WorldWideScience

Sample records for cord nociceptive transmission

  1. Roles of substance P and somatostatin on transmission of nociceptive information induced by formalin in spinal cord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohkubo, T.; Shibata, M.; Takahashi, H.; Inoki, R. (Fukuoka Dental College (Japan))

    1990-03-01

    Nociceptive response induced by 0.5% Formalin in the hindpaw of mice had two peaks, 0-5 min (first phase) and 15-20 min (second phase). By using the distinct biphasic response, the nature of the transmitter systems activated by Formalin in the spinal cord was studied for the purpose of determining the difference of the role of substance P (SP) and somatostatin (SST). The injection of (D-Pro2, D-Trp7,9)SP, (D-Arg1, D-Pro2, D-Trp7,9, Leu11)SP and SP antiserum inhibited only the first phase response. The i.t. injection of -Aminoheptanoyl-Phe-D-Trp-Lys-(OBz)-Thr- (an SST antagonist), SST antiserum and cysteamine (an SST depletor) inhibited only the second phase. This result indicates that SP is involved in the transmission of the first phase, and SST is involved in the transmission of the second phase of the Formalin-induced nociceptive response. With regard to other nociceptive stimuli, two i.t. SP antagonists produced a significant analgesia in the hot plate and tail pinch tests but had no effect in the acetic acid writhing test. However, i.t. SST antagonist and cysteamine produced a significant analgesia in the writhing test but had no effect in the hot plate and tail pinch test. These results suggest that SP participates in the transient pain induced by such acute stimuli as hot plate, tail pinch and the first phase of Formalin response and that SST participates in the prolonged and inflammatory pain induced by stimuli such as acetic acid and the second phase response.

  2. Direct Effect of Remifentanil and Glycine Contained in Ultiva® on Nociceptive Transmission in the Spinal Cord: In Vivo and Slice Patch Clamp Analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Sumie

    Full Text Available Ultiva® is commonly administered intravenously for analgesia during general anaesthesia and its main constituent remifentanil is an ultra-short-acting μ-opioid receptor agonist. Ultiva® is not approved for epidural or intrathecal use in clinical practice. Previous studies have reported that Ultiva® provokes opioid-induced hyperalgesia by interacting with spinal dorsal horn neurons. Ultiva® contains glycine, an inhibitory neurotransmitter but also an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor co-activator. The presence of glycine in the formulation of Ultiva® potentially complicates its effects. We examined how Ultiva® directly affects nociceptive transmission in the spinal cord.We made patch-clamp recordings from substantia gelatinosa (SG neurons in the adult rat spinal dorsal horn in vivo and in spinal cord slices. We perfused Ultiva® onto the SG neurons and analysed its effects on the membrane potentials and synaptic responses activated by noxious mechanical stimuli.Bath application of Ultiva® hyperpolarized membrane potentials under current-clamp conditions and produced an outward current under voltage-clamp conditions. A barrage of excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs evoked by the stimuli was suppressed by Ultiva®. Miniature EPSCs (mEPSCs were depressed in frequency but not amplitude. Ultiva®-induced outward currents and suppression of mEPSCs were not inhibited by the μ-opioid receptor antagonist naloxone, but were inhibited by the glycine receptor antagonist strychnine. The Ultiva®-induced currents demonstrated a specific equilibrium potential similar to glycine.We found that intrathecal administration of Ultiva® to SG neurons hyperpolarized membrane potentials and depressed presynaptic glutamate release predominantly through the activation of glycine receptors. No Ultiva®-induced excitatory effects were observed in SG neurons. Our results suggest different analgesic mechanisms of Ultiva® between intrathecal and intravenous

  3. Direct Effect of Remifentanil and Glycine Contained in Ultiva® on Nociceptive Transmission in the Spinal Cord: In Vivo and Slice Patch Clamp Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumie, Makoto; Shiokawa, Hiroaki; Yamaura, Ken; Karashima, Yuji; Hoka, Sumio; Yoshimura, Megumu

    2016-01-01

    Background Ultiva® is commonly administered intravenously for analgesia during general anaesthesia and its main constituent remifentanil is an ultra-short-acting μ-opioid receptor agonist. Ultiva® is not approved for epidural or intrathecal use in clinical practice. Previous studies have reported that Ultiva® provokes opioid-induced hyperalgesia by interacting with spinal dorsal horn neurons. Ultiva® contains glycine, an inhibitory neurotransmitter but also an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor co-activator. The presence of glycine in the formulation of Ultiva® potentially complicates its effects. We examined how Ultiva® directly affects nociceptive transmission in the spinal cord. Methods We made patch-clamp recordings from substantia gelatinosa (SG) neurons in the adult rat spinal dorsal horn in vivo and in spinal cord slices. We perfused Ultiva® onto the SG neurons and analysed its effects on the membrane potentials and synaptic responses activated by noxious mechanical stimuli. Results Bath application of Ultiva® hyperpolarized membrane potentials under current-clamp conditions and produced an outward current under voltage-clamp conditions. A barrage of excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) evoked by the stimuli was suppressed by Ultiva®. Miniature EPSCs (mEPSCs) were depressed in frequency but not amplitude. Ultiva®-induced outward currents and suppression of mEPSCs were not inhibited by the μ-opioid receptor antagonist naloxone, but were inhibited by the glycine receptor antagonist strychnine. The Ultiva®-induced currents demonstrated a specific equilibrium potential similar to glycine. Conclusions We found that intrathecal administration of Ultiva® to SG neurons hyperpolarized membrane potentials and depressed presynaptic glutamate release predominantly through the activation of glycine receptors. No Ultiva®-induced excitatory effects were observed in SG neurons. Our results suggest different analgesic mechanisms of Ultiva® between intrathecal

  4. Phorbol Ester Modulation of Ca2+ Channels Mediates Nociceptive Transmission in Dorsal Horn Neurones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary J. Stephens

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Phorbol esters are analogues of diacylglycerol which activate C1 domain proteins, such as protein kinase C (PKC. Phorbol ester/PKC pathways have been proposed as potential therapeutic targets for chronic pain states, potentially by phosphorylating proteins involved in nociception, such as voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels (VDCCs. In this brief report, we investigate the potential involvement of CaV2 VDCC subtypes in functional effects of the phorbol ester, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA on nociceptive transmission in the spinal cord. Effects of PMA and of selective pharmacological blockers of CaV2 VDCC subtypes on nociceptive transmission at laminae II dorsal horn neurones were examined in mouse spinal cord slices. Experiments were extended to CaV2.3(−/− mice to complement pharmacological studies. PMA increased the mean frequency of spontaneous postsynaptic currents (sPSCs in dorsal horn neurones, without an effect on event amplitude or half-width. sPSC frequency was reduced by selective VDCC blockers, w-agatoxin-IVA (AgTX; CaV2.1, w-conotoxin-GVIA (CTX; CaV2.2 or SNX-482 (CaV2.3. PMA effects were attenuated in the presence of each VDCC blocker and, also, in CaV2.3(−/− mice. These initial data demonstrate that PMA increases nociceptive transmission at dorsal horn neurones via actions on different CaV2 subtypes suggesting potential anti-nociceptive targets in this system.

  5. Central nociceptive sensitization vs. spinal cord training: opposing forms of plasticity that dictate function after complete spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Adam R.; Huie, J. Russell; Crown, Eric D.; Grau, James W.

    2012-01-01

    The spinal cord demonstrates several forms of plasticity that resemble brain-dependent learning and memory. Among the most studied form of spinal plasticity is spinal memory for noxious (nociceptive) stimulation. Numerous papers have described central pain as a spinally-stored memory that enhances future responses to cutaneous stimulation. This phenomenon, known as central sensitization, has broad relevance to a range of pathological conditions. Work from the spinal cord injury (SCI) field indicates that the lumbar spinal cord demonstrates several other forms of plasticity, including formal learning and memory. After complete thoracic SCI, the lumbar spinal cord can be trained by delivering stimulation to the hindleg when the leg is extended. In the presence of this response-contingent stimulation the spinal cord rapidly learns to hold the leg in a flexed position, a centrally mediated effect that meets the formal criteria for instrumental (response-outcome) learning. Instrumental flexion training produces a central change in spinal plasticity that enables future spinal learning on both the ipsilateral and contralateral leg. However, if stimulation is given in a response-independent manner, the spinal cord develops central maladaptive plasticity that undermines future spinal learning on both legs. The present paper tests for interactions between spinal cord training and central nociceptive sensitization after complete spinal cord transection. We found that spinal training alters future central sensitization by intradermal formalin (24 h post-training). Conversely intradermal formalin impaired future spinal learning (24 h post-injection). Because formalin-induced central sensitization has been shown to involve NMDA receptor activation, we tested whether pre-treatment with NMDA would also affect spinal learning in manner similar to formalin. We found intrathecal NMDA impaired learning in a dose-dependent fashion, and that this effect endures for at least 24 h. These

  6. [Physiology of nociception].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guirimand, F; Le Bars, D

    1996-01-01

    Nociception is related to the mechanisms elicited by stimuli threatening the integrity of the organism. At the peripheral level, unmyelinated C fibres (C polymodal nociceptores) or fine myelinated A delta fibres are excited by noxious stimulation, directly or indirectly by inflammatory processes. Nociceptive afferent fibres terminate in the superficial laminae of the dorsal horn of the spinal cord where informations are integrated and controlled. These first synapses are modulated by excitatory amino acids (glutamate and aspartate) and many peptides (substance P, CGRP, CCK, endogenous opiods). The majority of ascending pathways involved in nociception are located in the ventrolateral controlateral quadrant of the cord (spinorelicular and spinothalamic tracts). Many supraspinal sites are activated following nociceptive stimuli, with relays in the reticular formation of the brain stem (including the subnucleus reticularis dorsalis), the ponto-mesencephalic regions (periaqueducal gray matter and parabrachial area) and thalamic sites. Amygdala and hypothamic targets could be involved in motivational reactions and neuroendocrine adaptations to a noxious event. The cingular, insular and somatosensory cortices also receive nociceptive informations. Nociceptive signals are modulated at all levels of their transmission; the more extensively studied controls are located at the spinal level. Segmental controls are inhibitory effects produced by non-noxious mechanical stimuli. Spinal signals can also be inhibited following activation of bulbopinal descending inhibitor pathways and release of serotonin, norepinephrine and, indirectly, endogenous opiods. Inhibitory controls triggered by noxious stimuli could facilitate the extraction of the nociceptive tone of informations having priority over other stimuli.

  7. Presynaptic modulation of spinal nociceptive transmission by glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salio, Chiara; Ferrini, Francesco; Muthuraju, Sangu; Merighi, Adalberto

    2014-10-01

    The role of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) in nociceptive pathways is still controversial, as both pronociceptive and antinociceptive actions have been reported. To elucidate this role in the mouse, we performed combined structural and functional studies in vivo and in acute spinal cord slices where C-fiber activation was mimicked by capsaicin challenge. Nociceptors and their terminals in superficial dorsal horn (SDH; laminae I-II) constitute two separate subpopulations: the peptidergic CGRP/somatostatin+ cells expressing GDNF and the nonpeptidergic IB4+ neurons expressing the GFRα1-RET GDNF receptor complex. Ultrastructurally the dorsal part of inner lamina II (LIIid) harbors a mix of glomeruli that either display GDNF/somatostatin (GIb)-IR or GFRα1/IB4 labeling (GIa). LIIid thus represents the preferential site for ligand-receptor interactions. Functionally, endogenous GDNF released from peptidergic CGRP/somatostatin+ nociceptors upon capsaicin stimulation exert a tonic inhibitory control on the glutamate excitatory drive of SDH neurons as measured after ERK1/2 phosphorylation assay. Real-time Ca(2+) imaging and patch-clamp experiments with bath-applied GDNF (100 nM) confirm the presynaptic inhibition of SDH neurons after stimulation of capsaicin-sensitive, nociceptive primary afferent fibers. Accordingly, the reduction of the capsaicin-evoked [Ca(2+)]i rise and of the frequency of mEPSCs in SDH neurons is specifically abolished after enzymatic ablation of GFRα1. Therefore, GDNF released from peptidergic CGRP/somatostatin+ nociceptors acutely depresses neuronal transmission in SDH signaling to nonpeptidergic IB4+ nociceptors at glomeruli in LIIid. These observations are of potential pharmacological interest as they highlight a novel modality of cross talk between nociceptors that may be relevant for discrimination of pain modalities.

  8. THE ROLE OF RED NUCLEUS IN THE MODULATION OF SPINAL NOCICEPTIVE TRANSMISSION AND IN NOCICEPTION ELICITED BY MUSCLE SPINDLE AFFERENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐斌; 樊小力; 吴苏娣

    2003-01-01

    Objective To analyse the antinociceptive effect of red nucleus (RN) and its role in the antinociceptive effect of muscle spindle afferents. Methods The single units of RN or wide dynamic range (WDR) neuron in the spinal cord dorsal horn were extracelluarly recorded. The effects of RN stimulation on nociceptive responses (C-fibers-evoked responses, C-responses) of WDR neurons were observed. The influence of muscle spindle afferents elicited by intravenous administration of succinylcholine (Sch) on the spontaneous discharge of RN neurons and on C-responses of WDR neurons were observed. The effect of muscle spindle afferents on C-responses of WDR neurons after unilateral lesions of RN was also observed. Results Electrical stimulation of the RN produced a significantly inhibitory effect on the nociceptive responses of WDR neurons. RN neurons were excited by muscle spindle afferents. Muscle spindle afferents significantly inhibited C-response of WDR neurons and this inhibitory effect was reduced by lesions of RN. Conclusion RN neurons have a significant antinociceptive effect and might be involved in the antinociceptive effects elicited by muscle spindle afferents.

  9. Identification of multisegmental nociceptive afferents that modulate locomotor circuits in the neonatal mouse spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandadi, Sravan; Hong, Peter; Tran, Michelle A; Bráz, Joao M; Colarusso, Pina; Basbaum, Allan I; Whelan, Patrick J

    2013-08-15

    Compared to proprioceptive afferent collateral projections, less is known about the anatomical, neurochemical, and functional basis of nociceptive collateral projections modulating lumbar central pattern generators (CPG). Quick response times are critical to ensure rapid escape from aversive stimuli. Furthermore, sensitization of nociceptive afferent pathways can contribute to a pathological activation of motor circuits. We investigated the extent and role of collaterals of capsaicin-sensitive nociceptive sacrocaudal afferent (nSCA) nerves that directly ascend several spinal segments in Lissauer's tract and the dorsal column and regulate motor activity. Anterograde tracing demonstrated direct multisegmental projections of the sacral dorsal root 4 (S4) afferent collaterals in Lissauer's tract and in the dorsal column. Subsets of the traced S4 afferent collaterals expressed transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), which transduces a nociceptive response to capsaicin. Electrophysiological data revealed that S4 dorsal root stimulation could evoke regular rhythmic bursting activity, and our data suggested that capsaicin-sensitive collaterals contribute to CPG activation across multiple segments. Capsaicin's effect on S4-evoked locomotor activity was potent until the lumbar 5 (L5) segments, and diminished in rostral segments. Using calcium imaging we found elevated calcium transients within Lissauer's tract and dorsal column at L5 segments when compared to the calcium transients only within the dorsal column at the lumbar 2 (L2) segments, which were desensitized by capsaicin. We conclude that lumbar locomotor networks in the neonatal mouse spinal cord are targets for modulation by direct multisegmental nSCA, subsets of which express TRPV1 in Lissauer's tract and the dorsal column. J. Comp. Neurol. 521:2870-2887, 2013. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Identification and quantification of neuropeptides in naïve mouse spinal cord using mass spectrometry reveals [des-Ser1]-cerebellin as a novel modulator of nociception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jie; Sandor, Katalin; Sköld, Karl; Hökfelt, Tomas; Svensson, Camilla I; Kultima, Kim

    2014-07-01

    Neuropeptide transmitters involved in nociceptive processes are more likely to be expressed in the dorsal than the ventral horn of the spinal cord. This study was designed to examine the relative distribution of neuropeptides between the dorsal and ventral spinal cord in naïve mice using liquid chromatography, high-resolution mass spectrometry. We identified and relatively quantified 36 well-characterized full-length neuropeptides and an additional 168 not previously characterized peptides. By extraction with organic solvents we identified seven additional full-length neuropeptides. The peptide [des-Ser1]-cerebellin (desCER), originating from cerebellin precursor protein 1 (CBLN1), was predominantly expressed in the dorsal horn. Immunohistochemistry showed the presence of CBLN1 immunoreactivity with a punctate cytoplasmic pattern in neuronal cell bodies throughout the spinal gray matter. The signal was stronger in the dorsal compared to the ventral horn, with most CBLN1 positive cells present in outer laminae II/III, colocalizing with calbindin, a marker for excitatory interneurons. Intrathecal injection of desCER induced a dose-dependent mechanical hypersensitivity but not heat or cold hypersensitivity. This study provides evidence for involvement of desCER in nociception and provides a platform for continued exploration of involvement of novel neuropeptides in the regulation of nociceptive transmission. Neuropeptides involved in nociceptive processes are more likely to be expressed in the dorsal than the ventral horn of spinal cord. Well-characterized full-length neuropeptides as well as uncharacterized neuropeptides were quantified by mass spectrometry. The CBLN1-derived peptide [des-Ser1]-cerebellin (desCER) is predominantly expressed in the dorsal horn, and intrathecal injection of desCER induced a dose-dependent mechanical hypersensitivity.

  11. Neurogenic nitric oxide facilitates the central nociceptive transmission of migraine attacks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hebo Wang; Huijun Qi; Shengyuan Yu; Sumian Yang; Ruozhuo Liu

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that nitric oxide (NO) can induce migraine attacks at three possible sites of action: nitroxidergic nerves, the vascular endothelium, and the central nervous system. Most previous studies have focused on the former two sites of action. Several experiments using exogenic NO donors have suggested that nitroglycerin may induce migraine via central mechanisms. However, few studies have investigated the source of the NO involved in the central mechanisms of migraine. The present study used a cat model of migraine to represent migraine attacks in humans. We performed immunochemical staining of successive frozen sections of the brainstem and upper cervical spinal cord, and then used c-Fos protein expression to label nerve cell activation. We observed the effects of Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), a non-selective nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor, and 7-nitroindozole (7-NI), a selective neuronal NOS inhibitor, on c-Fos and nNOS expression, which were induced by electrical stimulation to the dura mater near the superior sagittal sinus. The results demonstrated that c-Fos or nNOS immunoreactive cells was concentrated in the superficial layers (laminae I and II) of the spinal nucleus of trigeminal nerve. L-NAME and 7-NI pre-treatment significantly decreased c-Fos and neurogenic NOS expression; and there was a significant linear correlation between c-Fos and NOS expression (r= 0.858 2, P< 0.01). These findings suggest that neurogenic NO could facilitate migraine nociceptive transmission to second-order neurons of the trigeminal nerve. However, L-NAME and 7-NI may block the activation of neurons in the spinal nucleus of the trigeminal nerve by inhibiting NO synthesis, and thereby attenuate acute migraine attacks.

  12. VGLUT2-dependent glutamatergic transmission in primary afferents is required for intact nociception in both acute and persistent pain modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogoz, Katarzyna; Lagerström, Malin C; Dufour, Sylvie; Kullander, Klas

    2012-07-01

    Glutamate is an essential transmitter in pain pathways. However, its broad usage in the central and peripheral nervous system prevents us from designing efficient glutamate-based pain therapies without causing harmful side effects. The discovery of vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUT1-3) has been a crucial step in describing specific glutamatergic neuronal subpopulations and glutamate-dependent pain pathways. To assess the role of VGLUT2-mediated glutamatergic contribution to pain transmission from the entire primary sensory population, we crossed our Vglut2(f/f) line with the Ht-Pa-Cre line. Such Vglut2-deficient mice showed significantly decreased, but not completely absent, acute nociceptive responses. The animals were less prone to develop an inflammatory-related state of pain and were, in the partial sciatic nerve ligation chronic pain model, much less hypersensitive to mechanical stimuli and did not develop cold allodynia or heat hyperalgesia. To take advantage of this neuropathic pain-resistant model, we analyzed Vglut2-dependent transcriptional changes in the dorsal spinal cord after nerve injury, which revealed several novel candidate target genes potentially relevant for the development of neuropathic pain therapeutics. Taken together, we conclude that VGLUT2 is a major mediator of nociception in primary afferents, implying that glutamate is the key somatosensory neurotransmitter.

  13. Central and peripheral actions of the NSAID ketoprofen on spinal cord nociceptive reflexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero, J F; Parrado, A; Cervero, F

    1997-10-01

    Ketoprofen is a non-steroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID) which provides effective analgesia in situations of pain provoked by tissue inflammation. However, the location of its analgesic effects, (peripheral tissues versus central nervous system), have not been clearly identified and separated. In the present study the effectiveness of ketoprofen was examined in two different types of experiments: (i) Open field behavioural tests in conscious rats, and (ii) spinal cord nociceptive reflexes (single motor units) activated by electrical and thermal stimulation in chloralose anaesthetised rats. The experiments were performed in rats with carrageenan-induced inflammation of one hindpaw, or of one knee joint. The administration of ketoprofen significantly inhibited the reduction of exploratory movements caused by inflammation in open field experiments. Ketoprofen was also effective in depressing reflex activity evoked by electrical and noxious thermal stimulation of the skin, either in inflamed tissue or in normal tissue of monoarthritic animals. It was also effective in the reduction of reflex wind-up; a phenomenon in which the activity of spinal cord neurones increases progressively with high frequency electrical stimulation. We therefore conclude that ketoprofen has central as well as peripheral analgesic activity.

  14. Motor cortex-periaqueductal gray-spinal cord neuronal circuitry may involve in modulation of nociception: a virally mediated transsynaptic tracing study in spinally transected transgenic mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da-Wei Ye

    Full Text Available Several studies have shown that motor cortex stimulation provided pain relief by motor cortex plasticity and activating descending inhibitory pain control systems. Recent evidence indicated that the melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R in the periaqueductal gray played an important role in neuropathic pain. This study was designed to assess whether MC4R signaling existed in motor cortex-periaqueductal gray-spinal cord neuronal circuitry modulated the activity of sympathetic pathway by a virally mediated transsynaptic tracing study. Pseudorabies virus (PRV-614 was injected into the left gastrocnemius muscle in adult male MC4R-green fluorescent protein (GFP transgenic mice (n = 15. After a survival time of 4-6 days, the mice (n = 5 were randomly assigned to humanely sacrifice, and spinal cords and brains were removed and sectioned, and processed for PRV-614 visualization. Neurons involved in the efferent control of the left gastrocnemius muscle were identified following visualization of PRV-614 retrograde tracing. The neurochemical phenotype of MC4R-GFP-positive neurons was identified using fluorescence immunocytochemical labeling. PRV-614/MC4R-GFP dual labeled neurons were detected in spinal IML, periaqueductal gray and motor cortex. Our findings support the hypothesis that MC4R signaling in motor cortex-periaqueductal gray-spinal cord neural pathway may participate in the modulation of the melanocortin-sympathetic signaling and contribute to the descending modulation of nociceptive transmission, suggesting that MC4R signaling in motor cortex-periaqueductal gray-spinal cord neural pathway may modulate the activity of sympathetic outflow sensitive to nociceptive signals.

  15. Potentiation of excitatory transmission in substantia gelatinosa neurons of rat spinal cord by inhibition of estrogen receptor alpha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Kai-Cheng

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been shown that estrogen is synthesized in the spinal dorsal horn and plays a role in modulating pain transmission. One of the estrogen receptor (ER subtypes, estrogen receptor alpha (ERα, is expressed in the spinal laminae I-V, including substantia gelatinosa (SG, lamina II. However, it is unclear how ERs are involved in the modulation of nociceptive transmission. Results In the present study, a selective ERα antagonist, methyl-piperidino-pyrazole (MPP, was used to test the potential functional roles of spinal ERα in the nociceptive transmission. Using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique, we examined the effects of MPP on SG neurons in the dorsal root-attached spinal cord slice prepared from adult rats. We found that MPP increased glutamatergic excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs evoked by the stimulation of either Aδ- or C-afferent fibers. Further studies showed that MPP treatment dose-dependently increased spontaneous EPSCs frequency in SG neurons, while not affecting the amplitude. In addition, the PKC was involved in the MPP-induced enhancement of synaptic transmission. Conclusions These results suggest that the selective ERα antagonist MPP pre-synaptically facilitates the excitatory synaptic transmission to SG neurons. The nociceptive transmission evoked by Aδ- and C-fiber stimulation could be potentiated by blocking ERα in the spinal neurons. Thus, the spinal estrogen may negatively regulate the nociceptive transmission through the activation of ERα.

  16. Inflammatory Pain Reduces C Fiber Activity-Dependent Slowing in a Sex-Dependent Manner, Amplifying Nociceptive Input to the Spinal Cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Barry; Lukito, Veny; Wilson, Kirsten L.

    2017-01-01

    potentials at progressively slower speeds, but the impact of this activity-dependent slowing (ADS) is unknown. Here we demonstrate that ADS is more prevalent in females than males and is reduced in an inflammatory pain model in females only. We also demonstrate a progressive delay of C fiber monosynaptic transmission to the spinal cord that is similarly sex and inflammation dependent. Experimentally manipulating ADS strongly influences spinal summation consistent with sex differences in behavioral pain thresholds. This suggests that ADS provides a peripheral mechanism that can regulate spinal nociceptive processing and pain sensation. PMID:28576935

  17. Anticipation of pain enhances the nociceptive transmission and functional connectivity within pain network in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baccalá Luiz A

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Expectation is a very potent pain modulator in both humans and animals. There is evidence that pain transmission neurons are modulated by expectation preceding painful stimuli. Nonetheless, few studies have examined the influence of pain expectation on the pain-related neuronal activity and the functional connectivity within the central nociceptive network. Results This study used a tone-laser conditioning paradigm to establish the pain expectation in rats, and simultaneously recorded the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC, the medial dorsal thalamus (MD, and the primary somatosensory cortex (SI to investigate the effect of pain expectation on laser-induced neuronal responses. Cross-correlation and partial directed coherence analysis were used to determine the functional interactions within and between the recorded areas during nociceptive transmission. The results showed that under anticipation condition, the neuronal activity to the auditory cue was significantly increased in the ACC area, whereas those to actual noxious stimuli were enhanced in all the recorded areas. Furthermore, neuronal correlations within and between these areas were significantly increased under conditions of expectation compared to those under non-expectation conditions, indicating an enhanced synchronization of neural activity within the pain network. In addition, information flow from the medial (ACC and MD to the lateral (SI cortex pain pathway increased, suggesting that the emotion-related neural circuits may modulate the neuronal activity in the somatosensory pathway during nociceptive transmission. Conclusion These results demonstrate that the nociceptive processing in both medial and lateral pain systems is modulated by the expectation of pain.

  18. Mechanisms of nociceptive transduction and transmission: a machinery for pain sensation and tools for selective analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binshtok, Alexander M

    2011-01-01

    Many surgical and dental procedures depend on use of local anesthetics to reversibly eliminate pain. By the blockade of voltage-gated sodium channels, local anesthetics prevent the transmission of nociceptive information. However, since all local anesthetics act non-selectively on all types of axons they also cause a loss of innocuous sensation, motor paralysis and autonomic block. Thus, approaches that produce only a selective blockade of pain fibers are of great potential clinical importance. In this chapter we will review the recent findings describing mechanisms of pain transduction and transmission and introduce novel therapeutic approaches to produce pain-selective analgesia.

  19. THE PARABRACHIAL NUCLEUS IS A CRITICAL LINK IN THE TRANSMISSION OF SHORT LATENCY NOCICEPTIVE INFORMATION TO MIDBRAIN DOPAMINERGIC NEURONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coizet, V.; Dommett, E. J.; Klop, E. M.; Redgrave, P.; Overton, P. G.

    2010-01-01

    Many dopaminergic neurons exhibit a short-latency response to noxious stimuli, the source of which is unknown. Here we report that the nociceptive-recipient parabrachial nucleus appears to be a critical link in the transmission of pain related information to dopaminergic neurons. Injections of retro

  20. THE PARABRACHIAL NUCLEUS IS A CRITICAL LINK IN THE TRANSMISSION OF SHORT LATENCY NOCICEPTIVE INFORMATION TO MIDBRAIN DOPAMINERGIC NEURONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coizet, V.; Dommett, E. J.; Klop, E. M.; Redgrave, P.; Overton, P. G.

    2010-01-01

    Many dopaminergic neurons exhibit a short-latency response to noxious stimuli, the source of which is unknown. Here we report that the nociceptive-recipient parabrachial nucleus appears to be a critical link in the transmission of pain related information to dopaminergic neurons. Injections of

  1. Sensitization of spinal cord nociceptive neurons with a conjugate of substance P and cholera toxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perez Federico M

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several investigators have coupled toxins to neuropeptides for the purpose of lesioning specific neurons in the central nervous system. By producing deficits in function these toxin conjugates have yielded valuable information about the role of these cells. In an effort to specifically stimulate cells rather than kill them we have conjugated the neuropeptide substance P to the catalytic subunit of cholera toxin (SP-CTA. This conjugate should be taken up selectively by neurokinin receptor expressing neurons resulting in enhanced adenylate cyclase activity and neuronal firing. Results The conjugate SP-CTA stimulates adenylate cyclase in cultured cells that are transfected with either the NK1 or NK2 receptor, but not the NK3 receptor. We further demonstrate that intrathecal injection of SP-CTA in rats induces the phosphorylation of the transcription factor cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB and also enhances the expression of the immediate early gene c-Fos. Behaviorally, low doses of SP-CTA (1 μg injected intrathecally produce thermal hyperalgesia. At higher doses (10 μg peripheral sensitivity is suppressed suggesting that descending inhibitory pathways may be activated by the SP-CTA induced sensitization of spinal cord neurons. Conclusion The finding that stimulation of adenylate cyclase in neurokinin receptor expressing neurons in the spinal cord produces thermal hyperalgesia is consistent with the known actions of these neurons. These data demonstrate that cholera toxin can be targeted to specific cell types by coupling the catalytic subunit to a peptide agonist for a g-protein coupled receptor. Furthermore, these results demonstrate that SP-CTA can be used as a tool to study sensitization of central neurons in vivo in the absence of an injury.

  2. Purines released from astrocytes inhibit excitatory synaptic transmission in the ventral horn of the spinal cord

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Eva Maria Meier; Perrier, Jean-Francois Marie

    2014-01-01

    by releasing gliotransmitters, which in turn modulate synaptic transmission. Here we investigated if astrocytes present in the ventral horn of the spinal cord modulate synaptic transmission. We evoked synaptic inputs in ventral horn neurons recorded in a slice preparation from the spinal cord of neonatal mice...

  3. Nociceptive transmission and modulation via P2X receptors in central pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuan, Yung-Hui; Shyu, Bai-Chuang

    2016-05-26

    Painful sensations are some of the most frequent complaints of patients who are admitted to local medical clinics. Persistent pain varies according to its causes, often resulting from local tissue damage or inflammation. Central somatosensory pathway lesions that are not adequately relieved can consequently cause central pain syndrome or central neuropathic pain. Research on the molecular mechanisms that underlie this pathogenesis is important for treating such pain. To date, evidence suggests the involvement of ion channels, including adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-gated cation channel P2X receptors, in central nervous system pain transmission and persistent modulation upon and following the occurrence of neuropathic pain. Several P2X receptor subtypes, including P2X2, P2X3, P2X4, and P2X7, have been shown to play diverse roles in the pathogenesis of central pain including the mediation of fast transmission in the peripheral nervous system and modulation of neuronal activity in the central nervous system. This review article highlights the role of the P2X family of ATP receptors in the pathogenesis of central neuropathic pain and pain transmission. We discuss basic research that may be translated to clinical application, suggesting that P2X receptors may be treatment targets for central pain syndrome.

  4. A machine learning methodology for the selection and classification of spontaneous spinal cord dorsum potentials allows disclosure of structured (non-random) changes in neuronal connectivity induced by nociceptive stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Mario; Contreras-Hernández, Enrique; Béjar, Javier; Esposito, Gennaro; Chávez, Diógenes; Glusman, Silvio; Cortés, Ulises; Rudomin, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies aimed to disclose the functional organization of the neuronal networks involved in the generation of the spontaneous cord dorsum potentials (CDPs) generated in the lumbosacral spinal segments used predetermined templates to select specific classes of spontaneous CDPs. Since this procedure was time consuming and required continuous supervision, it was limited to the analysis of two specific types of CDPs (negative CDPs and negative positive CDPs), thus excluding potentials that may reflect activation of other neuronal networks of presumed functional relevance. We now present a novel procedure based in machine learning that allows the efficient and unbiased selection of a variety of spontaneous CDPs with different shapes and amplitudes. The reliability and performance of the present method is evaluated by analyzing the effects on the probabilities of generation of different classes of spontaneous CDPs induced by the intradermic injection of small amounts of capsaicin in the anesthetized cat, a procedure known to induce a state of central sensitization leading to allodynia and hyperalgesia. The results obtained with the selection method presently described allowed detection of spontaneous CDPs with specific shapes and amplitudes that are assumed to represent the activation of functionally coupled sets of dorsal horn neurones that acquire different, structured configurations in response to nociceptive stimuli. These changes are considered as responses tending to adequate transmission of sensory information to specific functional requirements as part of homeostatic adjustments.

  5. A machine learning methodology for the selection and classification of spontaneous spinal cord dorsum potentials allows disclosure of structured (non-random) changes in neuronal connectivity induced by nociceptive stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Mario; Contreras-Hernández, Enrique; Béjar, Javier; Esposito, Gennaro; Chávez, Diógenes; Glusman, Silvio; Cortés, Ulises; Rudomin, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies aimed to disclose the functional organization of the neuronal networks involved in the generation of the spontaneous cord dorsum potentials (CDPs) generated in the lumbosacral spinal segments used predetermined templates to select specific classes of spontaneous CDPs. Since this procedure was time consuming and required continuous supervision, it was limited to the analysis of two specific types of CDPs (negative CDPs and negative positive CDPs), thus excluding potentials that may reflect activation of other neuronal networks of presumed functional relevance. We now present a novel procedure based in machine learning that allows the efficient and unbiased selection of a variety of spontaneous CDPs with different shapes and amplitudes. The reliability and performance of the present method is evaluated by analyzing the effects on the probabilities of generation of different classes of spontaneous CDPs induced by the intradermic injection of small amounts of capsaicin in the anesthetized cat, a procedure known to induce a state of central sensitization leading to allodynia and hyperalgesia. The results obtained with the selection method presently described allowed detection of spontaneous CDPs with specific shapes and amplitudes that are assumed to represent the activation of functionally coupled sets of dorsal horn neurones that acquire different, structured configurations in response to nociceptive stimuli. These changes are considered as responses tending to adequate transmission of sensory information to specific functional requirements as part of homeostatic adjustments. PMID:26379540

  6. Nociception and pain: lessons from optogenetics

    OpenAIRE

    Venetia eZachariou; Fiona eCarr

    2014-01-01

    The process of pain perception begins in the periphery by activation of nociceptors. From here nociceptive signals are conveyed via the dorsal horn of the spinal cord to multiple brain regions, where pain is perceived. Despite great progress in pain research in recent years, many questions remain regarding nociceptive circuitry and behavior, in both acute nociception and chronic pain states. Techniques that allow for selective activation of neuronal subpopulations in vivo can provide a better...

  7. Capsaicin, Nociception and Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frias, Bárbara; Merighi, Adalberto

    2016-06-18

    Capsaicin, the pungent ingredient of the hot chili pepper, is known to act on the transient receptor potential cation channel vanilloid subfamily member 1 (TRPV1). TRPV1 is involved in somatic and visceral peripheral inflammation, in the modulation of nociceptive inputs to spinal cord and brain stem centers, as well as the integration of diverse painful stimuli. In this review, we first describe the chemical and pharmacological properties of capsaicin and its derivatives in relation to their analgesic properties. We then consider the biochemical and functional characteristics of TRPV1, focusing on its distribution and biological effects within the somatosensory and viscerosensory nociceptive systems. Finally, we discuss the use of capsaicin as an agonist of TRPV1 to model acute inflammation in slices and other ex vivo preparations.

  8. Quercetin Inhibits Peripheral and Spinal Cord Nociceptive Mechanisms to Reduce Intense Acute Swimming-Induced Muscle Pain in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghi, Sergio M.; Pinho-Ribeiro, Felipe A.; Fattori, Victor; Bussmann, Allan J. C.; Vignoli, Josiane A.; Camilios-Neto, Doumit; Casagrande, Rubia; Verri, Waldiceu A.

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of the flavonoid quercetin (3,3´,4´,5,7-pentahydroxyflavone) in a mice model of intense acute swimming-induced muscle pain, which resembles delayed onset muscle soreness. Quercetin intraperitoneal (i.p.) treatment dose-dependently reduced muscle mechanical hyperalgesia. Quercetin inhibited myeloperoxidase (MPO) and N-acetyl-β-D- glucosaminidase (NAG) activities, cytokine production, oxidative stress, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and gp91phox mRNA expression and muscle injury (creatinine kinase [CK] blood levels and myoblast determination protein [MyoD] mRNA expression) as well as inhibited NFκB activation and induced Nrf2 and HO-1 mRNA expression in the soleus muscle. Beyond inhibiting those peripheral effects, quercetin also inhibited spinal cord cytokine production, oxidative stress and glial cells activation (glial fibrillary acidic protein [GFAP] and ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 [Iba-1] mRNA expression). Concluding, the present data demonstrate that quercetin is a potential molecule for the treatment of muscle pain conditions related to unaccustomed exercise. PMID:27583449

  9. NO在脊髓痛觉传递过程中的作用%Role of nitric oxide in spinal nociception transmission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈扬林; 陈小卫; 张文华

    2011-01-01

    一氧化氮(nitric oxide,NO)是神经元细胞内一种新型的神经递质,它参与多种生命活动,包括脊髓水平的伤害性信息传递过程.研究NO在伤害性信息传递过程中的作用及其机制,有利于阐明痛觉生理和发现疼痛治疗的新手段.本文将NO在慢性痛脊髓伤害性信息传递中的作用及其机制的相关研究进展作综述.%Nitric oxide (NO) acts as a new neurotransmitter in neuron cells. A large body of evidence indicates that NO essentially contributes to the processing of nociceptive signals in the spinal cord. Studying the effect and mechanism of NO underlying pain sensitization is a crucial prerequisite for the development of novel analgesics. This review summarizes the recent advances of NOdependent signaling pathways in the spinal cord of chronic pain.

  10. Anti-nociceptive effect induced by intrathecal injection of ATPA, an effect enhanced and prolonged by concanavalin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dong-Chuan; Zhou, Ning; Yu, Long-Chuan

    2003-01-10

    The present study investigated the effect of intrathecal injection of (RS)-2-alpha-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-tbutylisoxazol-4-yl) propanoic acid (ATPA), a selective agonist to kainate receptor, on nociception in rats. Intrathecal administration of 1, 4 and 10 nmol of ATPA induced dose-dependent increases in the hindpaw withdrawal latency (HWL) to thermal and mechanical stimulation in rats. Pretreatment with intrathecal injection of 300 microg of concanavalin A (ConA) to block the desensitization of kainate receptors enhanced and prolonged the anti-nociceptive effect induced by intrathecal injection of ATPA. The results suggest that the pre-synaptic kainate receptor in the primary afferent terminals is involved in the transmission of nociceptive information in dorsal horn of the spinal cord in rats. Furthermore, blocking the desensitization of kainate receptor enhanced and prolonged the ATPA-induced anti-nociceptive effects.

  11. Descending control of nociception: Specificity, recruitment and plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinricher, M M; Tavares, I; Leith, J L; Lumb, B M

    2009-04-01

    The dorsal horn of the spinal cord is the location of the first synapse in pain pathways, and as such, offers a very powerful target for regulation of nociceptive transmission by both local segmental and supraspinal mechanisms. Descending control of spinal nociception originates from many brain regions and plays a critical role in determining the experience of both acute and chronic pain. The earlier concept of descending control as an "analgesia system" is now being replaced with a more nuanced model in which pain input is prioritized relative to other competing behavioral needs and homeostatic demands. Descending control arises from a number of supraspinal sites, including the midline periaqueductal gray-rostral ventromedial medulla (PAG-RVM) system, and the more lateral and caudal dorsal reticular nucleus (DRt) and ventrolateral medulla (VLM). Inhibitory control from the PAG-RVM system preferentially suppresses nociceptive inputs mediated by C-fibers, preserving sensory-discriminative information conveyed by more rapidly conducting A-fibers. Analysis of the circuitry within the RVM reveals that the neural basis for bidirectional control from the midline system is two populations of neurons, ON-cells and OFF-cells, that are differentially recruited by higher structures important in fear, illness and psychological stress to enhance or inhibit pain. Dynamic shifts in the balance between pain inhibiting and facilitating outflows from the brainstem play a role in setting the gain of nociceptive processing as dictated by behavioral priorities, but are also likely to contribute to pathological pain states.

  12. Impaired transmission in the corticospinal tract and gait disability in spinal cord injured persons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barthélemy, Dorothy; Willerslev-Olsen, Maria; Lundell, Hans Magnus Henrik;

    2010-01-01

    of foot drop. Spinal cord injured participants who exhibited a large foot drop had little or no MEP at rest in the TA muscle and had little or no coherence in the same muscle during walking. Gait speed was correlated to foot drop, and was the lowest in participants with no MEP at rest. The data confirm......Rehabilitation following spinal cord injury is likely to depend on recovery of corticospinal systems. Here we investigate whether transmission in the corticospinal tract may explain foot drop (inability to dorsiflex ankle) in persons with spinal cord lesion. The study was performed in 24 persons...... with incomplete spinal cord lesion (C1 to L1) and 15 healthy controls. Coherence in the 10-20 Hz frequency band between paired tibialis anterior muscle (TA) electromyographic recordings obtained in the swing phase of walking, which is taken as a measure of motor unit synchronization, was significantly correlated...

  13. Selective depression of nociceptive responses of dorsal horn neurones by SNC 80 in a perfused hindquarter preparation of adult mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, C Q; Hong, Y G; Dray, A; Perkins, M N

    2001-01-01

    Detailed electrophysiological characterisation of spinal opioid receptors in the mouse has been limited due to various technical difficulties. In this study, extracellular single unit recordings were made from dorsal horn neurones in a perfused spinal cord with attached trunk-hindquarter to investigate the role of delta-opioid receptor in mediating nociceptive and non-nociceptive transmission in mouse. Noxious electrical shock, pinch and heat stimuli evoked a mean response of 20.8+/-2.5 (n=10, PSNC 80) was perfused for 8-10 min, these evoked nociceptive responses were reversibly depressed. SNC 80 (2 microM) depressed the nociceptive responses evoked by electrical shock, pinch and heat by 74.0+/-13.7% (n=8, PSNC 80 was 92.6+/-6.8% (n=3). SNC 80 at 5 microM also completely abolished the wind-up and/or hypersensitivity (n=5). The depressant effects of SNC 80 on the nociceptive responses were completely blocked by 10 microM naloxone (n=5) and 3 microM 17-(cyclopropylmethyl)-6,7-dehydro-4,5 alpha-epoxy-14 beta-ethoxy-5 beta-methylindolo [2',3':6',7'] morphinan-3-ol hydrochloride (HS 378, n=8), a novel highly selective delta-opioid receptor antagonist. Interestingly, HS 378 (3 microM) itself potentiated the background activity and evoked responses to pinch and heat by 151.8+/-38.4% (PSNC 80 at a dose of up to 10 microM (n=5). These data demonstrate that delta-opioid receptor modulate nociceptive, but not non-nociceptive, transmission in spinal dorsal horn neurones of the adult mouse. The potentiation of neuronal activity by HS 378 may reflect an autoregulatory role of the endogenous delta-opioid in nociceptive transmission in mouse.

  14. 痛温觉和本体觉传入纤维在小鼠脊髓内的不同发育特点%ALTERNATIVE DEVELOPMENT OF NOCICEPTIVE AND PROPRIOCEPTIVE AFFERENT FIBERS IN THE MOUSE SPINAL CORD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯枫; 黄静; 刘翔宇; 李云庆; 武胜昔

    2006-01-01

    The present study was designed to examine the developmental changes in projection and termination of nociceptive and proprioceptive afferent fibers in the spinal cord by labeling those two fibers with calcitonion gene-related peptide (CGRP) and parvalbumin (PV)separately in mouse embryos and neonatal pups aged embryonic day 15 to posanatal day 3 (E15 -P3). CGRP-like immunoreactive (LI)nociceptive fibers first appeared in the superficial dorsal horn (DH) at E16. The afferent projections extended laterally to the DH and entered into the deep portions of the DH at E17 and E18. After birth, the projection pattern of CGRP-LI fibers remained unchanged but the intensity of afferent terminals increased in the superficial laminae and their branching patterns became more complicated. In addition,CGRP-LI collaterals that projected into the contralateral DH were also examined after E16. Around birth, the contralateral projections were also found originated from the lateral part of the DH. PV-LI proprioceptive afferents were first observed entering the gray matter at E15 and reached the intermediate gray matter (IG) and the ventral horn (VH) more obviously on E16. The number and intensity of PV-LI fibers increased in the the VH with age and reached a maximum during earlier postnatal period ( P0-P3 ). The proprioceptive terminals seemed to form close relationship with motoneurons in the VH from E17. Our results indicate that the somatotopic organization of nociceptive and proprioceptive afferents in the spinal cord both are established during the late embryonic and early postnatal stages. These results help to understand the development of the sensory transmission in more details.%本研究通过采用钙基因相关肽(CGRP)和小牛白蛋白(PV)分别标记胚胎15d(E15)到生后3d(P3)小鼠脊髓的痛温觉和本体觉两种初级传入纤维,观察了这两种纤维在小鼠脊髓内投射和终止的发育变化.结果显示:CGRP样免疫阳性(LI)纤维最早于E16出现

  15. A machine learning methodology for the selection and classification of spontaneous spinal cord dorsum potentials allows disclosure of structured (non-random changes in neuronal connectivity induced by nociceptive stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario eMartin

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Fractal analysis of spontaneous cord dorsum potentials (CDPs generated in the lumbosacral spinal segments has revealed that these potentials are generated by ongoing structured (non-random neuronal activity. Studies aimed to disclose the changes produced by nociceptive stimulation on the functional organization of the neuronal networks generating these potentials used predetermined templates to select specific classes of spontaneous CDPs. Since this procedure was time consuming and required continuous supervision, it was limited to the analysis of two types of CDPs (negative CDPs and negative positive CDPs, thus excluding potentials that may reflect activation of other neuronal networks of presumed functional relevance. We now present a novel procedure based in machine learning that allows the efficient and unbiased selection of a variety of spontaneous CDPs with different shapes and amplitudes. The reliability and performance of the method is evaluated by analyzing the effects on the probabilities of generation of different types of spontaneous CDPs induced by the intradermic injection of small amounts of capsaicin in the anesthetized cat.The results obtained with the selection method presently described allowed detection of spontaneous CDPs with specific shapes and amplitudes that are assumed to represent the activation of functionally coupled sets of dorsal horn neurones that acquire different, structured configurations in response to nociceptive stimuli.

  16. The roles of P2 purinergic receptors in nociception and antinociception

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SatohM; MinamM

    2002-01-01

    Extracellular adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) has been established as a neurotransmitter or neuromodulator in both the periphe- ral and central nervous systems,in addition to diverse intracellular roles of it.P2 purinergic receptors,the receptors of ATP,are classified into two subfamilites,ionotropic P2X and metabotropic P2Y receptors.Recent studies suggest that ATP play a significant role in facilitating perpheral and spinal nociceptive transmission via P2X receptors.However,we demonstrated that at the supraspinal level P2X receptor agonists produce an antinociception.On the other hand,the activation of some subtypes of P2Y receptors in the spinal cord caused inhibitory effects on nociceptive transmission.Thus,P2X and P2Y receptors are suggested to be related to diverse roles in nociceptive functions at peripheral,spinal and supraspinal levels.We would like to take an overview about the significance of P2X and P2Y receptors in nociception and antinociception.

  17. Purines released from astrocytes inhibit excitatory synaptic transmission in the ventral horn of the spinal cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Meier Carlsen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Spinal neuronal networks are essential for motor function. They are involved in the integration of sensory inputs and the generation of rhythmic motor outputs. They continuously adapt their activity to the internal state of the organism and to the environment. This plasticity can be provided by different neuromodulators. These substances are usually thought of being released by dedicated neurons. However, in other networks from the central nervous system synaptic transmission is also modulated by transmitters released from astrocytes. The star-shaped glial cell responds to neurotransmitters by releasing gliotransmitters, which in turn modulate synaptic transmission. Here we investigated if astrocytes present in the ventral horn of the spinal cord modulate synaptic transmission. We evoked synaptic inputs in ventral horn neurons recorded in a slice preparation from the spinal cord of neonatal mice. Neurons responded to electrical stimulation by monosynaptic EPSCs. We used mice expressing the enhanced green fluorescent protein under the promoter of the glial fibrillary acidic protein to identify astrocytes. Chelating calcium with BAPTA in a single neighboring astrocyte increased the amplitude of synaptic currents. In contrast, when we selectively stimulated astrocytes by activating PAR-1 receptors with the peptide TFLLR, the amplitude of EPSCs evoked by a paired stimulation protocol was reduced. The paired-pulse ratio was increased, suggesting an inhibition occurring at the presynaptic side of synapses. In the presence of blockers for extracellular ectonucleotidases, TFLLR did not induce presynaptic inhibition. Puffing adenosine reproduced the effect of TFLLR and blocking adenosine A1 receptors with DPCPX prevented it. Altogether our results show that ventral horn astrocytes are responsible for a tonic and a phasic inhibition of excitatory synaptic transmission by releasing ATP, which gets converted into adenosine that binds to inhibitory

  18. The Role of CGRPin Nociception?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. G. Hill

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The failure of NK1 receptor antagonists to show analgesic activity in clinical trials in spite of abundant preclinical evidence for a role of this neuropeptide in nociception, makes it somewhat dangerous to speculate on the nociceptive role of other neuropeptides, especially with respect to therapeutic utility of receptor antagonists! However, CGRP is the primary afferent peptide with the strongest evidence of a role in pain perception. It is found in a greater proportion of sensory neurones than other peptides and is a constituent of A[delta ] as well as C-fibres. Inflammation of peripheral tissues upregulates production of CGRP in sensory ganglia, coincident with the development of hyperalgesia, and CGRP knockout mice have attenuated hyperalgesic responses. CGRP is released into the dorsal horn of the spinal cord (DHSC by noxious peripheral stimuli and excites nociceptive DHSC neurones on local application. The peptide antagonist CGRP8-37 blocks the response to exogenous CGRP and can reduce the response of DHSC neurones to noxious peripheral stimuli. CGRP8-37 has also been shown to have behavioural antinociceptive properties when given intrathecally. Conversely, injection of CGRP itself to the PAG or n. accumbens has been reported to have antinociceptive effects that are reversed by CGRP8-37. With the advent of potent non-peptide antagonists such as BIBN4096BS we should soon be able to determine whether systemic blockade of all CGRP receptors produces antinociception without limiting side effects.

  19. D2-like receptors in the descending dopaminergic pathway are not involved in the decreased postoperative nociceptive threshold induced by plantar incision in adult rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtani, Norimasa; Masaki, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    Background Approximately half of all patients who undergo surgery develop postoperative pain, the mechanisms of which are not well understood by anesthesiologists. D2-like receptors in the descending dopaminergic pathway play an important role in regulation of pain transmission in the spinal cord. Impairment of inhibitory neurons in the spinal cord is suggested as part of the mechanism for neuropathic pain, which is one component of postoperative pain. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether impairment of D2-like receptors in the descending dopaminergic pathway in the spinal cord is involved in the decreased postoperative nociceptive threshold in rats. Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats (250–300 g) were anesthetized with sevoflurane and an intrathecal (IT) catheter was implanted. Six days later, a plantar incision was made. On the following day, saline, a D2-like receptor agonist (quinpirole), or a D2-like receptor antagonist (sulpiride) was administered intrathecally. Thermal and mechanical nociceptive responses were assessed by exposure to infrared radiant heat and the von Frey filament test before and after plantar incision. Results Plantar incision decreased both thermal latency and the mechanical nociceptive threshold. IT administration of quinpirole inhibited the nociceptive responses induced by plantar incision, but sulpiride had no effect. Conclusion A D2-like receptor agonist had antinociceptive effects on the hypersensitivity response triggered by a surgical incision, but a D2-like receptor antagonist had no effect on this response. These results suggest that impairment and/or modification of D2-like receptors in the descending dopaminergic pathway in the spinal cord is not involved in the postoperative decrease in nociceptive threshold. PMID:27799818

  20. D2-like receptors in the descending dopaminergic pathway are not involved in the decreased postoperative nociceptive threshold induced by plantar incision in adult rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohtani N

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Norimasa Ohtani, Eiji Masaki Division of Dento-oral Anesthesiology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Dentistry, Sendai, Miyagi, Japan Background: Approximately half of all patients who undergo surgery develop postoperative pain, the mechanisms of which are not well understood by anesthesiologists. D2-like receptors in the descending dopaminergic pathway play an important role in regulation of pain transmission in the spinal cord. Impairment of inhibitory neurons in the spinal cord is suggested as part of the mechanism for neuropathic pain, which is one component of postoperative pain. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether impairment of D2-like receptors in the descending dopaminergic pathway in the spinal cord is involved in the decreased postoperative nociceptive threshold in rats.Methods: Male Sprague-Dawley rats (250–300 g were anesthetized with sevoflurane and an intrathecal (IT catheter was implanted. Six days later, a plantar incision was made. On the following day, saline, a D2-like receptor agonist (quinpirole, or a D2-like receptor antagonist (sulpiride was administered intrathecally. Thermal and mechanical nociceptive responses were assessed by exposure to infrared radiant heat and the von Frey filament test before and after plantar incision.Results: Plantar incision decreased both thermal latency and the mechanical nociceptive threshold. IT administration of quinpirole inhibited the nociceptive responses induced by plantar incision, but sulpiride had no effect.Conclusion: A D2-like receptor agonist had antinociceptive effects on the hypersensitivity response triggered by a surgical incision, but a D2-like receptor antagonist had no effect on this response. These results suggest that impairment and/or modification of D2-like receptors in the descending dopaminergic pathway in the spinal cord is not involved in the postoperative decrease in nociceptive threshold. Keywords: postoperative pain, descending pathway

  1. D2-like receptors in the descending dopaminergic pathway are not involved in the decreased postoperative nociceptive threshold induced by plantar incision in adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtani, Norimasa; Masaki, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    Approximately half of all patients who undergo surgery develop postoperative pain, the mechanisms of which are not well understood by anesthesiologists. D2-like receptors in the descending dopaminergic pathway play an important role in regulation of pain transmission in the spinal cord. Impairment of inhibitory neurons in the spinal cord is suggested as part of the mechanism for neuropathic pain, which is one component of postoperative pain. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether impairment of D2-like receptors in the descending dopaminergic pathway in the spinal cord is involved in the decreased postoperative nociceptive threshold in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (250-300 g) were anesthetized with sevoflurane and an intrathecal (IT) catheter was implanted. Six days later, a plantar incision was made. On the following day, saline, a D2-like receptor agonist (quinpirole), or a D2-like receptor antagonist (sulpiride) was administered intrathecally. Thermal and mechanical nociceptive responses were assessed by exposure to infrared radiant heat and the von Frey filament test before and after plantar incision. Plantar incision decreased both thermal latency and the mechanical nociceptive threshold. IT administration of quinpirole inhibited the nociceptive responses induced by plantar incision, but sulpiride had no effect. A D2-like receptor agonist had antinociceptive effects on the hypersensitivity response triggered by a surgical incision, but a D2-like receptor antagonist had no effect on this response. These results suggest that impairment and/or modification of D2-like receptors in the descending dopaminergic pathway in the spinal cord is not involved in the postoperative decrease in nociceptive threshold.

  2. Disruption of persistent nociceptive behavior in rats with learning impairment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuxin Ma

    Full Text Available Despite the subjective nature of pain experience with cognitive and affective dimensions, preclinical pain research has largely focused on its sensory dimension. Here, we examined the relationship between learning/memory and nociceptive behavior in rats with combined learning impairment and persistent nociception. Learning impairment was induced by bilateral hippocampal injection of a mixed Aβ solution, whereas persistent nociception produced in these rats by complete Freund's adjuvant-induced ankle inflammation. Those rats with learning impairment showed a diminished development of thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia and a shorter time course of nociceptive behavior without alteration of their baseline nociceptive threshold. In rats with pre-established hyperalgesia and allodynia due to ankle inflammation, bilateral intra-hippocampal injection of cycloheximide (a protein synthesis inhibitor promoted the earlier recovery of nociceptive behavior. Moreover, expression of Aβ, NR1 subunit of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, and protein kinase Cγ was upregulated, whereas the choline acetyl transferase expression was downregulated, in the hippocampus, thalamus, amygdala, and/or spinal cord of rats with combined learning impairment and persistent nociception. The data indicate that learning impairment could disrupt the response to a state of persistent nociception, suggesting an important role for cognitive maladaptation in the mechanisms of chronic pain. These results also suggest that a preclinical model of combined learning impairment and persistent nociception may be useful to explore the brain mechanisms underlying the transition from acute to chronic pain.

  3. Effect and mechanism of the co-regulation of HCN2-GLT-1 on the spinal cord level of the visceral nociception and hyperalgesia following exposure to posttraumatic stress disorder-like stress in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei JI

    2014-10-01

    and indirectly down-regulating the expression of HCN2 I exposure to PTSD-like stress. The HCN2-GLT-1 pathway takes part in the regulation of visceral nociception and hyperalgesia in the spine cord, and it may play a role in the prevention or inhibition of the visceral nociception and hyperalgesia after exposure to PTSD-like stress. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2014.10.02

  4. Ryanodine receptors contribute to the induction of nociceptive input-evoked long-term potentiation in the rat spinal cord slice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Zhi-Qi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our previous study demonstrated that nitric oxide (NO contributes to long-term potentiation (LTP of C-fiber-evoked field potentials by tetanic stimulation of the sciatic nerve in the spinal cord in vivo. Ryanodine receptor (RyR is a downstream target for NO. The present study further explored the role of RyR in synaptic plasticity of the spinal pain pathway. Results By means of field potential recordings in the adult male rat in vivo, we showed that RyR antagonist reduced LTP of C-fiber-evoked responses in the spinal dorsal horn by tetanic stimulation of the sciatic nerve. Using spinal cord slice preparations and field potential recordings from superficial dorsal horn, high frequency stimulation of Lissauer's tract (LT stably induced LTP of field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs. Perfusion of RyR antagonists blocked the induction of LT stimulation-evoked spinal LTP, while Ins(1,4,5P3 receptor (IP3R antagonist had no significant effect on LTP induction. Moreover, activation of RyRs by caffeine without high frequency stimulation induced a long-term potentiation in the presence of bicuculline methiodide and strychnine. Further, in patch-clamp recordings from superficial dorsal horn neurons, activation of RyRs resulted in a large increase in the frequency of miniature EPSCs (mEPSCs. Immunohistochemical study showed that RyRs were expressed in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons. Likewise, calcium imaging in small DRG neurons illustrated that activation of RyRs elevated [Ca2+]i in small DRG neurons. Conclusions These data indicate that activation of presynaptic RyRs play a crucial role in the induction of LTP in the spinal pain pathway, probably through enhancement of transmitter release.

  5. Effects of 4-aminopyridine on synaptic transmission in the cat spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowska, E; Lundberg, A; Rudomin, P; Sykova, E

    1982-05-20

    An analysis was made of effects of 0.1-1.0 mg/kg 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) i.v. on excitatory and inhibitory spinal reflex pathways in lightly anaesthetized or decerebrated cats. The effects appeared within the first minutes of the injection, reached maximum after about 10-15 min and remained stable during at least several hours. 4-AP enhanced the following synaptic actions on motoneurones: monosynaptic excitation from Ia afferents and descending tracts, disynaptic and polysynaptic excitation from group Ib, group II, cutaneous and high threshold muscle afferents, disynaptic inhibition from Ia and Ib afferents and recurrent and polysynaptic inhibition from different afferents. 4-AP also increased primary afferent depolarization and excitation of ascending tract cells by peripheral stimuli. In the case of the disynaptic inhibitory pathways it has been shown that 4-AP may enhance the excitation of the interposed interneurones but it also increases the action of these interneurones on the motoneurones; monosynaptic inhibition evoked in motoneurones by electrical stimulation of the axons of the inhibitory interneurones was used as a test response in these experiments. No indications were found of direct effects of 4-AP on excitability of afferent fibres or motoneurones to electrical stimuli. No systematic changes were either found in the membrane potential of motoneurones or in the duration of action potentials of these neurones or primary afferents. It is therefore concluded that small doses of 4-AP enhance synaptic transmission in the spinal cord by an action at a presynaptic level.

  6. Orexin-A modulates excitatory synaptic transmission and neuronal excitability in the spinal cord substantia gelatinosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Younghoon; Park, Ki Bum; Pervin, Rokeya; Kim, Tae Wan; Youn, Dong-ho

    2015-09-14

    Although intrathecal orexin-A has been known to be antinociceptive in various pain models, the role of orexin-A in antinociception is not well characterized. In the present study, we examined whether orexin-A modulates primary afferent fiber-mediated or spontaneous excitatory synaptic transmission using transverse spinal cord slices with attached dorsal root. Bath-application of orexin-A (100nM) reduced the amplitude of excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) evoked by electrical stimulation of Aδ- or C-primary afferent fibers. The magnitude of reduction was much larger for EPSCs evoked by polysynaptic C-fibers than polysynaptic Aδ-fibers, whereas it was similar in EPSCs evoked by monosynaptic Aδ- or C-fibers. SB674042, an orexin-1 receptor antagonist, but not EMPA, an orexin-2 receptor antagonist, significantly inhibited the orexin-A-induced reduction in EPSC amplitude from mono- or polysynaptic Aδ-fibers, as well as from mono- or polysynaptic C-fibers. Furthermore, orexin-A significantly increased the frequency of spontaneous EPSCs but not the amplitude. This increase was almost completely blocked by both SB674042 and EMPA. On the other hand, orexin-A produced membrane oscillations and inward currents in the SG neurons that were partially or completely inhibited by SB674042 or EMPA, respectively. Thus, this study suggests that the spinal actions of orexin-A underlie orexin-A-induced antinociceptive effects via different subtypes of orexin receptors.

  7. Effects of N- and L-type calcium channel antagonists on the responses of nociceptive spinal cord neurons to mechanical stimulation of the normal and the inflamed knee joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugebauer, V; Vanegas, H; Nebe, J; Rümenapp, P; Schaible, H G

    1996-12-01

    innocuous and noxious pressure applied to the noninflamed ankle joint. 3. The topical administration of nimodipine decreased the responses to innocuous and noxious pressure applied to the knee in a sample of 9 neurons with input from the normal joint and in a sample of 16 neurons with input from the inflamed knee joint (hyperexcitable neurons). Within administration times of 30 min, the responses were reduced to approximately 70% of the predrug values. In hyperexcitable neurons, the responses to innocuous and noxious pressure applied to the knee were also decreased during ionophoretic administration of nimodipine (6 neurons) and diltiazem (9 neurons). When the noninflamed ankle was stimulated, the responses to innocuous pressure were reduced neither in neurons with input from the normal knee nor in neurons with input from the inflamed knee, but the responses of hyperexcitable neurons to noxious pressure onto the ankle were reduced. The ionophoretic administration of the agonist at the L-type calcium channel, S(-)-Bay K 8644, enhanced the responses to mechanical stimulation of the knee joint in all 14 hyperexcitable neurons tested. The effect of S(-)-Bay K 8644 was counteracted by both diltiazem (in 6 of 6 neurons) and nimodipine (in 5 of 5 neurons). 4. These data show that antagonists at both the N- and the L-type voltage-dependent calcium channels influence the spinal processing of input from the knee joint. The data suggest, therefore, that voltage-dependent calcium calcium channels of both the N and the L type are important for the sensory functions of the spinal cord. They are involved in the spinal processing of nonnociceptive as well as nociceptive mechanosensory input from the joint, both under normal and inflammatory conditions. The present results show in particular that N- and L-type channels are likely to be involved in the generation of pain evoked by noxious mechanical stimulation in normal tissue as well as in the mechanical hyperalgesia that is usually pres

  8. Assessment of transmission in specific descending pathways in relation to gait and balance following spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barthélemy, Dorothy; Willerslev-Olsen, Maria; Lundell, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Human bipedal gait requires supraspinal control and gait is consequently severely impaired in most persons with spinal cord injury (SCI). Little is known of the contribution of lesion of specific descending pathways to the clinical manifestations of gait deficits. Here, we assessed transmission...... in descending pathways using imaging and electrophysiological techniques and correlated them with clinical measures of impaired gait in persons with SCI. Twenty-five persons with SCI participated in the study. Functional assessment of gait included the Walking Index for Spinal Cord Injury (WISCI), the Timed......-Up and Go (TUG), the 6-Min Walking Test (6MWT), and the maximal treadmill gait speed. Balance was evaluated clinically by the Berg Balance Scale (BBS). The amplitude of tibialis anterior (TA) motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) at rest elicited by transcranial magnetic stimulation as a measure of corticospinal...

  9. Involvement of group III metabotropic glutamate receptors in the modulation of spinal nociceptive signals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaorong Yang; Yu Zhang; Xin Zhao; Naihong Liu; Jiantian Qiao; Ce Zhang

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Previous morphological studies have demonstrated that group III metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are commonly found in nociceptive pathways,particularly in the terminals of primary afferent fibers in the spinal dorsal horn.OBJECTIVE:To investigate the role of group III mGluRs in a rat model of spinal nociception by intrathecal administration of a selective agonist,L-Serine-O-phosphate (L-SOP).DESIGN,TIME AND SETTING:A randomized,controlled,animal experiment.The study was performed at the Department of Physiology and Neurobiology,Shanxi Medical University,between March 2007 and May 2008.MATERIALS:L-SOP of group III mGluRs (Tocris Cookson Ltd,UK),formalin (Sigma,USA),rabbit anti-c-Fos polyclonal antibody and biotin-labeled goat anti-rabbit IgG (Cell Signaling Technology,USA) were used in this study.METHODS:A total of 26 healthy Wistar rats,aged 1 month and weighing 100-120 g,were subjected to intrathecal catheter implantation.After 5-8 days,10 rats were selected according to experimental requirements.L-SOP 250 nmol in 10 μL,or the equivalent volume of normal saline,was administered by intrathecal injection into the L3-5 region of the spinal cord in the experimental and control groups,respectively.After 15 minutes,formalin (5%,50 μL) was subcutaneously injected into the plantar of the left hindpaw of each rat to establish formalin-induced pain models.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:Nociceptive behavioral responses and immunohistochemical examination of Fos expression.RESULTS:Intrathecal injection of L-SOP significantly attenuated the second phase nociceptive response compared with the control group (P<0.05),and Fos expression in the spinal dorsal horn was significantly decreased along with the number of Fos-like immunoreactive neurons (P<0.05).CONCLUSION:Group III mGluRs are involved in the modulation of nociceptive signals,and their activation suppresses the transmission of nociceptive signals.

  10. Induction of long-term potentiation in single nociceptive dorsal horn neurons is blocked by the CaMKII inhibitor AIP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Linda Margareth; Lien, Guro Flor; Bollerud, Ingunn; Gjerstad, Johannes

    2005-04-11

    Neuronal events leading to development of long-term potentiation (LTP) in the nociceptive pathways may be a cellular mechanism underlying central hyperalgesia. Here, we examine whether induction of LTP in nociceptive dorsal horn neurons at depths of 80-500 microm from the cord surface can be affected by spinal application of the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) inhibitor AIP. Extracellular recordings from single neurons in intact urethane anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats were performed, and the neuronal A-fiber and C-fiber responses after sciatic nerve test pulses were defined according to latencies. A clear LTP of the nociceptive transmission following sciatic nerve high-frequency stimulation (HFS) was observed in single neurons in laminae I-IV of the dorsal horn. The increase in the C-fiber response after HFS was blocked in the presence of 2.0 mM AIP (P fiber response was not affected by 2.0 mM AIP alone or by vehicle. Thus, our data show that the neuronal process leading to the induction of LTP in the dorsal horn induced by HFS is clearly inhibited by the specific CaMKII inhibitor AIP. It is concluded that CaMKII may be important for the induction of LTP in single nociceptive dorsal horn neurons.

  11. Sympathetic nonadrenergic transmission contributes to autonomic dysreflexia in spinal cord-injured individuals.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groothuis, J.T.; Rongen, G.A.P.J.M.; Deinum, J.; Pickkers, P.; Danser, A.H.; Geurts, A.C.H.; Smits, P.; Hopman, M.T.E.

    2010-01-01

    Autonomic dysreflexia is a hypertensive episode in spinal cord-injured individuals induced by exaggerated sympathetic activity and thought to be alpha-adrenergic mediated. alpha-Adrenoceptor antagonists have been a rational first choice; nevertheless, calcium channel blockers are primarily used in a

  12. Pain following spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    The aims of this thesis were to assess and characterise nociceptive and neuropathic pain, the use of pharmacological and non-pharmacological pain treatment, and the influence of pain on the quality of sleep in a population following spinal cord injury (SCI). This thesis is divided into five separate studies: I. Pain in a Swedish spinal cord injury population. II. Gender related differences in pain in spinal cord injured individuals. III. Use of analgesic drugs in indi...

  13. Synaptic Plasticity and Nociception

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ChenJianguo

    2004-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity is one of the fields that progresses rapidly and has a lot of success in neuroscience. The two major types of synaptie plasticity: long-term potentiation ( LTP and long-term depression (LTD are thought to be the cellular mochanisms of learning and memory. Recently, accumulating evidence suggests that, besides serving as a cellular model for learning and memory, the synaptic plasticity involves in other physiological or pathophysiological processes, such as the perception of pain and the regulation of cardiovascular system. This minireview will focus on the relationship between synaptic plasticity and nociception.

  14. Actions of endomorphins on synaptic transmission of Adelta-fibers in spinal cord dorsal horn neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajiri, Y; Huang, L Y

    2000-01-01

    The effects of endogenous mu-opioid ligands, endomorphins, on Adelta-afferent-evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) were studied in substantia gelatinosa neurons in spinal cord slices. Under voltage-clamp conditions, endomorphins blocked the evoked EPSCs in a dose-dependent manner. To determine if the block resulted from changes in transmitter release from glutamatergic synaptic terminals, the opioid actions on miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) were examined. Endomorphins (1 microM) reduced the frequency but not the amplitude of mEPSCs, suggesting that endomorphins directly act on presynaptic terminals. The effects of endomorphins on the unitary (quantal) properties of the evoked EPSCs were also studied. Endomorphins reduced unitary content without significantly changing unitary amplitude. These results suggest that in addition to presynaptic actions on interneurons, endomorphins also inhibit evoked EPSCs by reducing transmitter release from Adelta-afferent terminals.

  15. GPR30 disrupts the balance of GABAergic and glutamatergic transmission in the spinal cord driving to the development of bone cancer pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jie; Huang, Xiaoxia; Li, Yali; Li, Yang; Xu, Xueqin; Gao, Yan; Shi, Ruoshi; Yao, Wanjun; Liu, Juying; Ke, Changbin

    2016-11-08

    Cancer induced bone pain is a very complicated clinical pain states that has proven difficult to be treated effectively due to poorly understand of underlying mechanism, but bone cancer pain (BCP) seems to be enhanced by a state of spinal sensitization. In the present study, we showed that carcinoma tibia implantation induced notable pain sensitization and up-regulation of G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPR30) in the spinal cord of rats which was reversed by GPR30 knockdown. Further studies indicated that upregulation of GPR30 induced by cancer implantation resulted in a select loss of γ-aminobutyric acid-ergic (GABAergic) neurons and functionally diminished the inhibitory transmission due to reduce expression of the vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT). GPR30 contributed to spinal cord disinhibition by diminishing the inhibitory transmission via upregulation of α1 subunit and downregulation of γ2 subunits. GPR30 also facilitated excitatory transmission by promoting functional up-regulation of the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II α (CaMKII α) in glutamatergic neurons and increasing the clustering of the glutamate receptor subunit 1 (GluR1) subunit to excitatory synapse.Taken together, GPR30 contributed to the development of BCP by both facilitating excitatory transmission and inhibiting inhibitory transmission in the spinal cord. Our findings provide the new spinal disinhibition and sensitivity mechanisms underlying the development of bone cancer pain.

  16. Selective targeting of TRPV1 expressing sensory nerve terminals in the spinal cord for long lasting analgesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph A Jeffry

    Full Text Available Chronic pain is a major clinical problem and opiates are often the only treatment, but they cause significant problems ranging from sedation to deadly respiratory depression. Resiniferatoxin (RTX, a potent agonist of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1, causes a slow, sustained and irreversible activation of TRPV1 and increases the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents, but causes significant depression of evoked EPSCs due to nerve terminal depolarization block. Intrathecal administration of RTX to rats in the short-term inhibits nociceptive synaptic transmission, and in the long-term causes a localized, selective ablation of TRPV1-expressing central sensory nerve terminals leading to long lasting analgesia in behavioral models. Since RTX actions are selective for central sensory nerve terminals, other efferent functions of dorsal root ganglion neurons can be preserved. Preventing nociceptive transmission at the level of the spinal cord can be a useful strategy to treat chronic, debilitating and intractable pain.

  17. Chronic intrathecal cannulation enhances nociceptive responses in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almeida F.R.C.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of a chronically implanted spinal cannula on the nociceptive response induced by mechanical, chemical or thermal stimuli was evaluated. The hyperalgesia in response to mechanical stimulation induced by carrageenin or prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 was significantly increased in cannulated (Cn rats, compared with naive (Nv or sham-operated (Sh rats. Only Cn animals presented an enhanced nociceptive response in the first phase of the formalin test when low doses were used (0.3 and 1%. The withdrawal latency to thermal stimulation of a paw inflamed by carrageenin was significantly reduced in Cn rats but not in Nv or Sh rats. In contrast to Nv and Sh rats, injection in Cn animals of a standard non-steroid anti-inflammatory drug, indomethacin, either intraperitoneally or into the spinal cord via an implanted cannula or by direct puncture of the intrathecal space significantly blocked the intensity of the hyperalgesia induced by PGE2. Cannulated animals treated with indomethacin also showed a significant inhibition of second phase formalin-induced paw flinches. Histopathological analysis of the spinal cord showed an increased frequency of mononuclear inflammatory cells in the Cn groups. Thus, the presence of a chronically implanted cannula seems to cause nociceptive spinal sensitization to mechanical, chemical and thermal stimulation, which can be blocked by indomethacin, thus suggesting that it may result from the spinal release of prostaglandins due to an ongoing mild inflammation.

  18. Modulatory Mechanism of Nociceptive Neuronal Activity by Dietary Constituent Resveratrol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamoru Takeda

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Changes to somatic sensory pathways caused by peripheral tissue, inflammation or injury can result in behavioral hypersensitivity and pathological pain, such as hyperalgesia. Resveratrol, a plant polyphenol found in red wine and various food products, is known to have several beneficial biological actions. Recent reports indicate that resveratrol can modulate neuronal excitability, including nociceptive sensory transmission. As such, it is possible that this dietary constituent could be a complementary alternative medicine (CAM candidate, specifically a therapeutic agent. The focus of this review is on the mechanisms underlying the modulatory effects of resveratrol on nociceptive neuronal activity associated with pain relief. In addition, we discuss the contribution of resveratrol to the relief of nociceptive and/or pathological pain and its potential role as a functional food and a CAM.

  19. Spinal Plasticity and Behavior: BDNF-Induced Neuromodulation in Uninjured and Injured Spinal Cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra M. Garraway

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF is a member of the neurotrophic factor family of signaling molecules. Since its discovery over three decades ago, BDNF has been identified as an important regulator of neuronal development, synaptic transmission, and cellular and synaptic plasticity and has been shown to function in the formation and maintenance of certain forms of memory. Neural plasticity that underlies learning and memory in the hippocampus shares distinct characteristics with spinal cord nociceptive plasticity. Research examining the role BDNF plays in spinal nociception and pain overwhelmingly suggests that BDNF promotes pronociceptive effects. BDNF induces synaptic facilitation and engages central sensitization-like mechanisms. Also, peripheral injury-induced neuropathic pain is often accompanied with increased spinal expression of BDNF. Research has extended to examine how spinal cord injury (SCI influences BDNF plasticity and the effects BDNF has on sensory and motor functions after SCI. Functional recovery and adaptive plasticity after SCI are typically associated with upregulation of BDNF. Although neuropathic pain is a common consequence of SCI, the relation between BDNF and pain after SCI remains elusive. This article reviews recent literature and discusses the diverse actions of BDNF. We also highlight similarities and differences in BDNF-induced nociceptive plasticity in naïve and SCI conditions.

  20. Role of ATP-sensitive potassium channels in modulating nociception in rat model of bone cancer pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Hui; Zhang, Dengwen; Yang, Shijie; Wang, Yu; Xu, Lin; Wu, Jinjing; Ren, Jing; Yao, Wenlong; Fan, Longchang; Zhang, Chuanhan; Tian, Yuke; Pan, Hui-Lin; Wang, Xueren

    2014-03-20

    Bone cancer pain is a major clinical problem and remains difficult to treat. ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels may be involved in regulating nociceptive transmission at the spinal cord level. We determined the role of spinal KATP channels in the control of mechanical hypersensitivity in a rat model of bone cancer pain. The rat model of bone cancer pain was induced by implanting rat mammary gland carcinoma cells (Walker256) into the tibias. KATP modulators (pinacidil and glibenclamide) or the specific Kir6.2-siRNA were injected via an intrathecal catheter. The mechanical withdrawal threshold of rats was tested using von Frey filaments. The Kir6.2 mRNA and protein levels were measured by quantitative PCR and western blots, respectively. Intrathecal injection of pinacidil, a KATP channel opener, significantly increased the tactile withdrawal threshold of cancer cell-injected rats in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, intrathecal delivery of glibenclamide, a KATP channel blocker, or the specific Kir6.2-siRNA significantly reduced the tactile withdrawal threshold of cancer cell-injected rats. The mRNA and protein levels of Kir6.2 in the spinal cord of cancer cell-injected rats were significantly lower than those in control rats. Our findings suggest that the KATP channel expression level in the spinal cord is reduced in bone cancer pain. Activation of KATP channels at the spinal level reduces pain hypersensitivity associated with bone cancer pain.

  1. Emotional modulation of pain and spinal nociception in fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhudy, Jamie L; DelVentura, Jennifer L; Terry, Ellen L; Bartley, Emily J; Olech, Ewa; Palit, Shreela; Kerr, Kara L

    2013-07-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is characterized by widespread pain, as well as affective disturbance (eg, depression). Given that emotional processes are known to modulate pain, a disruption of emotion and emotional modulation of pain and nociception may contribute to FM. The present study used a well-validated affective picture-viewing paradigm to study emotional processing and emotional modulation of pain and spinal nociception. Participants were 18 individuals with FM, 18 individuals with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and 19 healthy pain-free controls (HC). Mutilation, neutral, and erotic pictures were presented in 4 blocks; 2 blocks assessed only physiological-emotional reactions (ie, pleasure/arousal ratings, corrugator electromyography, startle modulation, skin conductance) in the absence of pain, and 2 blocks assessed emotional reactivity and emotional modulation of pain and the nociceptive flexion reflex (NFR, a physiological measure of spinal nociception) evoked by suprathreshold electric stimulations over the sural nerve. In general, mutilation pictures elicited displeasure, corrugator activity, subjective arousal, and sympathetic activation, whereas erotic pictures elicited pleasure, subjective arousal, and sympathetic activation. However, FM was associated with deficits in appetitive activation (eg, reduced pleasure/arousal to erotica). Moreover, emotional modulation of pain was observed in HC and RA, but not FM, even though all 3 groups evidenced modulation of NFR. Additionally, NFR thresholds were not lower in the FM group, indicating a lack of spinal sensitization. Together, these results suggest that FM is associated with a disruption of supraspinal processes associated with positive affect and emotional modulation of pain, but not brain-to-spinal cord circuitry that modulates spinal nociceptive processes.

  2. Impact of behavioral control on the processing of nociceptive stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James W Grau

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available How nociceptive signals are processed within the spinal cord, and whether these signals lead to behavioral signs of neuropathic pain, depends upon their relation to other events and behavior. Our work shows that these relations can have a lasting effect on spinal plasticity, inducing a form of learning that alters the effect of subsequent nociceptive stimuli. The capacity of lower spinal systems to adapt, in the absence of brain input, is examined in spinally transected rats that receive a nociceptive shock to the tibialis anterior muscle of one hind leg. If shock is delivered whenever the leg is extended (controllable stimulation, it induces an increase in flexion duration that minimizes net shock exposure. This learning is not observed in subjects that receive the same amount of shock independent of leg position (uncontrollable stimulation. These two forms of stimulation have a lasting, and divergent, effect on subsequent learning: Controllable stimulation enables learning whereas uncontrollable stimulation disables it (learning deficit. Uncontrollable stimulation also enhances mechanical reactivity (allodynia. We review evidence that training with controllable stimulation engages a BDNF-dependent process that can both prevent and reverse the consequences of uncontrollable shock. We relate these effects to changes in BDNF protein and TrkB signaling. Controllable stimulation is also shown to counter the effects of peripheral inflammation (from intradermal capsaicin. A model is proposed that assumes nociceptive input is gated at an early stage, within the dorsal horn. his gate is sensitive to current environmental relations (between proprioceptive and nociceptive input, allowing stimulation to be classified as controllable or uncontrollable. We further propose that the status of this gate is affected by past experience and that a history of uncontrollable stimulation will promote the development of neuropathic pain.

  3. Acute estrogen surge enhances inflammatory nociception without altering spinal Fos expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralya, Andrew; McCarson, Kenneth E

    2014-07-11

    Chronic pain is a major neurological disorder that can manifest differently between genders or sexes. The complex actions of sex hormones may underlie these differences; previous studies have suggested that elevated estrogen levels can enhance pain perception. The purpose of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that acute, activational effects of estradiol (E2) increase persistent inflammatory nociception, and anatomically where this modulation occurs. Spinal expression of Fos is widely used as a marker of nociceptive activation. This study used formalin-evoked nociception in ovariectomized (OVX) adult female rats and measured late-phase hindlimb flinching and Fos expression in the spinal cord, and their modification by acute estrogen supplementation similar to a proestrus surge. Six days after ovariectomy, female rats were injected subcutaneously (s.c.) with 10μg/kg E2 or vehicle. Twenty-four hours later, 50μL of 1.25% or 100μL of 5% formalin was injected into the right hindpaw; hindlimb flinches were counted, and spinal cords removed 2h after formalin injection. The numbers of Fos-expressing neurons in sections of the lumbar spinal cord were analyzed using immunohistochemistry. Formalin-induced inflammation produced a dose-dependent increase in late-phase hindlimb flinching, and E2 pretreatment increased flinching following 5%, but not 1.25% formalin injection. Despite the modification of behavior by E2, the number of spinal Fos-positive neurons was not altered by E2 pretreatment. These findings demonstrate that an acute proestrus-like surge in serum estrogen can produce a stimulus-intensity-dependent increase in inflammation-evoked nociceptive behavior. However, the lack of effect on spinal Fos expression suggests that this enhancement of nociceptive signaling by estrogen is independent of changes in peripheral activation of, expression of the immediate early gene Fos by, or signal throughput of spinal nociceptive neurons.

  4. Aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 regulates nociception in rodent models of acute inflammatory pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambelli, Vanessa O; Gross, Eric R; Chen, Che-Hong; Gutierrez, Vanessa P; Cury, Yara; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2014-08-27

    Exogenous aldehydes can cause pain in animal models, suggesting that aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH2), which metabolizes many aldehydes, may regulate nociception. To test this hypothesis, we generated a knock-in mouse with an inactivating point mutation in ALDH2 (ALDH2*2), which is also present in human ALDH2 of ~540 million East Asians. The ALDH2*1/*2 heterozygotic mice exhibited a larger response to painful stimuli than their wild-type littermates, and this heightened nociception was inhibited by an ALDH2-selective activator (Alda-1). No effect on inflammation per se was observed. Using a rat model, we then showed that nociception tightly correlated with ALDH activity (R(2) = 0.90) and that reduced nociception was associated with less early growth response protein 1 (EGR1) in the spinal cord and less reactive aldehyde accumulation at the insult site (including acetaldehyde and 4-hydroxynonenal). Further, acetaldehyde- and formalin-induced nociceptive behavior was greater in the ALDH2*1/*2 mice than in the wild-type mice. Finally, Alda-1 treatment was even beneficial when given after the inflammatory agent was administered. Our data in rodent models suggest that the mitochondrial enzyme ALDH2 regulates nociception and could serve as a molecular target for pain control, with ALDH2 activators, such as Alda-1, as potential non-narcotic, cardiac-safe analgesics. Furthermore, our results suggest a possible genetic basis for East Asians' apparent lower pain tolerance.

  5. The zebrafish as a model for nociception studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malafoglia, Valentina; Bryant, Bruce; Raffaeli, William; Giordano, Antonio; Bellipanni, Gianfranco

    2013-10-01

    Nociception is the sensory mechanism used to detect cues that can harm an organism. The understanding of the neural networks and molecular controls of the reception of pain remains an ongoing challenge for biologists. While we have made significant progress in identifying a number of molecules and pathways that are involved in transduction of noxious stimuli, from the skin through the sensory receptor cell and from this to the spinal cord on into the central nervous system, we still lack a clear understanding of the perceptual processes, the responses to pain and the regulation of pain perception. Mice and rat animal models have been extensively used for nociception studies. However, the study of pain and noiception in these organisms can be rather laborious, costly and time consuming. Conversely, the use of Drosophila and Caenorhabditis elegans may be affected by the large evolutionary distance between these animals and humans. We outline here the reasons why zebrafish presents a new and attractive model for studying pain reception and responses and the most interesting findings in the study of nociception that have been obtained using the zebrafish model.

  6. DNA Methylation Modulates Nociceptive Sensitization after Incision.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Sun

    Full Text Available DNA methylation is a key epigenetic mechanism controlling DNA accessibility and gene expression. Blockade of DNA methylation can significantly affect pain behaviors implicated in neuropathic and inflammatory pain. However, the role of DNA methylation with regard to postoperative pain has not yet been explored. In this study we sought to investigate the role of DNA methylation in modulating incisional pain and identify possible targets under DNA methylation and contributing to incisional pain. DNA methyltranferase (DNMT inhibitor 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine significantly reduced incision-induced mechanical allodynia and thermal sensitivity. Aza-2'-deoxycytidine also reduced hindpaw swelling after incision, suggesting an anti-inflammatory effect. Global DNA methylation and DNMT3b expression were increased in skin after incision, but none of DNMT1, DNMT3a or DNMT3b was altered in spinal cord or DRG. The expression of proopiomelanocortin Pomc encoding β-endorphin and Oprm1 encoding the mu-opioid receptor were upregulated peripherally after incision; moreover, Oprm1 expression was further increased under DNMT inhibitor treatment. Finally, local peripheral injection of the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone significantly exacerbated incision-induced mechanical hypersensitivity. These results suggest that DNA methylation is functionally relevant to incisional nociceptive sensitization, and that mu-opioid receptor signaling might be one methylation regulated pathway controlling sensitization after incision.

  7. Divergent Modulation of Nociception by Glutamatergic and GABAergic Neuronal Subpopulations in the Periaqueductal Gray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grajales-Reyes, Jose G.; Copits, Bryan A.; O’Brien, Daniel E.; Trigg, Sarah L.; Gomez, Adrian M.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (vlPAG) constitutes a major descending pain modulatory system and is a crucial site for opioid-induced analgesia. A number of previous studies have demonstrated that glutamate and GABA play critical opposing roles in nociceptive processing in the vlPAG. It has been suggested that glutamatergic neurotransmission exerts antinociceptive effects, whereas GABAergic neurotransmission exert pronociceptive effects on pain transmission, through descending pathways. The inability to exclusively manipulate subpopulations of neurons in the PAG has prevented direct testing of this hypothesis. Here, we demonstrate the different contributions of genetically defined glutamatergic and GABAergic vlPAG neurons in nociceptive processing by employing cell type-specific chemogenetic approaches in mice. Global chemogenetic manipulation of vlPAG neuronal activity suggests that vlPAG neural circuits exert tonic suppression of nociception, consistent with previous pharmacological and electrophysiological studies. However, selective modulation of GABAergic or glutamatergic neurons demonstrates an inverse regulation of nociceptive behaviors by these cell populations. Selective chemogenetic activation of glutamatergic neurons, or inhibition of GABAergic neurons, in vlPAG suppresses nociception. In contrast, inhibition of glutamatergic neurons, or activation of GABAergic neurons, in vlPAG facilitates nociception. Our findings provide direct experimental support for a model in which excitatory and inhibitory neurons in the PAG bidirectionally modulate nociception. PMID:28374016

  8. Cytomegalovirus upregulates expression of CCR5 in central memory cord blood mononuclear cells, which may facilitate in utero HIV type 1 transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Erica L; Howard, Chanie L; Thurman, Joy; Pontiff, Kyle; Johnson, Elan S; Chakraborty, Rana

    2015-01-15

    Administration of combination antiretroviral therapy to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected pregnant women significantly reduces vertical transmission. In contrast, maternal co-opportunistic infection with primary or reactivated cytomegalovirus (CMV) or other pathogens may facilitate in utero transmission of HIV-1 by activation of cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMCs). Here we examine the targets and mechanisms that affect fetal susceptibility to HIV-1 in utero. Using flow cytometry, we demonstrate that the fraction of CD4(+)CD45RO(+) and CD4(+)CCR5(+) CBMCs is minimal, which may account for the low level of in utero HIV-1 transmission. Unstimulated CD4(+) CBMCs that lack CCR5/CD45RO showed reduced levels of HIV-1 infection. However, upon in vitro stimulation with CMV, CBMCs undergo increased proliferation to upregulate the fraction of T central memory cells and expression of CCR5, which enhances susceptibility to HIV-1 infection in vitro. These data suggest that activation induced by CMV in vivo may alter CCR5 expression in CD4(+) T central memory cells to promote in utero transmission of HIV-1.

  9. Pain modulation by nitric oxide in the spinal cord.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Aurelio M Freire

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is a versatile messenger molecule first associated with endothelial relaxing effects. In the central nervous system (CNS, NO synthesis is primarily triggered by activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptors and has a Janus face, with both beneficial and harmful properties, depending on concentration and the identity of its synthetic enzyme isoform. There are three isoforms of the NO synthesizing enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS: neuronal (nNOS, endothelial (eNOS, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, each one involved with specific events in the brain. In CNS, nNOS is involved with modulation of synaptic transmission through long-term potentiation in several regions, including nociceptive circuits in the spinal cord. Here, we review the role played by NO on central pain sensitization.

  10. Search and Neutralize Factors (Cspgs) that Induce Decline in Transmission to Motoneurons from Spared Fibers after Chronic Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    clinically relevant treatment to facilitate recovery after SCI. During the 6-moths of no-cost extension we have completed post - mortem immunochemistry... lesions during the recordings. Methods. Spinal cord injury. All procedures were performed on adult, female Sprague-Dawley rats (~210 g) in compliance... post -operative pain. Contusion injury was performed at T10 spinal level using computer controlled IH-0400 Impactor device (Precision System and

  11. Ependyma of the central canal of the rat spinal cord: a light and transmission electron microscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruni, J E; Reddy, K

    1987-06-01

    Ependymal cells of the rat central canal were examined with a view to identifying features that distinguish them regionally and from their counterparts elsewhere in the ventricular system. The results revealed that the lining consisted for the most part of a pseudostratified layer of uniformly organised cuboidal to columnar ependymal cells present in largest numbers in lumbar and sacral segments and in the conus. Two cell variants were identified on the basis of the presence or absence of a radially directed cytoplasmic process originating from the base of the cell. The tanycytic form of ependymal cell was encountered along the entire length of the central canal but with increased frequency in caudalmost segments. Ependymal cells were largely similar in ultrastructural appearance along the length of the cord. Although they were also similar in appearance and orientation to their counterparts in the ventricles they did exhibit some unique features. The most notable were the prominent junctional complexes and associated filaments present along the lateral border of the cells near their apex and the abundance of intermediate filaments in tanycytes. The central canal of the filum differed most markedly from other segments of the cord and resembled in structure the primitive ependymal tube of the caudal cord in lower vertebrates. Ependymal cells of the cord were not sufficiently dissimilar morphologically from their counterparts in the ventricles to account for differences in proliferative capacity in response to localised injury. A factor that merits further study is the difference in numbers of tanycyte ependymal cells in the two locations for they may be the reactive elements that proliferate in response to injury.

  12. Search and Neutralize Factors (CSPGs) that Induce Decline in Transmission to Neurons from Spared Fibers after Chronic Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    demonstrating acute effects of NG2 antibody on removing inhibitory effect of NG2 on axonal conduction. Representative traces of EPSPs recorded...Superimposed averaged responses recorded from the opposite side of the cord in same rat, showing depression of EPSPs after injection of NG2 in absence of NG2...responses were measured again. We found that intraspinal injections of NG2-Ab did not induce changes in the amplitude of intracellularly recorded EPSPs

  13. Responsiveness of electrical nociceptive detection thresholds to capsaicin (8 %)‑induced changes in nociceptive processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doll, Robert J.; Amerongen, van Guido; Hay, Justin L.; Groeneveld, Geert J.; Veltink, Peter H.; Buitenweg, Jan R.

    2016-01-01

    Pain disorders can be initiated and maintained by malfunctioning of one or several mechanisms underlying the nociceptive function. Psychophysical procedures allow the estimation of nociceptive detection thresholds using intra-epidermal electrical stimuli. By varying the temporal properties of electr

  14. Tumor necrosis factor α sensitizes spinal cord TRPV1 receptors to the endogenous agonist N-oleoyldopamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spicarova Diana

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Modulation of synaptic transmission in the spinal cord dorsal horn is thought to be involved in the development and maintenance of different pathological pain states. The proinflamatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα, is an established pain modulator in both the peripheral and the central nervous system. Up-regulation of TNFα and its receptors (TNFR in dorsal root ganglion (DRG cells and in the spinal cord has been shown to play an important role in neuropathic and inflammatory pain conditions. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1 receptors are known as molecular integrators of nociceptive stimuli in the periphery, but their role on the spinal endings of nociceptive DRG neurons is unclear. The endogenous TRPV1 receptor agonist N-oleoyldopamine (OLDA was shown previously to activate spinal TRPV1 receptors. In our experiments the possible influence of TNFα on presynaptic spinal cord TRPV1 receptor function was investigated. Using the patch-clamp technique, miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs were recorded in superficial dorsal horn neurons in acute slices after incubation with 60 nM TNFα. A population of dorsal horn neurons with capsaicin sensitive primary afferent input recorded after the TNFα pretreatment had a basal mEPSC frequency of 1.35 ± 0.20 Hz (n = 13, which was significantly higher when compared to a similar population of neurons in control slices (0.76 ± 0.08 Hz; n = 53; P

  15. Protein kinases mediate increment of the phosphorylation of cyclic AMP -responsive element binding protein in spinal cord of rats following capsaicin injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Junfa

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Strong noxious stimuli cause plastic changes in spinal nociceptive neurons. Intracellular signal transduction pathways from cellular membrane to nucleus, which may further regulate gene expression by critical transcription factors, convey peripheral stimulation. Cyclic AMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB is a well-characterized stimulus-induced transcription factor whose activation requires phosphorylation of the Serine-133 residue. Phospho-CREB can further induce gene transcription and strengthen synaptic transmission by the activation of the protein kinase cascades. However, little is known about the mechanisms by which CREB phosphorylation is regulated by protein kinases during nociception. This study was designed to use Western blot analysis to investigate the role of mitogen-activated protein (MAP/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK kinase (MEK 1/2, PKA and PKC in regulating the phosphorylation of CREB in the spinal cord of rats following intraplantar capsaicin injection. Results We found that capsaicin injection significantly increased the phosphorylation level of CREB in the ipsilateral side of the spinal cord. Pharmacological manipulation of MEK 1/2, PKA and PKC with their inhibitors (U0126, H89 and NPC 15473, respectively significantly blocked this increment of CREB phosphorylation. However, the expression of CREB itself showed no change in any group. Conclusion These findings suggest that the activation of intracellular MAP kinase, PKA and PKC cascades may contribute to the regulation of phospho-CREB in central nociceptive neurons following peripheral painful stimuli.

  16. Operant nociception in nonhuman primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangas, Brian D; Bergman, Jack

    2014-09-01

    The effective management of pain is a longstanding public health concern. Morphine-like opioids have long been front-line analgesics, but produce undesirable side effects that can limit their application. Slow progress in the introduction of novel improved medications for pain management over the last 5 decades has prompted a call for innovative translational research, including new preclinical assays. Most current in vivo procedures (eg, tail flick, hot plate, warm water tail withdrawal) assay the effects of nociceptive stimuli on simple spinal reflexes or unconditioned behavioral reactions. However, clinical treatment goals may include the restoration of previous behavioral activities, which can be limited by medication-related side effects that are not measured in such procedures. The present studies describe an apparatus and procedure to study the disruptive effects of nociceptive stimuli on voluntary behavior in nonhuman primates, and the ability of drugs to restore such behavior through their analgesic actions. Squirrel monkeys were trained to pull a cylindrical thermode for access to a highly palatable food. Next, sessions were conducted in which the temperature of the thermode was increased stepwise until responding stopped, permitting the determination of stable nociceptive thresholds. Tests revealed that several opioid analgesics, but not d-amphetamine or Δ(9)-THC, produced dose-related increases in threshold that were antagonist sensitive and efficacy dependent, consistent with their effects using traditional measures of antinociception. Unlike traditional reflex-based measures, however, the results also permitted the concurrent evaluation of response disruption, providing an index with which to characterize the behavioral selectivity of antinociceptive drugs.

  17. Role of L-DOPA in spinal nociceptive reflex activity: higher sensitivity of Aδ versus C fibre-evoked nociceptive reflexes to L-DOPA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schomburg, E D; Dibaj, P; Steffens, H

    2011-01-01

    The role of L-DOPA in spinal nociceptive reflex activity has been re-evaluated. In high spinal cats, with supraspinal loops being excluded, the onset of reflex facilitation induced by noxious radiant heat is delayed after injection of L-DOPA by 4 to 10 s, i.e. the early component of nociceptive reflex facilitation is blocked, while the late component persisted. Further investigations have shown that the early component of reflex facilitation induced by noxious radiant heat is mediated by Adelta-fibres and the late component by C-fibres. Therefore, it can be assumed that L-DOPA, like opioids, preferentially blocks the transmission in nociceptive reflex pathways from Adelta-fibres.

  18. Glial activation in the collagenase model of nociception associated with osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Lígia; Potes, Catarina S; Ferreira, Ana Rita; Castro-Lopes, José M; Ferreira-Gomes, Joana; Neto, Fani L

    2017-01-01

    Background Experimental osteoarthritis entails neuropathic-like changes in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons. Since glial activation has emerged as a key player in nociception, being reported in numerous models of neuropathic pain, we aimed at evaluating if glial cell activation may also occur in the DRG and spinal cord of rats with osteoarthritis induced by intra-articular injection of collagenase. Methods Osteoarthritis was induced by two injections, separated by three days, of 500 U of type II collagenase into the knee joint of rats. Movement-induced nociception was evaluated by the Knee-Bend and CatWalk tests during the following six weeks. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression in satellite glial cells of the DRG was assessed by immunofluorescence and Western Blot analysis; the pattern of GFAP and activating transcription factor-3 (ATF-3) expression was also compared through double immunofluorescence analysis. GFAP expression in astrocytes and IBA-1 expression in microglia of the L3–L5 spinal cord segments was assessed by immunohistochemistry and Western Blot analysis. The effect of the intrathecal administration of fluorocitrate, an inhibitor of glial activation, on movement-induced nociception was evaluated six weeks after the first collagenase injection. Results GFAP expression in satellite glial cells of collagenase-injected animals was significantly increased six weeks after osteoarthritis induction. Double immunofluorescence showed GFAP upregulation in satellite glial cells surrounding ATF-3-positive neurons. In the spinal cord of collagenase-injected animals, an ipsilateral upregulation of GFAP and IBA-1 was also observed. The inhibition of glial activation with fluorocitrate decreased movement- and loading-induced nociception. Conclusion Collagenase-induced knee osteoarthritis leads to the development of nociception associated with movement of the affected joint and to the activation of glial cells in both the DRG and the spinal cord

  19. Glial activation in the collagenase model of nociception associated with osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adães, Sara; Almeida, Lígia; Potes, Catarina S; Ferreira, Ana Rita; Castro-Lopes, José M; Ferreira-Gomes, Joana; Neto, Fani L

    2017-01-01

    Background Experimental osteoarthritis entails neuropathic-like changes in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons. Since glial activation has emerged as a key player in nociception, being reported in numerous models of neuropathic pain, we aimed at evaluating if glial cell activation may also occur in the DRG and spinal cord of rats with osteoarthritis induced by intra-articular injection of collagenase. Methods Osteoarthritis was induced by two injections, separated by three days, of 500 U of type II collagenase into the knee joint of rats. Movement-induced nociception was evaluated by the Knee-Bend and CatWalk tests during the following six weeks. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression in satellite glial cells of the DRG was assessed by immunofluorescence and Western Blot analysis; the pattern of GFAP and activating transcription factor-3 (ATF-3) expression was also compared through double immunofluorescence analysis. GFAP expression in astrocytes and IBA-1 expression in microglia of the L3-L5 spinal cord segments was assessed by immunohistochemistry and Western Blot analysis. The effect of the intrathecal administration of fluorocitrate, an inhibitor of glial activation, on movement-induced nociception was evaluated six weeks after the first collagenase injection. Results GFAP expression in satellite glial cells of collagenase-injected animals was significantly increased six weeks after osteoarthritis induction. Double immunofluorescence showed GFAP upregulation in satellite glial cells surrounding ATF-3-positive neurons. In the spinal cord of collagenase-injected animals, an ipsilateral upregulation of GFAP and IBA-1 was also observed. The inhibition of glial activation with fluorocitrate decreased movement- and loading-induced nociception. Conclusion Collagenase-induced knee osteoarthritis leads to the development of nociception associated with movement of the affected joint and to the activation of glial cells in both the DRG and the spinal cord

  20. Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels in Nociception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Takahiro; Adams, David J.

    Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) are a large and functionally diverse group of membrane ion channels ubiquitously expressed throughout the central and peripheral nervous systems. VGCCs contribute to various physiological processes and transduce electrical activity into other cellular functions. This chapter provides an overview of biophysical properties of VGCCs, including regulation by auxiliary subunits, and their physiological role in neuronal functions. Subsequently, then we focus on N-type calcium (Cav2.2) channels, in particular their diversity and specific antagonists. We also discuss the role of N-type calcium channels in nociception and pain transmission through primary sensory dorsal root ganglion neurons (nociceptors). It has been shown that these channels are expressed predominantly in nerve terminals of the nociceptors and that they control neurotransmitter release. To date, important roles of N-type calcium channels in pain sensation have been elucidated genetically and pharmacologically, indicating that specific N-type calcium channel antagonists or modulators are particularly useful as therapeutic drugs targeting chronic and neuropathic pain.

  1. Lateral inhibition during nociceptive processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quevedo, Alexandre S.; Mørch, Carsten Dahl; Andersen, Ole Kæseler

    2017-01-01

    of skin. Thus, the stimulation of the skin region between the endpoints of the lines appears to produce inhibition. These findings indicate that lateral inhibition limits spatial summation of pain and is an intrinsic component of nociceptive information processing. Disruption of such lateral inhibition......Spatial summation of pain is the increase of perceived intensity that occurs as the stimulated area increases. Spatial summation of pain is sub-additive in that increasing the stimulus area produces a disproportionately small increase in the perceived intensity of pain. A possible explanation...... for sub-additive summation may be that convergent excitatory information is modulated by lateral inhibition. To test the hypothesis that lateral inhibition may limit spatial summation of pain, we delivered different patterns of noxious thermal stimuli to the abdomens of 15 subjects using a computer...

  2. Top-Down Effect of Direct Current Stimulation on the Nociceptive Response of Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimov, Luiz Fabio; Franciosi, Adriano Cardozo; Campos, Ana Carolina Pinheiro; Brunoni, André Russowsky

    2016-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is an emerging, noninvasive technique of neurostimulation for treating pain. However, the mechanisms and pathways involved in its analgesic effects are poorly understood. Therefore, we investigated the effects of direct current stimulation (DCS) on thermal and mechanical nociceptive thresholds and on the activation of the midbrain periaqueductal gray (PAG) and the dorsal horn of the spinal cord (DHSC) in rats; these central nervous system areas are associated with pain processing. Male Wistar rats underwent cathodal DCS of the motor cortex and, while still under stimulation, were evaluated using tail-flick and paw pressure nociceptive tests. Sham stimulation and naive rats were used as controls. We used a randomized design; the assays were not blinded to the experimenter. Immunoreactivity of the early growth response gene 1 (Egr-1), which is a marker of neuronal activation, was evaluated in the PAG and DHSC, and enkephalin immunoreactivity was evaluated in the DHSC. DCS did not change the thermal nociceptive threshold; however, it increased the mechanical nociceptive threshold of both hind paws compared with that of controls, characterizing a topographical effect. DCS decreased the Egr-1 labeling in the PAG and DHSC as well as the immunoreactivity of spinal enkephalin. Altogether, the data suggest that DCS disinhibits the midbrain descending analgesic pathway, consequently inhibiting spinal nociceptive neurons and causing an increase in the nociceptive threshold. This study reinforces the idea that the motor cortex participates in the neurocircuitry that is involved in analgesia and further clarifies the mechanisms of action of tDCS in pain treatment. PMID:27071073

  3. Nociceptive neurons detect cytokines in arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Schaible, Hans-Georg

    2014-01-01

    Proinflammatory cytokines are major mediators in the pathogenesis of diseases of joints such as rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. This review emphasizes that proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1beta, interleukin-6 and interleukin-17 are also mediators of pain by directly acting on the nociceptive system. Proportions of nociceptive sensory neurons express receptors for these cytokines, and the application of cytokines rapidly changes the excitabil...

  4. Lateral inhibition during nociceptive processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quevedo, Alexandre S; Mørch, Carsten Dahl; Andersen, Ole K; Coghill, Robert C

    2017-06-01

    Spatial summation of pain (SSP) is the increase of perceived intensity that occurs as the stimulated area increases. Spatial summation of pain is subadditive in that increasing the stimulus area produces a disproportionately small increase in the perceived intensity of pain. A possible explanation for subadditive summation may be that convergent excitatory information is modulated by lateral inhibition. To test the hypothesis that lateral inhibition may limit SSP, we delivered different patterns of noxious thermal stimuli to the abdomens of 15 subjects using a computer-controlled CO2 laser. Lines (5 mm wide) of variable lengths (4, 8 cm) were compared with 2-point stimuli delivered at the same position/separation as the length of lines. When compared with one-point control stimuli, 2-point stimulus patterns produced statistically significant SSP, while no such summation was detected during line stimulus patterns. Direct comparison of pain intensity evoked by 2-point pattern stimuli with line pattern stimuli revealed that 2-point patterns were perceived as significantly more painful, despite the fact that the 2-point pattern stimulated far smaller areas of skin. Thus, the stimulation of the skin region between the endpoints of the lines appears to produce inhibition. These findings indicate that lateral inhibition limits SSP and is an intrinsic component of nociceptive information processing. Disruption of such lateral inhibition may contribute substantially to the radiation of some types of chronic pain.

  5. Depletion of vesicular zinc in dorsal horn of spinal cord causes increased neuropathic pain in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jo, Seung; Danscher, Gorm; Schrøder, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    to neuropathic pain we applied Chung's rodent pain model on BALB/c mice, and traced zinc transporter 3 (ZnT3) proteins and zinc ions with immunohistochemistry and autometallography (AMG), respectively. Under anesthesia the left fifth lumbar spinal nerve was ligated in male mice in order to produced neuropathic......Zinc enriched (ZEN) neurons and terminals are abundant in the rodent spinal cord. Zinc ions have been suggested to modulate the excitability of primary afferent fibers believed to be important in nociceptive transmission. To test the hypothesis that vesicular zinc concentration is related...... of the smaller spinal ganglion cell, but 5 days after spinal nerve transection zinc precipitation was also found in the lager ganglion cells. The present results indicate that zinc may be involved in pain mechanism in the spinal ganglion level. These results support the hypothesis that vesicular zinc might have...

  6. Mechanisms of G Protein-Coupled Estrogen Receptor-Mediated Spinal Nociception

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deliu, Elena; Brailoiu, G. Cristina; Arterburn, Jeffrey B.

    2012-01-01

    in spinal nociceptive processing. Intrathecal challenging of mice with the GPER agonist G-1 results in pain-related behaviors. GPER antagonism with G15 reduces the G-1-induced response. Electrophysiological recordings from superficial dorsal horn neurons indicate neuronal membrane depolarization with G-1......Human and animal studies suggest that estrogens are involved in the processing of nociceptive sensory information and analgesic responses in the central nervous system. Rapid pronociceptive estrogenic effects have been reported, some of which likely involve G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER......) activation. Membrane depolarization and increases in cytosolic calcium and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels are markers of neuronal activation, underlying pain sensitization in the spinal cord. Using behavioral, electrophysiological, and fluorescent imaging studies, we evaluated GPER involvement...

  7. Plasmodium falciparum genotypes in matched peripheral, placental and umbilical cord blood in an area characterised by unstable malaria transmission in eastern Sudan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar E. Fadlelseed

    2017-06-01

    Conclusion: Compared with the peripheral and cord samples, placental samples had a higher prevalence of submicroscopic parasitaemia. MSP1 alleles were predominant in the cord, while MSP2 alleles were predominant in the placental samples, which had a significant higher multiplicity of the infection.

  8. Treating Chronic Pain after Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    5   Our preliminary data indicated that severe SCI rats exhibited cold allodynia. During this cycle we confirmed and expanded our studies. We...reflecting expanded nociceptive inputs to dorsal horn neurons [17; 20; 54]. However, in contrast to SCI of moderate severity, we did not observe changes in...traumatic injuries, including spinal cord injury ( SCI ). Chronic pain so greatly affects quality of life that depression and suicide frequently result

  9. Role of NHE1 in Nociception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Elías Torres-López

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular pH is a fundamental parameter to cell function that requires tight homeostasis. In the absence of any regulation, excessive acidification of the cytosol would have the tendency to produce cellular damage. Mammalian Na+/H+ exchangers (NHEs are electroneutral Na+-dependent proteins that exchange extracellular Na+ for intracellular H+. To date, there are 9 identified NHE isoforms where NHE1 is the most ubiquitous member, known as the housekeeping exchanger. NHE1 seems to have a protective role in the ischemia-reperfusion injury and other inflammatory diseases. In nociception, NHE1 is found in neurons along nociceptive pathways, and its pharmacological inhibition increases nociceptive behavior in acute pain models at peripheral and central levels. Electrophysiological studies also show that NHE modulates electrical activity of primary nociceptive terminals. However, its role in neuropathic pain still remains controversial. In humans, NHE1 may be responsible for inflammatory bowel diseases since its expression is reduced in Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. The purpose of this work is to provide a review of the evidence about participation of NHE1 in the nociceptive processing.

  10. Forebrain Mechanisms of Nociception and Pain: Analysis through Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Kenneth L.

    1999-07-01

    Pain is a unified experience composed of interacting discriminative, affective-motivational, and cognitive components, each of which is mediated and modulated through forebrain mechanisms acting at spinal, brainstem, and cerebral levels. The size of the human forebrain in relation to the spinal cord gives anatomical emphasis to forebrain control over nociceptive processing. Human forebrain pathology can cause pain without the activation of nociceptors. Functional imaging of the normal human brain with positron emission tomography (PET) shows synaptically induced increases in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in several regions specifically during pain. We have examined the variables of gender, type of noxious stimulus, and the origin of nociceptive input as potential determinants of the pattern and intensity of rCBF responses. The structures most consistently activated across genders and during contact heat pain, cold pain, cutaneous laser pain or intramuscular pain were the contralateral insula and anterior cingulate cortex, the bilateral thalamus and premotor cortex, and the cerebellar vermis. These regions are commonly activated in PET studies of pain conducted by other investigators, and the intensity of the brain rCBF response correlates parametrically with perceived pain intensity. To complement the human studies, we developed an animal model for investigating stimulus-induced rCBF responses in the rat. In accord with behavioral measures and the results of human PET, there is a progressive and selective activation of somatosensory and limbic system structures in the brain and brainstem following the subcutaneous injection of formalin. The animal model and human PET studies should be mutually reinforcing and thus facilitate progress in understanding forebrain mechanisms of normal and pathological pain.

  11. Nociception, Pain, Negative Moods, and Behavior Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baliki, Marwan N; Apkarian, A Vania

    2015-08-05

    Recent neuroimaging studies suggest that the brain adapts with pain, as well as imparts risk for developing chronic pain. Within this context, we revisit the concepts for nociception, acute and chronic pain, and negative moods relative to behavior selection. We redefine nociception as the mechanism protecting the organism from injury, while acute pain as failure of avoidant behavior, and a mesolimbic threshold process that gates the transformation of nociceptive activity to conscious pain. Adaptations in this threshold process are envisioned to be critical for development of chronic pain. We deconstruct chronic pain into four distinct phases, each with specific mechanisms, and outline current state of knowledge regarding these mechanisms: the limbic brain imparting risk, and the mesolimbic learning processes reorganizing the neocortex into a chronic pain state. Moreover, pain and negative moods are envisioned as a continuum of aversive behavioral learning, which enhance survival by protecting against threats.

  12. Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase modulates nociception: evidence from genetic deletion and pharmacological inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azkona, Garikoitz; Saavedra, Ana; Aira, Zigor; Aluja, David; Xifró, Xavier; Baguley, Tyler; Alberch, Jordi; Ellman, Jonathan A; Lombroso, Paul J; Azkue, Jon J; Pérez-Navarro, Esther

    2016-02-01

    The information from nociceptors is processed in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord by complex circuits involving excitatory and inhibitory interneurons. It is well documented that GluN2B and ERK1/2 phosphorylation contributes to central sensitization. Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) dephosphorylates GluN2B and ERK1/2, promoting internalization of GluN2B and inactivation of ERK1/2. The activity of STEP was modulated by genetic (STEP knockout mice) and pharmacological (recently synthesized STEP inhibitor, TC-2153) approaches. STEP(61) protein levels in the lumbar spinal cord were determined in male and female mice of different ages. Inflammatory pain was induced by complete Freund's adjuvant injection. Behavioral tests, immunoblotting, and electrophysiology were used to analyze the effect of STEP on nociception. Our results show that both genetic deletion and pharmacological inhibition of STEP induced thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia, which were accompanied by increased pGluN2B(Tyr1472) and pERK1/2(Thr202/Tyr204)levels in the lumbar spinal cord. Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase heterozygous and knockout mice presented a similar phenotype. Furthermore, electrophysiological experiments showed that TC-2153 increased C fiber-evoked spinal field potentials. Interestingly, we found that STEP(61) protein levels in the lumbar spinal cord inversely correlated with thermal hyperalgesia associated with age and female gender in mice. Consistently, STEP knockout mice failed to show age-related thermal hyperalgesia, although gender-related differences were preserved. Moreover, in a model of inflammatory pain, hyperalgesia was associated with increased phosphorylation-mediated STEP(61) inactivation and increased pGluN2B(Tyr1472) and pERK1/2(Thr202/Tyr204)levels in the lumbar spinal cord. Collectively, the present results underscore an important role of spinal STEP activity in the modulation of nociception.

  13. Fos, nociception and the dorsal horn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coggeshall, Richard E

    2005-12-01

    The protooncogene c-fos is rapidly activated after noxious stimuli to express the protein Fos in spinal dorsal horn neurons that are in the 'correct' locations for nociceptive information transfer. As such, therefore, mapping Fos expression in these neurons is at present the best global marker for efficiently locating populations of neurons in the awake animal that respond to nociceptive input. This allows, among other things, precise behavioral measurements to be correlated with Fos expression. Two arenas where mapping dorsal horn Fos expression has made a major impact are in the anatomy of nociceptive systems and as a useful assay for the analgesic properties of various therapeutic regimens. Also Fos expression is the only way to map populations of neurons that are responding to non-localized input such as withdrawal after addiction and vascular occlusion. Another insight is that it shows a clear activation of neurons in superficial 'pain-processing' laminae by innocuous stimuli after nerve lesions, a finding that presumably bears on the allodynia that often accompanies these lesions. It is to be understood, however, that the Fos localizations are not sufficient unto themselves, but the major function of these studies is to efficiently locate populations of cells in nociceptive pathways so that powerful anatomic and physiologic techniques can be brought to bear efficiently. Thus, the purpose of this review is to summarize the studies whose numbers are geometrically expanding that deal with Fos in the dorsal horn and the conclusions therefrom.

  14. Mechanical signalling in tissues and its possible role in nociception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traverso, Silvano

    2011-01-01

    Mechanotransduction is known to play a key role in physiological as well as pathological processes. In the present work, the possibility is discussed that even weak mechanical signals travelling through the extracellular matrix can elicit significant cellular responses, by causing gel/sol transitions and actomyosin contractions. Such mechanical cues can result from both physiological activities, such as the heartbeat, and noxious stimuli to which tissues respond by rearranging the cells' cytoskeleton and remodelling the extracellular matrix. The possibility is explored that such viscoelastic modifications also affect the function of nociceptors, thus modulating pain transmission. Growing evidence indicates that the rearrangement of the axonal cytoskeleton represents a key step in nociception. Hyperalgesia is suggested to result from an exceedingly dynamical state of the nociceptor's cytoskeleton, which would lead to enhanced electrical conduction and synaptic facilitation.

  15. Postnatal temporal, spatial and modality tuning of nociceptive cutaneous flexion reflexes in human infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelissen, Laura; Fabrizi, Lorenzo; Patten, Deborah; Worley, Alan; Meek, Judith; Boyd, Stewart; Slater, Rebeccah; Fitzgerald, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Cutaneous flexion reflexes are amongst the first behavioural responses to develop and are essential for the protection and survival of the newborn organism. Despite this, there has been no detailed, quantitative study of their maturation in human neonates. Here we use surface electromyographic (EMG) recording of biceps femoris activity in preterm (reflex (>4 seconds) to a single noxious skin lance which decreases significantly with gestational age. This reflex is not restricted to the stimulated limb: heel lance evokes equal ipsilateral and contralateral reflexes in preterm and term infants. We further show that infant flexion withdrawal reflexes are not always nociceptive specific: in 29% of preterm infants, tactile stimulation evokes EMG activity that is indistinguishable from noxious stimulation. In 40% of term infants, tactile responses are also present but significantly smaller than nociceptive reflexes. Infant flexion reflexes are also evoked by application of calibrated punctate von Frey hairs (vFh), 0.8-17.2 g, to the heel. Von Frey hair thresholds increase significantly with gestational age and the magnitude of vFh evoked reflexes are significantly greater in preterm than term infants. Furthermore flexion reflexes in both groups are sensitized by repeated vFh stimulation. Thus human infant flexion reflexes differ in temporal, modality and spatial characteristics from those in adults. Reflex magnitude and tactile sensitivity decreases and nociceptive specificity and spatial organisation increases with gestational age. Strong, relatively non-specific, reflex sensitivity in early life may be important for driving postnatal activity dependent maturation of targeted spinal cord sensory circuits.

  16. Emotional modulation of pain and spinal nociception in persons with major depressive disorder (MDD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Ellen L; DelVentura, Jennifer L; Bartley, Emily J; Vincent, Ashley L; Rhudy, Jamie L

    2013-12-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with risk for chronic pain, but the mechanisms contributing to the MDD and pain relationship are unclear. To examine whether disrupted emotional modulation of pain might contribute, this study assessed emotional processing and emotional modulation of pain in healthy controls and unmedicated persons with MDD (14 MDD, 14 controls). Emotionally charged pictures (erotica, neutral, mutilation) were presented in 4 blocks. Two blocks assessed physiological-emotional reactions (pleasure/arousal ratings, corrugator electromyography (EMG), startle modulation, skin conductance) in the absence of pain and 2 blocks assessed emotional modulation of pain and the nociceptive flexion reflex (NFR, a physiological measure of spinal nociception) evoked by suprathreshold electric stimulations. Results indicated pictures generally evoked the intended emotional responses; erotic pictures elicited pleasure, subjective arousal, and smaller startle magnitudes, whereas mutilation pictures elicited displeasure, corrugator EMG activation, and subjective/physiological arousal. However, emotional processing was partially disrupted in MDD, as evidenced by a blunted pleasure response to erotica and a failure to modulate startle according to a valence linear trend. Furthermore, emotional modulation of pain was observed in controls but not MDD, even though there were no group differences in NFR threshold or emotional modulation of NFR. Together, these results suggest supraspinal processes associated with emotion processing and emotional modulation of pain may be disrupted in MDD, but brain to spinal cord processes that modulate spinal nociception are intact. Thus, emotional modulation of pain deficits may be a phenotypic marker for future pain risk in MDD.

  17. Inflammation unmasks gabapentin's effect on Aδ-fiber evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents in substantia gelatinosa neurons of rat spinal cord

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘智良; 徐如祥; 杨鲲

    2003-01-01

    ObjectiveTo study the analgesic mechanism of gabapentin, an anticonvulsant, during antinociceptive clinical treatment. MethodsWhole-cell voltage-clamp recordings were taken from adult rat spinal cord slices to investigate the effect of gabapentin on primary afferent Aδ-fiber evokedexcitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) to substantia gelatinosa (SG) neurons in normal and inflamed (established by plantar injection of carrageenan) rats. Results Gabapentin (5-20 μmol/L for 5 min) depressed dorsal root Aδ fiber evoked polysynaptic, but not monosynaptic EPSCs to SG experiencing inflammation by about 25ptic or monosynaptic EPSCs in normal rats. Gabapentin failed to block a glutamate receptor subtype, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), -induced slow excitatory currents on SG neurons.ConclusionsInflammation, at least in part, unmasks the gabapentin depression on nociception transmission in the dorsal horn, and this depression is not due to the blockade of postsynaptic NMDA receptor.

  18. The RS504393 Influences the Level of Nociceptive Factors and Enhances Opioid Analgesic Potency in Neuropathic Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatkowski, Klaudia; Piotrowska, Anna; Rojewska, Ewelina; Makuch, Wioletta; Mika, Joanna

    2017-09-01

    Increasing evidence has indicated that activated glial cells releasing nociceptive factors, such as interleukins and chemokines, are of key importance for neuropathic pain. Significant changes in the production of nociceptive factors are associated with the low effectiveness of opioids in neuropathic pain. Recently, it has been suggested that CCL2/CCR2 signaling is important for nociception. Here, we studied the time course changes in the mRNA/protein level of CD40/Iba-1, CCL2 and CCR2 in the spinal cord/dorsal root ganglia (DRG) in rats following chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve. Moreover, we examined the influence of intrathecal preemptive and repeated (daily for 7 days) administration of RS504393, CCR2 antagonist, on pain-related behavior and the associated biochemical changes of some nociceptive factors as well as its influence on opioid effectiveness. We observed simultaneous upregulation of Iba-1, CCL2, CCR2 in the spinal cord on 7th day after CCI. Additionally, we demonstrated that repeated administration of RS504393 not only attenuated tactile/thermal hypersensitivity but also enhanced the analgesic properties of morphine and buprenorphine under neuropathy. Our results proof that repeated administration of RS504393 reduced the mRNA and/or protein levels of pronociceptive factors, such as IL-1beta, IL-18, IL-6 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and some of their receptors in the spinal cord and/or DRG. Furthermore, RS504393 elevated the spinal protein level of antinociceptive IL-1alpha and IL-18 binding protein. Our data provide new evidence that CCR2 is a promising target for diminishing neuropathic pain and enhancing the opioid analgesic effects.

  19. Central nervous system mast cells in peripheral inflammatory nociception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellmeier Wilfried

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Functional aspects of mast cell-neuronal interactions remain poorly understood. Mast cell activation and degranulation can result in the release of powerful pro-inflammatory mediators such as histamine and cytokines. Cerebral dural mast cells have been proposed to modulate meningeal nociceptor activity and be involved in migraine pathophysiology. Little is known about the functional role of spinal cord dural mast cells. In this study, we examine their potential involvement in nociception and synaptic plasticity in superficial spinal dorsal horn. Changes of lower spinal cord dura mast cells and their contribution to hyperalgesia are examined in animal models of peripheral neurogenic and non-neurogenic inflammation. Results Spinal application of supernatant from activated cultured mast cells induces significant mechanical hyperalgesia and long-term potentiation (LTP at spinal synapses of C-fibers. Lumbar, thoracic and thalamic preparations are then examined for mast cell number and degranulation status after intraplantar capsaicin and carrageenan. Intradermal capsaicin induces a significant percent increase of lumbar dural mast cells at 3 hours post-administration. Peripheral carrageenan in female rats significantly increases mast cell density in the lumbar dura, but not in thoracic dura or thalamus. Intrathecal administration of the mast cell stabilizer sodium cromoglycate or the spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk inhibitor BAY-613606 reduce the increased percent degranulation and degranulated cell density of lumbar dural mast cells after capsaicin and carrageenan respectively, without affecting hyperalgesia. Conclusion The results suggest that lumbar dural mast cells may be sufficient but are not necessary for capsaicin or carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia.

  20. Pain-related mediators underlie incision-induced mechanical nociception in the dorsal root ganglia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiuhong Yuan; Xiangyan Liu; Qiuping Tang; Yunlong Deng

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 50-70% of patients experience incision-induced mechanical nociception after sur-gery. However, the mechanism underlying incision-induced mechanical nociception is stil unclear. Interleukin-10 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor are important pain mediators, but whether in-terleukin-10 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor are involved in incision-induced mechanical no-ciception remains uncertain. In this study, forty rats were divided randomly into the incision surgery (n=32) and sham surgery (n=8) groups. Plantar incision on the central part of left hind paw was performed under anesthesia in rats from the surgery group. Rats in the sham surgery group re-ceived anesthesia, but not an incision. Von Frey test results showed that, compared with the sham surgery group, incision surgery decreased the withdrawal threshold of rats at 0.5, 3, 6 and 24 hours after incision. Immunofluorescence staining in the dorsal root ganglia of the spinal cord (L 3-5 ) showed that interleukin-10 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor were expressed mainly on smal-and medium-sized neurons (diameter40μm) at 6 and 24 hours after incision surgery, which corresponded to the decreased mechanical withdrawal threshold of rats in the surgery group. These experimental findings suggest that expression pattern shift of interleukin-10 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor induced by inci-sion surgery in dorsal root ganglia of rats was closely involved in lowering the threshold to me-chanical stimulus in the hind paw fol owing incision surgery. Pain-related mediators induced by in-cision surgery in dorsal root ganglia of rats possibly underlie mechanical nociception in ipsilateral hind paws.

  1. Cord Blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Abroun

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available   Stem cells are naïve or master cells. This means they can transform into special 200 cell types as needed by body, and each of these cells has just one function. Stem cells are found in many parts of the human body, although some sources have richer concentrations than others. Some excellent sources of stem cells, such as bone marrow, peripheral blood, cord blood, other tissue stem cells and human embryos, which last one are controversial and their use can be illegal in some countries. Cord blood is a sample of blood taken from a newborn baby's umbilical cord. It is a rich source of stem cells, umbilical cord blood and tissue are collected from material that normally has no use following a child’s birth. Umbilical cord blood and tissue cells are rich sources of stem cells, which have been used in the treatment of over 80 diseases including leukemia, lymphoma and anemia as bone marrow stem cell potency.  The most common disease category has been leukemia. The next largest group is inherited diseases. Patients with lymphoma, myelodysplasia and severe aplastic anemia have also been successfully transplanted with cord blood. Cord blood is obtained by syringing out the placenta through the umbilical cord at the time of childbirth, after the cord has been detached from the newborn. Collecting stem cells from umbilical blood and tissue is ethical, pain-free, safe and simple. When they are needed to treat your child later in life, there will be no rejection or incompatibility issues, as the procedure will be using their own cells. In contrast, stem cells from donors do have these potential problems. By consider about cord blood potency, cord blood banks (familial or public were established. In IRAN, four cord blood banks has activity, Shariati BMT center cord blood bank, Royan familial cord blood banks, Royan public cord blood banks and Iranian Blood Transfusion Organ cord blood banks. Despite 50,000 sample which storage in these banks, but the

  2. Endocannabinoids in the brainstem modulate dural trigeminovascular nociceptive traffic via CB1 and "triptan" receptors: implications in migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerman, Simon; Holland, Philip R; Lasalandra, Michele P; Goadsby, Peter J

    2013-09-11

    Activation and sensitization of trigeminovascular nociceptive pathways is believed to contribute to the neural substrate of the severe and throbbing nature of pain in migraine. Endocannabinoids, as well as being physiologically analgesic, are known to inhibit dural trigeminovascular nociceptive responses. They are also involved in the descending modulation of cutaneous-evoked C-fiber spinal nociceptive responses from the brainstem. The purpose of this study was to determine whether endocannabinoids are involved in the descending modulation of dural and/or cutaneous facial trigeminovascular nociceptive responses, from the brainstem ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (vlPAG). CB1 receptor activation in the vlPAG attenuated dural-evoked Aδ-fiber neurons (maximally by 19%) and basal spontaneous activity (maximally by 33%) in the rat trigeminocervical complex, but there was no effect on cutaneous facial receptive field responses. This inhibitory vlPAG-mediated modulation was inhibited by specific CB1 receptor antagonism, given via the vlPAG, and with a 5-HT1B/1D receptor antagonist, given either locally in the vlPAG or systemically. These findings demonstrate for the first time that brainstem endocannabinoids provide descending modulation of both basal trigeminovascular neuronal tone and Aδ-fiber dural-nociceptive responses, which differs from the way the brainstem modulates spinal nociceptive transmission. Furthermore, our data demonstrate a novel interaction between serotonergic and endocannabinoid systems in the processing of somatosensory nociceptive information, suggesting that some of the therapeutic action of triptans may be via endocannabinoid containing neurons in the vlPAG.

  3. Nociceptive Effects of Locally Treated Metoprolol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nursima Cukadar

    2015-06-01

    Results: Metoprolol, an antagonist, significantly decreased the thermal latency and mechanical thresholds with dose and time dependent manner. However, dobutamine, an agonist, enhanced the latency and thresholds dose and time dependent. Conclusions: This results suggest that in contrast to dobutamine, locally treated metoprolol may cause hyperalgesic and allodynic actions. In addition, our results can demonstrate that peripheral beta-adrenergic receptors can play important roles in nociceptive process. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(2.000: 258-266

  4. Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide Modulates Heat Nociception in the Human Brain - An fMRI Study in Healthy Volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asghar, Mohammad Sohail; Becerra, Lino; Larsson, Henrik B W

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intravenous infusion of calcitonin-gene-related-peptide (CGRP) provokes headache and migraine in humans. Mechanisms underlying CGRP-induced headache are not fully clarified and it is unknown to what extent CGRP modulates nociceptive processing in the brain. To elucidate this we record...... cortex. Sumatriptan injection reversed these changes. CONCLUSION: The changes in BOLD-signals in the brain after CGRP infusion suggests that systemic CGRP modulates nociceptive transmission in the trigeminal pain pathways in response to noxious heat stimuli.......BACKGROUND: Intravenous infusion of calcitonin-gene-related-peptide (CGRP) provokes headache and migraine in humans. Mechanisms underlying CGRP-induced headache are not fully clarified and it is unknown to what extent CGRP modulates nociceptive processing in the brain. To elucidate this we recorded...

  5. Trigemino-hypoglossal somatic reflex in the pharmacological studies of nociception in orofacial area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubrzycki, Marek; Janecka, Anna; Zubrzycka, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Disorders involving the orofacial area represent a major medical and social problem. They are a consequence of central nociceptive processes associated with stimulation of the trigeminal nerve nucleus. A rat model of trigeminal pain, utilizing tongue jerks evoked by electrical tooth pulp stimulation during perfusion of the cerebral ventricles with various neuropeptide solutions, can be used in the pharmacological studies of nociception in orofacial area. The investigated neuropeptides diffuse through the cerebroventricular lining producing an analgesic effect either directly, through the trigemino-hypoglossal reflex arc neurons or indirectly through the periaqueductal central gray, raphe nuclei or locus coeruleus neurons. The aim of this review is to present the effect of pharmacological activity of various neuropeptides affecting the transmission of the sensory information from the orofacial area on the example of trigemino-hypoglossal reflex in rats.

  6. Presence of neuropeptide FF receptors on primary afferent fibres of the rat spinal cord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zajac, J.-M. [Laboratoire de Pharmacologie et de Toxicologie Fondamentales, C.N.R.S., 205 Route de Narbonne, 31077 Toulouse Cedex (France); Kar, S. [Douglas Hospital Research Centre and Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, 6875 LaSalle Blvd, Verdun, Quebec H4H1R3 (Canada); Gouarderes, C. [Laboratoire de Pharmacologie et de Toxicologie Fondamentales, C.N.R.S., 205 Route de Narbonne, 31077 Toulouse Cedex (France)

    1996-09-01

    A radioiodinated analogue of neuropeptide FF, [{sup 125}I][d.Tyr{sup 1},(NMe)Phe{sup 3}]neuropeptide FF, was used as a selective probe to label neuropeptide FF receptors in the rat spinal cord. Following neonatal capsaicin treatment, dorsal rhizotomy or sciatic nerve section, the distribution and possible alterations of spinal cord specific [{sup 125}I][d.Tyr{sup 1},(NMe)Phe{sup 3}]neuropeptide FF binding sites were evaluated using in vitro quantitative receptor autoradiography. In normal rats, the highest densities of sites were observed in the superficial layers of the dorsal horn (laminae I-II) whereas moderate to low amounts of labelling were seen in the deeper (III-VI) laminae, around the central canal, and in the ventral horn. Capsaicin-treated rats showed a bilateral decrease (47%) in [{sup 125}I][d.Tyr{sup 1},(NMe)Phe{sup 3}]neuropeptide FF binding in all spinal areas. Unilateral sciatic nerve section and unilateral dorsal rhizotomy induced significant depletions (15-27%) in [{sup 125}I][d.Tyr{sup 1},(NMe)Phe{sup 3}]neuropeptide FF labelling in the ipsilateral dorsal horn.These results suggest that a proportion of neuropeptide FF receptors is located on primary afferent terminals of the dorsal horn and could thus play a role in the modulation of nociceptive transmission. (Copyright (c) 1996 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  7. Maladaptive spinal plasticity opposes spinal learning and recovery in spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam R Ferguson

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic plasticity within the spinal cord has great potential to facilitate recovery of function after spinal cord injury (SCI. Spinal plasticity can be induced in an activity-dependent manner even without input from the brain after complete SCI. The mechanistic basis for these effects is provided by research demonstrating that spinal synapses have many of the same plasticity mechanisms that are known to underlie learning and memory in the brain. In addition, the lumbar spinal cord can sustain several forms of learning and memory, including limb-position training. However, not all spinal plasticity promotes recovery of function. Central sensitization of nociceptive (pain pathways in the spinal cord may emerge with certain patterns of activity, demonstrating that plasticity within the spinal cord may contribute to maladaptive pain states. In this review we discuss interactions between adaptive and maladaptive forms of activity-dependent plasticity in the spinal cord. The literature demonstrates that activity-dependent plasticity within the spinal cord must be carefully tuned to promote adaptive spinal training. Stimulation that is delivered in a limb position-dependent manner or on a fixed interval can induce adaptive plasticity that promotes future spinal cord learning and reduces nociceptive hyper-reactivity. On the other hand, stimulation that is delivered in an unsynchronized fashion, such as randomized electrical stimulation or peripheral skin injuries, can generate maladaptive spinal plasticity that undermines future spinal cord learning, reduces recovery of locomotor function, and promotes nociceptive hyper-reactivity after spinal cord injury. We review these basic phenomena, discuss the cellular and molecular mechanisms, and discuss implications of these findings for improved rehabilitative therapies after spinal cord injury.

  8. ZBTB20 regulates nociception and pain sensation by modulating TRP channel expression in nociceptive sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, An-Jing; Wang, Kai; Zhang, Huan; Liu, Anjun; Ma, Xianhua; Liang, Qing; Cao, Dongmei; Wood, John N; He, David Z; Ding, Yu-Qiang; Yuan, Wen-Jun; Xie, Zhifang; Zhang, Weiping J

    2014-11-05

    In mammals, pain sensation is initiated by the detection of noxious stimuli through specialized transduction ion channels and receptors in nociceptive sensory neurons. Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are the key sensory transducers that confer nociceptors distinct sensory modalities. However, the regulatory mechanisms about their expression are poorly defined. Here we show that the zinc-finger protein ZBTB20 regulates TRP channels expression in nociceptors. ZBTB20 is highly expressed in nociceptive sensory neurons of dorsal root ganglia. Disruption of ZBTB20 in nociceptors led to a marked decrease in the expression levels of TRPV1, TRPA1 and TRPM8 and the response of calcium flux and whole-cell currents evoked by their respective specific agonists. Phenotypically, the mice lacking ZBTB20 specifically in nociceptors showed a defect in nociception and pain sensation in response to thermal, mechanical and inflammatory stimulation. Our findings point to ZBTB20 as a critical regulator of nociception and pain sensation by modulating TRP channels expression in nociceptors.

  9. Capsaicin in adult frogs: effects on nociceptive responses to cutaneous stimuli and on nervous tissue concentrations of immunoreactive substance P, somatostatin and cholecystokinin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chéry-Croze, S; Godinot, F; Jourdan, G; Bernard, C; Chayvialle, J A

    1985-11-01

    Adult frogs (Rana esculenta) were given subcutaneous injections of 10, 20, 30, 50 and 100 mg/kg capsaicin in sequential order over 5 days, or the vehicle only. The nociceptive thresholds to electrical, thermal and chemical stimuli were measured before, and 1, 5 and 24 h after each injection. Capsaicin was followed by a dose-related reduction of nociceptive responses to all stimuli, but these effects lasted for only 1-5 h after the given injection. Water/acetic extracts of undivided brains and spinal cords were prepared at the corresponding time periods for the radioimmunoassay of peptides. Spinal cord concentrations of immunoreactive substance P were essentially unaffected by capsaicin, while those of immunoreactive somatostatin were significantly increased after the second for fourth injections (20, 30 and 50 mg/kg) of capsaicin. Brain extracts showed an increase of somatostatin and substance P concentrations after the dose of 50 mg/kg. In an additional experiment, immunoreactive substance P, somatostatin and cholecystokinin were measured in tissue samples taken at 2 and 10 min, and 1, 5 and 24 h after a single dose of either 50 mg/kg capsaicin or the vehicle. The only significant effect of capsaicin was an increase of immunoreactive somatostatin concentration in brain homogenates at 5 h, while the vehicle in itself elicited major variations of all three peptides in spinal cord and/or brain. These results indicate that capsaicin reduces the nociceptive responses to cutaneous stimuli in adult frogs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Glutamate Transporter GLT-1 Upregulation Attenuates Visceral Nociception and Hyperalgesia via Spinal Mechanisms Not Related to Anti-Inflammatory or Probiotic Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Lin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Visceral pain is the most common reason for physician visits in US. Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter and mediates visceral nociceptive neuro-transmission and hypersensitivity. Removal of extracellular glutamate is predominantly mediated by glial glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1. The pharmacological approach to up-regulate GLT-1 by 1 week administration of ceftriaxone (CTX has been successful to mitigate visceral nociception. The present study shows that intrathecal delivery of selective GLT-1 antagonist dihydrokainate reversed CTX-blunted visceral nociceptive response, suggesting a spinal site of action. The role of GLT-1 up-regulation in animal models of colitis was studied. CTX treatment reversed TNBS-induced visceral hypersensitivity. In addition, CTX treatment initiated one week after the onset of DSS-induced visceral inflammation also attenuated visceral hypersensitivity, revealing a potential therapeutic effect. Cephalothin, a cephalosporin antibiotic lacking GLT-1 induction activity, failed to attenuate visceral nociception. CTX-induced changes in fecal microbiota do not support a role of probiotic effects in mitigating visceral nociception/hypersensitivity. Finally, adeno-associated virus serotype 9-mediated GLT-1 over-expression was effective to mitigate visceromotor response to 60 mmHg colo-rectal distension. These studies indicate that GLT-1 over-expression is a novel and effective method to attenuate visceral nociception, and is deserving of further study as a translationally relevant approach to treat visceral pain.

  11. The effect of distraction strategies on pain perception and the nociceptive flexor reflex (RIII reflex).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruscheweyh, Ruth; Kreusch, Annette; Albers, Christoph; Sommer, Jens; Marziniak, Martin

    2011-11-01

    Distraction from pain reduces pain perception, and imaging studies have suggested that this may at least partially be mediated by activation of descending pain inhibitory systems. Here, we used the nociceptive flexor reflex (RIII reflex) to directly quantify the effects of different distraction strategies on basal spinal nociception and its temporal summation. Twenty-seven healthy subjects participated in 3 distraction tasks (mental imagery, listening to preferred music, spatial discrimination of brush stimuli) and, in a fourth task, concentrated on the painful stimulus. Results show that all 3 distraction tasks reduced pain perception, but only the brush task also reduced the RIII reflex. The concentration-on-pain task increased both pain perception and the RIII reflex. The extent of temporal summation of pain perception and the extent of temporal summation of the RIII reflex were not affected by any of the tasks. These results suggest that some, but not all, forms of pain reduction by distraction rely on descending pain inhibition. In addition, pain reduction by distraction seems to preferentially affect mechanisms of basal nociceptive transmission, not of temporal summation. Copyright © 2011 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Controlling attention to nociceptive stimuli with working memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéry Legrain

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Because pain often signals the occurrence of potential tissue damage, a nociceptive stimulus has the capacity to involuntarily capture attention and take priority over other sensory inputs. Whether distraction by nociception actually occurs may depend upon the cognitive characteristics of the ongoing activities. The present study tested the role of working memory in controlling the attentional capture by nociception. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Participants performed visual discrimination and matching tasks in which visual targets were shortly preceded by a tactile distracter. The two tasks were chosen because of the different effects the involvement of working memory produces on performance, in order to dissociate the specific role of working memory in the control of attention from the effect of general resource demands. Occasionally (i.e. 17% of the trials, tactile distracters were replaced by a novel nociceptive stimulus in order to distract participants from the visual tasks. Indeed, in the control conditions (no working memory, reaction times to visual targets were increased when the target was preceded by a novel nociceptive distracter as compared to the target preceded by a frequent tactile distracter, suggesting attentional capture by the novel nociceptive stimulus. However, when the task required an active rehearsal of the visual target in working memory, the novel nociceptive stimulus no longer induced a lengthening of reaction times to visual targets, indicating a reduction of the distraction produced by the novel nociceptive stimulus. This effect was independent of the overall task demands. CONCLUSION AND SIGNIFICANCE: Loading working memory with pain-unrelated information may reduce the ability of nociceptive input to involuntarily capture attention, and shields cognitive processing from nociceptive distraction. An efficient control of attention over pain is best guaranteed by the ability to maintain active goal

  13. Postnatal temporal, spatial and modality tuning of nociceptive cutaneous flexion reflexes in human infants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Cornelissen

    Full Text Available Cutaneous flexion reflexes are amongst the first behavioural responses to develop and are essential for the protection and survival of the newborn organism. Despite this, there has been no detailed, quantitative study of their maturation in human neonates. Here we use surface electromyographic (EMG recording of biceps femoris activity in preterm (4 seconds to a single noxious skin lance which decreases significantly with gestational age. This reflex is not restricted to the stimulated limb: heel lance evokes equal ipsilateral and contralateral reflexes in preterm and term infants. We further show that infant flexion withdrawal reflexes are not always nociceptive specific: in 29% of preterm infants, tactile stimulation evokes EMG activity that is indistinguishable from noxious stimulation. In 40% of term infants, tactile responses are also present but significantly smaller than nociceptive reflexes. Infant flexion reflexes are also evoked by application of calibrated punctate von Frey hairs (vFh, 0.8-17.2 g, to the heel. Von Frey hair thresholds increase significantly with gestational age and the magnitude of vFh evoked reflexes are significantly greater in preterm than term infants. Furthermore flexion reflexes in both groups are sensitized by repeated vFh stimulation. Thus human infant flexion reflexes differ in temporal, modality and spatial characteristics from those in adults. Reflex magnitude and tactile sensitivity decreases and nociceptive specificity and spatial organisation increases with gestational age. Strong, relatively non-specific, reflex sensitivity in early life may be important for driving postnatal activity dependent maturation of targeted spinal cord sensory circuits.

  14. Cord-Blood Banking

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Be Smart About Social Media Cord-Blood Banking KidsHealth > For Parents > Cord-Blood Banking Print A ... for you and your family. About Cord-Blood Banking Cord-blood banking basically means collecting and storing ...

  15. Somatic modulation of spinal reflex bladder activity mediated by nociceptive bladder afferent nerve fibers in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zhiying; Rogers, Marc J; Shen, Bing; Wang, Jicheng; Schwen, Zeyad; Roppolo, James R; de Groat, William C; Tai, Changfeng

    2014-09-15

    The goal of the present study was to determine if supraspinal pathways are necessary for inhibition of bladder reflex activity induced by activation of somatic afferents in the pudendal or tibial nerve. Cats anesthetized with α-chloralose were studied after acute spinal cord transection at the thoracic T9/T10 level. Dilute (0.25%) acetic acid was used to irritate the bladder, activate nociceptive afferent C-fibers, and trigger spinal reflex bladder contractions (amplitude: 19.3 ± 2.9 cmH2O). Hexamethonium (a ganglionic blocker, intravenously) significantly (P irritation. Understanding the sites of action for PNS or TNS inhibition is important for the clinical application of pudendal or tibial neuromodulation to treat bladder dysfunctions. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Learned control over spinal nociception reduces supraspinal nociception as quantified by late somatosensory evoked potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruscheweyh, Ruth; Bäumler, Maximilian; Feller, Moritz; Krafft, Stefanie; Sommer, Jens; Straube, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    We have recently shown that subjects can learn to use cognitive-emotional strategies to suppress their spinal nociceptive flexor reflex (RIII reflex) under visual RIII feedback and proposed that this reflects learned activation of descending pain inhibition. Here, we investigated whether learned RIII suppression also affects supraspinal nociception and whether previous relaxation training increases success. Subjects were trained over 3 sessions to reduce their RIII size by self-selected cognitive-emotional strategies. Two groups received true RIII feedback (with or without previous relaxation training) and a sham group received false feedback (15 subjects per group). RIII reflexes, late somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs), and F-waves were recorded and pain intensity ratings collected. Both true feedback groups achieved significant (P Pain intensity was significantly reduced in all 3 groups and also correlated with RIII reduction (r = 0.44, P nociception as quantified by SEPs, although effects on pain ratings were less clear. Lower motor neuron excitability as quantified by F-waves was not affected. Previous relaxation training did not significantly improve RIII feedback training success.

  17. Mast Cell-Mediated Mechanisms of Nociception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aich, Anupam; Afrin, Lawrence B; Gupta, Kalpna

    2015-12-04

    Mast cells are tissue-resident immune cells that release immuno-modulators, chemo-attractants, vasoactive compounds, neuropeptides and growth factors in response to allergens and pathogens constituting a first line of host defense. The neuroimmune interface of immune cells modulating synaptic responses has been of increasing interest, and mast cells have been proposed as key players in orchestrating inflammation-associated pain pathobiology due to their proximity to both vasculature and nerve fibers. Molecular underpinnings of mast cell-mediated pain can be disease-specific. Understanding such mechanisms is critical for developing disease-specific targeted therapeutics to improve analgesic outcomes. We review molecular mechanisms that may contribute to nociception in a disease-specific manner.

  18. Spinal modulation of nociception by music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, M; Lebuis, A; Hugueville, L; Peretz, I; Rainville, P

    2012-07-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated the capacity of music to modulate pain. However, the neurophysiological mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon remain unknown. In order to assess the involvement of descending modulatory mechanisms in the modulation of pain by music, we evaluated the effects of musical excerpts conveying different emotions (pleasant-stimulating, pleasant-relaxing, unpleasant-stimulating) on the spinally mediated nociceptive flexion reflex (or RIII), as well as on pain ratings and skin conductance responses. The RIII reflex and pain ratings were increased during the listening of unpleasant music compared with pleasant music, suggesting the involvement of descending pain-modulatory mechanisms in the effects of musical emotions on pain. There were no significant differences between the pleasant-stimulating and pleasant-relaxing musical condition, indicating that the arousal of music had little influence on pain processing. © 2012 European Federation of International Association for the Study of Pain Chapters.

  19. Maladaptive spinal plasticity opposes spinal learning and recovery in spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Adam R.; Huie, J. Russell; Crown, Eric D.; Baumbauer, Kyle M.; Hook, Michelle A.; Garraway, Sandra M.; Lee, Kuan H.; Hoy, Kevin C.; Grau, James W.

    2012-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity within the spinal cord has great potential to facilitate recovery of function after spinal cord injury (SCI). Spinal plasticity can be induced in an activity-dependent manner even without input from the brain after complete SCI. A mechanistic basis for these effects is provided by research demonstrating that spinal synapses have many of the same plasticity mechanisms that are known to underlie learning and memory in the brain. In addition, the lumbar spinal cord can sustain several forms of learning and memory, including limb-position training. However, not all spinal plasticity promotes recovery of function. Central sensitization of nociceptive (pain) pathways in the spinal cord may emerge in response to various noxious inputs, demonstrating that plasticity within the spinal cord may contribute to maladaptive pain states. In this review we discuss interactions between adaptive and maladaptive forms of activity-dependent plasticity in the spinal cord below the level of SCI. The literature demonstrates that activity-dependent plasticity within the spinal cord must be carefully tuned to promote adaptive spinal training. Prior work from our group has shown that stimulation that is delivered in a limb position-dependent manner or on a fixed interval can induce adaptive plasticity that promotes future spinal cord learning and reduces nociceptive hyper-reactivity. On the other hand, stimulation that is delivered in an unsynchronized fashion, such as randomized electrical stimulation or peripheral skin injuries, can generate maladaptive spinal plasticity that undermines future spinal cord learning, reduces recovery of locomotor function, and promotes nociceptive hyper-reactivity after SCI. We review these basic phenomena, how these findings relate to the broader spinal plasticity literature, discuss the cellular and molecular mechanisms, and finally discuss implications of these and other findings for improved rehabilitative therapies after SCI. PMID

  20. Sensory TRP channels: the key transducers of nociception and pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickle, Aaron D; Shepherd, Andrew J; Mohapatra, Durga P

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral detection of nociceptive and painful stimuli by sensory neurons involves a complex repertoire of molecular detectors and/or transducers on distinct subsets of nerve fibers. The majority of such molecular detectors/transducers belong to the transient receptor potential (TRP) family of cation channels, which comprise both specific receptors for distinct nociceptive stimuli, as well as for multiple stimuli. This chapter discusses the classification, distribution, and functional properties of individual TRP channel types that have been implicated in various nociceptive and/or painful conditions.

  1. Repeated forced swim stress differentially affects formalin-evoked nociceptive behaviour and the endocannabinoid system in stress normo-responsive and stress hyper-responsive rat strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Elaine M; Okine, Bright N; Olango, Weredeselam M; Roche, Michelle; Finn, David P

    2016-01-01

    Repeated exposure to a homotypic stressor such as forced swimming enhances nociceptive responding in rats. However, the influence of genetic background on this stress-induced hyperalgesia is poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of repeated forced swim stress on nociceptive responding in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats versus the Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rat strain, a genetic background that is susceptible to stress, negative affect and hyperalgesia. Given the well-documented role of the endocannabinoid system in stress and pain, we investigated associated alterations in endocannabinoid signalling in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord and amygdala. In SD rats, repeated forced swim stress for 10 days was associated with enhanced late phase formalin-evoked nociceptive behaviour, compared with naive, non-stressed SD controls. In contrast, WKY rats exposed to 10 days of swim stress displayed reduced late phase formalin-evoked nociceptive behaviour. Swim stress increased levels of monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) mRNA in the ipsilateral side of the dorsal spinal cord of SD rats, an effect not observed in WKY rats. In the amygdala, swim stress reduced anandamide (AEA) levels in the contralateral amygdala of SD rats, but not WKY rats. Additional within-strain differences in levels of CB1 receptor and fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) mRNA and levels of 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG) were observed between the ipsilateral and contralateral sides of the dorsal horn and/or amygdala. These data indicate that the effects of repeated stress on inflammatory pain-related behaviour are different in two rat strains that differ with respect to stress responsivity and affective state and implicate the endocannabinoid system in the spinal cord and amygdala in these differences.

  2. fMRI investigation of the effect of local and systemic lidocaine on noxious electrical stimulation-induced activation in spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fuqiang; Williams, Mangay; Welsh, Denise C; Meng, Xiangjun; Ritter, Amy; Abbadie, Catherine; Cook, Jacquelynn J; Reicin, Alise S; Hargreaves, Richard; Williams, Donald S

    2009-09-01

    Spinal cord fMRI offers an excellent opportunity to quantify nociception using neuronal activation induced by painful stimuli. Measurement of the magnitude of stimulation-induced activation, and its suppression with analgesics can provide objective measures of pain and efficacy of analgesics. This study investigates the feasibility of using spinal cord fMRI in anesthetized rats as a pain assay to test the analgesic effect of locally and systemically administered lidocaine. Blood volume (BV)-weighted fMRI signal acquired after intravenous injection of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) particles was used as an indirect readout of the neuronal activity. Transcutaneous noxious electrical stimulation was used as the pain model. BV-weighted fMRI signal could be robustly quantified on a run-by-run basis, opening the possibility of measuring pharmacodynamics (PD) of the analgesics with a temporal resolution of approximately 2 min. Local administration of lidocaine was shown to ablate all stimulation-induced fMRI signals by the total blockage of peripheral nerve transmission, while the analgesic effect of systemically administered lidocaine was robustly detected after intravenous infusion of approximately 3mg/kg, which is similar to clinical dosage for human. This study establishes spinal cord fMRI as a viable assay for analgesics. With respect to the mode of action of lidocaine, this study suggests that systemic lidocaine, which is clinically used for the treatment of neuropathic pain, and believed to only block the peripheral nerve transmission of abnormal neural activity (ectopic discharge) originating from the damaged peripheral nerves, also blocks the peripheral nerve transmission of normal neural activity induced by transcutaneous noxious electrical stimulation.

  3. Glutamate acts as a neurotransmitter for gastrin releasing peptide-sensitive and insensitive itch-related synaptic transmission in mammalian spinal cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Jennifer

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Itch sensation is one of the major sensory experiences of human and animals. Recent studies have proposed that gastrin releasing peptide (GRP is a key neurotransmitter for itch in spinal cord. However, no direct evidence is available to indicate that GRP actually mediate responses between primary afferent fibers and dorsal horn neurons. Here we performed integrative neurobiological experiments to test this question. We found that a small population of rat dorsal horn neurons responded to GRP application with increases in calcium signaling. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings revealed that a part of superficial dorsal horn neurons responded to GRP application with the increase of action potential firing in adult rats and mice, and these dorsal horn neurons received exclusively primary afferent C-fiber inputs. On the other hands, few Aδ inputs receiving cells were found to be GRP positive. Finally, we found that evoked sensory responses between primary afferent C fibers and GRP positive superficial dorsal horn neurons are mediated by glutamate but not GRP. CNQX, a blocker of AMPA and kainate (KA receptors, completely inhibited evoked EPSCs, including in those Fos-GFP positive dorsal horn cells activated by itching. Our findings provide the direct evidence that glutamate is the principal excitatory transmitter between C fibers and GRP positive dorsal horn neurons. Our results will help to understand the neuronal mechanism of itch and aid future treatment for patients with pruritic disease.

  4. Roles of phosphotase 2A in nociceptive signal processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Multiple protein kinases affect the responses of dorsal horn neurons through phosphorylation of synaptic receptors and proteins involved in intracellular signal transduction pathways, and the consequences of this modulation may be spinal central sensitization. In contrast, the phosphatases catalyze an opposing reaction of de-phosphorylation, which may also modulate the functions of crucial proteins in signaling nociception. This is an important mechanism in the regulation of intracellular signal transduction pathways in nociceptive neurons. Accumulated evidence has shown that phosphatase 2A (PP2A), a serine/threonine specific phosphatase, is implicated in synaptic plasticity of the central nervous system and central sensitization of nociception. Therefore, targeting protein phosphotase 2A may provide an effective and novel strategy for the treatment of clinical pain. This review will characterize the structure and functional regulation of neuronal PP2A and bring together recent advances on the modulation of PP2A in targeted downstream substrates and relevant multiple nociceptive signaling molecules. PMID:24010880

  5. Investigation of the anti-inflammatory and anti- nociceptive activities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-06-15

    Jun 15, 2009 ... out these side effects are therefore being researched as alternatives to .... accompanied by stretching of hind limbs in response to pain. Anti- nociceptive .... writhing, which is the visceral pain model, the processor releases ...

  6. Early Postoperative Nociceptive Threshold and Production of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Induced by Plantar Incision Are Not Influenced with Minocycline in a Rat: Role of Spinal Microglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiji Masaki

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF from spinal microglia is crucial for aberrant nociceptive signaling in several pathological pain conditions, including postoperative pain. We assess the contribution of spinal microglial activation and associated BDNF overexpression to the early post-incisional nociceptive threshold. Methods: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with an intrathecal catheter. A postoperative pain model was established by plantar incision. Thermal and mechanical nociceptive responses were assessed by infrared radiant heat and von Frey filaments before and after plantar incision. Rats were injected intrathecally the microglial activation inhibitor minocycline before incision, 24 h after incision, or both. Other groups were subjected to the same treatments and the L4-L5 spinal cord segment removed for immunohistochemical analysis of microglia activation and BNDF expression. Results: Plantar incision reduced both thermal latency and mechanical threshold, indicating thermal hypersensitivity and mechanical allodynia. Minocycline temporally reduced thermal withdrawal latency but had no effect on mechanical withdrawal threshold, spinal microglial activity, or dorsal horn BDNF overexpression during the early post-incision period. Conclusion: These results suggest that spinal microglia does not contribute substantially to post-incisional nociceptive threshold. The BDNF overexpression response that may contribute to postoperative hyperalgesia and allodynia is likely derived from other sources.

  7. CORTICAL RESPONSES TO SALIENT NOCICEPTIVE AND NOT NOCICEPTIVE STIMULI IN VEGETATIVE AND MINIMAL CONSCIOUS STATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARINA eDE TOMMASO

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims Questions regarding perception of pain in non-communicating patients and the management of pain continue to raise controversy both at a clinical and ethical level. The aim of this study was to examine the cortical response to salient multimodal visual, acoustic, somatosensory electric non nociceptive and nociceptive laser stimuli and their correlation with the clinical evaluation.Methods: Five Vegetative State (VS, 4 Minimally Conscious State (MCS patients and 11 age- and sex-matched controls were examined. Evoked responses were obtained by 64 scalp electrodes, while delivering auditory, visual, non-noxious electrical and noxious laser stimulation, which were randomly presented every 10 sec. Laser, somatosensory, auditory and visual evoked responses were identified as a negative-positive (N2-P2 vertex complex in the 500 msec post-stimulus time. We used Nociception Coma Scale-Revised (NCS-R and Coma Recovery Scale (CRS-R for clinical evaluation of pain perception and consciousness impairment.Results: The laser evoked potentials (LEPs were recognizable in all cases. Only one MCS patient showed a reliable cortical response to all the employed stimulus modalities. One VS patient did not present cortical responses to any other stimulus modality. In the remaining participants, auditory, visual and electrical related potentials were inconstantly present. Significant N2 and P2 latency prolongation occurred in both VS and MCS patients. The presence of a reliable cortical response to auditory, visual and electric stimuli was able to correctly classify VS and MCS patients with 90% accuracy. Laser P2 and N2 amplitudes were not correlated with the CRS-R and NCS-R scores, while auditory and electric related potentials amplitude were associated with the motor response to pain and consciousness recovery. Discussion: pain arousal may be a primary function also in vegetative state patients while the relevance of other stimulus modalities may indicate the

  8. Different effects of two aldose reductase inhibitors on nociception and prostaglandin E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcutt, N A; Li, L; Yaksh, T L; Malmberg, A B

    1995-10-16

    This study examined the effect of two structurally dissimilar aldose reductase inhibitors, N-[[5-(trifluoromethyl)-6-methoxy-1- napthalenyl]thioxomethyl]-N-methlyglycine (tolrestat) and 4-amino-2,6-dimethylphenyl-sulphonyl nitromethane (ICI 222155), on formalin-evoked behavioural responses in control and diabetic rats and on capsaicin-evoked release of prostaglandin E from spinal cord slices in vitro. Both compounds, given orally for 4 weeks, prevented hyperalgesia in diabetic rats 5-20 min after hindpaw formalin injection. ICI 222155 also prevented hyperalgesia in diabetic rats 21-60 min after formalin, whereas tolrestat suppressed activity in diabetic rats below controls and also suppressed activity in controls when given orally or intrathecally. Capsaicin-evoked release of prostaglandin E from spinal cord slices of control rats was significantly reduced by tolrestat, but not ICI 222155. These data suggest that hyperalgesia in diabetic rats is related to glucose metabolism by aldose reductase, whereas tolrestat has specific effects on formalin-evoked nociception associated with an ability to reduce spinal prostaglandin release.

  9. Altered nociception in mice with genetically induced hypoglutamatergic tone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayser, V; Viguier, F; Melfort, M; Bourgoin, S; Hamon, M; Masson, J

    2015-05-07

    Extensive pharmacological evidence supports the idea that glutamate plays a key role in both acute and chronic pain. In the present study, we investigated the implication of the excitatory amino acid in physiological nociception by using mutant mice deficient in phosphate-activated glutaminase type 1 (GLS1), the enzyme that synthesizes glutamate in central glutamatergic neurons. Because homozygous GLS1-/- mutants die shortly after birth, assays for assessing mechanical, thermal and chemical (formalin) nociception were performed on heterozygous GLS1+/- mutants, which present a clear-cut decrease in glutamate synthesis in central neurons. As compared to paired wild-type mice, adult male GLS1+/- mutants showed decreased responsiveness to mechanical (von Frey filament and tail-pressure, but not tail-clip, tests) and thermal (Hargreaves' plantar, tail-immersion and hot-plate tests) nociceptive stimuli. Genotype-related differences were also found in the formalin test for which GLS1+/- mice exhibited marked decreases in the nociceptive responses (hindlimb lift, lick and flinch) during both phase 1 (0-5 min) and phase 2 (16-45 min) after formalin injection. On the other hand, acute treatment with memantine (1mg/kg i.p.), an uncompetitive antagonist at NMDA glutamate receptors, reduced nociception responses in wild-type but not GLS1+/- mice. Conversely, antinociceptive response to acute administration of a low dose (1mg/kg s.c.) of morphine was significantly larger in GLS1+/- mutants versus wild-type mice. Our findings indicate that genetically driven hypoactivity of central glutamatergic neurotransmission renders mice hyposensitive to nociceptive stimulations, and promotes morphine antinociception, further emphasizing the critical role of glutamate in physiological nociception and its opioid-mediated control.

  10. Cord blood testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is born. The umbilical cord is the cord connecting the baby to the mother's womb. Cord blood ... ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get email updates Subscribe to RSS Follow ...

  11. Exercise alleviates hypoalgesia and increases the level of calcitonin gene-related peptide in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord of diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Severo do Nascimento

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of treadmill training on nociceptive sensitivity and immunoreactivity to calcitonin gene-related peptide in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord of diabetic rats. METHODS: Male Wistar rats were divided into three groups: control, diabetic and trained diabetic. Treadmill training was performed for 8 weeks. The blood glucose concentrations and body weight were evaluated 48 h after diabetes induction and every 30 days thereafter. The nociceptive sensitivity was evaluated using the tail-flick apparatus. The animals were then transcardially perfused, and the spinal cords were post-fixed, cryoprotected and sectioned in a cryostat. Immunohistochemistry for calcitonin gene-related peptide analysis was performed on the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. RESULTS: The nociceptive sensitivity analysis revealed that, compared with the control and trained diabetic animals, the latency to tail deflection on the apparatus was longer for the diabetic animals. Optical densitometry demonstrated decreased calcitonin gene-related peptide immunoreactivity in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord in diabetic animals, which was reversed by treadmill training. CONCLUSION: We concluded that treadmill training can alleviate nociceptive hypoalgesia and reverse decreased calcitonin gene-related peptide immunoreactivity in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord of diabetic animals without pharmacological treatment.

  12. Involvement of GABA and opioid peptide receptors in sevoflurane-induced antinociception in rat spinal cord

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-wei WANG; Xiao-ming DENG; Xin-min YOU; Shu-xiao LIU; Zhi-qi ZHAO

    2005-01-01

    Aim: The spinal cord is pivotal in immobility induced by volatile anesthetics because the anesthetics depress the activity of motor neurons in the spinal cord.The aim of this study was to observe the effects of sevoflurane on pain processing at the spinal level. Methods: The firing of the gastrocnemius muscle was evoked by electrical stimulation to the ipsilateral hindpaw in rats. The nociceptive C response of electromyography (EMG)was selected to study. The GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline (0.1 mg/kg) and opioid receptor antagonist naloxone (0.4 mg/kg) were administered intravenously, either in the presence or in the absence of 1.0% sevoflurane. Results: In rats with transected spinal cord,sevoflurane produced a profound reduction in the C response in a dose- and timedependent manner. In the presence of 1.0% sevoflurane, the C responses were increased after injections of bicuculline and naloxone. Conclusion: Sevoflurane is a volatile anesthetic that acts directly on the spinal cord to suppress the nociceptive reflex. The sevoflurane-induced suppression of the C response is antagonized by either bicuculline or naloxone. The results suggest that spinal GABAA receptors and opioid peptide receptors are involved in the sevoflurane-induced suppression of spinal nociception.

  13. Spinal Cord Contusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gong Ju; Jian Wang; Yazhou Wang; Xianghui Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord injury is a major cause of disability with devastating neurological outcomes and lim-ited therapeutic opportunities, even though there are thousands of publications on spinal cord injury annually. There are two major types of spinal cord injury, transaction of the spinal cord and spinal cord contusion. Both can theoretically be treated, but there is no well documented treatment in human being. As for spinal cord contusion, we have developed an operation with fabulous result.

  14. Intrathecal rimantadine induces motor, proprioceptive, and nociceptive blockades in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeng, Jann-Inn; Wang, Jieh-Neng; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Chen, Yu-Wen; Hung, Ching-Hsia

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of the experiment was to evaluate the local anesthetic effect of rimantadine in spinal anesthesia. Rimantadine in a dose-dependent fashion was constructed after intrathecally injecting the rats with four different doses. The potency and duration of rimantadine were compared with that of the local anesthetic lidocaine at producing spinal motor, nociceptive, and proprioceptive blockades. We demonstrated that intrathecal rimantadine dose-dependently produced spinal motor, nociceptive, and proprioceptive blockades. On the 50% effective dose (ED50) basis, the ranks of potencies at inducing spinal motor, nociceptive, and proprioceptive blockades was lidocaine>rimantadine (P<0.01). Rimantadine exhibited more nociceptive block (ED50) than motor block (P<0.05). At equi-anesthetic doses (ED25, ED50, and ED75), the spinal block duration produced by rimantadine was longer than that produced by lidocaine (P<0.01). Furthermore, rimantadine (26.52μmol/kg) prolonged the nociceptive nerve block more than the motor block (P<0.001). Our preclinical data showed that rimantadine, with a more sensory-selective action over motor block, was less potent than lidocaine. Rimantadine produced longer duration in spinal anesthesia when compared with lidocaine.

  15. Influence of a serotonin receptor antagonist, 5-HTP-DP-hex, on spinal and thalamic nociceptive neurons in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmers, R; Tamir, H; Wilchek, M

    1987-06-01

    The antinociceptive properties of a new synthetic dipeptide (N-hexanoyl-5-hydroxytryptophyl-5-hydroxytryptophan amide, or 5-HTP-DP-hex) were studied in rats by an electrophysiological method. After an i.p. injection of alpha-chloralose and urethane, the animals were prepared for stereotaxic approach to the nucleus ventralis posterolateralis of the thalamus. With tungsten microelectrodes, individual nociceptive neurons in the nucleus were identified by the sequence of spikes emitted in response to single-pulse stimulation of the sciatic nerve. In addition to the usual short-latency spikes, a nociceptive neuron fired late spikes at regular intervals within 500 ms following each stimulus. When the spikes were accumulated in poststimulus time histograms, the short-latency spikes compiled an intensity-related (I) peak. The late spikes formed modality-related (M) peaks with spacing characteristic of nociception. Intracarotid infusion of 5-HTP-DP-hex (1 mg/kg) elevated the delayed portion of the I peak and the first M peak. This effect was followed in 25 min by suppression of all M peaks. The control record could be reinstated at any time by 5-hydroxytryptophan (3.5 mg/kg), or by natural recovery in 2.5 h. Responses evoked from a thalamic nociceptive neuron by single-pulse stimulation of the spinothalamic tract were modified by 5-HTP-DP-hex in a similar manner, except that no elevation of the activity peaks was observed. As shown previously, elevation of the delayed I peak and M1 indicated an increased input of A-delta and C fibers, respectively. The increased input lowers the response threshold and may represent hyperalgesia. Suppression of the M peaks may result from altered function of the positive feedback loop in the nociceptive system at the thalamic level, and may represent analgesia. Naloxone, methysergide, as well as ketanserin had no significant effect on the response histograms. These findings suggested that 5-HTP-DP-hex, a known serotonin receptor antagonist

  16. Zingerone enhances glutamatergic spontaneous excitatory transmission by activating TRPA1 but not TRPV1 channels in the adult rat substantia gelatinosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Hai-Yuan; Jiang, Chang-Yu; Fujita, Tsugumi; Kumamoto, Eiichi

    2013-08-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are thought to play a role in regulating nociceptive transmission to spinal substantia gelatinosa (SG) neurons. It remains to be unveiled whether the TRP channels in the central nervous system are different in property from those involved in receiving nociceptive stimuli in the peripheral nervous system. We examined the effect of the vanilloid compound zingerone, which activates TRPV1 channels in the cell body of a primary afferent neuron, on glutamatergic excitatory transmission in the SG neurons of adult rat spinal cord slices by using the whole cell patch-clamp technique. Bath-applied zingerone reversibly and concentration-dependently increased spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic current (EPSC) frequency. This effect was accompanied by an inward current at -70 mV that was resistant to glutamate receptor antagonists. These zingerone effects were repeated and persisted in Na(+)-channel blocker tetrodotoxin-, La(3+)-, or IP3-induced Ca(2+)-release inhibitor 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate-containing or Ca(2+)-free Krebs solution. Zingerone activity was resistant to the selective TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine but sensitive to the nonselective TRP antagonist ruthenium red, the TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031, and the Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+)-release inhibitor dantrolene. TRPA1 agonist allyl isothiocyanate but not capsaicin inhibited the facilitatory effect of zingerone. On the other hand, zingerone reduced monosynaptically evoked EPSC amplitudes, as did TRPA1 agonists. Like allyl isothiocyanate, zingerone enhanced GABAergic spontaneous inhibitory transmission in a manner sensitive to tetrodotoxin. We conclude that zingerone presynaptically facilitates spontaneous excitatory transmission, probably through Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+)-release mechanisms, and produces a membrane depolarization in SG neurons by activating TRPA1 but not TRPV1 channels.

  17. Nociceptive-induced myocardial remote conditioning is mediated by neuronal gamma protein kinase C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Eric R; Hsu, Anna K; Urban, Travis J; Mochly-Rosen, Daria; Gross, Garrett J

    2013-09-01

    Deciphering the remote conditioning molecular mechanism may provide targets to develop therapeutics that can broaden the clinical application. To further investigate this, we tested whether two protein kinase C (PKC) isozymes, the ubiquitously expressed epsilon PKC (εPKC) and the neuronal-specific gamma PKC (γPKC), mediate nociceptive-induced remote myocardial conditioning. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were used for both in vivo and ex vivo myocardial ischemia-reperfusion protocols. For the in vivo studies, using a surgical abdominal incision for comparison, applying only to the abdomen either bradykinin or the εPKC activator (ψεRACK) reduced myocardial infarct size (45 ± 1, 44 ± 2 %, respectively, vs. incision: 43 ± 2 %, and control: 63 ± 2 %, P classical PKC isozyme activator (activating α, β, βII, and γ), reduced myocardial injury. Importantly, the classical PKC isozyme activator given to the abdomen in vivo (with an intact nervous system including γPKC) during myocardial ischemia reduced infarct size as effectively as an abdominal incision or ψεRACK (45 ± 1 vs. 45 ± 2 and 47 ± 1 %, respectively). The classical PKC activator-induced protection was also blocked by spinal cord surgical transection. These findings identified potential remote conditioning mimetics, with these strategies effective even during myocardial ischemia. A novel mechanism of nociceptive-induced remote conditioning, involving γPKC, was also identified.

  18. Does the histaminergic system play a role in spinal nociception?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harasawa, K

    2000-07-01

    The author studied whether the histaminergic system is involved in spinal nociception or not. A nociception-related, slow ventral root potential of rats, which is an integrated output of motoneurons, was recorded as an index of the intensity of nociception when an electric stimulation was applied to the dorsal root. Histamine dissolved in an artificial cerebrospinal fluid caused small reduction in the potential; however, mepyramine (10 nM to 10 microM, as an H1 receptor antagonist), ranitidine (1 nM to 1 microM, as an H2 receptor antagonist), R(-)-alpha-methylhistamine (2 pM to 200 nM, as an H3 receptor agonist), and thioperamide (1 nM to 10 microM, as an H3 receptor antagonist) dose-dependently reduced the potential down to around a half of each control level. These results indicate that the histaminergic system may affect the spinal withdrawal reflex.

  19. Activation of ERK1/2 in spinal cord contributes to the development of acute cystic pain in rabbits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Hong WANG; Li-Cai ZHANG; Yin-Ming ZENG

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate the role of activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) in spinal cord in the development of cystic pain in rabbit. Methods We observed the relationship between the activation of ERK1/2 in spinal cord and nociceptive behaviors, as well as the effect of U0126, a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK, upstream protein of ERK1/2) inhibitor, on cystic pain in rabbits by behavioral test, immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. Results After injecting 0.5 ml formalin into gallbladder, the behaviors such as grasping of the cheek and licking of theabdomen increased in 30 min, with a significant increase in pERK1/2 expression in the spinal cord, as well as the pERK1/2 immunoreactive cells located in laminae Ⅴ~Ⅶ and X of the dorsal horn and ventral horn of T6 spinal cord. Administration of U0126 (100 ~400 μg/kg body weight, i.v., 10 min before instillation of formalin) could attenuated nociceptive behaviors dose-dependently, but could not restrain the nociceptive behaviors completely even at the maximal efficient dose of 400 μg/kg body weight. Conclusion Activated ERK1/2 in the spinal cord at least partly participates in the development of acute inflammatory cystic pain induced by formalin in rabbits.

  20. Effect of temporal stimulus properties on the nociceptive detection probability using intra‑epidermal electrical stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doll, Robert J.; Maten, Annefloor C.A.; Spaan, Sjoerd P.G.; Veltink, Peter H.; Buitenweg, Jan R.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic pain disorders can be initiated and maintained by malfunctioning of one or several mechanisms underlying the nociceptive function. Although several quantitative sensory testing methods exist to characterize the nociceptive function, it remains difficult to distinguish the contributions of in

  1. Morphological properties of nociceptive and non-nociceptive neurons in primary somatic cerebral cortex (SI) of cat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    With the techniques of intracellular recording and labelling, we investigated pain sensation and modulation of the somatic cortical cortex at the neuron's level. After observing the evoked potentials from stimulating the saphenous nerves (SN) of 654 neurons in SI area of the cats, we labelled 30 of the neurons with Neurobiotin to preserve the distribution and the morphologic characteristics of the neurons in the cortex. Based on the tridimensional reconstruction in addition to the eletrophysiological functions, we found clear morphological distinctions between nociceptive and non-nociceptive neurons (P<0.01). This result provided new experimental material to illustrate the function of nociceptive neurons in somatosensory cortex (SI) and presented further evidence to support the "specificity theory" of pain sensation in terms of morphology.

  2. Nociception and inflammatory hyperalgesia evaluated in rodents using infrared laser stimulation after Trpv1 gene knockout or resiniferatoxin lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Kendall; Lebovitz, Evan E; Keller, Jason M; Mannes, Andrew J; Nemenov, Michael I; Iadarola, Michael J

    2014-04-01

    TRPV1 is expressed in a subpopulation of myelinated Aδ and unmyelinated C-fibers. TRPV1+ fibers are essential for the transmission of nociceptive thermal stimuli and for the establishment and maintenance of inflammatory hyperalgesia. We have previously shown that high-power, short-duration pulses from an infrared diode laser are capable of predominantly activating cutaneous TRPV1+ Aδ-fibers. Here we show that stimulating either subtype of TRPV1+ fiber in the paw during carrageenan-induced inflammation or following hind-paw incision elicits pronounced hyperalgesic responses, including prolonged paw guarding. The ultrapotent TRPV1 agonist resiniferatoxin (RTX) dose-dependently deactivates TRPV1+ fibers and blocks thermal nociceptive responses in baseline or inflamed conditions. Injecting sufficient doses of RTX peripherally renders animals unresponsive to laser stimulation even at the point of acute thermal skin damage. In contrast, Trpv1-/- mice, which are generally unresponsive to noxious thermal stimuli at lower power settings, exhibit withdrawal responses and inflammation-induced sensitization using high-power, short duration Aδ stimuli. In rats, systemic morphine suppresses paw withdrawal, inflammatory guarding, and hyperalgesia in a dose-dependent fashion using the same Aδ stimuli. The qualitative intensity of Aδ responses, the leftward shift of the stimulus-response curve, the increased guarding behaviors during carrageenan inflammation or after incision, and the reduction of Aδ responses with morphine suggest multiple roles for TRPV1+ Aδ fibers in nociceptive processes and their modulation of pathological pain conditions.

  3. Activation of P2X7 receptors in glial satellite cells reduces pain through downregulation of P2X3 receptors in nociceptive neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yong; Zhang, Xiaofei; Wang, Congying; Li, Guangwen; Gu, Yanping; Huang, Li-Yen Mae

    2008-01-01

    Purinergic ionotropic P2X7 receptors (P2X7Rs) are closely associated with excitotoxicity and nociception. Inhibition of P2X7R activation has been considered as a potentially useful strategy to improve recovery from spinal cord injury and reduce inflammatory damage to trauma. The physiological functions of P2X7Rs, however, are poorly understood, even though such information is essential for making the P2X7R an effective therapeutic target. We show here that P2X7Rs in satellite cells of dorsal ...

  4. Optical imaging of nociception in primary somatosensory cortex of non-human primates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Min CHEN; Robert M. Friedman; Anna W. Roe

    2008-01-01

    While the activation of primary somatosensory (SI) cortex during pain perception is consistently reported in functional imaging studies on normal subjects and chronic pain patients, the specific roles of SI, particularly the subregions within SI, in the processing of sensory aspects of pain are still largely unknown. Using optical imaging of intrinsic signal (OIS) and single unit electrophysiology, we studied cortical activation patterns within SI cortex (among Brodmann areas 3a, 3b and 1) and signal amplitude changes to various intensities of non-nociceptive, thermal nociceptive and mechanical nociceptive stimulation of individual distal finerpads in anesthetized squirrel monkeys. We have demonstrated that areas 3a and 1 are preferentially involved in the processing of nociceptive information while areas 3b and 1 are preferentially activated in the processing of non-nociceptive (touch) information. Nociceptive activations of individual fingerpad were organized topographically suggesting that nociceptive topographic map exits in areas 3a and 1. Signal amplitude was enhanced to increasing intensity of mechanical nociceptive stimuli in areas 3a, 3b and 1. Within area 1, nociceptive response co-localizes with the non-nociceptive response. Therefore, we hypothesize that nocicepitve information is area-specifically represented within SI cortex, in which nociceptive inputs are preferentially represented in areas 3a and 1 while non-nociceptive inputs are preferentially represented in areas 3b and 1.

  5. Different phosphoinositide 3-kinase isoforms mediate carrageenan nociception and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Rory A; Falk, Lovissa; Larsson, Mathilda; Leinders, Mathias; Sorkin, Linda S

    2016-01-01

    Phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) participate in signal transduction cascades that can directly activate and sensitize nociceptors and enhance pain transmission. They also play essential roles in chemotaxis and immune cell infiltration leading to inflammation. We wished to determine which PI3K isoforms were involved in each of these processes. Lightly anesthetized rats (isoflurane) were injected subcutaneously with carrageenan in their hind paws. This was preceded by a local injection of 1% DMSO vehicle or an isoform-specific antagonist to PI3K-α (compound 15-e), -β (TGX221), -δ (Cal-101), or -γ (AS252424). We measured changes in the mechanical pain threshold and spinal c-Fos expression (4 hours after injection) as indices of nociception. Paw volume, plasma extravasation (Evans blue, 0.3 hours after injection), and neutrophil (myeloperoxidase; 1 hour after injection) and macrophage (CD11b+; 4 hour after injection) infiltration into paw tissue were the measured inflammation endpoints. Only PI3K-γ antagonist before treatment reduced the carrageenan-induced pain behavior and spinal expression of c-Fos (P ≤ 0.01). In contrast, pretreatment with PI3K-α, -δ, and-γ antagonists reduced early indices of inflammation. Plasma extravasation PI3K-α (P ≤ 0.05), -δ (P ≤ 0.05), and -γ (P ≤ 0.01), early (0-2 hour) edema -α (P ≤ 0.05), -δ (P ≤ 0.001), and -γ (P ≤ 0.05), and neutrophil infiltration (all P ≤ 0.001) were all reduced compared to vehicle pretreatment. Later (2-4 hour), edema and macrophage infiltration (P ≤ 0.05) were reduced by only the PI3K-δ and -γ isoform antagonists, with the PI3K-δ antagonist having a greater effect on edema. PI3K-β antagonism was ineffective in all paradigms. These data indicate that pain and clinical inflammation are pharmacologically separable and may help to explain clinical conditions in which inflammation naturally wanes or goes into remission, but pain continues unabated.

  6. Intracisternal octreotide does not ameliorate orthodromic trigeminovascular nociception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemper, RHA; Jeuring, M; Meijler, WJ; Korf, J; Ter Horst, GJ

    2000-01-01

    Octreotide is a long-acting somatostatin analogue that has been effectively used to treat migraine. Octreotide poorly penetrates the blood-brain barrier, but has potential central target sites in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis, which is the primary central relay station for trigeminal nociceptive i

  7. Tests and models of nociception and pain in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrot, M

    2012-06-01

    Nociception and pain is a large field of both neuroscience and medical research. Over time, various tests and models were developed in rodents to provide tools for fundamental and translational research on the topic. Tests using thermal, mechanical, and chemical stimuli, measures of hyperalgesia and allodynia, models of inflammatory or neuropathic pain, constitute a toolbox available to researchers. These tests and models allowed rapid progress on the anatomo-molecular basis of physiological and pathological pain, even though they have yet to translate into new analgesic drugs. More recently, a growing effort has been put forth trying to assess pain in rats or mice, rather than nociceptive reflexes, or at studying complex states affected by chronic pain. This aids to further improve the translational value of preclinical research in a field with balanced research efforts between fundamental research, preclinical work, and human studies. This review describes classical tests and models of nociception and pain in rodents. It also presents some recent and ongoing developments in nociceptive tests, recent trends for pain evaluation, and raises the question of the appropriateness between tests, models, and procedures.

  8. Comparison of trigeminal and spinal modulation of pain and nociception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehberg, Benno; Baars, Jan H; Kotsch, Julia; Koppe, Peter; von Dincklage, Falk

    2012-06-01

    Modulation of pain and nociception by noxious counterstimulation, also called "diffuse noxious inhibitory controls" or DNIC-like effect, is often used in studies of pain disorders. It can be elicited in the trigeminal and spinal innervation areas, but no study has previously compared effects in both innervation areas. Therefore, we performed a study comparing DNIC-like effects on the nociceptive flexion reflex (NFR) and the nociceptive blink reflex as well as the respective pain sensations. In 50 healthy volunteers, the blink reflex elicited with a concentric electrode and the NFR were recorded before and after immersion of the contralateral hand in cold water. Responses were recorded as the subjective pain sensation and the reflex size. The cold water immersion of the contralateral hand elicited a reduction of both subjective pain sensation and reflex amplitude following the stimulation of both reflexes. However, there were no strong correlations between the individual reductions of both subjective pain sensation and reflex amplitude for both reflexes, and neither when results of the two reflexes were compared with each other. The dissociation between DNIC-like effects on pain and on nociception, which had been found previously already for the NFR, implies that both effects need to be studied separately.

  9. Citral reduces nociceptive and inflammatory response in rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucindo J. Quintans-Júnior

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Citral (CIT, which contains the chiral enantiomers, neral (cis and geranial (trans, is the majority monoterpene from Lippia alba and Cymbopogon citratus. The present study aimed to evaluate CIT for antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities in rodents. Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects were studied by measuring nociception through acetic acid and formalin tests, while inflammation was verified by inducing peritonitis and paw edema with carrageenan. All tested doses of CIT had significant protection (p<0.001 against acetic acid (0.8% induced nociceptive behavior and the effects were also similar to morphine while formalin induced nociception was significantly protected (p<0.05 only at higher dose (200 mg/kg of CIT in the first phase of the test. CIT significantly reduce (p<0.001 nociceptive behavior emanating from inflammation in second phase at all the doses.The pretreatment with CIT (100 and 200 mg/kg significantly reduced the paw edema induced by carrageenan. Moreover, systemic treatment with CIT (100 and 200 mg/kg significantly reduced (p<0.001 the leukocyte migration in the carrageenan-induced migration to the peritoneal cavity. Our investigation shows that CIT possess significant central and peripheral antinociceptive effects. It was also verified an anti-inflammatory activity. All together these results suggest that CIT might represent important tool for treatment of painful conditions.

  10. Nociception at the diabetic foot, an uncharted territory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantelau, Ernst A

    2015-04-15

    The diabetic foot is characterised by painless foot ulceration and/or arthropathy; it is a typical complication of painless diabetic neuropathy. Neuropathy depletes the foot skin of intraepidermal nerve fibre endings of the afferent A-delta and C-fibres, which are mostly nociceptors and excitable by noxious stimuli only. However, some of them are cold or warm receptors whose functions in diabetic neuropathy have frequently been reported. Hence, it is well established by quantitative sensory testing that thermal detection thresholds at the foot skin increase during the course of painless diabetic neuropathy. Pain perception (nociception), by contrast, has rarely been studied. Recent pilot studies of pinprick pain at plantar digital skinfolds showed that the perception threshold was always above the upper limit of measurement of 512 mN (equivalent to 51.2 g) at the diabetic foot. However, deep pressure pain perception threshold at musculus abductor hallucis was beyond 1400 kPa (equivalent to 14 kg; limit of measurement) only in every fifth case. These discrepancies of pain perception between forefoot and hindfoot, and between skin and muscle, demand further study. Measuring nociception at the feet in diabetes opens promising clinical perspectives. A critical nociception threshold may be quantified (probably corresponding to a critical number of intraepidermal nerve fibre endings), beyond which the individual risk of a diabetic foot rises appreciably. Staging of diabetic neuropathy according to nociception thresholds at the feet is highly desirable as guidance to an individualised injury prevention strategy.

  11. Nociception and Conditioned Fear in Rats: Strains Matter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaap, M.W.H.; van Oostrom, H.; Doornenbal, A.; van 't Klooster, J.; Baars, A.M.; Arndt, S.S.; Hellebrekers, L.J.

    2013-01-01

    When using rats in pain research, strain-related differences in outcomes of tests for pain and nociception are acknowledged. However, very little is known about the specific characteristics of these strain differences. In this study four phylogenetically distant inbred rat strains, i.e. Wistar Kyoto

  12. D-Aspartate Modulates Nociceptive-Specific Neuron Activity and Pain Threshold in Inflammatory and Neuropathic Pain Condition in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Boccella

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available D-Aspartate (D-Asp is a free D-amino acid found in the mammalian brain with a temporal-dependent concentration based on the postnatal expression of its metabolizing enzyme D-aspartate oxidase (DDO. D-Asp acts as an agonist on NMDA receptors (NMDARs. Accordingly, high levels of D-Asp in knockout mice for Ddo gene (Ddo−/− or in mice treated with D-Asp increase NMDAR-dependent processes. We have here evaluated in Ddo−/− mice the effect of high levels of free D-Asp on the long-term plastic changes along the nociceptive pathway occurring in chronic and acute pain condition. We found that Ddo−/− mice show an increased evoked activity of the nociceptive specific (NS neurons of the dorsal horn of the spinal cord (L4–L6 and a significant decrease of mechanical and thermal thresholds, as compared to control mice. Moreover, Ddo gene deletion exacerbated the nocifensive responses in the formalin test and slightly reduced pain thresholds in neuropathic mice up to 7 days after chronic constriction injury. These findings suggest that the NMDAR agonist, D-Asp, may play a role in the regulation of NS neuron electrophysiological activity and behavioral responses in physiological and pathological pain conditions.

  13. D-Aspartate Modulates Nociceptive-Specific Neuron Activity and Pain Threshold in Inflammatory and Neuropathic Pain Condition in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccella, Serena; Vacca, Valentina; Errico, Francesco; Marinelli, Sara; Squillace, Marta; Di Maio, Anna; Vitucci, Daniela; Palazzo, Enza; De Novellis, Vito; Maione, Sabatino; Pavone, Flaminia; Usiello, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    D-Aspartate (D-Asp) is a free D-amino acid found in the mammalian brain with a temporal-dependent concentration based on the postnatal expression of its metabolizing enzyme D-aspartate oxidase (DDO). D-Asp acts as an agonist on NMDA receptors (NMDARs). Accordingly, high levels of D-Asp in knockout mice for Ddo gene (Ddo−/−) or in mice treated with D-Asp increase NMDAR-dependent processes. We have here evaluated in Ddo−/− mice the effect of high levels of free D-Asp on the long-term plastic changes along the nociceptive pathway occurring in chronic and acute pain condition. We found that Ddo−/− mice show an increased evoked activity of the nociceptive specific (NS) neurons of the dorsal horn of the spinal cord (L4–L6) and a significant decrease of mechanical and thermal thresholds, as compared to control mice. Moreover, Ddo gene deletion exacerbated the nocifensive responses in the formalin test and slightly reduced pain thresholds in neuropathic mice up to 7 days after chronic constriction injury. These findings suggest that the NMDAR agonist, D-Asp, may play a role in the regulation of NS neuron electrophysiological activity and behavioral responses in physiological and pathological pain conditions. PMID:25629055

  14. Abnormal nociception and opiate sensitivity of STOP null mice exhibiting elevated levels of the endogenous alkaloid morphine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aunis Dominique

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background- Mice deficient for the stable tubule only peptide (STOP display altered dopaminergic neurotransmission associated with severe behavioural defects including disorganized locomotor activity. Endogenous morphine, which is present in nervous tissues and synthesized from dopamine, may contribute to these behavioral alterations since it is thought to play a role in normal and pathological neurotransmission. Results- In this study, we showed that STOP null brain structures, including cortex, hippocampus, cerebellum and spinal cord, contain high endogenous morphine amounts. The presence of elevated levels of morphine was associated with the presence of a higher density of mu opioid receptor with a higher affinity for morphine in STOP null brains. Interestingly, STOP null mice exhibited significantly lower nociceptive thresholds to thermal and mechanical stimulations. They also had abnormal behavioural responses to the administration of exogenous morphine and naloxone. Low dose of morphine (1 mg/kg, i.p. produced a significant mechanical antinociception in STOP null mice whereas it has no effect on wild-type mice. High concentration of naloxone (1 mg/kg was pronociceptive for both mice strain, a lower concentration (0.1 mg/kg was found to increase the mean mechanical nociceptive threshold only in the case of STOP null mice. Conclusions- Together, our data show that STOP null mice displayed elevated levels of endogenous morphine, as well as an increase of morphine receptor affinity and density in brain. This was correlated with hypernociception and impaired pharmacological sensitivity to mu opioid receptor ligands.

  15. Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal root extract alleviates formalin-induced nociception in mice: involvement of the opioidergic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orrù, Alessandro; Casu, Maria Antonietta; Tambaro, Simone; Marchese, Giorgio; Casu, Gianluca; Ruiu, Stefania

    2016-02-01

    Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal extracts (WSEs) may possess therapeutic perspectives in the treatment of inflammation and pain. We aimed to evaluate the antinociceptive property of a WSE in the formalin test and to investigate the involvement of several neurotransmitter systems in this effect. The time spent licking the formalin-injected paw was recorded in CD1 mice after pretreatment with increasing doses of WSE. Also, c-Fos spinal cord expression and the effects of different compounds were investigated under these experimental conditions. Finally, the efficacy of WSE was analyzed following an injection of glutamate. WSE reduced the antinociceptive response during the tonic but not the acute phase of the formalin test and decreased formalin-induced c-Fos expression in spinal neurons. These effects were antagonized by the opioid antagonist naltrexone, whereas GABA, cannabinoid, δ-opioid, and nitric oxide compounds were ineffective. The administration of WSE also reduced nociception and c-Fos expression induced by glutamate injection. These results showed that WSE is effective in assays of chemical-induced nociception, indicating that this plant has potential valuable properties for the treatment of specific painful conditions. The antinocicetive effects of WSE in the formalin test appeared to be specifically mediated by the opioidergic system, although the involvement of the glutamatergic system cannot be excluded.

  16. Endomorphins suppress nociception-induced c-Fos and Zif/268 expression in the rat spinal dorsal horn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateyama, Shingo; Ikeda, Tetsuya; Kosai, Kazuko; Nakamura, Tadashi; Kasaba, Toshiharu; Takasaki, Mayumi; Nishimori, Toshikazu

    2002-09-06

    We evaluated the potency of endomorphin-1 and -2 as endogenous ligands on c-Fos and Zif/268 expression in the spinal dorsal horn by formalin injection to the rat hind paw. Endomorphin-1, -2, or morphine was administered intrathecally or intracerebroventricularly 5 min before formalin injection (5%, 100 microl). All drugs produced marked reductions of formalin-induced c-Fos and Zif/268 immunoreactivity in laminae I and II, and laminae V and VI in the rat lumbar spinal cord. The reductions of Zif/268 expression by endomorphins were greater than those by morphine, while the reductions of c-Fos expression by endomorphins were smaller than those by morphine. These effects of endomorphins were attenuated by pretreatment with naloxone. These results indicate that endomorphin-1 and -2 act as endogenous ligands of mu-opioid receptor in neurons of the spinal dorsal horn and suppress the processing of nociceptive information in the central nervous system.

  17. The search for novel analgesics: re-examining spinal cord circuits with new tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly M Smith

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this perspective, we propose the absence of detailed information regarding spinal cord circuits that process sensory information remains a major barrier to advancing analgesia. We highlight recent advances showing that functionally discrete populations of neurons in the spinal cord dorsal horn play distinct roles in processing sensory information. We then discuss new molecular, electrophysiological, and optogenetic techniques that can be employed to understand how dorsal horn circuits process tactile and nociceptive information. We believe this information can drive the development of entirely new classes of pharmacotherapies that target key elements in spinal circuits to selectively modify sensory function and blunt pain.

  18. The search for novel analgesics: re-examining spinal cord circuits with new tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kelly M.; Madden, Jessica F.; Callister, Robert J.; Hughes, David I.; Graham, Brett A.

    2014-01-01

    In this perspective, we propose the absence of detailed information regarding spinal cord circuits that process sensory information remains a major barrier to advancing analgesia. We highlight recent advances showing that functionally discrete populations of neurons in the spinal cord dorsal horn (DH) play distinct roles in processing sensory information. We then discuss new molecular, electrophysiological, and optogenetic techniques that can be employed to understand how DH circuits process tactile and nociceptive information. We believe this information can drive the development of entirely new classes of pharmacotherapies that target key elements in spinal circuits to selectively modify sensory function and blunt pain. PMID:24616699

  19. p-Cymene reduces orofacial nociceptive response in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele F. Santana

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the possible antinociceptive effect of p-cymene in different tests of orofacial nociception. The animals (mice were pretreated (i.p. with p-cymene (25, 50, 100 mg/kg, morphine (5 mg/kg, or vehicle (0.2% Tween 80+saline, and were then subsequently administered, subcutaneously into their upper lip: formalin, capsaicin, and glutamate. The nociceptive behavior response was characterized by the time in s that the mice remained rubbing the orofacial region, for a period of 40 min in the formalin test (first phase, 0-6 min; and second phase, 21-40 min, and for 42 and 15 min in the capsaicin and glutamate tests, respectively. To verify the possible opioid involvement in the antinociceptive effects, naloxone (i.p. was administered into the mice 15 min prior to the pretreatment with p-cymene (100 mg/kg. Finally, whether or not the p-cymene evoked any change in motor performance in the Rota-rod test was evaluated. The results showed that the treatment with p-cymene, at all doses, reduced (p<0.001 the nociceptive behavior in all nociception tests. The antinociceptive effect of p-cymene was antagonized by naloxone (1.5 mg/kg. Additionally, mice treated with p-cymene did not show any change in motor performance. In conclusion, p-cymene attenuated orofacial nociception, suggesting an involvement of the opioid system in this effect. Thus, p-cymene might represent an important biomolecule for management and/or treatment of orofacial pain.

  20. Intraplantar injection of tetrahydrobiopterin induces nociception in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasser, Arafat; Ali, Sawsan; Wilsbech, Signe; Bjerrum, Ole J; Møller, Lisbeth B

    2015-01-01

    Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is implicated in the development and maintenance of chronic pain. After injury/inflammation, the biosynthesis of BH4 is markedly increased in sensory neurons, and the pharmacological and genetic inhibition of BH4 shows analgesic effects in pre-clinical animal pain models. Intrathecal injections of BH4 have been shown to induce and enhance pain-like behaviours in rats, suggesting that under chronic pain conditions BH4 may act by facilitating central sensitisation. So far it is unknown whether BH4 acts on peripheral sites of the somatosensory system or whether BH4 per se provokes nociceptive pain behaviours. The purpose of this study was therefore to investigate the acute nociceptive effects of intraplantar injection of BH4. BH4 was found to induce dose-dependent licking/biting of the paw lasting 5 min, which was not observed following an injection of biopterin (inactive BH4 metabolite). Paw swelling, measured as paw thickness and weight, was not observed after BH4 injection. To explore possible mechanisms of action of BH4, the effect of local pre-treatment with indomethacin, Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, Nω-nitro-L-arginine, capsazepine and ruthenium red was tested. Morphine served as a positive control. Intraplantar pre-injection of morphine dose-dependently inhibited BH4-induced nociception, while none of the other compounds showed any statistical significant antinociception. These results suggest that BH4 exhibits nociceptive properties at peripheral sites of the somatosensory system, proposing an as yet unexplored involvement of BH4 in peripheral nociceptive processes. However, this appears not to be mediated through nitric oxide and prostaglandin release or by activation of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1.

  1. Oxidation-sensitive nociception involved in endometriosis-associated pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Kristeena; Fahrmann, Johannes; Mitchell, Brenda; Paul, Dennis; King, Holly; Crain, Courtney; Cook, Carla; Golovko, Mikhail; Brose, Stephen; Golovko, Svetlana; Santanam, Nalini

    2015-03-01

    Endometriosis is a disease characterized by the growth of endometrial tissue outside the uterus and is associated with chronic pelvic pain. Peritoneal fluid (PF) of women with endometriosis is a dynamic milieu and is rich in inflammatory markers, pain-inducing prostaglandins prostaglandin E2 and prostaglandin F2α, and lipid peroxides; and the endometriotic tissue is innervated with nociceptors. Our clinical study showed that the abundance of oxidatively modified lipoproteins in the PF of women with endometriosis and the ability of antioxidant supplementation to alleviate endometriosis-associated pain. We hypothesized that oxidatively modified lipoproteins present in the PF are the major source of nociceptive molecules that play a key role in endometriosis-associated pain. In this study, PF obtained from women with endometriosis or control women were used for (1) the detection of lipoprotein-derived oxidation-sensitive pain molecules, (2) the ability of such molecules to induce nociception, and (3) the ability of antioxidants to suppress this nociception. LC-MS/MS showed the generation of eicosanoids by oxidized-lipoproteins to be similar to that seen in the PF. Oxidatively modified lipoproteins induced hypothermia (intracerebroventricular) in CD-1 mice and nociception in the Hargreaves paw withdrawal latency assay in Sprague-Dawley rats. Antioxidants, vitamin E and N-acetylcysteine, and the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug indomethacin suppressed the pain-inducing ability of oxidatively modified lipoproteins. Treatment of human endometrial cells with oxidatively modified lipoproteins or PF from women with endometriosis showed upregulation of similar genes belonging to opioid and inflammatory pathways. Our finding that oxidatively modified lipoproteins can induce nociception has a broader impact not only on the treatment of endometriosis-associated pain but also on other diseases associated with chronic pain.

  2. Nociception originating from the crural fascia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Toru; Yasui, Masaya; Kubo, Asako; Abe, Masahiro; Kiyama, Hiroshi; Yamanaka, Akihiro; Mizumura, Kazue

    2013-07-01

    Little is documented in the literature as to the function of muscle fascia in nociception and pain. The aim of this study was to examine the distribution of presumptive nociceptive nerve fibers, to characterize fascial thin-fiber sensory receptors, and to examine the spinal projection of nociceptive input from the rat crural fascia (CF). Nerve fibers labeled with specific antibodies to calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and peripherin were found to be densely distributed in the distal third of the CF. Thin-fiber receptors (Aδ- and C-fibers) responding to pinching stimuli to the CF with sharpened watchmaker's forceps, identified in vivo with the teased fiber technique from the common peroneal nerve, exist in the CF. Forty-three percent of the mechano-responsive fascial C-fibers were polymodal receptors (nociceptors) responding to mechanical, chemical (bradykinin), and heat stimuli, whereas almost all Aδ-fibers were responsive only to mechanical stimuli. Repetitive pinching stimulus to the CF induced c-Fos protein expression in the middle to medial part of superficial layers ie, laminae I-II of the spinal dorsal horn at segments L2 to L4, peaking at L3. These results clearly demonstrate the following: 1) peptidergic and non-peptidergic axons of unmyelinated C-fibers with nerve terminals are distributed in the CF; 2) peripheral afferents responding to noxious stimuli exist in the fascia, and 3) nociceptive information from the CF is mainly processed in the spinal dorsal horn at the segments L2 to L4. These results together indicate that the "muscle fascia," a tissue often overlooked in pain research, can be an important source of nociception under normal conditions. Copyright © 2013 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Enhancement of spontaneous and heat-evoked activity in spinal nociceptive neurons by the endovanilloid/endocannabinoid N-arachidonoyldopamine (NADA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Susan M; Walker, J Michael

    2006-02-01

    N-arachidonoyldopamine (NADA) is an endogenous molecule found in the nervous system that is capable of acting as a vanilloid agonist via the TRPV1 receptor and as a cannabinoid agonist via the CB1 receptor. Using anesthetized rats, we investigated the neural correlates of behavioral thermal hyperalgesia produced by NADA. Extracellular single cell electrophysiology was conducted to assess the effects of peripheral administration of NADA (i.pl.) on nociceptive neurons in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. Injection of NADA in the hindpaw caused increased spontaneous discharge of spinal nociceptive neurons compared with injection of vehicle. The neurons also displayed magnified responses to application of thermal stimuli ranging from 34 to 52 degrees C. NADA-induced neural hypersensitivity was dose dependent (EC50 = 1.55 microg) and TRPV1 dependent, as the effect was abolished by co-administration of the TRPV1 antagonist 5'-iodoresiniferatoxin (I-RTX). In contrast, co-administration of the CB1 antagonist SR 141716A did not attenuate this effect. These results suggest that the enhanced responses of spinal nociceptive neurons likely underlie the behavioral thermal hyperalgesia and implicate a possible pain-sensitizing role of endogenous NADA mediated by TRPV1 in the periphery.

  4. Stimulus intensity, cell excitation and the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor component of sensory responses in the rat spinal cord in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chizh, B A; Cumberbatch, M J; Herrero, J F; Stirk, G C; Headley, P M

    1997-09-01

    The importance of receptors for N-methyl-D-aspartate in synaptic plasticity and in triggering long-term pronociceptive changes is explained by their voltage-dependence. This suggests that their contribution to acute nociceptive responses would be determined both by the magnitude of synaptic input and by the level of background excitation. We have now examined the role of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors in acute nociceptive transmission in the spinal cord. Drugs selectively affecting activity mediated by these receptors were tested on responses of dorsal horn neurons to noxious stimuli of different intensities and at different levels of ongoing spike discharge. The drugs used were the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor channel blocker ketamine; the competitive antagonists, 3-((R)-2-carboxypiperazin-4-yl)-propyl-1-phosphonic acid (D-CPP) and D-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (D-AP5), and the positive modulator thyrotropin-releasing hormone. The activity of dorsal horn wide dynamic range neurons was recorded extracellularly in alpha-chloralose-anaesthetized spinalized rats. Their responses to noxious stimuli (pinch, heat and electrical) were monitored in parallel with responses to iontophoretic N-methyl-D-aspartate and (RS)-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionic acid (AMPA). Drugs were given i.v. or (D-AP5) iontophoretically. At doses that selectively inhibited responses to exogenous N-methyl-D-aspartate, ketamine (4 or 8, mean 5 mg/kg i.v.) reduced the nociceptive responses of the majority of the cells in deep dorsal horn. Ketamine also reduced wind-up of the responses to repetitive electrical stimulation. Ketamine (4 or 8 mg/kg). D-CPP (2 mg/kg), D-AP5 (iontophoretically) and thyrotrophin-releasing hormone (1 mg/kg) were tested on different magnitude nociceptive responses evoked by alternating intensities of noxious heat or pinch. In percentage terms, the less vigorous responses were affected by all four drugs as much as or more than the more vigorous

  5. The potentiating effect of calcitonin gene-related peptide on transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 activity and the electrophysiological responses of rat trigeminal neurons to nociceptive stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatchaisak, Duangthip; Connor, Mark; Srikiatkhachorn, Anan; Chetsawang, Banthit

    2017-02-15

    Growing evidence suggests that calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) participates in trigeminal nociceptive responses. However, the role of CGRP in sensitization or desensitization of nociceptive transduction remains poorly understood. In this study, we sought to further investigate the CGRP-induced up-regulation of transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) and the responses of trigeminal neurons to nociceptive stimuli. Rat trigeminal ganglion (TG) organ cultures and isolated trigeminal neurons were incubated with CGRP. An increase in TRPV1 levels was observed in CGRP-incubated TG organ cultures. CGRP potentiated capsaicin-induced increase in phosphorylated CaMKII levels in the TG organ cultures. The incubation of the trigeminal neurons with CGRP significantly increased the inward currents in response to capsaicin challenge, and this effect was inhibited by co-incubation with the CGRP receptor antagonist, BIBN4068BS or the inhibitor of protein kinase A, H-89. These findings reveal that CGRP acting on trigeminal neurons may play a significant role in facilitating cellular events that contribute to the peripheral sensitization of the TG in nociceptive transmission.

  6. [Evaluation of perioperative analgesia by nociceptive flexor reflex in pigs under ketamine-azaperone-general anaesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rintisch, Ulf; Baars, Jan; Lahrmann, Karl-Heinz

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the investigation was to evaluate quantitatively the analgesic efficacy of the Ketamine-Azaperone-general anesthesia during surgical procedures on pigs by nociceptive flexor reflexes (NFR). The study was performed in 30 four to five month old male pigs which were castrated. The NFR was evoked every minute over the N. ulnaris by multiple electrical stimulation consisting of five single stimuli (2 Hz). The reflex response was derived electromyographically (EMG) by surface electrodes placed over the M. deltoideus. The root-mean-square amplitude within the time interval of 80-240 ms after the last stimulus was calculated as measure for the reflex size. The threshold was fixed at 40 microV. Beside electrical NFR recording the surgical tolerance was determined by the traditional interdigital reflex and the defense reaction to defined surgical test stimuli which were incisisions in the scrotal skin, in the tunica vaginalis and in the testis, pulling off the spermatic cord, clamping and cutting off the spermatic cord and final wound disinfection. All surgical pain stimuli were performed simultaneously with the electrical stimuli. After induction of anesthesia the NFR amplitude declined from 3500 microV below the threshold of 40 microV. At 98% of the surgical stimuli without defense reaction were below the reflex threshold. At 93% with defense reactions demonstrated reflex amplitudes above the threshold. When the interdigital reflex was suppressed, 89% of the NFR values fell below the threshold of 40 microV. These findings demonstrate a good correlation of NFR-amplitudes with reactions to traditional controls of analgesia.

  7. Presynaptic regulation of the inhibitory transmission by GluR5-containing kainate receptors in spinal substantia gelatinosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hui; Wu, Long-Jun; Zhao, Ming-Gao; Toyoda, Hiroki; Vadakkan, Kunjumon I; Jia, Yongheng; Pinaud, Raphael; Zhuo, Min

    2006-09-01

    GluR5-containing kainate receptors (KARs) are known to be involved in nociceptive transmission. Our previous work has shown that the activation of presynaptic KARs regulates GABAergic and glycinergic synaptic transmission in cultured dorsal horn neurons. However, the role of GluR5-containing KARs in the modulation of inhibitory transmission in the spinal substantia gelatinosa (SG) in slices remains unknown. In the present study, pharmacological, electrophysiological and genetic methods were used to show that presynaptic GluR5 KARs are involved in the modulation of inhibitory transmission in the SG of spinal slices in vitro. The GluR5 selective agonist, ATPA, facilitated the frequency but not amplitude of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) in SG neurons. ATPA increased sIPSC frequency in all neurons with different firing patterns as delayed, tonic, initial and single spike patterns. The frequency of either GABAergic or glycinergic sIPSCs was significantly increased by ATPA. ATPA could also induce inward currents in all SG neurons recorded. The frequency, but not amplitude, of action potential-independent miniature IPSCs (mIPSCs) was also facilitated by ATPA in a concentration-dependent manner. However, the effect of ATPA on the frequency of either sIPSCs or mIPSCs was abolished in GluR5-/- mice. Deletion of the GluR5 subunit gene had no effect on the frequency or amplitude of mIPSCs in SG neurons. However, GluR5 antagonist LY293558 reversibly inhibited sIPSC and mIPSC frequencies in spinal SG neurons. Taken together, these results suggest that GluR5 KARs, which may be located at presynaptic terminals, contribute to the modulation of inhibitory transmission in the SG. GluR5-containing KARs are thus important for spinal sensory transmission/modulation in the spinal cord.

  8. Presynaptic regulation of the inhibitory transmission by GluR5-containing kainate receptors in spinal substantia gelatinosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinaud Raphael

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract GluR5-containing kainate receptors (KARs are known to be involved in nociceptive transmission. Our previous work has shown that the activation of presynaptic KARs regulates GABAergic and glycinergic synaptic transmission in cultured dorsal horn neurons. However, the role of GluR5-containing KARs in the modulation of inhibitory transmission in the spinal substantia gelatinosa (SG in slices remains unknown. In the present study, pharmacological, electrophysiological and genetic methods were used to show that presynaptic GluR5 KARs are involved in the modulation of inhibitory transmission in the SG of spinal slices in vitro. The GluR5 selective agonist, ATPA, facilitated the frequency but not amplitude of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs in SG neurons. ATPA increased sIPSC frequency in all neurons with different firing patterns as delayed, tonic, initial and single spike patterns. The frequency of either GABAergic or glycinergic sIPSCs was significantly increased by ATPA. ATPA could also induce inward currents in all SG neurons recorded. The frequency, but not amplitude, of action potential-independent miniature IPSCs (mIPSCs was also facilitated by ATPA in a concentration-dependent manner. However, the effect of ATPA on the frequency of either sIPSCs or mIPSCs was abolished in GluR5-/- mice. Deletion of the GluR5 subunit gene had no effect on the frequency or amplitude of mIPSCs in SG neurons. However, GluR5 antagonist LY293558 reversibly inhibited sIPSC and mIPSC frequencies in spinal SG neurons. Taken together, these results suggest that GluR5 KARs, which may be located at presynaptic terminals, contribute to the modulation of inhibitory transmission in the SG. GluR5-containing KARs are thus important for spinal sensory transmission/modulation in the spinal cord.

  9. Role of capsaicin-sensitive C-fiber afferents in neuropathic pain-induced synaptic potentiation in the nociceptive amygdala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakao Ayano

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurons in the capsular part of the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeC, a region also called "nociceptive amygdala," receive nociceptive information from the dorsal horn via afferent pathways relayed from the lateral parabrachial nucleus (LPB. As the central amygdala is known to be involved in the acquisition and expression of emotion, this pathway is thought to play central roles in the generation of affective responses to nociceptive inputs. Excitatory synaptic transmission between afferents arising from the LPB and these CeC neurons is potentiated in arthritic, visceral, neuropathic, inflammatory and muscle pain models. In neuropathic pain models following spinal nerve ligation (SNL, in which we previously showed a robust LPB-CeC potentiation, the principal behavioral symptom is tactile allodynia triggered by non-C-fiber low-threshold mechanoreceptor afferents. Conversely, recent anatomical studies have revealed that most of the spinal neurons projecting to the LPB receive C-fiber afferent inputs. Here, we examined the hypothesis that these C-fiber-mediated inputs are necessary for the full establishment of robust synaptic potentiation of LPB-CeC transmission in the rats with neuropathic pain. Results Postnatal capsaicin treatment, which has been shown to denervate the C-fibers expressing transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 (TRPV1 channels, completely abolished eye-wiping responses to capsaicin eye instillation in rats, but this treatment did not affect mechanical allodynia in the nerve-ligated animals. However, the postnatal capsaicin treatment prevented LPB-CeC synaptic potentiation after SNL, unlike in the vehicle-treated rats, primarily due to the decreased incidence of potentiated transmission by elimination of TRPV1-expressing C-fiber afferents. Conclusions C-fiber-mediated afferents in the nerve-ligated animals may be a required facilitator of the establishment of nerve injury-evoked synaptic

  10. Tethered Spinal Cord Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... roots may be cut to relieve pain. In adults, surgery to free (detether) the spinal cord can reduce the size ... is a neurological disorder caused by tissue attachments that limit the movement of the spinal cord ...

  11. Spinal Cord Dysfunction (SCD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Spinal Cord Dysfunction (SCD) module supports the maintenance of local and national registries for the tracking of patients with spinal cord injury and disease...

  12. Looking at the hand modulates the brain responses to nociceptive and non-nociceptive somatosensory stimuli but does not necessarily modulate their perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torta, Diana M; Legrain, Valéry; Mouraux, André

    2015-08-01

    Previous studies have suggested that looking at the hand can reduce the perception of pain and the magnitude of the ERPs elicited by nociceptive stimuli delivered onto the hand. In contrast, other studies have suggested that looking at the hand can increase tactile sensory discrimination performance, and enhance the magnitude of the ERPs elicited by tactile stimulation. These opposite effects could be related to differences in the crossmodal effects between vision, nociception, and touch. However, these differences could also be related to the use of different experimental designs. Importantly, most studies on the effects of vision on pain have relied on a mirror to create the illusion that the reflected hand is a direct view of the stimulated hand. Here, we compared the effects of direct versus mirror vision of the hand versus an object on the perception and ERPs elicited by non-nociceptive and nociceptive stimuli. We did not observe any significant effect of vision on the perceived intensity. However, vision of the hand did reduce the magnitude of the nociceptive N240 wave, and enhanced the magnitude of the non-nociceptive P200. Our results confirm that vision of the body differentially affects nociceptive and non-nociceptive processing, but question the robustness of visual analgesia.

  13. Comparative biology of pain: What invertebrates can tell us about how nociception works.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrell, Brian D

    2017-04-01

    The inability to adequately treat chronic pain is a worldwide health care crisis. Pain has both an emotional and a sensory component, and this latter component, nociception, refers specifically to the detection of damaging or potentially damaging stimuli. Nociception represents a critical interaction between an animal and its environment and exhibits considerable evolutionary conservation across species. Using comparative approaches to understand the basic biology of nociception could promote the development of novel therapeutic strategies to treat pain, and studies of nociception in invertebrates can provide especially useful insights toward this goal. Both vertebrates and invertebrates exhibit segregated sensory pathways for nociceptive and nonnociceptive information, injury-induced sensitization to nociceptive and nonnociceptive stimuli, and even similar antinociceptive modulatory processes. In a number of invertebrate species, the central nervous system is understood in considerable detail, and it is often possible to record from and/or manipulate single identifiable neurons through either molecular genetic or physiological approaches. Invertebrates also provide an opportunity to study nociception in an ethologically relevant context that can provide novel insights into the nature of how injury-inducing stimuli produce persistent changes in behavior. Despite these advantages, invertebrates have been underutilized in nociception research. In this review, findings from invertebrate nociception studies are summarized, and proposals for how research using invertebrates can address questions about the fundamental mechanisms of nociception are presented.

  14. Physiological Signal Processing for Individualized Anti-nociception Management During General Anesthesia: a Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jonckheere, J; Bonhomme, V; Jeanne, M; Boselli, E; Gruenewald, M; Logier, R; Richebé, P

    2015-08-13

    The aim of this paper is to review existing technologies for the nociception / anti-nociception balance evaluation during surgery under general anesthesia. General anesthesia combines the use of analgesic, hypnotic and muscle-relaxant drugs in order to obtain a correct level of patient non-responsiveness during surgery. During the last decade, great efforts have been deployed in order to find adequate ways to measure how anesthetic drugs affect a patient's response to surgical nociception. Nowadays, though some monitoring devices allow obtaining information about hypnosis and muscle relaxation, no gold standard exists for the nociception / anti-nociception balance evaluation. Articles from the PubMed literature search engine were reviewed. As this paper focused on surgery under general anesthesia, articles about nociception monitoring on conscious patients, in post-anesthesia care unit or in intensive care unit were not considered. In this article, we present a review of existing technologies for the nociception / anti-nociception balance evaluation, which is based in all cases on the analysis of the autonomous nervous system activity. Presented systems, based on sensors and physiological signals processing algorithms, allow studying the patients' reaction regarding anesthesia and surgery. Some technological solutions for nociception / antinociception balance monitoring were described. Though presented devices could constitute efficient solutions for individualized anti-nociception management during general anesthesia, this review of current literature emphasizes the fact that the choice to use one or the other mainly relies on the clinical context and the general purpose of the monitoring.

  15. The Role of PPK26 in Drosophila Larval Mechanical Nociception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanmeng Guo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In Drosophila larvae, the class IV dendritic arborization (da neurons are polymodal nociceptors. Here, we show that ppk26 (CG8546 plays an important role in mechanical nociception in class IV da neurons. Our immunohistochemical and functional results demonstrate that ppk26 is specifically expressed in class IV da neurons. Larvae with mutant ppk26 showed severe behavioral defects in a mechanical nociception behavioral test but responded to noxious heat stimuli comparably to wild-type larvae. In addition, functional studies suggest that ppk26 and ppk (also called ppk1 function in the same pathway, whereas piezo functions in a parallel pathway. Consistent with these functional results, we found that PPK and PPK26 are interdependent on each other for their cell surface localization. Our work indicates that PPK26 and PPK might form heteromeric DEG/ENaC channels that are essential for mechanotransduction in class IV da neurons.

  16. Spinal Cord Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your body and your brain. A spinal cord injury disrupts the signals. Spinal cord injuries usually begin with a blow that fractures or ... bone disks that make up your spine. Most injuries don't cut through your spinal cord. Instead, ...

  17. Attention effects on vicarious modulation of nociception and pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatibi, Ali; Vachon-Presseau, Etienne; Schrooten, Martien; Vlaeyen, Johan; Rainville, Pierre

    2014-10-01

    The observation of others' facial expressions of pain has been shown to facilitate the observer's nociceptive responses and to increase pain perception. We investigated how this vicarious facilitation effect is modulated by directing the observer's attention toward the meaning of pain expression or the facial movements. In separate trials, participants were instructed to assess the "intensity of the pain expression"(meaning) or to "discriminate the facial movements" in the upper vs lower part of the face shown in 1-second dynamic clips displaying mild, moderate, or strong pain expressions or a neutral control. In 50% of the trials, participants received a painful electrical stimulation to the sural nerve immediately after the presentation of the expression. Low-level nociceptive reactivity was measured with the RIII-response, and pain perception was assessed using pain ratings. Pain induced by the electrical stimulation increased after viewing stronger pain expressions in both tasks, but the RIII-response showed this vicarious facilitation effect only in the movement discrimination task at the strongest expression intensity. These findings are consistent with the notion that vicarious processes facilitate self-pain and may prime automatic nociceptive responses. However, this priming effect is influenced by top-down attentional processes. These results provide another case of dissociation between reflexive and perceptual processes, consistent with the involvement of partly separate brain networks in the regulation of cortical and lower-level nociceptive responses. Combined with previous results, these findings suggest that vicarious pain facilitation is an automatic process that may be diminished by top-down attentional processes directed at the meaning of the expression.

  18. (-)-α-Bisabolol reduces orofacial nociceptive behavior in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Luana Torres; Duailibe, Mariana Araújo Braz; Pessoa, Luciana Moura; da Costa, Flávio Nogueira; Vieira-Neto, Antonio Eufrásio; de Vasconcellos Abdon, Ana Paula; Campos, Adriana Rolim

    2017-02-01

    The purposes of this study were to evaluate the anti-nociceptive effect of oral and topical administration of (-)-α-bisabolol (BISA) in rodent models of formalin- or cinnamaldehyde-induced orofacial pain and to explore the inhibitory mechanisms involved. Orofacial pain was induced by injecting 1.5% formalin into the upper lip of mice (20 μL) or into the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of rats (50 μL). In another experiment, orofacial pain was induced with cinnamaldehyde (13.2 μg/lip). Nociceptive behavior was proxied by time (s) spent rubbing the injected area and by the incidence of head flinching. BISA (100, 200, or 400 mg/kg p.o. or 50, 100, or 200 mg/mL topical) or vehicle was administered 60 min before pain induction. The two formulations (lotion and syrup) were compared with regard to efficacy. The effect of BISA remained after incorporation into the formulations, and nociceptive behavior decreased significantly in all tests. The high binding affinity observed for BISA and TRPA1 in the molecular docking study was supported by in vivo experiments in which HC-030031 (a TRPA1 receptor antagonist) attenuated pain in a manner qualitatively and quantitatively similar to that of BISA. Blockers of opioid receptors, NO synthesis, and K(+) ATP channels did not affect orofacial pain, nor inhibit the effect of BISA. In conclusion, BISA had a significant anti-nociceptive effect on orofacial pain. The effect may in part be due to TRPA1 antagonism. The fact that the effect of BISA remained after incorporation into oral and topical formulations suggests that the compound may be a useful adjuvant in the treatment of orofacial pain.

  19. Sacral neuromodulation of nociceptive bladder overactivity in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhaocun; Bandari, Jathin; Bansal, Utsav; Shen, Bing; Wang, Jicheng; Lamm, Vladimir; Roppolo, James R; de Groat, William C; Tai, Changfeng

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the effects of electrical stimulation of sacral dorsal/ventral roots on irritation-induced bladder overactivity, reveal possible different mechanisms under nociceptive bladder conditions, and establish a large animal model of sacral neuromodulation. Intravesical infusion of 0.5% acetic acid (AA) was used to irritate the bladder and induce bladder overactivity in cats under α-chloralose anesthesia. Electrical stimulation (5, 15, or 30 Hz) was applied to individual S1-S3 dorsal or ventral roots at or below motor threshold intensity. Repeated cystometrograms (CMGs) were performed with/without the stimulation to determine the inhibition of bladder overactivity. AA irritation induced bladder overactivity and significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the bladder capacity to 62.6 ± 11.7% of control capacity measured during saline CMGs. At threshold intensity for inducing reflex twitching of the anal sphincter or toe, S1/S2 dorsal root stimulation at 5 Hz but not at 15 or 30 Hz inhibited bladder overactivity and significantly (P < 0.05) increased bladder capacity to 187.3 ± 41.6% and 155.5 ± 9.7% respectively, of AA control capacity. Stimulation of S3 dorsal root or S1-S3 ventral roots was not effective. Repeated stimulation of S1-S3 dorsal root did not induced a post-stimulation inhibition. This study established a cat model of sacral neuromodualation of nociceptive bladder overactivity. The results revealed that the mechanisms underlying sacral neuromodulation are different for nociceptive and non-nociceptive bladder activity. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Not an Aspirin: No Evidence for Acute Anti-Nociception to Laser-Evoked Pain After Motor Cortex rTMS in Healthy Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Claire; Perchet, Caroline; Lelekov-Boissard, Taïssia; Magnin, Michel; Garcia-Larrea, Luis

    2016-01-01

    High-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (HF-rTMS) has shown efficacy in relieving neuropathic pain. Whether its analgesic effect also applies to acute physiological nociception remains unclear due to previous contradictory findings. To provide an in-depth investigation of the effects of motor cortex HF-rTMS on acute laser-evoked pain and excitability of nociceptive networks in healthy subjects. Randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, cross-over study in 20 healthy participants. Laser heat stimuli at nociceptive threshold were delivered to the right hand, allowing assessment of: (a) subjective pain intensity and unpleasantness; (b) laser-evoked potentials (LEPs, 128 electrodes) and their source model; (c) sympathetic skin responses, and (d) spino-thalamic pathway excitability. Data were collected before and 20 minutes after a session of neuro-navigated 20 Hz rTMS to the contralateral motor cortex. Subjective pain reports to thermal laser pulses, amplitude of late cortical potentials and sympathetic skin responses were decreased after cortical stimulation, to a similar extent whether it was active or placebo. Early cortical potentials and nociceptive network excitability remained identical before and after rTMS, as did anatomical sources of LEPs. Our results do not provide evidence for a genuine anti-nociceptive effect of rTMS on acute physiological pain. We suggest that motor cortex rTMS may act upon high-order networks linked to the emotional and cognitive appraisal of chronic pain, and/or modulate pathologically sensitized networks, rather than change the physiological transmission within an intact nervous system. Such dichotomy is reminiscent of that observed with most drugs used for neuropathic pain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Modulation of spinal cord synaptic activity by tumor necrosis factor α in a model of peripheral neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spicarova Diana

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cytokine tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα is an established pain modulator in both the peripheral and central nervous systems. Modulation of nociceptive synaptic transmission in the spinal cord dorsal horn (DH is thought to be involved in the development and maintenance of several pathological pain states. Increased levels of TNFα and its receptors (TNFR in dorsal root ganglion (DRG cells and in the spinal cord DH have been shown to play an essential role in neuropathic pain processing. In the present experiments the effect of TNFα incubation on modulation of primary afferent synaptic activity was investigated in a model of peripheral neuropathy. Methods Spontaneous and miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSC and mEPSCs were recorded in superficial DH neurons in acute spinal cord slices prepared from animals 5 days after sciatic nerve transection and in controls. Results In slices after axotomy the sEPSC frequency was 2.8 ± 0.8 Hz, while neurons recorded from slices after TNFα incubation had significantly higher sEPSC frequency (7.9 ± 2.2 Hz. The effect of TNFα treatment was smaller in the slices from the control animals, where sEPSC frequency was 1.2 ± 0.2 Hz in slices without and 2.0 ± 0.5 Hz with TNFα incubation. Tetrodotoxin (TTX application in slices from axotomized animals and after TNFα incubation decreased the mEPSC frequency to only 37.4 ± 6.9% of the sEPSC frequency. This decrease was significantly higher than in the slices without the TNFα treatment (64.4 ± 6.4%. TTX application in the control slices reduced the sEPSC frequency to about 80% in both TNFα untreated and treated slices. Application of low concentration TRPV1 receptors endogenous agonist N-oleoyldopamine (OLDA, 0.2 μM in slices after axotomy induced a significant increase in mEPSC frequency (175.9 ± 17.3%, similar to the group with TNFα pretreatment (158.1 ± 19.5%. Conclusions Our results indicate that TNFα may enhance

  2. The effect of fenugreek on nociceptive response in diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad Roghani

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available   Abstract  Introduction: Diabetic rats display exaggerated hyperalgesic behavior in response to noxious stimuli that may resemble and model aspects of painful diabetic neuropathy in humans. This study was designed to investigate the effect of Trigonella foenum-graecum (TFG on formalin-induced nociceptive responses (standard formalin test in streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetic rats.  Methods: For this purpose, STZ-diabetic rats received intraperitoneal injection of aqueous leaf extract of TFG (200 mg/kg every other day for a period of one month.  Results: It was found out that TFG treatment did cause a significant reduction in blood glucose in diabetic rats and TFG-treated diabetic rats exhibited a lower nociceptive score as compared to untreated-diabetic ones. Meanwhile, TFG treatment reduced the nociceptive score in both phases of the formalin test. In contrast, sodium salicylate as positive control only reduced this score in the second phase of the test.  Discussion: The results suggest therapeutic potential of aqueous extract of fenugreek for treating painful diabetic neuropathy. 

  3. The influence of gender and sex steroids on craniofacial nociception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairns, Brian E

    2007-02-01

    Several pain conditions localized to the craniofacial region show a remarkable sex-related difference in their prevalence. These conditions include temporomandibular disorders and burning mouth syndrome as well as tension-type, migraine, and cluster headaches. The mechanisms that underlie sex-related differences in the prevalence of these craniofacial pain conditions remain obscure and likely involve both physiological and psychosocial factors. In terms of physiological factors relevant to the development of headache, direct evidence of sex-related differences in the properties of dural afferent fibers or durally activated second-order trigeminal sensory neurons has yet to be provided. There is, however, evidence for sex-related differences in the response properties of afferent fibers and second-order trigeminal sensory neurons that convey nociceptive input from other craniofacial tissues associated with sex-related differences in chronic pain conditions, such as those that innervate the masseter muscle and temporomandibular joint. Further, modulation of craniofacial nociceptive input by opioidergic receptor mechanisms appears to be dependent on biological sex. Research into mechanisms that may contribute to sex-related differences in trigeminal nociceptive processing has primarily focused on effect of the female sex hormone estrogen, which appears to alter the excitability of trigeminal afferent fibers and sensory neurons to noxious stimulation of craniofacial tissues. This article discusses current knowledge of potential physiological mechanisms that could contribute to sex-related differences in certain craniofacial pain conditions.

  4. Nociception at the diabetic foot, an uncharted territory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ernst A Chantelau

    2015-01-01

    The diabetic foot is characterised by painless footulceration and/or arthropathy; it is a typical complicationof painless diabetic neuropathy. Neuropathy depletesthe foot skin of intraepidermal nerve fibre endings of theafferent A-delta and C-fibres, which are mostly nociceptorsand excitable by noxious stimuli only. However, someof them are cold or warm receptors whose functionsin diabetic neuropathy have frequently been reported.Hence, it is well established by quantitative sensory testingthat thermal detection thresholds at the foot skin increaseduring the course of painless diabetic neuropathy. Painperception (nociception), by contrast, has rarely beenstudied. Recent pilot studies of pinprick pain at plantardigital skinfolds showed that the perception thresholdwas always above the upper limit of measurement of 512mN (equivalent to 51.2 g) at the diabetic foot. However,deep pressure pain perception threshold at musculus abductor hallucis was beyond 1400 kPa (equivalent to 14 kg; limit of measurement) only in every fifth case. These discrepancies of pain perception between forefoot and hindfoot, and between skin and muscle, demand further study. Measuring nociception at the feet in diabetes opens promising clinical perspectives. A critical nociception threshold may be quantified (probably corresponding to a critical number of intraepidermal nerve fibre endings), beyond which the individual risk of a diabetic foot rises appreciably. Staging of diabetic neuropathy according to nociception thresholds at the feet is highly desirable as guidance to an individualised injury prevention strategy.

  5. Network dynamics in nociceptive pathways assessed by the neuronal avalanche model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu José

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Traditional electroencephalography provides a critical assessment of pain responses. The perception of pain, however, may involve a series of signal transmission pathways in higher cortical function. Recent studies have shown that a mathematical method, the neuronal avalanche model, may be applied to evaluate higher-order network dynamics. The neuronal avalanche is a cascade of neuronal activity, the size distribution of which can be approximated by a power law relationship manifested by the slope of a straight line (i.e., the α value. We investigated whether the neuronal avalanche could be a useful index for nociceptive assessment. Findings Neuronal activity was recorded with a 4 × 8 multichannel electrode array in the primary somatosensory cortex (S1 and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC. Under light anesthesia, peripheral pinch stimulation increased the slope of the α value in both the ACC and S1, whereas brush stimulation increased the α value only in the S1. The increase in α values was blocked in both regions under deep anesthesia. The increase in α values in the ACC induced by peripheral pinch stimulation was blocked by medial thalamic lesion, but the increase in α values in the S1 induced by brush and pinch stimulation was not affected. Conclusions The neuronal avalanche model shows a critical state in the cortical network for noxious-related signal processing. The α value may provide an index of brain network activity that distinguishes the responses to somatic stimuli from the control state. These network dynamics may be valuable for the evaluation of acute nociceptive processes and may be applied to chronic pathological pain conditions.

  6. Connexin-43 induces chemokine release from spinal cord astrocytes to maintain late-phase neuropathic pain in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gang; Park, Chul-Kyu; Xie, Rou-Gang; Berta, Temugin; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2014-01-01

    synaptic transmission (spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents) in spinal lamina IIo nociceptive synapses in the late phase, and this increase was suppressed by carbenoxolone and Gap27, and recapitulated by CXCL1. Together, our findings demonstrate a novel mechanism of astrocytic connexin-43 to enhance spinal cord synaptic transmission and maintain neuropathic pain in the late-phase via releasing chemokines. PMID:24919967

  7. Gastric electrical stimulation decreases gastric distension-induced central nociception response through direct action on primary afferents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wassila Ouelaa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND & AIMS: Gastric electrical stimulation (GES is an effective therapy to treat patients with chronic dyspepsia refractory to medical management. However, its mechanisms of action remain poorly understood. METHODS: Gastric pain was induced by performing gastric distension (GD in anesthetized rats. Pain response was monitored by measuring the pseudo-affective reflex (e.g., blood pressure variation, while neuronal activation was determined using c-fos immunochemistry in the central nervous system. Involvement of primary afferents was assessed by measuring phosphorylation of ERK1/2 in dorsal root ganglia. RESULTS: GES decreased blood pressure variation induced by GD, and prevented GD-induced neuronal activation in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord (T9-T10, the nucleus of the solitary tract and in CRF neurons of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus. This effect remained unaltered within the spinal cord when sectioning the medulla at the T5 level. Furthermore, GES prevented GD-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 in dorsal root ganglia. CONCLUSIONS: GES decreases GD-induced pain and/or discomfort likely through a direct modulation of gastric spinal afferents reducing central processing of visceral nociception.

  8. The Dolognawmeter: A Novel Instrument and Assay to Quantify Nociception in Rodent Models of Orofacial Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Dolan, John C.; Lam, David K; Achdjian, Stacy H.; Schmidt, Brian L.

    2010-01-01

    Rodent pain models play an important role in understanding the mechanisms of nociception and have accelerated the search for new treatment approaches for pain. Creating an objective metric for orofacial nociception in these models presents significant technical obstacles. No animal assay accurately measures pain-induced orofacial dysfunction that is directly comparable to human orofacial dysfunction. We developed and validated a high throughput, objective, operant, nociceptive animal assay, a...

  9. Heterosynaptic long-term depression of craniofacial nociception: divergent effects on pain perception and blink reflex in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yekta, Sareh Said; Lamp, Susanne; Ellrich, Jens

    2006-04-01

    Noxious low-frequency stimulation (LFS) of presynaptic nerve fibers induces long-term depression (LTD) of synaptic transmission. In vitro studies suggest a sole homosynaptic effect. Consequently, the present study addressed the hypothesis that LTD of craniofacial nociception in man is mediated by a homosynaptic mechanism. Nociceptive supraorbital afferents were excited by electric pulses via a concentric electrode in ten healthy volunteers. The electrically evoked bilateral blink reflex (BR) was recorded from both orbicularis oculi muscles by surface electrodes. The BR was evoked in blocks of ten electric stimuli each (0.1 Hz) with an interblock interval of 8 min. Conditioning noxious LFS (1 Hz, 20 min) was applied via concentric electrode either to the same site as BR test stimuli (ipsilateral) or to the corresponding contralateral forehead area (contralateral). LFS and test stimulus intensities corresponded to about threefold the pain threshold. After three baseline stimulus blocks, either conditioning ipsilateral or contralateral LFS were applied or stimulation was interrupted for 20 min as a control task. Afterwards, test stimulation blocks were continued for 40 min. Each volunteer participated in all three sessions on different days. Noxious LFS induced LTD of the BR independently from the side of conditioning stimulation. Pain perception decreased after ipsilateral LFS but not after contralateral LFS. The bilateral effect of noxious LFS on the BR provides evidence for heterosynaptic LTD based on bilateral projections of supraorbital nerve afferents onto spinal trigeminal nuclei. The divergent effect on pain perception may be due to a preferential contralateral projection of nociceptive afferents onto reflex interneurons but not onto trigeminothalamic projection neurons.

  10. Umbilical cord and preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaya-C, M; Salcedo-Betancourt, J; Galvis, S H; Ortiz, A M; Gutierrez, S; Bernal, J E

    2016-01-01

    Preeclampsia is associated with abnormalities in the umbilical cord in several ways: morphological, biochemical and functional. Alteration in blood vessels of the placenta, decidua and circulatory system of the fetus might be related to factors that cause preeclampsia and may be associated with alterations of the umbilical cord. This study aimed to analyze the relationship between each type of umbilical cord abnormality and the different subtypes of hypertensive gestational disorders. We conducted a prospective study on consecutive autopsies and its placentas, looking for abnormalities in the umbilical cord's features and their clinical associations. Umbilical cord abnormalities including length, diameter, insertion, entanglements, knots and coils were associated with maternal gestational hypertension. In women with gestational hypertension, umbilical cord abnormalities are associated with fetal and neonatal consequences.

  11. Enhancement by citral of glutamatergic spontaneous excitatory transmission in adult rat substantia gelatinosa neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lan; Fujita, Tsugumi; Jiang, Chang-Yu; Kumamoto, Eiichi

    2016-02-10

    Although citral, which is abundantly present in lemongrass, has various actions including antinociception, how citral affects synaptic transmission has not been examined as yet. Citral activates in heterologous cells transient receptor potential vanilloid-1, ankyrin-1, and melastatin-8 (TRPV1, TRPA1, and TRPM8, respectively) channels, the activation of which in the spinal lamina II [substantia gelatinosa (SG)] increases the spontaneous release of L-glutamate from nerve terminals. It remains to be examined what types of transient receptor potential channel in native neurons are activated by citral. With a focus on transient receptor potential activation, we examined the effect of citral on glutamatergic spontaneous excitatory transmission using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique to SG neurons in adult rat spinal cord slices. Bath-applied citral for 3 min increased the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic current in a concentration-dependent manner (half-maximal effective concentration=0.58 mM), with a small increase in its amplitude. The spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic current frequency increase produced by citral was repeated at a time interval of 30 min, albeit this action recovered with a slow time course after washout. The presynaptic effect of citral was inhibited by TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031, but not by voltage-gated Na-channel blocker tetrodotoxin, TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine, and TRPM8 antagonist BCTC. It is concluded that citral increases spontaneous L-glutamate release in SG neurons by activating TRPA1 channels. Considering that the SG plays a pivotal role in modulating nociceptive transmission from the periphery, the citral activity could contribute toward at least a part of the modulation.

  12. Nociceptive responses to thermal and mechanical stimulations in awake pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    di Giminiani, Pierpaolo; Petersen, Lars Jelstrup; Herskin, Mette S.

    2013-01-01

    animal studies in a large species require further examination. This manuscript describes the initial development of a porcine model of cutaneous nociception and focuses on interactions between the sensory modality, body size and the anatomical location of the stimulation site. METHODS: Pigs of different...... significantly lower pain thresholds (shorter latency to response) than large pigs to thermal and mechanical stimulations. Stimulations at the two anatomical locations elicited very distinct sets of behavioural responses, with different levels of sensitivity between the flank and the hind legs. Furthermore...

  13. Intraplantar injection of tetrahydrobiopterin induces nociception in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nasser, Arafat; Ali, Sawsan; Wilsbech, Signe

    2015-01-01

    Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is implicated in the development and maintenance of chronic pain. After injury/inflammation, the biosynthesis of BH4 is markedly increased in sensory neurons, and the pharmacological and genetic inhibition of BH4 shows analgesic effects in pre-clinical animal pain models...... sites of the somatosensory system, proposing an as yet unexplored involvement of BH4 in peripheral nociceptive processes. However, this appears not to be mediated through nitric oxide and prostaglandin release or by activation of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1....

  14. Sigma-1 receptor antagonist, BD1047 reduces nociceptive responses and phosphorylation of p38 MAPK in mice orofacial formalin model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Dae-Hyun; Yoon, Seo-Yeon

    2014-01-01

    Sigma-1 receptors (Sig-1Rs) play a role in different types of pain and in central sensitization mechanism in spinal cord. However, it is currently unexplored whether Sig-1Rs are involved in orofacial pain processing. Here we show whether a selective Sig-1R antagonist, BD1047 reduces nociceptive responses in the mouse orofacial formalin model and the number of Fos-immunoreactive (ir) cells in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis (TNC). In addition, it was examined whether the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK) or p38 (pp38) mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), which are closely linked to pain signaling and sensitization, in TNC was modified by BD1047. The 5% formalin (10 µL) was subcutaneously injected into the right upper lip, and the rubbing responses with ipsilateral fore- or hind paw were counted for 45 min. BD1047 (1, 3 or 10 mg/kg) were intraperitoneally treated 30 min before formalin injection. High dose of BD1047 (10 mg/kg) produced significant anti-nociceptive effects in the first and the second phase. The number of Fos-ir cells in ipsilateral side of TNC was also reduced by BD1047 as compared to that in saline-treated animals. In addition, the number of pp38-ir cells in ipsilateral TNC was decreased in BD1047-treated animals, whereas the number of pERK-ir cells was not modified. Collectively, these results demonstrate that Sig-1Rs play a pivotal role in the orofacial pain processing, and the pp38 signaling pathway can be associated with Sig-1R's action in TNC.

  15. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spinal cord during thermal stimulation across consecutive runs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Kenneth A; Chen, Yufen; Wang, Xue; Kahnt, Thorsten; Parrish, Todd B

    2016-12-01

    The spinal cord is the first site of nociceptive processing in the central nervous system and has a role in the development and perpetuation of clinical pain states. Advancements in functional magnetic resonance imaging are providing a means to non-invasively measure spinal cord function, and functional magnetic resonance imaging may provide an objective method to study spinal cord nociceptive processing in humans. In this study, we tested the validity and reliability of functional magnetic resonance imaging using a selective field-of-view gradient-echo echo-planar-imaging sequence to detect activity induced blood oxygenation level-dependent signal changes in the cervical spinal cord of healthy volunteers during warm and painful thermal stimulation across consecutive runs. At the group and subject level, the activity was localized more to the dorsal hemicord, the spatial extent and magnitude of the activity was greater for the painful stimulus than the warm stimulus, and the spatial extent and magnitude of the activity exceeded that of a control analysis. Furthermore, the spatial extent of the activity for the painful stimuli increased across the runs likely reflecting sensitization. Overall, the spatial localization of the activity varied considerably across the runs, but despite this variability, a machine-learning algorithm was able to successfully decode the stimuli in the spinal cord based on the distributed pattern of the activity. In conclusion, we were able to successfully detect and characterize cervical spinal cord activity during thermal stimulation at the group and subject level. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Ascending projections of nociceptive neurons from trigeminal subnucleus caudalis: A population approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Hiroto; Katagiri, Ayano; Okada, Shinji; Mikuzuki, Lou; Kubo, Asako; Suzuki, Tatsuro; Ohara, Kinuyo; Lee, Jun; Gionhaku, Nobuhito; Iinuma, Toshimitsu; Bereiter, David A; Iwata, Koichi

    2017-07-01

    Second-order neurons in trigeminal subnucleus caudalis (Vc) and upper cervical spinal cord (C1) are critical for craniofacial pain processing and project rostrally to terminate in: ventral posteromedial thalamic nucleus (VPM), medial thalamic nuclei (MTN) and parabrachial nuclei (PBN). The contribution of each region to trigeminal nociception was assessed by the number of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase-immunoreactive (pERK-IR) neurons co-labeled with fluorogold (FG). The phenotype of pERK-IR neurons was further defined by the expression of neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1). The retrograde tracer FG was injected into VPM, MTN or PBN of the right hemisphere and after seven days, capsaicin was injected into the left upper lip in male rats. Nearly all pERK-IR neurons were found in superficial laminae of Vc-C1 ipsilateral to the capsaicin injection. Nearly all VPM and MTN FG-labeled neurons in Vc-C1 were found contralateral to the injection site, whereas FG-labeled neurons were found bilaterally after PBN injection. The percentage of FG-pERK-NK1-IR neurons was significantly greater (>10%) for PBN projection neurons than for VPM and MTN projection neurons (NK1-IR VPM projection neurons were found mainly in the middle-Vc, while pERK-NK1-immunoreactive MTN or PBN projection neurons were found in the middle-Vc and caudal Vc-C1. These results suggest that a significant percentage of capsaicin-responsive neurons in superficial laminae of Vc-C1 project directly to PBN, while neurons that project to VPM and MTN are subject to greater modulation by pERK-IR local interneurons. Furthermore, the rostrocaudal distribution differences of FG-pERK-NK1-IR neurons in Vc-C1 may reflect functional differences between these projection areas regarding craniofacial pain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The Interface of Mechanics and Nociception in Joint Pathophysiology: Insights From the Facet and Temporomandibular Joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperry, Megan M; Ita, Meagan E; Kartha, Sonia; Zhang, Sijia; Yu, Ya-Hsin; Winkelstein, Beth

    2017-02-01

    Chronic joint pain is a widespread problem that frequently occurs with aging and trauma. Pain occurs most often in synovial joints, the body's load bearing joints. The mechanical and molecular mechanisms contributing to synovial joint pain are reviewed using two examples, the cervical spinal facet joints and the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Although much work has focused on the macroscale mechanics of joints in health and disease, the combined influence of tissue mechanics, molecular processes, and nociception in joint pain has only recently become a focus. Trauma and repeated loading can induce structural and biochemical changes in joints, altering their microenvironment and modifying the biomechanics of their constitutive tissues, which themselves are innervated. Peripheral pain sensors can become activated in response to changes in the joint microenvironment and relay pain signals to the spinal cord and brain where pain is processed and perceived. In some cases, pain circuitry is permanently changed, which may be a potential mechanism for sustained joint pain. However, it is most likely that alterations in both the joint microenvironment and the central nervous system (CNS) contribute to chronic pain. As such, the challenge of treating joint pain and degeneration is temporally and spatially complicated. This review summarizes anatomy, physiology, and pathophysiology of these joints and the sensory pain relays. Pain pathways are postulated to be sensitized by many factors, including degeneration and biochemical priming, with effects on thresholds for mechanical injury and/or dysfunction. Initiators of joint pain are discussed in the context of clinical challenges including the diagnosis and treatment of pain.

  18. Anatomy, physiology and neurobiology of the nociception: a focus on low back pain (part A).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, P; Blond, S; David, R; Rigoard, P

    2015-03-01

    The treatment of Failed Back Surgery Syndrome (FBSS) remains a challenge for pain medicine due to the complexity in the interactions between [1] a residual mechanical pain after surgery and, [2] a progressive transition into chronic pain involving central nervous system plasticity and molecular reorganization. The aim of this paper is to provide a fundamental overview of the pain pathway supporting the nociceptive component of the back pain. Literature searches included an exhaustive review of 643 references and 74 book chapters updated by searching the major electronic databases from 1930 to August 2013. Pain input is gathered by the peripheral fibre from the innervated tissue's environment and relayed by two contiguous central axons to the brain, via the spinal cord. At this level, it is possible to characterize physical pain and emotional pain. These are supported by two different pathways, encoding two dimensions of pain perception: In Neo-spino-thalamic pathway, the wide dynamic range neuron system is able to provide the information needed for mapping the "sensory-discriminative" dimension of pain. The second projection system (Paleo-spino-thalamic pathway) also involves the ventromedial thalamus but projects to the amygdala, the insula and the anterior cingulate cortex. These areas are associated with emotionality and affect. The mechanical component of FBSS cannot be understood unless the functioning of the pain system is known. But ultimately, the highly variable nature of back pain expression among individuals would require a careful pathophysiological dissection of the potential generators of back pain to guide pain management strategies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Regulatory effects of intermittent noxious stimulation on spinal cord injury-sensitive microRNAs and their presumptive targets following spinal cord contusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Eric R; Woller, Sarah A; Garraway, Sandra M; Hook, Michelle A; Grau, James W; Miranda, Rajesh C

    2014-01-01

    Uncontrollable nociceptive stimulation adversely affects recovery in spinally contused rats. Spinal cord injury (SCI) results in altered microRNA (miRNA) expression both at, and distal to the lesion site. We hypothesized that uncontrollable nociception further influences SCI-sensitive miRNAs and associated gene targets, potentially explaining the progression of maladaptive plasticity. Our data validated previously described sensitivity of miRNAs to SCI alone. Moreover, following SCI, intermittent noxious stimulation decreased expression of miR124 in dorsal spinal cord 24 h after stimulation and increased expression of miR129-2 in dorsal, and miR1 in ventral spinal cord at 7 days. We also found that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA expression was significantly down-regulated 1 day after SCI alone, and significantly more so, after SCI followed by tailshock. Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) mRNA expression was significantly increased at both 1 and 7 days post-SCI, and significantly more so, 7 days post-SCI with shock. MiR1 expression was positively and significantly correlated with IGF-1, but not BDNF mRNA expression. Further, stepwise linear regression analysis indicated that a significant proportion of the changes in BDNF and IGF-1 mRNA expression were explained by variance in two groups of miRNAs, implying co-regulation. Collectively, these data show that uncontrollable nociception which activates sensorimotor circuits distal to the injury site, influences SCI-miRNAs and target mRNAs within the lesion site. SCI-sensitive miRNAs may well mediate adverse consequences of uncontrolled sensorimotor activation on functional recovery. However, their sensitivity to distal sensory input also implicates these miRNAs as candidate targets for the management of SCI and neuropathic pain.

  20. Changes in thermal nociceptive responses in dairy cows following experimentally induced Escherichia coli mastitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Ditte B; Jensen, Katrine Fogsgaard; Røntved, Christine M.;

    2011-01-01

    Mastitis is a high incidence disease in dairy cows. The acute stage is considered painful and inflammation can lead to hyperalgesia and thereby contribute to decreased welfare. The aim of this study was to examine changes in nociceptive responses toward cutaneous nociceptive laser stimulation (NLS...

  1. Somatosensory and nociceptive changes in chronic post-stroke shoulder pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roosink, M.; Renzenbrink, G.J.; Buitenweg, Jan R.; Van Dongen, R.T.M.; Geurts, A.C.H.; IJzerman, Maarten Joost; Engbersen, Johannes F.J.; Engelbersen, J.F.J.; Koopman, Hubertus F.J.M.; Kanger, Johannes S.

    2008-01-01

    Preliminary results from a cross-sectional study that investigated the relation between the presence of post-stroke shoulder pain and somatosensory and nociceptive changes are presented. The main finding is that both abnormal somatosensation and nociception are more frequently observed in stroke

  2. Nociception affects motor output: a review on sensory-motor interaction with focus on clinical implications.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijs, J.; Daenen, L.; Cras, P.; Struyf, F.; Roussel, N.; Oostendorp, R.A.B.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Research has provided us with an increased understanding of nociception-motor interaction. Nociception-motor interaction is most often processed without conscious thoughts. Hence, in many cases neither patients nor clinicians are aware of the interaction. It is aimed at reviewing the sci

  3. Dependence of nociceptive detection thresholds on physiological parameters and capsaicin-induced neuroplasticity: a computational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Huan; Meijer, Hil G.E.; Doll, Robert J.; Buitenweg, Jan R.; Gils, van Stephan A.

    2016-01-01

    Physiological properties of peripheral and central nociceptive subsystems can be altered over time due to medical interventions. The effective change for the whole nociceptive system can be reflected in changes of psychophysical characteristics, e.g., detection thresholds. However, it is challenging

  4. Anti-nociceptive effect of total alkaloids isolated from the seeds of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    produced a marked anti-nociceptive activity in mice, and pretreatment with naloxone did not reverse the anti-nociceptive ... cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) rabbit monoclonal. IgG and ... Table 1: Orthogonal experiment design (four factors and three levels). Factor. A .... Antibodies directed against β-actin were used to normalize ...

  5. The Specification and Maturation of Nociceptive Neurons from Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisvert, Erin M; Engle, Sandra J; Hallowell, Shawn E; Liu, Ping; Wang, Zhao-Wen; Li, Xue-Jun

    2015-11-19

    Nociceptive neurons play an essential role in pain sensation by transmitting painful stimuli to the central nervous system. However, investigations of nociceptive neuron biology have been hampered by the lack of accessibility of human nociceptive neurons. Here, we describe a system for efficiently guiding human embryonic stem cells into nociceptive neurons by first inducing these cells to the neural lineage. Subsequent addition of retinoic acid and BMP4 at specific time points and concentrations yielded a high population of neural crest progenitor cells (AP2α(+), P75(+)), which further differentiated into nociceptive neurons (TRKA(+), Nav1.7(+), P2X3(+)). The overexpression of Neurogenin 1 (Neurog1) promoted the neurons to express genes related to sensory neurons (Peripherin, TrkA) and to further mature into TRPV1(+) nociceptive neurons. Importantly, the overexpression of Neurog1 increased the response of these neurons to capsaicin stimulation, a hallmark of mature functional nociceptive neurons. Taken together, this study reveals the important role that Neurog1 plays in generating functional human nociceptive neurons.

  6. Amygdala-prefrontal pathways and the dopamine system affect nociceptive responses in the prefrontal cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onozawa Kitaro

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously demonstrated nociceptive discharges to be evoked by mechanical noxious stimulation in the prefrontal cortex (PFC. The nociceptive responses recorded in the PFC are conceivably involved in the affective rather than the sensory-discriminative dimension of pain. The PFC receives dense projection from the limbic system. Monosynaptic projections from the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala (BLA to the PFC are known to produce long-lasting synaptic plasticity. We examined effects of high frequency stimulation (HFS delivered to the BLA on nociceptive responses in the rat PFC. Results HFS induced long lasting suppression (LLS of the specific high threshold responses of nociceptive neurons in the PFC. Microinjection of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA receptor antagonists (2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (APV, dizocilpine (MK-801 and also metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR group antagonists (α-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine (MCPG, and 2-[(1S,2S-2-carboxycyclopropyl]-3-(9H-xanthen-9-yl-D-alanine (LY341495, prevented the induction of LLS of nociceptive responses. We also examined modulatory effects of dopamine (DA on the LLS of nociceptive responses. With depletion of DA in response to 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA injection into the ipsilateral forebrain bundle, LLS of nociceptive responses was decreased, while nociceptive responses were normally evoked. Antagonists of DA receptor subtypes D2 (sulpiride and D4 (3-{[4-(4-chlorophenyl piperazin-1-yl] methyl}-1H-pyrrolo [2, 3-b] pyridine (L-745,870, microinjected into the PFC, inhibited LLS of nociceptive responses. Conclusions Our results indicate that BLA-PFC pathways inhibited PFC nociceptive cell activities and that the DA system modifies the BLA-PFC regulatory function.

  7. Spinal Cord Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... damages the vertebrae or other parts of the spine, this can also injure the spinal cord. Other spinal cord problems include Tumors Infections such as meningitis and polio Inflammatory diseases Autoimmune diseases Degenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and spinal ...

  8. Stability of long term facilitation and expression of zif268 and Arc in the spinal cord dorsal horn is modulated by conditioning stimulation within the physiological frequency range of primary afferent fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugan, F; Wibrand, K; Fiskå, A; Bramham, C R; Tjølsen, A

    2008-07-17

    Long term facilitation (LTF) of C-fiber-evoked firing of wide dynamic range neurons in the spinal dorsal horn in response to conditioning stimulation (CS) of afferent fibers is a widely studied cellular model of spinal nociceptive sensitization. Although 100 Hz CS of primary afferent fibers is commonly used to induce spinal cord LTF, this frequency exceeds the physiological firing range. Here, we examined the effects of electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve within the physiological frequency range on the magnitude and stability of the C-fiber-evoked responses of wide dynamic range neurons and the expression of immediate early genes (c-fos, zif268, and Arc) in anesthetized rats. Stimulation frequencies of 3, 30 and 100 Hz all induced facilitation of similar magnitude as recorded at 1 h post-CS. Strikingly, however, 3 Hz-induced potentiation of the C-fiber responses was decremental, whereas both 30 and 100 Hz stimulation resulted in stable, non-decremental facilitation over 3 h of recording. The number of dorsal horn neurons expressing c-fos, but not zif268 or Arc, was significantly elevated after 3 Hz CS and increased proportionally with stimulation rate. In contrast, a stable LTF of C-fiber responses was obtained at 30 and 100 Hz CS, and at these frequencies there was a sharp increase in zif268 expression and appearance of Arc-positive neurons. The results show that response facilitation can be induced by stimulation frequencies in the physiological range (3 and 30 Hz). Three hertz stimulation induced the early phase of LTF, but the responses were decremental. Arc and zif268, two genes previously coupled to LTP of synaptic transmission in the adult brain, are upregulated at the same frequencies that give stable LTF (30 and 100 Hz). This frequency-dependence is important for understanding how the afferent firing pattern affects neuronal plasticity and nociception in the spinal dorsal horn.

  9. P2Y1 purinoceptor inhibition reduces extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 phosphorylation in spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia: implications for cancer-induced bone pain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Chen; Lina Wang; Yanbing Zhang; Jianping Yang

    2012-01-01

    It remains unclear as to whether P2Y1 purinergic receptor (P2Y1R) and the molecules that act downstream,such as extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2),are involved in the development of cancer-induced bone pain (CIBP) in vivo.Here,we investigated the role of the P2Y1R in the modulation of CIBP-associated nociception in spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia (DRG).A CIBP model was established by inoculating Walker 256 gland carcinoma cells into the tibia of female rats.Tactile ailodynia and spontaneous pain were assessed using von Frey filaments and ambulatory scores.The results showed that both the paw withdrawal latency to tactile allodynia and the ambulatory score to spontaneous pain were significantly different between the CIBP group and the sham group on days 7-9 post-inoculation (P < 0.01).Furthermore,rats in the CIBP group also showed a progressive increase in ambulatory score,which is different from the sham group (P<0.01).Furthermore,P2Y1R mRNA and phosphory lated ERK1/2 (p-ERK1/2) protein expression levels were increased in the spinal dorsal horn and DRG of the CIBP group relative to the sham group.However,intrathecal injection of the P2Y1R antagonist MRS2179 decreased P2Y1R mRNA and p-ERK1/2 protein expression in the spinal dorsal horn and DRG (P<0.01).These results provide evidence that the inhibition of P2Y1R-mediated ERK1/2 phosphorylation in the spinal dorsal horn and DRG can attenuate nociception transmission.

  10. Split Cord Malformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurdal Gezercan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Split cord malformations are rare form of occult spinal dysraphism in children. Split cord malformations are characterized by septum that cleaves the spinal canal in sagittal plane within the single or duplicated thecal sac. Although their precise incidence is unknown, split cord malformations are exceedingly rare and represent %3.8-5 of all congenital spinal anomalies. Characteristic neurological, urological, orthopedic clinical manifestations are variable and asymptomatic course is possible. Earlier diagnosis and surgical intervention for split cord malformations is associated with better long-term fuctional outcome. For this reason, diagnostic imaging is indicated for children with associated cutaneous and orthopedic signs. Additional congenital anomalies usually to accompany the split cord malformations. Earlier diagnosis, meticuolus surgical therapy and interdisciplinary careful evaluation and follow-up should be made for good prognosis. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(2.000: 199-207

  11. [Spontaneous spinal cord herniation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, J J; de la Lama, A; Gonza Lez, P; Ramos, A; Zurdo, M; Alday, R

    2004-10-01

    Spontaneous spinal cord herniation through a dural defect is an unusual condition. This entity has been probably underestimated before the introduction of MRI. We report a case of a 49-year-old man with a progressive Brown-Sequard syndrome. MRI and CT myelogram showed a ventrally displaced spinal cord at level T6-T7 and expansion of the posterior subarachnoid space. Through a laminectomy, a spinal cord herniation was identified and reduced. The anterior dural defect was repaired with a patch of lyophilized dura. The patient recovered muscle power but there was no improvement of the sensory disturbance. The diagnosis of spontaneous spinal cord herniation must be considered when progressive myelopathy occurs in middle-aged patients, without signs of spinal cord compression and typical radiological findings. Surgical treatment may halt the progressive deficits and even yield improvement in many cases.

  12. Strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors mediate analgesia induced by emulsified inhalation anaesthetics in thermal nociception but not in chemical nociception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan; Dai, Ti-Jun; Zeng, Yin-Ming

    2007-03-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the role of strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors in analgesia induced by emulsified inhalation anaesthetics. After having established the mice model of analgesia by intraperitoneal or subcutaneous injections of appropriate doses of ether, enflurane, isoflurane or sevoflurane, we injected different doses of strychnine intrathecally and then observed the effects on the tail-flick latency using the tail-withdrawal test and the writhing times and acetic acid-induced writhing test. In the tail-withdrawal test, all four emulsified inhalation anaesthetics (intraperitoneally) significantly increased the tail-flick latency (P strychnine. In the acetic acid-induced writhing test, writhing times inhibition induced by subcutaneous administration of four emulsified inhalation anaesthetics was not effected by intrathecal strychnine (0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 microg). The data presented in this study suggest that glycine receptors are specifically involved in mediating the analgesic effect of ether, enflurane, isoflurane and sevoflurane on thermal-induced nociception but not chemically induced nociception.

  13. Anti-nociceptive effects of Tanshinone IIA (TIIA) in a rat model of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced inflammatory pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shukai; Yin, Yue; Yin, Xin; Cao, Fale; Luo, Daoshu; Zhang, Ting; Li, Yunqing; Ni, Longxing

    2012-09-01

    Inflammatory pain is an important clinical symptom. The levels of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) and the levels of cytokines such as interleukin 1β (IL-1β), interleukin 6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) play important roles in inflammatory pain. Tanshinone IIA (TIIA) is an important component of Danshen, a traditional Chinese medicine that has been commonly used to treat cardiovascular disease. In this study, we investigated the potential anti-inflammatory nociceptive effects of TIIA on complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced inflammation and inflammatory pain in rats. The effects of TIIA on CFA-induced thermal and mechanical hypersensitivity were investigated using behavioral tests. The levels of ERKs, nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) in the fifth segment of the lumbar spinal cord (L5) ganglia were detected by Western blot, and the levels of mRNA and protein production of IL1-β, IL-6 and TNF-α were detected by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and enzyme-linked immuno sorbent assay (ELISA). In this study, we found that TIIA attenuates the development of CFA-induced mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity. In addition, p-ERK and NF-κB expression levels were inhibited by TIIA, and the levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α were reduced. Finally, we found that the expression level of TRPV1 was significantly decreased after TIIA injection. This study demonstrated that TIIA has significant anti-nociceptive effects in a rat model of CFA-induced inflammatory pain. TIIA can inhibit the activation of ERK signaling pathways and the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These results suggest that TIIA may be a potential anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive drug. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Noradrenergic mechanism involved in the nociceptive modulation of hippocampal CA3 region of normal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hua; Teng, Yueqiu; Zhang, Xuexin; Yang, Chunxiao; Xu, Manying; Yang, Lizhuang

    2014-06-27

    Norepinephrine (NE) is an important neurotransmitter in the brain, and regulates antinociception. However, the mechanism of action of NE on pain-related neurons in the hippocampal CA3 region is not clear. This study examines the effects of NE, phentolamine on the electrical activities of pain-excited neurons (PENs) and pain-inhibited neurons (PINs) in the hippocampal CA3 region of rats. Trains of electric impulses applied to the right sciatic nerve were used as noxious stimulation. The electrical activities of PENs or PINs in the hippocampal CA3 region were recorded by using a glass microelectrode. Our results revealed that, in the hippocampal CA3 region, the intra-CA3 region microinjection of NE decreased the pain-evoked discharged frequency and prolonged the discharged latency of PEN, and increased the pain-evoked discharged frequency and shortened discharged inhibitory duration (ID) of PIN, exhibiting the specific analgesic effect of NE. While intra-CA3 region microinjection of phentolamine produced the opposite response. It implies that phentolamine can block the effect of endogenous NE to cause the enhanced response of PEN and PIN to noxious stimulation. On the basis of above findings we can deduce that NE, phentolamine and alpha-adrenoceptor are involved in the modulation of nociceptive information transmission in the hippocampal CA3 region.

  15. Modulation of Visceral Nociception, Inflammation and Gastric Mucosal Injury by Cinnarizine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar M.E. Abdel-Salam

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of cinnarizine, a drug used for the treatment of vertigo was assessed in animal models of visceral nociception, inflammation and gastric mucosal injury. Cinnarizine (1.25–20 mg/kg, s.c. caused dose-dependent inhibition of the abdominal constrictions evoked by i.p. injection of acetic acid by 38.7–99.4%. This effect of cinnarizine (2.5 mg/kg was unaffected by co-administration of the centrally acting dopamine D2 receptor antagonists, sulpiride, haloperidol or metoclopramide, the peripherally acting D2 receptor antagonist domperidone, but increased by the D2 receptor agonist bromocryptine and by the non-selective dopamine receptor antagonist chlorpromazine. The antinociception caused by cinnarizine was naloxone insenstive, but enhanced by propranolol, atropine and by yohimbine. The antinociceptive effect of cinnarizine was prevented by co-treatment with the adenosine receptor blocker theophylline or by the ATP-sensitive potassium channel (KATP blocker glibenclamide. Cinnarizine at 2.5 mg/kg reversed the baclofen-induced antinociception. Cinnarizine at 2.5 mg/kg reduced immobility time in the Porsolt’s forced-swimming test by 24%. Cinnarizine inhibited the paw oedema response to carrageenan and reduced gastric mucosal lesions caused by indomethacin in rats. It is suggested that cinnarizine exerts anti-infl ammatory, antinociceptive and gastric protective properties. The mechanism by which cinnarizine modulates pain transmission is likely to involve adenosine receptors and KATP channels.

  16. The role of Drosophila Piezo in mechanical nociception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Eun; Coste, Bertrand; Chadha, Abhishek; Cook, Boaz; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2012-02-19

    Transduction of mechanical stimuli by receptor cells is essential for senses such as hearing, touch and pain. Ion channels have a role in neuronal mechanotransduction in invertebrates; however, functional conservation of these ion channels in mammalian mechanotransduction is not observed. For example, no mechanoreceptor potential C (NOMPC), a member of transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channel family, acts as a mechanotransducer in Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans; however, it has no orthologues in mammals. Degenerin/epithelial sodium channel (DEG/ENaC) family members are mechanotransducers in C. elegans and potentially in D. melanogaster; however, a direct role of its mammalian homologues in sensing mechanical force has not been shown. Recently, Piezo1 (also known as Fam38a) and Piezo2 (also known as Fam38b) were identified as components of mechanically activated channels in mammals. The Piezo family are evolutionarily conserved transmembrane proteins. It is unknown whether they function in mechanical sensing in vivo and, if they do, which mechanosensory modalities they mediate. Here we study the physiological role of the single Piezo member in D. melanogaster (Dmpiezo; also known as CG8486). Dmpiezo expression in human cells induces mechanically activated currents, similar to its mammalian counterparts. Behavioural responses to noxious mechanical stimuli were severely reduced in Dmpiezo knockout larvae, whereas responses to another noxious stimulus or touch were not affected. Knocking down Dmpiezo in sensory neurons that mediate nociception and express the DEG/ENaC ion channel pickpocket (ppk) was sufficient to impair responses to noxious mechanical stimuli. Furthermore, expression of Dmpiezo in these same neurons rescued the phenotype of the constitutive Dmpiezo knockout larvae. Accordingly, electrophysiological recordings from ppk-positive neurons revealed a Dmpiezo-dependent, mechanically activated current. Finally, we found that Dmpiezo

  17. A D2-like receptor family agonist produces analgesia in mechanonociception but not in thermonociception at the spinal cord level in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almanza, Angélica; Simón-Arceo, Karina; Coffeen, Ulises; Fuentes-García, Ruth; Contreras, Bernardo; Pellicer, Francisco; Mercado, Francisco

    2015-10-01

    The administration of dopaminergic drugs produces analgesia in individuals experiencing different types of pain. Analgesia induced by these drugs at the spinal cord level is mediated by D2-like agonists, which specifically inhibit the detection of nociceptive stimuli by sensory afferents. The extent of the analgesia provided by spinal dopamine agonists remains controversial, and the cellular mechanism of this analgesic process is poorly understood. The objective of this study was to evaluate the analgesic effect of quinpirole, a D2-like agonist, based on two nociceptive tests and at various doses that were selected to specifically activate dopamine receptors. We found that intrathecal quinpirole administration produces analgesia of mechanical but not thermal nociception and that the analgesic effect of quinpirole is reversed by a mix of D2, D3, and D4 receptor-specific antagonists, suggesting that the activation of all D2-like receptors is involved in the analgesia produced by intrathecal quinpirole. The differential effect on thermal and mechanical nociception was also tested upon the activation of μ-opioid receptors. As reported previously, low doses of the μ-opioid receptor agonist DAMGO produced analgesia of only thermonociception. This evidence shows that a D2-like receptor agonist administered at the spinal cord level produces analgesia specific to mechanonociception but not thermonociception. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Role of taurine in spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, R C; Seki, Y; Yosida, J

    2006-08-01

    Taurine is a sulfur amino acid. It is found endogenously in human and several others tissues. It is significantly in high concentration in mammals. Human body contains about 0.1% of body weight as taurine. It has a number of physiological and pharmacological actions. It is also used in the therapy of important organs dysfunctions. In spinal cord it has inhibitory effects; like antiepileptic and anti-nociceptive. Taurine also inhibits substance p induced biting and scratching behavior. In spinal cord injury elevated level of taurine has been observed. Higher level of taurine has been also recorded in SCI therapy using, known clinical agent methyl prednisolone (MP). The increased taurine concentration seems to be involved in protection and regeneration of tissues following injury. In SCI along with physical injury secondary activities also takes place which are complex in nature. Secondary activity includes vascular events and activation of neutrophils, resulting endothelial damage. Activated neutrophils; release a variety of inflammatory mediators such as myeloperoxidase (MPO), reactive oxygen species (ROS), and some others. It is believed that taurine exert its protective action through scavenging of ROS and down regulating several other inflammatory mediators like tumor necrosis factors (TNFalpha). The inside of mechanism reveals toxic substance HOCl is produced by MPO is converted to less toxic substances through scavenging action of taurine. Amino acid therapy has its own limitations and to over come such situation there is a need to develop small, simple lipophilic analogs of taurine. Use of taurine analogs has provided better results; for example, N- chloro taurine (NCT) which is a taurine derivative has exhibited therapeutic advances over taurine. Taurine and its analogs with sound experimental and clinical support may constitute a new class of therapeutic agents for SCI., and perhaps this review may provide enough material to think of this.

  19. Modeling spinal cord biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, Carlos; Shah, Sameer; Cohen, Avis; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim

    2012-02-01

    Regeneration after spinal cord injury is a serious health issue and there is no treatment for ailing patients. To understand regeneration of the spinal cord we used a system where regeneration occurs naturally, such as the lamprey. In this work, we analyzed the stress response of the spinal cord to tensile loading and obtained the mechanical properties of the cord both in vitro and in vivo. Physiological measurements showed that the spinal cord is pre-stressed to a strain of 10%, and during sinusoidal swimming, there is a local strain of 5% concentrated evenly at the mid-body and caudal sections. We found that the mechanical properties are homogeneous along the body and independent of the meninges. The mechanical behavior of the spinal cord can be characterized by a non-linear viscoelastic model, described by a modulus of 20 KPa for strains up to 15% and a modulus of 0.5 MPa for strains above 15%, in agreement with experimental data. However, this model does not offer a full understanding of the behavior of the spinal cord fibers. Using polymer physics we developed a model that relates the stress response as a function of the number of fibers.

  20. Changes in Activity of the Same Thalamic Neurons to Repeated Nociception in Behaving Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Yeowool; Cho, Jeiwon

    2015-01-01

    The sensory thalamus has been reported to play a key role in central pain sensory modulation and processing, but its response to repeated nociception at thalamic level is not well known. Current study investigated thalamic response to repeated nociception by recording and comparing the activity of the same thalamic neuron during the 1st and 2nd formalin injection induced nociception, with a week interval between injections, in awake and behaving mice. Behaviorally, the 2nd injection induced greater nociceptive responses than the 1st. Thalamic activity mirrored these behavioral changes with greater firing rate during the 2nd injection. Analysis of tonic and burst firing, characteristic firing pattern of thalamic neurons, revealed that tonic firing activity was potentiated while burst firing activity was not significantly changed by the 2nd injection relative to the 1st. Likewise, burst firing property changes, which has been consistently associated with different phases of nociception, were not induced by the 2nd injection. Overall, data suggest that repeated nociception potentiated responsiveness of thalamic neurons and confirmed that tonic firing transmits nociceptive signals.

  1. Specific activation of the paralemniscal pathway during nociception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frangeul, Laura; Porrero, Cesar; Garcia-Amado, Maria; Maimone, Benedetta; Maniglier, Madlyne; Clascá, Francisco; Jabaudon, Denis

    2014-05-01

    Two main neuronal pathways connect facial whiskers to the somatosensory cortex in rodents: (i) the lemniscal pathway, which originates in the brainstem principal trigeminal nucleus and is relayed in the ventroposterior thalamic nucleus and (ii) the paralemniscal pathway, originating in the spinal trigeminal nucleus and relayed in the posterior thalamic nucleus. While lemniscal neurons are readily activated by whisker contacts, the contribution of paralemniscal neurons to perception is less clear. Here, we functionally investigated these pathways by manipulating input from the whisker pad in freely moving mice. We report that while lemniscal neurons readily respond to neonatal infraorbital nerve sectioning or whisker contacts in vivo, paralemniscal neurons do not detectably respond to these environmental changes. However, the paralemniscal pathway is specifically activated upon noxious stimulation of the whisker pad. These findings reveal a nociceptive function for paralemniscal neurons in vivo that may critically inform context-specific behaviour during environmental exploration.

  2. Sertraline inhibits formalin-induced nociception and cardiovascular responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santuzzi, C.H. [Departamento de Ciências Fisiológicas, Centro de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Vitória, ES (Brazil); Futuro Neto, H.A. [Departamento de Morfologia, Centro de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Vitória, ES (Brazil); Escola de Medicina da Empresa Brasileira de Ensino, Pesquisa e Extensão, Vitória, ES (Brazil); Escola Superior de Ciências da Saúde, Santa Casa de Misericórdia de Vitória, Vitória, ES (Brazil); Pires, J.G.P. [Escola de Medicina da Empresa Brasileira de Ensino, Pesquisa e Extensão, Vitória, ES (Brazil); Centro Universitário do Espírito Santo, Colatina, ES (Brazil); Gonçalves, W.L.S. [Centro Universitário do Espírito Santo, Colatina, ES (Brazil); Tiradentes, R.V.; Gouvea, S.A.; Abreu, G.R. [Departamento de Ciências Fisiológicas, Centro de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Vitória, ES (Brazil)

    2011-11-18

    The objective of the present study was to determine the antihyperalgesic effect of sertraline, measured indirectly by the changes of sciatic afferent nerve activity, and its effects on cardiorespiratory parameters, using the model of formalin-induced inflammatory nociception in anesthetized rats. Serum serotonin (5-HT) levels were measured in order to test their correlation with the analgesic effect. Male Wistar rats (250-300 g) were divided into 4 groups (N = 8 per group): sertraline-treated group (Sert + Saline (Sal) and Sert + Formalin (Form); 3 mg·kg{sup −1}·day{sup −1}, ip, for 7 days) and saline-treated group (Sal + Sal and Sal + Form). The rats were injected with 5% (50 µL) formalin or saline into the right hind paw. Sciatic nerve activity was recorded using a silver electrode connected to a NeuroLog apparatus, and cardiopulmonary parameters (mean arterial pressure, heart rate and respiratory frequency), assessed after arterial cannulation and tracheotomy, were monitored using a Data Acquisition System. Blood samples were collected from the animals and serum 5-HT levels were determined by ELISA. Formalin injection induced the following changes: sciatic afferent nerve activity (+50.8 ± 14.7%), mean arterial pressure (+1.4 ± 3 mmHg), heart rate (+13 ± 6.8 bpm), respiratory frequency (+4.6 ± 5 cpm) and serum 5-HT increased to 1162 ± 124.6 ng/mL. Treatment with sertraline significantly reduced all these parameters (respectively: +19.8 ± 6.9%, -3.3 ± 2 mmHg, -13.1 ± 10.8 bpm, -9.8 ± 5.7 cpm) and serum 5-HT level dropped to 634 ± 69 ng/mL (P < 0.05). These results suggest that sertraline plays an analgesic role in formalin-induced nociception probably through a serotonergic mechanism.

  3. Sertraline inhibits formalin-induced nociception and cardiovascular responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.H. Santuzzi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to determine the antihyperalgesic effect of sertraline, measured indirectly by the changes of sciatic afferent nerve activity, and its effects on cardiorespiratory parameters, using the model of formalin-induced inflammatory nociception in anesthetized rats. Serum serotonin (5-HT levels were measured in order to test their correlation with the analgesic effect. Male Wistar rats (250-300 g were divided into 4 groups (N = 8/per group: sertraline-treated group (Sert + Saline (Sal and Sert + Formalin (Form; 3 mg·kg-1·day-1, ip, for 7 days and saline-treated group (Sal + Sal and Sal + Form. The rats were injected with 5% (50 µL formalin or saline into the right hind paw. Sciatic nerve activity was recorded using a silver electrode connected to a NeuroLog apparatus, and cardiopulmonary parameters (mean arterial pressure, heart rate and respiratory frequency, assessed after arterial cannulation and tracheotomy, were monitored using a Data Acquisition System. Blood samples were collected from the animals and serum 5-HT levels were determined by ELISA. Formalin injection induced the following changes: sciatic afferent nerve activity (+50.8 ± 14.7%, mean arterial pressure (+1.4 ± 3 mmHg, heart rate (+13 ± 6.8 bpm, respiratory frequency (+4.6 ± 5 cpm and serum 5-HT increased to 1162 ± 124.6 ng/mL. Treatment with sertraline significantly reduced all these parameters (respectively: +19.8 ± 6.9%, -3.3 ± 2 mmHg, -13.1 ± 10.8 bpm, -9.8 ± 5.7 cpm and serum 5-HT level dropped to 634 ± 69 ng/mL (P < 0.05. These results suggest that sertraline plays an analgesic role in formalin-induced nociception probably through a serotonergic mechanism.

  4. Transplacental transmission of Human Papillomavirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serafini Eduardo P

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper aimed at studying the transplacental transmission of HPV and looking at the epidemiological factors involved in maternal viral infection. The following sampling methods were used: (1 in the pregnant woman, (a genital; (b peripheral blood; (2 in the newborn, (a oral cavity, axillary and inguinal regions; (b nasopharyngeal aspirate, and (c cord blood; (3 in the placenta. The HPV DNA was identified using two methods: multiplex PCR of human β-globin and of HPV using the PGMY09 and PGMY11 primers; and nested-PCR, which combines degenerated primers of the E6/E7 regions of the HPV virus, that allowed the identification of genotypes 6/11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 42, 52 and 58. Transplacental transmission was considered when type-specific HPV concordance was found between the mother, the placenta and the newborn or the mother and cord blood. The study included 49 HPV DNA-positive pregnant women at delivery. Twelve placentas (24.5%, n = 12/49 had a positive result for HPV DNA. Eleven newborn were HPV DNA positive in samples from the nasopharyngeal or buccal and body or cord blood. In 5 cases (10.2%, n = 5/49 there was HPV type-specific agreement between genital/placenta/newborn samples. In one case (2%, n = 1/49 there was type specific HPV concordance between genital/cord blood and also suggested transplacental transmission. A positive and significant correlation was observed between transplacental transmission of HPV infection and the maternal variables of immunodepression history (HIV, p = 0.011. In conclusion the study suggests placental infection in 23.3% of the cases studied and transplacental transmission in 12.2%. It is suggested that in future HPV DNA be researched in the normal endometrium of women of reproductive age. The possible consequence of fetal exposure to HPV should be observed.

  5. Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... indicated by a total lack of sensory and motor function below the level of injury. People who survive a spinal cord injury will most likely have medical complications such as chronic pain and bladder and bowel ...

  6. Spinal cord abscess

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... drugs The infection often begins in the bone ( osteomyelitis ). The bone infection may cause an epidural abscess ... Boils Cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) collection Epidural abscess Osteomyelitis Pulmonary tuberculosis Sepsis Spinal cord trauma Swelling Review ...

  7. Psychologic factors are related to some sensory pain thresholds but not nociceptive flexion reflex threshold in chronic whiplash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterling, Michele; Hodkinson, Emily; Pettiford, Catherine; Souvlis, Tina; Curatolo, Michele

    2008-02-01

    Sensory hypersensitivity, central hyperexcitability [lowered nociceptive flexion reflex (NFR) thresholds], and psychologic distress are features of chronic whiplash. However, relationships between these substrates are not clear. This study tested the hypothesis that psychologic distress and catastrophization are correlated with sensory hypersensitivity and NFR responses in chronic whiplash. Pressure and thermal pain thresholds (mean values across 3 body sites), NFR threshold, and pain at threshold Visual Analog Scale were measured in 30 participants with chronic whiplash and 30 asymptomatic controls. Pain and disability levels Neck Disability Index, psychologic distress (GHQ-28), and catastrophization (PCS) were also measured in the whiplash group. Whiplash injured participants demonstrated lowered pain thresholds to pressure and cold (Pthresholds (P=0.003), and demonstrated above threshold levels of psychologic distress (GHQ-28) and levels of catastrophization comparable with other musculoskeletal conditions. There were no group differences for heat pain thresholds or pain at NFR threshold. In the whiplash group, PCS scores correlated moderately with cold pain threshold (r=0.51, P=0.01). In contrast, there were no significant correlations between GHQ-28 scores and pain threshold measures or between psychologic factors and NFR responses in whiplash participants. There were no significant correlations between psychologic factors and pain thresholds or NFR responses in controls. We have demonstrated that psychologic factors have some association with sensory hypersensitivity (cold pain threshold measures) in chronic whiplash but do not seem to influence spinal cord excitability. This suggests that psychologic disorders are important, but not the only, determinants of central hypersensitivity in whiplash patients.

  8. Inducible Lentivirus-Mediated siRNA against TLR4 Reduces Nociception in a Rat Model of Bone Cancer Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruirui Pan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although bone cancer pain is still not fully understood by scientists and clinicians alike, studies suggest that toll like receptor 4 (TLR4 plays an important role in the initiation and/or maintenance of pathological pain state in bone cancer pain. A promising treatment for bone cancer pain is the downregulation of TLR4 by RNA interference; however, naked siRNA (small interference RNA is not effective in long-term treatments. In order to concoct a viable prolonged treatment for bone cancer pain, an inducible lentivirus LvOn-siTLR4 (tetracycline inducible lentivirus carrying siRNA targeting TLR4 was prepared and the antinociception effects were observed in bone cancer pain rats induced by Walker 256 cells injection in left leg. Results showed that LvOn-siTLR4 intrathecal injection with doxycycline (Dox oral administration effectively reduced the nociception induced by Walker 256 cells while inhibiting the mRNA and protein expression of TLR4. Proinflammatory cytokines as TNF-α and IL-1β in spinal cord were also decreased. These findings suggest that TLR4 could be a target for bone cancer pain treatment and tetracycline inducible lentivirus LvOn-siTLR4 represents a new potential option for long-term treatment of bone cancer pain.

  9. Inducible Lentivirus-Mediated siRNA against TLR4 Reduces Nociception in a Rat Model of Bone Cancer Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Ruirui; Di, Huiting; Zhang, Jinming; Huang, Zhangxiang; Sun, Yuming; Yu, Weifeng; Wu, Feixiang

    2015-01-01

    Although bone cancer pain is still not fully understood by scientists and clinicians alike, studies suggest that toll like receptor 4 (TLR4) plays an important role in the initiation and/or maintenance of pathological pain state in bone cancer pain. A promising treatment for bone cancer pain is the downregulation of TLR4 by RNA interference; however, naked siRNA (small interference RNA) is not effective in long-term treatments. In order to concoct a viable prolonged treatment for bone cancer pain, an inducible lentivirus LvOn-siTLR4 (tetracycline inducible lentivirus carrying siRNA targeting TLR4) was prepared and the antinociception effects were observed in bone cancer pain rats induced by Walker 256 cells injection in left leg. Results showed that LvOn-siTLR4 intrathecal injection with doxycycline (Dox) oral administration effectively reduced the nociception induced by Walker 256 cells while inhibiting the mRNA and protein expression of TLR4. Proinflammatory cytokines as TNF-α and IL-1β in spinal cord were also decreased. These findings suggest that TLR4 could be a target for bone cancer pain treatment and tetracycline inducible lentivirus LvOn-siTLR4 represents a new potential option for long-term treatment of bone cancer pain.

  10. Electrical and pharmacological neuromodulation in patient with spinal cord injury pain (La neuromodulazione elettrica e farmacologica nel paziente con dolore post lesione midollare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmelo Costa

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The authors present the different kinds of pain following the spinal cord lesions (neuropathic, nociceptive, somatic, visceral; they describe the alterations that occur on spinal cord, brain and periphery; the methods to define the kinds of pain and to evaluate the pain intensity; the strumental and pharmacological treatments for pain relief. In detail data on the efficacy of spinal neurostimulation are compared with data on the efficacy of baclofen intrathecally administered. Based on results of his studies and on international literature data, the authors conclude that efficacy of treatment with baclofen intratecally administered with a programmable pump is higher than spinal neurostimulation treatment.

  11. Participation of pro- and anti-nociceptive interleukins in botulinum toxin A-induced analgesia in a rat model of neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zychowska, Magdalena; Rojewska, Ewelina; Makuch, Wioletta; Luvisetto, Siro; Pavone, Flaminia; Marinelli, Sara; Przewlocka, Barbara; Mika, Joanna

    2016-11-15

    Botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A) shows antinociceptive properties, and its clinical applications in pain therapy are continuously increasing. BoNT/A specifically cleaves SNAP-25, which results in the formation of a non-functional SNARE complex, thereby potently inhibiting the release of neurotransmitters and neuropeptides, including those involved in nociception. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of BoNT/A (300pg/paw) on pain-related behavior and the levels of glial markers and interleukins in the spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) after chronic constriction injury (CCI) to the sciatic nerve in rats. Glial activity was also examined after repeated intraperitoneal injection of minocycline combined with a single BoNT/A injection. Our results show that a single intraplantar BoNT/A injection did not influence motor function but strongly diminished pain-related behaviors in naïve and CCI-exposed rats. Additionally, microglial inhibition using minocycline enhanced the analgesic effects of BoNT/A. Western blotting results suggested that CCI induces the upregulation of the pronociceptive proteins IL-18, IL-6 and IL-1β in the ipsilateral lumbar spinal cord and DRG, but no changes in the levels of the antinociceptive proteins IL-18BP, IL-1RA and IL-10 were observed. Interestingly, BoNT/A injection suppressed the CCI-induced upregulation of IL-18 and IL-1β in the spinal cord and/or DRG and increased the levels of IL-10 and IL-1RA in the DRG. In summary, our results suggest that BoNT/A significantly attenuates pain-related behavior and microglial activation and restores the neuroimmune balance in a CCI model by decreasing the levels of pronociceptive factors (IL-1β and IL-18) and increasing the levels of antinociceptive factors (IL-10 and IL-1RA) in the spinal cord and DRG.

  12. Electrophysiological assessment of nociception in patients with Parkinson's disease : A multi-methods approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Priebe, Janosch A.; Kunz, Miriam; Morcinek, Christian; Rieckmann, Peter; Lautenbacher, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Nociceptive abnormalities indicating increased pain sensitivity have been reported in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). The disturbances are mostly responsive to dopaminergic (DA) treatment; yet, there are conflicting results. The objective of the present study was to investigate pa

  13. Trigeminal nociception-induced, cerebral Fos expression in the conscious rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ter Horst, GJ; Meijler, WJ; Korf, J; Kemper, RHA

    2001-01-01

    Little is known about trigeminal nociception-induced cerebral activity and involvement of cerebral structures in pathogenesis of trigeminovascular headaches such as migraine. Neuroimaging has demonstrated cortical, hypothalamic and brainstem activation during the attack and after abolition with suma

  14. Effects of silymarin on neuropathic pain and formalin-induced nociception in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faezeh Vahdati Hassani

    2015-07-01

    Conclusion:Results of the present study indicated that repeated administration of silymarin prevents the formalin-induced nociceptive behavior. However, it is not effective in the treatment of sciatic neuropathic pain.

  15. Increased immunoreactivity of c‑Fos in the spinal cord of the aged mouse and dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Ji Hyeon; Shin, Myoung Chul; Park, Joon Ha; Kim, In Hye; Lee, Jae-Chul; Yan, Bing Chun; Hwang, In Koo; Moon, Seung Myung; Ahn, Ji Yun; Ohk, Taek Geun; Lee, Tae Hun; Cho, Jun Hwi; Shin, Hyung-Cheul; Won, Moo-Ho

    2015-02-01

    Expression of c‑Fos in the spinal cord following nociceptive stimulation is considered to be a neurotoxic biomarker. In the present study, the immunoreactivity of c‑Fos in the spinal cord was compared between young adult (2‑3 years in dogs and 6 months in mice) and aged (10‑12 years in dogs and 24 months in mice) Beagle dogs and C57BL/6J mice. In addition, changes to neuronal distribution and damage to the spinal cord were also investigated. There were no significant differences in neuronal loss or degeneration of the spinal neurons observed in either the aged dogs or mice. Weak c‑Fos immunoreactivity was observed in the spinal neurons of the young adult animals; however, c‑Fos immunoreactivity was markedly increased in the nuclei of spinal neurons in the aged dogs and mice, as compared with that of the young adults. In conclusion, c‑Fos immunoreactivity was significantly increased without any accompanying neuronal loss in the aged spinal cord of mice and dogs, as compared with the spinal cords of the young adult animals.

  16. Forebrain medial septum region facilitates nociception in a rat formalin model of inflammatory pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Andy Thiam-Huat; Ariffin, Mohammed Zacky; Zhou, Mingyi; Ye, Jenn Zhou; Moochhala, Shabbir M; Khanna, Sanjay

    2011-11-01

    The medial septum is anatomically and functionally linked to the hippocampus, a region implicated in nociception. However, the role of medial septum in nociception remains unclear. To investigate the role of the region in nociception in rats, muscimol, a GABA agonist, or zolpidem, a positive allosteric modulator of GABA(A) receptors, was microinjected into medial septum to attenuate the activity of neurons in the region. Electrophysiological studies in anesthetized rats indicated that muscimol evoked a stronger and longer-lasting suppression of medial septal-mediated activation of hippocampal theta field activity than zolpidem. Similarly, microinjection of muscimol (1 or 2 μg/0.5 μl) into the medial septum of awake rats suppressed both licking and flinching behaviors in the formalin test of inflammatory pain, whereas only the latter behavior was affected by zolpidem (8 or 12 μg/0.5 μl) administered into the medial septum. Interestingly, both drugs selectively attenuated nociceptive behaviors in the second phase of the formalin test that are partly driven by central plasticity. Indeed, muscimol reduced the second phase behaviors by 30% to 60%, which was comparable to the reduction seen with systemic administration of a moderate dose of the analgesic morphine. The reduction was accompanied by a decrease in formalin-induced expression of spinal c-Fos protein that serves as an index of spinal nociceptive processing. The drug effects on nociceptive behaviors were without overt sedation and were distinct from the effects observed after septal lateral microinjections. Taken together, these findings suggest that the activation of medial septum is pro-nociceptive and facilitates aspects of central neural processing underlying nociception.

  17. Physiological brainstem mechanisms of trigeminal nociception: An fMRI study at 3T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Laura H; Sprenger, Christian; May, Arne

    2016-01-01

    The brainstem is a major site of processing and modulation of nociceptive input and plays a key role in the pathophysiology of various headache disorders. However, human imaging studies on brainstem function following trigeminal nociceptive stimulation are scarce as brainstem specific imaging approaches have to address multiple challenges such as magnetic field inhomogeneities and an enhanced level of physiological noise. In this study we used a viable protocol for brainstem fMRI of standardized trigeminal nociceptive stimulation to achieve detailed insight into physiological brainstem mechanisms of trigeminal nociception. We conducted a study of 21 healthy participants using a nociceptive ammonia stimulation of the left nasal mucosa with an optimized MR acquisition protocol for high resolution brainstem echoplanar imaging in combination with two different noise correction techniques. Significant BOLD responses to noxious ammonia stimulation were observed in areas typically involved in trigeminal nociceptive processing such as the spinal trigeminal nuclei (sTN), thalamus, secondary somatosensory cortex, insular cortex and cerebellum as well as in a pain modulating network including the periaqueductal gray area, hypothalamus (HT), locus coeruleus and cuneiform nucleus (CNF). Activations of the left CNF were positively correlated with pain intensity ratings. Employing psychophysiological interaction (PPI) analysis we found enhanced functional connectivity of the sTN with the contralateral sTN and HT following trigeminal nociception. We also observed enhanced functional connectivity of the CNF with the RVM during painful stimulation thus implying an important role of these two brainstem regions in central pain processing. The chosen approach to study trigeminal nociception with high-resolution fMRI offers new insight into human pain processing and might thus lead to a better understanding of headache pathophysiology.

  18. Ultrasound, color - normal umbilical cord (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is a normal color Doppler ultrasound of the umbilical cord performed at 30 weeks gestation. The cord is ... the cord, two arteries and one vein. The umbilical cord is connected to the placenta, located in the ...

  19. The inhibitory effect of locally injected dexmedetomidine on carrageenan-induced nociception in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Yuka; Higuchi, Hitoshi; Matsuoka, Yoshikazu; Yabuki-Kawase, Akiko; Ishii-Maruhama, Minako; Tomoyasu, Yumiko; Maeda, Shigeru; Morimatsu, Hiroshi; Miyawaki, Takuya

    2015-10-05

    Recent studies showed that the administration of dexmedetomidine relieved hyperalgesia in the presence of neuropathic pain. These findings have led to the hypothesis that the local administration of dexmedetomidine is useful for relieving acute inflammatory nociception, such as postoperative pain. Thus, we evaluated the inhibitory effect of locally injected dexmedetomidine on acute inflammatory nociception. Acute inflammatory nociception was induced by an intraplantar injection of 1% carrageenan into the hindpaws of rats, and dexmedetomidine was also injected combined with carrageenan. The paw withdrawal threshold based on von Frey filament stimulation was measured until 12 h after injection. We compared the area under the time-curve (AUC) between carrageenan and carrageenan with dexmedetomidine. To clarify that the action of dexmedetomidine was via α2-adrenoceptors, we evaluated the effect of yohimbine, a selective antagonist of α2-adrenoceptors, on the anti-nociception of dexmedetomidine. As the results, the intraplantar injection of carrageenan with over 10 μM dexmedetomidine significantly increased AUC, compared to that with only carrageenan injection. This effect of dexmedetomidine was reversed by the addition of yohimbine to carrageenan and dexmedetomidine. These results demonstrated that the locally injected dexmedetomidine was effective against carrageenan-induced inflammatory nociception via α2-adrenoceptors. The findings suggest that the local injection of dexmedetomidine is useful for relieving local acute inflammatory nociception.

  20. Application of calibrated forceps for assessing mechanical nociception with high time resolution in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiwadani, Hideki; Kanmura, Yuichi; Kuwaki, Tomoyuki

    2017-01-01

    In order to investigate the basic physiological mechanisms of pain and the anti-nociceptive effects of analgesics, development of pain assays in mice is critical due to the advances of genetic manipulation techniques. The von Frey hairs/Semmes-Weinstein monofilaments test (von Frey test) has long been applied to examine mechanical nociception in mice. Though the von Frey test is a well-established and standardized method, it is inappropriate to assess a rapid change in the nociceptive threshold because voluntary resting/sleeping states are necessary to examine the response. In this study, we assessed the effectiveness of calibrated forceps to determine the mechanical nociceptive threshold in mice. Repeated daily measurements of the threshold over 5 days indicated that the device obtained stable and reliable values. Furthermore, repeated measurements with 5 minute intervals revealed that the device detected the rapid change of the threshold induced by remifentanil, a short-acting μ-receptor agonist. These results indicate that the calibrated forceps are well-suited for measuring the mechanical nociceptive threshold in mice, and are useful in assessing the effects of short-acting analgesics on mechanical nociception. PMID:28212389

  1. Effects of Parecoxib and Fentanyl on nociception-induced cortical activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Ying-Wei

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Analgesics, including opioids and non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs reduce postoperative pain. However, little is known about the quantitative effects of these drugs on cortical activity induced by nociceptive stimulation. The aim of the present study was to determine the neural activity in response to a nociceptive stimulus and to investigate the effects of fentanyl (an opioid agonist and parecoxib (a selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor on this nociception-induced cortical activity evoked by tail pinch. Extracellular recordings (electroencephalogram and multi-unit signals were performed in the area of the anterior cingulate cortex while intracellular recordings were made in the primary somatosensory cortex. The effects of parecoxib and fentanyl on induced cortical activity were compared. Results Peripheral nociceptive stimulation in anesthetized rats produced an immediate electroencephalogram (EEG desynchronization resembling the cortical arousal (low-amplitude, fast-wave activity, while the membrane potential switched into a persistent depolarization state. The induced cortical activity was abolished by fentanyl, and the fentanyl's effect was reversed by the opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone. Parecoxib, on the other hand, did not significantly affect the neural activity. Conclusion Cortical activity was modulated by nociceptive stimulation in anesthetized rats. Fentanyl showed a strong inhibitory effect on the nociceptive-stimulus induced cortical activity while parecoxib had no significant effect.

  2. Differential magnetic field effects on heart rate and nociception in anosmic pigeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Seppia, Cristina; Mencacci, Resi; Luschi, Paolo; Varanini, Maurizio; Ghione, Sergio

    2012-05-01

    Several studies have shown that exposure to altered magnetic fields affects nociception by suppressing stress-induced hypoalgesia, and that this effect is reduced or abolished if the treatment is performed in the absence of light. This raises the question as to whether other sources of sensory stimuli may also modulate these magnetic effects. We investigated the possible role of olfaction in the magnetically induced effects on sensitivity to nociceptive stimuli and heart rate (HR) in restraint-stressed homing pigeons exposed to an Earth-strength, irregularly varying (<1 Hz) magnetic field. The magnetic treatment decreased the nociceptive threshold in normally smelling birds and an opposite effect was observed in birds made anosmic by nostril plugging. Conversely, no differential effect of olfactory deprivation was observed on HR, which was reduced by the magnetic treatment both in smelling and anosmic pigeons. The findings highlight an important role of olfactory environmental information in the mediation of magnetic effects on nociception, although the data cannot be interpreted unambiguously because of the lack of an additional control group of olfactory-deprived, non-magnetically exposed pigeons. The differential effects on a pigeon's sensitivity to nociceptive stimulus and HR additionally indicate that the magnetic stimuli affect nociception and the cardiovascular system in different ways.

  3. The dolognawmeter: a novel instrument and assay to quantify nociception in rodent models of orofacial pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, John C; Lam, David K; Achdjian, Stacy H; Schmidt, Brian L

    2010-03-30

    Rodent pain models play an important role in understanding the mechanisms of nociception and have accelerated the search for new treatment approaches for pain. Creating an objective metric for orofacial nociception in these models presents significant technical obstacles. No animal assay accurately measures pain-induced orofacial dysfunction that is directly comparable to human orofacial dysfunction. We developed and validated a high throughput, objective, operant, nociceptive animal assay, and an instrument to perform the assay termed the dolognawmeter, for evaluation of conditions known to elicit orofacial pain in humans. Using the device our assay quantifies gnawing function in the mouse. We quantified a behavioral index of nociception and demonstrated blockade of nociception in three models of orofacial pain: (1) TMJ inflammation, (2) masticatory myositis, and (3) head and neck cancer. This assay will be useful in the study of nociceptive mediators involved in the development and progression of orofacial pain conditions and it will also provide a unique tool for development and assessment of new therapeutic approaches.

  4. The Dolognawmeter: A Novel Instrument and Assay to Quantify Nociception in Rodent Models of Orofacial Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, John C.; Lam, David K.; Achdjian, Stacy H.; Schmidt, Brian L.

    2010-01-01

    Rodent pain models play an important role in understanding the mechanisms of nociception and have accelerated the search for new treatment approaches for pain. Creating an objective metric for orofacial nociception in these models presents significant technical obstacles. No animal assay accurately measures pain-induced orofacial dysfunction that is directly comparable to human orofacial dysfunction. We developed and validated a high throughput, objective, operant, nociceptive animal assay, and an instrument to perform the assay termed the dolognawmeter, for evaluation of conditions known to elicit orofacial pain in humans. Using the device our assay quantifies gnawing function in the mouse. We quantified a behavioral index of nociception and demonstrated blockade of nociception in three models of orofacial pain: (1) TMJ inflammation, (2) masticatory myositis, and (3) head and neck cancer. This assay will be useful in the study of nociceptive mediators involved in the development and progression of orofacial pain conditions and it will also provide a unique tool for development and assessment of new therapeutic approaches. PMID:20096303

  5. Protein phosphatase 2A regulates central sensitization in the spinal cord of rats following intradermal injection of capsaicin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Li

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intradermal injection of capsaicin into the hind paw of rats induces spinal cord central sensititzation, a process in which the responsiveness of central nociceptive neurons is amplified. In central sensitization, many signal transduction pathways composed of several cascades of intracellular enzymes are involved. As the phosphorylation state of neuronal proteins is strictly controlled and balanced by the opposing activities of protein kinases and phosphatases, the involvement of phosphatases in these events needs to be investigated. This study is designed to determine the influence of serine/threonine protein phosphatase type 2A (PP2A on the central nociceptive amplification process, which is induced by intradermal injection of capsaicin in rats. Results In experiment 1, the expression of PP2A protein in rat spinal cord at different time points following capsaicin or vehicle injection was examined using the Western blot method. In experiment 2, an inhibitor of PP2A (okadaic acid, 20 nM or fostriecin, 30 nM was injected into the subarachnoid space of the spinal cord, and the spontaneous exploratory activity of the rats before and after capsaicin injection was recorded with an automated photobeam activity system. The results showed that PP2A protein expression in the spinal cord was significantly upregulated following intradermal injection of capsaicin in rats. Capsaicin injection caused a significant decrease in exploratory activity of the rats. Thirty minutes after the injection, this decrease in activity had partly recovered. Infusion of a phosphatase inhibitor into the spinal cord intrathecal space enhanced the central sensitization induced by capsaicin by making the decrease in movement last longer. Conclusion These findings indicate that PP2A plays an important role in the cellular mechanisms of spinal cord central sensitization induced by intradermal injection of capsaicin in rats, which may have implications in

  6. Annexin A2 regulates TRPA1-dependent nociception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avenali, Luca; Narayanan, Pratibha; Rouwette, Tom; Cervellini, Ilaria; Sereda, Michael; Gomez-Varela, David; Schmidt, Manuela

    2014-10-29

    The transient receptor potential A1 (TRPA1) channel is essential for vertebrate pain. Even though TRPA1 activation by ligands has been studied extensively, the molecular machinery regulating TRPA1 is only poorly understood. Using an unbiased proteomics-based approach we uncovered the physical association of Annexin A2 (AnxA2) with native TRPA1 in mouse sensory neurons. AnxA2 is enriched in a subpopulation of sensory neurons and coexpressed with TRPA1. Furthermore, we observe an increase of TRPA1 membrane levels in cultured sensory neurons from AnxA2-deficient mice. This is reflected by our calcium imaging experiments revealing higher responsiveness upon TRPA1 activation in AnxA2-deficient neurons. In vivo these findings are associated with enhanced nocifensive behaviors specifically in TRPA1-dependent paradigms of acute and inflammatory pain, while heat and mechanical sensitivity as well as TRPV1-mediated pain are preserved in AnxA2-deficient mice. Our results support a model whereby AnxA2 limits the availability of TRPA1 channels to regulate nociceptive signaling in vertebrates.

  7. Mechanisms involved in the nociception triggered by the venom of the armed spider Phoneutria nigriventer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Gewehr

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The frequency of accidental spider bites in Brazil is growing, and poisoning due to bites from the spider genus Phoneutria nigriventer is the second most frequent source of such accidents. Intense local pain is the major symptom reported after bites of P. nigriventer, although the mechanisms involved are still poorly understood. Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify the mechanisms involved in nociception triggered by the venom of Phoneutria nigriventer (PNV. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Twenty microliters of PNV or PBS was injected into the mouse paw (intraplantar, i.pl.. The time spent licking the injected paw was considered indicative of the level of nociception. I.pl. injection of PNV produced spontaneous nociception, which was reduced by arachnid antivenin (ArAv, local anaesthetics, opioids, acetaminophen and dipyrone, but not indomethacin. Boiling or dialysing the venom reduced the nociception induced by the venom. PNV-induced nociception is not dependent on glutamate or histamine receptors or on mast cell degranulation, but it is mediated by the stimulation of sensory fibres that contain serotonin 4 (5-HT4 and vanilloid receptors (TRPV1. We detected a kallikrein-like kinin-generating enzyme activity in tissue treated with PNV, which also contributes to nociception. Inhibition of enzymatic activity or administration of a receptor antagonist for kinin B2 was able to inhibit the nociception induced by PNV. PNV nociception was also reduced by the blockade of tetrodotoxin-sensitive Na(+ channels, acid-sensitive ion channels (ASIC and TRPV1 receptors. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Results suggest that both low- and high-molecular-weight toxins of PNV produce spontaneous nociception through direct or indirect action of kinin B2, TRPV1, 5-HT4 or ASIC receptors and voltage-dependent sodium channels present in sensory neurons but not in mast cells. Understanding the mechanisms involved in nociception caused by PNV are of

  8. The nociception role of Cav3.2 calcium channel%Cav3.2通道在伤害性感受中的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏昊; 徐世元

    2015-01-01

    Background Some of the earliest detailed descriptions of biophysical properties of low voltage-activated or transient (T) type Calcium channels were done using in vitro preparation of primary sensory or dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons that are known for their functional role in processing pain signals.However, in spite of these early discoveries, T-type calcium channels were not implicated in sensory transmission in general and pain processing (nociception) in particular until recently.Objective To summarize the important role of peripheral T-type Calcium channels in boosting nociceptive transmission.Content T-type calcium channels in peripheral sensory neurons play important role under physiological conditions (e.g.acute nociceptive pain) and to pain processing under pathological conditions.Trend peripheral T-type Calcium channels in nociception and the value of these channels as cellular targets for potential drug developments.%背景 疼痛是危害人类健康,影响人类生存质量的重要因素,但目前可用于临床治疗的手段尚不能满足患者的无痛要求,且存在不同程度的副作用,其主要原因之一是目前对疼痛的产生机制尚未完全明了.最近的研究表明,T型钙通道Cav3.2亚型在疼痛信号转导中起重要作用. 目的 综述T型钙通道Cav3.2亚型在痛觉传导中的作用. 内容 阐述位于背根神经节(dorsal root ganglion,DRG)的T型钙通道参与传递生理性疼痛(疼痛感知)和病理性疼痛(神经病理性疼痛)伤害性刺激信号. 趋向 T型钙离子通道可调控疼痛伤害性刺激信号转导,并可作为可能的疼痛治疗靶点.

  9. [Spinal cord infarction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumann, N; Shariat, K; Ulmer, S; Stippich, C; Ahlhelm, F J

    2012-05-01

    Infarction of the spinal cord can cause a variety of symptoms and neurological deficits because of the complex vascular supply of the myelon. The most common leading symptom is distal paresis ranging from paraparesis to tetraplegia caused by arterial ischemia or infarction of the myelon. Venous infarction, however, cannot always be distinguished from arterial infarction based on the symptoms alone.Modern imaging techniques, such as computed tomography angiography (CTA) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) assist in preoperative planning of aortic operations to reliably identify not only the most important vascular structure supplying the spinal cord, the artery of Adamkiewicz, but also other pathologies such as tumors or infectious disorders. In contrast to CT, MRI can reliably depict infarction of the spinal cord.

  10. Spinal cord swelling and candidiasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, K.; Gronseth, G.; Aldrich, M.; Williams, A.

    1982-11-01

    Fusiform swelling of the spinal cord was noted myelographically in a patient with Hodgkin's disease. Autopsy revealed that the swelling was caused by Candida infection of the spinal cord. It is suggested that fungal infection be included in the differential diagnosis of spinal cord swelling in the immunosuppressed cancer patient.

  11. Spinal Cord Stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Kaare

    2014-01-01

    pain after failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS)(4), pain due to peripheral nerve injury, stump pain(5), peripheral vascular disease(6) and diabetic neuropathy(7,8); whereas phantom pain(9), postherpetic neuralgia(10), chronic visceral pain(11), and pain after partial spinal cord injury(12) remain more......Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is a surgical treatment for chronic neuropathic pain that is refractory to other treatment. Originally described by Shealy et al. in 1967(1), it is used to treat a range of conditions such as complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS I)(2), angina pectoris(3), radicular...

  12. Alfaxalone Anaesthesia Facilitates Electrophysiological Recordings of Nociceptive Withdrawal Reflexes in Dogs (Canis familiaris.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Hunt

    Full Text Available Naturally occurring canine osteoarthritis represents a welfare issue for affected dogs (Canis familiaris, but is also considered very similar to human osteoarthritis and has therefore been proposed as a model of disease in humans. Central sensitisation is recognized in human osteoarthritis sufferers but identification in dogs is challenging. Electromyographic measurement of responses to nociceptive stimulation represents a potential means of investigating alterations in central nociceptive processing, and has been evaluated in conscious experimental dogs, but is likely to be aversive. Development of a suitable anaesthetic protocol in experimental dogs, which facilitated electrophysiological nociceptive withdrawal reflex assessment, may increase the acceptability of using the technique in owned dogs with naturally occurring osteoarthritis. Seven purpose bred male hound dogs underwent electromyographic recording sessions in each of three states: acepromazine sedation, alfaxalone sedation, and alfaxalone anaesthesia. Electromyographic responses to escalating mechanical and electrical, and repeated electrical, stimuli were recorded. Subsequently the integral of both early and late rectified responses was calculated. Natural logarithms of the integral values were analysed within and between the three states using multi level modeling. Alfaxalone increased nociceptive thresholds and decreased the magnitude of recorded responses, but characteristics of increasing responses with increasing stimulus magnitude were preserved. Behavioural signs of anxiety were noted in two out of seven dogs during recordings in the acepromazine sedated state. There were few significant differences in response magnitude or nociceptive threshold between the two alfaxalone states. Following acepromazine premedication, induction of anaesthesia with 1-2 mg kg-1 alfaxalone, followed by a continuous rate infusion in the range 0.075-0.1 mg kg-1 min-1 produced suitable conditions

  13. Alfaxalone Anaesthesia Facilitates Electrophysiological Recordings of Nociceptive Withdrawal Reflexes in Dogs (Canis familiaris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, James; Murrell, Jo; Knazovicky, David; Harris, John; Kelly, Sara; Knowles, Toby G; Lascelles, B Duncan X

    2016-01-01

    Naturally occurring canine osteoarthritis represents a welfare issue for affected dogs (Canis familiaris), but is also considered very similar to human osteoarthritis and has therefore been proposed as a model of disease in humans. Central sensitisation is recognized in human osteoarthritis sufferers but identification in dogs is challenging. Electromyographic measurement of responses to nociceptive stimulation represents a potential means of investigating alterations in central nociceptive processing, and has been evaluated in conscious experimental dogs, but is likely to be aversive. Development of a suitable anaesthetic protocol in experimental dogs, which facilitated electrophysiological nociceptive withdrawal reflex assessment, may increase the acceptability of using the technique in owned dogs with naturally occurring osteoarthritis. Seven purpose bred male hound dogs underwent electromyographic recording sessions in each of three states: acepromazine sedation, alfaxalone sedation, and alfaxalone anaesthesia. Electromyographic responses to escalating mechanical and electrical, and repeated electrical, stimuli were recorded. Subsequently the integral of both early and late rectified responses was calculated. Natural logarithms of the integral values were analysed within and between the three states using multi level modeling. Alfaxalone increased nociceptive thresholds and decreased the magnitude of recorded responses, but characteristics of increasing responses with increasing stimulus magnitude were preserved. Behavioural signs of anxiety were noted in two out of seven dogs during recordings in the acepromazine sedated state. There were few significant differences in response magnitude or nociceptive threshold between the two alfaxalone states. Following acepromazine premedication, induction of anaesthesia with 1-2 mg kg-1 alfaxalone, followed by a continuous rate infusion in the range 0.075-0.1 mg kg-1 min-1 produced suitable conditions to enable assessment

  14. Brain measures of nociception using near-infrared spectroscopy in patients undergoing routine screening colonoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerra, Lino; Aasted, Christopher M; Boas, David A; George, Edward; Yücel, Meryem A; Kussman, Barry D; Kelsey, Peter; Borsook, David

    2016-04-01

    Colonoscopy is an invaluable tool for the screening and diagnosis of many colonic diseases. For most colonoscopies, moderate sedation is used during the procedure. However, insufflation of the colon produces a nociceptive stimulus that is usually accompanied by facial grimacing/groaning while under sedation. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether a nociceptive signal elicited by colonic insufflation could be measured from the brain. Seventeen otherwise healthy patients (age 54.8 ± 9.1; 6 female) undergoing routine colonoscopy (ie, no history of significant medical conditions) were monitored using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Moderate sedation was produced using standard clinical protocols for midazolam and meperidine, titrated to effect. Near-infrared spectroscopy data captured during the procedure was analyzed offline to evaluate the brains' responses to nociceptive stimuli evoked by the insufflation events (defined by physician or observing patients' facial responses). Analysis of NIRS data revealed a specific, reproducible prefrontal cortex activity corresponding to times when patients grimaced. The pattern of the activation is similar to that previously observed during nociceptive stimuli in awake healthy individuals, suggesting that this approach may be used to evaluate brain activity evoked by nociceptive stimuli under sedation, when there is incomplete analgesia. Although some patients report recollection of procedural pain after the procedure, the effects of repeated nociceptive stimuli in surgical patients may contribute to postoperative changes including chronic pain. The results from this study indicate that NIRS may be a suitable technology for continuous nociceptive afferent monitoring in patients undergoing sedation and could have applications under sedation or anesthesia.

  15. Involvement of the histaminergic system in the nociceptin-induced pain-related behaviors in the mouse spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurada, Shinobu; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Mizoguchi, Hirokazu; Yonezawa, Akihiko; Orito, Tohru; Katsuyama, Sou; Kuramasu, Atsuo; Sakurada, Chikai; Yanai, Kazuhiko; Sakurada, Tsukasa

    2004-11-01

    Intrathecal (i.t.) injection of nociceptin elicited a behavioral response mainly consisting of biting and licking, which were eliminated by the i.t. co-administration of opioid receptor-like-1 (ORL-1) receptor antagonists. The behavioral response induced by nociceptin was characteristically similar to that by i.t.-administered histamine, and was attenuated by i.t. co-administration of the H1 receptor antagonists, but not by the H2 receptor antagonists, whereas the H3 receptor antagonist promoted the nociceptin-induced behavior. H1 receptor knockout (H1R-KO) mice did not show the nociceptin-induced nociceptive behavior, which was observed in wild-type mice. Pretreatment with a histamine antiserum or a histidine decarboxylase inhibitor resulted in a significant reduction of the response to nociceptin. The previous studies showed that NK1 receptor antagonists and a novel substance P (SP)-specific antagonist given i.t. could reduce the behavioral response to nociceptin and histamine. On the other hand, the nociceptive response induced by nociceptin, but not histamine, was completely attenuated by the i.t. co-administration of agonists for GABAA and GABAB receptors. In contrast, the antagonists for GABAA and GABAB receptors injected i.t. showed same nociceptive response with nociceptin and histamine, and their nociceptive responses were significantly blocked by the i.t. co-administration of the H1 receptor antagonists, but not H2 receptor antagonists or ORL-1 receptor antagonists. The present results suggest that the activation of the ORL-1 receptor by nociceptin may induce the disinhibition of histaminergic neuron and enhance the release of histamine, which subsequently acts on the H1 receptor located on the SP-containing neurons to produce the spinal cord-mediated nociceptive response.

  16. Delayed cord clamping and cord gas analysis at birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xodo, Serena; Xodo, Luigi; Berghella, Vincenzo

    2017-09-16

    Delayed cord clamping for at least 60 seconds in both term and preterm babies is a major recent change in clinical care. Delayed cord clamping has several effects on other possible interventions. One of these is the effect of delayed cord clamping on umbilical artery gas analysis. When indicated, umbilical artery gas analysis can safely be done either with early cord clamping, or, probably most of the times it is necessary, during delayed cord clamping with the cord still unclamped. Paired blood samples (one from the umbilical artery and one from the umbilical vein) can be taken from the pulsating and unclamped cord, immediately after birth, during delayed cord clamping, without any effect on either the accuracy of umbilical artery gas analysis or on the transfusion of blood through delayed cord clamping. Umbilical artery gas analysis should instead not be done after delayed cord clamping, since delayed cord clamping alters several acid-based parameters and lactate values. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. Puerarin Alleviates Neuropathic Pain by Inhibiting Neuroinflammation in Spinal Cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuropathic pain responds poorly to drug treatments, and partial relief is achieved in only about half of the patients. Puerarin, the main constituent of Puerariae Lobatae Radix, has been used extensively in China to treat hypertension and tumor. The current study examined the effects of puerarin on neuropathic pain using two most commonly used animal models: chronic constriction injury (CCI and diabetic neuropathy. We found that consecutive intrathecal administration of puerarin (4–100 nM for 7 days inhibited the mechanical and thermal nociceptive response induced by CCI and diabetes without interfering with the normal pain response. Meanwhile, in both models puerarin inhibited the activation of microglia and astroglia in the spinal dorsal horn. Puerarin also reduced the upregulated levels of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB and other proinflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6, IL-1β, and TNF-α, in the spinal cord. In summary, puerarin alleviated CCI- and diabetes-induced neuropathic pain, and its effectiveness might be due to the inhibition of neuroinflammation in the spinal cord. The anti-inflammation effect of puerarin might be related to the suppression of spinal NF-κB activation and/or cytokines upregulation. We conclude that puerarin has a significant effect on alleviating neuropathic pain and thus may serve as a therapeutic approach for neuropathic pain.

  18. Presynaptic facilitation by tetracaine of glutamatergic spontaneous excitatory transmission in the rat spinal substantia gelatinosa - Involvement of TRPA1 channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Lian-Hua; Fujita, Tsugumi; Yu, Ting; Kumamoto, Eiichi

    2017-02-15

    The amide-type local anesthetic (LA) lidocaine activates transient receptor potential (TRP) ankyrin-1 (TRPA1) channels to facilitate spontaneous l-glutamate release onto spinal substantia gelatinosa (SG) neurons, which play a crucial role in regulating nociceptive transmission. In contrast, the ester-type LA procaine reduces the spontaneous release of l-glutamate in SG neurons. In order to determine whether TRPA1 activation by LAs is specific to amide-types, we examined the actions of tetracaine, another ester-type LA, and other amide-type LAs on glutamatergic spontaneous excitatory transmission in SG neurons by focusing on TRP activation. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were performed on SG neurons of adult rat spinal cord slices at a holding potential of -70mV. Bath-applied tetracaine increased spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic current (sEPSC) frequency in a concentration-dependent manner. Tetracaine activity was resistant to the voltage-gated Na(+)-channel blocker tetrodotoxin, the TRP vanilloid-1 antagonist capsazepine, and the TRP melastatin-8 antagonist BCTC, but was inhibited by the non-selective TRP antagonist ruthenium red and the TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031. With respect to amide-type LAs, prilocaine had a tendency to increase sEPSC frequency, while ropivacaine and levobupivacaine reduced the frequency. In conclusion, tetracaine facilitated spontaneous l-glutamate release from nerve terminals by activating TRPA1 channels in the SG, resulting in an increase in the excitability of SG neurons. TRPA1 activation was not specific to amide-type or ester-type LAs. The facilitatory action of LAs may be involved in pain occurring after recovery from spinal anesthesia.

  19. Sensitization of the Nociceptive System in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maren Reimer

    Full Text Available Complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS-I is characterized by sensory, motor and autonomic abnormalities without electrophysiological evidence of a nerve lesion.Aims were to investigate how sensory, autonomic and motor function change in the course of the disease.19 CRPS-I patients (17 with acute, 2 with chronic CRPS, mean duration of disease 5.7±8.3, range 1-33 months were examined with questionnaires (LANSS, NPS, MPI, Quick DASH, multiple choice list of descriptors for sensory, motor, autonomic symptoms, motor and autonomic tests as well as quantitative sensory testing according to the German Research Network on Neuropathic Pain at two visits (baseline and 36±10.6, range 16-53 months later.CRPS-I patients had an improvement of sudomotor and vasomotor function, but still a great impairment of sensory and motor function upon follow-up. Although pain and mechanical detection improved upon follow-up, thermal and mechanical pain sensitivity increased, including the contralateral side. Increase in mechanical pain sensitivity and loss of mechanical detection were associated with presence of ongoing pain.The results demonstrate that patients with CRPS-I show a sensitization of the nociceptive system in the course of the disease, for which ongoing pain seems to be the most important trigger. They further suggest that measured loss of function in CRPS-I is due to pain-induced hypoesthesia rather than a minimal nerve lesion. In conclusion, this article gives evidence for a pronociceptive pain modulation profile developing in the course of CRPS and thus helps to assess underlying mechanisms of CRPS that contribute to the maintenance of patients' pain and disability.

  20. Effects of salt-loading hypertension on nociception in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afolabi AO

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Ayobami Oladele Afolabi,1 Saheed Kolade Mudashiru,1 Isiaka Abdullateef Alagbonsi21Department of Physiology, College of Health Sciences, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Ogbomoso, Oyo, Nigeria; 2Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Kogi State University, PMB 1008, Anyigba, Kogi, NigeriaBackground: There is on going controversy on the effect of experimentally induced hypertension on nociception. The effect of salt-loading-induced hypertension on pain was studied in male rats.Method: Twenty-four male Sprague-Dawley rats (160–280 g were divided into two groups. Group A (n = 12 was treated with normal-feed diet (control, while group B (n = 12 was treated with 8% salt-loaded diet for 10 weeks. After 10 weeks of the treatment, six rats each from groups A and B were used for blood pressure measurement, while the remaining six rats were used for both the tail-flick and formalin tests. Thermal and chemical pain test were assessed using tail immersion test (tail flick and formalin test pain paradigms at onset of salt-loading diet and after 10 weeks of salt loading.Results: Chronic administration of salt-loading diet caused significant increases (P < 0.001 in systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and mean arterial blood pressure. Moreover, salt-loading-induced hypertension was found to significantly reduce pain sensitivity in the tail-immersion test (P < 0.001 and in the early and late phase of the formalin test (P < 0.01. However, the hypoalgesia was higher in the late phase (94.8% than in the early phase (56.8% of the formalin test.Conclusion: The present study suggests that high salt-loading-induced hypertension causes hypoalgesia in rats, which might be due more to reduction in inflammatory response.Keywords: formalin test, tail-flick test

  1. Meta-chlorophenylpiperazine attenuates formalin-induced nociceptive responses through 5-HT1/2 receptors in both normal and diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshita, N; Yamaguchi, I

    1995-12-01

    1. This study was designed to investigate the effect of meta-chlorophenylpiperazine (m-CPP; a 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptor agonist) on the formalin-induced nociceptive responses in normal, insulin-dependent streptozotocin (STZ) diabetic and non-insulin dependent genetically diabetic (db/db) mice. 2. A subcutaneous injection of diluted formalin (1% formaldehyde in 0.9% saline, 10 microliters) under the plantar surface of the left hindpaw induced biphasic nociceptive responses, the first and second phases considered to represent acute and chronic pain, respectively. The former response in db/db mice was significantly lower than those in normal mice, and the latter responses in STZ and db/db mice were significantly lower than those in normal mice. 3. In normal mice, m-CPP (0.32-3.2 mg ml-1, p.o.) exhibited potent antinociceptive activity, dose-dependently attenuating the first and second phase; the ID50 value of the second phase was 0.4 mg kg-1. m-CPP (0.32-3.2 mg kg-1, p.o.) also dose-dependently attenuated the formalin-induced nociceptive responses in STZ-induced diabetic mice and genetically diabetic db/db mice, and the activities were comparable to those in normal mice. 4. The antinociceptive activities of m-CPP (1 mg kg-1, p.o.) were significantly inhibited by pretreatment with pindolol (a 5-HT1-receptor antagonist, 1 mg kg-1, i.p.) or ketanserin (a 5-HT2 receptor antagonist, 1 mg kg-1, i.p.) but were hardly affected by ICS205-930 (a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, 1 mg kg-1, i.p.). 5. These results suggest that m-CPP inhibits not only acute but also chronic pain transmission through 5-HT1 and 5-HT2 receptors, and that the 5-hydroxytryptaminergic antinociceptive pathways are little affected by diabetes.

  2. Spinal Cord Stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Kaare

    2014-01-01

    pain after failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS)(4), pain due to peripheral nerve injury, stump pain(5), peripheral vascular disease(6) and diabetic neuropathy(7,8); whereas phantom pain(9), postherpetic neuralgia(10), chronic visceral pain(11), and pain after partial spinal cord injury(12) remain more...

  3. Sida cordifolia leaf extract reduces the orofacial nociceptive response in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonjardim, L R; Silva, A M; Oliveira, M G B; Guimarães, A G; Antoniolli, A R; Santana, M F; Serafini, M R; Santos, R C; Araújo, A A S; Estevam, C S; Santos, M R V; Lyra, A; Carvalho, R; Quintans-Júnior, L J; Azevedo, E G; Botelho, M A

    2011-08-01

    In this study, we describe the antinociceptive activity of the ethanol extract (EE), chloroform (CF) and methanol (MF) fractions obtained from Sida cordifolia, popularly known in Brazil as "malva branca" or "malva branca sedosa". Leaves of S. cordifolia were used to produce the crude ethanol extract and after CF and MF. Experiments were conducted on Swiss mice using the glutamate and formalin-induced orofacial nociception. In the formalin test, all doses of EE, CF and MF significantly reduced the orofacial nociception in the first (p < 0.001) and second phase (p < 0.001), which was also naloxone-sensitive. In the glutamate-induced nociception test, only CF and MF significantly reduced the orofacial nociceptive behavior with inhibition percentage values of 48.1% (100 mg/kg, CF), 56.1% (200 mg/kg, CF), 66.4% (400 mg/kg, CF), 48.2 (200 mg/kg, MF) and 60.1 (400 mg/kg, MF). Furthermore, treatment of the animals with EE, CF and MF was not able to promote motor activity changes. These data demonstrate that S. cordifolia has a pronounced antinociceptive activity on orofacial nociception. However, pharmacological and chemical studies are necessary in order to characterize the responsible mechanisms for this antinociceptive action and also to identify other bioactive compounds present in S. cordifolia. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Nociceptive TRP Channels: Sensory Detectors and Transducers in Multiple Pain Pathologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron D. Mickle

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Specialized receptors belonging to the transient receptor potential (TRP family of ligand-gated ion channels constitute the critical detectors and transducers of pain-causing stimuli. Nociceptive TRP channels are predominantly expressed by distinct subsets of sensory neurons of the peripheral nervous system. Several of these TRP channels are also expressed in neurons of the central nervous system, and in non-neuronal cells that communicate with sensory nerves. Nociceptive TRPs are activated by specific physico-chemical stimuli to provide the excitatory trigger in neurons. In addition, decades of research has identified a large number of immune and neuromodulators as mediators of nociceptive TRP channel activation during injury, inflammatory and other pathological conditions. These findings have led to aggressive targeting of TRP channels for the development of new-generation analgesics. This review summarizes the complex activation and/or modulation of nociceptive TRP channels under pathophysiological conditions, and how these changes underlie acute and chronic pain conditions. Furthermore, development of small-molecule antagonists for several TRP channels as analgesics, and the positive and negative outcomes of these drugs in clinical trials are discussed. Understanding the diverse functional and modulatory properties of nociceptive TRP channels is critical to function-based drug targeting for the development of evidence-based and efficacious new generation analgesics.

  5. Roles of prefrontal cortex and paraventricular thalamus in affective and mechanical components of visceral nociception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurik, Angela; Auffenberg, Eva; Klein, Sabine; Deussing, Jan M; Schmid, Roland M; Wotjak, Carsten T; Thoeringer, Christoph K

    2015-12-01

    Visceral pain represents a major clinical challenge in the management of many gastrointestinal disorders, eg, pancreatitis. However, cerebral neurobiological mechanisms underlying visceral nociception are poorly understood. As a representative model of visceral nociception, we applied cerulein hyperstimulation in C57BL6 mice to induce acute pancreatitis and performed a behavioral test battery and c-Fos staining of brains. We observed a specific pain phenotype and a significant increase in c-Fos immunoreactivity in the paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus (PVT), the periaqueductal gray, and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Using neuronal tracing, we observed projections of the PVT to cortical layers of the mPFC with contacts to inhibitory GABAergic neurons. These inhibitory neurons showed more activation after cerulein treatment suggesting thalamocortical "feedforward inhibition" in visceral nociception. The activity of neurons in pancreatitis-related pain centers was pharmacogenetically modulated by designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs, selectively and cell type specifically expressed in target neurons using adeno-associated virus-mediated gene transfer. Pharmacogenetic inhibition of PVT but not periaqueductal gray neurons attenuated visceral pain and induced an activation of the descending inhibitory pain pathway. Activation of glutamatergic principle neurons in the mPFC, but not inhibitory neurons, also reversed visceral nociception. These data reveal novel insights into central pain processing that underlies visceral nociception and may trigger the development of novel, potent centrally acting analgesic drugs.

  6. Spinal cord distribution of sup 3 H-morphine after intrathecal administration: Relationship to analgesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishio, Y.; Sinatra, R.S.; Kitahata, L.M.; Collins, J.G. (Yale Univ. School of Medicine, CT (USA))

    1989-09-01

    The distribution of intrathecally administered {sup 3}H-morphine was examined by light microscopic autoradiography in rat spinal cord and temporal changes in silver grain localization were compared with results obtained from simultaneous measurements of analgesia. After tissue processing, radio-activity was found to have penetrated in superficial as well as in deeper layers (Rexed lamina V, VII, and X) of rat spinal cord within minutes after application. Silver grain density reached maximal values at 30 min in every region of cord studied. Radioactivity decreased rapidly between 30 min and 2 hr and then more slowly over the next 24 hr. In rats tested for responses to a thermal stimulus (tail flick test), intrathecal administration of morphine (5 and 15 micrograms) resulted in significant dose dependent analgesia that peaked at 30 min and lasted up to 5 hr (P less than 0.5). There was a close relationship between analgesia and spinal cord silver grain density during the first 4 hr of the study. It is postulated that the onset of spinal morphine analgesia depends on appearance of molecules at sites of action followed by the activation of anti-nociceptive mechanisms.

  7. EVALUATION OF ANTI-NOCICEPTIVE AND ANTI-INFLAMMATORY ACTIVITY OF PUNICA GRANATUM SEED EXTRACT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Jeetendra Kumar

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The plant Punica granatum of family Punicaceae is distributed throughout India and reputed to have numerous applications in traditional medicine system. In order to justify its folkloric use in nociception and inflammation, the study was performed.In this study, the extraction of Punica granatum seed extract was carried out in aqueous media. In order to explore its potency, various experimental models of anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities were taken. The oral administration of the extract 100mg and 200mg per kg body weight showed significant pharmacological action. Furthermore the anti-ulcer activity was carried out with the help of Indomethacin induced ulceration model using Mesoprostol as standard drug and it showed no ulcerogenic effect in wistar albino rats.Overall, the extract was found to be significant anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory activity with no ulcerogenic adverse effect.

  8. Are presynaptic GABA-Cρ2 receptors involved in anti-nociception?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadavarty, R; Hwang, J; Rajput, P S; Soja, P J; Kumar, U; Sastry, B R

    2015-10-01

    We investigated the anti-nociceptive effects of GABA-C receptors in the central nervous system. Intracisternal injection of CACA, a GABA-C receptor agonist or isoguvacine, a GABA-A receptor agonist, significantly increased the tail-withdrawal latency. TPMPA, a GABA-C receptor antagonist blocked the effects of CACA but not isoguvacine indicating that GABA-C receptors are involved in regulating pain. Further, double-labelled immunofluorescence studies revealed that GABA-Cρ2 receptors are expressed presynaptically in the spinal dorsal horn, especially, substantia gelatinosa, a region that has been previously implicated in analgesia by regulating nociceptive inflow. These data provide a provenance for future work looking at presynaptic spinal GABA-C receptors in the control of nociception.

  9. Interaction and regulatory functions of μ- and δ-opioid receptors in nociceptive afferent neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Zhang; Lan Bao

    2012-01-01

    μ-opioid receptor (MOR) agonists such as morphine are powerful analgesics used for pain therapy.However,the use of these drugs is limited by their side-effects,which include antinociceptive tolerance and dependence.Earlier studies reported that MOR analgesic tolerance is reduced by blockade of δ-opioid receptors (DORs) that interact with MORs.Recent studies show that the MOR/DOR interaction in nociceptive afferent neurons in the dorsal root ganglion may contribute to morphine analgesic tolerance.Further analysis of the mechanisms for regulating the trafficking of receptors,ion channels and signaling molecules in nociceptive afferent neurons would help to understand the nociceptive mechanisms and improve pain therapy.

  10. Umbilical cord blood banking: implications for perinatal care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armson, B Anthony

    2005-03-01

    To evaluate the risks and benefits of umbilical cord blood banking for future stem cell transplantation and to provide guidelines for Canadian perinatal care providers regarding the counselling, procedural, and ethical implications of this potential therapeutic option. Selective or routine collection and storage of umbilical cord blood for future autologous (self) or allogenic (related or unrelated) transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells to treat malignant and nonmalignant disorders in children and adults. Maternal and perinatal morbidity, indications for umbilical cord blood transplantation, short- and long-term risks and benefits of umbilical cord blood transplantation, burden of umbilical cord blood collection on perinatal care providers, parental satisfaction, and health care costs. MEDLINE and PubMed searches were conducted from January 1970 to October 2003 for English-language articles related to umbilical cord blood collection, banking, and transplantation; the Cochrane library was searched; and committee opinions of the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists were obtained. The evidence collected was reviewed and evaluated by the Maternal/Fetal Medicine Committee of the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada (SOGC), and recommendations were made using the evaluation of evidence guidelines developed by the Canadian Task Force on the Periodic Health Exam. Umbilical cord blood is a readily available source of hematopoietic stem cells used with increasing frequency as an alternative to bone marrow or peripheral stem cells for transplantation in the treatment of malignant and nonmalignant conditions in children and adults. Umbilical cord blood transplantation provides a rich source of hematopoietic stem cells with several advantages, including prompt availability, decreased risk of transmissible viral infections and graft

  11. The multiplicity of spinal AA-5-HT anti-nociceptive action in a rat model of neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malek, Natalia; Kostrzewa, Magdalena; Makuch, Wioletta; Pajak, Agnieszka; Kucharczyk, Mateusz; Piscitelli, Fabiana; Przewlocka, Barbara; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Starowicz, Katarzyna

    2016-09-01

    There is considerable evidence to support the role of anandamide (AEA), an endogenous ligand of cannabinoid receptors, in neuropathic pain modulation. AEA also produces effects mediated by other biological targets, of which the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) has been the most investigated. Both, inhibition of AEA breakdown by fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and blockage of TRPV1 have been shown to produce anti-nociceptive effects. Recent research suggests the usefulness of dual-action compounds, which may afford greater anti-allodynic efficacy. Therefore, in the present study, we examined the effect of N-arachidonoyl-serotonin (AA-5-HT), a blocker of FAAH and TRPV1, in a rat model of neuropathic pain after intrathecal administration. We found that treatment with AA-5-HT increased the pain threshold to mechanical and thermal stimuli, with highest effect at the dose of 500nM, which was most strongly attenuated by AM-630, CB2 antagonist, administration. The single action blockers PF-3845 (1000nM, for FAAH) and I-RTX (1nM, for TRPV1) showed lower efficacy than AA-5-HT. Moreover AA-5-HT (500nM) elevated AEA and palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) levels. Among the possible targets of these mediators, only the mRNA levels of CB2, GPR18 and GPR55, which are believed to be novel cannabinoid receptors, were upregulated in the spinal cord and/or DRG of CCI rats. It was previously reported that AA-5-HT acts in CB1 and TRPV1-dependent manner after systemic administration, but here for the first time we show that AA-5-HT action at the spinal level involves CB2, with potential contributions from GRP18 and/or GPR55 receptors.

  12. Changes in thermal nociceptive responses in dairy cows following experimentally induced Esherichia coli mastitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Ditte B.; Fogsgaard, Katrine; Røntved, Christine Maria;

    2011-01-01

    Mastitis is a high incidence disease in dairy cows. The acute stage is considered painful and inflammation can lead to hyperalgesia and thereby contribute to decreased welfare. The aim of this study was to examine changes in nociceptive responses toward cutaneous nociceptive laser stimulation (NL...

  13. Edema and Nociception Induced by Philodryas patagoniensis Venom in Mice: A Pharmacological Evaluation with Implications for the Accident Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Priscila Hess; Rocha, Marisa M T; Kuniyoshi, Alexandre Kazuo; Portaro, Fernanda Calheta Vieira; Gonçalves, Luís Roberto C

    2017-06-01

    We have investigated the mechanisms involved in the genesis of edema and nociception induced by Philodryas patagoniensis venom (PpV) injected into the footpad of mice. PpV induced dose-related edema and nociceptive effects. Pretreatment of mice with cyclooxygenase inhibitor (indomethacin), but not with cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitor (celecoxib) markedly inhibited both effects. Pretreatments with H1 receptor antagonist (promethazine) or with dual histamine-serotonin inhibitor (cyproheptadine) failed in inhibiting both effects. In groups pretreated with captopril (angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor) the edema was unaltered, but nociception was clearly increased, suggesting the participation of kinins in the pathophysiology of the nociception but not of the edema-forming effect of PpV. When PpV was treated with EDTA, the nociception was similar to the one induced by untreated venom, but edema was markedly reduced. We concluded that PpV-induced edema and nociception have cyclooxygenase eicosanoids as the main mediators and no participation of vasoactive amines. Kinins seem to participate in nociception but not in edema induced by PpV. The results also suggest that metalloproteinases are the main compounds responsible for the edema, but not for the nociception induced by this venom. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  14. Comparing the effects of sustained and transient spatial attention on the orienting towards and the processing of electrical nociceptive stimuli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubbe, van der Rob H.J.; Blom, Jorian H.G.; Kleine, de Elian; Bohlmeijer, Ernst T.

    2017-01-01

    We examined whether sustained vs. transient spatial attention differentially affect the processing of electrical nociceptive stimuli. Cued nociceptive stimuli of a relevant intensity (low or high) on the left or right forearm required a foot pedal press. The cued side varied trial wise in the transi

  15. Spinal Cord Stimulation Modulates Gene Expression in the Spinal Cord of an Animal Model of Peripheral Nerve Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilley, Dana M; Cedeño, David L; Kelley, Courtney A; Benyamin, Ramsin; Vallejo, Ricardo

    Previously, we found that application of pulsed radiofrequency to a peripheral nerve injury induces changes in key genes regulating nociception concurrent with alleviation of paw sensitivity in an animal model. In the current study, we evaluated such genes after applying spinal cord stimulation (SCS) therapy. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 6 per group) were randomized into test and control groups. The spared nerve injury model was used to simulate a neuropathic pain state. A 4-contact microelectrode was implanted at the L1 vertebral level and SCS was applied continuously for 72 hours. Mechanical hyperalgesia was tested. Spinal cord tissues were collected and analyzed using real-time polymerase chain reaction to quantify levels of IL1β, GABAbr1, subP, Na/K ATPase, cFos, 5HT3ra, TNFα, Gal, VIP, NpY, IL6, GFAP, ITGAM, and BDNF. Paw withdrawal thresholds significantly decreased in spared nerve injury animals and stimulation attenuated sensitivity within 24 hours (P = 0.049), remaining significant through 72 hours (P = 0.003). Nerve injury caused up-regulation of TNFα, GFAP, ITGAM, and cFOS as well as down-regulation of Na/K ATPase. Spinal cord stimulation therapy modulated the expression of 5HT3ra, cFOS, and GABAbr1. Strong inverse relationships in gene expression relative to the amount of applied current were observed for GABAbr1 (R = -0.65) and Na/K ATPase (R = -0.58), and a positive linear correlations between 5HT3r (R = 0.80) and VIP (R = 0.50) were observed. Continuously applied SCS modulates expression of key genes involved in the regulation of neuronal membrane potential.

  16. Is early cord clamping, delayed cord clamping or cord milking best?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatansever, Binay; Demirel, Gamze; Ciler Eren, Elif; Erel, Ozcan; Neselioglu, Salim; Karavar, Hande Nur; Gundogdu, Semra; Ulfer, Gozde; Bahadir, Selcen; Tastekin, Ayhan

    2017-03-20

    To compare the antioxidant status of three cord clamping procedures (early clamping, delayed clamping and milking) by analyzing the thiol-disulfide balance. This randomized controlled study enrolled 189 term infants who were divided into three groups according to the cord clamping procedure: early clamping, delayed clamping and milking. Blood samples were collected from the umbilical arteries immediately after clamping, and the thiol/disulfide homeostasis was analyzed. The native and total thiol levels were significantly (p cord clamping group compared with the other two groups. The disulfide/total thiol ratio was significantly (p = .026) lower in the delayed cord clamping and milking groups compared with the early clamping groups. Early cord clamping causes the production of more disulfide bonds and lower thiol levels, indicating that oxidation reactions are increased in the early cord clamping procedure compared with the delayed cord clamping and milking procedures. The oxidant capacity is greater with early cord clamping than with delayed clamping or cord milking. Delayed cord clamping or milking are beneficial in neonatal care, and we suggest that they be performed routinely in all deliveries.

  17. Sonography of the umbilical cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudiak, C M; Salomon, C G; Posniak, H V; Olson, M C; Flisak, M E

    1995-09-01

    Knowledge of the development, normal sonographic appearance, and potential abnormalities of the umbilical cord is important in fetal assessment. The umbilical cord can be visualized throughout most of gestation and is detectable sonographically soon after visualization of the fetal pole. The normal umbilical cord is 50-60 cm long and may coil as many as 40 times, usually to the left. Abnormalities in umbilical cord size, degree of coiling, attachment, and position can have important implications for the outcome of the pregnancy. Structural abnormalities of the umbilical cord such as single umbilical artery, knots, cysts, and tumors may be associated with fetal distress or malformations. Color Doppler ultrasound (US) is useful in the identification and evaluation of structural abnormalities of the cord. By allowing measurement of blood flow velocity in the umbilical artery, duplex Doppler US may provide additional information in the evaluation of intrauterine growth retardation and twin-twin transfusion syndrome.

  18. Pannexin 1: a novel participant in neuropathic pain signaling in the rat spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, David; Ibarra, Paula; Retamal, Jeffri; Pelissier, Teresa; Laurido, Claudio; Hernandez, Alejandro; Constandil, Luis

    2014-10-01

    Pannexin 1 (panx1) is a large-pore membrane channel expressed in many tissues of mammals, including neurons and glial cells. Panx1 channels are highly permeable to calcium and adenosine triphosphatase (ATP); on the other hand, they can be opened by ATP and glutamate, two crucial molecules for acute and chronic pain signaling in the spinal cord dorsal horn, thus suggesting that panx1 could be a key component for the generation of central sensitization during persistent pain. In this study, we examined the effect of three panx1 blockers, namely, 10panx peptide, carbenoxolone, and probenecid, on C-reflex wind-up activity and mechanical nociceptive behavior in a spared nerve injury neuropathic rat model involving sural nerve transection. In addition, the expression of panx1 protein in the dorsal horn of the ipsilateral lumbar spinal cord was measured in sural nerve-transected and sham-operated control rats. Sural nerve transection resulted in a lower threshold for C-reflex activation by electric stimulation of the injured hindpaw, together with persistent mechanical hypersensitivity to pressure stimuli applied to the paw. Intrathecal administration of the panx1 blockers significantly depressed the spinal C-reflex wind-up activity in both neuropathic and sham control rats, and decreased mechanical hyperalgesia in neuropathic rats without affecting the nociceptive threshold in sham animals. Western blotting showed that panx1 was similarly expressed in the dorsal horn of lumbar spinal cord from neuropathic and sham rats. The present results constitute the first evidence that panx1 channels play a significant role in the mechanisms underlying central sensitization in neuropathic pain. Copyright © 2014 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. BOLD MRI of the human cervical spinal cord at 3 tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroman, P W; Nance, P W; Ryner, L N

    1999-09-01

    The feasibility of functional MRI of the spinal cord was investigated by carrying out blood oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) imaging of the human cervical spinal cord at a field of 3 T. BOLD imaging of the cervical spinal cord showed an average intensity increase of 7.0% during repeated exercise with the dominant hand with a return to baseline during rest periods. The areas of activation were predominantly on the same side of the spinal cord as the hand performing the exercise, between the levels of the sixth cervical and first thoracic spinal cord segments. The direct correspondence between these areas and those involved with the transmission of motor impulses to the hand, and reception of sensory information from the hand, demonstrates that spinal functional magnetic resonance imaging is feasible. Magn Reson Med 42:571-576, 1999. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Reversal of TRESK Downregulation Alleviates Neuropathic Pain by Inhibiting Activation of Gliocytes in the Spinal Cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jun; Chen, Hongtao; Yang, Chengxiang; Zhong, Jiying; He, Wanyou; Xiong, Qingming

    2017-02-03

    Despite the consensus that activation of TWIK-related spinal cord K(+) (TRESK) might contribute to the pathogenesis of chronic pain, the specific mechanisms underlying the transfer and development of pain signals still remain obscure. In the present study, we validated that TRESK was expressed in neurons instead of glial cells. Furthermore, in the SNI model of neuropathic pain (NP), downregulation of TRESK in spinal cord neurons resulted in upregulation of connexin 36 (Cx36) and connexin 43 (Cx43), both being subtypes of gap junctions in the spinal cord, with gliocytes in the spinal cord activated ultimately. Compared with SNI rats, intrathecal injection of TRESK gene recombinant adenovirus significantly downregulated the expression levels of Cx36 and Cx43 and suppressed the activation of gliocytes in the spinal cord, with hyperalgesia significantly reduced. In conclusion, TRESK contributes to the pathogenesis of NP by upregulation of synaptic transmission and activation of gliocytes.

  1. Pain and nociception: mechanisms of cancer-induced bone pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Sarah; Dickenson, Anthony H

    2014-06-01

    Cancer pain, especially pain caused by metastasis to bone, is a severe type of pain, and unless the cause and consequences can be resolved, the pain will become chronic. As detection and survival among patients with cancer have improved, pain has become an increasing challenge, because traditional therapies are often only partially effective. Until recently, knowledge of cancer pain mechanisms was poor compared with understanding of neuropathic and inflammatory pain states. We now view cancer-induced bone pain as a complex pain state involving components of both inflammatory and neuropathic pain but also exhibiting elements that seem unique to cancer pain. In addition, the pain state is often unpredictable, and the intensity of the pain is highly variable, making it difficult to manage. The establishment of translational animal models has started to reveal some of the molecular components involved in cancer pain. We present the essential pharmacologic and neurobiologic mechanisms involved in the generation and continuance of cancer-induced bone pain and discuss these in the context of understanding and treating patients. We discuss changes in peripheral signaling in the area of tumor growth, examine spinal cord mechanisms of sensitization, and finally address central processing. Our aim is to provide a mechanistic background for the sensory characteristics of cancer-induced bone pain as a basis for better understanding and treating this condition.

  2. Effect of galanin on substance P- and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide-induced nociceptive trigemino-hypoglossal reflex in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubrzycka, M; Janecka, A

    2007-09-01

    Substance P (SP), vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) and galanin (GAL), present in primary sensory neurons, are involved in transmission of nociceptive signaling from the peripheral to central nervous system. In this study we investigated the effect of GAL on SP-induced or VIP-induced evoked tongue jerks (ETJ) in response to noxious tooth pulp stimulation during perfusion of the cerebral ventricles with SP or VIP solutions. The experiments were carried out on rats under chloralose anesthesia. It was shown that both, SP and VIP, perfused through the cerebral ventricles enhanced the ETJ amplitude as compared with control, but the effect produced by SP was stronger. The intracerebroventricular perfusion of GAL 5 minutes before SP caused a dose-dependent inhibition of SP-induced ETJ, whereas GAL perfused through the cerebral ventricles 5 minutes before VIP did not reduce the excitatory effect of VIP on ETJ. These results indicate that the antinociceptive effect of GAL perfused through the cerebral ventricles, tested on the trigemino-hypoglossal reflex in rats, is specifically mediated by the SP-ergic system.

  3. Neuropeptides amplify and focus the monoaminergic inhibition of nociception in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hapiak, Vera; Summers, Philip; Ortega, Amanda; Law, Wen Jing; Stein, Andrew; Komuniecki, Richard

    2013-08-28

    Monoamines and neuropeptides interact to modulate most behaviors. To better understand these interactions, we have defined the roles of tyramine (TA), octopamine, and neuropeptides in the inhibition of aversive behavior in Caenorhabditis elegans. TA abolishes the serotonergic sensitization of aversive behavior mediated by the two nociceptive ASH sensory neurons and requires the expression of the adrenergic-like, Gαq-coupled, TA receptor TYRA-3 on inhibitory monoaminergic and peptidergic neurons. For example, TA inhibition requires Gαq and Gαs signaling in the peptidergic ASI sensory neurons, with an array of ASI neuropeptides activating neuropeptide receptors on additional neurons involved in locomotory decision-making. The ASI neuropeptides required for tyraminergic inhibition are distinct from those required for octopaminergic inhibition, suggesting that individual monoamines stimulate the release of different subsets of ASI neuropeptides. Together, these results demonstrate that a complex humoral mix of monoamines is focused by more local, synaptic, neuropeptide release to modulate nociception and highlight the similarities between the tyraminergic/octopaminergic inhibition of nociception in C. elegans and the noradrenergic inhibition of nociception in mammals that also involves inhibitory peptidergic signaling.

  4. Effects of visual cortex activation on the nociceptive blink reflex in healthy subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona L Sava

    Full Text Available Bright light can cause excessive visual discomfort, referred to as photophobia. The precise mechanisms linking luminance to the trigeminal nociceptive system supposed to mediate this discomfort are not known. To address this issue in healthy human subjects we modulated differentially visual cortex activity by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS or flash light stimulation, and studied the effect on supraorbital pain thresholds and the nociceptive-specific blink reflex (nBR. Low frequency rTMS that inhibits the underlying cortex, significantly decreased pain thresholds, increased the 1st nBR block ipsi- and contralaterally and potentiated habituation contralaterally. After high frequency or sham rTMS over the visual cortex, and rMS over the right greater occipital nerve we found no significant change. By contrast, excitatory flash light stimulation increased pain thresholds, decreased the 1st nBR block of ipsi- and contralaterally and increased habituation contralaterally. Our data demonstrate in healthy subjects a functional relation between the visual cortex and the trigeminal nociceptive system, as assessed by the nociceptive blink reflex. The results argue in favour of a top-down inhibitory pathway from the visual areas to trigemino-cervical nociceptors. We postulate that in normal conditions this visuo-trigeminal inhibitory pathway may avoid disturbance of vision by too frequent blinking and that hypoactivity of the visual cortex for pathological reasons may promote headache and photophobia.

  5. Long-term potentiation in spinal nociceptive pathways as a novel target for pain therapy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruscheweyh, R.; Wilder-Smith, O.H.G.; Drdla, R.; Liu, X.G.; Sandkuhler, J.

    2011-01-01

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) in nociceptive spinal pathways shares several features with hyperalgesia and has been proposed to be a cellular mechanism of pain amplification in acute and chronic pain states. Spinal LTP is typically induced by noxious input and has therefore been hypothesized to contr

  6. Dry needle stimulation of myofascial trigger points evokes segmental anti-nociceptive effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srbely, John Z; Dickey, James P; Lee, David; Lowerison, Mark

    2010-05-01

    To test the hypothesis that dry needle stimulation of a myofascial trigger point (sensitive locus) evokes segmental anti-nociceptive effects. Double-blind randomized controlled trial. Forty subjects (21 males, 19 females). Test subjects received intramuscular dry needle puncture to a right supraspinatus trigger point (C4,5); controls received sham intramuscular dry needle puncture. Pain pressure threshold (PPT) readings were recorded from right infraspinatus (C5,6) and right gluteus medius (L4,5S1) trigger points at 0 (pre-needling baseline), 1, 3, 5, 10 and 15 min post-needling and normalized to baseline values. The supraspinatus and infraspinatus trigger points are neurologically linked at C5; the supraspinatus and gluteus medius are segmentally unrelated. The difference between the infraspinatus and gluteus medius PPT values (PPTseg) represents a direct measure of the segmental anti-nociceptive effects acting at the infraspinatus trigger point. Significant increases in PPTseg were observed in test subjects at 3 (p = 0.002) and 5 (p = 0.015) min post-needling, compared with controls. One intervention of dry needle stimulation to a single trigger point (sensitive locus) evokes short-term segmental anti-nociceptive effects. These results suggest that trigger point (sensitive locus) stimulation may evoke anti-nociceptive effects by modulating segmental mechanisms, which may be an important consideration in the management of myofascial pain.

  7. Is the Nociceptive Blink Reflex Associated with Psychological Factors in Healthy Participants?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Costa, Yuri; Baad-Hansen, Lene; Bonjardim, Leonardo Rigoldi;

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: To evaluate the possible association between the nociceptive blink reflex (nBR) and various pain-related psychological measures: the Anxiety Sensitivity Index-3 (ASI-3), the Fear of Pain Questionnaire III (FPQ-III), the Pain Vigilance and Awareness Questionnaire (PVAQ), the Somatosensory...

  8. Heritability of nociception IV: neuropathic pain assays are genetically distinct across methods of peripheral nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Erin E; Costigan, Michael; Herbert, Teri A; Lariviere, William R

    2014-05-01

    Prior genetic correlation analysis of 22 heritable behavioral measures of nociception and hypersensitivity in the mouse identified 5 genetically distinct pain types. In the present study, we reanalyzed that dataset and included the results of an additional 9 assays of nociception and hypersensitivity, with the following goals: to replicate the previously identified 5 pain types; to test whether any of the newly added pain assays represent novel genetically distinct pain types; and to test the level of genetic relatedness among 9 commonly used neuropathic pain assays. Multivariate analysis of pairwise correlations between assays shows that the newly added zymosan-induced heat hypersensitivity assay does not conform to the 2 previously identified groups of heat hypersensitivity assays and cyclophosphamide-induced cystitis, the first organ-specific visceral pain model examined, is genetically distinct from other inflammatory assays. The 4 included mechanical hypersensitivity assays are genetically distinct and do not comprise a single pain type as previously reported. Among the 9 neuropathic pain assays including autotomy, chemotherapy, nerve ligation and spared nerve injury assays, at least 4 genetically distinct types of neuropathic sensory abnormalities were identified, corresponding to differences in nerve injury method. In addition, 2 itch assays and Comt genotype were compared to the expanded set of nociception and hypersensitivity assays. Comt genotype was strongly related only to spontaneous inflammatory nociception assays. These results indicate the priority for continued investigation of genetic mechanisms in several assays newly identified to represent genetically distinct pain types.

  9. Nociception-related somatosensory evoked potentials in awake dogs recorded after intra epidermal electrical stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oostrom, H.; Stienen, P.J.; Doornenbal, A.; Hellebrekers, L.J.

    2009-01-01

    Eur J Pain. 2009 Feb;13(2):154-60. Epub 2008 May 16. Nociception-related somatosensory evoked potentials in awake dogs recorded after intra epidermal electrical stimulation. van Oostrom H, Stienen PJ, Doornenbal A, Hellebrekers LJ. Department of Clinical Sciences of Companion Animals, Division Anest

  10. Neural correlates of heterotopic facilitation induced after high frequency electrical stimulation of nociceptive pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broeke, E.N. van den; Heck, C.H. van; Rijn, C.M. van; Wilder-Smith, O.H.G.

    2011-01-01

    Background High frequency electrical stimulation (HFS) of primary nociceptive afferents in humans induce a heightened sensitivity in the surrounding non-stimulated skin area. Several studies suggest that this heterotopic effect is the result of central (spinal) plasticity. The aim of this study is t

  11. Reliability of Subjective Pain Ratings and Nociceptive Flexion Reflex Responses as Measures of Conditioned Pain Modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Jurth

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The endogenous modulation of pain can be assessed through conditioned pain modulation (CPM, which can be quantified using subjective pain ratings or nociceptive flexion reflexes. However, to date, the test-retest reliability has only been investigated for subjective pain ratings.

  12. Exteroceptive aspects of nociception: insights from graphesthesia and two-point discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mørch, Carsten Dahl; Andersen, Ole K; Quevedo, Alexandre S; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Coghill, Robert C

    2010-10-01

    The exteroceptive capabilities of the nociceptive system have long been thought to be considerably more limited than those of the tactile system. However, most investigations of spatio-temporal aspects of the nociceptive system have largely focused on intensity coding as consequence of spatial or temporal summation. Graphesthesia, the identification of numbers "written" on the skin, and assessment of the two-point discrimination thresholds were used to compare the exteroceptive capabilities of the tactile and nociceptive systems. Numbers were "written" on the forearm and the abdomen by tactile stimulation and by painful non-contact infrared laser heat stimulation. Subjects performed both graphesthesia tasks better than chance. The tactile graphesthesia tasks were performed with 89% (82-97%) correct responses on the forearm and 86% (79-94%) correct responses on the abdomen. Tactile graphesthesia tasks were significantly better than painful heat graphesthesia tasks that were performed with 31% (23-40%) and 44% (37-51%) correct responses on the forearm and abdomen, respectively. These findings demonstrate that the central nervous system is capable of assembling complex spatio-temporal patterns of nociceptive information from the body surface into unified mental objects with sufficient accuracy to enable behavioral discrimination.

  13. Transmission eigenvalues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakoni, Fioralba; Haddar, Houssem

    2013-10-01

    In inverse scattering theory, transmission eigenvalues can be seen as the extension of the notion of resonant frequencies for impenetrable objects to the case of penetrable dielectrics. The transmission eigenvalue problem is a relatively late arrival to the spectral theory of partial differential equations. Its first appearance was in 1986 in a paper by Kirsch who was investigating the denseness of far-field patterns for scattering solutions of the Helmholtz equation or, in more modern terminology, the injectivity of the far-field operator [1]. The paper of Kirsch was soon followed by a more systematic study by Colton and Monk in the context of developing the dual space method for solving the inverse scattering problem for acoustic waves in an inhomogeneous medium [2]. In this paper they showed that for a spherically stratified media transmission eigenvalues existed and formed a discrete set. Numerical examples were also given showing that in principle transmission eigenvalues could be determined from the far-field data. This first period of interest in transmission eigenvalues was concluded with papers by Colton et al in 1989 [3] and Rynne and Sleeman in 1991 [4] showing that for an inhomogeneous medium (not necessarily spherically stratified) transmission eigenvalues, if they existed, formed a discrete set. For the next seventeen years transmission eigenvalues were ignored. This was mainly due to the fact that, with the introduction of various sampling methods to determine the shape of an inhomogeneous medium from far-field data, transmission eigenvalues were something to be avoided and hence the fact that transmission eigenvalues formed at most a discrete set was deemed to be sufficient. In addition, questions related to the existence of transmission eigenvalues or the structure of associated eigenvectors were recognized as being particularly difficult due to the nonlinearity of the eigenvalue problem and the special structure of the associated transmission

  14. Changes in thermal nociceptive responses in dairy cows following experimentally induced Escherichia coli mastitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaas Ilka C

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mastitis is a high incidence disease in dairy cows. The acute stage is considered painful and inflammation can lead to hyperalgesia and thereby contribute to decreased welfare. The aim of this study was to examine changes in nociceptive responses toward cutaneous nociceptive laser stimulation (NLS in dairy cows with experimentally induced Escherichia coli mastitis, and correlate behavioral changes in nociceptive responses to clinical and paraclinical variables. Methods Seven Danish Holstein-Friesian cows were kept in tie-stalls, where the E. coli associated mastitis was induced and laser stimulations were conducted. Measurements of rectal temperature, somatic cell counts, white blood cell counts and E. coli counts were conducted. Furthermore, scores were given for anorexia, local udder inflammation and milk appearance to quantify the local and systemic disease response. In order to quantify the nociceptive threshold, behavioral responses toward cutaneous NLS applied to six skin areas at the tarsus/metatarsus and udder hind quarters were registered at evening milking on day 0 (control and days 1, 2, 3, 6 and 10 after experimental induction of mastitis. Results All clinical and paraclinical variables were affected by the induced mastitis. All cows were clinically ill on days 1 and 2. The cows responded behaviorally toward the NLS. For hind leg stimulation, the proportion of cows responding by stepping was higher on day 0 than days 3 and 6, and the frequency of leg movements after laser stimulation tended to decrease on day 1 compared to the other days. After udder stimulation, the proportion of cows responding by stepping was higher on day 1 than on all other days of testing. Significant correlations between the clinical and paraclinical variables of disease and the behavioral responses toward nociceptive stimulation were found. Conclusions Changes in behavioral responses coincide with peaks in local and systemic signs of E

  15. Neonatal nociception elevated baseline blood pressure and attenuated cardiovascular responsiveness to noxious stress in adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Ya-Chun; Yang, Cheryl C H; Lin, Ho-Tien; Chen, Pin-Tarng; Chang, Kuang-Yi; Yang, Shun-Chin; Kuo, Terry B J

    2012-10-01

    Neonatal nociception has significant long-term effects on sensory perception in adult animals. Although neonatal adverse experience affect future responsiveness to stressors is documented, little is known about the involvement of early nociceptive experiences in the susceptibility to subsequent nociceptive stress exposure during adulthood. The aim of this study is to explore the developmental change in cardiovascular regulating activity in adult rats that had been subjected to neonatal nociceptive insults. To address this question, we treated neonatal rats with an intraplantar injection of saline (control) or carrageenan at postnatal day 1. The carrageenan-treated rats exhibited generalized hypoalgesia at basal state, and localized hyperalgesia after re-nociceptive challenge induced by intraplantar injections of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) as adults. Then we recorded baseline cardiovascular variables and 24-h responsiveness to an injection of CFA in the free-moving adult rats with telemetric technique. The carrageenan-treated rats showed significantly higher basal blood pressures (110.3±3.16 vs. control 97.0±4.28 mmHg). In control animals, baroreceptor reflex sensitivity (BRS) decreased, sympathetic vasomotor activity increased, and parasympathetic activity was inhibited after CFA injection. Blood pressure elevation was evident (107.0±2.75 vs. pre-injection 97.0±4.28 mmHg). Comparatively, the carrageenan-treated rats showed a higher BRS (BrrLF 1.03±0.09 vs. control 0.70±0.06 ms/mmHg) and higher parasympathetic activity [0.93±0.17 vs. control 0.32±0.02 ln(ms²)] after CFA injection. The change in blood pressure is negligible (111.9±4.05 vs. pre-injection 110.3±3.16 mmHg). Our research has shown that neonatal nociception alters future pain sensation, raises basal blood pressure level, and attenuates cardiovascular responsiveness to nociceptive stress in adult rats.

  16. Consequences of a human TRPA1 genetic variant on the perception of nociceptive and olfactory stimuli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Schütz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: TRPA1 ion channels are involved in nociception and are also excited by pungent odorous substances. Based on reported associations of TRPA1 genetics with increased sensitivity to thermal pain stimuli, we therefore hypothesized that this association also exists for increased olfactory sensitivity. METHODS: Olfactory function and nociception was compared between carriers (n = 38 and non-carriers (n = 43 of TRPA1 variant rs11988795 G>A, a variant known to enhance cold pain perception. Olfactory function was quantified by assessing the odor threshold, odor discrimination and odor identification, and by applying 200-ms pulses of H2S intranasal. Nociception was assessed by measuring pain thresholds to experimental nociceptive stimuli (blunt pressure, electrical stimuli, cold and heat stimuli, and 200-ms intranasal pulses of CO2. RESULTS: Among the 11 subjects with moderate hyposmia, carriers of the minor A allele (n = 2 were underrepresented (34 carriers among the 70 normosmic subjects; p = 0.049. Moreover, carriers of the A allele discriminated odors significantly better than non-carriers (13.1±1.5 versus 12.3±1.6 correct discriminations and indicated a higher intensity of the H2S stimuli (29.2±13.2 versus 21±12.8 mm VAS, p = 0.006, which, however, could not be excluded to have involved a trigeminal component during stimulation. Finally, the increased sensitivity to thermal pain could be reproduced. CONCLUSIONS: The findings are in line with a previous association of a human TRPA1 variant with nociceptive parameters and extend the association to the perception of odorants. However, this addresses mainly those stimulants that involve a trigeminal component whereas a pure olfactory effect may remain disputable. Nevertheless, findings suggest that future TRPA1 modulating drugs may modify the perception of odorants.

  17. Deletion of ENTPD3 does not impair nucleotide hydrolysis in primary somatosensory neurons or spinal cord [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/3rm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric McCoy

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Ectonucleotidases are membrane-bound or secreted proteins that hydrolyze extracellular nucleotides.  Recently, we identified three ectonucleotidases that hydrolyze extracellular adenosine 5’-monophosphate (AMP to adenosine in primary somatosensory neurons.  Currently, it is unclear which ectonucleotidases hydrolyze ATP and ADP in these neurons.  Ectonucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases (ENTPDs comprise a class of enzymes that dephosphorylate extracellular ATP and ADP.  Here, we found that ENTPD3 (also known as NTPDase3 or CD39L3 was located in nociceptive and non-nociceptive neurons of the dorsal root ganglion (DRG, in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord, and in free nerve endings in the skin.  To determine if ENTPD3 contributes directly to ATP and ADP hydrolysis in these tissues, we generated and characterized an Entpd3 knockout mouse.  This mouse lacks ENTPD3 protein in all tissues examined, including the DRG, spinal cord, skin, and bladder.  However, DRG and spinal cord tissues from Entpd3-/- mice showed no reduction in histochemical staining when ATP, ADP, AMP, or UTP were used as substrates.  Additionally, using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV, adenosine production was not impaired in the dorsal spinal cord of Entpd3-/- mice when the substrate ADP was applied.  Further, Entpd3-/- mice did not differ in nociceptive behaviors when compared to wild-type mice, although Entpd3-/- mice showed a modest reduction in β-alanine-mediated itch.  Taken together, our data indicate that deletion of Entpd3 does not impair ATP or ADP hydrolysis in primary somatosensory neurons or in dorsal spinal cord.  Moreover, our data suggest there could be multiple ectonucleotidases that act redundantly to hydrolyze nucleotides in these regions of the nervous system.

  18. Biomarkers in spinal cord injury.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pouw, M.H.; Hosman, A.J.F.; Middendorp, J.J. van; Verbeek, M.M.; Vos, P.E.; Meent, H. van de

    2009-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Literature review. OBJECTIVES: In traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI), much effort has been put into the evaluation of SCI severity and the prediction of recovery potential. An accurate prediction of the initial damage of the spinal cord that differentiates between the severities of SCI

  19. Cutting the Cord-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    This animation shows the view from the rear hazard avoidance cameras on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit as the rover turns 45 degrees clockwise. This maneuver is the first step in a 3-point turn that will rotate the rover 115 degrees to face west. The rover must make this turn before rolling off the lander because airbags are blocking it from exiting from the front lander petal. Before this crucial turn took place, engineers instructed the rover to cut the final cord linking it to the lander. The turn took around 30 minutes to complete.

  20. Cutting the Cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    This animation shows the view from the front hazard avoidance cameras on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit as the rover turns 45 degrees clockwise. This maneuver is the first step in a 3-point turn that will rotate the rover 115 degrees to face west. The rover must make this turn before rolling off the lander because airbags are blocking it from exiting off the front lander petal. Before this crucial turn could take place, engineers instructed the rover to cut the final cord linking it to the lander. The turn took around 30 minutes to complete.

  1. Janus molecule I: dichotomous effects of COMT in neuropathic vs nociceptive pain modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segall, S K; Maixner, W; Belfer, I; Wiltshire, T; Seltzer, Z; Diatchenko, L

    2012-05-01

    The enzyme catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) has been shown to play a critical role in pain perception by regulating levels of epinephrine (Epi) and norepinephrine (NE). Although the key contribution of catecholamines to the perception of pain has been recognized for a long time, there is a clear dichotomy of observations. More than a century of research has demonstrated that increasing adrenergic transmission in the spinal cord decreases pain sensitivity in animals. Equally abundant evidence demonstrates the opposite effect of adrenergic signaling in the peripheral nervous system, where adrenergic signaling increases pain sensitivity. Viewing pain processing within spinal and peripheral compartments and determining the directionality of adrenergic signaling helps clarify the seemingly contradictory findings of the pain modulatory properties of adrenergic receptor agonists and antagonists presented in other reviews. Available evidence suggests that adrenergic signaling contributes to pain phenotypes through α(1/2) and β(2/3) receptors. While stimulation of α(2) adrenergic receptors seems to uniformly produce analgesia, stimulation of α(1) or β receptors produces either analgesic or hyperalgesic effects. Establishing the directionality of adrenergic receptor modulation of pain processing, and related COMT activity in different pain models are needed to bring meaning to recent human molecular genetic findings. This will enable the translation of current findings into meaningful clinical applications such as diagnostic markers and novel therapeutic targets for complex human pain conditions.

  2. Biciliated ependymal cell proliferation contributes to spinal cord growth

    OpenAIRE

    Alfaro-Cervello, Clara; Soriano-Navarro, Mario; Mirzadeh, Zaman; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo; García Verdugo, José Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Two neurogenic regions have been described in the adult brain, the lateral ventricle subventricular zone and the dentate gyrus subgranular zone. It has been suggested that neural stem cells also line the central canal of the adult spinal cord. Using transmission and scanning electron microscopy and immunostaining, we describe here the organization and cell types of the central canal epithelium in adult mice. The identity of dividing cells was determined by three-dimensional ultrastructural re...

  3. Vocal cord dysfunction in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyes, Blakeslee E; Kemp, James S

    2007-06-01

    Vocal cord dysfunction is characterised by paradoxical vocal cord adduction that occurs during inspiration, resulting in symptoms of dyspnoea, wheeze, chest or throat tightness and cough. Although the condition is well described in children and adults, confusion with asthma often triggers the use of an aggressive treatment regimen directed against asthma. The laryngoscopic demonstration of vocal cord adduction during inspiration has been considered the gold standard for the diagnosis of vocal cord dysfunction, but historical factors and pulmonary function findings may provide adequate clues to the correct diagnosis. Speech therapy, and in some cases psychological counselling, is often beneficial in this disorder. The natural course and prognosis of vocal cord dysfunction are still not well described in adults or children.

  4. 依托咪酯对离体大鼠脊髓运动神经元感觉传入的差异性作用%Etomidate (ET) produced differential effects on afferent sensory transmission to motor neurons (MNs) in neonatal rat spinal cord slices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑超; 汪萌芽

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of anesthetic ET treatment on afferent sensory-motor transmission m neonatal rat spinal cord ex vivo and the underlying mechanisms.Methods Spinal cord slices from neonatal rats (7 - 14 days postnatal) were treated with ET at different concentrations.The conventional recording techniques for intracellular electrophysiological parameters were employed for the analysis of the dorsal root (DR) electric stimulation elicited excitatory postsynaptic potential (DR-EPSP) in MNs.Results ET concentration-dependently suppressed the action potential (AP) and the frequency of firing in MNs.As compared to un-treated control,at 0.3,3.0 (clinical concentration 0.8 -20.0 rimol/L) and 30.O ymol/L,ET significantly (Pcord ex vivo.At certain concentration,its effect is differential for DR-EPSP and the glutamate receptors mediating the afferents sensory-MN transmission.%目的 了解全麻药依托咪酯(ET)对新生大鼠离体脊髓运动神经元(MN)感觉传入的作用及受体机制.方法 应用新生大鼠(7~14

  5. Retraining the injured spinal cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgerton, V. R.; Leon, R. D.; Harkema, S. J.; Hodgson, J. A.; London, N.; Reinkensmeyer, D. J.; Roy, R. R.; Talmadge, R. J.; Tillakaratne, N. J.; Timoszyk, W.; Tobin, A.

    2001-01-01

    The present review presents a series of concepts that may be useful in developing rehabilitative strategies to enhance recovery of posture and locomotion following spinal cord injury. First, the loss of supraspinal input results in a marked change in the functional efficacy of the remaining synapses and neurons of intraspinal and peripheral afferent (dorsal root ganglion) origin. Second, following a complete transection the lumbrosacral spinal cord can recover greater levels of motor performance if it has been exposed to the afferent and intraspinal activation patterns that are associated with standing and stepping. Third, the spinal cord can more readily reacquire the ability to stand and step following spinal cord transection with repetitive exposure to standing and stepping. Fourth, robotic assistive devices can be used to guide the kinematics of the limbs and thus expose the spinal cord to the new normal activity patterns associated with a particular motor task following spinal cord injury. In addition, such robotic assistive devices can provide immediate quantification of the limb kinematics. Fifth, the behavioural and physiological effects of spinal cord transection are reflected in adaptations in most, if not all, neurotransmitter systems in the lumbosacral spinal cord. Evidence is presented that both the GABAergic and glycinergic inhibitory systems are up-regulated following complete spinal cord transection and that step training results in some aspects of these transmitter systems being down-regulated towards control levels. These concepts and observations demonstrate that (a) the spinal cord can interpret complex afferent information and generate the appropriate motor task; and (b) motor ability can be defined to a large degree by training.

  6. Synaptic development in the injured spinal cord cavity following co-transplantation of fetal spinal cord cells and autologous activated Schwann cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wendong Ruan; Yuan Xue; Ninghua Li; Xiaotao Zhao; Huajian Zhao; Peng Li

    2010-01-01

    Transplantation of activated transgenic Schwann cells or a fetal spinal cord cell suspension has been widely used to treat spinal cord injury. However, little is known regarding the effects of co-transplantation. In the present study, autologous Schwann cells in combination with a fetal spinal cord cell suspension were transplanted into adult Wistar rats with spinal cord injury, and newly generated axonal connections were observed ultrastructurally. Transmission electron microscopic observations showed that the neuroblast first presented cytoplasmic processes, followed by pre- and postsynaptic membranes with low electron density forming a dense projection. The number and types of synaptic vesicles were increased. Synaptic connections developed from single cell body-dendritic synapses into multiple cell body-dendritic anddendrite-dendritic synapses. In addition, the cell organs of the transplanted neuroblast, oligodendroblast and astroblast matured gradually. The blood-brain barrier appeared subsequently. Moreover, neurofilament, histamine, calcitonin-gene-related peptides, and glial fibrillary acidic protein positive fibers were observed in the transplant region. These findings demonstrate that fetal spinal cord cells in the presence of autologous activated Schwann cells can develop into mature synapses in the cavity of injured spinal cords, suggesting the possibility of information exchange through the reconstructed synapse between fetal spinal cord cells and the host.

  7. Umbilical cord blood transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Hong Hoe; Ahn, Hyo Seop

    2012-07-01

    Since the first umbilical cord blood transplantation (CBT) in 1998, cord blood (CB) has now become one of the most commonly used sources of hematopoietic stem cells for transplantation. CBT has advantages of easy procurement, no risk to donor, low risk of transmitting infections, immediate availability and immune tolerance allowing successful transplantation despite human leukocyte antigen disparity. Several studies have shown that the number of cells transplanted is the most important factor for engraftment in CBT, and it limits the wide use of CB in adult patients. New strategies for facilitating engraftment and reducing transplantation-related mortality are ongoing in the field of CBT and include the use of a reduced-intensity conditioning regimen, double-unit CBT, ex vivo expansion of CB, and co-transplantation of CB and mesenchymal stem cells. Recently, the results of two international studies with large sample sizes showed that CB is an acceptable alternative source of hematopoietic stem cells for adult recipients who lack human leukocyte antigen-matched adult donors. Along with the intensive researches, development in banking process of CB will amplify the use of CB and offer the chance for cure in more patients.

  8. Umbilical cord blood transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Hoe Koo

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Since the first umbilical cord blood transplantation (CBT in 1998, cord blood (CB has now become one of the most commonly used sources of hematopoietic stem cells for transplantation. CBT has advantages of easy procurement, no risk to donor, low risk of transmitting infections, immediate availability and immune tolerance allowing successful transplantation despite human leukocyte antigen disparity. Several studies have shown that the number of cells transplanted is the most important factor for engraftment in CBT, and it limits the wide use of CB in adult patients. New strategies for facilitating engraftment and reducing transplantation-related mortality are ongoing in the field of CBT and include the use of a reduced-intensity conditioning regimen, double-unit CBT, ex vivo expansion of CB, and co-transplantation of CB and mesenchymal stem cells. Recently, the results of two international studies with large sample sizes showed that CB is an acceptable alternative source of hematopoietic stem cells for adult recipients who lack human leukocyte antigen-matched adult donors. Along with the intensive researches, development in banking process of CB will amplify the use of CB and offer the chance for cure in more patients.

  9. Sensory Stimulation Prior to Spinal Cord Injury Induces Post-Injury Dysesthesia in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoschouer, Emily L.; Finseth, Taylor; Flinn, Sharon; Basso, D. Michele

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Chronic pain and dysesthesias are debilitating conditions that can arise following spinal cord injury (SCI). Research studies frequently employ rodent models of SCI to better understand the underlying mechanisms and develop better treatments for these phenomena. While evoked withdrawal tests can assess hypersensitivity in these SCI models, there is little consensus over how to evaluate spontaneous sensory abnormalities that are seen in clinical SCI subjects. Overgrooming (OG) and biting after peripheral nerve injury or spinal cord excitotoxic lesions are thought to be one behavioral demonstration of spontaneous neuropathic pain or dysesthesia. However, reports of OG after contusion SCI are largely anecdotal and conditions causing this response are poorly understood. The present study investigated whether repeated application of sensory stimuli to the trunk prior to mid-thoracic contusion SCI would induce OG after SCI in mice. One week prior to SCI or laminectomy, mice were subjected either to nociceptive and mechanical stimulation, mechanical stimulation only, the testing situation without stimulation, or no treatment. They were then examined for 14 days after surgery and the sizes and locations of OG sites were recorded on anatomical maps. Mice subjected to either stimulus paradigm showed increased OG compared with unstimulated or uninjured mice. Histological analysis showed no difference in spinal cord lesion size due to sensory stimulation, or between mice that overgroomed or did not overgroom. The relationship between prior stimulation and contusion injury in mice that display OG indicates a critical interaction that may underlie one facet of spontaneous neuropathic symptoms after SCI. PMID:20121420

  10. Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha in rat spinal cord after peripheral noxious stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benani, A; Heurtaux, T; Netter, P; Minn, A

    2004-10-07

    Following recurrent noxious stimulation, both functional modification and structural reorganization such as activation of the arachidonate cascade or axon sprouting occur in the central nervous system (CNS). It has been recently proposed that these alterations observed during chronic pain state were supported by an intensification of the lipid metabolism. In this regard, it has been shown that mRNA coding for several fatty acid metabolizing enzymes are up-regulated in the rat lumbar spinal cord in response to persistent nociception induced by a peripheral inflammation. As peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor (PPAR) could mediate such effects, we therefore investigated the activation of this transcription factor in the rat spinal cord following subcutaneous injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) into a hind paw. In this study, we compared the DNA-binding activity of nuclear proteins extracted from healthy and inflamed rats toward a PPAR response element. Using electrophoretic mobility-shift assay (EMSA), we found that only the PPARalpha isoform was activated in the rat spinal cord after CFA injection. This activation occurred rapidly, as early as 30 min post-CFA injection, and was persistent up to 10 h, reaching a maximum at 6h after CFA injection. In view of the consequences of PPARalpha activation in other tissues, these results suggest that fatty acid utilization is enhanced in the CNS during chronic pain state. Although the physiopathological relevance of PPARalpha activation during hyperalgesia needs further investigation, we provided here a new player in the molecular modeling of pain pathways.

  11. Attitudes Towards Individuals with Spinal Cord Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Cassandra Sligh D.; Gooden, Randy; Nowell, Jennifer; Wilson, Navodda

    2010-01-01

    This paper will shed light on the lives of persons with spinal cord injuries by revealing the literature on spinal cord injuries that focuses on research that can shed light on attitudes towards persons with spinal cord injuries. The background literature related to incidences, the definition of spinal cord injury, and vocational opportunities are…

  12. Effects of morphine and endomorphins on the polysynaptic reflex in the isolated rat spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Pao-Luh; Lai, Yong-Shang; Chow, Lok-Hi; Huang, Eagle Yi-Kung

    2005-01-01

    At the spinal level, mu-opioids exert their actions on nociceptive primary afferent neurons both pre- and postsynaptically. In the present study, we used an in vitro isolated neonatal rat (11-15 days old) spinal cord preparation to examine the effects of morphine and the endogenous mu-opioid ligands endomorphin-1 (EM-1) and endomorphin-2 (EM-2) on the polysynaptic reflex (PSR) of dorsal root-ventral root (DR-VR) reflex. The actions of mu-opioids on spinal nociception were investigated by quantification of the firing frequency and the mean amplitude of the PSR evoked by stimuli with 20 x threshold intensity. EM-1 decreased the mean amplitude of PSR, whereas EM-2 and morphine decreased the firing frequency. The pattern of the effects elicited by morphine was the same as that for EM-2, except at high concentration. Naloxonazine, a selective mu(1) opioid receptor antagonist, had no significant effect on PSR by itself, but blocked the inhibition of PSR firing frequency or amplitude induced by EM-1, -2 and morphine. This may suggest that EM-1, EM-2 and morphine modulate spinal nociception differently and act mainly at the mu(1)-opioid receptors. Although they all act via mu(1)-opioid receptors, their different effects on the PSR may suggest the existence of different subtypes of the mu(1)-opioid receptor. The present data is also consistent with a further hypothesis, namely, that morphine and EM-2 activate a subtype of mu(1)-opioid receptor presynaptically, while EM-1 acts mainly through another subtype postsynaptically. However, since other reports indicate that EM-2, but not EM-1, could stimulate the release of enkephalins or dynorphin, presynaptic delta and kappa receptors may be also involved indirectly in the different regulation by mu-opioids at the spinal level.

  13. Cardiac nociception in rats - Neuronal pathways and the influence of dermal neurostimulation on conveyance to the central nervous system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albutaihi, IAM; Hautvast, RWM; DeJongste, MJL; Ter Horst, GJ; Staal, MJ

    2003-01-01

    Neurostimulation for refractory angina pectoris is often advocated for its clinical efficacy. However, the recruited pathways to induce electroanalgesia are partially unknown. Therefore, we sought to study the effect of neurostimulation on experimentally induced cardiac nociception, using capsaicin

  14. Accuracy of the Composite Variability Index as a Measure of the Balance Between Nociception and, Antinociception During Anesthesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sahinovic, Marko; Eleveld, Douglas J.; Kalmar, Alain F.; Heeremans, Eleonora H.; De Smet, Tom; Seshagiri, Chandran V.; Absalom, Anthony R.; Vereecke, Hugo E. M.; Struys, Michel M. R. F.

    BACKGROUND: The Composite Variability Index (CVI), derived from the electroencephalogram, was developed to assess the antinociception-nociception balance, whereas the Bispectral Index (BIS) was developed to assess the hypnotic state during anesthesia. We studied the relationships between these

  15. Evidence for the presence of both peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors alpha and beta in the rat spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benani, A; Krémarik-Bouillaud, P; Bianchi, A; Netter, P; Minn, A; Dauça, M

    2003-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors belonging to the nuclear receptor superfamily. Different subtypes of PPARs (alpha, beta, and gamma) have been described. Their distinct physiological functions depend on their differential ligand activation profiles but also on their specific tissue expression. Previous studies have described their presence in the central nervous system. However, their expression in the adult rat spinal cord in normal physiological conditions has never been investigated. We demonstrated by using reverse-transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and Western blotting, the mRNA and protein expression of PPARalpha and PPARbeta, but not PPARgamma in cervical, thoracic, and lumbar segments of the spinal cord. Using immunohistochemistry, we also showed for the first time the specific cellular distribution of these transcription factors in the different segments of the spinal cord. In the gray matter, the distribution of PPARalpha was homogenous whereas PPARbeta was specifically localized in motoneurons and in medial part of laminae IV, V, VI, VII, VIII, and X. These latter areas are known as nociceptive afferent pathways to supra-spinal structures such as the medulla reticular nucleus and the thalamus. In the white matter, PPARalpha was localized exclusively in astrocytes while PPARbeta was present in oligodendrocytes. The possible functions of PPARalpha and PPARbeta expressed in both white and gray matters of the spinal cord will be discussed but need further studies.

  16. International Spinal Cord Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dvorak, M F; Itshayek, E; Fehlings, M G

    2015-01-01

    the final version. RESULTS: The data set consists of nine variables: (1) Intervention/Procedure Date and start time (2) Non-surgical bed rest and external immobilization, (3) Spinal intervention-closed manipulation and/or reduction of spinal elements, (4) Surgical procedure-approach, (5) Date and time......STUDY DESIGN: Survey of expert opinion, feedback and final consensus. OBJECTIVE: To describe the development and the variables included in the International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Spinal Interventions and Surgical Procedures Basic Data set. SETTING: International working group. METHODS...... of the completion of the intervention or surgical closure; (6) Surgical procedure-open reduction, (7) Surgical procedure-direct decompression of neural elements, and (8 and 9) Surgical procedure-stabilization and fusion (spinal segment number and level). All variables are coded using numbers or characters. Each...

  17. Neuropathic Pain Following Spinal Cord Injury: Mechanism, Assessment and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gul Mete Civelek

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury (SCI is a devastating disease which may cause physical, psychological and social dysfunction. Neuropathic pain (NP after SCI is common, can be seen in varying degrees and is one of the most difficultly treated problems developing after SCI. With the addition of the NP to loss of function after SCI, sleep patterns, moods and daily activities of patients are adversely affected. In order to treat pain effectively, classification of pain after SCI must be done carefully and correctly. According to classification of International Pain Study Group, pain after SCI is divided into two main groups as nociceptive and neuropathic pain. Neuropathic pain is defined as %u201Cpain occuring as a direct result of a disease or lesion directly affecting somato-sensorial system%u201D. NP after SCI can be classified according to anatomical region (above the level of lesion, at the level of lesion, below the level of lesion. Treatment of NP after SCI is often challenging and receiving response to treatment may take long time. Therefore, treatment of NP after SCI should be multifactorial. Treatment options include pharmochologic treatment, application of transcutanous electrical nerve stimulation, psychiatric treatment approaches, and surgical approaches in selected cases. In pharmachologic treatment, first line agents are tricyclic antidepresants, pregabalin and gabapentin. In this review, mechanisms and assessment and treatment of NP after SCI is discussed with the guide of current literature.

  18. Behavioral changes in brain-injured critical care adults with different levels of consciousness during nociceptive stimulation: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roulin, Marie-José; Ramelet, Anne-Sylvie

    2014-08-01

    The primary objective of this study was to describe the frequency of behaviors observed during rest, a non-nociceptive procedure, and a nociceptive procedure in brain-injured intensive care unit (ICU) patients with different levels of consciousness (LOC). Second, it examined the inter-rater reliability and discriminant and concurrent validity of the behavioral checklist used. The non-nociceptive procedure involved calling the patient and shaking his/her shoulder. The nociceptive procedure involved turning the patient. The frequency of behaviors was recorded using a behavioral checklist. Patients with absence of movement, or stereotyped flexion or extension responses to a nociceptive stimulus displayed more behaviors during turning (median 5.5, range 0-14) than patients with localized responses (median 4, range 0-10) or able to self-report their pain (median 4, range 0-10). Face flushing, clenched teeth, clenched fist, and tremor were more frequent in patients with absence of movement, or stereotyped responses to a nociceptive stimulus. The reliability of the checklist was supported by a high intra-class correlation coefficient (0.77-0.92), and the internal consistency was acceptable in all three groups (KR 20, 0.71-0.85). Discriminant validity was supported as significantly more behaviors were observed during nociceptive stimulation than at rest. Concurrent validity was confirmed as checklist scores were correlated to the patients' self-reports of pain (r s = 0.53; 95 % CI 0.21-0.75). Brain-injured patients reacted significantly more during a nociceptive stimulus and the number of observed behaviors was higher in patients with a stereotyped response.

  19. Inhibition of spinal cord dorsal horn neuronal activity by electrical stimulation of the cerebellar cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagains, Christopher E; Senapati, Arun K; Huntington, Paula J; He, Ji-Wei; Peng, Yuan B

    2011-11-01

    The cerebellum plays a major role in not only modulating motor activity, but also contributing to other functions, including nociception. The intermediate hemisphere of the cerebellum receives sensory input from the limbs. With the extensive connection between the cerebellum to brain-stem structures and cerebral cortex, it is possible that the cerebellum may facilitate the descending system to modulate spinal dorsal horn activity. This study provided the first evidence to support this hypothesis. Thirty-one wide-dynamic-range neurons from the left lumbar and 27 from the right lumbar spinal dorsal horn were recorded in response to graded mechanical stimulation (brush, pressure, and pinch) at the hind paws. Electrical stimulation of the cerebellar cortex of the left intermediate hemisphere significantly reduced spinal cord dorsal horn neuron-evoked responses bilaterally in response to peripheral high-intensity mechanical stimuli. It is concluded that the cerebellum may play a potential antinociceptive role, probably through activating descending inhibitory pathways indirectly.

  20. Neuropeptidergic Signaling and Active Feeding State Inhibit Nociception in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezcurra, Marina; Walker, Denise S.; Beets, Isabel; Swoboda, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Food availability and nutritional status are important cues affecting behavioral states. Here we report that, in Caenorhabditis elegans, a cascade of dopamine and neuropeptide signaling acts to inhibit nociception in food-poor environments. In the absence of food, animals show decreased sensitivity and increased adaptation to soluble repellents sensed by the polymodal ASH nociceptors. The effects of food on adaptation are affected by dopamine and neuropeptide signaling; dopamine acts via the DOP-1 receptor to decrease adaptation on food, whereas the neuropeptide receptors NPR-1 and NPR-2 act to increase adaptation off food. NPR-1 and NPR-2 function cell autonomously in the ASH neurons to increase adaptation off food, whereas the DOP-1 receptor controls neuropeptide release from interneurons that modulate ASH activity indirectly. These results indicate that feeding state modulates nociception through the interaction of monoamine and neuropeptide signaling pathways. PMID:26985027

  1. Experimental evidence for alleviating nociceptive hypersensitivity by single application of capsaicin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiao-Li; Zhang, Fang-Xiong; Dong, Fei; Bao, Lan; Zhang, Xu

    2015-04-22

    The single application of high-concentration of capsaicin has been used as an analgesic therapy of persistent pain. However, its effectiveness and underlying mechanisms remain to be further evaluated with experimental approaches. The present study provided evidence showing that the single application of capsaicin dose-dependently alleviated nociceptive hypersensitivity, and reduced the action potential firing in small-diameter neurons of the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) in rats and mice. Pre-treatment with capsaicin reduced formalin-induced acute nocifensive behavior after a brief hyperalgesia in rats and mice. The inhibitory effects of capsaicin were calcium-dependent, and mediated by the capsaicin receptor (transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1). We further found that capsaicin exerted inhibitory effects on the persistent nociceptive hypersensitivity induced by peripheral inflammation and nerve injury. Thus, these results support the long-lasting and inhibitory effects of topical capsaicin on persistent pain, and the clinic use of capsaicin as a pain therapy.

  2. Lacosamide: A novel antiepileptic and anti-nociceptive drug on the block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhminder Jit Singh Bajwa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With an increasing demand for newer anti-epileptic agents having a better pharmacological profile, many newer agents are being investigated. Lacosamide is a newer functional amino acid being developed as an adjunctive therapy for resistant partial-onset seizures owing to its activity of enhancing the slow inactivation of voltage-gated sodium channels thereby reducing pathologic hyperactivity in neurons. It has also being investigated for its role as anti-nociceptive in variety of pain scenarios specifically in diabetic neuropathic pain. It is well-absorbed orally, metabolized in liver and excreted by the kidneys. It has a favorable pharmacologic profile in having minimal drug interactions. The adverse effects include mild dizziness, behavioral changes and dose dependent prolongation of PR interval. This review is directed toward the development of lacosamide and its potential usefulness as an anti-epileptic and an anti-nociceptive drug.

  3. Artificial nociception and motor responses to pain, for humans and robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagnato, Carlo; Takagi, Atsushi; Burdet, Etienne

    2015-01-01

    This concept paper describes nociception and the role of pain in humans. Understanding the mechanisms of pain can give insight into the implementation of artificial pain for robots. Identification of noxious contacts could help robots to elicit reactions in order to avoid or minimize damage to the robot and the environment. The information processing of artificial pain can also be used to optimally regulate incoming sensory information and prevent accidents or real pain to the users of robotic systems and prostheses, improving the performance of robots and their interaction with human users. Besides the applications of artificial nociception for robotic manipulation and intelligent prostheses, the development of computational models of pain mechanisms for the discrimination of noxious stimuli from innocuous touch can find crucial clinical applications, addressing the vulnerable non-verbal population who are unable to report pain.

  4. Is temporal summation of pain and spinal nociception altered during normal aging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marouf, Rafik; Piché, Mathieu; Rainville, Pierre

    2015-10-01

    This study examines the effect of normal aging on temporal summation (TS) of pain and the nociceptive flexion reflex (RIII). Two groups of healthy volunteers, young and elderly, received transcutaneous electrical stimulation applied to the right sural nerve to assess pain and the nociceptive flexion reflex (RIII-reflex). Stimulus intensity was adjusted individually to 120% of RIII-reflex threshold, and shocks were delivered as a single stimulus or as a series of 5 stimuli to assess TS at 5 different frequencies (0.17, 0.33, 0.66, 1, and 2 Hz). This study shows that robust TS of pain and RIII-reflex is observable in individuals aged between 18 and 75 years and indicates that these effects are comparable between young and older individuals. These results contrast with some previous findings and imply that at least some pain regulatory processes, including TS, may not be affected by normal aging, although this may vary depending on the method.

  5. Characterisation of a behavioural protocol for the assessment of nociception in normal and inflamed porcine skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    di Giminiani, Pierpaolo

    2012-01-01

    pain sensitivity following ultraviolet-B and capsaicin-induced inflammation in porcine skin. A series of experiments was performed to characterise the new experimental protocol, which included (1) the identification and quantification of reflexive behavioural responses indicative of the nociceptive...... of behavioural cutaneous nociception was performed via the assessment of differences in cutaneous pain sensitivity as determined by the body size of the animals, the anatomical locations of interest and the sensory modalities involved. Consequently, this new protocol allowed measuring the change in cutaneous...... the performance of spontaneous behaviours. Different levels of cutaneous pain sensitivity were linked to differences in the anatomy of the animals and in the specific features of two distinct anatomical locations receiving the thermal and the mechanical challenges. Furthermore, the two sensory modalities under...

  6. Neuropeptidergic Signaling and Active Feeding State Inhibit Nociception in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezcurra, Marina; Walker, Denise S; Beets, Isabel; Swoboda, Peter; Schafer, William R

    2016-03-16

    Food availability and nutritional status are important cues affecting behavioral states. Here we report that, in Caenorhabditis elegans, a cascade of dopamine and neuropeptide signaling acts to inhibit nociception in food-poor environments. In the absence of food, animals show decreased sensitivity and increased adaptation to soluble repellents sensed by the polymodal ASH nociceptors. The effects of food on adaptation are affected by dopamine and neuropeptide signaling; dopamine acts via the DOP-1 receptor to decrease adaptation on food, whereas the neuropeptide receptors NPR-1 and NPR-2 act to increase adaptation off food. NPR-1 and NPR-2 function cell autonomously in the ASH neurons to increase adaptation off food, whereas the DOP-1 receptor controls neuropeptide release from interneurons that modulate ASH activity indirectly. These results indicate that feeding state modulates nociception through the interaction of monoamine and neuropeptide signaling pathways.

  7. Ion Channel Photoswitch Reveals Crosstalk between Intact and Injured Nociceptive Neurons after Nerve Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Herold, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The development of novel techniques utilizing the advantages of light has created an optical revolution for neuroscience research. Controlling and probing neuronal function with light has provided unprecedented insights by being able to manipulate many neurons simultaneously in intact circuits and living organisms.In my dissertation research, I used novel optical methods to probe the cellular permeability of sensory neuron populations. Primary nociceptive afferents detect, modulate and integr...

  8. A new trigemino-nociceptive stimulation model for event-related fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankewitz, A; Voit, H L; Bingel, U; Peschke, C; May, A

    2010-04-01

    Functional imaging of human trigemino-nociceptive processing provides meaningful insights into altered pain processing in head and face pain diseases. Although functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) offers high temporal and spatial resolution, most studies available were done with radioligand-positron emission tomography, as fMRI requires non-magnetic stimulus equipment and fast on-off conditions. We developed a new approach for painful stimulation of the trigeminal nerve that can be implemented within an event-related design using fMRI and aimed to detect increased blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signals as surrogate markers of trigeminal pain processing. Using an olfactometer, 20 healthy volunteers received intranasally standardized trigeminal nociceptive stimuli (ammonia gas) as well as olfactory (rose odour) and odorless control stimuli (air puffs). Imaging revealed robust BOLD responses to the trigeminal nociceptive stimulation in cortical and subcortical brain areas known to be involved in pain processing. Focusing on the trigeminal pain pathway, significant activations were observed bilaterally in brainstem areas at the trigeminal nerve entry zone, which are agreeable with the principal trigeminal nuclei. Furthermore, increased signal changes could be detected ipsilaterally at anatomical localization of the trigeminal ganglion and bilaterally in the rostral medulla, which probably represents the spinal trigeminal nuclei. However, brainstem areas involved in the endogenous pain control system that are close to this anatomical localization, such as raphe nuclei, have to be discussed. Our findings suggest that mapping trigeminal pain processing using fMRI with this non-invasive experimental design is feasible and capable of evoking specific activations in the trigeminal nociceptive system. This method will provide an ideal opportunity to study the trigeminal pain system in both health and pathological conditions such as idiopathic headache disorders.

  9. Medulla Oblongata Mechanism of Inhibitory Effect of Thermal Stimulation to Nociceptive Colorectal Distention in Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang Li; Pei-Jing Rong; Xin-Yan Gao; Hui Ben; Hong Cai; Bing Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To discuss mechanism of moxibustion (thermal stimulation) effect and best moxibustion stimulus parameter. Methods: Experiments were performed on 48 male Sprague-Dawley rats. Unit discharges from individual single neuron were recorded extracellularly with glass-microelectrode in Subnucleus Reticularis Dorsalis (SRD). Visceral-intrusive stimulation is done by colorectal distension. Thermal stimulation with different temperature (40°C, 42°C, 44°C, 46°C, 48°C, 50°C, 52°C) and different stimulus area (diameter of circle:1.0 cm, 1.5 cm, 2.0 cm, 2.5 cm, 3.0 cm, 3.5 cm, 4.0cm) was applied around RN12 during nociceptive colorectal distension. Results: SRD neurons could be activated by visceral stimulation within noxious range. Under low temperature of stimulus, especially under 45°C of pain threshold to ordinary people, visceral nociceptive afferent facilitated thermal stimulus from the body surface. While after thermal stimulation reached a harmful degree, the thermal stimulus will inhibit visceral nociceptive afferent. Moreover, statistics show that the higher the temperature is, the smaller the size of stimulation area is needed, and they correlate with each other negatively. Conclusion: Visceral nociception could be inhibited by somatic thermal stimulation with specific parameter at medulla level. According to our finding, best thermal stimulation temperature is around 48°C and the best size of stimulation area is around 3.14-7.07cm2 (with 2.0-3.0cm diameter).

  10. Ovariectomy results in variable changes in nociception, mood and depression in adult female rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Hong Li

    Full Text Available Decline in the ovarian hormones with menopause may influence somatosensory, cognitive, and affective processing. The present study investigated whether hormonal depletion alters the nociceptive, depressive-like and learning behaviors in experimental rats after ovariectomy (OVX, a common method to deplete animals of their gonadal hormones. OVX rats developed thermal hyperalgesia in proximal and distal tail that was established 2 weeks after OVX and lasted the 7 weeks of the experiment. A robust mechanical allodynia was also occurred at 5 weeks after OVX. In the 5th week after OVX, dilute formalin (5%-induced nociceptive responses (such as elevating and licking or biting during the second phase were significantly increased as compared to intact and sham-OVX females. However, chronic constriction injury (CCI of the sciatic nerve-induced mechanical allodynia did not differ as hormonal status (e.g. OVX and ovarian intact. Using formalin-induced conditioned place avoidance (F-CPA, which is believed to reflect the pain-related negative emotion, we further found that OVX significantly attenuated F-CPA scores but did not alter electric foot-shock-induced CPA (S-CPA. In the open field and forced swimming test, there was an increase in depressive-like behaviors in OVX rats. There was no detectable impairment of spatial performance by Morris water maze task in OVX rats up to 5 weeks after surgery. Estrogen replacement retrieved OVX-induced nociceptive hypersensitivity and depressive-like behaviors. This is the first study to investigate the impacts of ovarian removal on nociceptive perception, negative emotion, depressive-like behaviors and spatial learning in adult female rats in a uniform and standard way.

  11. Nociceptive and Inflammatory Mediator Upregulation in a Mouse Model of Chronic Prostatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Erica S.; Xie, Amy; La, Jun-Ho; Gebhart, G.F.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic nonbacterial prostatitis, characterized by genitourinary pain in the pelvic region in the absence of an identifiable cause, is common in adult males. Surprisingly, the sensory innervation of the prostate and mediators that sensitize its innervation have received little attention. We thus characterized a mouse model of chronic prostatitis, focusing on the prostate innervation and how organ inflammation affects gene expression of putative nociceptive markers in prostate afferent somata in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and mediators in the prostate. Retrograde tracing (fast blue, FB) from the prostate revealed that thoracolumbar (TL) and lumbosacral (LS) DRG are the principal sources of somata of prostate afferents. Nociceptive markers (e.g., TRP, TREK and P2X channels) were upregulated in FB-labeled TL and LS somata for up to four weeks after inflaming the prostate (intra-prostate injection of zymosan). Prostatic inflammation was evident histologically, by monocyte infiltration and a significant increase in mast cell tryptase activity 14, 21 and 28 days after zymosan injection. Interleukin-10 and NGF were also significantly upregulated in the prostate throughout the four weeks of inflammation. Open field pain-related behaviors (e.g., rearing) were unchanged in prostate-inflamed mice, suggesting the absence of ongoing nociception, but withdrawal thresholds to lower abdominal pressure were significantly reduced. The increases in IL-10, mast cell tryptase and NGF in the inflamed prostate were cotemporaneous with reduced thresholds to probing of the abdomen and upregulation of nociceptive markers in DRG somata innervating the prostate. The results provide insight and direction for study of mechanisms underlying pain in chronic prostatitis. PMID:25915147

  12. Nucleotide homeostasis and purinergic nociceptive signaling in rat meninges in migraine-like conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yegutkin, Gennady G; Guerrero-Toro, Cindy; Kilinc, Erkan; Koroleva, Kseniya; Ishchenko, Yevheniia; Abushik, Polina; Giniatullina, Raisa; Fayuk, Dmitriy; Giniatullin, Rashid

    2016-09-01

    Extracellular ATP is suspected to contribute to migraine pain but regulatory mechanisms controlling pro-nociceptive purinergic mechanisms in the meninges remain unknown. We studied the peculiarities of metabolic and signaling pathways of ATP and its downstream metabolites in rat meninges and in cultured trigeminal cells exposed to the migraine mediator calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). Under resting conditions, meningeal ATP and ADP remained at low nanomolar levels, whereas extracellular AMP and adenosine concentrations were one-two orders higher. CGRP increased ATP and ADP levels in meninges and trigeminal cultures and reduced adenosine concentration in trigeminal cells. Degradation rates for exogenous nucleotides remained similar in control and CGRP-treated meninges, indicating that CGRP triggers nucleotide release without affecting nucleotide-inactivating pathways. Lead nitrate-based enzyme histochemistry of whole mount meninges revealed the presence of high ATPase, ADPase, and AMPase activities, primarily localized in the medial meningeal artery. ATP and ADP induced large intracellular Ca(2+) transients both in neurons and in glial cells whereas AMP and adenosine were ineffective. In trigeminal glia, ATP partially operated via P2X7 receptors. ATP, but not other nucleotides, activated nociceptive spikes in meningeal trigeminal nerve fibers providing a rationale for high degradation rate of pro-nociceptive ATP. Pro-nociceptive effect of ATP in meningeal nerves was reproduced by α,β-meATP operating via P2X3 receptors. Collectively, extracellular ATP, which level is controlled by CGRP, can persistently activate trigeminal nerves in meninges which considered as the origin site of migraine headache. These data are consistent with the purinergic hypothesis of migraine pain and suggest new targets against trigeminal pain.

  13. The Purinergic System and Glial Cells: Emerging Costars in Nociception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Magni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is now well established that glial cells not only provide mechanical and trophic support to neurons but can directly contribute to neurotransmission, for example, by release and uptake of neurotransmitters and by secreting pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators. This has greatly changed our attitude towards acute and chronic disorders, paving the way for new therapeutic approaches targeting activated glial cells to indirectly modulate and/or restore neuronal functions. A deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways involved in neuron-to-glia and glia-to-glia communication that can be pharmacologically targeted is therefore a mandatory step toward the success of this new healing strategy. This holds true also in the field of pain transmission, where the key involvement of astrocytes and microglia in the central nervous system and satellite glial cells in peripheral ganglia has been clearly demonstrated, and literally hundreds of signaling molecules have been identified. Here, we shall focus on one emerging signaling system involved in the cross talk between neurons and glial cells, the purinergic system, consisting of extracellular nucleotides and nucleosides and their membrane receptors. Specifically, we shall summarize existing evidence of novel “druggable” glial purinergic targets, which could help in the development of innovative analgesic approaches to chronic pain states.

  14. Memantine elicits spinal blockades of motor function, proprioception, and nociception in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Wen; Chiu, Chong-Chi; Liu, Kuo-Sheng; Hung, Ching-Hsia; Wang, Jhi-Joung

    2015-12-01

    Although memantine blocks sodium currents and produces local skin anesthesia, spinal anesthesia with memantine is unknown. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the local anesthetic effect of memantine in spinal anesthesia and its comparison with a widely used local anesthetic lidocaine. After intrathecally injecting the rats with five doses of each drug, the dose-response curves of memantine and lidocaine were constructed. The potencies of the drugs and durations of spinal anesthetic effects on motor function, proprioception, and nociception were compared with those of lidocaine. We showed that memantine produced dose-dependent spinal blockades in motor function, proprioception, and nociception. On a 50% effective dose (ED50 ) basis, the rank of potency was lidocaine greater than memantine (P < 0.05 for the differences). At the equipotent doses (ED25 , ED50 , ED75 ), the block duration produced by memantine was longer than that produced by lidocaine (P < 0.05 for the differences). Memantine, but not lidocaine, displayed more sensory/nociceptive block than motor block. The preclinical data demonstrated that memantine is less potent than lidocaine, whereas memantine produces longer duration of spinal anesthesia than lidocaine. Memantine shows a more sensory-selective action over motor blockade.

  15. Cognitive aspects of nociception and pain: bridging neurophysiology with cognitive psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legrain, V; Mancini, F; Sambo, C F; Torta, D M; Ronga, I; Valentini, E

    2012-10-01

    The event-related brain potentials (ERPs) elicited by nociceptive stimuli are largely influenced by vigilance, emotion, alertness, and attention. Studies that specifically investigated the effects of cognition on nociceptive ERPs support the idea that most of these ERP components can be regarded as the neurophysiological indexes of the processes underlying detection and orientation of attention toward the eliciting stimulus. Such detection is determined both by the salience of the stimulus that makes it pop out from the environmental context (bottom-up capture of attention) and by its relevance according to the subject's goals and motivation (top-down attentional control). The fact that nociceptive ERPs are largely influenced by information from other sensory modalities such as vision and proprioception, as well as from motor preparation, suggests that these ERPs reflect a cortical system involved in the detection of potentially meaningful stimuli for the body, with the purpose to respond adequately to potential threats. In such a theoretical framework, pain is seen as an epiphenomenon of warning processes, encoded in multimodal and multiframe representations of the body, well suited to guide defensive actions. The findings here reviewed highlight that the ERPs elicited by selective activation of nociceptors may reflect an attentional gain apt to bridge a coherent perception of salient sensory events with action selection processes.

  16. Do sex hormones influence emotional modulation of pain and nociception in healthy women?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhudy, Jamie L; Bartley, Emily J; Palit, Shreela; Kerr, Kara L; Kuhn, Bethany L; Martin, Satin L; Delventura, Jennifer L; Terry, Ellen L

    2013-12-01

    Sex hormones may contribute to inter- and intra-individual differences in pain by influencing emotional modulation of pain and nociception. To study this, a well-validated picture-viewing paradigm was used to assess emotional modulation of pain and the nociceptive flexion reflex (NFR; physiologic measure of nociception) during mid-follicular, ovulatory, and late-luteal phases of the menstrual cycle in healthy normally cycling women (n=40). Salivary estradiol, progesterone, and testosterone were assessed at each testing session. Emotional modulation of pain/NFR did not differ across menstrual phases, but low estradiol was associated with weaker emotional modulation of NFR (during all phases) and emotional modulation of pain (ovulatory and late-luteal phases). Given evidence that a failure to emotionally modulate pain might be a risk factor for chronic pain, low estradiol may promote chronic pain via this mechanism. However, future research is needed to extend these findings to women with disturbances of pain, emotion, and/or sex hormones.

  17. Examining emotional modulation of pain and spinal nociception in Native Americans: a preliminary investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palit, Shreela; Kerr, Kara L; Kuhn, Bethany L; DelVentura, Jennifer L; Terry, Ellen L; Bartley, Emily J; Shadlow, Joanna O; Rhudy, Jamie L

    2013-11-01

    Pain problems are more prevalent in Native Americans than in any other group in the U.S., and this might result from group differences in pain modulation. This study was designed to examine emotional modulation of pain and spinal nociception in healthy, pain-free Native Americans (n = 21) relative to non-Hispanic Whites (n = 20). To assess emotional modulation of pain and the nociceptive flexion reflex (NFR, a physiological measure of spinal nociception), participants underwent a well-validated emotional picture-viewing paradigm during which suprathreshold pain stimuli were delivered to the ankle. Compared to Whites, Native Americans reported less pleasure to erotic pictures and failed to show corrugator reactivity to mutilation pictures. Unlike Whites, Native Americans only evidenced pain inhibition in response to erotica, but no pain facilitation (disinhibition) to mutilation pictures. Emotional modulation of NFR was similar in both groups. These preliminary findings suggest that Native Americans failed to disinhibit pain, perhaps due to over-activation of pain inhibitory mechanisms. Chronic over-activation of this system could ultimately exhaust it, thus putting Native Americans at future risk for chronic pain.

  18. Validation of a Modified Algometer to Measure Mechanical Nociceptive Thresholds in Awake Dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ubedullah Kaka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to validate the use of a modified algometer device to measure mechanical nociceptive thresholds in six dogs. Dogs were administered morphine intravenously (IV at 1 mg/kg or saline at equivolume in a crossover design with one-week washout period. Mechanical nociceptive thresholds were determined before, after the administration of treatments at 5 minutes, and hourly for 8 hours. Thresholds were recorded at the carpal pad, metacarpal foot pad, tibia, femur, and abdomen. Heart rates, body temperature, and respiration were recorded at similar time points. Thresholds increased significantly (P<0.05 from baseline values for up to 3 hours at tibia and abdomen, 4 hours at metacarpal pad, and 5 hours at the carpal pad and femur. Hypothermia, bradycardia, and change in respiration were observed in all dogs after morphine injection. Saline did not alter any threshold levels during the eight-hour study period, indicating no evidence of tolerance, learned avoidance, or local hyperaesthesia. The device and methods of testing were well tolerated by all the dogs. Results suggest that the modified algometer and method of application are useful to measure nociceptive mechanical thresholds in awake dogs.

  19. Distinct interactions of cannabidiol and morphine in three nociceptive behavioral models in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neelakantan, Harshini; Tallarida, Ronald J; Reichenbach, Zachary W; Tuma, Ronald F; Ward, Sara J; Walker, Ellen A

    2015-04-01

    Cannabinoid and opioid agonists can display overlapping behavioral effects and the combination of these agonists is known to produce enhanced antinociception in several rodent models of acute and chronic pain. The present study investigated the antinociceptive effects of the nonpsychoactive cannabinoid, cannabidiol (CBD) and the µ-opioid agonist morphine, both alone and in combination, using three behavioral models in mice, to test the hypothesis that combinations of morphine and CBD would produce synergistic effects. The effects of morphine, CBD, and morphine/CBD combinations were assessed in the following assays: (a) acetic acid-stimulated stretching; (b) acetic acid-decreased operant responding for palatable food; and (c) hot plate thermal nociception. Morphine alone produced antinociceptive effects in all three models of acute nociception, whereas CBD alone produced antinociception only in the acetic acid-stimulated stretching assay. The nature of the interactions between morphine and CBD combinations were assessed quantitatively based on the principle of dose equivalence. Combinations of CBD and morphine produced synergistic effects in reversing acetic acid-stimulated stretching behavior, but subadditive effects in the hot plate thermal nociceptive assay and the acetic acid-decreased operant responding for palatable food assay. These results suggest that distinct mechanisms of action underlie the interactions between CBD and morphine in the three different behavioral assays and that the choice of appropriate combination therapies for the treatment of acute pain conditions may depend on the underlying pain type and stimulus modality.

  20. Borneol, a Bicyclic Monoterpene Alcohol, Reduces Nociceptive Behavior and Inflammatory Response in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson Roberto Guedes da Silva Almeida

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Borneol, a bicyclic monoterpene, has been evaluated for antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities. Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities were studied by measuring nociception by acetic acid, formalin, hot plate, and grip strength tests, while inflammation was prompted by carrageenan-induced peritonitis. The rotarod test was used to evaluate motor coordination. Borneol produced a significant (P<0.01 reduction of the nociceptive behavior at the early and late phases of paw licking and reduced the writhing reflex in mice (formalin and writhing tests, resp.. When the hot plate test was conducted, borneol (in higher dose produced an inhibition (P<0.05 of the nociceptive behavior. Such results were unlikely to be provoked by motor abnormality. Additionally, borneol-treated mice reduced the carrageenan-induced leukocytes migration to the peritoneal cavity. Together, our results suggest that borneol possess significant central and peripheral antinociceptive activity; it has also anti-inflammatory activity. In addition, borneol did not impair motor coordination.

  1. Nociceptive input from the rat thoracolumbar fascia to lumbar dorsal horn neurones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoheisel, Ulrich; Taguchi, Toru; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Mense, Siegfried

    2011-09-01

    In anaesthetised rats, systematic electrophysiological recordings from dorsal horn neurones in spinal segments Th13-L5 were made to obtain information about the spinal nociceptive processing from the lumbar thoracolumbar fascia. Six to fourteen percent of the neurones in the spinal segments Th13-L2 had nociceptive input from the thoracolumbar fascia in naïve animals, no neurones responsive to input from the lumbar fascia were found in segments L3-L5. The segmental location of the receptive fields in the fascia was shifted 2-4 segments caudally relative to the spinal segment recorded from. Most neurones were convergent in that they received additional input from other deep somatic tissues in the low back (87%) and from the skin in the abdominal wall or the proximal leg (50%). The proportion of neurones responsive to input from the thoracolumbar fascia rose significantly from 4% to 15% (Pfascia in normal animals - responded to fascia input in animals with inflamed muscle. The data suggest that the nociceptive input from the thoracolumbar fascia contributes to the pain in low back pain patients.

  2. Potent analgesic effects of anticonvulsants on peripheral thermal nociception in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorovic, Slobodan M; Rastogi, A J; Jevtovic-Todorovic, Vesna

    2003-01-01

    Anticonvulsant agents are commonly used to treat neuropathic pain conditions because of their effects on voltage- and ligand-gated channels in central pain pathways. However, their interaction with ion channels in peripheral pain pathways is poorly understood. Therefore, we studied the potential analgesic effects of commonly used anticonvulsant agents in peripheral nociception. We injected anticonvulsants intradermally into peripheral receptive fields of sensory neurons in the hindpaws of adult rats, and studied pain perception using the model of acute thermal nociception. Commonly used anticonvulsants such as voltage-gated Na+ channel blockers, phenytoin and carbamazepine, and voltage-gated Ca2+ channel blockers, gabapentin and ethosuximide, induced dose-dependent analgesia in the injected paw, with ED50 values of 0.30, 0.32 and 8, 410 μg per 100 μl, respectively. Thermal nociceptive responses were not affected in the contralateral, noninjected paws, indicating a lack of systemic effects with doses of anticonvulsants that elicited local analgesia. Hill slope coefficients for the tested anticonvulsants indicate that the dose–response curve was less steep for gabapentin than for phenytoin, carbamazepine and ethosuximide. Our data strongly suggest that cellular targets like voltage-gated Na+ and Ca2+ channels, similar to those that mediate the effects of anticonvulsant agents in the CNS, may exist in the peripheral nerve endings of rat sensory neurons. Thus, peripherally applied anticonvulsants that block voltage-gated Na+ and Ca2+ channels may be useful analgesics. PMID:12970103

  3. Synaptic Conversion of Chloride-Dependent Synapses in Spinal Nociceptive Circuits: Roles in Neuropathic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark S. Cooper

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrophysiological conversion of chloride-dependent synapses from inhibitory to excitatory function, as a result of aberrant neuronal chloride homeostasis, is a known mechanism for the genesis of neuropathic pain. This paper examines theoretically how this type of synaptic conversion can disrupt circuit logic in spinal nociceptive circuits. First, a mathematical scaling factor is developed to represent local aberration in chloride electrochemical driving potential. Using this mathematical scaling factor, electrophysiological symbols are developed to represent the magnitude of synaptic conversion within nociceptive circuits. When inserted into a nociceptive circuit diagram, these symbols assist in understanding the generation of neuropathic pain associated with the collapse of transmembrane chloride gradients. A more generalized scaling factor is also derived to represent the interplay of chloride and bicarbonate driving potentials on the function of GABAergic and glycinergic synapses. These mathematical and symbolic representations of synaptic conversion help illustrate the critical role that anion driving potentials play in the transduction of pain. Using these representations, we discuss ramifications of glial-mediated synaptic conversion in the genesis, and treatment, of neuropathic pain.

  4. THE EFFECTS OF RIBOFLAVIN AND METHYLENE BLUE ON NOCICEPTION AND VISCERAL PAIN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luca, A; Alexa, Teodora; Dondaş, A; Crăcană, Irina-Mihaela; Bădescu, Magda; Bohotin, Cătălina

    2015-01-01

    Methylene Blue (MB) can prevent electron leaking, increase mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, and reduce ROS overproduction under pathological conditions, currently being trace evidence that it can alter pain perception in humans by local administration during certain surgical procedures. Riboflavin or vitamin B2 (B2) constitutes a part of the vitamin B group, which in recent studies shows a growing implication in the treatment of some pathology that imply pain management. To investigate the effect of one dose of Riboflavin and Methylene Blue on nociception and visceral pain in mice. A total of 48 BALB/c male mice were divided into 3 groups: MB Group, B2 Group and C Group. MB (5 mg/kg b.w.), B2 (100 mg/kg b.w.) or an equivalent volume of saline was administered intraperitoneally. Mice were tested before (baseline) and after drugs administration over a 4h period. Nociception was evaluated by means of Hot Plate Test (HPT) and TFT (Tail Flick Test). Visceral pain was evaluated 2h after administration. Four hours after MB administration we recorded an analgesic effect on the hot plate test (p visceral pain when compared to the control group but the pain inhibition was more important after riboflavin administration. Even if the exact mechanisms are not clarified by our study, we demonstrated that both ATP modulators (MB & B2 vitamin) have analgesic effect on visceral pain and nociception.

  5. Acrolein involvement in sensory and behavioral hypersensitivity following spinal cord injury in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Due, Michael R; Park, Jonghyuck; Zheng, Lingxing; Walls, Michael; Allette, Yohance M; White, Fletcher A; Shi, Riyi

    2014-03-01

    Growing evidence suggests that oxidative stress, as associated with spinal cord injury (SCI), may play a critical role in both neuroinflammation and neuropathic pain conditions. The production of the endogenous aldehyde acrolein, following lipid peroxidation during the inflammatory response, may contribute to peripheral sensitization and hyperreflexia following SCI via the TRPA1-dependent mechanism. Here, we report that there are enhanced levels of acrolein and increased neuronal sensitivity to the aldehyde for at least 14 days after SCI. Concurrent with injury-induced increases in acrolein concentration is an increased expression of TRPA1 in the lumbar (L3-L6) sensory ganglia. As proof of the potential pronociceptive role for acrolein, intrathecal injections of acrolein revealed enhanced sensitivity to both tactile and thermal stimuli for up to 10 days, supporting the compound's pro-nociceptive functionality. Treatment of SCI animals with the acrolein scavenger hydralazine produced moderate improvement in tactile responses as well as robust changes in thermal sensitivity for up to 49 days. Taken together, these data suggest that acrolein directly modulates SCI-associated pain behavior, making it a novel therapeutic target for preclinical and clinical SCI as an analgesic. Following spinal cord injury (SCI), acrolein involvement in neuropathic pain is likely through direct activation and elevated levels of pro-nociceptive channel TRPA1. While acrolein elevation correlates with neuropathic pain, suppression of this aldehyde by hydralazine leads to an analgesic effect. Acrolein may serve as a novel therapeutic target for preclinical and clinical SCI to relieve both acute and chronic post-SCI neuropathic pain.

  6. HIV Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Abroad Treatment Basic Statistics Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS See RSS | ... on HIV Syndicated Content Website Feedback HIV/AIDS HIV Transmission Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend ...

  7. Linkage between increased nociception and olfaction via a SCN9A haplotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Heimann

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Mutations reducing the function of Nav1.7 sodium channels entail diminished pain perception and olfactory acuity, suggesting a link between nociception and olfaction at ion channel level. We hypothesized that if such link exists, it should work in both directions and gain-of-function Nav1.7 mutations known to be associated with increased pain perception should also increase olfactory acuity. METHODS: SCN9A variants were assessed known to enhance pain perception and found more frequently in the average population. Specifically, carriers of SCN9A variants rs41268673C>A (P610T; n = 14 or rs6746030C>T (R1150W; n = 21 were compared with non-carriers (n = 40. Olfactory function was quantified by assessing odor threshold, odor discrimination and odor identification using an established olfactory test. Nociception was assessed by measuring pain thresholds to experimental nociceptive stimuli (punctate and blunt mechanical pressure, heat and electrical stimuli. RESULTS: The number of carried alleles of the non-mutated SCN9A haplotype rs41268673C/rs6746030C was significantly associated with the comparatively highest olfactory threshold (0 alleles: threshold at phenylethylethanol dilution step 12 of 16 (n = 1, 1 allele: 10.6±2.6 (n = 34, 2 alleles: 9.5±2.1 (n = 40. The same SCN9A haplotype determined the pain threshold to blunt pressure stimuli (0 alleles: 21.1 N/m(2, 1 allele: 29.8±10.4 N/m(2, 2 alleles: 33.5±10.2 N/m(2. CONCLUSIONS: The findings established a working link between nociception and olfaction via Nav1.7 in the gain-of-function direction. Hence, together with the known reduced olfaction and pain in loss-of-function mutations, a bidirectional genetic functional association between nociception and olfaction exists at Nav1.7 level.

  8. Sensitization of voltage activated calcium channel currents for capsaicin in nociceptive neurons by tumor-necrosis-factor-alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagenacker, T; Czeschik, J C; Schäfers, M; Büsselberg, D

    2010-01-15

    It is known that application of tumor-necrosis-factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) sensitizes neuronal calcium channels for heat stimuli in rat models of neuropathic pain. This study examines whether TNF-alpha modulates the capsaicin-induced effects after transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV)-1 receptor activation on voltage activated calcium channel currents (I(Ca(V))). TRPV-1 receptors are activated by heat and play an important role in the pathogenesis of thermal hyperalgesia in neuropathic pain syndromes, while voltage activated channels are essential for transmission of neuronal signals. Eliciting I(Ca(V)) in DRG neurons of rats by a depolarization from the resting potential to 0 mV, TNF-alpha (100 ng/ml) reduces I(Ca(V)) by 16.9+/-2.2%, while capsaicin (0.1 microM) decreases currents by 27+/-4.3%. Pre-application of TNF-alpha (100 ng/ml) for 24h results in a sensitization of I(Ca(V)) to capsaicin (0.1 microM) with a reduction of 42.8+/-4.4% mediated by TRPV-1. While L-type (36.6+/-5.2%) and P/Q-type currents (35.6+/-4.1%) are also sensitized by TRPV-1 activation, N-type channel currents are most sensitive (74.5+/-7.3%). The capsaicin-induced shift towards the hyperpolarizing voltage range does not occur when TNF-alpha is applied. Summarizing, TNF-alpha sensitizes nociceptive neurons for capsaicin.

  9. AMPA Receptor Phosphorylation and Synaptic Colocalization on Motor Neurons Drive Maladaptive Plasticity below Complete Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huie, J Russell; Stuck, Ellen D; Lee, Kuan H; Irvine, Karen-Amanda; Beattie, Michael S; Bresnahan, Jacqueline C; Grau, James W; Ferguson, Adam R

    2015-01-01

    Clinical spinal cord injury (SCI) is accompanied by comorbid peripheral injury in 47% of patients. Human and animal modeling data have shown that painful peripheral injuries undermine long-term recovery of locomotion through unknown mechanisms. Peripheral nociceptive stimuli induce maladaptive synaptic plasticity in dorsal horn sensory systems through AMPA receptor (AMPAR) phosphorylation and trafficking to synapses. Here we test whether ventral horn motor neurons in rats demonstrate similar experience-dependent maladaptive plasticity below a complete SCI in vivo. Quantitative biochemistry demonstrated that intermittent nociceptive stimulation (INS) rapidly and selectively increases AMPAR subunit GluA1 serine 831 phosphorylation and localization to synapses in the injured spinal cord, while reducing synaptic GluA2. These changes predict motor dysfunction in the absence of cell death signaling, suggesting an opportunity for therapeutic reversal. Automated confocal time-course analysis of lumbar ventral horn motor neurons confirmed a time-dependent increase in synaptic GluA1 with concurrent decrease in synaptic GluA2. Optical fractionation of neuronal plasma membranes revealed GluA2 removal from extrasynaptic sites on motor neurons early after INS followed by removal from synapses 2 h later. As GluA2-lacking AMPARs are canonical calcium-permeable AMPARs (CP-AMPARs), their stimulus- and time-dependent insertion provides a therapeutic target for limiting calcium-dependent dynamic maladaptive plasticity after SCI. Confirming this, a selective CP-AMPAR antagonist protected against INS-induced maladaptive spinal plasticity, restoring adaptive motor responses on a sensorimotor spinal training task. These findings highlight the critical involvement of AMPARs in experience-dependent spinal cord plasticity after injury and provide a pharmacologically targetable synaptic mechanism by which early postinjury experience shapes motor plasticity.

  10. Mechanisms involved in abdominal nociception induced by either TRPV1 or TRPA1 stimulation of rat peritoneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisan, Gabriela; Rossato, Mateus F; Hoffmeister, Carin; Oliveira, Sara M; Silva, Cássia R; Matheus, Filipe C; Mello, Gláucia C; Antunes, Edson; Prediger, Rui D S; Ferreira, Juliano

    2013-08-15

    Abdominal pain is a frequent symptom of peritoneal cavity irritation, but little is known about the role of the receptors for irritant substances, transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and ankyrin 1 (TRPA1), in this painful condition. Thus, we investigated the abdominal nociception caused by peritoneal stimulation with TRPV1 (capsaicin) and TRPA1 (allyl isothiocyanate, AITC) agonists and their mechanisms in rats. The intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of either capsaicin or AITC (0.03-10 mg/kg) induced short-term (up to 20 min) and dose-dependent abdominal nociception, and also produced c-fos expression in spinal afferents of the dorsal horn. TRPV1 antagonism prevented (94 ± 4% inhibition) nociception induced by capsaicin but not by AITC. In contrast, the TRPA1 antagonism almost abolished AITC-induced nociception (95 ± 2% inhibition) without altering the capsaicin response. Moreover, nociception induced by either capsaicin or AITC was reduced by the desensitisation of TRPV1-positive sensory fibres with resiniferatoxin (73 ± 18 and 76 ± 15% inhibitions, respectively) and by the NK1 receptor antagonist aprepitant (56 ± 5 and 53 ± 8% inhibitions, respectively). Likewise, the i.p. injections of capsaicin or AITC increased the content of substance P in the peritoneal fluid. Nevertheless, neither the mast cell membrane stabiliser cromoglycate, nor the H1 antagonist promethazine, nor depletion of peritoneal macrophages affected abdominal nociception induced either by capsaicin or AITC. Accordingly, neither capsaicin nor AITC increased the histamine content in the peritoneal fluid or provoked peritoneal mast cell degranulation in vitro. Collectively, our findings suggest that TRPV1 and TRPA1 stimulation in the peritoneum produces abdominal nociception that is mediated by sensory fibres activation.

  11. Peripheral noxious stimulation reduces withdrawal threshold to mechanical stimuli after spinal cord injury: role of tumor necrosis factor alpha and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garraway, Sandra M; Woller, Sarah A; Huie, J Russell; Hartman, John J; Hook, Michelle A; Miranda, Rajesh C; Huang, Yung-Jen; Ferguson, Adam R; Grau, James W

    2014-11-01

    We previously showed that peripheral noxious input after spinal cord injury (SCI) inhibits beneficial spinal plasticity and impairs recovery of locomotor and bladder functions. These observations suggest that noxious input may similarly affect the development and maintenance of chronic neuropathic pain, an important consequence of SCI. In adult rats with a moderate contusion SCI, we investigated the effect of noxious tail stimulation, administered 1 day after SCI on mechanical withdrawal responses to von Frey stimuli from 1 to 28 days after treatment. In addition, because the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) is implicated in numerous injury-induced processes including pain hypersensitivity, we assessed the temporal and spatial expression of TNFα, TNF receptors, and several downstream signaling targets after stimulation. Our results showed that unlike sham surgery or SCI only, nociceptive stimulation after SCI induced mechanical sensitivity by 24h. These behavioral changes were accompanied by increased expression of TNFα. Cellular assessments of downstream targets of TNFα revealed that nociceptive stimulation increased the expression of caspase 8 and the active subunit (12 kDa) of caspase 3, indicative of active apoptosis at a time point consistent with the onset of mechanical allodynia. In addition, immunohistochemical analysis revealed distinct morphological signs of apoptosis in neurons and microglia at 24h after stimulation. Interestingly, expression of the inflammatory mediator NFκB was unaltered by nociceptive stimulation. These results suggest that noxious input caudal to the level of SCI can increase the onset and expression of behavioral responses indicative of pain, potentially involving TNFα signaling.

  12. Tumor necrosis factor α sensitizes spinal cord TRPV1 receptors to the endogenous agonist N-oleoyldopamine

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Modulation of synaptic transmission in the spinal cord dorsal horn is thought to be involved in the development and maintenance of different pathological pain states. The proinflamatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), is an established pain modulator in both the peripheral and the central nervous system. Up-regulation of TNFα and its receptors (TNFR) in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cells and in the spinal cord has been shown to play an important role in neuropathic and inflam...

  13. Bancos de cordón umbilical Umbilical cord banks

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    La utilización de sangre de cordón como fuente de precursores hematológicos se remonta a 1983 cuando Boyse apuntó el potencial en progenitores existente en la sangre de cordón, realizándose un año más tarde las primeras experiencias sobre modelos murinos. Tuvieron que pasar más de cinco años para que Gluckman realizara la primera experiencia en humanos. Un niño afecto de anemia de Fanconi fue trasplantado con progenitores de sangre de cordón umbilical de su hermana HLA idéntica, realizándose ...

  14. Role of 5-HT1 receptor subtypes in the modulation of pain and synaptic transmission in rat spinal superficial dorsal horn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Hyo-Jin; Mitchell, Vanessa A; Vaughan, Christopher W

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE 5-HT receptor agonists have variable nociceptive effects within the spinal cord. While there is some evidence for 5-HT1A spinally-mediated analgesia, the role of other 5-HT1 receptor subtypes remains unclear. In the present study, we examined the spinal actions of a range of 5-HT1 agonists, including sumatriptan, on acute pain, plus their effect on afferent-evoked synaptic transmission onto superficial dorsal horn neurons. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH For in vivo experiments, 5-HT agonists were injected via chronically implanted spinal catheters to examine their effects in acute mechanical and thermal pain assays using a paw pressure analgesymeter and a Hargreave's device. For in vitro experiments, whole-cell patch-clamp recordings of primary afferent-evoked glutamatergic EPSC were made from lamina II neurons in rat lumbar spinal slices. KEY RESULTS Intrathecal (i.t.) delivery of the 5-HT1A agonist R ± 8-OH-DPAT (30–300 nmol) produced a dose-dependent thermal, but not mechanical, analgesia. Sumatriptan and the 5-HT1B, 5-HT1D, 5-HT1F agonists CP93129, PNU109291 and LY344864 (100 nmol) had no effect on either acute pain assay. R ± 8-OH-DPAT (1 µM) and sumatriptan (3 µM) both reduced the amplitude of the evoked EPSC. In contrast, CP93129, PNU109291 and LY344864 (0.3–3 µM) had no effect on the evoked EPSC. The actions of both R ± 8-OH-DPAT and sumatriptan were abolished by the 5-HT1A antagonist WAY100635 (3 µM). CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS These findings indicate that the 5-HT1A receptor subtype predominantly mediates the acute antinociceptive and cellular actions of 5-HT1 ligands within the rat superficial dorsal horn. PMID:21950560

  15. Suicide in a spinal cord injured population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartkopp, A; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Seidenschnur, A M

    1998-01-01

    To determine the relation between functional status and risk of suicide among individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI).......To determine the relation between functional status and risk of suicide among individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI)....

  16. Spinal Cord Injury Model System Information Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Go New to Website Managing Bowel Function After Spinal Cord Injury Resilience, Depression and Bouncing Back after SCI Getting ... the UAB-SCIMS Contact the UAB-SCIMS UAB Spinal Cord Injury Model System Newly Injured Health Daily Living Consumer ...

  17. Percutaneous umbilical cord blood sampling - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100196.htm Percutaneous umbilical cord blood sampling - series—Normal anatomy To use the ... or blood disorder, your doctor may recommend percutaneous umbilical cord blood sampling (PUBS), which is performed at 18 ...

  18. Endocannabinoid-dependent long-term depression in a nociceptive synapse requires coordinated presynaptic and postsynaptic transcription and translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Sharleen; Burrell, Brian D

    2013-03-06

    Endocannabinoids (eCBs) play an important role in long-term regulation of synaptic signaling in both vertebrates and invertebrates. In this study, the role of transcription- and translation-dependent processes in presynaptic versus postsynaptic neurons was examined during eCB-mediated synaptic plasticity in the CNS of the leech. Low-frequency stimulation (LFS) of non-nociceptive afferents elicits eCB-dependent long-term depression (eCB-LTD) heterosynaptically in nociceptive synapses that lasts at least 2 h. Bath application of emetine, a protein synthesis inhibitor, blocked eCB-LTD after afferent LFS or exogenous eCB application, indicating that this depression was translation dependent. Bath application of actinomycin D, an irreversible RNA synthesis inhibitor, or 5,6-dichlorobenzimidazole 1-β-d-ribofurandoside (DRB), a reversible RNA synthesis inhibitor, also prevented eCB-LTD. Selective injection of DRB or emetine into the presynaptic or postsynaptic neuron before LFS indicated that eCB-LTD required transcription and translation in the postsynaptic neuron but only translation in the presynaptic cell. Depression observed immediately after LFS was also blocked when these transcription- and translation-dependent processes were inhibited. It is proposed that induction of eCB-LTD in this nociceptive synapse requires the coordination of presynaptic protein synthesis and postsynaptic mRNA and protein synthesis. These findings provide significant insights into both eCB-based synaptic plasticity and understanding how activity in non-nociceptive afferents modulates nociceptive pathways.

  19. Timing of Surgery After Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Matthew; Schuster, James

    2017-01-01

    Although timing for surgical intervention after spinal cord injury remains controversial, there is accumulating evidence suggesting that early surgery may improve neurologic outcomes, particularly with incomplete spinal cord injury, and may reduce non-neurologic complications and health care resource utilization. Moreover, even in patients with complete spinal cord injury, minor improvement in neurologic function can lead to significant changes in quality of life. This article reviews the experimental and clinical data examining surgical timing after spinal cord injury.

  20. Management of umbilical cord clamping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webbon, Lucy

    2013-02-01

    The Royal College of Midwives (RCM) has updated its third stage of labour guidelines (RCM 2012) to be clearly supportive of a delay in umbilical cord clamping, although specific guidance on timing is yet to be announced. It is therefore imperative that both midwives and student midwives understand and are able to integrate delaying into their practice, as well as communicating to women the benefits; only in this way can we give women fully informed choices on this aspect of care. The main benefit of delayed cord clamping is the protection it can provide in reducing childhood anaemia, which is a major issue, especially in poorer countries. A review of the evidence found no risks linked to delayed clamping, and no evidence that it cannot be used in combination with the administration of uterotonic drugs. Delayed cord clamping can be especially beneficial for pre term and compromised babies.

  1. Aquaporins in the Spinal Cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal K. Oklinski

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Aquaporins (AQPs are water channel proteins robustly expressed in the central nervous system (CNS. A number of previous studies described the cellular expression sites and investigated their major roles and function in the brain and spinal cord. Among thirteen different mammalian AQPs, AQP1 and AQP4 have been mainly studied in the CNS and evidence has been presented that they play important roles in the pathogenesis of CNS injury, edema and multiple diseases such as multiple sclerosis, neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, glioblastoma multiforme, Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. The objective of this review is to highlight the current knowledge about AQPs in the spinal cord and their proposed roles in pathophysiology and pathogenesis related to spinal cord lesions and injury.

  2. Psychophysics of a nociceptive test in the mouse: ambient temperature as a key factor for variation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanne Pincedé

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The mouse is increasingly used in biomedical research, notably in behavioral neurosciences for the development of tests or models of pain. Our goal was to provide the scientific community with an outstanding tool that allows the determination of psychophysical descriptors of a nociceptive reaction, which are inaccessible with conventional methods: namely the true threshold, true latency, conduction velocity of the peripheral fibers that trigger the response and latency of the central decision-making process. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Basically, the procedures involved heating of the tail with a CO(2 laser, recording of tail temperature with an infrared camera and stopping the heating when the animal reacted. The method is based mainly on the measurement of three observable variables, namely the initial temperature, the heating rate and the temperature reached at the actual moment of the reaction following random variations in noxious radiant heat. The initial temperature of the tail, which itself depends on the ambient temperature, very markedly influenced the behavioral threshold, the behavioral latency and the conduction velocity of the peripheral fibers but not the latency of the central decision-making. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We have validated a psychophysical approach to nociceptive reactions for the mouse, which has already been described for rats and Humans. It enables the determination of four variables, which contribute to the overall latency of the response. The usefulness of such an approach was demonstrated by providing new fundamental findings regarding the influence of ambient temperature on nociceptive processes. We conclude by challenging the validity of using as "pain index" the reaction time of a behavioral response to an increasing heat stimulus and emphasize the need for a very careful control of the ambient temperature, as a prevailing environmental source of variation, during any behavioral testing of

  3. Peripheral and central determinants of a nociceptive reaction: an approach to psychophysics in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoist, Jean-Michel; Pincedé, Ivanne; Ballantyne, Kay; Plaghki, Léon; Le Bars, Daniel

    2008-09-03

    The quantitative end-point for many behavioral tests of nociception is the reaction time, i.e. the time lapse between the beginning of the application of a stimulus, e.g. heat, and the evoked response. Since it is technically impossible to heat the skin instantaneously by conventional means, the question of the significance of the reaction time to radiant heat remains open. We developed a theoretical framework, a related experimental paradigm and a model to analyze in psychophysical terms the "tail-flick" responses of rats to random variations of noxious radiant heat. A CO(2) laser was used to avoid the drawbacks associated with standard methods of thermal stimulation. Heating of the skin was recorded with an infrared camera and was stopped by the reaction of the animal. For the first time, we define and determine two key descriptors of the behavioral response, namely the behavioral threshold (Tbeta) and the behavioral latency (Lbeta). By employing more than one site of stimulation, the paradigm allows determination of the conduction velocity of the peripheral fibers that trigger the response (V) and an estimation of the latency (Ld) of the central decision-making process. Ld (approximately 130 ms) is unaffected by ambient or skin temperature changes that affect the behavioral threshold (approximately 42.2-44.9 degrees C in the 20-30 degrees C range), behavioral latency (psychophysical (Tbeta, Lbeta, Ld) and neurophysiological (V) variables that have been previously inaccessible with conventional methods. Such an approach satisfies the repeated requests for improving nociceptive tests and offers a potentially heuristic progress for studying nociceptive behavior on more firm physiological and psychophysical grounds. The validity of using a reaction time of a behavioral response to an increasing heat stimulus as a "pain index" is challenged. This is illustrated by the predicted temperature-dependent variations of the behavioral TFL elicited by spontaneous variations

  4. Peripheral and spinal mechanisms of nociception in a rat reserpine-induced pain model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Toru; Katanosaka, Kimiaki; Yasui, Masaya; Hayashi, Koei; Yamashita, Mai; Wakatsuki, Koji; Kiyama, Hiroshi; Yamanaka, Akihiro; Mizumura, Kazue

    2015-03-01

    Chronic widespread pain is a serious medical problem, yet the mechanisms of nociception and pain are poorly understood. Using a reserpine-induced pain model originally reported as a putative animal model for fibromyalgia, this study was undertaken to examine the following: (1) expression of several ion channels responsible for pain, mechanotransduction, and generation/propagation of action potentials in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG), (2) activities of peripheral nociceptive afferents, and (3) alterations in spinal microglial cells. A significant increase in mRNA expression of the acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC)-3 was detected in the DRG, and the behavioral mechanical hyperalgesia was significantly reversed by subcutaneous injection of APETx2, a selective blocker of ASIC3. Single-fiber recordings in vitro revealed facilitated mechanical responses of mechanoresponsive C-fibers both in the skin and muscle although the proportion of mechanoresponsive C-nociceptors was paradoxically decreased. In the spinal dorsal horn, microglial cells labeled with Iba1 immunoreactivity was activated, especially in laminae I-II where the nociceptive input is mainly processed compared with the other laminae. The activated microglia and behavioral hyperalgesia were significantly tranquilized by intraperitoneal injection of minocycline. These results suggest that the increase in ASIC3 in the DRG facilitated mechanical response of the remaining C-nociceptors and that activated spinal microglia may direct to intensify pain in this model. Pain may be further amplified by reserpine-induced dysfunction of the descending pain inhibitory system and by the decrease in peripheral drive to this system resulting from a reduced proportion of mechanoresponsive C-nociceptors.

  5. Modification of formalin-induced nociception by different histamine receptor agonists and antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzin, Davood; Nosrati, Farnaz

    2007-01-15

    The present study evaluated the effects of different histamine receptor agonists and antagonists on the nociceptive response in the mouse formalin test. Intracerebroventricular (20-40 microg/mouse i.c.v.) or subcutaneous (1-10 mg/kg s.c.) injection of HTMT (H(1) receptor agonist) elicited a dose-related hyperalgesia in the early and late phases. Conversely, intraperitoneal (20 and 30 mg/kg i.p.) injection of dexchlorpheniramine (H(1) receptor antagonist) was antinociceptive in both phases. At a dose ineffective per se, dexchlorpheniramine (10 mg/kg i.p.) antagonized the hyperalgesia induced by HTMT (40 mug/mouse i.c.v. or 10 mg/kg s.c.). Dimaprit (H(2) receptor agonist, 30 mg/kg i.p.) and ranitidine (H(2) receptor antagonist, 20 and 40 mg/kg i.p.) reduced the nociceptive responses in the early and late phases. No significant change in the antinociceptive activity was found following the combination of dimaprit (30 mg/kg i.p.) with ranitidine (10 mg/kg i.p.). The antinociceptive effect of dimaprit (30 mg/kg i.p.) was prevented by naloxone (5 mg/kg i.p.) in the early phase or by imetit (H(3) receptor agonist, 25 mg/kg i.p.) in both early and late phases. The histamine H(3) receptor agonist imetit was hyperalgesic following i.p. administration of 50 mg/kg. Imetit-induced hyperalgesia was completely prevented by treatment with a dose ineffective per se of thioperamide (H(3) receptor antagonist, 5 mg/kg i.p.). The results suggest that histamine H(1) and H(3) receptor activations increase sensitivity to nociceptive stimulus in the formalin test.

  6. Is the cutaneous silent period an opiate-sensitive nociceptive reflex?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inghilleri, Maurizio; Conte, Antonella; Frasca, Vittorio; Berardelli, Alfredo; Manfredi, Mario; Cruccu, Giorgio

    2002-05-01

    In humans, high-intensity electrical stimuli delivered to the fingers induce an inhibitory effect on C7-T1 motoneurons. This inhibitory reflex, called the cutaneous silent period (CSP) is considered a defense response specific for the human upper limbs. It is not clear whether the CSP-like other defense responses such as the corneal reflex and the R III reflex-is an opiate-sensitive nociceptive reflex. Because opiates suppress some, but not all, nociceptive reflexes, we studied the effect of the narcotic-analgesic drug fentanyl on the CSP and the R III reflex. The CSP was recorded from the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle in seven normal subjects during voluntary contraction, before and 10 and 20 min after fentanyl injection. To assess possible fentanyl-induced changes, we also tested the effect of finger stimulation on motor evoked potentials (MEPs) elicited in the FDI muscle by transcranial magnetic stimulation before and after fentanyl injection. Fentanyl-induced changes were also studied on the R III reflex recorded from the biceps femoris muscle. Fentanyl, as expected, suppressed the R III reflex but failed to change the inhibitory effect of finger stimulation on FDI motoneurons. Finger stimulation reduced the size of MEPs in the FDI, and fentanyl injection left this inhibitory effect unchanged. The differential fentanyl-induced modulation of the CSP and R III reflex provides evidence that the CSP circuit is devoid of mu-opiate receptors and is therefore an opiate-insensitive nociceptive reflex, which may be useful in the assessment of central-acting, non-opioid drugs.

  7. Role of spinal GABAA receptors in pudendal inhibition of nociceptive and nonnociceptive bladder reflexes in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zhiying; Reese, Jeremy; Schwen, Zeyad; Shen, Bing; Wang, Jicheng; Roppolo, James R; de Groat, William C; Tai, Changfeng

    2014-04-01

    Picrotoxin, an antagonist for γ-aminobutyric acid receptor subtype A (GABAA), was used to investigate the role of GABAA receptors in nociceptive and nonnociceptive reflex bladder activities and pudendal inhibition of these activities in cats under α-chloralose anesthesia. Acetic acid (AA; 0.25%) was used to irritate the bladder and induce nociceptive bladder overactivity, while saline was used to distend the bladder and induce nonnociceptive bladder activity. To modulate the bladder reflex, pudendal nerve stimulation (PNS) was applied at multiple threshold (T) intensities for inducing anal sphincter twitching. AA irritation significantly (P < 0.01) reduced bladder capacity to 34.3 ± 7.1% of the saline control capacity, while PNS at 2T and 4T significantly (P < 0.01) increased AA bladder capacity to 84.0 ± 7.8 and 93.2 ± 15.0%, respectively, of the saline control. Picrotoxin (0.4 mg it) did not change AA bladder capacity but completely removed PNS inhibition of AA-induced bladder overactivity. Picrotoxin (iv) only increased AA bladder capacity at a high dose (0.3 mg/kg) but significantly (P < 0.05) reduced 2T PNS inhibition at low doses (0.01-0.1 mg/kg). During saline cystometry, PNS significantly (P < 0.01) increased bladder capacity to 147.0 ± 7.6% at 2T and 172.7 ± 8.9% at 4T of control capacity, and picrotoxin (0.4 mg it or 0.03-0.3 mg/kg iv) also significantly (P < 0.05) increased bladder capacity. However, picrotoxin treatment did not alter PNS inhibition during saline infusion. These results indicate that spinal GABAA receptors have different roles in controlling nociceptive and nonnociceptive reflex bladder activities and in PNS inhibition of these activities.

  8. Induction of muscle cramps by nociceptive stimulation of latent myofascial trigger points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Hong-You; Zhang, Yang; Boudreau, Shellie; Yue, Shou-Wei; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this present study is to test the hypothesis that nociceptive stimulation of latent myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) increases the occurrence of local muscle cramps. Nociceptive muscle stimulation was obtained by a bolus injection of glutamate (0.1 ml, 0.5 M) into a latent MTrP and a control point (a non-MTrP) located in the right or left gastrocnemius medialis muscles in 14 healthy subjects. A bolus of isotonic saline (0.9%, 0.1 ml) injection served as a control. The injections were guided by intramuscular electromyography (EMG) showing resting spontaneous electrical activity at a latent MTrP and no such activity at a non-MTrP. Intramuscular and surface EMG activities in the gastrocnemius medialis muscle were recorded pre-, during-, and post-injection for a period of 8 min to monitor the occurrence of muscle cramps, which are characterized by a brief episodic burst of high levels of EMG activity. The results showed that glutamate and isotonic saline injections into the latent MTrPs induced higher peak pain intensity than into the non-MTrPs (both P < 0.05). Glutamate injection induced higher peak pain intensity than isotonic saline injection into either latent MTrPs or non-MTrPs (both P < 0.05). Muscle camps were observed in 92.86% of the subjects following glutamate injection into the latent MTrPs, but not into the non-MTrPs (P < 0.001). No muscle cramps were recorded following isotonic saline injection into either the latent MTrPs or the non-MTrPs. These results suggest that latent MTrPs could be involved in the genesis of muscle cramps. Focal increase in nociceptive sensitivity at MTrPs constitutes one of the mechanisms underlying muscle cramps.

  9. Decoding Subjective Intensity of Nociceptive Pain from Pre-stimulus and Post-stimulus Brain Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiheng eTu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Pain is a highly subjective experience. Self-report is the gold standard for pain assessment in clinical practice, but it may not be available or reliable in some populations. Neuroimaging data, such as electroencephalography (EEG and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI, have the potential to be used to provide physiology-based and quantitative nociceptive pain assessment tools that complements self-report. However, existing neuroimaging-based nociceptive pain assessments only rely on the information in pain-evoked brain activities, but neglect the fact that the perceived intensity of pain is also encoded by ongoing brain activities prior to painful stimulation. Here, we proposed to use machine learning algorithms to decode pain intensity from both pre-stimulus ongoing and post-stimulus evoked brain activities. Neural features that were correlated with intensity of laser-evoked nociceptive pain were extracted from high-dimensional pre- and post-stimulus EEG and fMRI activities using partial least-squares regression (PLSR. Further, we used support vector machine (SVM to predict the intensity of pain from pain-related time-frequency EEG patterns and BOLD-fMRI patterns. Results showed that combining predictive information in pre- and post-stimulus brain activities can achieve significantly better performance in classifying high-pain and low-pain and in predicting the rating of perceived pain than only using post-stimulus brain activities. Therefore, the proposed pain prediction method holds great potential in basic research and clinical applications.

  10. Psychological Aspects of Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Daniel W.

    1976-01-01

    Reviewing literature on the psychological impact of spinal cord injury suggests: (a) depression may not be a precondition for injury adjustment; (b) many persons sustaining cord injury may have experienced psychological disruption prior to injury; and (c) indexes of rehabilitation success need to be developed for the spinal cord injured. (Author)

  11. Evaluation of spinal cord injury animal models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning Zhang; Marong Fang; Haohao Chen; Fangming Gou; Mingxing Ding

    2014-01-01

    Because there is no curative treatment for spinal cord injury, establishing an ideal animal model is important to identify injury mechanisms and develop therapies for individuals suffering from spinal cord injuries. In this article, we systematically review and analyze various kinds of animal models of spinal cord injury and assess their advantages and disadvantages for further studies.

  12. Delayed umbilical cord separation in alloimmune neutropenia.

    OpenAIRE

    Kemp, A S; Lubitz, L

    1993-01-01

    Delayed umbilical cord separation in association with neonatal alloimmune neutropenia is reported. Delayed umbilical cord separation has been described in association with defects in neutrophil function. The present case indicates that deficiency in neutrophil number should also be considered as a cause of delayed cord separation.

  13. Chronic morphine administration enhances nociceptive sensitivity and local cytokine production after incision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angst Martin S

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background - The chronic use of opioids prior to surgery leads to lowered pain thresholds and exaggerated pain levels after these procedures. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain this heightened sensitivity commonly termed opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH. Most of these proposed mechanisms involve plastic events in the central or peripheral nervous systems. Alterations in the abundance of peripheral mediators of nociception have not previously been explored. Results - In these experiments mice were treated with saline (control or ascending daily doses of morphine to generate a state of OIH followed by hind paw incision. In other experiments morphine treatment was initiated at the time of incision. Both mechanical allodynia and peri-incisional skin cytokine levels were measured. Myeloperoxidase (MPO assays were used to determine neutrophil activity near the wounds. The cytokine production inhibitor pentoxifylline was used to determine the functional significance of the excess cytokines in previously morphine treated animals. Mice treated chronically treated with morphine prior to incision were found to have enhanced skin levels of IL-1β, IL-6, G-CSF, KC and TNFα after incision at one or more time points compared to saline pretreated controls. The time courses of individual cytokines followed different patterns. There was no discernable effect of chronic morphine treatment on wound area neutrophil infiltration. Pentoxifylline reduced cytokine levels and reversed the excess mechanical sensitization caused by chronic morphine administration prior to incision. Morphine treatment initiated at the time of incision did not lead to a generalized enhancement of cytokine production or nociceptive sensitization in excess of the levels observed after incision alone. Conclusion - The enhanced level of nociceptive sensitization seen after incision in animals chronically exposed to morphine is associated with elevated levels of several

  14. Can preoperative electrical nociceptive stimulation predict acute pain after groin herniotomy?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aasvang, Eske Kvanner; Hansen, Jeanette Birch; Kehlet, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    groin hernia repair. The correlation between the pain data for electrical stimulation was compared with the postoperative pain during the first week in 165 patients, whereof 3 were excluded. Preoperative electrical pain detection threshold and electrical pain tolerance threshold did not correlate...... to postoperative pain (rho = -0.13, P = .09, and rho = -1.2, P = .4, respectively. PERSPECTIVE: Although preoperative electrical nociceptive stimulation may predict patients at risk of high-intensity acute pain after other surgical procedures, this was not the case in groin hernia repair patients receiving...

  15. Influence of tramadol on acute thermal and mechanical cutaneous nociception in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütter, Alexandra F; Tünsmeyer, Julia; Kästner, Sabine B R

    2017-03-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of tramadol on acute nociception in dogs. Experimental, blinded, randomized, crossover study. Six healthy laboratory Beagle dogs. Dogs received three treatments intravenously (IV): isotonic saline placebo (P), tramadol 1 mg kg(-1) (T1) and tramadol 4 mg kg(-1) (T4). Thermal thresholds were determined by ramped contact heat stimulation (0.6 °C second(-1)) at the lateral thoracic wall. Mechanical thresholds (MT) were measured using a probe containing three blunted pins which were constantly advanced over the radial bone, using a rate of force increase of 0.8 N second(-1). Stimulation end points were defined responses (e.g. skin twitch, head turn, repositioning, vocalization) or pre-set cut-out values (55 °C, 20 N). Thresholds were determined before treatment and at predetermined time points up to 24 hours after treatment. At each measurement point, blood was collected for determination of O-desmethyltramadol concentrations. The degree of sedation and behavioural side effects were recorded. Data were analysed by one-way anova and two-way anova for repeated measurements. Thermal nociception was not influenced by drug treatment. Mechanical nociception was significantly increased between P and T1 at 120 and 240 minutes, and between P and T4 at 30, 60, 240 and 420 minutes. T1 and T4 did not differ. O-desmethyltramadol (M1) maximum plasma concentrations (Cmax) were 4.2±0.8 ng mL(-1) and 14.3±2.8 ng mL(-1) for T1 and T4, respectively. Times to reach maximum plasma concentrations (Tmax) were 27.6±6.3 minutes for T1 and 32.1±7.8 minutes for T4. No sedation occurred. There were signs of nausea and mild to moderate salivation in both groups. Tramadol was metabolized marginally to O-desmethyltramadol and failed to produce clinically relevant acute antinociception. Therefore, the use of tramadol for acute nociceptive pain is questionable in dogs. Copyright © 2017 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and

  16. Kaempferol, a dietary flavonoid, ameliorates acute inflammatory and nociceptive symptoms in gastritis, pancreatitis, and abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Shi Hyoung; Park, Jae Gwang; Sung, Gi-Ho; Yang, Sungjae; Yang, Woo Seok; Kim, Eunji; Kim, Jun Ho; Ha, Van Thai; Kim, Han Gyung; Yi, Young-Su; Kim, Ji Hye; Baek, Kwang-Soo; Sung, Nak Yoon; Lee, Mi-nam; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Cho, Jae Youl

    2015-07-01

    Kaempferol (KF) is the most abundant polyphenol in tea, fruits, vegetables, and beans. However, little is known about its in vivo anti-inflammatory efficacy and mechanisms of action. To study these, several acute mouse inflammatory and nociceptive models, including gastritis, pancreatitis, and abdominal pain were employed. Kaempferol was shown to attenuate the expansion of inflammatory lesions seen in ethanol (EtOH)/HCl- and aspirin-induced gastritis, LPS/caerulein (CA) triggered pancreatitis, and acetic acid-induced writhing. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Contrasting phenotypes of putative proprioceptive and nociceptive trigeminal neurons innervating jaw muscle in rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Connor Mark

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the clinical significance of muscle pain, and the extensive investigation of the properties of muscle afferent fibers, there has been little study of the ion channels on sensory neurons that innervate muscle. In this study, we have fluorescently tagged sensory neurons that innervate the masseter muscle, which is unique because cell bodies for its muscle spindles are in a brainstem nucleus (mesencephalic nucleus of the 5th cranial nerve, MeV while all its other sensory afferents are in the trigeminal ganglion (TG. We examine the hypothesis that certain molecules proposed to be used selectively by nociceptors fail to express on muscle spindles afferents but appear on other afferents from the same muscle. Results MeV muscle afferents perfectly fit expectations of cells with a non-nociceptive sensory modality: Opiates failed to inhibit calcium channel currents (ICa in 90% of MeV neurons, although ICa were inhibited by GABAB receptor activation. All MeV afferents had brief (1 msec action potentials driven solely by tetrodotoxin (TTX-sensitive Na channels and no MeV afferent expressed either of three ion channels (TRPV1, P2X3, and ASIC3 thought to be transducers for nociceptive stimuli, although they did express other ATP and acid-sensing channels. Trigeminal masseter afferents were much more diverse. Virtually all of them expressed at least one, and often several, of the three putative nociceptive transducer channels, but the mix varied from cell to cell. Calcium currents in 80% of the neurons were measurably inhibited by μ-opioids, but the extent of inhibition varied greatly. Almost all TG masseter afferents expressed some TTX-insensitive sodium currents, but the amount compared to TTX sensitive sodium current varied, as did the duration of action potentials. Conclusion Most masseter muscle afferents that are not muscle spindle afferents express molecules that are considered characteristic of nociceptors, but these

  18. The effect of intracerebroventricular injection of histamine in visceral nociception induced by acetic acid in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Zanboori Ali; Tamaddonfard Esmaeal; Mojtahedin Ali

    2010-01-01

    Objective : This study was designed to investigate the role of brain histamine and H1 and H2 receptors in mediating the central perception of visceral pain in rats. Materials and Methods : In conscious rats implanted with a lateral brain ventricle cannula, the effect of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of histamine (2.5, 10, and 40 μg), and chlorpheniramine and ranitidine at the same doses of 5, 20, and 80 μg were investigated on visceral pain. Visceral nociception induce...

  19. The Effect of Bee Venom Acupuncture into Chok-samni (ST36 on Neuronal Activity in the Spinal Cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yim Yun-Kyoung

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to evaluate the analgesic effect of bee venom (BV Acupuncture into different treatment points, Chok-samni (ST36 and blank loci of the gluteal muscle and back. We investigated neuronal activity in the spinal cord using the Fos immunohistochemical technique according to the pretreatment with different concentrations of BV, thirty minutes before the formalin injection. The results were summarized as follows: 1. The number of Fos-like immunoreactive (Fos-LI neurons in L2 segment of the saline-formalin treated group was significantly increased in NECK and VENT of the spinal cord as compared with that of the room control group. However, there was no significant change in the number of the Fos-LI neurons in L2 segment of the BV-formalin treated group as compared with that of the room control group. 2. The number of Fos-LI neurons in L3-5 segment of the saline-formalin group was significantly increased in all the regions of the spinal cord as compared with that of the room control group. However, the Fos-LI neurons in L3-5 segment of the BV-formalin treated group was dramatically decreased in all the regions of the spinal cord as compared with that of the saline-formalin group. Therefore, these results indicated that the BV acupuncture suppressed the nociceptive neuronal activities in L3-5 of the spinal cord induced by formalin injection. 3. There was a strong positive correlation between the formalin-induced pain behavior and the number of the Fos-LI neurons in L3-5 segment.

  20. Bortezomib Treatment Produces Nocifensive Behavior and Changes in the Expression of TRPV1, CGRP, and Substance P in the Rat DRG, Spinal Cord, and Sciatic Nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Quartu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate neurochemical changes associated with bortezomib-induced painful peripheral neuropathy (PN, we examined the effects of a single-dose intravenous administration of bortezomib and a well-established “chronic” schedule in a rat model of bortezomib-induced PN. The TRPV1 channel and sensory neuropeptides CGRP and substance P (SP were studied in L4-L5 dorsal root ganglia (DRGs, spinal cord, and sciatic nerve. Behavioral measures, performed at the end of the chronic bortezomib treatment, confirmed a reduction of mechanical nociceptive threshold, whereas no difference occurred in thermal withdrawal latency. Western blot analysis showed a relative increase of TRPV1 in DRG and spinal cord after both acute and chronic bortezomib administration. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction revealed a decrease of TRPV1 and CGRP mRNA relative levels after chronic treatment. Immunohistochemistry showed that in the DRGs, TRPV1-, CGRP-, and SP-immunoreactive neurons were mostly small- and medium-sized and the proportion of TRPV1- and CGRP-labeled neurons increased after treatment. A bortezomib-induced increase in density of TRPV1- and CGRP-immunoreactive innervation in the dorsal horn was also observed. Our findings show that bortezomib-treatment selectively affects subsets of DRG neurons likely involved in the processing of nociceptive stimuli and that neurochemical changes may contribute to development and persistence of pain in bortezomib-induced PN.

  1. Rabbit IgG distribution in skin, spinal cord and DRG following systemic injection in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonra, J R; Mendell, L M

    1997-12-01

    In order to determine the distribution of antibodies such as anti-NGF following systemic injection in neonates, immunocytochemical techniques were used to examine the localization of rabbit IgG in rat skin, DRG, and spinal cord after treatments with normal rabbit serum or purified rabbit IgG. Daily subcutaneous injections beginning on postnatal day 2 or on day 15 were given for three days. On the fourth day the animals were sacrificed and tissues were processed for rabbit IgG-IR. In the dorsal and ventral spinal cord, staining intensities suggest a substantial increase in the blood-brain barrier during the first two weeks after birth. Staining intensity in the epidermis of the glabrous skin from the hindpaw was substantially lower than in the adjacent dermis. In addition, IgG infrequently accumulated intracellularly in intensely stained patches in the epidermis. IgG was also able to reach relatively high intracellular concentrations in a small number of sensory neurons. The IgG staining pattern in the skin was similar when anti-NGF itself was administered to the animals. The results are discussed in the context of the effects of anti-NGF on the development of nociceptive afferents.

  2. Measuring cutaneous thermal nociception in group-housed pigs using laser technique - effects of laser power output

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herskin, Mette S.; Ladevig, Jan; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2009-01-01

    of the metatarsus were examined using 15 gilts kept in one group and tested in individual feeding stalls after feeding. Increasing the power output led to gradually decreasing latency to respond (P ... are available, especially methodology which is applicable for pigs kept in group-housing without disturbing the daily routines of the animals. To validate a laser-based method to measure thermal nociception in group-housed pigs, we performed two experiments observing the behavioural responses toward cutaneous...... nociceptive stimulation from a computer-controlled CO2-laser beam applied to either the caudal part of the metatarsus on the hind legs or the shoulder region of gilts. In Exp. 1, effects of laser power output (0, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 W) on nociceptive responses toward stimulation on the caudal aspects...

  3. Delayed umbilical cord clamping in premature neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaempf, Joseph W; Tomlinson, Mark W; Kaempf, Andrew J; Wu, YingXing; Wang, Lian; Tipping, Nicole; Grunkemeier, Gary

    2012-08-01

    Delayed umbilical cord clamping is reported to increase neonatal blood volume. We estimated the clinical outcomes in premature neonates who had delayed umbilical cord clamping compared with a similar group who had early umbilical cord clamping. This was a before-after investigation comparing early umbilical cord clamping with delayed umbilical cord clamping (45 seconds) in two groups of singleton neonates, very low birth weight (VLBW) (401-1,500 g) and low birth weight (LBW) (greater than 1,500 g but less than 35 weeks gestation). Neonates were excluded from delayed umbilical cord clamping if they needed immediate major resuscitation. Primary outcomes were provision of delivery room resuscitation, hematocrit, red cell transfusions, and the principle Vermont Oxford Network outcomes. In VLBW neonates (77 delayed umbilical cord clamping, birth weight [mean±standard deviation] 1,099±266 g; 77 early umbilical cord clamping 1,058±289 g), delayed umbilical cord clamping was associated with less delivery room resuscitation, higher Apgar scores at 1 minute, and higher hematocrit. Delayed umbilical cord clamping was not associated with significant differences in the overall transfusion rate, peak bilirubin, any of the principle Vermont Oxford Network outcomes, or mortality. In LBW neonates (172 delayed umbilical cord clamping, birth weight [mean±standard deviation] 2,159±384 g; 172 early umbilical cord clamping 2,203±447 g), delayed umbilical cord clamping was associated with higher hematocrit and was not associated with a change in delivery room resuscitation or Apgar scores or with changes in the transfusion rate or peak bilirubin. Regression analysis showed increasing gestational age and birth weight and delayed umbilical cord clamping were the best predictors of higher hematocrit and less delivery room resuscitation. Delayed umbilical cord clamping can safely be performed in singleton premature neonates and is associated with a higher hematocrit, less delivery room

  4. Affective disturbance associated with premenstrual dysphoric disorder does not disrupt emotional modulation of pain and spinal nociception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhudy, Jamie L; Bartley, Emily J; Palit, Shreela; Kuhn, Bethany L; Kerr, Kara L; Martin, Satin L; DelVentura, Jennifer L; Terry, Ellen L

    2014-10-01

    In healthy individuals, emotions modulate pain and spinal nociception according to a valence linear trend (ie, pain/nociception is highest during negative emotions and lowest during positive emotions). However, emerging evidence suggests that emotional modulation of pain (but not spinal nociception) is disrupted in fibromyalgia and disorders associated with chronic pain risk (eg, major depression, insomnia). The present study attempted to extend this work and to examine whether women with premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD), a cyclical syndrome associated with debilitating affective symptoms during the late-luteal (premenstrual) phase of the menstrual cycle, is also associated with disrupted emotional modulation of pain. To do so, an affective picture-viewing procedure was used to study emotional modulation of pain and spinal nociception in 14 women with PMDD and 14 control women during mid-follicular, ovulatory, and late-luteal phases of the menstrual cycle (verified by salivary hormone levels and luteinizing hormone tests). At each phase, mutilation, neutral, and erotic pictures were presented to manipulate emotion. During picture viewing, suprathreshold electrocutaneous stimuli were presented to evoke pain and the nociceptive flexion reflex (NFR; a physiological measure of spinal nociception). Statistically powerful linear mixed model analyses confirmed that pictures evoked the intended emotional states in both groups across all menstrual phases. Furthermore, emotion modulated pain and NFR according to a valence linear trend in both groups and across all menstrual phases. Thus, PMDD-related affective disturbance is not associated with a failure to emotionally modulate pain, suggesting that PMDD does not share this pain phenotype with major depression, insomnia, and fibromyalgia.

  5. Spinal cord injury at birth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenger-Gron, Jesper; Kock, Kirsten; Nielsen, Rasmus G

    2008-01-01

    UNLABELLED: A case of perinatally acquired spinal cord injury (SCI) is presented. The foetus was vigorous until birth, the breech presented and delivery was performed by a non-traumatic Caesarean section. The infant displayed symptoms of severe SCI but diagnosis was delayed due to severe co...

  6. Depression and Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About Us Patient Care Resources Information & Education SCI Empowerment Project Projects & Research FAQ © 2017 University of Washington ... Cord Injury” (PDF - 477KB)] Depression is a common illness that can affect ... or a mental health specialist immediately. Also, inform those around you ...

  7. TRPV1 and TRPA1 mediate peripheral nitric oxide-induced nociception in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Miyamoto

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO can induce acute pain in humans and plays an important role in pain sensitization caused by inflammation and injury in animal models. There is evidence that NO acts both in the central nervous system via a cyclic GMP pathway and in the periphery on sensory neurons through unknown mechanisms. It has recently been suggested that TRPV1 and TRPA1, two polymodal ion channels that sense noxious stimuli impinging on peripheral nociceptors, are activated by NO in heterologous systems. Here, we investigate the relevance of this activation. We demonstrate that NO donors directly activate TRPV1 and TRPA1 in isolated inside-out patch recordings. Cultured primary sensory neurons display both TRPV1- and TRPA1-dependent responses to NO donors. BH4, an essential co-factor for NO production, causes activation of a subset of DRG neurons as assayed by calcium imaging, and this activation is at least partly dependent on nitric oxide synthase activity. We show that BH4-induced calcium influx is ablated in DRG neurons from TRPA1/TRPV1 double knockout mice, suggesting that production of endogenous levels of NO can activate these ion channels. In behavioral assays, peripheral NO-induced nociception is compromised when TRPV1 and TRPA1 are both ablated. These results provide genetic evidence that the peripheral nociceptive action of NO is mediated by both TRPV1 and TRPA1.

  8. Cannabinoid CB2 receptor-mediated anti-nociception in models of acute and chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhaveri, Maulik D; Sagar, Devi R; Elmes, Steven J R; Kendall, David A; Chapman, Victoria

    2007-08-01

    The endocannabinoid system consists of cannabinoid CB(1) and CB(2) receptors, endogenous ligands and their synthesising/metabolising enzymes. Cannabinoid receptors are present at key sites involved in the relay and modulation of nociceptive information. The analgesic effects of cannabinoids have been well documented. The usefulness of nonselective cannabinoid agonists can, however, be limited by psychoactive side effects associated with activation of CB(1) receptors. Following the recent evidence for CB(2) receptors existing in the nervous system and reports of their up-regulation in chronic pain states and neurodegenerative diseases, much research is now aimed at shedding light on the role of the CB(2) receptor in human disease. Recent studies have demonstrated anti-nociceptive effects of selective CB(2) receptor agonists in animal models of pain in the absence of CNS side effects. This review focuses on the analgesic potential of CB(2) receptor agonists for inflammatory, post-operative and neuropathic pain states and discusses their possible sites and mechanisms of action.

  9. Descending effect on spinal nociception by amygdaloid glutamate varies with the submodality of noxious test stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourbia, Nora; Sagalajev, Boriss; Pertovaara, Antti

    2014-06-06

    Amygdala has an important role in the processing of primary emotions, such as fear. Additionally, amygdala is involved in processing and modulation of pain. While the amygdala, particularly its central nucleus (CeA), has been shown to contribute to pain control, the descending pain regulation by the CeA is still only partly characterized. Here heat and mechanical nociception was tested in both hind limbs of healthy rats with a chronic guide cannula for microinjection of glutamate into the CeA of the left or right hemisphere. The aim was to assess whether the descending pain regulatory effect by glutamate in the amygdala varies with the submodality or the body side of nociceptive testing, brain hemisphere or the amygdaloid glutamate receptor. Motor performance was assessed with the Rotarod test. Amygdaloid glutamate, independent of the treated hemisphere, produced a dose-related heat and mechanical antinociception that varied with the submodality of testing. Heat antinociception was short lasting (minutes), bilateral and not reversed by blocking the amygdaloid NMDA receptor with MK-801. In contrast, mechanical antinociception lasted longer (>20 min), was predominantly contralateral and reversed by blocking the amygdaloid NMDA receptor. At an antinociceptive dose, amygdaloid glutamate failed to influence motor performance. The results indicate that independent of the brain hemisphere, the spatial extent and duration of the descending antinociceptive effect induced by amygdaloid glutamate varies with the amygdaloid glutamate receptor and the submodality of pain.

  10. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5 regulates bladder nociception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crock Lara W

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome (IC/PBS, is a severely debilitating chronic condition that is frequently unresponsive to conventional pain medications. The etiology is unknown, however evidence suggests that nervous system sensitization contributes to enhanced pain in IC/PBS. In particular, central nervous system plasticity of glutamatergic signaling involving NMDA and metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs has been implicated in a variety of chronic pain conditions. Here, we test the hypothesis that mGluR5 mediates both non-inflammatory and inflammatory bladder pain or nociception in a mouse model by monitoring the visceromotor response (VMR during graded bladder distention. Results Using a combination of genetic and pharmacologic approaches, we provide evidence indicating that mGluR5 is necessary for the full expression of VMR in response to bladder distention in the absence of inflammation. Furthermore, we observed that mice infected with a uropathogenic strain of Escherichia coli (UPEC develop inflammatory hyperalgesia to bladder distention, and that the selective mGluR5 antagonist fenobam [N-(3-chlorophenyl-N'-(4,5-dihydro-1-methyl-4-oxo-1H-imidazole-2-yl urea], reduces the VMR to bladder distention in UPEC-infected mice. Conclusions Taken together, these data suggest that mGluR5 modulates both inflammatory and non-inflammatory bladder nociception, and highlight the therapeutic potential for mGluR5 antagonists in the alleviation of bladder pain.

  11. Neural correlates of heterotopic facilitation induced after high frequency electrical stimulation of nociceptive pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Rijn Clementina M

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High frequency electrical stimulation (HFS of primary nociceptive afferents in humans induce a heightened sensitivity in the surrounding non-stimulated skin area. Several studies suggest that this heterotopic effect is the result of central (spinal plasticity. The aim of this study is to investigate HFS-induced central plasticity of sensory processing at the level of the brain using the electroencephalogram (EEG. To this end we measured evoked potentials in response to noxious electrical pinprick-like stimuli applied in the heterotopic skin area before, directly after and 30 minutes after HFS. Results We observed potential cortical electrophysiological correlates of heterotopic facilitation. Two different cortical correlates were found; the first one was a lateralized effect, i.e. a larger N100 amplitude on the conditioned arm than the control arm 30 minutes after end of HFS. This was comparable with the observed lateralized effect of visual analogue scale (VAS scores as response to the mechanical punctate stimuli. The second correlate seems to be a more general (non-lateralized effect, because the result affects both arms. On average for both arms the P200 amplitude increased significantly 30 minutes after end of HFS with respect to baseline. Conclusions We suggest that for studying heterotopic nociceptive facilitation the evoked brain response is suitable and relevant for investigating plasticity at the level of the brain and is perhaps a more sensitive and reliable marker than the perceived pain intensity (e.g. VAS.

  12. Increased Brain Neurotensin and NTSR2 Lead to Weak Nociception in NTSR3/Sortilin Knockout Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devader, Christelle; Moreno, Sébastien; Roulot, Morgane; Deval, Emmanuel; Dix, Thomas; Morales, Carlos R.; Mazella, Jean

    2016-01-01

    The neuropeptide neurotensin (NT) elicits numerous pharmacological effects through three different receptors (NTSR1, NTSR2, and NTSR3 also called sortilin). Pharmacological approaches and generation of NTSR1 and NTSR2-deficient mice allowed to determine the NT-induced antipsychotic like behavior, the inhibitory of weak fear memory and the nociceptive signaling in a rat formalin tonic pain model to NTSR1. Conversely, the effects of NT on thermal and tonic nociceptions were mediated by NTSR2. However, the role of NTSR3/sortilin on the neurotensinergic system was not investigated. Here, by using C57Bl/6J mouse model in which the gene coding for NTSR3/sortilin has been inactivated, we observed a modification of the expression of both NTSR2 and NT itself. Quantitative PCR and protein expression using Western blot analyses and AlphaLisa™ technology resulted in the observation that brain NTSR2 as well as brain and blood NT were 2-fold increased in KO mice leading to a resistance of these mice to thermal and chemical pain. These data confirm that NTSR3/sortilin interacts with other NT receptors (i.e., NTSR2) and that its deletion modifies also the affinity of this receptor to NT. PMID:27932946

  13. Distinct brain systems mediate the effects of nociceptive input and self-regulation on pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Choong-Wan; Roy, Mathieu; Buhle, Jason T; Wager, Tor D

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive self-regulation can strongly modulate pain and emotion. However, it is unclear whether self-regulation primarily influences primary nociceptive and affective processes or evaluative ones. In this study, participants engaged in self-regulation to increase or decrease pain while experiencing multiple levels of painful heat during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) imaging. Both heat intensity and self-regulation strongly influenced reported pain, but they did so via two distinct brain pathways. The effects of stimulus intensity were mediated by the neurologic pain signature (NPS), an a priori distributed brain network shown to predict physical pain with over 90% sensitivity and specificity across four studies. Self-regulation did not influence NPS responses; instead, its effects were mediated through functional connections between the nucleus accumbens and ventromedial prefrontal cortex. This pathway was unresponsive to noxious input, and has been broadly implicated in valuation, emotional appraisal, and functional outcomes in pain and other types of affective processes. These findings provide evidence that pain reports are associated with two dissociable functional systems: nociceptive/affective aspects mediated by the NPS, and evaluative/functional aspects mediated by a fronto-striatal system.

  14. Studies on the anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive properties of Blepharis maderaspatensis leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abimbola Sowemimo

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Blepharis maderaspatensis(L. B. Heyne ex Roth, Acanthaceae, is a procumbent or scrambling perennial herb used traditionally for treatment of snakebites, wounds, edema and gout. The anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive properties of the ethanol extract of the whole plant of B. maderaspatensis was investigated using carrageenan-induced paw edema in rats, xyleneinduced edema in mice, mouse writhing and tail clip tests respectively. The effect of the extract on inflammatory mediators, serotonin and histamine, using the most active dose (75 mg/kg was also carried out. The results showed that the extract of B. maderaspatensis in carrageenan-induced test caused a significant inhibition (84.5%, 90 min of paw edema at a dose of 75 mg/kg while the xylene-induced test caused a significant inhibition (62.65% at 50 mg/kg. The histamine-induced test showed significant inhibition (90.9%, 90 min while serotonin-induced test showed moderate inhibition (54.10%, 180 min. In the mouse writhing and tail clip tests, the extract produced a significant inhibition of 66.21% and 15.81% at 75 mg/kg, respectively. These results collectively demonstrate that the ethanol extract of B. maderaspatensis possesses anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive properties, and this supports the ethnopharmacological use of the plant in the treatment of inflammation.

  15. Distinct brain systems mediate the effects of nociceptive input and self-regulation on pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choong-Wan Woo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive self-regulation can strongly modulate pain and emotion. However, it is unclear whether self-regulation primarily influences primary nociceptive and affective processes or evaluative ones. In this study, participants engaged in self-regulation to increase or decrease pain while experiencing multiple levels of painful heat during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI imaging. Both heat intensity and self-regulation strongly influenced reported pain, but they did so via two distinct brain pathways. The effects of stimulus intensity were mediated by the neurologic pain signature (NPS, an a priori distributed brain network shown to predict physical pain with over 90% sensitivity and specificity across four studies. Self-regulation did not influence NPS responses; instead, its effects were mediated through functional connections between the nucleus accumbens and ventromedial prefrontal cortex. This pathway was unresponsive to noxious input, and has been broadly implicated in valuation, emotional appraisal, and functional outcomes in pain and other types of affective processes. These findings provide evidence that pain reports are associated with two dissociable functional systems: nociceptive/affective aspects mediated by the NPS, and evaluative/functional aspects mediated by a fronto-striatal system.

  16. Dragon's blood from Croton urucurana (Baill.) attenuates visceral nociception in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Vietla S; Gurgel, Luilma A; Lima-Júnior, Roberto C P; Martins, Domingos T O; Cechinel-Filho, Valdir; Santos, Flávia A

    2007-09-05

    Dragon's blood, the red sap from Croton urucurana Baill. (Euphorbiaceae) has a profound history of traditional use in conditions such as inflammation, diarrhoea and gastrointestinal distress. Previous studies established its anti-inflammatory, antidiarrhoeal and analgesic properties and in this study we verified its potential to suppress visceral pain, using capsaicin- and cyclophosphamide-induced models of visceral nociception. Mice that received intra-colonic capsaicin (0.3%, 50 microl/animal) or intraperitoneal injection of cyclophosphamide (400 mg/kg) manifested spontaneous nociceptive behaviors or crises, which were significantly suppressed in animal groups treated with red sap (200 and 400 mg/kg, p.o.) or that received N-acetylcysteine (750 mg/kg, i.p.) or morphine (7.5 mg/kg, s.c.), as positive controls. In capsaicin model, the antinociception produced by 200 mg/kg red sap was found to be naloxone-sensitive (2 mg/kg, i.p.), suggesting an opioid mechanism. In tests of open-field and pentobarbital-sleeping time, mice received 200mg/kg red sap showed no significant alterations in either locomotion frequency or on sleeping time, indicating that the observed antinociception is not a consequence of sedation or motor abnormality. These findings highlight the visceral antinociceptive property of Croton urucurana sap and further support its ethno-medical use to alleviate pain associated with gastrointestinal and other related disorders.

  17. Heart rate variability in subjects with different hypnotic susceptibility receiving nociceptive stimulation and suggestions of analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balocchi, R; Varanini, M; Menicucci, D; Santarcangelo, E L; Migliorini, S; Fontani, G; Carli, G

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible hypnotizability-related modulation of heart activity during nociceptive stimulation (pressor pain) and during nociceptive stimulation associated with the suggestion of analgesia in not hypnotized healthy individuals with a high (Highs) and a low (Lows) hypnotic susceptibility. ECG and respirogram were recorded. Standard time and frequency domain indexes were evaluated, together with the sd1 and sd2 values of the Poincaré plot over the RR series. Results showed self reports of analgesia in Highs and a significant increase of the respiratory frequency during stimulation in both groups. Very few significant differences between groups and among conditions were detected for mean RR and heart rate variability (HRV) through spectral analysis. and through the Poincaré indexes evaluation. On the contrary, a promising approach seems to be the study of the correlations among standard and Poincaré variables. In particular, different changes in (or even lost of) correlations were enlightened in Highs and Lows, suggesting a different modulation of RR in the two groups, probably due to the very low frequency components of HRV. Different roles of sympathetic and parasympathetic activities during stimulation can be suggested.

  18. P2X receptors mediate ATP-induced primary nociceptive neurone activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bland-Ward, P A; Humphrey, P P

    2000-07-01

    ATP-gated P2X ion-channel receptors are localised throughout the mammalian nervous system and have been identified on neurones which participate in conduction of nociceptive information from the periphery to, and within, the CNS. This article briefly reviews recently published research describing the role that ATP and P2X receptors may play in pain perception, highlighting the importance of the P2X(3) receptor in this process. The P2X(3) receptor subunit is almost exclusively expressed on a subset of small and medium diameter sensory neurones innervating cutaneous and visceral tissue. Activation of P2X receptors present on the peripheral terminals of primary afferents results in neuronal depolarisation and, in conscious animals, leads to the manifestation of acute nociceptive behaviour. Recent animal studies have also shown that P2X(3) receptor expression is increased in sensory ganglia following acute neuronal injury, hinting that similar plasticity in the expression of this receptor subtype could underlie the mechanisms involved in a range of conditions characterised by sensory hypersensitivity in man. It is apparent from the evidence available that functional antagonists at specific P2X receptor subtypes could represent an important class of novel analgesic agents.

  19. Frutalin reduces acute and neuropathic nociceptive behaviours in rodent models of orofacial pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damasceno, Marina B M V; de Melo Júnior, José de Maria A; Santos, Sacha Aubrey A R; Melo, Luana T M; Leite, Laura Hévila I; Vieira-Neto, Antonio E; Moreira, Renato de A; Monteiro-Moreira, Ana Cristina de O; Campos, Adriana R

    2016-08-25

    Orofacial pain is a highly prevalent clinical condition, yet difficult to control effectively with available drugs. Much attention is currently focused on the anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive properties of lectins. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antinociceptive effect of frutalin (FTL) using rodent models of inflammatory and neuropathic orofacial pain. Acute pain was induced by formalin, glutamate or capsaicin (orofacial model) and hypertonic saline (corneal model). In one experiment, animals were pretreated with l-NAME and naloxone to investigate the mechanism of antinociception. The involvement of the lectin domain in the antinociceptive effect of FTL was verified by allowing the lectin to bind to its specific ligand. In another experiment, animals pretreated with FTL or saline were submitted to the temporomandibular joint formalin test. In yet another, animals were submitted to infraorbital nerve transection to induce chronic pain, followed by induction of thermal hypersensitivity using acetone. Motor activity was evaluated with the rotarod test. A molecular docking was performed using the TRPV1 channel. Pretreatment with FTL significantly reduced nociceptive behaviour associated with acute and neuropathic pain, especially at 0.5 mg/kg. Antinociception was effectively inhibited by l-NAME and d-galactose. In line with in vivo experiments, docking studies indicated that FTL may interact with TRPV1. Our results confirm the potential pharmacological relevance of FTL as an inhibitor of orofacial nociception in acute and chronic pain mediated by TRPA1, TRPV1 and TRPM8 receptor.

  20. St. John's wort reversal of meningeal nociception: a natural therapeutic perspective for migraine pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeotti, N; Ghelardini, C

    2013-07-15

    Despite a number of antimigraine drugs belonging to different pharmacological classes are available, there is a huge unmet need for better migraine pharmacotherapy. We here demonstrated the capability of Hypericum perforatum, popularly called St. John's wort (SJW), to relieve meningeal nociception in an animal model induced by administration of the nitric oxide (NO) donors glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP). GTN and SNP produced a delayed meningeal inflammation, as showed by the upregulation of interleukin (IL)-1β and inducible NO synthase (iNOS), and a prolonged cold allodynia and heat hyperalgesia with a time-course consistent with NO-induced migraine attacks. A single oral administration of a SJW dried extract (5mg/kg p.o.) counteracted the nociceptive behaviour and the overexpression of IL-1β and iNOS. To clarify the cellular pathways involved, the expression of protein kinase C (PKC) and downstream effectors was detected. NO donors increased expression and phosphorylation of PKCγ, PKCɛ and transcription factors, such as nuclear factor (NF)-κB, cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB), Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (STAT)-1. All these molecular events were prevented by SJW and hypericin, a SJW main component. In conclusion, SJW counteracted the NO donor-induced pain hypersensitivity and meningeal activation by blocking PKC-mediated pathways involving NF-κB, CREB, STAT1. These results might suggest SJW as an innovative and safe perspective for migraine pain.

  1. TMC-1 Mediates Alkaline Sensation in C. elegans through Nociceptive Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiang; Li, Guang; Liu, Jie; Liu, Jianfeng; Xu, X Z Shawn

    2016-07-06

    Noxious pH triggers pungent taste and nocifensive behavior. While the mechanisms underlying acidic pH sensation have been extensively characterized, little is known about how animals sense alkaline pH in the environment. TMC genes encode a family of evolutionarily conserved membrane proteins whose functions are largely unknown. Here, we characterize C. elegans TMC-1, which was suggested to form a Na(+)-sensitive channel mediating salt chemosensation. Interestingly, we find that TMC-1 is required for worms to avoid noxious alkaline environment. Alkaline pH evokes an inward current in nociceptive neurons, which is primarily mediated by TMC-1 and to a lesser extent by the TRP channel OSM-9. However, unlike OSM-9, which is sensitive to both acidic and alkaline pH, TMC-1 is only required for alkali-activated current, revealing a specificity for alkaline sensation. Ectopic expression of TMC-1 confers alkaline sensitivity to alkali-insensitive cells. Our results identify an unexpected role for TMCs in alkaline sensation and nociception.

  2. A plant-derived anti-nociceptive spray for reduction of pain with photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anseline, William; Grose, Douglas; Smith, Peter; Murray, Stephen; Messieh, Alfonse; Billing, Tania

    2014-12-01

    Photodynamic therapy is an effective tool in the management of some forms of skin cancer and generalized solar dermopathy and can be beneficial in the management of acne vulgaris. When used as an area treatment one of the main limiters is the quite severe burning pain that patients feel during the illumination phase of the treatment. To examine the effectiveness of a plant derived anti-nociceptive spray applied prior to and during large area photodynamic therapy. A split face or left arm versus right arm, placebo controlled trial was performed on 60 patients to assess the effectiveness of the spray in reducing pain perception. There was a statistically significant reduction in pain at all illumination points during the illumination phase but no significant difference in discomfort levels in the first 72 h post illumination. Only large area photodynamic therapy treatment was performed during the study. No conclusions can be drawn for small area treatments. Use of a simple, plant derived anti-nociceptive spray can reduce the discomfort experienced by patients undergoing photodynamic therapy to large areas. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Angiomyxoma: a rare tumor of the umbilical cord

    OpenAIRE

    Göksever, Hale; Celiloğlu, Murat; Küpelioğlu, Ali

    2010-01-01

    Tumors of the umbilical cord are rare anomalies and should be considered when using prenatal ultrasound for detection of cystic lesions. Differential diagnosis of umbilical cord tumors should comprise umbilical cord teratoma, hemangioma and angiomyxoma. It can also be an umbilical cord polyp, umbilical cord cyst, hernia into the cord and omphalocele, which are mostly isolated findings, except omphalocele. Angiomyxoma is a rare tumor of the umbilical cord and is associated with incresaed perin...

  4. Allopregnanolone suppresses diabetes-induced neuropathic pain and motor deficit through inhibition of GABAA receptor down-regulation in the spinal cord of diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira Afrazi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s:Painful diabetic neuropathy is associated with hyperexcitability and hyperactivity of spinal cord neurons. However, its underlying pathophysiological mechanisms have not been fully clarified. Induction of excitatory/inhibitory neurotransmission imbalance at the spinal cord seems to account for the abnormal neuronal activity in diabetes. Protective properties of neurosteroids have been demonstrated in numerous cellular and animal models of neurodegeneration. Materials and Methods: Here, the protective effects of allopregnanolone, a neurosteroid were investigated in an in vivo model of diabetic neuropathy. The tail-flick test was used to assess the nociceptive threshold. Diabetes was induced by injection of 50 mg/kg (IP streptozotocin. Seven weeks after the induction of diabetes, the dorsal half of the lumbar spinal cord was assayed for the expression of γ2 subunit of GABAA receptor using semiquantitative RT-PCR. Results: The data shows that allopregnanolone (5 and 20 mg/kg markedly ameliorated diabetes-induced thermal hyperalgesia and motor deficit. The weights of diabetic rats that received 5 and 20 mg/kg allopregnanolone did not significantly reduce during the time course of study. Furthermore, this neurosteroid could inhibit GABAA receptor down-regulation induced by diabetes in the rat spinal cord. Conclusion: The data revealed that allopregnanolone has preventive effects against hyperglycemic-induced neuropathic pain and motor deficit which are related to the inhibition of GABAA receptor down-regulation.

  5. MicroRNA-mediated GABA Aα-1 receptor subunit down-regulation in adult spinal cord following neonatal cystitis-induced chronic visceral pain in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Jyoti N; Pochiraju, Soumya; Pochiraju, Soumiya; Kannampalli, Pradeep; Bruckert, Mitchell; Addya, Sankar; Yadav, Priyanka; Miranda, Adrian; Shaker, Reza; Banerjee, Banani

    2013-01-01

    The nociceptive transmission under pathological chronic pain conditions involves transcriptional and/or translational alteration in spinal neurotransmitters, receptor expressions, and modification of neuronal functions. Studies indicate the involvement of microRNA (miRNA) - mediated transcriptional deregulation in the pathophysiology of acute and chronic pain. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that long-term cross-organ colonic hypersensitivity in neonatal zymosan-induced cystitis is due to miRNA-mediated posttranscriptional suppression of the developing spinal GABAergic system. Cystitis was produced by intravesicular injection of zymosan (1% in saline) into the bladder during postnatal (P) days P14 through P16 and spinal dorsal horns (L6-S1) were collected either on P60 (unchallenged groups) or on P30 after a zymosan re-challenge on P29 (re-challenged groups). miRNA arrays and real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) revealed significant, but differential, up-regulation of mature miR-181a in the L6-S1 spinal dorsal horns from zymosan-treated rats compared with saline-treated controls in both the unchallenged and re-challenged groups. The target gene analysis demonstrated multiple complementary binding sites in miR-181a for GABA(A) receptor subunit GABA(Aα-1) gene with a miRSVR score of -1.83. An increase in miR-181a concomitantly resulted in significant down-regulation of GABA(Aα-1) receptor subunit gene and protein expression in adult spinal cords from rats with neonatal cystitis. Intrathecal administration of the GABA(A) receptor agonist muscimol failed to attenuate the viscero-motor response (VMR) to colon distension in rats with neonatal cystitis, whereas in adult zymosan-treated rats the drug produced significant decrease in VMR. These results support an integral role for miRNA-mediated transcriptional deregulation of the GABAergic system in neonatal cystitis-induced chronic pelvic pain. Copyright © 2012 International

  6. Is umbilical cord milking always an advantage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilicdag, Hasan; Gulcan, Hande; Hanta, Deniz; Torer, Birgin; Gokmen, Zeynel; Ozdemir, Sonay Incesoy; Antmen, Bulent Ali

    2016-01-01

    The role of cord milking as an alternative to delayed cord clamping is an area that requires more research. Purpose of this clinical trial was to investigate the impact of umbilical cord milking on the absolute neutrophil counts (ANCs) and the neutropenia frequency of preterm infants. Fifty-eight pregnant women were randomly assigned to one of the umbilical cord milking and control groups. A total of 54 preterm infants (gestational age ≤ 32 weeks) were enrolled into the study. The umbilical cords of 25 infants were clamped immediately after birth, and in 29 infants, umbilical cord milking was performed first. The ANCs were statistically significantly lower in the cord milking group compared with the control group on days 1, 3 and 7. The frequency of neutropenia was higher in the cord milking group compared with the control group. In our study, ANCs were lower in the cord milking group and the frequency of neutropenia was higher. Umbilical cord milking plays a role on the ANCs of preterm infants.

  7. Possible effects of mobilisation on acute post-operative pain and nociceptive function after total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunn, T H; Kristensen, B B; Gaarn-Larsen, L

    2012-01-01

    anaesthesia and analgesia underwent an exercise (mobilisation) strategy on the first post-operative morning consisting of 25-m walking twice, with a 20-min interval. Pain was assessed at rest and during passive hip and knee flexion before, and 5 and 20 min after walk, as well as during walk. Nociceptive...

  8. Anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive activities of methanolic leaf extract of Indigofera cassioides Rottl. Ex. DC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raju Senthil Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: All the results obtained revealed that the extract MEIC showed potent anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive activity against all the tested models and the results obtained were comparable with the standards used. The activity of the extract may be due to the presence of terpenoids, flavonoids and other phytochemicals.

  9. Experimental reduction of pain catastrophizing modulates pain report but not spinal nociception as verified by mediation analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Ellen L; Thompson, Kathryn A; Rhudy, Jamie L

    2015-08-01

    Pain catastrophizing is associated with enhanced pain; however, the mechanisms by which it modulates pain are poorly understood. Evidence suggests that catastrophizing modulates supraspinal processing of pain but does not modulate spinal nociception (as assessed by nociceptive flexion reflex [NFR]). Unfortunately, most NFR studies have been correlational. To address this, this study experimentally reduced catastrophizing to determine whether it modulates spinal nociception (NFR). Healthy pain-free participants (N = 113) were randomly assigned to a brief 30-minute catastrophizing reduction manipulation or a control group that received pain education. Before and after manipulations, 2 types of painful stimuli were delivered to elicit (1) NFR (single trains of stimuli) and (2) temporal summation of NFR (3 stimulations at 2 Hz). After each set of stimuli, participants were asked to report their pain intensity and unpleasantness, as well as their situation-specific catastrophizing. Manipulation checks verified that catastrophizing was effectively reduced. Furthermore, pain intensity and unpleasantness to both stimulation types were reduced by the catastrophizing manipulation, effects that were mediated by catastrophizing. Although NFRs were not affected by the catastrophizing manipulation, temporal summation of NFR was reduced. However, this effect was not mediated by catastrophizing. These results indicate that reductions in catastrophizing lead to reductions in pain perception but do not modulate spinal nociception and provides further evidence that catastrophizing modulates pain at the supraspinal, not the spinal, level.

  10. Time course of immediate early gene protein expression in the spinal cord following conditioning stimulation of the sciatic nerve in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojovic, Ognjen; Panja, Debabrata; Bittins, Margarethe; Bramham, Clive R; Tjølsen, Arne

    2015-01-01

    Long-term potentiation induced by conditioning electrical stimulation of afferent fibers is a widely studied form of synaptic plasticity in the brain and the spinal cord. In the spinal cord dorsal horn, long-term potentiation is induced by a series of high-frequency trains applied to primary afferent fibers. Conditioning stimulation (CS) of sciatic nerve primary afferent fibers also induces expression of immediate early gene proteins in the lumbar spinal cord. However, the time course of immediate early gene expression and the rostral-caudal distribution of expression in the spinal cord have not been systematically studied. Here, we examined the effects of sciatic nerve conditioning stimulation (10 stimulus trains, 0.5 ms stimuli, 7.2 mA, 100 Hz, train duration 2 s, 8 s intervals between trains) on cellular expression of immediate early genes, Arc, c-Fos and Zif268, in anesthetized rats. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed on sagittal sections obtained from Th13- L5 segments of the spinal cord at 1, 2, 3, 6 and 12 h post-CS. Strikingly, all immediate early genes exhibited a monophasic increase in expression with peak increases detected in dorsal horn neurons at 2 hours post-CS. Regional analysis showed peak increases at the location between the L3 and L4 spinal segments. Both Arc, c-Fos and Zif268 remained significantly elevated at 2 hours, followed by a sharp decrease in immediate early gene expression between 2 and 3 hours post-CS. Colocalization analysis performed at 2 hours post-CS showed that all c-Fos and Zif268 neurons were positive for Arc, while 30% and 43% of Arc positive neurons were positive for c-Fos and Zif268, respectively. The present study identifies the spinal cord level and time course of immediate early gene (IEGP) expression of relevance for analysis of IEGPs function in neuronal plasticity and nociception.

  11. Leishmania (L). amazonensis induces hyperalgesia in balb/c mice: Contribution of endogenous spinal cord TNFα and NFκB activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghi, Sergio M; Fattori, Victor; Ruiz-Miyazawa, Kenji W; Miranda-Sapla, Milena M; Casagrande, Rúbia; Pinge-Filho, Phileno; Pavanelli, Wander R; Verri, Waldiceu A

    2017-02-17

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is the most common form of the leishmaniasis in humans. Ulcerative painless skin lesions are predominant clinical features of CL. Wider data indicate pain accompanies human leishmaniasis, out with areas of painless ulcerative lesions per se. In rodents, Leishmania (L.) major infection induces nociceptive behaviors that correlate with peripheral cytokine levels. However, the role of the spinal cord in pain processing after Leishmania infection has not been investigated. Balb/c mice received intraplantar (i.pl.) injection of Leishmania (L). amazonensis and hyperalgesia, edema, parasitism, and spinal cord TNFα, TNFR1 and TNFR2 mRNA expression, and NFκB activation were evaluated. The effects of intrathecal (i.t.) injection of morphine, TNFα, TNFα inhibitors (etanercept and adalimumab) and NFκB inhibitor (PDTC) were investigated. The present study demonstrates that Leishmania (L.) amazonensis infection in balb/c mice induces chronic mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in an opioid-sensitive manner. Spinal cord TNFα mRNA expression increased in a time-dependent manner, peaking between 30 and 40 days after infection. At the peak of TNFα mRNA expression (day 30), there was a concomitant increase in TNFR1 and TNFR2 mRNA expression. TNFα i.t. injection enhanced L. (L.) amazonensis-induced hyperalgesia. Corroborating a role for TNFα in L. (L.) amazonensis-induced hyperalgesia, i.t. treatment with the TNFα inhibitors, etanercept and adalimumab inhibited the hyperalgesia. L. (L.) amazonensis also induced spinal cord activation of NFκB, and PDTC (given i.t.), also inhibited L. (L.) amazonensis-induced hyperalgesia, and spinal cord TNFα, TNFR1 and TNFR2 mRNA expression. Moreover, L. (L.) amazonensis-induced spinal cord activation of NFκB was also inhibited by etanercept and adalimumab as well as PDTC i.t.

  12. Validation of a thermal threshold nociceptive model in bearded dragons (Pogona vitticeps).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couture, Émilie L; Monteiro, Beatriz P; Aymen, Jessica; Troncy, Eric; Steagall, Paulo V

    2017-05-01

    To validate a thermal threshold (TT) nociceptive model in bearded dragons (Pogona vitticeps) and to document TT changes after administration of morphine. A two-part randomized, blinded, controlled, experimental study. Five adult bearded dragons (242-396 g). A TT device delivered a ramped nociceptive stimulus (0.6 °C second(-1)) to the medial thigh until a response (leg kick/escape behavior) was observed or maximum (cut-off) temperature of 62 °C was reached. In phase I, period 1, six TT readings were determined at 20 minute intervals for evaluation of repeatability. Two of these readings were randomly assigned to be sham to assess specificity of the behavioral response. The same experiment was repeated 2 weeks later (period 2) to test reproducibility. In phase II, animals were administered either intramuscular morphine (10 mg kg(-1)) or saline 0.9%. TTs (maximum 68 °C) were determined before and 2, 4, 8, 12 and 24 hours after treatment administration. Data were analyzed using one-way anova (temporal changes and repeatability) and paired t tests (reproducibility and treatment comparisons) using Bonferroni correction (p < 0.05). Mean TT values were 57.4 ± 3.8 °C and 57.3 ± 4.3 °C for periods 1 and 2, respectively. Data were repeatable within each period (p = 0.83 and p = 0.07, respectively). Reproducibility between periods was remarkable (p = 0.86). False-positive responses during sham testing were 10%. TTs were significantly increased after morphine administration at 2, 4 and 8 hours compared with baseline, and at 2 and 4 hours compared with saline 0.9%. The highest TT was 67.7 ± 0.7 °C at 4 hours after morphine administration. Testing was repeatable, reproducible and well tolerated in bearded dragons. TT nociceptive testing detected morphine administration and may be suitable for studying opioid regimens in bearded dragons. Copyright © 2017 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and

  13. Prostaglandin metabolite induces inhibition of TRPA1 and channel-dependent nociception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weng Yingqi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Transient Receptor Potential (TRP ion channel TRPA1 is a key player in pain pathways. Irritant chemicals activate ion channel TRPA1 via covalent modification of N-terminal cysteines. We and others have shown that 15-Deoxy-Δ12, 14-prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2 similarly activates TRPA1 and causes channel-dependent nociception. Paradoxically, 15d-PGJ2 can also be anti-nociceptive in several pain models. Here we hypothesized that activation and subsequent desensitization of TRPA1 in dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons underlies the anti-nociceptive property of 15d-PGJ2. To investigate this, we utilized a battery of behavioral assays and intracellular Ca2+ imaging in DRG neurons to test if pre-treatment with 15d-PGJ2 inhibited TRPA1 to subsequent stimulation. Results Intraplantar pre-injection of 15d-PGJ2, in contrast to mustard oil (AITC, attenuated acute nocifensive responses to subsequent injections of 15d-PGJ2 and AITC, but not capsaicin (CAP. Intraplantar 15d-PGJ2—administered after the induction of inflammation—reduced mechanical hypersensitivity in the Complete Freund’s Adjuvant (CFA model for up to 2 h post-injection. The 15d-PGJ2-mediated reduction in mechanical hypersensitivity is dependent on TRPA1, as this effect was absent in TRPA1 knockout mice. Ca2+ imaging studies of DRG neurons demonstrated that 15d-PGJ2 pre-exposure reduced the magnitude and number of neuronal responses to AITC, but not CAP. AITC responses were not reduced when neurons were pre-exposed to 15d-PGJ2 combined with HC-030031 (TRPA1 antagonist, demonstrating that inhibitory effects of 15d-PGJ2 depend on TRPA1 activation. Single daily doses of 15d-PGJ2, administered during the course of 4 days in the CFA model, effectively reversed mechanical hypersensitivity without apparent tolerance or toxicity. Conclusions Taken together, our data support the hypothesis that 15d-PGJ2 induces activation followed by persistent inhibition of TRPA1 channels

  14. Facilitation of a nociceptive flexion reflex in man by nonnoxious radiant heat produced by a laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaghki, L; Bragard, D; Le Bars, D; Willer, J C; Godfraind, J M

    1998-05-01

    Electromyographic recordings were made in healthy volunteers from the knee-flexor biceps femoris muscle of the nociceptive RIII reflex elicited by electrical stimulation of the cutaneous sural nerve. The stimulus intensity was adjusted to produce a moderate pricking-pain sensation. The test responses were conditioned by a nonnoxious thermal (CO2 laser stimulator and consisted of a 100-ms pulse of heat with a beam diameter of 20 mm. Its power was 22.7 +/- 4.2 W (7.2 mJ/mm2), and it produced a sensation of warmth. The maximum surface temperature reached at the end of the period of stimulation was calculated to be 7 degrees C above the actual reference temperature of the skin (32 degrees C). The interval between the laser (conditioning) and electrical (test) stimuli was varied from 50 to 3, 000 ms in steps of 50 ms. It was found that the nociceptive flexion reflex was facilitated by the thermal stimulus; this modulation occurred with particular conditioning-test intervals, which peaked at 500 and 1,100 ms with an additional late, long-lasting phase between 1,600 and 2,300 ms. It was calculated that the conduction velocities of the cutaneous afferent fibers responsible for facilitating the RIII reflex, fell into three ranges: one corresponding to A delta fibers (3.2 m/s) and two in the C fiber range (1.3 and 0.7 m/s). It is concluded that information emanating from warm receptors and nociceptors converges. In this respect, the present data show, for the first time, that in man, conditioning nonnociceptive warm thermoreceptive A delta and C fibers results in an interaction at the spinal level with a nociceptive reflex. This interaction may constitute a useful means whereby signals add together to trigger flexion reflexes in defensive reactions and other basic motor behaviors. It also may contribute to hyperalgesia in inflammatory processes. The methodology used in this study appears to be a useful noninvasive tool for exploring the thermoalgesic mechanisms in both

  15. Branched oxytocinergic innervations from the paraventricular hypothalamic nuclei to superficial layers in the spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condés-Lara, Miguel; Martínez-Lorenzana, Guadalupe; Rojas-Piloni, Gerardo; Rodríguez-Jiménez, Javier

    2007-07-30

    The paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus is an interesting structure with diverse functions due to its different neuronal populations, neurotransmitters, and projections to other central nervous system structures. The PVN is a primary source of oxytocin (OT) in the central nervous system. In fact, a direct PVN projection to the spinal cord has been demonstrated by retrograde and anterograde tracers, and more than the 50% of this projection is oxytocinergic. This OT descending projection is proposed to be an endogenous system that controls the nociceptive information arriving at the spinal cord. However, we have no information about the specific organization of the OT descending innervations to the different spinal cord segments. The aim of the present study was to determine whether the projecting PVN neurons arrive at cervical regions and then continue to lumbar regions. That is, we sought to establish if the OT projecting cells have a topic or a diffuse projection in order to obtain histological data to support the endogenous OT diffuse mechanism of analgesia described elsewhere. With this purpose in mind we combined the OT immunohistochemistry technique with retrograde neuronal tracers in the spinal cord. We applied Diamidino Yellow (DY) for the superficial dorsal horn cervical segments and True Blue (TB) for the lumbar segments. Data were collected from eight rats with well-placed injections. We only used the animals in which the tracer deposits were confined to superficial layers I and II of the dorsal horn. A mainly ipsilateral projection was observed, but stained neurons were also observed in the contralateral PVN. A large fraction of the stained PVN cells was doubled labeled but some were single labeled. Combining the retrograde tracer techniques and the OT detection procedure, we observed triple-labeled neurons. The present results demonstrate that PVN neurons send collaterals at least to the superficial cervical and lumbar segments of the

  16. Effects of anesthetic propofol on release of amino acids from the spinal cord during visceral pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Xiaobo; Wu, Anshi; Wu, Jing; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Yongqian; Yue, Yun; Fang, Li; Wang, Yun

    2010-11-05

    As one of general anesthetics, propofol, has been used for surgical procedures of visceral organs. However, the mechanisms underlying the action of propofol on visceral nociception remain controversial. The aim of this study is to test whether the antinociception of systemic administration of propofol against visceral stimuli is related to the changes in release of excitatory and inhibitory amino acids in the spinal cord. The spinal microdialysis catheters were implanted subarachnoidally via the atlanto-occipital membrane in healthy SD rats. The rats received an intraperitoneal injection of acetic acid for visceral pain induction 10min after intraperitoneal pretreatment with vehicle or propofol (100mg/kg). The acetic acid-induced writhing assay was used to determine the degree of antinociception. Cerebrospinal fluid dialysate was collected by microdialysis from the spinal subarachnoid space before pretreatment and after visceral pain induction. Visceral pain-induced release of amino acids into the dialysate, including glutamate, aspartate, and γ-amino butyric acid was evaluated by measuring the changes in the concentrations of these amino acids. Acetic acid increased release of aspartate and glutamate, and decreased release of γ-amino butyric acid in the cerebrospinal fluid as measured by microdialysis. Pretreatment with propofol significantly decreased writhing responses induced by visceral pain, suppressed the visceral pain-induced aspartate and glutamate release, and reversed the decreased release of γ-amino butyric acid in the cerebrospinal fluid. These data provide evidence for a potential mechanism for the antinociceptive effects of propofol on visceral nociception. 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Roles of the periaqueductal gray in descending facilitatory and inhibitory controls of intramuscular hypertonic saline induced muscle nociception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Jing; Sun, Tao; Lumb, Bridget M; You, Hao-Jun

    2014-07-01

    Despite the importance of the periaqueductal gray (PAG) in the modulation of nociception and pain, many aspects of the roles of the different columns of the PAG in descending controls: facilitation and inhibition, are not understood. Employing a tonic muscle pain model established by i.m. injection of 5.8% saline into the gastrocnemius muscle, we now report the results of investigations designed to explore any differences in Fos expression in the different functional columns of the PAG in male Sprague-Dawley rats. In a second series of experiments, effects of the PAG on descending control of spinally-organized nociception were assessed by measuring hind paw withdrawal reflexes to noxious mechanical and heat stimulation before and after electrolytic lesion of specific columns of the PAG. Our results show that Fos expression within different columns of the PAG increases significantly and differentially following i.m. injection of 5.8% saline. The mean number of Fos positive neurons in the dorsolateral (dl), lateral (l), dorsomedial (dm) PAG elicited by i.m. injection of 5.8% saline reached a peak at 4h with a gradual decrease over time, whereas the maximum number of Fos-positive neurons in the ventrolateral (vl) PAG was observed 8h after i.m. injection. Contralateral lesion of the dl PAG significantly depressed ipsilateral secondary mechanical hyperalgesia in intramuscularly induced (5.8% saline) nociception (P0.05). By contrast, contralateral lesion of the vl PAG completely blocked the occurrence of ipsilateral heat hypoalgesia (P0.05). In conclusion, functions of specific columns of the PAG in the control of spinal nociceptive activities are not homogeneous. It is suggested that, in this muscle pain model, the dl PAG and vl PAG participate in descending facilitation and inhibition of nociception, respectively.

  18. Surgical incision-induced nociception causes cognitive impairment and reduction in synaptic NMDA receptor 2B in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoqin; Xin, Xin; Dong, Yuanlin; Zhang, Yiying; Yu, Buwei; Mao, Jianren; Xie, Zhongcong

    2013-11-06

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) is associated with impairments in daily functioning, and increased morbidity and mortality. However, the causes and neuropathogenesis of POCD remain largely unknown. Uncontrolled pain often occurs postoperatively. We therefore set out to determine the effects of surgical incision-induced nociception on the cognitive function and its underlying mechanisms in 3- and 9-month-old mice. The mice had surgical incision in the hindpaw and then were tested for nociceptive threshold, learning, and memory. Brain levels of NMDA receptor and cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) were also assessed. We found that surgical incision-induced nociception in mice led to a decreased freezing time in the tone test (which assesses the hippocampus-independent learning and memory function), but not the context test, of Fear Conditioning System at 3 and 7 d, but not 30 d post incision in 9-month-old, but not 3-month-old mice. Consistently, the surgical incision selectively decreased synaptic NMDA receptor 2B levels in the medial prefrontal cortex, and increased levels of tumor necrosis factor-α and CDK5 in the cortex, but not hippocampus, of the mice. Finally, eutectic mixture of local anesthetics and CDK5 inhibitor, roscovitine, attenuated the surgical incision-induced reduction in the synaptic NMDA receptor 2B levels and learning impairment. These results suggested that surgical incision-induced nociception reduced the synaptic NMDA receptor 2B level in the medial prefrontal cortex of mice, which might lead to hippocampus-independent learning impairment, contributing to POCD. These findings call for further investigation to determine the role of surgical incision-induced nociception in POCD.

  19. Influence of intramuscular heat stimulation on modulation of nociception: complex role of central opioid receptors in descending facilitation and inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Hao-Jun; Lei, Jing; Ye, Gang; Fan, Xiao-Li; Li, Qiang

    2014-10-01

    It has been reported that the threshold to activate 'silent' or inactive descending facilitation of nociception is lower than that of descending inhibition. Thus, the development of pain therapy to effectively drive descending inhibition alone, without the confounding influences of facilitation is a challenge. To address this issue we investigated the effects of intramuscular stimulation with a heating-needle on spinal nociception, assessed by measuring nociceptive paw withdrawal reflex in rats. Additionally, involvement of the thalamic 'nociceptive discriminators' (thalamic mediodorsal (MD) and ventromedial (VM) nuclei), and opioid-mediated mechanisms were further explored. Descending facilitation and inhibition were elicited by 46°C noxious heating-needle stimulation, and were regulated by thalamic MD and VM nuclei, respectively. In contrast, innocuous heating-needle stimulation at a temperature of 43°C elicited descending inhibition modulated by the thalamic VM nucleus alone. Microinjection of μ/δ/κ-opioid receptor antagonists β-funaltrexamine hydrochloride/naltrindole/nor-binaltorphimine, into the VM nucleus attenuated the 46°C intramuscular heating-needle stimulation-evoked descending inhibition, whereas treatment of the MD nucleus with β-funaltrexamine hydrochloride significantly decreased the descending facilitation. By contrast, descending inhibition evoked by 43°C heating-needle stimulation was only depressed by naltrindole, as opposed to μ- and κ-opioid receptor antagonists, which failed to influence descending inhibition. The present study reveals distinct roles of μ-opioid receptors in the function of thalamic MD and VM nuclei,which exert facilitatory and inhibitory actions on nociception. Furthermore, innocuous, but not noxious, intramuscular heating-needle stimulation targeting δ-opioid receptors is suggested to be a promising avenue for the effective inhibition of pain.

  20. Local administration of resveratrol inhibits excitability of nociceptive wide-dynamic range neurons in rat trigeminal spinal nucleus caudalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimazu, Yoshihito; Shibuya, Eri; Takehana, Shiori; Sekiguchi, Kenta; Oshima, Katsuo; Kamata, Hiroaki; Karibe, Hiroyuki; Takeda, Mamoru

    2016-06-01

    Although we recently reported that intravenous administration of resveratrol suppresses trigeminal nociception, the precise peripheral effect of resveratrol on nociceptive and non-nociceptive mechanical stimulation-induced trigeminal neuron activity in vivo remains to be determined. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether local subcutaneous administration of resveratrol attenuates mechanical stimulation-induced excitability of trigeminal spinal nucleus caudalis (SpVc) neuron activity in rats, in vivo. Extracellular single-unit recordings were made of SpVc wide-dynamic range (WDR) neuron activity in response to orofacial mechanical stimulation in pentobarbital-anesthetized rats. Neurons responded to non-noxious and noxious mechanical stimulation applied to the orofacial skin. Local subcutaneous administration of resveratrol (1-10mM) into the orofacial skin dose dependently and significantly reduced the mean number of SpVc WDR neurons firing in response to both non-noxious and noxious mechanical stimuli, with the maximal inhibition of discharge frequency in response to both stimuli being seen within 5min. These inhibitory effects were no longer evident after approximately 20min. The mean magnitude of inhibition by resveratrol (10mM) of SpVc neuron discharge frequency was almost equal to that of the local anesthetic 1% lidocaine (37mM). These results suggest that local injection of resveratrol into the peripheral receptive field suppresses the excitability of SpVc neurons, possibly via inhibition of Na(+) channels in the nociceptive nerve terminals of trigeminal ganglion neurons. Therefore, local subcutaneous administration of resveratrol may provide relief of trigeminal nociceptive pain, without side effects, thus contributing to the suite of complementary and alternative medicines used as local anesthetic agents.

  1. Lean Umbilical Cord - a Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rippinger, N; Elsässer, M; Sinn, P; Sohn, C; Fluhr, H

    2016-11-01

    The "lean" umbilical cord (also known as thin-cord syndrome) is a comparatively rare anomaly of the umbilical cord, which has seldom been described in the medical literature. We report on a 35-year-old women who presented to us at 29 + 4 weeks gestation with vaginal bleeding and cervical incompetence subsequently complicated not only by premature rupture of membranes but also acute placental insufficiency requiring emergency caesarean section under general anaesthesia at 31 + 2 weeks gestation. At surgery no obvious cause for the acute placental insufficiency - such as placental abruption, cord prolapse or true knot of the umbilical cord - was found. Other possible causes such as vasa praevia or placenta praevia had previously been excluded sonographically on admission for vaginal bleeding. The only notable intraoperative finding was a macroscopically extremely thin umbilical cord.

  2. Umbilical Cord Care in the Newborn Infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Dan; Benitz, William

    2016-09-01

    Postpartum infections remain a leading cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality worldwide. A high percentage of these infections may stem from bacterial colonization of the umbilicus, because cord care practices vary in reflection of cultural traditions within communities and disparities in health care practices globally. After birth, the devitalized umbilical cord often proves to be an ideal substrate for bacterial growth and also provides direct access to the bloodstream of the neonate. Bacterial colonization of the cord not infrequently leads to omphalitis and associated thrombophlebitis, cellulitis, or necrotizing fasciitis. Various topical substances continue to be used for cord care around the world to mitigate the risk of serious infection. More recently, particularly in high-resource countries, the treatment paradigm has shifted toward dry umbilical cord care. This clinical report reviews the evidence underlying recommendations for care of the umbilical cord in different clinical settings. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  3. Characterisation of a behavioural protocol for the assessment of nociception in normal and inflamed porcine skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    di Giminiani, Pierpaolo

    2012-01-01

    experimental conditions has only partially considered the use of alternative animal species as models of pain research, with a general perseverance to target primarily rodents. The main aim of the present thesis was to develop and evaluate a new experimental protocol that would allow the application....... The adaptation of well-established behavioural tests of nociception in a new animal species for pain research should be interpreted as an incentive to include more complex behavioural analyses in the near future as part of the new approaches being requested within translational research. The new experimental......-clinical research, based on the investigation of experimental models designed to reproduce painful conditions or parts thereof. Animals play a fundamental role, since they provide the platform to reproduce human conditions in order to study the mechanisms behind pain processes, and during the last three decades...

  4. Characterization of nociceptive behavioural responses in the awake pig following UV-B-induced inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    di Giminiani, Pierpaolo; Petersen, L J; Herskin, Mette S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Among the current translational inflammatory pain models, the ultraviolet (UV) irradiation is of rapidly growing interest. The development of primary thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia has been observed in humans and rodents. The pig as a translational animal model might be advantageous...... of irradiation compared with the control skin at both 24 and 48 h (P thermal hyperalgesia following UV-B inflammation in porcine skin, but they were not capable of providing a clear indication...... due to its great homology with humans. Methods The skin in the flank of awake pigs was irradiated by a UV-B light source (1 J/cm2) and changes in thermal and mechanical sensitivity 24 and 48 h following irradiation were measured via assessment of nociceptive behaviours. Results Thermal sensitivity...

  5. Untangling nociceptive, neuropathic and neuroplastic mechanisms underlying the biological domain of back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hush, Julia M; Stanton, Tasha R; Siddall, Philip; Marcuzzi, Anna; Attal, Nadine

    2013-05-01

    SUMMARY Current clinical practice guidelines advocate a model of diagnostic triage for back pain, underpinned by the biopsychosocial paradigm. However, limitations of this clinical model have become apparent: it can be difficult to classify patients into the diagnostic triage categories; patients with 'nonspecific back pain' are clearly not a homogenous group; and mean effects of treatments based on this approach are small. In this article, it is proposed that the biological domain of the biopsychosocial model needs to be reconceptualized using a neurobiological mechanism-based approach. Recent evidence about nociceptive and neuropathic contributors to back pain is outlined in the context of maladaptive neuroplastic changes of the somatosensory system. Implications for clinical practice and research are discussed.

  6. Can preoperative electrical nociceptive stimulation predict acute pain after groin herniotomy?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aasvang, Eske Kvanner; Hansen, J.B.; Kehlet, H.

    2008-01-01

    pain (rho = -0.13, P = .09, and rho = -1.2, P = .4, respectively. PERSPECTIVE: Although preoperative electrical nociceptive stimulation may predict patients at risk of high-intensity acute pain after other surgical procedures, this was not the case in groin hernia repair patients receiving concomitant......Preoperative identification of patients at risk for high-intensity postoperative pain may be used to predict patients at risk for development of a persistent pain state and allocate patients to more intensive specific pain therapy. Preoperative pain threshold to electrocutaneus stimulation has...... recently been shown to correlate to acute postoperative pain after cesarean section, but the findings have not been confirmed in larger studies or other procedures. Preoperative electrical pain detection threshold and pain tolerance were assessed in patients undergoing a primary unilateral groin hernia...

  7. Pain sensation and nociceptive reflex excitability in surgical patients and human volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, J B; Erichsen, C J; Fuglsang-Frederiksen, A

    1992-01-01

    Pain threshold, nociceptive flexion reflex (NFR) threshold and responses to suprathreshold stimulation were investigated in 15 female patients (mean age 32 yr (range 22-48 yr)) before and 68 (range 48-96) h after gynaecological laparotomy. Control measurements were performed in 17 healthy human...... volunteers (five males, age 30 yr (range 24-41 yr)). In the surgical patients, pain threshold decreased and pain to suprathreshold stimulation increased significantly (P = 0.006 and P = 0.04, respectively) from before to after surgery. A corresponding trend was demonstrated in neurophysiological measurements......, although the decrease in NFR threshold and increase in NFR amplitude to suprathreshold stimulation were not significant (P = 0.08 and P = 0.24, respectively). The correlations between the relative change in pain and reflex thresholds, and time from surgery, were statistically significant (pain threshold...

  8. Cutaneous nociception and neurogenic inflammation evoked by PACAP38 and VIP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schytz, Henrik Winther; Holst, Helle; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2010-01-01

    .002). In conclusion, we found that peripheral nociceptive cutaneous responses elicited by PACAP38 and VIP are similar in healthy volunteers. This suggests that acute pain and vasomotor responses following intradermal injections of PACAP38 and VIP are primarily mediated by VPAC receptors.......Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide-38 (PACAP38) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) belong to the same secretin-glucagon superfamily and are present in nerve fibers in dura and skin. Using a model of acute cutaneous pain we explored differences in pain perception and vasomotor...... responses between PACAP38 and VIP in 16 healthy volunteers in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study. All participants received intradermal injections of 200 pmol PACAP38, 200 pmol VIP and placebo into the volar forearm. Measurements included pain intensity on a visual analog scale (VAS), blood...

  9. Long-Term Effects of Neonatal Pain and Stress on Reactivity of the Nociceptive System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butkevich, I P; Mikhailenko, V A

    2016-10-01

    The influence of inflammatory pain and/or weaning stress at different terms of neonatal development on functional activity of the nociceptive system during adulthood was studied in rats. Repeated stress in 1-2-day-old rat pups (a premature baby model) enhanced pain sensitivity to peripheral inflammation in both males and females. Repeated inflammatory pain experienced by male pups aged 1-2 or 7-8 days (models of preterm and full-term baby), even in presence of mother, enhanced pain behavior under conditions of repeated inflammatory pain in adulthood. Pain sensitivity in adult animals before (hot plate test) and after formation of the inflammatory focus (formalin test) depended on the age when the animals were subjected to the injury, type of exposure, and on animal sex. The priority data obtained by us will help to understand the mechanisms of long-term effects of early injuries and are important for pediatricians and neonatologists.

  10. Cortical stimulation and tooth pulp evoked potentials in rats: a model of direct anti-nociception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusina, Robert; Barek, Stephane; Vaculin, Simon; Azérad, Jean; Rokyta, Richard

    2010-01-01

    While the effect of cortex stimulation on pain control is widely accepted, its physiological basis remains poorly understood. We chose an animal model of pain to study the influence of sensorimotor cortex stimulation on tooth pulp stimulation evoked potentials (TPEPs). Fifteen awake rats implanted with tooth pulp, cerebral cortex, and digastric muscle electrodes were divided into three groups, receiving 60 Hz, 40 Hz and no cortical stimulation, respectively. TPEPs were recorded before, one, three and five hours after continuous stimulation. We observed an inverse relationship between TPEP amplitude and latency with increasing tooth pulp stimulation. The amplitudes of the early components of TPEPs increased and their latency decreased with increasing tooth pulp stimulation intensity. Cortical stimulation decreased the amplitude of TPEPs; however, neither the latencies of TPEPs nor the jaw-opening reflex were changed after cortical stimulation. The decrease in amplitude of TPEPs after cortical stimulation may reflect its anti-nociceptive effect.

  11. Anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive activity of the water decoction Desmodium gangeticum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathi, Anshu; Rao, Ch V; Ravishankar, B; De, S; Mehrotra, S

    2004-12-01

    The water decoction of root and aerial parts of Desmodium gangeticum (Leguminosae) was examined for anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive activity in experimental animals. The root and aerial decoction in doses of 5, 10 and 20 mg /kg caused a dose-dependent inhibition of swelling caused by carrageenin equivalent to 14.58-51.02% protection and 14.43-38.67%, respectively, in cotton pellet granuloma. There was a significant increase in analgesio-meter-induced force equivalent to 6.56-67.66% protection and 22.18-73.83% protection in acetic acid-induced writhing. The result establishes the traditional use of water decoction of Desmodium gangeticum codified in Indian System of Medicine.

  12. Hargreaves does not evaluate nociception following a surgical laparotomy in Xenopus leavis frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachon, P

    2014-10-01

    The present study was performed to determine the effectiveness of the Hargreaves test for the evaluation of nociception in frogs, more precisely to determine if cutaneous thresholds to a radiant heat stimulus would increase with analgesics following an abdominal laparotomy performed under general anaesthesia. Non breeding female Xenopus leavis frogs (3 groups (non-anaesthetized, anaesthetized with tricaine methanesulfonate (MS222), with or without an abdominal laparotomy) were used to evaluate the effectiveness of the Hargreaves test. Cutaneous thresholds were evaluated at baseline and following anaesthetic recovery (over 8 h) at six different body locations. Increased reaction times were observed in the gular area only at 1 h post-recovery following a MS222 bath immersion in frogs with (p leavis frogs.

  13. Clinical, nociceptive and psychological profiling to predict acute pain after total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luna, I E; Kehlet, H; Petersen, M A

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pre-operative identification of high-pain responders for acute pain after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) could lead to targeted analgesic trials and individualized analgesic strategies to improve recovery and potentially reduce the risk of persistent post-surgical pain. The aim...... outcome. Predictive variables collected prior to surgery included demographics, nociceptive testing (pressure pain threshold (PPT), cold pressor tolerance, electrical pain threshold and tolerance) and psychological profile (pain catastrophizing scale (PCS) and hospital anxiety and depression scale...... catastrophizing are predictive of moderate severe post-TKA pain. If validated in a larger population, the clinically applicable tests should be considered in future interventions aiming to minimize post-operative pain in high-risk patients....

  14. Distinct Presentations of Hernia of Umbilical Cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Bilal; Ali, Waqas

    2016-01-01

    Hernia of umbilical cord is a well-known entity which presents with herniation of small bowel into the proximal part of umbilical cord. It has very good prognosis after surgical repair. Occasionally, it can have distinct presentations and varied malformations at the umbilicus which have bearing on the course of treatment and final outcome. Herein, we describe various presentations and malformations associated with hernia of umbilical cord. Embryological extrapolation is attempted for the malformations at umbilicus. PMID:27896161

  15. NEW TRENDS IN STEEL CORD DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Vedeneev

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of directions of metal cord constructions developments depending on the place of application in tires of different function is carried out. the requirements to metal cord, which are necessary to be taken into account at development of its new type, are given. the peculiarities of perspective types of reinforcing agents for tires, and also advantages of new types of metal cord over the existing ones are shown.

  16. Spinal cord injury drives chronic brain changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Jure

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Only a few studies have considered changes in brain structures other than sensory and motor cortex after spinal cord injury, although cognitive impairments have been reported in these patients. Spinal cord injury results in chronic brain neuroinflammation with consequent neurodegeneration and cognitive decline in rodents. Regarding the hippocampus, neurogenesis is reduced and reactive gliosis increased. These long-term abnormalities could explain behavioral impairments exhibited in humans patients suffering from spinal cord trauma.

  17. Differential Contribution of TRPA1, TRPV4 and TRPM8 to Colonic Nociception in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja M Mueller-Tribbensee

    Full Text Available Various transient receptor potential (TRP channels in sensory neurons contribute to the transduction of mechanical stimuli in the colon. Recently, even the cold-sensing menthol receptor TRPM(melastatin8 was suggested to be involved in murine colonic mechano-nociception.To analyze the roles of TRPM8, TRPA1 and TRPV4 in distension-induced colonic nociception and pain, TRP-deficient mice and selective pharmacological blockers in wild-type mice (WT were used. Visceromotor responses (VMR to colorectal distension (CRD in vivo were recorded and distension/pressure-induced CGRP release from the isolated murine colon ex vivo was measured by EIA.Distension-induced colonic CGRP release was markedly reduced in TRPA1-/- and TRPV4-/- mice at 90/150 mmHg compared to WT. In TRPM8-deficient mice the reduction was only distinct at 150 mmHg. Exposure to selective pharmacological antagonists (HC030031, 100 μM; RN1734, 10 μM; AMTB, 10 μM showed corresponding effects. The unselective TRP blocker ruthenium red (RR, 10 μM was as efficient in inhibiting distension-induced CGRP release as the unselective antagonists of mechanogated DEG/ENaC (amiloride, 100 μM and stretch-activated channels (gadolinium, 50 μM. VMR to CRD revealed prominent deficits over the whole pressure range (up to 90 mmHg in TRPA1-/- and TRPV4-/- but not TRPM8-/- mice; the drug effects of the TRP antagonists were again highly consistent with the results from mice lacking the respective TRP receptor gene.TRPA1 and TRPV4 mediate colonic distension pain and CGRP release and appear to govern a wide and congruent dynamic range of distensions. The role of TRPM8 seems to be confined to signaling extreme noxious distension, at least in the healthy colon.

  18. Thermal nociceptive threshold testing detects altered sensory processing in broiler chickens with spontaneous lameness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hothersall, Becky; Caplen, Gina; Parker, Richard M A; Nicol, Christine J; Waterman-Pearson, Avril E; Weeks, Claire A; Murrell, Joanna C

    2014-01-01

    Lameness is common in commercially reared broiler chickens but relationships between lameness and pain (and thus bird welfare) have proved complex, partly because lameness is often partially confounded with factors such as bodyweight, sex and pathology. Thermal nociceptive threshold (TNT) testing explores the neural processing of noxious stimuli, and so can contribute to our understanding of pain. Using an acute model of experimentally induced articular pain, we recently demonstrated that TNT was reduced in lame broiler chickens, and was subsequently attenuated by administration of Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs). This study extended these findings to a large sample of commercial broilers. It examined factors affecting thermal threshold (Part 1) and the effect of an NSAID drug (meloxicam, 5 mg/kg) and of an opioid (butorphanol; 4 mg/kg) (Part 2). Spontaneously lame and matched non-lame birds (n=167) from commercial farms were exposed to ramped thermal stimulations via a probe attached to the lateral aspect of the tarsometatarsus. Baseline skin temperature and temperature at which a behavioural avoidance response occurred (threshold) were recorded. In Part 1 bird characteristics influencing threshold were modelled; In Part 2 the effect of subcutaneous administration of meloxicam or butorphanol was investigated. Unexpectedly, after accounting for other influences, lameness increased threshold significantly (Part 1). In Part 2, meloxicam affected threshold differentially: it increased further in lame birds and decreased in non-lame birds. No effect of butorphanol was detected. Baseline skin temperature was also consistently a significant predictor of threshold. Overall, lameness significantly influenced threshold after other bird characteristics were taken into account. This, and a differential effect of meloxicam on lame birds, suggests that nociceptive processing may be altered in lame birds, though mechanisms for this require further investigation.

  19. The Anti-Nociceptive Effect of Aloe. Vera Aqueous Extract in Fructose-Fed Male Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Shahraki

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available A B S T R A C T Introduction: Aloe Vera extract is used as an anti-inflammatory and anti-bradikinin agent in laboratory animals. The aim of this survey was to evaluate the ant-nociceptive effect of A. Vera aqueous extract in fructose-fed male rats. Methods: Forty-five Wistar-Albino male rats were equally and randomly divided into five groups including sham operated and four test groups. Sham operated group consumed tap water and the test groups consumed fructoseenriched water. Test groups 2, 3 and 4 additionally received, 0, 100, 150 and 200 mg/kg of A. Vera extract, respectively, whereas the other test group received distilled water daily. Tail flick reaction time, serum glucose and oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT were measured. The results were analyzed by SPSS software using ANOVA and Tukey tests. Results were expressed as mean ± SD. Statistical differences were considered significant at p<0.05. Results: The results showed that tail flick reaction time significantly increased in test group 3 which received 200 mg/kg A. Vera extract comparing with that of sham operated group. However, OGTT and serum glucose value were significantly increased in all fructose-fed male rats comparing with those of sham operated group. Discussion: These results indicated that A. Vera aqueous extract can affect tail flick reaction time in fructose-fed male rats. Further studies are required to show the exact mechanism of anti-nociceptive effect of A. Vera extract.

  20. Effects of acid on vagal nociceptive afferent subtypes in guinea pig esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaoyun; Hu, Youtian; Yu, Shaoyong

    2014-08-15

    Acid reflux-induced heartburn and noncardiac chest pain are processed peripherally by sensory nerve endings in the wall of the esophagus, but the underlying mechanism is still unclear. This study aims to determine the effects of acid on esophageal vagal nociceptive afferent subtypes. Extracellular single-unit recordings were performed in guinea pig vagal nodose or jugular C fiber neurons by using ex vivo esophageal-vagal preparations with intact nerve endings in the esophagus. We recorded action potentials (AP) of esophageal nodose or jugular C fibers evoked by acid perfusion and compared esophageal distension-evoked AP before and after acid perfusion. Acid perfusion for 30 min (pH range 7.4 to 5.8) did not evoke AP in nodose C fibers but significantly decreased their responses to esophageal distension, which could be recovered after washing out acid for 90 min. In jugular C fibers, acid perfusion not only evoked AP but also inhibited their responses to esophageal distension, which were not recovered after washing out acid for 120 min. Lower concentration of capsaicin perfusion mimicked acid-induced effects in nodose and jugular C fibers. Pretreatment with TRPV1 antagonist AMG9810, but not acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC) inhibitor amiloride, significantly inhibited acid-induced effects in nodose and jugular C fiber. These results demonstrate that esophageal vagal nociceptive afferent nerve subtypes display distinctive responses to acid. Acid activates jugular, but not nodose, C fibers and inhibits both of their responses to esophageal distension. These effects are mediated mainly through TRPV1. This inhibitory effect is a novel finding and may contribute to esophageal sensory/motor dysfunction in acid reflux diseases.

  1. Changes in Aβ non-nociceptive primary sensory neurons in a rat model of osteoarthritis pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry James L

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pain is a major debilitating factor in osteoarthritis (OA, yet few mechanism-based therapies are available. To address the need to understand underlying mechanisms the aim of the present study was to determine changes in sensory neurons in an animal model of OA pain. Results The model displayed typical osteoarthritis pathology characterized by cartilage degeneration in the knee joint and also manifested knee pathophysiology (edema and increased vasculature permeability of the joint and altered nociception of the affected limb (hind paw tenderness and knee articulation-evoked reduction in the tail flick latency. Neurons included in this report innervated regions throughout the entire hind limb. Aβ-fiber low threshold mechanoreceptors exhibited a slowing of the dynamics of action potential (AP genesis, including wider AP duration and slower maximum rising rate, and muscle spindle neurons were the most affected subgroup. Only minor AP configuration changes were observed in either C- or Aδ-fiber nociceptors. Conclusion Thus, at one month after induction of the OA model Aβ-fiber low threshold mechanoreceptors but not C- or Aδ-fiber nociceptors had undergone changes in electrophysiological properties. If these changes reflect a change in functional role of these neurons in primary afferent sensory processing, then Aβ-fiber non-nociceptive primary sensory neurons may be involved in the pathogenesis of OA pain. Further, it is important to point out that the patterns of the changes we observed are consistent with observations in models of peripheral neuropathy but not models of peripheral inflammation.

  2. Effect of tramadol on immune responses and nociceptive thresholds in a rat model of incisional pain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-min LIU; Sheng-mei ZHU; Kui-rong WANG; Zhi-ying FENG; Qing-lian CHEN

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects oftramadol on the proinflammatory responses in a rat model of incisional pain by investigating its effects on nociceptive thresholds and serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-2 levels. Methods: Forty-two male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats scheduled for plantar incision were randomly divided into 7 groups (n=6 in each group). Rats in Group 1 receiving general anesthesia with no incision were served as control; At 30 min before skin incision, Groups 2~5 were given 5 ml normal saline or 1, 10, and 20 mg/kg tramadol, respectively, intraperitoneally (i.p.); Group 6 received 10 mg/kg tramadol after operation; Group 7 received 10 mg/kg tramadol before incision, followed by 200 μg/kg naloxone after operation. Mechanical allodynia was measured by electronic von Frey filament to evaluate the nociceptive thresholds 1 h before incision, and 1 h and 2 h after operation. Serum IL-6 and IL-2 levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) 2 h after operation. Results: Mechanical thresholds decreased significantly and serum IL-6 level increased significantly after operation in Group 2 compared with control (P<0.01), and these changes were reversed respectively by tramadol in a dose-dependent manner (P<0.05 and P<0.01, respectively). IL-2 level remained unchanged after operation in Group 2, but decreased in Group 3 (P<0.05), then gradually returned to the normal level in Groups 4 and 5. The intraperitoneally injected tramadol (10 and 20 mg/kg) produced a potent and dose-dependent antinocicptive effect on the lesioned paw. The antinocicptive effects of tramadol were partially an-tagonized by naloxone (200 μg/kg), suggesting an additional non-opioid mechanism. Conclusion: The results suggest that tramadol could be a good choice for the treatment of pain under the conditions that immunosuppression may be particularly contraindicated.

  3. Effects of juvenile exposure to predator odor on adolescent and adult anxiety and pain nociception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Ryan J; Dahlborg, Kaitlyn M; O'Loughlin, Lauren E; Bloom, Christopher M

    2014-05-28

    Clinical researchers have tracked patients with early life trauma and noted generalized anxiety disorder, unipolar depression, and risk-taking behaviors developing in late adolescence and into early adulthood. Animal models provide an opportunity to investigate the neural and developmental processes that underlie the relationship between early stress and later abnormal behavior. The present model used repeated exposure to 2,3,5-trimethyl-3-thiazoline (TMT), a component of fox feces, as an unconditioned fear-eliciting stimulus in order to induce stress in juvenile rats aged postnatal day (PND) 23 through 27. After further physical maturation characteristic of the adolescent stage (PND 42), animals were tested using an elevated plus maze (EPM) for anxiety and plantar test (Hargreaves method) for pain to assess any lingering effects of the juvenile stress. To assess how an additional stress later in life affects anxiety and pain nociception, PND 43 rats were exposed to inescapable shock (0.8mA) and again tested on EPM and plantar test. A final testing period was conducted in the adult (PND 63) rats to assess resulting changes in adult behaviors. TMT-exposed rats were significantly more anxious in adolescence than controls, but this difference disappeared after exposure to the secondary stressor. In adulthood, but not in adolescence, TMT-exposed rats demonstrated lower pain sensitivity than controls. These results suggest that early life stress can play a significant role in later anxiety and pain nociception, and offer insight into the development and manifestation of anxiety- and trauma-related disorders.

  4. Calpain inhibitor, MDL 28170 confer electrophysiological, nociceptive and biochemical improvement in diabetic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharatmal, Shivsharan B; Singh, Jitendra N; Sharma, Shyam S

    2015-10-01

    Calpain plays an important role in the pathophysiology of neurological and cardiovascular complications, but its functional association in diabetic neuropathy is not yet elucidated. Therefore, we investigated the role of calpain in modulation of tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium channels (TTX-R Na(+) channels) in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons using a pharmacological approach. The effects of a calpain inhibitor, MDL 28170 (3 and 10 mg/kg, i.p.) on TTX-R Na(+) channels in DRG neurons of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were assessed by using whole-cell patch-clamp technique. In addition to this biochemical, functional and behavioral deficits were also measured. Diabetic rats demonstrated the mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia with reduced nerve perfusion and conduction velocity as compared to control. MDL 28170 treatments significantly recovered these functional and nociceptive deficits. Moreover, diabetic rats exhibited increased calpain activation, lipid peroxidation and proinflammatory cytokines as compared to control. Drug treatment significantly improved these biochemical deficits. Additionally, DRG neurons from diabetic rats illustrated a significant increase in TTX-R sodium current (INa) density as compared to control. MDL 28170 treatments in diabetic rats significantly blocked the altered channel kinetics with hyperpolarizing shift in voltage-dependence of steady-state activation and inactivation curves. All together, our study provides evidence that calpain activation is directly associated with alterations in TTX-R Na(+) channels and triggers functional, nociceptive and biochemical deficits in experimental diabetic neuropathy. The calpain inhibitor, MDL 28710 have shown beneficial effects in alleviating diabetic neuropathy via modulation of TTX-R Na(+) channel kinetics and reduction of oxidative stress and neuro-inflammation.

  5. Thermal nociceptive threshold testing detects altered sensory processing in broiler chickens with spontaneous lameness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Becky Hothersall

    Full Text Available Lameness is common in commercially reared broiler chickens but relationships between lameness and pain (and thus bird welfare have proved complex, partly because lameness is often partially confounded with factors such as bodyweight, sex and pathology. Thermal nociceptive threshold (TNT testing explores the neural processing of noxious stimuli, and so can contribute to our understanding of pain. Using an acute model of experimentally induced articular pain, we recently demonstrated that TNT was reduced in lame broiler chickens, and was subsequently attenuated by administration of Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs. This study extended these findings to a large sample of commercial broilers. It examined factors affecting thermal threshold (Part 1 and the effect of an NSAID drug (meloxicam, 5 mg/kg and of an opioid (butorphanol; 4 mg/kg (Part 2. Spontaneously lame and matched non-lame birds (n=167 from commercial farms were exposed to ramped thermal stimulations via a probe attached to the lateral aspect of the tarsometatarsus. Baseline skin temperature and temperature at which a behavioural avoidance response occurred (threshold were recorded. In Part 1 bird characteristics influencing threshold were modelled; In Part 2 the effect of subcutaneous administration of meloxicam or butorphanol was investigated. Unexpectedly, after accounting for other influences, lameness increased threshold significantly (Part 1. In Part 2, meloxicam affected threshold differentially: it increased further in lame birds and decreased in non-lame birds. No effect of butorphanol was detected. Baseline skin temperature was also consistently a significant predictor of threshold. Overall, lameness significantly influenced threshold after other bird characteristics were taken into account. This, and a differential effect of meloxicam on lame birds, suggests that nociceptive processing may be altered in lame birds, though mechanisms for this require further

  6. Entanglement between thermoregulation and nociception in the rat: the case of morphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Bitar, Nabil; Pollin, Bernard; Karroum, Elias; Pincedé, Ivanne; Le Bars, Daniel

    2016-12-01

    In thermoneutral conditions, rats display cyclic variations of the vasomotion of the tail and paws, the most widely used target organs in current acute or chronic animal models of pain. Systemic morphine elicits their vasoconstriction followed by hyperthermia in a naloxone-reversible and dose-dependent fashion. The dose-response curves were steep with ED50 in the 0.5-1 mg/kg range. Given the pivotal functional role of the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) in nociception and the rostral medullary raphe (rMR) in thermoregulation, two largely overlapping brain regions, the RVM/rMR was blocked by muscimol: it suppressed the effects of morphine. "On-" and "off-" neurons recorded in the RVM/rMR are activated and inhibited by thermal nociceptive stimuli, respectively. They are also implicated in regulating the cyclic variations of the vasomotion of the tail and paws seen in thermoneutral conditions. Morphine elicited abrupt inhibition and activation of the firing of on- and off-cells recorded in the RVM/rMR. By using a model that takes into account the power of the radiant heat source, initial skin temperature, core body temperature, and peripheral nerve conduction distance, one can argue that the morphine-induced increase of reaction time is mainly related to the morphine-induced vasoconstriction. This statement was confirmed by analyzing in psychophysical terms the tail-flick response to random variations of noxious radiant heat. Although the increase of a reaction time to radiant heat is generally interpreted in terms of analgesia, the present data question the validity of using such an approach to build a pain index. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Intracerebroventricular administration of riluzole prevents morphine-induced apoptosis in the lumbar region of the rat spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanzadeh, Kambiz; Habibi-asl, Bohlool; Roshangar, Leila; Nemati, Mahboob; Ansarin, Masood; Farajnia, Safar

    2010-01-01

    Opiates are the most effective drugs for pain relief. However, the repeated use of opiates induces tolerance to their analgesic effects. It has been shown that this morphine-induced tolerance is associated with apoptosis in the central nervous system. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of riluzole, an anti-glutamatergic drug, on morphine-induced apoptosis in the lumbar region of the rat spinal cord. Animals were given daily injections of morphine and vehicle, morphine and riluzole, or riluzole alone. Nociception was assessed using a hot plate apparatus, and apoptosis was assessed using the in situ terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end-labeling (TUNEL) method. The levels of anti-apoptotic factors Bcl-2 and HSP 70 and the pro-apoptotic agent caspase-3 were evaluated using immunoblotting. The glutamate concentration in the lumbar spinal cord was measured with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The results indicate that the i.c.v. administration of riluzole attenuated morphine tolerance and reduced the number of TUNEL positive cells. Immunoblotting revealed that the levels of the selected anti-apoptotic agents were greater in the treatment groups compared to the controls. Furthermore, the results demonstrated that the administration of riluzole can attenuate the morphine-induced elevation of glutamate in the lumbar spinal cord. In conclusion, i.c.v. administration of riluzole attenuated morphine-induced tolerance to analgesia and apoptosis in addition to preventing the morphine-induced increase of glutamate in the lumbar spinal cord of rats.

  8. Is Nuchal Cord a Perfect Scapegoat: A Retrospective Analysis from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mubeen

    Background: Entanglement of the umbilical cord around the fetal neck (nuchal cord) is quite a common finding at delivery. ... needed to be clamped and cut before delivery of the baby) group. ..... The natural history of antenatal nuchal cords.

  9. Cord blood stem cell banking and transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhot, P S; Nair, V; Swarup, D; Sirohi, D; Ganguli, P

    2003-12-01

    Stem cells have the ability to divide for indefinite periods in culture and to give rise to specialized cells. Cord blood as a source of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) has several advantages as it is easily available, involves non-invasive collection procedure and is better tolerated across the HLA barrier. Since the first cord blood transplant in 1988, over 2500 cord blood HSC transplants have been done world wide. Since then, the advantages of cord blood as a source of hematopietic stem cells for transplantation have become clear. Firstly, the proliferative capacity of HSC in cord blood is superior to that of cells in bone marrow or blood from adults. A 100 ml unit of cord blood contains 1/10th the number of nucleated cells and progenitor cells (CD34+ cells) present in 1000 ml of bone marrow, but because they proliferate rapidly, the stem cell in a single unit of cord blood can reconstitute the entire haematopoietic system. Secondly, the use of cord blood reduces the risk of graft vs host disease. Cord Blood Stem Cell banks have been established in Europe and United States to supply HSC for related and unrelated donors. Currently, more than 65,000 units are available and more than 2500 patients have received transplants of cord blood. Results in children have clearly shown that the number of nucleated cells in the infused cord blood influences the speed of recovery of neutrophils and platelets after myeloablative chemotherapy. The optimal dose is about 2 x 10(7) nucleated cells/kg of body weight. The present study was carried out for collection, separation, enumeration and cryopreservation of cord blood HSC and establishing a Cord Blood HSC Bank. 172 samples of cord blood HSC were collected after delivery of infant prior to expulsion of placenta. The average cord blood volume collected was 101.20 ml. Mononuclear cell count ranged from 7.36 to 25.6 x 10(7)/ml. Viability count of mononuclear cells was 98.1%. After 1 year of cryopreservation, the viability count on

  10. Spinal cord compression due to ethmoid adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, D R; Sweriduk, S T

    1987-10-15

    Adenocarcinoma of the ethmoid sinus is a rare tumor which has been epidemiologically linked to woodworking in the furniture industry. It has a low propensity to metastasize and has not been previously reported to cause spinal cord compression. A symptomatic epidural spinal cord compression was confirmed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan in a former furniture worker with widely disseminated metastases. The clinical features of ethmoid sinus adenocarcinoma and neoplastic spinal cord compression, and the comparative value of MRI scanning in the neuroradiologic diagnosis of spinal cord compression are reviewed.

  11. Survey of Transmission Cost Allocation Methodologies for Regional Transmission Organizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, S.; Porter, K.; Mudd, C.; Rogers, J.

    2011-02-01

    The report presents transmission cost allocation methodologies for reliability transmission projects, generation interconnection, and economic transmission projects for all Regional Transmission Organizations.

  12. Segmentation of the human spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Leener, Benjamin; Taso, Manuel; Cohen-Adad, Julien; Callot, Virginie

    2016-04-01

    Segmenting the spinal cord contour is a necessary step for quantifying spinal cord atrophy in various diseases. Delineating gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) is also useful for quantifying GM atrophy or for extracting multiparametric MRI metrics into specific WM tracts. Spinal cord segmentation in clinical research is not as developed as brain segmentation, however with the substantial improvement of MR sequences adapted to spinal cord MR investigations, the field of spinal cord MR segmentation has advanced greatly within the last decade. Segmentation techniques with variable accuracy and degree of complexity have been developed and reported in the literature. In this paper, we review some of the existing methods for cord and WM/GM segmentation, including intensity-based, surface-based, and image-based methods. We also provide recommendations for validating spinal cord segmentation techniques, as it is important to understand the intrinsic characteristics of the methods and to evaluate their performance and limitations. Lastly, we illustrate some applications in the healthy and pathological spinal cord. One conclusion of this review is that robust and automatic segmentation is clinically relevant, as it would allow for longitudinal and group studies free from user bias as well as reproducible multicentric studies in large populations, thereby helping to further our understanding of the spinal cord pathophysiology and to develop new criteria for early detection of subclinical evolution for prognosis prediction and for patient management. Another conclusion is that at the present time, no single method adequately segments the cord and its substructure in all the cases encountered (abnormal intensities, loss of contrast, deformation of the cord, etc.). A combination of different approaches is thus advised for future developments, along with the introduction of probabilistic shape models. Maturation of standardized frameworks, multiplatform availability, inclusion

  13. Umbilical Cord Milking Versus Delayed Cord Clamping in Preterm Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katheria, Anup C; Truong, Giang; Cousins, Larry; Oshiro, Bryan; Finer, Neil N

    2015-07-01

    Delayed cord clamping (DCC) is recommended for premature infants to improve blood volume. Most preterm infants are born by cesarean delivery (CD), and placental transfusion may be less effective than in vaginal delivery (VD). We sought to determine whether infants umbilical cord milking (UCM) have higher measures of systemic blood flow than infants who undergo DCC. This was a 2-center trial. Infants delivered by CD were randomly assigned to undergo UCM or DCC. Infants delivered by VD were also randomly assigned separately. UCM (4 strippings) or DCC (45-60 seconds) were performed. Continuous hemodynamic measurements and echocardiography were done at site 1. A total of 197 infants were enrolled (mean gestational age 28 ± 2 weeks). Of the 154 infants delivered by CD, 75 were assigned to UCM and 79 to DCC. Of the infants delivered by CD, neonates randomly assigned to UCM had higher superior vena cava flow and right ventricular output in the first 12 hours of life. Neonates undergoing UCM also had higher hemoglobin, delivery room temperature, blood pressure over the first 15 hours, and urine output in the first 24 hours of life. There were no differences for the 43 infants delivered by VD. This is the first randomized controlled trial demonstrating higher systemic blood flow with UCM in preterm neonates compared with DCC. UCM may be a more efficient technique to improve blood volume in premature infants delivered by CD. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  14. Family-directed umbilical cord blood banking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluckman, Eliane; Ruggeri, Annalisa; Rocha, Vanderson; Baudoux, Etienne; Boo, Michael; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Welte, Kathy; Navarrete, Cristina; van Walraven, Suzanna M.

    2011-01-01

    Umbilical cord blood transplantation from HLA-identical siblings provides good results in children. These results support targeted efforts to bank family cord blood units that can be used for a sibling diagnosed with a disease which can be cured by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation or for research that investigates the use of allogeneic or autologous cord blood cells. Over 500 patients transplanted with related cord blood units have been reported to the Eurocord registry with a 4-year overall survival of 91% for patients with non-malignant diseases and 56% for patients with malignant diseases. Main hematologic indications in children are leukemia, hemoglobinopathies or inherited hematologic, immunological or metabolic disorders. However, family-directed cord blood banking is not widely promoted; many cord blood units used in sibling transplantation have been obtained from private banks that do not meet the necessary criteria required to store these units. Marketing by private banks who predominantly store autologous cord blood units has created public confusion. There are very few current validated indications for autologous storage but some new indications might appear in the future. Little effort is devoted to provide unbiased information and to educate the public as to the distinction between the different types of banking, economic models and standards involved in such programs. In order to provide a better service for families in need, directed-family cord blood banking activities should be encouraged and closely monitored with common standards, and better information on current and future indications should be made available. PMID:21750089

  15. Pulmonary mucormycosis presenting with vocal cord paralysis

    OpenAIRE

    Gayathri Devi, H. J.; Mohan Rao, K.N.; K M Prathima; Moideen, Riyaz

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary mucormycosis is a relatively uncommon infection. It can present in various forms. Very few cases of pulmonary mucormycosis presenting as vocal cord paralysis have been described in the literature. We report a case of pulmonary mucormycosis presenting as vocal cord paralysis in an uncontrolled diabetic patient.

  16. Nutrition of People with Spinal Cord Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    This conference proceeding summarizes current knowledge about the nutritional status and needs of the spinal cord injured patient. Topics covered include the aspects of spinal cord injury that influence nutrient intakes and status, and the nutrients most likely to be problematic in this diverse gro...

  17. Blast characterization of det-cord

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borgers, J.B.W.; Pett, A.; Vantomme, J.; van der Stoel, Almer

    2012-01-01

    Det-cord, short for detonating cord, is thin flexible plastic tube with a core of PETN, with a diameter of 5 mm and lengths of 30m per spool. It is commonly used to connect multiple charges, either in military or in civil (mining) operations, but this use has been extended to cutting trees,

  18. Diagnosis of true umbilical cord knot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzikowski, Wojciech; Kowalczyk, Dariusz; Więcek, Jacek

    2014-02-24

    Many abnormalities are observed in the morphology and pathology of the umbilical cord. The aim of the study was to assess the role of 3D sonography in pathology of true umbilical cord knots. In our materials we observed 10 cases of true umbilical cord knots in a population of 2,864 deliveries. The 2-dimensional transverse scan of the umbilical cord was shown in 3- and 4-dimensional volume scan in order to get a precise image. Four knots were diagnosed prenatally, 3 knots were not diagnosed before the delivery and in the 3 remaining cases ultrasound examinations were not undertaken because the patients were in the course of delivery. In the pregnant subjects with diagnosed true umbilical cord knot once a week the Doppler blood flow indices were examined in the umbilical cord sections before and after the knot. In the three shown cases there were no signs of constriction or tightening of the knot. Four newborns were delivered spontaneously and five by caesarean section. In none of the cases was a pathological FHR trace an indication for emergency delivery. Four-dimensional and Color Doppler examination is very important to diagnose a true umbilical cord. To make a precise diagnosis a longer observation of the abnormality is necessary and its repeated confirmation by color Doppler and power Doppler. This diagnosis requires strict monitoring of fetal wellbeing during pregnancy and the delivery. Perfection of true umbilical cord knot diagnoses may reduce sudden and unforeseen fetal distress.

  19. Ambulation and spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, Elizabeth C; Kobetic, Rudi; Triolo, Ronald J

    2013-05-01

    Walking is possible for many patients with a spinal cord injury. Avenues enabling walking include braces, robotics and FES. Among the benefits are improved musculoskeletal and mental health, however unrealistic expectations may lead to negative changes in quality of life. Use rigorous assessment standards to gauge the improvement of walking during the rehabilitation process, but also yearly. Continued walking after discharge may be limited by challenges, such as lack of accessibility in and outside the home, and complications, such as shoulder pain or injuries from falls. It is critical to determine the risks and benefits of walking for each patient.

  20. Recognising serious umbilical cord anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Andrew S J; Jayapal, Sathiya S K; Whitburn, Jessica A S; Akinbiyi, Bolutito A; Willetts, Ian E

    2013-11-27

    Umbilical vessel catheterisation is a common intervention in neonatal care. Many complications are recognised, some of which are life-threatening. We report the case of a term neonate who was compromised at birth following antepartum haemorrhage with evidence of multiorgan ischaemic injury. Following resuscitation and umbilical vessel catheterisation, she developed pneumoperitoneum. At laparotomy, a patent vitellointestinal duct was identified and resected. Intestinal perforation was found in the duct wall, most plausibly explained by the unintentional catheterisation of the duct via the umbilicus. Learning to recognise umbilical cord anomalies, such as patent vitellointestinal duct, can be simple and could prevent potentially serious complications.

  1. Changes of blood flow, oxygen tension, action potential and vascular permeability induced by arterial ischemia or venous congestion on the spinal cord in canine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Shigeru; Yoshizawa, Hidezo; Shimada, Seiichiro; Guerrero, Alexander Rodríguez; Miyachi, Masaya

    2013-01-01

    It is generally considered that the genesis of myelopathy associated with the degenerative conditions of the spine may result from both mechanical compression and circulatory disturbance. Many references about spinal cord tissue ischemic damage can be found in the literature, but not detailed studies about spinal cord microvasculature damage related to congestion or blood permeability. This study investigates the effect of ischemia and congestion on the spinal cord using an in vivo model. The aorta was clamped as an ischemia model of the spinal cord and the inferior vena cava was clamped as a congestion model at the 6th costal level for 30 min using forceps transpleurally. Measurements of blood flow, partial oxygen pressure, and conduction velocity in the spinal cord were repeated over a period of 1 h after release of clamping. Finally, we examined the status of blood-spinal cord barrier under fluorescence and transmission electron microscope. Immediately after clamping of the inferior vena cava, the central venous pressure increased by about four times. Blood flow, oxygen tension and action potential were more severely affected by the aorta clamping; but this ischemic model did not show any changes of blood permeability in the spinal cord. The intramedullar edema was more easily produced by venous congestion than by arterial ischemia. In conclusions, venous congestion may be a preceding and essential factor of circulatory disturbance in the compressed spinal cord inducing myelopathy.

  2. Involvement of capsaicin receptors in synaptic transmission in sacral dorsal commissural nucleus neurons%辣椒素受体参与骶髓后联合核神经元突触传递

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马红雨; 任曲; 魏利召; 罗丹; 安映红; 杨鲲

    2011-01-01

    Aim To investigate the role of capsaicin receptors in synaptic transmission in sacral dorsal commissural nucleus ( SDCN ) neurons of rat spinal cord.Methods Whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings on spinal cord slice were used to investigate glutamate-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents ( EPSCs ) and γ-aminobutyric acid ( GABA )-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic currents ( IPSCs ); capsaicin effect on action potentials discharge was also accessed. Results Activation of capsaicin receptors by a specific agonist , capsaicin ( I μmol · L-1 ). significantly enhanced both frequency and amplitude of spontaneous EPSCs ( sEP-SCs ) ( P < 0. 05 , n = 17 ). In the presence of tedrodotoxin ( TTX ), capsaicin increased miniature EPSCs mEPSCs ) frequency ( P < 0. 01 , n = 13 ) but not amplitude distribution ( P > 0. 05 , n = 13 ), indicating a presynaptic action. Capsaicin also significantly accelerated action potential discharge ( P < 0. 01, n = 19 ).Capsaicin action was abolished by pretreatment of a specific antagonist, capsazepine. Capsaicin also enhanced spontaneous IPSCs ( sIPSCs ) frequency( P <0. 05, n = 20 ), but had no effect on either frequency or amplitude of miniature IPSCs ( mIPSCs ) ( P >0. 05 , n = 9 ). Conclusion Capsaicin receptors are exclusively expressed at presynaptic terminals of excitatory glutamatergic terminals to SDCN neurons; activation of capsaicin receptors modulates excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission in SDCN which may contribute to nociceptive information transmission and modulation at spinal cord level.%目的 研究辣椒素受体对大鼠骶髓后联合核(SDCN)神经元突触传递的影响.方法 在脊髓骶段横切薄片上,利用全细胞膜片钳法记录骶髓后联合核神经元谷氨酸能兴奋性突触后电流(EPSCs)和γ-氨基丁酸(GABA)能抑制性突触后电流(IPSCs),比较激动辣椒素受体后上述突触电流的变化;观察激动辣椒素受体对SDCN神经元动

  3. Spinal cord ischemia secondary to hypovolemic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jacob Yl; Kapoor, Siddhant; Koh, Roy Km; Yang, Eugene Wr; Hee, Hwan-Tak

    2014-12-01

    A 44-year-old male presented with symptoms of spinal cord compression secondary to metastatic prostate cancer. An urgent decompression at the cervical-thoracic region was performed, and there were no complications intraoperatively. Three hours postoperatively, the patient developed acute bilateral lower-limb paralysis (motor grade 0). Clinically, he was in class 3 hypovolemic shock. An urgent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed, showing no epidural hematoma. He was managed aggressively with medical therapy to improve his spinal cord perfusion. The patient improved significantly, and after one week, he was able to regain most of his motor functions. Although not commonly reported, spinal cord ischemia post-surgery should be recognized early, especially in the presence of hypovolemic shock. MRI should be performed to exclude other potential causes of compression. Spinal cord ischemia needs to be managed aggressively with medical treatment to improve spinal cord perfusion. The prognosis depends on the severity of deficits, and is usually favorable.

  4. Time to implement delayed cord clamping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAdams, Ryan M

    2014-03-01

    Immediate umbilical cord clamping after delivery is routine in the United States despite little evidence to support this practice. Numerous trials in both term and preterm neonates have demonstrated the safety and benefit of delayed cord clamping. In premature neonates, delayed cord clamping has been shown to stabilize transitional circulation, lessening needs for inotropic medications and reducing blood transfusions, necrotizing enterocolitis, and intraventricular hemorrhage. In term neonates, delayed cord clamping has been associated with decreased iron-deficient anemia and increased iron stores with potential valuable effects that extend beyond the newborn period, including improvements in long-term neurodevelopment. The failure to more broadly implement delayed cord clamping in neonates ignores published benefits of increased placental blood transfusion at birth and may represent an unnecessary harm for vulnerable neonates.

  5. Stem Cells in the Umbilical Cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Mark L.; Troyer, Deryl L.

    2012-01-01

    Stem cells are the next frontier in medicine. Stem cells are thought to have great therapeutic and biotechnological potential. This will not only to replace damaged or dysfunctional cells, but also rescue them and/or deliver therapeutic proteins after they have been engineered to do so. Currently, ethical and scientific issues surround both embryonic and fetal stem cells and hinder their widespread implementation. In contrast, stem cells recovered postnatally from the umbilical cord, including the umbilical cord blood cells, amnion/placenta, umbilical cord vein, or umbilical cord matrix cells, are a readily available and inexpensive source of cells that are capable of forming many different cell types (i.e., they are “multipotent”). This review will focus on the umbilical cord-derived stem cells and compare those cells with adult bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. PMID:17237554

  6. Galactorrhea: a complication of spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarkony, G M; Novick, A K; Roth, E J; Kirschner, K L; Rayner, S; Betts, H B

    1992-09-01

    Galactorrhea, a secretion of milk or milk-like products from the breast in the absence of parturition, has been reported to occur in women with spinal cord injuries in association with amenorrhea and hyperprolactinemia. Four cases of galactorrhea in association with spinal cord injury are reported. Galactorrhea developed in four spinal cord injured women who had thoracic paraplegia. The onset of galactorrhea was from one month to five months after injury. Although the onset of galactorrhea may have been related to prescribed medications in all four cases, insufficient data exist to draw conclusions. The three women whose galactorrhea persisted declined treatment and galactorrhea continuing for more than two years in one instance. We conclude that galactorrhea with or without amenorrhea may develop after a spinal cord injury and that spinal cord injured women may have an enhanced sensitivity to medication-induced galactorrhea.

  7. Meta-chlorophenylpiperazine attenuates formalin-induced nociceptive responses through 5-HT1/2 receptors in both normal and diabetic mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Takeshita, N; Yamaguchi, I.

    1995-01-01

    1. This study was designed to investigate the effect of meta-chlorophenylpiperazine (m-CPP; a 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptor agonist) on the formalin-induced nociceptive responses in normal, insulin-dependent streptozotocin (STZ) diabetic and non-insulin dependent genetically diabetic (db/db) mice. 2. A subcutaneous injection of diluted formalin (1% formaldehyde in 0.9% saline, 10 microliters) under the plantar surface of the left hindpaw induced biphasic nociceptive responses, the first...

  8. Nociceptive stimulation induces expression of Arc/Arg3.1 in the spinal cord with a preference for neurons containing enkephalin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.M. Hossaini (Mehdi); J.L.M. Jongen (Joost); K. Biesheuvel (Karla); D. Kuhl (Dietmar); J.C. Holstege (Jan)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground: In pain processing, long term synaptic changes play an important role, especially during chronic pain. The immediate early gene Arc/Arg3.1 has been widely implicated in mediating long-term plasticity in telencephalic regions, such as the hippocampus and cortex. Accordingly, A

  9. Pressure pain threshold changes after repeated mechano-nociceptive stimulation of the trapezius muscle: possible influence of previous pain experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjölund, Bengt H; Persson, Ann L

    2007-01-01

    We examined the relation between repeated noxious pressure over the trapezius muscle and changes in pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) in a before-after trial design. A conditioning series of 30 mechano-nociceptive stimuli was applied manually with a handheld algometer probe, and PPTs were measured...... who had given birth to 1 or several children (Ptested at a second session, a clear correlation of PPT reactions (r=0.527; Pmuscle in healthy females evokes moderate and temporary...... over 1 trapezius muscle (skin anaesthetized) in 27 healthy women before and after the intervention. With a mean stimulation rate of 0.40 Hz and a mean nociceptive stimulation intensity of 1.78 x Threshold, subjects were found to systematically react with a change in PPT, either a decrease...

  10. Pre-test habituation improves the reliability of a handheld test of mechanical nociceptive threshold in dairy cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raundal, P. M.; Andersen, P. H.; Toft, Nils;

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical nociceptive threshold (MNT) testing has been used to investigate aspects of painful states in bovine claws. We investigated a handheld tool, where the applied stimulation force was monitored continuously relative to a pre-encoded based target force. The effect on MNT of two pre......-testing habituation procedures was performed in two different experiments comprising a total of 88 sound Holsteins dairy cows kept either inside or outside their home environment. MNT testing was performed using five consecutive mechanical nociceptive stimulations per cow per test at a fixed pre-encoded target rate...... of 2.1 N/s. The habituation procedure performed in dairy cows kept in their home environment led to lowered intra-individual coefficient of variation of MNT (P force during stimulations (P

  11. Intrathecal administration of roscovitine inhibits Cdk5 activity and attenuates formalin-induced nociceptive response in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng-haung WANG; Wen-ying CHOU; Kung-sheng HUNG; Bruno JAWAN; Cheng-nann LU; Jong-kang LIU; Yi-ping HUNG; Tsung-hsing LEE

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To investigate effects of the cyclin-dependent kinase5 (Cdk5) inhibitor roscovitine on formalin-induced nociceptive responses in rats. Methods: The flinch response as a methood of pain threshold measurement and intrathecal injection techniques were used. Cdk5 and phosphorylation of its downstream target,DARPP-32 (dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein of Mr 32 kDa), were investigated by Western blot analysis. Results: Rats demonstrated a typical flinch response after formalin injection. Intrathecal roscovitine injections significantly suppressed the flinch response in a dose-dependent manner. Western blot analysis showed that phosphorylated DARPP-32 at Thr75 increased in concentration after formalin hyperalgesia, with this effect reduced by roscovitine administration.This antinociception was partially attenuated by administration of naloxone before the formalin test. Conclusion: DARPP-32 phosphorylation is involved in acute inflammatory pain response. Intrathecal roscovitine administration attenuates formalin-induced nociceptive responses and there is potential for further application.

  12. Anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of aqueous leaves extract of Ocimum gratissimum (Labiate) in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanko, Y; Magaji, G M; Yerima, M; Magaji, R A; Mohammed, A

    2008-01-22

    The aqueous leaves extract of Ocimum gratissimum was investigated for anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects in mice and rats. The models used to study the effect on nociception are the acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction test, hot-plate method in mice. The anti-inflammatory effect was investigated employing the formalin-induced hind-paw oedema in rats. The extract caused a significant (p<0.05), dose-dependent inhibition of acetic acid-induced writhing and hot-plate method. The extract also exhibited anti-inflammatory effect which was significant (P<0.001) at all the three doses. The intraperitoneal LD(50) value of the extract was 1264.9 mg/kg body weight in mice. Preliminary phytochemical screening revealed the presence of alkaloids, saponins, tannins and flavonoids. The results suggest the extract contained pharmacologically active principles, and supports the local application of the plant in painful and inflammatory conditions.

  13. Astroglial glutamate-glutamine cycle is involved in the modulation of inflammatory nociception in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tiancheng Wang; Jing Wang; Bin Geng; Hongyu Guo; Haili Shen; Yayi Xia

    2011-01-01

    Our previous behavioral studies have indicated that the astroglial glutamate-glutamine cycle is involved in the process of formalin-induced spinal cord central sensitization, but there was little morphological evidence. In this study, double-labeling immunofluorescence techniques showed that after rats were intrathecally injected with PBS and plantarly injected with formalin, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and glutamine synthesase (GS) expression were increased and GFAP/GS coexpression was changed to include layers III and IV. After intrathecal injection of methionine sulfoximine, a GS specific inhibitor, the formalin-induced change in expression and coexpression of GFAP and GS in spinal cord dorsal horns was inhibited. The morphology, distribution and quantity of astrocytes recovered to normal levels. An intrathecal glutamine injection reversed the inhibitory effect of methionine sulfoximine. Astrocytes showed significant activation and distribution extended to layers V and VI. The present study provides morphological evidence that the astroglial glutamate-glutamine cycle is involved in the process of formalin-induced spinal cord central sensitization.

  14. Intrathecal siRNA against GPNMB attenuates nociception in a rat model of neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Lili; Zhang, Yanfeng; Yang, Yong; Xiang, Kai; Tan, Qindong; Guo, Qulian

    2015-02-01

    Neuropathic pain is characterized by hyperalgesia, allodynia, and spontaneous pain. Recent studies have shown that glycoprotein nonmetastatic melanoma B (GPNMB) plays a pivotal role in neuronal survival and neuroprotection. However, the role of GPNMB in neuropathic pain remains unknown. The aim of the present study was to assess the role of GPNMB in neuropathic pain. In cultured spinal cord neurons, we used two small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting the complementary DNA (cDNA) sequence of rat GPNMB that had potent inhibitory effects on GPNMB, and siRNA1-GPNMB was selected for further in vivo study as it had the higher inhibitory effect. After sciatic nerve injury in rats, the endogenous level of GPNMB was increased in a time-dependent manner in the spinal cord. Furthermore, the intrathecal injection of siRNA1-GPNMB inhibited the expression of GPNMB and pro-inflammatory factors (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6) and alleviated mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in the chronic constriction injury (CCI) model of rats. Taken together, our findings suggest that siRNA against GPNMB can alleviate the chronic neuropathic pain caused by CCI, and this effect may be mediated by attenuated expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 in the spinal cord of CCI rats. Therefore, inhibition of GPNMB may provide a novel strategy for the treatment of neuropathic pain.

  15. Identification of sodium channel isoforms that mediate action potential firing in lamina I/II spinal cord neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Paula L

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Voltage-gated sodium channels play key roles in acute and chronic pain processing. The molecular, biophysical, and pharmacological properties of sodium channel currents have been extensively studied for peripheral nociceptors while the properties of sodium channel currents in dorsal horn spinal cord neurons remain incompletely understood. Thus far, investigations into the roles of sodium channel function in nociceptive signaling have primarily focused on recombinant channels or peripheral nociceptors. Here, we utilize recordings from lamina I/II neurons withdrawn from the surface of spinal cord slices to systematically determine the functional properties of sodium channels expressed within the superficial dorsal horn. Results Sodium channel currents within lamina I/II neurons exhibited relatively hyperpolarized voltage-dependent properties and fast kinetics of both inactivation and recovery from inactivation, enabling small changes in neuronal membrane potentials to have large effects on intrinsic excitability. By combining biophysical and pharmacological channel properties with quantitative real-time PCR results, we demonstrate that functional sodium channel currents within lamina I/II neurons are predominantly composed of the NaV1.2 and NaV1.3 isoforms. Conclusions Overall, lamina I/II neurons express a unique combination of functional sodium channels that are highly divergent from the sodium channel isoforms found within peripheral nociceptors, creating potentially complementary or distinct ion channel targets for future pain therapeutics.

  16. Quantitative assessment of the nociceptive withdrawal reflex in healthy, non-medicated experimental sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrbach, Helene; Zeiter, Stephan; Andersen, Ole K; Wieling, Ronald; Spadavecchia, Claudia

    2014-04-22

    This study aimed to characterize the nociceptive withdrawal reflex (NWR) and to define the nociceptive threshold in 25 healthy, non-medicated experimental sheep in standing posture. Electrical stimulation of the dorsal lateral digital nerves of the right thoracic and the pelvic limb was performed and surface-electromyography (EMG) from the deltoid (all animals) and the femoral biceps (18 animals) or the peroneus tertius muscles (7 animals) was recorded. The behavioural reaction following each stimulation was scored on a scale from 0 (no reaction) to 5 (strong whole body reaction). A train-of-five 1ms constant-current pulse was used and current intensity was stepwise increased until NWR threshold intensity was reached. The NWR threshold intensity (It) was defined as the minimal stimulus intensity able to evoke a reflex with a minimal Root-Mean-Square amplitude (RMSA) of 20μV, a minimal duration of 10ms and a minimal reaction score of 1 (slight muscle contraction of the stimulated limb) within the time window of 20 to 130ms post-stimulation. Based on this value, further stimulations were performed below (0.9It) and above threshold (1.5It and 2It). The stimulus-response curve was described. Data are reported as medians and interquartile ranges. At the deltoid muscle It was 4.4mA (2.9-5.7) with an RMSA of 62μV (30-102). At the biceps femoris muscle It was 7.0mA (4.0-10.0) with an RMSA of 43μV (34-50) and at the peroneus tertius muscle It was 3.4mA (3.1-4.4) with an RMSA of 38μV (32-46). Above threshold, RMSA was significantly increased at all muscles. Below threshold, RMSA was only significantly smaller than at It for the peroneus tertius muscle but not for the other muscles. Data achieved in this study serve as reference for experimental or clinical applications of the conscious sheep model. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Protease activated receptors 1 and 4 sensitize TRPV1 in nociceptive neurones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magherini Pier C

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Protease-activated receptors (PAR1-4 are activated by proteases released by cell damage or blood clotting, and are known to be involved in promoting pain and hyperalgesia. Previous studies have shown that PAR2 receptors enhance activation of TRPV1 but the role of other PARs is less clear. In this paper we investigate the expression and function of the PAR1, 3 and 4 thrombin-activated receptors in sensory neurones. Immunocytochemistry and in situ hybridization show that PAR1 and PAR4 are expressed in 10 - 15% of neurons, distributed across all size classes. Thrombin or a specific PAR1 or PAR4 activating peptide (PAR1/4-AP caused functional effects characteristic of activation of the PLCβ/PKC pathway: intracellular calcium release, sensitisation of TRPV1, and translocation of the epsilon isoform of PKC (PKCε to the neuronal cell membrane. Sensitisation of TRPV1 was significantly reduced by PKC inhibitors. Neurons responding to thrombin or PAR1-AP were either small nociceptive neurones of the peptidergic subclass, or larger neurones which expressed markers for myelinated fibres. Sequential application of PAR1-AP and PAR4-AP showed that PAR4 is expressed in a subset of the PAR1-expressing neurons. Calcium responses to PAR2-AP were by contrast seen in a distinct population of small IB4+ nociceptive neurones. PAR3 appears to be non-functional in sensory neurones. In a skin-nerve preparation the release of the neuropeptide CGRP by heat was potentiated by PAR1-AP. Culture with nerve growth factor (NGF increased the proportion of thrombin-responsive neurons in the IB4- population, while glial-derived neurotropic factor (GDNF and neurturin upregulated the proportion of thrombin-responsive neurons in the IB4+ population. We conclude that PAR1 and PAR4 are functionally expressed in large myelinated fibre neurons, and are also expressed in small nociceptors of the peptidergic subclass, where they are able to potentiate TRPV1 activity.

  18. Participation of cannabinoid receptors in peripheral nociception induced by some NSAIDs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.C.R. Silva

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs have been used extensively to control inflammatory pain. Several peripheral antinociceptive mechanisms have been described, such as opioid system and NO/cGMP/KATP pathway activation. There is evidence that the cannabinoid system can also contribute to the in vivo pharmacological effects of ibuprofen and indomethacin. However, there is no evidence of the involvement of the endocannabinoid system in the peripheral antinociception induced by NSAIDs. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the participation of the endocannabinoid system in the peripheral antinociceptive effect of NSAIDs. All experiments were performed on male Wistar rats (160-200 g; N = 4 per group. Hyperalgesia was induced by a subcutaneous intraplantar (ipl injection of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, 2 μg/paw in the rat’s hindpaw and measured by the paw pressure test 3 h after injection. The weight in grams required to elicit a nociceptive response, paw flexion, was determined as the nociceptive threshold. The hyperalgesia was calculated as the difference between the measurements made before and after PGE2, which induced hyperalgesia (mean = 83.3 ± 4.505 g. AM-251 (80 μg/paw and AM-630 (100 μg/paw were used as CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptor antagonists, respectively. Ipl injection of 40 μg dipyrone (mean = 5.825 ± 2.842 g, 20 μg diclofenac (mean = 4.825 ± 3.850 g and 40 μg indomethacin (mean = 6.650 ± 3.611 g elicited a local peripheral antinociceptive effect. This effect was not antagonized by ipl CB1 cannabinoid antagonist to dipyrone (mean = 5.00 ± 0.9815 g, diclofenac (mean = 2.50 ± 0.8337 g and indomethacin (mean = 6.650 ± 4.069 g or CB2 cannabinoid antagonist to dipyrone (mean = 1.050 ± 6.436 g, diclofenac (mean = 6.675 ± 1.368 g and indomethacin (mean = 2.85 ± 5.01 g. Thus, cannabinoid receptors do not seem to be involved in the peripheral antinociceptive mechanism of the NSAIDs dipyrone, diclofenac and

  19. Participation of cannabinoid receptors in peripheral nociception induced by some NSAIDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, L.C.R.; Romero, T.R.L.; Guzzo, L.S.; Duarte, I.D.G. [Departamento de Farmacologia, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2012-09-21

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been used extensively to control inflammatory pain. Several peripheral antinociceptive mechanisms have been described, such as opioid system and NO/cGMP/KATP pathway activation. There is evidence that the cannabinoid system can also contribute to the in vivo pharmacological effects of ibuprofen and indomethacin. However, there is no evidence of the involvement of the endocannabinoid system in the peripheral antinociception induced by NSAIDs. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the participation of the endocannabinoid system in the peripheral antinociceptive effect of NSAIDs. All experiments were performed on male Wistar rats (160-200 g; N = 4 per group). Hyperalgesia was induced by a subcutaneous intraplantar (ipl) injection of prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}, 2 µg/paw) in the rat's hindpaw and measured by the paw pressure test 3 h after injection. The weight in grams required to elicit a nociceptive response, paw flexion, was determined as the nociceptive threshold. The hyperalgesia was calculated as the difference between the measurements made before and after PGE{sub 2}, which induced hyperalgesia (mean = 83.3 ± 4.505 g). AM-251 (80 µg/paw) and AM-630 (100 µg/paw) were used as CB{sub 1} and CB{sub 2} cannabinoid receptor antagonists, respectively. Ipl injection of 40 µg dipyrone (mean = 5.825 ± 2.842 g), 20 µg diclofenac (mean = 4.825 ± 3.850 g) and 40 µg indomethacin (mean = 6.650 ± 3.611 g) elicited a local peripheral antinociceptive effect. This effect was not antagonized by ipl CB{sub 1} cannabinoid antagonist to dipyrone (mean = 5.00 ± 0.9815 g), diclofenac (mean = 2.50 ± 0.8337 g) and indomethacin (mean = 6.650 ± 4.069 g) or CB{sub 2} cannabinoid antagonist to dipyrone (mean = 1.050 ± 6.436 g), diclofenac (mean = 6.675 ± 1.368 g) and indomethacin (mean = 2.85 ± 5.01 g). Thus, cannabinoid receptors do not seem to be involved in the peripheral antinociceptive mechanism of

  20. Phytochemical study and antinociceptive effect of the hexanic extract of leaves from Combretum duarteanum and friedelin, a triterpene isolated from the hexanic extract, in orofacial nociceptive protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jullyana S.S. Quintans

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Combretum duarteanum Cambess, Combretaceae, is a plant widely distributed in Northeastern Brazil and, in folk medicine, stems and leaves are used for pain treatment. We investigated the antinociceptive effects of the hexanic extract of leaves from C. duarteanum and of friedelin, its main compound, in formalin-, glutamate- and capsaicin- induced orofacial nociception models. In order to isolate friedelin from the hexanic extract, flash chromatography technique was used. Male mice (n = 8/group were pretreated with hexanic extract, friedelin, morphine or vehicle, before the injection of algogen agents into the right upper lip (perinasal area. The test of formalin-induced orofacial nociception showed that hexanic extract and friedelin significantly reduced nociception (p < 0.001 in both phases of testing. In the glutamate and capsaicin-induced orofacial nociception tests, pre-treatment with hexanic extract produced a significant reduction of orofacial nociception (p < 0.001 at all doses tested.The results suggest the hexanic extract and friedelin possess antinociceptive effects in models of orofacial nociception in rodents.

  1. [Changes in ingestive behavior during growth affects the functional maturation of temporomandibular joint nociceptive neurons of rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiranuma, Maya

    2013-03-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) loading during development promotes its growth and maintains normal structure/function. Continuous change in diet consistency is related to development and maturation of the peripheral nervous system, including the nociceptive system. However, the functional modulation of TMJ-nociceptive neurons under different ingestive behavior is unclear. We fed growing rats a liquid diet to investigate the effects of low TMJ loading on the response properties of neurons in the trigeminal spinal tract subnucleus caudalis (Sp5C). Forty 2-week-old male rats were used. They were fed chow pellets (n = 20, C group) or a liquid diet (n = 20, LD group) soon after weaning. Firing activities of single sensory units in response to TMJ pressure stimuli were recorded at 4, 5, 7 and 9 weeks. In TMJ-nociceptive neurons, the firing threshold (FT) in the LD group was significantly lower than that in the C group at each recording age. The FT in the C group remained unchanged throughout the recording period, whereas that in the LD group was the highest at 4 weeks, and gradually decreased. On the other hand, the initial firing frequency (IFF) was significantly higher in the LD group than in the C group at each recording age. The IFF in the C group remained unchanged throughout the experimental period, whereas that in the LD group was at its lowest at 4 weeks, and gradually increased. Based on these findings, ingestive behavior that results from continuous changes in the physical consistency of the diet during growth may affect the functional maturation of TMJ-nociceptive neurons.

  2. Influence of nociception and stress-induced antinociception on genetic variation in isoflurane anesthetic potency among mouse strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogil, Jeffrey S; Smith, Shad B; O'Reilly, Meghan K; Plourde, Gilles

    2005-10-01

    Genetic background influences anesthetic potency to suppress motor response to noxious stimulation (minimum alveolar concentration [MAC]) as well as nociceptive sensitivity in unmedicated animals. However, the influence on MAC of baseline sensitivity to the noxious stimuli used to assess MAC has virtually never been studied. The authors assessed room air nociceptive sensitivity and isoflurane MAC in multiple mouse strains. Isoflurane requirement for loss of righting response (MACLORR) was also measured. One outbred and 10 inbred mouse strains were tested for latency to respond (in room air) to a tail clip (either 500 g or 2,000 g). Naive mice of the same 11 strains were tested for isoflurane MAC and MACLORR. To assess the role of opioid-mediated stress-induced antinociception, mice were also tested for nociceptive sensitivity after injection of naloxone (10 mg/kg) or saline. Robust strain differences were observed for all measures. The authors found that tail-clip latency (using a 500-g or 2,000-g clip, respectively) correlated significantly with MAC (r = -0.76 and -0.58, respectively) but not MACLORR (r = -0.10 and -0.26). Naloxone produced strain-dependent reductions in open air tail-clip latencies, and these reductions were also strongly correlated with MAC (r = -0.67 and -0.71). The authors suggest that genetic variability in isoflurane MAC (but not MACLORR) may reflect genetic variability in the underlying sensitivity to the noxious stimulus being used to measure MAC. This variable sensitivity to nociception in the awake state is at least partially mediated by endogenous antinociceptive mechanisms activated by the tail-clip stimulus itself.

  3. Anti-nociceptive, anti-inflammatory and sedative activities of the extracts and chemical constituents of Diospyros lotus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Ghias; Rauf, Abdur; Siddiqui, Bina S; Muhammad, Naveed; Khan, Ajmal; Shah, Syed Uzair Ali

    2014-06-15

    Diospyros lotus L. is traditionally used in various diseases including pain and sleep disorders. The pain and inflammation are the common problems, which are treated with various synthetic analgesic drugs, and associated the side effects. The natural products have gained significant importance over synthetic drugs. The importance of phyto-medicine the current study has been designed with the aim to investigate the analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of Diospyros lotus and bioassay guided isolation from its crude fractions. Seven known compounds; lupeol (1), 7-methyljuglone (2), β-Sitosterol (3), stigmasterol (4) betulinic acid (5), diospyrin (6; DS) and 8-hydroxyisodiospyrin (7; HDS) which were hitherto unreported from D. lotus. The chloroform fraction (CFDL) and isolated compounds DS and HDS were evaluated for anti-nociceptive, sedative and anti-inflammatory effects. The acetic acid induced writing was significantly (pHDS (65.76%) at higher doses which exhibited peripheral and central analgesic effects in acetic acid and hot-plat pain paradigms. Regarding the anti-inflammatory effect the CFDL (77.43%), DS (80.54%) and HDS (75.87%) protected the carrageenan paw edema after 3rd h. The central analgesic effect was significantly antagonized with naloxone (0.5 mg/kg), showing opiodergic mechanism of action. The CFDL, DS and HDS were also proved sedative in open field animal models. In acute toxicity study the chloroform fraction [CFDL (50, 100 and 150 mg/kg)], DS (5 and 10 mg/kg) and HDS (5 and 10 mg/kg) were found safe. Our study concluded that CFDL, DS and HDS have marked anti-nociceptive, anti-inflammatory and sedative effect. The anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of the roots of D. lotus are partially attributed due to the presence of analgesic constituents like diospyrin (DS), 8-hydroxyisodiospyrin (HDS) and strongly supports the ethno-pharmacological uses of D. lotus as anti-nociceptive, anti-inflammatory and sedative.

  4. KCNQ channels in nociceptive cold-sensing trigeminal ganglion neurons as therapeutic targets for treating orofacial cold hyperalgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-Elsayed, Alaa A; Ikeda, Ryo; Jia, Zhanfeng; Ling, Jennifer; Zuo, Xiaozhuo; Li, Min; Gu, Jianguo G

    2015-07-31

    Hyperexcitability of nociceptive afferent fibers is an underlying mechanism of neuropathic pain and ion channels involved in neuronal excitability are potentially therapeutic targets. KCNQ channels, a subfamily of voltage-gated K(+) channels mediating M-currents, play a key role in neuronal excitability. It is unknown whether KCNQ channels are involved in the excitability of nociceptive cold-sensing trigeminal afferent fibers and if so, whether they are therapeutic targets for orofacial cold hyperalgesia, an intractable trigeminal neuropathic pain. Patch-clamp recording technique was used to study M-currents and neuronal excitability of cold-sensing trigeminal ganglion neurons. Orofacial operant behavioral assessment was performed in animals with trigeminal neuropathic pain induced by oxaliplatin or by infraorbital nerve chronic constrictive injury. We showed that KCNQ channels were expressed on and mediated M-currents in rat nociceptive cold-sensing trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons. The channels were involved in setting both resting membrane potentials and rheobase for firing action potentials in these cold-sensing TG neurons. Inhibition of KCNQ channels by linopirdine significantly decreased resting membrane potentials and the rheobase of these TG neurons. Linopirdine directly induced orofacial cold hyperalgesia when the KCNQ inhibitor was subcutaneously injected into rat orofacial regions. On the other hand, retigabine, a KCNQ channel potentiator, suppressed the excitability of <