo-chimerism in the CD3 lineage was associated with an increased rate of disease recurrence (40% vs 15%, P=0.009) Chimerism did not predict for treatment related mortality. The cumulative incidence of acute GVHD by day 100 was 43%. The cumulative incidence of moderate/severe chronic GVHD was only 5%. Engraftment of the umbilical cord blood grafts provides powerful GVL effects which protect against disease recurrence and is associated with low risk of chronic GVHD. Engraftment of CD34 selected haplo-identical cells can lead to rapid development of circulating T-cells, but when these cells dominate, GVL-effects are limited and rates of disease recurrence are high. PMID:27333804

  15. Automated identification of spinal cord and vertebras on sagittal MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chuan; Chan, Heang-Ping; Dong, Qian; He, Bo; Wei, Jun; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Couriel, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    We are developing an automated method for the identification of the spinal cord and the vertebras on spinal MR images, which is an essential step for computerized analysis of bone marrow diseases. The spinal cord segment was first enhanced by a newly developed hierarchical multiscale tubular (HMT) filter that utilizes the complementary hyper- and hypo- intensities in the T1-weighted (T1W) and STIR MRI sequences. An Expectation-Maximization (EM) analysis method was then applied to the enhanced tubular structures to extract candidates of the spinal cord. The spinal cord was finally identified by a maximum-likelihood registration method by analysis of the features extracted from the candidate objects in the two MRI sequences. Using the identified spinal cord as a reference, the vertebras were localized based on the intervertebral disc locations extracted by another HMT filter applied to the T1W images. In this study, 5 and 30 MRI scans from 35 patients who were diagnosed with multiple myeloma disease were collected retrospectively with IRB approval as training and test set, respectively. The vertebras manually outlined by a radiologist were used as reference standard. A total of 422 vertebras were marked in the 30 test cases. For the 30 test cases, 100% (30/30) of the spinal cords were correctly segmented with 4 false positives (FPs) mistakenly identified on the back muscles in 4 scans. A sensitivity of 95.0% (401/422) was achieved for the identification of vertebras, and 5 FPs were marked in 4 scans with an average FP rate of 0.17 FPs/scan.

  16. The significance of dorsal migration of the cord after extensive cervical laminectomy for patients with traumatic central cord syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, L; Wolf, A; Mirvis, S; Rigamonti, D; Fianfaca, M S; Monasky, M

    1995-08-01

    Central cord syndrome (CCS) resulting from traumatic cervical injury is often associated with cervical stenosis and/or spondylosis. The efficacy of multilevel laminectomy in the treatment of this condition has been controversial. The objective of this study was to validate by magnetic resonance (MR) imaging the occurrence of dorsal cord migration after extensive laminectomy for patients with the clinical syndrome of central cord damage and its relationship to the short-term outcome. During a 28-month period, the authors evaluated 20 patients (mean age 54 years) who sustained CCS after cervical spine trauma. Pre- and postoperative MR imaging assessed the adequacy of cervical cord decompression by multilevel laminectomy. All patients had cervical canal stenosis with complete obliteration of the anterior subarachnoid space over multiple levels. Seventeen patients initially had CCS of different degrees of severity. One had no motor deficit and two had motor complete with sensory deficits greater in their arms. Laminectomy, generally from C2 to C7 without facetectomy, was performed after plateau of neurological recovery (mean 17 days postinjury). Neurological assessment 3 months after operation revealed improvement in 12, stable function in 7, and progression of deficit in one with no mortality. The postoperative midsagittal MR images demonstrated adequate decompression with restoration of anterior cerebrospinal fluid space and posterior cord migration in 12 patients (60% of the 20), but only 8 of them also had improved function. MR imaging demonstrated that, in the presence of multilevel spondylosis/stenosis, laminectomy may provide adequate spinal cord decompression in patients with traumatic CCS.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Suicide in a spinal cord injured population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartkopp, A; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Seidenschnur, A M

    1998-01-01

    To determine the relation between functional status and risk of suicide among individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI).......To determine the relation between functional status and risk of suicide among individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI)....

  18. Hospital- and community-based interventions enhancing (re) employment for people with spinal cord injury : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roels, E. H.; Aertgeerts, B.; Ramaekers, D.; Peers, K.

    Study design: Systematic Review. Objectives: To investigate the effect of interventions enhancing (re) employment following spinal cord injury (SCI). Setting: Studies from multiple countries were included. Methods: MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), CINAHL,

  19. Radiation treatment of spinal cord neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, R.V.

    1982-01-01

    Results of radiation treatment of spinal cord neoplasms are presented. The results of combined (surgical and radiation) treatment of tumors are studied. On the whole it is noted that radiation treatment of initial spinal cord tumours is not practised on a large scale because of low radiostability of spinal cord

  20. Traumatic spinal cord injury in MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bronarski, J.; Wozniak, E.

    1993-01-01

    Spinal cord injuries in tetraplegics were briefly discussed on the basis of MR imaging. It was found that severe cervical spine trauma usually results in concussion - the complete transection of the cord is rare. A case of 19 years old male with total cord transection confirmed by MR imaging is described. (author)

  1. CORD PROLAPSE, ASSOCIATED FACTORS AND FETAL OUTCOME

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Several factors predispose to cord prolapse, amongst which are breech presentation, abnormal lie and presentation, hydramnios and long cord [2-3, 5-7]. Perinatal mortality is the most feared complication and often seen in up to 91% of cases [8-9]. Little is known about the pattern of umbilical cord prolapse in Cameroon as ...

  2. Lymphangioma of the spermatic cord

    OpenAIRE

    Campos, Antônio Carlos Ligocki; Costa, Marco Aurélio Raeder da; Salvalaggio, Paolo Rogério de Oliveira; Torres, Luiz Fernando Bleggi; Coelho, Júlio Cézar Uili

    1998-01-01

    We describe a case of a 22-year-old man that had been submitted to a left herniorraphy 11 years previously to the present admission. He returned to our hospital with another mass in the same side of the groin. At operation, several small cysts linked to the spermatic cord were demonstrated. At this time, an histological exam demonstrated the presence of conective tissue. The final histology report confirmed the diagnosis of lymphangioma of the spermatic cord in the groin region. The patient w...

  3. Spinal cord injury with central cord syndrome from surfing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinfeld, Yaniv; Keren, Yaniv; Haddad, Elias

    2018-01-01

    Central cord syndrome (CCS) is an injury to the center of the spinal cord. It is well known as a hyperextension injury, but it has never been described as a surfing injury. Our report describes this injury in detail. A 35-year-old male novice surfer presented to the emergency department with acute tetraplegia following falling off his surfboard and hitting sea floor at a shallow beach break. He was rescued by a fellow surfer while floating in the sea and unable to raise his head above sea level. Upon arrival at the hospital, tetraplegia and sensory deficits were noted. Radiological investigations showed advanced spinal stenosis at C4-6 levels. T2 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated myelopathy at C5-C6 level. He was diagnosed as having central cord syndrome, treated conservatively, and regained near full neurologic recovery after a month of rehabilitation. Unique sport activities lead to unique injuries. It is important to accurately describe these injuries in order to create protective measures against them. Neurologic injuries in surfers are uncommon. With low-energy trauma, surfer's myelopathy is still the most common diagnosis, but central cord syndrome should be in the differential diagnosis.

  4. Local perceptions, cultural beliefs and practices that shape umbilical cord care: a qualitative study in Southern Province, Zambia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie M Herlihy

    Full Text Available Global policy regarding optimal umbilical cord care to prevent neonatal illness is an active discussion among researchers and policy makers. In preparation for a large cluster-randomized control trial to measure the impact of 4% chlorhexidine as an umbilical wash versus dry cord care on neonatal mortality in Southern Province, Zambia, we performed a qualitative study to determine local perceptions of cord health and illness and the cultural belief system that shapes umbilical cord care knowledge, attitudes, and practices.This study consisted of 36 focus group discussions with breastfeeding mothers, grandmothers, and traditional birth attendants, and 42 in-depth interviews with key community informants. Semi-structured field guides were used to lead discussions and interviews at urban and rural sites. A wide variation in knowledge, beliefs, and practices surrounding cord care was discovered. For home deliveries, cords were cut with non-sterile razor blades or local grass. Cord applications included drying agents (e.g., charcoal, baby powder, dust, lubricating agents (e.g., Vaseline, cooking oil, used motor oil and agents intended for medicinal/protective purposes (e.g., breast milk, cow dung, chicken feces. Concerns regarding the length of time until cord detachment were universally expressed. Blood clots in the umbilical cord, bulongo-longo, were perceived to foreshadow neonatal illness. Management of bulongo-longo or infected umbilical cords included multiple traditional remedies and treatment at government health centers.Umbilical cord care practices and beliefs were diverse. Dry cord care, as recommended by the World Health Organization at the time of the study, is not widely practiced in Southern Province, Zambia. A cultural health systems model that depicts all stakeholders is proposed as an approach for policy makers and program implementers to work synergistically with existing cultural beliefs and practices in order to maximize

  5. The relation between umbilical cord characteristics and the outcome of external cephalic version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuppens, Simone M I; Waerenburgh, Evelyne R; Kooistra, Libbe; van der Donk, Riet W P; Hasaart, Tom H M; Pop, Victor J M

    2011-05-01

    Umbilical cords of fetuses in breech presentation differ in length and coiling from their cephalic counterparts and it might be hypothesised that these cord characteristics may in turn affect ECV outcome. To investigate the relation between umbilical cord characteristics and the outcome of external cephalic version (ECV). Prospective cohort study. Women (>35 weeks gestation) with a singleton fetus in breech presentation, suitable for external cephalic version. Demographic, lifestyle and obstetrical parameters were assessed at intake. ECV success was based on cephalic presentation on ultrasound post-ECV. Umbilical cord length (UCL) and umbilical coiling index (UCI) were measured after birth. The relation between umbilical cord characteristics (cord length and coiling) and the success of external cephalic version. ECV success rate was overall 79/146 (54%), for multiparas 37/46(80%) and for nulliparas 42/100 (42%). Multiple logistic regression showed that UCL (OR: 1.04, CI: 1.01-1.07), nulliparity (OR: 0.20, CI: 0.08-0.51), frank breech (OR: 0.37, 95% CI: 0.15-0.90), body mass index (OR: 0.85, CI: 0.76-0.95), placenta anterior (OR: 0.27, CI: 0.12-0.63) and birth weight (OR: 1.002, CI: 1.001-1.003) were all independently related to ECV success. Umbilical cord length is independently related to the outcome of ECV, whereas umbilical coiling index is not. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Can the human lumbar posterior columns be stimulated by transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation? A modeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danner, Simon M; Hofstoetter, Ursula S; Ladenbauer, Josef; Rattay, Frank; Minassian, Karen

    2011-03-01

    Stimulation of different spinal cord segments in humans is a widely developed clinical practice for modification of pain, altered sensation, and movement. The human lumbar cord has become a target for modification of motor control by epidural and, more recently, by transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation. Posterior columns of the lumbar spinal cord represent a vertical system of axons and when activated can add other inputs to the motor control of the spinal cord than stimulated posterior roots. We used a detailed three-dimensional volume conductor model of the torso and the McIntyre-Richard-Grill axon model to calculate the thresholds of axons within the posterior columns in response to transcutaneous lumbar spinal cord stimulation. Superficially located large-diameter posterior column fibers with multiple collaterals have a threshold of 45.4 V, three times higher than posterior root fibers (14.1 V). With the stimulation strength needed to activate posterior column axons, posterior root fibers of large and small diameters as well as anterior root fibers are coactivated. The reported results inform on these threshold differences, when stimulation is applied to the posterior structures of the lumbar cord at intensities above the threshold of large-diameter posterior root fibers. © 2011, Copyright the Authors. Artificial Organs © 2011, International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. A Novel Translational Model of Spinal Cord Injury in Nonhuman Primate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Corre, Marine; Noristani, Harun N; Mestre-Frances, Nadine; Saint-Martin, Guillaume P; Coillot, Christophe; Goze-Bac, Christophe; Lonjon, Nicolas; Perrin, Florence E

    2017-11-27

    Spinal cord injuries (SCI) lead to major disabilities affecting > 2.5 million people worldwide. Major shortcomings in clinical translation result from multiple factors, including species differences, development of moderately predictive animal models, and differences in methodologies between preclinical and clinical studies. To overcome these obstacles, we first conducted a comparative neuroanatomical analysis of the spinal cord between mice, Microcebus murinus (a nonhuman primate), and humans. Next, we developed and characterized a new model of lateral spinal cord hemisection in M. murinus. Over a 3-month period after SCI, we carried out a detailed, longitudinal, behavioral follow-up associated with in vivo magnetic resonance imaging ( 1 H-MRI) monitoring. Then, we compared lesion extension and tissue alteration using 3 methods: in vivo 1 H-MRI, ex vivo 1 H-MRI, and classical histology. The general organization and glial cell distribution/morphology in the spinal cord of M. murinus closely resembles that of humans. Animals assessed at different stages following lateral hemisection of the spinal cord presented specific motor deficits and spinal cord tissue alterations. We also found a close correlation between 1 H-MRI signal and microglia reactivity and/or associated post-trauma phenomena. Spinal cord hemisection in M. murinus provides a reliable new nonhuman primate model that can be used to promote translational research on SCI and represents a novel and more affordable alternative to larger primates.

  8. Banking on cord blood stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Michael J

    2008-07-01

    Umbilical cord blood gifted to non-profit public cord blood banks is now routinely used as an alternative source of haematopoietic stem cells for allogeneic transplantation for children and adults with cancer, bone marrow failure syndromes, haemoglobinopathies and many genetic metabolic disorders. Because of the success and outcomes of public cord banking, many companies now provide private cord banking services. However, in the absence of any published transplant evidence to support autologous and non-directed family banking, commercial cord banks currently offer a superfluous service.

  9. MR imaging and spinal cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azar-Kia, B.; Fine, M.; Naheedy, M.; Elias, D.

    1987-01-01

    MR imaging has significantly improved diagnostic capability of spinal cord injuries. Other available diagnostic modalities such as plain films, myelography, CT, and post-CT myelography have failed to consistently show the secific evidence of spinal cord injuries and their true extent. The authors are presenting our experiences with MR imaging in spinal column injury. They have found MR imaging to be the procedure of choice for prognostic evaluation of spinal cord trauma. They are showing examples of recent and old spinal cord injury such as hematomyelia, myelomalacia, transection, spinal cord edema, and cavitation

  10. Distribution of elements in human spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yukawa, Masae; Kobayashi, T.; Qiu, Y.; Kameda, N.; Ito, Y.; Otomo, E.

    1992-01-01

    The distribution of elements in human spinal cord was investigated on unfixed frozen cord material using PIXE technique. Distribution of Cu, Zn and Fe were not uniform in the cross section of the spinal cord and concentrations of these elements were higher in the anterior gray horn than in the other areas, while K and Cl distributed uniformly. The content of K changed along the spinal cord from the cervical to the lumbar level. These findings are discussed in relation to current understanding of the physiology of the spinal cord. (author)

  11. Spinal cord injury at birth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenger-Gron, Jesper; Kock, Kirsten; Nielsen, Rasmus G

    2008-01-01

    UNLABELLED: A case of perinatally acquired spinal cord injury (SCI) is presented. The foetus was vigorous until birth, the breech presented and delivery was performed by a non-traumatic Caesarean section. The infant displayed symptoms of severe SCI but diagnosis was delayed due to severe co...

  12. Neuromyelitis optica and multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennett, J. L.; de Seze, J.; Lana-Peixoto, M.

    2015-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an inflammatory autoimmune disease of the central nervous system that preferentially targets the optic nerves and spinal cord. The clinical presentation may suggest multiple sclerosis (MS), but a highly specific serum autoantibody against the astrocytic water channel...

  13. Cord Blood Banking for Potential Future Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, William T; Lubin, Bertram H; Cairo, Mitchell S; Notarangelo, Luigi D

    2017-11-01

    This policy statement is intended to provide information to guide pediatricians, obstetricians, and other medical specialists and health care providers in responding to parents' questions about cord blood donation and banking as well as the types (public versus private) and quality of cord blood banks. Cord blood is an excellent source of stem cells for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children with some fatal diseases. Cord blood transplantation offers another method of definitive therapy for infants, children, and adults with certain hematologic malignancies, hemoglobinopathies, severe forms of T-lymphocyte and other immunodeficiencies, and metabolic diseases. The development of universal screening for severe immunodeficiency assay in a growing number of states is likely to increase the number of cord blood transplants. Both public and private cord blood banks worldwide hold hundreds of thousands of cord blood units designated for the treatment of fatal or debilitating illnesses. The procurement, characterization, and cryopreservation of cord blood is free for families who choose public banking. However, the family cost for private banking is significant and not covered by insurance, and the unit may never be used. Quality-assessment reviews by several national and international accrediting bodies show private cord blood banks to be underused for treatment, less regulated for quality control, and more expensive for the family than public cord blood banks. There is an unquestionable need to study the use of cord blood banking to make new and important alternative means of reconstituting the hematopoietic blood system in patients with malignancies and blood disorders and possibly regenerating tissue systems in the future. Recommendations regarding appropriate ethical and operational standards (including informed consent policies, financial disclosures, and conflict-of-interest policies) are provided for physicians, institutions, and organizations that

  14. Right-sided vagus nerve stimulation inhibits induced spinal cord seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs, R Shane; Salter, E George; Killingsworth, Cheryl; Rollins, Dennis L; Smith, William M; Ideker, Raymond E; Wellons, John C; Blount, Jeffrey P; Oakes, W Jerry

    2007-01-01

    We have previously shown that left-sided vagus nerve stimulation results in cessation of induced spinal cord seizures. To test our hypothesis that right-sided vagus nerve stimulation will also abort seizure activity, we have initiated seizures in the spinal cord and then performed right-sided vagus nerve stimulation in an animal model. Four pigs were anesthetized and placed in the lateral position and a small laminectomy performed in the lumbar region. Topical penicillin, a known epileptogenic drug to the cerebral cortex and spinal cord, was next applied to the dorsal surface of the exposed cord. With the exception of the control animal, once seizure activity was discernible via motor convulsion or increased electrical activity, the right vagus nerve previously isolated in the neck was stimulated. Following multiple stimulations of the vagus nerve and with seizure activity confirmed, the cord was transected in the midthoracic region and vagus nerve stimulation performed. Right-sided vagus nerve stimulation resulted in cessation of spinal cord seizure activity in all animals. Transection of the spinal cord superior to the site of seizure induction resulted in the ineffectiveness of vagus nerve stimulation in causing cessation of seizure activity in all study animals. As with left-sided vagus nerve stimulation, right-sided vagus nerve stimulation results in cessation of induced spinal cord seizures. Additionally, the effects of right-sided vagus nerve stimulation on induced spinal cord seizures involve descending spinal pathways. These data may aid in the development of alternative mechanisms for electrical stimulation for patients with medically intractable seizures and add to our knowledge regarding the mechanism for seizure cessation following peripheral nerve stimulation.

  15. Identification and Management of Pump Thrombus in the HeartWare Left Ventricular Assist Device System: A Novel Approach Using Log File Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorde, Ulrich P; Aaronson, Keith D; Najjar, Samer S; Pagani, Francis D; Hayward, Christopher; Zimpfer, Daniel; Schlöglhofer, Thomas; Pham, Duc T; Goldstein, Daniel J; Leadley, Katrin; Chow, Ming-Jay; Brown, Michael C; Uriel, Nir

    2015-11-01

    The study sought to characterize patterns in the HeartWare (HeartWare Inc., Framingham, Massachusetts) ventricular assist device (HVAD) log files associated with successful medical treatment of device thrombosis. Device thrombosis is a serious adverse event for mechanical circulatory support devices and is often preceded by increased power consumption. Log files of the pump power are easily accessible on the bedside monitor of HVAD patients and may allow early diagnosis of device thrombosis. Furthermore, analysis of the log files may be able to predict the success rate of thrombolysis or the need for pump exchange. The log files of 15 ADVANCE trial patients (algorithm derivation cohort) with 16 pump thrombus events treated with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) were assessed for changes in the absolute and rate of increase in power consumption. Successful thrombolysis was defined as a clinical resolution of pump thrombus including normalization of power consumption and improvement in biochemical markers of hemolysis. Significant differences in log file patterns between successful and unsuccessful thrombolysis treatments were verified in 43 patients with 53 pump thrombus events implanted outside of clinical trials (validation cohort). The overall success rate of tPA therapy was 57%. Successful treatments had significantly lower measures of percent of expected power (130.9% vs. 196.1%, p = 0.016) and rate of increase in power (0.61 vs. 2.87, p file parameters can potentially predict the likelihood of successful tPA treatments and if validated prospectively, could substantially alter the approach to thrombus management. Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Ambient hemolysis and activation of coagulation is different between HeartMate II and HeartWare left ventricular assist devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birschmann, Ingvild; Dittrich, Marcus; Eller, Thomas; Wiegmann, Bettina; Reininger, Armin J; Budde, Ulrich; Strüber, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Thromboembolic and bleeding events in patients with a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) are still a major cause of complications. Therefore, the balance between anti-coagulant and pro-coagulant factors needs to be tightly controlled. The principle hypothesis of this study is that different pump designs may have an effect on hemolysis and activation of the coagulation system. Referring to this, the HeartMate II (HMII; Thoratec Corp, Pleasanton, CA) and the HeartWare HVAD (HeartWare International Inc, Framingham, MA) were investigated. For 20 patients with LVAD support (n = 10 each), plasma coagulation, full blood count, and clinical chemistry parameters were measured. Platelet function was monitored using platelet aggregometry, platelet function analyzer-100 system ( Siemens, Marburg, Germany), vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein phosphorylation assay, immature platelet fraction, platelet-derived microparticles, and von Willebrand diagnostic. Acquired von Willebrand syndrome could be detected in all patients. Signs of hemolysis, as measured by lactate dehydrogenase levels (mean, 470 U/liter HMII, 250 U/liter HVAD; p < 0.001), were more pronounced in the HMII patients. In contrast, D-dimer analysis indicated a significantly higher activation of the coagulation system in HVAD patients (mean, 0.94 mg/liter HMII, 2.01 mg/liter HVAD; p < 0.01). The efficacy of anti-platelet therapy using clopidogrel was not sufficient in more than 50% of the patients. Our results support the finding that all patients with rotary blood pumps suffered from von Willebrand syndrome. In addition, a distinct footprint of effects on hemolysis and the coagulation system can be attributed to different devices. As a consequence, the individual status of the coagulation system needs to be controlled in long-term patients. © 2013 Published by International Society for the Heart and Lung Transplantation on behalf of International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation.

  17. Imaging of Spinal Cord Injury: Acute Cervical Spinal Cord Injury, Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy, and Cord Herniation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talekar, Kiran; Poplawski, Michael; Hegde, Rahul; Cox, Mougnyan; Flanders, Adam

    2016-10-01

    We review the pathophysiology and imaging findings of acute traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI), cervical spondylotic myelopathy, and briefly review the much less common cord herniation as a unique cause of myelopathy. Acute traumatic SCI is devastating to the patient and the costs to society are staggering. There are currently no "cures" for SCI and the only accepted pharmacologic treatment regimen for traumatic SCI is currently being questioned. Evaluation and prognostication of SCI is a demanding area with significant deficiencies, including lack of biomarkers. Accurate classification of SCI is heavily dependent on a good clinical examination, the results of which can vary substantially based upon the patient׳s condition or comorbidities and the skills of the examiner. Moreover, the full extent of a patients׳ neurologic injury may not become apparent for days after injury; by then, therapeutic response may be limited. Although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the best imaging modality for the evaluation of spinal cord parenchyma, conventional MR techniques do not appear to differentiate edema from axonal injury. Recently, it is proposed that in addition to characterizing the anatomic extent of injury, metrics derived from conventional MRI and diffusion tensor imaging, in conjunction with the neurological examination, can serve as a reliable objective biomarker for determination of the extent of neurologic injury and early identification of patients who would benefit from treatment. Cervical spondylosis is a common disorder affecting predominantly the elderly with a potential to narrow the spinal canal and thereby impinge or compress upon the neural elements leading to cervical spondylotic myelopathy and radiculopathy. It is the commonest nontraumatic cause of spinal cord disorder in adults. Imaging plays an important role in grading the severity of spondylosis and detecting cord abnormalities suggesting myelopathy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  18. Acute Thoracolumbar Spinal Cord Injury: Relationship of Cord Compression to Neurological Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeers, Peta; Battistuzzo, Camila R; Clark, Jillian M; Bernard, Stephen; Freeman, Brian J C; Batchelor, Peter E

    2018-02-21

    Spinal cord injury in the cervical spine is commonly accompanied by cord compression and urgent surgical decompression may improve neurological recovery. However, the extent of spinal cord compression and its relationship to neurological recovery following traumatic thoracolumbar spinal cord injury is unclear. The purpose of this study was to quantify maximum cord compression following thoracolumbar spinal cord injury and to assess the relationship among cord compression, cord swelling, and eventual clinical outcome. The medical records of patients who were 15 to 70 years of age, were admitted with a traumatic thoracolumbar spinal cord injury (T1 to L1), and underwent a spinal surgical procedure were examined. Patients with penetrating injuries and multitrauma were excluded. Maximal osseous canal compromise and maximal spinal cord compression were measured on preoperative mid-sagittal computed tomography (CT) scans and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) by observers blinded to patient outcome. The American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale (AIS) grades from acute hospital admission (≤24 hours of injury) and rehabilitation discharge were used to measure clinical outcome. Relationships among spinal cord compression, canal compromise, and initial and final AIS grades were assessed via univariate and multivariate analyses. Fifty-three patients with thoracolumbar spinal cord injury were included in this study. The overall mean maximal spinal cord compression (and standard deviation) was 40% ± 21%. There was a significant relationship between median spinal cord compression and final AIS grade, with grade-A patients (complete injury) exhibiting greater compression than grade-C and D patients (incomplete injury) (p compression as independently influencing the likelihood of complete spinal cord injury (p compression. Greater cord compression is associated with an increased likelihood of severe neurological deficits (complete injury) following

  19. Umbilical cord blood donation: public or private?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballen, K K; Verter, F; Kurtzberg, J

    2015-10-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) is a graft source for patients with malignant or genetic diseases who can be cured by allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), but who do not have an appropriately HLA-matched family or volunteer unrelated adult donor. Starting in the 1990s, unrelated UCB banks were established, accepting donations from term deliveries and storing UCB units for public use. An estimated 730 000 UCB units have been donated and stored to date and ~35 000 UCB transplants have been performed worldwide. Over the past 20 years, private and family banks have grown rapidly, storing ~4 million UCB units for a particular patient or family, usually charging an up-front and yearly storage fee; therefore, these banks are able to be financially sustainable without releasing UCB units. Private banks are not obligated to fulfill the same regulatory requirements of the public banks. The public banks have released ~30 times more UCB units for therapy. Some countries have transitioned to an integrated banking model, a hybrid of public and family banking. Today, pregnant women, their families, obstetrical providers and pediatricians are faced with multiple choices about the disposition of their newborn's cord blood. In this commentary, we review the progress of UCB banking technology; we also analyze the current data on pediatric and adult unrelated UCB, including the recent expansion of interest in transplantation for hemoglobinopathies, and discuss emerging studies on the use of autologous UCB for neurologic diseases and regenerative medicine. We will review worldwide approaches to UCB banking, ethical considerations, criteria for public and family banking, integrated banking ideas and future strategies for UCB banking.

  20. Maternal nutritional status during pregnancy and surma use determine cord lead levels in Karachi, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janjua, Naveed Zafar; Delzell, Elizabeth; Larson, Rodney R.; Meleth, Sreelatha; Kabagambe, Edmond K.; Kristensen, Sibylle; Sathiakumar, Nalini

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: To estimate the umbilical cord blood lead levels (BLLs) of Pakistani neonates and to identify determinants for umbilical BLLs. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study of mothers and infants at one of the two obstetric units of two tertiary care hospitals in Karachi during January-August 2005. Information from 540 mothers selected randomly from those registered for delivery was obtained about their pregnancy, diet, and current and past lead exposures. We collected umbilical cord blood for lead levels analyzed using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry. We computed geometric and arithmetic means. We performed multiple linear regression analysis to identify factors associated with log-transformed umbilical cord BLLs. We also performed logistic regression analysis to identify determinants of high lead cord BLLs (≥10 μg/dl). Results: The geometric mean cord BLL of the neonates was 9.6 μg/dl; arithmetic mean (S.D.) was 10.8 μg/dl (5.7) with a median of 9.7 μg/dl and a range of 1.8-48.9 μg/dl. Women who reported intake of less than 58.5 mg of elemental iron supplement per day during pregnancy had cord BLL of 10.0 μg/dl; in comparison those women who had higher iron intake had lower cord BLL (8.4 μg/dl). Those who used surma (an eye cosmetic) daily had higher cord BLL (11.5 μg/dl) as compared to those who used it less frequently (9.4 μg/dl). In multivariable linear regression model, higher iron intake, owning a car, and being in 2nd quartile of mid-arm circumference were associated with low lead levels while father's occupation in lead-based industry was associated with significantly higher umbilical cord BLLs. There was interaction of daily surma use and ethnicity. Geometric mean BLLs were varied among surma users by ethnicity. Conclusions: Umbilical cord BLLs are high in Karachi, Pakistan, in comparison to those in developed countries such as United States. Measures are needed to reduce fetal lead exposure to prevent adverse

  1. Religious perspectives on umbilical cord blood banking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordens, Christopher F C; O'Connor, Michelle A C; Kerridge, Ian H; Stewart, Cameron; Cameron, Andrew; Keown, Damien; Lawrence, Rabbi Jeremy; McGarrity, Andrew; Sachedina, Abdulaziz; Tobin, Bernadette

    2012-03-01

    Umbilical cord blood is a valuable source of haematopoietic stem cells. There is little information about whether religious affiliations have any bearing on attitudes to and decisions about its collection, donation and storage. The authors provided information about umbilical cord blood banking to expert commentators from six major world religions (Catholicism, Anglicanism, Islam, Judaism, Hinduism and Buddhism) and asked them to address a specific set of questions in a commentary. The commentaries suggest there is considerable support for umbilical cord blood banking in these religions. Four commentaries provide moral grounds for favouring public donation over private storage. None attach any particular religious significance to the umbilical cord or to the blood within it, nor place restrictions on the ethnicity or religion of donors and recipients. Views on ownership of umbilical cord blood vary. The authors offer a series of general points for those who seek a better understanding of religious perspectives on umbilical cord blood banking.

  2. Microdialysis to optimize cord perfusion and drug delivery in spinal cord injury.

    OpenAIRE

    Phang, I; Zoumprouli, A; Papadopoulos, MC; Saadoun, S

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: There is lack of monitoring from the injury site to guide management of patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injury. Here we describe a bedside microdialysis monitoring technique for optimizing spinal cord perfusion and drug delivery at the injury site. METHODS: 14 patients were recruited within 72 hours of severe spinal cord injury. We inserted intradurally at the injury site a pressure probe, to monitor continuously spinal cord perfusion pressure, and a microdialysis cathete...

  3. MRI in diagnosis of spinal cord diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Naotoshi; Ono, Yuko; Kakinoki, Yoshio; Kimura, Humiko; Ebihara, Reiko; Nagayama, Takashi; Okada, Takaharu; Watanabe, Hiromi

    1985-01-01

    64 MRI studies of 57 cases of spinal cord diseases were reviewed, and following results were obtained. (1) MRI is usefull for screening method of spinal cord diseases, as CT in cerebral diseases. (2) MRI might replaces myelography in most of spinal cord disease, and more reliable informations might be obtained by MRI than in myelography in some cases, but (3) in detection of small organic changes, some technological problems are layed regarding to the image resolution of MRI. (author)

  4. Spinal cord injury drives chronic brain changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Jure

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Only a few studies have considered changes in brain structures other than sensory and motor cortex after spinal cord injury, although cognitive impairments have been reported in these patients. Spinal cord injury results in chronic brain neuroinflammation with consequent neurodegeneration and cognitive decline in rodents. Regarding the hippocampus, neurogenesis is reduced and reactive gliosis increased. These long-term abnormalities could explain behavioral impairments exhibited in humans patients suffering from spinal cord trauma.

  5. Contrast enhanced CT of spinal cord angioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Takahiko; Ebitani, Tsutomu; Honma, Takao; Sofue, Muroto; Nakamura, Shigeru

    1982-01-01

    Contrast enhanced CT on 6 patients with spinal cord angioma showed enhancement in 2 of them. The conditions to produce contrast enhancement were the window width of 100 - 200, and the window level of 0 - 50. In spinal cord angioma, contrast enhanced CT is presently only an adjunct to angiography and myelography. Nevertheless, contrast enhanced CT is useful in the screening test for spinal cord angioma, in the patients who are nonindicated to angiography, and in the postoperative follow-up. (Ueda, J.)

  6. A case of recurrent breast cancer with intramedullary spinal cord metastasis and symptomatic improvement by Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakahara, Makoto; Hosoya, Keiko; Hirooka, Yumi

    2017-01-01

    A 65-year-old woman underwent surgery for right breast cancer (TIN1aM0) in December 2005. In March 2011, the breast cancer recurred with multiple lung and lymph node metastases. In February 2013, because of multiple brain metastases whole-brain radiation therapy was performed. In January 2014, she developed paralysis of the left leg. Spinal cord magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass lesion (Th12 to L1 level) in the spinal cord, and she was diagnosed with intramedullary spinal cord metastasis (ISCM) from the breast cancer. Spinal cord irradiation reduced the metastasis and improved her paralysis. Although pharmacotherapy was continued, her metastases, with the exception of ISCM, progressed and she died of the disease in November 2014. It is necessary to diagnose ISCM at the time of its onset. Additionally immediate therapeutic intervention can significantly reduce the volume of ISCM, resulting in symptomatic relief from neurological deficit; in this case, radiation therapy was effective. (author)

  7. Inverse associations between cord vitamin D and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder symptoms: A child cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossin, Mats H; Aaby, Jens B; Dalgård, Christine; Lykkedegn, Sine; Christesen, Henrik T; Bilenberg, Niels

    2017-07-01

    To examine the association between cord 25-hydroxyvitamin D 2+3 (25(OH)D) and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder symptoms in toddlers, using Child Behaviour Checklist for ages 1.5-5. In a population-based birth cohort, a Child Behaviour Checklist for ages 1.5-5 questionnaire was returned from parents of 1233 infants with mean age 2.7 (standard deviation 0.6) years. Adjusted associations between cord 25(OH)D and Child Behaviour Checklist-based attention deficit hyperactivity disorder problems were analysed by multiple regression. Results The median cord 25(OH)D was 44.1 (range: 1.5-127.1) nmol/L. Mean attention deficit hyperactivity disorder problem score was 2.7 (standard deviation 2.1). In adjusted analyses, cord 25(OH)D levels >25 nmol/L and >30 nmol/L were associated with lower attention deficit hyperactivity disorder scores compared to levels ⩽25 nmol/L ( p = 0.035) and ⩽30 nmol/L ( p = 0.043), respectively. The adjusted odds of scoring above the 90th percentile on the Child Behaviour Checklist-based attention deficit hyperactivity disorder problem scale decreased by 11% per 10 nmol/L increase in cord 25(OH)D. An inverse association between cord 25(OH)D and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder symptoms in toddlers was found, suggesting a protective effect of prenatal vitamin D.

  8. Spinal Cord Tolerance in the Age of Spinal Radiosurgery: Lessons From Preclinical Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medin, Paul M.; Boike, Thomas P.

    2011-01-01

    Clinical implementation of spinal radiosurgery has increased rapidly in recent years, but little is known regarding human spinal cord tolerance to single-fraction irradiation. In contrast, preclinical studies in single-fraction spinal cord tolerance have been ongoing since the 1970s. The influences of field length, dose rate, inhomogeneous dose distributions, and reirradiation have all been investigated. This review summarizes literature regarding single-fraction spinal cord tolerance in preclinical models with an emphasis on practical clinical significance. The outcomes of studies that incorporate uniform irradiation are surprisingly consistent among multiple small- and large-animal models. Extensive investigation of inhomogeneous dose distributions in the rat has demonstrated a significant dose-volume effect while preliminary results from one pig study are contradictory. Preclinical spinal cord dose-volume studies indicate that dose distribution is more critical than the volume irradiated suggesting that neither dose-volume histogram analysis nor absolute volume constraints are effective in predicting complications. Reirradiation data are sparse, but results from guinea pig, rat, and pig studies are consistent with the hypothesis that the spinal cord possesses a large capacity for repair. The mechanisms behind the phenomena observed in spinal cord studies are not readily explained and the ability of dose response models to predict outcomes is variable underscoring the need for further investigation. Animal studies provide insight into the phenomena and mechanisms of radiosensitivity but the true significance of animal studies can only be discovered through clinical trials.

  9. Potential of human dental stem cells in repairing the complete transection of rat spinal cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chao; Li, Xinghan; Sun, Liang; Guo, Weihua; Tian, Weidong

    2017-04-01

    Objective. The adult spinal cord of mammals contains a certain amount of neural precursor cells, but these endogenous cells have a limited capacity for replacement of lost cells after spinal cord injury. The exogenous stem cells transplantation has become a therapeutic strategy for spinal cord repairing because of their immunomodulatory and differentiation capacity. In addition, dental stem cells originating from the cranial neural crest might be candidate cell sources for neural engineering. Approach. Human dental follicle stem cells (DFSCs), stem cells from apical papilla (SCAPs) and dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) were isolated and identified in vitro, then green GFP-labeled stem cells with pellets were transplanted into completely transected spinal cord. The functional recovery of rats and multiple neuro-regenerative mechanisms were explored. Main results. The dental stem cells, especially DFSCs, demonstrated the potential in repairing the completely transected spinal cord and promote functional recovery after injury. The major involved mechanisms were speculated below: First, dental stem cells inhibited the expression of interleukin-1β to reduce the inflammatory response; second, they inhibited the expression of ras homolog gene family member A (RhoA) to promote neurite regeneration; third, they inhibited the sulfonylurea receptor1 (SUR-1) expression to reduce progressive hemorrhagic necrosis; lastly, parts of the transplanted cells survived and differentiated into mature neurons and oligodendrocytes but not astrocyte, which is beneficial for promoting axons growth. Significance. Dental stem cells presented remarkable tissue regenerative capability after spinal cord injury through immunomodulatory, differentiation and protection capacity.

  10. Cord Blood Metabolome Is Highly Associated with Birth Weight, but Less Predictive for Later Weight Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Hellmuth

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Fetal metabolism may be changed by the exposure to maternal factors, and the route to obesity may already set in utero. Cord blood metabolites might predict growth patterns and later obesity. We aimed to characterize associations of cord blood with birth weight, postnatal weight gain, and BMI in adolescence. Methods: Over 700 cord blood samples were collected from infants participating in the German birth cohort study LISAplus. Glycerophospholipid fatty acids (GPL-FA, polar lipids, non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA, and amino acids were analyzed with a targeted, liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry based metabolomics platform. Cord blood metabolites were related to growth factors by linear regression models adjusted for confounding variables. Results: Cord blood metabolites were highly associated with birth weight. Lysophosphatidylcholines C16:1, C18:1, C20:3, C18:2, C20:4, C14:0, C16:0, C18:3, GPL-FA C20:3n-9, and GPL-FA C22:5n-6 were positively related to birth weight, while higher cord blood concentrations of NEFA C22:6, NEFA C20:5, GPL-FA C18:3n-3, and PCe C38:0 were associated with lower birth weight. Postnatal weight gain and BMI z-scores in adolescents were not significantly associated with cord blood metabolites after adjustment for multiple testing. Conclusion: Potential long-term programming effects of the intrauterine environment and metabolism on later health cannot be predicted with profiling of the cord blood metabolome.

  11. Chronic spinal cord injury in the cervical spine of a young soccer player.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Yoshihiko; Koga, Michiaki; Taguchi, Toshihiko

    2010-05-12

    A 17-year-old male soccer player presented with numbness in the upper- and lower-left extremities of 6 months' duration. He had no apparent history of trauma but experienced neck pain during heading of the ball 5 years prior. A high-signal intensity area was seen on T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the cervical spine. No muscle weakness was observed. Hypoesthesia was observed in bilateral forearms, hands, and extremities below the inguinal region. Plain radiographs in the neutral position showed local kyphosis at C3/4. A small protrusion of the C3/4 disk was observed on T1-weighted MRI. A high-signal area in the spinal cord at the C3/4 level was observed on T2-weighted MRI, but this was not enhanced by gadolinium. Multiple sclerosis, intramedullary spinal cord tumor, sarcoidosis and malignant lymphoma, and spinal cord injury were all considered in the differential diagnosis. However, in view of the clinical, laboratory, and radiological investigations, we concluded that repeated impacts to the neck caused by heading of the ball during soccer induced a chronic, minor spinal cord injury. This contributed to the high-signal intensity change of the spinal cord in T2-weighted MRI. The present case demonstrates that repeated impact may cause chronic spinal cord injury. Soccer, American football, or rugby players presenting with neck or extremity symptoms should not be overlooked for the possibility of latent spinal cord injury, as this could present later development of more severe or unrecoverable spinal cord injuries. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. Spinal cord arteriovenous shunts: from imaging to management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodesch, G.; Lasjaunias, P.

    2003-01-01

    Spinal cord arteriovenous shunts (SCAVSs) are either fistulas or niduses that can be separated in four different groups according to their localization and relationship to the dura. Paraspinal AVSs are located outside the spine and are responsible for neurological symptoms because of cord compression by ertatic veins, venous congestion or arterial steal. Epidural shunts are located in the epidural space and drain in epidural veins with secondary intradural congestion. Dural shunts are embedded in the dura, produce a cord venous myelopathy after draining through veins that either pierce the dura far from a nerve root or accompany a nerve root. Intradural shunts affect the cord, the roots or the filum. Additionally, they can be classified according to their potential relationships with genetics, vascular biological features and angiogenesis into genetic hereditary lesions (hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia), genetic non-hereditary lesions (multiple lesions with metameric links) and single lesions (AVMs or micro AVFs). MRI and MRA are able to visualise SCAVS early after the onset of clinical symptoms. The type of shunt and its localization may remain difficult to be precise. Angiography remains the gold standard for analysis of the anatomical, morphological and architectural features necessary for therapeutic decisions in both paediatric and adult populations. In our series, embolisation is chosen in first intention whatever the type of shunt responsible for the clinical symptoms and glue is preferably used. In paraspinal, dural or epidural arteriovenous shunts, the goal of treatment should be complete closure of the shunt. A complete cure by embolization is rather easily achieved in paraspinal lesions. Failure of endovascular therapy in dural or epidural shunts must bring the patient to surgery. The prognosis of most intradural shunts seems better than previously thought, even after haemorrhage. In intradural spinal cord arteriovenous shunts, embolisation

  13. Cell type specific DNA methylation in cord blood: A 450K-reference data set and cell count-based validation of estimated cell type composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gervin, K. (Kristina); Page, C.M. (Christian Magnus); H.C.D. Aass (Hans Christian Dalsbotten); M.A.E. Jansen (Michelle); Fjeldstad, H.E. (Heidi Elisabeth); B.K. Andreassen (Bettina Kulle); L. Duijts (Liesbeth); J.B.J. van Meurs (Joyce); M.C. van Zelm (Menno); V.W.V. Jaddoe (Vincent); Nordeng, H. (Hedvig); Knudsen, G.P. (Gunn Peggy); P. Magnus (Per); W. Nystad (Wenche); Staff, A.C. (Anne Cathrine); J.F. Felix (Janine); R. Lyle (Robert)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractEpigenome-wide association studies of prenatal exposure to different environmental factors are becoming increasingly common. These studies are usually performed in umbilical cord blood. Since blood comprises multiple cell types with specific DNA methylation patterns, confounding caused

  14. A clinical perspective of spinal cord injury.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nandoe Tewarie, R.D.S.; Hurtado, A.; Bartels, R.H.M.A.; Grotenhuis, J.A.; Oudega, M.

    2010-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) results in loss of nervous tissue in the spinal cord and consequently loss of motor and sensory function. The impairments are permanent because endogenous repair events fail to restore the damaged axonal circuits that are involved in function. There is no treatment available

  15. Twiddler's syndrome in spinal cord stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mahfoudh, Rafid; Chan, Yuen; Chong, Hsu Pheen; Farah, Jibril Osman

    2016-01-01

    The aims are to present a case series of Twiddler's syndrome in spinal cord stimulators with analysis of the possible mechanism of this syndrome and discuss how this phenomenon can be prevented. Data were collected retrospectively between 2007 and 2013 for all patients presenting with failure of spinal cord stimulators. The diagnostic criterion for Twiddler's syndrome is radiological evidence of twisting of wires in the presence of failure of spinal cord stimulation. Our unit implants on average 110 spinal cord stimulators a year. Over the 5-year study period, all consecutive cases of spinal cord stimulation failure were studied. Three patients with Twiddler's syndrome were identified. Presentation ranged from 4 to 228 weeks after implantation. Imaging revealed repeated rotations and twisting of the wires of the spinal cord stimulators leading to hardware failure. To the best of our knowledge this is the first reported series of Twiddler's syndrome with implantable pulse generators (IPGs) for spinal cord stimulation. Hardware failure is not uncommon in spinal cord stimulation. Awareness and identification of Twiddler's syndrome may help prevent its occurrence and further revisions. This may be achieved by implanting the IPG in the lumbar region subcutaneously above the belt line. Psychological intervention may have a preventative role for those who are deemed at high risk of Twiddler's syndrome from initial psychological screening.

  16. Complement elevation in spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebhun, J; Botvin, J

    1980-05-01

    Laboratory studies revealed an elevated complement in 66% of patients with spinal cord injury. It is postulated that the activated complement may be a component of self-feeding immunological mechanism responsible for the failure of regeneration of a mature mammalian spinal cord. There was no evidence that such an injury had any effect on pre-existing atopy.

  17. Risk factors in iatrogenic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montalva-Iborra, A; Alcanyis-Alberola, M; Grao-Castellote, C; Torralba-Collados, F; Giner-Pascual, M

    2017-09-01

    In the last years, there has been a change in the aetiology of spinal cord injury. There has been an increase in the number of elderly patients with spinal cord injuries caused by diseases or medical procedures. The aim of this study is to investigate the frequency of the occurrence of iatrogenic spinal cord injury in our unit. The secondary aim is to study what variables can be associated with a higher risk of iatrogenesis. A retrospective, descriptive, observational study of patients with acute spinal cord injury admitted from June 2009 to May 2014 was conducted. The information collected included the patient age, aetiology, neurological level and grade of injury when admitted and when discharged, cardiovascular risk factors, a previous history of depression and any prior treatment with anticoagulant or antiplatelet drugs. We applied a logistic regression. The grade of statistical significance was established as Pinjury was the thoracic level (48%). The main aetiology of spinal cord injury caused by iatrogenesis was surgery for degenerative spine disease, in patients under the age of 30 were treated with intrathecal chemotherapy. Iatrogenic spinal cord injury is a frequent complication. A statistically significant association between a patient history of depression and iatrogenic spinal cord injury was found as well as with anticoagulant and antiplatelet drug use prior to iatrogenic spinal cord injury.

  18. Family-directed umbilical cord blood banking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluckman, Eliane; Ruggeri, Annalisa; Rocha, Vanderson; Baudoux, Etienne; Boo, Michael; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Welte, Kathy; Navarrete, Cristina; van Walraven, Suzanna M

    2011-11-01

    Umbilical cord blood transplantation from HLA-identical siblings provides good results in children. These results support targeted efforts to bank family cord blood units that can be used for a sibling diagnosed with a disease which can be cured by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation or for research that investigates the use of allogeneic or autologous cord blood cells. Over 500 patients transplanted with related cord blood units have been reported to the Eurocord registry with a 4-year overall survival of 91% for patients with non-malignant diseases and 56% for patients with malignant diseases. Main hematologic indications in children are leukemia, hemoglobinopathies or inherited hematologic, immunological or metabolic disorders. However, family-directed cord blood banking is not widely promoted; many cord blood units used in sibling transplantation have been obtained from private banks that do not meet the necessary criteria required to store these units. Marketing by private banks who predominantly store autologous cord blood units has created public confusion. There are very few current validated indications for autologous storage but some new indications might appear in the future. Little effort is devoted to provide unbiased information and to educate the public as to the distinction between the different types of banking, economic models and standards involved in such programs. In order to provide a better service for families in need, directed-family cord blood banking activities should be encouraged and closely monitored with common standards, and better information on current and future indications should be made available.

  19. Spinal cord injury arising in anaesthesia practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewson, D W; Bedforth, N M; Hardman, J G

    2018-01-01

    Spinal cord injury arising during anaesthetic practice is a rare event, but one that carries a significant burden in terms of morbidity and mortality. In this article, we will review the pathophysiology of spinal cord injury. We will then discuss injuries relating to patient position, spinal cord hypoperfusion and neuraxial techniques. The most serious causes of spinal cord injury - vertebral canal haematoma, spinal epidural abscess, meningitis and adhesive arachnoiditis - will be discussed in turn. For each condition, we draw attention to practical, evidence-based measures clinicians can undertake to reduce their incidence, or mitigate their severity. Finally, we will discuss transient neurological symptoms. Some cases of spinal cord injury during anaesthesia can be ascribed to anaesthesia itself, arising as a direct consequence of its conduct. The injury to a spinal nerve root by inaccurate and/or incautious needling during spinal anaesthesia is an obvious example. But in many cases, spinal cord injury during anaesthesia is not caused by, related to, or even associated with, the conduct of the anaesthetic. Surgical factors, whether direct (e.g. spinal nerve root damage due to incorrect pedicle screw placement) or indirect (e.g. cord ischaemia following aortic surgery) are responsible for a significant proportion of spinal cord injuries that occur concurrently with the delivery of regional or general anaesthesia. © 2018 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  20. Ultrasound-Guided Bipolar Umbilical Cord Occlusion in Complicated Monochorionic Pregnancies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Katrine V; Jensen, Lisa N; Jørgensen, Connie

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Ultrasound-guided bipolar umbilical cord occlusion (UCO) is used in complicated monochorionic multiple pregnancies in Denmark. The aim of this study was to assess a learning curve in the procedure of UCO. MATERIALS AND METHODS: One hundred and two monochorionic pregnancies treated...

  1. Diagnosis of spinal cord diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halimi, P.; Sigal, R.; Doyon, D.; David, P.

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) nowadays plays a predominant role in the diagnosis and evaluation of spinal canal pathologies and has reduced the other exploratory methods, including computerized tomography (CT) and myelography, to an ancillary role. These pathologies are divided into three groups: those where MRI is the only imaging method (syringomyela, tumours in the spinal canal, phakomatoses, external pachimeningitis, spinal cord injuries, myelitis); those where MRI is the initial method and is completed by other examinations (vascular malformations, dysraphism, myelopathies due to cervical osteoarthritis) and those where MRI still play a lesser role than CT (degenerative lesions of the lumbar column) [fr

  2. Clinical Use and Patentability of Cord Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavusoglu, Turker; Kilic, Kubilay Dogan; Yigitturk, Gurkan; Tomruk, Canberk; Turgut, Mehmet; Uyanikgil, Yigit

    2018-03-14

    The blood in the umbilical cord that provides the connection between mother and fetus during pregnancy is called cord blood. The blood of umbilical cord which is usually got rid of following birth, is a very rich stem cell source. Cord blood collection gives no harm to the mother and baby. Besides, its allogeneic and au-tologous usage, the most important disadvantage is that the number of cells is insufficient in adults. Today, it is predominantly used for therapeutic purposes for many diseases. The aim of this review is giving a detailed information about groups of stem cells in cord blood and determining the point of clinical use. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  3. Topologically preserving straightening of spinal cord MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Leener, Benjamin; Mangeat, Gabriel; Dupont, Sara; Martin, Allan R; Callot, Virginie; Stikov, Nikola; Fehlings, Michael G; Cohen-Adad, Julien

    2017-10-01

    To propose a robust and accurate method for straightening magnetic resonance (MR) images of the spinal cord, based on spinal cord segmentation, that preserves spinal cord topology and that works for any MRI contrast, in a context of spinal cord template-based analysis. The spinal cord curvature was computed using an iterative Non-Uniform Rational B-Spline (NURBS) approximation. Forward and inverse deformation fields for straightening were computed by solving analytically the straightening equations for each image voxel. Computational speed-up was accomplished by solving all voxel equation systems as one single system. Straightening accuracy (mean and maximum distance from straight line), computational time, and robustness to spinal cord length was evaluated using the proposed and the standard straightening method (label-based spline deformation) on 3T T 2 - and T 1 -weighted images from 57 healthy subjects and 33 patients with spinal cord compression due to degenerative cervical myelopathy (DCM). The proposed algorithm was more accurate, more robust, and faster than the standard method (mean distance = 0.80 vs. 0.83 mm, maximum distance = 1.49 vs. 1.78 mm, time = 71 vs. 174 sec for the healthy population and mean distance = 0.65 vs. 0.68 mm, maximum distance = 1.28 vs. 1.55 mm, time = 32 vs. 60 sec for the DCM population). A novel image straightening method that enables template-based analysis of quantitative spinal cord MRI data is introduced. This algorithm works for any MRI contrast and was validated on healthy and patient populations. The presented method is implemented in the Spinal Cord Toolbox, an open-source software for processing spinal cord MRI data. 1 Technical Efficacy: Stage 1 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017;46:1209-1219. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  4. Study on security of sterile and non-pyrogenic disposable wares for medical use. Inactivation of endotoxins by γ-ray radiation in the presence of various drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosobuchi, Kazunari; Tanamoto, Kenichi; Haijima, Yuji

    1997-01-01

    To efficiently inactivate endotoxins, γ-ray radiation to disposable wares for medical use was conducted using 185TBq 60 Co-radiation system in a medium added with various drugs. Endotoxin derived from E. coli R3F653 was used as the subject. Hydrogen peroxide solution, ethyl alcohol, or sodium hydrochloride were added to the basal medium. The activity of endotoxin was determined by limulus test with toxicolor system. The activity was markedly decreased by standing in 0.03% sodium hydrochloride solution for several days, whereas it was little affected in solutions of other two drugs at any concentration. However, γ-ray radiation in the medium added with either of those drugs caused to reduce the endotoxin activity dose-dependently. Such reducing effects by γ-ray radiation were most marked in the medium containing Na-hydrochloride at 0.03 or 0.3%, suggesting that there might be interaction of γ-ray and Na-hydrochloride. (M.N.)

  5. Different patterns of longitudinal brain and spinal cord changes and their associations with disability progression in NMO and MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yaou; Duan, Yunyun; Huang, Jing; Ren, Zhuoqiong; Liu, Zheng; Dong, Huiqing; Weiler, Florian; Hahn, Horst K; Shi, Fu-Dong; Butzkueven, Helmut; Barkhof, Frederik; Li, Kuncheng

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the longitudinal spinal cord and brain changes in neuromyelitis optica (NMO) and multiple sclerosis (MS) and their associations with disability progression. We recruited 28 NMO, 22 MS, and 20 healthy controls (HC), who underwent both spinal cord and brain MRI at baseline. Twenty-five NMO and 20 MS completed 1-year follow-up. Baseline spinal cord and brain lesion loads, mean upper cervical cord area (MUCCA), brain, and thalamus volume and their changes during a 1-year follow-up were measured and compared between groups. All the measurements were also compared between progressive and non-progressive groups in NMO and MS. MUCCA decreased significantly during the 1-year follow-up in NMO not in MS. Percentage brain volume changes (PBVC) and thalamus volume changes in MS were significantly higher than NMO. MUCCA changes were significantly different between progressive and non-progressive groups in NMO, while baseline brain lesion volume and PBVC were associated with disability progression in MS. MUCCA changes during 1-year follow-up showed association with clinical disability in NMO. Spinal cord atrophy changes were associated with disability progression in NMO, while baseline brain lesion load and whole brain atrophy changes were related to disability progression in MS. • Spinal cord atrophy progression was observed in NMO. • Spinal cord atrophy changes were associated with disability progression in NMO. • Brain lesion and atrophy were related to disability progression in MS.

  6. White matter organization in cervical spinal cord relates differently to age and control of grip force in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindberg, Påvel G; Feydy, Antoine; Maier, Marc A

    2010-03-17

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) can be used to elucidate relations between CNS structure and function. We hypothesized that the degree of spinal white matter organization relates to the accuracy of control of grip force. Healthy subjects of different age were studied using DTI and visuomotor tracking of precision grip force. The latter is a prime component of manual dexterity. A regional analysis of spinal white matter [fractional anisotropy (FA)] across multiple cervical levels (C2-C3, C4-C5, and C6-C7) and in different regions of interest (left and right lateral or medial spinal cord) was performed. FA was highest at the C2-C3 level, higher on the right than the left side, and higher in the lateral than in the medial spinal cord (p level in the lateral spinal cord, in which the corticospinal tract innervates spinal circuitry controlling hand and digit muscles. FA of the medial spinal cord correlated consistently with age across all cervical levels, whereas FA of the lateral spinal cord did not. The results suggest (1) a functionally relevant specialization of lateral spinal cord white matter and (2) an increased sensitivity to age-related decline in medial spinal cord white matter in healthy subjects.

  7. Spinal Cord Independence Measure, version III: applicability to the UK spinal cord injured population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Clive A; Tesio, Luigi; Itzkovich, Malka; Soni, Bakul M; Silva, Pedro; Mecci, Munawar; Chadwick, Raymond; el Masry, Waghi; Osman, Aheed; Savic, Gordana; Gardner, Brian; Bergström, Ebba; Catz, Amiram

    2009-09-01

    To examine the validity, reliability and usefulness of the Spinal Cord Independence Measure for the UK spinal cord injury population. Multi-centre cohort study. Four UK regional spinal cord injury centres. Eighty-six people with spinal cord injury. Spinal Cord Independence Measure and Functional Independence Measure on admission analysed using inferential statistics, and Rasch analysis of Spinal Cord Independence Measure. Internal consistency, inter-rater reliability, discriminant validity; Spinal Cord Independence Measure subscale match between distribution of item difficulty and patient ability measurements; reliability of patient ability measures; fit of data to Rasch model; unidimensionality of subscales; hierarchical ordering of categories within items; differential item functioning across patient groups. Scale reliability (kappa coefficients range 0.491-0.835; (p Spinal Cord Independence Measure subscales compatible with stringent Rasch requirements; mean infit indices high; distinct strata of abilities identified; most thresholds ordered; item hierarchy stable across clinical groups and centres. Misfit and differences in item hierarchy identified. Difficulties assessing central cord injuries highlighted. Conventional statistical and Rasch analyses justify the use of the Spinal Cord Independence Measure in clinical practice and research in the UK. Cross-cultural validity may be further improved.

  8. Miliary Tuberculosis with Concurrent Brain and Spinal Cord Involvement: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, Chang Keun; Na, Hyoung Il; Yu, Hyeon; Byun, Jun Soo; Youn, Young Chul; Seo, Jae Seung; Kim, Gi Hyeon

    2008-01-01

    Central nervous system involvement by tuberculosis is rare, and intramedullary involvement is even more rare. A patient that developed intermittent amnesia during anti-tuberculous therapy underwent brain CT and MRI and spine MRI. The latter showed multiple small enhancing nodules in the brain and spinal cord. The patient was treated with anti-tuberculous medication and steroids under the suspected diagnosis of miliary tuberculosis. Follow-up CT showed decreased nodule size and number. We report a case of miliary tuberculosis in the brain and spinal cord and present a review of the literature related to similar cases

  9. Miliary Tuberculosis with Concurrent Brain and Spinal Cord Involvement: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Chang Keun; Na, Hyoung Il; Yu, Hyeon; Byun, Jun Soo; Youn, Young Chul; Seo, Jae Seung; Kim, Gi Hyeon [Chung-Ang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-11-15

    Central nervous system involvement by tuberculosis is rare, and intramedullary involvement is even more rare. A patient that developed intermittent amnesia during anti-tuberculous therapy underwent brain CT and MRI and spine MRI. The latter showed multiple small enhancing nodules in the brain and spinal cord. The patient was treated with anti-tuberculous medication and steroids under the suspected diagnosis of miliary tuberculosis. Follow-up CT showed decreased nodule size and number. We report a case of miliary tuberculosis in the brain and spinal cord and present a review of the literature related to similar cases.

  10. Spinal Cord Glioblastoma Induced by Radiation Therapy of Nasopharyngeal Rhabdomyosarcoma with MRI Findings: Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Se Jin; Kim, In One [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    Radiation-induced spinal cord gliomas are extremely rare. Since the first case was reported in 1980, only six additional cases have been reported.; The radiation-induced gliomas were related to the treatment of Hodgkin's lymphoma, thyroid cancer, and medullomyoblastoma, and to multiple chest fluoroscopic examinations in pulmonary tuberculosis patient. We report a case of radiation-induced spinal cord glioblastoma developed in a 17-year-old girl after a 13-year latency period following radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal rhabdomyosarcoma. MRI findings of our case are described.

  11. Cervical Cord-Canal Mismatch: A New Method for Identifying Predisposition to Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouri, Aria; Montejo, Julio; Sun, Xin; Virojanapa, Justin; Kolb, Luis E; Abbed, Khalid M; Cheng, Joseph S

    2017-12-01

    The risk for spinal cord injuries (SCIs) ranging from devastating traumatic injuries, compression because of degenerative pathology, and neurapraxia is increased in patients with congenital spinal stenosis. Classical diagnostic criteria include an absolute anteroposterior diameter of spinal cord, which varies across patients, independent of canal size. Recent large magnetic resonance imaging studies of population cohorts have allowed newer methods to emerge that account for both cord and canal size by measuring a spinal cord occupation ratio (SCOR). A SCOR defined as ≥70% on midsagittal imaging or ≥80% on axial imaging appears to be an effective method of identifying cord-canal mismatch, but requires further validation. Cord-canal size mismatch predisposes patients to SCI because of 1) less space within the canal lowering the amount of degenerative changes needed for cord compression, and 2) less cerebrospinal fluid surrounding the spinal cord decreasing the ability to absorb kinetic forces directed at the spine. Patients with cord-canal mismatch have been reported to be at a substantially higher risk of traumatic SCI, and present with degenerative cervical myelopathy at a younger age than patients without cord-canal mismatch. However, neurologic outcome after SCI has occurred does not appear to be different in patients with or without a cord-canal mismatch. Recognition that canal and cord size are both factors which predispose to SCI supports that cord-canal size mismatch rather than a narrow cervical canal in isolation should be viewed as the underlying mechanism predisposing to SCI. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Nanofiber mat spinal cord dressing-released glutamate impairs blood-spinal cord barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Sulejczak

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available An excessive glutamate level can result in excitotoxic damage and death of central nervous system (CNS cells, and is involved in the pathogenesis of many CNS diseases. It may also be related to a failure of the blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB. This study was aimed at examining the effects of extended administration of monosodium glutamate on the BSCB and spinal cord cells in adult male Wistar rats. The glutamate was delivered by subarachnoidal application of glutamate-carrying electrospun nanofiber mat dressing at the lumbar enlargement level. Half of the rats with the glutamate-loaded mat application were treated systemically with the histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid. A group of intact rats and a rat group with subarachnoidal application of an ‘empty’ (i.e., carrying no glutamate nanofiber mat dressing served as controls. All the rats were euthanized three weeks later and lumbar fragments of their spinal cords were harvested for histological, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural studies. The samples from controls revealed normal parenchyma and BSCB morphology, whereas those from rats with the glutamate-loaded nanofiber mat dressing showed many intraparenchymal microhemorrhages of variable sizes. The capillaries in the vicinity of the glutamate-carrying dressing (in the meninges and white matter alike were edematous and leaky, and their endothelial cells showed degenerative changes: extensive swelling, enhanced vacuo­lization and the presence of vascular intraluminal projections. However, endothelial tight junctions were generally well preserved. Some endothelial cells were dying by necrosis or apoptosis. The adjacent parenchyma showed astrogliosis with astrocytic hypertrophy and swelling of perivascular astrocytic feet. Neurons in the parenchyma revealed multiple symptoms of degeneration, including, inter alia, perikaryal, dendritic and axonal swelling, and destruction of organelles. All the damage symptoms were slightly less

  13. Drilled teeth and shell artefacts from a grave at Prague-Březiněves and a review of decorative artefacts made from animal material from Corded Ware culture in the Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kyselý, René; Dobeš, Miroslav; Svoboda, K.

    -, - (2017) ISSN 1866-9557 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-14855S Institutional support: RVO:67985912 Keywords : tooth pendants * shell beads * solar disc * dog (Canis familiaris) * Margaritifera auricularia * Chalcolithic (Copper Age) * Bohemia * Moravia Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology OBOR OECD: Archaeology Impact factor: 1.844, year: 2016

  14. Preliminary results of the research at corded ware sites in the Narva-Luga interfluve Estonian-Russian borders area in 2008-2014 / Aivar Kriiska, Kekko Nordqvist, Dmitri V. Gerassimov, Sarita Sandell

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2015-01-01

    2008-2014. aastatel aset leidnud kaevamiste käigus on avastatud umbes 1000 km2 suuruselt alalt üle 40 uue kinnismuistisedateeringuga 5100-2000 eKr. Savinõude sarnasus uuritud alal osutab Narva-Lauga piirkonna ühtsele keraamikatraditsioonile

  15. Therapeutic approaches for spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Fogaça Cristante

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This study reviews the literature concerning possible therapeutic approaches for spinal cord injury. Spinal cord injury is a disabling and irreversible condition that has high economic and social costs. There are both primary and secondary mechanisms of damage to the spinal cord. The primary lesion is the mechanical injury itself. The secondary lesion results from one or more biochemical and cellular processes that are triggered by the primary lesion. The frustration of health professionals in treating a severe spinal cord injury was described in 1700 BC in an Egyptian surgical papyrus that was translated by Edwin Smith; the papyrus reported spinal fractures as a ''disease that should not be treated.'' Over the last biological or pharmacological treatment method. Science is unraveling the mechanisms of cell protection and neuroregeneration, but clinically, we only provide supportive care for patients with spinal cord injuries. By combining these treatments, researchers attempt to enhance the functional recovery of patients with spinal cord injuries. Advances in the last decade have allowed us to encourage the development of experimental studies in the field of spinal cord regeneration. The combination of several therapeutic strategies should, at minimum, allow for partial functional recoveries for these patients, which could improve their quality of life.

  16. Diffusion tensor imaging in spinal cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamble, Ravindra B; Venkataramana, Neelam K; Naik, Arun L; Rao, Shailesh V

    2011-01-01

    To assess the feasibility of spinal tractography in patients of spinal cord injury vs a control group and to compare fractional anisotropy (FA) values between the groups. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was performed in the spinal cord of 29 patients (18 patients and 11 controls). DTI was done in the cervical region if the cord injury was at the dorsal or lumbar region and in the conus region if cord injury was in the cervical or dorsal region. FA was calculated for the patients and the controls and the values were compared. The mean FA value was 0.550±0.09 in the control group and 0.367±0.14 in the patients; this difference was statistically significant (P=0.001). Spinal tractography is a feasible technique to assess the extent of spinal cord injury by FA, which is reduced in patients of spinal cord injury, suggesting possible Wallerian degeneration. In future, this technique may become a useful tool for assessing cord injury patients after stem cell therapy, with improvement in FA values indicating axonal regeneration

  17. Banking cord blood stem cells: attitude and knowledge of pregnant women in five European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Gregory; Mills, Antonia; Garcia, Joan; Hooper, Karen; McGuckin, Colin; Platz, Alexander; Rebulla, Paolo; Salvaterra, Elena; Schmidt, Alexander H; Torrabadella, Marta

    2011-03-01

    This study explores pregnant women's awareness of cord blood stem cells and their attitude regarding banking options in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and the UK. Questionnaires were distributed in six maternities. This anonymous and self-completed questionnaire included 29 multiple-choice questions based on: 1) sociodemographic factors, 2) awareness and access to information about cord blood banking, 3) banking option preferences, and 4) donating cord blood units (CBUs) to research. A total of 79% of pregnant women had little awareness of cord blood banking (n = 1620). A total of 58% of women had heard of the therapeutic benefits of cord blood, of which 21% received information from midwives and obstetricians. A total of 89% of respondents would opt to store CBUs. Among them, 76% would choose to donate CBUs to a public bank to benefit any patient in need of a cord blood transplant. Twelve percent would choose a mixed bank, and 12%, a private bank. A total of 92% would donate their child's CBU to research when it is not suitable for transplantation. The study reveals a strong preference for public banking in all five countries, based on converging values such as solidarity. Attitudes of pregnant women are not an obstacle to the rapid expansion of allogeneic banking in these EU countries. Banking choices do not appear to be correlated with household income. The extent of commercial marketing of cord blood banks in mass media highlights the importance for obstetric providers to play a central role in raising women's awareness early during their pregnancy with evidence-based medical information about banking options. © 2010 American Association of Blood Banks.

  18. Maternal systemic or cord blood inflammation is associated with birth anthropometry in a Tanzanian prospective cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, A L; Pedersen, S H; Urassa, M; Michael, D; Andreasen, A; Todd, J; Kinung'hi, S M; Changalucha, J; McDermid, J M

    2017-01-01

    HIV infection is associated with chronic systemic inflammation, with or without antiretroviral therapy. Consequences for foetal growth are not understood, particularly in settings where multiple maternal infections and malnutrition are common. The study was designed to examine maternal systemic circulating and umbilical cord blood cytokine concentrations in relation to birth anthropometry in a Tanzanian prospective cohort. A 9-plex panel of maternal plasma cytokines in HIV-positive (n = 44) and HIV-negative (n = 70) mothers and the same cytokines in umbilical cord blood collected at delivery was assayed. Linear regression modelled associations between maternal or cord blood cytokines and birth anthropometry. Health indicators (haemoglobin, mid-upper-arm circumference, body mass index) in HIV-positive mothers without considerable immunosuppression did not differ from HIV-negative women. Despite this, HIV-exposed infants had lower birthweight and length. Subgroup analyses indicated that HIV management using HAART was associated with lower plasma TNF-α, as were longer durations of any antiretroviral therapy (≥2 months). Greater maternal plasma TNF-α was associated with earlier delivery (-1.7 weeks, P = 0.039) and lower birthweights (-287 g; P = 0.020), while greater umbilical cord TNF-α (-1.43 cm; P = 0.036) and IL-12p70 (-2.4 cm; P = 0.008) were associated with shorter birth length. Birthweight was inversely associated with cord IL-12p70 (-723 g; P = 0.001) and IFN-γ (-482 g, P = 0.007). Maternal cytokines during pregnancy did not correlate with umbilical cord cytokines at delivery. Systemic inflammation identified in maternal plasma or umbilical cord blood was associated with poorer birth anthropometrics in HIV-exposed and HIV-unexposed infants. Controlling maternal and/or foetal systemic inflammation may improve birth anthropometry. © 2016 The Authors. Tropical Medicine & International Health Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Evaluation overview for the Massachusetts Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration (MA-CORD) project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, Kirsten K; Falbe, Jennifer; Taveras, Elsie M; Gortmaker, Steve; Kulldorff, Martin; Perkins, Meghan; Blaine, Rachel E; Franckle, Rebecca L; Ganter, Claudia; Baidal, Jennifer Woo; Kwass, Jo-Ann; Buszkiewicz, James; Smith, Lauren; Land, Thomas

    2015-02-01

    The Massachusetts Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration (MA-CORD) project is a 2-year, multilevel, multisector community intervention to prevent and control obesity among children 2-12 years of age from two predominantly low-income communities in Massachusetts. MA-CORD includes evidence-based interventions in multiple sectors, including community health centers, early care and education centers, schools, afterschool programs, the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children, and the broader community. Currently, implementation of MA-CORD is complete and the final year of data collection is in progress. Here, the MA-CORD evaluation plan is described and baseline data are presented. The impact of MA-CORD on children's BMI, lifestyle behaviors, obesity-related care, and quality of life will be assessed using sector-specific, pre/post, time-series, and quasi-experimental designs. Change in the primary outcomes will be compared for intervention and comparison communities. Additionally, change in mean BMI and obesity prevalence in intervention school districts will be compared to similar districts throughout the state. At baseline in 2012, approximately 16% of preschool-aged and 25% of school-aged children were obese. Moreover, 15-40% of children consumed no vegetables on the previous day, 25-75% drank a sugar-sweetened beverage on the previous day, up to 87% had insufficient physical activity, 50-75% had a television in the room where they slept, and 50-80% obtained insufficient sleep. There is ample room for improvement in BMI and health behaviors in children in MA-CORD communities. If successful, MA-CORD may serve as a model for multilevel, multisector approaches to childhood obesity prevention and control.

  20. CT-myelography of cervical cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyanagi, Izumi; Isu, Toyohiko; Iwasaki, Yoshinobu

    1986-01-01

    We reported seven cases of acute cervical cord injuries who were examined by CT-Myelography (CTM) within 7 days after trauma. The presence or absence of spinal cord enlargement, the initial neurological status and the neurological prognosis of these patients were studied. The neurological status of each patient was graded by the method of Frankel who defined five grades from A to E according to the severity of neurological deficits. Seven patients were all males. The youngest was 18 and the oldest was 73 years old, with a mean age of 40.7 years. Follows up periods ranged from 7 to 23 months. Result: CTM revealed the enlargement of spinal cord in two cases, who had severe neurological deficits and were graded to A. No neurological improvements were obtained in these cases. Five cases without cord enlargement were graded to A in one patient, B in one patient and C in three patients. Four of these five patients improved neurologically. One grade C patient remained grade C. Complete block of subarachnoid space was observed in two out of seven cases. Cord enlargement was present in one of them. Another case of complete block improved from C to D. Conclusion: We consider the presence of cord enlargement which can be demonstrated by CTM well correlates the severity of the cord damage and presume poor neurological prognosis. Internal decompression, such as posterior longitudinal myelotomy may be recommended to the case of cord enlargement. When the cord enlargement is absent, improvement of neurological grade is expected although the initial neurological status shows severe deficits. (author)

  1. Nanomedicine for treating spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Jacqueline Y.; Xu, Xiao-Ming; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2013-09-01

    Spinal cord injury results in significant mortality and morbidity, lifestyle changes, and difficult rehabilitation. Treatment of spinal cord injury is challenging because the spinal cord is both complex to treat acutely and difficult to regenerate. Nanomaterials can be used to provide effective treatments; their unique properties can facilitate drug delivery to the injury site, enact as neuroprotective agents, or provide platforms to stimulate regrowth of damaged tissues. We review recent uses of nanomaterials including nanowires, micelles, nanoparticles, liposomes, and carbon-based nanomaterials for neuroprotection in the acute phase. We also review the design and neural regenerative application of electrospun scaffolds, conduits, and self-assembling peptide scaffolds.

  2. Idiopathic thoracic transdural intravertebral spinal cord herniation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazda K Turel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic spinal cord herniation is a rare and often missed cause of thoracic myelopathy. The clinical presentation and radiological appearance is inconsistent and commonly confused with a dorsal arachnoid cyst and often is a misdiagnosed entity. While ventral spinal cord herniation through a dural defect has been previously described, intravertebral herniation is a distinct entity and extremely rare. We present the case of a 70-year old man with idiopathic thoracic transdural intravertebral spinal cord herniation and discuss the clinico-radiological presentation, pathophysiology and operative management along with a review the literature of this unusual entity.

  3. Incarcerated umbilical cord hernia containing the gallbladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann M. Kulungowski

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A 16 day-old boy infant with an umbilical mass underwent operative exploration of the umbilicus. The mass proved to be a gallbladder incarcerated in a hernia of the umbilical cord. Distinguishing an omphalocele from an umbilical cord hernia is not obvious and can be arbitrary. Morphologically, the two terms both describe congenital abdominal wall defects covered by a membrane, typically containing abdominal organs. Subtle differences and clinical features between omphalocele and umbilical cord hernia are highlighted in this report.

  4. Teaching nonlinear dynamics through elastic cords

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chacon, R; Galan, C A; Sanchez-Bajo, F

    2011-01-01

    We experimentally studied the restoring force of a length of stretched elastic cord. A simple analytical expression for the restoring force was found to fit all the experimental results for different elastic materials. Remarkably, this analytical expression depends upon an elastic-cord characteristic parameter which exhibits two limiting values corresponding to two nonlinear springs with different Hooke's elastic constants. Additionally, the simplest model of elastic cord dynamics is capable of exhibiting a great diversity of nonlinear phenomena, including bifurcations and chaos, thus providing a suitable alternative model system for discussing the basic essentials of nonlinear dynamics in the context of intermediate physics courses at university level.

  5. Clinical, magnetic resonance imaging, and histopathologic findings in 6 dogs with surgically resected extraparenchymal spinal cord hematomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hague, D W; Joslyn, S; Bush, W W; Glass, E N; Durham, A C

    2015-01-01

    Extraparenchymal spinal cord hematoma has been described in veterinary medicine in association with neoplasia, intervertebral disk disease, and snake envenomation. There are rare reports of spontaneous extraparenchymal spinal cord hematoma formation with no known cause in human medicine. Multiple cases of spontaneous extraparenchymal spinal cord hematoma have not been described previously in veterinary medicine. To describe the signalment, clinical findings, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features, and surgical outcomes in histopathologically confirmed extraparenchymal spinal cord hematomas in dogs with no identified underlying etiology. Six dogs had MRI of the spinal cord, decompressive spinal surgery, and histopathologic confirmation of extraparenchymal spinal cord hematoma not associated with an underlying cause. Multi-institutional retrospective study. Six patients had spontaneous extraparenchymal spinal cord hematoma formation. MRI showed normal signal within the spinal cord parenchyma in all patients. All hematomas had T2-weighted hyperintensity and the majority (5/6) had no contrast enhancement. All dogs underwent surgical decompression and most patients (5/6) returned to normal or near normal neurologic function postoperatively. Follow-up of the patients (ranging between 921 and 1,446 days) showed no progression of neurologic clinical signs or any conditions associated with increased bleeding tendency. Before surgery and histopathology confirming extraparenchymal hematoma, the primary differential in most cases was neoplasia, based on the MRI findings. This retrospective study reminds clinicians of the importance of the combination of advanced imaging combined with histopathologic diagnosis. The prognosis for spontaneous spinal cord extraparenchymal hematoma with surgical decompression appears to be favorable in most cases. Copyright © 2015 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  6. MRI findings of multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Min Yun; Sol, Chang Hyo; Chung, Choon Phill; Kim, Byung Soo; Park, Byung Ho

    1993-01-01

    Nine patients of clinically definite multiple sclerosis (MS) were examined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 1.0 T. The MS plaques were seen in the brain and spinal cord in eight and three patients, respectively. The frequent sites of MS plaques were periventricular white matter, brain stem, and cervical cord. The shape of most brain MS plaques was round or finger-like configuration. The MS plaques showed high signal intensity on T2 weighted images and low or iso signal intensity on T1 weighted images in all nine cases. Contrast enhancement was seen in 4 cases. Mild brain atrophy was noted in 2 cases and mass effect in 1 case. The sites of cord MS plaques in three patients were C2-C4, C2-C5, and C4-C6 levels respectively. The core MS plaques showed high signal intensity on T2 weighted image and contrast enhancement on Gd-DTPA enhanced T1 weighted images in all 3 case with mild cord expansion in 2 cases. In conclusion, MRI is a useful diagnosis tool in evaluating the MS plaques involved central nervous system

  7. Muscle after spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, Bo; Kristensen, Ida Bruun; Kjaer, Michael

    2009-01-01

    years after the injury. There is a progressive drop in the proportion of slow myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform fibers and a rise in the proportion of fibers that coexpress both the fast and slow MHC isoforms. The oxidative enzymatic activity starts to decline after the first few months post-SCI. Muscles......The morphological and contractile changes of muscles below the level of the lesion after spinal cord injury (SCI) are dramatic. In humans with SCI, a fiber-type transformation away from type I begins 4-7 months post-SCI and reaches a new steady state with predominantly fast glycolytic IIX fibers...... from individuals with chronic SCI show less resistance to fatigue, and the speed-related contractile properties change, becoming faster. These findings are also present in animals. Future studies should longitudinally examine changes in muscles from early SCI until steady state is reached in order...

  8. Therapeutic potential of umbilical cord blood cells for type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Binbin; Li, Xia; Yu, Haibo; Zhou, Zhiguang

    2015-11-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is a chronic disorder that results from autoimmune-mediated destruction of pancreatic islet β-cells. However, to date, no conventional intervention has successfully treated the disease. The optimal therapeutic method for T1DM should effectively control the autoimmunity, restore immune homeostasis, preserve residual β-cells, reverse β-cell destruction, and protect the regenerated insulin-producing cells against re-attack. Umbilical cord blood is rich in regulatory T (T(reg)) cells and multiple types of stem cells that exhibit immunomodulating potential and hold promise in their ability to restore peripheral tolerance towards pancreatic islet β-cells through remodeling of immune responses and suppression of autoreactive T cells. Recently, reinfusion of autologous umbilical cord blood or immune cells from cord blood has been proposed as a novel therapy for T1DM, with the advantages of no risk to the donors, minimal ethical concerns, a low incidence of graft-versus-host disease and easy accessibility. In this review, we revisit the role of autologous umbilical cord blood or immune cells from cord blood-based applications for the treatment of T1DM. © 2015 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  9. An ex vivo spinal cord injury model to study ependymal cells in adult mouse tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Zafra, Teresa; Codeluppi, Simone; Uhlén, Per

    2017-08-15

    Traumatic spinal cord injury is characterized by an initial cell loss that is followed by a concerted cellular response in an attempt to restore the damaged tissue. Nevertheless, little is known about the signaling mechanisms governing the cellular response to injury. Here, we have established an adult ex vivo system that exhibits multiple hallmarks of spinal cord injury and allows the study of complex processes that are difficult to address using animal models. We have characterized the ependymal cell response to injury in this model system and found that ependymal cells can become activated, proliferate, migrate out of the central canal lining and differentiate in a manner resembling the in vivo situation. Moreover, we show that these cells respond to external adenosine triphosphate and exhibit spontaneous Ca 2+ activity, processes that may play a significant role in the regulation of their response to spinal cord injury. This model provides an attractive tool to deepen our understanding of the ependymal cell response after spinal cord injury, which may contribute to the development of new treatment options for spinal cord injury. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy in newborns linked to placental and umbilical cord abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasiell, Josefine; Papadogiannakis, Nikos; Löf, Erika; Elofsson, Fanny; Hallberg, Boubou

    2016-03-01

    Birth asphyxia and hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) of the newborn remain serious complications. We present a study investigating if placental or umbilical cord abnormalities in newborns at term are associated with HIE. A prospective cohort study of the placenta and umbilical cord of infants treated with hypothermia (HT) due to hypoxic brain injury and follow-up at 12 months of age has been carried out. The study population included 41 infants treated for HT whose placentas were submitted for histopathological analysis. Main outcome measures were infant development at 12 months, classified as normal, cerebral palsy, or death. A healthy group of 100 infants without HIE and normal follow-up at 12 months of age were used as controls. A velamentous or marginal umbilical cord insertion and histological abruption was associated with the risk of severe HIE, OR = 5.63, p = 0.006, respectively, OR = 20.3, p = 0.01 (multiple-logistic regression). Velamentous or marginal umbilical cord insertion was found in 39% among HIE cases compared to 7% in controls. Placental and umbilical cord abnormalities have a profound association with HIE. A prompt examination of the placentas of newborns suffering from asphyxia can provide important information on the pathogenesis behind the incident and contribute to make a better early prognosis.

  11. Clinical course of non-operated patients with spinal cord tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamata, Michihiro; Kinouchi, Junnosuke; Maruiwa, Hirofumi; Nakamura, Masaya; Matsumoto, Morio; Chiba, Kazuhiro; Toyama, Yoshiaki

    2003-01-01

    The clinical course of spinal cord tumors in 24 non-operated patients who were followed by MRI for more than 1 year was investigated retrospectively. Only 7 patients were positive in neurological symptoms. 7 patients had multiple tumors, and the histopathologic diagnosis in 16 patients was neurinoma. The MRI findings changed in 4 patients, and follow-up MR images showed rapid growth of 2 neurinomas. The clinical manifestations did not change in 17 patients, but they improved in 3 patients whose symptoms were not caused by tumors and improved after temporary worsening caused by tumor growth in 2 patients. They worsened in 2 patients with intramedullary tumors associated with neurological symptoms. The diameter of the spinal cord of the patients with intramedullary tumors increased, making the spinal cord susceptible to both anterior and posterior compression. Finally, the clinical course of the patients with spinal cord tumors did not deteriorate rapidly, except in the patients with intramedullary tumor associated with neurological manifestations. We concluded that when spinal cord tumors that are asymptomatic or associated with minor symptoms are diagnosed as neurinoma or neurofibroma based on the MRI findings, early surgery should not be performed and followed by meticulous follow-up. (author)

  12. The experience of attempting to return to work following spinal cord injury: a systematic review of the qualitative literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Gillean; Unsworth, Carolyn; Murphy, Gregory

    2018-07-01

    This review sought to answer the question "What are the barriers and facilitators influencing people's experience of return to work following spinal cord injury?" Studies that met the selection criteria were identified, presented and critically appraised using National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidelines. Thematic synthesis was completed with studies possessing strong methodological rigor. Synthesis and interpretation involved three stages; coding of primary data; development of descriptive themes reflective of the primary data; and establishment of analytical themes to answer the review question. Data from nine papers were included in the thematic synthesis. Several descriptive themes and three analytical themes were drawn from the data to answer the research question. Analytical themes included: a matrix of personal and environmental factors exists requiring complex navigation in order to create possibilities and opportunities for postinjury employment; the process of seeking or gaining employment shares a reciprocal relationship with the temporal nature of adjustment to spinal cord injury; and there is an intrinsic need for occupational engagement through paid employment. Returning to or gaining employment after spinal cord injury is a fundamentally difficult experience for people. Multiple strategies are required to support the navigation of the process. There is, however, a need in people with spinal cord injury, to be a worker, and with that comes the inherent benefits of being employed. Implications for rehabilitation Returning to work should be a significant focus of spinal cord injury rehabilitation. Employment is both possible and health promoting following spinal cord injury. Multiple strategies are required to support people to navigate the return to work process. It is important to be cognizant of the individual motivations for being a worker and the complexity of the adjustment process. Spinal cord injury centers can provide a

  13. Incidence of cord around the neck and its effects on labour and neonatal outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khushboo Joshi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The umbilical cord is a narrow tube-like structure that connects the developing baby to the placenta. Most of the nuchal cords diagnosed in early pregnancy get spontaneously uncoiled. This study was carried out to show that such natural occurrence does not have significant effect on pregnancy, labour and neonates if proper intra-partum foetal heart rate (FHR monitoring could be provided by a caregiver. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at Sardar Patel Medical College, Bikaner (Rajasthan. For completing 100 cases with nuchal cord, we had to observe 506 cases and by which we took out the incidence of nuchal cord and which was separately categorised into single, double, triple and four and more than four groups. Results: The present study showed mean cord length also increases with number of loops (50.93 cm in single loop as compared to 72.33 cm in cases with four loops and showed that patients having tight nuchal cord have higher incidence of caesarean as well as forceps delivery, but these were not statistically significant (P = 0.56 and P= 0.57 and Apgar score <7 at 1 min, FHR deceleration and meconium staining of liquor were statistically higher significant (P = 0.001,P= 0.0001 and P= 0.001, respectively. Conclusion: At present, expertise to diagnose multiple and tight loops on ultrasound are limited, which should be the aim for future. Multicentric and large studies are further required in association with more specific and sensitive diagnostic aid for tight and multiple loops so as to provide the best perinatal management with good foetal outcome.

  14. Psychological impact of sports activity in spinal cord injury patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioia, M C; Cerasa, A; Di Lucente, L; Brunelli, S; Castellano, V; Traballesi, M

    2006-12-01

    To investigate whether sports activity is associated with better psychological profiles in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) and to evaluate the effect of demographic factors on psychological benefits. The State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, Form X2 (STAI-X2), the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire for extraversion (EPQ-R (E)) and the questionnaire for depression (QD) were administered in a cross-sectional study of 137 males with spinal cord injury including 52 tetraplegics and 85 paraplegics. The subjects were divided into two groups according to sports activity participation (high frequency vs no sports participation). Moreover, multiple regression analysis was adopted to investigate the influence of demographic variables, such as age, educational level, occupational status and marital status, on psychological variables. Analysis of variance revealed significant differences among the groups for anxiety (STAI-X2), extraversion (EPQ-R (E)) and depression (QD). In particular, SCI patients who did not practice sports showed higher anxiety and depression scores and lower extraversion scores than sports participants. In addition, with respect to the paraplegics, the tetraplegic group showed the lowest depression scores. Following multiple regression analysis, only the sports activity factor remained as an independent factor of anxiety scores. These findings demonstrate that sports activity is associated with better psychological status in SCI patients, irrespective of tetraplegia and paraplegia, and that psychological benefits are not emphasized by demographic factors.

  15. Umbilical Cord Blood: Counselling, Collection, and Banking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armson, B Anthony; Allan, David S; Casper, Robert F

    2015-09-01

    To review current evidence regarding umbilical cord blood counselling, collection, and banking and to provide guidelines for Canadian health care professionals regarding patient education, informed consent, procedural aspects, and options for cord blood banking in Canada. Selective or routine collection and banking of umbilical cord blood for future stem cell transplantation for autologous (self) or allogeneic (related or unrelated) treatment of malignant and non-malignant disorders in children and adults. Cord blood can be collected using in utero or ex utero techniques. Umbilical cord blood counselling, collection, and banking, education of health care professionals, indications for cord blood collection, short- and long-term risk and benefits, maternal and perinatal morbidity, parental satisfaction, and health care costs. Published literature was retrieved through searches of Medline and PubMed beginning in September 2013 using appropriate controlled MeSH vocabulary (fetal blood, pregnancy, transplantation, ethics) and key words (umbilical cord blood, banking, collection, pregnancy, transplantation, ethics, public, private). Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized control trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies. There were no date limits, but results were limited to English or French language materials. Searches were updated on a regular basis and incorporated in the guideline to September 2014. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the websites of health technology assessment and health technology-related agencies, clinical practice guideline collections, and national and international medical specialty societies. The quality of evidence in this document was rated using the criteria described in the Report of the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care (Table 1). Umbilical cord blood is a readily available source of hematopoetic stem cells used with increasing frequency as an alternative to

  16. Spinal Cord Injury Model System Information Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the UAB-SCIMS More The UAB-SCIMS Information Network The University of Alabama at Birmingham Spinal Cord Injury Model System (UAB-SCIMS) maintains this Information Network as a resource to promote knowledge in the ...

  17. Spinal Cord Injury: Hope through Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... research? Where can I get more information? Glossary Introduction Until World War II, a serious spinal cord ... muscle, the bony structure appears white on the film. Vertebral misalignment or fracture can be seen within ...

  18. Alcohol application natural drying of umbilical cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafique, M.F.; Ali, S.; Roshan, E.; Jamal, S.

    2006-01-01

    To compare the outcome, between the application of Alcohol and natural drying to umbilical stump in low risk newborns. Newborns delivered in Military Hospital and Combined Military Hospital Rawalpindi were randomized into group A (70% Alcohol) and group B (No antiseptic). In group A, 70% Alcohol was applied once daily to the umbilical stump, whereas no antiseptic was applied in group B. These newborns were followed till four weeks of life. Age at separation of umbilical cord was noted. Cases showing signs of neonatal sepsis and omphalitis were documented. Of 100 singleton full-term newborns enrolled, 90 completed the study. No newborn in either group developed a cord infection or neonatal sepsis. The difference of cord separation time between the two groups was statistically significant. Evidence does not support continued use of alcohol for low risk newborn cord care. (author)

  19. Apolipoprotein E in umbilical cord blood plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forte, T.M.; Davis, P.A.; Blum, C.B.

    1983-01-01

    Adolipoprotein E (apo E), with a molecular weight of approximately 37,000 daltons, is a minor apolipoprotein constituent in adult plasma lipoproteins. This apolipoprotein, like apolipoprotein B, is a ligand recognized by specific lipoprotein receptor sites (B-E receptors) on cell surfaces. We have recently shown that a pronounced apo E band appears in umbilical cord blood low-density (LDL) lipoproteins and also in high density (HDL) lipoproteins. Densitometric scans of Coomassie blue G-250 stained polyacrylamide gels suggested that apo E was probably elevated in cord blood lipoproteins. To pursue this suggestion, apo E in cord blood was quantitated by radioimmunoassay and correlated with cord blood lipid levels. In addition, apo E levels in 20 normal adult volunteers were also examined

  20. Neurological manifestaions among Sudanese patients with multiple ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Multiple myeloma may involve the nervous system at every level, including the neuromuscular junction, peripheral nerve, plexus, spinal nerve root, spinal cord, meninges, and brain. Such involvement may be primary or secondary, as well as non-invasive paraneoplastic effects. Objective: To find out the ...

  1. Multiple sclerose : epidemiologie en kwaliteit van leven

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwanikken, Cornelis Petrus

    1997-01-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a chronic disease of the brain and the spinal cord. The cause of MS is unknown. MS usually starts in young adulthood. In the course of the disease progression of neurological handicap and increase of impairments in daily life is common. In this study there were two aims.

  2. Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation in Nepal

    OpenAIRE

    Nabina Shah; Binav Shrestha; Kamana Subba

    2013-01-01

    Spinal cord injury is a major trauma, with its short and long term effects and consequences to the patient, his friends and family. Spinal cord injury is addressed in the developed countries with standard trauma care system commencing immediately after injury and continuing to the specialized rehabilitation units. Rehabilitation is important to those with spinal injury for both functional and psychosocial reintegration. It has been an emerging concept in Nepal, which has been evident with the...

  3. Tuberculosis of the Spermatic Cord: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amine Benjelloun

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The spermatic cord tuberculoma is uncommon, especially in its lower portion. Most cases were described in Japanese literature. We report a case of tuberculosis of the spermatic cord in a sexually active young man, revealed by a scrotal mass mimicking a tumor of the testicle and discuss the suitable diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, with preservation of the testes and the other sexual organs.

  4. Diffusion tensor imaging in spinal cord compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Wei; Qin, Wen; Hao, Nanxin; Wang, Yibin; Zong, Genlin

    2012-01-01

    Background Although diffusion tensor imaging has been successfully applied in brain research for decades, several main difficulties have hindered its extended utilization in spinal cord imaging. Purpose To assess the feasibility and clinical value of diffusion tensor imaging and tractography for evaluating chronic spinal cord compression. Material and Methods Single-shot spin-echo echo-planar DT sequences were scanned in 42 spinal cord compression patients and 49 healthy volunteers. The mean values of the apparent diffusion coefficient and fractional anisotropy were measured in region of interest at the cervical and lower thoracic spinal cord. The patients were divided into two groups according to the high signal on T2WI (the SCC-HI group and the SCC-nHI group for with or without high signal). A one-way ANOVA was used. Diffusion tensor tractography was used to visualize the morphological features of normal and impaired white matter. Results There were no statistically significant differences in the apparent diffusion coefficient and fractional anisotropy values between the different spinal cord segments of the normal subjects. All of the patients in the SCC-HI group had increased apparent diffusion coefficient values and decreased fractional anisotropy values at the lesion level compared to the normal controls. However, there were no statistically significant diffusion index differences between the SCC-nHI group and the normal controls. In the diffusion tensor imaging maps, the normal spinal cord sections were depicted as fiber tracts that were color-encoded to a cephalocaudal orientation. The diffusion tensor images were compressed to different degrees in all of the patients. Conclusion Diffusion tensor imaging and tractography are promising methods for visualizing spinal cord tracts and can provide additional information in clinical studies in spinal cord compression

  5. Neuroimaging for spine and spinal cord surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyanagi, Izumi [Hokkaido Neurosurgical Memorial Hospital (Japan); Iwasaki, Yoshinobu; Hida, Kazutoshi

    2001-01-01

    Recent advances in neuroimaging of the spine and spinal cord are described based upon our clinical experiences with spinal disorders. Preoperative neuroradiological examinations, including magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and computerized tomography (CT) with three-dimensional reconstruction (3D-CT), were retrospectively analyzed in patients with cervical spondylosis or ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (130 cases), spinal trauma (43 cases) and intramedullary spinal cord tumors (92 cases). CT scan and 3D-CT were useful in elucidating the spine pathology associated with degenerative and traumatic spine diseases. Visualization of the deformity of the spine or fracture-dislocation of the spinal column with 3D-CT helped to determine the correct surgical treatment. MR imaging was most important in the diagnosis of both spine and spinal cord abnormalities. The axial MR images of the spinal cord were essential in understanding the laterality of the spinal cord compression in spinal column disorders and in determining surgical approaches to the intramedullary lesions. Although non-invasive diagnostic modalities such as MR imaging and CT scans are adequate for deciding which surgical treatment to use in the majority of spine and spinal cord disorders, conventional myelography is still needed in the diagnosis of nerve root compression in some cases of cervical spondylosis. (author)

  6. Inflammatory lesions of the spinal cord and the nerve roots in magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sartoretti-Schefer, S.; Wichmann, W.; Valavanis, A.

    1996-01-01

    The MRI examinations of 52 patients with proven inflammatory lesions (39 patients) or tumorous/postactinic lesions of the spinal cord (6 patients) and vasuclar malformations of the spinal cord (7 patients) were retrospectively analyzed. All examinations were performed on a 1.5 T MR unit, using bi- or triplanar T1-w pre- and postcontrast as well as T2-w SE sequences. Clinical and radiological examinations allow a subdivision of inflammations of the spinal cord and the nerve roots into (mening-oradiculo) myelitis and meningoradiculo (myelitis). The MRI patterns of these two inflammatory subtypes vary: Meningoradiculitis presents with an enhancement of the nerve roots and the leptomeninges; myelitis itself is characterized by single or multiple, diffuse or multifocal, with or without nodular, patchy or diffusely enhancing intramedullary lessions, with or without thickening of the cord and leptomeningeal inflammation. The immunologically suppressed patient suffers from viral infections (especially herpes simplex, varicella-zoster virus, cytomegalovirus), bacterial infections (tuberculosis), but rarely viral infections, sarcoidosis and demyelinating diseases. Idiopathic myelitis is also common. Secondary ischemic and demyelinating processes result in a complex morphology of inflammatory lesions on MRI, and therefore the whole spectrum of demyelinating, ischemic and inflammatory lesions has to be included in the differential diagnosis. Even tumors may imitate inflammatory myelitis and radiculitis. Most commonly, meningoradiculitis can be separated from myelitis. A reliable diagnosis of a specific inflammatory lesion is difficult and is mostly achieved in patients with multiple sclerosis and in patients with HIV-associated cytomegalovirus infection. (orig.) [de

  7. Inflammogenesis of Secondary Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, M. Akhtar; Al Shehabi, Tuqa S.; Eid, Ali H.

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) and spinal infarction lead to neurological complications and eventually to paraplegia or quadriplegia. These extremely debilitating conditions are major contributors to morbidity. Our understanding of SCI has certainly increased during the last decade, but remains far from clear. SCI consists of two defined phases: the initial impact causes primary injury, which is followed by a prolonged secondary injury consisting of evolving sub-phases that may last for years. The underlying pathophysiological mechanisms driving this condition are complex. Derangement of the vasculature is a notable feature of the pathology of SCI. In particular, an important component of SCI is the ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) that leads to endothelial dysfunction and changes in vascular permeability. Indeed, together with endothelial cell damage and failure in homeostasis, ischemia reperfusion injury triggers full-blown inflammatory cascades arising from activation of residential innate immune cells (microglia and astrocytes) and infiltrating leukocytes (neutrophils and macrophages). These inflammatory cells release neurotoxins (proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, free radicals, excitotoxic amino acids, nitric oxide (NO)), all of which partake in axonal and neuronal deficit. Therefore, our review considers the recent advances in SCI mechanisms, whereby it becomes clear that SCI is a heterogeneous condition. Hence, this leads towards evidence of a restorative approach based on monotherapy with multiple targets or combinatorial treatment. Moreover, from evaluation of the existing literature, it appears that there is an urgent requirement for multi-centered, randomized trials for a large patient population. These clinical studies would offer an opportunity in stratifying SCI patients at high risk and selecting appropriate, optimal therapeutic regimens for personalized medicine. PMID:27147970

  8. Arterial Blood Supply to the Spinal Cord in Animal Models of Spinal Cord Injury. A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazensky, David; Flesarova, Slavka; Sulla, Igor

    2017-12-01

    Animal models are used to examine the results of experimental spinal cord injury. Alterations in spinal cord blood supply caused by complex spinal cord injuries contribute significantly to the diversity and severity of the spinal cord damage, particularly ischemic changes. However, the literature has not completely clarified our knowledge of anatomy of the complex three-dimensional arterial system of the spinal cord in experimental animals, which can impede the translation of experimental results to human clinical applications. As the literary sources dealing with the spinal cord arterial blood supply in experimental animals are limited and scattered, the authors performed a review of the anatomy of the arterial blood supply to the spinal cord in several experimental animals, including pigs, dogs, cats, rabbits, guinea pigs, rats, and mice and created a coherent format discussing the interspecies differences. This provides researchers with a valuable tool for the selection of the most suitable animal model for their experiments in the study of spinal cord ischemia and provides clinicians with a basis for the appropriate translation of research work to their clinical applications. Anat Rec, 300:2091-2106, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Nestin- and doublecortin-positive cells reside in adult spinal cord meninges and participate in injury-induced parenchymal reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decimo, Ilaria; Bifari, Francesco; Rodriguez, Francisco Javier; Malpeli, Giorgio; Dolci, Sissi; Lavarini, Valentina; Pretto, Silvia; Vasquez, Sandra; Sciancalepore, Marina; Montalbano, Alberto; Berton, Valeria; Krampera, Mauro; Fumagalli, Guido

    2011-12-01

    Adult spinal cord has little regenerative potential, thus limiting patient recovery following injury. In this study, we describe a new population of cells resident in the adult rat spinal cord meninges that express the neural stem/precursor markers nestin and doublecortin. Furthermore, from dissociated meningeal tissue a neural stem cell population was cultured in vitro and subsequently shown to differentiate into functional neurons or mature oligodendrocytes. Proliferation rate and number of nestin- and doublecortin-positive cells increased in vivo in meninges following spinal cord injury. By using a lentivirus-labeling approach, we show that meningeal cells, including nestin- and doublecortin-positive cells, migrate in the spinal cord parenchyma and contribute to the glial scar formation. Our data emphasize the multiple roles of meninges in the reaction of the parenchyma to trauma and indicate for the first time that spinal cord meninges are potential niches harboring stem/precursor cells that can be activated by injury. Meninges may be considered as a new source of adult stem/precursor cells to be further tested for use in regenerative medicine applied to neurological disorders, including repair from spinal cord injury. Copyright © 2011 AlphaMed Press.

  10. Sonographic findings of normal newborn spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Chan Sup; Kim, Dong Gyu

    1988-01-01

    The authors performed spinal cord ultrasonography of 21 healthy newborn infants in Gyeongsang National University Hospital. Normal spinal cord revealed low echogenecity at that of cerebrospinal fluid and was demarcated by intense reflections from its dorsal and ventral surfaces. The central canal was routinely seen as a thin linear reflection in the center of the cord. The nerve roots making up the cauda equina formed a poorly defined collection of intense linear echoes extending from the conus. On real time image, the normal spinal cord exhibited rather slow and rhythmical anteroposterior movement within the subarachnoid fluid. A distinct and rapid vascular pulsation of the spinal cord was usually recognizable. The approximate level of vertebral bodies was determined as follows; most ventrally located vertebral body was thought to be L5 and S1 was seen slightly posterior to the L5 directed inferoposteriorly. According to the above criteria terminal portions of spinal cord were seen around the L2 body in 5 MHz and pointed termination of conus medullaris was clearly seen at L2-3 junction and in upper body of L3 by 7.5 MHz. So it would be better to examine by 5 MHz for spatial orientation and then by 7.5 MHz for more accurate examination. High-resolution, real-time ultrasonography was a safe, rapid screening technique for evaluation of the spinal cord in infants. Additional applications of spinal sonography may be possible in the evaluation of neonatal syringohydromyelia and meningocele as well as intraspinal cyst localization for possible percutaneous puncture by ultrasound guidance

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Shigeyuki; Hirayama, Keizo

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain was performed in a total of 45 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), comprising 27 with brain symptoms and 18 without it. The results were compared with X-ray computed tomography (CT). Some of the 45 MS patients were also examined by neurophysiological studies for comparison. MRI showed demyelinating plaques of the brain in a total of 31 patients (69%) - 20 symptomatic and 11 asymptomatic patients. For symptomatic patients, MRI was capable of detecting brain lesions in 6 (86%) of 7 acute stage patients and 14 (70%) of 20 non-acute stage patients. It was also capable of detecting brain lesions in 21 (70%) of 30 clinically definite MR patients and 10 (67%) of 15 clinically probable MS patients. Concurrently available X-ray CT revealed brain lesions in 9 symptomatic patients (33%) and one asymptomatic patient (6%). Visual evoked potentials examined in 31 patients showed abnormality in one (11%) of 9 patients without symptoms of optic neuritis and all (100%) of the other 22 patients with symptoms. In 19 evaluable patients, auditory brainstem responses were abnormal in one (11%) of 9 patients without brainstem symptoms and 3 (30%) of 10 patients with symptoms. MRI of the brain was far superior to X-ray CT, visual evoked potentials and auditory brainstem responses in detecting clinically unsuspected lesions. We proposed new diagnostic criteria including MRI findings of the brain in the Japanese MS diagnostic criteria. MRI of the spinal cord was performed in 12 MS patients with spinal cord symptoms by sagittal and coronal images. It demonstrated demyelinating lesions within the cervical and superior thoracic cord in 8 MS acute stage patients. Spinal cord lesions were longitudinally continuous as long as many spinal segments, with swelling in 6 patients and atrophy in 2 patients. MRI of spinal cord was useful in deciding superior and inferior limits of cord lesions and in visualizing cord swelling or atrophy. (Namekawa, K)

  12. Prenatal lipid-based nutrient supplements increase cord leptin concentration in pregnant women from rural Burkina Faso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huybregts, Lieven; Roberfroid, Dominique; Lanou, Hermann; Meda, Nicolas; Taes, Youri; Valea, Innocent; D'Alessandro, Umberto; Kolsteren, Patrick; Van Camp, John

    2013-05-01

    In developing countries, prenatal lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNSs) were shown to increase birth size; however, the mechanism of this effect remains unknown. Cord blood hormone concentrations are strongly associated with birth size. Therefore, we hypothesize that LNSs increase birth size through a change in the endocrine regulation of fetal development. We compared the effect of daily prenatal LNSs with multiple micronutrient tablets on cord blood hormone concentrations using a randomized, controlled design including 197 pregnant women from rural Burkina Faso. Insulin-like growth factors (IGF) I and II, their binding proteins IGFBP-1 and IGFBP-3, leptin, cortisol, and insulin were quantified in cord sera using immunoassays. LNS was associated with higher cord blood leptin mainly in primigravidae (+57%; P = 0.02) and women from the highest tertile of BMI at study inclusion (+41%; P = 0.02). We did not find any significant LNS effects on other measured cord hormones. The observed increase in cord leptin was associated with a significantly higher birth weight. Cord sera from small-for-gestational age newborns had lower median IGF-I (-9 μg/L; P = 0.003), IGF-II (-79 μg/L; P = 0.003), IGFBP-3 (-0.7 μg/L; P = 0.007), and leptin (-1.0 μg/L; P = 0.016) concentrations but higher median cortisol (+18 μg/L; P = 0.037) concentrations compared with normally grown newborns. Prenatal LNS resulted in increased cord leptin concentrations in primigravidae and mothers with higher BMI at study inclusion. The elevated leptin concentrations could point toward a higher neonatal fat mass.

  13. Spinal Cord Excitability and Sprint Performance Are Enhanced by Sensory Stimulation During Cycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory E. P. Pearcey

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord excitability, as assessed by modulation of Hoffmann (H- reflexes, is reduced with fatiguing isometric contractions. Furthermore, spinal cord excitability is reduced during non-fatiguing arm and leg cycling. Presynaptic inhibition of Ia terminals is believed to contribute to this suppression of spinal cord excitability. Electrical stimulation to cutaneous nerves reduces Ia presynaptic inhibition, which facilitates spinal cord excitability, and this facilitation is present during arm cycling. Although it has been suggested that reducing presynaptic inhibition may prolong fatiguing contractions, it is unknown whether sensory stimulation can alter the effects of fatiguing exercise on performance or spinal cord excitability. Thus, the aim of this experiment was to determine if sensory stimulation can interfere with fatigue-related suppression of spinal cord excitability, and alter fatigue rates during cycling sprints. Thirteen participants randomly performed three experimental sessions that included: unloaded cycling with sensory stimulation (CONTROL + STIM, sprints with sensory stimulation (SPRINT + STIM and sprints without stimulation (SPRINT. Seven participants also performed a fourth session (CONTROL, which consisted of unloaded cycling. During SPRINT and SPRINT + STIM, participants performed seven, 10 s cycling sprints interleaved with 3 min rest. For CONTROL and CONTROL + STIM, participants performed unloaded cycling for ~30 min. During SPRINT + STIM and CONTROL + STIM, participants received patterned sensory stimulation to nerves of the right foot. H-reflexes and M-waves of the right soleus were evoked by stimulation of the tibial nerve at multiple time points throughout exercise. Sensory stimulation facilitated soleus H-reflexes during unloaded cycling, whereas sprints suppressed soleus H-reflexes. While receiving sensory stimulation, there was less suppression of soleus H-reflexes and slowed reduction in average power output

  14. Spinal Cord Excitability and Sprint Performance Are Enhanced by Sensory Stimulation During Cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearcey, Gregory E P; Noble, Steven A; Munro, Bridget; Zehr, E Paul

    2017-01-01

    Spinal cord excitability, as assessed by modulation of Hoffmann (H-) reflexes, is reduced with fatiguing isometric contractions. Furthermore, spinal cord excitability is reduced during non-fatiguing arm and leg cycling. Presynaptic inhibition of Ia terminals is believed to contribute to this suppression of spinal cord excitability. Electrical stimulation to cutaneous nerves reduces Ia presynaptic inhibition, which facilitates spinal cord excitability, and this facilitation is present during arm cycling. Although it has been suggested that reducing presynaptic inhibition may prolong fatiguing contractions, it is unknown whether sensory stimulation can alter the effects of fatiguing exercise on performance or spinal cord excitability. Thus, the aim of this experiment was to determine if sensory stimulation can interfere with fatigue-related suppression of spinal cord excitability, and alter fatigue rates during cycling sprints. Thirteen participants randomly performed three experimental sessions that included: unloaded cycling with sensory stimulation ( CONTROL + STIM ), sprints with sensory stimulation ( SPRINT + STIM ) and sprints without stimulation ( SPRINT ). Seven participants also performed a fourth session ( CONTROL ), which consisted of unloaded cycling. During SPRINT and SPRINT + STIM, participants performed seven, 10 s cycling sprints interleaved with 3 min rest. For CONTROL and CONTROL + STIM , participants performed unloaded cycling for ~30 min. During SPRINT + STIM and CONTROL + STIM , participants received patterned sensory stimulation to nerves of the right foot. H-reflexes and M-waves of the right soleus were evoked by stimulation of the tibial nerve at multiple time points throughout exercise. Sensory stimulation facilitated soleus H-reflexes during unloaded cycling, whereas sprints suppressed soleus H-reflexes. While receiving sensory stimulation, there was less suppression of soleus H-reflexes and slowed reduction in average power output, compared

  15. Wind-up of spinal cord neurones and pain sensation: much ado about something?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero, J F; Laird, J M; López-García, J A

    2000-06-01

    Wind-up is a frequency-dependent increase in the excitability of spinal cord neurones, evoked by electrical stimulation of afferent C-fibres. Although it has been studied over the past thirty years, there are still uncertainties about its physiological meaning. Glutamate (NMDA) and tachykinin NK1 receptors are required to generate wind-up and therefore a positive modulation between these two receptor types has been suggested by some authors. However, most drugs capable of reducing the excitability of spinal cord neurones, including opioids and NSAIDs, can also reduce or even abolish wind-up. Thus, other theories involving synaptic efficacy, potassium channels, calcium channels, etc. have also been proposed for the generation of this phenomenon. Whatever the mechanisms involved in its generation, wind-up has been interpreted as a system for the amplification in the spinal cord of the nociceptive message that arrives from peripheral nociceptors connected to C-fibres. This probably reflects the physiological system activated in the spinal cord after an intense or persistent barrage of afferent nociceptive impulses. On the other hand, wind-up, central sensitisation and hyperalgesia are not the same phenomena, although they may share common properties. Wind-up can be an important tool to study the processing of nociceptive information in the spinal cord, and the central effects of drugs that modulate the nociceptive system. This paper reviews the physiological and pharmacological data on wind-up of spinal cord neurones, and the perceptual correlates of wind-up in human subjects, in the context of its possible relation to the triggering of hyperalgesic states, and also the multiple factors which contribute to the generation of wind-up.

  16. Spinal cord stimulation: Current applications for treatment of chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannemreddy, Prasad; Slavin, Konstantin V

    2011-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is thought to relieve chronic intractable pain by stimulating nerve fibers in the spinal cord. The resulting impulses in the fibers may inhibit the conduction of pain signals to the brain, according to the pain gate theory proposed by Melzack and Wall in 1965 and the sensation of pain is thus blocked. Although SCS may reduce pain, it will not eliminate it. After a period of concern about safety and efficacy, SCS is now regaining popularity among pain specialists for the treatment of chronic pain. The sympatholytic effect of SCS is one of its most interesting therapeutic properties. This effect is considered responsible for the effectiveness of SCS in peripheral ischemia, and at least some cases of complex regional pain syndrome. The sympatholytic effect has also been considered part of the management of other chronic pain states such as failed back surgery syndrome, phantom pain, diabetic neuropathy, and postherpetic neuralgia. In general, SCS is part of an overall treatment strategy and is used only after the more conservative treatments have failed. The concept of SCS has evolved rapidly following the technological advances that have produced leads with multiple contact electrodes and battery systems. The current prevalence of patients with chronic pain requiring treatment other than conventional medical management has significantly increased and so has been the need for SCS. With the cost benefit analysis showing significant support for SCS, it may be appropriate to offer this as an effective alternative treatment for these patients.

  17. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Therapies for Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doulames, Vanessa M.; Plant, Giles W.

    2016-01-01

    Cervical-level injuries account for the majority of presented spinal cord injuries (SCIs) to date. Despite the increase in survival rates due to emergency medicine improvements, overall quality of life remains poor, with patients facing variable deficits in respiratory and motor function. Therapies aiming to ameliorate symptoms and restore function, even partially, are urgently needed. Current therapeutic avenues in SCI seek to increase regenerative capacities through trophic and immunomodulatory factors, provide scaffolding to bridge the lesion site and promote regeneration of native axons, and to replace SCI-lost neurons and glia via intraspinal transplantation. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are a clinically viable means to accomplish this; they have no major ethical barriers, sources can be patient-matched and collected using non-invasive methods. In addition, the patient’s own cells can be used to establish a starter population capable of producing multiple cell types. To date, there is only a limited pool of research examining iPSC-derived transplants in SCI—even less research that is specific to cervical injury. The purpose of the review herein is to explore both preclinical and clinical recent advances in iPSC therapies with a detailed focus on cervical spinal cord injury. PMID:27070598

  18. Symptomatic thoracic spinal cord herniation: case series and technical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawasli, Ammar H; Ray, Wilson Z; Wright, Neill M

    2014-09-01

    Idiopathic spinal cord herniation (ISCH) is an uncommon condition located predominantly in the thoracic spine and often associated with a remote history of a major traumatic injury. ISCH has an incompletely described presentation and unknown etiology. There is no consensus on the treatment algorithm and surgical technique, and there are few data on clinical outcomes. In this case series and technical report, we describe the atypical myelopathy presentation, remote history of traumatic injury, radiographic progression, treatment, and outcomes of 5 patients treated at Washington University for symptomatic ISCH. A video showing surgical repair is presented. In contrast to classic compressive myelopathy symptomatology, ISCH patients presented with an atypical myelopathy, characterized by asymmetric motor and sensory deficits and early-onset urinary incontinence. Clinical deterioration correlated with progressive spinal cord displacement and herniation observed on yearly spinal imaging in a patient imaged serially because of multiple sclerosis. Finally, compared with compressive myelopathy in the thoracic spine, surgical treatment of ISCH led to rapid improvement despite a long duration of symptoms. Symptomatic ISCH presents with atypical myelopathy and slow temporal progression and can be successfully managed with surgical repair.

  19. Radiation tolerance of the cervical spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCunniff, A.J.; Liang, M.J.

    1989-01-01

    The incidence of permanent injury to the spinal cord as a complication of radiation therapy generally correlates positively with total radiation dosage. However, several reports in the literature have indicated that fraction size is also an important factor in the development or nondevelopment of late injuries in normal tissue. To determine the effect of fraction size on the incidence of radiation-induced spinal cord injuries, we reviewed 144 cases of head and neck cancer treated at our institution between 1971 and 1980 with radiation greater than 5600 cGy to a portion of the cervical spinal cord. Most of these patients received greater than or equal to 6000 cGy, with fraction sizes ranging from 133 cGy to 200 cGy. Fifty-three of the 144 patients have been followed up for 2 years or more. Nearly half of these (26 patients) received greater than 6000 cGy with fraction sizes of 133 cGy to 180 cGy. Only 1 of the 53 (1.9%) has sustained permanent spinal cord injury; 20 months after completion of radiation treatments he developed Brown-Sequard syndrome. Our experience suggests that radiation injuries to the spinal cord correlate not only with total radiation dosage, but also with fraction size; low fraction sizes appear to decrease the incidence of such injuries

  20. Radiation effects in brain and spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franke, H.D.; Lierse, W.

    1978-01-01

    Radiation sensitivity of both the brain and spinal cord in prenatal and postnatal stages, in infancy and adult age is represented also in consideration of a combined treatment with methotrexate. In adults, application of important doses of high-energy radiation increases the risk of injurious effects to the central nervous system. If the spinal cord is involved, more than 60% of the radiolesions have a progredient course ending with death. The pathogenesis and disposing factors are referred to, and the incidence of radiation necrosis with regard to age and sex, the degrees of injury and their frequence within different ranges of dosage are analyzed on the basis of data from universal literature. An examination of 'tolerance doses' for the spinal cord is made by means of Strandquist-diagrams and of the Ellis-formula. The slopes of regression lines are reported for various 'degrees of response' in skin, brain and spinal cord following radiation therapy. In the Strandquist-diagram, slopes of regression lines are dependent on the 'degree of response', flattening if skin and spinal cord are affected by radiation in the same degree, necroses having the same slope for both the organs. (orig./MG) [de

  1. Isolation of mesenchymal stem cells from equine umbilical cord blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Thomas Gadegaard; Heerkens, Tammy; Thomsen, Preben Dybdahl

    2007-01-01

    . The hypothesis of this study was that equine MSCs could be isolated from fresh whole equine cord blood. Results: Cord blood was collected from 7 foals immediately after foaling. The mononuclear cell fraction was isolated by Ficoll density centrifugation and cultured in a DMEM low glucose based media at 38.5o......Background: There are no published studies on stem cells from equine cord blood although commercial storage of equine cord blood for future autologous stem cell transplantations is available. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been isolated from fresh umbilical cord blood of humans collected non......-invasively at the time of birth and from sheep cord blood collected invasively by a surgical intrauterine approach. Mesenchymal stem cells isolation percentage from frozen-thawed human cord blood is low and the future isolation percentage of MSCs from cryopreserved equine cord blood is therefore expectedly low...

  2. General Information about Childhood Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The tentorium separates the supratentorium from the infratentorium (right panel). The skull and meninges protect the brain and spinal cord (left panel). The spinal cord connects the brain with ...

  3. Childhood Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors Treatment Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The tentorium separates the supratentorium from the infratentorium (right panel). The skull and meninges protect the brain and spinal cord (left panel). The spinal cord connects the brain with ...

  4. Seminal plasma PSA in spinal cord injured men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brasso, K; Sønksen, J; Sommer, P

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of spinal cord injury on seminal plasma PSA concentration.......The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of spinal cord injury on seminal plasma PSA concentration....

  5. Optogenetics of the Spinal Cord: Use of Channelrhodopsin Proteins for Interrogation of Spinal Cord Circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Habibur; Nam, Youngpyo; Kim, Jae-Hong; Lee, Won-Ha; Suk, Kyoungho

    2017-12-29

    Spinal cord circuits play a key role in receiving and transmitting somatosensory information from the body and the brain. They also contribute to the timing and coordination of complex patterns of movement. Under disease conditions, such as spinal cord injury and neuropathic pain, spinal cord circuits receive pain signals from peripheral nerves, and are involved in pain development via neurotransmitters and inflammatory mediators released from neurons and glial cells. Despite the importance of spinal cord circuits in sensory and motor functions, many questions remain regarding the relationship between activation of specific cells and behavioral responses. Optogenetics offers the possibility of understanding the complex cellular activity and mechanisms of spinal cord circuits, as well as having therapeutic potential for addressing spinal cord-related disorders. In this review, we discuss recent findings in optogenetic research employing the channelrhodopsin protein to assess the function of specific neurons and glia in spinal cord circuits ex vivo and in vivo. We also explore the possibilities and challenges of employing optogenetics technology in future therapeutic strategies for the treatment of spinal disorders. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  6. Prognosis by tumor location for pediatric spinal cord Ependymomas

    OpenAIRE

    Oh, MC; Sayegh, ET; Safaee, M; Sun, MHZ; Kaur, G; Kim, JM; Aranda, D; Molinaro, AM; Gupta, N; Parsa, AT

    2013-01-01

    Object. Ependymoma is a common CNS tumor in children, with spinal cord ependymomas making up 13.1% of all ependymomas in this age group. The clinical features that affect prognosis in pediatric spinal cord ependymomas are not well understood. A comprehensive literature review was performed to determine whether a tumor location along the spinal cord is prognostically significant in children undergoing surgery for spinal cord ependymomas. Methods. A PubMed search was performed to identify all p...

  7. Vascular anatomy of the spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thron, A.K.

    1988-01-01

    The book summarizes the anatomic guidelines of external blood supply to the spinal cord. The basic principles of arterial supply and venous drainage are illustrated by explicit schemes for quick orientation. In the first part of the book, systematic radiologic-anatomic investigations of the superficial and deep vessels of all segments of the spinal cord are introduced. The microvascular morphology is portrayed by numerous microradiographic sections in all three dimensions without overshadowing. The three-dimensional representation of the vascular architecture illustrates elementary outlines and details of arterial territories, anastomotic cross-linking as well as the capillary system, particularly the hitherto unknown structure of the medullary venous system with its functionally important anastomoses and varying regional structures. These often now radiologic-anatomic findings are discussed as to their functional and pathophysiologic impact and constitute the basic on which to improve one's understanding of vascular syndromes of the spinal cord

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of spinal cord syndromes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einsiedel, H. von; Stepan, R.

    1985-01-01

    Thirty-four patients with intramedullary space-occupying lesions or cord compression syndromes were examined with a resistive and two different superconductive magnetic resonance (MR) imaging units. Studies were done primarily by the spin-echo (SE) technique and in the majority of patients different pulse sequences were used. Images with short echo-time (TE) and short recovery-time (TR) were best for demonstration of spinal cord anatomy, for depicting cystic portions in intramedullary tumours and for showing syringomyelia. Solid intramedullary tumours showed normal cord signal intensity. Images with prolonged TE and TR predominantly enhanced CSF signal intensity and, to a more considerable extent, solid intramedullary tumours. Thus, the diameter of the subarachnoid space and the presence of a solid intramedullary tumour, not concomittant with a significant enlargement of the spinal cord, could only be recognized on these prolonged SE images. Major advantages of MR in comparison to CT are that the spinal cord can be imaged in the sagittal plane and that beam hardening artifacts do not occur; in comparison to myelography the cord can be imaged directly by MR. Partial volume is a major limitation of MR, not only in the preferably applied sagittal plane. The choice of slice thickness adequate to the diameter of the lesion and straight positioning of the patient for sagittal single slice midline images are fundamental for reliable MR investigations. Another limitation to MR is that cortical bone gives no signal. The actual diameter of the spinal canal therefore cannot be correctly appreciated and consequently it was difficult or impossible to assess spinal stenosis. (orig.)

  9. Ethical considerations in umbilical cord blood banking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Nathan S; Chervenak, Frank A; McCullough, Laurence B

    2008-01-01

    Pregnant patients have the option at delivery of having their cord blood collected and stored for future use. At many hospitals, they have the option of donating their cord blood to the public banking system for future use by anyone who is an appropriate match (public banking). Patients also have the option of having their cord blood stored for a fee with a commercial/private company for future use within their family (private banking). Currently, private banking is not recommended by major obstetric and pediatric professional organizations. We applied current evidence of the risks and benefits of private and public cord blood banking and accepted ethical principles to answer the following two related questions: 1) Do obstetricians have an ethical obligation to comply with a request for private banking? and 2) Do obstetricians have an ethical obligation to routinely offer private banking to women who do not request it? The only situation where there is a known benefit to private banking is when public banking is not available and the patient currently has an affected family member who may benefit from cord blood therapy. We conclude that when presented with a request for private banking, obstetricians have an ethical obligation to explain the lack of proven benefit of this procedure. If the patient still requests private banking, it would be appropriate to comply, because there is minimal or no risk to the procedure. However, obstetricians are not ethically obligated to offer private banking, even when public banking is not available, except in the limited circumstance when the patient currently has an affected family member who may benefit from cord blood therapy.

  10. Umbilical cord blood banking ethico-legal issues: review article ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The recent discovery that umbilical cord blood has a high concentration of haematopoeitic stem cells has led to cord blood being used to treat a variety of disorders. Collection of cord blood is easy, non-invasive and generally does not interfere with the delivery process. However, there are various ethical and logistical ...

  11. Levetiracetam in spinal cord injury pain: a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finnerup, N B; Grydehøj, J; Bing, J

    2009-01-01

    . OBJECTIVES: The objective of the study was primarily to evaluate the efficacy of the anticonvulsant levetiracetam in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) at- and below-level pain and secondarily to evaluate the effect on spasm severity. SETTING: Outpatients at two spinal cord units and a pain center...... severity following spinal cord injury....

  12. Determinants of cord care practices among mothers in Benin City ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-10-04

    Oct 4, 2011 ... Background: Mothers care for their infants' umbilical cord stump in various ways. Different cord care practices have been documented; some are beneficial while others are harmful. Who and what influence the cord care practiced by mothers have, however, not been fully explored particularly in the study ...

  13. Spontaneous herniation of the thoracic spinal cord : a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Sung Chan; Lee, Seong Ro; Park, Dong Woo; Joo, Kyung Bin

    2001-01-01

    Spontaneous herniation of the spinal cord is a rare disease entity in which spinal cord substance is herniated through a previously uninjured and/or untouched dural. It is a cause of myelopathy that is treatable but difficult to diagnose. We report the CT and MR findings of a case of spontaneous thoracic spinal cord through a dural defect

  14. Neuroprotective effect corilagin in spinal cord injury rat model by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Neurological functions get altered in a patient suffering from spinal cord injury (SCI). Present study evaluates the neuroprotective effect of corilagin in spinal cord injury rats by inhibiting nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), inflammatory mediators and apoptosis. Materials and method: Spinal cord injury was ...

  15. Survey of Umbilical Cord care and Separation time in Healthy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The interval between delivery and umbilical cord separation varies worldwide. Some maternal, foetal and perinatal factors including cord care practices are known to affect this interval. Objectives: To establish the mean umbilical cord separation time and the effect of maternal and infant characteristics, perinatal ...

  16. Hypothermia in Multiple Sclerosis: Beyond the Hypothalamus? A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Berti

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypothermia is a rare and poorly understood complication of Multiple Sclerosis (MS. We report on a 66-year-old patient currently with Secondary Progressive MS (SP-MS who developed unexplained hypothermia associated with multiple hospitalisations and we review the literature on this topic. In our case, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the brain failed to highlight hypothalamic disease, but spinal MRI identified a number of spinal cord lesions. Given the incidence and clinical significance of spinal involvement in MS and the hypothermic disturbances observed in high Spinal Cord Injury (SCI, we hypothesise that upper spinal cord pathology, along with hypothalamic and brainstem dysfunctions, can contribute to hypothermia.

  17. Cord entanglement in monoamniotic twin pregnancies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyndrup, J; Schouenborg, Lars Øland

    1987-01-01

    Monoamniotic twin pregnancy involves a heavy risk of fatal umbilical cord entanglement. Two cases are reported. In the first case, both twins were found dead in the 36th week, and the monoamnionicity was recognized at birth. In the second case, the monoamnionicity was discovered during an ultraso...... an ultrasound examination, and cord entanglement was suspected in the 35th week on the basis of a non-stress test (NST) with variable decelerations. Cesarean section was performed and two healthy children were delivered....

  18. Spinal Cord Ischemia after Thoracoabdominal Aortic Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupesh George

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Overall prevalence of Thoraco abdominal aneurysm has increased due to widespread use of imaging techniques and aging population. Surgical aneurysm repair and endovascular stent graft repair have refined as successful treatment modalities in preventing aneurysm progression and rupture. Since spinal cord depends on branches of thoracoabdominal aorta for blood supply ,spinal cord ischaemia is a dreadful complication of these procedures. However recent animal experiments and surgical series thrown light in tackling this anatomical obstructions by physiologic means. The adoption of techniques for avoiding hypovolumea, hypotension, CSF pressure has reduced this complication rate from 23% to 2-6%.

  19. Histamine release from cord blood basophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Bent Windelborg; Damsgaard, Tine Engberg; Herlin, Troels

    1990-01-01

    The histamine release (HR) after challenge with anti-IgE, concanavalin A, N-formyl-met-leu-phe and the calcium ionophore A23187 from 97 cord blood samples was determined by a microfiber-based assay. Maximum HR with anti-IgE showed great inter-individual variation (median: 20.5; range: 1-104 ng...... of less than 0.5 IU/ml, although sensitivity to anti-IgE was universally increased. Preincubation with pharmacologic agents modulating the IgE-mediated HR produced effects generally similar to previous findings in adult blood. However, the effects of inhibiting the cyclooxygenase pathway in cord blood...

  20. Remyelination of the injured spinal cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Masanori; Li, Bingcang; Lankford, Karen L.; Radtke, Christine; Kocsis, Jeffery D.

    2008-01-01

    Contusive spinal cord injury (SCI) can result in necrosis of the spinal cord, but often long white matter tracts outside of the central necrotic core are demyelinated. One experimental strategy to improve functional outcome following SCI is to transplant myelin-forming cells to remyelinate these axons and improve conduction. This review focuses on transplantation studies using olfactory ensheathing cell (OEC) to improve functional outcome in experimental models of SCI and demyelination. The biology of the OEC, and recent experimental research and clinical studies using OECs as a potential cell therapy candidate are discussed. PMID:17618995

  1. Robust optical fiber patch-cords for in vivo optogenetic experiments in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo-Pisanty, Ivan; Sanio, Christian; Chaudhri, Nadia; Shizgal, Peter

    2015-01-01

    In vivo optogenetic experiments commonly employ long lengths of optical fiber to connect the light source (commonly a laser) to the optical fiber implants in the brain. Commercially available patch cords are expensive and break easily. Researchers have developed methods to build these cables in house for in vivo experiments with rodents [1-4]. However, the half-life of those patch cords is greatly reduced when they are used with behaving rats, which are strong enough to break the delicate cable tip and to bite through the optical fiber and furcation tubing. Based on [3] we have strengthened the patch-cord tip that connects to the optical implant, and we have incorporated multiple layers of shielding to produce more robust and resistant cladding. Here, we illustrate how to build these patch cords with FC or M3 connectors. However, the design can be adapted for use with other common optical-fiber connectors. We have saved time and money by using this design in our optical self-stimulation experiments with rats, which are commonly several months long and last four to eleven hours per session. The main advantages are: •Long half-life.•Resistant to moderate rodent bites.•Suitable for long in vivo optogenetic experiments with large rodents.

  2. Inverse associations between cord vitamin D and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mossin, Mats H; Aaby, Jens B; Dalgård, Christine

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between cord 25-hydroxyvitamin D2+3 (25(OH)D) and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder symptoms in toddlers, using Child Behaviour Checklist for ages 1.5-5. METHOD: In a population-based birth cohort, a Child Behaviour Checklist for ages 1.5-5 questionnaire...... was returned from parents of 1233 infants with mean age 2.7 (standard deviation 0.6) years. Adjusted associations between cord 25(OH)D and Child Behaviour Checklist-based attention deficit hyperactivity disorder problems were analysed by multiple regression. RESULTS: The median cord 25(OH)D was 44.1 (range: 1.......5-127.1) nmol/L. Mean attention deficit hyperactivity disorder problem score was 2.7 (standard deviation 2.1). In adjusted analyses, cord 25(OH)D levels >25 nmol/L and >30 nmol/L were associated with lower attention deficit hyperactivity disorder scores compared to levels ⩽25 nmol/L (p = 0.035) and ⩽30 nmol...

  3. Influence of obstetric factors on osteogenic potential of umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canella Alessandro

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Wharton's jelly from the umbilical cord is a noncontroversial source of mesenchymal stem cells (WJMSCs with high plasticity, proliferation rate and ability to differentiate towards multiple lineages. WJMSCs from different donors have been characterized for their osteogenic potential. Although there is large evidence of WJMSCs plasticity, recently scientific debate has focused on MSCs selection, establishing predictable elements to discriminate the cells with most promising osteoprogenitor cell potential. In the present study a comparative study between the presence of osteoblastic markers and different parameters that pertain to both the newborn and the mother was performed. Umbilical cords were collected after all patients signed the informed consent and local ethical commettee approved the study. Obstetric parameters, including baby's gender and birth weight, mother's age at delivery, gestational stage at parturition and mode of delivery were examined. After characterization and expansion, WJMSCs were analyzed for two osteoblastic markers, alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity, and the expression level of RUNX-2 transcription factor, and for their ability to deposit mineralized matrix after osteogenic induction. We found that osteoblastic potential was not influenced by baby's gender and mode of delivery. On the contrary, the highest degree of osteoblastic potential has been shown by WJMSCs with RUNX-2 high basal levels, selected from umbilical cords of the heaviest term babies. Even if further evaluation is required, our hypothesis is that our findings may help in selecting the optimal umbilical cord donors and in collecting high potential Wharton's jelly-derived osteoprogenitors efficiently.

  4. Characterization of Proliferating Neural Progenitors after Spinal Cord Injury in Adult Zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhra Prakash Hui

    Full Text Available Zebrafish can repair their injured brain and spinal cord after injury unlike adult mammalian central nervous system. Any injury to zebrafish spinal cord would lead to increased proliferation and neurogenesis. There are presences of proliferating progenitors from which both neuronal and glial loss can be reversed by appropriately generating new neurons and glia. We have demonstrated the presence of multiple progenitors, which are different types of proliferating populations like Sox2+ neural progenitor, A2B5+ astrocyte/ glial progenitor, NG2+ oligodendrocyte progenitor, radial glia and Schwann cell like progenitor. We analyzed the expression levels of two common markers of dedifferentiation like msx-b and vimentin during regeneration along with some of the pluripotency associated factors to explore the possible role of these two processes. Among the several key factors related to pluripotency, pou5f1 and sox2 are upregulated during regeneration and associated with activation of neural progenitor cells. Uncovering the molecular mechanism for endogenous regeneration of adult zebrafish spinal cord would give us more clues on important targets for future therapeutic approach in mammalian spinal cord repair and regeneration.

  5. Targeting Lumbar Spinal Neural Circuitry by Epidural Stimulation to Restore Motor Function After Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minassian, Karen; McKay, W Barry; Binder, Heinrich; Hofstoetter, Ursula S

    2016-04-01

    Epidural spinal cord stimulation has a long history of application for improving motor control in spinal cord injury. This review focuses on its resurgence following the progress made in understanding the underlying neurophysiological mechanisms and on recent reports of its augmentative effects upon otherwise subfunctional volitional motor control. Early work revealed that the spinal circuitry involved in lower-limb motor control can be accessed by stimulating through electrodes placed epidurally over the posterior aspect of the lumbar spinal cord below a paralyzing injury. Current understanding is that such stimulation activates large-to-medium-diameter sensory fibers within the posterior roots. Those fibers then trans-synaptically activate various spinal reflex circuits and plurisegmentally organized interneuronal networks that control more complex contraction and relaxation patterns involving multiple muscles. The induced change in responsiveness of this spinal motor circuitry to any residual supraspinal input via clinically silent translesional neural connections that have survived the injury may be a likely explanation for rudimentary volitional control enabled by epidural stimulation in otherwise paralyzed muscles. Technological developments that allow dynamic control of stimulation parameters and the potential for activity-dependent beneficial plasticity may further unveil the remarkable capacity of spinal motor processing that remains even after severe spinal cord injuries.

  6. Local delivery of thyroid hormone enhances oligodendrogenesis and myelination after spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, Robert B.; Wang, Zhicheng; Nong, Jia; Zhang, Zhiling; Zhong, Yinghui

    2017-06-01

    Objective. Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) causes apoptosis of myelin-forming oligodendrocytes (OLs) and demyelination of surviving axons, resulting in conduction failure. Remyelination of surviving denuded axons provides a promising therapeutic target for spinal cord repair. While cell transplantation has demonstrated efficacy in promoting remyelination and functional recovery, the lack of ideal cell sources presents a major obstacle to clinical application. The adult spinal cord contains oligodendrocyte precursor cells and multipotent neural stem/progenitor cells that have the capacity to differentiate into mature, myelinating OLs. However, endogenous oligodendrogenesis and remyelination processes are limited by the upregulation of remyelination-inhibitory molecules in the post-injury microenvironment. Multiple growth factors/molecules have been shown to promote OL differentiation and myelination. Approach. In this study we screened these therapeutics and found that 3, 3‧, 5-triiodothyronine (T3) is the most effective in promoting oligodendrogenesis and OL maturation in vitro. However, systemic administration of T3 to achieve therapeutic doses in the injured spinal cord is likely to induce hyperthyroidism, resulting in serious side effects. Main results. In this study we developed a novel hydrogel-based drug delivery system for local delivery of T3 to the injury site without eliciting systemic toxicity. Significance. Using a clinically relevant cervical contusion injury model, we demonstrate that local delivery of T3 at doses comparable to safe human doses promoted new mature OL formation and myelination after SCI.

  7. Different strategies to improve the use of the umbilical cord and cord blood for hematopoietic and other regenerative cell therapies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garde, Mark Paul van der

    2016-01-01

    The umbilical cord and cord blood contain stem cells that can be used for regenerative cell therapies such as hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. However, the application of cord blood is hindered by the slow engraftment of the cells and delayed immune reconstitution compared to stem cells of

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging study of lumbosacral spinal cord nerves before artificial somatic-central nervous system-autonomic reflex pathway establish ment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Xianbo; Kong Xiangquan; Feng Gansheng; Han Ping; Liu Dingxi; Ma Hui

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the value of MRI as imaging technique for lumbosacral spinal nerves before artificial somatic-central nervous system-autonomic reflex pathway establish ment. Methods: Conventional MRI and T 2 W CISS 3D were performed in 10 patients with neurogenic bladder planned for the operation of artificial somatic-central nervous system-autonomic reflex pathway. The Three-dimensional data were then constructed into composite images using a standard multiple planar reformation (MPR). Results: Five patients showed tethered spinal cord syndrome, whose spinal cord nerves were circuitous distributed and had abnormity number when penetrated the dura. Of these 5 patients, one patient was accompanied by spinal cord vas malformation. Four patients had vertebral fracture and spinal injury, and the other one patients demonstrated tumor in vertebral canal on MRI examinations. The spinal cord nerves in these 5 patients floated down river and had normal number of spinal cord nerves. Conclusion: Conventional MRI and T 2 W CISS 3D MRI were essential for the pre-operative planning of artificial somatic-central nervous system-autonomic reflex pathway, especially in patients with tethered spinal cord syndrome. Spinal cord nerves distribute and anterior and posterior roots array can be clearly showed by MPR. (authors)

  9. Correlation of force control with regional spinal DTI in patients with cervical spondylosis without signs of spinal cord injury on conventional MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindberg, Paavel G.; Sanchez, Katherine; Rannou, Francois; Poiraudeau, Serge; Ozcan, Fidan; Feydy, Antoine; Maier, Marc A.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate spinal cord structure in patients with cervical spondylosis where conventional MRI fails to reveal spinal cord damage. We performed a cross-sectional study of patients with cervical spondylosis without conventional MRI findings of spinal cord damage and healthy controls. Subjects were studied using spinal diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), precision grip and foot force-tracking tasks, and a clinical examination including assessment of neurological signs. A regional analysis of lateral and medial spinal white matter across multiple cervical levels (C1-C5) was performed. DTI revealed reduced fractional anisotropy (FA) and increased radial diffusivity (RD) in the lateral spinal cord at the level of greatest compression (lowest Pavlov ratio) in patients (p < 0.05). Patients with spondylosis had greater error and longer release duration in both grip and foot force-tracking. Similar spinal cord deficits were present in patients without neurological signs. Increased error in grip and foot tracking (low accuracy) correlated with increased RD in the lateral spinal cord at the level of greatest compression (p ≤ 0.01). Spinal DTI can detect subtle spinal cord damage of functional relevance in cervical spondylosis, even in patients without signs on conventional T2-imaging and without neurological signs. (orig.)

  10. Correlation of force control with regional spinal DTI in patients with cervical spondylosis without signs of spinal cord injury on conventional MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindberg, Paavel G. [Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, FR 3636 Neurosciences, Paris (France); Centre de Psychiatrie et Neurosciences, Inserm U894, Paris (France); Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France); Universite Paris Descartes, Service de Radiologie B, APHP, CHU Cochin, Faculte de Medecine, Paris (France); Sanchez, Katherine; Rannou, Francois; Poiraudeau, Serge [Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France); Service de Medecine Physique et de Readaptation, APHP, CHU Cochin, Paris (France); INSERM U1153 Epidemiologie Clinique des Maladies Osteo-Articulaires, Paris (France); Ozcan, Fidan [Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, FR 3636 Neurosciences, Paris (France); Feydy, Antoine [Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, FR 3636 Neurosciences, Paris (France); Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France); Universite Paris Descartes, Service de Radiologie B, APHP, CHU Cochin, Faculte de Medecine, Paris (France); Maier, Marc A. [Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, FR 3636 Neurosciences, Paris (France); Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France); Universite Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France)

    2016-03-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate spinal cord structure in patients with cervical spondylosis where conventional MRI fails to reveal spinal cord damage. We performed a cross-sectional study of patients with cervical spondylosis without conventional MRI findings of spinal cord damage and healthy controls. Subjects were studied using spinal diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), precision grip and foot force-tracking tasks, and a clinical examination including assessment of neurological signs. A regional analysis of lateral and medial spinal white matter across multiple cervical levels (C1-C5) was performed. DTI revealed reduced fractional anisotropy (FA) and increased radial diffusivity (RD) in the lateral spinal cord at the level of greatest compression (lowest Pavlov ratio) in patients (p < 0.05). Patients with spondylosis had greater error and longer release duration in both grip and foot force-tracking. Similar spinal cord deficits were present in patients without neurological signs. Increased error in grip and foot tracking (low accuracy) correlated with increased RD in the lateral spinal cord at the level of greatest compression (p ≤ 0.01). Spinal DTI can detect subtle spinal cord damage of functional relevance in cervical spondylosis, even in patients without signs on conventional T2-imaging and without neurological signs. (orig.)

  11. Application of standard softWare of the CDC-6500 interactive graphic therminal for representation of spiral scanning data and event saving

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nehrguj, B.; Ososkov, G.A.

    1978-01-01

    A system of programs, based on a standard graphic display software, is developed which enables the user to display the results of spiral scanning using a terminal keyboard and a FILTR program. Quality assessment of filtering is also available. The use of a cursor which provides a certain feedback between the display and the CDC-6500 computer provides good capabilities for the investigation of the filtering program failures and saves the most interesting events. To speed up scanning of events, a special program is written which performs pre-filtration and reduces 4 to 5 fold the amount of source numerical data of track projections. Its flowchart is based on the well-known method of cords, which allows to save 10-12 events/hour

  12. Symptomatic epidural lipomatosis of the spinal cord in a child: MR demonstration of spinal cord injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz, Alberto [Department of Radiology, Section of Neuroradiology, 505 Parnassus Av, L-371, University of California-San Francisco, CA 94143-0628 (United States); Servicio de Radiodiagnostico, Seccion de Neurorradiologia, Hospital Universitario ' ' 12 de Octubre' ' , 28040 Madrid (Spain); Barkovich, James A. [Department of Radiology, Section of Neuroradiology, 505 Parnassus Av, L-371, University of California-San Francisco, CA 94143-0628 (United States); Mateos, Fernando; Simon, Rogelio [Seccion de Neurpediatria, Servicio de Neurologia, Hospital Universitario ' ' 12 de Octubre' ' , 28041 Madrid (Spain)

    2002-12-01

    We report a case of symptomatic epidural lipomatosis in an 8-year-old girl with Cushing's syndrome secondary to longstanding high-dose steroid therapy for Crohn's disease. MR imaging of the spine revealed massive diffuse epidural fat compressing the entire spinal cord with T2 prolongation in the central gray matter of the cord suggesting ischemic myelopathy. This finding has not been previously demonstrated on imaging. A proposed mechanism underlying these findings is discussed. (orig.)

  13. Symptomatic epidural lipomatosis of the spinal cord in a child: MR demonstration of spinal cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munoz, Alberto; Barkovich, James A.; Mateos, Fernando; Simon, Rogelio

    2002-01-01

    We report a case of symptomatic epidural lipomatosis in an 8-year-old girl with Cushing's syndrome secondary to longstanding high-dose steroid therapy for Crohn's disease. MR imaging of the spine revealed massive diffuse epidural fat compressing the entire spinal cord with T2 prolongation in the central gray matter of the cord suggesting ischemic myelopathy. This finding has not been previously demonstrated on imaging. A proposed mechanism underlying these findings is discussed. (orig.)

  14. Noninvasive Optical Monitoring of Spinal Cord Hemodynamics and Oxygenation after Acute Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    model in anesthetized (immobile) animals. Task 1: Evaluating the NIRS system function in a pig model of SCI in conjunction with IP measurements...started. We are collecting spinal cord NIRS data, using the V1 and OXT5 NIRS systems, in conjunction with IP measurements of spinal cord tissue...model of SCI in conjunction with IP measurements of oxygen, perfusion, pressure, and metabolism. SC150178 Kwon - Anual Report – Sep 01 2016 – Aug 31

  15. New trends in spinal cord tissue engineering

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubinová, Šárka

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 2 (2015), s. 129-145 ISSN 1479-6708 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1309 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : biomaterial * cell therapy * regenerative medicine * spinal cord injury * stem cells scaffold * tissue engineering Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  16. Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation in Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabina Shah

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury is a major trauma, with its short and long term effects and consequences to the patient, his friends and family. Spinal cord injury is addressed in the developed countries with standard trauma care system commencing immediately after injury and continuing to the specialized rehabilitation units. Rehabilitation is important to those with spinal injury for both functional and psychosocial reintegration. It has been an emerging concept in Nepal, which has been evident with the establishment of the various hospitals with rehabilitation units, rehabilitation centres and physical therapy units in different institutions. However, the spinal cord injury rehabilitation setting and scenario is different in Nepal from those in the developed countries since spinal cord injury rehabilitation care has not been adequately incorporated into the health care delivery system nor its importance has been realized within the medical community of Nepal. To name few, lack of human resource for the rehabilitation care, awareness among the medical personnel and general population, adequate scientific research evidence regarding situation of spinal injury and exorbitant health care policy are the important hurdles that has led to the current situation. Hence, it is our responsibility to address these apparent barriers to successful implementation and functioning of rehabilitation so that those with spinal injury would benefit from enhanced quality of life. Keywords: rehabilitation; spinal injury.

  17. Cord Blood Leptin Levels in Gestational Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem Şengül

    2010-08-01

    CONCLUSION: In this study there is a minimal clinical effect of cord blood leptin on macrosomia in women with GD, although it is increased in GD and associated with birthweight. Therefore overgrowth may be a result of direct anabolic effect of insulin, rather than indirect effect via leptin.

  18. Current obstetrical practice and umbilical cord prolapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usta, I M; Mercer, B M; Sibai, B M

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the contribution of current obstetrical practice to the occurrence and complications of umbilical cord prolapse. Maternal and neonatal charts of 87 pregnancies complicated by true umbilical cord prolapse during a 5-year period were reviewed. Twin gestation and noncephalic presentations were common features (14 and 41%, respectively). Eighty-nine percent (77) of infants were delivered by cesarean section of which 29% were classical and 88% were primary. The mean gestational age at delivery was 34.0 +/- 6.0 weeks, and the mean birth weight was 2318 +/- 1159 g. Obstetrical intervention preceded 41 (47%) cases (the obstetrical intervention group): amniotomy (9), scalp electrode application (4), intrauterine pressure catheter insertion (6), attempted external cephalic version (7), expectant management of preterm premature rupture of membranes (14), manual rotation of the fetal head (1), and amnioreduction (1). There were 11 perinatal deaths. Thirty-three percent of the infants (32) had a 5-min Apgar score < 7 and 34% had a cord pH < 7.20. Neonatal seizures, intracerebral hemorrhage, necrotizing enterocolitis, hyaline membrane disease, persistent fetal circulation, sepsis, assisted ventilation, and perinatal mortality were comparable in the "obstetrical intervention" and "no-intervention" groups. Most of the neonatal complications occurred in infants < 32 weeks' gestation. We conclude that obstetrical intervention contributes to 47% of umbilical cord prolapse cases; however, it does not increase the associated perinatal morbidity and mortality.

  19. Cardiac arrhythmias associated with spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hector, Sven Magnus; Biering-Sørensen, Tor; Krassioukov, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    CONTEXT/OBJECTIVES: To review the current literature to reveal the incidence of cardiac arrhythmias and its relation to spinal cord injury (SCI). METHODS: Data source: MEDLINE database, 304 hits, and 32 articles were found to be relevant. The relevant articles all met the inclusion criteria: (1...

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of spinal cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakudo, Miyuki; Inoue, Yuichi; Fukuda, Teruo

    1988-01-01

    Forty-three MR examinations of 30 patients with spinal cord injuries were retrospectively reviewed to evaluate MR findings of the injured cord and to correlate them with the time interval from the day of spinal cord injury. There were 18 cysts, 8 ''myelomalacias'', 2 cord atrophies, one intramedullary hematoma and two transections. In one patient, ''myelomalacia'' became a cyst on the follow-up study. Large cysts of more than 6 vertebral segments were found in 7 patients, all of whom had had trauma more than 5 years prior to examination. Small cysts of less than half a vertebral height were seen in 5 patients, all of whom were studied 3 to 6 months after the injury. Intermediate cysts were seen in 7 patients who had sustained trauma more than a year before. In a majority (13/14 scans) of ''myelomalacia'', the time interval from injury until examination was only 2 weeks to 6 months. Of the 14 patients who showed post-traumatic progressive myelopathy, seven had large cysts. It is known that intramedullary hematoma becomes a cyst, and that post-traumatic myelomalacia probably results in a cyst in animal studies. Our clinical study seems to support a strong causal relation between myelomalacia and post-traumatic cysts. Since post-traumatic progressive myelopathy with a cyst is surgically treatable, follow-up MR imaging is preferable in cases with myelomalacia. (author)

  1. Spinal cord involvement in Balo's concentric sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kreft, Karim L.; Mellema, S. Jouke; Hintzen, Rogier Q.

    2009-01-01

    We present a patient with a history of myelitis, who had a steroid refractory attack of CNS inflammatory demyelinating disease that developed into cerebral concentric sclerosis of Balo after plasma exchange. The acute inflammatory disease involved the spinal cord, a phenomenon rarely demonstrated.

  2. Arrest—Individual Treatment with Cord Blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Jensen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Each year, thousands of children incur brain damage that results in lifelong sequelae. Therefore, based on experimental evidence, we explored the therapeutic potential of human cord blood, known to contain stem cells, to examine the functional neuroregeneration in a child with cerebral palsy after cardiac arrest. The boy, whose cord blood was stored at birth, was 2.5 years old and normally developed when global ischemic brain damage occurred resulting in a persistent vegetative state. Nine weeks later, he received autologous cord blood (91.7 mL, cryopreserved, 5.75×10e8 mononuclear cells intravenously. Active rehabilitation (physio- and ergotherapy was provided daily, follow-up at 2, 5, 12, 24, 30, and 40 months. At 2-months follow-up the boy’s motor control improved, spastic paresis was largely reduced, and eyesight was recovered, as did the electroencephalogram. He smiled when played with, was able to sit and to speak simple words. At 40 months, independent eating, walking in gait trainer, crawling, and moving from prone position to free sitting were possible, and there was significantly improved receptive and expressive speech competence (four-word sentences, 200 words. This remarkable functional neuroregeneration is difficult to explain by intense active rehabilitation alone and suggests that autologous cord blood transplantation may be an additional and causative treatment of pediatric cerebral palsy after brain damage.

  3. Jomon pottery: cord-imitating decoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Zhushchikhovskaya

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the decoration of pottery of the Neolithic Jomon culture (Japanese Archipelago, 13600–900 BC. The comb-impressed pattern produced by various kinds of cord or rope stamps is considered as the ‘calling card’ of Jomon pottery from the earliest cultural periods to the latest. Another kind of decoration recognized recently uses the cord not as a patterning tool, but as an essential motif of decorative composition. High relief elements imitate cordage forms and structures – knots, loops, hanging cord, net, etc. This kind of decoration corresponds to the pottery of Mid-dle Jomon period (3500–2500 BC sites located in northern and north-eastern Honshu and southern Hokkaido. It is supposed that the introduction of images of real material object into the field of decorative art was reasoned by the meaning of cord and cordage as cultural signs during the Middle Jomon period. Interesting parallels to some cordage structures reconstructed on Middle Jomon pottery decoration are well known in traditional Japanese culture of VI–XX cc. Analytical interpretation of this resemblance may became the subject of special research.

  4. Arteriovenous malformations of the cervical spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagasawa, Shiro; Yoshida, Shinzo; Ishikawa, Masatsune; Yonekawa, Yasuhiro; Handa, Hajime

    1984-01-01

    Arteriovenous malformation (AVM) of the cervical spinal cord has been known to constitute 5-13% of all spinal AVMs. In contrast to the AVMs located in thoracic or thoraco-lumbar regions, cervical AVM has several characteristic features such as preponderance in younger generation, high incidence of subarachnoid hemorrhage, intramedullary location of the nidus usually fed by the anterior spinal arterial system. We reported three cases of cervical AVMs, which located intramedullary at the levels of C 4 -C 6 , C 1 -C 4 and C 1 -C 2 , respectively. Although selective angiography (vertebral artery, thyrocervical artery, costocervical artery) was essential for the diagnosis of these lesions, computerized tomographic (CT) study with both intrathecal injection of metrizamide and intravenous infusion of contrast material (dynamic and static study) was found to be extremely advantageous in detecting the topography of AVMs in the concerned horizontal planes of the spinal cord. Removal of AVM was given up in one case because of its possible involvement of the anterior spinal artery and central artery shown by CT scan. Removal of AVMs were performed in other two cases. A lateral approach was tried in one case with the AVM located in C 1 -C 2 level, in which CT scan revealed not only an intramedullary but the associated extramedullary AVM in ventrolateral surface of the spinal cord. This operative approach was found to involve less bone removal and markedly reduce spinal cord manipulation necessary to deal with ventrally situated high cervical lesions, compared with a posterior approach with laminectomy. (author)

  5. Spinal cord grey matter segmentation challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prados, Ferran; Ashburner, John; Blaiotta, Claudia; Brosch, Tom; Carballido-Gamio, Julio; Cardoso, Manuel Jorge; Conrad, Benjamin N; Datta, Esha; Dávid, Gergely; Leener, Benjamin De; Dupont, Sara M; Freund, Patrick; Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A M Gandini; Grussu, Francesco; Henry, Roland; Landman, Bennett A; Ljungberg, Emil; Lyttle, Bailey; Ourselin, Sebastien; Papinutto, Nico; Saporito, Salvatore; Schlaeger, Regina; Smith, Seth A; Summers, Paul; Tam, Roger; Yiannakas, Marios C; Zhu, Alyssa; Cohen-Adad, Julien

    2017-05-15

    An important image processing step in spinal cord magnetic resonance imaging is the ability to reliably and accurately segment grey and white matter for tissue specific analysis. There are several semi- or fully-automated segmentation methods for cervical cord cross-sectional area measurement with an excellent performance close or equal to the manual segmentation. However, grey matter segmentation is still challenging due to small cross-sectional size and shape, and active research is being conducted by several groups around the world in this field. Therefore a grey matter spinal cord segmentation challenge was organised to test different capabilities of various methods using the same multi-centre and multi-vendor dataset acquired with distinct 3D gradient-echo sequences. This challenge aimed to characterize the state-of-the-art in the field as well as identifying new opportunities for future improvements. Six different spinal cord grey matter segmentation methods developed independently by various research groups across the world and their performance were compared to manual segmentation outcomes, the present gold-standard. All algorithms provided good overall results for detecting the grey matter butterfly, albeit with variable performance in certain quality-of-segmentation metrics. The data have been made publicly available and the challenge web site remains open to new submissions. No modifications were introduced to any of the presented methods as a result of this challenge for the purposes of this publication. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Spinal cord stimulation: Background and clinical application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Kaare

    2014-01-01

    a number of contacts capable of delivering a weak electrical current to the spinal cord, evoking a feeling of peripheral paresthesia. With correct indication and if implanted by an experienced implanter, success rates generally are in the range of about 50–75%. Common indications include complex regional...

  7. Alleviating Autonomic Dysreflexia after Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    tracts originating from cortex, we may eventually be able to use cell transplantation as a bridge to promote targeted, functional axon regeneration ...13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT 15. SUBJECT TERMS autonomic dysreflexia, spinal cord injury, transplantation, axon regeneration 16. SECURITY...different root causes – i.e. using neural precursor cells to restore more normal innervation of sympathetic preganglionic neurons and

  8. Experimental spinal cord trauma: a review of mechanically induced spinal cord injury in rat models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullahi, Dauda; Annuar, Azlina Ahmad; Mohamad, Masro; Aziz, Izzuddin; Sanusi, Junedah

    2017-01-01

    It has been shown that animal spinal cord compression (using methods such as clips, balloons, spinal cord strapping, or calibrated forceps) mimics the persistent spinal canal occlusion that is common in human spinal cord injury (SCI). These methods can be used to investigate the effects of compression or to know the optimal timing of decompression (as duration of compression can affect the outcome of pathology) in acute SCI. Compression models involve prolonged cord compression and are distinct from contusion models, which apply only transient force to inflict an acute injury to the spinal cord. While the use of forceps to compress the spinal cord is a common choice due to it being inexpensive, it has not been critically assessed against the other methods to determine whether it is the best method to use. To date, there is no available review specifically focused on the current compression methods of inducing SCI in rats; thus, we performed a systematic and comprehensive publication search to identify studies on experimental spinalization in rat models, and this review discusses the advantages and limitations of each method.

  9. Malignant spinal cord compression in cancer patients may be mimicked by a primary spinal cord tumour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadianpanah, M; Vasei, M; Mosalaei, A; Omidvari, S; Ahmadloo, N

    2006-12-01

    Although it is quite rare, second primary neoplasms in cancer patients may present with the signs and symptoms of malignant spinal cord compression. Primary spinal cord tumours in the cancer patients may be deceptive and considered as the recurrent first cancer. Therefore, it should be precisely differentiated and appropriately managed. We report such a case of intramedullary ependymoma of the cervical spinal cord mimicking metatstatic recurrent lymphoma and causing cord compression. A 50-year-old man developed intramedullary ependymoma of the cervical spinal cord 1.5 years following chemoradiation for Waldeyer's ring lymphoma. He presented with a 2-month history of neck pain, progressive upper- and lower-extremity numbness and weakness, and bowel and bladder dysfunction. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an intramedullary expansive lesion extending from C4 to C6 levels of the cervical spinal cord. The clinical and radiological findings were suggestive of malignant process. A comprehensive investigation failed to detect another site of disease. He underwent operation, and the tumour was subtotally resected. The patient's neurological deficits improved subsequently. The development of the intramedullary ependymoma following treating lymphoma has not been reported. We describe the clinical, radiological and pathological findings of this case and review the literature.

  10. Reliable volumetry of the cervical spinal cord in MS patient follow-up data with cord image analyzer (Cordial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amann, Michael; Pezold, Simon; Naegelin, Yvonne; Fundana, Ketut; Andělová, Michaela; Weier, Katrin; Stippich, Christoph; Kappos, Ludwig; Radue, Ernst-Wilhelm; Cattin, Philippe; Sprenger, Till

    2016-07-01

    Spinal cord (SC) atrophy is an important contributor to the development of disability in many neurological disorders including multiple sclerosis (MS). To assess the spinal cord atrophy in clinical trials and clinical practice, largely automated methods are needed due to the sheer amount of data. Moreover, using these methods in longitudinal trials requires them to deliver highly reliable measurements, enabling comparisons of multiple data sets of the same subject over time. We present a method for SC volumetry using 3D MRI data providing volume measurements for SC sections of fixed length and location. The segmentation combines a continuous max flow approach with SC surface reconstruction that locates the SC boundary based on image voxel intensities. Two cutting planes perpendicular to the SC centerline are determined based on predefined distances to an anatomical landmark, and the cervical SC volume (CSCV) is then calculated in-between these boundaries. The development of the method focused on its application in MRI follow-up studies; the method provides a high scan-rescan reliability, which was tested on healthy subject data. Scan-rescan reliability coefficients of variation (COV) were below 1 %, intra- and interrater COV were even lower (0.1-0.2 %). To show the applicability in longitudinal trials, 3-year follow-up data of 48 patients with a progressive course of MS were assessed. In this cohort, CSCV loss was the only significant predictor of disability progression (p = 0.02). We are, therefore, confident that our method provides a reliable tool for SC volumetry in longitudinal clinical trials.

  11. Umbilical cord cell banking-implications for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunning, Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    The first successful cord cell transplant to a sibling with Fanconi's anaemia took place 15 years ago. This proven utility of cord blood led to the establishment of cord blood banks both private and public and there are now nearly 100 cord blood banks worldwide. It is estimated that over 200,000 cord blood units (CBU) are held by the private sector and over 160,000 CBU are registered with the largest public cord blood registry. There is a tension between private cord blood banks, which store CBU for autologous or family use, and public banks, which store CBU for unrelated use and the ethics of private cord blood storage has been questioned. But more general ethical questions also arise regarding ownership, consent, confidentiality, costs and quality standards and patenting. In looking at these ethical issues one also needs to look at potential future use of cord blood stem cells. Up until now cord cells have principally been used in the treatment of paediatric blood and immune disorders. Improvements in cell expansion technology will make CBU more appropriate also for treating adults with such disorders. However, it has also been demonstrated that cord blood stem cells have the capacity to differentiate into other types of cells, neuronal, bone, epithelial and muscle which would have a future role to play in cell therapy and regenerative medicine

  12. A study of spinal cord tumors by magnetic resonance imaging

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    Gushiken, Isao; Nishihira, Takeshi; Nakasone, Tomohiro [Ryukyu Univ., Nishihara, Okinawa (Japan). School of Medicine; Takara, Hiroaki; Oshiro, Yutaka; Oshiro, Takashi; Isa, Makoto; Kinjo, Yukio; Ibaraki, Kunio

    1989-10-01

    We studied 17 cases of spinal cord tumors using magnetic resonance imaging. According to the intensity of image and histological feature of spinal cord tumors, we identified two groups in T2 weighted imaging. One was a hypointensity group showing cystic or vascular tumors, and the other was hyperintensity group of solid tumors. Preoperative images of swelling, narrowing, deviation of the spinal cord were remained after the operations. Grafted free fatty tissue for the prevention of adhesion was recognized well also after the operation. Postoperative imagings sometime showed pseudo-deviation of the spinal cord which was easy to be mistaken as the remains of tumors and narrowing of the spinal cord. In conclusion, the magnetic resonance imaging makes very early detection of spinal cord tumors possible, and it is valuable for a diagnosis of the spinal cord tumor associated with brain tumor. (author).

  13. Spinal cord injury reveals multilineage differentiation of ependymal cells.

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    Konstantinos Meletis

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury often results in permanent functional impairment. Neural stem cells present in the adult spinal cord can be expanded in vitro and improve recovery when transplanted to the injured spinal cord, demonstrating the presence of cells that can promote regeneration but that normally fail to do so efficiently. Using genetic fate mapping, we show that close to all in vitro neural stem cell potential in the adult spinal cord resides within the population of ependymal cells lining the central canal. These cells are recruited by spinal cord injury and produce not only scar-forming glial cells, but also, to a lesser degree, oligodendrocytes. Modulating the fate of ependymal progeny after spinal cord injury may offer an alternative to cell transplantation for cell replacement therapies in spinal cord injury.

  14. A study of spinal cord tumors by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gushiken, Isao; Nishihira, Takeshi; Nakasone, Tomohiro; Takara, Hiroaki; Oshiro, Yutaka; Oshiro, Takashi; Isa, Makoto; Kinjo, Yukio; Ibaraki, Kunio.

    1989-01-01

    We studied 17 cases of spinal cord tumors using magnetic resonance imaging. According to the intensity of image and histological feature of spinal cord tumors, we identified two groups in T2 weighted imaging. One was a hypointensity group showing cystic or vascular tumors, and the other was hyperintensity group of solid tumors. Preoperative images of swelling, narrowing, deviation of the spinal cord were remained after the operations. Grafted free fatty tissue for the prevention of adhesion was recognized well also after the operation. Postoperative imagings sometime showed pseudo-deviation of the spinal cord which was easy to be mistaken as the remains of tumors and narrowing of the spinal cord. In conclusion, the magnetic resonance imaging makes very early detection of spinal cord tumors possible, and it is valuable for a diagnosis of the spinal cord tumor associated with brain tumor. (author)

  15. Simplified spinal cord phantom for evaluation of SQUID magnetospinography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Y; Oyama, D; Uehara, G; Somchai, N; Kawabata, S

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord functional imaging by magnetospinography (MSG) is a noninvasive diagnostic method for spinal cord diseases. However, the accuracy and spatial resolution of lesion localization by MSG have barely been evaluated in detail so far. We developed a simplified spinal cord phantom for MSG evaluation. The spinal cord phantom is composed of a cylindrical vessel filled with saline water, which acts as a model of a neck. A set of modeled vertebrae is arranged in the cylindrical vessel, which has a neural current model made from catheter electrodes. The neural current model emulates the current distribution around the activated site along the axon of the spinal cord nerve. Our MSG system was used to observe the magnetic field from the phantom; a quadrupole-like pattern of the magnetic field distribution, which is a typical distribution pattern for spinal cord magnetic fields, was successfully reproduced by the phantom. Hence, the developed spinal cord phantom can be used to evaluate MSG source analysis methods.

  16. Locomotor recovery after spinal cord hemisection/contusion injures in bonnet monkeys: footprint testing--a minireview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangasamy, Suresh Babu

    2013-07-01

    Spinal cord injuries usually produce loss or impairment of sensory, motor and reflex function below the level of damage. In the absence of functional regeneration or manipulations that promote regeneration, spontaneous improvements in motor functions occur due to the activation of multiple compensatory mechanisms in animals and humans following the partial spinal cord injury. Many studies were performed on quantitative evaluation of locomotor recovery after induced spinal cord injury in animals using behavioral tests and scoring techniques. Although few studies on rodents have led to clinical trials, it would appear imperative to use nonhuman primates such as macaque monkeys in order to relate the research outcomes to recovery of functions in humans. In this review, we will discuss some of our research evidences concerning the degree of spontaneous recovery in bipedal locomotor functions of bonnet monkeys that underwent spinal cord hemisection/contusion lesions. To our knowledge, this is the first report to discuss on the extent of spontaneous recovery in bipedal locomotion of macaque monkeys through the application of footprint analyzing technique. In addition, the results obtained were compared with the published data on recovery of quadrupedal locomotion of spinally injured rodents. We propose that the mechanisms underlying spontaneous recovery of functions in spinal cord lesioned monkeys may be correlated to the mature function of spinal pattern generator for locomotion under the impact of residual descending and afferent connections. Moreover, based on analysis of motor functions observed in locomotion in these subjected monkeys, we understand that spinal automatism and development of responses by afferent stimuli from outside the cord could possibly contribute to recovery of paralyzed hindlimbs. This report also emphasizes the functional contribution of progressive strengthening of undamaged nerve fibers through a collateral sprouts/synaptic plasticity formed

  17. Magnetic resonance in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scotti, G.; Caputo, D.; Cazzullo, C.L.

    1986-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging was performed in more than 200 patients with clinical suspicion or knowledge of Multiple Sclerosis. One hundred and forty-seven (60 males and 87 females) had MR evidence of multiple sclerosis lesions. The MR signal of demyelinating plaques characteristically has prolonged T1 and T2 relaxation times and the T2-weighted spin-echo sequences are generally superior to the T1-weighted images because the lesions are better visualized as areas of increased signal intensity. MR is also able to detect plaques in the brainstem, cerebellum and within the cervical spinal cord. MR appears to be an important, non-invasive method for the diagnosis of Multiple Sclerosis and has proven to be diagnostically superior to CT, evoked potentials (EP) and CSF examination. In a selected group of 30 patients, with the whole battery of the relevant MS studies, MR was positive in 100%, CT in 33,3%, EP in 56% and CSF examination in 60%. In patients clinically presenting only with signs of spinal cord involvement or optic neuritis or when the clinical presentation is uncertain MR has proven to be a very useful diagnostic tool for diagnosis of MS by demonstrating unsuspected lesions in the cerebral hemispheres. (orig.)

  18. MULTIPLE SPINAL CANAL MENINGIOMAS

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    Nandigama Pratap Kumar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Meningiomas of the spinal canal are common tumours with the incidence of 25 percent of all spinal cord tumours. But multiple spinal canal meningiomas are rare in compare to solitary lesions and account for 2 to 3.5% of all spinal meningiomas. Most of the reported cases are both intra cranial and spinal. Exclusive involvement of the spinal canal by multiple meningiomas are very rare. We could find only sixteen cases in the literature to the best of our knowledge. Exclusive multiple spinal canal meningiomas occurring in the first two decades of life are seldom reported in the literature. We are presenting a case of multiple spinal canal meningiomas in a young patient of 17 years, who was earlier operated for single lesion. We analysed the literature, with illustration of our case. MATERIALS AND METHODS In September 2016, we performed a literature search for multiple spinal canal meningiomas involving exclusively the spinal canal with no limitation for language and publication date. The search was conducted through http://pubmed.com, a wellknown worldwide internet medical address. To the best of our knowledge, we could find only sixteen cases of multiple meningiomas exclusively confined to the spinal canal. Exclusive multiple spinal canal meningiomas occurring in the first two decades of life are seldom reported in the literature. We are presenting a case of multiple spinal canal meningiomas in a young patient of 17 years, who was earlier operated for solitary intradural extra medullary spinal canal meningioma at D4-D6 level, again presented with spastic quadriparesis of two years duration and MRI whole spine demonstrated multiple intradural extra medullary lesions, which were excised completely and the histopathological diagnosis was transitional meningioma. RESULTS Patient recovered from his weakness and sensory symptoms gradually and bladder and bowel symptoms improved gradually over a period of two to three weeks. CONCLUSION Multiple

  19. A further study on the concept of top-up dose of spinal cord on rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Yan

    1993-01-01

    The concept of top-up dose has been used in the study on process of spinal cord repair in multiple radiation treatment in order to avoid cellular proliferation and animal loss. This study indicates that top up dose could be given 24 h or 6 weeks after completion of radiation treatment without significant difference of biological effects. It is suggested that the radiobiological effect could be reduced if 16 Gy of top-up dose is used in the multiple treatment instead of half of the number of treatment. A possible mechanism is discussed

  20. Maternal adiposity and maternal and cord blood concentrations of vitamin D [25(OHD3

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    Fernanda F.A. Simões

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is associated with lower concentrations of vitamin D [25(OHD3] in children, adolescents and adults, but it remains unclear whether maternal adiposity influences maternal and foetal concentrations of this vitamin. The objective of this cross-sectional study was to assess the relationship between maternal adiposity and maternal and cord blood concentrations of vitamin D. It involved 101 mother–newborn pairs from a public maternity in Sao Paulo city, Brazil. Demographic, socioeconomic and obstetric data, as well as anthropometry, physical activity and vitamin D supplementation during pregnancy, were investigated. Maternal adiposity was assessed by bioelectrical impedance. Maternal and cord blood concentrations of vitamin D were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. Two multiple linear regression models that included maternal and cord blood vitamin D concentrations as outcomes and maternal adiposity as independent variable were used. No association was observed between maternal adiposity and maternal or cord blood concentrations of vitamin D. Maternal vitamin D concentration was associated with race, physical activity and vitamin D supplementation (adj. R2 = 0.74. Cord blood vitamin D concentration was associated with maternal vitamin D concentration (adj. R2 = 0.24. Although fat mass quantification is important to understand vitamin D status during all stages of life, this may not be true in pregnancy as race, vitamin D supplementation and physical activity appeared to be more relevant to vitamin D status. Understanding vitamin D metabolism in pregnancy may elucidate how or if adiposity influences maternal vitamin D status and how it impacts vitamin D transport to the foetus.

  1. Different patterns of longitudinal brain and spinal cord changes and their associations with disability progression in NMO and MS

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    Liu, Yaou [Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Department of Radiology, Beijing (China); Beijing Key Lab of MRI and Brain Informatics, Beijing (China); VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Department of Neurology and Tianjin Neurological Institute, Tianjin (China); Duan, Yunyun; Huang, Jing; Ren, Zhuoqiong [Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Department of Radiology, Beijing (China); Liu, Zheng; Dong, Huiqing [Capital Medical University, Department of Neurology, Xuanwu Hospital, Beijing (China); Weiler, Florian; Hahn, Horst K. [Fraunhofer MEVIS, Institute for Medical Image Computing, Bremen (Germany); Shi, Fu-Dong [Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Department of Neurology and Tianjin Neurological Institute, Tianjin (China); Butzkueven, Helmut [University of Melbourne, Department of Medicine, Parkville (Australia); Barkhof, Frederik [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); UCL, Institutes of Neurology and Healthcare Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Li, Kuncheng [Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Department of Radiology, Beijing (China); Beijing Key Lab of MRI and Brain Informatics, Beijing (China)

    2018-01-15

    To investigate the longitudinal spinal cord and brain changes in neuromyelitis optica (NMO) and multiple sclerosis (MS) and their associations with disability progression. We recruited 28 NMO, 22 MS, and 20 healthy controls (HC), who underwent both spinal cord and brain MRI at baseline. Twenty-five NMO and 20 MS completed 1-year follow-up. Baseline spinal cord and brain lesion loads, mean upper cervical cord area (MUCCA), brain, and thalamus volume and their changes during a 1-year follow-up were measured and compared between groups. All the measurements were also compared between progressive and non-progressive groups in NMO and MS. MUCCA decreased significantly during the 1-year follow-up in NMO not in MS. Percentage brain volume changes (PBVC) and thalamus volume changes in MS were significantly higher than NMO. MUCCA changes were significantly different between progressive and non-progressive groups in NMO, while baseline brain lesion volume and PBVC were associated with disability progression in MS. MUCCA changes during 1-year follow-up showed association with clinical disability in NMO. Spinal cord atrophy changes were associated with disability progression in NMO, while baseline brain lesion load and whole brain atrophy changes were related to disability progression in MS. (orig.)

  2. Different patterns of longitudinal brain and spinal cord changes and their associations with disability progression in NMO and MS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yaou; Duan, Yunyun; Huang, Jing; Ren, Zhuoqiong; Liu, Zheng; Dong, Huiqing; Weiler, Florian; Hahn, Horst K.; Shi, Fu-Dong; Butzkueven, Helmut; Barkhof, Frederik; Li, Kuncheng

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the longitudinal spinal cord and brain changes in neuromyelitis optica (NMO) and multiple sclerosis (MS) and their associations with disability progression. We recruited 28 NMO, 22 MS, and 20 healthy controls (HC), who underwent both spinal cord and brain MRI at baseline. Twenty-five NMO and 20 MS completed 1-year follow-up. Baseline spinal cord and brain lesion loads, mean upper cervical cord area (MUCCA), brain, and thalamus volume and their changes during a 1-year follow-up were measured and compared between groups. All the measurements were also compared between progressive and non-progressive groups in NMO and MS. MUCCA decreased significantly during the 1-year follow-up in NMO not in MS. Percentage brain volume changes (PBVC) and thalamus volume changes in MS were significantly higher than NMO. MUCCA changes were significantly different between progressive and non-progressive groups in NMO, while baseline brain lesion volume and PBVC were associated with disability progression in MS. MUCCA changes during 1-year follow-up showed association with clinical disability in NMO. Spinal cord atrophy changes were associated with disability progression in NMO, while baseline brain lesion load and whole brain atrophy changes were related to disability progression in MS. (orig.)

  3. Left Vocal Cord Paralysis Detected by PET/CT in a Case of Lung Cancer

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    Ali Ozan Oner

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a patient with lung cancer. The first PET/CT imaging revealed hypermetabolic mass in the left aortopulmonary region and hypermetabolic nodule in the anterior segment of the upper lobe of the left lung. After completing chemotherapy and radiotherapy against the primary mass in the left lung, the patient underwent a second PET/CT examination for evaluation of treatment response. This test demonstrated, compared with the first PET/CT, an increase in the size and metabolic activity of the primary mass in the left lung in addition to multiple, pathologic-sized, hypermetabolic metastatic lymph nodes as well as multiple metastatic sclerotic areas in bones. These findings were interpreted as progressive disease. In addition, an asymmetrical FDG uptake was noticed at the level of right vocal cord. During follow-up, a laryngoscopy was performed, which demonstrated left vocal cord paralysis with no apparent mass. Thus, we attributed the paralytic appearance of the left vocal cord to infiltration of the left recurrent laryngeal nerve by the primary mass located in the apical region of the left lung. In conclusion, the knowledge of this pitfall is important to avoid false-positive PET results.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical and thoracic spine and the spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, E.M.

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MR), using a 0.3 T resistive scanner with an iron core and a vertical magnetic field, was evaluated in patients with different diseases affecting the cervical and thoracic spine and the spinal cord. The results indicate that MR is well suited as the procedure of choice for emergency examination of patients with spinal cord symptoms, for examination of patients with suspected spinal multiple sclerosis and for pre-operative evaluation of patients with rheumatoid arthritis with neurological symptoms emanating from the cranio-cervical junction. In patients with cervical radiculapathy and/or myelopathy, caused by spondylosis or disk herniation, MR was found to be equivalent with myelography and CT myelography but MR has several practical advantages. MR at 0.3 T using a vertical magnetic field provided information comparable to that reported from examinations performed with superconducting MR scanners. In order to optimize the MR examinations of the spine, the signal characteristics of different coils available when using a vertical magnetic field were determined by phantom studies. Recommendations for optimal coil selection for different levels of the cervical and thoracic spine are given. In addition, the paramagnetic contrast medium gadolinium-DTPA was administered intravenously to patients with suspected spinal multiple sclerosis. Enhancement of clinically active lesions in the cervical spinal cord was observed. Serial MR examinations with gadolinium-DTPA showed that a decrease in enhancement could be correlated with decrease in clinical symptoms and signs. (author)

  5. Spinal meningioma: relationship between degree of cord compression and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Simon; Gregson, Barbara; Mitchell, Patrick

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to find the relationships between the degree of cord compression as seen on MRIs with persisting cord atrophy after decompression and patient outcomes in spinal meningiomas. We undertook a retrospective analysis of 31 patients' pre- and postoperative MRIs, preoperative functional status and their outcomes at follow-up. The following metrics were analysed; percentage cord area at maximum compression, percentage tumour occupancy and percentage cord occupancy. These were then compared with outcome as measured by the Nurick scale. Of the 31 patients, 27 (87%) had thoracic meningiomas, 3 (10%) cervical and 1 (3%) cervicothoracic. The meningiomas were pathologically classified as grade 1 (29) or grade 2 (2) according to the WHO classification. The average remaining cord cross-sectional area was 61% of the estimated original value. The average tumour occupancy of the canal was 72%. The average cord occupancy of the spinal canal at maximum compression was 20%. No correlation between cord cross-section area and Nurick Scale was seen. On the postoperative scan, the average cord area had increased to 84%. No correlation was seen between this value and outcome. We found that cross-section area measurements on MRI scans have no obvious relationship with function before or after surgery. This is a base for future research into the mechanism of cord recovery and other compressive cord conditions.

  6. [Varices of the vocal cord: report of 21 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin-rang; Sun, Jian-jun

    2006-04-01

    To study the diagnosis and treatment of varices of the vocal cord. The clinical data of 21 cases with varix of vocal cord were analyzed. All the patients presented hoarseness. There were 15 female and 6 male cases with their ages ranged from 23 to 68 years (median 44 years old). The varix was found on the right vocal cord in 12 cases, on the left vocal cord in 9 cases. Isolated varix existed on the vocal cord in 10 cases, varix with vocal cord polyps or nodules in 10 cases, varix with vocal cord paralysis in 1 case. All the patients were diagnosed under the laryngovideoscopy. The lesions appeared on the superior surface of the vocal cord. Varices manifested as abnormally dilated capillary running in the anterior to posterior direction in 6 cases, as clusters of capillary in 3 cases, as a dot or small sheet or short line of capillary in 12 cases. The varices were disappeared in 2 of 8 cases with vocal cord varices and polyps after removed the polyps. The varices of others patients had no change after following up for more than 6 months, but one patient happened hemorrhage of the contralateral vocal cord. Varices are most commonly seen in female. Laryngovideoscopy is the key in determining the vocal fold varices. Management of patients with a varix includes medical therapy, speech therapy, and occasionally surgical vaporization.

  7. Comprehensive management of pressure ulcers in spinal cord injury: Current concepts and future trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, Erwin A.; Pires, Marilyn; Ngann, Yvette; Sterling, Michelle; Rubayi, Salah

    2013-01-01

    Pressure ulcers in spinal cord injury represent a challenging problem for patients, their caregivers, and their physicians. They often lead to recurrent hospitalizations, multiple surgeries, and potentially devastating complications. They present a significant cost to the healthcare system, they require a multidisciplinary team approach to manage well, and outcomes directly depend on patients' education, prevention, and compliance with conservative and surgical protocols. With so many factors involved in the successful treatment of pressure ulcers, an update on their comprehensive management in spinal cord injury is warranted. Current concepts of local wound care, surgical options, as well as future trends from the latest wound healing research are reviewed to aid medical professionals in treating patients with this difficult problem. PMID:24090179

  8. Profile of malignant spinal cord compression: One year study at regional cancer center

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    Malik Tariq Rasool

    2016-01-01

    Results: Most of the patients were in the age group of 41–60 years and there was no gender preponderance in patients. Female breast cancer was the most common incident (15.5% malignancy followed by multiple myeloma, lung, and prostatic carcinoma. Lower dorsal spine was the most common site of compression (35% followed by lumbar (31% and mid-dorsal (26% spine. 70 (91% patients had cord compression subsequent to bone metastasis while as other patients had leptomeningeal metastasis. In 31 (40% patients, spinal cord compression was the presenting symptom. Overall, only 26 patients had motor improvement after treatment. Conclusion: Grade of power before treatment was predictive of response to treatment and overall outcome of motor or sensory functions. Neurodeficit of more than 10 days duration was associated with poor outcome in neurological function.

  9. Risk Factors and Options to Improve Engraftment in Unrelated Cord Blood Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna D. Petropoulou

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Use of umbilical unrelated cord-blood (UCB cells as an alternative source of hematopoietic cell transplantation has been widely used mainly for patients lacking an HLA-matched donor. UCB present many advantages over bone marrow or mobilized peripheral blood from volunteer donors, such as rapid availability, absence of risk for the donor, and decreased incidence of acute graft-versus-host disease. However, a significant clinical problem is delayed engraftment that is directly correlated with the number of hematopoietic stem cells in a cord-blood unit. The identification of prognostic factors associated with engraftment that can be easily modified (e.g., strategies for donor choice and the development of new approaches including use of multiple donors, intrabone injection of UCB, ex vivo expansion, and cotransplantation with accessory cells are of crucial importance in order to circumvent the problem of delayed engraftment after UCB transplantation. Those approaches may increase the quality and availability of UCB for transplantation.

  10. Spinal cord toxoplasmosis in human immunodeficiency virus infection/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-García, Concepción; Castillo-Álvarez, Federico; Azcona-Gutiérrez, José M; Herraiz, María J; Ibarra, Valvanera; Oteo, José A

    2015-05-01

    Neurological complications in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) are still common, even in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy. Opportunistic infections, immune reconstitution, the virus itself, antiretroviral drugs and neurocognitive disorders have to be considered when establishing the differential diagnosis. Toxoplasmic encephalitis remains the major cause of space-occupying lesions in the brain of patients with HIV/AIDS; however, spinal cord involvement has been reported infrequently. Here, we review spinal cord toxoplasmosis in HIV infection and illustrate the condition with a recent case from our hospital. We suggest that most patients with HIV/AIDS and myelitis with enhanced spine lesions, multiple brain lesions and positive serology for Toxoplasma gondii should receive immediate empirical treatment for toxoplasmosis, and a biopsy should be performed in those cases without clinical improvement or with deterioration.

  11. A pilot study of perceived needs of persons with new spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushman, Laura A; Scherer, Marcia J

    2002-06-01

    Persons with new spinal cord injury have varying perceptions of their own needs in multiple life domains such as readiness and need to use assistive technologies, but these are often not directly addressed. These areas were the focus of the present study. This descriptive study looked at subjective need in a variety of areas with a new measure and also assessed perceptions related to assistive technology and quality of life. Perceptions of various needs were compared at baseline and at 1- and 6-mo. follow-up. The Perceived Needs Inventory, the Assistive Technology Device Predisposition Assessment, and the Diener Satisfaction with Life Scale were the main outcome measures given 22 patients with new injuries in an inpatient service for acute spinal cord injury with community follow-up. As the Perceived Needs Inventory provided distinct information and showed good test-reliability and some evidence of construct validity, it may be a useful adjunctive tool with such patients.

  12. Ring-enhancing spinal cord lesions in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalewski, Nicholas L; Morris, Padraig P; Weinshenker, Brian G; Lucchinetti, Claudia F; Guo, Yong; Pittock, Sean J; Krecke, Karl N; Kaufmann, Timothy J; Wingerchuk, Dean M; Kumar, Neeraj; Flanagan, Eoin P

    2017-03-01

    We assessed the frequency and characteristics of ring-enhancing spinal cord lesions in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) myelitis and myelitis of other cause. We reviewed spinal cord MRIs for ring-enhancing lesions from 284 aquaporin-4 (AQP4)-IgG seropositive patients at Mayo Clinic from 1996 to 2014. Inclusion criteria were as follows: (1) AQP4-IgG seropositivity, (2) myelitis attack and (3) MRI spinal cord demonstrating ring-enhancement. We identified two groups of control patients with: (1) longitudinally extensive myelopathy of other cause (n=66) and (2) myelitis in the context of a concurrent or subsequent diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) from a population-based cohort (n=30). Ring-enhancement was detected in 50 of 156 (32%) myelitis episodes in 41 patients (83% single; 17% multiple attacks). Ring-enhancement was noted on sagittal and axial images in 36 of 43 (84%) ring enhancing myelitis episodes and extended a median of two vertebral segments (range, 1-12); in 21 of 48 (44%) ring enhancing myelitis episodes, the ring extended greater than or equal to three vertebrae. Ring-enhancement was accompanied by longitudinally extensive (greater than or equal to three vertebral segments) T2-hyperintensity in 44 of 50 (88%) ring enhancing myelitis episodes. One case of a spinal cord biopsy during ring-enhancing myelitis revealed tissue vacuolation and loss of AQP4 immunoreactivity with preserved axons. The clinical characteristics of ring-enhancing myelitis episodes did not differ from non-ring-enhancing episodes. Ring-enhancing spinal cord lesions were more common in NMOSD than other causes of longitudinally extensive myelopathy (50/156 (32%) vs 0/66 (0%); p≤0.001) but did not differ between NMOSD and MS (50/156 (32%) vs 6/30 (20%); p=0.20). Spinal cord ring-enhancement accompanies one-third of NMOSD myelitis episodes and distinguishes NMOSD from other causes of longitudinally extensive myelopathies but not from MS. Published by the BMJ Publishing

  13. Multiple Perspectives / Multiple Readings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Biggs

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available People experience things from their own physical point of view. What they see is usually a function of where they are and what physical attitude they adopt relative to the subject. With augmented vision (periscopes, mirrors, remote cameras, etc we are able to see things from places where we are not present. With time-shifting technologies, such as the video recorder, we can also see things from the past; a time and a place we may never have visited.In recent artistic work I have been exploring the implications of digital technology, interactivity and internet connectivity that allow people to not so much space/time-shift their visual experience of things but rather see what happens when everybody is simultaneously able to see what everybody else can see. This is extrapolated through the remote networking of sites that are actual installation spaces; where the physical movements of viewers in the space generate multiple perspectives, linked to other similar sites at remote locations or to other viewers entering the shared data-space through a web based version of the work.This text explores the processes involved in such a practice and reflects on related questions regarding the non-singularity of being and the sense of self as linked to time and place.

  14. Focal Anterior Displacement of the Thoracic Spinal Cord without Evidence of Spinal Cord Herniation or an Intradural Mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Yoon; Lee, Joon Woo; Lee, Guen Young; Kang, Heung Sik [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam 463-707 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-01

    We report magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings on focal anterior displacement of the thoracic spinal cord in asymptomatic patients without a spinal cord herniation or intradural mass. We identified 12 patients (male:female = 6:6; mean age, 51.7; range, 15-83 years) between 2007 and 2011, with focal anterior displacement of the spinal cord and without evidence of an intradural mass or spinal cord herniation. Two radiologists retrospectively reviewed the MRI findings in consensus. An asymmetric spinal cord deformity with a focal dented appearance was seen on the posterior surface of the spinal cord in all patients, and it involved a length of 1 or 2 vertebral segments in the upper thoracic spine (thoracic vertebrae 1-6). Moreover, a focal widening of the posterior subarachnoid space was also observed in all cases. None of the patients had myelopathy symptoms, and they showed no focal T2-hyperintensity in the spinal cord with the exception of one patient. In addition, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow artifacts were seen in the posterior subarachnoid space of the affected spinal cord level. Computed tomography myelography revealed preserved CSF flow in the two available patients. Focal anterior spinal cord indentation can be found in the upper thoracic level of asymptomatic patients without a spinal cord herniation or intradural mass.

  15. Focal Anterior Displacement of the Thoracic Spinal Cord without Evidence of Spinal Cord Herniation or an Intradural Mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Yoon; Lee, Joon Woo; Lee, Guen Young; Kang, Heung Sik

    2014-01-01

    We report magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings on focal anterior displacement of the thoracic spinal cord in asymptomatic patients without a spinal cord herniation or intradural mass. We identified 12 patients (male:female = 6:6; mean age, 51.7; range, 15-83 years) between 2007 and 2011, with focal anterior displacement of the spinal cord and without evidence of an intradural mass or spinal cord herniation. Two radiologists retrospectively reviewed the MRI findings in consensus. An asymmetric spinal cord deformity with a focal dented appearance was seen on the posterior surface of the spinal cord in all patients, and it involved a length of 1 or 2 vertebral segments in the upper thoracic spine (thoracic vertebrae 1-6). Moreover, a focal widening of the posterior subarachnoid space was also observed in all cases. None of the patients had myelopathy symptoms, and they showed no focal T2-hyperintensity in the spinal cord with the exception of one patient. In addition, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow artifacts were seen in the posterior subarachnoid space of the affected spinal cord level. Computed tomography myelography revealed preserved CSF flow in the two available patients. Focal anterior spinal cord indentation can be found in the upper thoracic level of asymptomatic patients without a spinal cord herniation or intradural mass

  16. The oblique cord of the forearm in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs, R Shane; O'Neil, James T; Key, Christopher D; Zarzour, Jessica G; Fulghum, Sarah B; Kim, Eugenia J; Lyerly, Michael J; Shoja, Mohammadali M; George Salter, E; Jerry Oakes, W

    2007-05-01

    There is minimal and often conflicting data in the literature regarding the oblique cord of the forearm. The current study seeks to elucidate further the anatomy of this structure of the upper extremity. In adult cadavers, the oblique cord was observed for and, when found, measurements were made of it. Ranges of motion were carried out while observation of the oblique cord was made. An oblique cord was found on 52.6% of sides. Gantzer's muscle was found on 55% of sides and, when present, had attachment into the oblique cord on five sides. The oblique cord was present on 13 sides with a Gantzer's muscle. Of the 20 sides with an oblique cord, no Gantzer's muscle was found on 10. The mean length of the oblique cord was 3.4 cm. In the majority of specimens, this cord tapered from proximal to distal. The proximal, middle, and distal widths of this structure had means 9, 7, and 4 mm, respectively. The oblique cord was found to travel approximately 45 degrees from a line drawn through the ulna and more or less traveled perpendicular to the insertion site of the bicipital tendon. This ligament was lax in the neutral position and with pronation became lax in all specimens. The oblique cord progressively became taut with increased supination from the neutral position and was maximally taut with the forearm fully supinated. Tautness of this cord was also found with distal distraction of the radius. Following the transection of the oblique cord, no discernable difference was observed in regard to maximal supination of the forearm or distal distraction of the radius. No obvious instability of the proximal forearm was found following transection of the oblique cord. Functionally, although the oblique cord may resist supination, it is unlikely that this structure affords significant stability to the proximal forearm, as it was often absent, of a very small caliber, and based on our observations, following its transection, the amount of supination of the forearm did not increase

  17. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy of spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitesh P Patel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury (SCI is a complex disease process that involves both primary and secondary mechanisms of injury and can leave patients with devastating functional impairment as well as psychological debilitation. While no curative treatment is available for spinal cord injury, current therapeutic approaches focus on reducing the secondary injury that follows SCI. Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO therapy has shown promising neuroprotective effects in several experimental studies, but the limited number of clinical reports have shown mixed findings. This review will provide an overview of the potential mechanisms by which HBO therapy may exert neuroprotection, provide a summary of the clinical application of HBO therapy in patients with SCI, and discuss avenues for future studies.

  18. Sleep disordered breathing following spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, Fin; Jennum, Poul; Laub, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) commonly complain about difficulty in sleeping. Although various sleep disordered breathing definitions and indices are used that make comparisons between studies difficult, it seems evident that the frequency of sleep disorders is higher in individuals...... with SCI, especially with regard to obstructive sleep apnea. In addition, there is a correlation between the incidence of sleep disturbances and the spinal cord level injured, age, body mass index, neck circumference, abdominal girth, and use of sedating medications. Regulation of respiration is dependent...... on wakefulness and sleep. Thus, it is important to be aware of basic mechanisms in the regulation and control of sleep and awake states. Supine position decreases the vital capacity in tetraplegic individuals, and diminished responsiveness to Pa(CO)(2) may further decrease ventilatory reserve. There also may...

  19. Cholinergic mechanisms in spinal cord and muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aquilonius, S.M.; Askmark, H.; Gilberg, P.G.

    1986-01-01

    Current knowledge regarding the distribution of acetylcholinesterase (ACHE) cholineacetyltranferase (ChAT) and cholinergic receptors in the spinal cord is presented as well as changes in these markers coupled to the degenerations in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The principal changes in ChAT and nicotonic receptors in rat hindleg muscles during denervation and reinnervation is discussed as a background for quantitative studies in human muscle biopsies. It is noted that thefirst published autoradiograph on spinal cord muscarinic receptors was from the rat, depicting an intense binding of radiolabeled quinuclikiny benzilate (tritium-QNB) in the ventral horn, and expecially in an apical part of the dorsal horn claimed to correspond to correspond to sustantia gelatinosa

  20. Association of cord blood chemokines and other biomarkers with neonatal complications following intrauterine inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshikazu Otsubo

    Full Text Available Intrauterine inflammation has been associated with preterm birth and neonatal complications. Few reports have comprehensively investigated multiple cytokine profiles in cord blood and precisely identified surrogate markers for intrauterine inflammation.To identify the cytokines and surrogate markers associated with intrauterine inflammation and subsequent neonatal complications.We analyzed cord blood samples from 135 patients admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit at Sasebo City General Hospital. We retrospectively determined the associations between the presence of neonatal complications and cord blood cytokines, prenatal factors, and laboratory data at birth. A total of 27 cytokines in the cord blood were measured using a bead-based array sandwich immunoassay.Both Th1 and Th2 cytokine levels were low, whereas the levels of growth factors and chemokines were high. In particular, chemokines IL-8, MCP-1, and MIP-1α were significantly higher in very premature neonates when compared with more mature neonates. In addition, some have been shown to be associated with multiple neonatal complications, including patent ductus arteriosus (PDA, respiratory distress syndrome (RDS, and chronic lung disease (CLD. Similarly, the levels of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide, nucleated RBC, and urinary β2-microglobulin were associated with these complications and chemokine levels.Our results suggest the association of inflammatory chemokines IL-8, MCP-1, and MIP-1α with intrauterine inflammation, premature birth, and neonatal complications in these perinatal subjects. Furthermore, the association of the aforementioned biomarkers with PDA, RDS, and CLD may help establish early diagnostic measures to predict such neonatal complications following intrauterine inflammation.

  1. Actitudes y percepciones de los docentes universitarios en el proceso de adopción de una innovación: la iniciativa OpenCourseWare en la Universidad de Valencia, España

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lourdes Margaix-Fontestad

    Full Text Available El proyecto OpenCourseWare, repositorio de recursos educativos en abierto, se inició en la Universidad de Valencia en 2008 y en 2009, sólo incluía 10 asignaturas, ninguna de ellas del área de Ciencias de la Salud. El objetivo de este trabajo es investigar las actitudes de los docentes de esta área así como sus percepciones con relación a este repositorio para determinar cuáles son las estrategias necesarias para extender su uso. Se parte de la teoría de la difusión de las innovaciones de Rogers y de un enfoque cualitativo a través del muestreo teórico, entrevistas semiestructuradas y codificación abierta. Los resultados indican la existencia de dos grandes grupos de profesores. Los adoptantes tempranos con una predisposición alta a participar en la iniciativa y con una percepción positiva de sus atributos y los mainstream o corriente principal más reacios a participar y con una percepción negativa respecto a alguno de sus atributos. La identificación de las características de estos dos grandes grupos marca las líneas de acción y de investigación futura en el ámbito del marketing y difusión, formación, sensibilización y motivación para extender el uso del OpenCourseWare.

  2. Amnioinfusion for umbilical cord compression in labour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmeyr, G J

    2000-01-01

    Amnioinfusion aims to prevent or relieve umbilical cord compression during labour by infusing a solution into the uterine cavity. The objective of this review was to assess the effects of amnioinfusion on maternal and perinatal outcome for potential or suspected umbilical cord compression or potential amnionitis. The Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group trials register and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register were searched. Randomised trials of amnioinfusion compared with no amnioinfusion in women with babies at risk of umbilical cord compression; and women at risk of intrauterine infection. Eligibility and trial quality were assessed by the reviewer. Twelve studies were included. Transcervical amnioinfusion for potential or suspected umbilical cord compression was associated with the following reductions: fetal heart rate decelerations (relative risk 0.54, 95% confidence interval 0.43 to 0.68); caesarean section for suspected fetal distress (relative risk 0.35, 95% confidence interval 0.24 to 0.52); neonatal hospital stay greater than 3 days (relative risk 0.40, 95% confidence interval 0. 26 to 0.62); maternal hospital stay greater than 3 days (relative risk 0.46, 95% 0.29 to 0.74). Transabdominal amnioinfusion showed similar results. Transcervical amnioinfusion to prevent infection in women with membranes ruptured for more than 6 hours was associated with a reduction in puerperal infection (relative risk 0.50, 95% confidence interval 0.26 to 0.97). Amnioinfusion appears to reduce the occurrence of variable heart rate decelerations and lower the use of caesarean section. However the studies were done in settings where fetal distress was not confirmed by fetal blood sampling. The results may therefore only be relevant where caesarean sections are commonly done for abnormal fetal heart rate alone. The trials reviewed are too small to address the possibility of rare but serious maternal adverse effects of amnioinfusion.

  3. Biocompatible hydrogels in spinal cord injury repair

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hejčl, Aleš; Lesný, Petr; Přádný, Martin; Michálek, Jiří; Jendelová, Pavla; Štulík, J.; Syková, Eva

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 57, Suppl.3 (2008), S121-S132 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC554; GA ČR GA309/06/1246 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) 1A8697 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703; CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : Spinal cord injury * Hydrogel * Tissue engineering Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.653, year: 2008

  4. Are there endogenous stem cells in the spinal cord?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrucci, Michela; Ryskalin, Larisa; Busceti, Carla L; Gaglione, Anderson; Biagioni, Francesca; Fornai, Francesco

    2017-12-01

    Neural progenitor cells (NPC) represent the stem-like niche of the central nervous system that maintains a regenerative potential also in the adult life. Despite NPC in the brain are well documented, the presence of NPC in the spinal cord has been controversial for a long time. This is due to a scarce activity of NPC within spinal cord, which also makes difficult their identification. The present review recapitulates the main experimental studies, which provided evidence for the occurrence of NPC within spinal cord, with a special emphasis on spinal cord injury and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. By using experimental models, here we analyse the site-specificity, the phenotype and the main triggers of spinal cord NPC. Moreover, data are reported on the effect of specific neurogenic stimuli on these spinal cord NPC in an effort to comprehend the endogenous neurogenic potential of this stem cell niche.

  5. 45 Gy - tolerance dose spinal cord - dogma or the facts?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maciejewski, B.; Hliniak, A.; Danczak-Ginalska, Z.; Meder, M.; Skolyszewski, J.; Reinfuss, M.; Korzeniowski, S.; Peszynski, J.; Jassem, J.

    1993-01-01

    Dose of 45 Gy as a tolerance dose for spinal cord was questioned based on review of clinical data. Some data show that for conventional fractionation with the dose per fraction of less than 2.0 Gy spinal cord tolerance dose may arise up to 50-55 Gy. This was the base for round-table discussion and the importance of clinical and physical risk factors of postirradiation spinal cord injury was discussed and previous diseases of spinal cord, size of dose per fraction and length of irradiated spinal cord were pointed out as high risk factors. It was concluded that from clinical point of view there is no reason and on need to verify and to increase tolerance dose for spinal cord. (author)

  6. Brain protection by methylprednisolone in rats with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia-Mao; Lee, Ming-Hsueh; Wang, Ting-Chung; Weng, Hsu-Huei; Chung, Chiu-Yen; Yang, Jen-Tsung

    2009-07-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury is clinically treated by high doses of methylprednisolone. However, the effect of methylprednisolone on the brain in spinal cord injury patients has been little investigated. This experimental study examined Bcl-2 and Bax protein expression and Nissl staining to evaluate an apoptosis-related intracellular signaling event and final neuron death, respectively. Spinal cord injury produced a significant apoptotic change and cell death not only in the spinal cord but also in the supraventricular cortex and hippocampal cornu ammonis 1 region in the rat brains. The treatment of methylprednisolone increased the Bcl-2/Bax ratio and prevented neuron death for 1-7 days after spinal cord injury. These findings suggest that rats with spinal cord injury show ascending brain injury that could be restricted through methylprednisolone management.

  7. Imaging evaluation of vocal cord paralysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Marcelo de Mattos; Magalhaes, Fabiana Pizanni; Dadalto, Gabriela Bijos; Moura, Marina Vimieiro Timponi de [Axial Centro de Imagem, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)], e-mail: marcelomgarcia@superig.com.br, e-mail: ce@axialmg.com.br

    2009-09-15

    Vocal cord paralysis is a common cause of hoarseness. It may be secondary to many types of lesions along the cranial nerve X pathway and its branches, particularly the laryngeal recurrent nerves. Despite the idiopathic nature of a great number of cases, imaging methods play a very significant role in the investigation of etiologic factors, such as thyroid and esophagus neoplasias with secondary invasion of the laryngeal recurrent nerves. Other conditions such as aortic and right subclavian artery aneurysms also may be found. The knowledge of local anatomy and related diseases is of great importance for the radiologist, so that he can tailor the examination properly to allow an appropriate diagnosis and therapy planning. Additionally, considering that up to 35% of patients with vocal cord paralysis are asymptomatic, the recognition of radiological findings indicative of this condition is essential for the radiologist who must warn the referring physician on the imaging findings. In the present study, the authors review the anatomy and main diseases related to vocal cord paralysis, demonstrating them through typical cases evaluated by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, besides describing radiological findings of laryngeal abnormalities indicative of this condition. (author)

  8. Tracking Changes following Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curt, Armin; Friston, Karl; Thompson, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury is often disabling and recovery of function is limited. As a consequence of damage, both spinal cord and brain undergo anatomical and functional changes. Besides clinical measures of recovery, biomarkers that can detect early anatomical and functional changes might be useful in determining clinical outcome—during the course of rehabilitation and recovery—as well as furnishing a tool to evaluate novel treatment interventions and their mechanisms of action. Recent evidence suggests an interesting three-way relationship between neurological deficit and changes in the spinal cord and of the brain and that, importantly, noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging techniques, both structural and functional, provide a sensitive tool to lay out these interactions. This review describes recent findings from multimodal imaging studies of remote anatomical changes (i.e., beyond the lesion site), cortical reorganization, and their relationship to clinical disability. These developments in this field may improve our understanding of effects on the nervous system that are attributable to the injury itself and will allow their distinction from changes that result from rehabilitation (i.e., functional retraining) and from interventions affecting the nervous system directly (i.e., neuroprotection or regeneration). PMID:22730072

  9. Vocal cord hemangioma in an adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muzaffer Kanlıkama

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Hemangioma is one of the most common benign tumorsin the head and neck region. Laryngeal hemangiomasare benign vascular tumors of unknown etiology thatarise from subglottic region with stridor in infants. Thistype also known as congenital laryngeal hemangioma, isthe more common. Congenital hemangiomas occur usuallyin subglottic region and more frequent in girls. Laryngealhemangioma in adults is a very rare conditionand main symptom is hoarseness and breathing difficulties.Adult hemangiomas can be seen in different locationssuch as the epiglottis, aryepiglottic folds, arytenoidsand false and true vocal cords. They are more oftenof cavernous form and cause hoarseness. In this reportwe present an adult patient with hemangioma ofthe left vocal fold and review the literature. Diagnosticinvestigation revealed a pink-purple mass which was extendedfrom the anterior comissure to the posterior partof true vocal cord and false vocal cord, filling the ventriculeand extending to supraglottic region. Directlaryngoscopy was performed, but the lesion was not excisedbecause of its widespread extension in the larynx. JClin Exp Invest 2010; 2(1: 91-94

  10. Evidence-based pathology: umbilical cord coiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khong, T Y

    2010-12-01

    The generation of a pathology test result must be based on criteria that are proven to be acceptably reproducible and clinically relevant to be evidence-based. This review de-constructs the umbilical cord coiling index to illustrate how it can stray from being evidence-based. Publications related to umbilical cord coiling were retrieved and analysed with regard to how the umbilical coiling index was calculated, abnormal coiling was defined and reference ranges were constructed. Errors and other influences that can occur with the measurement of the length of the umbilical cord or of the number of coils can compromise the generation of the coiling index. Definitions of abnormal coiling are not consistent in the literature. Reference ranges defining hypocoiling or hypercoiling have not taken those potential errors or the possible effect of gestational age into account. Even the way numerical test results in anatomical pathology are generated, as illustrated by the umbilical coiling index, warrants a critical analysis into its evidence base to ensure that they are reproducible or free from errors.

  11. Neurogenic bladder in spinal cord injury patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Taweel W

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Waleed Al Taweel, Raouf SeyamDepartment of Urology, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi ArabiaAbstract: Neurogenic bladder dysfunction due to spinal cord injury poses a significant threat to the well-being of patients. Incontinence, renal impairment, urinary tract infection, stones, and poor quality of life are some complications of this condition. The majority of patients will require management to ensure low pressure reservoir function of the bladder, complete emptying, and dryness. Management typically begins with anticholinergic medications and clean intermittent catheterization. Patients who fail this treatment because of inefficacy or intolerability are candidates for a spectrum of more invasive procedures. Endoscopic managements to relieve the bladder outlet resistance include sphincterotomy, botulinum toxin injection, and stent insertion. In contrast, patients with incompetent sphincters are candidates for transobturator tape insertion, sling surgery, or artificial sphincter implantation. Coordinated bladder emptying is possible with neuromodulation in selected patients. Bladder augmentation, usually with an intestinal segment, and urinary diversion are the last resort. Tissue engineering is promising in experimental settings; however, its role in clinical bladder management is still evolving. In this review, we summarize the current literature pertaining to the pathology and management of neurogenic bladder dysfunction in patients with spinal cord injury.Keywords: neurogenic bladder, spinal cord injury, urodynamics, intestine, intermittent catheterization

  12. Considerations on umbilical cord resistance to traction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Hanganu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Neonaticide represents a particular issue both to society and forensic field, being admitted nowadays as a crime all over the world. Apart from common gross and microscopic examination of the newborn cadaver, thorough examination of the umbilical cord during autopsy proved many times its major utility in solving neonaticide cases. Although by its constituents, the umbilical cord is a quite resistant structure to bending and compression, mechanical properties vary along its surface, with gestational age or various pregnancy disorders, as well as genetic anomalies of the fetus, so that a rupture may occur. The authors present the case of a newborn found dead in a sink – about whom mother states that he accidentally fell in the feces, the moment of the birth being a surprise – and discuss on the circumstances when the umbilical cord may rupture. This issue is most important when is a need to differentiate between a true accident and an intentional newborn homicide by the mother set forth as an accident.

  13. Primary hyperparathyroidism: A rare cause of spinal cord compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haddad, Fares H.; Malkawi, Omar M.; Sharbaji, Amer A.; Rihani, Hanan R.; Jbara, Ibrahim F.

    2007-01-01

    We report a case of a 62-year-old postmenopausal hypertensive lady who was treated for osteoporosis with calcium and Vitamin D. She presented with progressive lower limb weakness and paresthesia with sensory level at T4. Investigations revealed high parathyroid hormone 1152 ng/dl, calcium 10.9 mg/dl, and low phosphorus of 2.4 mg/dl after stopping calcium supplement. Chest x-ray showed an expansile mass lesion of the right 6th rib confirmed by chest CT. Thoracic MRI showed a mass lesion extending from the T3 vertebral body and compressing the spinal cord. There were multiple lytic lesions of the scalp, ribs, femur, and pelvis suggesting metastatic lesions. A neck ultrasound and SESTA MIBI parathyroid scan confirmed a right lower parathyroid adenoma. Excision biopsy of the rib lesion confirmed a vascular lesion with features of brown tumor BT. Decompression surgery of the thoracic spine was performed, and the histopathology confirmed BT. Two weeks later the patient underwent right parathyroidectomy that proved to be a parathyroid adenoma. She showed a remarkable improvement in her clinical condition and there were some regression of the bony lesions observed 12 months post parathyroidectomy. This case should alert physicians to the association of multiple brown tumors in PHPT and that the presentation may be an aggressive one mimicking metastasis, patients with osteoporosis warrant at least calcium profile to rule out a secondary cause. (author)

  14. Diagnosis and surgical treatment of terminal syringomyelia within spinal cord combined with tethered cord syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-cheng XIE

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To summarize the clinical manifestations, imaging characteristics and experience of surgical treatment of spinal cord terminal syringomyelia with tethered cord syndrome (TCS.  Methods and Results Clinical data of 10 patients with spinal cord syringomyelia combined with TCS surgically treated under microscope from January 1999 to March 2014 in our hospital were retrospectively analyzed. There were 3 males and 7 females with average age of 15.06 years old (ranged from 2 to 35 years old. The course of disease ranged from 3 months to 20 years (average 42.17 months. Among those patients, one patient presented hydromyelia, 8 patients suffered from meningeal cyst within the sacral canal, and one patient were concurrent with sacral dermal sinus. The weakness of lower extremities, especially distal limbs, was the main clinical manifestation. Five patients were accompanied with bowel and bladder dysfunction and 5 patients with sensory disturbance below the level of syringomyelia, especially hypesthesia. Preoperative MRI showed conus medullaris disappeared at the end of spinal cord, and there was fluid signal in the lower spinal cord with hypo-intensity signal in T1WI and hyper-intensity signal in T2WI without enhancement. All patients underwent surgical procedures. Under microscope, filum terminale was cut off, drainage was performed, meningeal cyst within the sacral canal was removed, and tethered cord was released. The success rate of operations was 100%. The duration of surgery ranged from 1.52 to 3.07 h (average 2.15 h, with average intraoperative blood loss 220 ml (ranged from 100 to 410 ml. The tethering filum had been totally resected and histological examination showed typical filum tissue in all cases. No operative complication was found. Visual Analogue Scale (VAS score was decreased, and the lower limbs weakness as well as bowel and bladder dysfunction was gradually relieved after operation. The period of follow-up was ranged from 6

  15. Heterogeneity of Opioid Binding Sites in Guinea Pig Spinal Cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-11-30

    MEDICAL CENTER WILFORD HALL AIR FORCE MEDICAL CENTER Title of Thesis: "Heterogeneity of Opioid Binding Sites in Guinea Pig Spinal Cord" Name of...that the use of any copyrighted material in the dissertation manuscript entitled: "Heterogeneity of Opioid Binding Sites in Guinea Pig Spinal Cord...University of the Health Sciences 11 Abstract Title of Thesis: Heterogenity of Opioid Binding Sites In Guinea Pig Spinal Cord Gary Dean Zarr MAJ/ANC

  16. Diffusion tensor imaging of spinal cord parenchyma lesion in rat with chronic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Can; Rao, Jia-Sheng; Pei, Xiao-Jiao; Lei, Jian-Feng; Wang, Zhan-Jing; Zhao, Wen; Wei, Rui-Han; Yang, Zhao-Yang; Li, Xiao-Guang

    2018-04-01

    Adequate evaluation of spinal cord parenchyma and accurate identification of injury range are considered two premises for the research and treatment of chronic spinal cord injury (SCI). Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) provides information about water diffusion in spinal cord, and thus makes it possible to realize these premises. In this study, we conducted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for Wistar rats 84days after spinal cord contusion. DTI metrics including fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), axial diffusivity (AD), and radial diffusivity (RD) from different positions of the injured cord were collected, analyzed, and compared with the histological results and locomotor outcomes. Moreover, we performed fiber tractography, and examined the difference in cavity percentage obtained respectively via conventional MRI, DTI and histology. Results showed that the chronic SCI rats had the largest changes of all DTI metrics at the epicenter; the farther away from the epicenter, the smaller the variation. FA, AD and RD were all influenced by SCI in a greater space range than MD. The good consistency of FA values and histological results in specific regions evidenced FA's capability of reflecting Wallerian degeneration after SCI. DTI metrics at the epicenter in ventral funiculus also showed a close correlation with the BBB scores. Additionally, supported by the histological results, DTI enables a more accurate measurement of cavity percentage compared to the conventional MRI. DTI parameters might comprehensively reflect the post-SCI pathological status of spinal cord parenchyma at the epicenter and distal parts during the chronic stage, while showing good consistency with locomotor performance. DTI combined with tractography could intuitively display the distribution of spared fibers after SCI and accurately provide information such as cavity area. This may shed light on the research and treatment of chronic SCI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  17. Measurement of normal cervical spinal cord in metrizamide CT myelography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Fumio; Koyama, Tsunemaro; Aii, Heihachirou

    1985-01-01

    The shape of the spinal cord is the most important factor in diagnosis of spinal disorders by metrizamide CT myelography (met. CT). Even in cases where the spinal cord looks normal in shape its size might be abnormal, for example in cases with spinal cord atrophy, syringomyelia, intramedullary tumor and several other conditions. In detecting the slightest abnormality in such cases, it is absolutely necessary to have in hand the knowledge of the nomal size of the spinal cord at each level. We measured, therefore, the sagittal and transverse diameters of the cervical spinal cord in 55 patients with no known lesions on met. CT (Fig. 1). Comparing our results with those by others, we found some differences as to the size of the spinal cord. We assume that these differences are due to the differences in resolution of the CT scanners used. The size of the spinal cord tends to measure larger with a CT scanner with high resolution than with others. Previous authors reported that the size of the spinal cord would vary by window center settings. Our experimental results indicate, however, that window center settings do not significantly affect the measurements. It is concluded that the normal values of the spinal cord dimensions at each level somewhat differ by CT equipments used. One should have normal values with one's own equipment in hand in order to take full advantage of this sophisticated diagnostic technique. (author)

  18. [Retention cysts of the vocal cords (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundmann, E W

    1979-05-01

    Present day knowledge in laryngology maintains that the free edge of the true cord mucosa is devoid of glands so that retention cysts should not occur in this tissue. When such cysts do occur, it is difficult to define their pathogenesis. Reference is made to the author's earlier study which found a regular occurrence of mucous glands in the squamous epithelial region of the vocal cords. A retention cyst in the true cord is described histologically in the present report. The glands responsible for these cysts are believed to function by moistening the mucous membrane of the vocal cords.

  19. Sex cord-gonadal stromal tumor of the rete testis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajadi, Kamran P; Dalton, Rory R; Brown, James A

    2009-01-01

    A 34-year-old tetraplegic patient with suppurative epididymitis was found on follow-up examination and ultrasonography to have a testicular mass. The radical orchiectomy specimen contained an undifferentiated spindled sex cord-stromal tumor arising in the rete testis. Testicular sex cord-stromal tumors are far less common than germ cell neoplasms and are usually benign. The close relationship between sex cords and ductules of the rete testis during development provides the opportunity for these uncommon tumors to arise anatomically within the rete tesis. This undifferentiated sex cord-stromal tumor, occurring in a previously unreported location, is an example of an unusual lesion mimicking an intratesticular malignant neoplasm.

  20. Utility of MR imaging in pediatric spinal cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felsberg, G.J.; Tien, R.D.; Osumi, A.K.; Cardenas, C.A.

    1995-01-01

    We evaluated the utility of MR imaging in pediatric patients with acute and subacute spinal cord injuries. MR imaging of 22 pediatric patients with suspected traumatic spinal cord injuries was reviewed. MR findings were correlated with physical examination and compared to available radiographs and CT examinations performed at time of presentation. Twelve patients had abnormalities on MR imaging. Seven had spinal cord contusions; five contusions were hemorrhagic. Five of seven patients with cord contusion had normal radiographs and CT exams. Six patients with normal radiographs and CT examinations had abnormal MR studies revealing cord contusion, ligamentous injury, disc herniation, and epidural hematoma. MR is useful in initial evaluation of pediatric patients with spinal cord injuries and in prognosis of future neurologic function. In the setting of spinal cord symptomatology and negative radiographic studies, MR imaging should be performed. Surgically correctable causes of cord compression demonstrated by MR imaging include disc herniation, epidural hematoma, and retropulsed fracture fragments. The entity of spinal cord injury without radiographic abnormality is a diagnosis of exclusion which should only be made after radiologic investigation with radiographs, high-resolution thin-section CT, and MR imaging. (orig.)

  1. Spinal cord motion. Influence of respiration and cardiac cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winklhofer, S. [RWTH Aachen University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Neuroradiology; University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland). Inst. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Schoth, F. [RWTH Aachen University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology; Stolzmann, P. [University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland). Inst. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Krings, T. [Toronto Western Hospital, ON (Canada). Div. of Neuroradiology; Mull, M.; Wiesmann, M. [RWTH Aachen University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Neuroradiology; Stracke, C.P. [RWTH Aachen University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Neuroradiology; Alfried-Krupp-Hospital, Essen (Germany). Dept. of Neuroradiology

    2014-11-15

    To assess physiological spinal cord motion during the cardiac cycle compared with the influence of respiration based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements. Anterior-posterior spinal cord motion within the spinal canal was assessed in 16 healthy volunteers (median age, 25 years) by cardiac-triggered and cardiac-gated gradient echo pulse sequence MRI. Image acquisition was performed during breath-holding, normal breathing, and forced breathing. Normal spinal cord motion values were computed using descriptive statistics. Breathing-dependent differences were assessed using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test and compared with the cardiac-based cord motion. A normal value table was set up for the spinal cord motion of each vertebral cervico-thoracic-lumbar segment. Significant differences in cord motion were found between cardiac-based motion while breath-holding and the two breathing modalities (P < 0.01 each). Spinal cord motion was found to be highest during forced breathing, with a maximum in the lower cervical spinal segments (C5; mean, 2.1 mm ± 1.17). Image acquisition during breath-holding revealed the lowest motion. MRI permits the demonstration and evaluation of cardiac and respiration-dependent spinal cord motion within the spinal canal from the cervical to lumbar segments. Breathing conditions have a considerably greater impact than cardiac activity on spinal cord motion.

  2. Spinal cord motion. Influence of respiration and cardiac cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winklhofer, S.; University Hospital Zurich; Schoth, F.; Stolzmann, P.; Krings, T.; Mull, M.; Wiesmann, M.; Stracke, C.P.; Alfried-Krupp-Hospital, Essen

    2014-01-01

    To assess physiological spinal cord motion during the cardiac cycle compared with the influence of respiration based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements. Anterior-posterior spinal cord motion within the spinal canal was assessed in 16 healthy volunteers (median age, 25 years) by cardiac-triggered and cardiac-gated gradient echo pulse sequence MRI. Image acquisition was performed during breath-holding, normal breathing, and forced breathing. Normal spinal cord motion values were computed using descriptive statistics. Breathing-dependent differences were assessed using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test and compared with the cardiac-based cord motion. A normal value table was set up for the spinal cord motion of each vertebral cervico-thoracic-lumbar segment. Significant differences in cord motion were found between cardiac-based motion while breath-holding and the two breathing modalities (P < 0.01 each). Spinal cord motion was found to be highest during forced breathing, with a maximum in the lower cervical spinal segments (C5; mean, 2.1 mm ± 1.17). Image acquisition during breath-holding revealed the lowest motion. MRI permits the demonstration and evaluation of cardiac and respiration-dependent spinal cord motion within the spinal canal from the cervical to lumbar segments. Breathing conditions have a considerably greater impact than cardiac activity on spinal cord motion.

  3. The spinal cord: a review of functional neuroanatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bican, Orhan; Minagar, Alireza; Pruitt, Amy A

    2013-02-01

    The spinal cord controls the voluntary muscles of the trunk and limbs and receives sensory input from these areas. It extends from the medulla oblongata to the lower border of the first lumbar vertebra. A basic knowledge of spinal cord anatomy is essential for interpretation of clinical signs and symptoms and for understanding of pathologic processes involving the spinal cord. In this article, anatomic structures are correlated with relevant clinical signs and symptoms and a step-wise approach to spinal cord diagnosis is outlined. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Cost-effectiveness of private umbilical cord blood banking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaimal, Anjali J; Smith, Catherine C; Laros, Russell K; Caughey, Aaron B; Cheng, Yvonne W

    2009-10-01

    To investigate the cost-effectiveness of private umbilical cord blood banking. A decision-analytic model was designed comparing private umbilical cord blood banking with no umbilical cord blood banking. Baseline assumptions included a cost of $3,620 for umbilical cord blood banking and storage for 20 years, a 0.04% chance of requiring an autologous stem cell transplant, a 0.07% chance of a sibling requiring an allogenic stem cell transplant, and a 50% reduction in risk of graft-versus-host disease if a sibling uses banked umbilical cord blood. Private cord blood banking is not cost-effective because it cost an additional $1,374,246 per life-year gained. In sensitivity analysis, if the cost of umbilical cord blood banking is less than $262 or the likelihood of a child needing a stem cell transplant is greater than 1 in 110, private umbilical cord blood banking becomes cost-effective. Currently, private umbilical cord blood banking is cost-effective only for children with a very high likelihood of needing a stem cell transplant. Patients considering private blood banking should be informed of the remote likelihood that a unit will be used for a child or another family member. III.

  5. Cord blood transplantation: can we make it better?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leland eMetheny

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Umbilical cord blood is an established source of hematopoietic stem cells for transplantation. It enjoys several advantages over bone marrow or peripheral blood, including increased tolerance for Human Leukocyte Antigen mismatches, decreased incidence of graft-versus-host disease, and easy availability. Unrelated cord blood does have limitations, however, especially in the treatment of adults. In the 24 years since the first umbilical cord blood transplant was performed, significant progress has been made, but delayed hematopoietic engraftment and increased treatment related mortality remain obstacles to widespread use. Here we summarize the latest results of unrelated cord blood transplants, and review strategies under investigation to improve clinical outcomes.

  6. Umbilical cord rupture: a case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidu, Madhusudhan; Nama, Vivek; Karoshi, Mahantesh; Kakumani, Vijayasri; Worth, Richard

    2007-01-01

    The umbilical cord acts as a mechanical conduit between the fetus and placenta, allowing movement of water and nutrient substances between the fetal circulation and the amniotic fluid. Complications can occur antenatally or intranatally and are usually acute events that require immediate delivery to prevent intrauterine death. Even though the majority of the cord complications are unpreventable, significant improvement in perinatal mortality and morbidity can be achieved if such an event can be predicted. Umbilical cord rupture is not uncommon, but significantly underreported. We present an unusual cause of umbilical cord rupture and a review of literature.

  7. Comparison of brain and spinal cord magnetic resonance imaging features in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders patients with or without aquaporin-4 antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Moli; Fu, Ying; Su, Lei; Shen, Yi; Wood, Kristofer; Yang, Li; Liu, Yaou; Shi, Fu-Dong

    2017-04-01

    The spinal cord and brain measurements are rarely investigated in neuromyelitis optica (NMO) patients with and without antibodies to aquaporin-4 (AQP4), directly compared to multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. To investigate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of both brain and spinal cord in NMO patients with and without antibodies to AQP4, compared with MS patients and healthy controls (HC). We recruited 55 NMO including 30 AQP4 (+) and 25 AQP4 (-), 25 MS and 25 HC. Brain and spinal cord MRIs were obtained for each participant. Brain lesions (BL), whole brain and deep grey matter volumes (DGMV), white matter diffusion metrics and spinal cord lesions were measured and compared among groups. The incidence of BL was lower in the AQP4 (+) group than in the AQP4 (-) and MS groups (p<0.05). In the AQP4 (+) group, there was a lower incidence of infratentorial lesions (ITL) and higher spinal cord lesions length than in the MS group (p<0.05). The thalamic and hippocampal volumes were smaller in the AQP4 (-) group and MS group than in the HC group (p<0.05). The NMO patients with AQP4 (-) showed higher prevalence of BL, ITL, and similar spinal cord lesion length, compared to AQP4 (+), and demonstrated deep grey matter atrophy, suggesting an intermediate phenotype between that of typical MS and NMO. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Neurofibromatosis type 1 and multiple sclerosis: Genetically related ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Neurofibromatosis type I (NF1) is an autosomal dominant disorder with involvement of both the cutaneous and nervous systems. Patients are susceptible to neurological complication in the form of tumors of the brain and spinal cord. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic autoimmune disease that affects the myelinated axons ...

  9. Spermatic Cord Knot: A Clinical Finding in Patients with Spermatic Cord Torsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullatif Al-Terki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pertinent history taking and careful examination often taper the differentials of the acute scrotum; congruently the ability to diagnose acute spermatic cord torsion (SCT when radiological adjuncts are not available is highly imperative. This observational study serves to present a series of 46 cases of spermatic cord torsion whereby we hypothesize the identification of a clinical knot on scrotal examination as an important clinical aid in making a decision to surgical exploration in patients with acute and subacute SCT, especially in centers where imaging resources are unavailable.

  10. Reliable and fast volumetry of the lumbar spinal cord using cord image analyser (Cordial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsagkas, Charidimos; Altermatt, Anna; Bonati, Ulrike; Pezold, Simon; Reinhard, Julia; Amann, Michael; Cattin, Philippe; Wuerfel, Jens; Fischer, Dirk; Parmar, Katrin; Fischmann, Arne

    2018-04-30

    To validate the precision and accuracy of the semi-automated cord image analyser (Cordial) for lumbar spinal cord (SC) volumetry in 3D T1w MRI data of healthy controls (HC). 40 3D T1w images of 10 HC (w/m: 6/4; age range: 18-41 years) were acquired at one 3T-scanner in two MRI sessions (time interval 14.9±6.1 days). Each subject was scanned twice per session, allowing determination of test-retest reliability both in back-to-back (intra-session) and scan-rescan images (inter-session). Cordial was applied for lumbar cord segmentation twice per image by two raters, allowing for assessment of intra- and inter-rater reliability, and compared to a manual gold standard. While manually segmented volumes were larger (mean: 2028±245 mm 3 vs. Cordial: 1636±300 mm 3 , p<0.001), accuracy assessments between manually and semi-automatically segmented images showed a mean Dice-coefficient of 0.88±0.05. Calculation of within-subject coefficients of variation (COV) demonstrated high intra-session (1.22-1.86%), inter-session (1.26-1.84%), as well as intra-rater (1.73-1.83%) reproducibility. No significant difference was shown between intra- and inter-session reproducibility or between intra-rater reliabilities. Although inter-rater reproducibility (COV: 2.87%) was slightly lower compared to all other reproducibility measures, between rater consistency was very strong (intraclass correlation coefficient: 0.974). While under-estimating the lumbar SCV, Cordial still provides excellent inter- and intra-session reproducibility showing high potential for application in longitudinal trials. • Lumbar spinal cord segmentation using the semi-automated cord image analyser (Cordial) is feasible. • Lumbar spinal cord is 40-mm cord segment 60 mm above conus medullaris. • Cordial provides excellent inter- and intra-session reproducibility in lumbar spinal cord region. • Cordial shows high potential for application in longitudinal trials.

  11. Multiple sclerosis in magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekiesinska-Figatowska, M.; Walecki, J.; Stelmasiak, Z.

    1994-01-01

    The authors analyzed MR examination of 277 patients with multiple sclerosis. White matter hyperintesities in brain were found in 270 of them, in spinal cord in 32. The most frequently they were found in periventricular white matter, in subcortical localization and in the corpus callosum. MR examination allows the estimate the activity of the disease on the basis of the presence of edema around the plaques and their contrast enhancement with Gd-DTPA. About one third of all cases were accompanied by cortical brain atrophy (the most often seen in the frontal lobes), subcortical brain atrophy was less frequent. In about two third of all cases the corpus callosum atrophy was found. MR examination is a highly sensitive method of multiple sclerosis diagnosis, of the assessment of its activity and progression. (author)

  12. Altered expression of IGF-I system in neurons of the inflamed spinal cord during acute experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvaneh Tafreshi, Azita; Talebi, Farideh; Ghorbani, Samira; Bernard, Claude; Noorbakhsh, Farshid

    2017-10-01

    There is growing evidence that the impaired IGF-I system contributes to neurodegeneration. In this study, we examined the spinal cords of the EAE, the animal model of multiple sclerosis, to see if the expression of the IGF-I system is altered. To induce EAE, C57/BL6 mice were immunized with the Hooke lab MOG kit, sacrificed at the peak of the disease and their spinal cords were examined for the immunoreactivities (ir) of the IGF-I, IGF binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1) and glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β), as one major downstream molecule in the IGF-I signaling. Although neurons in the non EAE spinal cords did not show the IGF-I immunoreactivity, they were numerously positive for the IGFBP-1. In the inflamed EAE spinal cord however, the patterns of expressions were reversed, that is, a significant increased number of IGF-I expressing neurons versus a reduced number of IGFBP-1 positive neurons. Moreover, while nearly all IGF-I-ir neurons expressed GSK3β, some expressed it more intensely. Considering our previous finding where we showed a significant reduced number of the inactive (phosphorylated) but not that of the total GSK3β expressing neurons in the EAE spinal cord, it is conceivable that the intense total GSK3β expression in the IGF-I-ir neurons belongs to the active form of GSK3β known to exert neuroinflammatory effects. We therefore suggest that the altered expression of the IGF-I system including GSK3β in spinal cord neurons might involve in pathophysiological events during the EAE. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... indwelling catheter Osteoporosis or thinning of the bones Pressure sores Side effects of medicines used to treat the ... Daily bowel care program Multiple sclerosis - discharge Preventing pressure ulcers Swallowing problems Images Multiple sclerosis MRI of the ...

  14. Optimal method for collection of umbilical cord blood: an Egyptian trial for a public cord blood bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassiouny, M R; El-Chennawi, F; Mansour, A K; Yahia, S; Darwish, A

    2015-06-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) contains stem cells and can be used as an alternative to bone marrow transplantation. Engraftment is dependent on the total nucleated cell (TNC) and CD34+ cell counts of the cord blood units. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of the method of collection of the UCB on the yield of the cord blood units. Informed consent was obtained from 100 eligible mothers for donation of cord blood. Both in utero and ex utero methods were used for collection. The cord blood volume was measured. The TNC and the CD34+ cell counts were enumerated. We have found that in utero collection gave significantly larger volumes of cord blood and higher TNC counts than ex utero collection. There was no significant difference between both methods regarding the CD34+ cell counts. This study revealed a significant correlation between the volume of the collected cord blood and both TNC and CD34+ cell counts. It is better to collect cord blood in utero before placental delivery to optimize the quality of the cord blood unit. © 2015 AABB.

  15. Tolerance of the human spinal cord to single dose radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, S.; Zhu, G.; Yin, F.-F.; Ajlouni, M.; Kim, J.H.

    2003-01-01

    Tolerance of the spinal cord to the single dose of radiation is not well defined. Although there are cases of human spinal cord tolerance from re-irradiation to the same cord level, the information about the tolerance of human spinal cord to single large dose of radiosurgery is not available. We carried out spinal radiosurgery to treat spinal metastasis and studied the single dose tolerance of the human spinal cord in an ongoing dose escalation paradigm. A total of 39 patients with 48 lesions of spinal metastasis were treated with single dose radiosurgery at Henry Ford Hospital. The radiosurgery dose was escalated from 8 Gy to 16 Gy at 2 Gy increment. The radiation dose was prescribed to periphery of the spinal tumor. The radiation dose to the spinal cord was estimated by computerized dosimetry. The median follow-up time was 10 months (range 6-18 months) from the radiosurgery. The endpoint of the study was to demonstrate the efficacy of the spinal radiosurgery and to determine the tolerance of human spinal cord to single dose radiosurgery. The dose to the spinal cord was generally less than 50 % of the prescribed radiation dose. The volume of the spinal cord that received higher than this dose was less than 20 % of the anterior portion of the spinal cord. Maximum single dose of 8 Gy was delivered to the anterior 20 % of the spinal cord in this dose escalation study. The dose volume histogram will be presented. There was no acute or subacute radiation toxicity detected clinically and radiologically during the maximum follow-up of 20 months. Further dose escalation is in progress. The single tolerance dose of the human spinal cord appears to be at least 8 Gy when it was given to the 20 % of the cord volume, although the duration of follow up is not long enough to detect severe late cord toxicity. This study offers a valuable radiobiological basis of the normal spinal cord tolerance, and opens spinal radiosurgery as a safe treatment for spinal metastasis

  16. Demyelination versus remyelination in progressive multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bramow, Stephan; Frischer, Josa M; Lassmann, Hans

    2010-01-01

    The causes of incomplete remyelination in progressive multiple sclerosis are unknown, as are the pathological correlates of the different clinical characteristics of patients with primary and secondary progressive disease. We analysed brains and spinal cords from 51 patients with progressive...... multiple sclerosis by planimetry. Thirteen patients with primary progressive disease were compared with 34 with secondary progressive disease. In patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis, we found larger brain plaques, more demyelination in total and higher brain loads of active demyelination...... compared with patients with primary progressive disease. In addition, the brain density of plaques with high-grade inflammation and active demyelination was highest in secondary progressive multiple sclerosis and remained ~18% higher than in primary progressive multiple sclerosis after adjustments...

  17. MRI of infections and neoplasms of the spine and spinal cord in 55 patients with AIDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurnher, M.M. [Neuroradiology Section, Department of Radiology, University Hospital Vienna (Austria); Post, M.J.D. [Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology Section, University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States); Jinkins, J.R. [Neuroimaging Research, Department of Radiology, Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States)

    2000-08-01

    Our purpose was to describe the range of MRI findings in infectious and neoplastic involvement of the spine and spinal cord in symptomatic patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). MRI studies in 55 patients with AIDS and neurological signs and symptoms thought to be related to the spine or spinal cord were reviewed. We categorized the findings according to the spinal compartment involved. There were 29 patients with extradural, 11 with intradural-extramedullary and 9 with intramedullary disease. In 6 patients more than one compartment was involved simultaneously, and patients presented with multiple lesions in the same compartment. The most common causes of extradural disease were bone lesions (28); an epidural mass was seen in 14 and spondylodiscitis in 4 patients. Cytomegalovirus polyradiculitis was the most common cause of intradural-extramedullary disease (in 10 cases); herpes radiculitis was seen in two, and tuberculous infection in another two. In three cases leptomeningeal contrast enhancement was due to lymphoma. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) myelitis was seen in two patients, presumed vacuolar myelopathy in two, toxoplasma myelitis in four, intramedullary lymphoma in one, and herpes myelitis in one. Familiarity with the various potential pathological entities that can affect the spine and spinal cord in the AIDS population and their imaging characteristics is crucial for initiation of further diagnostic tests and appropriate medical or surgical treatment. (orig.)

  18. MRI of infections and neoplasms of the spine and spinal cord in 55 patients with AIDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thurnher, M.M.; Post, M.J.D.; Jinkins, J.R.

    2000-01-01

    Our purpose was to describe the range of MRI findings in infectious and neoplastic involvement of the spine and spinal cord in symptomatic patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). MRI studies in 55 patients with AIDS and neurological signs and symptoms thought to be related to the spine or spinal cord were reviewed. We categorized the findings according to the spinal compartment involved. There were 29 patients with extradural, 11 with intradural-extramedullary and 9 with intramedullary disease. In 6 patients more than one compartment was involved simultaneously, and patients presented with multiple lesions in the same compartment. The most common causes of extradural disease were bone lesions (28); an epidural mass was seen in 14 and spondylodiscitis in 4 patients. Cytomegalovirus polyradiculitis was the most common cause of intradural-extramedullary disease (in 10 cases); herpes radiculitis was seen in two, and tuberculous infection in another two. In three cases leptomeningeal contrast enhancement was due to lymphoma. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) myelitis was seen in two patients, presumed vacuolar myelopathy in two, toxoplasma myelitis in four, intramedullary lymphoma in one, and herpes myelitis in one. Familiarity with the various potential pathological entities that can affect the spine and spinal cord in the AIDS population and their imaging characteristics is crucial for initiation of further diagnostic tests and appropriate medical or surgical treatment. (orig.)

  19. Factors associated with upper extremity contractures after cervical spinal cord injury: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardwick, Dustin; Bryden, Anne; Kubec, Gina; Kilgore, Kevin

    2018-05-01

    To examine the prevalence of joint contractures in the upper limb and association with voluntary strength, innervation status, functional status, and demographics in a convenience sample of individuals with cervical spinal cord injury to inform future prospective studies. Cross-sectional convenience sampled pilot study. Department of Veterans Affairs Research Laboratory. Thirty-eight participants with cervical level spinal cord injury. Not applicable. Contractures were measured with goniometric passive range of motion. Every joint in the upper extremity was evaluated bilaterally. Muscle strength was measured with manual muscle testing. Innervation status was determined clinically with surface electrical stimulation. Functional independence was measured with the Spinal Cord Independence Measure III (SCIM-III). Every participant tested had multiple joints with contractures and, on average, participants were unable to achieve the normative values of passive movement in 52% of the joints tested. Contractures were most common in the shoulder and hand. There was a weak negative relationship between percentage of contractures and time post-injury and a moderate positive relationship between percentage of contractures and age. There was a strong negative correlation between SCIM-III score and percentage of contractures. Joint contractures were noted in over half of the joints tested. These joint contractures were associated with decreased functional ability as measured by the SCIM-III. This highlights the need the need for detailed evaluation of the arm and hand early after injury as well as continued monitoring of joint characteristics throughout the life course of the individual with tetraplegia.

  20. The PPAR alpha agonist gemfibrozil is an ineffective treatment for spinal cord injured mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almad, Akshata; Lash, A Todd; Wei, Ping; Lovett-Racke, Amy E; McTigue, Dana M

    2011-12-01

    Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor (PPAR)-α is a key regulator of lipid metabolism and recent studies reveal it also regulates inflammation in several different disease models. Gemfibrozil, an agonist of PPAR-α, is a FDA approved drug for hyperlipidemia and has been shown to inhibit clinical signs in a rodent model of multiple sclerosis. Since many studies have shown improved outcome from spinal cord injury (SCI) by anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective agents, we tested the efficacy of oral gemfibrozil given before or after SCI for promoting tissue preservation and behavioral recovery after spinal contusion injury in mice. Unfortunately, the results were contrary to our hypothesis; in our first attempt, gemfibrozil treatment exacerbated locomotor deficits and increased tissue pathology after SCI. In subsequent experiments, the behavioral effects were not replicated but histological outcomes again were worse. We also tested the efficacy of a different PPAR-α agonist, fenofibrate, which also modulates immune responses and is beneficial in several neurodegenerative disease models. Fenofibrate treatment did not improve recovery, although there was a slight trend for a modest increase in histological tissue sparing. Based on our results, we conclude that PPAR-α agonists yield either no effect or worsen recovery from spinal cord injury, at least at the doses and the time points of drug delivery tested here. Further, patients sustaining spinal cord injury while taking gemfibrozil might be prone to exacerbated tissue damage. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.