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Sample records for coracoacromial ligament transfer

  1. Clinical results of coracoacromial ligament transfer in acromioclavicular dislocations: A review of published literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sood Aman

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Acromioclavicular joint dislocations are common injuries, which typically occur with trauma in young men. Treatment recommendations for these injuries are highly variable and controversial. There are greater than 100 surgical techniques described for operative treatment of this injury. One of the most widely recommended methods of surgical reconstruction for acromioclavicular joint dislocations is to utilize the coracoacromial ligament for stabilization of the distal clavicle. Several modifications of this procedure have been described which have involved adjunct coracoclavicular fixation or fixation across acromioclavicular joint. Although the literature is replete with descriptive papers, there is paucity of studies evaluating the surgical outcome of this procedure. We systematically reviewed the English language published literature in peer reviewed journals (Medline, EMBASE, SCOPUS and assigned a level of evidence for available studies. We critically reviewed each paper for the flaws and biases and then evaluated the comparable clinical outcomes for various procedures and their modifications. The published literature consists entirely of case series (Level IV evidence with variability in surgical technique and outcome measures. On review there is low level evidence to support the use of coracoacromial ligament for acromioclavicular dislocation but it has been associated with high rate of deformity recurrence. Adjunct fixation does not improve clinical results when compared to isolated coracoacromial ligament transfer. This is in part because of the high incidence of fixation related complications. Similar results are reported with coracoacromial ligament reconstruction for acute and chronic cases. The development of secondary acromioclavicular joint symptoms with distal clavicle retention is poorly reported with the incidence rate varying from 12% to 32%. Despite this, the retention or excision of distal clavicle did not affect overall

  2. Acromioclavicular joint reconstruction with coracoacromial ligament transfer using the docking technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gobezie Reuben

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Symptomatic Acromioclavicular (AC dislocations have historically been surgically treated with Coracoclavicular (CC ligament reconstruction with transfer of the Coracoacromial (CA ligament. Tensioning the CA ligament is the key to success. Methods Seventeen patients with chronic, symptomatic Type III AC joint or acute Type IV and V injuries were treated surgically. The distal clavicle was resected and stabilized with CC ligament reconstruction using the CA ligament. The CA ligament was passed into the medullary canal and tensioned, using a modified 'docking' technique. Average follow-up was 29 months (range 12–57. Results Postoperative ASES and pain significantly improved in all patients (p = 0.001. Radiographically, 16 (94% maintained reduction, and only 1 (6% had a recurrent dislocation when he returned to karate 3 months postoperatively. His ultimate clinical outcome was excellent. Conclusion The docking procedure allows for tensioning of the transferred CA ligament and healing of the ligament in an intramedullary bone tunnel. Excellent clinical results were achieved, decreasing the risk of recurrent distal clavicle instability.

  3. [Structural findings of the coraco-acromial ligament in rotator cuff rupture, tendinosis calcarea and supraspinatus syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putz, R; Reichelt, A

    1990-01-01

    Coracoacromial ligaments from 133 operation specimens were examined histomorphologically near their acromial attachments. 85% showed signs of moderate to severe degeneration, 67% to 85% chondroid metaplasia near the origin. No significant differences were found between specimens brought to operation for the three diseases mentioned. It is therefore concluded that an intermittent local pressure on the origin of the ligament is present in these diseases, and this can lead to chondroid changes near its acromial attachment.

  4. Conjoined tendon and coracoacromial ligament transfer in the treatment of RockwoodIII acromioclavicular joint dislocation:anatomical and clinical validation%联合腱与喙肩韧带双束重建喙锁韧带修复RockwoodⅢ型肩锁关节脱位:解剖学及临床试验验证

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王治洲; 伊力哈木•托合提; 徐超; 侯彦杰; 郭洪亮; 甘子明; 张爱红

    2015-01-01

      结果与结论:①尸体解剖形态学研究结果:试验获得了肩锁关节及其周围组织、肌皮神经较为详细的形态学参数,为该部位手术提供了解剖学资料。②临床病例分析结果:11例RockwoodⅢ型患者行联合腱外侧半肌腱与喙肩韧带内侧半肌腱双束共同重建喙锁韧带治疗肩锁关节脱位,随访2-24个月,平均美国肩肘外科协会评分为92.3分,平均Constant-Murley肩关节功能评分为90.4分,平均美国加州大学洛杉矶分校评分31.6分,平均目测类比评分1.4分,平均肩关节简明测试问卷肯定答案为8个,总体优良率为91%(10/11)。1例患者修复结果较差。课题通过解剖重建肩锁关节的静态稳定性结构(如喙锁韧带)和动态稳定性结构(如关节囊、斜方肌和三角肌)实现了肩锁关节的解剖复位。总而言之,联合腱与喙肩韧带双束重建喙锁韧带修复RockwoodⅢ型肩锁关节脱位是一种有效的修复方法。%BACKGROUND:There are many surgical methods for treatment of acromioclavicular joint dislocation. Through various internal fixation materials (such as hook plate, screws, K-wire, etc.), we can achieve the initial stability and restoration of the acromioclavicular joint. But these internal fixators can cause varying degrees of occupancy and damage to the acromioclavicular joint, and the joint reduction often miss after removal of the internal fixators. OBJECTIVE:To use conjoined tendon and coracoacromial ligament transfer for coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction in the repair of RockwoodIII acromioclavicular joint dislocation, to provide the theoretical foundation through the autopsy, and to analyze the clinical efficacy based on clinical fol ow-up results. METHODS:(1) Autopsy morphology research:From September 2012 to November 2012, total y 46 adult cadaveric human shoulders were dissected in the Department of Anatomy, Xinjiang Medical University. The anatomical

  5. The coracoacromial arch: MR evaluation and correlation with rotator cuff pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farley, T.E. [San Francisco Magnetic Resonance Center, San Francisco, CA (United States)]|[Florida Hospital, Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Orlando, FL (United States); Neumann, C.H. [San Francisco Magnetic Resonance Center, San Francisco, CA (United States)]|[Desert Hospital, Dept. of Radiology, Palm Springs, CA (United States)]|[Univ. of California San Francisco, Dept. of Radiology, San Francisco, CA (United States); Steinbach, L.S. [Univ. of California San Francisco, Dept. of Radiology, San Francisco, CA (United States); Petersen, S.A. [Wayne State Univ. School of Medicine, Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Detroit, MI (United States)

    1994-11-01

    The relative prevalence of various acromial shapes, appearance of the coracoacromial ligament and enthesophytes along the inferior aspect of the acromioclavicular joint in patients with and without rotator cuff tears were evaluated. Of 76 patients with clinical instability and impingement, 31 had a normal rotator cuff and 45 demonstrated a partial or full tear of the supraspinatus tendon at surgery. Results were compared with those from magnetic resonance (MR) scans of 57 asymptomatic volunteers. Of the 45 patients with a supraspinatus tear, 38% (17) had a flat acromial undersurface (type I), 40% (18) had a concave acromial undersurface (type II), 18% (8) had an anteriorly hooked acromion (type III), and 4% (2) had an inferiorly convex acromion (type IV). Among the 31 patients with a normal rotator cuff at surgery and the 57 asymptomatic volunteers, the respective prevalences of the type I acromion were 39% (12) and 44% (25), of type II 48% (15) and 35% (20), type III 3% (1) and 12% (7), and type IV 10% (3) and 9% (5). Shoulders with surgically proven rotator cuff tears showed a tendential association with a type III acromion (8/45) and statistically significant associations with a thickened coracoacromial ligament (17/45) and acromioclavicular enthesophytes (18/45). For the association between inferiorly directed acromioclavicular joint enthesophytes and rotator cuff tears, age appears to be a confounding factor. The type IV acromion, newly classified by this study, does not have a recognizable association with rotator cuff tears. Assessment of the osseous-ligamentous coracoacromial outlet by MR imaging provides useful diagnostic information and may prove helpful to the orthopedic surgeon in patients for whom surgical decompression is contemplated. (orig.)

  6. 关节镜下喙锁韧带增强术治疗肩锁关节脱位%Arthroscopic treatment of acute acromioclavicular joint dislocations by coracoacromial ligament augmentation and suture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    皇甫小桥; 赵金忠; 何耀华; 杨星光; 刘旭东; 刘闻欣; 王海明

    2013-01-01

    目的:研究关节镜下缝线钢板增强喙锁韧带术治疗肩锁关节脱位的近期治疗效果。方法2010年3月至2011年3月,在关节镜下使用膝关节韧带重建技术的缝线钢板(德国 ASCULAP 公司, B′BRAUN)增强重建喙锁韧带(三角韧带与斜方韧带),治疗 Rockwood Ⅲ型9例、Ⅴ型3例新鲜肩锁关节脱位。行 X线片、美国肩肘关节外科医师(America Shoulder Elbow Surgeons,ASES)评分和 Constant 评分,随访12~18个月。结果 ASES 评分:术前28.7分,术后86.9分;Constant 评分:术前24分,术后91分。治疗组 X线片显示,肩锁关节复位良好。术后1年,91.7%(11/12)病例获得满意治疗效果,83.3%(10/12)恢复到术前运动水平,仅有1例出现肩锁关节半脱位。结论关节镜下缝线钢板喙锁韧带增强术治疗肩锁关节脱位,早期可以获得满意的治疗效果,术后复位良好,并发症少。%Objective Acromioclavicular joint dislocation is commonly seen in shoulder joint injuries. Dysfunction as well as pain and discomfort usually occurred when the integrity of shoulder is damaged,for the acromioclavicular (AC)joint is involved in the connection between the scapula and the body as well as the activities of shoulder joint.Therefore,a consensus has been reached to treat severe AC joint dislocation by surgery.Based on different anatomical and functional cognition,methods for AC joint dislocation are various,which are typically performed by incision to reconstruct its stability and restore function.Attempts had been made by many doctors in the reconstruction of AC joint dislocation with the development of arthroscopy.From March 2010 to March 2011,obvious therapeutic effect was obtained in treating Rockwood type Ⅲ and Ⅴ AC joint dislocation arthroscopically with the suture plate used for the reconstruction of ligaments of knee joint to augment the reconstructed CC ligaments (conoid ligament and trapezoid ligament).Methods From March 2010 to March 2011

  7. Nontraumatic glenohumeral instability and coracoacromial impingement in swimmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bak, K

    1996-06-01

    Competitive swimming is one of the most demanding and time-consuming sports. Swimmers at elite level practice 20-30 h per week. During 1 year's practice, the average top level swimmer performs more than 500,000 stroke revolutions per arm. These innumerable repetitions over many years of hard training together with an increasing muscular imbalance around the shoulder girdle seem to be the main etiological factors in the development of the over-use syndrome swimmer's shoulder. Shoulder pain in swimmers has in general been regarded as synonymous with coracoacromial impingement, i.e. anterior shoulder pain due to rotator cuff tendinitis, but new knowledge suggests that a concomitant glenohumeral instability plays an additional role. The diagnostic complexity of the problem is as challenging as the search for the gold standard of treatment. The condition should ideally be diagnosed as early as possible, and intensive functional rehabilitation of the shoulder girdle including the scapular muscles should be started in order to restore muscle balance. The surgical possibilities include subacromial decompression in cases of purely mechanical impingement. If a painful glenohumeral instability persists after intensive functional rehabilitation, anterior capsulolabral reconstruction can be performed. Still, however, short- and long-term results show that surgery is less successful in elite athletes involved in overhead sports. Prevention protocols include education of coaches in primary injury prophylaxis and the institution of resistance strength training in prepubescent swimmers. Emphasis should be made to improve muscular balance around the glenohumeral and scapulothoracic joints.

  8. Reflexes in the shoulder muscles elicited from the human coracoacromial ligament

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, Louise Pyndt; Nørregaard, Jesper; Krogsgaard, Michael

    2004-01-01

    into the CAL in seven normal shoulders. Electric activity was recorded from eight shoulder muscles by surface and intramuscular electrodes. During isometric contractions, electrical stimulation was applied to the CAL at two different stimulus intensities, a weak stimulus (stim-1) and a stronger stimulus (stim......-2). In both experiments, electrical stimulation of the CAL elicited a general inhibition in the voluntary activated shoulder muscles. In study I the average latencies (mean+/-SE) of the muscular inhibition were 66+/-4 ms (stim-1) and 62+/-4 ms (stim-2) during isometric flexion and 73+/-3 ms (stim-1...

  9. [Case-control study on clavicular hook plate combined with acromiocoracoid ligament transfer in the treatment of acromioclavicular joint dislocation of type Tossy III in young patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chun-Zhen; Li, Deng-Lu; Mu, Shi-Xiang

    2012-07-01

    To study the clinical effects of acromiocoracoid ligament transfer to repair coracoclavicular ligament and acromioclavicular ligament in the treatment of acromioclavicular joint dislocation of type Tossy III in young patients. From January 2005 to January 2007, 52 patients with acromioclavicular joint dislocation of type Tossy III were divided into therapeutic group I (32 cases) and therapeutic group II (22 cases). There were 17 males and 13 females with an average age of 31.0 years (ranged, 19 to 40 years) in group I; as well as 12 males and 10 females with an average age of 33.6 years (ranged, 20 to 42 years) in group II. All the patients were fresh injury and the acromioclavicular joint dislocations were type Tossy III according to X-ray findings. The duration from damage to the operation time ranged from 2 to 17 days (averaged, 7.6 days). All the patients had normal shoulder function before injury and were treated with clavicular hook plate implantation. The patients in group II were treated with normal desmorrhaphy method, and the patients in group I were treated with acromiocoracoid ligament transfer to repair coracoclavicular ligament and acromioclavicular ligament. Steel plate was taken out at about 4 to 6 months after clavicular hook plate implantation. The results were evaluated according to Karlsson's standards. All the incisions healed without infection. The therapeutic effects of 52 patients were evaluated at the 6th month after internal fixation was taken out. Twenty-four patients in group I got an excellent results and 6 good; 17 patients in group II got an excellent results and 5 good. There was no significant difference between the two groups. Twenty-six patients in group I and 19 patients in group II had long-term follow-up, and the duration ranged from 3 to 5 years (averaged, 4.5 years ). Twenty patients in group I got an excellent results and 6 good; 9 patients in group II got an excellent results, 7 good and 3 bad. Three patients in group II

  10. A mini-invasive adductor magnus tendon transfer technique for medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction: a technical note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sillanpää, Petri J; Mäenpää, Heikki M; Mattila, Ville M; Visuri, Tuomo; Pihlajamäki, Harri

    2009-05-01

    Patellar dislocations are associated with injuries to the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL). Several techniques for MPFL reconstruction have been recently published with some disadvantages involved, including large skin incisions and donor site morbidity. Arthroscopic stabilizing techniques carry the potential of inadequate restoration of MPFL function. We present a minimally invasive technique for MPFL reconstruction using adductor magnus tendon autograft. This technique is easily performed, safe, and provides a stabilizing effect equal to current MPFL reconstructions. Skin incision of only 3-4 cm is located at the level of the proximal half of the patella. After identifying the distal insertion of the adductor magnus tendon, a tendon harvester is introduced to harvest the medial two-thirds of the tendon, while the distal insertion is left intact. The adductor magnus tendon is cut at 12-14 cm from its distal insertion and transferred into the patellar medial margin. Two suture anchors are inserted through the same incision at the superomedial aspect of the patella in the anatomic MPFL origin. The graft is tightened at 30 degrees knee flexion. Aftercare includes 4 weeks of brace treatment with restricted range of motion.

  11. Ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glickel, Steven Z; Gupta, Salil

    2006-05-01

    Volar ligament reconstruction is an effective technique for treating symptomatic laxity of the CMC joint of the thumb. The laxity may bea manifestation of generalized ligament laxity,post-traumatic, or metabolic (Ehler-Danlos). There construction reduces the shear forces on the joint that contribute to the development and persistence of inflammation. Although there have been only a few reports of the results of volar ligament reconstruction, the use of the procedure to treat Stage I and Stage II disease gives good to excellent results consistently. More advanced stages of disease are best treated by trapeziectomy, with or without ligament reconstruction.

  12. Diagnostic performance of susceptibility-weighted magnetic resonance imaging for the assessment of sub-coracoacromial spurs causing subacromial impingement syndrome

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    Noerenberg, Dominik; Armbruster, Marco [Munich University Hospitals Campus Grosshadern, Department of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Bender, Yi-Na; Walter, Thula; Diederichs, Gerd; Hamm, Bernd [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Ebersberger, Hans U. [Heart Center Munich-Bogenhausen, Department of Cardiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Munich (Germany); Ockert, Ben [Munich University Hospitals Campus Grosshadern, Department of Trauma and Orthopedic Surgery, Shoulder and Elbow Service, Munich (Germany); Makowski, Marcus R. [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom)

    2017-03-15

    To evaluate the potential of susceptibility-weighted-magnetic-resonance-imaging (SWMR) for the detection of sub-coracoacromial spurs in patients with clinically suspected subacromial impingement syndrome (SAIS), compared to standard MR-sequences and radiographs. Forty-four patients with suspected SAIS were included. All patients underwent radiography, standard MRI of the shoulder and SWMR. Radiograph-based identification of sub-coracoacromial spurs served as goldstandard. Radiographs identified twenty-three spurs in twenty-three patients. Twenty-one patients without spur formation served as reference group. Detection rate, sensitivity/specificity and interobserver-agreements were calculated. Linear regression was applied to determine the relationship between size measurements on radiographs and MRI. Detection rates for spurs on standard MRI and SWMR were 47.8 % and 91.3 % compared to radiography (p<0.001). SWMR demonstrated a sensitivity of 97.7 % (CI=0.92-1) and a specificity of 91.3 % (CI=0.788-1) for the identification of spurs. Standard MR-sequences achieved a sensitivity of 47.8 % (CI=0.185-0.775) and a specificity of 80.8 % (CI=0.642-0.978). Size measurements between SWMR and radiography showed a good correlation (R{sup 2}=0.75;p<0.0001), while overestimating lesion size (5.7±1.2 mm; 4.3±1.3 mm;p<0.0001). Interobserver-agreement for spurs was high on SWMR (R{sup 2}=0.74;p<0.0001), but low on standard MRI (R{sup 2}=0.24;p<0.0001). SWMR allows a reliable detection of sub-coracoacromial spur formation in patients with SAIS and is superior to standard MR-sequences using radiography as goldstandard. (orig.)

  13. Results of Latarjet Coracoid Transfer to Revise Failed Arthroscopic Instability Repairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Gregory P.; Rahman, Zain; Verma, Nikhil N.; Romeo, Anthony A.; Cole, Brian J.; Gupta, Anil Kumar; Bruce, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Arthroscopic instability repair has supplanted open techniques to anatomically reconstruct anteroinferior instability pathology. Arthroscopic technique can fail for a variety of reasons. We have utilized the Latarjet as a revision option in failed arthroscopic instability repairs when there is altered surgical anatomy, capsular deficiency and/or glenoid bone compromise and recurrent glenohumeral instability. Methods: We reviewed 51 shoulders (40 ♀, 11♂) that underwent Latarjet coracoid transfer for the revision of failed previous arthroscopic instability repair. The avg. age was 32.6 yrs (16-58). All patients had recurrent symptomatic anterior instability after previous arthroscopic surgery, and avg. time from arthroscopic repair to Latarjet was 13 months (4-40 mn). All had either CT or MRI that revealed suture anchor material in the glenoid, labral and capsular stripping, and anteroinferior glenoid bone loss or erosion. Advanced bone loss percentage analysis was not performed for this study. We excluded all patients that had a previous open repair, a seizure disorder, or if the Latarjet was a primary procedure. Outcome scores pre-operatively avg: SST: 6.7 (1-12); VAS: 3 (0-8); ASES: 63 (32-89). Coracoid transfer was performed thru a subscapularis split in 38, and with tendon takedown in 13. The coracoid was osteotomized along its long axis parallel to the undersurface of the lateral aspect. This provided at least 2.5 to 3.5 cm of graft with the conjoined tendon attached. The coracoacromial (CA) ligament was incised leaving a 1 cm. stump. The transfer was affixed flush with the articular surface but not lateral to it, with two 3.5 mm cortical screws in lag fashion overdrilling the coracoid with the CA ligament directed laterally. The capsule was then repaired to the CA ligament to make the transfer extra-articular. Results: At avg. 4 yr (2-7 yrs) follow-up stability had been maintained in 51 (100%).without further instability surgery. There were no

  14. Artificial Ligaments: Promise or Panacea?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubell, Adele

    1987-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration has approved a prosthetic ligament for limited use in persons with damaged anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL). This article addresses ligament repair, ACL tears, current treatment, development of the Gore-Tex artificial ligament, other artificial ligaments in process, and arguments for and against their use.…

  15. Tendon and ligament imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, R J; O'Connor, P J; Grainger, A J

    2012-01-01

    MRI and ultrasound are now widely used for the assessment of tendon and ligament abnormalities. Healthy tendons and ligaments contain high levels of collagen with a structured orientation, which gives rise to their characteristic normal imaging appearances as well as causing particular imaging artefacts. Changes to ligaments and tendons as a result of disease and injury can be demonstrated using both ultrasound and MRI. These have been validated against surgical and histological findings. Novel imaging techniques are being developed that may improve the ability of MRI and ultrasound to assess tendon and ligament disease. PMID:22553301

  16. Endoscopic Intermetatarsal Ligament Decompression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-12-01

    Morton neuroma is an entrapment of the intermetatarsal nerve by the deep intermetatarsal ligament. It is usually treated conservatively. Surgery is considered if there is recalcitrant pain that is resistant to conservative treatment. The surgical options include resection of the neuroma or decompression of the involved nerve. Decompression of the nerve by release of the intermetatarsal ligament can be performed by either an open or minimally invasive approach. We describe 2-portal endoscopic decompression of the intermetatarsal nerve. The ligament is released by a retrograde knife through the toe-web portal under arthroscopic guidance through the plantar portal.

  17. Endoscopic Intermetatarsal Ligament Decompression

    OpenAIRE

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-01-01

    Morton neuroma is an entrapment of the intermetatarsal nerve by the deep intermetatarsal ligament. It is usually treated conservatively. Surgery is considered if there is recalcitrant pain that is resistant to conservative treatment. The surgical options include resection of the neuroma or decompression of the involved nerve. Decompression of the nerve by release of the intermetatarsal ligament can be performed by either an open or minimally invasive approach. We describe 2-portal endoscopic ...

  18. Ankle ligament injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per A.F.H. Renström

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute ankle ligament sprains are common injuries. The majority of these occur during athletic participation in the 15 to 35 year age range. Despite the frequency of the injury, diagnostic and treatment protocols have varied greatly. Lateral ligament complex injuries are by far the most common of the ankle sprains. Lateral ligament injuries typically occur during plantar flexion and inversion, which is the position of maximum stress on the anterotalofibular liagment (ATFL. For this reason, the ATFL is the most commonly torn ligament during an inversion injury. In more severe inversion injuries the calcaneofibular (CFL, posterotalofibular (PTFL and subtalar ligament can also be injured. Most acute lateral ankle ligament injuries recover quickly with nonoperative management. The treatment program, called "functional treatment," includes application of the RICE principle (rest, ice, compression, and elevation immediately after the injury, a short period of immobilization and protection with an elastic or inelastic tape or bandage, and early motion exercises followed by early weight bearing and neuromuscular ankle training. Proprioceptive training with a tilt board is commenced as soon as possible, usually after 3 to 4 weeks. The purpose is to improve the balance and neuromuscular control of the ankle. Sequelae after ankle ligament injuries are very common. As much as 10% to 30% of patients with a lateral ligament injury may have chronic symptoms. Symptoms usually include persistent synovitis or tendinitis, ankle stiffness, swelling, and pain, muscle weakness, and frequent giving-way. A well designed physical therapy program with peroneal strengthening and proprioceptive training, along with bracing and/or taping can alleviate instability problems in most patients. For cases of chronic instability that are refractory to bracing and external support, surgical treatment can be explored. If the chronic instability is associated with subtalar instability

  19. Anterior crucate ligament (ACL) injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... An anterior cruciate ligament injury is the over-stretching or tearing of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ... may be injured. This is a medical emergency. Prevention Use proper techniques when playing sports or exercising. ...

  20. Cruciate ligament reflexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsgaard, Michael R; Dyhre-Poulsen, Poul; Fischer-Rasmussen, Torsten

    2002-01-01

    The idea of muscular reflexes elicited from sensory nerves of the cruciate ligaments is more than 100 years old, but the existence of such reflexes has not been proven until the recent two decades. First in animal experiments, a muscular excitation could be elicited in the hamstrings when the ant...

  1. Three-dimensional loading model for periodontal ligament regeneration in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berendsen, A.D.; Smit, T.H.; Walboomers, X.F.; Everts, V.; Jansen, J.A.; Bronckers, A.L.J.J.

    2009-01-01

    In this study we present a new three-dimensional (3D) model to study effects of mechanical loading on tendon/ligament formation in vitro. The model mimics a functional periodontal ligament (PDL), which anchors dental roots to the jaw bone and transfers the axial load of mastication to the jaw bone.

  2. Three-dimensional loading model for periodontal ligament regeneration in vitro.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berendsen, A.D.; Smit, T.H.; Walboomers, X.F.; Everts, V.; Jansen, J.A.; Bronckers, A.L.

    2009-01-01

    In this study we present a new three-dimensional (3D) model to study effects of mechanical loading on tendon/ligament formation in vitro. The model mimics a functional periodontal ligament (PDL), which anchors dental roots to the jaw bone and transfers the axial load of mastication to the jaw bone.

  3. Three-dimensional loading model for periodontal ligament regeneration in vitro.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berendsen, A.D.; Smit, T.H.; Walboomers, X.F.; Everts, V.; Jansen, J.A.; Bronckers, A.L.

    2009-01-01

    In this study we present a new three-dimensional (3D) model to study effects of mechanical loading on tendon/ligament formation in vitro. The model mimics a functional periodontal ligament (PDL), which anchors dental roots to the jaw bone and transfers the axial load of mastication to the jaw bone.

  4. Three-dimensional loading model for periodontal ligament regeneration in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.D. Berendsen; T.H. Smit; X.F. Walboomers; V. Everts; J.A. Jansen; A.L.J.J. Bronckers

    2009-01-01

    In this study we present a new three-dimensional (3D) model to study effects of mechanical loading on tendon/ligament formation in vitro. The model mimics a functional periodontal ligament (PDL), which anchors dental roots to the jaw bone and transfers the axial load of mastication to the jaw bone.

  5. [Traumatology of the alar ligaments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saternus, K S; Thrun, C

    1987-10-01

    A postmortem study of craniocerebral traumas of varying severity was done to determine the pattern of injury of the alar ligaments. It was found that in the entire group of patients (n = 30) the alar ligaments were ruptured or suffused with blood 11 times. No close relationship was found between the massive nature of the cranial trauma and the severity of the injury of the alar ligaments. In some cases the alar ligaments were not at all involved even though the skull had suffered extensive osseous lesions, whereas on the other hand the ligaments were injured even though only soft parts had been involved (e.g., haematoma or dehiscent wounds of the scalp). Ruptures of the alar ligaments were typically involved in extended ruptures of the ligamentous apparatus (see Figure 6a involving the ligamentum apicis dentis, ligamentum transversum atlantis, m.atlanto-occipitalis anterior, m.tectoria, m.atlanto-axialis anterior et posterior). In some cases the pattern of injury of the alar ligaments was found to be decisive in enabling reconstruction of the course of the accident. Damage to the alar ligaments near the dens axis represent rotation injuries. On the other hand, insertion tears out of the condyli occipitales must be related to a lateral thrust tendency in indirect fracture of the skull (bursting fracture). Within this overall framework a new mechanism of fracture of the condylus occipitalis is described. As a matter of principle, the alar ligaments can become involved in consequence of rotation, traction and compression of the cranium.

  6. Incidental Anterior Cruciate Ligament Calcification: Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Hisami; Fischer, Hans

    2016-03-01

    The calcification of knee ligaments is a finding noted only in a handful of case reports. The finding of an anterior cruciate ligament calcification has been reported once in the literature. Comparable studies involving the posterior cruciate ligament, medial collateral ligament and an ossicle within the anterior cruciate ligament are likewise discussed in reports of symptomatic patients. We report a case of incidentally discovered anterior cruciate ligament calcification. We discuss the likely etiology and clinical implications of this finding.

  7. Acromioclavicular joint reconstruction using the LockDown synthetic implant: a study with cadavers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taranu, R; Rushton, P R P; Serrano-Pedraza, I; Holder, L; Wallace, W A; Candal-Couto, J J

    2015-12-01

    Dislocation of the acromioclavicular joint is a relatively common injury and a number of surgical interventions have been described for its treatment. Recently, a synthetic ligament device has become available and been successfully used, however, like other non-native solutions, a compromise must be reached when choosing non-anatomical locations for their placement. This cadaveric study aimed to assess the effect of different clavicular anchorage points for the Lockdown device on the reduction of acromioclavicular joint dislocations, and suggest an optimal location. We also assessed whether further stability is provided using a coracoacromial ligament transfer (a modified Neviaser technique). The acromioclavicular joint was exposed on seven fresh-frozen cadaveric shoulders. The joint was reconstructed using the Lockdown implant using four different clavicular anchorage points and reduction was measured. The coracoacromial ligament was then transferred to the lateral end of the clavicle, and the joint re-assessed. If the Lockdown ligament was secured at the level of the conoid tubercle, the acromioclavicular joint could be reduced anatomically in all cases. If placed medial or 2 cm lateral, the joint was irreducible. If the Lockdown was placed 1 cm lateral to the conoid tubercle, the joint could be reduced with difficulty in four cases. Correct placement of the Lockdown device is crucial to allow anatomical joint reduction. Even when the Lockdown was placed over the conoid tubercle, anterior clavicle displacement remained but this could be controlled using a coracoacromial ligament transfer. ©2015 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  8. Anterior cruciate ligament - updating article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Vinicius Malheiros Luzo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This updating article on the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL has the aim of addressing some of the most interesting current topics in this field. Within this stratified approach, it contains the following sections: ACL remnant; anterolateral ligament and combined intra and extra-articular reconstruction; fixation devices; and ACL femoral tunnel creation techniques.

  9. Anterior cruciate ligament - updating article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzo, Marcus Vinicius Malheiros; Franciozi, Carlos Eduardo da Silveira; Rezende, Fernando Cury; Gracitelli, Guilherme Conforto; Debieux, Pedro; Cohen, Moisés

    2016-01-01

    This updating article on the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) has the aim of addressing some of the most interesting current topics in this field. Within this stratified approach, it contains the following sections: ACL remnant; anterolateral ligament and combined intra and extra-articular reconstruction; fixation devices; and ACL femoral tunnel creation techniques.

  10. Hindlimb unloading alters ligament healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provenzano, Paolo P.; Martinez, Daniel A.; Grindeland, Richard E.; Dwyer, Kelley W.; Turner, Joanne; Vailas, Arthur C.; Vanderby, Ray Jr

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that hindlimb unloading inhibits healing in fibrous connective tissue such as ligament. Male rats were assigned to 3- and 7-wk treatment groups with three subgroups each: sham control, ambulatory healing, and hindlimb-suspended healing. Ambulatory and suspended animals underwent surgical rupture of their medial collateral ligaments, whereas sham surgeries were performed on control animals. After 3 or 7 wk, mechanical and/or morphological properties were measured in ligament, muscle, and bone. During mechanical testing, most suspended ligaments failed in the scar region, indicating the greatest impairment was to ligament and not to bone-ligament insertion. Ligament testing revealed significant reductions in maximum force, ultimate stress, elastic modulus, and low-load properties in suspended animals. In addition, femoral mineral density, femoral strength, gastrocnemius mass, and tibialis anterior mass were significantly reduced. Microscopy revealed abnormal scar formation and cell distribution in suspended ligaments with extracellular matrix discontinuities and voids between misaligned, but well-formed, collagen fiber bundles. Hence, stress levels from ambulation appear unnecessary for formation of fiber bundles yet required for collagen to form structurally competent continuous fibers. Results support our hypothesis that hindlimb unloading impairs healing of fibrous connective tissue. In addition, this study provides compelling morphological evidence explaining the altered structure-function relationship in load-deprived healing connective tissue.

  11. Medial Collateral Ligament (MCL) Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... THIS TOPIC Jumper's Knee Safety Tips: Basketball Knee Injuries Sports and Exercise Safety Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis (SCFE) Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injuries Contact Us Print Resources Send to a friend ...

  12. Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... knee injury, especially for athletes. Ligaments are long, rope-like bands that fasten bones together. The ACL ... re used to doing all the time, like jumping and landing hard on the feet. If the ...

  13. TRANSFER

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    “Chemistry Department, Kenyatta University, P. 0. Box 43844 ... harvester (X) [L 2] in a manner consistent with the following Forster equation for long range energy transfer [3-7]. .... sensitive foods, chemical reactors and essences. Recently we ...

  14. Ligament and Droplet Generation by Oil Film on a Rotating Disk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hengchao Sun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The lubrication and heat transfer designs of bearing chamber depend on an understanding of oil/air two-phase flow. As initial and boundary conditions, the characteristics of ligament and droplet generation by oil film on rotating parts have significant influence on the feasibility of oil/air two-phase flow analysis. An integrated model to predict the oil film flow, ligament number, and droplet Sauter mean diameter (SMD of a rotating disk, which is an abstraction of the droplet generation sources in a bearing chamber, is developed based on the oil film force balance analysis and wave theory. The oil film thickness and velocity, ligaments number, and droplet SMD are calculated as functions of the rotating disk radius, rotational speed and oil volume flow rate and oil properties. The theoretical results show that the oil film thickness and SMD are decreased with an increasing rotational speed, while the radial, transverse velocities, and ligament number are increased. The oil film thickness, radial velocity, and SMD are increased with an increasing oil flow rate, but the transverse velocity and ligament number are decreased. A test facility is built for the investigation into the ligament number of a rotating disk, and the measurement of ligament number is carried out by means of a high speed photography.

  15. Anterior cruciate ligament allograft transplantation for intraarticular ligamentous reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goertzen, M; Dellmann, A; Gruber, J; Clahsen, H; Bürrig, K F

    1992-01-01

    A multiplicity of surgical operations have been developed in an attempt to achieve satisfactory function after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) repair. None of these procedures have been able to reproduce the fiber organization anatomy of attachment site, vascularity, or function of the ACL. Twenty-nine foxhounds received a deep-frozen bone-ACL-bone allograft and a ligament augmentation device (LAD). Biomechanical, microvascular, and histological changes were evaluated 3, 6, and 12 months following implantation. The maximum loads of the allograft/LADs were 34.3% (387.2 N) after 3 months, 49.3% (556.6 N) after 6 months, and 61.1% (698.8 N) after a year. The maximum load was 69.1% (780 N). In general, after 6 months the allografts showed normal collagen orientation. The allografts demonstrated no evidence of infection or immune reaction. No bone ingrowth into the LAD was observed. Polarized light microscopy and periodic acid-schiff staining showed that the new bone-ligament substance interface had intact fiber orientation at the area of the ligament insertion. Microvascular examination using the Spalteholtz technique revealed revascularization and the importance of an infrapatellar fat pad for the nourishment of ACL allografts.

  16. Anatomy of the alar ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanaga, Joe; Sardi, Juan P; Laws, Tyler; Chapman, Jens R; Oskouian, Rod J; Tubbs, R Shane

    2017-08-18

    There are four layers of ligamentous stabilizers at the cranio-cervical junction and the second layer is comprised of the apical and paired alar ligaments. The purpose of this study is to establish the tensile strength of the alar ligaments for better understanding the implications that can arise from trauma and other pathologies in the craniocervical region. Nineteen sides from ten fresh frozen adult cadaveric Caucasian heads were used in this study. The specimens were derived from six males and four females, and the age of the cadavers at death ranged from 67 to 90-years-old to measure the tensile strength, a tensile testing machine (M2-200, Mark-10 corporation, USA) was used in this study. The force (N) necessary until failure for all alar ligaments ranged from 87 to 346 N with a mean of 186.9±69.7 N. There was a significant difference when comparing tensile strength between males and females. Further studies will be needed to determine their importance as secondary stabilizers and measure their ability to support similar forces when subject to rotation and lateral bending forces, as well as with flexion-extension. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Ligament-mediated spray formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Villermaux, E.; Marmottant, Ph.; Duplat, J.

    2004-01-01

    The spray formed when a fast gas stream blows over a liquid volume presents a wide distribution of fragment sizes. The process involves a succession of changes of the liquid topology, the last being the elongation and capillary breakup of ligaments torn off from the liquid surface. The coalescence o

  18. Status and headway of the clinical application of artificial ligaments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianwu Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors first reviewed the history of clinical application of artificial ligaments. Then, the status of clinical application of artificial ligaments was detailed. Some artificial ligaments possessed comparable efficacy to, and fewer postoperative complications than, allografts and autografts in ligament reconstruction, especially for the anterior cruciate ligament. At the end, the authors focused on the development of two types of artificial ligaments: polyethylene glycol terephthalate artificial ligaments and tissue-engineered ligaments. In conclusion, owing to the advancements in surgical techniques, materials processing, and weaving methods, clinical application of some artificial ligaments so far has demonstrated good outcomes and will become a trend in the future.

  19. Surface modification of nano-silica on the ligament advanced reinforcement system for accelerated bone formation: primary human osteoblasts testing in vitro and animal testing in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengmeng; Wang, Shiwen; Jiang, Jia; Sun, Jiashu; Li, Yuzhuo; Huang, Deyong; Long, Yun-Ze; Zheng, Wenfu; Chen, Shiyi; Jiang, Xingyu

    2015-05-07

    The Ligament Advanced Reinforcement System (LARS) has been considered as a promising graft for ligament reconstruction. To improve its biocompatibility and effectiveness on new bone formation, we modified the surface of a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) ligament with nanoscale silica using atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and silica polymerization. The modified ligament is tested by both in vitro and in vivo experiments. Human osteoblast testing in vitro exhibits an ∼21% higher value in cell viability for silica-modified grafts compared with original grafts. Animal testing in vivo shows that there is new formed bone in the case of a nanoscale silica-coated ligament. These results demonstrate that our approach for nanoscale silica surface modification on LARS could be potentially applied for ligament reconstruction.

  20. Ultrasound appearance of the normal Lisfranc ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaicker, Jatin; Zajac, Mercedes; Shergill, Ravi; Choudur, Hema N

    2016-12-01

    This study aims to prospectively evaluate the ultrasound appearance of the normal Lisfranc's ligament in 50 patients (100 ft) with no prior or current ligament injury. Fifty normal asymptomatic patients between the ages of 18 and 80 years were assessed. Three key features were recorded: ultrasound appearance, thickness, and length of the Lisfranc's ligament. Patients excluded from this study included pediatric patients and those with history of injury or symptoms related to the foot. The mean right- and left-sided ligament (RT) thickness were 0.096 (0.021) and 0.104 (0.023), respectively. The mean right- and left-sided ligament RT length was 0.54 (0.11) and 0.57 (0.11), respectively. The appearance of the ligament was similar in all patients with a central thin band of hypoechogenicity lined by hyperechoic lines on either side. Understanding the normal appearance, thickness, and length of the Lisfranc's ligament in a large sample is imperative to diagnose abnormal appearances of this ligament including sprains and tears by ultrasound. Ultrasound, with its easy accessibility, can be used in the emergency department to rapidly exclude injury of the ligament. Increased understanding and awareness of the Lisfranc's ligament on ultrasound can allow for more accurate diagnosis and treatment.

  1. Multiple-ligament injured knee

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Lei; NING Zhi-jie; ZHANG Hui; TIAN Min; NING Tin-min

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore the clinical characteristic of the multiple-ligament injured knee and evaluate the protocol,technique and outcome of treatment for the multipleligament injured knee.Methods: From October 2001 to March 2005, 9 knees with combined anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) tears in 9 patients were identified with clinical and arthroscopic examinations. Of them, 5 knees were combined with ruptures of posteromedial corner (PMC) and medial collateral ligament (MCL), 4 with disruptions of posterolateral corner ( PLC), 2 with popliteal vascular injuries and 1 with peroneal nerve injuries. Six patients were hospitalized in acute phase of trauma, 2 received repairs of popliteal artery and 4 had repairs of PMC and MCL. Reconstructions of ACL and PCL with autografts under arthroscope were performed in all patients at 4 to 10 weeks after trauma,including reconstruction of PLC with the posterior half of biceps femoris tendon tenodesis in 4 patients and reconstructions of PMC and MCL with femoral fascia in 1 patient.Results: No severe complications occurred at early stage after operation in the 9 patients. All of them were followed up for 10-39 months with an average of 23. 00 months ± 9.46 months. Lysholm score was 70-95 with an average of 85.00 ± 8.29. International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score was from severely abnormal (Grade D) in 9 knees at initial examination to normal (Grade A) in 2 knees, nearly normal (Grade B ) in 6 knees and abnormal in 1 knee at the last follow-up. Of the 9 patients, 7 returned to the same activity level before injury and 2 were under the level.Conclusions: The multiple-ligament injured knee with severe instability is usually combined with other important structure damages. Therefore, careful assessment and treatment of the combined injuries are essential. Reconstructions of ACL and PCL under arthroscope, combined with repairs or reconstructions of the extraarticular ligaments

  2. Characteristics of the three ligaments of human spring ligament complex from a viewpoint of elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohno, Yoshiyuki; Tohno, Setsuko; Taniguchi, Akira; Azuma, Cho; Minami, Takeshi; Mahakkanukrauh, Pasuk

    2012-06-01

    To elucidate characteristics of the three ligaments constituting the spring ligament complex from a viewpoint of elements, the authors investigated age-related changes of elements, relationships among their elements, relationships among ligaments in the elements, and gender differences in the three ligaments of the spring ligament complex, the superomedial calcaneonavicular (SMCN), inferoplantar longitudinal calcaneonavicular (ICN), and third or medioplantar oblique calcaneonavicular (TCN) ligaments. After ordinary dissection at Nara Medical University was finished, the SMCN, ICN, and TCN ligaments of the spring ligament complex were removed from the subjects. The subjects consisted of 10 men and 12 women, ranging in age from 62 to 99 years (average age = 80.5 ± 9.7 years). After incineration with nitric acid and perchloric acid, the element contents were determined by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry. It was found that although the Ca and P content hardly changed in the SMCN ligament with aging, the Ca and P content in the ICN ligament increased to about three and five times higher in the 80s in comparison with the 60s, respectively, whereas in the TCN ligament, it increased about 40% and 90% higher in the 80s compared with the 60s, respectively. Regarding the relationships among elements, significant direct correlations were found among the contents of Ca, P, and Mg in all the three ligaments of the spring ligament complex. This finding was in agreement with the previous finding obtained with the three ligaments of the anterior cruciate ligament, posterior longitudinal ligament, and ligamentum capitis femoris. Whether there were significant correlations among the three ligaments of the spring ligament complex with regard to the Ca, P, S, Mg, Zn, and Fe contents was examined using Pearson's correlation. It was found that there were significant direct correlations between the SMCN and TCN ligaments in all the Ca, P, Mg, and Zn contents and

  3. Bioreactor Design for Tendon/Ligament Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Gardiner, Bruce S.; Lin, Zhen; Rubenson, Jonas; Kirk, Thomas B.; Wang, Allan; Xu, Jiake

    2013-01-01

    Tendon and ligament injury is a worldwide health problem, but the treatment options remain limited. Tendon and ligament engineering might provide an alternative tissue source for the surgical replacement of injured tendon. A bioreactor provides a controllable environment enabling the systematic study of specific biological, biochemical, and biomechanical requirements to design and manufacture engineered tendon/ligament tissue. Furthermore, the tendon/ligament bioreactor system can provide a suitable culture environment, which mimics the dynamics of the in vivo environment for tendon/ligament maturation. For clinical settings, bioreactors also have the advantages of less-contamination risk, high reproducibility of cell propagation by minimizing manual operation, and a consistent end product. In this review, we identify the key components, design preferences, and criteria that are required for the development of an ideal bioreactor for engineering tendons and ligaments. PMID:23072472

  4. Posterior cruciate ligament and posterolateral corner reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanelli, Gregory C; Edson, Craig J; Reinheimer, Kristin N; Garofalo, Raffaele

    2007-12-01

    The keys to successful posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction are to identify and treat all pathology, use strong graft material, accurately place tunnels in anatomic insertion sites, minimize graft bending, use a mechanical graft-tensioning device, use primary and backup graft fixation, and employ the appropriate postoperative rehabilitation program. Adherence to these technical points results in successful single and double bundle arthroscopic transtibial tunnel posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction documented with stress radiography, arthrometer, knee ligament rating scales, and patient satisfaction measurements.

  5. Hypertrophy of Ligament of Treitz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddharth P. Dubhashi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Congenital duodenal obstruction commonly occurs due to malrotation, atresia, stenosis and annular pancreas in decreasing order of frequency. This is a case report of a 12 year old male child who presented with complaints of non-projectile vomiting and abdominal distension and pain after meals since 7 years. Barium study showed narrowing of the Duodeno-jejunal(DJ junction due to hypertrophied ligament of Treitz. Exploratory laparotomy revealed a dilated stomach and collapsed bowel loops. There were adhesions at DJ junction and other parts of the small intestine. Adhesiolysis was done. The followup revealed a weight gain of 2 kg. The barium study was repeated which also revealed a normal study. Congenital obstruction of duodeno-jejunal junction due to extrinsic band or due to narrower attachment of ligament of Treitz at duodeno-jejunal flexure is a rare cause of bilious vomiting in the newborn period. A broad attachment of the ligament of Treitz makes a smooth obtuse angle at the duodeno-jejunum junction whereas a narrower insertion creates an acute angle that predisposes to obstruction.Duodenal obstruction may rarely occur in the presence of a normally rotated gut.

  6. Functional anatomy of the alar ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvorak, J; Panjabi, M M

    1987-03-01

    Nineteen upper cervical spine specimens were dissected to examine the macroscopic and functional anatomy of alar ligaments. They are on both sides, symmetrically placed, approximately 10-13 mm long and elliptical in cross-section 3 X 6 mm in diameter. The fiber orientation is dependent on the height of dens axis, mostly in the cranial caudal direction. In 12 specimens there was a ligamentous connection between dens and lateral mass of the atlas as a part of the alar ligament. In 2 specimens anterior atlanto-dental ligament was identified. The computerized tomographic (CT) images can clearly show alar ligaments in axial, coronal, and sagittal planes. The ligaments limit the axial rotation in the occipito-atlanto-axial complex (to the right by left alar and vice versa) as well as in side bending. The ligament is most stretched, and consequently most vulnerable, when the head is rotated and in addition flexed. This mechanism, common in whiplash injuries, could lead to irreversible overstretching or rupture of the ligaments especially as the ligaments consist of mainly collagen fibers.

  7. MR imaging of alar and transverse atlantal ligament injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Echigoya, Naoki; Harata, Seiko; Ueyama, Kazumasa (Hirosaki Univ., Aomori (Japan). School of Medicine); Nakano, Keisuke

    1992-06-01

    Autopsy findings of ligaments of the upper cervical spine were compared with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. Ligaments were clearly shown as hypointensity on T1-weighted images and proton density images. Transverse images were useful in diagnosing alar and transverse atlantal ligament injuries. When there is a bilateral difference in the alar ligaments, ruptured ligament is suspected. Transverse ligament rupture was shown on interrupted hypointensity and as hyperintensity. MRI was capable of diagnosing alar ligament rupture in 8 of 11 patients, and transverse ligament rupture in all 3 patients. In 2 patients having Jefferson's fracture and injuried atlanoaxial subluxation encountered in the clinical practice, transverse ligament rupture was similarly observed as that in autopsy cases on MR images. Hyperintensity in the transverse ligament rupture area was seen even one year after injury. Injured transverse ligament was seen as swollen hyperintensity on sagittal images; and the hyperintensity was gradually decreased with the process of healing. (N.K.).

  8. Variations in meniscofemoral ligaments at anatomical study and MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, J.M.; Suh, J.S. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Na, J.B. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Kyungsang National University, College of Medicine, Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Cho, J.H. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Ajou University College of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Y.; Yoo, W.K. [Department of Rehabilitation, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, H.Y.; Chung, I.H. [Department of Anatomy, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-04-01

    Purpose To demonstrate variations in the meniscofemoral ligaments (ligaments of Wrisberg and Humphrey) at anatomical study and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Design Twenty-eight cadaveric knees were partially dissected for the examination of the meniscofemoral ligaments. One hundred knee MR examinations were reviewed by two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists. Proximal variations in the meniscofemoral ligaments at MR imaging were classified into three types according to the attachment site: type I, medial femoral condyle; type II, proximal half of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL); type III, distal half of the PCL. Distal variations were classified into vertical or oblique types according to the orientation of the intermediate signal at the interface of the ligament and lateral meniscus. Results At anatomical study, six cases showed variations in the proximal insertion site of the meniscofemoral ligaments. At MR imaging 93 cases had one or more meniscofemoral ligaments, giving a total of 107 ligaments: 90 ligaments of Wrisberg and 17 ligaments of Humphrey. Forty-one ligaments of Wrisberg were type I, 28 type II, 19 type III, and with two indeterminate type, while 6 ligaments of Humphrey were type I and the remaining 11 were indeterminate. Seven cases showed no meniscofemoral ligament. Of the 107 meniscofemoral ligaments, the distal insertion orientation was of vertical type in 10 ligaments, oblique type in 70 and unidentified in 27. Conclusion An understanding of the high incidence of meniscofemoral ligament variations may help in the interpretation of knee MR studies. (orig.) With 7 figs., 1 tab., 16 refs.

  9. Postoperative rehabilitation of the posterior cruciate ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edson, Craig J; Fanelli, Gregory C; Beck, John D

    2010-12-01

    Diagnosis and management of posterior cruciate ligament injuries has evolved, and now the treatment often includes surgical intervention. The purpose of this paper is to define the current approach to postsurgical management after the posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, review conservative management, and discuss surgical outcomes using a specified program.

  10. Instructive materials for tendon and ligament augmentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ribeiro Pereira Simões Crispim, João Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Tendons and ligaments (T/L) are the connective tissue that connect muscles to bone and bone to bone, respectively. The main function of tendons is to translate muscle contractions into join motion and consequently generate movement. Ligaments function to stabilize joints and guide them during their

  11. The sacroiliac part of the iliolumbar ligament

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.L. Pool-Goudzwaard (Annelies); G.J. Kleinrensink (Gert Jan); C.J. Snijders (Chris); C.A. Entius; R. Stoeckart (Rob)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractThe iliolumbar ligament has been described as the most important ligament for restraining movement at the lumbosacral junction. In addition, it may play an important role in restraining movement in the sacroiliac joints. To help understand its presumed restraining effec

  12. Current concepts review: the posterior cruciate ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanelli, Gregory C; Beck, John D; Edson, Craig J

    2010-06-01

    Injuries to the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) and methods of treatment of the injured PCL have historically been surrounded by controversy in the orthopedic community. The infrequent occurrence of PCL injuries and PCL-based, multiple ligament knee injuries has led to limitations in clinical studies and a subsequent lag in basic science and clinical research compared with that for other ligamentous injuries. In recent years, new studies have elucidated the biomechanical function and complex anatomy of the PCL leading to an increased interest in research, understanding, and treatment of these complex injuries. In addition to improved understanding of knee ligament structure and biomechanics, technical advancements in allograft tissue, surgical instrumentation, and graft tensioning and fixation methods and improved surgical techniques and postoperative rehabilitation methods have enhanced the results in PCL reconstruction and PCL-based, multiple ligament knee surgical outcomes.

  13. Outcome of hamstring ligament harvest for Anterior Cruciate Ligament reconstruction with allograft versus autograft: a clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Moghtadaei

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The goal of this study was to evaluate, functional capacity of the knee in flexion and internal rotation after hamstring ligament harvest for Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL reconstruction.Methods: Fifty patients (male and 18-45 years old with isolated ACL injury, randomly allocated in two equal groups (in one group, ACL reconstruction was performed with Tibialis Posterior allograft and in another group with quadruple hamstring ligament auto graft and before and 6 months after surgery in both groups isokinetic flexion strength and isometric internal rotation strength of knee evaluated with Biodex System 4 dynamometer and rotational torque recorder, in order. Isokinetic flexion strength evaluated in sitting and prone position; the later position was performed for deep flexion strength evaluation. Also subjective and objective assessment of all patients pre operatively and 6 months post operatively was documented with International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC questionnaire. In this study for first time, rotational torque strength of knee was recorded with new design measure, from isometric aspect and not isokinetic.Results: Although significant improvements in IKDC scores, flexion and internal rotation capacity of the knee were observed in both groups, post operatively in respect to pre operatively; there was no significant difference between 2 groups. (P<0.05 or more than 95% confidence Interval of the differenceConclusion: This study demonstrates that ACL reconstruction surgery, improves knee performance in flexion and internal rotation, regardless of hamstring tendon harvesting. Considering potential complications of allograft (for example: transfer of harmful diseases from donor to recipient, it is logical to use hamstring auto graft ligament for ACL reconstruction surgery. Because result of this study is not longstanding follow up and limited to male sex, for more worthfull conclusion, we suggest future study in both sex

  14. Transverse ligament of the knee in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratajczak, Wojciech; Jakubowicz, Marian; Pytel, Andrzej

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to trace the histological structure of the transverse ligament of the knee and its relation to the inferior lateral genicular artery. Investigations were carried out on 20 lower limbs (10 males, and 10 females) from the Department of Anatomy. It was found that close to the attachment of the transverse ligament to the menisci, bundles of fibres pass in vertical, oblique and horizontal directions, occupying a wide area on the anterior margin of the menisci. These fibres intermingle with bundles of the fibrocartilage of the menisci. In the area of the lateral attachment the inferior lateral genicular artery passes anteriorly to the transverse ligament, giving off numerous branches to the ligament. The medial part of the transverse ligament presents a thick rounded structure, surrounded by loose connective tissue. The fibres are arranged irregularly in bundles running horizontally on a tortuous course and with single spindle-like cells with darkly stained nuclei. The cells are not found at the ends of the ligament. Numerous blood vessels are observed between the bundles of fibres and on the periphery of the ligament.

  15. Functional tissue engineering of ligament healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsu Shan-Ling

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ligaments and tendons are dense connective tissues that are important in transmitting forces and facilitate joint articulation in the musculoskeletal system. Their injury frequency is high especially for those that are functional important, like the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL and medial collateral ligament (MCL of the knee as well as the glenohumeral ligaments and the rotator cuff tendons of the shoulder. Because the healing responses are different in these ligaments and tendons after injury, the consequences and treatments are tissue- and site-specific. In this review, we will elaborate on the injuries of the knee ligaments as well as using functional tissue engineering (FTE approaches to improve their healing. Specifically, the ACL of knee has limited capability to heal, and results of non-surgical management of its midsubstance rupture have been poor. Consequently, surgical reconstruction of the ACL is regularly performed to gain knee stability. However, the long-term results are not satisfactory besides the numerous complications accompanied with the surgeries. With the rapid development of FTE, there is a renewed interest in revisiting ACL healing. Approaches such as using growth factors, stem cells and scaffolds have been widely investigated. In this article, the biology of normal and healing ligaments is first reviewed, followed by a discussion on the issues related to the treatment of ACL injuries. Afterwards, current promising FTE methods are presented for the treatment of ligament injuries, including the use of growth factors, gene delivery, and cell therapy with a particular emphasis on the use of ECM bioscaffolds. The challenging areas are listed in the future direction that suggests where collection of energy could be placed in order to restore the injured ligaments and tendons structurally and functionally.

  16. Surgical Management and Treatment of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament/Medial Collateral Ligament Injured Knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Kevin M; Bailey, James R; Moorman, Claude T

    2017-01-01

    The medial collateral ligament (MCL) is the most commonly injured ligament of the knee. The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is the most commonly injured ligament in conjunction with the MCL. Most MCL injuries can be treated nonoperatively, whereas the ACL often requires reconstruction. A good physical examination is essential for diagnosis, whereas radiographs and MRI of the knee confirm diagnosis and help guide treatment planning. Preoperative physical therapy should be completed before surgical management to allow for return of knee range of motion and an attempt at MCL healing.

  17. Round Ligament Varicosities During Pregnancy: Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Chang Kyu; Oh, Young Taik; Jung, Dae Chul [Yonsei University Health System, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    There are various causes of a painful palpable mass in the groin during pregnancy. The differential diagnoses of an inguinal mass include hernia, lymphadenopathy, mesothelial cyst, cystic lymphangioma, neoplasms (lipoma, leiomyoma and sarcoma), endometriosis, embryonic remnants and round ligament varicosities. Among them, round ligament varicosities can be easily misdiagnosed as an inguinal hernia in a pregnant woman. These lesions should be managed conservatively because they resolve spontaneously during the postpartum period. Ultrasonography can help make the diagnosis of round ligament varicosities and so prevent unnecessary surgical intervention and the associated morbidity. Herein we report on a case of round ligament varicosities that presented during pregnancy and this condition was readily diagnosed via Doppler sonography

  18. Arthrofibrosis of the knee following ligament surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeHaven, Kenneth E; Cosgarea, Andrew J; Sebastianelli, Wayne J

    2003-01-01

    Arthrofibrosis of the knee is one of the most serious complications that can result from ligament surgery. Reported incidence of arthrofibrosis following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction ranges from 4% to 35%. The loss of motion caused by arthrofibrosis can be even more disabling than the instability for which the reconstruction was performed, often requiring extensive physical therapy and/or surgical lysis of adhesions. With aggressive rehabilitation and modifications in the bracing of knees undergoing ligament reconstruction, the incidence of this complication has decreased significantly. Additionally, delaying anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction until the acute inflammatory period has resolved has also been shown to be a significant factor in the reduction of postoperative knee stiffness.

  19. Guideline on anterior cruciate ligament injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.E. Meuffels (Duncan); M.T. Poldervaart (Michelle T.); R.L. Diercks (Ron L.); A.W.F.M. Fievez (Alex W.F.M.); T.W. Patt (Thomas W.); C.P. van der Hart (Cor P.); E.R. Hammacher (Eric); F. van der Meer (Fred); E.A. Goedhart (Edwin A.); A.F. Lenssen (Anton F); S.B. Muller-Ploeger (Sabrina B); M.A. Pols (Margreet); D.B.F. Saris (Daniel)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe Dutch Orthopaedic Association has a long tradition of development of practical clinical guidelines. Here we present the recommendations from the multidisciplinary clinical guideline working group for anterior cruciate ligament injury. The following 8 clinical questions were formulate

  20. Osseous Injury Associated With Ligamentous Tear of the Knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chee Hwee; Tan, Chih Feng; Kim, Okwha; Suh, Kyung Jin; Yao, Min-Szu; Chan, Wing P; Wu, Jim S

    2016-11-01

    One of the most common knee injuries is ligament tear, which may initially manifest as an osseous injury in radiographs. Radiologists should therefore be able to recognize ligament tears of the knee as osseous abnormalities in images. This review focuses on the imaging features of knee ligament injuries and their related osseous injuries: anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear with Segond fracture; associated marrow contusion; ACL avulsion fracture; posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) tear with osseous avulsion of the ligament including arcuate sign; reverse Segond fracture; PCL avulsion fracture; medial collateral ligament tear with Pellegrini-Stieda disease; lateral collateral ligament tear with avulsion fracture of the fibular head; and patellar ligament injuries with Osgood-Schlatter and Sinding-Larsen-Johansson.

  1. Tissue Engineering Strategies in Ligament Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caglar Yilgor

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ligaments are dense fibrous connective tissues that connect bones to other bones and their injuries are frequently encountered in the clinic. The current clinical approaches in ligament repair and regeneration are limited to autografts, as the gold standard, and allografts. Both of these techniques have their own drawbacks that limit the success in clinical setting; therefore, new strategies are being developed in order to be able to solve the current problems of ligament grafting. Tissue engineering is a novel promising technique that aims to solve these problems, by producing viable artificial ligament substitutes in the laboratory conditions with the potential of transplantation to the patients with a high success rate. Direct cell and/or growth factor injection to the defect site is another current approach aiming to enhance the repair process of the native tissue. This review summarizes the current approaches in ligament tissue engineering strategies including the use of scaffolds, their modification techniques, as well as the use of bioreactors to achieve enhanced regeneration rates, while also discussing the advances in growth factor and cell therapy applications towards obtaining enhanced ligament regeneration.

  2. Ligament strain on the iliofemoral, pubofemoral, and ischiofemoral ligaments in cadaver specimens: biomechanical measurement and anatomical observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidaka, Egi; Aoki, Mitsuhiro; Izumi, Tomoki; Suzuki, Daisuke; Fujimiya, Mineko

    2014-10-01

    The iliofemoral, pubofemoral, and ischiofemoral ligaments are major structures that stabilize the hip joint. We have sought evidence on which to base more effective hip stretching positions. The purpose of this study was to measure strains on these ligaments and to observe them. Eight fresh/frozen translumbar cadaver specimens were used. Clinically available stretching positions for these ligaments were adopted. Strain on each ligament was measured by a displacement sensor during passive torque to the hip joint. Hip motion was measured using an electromagnetic tracking device. The strained ligaments were captured on clear photographs. Significantly, high strains were imposed on the superior iliofemoral ligament by external rotation of the hip (3.48%); on the inferior iliofemoral ligament by maximal extension and 10° or 20° of external rotation with maximal extension (1.86%, 1.46%, 1.25%); on the pubofemoral ligament by maximal abduction and 10°, 20°, or 30° of external rotation with maximal abduction (3.18%, 3.28%, 3.11%, 2.99%); and on the ischiofemoral ligament by 10° or 20° of abduction with maximal internal rotation (7.11%, 7.83%). Fiber direction in each ligament was clearly identified. Significantly, high strains on hip ligaments corresponded with the anatomical direction of the ligament fibers. Positions were identified for each ligament that imposed maximal increase in strain on it.

  3. Advanced imaging of the scapholunate ligamentous complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabpour, Maryam; Staelens, Barbara; Van Overstraeten, Luc; De Maeseneer, Michel; Boulet, Cedric; De Mey, Johan; Scheerlinck, Thierry

    2015-12-01

    The scapholunate joint is one of the most involved in wrist injuries. Its stability depends on primary and secondary stabilisers forming together the scapholunate complex. This ligamentous complex is often evaluated by wrist arthroscopy. To avoid surgery as diagnostic procedure, optimization of MR imaging parameters as use of three-dimensional (3D) sequences with very thin slices and high spatial resolution, is needed to detect lesions of the intrinsic and extrinsic ligaments of the scapholunate complex. The paper reviews the literature on imaging of radial-sided carpal ligaments with advanced computed tomographic arthrography (CTA) and magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) to evaluate the scapholunate complex. Anatomy and pathology of the ligamentous complex are described and illustrated with CTA, MRA and corresponding arthroscopy. Sprains, mid-substance tears, avulsions and fibrous infiltrations of carpal ligaments could be identified on CTA and MRA images using 3D fat-saturated PD and 3D DESS (dual echo with steady-state precession) sequences with 0.5-mm-thick slices. Imaging signs of scapholunate complex pathology include: discontinuity, nonvisualization, changes in signal intensity, contrast extravasation (MRA), contour irregularity and waviness and periligamentous infiltration by edema, granulation tissue or fibrosis. Based on this preliminary experience, we believe that 3 T MRA using 3D sequences with 0.5-mm-thick slices and multiplanar reconstructions is capable to evaluate the scapholunate complex and could help to reduce the number of diagnostic arthroscopies.

  4. Advanced imaging of the scapholunate ligamentous complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shahabpour, Maryam; Maeseneer, Michel de; Boulet, Cedric; Mey, Johan de [Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel (UZ Brussel), Department of Radiology, Brussels (Belgium); Staelens, Barbara; Scheerlinck, Thierry [Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel (UZ Brussel), Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Brussels (Belgium); Overstraeten, Luc van [Hand and Foot Surgery Unit (HFSU), Tournai (Belgium)

    2015-12-15

    The scapholunate joint is one of the most involved in wrist injuries. Its stability depends on primary and secondary stabilisers forming together the scapholunate complex. This ligamentous complex is often evaluated by wrist arthroscopy. To avoid surgery as diagnostic procedure, optimization of MR imaging parameters as use of three-dimensional (3D) sequences with very thin slices and high spatial resolution, is needed to detect lesions of the intrinsic and extrinsic ligaments of the scapholunate complex. The paper reviews the literature on imaging of radial-sided carpal ligaments with advanced computed tomographic arthrography (CTA) and magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) to evaluate the scapholunate complex. Anatomy and pathology of the ligamentous complex are described and illustrated with CTA, MRA and corresponding arthroscopy. Sprains, mid-substance tears, avulsions and fibrous infiltrations of carpal ligaments could be identified on CTA and MRA images using 3D fat-saturated PD and 3D DESS (dual echo with steady-state precession) sequences with 0.5-mm-thick slices. Imaging signs of scapholunate complex pathology include: discontinuity, nonvisualization, changes in signal intensity, contrast extravasation (MRA), contour irregularity and waviness and periligamentous infiltration by edema, granulation tissue or fibrosis. Based on this preliminary experience, we believe that 3 T MRA using 3D sequences with 0.5-mm-thick slices and multiplanar reconstructions is capable to evaluate the scapholunate complex and could help to reduce the number of diagnostic arthroscopies. (orig.)

  5. Characteristics of bone tunnel changes after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using Ligament Advanced Reinforcement System artificial ligament

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Jian-ming; LIU Hao-yuan; CHEN Feng-rong; JIAN Guo-jian; CHEN Qi; WANG Zi-min; KANG Yi-fan

    2012-01-01

    Background There are different materials used for anterior cruciate ligament(ACL)reconstruction.It has been reported that both autologous grafts and allografts used in ACL reconstruction can cause bone tunnel enlargement.This study aimed to observe the characteristics of bone tunnel changes and possible causative factors following ACL reconstruction using Ligament Advanced Reinforcement System(LARS)artificial ligament.Methods Forty-three patients underwent ACL reconstruction using LARS artificial ligament and were followed up for 3 years.X-ray and CT examinations were performed at 1,3,6,12,24,and 36 months after surgery,to measure the width of tibial and femoral tunnels.Knee function was evaluated according to the Lysholm scoring system.The anterior and posterior stability of the knee was measured using the KT-1000 arthrometer.Results According to the Peyrache grading method,grade 1 femoral bone tunnel enlargement was observed in three cases six months after surgery.No grade 2 or grade 3 bone tunnel enlargement was found.The bone tunnel enlargement in the three cases was close to the articular surface with an average tunnel enlargement of(2.5±0.3)mm.Forty cases were evaluated as grade 0.The average tibial and femoral tunnel enlargements at the last follow-up were(0.8±0.3)and(1.1±0.3)mm,respectively.There was no statistically significant difference in bone tunnel width changes at different time points(P>0.05).X-ray and CT measurements were consistent.Conclusions There was no marked bone tunnel enlargement immediately following ACL reconstruction using LARS artificial ligament.Such enlargement may,however,result from varying grafting factors involving the LARS artificial ligament or from different fixation methods.

  6. Deltoid ligament in acute ankle injury: MR imaging analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Min Sun; Choi, Yun Sun; Kim, Yun Jung; Jung, Yoon Young [Eulji University, Department of Radiology, Eulji Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Su; Young, Ki Won [Eulji University, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Eulji Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    To identify the pattern of deltoid ligament injury after acute ankle injury and the relationship between ankle fracture and deltoid ligament tear by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Thirty-six patients (32 male, and 4 female; mean age, 29.8 years) with acute deltoid ligament injury who had undergone MRI participated in this study. The deltoid ligament was classified as having 3 superficial and 2 deep components. An image analysis included the integrity and tear site of the deltoid ligament, and other associated injuries. Association between ankle fracture and deltoid ligament tear was assessed using Fisher's exact test (P < 0.05). Of the 36 patients, 21 (58.3 %) had tears in the superficial and deep deltoid ligaments, 6 (16.7 %) in the superficial ligaments only, and 4 (11.1 %) in the deep ligaments only. The most common tear site of the three components of the superficial deltoid and deep anterior tibiotalar ligaments was their proximal attachments (94 % and 91.7 % respectively), and that of the deep posterior tibiotalar ligament (pTTL) was its distal attachment (82.6 %). The common associated injuries were ankle fracture (63.9 %), syndesmosis tear (55.6 %), and lateral collateral ligament complex tear (44.4 %). All the components of the deltoid ligament were frequently torn in patients with ankle fractures (tibionavicular ligament, P = 0.009). The observed injury pattern of the deltoid ligament was complex and frequently associated with concomitant ankle pathology. The most common tear site of the superficial deltoid ligament was the medial malleolar attachment, whereas that of the deep pTTL was near its medial talar insertion. (orig.)

  7. Bone-patellar tendon-bone autograft versus LARS artificial ligament for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiaoyun; Wen, Hong; Wang, Lide; Ge, Tichi

    2013-10-01

    The optimized graft for use in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is still in controversy. The bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) autograft has been accepted as the gold standard for ACL reconstruction. However, donor site morbidities cannot be avoided after this treatment. The artificial ligament of ligament advanced reinforcement system (LARS) has been recommended for ACL reconstruction. The purpose of this study is to compare the midterm outcome of ACL reconstruction using BPTB autografts or LARS ligaments. Between July 2004 and March 2006, the ACL reconstruction using BPTB autografts in 30 patients and LARS ligaments in 32 patients was performed. All patients were followed up for at least 4 years and evaluated using the Lysholm knee score, Tegner score, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score, and KT-1000 arthrometer test. There were no significant differences between the two groups with respect to the data of Lysholm scores, Tegner scores, IKDC scores, and KT-1000 arthrometer test at the latest follow-up. Our study demonstrates that the similarly good clinical results are obtained after ACL reconstruction using BPTB autografts or LARS ligaments at midterm follow-up. In addition to BPTB autografts, the LARS ligament may be a satisfactory treatment option for ACL rupture.

  8. Surgical treatment of anterior cruciate ligament injury in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alazzawi, Sulaiman; Sukeik, Mohamed; Ibrahim, Mazin; Haddad, Fares S

    2016-04-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament injury is among the most common soft tissue injuries of the knee joint and reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament is the gold standard treatment for young active symptomatic patients. This review summarizes the surgical treatment of anterior cruciate ligament injury.

  9. Macroscopic and microscopic analysis of the thumb carpometacarpal ligaments: a cadaveric study of ligament anatomy and histology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladd, Amy L; Lee, Julia; Hagert, Elisabet

    2012-08-15

    Stability and mobility represent the paradoxical demands of the human thumb carpometacarpal joint, yet the structural origin of each functional demand is poorly defined. As many as sixteen and as few as four ligaments have been described as primary stabilizers, but controversy exists as to which ligaments are most important. We hypothesized that a comparative macroscopic and microscopic analysis of the ligaments of the thumb carpometacarpal joint would further define their role in joint stability. Thirty cadaveric hands (ten fresh-frozen and twenty embalmed) from nineteen cadavers (eight female and eleven male; average age at the time of death, seventy-six years) were dissected, and the supporting ligaments of the thumb carpometacarpal joint were identified. Ligament width, length, and thickness were recorded for morphometric analysis and were compared with use of the Student t test. The dorsal and volar ligaments were excised from the fresh-frozen specimens and were stained with use of a triple-staining immunofluorescent technique and underwent semiquantitative analysis of sensory innervation; half of these specimens were additionally analyzed for histomorphometric data. Mixed-effects linear regression was used to estimate differences between ligaments. Seven principal ligaments of the thumb carpometacarpal joint were identified: three dorsal deltoid-shaped ligaments (dorsal radial, dorsal central, posterior oblique), two volar ligaments (anterior oblique and ulnar collateral), and two ulnar ligaments (dorsal trapeziometacarpal and intermetacarpal). The dorsal ligaments were significantly thicker (p histologic appearance of capsular tissue with low cellularity. The dorsal deltoid ligament complex is uniformly stout and robust; this ligament complex is the thickest morphometrically, has the highest cellularity histologically, and shows the greatest degree of sensory nerve endings. The hypocellular anterior oblique ligament is thin, is variable in its location, and

  10. Tissue engineering of ligaments for reconstructive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, MaCalus V; Kawakami, Yohei; Murawski, Christopher D; Fu, Freddie H

    2015-05-01

    The use of musculoskeletal bioengineering and regenerative medicine applications in orthopaedic surgery has continued to evolve. The aim of this systematic review was to address tissue-engineering strategies for knee ligament reconstruction. A systematic review of PubMed/Medline using the terms "knee AND ligament" AND "tissue engineering" OR "regenerative medicine" was performed. Two authors performed the search, independently assessed the studies for inclusion, and extracted the data for inclusion in the review. Both preclinical and clinical studies were reviewed, and the articles deemed most relevant were included in this article to provide relevant basic science and recent clinical translational knowledge concerning "tissue-engineering" strategies currently used in knee ligament reconstruction. A total of 224 articles were reviewed in our initial PubMed search. Non-English-language studies were excluded. Clinical and preclinical studies were identified, and those with a focus on knee ligament tissue-engineering strategies including stem cell-based therapies, growth factor administration, hybrid biomaterial, and scaffold development, as well as mechanical stimulation modalities, were reviewed. The body of knowledge surrounding tissue-engineering strategies for ligament reconstruction continues to expand. Presently, various tissue-engineering techniques have some potential advantages, including faster recovery, better ligamentization, and possibly, a reduction of recurrence. Preclinical research of these novel therapies continues to provide promising results. There remains a need for well-designed, high-powered comparative clinical studies to serve as a foundation for successful translation into the clinical setting going forward. Level IV, systematic review of Level IV studies. Copyright © 2015 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Nerve growth factor improves ligament healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammoto, Takeo; Seerattan, Ruth A; Paulson, Kent D; Leonard, Catherine A; Bray, Robert C; Salo, Paul T

    2008-07-01

    Previous work has shown that innervation participates in normal ligament healing. The present study was performed to determine if exogenous nerve growth factor (NGF) would improve the healing of injured ligament by promoting reinnervation, blood flow, and angiogenesis. Two groups of 30 Sprague-Dawley rats underwent unilateral medial collateral ligament transection (MCL). One group was given 10 microg NGF and the other was given PBS via osmotic pump over 7 days after injury. After 7, 14, and 42 days, in vivo blood flow was measured using laser speckle perfusion imaging (LSPI). Morphologic assessments of nerve density, vascularity, and angiogenesis inhibitor production were done in three animals at each time point by immunohistochemical staining for the pan-neuronal marker PGP9.5, the endothelial marker vWF, and the angiogenesis inhibitor thrombospondin-2 (TSP-2). Ligament scar material and structural mechanical properties were assessed in seven rats at each time point. Increased nerve density was promoted by NGF at both 14 and 42 days. Exposure to NGF also led to increased ligament vascularity, as measured by histologic assessment of vWF immunohistochemistry, although LSPI-measured blood flow was not significantly different from controls. NGF treatment also led to decreased expression of TSP-2 at 14 days. Mechanical testing revealed that exposure to NGF increased failure load by 40%, ultimate tensile strength by 55%, and stiffness by 30% at 42 days. There were no detectable differences between groups in creep properties. The results suggest that local application of NGF can improve ligament healing by promoting both reinnervation and angiogenesis, and results in scars with enhanced mechanical properties.

  12. Injuries of the scapholunate ligament in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alt, Volker; Gasnier, Jacky; Sicre, Gérard

    2004-09-01

    Wrist arthroscopy was performed in three children (9, 11 and 12 years old) after persisting pain over the dorsal scapholunate region and revealed intraligamentous tear of the scapholunate ligament in two cases and its avulsion from the scaphoid border in one case. Open surgical repair of all lesions was performed after arthroscopy during the same session. After an average follow-up of 2.4 years all patients were pain free and resumed all sports activities. This study shows that different kind of injuries can occur to the scapholunate ligament in the skeletally immature carpus. Surgical repair leads to good results.

  13. Biological fixation in anterior cruciate ligament surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Hwa Chen

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Successful anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction with tendon graft requires extensive tendon-to-bone healing in the bone tunnels and progressive graft ligamentization for biological, structural, and functional recovery of the ACL. Improvement in graft-to-bone healing is crucial for facilitating early, aggressive rehabilitation after surgery to ensure an early return to pre-injury activity levels. The use of various biomaterials for enhancing the healing of tendon grafts in bone tunnels has been developed. With the biological enhancement of tendon-to-bone healing, biological fixation of the tendon graft in the tunnel can be achieved in ACL reconstruction.

  14. Avulsion fracture of the posterior cruciate ligament in an uncommon location associated with distal injury to the patellar ligament

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Pires e Albuquerque

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Avulsion fractures of the posterior cruciate ligament in unusual locations are rare injuries. We report the first case in the literature of an avulsion fracture of the posterior cruciate ligament associated with distal injury to the patellar ligament. The aim of this study was to present a novel case, the therapy used and the clinical follow-up.

  15. Evaluation and treatment of posterior cruciate ligament injuries: revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wind, William M; Bergfeld, John A; Parker, Richard D

    2004-01-01

    Current knowledge and treatment of posterior cruciate ligament injuries continue to lag behind that of anterior cruciate ligament injuries. This is the result of the relative infrequency of posterior cruciate ligament injuries and the lack of consensus with respect to its natural history, surgical indications, technique, and postoperative rehabilitation. Recent anatomical and biomechanical studies have improved our understanding of the posterior cruciate ligament in an attempt to reproduce its anatomy and function during reconstruction. The following is a comprehensive review on the evaluation and treatment of posterior cruciate ligament injuries with special focus on the current surgical techniques.

  16. Cruciate ligament loading during common knee rehabilitation exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escamilla, Rafael F; Macleod, Toran D; Wilk, Kevin E; Paulos, Lonnie; Andrews, James R

    2012-09-01

    Cruciate ligament injuries are common and may lead to dysfunction if not rehabilitated. Understanding how to progress anterior cruciate ligament and posterior cruciate ligament loading, early after injury or reconstruction, helps clinicians prescribe rehabilitation exercises in a safe manner to enhance recovery. Commonly prescribed therapeutic exercises include both weight-bearing exercise and non-weight-bearing exercise. This review was written to summarize and provide an update on the available literature on cruciate ligament loading during commonly used therapeutic exercises. In general, weight-bearing exercise produces smaller loads on the anterior cruciate ligament and posterior cruciate ligament compared with non-weight-bearing exercise. The anterior cruciate ligament is loaded less at higher knee angles (i.e. 50-100 degrees). Squatting and lunging with a more forward trunk tilt and moving the resistance pad proximally on the leg during the seated knee extension unloads the anterior cruciate ligament. The posterior cruciate ligament is less loaded at lower knee angles (i.e. 0-50 degrees), and may be progressed from level ground walking to a one-leg squat, lunges, wall squat, leg press, and the two-leg squat (from smallest to greatest). Exercise type and technique variation affect cruciate ligament loading, such that the clinician may prescribe therapeutic exercises to progress ligament loading safely, while ensuring optimal recovery of the musculoskeletal system.

  17. Revisiting the clinical anatomy of the alar ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osmotherly, Peter G; Rivett, Darren A; Mercer, Susan R

    2013-01-01

    The morphology of the alar ligaments has been inconsistently described, particularly with regard to the existence of an atlantal portion. Despite these inconsistencies, these descriptions have been used to develop physical tests for the integrity of these ligaments in patients with cervical spine problems. The purpose of this study was to describe the detailed macrostructure of the alar ligaments. The alar ligaments of 11 cervical spine specimens from embalmed adult cadavers were examined by fine dissection. A detailed description of the macrostructure of these ligaments and their attachment sites was recorded. Measurements were performed with respect to ligament dimensions and relations with selected bony landmarks. No atlantal portion of the alar ligament was viewed in any specimen. The attachment of the ligaments on the odontoid process occurred on its lateral and posterolateral aspects, frequently below the level of the apex. The occipital attachment was on the medial surface of the occipital condyles in close proximity to the atlanto-occipital joints. The orientation of the ligaments was primarily horizontal. The presence of transverse bands extending occiput to occiput with minimal or no attachment to the odontoid process was a common variant. The absence of findings with respect to the atlantal portion of the alar ligament suggests that it may be considered an anatomical variant, not an essential component for stability of the craniocervical complex. These findings may inform the use and interpretation of clinical tests for alar ligament integrity.

  18. The mechanical properties of the human hip capsule ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, John D; Glisson, Richard R; Guilak, Farshid; Vail, T Parker

    2002-01-01

    The human hip capsule is adapted to facilitate upright posture, joint stability, and ambulation, yet it routinely is excised in hip surgery without a full understanding of its mechanical contributions. The objective of this study was to provide information about the mechanical properties of the ligaments that form the hip capsule. Cadaver bone-ligament-bone specimens of the iliofemoral, ischiofemoral, and femoral arcuate ligaments were tested to failure in tension. The hip capsule was found to be an inhomogeneous structure and should be recognized as being composed of discrete constituent ligaments. The anterior ligaments, consisting of the 2 arms of the iliofemoral ligament, were much stronger than the posterior ischiofemoral ligament, withstanding greater force at failure and exhibiting greater stiffness. Knowledge of the anatomy and mechanical properties of the capsule may help the hip surgeon choose an appropriate surgical approach or repair strategy.

  19. [Posterior longitudinal ligament ossification: case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tella, Oswaldo Inácio de; Herculano, Marco Antonio; Paiva Neto, Manoel Antonio; Faedo Neto, Atílio; Crosera, João Francisco

    2006-03-01

    Posterior longitudinal ligament ossification of cervical spine is a rare condition among caucasians. A 42 years old japanese patient with progressive walking difficulty was diagnosed with this pathology by CT scan and MRI and treated surgically by an anterior approach with arthrodesis. Pathophysiology, racial prevalence, clinical picture, radiological characteristics and surgical approaches options are revised.

  20. Isolated unilateral rupture of the alar ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Sui-To; Ernest, Kimberly; Fan, Grace; Zovickian, John; Pang, Dachling

    2014-05-01

    Only 6 cases of isolated unilateral rupture of the alar ligament have been previously reported. The authors report a new case and review the literature, morbid anatomy, and pathogenesis of this rare injury. The patient in their case, a 9-year-old girl, fell head first from a height of 5 feet off the ground. She presented with neck pain, a leftward head tilt, and severe limitation of right rotation, extension, and right lateral flexion of the neck. Plain radiographs and CT revealed no fracture but a shift of the dens toward the right lateral mass of C-1. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine showed signal hyperintensity within the left dens-atlas space on both T1- and T2-weighted sequences and interruption of the expected dark signal representing the left alar ligament, suggestive of its rupture. After 12 weeks of immobilization in a Guilford brace, MRI showed lessened dens deviation, and the patient attained full and painless neck motion. Including the patient in this case, the 7 patients with this injury were between 5 and 21 years old, sustained the injury in traffic accidents or falls, presented with marked neck pain, and were treated with external immobilization. All patients had good clinical outcome. The mechanism of injury is hyperflexion with rotation. Isolated unilateral alar ligament rupture is a diagnosis made by excluding associated fracture, dislocation, or disruption of other major ligamentous structures in the craniovertebral junction. CT and MRI are essential in establishing the diagnosis. External immobilization is adequate treatment.

  1. Causes of anterior cruciate ligament injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ristić Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to prevent anterior cruciate ligament injuries it is necessary to define risk factors and to analyze the most frequent causes of injuries - that being the aim of this study. The study sample consisted of 451 surgically treated patients, including 400 sportsmen (65% of them being active and 35% recreational sportsmen, 29% female and 71% male; of whom 90% were younger than 35. Sports injuries, as the most frequent cause of anterior cruciate ligament injuries, were recorded in 88% of patients (non-contact ones in 78% and contact ones in 22%, injuries occurring in everyday activities in 11% and in traffic in 1%. Among sportsmen, reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament was most frequently performed in football players (48%, then in handball players (22%, basketball players (13%, volleyball players (8%, martial arts fighters (4%. However, the injury incidence was the highest among the active basketball players (1 injured among 91 active players. Type of footwear, warming up before the activity, genetic predisposition and everyday therapy did not have a significant influence on getting injured. Anterior cruciate ligament injuries happened three times more often during matches, in the middle and at the end of a match and training session (79%, at landing after the jump or when changing direction of movement (75% without a contact with other competitors, on dry surfaces (79%, among not so well prepared sportsmen.

  2. Treatment for acute anterior cruciate ligament tear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frobell, Richard B; Roos, Harald P; Roos, Ewa M

    2013-01-01

    To compare, in young active adults with an acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear, the mid-term (five year) patient reported and radiographic outcomes between those treated with rehabilitation plus early ACL reconstruction and those treated with rehabilitation and optional delayed ACL...

  3. Treatment for acute anterior cruciate ligament tear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frobell, Richard B; Roos, Harald P; Roos, Ewa M

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: In young active adults with an acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture, do patient reported or radiographic outcomes after five years differ between those treated with rehabilitation plus early ACL reconstruction and those treated with rehabilitation and optional delayed ACL...

  4. Guideline on anterior cruciate ligament injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meuffels, Duncan E; Poldervaart, Michelle T; Diercks, Ronald; Fievez, Alex W F M; Patt, Thomas W; Hart, Cor P van der; Hammacher, Eric R; Meer, Fred van der; Goedhart, Edwin A; Lenssen, Anton F; Muller-Ploeger, Sabrina B; Pols, Margreet A; Saris, Daniel B F

    2012-01-01

    The Dutch Orthopaedic Association has a long tradition of development of practical clinical guidelines. Here we present the recommendations from the multidisciplinary clinical guideline working group for anterior cruciate ligament injury. The following 8 clinical questions were formulated by a steer

  5. Novel Insights into Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.E. Meuffels (Duncan)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAnterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury is one of the most common sports injuries of the knee. ACL reconstruction has become, standard orthopaedic practice worldwide with an estimated 175,000 reconstructions per year in the United States.6 The ACL remains the most frequently studied liga

  6. Optimizing the reconstruction filter in cone-beam CT to improve periodontal ligament space visualization: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houno, Yuuki; Hishikawa, Toshimitsu; Gotoh, Ken-Ichi; Naitoh, Munetaka; Mitani, Akio; Noguchi, Toshihide; Ariji, Eiichiro; Kodera, Yoshie

    2017-09-01

    Evaluation of alveolar bone is important in the diagnosis of dental diseases. The periodontal ligament space is difficult to clearly depict in cone-beam computed tomography images because the reconstruction filter conditions during image processing cause image blurring, resulting in decreased spatial resolution. We examined different reconstruction filters to assess their ability to improve spatial resolution and allow for a clearer visualization of the periodontal ligament space. Cone-beam computed tomography projections of 2 skull phantoms were reconstructed using 6 reconstruction conditions and then compared using the Thurstone paired comparison method. Physical evaluations, including the modulation transfer function and the Wiener spectrum, as well as an assessment of space visibility, were undertaken using experimental phantoms. Image reconstruction using a modified Shepp-Logan filter resulted in better sensory, physical, and quantitative evaluations. The reconstruction conditions substantially improved the spatial resolution and visualization of the periodontal ligament space. The difference in sensitivity was obtained by altering the reconstruction filter. Modifying the characteristics of a reconstruction filter can generate significant improvement in assessments of the periodontal ligament space. A high-frequency enhancement filter improves the visualization of thin structures and will be useful when accurate assessment of the periodontal ligament space is necessary.

  7. Spray-painted human fibronectin coating as an effective strategy to enhance graft ligamentization of a polyethylene terephthalate artificial ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong; Chen, Chen; Ge, Yunsheng; Chen, Shiyi

    2014-05-01

    To enhance graft ligamentization after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, human fibronectin (FN) was coated on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) ligaments by spray painting. The FN-coated PET ligaments were investigated in vitro using rat mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). MSCs cultured on FN-coated grafts resulted in similar cell densities and amounts of proliferating cells with control grafts without coating. The FN-coated group not only gave rise to MSC-derived collagen-like tissues but also enhanced the expression of collagen-I gene. Furthermore, rat ACL reconstruction models were used to evaluate the effect of the FN coating in vivo. The FN coating significantly promoted new ligament tissue regeneration into the graft fibers. In conclusion, sprayed FN coating had a positive effect to enhance graft ligamentization of PET artificial ligament.

  8. The ligament augmentation device: an historical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, K; Maffulli, N

    1999-05-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury is the most common ligament injury in the knee, and a significant number of patients may develop progressive instability and disability despite aggressive rehabilitation. Various materials have been used for its reconstruction. These include autografts, allografts, prosthetic ligaments, and synthetic augmentation of the biological tissue. The concept of ligament augmentation device (LAD) arose from the observation that biological grafts undergo a phase of degeneration and loss of strength before being incorporated. The LAD is meant to protect the biological graft during this vulnerable phase. However, it provokes an inflammatory reaction in the knee, and has been found to delay maturation of autogenous graft in humans. In experimental situations, the LAD has been found to share loads in a composite graft. It has also been found to be substantially stronger than the biological graft. However, in clinical situations no significant advantages have been observed with the use of LAD to augment patellar tendon or hamstring reconstruction of the chronic ACL-deficient knee or in the acute setting to augment repair of the torn ACL. There are very few reports of the use of LAD in reconstruction of the posterior cruciate ligament, and again these do not suggest any advantage in its use. Insertion of the LAD implies the introduction of a foreign material into the knee, has been associated with complications such as reactive synovitis and effusions, and may also be associated with an increased risk of infection. At present, there is no evidence that its routine use should be advocated in uncomplicated reconstructions of the ACL using biological grafts.

  9. Falciform ligament abscess from left sided portal pyaemia following malignant obstructive cholangitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warren Leigh R

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Abscess formation of the falciform ligament is incredibly rare and perplexing when encountered for the first time. It is reported to occur in the setting of cholecystitis and cholangitis, but the pathophysiology is poorly understood. In this case report, we present a 73-year-old man with falciform ligament abscess following cholangitis from an obstructive ampullary carcinoma. The patient was referred to the Royal Adelaide Hospital from a country hospital, with progressive jaundice, anorexia and nausea. Prior to transfer, he deteriorated with cholangitis, dehydration and renal failure. On arrival, his abdomen was exquisitely tender along the course of the falciform ligament. His blood tests revealed an elevated white cell count of 14.9 x 103/μl, bilirubin of 291μmol/l and creatinine of 347 μmol/l. His CA 19-9 was markedly elevated at 35,000 kU/l. A non-contrast computed tomography (CT demonstrated gross biliary dilatation and a collection tracking along the path of the falciform ligament to the umbilicus. The patient was commenced on intravenous antibiotics and underwent an urgent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatogram (ERCP with sphincterotomy and biliary stent drainage. Cholangiogram revealed a grossly dilated biliary tree, with abrupt transition at the ampulla, which on biopsy confirmed an obstructing ampullary carcinoma. Following ERCP, his jaundice and abdominal tenderness resolved. He was optimized over 4 weeks for an elective pancreaticoduodenectomy. At operation, we found abscess transformation of the falciform ligament. Copious amounts of pus and necrotic material was drained. Part of the round ligament was resected along the undersurface of the liver. Histology showed that there was prominent histiocytic inflammation with granular acellular eosinophilic components. The patient recovered slowly but uneventfully. A contrast CT scan undertaken 2 weeks post-operatively (approximately 7 weeks after the initial CT revealed

  10. Regional material properties of the human hip joint capsule ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, J; Guilak, F; Glisson, R; Vail, T P

    2001-05-01

    The hip joint capsule functions to constrain translation between the femur and acetabulum while allowing rotational and planar movements. Despite the crucial role it plays in the pathogenesis of hip instability, little is known about its biomechanical properties. The goal of this study was to determine the regional material properties of the iliofemoral and ischiofemoral ligaments of the capsule. Ten human cadaveric specimens of each ligament were tested to failure in tension. The stress at failure, strain at failure, strain energy density at failure, toe- and linear-region elastic moduli, and the Poisson's ratio were measured for each ligament. The strain to failure was greatest in the ischiofemoral ligament, while no significant difference was noted in failure stress by region or ligament. The Young's moduli of elasticity ranged from 76.1 to 285.8 MPa among the different ligaments, and were generally consistent with properties previously reported for the shoulder capsule. The elastic moduli and strain energy density at failure differed by region. No significant differences in Poisson's ratio were found by region or ligament. The average Poisson's ratio was approximately 1.4, consistent with anisotropic behavior of ligamentous tissues. Understanding the material properties of the hip capsule may help the orthopaedic surgeon better understand normal ligament function, and thereby choose a surgical approach or strategy of repair. Furthermore, knowledge of the normal mechanical function of the hip capsule ligaments could assist in the evaluation of the success of a repair.

  11. Neck ligament strength is decreased following whiplash trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubin Wolfgang

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous clinical studies have documented successful neck pain relief in whiplash patients using nerve block and radiofrequency ablation of facet joint afferents, including capsular ligament nerves. No previous study has documented injuries to the neck ligaments as determined by altered dynamic mechanical properties due to whiplash. The goal of the present study was to determine the dynamic mechanical properties of whiplash-exposed human cervical spine ligaments. Additionally, the present data were compared to previously reported control data. The ligaments included the anterior and posterior longitudinal, capsular, and interspinous and supraspinous ligaments, middle-third disc, and ligamentum flavum. Methods A total of 98 bone-ligament-bone specimens (C2–C3 to C7-T1 were prepared from six cervical spines following 3.5, 5, 6.5, and 8 g rear impacts and pre- and post-impact flexibility testing. The specimens were elongated to failure at a peak rate of 725 (SD 95 mm/s. Failure force, elongation, and energy absorbed, as well as stiffness were determined. The mechanical properties were statistically compared among ligaments, and to the control data (significance level: P Results For all whiplash-exposed ligaments, the average failure elongation exceeded the average physiological elongation. The highest average failure force of 204.6 N was observed in the ligamentum flavum, significantly greater than in middle-third disc and interspinous and supraspinous ligaments. The highest average failure elongation of 4.9 mm was observed in the interspinous and supraspinous ligaments, significantly greater than in the anterior longitudinal ligament, middle-third disc, and ligamentum flavum. The average energy absorbed ranged from 0.04 J by the middle-third disc to 0.44 J by the capsular ligament. The ligamentum flavum was the stiffest ligament, while the interspinous and supraspinous ligaments were most flexible. The whiplash

  12. CARTILAGE-LIKE PHENOMENON IN THE ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To detect histological characteristic of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and medial collateral ligament (MCL). Methods. In each of 20 skeletally mature male mongrels and 4 men, the ACL and MCL were examined by standard hematoxylin-eosin procedure and toluidine blue staining for histologic observation. Results. The fibroblasts in medial collateral are elongated to spindle shape and aligned in a row between the bundles of collagenous fibers. Toluidine blue staining is negative. The anterior cruciate ligament demonstrated more heterogenous cell types and arrangement. It had three major cell forms:spindle, round and ovoid type, which were shorter but greater than the cells in medial collateral ligament. Toluidine blue staining was positive in anterior cruciate ligament. Most cells in anterior cruciate ligament were enclosed within lacunae. Conclusion. This study suggests that the ACL has different histological characteristics from MCL, and is more cartilage-like in nature.

  13. CARTILAGE-LIKE PHENOMENON IN THE ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋青; 林共周; 典绵域; 崔国庆; 滕华建

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To detect histological characteristic of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and medial collateral ligament (MCL). Methods. In each of 20 skeletally mature male mongrels and 4 men, the ACL and MCL were examined by standard hematoxylin-eosin procedure and toluidine blue staining for histologic observation. Results. The fibroblasts in medial collateral are elongated to spindle shape and aligned in a row between the bundles of collagenous fibers. Toluidine blue staining is negative. The anterior cruciate ligament demonstrated more heterogenous cell types and arrangement. It had three major cell forms: spindle, round and ovoid type,which were shorter but greater than the cells in medial collateral ligament. Toluidine blue staining was positive in anterior cruciate ligament. Most cells in anterior cruciate ligament were enclosed within lacunae. Conclusion. This study suggests that the ACL has different histological characteristics from MCL, and is more cartilage-like in nature.

  14. Essentials of anterior cruciate ligament rupture management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinge, Stephen A; Sawyer, Gregory A; Hulstyn, Michael J

    2013-05-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture is a common knee injury and an understanding of current medical knowledge regarding its management is essential. Accurate and prompt diagnosis requires an awareness of injury mechanisms and risk factors, common symptoms and physical/radiologic findings. Early mobilization and physical therapy improves outcomes regardless of treatment modality. Many older patients regain sufficient stability and function after non-operative rehabilitation. Early ACL reconstruction is appropriate for younger patients and those who engage in activities requiring frequent pivoting and rapid direction changes. ACL surgery involves reconstruction of the torn ligament tissue with various replacement graft options, each with advantages and disadvantages. The guidance of a knowledgeable and experienced therapist is required throughout an intensive and prolonged rehabilitation course. Generally excellent outcomes and low complication rates are expected, but treatment does not prevent late osteoarthritis.

  15. Ulnar nerve entrapment by anconeus epitrochlearis ligament.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tiong, William H C

    2012-01-01

    Ulnar nerve entrapment at the elbow is the second most common upper limb entrapment neuropathy other than carpal tunnel syndrome. There have been many causes identified ranging from chronic aging joint changes to inflammatory conditions or systemic disorders. Among them, uncommon anatomical variants accounts for a small number of cases. Here, we report our experience in managing ulnar nerve entrapment caused by a rare vestigial structure, anconeus epitrochlearis ligament, and provide a brief review of the literature of its management.

  16. Guideline on anterior cruciate ligament injury

    OpenAIRE

    Meuffels, Duncan; Poldervaart, Michelle T.; Diercks, Ron L; Fievez, Alex W.F.M.; Patt, Thomas W.; van der Hart, Cor P.; Hammacher, Eric; van der Meer, Fred; Goedhart, Edwin A; Lenssen, Anton F; Muller-Ploeger, Sabrina B; Pols, Margreet; Saris, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe Dutch Orthopaedic Association has a long tradition of development of practical clinical guidelines. Here we present the recommendations from the multidisciplinary clinical guideline working group for anterior cruciate ligament injury. The following 8 clinical questions were formulated by a steering group of the Dutch Orthopaedic Association. • What is the role of physical examination and additional diagnostic tools? • Which patient-related outcome measures should be used? • Wh...

  17. Validation of Cooper's ligament thickness in software breast phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuperavage, Adam J.; Imran, Abdullah-Al-Zubaer; Bakic, Predrag R.; Maidment, Andrew; Pokrajac, David D.

    2017-03-01

    Anthropomorphic breast phantoms are important tools for a wide range of tasks including pre-clinical validation of novel imaging techniques. In order to improve the realism in the phantoms, assessment of simulated anatomical structures is crucial. Thickness of simulated Cooper's ligaments influences the percentage of dense tissue, as well as qualitative and quantitative properties of simulated images. We introduce three methods (2-dimensional watershed, 3-dimensional watershed, and facet counting) to assess the thickness of the simulated Cooper's ligaments in the breast phantoms. For the validation of simulated phantoms, the thickness of ligaments has been measured and compared with the input thickness values. These included a total of 64 phantoms with nominal ligament thicknesses of 200, 400, 600, and 800 μm. The 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional watershed transformations were performed to obtain the median skeleton of the ligaments. In the 2-dimensional watershed, the median skeleton was found cross-section by cross-section, while the skeleton was found for the entire 3-dimensional space in the 3-dimensional watershed. The thickness was calculated by taking the ratio of the total volume of ligaments and the volume of median skeleton. In the facet counting method, the ligament thickness was estimated as a ratio between estimated ligaments' volume and average ligaments' surface area. We demonstrated that the 2-dimensional watershed technique overestimates the ligament thickness. Good agreement was found between the facet counting technique and the 3-dimensional watershed for assessing thickness. The proposed techniques are applicable for ligaments' thickness estimation on clinical breast images, provided segmentation of Cooper's ligaments has been performed.

  18. Anterior Cruciate Ligament OsteoArthritis Score (ACLOAS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roemer, Frank W; Frobell, Richard; Lohmander, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop a whole joint scoring system, the Anterior Cruciate Ligament OsteoArthritis Score (ACLOAS), for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based assessment of acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and follow-up of structural sequelae, and to assess its reliability. DESIGN...... and longitudinal changes including osteoarthritis (OA) features. Joint features assessed were acute osteochondral injury, traumatic and degenerative bone marrow lesions (BMLs), meniscus morphology and extrusion, osteophytes, collateral and cruciate ligaments including ACL graft, Hoffa-synovitis and effusion...

  19. Double bundle posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: surgical technique and results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanelli, Gregory C; Beck, John D; Edson, Craig J

    2010-12-01

    The keys to successful posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction are to identify and treat all pathology, use strong graft material, accurately place tunnels in anatomic insertion sites, minimize graft bending, use a mechanical graft tensioning device, use primary and back-up graft fixation, and use the appropriate postoperative rehabilitation program. Adherence to these technical principles results in successful single and double-bundle arthroscopic transtibial tunnel posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction based upon stress radiography, arthrometer, knee ligament rating scales, and patient satisfaction measurements.

  20. The spatiotemporal development of innervation in spinal ligaments of chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, H; Moreau, M; Greidanus, N; Bilo, J; Russell, G; Raso, J; Bagnall, K

    1996-08-01

    The development of the innervation of both central and lateral (intertransverse) spinal ligaments was investigated in chickens between the time of hatching and 13 wk of age. A total of 36 White Leghorn chickens in 4 groups of 9 at ages 0, 2, 7, and 13 wk were used. The spinal ligaments were dissected, serially sectioned and labelled with a monoclonal antibody against neurofilament protein and observed using either conventional fluorescence or confocal microscopy. Only a few nerve elements were found in the ligaments at hatching and these consisted simply of single nerve fibres and small nerve bundles. The number of nerve elements increased rapidly up to 7 wk of age when large nerve bundles and Ruffini corpuscles were also found. The number of nerve elements decreased between 7 and 13 wk birds when the ligaments had begun to ossify and the amount of collagenous ligamentous tissue was significantly reduced. The fluctuation in numbers of neural elements was due to changes in numbers of single nerve fibres and small nerve bundles rather than large nerve bundles and Ruffini corpuscles which remained constant. In contrast to this significant increase in numbers of nerve elements, the innervation density of the ligaments decreased because of the overwhelming increase of the ligament volume due to growth. There were no differences between ligaments on the left and right sides of the body, but there was an unequal distribution of the neural elements within the ligaments; most were found in the cranial third of the intertransverse ligaments. These results show that significant changes in innervation of spinal ligaments occur during development and reflect the possibility that damage to the ligaments during this time could produce significant and permanent damage, especially in relation to the maintenance of an erect spine.

  1. Review of common conditions associated with periodontal ligament widening

    OpenAIRE

    Mortazavi, Hamed; Baharvand, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this article is to review a group of lesions associated with periodontal ligament (PDL) widening. Materials and Methods An electronic search was performed using specialized databases such as Google Scholar, PubMed, PubMed Central, Science Direct, and Scopus to find relevant studies by using keywords such as “periodontium”, “periodontal ligament”, “periodontal ligament space”, “widened periodontal ligament”, and “periodontal ligament widening”. Results Out of nearly 200 arti...

  2. Anterior cruciate ligament ganglion: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Pedrinelli

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: A ganglion is a cystic formation close to joints or tendinous sheaths, frequently found in the wrist, foot or knee. Intra-articular ganglia of the knee are rare, and most of them are located in the anterior cruciate ligament. The clinical picture for these ganglia comprises pain and movement restrictions in the knee, causing significant impairment to the patient. Symptoms are non-specific, and anterior cruciate ligament ganglia are usually diagnosed through magnetic resonance imaging or arthroscopy. Not all ganglia diagnosed through magnetic resonance imaging need to undergo surgical treatment: only those that cause clinical signs and symptoms do. Surgical results are considered good or excellent in the vast majority of cases. CASE REPORT: A 29-year-old male presented with pain in the left knee during a marathon race. Physical examination revealed limitation in the maximum range of knee extension and pain in the posterior aspect of the left knee. Radiographs of the left knee were normal, but magnetic resonance imaging revealed a multi-lobed cystic structure adjacent to the anterior cruciate ligament, which resembled a ganglion cyst. The mass was removed through arthroscopy, and pathological examination revealed a synovial cyst. Patient recovery was excellent, and he resumed his usual training routine five months later.

  3. Roentgenologic diagnostics of capsular ligament lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirth, C.J.; Jaeger, M.

    1981-10-01

    The X-ray diagnostic is of obvious importance and relevance in the detection of acute or old capsular ligament lesions of the limb joint. On the one hand it serves as the plain radiograph (roentgenogram without contrast medium) for the assessment of osseous secondary lesions, for the documentation of luxationary positions of the joint partners, and in old capsular ligament lesions for the detection of an already existing arthrosis. On the other hand the X-ray images are of main importance, which are made from the hand-held limb in order to permit a comparison of the two sides, and which beyond the clinical detection of a joint instability indicate the extent and the direction of this instability and which also document it, and which allow in adolescents to recognize a separation of the epiphysis as an alternative to the capsular ligament rupture. Only in particular cases arthrography can provide some additional information, so for example in the case of an isolated syndesmosis rupture, ruptures of the rosette of the rotator muscle or of a damaged triangular disk in the hand. Angiography is only required in cases of traumatic luxations of the knee in order to exclude an intimal lesion of the popliteal artery.

  4. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using the bone-posterior cruciate ligament-bone allograft

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIAO Chen; AO Ying-fang; LIU Ping; XIE Xing; LIU Chen; MA Yong

    2013-01-01

    Background AIIografts were widely used in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction for patients with ACL rupture of the knee.This study was to approve the feasibility of bone-posterior cruciate ligament-bone (BPCLB) allograft transplantation in ACL reconstruction.Methods Eight patients underwent ACL reconstructions with BPCLB allografts and were followed up for an average period of 32 months after operation.Results Subjective parameters including Intemational Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC),modified Larson knee ligament,Lysholm,and Tegner rating scales were much improved and side to side KT-2000 arthrometer difference was much less postoperatively.Pivot shift test was negative in all patients.The reconstructed ACL had satisfactory shape and tension.Conclusions BPCLB allograft is an optional choice forACL reconstruction.

  5. Posttraumatic incarceration of medial collateral ligament into knee joint with anterior cruciate ligament injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sunil Gurpur Kini; Karel du Pre; Warwick Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Medial collateral ligament of the knee is an important coronal stabiliser and often injured in isolation or as combination of injuries.The article reports a case of incarcerated medial collateral ligament (MCL) injury in combination with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury in 20 year old male who presented to us 4 weeks after injury.Clinical examination and MRI was correlated to complete ACL tear with torn distal MCL and incarceration into the joint.Patient was taken up for ACL hamstring graft reconstruction with mini-arthrotomy and repair of the torn MCL.Patient was followed up with dedicated rehabilitation protocol with good functional results.At one year follow-up, patient exhibited full range of motion with negative Lachman, Pivot shift and valgus stress tests.This article highlights the rare pattern of MCL tear and also reviews the literature on this pattern of injury.

  6. Photonic crystal type structure in bivalve ligament of Pinctada maxima

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG GangSheng

    2007-01-01

    The dry ligament of Pinctada maxima normally appears black; however, it can exhibit striking blue structural colors after being wetted by water. The field-mission SEM investigation shows that the ligament is made of lamellae, which, about 35 μm thick, are made of proteins and aragonite fibers of about 78 nm in diameter. In each single lamella, the fibers are highly aligned characterized by a 2D photonic crystal type structure. According to measured reflective spectra and theoretical simulations, the dry and wet ligaments possess photonic stop band at ultraviolet and blue wavelengths, respectively, which are responsible for structural colorations of ligament.

  7. Cruciate ligament reconstruction using LARS artificial ligament under arthroscopy: 81 cases report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Jian-ming; WANG Qian; SHEN Feng; WANG Zi-min; KANG Yi-fan

    2010-01-01

    Background There are many different materials used for ligament reconstruction. Currently, autograft, allograft, and artificial ligaments are used in the reconstruction. The objective of this study was to explore the clinical result of cruciate ligament reconstruction under arthroscopy.Methods Eighty-one cases were reconstructed with the LARS ligament under arthroscopy, including 43 cases of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, 20 cases of posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injury, and 18 cases of ACL combined with PCL injuries of the knee. The follow up period was 10 to 49 months. The International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) and Lysholm knee score scales were used for functional evaluation. We examined the anterior and posterior stability of the knee with KT-1000.Results According to the Lysholm knee function score scale, the average preoperative score of (44.6±1.4) increased to a postoperative score of (82.8±2.5) in the ACL group and from (46.6±2.3) to (80.8±2.0) in the PCL group. In the ACL combined with PCL injury group, the preoperative score increased from (45.2±1.2) to (85.5±2.3). According to IKDC score standards, in ACL group we evaluated 19 cases as C and 24 cases as D, preoperatively, and postoperatively 27 cases as A, 14 cases as B and two cases as C. In the preoperative PCL group, we had 11 cases defined as C and nine cases as D that resolved to 12 cases as A, seven as B and one case of C in postoperative evaluation. In the ACL combined with PCL injury group we defined four cases as C and 14 as D during preoperative scoring. These patients had postoperative grades of six cases as A, 10 as B, and two cases as C. All of the results have statistical significance. Conclusions ACL, PCL, or combined ACL and PCL reconstruction using the LARS ligament under arthroscopy is a minimally invasive, safe and effective method to treat cruciate ligament injuries of the knee. Clinical results are satisfactory in the short term.

  8. Reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament and anterolateral ligament using interlinked hamstrings - technical note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Marcio de Castro; Zidan, Flavio Ferreira; Miduati, Francini Belluci; Fortuna, Caio Cesar; Mizutani, Bruno Moreira; Abdalla, Rene Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Recent anatomical and biomechanical studies on the anterolateral ligament (ALL) of the knee have shown that this structure has an important function in relation to joint stability, especially when associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. However, the criteria for its reconstruction have not yet been fully established and the surgical techniques that have been described present variations regarding anatomical points and fixation materials. This study presents a reproducible technique for ALL and ACL reconstruction using hamstring tendons, in which three interference screws are used for fixation.

  9. The name cranial ovarian suspensory ligaments in mammalian anatomy should be used only to indicate the structures derived from the foetal cranial mesonephric and gonadal ligaments

    OpenAIRE

    van der Schoot, P.

    1993-01-01

    textabstractThe term ovarian suspensory ligament appears ambiguous when human adult anatomy textbooks are compared with human embryology or with general mammalian anatomy textbooks. The term ovarian suspensory ligament in laboratory rodents and domestic animals indicates homologous structures during foetal (the cranial mesonephric and gonadal ligaments) and later life (the cranial mesonephric ligament derivatives). In human foetal anatomy textbooks ovarian suspensory ligament is generally app...

  10. Successful treatment of combined vaginal and broad ligament hematoma using pelvic pressure pack and arterial embolization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Runmei; Lao Terence T; Feng Yukun; Zhao Wei; Huang Jianqiang; Liang GuoHua; Li Hongyu; Chen Zhuo

    2005-01-01

    Objective:To assess using the pelvic pressure pack as temporizing treatment for combined vaginal and broad ligament hematoma before selective arterial embolization could be undertaken.Methods:A 29-year-old woman was transferred because of a 10cm right upper vaginal hematoma found shortly after the spontaneous delivery of a 3400g infant at term.Following evacuation of the clots,the patient's condition deteriorated with the appearance of a painful right pelvic mass,displacing the uterus.At laparotomy,the hematoma extended between the folds of the broad ligament into the pelvic sidewall.After evacuation of the clots,hemostasis failed despite subtotal hysterectomy.Eventually a pressure pack created from joined gauze rolls was used to fill up the pelvic cavity and achieved hemostasis before abdominal closure.When the vaginal pack was removed 30 hours later,vaginal bleeding recurred,and bilateral hypogastric embolization was performed with Gianturco coils.Results:The patient was successfully treated by this way and discharged uneventfully.Conclusion:In combined vaginal and broad ligament hematoma,pelvic pressure pack can be used to ensure maternal survival until definitive treatment with angiographic embolization.

  11. Controlled Bioactive Molecules Delivery Strategies for Tendon and Ligament Tissue Engineering using Polymeric Nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiong Teh, Thomas Kok; Hong Goh, James Cho; Toh, Siew Lok

    2015-01-01

    The interest in polymeric nanofibers has escalated over the past decade given its promise as tissue engineering scaffolds that can mimic the nanoscale structure of the native extracellular matrix. With functionalization of the polymeric nanofibers using bioactive molecules, localized signaling moieties can be established for the attached cells, to stimulate desired biological effects and direct cellular or tissue response. The inherently high surface area per unit mass of polymeric nanofibers can enhance cell adhesion, bioactive molecules loading and release efficiencies, and mass transfer properties. In this review article, the application of polymeric nanofibers for controlled bioactive molecules delivery will be discussed, with a focus on tendon and ligament tissue engineering. Various polymeric materials of different mechanical and degradation properties will be presented along with the nanofiber fabrication techniques explored. The bioactive molecules of interest for tendon and ligament tissue engineering, including growth factors and small molecules, will also be reviewed and compared in terms of their nanofiber incorporation strategies and release profiles. This article will also highlight and compare various innovative strategies to control the release of bioactive molecules spatiotemporally and explore an emerging tissue engineering strategy involving controlled multiple bioactive molecules sequential release. Finally, the review article concludes with challenges and future trends in the innovation and development of bioactive molecules delivery using polymeric nanofibers for tendon and ligament tissue engineering.

  12. The normal anterior cruciate ligament as a model for tensioning strategies in anterior cruciate ligament grafts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnold, MP; Verdonschot, N; van Kampen, A

    2005-01-01

    Background: There is some confusion about the relationship between the tension placed on the graft and the joint position used in the fixation of anterior cruciate ligament grafts. This is because of deficiency in accurate basic science about this important interaction in the normal and reconstructe

  13. The normal anterior cruciate ligament as a model for tensioning strategies in anterior cruciate ligament grafts.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnold, M.P.; Verdonschot, N.J.J.; Kampen, A. van

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is some confusion about the relationship between the tension placed on the graft and the joint position used in the fixation of anterior cruciate ligament grafts. This is because of deficiency in accurate basic science about this important interaction in the normal and reconstructe

  14. Reconstruction of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament : Alternative Strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eijk, F.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis describes the long-term results of reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament with an allograft. Due to the poor results found, further studies were performed to investigate alternative strategies for reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament in the field of tissue engineeri

  15. Stiffness of the healing medial collateral ligament of the mouse.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijssen, Y.; Sierevelt, I.N.; Kooloos, J.G.M.; Blankevoort, L.

    2004-01-01

    The knee joints of mice can serve as a model for studying knee ligament properties. The goal of our study was to measure the structural stiffness of the medial collateral ligament (MCL) of the murine knee. A tensile test was developed for this purpose. First 84 femur-MCL-tibia complexes of

  16. Anterior cruciate ligament: 3-D fiber anatomy, fluorescence arthroscopy & healing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, D.T.

    2015-01-01

    One of the current emphases in optimizing anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructions is closer mimicking the anatomy of the ACL. The aim of Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 is to develop and validate a methodology to quantify the 3-D collagen fiber orientation of ligaments, accurately and at a high res

  17. Comparative histology of mouse, rat, and human pelvic ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanaga, Ritsuko; Orlicky, David J; Arnett, Jameson; Guess, Marsha K; Hurt, K Joseph; Connell, Kathleen A

    2016-11-01

    The uterosacral (USL) and cardinal ligaments (CL) provide support to the uterus and pelvic organs, and the round ligaments (RL) maintain their position in the pelvis. In women with pelvic organ prolapse (POP), the connective tissue, smooth muscle, vasculature, and innervation of the pelvic support structures are altered. Rodents are commonly used animal models for POP research. However, the pelvic ligaments have not been defined in these animals. In this study, we hypothesized that the gross anatomy and histological composition of pelvic ligaments in rodents and humans are similar. We performed an extensive literature search for anatomical and histological descriptions of the pelvic support ligaments in rodents. We also performed anatomical dissections of the pelvis to define anatomical landmarks in relation to the ligaments. In addition, we identified the histological components of the pelvic ligaments and performed quantitative analysis of the smooth muscle bundles and connective tissue of the USL and RL. The anatomy of the USL, CL, and RL and their anatomical landmarks are similar in mice, rats, and humans. All species contain the same cellular components and have similar histological architecture. However, the cervical portion of the mouse USL and RL contain more smooth muscle and less connective tissue compared with rat and human ligaments. The pelvic support structures of rats and mice are anatomically and histologically similar to those of humans. We propose that both mice and rats are appropriate, cost-effective models for directed studies in POP research.

  18. Features extraction in anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarychta, P

    2015-12-01

    The main aim of this research is finding the feature vectors of the anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments (ACL and PCL). These feature vectors have to clearly define the ligaments structure and make it easier to diagnose them. Extraction of feature vectors is obtained by analysis of both anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments. This procedure is performed after the extraction process of both ligaments. In the first stage in order to reduce the area of analysis a region of interest including cruciate ligaments (CL) is outlined in order to reduce the area of analysis. In this case, the fuzzy C-means algorithm with median modification helping to reduce blurred edges has been implemented. After finding the region of interest (ROI), the fuzzy connectedness procedure is performed. This procedure permits to extract the anterior and posterior cruciate ligament structures. In the last stage, on the basis of the extracted anterior and posterior cruciate ligament structures, 3-dimensional models of the anterior and posterior cruciate ligament are built and the feature vectors created. This methodology has been implemented in MATLAB and tested on clinical T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) slices of the knee joint. The 3D display is based on the Visualization Toolkit (VTK).

  19. Bilateral agenesis of the anterior cruciate ligament: MRI evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bedoya, Maria A.; Jaramillo, Diego [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Radiology Department, Philadelphia, PA (United States); McGraw, Michael H. [Hospitalof theUniversityof Pennsylvania, Divisionof Orthopaedics, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Wells, Lawrence [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Division of Orthopaedics, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Bilateral agenesis of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is extremely rare. We describe a 13-year-old girl who presented with bilateral knee pain without history of trauma; she has two family members with knee instability. Magnetic resonance imaging showed bilateral absence of the ACL, and medial posterior horn meniscal tears. Bilateral arthroscopic partial meniscectomy and anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction was performed. (orig.)

  20. Characterization and role of the immune response during ligament healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Connie S.

    Scar formation of ligaments after rupture remains a great challenge. Ligament healing involves a complex, coordinated series of events that form a neo-ligament, which is more disorganized and fibrotic in character than the native tissue. The repair process may extend from months to years, and the injured ligament never fully recovers its original mechanical properties. With little intrinsic healing potential, ruptures of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are usually reconstructed. The "healed" tissues, however, do not regenerate native tissues or recapitulate their mechanical function. ACL grafts often lengthen (incidents range from 40-100%) and their strength can drop by ˜50% after remodeling. Reconstructed knees are often less stable and fail to restore normal joint kinematics. Our overall goal is to improve healing, making ligaments more regenerative. The first 2 studies characterized ligament healing in a spatial and temporal manner over 28 days. The experiments demonstrated creeping substitution and the potential role of the immune system to control the repair and/or regenerative process. From these studies, macrophages were identified as significant players during healing. Macrophages paralleled creeping substitution, were abundant within the healing ligament, and potentially played a destructive role via matrix phagocytosis. The role of macrophages during early ligament healing was then evaluated using liposome-encapsulated clodronate to inhibit phagocytosing macrophages. Clodronate attenuated the early infiltration of macrophages, resulting in delayed structural and functional healing. Macrophage re-infiltration into the wound resulted in continued ligament healing. These results suggested that early inhibition of phagocytosing macrophages is detrimental to ligament healing. The final experiment evaluated the effects of interleukin-4 on ligament healing. Interleukin-4 (IL-4) is reported to stimulate the Th2 lymphocyte/M2 macrophage pathway, reducing

  1. Infections after reconstructions of anterior cruciate ligament

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ristić Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Infections after anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions are rare, but, on the other hand, they are difficult to be treated. The aim of this study was to analyze causes of infections, risk factors, diagnostics, and possibilities of their prevention. Material and Methods. Seventeen deep infections (1.2% were found in 1425 patients who had undergone anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions. Fifteen patients were males and two were females. Out of 475 professional athletes nine (1.9% had this postoperative complication. Eleven patients with septic arthritis were allergic to penicillin. Three of them had immunosuppressive diseases. Results. Staphylococcus aureus was isolated in eleven cases (65%, other Staphylococcus and Streptococcus groups were found in four and three patients, respectively; while one patient had infection although the punctate was negative. Out of 965 patients with the patellar tendon grafts, ten (1.03% had this complication, while the incidence was 1.52% (7/460 in those with the hamstring grafts. Fifteen infections were acute with obvious symptoms within 14 days after surgery. Severe pain, limited range of motion, swelling of the knee joint and fever were the most common symptoms, while rubor and pus developed rarely. The infection was three times more frequent in the patients who had undergone surgery lasting more than 1.5 hour. Discussion and Conclusion. The following population groups are at risk of developing septic arthritis after anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions: professional athletes, those who are allergic to penicillin, and those with immunosuppressive diseases. Staphyllococus aureus is the most common cause of infection. The patients with the hamstring autografts have a higher risk than those with the patellar tendon grafts. Preventive measures that should be performed include aseptic conditions in operative rooms, irrigation of the graft before its placement into the bone tunnels

  2. [Injuries of the alar ligaments in children and adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briem, D; Linhart, W; Dickmann, C; Rueger, J M

    2002-06-01

    Cervical spine trauma most commonly involves the lower parts in adults. In children lesions of the cervical spine can predominantly be found in the region of C1/C2 including ligament injuries at this level. However such injuries are difficult to detect and only few data are available concerning therapy and prognosis of atlantoxial ligament lesions. We report on two children suffering from isolated rupture of the alar ligaments. Both injuries were proven by magnetic resonance imaging which is recommended as the resource of choice for the evaluation of the cervical spine soft tissues in children. Although the biomechanic properties of the alar ligaments remain unclear non-operative treatment for the rupture of these ligaments seems to be adequate. In order to avoid neurologic symptoms or long term complications an immediate diagnosis is indispensable.

  3. Tunnel widening in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clatworthy, M G; Annear, P; Bulow, J U

    1999-01-01

    .1% in the patella tendon group (P = film measurements. Tunnel widening did not correlate with the clinical findings, knee scores, KT-1000 or isokinetic muscle strength. Tunnel widening is marked in the hamstring group. Tunnel widening does not correlate with instability......We report a prospective series evaluating the incidence and degree of tunnel widening in a well-matched series of patients receiving a hamstring or patella tendon graft for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) deficiency. We correlated tunnel widening with clinical factors, knee scores, KT-1000...

  4. Tissue engineering of ligaments : A comparison of bone marrow stromal cells, anterior cruciate ligament, and skin fibroblasts as cell source

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Eijk, F; Riesle, J; Willems, WJ; Van Blitterswijk, CA; Verbout, AJ; Dhert, WJA

    2004-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgery still has important problems to overcome, such as "donor site morbidity" and the limited choice of grafts in revision surgery. Tissue engineering of ligaments may provide a solution for these problems. Little is known about the optimal cell sou

  5. Tissue engineering of ligaments : A comparison of bone marrow stromal cells, anterior cruciate ligament, and skin fibroblasts as cell source

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Eijk, F; Riesle, J; Willems, WJ; Van Blitterswijk, CA; Verbout, AJ; Dhert, WJA

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgery still has important problems to overcome, such as "donor site morbidity" and the limited choice of grafts in revision surgery. Tissue engineering of ligaments may provide a solution for these problems. Little is known about the optimal cell

  6. MRI of anterior cruciate ligament autografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogi, Shigeyuki; Ariizumi, Mitsuko; Yamagishi, Tsuneo [The Aoyama Tokyo Metropolitan office' s Hospital (Japan); Agata, Toshihiko; Tada, Shinpei; Fukuda, Kunihiko

    2000-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the usefulness of MRI in the evaluation of autografts after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The subjects were 110 patients with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using patellar tendon autografts who underwent clinical examination, MRI, and arthroscopy of the knee. T1- and T2-weighted MR images were obtained in sagittal plane. Clinical findings were categorized into three groups: normal, borderline, and abnormal. The MRI appearances of the autografts were categorized into three types: straight continuous band (type I), interrupted band (type II) and generalized increased intensity band (type III). The clinical findings and MRI findings were compared with arthroscopic findings. Ninety-six percent of the type I showed no autograft tear on arthroscopy. In comparison with the clinical findings, MRI was found to be well correlated with arthroscopic findings. In conclusion, if the clinical findings are normal, patients are to be followed-up without MRI and arthroscopy. However, if clinical findings are either borderline or abnormal, MRI should be performed prior to arthroscopy. (author)

  7. Anterior cruciate ligament repair with LARS (ligament advanced reinforcement system: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Machotka Zuzana

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Injury to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL of the knee is common. Following complete rupture of the ACL, insufficient re-vascularization of the ligament prevents it from healing completely, creating a need for reconstruction. A variety of grafts are available for use in ACL reconstruction surgery, including synthetic grafts. Over the last two decades new types of synthetic ligaments have been developed. One of these synthetic ligaments, the Ligament Advanced Reinforcement System (LARS, has recently gained popularity. The aim of this systematic review was to assess the current best available evidence for the effectiveness of the LARS as a surgical option for symptomatic, anterior cruciate ligament rupture in terms of graft stability, rehabilitation time and return to pre-injury function. Method This systematic review included studies using subjects with symptomatic, ACL ruptures undergoing LARS reconstruction. A range of electronic databases were searched in May 2010. The methodological quality of studies was appraised with a modified version of the Law critical appraisal tool. Data relating to study characteristics, surgical times, complication rates, outcomes related to knee stability, quality of life, function, and return to sport as well as details of rehabilitation programs and timeframes were collected. Results This review identified four studies of various designs, of a moderate methodological quality. Only one case of knee synovitis was reported. Patient satisfaction with LARS was high. Graft stability outcomes were found to be inconsistent both at post operative and at follow up periods. The time frames of rehabilitation periods were poorly reported and at times omitted. Return to pre-injury function and activity was often discussed but not reported in results. Conclusions There is an emerging body of evidence for LARS with comparable complication rates to traditional surgical techniques, and high patient

  8. MORPHOMETRIC STUDY OF MEDIAL COLLATERAL LIGAMENTS OF ANKLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelu Prasad

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The ankle joint is one of the most frequently injured joint. A sprained ankle results due to tear of anterior talofibular and calcaneofibular ligaments when the foot is twisted in lateral direction. In forcible eversion of the foot, the deltoid ligament may be torn. At times, the deltoid ligament pulls the medial malleolus thereby causing avulsion fracture of the malleolus. The strong eversion pull on the deltoid ligament causes transverse fracture of medial malleolus. If the tibia is carried anteriorly, the posterior margin of the distal end of the tibia is also broken by the talus producing a trimalleolar fracture. The talocrural joint is a major weight bearing joint of the body. The weight of the body is transmitted from the tibia and fibula to the talus which distributes the weight anteriorly and posteriorly within the foot. One sixth of the static load of the leg is carried by the fibula at the tibiofibular joint. These require a high degree of stability which is determined by the passive and dynamic factors. A sprained ankle results due to tear of anterior talofibular and calcaneofibular ligaments when the foot is twisted in lateral direction. In forcible eversion of the foot, the deltoid ligament may be torn. At times, the deltoid ligament pulls the medial malleolus thereby causing avulsion fracture of the malleolus. The strong eversion pull on the deltoid ligament causes transverse fracture of medial malleolus. If the tibia is carried anteriorly, the posterior margin of the distal end of the tibia is also broken by the talus producing a trimalleolar fracture. Conventionally, X-ray techniques have been used to diagnose ligament injuries. Magnetic resonance (MR imaging has opened new horizons in the diagnosis and treatment of many musculoskeletal diseases of the ankle and foot. It demonstrates abnormalities in the bones and soft tissues before they become evident at other imaging modalities. The anatomy of the deltoid ligament

  9. The ligaments of the canine hip joint revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casteleyn, C; den Ouden, I; Coopman, F; Verhoeven, G; Van Cruchten, S; Van Ginneken, C; Van Ryssen, B; Simoens, P

    2015-12-01

    Numerous conventional anatomical textbooks describe the canine hip joint, but many contradictions, in particular regarding the ligament of the femoral head, are present. This paper presents a brief overview of the different literature descriptions. These are compared with own observations that have resulted in a revised description of the anatomy of the ligament of the femoral head in the dog. To this purpose, the hip joints of 41 dogs, euthanized for reasons not related to this study and devoid of lesions related to hip joint pathology, were examined. It was observed that the ligament of the femoral head is not a single structure that attaches only to the acetabular fossa, as generally accepted, but it also connects to the transverse acetabular ligament and is complemented by a strong accessory ligament that courses in caudal direction to attach in the elongation of the acetabular notch that extends on the cranioventral surface of the body of the ischium. The description of this accessory ligament in conventional anatomical handbooks is incomplete. This description of the accessory ligament of the femoral head could support the research unravelling the etiopathogenesis of hip instability.

  10. Oblique reconstruction of the cruciate ligaments on computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ihara, Hidetoshi; Nishino, Koshi; Koga, Masayuki; Kitakata, Akira; Deya, Keizo; Nakagawa, Hiroto

    1984-12-01

    Optimal positioning where the entire longitudinal axis of the cruciate ligaments could be demonstrated on computed tomography was discovered by using an amputated knee and was applied clinically. To demonstrate the anterior cruciate ligament, the patient was positioned on the table with the hip flexed, abducted, externally rotated and knee flexed at a 110-140 degrees angle. For the posterior cruciate ligament, the patient was placed in a prone position on the table with the knee flexed at a 50 degrees angle. These positions, especially the one for the anterior cruciate ligament, were difficult for some patients with gonalgia or limited range of motion. Reconstruction in the oblique planes was studied for those patients by using an amputated knee and quasi-ligament made of gum. Clinically, an axial image was obtained by the simple position of the patient lying prone on the table with knee extended. Oblique reconstruction was made from the axial images and this reconstructed image also demonstrated the entire longitudinal axis of the ligament. The rupture of the cruciate ligaments could be assessed by the reconstructed image in the oblique plane. (author).

  11. Pollical oblique ligament in humans and non-human primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrewsbury, Marvin

    2003-04-01

    A morphological study of the oblique ligament in the thumb is presented. The ligament was consistently described in human specimens and compared with dissections of non-human primates from different species. The oblique ligament was found in some, but not all, specimens in each of the following species examined: chimpanzee, orangutan, gibbon, anubis baboon, hamadryas baboon, squirrel monkey, lemur and marmoset. A revised identity of the oblique ligament is proposed as a reinforced distal border of a fibro-osseous annular pollical flexor sheath and whose function is not independent of the flexor sheath. The constant presence and tendinous trait of the pollical oblique ligament in humans, when compared with non-human primates, supports the notion that the oblique ligament strengthens the pollical flexor sheath in humans for restraint of the flexor pollicis longus tendon during forceful precision pinching. A derivation of the pollical oblique ligament is considered as representing a vestigial radial limb of a flexor pollicis superficialis tendon in the thumb.

  12. Immunohistological analysis of extracted anterior cruciate ligament graft impinged against posterior cruciate ligament

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kato So

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A young female athlete suffered from the residual instability of the knee after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction with hamstring autograft. The 3-dimensional (3-D CT scan showed the "high noon" positioning of the primary femoral bone tunnel. The revision surgery with anatomic double-bundle technique was performed two years after the primary surgery and the femoral tunnels were created with the assistance of the 3-D fluoroscopy-based navigation. An arthroscopic examination confirmed the ACL graft impingement against posterior cruciate ligament (PCL when the knee was deeply flexed. The histological analysis of the resected primary ACL graft showed local inflammatory infiltration, enhanced synovial coverage and vascularization at the impinged site. The enhanced expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF at the impinged area when compared with non-impinged area was observed on immunohistochemical analysis. Abnormal mechanical stress by the impingement against PCL might have induced chronic inflammation and VEGF overexpression.

  13. Ultrastructure of periprosthetic Dacron knee ligament tissue. Two cases of ruptured anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvi, M; Velluti, C; Misasi, M; Bartolozzi, P; Quacci, D; Dell'Orbo, C

    1991-04-01

    Light- and electron-microscopic investigations were performed on two failed Dacron ligaments that had been removed from 2 patients shortly after failure of the implant 2-3 years after reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament. Two different cell populations and matrices were correlated with closeness to the Dacron threads. Fibroblasts surrounded by connective tissue with collagen fibrils were located far from the Dacron threads. Roundish cells, appearing to be myofibroblasts surrounded by a more lax connective tissue and elastic fibers, were found close to the Dacron threads. The presence of myofibroblasts and the matrix differentiation could be attributed to the different mechanical forces acting on the Dacron and on the connective tissue because of their different coefficients of elasticity. The sparse occurrence of inflammatory cells in the synovial membrane and in the connective tissue surrounding the Dacron supports the biologic inertness of this artificial material. However, the repair tissue was not structured to resist tension stresses.

  14. Combined anterolateral ligament and anatomic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, James O; Yasen, Sam K; Lord, Breck; Wilson, Adrian J

    2015-11-01

    Although anatomic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is established for the surgical treatment of anterolateral knee instability, there remains a significant cohort of patients who continue to experience post-operative instability. Recent advances in our understanding of the anatomic, biomechanical and radiological characteristics of the native anterolateral ligament (ALL) of the knee have led to a resurgent interest in reconstruction of this structure as part of the management of knee instability. This technical note describes our readily reproducible combined minimally invasive technique to reconstruct both the ACL and ALL anatomically using autologous semitendinosus and gracilis grafts. This method of ALL reconstruction can be easily integrated with all-inside ACL reconstruction, requiring minimal additional operative time, equipment and expertise. Level of evidence V.

  15. Anterior cruciate ligament remnant and its values for preservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Muneta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Controversy surrounds the remnant-preserving anterior cruciate ligament surgery. Advantages of remnant preservation have been reported in regard to better healing and knee function, although no consensus has been reached. This review article discussed the value and meaning of anterior cruciate ligament remnant preservation in several sections such as effects on healing, remnant classification, biomechanical evaluation, relation to proprioception, animal studies, and clinical studies. We hope that this review will facilitate further discussion and investigation for better treatment of anterior cruciate ligament injuries. So far, the current reviews have not provided sufficient scientific evidence to support the value of preserving the remnant.

  16. Absence of sensory function in the reconstructed anterior cruciate ligament

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsgaard, Michael R; Fischer-Rasmussen, Torsten; Dyhre-Poulsen, Poul

    2011-01-01

    Cruciate ligaments provide sensory information that cause excitatory as well as inhibitory effects to the activity of the muscles around the knee. The aim of the study was to determine whether these muscular reflexes are reestablished after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) re-construction. Wire...... electrodes were inserted during arthroscopy into the normal posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) and the reconstructed ACL in 11 patients who had a successful ACL re-construction 8 months to 12 years earlier. After the anesthesia had subsided, the PCL was stimulated electrically through the electrodes...

  17. Medial patellofemoral ligament and medial patellotibial ligament reconstruction in children: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadigursky, David; Garcia, Lucas Cortizo; Armede, Maurício; Oliveira, Lucas Rodrigues de; Carneiro, Rogério Jamil Fernandes; Colavolpe, Paulo Oliveira

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament associated with the medial patellotibial ligament in skeletally immature patients. This is a case series study in patients with patellar instability with open physis. In total, seven patients were evaluated: four males and three females were operated using the proposed technique. Patients with open physis who had more than two episodes of recurring patellar dislocation were included. No patients underwent additional procedures. The distance from the anterior tibial tuberosity to the trochlea grove (TT-TG) was measured in all patients. On physical examination, the inverted J-sign, the apprehension sign, and the knee range of motion parameters were used in the pre- and post-operative period. In addition, the Kujala and Lysholm scores were applied before and 12 months after surgery. The results were analyzed with the Wilcoxon test. The mean age of the patients was 11.28 in both genders. Comparing the data of the pre- and post-operative period, the inverted J-sign was present in six patients (85.7%) vs. absent in one (14.3%). The apprehension sign was absent in cases in the postoperative period; the range of motion was 117.85 ± 8.09 vs. 148.57 ± 3.77. The Kujala score was 42.57 ± 8.9 vs. 88.57 ± 5.09 and the Lysholm scores were classified as excellent or good in 28.6% and 71.4%, respectively. The combined reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament combined with the medial patellotibial ligament in skeletally immature patients with predisposing factors, presents satisfactory results without episodes of recurrence or residual subluxation; according to these preliminary results, it should be considered as a treatment option.

  18. Proprioception in anterior cruciate ligament deficient knees and its relevance in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandeep S Dhillon

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Injury to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL not only causes mechanical instability but also leads to a functional deficit in the form of diminished proprioception of the knee joint. "Functional" recovery is often incomplete even after "anatomic" arthroscopic ACL reconstruction, as some patients with a clinically satisfactory repair and good ligament tension continue to complain of a feeling of instability and giving way, although the knee does not sublux on clinical testing. Factors that may play a role could be proprioceptive elements, as the intact ACL has been shown to have significant receptors. Significant data have come to light demonstrating proprioceptive differences between normal and injured knees, and often between injured and reconstructed knees. ACL remnants have been shown to have proprioceptive fibers that could enhance functional recovery if they adhere to or grow into the reconstructed ligament. Conventionally the torn remnants are shaved off from the knee before graft insertion; modern surgical techniques, with remnant sparing methods have shown better outcomes and functional recovery, and this could be an avenue for future research and development. This article analyzes and reviews our understanding of the sensory element of ACL deficiency, with specific reference to proprioception as an important component of functional knee stability. The types of mechanoreceptors, their distribution and presence in ACL remnants is reviewed, and suggestions are made to minimize soft tissue shaving during ACL reconstruction to ensure a better functional outcome in the reconstructed knee.

  19. The name cranial ovarian suspensory ligaments in mammalian anatomy should be used only to indicate the structures derived from the foetal cranial mesonephric and gonadal ligaments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. van der Schoot (P.)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractThe term ovarian suspensory ligament appears ambiguous when human adult anatomy textbooks are compared with human embryology or with general mammalian anatomy textbooks. The term ovarian suspensory ligament in laboratory rodents and domestic animals indicates homologous structures during

  20. The effectiveness of surgical correction of uterine prolapse: cervical amputation with uterosacral ligament plication (modified Manchester) versus vaginal hysterectomy with high uterosacral ligament plication.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, T.A. de; Milani, A.L.; Kluivers, K.B.; Withagen, M.I.J.; Vierhout, M.E.

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: The objective of this study is to evaluate cervical amputation with uterosacral ligament plication (modified Manchester) and compare it to vaginal hysterectomy with high uterosacral ligament plication procedure with special regard to the middle compartment. METHODS:

  1. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction without drill holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brief, L P

    1991-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in adolescents with open physes remains a difficult problem for the orthopedic surgeon, especially in view of growing teenage participation in contact sports. Traditionally, treatment of ACL tears in adolescents has been conservative; the patient is advised to delay surgery up to several years for fear of damaging physes by drilling holes across them. Unfortunately, this waiting period may inflict irreparable knee damage. This paper suggests an ACL reconstruction technique that utilizes no drill holes, thus causing no harm to physes or other essential knee structures. A graft consisting of semitendinosus and gracilis (SG) tendons is passed under the anterior horn of the medial meniscus through the knee joint, then brought out through the posterior capsule and secured to the lateral femoral metaphysis. The graft is augmented with an iliotibial band tenodesis. Designed primarily but not exclusively for teenagers with open physes, the procedure has produced encouraging results thus far in a small series.

  2. Day case arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgafy, H; Elsafty, M

    1998-10-01

    This is a report of the first 33 consecutive patients who had arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in the day unit of Sandwell District General Hospital. Bone-patellar tendon-bone autograft was used. This study assessed post-operative pain control, clinical results and patient satisfaction with day case surgery. The mean age was 29 years, (range 17-43). The mean period between injury and reconstruction was 29 months, (range 2-50). The mean follow-up period was 16 months (range 6-31). In 31 patients (94%), adequate post-operative pain control was achieved with oral non opioid analgesic. No patient required readmission for pain control, nausea, vomiting or urinary retention. At the last follow up, the mean Lysholm score was 93.9, (range 68-100). Thirty-one patients (94%) were satisfied with the day case surgery and believed that they did not require hospitalization after surgery.

  3. Posterior cruciate ligament: focus on conflicting issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong Seuk; Jung, Young Bok

    2013-12-01

    There is little consensus on how to optimally reconstruct the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) and the natural history of injured PCL is also unclear. The graft material (autograft vs. allograft), the type of tibial fixation (tibial inlay vs. transtibial tunnel), the femoral tunnel position within the femoral footprint (isometric, central, or eccentric), and the number of bundles in the reconstruction (1 bundle vs. 2 bundles) are among the many decisions that a surgeon must make in a PCL reconstruction. In addition, there is a paucity of information on rehabilitation after reconstruction of the PCL and posterolateral structures. This article focused on the conflicting issues regarding the PCL, and the scientific rationales behind some critical points are discussed.

  4. Dorello's Canal and Gruber's Ligament: Historical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambekar, Sudheer; Sonig, Ashish; Nanda, Anil

    2012-01-01

    Wenzel Leopold Gruber and Primo Dorello were great anatomists and researchers during the 19th and 20th centuries. Their contributions to neuroanatomy—namely the Gruber's (petrosphenoidal) ligament and Dorello's canal, respectively—have come to be important structures in various approaches through the middle fossa. These structures have also helped provide us with an understanding of the mechanism of sixth nerve paresis in various pathological conditions, such as raised intracranial pressure and Gradenigo syndrome. Their numerous publications have stood as a reference to anatomical researchers. Gruber's description of internal mesogastric hernia and the Meckel-Gruber anastomosis are also widely known in medical literature. The following article is an attempt to reflect upon the life and works of Gruber and Dorello and the importance of their research. PMID:24294562

  5. Telomere length of anterior crucial ligament after rupture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ponsot, Elodie; Langberg, Henning; Krogsgaard, Michael R

    2011-01-01

    ) and there was no relationship between mean telomere length in ACL and the healing duration after rupture. This implies that despite the occurrence of ligament repair including a phase of intense cell proliferation the proliferative potential of ruptured ACL is not impaired. This knowledge is important for scientists......The regeneration of ligaments following injury is a slow process compared to the healing of many other tissues and the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the proliferative potential of ligaments by assessing telomere length within three distinct parts...... tissues indicating that the endogenous machinery responsible for the proliferative potential of ligament is not implicated in its poor healing capacity. The three ACL parts showed similar mean TRF lengths (distal part: 11.5 ± 0.8 kbp, mid-portion: 11.8 ± 1.2 kbp, proximal part: 11.9 ± 1.6 kbp...

  6. Tendon and ligament adaptation to exercise, immobilization, and remobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wren, T A; Beaupré, G S; Carter, D R

    2000-01-01

    This study provides a theoretical and computational basis for understanding and predicting how tendons and ligaments adapt to exercise, immobilization, and remobilization. In a previous study, we introduced a model that described the growth and development of tendons and ligaments. In this study, we use the same model to predict changes in the cross-sectional area, modulus, and strength of tendons and ligaments due to increased or decreased loading. The model predictions are consistent with the results of experimental exercise and immobilization studies performed by other investigators. These results suggest that the same fundamental principles guide both development and adaptation. A basic understanding of these principles can contribute both to prevention of tendon and ligament injuries and to more effective rehabilitation when injury does occur.

  7. Creep behaviour and creep mechanisms of normal and healing ligaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Gail Marilyn

    Patients with knee ligament injuries often undergo ligament reconstructions to restore joint stability and, potentially, abate osteoarthritis. Careful literature review suggests that in 10% to 40% of these patients the graft tissue "stretches out". Some graft elongation is likely due to creep (increased elongation of tissue under repeated or sustained load). Quantifying creep behaviour and identifying creep mechanisms in both normal and healing ligaments is important for finding clinically relevant means to prevent creep. Ligament creep was accurately predicted using a novel yet simple structural model that incorporated both collagen fibre recruitment and fibre creep. Using the inverse stress relaxation function to model fibre creep in conjunction with fibre recruitment produced a superior prediction of ligament creep than that obtained from the inverse stress relaxation function alone. This implied mechanistic role of fibre recruitment during creep was supported using a new approach to quantify crimp patterns at stresses in the toe region (increasing stiffness) and linear region (constant stiffness) of the stress-strain curve. Ligament creep was relatively insensitive to increases in stress in the toe region; however, creep strain increased significantly when tested at the linear region stress. Concomitantly, fibre recruitment was evident at the toe region stresses; however, recruitment was limited at the linear region stress. Elevating the water content of normal ligament using phosphate buffered saline increased the creep response. Therefore, both water content and fibre recruitment are important mechanistic factors involved in creep of normal ligaments. Ligament scars had inferior creep behaviour compared to normal ligaments even after 14 weeks. In addition to inferior collagen properties affecting fibre recruitment and increased water content, increased glycosaminoglycan content and flaws in scar tissue were implicated as potential mechanisms of scar creep

  8. Tissue Engineering Applications for Ligament and Tendon Reconstruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.C.H.; GOH; H.W.; OU; YANG; Z.G.; GE; S.L.; TOH

    2005-01-01

    Tendons and ligaments are subjected to high physiological loads. As such, injuries due to high impact activities are common. Due to the avascular nature of these connective tissues, the healing rate is rather slow. Currently the therapeutic options to treat tendon and ligament injuries are autografts, allografts and prosthetic devices. However, there are many disadvantages in using biological grafts, as well as concerns over long-term performance of synthetic prostheses. Therefore, further research for alte...

  9. Delayed diagnosis of isolated alar ligament rupture: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Robin A; Marzi, Ingo; Vogl, Thomas J

    2015-10-28

    Ligament disruptions at the craniovertebral junction are typically associated with atlantoaxial rotatory dislocation during upper cervical spine injuries and require external orthoses or surgical stabilization. Only in few patients isolated ruptures of the alar ligament have been reported. Here we present a further case, in which the diagnosis was initially obscured by a misleading clinical symptomatology but finally established six month following the trauma, demonstrating the value of contrast-enhanced high resolution 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging in identifying this particular lesion.

  10. [Chondroblastoma in the anterior cruciate ligament origo: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Hafız; Turhan, Ahmet Uğur; Karataş, Metin; Onay, Atilgan; Yildiz, Kadriye

    2012-01-01

    Chondroblastoma is a rarely seen cartilage originated tumor. It is mostly localized in the epiphysis of long bones. In this article, we present an 18-year-old male case in whom the tumor was located in the right distal femoral lateral condyle and destroyed anterior cruciate ligament origo. The tumor was curetted and the cavity was filled with cement. Anterior cruciate ligament resection was mandatory for this treatment. The patient had no complaint in the postoperative period.

  11. Posterior cruciate ligament's tibial insertions: topographic anatomy and morphometric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Cesar Gali

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To provide anatomical and morphometric basis of the posterior cruciate ligament's tibial insertions in order to assist the creation of anatomical tibial tunnels, in the ligament surgical reconstruction. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The topographic anatomy and morphometry of the posterior cruciate ligament's anterolateral and posteromedial bundles' tibial insertions were analyzed in 24 anatomical knee pieces. The pieces were photographed by a digital camera and the images obtained were studied by the software ImageJ, where the bundles' insertion areas were measured in square millimeters, and the length of structures and the distances between significant points were measured in millimeters. RESULTS: In 54.2% of the knees the insertion' shape was concave; in most pieces (41.6% the form of insertion was oval. The average posterior cruciate ligament's tibial insertion total area was 88.33 ± 21.66 mm2; the average anterolateral bundle's tibial insertion area was 46.79 ± 14.10 mm2 and it was 41.54 ± 9.75 mm2 for the posteromedial bundle. CONCLUSIONS: The anterolateral bundle has a tibial insertion area larger than the posteromedial bundle; the insertion areas of those bundles in our study, were smaller than the ones found in the literature. The variations in the posterior cruciate ligament's tibial insertion area suggest that there should be an indication for anatomical reconstructions of this ligament using single or double tibial tunnels according to individual characteristics.

  12. [PARTICULAR QUALITIES OF DIAGNOSTIC ACUTE LATERAL ANKLE LIGAMENT INJURIES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnoperov, S N; Shishka, I V; Golovaha, M L

    2015-01-01

    Delayed diagnosis of acute lateral ankle ligaments injury and subsequent inadequate treatment leads to the development of chronic instability and rapid progression of degenerative processes in the joint. The aim of our work was to improve treatment results by developing an diagnostic algorithm and treatment strategy of acute lateral ankle ligament injuries. The study included 48 patients with history of acute inversion ankle injury mechanism. Diagnostic protocol included clinical and radiological examination during 48 hours and after 7-10 days after injury. According to the high rate of inaccurate clinical diagnosis in the first 48 hours of the injury a short course of conservative treatment for 7-10 days is needed with follow-up and controlling clinical and radiographic instability tests. Clinical symptoms of ankle inversion injury showed that the combination of local tenderness in the projection of damaged ligaments, the presence of severe periarticular hematoma in the lateral department and positive anterior drawer and talar tilt tests in 7-10 days after the injury in 87% of cases shows the presence of ligament rupture. An algorithm for diagnosis of acute lateral ankle ligament injury was developed, which allowed us to determine differential indications for surgical repair of the ligaments and conservative treatment of these patients.

  13. The sacrotuberous and the sacrospinous ligament--a virtual reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, N; Steinke, H; Slowik, V; Josten, C; Stadler, J; Böhme, J; Spanel-Borowski, K

    2009-10-01

    Little is known about the morphometric properties of the sacrotuberous ligament (ST) and the sacrospinous ligament (SS). The influence of ligaments on pelvic stability and the extent of reconstruction in case of instability are controversially discussed. The ST and the SS of 55 human subjects fixed in alcohol solution and of four fresh cadavers were measured. Both ligaments were defined as geometric figures. The ST was a contorted bifrustum, while the SS was a contorted frustum, both with elliptic planes. In all cases investigated, the ST and the SS fibres were twisted. For men, the ST and the SS had a mean length of 64 and 38 mm. For women, lengths of 70 and 46 mm were measured in the ST and the SS. The ST length, height and cross-sectional area showed gender-specific differences at statistically significant level. The ST and the SS volumes correlated closely, regardless of gender or side. Measurements of fresh ligaments of four unfixed cadavers showed similar results. The data obtained were then used to generate computer-based three-dimensional models of both ligaments, using the Catia software. Conclusively, the virtually generated ST and SS are suitable models to be included in pelvic fracture simulation, using the finite element method.

  14. Cable-Augmented, Quad Ligament Tenodesis Scapholunate Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Gregory I; Watts, Adam C; McLean, James; Lee, Yu C; Eng, Kevin

    2015-11-01

    Maintaining reduction of the scapholunate interval after reconstruction can be difficult. The authors performed scapholunate reconstruction using tensionable suture anchors in 8 patients. The anchors provide a fixed cable that both fixes the graft, and reduces the scapholunate diastasis and maintains reduction. The flexor carpi radialis tendon graft stabilizes not only the volar scaphotrapezial ligament, and dorsal scapholunate ligament, but also the dorsal intercarpal and dorsal radiocarpal ligament. The Berger flap is closed using an ulnar advancement capsulodesis that further reinforces the dorsal intercarpal and dorsal radiocarpal ligament. The mean pain score improved from 5.8 to 2.1. Mean extension was 56° (91% of contralateral side), flexion 44° (70% of contralateral side), and grip strength was 41kg (95% of the contralateral side). The mean scapholunate angle was 71°, radiolunate angle 16° and scapholunate interval 3.0 mm. The cable augmented, quad ligament scapholunate ligament reconstruction offers theoretical advantages but long term follow up is required.

  15. Arthroscopically assisted anatomical coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction using tendon graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Yon-Sik; Seo, Young-Jin; Noh, Kyu-Cheol; Patro, Bishu Prasad; Kim, Do-Young

    2011-07-01

    We describe a method of arthroscopically assisted, mini-open, anatomical reconstruction of the coracoclavicular ligament. This method restores both components of the native ligament with the aim of achieving maximum stability with minimal disruption of the normal anatomy. Using the same principles of ligament reconstruction that are employed in other joints, transosseous tunnels are created following the native footprints of the conoid and trapezoid ligaments and an autologous graft is fixed using a PEEK screw. Adequate healing of the ligament occurs within the bone, to prevent stress risers with an appropriate working length. This procedure is unique, as it replaces the torn ligament with a natural substitute, in the appropriate location, through a minimally invasive procedure. This technique would be suitable for treatment of patients with either grade III or V acute acromioclavicular dislocations. Clinical outcomes for the first 13 consecutive patients treated with this procedure are reported, revealing excellent satisfaction rates with a Constant score of 96.6 at final follow-up.

  16. [VARIANT ANATOMY OF SPLENIC LIGAMENTS AND ARTERIES PASSING THROUGH THEM].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaivoronskiy, I V; Kotiv, B N; Alekseyev, V S; Nichiporuk, G I

    2015-01-01

    The research was performed on 15 non embalmed bodies and 32 abdominal complexes of adult individuals. The comparative study of variant anatomy of splenic ligaments and architectonics of arteries passing through them was carried out to substantiate the mobilization of splenopancreatic complex. Anatomical and angiographic restudied were carried out using preparation, morphometry, injection of gastric, pancreatic and splenic vascular bed with red lead suspension. It was established that the form and sizes of splenic ligaments and their interrelation with the branches of the splenic artery were variable. The minimal and maximal sizes of gastrolienal, phrenicosplenic and splenocolic ligaments differed 2-3 times. In most cases, spleen was fixed in abdominal cavity by many short ligaments. It was shown that architectonics and topography of main branches of spleen artery were determined by morphometric characteristics of the spleen proper and its ligaments. The knowledge of splenic ligament variant anatomy allows a new perspective to approach to substantiate different methods of the mobilization of spleno-pancreatic complex during surgical operations on organs of the upper part of the peritoneal cavity and organ-preserving surgery of the spleen.

  17. Chronic multiple knee ligament injuries: epidemiological analysis of more than one hundred cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalvo Zosimo Bispo Júnior

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Diagnosis and treatment of multiple ligament injuries of the knee remain a real challenge for most surgeons. OBJECTIVE: To find out the epidemiological profile of patients surgically treated at a Reference Service with more than one chronic ligament injury in the knee joint. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Of a total of 978 operated patients, 109 presented at least two associated ligament injuries in the same knee. Demographic and clinical variables were evaluated. RESULTS: The anterior cruciate ligament group presented a larger number of cases of ligament injuries related with sports practice and falls, while the posterior cruciate ligament and anterior cruciate ligament + posterior cruciate ligament groups presented more cases related to traffic accidents and trauma with object (weight on the knee (p<0.001. The varus group presented significantly higher values of time since injury (p<0.01. In the group with new anterior cruciate ligament injury (neoligament associated with other ligament injuries the disruption times were higher, showing statistical significance (p<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: Anterior cruciate ligament injury associated with other ligament injuries other than posterior cruciate ligament injury are related to sports practice and falls. Posterior cruciate ligament injury associated to other ligament injuries, including or not anterior cruciate ligament injury, are related to traffic accidents and direct trauma caused by an object on the knee. Significant delay between primary ligament injuries and their reconstructions generates varus deformity of the affected knee. In spite of the large delay in seeking medical treatment, few patients with neoligament anterior cruciate ligament injury and other combined disruptions will develop varus deformity.

  18. Tissue Engineering of Ligament/tendon-Part II-Importance of Biochemical and Mechanical Factors on the Neogenesis of Ligament

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sylvaine; Muller; Shalaw; Fawzi-Grancher; Said; Slimani

    2005-01-01

    1 IntroductionLigaments and tendons are bands of parallel fibers, made of dense connective tissue, that play an important role in mediating normal movement and stability of joints. Injury to these structures can cause significant joint instability, which may lead to injury of others tissues and the development of degenerative joint diseases. Tissue engineering offers the potential to improve the reconstruction of tendons and ligaments. The concept is based on the manipulation of cellular and molecular media...

  19. Increased Prevalence of Ossification of Posterior Longitudinal Ligament and Increased Bone Mineral Density in Patients with Ossification of Nuchal Ligament

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Objective There are also few studies demonstrating the relationship between ossification of nuchal ligament (ONL) and ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL). We compared the prevalence, location, and type of OPLL between patients with ONL and matched patients without ONL.We also compared the bone mineral densities (BMDs) between the 2 groups. Methods total of 124 cervical ONL patients were enrolled in this study. The control group of 124 patients was matched with 124 patients ...

  20. Morphology of the transverse ligament of the atlas and the alar ligaments in the silver fox (Vulpes vulpes var)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent new anatomical and histological features of craniocervical junction in dogs and cats were described providing evidence of differences between the carnivore species. No information on these structures in foxes exists. Results Two parts of the alar ligaments were found. A longer one aroused from dens of axis to the internal (medial) surface of the occipital condyles and was called apical part. A shorter part originated from the entire length of the lateral edge of the dens of axis and terminated on the internal wall of the vertebral foramen of atlas and thus was called the lateral part. The transverse ligament of the atlas was widened in the mid region, above the dens of axis, and thickened at enthesis. Periosteal fibrocartilage was detected in the transverse ligament of the atlas at the enthesis, and sesamoid fibrocartilage was present on periphery in the middle of the ligament. Conclusions The craniocervical junction in foxes differs in part from other carnivores such as dogs and cats but resembles that of mesaticephalic dogs. The sesamoid and periosteal fibrocartilage supports the transverse ligament of the atlas whereas the alar ligaments have no cartilage. PMID:23557095

  1. Morphology of the transverse ligament of the atlas and the alar ligaments in the silver fox (Vulpes vulpes var).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupczynska, Marta; Barszcz, Karolina; Janczyk, Pawel; Wasowicz, Michal; Czubaj, Norbert

    2013-04-04

    Recent new anatomical and histological features of craniocervical junction in dogs and cats were described providing evidence of differences between the carnivore species. No information on these structures in foxes exists. Two parts of the alar ligaments were found. A longer one aroused from dens of axis to the internal (medial) surface of the occipital condyles and was called apical part. A shorter part originated from the entire length of the lateral edge of the dens of axis and terminated on the internal wall of the vertebral foramen of atlas and thus was called the lateral part. The transverse ligament of the atlas was widened in the mid region, above the dens of axis, and thickened at enthesis. Periosteal fibrocartilage was detected in the transverse ligament of the atlas at the enthesis, and sesamoid fibrocartilage was present on periphery in the middle of the ligament. The craniocervical junction in foxes differs in part from other carnivores such as dogs and cats but resembles that of mesaticephalic dogs. The sesamoid and periosteal fibrocartilage supports the transverse ligament of the atlas whereas the alar ligaments have no cartilage.

  2. Prevalence and progression of pectinate ligament dysplasia in the Welsh springer spaniel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, J A C; Ekiri, A; Mellersh, C S

    2016-08-01

    To determine the prevalence of pectinate ligament dysplasia in a large group of Welsh springer spaniels; to investigate associations between pectinate ligament dysplasia and age, sex and intraocular pressure and between intraocular pressure and age and sex; and to investigate progression of pectinate ligament dysplasia in individual dogs. In a prospective study, gonioscopy was performed in both eyes of 227 Welsh springer spaniels and intraocular pressure measured by rebound tonometry. Eyes were classified as "unaffected" if 0% of the iridocorneal angle was affected with pectinate ligament dysplasia (grade 0), "mildly affected" if 90% was affected (grade 3). In a retrospective study, progression of pectinate ligament dysplasia over time was investigated for 65 dogs. One hundred and thirty-nine of 227 dogs (61·2%) were affected by pectinate ligament dysplasia (grades 1 to 3) and 82/227 (36·2%) were moderately or severely affected. There was a significant association between pectinate ligament dysplasia and age. There were no associations between pectinate ligament dysplasia and intraocular pressure or pectinate ligament dysplasia and sex. Thirty-five of 65 dogs (53·8%) demonstrated progression of pectinate ligament dysplasia. Prevalence of pectinate ligament dysplasia was high despite widespread screening and selection against the condition. Our data indicate that gonioscopic features of pectinate ligament dysplasia can progress in the Welsh springer spaniel. Dogs deemed unaffected at an early age may subsequently be diagnosed with pectinate ligament dysplasia. © 2016 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  3. Pitfalls of magnetic resonance imaging of alar ligament

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Sumit; Hol, Per Kristian; Tillung, Terje [Interventional Centre, Rikshospitalet University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Laerum, L. Thea [Anglo-European College of Chiropractic, Bournemouth (United Kingdom)

    2004-05-01

    An observational study of variations in the appearance of the alar ligament on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the normal range of lateral flexion and rotation of the atlas was performed to validate some of the premises underlying the use of MRI for the detection of injuries to the alar ligament. Fifteen healthy volunteers were included. Three sets of coronal proton-density images, and axial T2-weighted images of the craniovertebral junction, were obtained at 0.5 T with the neck in neutral position and laterally flexed (coronal proton density) or rotated (axial T2). Five of the subjects also underwent imaging at 1.5 T. The scans were independently examined twice by two radiologists. The presence of alar ligaments was recorded and a three-point scale used to grade the extent of hyperintensity exhibited by the structures: the ligament were graded as 2 and 3 if, respectively, less or more of its cross-section was hyperintense, whereas grade 1 represented a hypointense ligament. The effect of lateral flexion on image quality was assessed. Concordance analysis of the data were performed before and after dichotomising the data on grading. The atlanto-axial angle and rotation of the atlas were measured. The magnitude of movement to right was normalised to that to the left to give, respectively, the flexion index and the rotation index. The alar ligaments were most reliably seen on coronal proton-density scans, with a Maxwell's RE of 0.96 as compared with 0.46 for sagittal images. Flexion of the neck improved definition of the ligaments in only rare instances. (orig.)

  4. Electrospun scaffold development for periodontal ligament regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourattar, Parisa

    Periodontitis is a major chronic inflammatory disorder that can lead to the destruction of the periodontal tissues and, ultimately, tooth loss. It is a major cause of tooth loss in adults and a substantial public-health burden worldwide. There is thus a significant need for periodontal ligament (PDL) regeneration to enable functional mechanical support of tooth prostheses and prevent occlusal overloading. The goal of stem cell-based dental tissue engineering, is to create tooth-like structures using scaffold materials to guide the dental stem cells. Current resorbable membranes act as an epithelial tissue down-growth into the defect, favoring the regeneration of periodontal tissues. In order to develop synthetic grafts for these applications, different biocompatible materials have been used to fabricate fibers with different structures and morphologies. This study demonstrated the feasibility of using a composite material that combines the advantage of multiple materials to synthesize polyvinyl alcohol/ chitosan blend fiber scaffolds to promote PDL regeneration and to achieve a synthetic composite that match the native PDL modulus. Morphology, dispersibility, and mechanical properties of blend nanofibrous mats were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and tensile test.

  5. Failure of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo Samitier

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The present review classifies and describes the multifactorial causes of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL surgery failure, concentrating on preventing and resolving such situations. The article particularly focuses on those causes that require ACL revision due to recurrent instability, without neglecting those that affect function or produce persistent pain. Although primary ACL reconstruction has satisfactory outcome rates as high as 97%, it is important to identify the causes of failure, because satisfactory outcomes in revision surgery can drop to as much as 76%. It is often possible to identify a primary or secondary cause of ACL surgery failure; even the most meticulous planning can give rise to unexpected findings during the intervention. The adopted protocol should therefore be sufficiently flexible to adapt to the course of surgery. Preoperative patient counseling is essential. The surgeon should limit the patient’s expectations for the outcome by explaining the complexity of this kind of procedure. With adequate preoperative planning, close attention to details and realistic patient expectations, ACL revision surgery may offer beneficial and satisfactory results for the patient.

  6. Failure of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo Samitier

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The present review classifies and describes the multifactorial causes of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL surgery failure, concentrating on preventing and resolving such situations. The article particularly focuses on those causes that require ACL revision due to recurrent instability, without neglecting those that affect function or produce persistent pain. Although primary ACL reconstruction has satisfactory outcome rates as high as 97%, it is important to identify the causes of failure, because satisfactory outcomes in revision surgery can drop to as much as 76%. It is often possible to identify a primary or secondary cause of ACL surgery failure; even the most meticulous planning can give rise to unexpected findings during the intervention. The adopted protocol should therefore be sufficiently flexible to adapt to the course of surgery. Preoperative patient counseling is essential. The surgeon should limit the patient’s expectations for the outcome by explaining the complexity of this kind of procedure. With adequate preoperative planning, close attention to details and realistic patient expectations, ACL revision surgery may offer beneficial and satisfactory results for the patient.

  7. Anterior cruciate ligament injury in professional dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuffels, Duncan E; Verhaar, Jan A N

    2008-08-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament injury (ACL) is a common sport injury; however, there are no data concerning dance and ACL injury. We report the incidence, injury mechanism, and clinical follow-up of ACL injury in professional dancers. In a retrospective cohort study involving the three major dance companies in the Netherlands, by interviewing all 253 dancers who had had a full-time contract during 1991-2002, dancers with symptomatic ACL injury or past ACL reconstruction were identified and examined. 6 dancers (2 of whom were women) had had a symptomatic ACL rupture and reconstruction. Interestingly, all had been on the left side and had had a similar trauma mechanism: while dancing a classical variation they landed, after a jump, on their left leg, in the turned out position with a valgus force on their knee. There was a higher risk of ACL injury in the classical company than in the two contemporary companies. The risk of dancers having a rupture of the left ACL during a 10-year career in this classical company was 7%. ACL injuries are not an infrequently seen type of injury in professional classical dancers, with a very specific mechanism of injury--a landing on the left leg in exorotation. More attention and prophylactic measures should be given to this specific injury mechanism.

  8. Biomechanical study on the suture strength of ligament in cruciate ligament reconstruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张春礼; 李起鸿; 杨柳

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To test the suture strength on the tendon or ligament end and evaluate the stitch in the reconstruction of cruciate ligament and its clinical application. Methods: Twenty-four specimens of patellar tendon with free ends were divided into 3 groups: Group I (3 Krackow stitches), Group II (2 Krackow stitches) and Group III (2 Krackow stitches with the first stitch passing through the tendon tissue as a modified Krackow stitch). These 3 groups were further divided into 6 subgroups according to different suture materials, No 1 Ethilon or stainless steel wire (φ= 0.4 mm). Tensile test was undertaken to find out the least stitches with efficient suture pattern. Results: Two Krackow locking stitches had stronger strength than 0.4 mm-diameter stainless steel wire. The fixation strength of 2 stitches with No 1 Ethilon was more than 80 N, superior to the failure strength of the material itself. The same strength was maintained if the first stitch was across the tendon tissue transversely. There was no statistically significant difference in the suture strength between 2 and 3 Krackow locking stitches. Conclusions: The suture strength is greater than the failure strength of the suture material. Less suture exposure can be achieved when the first stitch is across the tendon tissue while maintaining a comparable strength to other sutures. To attain higher suture strength, stronger materials or multiple strands rather than more stitches are preferred. Therefore, a rapid early rehabilitation of range of motion (ROM) is possible and reliable in practice.

  9. Calcification of the alar ligament of the cervical spine: imaging findings and clinical course

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Yuka; Mochida, J.; Toh, E. [Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Tokai Univ., Isehara, Kanagawa (Japan); Saito, Ikuo; Matui, Sizuka [Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Odawara Hospital, Printing Bureau, Ministry of Finance, Sakawa, Odawara, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2001-05-01

    Ligamentous calcification of the cervical spine has been reported in the yellow ligament, anterior and posterior longitudinal ligaments and interspinous ligament. Calcification in the upper cervical spine is rare, although some cases with calcification of the transverse ligament of the atlas have been reported. Two patients with calcification of the alar ligament with an unusual clinical presentation and course are described. Examination by tomography and computed tomography (CT) showed calcification of the alar ligament and the transverse ligament of the atlas. CT documented decreased calcification as symptoms resolved. There may be a role for CT in the search for calcifications in the upper cervical spine in patients presenting with neck pain and pharyngodynia if radiographs are normal. (orig.)

  10. Arthroscopic Dorsal Capsulo-Ligamentous Repair in the Treatment of Chronic Scapho-Lunate Ligament Tears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahegaonkar, Abhijeet L.; Mathoulin, Christophe L.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Scapholunate ligament injuries usually result due to a fall on the outstretched hand leading to scapholunate instability. The natural history of untreated scapholunate instability remains controversial and usually results in late arthritic changes- the so-called “SLAC” wrist. The advent of wrist arthroscopy helps in early diagnosis and treatment of these serious injuries. In selected cases with reducible scapholunate instability (Garcia-Elias stages 2, 3 and 4) we propose a new “all arthroscopic dorsal capsulo- ligamentous repair” with the added advantage of early rehabilitation and prevention of post-operative stiffness. Material and Methods We report the results of our series of 57 consecutive patients suffering from chronic wrist pain refractory to conservative measures. All patients underwent a thorough clinical examination in addition to a standard set of radiographs and MRI exam; and they were treated by an all-arthroscopic dorsal capsulo-ligamentous repair under loco-regional anesthesia on an ambulatory basis. All patients were available for follow-up at regular intervals during the post-operative period. At follow-up, the wrist ROM in all directions, the grip strength, DASH questionnaire and pain relief based on the VAS were recorded for both- the operated and contra-lateral sides. Results There were 34 males & 23 females with a mean age of 38.72 ± 11.33 years (range 17–63 years). The dominant side was involved in 52 cases. The mean time since injury was 9.42 ± 6.33 months (range 3–24 months) and the mean follow-up was 30.74 ± 7.05 months (range 18–43 months). The mean range of motion improved in all directions. The mean difference between the post- and pre-operative extension was 14.03° (SEM = 1.27°; p wrist. The mean difference for the VAS score was -5.46 (SEM = 0.19; p < 0.0001). The mean post-operative grip strength of the affected side was 38.42 ± 10.27 kg (range 20–60 kg) as

  11. Scapholunate interosseus ligament reconstruction on a cadaver A technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Arenas Prat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute rupture of the scapholunate interosseus ligament is a relatively frequent occurrence which can be repaired primarily by direct suturing. However, patients are often seen a few weeks after injury when most of the ligament fibers have degenerated. This poses a challenge because direct repair can be difficult and long term results have not been satisfying. In the present study, a technique is presented to address this problem and its possible advantages are discussed. Materials and Methods: A fresh frozen wrist cadaver specimen, thawed to room temperature, was used to carry out the procedure. The scapholunate joint was exposed through a dorsal approach and stabilized using two percutaneous Kirschner wires. Using a U shaped chisel, a groove along the scapholunate articular margin was created to accommodate a strip from the extensor retinaculum as a ligament plasty. This has been secured using six anchor sutures and several pictures taken during the procedure to expose the key steps. Results: The ligamentoplasty presented in this article preserves most of the articular surface of proximal carpus and at the same time stabilizes the scapholunate joint. However, more in vivo research should be carried out to validate this treatment. Conclusion: The technique suggests a possible way to repair a ruptured scapholunate interosseus ligament that cannot be repaired primarily. Because osteointegration of the ligament strips is not possible in the present experiment, biomechanics of the construct cannot be fully tested.

  12. Artificial phrenoesophageal ligament. An experimental study in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sader, A A; Dantas, R O; Campos, A D; Evora, P R B

    2016-01-01

    This report deals with the preparation of a 'true' artificial phrenoesophageal ligament aimed at restoring effective anchoring of the esophagus to the diaphragm, keeping the esophagogastric sphincter in the abdomen. A total of 24 mongrel dogs were assigned to four groups: (i) Group I (n = 4): the esophageal diaphragm hiatus left wide open; (ii) Group II (n = 8): the anterolateral esophagus walls were attached to the diaphragm by the artificial ligament and the esophageal hiatus was left wide opened; (iii) Group III (n = 5): in addition to the use of the artificial ligament, the esophageal hiatus was narrowed with two retroesophageal stitches; (iv) Group IV (n = 7): the only procedure was the esophageal hiatus narrowing with two retroesophageal stitches. The phrenoesophagogastric connections were released, sparing the vagus nerves. Five animals of groups III and IV, which did not develop hiatal hernia, were submitted to esophageal manometry immediately before and 15 days after surgery. In group I, all animals developed huge sliding hiatal hernias. In group II, two dogs (25%) had a paraesophageal hernia between the two parts of the artificial ligament. In group III, neither sliding hiatal hernia nor paraesophageal hernia occurred. In group IV, two animals (28.6%) developed sliding esophageal hiatus hernia. Regarding esophageal manometry, postoperative significant difference between groups III and IV (P = 0.008) was observed. Thus, the artificial phrenoesophageal ligament maintained the esophagus firmly attached to the diaphragm in all animals and the esophagogastric sphincter pressure was significantly higher in this group.

  13. STUDY OF ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT INJURY AND ITS MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tummala Venkata

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The anterior cruciate ligament is the weaker of the two cruciate ligaments stabilizing the knee joint, and therefore gets torn easier than the posterior cruciate ligament. OBJECTIVE To determine pattern of anterior cruciate ligament injury and its management in a tertiary care center. MATERIALS AND METHODS A prospective study was carried out for two years, 28 patients with ACL injury were included. A detailed history regarding the pattern of injury was noted and ACL reconstruction was done using BT Bautograft with mini-arthrotomy and arthroscopic assisted ACL reconstruction. RESULTS The mean age of the study subjects was 30.6±7.3 years & majority were males. Majority of the ACL injury was sports related & was on the right knee. 64% underwent arthroscopic assisted ACL reconstruction & majority of them had normal range of motion of the knee. CONCLUSION Our present study concludes that most common age group involved was 20-30 years & ACL injury was more common among males. Patients with an early ACL reconstruction were more satisfied with the end result. Also, ACL reconstruction techniques using BTB auto graft leads to good ligamentous stability and function of the knee.

  14. Human periodontal ligament stem cells repair mental nerve injury*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bohan Li; Hun-Jong Jung; Soung-Min Kim; Myung-Jin Kim; Jeong Won Jahng; Jong-Ho Lee

    2013-01-01

    Human periodontal ligament stem cells are easily accessible and can differentiate into Schwann cells. We hypothesized that human periodontal ligament stem cells can be used as an alternative source for the autologous Schwann cells in promoting the regeneration of injured peripheral nerve. To validate this hypothesis, human periodontal ligament stem cells (1 × 106) were injected into the crush-injured left mental nerve in rats. Simultaneously, autologous Schwann cells (1 × 106) and PBS were also injected as controls. Real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction showed that at 5 days after injection, mRNA expression of low affinity nerve growth factor receptor was sig-nificantaly increased in the left trigeminal ganglion of rats with mental nerve injury. Sensory tests, histomorphometric evaluation and retrograde labeling demonstrated that at 2 and 4 weeks after in-jection, sensory function was significantly improved, the numbers of retrograde labeled sensory neurons and myelinated axons were significantly increased, and human periodontal ligament stem cells and autologous Schwann cells exhibited similar therapeutic effects. These findings suggest that transplantation of human periodontal ligament stem cells show a potential value in repair of mental nerve injury.

  15. Sonoanatomy and injection technique of the iliolumbar ligament.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Harmon, Dominic

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: The iliolumbar ligament plays an important biomechanic role in anchoring the spine to the pelvic ring and stabilizing the sacroiliac joint. Iliolumbar syndrome is a back pain condition caused by pathology of the iliolumbar ligament. History and physical examination are important in the assessment of back pain, but they lack sufficient specificity. Injection of small volumes of local anesthetic into the structure considered to be the source of the pain (i.e. the iliolumbar ligament) increases the specificity of the diagnostic workup. OBJECTIVE: To describe an ultrasound - guided technique for injecting the iliolumbar ligament. STUDY DESIGN: Case report based on knowledge of topographic anatomy and sonoanatomy. SETTING: Outpatient clinic. METHODS: A patient with a clinical picture suggestive of iliolumbar syndrome was selected. An ultrasound-guided injection of the iliolumbar ligament with local anesthetic was performed. We recorded the patient\\'s subjective assessment of pain and the change in range of movement and pain scores during provocative tests. RESULTS: Following the injection, the patient\\'s pain score decreased, provocation tests became negative, and the range of movement increased. LIMITATIONS: Case report. Target specificity and dispersion of local anesthetic spread not confirmed with an independent technique (i.e. magnetic resonance imaging). CONCLUSIONS: Ultrasound guidance allows the selective deposition of small volumes of local anesthetic into structures believed to cause soft tissue back pain and thus to confirm or exclude the working diagnosis. Further studies are needed to confirm our conclusions and to prove the clinical feasibility of this technique.

  16. Psychological Aspects of Recovery Following Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christino, Melissa A; Fantry, Amanda J; Vopat, Bryan G

    2015-08-01

    Recovery following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction is an arduous process that requires a significant mental and physical commitment to rehabilitation. Orthopaedic research in recent years has focused on optimizing anterior cruciate ligament surgical techniques; however, despite stable anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions, many athletes still never achieve their preinjury ability or even return to sport. Psychological factors associated with patient perceptions and functional outcomes following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction are important to acknowledge and understand. Issues related to emotional disturbance, motivation, self-esteem, locus of control, and self-efficacy can have profound effects on patients' compliance, athletic identity, and readiness to return to sport. The psychological aspects of recovery play a critical role in functional outcomes, and a better understanding of these concepts is essential to optimize the treatment of patients undergoing anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, particularly those who plan to return to sport. Identifying at-risk patients, encouraging a multidisciplinary approach to patient care, and providing early referral to a sports psychologist may improve patient outcomes and increase return-to-play rates among athletes.

  17. Anterolateral Ligament of the Knee Shows Variable Anatomy in Pediatric Specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Kevin G; Milewski, Matthew D; Cannamela, Peter C; Ganley, Theodore J; Fabricant, Peter D; Terhune, Elizabeth B; Styhl, Alexandra C; Anderson, Allen F; Polousky, John D

    2017-06-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction failure rates are highest in youth athletes. The role of the anterolateral ligament in rotational knee stability is of increasing interest, and several centers are exploring combined ACL and anterolateral ligament reconstruction for these young patients. Literature on the anterolateral ligament of the knee is sparse in regard to the pediatric population. A single study on specimens younger than age 5 years demonstrated the presence of the anterolateral ligament in only one of eight specimens; therefore, much about the prevalence and anatomy of the anterolateral ligament in pediatric specimens remains unknown. We sought to (1) investigate the presence or absence of the anterolateral ligament in prepubescent anatomic specimens; (2) describe the anatomic relationship of the anterolateral ligament to the lateral collateral ligament; and (3) describe the anatomic relationship between the anterolateral ligament and the physis. Fourteen skeletally immature knee specimens (median age, 8 years; range, 7-11 years) were dissected (12 male, two female specimens). The posterolateral structures were identified in all specimens, including the lateral collateral ligament and popliteus tendon. The presence or absence of the anterolateral ligament was documented in each specimen, along with origin, insertion, and dimensions, when applicable. The relationship of the anterolateral ligament origin to the lateral collateral ligament origin was recorded. The anterolateral ligament was identified in nine of 14 specimens. The tibial attachment point was consistently located in the same region on the proximal tibia, between the fibular head and Gerdy's tubercle; however, the femoral origin of the anterolateral ligament showed considerable variation with respect to the lateral collateral ligament origin. The median femoral origin of the anterolateral ligament was 10 mm (first interquartile 6 mm, third interquartile 13) distal to the distal

  18. Elastic Properties of the Annular Ligament of the Human Stapes—AFM Measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Kwacz, Monika; Rymuza, Zygmunt; Michałowski, Marcin; Wysocki, Jarosław

    2015-01-01

    Elastic properties of the human stapes annular ligament were determined in the physiological range of the ligament deflection using atomic force microscopy and temporal bone specimens. The annular ligament stiffness was determined based on the experimental load-deflection curves. The elastic modulus (Young’s modulus) for a simplified geometry was calculated using the Kirchhoff–Love theory for thin plates. The results obtained in this study showed that the annular ligament is a linear elastic ...

  19. Biaxial Mechanical Behavior of Swine Pelvic Floor Ligaments: Experiments and Modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Becker, Winston Reynolds

    2014-01-01

    Although mechanical alterations to pelvic floor ligaments, such as the cardinal and uterosacral ligaments, are one contributing factor to the development and progression of pelvic floor disorders, very little research has examined their mechanical properties. In this study, the first biaxial elastic and viscoelastic tests were performed on uterosacral and cardinal ligament complexes harvested from adult female swine. Biaxial elastic testing revealed that the ligaments undergo large strains an...

  20. A study of isokinetic strength and laxity with and without anterior cruciate ligament injury

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Kewwan; Jeon, Kyoungkyu; Mullineaux, David R.; Cho, Eunok

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to provide useful information for future treatments and to organize rehabilitation programs for anterior cruciate ligament injury by assessing isokinetic muscle strength and laxity of knee joints in athletes with anterior cruciate ligament injuries. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-one high school athletes with anterior cruciate ligament injuries participated in this study. Isokinetic muscle strength at 60°/sec and anterior cruciate ligament laxity for non...

  1. A study of isokinetic strength and laxity with and without anterior cruciate ligament injury

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Kewwan; Jeon, Kyoungkyu; Mullineaux, David R.; Cho, Eunok

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide useful information for future treatments and to organize rehabilitation programs for anterior cruciate ligament injury by assessing isokinetic muscle strength and laxity of knee joints in athletes with anterior cruciate ligament injuries. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-one high school athletes with anterior cruciate ligament injuries participated in this study. Isokinetic muscle strength at 60°/sec and anterior cruciate ligament laxity for non-involved ...

  2. Analysis of 3-dimensional finite element after reconstruction of impaired ankle deltoid ligament

    OpenAIRE

    Ji, Yunhan; Tang, Xianzhong; Li, Yifan; Xu, Wei; Qiu, Wenjun

    2016-01-01

    We compared four repair techniques for impaired ankle ligament deltoideum, namely Wiltberger, Deland, Kitaoka and Hintermann using a 3-dimensional finite element. We built an ankle ligament deltoideum model, including six pieces of bone structures, gristles and main ligaments around the ankle. After testing the model, we built an impaired ligament deltoideum model plus four reconstruction models. Subsequently, different levels of force on ankles with different flexion were imposed and ankle b...

  3. Round ligament lipoma mimicking acute appendicitis in a 24-week pregnant female: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, T J; Paulk, D G

    2013-04-01

    An exhaustive search of the literature using the Pub Med database revealed no reports of round ligament lipomas mimicking acute appendicitis in pregnant patients. There are relatively few articles on round ligament lipomas and even less on round ligament lipomas during pregnancy. This case report is on a 27-year-old 24-week pregnant female who presented with signs and symptoms similar to acute appendicitis who in fact had a large right pelvic round ligament lipoma that was causing her pain.

  4. Lateral collateral ligament deficiency of the elbow joint: A modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Munsur; Cil, Akin; Bogener, James W; Stylianou, Antonis P

    2016-09-01

    A computational model capable of predicting the effects of lateral collateral ligament deficiency of the elbow joint would be a valuable tool for surgical planning and prediction of the long-term consequences of ligament deficiency. The purpose of this study was to simulate lateral collateral ligament deficiency during passive flexion using a computational multibody elbow joint model and investigate the effects of ligament insufficiency on the kinematics, ligament loads, and articular contact characteristics (area, pressure). The elbow was placed initially at approximately 20° of flexion and a 345 mm vertical downward motion profile was applied over 40 s to the humerus head. The vertical displacement induced flexion from the initial position to a maximum flexion angle of 135°. The study included simulations for intact, radial collateral ligament deficient, lateral ulnar collateral ligament deficient, and combined radial and lateral ulnar collateral ligament deficient elbow. For each condition, relative bone kinematics, contact pressure, contact area, and intact ligament forces were predicted. Intact and isolated radial collateral ligament deficient elbow simulations were almost identical for all observed outcomes. Minor differences in kinematics, contact area and pressure were observed for the isolated lateral ulnar collateral ligament deficient elbow compared to the intact elbow, but no elbow dislocation was detected. However, sectioning both ligaments together induced substantial differences in kinematics, contact area, and contact pressure, and caused complete dislocation of the elbow joint. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1645-1655, 2016.

  5. [Variations in the calcaneo-fibular ligament (lig. calcaneofibulare). Application to the kinematics of the ankle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trouilloud, P; Dia, A; Grammont, P; Gelle, M C; Autissier, J M

    1988-03-01

    The authors observe variations in the calcaneo-fibular ligament because this ligament controls two articulations, the talo-crural and the subtalar. This study is based on the dissection of the ankle of 20 specimens. The calcaneo-fibular ligament is reinforced by the ventral and lateral talo-calcaneus ligaments with variations. 3 types of disposition have been described. Type A: A lateral talo-calcaneal ligament reinforces the calcaneo-fibular ligament. These two ligaments are divergent on the proximal, medial, or distal part. Type B: There is an independent lateral talo-calcaneal ligament forward of the calcaneo-fibular ligament. Type C: A ventral talo-calcaneal ligament is observed, parallel to the interosseous ligament. The authors consider the consequences of variation in the lateral ligaments of the ankle for the functioning of the tibio-tarsal articulation, the subtalar articulation and the astragalo-scaphoid articulation in order to propose specific radiographic examination of the kinematics of the ankle.

  6. Patellofemoral ligament reconstruction in a patient with Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fardin Mirzatolooei

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent dislocation of patella may occur in patients with ligament laxity. Method of treatment in this condition is controversial but patellofemoral ligament reconstruction is the most accepted method. We present a patient with Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome and recurrent patellar dislocation who managed successfully by patellofemoral ligament reconstruction.

  7. A Comparison of Anterior and Posterior Cruciate Ligament Laxity Between Female and Male Basketball Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weesner, Carol L.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament and posterior cruciate ligament laxity of 90 uninjured male and female high school players were measured. No significant differences were found, indicating that the greater female injury rate may be due to inadequate conditioning, not greater knee ligament laxity. (Author/MT)

  8. On the scaling behavior of hardness with ligament diameter of nanoporous-Au: Constrained motion of dislocations along the ligaments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viswanath, R. N.; Polaki, S. R.; Rajaraman, R.; Abhaya, S.; Chirayath, V. A.; Amarendra, G.; Sundar, C. S. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102, TamilNadu (India)

    2014-06-09

    The scaling behavior of hardness with ligament diameter and vacancy defect concentration in nanoporous Au (np-Au) has been investigated using a combination of Vickers Hardness, Scanning electron microscopy, and positron lifetime measurements. It is shown that for np-Au, the hardness scales with the ligament diameter with an exponent of −0.3, that is, at variance with the conventional Hall-Petch exponent of −0.5 for bulk systems, as seen in the controlled experiments on cold worked Au with varying grain size. The hardness of np-Au correlates with the vacancy concentration C{sub V} within the ligaments, as estimated from positron lifetime experiments, and scales as C{sub V}{sup 1/2}, pointing to the interaction of dislocations with vacancies. The distinctive Hall-Petch exponent of −0.3 seen for np-Au, with ligament diameters in the range of 5–150 nm, is rationalized by invoking the constrained motion of dislocations along the ligaments.

  9. Anterolateral ligament abnormalities in patients with acute anterior cruciate ligament rupture are associated with lateral meniscal and osseous injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyck, Pieter van; Smet, Eline de; Gielen, Jan L.; Parizel, Paul M. [Antwerp University Hospital and University of Antwerp, Department of Radiology, Antwerp (Belgium); Clockaerts, Stefan [University College Hospitals, Department of Orthopaedics, London (United Kingdom); Vanhoenacker, Filip M. [Antwerp University Hospital and University of Antwerp, Department of Radiology, Antwerp (Belgium); Ghent University Hospital and University of Ghent, Department of Radiology, Ghent (Belgium); AZ St-Maarten, Department of Radiology, Antwerp (Belgium); Lambrecht, Valerie [Ghent University Hospital and University of Ghent, Department of Radiology, Ghent (Belgium); Wouters, Kristien [Antwerp University Hospital and University of Antwerp, Department of Biostatistics, Antwerp (Belgium)

    2016-10-15

    To determine the frequency of anterolateral ligament (ALL) injury in patients with acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture and to analyse its associated injury patterns. Ninety patients with acute ACL rupture for which MRI was obtained within 8 weeks after the initial trauma were retrospectively identified. Two radiologists assessed the status of the ALL on MRI by consensus. The presence or absence of an ALL abnormality was compared with the existence of medial and lateral meniscal tears diagnosed during arthroscopy. Associated collateral ligament and osseous injuries were documented with MRI. Forty-one of 90 knees (46 %) demonstrated ALL abnormalities on MRI. Of 49 knees with intact ALL, 15 (31 %) had a torn lateral meniscus as compared to 25 torn lateral menisci in 41 knees (61 %) with abnormal ALL (p = 0.008). Collateral ligament (p ≤ 0.05) and osseous injuries (p = 0.0037) were more frequent and severe in ALL-injured as compared with ALL-intact knees. ALL injuries are fairly common in patients with acute ACL rupture and are statistically significantly associated with lateral meniscal, collateral ligament and osseous injuries. (orig.)

  10. Broad ligament pregnancy a diagnostic dilemma: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Gupta

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Broad ligament pregnancy is one of the rarest forms of ectopic pregnancy with high risk of maternal mortality. Although ultrasonography is usually helpful in making the diagnosis but it is mostly established during laparotomy. 34 year old G2P1 with previous caesarean section reported at 8th month of pregnancy with inability to perceive foetal movements. Ultrasonography confirmed intrauterine fetal demise. Patient was taken for caesarean section after failed induction. Intraoperative diagnosis of broad ligament pregnancy was made and broad ligament along with fetus, sac, fallopian tube and ovary was excised. Post-operative period was uneventful. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2016; 5(7.000: 2478-2480

  11. Compartment syndrome with mononeuropathies after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindle, Brett J; Murthy, Naveen; Stolp, Kathryn

    2015-05-01

    Compartment syndrome rarely follows anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. However, when it does, it may result in mononeuropathies that are amenable to neurolysis. The authors of this study present an 18-yr-old woman who sustained a right anterior cruciate ligament tear and underwent uneventful anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using femoral and popliteal nerve blocks. Postoperatively, she developed compartment syndrome requiring emergent fasciotomies. At 11 wks after fasciotomy, results of electrophysiologic tests showed evidence of severe fibular and tibial neuropathies. Magnetic resonance images showed extensive tricompartmental myonecrosis. Fibular and tibial neurolysis as well as decompression were performed, followed by intensive outpatient rehabilitation. At the 6-mo follow-up, she reported resolution of pain as well as significant improvement in sensation, strength, and function. Early recognition and intervention are crucial to prevent serious neurologic damage. Excessive tourniquet pressure and anesthetic nerve blocks may have been responsible.

  12. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries in Wakeboarding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starr, Harlan M.; Sanders, Brett

    2012-01-01

    Background: Wakeboarding is an increasingly popular sport that involves aggressive stunts with high risk for lower extremity injury, including anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture. Little has been reported on prevalence or mechanism of ACL injury while wakeboarding. Hypothesis: The prevalence of ACL injury in wakeboarding approaches that of other high-risk sports. Analyzing the mechanism of ACL injury may aid in future efforts of prevention. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiology study. Methods: In sum, 1580 surveys were sent internationally to professional and amateur wakeboarders. The survey questioned the participants on their history of an ACL tear while wakeboarding and asked them to describe the mechanism of injury and treatment. Results: A total of 123 surveys were returned. Of this group, 52 (42.3%) acknowledged having had an ACL tear while wakeboarding. The majority described feeling a pop or buckle after attempting to land a high jump. Only 5 participants (13.5%) described a rotational mechanism created by catching the board edge in the water. Thirty-seven participants (71.15%) said that the injury ruined their ability to wakeboard before reconstruction, and 41 (78.85%) had the injury repaired surgically. Conclusion: The prevalence of ACL tears in this data set, 42.3%, is the highest reported in the literature for wakeboarding and one of the highest for any sport. The main mechanism of injury appears to involve axial compression while one lands in a provocative position; it is not related to a rotational force created by fixed bindings. The injury should be surgically repaired to effectively continue the sport. Further study is needed to determine if wakeboarding represents a high-risk sport for ACL injury. Clinical Significance: Wakeboarding may be a high-risk sport for ACL injury. Noncontact axial compression appears to be the main mechanism of injury. PMID:23016104

  13. Functional bundles of the medial patellofemoral ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hui Jun; Wang, Fei; Chen, Bai Cheng; Su, Yan Ling; Zhang, Zhan Chi; Yan, Chang Bao

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the anatomy and evaluate the function of the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL). Anatomical dissection was performed on 12 fresh-frozen knee specimens. The MPFL is a condensation of capsular fibers, which originates at the medial femoral condyle. It runs transversely and inserts to the medial edge of the patella. With the landmark of the medial femur epicondyle (MFE), the femoral origination was located: just 8.90 ± 3.27 mm proximally and 13.47 ± 3.68 mm posteriorly to the MFE. The most interesting finding in present study was functional bundles of its patellar insertion. Approximately from the femoral origination point, fibers of the MPFL form two relatively concentrated fiber bundles: the inferior-straight bundle and the superior-oblique bundle. The whole length of each was 71.78 ± 5.51 and 73.67 ± 5.40 mm, respectively. The included angle between bundles was 15.1° ± 2.1°. Although the superior-oblique bundle and the inferior-straight bundle run on the patellar MPFL inferiorly and superiorly, respectively, as their name indicates, the two bundles are not entirely separated, which make MPFL one intact structure. The inferior-straight bundle is the main static soft tissue restraints where the superior-oblique bundle associated with vastus medialis obliquus (VMO) is to serve as the main dynamic soft tissue restraints. So this finding may provide the theoretical foundation for the anatomical reconstruction of the MPFL and shed lights on the future researchers.

  14. MRI features of the anterolateral ligament of the knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taneja, Atul K. [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Musculoskeletal Radiology Division, Imaging Department, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Hospital do Coracao (HCor), and Teleimagem, Musculoskeletal Imaging, Diagnostic Center, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Miranda, Frederico C.; Braga, Cesar A.P.; Hartmann, Luiz G.C.; Santos, Durval C.B.; Rosemberg, Laercio A. [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Musculoskeletal Radiology Division, Imaging Department, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Gill, Corey M. [Department of Neurology and Cancer Center, Pappas Center for Neuro-Oncology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-11-27

    Evaluate the visibility and describe the anatomical features of the anterolateral ligament of the knee using MRI. Magnetic resonance imaging examinations of the knee were independently reviewed by two musculoskeletal radiologists and assessed for the visibility of the anterolateral ligament under direct cross-referencing of axial and coronal images as complete, partial, or non-visible. Distal insertion site (tibial, meniscal), distance to lateral tibial plateau, measurements (length, width, thickness), and associated imaging findings were also tabulated. Clinical and surgical records were also reviewed. Seventy MRI scans from 60 consecutive subjects were included in the study. Mean age was 40 years, body mass 74.9 kg, and height 1.72 m. The subject population was 53 % male, most of the knees were from the left side (51 %), and chronic pain was the main clinical symptom (40 %). Nine knees (13 %) had undergone previous surgery. The anterolateral ligament was identified in 51 % of the knees: completely visible in 11 % and partially visible in 40 %. In all visible cases, the distal insertion site was identified on the tibia, with a mean distance of 5.7 mm to the plateau. A completely visible ligament had a mean length of 33.2 mm, thickness of 5.6 mm, and width of 1.9 mm. Inter-observer agreement for ligament presence was significant (κ = 0.7). Statistical analyses showed a trend to be more visible in men, with a longer length compared with women. Magnetic resonance imaging clearly identifies the anterolateral ligament of the knee in slightly more than half of cases, being partially visible in most of them. In all cases, a tibial insertion is characterized. (orig.)

  15. Ligament balancing in total knee arthroplasty—Medial stabilizing technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuichi Matsuda

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Ligament balancing is one of the most important surgical techniques for successful total knee arthroplasty. It has traditionally been recommended that medial and lateral as well as flexion and extension gaps are equal. This article reviews the relevant literature and discusses the clinical importance of the aforementioned gaps. Current evidence indicates that achieving medial stability throughout the range of motion should be a high priority in ligament balancing in total knee arthroplasty. Finally, the medial stabilising surgical technique, which aims to achieve good medial stability in posterior cruciate-retaining total knee arthroplasty, is introduced.

  16. Rare case of giant broad ligament fibroid with myxoid degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R R Godbole

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant fibroids are known to arise from the uterus, although very rarely from extra-uterine sites. Among extra-uterine fibroids, broad ligament fibroids generally achieve enormous size and generally present with pressure symptom like bladder and bowel dysfunction. Myxoid degeneration is a rare complication of benign fibroid, where presence of cystic changes mimics the metastatic malignant ovarian tumor. We report a case of true broad ligament fibroid measured about 13 kg. This case is reported for its rarity and the diagnostic difficulties in differentiating malignant ovarian tumor and benign fibroid with myxoid degeneration.

  17. Arthroscopic double-bundle posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction surgical technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanelli, Gregory C; Beck, John D; Edson, Craig J

    2010-06-01

    The keys to successful posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction are to identify and treat all pathology, use strong graft material, accurately place tunnels in anatomic insertion sites, minimize graft bending, use a mechanical graft tensioning device, use primary and back-up graft fixation, and use the appropriate postoperative rehabilitation program. Adherence to these technical principles results in successful single-bundle and double-bundle arthroscopic transtibial tunnel PCL reconstruction based on stress radiography, arthrometer, knee ligament rating scales, and patient satisfaction measurements.

  18. Pathologic conditions of the ligaments and tendons of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Dieb, Adam; Yu, Joseph S; Huang, Guo-Shu; Farooki, Shella

    2002-09-01

    Excellent spatial resolution and unparalleled contrast resolution have allowed MRI to emerge as the dominant imaging modality for diagnosis of ligament and tendon pathology of the knee joint This article presents several important mechanisms of injury associated with tendon and ligament disruptions. When present, the pattern of bone contusions may reveal the vector of force. When one is aware of the mechanism of injury, it is possible to analyze systematically the structures of the knee and maximize the detection of pathology. Recognition of a knee dislocation pattern is important because the diagnosis may be unsuspected, and the clinician may have to be alerted to the possibility of vascular and neural injury.

  19. Acute finger injuries: part I. Tendons and ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggit, Jeffrey C; Meko, Christian J

    2006-03-01

    Improper diagnosis and treatment of finger injuries can cause deformity and dysfunction over time. A basic understanding of the complex anatomy of the finger and of common tendon and ligament injury mechanisms can help physicians properly diagnose and treat finger injuries. Evaluation includes a general musculoskeletal examination as well as radiography (oblique, anteroposterior, and true lateral views). Splinting and taping are effective treatments for tendon and ligament injuries. Treatment should restrict the motion of injured structures while allowing uninjured joints to remain mobile. Although family physicians are usually the first to evaluate patients with finger injuries, it is important to recognize when a referral is needed to ensure optimal outcomes.

  20. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Williams

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This report details the reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament in an 18-year-old man with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS. The reduced mechanical properties of the tissue in EDS can pose a challenge to the orthopaedic surgeon. In this case, we describe the use of a hamstring autograft combined with a Ligament Advanced Reinforcement System (LARS. There was a good radiographical, clinical, and functional outcome after two years. This technique gave a successful outcome in the reconstruction of the ACL in a patient with EDS and therefore may help surgeons faced with the same clinical scenario.

  1. Anterior Cruciate Ligament: Structure, Injuries and Regenerative Treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negahi Shirazi, Ali; Chrzanowski, Wojciech; Khademhosseini, Ali; Dehghani, Fariba

    2015-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of the most vulnerable ligaments of the knee. ACL impairment results in episodic instability, chondral and meniscal injury and early osteoarthritis. The poor self-healing capacity of ACL makes surgical treatment inevitable. Current ACL reconstructions include a substitution of torn ACL via biological grafts such as autograft, allograft. This review provides an insight of ACL structure, orientation and properties followed by comparing the performance of various constructs that have been used for ACL replacement. New approaches, undertaken to induce ACL regeneration and fabricate biomimetic scaffolds, are also discussed.

  2. Ultrasonographic diagnosis of round ligament varicosities mimicking inguinal hernia: report of two cases with literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Kyeong Hwa; Yoon, Jung Hee [Dept. of Radiology, Inje University Haeundae Paik Hospital, College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Round ligament varicosities are rare, and the mass mimics an inguinal hernia. Round ligament varicosities should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a groin swelling in a female, especially during pregnancy. The diagnosis of round ligament varicosities can be established on grayscale and color Doppler ultrasonography. We report two cases of round ligament varicosities in a 33-year-old non pregnant woman and a 28-year-old pregnant woman, and these patients were diagnosed using ultrasonography. We also reviewed the literature on round ligament varicosities including the present cases. Ultrasonography is diagnostic and can prevent unnecessary surgical intervention and associated morbidity.

  3. Experience of CT arthrography of the cruciate ligaments of the knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiser, M.; Rupp, N.; Karpf, P.M.; Feuerbach, S.; Paar, O.

    1982-10-01

    CT arthrography of the cruciate ligaments in 512 patients has shown that this new procedure provides a reproducible method for demonstrating these ligaments and for making a confident diagnosis of abnormalities. A classification of cruciate ligament lesions into five injury types was introduced in order to distinguish the morphological CT findings. The indication for CT arthrography of the cruciate ligaments is uncertainty after clinical examination. CT can help materially in deciding on treatment and in planning surgery, particularly in cases of possible knee joint instability with a long history, in recent cases with marked muscle spasm and in patients with isolated anterior ligament rupture.

  4. Sex Differences in Patient-Reported Outcomes After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: Data From the Swedish Knee Ligament Register

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ageberg, Eva; Forssblad, Magnus; Herbertsson, Pär

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Female gender is a risk factor for sustaining anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. However, little is known about possible sex differences in patients with ACL injury/reconstruction. PURPOSE: To study sex differences in patient-reported outcomes before and at 1 and 2 years after ACL...... reconstruction and to present reference values. STUDY DESIGN: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. METHODS: Between 2005 and 2008, 10 164 patients (mean age, 27 years; SD, 9.8; 42% females) with primary ACL reconstruction were registered in the Swedish national knee ligament register. There were 4438 (44...

  5. Anatomy of the Alar Ligament: Part II: Variations of Its Attachment onto the Dens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardi, Juan P; Iwanaga, Joe; Schmidt, Cameron; Rustagi, Tarush; Chapman, Jens R; Oskouian, Rod J; Tubbs, R Shane

    2017-08-09

    Various authors have described the morphology of the alar ligaments; however, there are no reports of a cadaveric study focusing on their attachments onto the dens. The purpose of this study was to use fresh cadaveric specimens to describe in detail different attachment patterns of the alar ligaments onto the dens. This study used 22 sides from 11 fresh frozen cadaveric heads. Specimens were obtained from 8 men and 3 women who were 67-99 years old at death. Dissection of the exact attachment of the alar ligaments onto the dens was observed from posterior, superior, and anterior views under the surgical microscope. From a posterior view, 6 alar ligaments passed over the tip of the dens, and 16 alar ligaments attached onto the posterolateral part of the dens; the right and left ligaments had no continuity. From a superior view, the alar ligament was classified in 2 ways: depending on the covered area of the dens (entirely or posterior two thirds) and continuity of the alar ligament (transversely, separately, or combination). Fourteen alar ligaments covered the posterior two thirds of the dens. From an anterior view, in 1 specimen, the alar ligament extended to the anterior surface of the dens. Wide posterolateral anchoring to the dens coupled with the nearly horizontal trajectory explains the biomechanical advantage of the alar ligaments in undertaking a stabilizing function in limiting head rotation that would otherwise be ineffective in the case of weaker attachments or a more vertical orientation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The response of periodontal ligament collagen fibres and the thickness of inserting periodontal ligament fibre bundles at cementum pressure sites of fixed orthodontic appliances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noengki Prameswari

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has indicated that there were several reactions in cellular activity and periodontal ligament collagen fibre as a response after orthodontic force application. Cementum has function to give attachment to collagen fibres of the periodontal ligament, maintaining the integrity of the root, helping to maintain the tooth in its functional position in the mouth, and being involved in tooth repair and regeneration so in the orthodontic tooth movement can induce changes in the cementum. The aim of this research is to investigate that fixed orthodontic appliance can change the amount of periodontal ligament collagen fibre and the thickness of inserting periodontal ligament fibre bundles at pressure site of cementum. This experimental study was held in laboratory with post test only control group design. Twenty two (22 premolar sample from 11 patient were divided into 2 groups. K group as control group (without treatment and P group as treatment group (with using fixed orthodontic appliance. The amount of periodontal ligament collagen fibre and thickness of inserting periodontal ligament fibre bundles was examined by light microscopy and measured by image tool program. In the summary, there are increasing amount of periodontal ligament collagen fibre and the thickness of inserting periodontal ligament fibre bundles at cementum pressure sites as a normal response to remodeling and regenerating to orthodontic appliance and have function for strengthen adhering tooth cementum to the periodontal ligament.

  7. Common Types and Countermeasures of Ankle Ligament Injury ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-09-14

    Sep 14, 2017 ... different hospitals from June 2011 to June 2015 for stochastic ... injury of basketball players and promote physical rehabilitation of ... prone to ankle ligament injury in training or competition, which has a direct ... causing intense repeated impact of articular surface, ... However, without effective treatment,.

  8. Ganglion cyst of the cruciate ligament with atlantoaxial subluxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ching-Yi; Lai, Hung-Yi; Lee, Shih-Tseng

    2013-10-01

    Ganglion cysts of the cruciate ligament are rare and sometimes asymptomatic. The authors present three cases of ganglion cysts of the cruciate ligament with atlantoaxial subluxation, which has rarely been reported previously. Generally, ganglion cysts of the cruciate ligament are reported as case reports. Several theories regarding the process of cyst formation and the development of treatment options have been described. However, trans-oral decompression with total removal of the cyst may be one of the options for treatment of this kind of disease. A retrospective review of three patients, two female and one male patient, with a mean age of 68 years was conducted. The operation performed was a trans-oral decompression with cyst removal for all patients. Clinical outcomes were evaluated after the operation. All patients underwent trans-oral decompression with total removal of the cyst, followed by posterior fusion and pathologic examination of the cyst, revealing myxoid stroma with an absence of synovial linings. The ganglion cysts and synovial cysts of the cruciate ligament are two different diseases with different presentation, pathogenesis, pathophysiology, and pathologic findings.

  9. Nocardia Septic Arthritis Complicating an Anterior Cruciate Ligament Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Elaine X L; Cheong, Elaine Y L; Boutlis, Craig S; Chen, Darren B; Liu, Eunice Y-T; McKew, Genevieve L

    2015-08-01

    Nocardia infection following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) allograft reconstruction is a rare occurrence. We report a case of Nocardia infection of an allograft ACL reconstruction and septic arthritis of the knee joint due to an organism most similar to the novel Nocardia species Nocardia aobensis.

  10. Morphology and History of Spinal Ligaments from Three Primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-01

    anatomical geometry of the vertebrae has been described in the literature by Swindler and Wood (1973), Kapandji (1974), Hamilton (1976), Gray (1977...131, 1978. 6. Heyling, D.J.A., "The supraspinous and Intraspinous Ligaments in the Dog, Cat and Baboon," J. Anati, 130(2):223-228, 1980. -. Kapandji

  11. Anatomy and histology of the transverse humeral ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Brian J; Narvy, Steven J; Omid, Reza; Atkinson, Roscoe D; Vangsness, C Thomas

    2013-10-01

    The classic literature describes the transverse humeral ligament (THL) as a distinct anatomic structure with a role in biceps tendon stability; however, recent literature suggests that it is not a distinct anatomic structure. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the gross and microscopic anatomy of the THL, including a specific investigation of the histology of this ligament. Thirty frozen, embalmed cadaveric specimens were dissected to determine the gross anatomy of the THL. Seven specimens were evaluated histologically for the presence of mechanoreceptors and free nerve endings. Two tissue layers were identified in the area described as the THL. In the deep layer, fibers of the subscapularis tendon were found to span the bicipital groove with contributions from the coracohumeral ligament and the supraspinatus tendon. Superficial to this layer was a fibrous fascial covering consisting of distinct bands of tissue. Neurohistology staining revealed the presence of free nerve endings but no mechanoreceptors. This study's findings demonstrate that the THL is a distinct structure continuous with the rotator cuff tendons and the coracohumeral ligament. The finding of free nerve endings in the THL suggests a potential role as a shoulder pain generator.

  12. Arthroscopic management of mucoid degeneration of anterior cruciate ligament

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chirag H Chudasama

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: Mucoid hypertrophy of the ACL should be suspected in elderly persons presenting pain on terminal extension or flexion without preceding trauma, especially when there is no associated meniscal lesion or ligamentous insufficiency. They respond well to a judicious arthroscopic release of the ACL with notchplasty.

  13. Anatomical study on the anterolateral ligament of the knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilo Partezani Helito

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Describe the knee anterolateral ligament (ALL and establish its anatomical marks of origin and insertion. METHODS: Dissection of the anterolateral aspect of the knee was performed in six cadavers. After isolation of the ALL, its lenght, width and thickness were measured as its places of origin and insertion. The ALL origin was documented in relation to the lateral collateral ligament (LCL origin and the insertion was documented in relation to the Gerdy tubercle, fibullar head and lateral meniscus. After the first two dissections, the ligament was removed and sent to histologycal analysis. RESULTS: The ALL was clearly identified in all knees. Its origin in the lateral epycondile was on average 0.5 mm distal and 2.5 mm anterior to the LCL. In the tibia, two insertions were observed, one in the lateral meniscus and another in the proximal tibia, about 4.5 mm distal to the articular cartilage, between the Gerdy tubercle and the fibullar head. The average measures obtained were: 35.1 mm lenght, 6.8 mm width and 2.6 mm thickness. In the ligament histological analysis, dense connective tissue was observed. CONCLUSION: The ALL is a constant structure in the knee anterolateral region. Its origin is anterior and distal to the LCL origin. In the tibia, it has two insertions, one in the lateral meniscus and another in the proximal tibia between the Gerdy tubercle and the fibullar head.

  14. Degenerative Suspensory Ligament Desmitis – A New Reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslava Halper*, Ahrar Khan1 and P. O. Eric Mueller2

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Degenerative suspensory ligament desmitis (DSLD is a chronic, debilitating disease occurring primarily in Peruvian Pasos and Peruvian Paso crosses. However, many other breeds are afflicted as well. DSLD is characterized by a slowly progressing bilateral or quadrilateral lameness. Typically, the owner does not recall any trauma or performance related injury. Fetlock effusion, static and dynamic hyperextension and degenerative joint disease are hallmarks on physical examination. Ultrasonography of affected ligaments reveals diffuse loss of echogenicity, and an irregular fiber pattern. Though until recently DSLD was considered a collagen disorder strictly limited to suspensory ligaments (SLs, our data show that it is a systemic disease involving tissues with high content of collagen. We have identified abnormal accumulations of proteoglycans not only in the SLs, but also in the superficial and deep digital flexor tendons, patellar and nuchal ligaments, aorta, coronary arteries and sclerae of DSLD-affected horses. Our most recent data point to the presence of an abnormal form of decorin in these proteoglycan deposits. This decorin also exhibited altered biological activity. Treatment for DSLD-affected horses is empirical and directed at minimizing musculoskeletal pain and providing support for the suspensory apparatus. Restricted exercise, supportive bandages and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs provide some, but usually only temporary relief. Unfortunately, unrelenting pain, severe lameness and suffering require all too often humane euthanasia.

  15. Benign Multicystic Mesothelioma in the Left Round Ligament: Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, So Young; Yi, Boem Ha; Lee, Hae Kyung; Park, Seong Jin; Cho, Gyu Seok; Kwak, Jeong Ja [Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-02-15

    Benign multicystic mesothelioma is a rare mesothelial lesion that forms multicystic masses in the upper abdomen, pelvis, and retroperitoneum. Most cases have a benign course. We present the ultrasound and MR findings of benign multicystic mesothelioma in the left round ligament, which caused a left inguinal hernia in a 46-year-old woman.

  16. Miniopen coracohumeral ligament release and manipulation for idiopathic frozen shoulder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelsalam Eid

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the management of idiopathic frozen shoulder, manipulation under anaesthesia is known to have serious potential complications including fractures and intra-articular injuries. Arthroscopy is a safer treatment modality but requires special instruments, experience, and involves added cost. The aim of this work was to study the use of miniopen Coracohumeral ligament release and manipulation of the shoulder as a safe and simple method of treating idiopathic frozen shoulder that could be performed as a quick procedure under short duration anaesthesia obtaining a significant improvement of shoulder function while avoiding complications that are feared to occur with the use of manipulation under anaesthesia. Miniopen Coracohumeral ligament release is performed through a 3-cm incision. The Coracohumeral ligament is divided, and then the shoulder is manipulated without undue force. A case series including fifteen patients (19 shoulders with idiopathic frozen shoulder operated by this technique is described. Miniopen Coracohumeral ligament release and manipulation is a quick procedure that may be performed under short duration anaesthesia obtaining a significant improvement of shoulder function meanwhile avoiding complications that are feared to occur with the use of manipulation under anaesthesia.

  17. Editorial Commentary: Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: Auto or Allo?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Nikhil N

    2016-01-01

    Considerable controversy exists regarding appropriate graft choice for patients undergoing anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Allografts pretreated with high-dose irradiation should be avoided. Otherwise, multiple factors should be considered to individualize patient decision making, including patient age and activity level, graft type, and fixation type.

  18. Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction in a Below-Knee Amputee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherif El-Tawil

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Patellar instability is a common finding in patients with below-knee amputation and yet management options are not commonly described in the literature. We describe the first reported case of a medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction using allograft in a patient with a below-knee amputation. Clinical outcome at two-year follow-up remains very good.

  19. Reconstruction of chronic acromioclavicular joint disruption with artificial ligament prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chouhan Devendra Kumar

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: Management of Rockwood type 3 acromioclavicular disruptions is a matter of debate. Should we adopt conservative or operative measures at first presentation? It is not clear but most of the evidences are in favour of conservative management. We present our expe-rience in managing these patients surgically. Methods: We present a prospective series of eight cases of chronic Rockwood type 3 acromioclavicular joint disruptions treated surgically. Anatomical reconstruction of the coracoclavicular ligament was done by artificial braided polyester ligament prosthesis. Results: All the patients were able to perform daily activities from an average of the 14th postoperative day. All patients felt an improvement in pain, with decrease in ave-rage visual analogue scale from preoperative 6.5 points (range 3-9 points to 2.0 points (range 0-5 points, Constant score from 59% to 91% and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons shoulder score from 65 to 93 points postoperatively. These results improved or at least remained stationary on midterm follow-up, and no deterioration was recorded at an average follow-up of 46 months. Conclusion: This midterm outcome analysis of the artificial ligament prosthesis is the first such follow-up study with prosthesis. Our results are encouraging and justify the further use and evaluation of this relatively new and easily reproducible technique. Key words: Acromioclavicular joint; Prostheses and implants; Reconstructive surgical procedures; Ligaments

  20. The effect of anterior cruciate ligament injury on bone curvature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hunter, D J; Lohmander, Stefan; Makovey, J

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Investigate the 5-year longitudinal changes in bone curvature after acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, and identify predictors of such changes. METHODS: In the KANON-trial (ISRCTN 84752559), 111/121 young active adults with an acute ACL tear to a previously un-injured knee ...

  1. Patella fracture following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milankov Miroslav

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The most frequent procedure in treatment of acute or chronic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL rupture is the so called bone-tendon-bone reconstruction. A transverse dislocated patella fracture is a rare complication of this procedure with an incidence of 0.23%-2.3%. In a five year period, (1998-2002, 407 arthroscopic reconstructions of the anterior cruciate ligaments were done at our Clinic, and there was only one case of patella fracture. Case report An 18-year-old female patient, a handball player, suffered an acute rupture of anterior cruciate ligament of the left knee, so arthroscopic bone-tendon-bone reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament was performed. After adequate skin incision, a bone graft was taken from the patella and upper part of trapezoid tibia, which was 25 mm long, 10 mm wide and 5 mm thick, together with a part of patellar ligament. After the remains of the anterior cruciate ligament had been arthroscopically removed, tunnels were made in tibia and femur and a graft was inserted and fixed with two metal interference screws. Knee stability was tested, and drainage was put in the knee joint. The wound was closed by layers. The quadriceps exercises and passive knee movements started immediately. Full range of movements was accomplished six weeks later when the patient started to walk with full weight-bearing on her operated leg. Three weeks later, (nine weeks after the operation, the patient has accidentally lost her balance and fell. A transverse, dislocated fracture of the left patella was diagnosed and osteosynthesis of the fractured patella with two Kirschner wires and a metallic loop was performed. Postoperatively, full range of movement was allowed. Six months later, the patient felt no pain, there was no swelling, full range of knee movement was achieved, while the Lachman Test was identical in both knees and the pivot shift test was negative. Discussion Fracture of patella after ACL reconstruction is

  2. Study on the nuchal ligament ossification on lateral cephalometric radiograph

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Chang Hyeon [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence and radiographic characteristics of the nuchal ligament ossification on lateral cephalometric radiographs in Koreans. I review and interpreted the lateral cephalometric radiographs from 4,558 patients (1,857 males and 2,701 females, age range from 2 to 79 years) who visited the Kyungpook National University Dental Hospital from January 1, 2008 to February 3, 2009. I grouped the shapes of nuchal ligament ossification as round, rod-like, and segmented shape. And localized the ossification as the involvement of anterior cervical vertebral body. The data were analyzed by using chi-squared test with two-tailed and at a 5% significance level. Among those who showed the nuchal ligament ossification, the mean age of the 143 males was 51.1 and that of the 97 females was 48.0 years. It was not observed completely below teens, and was observed 1% in twenties, 6.1% in thirties, 18.6% in forties, and 26.3% over fifties. It was significantly prevalent in older age group (P<0.01) and in males than females among the same age group (P<0.05). The shapes of nuchal ligament ossification were as follows in order of frequency : rod-like (49.2%), round (30.4%), and segmented (20.4%). The highest involvement of ossification was found at the level of C5 (67.9%), C4 (29.2%), C6 (22.9%), C3 (3.3%), C7 (2.9%), C2 (0.8%), and C1 (0.4%). The nuchal ligament ossifications on lateral cephalometric radiographs were showed as round, rodlike, or segmented shape. The nuchal ligament ossification is often observed after the age of 40 and is observed more frequently in males than females. The highest shape of nuchal ligament ossification was rod-like shape and the highest involvement of cervical spine was C5.

  3. The biomechanical function of the anterolateral ligament of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Erin M; Gee, Albert O; Spiekerman, Charles; Cavanagh, Peter R

    2015-03-01

    Recent anatomic investigations of the lateral structures of the knee have identified a new ligament, called the anterolateral ligament (ALL). To date, the anterolateral ligament has not been biomechanically tested to determine its function. The ALL of the knee will resist internal rotation at high angles of flexion but will not resist anterior drawer forces. Controlled laboratory study. Eleven cadaveric knees were subjected to 134 N of anterior drawer at flexion angles between 0° and 90° and separately to 5 N·m of internal rotation at the same flexion angles. The in situ forces of the ALL, anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), and lateral collateral ligament (LCL) were determined by the principle of superposition. The contribution of the ALL during internal rotation increased significantly with increasing flexion, whereas that of the ACL decreased significantly. At knee flexion angles greater than 30°, the contribution of the ALL exceeded that of the ACL. During anterior drawer, the forces in the ALL were significantly less than the forces in the ACL at all flexion angles (P rotation (P rotation at flexion angles greater than 35°; however, it is minimally loaded during anterior drawer at all flexion angles. The ACL is the primary resister during anterior drawer at all flexion angles and during internal rotation at flexion angles less than 35°. Damage to the ALL of the knee could result in knee instability at high angles of flexion. It is possible that a positive pivot-shift sign may be observed in some patients with an intact ACL but with damage to the ALL. This work may have implications for extra-articular reconstruction in patients with chronic anterolateral instability. © 2015 The Author(s).

  4. Stress changes of lateral collateral ligament at different

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHONG Yan-lin

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】 Objective: To create a 3-dimensional finite element model of knee ligaments and to analyse the stress changes of lateral collateral ligament (LCL with or without displaced movements at different knee flexion conditions. Methods: A four-major-ligament contained knee specimen from an adult died of skull injury was prepared for CT scanning with the detectable ligament insertion footprints, locations and orientations precisely marked in advance. The CT scanning images were converted to a 3-dimensional model of the knee with the 3-dimensional reconstruction technique and transformed into finite element model by the software of ANSYS. The model was validated using experimental and numerical results obtained by other scientists. The natural stress changes of LCL at five different knee flexion angles (0°, 30°, 60°, 90°, 120° and under various motions of anterior-posterior tibial translation, tibial varus rotation and internal-external tibial rotation were measured. Results: The maximum stress reached to 87%-113% versus natural stress in varus motion at early 30° of knee flexions. The stress values were smaller than the peak value of natural stress at 0° (knee full extension when knee bending was over 60° of flexion in anterior-posterior tibial translation and internal-external rotation. Conclusion: LCL is vulnerable to varus motion in almost all knee bending positions and susceptible to anterior- posterior tibial translation or internal-external rotation at early 30° of knee flexions. Key words: Knee joint; Collateral ligaments; Finite element analysis

  5. Simultaneous reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament and posterior cruciate ligament by using allogeneic patellar tendon under arthroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Li-ping; ZHEN Min-qing; XU Zhong-he

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate operative effects of a new method to reconstruct anterior crucial ligament (ACL) and posterior crucial ligament (PCL) simultaneously by using patellar tendon under arthroscopy.Methods: From November 1999 to November 2003,the injured ACL and PCL of 11 patients were fixated with compressed screws and reconstructed under arthroscopy with the bone-patellar tendon-bone treated with deep hypothermia and T radiation. At the same time, 2 patients were treated with medial collateral ligament (MCL)reconstruction, 3 with lateral collateral ligament (LCL)reconstruction, 1 with meniscus suture and 4 with whole or partial resection.Results: All patients were followed up for 12-26months (average 16.5 months ). The Lysholm score method was employed to evaluate the knee function. The average preoperative score was 45.3 and the postoperative score was 86.4. Anterior drawer test (ADT) was positive in 11 knees preoperatively and feeble positive in one knee postoperatively. Lachman test was positive in 11 knees preoperatively and in one postoperatively, and feebly positive in two postoperatively. Posterior drawer test was positive in 11 knees preoperatively and feebly positive in 2postoperatively. There were 2 knees with tolerable pain and 2 with knee flexion of 5°-20°.Conclusions: As for simultaneous reconstruction of ACL and PCL under arthroscopy, ailogeneic bone-patellar tendon-bone can not only avoid injury and complication caused by autografting, but also help rehabilitation of the knee function.

  6. Meniscus and ligament injuries; Meniskus- und Bandlaesionen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glaser, C.; Trumm, C. [Klinikum Grosshadern der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie (Germany); Scheidler, J.; Heuck, A. [Radiologisches Zentrum Muenchen, Pasing (Germany)

    2006-01-01

    The knee is one of the major weight-bearing joints and is relatively exposed to trauma. Capsuloligamentous structures are essential to provide joint stability and - in turn - persistent instability bears a risk for osteoarthritis that needs timely and comprehensive diagnosis. Using MRI it may be beneficial to routinely apply (T)SE sequences in all three major planes as a basic protocol and to add additional sequences according to the clinical information available and imaging findings in the basic protocol. Especially fat-suppressed sequences (STIR, T2w/PDw FS TSE) are very useful because they sensitively depict bone marrow edema pattern (BMEP)-like changes. This finding often alerts the reader to - sometimes only discrete - underlying pathologies and may - if found in typical locations - give information about the mechanism of injury and thus lead the radiologist to look for specific concomitant capsuloligamentous, cartilage, and/or meniscal injury. BMEP is quite prominent in contusion injury, whereas often it is but discrete in avulsion lesions. There is extensive literature about the signs, possible pitfalls, and the accuracy of MRI for the diagnosis of specific pathologies such as meniscal tears or cruciate or collateral ligament ruptures. However, combined injuries of more than one structure are frequent and affect the therapeutic approach. Thus, the primary goal of the radiologist is to go beyond the description of any isolated lesion and to give a comprehensive description of (or to reliably exclude) any injury to other structures. A necessary prerequisite to accomplish this is a thorough knowledge of the - in some locations - complex anatomic relationships, pitfalls, and locations where lesions typically occur and where they may be overlooked. (orig.) [German] Das Knie ist vergleichsweise exponiert gegenueber Traumata. Sein Kapsel-Band-Apparat ist ein wesentlicher Faktor fuer die Gelenkstabilitaet. Umgekehrt erhoeht persistierende Instabilitaet das Risiko

  7. Biomechanical analysis of ankle ligamentous sprain injury cases from televised basketball games: Understanding when, how and why ligament failure occurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagiotakis, Emmanouil; Mok, Kam-Ming; Fong, Daniel Tik-Pui; Bull, Anthony M J

    2017-05-25

    Ankle sprains due to landing on an opponent's foot are common in basketball. There is no analysis to date that provides a quantification of this injury mechanism. The aim of this study was to quantify the kinematics of this specific injury mechanism and relate this to lateral ankle ligament biomechanics. Case series. The model-based image-matching technique was used to quantify calcaneo-fibular-talar kinematics during four ankle inversion sprain injury incidents in televised NBA basketball games. The four incidents follow the same injury pattern in which the players of interest step onto an opponent's foot with significant inversion and a diagnosed ankle injury. A geometric analysis was performed to calculate the in vivo ligament strains and strain rates for the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) and the calcaneofibular ligament (CFL). Despite the controlled selection of cases, the results show that there are two distinct injury mechanisms: sudden inversion and internal rotation with low levels of plantarflexion; and a similar mechanism without internal rotation. The first of these mechanisms results in high ATFL and CFL strains, whereas the second of these strains the CFL in isolation. The injury mechanism combined with measures of the ligament injury in terms of percentage of strain to failure correlate directly with the severity of the injury quantified by return-to-sport. The opportunity to control excessive internal rotation through proprioceptive training and/or prophylactic footwear or bracing could be utilised to reduce the severity of common ankle injuries in basketball. Copyright © 2017 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. MR investigation in evaluation of chronic whiplash alar ligament injury in elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianqiang; Wang, Wei; Han, Guibin; Han, Xiangjun; Li, Xiangying; Zhan, Yuefu

    2015-01-01

    To observe the imaging features for chronic whiplash alar ligament injury in elderly patients and to provide an effective diagnostic method for long-term neck pain and headaches due to alar ligament injury in elderly patients. A total of 134 elderly patients, who engaged in the work or activities related to whiplash motion and suffered from chronic neck pain, were enrolled for the study. All patients were performed comprehensive health examination (CT, MR, ultrasound and laboratory examination) and high resolution PDWI. The patients were divided into 2 groups according to the results of comprehensive health examination: a clear etiology group(CE group, n=96) and an unknown etiology group(UE group, n=38). Th e characteristics of PDWI signal in the ligament were analyzed between the 2 groups. Th e anatomy and signal characteristics of the alar ligament were clearly displayed by high resolution PDWI. Th e alar ligaments were effectively displayed by oblique coronal image. In the CE group, 7 patients (7/96) showed the positive sign of ligament injured, while 21 (21/38) patients showed positive sign of ligament injured in the UE group (Palar ligament is an important reason for chronic neck pain in elderly patients. High resolution PDWI is an effective method to evaluate the image features of alar ligament and can provide an accurate diagnosis for chronic neck pain and headaches caused by the alar ligament whiplash injury.

  9. Viability of ligaments after freezing: an experimental study in a rabbit model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, C.; Edwards, P.; McDonald, D.; Bodie, D.; Sabiston, P.

    1988-01-01

    Our purpose in this study was to assess ligament fibroblast viability after freezing by quantifying the subsequent ability of fibroblasts to synthesize collagen in vitro. Both medial collateral ligament (MCL) complexes from 40 adolescent rabbits were studied. Collagen production was determined by in vitro incubation of ligaments in /sup 3/H-proline (a collagen precursor) and subsequent analysis of /sup 3/H-hydroxyproline (a marker of newly synthesized collagen). Autoradiographs determined the distributions of ligament cell activity. All right MCL complexes served as fresh controls, providing a baseline of collagen production. Each left MCL was assigned to an experimental group and was either incubated fresh (10 animals); killed by drying, multiple freeze thawing, or cycloheximide (six animals); or slowly frozen at -70 degrees C without cryoprotection (24 animals). Collagen production of rapidly thawed ligaments was studied by proline incubation at 1 day, 9 days, or 6 weeks after freezing and was compared with that of contralateral fresh controls. Results demonstrate that some cells in the substance of these rabbit ligaments retained the ability to synthesize collagen in vitro after being frozen for up to 6 weeks. Mean collagen production of frozen ligaments was decreased, but tests of mean and median values as well as ratios were statistically similar to fresh contralateral ligaments in all animals. This postfreezing ligament cell survival and collagen production after -70 degrees C storage may have implications for ligament transplantation.

  10. Radio sterilized human ligaments and their clinical application;Ligamentos humanos radioesterilizados y su aplicacion clinica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luna Z, D.; Reyes F, M. L. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Diaz M, I.; Hernandez R, G., E-mail: daniel.luna@inin.gob.m [Centro Estatal de Trasplantes del Estado de Mexico, Pablo Sidar No. 602, Col. Universidad, 50130 Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2009-10-15

    The ligaments are human tissues that are used in the transplantation area. A ligament is an anatomical structure in band form, composed by resistant fibers that connect the tissues that unite the bones with the articulations. In an articulation, the ligaments allow and facilitate the movement inside the natural anatomical directions, while it restricts those movements that are anatomically abnormal, impeding lesions that could arise of this type of movements. The kneecap ligament is a very important tissue in the knee mobility and of walking in the human beings. This ligament can injure it because of automobile accidents, for sport lesions or illnesses, and in many cases the only form of recovering the knee movement is carried out a transplant with the purpose of replacing the damage ligament by allo gen kneecap ligament processed in specialized Tissue Banks where the tissue is sterilized with gamma radiation of {sup 60}Co at very low temperatures, obtaining high quality ligaments for clinical application in injured patients. The kneecap ligaments are processed in the Tissue Banks with a segment of kneecap bone, a segment of tibial bone, the contained ligament between both bones and in some cases a fraction of the quadriceps tendon. In this work is given a description of the selection method of the tissue that includes the donor's serologic control, the kneecap ligament processing in the Radio Sterilized Tissues Bank, its sterilization with gamma radiation of {sup 60}Co, also it is indicated like the clinical application of the allo gen ligament was realized in a hasty patient and whose previous crossed ligament was injured. Finally the results are presented from the tissue obtaining until the clinical application of it is, and in this case is observed a favorable initial evolution of the transplantation patient. (Author)

  11. The Forgotten Lumbocostal Ligament: Anatomical Study with Application to Thoracolumbar Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardieu, Gabrielle G; Alonso, Fernando; Chung, Beom Sun; Fisahn, Christian; Loukas, Marios; Oskouian, Rod J; Tubbs, R. Shane

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Most ligaments of the human body have been well studied. However, the lumbocostal ligament has received little attention in the extant medical literature and, to our knowledge, has not undergone anatomical study. Therefore, the present study was performed to better characterize this structure’s anatomy and relationships. Methods: In the prone position, 10 adult cadavers underwent dissection of their lumbocostal ligaments. All specimens were unembalmed and had no history of surgery to the spine. The lumbocostal ligament was dissected and measurements made using calipers and a ruler. This ligament’s attachments were determined as well as its relationships to surrounding fasciae, muscle, and nerves. Results: A lumbocostal ligament was identified on all sides. The ligament was posterior to the quadratus lumborum muscle on all sides. The mean length of the ligament was 3 cm. The overall shape of the ligaments ranged from short bands to large rhomboidal sheets. Inferiorly, the lumbocostal ligament blended with the middle layer of the thoracolumbar fascia on all sides. The ligament attached to the transverse processes of L1 on 25% of sides and onto the transverse processes of L1 and L2 on 75% of sides. The ligament became taut with rib elevation and was lax with rib depression. Conclusions: The lumbocostal ligament is a constant structure of the thoracolumbar junction. Appreciation of this ligament can help localize the transverse processes of L1 and L2 and adjacent nerves, such as the regional dorsal rami as they exit near its attachment onto the lumbar transverse processes.  PMID:28090418

  12. [Anterior cruciate ligament-plasty using the "U-dos" technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Trevizo, C; Paz-García, M; Leal-Berumen, I; Leal-Contreras, C; Berumen-Nafarrate, E

    2013-01-01

    The knee is a compound diarthrodial joint, vulnerable to serious injuries such as ligament injuries of: medial collateral ligament, lateral collateral ligament, anterior cruciate ligament and posterior cruciate ligament, as cruciate ligaments limit rotation movement in the joint. The purpose of our study was to create a new technique to treat injuries of the anterior cruciate ligament, which is composed of two bundles--anteromedial and posterolateral--trying to achieve an anatomical reconstruction that allows for a normal biomechanical recovery. This technique reduces the use of fixation material and costs. The diagnosis of anterior cruciate ligament injuries was made with the pivot shift test. There are currently two repair methods for anterior cruciate ligament injuries: single bundle or double bundle repair; none of these techniques is considered as the gold standard, as their results are very similar. This paper describes a technique used for the treatment of anterior cruciate ligament injuries, known as "U-dos", and its clinical results. Cross-sectional, observational study that enrolled 20 patients with total anterior cruciate ligament injuries who underwent anterior cruciate ligament plasty using the "U-dos" technique between June 2009 and June 2010. The technique requires the use of bone bank allograft, in this case of the anterior tibial ligament. Patients were assessed using the Lysholm scale and the pivot shift test. Our results show that all the pivot shift tests were negative and assessments according to the Lysholm scale were from normal to excellent in 95% of cases (19/20). Only one failure was reported, with avulsion of the graft attachment which required a surgical intervention.

  13. Understanding acute ankle ligamentous sprain injury in sports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fong Daniel TP

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper summarizes the current understanding on acute ankle sprain injury, which is the most common acute sport trauma, accounting for about 14% of all sport-related injuries. Among, 80% are ligamentous sprains caused by explosive inversion or supination. The injury motion often happens at the subtalar joint and tears the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL which possesses the lowest ultimate load among the lateral ligaments at the ankle. For extrinsic risk factors to ankle sprain injury, prescribing orthosis decreases the risk while increased exercise intensity in soccer raises the risk. For intrinsic factors, a foot size with increased width, an increased ankle eversion to inversion strength, plantarflexion strength and ratio between dorsiflexion and plantarflexion strength, and limb dominance could increase the ankle sprain injury risk. Players with a previous sprain history, players wearing shoes with air cells, players who do not stretch before exercising, players with inferior single leg balance, and overweight players are 4.9, 4.3, 2.6, 2.4 and 3.9 times more likely to sustain an ankle sprain injury. The aetiology of most ankle sprain injuries is incorrect foot positioning at landing – a medially-deviated vertical ground reaction force causes an explosive supination or inversion moment at the subtalar joint in a short time (about 50 ms. Another aetiology is the delayed reaction time of the peroneal muscles at the lateral aspect of the ankle (60–90 ms. The failure supination or inversion torque is about 41–45 Nm to cause ligamentous rupture in simulated spraining tests on cadaver. A previous case report revealed that the ankle joint reached 48 degrees inversion and 10 degrees internal rotation during an accidental grade I ankle ligamentous sprain injury during a dynamic cutting trial in laboratory. Diagnosis techniques and grading systems vary, but the management of ankle ligamentous sprain injury is mainly conservative

  14. Microvascular system of anterior cruciate ligament in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Shigeru; Baba, Hisatoshi; Uchida, Kenzo; Negoro, Kohei; Sato, Mituhiko; Miyazaki, Tsuyoshi; Nomura, Eiki; Murakami, Kaname; Shimizubata, Matsuyuki; Meir, Adam

    2006-07-01

    This study was done to investigate the microvascular system of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) using dogs. The objective was to study the microvascular architecture and the status of the barrier function of the capillary wall in the ACL by using microangiogram, scanning (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The vascular system in the ACL has been intensively studied by a number of researchers, using several microangiographic techniques in dogs, rabbits, and humans. However, most of these microangiographic studies had significant shortcomings, including the lack of three-dimensional observations and function of the blood-joint barrier in the ACL. In this study, the microstructure of the ACL was examined using microangiogram, SEM, and TEM. We investigated the vasculature of the ACL with SEM of vascular corrosion casts. In addition, we examined the status of the barrier function of the capillary wall in the ACL using the protein tracer horseradish peroxidase (HRP). Feeding vessels of the ligament were predominantly coming from the synovial-derived vessels originating from the synovium attached to the ligament near the tibial and femoral bone insertions of the ACL. The anterior cruciate ligament was surrounded by synovium, which had abundant vessels. The branches of these synovial vessels were penetrating into the ligament and making the intrinsic vascular network. It was also ascertained under SEM that the perivascular space around the intrinsic vessels were communicating through the intrinsic ligament fiber bundles and the mesh-like synovial membrane. The capillaries in the ACL were all of the continuous type under TEM. The protein tracer that was injected into the joint space passed through the synovial membrane and entered into the capillary lumen in the ACL, but the tracer that was injected intravenously did not appear in the perivascular space. The existence of a blood-ACL barrier does not necessarily imply the existence of an ACL-blood barrier. We

  15. Anatomy and Histology of the Knee Anterolateral Ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helito, Camilo Partezani; Demange, Marco Kawamura; Bonadio, Marcelo Batista; Tírico, Luis Eduardo Passarelli; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Pécora, José Ricardo; Camanho, Gilberto Luis

    2013-12-01

    Reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of the most common procedures in orthopaedic surgery. However, even with advances in surgical techniques and implants, some patients still have residual anterolateral rotatory laxity after reconstruction. A thorough study of the anatomy of the anterolateral region of the knee is needed. To study the anterolateral region and determine the measurements and points of attachments of the anterolateral ligament (ALL). Descriptive laboratory study. Dissections of the anterolateral structures of the knee were performed in 20 human cadavers. After isolating the ALL, its length, thickness, width, and points of attachments were determined. The femoral attachment of the ALL was based on the anterior-posterior and proximal-distal distances from the attachment of the lateral collateral ligament (LCL). The tibial attachment point was based on the distance from the Gerdy tubercle to the fibular head and the distance from the lateral tibial plateau. The ligaments from the first 10 dissections were sent for histological analysis. The ALL was found in all 20 knees. The femoral attachment of the ALL at the lateral epicondyle averaged 3.5 mm distal and 2.2 mm anterior to the attachment of the LCL. Two distal attachments were observed: one inserts into the lateral meniscus, the other between the Gerdy tubercle and the fibular head, approximately 4.4 mm distal to the tibial articular cartilage. The mean measurements for the ligament were 37.3 mm (length), 7.4 mm (width), and 2.7 mm (thickness). The histological analysis of the ligaments revealed dense connective tissue. The ALL is consistently present in the anterolateral region of the knee. Its attachment to the femur is anterior and distal to the attachment of the LCL. Moving distally, it bifurcates at close to half of its length. The ALL features 2 distal attachments, one at the lateral meniscus and the other between the Gerdy tubercle and the fibular head. The ALL may be

  16. Influence of thermofixation on artificial ACL ligament dimensional and mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Abdessalem, S.; Jedda, H.; Skhiri, S.; Karray, S.; Dahmen, J.; Boughamoura, H.

    2005-11-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is the major articular ligamentous structure of the knee, it functions as a joint stabilizer. When ruptured, the natural ACL ligament can be replaced by a textile synthetic ligament such as a braid, knitted cord, or woven cord. Theses structures are composed of biocompatible materials such as polyester or Gore-Tex filaments. The success of an ACL replacement is widely linked to its mechanical and dimensional properties such as tensile strength, dimensional stability and resistance to abrasion. We introduced an additional treatment in the manufacturing of textile ACL ligaments based on the thermofixation of the textile structure by using textile industry stabilization techniques. Boiling water, saturated vapor and dry heat have been tested to stabilize a braided ligament made of Dacron polyester. The application of these three techniques led to shrinkage and an increase of breaking strength of the textile structure.

  17. Manual therapy of the mandibular accessory ligaments for the management of temporomandibular joint disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuccia, Antonino Marco; Caradonna, Carola; Caradonna, Domenico

    2011-02-01

    Temporomandibular joint disorders are characterized by chronic or acute musculoskeletal or myofascial pain with dysfunction of the masticatory system. Treatment modalities include occlusal splints, patient education, activity modification, muscle and joint exercises, myofascial therapy, acupuncture, and manipulative therapy. In the physiology of the temporomandibular joint, accessory ligaments limit the movement of the mandible. A thorough knowledge of the anatomy of accessory ligaments is necessary for good clinical management of temporomandibular joint disorders. Although general principles regarding the anatomy of the ligaments are relatively clear, very little substantiated information on the dimension, orientation, and function of the ligaments has been published, to the authors' knowledge. The authors review the literature concerning the accessory ligaments of the temporomandibular joint and describe treatment options, including manual techniques for mobilizing the accessory ligaments.

  18. Anatomy of the alar ligamentPart I: Morphometrics and variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanaga, Joe; Sardi, Juan; Voin, Vlad; Chapman, Jens R; Oskouian, Rod J; Tubbs, R Shane

    2017-08-18

    The alar ligaments are one of the primary ligamentous structures contributing to craniovertebral stability. The purpose of this study is to clarify the morphology of the alar ligament using fresh cadaveric specimens. Twenty-two fresh frozen cadaveric alar ligaments were used in this study. The occiput, C1 and C2 were removed en bloc from each specimen and various measurements and observations, including variations, were documented. The angle formed by both alar ligaments was measured in a neutral position (149±24.19°), as well as during forced flexion (134.18±27.08°) and extension (163.81±24.54°). The current cadaveric evaluation offers an interesting window into better understanding the anatomy of the alar ligaments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Acute longitudinal ligament rupture following acute spinal trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald Hansom

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The authors present a rare case of anterior longitudinal ligament (ALL rupture in a 47- year-old gentleman following a bicycle accident. The ALL is a continuous band of a variable thickness that acts as a primary spinal stabiliser. Stress, strain or rupture of the ALL usually occurs as a result of hyperextension, with the primary perpetrator being whiplash injuries. Such injuries have been shown to result in cervical spine instability during extension, axial rotation, and lateral bending modes. Spine radiographs of such patients may be routinely assessed as normal, therefore this specific type of injury does not lend itself to identification by traditional imaging methods. This account demonstrates the importance of having a high index of suspicion of a ligamentous neck injury in the setting of normal plain radiographs but abnormal clinical examination.

  20. Absence of sensory function in the reconstructed anterior cruciate ligament

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsgaard, Michael R; Fischer-Rasmussen, Torsten; Dyhre-Poulsen, Poul

    2011-01-01

    and the sensory threshold was determined. Stimulus amplitudes were increased to 1.5-2.0 times the sensory threshold, and inhibitory reflexes could be elicited from PCL in the quadriceps during active extension and in the hamstrings muscles during active flexion in all patients. Subsequently the ACL re......-constructions were stimulated. The sensory threshold was 3.4 times higher in the ACL than in the PCL. Stimulus amplitudes were increased to 1.5-2.0 times the sensory threshold, and a typical inhibitory reflex could be elicited in 9 patients. The latency was the same as for the reflex from the PCL. The stimulus......Cruciate ligaments provide sensory information that cause excitatory as well as inhibitory effects to the activity of the muscles around the knee. The aim of the study was to determine whether these muscular reflexes are reestablished after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) re-construction. Wire...

  1. Repair of rectus femoris rupture with LARS ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Clare; Yarlagadda, Rathan; Keenan, Jonathan

    2012-03-20

    The rectus femoris muscle is the most frequently involved quadriceps muscle in strain pathologies. The majority of quadriceps muscle belly injuries can be successfully treated conservatively and even significant tears in the less active and older population, non-operative management is a reasonable option. The authors report the delayed presentation of a 17-year-old male who sustained an injury to his rectus femoris muscle belly while playing football. This young patient did not recover the functional outcome required to get back to running and participating in sport despite 15 months of physiotherapy and non-operative management. Operative treatment using the ligament augmentation and reconstruction system ligament to augment Kessler repair allowed immediate full passive flexion of the knee and an early graduated physiotherapy programme. Our patient was able to return to running and his previous level of sport without any restrictions.

  2. Mechanical properties of canine patella-ligament-tibia segment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biskup, Jeffery; Freeman, Andy; Camisa, Will; Innes, John; Conzemius, Michael

    2014-02-01

    To test the ex vivo mechanical properties of canine patella-ligament-tibia (PLT) segment and establish the relationship between donor size and PLT dimensions to the mechanical properties of PLT grafts. Ex vivo mechanical testing study. Canine PLT segments (n = 21 dogs; 42 PLT). Morphometric measurements of PLT segments were taken from computed tomography (CT) images and compared with results obtained using calipers. PLT were tested to failure at a rate of 100% length/s. Mechanical properties and failure mode were recorded. PLT width and thickness (P 25 kg were similar to those reported for the cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) suggesting that the PLT may be a suitable allograft for CCL replacement. © Copyright 2013 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  3. [Ligamento-periostosis of the attachment of the patellar ligament].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selivanov, V P

    1989-08-01

    The analysis of 1140 observations of ligamento-periostosis of the apex of the patella (the proximal attachment of its proper ligament) revealed that it was rather frequently present (3.1%) in the latent form during the prophylactic examinations of sportsmen, which constituted an important part (7.6%) in the structure of the diseases of the locomotor system. It was confirmed that the disease depended on the intensity of the loads and on the age of the patients. Early (at the preclinical stage) treatment allows to reduce the transition of the latent course of the disease into its clinical forms down to 6%. The administration of a complex treatment with novocaine electrophoresis and vitamin R12, drug blocks of the pathologic foci at the site of the attachment of the ligament and differential correction of the static and dynamic loads provide for steady healing without recurrences and relapses of the disease in 89% of the patients.

  4. Periodontal ligament distraction: A simplified approach for rapid canine retraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K C Prabhat

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Distraction osteogenesis is a method of inducing new bone formation by applying mechanical strains on preexisting bone. The process of osteogenesis in the periodontal ligament during orthodontic tooth movement is similar to the osteogenesis in the midpalatal suture during rapid palatal expansion. A new concept of "distracting the periodontal ligament" is proposed to elicit rapid canine retraction in two weeks. At the time of first premolar extraction, the interseptal bone distal to the canine was undermined with a bone bur, grooving vertically inside the extraction socket along the buccal and lingual sides and extending obliquely toward the socket base. Then, a tooth-borne, custom-made, intraoral distraction device was placed to distract the canine distally into the extraction space. It was activated 0.5 mm/day, immediately after the extraction. Canine was distracted 6.5 mm into the extraction space within two weeks.

  5. A Brief History of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos Davarinos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Reconstructions of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL are among the most frequently performed procedures in knee surgery nowadays. The history of ACL surgery can be traced as far back as the Egyptian times. The early years reflect the efforts to establish a viable, consistently successful reconstruction technique while, during the early 20th century, we witness an increasing awareness of, and interest in, the ligament and its lesions. Finally, we highlight the most important steps in the evolution of the ACL reconstruction surgery by discussing the various techniques spanning the years using not only autologous grafts (fascia lata, meniscal, hamstring, patella tendon, bone-patella tendon-bone, and double bundle grafts but also synthetic ones and allografts.

  6. Popliteal artery injury during posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Henrique Frauendorf Cenni

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study reports a case of popliteal artery injury during arthroscopic reconstruction of the posterior cruciate ligament. The evolution of the injury is described and comments are made regarding the anatomy of this artery and potential risks of this surgical technique. This study had the aims of alerting the medical community, especially knee surgeons, regarding a severe surgical complication and discussing the ways of preventing it.

  7. Core Stabilization Training After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Medeni, Özge Çınar; Bayramlar, Kezban; Baltacı, Gül; Yanmış, İbrahim

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the effects of core stabilization exercises and conventional rehabilitation exercises after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in terms of knee joint laxity, knee muscle strength, postural stability and functional tests. Methods: Twenty eight patients reconstructed with hamstring tendon were included. Thirteen patients evaluated after a conventional rehabilitation and fifteen after a core stabilization programme. Single-limb postural sta...

  8. Promise of periodontal ligament stem cells in regeneration of periodontium

    OpenAIRE

    Maeda, Hidefumi; Tomokiyo, Atsushi; Fujii, Shinsuke; Wada, Naohisa; Akamine, Akifumi

    2011-01-01

    A great number of patients around the world experience tooth loss that is attributed to irretrievable damage of the periodontium caused by deep caries, severe periodontal diseases or irreversible trauma. The periodontium is a complex tissue composed mainly of two soft tissues and two hard tissues; the former includes the periodontal ligament (PDL) tissue and gingival tissue, and the latter includes alveolar bone and cementum covering the tooth root. Tissue engineering techniques are therefore...

  9. Do cells contribute to tendon and ligament biomechanics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels Hammer

    Full Text Available Acellular scaffolds are increasingly used for the surgical repair of tendon injury and ligament tears. Despite this increased use, very little data exist directly comparing acellular scaffolds and their native counterparts. Such a comparison would help establish the effectiveness of the acellularization procedure of human tissues. Furthermore, such a comparison would help estimate the influence of cells in ligament and tendon stability and give insight into the effects of acellularization on collagen.Eighteen human iliotibial tract samples were obtained from nine body donors. Nine samples were acellularized with sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS, while nine counterparts from the same donors remained in the native condition. The ends of all samples were plastinated to minimize material slippage. Their water content was adjusted to 69%, using the osmotic stress technique to exclude water content-related alterations of the mechanical properties. Uniaxial tensile testing was performed to obtain the elastic modulus, ultimate stress and maximum strain. The effectiveness of the acellularization procedure was histologically verified by means of a DNA assay.The histology samples showed a complete removal of the cells, an extensive, yet incomplete removal of the DNA content and alterations to the extracellular collagen. Tensile properties of the tract samples such as elastic modulus and ultimate stress were unaffected by acellularization with the exception of maximum strain.The data indicate that cells influence the mechanical properties of ligaments and tendons in vitro to a negligible extent. Moreover, acellularization with SDS alters material properties to a minor extent, indicating that this method provides a biomechanical match in ligament and tendon reconstruction. However, the given protocol insufficiently removes DNA. This may increase the potential for transplant rejection when acellular tract scaffolds are used in soft tissue repair. Further research

  10. 3-Tesla MRI: Beneficial visualization of the meniscofemoral ligaments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrecht, Johanna; Krasny, Andrej; Hartmann, Dinah Maria; Rückbeil, Marcia Viviane; Ritz, Thomas; Prescher, Andreas

    2017-10-01

    Recent investigations have confirmed an important stabilizing and protective function of the meniscofemoral ligaments (MFLs) to the knee joint and suggest a clinical relevance. Concerning their incidences, however, there have been discrepancies between data acquired from cadaveric studies and MRI data using 0.3- to 1.5-Tesla field strengths probably due to lower resolution. This study aims to investigate whether imaging with 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (3-T MRI) is beneficial in gaining information regarding the ligaments' incidence, length, width and anatomic variation. 3-T MRI images of 448 patients (224 males, 224 females, with, respectively, 32 patients of each sex in the age groups: 0-20, 21-30, 31-40, 41-50, 51-60, 61-70, >70years) were retrospectively reviewed. The influence of the parameters 'sex' and 'age' was determined. Whereas 71% of the patients had at least one MFL, 22% had an anterior MFL (aMFL), 53% had a posterior MFL (pMFL) and five percent had coexisting ligaments. The pMFLs were more likely to be present in female patients (P<0.05) but if so, they were longer in the males (P<0.05). The pMFL was categorized according to its insertion on the medial femoral condyle. 3-T MRI enables an excellent illustration of the anatomic variations of pMFLs. By modifying an anatomic classification for radiological use we measured lengths and widths of the MFLs without any difficulties. Despite its increased resolution, 3-T MRI lends no diagnostic benefit in visualizing the course of the aMFL or filigree coexisting ligaments as compared to MRI at lower field strengths. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The development of zebrafish tendon and ligament progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jessica W; Galloway, Jenna L

    2014-05-01

    Despite the importance of tendons and ligaments for transmitting movement and providing stability to the musculoskeletal system, their development is considerably less well understood than that of the tissues they serve to connect. Zebrafish have been widely used to address questions in muscle and skeletal development, yet few studies describe their tendon and ligament tissues. We have analyzed in zebrafish the expression of several genes known to be enriched in mammalian tendons and ligaments, including scleraxis (scx), collagen 1a2 (col1a2) and tenomodulin (tnmd), or in the tendon-like myosepta of the zebrafish (xirp2a). Co-expression studies with muscle and cartilage markers demonstrate the presence of scxa, col1a2 and tnmd at sites between the developing muscle and cartilage, and xirp2a at the myotendinous junctions. We determined that the zebrafish craniofacial tendon and ligament progenitors are neural crest derived, as in mammals. Cranial and fin tendon progenitors can be induced in the absence of differentiated muscle or cartilage, although neighboring muscle and cartilage are required for tendon cell maintenance and organization, respectively. By contrast, myoseptal scxa expression requires muscle for its initiation. Together, these data suggest a conserved role for muscle in tendon development. Based on the similarities in gene expression, morphology, collagen ultrastructural arrangement and developmental regulation with that of mammalian tendons, we conclude that the zebrafish tendon populations are homologous to their force-transmitting counterparts in higher vertebrates. Within this context, the zebrafish model can be used to provide new avenues for studying tendon biology in a vertebrate genetic system.

  12. Isokinetic profile of subjects with the ruptured anterior cruciated ligament

    OpenAIRE

    Drapšin Miodrag; Lukač Damir; Rašović Predrag; Drid Patrik; Klašnja Aleksandar; Lalić Ivica

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim. All changes in the knee that appear after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) lesion lead to difficulties in walking, running, jumping especially during sudden changes of the line of movement. This significantly impairs quality of life of these subjects and leads to decrease in physical activity. Knee injuries make 5% of all most severe acute sport injuries. The aim of the study was to determine strength of the thigh muscles in persons with uni...

  13. Anatomic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using an individualized approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carola F. van Eck

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction is one of the most commonly performed orthopaedic procedures. Recently, there has been a shift in interest towards reconstruction techniques that more closely restore the native anatomy of the ACL. This review paper discusses our approach to individualized anatomic ACL reconstruction, including the anatomy of the ACL, the physical exam, imaging modalities, the surgical technique for anatomic reconstruction including pre- and intraoperative considerations and our postoperative rehabilitation protocol.

  14. Septic arthritis of the knee following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matjaz Sajovic

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Septic arthritis of the knee is a rare complication after arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, and the most appropriate treatment is unclear. All case series reported so far have been retrospective, and case numbers of septic arthritis have ranged from 4 to 11. From a consecutive case series of 1,283 patients who underwent arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction between January 1997 and May 2008, we report on 3 patients (0.23% with post-operative septic arthritis. All patients had acute infection (≤ 2 weeks, bacterial cultures showed Staphylococcus species in 2 patients, while the bacterial culture was negative in the third. All of them underwent immediate arthroscopic debridement and lavage with continuous irrigation, as well as antibiotic treatment. The results were evaluated with physical and radiographic examination, functional testing, KT-2000, Lysholm and Tegner scales. The infection was successfully eradicated without further surgical treatment and the ligament graft was retained in all patients. Follow-up, at an average of 33 months, revealed that the patients had full symmetric knee range of motion and no effusion. The average Lysholm score was 91 points. In the patient with a lower subjective score, radiographs demonstrated patellofemoral joint-space narrowing, which is most probably in correlation with his anterior knee pain problems and lower activity level. The 134 N KT-2000 arthrometer side-to-side differences averaged 13 mm. Their performance in the single-legged hop test gave excellent results. The goals of treatment for septic arthritis after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction are, primarily, to protect the articular cartilage and, secondly, to protect the graft. Through early diagnosis and prompt treatment, the infection can be successfully eradicated, with stability of the knee and full range of motion achieved.

  15. Transient superficial peroneal nerve palsy after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Majed Alrowaili

    2016-01-01

    A 19-year-old male subject was diagnosed with medial meniscal, lateral meniscal and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear. The symptoms did not subside after 4 months of physical therapy, and he underwent arthroscopic partial medial and lateral meniscectomy and ACL reconstruction. Immediately after the patient woke up from general anesthesia, he started experience loss of sensation in the area of superficial peroneal nerve with inverted dorsiflexion of foot and ankle. Instantly, the bandage a...

  16. FUNCTIONAL OUTCOME OF ARTHROSCOPIC RECONSTRUCTION OF ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT TEARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Kumar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL tear is the most common serious ligamentous injury to the knee joint. Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL injury is quite common among young active population, athletes and contact sports. The exact incidence of anterior cruciate ligament tears is not known as the cases are being under reported. The ACL is the primary stabilizer against anterior translation of the tibia on the femur and is important in counteracting rotation and valgus stress. MATERIALS AND METHODS Between November 2012 to October 2014, 34 consecutive patients who underwent arthroscopic assisted ACL reconstructions in the Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, King George Hospital, Visakhapatnam were the material in our study. Age groups between 18 to 45 years considered. We utilised both BPTB and Quadrupled hamstring graft depending on the patient’s age, outcome testing in all cases was performed at the latest follow-up (at least 6 months. Post-operative physiotherapy rehabilitation protocol followed for 06 months. RESULTS Standard protocol of Lysholm and IKDC knee scoring system were used for evaluation of the results of the surgery during followup. Patients were evaluated periodically at preop, 3 months, 6 months, 12 months, 18 months and 24 months. CONCLUSION Patients with isolated ACL injury had better outcome compared to patients who underwent associated meniscectomy. Most common mechanism of injury was activity of sports in 20 patients. Postoperatively at 3 months, anterior drawer’s was 1+ in 6, 29 (85.2% patients had normal range of motion; 29 (85.29% patients had 5/5 quadriceps power (MRC grading 94% of them had 5/5 power at latest followup. No significant difference between outcomes of BPTB and Hamstrings graft. Functional outcome of our study were similar to the previously published studies.

  17. Arthroscopy Up to Date: Anterior Cruciate Ligament Anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schillhammer, Carl K; Reid, John B; Rister, Jamie; Jani, Sunil S; Marvil, Sean C; Chen, Austin W; Anderson, Chris G; D'Agostino, Sophia; Lubowitz, James H

    2016-01-01

    To categorize and summarize up-to-date anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) research published in Arthroscopy and The American Journal of Sports Medicine and systematically review each subcategory, beginning with ACL anatomy. After searching for "anterior cruciate ligament" OR "ACL" in Arthroscopy and The American Journal of Sports Medicine from January 2012 through December 2014, we excluded articles more pertinent to ACL augmentation; open growth plates; and meniscal, chondral, or multiligamentous pathology. Studies were subcategorized for data extraction. We included 212 studies that were classified into 8 categories: anatomy; basic science and biomechanics; tunnel position; graft selection; graft fixation; injury risk and rehabilitation; practice patterns and outcomes; and complications. Anatomic risk factors for ACL injury and post-reconstruction graft failure include a narrow intercondylar notch, low native ACL volume, and increased posterior slope. Regarding anatomic footprints, the femoral attachment is 43% of the proximal-to-distal lateral femoral condylar length whereas the posterior border of the tendon is 2.5 mm from the articular margin. The tibial attachment of the ACL is two-fifths of the medial-to-lateral interspinous distance and 15 mm anterior to the posterior cruciate ligament. Anatomic research using radiology and computed tomography to evaluate ACL graft placement shows poor interobserver and intraobserver reliability. With a mind to improving outcomes, surgeons should be aware of anatomic risk factors (stenotic femoral notch, low ligament volume, and increased posterior slope) for ACL graft failure, have a precise understanding of arthroscopic landmarks identifying femoral and tibial footprint locations, and understand that imaging to evaluate graft placement is unreliable. Level III, systematic review of Level III evidence. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Tissue Engineering of Ligaments/tendons .Part I .Biomaterial and Mechanical Aspects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    X.; WANG; C.; VAQUETTE; L.; ZHANG; S.; SLIMANI; S.; MULLER1

    2005-01-01

    1 IntroductionTendons and ligaments play important roles in the mediation of skeletal equilibrium and movement. Ruptures or tears of these tissues often result in a significant loss of joint function and long term problems such as degenerative diseases. The healing of some tendons and ligaments is a complex process, and in some cases (for exapmple,rupture the anterior cruciate ligament), no healing is possible, surgical implantation of grafts is necessary for the reparation. However, in surgical implantatio...

  19. Viscoelastic properties of soft tissues: application to knee ligaments and tendons

    OpenAIRE

    1997-01-01

    Ligaments play a central role in the stability of the knee. Due to the increase in sport activities of the young population, rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) has become a frequent clinical problem. A surgical procedure replacing the deficient ligament is performed to restore the knee's initial stability. Although this surgical technique is widespread and well established, long term clinical results are inconsistent and the stability of the knee is not always restored, leading t...

  20. Viscoelastic properties of soft tissues: application to knee ligaments and tendons

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Ligaments play a central role in the stability of the knee. Due to the increase in sport activities of the young population, rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) has become a frequent clinical problem. A surgical procedure replacing the deficient ligament is performed to restore the knee's initial stability. Although this surgical technique is widespread and well established, long term clinical results are inconsistent and the stability of the knee is not always restored, leading t...

  1. Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells on Periodontal Ligament Fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elçin, Y Murat; İnanç, Bülend; Elçin, A Eser

    2016-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells' (hESCs) unlimited proliferative potential and differentiation capability to all somatic cell types makes them one of the potential cell sources in cell-based tissue engineering strategies as well as various experimental applications in fields such as developmental biology, pharmacokinetics, toxicology, and genetics. Periodontal tissue engineering is an approach to reconstitute the ectomesenchymally derived alveolar bone, periodontal ligament apparatus, and cementum tissues lost as a result of periodontal diseases. Cell-based therapies may offer potential advantage in overcoming the inherent limitations associated with contemporary regenerative procedures, such as dependency on defect type and size and the pool and capacity of progenitor cells resident in the wound area. Further elucidation of developmental mechanisms associated with tooth formation may also contribute to valuable knowledge based upon which the future therapies can be designed. Protocols for the differentiation of pluripotent hESCs into periodontal ligament fibroblastic cells (PDLF) as common progenitors for ligament, cementum, and alveolar bone tissue represent an initial step in developing hESC-based experimental and tissue engineering strategies. The present protocol describes methods associated with the guided differentiation of hESCs by the use of coculture with adult PDLFs and the resulting change of morphotype and phenotype of the pluripotent embryonic stem cells toward fibroblastic and osteoblastic lineages.

  2. Review of common conditions associated with periodontal ligament widening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mortazavi, Hamed; Baharvand, Maryam [Dept. of Oral Medicine, School of Dentistry, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The aim of this article is to review a group of lesions associated with periodontal ligament (PDL) widening. An electronic search was performed using specialized databases such as Google Scholar, PubMed, PubMed Central, Science Direct, and Scopus to find relevant studies by using keywords such as “periodontium”, “periodontal ligament”, “periodontal ligament space”, “widened periodontal ligament”, and “periodontal ligament widening”. Out of nearly 200 articles, about 60 were broadly relevant to the topic. Ultimately, 47 articles closely related to the topic of interest were reviewed. When the relevant data were compiled, the following 10 entities were identified: occlusal/orthodontic trauma, periodontal disease/periodontitis, pulpo-periapical lesions, osteosarcoma, chondrosarcoma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, progressive systemic sclerosis, radiation-induced bone defect, bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis, and osteomyelitis. Although PDL widening may be encountered by many dentists during their routine daily procedures, the clinician should consider some serious related conditions as well.

  3. Effect of Ligament Morphology on Electrical Conductivity of Porous Silver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuruzi, Abu Samah; Mazulianawati, Majid Siti

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the effect of ligament morphology on electrical conductivity of open cell porous silver (Ag). Porous Ag was formed when silver nanoparticles in an organic phase were annealed at 150°C for durations ranging from 1 to 5 min. Electrical conductivity of porous Ag was about 20% of bulk value after 5 min annealing. Porous Ag was modeled as a collection of Kelvin cell (truncated octahedrons) structures comprised of conjoined conical ligaments and spherical vertices. An analytical expression for electrical conductivity was obtained. Electrical conductivity normal to hexagonal faces of the unit cell was computed. Our model indicates contribution of grain boundary to electrical resistance increases significantly after the first minute of annealing and plateaus thereafter. Using experimental electrical conductivity data as an input, the model suggests that the ratio, n, of surfaces of one half of a conjoined cone ligament is between 0.7 and 1.0. Average deviation from experimentally determined relative electrical conductivity, Δ σ r, was minimal when n = 0.9.

  4. Tibial inlay for posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papalia, Rocco; Osti, Leonardo; Del Buono, Angelo; Denaro, Vincenzo; Maffulli, Nicola

    2010-08-01

    Although no consensus has been reached regarding the management of PCL deficiency, in vitro and in vivo studies have investigated whether the tibial inlay technique restores the anatomical site of insertion of the PCL, prevents elongation, stretching, graft failure, and improves long-term PCL stability. A systematic search using PubMed, Ovid, the Cochrane Reviews, and Google Scholar databases using 'posterior cruciate ligament tear', 'Tibial inlay technique' and 'posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction' as keywords identified 71 publications, of which 10 were relevant to the topic, and included a total of 255 patients. The tibial inlay technique restores the anatomic insertion site of the PCL, eliminates the killer turn effect, and places the graft at lower potential risk for abrasion and subsequent rupture. It has the disadvantages of increased operating time and risk to the posterior neurovascular structures. There was no evidence of an association between outcome results and Coleman methodology score, but the Coleman methodology scores correlated positively with the level-of-evidence rating. The methodological quality of the studies included has not improved over the years. Given the few reported published findings, we cannot ascertain whether this procedure may provide a consistent alternative to commonly used PCL surgical strategies. The lack of published randomized clinical trials and few reported findings did not allow to ascertain whether the tibial inlay for posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction may provide a consistent alternative to commonly used PCL surgical strategies and to demonstrate procedure efficacy.

  5. Collagenolytic activity is produced by rabbit ligaments and tendon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harper, J.; Amiel, D.; Harper, E.

    1986-05-01

    The authors examined the patellar tendon (PT), anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and medial collateral ligament (MCL) from normal rabbits for collagenase activity. All three connective tissues contain large amounts of collagen and the catabolism of this structural protein is important to their integrity. The authors cultured each tissue in serum free medium for 14 days. Collagenase was produced by all three connective tissues after a lag period of up to 7 days, as detected by the /sup 14/C-glycine peptide-release assay. Culture media that did not express enzyme the authors found to contain inhibitory activity. The collagenases and inhibitors from each tissue have been quantitated and characterized. After 9 days the collagenase activity for the rabbit periarticular tissues was 6.1 (PT), 4.4 (MCL) and 8.6 (ACL) units per milligram of secreted protein. The cleavage site of all three collagenases was found to be similar to that observed for rabbit skin collagenase, and generation of reaction products TC/sup A/ and TC/sup B/ was demonstrated by collagenases from PT, MCL and ACL. These results suggest that the metabolism of ligaments and tendon is regulated by the production of zymogen, active collagenase and inhibitor, similar to other connective tissues. The role of these components in joint injury and joint diseases is currently being investigated.

  6. Posterior cruciate ligament rehabilitation: how slow should we go?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanelli, Gregory C

    2008-02-01

    Outcomes after posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstructive surgery have historically been inferior to outcomes after reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). As such, some surgeons may be reluctant to recommend reconstruction of the PCL. However, recent technologic advances have substantially improved PCL reconstructive surgical outcomes. These advances include better understanding of PCL diagnosis and surgical indications; recognition of the need for repair or reconstruction of associated injuries, especially injuries to the posterolateral and posteromedial corners of the knee; PCL-specific surgical instruments including mechanical tensioning devices to restore anatomic tibial step-off; improved graft fixation techniques including primary and backup methods of fixation; use of strong graft material including advances in the procurement, processing, and usage of allograft tissue; improved surgical techniques; and advances in the understanding of knee ligament structure and biomechanics, resulting in more accurate surgical tunnel placement, achieving anatomic graft insertion sites while minimizing graft bending. Today, PCL reconstructive surgery often results in excellent function with a return to the patient's preinjury level of activity. In contrast to accelerated rehabilitation after ACL reconstructive surgery, slow and deliberate postoperative rehabilitation is recommended to allow early healing to occur after PCL reconstructive surgery.

  7. Non-traumatic Thickening of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Hyun Jun; Park, Jin Gyoon; Song, Sang Gook [Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-08-15

    To describe the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings of non-traumatic thickening of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and to evaluate the associated lesions. Between January 2003 and August 2005, 44 knees of 44 patients who had thickened ACLs on MR images and had no history of knee trauma were analyzed retrospectively. The normal thickness of the ACL was measured on axial T2-weighted images of 40 healthy adult knees. The MR imaging findings of the thickened ACLs and associated lesions were analyzed. In 40 cases of healthy knees, the thickness of the proximal ACL was 3-6 mm. In 44 cases of non-traumatic thickening of the ACL, the thickness of the proximal ACL was 8-14 mm. There was an increased signal intensity and ill-defined border in all cases of thickened ACLs, linear low-signal intensity fibers parallel to the long axis of the thickened ACL (celery stalk appearance) in 24 cases, and entrapment in 10 cases. With respect to associated lesions, there was osteoarthritis in 40 cases, meniscal tears in 42 cases, and degeneration of the posterior cruciate ligament in 7 cases. Non-traumatic thickening of the ACL was associated with osteoarthritis and meniscal tears in almost all cases and showed increased signal intensity and ill-defined borders simulating acute ligamentous tears

  8. Reconstruction of chronic acromioclavicular joint disruption with artificial ligament prosthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Devendra Kumar Chouhan; Uttam Chand Saini; Mandeep Singh Dhillon

    2013-01-01

    Objective:Management of Rockwood type 3 acromioclavicular disruptions is a matter of debate.Should we adopt conservative or operative measures at first presentation? It is not clear but most of the evidences are in favour of conservative management.We present our experience in managing these patients surgically.Methods:We present a prospective series of eight cases of chronic Rockwood type 3 acromioclavicular joint disruptions treated surgically.Anatomical reconstruction of the coracoclavicular ligament was done by artificial braided polyester ligament prosthesis.Results:All the patients were able to perform daily activities from an average of the 14th postoperative day.All patients felt an improvement in pain,with decrease in average visual analogue scale from preoperative 6.5 points (range 3-9 points) to 2.0 points (range 0-5 points),Constant score from 59% to 91% and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons shoulder score from 65 to 93 points postoperatively.These results improved or at least remained stationary on midterm follow-up,and no deterioration was recorded at an average follow-up of 46 months.Conclusion:This midterm outcome analysis of the artificial ligament prosthesis is the first such follow-up study with prosthesis.Our results are encouraging and justify the further use and evaluation of this relatively new and easily reproducible technique.

  9. ARTHROSCOPIC RECONSTRUCTION OF ANTERIO R CRUCIATE LIGAMENT TEARS: OUR EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thimma Reddy

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Anterior knee instability associated with rupture of the ACL (Anterior Cruciate Ligament is a disabling clinical problem. The ACL has a poor capacity for intrinsic repair. Thus for patients who have knee symptoms related to ACL deficiency, one may consider ligament reconstruction as a means of stabilizing the T ibio - F emoral articulation and restoring high level function of the knee joint. Arthroscopically assisted ACLR ( ACL Reconstruction has the advantage of being minimally invasive, accurate graft placement, less disturbance of normal tissue resulting in quicker recovery and rehabilitation, minimal hospital stay and very less infection rate. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Between April 2012 to May 2013, 30 patients who underwent arthroscopic assisted ACL reconstructions using either bone - patellar tendon - bone auto graft ( BTB or Quadrupled hamstring auto graft ( QHG or Quadriceps tendon graft ( QTG in the Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Osmania Medical College, Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh is the material in our study. CONCLUSIONS : Arthroscopic reconstruction of Anterior Cruciate Ligament is a reliable, safe procedure. It helps in the early restoration of function and stability of the Knee joint and helps the patient to get back to his normal activity much earlier than with the traditional open surgical methods. The choice of the graft does not play a major role in the function of the knee in the long run.

  10. Biologic characteristics of fibroblast cells cultured from the knee ligaments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈鸿辉; 唐毅; 李斯明; 沈雁; 刘向荣; 钟灿灿

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To culture fibroblast cells from the kneeligaments and to study the biological characteristics of thesecells.Methods: Cells of the anterior cruciate ligament(ACL) and the medial collateral ligament (MCL) fromNew Zealand white rabbit were cultured in vitro. Cellulargrowth and expression of the collagen were analyzed.Moreover, an in vitro wound closure model was establishedand the healing of the ACL and the MCL cells wascompared.Results: Maximal growth for all these cells wereobtained with Dulbecco's modified Eagle's mediumsupplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum, but RPMI 1640and Ham's F12 media were not suitable to maintain thesecells. Morphology of both ACL and MCL cells from NewZealand white rabbit was alike in vitro, but the MCL cellsgrew faster than the ACL cells. Both cell types producedsimilar amount of collagen in culture, but the ratio ofcollage type I to type III produced by ACL cells was higherthan that produced by MCL cells. Wound closure assayshowed that at 36 hours after injury, cell-free zones createdin the ACL cultures were occupied partially by the ACLcells; in contrast, the wounded zone in the MCL cultureswas almost completely covered by the cells.Conclusions: Although the ACL cells and the MCLcells from New Zealand white rabbit show similarappearance in morphology in culture, the cellular growthand the biochemical synthesis of collagen as well as thehealing in vitro were significantly different. Thesedifferences in intrinsic properties of the two types of cells invitro might contribute to the differential healing potentialsof these ligaments in vivo.

  11. Review of common conditions associated with periodontal ligament widening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, Hamed

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this article is to review a group of lesions associated with periodontal ligament (PDL) widening. Materials and Methods An electronic search was performed using specialized databases such as Google Scholar, PubMed, PubMed Central, Science Direct, and Scopus to find relevant studies by using keywords such as “periodontium”, “periodontal ligament”, “periodontal ligament space”, “widened periodontal ligament”, and “periodontal ligament widening”. Results Out of nearly 200 articles, about 60 were broadly relevant to the topic. Ultimately, 47 articles closely related to the topic of interest were reviewed. When the relevant data were compiled, the following 10 entities were identified: occlusal/orthodontic trauma, periodontal disease/periodontitis, pulpo-periapical lesions, osteosarcoma, chondrosarcoma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, progressive systemic sclerosis, radiation-induced bone defect, bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis, and osteomyelitis. Conclusion Although PDL widening may be encountered by many dentists during their routine daily procedures, the clinician should consider some serious related conditions as well. PMID:28035300

  12. Ring-shaped lateral meniscus with hypoplasic anterior cruciate ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteves, Cátia; Castro, Ricardo; Cadilha, Rui; Raposo, Frederico; Melão, Lina

    2015-12-01

    Knee joint lesions can be solitary or occur concomitantly with other lower limb abnormalities. Ring-shaped lateral meniscus (RSM) and hypoplasic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are two rare malformations. The therapeutic management of such abnormalities is not consensual, and highly depends on clinical symptomatology. We report a case of a 25-year-old girl with progressive knee pain whose MRI demonstrated a continuous segment of lateral meniscus situated along the medial aspect of the lateral compartment, continuous with the otherwise normal-appearing lateral meniscus, compatible with an RSM. This anatomic variant can be mistaken by a displaced meniscal fragment, like a bucket-handle tear, a central tear of a discoid meniscus, or incomplete discoid meniscus, as previously reported. Her MRI examination also showed a thinned ACL with anomalous lateral course. This abnormality may be mistaken for an ACL rupture and/or a meniscofemoral ligament with agenesis of ACL. Multiple images in different planes as well as following the course of meniscal and ligaments are critical clues to avoid misdiagnosis. As a result, the diagnosis of an RSM along with hypoplasic ACL with abnormal attachment was assumed based on MRI and confirmed during arthroscopy. The patient was treated conservatively with clinical outcome improvement.

  13. Abscess Formation of the Round Ligament of the Liver: Report of a Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikeda,Eiji

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abscess formation of the round ligament of the liver is very rare. We report a case of a 70-year-old female with abscess of the round ligament after an endoscopic papillotomy for choledocholithiasis. On the 21st day following papillotomy, abscess formation of the round ligament was found by ultrasonographic examination. Surgical treatment was performed because conservative therapy was not effective. The purulent fluid and necrotic tissue at the round ligament were completely removed. Cultures obtained from the abscess grew Staphylococcus epidermidis, but the mechanism of abscess formation in this case remains unclear.

  14. [Alar ligaments: radiological aspects in the diagnosis of patients with whiplash injuries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhle, C; Brossmann, J; Biederer, J; Jahnke, Th; Grimm, J; Heller, M

    2002-04-01

    Post-traumatic changes of the alar ligaments have been proposed to be the cause of chronic pain in patients after whiplash injury of the cervical spine. In addition to an asymmetric dens position, widening of the atlantodental distance to more than 12 mm can be an indirect sign of an alar ligament rupture. CT is recommended for detection of a avulsion fracture of the occipital condyle. Isolated ruptures of the alar ligaments are best visualized on MRI. In patients with chronic impairments after whiplash injuries changes of the alar ligaments on MRI must be differentiated from normal variants in healthy individuals.

  15. Tuberculous abscess in hepatoduodenal ligament: Evaluation with contrast-enhanced computed tomography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng Dong; Bin Wang; Ye-Quan Sun

    2008-01-01

    Two patients with tuberculous abscess in the hepatoduodenal ligament were studied. Both patients underwent contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) scan. The abscess showed a low density with an irregular thick wall in the hepatoduodenal ligament on CT images, the margin was poorly defined. Contrastenhanced CT images showed the contrast-enhanced thick wall, homogeneous and peripheral-enhanced lymph nodes. Although features of the tuberculous abscess in the hepatoduodenal ligament could be conspicuously shown with contrast-enhanced CT, further experience is needed to evaluate the potential value of CT in detecting early tuberculous abscess in relation to other entities in the hepatoduodenal ligament.

  16. [Augmented anterior cruciate ligament replacement with the Kennedy-LAD (ligament augmentation device)--long term outcome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riel, K A

    1998-01-01

    The ligament augmentation device (Kennedy-LAD) is used to protect tendon grafts during the posttransplantation decrease in strength in anterior cruciate ligament (acl) reconstructions. The augmentation with the LAD is based on the concept of load sharing. Since 1983 we used the LAD in acl-reconstructions in 856 patients. In 63 cases we had to treat complications like infection (8), recurrent effusions (21), arthrofibrosis (34). The overall results are good with respect to stability, regain of strength and sports activity. In 73 cases resurgery was necessary because of synovitis (7), LAD-rupture due to re-injury (9), fatigue-rupture of the LAD (22), meniscal tears (35), 2.7 +/- 2.3 years (range: 2 months to 10 years) after LAD implantation. Modern techniques in acl reconstruction lead to comparable results without synthetic augmentation. Therefore, we now recommend the use of a LAD only in cases of repeated acl replacement with week tendon grafts, to avoid an allograft.

  17. Return to Sports after Acute Simultaneous Reconstruction of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury and Grade III Medial Collateral Ligament Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertona, Agustin; Zicaro, Juan Pablo; Viescas, Juan Manuel Gonzalez; Atala, Nicolas; Yacuzzi, Carlos; Costa-Paz, Matias

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Combined Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) injury and Medial Collateral Ligament (MCL) injury account for 20% of knee ligament lesions. Conservative treatment of MCL and surgical ACL reconstruction are generally recommended. Significant medial instability after non-surgical management of MCL can lead to ACL reconstruction failure. The optimal management for athletes with combined ACL-MCL injuries remains controversial. The purpose of this study was to analyze the functional and clinical evolution of patients who underwent combined ACL-MCL surgery and their return-to-sport level with minimum 2-years follow-up. Methods: A total of 20 athletes with acute simultaneous ACL/Grade III MCL reconstructions were treated between March 2006 and January 2014. The minimum follow-up time was 24 months. Subjective functional results (IKDC, Lysholm), range of motion, anterior-medial and rotational stability (Lachmann, Pivot Shift, valgus stress) were evaluated. The ability to return to sport (Tegner) and the level achieved was recorded. Results: All patients significantly improved functional scores and stability tests. The mean subjective IKDC score improved from 37.7 ± 12.9 (range 21-69) preoperatively to 88.21 ± 4.47 (range 80-96) postoperatively (P sports; 90% reached the level they had prior to the ligamentous injury. Of all competitive athletes, 66% achieved the same level of sport. Conclusion: In athletes with acute ACL-Grade III MCL lesions, an early simultaneous reconstruction can significantly improve the medial and sagittal stability of the knee. This procedure resulted in excellent functional outcomes, with return to the same level of sports in the majority of patients at short-term follow-up.

  18. Definition of the to be named ligament and vertebrodural ligament and their possible effects on the circulation of CSF.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Zheng

    Full Text Available Few studies have been conducted specifically on the dense connective tissue located in the posterior medial part of the cervical epidural space. This study was undertaken to examine the presence of this connection between the cervical dura mater and the posterior wall of spinal canal at the level of C1-C2. 30 head-neck specimens of Chinese adults were used. Gross dissection was performed on the suboccipital regions of the 20 specimens. Having been treated with the P45 plastination method, 10 specimens were sliced (9 sagittal and 1 horizontal sections. As a result, a dense fibrous band was identified in the nuchal ligament of 29 specimens (except for one horizontal section case. This fascial structure arose from the tissue of the posterior border of the nuchal ligament and then projected anteriorly and superiorly to enter the atlantoaxial interspace. It was termed as to be named ligament (TBNL. In all 30 specimens the existence of a fibrous connection was found between the posterior aspect of the cervical dura mater and the posterior wall of the spinal canal at the level of the atlas to the axis. This fibrous connection was identified as vertebrodural ligament (VDL. The VDL was mainly subdivided into three parts, and five variations of VDL were identified. These two structures, TBNL and VDL, firmly link the posterior aspect of cervical dura mater to the rear of the atlas-axis and the nuchal region. According to these findings, the authors speculated that the movements of the head and neck are likely to affect the shape of the cervical dural sleeve via the TBNL and VDL. It is hypothesized that the muscles directly associated with the cervical dural sleeve, in the suboccipital region, may work as a pump providing an important force required to move the CSF in the spinal canal.

  19. MRI appearance of the distal insertion of the anterior cruciate ligament of the knee: an additional criterion for ligament ruptures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oldrini, G.; Teixeira, P.G.; Chanson, A.; Osemont, B.; Louis, M.; Blum, A. [CHU Nancy, Service d' imagerie Guilloz, Nancy (France); Erpelding, M.L. [CHU Nancy, Hopitaux de Brabois Allee du Morvan, Service Epidemiologie et Evaluation Cliniques, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

    2012-09-15

    Anterior cruciate ligament tears are frequent and if not diagnosed may lead to relevant patient disability. Magnetic resonance imaging is the method of choice for the non-invasive diagnosis of these tears. Despite the high performance of this method some cases are challenging and the criteria described in the literature are not sufficient to reach a diagnosis. We propose a systematic method for the evaluation of anterior cruciate ligament tears based on the aspect of its distal portion. Magnetic resonance studies of 132 knees were evaluated in correlation with arthroscopy. The performance of the proposed method was compared with that of classic imaging signs of anterior cruciate ligament tear. The impact of image quality and reader expertise on the proposed method and the classic signs of tear were taken into account. This method had a sensitivity and specificity of 91.1% and 82.9% for the detection of abnormal ACLs. The interobserver agreement (kappa) of the proposed method was significantly higher than that of the classic signs at all levels of expertise (0.89 vs 0.76). This method was not influenced by image quality. Distal ACL analysis identified more partial tears and synovialization (granulation scar tissue) than the conventional method (71% vs 58.5% for partial tears and 83.5% vs 58.5% for synovialization). The proposed classification has a high performance and reproducibility for the identification of abnormal anterior cruciate ligament. The results were influenced neither by the level of expertise of the readers nor by the image quality. (orig.)

  20. Reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament of the knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Dragan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Numerous papers on reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament of the knee (ACL contribute to the significance of this method. The aim of this study was to analyze the outcome of the use of this surgical treatment method regardless the type of surgical intervention, graft, and the choice of the material for fixing. Methods. The study included 324 patients treated within the period from April 1997 to April 2004. Arthroscopically assisted ACL reconstruction was typically performed using the central one-third of the patellar ligament, as a graft, with bone blocks. Fixing was performed using screws (spongy or interferential, Mitek type. In the cases who required revision of the surgery, we used a graft m. semitendinosus and m. gracilise (STG or a graft of the patellar ligament (B-Pt-B. Fixation in these cases was performed using absorptive wedges according to the Rigidfix technique or metallic implants. Results. The analysis included the results of the reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament of the knee (B-Pt-B or STG graft in 139 of the knees. Chronic injuries were revealed in 132 (94.9% of the knees. According to the anamnesis and clinical findings, the feeling of instability prevailed in 132 (94.9% of the knees, pain in 72 (51.7%, effluents in 24 (17.2%, and blockages in 13 (9.3%. Early and late postoperative complications were noticeable in 3.5% each. Hypotrophy of the upper knee musculature up to 2 cm was present in 53.9% of the operated knees, while minor contractions in 13.6% of them. The final result of the reconstruction graded begusing the Lysholm Scale was 85.2, simultaneous reconstructions of other ligaments 75.3, and revision surgery 68.0. First-grade degenerative postoperative changes according to the K/L Scale were found in 55.0% of the surgically treated knees, while the worst, four-grade one in 2.5%. Conclusion. On the basis of these findings, we can conclude that this method is the method of choice in

  1. "THE STUDY OF DOSE-RESPONSE MITOGENIC EFFECT OF L-DOPA ON THE HUMAN PERIODONTAL LIGAMENT FIBROBLAST CELLS"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Zarabian

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Avulsion is one of the most serious emergencies in dental office. In the event of any problem, the tooth should be stored in a medium that supports the periodontal ligament cell viability. In other clinical situations, preserving media, growth factors and mitogenic products may be useful in repairing the traumatized tissues. It has been previously reported that levodopa (L-dopa accelerates healing by increasing the growth hormone level. In this study, the local effect of L-dopa, as a mitogen, on human periodontal ligament fibroblast (HPLF cells was evaluated. Samples from impacted or semiimpacted wisdom or canine teeth, which were devoid of inflammation, were taken. The cells obtained from this tissue were cultured in an appropriate medium. The passage numbers between 3-6 were taken for further experiments. The viability of HPLF cells, which were treated by L-dopa, was evaluated by trypan blue dye exclusion and neutral red assay. Results indicated that low concentration of L-dopa produces significant increase of these cells compared to control group. These results confirmed previous studies about direct action of L- dopa on the viability of HPLF cells. On the basis of this study and previous reports, presence of L-dopa in preserving media may be useful in increasing the self-life transferring HPLF cells.

  2. Modeling of failure mode in knee ligaments depending on the strain rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyman William

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The failure mechanism of the knee ligament (bone-ligament-bone complex at different strain rates is an important subject in the biomechanics of the knee. This study reviews and summarizes the literature describing ligament injury as a function of stain rate, which has been published during the last 30 years. Methods Three modes of injury are presented as a function of strain rate, and they are used to analyze the published cases. The number of avulsions is larger than that of ligament tearing in mode I. There is no significant difference between the number of avulsions and ligament tearing in mode II. Ligament tearing happens more frequently than avulsion in mode III. Results When the strain rate increases, the order of mode is mode I, II, III, I, and II. Analytical models of ligament behavior as a function of strain rate are also presented and used to provide an integrated framework for describing all of the failure regimes. In addition, this study showed the failure mechanisms with different specimens, ages, and strain rates. Conclusion There have been several a numbers of studies of ligament failure under various conditions including widely varying strain rates. One issue in these studies is whether ligament failure occurs mid-ligament or at the bone attachment point, with assertions that this is a function of the strain rate. However, over the range of strain rates and other conditions reported, there has appeared to be discrepancies in the conclusions on the effect of strain rate. The analysis and model presented here provides a unifying assessment of the previous disparities, emphasizing the differential effect of strain rate on the relative strengths of the ligament and the attachment.

  3. Review of the Nomenclature of the Retaining Ligaments of the Cheek: Frequently Confused Terminology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeui Seok Seo

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Since the time of its inception within facial anatomy, wide variability in the terminology as well as the location and extent of retaining ligaments has resulted in confusion over nomenclature. Confusion over nomenclature also arises with regard to the subcutaneous ligamentous attachments, and in the anatomic location and extent described, particularly for zygomatic and masseteric ligaments. Certain historical terms—McGregor’s patch, the platysma auricular ligament, parotid cutaneous ligament, platysma auricular fascia, temporoparotid fasica (Lore’s fascia, anterior platysma-cutaneous ligament, and platysma cutaneous ligament—delineate retaining ligaments of related anatomic structures that have been conceptualized in various ways. Confusion around the masseteric cutaneous ligaments arises from inconsistencies in their reported locations in the literature because the size and location of the parotid gland varies so much, and this affects the relationship between the parotid gland and the fascia of the masseter muscle. For the zygomatic ligaments, there is disagreement over how far they extend, with descriptions varying over whether they extend medially beyond the zygomaticus minor muscle. Even the ‘main’ zygomatic ligament’s denotation may vary depending on which subcutaneous plane is used as a reference for naming it. Recent popularity in procedures using threads or injectables has required not only an accurate understanding of the nomenclature of retaining ligaments, but also of their location and extent. The authors have here summarized each retaining ligament with a survey of the different nomenclature that has been introduced by different authors within the most commonly cited published papers.

  4. Transfer of lumbosacral load to iliac bones and legs Part 2: Loading of the sacroiliac joints when lifting in a stooped posture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.J. Snijders (Chris); A. Vleeming (Andry); R. Stoeckart (Rob)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractWe developed a biomechanical model of load transfer by the sacroiliac joints in relation to posture. A description is given of two ways in which the transfer of lumbar load to the pelvis in a stooped posture can take place. One way concerns ligament and muscle forces that act on the sacr

  5. Transfer of lumbosacral load to iliac bones and legs Part 2: Loading of the sacroiliac joints when lifting in a stooped posture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.J. Snijders (Chris); A. Vleeming (Andry); R. Stoeckart (Rob)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractWe developed a biomechanical model of load transfer by the sacroiliac joints in relation to posture. A description is given of two ways in which the transfer of lumbar load to the pelvis in a stooped posture can take place. One way concerns ligament and muscle forces that act on the

  6. [Analysis of Musculoskeletal Systems and Their Diseases. Pathology and treatment for injuries of the tendon and ligament].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furumatsu, Takayuki; Shimamura, Yasunori; Nishida, Keiichiro

    2015-08-01

    Tendons and ligaments are dense connective fibers mainly composed of type I collagen. However, the structure, function, and cellular behavior are different between tendons and ligaments. Anatomic, biological, and developmental studies have revealed the distinct differentiation process of tendons, ligaments, and these attachments to the bones (so-called entheses). In addition, arthroscopic devices, surgical materials, and operative techniques for the treatment of tendon/ligament injuries have been dramatically improved. Based on these backgrounds, the treatment strategies of tendon/ligament disorders have changed in recent years. This review focused on the pathology of tendon and ligament injuries involved in the tear of the rotator cuff and anterior cruciate ligament. We also described the current treatment for the tendon/ligament injuries and the future regeneration therapy against these connective tissue injuries.

  7. Radionuclide transfer. Radionuklid Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, G.B.

    1993-01-01

    The research project described here had the aim to obtain further information on the transfer of nuclides during pregnancy and lactation. The tests were carried out in mini-pigs and rats receiving unchanging doses of radionuclides with the food. The following findings were revealed for the elements examined: Fe, Se, Cs and Zn were characterized by very high transfer levels in the mother, infant and foetus. A substantial uptake by the mother alone was observed for Co, Ag and Mn. The uptake by the foetus and infant here was 1 to 10 times lower. A preferential concentration in certain tissues was seen for Sr and Tc; the thyroid levels of Tc were about equally high in mothers and infants, while Sr showed less accumulation in the maternal bone. The lanthanide group of substances (Ce, Eu and Gd as well as Y and Ru) were only taken up to a very limited extent. The uptake of the examined radionuclides (Fe, Co, Ag, Ce) with the food ingested was found here to be ten times greater in rats as compared to mini-pigs. This showed that great caution must be observed, if the behaviour of radionuclides in man is extrapolated from relevant data obtained in rodents. (orig./MG)

  8. The role of extrinsic ligaments in maintaining carpal stability - A prospective statistical analysis of 85 arthroscopic cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Overstraeten, Luc; Camus, Emmanuel J

    2016-02-01

    Several biomechanical studies have shown that the scapholunate (SL) and lunotriquetral (LT) ligaments are not the only stabilizers of the proximal carpal row. However, no study has yet analyzed the range of ligament lesions leading to instability in vivo. Arthroscopy has been used to assess the condition of the wrist's extrinsic ligaments by palpating and tensioning the various ligament and capsule structures. In this prospective study, this arthroscopic method was used in 85 cases of wrist sprain without static instability to evaluate the correlation between lesions of the intrinsic and extrinsic carpal ligaments and carpal instability. In SL instability, a scapholunate interosseous ligament (SLIL) lesion was statistically correlated with lesions of the long radiolunate ligament (P<0.05). There also was a statistically significant correlation between lesions of the SLIL and the radioscaphocapitate, scaphotrapezial and dorsal intercarpal ligaments. There was a correlation between the stage of SL instability and the number of lax extrinsic ligaments (P<0.05) but not with the severity of the extrinsic ligament lesions. In LT instability, a LT interosseous ligament lesion was statistically correlated with lesions of the dorsal intercarpal ligament (P<0.05). There also was a correlation between the stage of LT instability and the number (P<0.005) and severity (P<0.001) of the extrinsic ligament lesions. Arthroscopy can reveal hidden radiographic instability and can also be used to define the number and severity of injured ligaments. In carpal instability, a lesion of one intrinsic carpal ligament was associated with a lesion of one or more extrinsic ligaments.

  9. Functional anatomy of the lateral collateral ligament complex of the elbow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seki, Atsuhito; Olsen, Bo Sanderhoff; Jensen, Steen Lund

    2002-01-01

    A previous anatomic study has revealed that the lateral collateral ligament (LCL) complex of the elbow has a Y-shaped configuration, which consists of a superior, an anterior, and a posterior band. The LCL complex, including the annular ligament, functions as a 3-dimensional (3D) Y-shaped structu...

  10. Androgen action during male sex differentiation includes suppression of cranial suspensory ligament development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M.A. Emmen (Judith); A. McLuskey; J.A. Grootegoed (Anton); A.O. Brinkmann (Albert)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractThe cranial suspensory ligament is located on the border of the cranial (mesonephric) mesentery in adult female mammals, which runs between the cranial pole of the internal genitalia and the dorsal abdominal wall. Absence of the cranial suspensory ligament i

  11. [Application of silk-based tissue engineering scaffold for tendon / ligament regeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yejun; Le, Huihui; Jin, Zhangchu; Chen, Xiao; Yin, Zi; Shen, Weiliang; Ouyang, Hongwei

    2016-03-01

    Tendon/ligament injury is one of the most common impairments in sports medicine. The traditional treatments of damaged tissue repair are unsatisfactory, especially for athletes, due to lack of donor and immune rejection. The strategy of tissue engineering may break through these limitations, and bring new hopes to tendon/ligament repair, even regeneration. Silk is a kind of natural biomaterials, which has good biocompatibility, wide range of mechanical properties and tunable physical structures; so it could be applied as tendon/ligament tissue engineering scaffolds. The silk-based scaffold has robust mechanical properties; combined with other biological ingredients, it could increase the surface area, promote more cell adhesion and improve the biocompatibility. The potential clinical application of silk-based scaffold has been confirmed by in vivo studies on tendon/ligament repairing, such as anterior cruciate ligament, medial collateral ligament, achilles tendon and rotator cuff. To develop novel biomechanically stable and host integrated tissue engineered tendon/ligament needs more further micro and macro studies, combined with product development and clinical application, which will give new hope to patients with tendon/ligament injury.

  12. Quadriceps muscle contraction protects the anterior cruciate ligament during anterior tibial translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aune, A K; Cawley, P W; Ekeland, A

    1997-01-01

    The proposed skiing injury mechanism that suggests a quadriceps muscle contraction can contribute to anterior cruciate ligament rupture was biomechanically investigated. The effect of quadriceps muscle force on a knee specimen loaded to anterior cruciate ligament failure during anterior tibial translation was studied in a human cadaveric model. In both knees from six donors, average age 41 years (range, 31 to 65), the joint capsule and ligaments, except the anterior cruciate ligament, were cut. The quadriceps tendon, patella, patellar tendon, and menisci were left intact. One knee from each pair was randomly selected to undergo destructive testing of the anterior cruciate ligament by anterior tibial translation at a displacement rate of 30 mm/sec with a simultaneously applied 889 N quadriceps muscle force. The knee flexion during testing was 30 degrees. As a control, the contralateral knee was loaded correspondingly, but only 5 N of quadriceps muscle force was applied. The ultimate load for the knee to anterior cruciate ligament failure when tested with 889 N quadriceps muscle force was 22% +/- 18% higher than that of knees tested with 5 N of force. The linear stiffness increased by 43% +/- 30%. These results did not support the speculation that a quadriceps muscle contraction contributes to anterior cruciate ligament failure. In this model, the quadriceps muscle force protected the anterior cruciate ligament from injury during anterior tibial translation.

  13. Clinical diagnosis of an anterior cruciate ligament rupture: A meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benjammse, A.; Gokeler, A.; Van der Schans, C.P.

    2006-01-01

    Study Design: Meta-analysis. Objectives: To define the accuracy of clinical tests for assessing anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ruptures. Background: The cruciate ligaments, and especially the ACL, are among the most commonly injured structures of the knee. Given the increasing injury prevalence, t

  14. Trunk position modulates anterior cruciate ligament forces and strains during a single-leg squat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kulas, Anthony S.; Hortobagyi, Tibor; DeVita, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Background: Although the squat exercise and its variations are commonly prescribed for anterior cruciate ligament rehabilitation, whether trunk position affects these ligament forces and strains during the squat is unclear. Our purpose was to evaluate the effects of trunk position on anterior crucia

  15. Collateral ligament reconstruction of the chronic thumb injury with bio-tenodesis screw fixation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gvozdenovic, Robert; Boeckstyns, Michel

    2014-01-01

    We describe a new technique for the reconstruction of chronic lesions of the collateral ligaments of the metacarpophalangeal ligaments of the thumb, using a Bio-Tenodesis screw for the fixation of a tendon graft in a triangular manner with proximal apex and allowing early mobilization, starting 2...

  16. Calcification of the alar ligament of the cervical spine in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soubai, Rahma Boussaadani; Tahiri, Latifa; Abourazzak, Fatima Zahra; Tizniti, Siham; Harzy, Taoufik

    2012-01-01

    Calcification of the alar ligament is rare. It usually develops as a result of traumatic injury and is especially prominent in the elderly. CT scanning is the gold standard of the diagnosis. We report a case of a calcification of the transverse and alar ligament in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:23330032

  17. Mechanisms of anterior cruciate ligament injury in basketball - Video analysis of 39 cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krosshaug, Tron; Nakamae, Atsuo; Boden, Barry P.; Engebretsen, Lars; Smith, Gerald; Slauterbeck, James R.; Hewett, Timothy E.; Bahr, Roald

    2007-01-01

    Background: The mechanisms of anterior cruciate ligament injury in basketball are not well defined. Purpose: To describe the mechanisms of anterior cruciate ligament injury in basketball based on videos of injury situations. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: Six international

  18. Severely calcified leiomyoma of broad ligament in a postmenopausal woman: Report of a rare case

    OpenAIRE

    Subrata Pal; Sajeeb Mondal; Palash Kr Mondal; Gargi Raychaudhuri; Rajashree Pradhan; Suparna Banerjee

    2016-01-01

    Calcified broad ligament leiomyoma is a rare benign lesion in postmenopausal age group. It causes diagnostic confusion with solid calcified adnexal mass and large bladder calculi at the pelvic region. Clinical and radiological diagnoses were confirmed by histopathology of the hysterectomy specimen. We hereby present a case of heavily calcified broad ligament fibroid in a postmenopausal woman.

  19. Severely calcified leiomyoma of broad ligament in a postmenopausal woman: Report of a rare case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subrata Pal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcified broad ligament leiomyoma is a rare benign lesion in postmenopausal age group. It causes diagnostic confusion with solid calcified adnexal mass and large bladder calculi at the pelvic region. Clinical and radiological diagnoses were confirmed by histopathology of the hysterectomy specimen. We hereby present a case of heavily calcified broad ligament fibroid in a postmenopausal woman.

  20. Clinical diagnosis of an anterior cruciate ligament rupture : A meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benjammse, A; Gokeler, A; van der Schans, CP

    2006-01-01

    Study Design: Meta-analysis. Objectives: To define the accuracy of clinical tests for assessing anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ruptures. Background: The cruciate ligaments, and especially the ACL, are among the most commonly injured structures of the knee. Given the increasing injury prevalence, t

  1. Arthroscopic procedures and therapeutic results of anatomical reconstruction of the coracoclavicular ligaments for acromioclavicular Joint dislocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takase, K; Yamamoto, K

    2016-09-01

    Surgical treatment is recommended for type 5 acromioclavicular joint dislocation on Rockwood's classification. We believe that anatomic repair of the coracoclavicular ligaments best restores the function of the acromioclavicular joint. We attempted to correctly reconstruct the anatomy of the coracoclavicular ligaments under arthroscopy, and describe the minimally invasive arthroscopic procedure. There were 22 patients; mean age at surgery, 38.1 years. Mean time to surgery was 13.2 days. Mean follow-up was 3 years 2 months. The palmaris longus tendon was excised from the ipsilateral side to replace the conoid ligament, while artificial ligament was used for reconstructing the trapezoid ligament. Both ligament reconstructions were performed arthroscopically. No temporary fixation of the acromioclavicular joint was performed. On postoperative radiographic evaluation, 4 patients showed subluxation and 2 showed dislocation of the acromioclavicular joint; the other 16 patients had maintained reduction at the final consultation. MR images 1year after surgery clearly revealed the reconstructed ligaments in 19 patients. Only 1 patient showed osteoarthritis of the acromioclavicular joint. Although it requires resection of the ipsilateral palmaris longus for grafting, we believe that anatomic reconstruction of both coracoclavicular ligaments best restores the function of the acromioclavicular joint. 4. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Mechanisms of anterior cruciate ligament injury in basketball - Video analysis of 39 cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krosshaug, Tron; Nakamae, Atsuo; Boden, Barry P.; Engebretsen, Lars; Smith, Gerald; Slauterbeck, James R.; Hewett, Timothy E.; Bahr, Roald

    2007-01-01

    Background: The mechanisms of anterior cruciate ligament injury in basketball are not well defined. Purpose: To describe the mechanisms of anterior cruciate ligament injury in basketball based on videos of injury situations. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: Six international

  3. Effects of Shuanghuangbu on the total protein content and ultrastructure in cultured human periodontal ligament cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许彦枝; 邹慧儒; 王小玲; 刘世正; 王永军

    2004-01-01

    Background Successful periodontal regeneration depends on the migration, proliferation and differentiation of periodontal ligament cells in periodontal defects. The total protein content and the ultrastructure demonstrate the metabolizability and activity of periodontal ligament cells. This study was conducted to observe the effects of Shuanghuangbu, a mixture of medicinal herbs, on the total protein content and the ultrastructure of human periodontal ligament cells.Methods Periodontal ligament cells were grown to confluence and then cultured in Dulbecco's modified eagle medium (DMEM) supplemented with Shuanghuangbu over the concentration range of 0 to 1000 μg/ml. The total protein content in cultured cells was determined by using Coommasie brilliant blue technique. Periodontal ligament cells were incubated in 0 and 100 μg/ml Shuanghuangbu decoction for 5 days, then observed through transmission electron microscope.Results The total protein content of human periodontal ligament cells increased in each experiment group added 10-1000 μg/ml Shuanghuangbu respectively, and the effect of 100 μg/ml was excellent. Under the transmission electron microscope, there were more rough endoplasmic reticulums and mitochodrias in the experiment group than those in the control group. Conclusion Shuanghuangbu stimulates the protein synthesis of human periodontal ligament cells and improves human periodontal ligament cells' metabolizability and activity.

  4. The remains of anterior cruciate ligament graft tension after cyclic knee motion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnold, MR; Lie, DTT; Verdonschot, N; de Graaf, R; Amis, AA; van Kampen, A

    2005-01-01

    Background: There is sometimes a return of excess knee laxity after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. One of the contributing factors might be a loss in graft tension. It is unknown whether the tension imposed on an anterior cruciate ligament graft degrades with time and, if so, the effect

  5. Current Concept on Ligament and Tendon Injury, Healing and Regeneration%韧带和肌腱损伤康复与再生的新概念

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sarvo Lan-Ynan Woo; Rui Liang

    2008-01-01

    @@ The nonlinear biomechanical properties of ligaments and tendons are well designed to guide synovial joints to move easily and smoothly,to transfer the large forces generated by muscles tobones and alsotolimit excessive bone to bone displacement when the external applied loads are higher in order to protect other soft tissues in and around the joints from damages.As such,these tissues experience large,repetitive forces during sports and work-related activities and are injured frequently,especially those of the knee and shoulder joints.

  6. Morphology of the medial collateral ligament of the knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gill Thomas J

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantitative knowledge on the anatomy of the medial collateral ligament (MCL is important for treatment of MCL injury and for MCL release during total knee arthroplasty (TKA. The objective of this study was to quantitatively determine the morphology of the MCL of human knees. Methods 10 cadaveric human knees were dissected to investigate the MCL anatomy. The specimens were fixed in full extension and this position was maintained during the dissection and morphometric measurements. The outlines of the insertion sites of the superficial MCL (sMCL and deep MCL (dMCL were digitized using a 3D digitizing system. Results The insertion areas of the superficial MCL (sMCL were 348.6 ± 42.8 mm2 and 79.7 ± 17.6 mm2 on the tibia and femur, respectively. The insertion areas of the deep MCL (dMCL were 63.6 ± 13.4 mm2 and 71.9 ± 14.8 mm2 on the tibia and femur, respectively. The distances from the centroids of the tibial and femoral insertions of the sMCL to the tibial and femoral joint line were 62.4 ± 5.5 mm and 31.1 ± 4.6 mm, respectively. The distances from the centroids of dMCL in the tibial insertion and the femoral insertion to the tibial and femoral joint line were 6.5 ± 1.3 mm and 20.5 ± 4.2 mm, respectively. The distal portion of the dMCL (meniscotibial ligament - MTL was approximately 1.7 times wider than the proximal portion of the dMCL (meniscofemoral ligament - MFL, whereas the MFL was approximately 3 times longer than the MTL. Conclusions The morphologic data on the MCL may provide useful information for improving treatments of MCL-related pathology and performing MCL release during TKA.

  7. MRI appearance of the superior transverse scapular ligament

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simeone, F.J.; Bredella, Miriam A.; Chang, Connie Y.; Torriani, Martin; Huang, Ambrose J. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging and Intervention, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-11-15

    The superior transverse scapular ligament (STSL) forms the roof of the suprascapular notch, which is the most common location of entrapment of the suprascapular nerve, a cause of shoulder pain and weakness. The purpose of this study is to determine the frequency of visualization of the STSL on routine shoulder MRIs, to identify the sequences and imaging planes on which it is visualized most frequently, and to describe its typical MRI appearance, none of which have been previously addressed in the radiologic literature. One hundred twenty-one consecutive shoulder MRIs were reviewed for the presence or absence of the STSL, including the imaging plane and sequence that best depicted the ligament. Dimensions of the ligament were recorded. Fifty four of 121 shoulder MRIs were technically adequate for visualization of the STSL, and it was identified on 51 of these studies (94 %). There was no statistically significant difference between 1.5-T and 3-T systems. The best individual sequence for visualizing the STSL was the sagittal T1-weighted sequence, in which the STSL was visible on 75/80 technically adequate sequences (94 %). The sagittal plane was the best plane for visualizing the STSL, in which it was visible on 65/69 technically adequate studies (94 %). The STSL on average measured 12.8 ± 1.5 mm in transverse dimension. The STSL can be visualized on the majority of shoulder MRIs and is best seen on sagittal T1-weighted images on our imaging protocol. Evaluation of the STSL can potentially help in identifying pathologic conditions affecting the suprascapular nerve. (orig.)

  8. Outcome of surgical treatment of arthrofibrosis following ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Said, Sinan; Christainsen, Svend Erik; Faunoe, Peter; Lund, Bent; Lind, Martin

    2011-10-01

    Clinical outcome following surgical treatment and intensive physiotherapy was evaluated in patients with arthrofibrosis as a complication to varying knee-ligament reconstructions. From 2003 to 2007, 31 patients underwent surgery for arthrofibrosis as a postoperative complication following knee-ligament reconstruction. Treatment for reduced range of motion consisted of forced manipulation or arthroscopic arthrolysis followed by intensive physiotherapy. Twenty-seven patients (12 men and 15 women; median age 35(12-70) years) were followed up. Objective examination, Pain, KOOS and Tegner scores were used to evaluate the clinical outcome at follow-up. Fourteen patients were treated with forced manipulation alone, and the remaining thirteen were treated with forced manipulation and arthroscopic arthrolysis. The patients' median follow-up was 51 months (19-73 months). Median interval between primary surgery and surgical release was 4 (1-32) months. Median range of motion (ROM) improved from -0°(0 to 20) to 0°(+2-9) in extension deficit and from 90°(40-145) to 130°(90-155) in flexion. Mean KOOS score were symptoms 63, pain 72, ADL 77, sport 42, QOL 45. Median Tegner score was 4 (2-9). Surgical arthrolysis combined with intensive physiotherapy improved range of motion to nearly normal values. Subjective outcome scores revealed relatively poor outcome levels compared to uncomplicated knee-ligament reconstruction. Predictors of poor outcome were global arthrofibrosis and greater than 6-month time interval from primary reconstruction and surgical release. Retrospective clinical case series, Level IV.

  9. Microarray gene expression analysis of uterosacral ligaments in uterine prolapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ak, Handan; Zeybek, Burak; Atay, Sevcan; Askar, Niyazi; Akdemir, Ali; Aydin, Hikmet Hakan

    2016-11-01

    Pelvic organ prolapse (POP) is a major health problem that impairs the quality of life with a wide clinical spectrum. Since the uterosacral ligaments provide primary support for the uterus and the upper vagina, we hypothesize that the disruption of these ligaments may lead to a loss of support and eventually contribute to POP. In this study, we therefore investigated whether there are any differences in the transcription profile of uterosacral ligaments in patients with POP when compared to those of the control samples. Seventeen women with POP and 8 non-POP controls undergoing hysterectomy for benign conditions were included in the study. Affymetrix® Gene Chip microarrays (Human Hu 133 plus 2.0) were used for whole genome gene expression profiling analysis. There was 1 significantly down-regulated gene, NKX2-3 in patients with POP compared to the controls (p=4.28464e-013). KIF11 gene was found to be significantly down-regulated in patients with ≥3 deliveries compared to patients with <3 deliveries (p=0.0156237). UGT1A1 (p=2.43388e-005), SCARB1 (p=1.19001e-006) and NKX2-3 (p=2.17966e-013) genes were found to be significantly down-regulated in the premenopausal patients compared to the premenopausal controls. UGT1A1 gene was also found to be significantly down-regulated in the post menopausal patients compared to the postmenopausal controls (p=0.0005). This study provides evidence for a significant down-regulation of the genes that take role in cell cycle, proliferation and embryonic development along with cell adhesion process on the development of POP for the first time. Copyright © 2016 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Gastropancreatic ligament: Description, incidence, and involvement during laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebibo, Lionel; Darmon, Ilan; Peltier, Johann; Dhahri, Abdennaceur; Regimbeau, Jean-Marc

    2017-04-01

    During laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG), adhesions between the stomach and the pancreas are sometimes found, forming a "gastropancreatic ligament" (GPL). However, the GPL has only been described once in the literature, in 1985. The objective of this study was to determine the incidence of the GPL during LSG, describe this structure and assess its effect on the surgical technique. All patients undergoing primary LSG in our institution (n = 240) and patients referred for gastric fistula (GF) after primary LSG (n = 18) between January 2015 and December 2015 were included. The primary endpoint was the incidence of a GPL during primary LSG. The secondary endpoints were the postoperative complication rate, the postoperative GF rate, and the presence of this ligament during reoperation for GF. Among the 240 patients, a GPL was visible in 49 cases (20.4%) and was described as thin in 34 of these (69.4%). Twelve postoperative complications (5%) were observed, including seven major (2.9%). The GF rate was 2% (n = 5), not requiring reoperation. The gastric stenosis rate was 0.4% (n = 1). The GPL had been previously sectioned in one of the five patients (20%) with postoperative GF. During the study period, 18 patients were referred for GF and 14 were reoperated. A non-sectioned GPL, not described in the operating report, was observed in four patients (28.5%). A GPL was identified in 20.4% of cases. Identification of a GPL could be important in the context of LSG, as section of the ligament allows tension-free stapling to be performed and can therefore possibly reduce the risk of postoperative complications, particularly GF. Clin. Anat. 30:336-341, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Risk factors for bilateral anterior cruciate ligament injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ristić Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The aim of this study has been to identify which risk factors can influence bilateral anterior cruciate ligament injury. Material and Methods. Thirty-two operated patients took part in this survey during the period of ten years. There were 5 women and 27 men, with average age of 30.46 years (19-55. The respondents filled in the questionnaire by answering the questions regarding the time when getting injured and operated, mechanism of injuries, genetic and anthropometric data, characteristics of sports and every day activities. Results. The incidence of reconstructed bilateral injuries in relation to unilateral ones was 2.3% (50/2168. The age of respondents and side of the injured knee did not correlate significantly with the achieved subjective physical activity level after the second knee surgery. The average time from the first injury to operation was 10 months and 4.3 years since that moment up to the injury of the other knee. It took more than 9 months on average until the reconstruction of contralateral anterior cruciate ligament. The most of athletes were injured in football matches. Three-quarters of athletes returned to competition activities after the first operation, which caused the same injury of the contralateral knee. Discussion and Conclusion. Anterior cruciate ligament rupture of the contralateral knee most often occurs in young active athletes within the first four years after the initial reconstruction. Its frequency is not affected by sex, side of extremity, genetic predisposition, type of sport, concomitant injuries and the choice of graft. Returning to the same or higher level of sports activities after the first reconstruction is one of the preconditions for injuring the other knee in the same way.

  12. LARS人工韧带同时重建前、后交叉韧带%Reconstruction of both the anterior cruciate ligament and posterior cruciate ligament with ligament advanced reinforcement system artificial ligament transplantation under knee arthroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尚平; 贺宪; 江永发; 刘志祥; 才忠民; 杨俊龙

    2007-01-01

    目的 探讨关节镜下LARS(Ligament Advanced Reinforcement System,LARS)人工韧带同时重建前(Anterior cruciate ligament,ACL)、后交叉韧带(posterior cruciate ligament,PCL)的方法和临床疗效.方法 从2006年1月至2007年4月,用LARS人工韧带同时重建ACL、PCL2例.应用Lysholm功能评分表评估膝关节功能,采用抽屉实验检查膝关节前后松弛度.结果 2例均获得随访,随访时间分别为8月、3月.2例患者术后患膝关节不稳定症状消失,胫骨后坠征阴性,前、后抽屉试验阴性.膝关节功能评估采用Lysholm功能评分标准,术前平均分别为45.6±7.6分,术后平均为80.3±9.1分.结论 关节镜下应用LARS人工韧带同时重建ACL、PCL可更好地恢复膝关节的稳定性,且创伤小,并发症少,近期疗效满意,但远期效果仍需进一步观察.

  13. Osseous femoral avulsion of the anterior cruciate ligament origin in an adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir H. Shah, MD

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Injuries of the anterior cruciate ligament are commonly encountered in clinical practice, and occur in a wide variety of settings, from sports-related injuries to polytrauma. Tears of the anterior cruciate ligament supersede osseous avulsion in the adult demographic; however, in the pediatric population, osseous avulsion reflects the most frequent injury. When osseous avulsion of the anterior cruciate ligament occurs in children or adults, the injury typically occurs at the level of the tibial eminence. Conversely, osseous avulsion injuries from the femur are rare, with all cases reported in the literature occurring in the skeletally immature. We report a case of a 47-year-old woman who suffered an osseous avulsion of her anterior cruciate ligament from her lateral femoral condyle. To our knowledge, this reflects the first reported case of femoral osseous avulsion of the anterior cruciate ligament origin in an adult.

  14. Full term viable secondary broad ligament pregnancy – A rare case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CH. Sheethal, Dr.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Broad ligament pregnancy is also known as inter ligamentous pregnancy which is a rare form of ectopic pregnancy. Very few successful live births have been reported in this condition, where such pregnancies reached term and with live birth of a baby. A case of 28 year old primigravida of 35 weeks gestation with oligoamnios was referred to our hospital. A right broad ligament pregnancy was confirmed after an ultrasound and an MRI. She was taken up for surgery and an incision was given on the anterior leaf of the broad ligament and a male live fetus was extracted. Placenta was found on the posterior leaf of the broad ligament and it was removed without any undue haemorrhage. Uterus was lying medial to the sac and was around ten weeks in size. Both mother and baby were discharged on seventh postoperative day in good health condition.

  15. Open anatomical coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction using a tendon graft with an Endobutton loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Nagraj S; Yoo, Yon S; Kim, Do Y; Lee, Sang S; Jeong, Un S

    2009-12-01

    We describe a technique of open anatomical coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction restoring both parts of the native ligament, aiming at achieving maximum stability of the acromioclavicular joint without disturbing the normal anatomy. Using the same anatomical principle of ligament reconstruction as in other joints, transosseous tunnels are created at the native footprints of the conoid and trapezoid ligaments. An autologous graft is fixed using an Endobutton continuous loop and a PEEK screw; adequate healing of the ligament is ensured with an appropriate working length. Although an open procedure, this technique offers several advantages. It can be easily reproduced using basic anatomical principles and simple cost-effective instrumentation. The implant does not have to be removed, important anatomical structures are respected, normal acromioclavicular joint kinematics are restored, the scar is cosmetically acceptable and post-operative morbidity is very low.

  16. The Importance of Calcified Stylohyoid Ligament to the Neck Injury a Case Report

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    Gürcan Altun

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Stylohyoid ligament (LS is an anatomical structure between the styloid processes of temporal bone and cornu minus of hyoid bone. LS may calcify as elongated styloid processes and it may occur partly or completely. Elongated styloid process or calcified stylohyoid ligament gives a complex of symptoms described by Eagle such as craniofacial and cervical pain, dysphagia and foreign body sensation, and it is called Eagle's Syndrome. An 82-year-old man died due to mechanical asphyxia from hanging. Calcified stylohyoid ligaments were showed on examination of the internal structures of his neck. According to forensic medicine, the importance of calcified stylohyoid ligament reviewed to the autopsies has neck injuries. Key words: Neck injury, stylohyoid ligament, hanging

  17. Spatial anatomy of the round ligament, gallbladder, and intrahepatic vessels in patients with right-sided round ligament of the liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibukuro, Kenji; Takeguchi, Takaya; Fukuda, Hozumi; Abe, Shoko; Tobe, Kimiko

    2016-11-01

    To analyze the vascular structure of the liver in patients with a right-sided round ligament. We reviewed 16 patients with a right-sided round ligament and 3 polysplenia and situs inversus patients with a left-sided round ligament who underwent multidetector row CT with contrast media. The patient population consisted of 13 men and 6 women (mean 62 years). We analyzed the axial and volume-rendered images for the location of the round ligament, gallbladder, portal veins, hepatic veins, and hepatic artery. The following imaging findings for the patients with polysplenia and situs inversus were horizontally reversed. The prevalence of a right-sided round ligament with and without polysplenia was 75 and 0.11 %, respectively. The gallbladder was located to the right, below, and left of the round ligament in 27.7, 38.8 and 33.3 %, respectively. Independent branching of the right posterior portal vein was noted in 57.8 %. PV4 was difficult to identify in 36.8 %. The middle hepatic vein was located to the left of the round ligament. Two branching patterns for the lateral and medial branches of the right anterior hepatic artery were noted: the common (44.4 %) and separated types (55.5 %). Both of the right anterior hepatic artery and portal vein ramified into two segments; the lateral segment with many branches and the medial segment with a few branches. The right-sided round ligament divided the right anterior section into the lateral and medial segments based on the portal vein and hepatic artery anatomy.

  18. Periodontal ligament stem cells: an update and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamila Prageeth Pandula, P K; Samaranayake, L P; Jin, L J; Zhang, Chengfei

    2014-05-01

    Chronic periodontitis is a serious infectious and inflammatory oral disease of humans worldwide. Conventional treatment modalities are effective for controlling periodontal disease. However, the regeneration of damaged periodontal tissues remains a major challenge in clinical practice due to the complex structure of the periodontium. Stem cell-based regenerative approaches combined with the usage of emerging biomaterials are entering a new era in periodontal regeneration. The present review updates the current knowledge of periodontal ligament stem cell-based approaches for periodontal regeneration, and elaborates on the potentials for clinical application.

  19. Anatomical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament: a logical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Cesar Gali

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT We describe the surgical approach that we have used over the last years for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction, highlighting the importance of arthroscopic viewing through the anteromedial portal (AMP and femoral tunnel drilling through an accessory anteromedial portal (AMP. The AMP allows direct view of the ACL femoral insertion site on the medial aspect of the lateral femoral condyle, does not require guides for anatomic femoral tunnel reaming, prevents an additional lateral incision in the distal third of the thigh (as would be unavoidable when the outside-intechnique is used and also can be used for double-bundle ACL reconstruction.

  20. Ligamentous and capsular restraints to experimental posterior elbow joint dislocation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deutch, Søren R; Olsen, Bo S; Jensen, Steen L

    2003-01-01

    Pathological external forearm rotation (PEFR) relates to posterolateral elbow joint instability, and is considered a possible requisite step in a simple posterior elbow joint dislocation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the capsuloligamentous restraint to PEFR. In all, 18 elbow joint...... specimens were examined in a joint analysis system developed for experimental elbow dislocation. Sequential cutting of capsule and ligaments followed by stability testing provided specific data relating to each capsuloligamentous structure. The primary stabilizers against PEFR in the extended elbow were...

  1. A nonlinear poroelastic model for the periodontal ligament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favino, Marco; Bourauel, Christoph; Krause, Rolf

    2016-05-01

    A coupled elastic-poroelastic model for the simulation of the PDL and the adjacent tooth is presented. A poroelastic constitutive material model for the periodontal ligament (PDL) is derived. The solid phase is modeled by means of a Fung material law, accounting for large displacements and strains. Numerical solutions are performed by means of a multigrid Newton method to solve the arising large nonlinear system. Finally, by means of numerical experiments, the biomechanical response of the PDL is studied. In particular, the effect of the hydraulic conductivity and of the mechanical parameters of a Fung potential is investigated in two realistic applications.

  2. Enhancing uncertainty tolerance in modelling creep of ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reda Taha, M M; Lucero, J

    2006-09-01

    The difficulty in performing biomechanical tests and the scarcity of biomechanical experimental databases necessitate extending the current knowledge base to allow efficient modelling using limited data sets. This study suggests a framework to reduce uncertainties in biomechanical systems using limited data sets. The study also shows how sparse data and epistemic input can be exploited using fuzzy logic to represent biomechanical relations. An example application to model collagen fibre recruitment in the medial collateral ligaments during time-dependent deformation under cyclic loading (creep) is presented. The study suggests a quality metric that can be employed to observe and enhance uncertainty tolerance in the modelling process.

  3. A perioperative rehabilitation program for anterior cruciate ligament surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, T; Shelbourne, K D

    2000-01-01

    Rehabilitation programs have progressed alongside surgical advances in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. A perioperative program has been successfully used at our clinic for more than 10 years to reduce postoperative complications and return patients to activity safely and quickly. The four-phase program starts at the time of injury and preoperatively includes aggressive swelling reduction, hyperextension exercises, gait training, and mental preparation. Goals after surgery are to control swelling while regaining full knee range of motion. After quadriceps strengthening goals are reached, patients can shift to sport-specific exercises.

  4. Optimization of a biomimetic poly-(lactic acid) ligament scaffold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uehlin, Andrew F.

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is the most commonly injured ligament of the knee, often requiring orthopedic reconstruction using autograft or allograph tissue, both with significant disadvantages. As a result, tissue engineering an ACL replacement graft has been heavily investigated. The present study attempts to replicate the morphology and mechanical properties of the ACL using a nanomatrix composite of highly-aligned poly(lactic acid) (PLA) fibers with various surface and biochemical modifications. Additionally, this study attempts to recreate the natural mineralization gradient found at the ACL enthesis onto the scaffold, capable of inducing a favorable cellular response in vitro. Unidirectional electrospinning was used to create nanofibers of PLA, followed by an induced degradation of the nanofibers via 0.25M NaOH hydrolysis. The effects of the unidirectional electrospinning as well as the effects of NaOH hydrolysis on fiber alignment, fiber diameter, surface morphology, crystallinity, in vitro swelling, immobilization of fibrin, and mechanical properties were investigated, resulting in a modified morphology correlating to the microstructure of native ligament tissue with similar mechanical properties. Furthering the development of the PLA nanomatrix composite, a bioinkjet printer was used to immobilize nanoparticulate hydroxyapatite (HANP) on the surface of the scaffold. A series of 300pL droplets of HANP bioink were printed over a gradient pattern mimetic of (and spatially corresponding to) the mineralization gradient found over the microanatomy at the ACL enthesis. Proliferation and differentiation response of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) in vitro was assessed on a variety of conditions and combinations of the PLA nanofiber scaffold surface modifications (inclusive and exclusive of HANP, fibrin, and various time dependent NaOH treatments). It was found that a combinatory effect of the HANP gradient with fibrin on 20 minute NaOH treated PLA

  5. The anatomy of the coracohumeral ligament and its relation to the subscapularis muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Ryuzo; Nimura, Akimoto; Yamaguchi, Kumiko; Yoshimura, Hideya; Sugaya, Hiroyuki; Saji, Takahiko; Matsuda, Shuichi; Akita, Keiichi

    2014-10-01

    Only a few reports describe the extension of the coracohumeral ligament to the subscapularis muscle. The purposes of this study were to histo-anatomically examine the structure between the ligament and subscapularis and to discuss the function of the ligament. Nineteen intact embalmed shoulders were used. In 9 shoulders, the expansion of the ligament was anatomically observed, and in 6 of these 9, the muscular tissue of the supraspinatus and subscapularis was removed to carefully examine the attachments to the tendons of these muscles. Five shoulders were frozen and sagittally sectioned into 3-mm-thick slices. After observation, histologic analysis was performed on 3 of these shoulders. In the remaining 5 shoulders, the coracoid process was harvested to investigate the ligament origin. The coracohumeral ligament originated from the horizontal limb and base of the coracoid process and enveloped the cranial part of the subscapularis muscle. The superficial layer of the ligament covered a broad area of the anterior surface of the muscle. Laterally, it protruded between the long head of the biceps tendon and subscapularis and attached to the tendinous floor, which extended from the subscapularis insertion. Histologically, the ligament consisted of irregular and sparse fibers abundant in type III collagen. The coracohumeral ligament envelops the whole subscapularis muscle and insertion and seems to function as a kind of holder for the subscapularis and supraspinatus muscles. The ligament is composed of irregular and sparse fibers and contains relatively rich type III collagen, which would suggest flexibility. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Analysis of 3-dimensional finite element after reconstruction of impaired ankle deltoid ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yunhan; Tang, Xianzhong; Li, Yifan; Xu, Wei; Qiu, Wenjun

    2016-12-01

    We compared four repair techniques for impaired ankle ligament deltoideum, namely Wiltberger, Deland, Kitaoka and Hintermann using a 3-dimensional finite element. We built an ankle ligament deltoideum model, including six pieces of bone structures, gristles and main ligaments around the ankle. After testing the model, we built an impaired ligament deltoideum model plus four reconstruction models. Subsequently, different levels of force on ankles with different flexion were imposed and ankle biomechanics were compared. In the course of bending, from plantar flexion 20° to back flexion 20°, the extortion of talus decreased while the eversion increased. Four reconstruction models failed to bring back the impaired ankle to normal, with an obvious increase of extortion and eversion. The Kitaoka technique was useful to reduce the extortion angle in a consequential manner. Compared with the other three techniques, the Kitaoka technique produced better results for extortion angle and the difference was statistically significant. However, in case of eversion, there was no significant difference among the four techniques (P>0.05). Lateral ligament's stress in all the four models was different from the normal one. When the ankle was imposed with extortion moment of force, stress of anterior talofibular ligament with the Kitaoka reconstruction method was close to that of the complete deltoid ligament. When ankle was imposed with eversion moment of force, stress of anterior talofibular ligament with Kitaoka and Deland reconstruction methods were close to that of the complete deltoid ligament. We concluded that Kitaoka and Deland tendon reconstruction technique could recover impaired ankle deltoid ligament and re-established its normal biomechanics characteristics.

  7. Rehabilitation therapy for old rupture of collateral ligament and cross ligament%陈旧性十字韧带和侧副韧带断裂康复治疗探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈秋生; 杨建成; 陈霞

    2002-01-01

    Objective To investigate therapeutic method for old rupture of cross ligament and collateral ligament of the knee. Method Reduce and fix the tibia migrated to anterior and posterior anatomically with three sets of Charnley articulated splints. Reconstruct cross ligament and collateral ligament with the tendon of semitendinosus. Result Clinical symptoms disappeared in 15 cases and normal function resumed; 9 cases had different degree of symptoms after following up for 7 months to three years and 5 months. Conclusion It is an effective method to reduce tibia femoral and patellar femoral joints anatomically, reconstruct cross and collateral ligaments and resume biological function.

  8. Acromioclavicular joint injuries: diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simovitch, Ryan; Sanders, Brett; Ozbaydar, Mehmet; Lavery, Kyle; Warner, Jon J P

    2009-04-01

    Acromioclavicular joint injuries represent nearly half of all athletic shoulder injuries, often resulting from a fall onto the tip of the shoulder with the arm in adduction. Stability of this joint depends on the integrity of the acromioclavicular ligaments and capsule as well as the coracoclavicular ligaments and the trapezius and deltoid muscles. Along with clinical examination for tenderness and instability, radiographic examination is critical in the evaluation of acromioclavicular joint injuries. Nonsurgical treatment is indicated for type I and II injuries; surgery is almost always recommended for type IV, V, and VI injuries. Management of type III injuries remains controversial, with nonsurgical treatment favored in most instances and reconstruction of the acromioclavicular joint reserved for symptomatic instability. Recommended techniques for stabilization in cases of acute and late symptomatic instability include screw fixation of the coracoid process to the clavicle, coracoacromial ligament transfer, and coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction. Biomechanical studies have demonstrated that anatomic acromioclavicular joint reconstruction is the most effective treatment for persistent instability.

  9. Transfer Pricing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren Bo

    2014-01-01

    Against a background of rather mixed evidence about transfer pricing practices in multinational enterprises (MNEs) and varying attitudes on the part of tax authorities, this paper explores how multiple aims in transfer pricing can be pursued across four different transfer pricing regimes. A MNE h...

  10. Pragmatic Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Gabriele

    1992-01-01

    Attempting to clarify the concept of pragmatic transfer, this article proposes as a basic distinction Leech/Thomas' dichotomy of sociopragmatics versus pragmalinguistics, presenting evidence for transfer at both levels. Issues discussed include pragmatic universals in speech act realization, conditions for pragmatic transfer, communicative…

  11. Functional results from reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament using the central third of the patellar ligament and flexor tendons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos George de Souza Leao

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVES: To evaluate knee function in patients undergoing reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL using the central third of the patellar ligament or the medial flexor tendons of the knee, i.e. quadruple ligaments from the semitendinosus and gracilis (ST-G, by means of the Knee Society Score (KSS and the Lysholm scale. METHODS: This was a randomized prospective longitudinal study on 40 patients who underwent arthroscopic ACL reconstruction between September 2013 and August 2014. They comprised 37 males and three females, with ages ranging from 16 to 52 years. The patients were numbered randomly from 1 to 40: the even numbers underwent surgical correction using the ST-G tendons and the odd numbers, using the patellar tendon. Functional evaluations were made using the KSS and Lysholm scale, applied in the evening before the surgical procedure and six months after the operation. RESULTS: From the statistical analysis, it could be seen that the patients' functional capacity was significantly greater after the operation than before the operation. There was strong evidence that the two forms of therapy had similar results ( p= >0.05, in all the comparisons. CONCLUSIONS: The results from the ACL reconstructions were similar with regard to functional recovery of the knee and improvement of quality of life, independent of the type of graft. It was not possible to identify the best method of surgical treatment. The surgeon's clinical and technical experience and the patient are the factors that determine the choice of graft type for use in ACL surgery.

  12. Reconstruction of medial patellofemoral ligament using quadriceps tendon combined with reconstruction of medial patellotibial ligament using patellar tendon: initial experience☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinckel, Betina Bremer; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Bonadio, Marcelo Batista; Demange, Marco Kawamura; Pécora, José Ricardo; Camanho, Gilberto Luis

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe a surgical technique for anatomical reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament using the quadriceps tendon, combined with reconstruction of the medial patellotibial ligament using the patellar tendon; and to present the initial results from a case series. Method The proposed technique was used on a series of cases of patients with diagnoses of patellofemoral instability and indications for surgical treatment, who were attended by the Knee Group of HC-IOT, University of São Paulo. The following were evaluated before and after the operation: range of motion (ROM), apprehension test, lateral translation test, patellar inclination test, inverted J sign, subluxation upon extension, pain from compression of the patella and pain from contraction of the quadriceps. After the operation, the patients were asked whether any new episode of dislocation had occurred, what their degree of satisfaction with the surgery was (on a scale from 0 to 10) and whether they would be prepared to go through this operation again. Results Seven knees were operated, in seven patients, with a mean follow-up of 5.46 months (±2.07). Four patients who presented apprehension before the operation did not show this after the operation. The lateral translation test became normal for all the patients, while the patellar inclination test remained positive for two patients. The patients with an inverted J sign continued to be positive for this sign. Five patients were positive for subluxation upon extension before the operation, but all patients were negative for this after the operation. None of the patients presented any new episode of dislocation of the patella. All of them stated that they were satisfied: five gave a satisfaction score of 9 and two, a score of 10. All of them said that they would undergo the operation again. Only one patient presented a postoperative complication: dehiscence of the wound. Conclusion Reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament

  13. Reconstruction of medial patellofemoral ligament using quadriceps tendon combined with reconstruction of medial patellotibial ligament using patellar tendon: initial experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betina Bremer Hinckel

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To describe a surgical technique for anatomical reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament using the quadriceps tendon, combined with reconstruction of the medial patellotibial ligament using the patellar tendon; and to present the initial results from a case series. METHOD: The proposed technique was used on a series of cases of patients with diagnoses of patellofemoral instability and indications for surgical treatment, who were attended by the Knee Group of HC-IOT, University of São Paulo. The following were evaluated before and after the operation: range of motion (ROM, apprehension test, lateral translation test, patellar inclination test, inverted J sign, subluxation upon extension, pain from compression of the patella and pain from contraction of the quadriceps. After the operation, the patients were asked whether any new episode of dislocation had occurred, what their degree of satisfaction with the surgery was (on a scale from 0 to 10 and whether they would be prepared to go through this operation again. RESULTS: Seven knees were operated, in seven patients, with a mean follow-up of 5.46 months (±2.07. Four patients who presented apprehension before the operation did not show this after the operation. The lateral translation test became normal for all the patients, while the patellar inclination test remained positive for two patients. The patients with an inverted J sign continued to be positive for this sign. Five patients were positive for subluxation upon extension before the operation, but all patients were negative for this after the operation. None of the patients presented any new episode of dislocation of the patella. All of them stated that they were satisfied: five gave a satisfaction score of 9 and two, a score of 10. All of them said that they would undergo the operation again. Only one patient presented a postoperative complication: dehiscence of the wound. CONCLUSION: Reconstruction of the

  14. Surgical treatment of acute and chronic anterior and posterior cruciate ligament and lateral side injuries of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Bruce A; Boyd, Joel L; Stuart, Michael J

    2011-06-01

    Combined anterior cruciate ligament, posterior cruciate ligament, and lateral-sided injuries of the knee most often occurs secondary to a forced varus moment or after knee dislocation. Management controversies include the optimal timing of surgery, operative techniques, and postoperative rehabilitation. Recent systematic literature reviews have demonstrated higher rates of failure with repair of the lateral and posterolateral corner structures, as opposed to reconstruction. However, the ideal ligament reconstruction techniques remain unclear. This chapter will review the combined anterior cruciate ligament/posterior cruciate ligament/lateral-sided injury pattern, including the physical examination findings, imaging, timing of surgery, graft selection, operative techniques, and postoperative rehabilitation protocols.

  15. [Mystery of alar ligament rupture: value of MRI in whiplash injuries--biomechanical, anatomical and clinical studies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitterling, H; Stäbler, A; Brückmann, H

    2007-11-01

    Whiplash injury of the cervical spine is a frequent issue in medical expertise and causes enormous consequential costs for motor insurance companies. Some authors accuse posttraumatic changes of alar ligaments to be causative for consequential disturbances. Review of recent studies on biomechanics, anatomical and clinical MR imaging. Biomechanical experiments can not induce according injuries of alar ligaments. Although MRI provides excellent visualization of alar ligaments, the range of normal variants is high. Biomechanical studies give no evidence of alar ligament involvement in whiplash disease. Using MRI, signal alterations of alar ligaments can hardly be differentiated from common normal variants. Functional MRI provides no diagnostic yield.

  16. Factors informing fear of reinjury after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Cheryl A; Clifford, Amanda; Louw, Quinette A

    2017-02-01

    Fear of reinjury is associated with cessation of sport after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction despite normal postoperative knee function. The objective of this study is to describe factors informing athletes' experience of fear of reinjury post ACL reconstruction, in athletes who cited fear as the sole reason for not returning to their pre-injury level of sport. Mixed-methods study design of qualitative and a preliminary quantitative component. A conveniently selected private hospital. Ten male and two female athletes, aged between 19 and 45 years, were eligible for the interview from 68 male and 32 female potential participants (age range 17-50) who underwent an ACL reconstruction using any graft type, excluding revision or multi-ligament surgery. To explore factors informing fear of reinjury in participants citing fear of reinjury as the sole reason for not returning to sport, albeit normal knee function. From the participant interview, four themes emerged: undergoing the surgery and recovery again, nature of the pre-injury sport imposing risk of reinjury, personality traits, and social priorities. Clinicians should be aware of factors informing fear of reinjury post ACL reconstruction. Modifiable fears including pain, mode and length of rehabilitation and psychological factors should be considered during rehabilitation to potentially improve the return to sport rate.

  17. Promise of periodontal ligament stem cells in regeneration of periodontium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Hidefumi; Tomokiyo, Atsushi; Fujii, Shinsuke; Wada, Naohisa; Akamine, Akifumi

    2011-07-28

    A great number of patients around the world experience tooth loss that is attributed to irretrievable damage of the periodontium caused by deep caries, severe periodontal diseases or irreversible trauma. The periodontium is a complex tissue composed mainly of two soft tissues and two hard tissues; the former includes the periodontal ligament (PDL) tissue and gingival tissue, and the latter includes alveolar bone and cementum covering the tooth root. Tissue engineering techniques are therefore required for regeneration of these tissues. In particular, PDL is a dynamic connective tissue that is subjected to continual adaptation to maintain tissue size and width, as well as structural integrity, including ligament fibers and bone modeling. PDL tissue is central in the periodontium to retain the tooth in the bone socket, and is currently recognized to include somatic mesenchymal stem cells that could reconstruct the periodontium. However, successful treatment using these stem cells to regenerate the periodontium efficiently has not yet been developed. In the present article, we discuss the contemporary standpoints and approaches for these stem cells in the field of regenerative medicine in dentistry.

  18. Timing of surgery in anterior cruciate ligament-injured knees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelbourne, K D; Patel, D V

    1995-01-01

    Despite recent advances in the surgical techniques of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in the past two decades, there is no consensus of opinion as to the ideal timing for ACL surgery. Based on the evolution of management of patients with ACL injuries over the period 1982-1994, we have found that various factors need to be considered in order to provide the best possible long-term result to the patient with minimal or no complications. In this review, we discuss the perioperative factors that one must consider to determine optimum timing for ACL surgery. Factors such as mental preparation of the patient; school, work, family, and social schedules; preoperative condition of the knee [i.e., minimal or no swelling, good strength, good leg control, and full range of motion (ROM) including full hyperextension]; and associated ligamentous and/or meniscal injuries must be considered before undertaking ACL surgery. With careful consideration of the above-mentioned factors and with our preoperative and postoperative rehabilitation program, we have been able to obtain predictable, successful, long-term results following ACL reconstruction in our athletic population. We emphasize that every patient should be treated on his or her own merit, and treatment decisions must be individualized.

  19. Injuries to the Collateral Ligaments of the Metacarpophalangeal Joint of the Thumb, Including Simultaneous Combined Thumb Ulnar and Radial Collateral Ligament Injuries, in National Football League Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Brian C; Belkin, Nicole S; Kennelly, Steve; Weiss, Leigh; Barnes, Ronnie P; Rodeo, Scott A; Warren, Russell F; Hotchkiss, Robert N

    2017-01-01

    Thumb collateral ligament injuries occur frequently in the National Football League (NFL). In the general population or in recreational athletes, pure metacarpophalangeal (MCP) abduction or adduction mechanisms yield isolated ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) and radial collateral ligament (RCL) tears, respectively, while NFL athletes may sustain combined mechanism injury patterns. To evaluate the incidence of simultaneous combined thumb UCL and RCL tears among all thumb MCP collateral ligament injuries in NFL athletes on a single team. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. A retrospective review of all thumb injuries on a single NFL team from 1991 to 2014 was performed. All players with a thumb MCP collateral ligament injury were included. Collateral ligament injuries were confirmed by review of both physical examination findings and magnetic resonance imaging. Player demographics, surgical details, and return-to-play data were obtained from the team electronic medical record and surgeons' records. A total of 36 thumbs in 32 NFL players were included in the study, yielding an incidence of 1.6 thumb MCP collateral ligament injuries per year on a single NFL team. Of these, 9 thumbs (25%) had a simultaneous combined UCL and RCL tear injury pattern confirmed on both physical examination and MRI. The remaining 27 thumbs (75%) were isolated UCL injuries. All combined UCL/RCL injuries required surgery due to dysfunction from instability; 63.0% of isolated UCL injuries required surgical repair ( P = .032) due to continued pain and dysfunction from instability. Repair, when required, was delayed until the end of the season. All players with combined UCL/RCL injuries and isolated UCL injuries returned to play professional football the following season. Simultaneous combined thumb UCL and RCL tear is a previously undescribed injury pattern that occurred in 25% of thumb MCP collateral ligament injuries on a single NFL team over a 23-year period. All players with combined thumb UCL

  20. Vascular Complications in Arthroscopic Repair Of Posterior Cruciate Ligament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agotegaray, Juan Ignacio; Comba, Ignacio; Bisiach, Luciana; Grignaffini, María Emilia

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Posterior cruciate ligament is the primary stabilizer of the knee. Among the potential complications in arthroscopic repair of this ligament, there are vascular lesions, due to laceration, thrombosis and injury of the intima of the popliteal artery. We used one case to show the vascular complications that may arise in arthroscopic repair of the posterior cruciate ligament, how to handle it and the results. Methods: One patient, 33 years old, with a history of traffic accident. In a physical exam the patient shows pain and swelling of the knee, positive posterior drawer test and positive Godfrey test. X-rays on the knee show posterior tibial translation and MRI a complete fibers rupture at the middle third of the posterior cruciate ligament. An arthroscopic repair surgery was scheduled three weeks after trauma, with PCL reconstruction using simple band technique.After surgical intervention, hemostatic cuff was released, no peripheral pulse, paleness and coldness of the member was confirmed. An arteriography was carried out, which confirmed absences of distal vascular filling in the popliteal artery. An urgent referral was carried out with Vascular Surgery Services, who had been informed of the surgery previously (a notification that is part of our routine for this kind of interventions). Arteriorrhaphy and venorrhaphy of the popliteal arteries was fulfilled 12 hours later, with a leg fasciotomy. Daily monitoring was performed, and after 72 hours, muscle necrosis is seen with wound drainage, analysis shows presence of gram-negative bacilli, Proteus Mirabilis-Pseudomonas spp and the lab results showed leukocytes: 8.700/ml, ESR: 58, CRP: 48. A new surgery is performed with complete resection of the anterior external compartment of the leg, and a system of continuous cleansing is applied with physiological saline solution and boric acid for 14 days until drainage is eliminated. Vancomycin and ceftazidime EV was indicated for 14 days and, after a good

  1. Anatomy and histology of apical support: a literature review concerning cardinal and uterosacral ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanah, Rajeev; Berger, Mitchell B; Parratte, Bernard M; DeLancey, John O L

    2012-11-01

    The objective of this work was to collect and summarize relevant literature on the anatomy, histology, and imaging of apical support of the upper vagina and the uterus provided by the cardinal (CL) and uterosacral (USL) ligaments. A literature search in English, French, and German languages was carried out with the keywords apical support, cardinal ligament, transverse cervical ligament, Mackenrodt ligament, parametrium, paracervix, retinaculum uteri, web, uterosacral ligament, and sacrouterine ligament in the PubMed database. Other relevant journal and textbook articles were sought by retrieving references cited in previous PubMed articles. Fifty references were examined in peer-reviewed journals and textbooks. The USL extends from the S2 to the S4 vertebra region to the dorsal margin of the uterine cervix and/or to the upper third of the posterior vaginal wall. It has a superficial and deep component. Autonomous nerve fibers are a major constituent of the deep USL. CL is defined as a perivascular sheath with a proximal insertion around the origin of the internal iliac artery and a distal insertion on the cervix and/or vagina. It is divided into a cranial (vascular) and a caudal (neural) portions. Histologically, it contains mainly vessels, with no distinct band of connective tissue. Both the deep USL and the caudal CL are closely related to the inferior hypogastric plexus. USL and CL are visceral ligaments, with mesentery-like structures containing vessels, nerves, connective tissue, and adipose tissue.

  2. Elastic properties of Thiel-embalmed human ankle tendon and ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Xiaochun; Kemp, Sandy; Corner, George; Eisma, Roos; Huang, Zhihong

    2015-10-01

    Thiel embalming is recommended as an alternative to formalin-based embalming because it preserves tissue elasticity, color, and flexibility in the long term, with low infection and toxicity risk. The degree to which Thiel embalming preserves elasticity has so far been assessed mainly by subjective scoring, with little quantitative verification. The aim of this study is to quantify the effect of Thiel embalming on the elastic properties of human ankle tendons and ligament. Biomechanical tensile tests were carried out on six Thiel-embalmed samples each of the peroneus longus, peroneus brevis, and calcaneal tendons, and the calcaneofibular ligament, with strain rates of 0.25%s(-1), 2%s(-1), and 8%s(-1). The stress-strain relationship was calculated from the force-extension response with cross-sectional area and gauge length. Young's modulus was determined from the stress-strain curve. The results showed that the tendon and ligament elasticity were lower after Thiel embalming than the literature values for fresh nonembalmed tendons and ligament. The biomechanical tensile test showed that the measured elasticity of Thiel-embalmed tendons and ligaments increased with the strain rate. The Thiel embalming method is useful for preserving human ankle tendons and ligaments for anatomy and surgery teaching and research, but users need to be aware of its softening effects. The method retains the mechanical strain rate effect on tendons and ligament. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Regional differences within the human supraspinous and interspinous ligaments: a sheet plastination study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Gillian M; Zhang, Ming

    2002-08-01

    The extent to which neighboring muscles and the fascia contribute to the formation of the supraspinous and interspinous ligaments is not clear from the literature. The purpose of this investigation is to examine the midline attachments of tendons and the posterior layer of thoracolumbar fascia in order to determine their respective contributions to the formation of these ligaments throughout the thoracolumbar spine. Study of the dense connective tissue organization in the posterior ligamentous system was carried out on two cadavers serially sectioned into thin (2.5-mm) epoxy resin plastinated slices. Additional observations were taken from a gross anatomical study of the midline anatomy in two adult cadavers. The results show that the spinal attachments of trapezius, rhomboideus major and splenius cervicis combine with the deep fascia to form the supraspinous ligament in the upper thoracic spine. The posterior layer of the thoracolumbar fascia makes a major contribution to the supraspinous and interspinous ligaments in the lower thoracic spine. In addition to the posterior layer of thoracolumbar fascia, longissimus thoracis and multifidus combine to form the lumbar supraspinous and interspinous ligaments. Their spinal attachments produce a system of dense connective tissue with marked regional variation in fiber orientation and arrangement. The findings support the description of the supraspinous and interspinous ligaments as structures formed by both muscle tendons and aponeuroses along the length of the thoracic and lumbar spine, with regional differences in their connective tissue architecture.

  4. Acute neck pain caused by pseudogout attack of calcified cervical yellow ligament: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Takashi; Miyakoshi, Naohisa; Abe, Toshiki; Abe, Eiji; Kikuchi, Kazuma; Noguchi, Hideaki; Konno, Norikazu; Shimada, Yoichi

    2016-05-30

    Calcification of the yellow ligament sometimes compresses the spinal cord and can induce myelopathy. Usually, the calcification does not induce acute neck pain. We report a case of a patient with acute neck pain caused by calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate in a calcified cervical yellow ligament. A 70-year-old Japanese woman presented with acute neck pain. She had a moderately high fever (37.5 °C), and her neck pain was so severe that she could not move her neck in any direction. Computed tomography showed a high-density area between the C5 and C6 laminae suspicious for calcification of the yellow ligament. Magnetic resonance imaging showed intermediate-signal intensity on T1-weighted imaging and high-signal intensity on T2-weighted imaging surrounding a low-signal region on both T1- and T2-weighted imaging with cord compression. There was a turbid, yellow fluid collection in the yellow ligament at the time of operation. Histologically, calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals were found in the fluid, and she was diagnosed as having a pseudogout attack of the yellow ligament. Pseudogout attack of the cervical yellow ligament is rare, but this clinical entity should be added to the differential diagnosis of acute neck pain, especially when calcification of the yellow ligament exists.

  5. A study of isokinetic strength and laxity with and without anterior cruciate ligament injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kewwan; Jeon, Kyoungkyu; Mullineaux, David R.; Cho, Eunok

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to provide useful information for future treatments and to organize rehabilitation programs for anterior cruciate ligament injury by assessing isokinetic muscle strength and laxity of knee joints in athletes with anterior cruciate ligament injuries. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-one high school athletes with anterior cruciate ligament injuries participated in this study. Isokinetic muscle strength at 60°/sec and anterior cruciate ligament laxity for non-involved and involved sides, classified on the basis of the severity of anterior cruciate ligament injury, were assessed. [Results] A comparison of isokinetic muscle strength measured from the non-involved and involved sides showed a significant difference in the maximum strength and knee flexor muscle strength. For laxity, a significant difference was observed in the anterior drawer test results obtained with a force of 88 N. [Conclusion] In conclusion, this study has shown that the assessment of isokinetic muscle strength and ligament laxity from athletes with anterior cruciate ligament injury should be utilized to provide baseline data for prevention and prediction of injury. PMID:28174432

  6. Comparative transcriptional analysis of three human ligaments with distinct biomechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorda-Diez, Carlos I; Canga-Villegas, Ana; Cerezal, Luis; Plaza, Santiago; Hurlé, Juan M; García-Porrero, Juan A; Montero, Juan A

    2013-12-01

    One major aim of regenerative medicine targeting the musculoskeletal system is to provide complementary and/or alternative therapeutic approaches to current surgical therapies, often involving the removal and prosthetic substitution of damaged tissues such as ligaments. For these approaches to be successful, detailed information regarding the cellular and molecular composition of different musculoskeletal tissues is required. Ligaments have often been considered homogeneous tissues with common biomechanical properties. However, advances in tissue engineering research have highlighted the functional relevance of the organisational and compositional differences between ligament types, especially in those with higher risks of injury. The aim of this study was to provide information concerning the relative expression levels of a subset of key genes (including extracellular matrix components, transcription factors and growth factors) that confer functional identity to ligaments. We compared the transcriptomes of three representative human ligaments subjected to different biomechanical demands: the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL); the ligamentum teres of the hip (LT); and the iliofemoral ligament (IL). We revealed significant differences in the expression of type I collagen, elastin, fibromodulin, biglycan, transforming growth factor β1, transforming growth interacting factor 1, hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha and transforming growth factor β-induced gene between the IL and the other two ligaments. Thus, considerable molecular heterogeneity can exist between anatomically distinct ligaments with differing biomechanical demands. However, the LT and ACL were found to show remarkable molecular homology, suggesting common functional properties. This finding provides experimental support for the proposed role of the LT as a hip joint stabiliser in humans.

  7. Comparative transcriptional analysis of three human ligaments with distinct biomechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorda-Diez, Carlos I; Canga-Villegas, Ana; Cerezal, Luis; Plaza, Santiago; Hurlé, Juan M; García-Porrero, Juan A; Montero, Juan A

    2013-01-01

    One major aim of regenerative medicine targeting the musculoskeletal system is to provide complementary and/or alternative therapeutic approaches to current surgical therapies, often involving the removal and prosthetic substitution of damaged tissues such as ligaments. For these approaches to be successful, detailed information regarding the cellular and molecular composition of different musculoskeletal tissues is required. Ligaments have often been considered homogeneous tissues with common biomechanical properties. However, advances in tissue engineering research have highlighted the functional relevance of the organisational and compositional differences between ligament types, especially in those with higher risks of injury. The aim of this study was to provide information concerning the relative expression levels of a subset of key genes (including extracellular matrix components, transcription factors and growth factors) that confer functional identity to ligaments. We compared the transcriptomes of three representative human ligaments subjected to different biomechanical demands: the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL); the ligamentum teres of the hip (LT); and the iliofemoral ligament (IL). We revealed significant differences in the expression of type I collagen, elastin, fibromodulin, biglycan, transforming growth factor β1, transforming growth interacting factor 1, hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha and transforming growth factor β-induced gene between the IL and the other two ligaments. Thus, considerable molecular heterogeneity can exist between anatomically distinct ligaments with differing biomechanical demands. However, the LT and ACL were found to show remarkable molecular homology, suggesting common functional properties. This finding provides experimental support for the proposed role of the LT as a hip joint stabiliser in humans. PMID:24128114

  8. Fetal development of ligaments around the tarsal bones with special reference to contribution of muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Eiichi; Kim, Ji Hyun; Abe, Hiroshi; Cho, Baik Hwan; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Jose Francisco; Murakami, Gen

    2014-04-01

    Through a histological examination of eight mid-term human fetuses (10-15 weeks) and seven late-stage fetuses (30-34 weeks), we attempted to determine how and when fetal ligaments around the tarsal bones form the regular arrangement seen in adults. Ligaments along the dorsal aspect of the tarsal bones developed early as an elongation of the perichondrium, in contrast to the late development of the plantar-sided ligaments. In contrast, a distal elongation of the tibialis posterior tendon was a limited plantar ligament in the early stage; finally, it extended from the navicular, ran obliquely to cross the dorsal side of the fibularis longus tendon, and inserted to the lateral cuneiform and fourth metatarsal. In the late stage, the adductor hallucis muscle origin provided multiple ligamentous structures along the cuneiforms and metatarsals. The tarsal sinus contained multiple fibrous bundles (possibly, the putative interosseous talocalcanean ligaments) that were derived from (1) insertion tendons of the extensor digitorus brevis muscle and (2) the fibrous sheath of the extensor digitorus longus tendon. The aponeurotic origin of the quadratus plantae muscle seemed to contribute to formation of the long plantar ligament. Therefore, tarsal ligaments appeared likely to develop from the long tendons, their fibrous sheaths and aponeuroses and intramuscular tendons of the proper foot muscles. Under in utero conditions with little or no stress from the plantar side of the foot, the muscle-associated connective tissue seems to play a crucial role in providing a regular arrangement of the ligaments in accordance with tensile stress from muscle contraction. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. MR imaging of the anterior intermeniscal ligament: classification according to insertion sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aydingoez, Uestuen; Kaya, Ayten [Department of Radiology, Hacettepe University Medical Center, Ankara (Turkey); Atay, Ahmet Oe.; Doral, Nedim M. [Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Hacettepe University Medical Center, Ankara (Turkey); Oeztuerk, Halil M. [Department of Radiology, SSK Ankara Hospital, Ankara (Turkey)

    2002-04-01

    Our objective was to study the frequency of anterior intermeniscal ligament on MR imaging and to make a classification according to its insertion sites on MR images. Sagittal T1-weighted and thin-section transverse T2*-weighted MR images of the knee were prospectively evaluated in 229 subjects without significant synovial effusion or total rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament. By using thin-section transverse images, the ligament was classified into three types according to its insertion sites (type A: between anterior horns of medial and lateral menisci; type B: between anterior horn of medial meniscus and anterior margin of lateral meniscus; type C: between anterior margins of medial and lateral menisci). On sagittal images location of the ligament was determined with respect to a line drawn between anterior of the tibial epiphysis and posterior of the intercondylar notch to look for a relation between its type on transverse images and location on sagittal images. Separately, arthroscopy was made in 36 patients to verify the MR assessment of the presence of the ligament. Anterior intermeniscal ligament was found in 53% of the subjects. Type B was the most common group (58%). Magnetic resonance imaging has a sensitivity and a specificity of 67 and 100%, respectively, in the detection of the ligament. Types A and C had a statistically significant location posterior and anterior, respectively, to the master line on sagittal images. In arthroscopy, the ligament was either cord-like (67%) or flat (33%) in appearance. Routine sagittal MR images can help identify anterior intermeniscal ligament. (orig.)

  10. FUNCTIONAL OUTCOME OF ARTHROSCOPY ASSISTED ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION USING BONE PATELLAR TENDON BONE AUTOGRAFT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Kumar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL is one of the most frequently injured ligaments in the human body. 1 The Anterior Cruciate ligament (ACL is the primary stabilizer of the knee and prevents the knee against anterior translation. 2 It is also important in counteracting rotational and valgus stress. 1 The middle third of the patellar tendon autograft for ACL reconstruction can be readily procured and firmly fixed. 3 It can tolerate the loads produced by an intensive rehabilitation programme. 3 Fixation of bone plugs using interference screws provides sufficient stability to meet the demand of a vigorous postoperative protocol. 3 It remains the gold standard for ACL reconstruction. 3 This study is to assess the functional outcome of arthroscopy assisted anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using bone patellar tendon bone autograft. METHODS: This study was conducted in Kempegowda Institute of Medical Sciences Hospital from November 2012 to April 2014. During this period 20 cases of adult patients with ACL deficient patients were selected according to the inclusion criteria. Study aims to assess the functional outcome of arthroscopy assisted anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using bone - patellar tendon - bone autograft in terms of range of motion, postoperative knee stability, graft site morbidity and subjective knee functions. RESULTS: Results of our study showed that arthroscopy assisted anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with bone - patellar tendon - bone autograft could effectively improve knee stability and functions after surgery without any complication. CONCLUSION : Arthroscopy assisted anterior cruciate l igament reconstruction with bone - patellar tendon - bone autograft is an excellent treatment option for anterior cruciate ligament deficient knees. It provides a stable knee and reduces postoperative morbidity and enables early rehabilitation. The functional outcome of arthroscopy assisted anterior

  11. Biological Events in Periodontal Ligament and Alveolar Bone Associated with Application of Orthodontic Forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Feller

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Orthodontic force-induced stresses cause dynamic alterations within the extracellular matrix and within the cytoskeleton of cells in the periodontal ligament and alveolar bone, mediating bone remodelling, ultimately enabling orthodontic tooth movement. In the periodontal ligament and alveolar bone, the mechanically induced tensile strains upregulate the expression of osteogenic genes resulting in bone formation, while mechanically induced compressive strains mediate predominantly catabolic tissue changes and bone resorption. In this review article we summarize some of the currently known biological events occurring in the periodontal ligament and in the alveolar bone in response to application of orthodontic forces and how these facilitate tooth movement.

  12. Does evaluation of the ligamentous compartment enhance diagnostic utility of sacroiliac joint MRI in axial spondyloarthritis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Ulrich; Maksymowych, Walter P; Chan, Stanley M

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Inflammation of the sacroiliac joints (SIJ) is a fundamental clinical feature of axial spondyloarthritis (SpA). The anatomy of the irregularly shaped SIJ is complex with an antero-inferior cartilaginous compartment containing central hyaline and peripheral fibrocartilage, and a dorso...... and ligamentous compartment. The incremental value of evaluating the ligamentous additionally to the cartilaginous compartment alone for diagnosis of SpA was graded qualitatively. We determined the lesion distribution between the two compartments, and the impact of the ligamentous compartment evaluation...

  13. Physiotherapy treatment after combined cruciate ligament reconstruction of the knee: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson Delano; Aline Mendonça de Andrade; Thiago Freire

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to describe the physiotherapy treatment after combined reconstruction of the cruciate ligaments of the knee. In order to do so a literature review was made and the articles from Medline and Lilacs databases were selected, published between 1997 and 2006, in English and Portuguese. The articles that featured any of the following keywords were chosen: “rehabilitation”, “anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)”, “posterior cruciate ligament (PCL)”, “combined reconstruction...

  14. Mesothelial Cyst of the Round Ligament Mimicking a Metastasis: a Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bo Mi; Lee, Ji Young; Han, Yoon Hee; Kim, Su Young; Seo, Jung Wook; Kim, Yong Hoon; Cha, Soon Joo; Hur, Gham; Joo, Mee; Lee, Eung Soo [Ilsan Paik Hospital, Inje University, School of Medicine, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    A mesothelial cyst of the round ligament is a rare cause of an inguinal mass. Clinically, it is frequently misdiagnosed as one of commoner diseases such as an inguinal hernia, femoral hernia, lipoma, and lymphadenopathy upon physical examination. Some previous reports elaborated the sonographic features of a mesothelial cyst of the round ligament. However, to our knowledge, few reports have described the CT features of a mesothelial cyst. We illustrated here the sonographic and multidetector CT features of a case of a mesothelial cyst of the round ligament that presented as an inguinal palpable mass and mimicked a metastasis in a patient with a Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor of the ovary.

  15. Location and tension of the medial palpebral ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Kun; Huan, Fan; Nam, Yong Seok; Han, Seung Ho; Kim, Dae Joong

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the precise anatomic location and tension of the medial palpebral ligament (MPL). Eleven hemifaces of 10 fresh Korean adult cadavers were used in this study. Nine specimens were used for measurement of dissection and tension, and 2 were used for histologic study. Measurements of tensile strength of each part of the MPL and Horner muscle were performed using a force gauge.The MPL consisted of 2 layers in all specimens dissected. The superficial layer of the palpebral ligament (SMPL) was observed from the anterior lacrimal crest to the upper and lower tarsal plates. The deep layer of the palpebral ligament (DMPL) lay from the anterior lacrimal crest to the posterior lacrimal crest, covering the lacrimal sac. The Horner muscle was observed at the posterior lacrimal crest just lateral to the attachment of the DMPL and ran laterally to the tarsal plate deep to the SMPL. The SMPL began at 4.5 ± 2.3 mm lateral to the nasomaxillary suture line to the upper and lower tarsal plates. Its transverse length was 9.6 ± 1.5 mm, and vertical width was 2.4 ± 0.7 mm, and its thickness was 4.5 ± 2.3 mm. The transverse length of the DMPL was 3.7 ± 0.4 mm, and its vertical width was 2.9 ± 1.3 mm, with a thickness of 0.3 ± 0.1 mm. The transverse length of the Horner muscle was 7.6 ± 1.9 mm, and its vertical width was 4.06 ± 1.5 mm, with a thickness of 0.4 ± 0.1 mm. The tensile strength of the SMPL was 13.4 ± 3.2 N, that of the DMPL was 4.1 ± 1.7 N, and that for Horner muscle was 9.0 ± 3.1 N. The tensile strength of the SMPL was significantly higher than that of the DMPL (P = 0.003).We reconfirmed that the MPL consisted of 2 layers: superficial layer and deep layer. Our results might be of use in surgeries of the medial canthi.

  16. [High vaginal uterosacral ligament suspension for treatment of uterine prolapse].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yong-xian; Shen, Wen-jie; Liu, Xin; Liu, Jing-xia; Zhang, Ying-hui; Zhao, Ying; Zhang, Lin; Hu, Man-luo; Ge, Jing; Ke, Niu

    2007-12-01

    To evaluate the physiological and anatomic basis,indications,surgical skills, prevention of ureter injury and clinic outcomes of using high uterosacral ligament suspension (HUS) for correction of advanced uterine prolapse by the vaginal route. Fifty women with advanced uterine prolapse underwent transvaginal HUS after vaginal hysterectomy with reconstruction of pubocervical and rectovaginal fascia to correct their uterine prolapse between June 2003 and September 2007. The average age of the women was 60.1 years. The mean follow-up period was 24 months (range 4-51 months). The degree of pelvic organ prolapse preoperatively and anatomic outcomes postoperatively were assessed with pelvic organ prolapse quantification system (POP-Q). The remnants of the uterosacral ligaments were clearly identified and palpated posterior and medial to the ischial spines by traction with a 24 cm long Allis clamp and used for successful vaginal vault suspension and reconstruction in all 50 consecutive advanced uterine prolapse patients. The ureter injury was avoided by complete knowledge of the ureter's course from the cervix/apex toward its insertion in the sacral region and how far outside of the uterosacral ligament, by uteri palpation and by suturing purposefully placed "deep" dorsally and posteriorly toward the sacrum, as well as by cystoscopy examination of the spillage of urine from both ureters. Mean POP-Q point C improved from 1.5 to -7.5 cm with a median follow-up of 24 months. If the successful HUS was defined as point C prolapse, both the objective and subjective cure rates were as high as 100% with a maximum follow-up of 51 months. None of the 50 patients had repeat operation for recurrence of prolapse. There was no major intra-or postoperative complications, such as ureter and other pelvic organ injury. HUS with fascial reconstruction seems to be a safe, minimal traumatic, tolerable and highly successful procedure for vaginal repair of advanced uterine prolapse. Because of

  17. The fifty highest cited papers in anterior cruciate ligament injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vielgut, Ines; Dauwe, Jan; Leithner, Andreas; Holzer, Lukas A

    2017-07-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of the most common injured knee ligaments and at the same time, one of the most frequent injuries seen in the sport orthopaedic practice. Due to the clinical relevance of ACL injuries, numerous papers focussing on this topic including biomechanical-, basic science-, clinical- or animal studies, were published. The purpose of this study was to determine the most frequently cited scientific articles which address this subject, establish a ranking of the 50 highest cited papers and analyse them according to their characteristics. The 50 highest cited articles related to Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury were searched in Thomson ISI Web of Science® by the use of defined search terms. All types of scientific papers with reference to our topic were ranked according to the absolute number of citations and analyzed for the following characteristics: journal title, year of publication, number of citations, citation density, geographic origin, article type and level of evidence. The 50 highest cited articles had up to 1624 citations. The top ten papers on this topic were cited 600 times at least. Most papers were published in the American Journal of Sports Medicine. The publication years spanned from 1941 to 2007, with the 1990s and 2000s accounting for half of the articles (n = 25). Seven countries contributed to the top 50 list, with the USA having by far the most contribution (n = 40). The majority of articles could be attributed to the category "Clinical Science & Outcome". Most of them represent a high level of evidence. Scientific articles in the field of ACL injury are highly cited. The majority of these articles are clinical studies that have a high level of evidence. Although most of the articles were published between 1990 and 2007, the highest cited articles in absolute and relative numbers were published in the early 1980s. These articles contain well established scoring- or classification systems. The

  18. In Vivo Study of Ligament-Bone Healing after Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using Autologous Tendons with Mesenchymal Stem Cells Affinity Peptide Conjugated Electrospun Nanofibrous Scaffold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingxian Zhu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrospinning nanofibrous scaffold was commonly used in tissue regeneration recently. Nanofibers with specific topological characteristics were reported to be able to induce osteogenic differentiation of MSCs. In this in vivo study, autologous tendon grafts with lattice-like nanofibrous scaffold wrapping at two ends of autologous tendon were used to promote early stage of ligament-bone healing after rabbit ACL reconstruction. To utilize native MSCs from bone marrow, an MSCs specific affinity peptide E7 was conjugated to nanofibrous meshes. After 3 months, H-E assessment and specific staining of collagen type I, II, and III showed direct ligament-bone insertion with typical four zones (bone, calcified fibrocartilage, fibrocartilage, and ligament in bioactive scaffold reconstruction group. Diameters of bone tunnel were smaller in nanofibrous scaffold conjugated E7 peptide group than those in control group. The failure load of substitution complex also indicated a stronger ligament-bone insertion healing using bioactive scaffold. In conclusion, lattice-like nanofibrous scaffold with specific MSCs affinity peptide has great potential in promoting early stage of ligament-bone healing after ACL reconstruction.

  19. Medial collateral ligament reconstruction in the baseball Pitcher's elbow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erne, Holger C; Zouzias, Ioannis C; Rosenwasser, Melvin P

    2009-08-01

    Pitchers are prone to elbow injuries because of high and repetitive valgus stresses on the elbow. The anterior bundle of the medial ulnar collateral ligament (MCL) of the elbow is the primary restraint and is often attenuated with time, leading to functional incompetence and ultimate failure. Pitchers with a history of medial elbow pain, reduced velocity, and loss of command may have an MCL injury in evolution. Physical examination and imaging can confirm the diagnosis. Treatment begins with rest and activity modification. All medial elbow pain is not MCL injury. Surgery is considered only for talented athletes who wish to return to competitive play and may include elite scholastic and other collegiates and professionals. The technique for MCL reconstruction was first described in 1986. Many variations have been offered since then, which can result in predictable outcomes, allowing many to return to the same level of competitive play.

  20. Transient Superficial Peroneal Nerve Palsy After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrowaili, Majed

    2016-04-26

    A 19-year-old male subject was diagnosed with medial meniscal, lateral meniscal and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear. The symptoms did not subside after 4 months of physical therapy, and he underwent arthroscopic partial medial and lateral meniscectomy and ACL reconstruction. Immediately after the patient woke up from general anesthesia, he started experience loss of sensation in the area of superficial peroneal nerve with inverted dorsiflexion of foot and ankle. Instantly, the bandage and knee brace was removed and a diagnosis of compartment syndrome was ruled out. After eight hours, post-operatively, the patient started receiving physiotherapy. He complained of numbness and tingling in the same area. After 24 h, post-operatively, the patient started to regain dorsiflexion and eversion gradually. Two days after the surgery, the patient exhibited complete recovery of neurological status.

  1. Anterior cruciate ligament injury/reinjury in alpine ski racing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jordan, Matthew J; Aagaard, Per; Herzog, Walter

    2017-01-01

    were searched for articles on ACL injury or knee injury in alpine ski racing. Studies were classified according to their relevance in relation to epidemiology, etiology, risk factors, and return to sport/reinjury prevention. Alpine ski racers (skiers) were found to be at high risk for knee injuries......The purpose of the present review was to: 1) provide an overview of the current understanding on the epidemiology, etiology, risk factors, and prevention methods for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury in alpine ski racing; and 2) provide an overview of what is known pertaining to ACL reinjury...... and return to sport after ACL injury in alpine ski racing. Given that most of the scientific studies on ACL injuries in alpine ski racing have been descriptive, and that very few studies contributed higher level scientific evidence, a nonsystematic narrative review was employed. Three scholarly databases...

  2. Factors influencing the treatment of posterior cruciate ligament injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ittivej, Kittimasak; Prompaet, Sureeporn; Rojanasthien, Sattaya

    2005-10-01

    The primary objective was to determine the factors which influence the requirement of surgical treatment of posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injury. Ninety one PCL injured patients diagnosed in the "Sports Medicine Clinic", Maharaj Nakorn Chiang Mai Hospital from January 1998 to December 2000 were included in the present study. There were 63 males and 28 females with an average age of 29 years. All of the PCL-insufficient knees were initially treated by non-operative method including 3 phases of rehabilitation. They were followed through to the end of December 2003. Analysis showed that the degree of posterior laxity was the only factor that had a statistical significant correlation to failure of conservative treatment. In addition, the need for surgical treatment was not associated with gender age, cause of injury, and concomitant of injury. The authors concluded that PCL injured patients with posterior laxity greater than 10 millimeters should be treated by PCL reconstruction.

  3. Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells Regulate Apoptosis of Neutrophils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing; Ding, Gang; Xu, Xin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) are promising cell resource for the cell-based therapy for periodontitis and regeneration of bio-root. In this study, we investigated the effect of PDLSCs on neutrophil, a critical constituent of innate immunity, and the underlying mechanisms. The effect of PDLSCs on the proliferation and apoptosis of resting neutrophils and IL-8 activated neutrophils was tested under cell-cell contact culture and Transwell culture, with or without anti-IL-6 neutralizing antibody. We found that PDLSCs could promote the proliferation and reduce the apoptosis of neutrophils whether under cell-cell contact or Transwell culture. Anti-IL-6 antibody reduced PDLSCs-mediated inhibition of neutrophil apoptosis. IL-6 at the concentration of 10ng/ml and 20ng/ml could inhibit neutrophil apoptosis statistically. Collectively, PDLSCs could reduce the apoptosis of neutrophils via IL-6.

  4. Popliteal pseudoaneurysm after arthroscopic posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dorp, Karin B; Breugem, Stefan J M; Driessen, Marcel J M

    2014-09-01

    This report presents the case of a 30-year-old motocross (BMX) cyclist with a third-degree posterior cruciate ligament rupture. The technique used for reconstruction was the transtibial single-bundle autologous hamstring technique. Unfortunately, the procedure was complicated by a popliteal pseudoaneurysm, which was located in line with the tibial canal. The pseudoaneurysm was treated with an end-to-end anastomosis and the patient recovered without further complaints. In this case, the popliteal artery was damaged most probably by the edge of the reamer or the guide wire during removal. Vascular complications can be limb- and life-threatening. This case report aims to increase the awareness of this serious complication with a review of the literature.

  5. Medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction: patient selection and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baer MR

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Michael R. Baer, Jeffrey A. Macalena Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA Abstract: Patellofemoral instability is a painful and often recurring disorder with many negative long-term consequences. After a period of failed nonoperative management, surgical intervention has been used to reduce the incidence of patellar subluxation and dislocations. Medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL reconstruction successfully addresses patellofemoral instability by restoring the deficient primary medial patellar soft tissue restraint. When planning MPFL reconstruction for instability, it is imperative to consider the patient’s unique anatomy including the tibial tuberosity–trochlear groove (TT–TG distance, trochlear dysplasia, and patella alta. Additionally, it is important to individualize surgical treatment in the skeletally immature, hypermobile, and athletic populations. Keywords: MPFL, indications, considerations, contraindications

  6. Transient superficial peroneal nerve palsy after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majed Alrowaili

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A 19-year-old male subject was diagnosed with medial meniscal, lateral meniscal and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL tear. The symptoms did not subside after 4 months of physical therapy, and he underwent arthroscopic partial medial and lateral meniscectomy and ACL reconstruction. Immediately after the patient woke up from general anesthesia, he started experience loss of sensation in the area of superficial peroneal nerve with inverted dorsiflexion of foot and ankle. Instantly, the bandage and knee brace was removed and a diagnosis of compartment syndrome was ruled out. After eight hours, post-operatively, the patient started receiving physiotherapy. He complained of numbness and tingling in the same area. After 24 h, post-operatively, the patient started to regain dorsiflexion and eversion gradually. Two days after the surgery, the patient exhibited complete recovery of neurological status.

  7. Medial plica after reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Yu; WANG Jian-quan; HE Zhen-ming

    2009-01-01

    Background The medial plica may be caused by direct trauma or joint degeneration,which also could be iatrogenic.There have been few reports in the literature discussing incidence of the medial plica caused by an operation on the knee joint,specifically after the reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL).In this study,we aimed to evaluate and analyze the relationship between the incidence of the medial plica and reconstruction of the ACL.Methods A retrospective case series study was conducted to review the findings of 1085 patients between 2003 and 2007,who underwent second-look arthroscopy after reconstruction of the ACL (between 2002 and 2006).The correlation of the incidence of medial plica with the stability of the knee joint,the time from onset of injury to reconstruction surgery,the associated injuries,and the rate of progress during postoperative rehabilitation were analyzed.Results We found that 722 patients had the structure of a medial plica.The incidence after reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (66.5%) was significantly higher than usually reported.All these medial plica had avascular fibrotic and thickened edges.An excision of pathologic medial plica and fat pad synovial fringes were done.The incidences were significantly different between the two groups with their reconstruction operation time,from onset of injury to surgery (less than one month or over 2 years),and the progress rate of postoperative rehabilitation (knee flexion could not be over 90° in four weeks).The incidence was not different between the groups with knee stable conditions.Conclusions Medial plica is more common in patients after reconstruction of ACL.More associated injuries and more rehabilitation difficulties can increase the medial plica incidence.

  8. Femoropatellar radiographic alterations in cases of anterior cruciate ligament failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Protásio de Vasconcelos

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To make a comparative analysis on three femoropatellar radiographic parameters, between knees with chronic failure of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL and normal knees.METHODS: Thirty volunteer patients with a diagnosis of unilateral isolated chronic ACL injury for more than one year and a normal contralateral knee were selected. Digital radiographs were produced for all the patients, on both knees in absolute lateral view at 30° of flexion, with and without load-bearing on one leg, and in axial view of the patella at 30°. The Caton-Deschamps patellar height index, Merchant patellar congruence angle and Laurin lateral patellar tilt angle were measured on the radiographs obtained from the normal knees and knees with ACL injuries, and comparative analysis was performed between these two groups.RESULTS: The patellar height was statistically significantly lower (p< 0.001 in the knees with ACL failure than in the normal knees, both on radiographs without loading and on those with single-foot loading. The Merchant patellar congruence angle was significantly smaller (p < 0.001 in the normal knees and the lateral patellar tilt angle was smaller (p < 0.001 in the knees with ACL failure.CONCLUSION: Chronic ACL failure gave rise to a statistically significant change in the femoropatellar radiographic values studied (p < 0.001. Knees with injuries to this ligament presented lower patellar height values, greater tilt and lateral displacement of the patella, in relation to the femoral trochlea, in comparison with the normal contralateral knees.

  9. Anterior cruciate ligament remnants nodule: potential factor causing extension loss

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jian; AO Ying-fang

    2013-01-01

    Background Extension loss caused by anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) remnants nodule was usually reported by case reports.There is no systematic report analyzing ACL remnants nodule.The purpose of this study was to investigate the characteristics of extension loss caused by remnants of ACL after injury.Methods From June 2008 to December 2011,ACL remnants were observed by atthroscopy in 1012 cases with ACL injuries at the time of primary reconstruction.ACL remnants nodules were recorded.The time of extension loss occurrence caused by ACL remnants nodule,associated symptom and sign,magnetic resonance imaging (MRI),and arthroscopic findings were observed.Histological examination was performed on the lesion resected.Results Twenty-four cases with ACL remnants nodules were found by arthroscopy.Among them extension loss caused by remnants of ACL happened in 19 cases (male 13; female 6).The average extension loss were 9.1° (range,5°-20°).The average time from injury to operation was 8.9 weeks (range,3-26 weeks).The remnants of ACL depressed in the inter-condylar notch were found on MRI in 15 cases with extension loss.The rupture locations of ACL were all close to the upper insertion of ACL.The microscopic examination of the resected remnants of ACL revealed disorganized fibrous connective tissue and tissue of ACL ligament.Conclusions Among 1012 ACL injury cases,24 ACL remnants nodules were found with arthroscopy and 19 nodules could cause knee extension loss.ACL remnants nodule should be paid attention to as a potential cause of extension loss.

  10. Clinical characteristics of 4355 patients with anterior cruciate ligament injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MEI Yu; AO Ying-fang; WANG Jian-quan; MA Yong; ZHANG Xin; WANG Jia-ning; ZHU Jing-xian

    2013-01-01

    Background Clinical features of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury are important for its prevention,diagnosis and treatment.However,few studies have reported such data,especially in China.The purpose of this study was to describe the clinical characteristics of ACL injury on a large cohort.Methods Between 1993 and 2007,a total of 4355 ACL deficient inpatients (612 athletes and 3743 non-athletes) were registered.Data were collected using a special database system.And the distributions of characteristics in different groups were compared and analyzed statistically.Results All subjects were confirmed with ACL tear during surgery.Statistical analysis revealed that the percentage of females in Athlete Group was significantly higher than that in Non-athlete Group (56.05% vs.24.95%,P<0.001).This study also found that sports trauma was the main cause of ACL tears.Soccer,basketball,judo,wrestling and track and field were the five most responsible activities for athletes.The average injury time for athletes was significantly shorter than that for non-athletes (413.3 days vs.717.5 days,P<0.001).Three thousand nine hundred and eight cases were ordered ACL reconstruction (76.04% single-bundle,18.30% double-bundle).Three hundred and forty-five patients (7.92%)were combined with other ligaments injuries,2667 (61.24%) were found with various grades of cartilage lesions,and 3377 (77.54%) were found with meniscal injury.Conclusions Sports trauma was the main cause of ACL tears in China,and reconstruction had become the principal surgical choice.In order to restore knee joint stability and reduce the incidence of cartilage and meniscal injury,patienttailored ACL reconstruction should be suggested at the right moment.

  11. Histological comparison of fate of ligamentous insertion after reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament:autograft vs allograft

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the histological results and the biological remodeling of ligamentous insertion after the reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament ( ACL ) with autograft or allograft tendon.Methods: Extensor digitorum tendon was harvested from hind limb as graft material and transplanted to reconstruct the resected ACL in 12 mongrel dogs. Each free tendon end was secured by holding sutures and then the sutures were tied to the post screw at the femoral and tibial bony tunnel outlet after transplantation respectively.Autograft was randomly performed on one side of knee while allograft on the other side of knee. After transplantation, the histological analysis was undertaken at the 6th, 12th weeks and the 6th month using hematoxylineosin (HE) stain under light microscope.Results: The insertion structure of normal ACL typically consisted of four layers, I. E., dense connective tissue, fibrocartilage, mineralized fibrocartilage and bone.There was a distinct regular tidemark line between fibrocartilage and mineralized fibrocartilage. At the 6th week postoperatively, loose connective tissue presented in the interspace between graft and bony tunnel wall in both autograft and allograft groups. At the 12th week postoperatively, the collagenous fibers between autograft and tunnel wall became well organized and the four layers of insertion with discontinuous tidemark line were demonstrated indistinctly in autograft group but not in allograft group. At the 6th month postoperatively, both of a clear and continuous tidemark line and distinct four layers could be seen in autograft group. In allograft group, only a waved discontinuous tidemark line was shown and either the anatomic morphology or the maturity of insertion was inferior to that of autograft group.Conclusions: At the 6th month postoperatively,although the ligament-cartilage insertion is primarily formed after ACL reconstruction with autograft or allograft tendon, the histological morphology and the

  12. A method to characterize average cervical spine ligament response based on raw data sets for implementation into injury biomechanics models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattucci, Stephen F E; Cronin, Duane S

    2015-01-01

    Experimental testing on cervical spine ligaments provides important data for advanced numerical modeling and injury prediction; however, accurate characterization of individual ligament response and determination of average mechanical properties for specific ligaments has not been adequately addressed in the literature. Existing methods are limited by a number of arbitrary choices made during the curve fits that often misrepresent the characteristic shape response of the ligaments, which is important for incorporation into numerical models to produce a biofidelic response. A method was developed to represent the mechanical properties of individual ligaments using a piece-wise curve fit with first derivative continuity between adjacent regions. The method was applied to published data for cervical spine ligaments and preserved the shape response (toe, linear, and traumatic regions) up to failure, for strain rates of 0.5s(-1), 20s(-1), and 150-250s(-1), to determine the average force-displacement curves. Individual ligament coefficients of determination were 0.989 to 1.000 demonstrating excellent fit. This study produced a novel method in which a set of experimental ligament material property data exhibiting scatter was fit using a characteristic curve approach with a toe, linear, and traumatic region, as often observed in ligaments and tendons, and could be applied to other biological material data with a similar characteristic shape. The resultant average cervical spine ligament curves provide an accurate representation of the raw test data and the expected material property effects corresponding to varying deformation rates.

  13. Transfer Pricing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, Carsten; Rossing, Christian Plesner

    trade internally as the units have to decide what prices should be paid for such inter-unit transfers. One important challenge is to uncover the consequences that different transfer prices have on the willingness in the organizational units to coordinate activities and trade internally. At the same time...

  14. Anterior cruciate ligament tears: MRI versus arthroscopy. Vordere Kreuzbandruptur: MRT versus Arthroskopie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tosch, U.; Felix, R. (Strahlenklinik und Poliklinik, Universitaetsklinik Rudolf Virchow, Berlin (Germany)); Schauwecker, W.; Dreithaler, B. (Chirurgische Klinik und Poliklinik, Universitaetsklinik Rudolf Virchow, Berlin (Germany))

    1992-05-01

    Because of suspected rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament sixteen acute traumatised patients were investigated by MR and arthroscopy. The MR diagnosis of a lesion of the anterior cruciate ligament proved to be correct by arthroscopy in fifteen of sixteen cases. Diagnostic criteria for lesions of the anterior cruciate ligament were: increased signal intensity in T[sub 1]- and T[sub 2] weighted images, increased volume and discontinuity of ligamentous structures. Additional MR findings of meniscal tears were correct in three of four cases laterally and in four of four cases medially. Femoral cartilage lesions were correctly identified by MR in three cases. MR normal findings proved to be correct by arthroscopy in another five cases. (orig.).

  15. Injury of the knee ligaments associated with ipsilateral femoral shaft fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Tulio Lopes Caldas

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: With the objective of identifying the incidence of ipsilateral knee ligament injury, thirty-six patients with femoral shaft fractures were evaluated. METHODS: During the osteosynthesis procedure to repair the femur while under anesthesia, all patients underwent a physical examination and X-ray examination. RESULTS: The most common mechanism of injury observed was motorcycle accidents. Of the thirty-six patients that were studied, eleven patients (30.5% had a knee ligament injury. Of the eleven patients, 64% had a cruciate ligament injury. The ligament injury was not treated at the time of the osteosynthesis procedure. CONCLUSION: We highlight the difficulty of diagnosis at the time of admission and the need for systematic physical examination before and after surgical treatment of femoral fracture.

  16. Rehabilitation in Patients with Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using Auxiliary Platelet-Rich Plasma Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albu Daniel – Emil

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The main target after successful AnteriorCruciate Ligament (ACL reconstruction is early rehabilitation. New options such as PRP (platelet rich plasma may improve clinical outcomes.

  17. Gingival and periodontal ligament fibroblasts differ in their inflammatory response to viable Porphyromonas gingivalis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheres, N; Laine, M L; de Vries, T J; Everts, V; van Winkelhoff, A J

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Porphyromonas gingivalis is an oral pathogen strongly associated with destruction of the tooth-supporting tissues in human periodontitis. Gingival fibroblasts (GF) and periodontal ligament fibroblasts (PDLF) are functionally different cell types in the periodontium that can

  18. Mucoid degeneration of the anterior cruciate ligament with erosion of the lateral femoral condyle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melloni, Pietro [Servei de Diagnostic per Imatge, Unitat de Diagnostic d' Alta Tecnologia (UDIAT), Corporacio Parc Tauli, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Sabadell (Barcelona) (Spain); UDIAT, c/ Parc Tauli, s/n, 08208 Sabadell (Barcelona) (Spain); Valls, Rafael [Servei de Diagnostic per Imatge, Unitat de Diagnostic d' Alta Tecnologia (UDIAT), Corporacio Parc Tauli, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Sabadell (Barcelona) (Spain); Yuguero, Mariano [Servei de Traumatologia i Ortopedia, Corporacio Parc Tauli, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Sabadell (Barcelona) (Spain); Saez, Amparo [Servei de Anatomia Patologica, Corporacio Parc Tauli, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Sabadell (Barcelona) (Spain)

    2004-06-01

    We report a case of a mucoid degeneration of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) that produced osseous erosion of the medial aspect of the lateral femoral condyle. The MRI findings and differential diagnosis are discussed. (orig.)

  19. Surgical Treatment of a Rare Isolated Bilateral Agenesis of Anterior and Posterior Cruciate Ligaments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Cerulli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The isolated bilateral agenesis of both cruciate ligaments is a rare congenital disorder. A 17-year-old male came to our attention due to an alteration in gait pattern, pain, and tendency to walk on the forefoot with his knee flexed. The patient did not recall previous injuries. Upon physical examination anterior and posterior chronic instability were observed. Radiographic examination of both knees showed hypoplasia of the tibial eminence, a hypoplastic lateral femoral condyle, and a narrow intercondylar notch. MRI brought to light a bilateral agenesis of both posterior cruciate ligaments. Arthroscopic evaluation confirmed bilateral isolated agenesis of both cruciate ligaments. We recommended a rehabilitation program to prepare the patient for the arthroscopic construction of both cruciate ligaments.

  20. Elastic Properties of the Annular Ligament of the Human Stapes--AFM Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwacz, Monika; Rymuza, Zygmunt; Michałowski, Marcin; Wysocki, Jarosław

    2015-08-01

    Elastic properties of the human stapes annular ligament were determined in the physiological range of the ligament deflection using atomic force microscopy and temporal bone specimens. The annular ligament stiffness was determined based on the experimental load-deflection curves. The elastic modulus (Young's modulus) for a simplified geometry was calculated using the Kirchhoff-Love theory for thin plates. The results obtained in this study showed that the annular ligament is a linear elastic material up to deflections of about 100 nm, with a stiffness of about 120 N/m and a calculated elastic modulus of about 1.1 MPa. These parameters can be used in numerical and physical models of the middle and/or inner ear.

  1. Mechanoreceptors found in a posterior cruciate ligament from a well-functioning total knee arthroplasty retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalko, William M; Creek, Aaron T; Mary, Michelle N; Williams, John L; Komatsu, David E

    2011-04-01

    Histologic analysis of the posterior cruciate ligament has been reported in the normal and osteoarthritic knee but not after cruciate-retaining (CR) total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Retention of the posterior cruciate ligament during TKA has been debated as to whether it is beneficial in stability and function. If the presence of mechanoreceptors is shown to be maintained in CR TKA, then there may be an argument for retention. This case report used a retrieval of a well-functioning TKA specimen that had a CR TKA. To prove the presence of mechanoreceptors within the ligament, immunohistochemistry techniques using S100 protein and neurofilament protein were used. This specimen had pacini and lamellar type of mechanoreceptors present on immunohistochemistry analysis. The presence or retention of mechanoreceptors and innervations of the ligament may indicate an advantage when retained during TKA.

  2. Surgical treatment of a rare isolated bilateral agenesis of anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerulli, G; Amanti, A; Placella, G

    2014-01-01

    The isolated bilateral agenesis of both cruciate ligaments is a rare congenital disorder. A 17-year-old male came to our attention due to an alteration in gait pattern, pain, and tendency to walk on the forefoot with his knee flexed. The patient did not recall previous injuries. Upon physical examination anterior and posterior chronic instability were observed. Radiographic examination of both knees showed hypoplasia of the tibial eminence, a hypoplastic lateral femoral condyle, and a narrow intercondylar notch. MRI brought to light a bilateral agenesis of both posterior cruciate ligaments. Arthroscopic evaluation confirmed bilateral isolated agenesis of both cruciate ligaments. We recommended a rehabilitation program to prepare the patient for the arthroscopic construction of both cruciate ligaments.

  3. Biomechanics of the anterior cruciate ligament: Physiology, rupture and reconstruction techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domnick, Christoph; Raschke, Michael J; Herbort, Mirco

    2016-02-18

    The influences and mechanisms of the physiology, rupture and reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) on kinematics and clinical outcomes have been investigated in many biomechanical and clinical studies over the last several decades. The knee is a complex joint with shifting contact points, pressures and axes that are affected when a ligament is injured. The ACL, as one of the intra-articular ligaments, has a strong influence on the resulting kinematics. Often, other meniscal or ligamentous injuries accompany ACL ruptures and further deteriorate the resulting kinematics and clinical outcomes. Knowing the surgical options, anatomic relations and current evidence to restore ACL function and considering the influence of concomitant injuries on resulting kinematics to restore full function can together help to achieve an optimal outcome.

  4. Uterosacral ligament smooth muscle cell apoptosis is increased in women with uterine prolapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takacs, Peter; Nassiri, Mehdi; Gualtieri, Marc; Candiotti, Keith; Medina, Carlos A

    2009-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the smooth muscle content and apoptosis of the uterosacral ligament in women with and without uterine prolapse. Uterosacral ligaments were sampled in women with (n = 9) or without (n = 9) uterine prolapse undergoing hysterectomy. Smooth muscle of the uterosacral ligament was identified by immunohistochemistry. Digital image analysis was used to determine the fractional area of smooth muscle in the histologic cross sections. Apoptosis was assessed by terminal deoxynucelotidyl-transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end-labeling method. The fractional area of nonvascular smooth muscle in the uterosacral ligament of women with uterine prolapse was significantly decreased compared to women without prolapse (0.32 +/- 0.12 vs. 0.42 +/- 0.03, P = .02) and the apoptotic index was significantly higher compared to women without prolapse (0.20 +/- 0.06 vs. 0.08 +/- 0.04, P uterine prolapse compared to women without prolapse.

  5. Effect of physiotherapy attendance on outcome after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Feller, J; Webster, K.; Taylor, N; Payne, R.; Pizzari, T.

    2004-01-01

    Background: In many centres patients are routinely referred for physiotherapy after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. However, to date the role and amount of supervised physiotherapy required has not been clearly established.

  6. The Effects of Dense/Nanometer Hydroxyapatite on Proliferation and Osteogenetic Differentiation of Periodontal Ligament Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate possible effects of nanometer powder of hydroxyapatite on proliferation of periodontal ligament cells. With sol-gel method, the nanometer hydroxyapatite powder were fabricated. The primary periodontal ligament cells were cultured on dense panicle hydroxyapatite and nanometer particle hydroxyapatite. The effects on proliferation of periodontal ligament cell were examined in vitro with MTT( methyl thiazolil tetracolium) test. The intercellular effects were observed with scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analyzer. In addition, the influence of two materials on osteogenetic differentiation was determined with measurement of ALP ( alkaline phosphatase) activity. It is concluded that nanometer hydroxyapatite can promote proliiferation and osteogenetic differentiation of periodontal ligament cells and it may become absorbable agent in osseous restoration.

  7. Nonoperative treatment of acute knee ligament injuries. A review with special reference to indications and methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannus, P; Järvinen, M

    1990-04-01

    Nonoperative treatment has received little attention in the numerous scientific reports on knee ligament injuries. Great controversy still exists concerning the proper treatment of a knee with a ruptured ligament, especially the anterior cruciate ligament. However, according to the studies of the authors and an extensive review of the literature the indications for conservative management can be established to be all grade I and II sprains (partial tears) of knee ligaments as well as an isolated grade III sprain (complete tear) of the posterior cruciate ligament. In addition, an isolated complete rupture of an anterior cruciate, or medial or lateral collateral ligament may be treated nonoperatively in an older sedentary person. Other injuries obviously call for an operative approach at the acute stage. Nonoperative therapy protocols must be based on the knowledge of the biological phenomenon occurring during connective tissue healing process. In the first phase of ligament healing the injured knee needs 2 to 3 weeks immobilisation for undisturbed fibroblast invasion and proliferation of collagen fibres. This is achieved by immobilising the knee in a rehabilitative knee brace locked in 40 to 45 degrees of flexion. Thereafter, a gradually increasing controlled mobilisation is allowed in the brace to avoid the deleterious effects of immobilisation to cartilage, bone, muscles, tendons and ligaments, and to enhance the orientation of collagen fibres to the stress lines of the healing ligament. After 4 to 8 weeks the goal for rehabilitation is rapid and full recovery to work and sports. A functional knee brace may be used at this phase to give extra protection before final strengthening of the injured ligament. During the mobilisation and muscle training of the therapy protocol various specific techniques can be used for strengthening of the hamstring and quadriceps muscles, including isometric, isotonic, isokinetic and eccentric exercises with or without resistive

  8. Closed patella fracture combined with cruciate ligament injury:a case control study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Han; WANG Wei; LIU Yue-ju; CHEN Wei; ZHANG Qi; LI Xu; ZHU Lian

    2013-01-01

    Background Patellar fracture and cruciate ligament injury are a common consequence of traumatic knee injury.Patellar fracture combined with cruciate ligament injury is rarely reported,although the mechanisms of two things are similar.This study aimed to evaluate the incidence of closed patella fracture combined with cruciate ligament injury.Methods From 2012 March 1 to June 30,magnetic resonance images of 60 patients with unilateral closed patellar fracture were studied in our institution.The mean age of the patients at presentation was 40.2 years (range,13-64 years) and 48 patients were men.First,patients were divided according to the cause of injury.Twenty-eight patients had highenergy trauma from a falling injury or motor vehicle accident,and 32 patients had low-energy trauma resulting from a tumbling injury.Second,according to the fracture pattern,31 patients had a transverse fracture and 29 patients had a comminuted fracture.Results We found seven cases of closed patellar fracture combined with cruciate ligament injury among 60 patients,including two cases of a completely ruptured posterior cruciate ligament,two with a partially torn posterior cruciate ligament,and three with a partially torn anterior cruciate ligament.The percentage of this combined injury was 11.6% (7/60).The incidence of a combined injury of the cruciate ligament with a comminuted fracture (6/29,20.7%) was significantly higher than that with a transverse fracture (1/31,3.2%,P <0.05).The most common mechanism of injury in patellar fracture combined with cruciate ligament injury was high-energy trauma from road traffic accidents (94%),whereas in the patellar fracture alone,it was tumbling (62%).The incidence of combined injury with high-energy trauma (6/28,21.4%) was significantly higher than that with low-energy trauma (1/32,3.1%,P <0.05).Conclusions These data suggest that high-energy trauma often results in a comminuted patellar fracture,which is often combined with

  9. [Injuries of the medial collateral ligament and anterior cruciate ligament of the knee joint and Lemaire surgical functional treatment. Long-term outcome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, F

    1996-06-01

    The present paper reports the results of 112 extraarticular ligamento-plasties performed on the knee with the procedure proposed by Lemaire. The series includes isolated tears of the anterior cruciate and medical collateral ligament as well as combined tears of both ligaments. The clinical and radiological results with a mean follow-up time of 11.5 years are compared with the results obtained in a first assessment 8 years ago. Good clinical results are in contrast with increasing osteoarthrosis in 1/3 of the knees radiologically assessed. The operation for a torn anterior cruciate ligament should be performed as soon as possible to avoid secondary meniscal lesions with subsequent severe osteoarthrosis. Presence or absence of arthrotic signs in the X-rays mainly determine the long-term result after ligamento-plasties of the knee. The Lemaire plasties are well tolerated even by elderly still active people and need little postoperative care.

  10. Rupture simultanée du ligament croisé antérieur et du ligament patellaire: à propos d'un cas

    OpenAIRE

    Achkoun, Abdessalam; Houjairi, Khalid; Quahtan, Omar; Hassoun, Jalal; Arssi, Mohamed; Rahmi, Mohamed; Garch, Abdelhak

    2016-01-01

    La rupture simultanée du tendon rotulien et du ligament croisé antérieur est une lésion relativement rare. Son diagnostic peut facilement manquer lors de l'examen initial. Les options de traitement incluent la réparation immédiate du tendon rotulien avec soit la reconstruction simultanée ou différée de ligament croisé antérieur. Nous rapportons le cas d'une rupture combinée du tendon rotulien et du ligament croisé antérieur chez un jeune footballeur de 22 ans. Une approche de traitement en de...

  11. Artificial ligament repairs the injured cruciate ligament of the knee joint%人工韧带修复膝关节交叉韧带损伤★

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于淼; 刘忆冰

    2013-01-01

      背景:以往治疗膝关节交叉韧带损伤的主要手段是移植重建,最常用的移植材料为自体的骨髌腱骨、半腱肌腱和股薄肌腱。但由于此类移植物存在取材区并发症及韧带化过程中的各种问题,近年来人工韧带的研究受到重视。目的:认识膝关节交叉韧带的结构及血供特点,以及膝关节交叉韧带损伤后人工韧带重建治疗机制与临床应用特点。方法:①分析膝关节前、后交叉韧带的组织结构,功能学特点以及血供差异。②分析膝关节前、后交叉韧带损伤的类型及生物力学机制。③分析修复膝关节交叉韧带损伤的材料学分类及特点。④分析人工韧带修复后影响关节稳定性的因素。结果与结论:修复膝关节前、后交叉韧带损伤时,应首先考虑到前、后交叉韧带的功能及血供情况,选择合适的重建物,使重建时过程简化,操作简单,重建材料的组织相容性较好,达到修复后的解剖与功能的双重建。%BACKGROUND: The previous main methods for the treatment of cruciate ligament injury of the keen joint are transplantation and reconstruction, and the most commonly used graft materials are autologous patel ar tendon bone, semitendinosus and gracilis tendon. But grafts can lead to complications in the drawn district and a variety of issues during ligament process. In recent years, the research of artificial ligament has become a hot spot. OBJECTIVE: To understand the structure and blood supply of cruciate ligament of the keen joint, and to investigate the mechanism and clinical characteristics of artificial ligament reconstruction for cruciate ligament injury of the keen joint. METHODS: The tissue structure and functional features of anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments of the knee joint as wel as the difference of blood supply were analyzed. The type and biomechanical mechanisms of anterior and posterior cruciate ligament

  12. Post traumatic osteoma of tibial insertion of medial collateral ligament of knee joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanker, V S; Gadikoppula, S; Loeffler, M D

    1998-03-01

    Two cases are presented of post traumatic para-articular osteoma developing at the site of tibial attachment of the medial collateral ligament of knee joint. These occurred after injuries sustained while playing football and in one case the ossified mass was treated with surgical excision for unresolved symptoms after conservative measures. A comparison is made with Pellegrini Stieda disease, which is a similar affection of the femoral insertion of the medial ligament of the knee joint.

  13. Post traumatic osteoma of tibial insertion of medial collateral ligament of knee joint

    OpenAIRE

    Shanker, V. S.; Gadikoppula, S.; Loeffler, M. D.

    1998-01-01

    Two cases are presented of post traumatic para-articular osteoma developing at the site of tibial attachment of the medial collateral ligament of knee joint. These occurred after injuries sustained while playing football and in one case the ossified mass was treated with surgical excision for unresolved symptoms after conservative measures. A comparison is made with Pellegrini Stieda disease, which is a similar affection of the femoral insertion of the medial ligament of the knee joint....

  14. Long-term outcome in dogs after surgical repair of cranial cruciate ligament disease

    OpenAIRE

    MölsÀ, Sari

    2014-01-01

    Cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) disease is one of the most common causes of lameness in dogs. Surgical treatment is recommended to stabilize the stifle joint, alleviate pain, and delay the progression of osteoarthritis (OA). A variety of surgical techniques has been introduced and can be broken down into the more traditional intracapsular ligament replacement and extracapsular suture techniques and the newer neutralizing dynamic osteotomy techniques. Although an enormous amount of literature ...

  15. The envelope of passive motion allowed by the capsular ligaments of the hip

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Laboratory data indicate the hip capsular ligaments prevent excessive range of motion, may protect the joint against adverse edge loading and contribute to synovial fluid replenishment at the cartilage surfaces of the joint. However, their repair after joint preserving or arthroplasty surgery is not routine. In order to restore their biomechanical function after hip surgery, the positions of the hip at which the ligaments engage together with their tensions when they engage is required. Nine ...

  16. Delayed diagnosis of isolated alar ligament rupture:A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robin; A; Kaufmann; Ingo; Marzi; Thomas; J; Vogl

    2015-01-01

    Ligament disruptions at the craniovertebral junction are typically associated with atlantoaxial rotatory dislocation during upper cervical spine injuries and require external orthoses or surgical stabilization. Only in few patients isolated ruptures of the alar ligament have been reported. Here we present a further case, in which the diagnosis was initially obscured by a misleading clinical symptomatology but finally established six month following the trauma, demonstrating the value of contrast-enhanced high resolution 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging in identifying this particular lesion.

  17. Marker of cemento-periodontal ligament junction associated with periodontal regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Ryohko; Wato, Masahiro; Tanaka, Akio

    2005-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify factors promoting formation of the cemento-periodontal ligament junction. Regeneration of the cemento-periodontal ligament junction is an important factor in recovery of the connective tissue attachment to the cementum and it is important to identify all specific substances that promote its formation. To clarify the substances involved in cemento-periodontal ligament junction formation, we produced a monoclonal antibody (mAb) to human cemento-periodontal ligament junction (designated as the anti-TAP mAb) and examined its immunostaining properties and reactive antigen. Hybridomas producing monoclonal antibody against human cemento-periodontal ligament junction antigens were established by fusing P3U1 mouse myeloma cells with spleen cells from BALB/c mice immunized with homogenized human cemento-periodontal ligament junction. The mAb, the anti-TAP mAb for cemento-periodontal ligament junction, was then isolated. The immunoglobulin class and light chain of the mAb were examined using an isotyping kit. Before immunostaining, antigen determination using an enzymatic method or heating was conducted. Human teeth, hard tissue-forming lesions, and animal tissues were immunostained by the anti-TAP mAb. The anti-TAP mAb was positive in human cemento-periodontal ligament junction and predentin but negative in all other human and animal tissues examined. In the cemento-osseous lesions, the anti-TAP mAb was positive in the peripheral area of the cementum and cementum-like hard tissues and not in the bone and bone-like tissues. The anti-TAP mAb showed IgM (kappa) and recognized phosphoprotein. The anti-TAP mAb is potentially useful for developing new agents promoting cementogenesis and periodontal regeneration.

  18. Initial evaluation of posterior cruciate ligament injuries: history, physical examination, imaging studies, surgical and nonsurgical indications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Vidriero, Emilio; Simon, David A; Johnson, Donald H

    2010-12-01

    Compared with anterior cruciate ligament injuries, posterior cruciate ligament injuries are a rare event. The mechanisms are predictable and a thorough physical examination is mandatory to rule out or define combined injury patterns. Stress radiography and magnetic resonance imaging studies are very helpful adjuncts. Acute and chronic injuries require slightly different approaches. As our understanding of normal and pathologic knee joint kinematics develops, nonoperative rehabilitation goals and operative techniques continue to evolve.

  19. Experimental evaluation of 3-dimensional kinematic behavior of the cruciate ligaments

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate a low-cost and easily reproducible technique for biomechanical studies in cadavers. In this kind of study, the natural effect of loading of the joint and shear forces are not taken into account. The objective is to describe the plastic deformation of the ligaments into 3-dimensional space. METHOD: For 18 intact human cadaver knees, the cruciate ligaments were divided into 3 fiber bundles, the tibial or femoral fixation points were marked, and...

  20. Dentists' level of knowledge of the treatment plans for periodontal ligament injuries after dentoalveolar trauma

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the level of knowledge held by dentists about the possible treatment plan procedures for periodontal ligament injuries after dentoalveolar trauma. A 5-item self-applied questionnaire was prepared with questions referring to the professional profile of the interviewees and to the treatment plan they would propose for periodontal ligament injuries secondary to dentoalveolar trauma. The questionnaires were filled out by 693 dentists attending the 23rd Annual Meeting of th...

  1. Evaluation of vertical forces in the pads of Pitbulls with cranial cruciate ligament rupture

    OpenAIRE

    Souza, Alexandre N A; Tatarunas, Angelica C; Matera,Julia M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background Cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CCLR) is one of the most important stifle injuries and a common cause of lameness in dogs. Our objective was to measure the vertical forces in the pads of Pitbulls with cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CCLR) using a pressure sensitive walkway. A pressure sensitive walkway was used to collect vertical force data from the pads of 10 Pitbulls affected with unilateral CCLR. Ten healthy...

  2. The impact of combined meniscus tear on quality of life after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harhaji Vladimir V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. An anterior cruciate ligament injury represents a significant epidemiological problem worldwide, especially due to involving young, sporty and active working-age population. This study has been conducted in order to compare the quality of life of patients who had isolated anterior cruciate ligament tear and of those who suffered from an associated meniscal injury. Material and Methods. This study included 185 patients who had undergone reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament at the Department of Orthopedic Surgery and Traumatology in Novi Sad from January 1st, 2012 to December 31st, 2012. The patients were divided into 2 groups: group A consisted of patients who had anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction only, and group B consisted of patients who had partial meniscectomy in addition to the anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The follow-up period was 12 months. Results. Distribution of patients by gender was significantly in favor of men. In our study, 146 patients were male and 39 patients were female. The average age of patients was 26.1 years overall (16-55 years, being 26.9 years for men, and 23.3 years for female patients. Out of 185 patients, 110 had an isolated anterior cruciate ligament injury, while 75 suffered both meniscus, internal or external, and anterior cruciate ligament injury. Conclusion. The comparison of the quality of life of patients in both groups showed no statistically significant difference. Therefore, we were not able to prove the hypothesis about the superior quality of life of those patients who had suffered from a ruptured anterior cruciate ligament only.

  3. Double-layered cell transfer technology for bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akazawa, Keiko; Iwasaki, Kengo; Nagata, Mizuki; Yokoyama, Naoki; Ayame, Hirohito; Yamaki, Kazumasa; Tanaka, Yuichi; Honda, Izumi; Morioka, Chikako; Kimura, Tsuyoshi; Komaki, Motohiro; Kishida, Akio; Izumi, Yuichi; Morita, Ikuo

    2016-09-14

    For cell-based medicine, to mimic in vivo cellular localization, various tissue engineering approaches have been studied to obtain a desirable arrangement of cells on scaffold materials. We have developed a novel method of cell manipulation called "cell transfer technology", enabling the transfer of cultured cells onto scaffold materials, and controlling cell topology. Here we show that using this technique, two different cell types can be transferred onto a scaffold surface as stable double layers or in patterned arrangements. Various combinations of adherent cells were transferred to a scaffold, amniotic membrane, in overlapping bilayers (double-layered cell transfer), and transferred cells showed stability upon deformations of the material including folding and trimming. Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells from periodontal ligaments (PDLSC) and osteoblasts, using double-layered cell transfer significantly enhanced bone formation, when compared to single cell type transplantation. Our findings suggest that this double-layer cell transfer is useful to produce a cell transplantation material that can bear two cell layers. Moreover, the transplantation of an amniotic membrane with PDLSCs/osteoblasts by cell transfer technology has therapeutic potential for bone defects. We conclude that cell transfer technology provides a novel and unique cell transplantation method for bone regeneration.

  4. Quadriceps Strength and Endurance After Posterior Cruciate Ligament Tears Versus Matched Group With Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dae-Hee; Han, Seung-Beom; Lee, Jin-Hyuck; Lee, Seok-Joo; Suh, Dong-Won; Jeong, Hye-Jin

    2015-06-01

    This study was designed to compare the preoperative strengths and endurances of the quadriceps and hamstring muscles in patients with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) versus posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) tears. Quadriceps and hamstring muscle strength and endurance were compared between 20 prospectively enrolled patients with isolated PCL tears and a retrospective, matched control group of 20 patients with isolated ACL tears. The maximal torque (60°/s) and total work (180°/s) of the quadriceps and hamstring were evaluated with an isokinetic testing device. Total work (1,094.4 ± 505.8 J v 797.5 ± 332.7 J, P = .035) and peak torque (129.9 ± 56.2 N ∙ m v 98.2 ± 37.4 N ∙ m, P = .046) of the quadriceps muscle on the involved side were higher in the PCL tear group than in the ACL tear group. However, there were no significant differences between the PCL tear group and ACL tear group in hamstring muscle strength (45.8 ± 42.3 N ∙ m and 46.0 ± 24.4 N ∙ m, respectively; P = .940) and endurance (429.3 ± 238.9 J and 382.4 ± 256.1 J, respectively; P = .574) on the involved side. The strength and endurance of the quadriceps muscle of the injured limb were greater after PCL tears than after ACL tears. However, there were no significant between-group differences in hamstring muscle strength and endurance on the involved side. Level III, retrospective comparative study. Copyright © 2015 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Grading Anterior Cruciate Ligament Graft Injury after Ligament Reconstruction Surgery: Diagnostic Efficacy of Oblique Coronal MR Imaging of the Knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Sung Gyu; Hong, Sung Hwan; Choi, Ja Young; Jun, Woo Sun; Choi, Jung Ah; Park, Eun Ah; Kang, Heung Sik; Kwon, Jong Won [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-04-15

    Objective : The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of using additional oblique coronal MRI of the knee for grading anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) graft injury after ligament reconstruction surgery. Materials and Methods : We retrospectively reviewed 51 consecutive MR knee examinations of 48 patients who underwent both ACL reconstruction and follow-up arthroscopy. The MR examinations included the orthogonal axial, sagittal, coronal images and the oblique coronal T2-weighted images, which were oriented in parallel with the course of the femoral intercondylar roof. Two radiologists independently evaluated the status of the ACL grafts with using the routine knee MRI and then with adding the oblique coronal imaging. The severity of ACL graft injury was graded using a 3-point system from MR images as intact, partial tear or complete tear, and the results were compared with the arthroscopic results. Weighted kappa statistics were used to analyze the diagnostic accuracies of the knee MRI with and without the additional oblique coronal imaging. For each evaluation, the observers reported a confidence level for grading the ACL graft injuries in the two imaging groups. Result : The weighted kappa values according to the routine knee MRI were 0.555 (reader 1) and 0.515 (reader 2). The inclusion of additional oblique coronal imaging increased the weighted kappa values to 0.666 (reader 1) and 0.611 (reader 2). The mean confidence levels by each reader were significantly higher (p < 0.01, paired t-test) with the additional oblique coronal imaging than by using the routine knee MRI alone. Conclusion : The additional use of oblique coronal MRI of the knee improves both the diagnostic accuracy and confidence for grading ACL graft injury.

  6. [Double Endobutto reconstituting coracoclavicular ligament combined with repairing acromioclavicular ligament at stage I for the treatment of acromioclavicular dislocation with Rockwood type III - V].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wen-yue; Yu, Chong; Huang, Zhong-ming; Han, Lei

    2015-06-01

    To explore clinical efficacy of double Endobutto reconstituting coracoclavicular ligament combined with repairing acromioclavicular ligament in stage I in treating acromioclavicular dislocation with Rockwood type III - V . From January 2010 to September 2013, 56 patients with Rockwood type III - V acromioclavicular dislocation were treated by operation, including 20 males and 36 femlaes, aged from 32 to 52 years old with an average of 38.5 years old. Twenty-five patients were on the left side and 31 cases on the right side. The time from injury to operation was from 3 to 14 days, averaged 7 days. All patients were diagnosed as acromioclavicular dislocation with Rockwood type III - V, and double Endobutto were used to reconstituting coracoclavicular ligament, line metal anchors were applied for repairing acromioclavicular ligament. Postoperative complications were observed, Karlsson and Constant-Murley evaluation standard were used to evaluate clinical effects. All patients were followed up from 8 to 24 months with average of 11 months. According to Karlsson evaluation standard at 6 months after operation,42 cases were grade A, 13 were grade B and 1 was grade C. Constant-Murley score were improved from (42.80±5.43) before operation to (91.75±4.27) at 6 months after operation. All items at 6 months after operation were better than that of preoperative items. Forty-eight patients got excellent results, 7 were moderate and only 1 with bad result. No shoulder joint adhesion, screw loosening or breakage were occurred during following up. Double Endobutto reconstituting coracoclavicular ligament combined with repairing acromioclavicular ligament in stage I for the treatment of acromioclavicular dislocation with Rockwood type III - V could obtain early staisfied clinical effects, and benefit for early recovery of shoulder joint function.

  7. "Transfer Shock" or "Transfer Ecstasy?"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickens, John M.

    The alleged characteristic drop in grade point average (GPA) of transfer students and the subsequent rise in GPA was investigated in this study. No statistically significant difference was found in first term junior year GPA between junior college transfers and native Florida State University students after the variance accounted for by the…

  8. Dynamic high-resolution US of ankle and midfoot ligaments: normal anatomic structure and imaging technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sconfienza, Luca Maria; Orlandi, Davide; Lacelli, Francesca; Serafini, Giovanni; Silvestri, Enzo

    2015-01-01

    The ankle is the most frequently injured major joint in the body, and ankle sprains are frequently encountered in individuals playing football, basketball, and other team sports, in addition to occurring in the general population. Imaging plays a crucial role in the evaluation of ankle ligaments. Magnetic resonance imaging has been proven to provide excellent evaluation of ligaments around the ankle, with the ability to show associated intraarticular abnormalities, joint effusion, and bone marrow edema. Ultrasonography (US) performed with high-resolution broadband linear-array probes has become increasingly important in the assessment of ligaments around the ankle because it is low cost, fast, readily available, and free of ionizing radiation. US can provide a detailed depiction of normal anatomic structures and is effective for evaluating ligament integrity. In addition, US allows the performance of dynamic maneuvers, which may contribute to increased visibility of normal ligaments and improved detection of tears. In this article, the authors describe the US techniques for evaluation of the ankle and midfoot ligaments and include a brief review of the literature related to their basic anatomic structures and US of these structures. Short video clips showing dynamic maneuvers and dynamic real-time US of ankle and midfoot structures and their principal pathologic patterns are included as supplemental material. Use of a standardized imaging technique may help reduce the intrinsic operator dependence of US. Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  9. Functional Enabling and Physiotherapeutic Treatment of Sportsmen after Injuring Collateral Ligaments of Knee Joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukosav Joksimović

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Ligamental compound of knee joint represents in mechanical terms, the most complex joint ligamental concatenation. According to seriousness and occurrence of damage, injuries of collateral ligaments can be divided into three degrees. Aim of paper was monitoring and evaluation of results of physiotherapeutic treatment in sportsmen with collateral ligaments injury (CLs of knee joint. The paper comprises 54 sportsmen over the period of four years aged from 16 to 32. Results of paper: 40% (74% injured collateral ligaments while playing game, during football game and 14 (26% while training, 43 (79,6% had collateral ligament injuries of right leg and 11 (20,4% of left leg. In 20( 37% it was a fi rst (1 st degree injury, in 26(48,1 % - second (2nd degree and in 8 (14% third (3rd degree injury. Treatment was conducted over three phases: fi rst - the phase of immobilization ( 2- 6 weeks with K.T.H. of free extremities. Second - the phase of removing immobilization, cryo T.h in combination with available electro- procedures. Third phase was enabling for high- risk physical activities. Results of paper have been classifi ed into four groups: excellent result was observed in 41 ( 76% sportsmen, good in 6 (11 % and satisfactory in 2( 3,8%. Conclusion: Illustrated results obtained on the basis of functional research and after completed rehabilitation allow us to recommend this rehabilitation program as on of the most effi cient ways in treatment of such serious injuries.

  10. Ligament rupture and unstable burst behaviors of axial flaws in steam generator U-bends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahn, Chi Bum, E-mail: bahn@pusan.ac.kr [Pusan National University, 2 Busandaehak-ro 63 beon-gil, Geumjeong-gu, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Young-Jin [KEPCO Engineering & Construction Co. Inc., Seongnam 463-870 (Korea, Republic of); Majumdar, Saurin [Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Ligament rupture and unstable burst pressure tests were conducted with U-bends. • In general, U-bends showed higher ligament rupture and burst pressures than straight tubes. • U-bend test data was bounded by 90% lower limit of the probabilistic models for straight tubes. • Prediction models for straight tubes could be conservatively applied to U-bends. - Abstract: Incidents of U-bend cracking in steam generator (SG) tubes have been reported, some of which have led to tube rupture. Experimental and analytical modeling efforts to determine the failure criteria of flawed SG U-bends are limited. To evaluate structural integrity of flawed U-bends, ligament rupture and unstable burst pressure tests were conducted on 57 and 152 mm bend radius U-bends with axial electrical discharge machining notches. In general, the ligament rupture and burst pressures of the U-bends were higher than those of straight tubes with similar notches. To quantitatively address the test data scatter issue, probabilistic models were introduced. All ligament rupture and burst pressures of U-bends were bounded by 90% lower limits of the probabilistic models for straight tubes. It was concluded that the prediction models for straight tubes could be applied to U-bends to conservatively evaluate the ligament rupture and burst pressures of U-bends with axial flaws.

  11. Ganglion cysts of the cruciate ligaments. MR findings with clinical correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, G.S.; Hsueh, C.-J.; Juan, C.J.; Chen, C.Y. [Tri-Service General Hospital and National Defense Medical Center, Taipei (China). Dept. of Radiology; Lee, C.H. [Tri-Service General Hospital and National Defense Medical Center, Taipei (China). Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery; Chan, W.P. [Taipei Medical Univ., Wan Fang Hospital, Taipei (China). Dept. of Radiology; Taylor, J.A.M. [New York Chiropractic College, Seneca Falls, NY (United States). Dept. of Diagnosis; Yu, J.S. [Ohio State Univ. Medical Center, Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    2002-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the MR findings of ganglion cysts of the cruciate ligaments in correlation with clinical findings. Material and Methods:We reviewed 12 patients with ganglion cysts of the cruciate ligaments obtained from a medical record of 4153 consecutive patients referred for knee MR examinations. All patients presented with chronic knee pain and 4 had restriction of knee motion. The MR imaging findings of the cysts were evaluated and correlated with clinical manifestations. Results:Seven ganglion cysts were found in the posterior cruciate ligaments and 5 in the anterior cruciate ligaments. All cysts were lobulated (n=7) or fusiform (n=5) in shape, 1.8-4.5 cm in size, along the posterior surface in the proximal or distal end of the ligaments. Ten patients had arthroscopic resection or aspiration of their cysts, became symptom free and had no recurrence on follow-up MR examinations. Two cysts reduced in size spontaneously by conservative treatment. Conclusion:MR imaging can offer useful information in detection and diagnosis of patients with chronic knee pain due to ganglion cysts of the cruciate ligaments. The size and location of the ganglion cysts can attribute to the clinical manifestations.

  12. A new laparoscopic technique for uterine prolapse: one-sided uterine fixation through the round ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Ching-Hung

    2011-02-01

    In this study, we provide a description of laparoscopic uterine suspension technique through round ligament. From 1997 to 2010, 55 patients with uterine prolapse were treated by laparoscopic uterine suspension. It is performed by suturing and tying a 1-0 Ethibond on the left round ligament at its insertion into the uterus. Then curved forceps pass the lateral puncture wound into the extraperitoneal space along the round ligament and penetrates the anterior leaf of the broad ligament into the peritoneal cavity and grasps the free ends of the Ethibond. They are withdrawn extraperitoneally along the round ligament then tightly tied at the fasciae on either side of the lateral puncture wound. Forty-two out of 55 patients (76.4%) experienced a reduction of prolapse to stage 0, regardless of what stage they started from. Twelve out of 55 (21.8%) experienced a reduction of prolapse varying from one to two stages. One out of 55 (1.8%) experienced no reduction in prolapse. This technique reconstructs a new, inelastic round ligament.

  13. Neuromuscular morphometry of the uterine ligaments and vaginal wall in women with pelvic organ prolapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Petek Balkanli; Usta, Ufuk; Inal, Hasan Ali; Tastekin, Ebru; Tastekin, Tugba; Tokuc, Burcu

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare neuromuscular histomorphometry of the uterine ligaments and vaginal wall in women with and without pelvic organ prolapse. Biopsies were obtained from the round, uterosacral, and cardinal ligaments of the uterus and apical vaginal wall of women having pelvic organ prolapse repaired (stage ≥ II; prolapse group, 37) and the same location in patients with no prolapse (stage prolapse than in women without. In round ligament, mean smooth muscle percentage was lower than in women with normal support (81.63 ± 8.2 vs. 51.63 ± 16, P=0.000). Mean distance of the smooth muscle fibers from surface epithelium of the vaginal epithelium of the women with prolapse were significantly higher than the control group (1.679 ± 0.34 vs. 2.240 ± 0.33, P = 0.000). PGP 9.5 stained area percentage of uterine ligaments and vaginal wall tissue samples were significantly lower in women with prolapse. Both total innervation of the anterior vaginal epithelium and uterine ligaments, and muscular percentage of the round ligament and vaginal wall were decreased in women with pelvic organ prolapse. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Anatomical relationships between Wrisberg meniscofemoral and posterior cruciate ligament's femoral insertions

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    Heetor Campora de Sousa Oliveira

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the frequency and morphometry of the Wrisberg's ligament and its relationships with the posterior cruciate ligament's femoral insertion. STUDY DESIGN: Controlled laboratory study. METHODS: 24 unpaired knee pieces, 12 right and 12 left were submitted to a deep dissection of the Wrisberg and posterior cruciate ligaments. The pieces were photographed with a digital camera and ruler; the Image J software was used to measure the ligaments' insertion areas, in square millimeters. RESULTS: The Wrisberg ligament was present in 91.6% of the studied pieces. In those its shape was elliptical in 12 pieces (54.54%. In 68% of the knees, the WL insertion was proximal to the medial intercondilar ridge, close to the PCL posteromedial bundle. The average area for the WL was 20.46 ± 6.12 mm2. This number corresponded to 23.3% of the PCL's average area. CONCLUSIONS: WL ligament is a common structure in knees. There is a wide variation of its insertion area. Proportionally to the PCL's insertion area the WL ones suggests that it may contribute to the posterior stability of the knee joint.

  15. A Multibody Knee Model Corroborates Subject-Specific Experimental Measurements of Low Ligament Forces and Kinematic Coupling During Passive Flexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kia, Mohammad; Schafer, Kevin; Lipman, Joseph; Cross, Michael; Mayman, David; Pearle, Andrew; Wickiewicz, Thomas; Imhauser, Carl

    2016-05-01

    A multibody model of the knee was developed and the predicted ligament forces and kinematics during passive flexion corroborated subject-specific measurements obtained from a human cadaveric knee that was tested using a robotic manipulator. The model incorporated a novel strategy to estimate the slack length of ligament fibers based on experimentally measured ligament forces at full extension and included multifiber representations for the cruciates. The model captured experimentally measured ligament forces (≤ 5.7 N root mean square (RMS) difference), coupled internal rotation (≤ 1.6 deg RMS difference), and coupled anterior translation (≤ 0.4 mm RMS difference) through 130 deg of passive flexion. This integrated framework of model and experiment improves our understanding of how passive structures, such as ligaments and articular geometries, interact to generate knee kinematics and ligament forces.

  16. Nrf2 Inhibits Periodontal Ligament Stem Cell Apoptosis under Excessive Oxidative Stress

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    Yanli Liu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to analyze novel mechanisms underlying Nrf2-mediated anti-apoptosis in periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs in the periodontitis oxidative microenvironment. We created an oxidative stress model with H2O2-treated PDLSCs. We used real-time PCR, Western blotting, TUNEL staining, fluorogenic assay and transfer genetics to confirm the degree of oxidative stress and apoptosis as well as the function of nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2. We demonstrated that with upregulated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS and malondialdehyde (MDA, the effect of oxidative stress was obvious under H2O2 treatment. Oxidative molecules were altered after the H2O2 exposure, whereby the signaling of Nrf2 was activated with an increase in its downstream effectors, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, NAD(PH:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1 and γ-glutamyl cysteine synthetase (γ-GCS. Additionally, the apoptosis levels gradually increased with oxidative stress by the upregulation of caspase-9, caspase-3, Bax and c-Fos levels in addition to the downregulation of Bcl-2. However, there was no alterations in levels of caspase-8. The enhanced antioxidant effect could not mitigate the occurrence of apoptosis. Furthermore, Nrf2 overexpression effectively improved the anti-oxidative levels and increased cell proliferation. At the same time, overexpression effectively restrained TUNEL staining and decreased the molecular levels of caspase-9, caspase-3, Bax and c-Fos, but not that of caspase-8. In contrast, silencing the expression of Nrf2 levels had the opposite effect. Collectively, Nrf2 alleviates PDLSCs via its effects on regulating oxidative stress and anti-intrinsic apoptosis by the activation of oxidative enzymes.

  17. Role of biomechanics in the understanding of normal, injured, and healing ligaments and tendons

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    Jung Ho-Joong

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ligaments and tendons are soft connective tissues which serve essential roles for biomechanical function of the musculoskeletal system by stabilizing and guiding the motion of diarthrodial joints. Nevertheless, these tissues are frequently injured due to repetition and overuse as well as quick cutting motions that involve acceleration and deceleration. These injuries often upset this balance between mobility and stability of the joint which causes damage to other soft tissues manifested as pain and other morbidity, such as osteoarthritis. The healing of ligament and tendon injuries varies from tissue to tissue. Tendinopathies are ubiquitous and can take up to 12 months for the pain to subside before one could return to normal activity. A ruptured medial collateral ligament (MCL can generally heal spontaneously; however, its remodeling process takes years and its biomechanical properties remain inferior when compared to the normal MCL. It is also known that a midsubstance anterior cruciate ligament (ACL tear has limited healing capability, and reconstruction by soft tissue grafts has been regularly performed to regain knee function. However, long term follow-up studies have revealed that 20–25% of patients experience unsatisfactory results. Thus, a better understanding of the function of ligaments and tendons, together with knowledge on their healing potential, may help investigators to develop novel strategies to accelerate and improve the healing process of ligaments and tendons. With thousands of new papers published in the last ten years that involve biomechanics of ligaments and tendons, there is an increasing appreciation of this subject area. Such attention has positively impacted clinical practice. On the other hand, biomechanical data are complex in nature, and there is a danger of misinterpreting them. Thus, in these review, we will provide the readers with a brief overview of ligaments and tendons and refer them to

  18. Repetitive loading damages healing ligaments more than sustained loading demonstrated by reduction in modulus and residual strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Gail M; Bailey, Soraya J

    2012-10-11

    Healing ligaments have decreased strength compared to normal ligaments, leaving healing ligaments vulnerable to damage accumulation during normal daily activities at functional stresses. Rabbit medial collateral ligament gap scars after 14 weeks of healing were exposed to long-term creep and fatigue loading over a range of functional stresses. In addition to the 58 healing ligaments that underwent in vitro creep and fatigue testing, seven healing ligaments underwent only monotonic failure tests for comparison with residual strength tests that followed creep and fatigue testing. When exposed to repetitive loading during fatigue testing, healing ligaments exhibited modulus reduction earlier than when exposed to sustained loading during creep testing that was occasionally interrupted with unloading/reloading cycles to measure modulus. In other words, after the same loading duration, repetitive loading was more damaging than sustained loading. At modulus reduction, the increase in strain during fatigue was greater than or similar to that during creep. Healing ligaments that were damaged during long-term loading exhibited decreased strength and increased toe-region strain during subsequent residual strength tests. Normal daily activities that result in repetitive loading of a ligament healing from an injury will likely cause damage to accumulate faster than activities that result in sustained loading.

  19. Tourniquet-induced cardiovascular responses in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction surgery under general anesthesia: Effect of preoperative oral amantadine

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    Ashraf Abd Elmawgood

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Preoperative oral amantadine reduced tourniquet induced hypertension and postoperative analgesic requirements in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction surgery under general anesthesia.

  20. Controversies relating to the management of acromioclavicular joint dislocations.

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    Modi, C S; Beazley, J; Zywiel, M G; Lawrence, T M; Veillette, C J H

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this review is to address controversies in the management of dislocations of the acromioclavicular joint. Current evidence suggests that operative rather than non-operative treatment of Rockwood grade III dislocations results in better cosmetic and radiological results, similar functional outcomes and longer time off work. Early surgery results in better functional and radiological outcomes with a reduced risk of infection and loss of reduction compared with delayed surgery. Surgical options include acromioclavicular fixation, coracoclavicular fixation and coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction. Although non-controlled studies report promising results for arthroscopic coracoclavicular fixation, there are no comparative studies with open techniques to draw conclusions about the best surgical approach. Non-rigid coracoclavicular fixation with tendon graft or synthetic materials, or rigid acromioclavicular fixation with a hook plate, is preferable to fixation with coracoclavicular screws owing to significant risks of loosening and breakage. The evidence, although limited, also suggests that anatomical ligament reconstruction with autograft or certain synthetic grafts may have better outcomes than non-anatomical transfer of the coracoacromial ligament. It has been suggested that this is due to better restoration horizontal and vertical stability of the joint. Despite the large number of recently published studies, there remains a lack of high-quality evidence, making it difficult to draw firm conclusions regarding these controversial issues.

  1. Predictors of Revision Surgery After Primary Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabroudi, Mohammad A.; Björnsson, Haukur; Lynch, Andrew D.; Muller, Bart; Samuelsson, Kristian; Tarabichi, Majd; Karlsson, Jón; Fu, Freddie H.; Harner, Christopher D.; Irrgang, James J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Revision anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgery occurs in 5% to 15% of individuals undergoing ACL reconstruction. Identifying predictors for revision ACL surgery is of essence in the pursuit of creating adequate prevention programs and to identify individuals at risk for reinjury and revision. Purpose: To determine predictors of revision ACL surgery after failed primary ACL reconstruction. Study Design: Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: A total of 251 participants (mean age ± SD, 26.1 ± 9.9 years) who had undergone primary ACL reconstruction 1 to 5 years earlier completed a comprehensive survey to determine predictors of revision ACL surgery at a mean 3.4 ± 1.3 years after the primary ACL reconstruction. Potential predictors that were assessed included subject characteristics (age at the time of surgery, time from injury to surgery, sex, body mass index, preinjury activity level, return to sport status), details of the initial injury (mechanism; concomitant injury to other ligaments, menisci, and cartilage), surgical details of the primary reconstruction (Lachman and pivot shift tests under anesthesia, graft type, femoral drilling technique, reconstruction technique), and postoperative course (length of rehabilitation, complications). Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to identify factors that predicted the need for revision ACL surgery. Results: Overall, 21 (8.4%) subjects underwent revision ACL surgery. Univariate analysis showed that younger age at the time of surgery (P = .003), participation in sports at a competitive level (P = .023), and double-bundle ACL reconstruction (P = .024) predicted increased risk of revision ACL surgery. Allograft reconstructions also demonstrated a trend toward greater risk of revision ACL surgery (P = .076). No other variables were significantly associated with revision ACL surgery. Multivariate analysis revealed that revision ACL surgery was

  2. Unilateral sacrospinous ligament fixation for treatment of genital prolapse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Ping; ZHU Lan; LANG Jing-he; WANG Wen-yan; SHI Hong-hui

    2010-01-01

    Background Genital prolapse affects 30% of middle-aged and older women and is becoming a major public health concern. Sacrospinous ligament fixation is an effective and safe procedure for vaginal vault prolaps with a low recurrence and complication rate. This study aimed to investigate the efficacy and safety of unilateral sacrospinous ligament fixation (SSLF) for the management of pelvic organ prolapse (POP).Methods Forty patients with severe prolapse of pelvic organ undergoing unilateral SSLF were retrospectively studied.In this study, all patients were staged by the value of POP-Q. All procedures were performed by a senior physician. The characteristics of these patients and their immediate and short-term post-operative outcome were recorded. All patients were seen six weeks and six months after the surgery. The evaluation included standardized questionnaire and site-specific vaginal examination by one physician.Results The average operation time was 65-92 minutes. The average blood loss was 83-188 ml. The average hospitalization time was 6.1 days. The average cost was 5885 yuan. The average day of urethral catheter removal after the operation was 2.1 days. The incidence of postoperative morbidity was 17.1%. One (2.4%) patient had hematoma in the right pelvic. The mean length of postoperative follow-up for 35 patients was 13.1 months. The rate of follow-up was 87.5%. One (2.9%) patient showed recurrent vaginal vault prolapse six months after the surgery. The objective success rate of pelvic organ prolapse was 85% (34/40). There was significant difference between the POP-Q of Aa, Ba, Ap, Bp,and D before and after operation (P <0.001 ). Five (14.3%) patients complained lower back pain, gluteal pain or right groin pain. Three (8.6%) patients developed de novo stress incontinence. Vaginal disabsorbable sutures were found in three (8.6%) patients. One (2.9%) patient had de novo urge incontinence.Conclusions Unilateral SSLF was both cost and treatment effective

  3. Simultaneous bicompartmental bucket-handle meniscal tears with intact anterior cruciate ligament: a case report

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    Beris Alexandros E

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Bucket handle tear of the menisci is a common type of lesion resulting from injury to the knee joint. Bucket handle injury of both menisci in almost all cases is associated with a lesion to either the anterior or the posterior cruciate ligament of the knee joint. We describe a case of acute bucket-handle tear of the medial and lateral menisci with intact anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments in a dancer. To the best of our knowledge, there are no previous reports of this type of injury in the literature. Case presentation A 28-year-old Caucasian Greek woman presented to the emergency department after sustaining an injury to her right knee during dancing. An MRI evaluation demonstrated tears in both menisci of the right knee, while the anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments were found to be intact. A partial medial and lateral meniscectomy was then performed. At a follow-up examination six months after her injury, clinical tests demonstrated that our patient's right knee was stable, had a full range of motion and had no tenderness. She was satisfied with the outcome of the operation and returned to her pre-injury activities. Conclusion We present the first case in the literature that describes a combined bucket-handle injury of both the medial and lateral menisci with an intact anterior cruciate ligament. The clinical examination of the anterior cruciate ligament was unremarkable, with no signs of deficiency or rupture. The posterior cruciate ligament was also intact. On magnetic resonance imaging, the ligaments were visualised as intact in all their length. These findings were confirmed by arthroscopic evaluation.

  4. Morphological and functional characteristics of three-dimensional engineered bone-ligament-bone constructs following implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jinjin; Goble, Kristen; Smietana, Michael; Kostrominova, Tatiana; Larkin, Lisa; Arruda, Ellen M

    2009-10-01

    The incidence of ligament injury has recently been estimated at 400,000/year. The preferred treatment is reconstruction using an allograft, but outcomes are limited by donor availability, biomechanical incompatibility, and immune rejection. The creation of an engineered ligament in vitro solely from patient bone marrow stromal cells (has the potential to greatly enhance outcomes in knee reconstructions. Our laboratory has developed a scaffoldless method to engineer three-dimensional (3D) ligament and bone constructs from rat bone marrow stem cells in vitro. Coculture of these two engineered constructs results in a 3D bone-ligament-bone (BLB) construct with viable entheses, which was successfully used for medial collateral ligament (MCL) replacement in a rat model. 1 month and 2 month implantations were applied to the engineered BLBs. Implantation of 3D BLBs in a MCL replacement application demonstrated that our in vitro engineered tissues grew and remodeled quickly in vivo to an advanced phenotype and partially restored function of the knee. The explanted 3D BLB ligament region stained positively for type I collagen and elastin and was well vascularized after 1 and 2 months in vivo. Tangent moduli of the ligament portion of the 3D BLB 1 month explants increased by a factor of 2.4 over in vitro controls, to a value equivalent to those observed in 14-day-old neonatal rat MCLs. The 3D BLB 1 month explants also exhibited a functionally graded response that closely matched native MCL inhomogeneity, indicating the constructs functionally adapted in vivo.

  5. Generalized Joint Laxity and Ligament Injuries in High School–Aged Female Volleyball Players in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sueyoshi, Ted; Emoto, Gen; Yuasa, Tomoki

    2016-01-01

    Background: Generalized joint laxity has been linked to ligamentous injuries such as anterior cruciate ligament tear and ankle sprain. Purpose/Hypothesis: The purpose of this study was to investigate generalized joint laxity and incidence of ligament injuries in high school–aged female volleyball players. It was hypothesized that volleyball players with a past history of sprains would have increased generalized joint laxity compared with those without any history and that athletes with multiple sprains would demonstrate with a higher generalized joint laxity score than those who had only 1 sprain. Study Design: Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Forty-seven subjects were tested for generalized joint laxity using the Beighton and Horan Joint Mobility Index (BHJMI). They were categorized into 2 groups based on the presence of past ligament injury: injury group (IG) and noninjury group (NG). The IG group was further divided into 2 groups based on whether they had a single ligamentous injury (IGS) or multiple injuries (IGM) in the past to study whether there was any difference in scores between the subgroups. The collected data were analyzed statistically with 1-way analysis of variance. Results: Subjects in the IG group scored significantly higher on the BHJMI than those in the NG group. The mean score for the IG group was 2.40 ± 1.42, as opposed to 1.24 ± 1.09 for the NG group (P = .006). Eleven subjects in the IG group had suffered multiple injuries or recurrent injuries (IGM) and scored significantly higher than the remaining 19 individuals in the IG group, who had only sustained a single injury (IGS). The mean BHJMI scores were 3.18 ± 1.47 and 1.95 ± 1.22 for IGM and IGS, respectively (P = .02). Conclusion: Female athletes with a high generalized joint laxity score may be more prone to ligament injury and potentially to recurrent ligament injuries. PMID:27761474

  6. Allogeneic versus autologous derived cell sources for use in engineered bone-ligament-bone grafts in sheep anterior cruciate ligament repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalingam, Vasudevan D; Behbahani-Nejad, Nilofar; Horine, Storm V; Olsen, Tyler J; Smietana, Michael J; Wojtys, Edward M; Wellik, Deneen M; Arruda, Ellen M; Larkin, Lisa M

    2015-03-01

    The use of autografts versus allografts for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is controversial. The current popular options for ACL reconstruction are patellar tendon or hamstring autografts, yet advances in allograft technologies have made allogeneic grafts a favorable option for repair tissue. Despite this, the mismatched biomechanical properties and risk of osteoarthritis resulting from the current graft technologies have prompted the investigation of new tissue sources for ACL reconstruction. Previous work by our lab has demonstrated that tissue-engineered bone-ligament-bone (BLB) constructs generated from an allogeneic cell source develop structural and functional properties similar to those of native ACL and vascular and neural structures that exceed those of autologous patellar tendon grafts. In this study, we investigated the effectiveness of our tissue-engineered ligament constructs fabricated from autologous versus allogeneic cell sources. Our preliminary results demonstrate that 6 months postimplantation, our tissue-engineered auto- and allogeneic BLB grafts show similar histological and mechanical outcomes indicating that the autologous grafts are a viable option for ACL reconstruction. These data indicate that our tissue-engineered autologous ligament graft could be used in clinical situations where immune rejection and disease transmission may preclude allograft use.

  7. Concomitant injuries of anterior cruciate ligament and meniscus

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    Ristić Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The aim of this study was to determine the correlation between meniscal injuries with injuries of the anterior cruciate ligament, as well as risk factors for those associated injuries. Material and Methods. This study included 496 operated patients. Almost half of patients with meniscal injury were between the ages of 21 and 30 years. Results. Meniscal injuries were diagnosed in 187 patients (38%. These patients were significantly older than the patients without meniscal injury. Meniscal injuries were significantly more frequent in patients who played sports recreationally than in professional athletes. The patients with meniscal injury underwent surgery almost four months later than the patients with preserved menisci. Meniscal injuries occurred significantly more frequently by non - contact mechanism, as a result of landing and sudden changes of direction and rhythm of running. Conclusion. Male patients hurt the medial meniscus more often, “bucket handle” type of lesion being much more frequent than on the lateral meniscus. The increase of body mass index is exactly proportional to the increase in the incidence of meniscal injuries.

  8. Complications of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papakonstantinou, Olympia; Chung, Christine B; Chanchairujira, Kullanuch; Resnick, Donald L

    2003-05-01

    Arthroscopic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) using autografts or allografts is being performed with increasing frequency, particularly in young athletes. Although the procedure is generally well tolerated, with good success rates, early and late complications have been documented. As clinical manifestations of graft complications are often non-specific and plain radiographs cannot directly visualize the graft and the adjacent soft tissues, MR imaging has a definite role in the diagnosis of complications after ACL reconstruction and may direct subsequent therapeutic management. Our purpose is to review the normal MR imaging of the ACL graft and present the MR imaging findings of a wide spectrum of complications after ACL reconstruction, such as graft impingement, graft rupture, cystic degeneration of the graft, postoperative infection of the knee, diffuse and localized (i.e., cyclops lesion) arthrofibrosis, and associated donor site abnormalities. Awareness of the MR imaging findings of complications as well as the normal appearances of the normal ACL graft is essential for correct interpretation.

  9. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in children with open growth plates

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    Rustam Sh Sadykov

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL tears are observed in 10%–32% of all traumatic lesions of the knee joint in children. Open growth plates are a serious problem in the treatment of ACL tears. Most modern methods of ACL reconstruction use transepiphyseal channels, which go through the growth plates. This may lead to angle deformity of the knee development, limb shortening and early arthritis. Material and methods. We observed 12 patients (11–17 years old; mean age, 13.2 years with ACL tears with opened growth plates, who were operated on between 2006 and 2010. ACL reconstruction was performed arthroscopically using the BTB-technique and synthetic grafts DONA-M. Results. In all cases, we achieved poor results, especially when the operation was done by BTB. We avoided shortening of the leg, but arthritis was common and progressed quickly. When we tried stabilize the joint, we achieved the reverse effect – pain in the knee, with a decreased quality of life. Conclusion. Our results demonstrate that ACL reconstruction in children with opened growth pates is not effective; we suggest performing the procedure after the growth has finished.

  10. Preoperative cryotherapy use in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyonos, Loukas; Owsley, Kevin; Vollmer, Emily; Limpisvasti, Orr; Gambardella, Ralph

    2014-12-01

    Unrelieved postoperative pain may impair rehabilitation, compromise functional outcomes, and lead to patient dissatisfaction. Preemptive multimodal analgesic techniques may improve outcomes after surgery. We hypothesized that patients using preoperative cryotherapy plus a standardized postoperative treatment plan will have lower pain scores and require less pain medication compared with patients receiving a standardized postoperative treatment plan alone after arthroscopically assisted anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). A total of 53 consecutive patients undergoing arthroscopically assisted ACLR performed by one of seven surgeons were randomly assigned to one of two groups. Group 1 received no preoperative cryotherapy and group 2 received 30 to 90 minutes of preoperative cryotherapy to the operative leg using a commercial noncompressive cryotherapy unit. Visual analog scale pain scores and narcotic use were recorded for the first 4 days postoperatively. Total hours of cold therapy and continuous passive motion (CPM) use and highest degree of flexion achieved were recorded as well. Group 1 consisted of 26 patients (15 allograft Achilles tendon and 11 autograft bone patellar tendon bone [BPTB]), and group 2 consisted of 27 patients (16 allograft Achilles tendon and 11 autograft BPTB). Group 2 patients reported less pain (average 1.3 units, p cryotherapy, hours of CPM use, or maximum knee flexion achieved. Complications did not occur in either group. This is the first report we are aware of showing the postoperative effects of preoperative cryotherapy. Our results support the safety and efficacy of preoperative cryotherapy in a multimodal pain regimen for patients undergoing ACL reconstruction.

  11. Xeno-free culture of human periodontal ligament stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubiani, Oriana; Diomede, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    The possibility of transplanting adult stem cells into damaged organs has opened a new prospective for the treatment of several human pathologies. Currently, in vitro expansion and culture of mesenchymal stem cells is founded on supplementing cell culture and differentiation medium with fetal calf serum (FCS) or fetal bovine serum (FBS) that contain numerous growth factors inducing cell attachment to plastic surfaces, proliferation, and differentiation. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) cultured with medium containing FCS or FBS are unusable in the cell therapy; in fact the central issues regarding limitations in using animal sera for cell therapy is that its components are highly variable and often unknown and may trigger a xenogenic immune response, immunological reactions, and the potential transmission of prion diseases and zoonoses. Here we describe the culture system protocols for the expansion and production of human Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells (hPDLSCs) using a new xeno-free medium formulation ensuring the maintenance of the stem cells features comprising the multiple passage expansion, mesengenic lineage differentiation, cellular phenotype, and genomic stability, essential elements for conforming to translation to cell therapy.

  12. Histological evidence for a supraspinous ligament in sauropod dinosaurs

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    Cerda, Ignacio A.; Casal, Gabriel A.; Martinez, Rubén D.; Ibiricu, Lucio M.

    2015-01-01

    Supraspinous ossified rods have been reported in the sacra of some derived sauropod dinosaurs. Although different hypotheses have been proposed to explain the origin of this structure, histological evidence has never been provided to support or reject any of them. In order to establish its origin, we analyse and characterize the microstructure of the supraspinous rod of two sauropod dinosaurs from the Upper Cretaceous of Argentina. The supraspinous ossified rod is almost entirely formed by dense Haversian bone. Remains of primary bone consist entirely of an avascular tissue composed of two types of fibre-like structures, which are coarse and longitudinally (parallel to the main axis of the element) oriented. These structures are differentiated on the basis of their optical properties under polarized light. Very thin fibrous strands are also observed in some regions. These small fibres are all oriented parallel to one another but perpendicular to the element main axis. Histological features of the primary bone tissue indicate that the sacral supraspinous rod corresponds to an ossified supraspinous ligament. The formation of this structure appears to have been a non-pathological metaplastic ossification, possibly induced by the continuous tensile forces applied to the element. PMID:26587248

  13. Anterior cruciate ligament injuries among wakeboarders: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narita, Tetsuya; Mori, Atsushi; Hashiguchi, Hiroshi; Iizawa, Norishige; Takeda, Tomomichi; Hattori, Mikihiko; Ito, Hiromoto

    2004-02-01

    No previous cases of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries sustained during wake-boarding have been reported. We report on a case involving an ACL injury sustained during wakeboarding. A 27-year-old man sustained an injury while attempting a wakeboarding maneuver(a heel-side back roll, consisting of a jump and simultaneous roll toward the heel side). He failed to complete his roll before landing, striking the water with his right shoulder foremost, then plunging underwater. When his wakeboard struck the water, his left knee was sprained by the rotational force exerted by the board. The patient was diagnosed with an isolated ACL injury and underwent arthroscopic ACL reconstructive surgery. The board used in wakeboarding is wider and subject to greater water resistance than that used in water skiing. The feet of the wakeboarder are firmly attached by binding boots to a board, laterally with respect to the direction of motion, impeding easy separation of the board from the feet in the event of a fall. Thus, wakeboarding conditions would appear to put wakeboarders at particular risk for ACL injuries. These conditions need be assessed from a medical perspective in order to devise ways to minimize the risk of such injuries.

  14. Basic principles of aggressive rehabilitation after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

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    Dubljanin-Raspopović Emilija

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Rehabilitation after ACL (anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction has drastically changed over the last decade, with the adoption of a more aggressive approach, right from the first day after surgery. Progress in the effectiveness of rehabilitation is based on improvements in operative techniques, as well as on the encouraging results of histological studies regarding graft healing. Despite a huge amount of research papers on this topic, a rehabilitation golden standard still has not been established, due to the complexity of this problem. In this review, we point out the basic principles of rehabilitation after arthroscopically assisted ACL reconstruction based on actual practices, as well as the importance of specific procedures for the prevention of complications during the postoperative period. The importance of range-of-motion exercises, early weight bearing, an appropriate gait scheme, patella mobilisation, pain and oedema control, as well as stretching and balance exercises is explained. The functional advantages of closed kinetic chain exercises, as well as their influence on the graft are also described, in comparison to open kinetic chain exercises. The fundamentals of returning to sports are revealed and the specific aspects of rehabilitation regarding graft choice are pointed out. While waiting for new clinical investigations, which are expected to enable the establishment of a rehabilitation golden standard, the outlined principles should be followed. The complexity of this injury requires treatment in highly specialised institutions.

  15. Sport-specific outcomes after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

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    Warner, Stephen J; Smith, Matthew V; Wright, Rick W; Matava, Matthew J; Brophy, Robert H

    2011-08-01

    Although anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction has been studied extensively in the literature, sport-specific outcomes have not been well-documented. The purpose of this systematic review was to assess sport-specific outcomes after ACL reconstruction in the literature. We performed a systematic review of the literature to identify studies reporting sport-specific outcomes after primary ACL reconstruction. Included studies were required to have reported standardized outcomes after primary ACL reconstruction for a single sport or comparing between different sports. In total 8 studies conformed to all inclusion criteria: 2 Level II studies, 1 Level III study, and 5 Level IV case series. Only 1 study reported comparisons of standardized outcomes between different sports, whereas 7 studies reported standardized outcomes in a single sport. Return to activity was the most common sport-specific outcome reported and varied from 19% (soccer) to 100% (bicycling and rugby), although the methods of measuring this outcome differed. Whereas return to activity after ACL reconstruction appears more likely for bicycling and jogging than for cutting and pivoting sports such as soccer and football, the literature on sport-specific outcomes from ACL reconstruction is limited with minimal data. Further studies are needed to report sport-specific outcomes and return to play after ACL reconstruction. Level IV, systematic review of Level II, III, and IV studies. Copyright © 2011 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. LOWER EXTREMITY MALALIGNMENTS AND ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT INJURY HISTORY

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    Rebecca A. Braham

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available To identify if lower extremity malalignments were associated with increased propensity of a history of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL ruptures in males and females using a case control design. Twenty subjects (10 males, 10 females had a history of ACL injury and twenty (10 males, 10 females had no history of ACL injury. Subjects were assessed for navicular drop, quadriceps angle, pelvic tilt, hip internal and external rotation range of motion, and true and apparent leg length discrepancies. Statistical analysis was performed to identify differences in these measures in regard to injury history and gender, and to identify if any of these measures were predictive of ACL injury history. Increased navicular drop and anterior pelvic tilt were found to be statistically significant predictors of ACL injury history regardless of gender. Limbs that had previously suffered ACL ruptures were found to have increased navicular drop and anterior pelvic tilt compared to uninjured limbs. Based on the results of this retrospective study, the lower extremity malalignments examined do not appear to predispose females to tearing their ACLs more than males.

  17. Anatomic double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Xue-song

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To retrospectively evaluate the early results of anatomic double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction and compare with the results of native ACL of the contralateral knee.Methods: The results of a consecutive series of 118 patients receiving arthroscopic ACL reconstruction were evaluated.Eight patients were lost to the latest follow-up,leaving a total of 110 patients available for study within at least 3 years' clinical follow-up.Among them,63 patients underwent postoperative MRI and CT scan,as well as clinical evaluation.Results: After reconstruction,the knees were stable and pain-free.Mean postoperative Lysholm score was 95.54 in 110 patients after 3 years.CT and MRI assessment showed that the reconstruction centered in the femoral footprint of ACL (n=63).The sagittal ACL angle in the reconstructed ACL (52.16°±2.45°) was much close to that in the contralateral intact ACL (51.31 °±2.18°,P>0.05).By ACL-Blumensaat line angle analysis,there was no difference between doublebundle reconstructed knees and their contralateral normal knees (4.67°±0.43° vs.4.62°±0.60°,P>0.05).Conclusion:Anatomic double-bundle ACL reconstruction can place grafts more precisely in the anatomic footprint of the ACL and better restore knee kinematics.

  18. Ruptures of the anterior cruciate ligament in soccer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochcongar, P; Laboute, E; Jan, J; Carling, C

    2009-05-01

    Ruptures of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are serious, common and costly injuries. The present 12-year investigation was undertaken to examine the frequency of ACL ruptures and identify the game events that may have contributed to the cause of these injuries in male soccer players across a French district. A retrospective questionnaire was used to record the players' age at the time of injury, laterality, standard of play, playing position and injured side. The characteristics of the injury situations were described in detail to investigate the game events involved in each case. A total of 934 ruptures was reported. Significantly more ruptures were sustained in a non-contact versus a contact situation (pgame events reported in the injury situations were shown to be related to player's age, standard and position. While these results have confirmed observations from previous investigations on ACL ruptures in soccer, the analysis of a considerably larger number of injury cases has brought new findings to the literature as well as recommendations for future research.

  19. Pathogenesis of ligaments ossification in spondyloarthritis: insights and doubts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neve, Anna; Maruotti, Nicola; Corrado, Addolorata; Cantatore, Francesco Paolo

    2017-05-01

    Despite intensive research in spondyloarthritis pathogenesis, some important questions still remain unanswered, particularly concerning enthesis new bone formation. Several evidences suggest that it prevalently occurs by endochondral ossification, however it remains to identify factors that can induce and influence its initiation and progression. Recent progress, achieved in animal models and in vitro and genetic association studies, has led us to hypothesize that several systemic factors (adipokines and gut hormones) and local factors (BMP and Wnt signaling) as well as angiogenesis and mechanical stress are involved. We critically review and summarize the available data and delineate the possible mechanisms involved in enthesis ossification, particularly at spinal ligament level. KEY MESSAGES Complete understanding of spondyloarthritis pathophysiology requires insights into inflammation, bone destruction and bone formation, which are all located in entheses and lead all together to ankylosis and functional disability. Several factors probably play a role in the pathogenesis of bone formation in entheses including not only cytokines but also several systemic factors such as adipokines and gut hormones, and local factors, such as BMP and Wnt signaling, as well as angiogenesis and mechanical stress. Data available about pathophysiology of new bone formation in spondyloarthritis are limited and often conflicting and future studies are needed to better delineate it and to develop new therapeutic approaches.

  20. Effect of storage media on human periodontal ligament cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamorro, Mónica M; Regan, John D; Opperman, Lynne A; Kramer, Phillip R

    2008-02-01

    The ability of storage media to preserve periodontal ligament (PDL) cell vitality has been previously evaluated. However, the mechanisms by which different storage conditions alter the functional status of PDL cells have not been determined. The purpose of the present study was to investigate, in vitro, the level of programed cell death or apoptosis in a population of PDL cells following storage under different conditions. Primary human PDL cells were plated into 24-well-culture plates and allowed to attach for 24 h. Cells were then exposed for 1 h to milk, Hank's balanced salt solution (HBSS), Soft Wear contact lens solution or Gatorade at room temperature or on ice. Culture medium was used as a negative control. Apoptosis was evaluated at 24, 48, and 72 h after treatment on quadruplicate samples by using the ST 160 ApopTag Fluorescein Direct In Situ Detection Kit. The total number of cells and the total number of apoptotic cells were counted. The results indicated that at 24 and 72 h, PDL treated with Gatorade and the contact lens solution displayed the highest percentages of apoptotic cells when compared with the other treatment groups at room temperature. Overall, cells treated on ice showed significantly lower levels of apoptosis when compared with treatments at room temperature. In conclusion, the results indicated that apoptosis plays a major role in cell death in cells treated with Gatorade and contact lens solutions in comparison to other storage solutions and that storage on ice can inhibit programed cell death.

  1. Dynamic knee joint mechanics after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Sarah B; Kenny, Ian C; Harrison, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    There is scarcity of information on the long-term adaptations in lower limb biomechanics during game-specific movements after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Particularly, variables such as knee abduction moments and transverse plane knee motion have not been studied during a game-specific landing and cutting task after ACL reconstruction. The purpose of this study was to compare the hip and knee mechanics between the ACL-reconstructed (ACLr) group and a healthy control group. Thirty-eight reconstructed athletes (18 ACLr, 18 control) participated in the study. Three-dimensional hip, knee, and ankle angles were calculated during a maximal drop jump land from a 0.30-m box and unanticipated cutting task at 45°. During the landing phase, ACLr participants had increased hip flexion (P knee range of motion (P = 0.027). During the cutting phase, the ACLr participant's previously injured limb had increased internal knee abduction moment compared with that of the control group (P = 0.032). No significant differences were reported between the previously injured and contralateral uninjured limb. Previously injured participants demonstrated higher knee abduction moment and transverse plane range of motion when compared with those of control participants during a game-specific landing and cutting task.

  2. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction failure after tibial shaft malunion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaFrance, Russell M; Gorczyca, John T; Maloney, Michael D

    2012-02-17

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is common, with >100,000 procedures performed each year in the United States. Several factors are associated with failure, including poor surgical technique, graft incorporation failure, overly aggressive rehabilitation, and trauma. Tibial shaft fracture is also common and frequently requires operative intervention. Failure to reestablish the anatomic alignment of the tibia may cause abnormal forces across adjacent joints, which can cause degenerative joint disease or attritional failure of the surrounding soft tissues. This article describes a case of ACL reconstruction failure after a tibial fracture that resulted in malunion. Excessive force across the graft from lower-extremity malalignment and improper tunnel placement likely contributed to the attritional failure of the graft. This patient required a staged procedure for corrective tibial osteotomy followed by revision ACL reconstruction. This article describes ACL reconstruction failure, tibial shaft malunions, their respective treatments, the technical details of each procedure, and the technical aspects that must be considered when these procedures are done in a staged manner by 2 surgeons.

  3. An Isolated Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction with Patellar Tendon Autograft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dariusz Witoński

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the results of the medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction with a medial strip of patellar tendon autograft after a minimum 2-year followup. Ten patients (10 knees were operated on by one surgeon, according to the modified technique, described by Camanho, without any bone plug at free graft end. The mean age of the patients was 27.2 years (ranging from 18 to 42 years. The mean follow-up period was 3 years and 7 months. All patients were reviewed prospectively. At the last follow-up visit, all the patients demonstrated a significant improvement in terms of patellofemoral joint stability, all aspects of the KOOS questionnaire, and Kujala et al.’s score (59.7 points preoperatively and 84.4 points at the last followup. No patient revealed recurrent dislocation. The SF-36 score revealed a significant improvement in bodily pain, general health, physical role functioning, social role functioning, and physical functioning domains. The described MPFL reconstruction with the use of the medial 1/3rd of patella tendon is an effective procedure that gives satisfactorily patellofemoral joint functions, improves the quality of life, and provides much pain relief. It is relatively simple, surgically not extensive, and economically cost-effective procedure.

  4. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in patients older than 35 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sallakh, Sameh; Pastides, Philip; Thomas, Panos

    2014-12-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is an increasingly established method even in patients older than 35 years. Our hypothesis is that functional outcome after ACL reconstruction is comparable in patients younger and older than 35 years. A total of 28 patients (5 women and 23 men) with average age of 41.5 years (36-68) were retrospectively evaluated. The average follow-up period was 33 months. All of them were treated operatively with arthroscopic single-bundle four-strand hamstring tendon autograft. The functional outcome was determined by clinical scores (Tegner activity scale and Lysholm knee score). The median values for the Lysholm knee score were preoperatively 77 and postoperatively 96 points (range, 90-100) with significant improvement (p pre- and postoperatively with an overall return to baseline for all patients. No significant correlation between functional outcome and patients' age was present and no reported significant complications. The good results and a high level of patient satisfaction show that ACL reconstruction is justified even in patients (older than 35 years) with symptomatic anterior knee instability. We commonly propose surgical treatment in symptomatic patients who express the need to restore their preinjury activity levels, regardless of their age.

  5. Displaced anterior cruciate ligament avulsion fractures: Arthroscopic staple fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S R Sundararajan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL avulsion fracture is commonly associated with knee injuries and its management is controversial ranging from conservative treatment to arthroscopic fixation. The aim of our study was to assess the clinical and radiological results of arthroscopic staple fixation in the management of ACL avulsion fractures. Materials and Methods: Twenty-two patients (17 males and 5 females who underwent arthroscopic staple fixation for displaced ACL avulsion fractures were analysed. The mean age was 32.2 years (15-55 years with a mean followup of 21 months (6-36 months. All patients were assessed clinically by calculating their Lysholm and International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC scores and the radiological union was assessed in the followup radiographs. Results: The mean Lysholm score was 95.4(83-100 and the mean IKDC score was 91.1(77-100 at the final followup. In 20 patients anterior drawer′s test was negative at the end of final followup while two patients had grade I laxity. Associated knee injuries were found in seven cases. The final outcome was not greatly influenced by the presence of associated injuries when treated simultaneously. At final followup all the patients were able to return to their pre-injury occupation Conclusion: Arthroscopic staple fixation is a safe and reliable method for producing clinical and radiological outcome in displaced ACL avulsion fractures.

  6. Return to sport following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feller, Julian; Webster, Kate E

    2013-02-01

    Rates of return to pre-injury sport following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction are less than might be expected from standard outcome measures and there appears to be a rapid decline in sporting participation after two to three years. There are many factors that influence whether an individual will return to sport following this type of surgery. They include not only surgical details and rehabilitation, but also social and psychological factors, as well as demographic characteristics. Age is of particular importance with older patients being less likely to resume their pre-injury sport. It is important that future research clearly identify the pre-injury characteristics of the study cohort when investigating return to sport, and also that there is consistent and precise terminology used to report rates of return to sporting activities. Little is known about how to determine when it is safe to return to sport following ACL reconstruction or how to predict whether an athlete will be able to successfully return to sport. Finally, it needs to be recognised that return to sport following ACL reconstruction is associated with a risk of further injury and the development of osteoarthritis.

  7. Anatomical Characteristics and Biomechanical Properties of the Oblique Popliteal Ligament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiang-Dong; Yu, Jin-Hui; Zou, Tao; Wang, Wei; LaPrade, Robert F.; Huang, Wei; Sun, Shan-Quan

    2017-01-01

    This anatomical study sought to investigate the morphological characteristics and biomechanical properties of the oblique popliteal ligament (OPL). Embalmed cadaveric knees were used for the study. The OPL and its surrounding structures were dissected; its morphology was carefully observed, analyzed and measured; its biomechanical properties were investigated. The origins and insertions of the OPL were relatively similar, but its overall shape was variable. The OPL had two origins: one originated from the posterior surface of the posteromedial tibia condyle, merged with fibers from the semimembranosus tendon, the other originated from the posteromedial part of the capsule. The two origins converged and coursed superolaterally, then attached to the fabella or to the tendon of the lateral head of the gastrocnemius and blended with the posterolateral joint capsule. The OPL was classified into Band-shaped, Y-shaped, Z-shaped, Trident-shaped, and Complex-shaped configurations. The mean length, width, and thickness of the OPL were 39.54, 22.59, and 1.44 mm, respectively. When an external rotation torque (18 N·m) was applied both before and after the OPL was sectioned, external rotation increased by 8.4° (P = 0.0043) on average. The OPL was found to have a significant role in preventing excessive external rotation and hyperextension of the knee. PMID:28205540

  8. Capturing the Regenerative Potential of Periodontal Ligament Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Springstead Scanlon

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The cell population within the periodontal ligament (PDL tissue is remarkably heterogeneous1. Fibroblasts, a mixed population of cells, are the main cellular component of the PDL and the cell type most often studied for periodontal regeneration. Osteoblasts and osteoclasts are found on the bone side, while fibroblasts, macrophages, undifferentiated adult/mesenchymal stem cells, neural elements, and endothelial cells are found throughout the PDL. Epithelial rests of Malassez cells and cementoblasts are focused near the root surface. PDL tissue also includes loose connective tissue between dense fiber bundles that contain branches of the periodontal blood vessels and nerves2. The complexity of the PDL tissue, with its various cell types and cell progenitor components, explains the challenges involved in therapies to restore tissue following periodontal disease. Cementoblasts, osteoblasts, and endothelial cells must migrate, differentiate, and coordinately interact with a variety of soluble mediators to regenerate the periodontium3. Stem cells located in the PDL tissue are key contributors to this process4. Stem cells in the PDL are important not only for formation and maintenance of the tissue but also for repair, remodeling, and regeneration of adjacent alveolar bone and cementum5. Our laboratory has shown that progenitor cells isolated from PDL tissue by selection with cell surface markers STRO-1+ and CD146+ are capable of differentiating into chondrogenic, osteogenic, and adipogenic phenotypes under appropriate culture conditions6.

  9. Limited oblique corpectomy for treatment of ossified posterior longitudinal ligament

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goel A

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We present our experience with treating four cases with ossified posterior longitudinal ligaments (OPLL causing cervical cord compression by limited oblique and strategic corpectomy. Materials and results: Four patients with cervical OPLL were treated by the discussed technique during the period of October 2000 to January 2005. The ages of the patients ranged from 46 to 72 years. All patients presented with symptoms of progressively increasing myelopathy. Two patients had four level OPLL and two patients had two level OPLL. Surgery involved anterior cervical exposure and partial oblique corpectomy, which was essentially an extended midline and lateral undercutting of the body. The procedure provided a wide exposure for resection of the OPLL. No metal instrumentation or any other kind of fixation procedure was simultaneously carried out and there was no need for postoperative cervical immobilization. During the period of follow up that ranged from 6 month to 5 years (mean: 33 months all the four patients have shown sustained clinical improvement. Neuroimaging studies confirmed satisfactory anatomical cervical cord decompression in all patients. Conclusions: The technique of oblique and strategic corpectomy provided a wide exposure for resection of the OPLL and preserved the stability of the region.

  10. Mucoid degeneration of the anterior cruciate ligament: Management and outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Pandey

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mucoid degeneration (MD is a rare pathological affection of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL. Mucinous material within the substance of ACL produces pain and limited motion in the knee. This series describes the clinicoradiological presentation of patients with mucoid ACL, partial arthroscopic debridement of ACL and outcomes. Materials and Methods: During a period of 3 years, 11 patients were included based upon the clinical suspicion, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI findings, arthroscopic features and histopathologic confirmation of MD of ACL. Result: Six patients were male and five were female with median age of 40 years (range 21-59 years. All patients complained of knee pain with median duration of 5 months (range 1-24 months. All patients had painful deep flexion with 63.6% (N = 7 reporting trivial trauma before the onset of symptoms. MRI revealed MD of ACL in all with associated cyst in three patients. Partial debridement of ACL was done in ten and complete in one patient. None of them required notchplasty. Histopathology confirmed the diagnosis in all of them. At the mean followup of 13.81 months (range 6-28 months, all patients regained complete flexion and none complained of instability. Conclusion: Prior knowledge of condition with high index of suspicion and careful interpretation of MRI can establish the diagnosis preoperatively. It responds well to partial debridement of ACL and mucinous material without development of instability.

  11. Complications of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papakonstantinou, Olympia; Chung, Christine B.; Chanchairujira, Kullanuch; Resnick, Donald L. [Department of Radiology, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, University of California, 3350 La Jolla Village Dr., San Diego, CA 92161 (United States)

    2003-05-01

    Arthroscopic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) using autografts or allografts is being performed with increasing frequency, particularly in young athletes. Although the procedure is generally well tolerated, with good success rates, early and late complications have been documented. As clinical manifestations of graft complications are often non-specific and plain radiographs cannot directly visualize the graft and the adjacent soft tissues, MR imaging has a definite role in the diagnosis of complications after ACL reconstruction and may direct subsequent therapeutic management. Our purpose is to review the normal MR imaging of the ACL graft and present the MR imaging findings of a wide spectrum of complications after ACL reconstruction, such as graft impingement, graft rupture, cystic degeneration of the graft, postoperative infection of the knee, diffuse and localized (i.e., cyclops lesion) arthrofibrosis, and associated donor site abnormalities. Awareness of the MR imaging findings of complications as well as the normal appearances of the normal ACL graft is essential for correct interpretation. (orig.)

  12. Partial tearing of the anterior cruciate ligament: diagnosis and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Frois Temponi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Partial tears of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL are common and represent 10-27% of the total. The main reasons for attending to cases of non-torn bundles are biomechanical, vascular and proprioceptive. Continued presence of the bundle also serves as protection during the healing process. There is controversy regarding the definition of these injuries, which is based on anatomy, clinical examination, translation measurements, imaging examinations and arthroscopy. The way in which it is treated will depend on the existing laxity and instability. Conservative treatment is optional for cases without instability, with a focus on motor rehabilitation. Surgical treatment is a challenge, since it requires correct positioning of the bone tunnels and conservation of the remnants of the torn bundle. The pivot shift test under anesthesia, the magnetic resonance findings, the previous level and type of sports activity and the arthroscopic appearance and mechanical properties of the remnants will aid the orthopedist in the decision-making process between conservative treatment, surgical treatment with strengthening of the native ACL (selective reconstruction and classical (anatomical reconstruction.

  13. Clinical outcome of primary medial collateral ligament-posteromedial corner repair with or without staged anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Vivek; Khanna, Vikrant; Madi, Sandesh; Tripathi, Anshul; Acharya, Kiran

    2017-06-01

    Medial collateral ligament (MCL) is a prime valgus stabilizer of the knee, and MCL tears are currently managed conservatively. However, posteromedial corner (PMC) injury along with MCL tear is not same as isolated MCL tear and the former is more serious injury and requires operative attention. However, literature is scarce about the management and outcome of PMC-MCL tear alongside anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear. The purpose of this study is to report the clinical outcome of primary repair of MCL and PMC with or without staged ACL reconstruction. A retrospective evaluation was performed on patients with MCL-PMC complex injury with ACL tear who underwent primary repair of MCL-PMC tear followed by rehabilitation. Further, several of them chose to undergo ACL reconstruction whereas rest opted conservative treatment for the ACL tear. A total of 35 patients of two groups [Group 1 (n=15): MCL-PMC repaired and ACL conserved; Group 2 (n=20): MCL-PMC repaired and ACL reconstructed] met the inclusion criteria with a minimum follow-up of two years. Clinical outcome measures included grade of valgus medial opening (0° extension and 30° flexion), Lysholm and International knee documentation committee (IKDC) scores, KT-1000 measurement, subjective feeling of instability, range of motion (ROM) assessment and complications. While comparing group 2 versus group 1, mean Lysholm (94.6 vs. 91.06; p=0.017) and IKDC scores (86.3 vs. 77.6; p=0.011) of group 2 were significantly higher than group 1. 60% patients of group 1 complained of instability against none in the group 2 (p<0.0001). All the knees of both the groups were valgus stable with none requiring late reconstruction. The mean loss of flexion ROM in group 1 and 2 was 12° and 9° respectively which was not statistically different (p=0.41). However while considering the loss of motion, two groups did not show any significant difference in clinical scores. Primary MCL-PMC repair renders the knee stable in coronal plane in

  14. Technology Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nanette R.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this summer's work was to attempt to enhance Technology Application Group (TAG) ability to measure the outcomes of its efforts to transfer NASA technology. By reviewing existing literature, by explaining the economic principles involved in evaluating the economic impact of technology transfer, and by investigating the LaRC processes our William & Mary team has been able to lead this important discussion. In reviewing the existing literature, we identified many of the metrics that are currently being used in the area of technology transfer. Learning about the LaRC technology transfer processes and the metrics currently used to track the transfer process enabled us to compare other R&D facilities to LaRC. We discuss and diagram impacts of technology transfer in the short run and the long run. Significantly, it serves as the basis for analysis and provides guidance in thinking about what the measurement objectives ought to be. By focusing on the SBIR Program, valuable information regarding the strengths and weaknesses of this LaRC program are to be gained. A survey was developed to ask probing questions regarding SBIR contractors' experience with the program. Specifically we are interested in finding out whether the SBIR Program is accomplishing its mission, if the SBIR companies are providing the needed innovations specified by NASA and to what extent those innovations have led to commercial success. We also developed a survey to ask COTR's, who are NASA employees acting as technical advisors to the SBIR contractors, the same type of questions, evaluating the successes and problems with the SBIR Program as they see it. This survey was developed to be implemented interactively on computer. It is our hope that the statistical and econometric studies that can be done on the data collected from all of these sources will provide insight regarding the direction to take in developing systematic evaluations of programs like the SBIR Program so that they can

  15. Visibility of Anterolateral Ligament Tears in Anterior Cruciate Ligament-Deficient Knees With Standard 1.5-Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartigan, David E; Carroll, Kevin W; Kosarek, Frank J; Piasecki, Dana P; Fleischli, James F; D'Alessandro, Donald F

    2016-10-01

    To attempt to visualize the ligament with standard 1.5-tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-torn knee, and if it is visible, attempt to characterize it as torn or intact at its femoral, meniscal, and tibial attachment sites. This was a retrospective MRI study based on arthroscopic findings of a known ACL tear in 72 patients between the years 2006 and 2010. Patients all had hamstring ACL reconstructions, no concomitant lateral collateral ligament, or posterolateral corner injury based on imaging and physical examination, and had a preoperative 1.5-tesla MRI scan with standard sequences performed within 3 weeks of the injury. Two fellowship-trained musculoskeletal radiologists retrospectively reviewed the preoperative MRI for visualization of the anterolateral ligament (ALL) for concomitant tears. Inter- and intraobserver reliability was calculated. Learning effect was analyzed to determine if radiologists' agreement improved as reads progressed. Both radiologists were able to visualize the ALL in 100% of the scans. Overall, ALL tears were noted in 26% by radiologist 1 and in 62% by radiologist 2. The agreement between the ligament being torn or not had a kappa of 0.54 between radiologists. The agreements in torn or not torn between radiologists in the femoral, meniscal, and tibial sites were 0.14, 0.15, and 0.31. The intraobserver reliability by radiologist 1 for femoral, meniscal, and tibial tears was 0.04, 0.57, and 0.54 respectively. For radiologist 2, they were 0.75, 0.61, and 0.55. There was no learning effect noted. ALL tears are currently unable to be reliably identified as torn or intact on standard 1.5-tesla MRI sequences. Proper imaging sequences are of crucial importance to reliably follow these tears to determine their clinical significance. Level IV, therapeutic case series study. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING EVALUATION OF LIGAMENTOUS TEARS OF THE KNEE JOINT AND ASSOCIATION OF MENISCAL TEARS WITH ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT TEARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bommandapalli Madhaiah

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Anterior cruciate ligament tears are most commonly sustained sports injury, often occurring in association with meniscal tears and trauma to other ligamentous structures around the knee. Magnetic resonance imaging is vital in assessing acute knee injuries and plays an important role in deciding treatment options and planning surgical intervention. Magnetic Resonance (MR imaging has emerged as investigation of choice to evaluate the status of the ACL and other associated structures in the knee. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES The purpose of this study is to determine the association of subtle meniscal injury in the presence of anterior cruciate ligament injury and other associated pathology on MR imaging. MATERIAL AND METHODS A prospective cross-sectional case study done on 40 patients including both the sexes in age group of 15 to 35 years presenting with knee joint injuries and subsequently underwent MRI of the knee joint. The data was analysed and the findings on MRI were correlated with that of arthroscopy and/or operative findings. RESULTS The commonest soft tissue injury identified on MRI of the knee joint was ACL injury and it was associated with injuries of medial meniscus followed by of lateral meniscus, medial collateral ligament and lateral collateral ligament. CONCLUSION MRI is an excellent, non-invasive, radiation free imaging modality with multiplanar capabilities and excellent soft tissue delineation. It can accurately detect, localize and characterize various internal derangements of the knee joint and help in arriving at a correct anatomical diagnosis, thereby guiding further management of the patient. Medial meniscal tears were more commonly associated with ACL tear. Various patterns of meniscal injuries were identified in this study, out of which bucket handle pattern was more common among medial meniscal tears and radial pattern was common in the lateral meniscal injuries. Radiologists while interpreting MR studies of knee injuries

  17. Blastocyst Transfer

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2014-01-01

    ### Method: Blastocyst transfer is usually performed 24 hours after aggregation when the morulae have become expanded blastocysts and on the same day as injection. A little time is given between injection and transfer to allow blastocysts to re-expand. **The Recipient** Careful selection of the recipient is most important as the pups are the end result of a lot of hard work. Two strains of mice are used:RB Swiss and (CBA*C57BL6/J)f1. RB Swiss are quiet and make excellent mothers ...

  18. Heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Holman, J P

    2010-01-01

    As one of the most popular heat transfer texts, Jack Holman's "Heat Transfer" is noted for its clarity, accessible approach, and inclusion of many examples and problem sets. The new tenth edition retains the straight-forward, to-the-point writing style while covering both analytical and empirical approaches to the subject. Throughout the book, emphasis is placed on physical understanding while, at the same time, relying on meaningful experimental data in those situations that do not permit a simple analytical solution. New examples and templates provide students with updated resources for computer-numerical solutions.

  19. Delineation of alar ligament morphology: comparison of magnetic resonance imaging at 1.5 and 3 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Peter; Mayer, Thomas E; Drescher, Robert

    2012-11-01

    Rupture of the alar and transverse ligaments due to whiplash injury can lead to upper cervical spine instability and subsequent neurological deterioration. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the normal anatomical variability of the alar ligaments in asymptomatic individuals with 3-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to compare the findings with standard 1.5-T examinations. Thirty-six participants underwent 3-T and 1.5-T MRIs. Magnetic resonance imaging findings were analyzed by classifying the alar ligaments with regard to the features detectability, signal intensity compared with muscle tissue, homogeneity, shape, spatial orientation, and symmetry. Delineation of the alar ligaments was significantly better on 3-T images, which were subjectively preferred for evaluation. The alar ligaments showed great variability. In the majority of participants, the alar ligaments were hypointense to muscle tissue, inhomogeneous, and different in shape and orientation. A statistically significantly higher number of ligaments appeared symmetric on 3-T imaging, indicating that 1.5-T imaging may underestimate the proportion of patients with normal, symmetric ligaments. This study demonstrates that high-field 3-T MRI provides better visualization of the alar ligaments compared with 1.5-T MRI. The higher signal-to-noise ratio allows detection of small signal changes. A great interindividual variety of the MRI morphology of the alar ligaments was found in participants with no history of neck trauma. Further studies with more participants are necessary to evaluate alar ligament pathologies in patients with a history of whiplash injury. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging signal changes of alar and transverse ligaments not correlated with whiplash-associated disorders: A meta-analysis of case–control studies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, Quan; Shen, Hongxing; Li, Ming

    2013-01-01

    .... In recent years, with development of more detailed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, morphologic changes of the ligaments and membranes in the craniocervical junction, especially alar and transverse ligaments have been discussed...

  1. An anatomic arthroscopic description of the hip capsular ligaments for the hip arthroscopist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telleria, Jessica J M; Lindsey, Derek P; Giori, Nicholas J; Safran, Marc R

    2011-05-01

    To examine and describe the normal anatomic intra-articular locations of the hip capsular ligaments in the central and peripheral compartments of the hip joint. Eight paired fresh-frozen human cadaveric hips (mean age, 73.3 years) were carefully dissected free of soft tissue to expose the hip capsule. Needles were placed through the capsule along the macroscopic borders of the hip capsular ligaments. Arthroscopy was performed on each hip, and the relations of the needles, and thus the ligaments, to the arthroscopic portals and other soft-tissue and osseous landmarks in the hip were recorded by use of a clock-face reference system. The iliofemoral ligament (ILFL) ran from 12:45 to 3 o'clock. The ILFL was pierced by the anterolateral and anterior portals just within its lateral and medial borders, respectively. The pubofemoral ligament was located from the 3:30 to the 5:30 clock position; the lateral border was at the psoas-U perimeter, and the medial border was at the junction of the anteroinferior acetabulum and the cotyloid fossa. The ischiofemoral ligament (ISFL) ran from the 7:45 to the 10:30 clock position. The posterolateral portal pierced the ISFL just inside its superior/lateral border, and the inferior/lateral border was located at the posteroinferior acetabulum. In the peripheral compartment the lateral ILFL and superior/lateral ISFL borders were in proximity to the lateral synovial fold. The medial ILFL and lateral pubofemoral ligament borders were closely approximated to the medial synovial fold. The hip capsular ligaments have distinct and consistent arthroscopic locations within the hip joint and are associated with clearly identifiable landmarks in the central and peripheral compartments. The standard hip arthroscopy portals are closely related to the borders of the hip capsular ligaments. These findings will help orthopaedic surgeons know which structures are being addressed during arthroscopic surgery and may help in the development of future hip

  2. Ultrasound of the elbow with emphasis on detailed assessment of ligaments, tendons, and nerves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Maeseneer, Michel, E-mail: Michel.demaeseneer@uzbrussel.be [Department of Radiology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Brigido, Monica Kalume, E-mail: Mbrigido@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Antic, Marijana, E-mail: Misscroa@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Lenchik, Leon, E-mail: Llenchik@wakehealth.edu [Department of Radiology, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Milants, Annemieke, E-mail: Annemieke.Milants@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Vereecke, Evie, E-mail: Evie.Vereecke@kuleuven-kulak.be [Department of Anatomy, KULAK, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Campus Kortrijk, Kortrijk (Belgium); Jager, Tjeerd [Aalsters Stedelijk Ziekenhuis, Aalst (Belgium); Shahabpour, Maryam, E-mail: Maryam.Shahabpour@uzbrussel.be [Department of Radiology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Brussels (Belgium)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: •Medial and lateral tendons: the different muscles forming these tendons can be followed up to the insertion. The imaging anatomy is reviewed. •Medial and lateral ligaments: the anatomy is complex and specialized imaging planes and arm positions are necessary for accurate assessment. •Biceps tendon: the anatomy of the distal biceps and lacertus fibrosus are discussed and illustrated with cadaveric correlation. •US imaging of the nerves about the elbow and visualization of the possible compression points is discussed. -- Abstract: The high resolution and dynamic capability of ultrasound make it an excellent tool for assessment of superficial structures. The ligaments, tendons, and nerves about the elbow can be fully evaluated with ultrasound. The medial collateral ligament consists of an anterior and posterior band that can easily be identified. The lateral ligament complex consists of the radial collateral ligament, ulnar insertion of the annular ligament, and lateral ulnar collateral ligament, easily identified with specialized probe positioning. The lateral ulnar collateral ligament can best be seen in the cobra position. On ultrasound medial elbow tendons can be followed nearly up to their common insertion. The pronator teres, flexor carpi radialis, palmaris longus, and flexor digitorum superficialis can be identified. The laterally located brachioradialis and extensor carpi radialis longus insert on the supracondylar ridge. The other lateral tendons can be followed up to their common insertion on the lateral epicondyle. The extensor digitorum, extensor carpi radialis brevis, extensor digiti minimi, and extensor carpi ulnaris can be differentiated. The distal biceps tendon is commonly bifid. For a complete assessment of the distal biceps tendon specialized views are necessary. These include an anterior axial approach, medial and lateral approach, and cobra position. In the cubital tunnel the ulnar nerve is covered by the ligament of Osborne

  3. A geometrical model of vertical translation and alar ligament tension in atlanto-axial rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boszczyk, B M; Littlewood, A P; Putz, R

    2012-08-01

    While allowing the greatest range of axial rotation of the entire spine with 40° to each side, gradual restraint at the extremes of motion by the alar ligaments is of vital importance. In order for the ligaments to facilitate a gradual transition from the neutral to the elastic zone, a complex interaction of axial rotation and vertical translation via the biconvex articular surfaces is essential. The aim of this investigation is to establish a geometrical model of the intricate interaction of the alar ligaments and vertical translatory motion of C1/C2 in axial rotation. Bilateral alar ligaments including the odontoid process and condylar bony entheses were removed from six adult cadavers aged 65-89 years within 48 h of death. All specimens were judged to be free of abnormalities with the exception of non-specific degenerative changes. Dimensions of the odontoid process and alar ligaments were measured. Graphical multiplanar reconstruction of atlanto-axial rotation was done in the transverse and frontal planes for the neutral position and for rotation to 40° with vertical translation of 3 mm. The necessary fibre elongation of the alar ligaments in the setting with and without vertical translation of the atlas was calculated. The mean diameter of the odontoid process in the sagittal plane was 10.6 mm (SD 1.1). The longest fibre length was measured from the posterior border of the odontoid enthesis to the posterior border of the condylar enthesis with an average of 13.2 mm (SD 2.5) and the shortest between the lateral (anterior) border odontoid enthesis and the anterior condylar enthesis with an average of 8.2 mm (SD 2.2). In graphical multiplanar reconstruction of atlanto-axial rotation to 40° without vertical translation of C1/C2, theoretical alar fibre elongation reaches 27.1% for the longest fibres, which is incompatible with the collagenous structure of the alar ligaments. Allowing 3 mm caudal translation of C1 on C2 at 40° rotation, as facilitated by the

  4. Transforaminal ligament may play a role in lumbar nerve root compression of foraminal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yu; Qin, An; Zheng, Ming H

    2011-12-01

    Lumbar foraminal stenosis is a common pathological change, and lumbar nerve root compression in stenotic foramina was recently considered as one of the main causes of low back pain and leg pain. However, the exact mechanism of lumbar nerve root compression in foramina is still not clear. Previous studies indicated that loss of the intervertebral disc height could reduce the cross-sectional area of lumbar foramina, while lumbar nerve root compression by boundaries of foramina has not been observed in experimental reduction of the intervertebral disc height. Given the close anatomic relationship between transforaminal ligaments and lumbar nerve roots, we hypothesize that transforaminal ligament can be the leading cause of lumbar nerve root compression in foraminal stenosis. We also propose that there are two possible mechanisms of lumbar nerve root compression by transforaminal ligaments: (1) nerve roots are compressed by the transforaminal ligament which moves downward with the loss of the intervertebral disc height; (2) pathological transforaminal ligaments increase the risk of nerve root compression in foramina.

  5. Morphometric analysis of the patella and patellar ligament of South Africans of European ancestry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oladiran I. Olateju

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Morphometric analyses of the patella and patellar ligament have been reported to be important in human identification, in knee implant design and in certain surgical procedures of the knee. It has also been shown that success in the functionality of a knee arthroplasty (knee replacement is dependent on the implant being of an appropriate dimension. We undertook this study because of the lack of available data on these dimensions in South Africans. Careful dissection was carried out on both knees of 46 South African cadavers (25 females and 21 males of European ancestry. The quadriceps femoris tendon and patellar ligament were carefully freed from the underlying structures. Eight measurements of the patella and patellar ligament were taken using a Vernier caliper. Patellae were also classified based on the dimensions of the articular facets. No significant difference was found when the measurements taken from both knees were compared except for the dimensions of patella thickness and widths. Dimensions of the patella, patellar ligament and articular facets are sexually dimorphic. In addition, measurements of the patella and patellar ligament showed significant positive correlations, with Type B patellae being the most prevalent in South Africans of European ancestry. The data from the present study will be beneficial in clinical and pathological practices and for local anthropological records.

  6. Challenges in using compliant ligaments for position estimation within robotic joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Felix; Gao, Lei; Ellison, Peter; Vaidyanathan, Ravi

    2017-07-01

    The mechanical advantages of bio-inspired condylar robotic knee joints for use in prosthetics or rehabilitation has been argued extensively in literature. A common limitation of these designs is the difficulty of estimating joint angle and therefore accurately controlling the joint. Furthermore, the potential role of ligament-like structures in robotic knees is not very well established. In this work, we investigate the role of compliant stretch sensing ligaments and their integration into a condylar robotic knee. Simulations and experiments are executed out in order to establish whether measurement of stretch in these structures can be used to produce a new feedback controller for joint position. We report results from a computer model, as well as the design and construction of a robotic knee that show, for a chosen condyle shape, ligament stretch is a function of muscle force and joint velocity as well as joint angle. We have developed a genetic algorithm optimised controller incorporating ligament feedback that demonstrates improved performance for a desired joint angle in response to step inputs. The controller showed marginal improvement in response to a cyclic command signal and further investigation is required in order to use these measurements in robust control, nevertheless we believe these results demonstrate the that ligament-like structures have the potential to improve the performance of robotic knees for prosthetics and rehabilitation devices.

  7. Accessory atlantoaxial ligament avulsion fracture of the axis: Are there any clinical implications?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Reza Niknejad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Injuries to the craniocervical support structures are frequently observed in neurotrauma cases. Stability of this region is of vital importance. Literature has mainly focused on three major ligaments of the craniocervical junction: The tectorial membrane, the transverse ligament, and the alar ligaments. However, the accessory atlantoaxial ligament (ALL also seems to be involved in craniocervical stability as shown in cadaveric specimens. Still, the biomechanical importance of this structure needs to be determined, especially in trauma settings. Here, we describe a case of isolated traumatic injury to this structure and discuss the clinical outcome. A 64 year old polytrauma patient with a remarkable avulsion fracture at the site of the insertion of the ALL was admitted to our center. We evaluated the patient both clinical and radiological at admission, after 3 months and after 1 year. We clinically assessed the upper cervical rotational stability using the cervical flexion rotation test. We observed no rotational instability or any other clinical repercussions at the long term after an isolated ALL injury. This case shows that isolated traumatic damage to the ALL is possible. Unilateral damage to the ALL probably does not cause rotational instability of the craniocervical junction. In case a similar avulsion fracture is observed, we recommend performing a magnetic resonance imaging of the craniovertebral region to assess for any ligamentous lesions.

  8. Dental trauma involving root fracture and periodontal ligament injury: a 10-year retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sônia Regina Panzarini

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this retrospective study was to analyze the cases of traumatic dental injuries involving root fracture and/or periodontal ligament injury (except avulsion treated at the Discipline of Integrated Clinic, School of Dentistry of Araçatuba, São Paulo State University (UNESP, Brazil, from January 1992 to December 2002. Clinical and radiographic records from 161 patients with 287 traumatized teeth that had sustained root fracture and/or injuries to the periodontal ligament were examined. The results of this survey revealed that subluxation (25.09% was the most common type of periodontal ligament injury, followed by extrusive luxation (19.86%. There was a predominance of young male patients and most of them did not present systemic alterations. Among the etiologic factors, the most frequent causes were falls and bicycle accidents. Injuries on extraoral soft tissues were mostly laceration and abrasion, while gingival and lip mucosa lacerations prevailed on intraoral soft tissues injuries. Radiographically, the most common finding was an increase of the periodontal ligament space. The most commonly performed treatment was root canal therapy. Within the limits of this study, it can be concluded that traumatic dental injuries occur more frequently in young male individuals, due to falls and bicycle accidents. Subluxation was the most common type of periodontal ligament injury. Root canal therapy was the type of treatment most commonly planned and performed.

  9. Specialized core stability exercise: a neglected component of anterior cruciate ligament rehabilitation programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Dong-liang; Li, Jing-long; Zhai, Hua; Wang, Hui-fang; Meng, Han; Wang, Yu-bin

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of anterior cruciate ligament injury has continued to increase over the last two decades. This injury is associated with abnormal gait patterns and osteoarthritis of the knee. In order to accelerate recovery, the introduction of core stability exercises into the rehabilitation program is proposed. The theory underlying the use of core stability exercise relates to the neuroplasticity that follows anterior cruciate ligament injury. Neuroplasticity in lumbar, thoracic, cervical and brain regions diminish activation in the contralateral thalamus, postparietal cortex, SM1, basal ganglia-external globus pallidus, SII, cingulated motor area, premotor cortex, and in the ipsilateral cerebellum and SM1 and increase activation in pre-SMA, SIIp, and pITG, indicating modifications of the CNS. In addition, the neuroplasticity can regulate the movement of trunk muscles, for example, sternocleidomastoid and lower trapezius muscles. Core stability also demonstrates a negative correlation with the incidence of anterior cruciate ligament injury. Therefore, we propose that core stability exercises may improve the rehabilitation of anterior cruciate ligament injuries by increasing core motor control. Specialized core stability exercises aimed at rectifying biomechanical problems associated with gait and core stability may play a key role in the management of anterior cruciate ligament injury.

  10. Knee function after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with patellar or hamstring tendon: a meta-analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Dong-liang; YAO Zhen-jun

    2011-01-01

    Background There is currently no consensus regarding the best graft type for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.Therefore,the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of patellar and hamstring tendon grafts on long-term knee function after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.Methods This meta-analysis was conducted according to the methodological guidelines outlined by the Cochrane Collaboration.An electronic search of the literature was performed and all trials published between January 1966 and August 2011 comparing knee function after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using patellar tendon grafts with knee function after reconstruction with hamstring tendon grafts were pooled.Six studies were included in the final meta-analysis.Results Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using hamstring tendon grafts resulted in greater pain upon kneeling than reconstruction using pateliar tendon grafts (P=0.001).However,both grafts resulted in similar levels of anterior tibial translation,and similar results regarding isokinetic extension/flexion tests,Lysholm scores,and the stair-hop test (P >0.05).Conclusion Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using patellar or hamstring tendon grafts results in similar long-term knee function.

  11. [Uterosacral ligament and hypogastric nerve anatomical relationship. Application to deep endometriotic nodules surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azaïs, H; Collinet, P; Delmas, V; Rubod, C

    2013-03-01

    Endometriosis is a concern for 10 to 15% of women of childbearing age. The uterosacral ligament is the most frequent localization of deep infiltrating endometriosis. Laparoscopic excision of endometriotic nodules may lead to functional consequences due to potential hypogastric nerve lesion. Our aim is to study the anatomical relationship between the hypogastric nerve and the uterosacral ligament in order to reduce the occurrence of such nerve lesions during pelvic surgeries. We based our study on an anatomical and surgical literature review and on the anatomical dissection of a 56-year-old fresh female subject. The hypogastric nerves cross the uterosacral ligament approximately 30mm from the torus. They go through the pararectal space, 20mm below the ureter and join the inferior hypogastric plexus at the level of the intersection between the ureter and the posterior wall of the uterine artery, at approximately 20mm from the torus. No anatomical variation has been described to date in the path of the nerve, but in its presentation which may be polymorphous. Laparoscopy and robot-assisted laparoscopic surgery facilitate the pelvic nerves visualization and are the best approach for uterosacral endometriotic nodule nerve-sparing excision. Precise knowledge by the surgeon of the anatomical relationship between the hypogastric nerve and the uterosacral ligament is essential in order to decrease the risk of complication and postoperative morbidity for patient surgically treated for deep infiltrating endometriosis involving uterosacral ligament.

  12. Minimal effect of patella eversion on ligament balancing in cruciate-retaining total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aunan, Eirik; Kibsgård, Thomas; Röhrl, Stephan M

    2017-03-01

    The effect of patellar eversion on ligament laxity measurements is still unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of patellar eversion on medial and lateral ligament laxity measurements performed intra-operatively in total knee arthroplasty (TKA). A total of 49 knees (27 female) with mean age 70 years (42-83) and mean body mass index of 28.5 were operated consecutively with a cruciate-retaining prosthesis. Medial and lateral ligament laxity in extension and in 90° of flexion was measured with the spatula-method intra-operatively after implantation of the prosthetic components with the patella everted and thereafter with the patella repositioned. The corresponding changes in gap height and inclination were calculated. A statistically significant increase of 0.6 mm (p patella repositioned compared to everted. No differences were found in extension or medially in flexion. Correspondingly, the flexion gap increased by 0.4 mm (p patella was repositioned. Earlier research has shown that ligament laxity must be at least 1-2 mm to cause inferior function after TKA. In the current study, we found that the effect of patellar eversion on ligament laxity measurements is too small to be considered clinically relevant. PROSPECTIVE STUDY EVALUATING THE EFFECT OF PATIENT CHARACTERISTICS: Level II.

  13. Quantitative investigation of ligament strains during physical tests for sacroiliac joint pain using finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoon Hyuk; Yao, Zhidong; Kim, Kyungsoo; Park, Won Man

    2014-06-01

    It may be assumed that the stability is affected when some ligaments are injured or loosened, and this joint instability causes sacroiliac joint pain. Several physical examinations have been used to diagnose sacroiliac pain and to isolate the source of the pain. However, more quantitative and objective information may be necessary to identify unstable or injured ligaments during these tests due to the lack of understanding of the quantitative relationship between the physical tests and the biomechanical parameters that may be related to pains in the sacroiliac joint and the surrounding ligaments. In this study, a three-dimensional finite element model of the sacroiliac joint was developed and the biomechanical conditions for six typical physical tests such as the compression test, distraction test, sacral apex pressure test, thigh thrust test, Patrick's test, and Gaenslen's test were modelled. The sacroiliac joint contact pressure and ligament strain were investigated for each test. The values of contact pressure and the combination of most highly strained ligaments differed markedly among the tests. Therefore, these findings in combination with the physical tests would be helpful to identify the pain source and to understand the pain mechanism. Moreover, the technology provided in this study might be a useful tool to evaluate the physical tests, to improve the present test protocols, or to develop a new physical test protocol.

  14. Can anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction be performed routinely in day clinic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Beule, J; Vandenneucker, H; Claes, S; Bellemans, J

    2014-09-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction is performed as an outpatient procedure in selected cases. Whether it can be safely performed on a routine basis in day clinic remains unclear. Our hypothesis was that routinely performing outpatient anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction would be equally safe as compared to inpatient procedures. A cohort of 355 patients who underwent outpatient primary reconstruction was analysed at an average follow-up of 3.8 years. Four patients (1.1%) could not be discharged or were readmitted within 24 hours. The 1-month readmission rate was 1.4%. The overall complication rate was 12.1% (43 cases) of which 4.2% (15 patients) occurred within the first 30 days. Performing anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions routinely in day clinic is associated with almost negligible readmission rates and has similar complication rates as for standard in-hospital anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions. Outpatient anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions can therefore be safely performed without specific preoperative patient selection protocols.

  15. Multiple risk factors related to familial predisposition to anterior cruciate ligament injury: fraternal twin sisters with anterior cruciate ligament ruptures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewett, T E; Lynch, T R; Myer, G D; Ford, K R; Gwin, R C; Heidt, R S

    2010-09-01

    A multifactorial combination of predictors may increase anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury risk in athletes. The objective of this twin study was to examine these risk factors to identify commonalities in risk factors that predisposed female fraternal twins to ACL injury. Female twins in high-risk sports were prospectively measured prior to an injury for neuromuscular control using three-dimensional motion analysis during landing, hamstrings and quadriceps muscular strength on a dynamometer and joint laxity using a modified Beighton-Horan index and a Compu-KT arthrometer. Intraoperative measures of femoral intercondylar notch width were recorded during ACL reconstruction. Abduction angles were increased at one knee in both of the twin sister athletes relative to uninjured controls at initial contact and at maximum displacement during landing. The twin female athletes that went on to ACL injury also demonstrated decreased peak knee flexion motion at both knees than uninjured females during landing. The twin athletes also had increased joint laxity and decreased hamstrings to quadriceps (H/Q) torque ratios compared to controls. Femoral intercondylar notch widths were also below the control mean in the twin siblings. Prescreened mature female twins that subsequently experienced ACL injury demonstrated multiple potential risk factors including: increased knee abduction angles, decreased knee flexion angles, increased general joint laxity, decreased H/Q ratios and femoral intercondylar notch width.

  16. Transfer Timing

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    sim present Simulation Presentation Interactive Media Element This IME is used in the Computer Communications and Networks class offered in the Graduate School of Operations and Information Sciences. This introductory computer networking course provides the theory and principles of networking and communications protocols. This IME is used to help students understand data transfer options. CS3502 Computer Communications and Networks

  17. Sophisticated transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinhart, T.

    2006-01-01

    On the eve of the Iraq war, fears were expressed in different circles that under the cover of war, Israel may attempt a transfer of Palestinians in the “seam line” area of the northern West Bank (Kalkilya, Tulkarem). Last week, the army produced a scene from this scenario. On April 2 at 3 AM, a larg

  18. “Floating popliteus tendon injury” in a mutiple-ligament knee injury: one case report and arthroscopy-assisted reconstruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jin; FENG Hua; HONG Lei; WANG Xue-song; ZHANG Hui

    2011-01-01

    A patient with both a femoral attachment injury (peel-off injury) and musculotendinous junction avulsion of the popliteus,a so-called “floating popliteus tendon injury”,received arthroscopy-assisted popliteus reconstruction.The injured ligaments were addressed in the same procedure,including mini-open direct repair of the femoral avulsed fibular collateral ligament (FCL),suture repair of the grade 3 medial collateral ligament (MCL),and reconstruction of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL).

  19. The Stress-Strain Data of the Hip Capsule Ligaments Are Gender and Side Independent Suggesting a Smaller Contribution to Passive Stiffness

    OpenAIRE

    Pieroh, Philipp; Schneider, Sebastian; Lingslebe, Uwe; Sichting, Freddy; Wolfskämpf, Thomas; Josten, Christoph; Böhme, Jörg; Hammer, Niels; Steinke, Hanno

    2016-01-01

    Background The ligaments in coherence with the capsule of the hip joint are known to contribute to hip stability. Nevertheless, the contribution of the mechanical properties of the ligaments and gender- or side-specific differences are still not completely clear. To date, comparisons of the hip capsule ligaments to other tissues stabilizing the pelvis and hip joint, e.g. the iliotibial tract, were not performed. Materials & Methods Hip capsule ligaments were obtained from 17 human cadavers (9...

  20. Microscopic analysis of the iliofemoral and ischiofemoral ligaments in the hip joint: collagen fiber direction and crimp distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kaori; Uchiyama, Eiichi; Katayose, Masaki; Fujimiya, Mineko

    2012-03-01

    Since no previous studies have described the functional significance of the iliofemoral and ischiofemoral ligaments on the basis of microscopic analyses, we examined the direction of collagen fiber alignment and crimp distribution of the collagen fibers in sections cut in different directions. Polarized microscopic images of sections along the longitudinal (L) and transverse (T) planes of each ligament were obtained from 20 cadavers (8 males and 12 females, age at death 81.7 ± 9.4 years old). Results showed that the microscopic direction of collagen fibers in the iliofemoral ligament was parallel to the macroscopic direction, suggesting that this ligament may play a part in restricting extension of the hip joint. In contrast, the microscopic direction of collagen fibers in the ischiofemoral ligament was not parallel to the macroscopic direction, suggesting that this ligament may contribute not only to the restriction of medial rotation but also retstriction of flexion of the hip joint. From the low density of the crimp distribution in the L plane, the iliofemoral ligament may contribute to stability of the hip joint in the standing position in the living body. In conclusion, the microscopic observations of the direction of collagen fibers as well as the crimp distribution shown in the present study provide a better understanding of the functional significance of the iliofemoral and ischiofemoral ligaments.

  1. The Impact of the Multicenter Orthopaedic Outcomes Network (MOON) Research on Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction and Orthopaedic Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, T Sean; Parker, Richard D; Patel, Ronak M; Andrish, Jack T; Spindler, Kurt P; Amendola, Annunziata; Brophy, Robert H; Dunn, Warren R; Flanigan, David C; Huston, Laura J; Jones, Morgan H; Kaeding, Christopher C; Marx, Robert G; Matava, Matthew J; McCarty, Eric C; Pedroza, Angela D; Reinke, Emily K; Wolf, Brian R; Wright, Rick W

    2015-03-01

    With an estimated 200,000 anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions performed annually in the United States, there is an emphasis on determining patient-specific information to help educate patients on expected clinically relevant outcomes. The Multicenter Orthopaedic Outcomes Network consortium was created in 2002 to enroll and longitudinally follow a large population cohort of anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions. The study group has enrolled >4,400 anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions from seven institutions to establish the large level I prospective anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction outcomes cohort. The group has become more than a database with information regarding anterior cruciate ligament injuries; it has helped to establish a new benchmark for conducting multicenter, multisurgeon orthopaedic research. The changes in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction practice resulting from the group include the use of autograft for high school, college, and competitive athletes in their primary anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions. Other modifications include treatment options for meniscus and cartilage injuries, as well as lifestyle choices made after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

  2. Generating finite element models of the knee : How accurately can we determine ligament attachment sites from MRI scans?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rachmat, H H; Janssen, D.; Zevenbergen, W J; Verkerke, G J; Diercks, R L; Verdonschot, N

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the intra- and inter-observer variability when determining the insertion and origin sites of knee ligaments on MRI scan images. We collected data of five observers with different backgrounds, who determined the ligament attachment sites in an MRI scan of a right knee of a

  3. Measurement of functional recovery after an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in competitive athletes; development of a measuring method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reininga, I.HF; Lemmink, K.A.P.M.; Krijt, D.I.; Waninge, H.; Diercks, Ron; Stevens, M.

    2005-01-01

    Many athletes with an anterior cruciate ligament tear do not return to their original sport level after reconstruction, in spite of good results on clinical tests. After an anterior cruciate ligament tear, knee joint proprioception is shown to be decreased. This leads to the use of compensatory mech

  4. Comparison of Plain MRI and MR Arthrography in the Evaluation of Lateral Ligamentous Injury of the Ankle Joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Chun Chou

    2006-01-01

    Conclusion: For evaluating ankle disability, using plain MRI alone is not adequate for correctly detecting lateral collateral ligamentous injury of the ankle joint. MR arthrography improves the sensitivity and the accuracy for ATaF and CF ligament injuries. It also helps in assessing coexisting pathologic lesions of ankle joints, especially impingement syndromes and osteochondral lesions, and provides more information for therapeutic decision making.

  5. Trauma resulting in hemarthrosis and long medial collateral ligament desmitis of the tarsocrural joint in a horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokateloff, Nathalie; Carmalt, James; Manning, Stephen

    2011-05-01

    A horse was initially diagnosed with hemarthrosis and desmitis of the long medial collateral ligament of the right tarsus and later developed prominent enthesiophytosis at the site of insertion of the ligament's deep portion. Hemarthrosis due to intra- or peri-articular pathology can cause recurrent lameness, even without evident external trauma.

  6. Anterior cruciate ligament- and hamstring tendon- derived cells: in vitro differential properties of cells involved in ACL reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghebes, C.A.; Kelder, C.; Schot, T.; Renard, A.J.S.; Pakvis, D.F.M.; Fernandes, H.; Saris, Daniël B.F.

    2015-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction involves the replacement of the torn ligament with a new graft, often a hamstring tendon (HT). Described as similar, the ACL and HT have intrinsic differences related to their distinct anatomical locations. From a cellular perspective, identifying

  7. Motives for sports participation as predictions of self-reported outcomes after anterior cruciate ligament injury of the knee

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roessler, K K; Andersen, Tonny Elmose; Lohmander, S

    2015-01-01

    Aim of the study was to access how individual's motives for participation in sports impact on self-reported outcomes 2 years after an anterior cruciate ligament injury. Based on a longitudinal cohort study, this secondary analysis present data from the Knee Anterior Cruciate Ligament, Nonsurgical...

  8. A novel use for suture button suspension: reconstruction of the dorsal ulnar ligament to treat thumb metacarpal dislocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ajul; Martin, Garry; Thomson, James Grant

    2015-01-01

    There are numerous treatment algorithms that have been developed to treat thumb carpometacarpal (CMC) arthritis. A newer treatment option for these patients is CMC stabilization using suture button suspensionplasty. The authors of this case report have extensive experience with the suture-button suspensionplasty using the Mini TightRope CMC technique (Arthrex). We present a novel usage of the suture-button suspensionplasty to reconstruct the dorsal ulnar ligament (in contrast to the usual reconstruction of the volar beak ligament) to treat a patient with persistent thumb metacarpal dislocation at the CMC joint. Two separate patients are presented. One patient demonstrates volar beak ligament instability, and the other demonstrates dorsal ulnar ligament instability. Both patients' demographics and operative indications are described. The operative technique for the novel usage of the suture-button suspensionplasty is described. Operative results of the dorsal ulnar ligament reconstruction are reviewed. After suture-button suspension of the thumb metacarpal to the trapezium, the dorsal ulnar ligament has been reconstructed. The patient demonstrated stability of the thumb CMC joint without dorsal or radial dislocation. The authors of this case report present a novel usage of the suture-button suspensionplasty to treat a patient with proximal thumb metacarpal dislocation at the trapezial-metacarpal interface. This method, in contrast to the referenced method of volar beak ligament reconstruction, allows reconstruction of the dorsal ulnar ligament. This allows stabilization of the joint by preventing dorsal and radial dislocation of the metacarpal.

  9. A review of ultrasonographic methods for the assessment of the anterior cruciate ligament in patients with knee instability – diagnostics using a posterior approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kielar, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    Aim The purpose of the study was to improve the ultrasonographic assessment of the anterior cruciate ligament by an inclusion of a dynamic element. The proposed functional modification aims to restore normal posterior cruciate ligament tension, which is associated with a visible change in the ligament shape. This method reduces the risk of an error resulting from subjectively assessing the shape of the posterior cruciate ligament. It should be also emphasized that the method combined with other ultrasound anterior cruciate ligament assessment techniques helps increase diagnostic accuracy. Methods Ultrasonography is used as an adjunctive technique in the diagnosis of anterior cruciate ligament injury. The paper presents a sonographic technique for the assessment of suspected anterior cruciate ligament insufficiency supplemented by the use of a dynamic examination. This technique can be recommended as an additional procedure in routine ultrasound diagnostics of anterior cruciate ligament injuries. Results Supplementing routine ultrasonography with the dynamic assessment of posterior cruciate ligament shape changes in patients with suspected anterior cruciate ligament injury reduces the risk of subjective errors and increases diagnostic accuracy. This is important especially in cases of minor anterior knee instability and bilateral anterior knee instability. Conclusions An assessment of changes in posterior cruciate ligament using a dynamic ultrasound examination effectively complements routine sonographic diagnostic techniques for anterior cruciate ligament insufficiency. PMID:27679732

  10. An Ecological Study of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction, Part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Timothy M.; Waddington, Gordon; Scarvell, Jennie M.; Ball, Nick; Creer, Rob; Woods, Kevin; Smith, Damian; Adams, Roger

    2017-01-01

    Background: Additional high-quality prospective studies are needed to better define the objective criteria used in relation to return-to-sport decisions after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in active populations. Purpose: To investigate prospectively the relationship between functional performance test results at 24 weeks postoperative and return-to-sport activity (Tegner activity score) at 12 and 24 months, respectively, after synthetic (ligament advanced reinforcement system [LARS]) and autograft (doubled semitendinosus/gracilis [2ST/2GR]) ACL reconstructions. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: A total of 64 patients who underwent ACL reconstruction (32 LARS, 32 2ST/2GR autograft; mean age, 27.9 years; body mass index [BMI], 24.9 kg/m2) were assessed preoperatively and at staged intervals postoperatively up to 24 weeks for isokinetic testing of quadriceps and hamstring average power per repetition at 60 deg/s and 180 deg/s, a battery of hop tests, peak vertical ground-reaction force (vGRF), and time to peak vGRF (in seconds) during a step- and jump-down task onto a force platform and peak speed (m/s) using a global positioning system (GPS unit) during a running task. A cohort of 32 healthy matched participants (mean age, 26.31 years; BMI, 25.7 kg/m2) were also tested to act as reference. Pearson correlation was calculated to assess correlation of each performance measure at 24 weeks postoperative with activity outcomes (Tegner score) at 12 and 24 months. Results: The strongest correlation between physical performance tests and return-to-sport outcomes was observed with peak speed during running. Large correlations were also observed for hamstring isokinetic power and hop test for distance. Moderate correlations were observed for timed hop, peak vGRF during a jump-down task, and quadriceps isokinetic power. No statistical correlations were observed for time to peak vGRF during a step-down and jump-down task as well as peak v

  11. Surgery for anterior cruciate ligament deficiency: a historical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Oliver S

    2012-01-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) has entertained scientific minds since the Weber brothers provided biomechanical insight into the importance of the ACL in maintaining normal knee kinematics. Robert Adams described the first clinical case of ACL rupture in 1837 some 175 years to date, followed by Mayo-Robson of Leeds who performed the first ACL repair in 1895. At that time, most patients presented late and clinicians started to appreciate signs and symptoms and disabilities associated with such injuries. Hey Groves of Bristol provided the initial description of an ACL reconstruction with autologous tissue graft in 1917, almost as we know it today. His knowledge and achievements were, however, not uniformly appreciated during his life time. What followed was a period of startling ingenuity which created an amazing variety of different surgical procedures often based more on surgical fashion and the absence of a satisfactory alternative than any indication that continued refinements were leading to improved results. It is hence not surprising that real inventors were forgotten, good ideas discarded and untried surgical methods adopted with uncritical enthusiasm only to be set aside without further explanation. Over the past 100 years, surgeons have experimented with a variety of different graft sources including xenograft, and allografts, whilst autologous tissue has remained the most popular choice. Synthetic graft materials enjoyed temporary popularity in the 1980 and 1990s, in the misguided belief that artificial ligaments may be more durable and better equipped to withstand stresses and strains. Until the 1970s, ACL reconstructions were considered formidable procedures, often so complex and fraught with peril that they remained reserved for a chosen few, never gaining the level of popularity they are enjoying today. The increasing familiarity with arthroscopy, popularised through Jackson and Dandy, and enhancements in surgical technology firmly established

  12. Ulnar Collateral Ligament Repair: An Old Idea With a New Wrinkle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugas, Jeffrey R

    2016-01-01

    At our practice, we have successfully treated thousands of overhead athletes with the modified Jobe technique of ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) repair. We used this technique regardless of the amount and location of the pathology encountered at the time of surgery. We asked whether the availability of modern anchor and suture technology, vast clinical experience with these injuries and their outcomes, and even biologic additives could be applied to some of these patients to achieve an equal or superior outcome in less time. This led us to create a construct that could be used to not only repair the torn native UCL tissue to bone, but also span the anatomic native ligament from its origin to its insertion. This construct includes an ultra-strong collagen coated tape attached at the anatomic insertions of the ligament using two 3.5-mm nonabsorbable PEEK corkscrew anchors and a suture through the eyelet of one of the anchors.

  13. Lymph node metastases in the gastrocolic ligament in patients with colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Claus A; Bols, Birgitte; Ingeholm, Peter

    2014-01-01

    in the proximity of the flexures or in the transverse colon. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this work was to present our findings of metastases in the gastrocolic ligament in a consecutive series of patients. DESIGN: This was a single-center retrospective study. SETTINGS: The study was conducted in a colorectal cancer......BACKGROUND: Long-term survival after colorectal cancer may be improved by more extensive resection of the primary tumor and lymph nodes. Resection of the gastroepiploic and infrapyloric lymph nodes in the gastrocolic ligament has been proposed as a standard procedure when resecting tumors located...... center. PATIENTS: All of the colon adenocarcinoma resections with relevant tumor location from June 1, 2008, to December 31, 2012 were included in this study. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The presence of lymph node metastases in the gastrocolic ligament in colon adenocarcinomas located in the proximity...

  14. Numerical damage models using a structural approach: application in bones and ligaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnoux, P. J.; Bonnoit, J.; Chabrand, P.; Jean, M.; Pithioux, M.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to apply knowledge of structural properties to perform numerical simulations with models of bones and knee ligaments exposed to dynamic tensile loading leading to tissue damage. Compact bones and knee ligaments exhibit the same geometrical pattern in their different levels of structural hierarchy from the tropocollagen molecule to the fibre. Nevertheless, their mechanical behaviours differ considerably at the fibril level. These differences are due to the contribution of the joints in the microfibril-fibril-fibre assembly and to the mechanical properties of the structural components. Two finite element models of the fibrous bone and ligament structure were used to describe damage in terms of elastoplastic laws or joint decohesion processes.

  15. Arthroscopic anatomical reconstruction of the lateral ankle ligaments: A technical simplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, R; Decante, C; Geffroy, L; Brulefert, K; Noailles, T

    2016-12-01

    Anatomical reconstruction of the lateral ankle ligaments has become a pivotal component of the treatment strategy for chronic ankle instability. The recently described arthroscopic version of this procedure is indispensable to ensure that concomitant lesions are appropriately managed, yet remains technically demanding. Here, we describe a simplified variant involving percutaneous creation of the calcaneal tunnel for the distal attachment of the calcaneo-fibular ligament. The rationale for this technical stratagem was provided by a preliminary cadaver study that demonstrated a correlation between the lateral malleolus and the distal footprint of the calcaneo-fibular ligament. The main objectives are simplification of the operative technique and decreased injury to tissues whose function is crucial to the recovery of proprioception. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Clinical and radiographic evaluation of a polyester prosthesis in dogs with cranial cruciate ligament rupture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selmi André Luis

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical and radiographic findings after intra-articular replacement of cranial cruciate ligament with a polyester prosthesis using a modified over-the-top technique were evaluated in six dogs. Seven surgeries were done due to bilateral involvement of the cranial cruciate ligament in one dog. Clinical evaluation was performed on postoperative days 3, 10 and 40, and radiographic evaluation was done at 5 and 24 months after surgery in five dogs, where signs of progressive degenerative joint disease were confirmed. Resolution of clinical signs was observed from 25 to 68 days after surgery as evaluated by dog owners. Overall function of joint movement after surgery was classified as good. Two dogs presented fraying of the implant after surgery. It was concluded that the polyester prosthesis, as implanted in these dogs, was not a satisfactory replacement for the injured ligament, as better results may be obtained with less invasive and simpler techniques.

  17. [Intraligamentous suture of a scapholunar ligament lesion in a 9-year-old child].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alt, V; Sicre, G; Schad, A

    2002-10-01

    Scapholunate dissociation is a well-known injury in adult patients. In pediatric patients, repair of this injury in the skeletally immature carpus has been previously reported. However, in none of these case studies is single ligamentous suture performed. We report a case of scapholunate dissociation in a 9-year-old boy after an initial Salter I injury of the distal radius. After 6 weeks of wrist immobilization, arthroscopy was performed due to persisting pain over the scapholunate gap, a positive Watson sign, and limited range of motion. This arthroscopy revealed intraligamentous rupture of the scapholunate ligament. Suture repair of the scapholunate ligament was performed. The suture was protected by a temporary K-wire arthrodesis for 8 weeks. One year after removal of the K-wire, the patient is completely free of symptoms and resumes all sport activities.

  18. How Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury was averted during Knee Collapse in a NBA Point Guard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilaty, Nathan D; Bates, Nathaniel A; Krych, Aaron J; Hewett, Timothy E

    2017-01-01

    Non-contact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries occur with rapid decelerations and pivoting. A recent injury to a high-level National Basketball Association (NBA) player demonstrated neuromuscular control and injury-sparing mechanisms that resulted in only minor ligament injury to the medial collateral ligament. We analyzed biomechanical mechanisms via publically available orthogonal 2-D video to demonstrate how this potential ACL injury was averted. Analysis of the knee injury mechanism demonstrated that the NBA player experienced low ground reaction force, high sagittal plane flexion, and maintenance of frontal plane stability with neuromuscular control. The outcome of these factors inhibited dynamic valgus collapse of the knee throughout the fall, avoiding ACL injury - a potentially career-altering injury. Many athletes, professional and recreational, will be subjected to similar mechanisms of injury and will have improved outcomes if they can successfully utilize preventive strategies of neuromuscular control to limit injury mechanisms.

  19. Material models and properties in the finite element analysis of knee ligaments: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio eGalbusera

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Knee ligaments are elastic bands of soft tissue with a complex microstructure and biomechanics which are critical to determine the kinematics as well as the stress bearing behavior of the knee joint. Their correct implementation in terms of material models and properties is therefore necessary in the development of finite element models of the knee, which has been performed for decades for the investigation of both its basic biomechanics and the development of replacement implants and repair strategies for degenerative and traumatic pathologies. Indeed, a wide range of element types and material models has been used to represent knee ligaments, ranging from elastic unidimensional elements to complex hyperelastic three-dimensional structures with anatomically realistic shapes. This paper systematically reviews literature studies which described finite element models of the knee, and summarizes the approaches which have been used to model the ligaments highlighting their strengths and weaknesses.

  20. [Imaging of alloplastic ligament implant. An in vivo and in vitro study exemplified by Kevlar].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wening, J V; Katzer, A; Nicolas, V; Hahn, M; Jungbluth, K H; Kratzer A [corrected to Katzer, A

    1994-04-01

    Neither native X-ray nor CT or NMR allow to evaluate intraarticular implantation results of Kevlar -49 directly. In animal trials, the course of an artificial ligament may only be presumed from connective tissue ingrowth. Although soft tissue structure appears much better in NMR than in CT, direct proof of ligament continuity is still impossible. As soon as the connective tissue becomes continuous, it appears clearly and allows indirect evaluation of the prosthesis, as integrity can be judged by its shape like in natural cruciate ligament. Anatomic preparations show that connective tissue fills up the small space between the two cords of a Kevlar -49 two bundle prosthesis eight weeks after implantation, so that imaging systems show only one intraarticular bundle.