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Sample records for cord evoked magnetic

  1. The correlation between evoked spinal cord potentials and magnetic resonance imaging before Surgery in cervical spondylotic myelopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akashi, Kosuke; Kanchiku, Tsukasa; Taguchi, Toshihiko; Kato, Yoshihiko; Imajo, Yasuaki; Suzuki, Hidenori

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to clarify the correlation between electrophysiological examination and MRI diagnosis. Twenty-four patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy were examined with magnetic resonance imaging and evoked spinal cord potentials (ESCPs) before surgery. In all the patients, only the intervertebral level was symptomatic, as shown by ESCPs. ESCPs following median nerve stimulation (MN-ESCPs), transcranial electric stimulation (TCE-ESCPs), and spinal cord stimulation (Spinal-ECSPs) were recorded. The patients were grouped into two groups as follows: group A, all ESCPs were abnormal; group B, normal spinal cord stimulation. Spinal cord transverse area and compression ratio (central and 1/4-lateral anteroposterior diameter divided by transverse diameter) were measured on T1-weighted axial imaging, with abnormal ESCPs as indicators of spinal cord morphology. Central and 1/4-lateral compression ratio was significantly lower in group A. Spinal cord morphology of magnetic resonance imaging is useful for functional diagnosis. (author)

  2. [Changes of somatosensory and transcranial magnetic stimulation motor evoked potentials in experimental spinal cord injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yong; Nie, Lin; Liu, Li-hong; Shao, Jun; Yuan, Yong-jian

    2008-03-18

    To study the changes of somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) and transcranial magnetic simulation motor evoked potential (TMS-MEP) in experimental spinal cord injury (SCI). Thirty-two rabbits were randomly divided into 4 equal groups. All rabbits were anesthetized for 90 min. A group (Group A) underwent only laminectomy of T12 without SCI, stimulation with different intensities was used to induce SEP and TMS-MEP to determine the most appropriate stimulation intensity. The EPs were recorded before and after the operation. The other 3 groups underwent laminectomy of T12 to expose the dura, and a spinal cord compressing apparatus weighing 40 g was put on the intact dura and dorsal surface of spinal cord underneath for 5, 15, and 30 min respectively (Groups B, C, and D). SEP and TMS-MEP were detected after anesthesia, after exposure of spinal cord, and 5 and 30 min, 1 and 6 h, and 1, 3, and 7 d. The latency and amplitude of each wave were measured. The data were analyzed by analysis of variance, t-test and linear correlation. Tarlov behavior score was used to assess the motor function before the operation and 1, 3, and 7 days after SCI. It was found that 100% intensity stimulus obtained stable and reliable MEP waves. Anesthetic did not influence the EPs. The amplitude of SEP began to decrease 5 min after SCI and the latency began to increase 30 min after SCI. And both the amplitude and latency, especially the former, of MEP began to significantly change 5 min after SCI. The latency levels of SEP and MEP increased and the amplitude decreased after compression time-dependently during a certain range of time (all P TMS-MEP are very sensitive to SCI, in particular, the change of amplitude is more sensitive then the latency change and can more accurately reflect the degree of SCI. Combination of SEP and TMS-MEP objectively reflects the SCI degree. EP measurement, as a noninvasive technique, has great value in monitoring spinal cord function.

  3. Short-term adaptations in spinal cord circuits evoked by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation: possible underlying mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perez, Monica A.; Lungholt, Bjarke K.S.; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2005-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has been shown to induce adaptations in cortical neuronal circuitries. In the present study we investigated whether rTMS, through its effect on corticospinal pathways, also produces adaptations at the spinal level, and what the neuronal mechanisms...... that the depression of the H-reflex by rTMS can be explained, at least partly, by an increased presynaptic inhibition of soleus Ia afferents. In contrast, rTMS had no effect on disynaptic reciprocal Ia inhibition from ankle dorsiflexors to plantarflexors. We conclude that a train of rTMS may modulate transmission...

  4. A comparison of myogenic motor evoked responses to electrical and magnetic transcranial stimulation during nitrous oxide/opioid anesthesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ubags, L. H.; Kalkman, C. J.; Been, H. D.; Koelman, J. H.; Ongerboer de Visser, B. W.

    1999-01-01

    Transcranial motor evoked potentials (tc-MEPs) are used to monitor spinal cord integrity intraoperatively. We compared myogenic motor evoked responses with electrical and magnetic transcranial stimuli during nitrous oxide/opioid anesthesia. In 11 patients undergoing spinal surgery, anesthesia was

  5. High frequency oscillations evoked by peripheral magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biller, S; Simon, L; Fiedler, P; Strohmeier, D; Haueisen, J

    2011-01-01

    The analysis of somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) and / or fields (SEF) is a well-established and important tool for investigating the functioning of the peripheral and central human nervous system. A standard technique to evoke SEPs / SEFs is the stimulation of the median nerve by using a bipolar electrical stimulus. We aim at an alternative stimulation technique enabling stimulation of deep nerve structures while reducing patient stress and error susceptibility. In the current study, we apply a commercial transcranial magnetic stimulation system for peripheral magnetic stimulation of the median nerve. We compare the results of simultaneously recorded EEG signals to prove applicability of our technique to evoke SEPs including low frequency components (LFC) as well as high frequency oscillations (HFO). Therefore, we compare amplitude, latency and time-frequency characteristics of the SEP of 14 healthy volunteers after electric and magnetic stimulation. Both low frequency components and high frequency oscillations were detected. The HFOs were superimposed onto the primary cortical response N20. Statistical analysis revealed significantly lower amplitudes and increased latencies for LFC and HFO components after magnetic stimulation. The differences indicate the inability of magnetic stimulation to elicit supramaximal responses. A psycho-perceptual evaluation showed that magnetic stimulation was less unpleasant for 12 out of the 14 volunteers. In conclusion, we showed that LFC and HFO components related to median nerve stimulation can be evoked by peripheral magnetic stimulation.

  6. The role of Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Visual Evoked ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: To report our experience in management of patients with optic neuritis. The effects of brain magnetic resonance imaging and visual evoked potential on management were investigated. Methods: This is a four years clinical trial that included patients presenting with first attack of optic neuritis older than 16 years ...

  7. Blocking proteinase-activated receptor 2 alleviated neuropathic pain evoked by spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, H; Wei, Y; Tian, F; Niu, T; Yi, G

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is an extremely serious type of physical trauma observed in clinics. Especially, neuropathic pain resulting from SCI has a lasting and significant impact on most aspects of daily life. Thus, a better understanding of the molecular pathways responsible for the cause of neuropathic pain observed in SCI is important to develop effectively therapeutic agents and treatment strategies. Proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) are a family member of G-protein-coupled receptors and are activated by a proteolytic mechanism. One of its subtypes PAR2 has been reported to be engaged in mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia. Thus, in this study we specifically examined the underlying mechanisms responsible for SCI evoked-neuropathic pain in a rat model. Overall, we demonstrated that SCI increases PAR2 and its downstream pathways TRPV1 and TRPA1 expression in the superficial dorsal horn of the spinal cord. Also, we showed that blocking spinal PAR2 by intrathecal injection of FSLLRY-NH2 significantly inhibits neuropathic pain responses induced by mechanical and thermal stimulation whereas FSLLRY-NH2 decreases the protein expression of TRPV1 and TRPA1 as well as the levels of substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide. Results of this study have important implications, i.e. targeting one or more of these signaling molecules involved in activation of PAR2 and TRPV1/TRPA1 evoked by SCI may present new opportunities for treatment and management of neuropathic pain often observed in patients with SCI.

  8. Relationship between median nerve somatosensory evoked potentials and spinal cord injury levels in patients with quadriplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Arruda Serra Gaspar, M I F; Cliquet, A; Fernandes Lima, V M; de Abreu, D C C

    2009-05-01

    Cross-sectional study. To observe if there is a relationship between the level of injury by the American Spinal Cord Injury Association (ASIA) and cortical somatosensory evoked potential (SSEP) recordings of the median nerve in patients with quadriplegia. Rehabilitation Outpatient Clinic at the university hospital in Brazil. Fourteen individuals with quadriplegia and 8 healthy individuals were evaluated. Electrophysiological assessment of the median nerve was performed by evoked potential equipment. The injury level was obtained by ASIA. N(9), N(13) and N(20) were analyzed based on the presence or absence of responses. The parameters used for analyzing these responses were the latency and the amplitude. Data were analyzed using mixed-effect models. N(9) responses were found in all patients with quadriplegia with a similar latency and amplitude observed in healthy individuals; N(13) responses were not found in any patients with quadriplegia. N(20) responses were not found in C5 patients with quadriplegia but it was present in C6 and C7 patients. Their latencies were similar to healthy individuals (P>0.05) but the amplitudes were decreased (P<0.05). This study suggests that the SSEP responses depend on the injury level, considering that the individuals with C6 and C7 injury levels, both complete and incomplete, presented SSEP recordings in the cortical area. It also showed a relationship between the level of spinal cord injury assessed by ASIA and the median nerve SSEP responses, through the latency and amplitude recordings.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of spinal cord syndromes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einsiedel, H. von; Stepan, R.

    1985-01-01

    Thirty-four patients with intramedullary space-occupying lesions or cord compression syndromes were examined with a resistive and two different superconductive magnetic resonance (MR) imaging units. Studies were done primarily by the spin-echo (SE) technique and in the majority of patients different pulse sequences were used. Images with short echo-time (TE) and short recovery-time (TR) were best for demonstration of spinal cord anatomy, for depicting cystic portions in intramedullary tumours and for showing syringomyelia. Solid intramedullary tumours showed normal cord signal intensity. Images with prolonged TE and TR predominantly enhanced CSF signal intensity and, to a more considerable extent, solid intramedullary tumours. Thus, the diameter of the subarachnoid space and the presence of a solid intramedullary tumour, not concomittant with a significant enlargement of the spinal cord, could only be recognized on these prolonged SE images. Major advantages of MR in comparison to CT are that the spinal cord can be imaged in the sagittal plane and that beam hardening artifacts do not occur; in comparison to myelography the cord can be imaged directly by MR. Partial volume is a major limitation of MR, not only in the preferably applied sagittal plane. The choice of slice thickness adequate to the diameter of the lesion and straight positioning of the patient for sagittal single slice midline images are fundamental for reliable MR investigations. Another limitation to MR is that cortical bone gives no signal. The actual diameter of the spinal canal therefore cannot be correctly appreciated and consequently it was difficult or impossible to assess spinal stenosis. (orig.)

  10. Blocking mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) improves neuropathic pain evoked by spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoping; Li, Xiaojia; Huang, Bin; Ma, Shuai

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is an extremely serious type of physical trauma observed in clinics. Neuropathic pain resulting from SCI has a lasting and significant impact on most aspects of daily life. Thus, a better understanding of the molecular pathways responsible for the cause of neuropathic pain observed in SCI is important to develop effective therapeutic agents and treatment strategies. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is well known for its critical roles in regulating protein synthesis and growth. Furthermore, compelling evidence supports the notion that widespread dysregulation of mTOR and its downstream pathways are involved in neuropathic pain. Thus, in this study we specifically examined the underlying mechanisms by which mTOR and its signaling pathways are involved in SCI-evoked neuropathic pain in a rat model. Overall, we demonstrated that SCI increased the protein expression of p-mTOR, and mTORmediated- phosphorylation of 4E-binding protein 4 (4E-BP1) and p70 ribosomal S6 protein kinase 1 (S6K1) in the superficial dorsal horn of the spinal cord. Also, we showed that blocking spinal mTOR by intrathecal injection of rapamycin significantly inhibited pain responses induced by mechanical and thermal stimulation. In addition, blocking spinal phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (p-PI3K) pathway significantly attenuated activities of p-mTOR pathways as well as mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in SCI rats. Moreover, blocking mTOR and PI3K decreased the enhanced levels of substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in the dorsal horn of SCI rats. We revealed specific signaling pathways leading to SCI-evoked neuropathic pain, including the activation of PI3K, mTOR and its downstream signaling pathways. Targeting one or more of these signaling molecules may present new opportunities for treatment and management of neuropathic pain often observed in patients with SCI.

  11. Lifting the veil on the dynamics of neuronal activities evoked by transcranial magnetic stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bingshuo; Virtanen, Juha P; Oeltermann, Axel; Schwarz, Cornelius; Giese, Martin A; Ziemann, Ulf

    2017-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a widely used non-invasive tool to study and modulate human brain functions. However, TMS-evoked activity of individual neurons has remained largely inaccessible due to the large TMS-induced electromagnetic fields. Here, we present a general method providing direct in vivo electrophysiological access to TMS-evoked neuronal activity 0.8–1 ms after TMS onset. We translated human single-pulse TMS to rodents and unveiled time-grained evoked activities of motor cortex layer V neurons that show high-frequency spiking within the first 6 ms depending on TMS-induced current orientation and a multiphasic spike-rhythm alternating between excitation and inhibition in the 6–300 ms epoch, all of which can be linked to various human TMS responses recorded at the level of spinal cord and muscles. The advance here facilitates a new level of insight into the TMS-brain interaction that is vital for developing this non-invasive tool to purposefully explore and effectively treat the human brain. PMID:29165241

  12. Lifting the veil on the dynamics of neuronal activities evoked by transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bingshuo; Virtanen, Juha P; Oeltermann, Axel; Schwarz, Cornelius; Giese, Martin A; Ziemann, Ulf; Benali, Alia

    2017-11-22

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a widely used non-invasive tool to study and modulate human brain functions. However, TMS-evoked activity of individual neurons has remained largely inaccessible due to the large TMS-induced electromagnetic fields. Here, we present a general method providing direct in vivo electrophysiological access to TMS-evoked neuronal activity 0.8-1 ms after TMS onset. We translated human single-pulse TMS to rodents and unveiled time-grained evoked activities of motor cortex layer V neurons that show high-frequency spiking within the first 6 ms depending on TMS-induced current orientation and a multiphasic spike-rhythm alternating between excitation and inhibition in the 6-300 ms epoch, all of which can be linked to various human TMS responses recorded at the level of spinal cord and muscles. The advance here facilitates a new level of insight into the TMS-brain interaction that is vital for developing this non-invasive tool to purposefully explore and effectively treat the human brain.

  13. Electroencephalographic evoked pain response is suppressed by spinal cord stimulation in complex regional pain syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hylands-White, Nicholas; Duarte, Rui V; Beeson, Paul; Mayhew, Stephen D; Raphael, Jon H

    2016-12-01

    Pain is a subjective response that limits assessment. The purpose of this case report was to explore how the objectivity of the electroencephalographic response to thermal stimuli would be affected by concurrent spinal cord stimulation. A patient had been implanted with a spinal cord stimulator for the management of complex regional pain syndrome of both hands for 8 years. Following ethical approval and written informed consent we induced thermal stimuli using the Medoc PATHWAY Pain & Sensory Evaluation System on the right hand of the patient with the spinal cord stimulator switched off and with the spinal cord stimulator switched on. The patient reported a clinically significant reduction in thermal induced pain using the numerical rating scale (71.4 % reduction) with spinal cord stimulator switched on. Analysis of electroencephalogram recordings indicated the occurrence of contact heat evoked potentials (N2-P2) with spinal cord stimulator off, but not with spinal cord stimulator on. This case report suggests that thermal pain can be reduced in complex regional pain syndrome patients with the use of spinal cord stimulation and offers objective validation of the reported outcomes with this treatment.

  14. A study of spinal cord tumors by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gushiken, Isao; Nishihira, Takeshi; Nakasone, Tomohiro [Ryukyu Univ., Nishihara, Okinawa (Japan). School of Medicine; Takara, Hiroaki; Oshiro, Yutaka; Oshiro, Takashi; Isa, Makoto; Kinjo, Yukio; Ibaraki, Kunio

    1989-10-01

    We studied 17 cases of spinal cord tumors using magnetic resonance imaging. According to the intensity of image and histological feature of spinal cord tumors, we identified two groups in T2 weighted imaging. One was a hypointensity group showing cystic or vascular tumors, and the other was hyperintensity group of solid tumors. Preoperative images of swelling, narrowing, deviation of the spinal cord were remained after the operations. Grafted free fatty tissue for the prevention of adhesion was recognized well also after the operation. Postoperative imagings sometime showed pseudo-deviation of the spinal cord which was easy to be mistaken as the remains of tumors and narrowing of the spinal cord. In conclusion, the magnetic resonance imaging makes very early detection of spinal cord tumors possible, and it is valuable for a diagnosis of the spinal cord tumor associated with brain tumor. (author).

  15. A study of spinal cord tumors by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gushiken, Isao; Nishihira, Takeshi; Nakasone, Tomohiro; Takara, Hiroaki; Oshiro, Yutaka; Oshiro, Takashi; Isa, Makoto; Kinjo, Yukio; Ibaraki, Kunio.

    1989-01-01

    We studied 17 cases of spinal cord tumors using magnetic resonance imaging. According to the intensity of image and histological feature of spinal cord tumors, we identified two groups in T2 weighted imaging. One was a hypointensity group showing cystic or vascular tumors, and the other was hyperintensity group of solid tumors. Preoperative images of swelling, narrowing, deviation of the spinal cord were remained after the operations. Grafted free fatty tissue for the prevention of adhesion was recognized well also after the operation. Postoperative imagings sometime showed pseudo-deviation of the spinal cord which was easy to be mistaken as the remains of tumors and narrowing of the spinal cord. In conclusion, the magnetic resonance imaging makes very early detection of spinal cord tumors possible, and it is valuable for a diagnosis of the spinal cord tumor associated with brain tumor. (author)

  16. Blocking mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR improves neuropathic pain evoked by spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury (SCI is an extremely serious type of physical trauma observed in clinics. Neuropathic pain resulting from SCI has a lasting and significant impact on most aspects of daily life. Thus, a better understanding of the molecular pathways responsible for the cause of neuropathic pain observed in SCI is important to develop effective therapeutic agents and treatment strategies. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is well known for its critical roles in regulating protein synthesis and growth. Furthermore, compelling evidence supports the notion that widespread dysregulation of mTOR and its downstream pathways are involved in neuropathic pain. Thus, in this study we specifically examined the underlying mechanisms by which mTOR and its signaling pathways are involved in SCI-evoked neuropathic pain in a rat model. Overall, we demonstrated that SCI increased the protein expression of p-mTOR, and mTORmediated- phosphorylation of 4E–binding protein 4 (4E-BP1 and p70 ribosomal S6 protein kinase 1 (S6K1 in the superficial dorsal horn of the spinal cord. Also, we showed that blocking spinal mTOR by intrathecal injection of rapamycin significantly inhibited pain responses induced by mechanical and thermal stimulation. In addition, blocking spinal phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (p-PI3K pathway significantly attenuated activities of p-mTOR pathways as well as mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in SCI rats. Moreover, blocking mTOR and PI3K decreased the enhanced levels of substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP in the dorsal horn of SCI rats. We revealed specific signaling pathways leading to SCI-evoked neuropathic pain, including the activation of PI3K, mTOR and its downstream signaling pathways. Targeting one or more of these signaling molecules may present new opportunities for treatment and management of neuropathic pain often observed in patients with SCI.

  17. Recording visual evoked potentials and auditory evoked P300 at 9.4T static magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrubla, Jorge; Neuner, Irene; Hahn, David; Boers, Frank; Shah, N Jon

    2013-01-01

    Simultaneous recording of electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has shown a number of advantages that make this multimodal technique superior to fMRI alone. The feasibility of recording EEG at ultra-high static magnetic field up to 9.4 T was recently demonstrated and promises to be implemented soon in fMRI studies at ultra high magnetic fields. Recording visual evoked potentials are expected to be amongst the most simple for simultaneous EEG/fMRI at ultra-high magnetic field due to the easy assessment of the visual cortex. Auditory evoked P300 measurements are of interest since it is believed that they represent the earliest stage of cognitive processing. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of recording visual evoked potentials and auditory evoked P300 in a 9.4 T static magnetic field. For this purpose, EEG data were recorded from 26 healthy volunteers inside a 9.4 T MR scanner using a 32-channel MR compatible EEG system. Visual stimulation and auditory oddball paradigm were presented in order to elicit evoked related potentials (ERP). Recordings made outside the scanner were performed using the same stimuli and EEG system for comparison purposes. We were able to retrieve visual P100 and auditory P300 evoked potentials at 9.4 T static magnetic field after correction of the ballistocardiogram artefact using independent component analysis. The latencies of the ERPs recorded at 9.4 T were not different from those recorded at 0 T. The amplitudes of ERPs were higher at 9.4 T when compared to recordings at 0 T. Nevertheless, it seems that the increased amplitudes of the ERPs are due to the effect of the ultra-high field on the EEG recording system rather than alteration in the intrinsic processes that generate the electrophysiological responses.

  18. H-reflexes reduce fatigue of evoked contractions after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergquist, Austin J; Wiest, Matheus J; Okuma, Yoshino; Collins, David F

    2014-08-01

    Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) over a muscle belly (mNMES) generates contractions predominantly through M-waves, while NMES over a nerve trunk (nNMES) can generate contractions through H-reflexes in people who are neurologically intact. We tested whether the differences between mNMES and nNMES are present in people with chronic motor-complete spinal cord injury and, if so, whether they influence contraction fatigue. Plantar-flexion torque and soleus electromyography were recorded from 8 participants. Fatigue protocols were delivered using mNMES and nNMES on separate days. nNMES generated contractions that fatigued less than mNMES. Torque decreased the least when nNMES generated contractions, at least partly through H-reflexes (n = 4 participants; 39% decrease), and torque decreased the most when contractions were generated through M-waves, regardless of NMES site (nNMES 71% decrease, n = 4; mNMES, 73% decrease, n = 8). nNMES generates contractions that fatigue less than mNMES, but only when H-reflexes contribute to the evoked contractions. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Novel aspects of spinal cord evoked potentials (SCEPs) in the evaluation of dorso-ventral and lateral mechanical impacts on the spinal cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rad, Iman; Kouhzaei, Sogolie; Mobasheri, Hamid; Saberi, Hooshang

    2015-02-01

    Objectives. The aim of the current study was to mimic mechanical impacts on the spinal cord by manifesting the effects of dorsoventral (DVMP) and lateral (LMP) mechanical pressure on neural activity to address points to be considered during surgery for different purposes, including spinal cord decompression. Approaches. Spinal cords of anesthetized rats were compressed at T13. Different characteristics of axons, including vulnerability, excitability, and conduction velocity (CV), in response to promptness, severity, and duration of pressure were assessed by spinal cord evoked potentials (SCEPs). Real-time SCEPs recorded at L4-5 revealed N1, N2, and N3 peaks that were used to represent the activity of injured sensory afferents, interneurons, and MN fibers. The averaged SCEP recordings were fitted by trust-region algorithm to find the equivalent Gaussian and polynomial equations. Main results. The pyramidal and extrapyramidal pathways possessed CVs of 3-11 and 16-80 m s-1, respectively. DVMP decreased the excitability of myelinated neural fibers in antidromic and orthodromic pathways. The excitability of fibers in extrapyramidal and pyramidal pathways of lateral corticospinal (LCS) and anterior corticospinal (ACS) tracts decreased following LMP. A significant drop in the amplitude of N3 and its conduction velocity (CV) revealed higher susceptibility of less-myelinated fibers to both DVMP and LMP. The best parametric fitting model for triplet healthy spinal cord CAP was a six-term Gaussian equation (G6) that fell into a five-term equation (G5) at the complete compression stage. Significance. The spinal cord is more susceptible to dorsoventral than lateral mechanical pressures, and this should be considered in spinal cord operations. SCEPs have shown promising capabilities for evaluating the severity of SCI and thus can be applied for diagnostic or prognostic intraoperative monitoring (IOM).

  20. Usefulness of laser-evoked potentials and quantitative sensory testing in the diagnosis of neuropathic spinal cord injury pain: a multiple case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landmann, G; Berger, M F; Stockinger, L; Opsommer, E

    2017-06-01

    A retrospective study. The aim of this study was to investigate the contribution of laser-evoked potentials (LEPs) and quantitative sensory testing (QST) to the diagnosis of neuropathic pain in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) and inconclusive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. A multidisciplinary pain center. QST (DFNS protocol) and Tm-YAG-laser stimulation of the skin were applied within the pain site corresponding with dermatomes of altered sensation. Available MRI scans were reviewed. Thirteen individuals (50±16 years) with SCI were examined. In four cases with no detectable neural lesion on MRI, all QST but three LEP were abnormal. In four patients with poorly defined spinal lesion on MRI, all QST but three LEP only were abnormal. In four cases where pain was not matching adequately with MRI lesions, all patients had abnormal LEP and QST. In one patient showing a spinal cord atrophy, LEP was normal but QST was abnormal. Findings supported the diagnoses at-level (n=5) and below-level (n=8) SCI pain. Spinothalamic tract function assessed by LEP was normal in three cases, but QST was abnormal in all cases. As QST is a psychophysical examination depending on patient cooperation, we suggest that the combination of QST and LEP might be a valuable diagnostic tool to detect lesions of the somatosensory system in a subgroup of patients with neuropathic spinal cord injury pain and inconclusive MRI findings.

  1. The effectiveness of FES-evoked EMG potentials to assess muscle force and fatigue in individuals with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibitoye, Morufu Olusola; Estigoni, Eduardo H; Hamzaid, Nur Azah; Wahab, Ahmad Khairi Abdul; Davis, Glen M

    2014-07-14

    The evoked electromyographic signal (eEMG) potential is the standard index used to monitor both electrical changes within the motor unit during muscular activity and the electrical patterns during evoked contraction. However, technical and physiological limitations often preclude the acquisition and analysis of the signal especially during functional electrical stimulation (FES)-evoked contractions. Hence, an accurate quantification of the relationship between the eEMG potential and FES-evoked muscle response remains elusive and continues to attract the attention of researchers due to its potential application in the fields of biomechanics, muscle physiology, and rehabilitation science. We conducted a systematic review to examine the effectiveness of eEMG potentials to assess muscle force and fatigue, particularly as a biofeedback descriptor of FES-evoked contractions in individuals with spinal cord injury. At the outset, 2867 citations were identified and, finally, fifty-nine trials met the inclusion criteria. Four hypotheses were proposed and evaluated to inform this review. The results showed that eEMG is effective at quantifying muscle force and fatigue during isometric contraction, but may not be effective during dynamic contractions including cycling and stepping. Positive correlation of up to r = 0.90 (p peak-to-peak amplitude of the eEMG and the decline in the force output during fatiguing isometric contractions has been reported. In the available prediction models, the performance index of the eEMG signal to estimate the generated muscle force ranged from 3.8% to 34% for 18 s to 70 s ahead of the actual muscle force generation. The strength and inherent limitations of the eEMG signal to assess muscle force and fatigue were evident from our findings with implications in clinical management of spinal cord injury (SCI) population.

  2. The Effectiveness of FES-Evoked EMG Potentials to Assess Muscle Force and Fatigue in Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morufu Olusola Ibitoye

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The evoked electromyographic signal (eEMG potential is the standard index used to monitor both electrical changes within the motor unit during muscular activity and the electrical patterns during evoked contraction. However, technical and physiological limitations often preclude the acquisition and analysis of the signal especially during functional electrical stimulation (FES-evoked contractions. Hence, an accurate quantification of the relationship between the eEMG potential and FES-evoked muscle response remains elusive and continues to attract the attention of researchers due to its potential application in the fields of biomechanics, muscle physiology, and rehabilitation science. We conducted a systematic review to examine the effectiveness of eEMG potentials to assess muscle force and fatigue, particularly as a biofeedback descriptor of FES-evoked contractions in individuals with spinal cord injury. At the outset, 2867 citations were identified and, finally, fifty-nine trials met the inclusion criteria. Four hypotheses were proposed and evaluated to inform this review. The results showed that eEMG is effective at quantifying muscle force and fatigue during isometric contraction, but may not be effective during dynamic contractions including cycling and stepping. Positive correlation of up to r = 0.90 (p < 0.05 between the decline in the peak-to-peak amplitude of the eEMG and the decline in the force output during fatiguing isometric contractions has been reported. In the available prediction models, the performance index of the eEMG signal to estimate the generated muscle force ranged from 3.8% to 34% for 18 s to 70 s ahead of the actual muscle force generation. The strength and inherent limitations of the eEMG signal to assess muscle force and fatigue were evident from our findings with implications in clinical management of spinal cord injury (SCI population.

  3. Evoked EMG versus Muscle Torque during Fatiguing Functional Electrical Stimulation-Evoked Muscle Contractions and Short-Term Recovery in Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estigoni, Eduardo H.; Fornusek, Che; Hamzaid, Nur Azah; Hasnan, Nazirah; Smith, Richard M.; Davis, Glen M.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated whether the relationship between muscle torque and m-waves remained constant after short recovery periods, between repeated intervals of isometric muscle contractions induced by functional electrical stimulation (FES). Eight subjects with spinal cord injury (SCI) were recruited for the study. All subjects had their quadriceps muscles group stimulated during three sessions of isometric contractions separated by 5 min of recovery. The evoked-electromyographic (eEMG) signals, as well as the produced torque, were synchronously acquired during the contractions and during short FES bursts applied during the recovery intervals. All analysed m-wave variables changed progressively throughout the three contractions, even though the same muscle torque was generated. The peak to peak amplitude (PtpA), and the m-wave area (Area) were significantly increased, while the time between the stimulus artefact and the positive peak (PosT) were substantially reduced when the muscles became fatigued. In addition, all m-wave variables recovered faster and to a greater extent than did torque after the recovery intervals. We concluded that rapid recovery intervals between FES-evoked exercise sessions can radically interfere in the use of m-waves as a proxy for torque estimation in individuals with SCI. This needs to be further investigated, in addition to seeking a better understanding of the mechanisms of muscle fatigue and recovery. PMID:25479324

  4. Effect of word familiarity on visually evoked magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, N; Iwaki, S; Nakagawa, S; Yamaguchi, M; Tonoike, M

    2004-11-30

    This study investigated the effect of word familiarity of visual stimuli on the word recognizing function of the human brain. Word familiarity is an index of the relative ease of word perception, and is characterized by facilitation and accuracy on word recognition. We studied the effect of word familiarity, using "Hiragana" (phonetic characters in Japanese orthography) characters as visual stimuli, on the elicitation of visually evoked magnetic fields with a word-naming task. The words were selected from a database of lexical properties of Japanese. The four "Hiragana" characters used were grouped and presented in 4 classes of degree of familiarity. The three components were observed in averaged waveforms of the root mean square (RMS) value on latencies at about 100 ms, 150 ms and 220 ms. The RMS value of the 220 ms component showed a significant positive correlation (F=(3/36); 5.501; p=0.035) with the value of familiarity. ECDs of the 220 ms component were observed in the intraparietal sulcus (IPS). Increments in the RMS value of the 220 ms component, which might reflect ideographical word recognition, retrieving "as a whole" were enhanced with increments of the value of familiarity. The interaction of characters, which increased with the value of familiarity, might function "as a large symbol"; and enhance a "pop-out" function with an escaping character inhibiting other characters and enhancing the segmentation of the character (as a figure) from the ground.

  5. Spinal cord magnetic resonance imaging in suspected multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lycklama a Nijeholt, G.J.; Bergers, E.; Castelijns, J.A.; Barkhof, F.; Uitdehaag, B.M.J.; Polman, C.H.

    2000-01-01

    We examined the value of spinal cord magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnostic work-up of multiple sclerosis (MS). Forty patients suspected of having MS were examined within 24 months after the start of symptoms. Disability was assessed, and symptoms were categorized as either brain or spinal cord. Work-up further included cerebrospinal fluid analysis and standard proton-density, T2-, and T1-weighted gadolinium-enhanced brain and spinal cord MRI. Patients were categorized as either clinically definite MS (n = 13), laboratory-supported definite MS (n = 14), or clinically probable MS (n = 4); four patients had clinically probable MS, and in nine MS was suspected. Spinal cord abnormalities were found in 35 of 40 patients (87.5 %), consisting of focal lesions in 31, only diffuse abnormalities in two, and both in two. Asymptomatic spinal cord lesions occurred in six patients. All patients with diffuse spinal cord abnormality had clear spinal cord symptoms and a primary progressive disease course. In clinically definite MS, the inclusion of spinal imaging increased the sensitivity of MRI to 100 %. Seven patients without a definite diagnosis had clinically isolated syndromes involving the spinal cord. Brain MRI was inconclusive, while all had focal spinal cord lesions which explained symptoms and ruled out other causes. Two other patients had atypical brain abnormalities suggesting ischemic/vascular disease. No spinal cord abnormalities were found, and during follow-up MS was ruled out. Spinal cord abnormalities are common in suspected MS, and may occur asymptomatic. Although diagnostic classification is seldom changed, spinal cord imaging increases diagnostic sensitivity of MRI in patients with suspected MS. In addition, patients with primary progressive MS may possibly be earlier diagnosed. Finally, differentiation with atypical lesions may be improved. (orig.)

  6. A novel approach for automatic visualization and activation detection of evoked potentials induced by epidural spinal cord stimulation in individuals with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesbah, Samineh; Angeli, Claudia A; Keynton, Robert S; El-Baz, Ayman; Harkema, Susan J

    2017-01-01

    Voluntary movements and the standing of spinal cord injured patients have been facilitated using lumbosacral spinal cord epidural stimulation (scES). Identifying the appropriate stimulation parameters (intensity, frequency and anode/cathode assignment) is an arduous task and requires extensive mapping of the spinal cord using evoked potentials. Effective visualization and detection of muscle evoked potentials induced by scES from the recorded electromyography (EMG) signals is critical to identify the optimal configurations and the effects of specific scES parameters on muscle activation. The purpose of this work was to develop a novel approach to automatically detect the occurrence of evoked potentials, quantify the attributes of the signal and visualize the effects across a high number of scES parameters. This new method is designed to automate the current process for performing this task, which has been accomplished manually by data analysts through observation of raw EMG signals, a process that is laborious and time-consuming as well as prone to human errors. The proposed method provides a fast and accurate five-step algorithms framework for activation detection and visualization of the results including: conversion of the EMG signal into its 2-D representation by overlaying the located signal building blocks; de-noising the 2-D image by applying the Generalized Gaussian Markov Random Field technique; detection of the occurrence of evoked potentials using a statistically optimal decision method through the comparison of the probability density functions of each segment to the background noise utilizing log-likelihood ratio; feature extraction of detected motor units such as peak-to-peak amplitude, latency, integrated EMG and Min-max time intervals; and finally visualization of the outputs as Colormap images. In comparing the automatic method vs. manual detection on 700 EMG signals from five individuals, the new approach decreased the processing time from several

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of spinal cord injury in chronic stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobimatsu, Haruki; Nihei, Ryuichi; Kimura, Tetsuhiko; Yano, Hideo; Touyama, Tetsuo; Tobimatsu, Yoshiko; Suyama, Naoto; Yoshino, Yasumasa

    1991-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images of a total of 195 patients with cervical (125) or thoracic (70) spinal cord injury were reviewed. The imaging studies of the spinal cord lesions were correlated with clinical manifestations. Sequential MR imaging revealed hypointensity on T1-weighted images (T1WI) and hyperintensity on T2-weighted images (T2WI) in all patients, except for five patients showing no signal changes and two showing isointensity, suggesting gliosis, myelomalacia, and syringomyelia. Spinal cord lesions were classified into four types: small lesions, large lesions, complete transverse, and longitudinal rupture. These lesions were well correlated with the severity of injury and paralysis. Complete paralysis was frequently associated with enlarged, complete transverse for cervical spinal cord injury, and longitudinal ruptured or thinned complete transverse for thoracic spinal cord injury. The height of paralysis was well in agreement with that of lesions. For incomplete paralysis, localized lesions were seen within the spinal cord, coinciding with the paralysis or severity. Traumatic syringomyelia was seen in 17 patients (8.7%)-- for the cervical site (10 patients, 8%) and the thoracic site (7 patients, 10%). When homogeneous and marginally clear hypointensity is shown on T1-weighted images and vacuolated hyperintensity is shown on T2-weighted images, in addition to lesions spreading two or more cords or 1.5 or more cords above the nervous root level of paralysis, traumatic syringomyelia is strongly suspected, requiring the follow up observation. (N.K.)

  8. Nuclear magnetic imaging for MTRA. Spinal canal and spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritzsch, Dominik; Hoffmann, Karl-Titus

    2011-01-01

    The booklet covers the following topics: (1) Clinical indications for NMR imaging of spinal cord and spinal canal; (2) Methodic requirements: magnets and coils, image processing, contrast media: (3) Examination technology: examination conditions, sequences, examination protocols; (4) Disease pattern and indications: diseases of the myelin, the spinal nerves and the spinal canal (infections, tumors, injuries, ischemia and bleedings, malformations); diseases of the spinal cord and the intervertebral disks (degenerative changes, infections, injuries, tumors, malformations).

  9. Schistosomiasis of the spinal cord value of magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masson, C.; Rey, A.; Ast, G.; Cambier, J.; Masson, M.

    1990-01-01

    The authors report a case of spinal cord schistosomiasis presenting as myelitis, with rapidly developing deficit, signs of severe cerebrospinal fluid inflammation, normal myelography and computerized tomography. The patient's country of origin suggested schistosomiasis, and the diagnosis was confirmed by serology and rectal biopsy which showed eggs of Schistosoma mansoni. Magnetic resonance imaging was helpful as it confirmed the absence of spinal cord compression and showed a lesion of the conus medullaris, this region being the most frequent site of schistosomial myelitis [fr

  10. Torque and mechanomyogram relationships during electrically-evoked isometric quadriceps contractions in persons with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibitoye, Morufu Olusola; Hamzaid, Nur Azah; Hasnan, Nazirah; Abdul Wahab, Ahmad Khairi; Islam, Md Anamul; Kean, Victor S P; Davis, Glen M

    2016-08-01

    The interaction between muscle contractions and joint loading produces torques necessary for movements during activities of daily living. However, during neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES)-evoked contractions in persons with spinal cord injury (SCI), a simple and reliable proxy of torque at the muscle level has been minimally investigated. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships between muscle mechanomyographic (MMG) characteristics and NMES-evoked isometric quadriceps torques in persons with motor complete SCI. Six SCI participants with lesion levels below C4 [(mean (SD) age, 39.2 (7.9) year; stature, 1.71 (0.05) m; and body mass, 69.3 (12.9) kg)] performed randomly ordered NMES-evoked isometric leg muscle contractions at 30°, 60° and 90° knee flexion angles on an isokinetic dynamometer. MMG signals were detected by an accelerometer-based vibromyographic sensor placed over the belly of rectus femoris muscle. The relationship between MMG root mean square (MMG-RMS) and NMES-evoked torque revealed a very high association (R(2)=0.91 at 30°; R(2)=0.98 at 60°; and R(2)=0.97 at 90° knee angles; Ptorque, between 0.65 and 0.79 for MMG-RMS, and from 0.67 to 0.73 for MMG-PTP. Their standard error of measurements (SEM) ranged between 10.1% and 31.6% (of mean values) for torque, MMG-RMS and MMG-PTP. The MMG peak frequency (MMG-PF) of 30Hz approximated the stimulation frequency, indicating NMES-evoked motor unit firing rate. The results demonstrated knee angle differences in the MMG-RMS versus NMES-isometric torque relationship, but a similar torque related pattern for MMG-PF. These findings suggested that MMG was well associated with torque production, reliably tracking the motor unit recruitment pattern during NMES-evoked muscle contractions. The strong positive relationship between MMG signal and NMES-evoked torque production suggested that the MMG might be deployed as a direct proxy for muscle torque or fatigue measurement during

  11. Comparison of sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging and evoked potentials in the detection of brainstem involvement in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comi, G.; Martinelli, V.; Medaglini, S.; Locatelli, T.; Magnani, G.; Poggi, A.; Triulzi, F.

    1988-01-01

    A comparison was made of the sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging and the combined use of Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potential and Median Somatosensory Evoked Potential in the detection of brainstem dysfunction in 54 multiple sclerosis patients. 10 refs.; 2 tabs

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of spinal cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakudo, Miyuki; Inoue, Yuichi; Fukuda, Teruo

    1988-01-01

    Forty-three MR examinations of 30 patients with spinal cord injuries were retrospectively reviewed to evaluate MR findings of the injured cord and to correlate them with the time interval from the day of spinal cord injury. There were 18 cysts, 8 ''myelomalacias'', 2 cord atrophies, one intramedullary hematoma and two transections. In one patient, ''myelomalacia'' became a cyst on the follow-up study. Large cysts of more than 6 vertebral segments were found in 7 patients, all of whom had had trauma more than 5 years prior to examination. Small cysts of less than half a vertebral height were seen in 5 patients, all of whom were studied 3 to 6 months after the injury. Intermediate cysts were seen in 7 patients who had sustained trauma more than a year before. In a majority (13/14 scans) of ''myelomalacia'', the time interval from injury until examination was only 2 weeks to 6 months. Of the 14 patients who showed post-traumatic progressive myelopathy, seven had large cysts. It is known that intramedullary hematoma becomes a cyst, and that post-traumatic myelomalacia probably results in a cyst in animal studies. Our clinical study seems to support a strong causal relation between myelomalacia and post-traumatic cysts. Since post-traumatic progressive myelopathy with a cyst is surgically treatable, follow-up MR imaging is preferable in cases with myelomalacia. (author)

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of experimental spinal cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Tsutomu; Kumano, Kouichi; Kadoya, Satoru

    1989-01-01

    Correlation between pathological findings and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of experimental cord injury were investigated. Cord injuries were made on ten Wistar rats weighing 80-170 gm by epidural compression of the thoracic cord with a Biemer cerebral vascular clip for 5-20 seconds. Several hours after the procedure animals were examined by spin echo axial MR images with a pulse sequence of TR/TE=1000/36 msec. MR studies were repeated on 4 animals 3-7 days after the initial examination. Immediately after the latest MRI examination animals were sacrificed and fixed with 10% formalin. Three micron thickness paraffin sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin were evaluated under a microscope. The pathological finding was hemorrhagic necrosis with edema of various severity depending on duration of clip application. The hemorrhagic necrosis was observed either unilaterally or bilaterally to the cord. MR findings of the cord were of high intensity in five animals which were severely injured, while central low intensity of the injured cord appeared in three mildly injured animals. Of the remaining two animals which had mild injury, one showed unilateral high intensity, while no definitive change was demonstrated in the other. The high intensity in the MRI suggested edema associated with hemorrhagic necrosis rather than hemorrhage. The central low intensity appearing in the mildly injured cord might be hemorrhage in the gray matter. It is concluded that MRI was useful to diagnose not only the level and severity but also the pathological process in the injured cord, and thus to estimate the prognosis of the cord injuries. (author)

  14. Assessment of abdominal muscle function in individuals with motor-complete spinal cord injury above T6 in response to transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerkefors, Anna; Squair, Jordan W; Chua, Romeo; Lam, Tania; Chen, Zhen; Carpenter, Mark G

    2015-02-01

    To use transcranial magnetic stimulation and electromyography to assess the potential for preserved function in the abdominal muscles in individuals classified with motor-complete spinal cord injury above T6. Five individuals with spinal cord injury (C5-T3) and 5 able-bodied individuals. Transcranial magnetic stimulation was delivered over the abdominal region of primary motor cortex during resting and sub-maximal (or attempted) contractions. Surface electromyography was used to record motor-evoked potentials as well as maximal voluntary (or attempted) contractions in the abdominal muscles and the diaphragm. Responses to transcranial magnetic stimulation in the abdominal muscles occurred in all spinal cord injury subjects. Latencies of muscle response onsets were similar in both groups; however, peak-to-peak amplitudes were smaller in the spinal cord injury group. During maximal voluntary (or attempted) contractions all spinal cord injury subjects were able to elicit electromyography activity above resting levels in more than one abdominal muscle across tasks. Individuals with motor-complete spinal cord injury above T6 were able to activate abdominal muscles in response to transcranial magnetic stimulation and during maximal voluntary (or attempted) contractions. The activation was induced directly through corticospinal pathways, and not indirectly by stretch reflex activations of the diaphragm. Transcranial magnetic stimulation and electromyography measurements provide a useful method to assess motor preservation of abdominal muscles in persons with spinal cord injury.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of acute spinal-cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Hideki; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Yamada, Takahisa; Iwata, Kinjiro; Okumura, Terufumi; Hoshino, Daisaku.

    1992-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides a noninvasive and very important method of investigating spinal-cord injuries. By means of MRI we examined 36 patients with spinal injuries, 34 of them in the acute stage. 19 cases had complete spinal-cord injury with paraplegia, while 17 cases had incomplete spinal-cord injury. MRI showed the injured spinal-cord in the acute stage to be partially swollen, with a high signal intensity in the T 2 -weighted images. In the chronic stage, the injured cord may show atrophic changes with a post-traumatic cavity or myelomalacia, which appears as a high-signal-intensity lesion in the T 2 -weighted images and as a low-signal intensity in the T 1 -weighted images. The cases with complete spinal injuries showed a high signal intensity at the wide level, and these prognoses were poor. The cases with incomplete injuries showed normal findings or a high-signal-intensity spot. In the Gd-DTPA enhanced images, the injured cords were enhanced very well in the subchronic stage. MRI is thus found to be useful in the diagnosis of spinal injuries; it also demonstrates a potential for predicting the neurological prognosis. (author)

  16. Joint angle affects volitional and magnetically-evoked neuromuscular performance differentially.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minshull, C; Rees, D; Gleeson, N P

    2011-08-01

    This study examined the volitional and magnetically-evoked neuromuscular performance of the quadriceps femoris at functional knee joint angles adjacent to full extension. Indices of volitional and magnetically-evoked neuromuscular performance (N=15 healthy males, 23.5 ± 2.9 years, 71.5 ± 5.4 kg, 176.5 ± 5.5 cm) were obtained at 25°, 35° and 45° of knee flexion. Results showed that volitional and magnetically-evoked peak force (PF(V) and P(T)F(E), respectively) and electromechanical delay (EMD(V) and EMD(E), respectively) were enhanced by increased knee flexion. However, greater relative improvements in volitional compared to evoked indices of neuromuscular performance were observed with increasing flexion from 25° to 45° (e.g. EMD(V), EMD(E): 36% vs. 11% improvement, respectively; F([2,14])=6.8, pjoint positions. These findings suggest that the extent of the relative differential between volitional and evoked neuromuscular performance capabilities is joint angle-specific and not correlated with performance capabilities at adjacent angles, but tends to be smaller with increased flexion. As such, effective prediction of volitional from evoked performance capabilities at both analogous and adjacent knee joint positions would lack robustness. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The relationship between electrodiagnosis using spinal cord evoked potential after spinal cord stimulation and MRI evaluation for cervical myelopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Tsuyoshi; Shiba, Keiichiro; Ueta, Takayoshi; Ohta, Hideki; Mori, Eiji; Kaji, Kozo; Yuge, Itaru; Kawano, Osamu

    2006-01-01

    We studied the correlation between the site of high intensity spinal cord signals on preoperative sagittal T2 MRIs (T2-high signal) and that of intrdaperative electrophysiological abnormalities for 200 cervical myelopathy cases. We recorded the Sp(E)-SCEPs during posterior cervical laminoplasty operations. In the cases with a T2-high signal at single levels, conduction abnormality matched the site of T2-high signal in 50%, and no conduction abnormalities were detected in 44%. In the cases with a T2-high signal at two levels, conduction abnormality matched the site of T2-high signal in only 11%, and no conduction abnormalities were disclosed in 59%. In the cases with a T2-high signal at three or more levels, conduction abnormalities matched the site of T2-high signal in 8% and no conduction abnormalities were disclosed in 72%. Our study showed a higher correspondence between the MRI finding and conduction abnormalities in the cases with T2-high signal at single levels, although our Sp(E)-SCEP study could not disclose conduction abnormalities in nearly half the cases. False negative findings of Sp(E)-SCEPs may result from the simplified recording technique. (author)

  18. Activation of groups of excitatory neurons in the mammalian spinal cord or hindbrain evokes locomotion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hägglund, Martin; Borgius, Lotta; Dougherty, Kimberly J.

    2010-01-01

    Central pattern generators (CPGs) are spinal neuronal networks required for locomotion. Glutamatergic neurons have been implicated as being important for intrinsic rhythm generation in the CPG and for the command signal for initiating locomotion, although this has not been demonstrated directly. We...... neurons in the spinal cord are critical for initiating or maintaining the rhythm and that activation of hindbrain areas containing the locomotor command regions is sufficient to directly activate the spinal locomotor network....

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of spinal cord lesions in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Shigeyuki; Yagishita, Toshiyuki; Fukutake, Toshio; Hirayama, Keizo; Fukuda, Nobuo.

    1987-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used in three patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) to demonstrate the longitudinal distribution of demyelinating plaques in the spinal cord and to measure their T1 relaxation time values in these disease processes. Neurological examination allowed the detection of the superior limit of the spinal cord lesions in the three patients, but did not permit detection of the inferior limit in two of the patients. With MRI, however, it was possible to demonstrate the longitudinal distribution of demyelinating plaques in all three patients from coronal or sagittal images using spin echo and inversion recovery pulse sequences. In two patients treated with prednisolone, serial T1 relaxation time values of MS spinal cord lesions were measured from T1 calculated images. In one patient with transverse myelopathy, the T1 relaxation time values of MS spinal cord lesions were significantly increased at a stage of acute exacerbation. This is apparently in contrast with the values at the stage of remission. In the patient with localized cervical myelopathy, the increase in T1 relaxation time values of MS spinal cord lesions at the acute stage was small and significantly different from the values at the remission stage. Several recent reports have indicated that MRI is extremely sensitive in the detection of MS plaques, but most efforts to use MRI in the diagnosis of MS have been concentrated on brain lesions in spite of their frequent associations with spinal cord involvements. It is concluded from our case studies that MRI coronal or sagittal image is useful in demonstrating the longitudinal distribution of MS spinal cord lesions. In addition, serial observations of T1 relaxation time values of MS plaques may be important in assessing the activity of MS plaques and evaluation of the steroid therapy in MS processes. (author)

  20. Muscle potentials evoked by magnetic stimulation of the sciatic nerve in unilateral sciatic nerve dysfunction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Soens, I.; Struys, M. M. R. F.; Van Ham, L. M. L.

    Magnetic stimulation of the sciatic nerve and subsequent recording of the muscle-evoked potential (MEP) was performed in eight dogs and three cats with unilateral sciatic nerve dysfunction. Localisation of the lesion in the sciatic nerve was based on the history, clinical neurological examination

  1. Modeling the Developmental Patterns of Auditory Evoked Magnetic Fields in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Kotecha, Rupesh; Pardos, Maria; Wang, Yingying; Wu, Ting; Horn, Paul; Brown, David; Rose, Douglas; deGrauw, Ton; Xiang, Jing

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As magnetoencephalography (MEG) is of increasing utility in the assessment of deficits and development delays in brain disorders in pediatrics, it becomes imperative to fully understand the functional development of the brain in children. METHODOLOGY: The present study was designed to characterize the developmental patterns of auditory evoked magnetic responses with respect to age and gender. Sixty children and twenty adults were studied with a 275-channel MEG system. CONCLUSIONS:...

  2. Modified cytoplasmic Ca2+ sequestration contributes to spinal cord injury-induced augmentation of nerve-evoked contractions in the rat tail artery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussain Al Dera

    Full Text Available In rat tail artery (RTA, spinal cord injury (SCI increases nerve-evoked contractions and the contribution of L-type Ca2+ channels to these responses. In RTAs from unoperated rats, these channels play a minor role in contractions and Bay K8644 (L-type channel agonist mimics the effects of SCI. Here we investigated the mechanisms underlying the facilitatory actions of SCI and Bay K8644 on nerve-evoked contractions of RTAs and the hypothesis that Ca2+ entering via L-type Ca2+ channels is rapidly sequestered by the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR limiting its role in contraction. In situ electrochemical detection of noradrenaline was used to assess if Bay K8644 increased noradrenaline release. Perforated patch recordings were used to assess if SCI changed the Ca2+ current recorded in RTA myocytes. Wire myography was used to assess if SCI modified the effects of Bay K8644 and of interrupting SR Ca2+ uptake on nerve-evoked contractions. Bay K8644 did not change noradrenaline-induced oxidation currents. Neither the size nor gating of Ca2+ currents differed between myocytes from sham-operated (control and SCI rats. Bay K8644 increased nerve-evoked contractions in RTAs from both control and SCI rats, but the magnitude of this effect was reduced by SCI. By contrast, depleting SR Ca2+ stores with ryanodine or cyclopiazonic acid selectively increased nerve-evoked contractions in control RTAs. Cyclopiazonic acid also selectively increased the blockade of these responses by nifedipine (L-type channel blocker in control RTAs, whereas ryanodine increased the blockade produced by nifedipine in both groups of RTAs. These findings suggest that Ca2+ entering via L-type channels is normally rapidly sequestered limiting its access to the contractile mechanism. Furthermore, the findings suggest SCI reduces the role of this mechanism.

  3. Task-evoked brain functional magnetic susceptibility mapping by independent component analysis (χICA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zikuan; Calhoun, Vince D

    2016-03-01

    Conventionally, independent component analysis (ICA) is performed on an fMRI magnitude dataset to analyze brain functional mapping (AICA). By solving the inverse problem of fMRI, we can reconstruct the brain magnetic susceptibility (χ) functional states. Upon the reconstructed χ dataspace, we propose an ICA-based brain functional χ mapping method (χICA) to extract task-evoked brain functional map. A complex division algorithm is applied to a timeseries of fMRI phase images to extract temporal phase changes (relative to an OFF-state snapshot). A computed inverse MRI (CIMRI) model is used to reconstruct a 4D brain χ response dataset. χICA is implemented by applying a spatial InfoMax ICA algorithm to the reconstructed 4D χ dataspace. With finger-tapping experiments on a 7T system, the χICA-extracted χ-depicted functional map is similar to the SPM-inferred functional χ map by a spatial correlation of 0.67 ± 0.05. In comparison, the AICA-extracted magnitude-depicted map is correlated with the SPM magnitude map by 0.81 ± 0.05. The understanding of the inferiority of χICA to AICA for task-evoked functional map is an ongoing research topic. For task-evoked brain functional mapping, we compare the data-driven ICA method with the task-correlated SPM method. In particular, we compare χICA with AICA for extracting task-correlated timecourses and functional maps. χICA can extract a χ-depicted task-evoked brain functional map from a reconstructed χ dataspace without the knowledge about brain hemodynamic responses. The χICA-extracted brain functional χ map reveals a bidirectional BOLD response pattern that is unavailable (or different) from AICA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Sensorimotor cortical activity in patients with complete spinal cord injury: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbah, P; de, Schonen S; Leveque, C; Gay, S; Pfefer, F; Nioche, C; Sarrazin, J L; Barouti, H; Tadie, M; Cordoliani, Y S

    2002-01-01

    Residual activation of the cortex was investigated in nine patients with complete spinal cord injury between T6 and L1 by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Brain activations were recorded under four conditions: (1) a patient attempting to move his toes with flexion-extension, (2) a patient imagining the same movement, (3) passive proprio-somesthesic stimulation of the big toes without visual control, and (4) passive proprio-somesthesic stimulation of the big toes with visual control by the patient. Passive proprio-somesthesic stimulation of the toes generated activation posterior to the central sulcus in the three patients who also showed a somesthesic evoked potential response to somesthesic stimulation. When performed under visual control, activations were observed in two more patients. In all patients, activations were found in the cortical areas involved in motor control (i.e., primary sensorimotor cortex, premotor regions and supplementary motor area [SMA]) during attempts to move or mental imagery of these tasks. It is concluded that even several years after injury with some local cortical reorganization, activation of lower limb cortical networks can be generated either by the attempt to move, the mental evocation of the action, or the visual feedback of a passive proprio-somesthesic stimulation.

  5. Ryanodine receptors contribute to the induction of nociceptive input-evoked long-term potentiation in the rat spinal cord slice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Zhi-Qi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our previous study demonstrated that nitric oxide (NO contributes to long-term potentiation (LTP of C-fiber-evoked field potentials by tetanic stimulation of the sciatic nerve in the spinal cord in vivo. Ryanodine receptor (RyR is a downstream target for NO. The present study further explored the role of RyR in synaptic plasticity of the spinal pain pathway. Results By means of field potential recordings in the adult male rat in vivo, we showed that RyR antagonist reduced LTP of C-fiber-evoked responses in the spinal dorsal horn by tetanic stimulation of the sciatic nerve. Using spinal cord slice preparations and field potential recordings from superficial dorsal horn, high frequency stimulation of Lissauer's tract (LT stably induced LTP of field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs. Perfusion of RyR antagonists blocked the induction of LT stimulation-evoked spinal LTP, while Ins(1,4,5P3 receptor (IP3R antagonist had no significant effect on LTP induction. Moreover, activation of RyRs by caffeine without high frequency stimulation induced a long-term potentiation in the presence of bicuculline methiodide and strychnine. Further, in patch-clamp recordings from superficial dorsal horn neurons, activation of RyRs resulted in a large increase in the frequency of miniature EPSCs (mEPSCs. Immunohistochemical study showed that RyRs were expressed in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons. Likewise, calcium imaging in small DRG neurons illustrated that activation of RyRs elevated [Ca2+]i in small DRG neurons. Conclusions These data indicate that activation of presynaptic RyRs play a crucial role in the induction of LTP in the spinal pain pathway, probably through enhancement of transmitter release.

  6. Leucoencephalopathy with brainstem and spinal cord involvement and high lactate: quantitative magnetic resonance imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenweg, M.E.; Pouwels, P.J.W.; Wolf, N.I.; van Wieringen, W.N.; Barkhof, F.; van der Knaap, M.S.

    2011-01-01

    Leucoencephalopathy with brainstem and spinal cord involvement and elevated lactate is a white matter disorder caused by DARS2 mutations. The pathology is unknown. We observed striking discrepancies between improvement on longitudinal conventional magnetic resonance images and clinical deterioration

  7. Sex differences in the refractory period of the 100 ms auditory evoked magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, D C; Teale, P; Sheeder, J; Reite, M

    1999-11-08

    The 100 ms latency auditory evoked magnetic response (M100) has been implicated in the earliest stage of acoustic memory encoding in the brain. Sex differences in this response have been found in its location within the brain and its functional properties. We recorded the M100 in 25 adults in response to changes in interstimulus interval of an auditory stimulus. Response amplitudes of the M100 were used to compute a measure of the M100 refractory period, which has been proposed to index the decay time constant of echoic memory. This time constant was significantly longer in both hemispheres of the female participants when compared to the male participants. Possible implications of this for behavioral sex differences in human memory performance are discussed.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging compared with trimodal evoked potentials in possible multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roullet, E.; Leger-Ravet, M.B.; Amarenco, P.; Marteau, R.; Lavallard-Rousseau, M.-C.; Dupuch, K.; Iba-Zizen, M.T.; Tamraz, J.; Cabanis, E.A.

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of the brain and Evoked Potentials (EP) can both demonstrate the presence of clinically unsuspected demyelinating lesions and have proven to be sensitive (but not specific) in the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS). MRI and EP are positive in 90 to 100% of patients with a definite diagnosis of MS. However, few studies have been conducted in patients with a lesser diagnostic certainty. In possible or suspected MS they gave conflicting results, possibly because of technical discrepancies and different clinical inclusion criteria. Since a number of putative new treatments can be evaluated in patients who have a definite diagnosis of MS, but nevertheless a short duration of disease and a low disability, it was decided to compare the sensitivity of MRI and EP as diagnostic tools in possible MS patients. MRI is shown to be more sensitive, shows more multiple lesions and gives a clearer appreciation of their size and exact location than EP. 10 refs.; 3 tabs

  9. Bilateral somatosensory evoked potentials following intermittent theta-burst repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premji, Azra; Ziluk, Angela; Nelson, Aimee J

    2010-08-05

    Intermittent theta-burst stimulation (iTBS) is a form of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation that may alter cortical excitability in the primary somatosensory cortex (SI). The present study investigated the effects of iTBS on subcortical and early cortical somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) recorded over left, iTBS stimulated SI and the right-hemisphere non-stimulated SI. SEPs were recorded before and at 5, 15, and 25 minutes following iTBS. Compared to pre-iTBS, the amplitude of cortical potential N20/P25 was significantly increased for 5 minutes from non-stimulated SI and for 15 to 25 minutes from stimulated SI. Subcortical potentials recorded bilaterally remained unaltered following iTBS. We conclude that iTBS increases the cortical excitability of SI bilaterally and does not alter thalamocortical afferent input to SI. ITBS may provide one avenue to induce cortical plasticity in the somatosensory cortex.

  10. Modulation of amplitude and latency of motor evoked potential by direction of transcranial magnetic stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Aya; Torii, Tetsuya; Iwahashi, Masakuni; Itoh, Yuji; Iramina, Keiji

    2014-05-01

    The present study analyzed the effects of monophasic magnetic stimulation to the motor cortex. The effects of magnetic stimulation were evaluated by analyzing the motor evoked potentials (MEPs). The amplitude and latency of MEPs on the abductor pollicis brevis muscle were used to evaluate the effects of repetitive magnetic stimulation. A figure eight-shaped flat coil was used to stimulate the region over the primary motor cortex. The intensity of magnetic stimulation was 120% of the resting motor threshold, and the frequency of magnetic stimulation was 0.1 Hz. In addition, the direction of the current in the brain was posterior-anterior (PA) or anterior-posterior (AP). The latency of MEP was compared with PA and AP on initial magnetic stimulation. The results demonstrated that a stimulus in the AP direction increased the latency of the MEP by approximately 2.5 ms. MEP amplitude was also compared with PA and AP during 60 magnetic stimulations. The results showed that a stimulus in the PA direction gradually increased the amplitude of the MEP. However, a stimulus in the AP direction did not modulate the MEP amplitude. The average MEP amplitude induced from every 10 magnetic pulses was normalized by the average amplitude of the first 10 stimuli. These results demonstrated that the normalized MEP amplitude increased up to approximately 150%. In terms of pyramidal neuron indirect waves (I waves), magnetic stimulation inducing current flowing backward to the anterior preferentially elicited an I1 wave, and current flowing forward to the posterior elicited an I3 wave. It has been reported that the latency of the I3 wave is approximately 2.5 ms longer than the I1 wave elicitation, so the resulting difference in latency may be caused by this phenomenon. It has also been reported that there is no alteration of MEP amplitude at a frequency of 0.1 Hz. However, this study suggested that the modulation of MEP amplitude depends on stimulation strength and stimulation direction.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of malignant extradural tumors with acute spinal cord compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lien, H.H.; Blomlie, V.; Heimdal, K.; Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo; Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo

    1990-01-01

    Thirty-six cancer patients with extradural spinal metastatic disease and acute symptoms of spinal cord compression underwent magnetic resonance (MR) imaging at 1.5 T. Cord involvement was found in all 36, 7 of whom had lesions at 2 different sites. Vertebral metastases in addition to those corresponding to the cord compressions were detected in 27 patients, and 18 of these had widespread deposits. MR displayed the extent of the tumors in the craniocaudal and lateral directions. The ability to identify multiple sites of cord and vertebral involvement and to delineate tumor accurately makes MR the examination of choice in cancer patients with suspected spinal cord compression. It obviates the need for myelography and postmyelography CT in this group of patients. (orig.)

  12. Serial changes of magnetic resonance imaging of spinal cord lesions in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimura, Kimiya; Sekimoto, Yoichi; Koike, Yasuo; Takahashi, Akira

    1987-01-01

    Serial changes of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of spinal cord lesions in multiple sclerosis (MS) were demonstrated. Two inpatients of MS were followed-up for 8 and 5 months respectively. The first case was a 38-year-old housewife with lesions in upper cervical cord, medulla oblongata and visual nerve. The second case was a 45-year-old man with middle thracic spinal cord and brain stem lesions. Both cases were successfully induced into the remission by peroral prednisolone therapy. In the first case, in early stage of the disease, low signal (in IR method) and high signal (in T 2 -weighted SE method) intensities with enlarged lower dorsal medulla were demonstrated. The second MRI in this case specially in horizontal sections revealed round high intensity lesions (in T 2 -weighted SE) with clear margins, which appeared to push away the normal spinal cord tissue. In the third MRI, T 2 weighted SE revealed localized narrowing in C 2 and C 3 cervical cord, and even no signal lesions in IR method were shown in the central of the spinal cord. The forth and fifth MRI, however, showed almost normally recovered spinal cord and medulla oblongata. In the second case, the first MRI revealed high intensity lesions in the middle thracic spinal cord in T 2 weight SE, and moreover, the spinal cord looked very enlarged. In IR method, localized patchy low intensity lesions were seen in the enlarged spinal cord, but in this case, the MRI demonstrated that localized patchy high intensity lesions without cord swelling in SE remained long after the clinically complete recovery of the disease. (author)

  13. Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging correlation in acute spinal cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramon, S.; Dominguez, R.; Ramirez, L.; Garcia Fernandez, L.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study was to correlate traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) patients'outcome with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed within the first 15 days following trauma. We retrospectively analyzed 55 SCI patients. Early functional prognosis may be established on the basis of clinical presentation of SCI and associated MRI. Cord hemorrhage and transection are irreversible, while edema has a potential for neurological recovery. Cord contusion tends to be associated with an incomplete SCI, unlike the compression pattern, in which the prognosis depends on the degree of the initial neurological damage. (author)

  14. Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging correlation in acute spinal cord injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramon, S.; Dominguez, R.; Ramirez, L.; Garcia Fernandez, L. [University Hospital Vall d`Hebron, Barcelona (Spain)

    1998-04-01

    The aim of this study was to correlate traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) patients`outcome with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed within the first 15 days following trauma. We retrospectively analyzed 55 SCI patients. Early functional prognosis may be established on the basis of clinical presentation of SCI and associated MRI. Cord hemorrhage and transection are irreversible, while edema has a potential for neurological recovery. Cord contusion tends to be associated with an incomplete SCI, unlike the compression pattern, in which the prognosis depends on the degree of the initial neurological damage. (author)

  15. Modeling the developmental patterns of auditory evoked magnetic fields in children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupesh Kotecha

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: As magnetoencephalography (MEG is of increasing utility in the assessment of deficits and development delays in brain disorders in pediatrics, it becomes imperative to fully understand the functional development of the brain in children. METHODOLOGY: The present study was designed to characterize the developmental patterns of auditory evoked magnetic responses with respect to age and gender. Sixty children and twenty adults were studied with a 275-channel MEG system. CONCLUSIONS: Three main responses were identified at approximately 46 ms (M50, 71 ms (M70 and 106 ms (M100 in latency for children. The latencies of M70 and M100 shortened with age in both hemispheres; the latency of M50 shortened with age only in the right hemisphere. Analysis of developmental lateralization patterns in children showed that the latency of the right hemispheric evoked responses shortened faster than the corresponding left hemispheric responses. The latency of M70 in the right hemisphere highly correlated to the age of the child. The amplitudes of the M70 responses increased with age and reached their peaks in children 12-14 years of age, after which they decreased with age. The source estimates for the M50 and M70 responses indicated that they were generated in different subareas in the Heschl's gyrus in children, while not localizable in adults. Furthermore, gender also affected developmental patterns. The latency of M70 in the right hemisphere was proposed to be an index of auditory development in children, the modeling equation is 85.72-1.240xAge (yrs. Our results demonstrate that there is a clear developmental pattern in the auditory cortex and underscore the importance of M50 and M70 in the developing brain.

  16. Histopathologic correlation of magnetic resonance imaging signal patterns in a spinal cord injury model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weirich, S D; Cotler, H B; Narayana, P A; Hazle, J D; Jackson, E F; Coupe, K J; McDonald, C L; Langford, L A; Harris, J H

    1990-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides a noninvasive method of monitoring the pathologic response to spinal cord injury. Specific MR signal intensity patterns appear to correlate with degrees of improvement in the neurologic status in spinal cord injury patients. Histologic correlation of two types of MR signal intensity patterns are confirmed in the current study using a rat animal model. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent spinal cord trauma at the midthoracic level using a weight-dropping technique. After laminectomy, 5- and 10-gm brass weights were dropped from designated heights onto a 0.1-gm impounder placed on the exposed dura. Animals allowed to regain consciousness demonstrated variable recovery of hind limb paraplegia. Magnetic resonance images were obtained from 2 hours to 1 week after injury using a 2-tesla MRI/spectrometer. Sacrifice under anesthesia was performed by perfusive fixation; spinal columns were excised en bloc, embedded, sectioned, and observed with the compound light microscope. Magnetic resonance axial images obtained during the time sequence after injury demonstrate a distinct correlation between MR signal intensity patterns and the histologic appearance of the spinal cord. Magnetic resonance imaging delineates the pathologic processes resulting from acute spinal cord injury and can be used to differentiate the type of injury and prognosis.

  17. Bilateral somatosensory evoked potentials following intermittent theta-burst repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziluk Angela

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intermittent theta-burst stimulation (iTBS is a form of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation that may alter cortical excitability in the primary somatosensory cortex (SI. The present study investigated the effects of iTBS on subcortical and early cortical somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs recorded over left, iTBS stimulated SI and the right-hemisphere non-stimulated SI. SEPs were recorded before and at 5, 15, and 25 minutes following iTBS. Results Compared to pre-iTBS, the amplitude of cortical potential N20/P25 was significantly increased for 5 minutes from non-stimulated SI and for 15 to 25 minutes from stimulated SI. Subcortical potentials recorded bilaterally remained unaltered following iTBS. Conclusion We conclude that iTBS increases the cortical excitability of SI bilaterally and does not alter thalamocortical afferent input to SI. ITBS may provide one avenue to induce cortical plasticity in the somatosensory cortex.

  18. Extracting Visual Evoked Potentials from EEG Data Recorded During fMRI-guided Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeh, Boaz; Yovel, Galit

    2014-01-01

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is an effective method for establishing a causal link between a cortical area and cognitive/neurophysiological effects. Specifically, by creating a transient interference with the normal activity of a target region and measuring changes in an electrophysiological signal, we can establish a causal link between the stimulated brain area or network and the electrophysiological signal that we record. If target brain areas are functionally defined with prior fMRI scan, TMS could be used to link the fMRI activations with evoked potentials recorded. However, conducting such experiments presents significant technical challenges given the high amplitude artifacts introduced into the EEG signal by the magnetic pulse, and the difficulty to successfully target areas that were functionally defined by fMRI. Here we describe a methodology for combining these three common tools: TMS, EEG, and fMRI. We explain how to guide the stimulator's coil to the desired target area using anatomical or functional MRI data, how to record EEG during concurrent TMS, how to design an ERP study suitable for EEG-TMS combination and how to extract reliable ERP from the recorded data. We will provide representative results from a previously published study, in which fMRI-guided TMS was used concurrently with EEG to show that the face-selective N1 and the body-selective N1 component of the ERP are associated with distinct neural networks in extrastriate cortex. This method allows us to combine the high spatial resolution of fMRI with the high temporal resolution of TMS and EEG and therefore obtain a comprehensive understanding of the neural basis of various cognitive processes. PMID:24893706

  19. Extracting visual evoked potentials from EEG data recorded during fMRI-guided transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeh, Boaz; Yovel, Galit

    2014-05-12

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is an effective method for establishing a causal link between a cortical area and cognitive/neurophysiological effects. Specifically, by creating a transient interference with the normal activity of a target region and measuring changes in an electrophysiological signal, we can establish a causal link between the stimulated brain area or network and the electrophysiological signal that we record. If target brain areas are functionally defined with prior fMRI scan, TMS could be used to link the fMRI activations with evoked potentials recorded. However, conducting such experiments presents significant technical challenges given the high amplitude artifacts introduced into the EEG signal by the magnetic pulse, and the difficulty to successfully target areas that were functionally defined by fMRI. Here we describe a methodology for combining these three common tools: TMS, EEG, and fMRI. We explain how to guide the stimulator's coil to the desired target area using anatomical or functional MRI data, how to record EEG during concurrent TMS, how to design an ERP study suitable for EEG-TMS combination and how to extract reliable ERP from the recorded data. We will provide representative results from a previously published study, in which fMRI-guided TMS was used concurrently with EEG to show that the face-selective N1 and the body-selective N1 component of the ERP are associated with distinct neural networks in extrastriate cortex. This method allows us to combine the high spatial resolution of fMRI with the high temporal resolution of TMS and EEG and therefore obtain a comprehensive understanding of the neural basis of various cognitive processes.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging features of the spinal cord in pediatric multiple sclerosis: a preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verhey, Leonard H. [Hospital for Sick Children, Neuroscience and Mental Health, Toronto, ON (Canada); University of Toronto, Institute of Medical Science, Faculty of Medicine, Toronto, ON (Canada); Branson, Helen M.; Shroff, Manohar [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging (Neuroradiology), Toronto, ON (Canada); University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Makhija, Monica [Hospital for Sick Children, Neuroscience and Mental Health, Toronto, ON (Canada); Banwell, Brenda [Hospital for Sick Children, Neuroscience and Mental Health, Toronto, ON (Canada); University of Toronto, Institute of Medical Science, Faculty of Medicine, Toronto, ON (Canada); University of Toronto, Department of Pediatrics (Neurology), Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2010-12-15

    Spinal cord lesions in adults with multiple sclerosis (MS) are thought to contribute to disability. The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance and clinical correlates of spinal cord lesions in children with MS have not been reported. T1-weighted pre- and post-gadolinium and T2-weighted TSE/FSE spine MR images of 36 children (age, 14.3 {+-} 3.3) with relapsing-remitting MS (annualized relapse rate, 0.7; disease duration, 7.5 {+-} 3.3 years) were analyzed for total lesion count, lesion location and length, intramedullary extent, and gadolinium enhancement. Clinical, demographic, laboratory, and MRI data were correlated. Lesions preferentially involved the cervical region, were predominantly focal, and involved only a portion of the transverse cord diameter. However, ten of 36 patients demonstrated longitudinally extensive lesions. Children with the highest clinical relapse rate also tended to have more spinal cord lesions and were more likely to accrue new lesions on serial spinal scans. These preliminary data suggest that MS lesions of the spinal cord in children are radiographically similar to that of adult-onset MS - supporting a common biology of pediatric- and adult-onset disease. However, children with relapsing-remitting MS can also develop longitudinally extensive lesions, suggesting that such lesions may be less specific for diseases such as neuromyelitis optica in pediatric patients. All patients recovered well from spinal cord attacks, and the presence of spinal cord lesions in the first few years of disease did not correlate with physical disability. Measures of spinal cord atrophy and longer periods of observation are required to determine the impact of spinal cord involvement in pediatric-onset MS. (orig.)

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging features of the spinal cord in pediatric multiple sclerosis: a preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verhey, Leonard H.; Branson, Helen M.; Shroff, Manohar; Makhija, Monica; Banwell, Brenda

    2010-01-01

    Spinal cord lesions in adults with multiple sclerosis (MS) are thought to contribute to disability. The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance and clinical correlates of spinal cord lesions in children with MS have not been reported. T1-weighted pre- and post-gadolinium and T2-weighted TSE/FSE spine MR images of 36 children (age, 14.3 ± 3.3) with relapsing-remitting MS (annualized relapse rate, 0.7; disease duration, 7.5 ± 3.3 years) were analyzed for total lesion count, lesion location and length, intramedullary extent, and gadolinium enhancement. Clinical, demographic, laboratory, and MRI data were correlated. Lesions preferentially involved the cervical region, were predominantly focal, and involved only a portion of the transverse cord diameter. However, ten of 36 patients demonstrated longitudinally extensive lesions. Children with the highest clinical relapse rate also tended to have more spinal cord lesions and were more likely to accrue new lesions on serial spinal scans. These preliminary data suggest that MS lesions of the spinal cord in children are radiographically similar to that of adult-onset MS - supporting a common biology of pediatric- and adult-onset disease. However, children with relapsing-remitting MS can also develop longitudinally extensive lesions, suggesting that such lesions may be less specific for diseases such as neuromyelitis optica in pediatric patients. All patients recovered well from spinal cord attacks, and the presence of spinal cord lesions in the first few years of disease did not correlate with physical disability. Measures of spinal cord atrophy and longer periods of observation are required to determine the impact of spinal cord involvement in pediatric-onset MS. (orig.)

  2. Non-invasive electrical and magnetic stimulation of the brain, spinal cord, roots and peripheral nerves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossini, P M; Burke, D; Chen, R

    2015-01-01

    These guidelines provide an up-date of previous IFCN report on "Non-invasive electrical and magnetic stimulation of the brain, spinal cord and roots: basic principles and procedures for routine clinical application" (Rossini et al., 1994). A new Committee, composed of international experts, some...

  3. Not all reading is alike: Task modulation of magnetic evoked response to visual word

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlova A. A.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. Previous studies have shown that brain response to a written word depends on the task: whether the word is a target in a version of lexical decision task or should be read silently. Although this effect has been interpreted as an evidence for an interaction between word recognition processes and task demands, it also may be caused by greater attention allocation to the target word. Objective. We aimed to examine the task effect on brain response evoked by non- target written words. Design. Using MEG and magnetic source imaging, we compared spatial-temporal pattern of brain response elicited by a noun cue when it was read silently either without additional task (SR or with a requirement to produce an associated verb (VG. Results.The task demands penetrated into early (200-300 ms and late (500-800 ms stages of a word processing by enhancing brain response under VG versus SR condition. The cortical sources of the early response were localized to bilateral inferior occipitotemporal and anterior temporal cortex suggesting that more demanding VG task required elaborated lexical-semantic analysis. The late effect was observed in the associative auditory areas in middle and superior temporal gyri and in motor representation of articulators. Our results suggest that a remote goal plays a pivotal role in enhanced recruitment of cortical structures underlying orthographic, semantic and sensorimotor dimensions of written word perception from the early processing stages. Surprisingly, we found that to fulfil a more challenging goal the brain progressively engaged resources of the right hemisphere throughout all stages of silent reading. Conclusion. Our study demonstrates that a deeper processing of linguistic input amplifies activation of brain areas involved in integration of speech perception and production. This is consistent with theories that emphasize the role of sensorimotor integration in speech understanding.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging-guided focused ultrasound to increase localized blood-spinal cord barrier permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Allison H; Hawryluk, Gregory W; Anzai, Yoshimi; Odéen, Henrik; Ostlie, Megan A; Reichert, Ethan C; Stump, Amanda J; Minoshima, Satoshi; Cross, Donna J

    2017-12-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) affects thousands of people every year in the USA, and most patients are left with some permanent paralysis. Therapeutic options are limited and only modestly affect outcome. To address this issue, we used magnetic resonance imaging-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) as a non-invasive approach to increase permeability in the blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB). We hypothesize that localized, controlled sonoporation of the BSCB by MRgFUS will aid delivery of therapeutics to the injury. Here, we report our preliminary findings for the ability of MRgFUS to increase BSCB permeability in the thoracic spinal cord of a normal rat model. First, an excised portion of normal rat spinal column was used to characterize the acoustic field and to estimate the insertion losses that could be expected in an MRgFUS blood spinal cord barrier opening. Then, in normal rats, MRgFUS was applied in combination with intravenously administered microbubbles to the spinal cord region. Permeability of the BSCB was indicated as signal enhancement by contrast administered prior to T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and verified by Evans blue dye. Neurological testing using the Basso, Beattie, and Breshnahan scale and the ladder walk was normal in 8 of 10 rats tested. Two rats showed minor impairment indicating need for further refinement of parameters. No gross tissue damage was evident by histology. In this study, we have opened successfully the blood spinal cord barrier in the thoracic region of the normal rat spine using magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound combined with microbubbles.

  5. Factors predicting the feasibility of monitoring lower-limb muscle motor evoked potentials in patients undergoing excision of spinal cord tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajshekhar, Vedantam; Velayutham, Parthiban; Joseph, Mathew; Babu, K Srinivasa

    2011-06-01

    This prospective study on intraoperative muscle motor evoked potentials (MMEPs) from lower-limb muscles in patients undergoing surgery for spinal cord tumors was performed to: 1) determine preoperative clinical features that could predict successful recording of lower-limb MMEPs; 2) determine the muscle in the lower limb from which MMEPs could be most consistently obtained; 3) assess the need to monitor more than 1 muscle per limb; and 4) determine the effect of a successful baseline MMEP recording on early postoperative motor outcome. Of 115 consecutive patients undergoing surgery for spinal cord tumors, 110 were included in this study (44 intramedullary and 66 intradural extramedullary tumors). Muscle MEPs were generated using transcranial electrical stimulation under controlled anesthesia and were recorded from the tibialis anterior, quadriceps, soleus, and external anal sphincter muscles bilaterally. The effect of age (≤ 20 or > 20 years old), location of the tumor (intramedullary or extramedullary), segmental location of the tumor (cervical, thoracic, or lumbar), duration of symptoms (≤ 12 or > 12 months), preoperative functional grade (Nurick Grades 0-3 or 4-5), and muscle power (Medical Research Council Grades 0/5-3/5 or 4/5-5/5) on the success rate of obtaining MMEPs was studied using multiple regression analysis. The effect of the ability to monitor MMEPs on motor outcome at discharge from the hospital was also analyzed. The overall success rate for obtaining baseline lower-limb MMEPs was 68.2% (75 of 110 patients). Eighty-nine percent of patients with Nurick Grades 0-3 had successful MMEP recordings. Muscle MEPs could not be obtained in any patient in whom muscle power was 2/5 or less, but were obtained from 91.4% of patients with muscle power of 4/5 or more. Analysis showed that only preoperative Nurick grade (p ≤ 0.0001) and muscle power (p < 0.0001) were significant predictors of the likelihood of obtaining MMEPs. Responses were most consistently

  6. Magnetic resonance diagnosis of intramedullary tumors of the spinal cord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scotti, G.; Scialfa, G.; Colombo, N.; Landoni, L.

    1987-03-01

    Fifty patients with intramedullary space occupying lesions were studied with MR from October 1983. Of these 32 were operated on and histological diagnosis together with gross morphological description was available. MR findings were reviewed in search for morphological and signal characteristics capable of providing a better preoperative diagnosis. There were 11 astrocytomas, 10 ependymomas, 5 vascular lesions and 6 ''gliomas''. All lesions usually had signal characteristics different from those of the normal cord, mainly because of prolonged T1 and T2 relaxation times. No specific patterns related either to morphology or signal were found, capable of differentiating the two main historical types. Vascular malformations may be suspected from the presence of serpiginous areas without signal. Tumor nodules within cysts can however be well recognized, thus providing the neurosurgeon with very useful preoperative information. Some characteristics of signal and morphology, are more common for one or the other of the two main groups of tumors. A tumor involving all the cord with a homogeneously prolonged T2 relaxation time is most likely to be an astrocytoma. A small nodule with signal close to normal parenchyma, associated with extensive cysts, is most likely to be an ependymoma.

  7. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of the human spinal cord during vibration stimulation of different dermatomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence, Jane M. [University Hospital of Zurich, Institute of Neuroradiology, Zurich (Switzerland); University of Manitoba, Department of Physiology, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Stroman, Patrick W. [Queen' s University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Kollias, Spyros S. [University Hospital of Zurich, Institute of Neuroradiology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2008-03-15

    We investigated noninvasively areas of the healthy human spinal cord that become active in response to vibration stimulation of different dermatomes using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The objectives of this study were to: (1) examine the patterns of consistent activity in the spinal cord during vibration stimulation of the skin, and (2) investigate the rostrocaudal distribution of active pixels when stimulation was applied to different dermatomes. FMRI of the cervical and lumbar spinal cord of seven healthy human subjects was carried out during vibration stimulation of six different dermatomes. In separate experiments, vibratory stimulation (about 50 Hz) was applied to the right biceps, wrist, palm, patella, Achilles tendon and left palm. The segmental distribution of activity observed by fMRI corresponded well with known spinal cord neuroanatomy. The peak number of active pixels was observed at the expected level of the spinal cord with some activity in the adjacent segments. The rostrocaudal distribution of activity was observed to correspond to the dermatome being stimulated. Cross-sectional localization of activity was primarily in dorsal areas but also spread into ventral and intermediate areas of the gray matter and a distinct laterality ipsilateral to the stimulated limb was not observed. We demonstrated that fMRI can detect a dermatome-dependent pattern of spinal cord activity during vibratory stimulation and can be used as a passive stimulus for the noninvasive assessment of the functional integrity of the human spinal cord. Demonstration of cross-sectional selectivity of the activation awaits further methodological and experimental refinements. (orig.)

  8. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of the human spinal cord during vibration stimulation of different dermatomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence, Jane M.; Stroman, Patrick W.; Kollias, Spyros S.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated noninvasively areas of the healthy human spinal cord that become active in response to vibration stimulation of different dermatomes using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The objectives of this study were to: (1) examine the patterns of consistent activity in the spinal cord during vibration stimulation of the skin, and (2) investigate the rostrocaudal distribution of active pixels when stimulation was applied to different dermatomes. FMRI of the cervical and lumbar spinal cord of seven healthy human subjects was carried out during vibration stimulation of six different dermatomes. In separate experiments, vibratory stimulation (about 50 Hz) was applied to the right biceps, wrist, palm, patella, Achilles tendon and left palm. The segmental distribution of activity observed by fMRI corresponded well with known spinal cord neuroanatomy. The peak number of active pixels was observed at the expected level of the spinal cord with some activity in the adjacent segments. The rostrocaudal distribution of activity was observed to correspond to the dermatome being stimulated. Cross-sectional localization of activity was primarily in dorsal areas but also spread into ventral and intermediate areas of the gray matter and a distinct laterality ipsilateral to the stimulated limb was not observed. We demonstrated that fMRI can detect a dermatome-dependent pattern of spinal cord activity during vibratory stimulation and can be used as a passive stimulus for the noninvasive assessment of the functional integrity of the human spinal cord. Demonstration of cross-sectional selectivity of the activation awaits further methodological and experimental refinements. (orig.)

  9. The corticospinal tract lesion of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terao, Shin-ichi; Sobue, Gen; Mitsuma, Terunori; Yasuda, Takeshi; Kachi, Teruhiko.

    1994-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging by gradient echo method demonstrated lesions of the lateral corticospinal tract at cervical cord levels in three ALS patients. Patient 1 was a 43-year-old woman with common from of ALS. She developed right-side predominant pyramidal signs, and right-side predominant prolongation of central motor conduction time. MRI showed hypersignal intensity areas in the dorsal region of the lateral column at the 4th and 5th cervical segments with right-side predominacy. Patient 2 was a 65-year-old man with pseudopolyneuritic from of ALS, who showed lower motor neuron signs without a pyramidal sign. MRI of the 3rd and 4th cervical cord segments demonstrated bilateral hypersignal intensity areas in the dorsal part of the lateral column. Patient 3 was a 62-year-old man with common form of ALS, who showed marked bilateral pyramidal signs with Babinski's sign. MRI of the 5th cervical spinal cord segment demonstrated bilateral hypersignal intensity areas in the dorsolateral column. MR images of the spinal cord thus obtained corresponded well to the postmortem confirmed degeneration of the spinal corticospinal tract. MRI of the spinal cord performed by gradient echo method would provide additional information on the upper motor neuron involvement in ALS. (author)

  10. The corticospinal tract lesion of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spinal cord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terao, Shin-ichi; Sobue, Gen; Mitsuma, Terunori (Aichi Medical Univ., Nagakute (Japan)); Yasuda, Takeshi; Kachi, Teruhiko

    1994-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging by gradient echo method demonstrated lesions of the lateral corticospinal tract at cervical cord levels in three ALS patients. Patient 1 was a 43-year-old woman with common from of ALS. She developed right-side predominant pyramidal signs, and right-side predominant prolongation of central motor conduction time. MRI showed hypersignal intensity areas in the dorsal region of the lateral column at the 4th and 5th cervical segments with right-side predominacy. Patient 2 was a 65-year-old man with pseudopolyneuritic from of ALS, who showed lower motor neuron signs without a pyramidal sign. MRI of the 3rd and 4th cervical cord segments demonstrated bilateral hypersignal intensity areas in the dorsal part of the lateral column. Patient 3 was a 62-year-old man with common form of ALS, who showed marked bilateral pyramidal signs with Babinski's sign. MRI of the 5th cervical spinal cord segment demonstrated bilateral hypersignal intensity areas in the dorsolateral column. MR images of the spinal cord thus obtained corresponded well to the postmortem confirmed degeneration of the spinal corticospinal tract. MRI of the spinal cord performed by gradient echo method would provide additional information on the upper motor neuron involvement in ALS. (author).

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging in cervical spinal cord compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Giammona

    1993-09-01

    Full Text Available In patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy MRI sometimes shows increased signal intensity zones on the T2-weighted images. It has been suggested that these findings carry prognostic significance. We studied 56 subjects with cervical spinal cord compression. Twelve patients showed an increased signal intensity (21.4% and a prevalence of narrowing of the AP-diameter (62% vs 24%. Furthemore, in this group, there was evidence of a longer mean duration of the symptoms and, in most of the patients, of more serious clinical conditions. The importance of these predisposing factors remains, however, to be clarified since they are also present in some patients without the increased signal intensity.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical and thoracic spine and the spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, E.M.

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MR), using a 0.3 T resistive scanner with an iron core and a vertical magnetic field, was evaluated in patients with different diseases affecting the cervical and thoracic spine and the spinal cord. The results indicate that MR is well suited as the procedure of choice for emergency examination of patients with spinal cord symptoms, for examination of patients with suspected spinal multiple sclerosis and for pre-operative evaluation of patients with rheumatoid arthritis with neurological symptoms emanating from the cranio-cervical junction. In patients with cervical radiculapathy and/or myelopathy, caused by spondylosis or disk herniation, MR was found to be equivalent with myelography and CT myelography but MR has several practical advantages. MR at 0.3 T using a vertical magnetic field provided information comparable to that reported from examinations performed with superconducting MR scanners. In order to optimize the MR examinations of the spine, the signal characteristics of different coils available when using a vertical magnetic field were determined by phantom studies. Recommendations for optimal coil selection for different levels of the cervical and thoracic spine are given. In addition, the paramagnetic contrast medium gadolinium-DTPA was administered intravenously to patients with suspected spinal multiple sclerosis. Enhancement of clinically active lesions in the cervical spinal cord was observed. Serial MR examinations with gadolinium-DTPA showed that a decrease in enhancement could be correlated with decrease in clinical symptoms and signs. (author)

  13. Asymmetry of magnetic motor evoked potentials recorded in calf muscles of the dominant and non-dominant lower extremity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olex-Zarychta, Dorota; Koprowski, Robert; Sobota, Grzegorz; Wróbel, Zygmunt

    2009-08-07

    The aim of the study was to determine the applicability of magnetic stimulation and magnetic motor evoked potentials (MEPs) in motor asymmetry studies by obtaining quantitative and qualitative measures of efferent activity during low intensity magnetic stimulation of the dominant and non-dominant lower extremities. Magnetic stimulation of the tibial nerve in the popliteal fossa was performed in 10 healthy male right-handed and right-footed young adults. Responses were recorded from the lateral head of the gastrocnemius muscles of the right and left lower extremities. Response characteristics (duration, onset latency, amplitude) were analyzed in relation to the functional dominance of the limbs and in relation to the direction of the current in the magnetic coil by use of the Wilcoxon pair sequence test. The CCW direction of coil current was related to reduced amplitudes of recorded MEPs. Greater amplitudes of evoked potentials were recorded in the non-dominant extremity, both in the CW and CCW coil current directions, with the statistical significance of this effect (p=0.005). No differences in duration of response were found in the CW current direction, while in CCW the time of the left-side response was prolonged (p=0.01). In the non-dominant extremity longer onset latencies were recorded in both current directions, but only for the CW direction the side asymmetries showed a statistical significance of p=0.005. In the dominant extremity the stimulation correlated with stronger paresthesias, especially using the CCW direction of coil current. The results indicate that low intensity magnetic stimulation may be useful in quantitative and qualitative research into the motor asymmetry.

  14. An optimized framework for quantitative magnetization transfer imaging of the cervical spinal cord in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battiston, Marco; Grussu, Francesco; Ianus, Andrada; Schneider, Torben; Prados, Ferran; Fairney, James; Ourselin, Sebastien; Alexander, Daniel C; Cercignani, Mara; Gandini Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A M; Samson, Rebecca S

    2018-05-01

    To develop a framework to fully characterize quantitative magnetization transfer indices in the human cervical cord in vivo within a clinically feasible time. A dedicated spinal cord imaging protocol for quantitative magnetization transfer was developed using a reduced field-of-view approach with echo planar imaging (EPI) readout. Sequence parameters were optimized based in the Cramer-Rao-lower bound. Quantitative model parameters (i.e., bound pool fraction, free and bound pool transverse relaxation times [ T2F, T2B], and forward exchange rate [k FB ]) were estimated implementing a numerical model capable of dealing with the novelties of the sequence adopted. The framework was tested on five healthy subjects. Cramer-Rao-lower bound minimization produces optimal sampling schemes without requiring the establishment of a steady-state MT effect. The proposed framework allows quantitative voxel-wise estimation of model parameters at the resolution typically used for spinal cord imaging (i.e. 0.75 × 0.75 × 5 mm 3 ), with a protocol duration of ∼35 min. Quantitative magnetization transfer parametric maps agree with literature values. Whole-cord mean values are: bound pool fraction = 0.11(±0.01), T2F = 46.5(±1.6) ms, T2B = 11.0(±0.2) µs, and k FB  = 1.95(±0.06) Hz. Protocol optimization has a beneficial effect on reproducibility, especially for T2B and k FB . The framework developed enables robust characterization of spinal cord microstructure in vivo using qMT. Magn Reson Med 79:2576-2588, 2018. © 2017 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. © 2017 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of rodent spinal cord with an improved performance coil at 7 Tesla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis-Najera, S. E.; Rodriguez, A. O.

    2014-11-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging of animal models provide reliable means to study human diseases. The image acquisition particularly determined by the radio frequency coil to detect the signal emanated from a particular region of interest. A scaled-down version of the slotted surface coil was built based on the previous results of a magnetron-type surface coil for human applications. Our coil prototype had a 2 cm total diameter and six circular slots and was developed for murine spinal cord at 7 T. Electromagnetic simulations of the slotted and circular coils were also performed to compute the spatially dependent magnetic and electric fields using a simulated saline-solution sphere. The quality factor of both coils was experimentally measured giving a lower noise figure and a higher quality factor for the slotted coil outperforming the circular coil. Images of the spinal cord of a rat were acquired using standard pulse sequences. The slotted surface coil can be a good tool for spinal cord rat imaging using conventional pulse sequences at 7 T.

  16. Motor-evoked potential amplitudes elicited by transcranial magnetic stimulation do not differentiate between patients and normal controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunhaus, Leon; Polak, Dana; Amiaz, Revital; Dannon, Pinhas N

    2003-12-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) applied over the motor cortex depolarizes neurons and leads to motor-evoked potentials (MEP). To assess cortico-spinal excitability we compared the motor threshold (MT) and the averaged MEP amplitude generated by TMS in patients with major depression (MD) and matched controls. Nineteen patients, who where participants in a protocol comparing the antidepressant effects of rTMS with those of ECT, and thirteen age- and gender-matched normal controls were studied. MT was similar between patients and normal controls. The MEP amplitude response was significantly increased by rTMS, however, the magnitude of the response was similar in patients and normal controls. Correlations between the averaged MEP amplitude and age revealed that older subjects demonstrated significantly lower responses at all time-points. We conclude that cortico-spinal excitability is increased following rTMS, however, differences between patients and normal controls were not apparent with the paradigm used.

  17. Comparison of clinical, magnetic resonance and evoked potentials data in a case of valproic-acid-related hyperammonemic coma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hantson, Philippe; Grandin, Cecile; Duprez, Thierry; Nassogne, Marie-Cecile; Guerit, Jean-Michel

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) multimodality evoked potentials (MEPs) and clinical findings were correlated in a 47-year-old epileptic man in whom parenteral valproic acid (VPA) therapy induced severe comatose hyperammonemic encephalopathy without biological signs of hepatotoxicity (or hepatocytic dysfunction). Although the plasma VPA level remained within a normal therapeutic range, the ammoniemia increased to a toxic peak level at 411 μmol/l 24 h after symptom onset, requiring VPA therapy discontinuation. Brain MR monitoring demonstrated early cytotoxic edema evolving into delayed vasogenic edema and final brain atrophy. Concomitantly to abnormalities within the brainstem on MR images, an increase in brainstem conduction at MEPs and clinical disturbance of brainstem reflexes were observed at the initial phase of the disease course. Later, the resolution of the MR and MEPs abnormalities paralleled the clinical recovery of the reflexes. (orig.)

  18. Comparison of clinical, magnetic resonance and evoked potentials data in a case of valproic-acid-related hyperammonemic coma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hantson, Philippe [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Department of Intensive Care, Cliniques Saint-Luc, Brussels (Belgium); Grandin, Cecile; Duprez, Thierry [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Department of Neuroradiology, Cliniques Saint-Luc, Brussels (Belgium); Nassogne, Marie-Cecile [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Department of Pediatric Neurology, Cliniques Saint-Luc, Brussels (Belgium); Guerit, Jean-Michel [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Laboratory of Neurophysiology, Cliniques Saint-Luc, Brussels (Belgium)

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) multimodality evoked potentials (MEPs) and clinical findings were correlated in a 47-year-old epileptic man in whom parenteral valproic acid (VPA) therapy induced severe comatose hyperammonemic encephalopathy without biological signs of hepatotoxicity (or hepatocytic dysfunction). Although the plasma VPA level remained within a normal therapeutic range, the ammoniemia increased to a toxic peak level at 411 {mu}mol/l 24 h after symptom onset, requiring VPA therapy discontinuation. Brain MR monitoring demonstrated early cytotoxic edema evolving into delayed vasogenic edema and final brain atrophy. Concomitantly to abnormalities within the brainstem on MR images, an increase in brainstem conduction at MEPs and clinical disturbance of brainstem reflexes were observed at the initial phase of the disease course. Later, the resolution of the MR and MEPs abnormalities paralleled the clinical recovery of the reflexes. (orig.)

  19. An effective strategy of magnetic stem cell delivery for spinal cord injury therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tukmachev, Dmitry; Lunov, Oleg; Zablotskii, Vitalii; Dejneka, Alexandr; Babic, Michal; Syková, Eva; Kubinová, Šárka

    2015-02-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a condition that results in significant mortality and morbidity. Treatment of SCI utilizing stem cell transplantation represents a promising therapy. However, current conventional treatments are limited by inefficient delivery strategies of cells into the injured tissue. In this study, we designed a magnetic system and used it to accumulate stem cells labelled with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) at a specific site of a SCI lesion. The loading of stem cells with engineered SPIONs that guarantees sufficient attractive magnetic forces was achieved. Further, the magnetic system allowed rapid guidance of the SPION-labelled cells precisely to the lesion location. Histological analysis of cell distribution throughout the cerebrospinal channel showed a good correlation with the calculated distribution of magnetic forces exerted onto the transplanted cells. The results suggest that focused targeting and fast delivery of stem cells can be achieved using the proposed non-invasive magnetic system. With future implementation the proposed targeting and delivery strategy bears advantages for the treatment of disease requiring fast stem cell transplantation.Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a condition that results in significant mortality and morbidity. Treatment of SCI utilizing stem cell transplantation represents a promising therapy. However, current conventional treatments are limited by inefficient delivery strategies of cells into the injured tissue. In this study, we designed a magnetic system and used it to accumulate stem cells labelled with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) at a specific site of a SCI lesion. The loading of stem cells with engineered SPIONs that guarantees sufficient attractive magnetic forces was achieved. Further, the magnetic system allowed rapid guidance of the SPION-labelled cells precisely to the lesion location. Histological analysis of cell distribution throughout the cerebrospinal

  20. Atrophy and Primary Somatosensory Cortical Reorganization after Unilateral Thoracic Spinal Cord Injury: A Longitudinal Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Sheng Rao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI on the changes in the central nervous system (CNS over time may depend on the dynamic interaction between the structural integrity of the spinal cord and the capacity of the brain plasticity. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI was used in a longitudinal study on five rhesus monkeys to observe cerebral activation during upper limb somatosensory tasks in healthy animals and after unilateral thoracic SCI. The changes in the spinal cord diameters were measured, and the correlations among time after the lesion, structural changes in the spinal cord, and primary somatosensory cortex (S1 reorganization were also determined. After SCI, activation of the upper limb in S1 shifted to the region which generally dominates the lower limb, and the rostral spinal cord transverse diameter adjacent to the lesion exhibited obvious atrophy, which reflects the SCI-induced changes in the CNS. A significant correlation was found among the time after the lesion, the spinal cord atrophy, and the degree of contralateral S1 reorganization. The results indicate the structural changes in the spinal cord and the dynamic reorganization of the cerebral activation following early SCI stage, which may help to further understand the neural plasticity in the CNS.

  1. In vivo tracking of neuronal-like cells by magnetic resonance in rabbit models of spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruiping; Zhang, Kun; Li, Jianding; Liu, Qiang; Xie, Jun

    2013-01-01

    In vitro experiments have demonstrated that neuronal-like cells derived from bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can survive, migrate, integrate and help to restore the function and behaviors of spinal cord injury models, and that they may serve as a suitable approach to treating spinal cord injury. However, it is very difficult to track transplanted cells in vivo. In this study, we injected superparamagnetic iron oxide-labeled neuronal-like cells into the subarachnoid space in a rabbit model of spinal cord injury. At 7 days after cell transplantation, a small number of dot-shaped low signal intensity shadows were observed in the spinal cord injury region, and at 14 days, the number of these shadows increased on T2-weighted imaging. Perl's Prussian blue staining detected dot-shaped low signal intensity shadows in the spinal cord injury region, indicative of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle-labeled cells. These findings suggest that transplanted neuronal-like cells derived from bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can migrate to the spinal cord injury region and can be tracked by magnetic resonance in vivo. Magnetic resonance imaging represents an efficient noninvasive technique for visually tracking transplanted cells in vivo. PMID:25206659

  2. Clinical, magnetic resonance imaging, and histopathologic findings in 6 dogs with surgically resected extraparenchymal spinal cord hematomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hague, D W; Joslyn, S; Bush, W W; Glass, E N; Durham, A C

    2015-01-01

    Extraparenchymal spinal cord hematoma has been described in veterinary medicine in association with neoplasia, intervertebral disk disease, and snake envenomation. There are rare reports of spontaneous extraparenchymal spinal cord hematoma formation with no known cause in human medicine. Multiple cases of spontaneous extraparenchymal spinal cord hematoma have not been described previously in veterinary medicine. To describe the signalment, clinical findings, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features, and surgical outcomes in histopathologically confirmed extraparenchymal spinal cord hematomas in dogs with no identified underlying etiology. Six dogs had MRI of the spinal cord, decompressive spinal surgery, and histopathologic confirmation of extraparenchymal spinal cord hematoma not associated with an underlying cause. Multi-institutional retrospective study. Six patients had spontaneous extraparenchymal spinal cord hematoma formation. MRI showed normal signal within the spinal cord parenchyma in all patients. All hematomas had T2-weighted hyperintensity and the majority (5/6) had no contrast enhancement. All dogs underwent surgical decompression and most patients (5/6) returned to normal or near normal neurologic function postoperatively. Follow-up of the patients (ranging between 921 and 1,446 days) showed no progression of neurologic clinical signs or any conditions associated with increased bleeding tendency. Before surgery and histopathology confirming extraparenchymal hematoma, the primary differential in most cases was neoplasia, based on the MRI findings. This retrospective study reminds clinicians of the importance of the combination of advanced imaging combined with histopathologic diagnosis. The prognosis for spontaneous spinal cord extraparenchymal hematoma with surgical decompression appears to be favorable in most cases. Copyright © 2015 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  3. Extracting Visual Evoked Potentials from EEG Data Recorded During fMRI-guided Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Sadeh, Boaz; Yovel, Galit

    2014-01-01

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is an effective method for establishing a causal link between a cortical area and cognitive/neurophysiological effects. Specifically, by creating a transient interference with the normal activity of a target region and measuring changes in an electrophysiological signal, we can establish a causal link between the stimulated brain area or network and the electrophysiological signal that we record. If target brain areas are functionally defined with prior...

  4. Multidimensional Analysis of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Predicts Early Impairment in Thoracic and Thoracolumbar Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabray, Marc C.; Whetstone, William D.; Dhall, Sanjay S.; Phillips, David B.; Pan, Jonathan Z.; Manley, Geoffrey T.; Bresnahan, Jacqueline C.; Beattie, Michael S.; Haefeli, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Literature examining magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in acute spinal cord injury (SCI) has focused on cervical SCI. Reproducible systems have been developed for MRI-based grading; however, it is unclear how they apply to thoracic SCI. Our hypothesis is that MRI measures will group as coherent multivariate principal component (PC) ensembles, and that distinct PCs and individual variables will show discriminant validity for predicting early impairment in thoracic SCI. We undertook a retrospective cohort study of 25 patients with acute thoracic SCI who underwent MRI on admission and had American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS) assessment at hospital discharge. Imaging variables of axial grade, sagittal grade, length of injury, thoracolumbar injury classification system (TLICS), maximum canal compromise (MCC), and maximum spinal cord compression (MSCC) were collected. We performed an analytical workflow to detect multivariate PC patterns followed by explicit hypothesis testing to predict AIS at discharge. All imaging variables loaded positively on PC1 (64.3% of variance), which was highly related to AIS at discharge. MCC, MSCC, and TLICS also loaded positively on PC2 (22.7% of variance), while variables concerning cord signal abnormality loaded negatively on PC2. PC2 was highly related to the patient undergoing surgical decompression. Variables of signal abnormality were all negatively correlated with AIS at discharge with the highest level of correlation for axial grade as assessed with the Brain and Spinal Injury Center (BASIC) score. A multiple variable model identified BASIC as the only statistically significant predictor of AIS at discharge, signifying that BASIC best captured the variance in AIS within our study population. Our study provides evidence of convergent validity, construct validity, and clinical predictive validity for the sampled MRI measures of SCI when applied in acute thoracic and thoracolumbar SCI. PMID:26414451

  5. The adult spinal cord injury without radiographic abnormalities syndrome: magnetic resonance imaging and clinical findings in adults with spinal cord injuries having normal radiographs and computed tomography studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasimatis, Georgios B; Panagiotopoulos, Elias; Megas, Panagiotis; Matzaroglou, Charalambos; Gliatis, John; Tyllianakis, Minos; Lambiris, Elias

    2008-07-01

    Spinal cord injury without radiographic abnormalities (SCIWORA) is thought to represent mostly a pediatric entity and its incidence in adults is rather underreported. Some authors have also proposed the term spinal cord injury without radiologic evidence of trauma, as more precisely describing the condition of adult SCIWORA in the setting of cervical spondylosis. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate adult patients with cervical spine injuries and radiological-clinical examination discrepancy, and to discuss their characteristics and current management. During a 16-year period, 166 patients with a cervical spine injury were admitted in our institution (Level I trauma center). Upper cervical spine injuries (occiput to C2, 54 patients) were treated mainly by a Halo vest, whereas lower cervical spine injuries (C3-T1, 112 patients) were treated surgically either with an anterior, or posterior procedure, or both. Seven of these 166 patients (4.2%) had a radiologic-clinical mismatch, i.e., they presented with frank spinal cord injury with no signs of trauma, and were included in the study. Magnetic resonance imaging was available for 6 of 7 patients, showing intramedullary signal changes in 5 of 6 patients with varying degrees of compression from the disc and/or the ligamentum flavum, whereas the remaining patient had only traumatic herniation of the intervertebral disc and ligamentum flavum bulging. Follow-up period was 6.4 years on average (1-10 years). This retrospective chart review provides information on adult patients with cervical spinal cord injuries whose radiographs and computed tomography studies were normal. It furthers reinforces the pathologic background of SCIWORA in an adult population, when evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging. Particularly for patients with cervical spondylosis, special attention should be paid with regard to vascular compromise by predisposing factors such as smoking or vascular disease, since they probably contribute in

  6. Study of the correlation of brainstem auditory evoked potentials and magnetic resonance imaging in children with spastic cerebral palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fobe, Lisete Pessoa de Oliveira

    1999-01-01

    Central auditory evaluation in 21 children with cerebral palsy was done with brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEP) and correlated with brain magnetic resonance imaging findings (MRI); 12 boys and 9 girls between 5 and 12 years old were studied. All children had follow-up at the Institute of Orthopedics and Traumatology of Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo. The control group was done with 17 children, 10 boys and 7 girls (mean age 8.06 years, SD 2.27 years). The BAEP abnormalities were: decrease of latency of wave V; decrease of latency III-V and I-IV intervals at the right side. All patients has MRI supratentorial abnormalities and 11 had brainstem atrophy. The MRI pathologic findings were: ventricular enlargement (n=17 or 80.95%), cortical/subcortical atrophy (n=15 or 71.42%), left brainstem atrophy (n=11 or 52.38%), periventricular leukomalacia (n=10 or 47.61%), infarction in the left middle cerebral artery territory (n=6 or 28.57%), and malformations such as schizencephaly and colpocephaly (n=5 or 23.80%). The findings of the decrease latencies in children with cerebral palsy suggest the contribution of decussating auditory fibers at the lower and upper pons and midbrain, the lack of homogeneity of the surrounding volume of the conductor fibres and the presence of several concurrently active potential generators sources, should be facilitating mechanisms for the nervous input to brainstem. (author)

  7. Study of the correlation of brainstem auditory evoked potentials and magnetic resonance imaging in children with spastic cerebral palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fobe, Lisete Pessoa de Oliveira [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina]. E-mail: lispessoa@yahoo.com

    1999-12-01

    Central auditory evaluation in 21 children with cerebral palsy was done with brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEP) and correlated with brain magnetic resonance imaging findings (MRI); 12 boys and 9 girls between 5 and 12 years old were studied. All children had follow-up at the Institute of Orthopedics and Traumatology of Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo. The control group was done with 17 children, 10 boys and 7 girls (mean age 8.06 years, SD 2.27 years). The BAEP abnormalities were: decrease of latency of wave V; decrease of latency III-V and I-IV intervals at the right side. All patients has MRI supratentorial abnormalities and 11 had brainstem atrophy. The MRI pathologic findings were: ventricular enlargement (n=17 or 80.95%), cortical/subcortical atrophy (n=15 or 71.42%), left brainstem atrophy (n=11 or 52.38%), periventricular leukomalacia (n=10 or 47.61%), infarction in the left middle cerebral artery territory (n=6 or 28.57%), and malformations such as schizencephaly and colpocephaly (n=5 or 23.80%). The findings of the decrease latencies in children with cerebral palsy suggest the contribution of decussating auditory fibers at the lower and upper pons and midbrain, the lack of homogeneity of the surrounding volume of the conductor fibres and the presence of several concurrently active potential generators sources, should be facilitating mechanisms for the nervous input to brainstem. (author)

  8. Spinal cord multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging for survival prediction in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Querin, G; El Mendili, M M; Lenglet, T; Delphine, S; Marchand-Pauvert, V; Benali, H; Pradat, P-F

    2017-08-01

    Assessing survival is a critical issue in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Neuroimaging seems to be promising in the assessment of disease severity and several studies also suggest a strong relationship between spinal cord (SC) atrophy described by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and disease progression. The aim of the study was to determine the predictive added value of multimodal SC MRI on survival. Forty-nine ALS patients were recruited and clinical data were collected. Patients were scored on the Revised ALS Functional Rating Scale and manual muscle testing. They were followed longitudinally to assess survival. The cervical SC was imaged using the 3 T MRI system. Cord volume and cross-sectional area (CSA) at each vertebral level were computed. Diffusion tensor imaging metrics were measured. Imaging metrics and clinical variables were used as inputs for a multivariate Cox regression survival model. On building a multivariate Cox regression model with clinical and MRI parameters, fractional anisotropy, magnetization transfer ratio and CSA at C2-C3, C4-C5, C5-C6 and C6-C7 vertebral levels were significant. Moreover, the hazard ratio calculated for CSA at the C3-C4 and C5-C6 levels indicated an increased risk for patients with SC atrophy (respectively 0.66 and 0.68). In our cohort, MRI parameters seem to be more predictive than clinical variables, which had a hazard ratio very close to 1. It is suggested that multimodal SC MRI could be a useful tool in survival prediction especially if used at the beginning of the disease and when combined with clinical variables. To validate it as a biomarker, confirmation of the results in bigger independent cohorts of patients is warranted. © 2017 EAN.

  9. High-frequency epidural stimulation across the respiratory cycle evokes phrenic short-term potentiation after incomplete cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Rothi, Elisa J; Streeter, Kristi A; Hanna, Marie H; Stamas, Anna C; Reier, Paul J; Baekey, David M; Fuller, David D

    2017-10-01

    C2 spinal hemilesion (C2Hx) paralyzes the ipsilateral diaphragm, but recovery is possible through activation of "crossed spinal" synaptic inputs to ipsilateral phrenic motoneurons. We tested the hypothesis that high-frequency epidural stimulation (HF-ES) would potentiate ipsilateral phrenic output after subacute and chronic C2Hx. HF-ES (300 Hz) was applied to the ventrolateral C4 or T2 spinal cord ipsilateral to C2Hx in anesthetized and mechanically ventilated adult rats. Stimulus duration was 60 s, and currents ranged from 100 to 1,000 µA. Bilateral phrenic nerve activity and ipsilateral hypoglossal (XII) nerve activity were recorded before and after HF-ES. Higher T2 stimulus currents potentiated ipsilateral phasic inspiratory activity at both 2 and 12 wk post-C2Hx, whereas higher stimulus currents delivered at C4 potentiated ipsilateral phasic phrenic activity only at 12 wk ( P = 0.028). Meanwhile, tonic output in the ipsilateral phrenic nerve reached 500% of baseline values at the high currents with no difference between 2 and 12 wk. HF-ES did not trigger inspiratory burst-frequency changes. Similar responses occurred following T2 HF-ES. Increases in contralateral phrenic and XII nerve output were induced by C4 and T2 HF-ES at higher currents, but the relative magnitude of these changes was small compared with the ipsilateral phrenic response. We conclude that following incomplete cervical spinal cord injury, HF-ES of the ventrolateral midcervical or thoracic spinal cord can potentiate efferent phrenic motor output with little impact on inspiratory burst frequency. However, the substantial increases in tonic output indicate that the uninterrupted 60-s stimulation paradigm used is unlikely to be useful for respiratory muscle activation after spinal injury. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Previous studies reported that high-frequency epidural stimulation (HF-ES) activates the diaphragm following acute spinal transection. This study examined HF-ES and phrenic motor output

  10. Time course and hemispheric lateralization effects of complex pitch processing: evoked magnetic fields in response to rippled noise stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertrich, Ingo; Mathiak, Klaus; Lutzenberger, Werner; Ackermann, Hermann

    2004-01-01

    To delineate the time course and processing stages of pitch encoding at the level of the supratemporal plane, the present study recorded evoked magnetic fields in response to rippled noise (RN) stimuli. RN largely masks simple tonotopic representations and addresses pitch processing within the temporal domain (periodicity encoding). Four dichotic stimulus types (111 or 133 Hz RN at one ear, white noise to the other one) were applied in randomized order during either visual distraction or selective auditory attention. Strictly periodic signals, noise-like events, and mixtures of both signals served as control conditions. (1) Attention-dependent ear x hemisphere interactions were observed within the time domain of the M50 field, indicating early streaming of auditory information. (2) M100 responses to strictly periodic stimuli were found lateralized to the right hemisphere. Furthermore, the higher-pitched stimuli yielded enhanced activation as compared to the lower-pitch signals (pitch scaling), conceivably reflecting sensory memory operations. (3) Besides right-hemisphere pitch scaling, the relatively late M100 component in association with the RN condition (latency = 136 ms) showed significantly stronger field strengths over the left hemisphere. Control experiments revealed this lateralization effect to be related to noise rather than pitch processing. Furthermore, subtle noise variations interacted with signal periodicity. Obviously, thus, complex task demands such as RN encoding give rise to functional segregation of auditory processing across the two hemispheres (left hemisphere: noise, right hemisphere: periodicity representation). The observed noise/periodicity interactions, furthermore, might reflect pitch-synchronous spectral evaluation at the level of the left supratemporal plane, triggered by right-hemisphere representation of signal periodicity. Copyright 2004 Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Differences in motor evoked potentials induced in rats by transcranial magnetic stimulation under two separate anesthetics: implications for plasticity studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Sykes

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS is primarily used in humans to change the state of corticospinal excitability. To assess the efficacy of different rTMS stimulation protocols, motor evoked potentials (MEPs are used as a readout due to their non-invasive nature. Stimulation of the motor cortex produces a response in a targeted muscle, and the amplitude of this twitch provides an indirect measure of the current state of the cortex. When applied to the motor cortex, rTMS can alter MEP amplitude, however results are variable between participants and across studies. In addition, the mechanisms underlying any change and its locus are poorly understood. In order to better understand these effects, MEPs have been investigated in vivo in animal models, primarily in rats. One major difference in protocols between rats and humans is the use of general anesthesia in animal experiments. Anesthetics are known to affect plasticity-like mechanisms and so may contaminate the effects of an rTMS protocol. In the present study, we explored the effect of anesthetic on MEP amplitude, recorded before and after intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS, a patterned rTMS protocol with reported facilitatory effects. MEPs were assessed in the brachioradialis muscle of the upper forelimb under two anesthetics: a xylazine/zoletil combination and urethane. We found MEPs could be induced under both anesthetics, with no differences in the resting motor threshold or the average baseline amplitudes. However, MEPs were highly variable between animals under both anesthetics, with the xylazine/zoletil combination showing higher variability and most prominently a rise in amplitude across the baseline recording period. Interestingly, application of iTBS did not facilitate MEP amplitude under either anesthetic condition. Although it is important to underpin human application of TMS with mechanistic examination of effects in animals, caution must be taken when

  12. Differences in Motor Evoked Potentials Induced in Rats by Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation under Two Separate Anesthetics: Implications for Plasticity Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykes, Matthew; Matheson, Natalie A; Brownjohn, Philip W; Tang, Alexander D; Rodger, Jennifer; Shemmell, Jonathan B H; Reynolds, John N J

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is primarily used in humans to change the state of corticospinal excitability. To assess the efficacy of different rTMS stimulation protocols, motor evoked potentials (MEPs) are used as a readout due to their non-invasive nature. Stimulation of the motor cortex produces a response in a targeted muscle, and the amplitude of this twitch provides an indirect measure of the current state of the cortex. When applied to the motor cortex, rTMS can alter MEP amplitude, however, results are variable between participants and across studies. In addition, the mechanisms underlying any change and its locus are poorly understood. In order to better understand these effects, MEPs have been investigated in vivo in animal models, primarily in rats. One major difference in protocols between rats and humans is the use of general anesthesia in animal experiments. Anesthetics are known to affect plasticity-like mechanisms and so may contaminate the effects of an rTMS protocol. In the present study, we explored the effect of anesthetic on MEP amplitude, recorded before and after intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS), a patterned rTMS protocol with reported facilitatory effects. MEPs were assessed in the brachioradialis muscle of the upper forelimb under two anesthetics: a xylazine/zoletil combination and urethane. We found MEPs could be induced under both anesthetics, with no differences in the resting motor threshold or the average baseline amplitudes. However, MEPs were highly variable between animals under both anesthetics, with the xylazine/zoletil combination showing higher variability and most prominently a rise in amplitude across the baseline recording period. Interestingly, application of iTBS did not facilitate MEP amplitude under either anesthetic condition. Although it is important to underpin human application of TMS with mechanistic examination of effects in animals, caution must be taken when selecting an

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging features of brain and spinal cord injury in a fatal case of isopropanol intoxication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahajan PS

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Parag Suresh Mahajan,1 Joyal Jacob Mathew,2 Abhilash Pulincherry Jayaram,1 Vidya Chander Negi,1 Mohamed Milad Abu Hmaira21Department of Radiology, 2Department of Medicine, Al-Khor Hospital, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, QatarAbstract: A 60-year-old man presented with headache, dizziness, and disorientation one day after consumption of isopropanol along with ethanol. Computed tomography (CT of the brain performed immediately was unremarkable. The patient collapsed within the hospital 30 minutes after the CT scan was done, and remained comatose until death, showing no improvement with symptomatic treatment. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and spine done 6 days after admission revealed bilaterally symmetrical hyperintensities involving the cerebral and cerebellar cortex and white matter, basal ganglia, thalami, and brainstem on T2-weighted, fluid attenuated inversion recovery and diffusion weighted images; similar hyperintensities were seen involving the swollen and edematous cervical spinal cord and cerebellar tonsillar herniation compressing the proximal cervical cord. Petechial hemorrhages were also noted within the brainstem. These features are compatible with toxic injury to the brain and cervical spinal cord. To our knowledge, the magnetic resonance imaging features of brain and spinal cord injury and cerebellar tonsillar herniation, secondary to isopropanol intoxication have not been reported in the published literature before.Keywords: alcohol intoxication, computed tomography, isopropyl alcohol, ethyl alcohol, toxicity

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of spinal cord lesions in 22 multiple sclerosis patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Hiroshi; Funakawa, Itaru; Hara, Kenji; Yasuda, Takeshi; Terao, Akira

    1994-01-01

    We reviewed MRI findings in 22 patients (37 cases) with clinically diagnosed multiple sclerosis (MS) with spinal cord lesions. The spinal cord lesions were detected in 17 (46%) of these 37 cases on MRI. The cervical cord lesions were more detectable than other spinal cord lesions. At the thoracic level, the upper lesions were more detectable than the lower ones. In this study, no correlation was found between the disease duration, the rate of functional disturbance and the detectable rate of spinal cord lesions. The characteristic findings of the lesions were swelling and the enhancement effect of Gd-DTPA in the patient group with a disease duration of less than three years, and atrophic change in the patient group with a disease duration of greater than seven years. The period of the enhancement effect of Gd-DTPA varied in each case, and it may reflect the clinical course. Syrinx-like lesions were found in four cases. In one of them, atrophic change was found in the same region six months after the follow up study. Although the precise reason for the syrinx-like lesion was unclear, a relationship between syrinx-like lesion and atrophy of the spinal cord was suggested. The MRI findings of the spinal cord lesions in MS varied in each case and in each stage of the disease. (author)

  15. Feasibility of 3.0 T diffusion-weighted nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of functional recovery of rats with complete spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duo Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diffusion tensor imaging is a sensitive way to reflect axonal necrosis and degeneration, glial cell regeneration and demyelination following spinal cord injury, and to display microstructure changes in the spinal cord in vivo. Diffusion tensor imaging technology is a sensitive method to diagnose spinal cord injury fiber tractography visualizes the white matter fibers, and directly displays the structural integrity and resultant damage of the fiber bundle. At present, diffusion tensor imaging is restricted to brain examinations, and is rarely applied in the evaluation of spinal cord injury. This study aimed to explore the fractional anisotropy and apparent diffusion coefficient of diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging and the feasibility of diffusion tensor tractography in the evaluation of complete spinal cord injury in rats. The results showed that the average combined scores were obviously decreased after spinal cord transection in rats, and then began to increase over time. The fractional anisotropy scores after spinal cord transection in rats were significantly lower than those in normal rats (P <0.05 the apparent diffusion coefficient was significantly increased compared with the normal group (P < 0.05. Following spinal cord transection, fractional anisotropy scores were negatively correlated with apparent diffusion coefficient values (r = -0.856, P < 0.01, and positively correlated with the average combined scores (r = 0.943, P < 0.01, while apparent diffusion coefficient values had a negative correlation with the average combined scores (r = -0.949, P < 0.01. Experimental findings suggest that, as a non-invasive examination, diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging can provide qualitative and quantitative information about spinal cord injury. The fractional anisotropy score and apparent diffusion coefficient have a good correlation with the average combined scores, which reflect functional recovery after spinal cord injury.

  16. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) examination of the normal spinal cord at 1. 5 Tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halimi, P.; Sigal, R.; Doyon, D.; Melki, P.; Francke, J.P.

    1988-01-01

    The remarkable analytical power of NMR imaging applied to the study of the spinal cord and the adjacent regions, and especially by means of high-field devices, requires a very precise knowledge of the anatomy. The spinal cord is analysed in its diverse regions: bulbomedullar junction, cervical and dorsal, conus medullaris and cauda equina in the various planes (sagittal, axial and frontal), which are confronted with anatomical sections.

  17. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) examination of the normal spinal cord at 1.5 Tesla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halimi, P.; Sigal, R.; Doyon, D.; Melki, P.; Francke, J.P.

    1988-01-01

    The remarkable analytical power of NMR imaging applied to the study of the spinal cord and the adjacent regions, and especially by means of high-field devices, requires a very precise knowledge of the anatomy. The spinal cord is analysed in its diverse regions: bulbomedullar junction, cervical and dorsal, conus medullaris and cauda equina in the various planes (sagittal, axial and frontal), which are confronted with anatomical sections [fr

  18. Sequential Magnetic Resonance Imaging Finding of Intramedullary Spinal Cord Abscess including Diffusion Weighted Image: a Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roh, Jae Eun; Lee, Seung Young; Cha, Sang Hoon; Cho, Bum Sang; Jeon, Min Hee; Kang, Min Ho [Chungbuk National University College of Medicine, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-04-15

    Intramedullary spinal cord abscess (ISCA) is a rare infection of the central nervous system. We describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings, including the diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) findings, of ISCA in a 78-year-old man. The initial conventional MRI of the thoracic spine demonstrated a subtle enhancing nodule accompanied by significant edema. On the follow-up MRI after seven days, the nodule appeared as a ring-enhancing nodule. The non-enhancing central portion of the nodule appeared hyperintense on DWI with a decreased apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value on the ADC map. We performed myelotomy and surgical drainage, and thick, yellowish pus was drained

  19. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with extension of the central canal of the spinal cord according to magnetic resonance imaging data

    OpenAIRE

    E. G. Mendelevich; G. R. Mukhamedzhanova; E. I. Bogdanov

    2016-01-01

    The paper describes an atypical case of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) concurrent with extension of the central canal – hydromyelia.Diagnostic difficulty is due to the presence of symptoms which are atypical for ALS, such as early age of onset, slow progression with long-term involvement of one leg, as well as extension of the central canal of the spinal cord at the level of TIII-IX bodies, as evidenced by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The paper presents a clinical case, a review of ...

  20. Vibration and muscle contraction affect somatosensory evoked potentials

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, LG; Starr, A

    1985-01-01

    We recorded potentials evoked by specific somatosensory stimuli over peripheral nerve, spinal cord, and cerebral cortex. Vibration attenuated spinal and cerebral potentials evoked by mixed nerve and muscle spindle stimulation; in one subject that was tested, there was no effect on cutaneous input. Presynaptic inhibition of Ia input in the spinal cord and muscle spindle receptor occupancy are probably the responsible mechanisms. In contrast, muscle contraction attenuated cerebral potentials to...

  1. Significance of T2 Hyperintensity on Magnetic Resonance Imaging After Cervical Cord Injury and Return to Play in Professional Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempel, Zachary J; Bost, Jeffrey W; Norwig, John A; Maroon, Joseph C

    2015-07-01

    Cervical cord magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) T2 hyperintensity is used as evidence of cord trauma in the evaluation and management of athletes in contact sports. The long-term pathophysiologic and prognostic value of this finding is poorly understood, especially in return to play (RTP). To examine the significance of T2 hyperintensity in the cervical spinal cord of professional athletes. Retrospective review of MRI T2 hyperintensity findings between 2007 and 2014 in 5 professional athletes. Pertinent examination and demographics, including mechanism of injury, surgical intervention, radiographs, MRI studies, long-term outcomes, and RTP recommendations were collected. Four National Football League players and 1 professional wrestler had prior traumatic neurapraxia that at the time of initial consultation had resolved. MRIs showed congenitally small cervical canal (1) and multilevel spondylosis/stenosis/disc herniation (4) along with focal cord T2 hyperintensity (5). The signal abnormalities were at C3/C4 (3), C4 mid-vertebral body (1), and C5/C6 (1). Four athletes had single-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion, and 1 was nonoperative. Serial MRI imaging at 3 months after surgery showed hyperintensity partially resolved (4) and unchanged (1), and at 9-months 3 of the 5 completely resolved. Based on the author's RTP criteria, 4 of 5 were released to return to their sport. Clearance for RTP preceded complete resolution of MRI T2 hyperintensity in 3 of 4 athletes. The 2 athletes that have returned to profession sport have not had any additional episodes of neurapraxia or any cervical spine-related complications. MRI T2 hyperintensity in contact sport athletes who are symptom-free with normal examination and no evidence of spinal instability may not be a contraindication to RTP. Additional observations are needed to confirm this observation.

  2. Corticospinal tract damage in patients with severe diffuse axonal injury in a chronic stage on diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging and motor evoked potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasokawa, Yu-to; Nakayama, Noriyuki; Iwama, Toru; Okumura, Ayumi; Shinoda, Jun; Miwa, Kazuhiro

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the disturbed motor function of the corticospinal tract (CST) of diffuse axonal injury (DAI) using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance (DTMR) imaging and motor evoked potential (MEP) examination, and to analyze these comparatively. Forty-three patients (86 sides of the CST) with severe DAI in a chronic stage underwent DTMR imaging and MEP examination using transcranial magnetic stimulation. Fractional anisotrophy (FA) values of 6 regions of interests (ROIs) in the CST were measured on FA map obtained from DTMR imaging. The lowest FA value among the FA values of the 6 ROIs in each of the CSTs was defined as the minimum FA value. And the lowest magnetic stimulation strength that could derive MEP was defined as the minimum threshold of MEP. The mean minimum FA value of the CSTs in which MEP could not be obtained even by the maximum strength of magnetic stimulation (the MEP (-) group) was significantly lower than that of the CSTs in which MEP could be obtained (the MEP (+) group). In the MEP (+) group, the minimum FA value decreased with the increase of the minimum threshold of MEP with a significant correlation. These results demonstrate that physiological motor dysfunction disclosed on MEP is significantly correlated with morphological damage of the CST observed on DTMR imaging in patients with DAI in a chronic stage. DTMR imaging is strongly suggested to be helpful to evaluate disturbed motor function and to infer its severity in DAI. (author)

  3. Effect of high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on motor cortical excitability and sensory nerve conduction velocity in subacute-stage incomplete spinal cord injury patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Hyun Gyu; Ji, Sang-Goo; Kim, Myoung-Kwon

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to determine whether repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation can improve sensory recovery of the lower extremities in subacute-stage spinal cord injury patients. [Subjects and Methods] This study was conducted on 20 subjects with diagnosed paraplegia due to spinal cord injury. These 20 subjects were allocated to an experimental group of 10 subjects that underwent active repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation or to a control group of 10 subjects that underwent sham repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation. The SCI patients in the experimental group underwent active repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and conventional rehabilitation therapy, whereas the spinal cord injury patients in the control group underwent sham repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and conventional rehabilitation therapy. Participants in both groups received therapy five days per week for six-weeks. Latency, amplitude, and sensory nerve conduction velocity were assessed before and after the six week therapy period. [Results] A significant intergroup difference was observed for posttreatment velocity gains, but no significant intergroup difference was observed for amplitude or latency. [Conclusion] repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation may be improve sensory recovery of the lower extremities in subacute-stage spinal cord injury patients.

  4. Correlation between single-trial visual evoked potentials and the blood oxygenation level dependent response in simultaneously recorded electroencephalography-functional magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglø, Dan; Pedersen, Henrik; Rostrup, Egill

    2012-01-01

    in different occipital and extraoccipital cortical areas not explained by the boxcar regressor. The results suggest that the P1-N2 regressor is the best EEG-based regressor to model the visual paradigm, but when looking for additional effects like habituation or attention modulation that cannot be modeled......To compare different electroencephalography (EEG)-based regressors and their ability to predict the simultaneously recorded blood oxygenation level dependent response during blocked visual stimulation, simultaneous EEG-functional magnetic resonance imaging in 10 healthy volunteers was performed....... The performance of different single-trial EEG regressors was compared in terms of predicting the measured blood oxygenation level dependent response. The EEG-based regressors were the amplitude and latency of the primary positive (P1) and negative (N2) peaks of the visual evoked potential, the combined P1-N2...

  5. Magnetic resonance detection of CD34+ cells from umbilical cord blood using a 19F label

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.E. Duinhouwer (Lucia); Van Rossum, B.J.M. (Bernard J. M.); S.T. van Tiel (Sandra); R.M. van der Werf (Ramon); R.Q. Doeswijk (Ronald); J.C. Haeck (Joost); Rombouts, E.W.J.C. (Elwin W. J. C.); M.N.D. Ter Borg (Mariëtte N. D.); G. Kotek (Gyula); E. Braakman (Eric); J.J. Cornelissen (Jan); M.R. Bernsen (Monique)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractImpaired homing and delayed recovery upon hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) with hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) derived from umbilical cord blood (UCB) is a major problem. Tracking transplanted cells in vivo will be helpful to detect impaired homing at an early stage and

  6. Inflammatory lesions of the spinal cord and the nerve roots in magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sartoretti-Schefer, S.; Wichmann, W.; Valavanis, A.

    1996-01-01

    The MRI examinations of 52 patients with proven inflammatory lesions (39 patients) or tumorous/postactinic lesions of the spinal cord (6 patients) and vasuclar malformations of the spinal cord (7 patients) were retrospectively analyzed. All examinations were performed on a 1.5 T MR unit, using bi- or triplanar T1-w pre- and postcontrast as well as T2-w SE sequences. Clinical and radiological examinations allow a subdivision of inflammations of the spinal cord and the nerve roots into (mening-oradiculo) myelitis and meningoradiculo (myelitis). The MRI patterns of these two inflammatory subtypes vary: Meningoradiculitis presents with an enhancement of the nerve roots and the leptomeninges; myelitis itself is characterized by single or multiple, diffuse or multifocal, with or without nodular, patchy or diffusely enhancing intramedullary lessions, with or without thickening of the cord and leptomeningeal inflammation. The immunologically suppressed patient suffers from viral infections (especially herpes simplex, varicella-zoster virus, cytomegalovirus), bacterial infections (tuberculosis), but rarely viral infections, sarcoidosis and demyelinating diseases. Idiopathic myelitis is also common. Secondary ischemic and demyelinating processes result in a complex morphology of inflammatory lesions on MRI, and therefore the whole spectrum of demyelinating, ischemic and inflammatory lesions has to be included in the differential diagnosis. Even tumors may imitate inflammatory myelitis and radiculitis. Most commonly, meningoradiculitis can be separated from myelitis. A reliable diagnosis of a specific inflammatory lesion is difficult and is mostly achieved in patients with multiple sclerosis and in patients with HIV-associated cytomegalovirus infection. (orig.) [de

  7. Extended magnetic resonance imaging studies on the effect of classically activated microglia transplantation on white matter regeneration following spinal cord focal injury in adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcol, Wiesław; Ślusarczyk, Wojciech; Larysz-Brysz, Magdalena; Łabuzek, Krzysztof; Kapustka, Bartosz; Staszkiewicz, Rafał; Rosicka, Paulina; Kalita, Katarzyna; Węglarz, Władysław; Lewin-Kowalik, Joanna

    2017-11-01

    Spinal cord injuries are still a serious problem for regenerative medicine. Previous research has demonstrated that activated microglia accumulate in spinal lesions, influencing the injured tissues in various ways. Therefore, transplantation of activated microglia may have a beneficial role in the regeneration of the nervous system. The present study examined the influence of transplanted activated microglial cells in adult rats with injured spinal cords. Rats were randomly divided into an experimental (M) and control (C) group, and were subjected to non-laminectomy focal injury of spinal cord white matter by means of a high-pressured air stream. In group M, activated cultured microglial cells were injected twice into the site of injury. Functional outcome and morphological features of regeneration were analyzed during a 12-week follow-up. The lesions were characterized by means of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Neurons in the brain stem and motor cortex were labeled with FluoroGold (FG). A total of 12 weeks after surgery, spinal cords and brains were collected and subjected to histopathological and immunohistochemical examinations. Lesion sizes in the spinal cord were measured and the number of FG-positive neurons was counted. Rats in group M demonstrated significant improvement of locomotor performance when compared with group C (Pspinal cord in the group M following microglia treatment, as compared with group C. The water diffusion perpendicular to the spinal cord in group M was closer to the reference values for a healthy spinal cord than it was in group C. The sizes of lesions were also significantly smaller in group M than in the group C (Pspinal cord gives some positive effects for the regeneration of the white matter.

  8. Extended magnetic resonance imaging studies on the effect of classically activated microglia transplantation on white matter regeneration following spinal cord focal injury in adult rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcol, Wiesław; Ślusarczyk, Wojciech; Larysz-Brysz, Magdalena; Łabuzek, Krzysztof; Kapustka, Bartosz; Staszkiewicz, Rafał; Rosicka, Paulina; Kalita, Katarzyna; Węglarz, Władysław; Lewin-Kowalik, Joanna

    2017-01-01

    Spinal cord injuries are still a serious problem for regenerative medicine. Previous research has demonstrated that activated microglia accumulate in spinal lesions, influencing the injured tissues in various ways. Therefore, transplantation of activated microglia may have a beneficial role in the regeneration of the nervous system. The present study examined the influence of transplanted activated microglial cells in adult rats with injured spinal cords. Rats were randomly divided into an experimental (M) and control (C) group, and were subjected to non-laminectomy focal injury of spinal cord white matter by means of a high-pressured air stream. In group M, activated cultured microglial cells were injected twice into the site of injury. Functional outcome and morphological features of regeneration were analyzed during a 12-week follow-up. The lesions were characterized by means of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Neurons in the brain stem and motor cortex were labeled with FluoroGold (FG). A total of 12 weeks after surgery, spinal cords and brains were collected and subjected to histopathological and immunohistochemical examinations. Lesion sizes in the spinal cord were measured and the number of FG-positive neurons was counted. Rats in group M demonstrated significant improvement of locomotor performance when compared with group C (PMRI analysis demonstrated moderate improvement in water diffusion along the spinal cord in the group M following microglia treatment, as compared with group C. The water diffusion perpendicular to the spinal cord in group M was closer to the reference values for a healthy spinal cord than it was in group C. The sizes of lesions were also significantly smaller in group M than in the group C (P<0.05). The number of brain stem and motor cortex FG-positive neurons in group M was significantly higher than in group C. The present study demonstrated that delivery of activated microglia directly into the injured spinal cord gives some

  9. Activation changes in zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) brain areas evoked by alterations of the earth magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keary, Nina; Bischof, Hans-Joachim

    2012-01-01

    Many animals are able to perceive the earth magnetic field and to use it for orientation and navigation within the environment. The mechanisms underlying the perception and processing of magnetic field information within the brain have been thoroughly studied, especially in birds, but are still obscure. Three hypotheses are currently discussed, dealing with ferromagnetic particles in the beak of birds, with the same sort of particles within the lagena organs, or describing magnetically influenced radical-pair processes within retinal photopigments. Each hypothesis is related to a well-known sensory organ and claims parallel processing of magnetic field information with somatosensory, vestibular and visual input, respectively. Changes in activation within nuclei of the respective sensory systems have been shown previously. Most of these previous experiments employed intensity enhanced magnetic stimuli or lesions. We here exposed unrestrained zebra finches to either a stationary or a rotating magnetic field of the local intensity and inclination. C-Fos was used as an activity marker to examine whether the two treatments led to differences in fourteen brain areas including nuclei of the somatosensory, vestibular and visual system. An ANOVA revealed an overall effect of treatment, indicating that the magnetic field change was perceived by the birds. While the differences were too small to be significant in most areas, a significant enhancement of activation by the rotating stimulus was found in a hippocampal subdivision. Part of the hyperpallium showed a strong, nearly significant, increase. Our results are compatible with previous studies demonstrating an involvement of at least three different sensory systems in earth magnetic field perception and suggest that these systems, probably less elaborated, may also be found in nonmigrating birds.

  10. Transcranial and spinal cord magnetic stimulation in treatment of spasticity: a literature review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzhova, Julia; Sinitsyn, Dmitry; Chervyakov, Alexander; Poydasheva, Alexandra; Zakharova, Maria; Suponeva, Natalia; Chernikova, Lyudmila; Piradov, Michael

    2018-02-01

    Spasticity is associated with various diseases of the nervous system. Current treatments such as drug therapy, botulinum toxin injections, kinesitherapy, and physiotherapy are not sufficiently effective in a large number of patients. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) can be considered as an alternative method of treatment. The purpose of this article was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of all available publications assessing the efficacy of repetitive TMS in treatment of spasticity. Search for articles was conducted in databases PubMed, Willey, and Google. Keywords included "TMS", "spasticity", "TMS and spasticity", "non-invasive brain stimulation", and "non-invasive spinal cord stimulation". The difference in scores according to the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) for one joint before and after treatment was taken as the effect size. We found 26 articles that examined the TMS efficacy in treatment of spasticity. Meta-analysis included 6 trials comprising 149 patients who underwent real stimulation or simulation. No statistically significant difference in the effect of real and simulated stimulation was found in stroke patients. In patients with spinal cord injury and spasticity, the mean effect size value and the 95% confidence interval were -0.80 and (-1.12, -0.49), respectively, in a group of real stimulation; in the case of simulated stimulation, these parameters were 0.15 and (-0.30, -0.00), respectively. Statistically significant differences between groups of real stimulation and simulation were demonstrated for using high-frequency repetitive TMS or iTBS mode for the M1 area of the spastic leg (P=0.0002). According to the meta-analysis, the statistically significant effect of TMS in the form of reduced spasticity was demonstrated only for the developed due to lesions at the brain stem and spinal cord level. To clarify the amount of the antispasmodic effect of repetitive TMS at other lesion levels, in particular in patients with

  11. Connectopathy in Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Review of Evidence from Visual Evoked Potentials and Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takao Yamasaki

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD show superior performance in processing fine details; however, they often exhibit impairments of gestalt face, global motion perception, and visual attention as well as core social deficits. Increasing evidence has suggested that social deficits in ASD arise from abnormal functional and structural connectivities between and within distributed cortical networks that are recruited during social information processing. Because the human visual system is characterized by a set of parallel, hierarchical, multistage network systems, we hypothesized that the altered connectivity of visual networks contributes to social cognition impairment in ASD. In the present review, we focused on studies of altered connectivity of visual and attention networks in ASD using visual evoked potentials (VEPs, event-related potentials (ERPs, and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI. A series of VEP, ERP, and DTI studies conducted in our laboratory have demonstrated complex alterations (impairment and enhancement of visual and attention networks in ASD. Recent data have suggested that the atypical visual perception observed in ASD is caused by altered connectivity within parallel visual pathways and attention networks, thereby contributing to the impaired social communication observed in ASD. Therefore, we conclude that the underlying pathophysiological mechanism of ASD constitutes a “connectopathy.”

  12. Comparison of brain and spinal cord magnetic resonance imaging features in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders patients with or without aquaporin-4 antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Moli; Fu, Ying; Su, Lei; Shen, Yi; Wood, Kristofer; Yang, Li; Liu, Yaou; Shi, Fu-Dong

    2017-04-01

    The spinal cord and brain measurements are rarely investigated in neuromyelitis optica (NMO) patients with and without antibodies to aquaporin-4 (AQP4), directly compared to multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. To investigate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of both brain and spinal cord in NMO patients with and without antibodies to AQP4, compared with MS patients and healthy controls (HC). We recruited 55 NMO including 30 AQP4 (+) and 25 AQP4 (-), 25 MS and 25 HC. Brain and spinal cord MRIs were obtained for each participant. Brain lesions (BL), whole brain and deep grey matter volumes (DGMV), white matter diffusion metrics and spinal cord lesions were measured and compared among groups. The incidence of BL was lower in the AQP4 (+) group than in the AQP4 (-) and MS groups (p<0.05). In the AQP4 (+) group, there was a lower incidence of infratentorial lesions (ITL) and higher spinal cord lesions length than in the MS group (p<0.05). The thalamic and hippocampal volumes were smaller in the AQP4 (-) group and MS group than in the HC group (p<0.05). The NMO patients with AQP4 (-) showed higher prevalence of BL, ITL, and similar spinal cord lesion length, compared to AQP4 (+), and demonstrated deep grey matter atrophy, suggesting an intermediate phenotype between that of typical MS and NMO. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Significance of T2 weighted image on magnetic resonance. Imaging in diagnosis of acute cervical cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Isao; Kitahara, Takao; Endo, Masataka; Ohwada, Takashi

    1999-01-01

    Thirty-eight patients with acute cervical cord injury with neurological deficit were examined within 72 hours of injury by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This study evaluated early MRI as a neurological status and prognostic indicator of the eventual neurological outcome. The neurological status was determined using Frankel classification at admission and follow-up examination. Three different patterns of T2 weighted image (T2WI) on MRI were observed in these patients: 7 patients (Frankel A in all) had coexistence of low and high signal (mixed type); 9 (A in 3, B in 5, C in one) had high signal over more than one spinal segment (diffuse high type); 14 (A in 5, B in 3, C in 6) had high signal within one spinal segment (local high type); 8 (C in 6, D in 2) had no abnormality (normal type). At follow-up examination, the improvement rate was 14.3% for mixed type, 33.3% for diffuse high type, 78.6% for local high type and 100% for normal type. These studies suggest that the early MRI is very useful in the diagnosis of acute cervical cord injury and in predicting neurological recovery. (author)

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of intramedullary meningioma of the spinal cord: case report and review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Covert, S.; Gandhi, D.; Goyal, M.; Woulfe, J.; Belanger, E.; Miller, W.; Modha, A.

    2003-01-01

    Intramedullary meningioma of the spinal cord is an extremely rare tumour. To the best of our knowledge, only 4 cases have been reported in the English literature, and limited information on imaging features is available. We present a further case and review the literature on this entity. Meningiomas are among the most common tumours that occur in the spinal canal, representing about 25% of all adult intraspinal tumours. They are commonly found in the thoracic segment of the spine and are most often intradural-extramedullary. Their location is explained by the way in which they develop. Meningiomas are derived from persistent arachnoid cell remnants in the spinal coverings, most commonly from arachnoid. They are usually adherent to, but do not arise from, dura. We present a case of intramedullary meningioma, a rare clinical entity, discuss the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and review the 4 cases that have been previously reported. (author)

  15. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with extension of the central canal of the spinal cord according to magnetic resonance imaging data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. G. Mendelevich

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes an atypical case of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS concurrent with extension of the central canal – hydromyelia.Diagnostic difficulty is due to the presence of symptoms which are atypical for ALS, such as early age of onset, slow progression with long-term involvement of one leg, as well as extension of the central canal of the spinal cord at the level of TIII-IX bodies, as evidenced by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. The paper presents a clinical case, a review of current literature on the clinical and MRI signs of ALS and on the differential diagnosis of motor neuron disease.

  16. Clinical neurophysiology in the prognosis and monitoring of traumatic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curt, A; Ellaway, P H

    2012-01-01

    Preclinical studies for the repair of spinal cord injury (SCI) and potential therapies for accessing the inherent plasticity of the central nervous system (CNS) to promote recovery of function are currently moving into the translational stage. These emerging clinical trials of therapeutic interventions for the repair of SCI require improved assessment techniques and quantitative outcome measures to supplement the American Spinal Injuries Association (ASIA) Impairment Scales. This chapter attempts to identify those electrophysiological techniques that show the most promise for provision of objective and quantitative measures of sensory, motor, and autonomic function in SCI. Reviewed are: (1) somatosensory evoked potentials, including dermatomal somatosensory evoked potentials, and the electrical perceptual threshold as tests of the dorsal (posterior) column pathway; (2) laser evoked potentials and contact heat evoked potentials as tests of the anterior spinothalamic tract; (3) motor evoked potentials in limb muscles, in response to transcranial magnetic stimulation of the motor cortex as tests of the corticospinal tract, and the application of the technique to assessment of trunk and sphincter muscles; and (4) the sympathetic skin response as a test of spinal cord access to the sympathetic chain. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation with Intermittent Theta Burst Stimulation Alters Corticospinal Output in Patients with Chronic Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hunter J. Fassett

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS is intended primarily to alter corticospinal excitability, creating an attractive opportunity to alter neural output following incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI. This study is the first to assess the effects of iTBS in SCI. Eight individuals with chronic incomplete SCI were studied. Sham or real iTBS was delivered (to each participant over primary motor and somatosensory cortices in separate sessions. Motor-evoked potential (MEP recruitment curves were obtained from the flexor carpi radialis muscle before and after iTBS. Results indicate similar responses for iTBS to both motor and somatosensory cortex and reduced MEPs in 56.25% and increased MEPs in 25% of instances. Sham stimulation exceeded real iTBS effects in the remaining 18.25%. It is our opinion that observing short-term neuroplasticity in corticospinal output in chronic SCI is an important advance and should be tested in future studies as an opportunity to improve function in this population. We emphasize the need to re-consider the importance of the direction of MEP change following a single session of iTBS since the relationship between MEP direction and motor function is unknown and multiple sessions of iTBS may yield very different directional results. Furthermore, we highlight the importance of including sham control in the experimental design. The fundamental point from this pilot research is that a single session of iTBS is often capable of creating short-term change in SCI. Future sham-controlled randomized trials may consider repeat iTBS sessions to promote long-term changes in corticospinal excitability.

  18. The dynamic evaluation of the cervical spinal canal and spinal cord by magnetic resonance imaging during movement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koschorek, F.; Jensen, H.P.; Terwey, B.

    1987-01-01

    The authors present results of in vivo measurements of the cervical canal and spinal cord. They indicate that tension in the spinal cord increases during flexion. They conclude that, as the dorsal approach avoids this increased tension of the spinal cord, the surgical treatment in chronic cervical myelopathy using this route seems to be preferable

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of syrinx cavity. Differentiation between syrinx with spinal cord tumor and without tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, Teruo; Inoue, Yuichi; Nemoto, Yutaka

    1987-12-01

    Syrinx cavity may result from a number of intramedullary tumors or non-neoplastic conditions such as Chiari malformation, trauma and meningitis. The surgical procedure to repair the syrinx is quite different between the cases with spinal cord tumor and without tumor. Therefore, it is important to determine whether syrinx is associated with tumor or not before surgery. We reviewed MR images of 26 cases with syrinx cavity; 20 of which were not associated with tumor (12 Chiari malformation, 5 trauma, 1 meningitis, 1 hydrocephalus, 1 idiopathic) and 6 of which were associated with intramedullary tumor (3 ependymoma, 2 astrocytoma, 1 hemangioendothelioma). The syrinx showed low signal in all 26 cases on T1 weighted images (SE 600/40). All 6 cases with syrinx associated with intramedullary tumor showed high intensity on T2 weighted images (SE 2000/120). On the other hand, the syrinx of 19 of 20 cases with no tumor condition showed reduced intensity on T2 weighted images. Only one post-traumatic small syrinx showed high signal. This was quite different between the cases with spinal cord tumor and without tumor. Therefore, when the syrinx cavity shows high signal on T2 weighted images, an intramedullary tumor is strongly suggested.

  20. Effect of inter-train interval on the induction of repetition suppression of motor-evoked potentials using transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minna Pitkänen

    Full Text Available Repetition suppression (RS is evident as a weakened response to repeated stimuli after the initial response. RS has been demonstrated in motor-evoked potentials (MEPs induced with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS. Here, we investigated the effect of inter-train interval (ITI on the induction of RS of MEPs with the attempt to optimize the investigative protocols. Trains of TMS pulses, targeted to the primary motor cortex by neuronavigation, were applied at a stimulation intensity of 120% of the resting motor threshold. The stimulus trains included either four or twenty pulses with an inter-stimulus interval (ISI of 1 s. The ITI was here defined as the interval between the last pulse in a train and the first pulse in the next train; the ITIs used here were 1, 3, 4, 6, 7, 12, and 17 s. RS was observed with all ITIs except with the ITI of 1 s, in which the ITI was equal to ISI. RS was more pronounced with longer ITIs. Shorter ITIs may not allow sufficient time for a return to baseline. RS may reflect a startle-like response to the first pulse of a train followed by habituation. Longer ITIs may allow more recovery time and in turn demonstrate greater RS. Our results indicate that RS can be studied with confidence at relatively short ITIs of 6 s and above.

  1. Artifact correction and source analysis of early electroencephalographic responses evoked by transcranial magnetic stimulation over primary motor cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvak, Vladimir; Komssi, Soile; Scherg, Michael; Hoechstetter, Karsten; Classen, Joseph; Zaaroor, Menashe; Pratt, Hillel; Kahkonen, Seppo

    2007-08-01

    Analyzing the brain responses to transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) using electroencephalography (EEG) is a promising method for the assessment of functional cortical connectivity and excitability of areas accessible to this stimulation. However, until now it has been difficult to analyze the EEG responses during the several tens of milliseconds immediately following the stimulus due to TMS-induced artifacts. In the present study we show that by combining a specially adapted recording system with software artifact correction it is possible to remove a major part of the artifact and analyze the cortical responses as early as 10 ms after TMS. We used this methodology to examine responses of left and right primary motor cortex (M1) to TMS at different intensities. Based on the artifact-corrected data we propose a model for the cortical activation following M1 stimulation. The model revealed the same basic response sequence for both hemispheres. A large part of the response could be accounted for by two sources: a source close to the stimulation site (peaking approximately 15 ms after the stimulus) and a midline frontal source ipsilateral to the stimulus (peaking approximately 25 ms). In addition the model suggests responses in ipsilateral temporo-parietal junction areas (approximately 35 ms) and ipsilateral (approximately 30 ms) and middle (approximately 50 ms) cerebellum. Statistical analysis revealed significant dependence on stimulation intensity for the ipsilateral midline frontal source. The methodology developed in the present study paves the way for the detailed study of early responses to TMS in a wide variety of brain areas.

  2. A Case of Adult-Onset Alexander Disease Featuring Severe Atrophy of the Medulla Oblongata and Upper Cervical Cord on Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonezu, Tadahiro; Ito, Shoichi; Kanai, Kazuaki; Masuda, Saeko; Shibuya, Kazumoto; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    Adult-onset Alexander disease (AOAD) has been increasingly recognized since the identification of the glial fibrillary acidic protein gene mutation in 2001. We report on a 56-year-old man who was genetically confirmed as AOAD with the glial fibrillary acidic protein mutation of p.M74T. He developed spastic tetraparesis, sensory disturbances in four limbs, and mild cognitive impairment without apparent dysarthria and dysphagia. The case was characterized by severe atrophy of the medulla oblongata and upper cervical cord with intramedullary signal intensity changes on magnetic resonance imaging. While AOAD is diverse in clinical presentation, the peculiar magnetic resonance imaging findings of marked atrophy of the medulla oblongata and cervical cord are thought to be highly suggestive of the diagnosis of AOAD. PMID:23185175

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of the normal and chronically injured adult rat spinal cord in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guizar-Sahagun, G.; Rivera, F.; Babinski, E.; Berlanga, E.; Madrazo, M.; Franco-Bourland, R.; Grijalva, I.; Gonzalez, J.; Contreras, B.; Madrazo, I.

    1994-01-01

    We assessed the capacity of MRI to show and characterise the spinal cord (SC) in vivo in normal and chronically injured adult rats. In the chronically injured animals the SC was studied by MRI and histological examination. MRI was performed at 1.5 T, using gradient-echo and spin-echo (SE) sequences, the latter with and without gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA). Several positions were tried for good alignment and to diminish interference by respiratory movements. Images of the SC were obtained in sagittal, coronal, and axial planes. Normal SC was observed as a continuous intensity in both sequences, although contrast resolution was better using SE; it was not possible to differentiate the grey and white matter. Low signal was seen in the damaged area in chronically injured rats, which corresponded to cysts, trabeculae, mononuclear infiltrate, and fibroglial wall on histological examination. Gd-DTPA failed to enhance the SC in normal or chronically injured rats. It did, however, cause enhancement of the lesion after acute SC injury. (orig.)

  4. Spinal cord stimulation modulates cerebral neurobiology: a proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moens, Maarten [Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Department of Neurosurgery and Center for Neuroscience, Brussels (Belgium); Marien, Peter [ZNA Middelheim General Hospital, Department of Neurology, Antwerp (Belgium); Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Department of Clinical and Experimental Neurolinguistics, Brussels (Belgium); Brouns, Raf; Smedt, Ann de [Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Neurology and Center for Neuroscience, Brussels (Belgium); Poelaert, Jan [Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Anesthesiology, Brussels (Belgium); Buyl, Ronald [Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Department of Biostatistics and Medical Informatics, Brussels (Belgium); Droogmans, Steven [Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Cardiology, Brussels (Belgium); Schuerbeek, Peter van [Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Radiology, Brussels (Belgium); Sunaert, Stefan [Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Department of Radiology, UZ Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Nuttin, Bart [Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Neurosurgery, UZ Leuven, Leuven (Belgium)

    2013-08-15

    Although spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is a widely used treatment for chronic neuropathic pain secondary to spinal surgery, little is known about the underlying physiological mechanisms. The primary aim of this study is to investigate the neural substrate underlying short-term SCS by means of {sup 1}H MR spectroscopy with short echo time, in 20 patients with failed back surgery syndrome. Marked increase of {gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and decrease in glucose in the ipsilateral thalamus were found between baseline situation without SCS and after 9' of SCS, indicating the key role of the ipsilateral thalamus as a mediator of chronic neuropathic pain. In addition, this study also showed a progressive decrease in glucose in the ipsilateral thalamus over time, which is in line with the findings of previous studies reporting deactivation in the ipsilateral thalamic region. The observation of GABA increase and glucose decrease over time in the ipsilateral thalamus may be the causal mechanism of the pain relief due to SCS or an epiphenomenon. (orig.)

  5. Spinal cord stimulation modulates cerebral neurobiology: a proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moens, Maarten; Marien, Peter; Brouns, Raf; Smedt, Ann de; Poelaert, Jan; Buyl, Ronald; Droogmans, Steven; Schuerbeek, Peter van; Sunaert, Stefan; Nuttin, Bart

    2013-01-01

    Although spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is a widely used treatment for chronic neuropathic pain secondary to spinal surgery, little is known about the underlying physiological mechanisms. The primary aim of this study is to investigate the neural substrate underlying short-term SCS by means of 1 H MR spectroscopy with short echo time, in 20 patients with failed back surgery syndrome. Marked increase of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and decrease in glucose in the ipsilateral thalamus were found between baseline situation without SCS and after 9' of SCS, indicating the key role of the ipsilateral thalamus as a mediator of chronic neuropathic pain. In addition, this study also showed a progressive decrease in glucose in the ipsilateral thalamus over time, which is in line with the findings of previous studies reporting deactivation in the ipsilateral thalamic region. The observation of GABA increase and glucose decrease over time in the ipsilateral thalamus may be the causal mechanism of the pain relief due to SCS or an epiphenomenon. (orig.)

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of the normal and chronically injured adult rat spinal cord in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guizar-Sahagun, G [Centro de Investigacion del Proyecto Camina, Mexico City (Mexico) Dept. of Clinical Research in Neurology and Neurosurgery, Hospital de Especialidades, Centro Medico Nacional Siglo XXI, Inst. Mexicano del Seguro Social, Mexico City (Mexico); Rivera, F [Centro de Investigacion del Proyecto Camina, Mexico City (Mexico); Babinski, E [Centro de Investigacion del Proyecto Camina, Mexico City (Mexico); Berlanga, E [Dept. of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Hospital Angeles del Pedregal, Mexico City (Mexico); Madrazo, M [Dept. of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Hospital Angeles del Pedregal, Mexico City (Mexico); Franco-Bourland, R [Centro de Investigacion del Proyecto Camina, Mexico City (Mexico) Dept. of Biochemistry, Inst. Nacional de la Nutricion, Mexico City (Mexico); Grijalva, I [Centro de Investigacion del Proyecto Camina, Mexico City (Mexico) Dept. of Clinical Research in Neurology and Neurosurgery, Hospital de Especialidades, Centro Medico Nacional Siglo

    1994-08-01

    We assessed the capacity of MRI to show and characterise the spinal cord (SC) in vivo in normal and chronically injured adult rats. In the chronically injured animals the SC was studied by MRI and histological examination. MRI was performed at 1.5 T, using gradient-echo and spin-echo (SE) sequences, the latter with and without gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA). Several positions were tried for good alignment and to diminish interference by respiratory movements. Images of the SC were obtained in sagittal, coronal, and axial planes. Normal SC was observed as a continuous intensity in both sequences, although contrast resolution was better using SE; it was not possible to differentiate the grey and white matter. Low signal was seen in the damaged area in chronically injured rats, which corresponded to cysts, trabeculae, mononuclear infiltrate, and fibroglial wall on histological examination. Gd-DTPA failed to enhance the SC in normal or chronically injured rats. It did, however, cause enhancement of the lesion after acute SC injury. (orig.)

  7. Establishing ¹H nuclear magnetic resonance based metabonomics fingerprinting profile for spinal cord injury: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hua; Peng, Jin; Zhou, Zhi-yuan; Duan, Yu; Chen, Wei; Cai, Bin; Yang, Hao; Zhang, Wei

    2010-09-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a complex trauma that consists of multiple pathological mechanisms involving cytotoxic, oxidation stress and immune-endocrine. This study aimed to establish plasma metabonomics fingerprinting atlas for SCI using (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) based metabonomics methodology and principal component analysis techniques. Nine Sprague-Dawley (SD) male rats were randomly divided into SCI, normal and sham-operation control groups. Plasma samples were collected for (1)H NMR spectroscopy 3 days after operation. The NMR data were analyzed using principal component analysis technique with Matlab software. Metabonomics analysis was able to distinguish the three groups (SCI, normal control, sham-operation). The fingerprinting atlas indicated that, compared with those without SCI, the SCI group demonstrated the following characteristics with regard to second principal component: it is made up of fatty acids, myc-inositol, arginine, very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), triglyceride (TG), glucose, and 3-methyl-histamine. The data indicated that SCI results in several significant changes in plasma metabolism early on and that a metabonomics approach based on (1)H NMR spectroscopy can provide a metabolic profile comprising several metabolite classes and allow for relative quantification of such changes. The results also provided support for further development and application of metabonomics technologies for studying SCI and for the utilization of multivariate models for classifying the extent of trauma within an individual.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging susceptibility artifacts in the cervical vertebrae and spinal cord related to monocortical screw-polymethylmethacrylate implants in canine cadavers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Brian G; Fosgate, Geoffrey T; Green, Eric M; Habing, Amy M; Hettlich, Bianca F

    2017-04-01

    OBJECTIVE To characterize and compare MRI susceptibility artifacts related to titanium and stainless steel monocortical screws in the cervical vertebrae and spinal cord of canine cadavers. SAMPLE 12 canine cadavers. PROCEDURES Cervical vertebrae (C4 and C5) were surgically stabilized with titanium or stainless steel monocortical screws and polymethylmethacrylate. Routine T1-weighted, T2-weighted, and short tau inversion recovery sequences were performed at 3.0 T. Magnetic susceptibility artifacts in 20 regions of interest (ROIs) across 4 contiguous vertebrae (C3 through C6) were scored by use of an established scoring system. RESULTS Artifact scores for stainless steel screws were significantly greater than scores for titanium screws at 18 of 20 ROIs. Artifact scores for titanium screws were significantly higher for spinal cord ROIs within the implanted vertebrae. Artifact scores for stainless steel screws at C3 were significantly less than at the other 3 cervical vertebrae. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Evaluation of routine MRI sequences obtained at 3.0 T revealed that susceptibility artifacts related to titanium monocortical screws were considered mild and should not hinder the overall clinical assessment of the cervical vertebrae and spinal cord. However, mild focal artifacts may obscure small portions of the spinal cord or intervertebral discs immediately adjacent to titanium screws. Severe artifacts related to stainless steel screws were more likely to result in routine MRI sequences being nondiagnostic; however, artifacts may be mitigated by implant positioning.

  9. Highly efficient magnetic targeting of mesenchymal stem cells in spinal cord injury

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vaněček, Václav; Zablotskyy, Vitaliy A.; Forostyak, Serhiy; Růžička, Jiří; Herynek, V.; Babič, Michal; Jendelová, Pavla; Kubinová, Šárka; Dejneka, Alexandr; Syková, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 7, 16 Jul (2012), s. 3719-3730 E-ISSN 1178-2013 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/12/1370; GA ČR GAP304/11/0731; GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/11/0189; GA ČR GAP304/11/0653; GA AV ČR IAA500390902 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703; CEZ:AV0Z10100522; CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : nanoparticles * mesenchymal stem cells * magnetic targeting Subject RIV: FH - Neurology; BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism (FZU-D); FH - Neurology (UMCH-V) Impact factor: 3.463, year: 2012

  10. Fixed cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, L.M.; DiChiro, G.; DeSouza, B.; McCullough, D.C.; McVeigh, E.; Hefffez, D.

    1989-01-01

    Pulsatile longitudinal motion of the spinal cord was examined with MR phase imaging in healthy subjects and in cases involving cord tethering and compression. Asymptomatic patients with a low conus medullaris demonstrated normal cord motion. Clinical improvement was associated with improved cord motion after surgical untethering, provided permanent neurologic damage had not occurred. Decreased and unchanged cord motion was associated with unchanged neurologic deficits. In cases of normal cord motion and possible retethering versus syringomyelia, clinical improvement occurred after shunting only. MR imaging of pulsatile cord motion can be clinically useful in the evaluation of diseases restricting motion of the neuraxis

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging study determining cord level and occupancy at thoracolumbar junction in achondroplasia - A prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitesh N Modi

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: Our results indicated high level of spinal cord in achondroplasia patients compared to nonachondroplasia individuals. High prevalence of neurological symptoms at TL level in such patients can be associated with high cord level and developing progressive kyphosis at TL level along with degenerative process.

  12. Targeted therapies using electrical and magnetic neural stimulation for the treatment of chronic pain in spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Duarte, Ingrid; Morse, Leslie R; Alam, Mahtab; Bikson, Marom; Zafonte, Ross; Fregni, Felipe

    2014-01-15

    Chronic neuropathic pain is one of the most common and disabling symptoms in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). Over two-thirds of subjects with SCI suffer from chronic pain influencing quality of life, rehabilitation, and recovery. Given the refractoriness of chronic pain to most pharmacological treatments, the majority of individuals with SCI report worsening of this condition over time. Moreover, only 4-6% of patients in this cohort report improvement. Novel treatments targeting mechanisms associated with pain-maladaptive plasticity, such as electromagnetic neural stimulation, may be desirable to improve outcomes. To date, few, small clinical trials have assessed the effects of invasive and noninvasive nervous system stimulation on pain after SCI. We aimed to review initial efficacy, safety and potential predictors of response by assessing the effects of neural stimulation techniques to treat SCI pain. A literature search was performed using the PubMed database including studies using the following targeted stimulation strategies: transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS), High Definition tDCS (HD-tDCS), repetitive Transcranial Magnetical Stimulation (rTMS), Cranial Electrotherapy Stimulation (CES), Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS), Spinal Cord Stimulation (SCS) and Motor Cortex Stimulation (MCS), published prior to June of 2012. We included studies from 1998 to 2012. Eight clinical trials and one naturalistic observational study (nine studies in total) met the inclusion criteria. Among the clinical trials, three studies assessed the effects of tDCS, two of CES, two of rTMS and one of TENS. The naturalistic study investigated the analgesic effects of SCS. No clinical trials for epidural motor cortex stimulation (MCS) or HD-tDCS were found. Parameters of stimulation and also clinical characteristics varied significantly across studies. Three out of eight studies showed larger effects sizes (0.73, 0.88 and 1.86 respectively) for pain

  13. Scent-evoked nostalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Chelsea A; Green, Jeffrey D; Wildschut, Tim; Sedikides, Constantine

    2015-01-01

    Can scents evoke nostalgia; what might be the psychological implications of such an evocation? Participants sampled 12 scents and rated the extent to which each scent was familiar, arousing and autobiographically relevant, as well as the extent to which each scent elicited nostalgia. Participants who were high (compared to low) in nostalgia proneness reported more scent-evoked nostalgia, and scents elicited greater nostalgia to the extent that they were arousing, familiar and autobiographically relevant. Scent-evoked nostalgia predicted higher levels of positive affect, self-esteem, self-continuity, optimism, social connectedness and meaning in life. In addition, scent-evoked nostalgia was characterised by more positive emotions than either non-nostalgic autobiographical memories or non-nostalgic non-autobiographical memories. Finally, scent-evoked nostalgia predicted in-the-moment feelings of personal (general or object-specific) nostalgia. The findings represent a foray into understanding the triggers and affective signature of scent-evoked nostalgia.

  14. Visual Evoked Potential and Magnetic Resonance Imaging are More Effective Markers of Multiple Sclerosis Progression than Laser Polarimetry with Variable Corneal Compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantorová, Ema; Ziak, Peter; Kurča, Egon; Koyšová, Mária; Hladká, Mária; Zeleňák, Kamil; Michalik, Jozef

    2014-01-01

    The aim of our study was to assess the role of laser polarimetry and visual evoked potentials (VEP) as potential biomarkers of disease progression in multiple sclerosis (MS). A total of 41 patients with MS (82 eyes) and 22 age-related healthy volunteers (44 eyes) completed the study. MS patients were divided into two groups, one (ON) with a history of optic neuritis (17 patients, 34 eyes) and another group (NON) without it (24 patients, 48 eyes). The MS patients and controls underwent laser polarimetry (GDx) examination of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL). In the MS group, we also examined: Kurtzke "expanded disability status scale" (EDSS), the duration of the disorder, VEP - latency and amplitude, and conventional brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Our results were statistically analyzed using ANOVA, Mann-Whitney, and Spearman correlation analyses. In the MS group, brain atrophy and new T2 brain lesions in MRI correlated with both VEP latencies and amplitudes. Separate comparisons revealed VEP latency testing to be less sensitive in ON than in NON-patients. In ON patients, VEP amplitudes correlated mildly with brain atrophy (r = -0.15) and strongly with brain new MRI lesions (r = -0.8). In NON-patients, highly significant correlation of new MRI brain lesions with VEP latencies (r = 0.63, r = 0.6) and amplitudes (r = -0.3, r = -4.2) was found. EDSS also correlated with brain atrophy in this group (r = 0.5). Our study did not find a correlation of GDx measures with MRI tests. The GDx method was not able to detect whole brain demyelinization and the degeneration process, but was only able to reveal the involvement of optic nerves in ON and NON-patients. In our study, we found that both methods (VEP and GDx) can be used for the detection of optic nerve damage, but VEP was found to be superior in evaluating whole brain demyelinization and axonal degeneration. Both VEP and MRI, but not GDx, have an important role in monitoring

  15. Prognostic value of motor evoked potentials elicited by multipulse magnetic stimulation in a surgically induced transitory lesion of the supplementary motor area: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Sala, F; Krzan, M; Jallo, G; Epstein, F; Deletis, V

    2000-01-01

    Surgery involving the supplementary motor area (SMA) places the patient at risk of transient motor deficit. To predict outcome in patients with early postoperative hypokinesis would be relevant to both the patient and the surgical team. A 15 year old girl with a large left thalamic tumour removed through a left transcallosal approach is described. Despite intraoperatively preserved muscle motor evoked potentials (mMEPs) from all limbs, elicited by multipulse electrical st...

  16. Proprioceptive evoked gamma oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnfred, S.M.; Hansen, Lars Kai; Parnas, J.

    2007-01-01

    A proprioceptive stimulus consisting of a weight change of a handheld load has recently been shown to elicit an evoked potential. Previously, somatosensory gamma oscillations have only been evoked by electrical stimuli. We conjectured that a natural proprioceptive stimulus also would be able...... to evoke gamma oscillations. EEG was recorded using 64 channels in 14 healthy subjects. In each of three runs a stimulus of 100 g load increment in each hand was presented in 120 trials. Data were wavelet transformed and runs collapsed. Inter-trial phase coherence (ITPC) was computed as the best measure...

  17. Can the acute magnetic resonance imaging features reflect neurologic prognosis in patients with cervical spinal cord injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Akinobu; Maeda, Takeshi; Mori, Eiji; Yuge, Itaru; Kawano, Osamu; Ueta, Takayoshi; Shiba, Keiichiro

    2017-09-01

    Several prognostic studies looked for an association between the degree of spinal cord injury (SCI), as depicted by primary magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) within 72 hours of injury, and neurologic outcome. It was not clearly demonstrated whether the MRI at any time correlates with neurologic prognosis. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the relationship between acute MRI features and neurologic prognosis, especially walking ability of patients with cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI). Moreover, at any point, MRI was clearly correlated with the patient's prognosis. Retrospective image study. From January 2010 to October 2015, 102 patients with CSCI were treated in our hospital. Patients who were admitted to our hospital within 3 days after injury were included in this study. The diagnosis was 78 patients for CSCI with no or minor bony injury and 24 patients for CSCI with fracture or dislocation. A total of 88 men and 14 women were recruited, and the mean patient age was 62.6 years (range, 16-86 years). Paralysis at the time of admission was graded as A in 32, B in 15, C in 42, and D in 13 patients on the basis of the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) impairment scale. Patients with CSCI with fracture or dislocation were treated with fixation surgery and those with CSCI with no or minor bony injury were treated conservatively. Patients were followed up for an average of 168 days (range, 25-496 days). Neurologic evaluation was performed using the ASIA motor score and the modified Frankel grade at the time of admission and discharge. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed for all patients at admission. Using the MRI sagittal images, we measured the vertical diameter of intramedullary high-intensity changed area with T2-weighted images at the injured segment. We studied separately the patients divided into two groups: 0-1 day admission after injury, and 2-3 days admission after injury. We evaluated the relationship between the vertical

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Shigeyuki; Hirayama, Keizo

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain was performed in a total of 45 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), comprising 27 with brain symptoms and 18 without it. The results were compared with X-ray computed tomography (CT). Some of the 45 MS patients were also examined by neurophysiological studies for comparison. MRI showed demyelinating plaques of the brain in a total of 31 patients (69%) - 20 symptomatic and 11 asymptomatic patients. For symptomatic patients, MRI was capable of detecting brain lesions in 6 (86%) of 7 acute stage patients and 14 (70%) of 20 non-acute stage patients. It was also capable of detecting brain lesions in 21 (70%) of 30 clinically definite MR patients and 10 (67%) of 15 clinically probable MS patients. Concurrently available X-ray CT revealed brain lesions in 9 symptomatic patients (33%) and one asymptomatic patient (6%). Visual evoked potentials examined in 31 patients showed abnormality in one (11%) of 9 patients without symptoms of optic neuritis and all (100%) of the other 22 patients with symptoms. In 19 evaluable patients, auditory brainstem responses were abnormal in one (11%) of 9 patients without brainstem symptoms and 3 (30%) of 10 patients with symptoms. MRI of the brain was far superior to X-ray CT, visual evoked potentials and auditory brainstem responses in detecting clinically unsuspected lesions. We proposed new diagnostic criteria including MRI findings of the brain in the Japanese MS diagnostic criteria. MRI of the spinal cord was performed in 12 MS patients with spinal cord symptoms by sagittal and coronal images. It demonstrated demyelinating lesions within the cervical and superior thoracic cord in 8 MS acute stage patients. Spinal cord lesions were longitudinally continuous as long as many spinal segments, with swelling in 6 patients and atrophy in 2 patients. MRI of spinal cord was useful in deciding superior and inferior limits of cord lesions and in visualizing cord swelling or atrophy. (Namekawa, K)

  19. Distribution of collateral fibers in the monkey cervical spinal cord detected with diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundell, Henrik; Nielsen, Jens Bo; Ptito, Maurice

    2011-01-01

    techniques. We calculate the diffusion tensor and the persistent angular structure (PAS), a multi-fiber reconstruction technique, from high quality post mortem data of a perfusion-fixed vervet monkey cervical spinal cord sample and simulated crossing fiber data. Our results show that (i) cylindrical geometry...

  20. Cord Blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Abroun

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available   Stem cells are naïve or master cells. This means they can transform into special 200 cell types as needed by body, and each of these cells has just one function. Stem cells are found in many parts of the human body, although some sources have richer concentrations than others. Some excellent sources of stem cells, such as bone marrow, peripheral blood, cord blood, other tissue stem cells and human embryos, which last one are controversial and their use can be illegal in some countries. Cord blood is a sample of blood taken from a newborn baby's umbilical cord. It is a rich source of stem cells, umbilical cord blood and tissue are collected from material that normally has no use following a child’s birth. Umbilical cord blood and tissue cells are rich sources of stem cells, which have been used in the treatment of over 80 diseases including leukemia, lymphoma and anemia as bone marrow stem cell potency.  The most common disease category has been leukemia. The next largest group is inherited diseases. Patients with lymphoma, myelodysplasia and severe aplastic anemia have also been successfully transplanted with cord blood. Cord blood is obtained by syringing out the placenta through the umbilical cord at the time of childbirth, after the cord has been detached from the newborn. Collecting stem cells from umbilical blood and tissue is ethical, pain-free, safe and simple. When they are needed to treat your child later in life, there will be no rejection or incompatibility issues, as the procedure will be using their own cells. In contrast, stem cells from donors do have these potential problems. By consider about cord blood potency, cord blood banks (familial or public were established. In IRAN, four cord blood banks has activity, Shariati BMT center cord blood bank, Royan familial cord blood banks, Royan public cord blood banks and Iranian Blood Transfusion Organ cord blood banks. Despite 50,000 sample which storage in these banks, but the

  1. Early impairment of somatosensory evoked potentials in very young children with achondroplasia with foramen magnum stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornarino, Stefania; Rossi, Daniela Paola; Severino, Mariasavina; Pistorio, Angela; Allegri, Anna Elsa Maria; Martelli, Simona; Doria Lamba, Laura; Lanteri, Paola

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate the contribution of somatosensory evoked potentials after median nerve (MN-SEPs) and posterior tibial nerve (PTN-SEPs) stimulation in functional assessment of cervical and lumbar spinal stenosis in children with achondroplasia. We reviewed MN-SEPs, PTN-SEPs, and spinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations performed in 58 patients with achondroplasia (25 males, 33 females; age range 21d-16y 10mo; mean age 4y 3mo [SD 4y 1mo]). Patients were subdivided into four age categories: achondroplasia, the cortical component of PTN-SEPs is more sensitive than the cortical component and central conduction time of MN-SEPs in detection of cervical spinal cord compression at early ages. © 2016 Mac Keith Press.

  2. Cortical somatosensory-evoked potentials during spine surgery in patients with neuromuscular and idiopathic scoliosis under propofol-remifentanil anaesthesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermanns, H.; Lipfert, P.; Meier, S.; Jetzek-Zader, M.; Krauspe, R.; Stevens, M. F.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intraoperative monitoring of the spinal cord via cortical somatosensory-evoked potentials (SSEP) is a routine during spinal surgery. However, especially in neuromuscular scoliosis, the reliability of cortical SSEP has been questioned. Therefore, we compared the feasibility of cortical

  3. Radiation-induced myelopathy in long-term surviving metastatic spinal cord compression patients after hypofractionated radiotherapy: a clinical and magnetic resonance imaging analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maranzano, Ernesto; Bellavita, Rita; Floridi, Piero; Celani, Grazia; Righetti, Enrico; Lupattelli, Marco; Panizza, Bianca Moira; Frattegiani, Alessandro; Pelliccioli, Gian Piero; Latini, Paolo

    2001-01-01

    Background and purpose: Hypofractionated radiotherapy is often administered in metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC), but no studies have been published on the incidence of radiation-induced myelopathy (RIM) in long-term surviving patients. Our report addresses this topic. Patients and methods: Of 465 consecutive MSCC patients submitted to radiotherapy between 1988 and 1997, 13 live patients (seven females, six males, median age 69 years, median follow-up 69 months) surviving for 2 years or more were retrospectively reviewed to evaluate RIM. All patients underwent radiotherapy. Eight patients underwent a short-course regimen of 8 Gy, with 7 days rest, and then another 8 Gy. Five patients underwent a split-course regimen of 5 Gy x3, 4 days rest, and then 3 Gy x5. Only one patient also underwent laminectomy. Full neurological examination and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed. Results: Of 12 patients submitted to radiotherapy alone, 11 were ambulant (eight without support and three with support) with good bladder function. In nine of these 11 patients, MRI was negative; in one case MRI evidenced an in-field relapse 30 months after the end of radiotherapy, and in the other, two new MSCC foci outside the irradiated spine. In the remaining patient RIM was suspected at 18 months after radiotherapy when the patient became paraplegic and cystoplegic, and magnetic resonance images evidenced an ischemic injury in the irradiated area. The only patient treated with surgery plus postoperative radiotherapy worsened and remained paraparetic. Magnetic resonance images showed cord atrophy at the surgical level, explained as an ischemic necrosis due to surgery injury. Conclusions: On the grounds of our data regarding RIM in long-term surviving MSCC patients, we believe that a hypofractionated radiotherapy regimen can be used for the majority of patients. For a minority of patients, more protracted radiation regimens could be considered

  4. Spinal cord stimulation: Background and clinical application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Kaare

    2014-01-01

    a number of contacts capable of delivering a weak electrical current to the spinal cord, evoking a feeling of peripheral paresthesia. With correct indication and if implanted by an experienced implanter, success rates generally are in the range of about 50–75%. Common indications include complex regional...

  5. Adverse Weather Evokes Nostalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tilburg, Wijnand A P; Sedikides, Constantine; Wildschut, Tim

    2018-03-01

    Four studies examined the link between adverse weather and the palliative role of nostalgia. We proposed and tested that (a) adverse weather evokes nostalgia (Hypothesis 1); (b) adverse weather causes distress, which predicts elevated nostalgia (Hypothesis 2); (c) preventing nostalgia exacerbates weather-induced distress (Hypothesis 3); and (d) weather-evoked nostalgia confers psychological benefits (Hypothesis 4). In Study 1, participants listened to recordings of wind, thunder, rain, and neutral sounds. Adverse weather evoked nostalgia. In Study 2, participants kept a 10-day diary recording weather conditions, distress, and nostalgia. We also obtained meteorological data. Adverse weather perceptions were positively correlated with distress, which predicted higher nostalgia. Also, adverse natural weather was associated with corresponding weather perceptions, which predicted elevated nostalgia. (Results were mixed for rain.) In Study 3, preventing nostalgia (via cognitive load) increased weather-evoked distress. In Study 4, weather-evoked nostalgia was positively associated with psychological benefits. The findings pioneer the relevance of nostalgia as source of comfort in adverse weather.

  6. A novel cortical target to enhance hand motor output in humans with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jinyi; Federico, Paolo; Perez, Monica A

    2017-06-01

    A main goal of rehabilitation strategies in humans with spinal cord injury is to strengthen transmission in spared neural networks. Although neuromodulatory strategies have targeted different sites within the central nervous system to restore motor function following spinal cord injury, the role of cortical targets remain poorly understood. Here, we use 180 pairs of transcranial magnetic stimulation for ∼30 min over the hand representation of the motor cortex at an interstimulus interval mimicking the rhythmicity of descending late indirect (I) waves in corticospinal neurons (4.3 ms; I-wave protocol) or at an interstimulus interval in-between I-waves (3.5 ms; control protocol) on separate days in a randomized order. Late I-waves are thought to arise from trans-synaptic cortical inputs and have a crucial role in the recruitment of spinal motor neurons following spinal cord injury. Motor evoked potentials elicited by transcranial magnetic stimulation, paired-pulse intracortical inhibition, spinal motor neuron excitability (F-waves), index finger abduction force and electromyographic activity as well as a hand dexterity task were measured before and after both protocols in 15 individuals with chronic incomplete cervical spinal cord injury and 17 uninjured participants. We found that motor evoked potentials size increased in spinal cord injury and uninjured participants after the I-wave but not the control protocol for ∼30 to 60 min after the stimulation. Intracortical inhibition decreased and F-wave amplitude and persistence increased after the I-wave but not the control protocol, suggesting that cortical and subcortical networks contributed to changes in corticospinal excitability. Importantly, hand motor output and hand dexterity increased in individuals with spinal cord injury after the I-wave protocol. These results provide the first evidence that late synaptic input to corticospinal neurons may represent a novel therapeutic target for improving motor function

  7. Direct detection of a single evoked action potential with MRS in Lumbricus terrestris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poplawsky, Alexander J; Dingledine, Raymond; Hu, Xiaoping P

    2012-01-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) measures neural activity indirectly by detecting the signal change associated with the hemodynamic response following brain activation. In order to alleviate the temporal and spatial specificity problems associated with fMRI, a number of attempts have been made to detect neural magnetic fields (NMFs) with MRI directly, but have thus far provided conflicting results. In this study, we used MR to detect axonal NMFs in the median giant fiber of the earthworm, Lumbricus terrestris, by examining the free induction decay (FID) with a sampling interval of 0.32 ms. The earthworm nerve cords were isolated from the vasculature and stimulated at the threshold of action potential generation. FIDs were acquired shortly after the stimulation, and simultaneous field potential recordings identified the presence or absence of single evoked action potentials. FIDs acquired when the stimulus did not evoke an action potential were summed as background. The phase of the background-subtracted FID exhibited a systematic change, with a peak phase difference of (-1.2 ± 0.3) × 10(-5) radians occurring at a time corresponding to the timing of the action potential. In addition, we calculated the possible changes in the FID magnitude and phase caused by a simulated action potential using a volume conductor model. The measured phase difference matched the theoretical prediction well in both amplitude and temporal characteristics. This study provides the first evidence for the direct detection of a magnetic field from an evoked action potential using MR. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Evoked acoustic emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elberling, C; Parbo, J; Johnsen, N J

    1985-01-01

    Stimulated acoustic emissions were recorded in response to tonal stimuli at 60 dB p.e. SPL in a small group of normal-hearing adults. Power spectral analysis reveals that the evoked activity from each ear contains energy in preferential frequency bands and the change of stimulus frequency has only...

  9. Diagnostic Use of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Psychiatry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Bolu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Motor evoked potentials from peripheral nerves, spinal cord or muscle can be recorded by stimulation of the motor cortex and motor pathways in the central nervous system with transcranial magnetic stimulation which is a neurophysiological analysis method. This method allows investigation the mechanism of diseases which cause changes in the excitability of cortical motor areas. Similarly, it was used in determining the effects of psychotropic drugs on cortical activity and electrophysiological measurement of aggressive behavior Transcranial magnetic stimulation studies in the field of psychiatry are focused on etiopathogenesis of pathologies such as schizophrenia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and substance abuse.

  10. Visual evoked potential and magnetic resonance imaging are more effective markers of multiple sclerosis progression than laser polarimetry with variable corneal compensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ema eKantorová

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Backround: The aim of our study was to assess the role of laser polarimetry and visual evoked potentials as potential biomarkers of disease progression in multiple sclerosis (MS. Participants: A total of 41 patients with MS (82 eyes and 22 age-related healthy volunteers (44 eyes completed the study. MS patients were divided into two groups, one (ON with a history of optic neuritis (17 patients, 34 eyes and another group (NON without it (24 patients, 48 eyes. The MS patients and controls underwent laser polarimetry (GDx examination of the retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL. In the MS group we also examined: Kurtzke Expanded disability status scale (EDSS, the duration of the disorder, visual evoked potentials (VEP – latency and amplitude – and conventional brain MRI. Results: In the MS group, brain atrophy and new T2 brain lesions in MRI correlated with both VEP latencies and amplitudes. Separate comparisons revealed VEP latency testing to be less sensitive in ON than in NON patients. In ON patients, VEP amplitudes correlated mildly with brain atrophy (r =-0.15 and strongly with brain new MRI lesions (r = -0.8. In NON patients, highly significant correlation of new MRI brain lesions with VEP latencies (r = 0.63, r = 0.6, and amplitudes ( r = -0.3, r = -4.2 was found. EDSS also correlated with brain atrophy in this group (r = 0.5. Our study did not find a correlation of GDx measures with MRI tests. The GDx method was not able to detect whole brain demyelinisation and the degeneration process, but was only able to reveal the involvement of optic nerves in ON and NON patients.Conclusions: In our study, we found that both methods (VEP and GDx can be used for detection of optic nerve damage, but VEP was found to be superior in evaluating whole brain demyelinisation and axonal degeneration. Both VEP and MRI, but not GDx, have an important role in monitoring disease progression in MS patients, independent of the ON history.

  11. [Recommendations for the clinical use of motor evoked potentials in multiple sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, V; Valls-Sole, J; Relova, J L; Raguer, N; Miralles, F; Dinca, L; Taramundi, S; Costa-Frossard, L; Ferrandiz, M; Ramió-Torrentà, Ll; Villoslada, P; Saiz, A; Calles, C; Antigüedad, A; Alvarez-Cermeño, J C; Prieto, J M; Izquierdo, G; Montalbán, X; Fernández, O

    2013-09-01

    To establish clinical guidelines for the clinical use and interpretation of motor evoked potentials (MEP) in diagnosing and monitoring patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Recommendations for MEP use and interpretation will help us rationalise and optimise resources used in MS patient diagnosis and follow up. We completed an extensive literature review and pooled our own data to produce a consensus statement with recommendations for the clinical use of MEPs in the study of MS. MEPs, in addition to spinal and cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), help us diagnose and assess MS patients whose disease initially presents as spinal cord syndrome and those with non-specific brain MRI findings, or a normal brain MRI and clinical signs of MS. Whenever possible, a multimodal evoked potential study should be performed on patients with suspected MS in order to demonstrate involvement of the motor pathway which supports a diagnosis of dissemination in space. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Non-invasive modulation of somatosensory evoked potentials by the application of static magnetic fields over the primary and supplementary motor cortices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirimoto, Hikari; Asao, Akihiko; Tamaki, Hiroyuki; Onishi, Hideaki

    2016-10-04

    This study was performed to investigate the possibility of non-invasive modulation of SEPs by the application of transcranial static magnetic field stimulation (tSMS) over the primary motor cortex (M1) and supplementary motor cortex (SMA), and to measure the strength of the NdFeB magnetic field by using a gaussmeter. An NdFeB magnet or a non-magnetic stainless steel cylinder (for sham stimulation) was settled on the scalp over M1 and SMA of 14 subjects for periods of 15 min. SEPs following right median nerve stimulation were recorded before and immediately after, 5 min after, and 10 min after tSMS from sites C3' and F3. Amplitudes of the N33 component of SEPs at C3' significantly decreased immediately after tSMS over M1 by up to 20%. However, tSMS over the SMA did not affect the amplitude of any of the SEP components. At a distance of 2-3 cm (rough depth of the cortex), magnetic field strength was in the range of 110-190 mT. Our results that tSMS over M1 can reduce the amplitude of SEPs are consistent with those of low-frequency repeated TMS and cathodal tDCS studies. Therefore, tSMS could be a useful tool for modulating cortical somatosensory processing.

  13. Umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells labeled with multimodal iron oxide nanoparticles with fluorescent and magnetic properties: application for in vivo cell tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibov, Tatiana T; Pavon, Lorena F; Miyaki, Liza A; Mamani, Javier B; Nucci, Leopoldo P; Alvarim, Larissa T; Silveira, Paulo H; Marti, Luciana C; Gamarra, LF

    2014-01-01

    Here we describe multimodal iron oxide nanoparticles conjugated to Rhodamine-B (MION-Rh), their stability in culture medium, and subsequent validation of an in vitro protocol to label mesenchymal stem cells from umbilical cord blood (UC-MSC) with MION-Rh. These cells showed robust labeling in vitro without impairment of their functional properties, the viability of which were evaluated by proliferation kinetic and ultrastructural analyzes. Thus, labeled cells were infused into striatum of adult male rats of animal model that mimic late onset of Parkinson’s disease and, after 15 days, it was observed that cells migrated along the medial forebrain bundle to the substantia nigra as hypointense spots in T2 magnetic resonance imaging. These data were supported by short-term magnetic resonance imaging. Studies were performed in vivo, which showed that about 5 × 105 cells could be efficiently detected in the short term following infusion. Our results indicate that these labeled cells can be efficiently tracked in a neurodegenerative disease model. PMID:24531365

  14. Umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells labeled with multimodal iron oxide nanoparticles with fluorescent and magnetic properties: application for in vivo cell tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibov, Tatiana T; Pavon, Lorena F; Miyaki, Liza A; Mamani, Javier B; Nucci, Leopoldo P; Alvarim, Larissa T; Silveira, Paulo H; Marti, Luciana C; Gamarra, Lf

    2014-01-01

    Here we describe multimodal iron oxide nanoparticles conjugated to Rhodamine-B (MION-Rh), their stability in culture medium, and subsequent validation of an in vitro protocol to label mesenchymal stem cells from umbilical cord blood (UC-MSC) with MION-Rh. These cells showed robust labeling in vitro without impairment of their functional properties, the viability of which were evaluated by proliferation kinetic and ultrastructural analyzes. Thus, labeled cells were infused into striatum of adult male rats of animal model that mimic late onset of Parkinson's disease and, after 15 days, it was observed that cells migrated along the medial forebrain bundle to the substantia nigra as hypointense spots in T2 magnetic resonance imaging. These data were supported by short-term magnetic resonance imaging. Studies were performed in vivo, which showed that about 5 × 10(5) cells could be efficiently detected in the short term following infusion. Our results indicate that these labeled cells can be efficiently tracked in a neurodegenerative disease model.

  15. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury What is a Spinal Cord Injury Levels of Injury and What They Mean Animated Spinal ... Cord Injury What is a Spinal Cord Injury Levels of Injury and What They Mean Animated Spinal ...

  16. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available menu Understanding Spinal Cord Injury What is a Spinal Cord Injury Levels of Injury and What They Mean Animated Spinal Cord Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal ...

  17. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal ... Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal ...

  18. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal Cord Injuries Video Library SCI Medical Experts People Living with SCI Personal ... Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal Cord Injuries Video Library SCI Medical Experts People Living with SCI Personal ...

  19. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Animated Spinal Cord Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal ... Animated Spinal Cord Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal ...

  20. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation ... Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation ...

  1. Acute Thoracolumbar Spinal Cord Injury: Relationship of Cord Compression to Neurological Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeers, Peta; Battistuzzo, Camila R; Clark, Jillian M; Bernard, Stephen; Freeman, Brian J C; Batchelor, Peter E

    2018-02-21

    Spinal cord injury in the cervical spine is commonly accompanied by cord compression and urgent surgical decompression may improve neurological recovery. However, the extent of spinal cord compression and its relationship to neurological recovery following traumatic thoracolumbar spinal cord injury is unclear. The purpose of this study was to quantify maximum cord compression following thoracolumbar spinal cord injury and to assess the relationship among cord compression, cord swelling, and eventual clinical outcome. The medical records of patients who were 15 to 70 years of age, were admitted with a traumatic thoracolumbar spinal cord injury (T1 to L1), and underwent a spinal surgical procedure were examined. Patients with penetrating injuries and multitrauma were excluded. Maximal osseous canal compromise and maximal spinal cord compression were measured on preoperative mid-sagittal computed tomography (CT) scans and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) by observers blinded to patient outcome. The American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale (AIS) grades from acute hospital admission (≤24 hours of injury) and rehabilitation discharge were used to measure clinical outcome. Relationships among spinal cord compression, canal compromise, and initial and final AIS grades were assessed via univariate and multivariate analyses. Fifty-three patients with thoracolumbar spinal cord injury were included in this study. The overall mean maximal spinal cord compression (and standard deviation) was 40% ± 21%. There was a significant relationship between median spinal cord compression and final AIS grade, with grade-A patients (complete injury) exhibiting greater compression than grade-C and D patients (incomplete injury) (p compression as independently influencing the likelihood of complete spinal cord injury (p compression. Greater cord compression is associated with an increased likelihood of severe neurological deficits (complete injury) following

  2. Umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells labeled with multimodal iron oxide nanoparticles with fluorescent and magnetic properties: application for in vivo cell tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibov TT

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tatiana T Sibov,1,2 Lorena F Pavon,1 Liza A Miyaki,1 Javier B Mamani,1 Leopoldo P Nucci,1,2 Larissa T Alvarim,1,3 Paulo H Silveira,1 Luciana C Marti,1 LF Gamarra1–31Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, Brazil; 2Departamento de Neurologia e Neurociências, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; 3Faculdade de Ciências Médicas da Santa Casa de São Paulo, São Paulo, BrazilAbstract: Here we describe multimodal iron oxide nanoparticles conjugated to Rhodamine-B (MION-Rh, their stability in culture medium, and subsequent validation of an in vitro protocol to label mesenchymal stem cells from umbilical cord blood (UC-MSC with MION-Rh. These cells showed robust labeling in vitro without impairment of their functional properties, the viability of which were evaluated by proliferation kinetic and ultrastructural analyzes. Thus, labeled cells were infused into striatum of adult male rats of animal model that mimic late onset of Parkinson's disease and, after 15 days, it was observed that cells migrated along the medial forebrain bundle to the substantia nigra as hypointense spots in T2 magnetic resonance imaging. These data were supported by short-term magnetic resonance imaging. Studies were performed in vivo, which showed that about 5 × 105 cells could be efficiently detected in the short term following infusion. Our results indicate that these labeled cells can be efficiently tracked in a neurodegenerative disease model.Keywords: mesenchymal stem cells, multimodal iron oxide nanoparticles, Rhodamine, magnetic resonance imaging, Parkinson's disease

  3. Simplified spinal cord phantom for evaluation of SQUID magnetospinography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Y; Oyama, D; Uehara, G; Somchai, N; Kawabata, S

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord functional imaging by magnetospinography (MSG) is a noninvasive diagnostic method for spinal cord diseases. However, the accuracy and spatial resolution of lesion localization by MSG have barely been evaluated in detail so far. We developed a simplified spinal cord phantom for MSG evaluation. The spinal cord phantom is composed of a cylindrical vessel filled with saline water, which acts as a model of a neck. A set of modeled vertebrae is arranged in the cylindrical vessel, which has a neural current model made from catheter electrodes. The neural current model emulates the current distribution around the activated site along the axon of the spinal cord nerve. Our MSG system was used to observe the magnetic field from the phantom; a quadrupole-like pattern of the magnetic field distribution, which is a typical distribution pattern for spinal cord magnetic fields, was successfully reproduced by the phantom. Hence, the developed spinal cord phantom can be used to evaluate MSG source analysis methods.

  4. International Evoked Potentials Symposium

    CERN Document Server

    1980-01-01

    The past decade has seen great progress in the measurement of evoked potentials in man; a steady increase in our understanding of their charac­ teristics, their origins and their usefulness; and a growing application in the field of clinical diagnosis. The topic is a truly multidisciplinary one. Important research contributions have been made by workers of many different backgrounds and clinical applications span the specialities. This book represents a revised and updated version of the work originally presented at the international evoked potential symposium held in Nottingham 4-6 1978. The Nottingham Symposium provided a forum for a state-of-the-art discussion amongst workers from many different disciplines and from many different countries. For each major topic in the field an expert review set the scene for discussion of current research presentations. This format is retained in the book: the chapters in Part A provide the context in which the research presented in Part B is set. The task of selecting m...

  5. Brain Activation in Response to Visually Evoked Sexual Arousal in Male-to-Female Transsexuals: 3.0 Tesla Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Seok-Kyun; Kim, Gwang-Won; Yang, Jong-Chul; Kim, Seok-Kwun; Kang, Heoung-Keun

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to contrast the differential brain activation patterns in response to visual stimulation with both male and female erotic nude pictures in male-to-female (MTF) transsexuals who underwent a sex reassignment surgery. Materials and Methods A total of nine healthy MTF transsexuals after a sex reassignment surgery underwent fMRI on a 3.0 Tesla MR Scanner. The brain activation patterns were induced by visual stimulation with both male and female erotic nude pictures. Results The sex hormone levels of the postoperative MTF transsexuals were in the normal range of healthy heterosexual females. The brain areas, which were activated by viewing male nude pictures when compared with viewing female nude pictures, included predominantly the cerebellum, hippocampus, putamen, anterior cingulate gyrus, head of caudate nucleus, amygdala, midbrain, thalamus, insula, and body of caudate nucleus. On the other hand, brain activation induced by viewing female nude pictures was predominantly observed in the hypothalamus and the septal area. Conclusion Our findings suggest that distinct brain activation patterns associated with visual sexual arousal in postoperative MTF transsexuals reflect their sexual orientation to males. PMID:22563262

  6. Brain Activation in Response to Visually Evoked Sexual Arousal in Male-to-Female Transsexuals: 3.0 Tesla Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Seok Kyun; Kim, Gwang Won; Kang, Heoung Keun; Jeong, Gwang Woo [Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Jong Chul [Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seok Kwun [Dong-A University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    This study used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to contrast the differential brain activation patterns in response to visual stimulation with both male and female erotic nude pictures in male-to-female (MTF) transsexuals who underwent a sex reassignment surgery. A total of nine healthy MTF transsexuals after a sex reassignment surgery underwent fMRI on a 3.0 Tesla MR Scanner. The brain activation patterns were induced by visual stimulation with both male and female erotic nude pictures. The sex hormone levels of the postoperative MTF transsexuals were in the normal range of healthy heterosexual females. The brain areas, which were activated by viewing male nude pictures when compared with viewing female nude pictures, included predominantly the cerebellum, hippocampus, putamen, anterior cingulate gyrus, head of caudate nucleus, amygdala, midbrain, thalamus, insula, and body of caudate nucleus. On the other hand, brain activation induced by viewing female nude pictures was predominantly observed in the hypothalamus and the septal area. Our findings suggest that distinct brain activation patterns associated with visual sexual arousal in postoperative MTF transsexuals reflect their sexual orientation to males.

  7. Brain Activation in Response to Visually Evoked Sexual Arousal in Male-to-Female Transsexuals: 3.0 Tesla Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Seok Kyun; Kim, Gwang Won; Kang, Heoung Keun; Jeong, Gwang Woo; Yang, Jong Chul; Kim, Seok Kwun

    2012-01-01

    This study used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to contrast the differential brain activation patterns in response to visual stimulation with both male and female erotic nude pictures in male-to-female (MTF) transsexuals who underwent a sex reassignment surgery. A total of nine healthy MTF transsexuals after a sex reassignment surgery underwent fMRI on a 3.0 Tesla MR Scanner. The brain activation patterns were induced by visual stimulation with both male and female erotic nude pictures. The sex hormone levels of the postoperative MTF transsexuals were in the normal range of healthy heterosexual females. The brain areas, which were activated by viewing male nude pictures when compared with viewing female nude pictures, included predominantly the cerebellum, hippocampus, putamen, anterior cingulate gyrus, head of caudate nucleus, amygdala, midbrain, thalamus, insula, and body of caudate nucleus. On the other hand, brain activation induced by viewing female nude pictures was predominantly observed in the hypothalamus and the septal area. Our findings suggest that distinct brain activation patterns associated with visual sexual arousal in postoperative MTF transsexuals reflect their sexual orientation to males.

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Assessment of Spinal Cord and Cauda Equina Motion in Supine Patients With Spinal Metastases Planned for Spine Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tseng, Chia-Lin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Sussman, Marshall S. [Department of Medical Imaging, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Atenafu, Eshetu G. [Department of Biostatistics, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Letourneau, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ma, Lijun [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Soliman, Hany; Thibault, Isabelle [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Cho, B. C. John; Simeonov, Anna [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Yu, Eugene [Department of Medical Imaging, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Fehlings, Michael G. [Department of Neurosurgery and Spine Program, Toronto Western Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Sahgal, Arjun, E-mail: arjun.sahgal@sunnybrook.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: To assess motion of the spinal cord and cauda equina, which are critical neural tissues (CNT), which is important when evaluating the planning organ-at-risk margin required for stereotactic body radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: We analyzed CNT motion in 65 patients with spinal metastases (11 cervical, 39 thoracic, and 24 lumbar spinal segments) in the supine position using dynamic axial and sagittal magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI, 3T Verio, Siemens) over a 137-second interval. Motion was segregated according to physiologic cardiorespiratory oscillatory motion (characterized by the average root mean square deviation) and random bulk shifts associated with gross patient motion (characterized by the range). Displacement was evaluated in the anteroposterior (AP), lateral (LR), and superior-inferior (SI) directions by use of a correlation coefficient template matching algorithm, with quantification of random motion measure error over 3 separate trials. Statistical significance was defined according to P<.05. Results: In the AP, LR, and SI directions, significant oscillatory motion was observed in 39.2%, 35.1%, and 10.8% of spinal segments, respectively, and significant bulk motions in all cases. The median oscillatory CNT motions in the AP, LR, and SI directions were 0.16 mm, 0.17 mm, and 0.44 mm, respectively, and the maximal statistically significant oscillatory motions were 0.39 mm, 0.41 mm, and 0.77 mm, respectively. The median bulk displacements in the AP, LR, and SI directions were 0.51 mm, 0.59 mm, and 0.66 mm, and the maximal statistically significant displacements were 2.21 mm, 2.87 mm, and 3.90 mm, respectively. In the AP, LR, and SI directions, bulk displacements were greater than 1.5 mm in 5.4%, 9.0%, and 14.9% of spinal segments, respectively. No significant differences in axial motion were observed according to cord level or cauda equina. Conclusions: Oscillatory CNT motion was observed to be relatively minor. Our results

  9. Cord Blood and Transplants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... donate their baby’s umbilical cord blood to a public cord blood bank. We have more than 249,000 cord blood ... stored as a cord blood unit at a public cord blood bank for future use. It can then be listed ...

  10. Motor unit activation order during electrically evoked contractions of paralyzed or partially paralyzed muscles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomas, CK; Nelson, G; Than, L; Zijdewind, Inge

    The activation order of motor units during electrically evoked contractions of paralyzed or partially paralyzed thenar muscles was determined in seven subjects with chronic cervical spinal cord injury. The median nerve was stimulated percutaneously with pulses of graded intensity to produce

  11. Music evokes vivid autobiographical memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belfi, Amy M; Karlan, Brett; Tranel, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    Music is strongly intertwined with memories-for example, hearing a song from the past can transport you back in time, triggering the sights, sounds, and feelings of a specific event. This association between music and vivid autobiographical memory is intuitively apparent, but the idea that music is intimately tied with memories, seemingly more so than other potent memory cues (e.g., familiar faces), has not been empirically tested. Here, we compared memories evoked by music to those evoked by famous faces, predicting that music-evoked autobiographical memories (MEAMs) would be more vivid. Participants listened to 30 songs, viewed 30 faces, and reported on memories that were evoked. Memories were transcribed and coded for vividness as in Levine, B., Svoboda, E., Hay, J. F., Winocur, G., & Moscovitch, M. [2002. Aging and autobiographical memory: Dissociating episodic from semantic retrieval. Psychology and Aging, 17, 677-689]. In support of our hypothesis, MEAMs were more vivid than autobiographical memories evoked by faces. MEAMs contained a greater proportion of internal details and a greater number of perceptual details, while face-evoked memories contained a greater number of external details. Additionally, we identified sex differences in memory vividness: for both stimulus categories, women retrieved more vivid memories than men. The results show that music not only effectively evokes autobiographical memories, but that these memories are more vivid than those evoked by famous faces.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging study of lumbosacral spinal cord nerves before artificial somatic-central nervous system-autonomic reflex pathway establish ment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Xianbo; Kong Xiangquan; Feng Gansheng; Han Ping; Liu Dingxi; Ma Hui

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the value of MRI as imaging technique for lumbosacral spinal nerves before artificial somatic-central nervous system-autonomic reflex pathway establish ment. Methods: Conventional MRI and T 2 W CISS 3D were performed in 10 patients with neurogenic bladder planned for the operation of artificial somatic-central nervous system-autonomic reflex pathway. The Three-dimensional data were then constructed into composite images using a standard multiple planar reformation (MPR). Results: Five patients showed tethered spinal cord syndrome, whose spinal cord nerves were circuitous distributed and had abnormity number when penetrated the dura. Of these 5 patients, one patient was accompanied by spinal cord vas malformation. Four patients had vertebral fracture and spinal injury, and the other one patients demonstrated tumor in vertebral canal on MRI examinations. The spinal cord nerves in these 5 patients floated down river and had normal number of spinal cord nerves. Conclusion: Conventional MRI and T 2 W CISS 3D MRI were essential for the pre-operative planning of artificial somatic-central nervous system-autonomic reflex pathway, especially in patients with tethered spinal cord syndrome. Spinal cord nerves distribute and anterior and posterior roots array can be clearly showed by MPR. (authors)

  13. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... spinal cord injury? play_arrow What kind of surgery is common after a spinal cord injury? play_ ... How soon after a spinal cord injury should surgery be performed? play_arrow Is it common to ...

  14. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... L Sarah Harrison, OT Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury ... a spinal cord injury important? play_arrow What role does “compression” play in a spinal cord injury? ...

  15. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury Diane M. Rowles, MS, NP How Family Life Changes After Spinal Cord Injury Nancy Rosenberg, ... Children with Spinal Cord Injury Patricia Mucia, RN Family Life After Pediatric Spinal Injury Dawn Sheaffer, MSW ...

  16. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Spinal Cord Injury ... Jennifer Piatt, PhD David Chen, MD Read Bio Medical Director, Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Program, Rehabilitation Institute ...

  17. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Spinal Cord Injury 101 ... arrow What is the “Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems” program? play_arrow What are the most promising ...

  18. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Spinal Cord Injury 101 Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 David ...

  19. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Spinal Cord Injury 101 Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 ...

  20. Spinal Cord Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your spinal cord is a bundle of nerves that runs down the middle of your back. It carries signals back ... of the spine, this can also injure the spinal cord. Other spinal cord problems include Tumors Infections such ...

  1. Spinal cord involvement in tuberculous meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, R K; Malhotra, H S; Gupta, R

    2015-09-01

    To summarize the incidence and spectrum of spinal cord-related complications in patients of tuberculous meningitis. Reports from multiple countries were included. An extensive review of the literature, published in English, was carried out using Scopus, PubMed and Google Scholar databases. Tuberculous meningitis frequently affects the spinal cord and nerve roots. Initial evidence of spinal cord involvement came from post-mortem examination. Subsequent advancement in neuroimaging like conventional lumbar myelography, computed tomographic myelography and gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance-myelography have contributed immensely. Spinal involvement manifests in several forms, like tuberculous radiculomyelitis, spinal tuberculoma, myelitis, syringomyelia, vertebral tuberculosis and very rarely spinal tuberculous abscess. Frequently, tuberculous spinal arachnoiditis develops paradoxically. Infrequently, spinal cord involvement may even be asymptomatic. Spinal cord and spinal nerve involvement is demonstrated by diffuse enhancement of cord parenchyma, nerve roots and meninges on contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. High cerebrospinal fluid protein content is often a risk factor for arachnoiditis. The most important differential diagnosis of tuberculous arachnoiditis is meningeal carcinomatosis. Anti-tuberculosis therapy is the main stay of treatment for tuberculous meningitis. Higher doses of corticosteroids have been found effective. Surgery should be considered only when pathological confirmation is needed or there is significant spinal cord compression. The outcome in these patients has been unpredictable. Some reports observed excellent recovery and some reported unfavorable outcomes after surgical decompression and debridement. Tuberculous meningitis is frequently associated with disabling spinal cord and radicular complications. Available treatment options are far from satisfactory.

  2. Spinal cord contusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Gong; Wang, Jian; Wang, Yazhou; Zhao, Xianghui

    2014-04-15

    Spinal cord injury is a major cause of disability with devastating neurological outcomes and limited therapeutic opportunities, even though there are thousands of publications on spinal cord injury annually. There are two major types of spinal cord injury, transaction of the spinal cord and spinal cord contusion. Both can theoretically be treated, but there is no well documented treatment in human being. As for spinal cord contusion, we have developed an operation with fabulous result.

  3. Quantification of trunk and android lean mass using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry compared to magnetic resonance imaging after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, Kathleen C; O'Brien, Laura C; Gorgey, Ashraf S

    2018-02-20

    To determine whether dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) compared to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may accurately quantify trunk lean mass (LM) after chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) and to investigate the relationships between trunk LM, visceral adiposity, trunk fat mass and basal metabolic rate (BMR). Cross-sectional design and correlational analysis. Research setting in a medical center. Twenty-two men with motor complete paraplegia (n = 14; T4-T11) and tetraplegia (n = 8; C5-C7) were recruited as part of a clinical trial. Not applicable. Trunk and android LM were measured using DXA. The volume of six trunk muscle groups were then measured using MRI to quantify trunk LM-MRI. Subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) cross-sectional areas were also measured using MRI. After overnight fast, BMR was evaluated using indirect calorimetry. Trunk LM-DXA (24 ± 3.3 kg) and android LM-DXA (3.6 ± 0.7 kg) overestimated (P android LM-DXA + 0.126; r 2 =0.26, SEE= 0.21 kg, P = 0.018. Percentage trunk LM-MRI was inversely related to VAT (r=-0.79, P android LM-DXA overestimated trunk LM-MRI. Percentage trunk LM-MRI, but not LM-DXA, was inversely related to trunk central adiposity. The findings highlight the importance of exercising trunk LM to attenuate cardio-metabolic disorders after SCI.

  4. Functional brain activity changes after four weeks supplementation with a multi-vitamin/mineral combination: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial exploring functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Steady-State Visual Evoked Potentials during working memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J White

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the neurocognitive effects of four weeks daily supplementation with a multivitamin and mineral combination (MVM in healthy adults (aged 18-40 years. Using a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled design, participants underwent assessments of brain activity using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI; n=32, 16 females and Steady-State Visual Evoked Potential recordings (SSVEP; n=39, 20 females during working memory and continuous performance tasks at baseline and following four weeks of active MVM treatment or placebo. There were several treatment-related effects suggestive of changes in functional brain activity associated with MVM administration. SSVEP data showed latency reductions across centro-parietal regions during the encoding period of a spatial working memory task following four weeks of active MVM treatment. Complementary results were observed with the fMRI data, in which a subset of those completing fMRI assessment after SSVEP assessment (n=16 demonstrated increased BOLD response during completion of the Rapid Visual Information Processing task (RVIP within regions of interest including bilateral parietal lobes. No treatment-related changes in fMRI data were observed in those who had not first undergone SSVEP assessment, suggesting these results may be most evident under conditions of fatigue. Performance on the working memory and continuous performance tasks did not significantly differ between treatment groups at follow-up. In addition, within the fatigued fMRI sample, increased RVIP BOLD response was correlated with the change in number of target detections as part of the RVIP task. This study provides preliminary evidence of changes in functional brain activity during working memory associated with four weeks of daily treatment with a multivitamin and mineral combination in healthy adults, using two distinct but complementary measures of functional brain activity.

  5. Spinal cord stimulation therapy for localized central pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirato, Masafumi; Takahashi, Akio; Watanabe, Katsushige; Kazama, Ken; Yoshimoto, Yuhei

    2008-01-01

    We studied the pathophysiology of localized central pain and the surgical result of spinal cord stimulation. There were 10 cases; 7 males and 3 females from 24 to 77 years old. Pain was caused by peripheral nerve injury in one case, spinal cord injury in two cases and cerebrovascular disease (CVD) (thalamic pain) in 7 cases. All cases were treated by epidural spinal cord stimulation and followed from 0.8 to 8.8 years. Sufficient pain relief was achieved in one case of peripheral nerve and spinal cord injury and in 4 cases of CVD. Moderate pain control was achieved in 2 cases of CVD. In one each case of spinal cord injury and of CVD, pain control was ineffective. In cases with thalamic pain, we studied the correlation between the surgical result of spinal cord stimulation and the clinical features, MRI, fluoro-deoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET), and somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) findings before operation. MRI revealed a small to moderate sized lesion on the thalamus or putamen in each case. PET also showed decreased accumulation of FDG on the affected thalamus. In all cases without one fair responder to spinal cord stimulation, we could recognize definite SEP originating in the sensory cortex ipsilateral side to the CVD lesion during contralateral median or posterior tibial nerve stimulation. In the good responders, we could recognize SEP originating in the sensory cortex of the lesion side with less delayed latency or decreased amplitude than in the moderate responders. In this group, test stimulation with low voltage on the spinal cord evoked a sensory effect (paresthesia) over the painful part of the body. Spinal cord stimulation proved to be an effective treatment for localized central pain. In cases with localized central pain after CVD, we could expect to ameliorate the intractable pain in those cases in which SEP or spinal cord test stimulation revealed that the thalamo-cortical system was preserved. (author)

  6. Neurophysiological detection of impending spinal cord injury during scoliosis surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Daniel M; Auerbach, Joshua D; Dormans, John P; Flynn, John; Drummond, Denis S; Bowe, J Andrew; Laufer, Samuel; Shah, Suken A; Bowen, J Richard; Pizzutillo, Peter D; Jones, Kristofer J; Drummond, Denis S

    2007-11-01

    Despite the many reports attesting to the efficacy of intraoperative somatosensory evoked potential monitoring in reducing the prevalence of iatrogenic spinal cord injury during corrective scoliosis surgery, these afferent neurophysiological signals can provide only indirect evidence of injury to the motor tracts since they monitor posterior column function. Early reports on the use of transcranial electric motor evoked potentials to monitor the corticospinal motor tracts directly suggested that the method holds great promise for improving detection of emerging spinal cord injury. We sought to compare the efficacy of these two methods of monitoring to detect impending iatrogenic neural injury during scoliosis surgery. We reviewed the intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring records of 1121 consecutive patients (834 female and 287 male) with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (mean age, 13.9 years) treated between 2000 and 2004 at four pediatric spine centers. The same group of experienced surgical neurophysiologists monitored spinal cord function in all patients with use of a standardized multimodality technique with the patient under total intravenous anesthesia. A relevant neurophysiological change (an alert) was defined as a reduction in amplitude (unilateral or bilateral) of at least 50% for somatosensory evoked potentials and at least 65% for transcranial electric motor evoked potentials compared with baseline. Thirty-eight (3.4%) of the 1121 patients had recordings that met the criteria for a relevant signal change (i.e., an alert). Of those thirty-eight patients, seventeen showed suppression of the amplitude of transcranial electric motor evoked potentials in excess of 65% without any evidence of changes in somatosensory evoked potentials. In nine of the thirty-eight patients, the signal change was related to hypotension and was corrected with augmentation of the blood pressure. The remaining twenty-nine patients had an alert that was related directly to a

  7. Spinal cord blood flow measured by 14C-iodoantipyrine autoradiography during and after graded spinal cord compression in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holtz, A.; Nystroem, B.G.; Gerdin, B.

    1989-01-01

    The relations between degree of thoracic spinal cord compression causing myelographic block, reversible paraparesis, and extinction of the sensory evoked potential on one hand, and spinal cord blood flow on the other, were investigated. This was done in rats using the blocking weight-technique and 14 C-iodoantipyrine autoradiography. A load of 9 g caused myelographic block. Five minutes of compression with that load caused a reduction of spinal cord blood flow to about 25%, but 5 and 60 minutes after the compression spinal cord blood flow was restored to 60% of the pretrauma value. A load of 35 g for 5 minutes caused transient paraparesis. Recovery to about 30% was observed 5 and 60 minutes thereafter. During compression at a load of 55 g, which caused almost total extinction of sensory evoked potential and irreversible paraplegia, spinal cord blood flow under the load ceased. The results indicate that myelographic block occurs at a load which does not cause irreversible paraparesis and that a load which permits sensory evoked potential to be elicited results in potentially salvageable damage

  8. Topologically preserving straightening of spinal cord MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Leener, Benjamin; Mangeat, Gabriel; Dupont, Sara; Martin, Allan R; Callot, Virginie; Stikov, Nikola; Fehlings, Michael G; Cohen-Adad, Julien

    2017-10-01

    To propose a robust and accurate method for straightening magnetic resonance (MR) images of the spinal cord, based on spinal cord segmentation, that preserves spinal cord topology and that works for any MRI contrast, in a context of spinal cord template-based analysis. The spinal cord curvature was computed using an iterative Non-Uniform Rational B-Spline (NURBS) approximation. Forward and inverse deformation fields for straightening were computed by solving analytically the straightening equations for each image voxel. Computational speed-up was accomplished by solving all voxel equation systems as one single system. Straightening accuracy (mean and maximum distance from straight line), computational time, and robustness to spinal cord length was evaluated using the proposed and the standard straightening method (label-based spline deformation) on 3T T 2 - and T 1 -weighted images from 57 healthy subjects and 33 patients with spinal cord compression due to degenerative cervical myelopathy (DCM). The proposed algorithm was more accurate, more robust, and faster than the standard method (mean distance = 0.80 vs. 0.83 mm, maximum distance = 1.49 vs. 1.78 mm, time = 71 vs. 174 sec for the healthy population and mean distance = 0.65 vs. 0.68 mm, maximum distance = 1.28 vs. 1.55 mm, time = 32 vs. 60 sec for the DCM population). A novel image straightening method that enables template-based analysis of quantitative spinal cord MRI data is introduced. This algorithm works for any MRI contrast and was validated on healthy and patient populations. The presented method is implemented in the Spinal Cord Toolbox, an open-source software for processing spinal cord MRI data. 1 Technical Efficacy: Stage 1 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017;46:1209-1219. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  9. Cervical Cord-Canal Mismatch: A New Method for Identifying Predisposition to Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouri, Aria; Montejo, Julio; Sun, Xin; Virojanapa, Justin; Kolb, Luis E; Abbed, Khalid M; Cheng, Joseph S

    2017-12-01

    The risk for spinal cord injuries (SCIs) ranging from devastating traumatic injuries, compression because of degenerative pathology, and neurapraxia is increased in patients with congenital spinal stenosis. Classical diagnostic criteria include an absolute anteroposterior diameter of spinal cord, which varies across patients, independent of canal size. Recent large magnetic resonance imaging studies of population cohorts have allowed newer methods to emerge that account for both cord and canal size by measuring a spinal cord occupation ratio (SCOR). A SCOR defined as ≥70% on midsagittal imaging or ≥80% on axial imaging appears to be an effective method of identifying cord-canal mismatch, but requires further validation. Cord-canal size mismatch predisposes patients to SCI because of 1) less space within the canal lowering the amount of degenerative changes needed for cord compression, and 2) less cerebrospinal fluid surrounding the spinal cord decreasing the ability to absorb kinetic forces directed at the spine. Patients with cord-canal mismatch have been reported to be at a substantially higher risk of traumatic SCI, and present with degenerative cervical myelopathy at a younger age than patients without cord-canal mismatch. However, neurologic outcome after SCI has occurred does not appear to be different in patients with or without a cord-canal mismatch. Recognition that canal and cord size are both factors which predispose to SCI supports that cord-canal size mismatch rather than a narrow cervical canal in isolation should be viewed as the underlying mechanism predisposing to SCI. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Torakal Ventral Cord Herniation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sermin Tok

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available  Ventral cord herniation is a rare cause of focal myelopathy due to herniation of the thoracic cord through a dural defect.It is also known by a variety of other terms such as spontaneous thoracic cord herniation or idiopathic spinal cord herniation.The key feature is focal distortion and rotation of the cord with no CSF seen between it and the ventral theca.

  11. Delayed detection of motor pathway dysfunction after selective reduction of thoracic spinal cord blood flow in pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lips, Jeroen; de Haan, Peter; Bouma, Gerrit J.; Jacobs, Michael J.; Kalkman, Cor J.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: Clinical monitoring of myogenic motor evoked potentials to transcranial stimulation provides rapid evaluation of motor-pathway function during surgical procedures in which spinal cord ischemia can occur. However, a severe reduction of spinal cord blood flow that remains confined to the

  12. Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging may show abnormalities in the normal-appearing cervical spinal cord from patients with multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Miraldi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective This study aims to evaluate “in vivo” the integrity of the normal-appearing spinal cord (NASC in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS compared to controls, using diffusion tensor MR imaging. Methods We studied 32 patients with MS and 17 without any neurologic disorder. Fractional anisotropy (FA, axial diffusivity (AD, radial diffusivity (RD and mean diffusivity (MD were calculated within regions of interest at C2 and C7 levels in the four columns of the spinal cord. Results At C2, FA value was decreased in MS patients. Besides, RD value was higher in MS than in controls. At C7, MD values were increased in MS. Conclusion The NASC in the right column of the cervical spinal cord showed abnormal FA, RD and MD values, which is possibly related to demyelination, since the FA abnormality was related to the RD and not to the AD.

  13. Evoked emotions predict food choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalenberg, Jelle R; Gutjar, Swetlana; Ter Horst, Gert J; de Graaf, Kees; Renken, Remco J; Jager, Gerry

    2014-01-01

    In the current study we show that non-verbal food-evoked emotion scores significantly improve food choice prediction over merely liking scores. Previous research has shown that liking measures correlate with choice. However, liking is no strong predictor for food choice in real life environments. Therefore, the focus within recent studies shifted towards using emotion-profiling methods that successfully can discriminate between products that are equally liked. However, it is unclear how well scores from emotion-profiling methods predict actual food choice and/or consumption. To test this, we proposed to decompose emotion scores into valence and arousal scores using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and apply Multinomial Logit Models (MLM) to estimate food choice using liking, valence, and arousal as possible predictors. For this analysis, we used an existing data set comprised of liking and food-evoked emotions scores from 123 participants, who rated 7 unlabeled breakfast drinks. Liking scores were measured using a 100-mm visual analogue scale, while food-evoked emotions were measured using 2 existing emotion-profiling methods: a verbal and a non-verbal method (EsSense Profile and PrEmo, respectively). After 7 days, participants were asked to choose 1 breakfast drink from the experiment to consume during breakfast in a simulated restaurant environment. Cross validation showed that we were able to correctly predict individualized food choice (1 out of 7 products) for over 50% of the participants. This number increased to nearly 80% when looking at the top 2 candidates. Model comparisons showed that evoked emotions better predict food choice than perceived liking alone. However, the strongest predictive strength was achieved by the combination of evoked emotions and liking. Furthermore we showed that non-verbal food-evoked emotion scores more accurately predict food choice than verbal food-evoked emotions scores.

  14. Production of lesions in rabbit spinal cord with microwave hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutton, C.H.; Popovic, P.

    1984-01-01

    The use of a variety of injury models in different species to produce spinal cord lesions by trauma or ischemia has often given rise to conflicting or inconclusive data. A new model has been developed in rabbits. Spinal cord lesions were produced in selected spinal cord segments of male New Zealand white rabbits by non-invasive irradiation with microwaves in the near field at 915 MHz. Graded injuries of predictable severity can be produced by the non-invasive induction of moderate hyperthermia in the thoracic spinal cord at precise dosage levels of temperature elevation and duration. Histological changes in microwave-induced hyperthermia closely parallel those seen in traumatic lesions of the human spinal cord, as well as those produced in animals with the classical weight-drop method of Allen. In addition to grading the spinal cord lesions with respect to residual neurological function, dose-response observations made with somatosensory evoked responses, blood-spinal cord barrier tracers, and neurohistological and enzyme histochemical preparations, suggest that it will be possible to use this approach to develop a standardized, calibrated model in rabbits to evaluate the efficacy of new therapeutic modalities for the treatment of spinal cord injury

  15. Spinal cord injury with central cord syndrome from surfing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinfeld, Yaniv; Keren, Yaniv; Haddad, Elias

    2018-01-01

    Central cord syndrome (CCS) is an injury to the center of the spinal cord. It is well known as a hyperextension injury, but it has never been described as a surfing injury. Our report describes this injury in detail. A 35-year-old male novice surfer presented to the emergency department with acute tetraplegia following falling off his surfboard and hitting sea floor at a shallow beach break. He was rescued by a fellow surfer while floating in the sea and unable to raise his head above sea level. Upon arrival at the hospital, tetraplegia and sensory deficits were noted. Radiological investigations showed advanced spinal stenosis at C4-6 levels. T2 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated myelopathy at C5-C6 level. He was diagnosed as having central cord syndrome, treated conservatively, and regained near full neurologic recovery after a month of rehabilitation. Unique sport activities lead to unique injuries. It is important to accurately describe these injuries in order to create protective measures against them. Neurologic injuries in surfers are uncommon. With low-energy trauma, surfer's myelopathy is still the most common diagnosis, but central cord syndrome should be in the differential diagnosis.

  16. Apolipoprotein E Mimetic Promotes Functional and Histological Recovery in Lysolecithin-Induced Spinal Cord Demyelination in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Zhen; Li, Fengqiao; Zhang, Yi Ping; Shields, Lisa B E; Hu, Xiaoling; Zheng, Yiyan; Yu, Panpan; Zhang, Yongjie; Cai, Jun; Vitek, Michael P; Shields, Christopher B

    2013-04-01

    Considering demyelination is the pathological hallmark of multiple sclerosis (MS), reducing demyelination and/or promoting remyelination is a practical therapeutic strategy to improve functional recovery for MS. An apolipoprotein E (apoE)-mimetic peptide COG112 has previously demonstrated therapeutic efficacy on functional and histological recovery in a mouse experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model of human MS. In the current study, we further investigated whether COG112 promotes remyelination and improves functional recovery in lysolecithin induced focal demyelination in the white matter of spinal cord in mice. A focal demyelination model was created by stereotaxically injecting lysolecithin into the bilateral ventrolateral funiculus (VLF) of T8 and T9 mouse spinal cords. Immediately after lysolecithin injection mice were treated with COG112, prefix peptide control or vehicle control for 21 days. The locomotor function of the mice was measured by the beam walking test and Basso Mouse Scale (BMS) assessment. The nerve transmission of the VLF of mice was assessed in vivo by transcranial magnetic motor evoked potentials (tcMMEPs). The histological changes were also examined by by eriochrome cyanine staining, immunohistochemistry staining and electron microscopy (EM) method. The area of demyelination in the spinal cord was significantly reduced in the COG112 group. EM examination showed that treatment with COG112 increased the thickness of myelin sheaths and the numbers of surviving axons in the lesion epicenter. Locomotor function was improved in COG112 treated animals when measured by the beam walking test and BMS assessment compared to controls. TcMMEPs also demonstrated the COG112-mediated enhancement of amplitude of evoked responses. The apoE-mimetic COG112 demonstrates a favorable combination of activities in suppressing inflammatory response, mitigating demyelination and in promoting remyelination and associated functional recovery in animal model

  17. Music-Evoked Emotions—Current Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Hans-Eckhardt

    2017-01-01

    The present study is focused on a review of the current state of investigating music-evoked emotions experimentally, theoretically and with respect to their therapeutic potentials. After a concise historical overview and a schematic of the hearing mechanisms, experimental studies on music listeners and on music performers are discussed, starting with the presentation of characteristic musical stimuli and the basic features of tomographic imaging of emotional activation in the brain, such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and positron emission tomography (PET), which offer high spatial resolution in the millimeter range. The progress in correlating activation imaging in the brain to the psychological understanding of music-evoked emotion is demonstrated and some prospects for future research are outlined. Research in psychoneuroendocrinology and molecular markers is reviewed in the context of music-evoked emotions and the results indicate that the research in this area should be intensified. An assessment of studies involving measuring techniques with high temporal resolution down to the 10 ms range, as, e.g., electroencephalography (EEG), event-related brain potentials (ERP), magnetoencephalography (MEG), skin conductance response (SCR), finger temperature, and goose bump development (piloerection) can yield information on the dynamics and kinetics of emotion. Genetic investigations reviewed suggest the heredity transmission of a predilection for music. Theoretical approaches to musical emotion are directed to a unified model for experimental neurological evidence and aesthetic judgment. Finally, the reports on musical therapy are briefly outlined. The study concludes with an outlook on emerging technologies and future research fields. PMID:29225563

  18. Spinal cord toxoplasmosis in AIDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carteret, M.; Petit, E.; Granat, O.; Marichez, M.; Gilquin, J.

    1995-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is the most common brain parasitic infection in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Spinal cord localizations are still rare (2 cases with cerebral involvement, 2 cases without). A case of both spinal cord and cerebral involvement is reported. Magnetic resonance imaging (MR imaging) was performed because of sensory level (L 1). A focal conus medullaris enlargement was seen, iso intense on T 1 weighted images. This lesion was hyperintense on T 2 weighted sequence, and was homogeneously enhanced after Gadolinium on T 1 weighted images. A medullary oedema was noted. A toxoplasmosis treatment was initiated, without cortico therapy. MR imaging performed one month later (D 30), while important clinical improvements were seen, pointed out normal thickness of conus medullaris, without enhancement after Gadolinium. Disease lesions in AIDS with focal spinal cord processes are reviewed, and diagnostic work-up is discussed. Spinal cord single lesion, associated or not with brain involvements should be treated as a toxoplasmic infection, with MR imaging follow up. This work up should avoid medullary biopsy, still required in case of treatment failure. Cerebral involvements, with multiples lesions can mask medullary localization. (authors). 8 refs., 2 figs

  19. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos ... Home Kim Eberhardt Muir, MS Coping with a New Injury Robin Dorman, PsyD Sex and Fertility After Spinal Cord Injury Diane M. ...

  20. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Kristine Cichowski, MS Occupational Therapy after Spinal Cord Injury Katie Powell, OT ... does not provide medical advice, recommend or endorse health care products or services, or control the information ...

  1. Spinal Cord Dysfunction (SCD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Spinal Cord Dysfunction (SCD) module supports the maintenance of local and national registries for the tracking of patients with spinal cord injury and disease...

  2. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal Cord Injuries Video Library SCI Medical Experts People Living with SCI Personal Experiences ...

  3. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... of spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? play_arrow When can we expect stem-cell treatments to become available for spinal cord injuries? ...

  4. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? play_arrow When can we expect stem-cell treatments to become available for spinal cord injuries? ...

  5. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injuries Video Library SCI Medical Experts People Living with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources ... Spinal Cord Injuries Video Library SCI Medical Experts People Living with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources ...

  6. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... play_arrow What are the chances of regaining feeling and mobility after a spinal cord injury? play_arrow How long does it usually take for feeling and movement to return after a spinal cord ...

  7. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... RN Pediatric Injuries Pediatric Spinal Cord Injury 101 Lawrence Vogel, MD The Basics of Pediatric SCI Rehabilitation ... Rogers, PT Recreational Therapy after Spinal Cord Injury Jennifer Piatt, PhD David Chen, MD Read Bio Medical ...

  8. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About Us Expert Videos Contact Us Personal Experience Videos Blog Videos By Topic Media Resources Donate to support families facing spinal cord ...

  9. Tethered Spinal Cord Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cord over time and may be exacerbated during sports or pregnancy, or may be due to narrowing of the ... cord over time and may be exacerbated during sports or pregnancy, or may be due to narrowing of the ...

  10. Spinal cord stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007560.htm Spinal cord stimulation To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Spinal cord stimulation is a treatment for pain that uses ...

  11. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injury 101 Lawrence Vogel, MD The Basics of Pediatric SCI Rehabilitation Sara Klaas, MSW Transitions for Children with Spinal Cord Injury Patricia Mucia, RN Family Life After Pediatric Spinal Injury Dawn Sheaffer, MSW Rehabilitation ...

  12. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injury 101 David Chen, MD Preventing Pressure Sores Mary Zeigler, MS Transition from Hospital to ... a spinal cord injury? play_arrow Why are high-dose steroids often used right after an injury? ...

  13. Motor cortex stimulation suppresses cortical responses to noxious hindpaw stimulation after spinal cord lesion in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Li; Ji, Yadong; Voulalas, Pamela J; Keaser, Michael; Xu, Su; Gullapalli, Rao P; Greenspan, Joel; Masri, Radi

    2014-01-01

    Motor cortex stimulation (MCS) is a potentially effective treatment for chronic neuropathic pain. The neural mechanisms underlying the reduction of hyperalgesia and allodynia after MCS are not completely understood. To investigate the neural mechanisms responsible for analgesic effects after MCS. We test the hypothesis that MCS attenuates evoked blood oxygen-level dependent signals in cortical areas involved in nociceptive processing in an animal model of chronic neuropathic pain. We used adult female Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 10) that received unilateral electrolytic lesions of the right spinal cord at the level of C6 (SCL animals). In these animals, we performed magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiments to study the analgesic effects of MCS. On the day of fMRI experiment, 14 days after spinal cord lesion, the animals were anesthetized and epidural bipolar platinum electrodes were placed above the left primary motor cortex. Two 10-min sessions of fMRI were performed before and after a session of MCS (50 μA, 50 Hz, 300 μs, for 30 min). During each fMRI session, the right hindpaw was electrically stimulated (noxious stimulation: 5 mA, 5 Hz, 3 ms) using a block design of 20 s stimulation off and 20 s stimulation on. A general linear model-based statistical parametric analysis was used to analyze whole brain activation maps. Region of interest (ROI) analysis and paired t-test were used to compare changes in activation before and after MCS in these ROI. MCS suppressed evoked blood oxygen dependent signals significantly (Family-wise error corrected P cortex and the prefrontal cortex. These findings suggest that, in animals with SCL, MCS attenuates hypersensitivity by suppressing activity in the primary somatosensory cortex and prefrontal cortex. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Evoked Emotions Predict Food Choice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalenberg, Jelle R.; Gutjar, Swetlana; ter Horst, Gert J.; de Graaf, Kees; Renken, Remco J.; Jager, Gerry

    2014-01-01

    In the current study we show that non-verbal food-evoked emotion scores significantly improve food choice prediction over merely liking scores. Previous research has shown that liking measures correlate with choice. However, liking is no strong predictor for food choice in real life environments.

  15. Spinal cord compression at C1-C2 level due to tophaceous gout (magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography cisternographic findings)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vries, C. de; Slegte, R.G.M. de; Valk, J.

    1987-01-01

    The authors report a case of spinal cord compression at the level of the foramen magnum due to tophaceous gout in a patient with no clinical history of gout. The presence of a foramen magnum mass due to urate crystal deposition in a patient without clinical history of gout or additional bone abnormalities has, to the best of the authors' knowledge, never been described before. In the case presented here, no bone changes were encountered with CT or MRI. Neither the presence of small high-density punctuations on the CT examination nor the signal intensities of the mass on T1- and T2-weighted images led to the radiological diagnois of tophaceous gout. The foramen magnum mass and the spinal cord compression were, however, beautifully depicted by both modalities. 14 refs.; 2 figs

  16. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... the spinal cord work? play_arrow Why is the level of a spinal cord injury important? play_arrow What role does “compression” play in a spinal cord injury? play_arrow Why are high-dose steroids often used right after an injury? play_arrow What is meant ...

  17. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... arrow What is the “Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems” program? play_arrow What are the most promising new treatments for spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What are the latest developments in the use of electrical stimulation for spinal cord injuries? play_arrow ...

  18. Spinal Cord Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... forth between your body and your brain. A spinal cord injury disrupts the signals. Spinal cord injuries usually begin with a blow that fractures or ... down on the nerve parts that carry signals. Spinal cord injuries can be complete or incomplete. With a complete ...

  19. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... injury? play_arrow How does the spinal cord work? play_arrow Why is the level of a spinal cord injury important? play_arrow What role does “compression” play in a spinal cord injury? play_arrow Why are high-dose steroids often used right after an injury? play_arrow What is meant ...

  20. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Abuse and Spinal Cord Injury Allen Heinemann, PhD How Peer Counseling Works Julie Gassaway, MS, RN Pediatric Injuries Pediatric Spinal ... What is a spinal cord injury? play_arrow How does the spinal cord work? play_arrow Why is the level of a ...

  1. Noise-evoked otoacoustic emissions in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maat, B; Wit, HP; van Dijk, P

    2000-01-01

    Click-evoked otoacoustic emissions (CEOAEs) and acoustical responses evoked by bandlimited Gaussian noise (noise-evoked otoacoustic emissions; NEOAEs) were measured in three normal-hearing subjects. For the NEOAEs the first- and second-order Wiener kernel and polynomial correlation functions up to

  2. Periodic modulation of repetitively elicited monosynaptic reflexes of the human lumbosacral spinal cord

    OpenAIRE

    Hofstoetter, Ursula S.; Danner, Simon M.; Freundl, Brigitta; Binder, Heinrich; Mayr, Winfried; Rattay, Frank; Minassian, Karen

    2015-01-01

    In individuals with motor-complete spinal cord injury, epidural stimulation of the lumbosacral spinal cord at 2 Hz evokes unmodulated reflexes in the lower limbs, while stimulation at 22–60 Hz can generate rhythmic burstlike activity. Here we elaborated on an output pattern emerging at transitional stimulation frequencies with consecutively elicited reflexes alternating between large and small. We analyzed responses concomitantly elicited in thigh and leg muscle groups bilaterally by epidural...

  3. Imaging of Spinal Cord Injury: Acute Cervical Spinal Cord Injury, Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy, and Cord Herniation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talekar, Kiran; Poplawski, Michael; Hegde, Rahul; Cox, Mougnyan; Flanders, Adam

    2016-10-01

    We review the pathophysiology and imaging findings of acute traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI), cervical spondylotic myelopathy, and briefly review the much less common cord herniation as a unique cause of myelopathy. Acute traumatic SCI is devastating to the patient and the costs to society are staggering. There are currently no "cures" for SCI and the only accepted pharmacologic treatment regimen for traumatic SCI is currently being questioned. Evaluation and prognostication of SCI is a demanding area with significant deficiencies, including lack of biomarkers. Accurate classification of SCI is heavily dependent on a good clinical examination, the results of which can vary substantially based upon the patient׳s condition or comorbidities and the skills of the examiner. Moreover, the full extent of a patients׳ neurologic injury may not become apparent for days after injury; by then, therapeutic response may be limited. Although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the best imaging modality for the evaluation of spinal cord parenchyma, conventional MR techniques do not appear to differentiate edema from axonal injury. Recently, it is proposed that in addition to characterizing the anatomic extent of injury, metrics derived from conventional MRI and diffusion tensor imaging, in conjunction with the neurological examination, can serve as a reliable objective biomarker for determination of the extent of neurologic injury and early identification of patients who would benefit from treatment. Cervical spondylosis is a common disorder affecting predominantly the elderly with a potential to narrow the spinal canal and thereby impinge or compress upon the neural elements leading to cervical spondylotic myelopathy and radiculopathy. It is the commonest nontraumatic cause of spinal cord disorder in adults. Imaging plays an important role in grading the severity of spondylosis and detecting cord abnormalities suggesting myelopathy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  4. Magnetic resonance in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scotti, G.; Caputo, D.; Cazzullo, C.L.

    1986-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging was performed in more than 200 patients with clinical suspicion or knowledge of Multiple Sclerosis. One hundred and forty-seven (60 males and 87 females) had MR evidence of multiple sclerosis lesions. The MR signal of demyelinating plaques characteristically has prolonged T1 and T2 relaxation times and the T2-weighted spin-echo sequences are generally superior to the T1-weighted images because the lesions are better visualized as areas of increased signal intensity. MR is also able to detect plaques in the brainstem, cerebellum and within the cervical spinal cord. MR appears to be an important, non-invasive method for the diagnosis of Multiple Sclerosis and has proven to be diagnostically superior to CT, evoked potentials (EP) and CSF examination. In a selected group of 30 patients, with the whole battery of the relevant MS studies, MR was positive in 100%, CT in 33,3%, EP in 56% and CSF examination in 60%. In patients clinically presenting only with signs of spinal cord involvement or optic neuritis or when the clinical presentation is uncertain MR has proven to be a very useful diagnostic tool for diagnosis of MS by demonstrating unsuspected lesions in the cerebral hemispheres. (orig.)

  5. Evoked Emotions Predict Food Choice

    OpenAIRE

    Dalenberg, Jelle R.; Gutjar, Swetlana; ter Horst, Gert J.; de Graaf, Kees; Renken, Remco J.; Jager, Gerry

    2014-01-01

    In the current study we show that non-verbal food-evoked emotion scores significantly improve food choice prediction over merely liking scores. Previous research has shown that liking measures correlate with choice. However, liking is no strong predictor for food choice in real life environments. Therefore, the focus within recent studies shifted towards using emotion-profiling methods that successfully can discriminate between products that are equally liked. However, it is unclear how well ...

  6. Focal Anterior Displacement of the Thoracic Spinal Cord without Evidence of Spinal Cord Herniation or an Intradural Mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Yoon; Lee, Joon Woo; Lee, Guen Young; Kang, Heung Sik [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam 463-707 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-01

    We report magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings on focal anterior displacement of the thoracic spinal cord in asymptomatic patients without a spinal cord herniation or intradural mass. We identified 12 patients (male:female = 6:6; mean age, 51.7; range, 15-83 years) between 2007 and 2011, with focal anterior displacement of the spinal cord and without evidence of an intradural mass or spinal cord herniation. Two radiologists retrospectively reviewed the MRI findings in consensus. An asymmetric spinal cord deformity with a focal dented appearance was seen on the posterior surface of the spinal cord in all patients, and it involved a length of 1 or 2 vertebral segments in the upper thoracic spine (thoracic vertebrae 1-6). Moreover, a focal widening of the posterior subarachnoid space was also observed in all cases. None of the patients had myelopathy symptoms, and they showed no focal T2-hyperintensity in the spinal cord with the exception of one patient. In addition, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow artifacts were seen in the posterior subarachnoid space of the affected spinal cord level. Computed tomography myelography revealed preserved CSF flow in the two available patients. Focal anterior spinal cord indentation can be found in the upper thoracic level of asymptomatic patients without a spinal cord herniation or intradural mass.

  7. Focal Anterior Displacement of the Thoracic Spinal Cord without Evidence of Spinal Cord Herniation or an Intradural Mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Yoon; Lee, Joon Woo; Lee, Guen Young; Kang, Heung Sik

    2014-01-01

    We report magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings on focal anterior displacement of the thoracic spinal cord in asymptomatic patients without a spinal cord herniation or intradural mass. We identified 12 patients (male:female = 6:6; mean age, 51.7; range, 15-83 years) between 2007 and 2011, with focal anterior displacement of the spinal cord and without evidence of an intradural mass or spinal cord herniation. Two radiologists retrospectively reviewed the MRI findings in consensus. An asymmetric spinal cord deformity with a focal dented appearance was seen on the posterior surface of the spinal cord in all patients, and it involved a length of 1 or 2 vertebral segments in the upper thoracic spine (thoracic vertebrae 1-6). Moreover, a focal widening of the posterior subarachnoid space was also observed in all cases. None of the patients had myelopathy symptoms, and they showed no focal T2-hyperintensity in the spinal cord with the exception of one patient. In addition, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow artifacts were seen in the posterior subarachnoid space of the affected spinal cord level. Computed tomography myelography revealed preserved CSF flow in the two available patients. Focal anterior spinal cord indentation can be found in the upper thoracic level of asymptomatic patients without a spinal cord herniation or intradural mass

  8. Inflammatory lesions of the spinal cord and the nerve roots in magnetic resonance imaging; Entzuendliche Erkrankungen des Rueckenmarks und der Nervenwurzeln in der MRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sartoretti-Schefer, S. [Inst. fuer Neuroradiologie, Universitaetsspital Zuerich (Switzerland); Wichmann, W. [Inst. fuer Neuroradiologie, Universitaetsspital Zuerich (Switzerland); Valavanis, A. [Inst. fuer Neuroradiologie, Universitaetsspital Zuerich (Switzerland)

    1996-11-01

    The MRI examinations of 52 patients with proven inflammatory lesions (39 patients) or tumorous/postactinic lesions of the spinal cord (6 patients) and vasuclar malformations of the spinal cord (7 patients) were retrospectively analyzed. All examinations were performed on a 1.5 T MR unit, using bi- or triplanar T1-w pre- and postcontrast as well as T2-w SE sequences. Clinical and radiological examinations allow a subdivision of inflammations of the spinal cord and the nerve roots into (mening-oradiculo) myelitis and meningoradiculo (myelitis). The MRI patterns of these two inflammatory subtypes vary: Meningoradiculitis presents with an enhancement of the nerve roots and the leptomeninges; myelitis itself is characterized by single or multiple, diffuse or multifocal, with or without nodular, patchy or diffusely enhancing intramedullary lessions, with or without thickening of the cord and leptomeningeal inflammation. The immunologically suppressed patient suffers from viral infections (especially herpes simplex, varicella-zoster virus, cytomegalovirus), bacterial infections (tuberculosis), but rarely viral infections, sarcoidosis and demyelinating diseases. Idiopathic myelitis is also common. Secondary ischemic and demyelinating processes result in a complex morphology of inflammatory lesions on MRI, and therefore the whole spectrum of demyelinating, ischemic and inflammatory lesions has to be included in the differential diagnosis. Even tumors may imitate inflammatory myelitis and radiculitis. Most commonly, meningoradiculitis can be separated from myelitis. A reliable diagnosis of a specific inflammatory lesion is difficult and is mostly achieved in patients with multiple sclerosis and in patients with HIV-associated cytomegalovirus infection. (orig.) [Deutsch] Entzuendliche Erkrankungen des Rueckenmarks und der Nervenwurzeln werden aus klinischer und radiologischer Sicht in eine (Meningo)-Myeloradikulitis und eine Meningoradikulo-(Myelitis) beim immunsupprimierten

  9. Awareness during anaesthesia for surgery requiring evoked potential monitoring: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pritish J Korula

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Evoked potential monitoring such as somatosensory-evoked potential (SSEP or motor-evoked potential (MEP monitoring during surgical procedures in proximity to the spinal cord requires minimising the minimum alveolar concentrations (MACs below the anaesthetic concentrations normally required (1 MAC to prevent interference in amplitude and latency of evoked potentials. This could result in awareness. Our primary objective was to determine the incidence of awareness while administering low MAC inhalational anaesthetics for these unique procedures. The secondary objective was to assess the adequacy of our anaesthetic technique from neurophysiologist′s perspective. Methods: In this prospective observational pilot study, 61 American Society of Anesthesiologists 1 and 2 patients undergoing spinal surgery for whom intraoperative evoked potential monitoring was performed were included; during the maintenance phase, 0.7-0.8 MAC of isoflurane was targeted. We evaluated the intraoperative depth of anaesthesia using a bispectral (BIS index monitor as well as the patients response to surgical stimulus (PRST scoring system. Post-operatively, a modified Bruce questionnaire was used to verify awareness. The adequacy of evoked potential readings was also assessed. Results: Of the 61 patients, no patient had explicit awareness. Intraoperatively, 19 of 61 patients had a BIS value of above sixty at least once, during surgery. There was no correlation with PRST scoring and BIS during surgery. Fifty-four out of 61 patient′s evoked potential readings were deemed ′good′ or ′fair′ for the conduct of electrophysiological monitoring. Conclusions: This pilot study demonstrates that administering low MAC inhalational anaesthetics to facilitate evoked potential monitoring does not result in explicit awareness. However, larger studies are needed to verify this. The conduct of SSEP electrophysiological monitoring was satisfactory with the use of this

  10. Neuroimaging for spine and spinal cord surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyanagi, Izumi [Hokkaido Neurosurgical Memorial Hospital (Japan); Iwasaki, Yoshinobu; Hida, Kazutoshi

    2001-01-01

    Recent advances in neuroimaging of the spine and spinal cord are described based upon our clinical experiences with spinal disorders. Preoperative neuroradiological examinations, including magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and computerized tomography (CT) with three-dimensional reconstruction (3D-CT), were retrospectively analyzed in patients with cervical spondylosis or ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (130 cases), spinal trauma (43 cases) and intramedullary spinal cord tumors (92 cases). CT scan and 3D-CT were useful in elucidating the spine pathology associated with degenerative and traumatic spine diseases. Visualization of the deformity of the spine or fracture-dislocation of the spinal column with 3D-CT helped to determine the correct surgical treatment. MR imaging was most important in the diagnosis of both spine and spinal cord abnormalities. The axial MR images of the spinal cord were essential in understanding the laterality of the spinal cord compression in spinal column disorders and in determining surgical approaches to the intramedullary lesions. Although non-invasive diagnostic modalities such as MR imaging and CT scans are adequate for deciding which surgical treatment to use in the majority of spine and spinal cord disorders, conventional myelography is still needed in the diagnosis of nerve root compression in some cases of cervical spondylosis. (author)

  11. Phase sensitive reconstruction of T1-weighted inversion recovery in the evaluation of the cervical cord lesions in multiple Sclerosis; is it similarly eligible in 1.5 T magnet fields?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shayganfar, A; Sarrami, A H; Fathi, S; Shaygannejad, V; Shamsian, S

    2018-04-22

    In primary studies with 3 T Magnets, phase sensitive reconstruction of T1-weighted inversion recovery (PSIR) have showed ability to depict the cervical multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions some of which may not be detected by short tau inversion recovery (STIR). Regarding to more availability of 1.5 T MRI, this study was designed to evaluate the eligibility of PSIR in 1.5 T for detection of spinal cord MS lesions. In a study between September 2016 till March 2017 the patients with proven diagnosis of MS enrolled to the study. The standard protocol (sagittal STIR and T2W FSE and axial T2W FSE) as well as sagittal PSIR sequences were performed using a 1.5 T magnet. The images were studied and the lesions were localized and recorded as sharp or faint on each sequence. Of 25 patients (22 females and 3 males, with mean age of 33.5 ± 9.8 years and mean disease duration of 5.4 ± 3.9 years) 69 lesions in STIR, 53 lesions in T2W FSE, 47 lesions in Magnitude reconstruction of PSIR (Magnitude), and 30 lesions in phase sensitive (real) reconstruction PSIR were detected. A Wilcoxon signed-rank test showed STIR has a statistically significant higher detection rate of the plaques rather than other three sequences. (STIR and T2W FSE, Z = -4.000, p definition of the plaques rather than other three sequences. This study shows that in the setting of a 1.5 T magnet field, STIR significantly has a superiority over both of the PSIR reconstructions (i.e. real and magnitude) for the detection as well as the boundary definition of the cervical cord lesions of MS. These results have a good relevance to clinical practice by using MRI scanners and sequences routinely available, however, it is discrepant with other reports performed by 3 T Magnet fields. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Diagnosis of spinal cord diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halimi, P.; Sigal, R.; Doyon, D.; David, P.

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) nowadays plays a predominant role in the diagnosis and evaluation of spinal canal pathologies and has reduced the other exploratory methods, including computerized tomography (CT) and myelography, to an ancillary role. These pathologies are divided into three groups: those where MRI is the only imaging method (syringomyela, tumours in the spinal canal, phakomatoses, external pachimeningitis, spinal cord injuries, myelitis); those where MRI is the initial method and is completed by other examinations (vascular malformations, dysraphism, myelopathies due to cervical osteoarthritis) and those where MRI still play a lesser role than CT (degenerative lesions of the lumbar column) [fr

  13. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About ... Your email address * This iframe contains the logic required to ...

  14. Proprioceptive evoked potentials in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnfred, S; Chen, A C; Eder, Derek N

    2000-01-01

    We studied cerebral evoked potentials on the scalp to the stimulation of the right hand from a change in weight of 400-480 g in ten subjects. Rise-time was 20g/10 ms, Inter Stimulus Interval 2s and stimulus duration was 100 ms. The cerebral activations were a double positive contralateral C3'/P70......). Further studies of the PEP are needed to assess the influence of load manipulations and of muscle contraction and to explore the effect of attentional manipulation....

  15. Spinal cord motion. Influence of respiration and cardiac cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winklhofer, S. [RWTH Aachen University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Neuroradiology; University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland). Inst. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Schoth, F. [RWTH Aachen University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology; Stolzmann, P. [University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland). Inst. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Krings, T. [Toronto Western Hospital, ON (Canada). Div. of Neuroradiology; Mull, M.; Wiesmann, M. [RWTH Aachen University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Neuroradiology; Stracke, C.P. [RWTH Aachen University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Neuroradiology; Alfried-Krupp-Hospital, Essen (Germany). Dept. of Neuroradiology

    2014-11-15

    To assess physiological spinal cord motion during the cardiac cycle compared with the influence of respiration based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements. Anterior-posterior spinal cord motion within the spinal canal was assessed in 16 healthy volunteers (median age, 25 years) by cardiac-triggered and cardiac-gated gradient echo pulse sequence MRI. Image acquisition was performed during breath-holding, normal breathing, and forced breathing. Normal spinal cord motion values were computed using descriptive statistics. Breathing-dependent differences were assessed using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test and compared with the cardiac-based cord motion. A normal value table was set up for the spinal cord motion of each vertebral cervico-thoracic-lumbar segment. Significant differences in cord motion were found between cardiac-based motion while breath-holding and the two breathing modalities (P < 0.01 each). Spinal cord motion was found to be highest during forced breathing, with a maximum in the lower cervical spinal segments (C5; mean, 2.1 mm ± 1.17). Image acquisition during breath-holding revealed the lowest motion. MRI permits the demonstration and evaluation of cardiac and respiration-dependent spinal cord motion within the spinal canal from the cervical to lumbar segments. Breathing conditions have a considerably greater impact than cardiac activity on spinal cord motion.

  16. Spinal cord motion. Influence of respiration and cardiac cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winklhofer, S.; University Hospital Zurich; Schoth, F.; Stolzmann, P.; Krings, T.; Mull, M.; Wiesmann, M.; Stracke, C.P.; Alfried-Krupp-Hospital, Essen

    2014-01-01

    To assess physiological spinal cord motion during the cardiac cycle compared with the influence of respiration based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements. Anterior-posterior spinal cord motion within the spinal canal was assessed in 16 healthy volunteers (median age, 25 years) by cardiac-triggered and cardiac-gated gradient echo pulse sequence MRI. Image acquisition was performed during breath-holding, normal breathing, and forced breathing. Normal spinal cord motion values were computed using descriptive statistics. Breathing-dependent differences were assessed using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test and compared with the cardiac-based cord motion. A normal value table was set up for the spinal cord motion of each vertebral cervico-thoracic-lumbar segment. Significant differences in cord motion were found between cardiac-based motion while breath-holding and the two breathing modalities (P < 0.01 each). Spinal cord motion was found to be highest during forced breathing, with a maximum in the lower cervical spinal segments (C5; mean, 2.1 mm ± 1.17). Image acquisition during breath-holding revealed the lowest motion. MRI permits the demonstration and evaluation of cardiac and respiration-dependent spinal cord motion within the spinal canal from the cervical to lumbar segments. Breathing conditions have a considerably greater impact than cardiac activity on spinal cord motion.

  17. Synaptically evoked glutamate transporter currents in Spinal Dorsal Horn Astrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dougherty Patrick M

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Removing and sequestering synaptically released glutamate from the extracellular space is carried out by specific plasma membrane transporters that are primarily located in astrocytes. Glial glutamate transporter function can be monitored by recording the currents that are produced by co-transportation of Na+ ions with the uptake of glutamate. The goal of this study was to characterize glutamate transporter function in astrocytes of the spinal cord dorsal horn in real time by recording synaptically evoked glutamate transporter currents. Results Whole-cell patch clamp recordings were obtained from astrocytes in the spinal substantia gelatinosa (SG area in spinal slices of young adult rats. Glutamate transporter currents were evoked in these cells by electrical stimulation at the spinal dorsal root entry zone in the presence of bicuculline, strychnine, DNQX and D-AP5. Transporter currents were abolished when synaptic transmission was blocked by TTX or Cd2+. Pharmacological studies identified two subtypes of glutamate transporters in spinal astrocytes, GLAST and GLT-1. Glutamate transporter currents were graded with stimulus intensity, reaching peak responses at 4 to 5 times activation threshold, but were reduced following low-frequency (0.1 – 1 Hz repetitive stimulation. Conclusion These results suggest that glutamate transporters of spinal astrocytes could be activated by synaptic activation, and recording glutamate transporter currents may provide a means of examining the real time physiological responses of glial cells in spinal sensory processing, sensitization, hyperalgesia and chronic pain.

  18. Three-dimensional reconstructed computed tomography-magnetic resonance fusion image-based preoperative planning for surgical procedures for spinal lipoma or tethered spinal cord after myelomeningocele repair. Technical note

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bamba, Yohei; Nonaka, Masahiro; Nakajima, Shin; Yamasaki, Mami

    2011-01-01

    Surgical procedures for spinal lipoma or tethered spinal cord after myelomeningocele (MMC) repair are often difficult and complicated, because the anatomical structures can be deformed in complex and unpredictable ways. Imaging helps the surgeon understand the patient's spinal anatomy. Whereas two-dimensional images provide only limited information for surgical planning, three-dimensional (3D) reconstructed computed tomography (CT)-magnetic resonance (MR) fusion images produce clearer representations of the spinal regions. Here we describe simple and quick methods for obtaining 3D reconstructed CT-MR fusion images for preoperative planning of surgical procedures using the iPlan cranial (BrainLAB AG, Feldkirchen, Germany) neuronavigation software. 3D CT images of the vertebral bone were combined with heavily T 2 -weighted MR images of the spinal cord, lipoma, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) space, and nerve root through a process of fusion, segmentation, and reconstruction of the 3D images. We also used our procedure called 'Image Overlay' to directly project the 3D reconstructed image onto the body surface using an light emitting diode (LED) projector. The final reconstructed 3D images took 10-30 minutes to obtain, and provided the surgeon with a representation of the individual pathological structures, so enabled the design of effective surgical plans, even in patients with bony deformity such as scoliosis. None of the 19 patients treated based on our 3D reconstruction method has had neurological complications, except for CSF leakage. This 3D reconstructed imaging method, combined with Image Overlay, improves the visual understanding of complicated surgical situations, and should improve surgical efficiency and outcome. (author)

  19. Cerebral activation is correlated to regional atrophy of the spinal cord and functional motor disability in spinal cord injured individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundell, Henrik; Christensen, Mark Schram; Barthélemy, Dorothy

    2011-01-01

    Recovery of function following lesions in the nervous system requires adaptive changes in surviving circuitries. Here we investigate whether changes in cerebral activation are correlated to spinal cord atrophy and recovery of functionality in individuals with incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI). 19...... hand and the functional ability of the SCI participants measured by the clinical motor score on the other. There was no significant correlation between activation in any other cerebral area and the motor score. Activation in ipsilateral somatosensory cortex (S1), M1 and PMC was negatively correlated...... to the width of the spinal cord in the left-right direction, where the corticospinal tract is located, but not in the antero-posterior direction. There was a tendency for a negative correlation between cerebral activation in ipsilateral S1, M1 and PMC and the amplitude of motor evoked potentials...

  20. Evoked Electromyographically Controlled Electrical Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuhiro Hayashibe

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Time-variant muscle responses under electrical stimulation (ES are often problematic for all the applications of neuroprosthetic muscle control. This situation limits the range of ES usage in relevant areas, mainly due to muscle fatigue and also to changes in stimulation electrode contact conditions, especially in transcutaneous ES. Surface electrodes are still the most widely used in noninvasive applications.Electrical field variations caused by changes in the stimulation contact condition markedly affect the resulting total muscle activation levels. Fatigue phenomena under functional electrical stimulation (FES are also well known source of time-varying characteristics coming from muscle response under ES. Therefore it is essential to monitor the actual muscle state and assess the expected muscle response by ES so as to improve the current ES system in favour of adaptive muscle-response-aware FES control. To deal with this issue, we have been studying a novel control technique using evoked electromyography (eEMG signals to compensate for these muscle time-variances under ES for stable neuroprosthetic muscle control. In this perspective article, I overview the background of this topic and highlight important points to be aware of when using ES to induce the desired muscle activation regardless of the time-variance. I also demonstrate how to deal with the common critical problem of ES to move toward robust neuroprosthetic muscle control with the Evoked Electromyographically Controlled Electrical Stimulation paradigm.

  1. Multiple actions of iontophoretically applied serotonin on motorneurones in the turtle spinal cord in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skydsgaard, Morten Arnika; Hounsgaard, J

    1996-01-01

    The effects of focal activation of serotonergic receptors in motorneurones were investigated in a slice preparation of the turtle spinal cord. The test response to glutamate evoked from a dendrite by iontophoresis was attenuated by serotonin or 8-hydroxy-dipropyl-aminotetralin (8-OH-DPAT) applied...

  2. Effects of propofol anesthesia on the processing of noxious stimuli in the spinal cord and the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtner, Gregor; Auksztulewicz, Ryszard; Kirilina, Evgeniya; Velten, Helena; Mavrodis, Dionysios; Scheel, Michael; Blankenburg, Felix; von Dincklage, Falk

    2018-05-15

    Drug-induced unconsciousness is an essential component of general anesthesia, commonly attributed to attenuation of higher-order processing of external stimuli and a resulting loss of information integration capabilities of the brain. In this study, we investigated how the hypnotic drug propofol at doses comparable to those in clinical practice influences the processing of somatosensory stimuli in the spinal cord and in primary and higher-order cortices. Using nociceptive reflexes, somatosensory evoked potentials and functional magnet resonance imaging (fMRI), we found that propofol abolishes the processing of innocuous and moderate noxious stimuli at low to medium concentration levels, but that intense noxious stimuli evoked spinal and cerebral responses even during deep propofol anesthesia that caused profound electroencephalogram (EEG) burst suppression. While nociceptive reflexes and somatosensory potentials were affected only in a minor way by further increasing doses of propofol after the loss of consciousness, fMRI showed that increasing propofol concentration abolished processing of intense noxious stimuli in the insula and secondary somatosensory cortex and vastly increased processing in the frontal cortex. As the fMRI functional connectivity showed congruent changes with increasing doses of propofol - namely the temporal brain areas decreasing their connectivity with the bilateral pre-/postcentral gyri and the supplementary motor area, while connectivity of the latter with frontal areas is increased - we conclude that the changes in processing of noxious stimuli during propofol anesthesia might be related to changes in functional connectivity. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Primary multifocal gliosarcoma of the spinal cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh M. Kumar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Gliosarcoma (GS is a rare and exceedingly malignant neoplasm of the central nervous system. It displays clinical features similar to glioblastoma, yet is histologically unique as it harbors both gliomatous and sarcomatous cellular components. Involvement of the neuroaxis is predominantly limited to the cerebral parenchyma and meninges. Primary GS of the spinal cord is rarely encountered. We report a case of a 54 year old male who presented with 2 months of progressive, bilateral lower extremity sensory deficits. Magnetic resonance imaging of the neuro-axis revealed multiple intradural lesions involving the cervical and thoracic spinal cord without evidence of intracranial involvement. Surgical resection of a dural based, extramedullary cervical lesion and two exophytic, intramedullary thoracic lesions revealed gliosarcoma, WHO grade IV. The patient died approximately 11 months after presentation. This report confirms that GS is not limited to supratentorial involvement and can primarily affect the spinal cord.

  4. Magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, I.R.

    1984-01-01

    A magnet pole piece for an NMR imaging magnet is made of a plurality of magnetic wires with one end of each wire held in a non-magnetic spacer, the other ends of the wires being brought to a pinch, and connected to a magnetic core. The wires may be embedded in a synthetic resin and the magnetisation and uniformity thereof can be varied by adjusting the density of the wires at the spacer which forms the pole piece. (author)

  5. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What is “Braingate” research? play_arrow How would stem-cell therapies work ... cord injuries? play_arrow What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? play_arrow When can ...

  6. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury Allen Heinemann, PhD How Peer Counseling Works Julie Gassaway, MS, RN Pediatric Injuries Pediatric Spinal ... injury? play_arrow How does the spinal cord work? play_arrow Why is the level of a ...

  7. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... arrow What are the latest developments in the use of electrical stimulation for spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What is “Braingate” research? play_arrow How would stem-cell therapies work in the treatment of spinal cord ...

  8. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injury Guy W. Fried, MD Substance Abuse and Spinal Cord Injury Allen Heinemann, PhD How ... arrow Why are high-dose steroids often used right after an injury? play_arrow What is meant ...

  9. SOMATOSENSORY EVOKED POTENTIALS IN DIABETES MELLITUS TYPE - 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rekha

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is the most common metabolic disorder affecting majority of population. It is estimated that over 400 million people throughout the world have diabetes. It has progressed to be a pandemic from an epidemic causing morbidity and mortality in the population. Among the many complications of diabetes, diabetic neuropathies contribute majorly to the morbidity associated with the disease. Axonal conduction is affected by elevated levels of protein kinase c causing neuronal ischemia; decreased ce llular myoinositol affecting sodium potassium ATPase pump leads to decreased nerve conduction; Somatosensory E voked P otentials (SSEPs reflect the activity of somatosensory pathways mediated through the dorsal columns of the spinal cord and the specific so matosensory cortex. Recording of Somatosensory Evoked Potentials in diabetics is done to assess the sensory involvement of spinal cord. Presence of SEPs provides clear evidence for axonal continuity and by using different stimulation sites, the rate of reg eneration can be determined. Both onset and peak latencies of all SEP components are prolonged in patients with diabetes. Present study is done to compare somatosensory evoked potentials in diabetics and normal subjects. MATERIALS AND METHOD S: The present study was undertaken at the Upgraded Department of Physiology, Osmania Medical College, Koti, Hyderabad. The study was conducted on subjects, both male and female in the age group of 45 to 55 years, suffering from type II diabetes excluding other neurologi cal disorders. Non - invasive method of estimation of nerve conduction studies using SFEMG/EP — Electromyography or evoked potential system (Nicolet systems — USA using surface electrodes with automated computerized monitor attached with printer is used. RESUL TS : ANOVA showed statistically significant N9 latency (right & left sides. Latencies of all the components of SSEPs were more significant than amplitudes in Diabetic

  10. Malignant spinal cord compression in cancer patients may be mimicked by a primary spinal cord tumour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadianpanah, M; Vasei, M; Mosalaei, A; Omidvari, S; Ahmadloo, N

    2006-12-01

    Although it is quite rare, second primary neoplasms in cancer patients may present with the signs and symptoms of malignant spinal cord compression. Primary spinal cord tumours in the cancer patients may be deceptive and considered as the recurrent first cancer. Therefore, it should be precisely differentiated and appropriately managed. We report such a case of intramedullary ependymoma of the cervical spinal cord mimicking metatstatic recurrent lymphoma and causing cord compression. A 50-year-old man developed intramedullary ependymoma of the cervical spinal cord 1.5 years following chemoradiation for Waldeyer's ring lymphoma. He presented with a 2-month history of neck pain, progressive upper- and lower-extremity numbness and weakness, and bowel and bladder dysfunction. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an intramedullary expansive lesion extending from C4 to C6 levels of the cervical spinal cord. The clinical and radiological findings were suggestive of malignant process. A comprehensive investigation failed to detect another site of disease. He underwent operation, and the tumour was subtotally resected. The patient's neurological deficits improved subsequently. The development of the intramedullary ependymoma following treating lymphoma has not been reported. We describe the clinical, radiological and pathological findings of this case and review the literature.

  11. Dorsal root potential produced by a TTX-insensitive micro-circuitry in the turtle spinal cord

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Russo, R E; Delgado-Lezama, R; Hounsgaard, J

    2000-01-01

    1, The mechanisms underlying the dorsal root potential (DRP) were studied in transverse slices of turtle spinal cord. DRPs were evoked by stimulating one filament in a dorsal root and were recorded from another such filament. 2. The DRP evoked at supramaximal stimulus intensity was reduced....... 5. Our results show that part of the DRP is generated by a TTX-resistant, probably non-spiking micro-circuit with separate components mediated by GABA and glutamate....

  12. Influence of detomidine and buprenorphine on motor-evoked potentials in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nollet, H; Van Ham, L; Gasthuys, F; Dewulf, J; Vanderstraeten, G; Deprez, P

    2003-04-26

    Horses need to be sedated before they are investigated by transcranial magnetic stimulation because of the mild discomfort induced by the evoked muscle contraction and the noise of stimulation. This paper describes the influence of a combination of detomidine (10 microg/kg bodyweight) and a low dose of buprenorphine (2.4 microg/kg) on the onset latency and peak-to-peak amplitude of magnetic motor-evoked potentials in normal horses. There were no significant differences between measurements of these parameters made before the horses were sedated and measurements made 10 and 30 minutes after the drugs were administered.

  13. Syrinx of the Spinal Cord and Brain Stem

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and problems with eye movements, taste, and speech. Magnetic resonance imaging can detect a syrinx. Surgery to drain the syrinx may be done, but ... young child or teenager who has typical symptoms. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the entire spinal cord and ... of the cause when possible A neurosurgeon ...

  14. Relative shortening and functional tethering of spinal cord in adolescent scoliosis - Result of asynchronous neuro-osseous growth, summary of an electronic focus group debate of the IBSE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Winnie Cw; Lam, Wynnie Mw; Ng, Bobby Kw; Tze-Ping, Lam; Lee, Kwong-Man; Guo, Xia; Cheng, Jack Cy; Burwell, R Geoffrey; Dangerfield, Peter H; Jaspan, Tim

    2008-06-27

    There is no generally accepted scientific theory for the causes of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). As part of its mission to widen understanding of scoliosis etiology, the International Federated Body on Scoliosis Etiology (IBSE) introduced the electronic focus group (EFG) as a means of increasing debate on knowledge of important topics. This has been designated as an on-line Delphi discussion. The Statement for this debate was written by Dr WCW Chu and colleagues who examine the spinal cord to vertebral growth interaction during adolescence in scoliosis. Using the multi-planar reconstruction technique of magnetic resonance imaging they investigated the relative length of spinal cord to vertebral column including ratios in 28 girls with AIS (mainly thoracic or double major curves) and 14 age-matched normal girls. Also evaluated were cerebellar tonsillar position, somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs), and clinical neurological examination. In severe AIS compared with normal controls, the vertebral column is significantly longer without detectable spinal cord lengthening. They speculate that anterior spinal column overgrowth relative to a normal length spinal cord exerts a stretching tethering force between the two ends, cranially and caudally leading to the initiation and progression of thoracic AIS. They support and develop the Roth-Porter concept of uncoupled neuro-osseous growth in the pathogenesis of AIS which now they prefer to term 'asynchronous neuro-osseous growth'. Morphological evidence about the curve apex suggests that the spinal cord is also affected, and a 'double pathology' is suggested. AIS is viewed as a disorder with a wide spectrum and a common neuroanatomical abnormality namely, a spinal cord of normal length but short relative to an abnormally lengthened anterior vertebral column. Neuroanatomical changes and/or abnormal neural function may be expressed only in severe cases. This asynchronous neuro-osseous growth concept is regarded as

  15. Postmortem diffusion MRI of the entire human spinal cord at microscopic resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evan Calabrese

    Full Text Available The human spinal cord is a central nervous system structure that plays an important role in normal motor and sensory function, and can be affected by many debilitating neurologic diseases. Due to its clinical importance, the spinal cord is frequently the subject of imaging research. Common methods for visualizing spinal cord anatomy and pathology include histology and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, both of which have unique benefits and drawbacks. Postmortem microscopic resolution MRI of fixed specimens, sometimes referred to as magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM, combines many of the benefits inherent to both techniques. However, the elongated shape of the human spinal cord, along with hardware and scan time limitations, have restricted previous microscopic resolution MRI studies (both in vivo and ex vivo to small sections of the cord. Here we present the first MRM dataset of the entire postmortem human spinal cord. These data include 50 μm isotropic resolution anatomic image data and 100 μm isotropic resolution diffusion data, made possible by a 280 h long multi-segment acquisition and automated image segment composition. We demonstrate the use of these data for spinal cord lesion detection, automated volumetric gray matter segmentation, and quantitative spinal cord morphometry including estimates of cross sectional dimensions and gray matter fraction throughout the length of the cord. Keywords: Spinal cord, Magnetic resonance microscopy, Tractography, Human, Gray matter

  16. Thermal Stimulation Alters Cervical Spinal Cord Functional Connectivity in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Kenneth A; Sentis, Amy I; Bernadel-Huey, Olivia N; Chen, Yufen; Wang, Xue; Parrish, Todd B; Mackey, Sean

    2018-01-15

    The spinal cord has an active role in the modulation and transmission of the neural signals traveling between the body and the brain. Recent advancements in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have made the in vivo examination of spinal cord function in humans now possible. This technology has been recently extended to the investigation of resting state functional networks in the spinal cord, leading to the identification of distinct patterns of spinal cord functional connectivity. In this study, we expand on the previous work and further investigate resting state cervical spinal cord functional connectivity in healthy participants (n = 15) using high resolution imaging coupled with both seed-based functional connectivity analyses and graph theory-based metrics. Within spinal cord segment functional connectivity was present between the left and right ventral horns (bilateral motor network), left and right dorsal horns (bilateral sensory network), and the ipsilateral ventral and dorsal horns (unilateral sensory-motor network). Functional connectivity between the spinal cord segments was less apparent with the connectivity centered at the region of interest and spanning spinal cord functional network was demonstrated to be state-dependent as thermal stimulation of the right ventrolateral forearm resulted in significant disruption of the bilateral sensory network, increased network global efficiency, and decreased network modularity. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Auditory evoked field measurement using magneto-impedance sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, K., E-mail: o-kabou@echo.nuee.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Tajima, S.; Song, D.; Uchiyama, T. [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya (Japan); Hamada, N.; Cai, C. [Aichi Steel Corporation, Tokai (Japan)

    2015-05-07

    The magnetic field of the human brain is extremely weak, and it is mostly measured and monitored in the magnetoencephalography method using superconducting quantum interference devices. In this study, in order to measure the weak magnetic field of the brain, we constructed a Magneto-Impedance sensor (MI sensor) system that can cancel out the background noise without any magnetic shield. Based on our previous studies of brain wave measurements, we used two MI sensors in this system for monitoring both cerebral hemispheres. In this study, we recorded and compared the auditory evoked field signals of the subject, including the N100 (or N1) and the P300 (or P3) brain waves. The results suggest that the MI sensor can be applied to brain activity measurement.

  18. Trauma: Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Matthew J; Martin, Matthew J

    2017-10-01

    Injuries to the spinal column and spinal cord frequently occur after high-energy mechanisms of injury, or with lower-energy mechanisms, in select patient populations like the elderly. A focused yet complete neurologic examination during the initial evaluation will guide subsequent diagnostic procedures and early supportive measures to help prevent further injury. For patients with injury to bone and/or ligaments, the initial focus should be spinal immobilization and prevention of inducing injury to the spinal cord. Spinal cord injury is associated with numerous life-threatening complications during the acute and long-term phases of care that all acute care surgeons must recognize. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Conduction of impulses by axons regenerated in a Schwann cell graft in the transected adult rat thoracic spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzon, A; Calancie, B; Oudega, M; Noga, B R

    2001-06-01

    Central nervous system axons regenerate into a Schwann cell implant placed in the transected thoracic spinal cord of an adult rat. The present study was designed to test whether these regenerated axons are capable of conducting action potentials. Following the transection and removal of a 4- to 5-mm segment of the thoracic spinal cord (T8-T9), a polymer guidance channel filled with a mixture of adult rat Schwann cells and Matrigel was grafted into a 4- to 5-mm-long gap in the transected thoracic spinal cord. The two cut ends of the spinal cord were eased into the guidance channel openings. Transected control animals received a channel containing Matrigel only. Three months after implantation, electrophysiological studies were performed. Tungsten microelectrodes were used for monopolar stimulation of regenerated axons within the Schwann cell graft. Glass microelectrodes were used to record responses in the spinal cord rostral to the stimulation site. Evoked responses to electrical stimulation of the axon cable were found in two out of nine Schwann cell-grafted animals. These responses had approximate latencies in the range of those of myelinated axons. No responses were seen in any of the Matrigel-grafted animals. Histological analysis revealed that the two cases that showed evoked potentials had the largest number of myelinated axons present in the cable. This study demonstrates that axons regenerating through Schwann cell grafts in the complete transected spinal cord can produce measurable evoked responses following electrical stimulation. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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  1. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Life in a Wheelchair Lisa Rosen, MS Spasticity, Physical Therapy-Lokomat T. George Hornby, PhD, PT Empowering ... Rogers, SW Marguerite David, MSW Kathy Hulse, MSW Physical Therapy after Spinal Cord Injury Laura Wehrli, PT ...

  2. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... How Peer Counseling Works Julie Gassaway, MS, RN Pediatric Injuries Pediatric Spinal Cord Injury 101 Lawrence Vogel, MD The Basics of Pediatric SCI Rehabilitation Sara Klaas, MSW Transitions for Children ...

  3. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... com is an informational and support website for families facing spinal cord injuries. The website does not provide medical advice, recommend or endorse health care products or ...

  4. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... OT Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury Patti Rogers, SW Marguerite ... play_arrow What are the latest developments in the use of electrical stimulation for spinal ...

  5. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Diane M. Rowles, MS, NP How Family Life Changes After Spinal Cord Injury Nancy Rosenberg, PsyD Understanding SCI Rehabilitation Donald Peck Leslie, MD Adjusting to Social Life in a Wheelchair Lisa Rosen, MS Spasticity, ...

  6. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate close search Understanding Spinal ... with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical ...

  7. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... does not provide medical advice, recommend or endorse health care products or services, or control the information ... With Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About Us ...

  8. Parachute Cord Tension Sensor

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    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To design and fabricate a light weight (few oz), very small (~2 inch length) parachute cord tension sensor demonstrator device.A major challenge for the CPAS (The...

  9. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate close search Understanding Spinal Cord Injury What is a Spinal ... health care products or services, or control the information found on external websites. The Hill Foundation is ...

  10. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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  11. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Living with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate close search Understanding ... Living with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury ...

  12. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Injury Diane M. Rowles, MS, NP How Family Life Changes After Spinal Cord Injury Nancy Rosenberg, PsyD ... Rehabilitation Donald Peck Leslie, MD Adjusting to Social Life in a Wheelchair Lisa Rosen, MS Spasticity, Physical ...

  13. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... With Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About Us ... With Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC close close

  14. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury Patti Rogers, SW Marguerite ... or endorse health care products or services, or control the information found on external websites. The Hill ...

  15. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    ... With Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About Us Expert ... With Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC close close

  16. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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  17. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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  18. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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  19. Cord-Blood Banking

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    ... cord blood mainly because of the promise that stem cell research holds for the future. Most of us would have little use for stem cells now, but research into using them to treat diseases is ongoing — ...

  20. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... SCI Rehabilitation Donald Peck Leslie, MD Adjusting to Social Life in a Wheelchair Lisa Rosen, MS Spasticity, ... OT Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury Patti Rogers, SW ...

  1. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Living with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer ... Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 David Chen, MD Preventing Pressure Sores Mary Zeigler, MS Transition from Hospital to ...

  2. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... arrow What is the “Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems” program? play_arrow ... recommend or endorse health care products or services, or control the information found on external websites. The Hill Foundation is ...

  3. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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  4. Infraclavicular brachial plexus block: Comparison of posterior cord stimulation with lateral or medial cord stimulation, a prospective double blinded study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dushyant Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infraclavicular approach to the brachial plexus sheath provides anesthesia for surgery on the distal arm, elbow, forearm, wrist, and hand. It has been found that evoked distal motor response or radial nerve-type motor response has influenced the success rate of single-injection infraclavicular brachial plexus block. Aim: We conducted this study to compare the extent and effectiveness of infraclavicular brachial plexus block achieved by injecting a local anesthetic drug after finding specific muscle action due to neural stimulator guided posterior cord stimulation and lateral cord/medial cord stimulation. Methods: After ethical committee approval, patients were randomly assigned to one of the two study groups of 30 patients each. In group 1, posterior cord stimulation was used and in group 2 lateral/medial cord stimulation was used for infraclavicular brachial plexus block. The extent of motor block and effectiveness of sensory block were assessed. Results: All four motor nerves that were selected for the extent of block were blocked in 23 cases (76.7% in group 1 and in 15 cases (50.0% in group 2 (P:0.032. The two groups did not differ significantly in the number of cases in which 0, 1, 2, and 3 nerves were blocked (P>0.05. In group 1, significantly lesser number of patients had pain on surgical manipulation compared with patients of group 2 (P:0.037. Conclusion: Stimulating the posterior cord guided by a nerve stimulator before local anesthetic injection is associated with greater extent of block (in the number of motor nerves blocked and effectiveness of block (in reporting no pain during the surgery than stimulation of either the lateral or medial cord.

  5. Infiltrative lipoma compressing the spinal cord in 2 large-breed dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobert, Marc K; Brauer, Christina; Dziallas, Peter; Gerhauser, Ingo; Algermissen, Dorothee; Tipold, Andrea; Stein, Veronika M

    2013-01-01

    Two cases of infiltrative lipomas compressing the spinal cord and causing nonambulatory paraparesis in 2 large-breed dogs are reported. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed severe extradural spinal cord compression by inhomogenous masses that infiltrated the adjacent tissues and the muscles of the spine in both dogs. The presumptive clinical diagnoses were infiltrative lipomas, which were confirmed by histopathology. In rare cases infiltrative lipomas are able to compress the spinal cord by the agressive growth of invasive adipocytes causing neurological deficits.

  6. Development of an Animal Model of Thoracolumbar Burst Fracture-Induced Acute Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    seven days after injury. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histology were performed on postoperative day one and seven respectively. Results: The...custom spinal cord impactor delivered consistent, predictable, impacts to the spinal cord. MRI and histology showed a positive correlation between...Accomplishments Specific Aim 1 – Develop and complete proof of concept for a novel animal model of anterior (ventral) spinal cord injury following simulated

  7. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    by B. Curé

    2011-01-01

    The magnet operation was very satisfactory till the technical stop at the end of the year 2010. The field was ramped down on 5th December 2010, following the successful regeneration test of the turbine filters at full field on 3rd December 2010. This will limit in the future the quantity of magnet cycles, as it is no longer necessary to ramp down the magnet for this type of intervention. This is made possible by the use of the spare liquid Helium volume to cool the magnet while turbines 1 and 2 are stopped, leaving only the third turbine in operation. This obviously requires full availability of the operators to supervise the operation, as it is not automated. The cryogenics was stopped on 6th December 2010 and the magnet was left without cooling until 18th January 2011, when the cryoplant operation resumed. The magnet temperature reached 93 K. The maintenance of the vacuum pumping was done immediately after the magnet stop, when the magnet was still at very low temperature. Only the vacuum pumping of the ma...

  8. Spinal cord grey matter segmentation challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prados, Ferran; Ashburner, John; Blaiotta, Claudia; Brosch, Tom; Carballido-Gamio, Julio; Cardoso, Manuel Jorge; Conrad, Benjamin N; Datta, Esha; Dávid, Gergely; Leener, Benjamin De; Dupont, Sara M; Freund, Patrick; Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A M Gandini; Grussu, Francesco; Henry, Roland; Landman, Bennett A; Ljungberg, Emil; Lyttle, Bailey; Ourselin, Sebastien; Papinutto, Nico; Saporito, Salvatore; Schlaeger, Regina; Smith, Seth A; Summers, Paul; Tam, Roger; Yiannakas, Marios C; Zhu, Alyssa; Cohen-Adad, Julien

    2017-05-15

    An important image processing step in spinal cord magnetic resonance imaging is the ability to reliably and accurately segment grey and white matter for tissue specific analysis. There are several semi- or fully-automated segmentation methods for cervical cord cross-sectional area measurement with an excellent performance close or equal to the manual segmentation. However, grey matter segmentation is still challenging due to small cross-sectional size and shape, and active research is being conducted by several groups around the world in this field. Therefore a grey matter spinal cord segmentation challenge was organised to test different capabilities of various methods using the same multi-centre and multi-vendor dataset acquired with distinct 3D gradient-echo sequences. This challenge aimed to characterize the state-of-the-art in the field as well as identifying new opportunities for future improvements. Six different spinal cord grey matter segmentation methods developed independently by various research groups across the world and their performance were compared to manual segmentation outcomes, the present gold-standard. All algorithms provided good overall results for detecting the grey matter butterfly, albeit with variable performance in certain quality-of-segmentation metrics. The data have been made publicly available and the challenge web site remains open to new submissions. No modifications were introduced to any of the presented methods as a result of this challenge for the purposes of this publication. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Activation of substantia gelatinosa by midbrain reticular stimulation demonstrated with 2-deoxyglucose in the rat spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzales-Lima, F.

    1986-01-01

    The autoradiographic ( 14 C)2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) method was used to map the descending effects of midbrain reticular stimulation on the rat cervical spinal cord. The stimulation evoked consistently a defensive 'freezing' reaction as well as a large and highly localized increase in 2-DG uptake in the substantia gelatinosa (SG)(Rexed laminae 2-3). No stimulus-induced changes in 2-DG uptake were produced in the other regions of the spinal cord. The findings represent the first anatomical demonstration of the activating effects of the spinal cord. The findings represent the first anatomical demonstration of the activating effects of midbrain reticular stimulation on the spinal cord. They also support the concept of an integrative role for the SG in descending reticular mechanisms at the spinal cord level. (author)

  10. Activation of substantia gelatinosa by midbrain reticular stimulation demonstrated with 2-deoxyglucose in the rat spinal cord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzales-Lima, F

    1986-04-24

    The autoradiographic (/sup 14/C)2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) method was used to map the descending effects of midbrain reticular stimulation on the rat cervical spinal cord. The stimulation evoked consistently a defensive 'freezing' reaction as well as a large and highly localized increase in 2-DG uptake in the substantia gelatinosa (SG)(Rexed laminae 2-3). No stimulus-induced changes in 2-DG uptake were produced in the other regions of the spinal cord. The findings represent the first anatomical demonstration of the activating effects of the spinal cord. The findings represent the first anatomical demonstration of the activating effects of midbrain reticular stimulation on the spinal cord. They also support the concept of an integrative role for the SG in descending reticular mechanisms at the spinal cord level. 12 refs.

  11. Pregnancy Complications: Umbilical Cord Abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Umbilical cord abnormalities Umbilical cord abnormalities Now playing: E-mail to a friend Please fill in all fields. ... blood supply) to the baby. The two arteries transport waste from the baby to the placenta (where ...

  12. Modeling the neuroanatomic propagation of ALS in the spinal cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drawert, Brian; Thakore, Nimish; Mitchell, Brian; Pioro, Erik; Ravits, John; Petzold, Linda R.

    2017-07-01

    Recent hypotheses of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) progression have posited a point-source origin of motor neuron death with neuroanatomic propagation either contiguously to adjacent regions, or along networks via axonal and synaptic connections. Although the molecular mechanisms of propagation are unknown, one leading hypothesis is a "prion-like" spread of misfolded and aggregated proteins, including SOD1 and TDP-43. We have developed a mathematical model representing cellular and molecular spread of ALS in the human spinal cord. Our model is based on the stochastic reaction-diffusion master equation approach using a tetrahedral discretized space to capture the complex geometry of the spinal cord. Domain dimension and shape was obtained by reconstructing human spinal cord from high-resolution magnetic resonance (MR) images and known gross and histological neuroanatomy. Our preliminary results qualitatively recapitulate the clinically observed pattern of spread of ALS thorough the spinal cord.

  13. Segmental hypersensitivity and spinothalamic function in spinal cord injury pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finnerup, Nanna Brix; Sørensen, Leif Hougaard; Biering-Sørensen, Fin

    2007-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying central pain following spinal cord injury (SCI) are unsettled. The purpose of the present study was to examine differences in spinothalamic tract function below injury level and evoked pain in incomplete SCI patients with neuropathic pain below injury level (central pain......-free group. The rostral-caudal extent of the lesion measured by MRI did not differ between the two patient groups, and there were no statistically significant differences in any of the predefined areas of interest on the axial plane images. This study suggests that neuronal hyperexcitability plays a key role...... in central SCI pain and furthermore - in contrast to previous findings - that loss of spinothalamic functions does not appear to be a predictor for central neuropathic pain in spinal cord injury....

  14. Spinal cord potentials in traumatic paraplegia and quadriplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedgwick, E M; el-Negamy, E; Frankel, H

    1980-01-01

    Cortical, cervical and lumbar somatosensory evoked potentials were recorded following median and tibial nerve stimulation in patients with traumatic paraplegia and quadriplegia. The isolated cord was able to produce normal potentials even during spinal shock if the vertical extent of the lesion did not involve the generator mechanisms. The cervical potentials showed subtle changes in paraplegia at Th5 levels and below. In high cervical lesions the early cervical potentials may still be present but the later potentials were absent or, in partial lesions, delayed. PMID:7420105

  15. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2010-01-01

    Operation of the magnet has gone quite smoothly during the first half of this year. The magnet has been at 4.5K for the full period since January. There was an unplanned short stop due to the CERN-wide power outage on May 28th, which caused a slow dump of the magnet. Since this occurred just before a planned technical stop of the LHC, during which access in the experimental cavern was authorized, it was decided to leave the magnet OFF until 2nd June, when magnet was ramped up again to 3.8T. The magnet system experienced a fault also resulting in a slow dump on April 14th. This was triggered by a thermostat on a filter choke in the 20kA DC power converter. The threshold of this thermostat is 65°C. However, no variation in the water-cooling flow rate or temperature was observed. Vibration may have been the root cause of the fault. All the thermostats have been checked, together with the cables, connectors and the read out card. The tightening of the inductance fixations has also been checked. More tem...

  16. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2012-01-01

      The magnet was energised at the beginning of March 2012 at a low current to check all the MSS safety chains. Then the magnet was ramped up to 3.8 T on 6 March 2012. Unfortunately two days later an unintentional switch OFF of the power converter caused a slow dump. This was due to a misunderstanding of the CCC (CERN Control Centre) concerning the procedure to apply for the CMS converter control according to the beam-mode status at that time. Following this event, the third one since 2009, a discussion was initiated to define possible improvement, not only on software and procedures in the CCC, but also to evaluate the possibility to upgrade the CMS hardware to prevent such discharge from occurring because of incorrect procedure implementations. The magnet operation itself was smooth, and no power cuts took place. As a result, the number of magnetic cycles was reduced to the minimum, with only two full magnetic cycles from 0 T to 3.8 T. Nevertheless the magnet suffered four stops of the cryogeni...

  17. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2012-01-01

      Following the unexpected magnet stops last August due to sequences of unfortunate events on the services and cryogenics [see CMS internal report], a few more events and initiatives again disrupted the magnet operation. All the magnet parameters stayed at their nominal values during this period without any fault or alarm on the magnet control and safety systems. The magnet was stopped for the September technical stop to allow interventions in the experimental cavern on the detector services. On 1 October, to prepare the transfer of the liquid nitrogen tank on its new location, several control cables had to be removed. One cable was cut mistakenly, causing a digital input card to switch off, resulting in a cold-box (CB) stop. This tank is used for the pre-cooling of the magnet from room temperature down to 80 K, and for this reason it is controlled through the cryogenics control system. Since the connection of the CB was only allowed for a field below 2 T to avoid the risk of triggering a fast d...

  18. Spinal cord swelling and candidiasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, K.; Gronseth, G.; Aldrich, M.; Williams, A.

    1982-01-01

    Fusiform swelling of the spinal cord was noted myelographically in a patient with Hodgkin's disease. Autopsy revealed that the swelling was cauused by Candida infection of the spinal cord. It is suggested that fungal infection be included in the differential diagnosis of spinal cord swelling in the immunsupporessed cancer patient. (orig.)

  19. Spinal cord swelling and candidiasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, K.; Gronseth, G.; Aldrich, M.; Williams, A.

    1982-11-01

    Fusiform swelling of the spinal cord was noted myelographically in a patient with Hodgkin's disease. Autopsy revealed that the swelling was caused by Candida infection of the spinal cord. It is suggested that fungal infection be included in the differential diagnosis of spinal cord swelling in the immunosuppressed cancer patient.

  20. Spinal Cord Stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Kaare

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is a surgical treatment for chronic neuropathic pain that is refractory to other treatment. Originally described by Shealy et al. in 1967(1), it is used to treat a range of conditions such as complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS I)(2), angina pectoris(3), radicular...... pain after failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS)(4), pain due to peripheral nerve injury, stump pain(5), peripheral vascular disease(6) and diabetic neuropathy(7,8); whereas phantom pain(9), postherpetic neuralgia(10), chronic visceral pain(11), and pain after partial spinal cord injury(12) remain more...

  1. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2012-01-01

      The magnet and its sub-systems were stopped at the beginning of the winter shutdown on 8th December 2011. The magnet was left without cooling during the cryogenics maintenance until 17th January 2012, when the cryoplant operation resumed. The magnet temperature reached 93 K. The vacuum pumping was maintained during this period. During this shutdown, the yearly maintenance was performed on the cryogenics, the vacuum pumps, the magnet control and safety systems, and the power converter and discharge lines. Several preventive actions led to the replacement of the electrovalve command coils, and the 20A DC power supplies of the magnet control system. The filters were cleaned on the demineralised water circuits. The oil of the diffusion pumps was changed. On the cryogenics, warm nitrogen at 343 K was circulated in the cold box to regenerate the filters and the heat exchangers. The coalescing filters have been replaced at the inlet of both the turbines and the lubricant trapping unit. The active cha...

  2. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2013-01-01

      The magnet was operated without any problem until the end of the LHC run in February 2013, apart from a CERN-wide power glitch on 10 January 2013 that affected the CMS refrigerator, causing a ramp down to 2 T in order to reconnect the coldbox. Another CERN-wide power glitch on 15 January 2013 didn’t affect the magnet subsystems, the cryoplant or the power converter. At the end of the magnet run, the reconnection of the coldbox at 2.5 T was tested. The process will be updated, in particular the parameters of some PID valve controllers. The helium flow of the current leads was reduced but only for a few seconds. The exercise will be repeated with the revised parameters to validate the automatic reconnection process of the coldbox. During LS1, the water-cooling services will be reduced and many interventions are planned on the electrical services. Therefore, the magnet cryogenics and subsystems will be stopped for several months, and the magnet cannot be kept cold. In order to avoid unc...

  3. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2010-01-01

    The magnet was successfully operated at the end of the year 2009 despite some technical problems on the cryogenics. The magnet was ramped up to 3.8 T at the end of November until December 16th when the shutdown started. The magnet operation met a few unexpected stops. The field was reduced to 3.5 T for about 5 hours on December 3rd due to a faulty pressure sensor on the helium compressor. The following day the CERN CCC stopped unintentionally the power converters of the LHC and the experiments, triggering a ramp down that was stopped at 2.7 T. The magnet was back at 3.8 T about 6 hours after CCC sent the CERN-wide command. Three days later, a slow dump was triggered due to a stop of the pump feeding the power converter water-cooling circuit, during an intervention on the water-cooling plant done after several disturbances on the electrical distribution network. The magnet was back at 3.8 T in the evening the same day. On December 10th a break occurred in one turbine of the cold box producing the liquid ...

  4. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2011-01-01

    The CMS magnet has been running steadily and smoothly since the summer, with no detected flaw. The magnet instrumentation is entirely operational and all the parameters are at their nominal values. Three power cuts on the electrical network affected the magnet run in the past five months, with no impact on the data-taking as the accelerator was also affected at the same time. On 22nd June, a thunderstorm caused a power glitch on the service electrical network. The primary water cooling at Point 5 was stopped. Despite a quick restart of the water cooling, the inlet temperature of the demineralised water on the busbar cooling circuit increased by 5 °C, up to 23.3 °C. It was kept below the threshold of 27 °C by switching off other cooling circuits to avoid the trigger of a slow dump of the magnet. The cold box of the cryogenics also stopped. Part of the spare liquid helium volume was used to maintain the cooling of the magnet at 4.5 K. The operators of the cryogenics quickly restarted ...

  5. Characterization of music-evoked autobiographical memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janata, Petr; Tomic, Stefan T; Rakowski, Sonja K

    2007-11-01

    Despite music's prominence in Western society and its importance to individuals in their daily lives, very little is known about the memories and emotions that are often evoked when hearing a piece of music from one's past. We examined the content of music-evoked autobiographical memories (MEAMs) using a novel approach for selecting stimuli from a large corpus of popular music, in both laboratory and online settings. A set of questionnaires probed the cognitive and affective properties of the evoked memories. On average, 30% of the song presentations evoked autobiographical memories, and the majority of songs also evoked various emotions, primarily positive, that were felt strongly. The third most common emotion was nostalgia. Analyses of written memory reports found both general and specific levels of autobiographical knowledge to be represented, and several social and situational contexts for memory formation were common across many memories. The findings indicate that excerpts of popular music serve as potent stimuli for studying the structure of autobiographical memories.

  6. Fixed cord in spinal stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, L.M.; Wang, H.; Francomano, C.; Hurko, O.; Carson, B.; Heffez, D.S.; DiChiro, G.; Bryan, R.N.

    1990-01-01

    This paper evaluates patients with cervical spinal canal compromise due to congenital anomalies (achondroplasia, Chiari malformation) and degenerative diseases using MR cord motion and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow studies. Pulsatile longitudinal motion of the cervical cord was determined by means of cardiac-gated velocity phase contrast methods, including cine. Pathology included dwarfism (n = 15), Chiari malformation (n = 10), spondylosis (n = 10), and acute cord compression (n = 9). Symptomatic cases of congenital cervical stenosis had decreased cord motion, although CSF flow was not always significantly compromised. Postoperative cases demonstrated good cord and CSF motion, unless compression or obstruction was present

  7. SCT: Spinal Cord Toolbox, an open-source software for processing spinal cord MRI data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Leener, Benjamin; Lévy, Simon; Dupont, Sara M; Fonov, Vladimir S; Stikov, Nikola; Louis Collins, D; Callot, Virginie; Cohen-Adad, Julien

    2017-01-15

    For the past 25 years, the field of neuroimaging has witnessed the development of several software packages for processing multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) to study the brain. These software packages are now routinely used by researchers and clinicians, and have contributed to important breakthroughs for the understanding of brain anatomy and function. However, no software package exists to process mpMRI data of the spinal cord. Despite the numerous clinical needs for such advanced mpMRI protocols (multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injury, cervical spondylotic myelopathy, etc.), researchers have been developing specific tools that, while necessary, do not provide an integrative framework that is compatible with most usages and that is capable of reaching the community at large. This hinders cross-validation and the possibility to perform multi-center studies. In this study we introduce the Spinal Cord Toolbox (SCT), a comprehensive software dedicated to the processing of spinal cord MRI data. SCT builds on previously-validated methods and includes state-of-the-art MRI templates and atlases of the spinal cord, algorithms to segment and register new data to the templates, and motion correction methods for diffusion and functional time series. SCT is tailored towards standardization and automation of the processing pipeline, versatility, modularity, and it follows guidelines of software development and distribution. Preliminary applications of SCT cover a variety of studies, from cross-sectional area measures in large databases of patients, to the precise quantification of mpMRI metrics in specific spinal pathways. We anticipate that SCT will bring together the spinal cord neuroimaging community by establishing standard templates and analysis procedures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Diffusion tensor imaging of spinal cord parenchyma lesion in rat with chronic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Can; Rao, Jia-Sheng; Pei, Xiao-Jiao; Lei, Jian-Feng; Wang, Zhan-Jing; Zhao, Wen; Wei, Rui-Han; Yang, Zhao-Yang; Li, Xiao-Guang

    2018-04-01

    Adequate evaluation of spinal cord parenchyma and accurate identification of injury range are considered two premises for the research and treatment of chronic spinal cord injury (SCI). Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) provides information about water diffusion in spinal cord, and thus makes it possible to realize these premises. In this study, we conducted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for Wistar rats 84days after spinal cord contusion. DTI metrics including fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), axial diffusivity (AD), and radial diffusivity (RD) from different positions of the injured cord were collected, analyzed, and compared with the histological results and locomotor outcomes. Moreover, we performed fiber tractography, and examined the difference in cavity percentage obtained respectively via conventional MRI, DTI and histology. Results showed that the chronic SCI rats had the largest changes of all DTI metrics at the epicenter; the farther away from the epicenter, the smaller the variation. FA, AD and RD were all influenced by SCI in a greater space range than MD. The good consistency of FA values and histological results in specific regions evidenced FA's capability of reflecting Wallerian degeneration after SCI. DTI metrics at the epicenter in ventral funiculus also showed a close correlation with the BBB scores. Additionally, supported by the histological results, DTI enables a more accurate measurement of cavity percentage compared to the conventional MRI. DTI parameters might comprehensively reflect the post-SCI pathological status of spinal cord parenchyma at the epicenter and distal parts during the chronic stage, while showing good consistency with locomotor performance. DTI combined with tractography could intuitively display the distribution of spared fibers after SCI and accurately provide information such as cavity area. This may shed light on the research and treatment of chronic SCI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  9. Vocal Cord Paralysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Viral infections. Some viral infections, such as Lyme disease, Epstein-Barr and herpes, can cause inflammation and damage directly to the nerves in the larynx. Neurological conditions. If you have certain ... disease, you may experience vocal cord paralysis. Risk factors ...

  10. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Home Kim Eberhardt Muir, MS Coping with a New Injury Robin Dorman, PsyD Sex and Fertility After ... program? play_arrow What are the most promising new treatments for spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What ...

  11. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... What is “Braingate” research? play_arrow How would stem-cell therapies work in the treatment of spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? play_arrow When ...

  12. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is “Braingate” research? play_arrow How would stem-cell therapies work in the treatment of spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? play_arrow When ...

  13. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Braingate” research? play_arrow How would stem-cell therapies work in the treatment of spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? play_arrow When can we expect ...

  14. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury Patti Rogers, SW Marguerite David, ... injuries. The website does not provide medical advice, recommend or endorse health care products or services, or control the information ...

  15. Relative shortening and functional tethering of spinal cord in adolescent scoliosis – Result of asynchronous neuro-osseous growth, summary of an electronic focus group debate of the IBSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burwell R Geoffrey

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There is no generally accepted scientific theory for the causes of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS. As part of its mission to widen understanding of scoliosis etiology, the International Federated Body on Scoliosis Etiology (IBSE introduced the electronic focus group (EFG as a means of increasing debate on knowledge of important topics. This has been designated as an on-line Delphi discussion. The Statement for this debate was written by Dr WCW Chu and colleagues who examine the spinal cord to vertebral growth interaction during adolescence in scoliosis. Using the multi-planar reconstruction technique of magnetic resonance imaging they investigated the relative length of spinal cord to vertebral column including ratios in 28 girls with AIS (mainly thoracic or double major curves and 14 age-matched normal girls. Also evaluated were cerebellar tonsillar position, somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs, and clinical neurological examination. In severe AIS compared with normal controls, the vertebral column is significantly longer without detectable spinal cord lengthening. They speculate that anterior spinal column overgrowth relative to a normal length spinal cord exerts a stretching tethering force between the two ends, cranially and caudally leading to the initiation and progression of thoracic AIS. They support and develop the Roth-Porter concept of uncoupled neuro-osseous growth in the pathogenesis of AIS which now they prefer to term 'asynchronous neuro-osseous growth'. Morphological evidence about the curve apex suggests that the spinal cord is also affected, and a 'double pathology' is suggested. AIS is viewed as a disorder with a wide spectrum and a common neuroanatomical abnormality namely, a spinal cord of normal length but short relative to an abnormally lengthened anterior vertebral column. Neuroanatomical changes and/or abnormal neural function may be expressed only in severe cases. This asynchronous neuro-osseous growth

  16. Anterior spinal cord syndrome of unknown etiology

    OpenAIRE

    Klakeel, Merrine; Thompson, Justin; Srinivasan, Rajashree; McDonald, Frank

    2015-01-01

    A spinal cord injury encompasses a physical insult to the spinal cord. In the case of anterior spinal cord syndrome, the insult is a vascular lesion at the anterior spinal artery. We present the cases of two 13-year-old boys with anterior spinal cord syndrome, along with a review of the anatomy and vasculature of the spinal cord and an explanation of how a lesion in the cord corresponds to anterior spinal cord syndrome.

  17. Cortical modulation of short-latency TMS-evoked potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenica eVeniero

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial magnetic stimulation - electroencephalogram (TMS-EEG co-registration offers the opportunity to test reactivity of brain areas across distinct conditions through TMS-evoked potentials (TEPs. Several TEPs have been described, their functional meaning being largely unknown. In particular, short-latency potentials peaking at 5 (P5 and 8 (N8 ms after the TMS pulse have been recently described, but because of their huge amplitude, the problem of whether their origin is cortical or not has been opened. To gain information about these components, we employed a protocol that modulates primary motor cortex excitability (MI through an exclusively cortical phenomena: low frequency stimulation of premotor area (PMC. TMS was applied simultaneously with EEG recording from 70 electrodes. Amplitude of TEPs evoked by 200 single-pulses TMS delivered over MI at 110% of resting motor threshold was measured before and after applying 900 TMS conditioning stimuli to left premotor cortex with 1 Hz repetition rate. Single subject analyses showed reduction in TEPs amplitude after PMC conditioning in a sample of participants and increase in TEPs amplitude in two subjects. No effects were found on corticospinal excitability as recorded by motor evoked potentials (MEPs. Furthermore, correlation analysis showed an inverse relation between the effects of the conditioning protocol on P5-N8 complex amplitude and MEPs amplitude. Because the effects of the used protocol have been ascribed to a cortical interaction between premotor area and MI, we suggest that despite the sign of P5-N8 amplitude modulation is not consistent across participant, this modulation could indicate, at least in part, their cortical origin. We conclude that with an accurate experimental procedure early-latency components can be used to evaluate the reactivity of the stimulated cortex.

  18. Brainstem evoked potentials in infantile spasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazaki, Masahito; Hashimoto, Toshiaki; Murakawa, Kazuyoshi; Tayama, Masanobu; Kuroda, Yasuhiro

    1992-01-01

    In ten patients with infantile spasms, brainstem evoked potentials and MRI examinations were performed to evaluate the brainstem involvement. The result of short latency somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP) following the right median nerve stimulation revealed abnormal findings including the absence or low amplitudes of the waves below wave P3 and delayed central conduction time in 7 of the ten patients. The result of auditory brainstem responses (ABR) revealed abnormal findings including low amplitudes of wave V, prolonged interpeak latency of waves I-V and absence of the waves below wave IV in 5 of the ten patients. The result of the MRI examinations revealed various degrees of the brainstem atrophy in 6 of the ten patients, all of whom showed abnormal brainstem evoked potentials. The result of this study demonstrates that patients with infantile spasms are frequently associated with brainstem dysfunction and raises the possibility that brainstem atrophy might be a cause of infantile spasms. (author)

  19. Slow cortical evoked potentials after noise exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    von Wedel, H; Opitz, H J

    1979-07-01

    Human cortical evoked potentials under conditions of stimuation are registrated in the post-stimulatory phase of a five minutes lasting equally masking white noise (90 dB HL). Changes of the evoked potentials during adaptation, possible analogy with high tone losses after noise representation and the origin of tinnitus are examined. Stimulation was started 3 sec after the off-effect of the noise. For five minutes periodically tone bursts were represented. Each train of stimulation consists of tone bursts of three frequencies: 2 kcs, 4 kcs, 8 kcs. The 0.5 sec lasting tones were separated by pauses of 2 sec. During the experiment stimulation and analysis were controlled by a computer. Changes in latency and amplitudes of the cortical evoked potentials were registered. Changes of the adaptation patterns as a function of the poststimulatory time are discussed.

  20. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2011-01-01

    The magnet ran smoothly in the last few months until a fast dump occurred on 9th May 2011. Fortunately, this occurred in the afternoon of the first day of the technical stop. The fast dump was due to a valve position controller that caused the sudden closure of a valve. This valve is used to regulate the helium flow on one of the two current leads, which electrically connects the coil at 4.5 K to the busbars at room temperature. With no helium flow on the lead, the voltage drop and the temperatures across the leads increase up to the defined thresholds, triggering a fast dump through the Magnet Safety System (MSS). The automatic reaction triggered by the MSS worked properly. The helium release was limited as the pressure rise was just at the limit of the safety valve opening pressure. The average temperature of the magnet reached 72 K. It took four days to recover the temperature and refill the helium volumes. The faulty valve controller was replaced by a spare one before the magnet ramp-up resumed....

  1. Evoking prescribed spike times in stochastic neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doose, Jens; Lindner, Benjamin

    2017-09-01

    Single cell stimulation in vivo is a powerful tool to investigate the properties of single neurons and their functionality in neural networks. We present a method to determine a cell-specific stimulus that reliably evokes a prescribed spike train with high temporal precision of action potentials. We test the performance of this stimulus in simulations for two different stochastic neuron models. For a broad range of parameters and a neuron firing with intermediate firing rates (20-40 Hz) the reliability in evoking the prescribed spike train is close to its theoretical maximum that is mainly determined by the level of intrinsic noise.

  2. Brain correlates of music-evoked emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelsch, Stefan

    2014-03-01

    Music is a universal feature of human societies, partly owing to its power to evoke strong emotions and influence moods. During the past decade, the investigation of the neural correlates of music-evoked emotions has been invaluable for the understanding of human emotion. Functional neuroimaging studies on music and emotion show that music can modulate activity in brain structures that are known to be crucially involved in emotion, such as the amygdala, nucleus accumbens, hypothalamus, hippocampus, insula, cingulate cortex and orbitofrontal cortex. The potential of music to modulate activity in these structures has important implications for the use of music in the treatment of psychiatric and neurological disorders.

  3. Spontaneous and Evoked Activity from Murine Ventral Horn Cultures on Microelectrode Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan J. Black

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Motor neurons are the site of action for several neurological disorders and paralytic toxins, with cell bodies located in the ventral horn (VH of the spinal cord along with interneurons and support cells. Microelectrode arrays (MEAs have emerged as a high content assay platform for mechanistic studies and drug discovery. Here, we explored the spontaneous and evoked electrical activity of VH cultures derived from embryonic mouse spinal cord on multi-well plates of MEAs. Primary VH cultures from embryonic day 15–16 mice were characterized by expression of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT by immunocytochemistry. Well resolved, all-or-nothing spontaneous spikes with profiles consistent with extracellular action potentials were observed after 3 days in vitro, persisting with consistent firing rates until at least day in vitro 19. The majority of the spontaneous activity consisted of tonic firing interspersed with coordinated bursting across the network. After 5 days in vitro, spike activity was readily evoked by voltage pulses where a minimum amplitude and duration required for excitation was 300 mV and 100 μs/phase, respectively. We characterized the sensitivity of spontaneous and evoked activity to a host of pharmacological agents including AP5, CNQX, strychnine, ω-agatoxin IVA, and botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A. These experiments revealed sensitivity of the cultured VH to both agonist and antagonist compounds in a manner consistent with mature tissue derived from slices. In the case of BoNT/A, we also demonstrated intoxication persistence over an 18-day period, followed by partial intoxication recovery induced by N- and P/Q-type calcium channel agonist GV-58. In total, our findings suggest that VH cultures on multi-well MEA plates may represent a moderate throughput, high content assay for performing mechanistic studies and for screening potential therapeutics pertaining to paralytic toxins and neurological disorders.

  4. MRI and clinical symptoms in chronic cervical cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soeda, Shuichi; Maruiwa, Hirofumi; Yokoi, Masahiro; Saitoh, Seiya; Yamauchi, Kenji.

    1992-01-01

    To assess the ability of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to determine the prognosis of spinal cord injury in the chronic stage and to detect the injured myelomere, 39 patients were examined with MR images obtained by T1-weighted spin echo method 5 months to 4 years and 8 months (mean, one year and 5 months) after they had sustained spinal cord injury. According to hypointensity area of the ventrodorsad diameter of the spinal cord, MR images were classified as non-hypointensity (I), discrete (II), central (III), large cavity (IV), and transverse (V). The most common type was III (25%), followed by IV (26%), II (18%), V (15%), and I (13%). In 21 patients with bone injury, 14 (67%) had type IV or V, in contrast to 2 (11%) of 18 patients without bone injury. Increased hypointensity on MR images was associated with severer injury of the spinal cord. When hypointensity accounted for less than 1/2 of the ventrodorsad diameter of the spinal cord, walking ability was recovered in more than 80% of the patients. When less than 1/3 of the ventrodorsad diameter of the spinal cord was seen as hypointensity, arm function was well preserved, and the anterior horn of gray matter was found less injured. In 60% of the patients, there was difference in the injured level of myelomere between MR images and the neurological examination; the injured level of myelomere tended to be more cephalad level in the neurological examination than MR appearance.(N.K.)

  5. Clinical and imaging findings in spinal cord arteriovenous malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sang Heum; Kim, Dong Ik; Yoon, Pyeong Ho; Jeon, Pyoung; Ihn, Yeon Kwon

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the findings of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and selective spinal angiography of spinal cord arteriovenous malformations (SCAVMs) and to investigate the correlation of these findings with the development of clinical symptoms. In 16 patients diagnosed as suffering from SCAVMs, MR imaging and selective spinal angiograms were retrospectively analyzed and correlated with clinical symptoms. Clinical data were reviewed, especially concerning the mode of onset of clinical symptoms, and MR images of SCAVMs were evaluated with regard to the following parameters: spinal cord swelling with T2 hyperintensity, cord atrophy, intramedullary hemorrhage, and contrast enhancement of the spinal cord. Selective spinal angiographic findings of SCAVMs were also evaluated in terms of the following , parameters: type of SCAVM, presence of aneurysms, and patterns of venous drainage. Imaging findings were also correlated with the development of clinical symptoms. Systematic evaluation of the findings of MR imaging and angiography provides detailed information on the type of AVM and status of the spinal cord parenchyma, and this can be correlated with clinical manifestations of SCAVM. In patients suffering from this condition, spinal cord dysfunction due to venous congestion appears to be the main cause of clinical symptoms. (author). 18 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs

  6. Development of a modified model of spinal cord ischemia injury by selective ligation of lumbar arteries in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, W; Wen, J; Huang, Y-C; Yu, B-S

    2017-11-01

    Experimental study. The aim of this study is to develop a modified model of spinal cord ischemia in rabbits. Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Spine Surgery, Shenzhen, China. In total, 20 New Zealand rabbits were divided into the following four groups according to the level of ligation of bilateral lumbar arteries: (1) group A, sham group, no ligation, n=5; (2) group B, ligation of bilateral lumbar arteries at three levels (L2-L4, n=5); (3) group C, ligation of bilateral lumbar arteries at four levels (L2-L5, n=5); and (4) group D, ligation of bilateral lumbar arteries at five levels (L1-L5, n=5). The latency of motor-evoked potentials was measured intraoperatively and the modified Tarlov grades were scored, followed by a histological observation of spinal cord, on the seventh day after surgery. All 10 rabbits in Group A and Group B were electrophysiologically, neurologically and histologically normal. In Group C, moderate spinal cord ischemia injury was found in three of five rabbits: they had prolonged latency of motor-evoked potentials and neuronal karyopyknosis in the anterior horn of spinal cord, and the average Tarlov score was 4.2±0.8. In Group D, severe spinal cord ischemia injury was recorded in all the five rabbits: the latency of motor-evoked potential prolonged in one rabbit, whereas the waveform disappeared in four rabbits; loss of neurons and vacuolation of gray matter were seen in spinal cord sections, and the average Tarlov score was 0.6±0.9. Selective ligation of lumbar arteries was a modified method to induce feasible and reproducible model of spinal cord ischemia in rabbits.

  7. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2010-01-01

    The magnet worked very well at 3.8 T as expected, despite a technical issue that manifested twice in the cryogenics since June. All the other magnet sub-systems worked without flaw. The issue in the cryogenics was with the cold box: it could be observed that the cold box was getting progressively blocked, due to some residual humidity and air accumulating in the first thermal exchanger and in the adsorber at 65 K. This was later confirmed by the analysis during the regeneration phases. An increase in the temperature difference between the helium inlet and outlet across the heat exchanger and a pressure drop increase on the filter of the adsorber were observed. The consequence was a reduction of the helium flow, first compensated by the automatic opening of the regulation valves. But once they were fully opened, the flow and refrigeration power reduced as a consequence. In such a situation, the liquid helium level in the helium Dewar decreased, eventually causing a ramp down of the magnet current and a field...

  8. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    MAGNET During the winter shutdown, the magnet subsystems went through a full maintenance. The magnet was successfully warmed up to room temperature beginning of December 2008. The vacuum was broken later on by injecting nitrogen at a pressure just above one atmosphere inside the vacuum tank. This was necessary both to prevent any accidental humidity ingress, and to allow for a modification of the vacuum gauges on the vacuum tank and maintenance of the diffusion pumps. The vacuum gauges had to be changed, because of erratic variations on the measurements, causing spurious alarms. The new type of vacuum gauges has been used in similar conditions on the other LHC experiments and without problems. They are shielded against the stray field. The lubricants of the primary and diffusion pumps have been changed. Several minor modifications were also carried out on the equipment in the service cavern, with the aim to ease the maintenance and to allow possible intervention during operation. Spare sensors have been bough...

  9. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé.

    The magnet operation restarted end of June this year. Quick routine checks of the magnet sub-systems were performed at low current before starting the ramps up to higher field. It appeared clearly that the end of the field ramp down to zero was too long to be compatible with the detector commissioning and operations plans. It was decided to perform an upgrade to keep the ramp down from 3.8T to zero within 4 hours. On July 10th, when a field of 1.5T was reached, small movements were observed in the forward region support table and it was decided to fix this problem before going to higher field. At the end of July the ramps could be resumed. On July 28th, the field was at 3.8T and the summer CRAFT exercise could start. This run in August went smoothly until a general CERN wide power cut took place on August 3rd, due to an insulation fault on the high voltage network outside point 5. It affected the magnet powering electrical circuit, as it caused the opening of the main circuit breakers, resulting in a fast du...

  10. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2013-01-01

    The magnet is fully stopped and at room temperature. The maintenance works and consolidation activities on the magnet sub-systems are progressing. To consolidate the cryogenic installation, two redundant helium compressors will be installed as ‘hot spares’, to avoid the risk of a magnet downtime in case of a major failure of a compressor unit during operation. The screw compressors, their motors, the mechanical couplings and the concrete blocks are already available and stored at P5. The metallic structure used to access the existing compressors in SH5 will be modified to allow the installation of the two redundant ones. The plan is to finish the installation and commissioning of the hot spare compressors before the summer 2014. In the meantime, a bypass on the high-pressure helium piping will be installed for the connection of a helium drier unit later during the Long Shutdown 1, keeping this installation out of the schedule critical path. A proposal is now being prepared for the con...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... allergies. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most ... cord is needed, MRI is useful because of its ability to see through the skull and the ...

  12. Spinal cord stimulation paresthesia and activity of primary afferents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, Richard B; Streelman, Karen; Rowland, Lance; Foreman, P Jay

    2012-10-01

    A patient with failed back surgery syndrome reported paresthesia in his hands and arms during a spinal cord stimulation (SCS) screening trial with a low thoracic electrode. The patient's severe thoracic stenosis necessitated general anesthesia for simultaneous decompressive laminectomy and SCS implantation for chronic use. Use of general anesthesia gave the authors the opportunity to characterize the patient's unusual distribution of paresthesia. During SCS implantation, they recorded SCS-evoked antidromic potentials at physiologically relevant amplitudes in the legs to guide electrode placement and in the arms as controls. Stimulation of the dorsal columns at T-8 evoked potentials in the legs (common peroneal nerves) and at similar thresholds, consistent with the sensation of paresthesia in the arms, in the right ulnar nerve. The authors' electrophysiological observations support observations by neuroanatomical specialists that primary afferents can descend several (in this case, at least 8) vertebral segments in the spinal cord before synapsing or ascending. This report thus confirms a physiological basis for unusual paresthesia distribution associated with thoracic SCS.

  13. Evoked Brain Activity and Personnel Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-10-01

    Shucard and Horn (1972), Galbraith, Gliddon, and Busk (1970), and Callaway (1975), the latter using Navy recruits. Callaway’s own work was reported at...G.C., Gliddon, J.B., & Busk , J. (1970). Visual evoked responses in mentally retarded and nonretarded subjects. American Journal of Mental Deficiency

  14. Is Urgent Evoke a Digital Ba?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wichmand, Mette

    2018-01-01

    of such a platform, the World Bank’s online game Urgent Evoke, which has been designed with the pur- pose of engaging citizens in developing innovative solutions for sociopolitical problems like poverty. The analysis is based on Nonaka’s concept of Ba, which means “place” and is described as a platform for advancing...

  15. Auditory and visual evoked potentials during hyperoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D. B. D.; Strawbridge, P. J.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental study of the auditory and visual averaged evoked potentials (AEPs) recorded during hyperoxia, and investigation of the effect of hyperoxia on the so-called contingent negative variation (CNV). No effect of hyperoxia was found on the auditory AEP, the visual AEP, or the CNV. Comparisons with previous studies are discussed.

  16. Interhemispheric Asymmetries in Visual Evoked Potential Amplitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-12

    Layne, 1965) and of patients with Korsakoff’s syndrome (Malerstein and Callaway, 1969) . In the schizophrenics, the high variability is related to poor...communication. Malerstein, A. J., Callaway, E. Two-tone average evoked response in Korsakoff patients. J. Psychiatr. Res. 6: 253-260, 1969. Marsh, G

  17. Acute spinal cord injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, M.; Izunaga, H.; Sato, R.; Shinzato, I.; Korogi, Y.; Yamashita, Y.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on sequential MR images and neurologic findings that were correlated in 40 acute spinal cord injuries. Within 1 week after injury, frequent initial MR changes appeared isointense on both T1- and T2-weighted images and isointense on T1- and hyperintense on T2-weighted images. After 2 months, hypointensity appeared on T1-weighted images and hyperintensity persisted or appeared on T2-weighted images. Clinical improvements were observed in patients with isointensity on both T1- and T2-weighted images at the initial examination. A larger area of hyperintensity on subsequent T2-weighted images was correlated with no neurologic improvement. MR findings were good indicators of the spinal cord injury

  18. International Spinal Cord Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dvorak, M F; Itshayek, E; Fehlings, M G

    2015-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Survey of expert opinion, feedback and final consensus. OBJECTIVE: To describe the development and the variables included in the International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Spinal Interventions and Surgical Procedures Basic Data set. SETTING: International working group. METHODS......: A committee of experts was established to select and define data elements. The data set was then disseminated to the appropriate committees and organizations for comments. All suggested revisions were considered and both the International Spinal Cord Society and the American Spinal Injury Association endorsed...... spinal intervention and procedure is coded (variables 1 through 7) and the spinal segment level is described (variables 8 and 9). Sample clinical cases were developed to illustrate how to complete it. CONCLUSION: The International SCI Spinal Interventions and Surgical Procedures Basic Data Set...

  19. Imaging evaluation of vocal cord paralysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Marcelo de Mattos; Magalhaes, Fabiana Pizanni; Dadalto, Gabriela Bijos; Moura, Marina Vimieiro Timponi de [Axial Centro de Imagem, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)], e-mail: marcelomgarcia@superig.com.br, e-mail: ce@axialmg.com.br

    2009-09-15

    Vocal cord paralysis is a common cause of hoarseness. It may be secondary to many types of lesions along the cranial nerve X pathway and its branches, particularly the laryngeal recurrent nerves. Despite the idiopathic nature of a great number of cases, imaging methods play a very significant role in the investigation of etiologic factors, such as thyroid and esophagus neoplasias with secondary invasion of the laryngeal recurrent nerves. Other conditions such as aortic and right subclavian artery aneurysms also may be found. The knowledge of local anatomy and related diseases is of great importance for the radiologist, so that he can tailor the examination properly to allow an appropriate diagnosis and therapy planning. Additionally, considering that up to 35% of patients with vocal cord paralysis are asymptomatic, the recognition of radiological findings indicative of this condition is essential for the radiologist who must warn the referring physician on the imaging findings. In the present study, the authors review the anatomy and main diseases related to vocal cord paralysis, demonstrating them through typical cases evaluated by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, besides describing radiological findings of laryngeal abnormalities indicative of this condition. (author)

  20. Tracking Changes following Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curt, Armin; Friston, Karl; Thompson, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury is often disabling and recovery of function is limited. As a consequence of damage, both spinal cord and brain undergo anatomical and functional changes. Besides clinical measures of recovery, biomarkers that can detect early anatomical and functional changes might be useful in determining clinical outcome—during the course of rehabilitation and recovery—as well as furnishing a tool to evaluate novel treatment interventions and their mechanisms of action. Recent evidence suggests an interesting three-way relationship between neurological deficit and changes in the spinal cord and of the brain and that, importantly, noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging techniques, both structural and functional, provide a sensitive tool to lay out these interactions. This review describes recent findings from multimodal imaging studies of remote anatomical changes (i.e., beyond the lesion site), cortical reorganization, and their relationship to clinical disability. These developments in this field may improve our understanding of effects on the nervous system that are attributable to the injury itself and will allow their distinction from changes that result from rehabilitation (i.e., functional retraining) and from interventions affecting the nervous system directly (i.e., neuroprotection or regeneration). PMID:22730072

  1. Normalization of auditory evoked potential and visual evoked potential in patients with idiot savant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X; Zhang, M; Wang, J; Lou, F; Liang, J

    1999-03-01

    To investigate the variations of auditory evoked potentials (AEP) and visual evoked potentials (VEP) of patients with idiot savant (IS) syndrome. Both AEP and VEP were recorded from 7 patients with IS syndrome, 21 mentally retarded (MR) children without the syndrome and 21 normally age-matched controls, using a Dantec concerto SEEG-16 BEAM instrument. Both AEP and VEP of MR group showed significantly longer latencies (P1 and P2 latencies of AEP, P savant syndrome presented normalized AEP and VEP.

  2. The relationship between central motor conduction time and spinal cord compression in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rikita, T; Tanaka, N; Nakanishi, K; Kamei, N; Sumiyoshi, N; Kotaka, S; Adachi, N; Ochi, M

    2017-04-01

    Retrospective study. Few studies have reported a relationship between central motor conduction time (CMCT), which evaluates corticospinal function, and degree of spinal cord compression in patients with myelopathy. Thus, there is no consensus on predicting the degree of prolonged CMCT on the basis of the degree of spinal cord compression. If a correlation exists between CMCT and spinal cord compression, then spinal cord compression may be a useful noninvasive clinical indicator of corticospinal function. Therefore, this study evaluated the relationship between CMCT and cervical spinal cord compression measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). Hiroshima University Hospital in Japan. We studied 33 patients undergoing laminoplasty. Patients exhibited significant cervical spinal cord compression on both MRI and intraoperative electrophysiological examination. We assessed transcranial magnetic stimulation measurement of CMCT; spinal cord compression parameters such as area, lateral diameter, anteroposterior diameter and flattening of the spinal cord at the lesion site and C2/3 levels on MRI; and pre- versus postoperative Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scores. Correlations between CMCT and flattening as well as anteroposterior diameter of the spinal cord at the lesion level were observed. Strong correlations between CMCT and the ratio of the flattening and anteroposterior diameter parameters at the lesion level to that at the C2/3 level were also observed. Measurement of spinal cord compression may be useful for the evaluation of corticospinal function as a proxy for CMCT in patients with CSM.

  3. Genetic influence demonstrated for MEG-recorded somatosensory evoked responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van 't Ent, D.; van Soelen, I.L.C.; Stam, K.J.; de Geus, E.J.C.; Boomsma, D.I.

    2010-01-01

    We tested for a genetic influence on magnetoencephalogram (MEG)-recorded somatosensory evoked fields (SEFs) in 20 monozygotic (MZ) and 14 dizygotic (DZ) twin pairs. Previous electroencephalogram (EEG) studies that demonstrated a genetic contribution to evoked responses generally focused on

  4. Visually Evoked Spiking Evolves While Spontaneous Ongoing Dynamics Persist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huys, Raoul; Jirsa, Viktor K; Darokhan, Ziauddin

    2016-01-01

    attractor. Its existence guarantees that evoked spiking return to the spontaneous state. However, the spontaneous ongoing spiking state and the visual evoked spiking states are qualitatively different and are separated by a threshold (separatrix). The functional advantage of this organization...

  5. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    The magnet subsystems resumed operation early this spring. The vacuum pumping was restarted mid March, and the cryogenic power plant was restarted on March 30th. Three and a half weeks later, the magnet was at 4.5 K. The vacuum pumping system is performing well. One of the newly installed vacuum gauges had to be replaced at the end of the cool-down phase, as the values indicated were not coherent with the other pressure measurements. The correction had to be implemented quickly to be sure no helium leak could be at the origin of this anomaly. The pressure measurements have been stable and coherent since the change. The cryogenics worked well, and the cool-down went quite smoothly, without any particular difficulty. The automated start of the turbines had to be fine-tuned to get a smooth transition, as it was observed that the cooling power delivered by the turbines was slightly higher than needed, causing the cold box to stop automatically. This had no consequence as the cold box safety system acts to keep ...

  6. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    During the winter shutdown, the magnet subsystems went through a full maintenance. The magnet was successfully warmed up to room temperature beginning of December 2008. The vacuum was broken later on by injecting nitrogen at a pressure just above one atmosphere inside the vacuum tank. This was necessary both to prevent any accidental humidity ingress, and to allow for a modification of the vacuum gauges on the vacuum tank and maintenance of the diffusion pumps. The vacuum gauges had to be changed, because of erratic variations on the measurements, causing spurious alarms. The new type of vacuum gauges has been used in similar conditions on the other LHC experiments and without problems. They are shielded against the stray field. The lubricants of the primary and diffusion pumps have been changed. Several minor modifications were also carried out on the equipment in the service cavern, with the aim to ease the maintenance and to allow possible intervention during operation. Spare sensors have been bought. Th...

  7. Complete reorganization of the motor cortex of adult rats following long-term spinal cord injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandon, Shashank; Kambi, Niranjan; Mohammed, Hisham; Jain, Neeraj

    2013-07-01

    Understanding brain reorganization following long-term spinal cord injuries is important for optimizing recoveries based on residual function as well as developing brain-controlled assistive devices. Although it has been shown that the motor cortex undergoes partial reorganization within a few weeks after peripheral and spinal cord injuries, it is not known if the motor cortex of rats is capable of large-scale reorganization after longer recovery periods. Here we determined the organization of the rat (Rattus norvegicus) motor cortex at 5 or more months after chronic lesions of the spinal cord at cervical levels using intracortical microstimulation. The results show that, in the rats with the lesions, stimulation of neurons in the de-efferented forelimb motor cortex no longer evokes movements of the forelimb. Instead, movements of the body parts in the adjacent representations, namely the whiskers and neck were evoked. In addition, at many sites, movements of the ipsilateral forelimb were observed at threshold currents. The extent of representations of the eye, jaw and tongue movements was unaltered by the lesion. Thus, large-scale reorganization of the motor cortex leads to complete filling-in of the de-efferented cortex by neighboring representations following long-term partial spinal cord injuries at cervical levels in adult rats. © 2013 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Head movements evoked in alert rhesus monkey by vestibular prosthesis stimulation: implications for postural and gaze stabilization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana E Mitchell

    Full Text Available The vestibular system detects motion of the head in space and in turn generates reflexes that are vital for our daily activities. The eye movements produced by the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR play an essential role in stabilizing the visual axis (gaze, while vestibulo-spinal reflexes ensure the maintenance of head and body posture. The neuronal pathways from the vestibular periphery to the cervical spinal cord potentially serve a dual role, since they function to stabilize the head relative to inertial space and could thus contribute to gaze (eye-in-head + head-in-space and posture stabilization. To date, however, the functional significance of vestibular-neck pathways in alert primates remains a matter of debate. Here we used a vestibular prosthesis to 1 quantify vestibularly-driven head movements in primates, and 2 assess whether these evoked head movements make a significant contribution to gaze as well as postural stabilization. We stimulated electrodes implanted in the horizontal semicircular canal of alert rhesus monkeys, and measured the head and eye movements evoked during a 100 ms time period for which the contribution of longer latency voluntary inputs to the neck would be minimal. Our results show that prosthetic stimulation evoked significant head movements with latencies consistent with known vestibulo-spinal pathways. Furthermore, while the evoked head movements were substantially smaller than the coincidently evoked eye movements, they made a significant contribution to gaze stabilization, complementing the VOR to ensure that the appropriate gaze response is achieved. We speculate that analogous compensatory head movements will be evoked when implanted prosthetic devices are transitioned to human patients.

  9. Visual bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation in the repair of spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui-ping Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An important factor in improving functional recovery from spinal cord injury using stem cells is maximizing the number of transplanted cells at the lesion site. Here, we established a contusion model of spinal cord injury by dropping a weight onto the spinal cord at T 7-8 . Superparamagnetic iron oxide-labeled bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were transplanted into the injured spinal cord via the subarachnoid space. An outer magnetic field was used to successfully guide the labeled cells to the lesion site. Prussian blue staining showed that more bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells reached the lesion site in these rats than in those without magnetic guidance or superparamagnetic iron oxide labeling, and immunofluorescence revealed a greater number of complete axons at the lesion site. Moreover, the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan (BBB locomotor rating scale scores were the highest in rats with superparamagnetic labeling and magnetic guidance. Our data confirm that superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles effectively label bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and impart sufficient magnetism to respond to the external magnetic field guides. More importantly, superparamagnetic iron oxide-labeled bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can be dynamically and non-invasively tracked in vivo using magnetic resonance imaging. Superparamagnetic iron oxide labeling of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells coupled with magnetic guidance offers a promising avenue for the clinical treatment of spinal cord injury.

  10. The temporal profile of the reaction of microglia, astrocytes, and macrophages in the delayed onset paraplegia after transient spinal cord ischemia in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Satoshi; Matsumoto, Mishiya; Yamashita, Atsuo; Ohtake, Kazunobu; Ishida, Kazuyoshi; Morimoto, Yasuhiro; Sakabe, Takefumi

    2003-06-01

    In the present study, we sought to elucidate the temporal profile of the reaction of microglia, astrocytes, and macrophages in the progression of delayed onset motor dysfunction after spinal cord ischemia (15 min) in rabbits. At 2, 4, 8, 12, 24, and 48 h after reperfusion (9 animals in each), hind limb motor function was assessed, and the lumbar spinal cord was histologically examined. Delayed motor dysfunction was observed in most animals at 48 h after ischemia, which could be predicted by a poor recovery of segmental spinal cord evoked potentials at 15 min of reperfusion. In the gray matter of the lumbar spinal cord, both microglia and astrocytes were activated early (2 h) after reperfusion. Microglia were diffusely activated and engulfed motor neurons irrespective of the recovery of segmental spinal cord evoked potentials. In contrast, early astrocytic activation was confined to the area where neurons started to show degeneration. Macrophages were first detected at 8 h after reperfusion and mainly surrounded the infarction area later. Although the precise roles of the activation of microglia, astrocytes, and macrophages are to be further determined, the results indicate that understanding functional changes of astrocytes may be important in the mechanism of delayed onset motor dysfunction including paraplegia. Microglia and macrophages play a role in removing tissue debris after transient spinal cord ischemia. Disturbance of astrocytic defense mechanism, breakdown of the blood-spinal cord barrier, or both seemed to be involved in the development of delayed motor dysfunction.

  11. Is early cord clamping, delayed cord clamping or cord milking best?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatansever, Binay; Demirel, Gamze; Ciler Eren, Elif; Erel, Ozcan; Neselioglu, Salim; Karavar, Hande Nur; Gundogdu, Semra; Ulfer, Gozde; Bahadir, Selcen; Tastekin, Ayhan

    2018-04-01

    To compare the antioxidant status of three cord clamping procedures (early clamping, delayed clamping and milking) by analyzing the thiol-disulfide balance. This randomized controlled study enrolled 189 term infants who were divided into three groups according to the cord clamping procedure: early clamping, delayed clamping and milking. Blood samples were collected from the umbilical arteries immediately after clamping, and the thiol/disulfide homeostasis was analyzed. The native and total thiol levels were significantly (p total thiol ratio was significantly (p = .026) lower in the delayed cord clamping and milking groups compared with the early clamping groups. Early cord clamping causes the production of more disulfide bonds and lower thiol levels, indicating that oxidation reactions are increased in the early cord clamping procedure compared with the delayed cord clamping and milking procedures. The oxidant capacity is greater with early cord clamping than with delayed clamping or cord milking. Delayed cord clamping or milking are beneficial in neonatal care, and we suggest that they be performed routinely in all deliveries.

  12. Symptom-Based Treatment of Neuropathic Pain in Spinal Cord-Injured Patients: A Randomized Crossover Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Kyunghoon; Oh, Yoongul; Lee, Sang-Hyuk; Ryu, Ju Seok

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the differences in medication effect according to pain characteristics in spinal cord-injured patients. This study is a prospective, randomized, crossover study. Fifty-five patients and 66 locations of neuropathic pain were included. Pain was classified into four spontaneous characteristics and three evoked pain characteristics. Oxcarbazepine (Na channel blocker) and pregabalin (calcium channel α2-δ ligand medication) were tried. Patients were divided into two groups: evoked pain present and evoked pain absent. Overall average visual analog scale was obtained. Oxcarbazepine was significantly more effective for patients without evoked pain than in those with it for electrical, burning, and pricking pain. The effect of pregabalin was not different regarding the presence or absence of evoked pain for all pain categories, except burning pain. In patients with evoked pain, pregabalin was shown to be significantly more effective for electrical pain, allodynia, and heat hyperalgesia than oxcarbazepine. In the evoked pain absent group, oxcarbazepine showed greater improvement than pregabalin but was not significant. In summary, the phenotype of neuropathic pain was associated with the efficacy of different pharmacologic treatments. Symptom-based treatment, therefore, can lead to more efficient analgesia.

  13. Thought-evoking approaches in engineering problems

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    In creating the value-added product in not distant future, it is necessary and inevitable to establish a holistic and though-evoking approach to the engineering problem, which should be at least associated with the inter-disciplinary knowledge and thought processes across the whole engineering spheres. It is furthermore desirable to integrate it with trans-disciplinary aspects ranging from manufacturing culture, through liberal-arts engineering, and industrial sociology.   The thought-evoking approach can be exemplified and typified by representative engineering problems: unveiling essential features in ‘Tangential Force Ratio and Interface Pressure’, prototype development for ‘Bio-mimetic Needle’ and application of ‘Water-jet Machining to Artificial Hip Joint’, product innovation in ‘Heat Sink for Computer’, application of ‘Graph Theory’ to similarity evaluation of production systems, leverage among reciprocity attributes in ‘Industrial and Engineering Designs for Machine Enclosure’,...

  14. Acute hypotension in a patient undergoing posttraumatic cervical spine fusion with somatosensory and motor-evoked potential monitoring while under total intravenous anesthesia: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cann, David F

    2009-02-01

    Hypotension should be vigilantly prevented in patients with spinal cord injury. Recent advances in neurological, intraoperative monitoring techniques have allowed Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists to assess the effects of spinal cord ischemia and compression as they occur. This case report describes a young, healthy man who sustained a cervical spine fracture and was scheduled for anterior spinal fusion with somatosensory and motor-evoked potential (MEP) monitoring while under total intravenous anesthesia. This patient experienced a brief period of intraoperative hypotension with evidence of abnormal MEPs. A wake-up test was performed, which showed normal functioning, and the case resumed an uneventful course. Although this scenario resulted in no neurological sequelae, the effects of spinal cord ischemia due to hypotension can lead to permanent, devastating motor and sensory damage.

  15. Cutting the Cord-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    This animation shows the view from the rear hazard avoidance cameras on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit as the rover turns 45 degrees clockwise. This maneuver is the first step in a 3-point turn that will rotate the rover 115 degrees to face west. The rover must make this turn before rolling off the lander because airbags are blocking it from exiting from the front lander petal. Before this crucial turn took place, engineers instructed the rover to cut the final cord linking it to the lander. The turn took around 30 minutes to complete.

  16. Cutting the Cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    This animation shows the view from the front hazard avoidance cameras on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit as the rover turns 45 degrees clockwise. This maneuver is the first step in a 3-point turn that will rotate the rover 115 degrees to face west. The rover must make this turn before rolling off the lander because airbags are blocking it from exiting off the front lander petal. Before this crucial turn could take place, engineers instructed the rover to cut the final cord linking it to the lander. The turn took around 30 minutes to complete.

  17. Magnetic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboud, Essam; El-Masry, Nabil; Qaddah, Atef; Alqahtani, Faisal; Moufti, Mohammed R. H.

    2015-06-01

    The Rahat volcanic field represents one of the widely distributed Cenozoic volcanic fields across the western regions of the Arabian Peninsula. Its human significance stems from the fact that its northern fringes, where the historical eruption of 1256 A.D. took place, are very close to the holy city of Al-Madinah Al-Monawarah. In the present work, we analyzed aeromagnetic data from the northern part of Rahat volcanic field as well as carried out a ground gravity survey. A joint interpretation and inversion of gravity and magnetic data were used to estimate the thickness of the lava flows, delineate the subsurface structures of the study area, and estimate the depth to basement using various geophysical methods, such as Tilt Derivative, Euler Deconvolution and 2D modeling inversion. Results indicated that the thickness of the lava flows in the study area ranges between 100 m (above Sea Level) at the eastern and western boundaries of Rahat Volcanic field and getting deeper at the middle as 300-500 m. It also showed that, major structural trend is in the NW direction (Red Sea trend) with some minor trends in EW direction.

  18. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    The cooling down to the nominal temperature of 4.5 K was achieved at the beginning of August, in conjunction with the completion of the installation work of the connection between the power lines and the coil current leads. The temperature gradient on the first exchanger of the cold box is now kept within the nominal range. A leak of lubricant on a gasket of the helium compressor station installed at the surface was observed and several corrective actions were necessary to bring the situation back to normal. The compressor had to be refilled with lubricant and a regeneration of the filters and adsorbers was necessary. The coil cool down was resumed successfully, and the cryogenics is running since then with all parameters being nominal. Preliminary tests of the 20kA coil power supply were done earlier at full current through the discharge lines into the dump resistors, and with the powering busbars from USC5 to UXC5 without the magnet connected. On Monday evening August 25th, at 8pm, the final commissionin...

  19. MAGNET

    CERN Document Server

    B. Curé

    The first phase of the commissioning ended in August by a triggered fast dump at 3T. All parameters were nominal, and the temperature recovery down to 4.5K was carried out in two days by the cryogenics. In September, series of ramps were achieved up to 3 and finally 3.8T, while checking thoroughly the detectors in the forward region, measuring any movement of and around the HF. After the incident of the LHC accelerator on September 19th, corrective actions could be undertaken in the forward region. When all these displacements were fully characterized and repetitive, with no sign of increments in displacement at each field ramp, it was possible to start the CRAFT, Cosmic Run at Four Tesla (which was in fact at 3.8T). The magnet was ramped up to 18.16kA and the 3 week run went smoothly, with only 4 interruptions: due to the VIP visits on 21st October during the LHC inauguration day; a water leak on the cooling demineralized water circuit, about 1 l/min, that triggered a stop of the cooling pumps, and resulte...

  20. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2013-01-01

    Maintenance work and consolidation activities on the magnet cryogenics and its power distribution are progressing according to the schedules. The manufacturing of the two new helium compressor frame units has started. The frame units support the valves, all the sensors and the compressors with their motors. This activity is subcontracted. The final installation and the commissioning at CERN are scheduled for March–April 2014. The overhauls of existing cryogenics equipment (compressors, motors) are in progress. The reassembly of the components shall start in early 2014. The helium drier, to be installed on the high-pressure helium piping, has been ordered and will be delivered in the first trimester of 2014. The power distribution for the helium compressors in SH5 on the 3.3kV network is progressing. The 3.3kV switches, between each compressor and its hot spare compressor, are being installed, together with the power cables for the new compressors. The 3.3kV electrical switchboards in SE5 will ...

  1. Avaliação clínica e por ressonância magnética do ombro de pacientes lesados medulares Clinical assessment and magnetic resonance imaging of the shoulder of patients with spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Pereira Alves

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Estudar o ombro destes indivíduos através de ressonância magnética para detectar lesões clínicas ou subclínicas para instituir programas específicos de reabilitação. MÉTODOS: Foram avaliados nove pacientes lesados medulares, com seguimento no Laboratório de Biomecânica e Reabilitação do Aparelho Locomotor HC/UNICAMP. Foram divididos em dois grupos de acordo com a presença de paraplegia ou tetraplegia e avaliados através de anamnese e exame físico para correlação com o exame de imagem. RESULTADOS: 41% dos ombros avaliados com imagens de ressonância apresentaram resultado normal. Dentre os resultados alterados, a tendinopatia do supra-espinhal e a degeneração acrômio-clavicular foram às alterações mais encontradas e 80% dos ombros com exame alterado possuiam mais de uma lesão associada. CONCLUSÃO: Pela amostra do estudo é possível identificar uma etiologia multivariada da omalgia, com particularidades para indivíduos paraplégicos e tetraplégicos. A inclusão rotineira da avaliação clínica e radiológica do ombro nos indivíduos lesados medulares pode contribuir para a evolução das técnicas de reabilitação e redução tanto das lesões músculo-articulares quanto dos sintomas álgicos. Nível de Evidência II, Desenvolvimento de critérios diagnósticos em pacientes consecutivos com padrão de referência "ouro" aplicado.OBJECTIVE: To study the shoulder of this group of patients using magnetic resonance imaging to detect clinical and subclinical disorders and establish a rehabilitation program. METHODS: Nine patients with spinal cord injury followed in the Laboratory of Biomechanics and Rehabilitation of the Locomotive System at HC/UNICAMP were divided into two groups according to the presence of paraplegia and tetraplegia and were clinically assessed for correlation with the imaging exams. RESULTS: Normal results were found in 41% of the shoulders. Most common injuries were tendinopathy of the

  2. Spinal cord ischemia following thoracotomy without epidural anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raz, Aeyal; Avramovich, Aharon; Saraf-Lavi, Efrat; Saute, Milton; Eidelman, Leonid A

    2006-06-01

    Paraplegia is an uncommon yet devastating complication following thoracotomy, usually caused by compression or ischemia of the spinal cord. Ischemia without compression may be a result of global ischemia, vascular injury and other causes. Epidural anesthesia has been implicated as a major cause. This report highlights the fact that perioperative cord ischemia and paraplegia may be unrelated to epidural intervention. A 71-yr-old woman was admitted for a left upper lobectomy for resection of a non-small cell carcinoma of the lung. The patient refused epidural catheter placement and underwent a left T5-6 thoracotomy under general anesthesia. During surgery, she was hemodynamically stable and good oxygen saturation was maintained. Several hours following surgery the patient complained of loss of sensation in her legs. Neurological examination disclosed a complete motor and sensory block at the T5-6 level. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed spinal cord ischemia. The patient received iv steroid treatment, but remained paraplegic. Five months following the surgery there was only partial improvement in her motor symptoms. A follow-up MRI study was consistent with a diagnosis of spinal cord ischemia. In this case of paraplegia following thoracic surgery for lung resection, epidural anesthesia/analgesia was not used. The MRI demonstrated evidence of spinal cord ischemia, and no evidence of cord compression. This case highlights that etiologies other than epidural intervention, such as injury to the spinal segmental arteries during thoracotomy, should be considered as potential causes of cord ischemia and resultant paraplegia in this surgical population.

  3. Vocal cord dysfunction in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyes, Blakeslee E; Kemp, James S

    2007-06-01

    Vocal cord dysfunction is characterised by paradoxical vocal cord adduction that occurs during inspiration, resulting in symptoms of dyspnoea, wheeze, chest or throat tightness and cough. Although the condition is well described in children and adults, confusion with asthma often triggers the use of an aggressive treatment regimen directed against asthma. The laryngoscopic demonstration of vocal cord adduction during inspiration has been considered the gold standard for the diagnosis of vocal cord dysfunction, but historical factors and pulmonary function findings may provide adequate clues to the correct diagnosis. Speech therapy, and in some cases psychological counselling, is often beneficial in this disorder. The natural course and prognosis of vocal cord dysfunction are still not well described in adults or children.

  4. Pelvic floor electrophysiology in spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tankisi, H; Pugdahl, K; Rasmussen, M M; Clemmensen, D; Rawashdeh, Y F; Christensen, P; Krogh, K; Fuglsang-Frederiksen, A

    2016-05-01

    The study aimed to investigate sacral peripheral nerve function and continuity of pudendal nerve in patients with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) using pelvic floor electrophysiological tests. Twelve patients with low cervical or thoracic SCI were prospectively included. Quantitative external anal sphincter (EAS) muscle electromyography (EMG), pudendal nerve terminal motor latency (PNTML) testing, bulbocavernosus reflex (BCR) testing and pudendal short-latency somatosensory-evoked potential (SEP) measurement were performed. In EAS muscle EMG, two patients had abnormal increased spontaneous activity and seven prolonged motor unit potential duration. PNTML was normal in 10 patients. BCR was present with normal latency in 11 patients and with prolonged latency in one. The second component of BCR could be recorded in four patients. SEPs showed absent cortical responses in 11 patients and normal latency in one. Pudendal nerve and sacral lower motor neuron involvement are significantly associated with chronic SCI, most prominently in EAS muscle EMG. The frequent finding of normal PNTML latencies supports earlier concerns on the utility of this test; however, BCR and pudendal SEPs may have clinical relevance. As intact peripheral nerves including pudendal nerve are essential for efficient supportive therapies, pelvic floor electrophysiological testing prior to these interventions is highly recommended. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Iatrogenic Spinal Cord Injury Resulting From Cervical Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Alan H; Hart, Robert A; Hilibrand, Alan S; Fish, David E; Wang, Jeffrey C; Lord, Elizabeth L; Buser, Zorica; Tortolani, P Justin; Stroh, D Alex; Nassr, Ahmad; Currier, Bradford L; Sebastian, Arjun S; Arnold, Paul M; Fehlings, Michael G; Mroz, Thomas E; Riew, K Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Retrospective cohort study of prospectively collected data. To examine the incidence of iatrogenic spinal cord injury following elective cervical spine surgery. A retrospective multicenter case series study involving 21 high-volume surgical centers from the AOSpine North America Clinical Research Network was conducted. Medical records for 17 625 patients who received cervical spine surgery (levels from C2 to C7) between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2011, were reviewed to identify occurrence of iatrogenic spinal cord injury. In total, 3 cases of iatrogenic spinal cord injury following cervical spine surgery were identified. Institutional incidence rates ranged from 0.0% to 0.24%. Of the 3 patients with quadriplegia, one underwent anterior-only surgery with 2-level cervical corpectomy, one underwent anterior surgery with corpectomy in addition to posterior surgery, and one underwent posterior decompression and fusion surgery alone. One patient had complete neurologic recovery, one partially recovered, and one did not recover motor function. Iatrogenic spinal cord injury following cervical spine surgery is a rare and devastating adverse event. No standard protocol exists that can guarantee prevention of this complication, and there is a lack of consensus regarding evaluation and treatment when it does occur. Emergent imaging with magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography myelography to evaluate for compressive etiology or malpositioned instrumentation and avoidance of hypotension should be performed in cases of intraoperative and postoperative spinal cord injury.

  6. Locomotor training improves premotoneuronal control after chronic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knikou, Maria; Mummidisetty, Chaithanya K

    2014-06-01

    Spinal inhibition is significantly reduced after spinal cord injury (SCI) in humans. In this work, we examined if locomotor training can improve spinal inhibition exerted at a presynaptic level. Sixteen people with chronic SCI received an average of 45 training sessions, 5 days/wk, 1 h/day. The soleus H-reflex depression in response to low-frequency stimulation, presynaptic inhibition of soleus Ia afferent terminals following stimulation of the common peroneal nerve, and bilateral EMG recovery patterns were assessed before and after locomotor training. The soleus H reflexes evoked at 1.0, 0.33, 0.20, 0.14, and 0.11 Hz were normalized to the H reflex evoked at 0.09 Hz. Conditioned H reflexes were normalized to the associated unconditioned H reflex evoked with subjects seated, while during stepping both H reflexes were normalized to the maximal M wave evoked after the test H reflex at each bin of the step cycle. Locomotor training potentiated homosynaptic depression in all participants regardless the type of the SCI. Presynaptic facilitation of soleus Ia afferents remained unaltered in motor complete SCI patients. In motor incomplete SCIs, locomotor training either reduced presynaptic facilitation or replaced presynaptic facilitation with presynaptic inhibition at rest. During stepping, presynaptic inhibition was modulated in a phase-dependent manner. Locomotor training changed the amplitude of locomotor EMG excitability, promoted intralimb and interlimb coordination, and altered cocontraction between knee and ankle antagonistic muscles differently in the more impaired leg compared with the less impaired leg. The results provide strong evidence that locomotor training improves premotoneuronal control after SCI in humans at rest and during walking. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Paired motor cortex and cervical epidural electrical stimulation timed to converge in the spinal cord promotes lasting increases in motor responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Asht M; Pal, Ajay; Gupta, Disha; Carmel, Jason B

    2017-11-15

    Pairing motor cortex stimulation and spinal cord epidural stimulation produced large augmentation in motor cortex evoked potentials if they were timed to converge in the spinal cord. The modulation of cortical evoked potentials by spinal cord stimulation was largest when the spinal electrodes were placed over the dorsal root entry zone. Repeated pairing of motor cortex and spinal cord stimulation caused lasting increases in evoked potentials from both sites, but only if the time between the stimuli was optimal. Both immediate and lasting effects of paired stimulation are likely mediated by convergence of descending motor circuits and large diameter afferents onto common interneurons in the cervical spinal cord. Convergent activity in neural circuits can generate changes at their intersection. The rules of paired electrical stimulation are best understood for protocols that stimulate input circuits and their targets. We took a different approach by targeting the interaction of descending motor pathways and large diameter afferents in the spinal cord. We hypothesized that pairing stimulation of motor cortex and cervical spinal cord would strengthen motor responses through their convergence. We placed epidural electrodes over motor cortex and the dorsal cervical spinal cord in rats; motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were measured from biceps. MEPs evoked from motor cortex were robustly augmented with spinal epidural stimulation delivered at an intensity below the threshold for provoking an MEP. Augmentation was critically dependent on the timing and position of spinal stimulation. When the spinal stimulation was timed to coincide with the descending volley from motor cortex stimulation, MEPs were more than doubled. We then tested the effect of repeated pairing of motor cortex and spinal stimulation. Repetitive pairing caused strong augmentation of cortical MEPs and spinal excitability that lasted up to an hour after just 5 min of pairing. Additional physiology

  8. Do ambient urban odors evoke basic emotions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Theresia Weber-Glass

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Fragrances, such as plant odors, have been shown to evoke autonomic response patterns associated with Ekman’s (Ekman et al., 1983 basic emotions happiness, surprise, anger, fear, sadness and disgust. Inducing positive emotions by odors in highly frequented public spaces could serve to improve the quality of life in urban environments. Thus, the present study evaluated the potency of ambient odors connoted with an urban environment to evoke basic emotions on an autonomic and cognitive response level. Synthetic mixtures representing the odors of disinfectant, candles / bees wax, summer air, burnt smell, vomit and musty smell as well as odorless water as a control were presented five times in random order to 30 healthy, non-smoking human subjects with intact sense of smell. Skin temperature, skin conductance, breathing rate, forearm muscle activity, blink rate and heart rate were recorded simultaneously. Subjects rated the odors in terms of pleasantness, intensity and familiarity and gave verbal labels to each odor as well as cognitive associations with the basic emotions. The results showed that the amplitude of the skin conductance response varied as a function of odor presentation. Burnt smell and vomit elicited significantly higher electrodermal responses than summer air. Also, a negative correlation was revealed between the amplitude of the skin conductance response and hedonic odor valence indicating that the magnitude of the electrodermal response increased with odor unpleasantness. The analysis of the cognitive associations between odors and basic emotions showed that candles / bees wax and summer air were specifically associated with happiness whereas burnt smell and vomit were uniquely associated with disgust. Our findings suggest that city odors may evoke specific cognitive associations of basic emotions and that autonomic activity elicited by such odors is related to odor hedonics.

  9. Patterns of motor activity in the isolated nerve cord of the octopus arm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutfreund, Yoram; Matzner, Henry; Flash, Tamar; Hochner, Binyamin

    2006-12-01

    The extremely flexible octopus arm provides a unique opportunity for studying movement control in a highly redundant motor system. We describe a novel preparation that allows analysis of the peripheral nervous system of the octopus arm and its interaction with the muscular and mechanosensory elements of the arm's intrinsic muscular system. First we examined the synaptic responses in muscle fibers to identify the motor pathways from the axial nerve cord of the arm to the surrounding musculature. We show that the motor axons project to the muscles via nerve roots originating laterally from the arm nerve cord. The motor field of each nerve is limited to the region where the nerve enters the arm musculature. The same roots also carry afferent mechanosensory information from the intrinsic muscle to the axial nerve cord. Next, we characterized the pattern of activity generated in the dorsal roots by electrically stimulating the axial nerve cord. The evoked activity, although far reaching and long lasting, cannot alone account for the arm extension movements generated by similar electrical stimulation. The mismatch between patterns of activity in the isolated cord and in an intact arm may stem from the involvement of mechanosensory feedback in natural arm extension.

  10. Propofol combined with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation improves electrophysiological function in the hindlimb of rats with spinal cord injury better than monotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue-xin Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The repair effects of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation on nervous system damage are not satisfactory. Propofol has been shown to protect against spinal cord injury. Therefore, this study sought to explore the therapeutic effects of their combination on spinal cord injury. Rat models of spinal cord injury were established using the weight drop method. Rats were subjected to bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation via tail vein injection and/or propofol injection via tail vein using an infusion pump. Four weeks after cell transplantation and/or propofol treatment, the cavity within the spinal cord was reduced. The numbers of PKH-26-positive cells and horseradish peroxidase-positive nerve fibers apparently increased in the spinal cord. Latencies of somatosensory evoked potentials and motor evoked potentials in the hindlimb were noticeably shortened, amplitude was increased and hindlimb motor function was obviously improved. Moreover, the combined effects were better than cell transplantation or propofol injection alone. The above data suggest that the combination of propofol injection and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation can effectively improve hindlimb electrophysiological function, promote the recovery of motor funtion, and play a neuroprotective role in spinal cord injury in rats.

  11. [The role of the neurophysiological methods in the assessment of the effectiveness of the rehabilitation of sensorimotor disturbances associated with the lesions of the central nervous system at the spinal cord level].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekusheva, E V; Voitenkov, V B; Skripchenko, N V; Samoilova, I G; Filimonov, V A

    2017-12-28

    The objective of the present study was the evaluation and comparison of the effectiveness of the differential approaches to the neurorehabilitation of the somatosensory disturbances in the patients presenting with the spinal cord lesions. A total of 68 patients with spinal cord lesions were enrolled in the study, including 38 suffering from vascular myelopathy, 18 with the consequences of extramedullar meningioma surgery, 12 with the sequelae of acute transverse myelitis. The control groups was comprised of were 55 subjects. All the participants of the study underwent rehabilitation which included robotized mechanotherapy, stabilography, neuro-muscular stimulation, kinesiotherapy, physical therapy, ergotherapy, massage, etc. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and evaluation of somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP) were carried out before and after the therapy. In those patients who received personalized therapy, significant changes of TMS parameters (central motor conduction time at rest and in facilitation probe), but not SSEP ones were registered. Moreover, the patients who had undergone personalized therapy exhibited better clinical results than in the absence of such treatment. The results of the study gave evidence that neurorehabilitation had produced the more pronounced beneficial influence as regards the correction of motor disturbances even though the disturbances of the somatosensory functions proved to be more resistant to therapy. The data obtained suggest that taking into consideration the afferent deficit has to be mandatory for the purpose of planning the neurorehabilitative treatment of the patients suffering from sensorimotor disturbances associated with the lesions of the central nervous system at the spinal cord level. TMS and SSEP have to be utilized as the tools for the objective evaluation of the effectiveness of the neurorehabilitation process in such patients.

  12. Effect of electrical stimulation on neural regeneration via the p38-RhoA and ERK1/2-Bcl-2 pathways in spinal cord-injured rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Min Cheol; Jang, Chul Hwan; Park, Jong Tae; Choi, Seung Won; Ro, Seungil; Kim, Min Seob; Lee, Moon Young

    2018-02-01

    Although electrical stimulation is therapeutically applied for neural regeneration in patients, it remains unclear how electrical stimulation exerts its effects at the molecular level on spinal cord injury (SCI). To identify the signaling pathway involved in electrical stimulation improving the function of injured spinal cord, 21 female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to three groups: control (no surgical intervention, n = 6), SCI (SCI only, n = 5), and electrical simulation (ES; SCI induction followed by ES treatment, n = 10). A complete spinal cord transection was performed at the 10 th thoracic level. Electrical stimulation of the injured spinal cord region was applied for 4 hours per day for 7 days. On days 2 and 7 post SCI, the Touch-Test Sensory Evaluators and the Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan locomotor scale were used to evaluate rat sensory and motor function. Somatosensory-evoked potentials of the tibial nerve of a hind paw of the rat were measured to evaluate the electrophysiological function of injured spinal cord. Western blot analysis was performed to measure p38-RhoA and ERK1/2-Bcl-2 pathways related protein levels in the injured spinal cord. Rat sensory and motor functions were similar between SCI and ES groups. Compared with the SCI group, in the ES group, the latencies of the somatosensory-evoked potential of the tibial nerve of rats were significantly shortened, the amplitudes were significantly increased, RhoA protein level was significantly decreased, protein gene product 9.5 expression, ERK1/2, p38, and Bcl-2 protein levels in the spinal cord were significantly increased. These data suggest that ES can promote the recovery of electrophysiological function of the injured spinal cord through regulating p38-RhoA and ERK1/2-Bcl-2 pathway-related protein levels in the injured spinal cord.

  13. Effect of electrical stimulation on neural regeneration via the p38-RhoA and ERK1/2-Bcl-2 pathways in spinal cord-injured rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Min Cheol; Jang, Chul Hwan; Park, Jong Tae; Choi, Seung Won; Ro, Seungil; Kim, Min Seob; Lee, Moon Young

    2018-01-01

    Although electrical stimulation is therapeutically applied for neural regeneration in patients, it remains unclear how electrical stimulation exerts its effects at the molecular level on spinal cord injury (SCI). To identify the signaling pathway involved in electrical stimulation improving the function of injured spinal cord, 21 female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to three groups: control (no surgical intervention, n = 6), SCI (SCI only, n = 5), and electrical simulation (ES; SCI induction followed by ES treatment, n = 10). A complete spinal cord transection was performed at the 10th thoracic level. Electrical stimulation of the injured spinal cord region was applied for 4 hours per day for 7 days. On days 2 and 7 post SCI, the Touch-Test Sensory Evaluators and the Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan locomotor scale were used to evaluate rat sensory and motor function. Somatosensory-evoked potentials of the tibial nerve of a hind paw of the rat were measured to evaluate the electrophysiological function of injured spinal cord. Western blot analysis was performed to measure p38-RhoA and ERK1/2-Bcl-2 pathways related protein levels in the injured spinal cord. Rat sensory and motor functions were similar between SCI and ES groups. Compared with the SCI group, in the ES group, the latencies of the somatosensory-evoked potential of the tibial nerve of rats were significantly shortened, the amplitudes were significantly increased, RhoA protein level was significantly decreased, protein gene product 9.5 expression, ERK1/2, p38, and Bcl-2 protein levels in the spinal cord were significantly increased. These data suggest that ES can promote the recovery of electrophysiological function of the injured spinal cord through regulating p38-RhoA and ERK1/2-Bcl-2 pathway-related protein levels in the injured spinal cord. PMID:29557386

  14. Speech Evoked Auditory Brainstem Response in Stuttering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Akbar Tahaei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Auditory processing deficits have been hypothesized as an underlying mechanism for stuttering. Previous studies have demonstrated abnormal responses in subjects with persistent developmental stuttering (PDS at the higher level of the central auditory system using speech stimuli. Recently, the potential usefulness of speech evoked auditory brainstem responses in central auditory processing disorders has been emphasized. The current study used the speech evoked ABR to investigate the hypothesis that subjects with PDS have specific auditory perceptual dysfunction. Objectives. To determine whether brainstem responses to speech stimuli differ between PDS subjects and normal fluent speakers. Methods. Twenty-five subjects with PDS participated in this study. The speech-ABRs were elicited by the 5-formant synthesized syllable/da/, with duration of 40 ms. Results. There were significant group differences for the onset and offset transient peaks. Subjects with PDS had longer latencies for the onset and offset peaks relative to the control group. Conclusions. Subjects with PDS showed a deficient neural timing in the early stages of the auditory pathway consistent with temporal processing deficits and their abnormal timing may underlie to their disfluency.

  15. Interaural difference values of vestibular evoked myogenic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marziyeh Moallemi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Migraine is a neurologic disease, which often is associated with a unilateral headache. Vestibular abnormalities are common in migraine. Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs assess otolith function in particular functional integrity of the saccule and the inferior vestibular nerve. We used VEMP to evaluate if the migraine headache can affect VEMP asymmetry parameters. A total of 25 patients with migraine (22 females and 3 males who were diagnosed according to the criteria of IHS-1988 were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. Control group consisted of 26 healthy participants (18 female and 8 male, without neurotological symptoms and history of migraine. The short tone burst (95 dB nHL, 500 Hz was presented to ears. VEMP was recorded with surface electromyography over the contracted ipsilateral sternocleidomastoid (SCM muscle. Although current results showed that the amplitude ratio is greater in migraine patients than normal group, there was no statistical difference between two groups in mean asymmetry parameters of VEMP. Asymmetry measurements in vestibular evoked myogenic potentials probably are not indicators of unilateral deficient in saccular pathways of migraine patients.

  16. Laser-evoked coloration in polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, H.Y.; Rosseinsky, David; Lim, G.C.

    2005-01-01

    Laser-evoked coloration in polymers has long been a major aim of polymer technology for potential applications in product surface decoration, marking personalised images and logos. However, the coloration results reported so far were mostly attributed to laser-induced thermal-chemical reactions. The laser-irradiated areas are characterized with grooves due to material removal. Furthermore, only single color was laser-induced in any given polymer matrix. To induce multiple colors in a given polymer matrix with no apparent surface material removal is most desirable and challenging and may be achieved through laser-induced photo-chemical reactions. However, little public information is available at present. We report that two colors of red and green have been produced on an initially transparent CPV/PVA samples through UV laser-induced photo-chemical reactions. This is believed the first observation of laser-induced multiple-colors in the given polymer matrix. It is believed that the colorants underwent photo-effected electron transfer with suitable electron donors from the polymers to change from colorless bipyridilium Bipm 2+ to the colored Bipm + species. The discovery may lead to new approaches to the development of laser-evoked multiple coloration in polymers

  17. Brainstem auditory evoked potentials in horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Almeida Nogueira da Gama

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The brainstem auditory evoked potential (BAEP evaluates the integrity of the auditory pathways to the brainstem. The aim of this study was to evoke BAEPs in 21 clinically normal horses. The animals were sedated with detomidine hydrochloride (0.013mg.kg-1 BW. Earphones were inserted and rarefaction clicks at 90 dB and noise masking at 40 dB were used. After performing the test, the latencies of waves (I, II, III, IV, and V and interpeaks(I-III, III-V, and I-V were identified. The mean latencies of the waves were as follows: wave I, 2.4 ms; wave II, 2.24 ms; wave III, 3.61ms; wave IV, 4.61ms; and wave V, 5.49ms. The mean latencies of the interpeaks were as follows: I-III, 1.37ms; III-V, 1.88ms; and I-V, 3.26ms. This is the first study using BAEPs in horses in Brazil, and the observed latencies will be used as normative data for the interpretation of tests performed on horses with changes related to auditory system or neurologic abnormalities.

  18. Pattern visual evoked potentials in malingering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, A; Akio, T; Matsuda, E; Wakami, Y

    2001-03-01

    We previously developed a new method for estimating objective visual acuity by means of pattern visual evoked potentials (PVEP). In this study, this method was applied to the diagnosis of malingering. Six patients ranging in age from 40 to 54 years (mean 47 years) with suspected malingering were evaluated by means of the visual evoked potential test, optokinetic nystagmus (OKN) inhibition test, and the visual field test. In the PVEP study, the stimulus consisted of black and white checkerboards (39', 26', 15', and 9') with a visual angle of 8 degrees, contrast level of 15%, and a frequency of 0.7 Hz. One hundred PVEP responses were averaged per session. Routine ophthalmic examinations were normal in all patients. Five patients had a tubularly constricted visual field, and the remaining patient had a normal visual field. The objective visual acuities of the six patients estimated from PVEP were better than their subjective visual acuities estimated with Landolt rings. Among a variety of psychophysical and electrophysiologic ancillary tests, we consider our PVEP method a useful method for objectively determining visual acuity in a patient with signs of ocular malingering.

  19. Evoked potentials in pediatric cerebral malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minal Bhanushali

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Cortical evoked potentials (EP provide localized data regarding brain function and may offer prognostic information and insights into the pathologic mechanisms of malariamediated cerebral injury. As part of a prospective cohort study, we obtained somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs and brainstem auditory EPs (AEPs within 24 hours of admission on 27 consecutive children admitted with cerebral malaria (CM. Children underwent follow-up for 12 months to determine if they had any long term neurologic sequelae. EPs were obtained in 27 pediatric CM admissions. Two children died. Among survivors followed an average of 514 days, 7/25 (28.0% had at least one adverse neurologic outcome. Only a single subject had absent cortical EPs on admission and this child had a good neurologic outcome. Among pediatric CM survivors, cortical EPs are generally intact and do not predict adverse neurologic outcomes. Further study is needed to determine if alterations in cortical EPs can be used to predict a fatal outcome in CM.

  20. Music-evoked emotions in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Daijyu; Arai, Makoto; Itokawa, Masanari

    2017-07-01

    Previous studies have reported that people with schizophrenia have impaired musical abilities. Here we developed a simple music-based assay to assess patient's ability to associate a minor chord with sadness. We further characterize correlations between impaired musical responses and psychiatric symptoms. We exposed participants sequentially to two sets of sound stimuli, first a C-major progression and chord, and second a C-minor progression and chord. Participants were asked which stimulus they associated with sadness, the first set, the second set, or neither. The severity of psychiatric symptoms was assessed using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). Study participants were 29 patients diagnosed with schizophrenia and 29 healthy volunteers matched in age, gender and musical background. 37.9% (95% confidence interval [CI]:19.1-56.7) of patients with schizophrenia associated the minor chord set as sad, compared with 97.9% (95%CI: 89.5-103.6) of controls. Four patients were diagnosed with treatment-resistant schizophrenia, and all four failed to associate the minor chord with sadness. Patients who did not recognize minor chords as sad had significantly higher scores on all PANSS subscales. A simple test allows music-evoked emotions to be assessed in schizophrenia patient, and may show potential relationships between music-evoked emotions and psychiatric symptoms. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Output Properties of the Cortical Hindlimb Motor Area in Spinal Cord-Injured Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Shawn B; Dunham, Caleb L; Barbay, Scott; Krizsan-Agbas, Dora; Winter, Michelle K; Guggenmos, David J; Nudo, Randolph J

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine neuronal activity levels in the hindlimb area of motor cortex following spinal cord injury (SCI) in rats and compare the results with measurements in normal rats. Fifteen male Fischer-344 rats received a 200 Kdyn contusion injury in the thoracic cord at level T9-T10. After a minimum of 4 weeks following SCI, intracortical microstimulation (ICMS) and single-unit recording techniques were used in both the forelimb and hindlimb motor areas (FLA, HLA) under ketamine anesthesia. Although movements could be evoked using ICMS in the forelimb area with relatively low current levels, no movements or electromyographical responses could be evoked from ICMS in the HLA in any of the injured rats. During the same procedure, electrophysiological recordings were obtained with a single-shank, 16-channel Michigan probe (Neuronexus) to monitor activity. Neural spikes were discriminated using principle component analysis. Neural activity (action potentials) was collected and digitized for a duration of 5 min. Despite the inability to evoke movement from stimulation of cortex, robust single-unit activity could be recorded reliably from hindlimb motor cortex in SCI rats. Activity in the motor cortex of SCI rats was significantly higher compared with uninjured rats, and increased in hindlimb and forelimb motor cortex by similar amounts. These results demonstrate that in a rat model of thoracic SCI, an increase in single-unit cortical activity can be reliably recorded for several weeks post-injury.

  2. Spinal cord: motor neuron diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezania, Kourosh; Roos, Raymond P

    2013-02-01

    Spinal cord motor neuron diseases affect lower motor neurons in the ventral horn. This article focuses on the most common spinal cord motor neuron disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, which also affects upper motor neurons. Also discussed are other motor neuron diseases that only affect the lower motor neurons. Despite the identification of several genes associated with familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, the pathogenesis of this complex disease remains elusive. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. MR microscopy of the cervical spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvlin, M.J.; Asato, R.; Hackney, D.B.; Kassab, E.A.; Muraki, A.S.; Joseph, P.M.; Fielding, R.M.; Hennessy, M.J.

    1988-01-01

    High-resolution magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was performed on ten fresh cadaver cervical spinal cords in order to identify internal features of the spinal cord and to distinguish anatomy from artifact. Axial, sagittal, and coronal long repetition time (TR), long echo time (TE) and short TR, short TE spin-echo, gradient-echo, and inversion-recovery images were acquired at 1.5 T (Siemens), 1.9T, and 4.7T (Varian/Sisco) with an inplane resolution of 0.05-1mm. The dorsal and ventral horns of the gray matter as well as the lateral and posterior funiculi of the white matter were distinctly resolved from truncation artifacts in sagittal and axial images. In short TR, short TE, long TR, long TE spin-echo and gradient-echo (TR, 35 msec; TE, 7 msec; flip angle, 10 0 -90 0 ) images, the central gray matter demonstrated higher signal intensity than the white matter. These findings are in contradistinction to the image contrast typically observed in brain. High-resolution MR imaging techniques capable of demonstrating this anatomy in vivo are being developed

  4. Functional mapping of the sensorimotor cortex: combined use of magnetoencephalography, functional MRI, and motor evoked potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morioka, T.; Fujii, K.; Fukui, M.; Mizushima, A.; Matsumoto, S.; Hasuo, K.; Yamamoto, T.; Tobimatsu, S.

    1995-01-01

    Combined use of magnetoencephalography (MEG), functional magnetic resonance imaging (f-MRI), and motor evoked potentials (MEPs) was carried out on one patient in an attempt to localise precisely a structural lesion to the central sulcus. A small cyst in the right frontoparietal region was thought to be the cause of generalised seizures in an otherwise asymptomatic woman. First the primary sensory cortex was identified with magnetic source imaging (MSI) of somatosensory evoked magnetic fields using MEG and MRI. Second, the motor area of the hand was identified using f-MRI during handsqueezing. Then transcranial magnetic stimulation localised the hand motor area on the scalp, which was mapped onto the MRI. There was a good agreement between MSI, f-MRI and MEP as to the location of the sensorimotor cortex and its relationship to the lesion. Multimodality mapping techniques may thus prove useful in the precise localisation of cortical lesions, and in the preoperative determination of the best treatment for peri-rolandic lesions. (orig.)

  5. Functional mapping of the sensorimotor cortex: combined use of magnetoencephalography, functional MRI, and motor evoked potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morioka, T. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Neurological Inst., Kyshu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Fujii, K. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Neurological Inst., Kyshu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Fukui, M. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Neurological Inst., Kyshu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Mizushima, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Fukuoka (Japan); Matsumoto, S. [Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Fukuoka (Japan); Hasuo, K. [Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Fukuoka (Japan); Yamamoto, T. [Dept. of Otolaryngology, Kyushu Univ. Fukuoka (Japan); Tobimatsu, S. [Dept. of Clinical Neurophysiology, Neurological Inst., Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan)

    1995-10-01

    Combined use of magnetoencephalography (MEG), functional magnetic resonance imaging (f-MRI), and motor evoked potentials (MEPs) was carried out on one patient in an attempt to localise precisely a structural lesion to the central sulcus. A small cyst in the right frontoparietal region was thought to be the cause of generalised seizures in an otherwise asymptomatic woman. First the primary sensory cortex was identified with magnetic source imaging (MSI) of somatosensory evoked magnetic fields using MEG and MRI. Second, the motor area of the hand was identified using f-MRI during handsqueezing. Then transcranial magnetic stimulation localised the hand motor area on the scalp, which was mapped onto the MRI. There was a good agreement between MSI, f-MRI and MEP as to the location of the sensorimotor cortex and its relationship to the lesion. Multimodality mapping techniques may thus prove useful in the precise localisation of cortical lesions, and in the preoperative determination of the best treatment for peri-rolandic lesions. (orig.)

  6. The significance of dorsal migration of the cord after extensive cervical laminectomy for patients with traumatic central cord syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, L; Wolf, A; Mirvis, S; Rigamonti, D; Fianfaca, M S; Monasky, M

    1995-08-01

    Central cord syndrome (CCS) resulting from traumatic cervical injury is often associated with cervical stenosis and/or spondylosis. The efficacy of multilevel laminectomy in the treatment of this condition has been controversial. The objective of this study was to validate by magnetic resonance (MR) imaging the occurrence of dorsal cord migration after extensive laminectomy for patients with the clinical syndrome of central cord damage and its relationship to the short-term outcome. During a 28-month period, the authors evaluated 20 patients (mean age 54 years) who sustained CCS after cervical spine trauma. Pre- and postoperative MR imaging assessed the adequacy of cervical cord decompression by multilevel laminectomy. All patients had cervical canal stenosis with complete obliteration of the anterior subarachnoid space over multiple levels. Seventeen patients initially had CCS of different degrees of severity. One had no motor deficit and two had motor complete with sensory deficits greater in their arms. Laminectomy, generally from C2 to C7 without facetectomy, was performed after plateau of neurological recovery (mean 17 days postinjury). Neurological assessment 3 months after operation revealed improvement in 12, stable function in 7, and progression of deficit in one with no mortality. The postoperative midsagittal MR images demonstrated adequate decompression with restoration of anterior cerebrospinal fluid space and posterior cord migration in 12 patients (60% of the 20), but only 8 of them also had improved function. MR imaging demonstrated that, in the presence of multilevel spondylosis/stenosis, laminectomy may provide adequate spinal cord decompression in patients with traumatic CCS.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. SPINAL CORD- A CADAVERIC STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayamma K. N

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Spinal cord is situated within the vertebral canal extending from the lower end of the medulla oblongata at the upper border of first cervical vertebra. In early foetal life, it extends throughout the length of the vertebral canal, and at the time of birth, it reaches the level of third lumbar vertebra. In adult, it ends at the lower border of first lumbar vertebra and thereafter continued as filum terminale, which gets attached to tip of coccyx. Spinal cord is covered by three protective membranes called spinal meninges, diameter, arachnoid and pia mater. The diameter and arachnoid mater extent up to second sacral vertebra and the pia mater forms filum terminale and extend at the tip of coccyx. MATERIALS AND METHODS Forty spinal cord cadaveric specimen were studied by dissection method after exposing the vertebral canal. The roots of spinal nerve were sectioned on both sides and the cord is released along with its coverings. The dura and arachnoid mater were incised longitudinally and the subarachnoid space, blood vessels, nerve roots, ligament denticulata, cervical and lumbar enlargements were observed. The blood vessels including radicular arteries were also studied photographed. RESULTS The spinal cord is a highly vascular structure situated within the vertebral canal, covered by diameter, arachnoid mater and pia mater. Spinal dura is thicker anteriorly than posteriorly. The pia mater forms linea splendens, which extend along the whole length of the cord in front of the anterior median fissure. The average length of the cord is 38 cm. The length and breadth of cervical enlargement was more compared to lumbar enlargement. The number of rootlets in both dorsal and ventral roots accounts more in cervical compared to other regions of the cord. The ligament denticulata is a thin transparent bands of pia mater attached on either sides of the cord between the dorsal and ventral roots of spinal nerves. The tooth like extensions are well

  8. MRI in chronic spinal cord trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curati, W.L.; Kingsley, D.P.E.; Kendall, B.E.; Moseley, I.F.

    1992-01-01

    Eighty-seven patients aged 16-68 years have been examined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) following spinal injury. The MRI findings have been correlated with length of history between trauma and investigation, extent of residual function and site of injury. They include changes at the site of injury consistent with myelomalacia in 37%, a syrinx in 40%, persistent cord compression in 32% and atrophy in 18%. An extensive syrinx can develop within 2 months of injury and it is nearly twice as common in patients with complete paralysis as in those whose paralysis was incomplete. It is suggested that investigation and management of spinal trauma should include early and repeated MRI examinations to detect sequelae at an early stage. (orig.)

  9. Music evokes vicarious emotions in listeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Ai; Furukawa, Kiyoshi; Okanoya, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    Why do we listen to sad music? We seek to answer this question using a psychological approach. It is possible to distinguish perceived emotions from those that are experienced. Therefore, we hypothesized that, although sad music is perceived as sad, listeners actually feel (experience) pleasant emotions concurrent with sadness. This hypothesis was supported, which led us to question whether sadness in the context of art is truly an unpleasant emotion. While experiencing sadness may be unpleasant, it may also be somewhat pleasant when experienced in the context of art, for example, when listening to sad music. We consider musically evoked emotion vicarious, as we are not threatened when we experience it, in the way that we can be during the course of experiencing emotion in daily life. When we listen to sad music, we experience vicarious sadness. In this review, we propose two sides to sadness by suggesting vicarious emotion.

  10. Cord Blood Chimerism And Relapse After Haplo-Cord Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Besien, Koen; Koshy, Nebu; Gergis, Usama; Mayer, Sebastian; Cushing, Melissa; Rennert, Hannah; Slotky, Ronit; Mark, Tomer; Pearse, Roger; Rossi, Adriana; Phillips, Adrienne; Vasovic, Liljana; Ferrante, Rosanna; Hsu, Michael; Shore, Tsiporah

    2018-01-01

    Haplo-cord stem cell transplantation combines the infusion of CD34 selected hematopoietic progenitors from a haplo-identical donor with an umbilical cord blood graft from an unrelated donor and allows faster count recovery, with low rates of disease recurrence and chronic GVHD. But the contribution of the umbilical cord blood graft to long-term transplant outcome remains unclear. We analyzed 39 recipients of haplo-cord transplants with AML and MDS, engrafted and in remission at 2 months. Median age was 66 (18-72) and all had intermediate, high, or very high risk disease. Less than 20% UCB chimerism in the CD33 lineage was associated with an increased rate of disease recurrence (54% vs 11% Pdisease recurrence (46% vs 12%, P=0.007) Persistent haplo-chimerism in the CD3 lineage was associated with an increased rate of disease recurrence (40% vs 15%, P=0.009) Chimerism did not predict for treatment related mortality. The cumulative incidence of acute GVHD by day 100 was 43%. The cumulative incidence of moderate/severe chronic GVHD was only 5%. Engraftment of the umbilical cord blood grafts provides powerful GVL effects which protect against disease recurrence and is associated with low risk of chronic GVHD. Engraftment of CD34 selected haplo-identical cells can lead to rapid development of circulating T-cells, but when these cells dominate, GVL-effects are limited and rates of disease recurrence are high. PMID:27333804

  11. Acute traumatic central cord syndrome: MRI-pathological correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quencer, R.M.; Bunge, R.P.; Egnor, M.; Green, B.A.; Puckett, W.; Naidich, T.P.; Post, M.J.D.; Norenberg, M.

    1992-01-01

    The acute traumatic central cord syndrome (ATCCS) is commonly stated to result from an injury which affects primarily the center of the spinal cord and is frequently hemorrhagic. To test the validity of this widely disseminated hypothesis, the magnetic resonance images [MRI] of 11 consecutive cases of ATCCS caused by closed injury to the spine were analyzed and correlated with the gross pathological and histological features of 3 cervical spinal cords obtained at post mortem from patients with ATCCS, including 2 of patients studied by MRI. In this study, the MRI and pathological observations indicate that ATCCS is predominantly a white matter injury and that intramedullary hemorrhage is not a necessary feature of the syndrome; indeed, it is probably an uncommon event in ATCCS. We suggest that the most common mechanism of injury in ATCCS may be direct compression of the cervical spinal cord by buckling of the ligamenta flava into an already narrowed cervical spinal canal; this would explain the predominance of axonal injury in the white matter of the lateral columns. (orig./GDG)

  12. Acute traumatic central cord syndrome: MRI-pathological correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quencer, R.M. (Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Miami MRI Center, FL (United States) Miami Project to Cure Paralysis, FL (United States)); Bunge, R.P.; Egnor, M.; Green, B.A. (Miami Project to Cure Paralysis, FL (United States) Dept. of Neurological Surgery, Univ. of Miami School of Medicine, FL (United States)); Puckett, W. (Miami Project to Cure Paralysis, FL (United States)); Naidich, T.P. (Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Miami MRI Center, FL (United States) Miami Project to Cure Paralysis, FL (United States) Baptist Hospital of Greater Miami, FL (United States)); Post, M.J.D. (Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Miami MRI Center, FL (United States)); Norenberg, M. (Dept. of Neuropathology, Univ. of Miami School of Medicine, FL (United States))

    1992-04-01

    The acute traumatic central cord syndrome (ATCCS) is commonly stated to result from an injury which affects primarily the center of the spinal cord and is frequently hemorrhagic. To test the validity of this widely disseminated hypothesis, the magnetic resonance images [MRI] of 11 consecutive cases of ATCCS caused by closed injury to the spine were analyzed and correlated with the gross pathological and histological features of 3 cervical spinal cords obtained at post mortem from patients with ATCCS, including 2 of patients studied by MRI. In this study, the MRI and pathological observations indicate that ATCCS is predominantly a white matter injury and that intramedullary hemorrhage is not a necessary feature of the syndrome; indeed, it is probably an uncommon event in ATCCS. We suggest that the most common mechanism of injury in ATCCS may be direct compression of the cervical spinal cord by buckling of the ligamenta flava into an already narrowed cervical spinal canal; this would explain the predominance of axonal injury in the white matter of the lateral columns. (orig./GDG).

  13. A Novel Translational Model of Spinal Cord Injury in Nonhuman Primate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Corre, Marine; Noristani, Harun N; Mestre-Frances, Nadine; Saint-Martin, Guillaume P; Coillot, Christophe; Goze-Bac, Christophe; Lonjon, Nicolas; Perrin, Florence E

    2017-11-27

    Spinal cord injuries (SCI) lead to major disabilities affecting > 2.5 million people worldwide. Major shortcomings in clinical translation result from multiple factors, including species differences, development of moderately predictive animal models, and differences in methodologies between preclinical and clinical studies. To overcome these obstacles, we first conducted a comparative neuroanatomical analysis of the spinal cord between mice, Microcebus murinus (a nonhuman primate), and humans. Next, we developed and characterized a new model of lateral spinal cord hemisection in M. murinus. Over a 3-month period after SCI, we carried out a detailed, longitudinal, behavioral follow-up associated with in vivo magnetic resonance imaging ( 1 H-MRI) monitoring. Then, we compared lesion extension and tissue alteration using 3 methods: in vivo 1 H-MRI, ex vivo 1 H-MRI, and classical histology. The general organization and glial cell distribution/morphology in the spinal cord of M. murinus closely resembles that of humans. Animals assessed at different stages following lateral hemisection of the spinal cord presented specific motor deficits and spinal cord tissue alterations. We also found a close correlation between 1 H-MRI signal and microglia reactivity and/or associated post-trauma phenomena. Spinal cord hemisection in M. murinus provides a reliable new nonhuman primate model that can be used to promote translational research on SCI and represents a novel and more affordable alternative to larger primates.

  14. MR imaging of spinal factors and compression of the spinal cord in cervical myelopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kokubun, Shoichi; Ozawa, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Minoru; Ishii, Sukenobu; Tani, Shotaro; Sato, Tetsuaki.

    1992-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images of surgical 109 patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy were retrospectively reviewed to examine whether MR imaging would replace conventional radiological procedures in determining spinal factors and spinal cord compression in this disease. MR imaging was useful in determining spondylotic herniation, continuous type of ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament, and calcification of yellow ligament, probably replacing CT myelography, discography, and CT discography. When total defect of the subarachnoid space on T2-weighted images and block on myelograms were compared in determining spinal cord compression, the spinal cord was affected more extensively by 1.3 intervertebral distance (IVD) on T2-weighted images. When indentation of one third or more in anterior and posterior diameter of the spinal cord was used as spinal cord compression, the difference in the affected extension between myelography and MR imaging was 0.2 IVD on T1-weighted images and 0.6 IVD on T2-weighted images. However, when block was seen in 3 or more IVD on myelograms, the range of spinal cord compression tended to be larger on T1-weighted images. For a small range of spinal cord compression, T1-weighted imaging seems to be helpful in determining the range of decompression. When using T2-weighted imaging, the range of decompression becomes large, frequently including posterior decompression. (N.K.)

  15. MRI of the injured spinal cord of the thoracic and lumber spin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Kenji; Satoh, Tetsurou; Hyodo, Hironori; Ohira, Nobuhiro; Moriai, Norio

    1991-01-01

    Magnetic resonance studies using a 1.5 Tesla superconductive magnet were performed on 23 patients with spinal cord injury of the thoracic and lumbar regions in their chronic stages. Our results were as follows. The MR images were found to well represent the spinal cord lesions except several cases of complex displacement of the spinal cord. The size and the degree of penetration of the MRI abnormalities well correlated with the spinal cord injury; those cases of large and penetrating MRI abnormalities were represented by complete paraplegia and those of small and non-penetrating abnormalities were those of imcomplete paraplegia. However, the neurological levels of the spinal cord injury in cases of complete paraplegia appeared higher than the spinal segments indicated by the MRI. This discrepancy was thought to be explained by a concomitant, additional nerve roots involvement along with the spinal cord injury. Incidentally, the MRI of the cone lesions did not seem to be reproducible presumably as the result of its too small sensitive volume. We also discussed the problem of MRI artifacts and effects from gross anatomical displacement of traumatic origin. (author)

  16. Suicide in a spinal cord injured population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartkopp, A; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Seidenschnur, A M

    1998-01-01

    To determine the relation between functional status and risk of suicide among individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI).......To determine the relation between functional status and risk of suicide among individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI)....

  17. Pericytes Make Spinal Cord Breathless after Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Viviani M; Paiva, Ana E; Sena, Isadora F G; Mintz, Akiva; Magno, Luiz Alexandre V; Birbrair, Alexander

    2017-09-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury is a devastating condition that leads to significant neurological deficits and reduced quality of life. Therapeutic interventions after spinal cord lesions are designed to address multiple aspects of the secondary damage. However, the lack of detailed knowledge about the cellular and molecular changes that occur after spinal cord injury restricts the design of effective treatments. Li and colleagues using a rat model of spinal cord injury and in vivo microscopy reveal that pericytes play a key role in the regulation of capillary tone and blood flow in the spinal cord below the site of the lesion. Strikingly, inhibition of specific proteins expressed by pericytes after spinal cord injury diminished hypoxia and improved motor function and locomotion of the injured rats. This work highlights a novel central cellular population that might be pharmacologically targeted in patients with spinal cord trauma. The emerging knowledge from this research may provide new approaches for the treatment of spinal cord injury.

  18. Mechanisms underlying chronic whiplash: contributions from an incomplete spinal cord injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, James M; Dewald, Julius P A; Hornby, T George; Walton, David M; Parrish, Todd B

    2014-11-01

    To explore the association between findings on advanced, but available, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences of the cervical spinal cord and muscular system, in tandem with biomechanical measures of maximum volitional plantar flexion torques as a proxy for a mild incomplete spinal cord injury. Observational case series. University research laboratory. Three patients with chronic whiplash and one patient with history of whiplash injury but no current symptoms. We measured lower extremity muscle fat, morphological changes in descending spinal cord pathways with advanced MRI applications and maximal activation of the plantar flexors. Larger magnitudes of lower extremity muscle fat corresponded to altered spinal cord anatomy and reductions in the ability to maximally activate plantar flexor torques in the three subjects with chronic whiplash. Such findings were not present in the recovered participant. The potential value of MRI to quantify neuromuscular degeneration in chronic whiplash is recognized. Larger scaled prospective studies are warranted before stronger conclusions can be drawn. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. MRI of anterior spinal artery syndrome of the cervical spinal cord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, S. (Dept. of Radiology, Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)); Yamada, T. (Dept. of Radiology, Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)); Ishii, K. (Dept. of Radiology, Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)); Saito, H. (Dept. of Neurology, Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)); Tanji, H. (Dept. of Neurology, Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)); Kobayashi, T. (Inst. of Rehabilitation Medicine, Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Miyagi (Japan)); Soma, Y. (Div. of Neurology, Takeda Hospital, Aizuwakamatsu (Japan)); Sakamoto, K. (Dept. of Radiology, Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan))

    1992-12-01

    Cervical spinal cord lesions in the anterior spinal artery syndrome were delineated on magnetic resonance images (MRI) in four patients. The lesion was always seen anteriorly in the cervical cord. On T2-weighted images, the lesions appeared hyperintense relative to the normal spinal cord, while on T1-weighted images, two chronic lesions appeared hypointense, with local atrophy of the cord. In one case, repeated T1-weighted images showed no signal abnormality 4 days after the ictus, but the lesion became hypointense 18 days later, when contrast enhancement was also recognized after injection of Gd-DTPA; this sequence of intensity changes was similar to that of cerebral infarction. The extent of the lesion seen MRI correlated closely with neurological findings in all cases. Although the findings may not be specific, MRI is now the modality of choice for confirming the diagnosis in patients suspected of having an anterior spinal artery syndrome. (orig.)

  20. Reference values and clinical application of magnetic peripheral nerve stimulation in cats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Soens, Iris; Struys, Michel M. R. F.; Bhatti, Sofie F. M.; Van Ham, Luc M. L.

    Magnetic stimulation of radial (RN) and sciatic (SN) nerves was performed bilaterally in 40 healthy cats. Reference values for onset latency and peak-to-peak amplitude of magnetic motor evoked potentials (MMEPs) were obtained and compared with values of electric motor evoked potentials (EMEPs) in

  1. Relationship of activity in ascending paths with phase encoding in the lumbar spinal cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. O. Shugurov

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We studied the relationship of discharges phase characteristics in ascending column of spinal cord (SC and specificity of activation of neurones, which generate negative components of evoked potentials of SC. The discharges was recorded from SC at a level of a presence of dorsal column (DC, spinocervical and dorsal spinocerebellar tract in upper lumbar and thoracic segments at a stimulation of a nerve or DC. It is shown, that the phase of the discharges depends on the quantity of synaptic delays in generating chain of such signals. Thus, the phase of a signal can carry the additional information on specificity of activation of the sensory elements in CNS.

  2. Spinal Cord Excitability and Sprint Performance Are Enhanced by Sensory Stimulation During Cycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory E. P. Pearcey

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord excitability, as assessed by modulation of Hoffmann (H- reflexes, is reduced with fatiguing isometric contractions. Furthermore, spinal cord excitability is reduced during non-fatiguing arm and leg cycling. Presynaptic inhibition of Ia terminals is believed to contribute to this suppression of spinal cord excitability. Electrical stimulation to cutaneous nerves reduces Ia presynaptic inhibition, which facilitates spinal cord excitability, and this facilitation is present during arm cycling. Although it has been suggested that reducing presynaptic inhibition may prolong fatiguing contractions, it is unknown whether sensory stimulation can alter the effects of fatiguing exercise on performance or spinal cord excitability. Thus, the aim of this experiment was to determine if sensory stimulation can interfere with fatigue-related suppression of spinal cord excitability, and alter fatigue rates during cycling sprints. Thirteen participants randomly performed three experimental sessions that included: unloaded cycling with sensory stimulation (CONTROL + STIM, sprints with sensory stimulation (SPRINT + STIM and sprints without stimulation (SPRINT. Seven participants also performed a fourth session (CONTROL, which consisted of unloaded cycling. During SPRINT and SPRINT + STIM, participants performed seven, 10 s cycling sprints interleaved with 3 min rest. For CONTROL and CONTROL + STIM, participants performed unloaded cycling for ~30 min. During SPRINT + STIM and CONTROL + STIM, participants received patterned sensory stimulation to nerves of the right foot. H-reflexes and M-waves of the right soleus were evoked by stimulation of the tibial nerve at multiple time points throughout exercise. Sensory stimulation facilitated soleus H-reflexes during unloaded cycling, whereas sprints suppressed soleus H-reflexes. While receiving sensory stimulation, there was less suppression of soleus H-reflexes and slowed reduction in average power output

  3. Spinal Cord Excitability and Sprint Performance Are Enhanced by Sensory Stimulation During Cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearcey, Gregory E P; Noble, Steven A; Munro, Bridget; Zehr, E Paul

    2017-01-01

    Spinal cord excitability, as assessed by modulation of Hoffmann (H-) reflexes, is reduced with fatiguing isometric contractions. Furthermore, spinal cord excitability is reduced during non-fatiguing arm and leg cycling. Presynaptic inhibition of Ia terminals is believed to contribute to this suppression of spinal cord excitability. Electrical stimulation to cutaneous nerves reduces Ia presynaptic inhibition, which facilitates spinal cord excitability, and this facilitation is present during arm cycling. Although it has been suggested that reducing presynaptic inhibition may prolong fatiguing contractions, it is unknown whether sensory stimulation can alter the effects of fatiguing exercise on performance or spinal cord excitability. Thus, the aim of this experiment was to determine if sensory stimulation can interfere with fatigue-related suppression of spinal cord excitability, and alter fatigue rates during cycling sprints. Thirteen participants randomly performed three experimental sessions that included: unloaded cycling with sensory stimulation ( CONTROL + STIM ), sprints with sensory stimulation ( SPRINT + STIM ) and sprints without stimulation ( SPRINT ). Seven participants also performed a fourth session ( CONTROL ), which consisted of unloaded cycling. During SPRINT and SPRINT + STIM, participants performed seven, 10 s cycling sprints interleaved with 3 min rest. For CONTROL and CONTROL + STIM , participants performed unloaded cycling for ~30 min. During SPRINT + STIM and CONTROL + STIM , participants received patterned sensory stimulation to nerves of the right foot. H-reflexes and M-waves of the right soleus were evoked by stimulation of the tibial nerve at multiple time points throughout exercise. Sensory stimulation facilitated soleus H-reflexes during unloaded cycling, whereas sprints suppressed soleus H-reflexes. While receiving sensory stimulation, there was less suppression of soleus H-reflexes and slowed reduction in average power output, compared

  4. Wind-up of spinal cord neurones and pain sensation: much ado about something?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero, J F; Laird, J M; López-García, J A

    2000-06-01

    Wind-up is a frequency-dependent increase in the excitability of spinal cord neurones, evoked by electrical stimulation of afferent C-fibres. Although it has been studied over the past thirty years, there are still uncertainties about its physiological meaning. Glutamate (NMDA) and tachykinin NK1 receptors are required to generate wind-up and therefore a positive modulation between these two receptor types has been suggested by some authors. However, most drugs capable of reducing the excitability of spinal cord neurones, including opioids and NSAIDs, can also reduce or even abolish wind-up. Thus, other theories involving synaptic efficacy, potassium channels, calcium channels, etc. have also been proposed for the generation of this phenomenon. Whatever the mechanisms involved in its generation, wind-up has been interpreted as a system for the amplification in the spinal cord of the nociceptive message that arrives from peripheral nociceptors connected to C-fibres. This probably reflects the physiological system activated in the spinal cord after an intense or persistent barrage of afferent nociceptive impulses. On the other hand, wind-up, central sensitisation and hyperalgesia are not the same phenomena, although they may share common properties. Wind-up can be an important tool to study the processing of nociceptive information in the spinal cord, and the central effects of drugs that modulate the nociceptive system. This paper reviews the physiological and pharmacological data on wind-up of spinal cord neurones, and the perceptual correlates of wind-up in human subjects, in the context of its possible relation to the triggering of hyperalgesic states, and also the multiple factors which contribute to the generation of wind-up.

  5. Neuromagnetic detection of the laryngeal area: Sensory-evoked fields to air-puff stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyaji, Hideaki; Hironaga, Naruhito; Umezaki, Toshiro; Hagiwara, Koichi; Shigeto, Hiroshi; Sawatsubashi, Motohiro; Tobimatsu, Shozo; Komune, Shizuo

    2014-03-01

    The sensory projections from the oral cavity, pharynx, and larynx are crucial in assuring safe deglutition, coughing, breathing, and voice production/speaking. Although several studies using neuroimaging techniques have demonstrated cortical activation related to pharyngeal and laryngeal functions, little is known regarding sensory projections from the laryngeal area to the somatosensory cortex. The purpose of this study was to establish the cortical activity evoked by somatic air-puff stimulation at the laryngeal mucosa using magnetoencephalography. Twelve healthy volunteers were trained to inhibit swallowing in response to air stimuli delivered to the larynx. Minimum norm estimates was performed on the laryngeal somatosensory evoked fields (LSEFs) to best differentiate the target activations from non-task-related activations. Evoked magnetic fields were recorded with acceptable reproducibility in the left hemisphere, with a peak latency of approximately 100ms in 10 subjects. Peak activation was estimated at the caudolateral region of the primary somatosensory area (S1). These results establish the ability to detect LSEFs with an acceptable reproducibility within a single subject and among subjects. These results also suggest the existence of laryngeal somatic afferent input to the caudolateral region of S1 in human. Our findings indicate that further investigation in this area is needed, and should focus on laryngeal lateralization, swallowing, and speech processing. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Radiation treatment of spinal cord neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, R.V.

    1982-01-01

    Results of radiation treatment of spinal cord neoplasms are presented. The results of combined (surgical and radiation) treatment of tumors are studied. On the whole it is noted that radiation treatment of initial spinal cord tumours is not practised on a large scale because of low radiostability of spinal cord

  7. Traumatic spinal cord injury in MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bronarski, J.; Wozniak, E.

    1993-01-01

    Spinal cord injuries in tetraplegics were briefly discussed on the basis of MR imaging. It was found that severe cervical spine trauma usually results in concussion - the complete transection of the cord is rare. A case of 19 years old male with total cord transection confirmed by MR imaging is described. (author)

  8. CORD PROLAPSE, ASSOCIATED FACTORS AND FETAL OUTCOME

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Several factors predispose to cord prolapse, amongst which are breech presentation, abnormal lie and presentation, hydramnios and long cord [2-3, 5-7]. Perinatal mortality is the most feared complication and often seen in up to 91% of cases [8-9]. Little is known about the pattern of umbilical cord prolapse in Cameroon as ...

  9. Lymphangioma of the spermatic cord

    OpenAIRE

    Campos, Antônio Carlos Ligocki; Costa, Marco Aurélio Raeder da; Salvalaggio, Paolo Rogério de Oliveira; Torres, Luiz Fernando Bleggi; Coelho, Júlio Cézar Uili

    1998-01-01

    We describe a case of a 22-year-old man that had been submitted to a left herniorraphy 11 years previously to the present admission. He returned to our hospital with another mass in the same side of the groin. At operation, several small cysts linked to the spermatic cord were demonstrated. At this time, an histological exam demonstrated the presence of conective tissue. The final histology report confirmed the diagnosis of lymphangioma of the spermatic cord in the groin region. The patient w...

  10. Periodic modulation of repetitively elicited monosynaptic reflexes of the human lumbosacral spinal cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danner, Simon M.; Freundl, Brigitta; Binder, Heinrich; Mayr, Winfried; Rattay, Frank; Minassian, Karen

    2015-01-01

    In individuals with motor-complete spinal cord injury, epidural stimulation of the lumbosacral spinal cord at 2 Hz evokes unmodulated reflexes in the lower limbs, while stimulation at 22–60 Hz can generate rhythmic burstlike activity. Here we elaborated on an output pattern emerging at transitional stimulation frequencies with consecutively elicited reflexes alternating between large and small. We analyzed responses concomitantly elicited in thigh and leg muscle groups bilaterally by epidural stimulation in eight motor-complete spinal cord-injured individuals. Periodic amplitude modulation of at least 20 successive responses occurred in 31.4% of all available data sets with stimulation frequency set at 5–26 Hz, with highest prevalence at 16 Hz. It could be evoked in a single muscle group only but was more strongly expressed and consistent when occurring in pairs of antagonists or in the same muscle group bilaterally. Latencies and waveforms of the modulated reflexes corresponded to those of the unmodulated, monosynaptic responses to 2-Hz stimulation. We suggest that the cyclical changes of reflex excitability resulted from the interaction of facilitatory and inhibitory mechanisms emerging after specific delays and with distinct durations, including postactivation depression, recurrent inhibition and facilitation, as well as reafferent feedback activation. The emergence of large responses within the patterns at a rate of 5.5/s or 8/s may further suggest the entrainment of spinal mechanisms as involved in clonus. The study demonstrates that the human lumbosacral spinal cord can organize a simple form of rhythmicity through the repetitive activation of spinal reflex circuits. PMID:25904708

  11. Spinal cord blood flow and ischemic injury after experimental sacrifice of thoracic and abdominal segmental arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etz, Christian D; Homann, Tobias M; Luehr, Maximilian; Kari, Fabian A; Weisz, Donald J; Kleinman, George; Plestis, Konstadinos A; Griepp, Randall B

    2008-06-01

    Spinal cord blood flow (SCBF) after sacrifice of thoracoabdominal aortic segmental arteries (TAASA) during thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA) repair remains poorly understood. This study explored SCBF for 72 h after sacrifice of all TAASA. Fourteen juvenile Yorkshire pigs underwent complete serial TAASA sacrifice (T4-L5). Six control pigs underwent anesthesia and cooling to 32 degrees C with no TAASA sacrifice. In the experimental animals, spinal cord function was continuously monitored using motor evoked potentials (MEPs) until 1h after clamping the last TAASA. Fluorescent microspheres enabled segmental measurement of SCBF along the entire spinal cord before, and 5 min, 1 h, 5 h, 24 h and 72 h after complete TAASA sacrifice. A modified Tarlov score was obtained for 3 days after surgery. All the pigs with complete TAASA sacrifice retained normal cord function (MEP) until 1h after TAASA ligation. Seven pigs (50%) with complete TAASA sacrifice recovered after 72 h; seven pigs suffered paraparesis or paraplegia. Intraoperatively, and until 1h postoperatively, SCBF was similar among the three groups along the entire cord. Postoperatively, SCBF did not decrease in any group, but significant hyperemia occurred at 5h in controls and recovery animals, but did not occur in pigs that developed paraparesis or paraplegia in the T8-L2 segments (p=0.0002) and L3-S segments (p=0.0007). At 24h, SCBF remained marginally lower from T8 caudally; at 72h, SCBF was similar among all groups along the entire cord. SCBF in the segments T8-L2 at 5h predicted functional recovery (p=0.003). This study suggests that critical spinal cord ischemia after complete TAASA sacrifice does not occur immediately (intraoperatively), but is delayed 1-5h or longer after clamping, and represents failure to mount a hyperemic response to rewarming and awakening. The short duration of low SCBF associated with spinal cord injury suggests that hemodynamic and metabolic manipulation lasting only 24-72 h may

  12. Choroid Plexus in the Central Canal of the Spinal Cord Causing Recurrent Syringomyelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtaya, Anan; Sadek, Ahmed-Ramadan; Nicoll, James A R; Nader-Sepahi, Ali

    2018-03-01

    Syringomyelia is a fluid-filled cavitation within the substance of the spinal cord. This condition usually follows a primary pathology that disrupts the normal cerebrospinal fluid circulation or disturbs the microcirculation and cytoarchitecture of the spinal cord parenchyma. However, an etiology of recurrent syringomyelia resulting from an ectopic choroid plexus (CP) has not been discussed. Ectopic CP rests may be found within the central nervous system. Although there has been a single report, describing ectopic intramedullary spinal cord CP, to our knowledge, extra-cranial nonmalignant CP in the central canal of the spinal cord has not been reported. We report CP in the central canal of the spinal cord in a 23-year-old male patient who had developmental delay and diabetes mellitus type I who presented with dissociated sensory changes and muscle wastage predominantly on the right upper and lower limbs. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a multiloculated spinal cord syringomyelia stretching from cervical (C3) to the conus medullaris causing recurrent neurologic deficits. A biopsy of the central canal spinal cord lesion revealed CP. Decompression and syringosubarachnoid shunt insertion stabilized the patient's neurology. Our illustrative case reveals the presence of CP in the central canal of the spinal cord that may suggest a role in the etiology of recurrent syringomyelia. Although management poses a challenge to neurosurgeons, prompt decompression and shunting of the syringomyelia remains a favorable approach with acceptable outcomes. Further investigation into the pathophysiology of central canal CP ectopic causing recurrent syringomyelia and its correlation with spinal cord development may help future treatments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Psychological and physiological responses to odor-evoked autobiographic memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Masahiro; Isowa, Tokiko; Yamakawa, Kaori; Kawanishi, Yoko; Tsuboi, Hirohito; Kaneko, Hiroshi; Sadato, Norihiro; Oshida, Akiko; Katayama, Atsushi; Kashiwagi, Mitsuyoshi; Ohira, Hideki

    2011-01-01

    The "Proust phenomenon" occurs when a certain smell evokes a specific memory. Recent studies have demonstrated that odor-evoked autobiographic memories are more emotional than those elicited by other sensory stimuli because of the direct neural communication between the olfactory system and the amygdala. The amygdala is known to regulate various physiological activities including the endocrine and immune systems; therefore, odor-evoked autobiographic memory may trigger various psychological and physiological responses; however, the responses elicited by this memory remains obscure. In this study, we aimed to investigate the psychological and physiological responses accompanying odor-evoked autobiographic memory. We recruited healthy male and female volunteers and investigated changes in their mood states and autonomic nervous, endocrine, and immune activities when autobiographic memory was evoked in the participants by asking them to smell an odor(s) that was nostalgic to them. The autobiographic memories associated with positive emotion resulted in increased positive mood states, such as comfort and happiness, and decreased negative mood states, such as anxiety. Furthermore, heart rate was decreased, skin-conductance level was increased, and peripheral interleukin-2 level was decreased after smelling the nostalgic odor. These psychological and physiological responses were significantly correlated. The present study suggests that odor-evoked autobiographic memory along with a positive feeling induce various physiological responses, including the autonomic nervous and immune activities. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to observe an interaction between odor-evoked autobiographic memories and immune function.

  14. Visually Evoked Spiking Evolves While Spontaneous Ongoing Dynamics Persist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huys, Raoul; Jirsa, Viktor K.; Darokhan, Ziauddin; Valentiniene, Sonata; Roland, Per E.

    2016-01-01

    Neurons in the primary visual cortex spontaneously spike even when there are no visual stimuli. It is unknown whether the spiking evoked by visual stimuli is just a modification of the spontaneous ongoing cortical spiking dynamics or whether the spontaneous spiking state disappears and is replaced by evoked spiking. This study of laminar recordings of spontaneous spiking and visually evoked spiking of neurons in the ferret primary visual cortex shows that the spiking dynamics does not change: the spontaneous spiking as well as evoked spiking is controlled by a stable and persisting fixed point attractor. Its existence guarantees that evoked spiking return to the spontaneous state. However, the spontaneous ongoing spiking state and the visual evoked spiking states are qualitatively different and are separated by a threshold (separatrix). The functional advantage of this organization is that it avoids the need for a system reorganization following visual stimulation, and impedes the transition of spontaneous spiking to evoked spiking and the propagation of spontaneous spiking from layer 4 to layers 2–3. PMID:26778982

  15. Auditory evoked potential measurements in elasmobranchs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casper, Brandon; Mann, David

    2005-04-01

    Auditory evoked potentials (AEP) were first used to examine hearing in elasmobranchs by Corwin and Bullock in the late 1970s and early 1980s, marking the first time AEPs had been measured in fishes. Results of these experiments identified the regions of the ear and brain in which sound is processed, though no actual hearing thresholds were measured. Those initial experiments provided the ground work for future AEP experiments to measure fish hearing abilities in a manner that is much faster and more convenient than classical conditioning. Data will be presented on recent experiments in which AEPs were used to measure the hearing thresholds of two species of elasmobranchs: the nurse shark, Ginglymostoma cirratum, and the yellow stingray, Urobatis jamaicencis. Audiograms were analyzed and compared to previously published audiograms obtained using classical conditioning with results indicating that hearing thresholds were similar for the two methods. These data suggest that AEP testing is a viable option when measuring hearing in elasmobranchs and can increase the speed in which future hearing measurements can be obtained.

  16. Transient evoked otoacoustic emissions in rock musicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høydal, Erik Harry; Lein Størmer, Carl Christian; Laukli, Einar; Stenklev, Niels Christian

    2017-09-01

    Our focus in this study was the assessment of transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAEs) in a large group of rock musicians. A further objective was to analyse tinnitus among rock musicians as related to TEOAEs. The study was a cross-sectional survey of rock musicians selected at random. A control group was included at random for comparison. We recruited 111 musicians and a control group of 40 non-musicians. Testing was conducted by using clinical examination, pure tone audiometry, TEOAEs and a questionnaire. TEOAE SNR in the half-octave frequency band centred on 4 kHz was significantly lower bilaterally in musicians than controls. This effect was strongly predicted by age and pure-tone hearing threshold levels in the 3-6 kHz range. Bilateral hearing thresholds were significantly higher at 6 kHz in musicians. Twenty percent of the musicians had permanent tinnitus. There was no association between the TEOAE parameters and permanent tinnitus. Our results suggest an incipient hearing loss at 6 kHz in rock musicians. Loss of TEOAE SNR in the 4 kHz half-octave frequency band was observed, but it was related to higher mean 3-6 kHz hearing thresholds and age. A large proportion of rock musicians have permanent tinnitus.

  17. Deconvolution of the vestibular evoked myogenic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lütkenhöner, Bernd; Basel, Türker

    2012-02-07

    The vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) and the associated variance modulation can be understood by a convolution model. Two functions of time are incorporated into the model: the motor unit action potential (MUAP) of an average motor unit, and the temporal modulation of the MUAP rate of all contributing motor units, briefly called rate modulation. The latter is the function of interest, whereas the MUAP acts as a filter that distorts the information contained in the measured data. Here, it is shown how to recover the rate modulation by undoing the filtering using a deconvolution approach. The key aspects of our deconvolution algorithm are as follows: (1) the rate modulation is described in terms of just a few parameters; (2) the MUAP is calculated by Wiener deconvolution of the VEMP with the rate modulation; (3) the model parameters are optimized using a figure-of-merit function where the most important term quantifies the difference between measured and model-predicted variance modulation. The effectiveness of the algorithm is demonstrated with simulated data. An analysis of real data confirms the view that there are basically two components, which roughly correspond to the waves p13-n23 and n34-p44 of the VEMP. The rate modulation corresponding to the first, inhibitory component is much stronger than that corresponding to the second, excitatory component. But the latter is more extended so that the two modulations have almost the same equivalent rectangular duration. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Surface electrical stimulation to evoke referred sensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forst, Johanna C; Blok, Derek C; Slopsema, Julia P; Boss, John M; Heyboer, Lane A; Tobias, Carson M; Polasek, Katharine H

    2015-01-01

    Surface electrical stimulation (SES) is being investigated as a noninvasive method to evoke natural sensations distal to electrode location. This may improve treatment for phantom limb pain as well as provide an alternative method to deliver sensory feedback. The median and/or ulnar nerves of 35 subjects were stimulated at the elbow using surface electrodes. Strength-duration curves of hand sensation were found for each subject. All subjects experienced sensation in their hand, which was mostly described as a paresthesia-like sensation. The rheobase and chronaxie values were found to be lower for the median nerve than the ulnar nerve, with no significant difference between sexes. Repeated sessions with the same subject resulted in sufficient variability to suggest that recalculating the strength-duration curve for each electrode placement is necessary. Most of the recruitment curves in this study were generated with 28 to 36 data points. To quickly reproduce these curves with limited increase in error, we recommend 10 data points. Future studies will focus on obtaining different sensations using SES with the strength-duration curve defining the threshold of the effective parameter space.

  19. Rivalry of homeostatic and sensory-evoked emotions: Dehydration attenuates olfactory disgust and its neural correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Lea; Friedrich, Hergen; Federspiel, Andrea; Jann, Kay; Morishima, Yosuke; Landis, Basile Nicolas; Wiest, Roland; Strik, Werner; Dierks, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    Neural correlates have been described for emotions evoked by states of homeostatic imbalance (e.g. thirst, hunger, and breathlessness) and for emotions induced by external sensory stimulation (such as fear and disgust). However, the neurobiological mechanisms of their interaction, when they are experienced simultaneously, are still unknown. We investigated the interaction on the neurobiological and the perceptional level using subjective ratings, serum parameters, and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in a situation of emotional rivalry, when both a homeostatic and a sensory-evoked emotion were experienced at the same time. Twenty highly dehydrated male subjects rated a disgusting odor as significantly less repulsive when they were thirsty. On the neurobiological level, we found that this reduction in subjective disgust during thirst was accompanied by a significantly reduced neural activity in the insular cortex, a brain area known to be considerably involved in processing of disgust. Furthermore, during the experience of disgust in the satiated condition, we observed a significant functional connectivity between brain areas responding to the disgusting odor, which was absent during the stimulation in the thirsty condition. These results suggest interference of conflicting emotions: an acute homeostatic imbalance can attenuate the experience of another emotion evoked by the sensory perception of a potentially harmful external agent. This finding offers novel insights with regard to the behavioral relevance of biologically different types of emotions, indicating that some types of emotions are more imperative for behavior than others. As a general principle, this modulatory effect during the conflict of homeostatic and sensory-evoked emotions may function to safeguard survival. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Guanfacine potentiates the activation of prefrontal cortex evoked by warning signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerkin, Suzanne M; Schulz, Kurt P; Halperin, Jeffrey M; Newcorn, Jeffrey H; Ivanov, Iliyan; Tang, Cheuk Y; Fan, Jin

    2009-08-15

    Warning signals evoke an alert state of readiness that prepares for a rapid response by priming a thalamo-frontal-striatal network that includes the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). Animal models indicate that noradrenergic input is essential for this stimulus-driven activation of DLPFC, but the precise mechanisms involved have not been determined. We tested the role that postsynaptic alpha(2A) adrenoceptors play in the activation of DLPFC evoked by warning cues using a placebo-controlled challenge with the alpha(2A) agonist guanfacine. Sixteen healthy young adults were scanned twice with event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), while performing a simple cued reaction time (RT) task following administration of a single dose of oral guanfacine (1 mg) and placebo in counterbalanced order. The RT task temporally segregates the neural effects of warning cues and motor responses and minimizes mnemonic demands. Warning cues produced a marked reduction in RT accompanied by significant activation in a distributed thalamo-frontal-striatal network, including bilateral DLPFC. Guanfacine selectively increased the cue-evoked activation of the left DLPFC and right anterior cerebellum, although this increase was not accompanied by further reductions in RT. The effects of guanfacine on DLPFC activation were specifically associated with the warning cue and were not seen for visual- or target-related activation. Guanfacine produced marked increases in the cue-evoked activation of DLPFC that correspond to the well-described actions of postsynaptic alpha(2) adrenoceptor stimulation. The current procedures provide an opportunity to test postsynaptic alpha(2A) adrenoceptor function in the prefrontal cortex in the pathophysiology of several psychiatric disorders.

  1. Short-interval and long-interval intracortical inhibition of TMS-evoked EEG potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premoli, Isabella; Király, Julia; Müller-Dahlhaus, Florian; Zipser, Carl M; Rossini, Pierre; Zrenner, Christoph; Ziemann, Ulf; Belardinelli, Paolo

    2018-03-15

    Inhibition in the human motor cortex can be probed by means of paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (ppTMS) at interstimulus intervals of 2-3 ms (short-interval intracortical inhibition, SICI) or ∼100 ms (long-interval intracortical inhibition, LICI). Conventionally, SICI and LICI are recorded as motor evoked potential (MEP) inhibition in the hand muscle. Pharmacological experiments indicate that they are mediated by GABAA and GABAB receptors, respectively. SICI and LICI of TMS-evoked EEG potentials (TEPs) and their pharmacological properties have not been systematically studied. Here, we sought to examine SICI by ppTMS-evoked compared to single-pulse TMS-evoked TEPs, to investigate its pharmacological manipulation and to compare SICI with our previous results on LICI. PpTMS-EEG was applied to the left motor cortex in 16 healthy subjects in a randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled crossover design, testing the effects of a single oral dose 20 mg of diazepam, a positive modulator at the GABAA receptor, vs. 50 mg of the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen on SICI of TEPs. We found significant SICI of the N100 and P180 TEPs prior to drug intake. Diazepam reduced SICI of the N100 TEP, while baclofen enhanced it. Compared to our previous ppTMS-EEG results on LICI, the SICI effects on TEPs, including their drug modulation, were largely analogous. Findings suggest a similar interaction of paired-pulse effects on TEPs irrespective of the interstimulus interval. Therefore, SICI and LICI as measured with TEPs cannot be directly derived from SICI and LICI measured with MEPs, but may offer novel insight into paired-pulse responses recorded directly from the brain rather than muscle. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Molecular Imaging in Stem Cell Therapy for Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahuan Song

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury (SCI is a serious disease of the center nervous system (CNS. It is a devastating injury with sudden loss of motor, sensory, and autonomic function distal to the level of trauma and produces great personal and societal costs. Currently, there are no remarkable effective therapies for the treatment of SCI. Compared to traditional treatment methods, stem cell transplantation therapy holds potential for repair and functional plasticity after SCI. However, the mechanism of stem cell therapy for SCI remains largely unknown and obscure partly due to the lack of efficient stem cell trafficking methods. Molecular imaging technology including positron emission tomography (PET, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, optical imaging (i.e., bioluminescence imaging (BLI gives the hope to complete the knowledge concerning basic stem cell biology survival, migration, differentiation, and integration in real time when transplanted into damaged spinal cord. In this paper, we mainly review the molecular imaging technology in stem cell therapy for SCI.

  3. Banking on cord blood stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Michael J

    2008-07-01

    Umbilical cord blood gifted to non-profit public cord blood banks is now routinely used as an alternative source of haematopoietic stem cells for allogeneic transplantation for children and adults with cancer, bone marrow failure syndromes, haemoglobinopathies and many genetic metabolic disorders. Because of the success and outcomes of public cord banking, many companies now provide private cord banking services. However, in the absence of any published transplant evidence to support autologous and non-directed family banking, commercial cord banks currently offer a superfluous service.

  4. MR imaging and spinal cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azar-Kia, B.; Fine, M.; Naheedy, M.; Elias, D.

    1987-01-01

    MR imaging has significantly improved diagnostic capability of spinal cord injuries. Other available diagnostic modalities such as plain films, myelography, CT, and post-CT myelography have failed to consistently show the secific evidence of spinal cord injuries and their true extent. The authors are presenting our experiences with MR imaging in spinal column injury. They have found MR imaging to be the procedure of choice for prognostic evaluation of spinal cord trauma. They are showing examples of recent and old spinal cord injury such as hematomyelia, myelomalacia, transection, spinal cord edema, and cavitation

  5. Distribution of elements in human spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yukawa, Masae; Kobayashi, T.; Qiu, Y.; Kameda, N.; Ito, Y.; Otomo, E.

    1992-01-01

    The distribution of elements in human spinal cord was investigated on unfixed frozen cord material using PIXE technique. Distribution of Cu, Zn and Fe were not uniform in the cross section of the spinal cord and concentrations of these elements were higher in the anterior gray horn than in the other areas, while K and Cl distributed uniformly. The content of K changed along the spinal cord from the cervical to the lumbar level. These findings are discussed in relation to current understanding of the physiology of the spinal cord. (author)

  6. Leukoencephalopathy with brain stem and spinal cord involvement and lactate elevation is associated with cell-type-dependent splicing of mtAspRS mRNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Berge, Laura; Dooves, Stephanie; van Berkel, Carola G. M.; Polder, Emiel; van der Knaap, Marjo S.; Scheper, Gert C.

    2012-01-01

    LBSL (leukoencephalopathy with brain stem and spinal cord involvement and lactate elevation) is an autosomal recessive white matter disorder with slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia, spasticity and dorsal column dysfunction. Magnetic resonance imaging shows characteristic abnormalities in the

  7. Rapid myelin water imaging in human cervical spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljungberg, Emil; Vavasour, Irene; Tam, Roger; Yoo, Youngjin; Rauscher, Alexander; Li, David K B; Traboulsee, Anthony; MacKay, Alex; Kolind, Shannon

    2017-10-01

    Myelin water imaging (MWI) using multi-echo T 2 relaxation is a quantitative MRI technique that can be used as an in vivo biomarker for myelin in the central nervous system. MWI using a multi-echo spin echo sequence currently takes more than 20 min to acquire eight axial slices (5 mm thickness) in the cervical spinal cord, making spinal cord MWI impractical for implementation in clinical studies. In this study, an accelerated gradient and spin echo sequence (GRASE), previously validated for brain MWI, was adapted for spinal cord MWI. Ten healthy volunteers were scanned with the GRASE sequence (acquisition time 8.5 min) and compared with the multi-echo spin echo sequence (acquisition time 23.5 min). Using region of interest analysis, myelin estimates obtained from the two sequences were found to be in good agreement (mean difference = -0.0092, 95% confidence interval =  - 0.0092 ± 0.061; regression slope = 1.01, ρ = 0.9). MWI using GRASE was shown to be highly reproducible with an average coefficient of variation of 6.1%. The results from this study show that MWI can be performed in the cervical spinal cord in less than 10 min, allowing for practical implementation in multimodal clinical studies. Magn Reson Med 78:1482-1487, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  8. Spinal cord injury at birth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenger-Gron, Jesper; Kock, Kirsten; Nielsen, Rasmus G

    2008-01-01

    UNLABELLED: A case of perinatally acquired spinal cord injury (SCI) is presented. The foetus was vigorous until birth, the breech presented and delivery was performed by a non-traumatic Caesarean section. The infant displayed symptoms of severe SCI but diagnosis was delayed due to severe co...

  9. A review of magnetic resonance imaging in spinal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, S.J.; Khangure, M.S.

    1994-01-01

    One hundred and ninety-five magnetic resonance (MR) images of 167 patients with neurological impairment following spinal trauma were reviewed. Acute cord injury produces central haemorrhagic necrosis that extends transversely and longitudinally with time and increased injury severity. Oedema appears more homogeneous, extensive and dominant in minimal lesions. Magnetic resonance appearances correlate with neurological status and outcome. Patients with MR evidence of cord blood had severe clinical lesions and failed to show useful clinical improvement. Patients with homogeneous 'oedema' improved to useful function. Lesion signal inhomogeneity relates to a worse prognosis. The clinical level correlates closely with cord blood or signal in homogeneity but imprecisely with homogeneous oedema. Disc herniations require differentiation from epidural blood and venous engorgement, which are prominent with bone displacement. Magnetic resonance is recommended in incomplete cord syndromes and in cord injuries with no apparent fracture, particularly of clinically deteriorating. 18 ref., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  10. Cord Blood Banking for Potential Future Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, William T; Lubin, Bertram H; Cairo, Mitchell S; Notarangelo, Luigi D

    2017-11-01

    This policy statement is intended to provide information to guide pediatricians, obstetricians, and other medical specialists and health care providers in responding to parents' questions about cord blood donation and banking as well as the types (public versus private) and quality of cord blood banks. Cord blood is an excellent source of stem cells for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children with some fatal diseases. Cord blood transplantation offers another method of definitive therapy for infants, children, and adults with certain hematologic malignancies, hemoglobinopathies, severe forms of T-lymphocyte and other immunodeficiencies, and metabolic diseases. The development of universal screening for severe immunodeficiency assay in a growing number of states is likely to increase the number of cord blood transplants. Both public and private cord blood banks worldwide hold hundreds of thousands of cord blood units designated for the treatment of fatal or debilitating illnesses. The procurement, characterization, and cryopreservation of cord blood is free for families who choose public banking. However, the family cost for private banking is significant and not covered by insurance, and the unit may never be used. Quality-assessment reviews by several national and international accrediting bodies show private cord blood banks to be underused for treatment, less regulated for quality control, and more expensive for the family than public cord blood banks. There is an unquestionable need to study the use of cord blood banking to make new and important alternative means of reconstituting the hematopoietic blood system in patients with malignancies and blood disorders and possibly regenerating tissue systems in the future. Recommendations regarding appropriate ethical and operational standards (including informed consent policies, financial disclosures, and conflict-of-interest policies) are provided for physicians, institutions, and organizations that

  11. [Maturation of cerebral somatosensory evoked potentials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadilhac, J; Zhu, Y; Georgesco, M; Echenne, B; Rodiere, M

    1985-07-01

    Cerebral somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) were elicited by stimulation of the median nerve and/or posterior tibial nerve in 117 children of 1 day to 16 years old. A major negative wave (N) was consistently recorded from the parietal region of the scalp when the arm was stimulated. The peak latency, the onset latency, the rising time and the duration of H wave are closely correlated with age and body length. The latencies are shortest in the subjects of 1-3 years old. SEPs to lower extremity stimulation were inconstant in the infants before the age of one. The major positive wave (P) has a variable topographic distribution along the middle line, over the scalp. The latencies are also very variable in the different subjects of the same age as well as in the same subject with different locations of active electrode. Among the parameters studied as for N wave, only the rising time of P wave is significantly correlated with age. The latencies of P wave have the shortest value in the subjects of 1-3 years old. The comparison of SEPs to upper and to lower limb stimulations shows that there is no relationship between them in respect to their morphology and amplitude. The minimum value of the latencies of N and P waves was observed at the same age but the difference between the peak latencies of P and N waves in the same subject increases considerably after 2 years of age and reaches the adult value after 5 years of age. These resultats indicate that the maturation of the peripheral somatosensory pathways proceeds at a higher rate than that of the central somatosensory pathways, that the maturation of the somatosensory pathways of the upper limb precedes that of the lower limb, and that the rising time of N or P waves is a good index of cortical maturation. The clinical utility of these SEPs in pediatrics is discussed.

  12. Pudendal somatosensory evoked potentials in normal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo A. Cavalcanti

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Somatosensory evoked potential (SSEP is an electrophysiological test used to evaluate sensory innervations in peripheral and central neuropathies. Pudendal SSEP has been studied in dysfunctions related to the lower urinary tract and pelvic floor. Although some authors have already described technical details pertaining to the method, the standardization and the influence of physiological variables in normative values have not yet been established, especially for women. The aim of the study was to describe normal values of the pudendal SSEP and to compare technical details with those described by other authors. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The clitoral sensory threshold and pudendal SSEP latency was accomplished in 38 normal volunteers. The results obtained from stimulation performed on each side of the clitoris were compared to ages, body mass index (BMI and number of pregnancies. RESULTS: The values of clitoral sensory threshold and P1 latency with clitoral left stimulation were respectively, 3.64 ± 1.01 mA and 37.68 ± 2.60 ms. Results obtained with clitoral right stimulation were 3.84 ± 1.53 mA and 37.42 ± 3.12 ms, respectively. There were no correlations between clitoral sensory threshold and P1 latency with age, BMI or height of the volunteers. A significant difference was found in P1 latency between nulliparous women and volunteers who had been previously submitted to cesarean section. CONCLUSIONS: The SSEP latency represents an accessible and reproducible method to investigate the afferent pathways from the genitourinary tract. These results could be used as normative values in studies involving genitourinary neuropathies in order to better clarify voiding and sexual dysfunctions in females.

  13. Visual Evoked Response in Children Subjected to Prenatal Maternal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    neural conduction, or arousal level. S. Afr. Med. J., 48 ... pression treatment in either development or IQ, whether ... children in brain function at an electrophysiological level, ..... Perry, N. W. and Childers, D. G. (1969): The Human Visual Evoked.

  14. Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potential in HIV-Positive Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matas, Carla Gentile; Samelli, Alessandra Giannella; Angrisani, Rosanna Giaffredo; Magliaro, Fernanda Cristina Leite; Segurado, Aluísio C

    2015-10-20

    To characterize the findings of brainstem auditory evoked potential in HIV-positive individuals exposed and not exposed to antiretroviral treatment. This research was a cross-sectional, observational, and descriptive study. Forty-five HIV-positive individuals (18 not exposed and 27 exposed to the antiretroviral treatment - research groups I and II, respectively - and 30 control group individuals) were assessed through brainstem auditory evoked potential. There were no significant between-group differences regarding wave latencies. A higher percentage of altered brainstem auditory evoked potential was observed in the HIV-positive groups when compared to the control group. The most common alteration was in the low brainstem. HIV-positive individuals have a higher percentage of altered brainstem auditory evoked potential that suggests central auditory pathway impairment when compared to HIV-negative individuals. There was no significant difference between individuals exposed and not exposed to antiretroviral treatment.

  15. Can visual evoked potentials be used in biometric identification?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Alan J; Lalor, Edmund C; Reilly, Richard B

    2006-01-01

    Due to known differences in the anatomical structure of the visual pathways and generators in different individuals, the use of visual evoked potentials offers the possibility of an alternative to existing biometrics methods. A study based on visual evoked potentials from 13 individuals was carried out to assess the best combination of temporal, spectral and AR modeling features to realize a robust biometric. From the results it can be concluded that visual evoked potentials show considerable biometric qualities, with classification accuracies reaching a high of 86.54% and that a specific temporal and spectral combination was found to be optimal. Based on these results the visual evoked potential may be a useful tool in biometric identification when used in conjunction with more established biometric methods.

  16. Methodologic aspects of acetylcholine-evoked relaxation of rabbit aorta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kirsten Vendelbo; Nedergaard, Ove A.

    1999-01-01

    The acetylcholine-evoked relaxation of rabbit isolated thoracic aorta precontracted by phenylephrine was studied. Phenylephrine caused a steady contraction that was maintained for 6 h. In the presence of calcium disodium ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) and ascorbic acid the contraction decreased...

  17. Towards a neural basis of music-evoked emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelsch, Stefan

    2010-03-01

    Music is capable of evoking exceptionally strong emotions and of reliably affecting the mood of individuals. Functional neuroimaging and lesion studies show that music-evoked emotions can modulate activity in virtually all limbic and paralimbic brain structures. These structures are crucially involved in the initiation, generation, detection, maintenance, regulation and termination of emotions that have survival value for the individual and the species. Therefore, at least some music-evoked emotions involve the very core of evolutionarily adaptive neuroaffective mechanisms. Because dysfunctions in these structures are related to emotional disorders, a better understanding of music-evoked emotions and their neural correlates can lead to a more systematic and effective use of music in therapy. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Variation in anisotropy and diffusivity along the medulla oblongata and the whole spinal cord in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: a pilot study using diffusion tensor imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Y; Shi, L; Hui, S C N; Wang, D; Deng, M; Chu, W C W; Cheng, J C Y

    2014-08-01

    Disturbed somatosensory evoked potentials have been demonstrated in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (but this functional delay was found to originate above the C5-6 level, while the lower cord level was unaffected). Together with MR imaging observation of tonsillar ectopia and a relatively tethered cord, we hypothesized that there is disturbed mean diffusivity integrity along the spinal cord. In this study, advanced DTI was used to evaluate whether there was underlying decreased WM integrity within the brain stem and spinal cord in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis and any relationship to cerebellar tonsillar ectopia. Clinical impact on balance testing was also correlated. Thirteen girls with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis with right thoracic curves were compared with 13 age-matched healthy girls. DTI of the brain and whole spinal cord was performed. ROIs were manually defined for the medulla oblongata and along each intervertebral segment of the cord. Mean values of fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity were computed at the defined regions. Between-group comparisons were performed by 1-way ANOVA. Significantly decreased fractional anisotropy values and increased mean diffusivity values were found at the medulla oblongata and C1-2, C2-3, C3-4, and C4-5 segments in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis compared with healthy subjects. No significant difference was found in the lower cord levels. Significant correlation was found between the tonsillar level and fractional anisotropy value at the C4-5 level in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis only. The findings from this study are in agreement with previous findings showing abnormal somatosensory evoked potential readings occurring only above the C5-6 level in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis; these findings might partially explain the pathophysiology of the neural pathway involved. © 2014 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  19. A Telehealth System for Remote Auditory Evoked Potential Monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Millan, Jorge; Yunda, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    A portable, Internet-based EEG/Auditory Evoked Potential (AEP) monitoring system was developed for remote electrophysiological studies during sleep. The system records EEG/AEP simultaneously at the subject?s home for increased comfort and flexibility. The system provides simultaneous recording and remote viewing of EEG, EMG and EOG waves and allows on-line averaging of auditory evoked potentials. The design allows the recording of all major AEP components (brainstem, middle and late latency E...

  20. Brain-immune interaction accompanying odor-evoked autobiographic memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Masahiro; Bai, Yu; Yamakawa, Kaori; Toyama, Asako; Kashiwagi, Mitsuyoshi; Fukuda, Kazuyuki; Oshida, Akiko; Sanada, Kazue; Fukuyama, Seisuke; Shinoda, Jun; Yamada, Jitsuhiro; Sadato, Norihiro; Ohira, Hideki

    2013-01-01

    The phenomenon in which a certain smell evokes a specific memory is known as the Proust phenomenon. Odor-evoked autobiographic memories are more emotional than those elicited by other sensory stimuli. The results of our previous study indicated that odor-evoked autobiographic memory accompanied by positive emotions has remarkable effects on various psychological and physiological activities, including the secretion of cytokines, which are immune-signaling molecules that modulate systemic inflammation. In this study, we aimed to clarify the neural substrates associated with the interaction between odor-evoked autobiographic memory and peripheral circulating cytokines. We recruited healthy male and female volunteers and investigated the association between brain responses and the concentration of several cytokines in the plasma by using positron emission tomography (PET) recordings when an autographic memory was evoked in participants by asking them to smell an odor that was nostalgic to them. Participants experienced positive emotions and autobiographic memories when nostalgic odors were presented to them. The levels of peripheral proinflammatory cytokines, such as the tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ), were significantly reduced after experiencing odor-evoked autobiographic memory. Subtraction analysis of PET images indicated that the medial orbitofrontal cortex (mOFC) and precuneus/posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) were significantly activated during experiences of odor-evoked autobiographic memory. Furthermore, a correlation analysis indicated that activities of the mOFC and precuneus/PCC were negatively correlated with IFN-γ concentration. These results indicate that the neural networks including the precuneus/PCC and mOFC might regulate the secretion of peripheral proinflammatory cytokines during the experience of odor-evoked autobiographic memories accompanied with positive emotions.

  1. Brain–Immune Interaction Accompanying Odor-Evoked Autobiographic Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Masahiro; Bai, Yu; Yamakawa, Kaori; Toyama, Asako; Kashiwagi, Mitsuyoshi; Fukuda, Kazuyuki; Oshida, Akiko; Sanada, Kazue; Fukuyama, Seisuke; Shinoda, Jun; Yamada, Jitsuhiro; Sadato, Norihiro; Ohira, Hideki

    2013-01-01

    The phenomenon in which a certain smell evokes a specific memory is known as the Proust phenomenon. Odor-evoked autobiographic memories are more emotional than those elicited by other sensory stimuli. The results of our previous study indicated that odor-evoked autobiographic memory accompanied by positive emotions has remarkable effects on various psychological and physiological activities, including the secretion of cytokines, which are immune-signaling molecules that modulate systemic inflammation. In this study, we aimed to clarify the neural substrates associated with the interaction between odor-evoked autobiographic memory and peripheral circulating cytokines. We recruited healthy male and female volunteers and investigated the association between brain responses and the concentration of several cytokines in the plasma by using positron emission tomography (PET) recordings when an autographic memory was evoked in participants by asking them to smell an odor that was nostalgic to them. Participants experienced positive emotions and autobiographic memories when nostalgic odors were presented to them. The levels of peripheral proinflammatory cytokines, such as the tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ), were significantly reduced after experiencing odor-evoked autobiographic memory. Subtraction analysis of PET images indicated that the medial orbitofrontal cortex (mOFC) and precuneus/posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) were significantly activated during experiences of odor-evoked autobiographic memory. Furthermore, a correlation analysis indicated that activities of the mOFC and precuneus/PCC were negatively correlated with IFN-γ concentration. These results indicate that the neural networks including the precuneus/PCC and mOFC might regulate the secretion of peripheral proinflammatory cytokines during the experience of odor-evoked autobiographic memories accompanied with positive emotions. PMID:23977312

  2. Brain-immune interaction accompanying odor-evoked autobiographic memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Matsunaga

    Full Text Available The phenomenon in which a certain smell evokes a specific memory is known as the Proust phenomenon. Odor-evoked autobiographic memories are more emotional than those elicited by other sensory stimuli. The results of our previous study indicated that odor-evoked autobiographic memory accompanied by positive emotions has remarkable effects on various psychological and physiological activities, including the secretion of cytokines, which are immune-signaling molecules that modulate systemic inflammation. In this study, we aimed to clarify the neural substrates associated with the interaction between odor-evoked autobiographic memory and peripheral circulating cytokines. We recruited healthy male and female volunteers and investigated the association between brain responses and the concentration of several cytokines in the plasma by using positron emission tomography (PET recordings when an autographic memory was evoked in participants by asking them to smell an odor that was nostalgic to them. Participants experienced positive emotions and autobiographic memories when nostalgic odors were presented to them. The levels of peripheral proinflammatory cytokines, such as the tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and interferon-γ (IFN-γ, were significantly reduced after experiencing odor-evoked autobiographic memory. Subtraction analysis of PET images indicated that the medial orbitofrontal cortex (mOFC and precuneus/posterior cingulate cortex (PCC were significantly activated during experiences of odor-evoked autobiographic memory. Furthermore, a correlation analysis indicated that activities of the mOFC and precuneus/PCC were negatively correlated with IFN-γ concentration. These results indicate that the neural networks including the precuneus/PCC and mOFC might regulate the secretion of peripheral proinflammatory cytokines during the experience of odor-evoked autobiographic memories accompanied with positive emotions.

  3. Beyond the evoked/intrinsic neural process dichotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor Bolt

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary functional neuroimaging research has increasingly focused on characterization of intrinsic or “spontaneous” brain activity. Analysis of intrinsic activity is often contrasted with analysis of task-evoked activity that has traditionally been the focus of cognitive neuroscience. But does this evoked/intrinsic dichotomy adequately characterize human brain function? Based on empirical data demonstrating a close functional interdependence between intrinsic and task-evoked activity, we argue that the dichotomy between intrinsic and task-evoked activity as unobserved contributions to brain activity is artificial. We present an alternative picture of brain function in which the brain’s spatiotemporal dynamics do not consist of separable intrinsic and task-evoked components, but reflect the enaction of a system of mutual constraints to move the brain into and out of task-appropriate functional configurations. According to this alternative picture, cognitive neuroscientists are tasked with describing both the temporal trajectory of brain activity patterns across time, and the modulation of this trajectory by task states, without separating this process into intrinsic and task-evoked components. We argue that this alternative picture of brain function is best captured in a novel explanatory framework called enabling constraint. Overall, these insights call for a reconceptualization of functional brain activity, and should drive future methodological and empirical efforts.

  4. Muscle synergies evoked by microstimulation are preferentially encoded during behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Alexander Overduin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Electrical microstimulation studies provide some of the most direct evidence for the neural representation of muscle synergies. These synergies, i.e. coordinated activations of groups of muscles, have been proposed as building blocks for the construction of motor behaviors by the nervous system. Intraspinal or intracortical microstimulation has been shown to evoke muscle patterns that can be resolved into a small set of synergies similar to those seen in natural behavior. However, questions remain about the validity of microstimulation as a probe of neural function, particularly given the relatively long trains of supratheshold stimuli used in these studies. Here, we examined whether muscle synergies evoked during intracortical microstimulation in two rhesus macaques were similarly encoded by nearby motor cortical units during a purely voluntary behavior involving object reach, grasp, and carry movements. At each microstimulation site we identified the synergy most strongly evoked among those extracted from muscle patterns evoked over all microstimulation sites. For each cortical unit recorded at the same microstimulation site, we then identified the synergy most strongly encoded among those extracted from muscle patterns recorded during the voluntary behavior. We found that the synergy most strongly evoked at an intracortical microstimulation site matched the synergy most strongly encoded by proximal units more often than expected by chance. These results suggest a common neural substrate for microstimulation-evoked motor responses and for the generation of muscle patterns during natural behaviors.

  5. Scissors stab wound to the cervical spinal cord at the craniocervical junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Yong; Yang, Ying-Ming

    2016-06-01

    Stab wounds resulting in spinal cord injury of the craniocervical junction are rare. A scissors stab wound to the cervical spinal cord has been reported only once in the literature. This paper aimed to report a case of Brown-Séquard-plus syndrome in an 8-year-old boy secondary to a scissors stab wound at the craniocervical junction. Case report and review of the literature. Case report of an 8-year-old boy accidentally stabbed in the neck by scissors, which were thrown as a dart. The case study of an 8-year-old boy who was hospitalized because of a scissors stab wound at the craniocervical junction. The patient developed Brown-Séquard-plus syndrome on the left side of the body. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a laceration of the spinal cord at the craniocervical junction with cerebrospinal fluid leakage. Careful cleansing and interrupted sutures of the wounds were performed to prevent cerebrospinal fluid leakage. Rehabilitation therapy was performed 2 days later. A follow-up examination revealed complete recovery of the neurologic deficit 8 months post-injury. Treatment of scissors stab wounds to the cervical spinal cord, whether conservative management or thorough surgical exploration, should be individualized based on history, examination, and imaging. As shown in this case report, despite conservative management, complete recovery, which was unexpected, was attributed to the initial mild laceration of the spinal cord and ipsilateral spinal cord functional compensation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Surgical reconstruction of spinal cord circuit provides functional return in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Carlstedt

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This mini review describes the current surgical strategy for restoring function after traumatic spinal nerve root avulsion in brachial or lumbosacral plexus injury in man. As this lesion is a spinal cord or central nervous injury functional return depends on spinal cord nerve cell growth within the central nervous system. Basic science, clinical research and human application has demonstrated good and useful motor function after ventral root avulsion followed by spinal cord reimplantation. Recently, sensory return could be demonstrated following spinal cord surgery bypassing the injured primary sensory neuron. Experimental data showed that most of the recovery depended on new growth reinnervating peripheral receptors. Restored sensory function and the return of spinal reflex was demonstrated by electrophysiology and functional magnetic resonance imaging of human cortex. This spinal cord surgery is a unique treatment of central nervous system injury resulting in useful functional return. Further improvements will not depend on surgical improvements. Adjuvant therapy aiming at ameliorating the activity in retinoic acid elements in dorsal root ganglion neurons could be a new therapeutic avenue in restoring spinal cord circuits after nerve root avulsion injury.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of traumatic cervical injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juhng, S. K.; Lee, K. S.; Sohn, K. J.; Choi, S. S.; Won, J. J.

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of cevical injuries. MRI studies of 34 patients with cervical spinal injuries were analyzed retrospectively. All MRI scans were obtained with an 1.0T superconductive MRI scanner (Siemens Magnetom 42SPE) and their findings were analyzed regarding the spinal cord, bony spine, ligaments, and intervertebral disks. A variety of abnormal findings were detected: 25 cord abnormalities including cord compression (15 cases), cord edema (4 cases), syringomyelia (4 cases), myelomalacia (1 case), and hemorrhagic contusion (1 case), 18 ligamentous injuries, 22 disk herniations (9 post-traumatic, 13 chronic degenerative), 11 spine fractures, and 4 subluxations. MRI is useful in evaluating the spinal cord itself, in depicting ligamentous injuries, in establishing the presence of disc herniation, and in assessing the alignment of cervical spine

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of traumatic cervical injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juhng, S. K.; Lee, K. S.; Sohn, K. J.; Choi, S. S.; Won, J. J. [Wonkwang University School of Medicine, Iri (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-04-15

    To evaluate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of cevical injuries. MRI studies of 34 patients with cervical spinal injuries were analyzed retrospectively. All MRI scans were obtained with an 1.0T superconductive MRI scanner (Siemens Magnetom 42SPE) and their findings were analyzed regarding the spinal cord, bony spine, ligaments, and intervertebral disks. A variety of abnormal findings were detected: 25 cord abnormalities including cord compression (15 cases), cord edema (4 cases), syringomyelia (4 cases), myelomalacia (1 case), and hemorrhagic contusion (1 case), 18 ligamentous injuries, 22 disk herniations (9 post-traumatic, 13 chronic degenerative), 11 spine fractures, and 4 subluxations. MRI is useful in evaluating the spinal cord itself, in depicting ligamentous injuries, in establishing the presence of disc herniation, and in assessing the alignment of cervical spine.

  9. Functional recovery in rat spinal cord injury induced by hyperbaric oxygen preconditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Pei-Gang; Hu, Sheng-Li; Hu, Rong; Wu, Nan; Chen, Zhi; Meng, Hui; Lin, Jiang-Kai; Feng, Hua

    2012-12-01

    It is a common belief that neurosurgical interventions can cause inevitable damage resulting from the procedure itself in surgery especially for intramedullary spinal cord tumors. The present study was designed to examine if hyperbaric oxygen preconditioning (HBO-PC) was neuroprotective against surgical injuries using a rat model of spinal cord injury (SCI). Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups: HBO-PC group, hypobaric hypoxic preconditioning (HH-PC) control group, and normobaric control group. All groups were subjected to SCI by weight drop device. Rats from each group were examined for neurological behavior and electrophysiological function. Tissue sections were analyzed by using immunohistochemistry, TdT-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling, and axonal tract tracing. Significant neurological deficits were observed after SCI and HBO-PC and HH-PC improved neurological deficits 1 week post-injury. The latencies of motor-evoked potential and somatosensory-evoked potential were significantly delayed after SCI, which was attenuated by HBO-PC and HH-PC. Compared with normobaric control group, pretreatment with HBO and hypobaric hypoxia significantly reduced the number of TdT-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling-positive cells, and increased nestin-positive cells. HBO-PC and HH-PC enhanced axonal growth after SCI. In conclusion, preconditioning with HBO and hypobaric hypoxia can facilitate functional recovery and suppress cell apoptosis after SCI and may prove to be a useful preventive strategy to neurosurgical SCI.

  10. Acute traumatic central cord syndrome: analysis of clinical and radiological correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, P; Gomez, P; Alday, R

    2008-12-01

    In patients with traumatic spinal cord injury, several studies correlate neurological impairment and radiological findings. However, little information is available about this correspondence in the particular group of acute traumatic central cord syndrome. The object of the present work was to describe the clinical and radiological features of a series of patients presenting with acute traumatic central cord syndrome and to analyze clinical and radiological correlations on admission and at last follow-up. Retrospective review of 15 patients diagnosed of acute traumatic central cord syndrome between 1995 and 2005. Global motor score and motor score in upper extremities were determined on admission and at last follow-up (6 months-4 years, mean 16 months). Plain films, cervical computed tomography and magnetic resonance (MR) were performed in every patient and retrieved for the study. In seven patients, serial MR studies were performed during follow-up. Clinical and radiological correlations were statistically analyzed with non-parametric tests. Cervical spondylosis appeared associated with older age, falls, and absence of fracture. Spinal cord edema was the most common finding in MR studies but hemorrhage was also observed. The length of spinal cord edema significantly correlated with initial motor score. The decrease in T2-weighted hyperintensity in serial MR studies correlated with the gain of motor power in upper limbs at last follow-up. Elderly patients with more degenerated cervical spines commonly develop acute traumatic central cord syndrome after incidental falls. Length of spinal cord edema correlates with neurological impairment on admission and may provide significant prognostic information.

  11. Pain and spinal cord imaging measures in children with demyelinating disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Barakat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pain is a significant problem in diseases affecting the spinal cord, including demyelinating disease. To date, studies have examined the reliability of clinical measures for assessing and classifying the severity of spinal cord injury (SCI and also to evaluate SCI-related pain. Most of this research has focused on adult populations and patients with traumatic injuries. Little research exists regarding pediatric spinal cord demyelinating disease. One reason for this is the lack of reliable and useful approaches to measuring spinal cord changes since currently used diagnostic imaging has limited specificity for quantitative measures of demyelination. No single imaging technique demonstrates sufficiently high sensitivity or specificity to myelin, and strong correlation with clinical measures. However, recent advances in diffusion tensor imaging (DTI and magnetization transfer imaging (MTI measures are considered promising in providing increasingly useful and specific information on spinal cord damage. Findings from these quantitative imaging modalities correlate with the extent of demyelination and remyelination. These techniques may be of potential use for defining the evolution of the disease state, how it may affect specific spinal cord pathways, and contribute to the management of pediatric demyelination syndromes. Since pain is a major presenting symptom in patients with transverse myelitis, the disease is an ideal model to evaluate imaging methods to define these regional changes within the spinal cord. In this review we summarize (1 pediatric demyelinating conditions affecting the spinal cord; (2 their distinguishing features; and (3 current diagnostic and classification methods with particular focus on pain pathways. We also focus on concepts that are essential in developing strategies for the detection, monitoring, treatment and repair of pediatric myelitis.

  12. Chronic spinal cord injury in the cervical spine of a young soccer player.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Yoshihiko; Koga, Michiaki; Taguchi, Toshihiko

    2010-05-12

    A 17-year-old male soccer player presented with numbness in the upper- and lower-left extremities of 6 months' duration. He had no apparent history of trauma but experienced neck pain during heading of the ball 5 years prior. A high-signal intensity area was seen on T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the cervical spine. No muscle weakness was observed. Hypoesthesia was observed in bilateral forearms, hands, and extremities below the inguinal region. Plain radiographs in the neutral position showed local kyphosis at C3/4. A small protrusion of the C3/4 disk was observed on T1-weighted MRI. A high-signal area in the spinal cord at the C3/4 level was observed on T2-weighted MRI, but this was not enhanced by gadolinium. Multiple sclerosis, intramedullary spinal cord tumor, sarcoidosis and malignant lymphoma, and spinal cord injury were all considered in the differential diagnosis. However, in view of the clinical, laboratory, and radiological investigations, we concluded that repeated impacts to the neck caused by heading of the ball during soccer induced a chronic, minor spinal cord injury. This contributed to the high-signal intensity change of the spinal cord in T2-weighted MRI. The present case demonstrates that repeated impact may cause chronic spinal cord injury. Soccer, American football, or rugby players presenting with neck or extremity symptoms should not be overlooked for the possibility of latent spinal cord injury, as this could present later development of more severe or unrecoverable spinal cord injuries. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. Unraveling ALS due to SOD1 mutation through the combination of brain and cervical cord MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosta, Federica; Spinelli, Edoardo Gioele; Marjanovic, Ivan V; Stevic, Zorica; Pagani, Elisabetta; Valsasina, Paola; Salak-Djokic, Biljana; Jankovic, Milena; Lavrnic, Dragana; Kostic, Vladimir S; Filippi, Massimo

    2018-02-20

    To explore structural and functional changes of the brain and cervical cord in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) due to mutation in the superoxide dismutase ( SOD1 ) gene compared with sporadic ALS. Twenty patients with SOD1 ALS, 11 with sporadic ALS, and 33 healthy controls underwent clinical evaluation and brain MRI. Cortical thickness analysis, diffusion tensor MRI of the corticospinal tracts (CST) and corpus callosum, and resting-state functional connectivity were performed. Patients with ALS also underwent cervical cord MRI to evaluate cord cross-sectional area and magnetization transfer ratio (MTR). Patients with SOD1 ALS showed longer disease duration and slower rate of functional decline relative to those with sporadic ALS. No cortical thickness abnormalities were found in patients with ALS compared with controls. Fractional anisotropy showed that sporadic ALS patients had significant CST damage relative to both healthy controls ( p = 0.001-0.02) and SOD1-related ALS ( p = 0.05), although the latter showed alterations that were intermediate between controls and sporadic ALS. Functional hyperconnectivity of the motor cortex in the sensorimotor network was observed in patients with sporadic ALS relative to controls. Conversely, patients with SOD1 ALS showed lower cord cross-sectional area along the whole cervical cord relative to those with sporadic ALS ( p ALS showed cervical cord atrophy relative to those with sporadic ALS and a relative preservation of brain motor structural and functional networks. Neurodegeneration in SOD1 ALS is likely to occur primarily in the spinal cord. An objective and accurate estimate of spinal cord damage has potential in the future assessment of preventive SOD1 ALS therapies. © 2018 American Academy of Neurology.

  14. Imaging of the late sequelae of spinal cord injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodley, R.

    1994-01-01

    With an increasing ability to diagnose and treat the neurological complications, surveillance of the state of the spinal cord has now assumed great importance. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), or computerized tomography (CT) with myelography if MRI is contra-indicated is the method of choice and can demonstrate the pathology with great clarity. In most patients, midline sagittal T1W images are sufficient for screening purposes and for monitoring the success of treatment. Operative, imaging and postmortem studies have shown that the two main changes that occur are: (a) atrophic and (b) cystic - the microcystic and myxoid gel changes of myelomalacia, focal cysts and the larger, more expansive, syringomyelia. As yet, there is no standardization of terminology to describe the various pathological and radiological states. This is critical as only one condition, syringomyelia, is currently amenable to definitive surgery and without conformity, comparisons of incidence in different populations and assessment of the results of surgery are impossible. The published small studies of predominantly symptomatic patients at varying stages of chronicity give differing incidences of changes. Preliminary results of a surveillance MRI study of the spinal cord changes in 153 patients who had had a spinal cord injury over 20 years previously are presented. Altrophy was present in 62%, myelomalacia in 54%, syringomyelia in 22%, focal cysts in 9% and disruption in 7%. (orig./VHE) [de

  15. Diagnosis of cervical spinal cord disorders with MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suyama, Naohito; Iizuka, Tadashi

    1991-01-01

    From September 1987 through May 1989, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been performed in 58 patients with myelopathy and 9 patients with spinal cord injuries. This study was designed to determine the rate of spinal cord stricture and changes of signal intensities. Increased signal intensity on T2-weighted images was more frequently observed than decreased intensity on T1-weighted images in the group of myelopathy (19/58 vs 10/58). In the group of spinal cord injuries, however, there was no significant difference in the incidence between increased intensity on T2-weighted images (4/9) and decreased intensity on T1-weighted images (7/9). Twelve patients with chronic compressive spinal myelopathy tended to have an increased intensity on T2-weighted images. In such cases, although JOA scores were low before surgery, signal intensity returned to that without marked signal changes. In chronic compressive cervical myelopathy, the degree of preoperative compression was the same as the postoperative JOA scores. Regarding cervical spinal injury, there was a good correlation between the size of low signal area and the degree of paralysis. (N.K.)

  16. Religious perspectives on umbilical cord blood banking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordens, Christopher F C; O'Connor, Michelle A C; Kerridge, Ian H; Stewart, Cameron; Cameron, Andrew; Keown, Damien; Lawrence, Rabbi Jeremy; McGarrity, Andrew; Sachedina, Abdulaziz; Tobin, Bernadette

    2012-03-01

    Umbilical cord blood is a valuable source of haematopoietic stem cells. There is little information about whether religious affiliations have any bearing on attitudes to and decisions about its collection, donation and storage. The authors provided information about umbilical cord blood banking to expert commentators from six major world religions (Catholicism, Anglicanism, Islam, Judaism, Hinduism and Buddhism) and asked them to address a specific set of questions in a commentary. The commentaries suggest there is considerable support for umbilical cord blood banking in these religions. Four commentaries provide moral grounds for favouring public donation over private storage. None attach any particular religious significance to the umbilical cord or to the blood within it, nor place restrictions on the ethnicity or religion of donors and recipients. Views on ownership of umbilical cord blood vary. The authors offer a series of general points for those who seek a better understanding of religious perspectives on umbilical cord blood banking.

  17. The paradox of music-evoked sadness: an online survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liila Taruffi

    Full Text Available This study explores listeners' experience of music-evoked sadness. Sadness is typically assumed to be undesirable and is therefore usually avoided in everyday life. Yet the question remains: Why do people seek and appreciate sadness in music? We present findings from an online survey with both Western and Eastern participants (N = 772. The survey investigates the rewarding aspects of music-evoked sadness, as well as the relative contribution of listener characteristics and situational factors to the appreciation of sad music. The survey also examines the different principles through which sadness is evoked by music, and their interaction with personality traits. Results show 4 different rewards of music-evoked sadness: reward of imagination, emotion regulation, empathy, and no "real-life" implications. Moreover, appreciation of sad music follows a mood-congruent fashion and is greater among individuals with high empathy and low emotional stability. Surprisingly, nostalgia rather than sadness is the most frequent emotion evoked by sad music. Correspondingly, memory was rated as the most important principle through which sadness is evoked. Finally, the trait empathy contributes to the evocation of sadness via contagion, appraisal, and by engaging social functions. The present findings indicate that emotional responses to sad music are multifaceted, are modulated by empathy, and are linked with a multidimensional experience of pleasure. These results were corroborated by a follow-up survey on happy music, which indicated differences between the emotional experiences resulting from listening to sad versus happy music. This is the first comprehensive survey of music-evoked sadness, revealing that listening to sad music can lead to beneficial emotional effects such as regulation of negative emotion and mood as well as consolation. Such beneficial emotional effects constitute the prime motivations for engaging with sad music in everyday life.

  18. The Paradox of Music-Evoked Sadness: An Online Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taruffi, Liila; Koelsch, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    This study explores listeners’ experience of music-evoked sadness. Sadness is typically assumed to be undesirable and is therefore usually avoided in everyday life. Yet the question remains: Why do people seek and appreciate sadness in music? We present findings from an online survey with both Western and Eastern participants (N = 772). The survey investigates the rewarding aspects of music-evoked sadness, as well as the relative contribution of listener characteristics and situational factors to the appreciation of sad music. The survey also examines the different principles through which sadness is evoked by music, and their interaction with personality traits. Results show 4 different rewards of music-evoked sadness: reward of imagination, emotion regulation, empathy, and no “real-life” implications. Moreover, appreciation of sad music follows a mood-congruent fashion and is greater among individuals with high empathy and low emotional stability. Surprisingly, nostalgia rather than sadness is the most frequent emotion evoked by sad music. Correspondingly, memory was rated as the most important principle through which sadness is evoked. Finally, the trait empathy contributes to the evocation of sadness via contagion, appraisal, and by engaging social functions. The present findings indicate that emotional responses to sad music are multifaceted, are modulated by empathy, and are linked with a multidimensional experience of pleasure. These results were corroborated by a follow-up survey on happy music, which indicated differences between the emotional experiences resulting from listening to sad versus happy music. This is the first comprehensive survey of music-evoked sadness, revealing that listening to sad music can lead to beneficial emotional effects such as regulation of negative emotion and mood as well as consolation. Such beneficial emotional effects constitute the prime motivations for engaging with sad music in everyday life. PMID:25330315

  19. The paradox of music-evoked sadness: an online survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taruffi, Liila; Koelsch, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    This study explores listeners' experience of music-evoked sadness. Sadness is typically assumed to be undesirable and is therefore usually avoided in everyday life. Yet the question remains: Why do people seek and appreciate sadness in music? We present findings from an online survey with both Western and Eastern participants (N = 772). The survey investigates the rewarding aspects of music-evoked sadness, as well as the relative contribution of listener characteristics and situational factors to the appreciation of sad music. The survey also examines the different principles through which sadness is evoked by music, and their interaction with personality traits. Results show 4 different rewards of music-evoked sadness: reward of imagination, emotion regulation, empathy, and no "real-life" implications. Moreover, appreciation of sad music follows a mood-congruent fashion and is greater among individuals with high empathy and low emotional stability. Surprisingly, nostalgia rather than sadness is the most frequent emotion evoked by sad music. Correspondingly, memory was rated as the most important principle through which sadness is evoked. Finally, the trait empathy contributes to the evocation of sadness via contagion, appraisal, and by engaging social functions. The present findings indicate that emotional responses to sad music are multifaceted, are modulated by empathy, and are linked with a multidimensional experience of pleasure. These results were corroborated by a follow-up survey on happy music, which indicated differences between the emotional experiences resulting from listening to sad versus happy music. This is the first comprehensive survey of music-evoked sadness, revealing that listening to sad music can lead to beneficial emotional effects such as regulation of negative emotion and mood as well as consolation. Such beneficial emotional effects constitute the prime motivations for engaging with sad music in everyday life.

  20. Cortical evoked potentials to an auditory illusion: binaural beats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Hillel; Starr, Arnold; Michalewski, Henry J; Dimitrijevic, Andrew; Bleich, Naomi; Mittelman, Nomi

    2009-08-01

    To define brain activity corresponding to an auditory illusion of 3 and 6Hz binaural beats in 250Hz or 1000Hz base frequencies, and compare it to the sound onset response. Event-Related Potentials (ERPs) were recorded in response to unmodulated tones of 250 or 1000Hz to one ear and 3 or 6Hz higher to the other, creating an illusion of amplitude modulations (beats) of 3Hz and 6Hz, in base frequencies of 250Hz and 1000Hz. Tones were 2000ms in duration and presented with approximately 1s intervals. Latency, amplitude and source current density estimates of ERP components to tone onset and subsequent beats-evoked oscillations were determined and compared across beat frequencies with both base frequencies. All stimuli evoked tone-onset P(50), N(100) and P(200) components followed by oscillations corresponding to the beat frequency, and a subsequent tone-offset complex. Beats-evoked oscillations were higher in amplitude with the low base frequency and to the low beat frequency. Sources of the beats-evoked oscillations across all stimulus conditions located mostly to left lateral and inferior temporal lobe areas in all stimulus conditions. Onset-evoked components were not different across stimulus conditions; P(50) had significantly different sources than the beats-evoked oscillations; and N(100) and P(200) sources located to the same temporal lobe regions as beats-evoked oscillations, but were bilateral and also included frontal and parietal contributions. Neural activity with slightly different volley frequencies from left and right ear converges and interacts in the central auditory brainstem pathways to generate beats of neural activity to modulate activities in the left temporal lobe, giving rise to the illusion of binaural beats. Cortical potentials recorded to binaural beats are distinct from onset responses. Brain activity corresponding to an auditory illusion of low frequency beats can be recorded from the scalp.

  1. Microdialysis to optimize cord perfusion and drug delivery in spinal cord injury.

    OpenAIRE

    Phang, I; Zoumprouli, A; Papadopoulos, MC; Saadoun, S

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: There is lack of monitoring from the injury site to guide management of patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injury. Here we describe a bedside microdialysis monitoring technique for optimizing spinal cord perfusion and drug delivery at the injury site. METHODS: 14 patients were recruited within 72 hours of severe spinal cord injury. We inserted intradurally at the injury site a pressure probe, to monitor continuously spinal cord perfusion pressure, and a microdialysis cathete...

  2. MRI in diagnosis of spinal cord diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Naotoshi; Ono, Yuko; Kakinoki, Yoshio; Kimura, Humiko; Ebihara, Reiko; Nagayama, Takashi; Okada, Takaharu; Watanabe, Hiromi

    1985-01-01

    64 MRI studies of 57 cases of spinal cord diseases were reviewed, and following results were obtained. (1) MRI is usefull for screening method of spinal cord diseases, as CT in cerebral diseases. (2) MRI might replaces myelography in most of spinal cord disease, and more reliable informations might be obtained by MRI than in myelography in some cases, but (3) in detection of small organic changes, some technological problems are layed regarding to the image resolution of MRI. (author)

  3. Spinal cord injury drives chronic brain changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Jure

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Only a few studies have considered changes in brain structures other than sensory and motor cortex after spinal cord injury, although cognitive impairments have been reported in these patients. Spinal cord injury results in chronic brain neuroinflammation with consequent neurodegeneration and cognitive decline in rodents. Regarding the hippocampus, neurogenesis is reduced and reactive gliosis increased. These long-term abnormalities could explain behavioral impairments exhibited in humans patients suffering from spinal cord trauma.

  4. Contrast enhanced CT of spinal cord angioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Takahiko; Ebitani, Tsutomu; Honma, Takao; Sofue, Muroto; Nakamura, Shigeru

    1982-01-01

    Contrast enhanced CT on 6 patients with spinal cord angioma showed enhancement in 2 of them. The conditions to produce contrast enhancement were the window width of 100 - 200, and the window level of 0 - 50. In spinal cord angioma, contrast enhanced CT is presently only an adjunct to angiography and myelography. Nevertheless, contrast enhanced CT is useful in the screening test for spinal cord angioma, in the patients who are nonindicated to angiography, and in the postoperative follow-up. (Ueda, J.)

  5. Purinergic receptors are involved in tooth-pulp evoked nocifensive behavior and brainstem neuronal activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sessle Barry J

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate whether P2X receptors are involved in responses to noxious pulp stimulation, the P2X3 and P2X2/3 receptor agonist α,β-methyleneATP (α,β-meATP was applied to the molar tooth pulp and nocifensive behavior and extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK phosphorylation in trigeminal spinal subnucleus caudalis (Vc, trigeminal spinal subnucleus interpolaris (Vi, upper cervical spinal cord (C1/C2 and paratrigeminal nucleus (Pa5 neurons were analyzed in rats. Results Genioglossus (GG muscle activity was evoked by pulpal application of 100 mM α,β-meATP and was significantly larger than GG activity following vehicle (phosphate-buffered saline PBS application (p 1, P2X3 and, P2X2/3 antagonist. A large number of pERK-LI cells were expressed in the Vc, Vi/Vc, C1/C2 and Pa5 at 5 min following pulpal application of 100 mM α,β-meATP compared to PBS application to the pulp (p Conclusions The present findings suggest that activation of P2X3 and P2X2/3 receptors in the tooth pulp is sufficient to elicit nociceptive behavioral responses and trigeminal brainstem neuronal activity.

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Features of Neuromyelitis Optica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Sun Kyung; Song, Chang June; Park, Woon Ju; Lee, In Ho; Son, Eun Hee [Chungnam National University College of Medicine, Chungnam National University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-15

    To report the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features of the spinal cord and brain in patients of neuromyelitis optica (NMO). Between January 2001 and March 2010, the MR images (spinal cord, brain, and orbit) and the clinical and serologic findings of 11 NMO patients were retrospectively reviewed. The contrast-enhancement of the spinal cord was performed (20/23). The presence and pattern of the contrast-enhancement in the spinal cord were classified into 5 types. Acute myelitis was monophasic in 8 patients (8/11, 72.7%); and optic neuritis preceded acute myelitis in most patients. Longitudinally extensive cord lesion (average, 7.3 vertebral segments) was involved. The most common type was the diffuse and subtle enhancement of the spinal cord with a multifocal nodular, linear or segmental intense enhancement (45%). Most of the brain lesions (5/11, 10 lesions) were located in the brain stem, thalamus and callososeptal interphase. Anti-Ro autoantibody was positive in 2 patients, and they showed a high relapse rate of acute myelitis. Anti-NMO IgG was positive in 4 patients (4/7, 66.7%). The imaging findings of acute myelitis in NMO may helpful in making an early diagnosis of NMO which can result in a severe damage to the spinal cord, and to make a differential diagnosis of multiple sclerosis and inflammatory diseases of the spinal cord such as toxocariasis.

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Features of Neuromyelitis Optica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, Sun Kyung; Song, Chang June; Park, Woon Ju; Lee, In Ho; Son, Eun Hee

    2013-01-01

    To report the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features of the spinal cord and brain in patients of neuromyelitis optica (NMO). Between January 2001 and March 2010, the MR images (spinal cord, brain, and orbit) and the clinical and serologic findings of 11 NMO patients were retrospectively reviewed. The contrast-enhancement of the spinal cord was performed (20/23). The presence and pattern of the contrast-enhancement in the spinal cord were classified into 5 types. Acute myelitis was monophasic in 8 patients (8/11, 72.7%); and optic neuritis preceded acute myelitis in most patients. Longitudinally extensive cord lesion (average, 7.3 vertebral segments) was involved. The most common type was the diffuse and subtle enhancement of the spinal cord with a multifocal nodular, linear or segmental intense enhancement (45%). Most of the brain lesions (5/11, 10 lesions) were located in the brain stem, thalamus and callososeptal interphase. Anti-Ro autoantibody was positive in 2 patients, and they showed a high relapse rate of acute myelitis. Anti-NMO IgG was positive in 4 patients (4/7, 66.7%). The imaging findings of acute myelitis in NMO may helpful in making an early diagnosis of NMO which can result in a severe damage to the spinal cord, and to make a differential diagnosis of multiple sclerosis and inflammatory diseases of the spinal cord such as toxocariasis.

  8. Intensity dependent effects of transcranial direct current stimulation on corticospinal excitability in chronic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Lynda M; Edwards, Dylan J; Ruffini, Giulio; Labar, Douglas; Stampas, Argyrios; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Cortes, Mar

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the effects of anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (a-tDCS) intensity on corticospinal excitability and affected muscle activation in individuals with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI). Single-blind, randomized, sham-controlled, crossover study. Medical research institute and rehabilitation hospital. Volunteers (N = 9) with chronic SCI and motor dysfunction in wrist extensor muscles. Three single session exposures to 20 minutes of a-tDCS (anode over the extensor carpi radialis [ECR] muscle representation on the left primary motor cortex, cathode over the right supraorbital area) using 1 mA, 2 mA, or sham stimulation, delivered at rest, with at least 1 week between sessions. Corticospinal excitability was assessed with motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) from the ECR muscle using surface electromyography after transcranial magnetic stimulation. Changes in spinal excitability, sensory threshold, and muscle strength were also investigated. Mean MEP amplitude significantly increased by approximately 40% immediately after 2mA a-tDCS (pre: 0.36 ± 0.1 mV; post: 0.47 ± 0.11 mV; P = .001), but not with 1 mA or sham. Maximal voluntary contraction measures remained unaltered across all conditions. Sensory threshold significantly decreased over time after 1mA (P = .002) and 2mA (P = .039) a-tDCS and did not change with sham. F-wave persistence showed a nonsignificant trend for increase (pre: 32% ± 12%; post: 41% ± 10%; follow-up: 46% ± 12%) after 2 mA stimulation. No adverse effects were reported with any of the experimental conditions. The a-tDCS can transiently raise corticospinal excitability to affected muscles in patients with chronic SCI after 2 mA stimulation. Sensory perception can improve with both 1 and 2 mA stimulation. This study gives support to the safe and effective use of a-tDCS using small electrodes in patients with SCI and highlights the importance of stimulation intensity. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation

  9. MRI findings of uterine tumor resembling ovarian sex-cord tumor: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Sung Hwan; Kim, Hee Jin; Han, Hyun Young; Hwang, In Taek; Kim, Ju Heon; Lee, Seung Yeon [Eulji University Hospital, Eulji University School of Medicine, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Uterine tumor resembling ovarian sex-cord tumor is a very rare uterine neoplasm that was first described by Clement and Scully in 1976. Since then, approximately 70 cases have been reported. However, these case reports have mainly described and discussed the pathologic and clinical features, and few radiologic findings have been presented. We experienced a case of a uterine tumor resembling ovarian sex-cord tumor, which was considered a uterine leiomyoma or leiomyosarcoma upon initial impression at preoperative evaluation including transvaginal ultrasonography and pelvic magnetic resonance imaging. Its diagnosis was pathologically confirmed after total abdominal hysterectomy.

  10. ASIC channel inhibition enhances excitotoxic neuronal death in an in vitro model of spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzone, Graciela L; Veeraraghavan, Priyadharishini; Gonzalez-Inchauspe, Carlota; Nistri, Andrea; Uchitel, Osvaldo D

    2017-02-20

    In the spinal cord high extracellular glutamate evokes excitotoxic damage with neuronal loss and severe locomotor impairment. During the cell dysfunction process, extracellular pH becomes acid and may activate acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) which could be important contributors to neurodegenerative pathologies. Our previous studies have shown that transient application of the glutamate analog kainate (KA) evokes delayed excitotoxic death of spinal neurons, while white matter is mainly spared. The present goal was to enquire if ASIC channels modulated KA damage in relation to locomotor network function and cell death. Mouse spinal cord slices were treated with KA (0.01 or 0.1mM) for 1h, and then washed out for 24h prior to analysis. RT-PCR results showed that KA (at 0.01mM concentration that is near-threshold for damage) increased mRNA expression of ASIC1a, ASIC1b, ASIC2 and ASIC3, an effect reversed by the ASIC inhibitor 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI). A KA neurotoxic dose (0.1mM) reduced ASIC1a and ASIC2 expression. Cell viability assays demonstrated KA-induced large damage in spinal slices from mice with ASIC1a gene ablation. Likewise, immunohistochemistry indicated significant neuronal loss when KA was followed by the ASIC inhibitors DAPI or amiloride. Electrophysiological recording from ventral roots of isolated spinal cords showed that alternating oscillatory cycles were slowed down by 0.01mMKA, and intensely inhibited by subsequently applied DAPI or amiloride. Our data suggest that early rise in ASIC expression and function counteracted deleterious effects on spinal networks by raising the excitotoxicity threshold, a result with potential implications for improving neuroprotection. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Body Position Influences Which Neural Structures Are Recruited by Lumbar Transcutaneous Spinal Cord Stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon M Danner

    Full Text Available Transcutaneous stimulation of the human lumbosacral spinal cord is used to evoke spinal reflexes and to neuromodulate altered sensorimotor function following spinal cord injury. Both applications require the reliable stimulation of afferent posterior root fibers. Yet under certain circumstances, efferent anterior root fibers can be co-activated. We hypothesized that body position influences the preferential stimulation of sensory or motor fibers. Stimulus-triggered responses to transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation were recorded using surface-electromyography from quadriceps, hamstrings, tibialis anterior, and triceps surae muscles in 10 individuals with intact nervous systems in the supine, standing and prone positions. Single and paired (30-ms inter-stimulus intervals biphasic stimulation pulses were applied through surface electrodes placed on the skin between the T11 and T12 inter-spinous processes referenced to electrodes on the abdomen. The paired stimulation was applied to evaluate the origin of the evoked electromyographic response; trans-synaptic responses would be suppressed whereas direct efferent responses would almost retain their amplitude. We found that responses to the second stimulus were decreased to 14%±5% of the amplitude of the response to the initial pulse in the supine position across muscles, to 30%±5% in the standing, and to only 80%±5% in the prone position. Response thresholds were lowest during standing and highest in the prone position and response amplitudes were largest in the supine and smallest in the prone position. The responses obtained in the supine and standing positions likely resulted from selective stimulation of sensory fibers while concomitant motor-fiber stimulation occurred in the prone position. We assume that changes of root-fiber paths within the generated electric field when in the prone position increase the stimulation thresholds of posterior above those of anterior root fibers. Thus, we

  12. Nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ethier, R.; Melanson, D.; Peters, T.M.

    1983-01-01

    Ten years following computerized tomography, a new technique called nuclear magnetic resonance revolutionizes the field of diagnostic imaging. A major advantage of nuclear magnetic resonance is that the danger of radiation is non-existent as compared to computerized tomography. When parts of the human body are subject to radio-frequencies while in a fixed magnetic field, its most detailed structures are revealed. The quality of images, the applications, as well as the indications are forever increasing. Images obtained at the level of the brain and spinal cord through nuclear magnetic resonance supercede those obtained through computerized tomography. Hence, it is most likely that myelography, along with pneumoencephalography will be eliminated as a diagnostic means. It is without a doubt that nuclear magnetic resonance is tomorrow's computerized tomography [fr

  13. Imaging in spine and spinal cord malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, Andrea; Biancheri, Roberta; Cama, Armando; Piatelli, Gianluca; Ravegnani, Marcello; Tortori-Donati, Paolo

    2004-01-01

    Spinal and spinal cord malformations are collectively named spinal dysraphisms. They arise from defects occurring in the early embryological stages of gastrulation (weeks 2-3), primary neurulation (weeks 3-4), and secondary neurulation (weeks 5-6). Spinal dysraphisms are categorized into open spinal dysraphisms (OSDs), in which there is exposure of abnormal nervous tissues through a skin defect, and closed spinal dysraphisms (CSD), in which there is a continuous skin coverage to the underlying malformation. Open spinal dysraphisms basically include myelomeningocele and other rare abnormalities such as myelocele and hemimyelo(meningo)cele. Closed spinal dysraphisms are further categorized based on the association with low-back subcutaneous masses. Closed spinal dysraphisms with mass are represented by lipomyelocele, lipomyelomeningocele, meningocele, and myelocystocele. Closed spinal dysraphisms without mass comprise simple dysraphic states (tight filum terminale, filar and intradural lipomas, persistent terminal ventricle, and dermal sinuses) and complex dysraphic states. The latter category further comprises defects of midline notochordal integration (basically represented by diastematomyelia) and defects of segmental notochordal formation (represented by caudal agenesis and spinal segmental dysgenesis). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the preferred modality for imaging these complex abnormalities. The use of the aforementioned classification scheme is greatly helpful to make the diagnosis

  14. Inhibition of somatosensory-evoked cortical responses by a weak leading stimulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Kei; Inui, Koji; Yuge, Louis; Kakigi, Ryusuke

    2014-11-01

    We previously demonstrated that auditory-evoked cortical responses were suppressed by a weak leading stimulus in a manner similar to the prepulse inhibition (PPI) of startle reflexes. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether a similar phenomenon was present in the somatosensory system, and also whether this suppression reflected an inhibitory process. We recorded somatosensory-evoked magnetic fields following stimulation of the median nerve and evaluated the extent by which they were suppressed by inserting leading stimuli at an intensity of 2.5-, 1.5-, 1.1-, or 0.9-fold the sensory threshold (ST) in healthy participants (Experiment 1). The results obtained demonstrated that activity in the secondary somatosensory cortex in the hemisphere contralateral to the stimulated side (cSII) was significantly suppressed by a weak leading stimulus with the intensity larger than 1.1-fold ST. This result implied that the somatosensory system had an inhibitory process similar to that of PPI. We then presented two successive leading stimuli before the test stimulus, and compared the extent of suppression between the test stimulus-evoked responses and those obtained with the second prepulse alone and with two prepulses (first and second) (Experiment 2). When two prepulses were preceded, cSII responses to the second prepulse were suppressed by the first prepulse, whereas the ability of the second prepulse to suppress the test stimulus remained unchanged. These results suggested the presence of at least two individual pathways; response-generating and inhibitory pathways. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The effects of curiosity-evoking events on activity enjoyment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isikman, Elif; MacInnis, Deborah J; Ülkümen, Gülden; Cavanaugh, Lisa A

    2016-09-01

    Whereas prior literature has studied the positive effects of curiosity-evoking events that are integral to focal activities, we explore whether and how a curiosity-evoking event that is incidental to a focal activity induces negative outcomes for enjoyment. Four experiments and 1 field study demonstrate that curiosity about an event that is incidental to an activity in which individuals are engaged, significantly affects enjoyment of a concurrent activity. The reason why is that curiosity diverts attention away from the concurrent activity and focuses attention on the curiosity-evoking event. Thus, curiosity regarding an incidental event decreases enjoyment of a positive focal activity but increases enjoyment of a negative focal activity. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved

  16. Do video games evoke specific types of epileptic seizures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccioli, Marta; Vigevano, Federico; Buttinelli, Carla; Kasteleijn-Nolst Trenité, Dorothée G A

    2005-11-01

    We determined whether epileptic clinical manifestations evoked by playing video games (VG) differ from those evoked by intermittent photic stimulation (IPS) or striped patterns (P). We exposed nine children who had TV- and VG-evoked seizures in daily life to 12 VG after standardized photic stimulation and pattern stimulation. Their EEGs were recorded continuously, analyzed, and then correlated with a video of their behavior. Similar types of clinical signs were seen during VG, P, and IPS, but the signs we observed were more subtle during the VG. Eight patients showed a clear lateralization. A new observation was the lowering of the eyelids to a state of half-closed. Our study suggests that the type of visual stimulus provoking a photoparoxysmal response or seizure is not particularly relevant. The children belonged to different epilepsy groups, and our findings add to the discussion on the boundaries of the epilepsy types.

  17. Stimulator with arbitrary waveform for auditory evoked potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, H R; Romao, M; Placido, D; Provenzano, F; Tierra-Criollo, C J

    2007-01-01

    The technological improvement helps many medical areas. The audiometric exams involving the auditory evoked potentials can make better diagnoses of auditory disorders. This paper proposes the development of a stimulator based on Digital Signal Processor. This stimulator is the first step of an auditory evoked potential system based on the ADSP-BF533 EZ KIT LITE (Analog Devices Company - USA). The stimulator can generate arbitrary waveform like Sine Waves, Modulated Amplitude, Pulses, Bursts and Pips. The waveforms are generated through a graphical interface programmed in C++ in which the user can define the parameters of the waveform. Furthermore, the user can set the exam parameters as number of stimuli, time with stimulation (Time ON) and time without stimulus (Time OFF). In future works will be implemented another parts of the system that includes the acquirement of electroencephalogram and signal processing to estimate and analyze the evoked potential

  18. Stimulator with arbitrary waveform for auditory evoked potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, H R; Romao, M; Placido, D; Provenzano, F; Tierra-Criollo, C J [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Departamento de Engenharia Eletrica (DEE), Nucleo de Estudos e Pesquisa em Engenharia Biomedica NEPEB, Av. Ant. Carlos, 6627, sala 2206, Pampulha, Belo Horizonte, MG, 31.270-901 (Brazil)

    2007-11-15

    The technological improvement helps many medical areas. The audiometric exams involving the auditory evoked potentials can make better diagnoses of auditory disorders. This paper proposes the development of a stimulator based on Digital Signal Processor. This stimulator is the first step of an auditory evoked potential system based on the ADSP-BF533 EZ KIT LITE (Analog Devices Company - USA). The stimulator can generate arbitrary waveform like Sine Waves, Modulated Amplitude, Pulses, Bursts and Pips. The waveforms are generated through a graphical interface programmed in C++ in which the user can define the parameters of the waveform. Furthermore, the user can set the exam parameters as number of stimuli, time with stimulation (Time ON) and time without stimulus (Time OFF). In future works will be implemented another parts of the system that includes the acquirement of electroencephalogram and signal processing to estimate and analyze the evoked potential.

  19. [Diagnostic significance of serum free DNA human telomerase reverse transcriptase quantitative determination on spinal cord injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, M K; Tang, J; Xiang, Z; Zhang, X; Wang, J; Li, Z; Li, Y; Sheng, W B

    2018-02-06

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between the content of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) and its clinical features in serum free DNA in patients with different degree of spinal cord injury. Methods: From December 2013 to December 2016, inpatients of the Central Hospital of Bazhong, Sichuan Province were enrolledand divided into the experimental group, the disease control group and the negative control group. For the experimental group: 46 patients with spinal cord injury were graded according to the criteria of the American Association of Spinal Cord Injury (ASIA), including 12 cases of grade A, 10 cases of grade B, 10 cases of grade C, 7 cases of grade D and 7 cases of grade E; for the disease control group: 15 patients with spinal fractures (without spinal cord injury) at the same period were included; and for the negative control group: 20 healthy adult volunteers aged 18-50 years were selected.Real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR and immunoblotting were performed to detect the content of hTERT in serum free DNA both in patients and healthy controls and to compare the difference between them. The results of the somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) of all patients were compared and analyzed.The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to analyze the diagnostic value of hTERT content in serum free DNA in patients with spinal cord injury. Results: Comparison of serum free DNA hTERT content: in the experimental group, the serum free DNA hTERT content of grade A, B, C, D, E was (99.63±8.23), (76.24±4.37), (46.07±5.43), (16.30±0.95) and (15.74±1.12)μg/L, respectively.While it was (15.01±1.39)μg/L in the disease control group and (14.54±1.03)μg/L in the negative control group. The total difference was statistically significant between patients of each group and the control group ( F =857.917, P spinal cord injury has a certain guiding significance for the diagnosis of spinal cord injury and the degree of injury.

  20. A case of recurrent breast cancer with intramedullary spinal cord metastasis and symptomatic improvement by Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakahara, Makoto; Hosoya, Keiko; Hirooka, Yumi

    2017-01-01

    A 65-year-old woman underwent surgery for right breast cancer (TIN1aM0) in December 2005. In March 2011, the breast cancer recurred with multiple lung and lymph node metastases. In February 2013, because of multiple brain metastases whole-brain radiation therapy was performed. In January 2014, she developed paralysis of the left leg. Spinal cord magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass lesion (Th12 to L1 level) in the spinal cord, and she was diagnosed with intramedullary spinal cord metastasis (ISCM) from the breast cancer. Spinal cord irradiation reduced the metastasis and improved her paralysis. Although pharmacotherapy was continued, her metastases, with the exception of ISCM, progressed and she died of the disease in November 2014. It is necessary to diagnose ISCM at the time of its onset. Additionally immediate therapeutic intervention can significantly reduce the volume of ISCM, resulting in symptomatic relief from neurological deficit; in this case, radiation therapy was effective. (author)

  1. Occipital dysplasia and associated cranial spinal cord abnormalities in two dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagley, R.S.; Harrington, M.L.; Tucker, R.L.; Sande, R.D.; Root, C.R.; Kramer, R.W.

    1996-01-01

    Occipital dysplasia was found in association with cervical spinal cord abnormalities in two dogs. One dog presented for tetraparesis and cervical hyperesthesia, the other for historical cervical hyperesthesia and mild paraparesis. In dog 1, a midline cervical spinal cord defect consistent with a communicating syrinx was found. In the other dog, a presumptive syringo/hydromyelia of the cervical spinal cord was found on magnetic resonance imaging. While occipital dysplasia alone is not thought to cause any clinical abnormalities, the dogs of this report suggest that intramedullary central nervous system abnormalities may be present concurrently with occipital dysplasia and should be considered as a possible cause of the clinical signs. The relationship between occipital dysplasia and syringo/hydromyelia in these dogs remains unclear, however, similar associated abnormalities are occasionally found in humans with Chiari malformation

  2. Contribution of spinal cord biopsy to diagnosis of aquaporin-4 antibody positive neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringelstein, M; Metz, I; Ruprecht, K; Koch, A; Rappold, J; Ingwersen, J; Mathys, C; Jarius, S; Brück, W; Hartung, H-P; Paul, F; Aktas, O

    2014-06-01

    Longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis is characteristic but not pathognomonic for neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSDs) and may mimic local tumors. In this retrospective study based on a cohort of 175 NMOSD patients we identified seven patients who initially presented with a longitudinally extensive spinal cord lesion and underwent spinal cord biopsy due to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-suspected malignancies. Remarkably, routine neuropathology was inconclusive and did not guide the diagnostic process to anti-aquaporin-4 (AQP4)-seropositive NMOSD. Serious postoperative complications occurred in 5/7 patients and persisted during follow-up in 2/7 patients (29%). Considering these sequelae, AQP4-antibody testing should be mandatory in patients with inconclusive longitudinally extensive spinal cord lesions prior to biopsy. © The Author(s) 2013.

  3. A clinical perspective of spinal cord injury.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nandoe Tewarie, R.D.S.; Hurtado, A.; Bartels, R.H.M.A.; Grotenhuis, J.A.; Oudega, M.

    2010-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) results in loss of nervous tissue in the spinal cord and consequently loss of motor and sensory function. The impairments are permanent because endogenous repair events fail to restore the damaged axonal circuits that are involved in function. There is no treatment available

  4. Twiddler's syndrome in spinal cord stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mahfoudh, Rafid; Chan, Yuen; Chong, Hsu Pheen; Farah, Jibril Osman

    2016-01-01

    The aims are to present a case series of Twiddler's syndrome in spinal cord stimulators with analysis of the possible mechanism of this syndrome and discuss how this phenomenon can be prevented. Data were collected retrospectively between 2007 and 2013 for all patients presenting with failure of spinal cord stimulators. The diagnostic criterion for Twiddler's syndrome is radiological evidence of twisting of wires in the presence of failure of spinal cord stimulation. Our unit implants on average 110 spinal cord stimulators a year. Over the 5-year study period, all consecutive cases of spinal cord stimulation failure were studied. Three patients with Twiddler's syndrome were identified. Presentation ranged from 4 to 228 weeks after implantation. Imaging revealed repeated rotations and twisting of the wires of the spinal cord stimulators leading to hardware failure. To the best of our knowledge this is the first reported series of Twiddler's syndrome with implantable pulse generators (IPGs) for spinal cord stimulation. Hardware failure is not uncommon in spinal cord stimulation. Awareness and identification of Twiddler's syndrome may help prevent its occurrence and further revisions. This may be achieved by implanting the IPG in the lumbar region subcutaneously above the belt line. Psychological intervention may have a preventative role for those who are deemed at high risk of Twiddler's syndrome from initial psychological screening.

  5. Complement elevation in spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebhun, J; Botvin, J

    1980-05-01

    Laboratory studies revealed an elevated complement in 66% of patients with spinal cord injury. It is postulated that the activated complement may be a component of self-feeding immunological mechanism responsible for the failure of regeneration of a mature mammalian spinal cord. There was no evidence that such an injury had any effect on pre-existing atopy.

  6. Risk factors in iatrogenic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montalva-Iborra, A; Alcanyis-Alberola, M; Grao-Castellote, C; Torralba-Collados, F; Giner-Pascual, M

    2017-09-01

    In the last years, there has been a change in the aetiology of spinal cord injury. There has been an increase in the number of elderly patients with spinal cord injuries caused by diseases or medical procedures. The aim of this study is to investigate the frequency of the occurrence of iatrogenic spinal cord injury in our unit. The secondary aim is to study what variables can be associated with a higher risk of iatrogenesis. A retrospective, descriptive, observational study of patients with acute spinal cord injury admitted from June 2009 to May 2014 was conducted. The information collected included the patient age, aetiology, neurological level and grade of injury when admitted and when discharged, cardiovascular risk factors, a previous history of depression and any prior treatment with anticoagulant or antiplatelet drugs. We applied a logistic regression. The grade of statistical significance was established as Pinjury was the thoracic level (48%). The main aetiology of spinal cord injury caused by iatrogenesis was surgery for degenerative spine disease, in patients under the age of 30 were treated with intrathecal chemotherapy. Iatrogenic spinal cord injury is a frequent complication. A statistically significant association between a patient history of depression and iatrogenic spinal cord injury was found as well as with anticoagulant and antiplatelet drug use prior to iatrogenic spinal cord injury.

  7. Family-directed umbilical cord blood banking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluckman, Eliane; Ruggeri, Annalisa; Rocha, Vanderson; Baudoux, Etienne; Boo, Michael; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Welte, Kathy; Navarrete, Cristina; van Walraven, Suzanna M

    2011-11-01

    Umbilical cord blood transplantation from HLA-identical siblings provides good results in children. These results support targeted efforts to bank family cord blood units that can be used for a sibling diagnosed with a disease which can be cured by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation or for research that investigates the use of allogeneic or autologous cord blood cells. Over 500 patients transplanted with related cord blood units have been reported to the Eurocord registry with a 4-year overall survival of 91% for patients with non-malignant diseases and 56% for patients with malignant diseases. Main hematologic indications in children are leukemia, hemoglobinopathies or inherited hematologic, immunological or metabolic disorders. However, family-directed cord blood banking is not widely promoted; many cord blood units used in sibling transplantation have been obtained from private banks that do not meet the necessary criteria required to store these units. Marketing by private banks who predominantly store autologous cord blood units has created public confusion. There are very few current validated indications for autologous storage but some new indications might appear in the future. Little effort is devoted to provide unbiased information and to educate the public as to the distinction between the different types of banking, economic models and standards involved in such programs. In order to provide a better service for families in need, directed-family cord blood banking activities should be encouraged and closely monitored with common standards, and better information on current and future indications should be made available.

  8. Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration (CORD): Evaluation plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration (CORD) project evaluation will determine the extent to which the CORD model of linking primary care (PC) interventions to public health (PH) interventions in multiple community sectors affects BMI and behavior in children (2 to 12 years). The evaluation c...

  9. Spinal cord injury arising in anaesthesia practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewson, D W; Bedforth, N M; Hardman, J G

    2018-01-01

    Spinal cord injury arising during anaesthetic practice is a rare event, but one that carries a significant burden in terms of morbidity and mortality. In this article, we will review the pathophysiology of spinal cord injury. We will then discuss injuries relating to patient position, spinal cord hypoperfusion and neuraxial techniques. The most serious causes of spinal cord injury - vertebral canal haematoma, spinal epidural abscess, meningitis and adhesive arachnoiditis - will be discussed in turn. For each condition, we draw attention to practical, evidence-based measures clinicians can undertake to reduce their incidence, or mitigate their severity. Finally, we will discuss transient neurological symptoms. Some cases of spinal cord injury during anaesthesia can be ascribed to anaesthesia itself, arising as a direct consequence of its conduct. The injury to a spinal nerve root by inaccurate and/or incautious needling during spinal anaesthesia is an obvious example. But in many cases, spinal cord injury during anaesthesia is not caused by, related to, or even associated with, the conduct of the anaesthetic. Surgical factors, whether direct (e.g. spinal nerve root damage due to incorrect pedicle screw placement) or indirect (e.g. cord ischaemia following aortic surgery) are responsible for a significant proportion of spinal cord injuries that occur concurrently with the delivery of regional or general anaesthesia. © 2018 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  10. Transcranial magnetic stimulation in the semi-quantitative, pre-operative assessment of patients undergoing spinal deformity surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasby, Michael A; Tsirikos, Athanasios I; Henderson, Lindsay; Horsburgh, Gillian; Jordan, Brian; Michaelson, Ciara; Adams, Christopher I; Garrido, Enrique

    2017-08-01

    To compare measurements of motor evoked potential latency stimulated either magnetically (mMEP) or electrically (eMEP) and central motor conduction time (CMCT) made pre-operatively in conscious patients using transcranial and intra-operatively using electrical cortical stimulation before and after successful instrumentation for the treatment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. A group initially of 51 patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis aged 12-19 years was evaluated pre-operatively in the outpatients' department with transcranial magnetic stimulation. The neurophysiological data were then compared statistically with intra-operative responses elicited by transcranial electrical stimulation both before and after successful surgical intervention. MEPs were measured as the cortically evoked compound action potentials of Abductor hallucis. Minimum F-waves were measured using conventional nerve conduction methods and the lower motor neuron conduction time was calculated and this was subtracted from MEP latency to give CMCT. Pre-operative testing was well tolerated in our paediatric/adolescent patients. No neurological injury occurred in any patient in this series. There was no significant difference in the values of mMEP and eMEP latencies seen pre-operatively in conscious patients and intra-operatively in patients under anaesthetic. The calculated quantities mCMCT and eCMCT showed the same statistical correlations as the quantities mMEP and eMEP latency. The congruency of mMEP and eMEP and of mCMCT and eCMCT suggests that these measurements may be used comparatively and semi-quantitatively for the comparison of pre-, intra-, and post-operative spinal cord function in spinal deformity surgery.

  11. Neuronal responses to tactile stimuli and tactile sensations evoked by microstimulation in the human thalamic principal somatic sensory nucleus (ventral caudal).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Anne-Christine; Chien, Jui-Hong; Greenspan, Joel D; Garonzik, Ira; Weiss, Nirit; Ohara, Shinji; Lenz, Frederick Arthur

    2016-06-01

    The normal organization and plasticity of the cutaneous core of the thalamic principal somatosensory nucleus (ventral caudal, Vc) have been studied by single-neuron recordings and microstimulation in patients undergoing awake stereotactic operations for essential tremor (ET) without apparent somatic sensory abnormality and in patients with dystonia or chronic pain secondary to major nervous system injury. In patients with ET, most Vc neurons responded to one of the four stimuli, each of which optimally activates one mechanoreceptor type. Sensations evoked by microstimulation were similar to those evoked by the optimal stimulus only among rapidly adapting neurons. In patients with ET, Vc was highly segmented somatotopically, and vibration, movement, pressure, and sharp sensations were usually evoked by microstimulation at separate sites in Vc. In patients with conditions including spinal cord transection, amputation, or dystonia, RFs were mismatched with projected fields more commonly than in patients with ET. The representation of the border of the anesthetic area (e.g., stump) or of the dystonic limb was much larger than that of the same part of the body in patients with ET. This review describes the organization and reorganization of human Vc neuronal activity in nervous system injury and dystonia and then proposes basic mechanisms. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Electro-acupuncture promotes survival, differentiation of the bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells as well as functional recovery in the spinal cord-transected rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Ying; Yan, Qing; Ruan, Jing-Wen; Zhang, Yan-Qing; Li, Wen-Jie; Zhang, Yu-Jiao; Li, Yan; Dong, Hongxin; Zeng, Yuan-Shan

    2009-01-01

    Background Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are one of the potential tools for treatment of the spinal cord injury; however, the survival and differentiation of MSCs in an injured spinal cord still need to be improved. In the present study, we investigated whether Governor Vessel electro-acupuncture (EA) could efficiently promote bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) survival and differentiation, axonal regeneration and finally, functional recovery in the transected spinal cord. Results The spinal cords of adult Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were completely transected at T10, five experimental groups were performed: 1. sham operated control (Sham-control); 2. operated control (Op-control); 3. electro-acupuncture treatment (EA); 4. MSCs transplantation (MSCs); and 5. MSCs transplantation combined with electro-acupuncture (MSCs+EA). After 2-8 weeks of MSCs transplantation plus EA treatment, we found that the neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), cAMP level, the differentiation of MSCs, the 5-HT positive and CGRP positive nerve fibers in the lesion site and nearby tissue of injured spinal cord were significantly increased in the MSCs+EA group as compared to the group of the MSCs transplantation or the EA treated alone. Furthermore, behavioral test and spinal cord evoked potentials detection demonstrated a significantly functional recovery in the MSCs +EA group. Conclusion These results suggest that EA treatment may promote grafted MSCs survival and differentiation; MSCs transplantation combined with EA treatment could promote axonal regeneration and partial locomotor functional recovery in the transected spinal cord in rats and indicate a promising avenue of treatment of spinal cord injury. PMID:19374777

  13. Clinical application of multifocal visual evoked potentials in children with epilepsy caused by intracranial disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yukawa, Eiichi; Kim, Yeong-Jin; Kawasaki, Kensuke; Yoshii, Toshiaki; Hara, Yoshiaki

    2006-01-01

    We investigated whether visual field defects could be objectively evaluated using multifocal visual evoked potential (m-VEP) in two children with epilepsy caused by intracranial disease in whom it was difficult to measure the visual field. To determine normal waves in m-VEP, recording was performed using a visual evoked response imaging system (VERIS) Junior Science program (Mayo, Aichi, Japan) in 20 healthy children (20 eyes) peak latency and amplitude were used for assessment. In the two children with epilepsy, m-VEPs were recorded, and compared with the results of static perimetry or the lesions observed by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). In the 20 healthy children, there was no significant difference in the peak latency or amplitude among 4 quadrants by one-way analysis of variance. m-VEP in the children with epilepsy showed abnormal waves, corresponding to the visual field defects in the static perimetry or the lesions observed by MRI. Objective evaluation of visual field defects using m-VEP may be useful in children with epilepsy caused by intracranial disease in whom kinetic/static perimetry as a subjective examination is difficult. (author)

  14. Clinical Use and Patentability of Cord Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavusoglu, Turker; Kilic, Kubilay Dogan; Yigitturk, Gurkan; Tomruk, Canberk; Turgut, Mehmet; Uyanikgil, Yigit

    2018-03-14

    The blood in the umbilical cord that provides the connection between mother and fetus during pregnancy is called cord blood. The blood of umbilical cord which is usually got rid of following birth, is a very rich stem cell source. Cord blood collection gives no harm to the mother and baby. Besides, its allogeneic and au-tologous usage, the most important disadvantage is that the number of cells is insufficient in adults. Today, it is predominantly used for therapeutic purposes for many diseases. The aim of this review is giving a detailed information about groups of stem cells in cord blood and determining the point of clinical use. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  15. Assessment of the neuroprotective effects of Lavandula angustifolia extract on the contusive model of spinal cord injury in Wistar rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza eKaka

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionSpinal cord injury (SCI involves a primary trauma and secondary cellular processes that can lead to severe damage to the nervous system, resulting in long-term spinal deficits. At the cellular level, SCI causes astrogliosis, of which glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP is a major index. ObjectiveThe aim of this study was to investigate the neuroprotective effects of Lavandula angustifolia (Lav on the repair of spinal cord injuries in Wistar rats.Materials and MethodsForty-five female rats were randomly divided into six groups of seven rats each: the intact, sham, control (SCI, Lav 100, Lav 200, and Lav 400 groups. Every week after SCI onset, all animals were evaluated for behavior outcomes by the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB score. H&E staining was performed to examine the lesions post-injury. GFAP expression was assessed for astrogliosis. Somatosensory evoked potential (SEP testing was performed to detect the recovery of neural conduction.Results BBB scores were significantly increased and delayed responses on sensory tests were significantly decreased in the Lav 200 and Lav 400 groups compared to the control group. The greatest decrease of GFAP was evident in the Lav 200 and Lav 400 groups. EMG results showed significant improvement in the hindlimbs in the Lav 200 and Lav 400 groups compared to the control group. Cavity areas significantly decreased and the number of ventral motor neurons significantly increased in the Lav 200 and Lav 400 groups.ConclusionLav at doses of 200 mg/kg and 400 mg/kg can promote structural and functional recovery after SCI. The neuroprotective effects of L. angustifolia can lead to improvement in the contusive model of spinal cord injury in Wistar rats.Keywords Spinal cord injury (SCI; Lavandula angustifolia; neuroprotection; Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB; glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP; somatosensory evoked potential (SEP

  16. A 3D map of the hindlimb motor representation in the lumbar spinal cord in Sprague Dawley rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrell, Jordan A.; Frost, Shawn B.; Peterson, Jeremy; Nudo, Randolph J.

    2017-02-01

    Objective. Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating neurological trauma with a prevalence of about 282 000 people living with an SCI in the United States in 2016. Advances in neuromodulatory devices hold promise for restoring function by incorporating the delivery of electrical current directly into the spinal cord grey matter via intraspinal microstimulation (ISMS). In such designs, detailed topographic maps of spinal cord outputs are needed to determine ISMS locations for eliciting hindlimb movements. The primary goal of the present study was to derive a topographic map of functional motor outputs in the lumbar spinal cord to hindlimb skeletal muscles as defined by ISMS in a rat model. Approach. Experiments were carried out in nine healthy, adult, male, Sprague Dawley rats. After a laminectomy of the T13-L1 vertebrae and removal of the dura mater, a four-shank, 16-channel microelectrode array was inserted along a 3D (200 µm) stimulation grid. Trains of three biphasic current pulses were used to determine evoked movements and electromyographic (EMG) activity. Via fine wire EMG electrodes, stimulus-triggered averaging (StTA) was used on rectified EMG data to determine response latency. Main results. Hindlimb movements were elicited at a median current intensity of 6 µA, and thresholds were significantly lower in ventrolateral sites. Movements typically consisted of whole leg, hip, knee, ankle, toe, and trunk movements. Hip movements dominated rostral to the T13 vertebral segment, knee movements were evoked at the T13-L1 vertebral junction, while ankle and digit movements were found near the rostral L1 vertebra. Whole leg movements spanned the entire rostrocaudal region explored, while trunk movements dominated medially. StTAs of EMG activity demonstrated a latency of ~4 ms. Significance. The derived motor map provides insight into the parameters needed for future neuromodulatory devices.

  17. A THREE-DIMENSIONAL MAP OF THE HINDLIMB MOTOR REPRESENTATION IN THE LUMBAR SPINAL CORD IN SPRAGUE DAWLEY RATS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrell, Jordan A.; Frost, Shawn; Peterson, Jeremy; Nudo, Randolph J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating neurological trauma with a prevalence of about 282,000 people living with an SCI in the United States in 2016. Advances in neuromodulatory devices hold promise for restoring function by incorporating the delivery of electrical current directly into the spinal cord grey matter via intraspinal microstimulation (ISMS). In such designs, detailed topographic maps of spinal cord outputs are needed to determine ISMS locations for eliciting hindlimb movements. The primary goal of the present study was to derive a topographic map of functional motor outputs in the lumbar spinal cord to hindlimb skeletal muscles as defined by ISMS in a rat model. Approach Experiments were carried out in nine healthy, adult, male, Sprague Dawley rats. After a laminectomy of the T13-L1 vertebrae and removal of the dura mater, a four-shank, 16-channel microelectrode array was inserted along a three-dimensional (200 µm) stimulation grid. Trains of three biphasic current pulses were used to determine evoked movements and EMG activity. Via fine wire electromyographic (EMG) electrodes, Stimulus-Triggered Averaging (StTA) was used on rectified EMG data to determine response latency. Main results Hindlimb movements were elicited at a median current intensity of 6 µA, and thresholds were significantly lower in ventrolateral sites. Movements typically consisted of whole leg, hip, knee, ankle, toe, and trunk movements. Hip movements dominated rostral to the T13 vertebral segment, knee movements were evoked at the T13-L1 vertebral junction, while ankle and digit movements were found near the rostral L1 vertebra. Whole leg movements spanned the entire rostrocaudal region explored, while trunk movements dominated medially. StTAs of EMG activity demonstrated a latency of ~4 ms. Significance The derived motor map provides insight into the parameters needed for future neuromodulatory devices. PMID:27934789

  18. The action of chlorphenesin carbamate on the frog spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aihara, H; Kurachi, M; Nakane, S; Sasajima, M; Ohzeki, M

    1980-02-01

    Studies were carried out to elucidate the mechanism of action of chlorphenesin carbamate (CPC) and to compare the effect of the drug with that of mephenesin on the isolated bullfrog spinal cord. Ventral and dorsal root potentials were recorded by means of the sucrose-gap method. CPC caused marked hyperpolarizations and depressed spontaneous activities in both of the primary afferent terminals (PAT) and motoneurons (MN). These hyperpolarizations were observed even in high-Mg2+ and Ca2+-free Ringer's solution, suggesting that CPC has direct actions on PAT and MN. Various reflex potentials (dorsal and ventral root potentials elicited by stimulating dorsal and ventral root, respectively) tended to be depressed by CPC as well as by mephenesin. Excitatory amino acids (L-aspartic acid and L-glutamic acid) caused marked depolarizations in PAT and MN, and increased the firing rate in MN. CPC did not modify the depolarization but abolished the motoneuron firing induced by these amino acids. However, mephenesin reduced both the depolarization and the motoneuron firing. The dorsal and ventral root potentials evoked by tetanic stimulation (40 Hz) of the dorsal root were depressed by the drugs. These results indicate that CPC has an apparent depressing action on the spinal neuron, and this action may be ascribed to the slight hyperpolarization and/or the prolongation of refractory period.

  19. Development of serotonergic and adrenergic receptors in the rat spinal cord: effects of neonatal chemical lesions and hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, C; Pylypiw, A; Ross, L L

    1985-03-01

    The sympathetic preganglionic neurons in the spinal cord receive dense serotonergic (5-HT) and catecholaminergic (CA) afferent inputs from the descending supraspinal pathways. In the rat spinal cord, the levels of these biogenic amines and their receptors are low at birth, but undergo rapid ontogenetic increases in the ensuing 2-3 postnatal weeks until the adult levels are reached. In many systems it has been shown that denervation of presynaptic neurons leads to an up-regulation of the number of postsynaptic receptors. To determine whether the 5-HT and CA receptors in the developing spinal cord are also subject to such transsynaptic regulation, we examined the ontogeny of serotonergic receptors and alpha- and beta-adrenergic receptors in thoracolumbar spinal cord of rats given neurotoxins which destroy serotonergic (5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,7-DHT)) or noradrenergic (6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)) nerve terminals. Intracisternal administration of 5,7-DHT or 6-OHDA at 1 and 6 days of age prevented, respectively, the development of 5-HT and CA levels in the spinal cord. Rats lesioned with 5,7-DHT displayed a marked elevation of 5-HT receptors with a binding of 50% greater than controls at 1 week and a continuing increase to twice normal by 4 weeks. A similar pattern of up-regulation was also detected with the alpha-adrenergic receptor, as rats lesioned with 6-OHDA exhibited persistent increases in receptor concentration. However, in these same animals ontogeny of the beta-adrenergic receptor in the spinal cord remained virtually unaffected by the chemical lesion. In several other parts of the nervous system, it has been demonstrated that the beta-adrenergic sensitivity can be modulated by hormonal signals, particularly that of the thyroid hormones. This phenomenon was examined in the spinal cord and in confirmation with previous studies neonatal treatment of triiodothyronine (0.1 mg/kg, s.c. daily) was capable of evoking persistent increases in beta

  20. Analysis of the Relationship Between the Epidural Spinal Cord Compression (ESCC) Scale and Paralysis Caused by Metastatic Spine Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uei, Hiroshi; Tokuhashi, Yasuaki; Maseda, Masafumi

    2018-04-15

    A retrospective, single-institute, and radiographic study. To evaluate the relationship between the epidural spinal cord compression (ESCC) scale and the severity of metastatic spine tumor-induced paralysis. The ESCC scale is used to evaluate the grade of spinal cord compression on T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, few studies have investigated the relationship between such MRI findings and paralysis. The subjects were 467 patients with metastatic spine tumors and grade 1b or worse spinal cord compression according to the ESCC scale. Evaluations using this scale were performed by three spine surgeons, and results that were obtained by two or more surgeons were adopted. We also examined patients whose spinal cord compression deteriorated by one grade or more to American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) grade C or worse within the first 3 weeks after MRI. The kappa coefficients for inter- and intraexaminer variability were 0.90 and 0.95, respectively. ASIA grade D or worse paralysis developed in at least 50% of the patients with ESCC grade 1b or worse spinal cord compression at the C1-T2 and at least 50% of those with ESCC grade 1c or worse spinal cord compression at the T3-L5. The frequency of ASIA grade C or worse paralysis was high among the patients with ESCC grade 2 or worse spinal cord compression at the C7-L1. Nineteen patients experienced rapid deterioration of one grade or more to ASIA grade C or worse paralysis within the first 3 weeks after MRI. Of these, paralysis occurred in at least 30% of the patients with anterolateral or circumferential cord compression combined with ESCC grade 2 or 3 compression at the C7-L1. The severity of paralysis was not correlated with the ESCC scale. Patients with anterolateral or circumferential ESCC grade 2 or 3 cord compression at the C7-L1 are at high risk of rapidly progressive paralysis. 4.