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Sample records for copy nuclear genes

  1. Primers for low-copy nuclear genes in the Melastomataceae 1

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    Reginato,Marcelo; Michelangeli, Fabián A.

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: Low-copy nuclear gene primers were developed for phylogenetic studies across the Melastomataceae. Methods and Results: Total genomic libraries from eight species in the Melastomataceae along with one transcriptome were used for marker identification and primer design. Eight exon-primed intron-crossing markers were amplified with success in taxa of nine tribes in the Melastomataceae. The new markers were directly sequenced for eight samples of closely related species of M...

  2. Oligonucleotide primers for targeted amplification of single-copy nuclear genes in apocritan Hymenoptera.

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    Gerrit Hartig

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Published nucleotide sequence data from the mega-diverse insect order Hymenoptera (sawflies, bees, wasps, and ants are taxonomically scattered and still inadequate for reconstructing a well-supported phylogenetic tree for the order. The analysis of comprehensive multiple gene data sets obtained via targeted PCR could provide a cost-effective solution to this problem. However, oligonucleotide primers for PCR amplification of nuclear genes across a wide range of hymenopteran species are still scarce. FINDINGS: Here we present a suite of degenerate oligonucleotide primer pairs for PCR amplification of 154 single-copy nuclear protein-coding genes from Hymenoptera. These primers were inferred from genome sequence data from nine Hymenoptera (seven species of ants, the honeybee, and the parasitoid wasp Nasonia vitripennis. We empirically tested a randomly chosen subset of these primer pairs for amplifying target genes from six Hymenoptera, representing the families Chrysididae, Crabronidae, Gasteruptiidae, Leucospidae, Pompilidae, and Stephanidae. Based on our results, we estimate that these primers are suitable for studying a large number of nuclear genes across a wide range of apocritan Hymenoptera (i.e., all hymenopterans with a wasp-waist and of aculeate Hymenoptera in particular (i.e., apocritan wasps with stingers. CONCLUSIONS: The amplified nucleotide sequences are (a with high probability from single-copy genes, (b easily generated at low financial costs, especially when compared to phylogenomic approaches, (c easily sequenced by means of an additionally provided set of sequencing primers, and (d suitable to address a wide range of phylogenetic questions and to aid rapid species identification via barcoding, as many amplicons contain both exonic and fast-evolving intronic nucleotides.

  3. Phylogeny and divergence times of gymnosperms inferred from single-copy nuclear genes.

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    Lu, Ying; Ran, Jin-Hua; Guo, Dong-Mei; Yang, Zu-Yu; Wang, Xiao-Quan

    2014-01-01

    Phylogenetic reconstruction is fundamental to study evolutionary biology and historical biogeography. However, there was not a molecular phylogeny of gymnosperms represented by extensive sampling at the genus level, and most published phylogenies of this group were constructed based on cytoplasmic DNA markers and/or the multi-copy nuclear ribosomal DNA. In this study, we use LFY and NLY, two single-copy nuclear genes that originated from an ancient gene duplication in the ancestor of seed plants, to reconstruct the phylogeny and estimate divergence times of gymnosperms based on a complete sampling of extant genera. The results indicate that the combined LFY and NLY coding sequences can resolve interfamilial relationships of gymnosperms and intergeneric relationships of most families. Moreover, the addition of intron sequences can improve the resolution in Podocarpaceae but not in cycads, although divergence times of the cycad genera are similar to or longer than those of the Podocarpaceae genera. Our study strongly supports cycads as the basal-most lineage of gymnosperms rather than sister to Ginkgoaceae, and a sister relationship between Podocarpaceae and Araucariaceae and between Cephalotaxaceae-Taxaceae and Cupressaceae. In addition, intergeneric relationships of some families that were controversial, and the relationships between Taxaceae and Cephalotaxaceae and between conifers and Gnetales are discussed based on the nuclear gene evidence. The molecular dating analysis suggests that drastic extinctions occurred in the early evolution of gymnosperms, and extant coniferous genera in the Northern Hemisphere are older than those in the Southern Hemisphere on average. This study provides an evolutionary framework for future studies on gymnosperms.

  4. Phylogeny and divergence times of gymnosperms inferred from single-copy nuclear genes.

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    Ying Lu

    Full Text Available Phylogenetic reconstruction is fundamental to study evolutionary biology and historical biogeography. However, there was not a molecular phylogeny of gymnosperms represented by extensive sampling at the genus level, and most published phylogenies of this group were constructed based on cytoplasmic DNA markers and/or the multi-copy nuclear ribosomal DNA. In this study, we use LFY and NLY, two single-copy nuclear genes that originated from an ancient gene duplication in the ancestor of seed plants, to reconstruct the phylogeny and estimate divergence times of gymnosperms based on a complete sampling of extant genera. The results indicate that the combined LFY and NLY coding sequences can resolve interfamilial relationships of gymnosperms and intergeneric relationships of most families. Moreover, the addition of intron sequences can improve the resolution in Podocarpaceae but not in cycads, although divergence times of the cycad genera are similar to or longer than those of the Podocarpaceae genera. Our study strongly supports cycads as the basal-most lineage of gymnosperms rather than sister to Ginkgoaceae, and a sister relationship between Podocarpaceae and Araucariaceae and between Cephalotaxaceae-Taxaceae and Cupressaceae. In addition, intergeneric relationships of some families that were controversial, and the relationships between Taxaceae and Cephalotaxaceae and between conifers and Gnetales are discussed based on the nuclear gene evidence. The molecular dating analysis suggests that drastic extinctions occurred in the early evolution of gymnosperms, and extant coniferous genera in the Northern Hemisphere are older than those in the Southern Hemisphere on average. This study provides an evolutionary framework for future studies on gymnosperms.

  5. Phylogeny and Divergence Times of Gymnosperms Inferred from Single-Copy Nuclear Genes

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    Guo, Dong-Mei; Yang, Zu-Yu; Wang, Xiao-Quan

    2014-01-01

    Phylogenetic reconstruction is fundamental to study evolutionary biology and historical biogeography. However, there was not a molecular phylogeny of gymnosperms represented by extensive sampling at the genus level, and most published phylogenies of this group were constructed based on cytoplasmic DNA markers and/or the multi-copy nuclear ribosomal DNA. In this study, we use LFY and NLY, two single-copy nuclear genes that originated from an ancient gene duplication in the ancestor of seed plants, to reconstruct the phylogeny and estimate divergence times of gymnosperms based on a complete sampling of extant genera. The results indicate that the combined LFY and NLY coding sequences can resolve interfamilial relationships of gymnosperms and intergeneric relationships of most families. Moreover, the addition of intron sequences can improve the resolution in Podocarpaceae but not in cycads, although divergence times of the cycad genera are similar to or longer than those of the Podocarpaceae genera. Our study strongly supports cycads as the basal-most lineage of gymnosperms rather than sister to Ginkgoaceae, and a sister relationship between Podocarpaceae and Araucariaceae and between Cephalotaxaceae-Taxaceae and Cupressaceae. In addition, intergeneric relationships of some families that were controversial, and the relationships between Taxaceae and Cephalotaxaceae and between conifers and Gnetales are discussed based on the nuclear gene evidence. The molecular dating analysis suggests that drastic extinctions occurred in the early evolution of gymnosperms, and extant coniferous genera in the Northern Hemisphere are older than those in the Southern Hemisphere on average. This study provides an evolutionary framework for future studies on gymnosperms. PMID:25222863

  6. Phylogeny of the cycads based on multiple single copy nuclear genes: congruence of concatenation and species tree inference methods

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    Despite a recent new classification, a stable tree of life for the cycads has been elusive, particularly regarding resolution of Bowenia, Stangeria and Dioon. In this study we apply five single copy nuclear genes (SCNGs) to the phylogeny of the order Cycadales. We specifically aim to evaluate seve...

  7. Potential use of low-copy nuclear genes in DNA barcoding: a comparison with plastid genes in two Hawaiian plant radiations.

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    Pillon, Yohan; Johansen, Jennifer; Sakishima, Tomoko; Chamala, Srikar; Barbazuk, W Brad; Roalson, Eric H; Price, Donald K; Stacy, Elizabeth A

    2013-02-09

    DNA barcoding of land plants has relied traditionally on a small number of markers from the plastid genome. In contrast, low-copy nuclear genes have received little attention as DNA barcodes because of the absence of universal primers for PCR amplification. From pooled-species 454 transcriptome data we identified two variable intron-less nuclear loci for each of two species-rich genera of the Hawaiian flora: Clermontia (Campanulaceae) and Cyrtandra (Gesneriaceae) and compared their utility as DNA barcodes with that of plastid genes. We found that nuclear genes showed an overall greater variability, but also displayed a high level of heterozygosity, intraspecific variation, and retention of ancient alleles. Thus, nuclear genes displayed fewer species-diagnostic haplotypes compared to plastid genes and no interspecies gaps. The apparently greater coalescence times of nuclear genes are likely to limit their utility as barcodes, as only a small proportion of their alleles were fixed and unique to individual species. In both groups, species-diagnostic markers from either genome were scarce on the youngest island; a minimum age of ca. two million years may be needed for a species flock to be barcoded. For young plant groups, nuclear genes may not be a superior alternative to slowly evolving plastid genes.

  8. Identification of shared single copy nuclear genes in Arabidopsis, Populus, Vitis and Oryza and their phylogenetic utility across various taxonomic levels

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    Ma Hong

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the overwhelming majority of genes found in angiosperms are members of gene families, and both gene- and genome-duplication are pervasive forces in plant genomes, some genes are sufficiently distinct from all other genes in a genome that they can be operationally defined as 'single copy'. Using the gene clustering algorithm MCL-tribe, we have identified a set of 959 single copy genes that are shared single copy genes in the genomes of Arabidopsis thaliana, Populus trichocarpa, Vitis vinifera and Oryza sativa. To characterize these genes, we have performed a number of analyses examining GO annotations, coding sequence length, number of exons, number of domains, presence in distant lineages, such as Selaginella and Physcomitrella, and phylogenetic analysis to estimate copy number in other seed plants and to demonstrate their phylogenetic utility. We then provide examples of how these genes may be used in phylogenetic analyses to reconstruct organismal history, both by using extant coverage in EST databases for seed plants and de novo amplification via RT-PCR in the family Brassicaceae. Results There are 959 single copy nuclear genes shared in Arabidopsis, Populus, Vitis and Oryza ["APVO SSC genes"]. The majority of these genes are also present in the Selaginella and Physcomitrella genomes. Public EST sets for 197 species suggest that most of these genes are present across a diverse collection of seed plants, and appear to exist as single or very low copy genes, though exceptions are seen in recently polyploid taxa and in lineages where there is significant evidence for a shared large-scale duplication event. Genes encoding proteins localized in organelles are more commonly single copy than expected by chance, but the evolutionary forces responsible for this bias are unknown. Regardless of the evolutionary mechanisms responsible for the large number of shared single copy genes in diverse flowering plant lineages, these

  9. Identification of shared single copy nuclear genes in Arabidopsis, Populus, Vitis and Oryza and their phylogenetic utility across various taxonomic levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Although the overwhelming majority of genes found in angiosperms are members of gene families, and both gene- and genome-duplication are pervasive forces in plant genomes, some genes are sufficiently distinct from all other genes in a genome that they can be operationally defined as 'single copy'. Using the gene clustering algorithm MCL-tribe, we have identified a set of 959 single copy genes that are shared single copy genes in the genomes of Arabidopsis thaliana, Populus trichocarpa, Vitis vinifera and Oryza sativa. To characterize these genes, we have performed a number of analyses examining GO annotations, coding sequence length, number of exons, number of domains, presence in distant lineages, such as Selaginella and Physcomitrella, and phylogenetic analysis to estimate copy number in other seed plants and to demonstrate their phylogenetic utility. We then provide examples of how these genes may be used in phylogenetic analyses to reconstruct organismal history, both by using extant coverage in EST databases for seed plants and de novo amplification via RT-PCR in the family Brassicaceae. Results There are 959 single copy nuclear genes shared in Arabidopsis, Populus, Vitis and Oryza ["APVO SSC genes"]. The majority of these genes are also present in the Selaginella and Physcomitrella genomes. Public EST sets for 197 species suggest that most of these genes are present across a diverse collection of seed plants, and appear to exist as single or very low copy genes, though exceptions are seen in recently polyploid taxa and in lineages where there is significant evidence for a shared large-scale duplication event. Genes encoding proteins localized in organelles are more commonly single copy than expected by chance, but the evolutionary forces responsible for this bias are unknown. Regardless of the evolutionary mechanisms responsible for the large number of shared single copy genes in diverse flowering plant lineages, these genes are valuable for

  10. Phylogeny of the genus Chrysanthemum L.: evidence from single-copy nuclear gene and chloroplast DNA sequences.

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    Liu, Ping-Li; Wan, Qian; Guo, Yan-Ping; Yang, Ji; Rao, Guang-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    Chrysanthemum L. (Asteraceae-Anthemideae) is a genus with rapid speciation. It comprises about 40 species, most of which are distributed in East Asia. Many of these are narrowly distributed and habitat-specific. Considerable variations in morphology and ploidy are found in this genus. Some species have been the subjects of many studies, but the relationships between Chrysanthemum and its allies and the phylogeny of this genus remain poorly understood. In the present study, 32 species/varieties from Chrysanthemum and 11 from the allied genera were analyzed using DNA sequences of the single-copy nuclear CDS gene and seven cpDNA loci (psbA-trnH, trnC-ycf6, ycf6-psbM, trnY-rpoB, rpS4-trnT, trnL-F, and rpL16). The cpDNA and nuclear CDS gene trees both suggest that 1) Chrysanthemum is not a monophyletic taxon, and the affinity between Chrysanthemum and Ajania is so close that these two genera should be incorporated taxonomically; 2) Phaeostigma is more closely related to the Chrysanthemum+Ajania than other generic allies. According to pollen morphology and to the present cpDNA and CDS data, Ajania purpurea is a member of Phaeostigma. Species differentiation in Chrysanthemum appears to be correlated with geographic and environmental conditions. The Chinese Chrysanthemum species can be divided into two groups, the C. zawadskii group and the C. indicum group. The former is distributed in northern China and the latter in southern China. Many polyploid species, such as C. argyrophyllum, may have originated from allopolyploidization involving divergent progenitors. Considering all the evidence from present and previous studies, we conclude that geographic and ecological factors as well as hybridization and polyploidy play important roles in the divergence and speciation of the genus Chrysanthemum.

  11. Phylogeny of the genus Chrysanthemum L.: evidence from single-copy nuclear gene and chloroplast DNA sequences.

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    Ping-Li Liu

    Full Text Available Chrysanthemum L. (Asteraceae-Anthemideae is a genus with rapid speciation. It comprises about 40 species, most of which are distributed in East Asia. Many of these are narrowly distributed and habitat-specific. Considerable variations in morphology and ploidy are found in this genus. Some species have been the subjects of many studies, but the relationships between Chrysanthemum and its allies and the phylogeny of this genus remain poorly understood. In the present study, 32 species/varieties from Chrysanthemum and 11 from the allied genera were analyzed using DNA sequences of the single-copy nuclear CDS gene and seven cpDNA loci (psbA-trnH, trnC-ycf6, ycf6-psbM, trnY-rpoB, rpS4-trnT, trnL-F, and rpL16. The cpDNA and nuclear CDS gene trees both suggest that 1 Chrysanthemum is not a monophyletic taxon, and the affinity between Chrysanthemum and Ajania is so close that these two genera should be incorporated taxonomically; 2 Phaeostigma is more closely related to the Chrysanthemum+Ajania than other generic allies. According to pollen morphology and to the present cpDNA and CDS data, Ajania purpurea is a member of Phaeostigma. Species differentiation in Chrysanthemum appears to be correlated with geographic and environmental conditions. The Chinese Chrysanthemum species can be divided into two groups, the C. zawadskii group and the C. indicum group. The former is distributed in northern China and the latter in southern China. Many polyploid species, such as C. argyrophyllum, may have originated from allopolyploidization involving divergent progenitors. Considering all the evidence from present and previous studies, we conclude that geographic and ecological factors as well as hybridization and polyploidy play important roles in the divergence and speciation of the genus Chrysanthemum.

  12. Apparent Polyploidization after Gamma Irradiation: Pitfalls in the Use of Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR) for the Estimation of Mitochondrial and Nuclear DNA Gene Copy Numbers

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    Kam, Winnie W. Y.; Lake, Vanessa; Banos, Connie; Davies, Justin; Banati, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) has been widely used to quantify changes in gene copy numbers after radiation exposure. Here, we show that gamma irradiation ranging from 10 to 100 Gy of cells and cell-free DNA samples significantly affects the measured qPCR yield, due to radiation-induced fragmentation of the DNA template and, therefore, introduces errors into the estimation of gene copy numbers. The radiation-induced DNA fragmentation and, thus, measured qPCR yield varies with temperature not only in living cells, but also in isolated DNA irradiated under cell-free conditions. In summary, the variability in measured qPCR yield from irradiated samples introduces a significant error into the estimation of both mitochondrial and nuclear gene copy numbers and may give spurious evidence for polyploidization. PMID:23722662

  13. Single copy nuclear gene analysis of polyploidy in wild potatoes (Solanum section Petota

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    Cai Danying

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent genomic studies have drastically altered our knowledge of polyploid evolution. Wild potatoes (Solanum section Petota are a highly diverse and economically important group of about 100 species widely distributed throughout the Americas. Thirty-six percent of the species in section Petota are polyploid or with diploid and polyploid cytotypes. However, the group is poorly understood at the genomic level and the series is ideal to study polyploid evolution. Two separate studies using the nuclear orthologs GBSSI and nitrate reductase confirmed prior hypotheses of polyploid origins in potato and have shown new origins not proposed before. These studies have been limited, however, by the use of few accessions per polyploid species and by low taxonomic resolution, providing clade-specific, but not species-specific origins within clades. The purpose of the present study is to use six nuclear orthologs, within 54 accessions of 11 polyploid species, 34 accessions of 29 diploid species of section Petota representing their putative progenitors, and two outgroups, to see if phenomena typical of other polyploid groups occur within wild potatoes, to include multiple origins, loss of alleles, or gain of new alleles. Results Our results increase resolution within clades, giving better ideas of diploid progenitors, and show unexpected complexity of allele sharing within clades. While some species have little diversity among accessions and concur with the GBSSI and nitrate reductase results, such as S. agrimonifolium, S. colombianum, S. hjertingii, and S. moscopanum, the results give much better resolution of species-specific progenitors. Seven other species, however, show variant patterns of allele distributions suggesting multiple origins and allele loss. Complex three-genome origins are supported for S. hougasii, and S. schenckii, and one of the ten accessions of S. stoloniferum. A very unexpected shared presence of alleles occurs

  14. Reticulate evolution in diploid and tetraploid species of Polystachya (Orchidaceae) as shown by plastid DNA sequences and low-copy nuclear genes

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    Russell, Anton; Samuel, Rosabelle; Klejna, Verena; Barfuss, Michael H. J.; Rupp, Barbara; Chase, Mark W.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims Here evidence for reticulation in the pantropical orchid genus Polystachya is presented, using gene trees from five nuclear and plastid DNA data sets, first among only diploid samples (homoploid hybridization) and then with the inclusion of cloned tetraploid sequences (allopolyploids). Two groups of tetraploids are compared with respect to their origins and phylogenetic relationships. Methods Sequences from plastid regions, three low-copy nuclear genes and ITS nuclear ribosomal DNA were analysed for 56 diploid and 17 tetraploid accessions using maximum parsimony and Bayesian inference. Reticulation was inferred from incongruence between gene trees using supernetwork and consensus network analyses and from cloning and sequencing duplicated loci in tetraploids. Key Results Diploid trees from individual loci showed considerable incongruity but little reticulation signal when support from more than one gene tree was required to infer reticulation. This was coupled with generally low support in the individual gene trees. Sequencing the duplicated gene copies in tetraploids showed clearer evidence of hybrid evolution, including multiple origins of one group of tetraploids included in the study. Conclusions A combination of cloning duplicate gene copies in allotetraploids and consensus network comparison of gene trees allowed a phylogenetic framework for reticulation in Polystachya to be built. There was little evidence for homoploid hybridization, but our knowledge of the origins and relationships of three groups of allotetraploids are greatly improved by this study. One group showed evidence of multiple long-distance dispersals to achieve a pantropical distribution; another showed no evidence of multiple origins or long-distance dispersal but had greater morphological variation, consistent with hybridization between more distantly related parents. PMID:20525745

  15. Allopolyploid speciation and ongoing backcrossing between diploid progenitor and tetraploid progeny lineages in the Achillea millefolium species complex: analyses of single-copy nuclear genes and genomic AFLP

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    Ehrendorfer Friedrich

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the flowering plants, many polyploid species complexes display evolutionary radiation. This could be facilitated by gene flow between otherwise separate evolutionary lineages in contact zones. Achillea collina is a widespread tetraploid species within the Achillea millefolium polyploid complex (Asteraceae-Anthemideae. It is morphologically intermediate between the relic diploids, A. setacea-2x in xeric and A. asplenifolia-2x in humid habitats, and often grows in close contact with either of them. By analyzing DNA sequences of two single-copy nuclear genes and the genomic AFLP data, we assess the allopolyploid origin of A. collina-4x from ancestors corresponding to A. setacea-2x and A. asplenifolia-2x, and the ongoing backcross introgression between these diploid progenitor and tetraploid progeny lineages. Results In both the ncpGS and the PgiC gene tree, haplotype sequences of the diploid A. setacea-2x and A. asplenifolia-2x group into two clades corresponding to the two species, though lineage sorting seems incomplete for the PgiC gene. In contrast, A. collina-4x and its suspected backcross plants show homeologous gene copies: sequences from the same tetraploid individual plant are placed in both diploid clades. Semi-congruent splits of an AFLP Neighbor Net link not only A. collina-4x to both diploid species, but some 4x individuals in a polymorphic population with mixed ploidy levels to A. setacea-2x on one hand and to A. collina-4x on the other, indicating allopolyploid speciation as well as hybridization across ploidal levels. Conclusions The findings of this study clearly demonstrate the hybrid origin of Achillea collina-4x, the ongoing backcrossing between the diploid progenitor and their tetraploid progeny lineages. Such repeated hybridizations are likely the cause of the great genetic and phenotypic variation and ecological differentiation of the polyploid taxa in Achillea millefolium agg.

  16. A multi-locus analysis of phylogenetic relationships within grass subfamily Pooideae (Poaceae) inferred from sequences of nuclear single copy gene regions compared with plastid DNA.

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    Hochbach, Anne; Schneider, Julia; Röser, Martin

    2015-06-01

    To investigate phylogenetic relationships within the grass subfamily Pooideae we studied about 50 taxa covering all recognized tribes, using one plastid DNA (cpDNA) marker (matK gene-3'trnK exon) and for the first time four nuclear single copy gene loci. DNA sequence information from two parts of the nuclear genes topoisomerase 6 (Topo6) spanning the exons 8-13 and 17-19, the exons 9-13 encoding plastid acetyl-CoA-carboxylase (Acc1) and the partial exon 1 of phytochrome B (PhyB) were generated. Individual and nuclear combined data were evaluated using maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods. All of the phylogenetic results show Brachyelytrum and the tribe Nardeae as earliest diverging lineages within the subfamily. The 'core' Pooideae (Hordeeae and the Aveneae/Poeae tribe complex) are also strongly supported, as well as the monophyly of the tribes Brachypodieae, Meliceae and Stipeae (except PhyB). The beak grass tribe Diarrheneae and the tribe Duthieeae are not monophyletic in some of the analyses. However, the combined nuclear DNA (nDNA) tree yields the highest resolution and the best delimitation of the tribes, and provides the following evolutionary hypothesis for the tribes: Brachyelytrum, Nardeae, Duthieeae, Meliceae, Stipeae, Diarrheneae, Brachypodieae and the 'core' Pooideae. Within the individual datasets, the phylogenetic trees obtained from Topo6 exon 8-13 shows the most interesting results. The divergent positions of some clone sequences of Ampelodesmos mauritanicus and Trikeraia pappiformis, for instance, may indicate a hybrid origin of these stipoid taxa. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Phylogeny and evolutionary history of Leymus (Triticeae; Poaceae) based on a single-copy nuclear gene encoding plastid acetyl-CoA carboxylase.

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    Fan, Xing; Sha, Li-Na; Yang, Rui-Wu; Zhang, Hai-Qin; Kang, Hou-Yang; Ding, Cun-Bang; Zhang, Li; Zheng, You-Liang; Zhou, Yong-Hong

    2009-10-08

    Single- and low- copy genes are less likely subject to concerted evolution, thus making themselves ideal tools for studying the origin and evolution of polyploid taxa. Leymus is a polyploid genus with a diverse array of morphology, ecology and distribution in Triticeae. The genomic constitution of Leymus was assigned as NsXm, where Ns was presumed to be originated from Psathyrostachys, while Xm represented a genome of unknown origin. In addition, little is known about the evolutionary history of Leymus. Here, we investigate the phylogenetic relationship, genome donor, and evolutionary history of Leymus based on a single-copy nuclear Acc1 gene. Two homoeologues of the Acc1 gene were isolated from nearly all the sampled Leymus species using allele-specific primer and were analyzed with those from 35 diploid taxa representing 18 basic genomes in Triticeae. Sequence diversity patterns and genealogical analysis suggested that (1) Leymus is closely related to Psathyrostachys, Agropyron, and Eremopyrum; (2) Psathyrostachys juncea is an ancestral Ns-genome donor of Leymus species; (3) the Xm genome in Leymus may be originated from an ancestral lineage of Agropyron and Eremopyrum triticeum; (4) the Acc1 sequences of Leymus species from the Qinghai-Tibetan plateau are evolutionarily distinct; (5) North America Leymus species might originate from colonization via the Bering land bridge; (6) Leymus originated about 11-12MYA in Eurasia, and adaptive radiation might have occurred in Leymus during the period of 3.7-4.3 MYA and 1.7-2.1 MYA. Leymus species have allopolyploid origin. It is hypothesized that the adaptive radiation of Leymus species might have been triggered by the recent upliftings of the Qinghai-Tibetan plateau and subsequent climatic oscillations. Adaptive radiation may have promoted the rapid speciation, as well as the fixation of unique morphological characters in Leymus. Our results shed new light on our understanding of the origin of Xm genome, the

  18. Phylogeny and evolutionary history of Leymus (Triticeae; Poaceae based on a single-copy nuclear gene encoding plastid acetyl-CoA carboxylase

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    Ding Cun-Bang

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single- and low- copy genes are less likely subject to concerted evolution, thus making themselves ideal tools for studying the origin and evolution of polyploid taxa. Leymus is a polyploid genus with a diverse array of morphology, ecology and distribution in Triticeae. The genomic constitution of Leymus was assigned as NsXm, where Ns was presumed to be originated from Psathyrostachys, while Xm represented a genome of unknown origin. In addition, little is known about the evolutionary history of Leymus. Here, we investigate the phylogenetic relationship, genome donor, and evolutionary history of Leymus based on a single-copy nuclear Acc1 gene. Results Two homoeologues of the Acc1 gene were isolated from nearly all the sampled Leymus species using allele-specific primer and were analyzed with those from 35 diploid taxa representing 18 basic genomes in Triticeae. Sequence diversity patterns and genealogical analysis suggested that (1 Leymus is closely related to Psathyrostachys, Agropyron, and Eremopyrum; (2 Psathyrostachys juncea is an ancestral Ns-genome donor of Leymus species; (3 the Xm genome in Leymus may be originated from an ancestral lineage of Agropyron and Eremopyrum triticeum; (4 the Acc1 sequences of Leymus species from the Qinghai-Tibetan plateau are evolutionarily distinct; (5 North America Leymus species might originate from colonization via the Bering land bridge; (6 Leymus originated about 11-12MYA in Eurasia, and adaptive radiation might have occurred in Leymus during the period of 3.7-4.3 MYA and 1.7-2.1 MYA. Conclusion Leymus species have allopolyploid origin. It is hypothesized that the adaptive radiation of Leymus species might have been triggered by the recent upliftings of the Qinghai-Tibetan plateau and subsequent climatic oscillations. Adaptive radiation may have promoted the rapid speciation, as well as the fixation of unique morphological characters in Leymus. Our results shed new light on our

  19. Phylogeny of the cycads based on multiple single-copy nuclear genes: congruence of concatenated parsimony, likelihood and species tree inference methods.

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    Salas-Leiva, Dayana E; Meerow, Alan W; Calonje, Michael; Griffith, M Patrick; Francisco-Ortega, Javier; Nakamura, Kyoko; Stevenson, Dennis W; Lewis, Carl E; Namoff, Sandra

    2013-11-01

    Despite a recent new classification, a stable phylogeny for the cycads has been elusive, particularly regarding resolution of Bowenia, Stangeria and Dioon. In this study, five single-copy nuclear genes (SCNGs) are applied to the phylogeny of the order Cycadales. The specific aim is to evaluate several gene tree-species tree reconciliation approaches for developing an accurate phylogeny of the order, to contrast them with concatenated parsimony analysis and to resolve the erstwhile problematic phylogenetic position of these three genera. DNA sequences of five SCNGs were obtained for 20 cycad species representing all ten genera of Cycadales. These were analysed with parsimony, maximum likelihood (ML) and three Bayesian methods of gene tree-species tree reconciliation, using Cycas as the outgroup. A calibrated date estimation was developed with Bayesian methods, and biogeographic analysis was also conducted. Concatenated parsimony, ML and three species tree inference methods resolve exactly the same tree topology with high support at most nodes. Dioon and Bowenia are the first and second branches of Cycadales after Cycas, respectively, followed by an encephalartoid clade (Macrozamia-Lepidozamia-Encephalartos), which is sister to a zamioid clade, of which Ceratozamia is the first branch, and in which Stangeria is sister to Microcycas and Zamia. A single, well-supported phylogenetic hypothesis of the generic relationships of the Cycadales is presented. However, massive extinction events inferred from the fossil record that eliminated broader ancestral distributions within Zamiaceae compromise accurate optimization of ancestral biogeographical areas for that hypothesis. While major lineages of Cycadales are ancient, crown ages of all modern genera are no older than 12 million years, supporting a recent hypothesis of mostly Miocene radiations. This phylogeny can contribute to an accurate infrafamilial classification of Zamiaceae.

  20. Untangling nucleotide diversity and evolution of the H genome in polyploid Hordeum and Elymus species based on the single copy of nuclear gene DMC1.

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    Dongfa Sun

    Full Text Available Numerous hybrid and polypoid species are found within the Triticeae. It has been suggested that the H subgenome of allopolyploid Elymus (wheatgrass species originated from diploid Hordeum (barley species, but the role of hybridization between polyploid Elymus and Hordeum has not been studied. It is not clear whether gene flow across polyploid Hordeum and Elymus species has occurred following polyploid speciation. Answering these questions will provide new insights into the formation of these polyploid species, and the potential role of gene flow among polyploid species during polyploid evolution. In order to address these questions, disrupted meiotic cDNA1 (DMC1 data from the allopolyploid StH Elymus are analyzed together with diploid and polyploid Hordeum species. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the H copies of DMC1 sequence in some Elymus are very close to the H copies of DMC1 sequence in some polyploid Hordeum species, indicating either that the H genome in theses Elymus and polyploid Hordeum species originated from same diploid donor or that gene flow has occurred among them. Our analysis also suggested that the H genomes in Elymus species originated from limited gene pool, while H genomes in Hordeum polyploids have originated from broad gene pools. Nucleotide diversity (π of the DMC1 sequences on H genome from polyploid species (π = 0.02083 in Elymus, π = 0.01680 in polyploid Hordeum is higher than that in diploid Hordeum (π = 0.01488. The estimates of Tajima's D were significantly departure from the equilibrium neutral model at this locus in diploid Hordeum species (P<0.05, suggesting an excess of rare variants in diploid species which may not contribute to the origination of polyploids. Nucleotide diversity (π of the DMC1 sequences in Elymus polyploid species (π = 0.02083 is higher than that in polyploid Hordeum (π = 0.01680, suggesting that the degree of relationships between two parents of a polyploid might be a factor

  1. Copy number gain of VCX, X-linked multi-copy gene, leads to cell proliferation and apoptosis during spermatogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Juan; Qin, Yufeng; Wang, Rong; Huang, Zhenyao; Zhang, Yan; Zhou, Ran; Song, Ling; Ling, Xiufeng; Hu, Zhibin; Miao, Dengshun; Shen, Hongbing; Xia, Yankai; Wang, Xinru; Lu, Chuncheng

    2016-01-01

    Male factor infertility affects one-sixth of couples worldwide, and non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA) is one of the most severe forms. In recent years there has been increasing evidence to implicate the participation of X chromosome in the process of spermatogenesis. To uncover the roles of X-linked multi-copy genes in spermatogenesis, we performed systematic analysis of X-linked gene copy number variations (CNVs) and Y chromosome haplogrouping in 447 idiopathic NOA patients and 485 healthy controls. Interestingly, the frequency of individuals with abnormal level copy of Variable charge, X-linked (VCX) was significantly different between cases and controls after multiple test correction (p = 5.10 × 10−5). To discriminate the effect of gain/loss copies in these genes, we analyzed the frequency of X-linked multi-copy genes in subjects among subdivided groups. Our results demonstrated that individuals with increased copy numbers of Nuclear RNA export factor 2 (NXF2) (p = 9.21 × 10−8) and VCX (p = 1.97 × 10−4) conferred the risk of NOA. In vitro analysis demonstrated that increasing copy number of VCX could upregulate the gene expression and regulate cell proliferation and apoptosis. Our study establishes a robust association between the VCX CNVs and NOA risk. PMID:27705943

  2. Copy number gain of VCX, X-linked multi-copy gene, leads to cell proliferation and apoptosis during spermatogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Juan; Qin, Yufeng; Wang, Rong; Huang, Zhenyao; Zhang, Yan; Zhou, Ran; Song, Ling; Ling, Xiufeng; Hu, Zhibin; Miao, Dengshun; Shen, Hongbing; Xia, Yankai; Wang, Xinru; Lu, Chuncheng

    2016-11-29

    Male factor infertility affects one-sixth of couples worldwide, and non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA) is one of the most severe forms. In recent years there has been increasing evidence to implicate the participation of X chromosome in the process of spermatogenesis. To uncover the roles of X-linked multi-copy genes in spermatogenesis, we performed systematic analysis of X-linked gene copy number variations (CNVs) and Y chromosome haplogrouping in 447 idiopathic NOA patients and 485 healthy controls. Interestingly, the frequency of individuals with abnormal level copy of Variable charge, X-linked (VCX) was significantly different between cases and controls after multiple test correction (p = 5.10 × 10-5). To discriminate the effect of gain/loss copies in these genes, we analyzed the frequency of X-linked multi-copy genes in subjects among subdivided groups. Our results demonstrated that individuals with increased copy numbers of Nuclear RNA export factor 2 (NXF2) (p = 9.21 × 10-8) and VCX (p = 1.97 × 10-4) conferred the risk of NOA. In vitro analysis demonstrated that increasing copy number of VCX could upregulate the gene expression and regulate cell proliferation and apoptosis. Our study establishes a robust association between the VCX CNVs and NOA risk.

  3. Evolution vs the number of gene copies per primitive cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, A L

    1984-01-01

    Computer simulations are presented of the rate at which an advantageous mutant would displace the prototype in a replicating system without an accurate segregation mechanism. If the number of gene copies in the system is indefinitely large, Darwinian evolution is essentially stopped because there is no coupling of phenotype with genotype, i.e., there is no growth advantage to the advantageous gene relative to the prototype and therefore no "survival of the fittest." The inhibition of evolution due to a number of gene copies less than 100 would have been not insurmountable. Although the presence of multiple copies would have allowed replacement by an advantageous mutant, it provided a way for the primitive cell to conserve less immediately useful genes that could evolve into different or more effective genes. This possibility was lost as accurate segregation mechanisms evolved and cells with few copies of each gene, such as modern procaryotes, arose.

  4. Phylogeny of the cycads based on multiple single-copy nuclear genes: congruence of concatenated parsimony, likelihood and species tree inference methods

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Salas-Leiva, Dayana E; Meerow, Alan W; Calonje, Michael; Griffith, M Patrick; Francisco-Ortega, Javier; Nakamura, Kyoko; Stevenson, Dennis W; Lewis, Carl E; Namoff, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    .... The specific aim is to evaluate several gene tree-species tree reconciliation approaches for developing an accurate phylogeny of the order, to contrast them with concatenated parsimony analysis...

  5. Phylogenetic analysis of the genus Avena based on chloroplast intergenic spacer psbA-trnH and single-copy nuclear gene Acc1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hong-Hai; Baum, Bernard R; Zhou, Ping-Ping; Zhao, Jun; Wei, Yu-Ming; Ren, Chang-Zhong; Xiong, Fang-Qiu; Liu, Gang; Zhong, Lin; Zhao, Gang; Peng, Yuan-Ying

    2014-05-01

    Two uncorrelated nucleotide sequences, chloroplast intergenic spacer psbA-trnH and acetyl CoA carboxylase gene (Acc1), were used to perform phylogenetic analyses in 75 accessions of the genus Avena, representing 13 diploids, seven tetraploid, and four hexaploids by maximum parsimony and Bayesian inference. Phylogenic analyses based on the chloroplast intergenic spacer psbA-trnH confirmed that the A genome diploid might be the maternal donor of species of the genus Avena. Two haplotypes of the Acc1 gene region were obtained from the AB genome tetraploids, indicating an allopolyploid origin for the tetraploid species. Among the AB genome species, both gene trees revealed differences between Avena agadiriana and the other species, suggesting that an AS genome diploid might be the A genome donor and the other genome diploid donor might be the Ac genome diploid Avena canariensis or the Ad genome diploid Avena damascena. Three haplotypes of the Acc1 gene have been detected among the ACD genome hexaploid species. The haplotype that seems to represent the D genome clustered with the tetraploid species Avena murphyi and Avena maroccana, which supported the CD genomic designation instead of AC for A. murphyi and A. maroccana.

  6. Copy number variations of 11 macronuclear chromosomes and their gene expression in Oxytricha trifallax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ke; Doak, Thomas G; Lipps, Hans J; Wang, Jingmei; Swart, Estienne C; Chang, Wei-Jen

    2012-08-15

    Ciliated protozoa are peculiar for their nuclear dimorphism, wherein two types of nuclei divide nuclear functions: a germline micronucleus (MIC) is transcriptionally inert during vegetative growth, but serves as the genetic blueprint for the somatic macronucleus (MAC), which is responsible for all transcripts supporting cell growth and reproduction. While all the advantages/disadvantages associated with nuclear dimorphism are not clear, an essential advantage seems to be the ability to produce a highly polyploid MAC, which then allows for the maintenance of extremely large single cells - many ciliate cells are larger than small metazoa. In some ciliate classes, chromosomes in the MAC are extensively fragmented to create extremely short chromosomes that often carry single genes, and these chromosomes may be present in different copy numbers, resulting in different ploidies. While using gene copy number to regulate gene expression is limited in most eukaryotic systems, the extensive fragmentation in some ciliate classes provides this opportunity to every MAC gene. However, it is still unclear if this mechanism is in fact used extensively in these ciliates. To address this, we have quantified copy numbers of 11 MAC chromosomes and their gene expression in Oxytricha trifallax (CI: Spirotrichea). We compared copy numbers between two subpopulations of O. trifallax, and copy numbers of 7 orthologous genes between O. trifallax and the closely related Stylonychia lemnae. We show that copy numbers of MAC chromosomes are variable, dynamic, and positively correlated to gene expression. These features might be conserved in all spirotrichs, and might exist in other classes of ciliates with heavily fragmented MAC chromosomes.

  7. Copy number variations exploration of multiple genes in Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Rong-Hua; Shao, Xiao-Qing; Li, Ling; Wang, Wen; Zhang, Jin-An

    2017-01-01

    Few previous published papers reported copy number variations of genes could affect the predisposition of Graves' disease (GD). Herein, the aim of this study was to explore the association between copy number variations (CNV) profile and GD. The preliminary copy number microarray used to screen copy number variant genes was performed in 6 GD patients. Five CNV candidate genes (CFH, CFHR1, KIAA0125, UGT2B15, and UGT2B17) were then validated in an independent set of samples (50 GD patients and 50 matched healthy ones) by the Accucopy assay method. The CNV of the other 2 genes TRY6 and CCL3L1 was investigated in 144 GD patients and 144 healthy volunteers by the definitive genotyping technique using the Taqman quantitative polymerase-chain-reaction (Taqman qPCR). TRY6 gene-associated single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs13230029, was genotyped by the PCR-ligase detection reaction (LDR) in 675 GD patients and 898 healthy controls. There were no correlation of the gene copy number (GCN) of CFH, CFHR1, KIAA0125, UGT2B15, and UGT2B17 with GD. In comparison with that of controls, the GCN distribution of TRY6 and CCL3L1 in GD patients did not show significantly differ (P > 0.05). Furthermore, TRY6-related polymorphism (rs13230029) showed no difference between GD patients and controls. No correlation was found between CNV or SNP genotype and clinical phenotypes. Generally, there were no link of the copy numbers of several genes, including CFH, CFHR1, KIAA0125, UGT2B15, UGT2B17, TRY6, and CCL3L1 to GD. Our results clearly indicated that the copy number variations of multiple genes, namely CFH, CFHR1, KIAA0125, UGT2B15, UGT2B17, TRY6, and CCL3L1, were not associated with the development of GD.

  8. Candidate gene copy number analysis by PCR and multicapillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szantai, Eszter; Elek, Zsuzsanna; Guttman, András; Sasvari-Szekely, Maria

    2009-04-01

    Genetic polymorphisms are often considered as risk factors of complex diseases serving as valuable and easily detectable biomarkers, also stable during the whole lifespan. A novel type of genetic polymorphism has been identified just recently, referred to as gene copy number variation (CNV) or copy number polymorphism. CNV of glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta and its adjacent gene, Nr1i2 (pregnane X receptor isoform), has been reported to associate with bipolar depression. In our study we introduced multicapillary electrophoresis for gene copy number analysis as an affordable alternative to real-time PCR quantification with TaqMan gene probes. Our results show the reliability of the developed method based on conventional PCR followed by separation of products by multicapillary electrophoresis with quantitative evaluation. This method can be readily implemented for the analysis of candidate gene CNVs in high throughput clinical laboratories and also in personalized medicine care of depression-related risk factors.

  9. Integrated analysis of DNA copy number and gene expression microarray data using gene sets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.X. de Menezes (Renee); M. Boetzer (Marten); M. Sieswerda (Melle); G.J.B. van Ommen; J.M. Boer (Judith)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Genes that play an important role in tumorigenesis are expected to show association between DNA copy number and RNA expression. Optimal power to find such associations can only be achieved if analysing copy number and gene expression jointly. Furthermore, some copy number

  10. Conserved genetic regions across angiosperms as tools to develop single-copy nuclear markers in gymnosperms: an example using cycads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Several individuals of the Caribbean Zamia clade (Zamia pumila complex) and other cycads were used to identify potential low copy nuclear genes for further studies of the phylogeographic relationships within the Caribbean Z. pumila complex and also among genera of Cycadales. Two strategies were used...

  11. Transcriptome-mining for single-copy nuclear markers in ferns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl J Rothfels

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Molecular phylogenetic investigations have revolutionized our understanding of the evolutionary history of ferns-the second-most species-rich major group of vascular plants, and the sister clade to seed plants. The general absence of genomic resources available for this important group of plants, however, has resulted in the strong dependence of these studies on plastid data; nuclear or mitochondrial data have been rarely used. In this study, we utilize transcriptome data to design primers for nuclear markers for use in studies of fern evolutionary biology, and demonstrate the utility of these markers across the largest order of ferns, the Polypodiales. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We present 20 novel single-copy nuclear regions, across 10 distinct protein-coding genes: ApPEFP_C, cryptochrome 2, cryptochrome 4, DET1, gapCpSh, IBR3, pgiC, SQD1, TPLATE, and transducin. These loci, individually and in combination, show strong resolving power across the Polypodiales phylogeny, and are readily amplified and sequenced from our genomic DNA test set (from 15 diploid Polypodiales species. For each region, we also present transcriptome alignments of the focal locus and related paralogs-curated broadly across ferns-that will allow researchers to develop their own primer sets for fern taxa outside of the Polypodiales. Analyses of sequence data generated from our genomic DNA test set reveal strong effects of partitioning schemes on support levels and, to a much lesser extent, on topology. A model partitioned by codon position is strongly favored, and analyses of the combined data yield a Polypodiales phylogeny that is well-supported and consistent with earlier studies of this group. CONCLUSIONS: The 20 single-copy regions presented here more than triple the single-copy nuclear regions available for use in ferns. They provide a much-needed opportunity to assess plastid-derived hypotheses of relationships within the ferns, and increase our capacity to

  12. Copy number variation of mitochondrial genes in Pneumocystis jirovecii according to the fungal load in BAL specimens

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    clara valero

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractPneumocystis jirovecii is an unculturable fungus and the causative agent of Pneumocystis pneumonia, a life-threatening opportunistic infection. Although molecular diagnosis is often based on the mtLSU rRNA mitochondrial gene due to its greater sensitivity, physiology and the dynamics of the mitochondria in this fungus remains largely unknown. We developed and optimized six real-time PCR assays in order to determine the copy number of four mitochondrial genes (mtSSU rRNA, mtLSU rRNA, NAD1 and CYTB in comparison to nuclear genome (DHPS and HSP70 and tested 84 bronchoalveolar fluids of patients at different stages of the infection. Unexpectedly, we found that copy number of mitochondrial genes varied from gene to gene with mtSSU rRNA gene being more represented (37 copies than NAD1 (23 copies, mtLSU rRNA (15 copies and CYTB (6 copies genes compared to nuclear genome. Hierarchical clustering analysis (HCA allowed us to define five major clusters, significantly associated with fungal load (p=0.029, in which copy number of mitochondrial genes was significantly different among them. More importantly, copy number of mtLSU rRNA, NAD1 and CYTB but not mtSSU rRNA differed according to P. jirovecii physiological state with a decreased number of copies when the fungal load is low. This suggests the existence of a mixture of various subspecies of mtDNA that can harbor different amplification rates. Overall, we revealed here an unexpected plasticity and dynamics of P. jirovecii mitochondrial DNA that vary according to P. jirovecii’s physiological state.

  13. Confirmed rare copy number variants implicate novel genes in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Gloria W C; van de Lagemaat, Louie N; Redon, Richard; Strathdee, Karen E; Croning, Mike D R; Malloy, Mary P; Muir, Walter J; Pickard, Ben S; Deary, Ian J; Blackwood, Douglas H R; Carter, Nigel P; Grant, Seth G N

    2010-04-01

    Understanding how cognitive processes including learning, memory, decision making and ideation are encoded by the genome is a key question in biology. Identification of sets of genes underlying human mental disorders is a path towards this objective. Schizophrenia is a common disease with cognitive symptoms, high heritability and complex genetics. We have identified genes involved with schizophrenia by measuring differences in DNA copy number across the entire genome in 91 schizophrenia cases and 92 controls in the Scottish population. Our data reproduce rare and common variants observed in public domain data from >3000 schizophrenia cases, confirming known disease loci as well as identifying novel loci. We found copy number variants in PDE10A (phosphodiesterase 10A), CYFIP1 [cytoplasmic FMR1 (Fragile X mental retardation 1)-interacting protein 1], K(+) channel genes KCNE1 and KCNE2, the Down's syndrome critical region 1 gene RCAN1 (regulator of calcineurin 1), cell-recognition protein CHL1 (cell adhesion molecule with homology with L1CAM), the transcription factor SP4 (specificity protein 4) and histone deacetylase HDAC9, among others (see http://www.genes2cognition.org/SCZ-CNV). Integrating the function of these many genes into a coherent model of schizophrenia and cognition is a major unanswered challenge.

  14. The Orphan Gene dauerless Regulates Dauer Development and Intraspecific Competition in Nematodes by Copy Number Variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Melanie G; Rödelsperger, Christian; Witte, Hanh; Riebesell, Metta; Sommer, Ralf J

    2015-06-01

    Many nematodes form dauer larvae when exposed to unfavorable conditions, representing an example of phenotypic plasticity and a major survival and dispersal strategy. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the regulation of dauer induction is a model for pheromone, insulin, and steroid-hormone signaling. Recent studies in Pristionchus pacificus revealed substantial natural variation in various aspects of dauer development, i.e. pheromone production and sensing and dauer longevity and fitness. One intriguing example is a strain from Ohio, having extremely long-lived dauers associated with very high fitness and often forming the most dauers in response to other strains' pheromones, including the reference strain from California. While such examples have been suggested to represent intraspecific competition among strains, the molecular mechanisms underlying these dauer-associated patterns are currently unknown. We generated recombinant-inbred-lines between the Californian and Ohioan strains and used quantitative-trait-loci analysis to investigate the molecular mechanism determining natural variation in dauer development. Surprisingly, we discovered that the orphan gene dauerless controls dauer formation by copy number variation. The Ohioan strain has one dauerless copy causing high dauer formation, whereas the Californian strain has two copies, resulting in strongly reduced dauer formation. Transgenic animals expressing multiple copies do not form dauers. dauerless is exclusively expressed in CAN neurons, and both CAN ablation and dauerless mutations increase dauer formation. Strikingly, dauerless underwent several duplications and acts in parallel or downstream of steroid-hormone signaling but upstream of the nuclear-hormone-receptor daf-12. We identified the novel or fast-evolving gene dauerless as inhibitor of dauer development. Our findings reveal the importance of gene duplications and copy number variations for orphan gene function and suggest daf-12 as major target for

  15. The Orphan Gene dauerless Regulates Dauer Development and Intraspecific Competition in Nematodes by Copy Number Variation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie G Mayer

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Many nematodes form dauer larvae when exposed to unfavorable conditions, representing an example of phenotypic plasticity and a major survival and dispersal strategy. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the regulation of dauer induction is a model for pheromone, insulin, and steroid-hormone signaling. Recent studies in Pristionchus pacificus revealed substantial natural variation in various aspects of dauer development, i.e. pheromone production and sensing and dauer longevity and fitness. One intriguing example is a strain from Ohio, having extremely long-lived dauers associated with very high fitness and often forming the most dauers in response to other strains' pheromones, including the reference strain from California. While such examples have been suggested to represent intraspecific competition among strains, the molecular mechanisms underlying these dauer-associated patterns are currently unknown. We generated recombinant-inbred-lines between the Californian and Ohioan strains and used quantitative-trait-loci analysis to investigate the molecular mechanism determining natural variation in dauer development. Surprisingly, we discovered that the orphan gene dauerless controls dauer formation by copy number variation. The Ohioan strain has one dauerless copy causing high dauer formation, whereas the Californian strain has two copies, resulting in strongly reduced dauer formation. Transgenic animals expressing multiple copies do not form dauers. dauerless is exclusively expressed in CAN neurons, and both CAN ablation and dauerless mutations increase dauer formation. Strikingly, dauerless underwent several duplications and acts in parallel or downstream of steroid-hormone signaling but upstream of the nuclear-hormone-receptor daf-12. We identified the novel or fast-evolving gene dauerless as inhibitor of dauer development. Our findings reveal the importance of gene duplications and copy number variations for orphan gene function and suggest daf-12 as

  16. Copy number variants in the kallikrein gene cluster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pernilla Lindahl

    Full Text Available The kallikrein gene family (KLK1-KLK15 is the largest contiguous group of protease genes within the human genome and is associated with both risk and outcome of cancer and other diseases. We searched for copy number variants in all KLK genes using quantitative PCR analysis and analysis of inheritance patterns of single nucleotide polymorphisms. Two deletions were identified: one 2235-bp deletion in KLK9 present in 1.2% of alleles, and one 3394-bp deletion in KLK15 present in 4.0% of alleles. Each deletion eliminated one complete exon and created out-of-frame coding that eliminated the catalytic triad of the resulting truncated gene product, which therefore likely is a non-functional protein. Deletion breakpoints identified by DNA sequencing located the KLK9 deletion breakpoint to a long interspersed element (LINE repeated sequence, while the deletion in KLK15 is located in a single copy sequence. To search for an association between each deletion and risk of prostate cancer (PC, we analyzed a cohort of 667 biopsied men (266 PC cases and 401 men with no evidence of PC at biopsy using short deletion-specific PCR assays. There was no association between evidence of PC in this cohort and the presence of either gene deletion. Haplotyping revealed a single origin of each deletion, with most recent common ancestor estimates of 3000-8000 and 6000-14 000 years for the deletions in KLK9 and KLK15, respectively. The presence of the deletions on the same haplotypes in 1000 Genomes data of both European and African populations indicate an early origin of both deletions. The old age in combination with homozygous presence of loss-of-function variants suggests that some kallikrein-related peptidases have non-essential functions.

  17. Nuclear gene sequences from a late pleistocene sloth coprolite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poinar, Hendrik; Kuch, Melanie; McDonald, Gregory; Martin, Paul; Pääbo, Svante

    2003-07-01

    The determination of nuclear DNA sequences from ancient remains would open many novel opportunities such as the resolution of phylogenies, the sexing of hominid and animal remains, and the characterization of genes involved in phenotypic traits. However, to date, single-copy nuclear DNA sequences from fossils have been determined only from bones and teeth of woolly mammoths preserved in the permafrost. Since the best preserved ancient nucleic acids tend to stem from cold environments, this has led to the assumption that nuclear DNA would be retrievable only from frozen remains. We have previously shown that Pleistocene coprolites stemming from the extinct Shasta sloth (Nothrotheriops shastensis, Megatheriidae) contain mitochondrial (mt) DNA from the animal that produced them as well as chloroplast (cp) DNA from the ingested plants. Recent attempts to resolve the phylogeny of two families of extinct sloths by using strictly mitochondrial DNA has been inconclusive. We have prepared DNA extracts from a ground sloth coprolite from Gypsum Cave, Nevada, and quantitated the number of mtDNA copies for three different fragment lengths by using real-time PCR. We amplified one multicopy and three single-copy nuclear gene fragments and used the concatenated sequence to resolve the phylogeny. These results show that ancient single-copy nuclear DNA can be recovered from warm, arid climates. Thus, nuclear DNA preservation is not restricted to cold climates.

  18. Copy-number and gene dependency analysis reveals partial copy loss of wild-type SF3B1 as a novel cancer vulnerability. | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genomic instability is a hallmark of human cancer, and results in widespread somatic copy number alterations. We used a genome-scale shRNA viability screen in human cancer cell lines to systematically identify genes that are essential in the context of particular copy-number alterations (copy-number associated gene dependencies). The most enriched class of copy-number associated gene dependencies was CYCLOPS (Copy-number alterations Yielding Cancer Liabilities Owing to Partial losS) genes, and spliceosome components were the most prevalent.

  19. Application of droplet digital PCR to determine copy number of endogenous genes and transgenes in sugarcane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yue; Joyce, Priya Aiyar

    2017-08-28

    Droplet digital PCR combined with the low copy ACT allele as endogenous reference gene, makes accurate and rapid estimation of gene copy number in Q208 (A) and Q240 (A) attainable. Sugarcane is an important cultivated crop with both high polyploidy and aneuploidy in its 10 Gb genome. Without a known copy number reference gene, it is difficult to accurately estimate the copy number of any gene of interest by PCR-based methods in sugarcane. Recently, a new technology, known as droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) has been developed which can measure the absolute amount of the target DNA in a given sample. In this study, we deduced the true copy number of three endogenous genes, actin depolymerizing factor (ADF), adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) and actin (ACT) in three Australian sugarcane varieties, using ddPCR by comparing the absolute amounts of the above genes with a transgene of known copy number. A single copy of the ACT allele was detected in Q208 (A) , two copies in Q240 (A) , but was absent in Q117. Copy number variation was also observed for both APRT and ADF, and ranged from 9 to 11 in the three tested varieties. Using this newly developed ddPCR method, transgene copy number was successfully determined in 19 transgenic Q208 (A) and Q240 (A) events using ACT as the reference endogenous gene. Our study demonstrates that ddPCR can be used for high-throughput genetic analysis and is a quick, accurate and reliable alternative method for gene copy number determination in sugarcane. This discovered ACT allele would be a suitable endogenous reference gene for future gene copy number variation and dosage studies of functional genes in Q208 (A) and Q240 (A) .

  20. Conserved genetic regions across angiosperms as tools to develop single-copy nuclear markers in gymnosperms: an example using cycads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas-Leiva, Dayana E; Meerow, Alan W; Francisco-Ortega, Javier; Calonje, Michael; Griffith, M Patrick; Stevenson, Dennis W; Nakamura, Kyoko

    2014-07-01

    Several individuals of the Caribbean Zamia clade and other cycad genera were used to identify single-copy nuclear genes for phylogeographic and phylogenetic studies in Cycadales. Two strategies were employed to select target loci: (i) a tblastX search of Arabidopsis conserved ortholog sequence (COS) set and (ii) a tblastX search of Arabidopsis-Populus-Vitis-Oryza Shared Single-Copy genes (APVO SSC) against the EST Zamia databases in GenBank. From the first strategy, 30 loci were selected, and from the second, 16 loci. In both cases, the matching GenBank accessions of Zamia were used as a query for retrieving highly similar sequences from Cycas, Picea, Pinus species or Ginkgo biloba. After retrieving and aligning all the sequences in each locus, intron predictions were completed to assist in primer design. PCR was carried out in three rounds to detect paralogous loci. A total of 29 loci were successfully amplified as a single band of which 20 were likely single-copy loci. These loci showed different diversity and divergence levels. A preliminary screening allowed us to select 8 promising loci (40S, ATG2, BG, GroES, GTP, LiSH, PEX4 and TR) for the Zamia pumila complex and 4 loci (COS26, GroES, GTP and HTS) for all other cycad genera.

  1. Droplet digital PCR-aided screening and characterization of Pichia pastoris multiple gene copy strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cámara, Elena; Albiol, Joan; Ferrer, Pau

    2016-07-01

    Pichia (syn. Komagataella) pastoris is a widely used yeast platform for heterologous protein production. Expression cassettes are usually stably integrated into the genome of this host via homologous recombination. Although increasing gene dosage is a powerful strategy to improve recombinant protein production, an excess in the number of gene copies often leads to decreased product yields and increased metabolic burden, particularly for secreted proteins. We have constructed a series of strains harboring different copy numbers of a Rhizopus oryzae lipase gene (ROL), aiming to find the optimum gene dosage for secreted Rol production. In order to accurately determine ROL gene dosage, we implemented a novel protocol based on droplet digital PCR (ddPCR), and cross validated it with conventional real-time PCR. Gene copy number determination based on ddPCR allowed for an accurate ranking of transformants according to their ROL gene dosage. Results indicated that ddPCR was particularly superior at lower gene dosages (one to five copies) over quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). This facilitated the determination of the optimal ROL gene dosage as low as two copies. The ranking of ROL gene dosage versus Rol yield was consistent at both small scale and bioreactor chemostat cultures, thereby easing clone characterization in terms of gene dosage dependent physiological effects, which could be discriminated even among strains differing by only one ROL copy. A selected two-copy strain showed twofold increase in Rol specific production in a chemostat culture over the single copy strain. Conversely, strains harboring more than two copies of the ROL gene showed decreased product and biomass yields, as well as altered substrate consumption specific rates, compared to the reference (one-copy) strain. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1542-1551. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. De novo copy number variations in cloned dogs from the same nuclear donor

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Seung-Hyun; Yim, Seon-Hee; Oh, Hyun Ju; Park, Jung Eun; Kim, Min Jung; Kim, Geon A; Kim, Tae-Min; Kim, Jin-Soo; Lee, Byeong Chun; Chung, Yeun-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Background Somatic mosaicism of copy number variants (CNVs) in human body organs and de novo CNV event in monozygotic twins suggest that de novo CNVs can occur during mitotic recombination. These de novo CNV events are important for understanding genetic background of evolution and diverse phenotypes. In this study, we explored de novo CNV event in cloned dogs with identical genetic background. Results We analyzed CNVs in seven cloned dogs using the nuclear donor genome as reference by array-...

  3. Abundant copy-number loss of CYCLOPS and STOP genes in gastric adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutcutache, Ioana; Wu, Alice Yingting; Suzuki, Yuka; McPherson, John Richard; Lei, Zhengdeng; Deng, Niantao; Zhang, Shenli; Wong, Wai Keong; Soo, Khee Chee; Chan, Weng Hoong; Ooi, London Lucien; Welsch, Roy; Tan, Patrick; Rozen, Steven G

    2016-04-01

    Gastric cancer, a leading cause of cancer death worldwide, has been little studied compared with other cancers that impose similar health burdens. Our goal is to assess genomic copy-number loss and the possible functional consequences and therapeutic implications thereof across a large series of gastric adenocarcinomas. We used high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism microarrays to determine patterns of copy-number loss and allelic imbalance in 74 gastric adenocarcinomas. We investigated whether suppressor of tumorigenesis and/or proliferation (STOP) genes are associated with genomic copy-number loss. We also analyzed the extent to which copy-number loss affects Copy-number alterations Yielding Cancer Liabilities Owing to Partial losS (CYCLOPS) genes-genes that may be attractive targets for therapeutic inhibition when partially deleted. The proportion of the genome subject to copy-number loss varies considerably from tumor to tumor, with a median of 5.5 %, and a mean of 12 % (range 0-58.5 %). On average, 91 STOP genes were subject to copy-number loss per tumor (median 35, range 0-452), and STOP genes tended to have lower copy-number compared with the rest of the genes. Furthermore, on average, 1.6 CYCLOPS genes per tumor were both subject to copy-number loss and downregulated, and 51.4 % of the tumors had at least one such gene. The enrichment of STOP genes in regions of copy-number loss indicates that their deletion may contribute to gastric carcinogenesis. Furthermore, the presence of several deleted and downregulated CYCLOPS genes in some tumors suggests potential therapeutic targets in these tumors.

  4. Low copy number of the salivary amylase gene predisposes to obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falchi, Mario; El-Sayed Moustafa, Julia Sarah; Takousis, Petros; Pesce, Francesco; Bonnefond, Amélie; Andersson-Assarsson, Johanna C; Sudmant, Peter H; Dorajoo, Rajkumar; Al-Shafai, Mashael Nedham; Bottolo, Leonardo; Ozdemir, Erdal; So, Hon-Cheong; Davies, Robert W; Patrice, Alexandre; Dent, Robert; Mangino, Massimo; Hysi, Pirro G; Dechaume, Aurélie; Huyvaert, Marlène; Skinner, Jane; Pigeyre, Marie; Caiazzo, Robert; Raverdy, Violeta; Vaillant, Emmanuel; Field, Sarah; Balkau, Beverley; Marre, Michel; Visvikis-Siest, Sophie; Weill, Jacques; Poulain-Godefroy, Odile; Jacobson, Peter; Sjostrom, Lars; Hammond, Christopher J; Deloukas, Panos; Sham, Pak Chung; McPherson, Ruth; Lee, Jeannette; Tai, E Shyong; Sladek, Robert; Carlsson, Lena M S; Walley, Andrew; Eichler, Evan E; Pattou, Francois; Spector, Timothy D; Froguel, Philippe

    2014-05-01

    Common multi-allelic copy number variants (CNVs) appear enriched for phenotypic associations compared to their biallelic counterparts. Here we investigated the influence of gene dosage effects on adiposity through a CNV association study of gene expression levels in adipose tissue. We identified significant association of a multi-allelic CNV encompassing the salivary amylase gene (AMY1) with body mass index (BMI) and obesity, and we replicated this finding in 6,200 subjects. Increased AMY1 copy number was positively associated with both amylase gene expression (P = 2.31 × 10(-14)) and serum enzyme levels (P copy number was associated with increased BMI (change in BMI per estimated copy = -0.15 (0.02) kg/m(2); P = 6.93 × 10(-10)) and obesity risk (odds ratio (OR) per estimated copy = 1.19, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.13-1.26; P = 1.46 × 10(-10)). The OR value of 1.19 per copy of AMY1 translates into about an eightfold difference in risk of obesity between subjects in the top (copy number > 9) and bottom (copy number copy number distribution. Our study provides a first genetic link between carbohydrate metabolism and BMI and demonstrates the power of integrated genomic approaches beyond genome-wide association studies.

  5. Copy-number and gene dependency analysis reveals partial copy loss of wild-type SF3B1 as a novel cancer vulnerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolella, Brenton R; Gibson, William J; Urbanski, Laura M; Alberta, John A; Zack, Travis I; Bandopadhayay, Pratiti; Nichols, Caitlin A; Agarwalla, Pankaj K; Brown, Meredith S; Lamothe, Rebecca; Yu, Yong; Choi, Peter S; Obeng, Esther A; Heckl, Dirk; Wei, Guo; Wang, Belinda; Tsherniak, Aviad; Vazquez, Francisca; Weir, Barbara A; Root, David E; Cowley, Glenn S; Buhrlage, Sara J; Stiles, Charles D; Ebert, Benjamin L; Hahn, William C; Reed, Robin; Beroukhim, Rameen

    2017-02-08

    Genomic instability is a hallmark of human cancer, and results in widespread somatic copy number alterations. We used a genome-scale shRNA viability screen in human cancer cell lines to systematically identify genes that are essential in the context of particular copy-number alterations (copy-number associated gene dependencies). The most enriched class of copy-number associated gene dependencies was CYCLOPS (Copy-number alterations Yielding Cancer Liabilities Owing to Partial losS) genes, and spliceosome components were the most prevalent. One of these, the pre-mRNA splicing factor SF3B1, is also frequently mutated in cancer. We validated SF3B1 as a CYCLOPS gene and found that human cancer cells harboring partial SF3B1 copy-loss lack a reservoir of SF3b complex that protects cells with normal SF3B1 copy number from cell death upon partial SF3B1 suppression. These data provide a catalog of copy-number associated gene dependencies and identify partial copy-loss of wild-type SF3B1 as a novel, non-driver cancer gene dependency.

  6. High-Resolution Analysis of Gene Copy Number Alterations in Human Prostate Cancer Using CGH on cDNA Microarrays: Impact of Copy Number on Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maija Wolf

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Identification of target genes for genetic rearrangements in prostate cancer and the impact of copy number changes on gene expression are currently not well understood. Here, we applied high-resolution comparative genomic hybridization (CGH on cDNA microarrays for analysis of prostate cancer cell lines. CGH microarrays identified most of the alterations detected by classical chromosomal CGH, as well as a number of previously unreported alterations. Specific recurrent regions of gain (28 and loss (18 were found, their boundaries defined with sub-megabasepair accuracy. The most common changes included copy number decreases at 13% and gains at iq and 5p. Refined mapping identified several sites, such as at 13q (33-44, 49-51, 74-76 Mbp from the p-telomere, which matched with minimal regions of loss seen in extensive loss of heterozygosity mapping studies of large numbers of tumors. Previously unreported recurrent changes were found at 2p, 2q, 3p, 17q (losses, at 3q, 5p, 6p (gains. Integration of genomic and transcriptomic data revealed the role of individual candidate target genes for genomic alterations as well as a highly significant (P < .0001 overall association between copy number levels and the percentage of differentially expressed genes. Across the genome, the overall impact of copy number on gene expression levels was, to a large extent, attributable to low-level gains and losses of copy number, corresponding to common deletions and gains of often large chromosomal regions.

  7. Importance of rare gene copy number alterations for personalized tumor characterization and survival analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Michael; Friedrich, Betty; Beyer, Andreas

    2016-10-03

    It has proven exceedingly difficult to ascertain rare copy number alterations (CNAs) that may have strong effects in individual tumors. We show that a regulatory network inferred from gene expression and gene copy number data of 768 human cancer cell lines can be used to quantify the impact of patient-specific CNAs on survival signature genes. A focused analysis of tumors from six tissues reveals that rare patient-specific gene CNAs often have stronger effects on signature genes than frequent gene CNAs. Further comparison to a related network-based approach shows that the integration of indirectly acting gene CNAs significantly improves the survival analysis.

  8. Gene expression profiling and gene copy-number changes in malignant mesothelioma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanazzi, Claudia; Hersmus, Remko; Veltman, Imke M; Gillis, Ad J M; van Drunen, Ellen; Beverloo, H Berna; Hegmans, Joost P J J; Verweij, Marielle; Lambrecht, Bart N; Oosterhuis, J Wolter; Looijenga, Leendert H J

    2007-10-01

    Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is an asbestos-induced tumor that acquires aneuploid DNA content during the tumorigenic process. We used instable MM cell lines as an in vitro model to study the impact of DNA copy-number changes on gene expression profiling, in the course of their chromosomal redistribution process. Two MM cell lines, PMR-MM2 (early passages of in vitro culture) and PMR-MM7 (both early and late passages of in vitro culture), were cytogenetically characterized. Genomic gains and losses were precisely defined using microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH), and minimal overlapping analysis led to the identification of the common unbalanced genomic regions. Using the U133Plus 2.0 Affymetrix gene chip array, we analyzed PMR-MM7 early and late passages for genome-wide gene expression, and correlated the differentially expressed genes with copy-number changes. The presence of a high number of genetic imbalances occurring from early to late culture steps reflected the tendency of MM cells toward genomic instability. The selection of specific chromosomal abnormalities observed during subsequent cultures demonstrated the spontaneous evolution of the cancer cells in an in vitro environment. MM cell lines were characterized by copy-number changes associated with the TP53 apoptotic pathway already present at the first steps of in vitro culture. Prolonged culture led to acquisition of additional chromosomal copy-number changes associated with dysregulation of genes involved in cell adhesion, regulation of mitotic cell cycle, signal transduction, carbohydrate metabolism, motor activity, glycosaminoglycan biosynthesis, protein binding activity, lipid transport, ATP synthesis, and methyltransferase activity.

  9. Variations in CCL3L gene cluster sequence and non-specific gene copy numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edberg Jeffrey C

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Copy number variations (CNVs of the gene CC chemokine ligand 3-like1 (CCL3L1 have been implicated in HIV-1 susceptibility, but the association has been inconsistent. CCL3L1 shares homology with a cluster of genes localized to chromosome 17q12, namely CCL3, CCL3L2, and, CCL3L3. These genes are involved in host defense and inflammatory processes. Several CNV assays have been developed for the CCL3L1 gene. Findings Through pairwise and multiple alignments of these genes, we have shown that the homology between these genes ranges from 50% to 99% in complete gene sequences and from 70-100% in the exonic regions, with CCL3L1 and CCL3L3 being identical. By use of MEGA 4 and BioEdit, we aligned sense primers, anti-sense primers, and probes used in several previously described assays against pre-multiple alignments of all four chemokine genes. Each set of probes and primers aligned and matched with overlapping sequences in at least two of the four genes, indicating that previously utilized RT-PCR based CNV assays are not specific for only CCL3L1. The four available assays measured median copies of 2 and 3-4 in European and African American, respectively. The concordance between the assays ranged from 0.44-0.83 suggesting individual discordant calls and inconsistencies with the assays from the expected gene coverage from the known sequence. Conclusions This indicates that some of the inconsistencies in the association studies could be due to assays that provide heterogenous results. Sequence information to determine CNV of the three genes separately would allow to test whether their association with the pathogenesis of a human disease or phenotype is affected by an individual gene or by a combination of these genes.

  10. Nuclear gene defects in mitochondrial disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeviani, M; Corona, P; Nijtmans, L; Tiranti, V

    1999-12-01

    An increasing number of nuclear genes have been associated with abnormalities of oxidative phosphorylation and mitochondrial disorders. The protein products of these genes can be grouped into three categories: structural components of the respiratory chain, factors influencing the structural integrity or the copy number of mitochondrial DNA, and proteins which control the formation, assembly and turnover of the respiratory complexes. Loss-of-function mutations in SURF-1, a gene belonging to the third category, have been associated with Leigh syndrome with cytochrome c oxidase deficiency. Mature Surf-1 protein (Surf-1p) is a 30 kDa hydrophobic polypeptide whose function is still unknown. Using antibodies against human Surf-1p, we demonstrated that this protein is imported into mitochondria as a larger precursor. The same analysis revealed that no protein is present in cell lines harboring loss-of-function mutations of SURF-1, regardless of their type and position. We also generated several constructs with truncated or partially deleted SURF-1 cDNAs. None of these constructs, expressed into SURF-1 null mutant cells, were able to rescue the COX phenotype, suggesting that different regions of the protein are all essential for function. Finally, experiments based on 2D gel electrophoresis indicated that assembly of COX in SURF-1 null mutants is blocked at an early step, most likely before the incorporation of subunit II in the nascent intermediates composed of subunit I alone or subunit I plus subunit IV.

  11. Identification of candidate growth promoting genes in ovarian cancer through integrated copy number and expression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishna, Manasa; Williams, Louise H; Boyle, Samantha E; Bearfoot, Jennifer L; Sridhar, Anita; Speed, Terence P; Gorringe, Kylie L; Campbell, Ian G

    2010-04-08

    Ovarian cancer is a disease characterised by complex genomic rearrangements but the majority of the genes that are the target of these alterations remain unidentified. Cataloguing these target genes will provide useful insights into the disease etiology and may provide an opportunity to develop novel diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. High resolution genome wide copy number and matching expression data from 68 primary epithelial ovarian carcinomas of various histotypes was integrated to identify genes in regions of most frequent amplification with the strongest correlation with expression and copy number. Regions on chromosomes 3, 7, 8, and 20 were most frequently increased in copy number (> 40% of samples). Within these regions, 703/1370 (51%) unique gene expression probesets were differentially expressed when samples with gain were compared to samples without gain. 30% of these differentially expressed probesets also showed a strong positive correlation (r > or =0.6) between expression and copy number. We also identified 21 regions of high amplitude copy number gain, in which 32 known protein coding genes showed a strong positive correlation between expression and copy number. Overall, our data validates previously known ovarian cancer genes, such as ERBB2, and also identified novel potential drivers such as MYNN, PUF60 and TPX2.

  12. Identification of candidate growth promoting genes in ovarian cancer through integrated copy number and expression analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manasa Ramakrishna

    Full Text Available Ovarian cancer is a disease characterised by complex genomic rearrangements but the majority of the genes that are the target of these alterations remain unidentified. Cataloguing these target genes will provide useful insights into the disease etiology and may provide an opportunity to develop novel diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. High resolution genome wide copy number and matching expression data from 68 primary epithelial ovarian carcinomas of various histotypes was integrated to identify genes in regions of most frequent amplification with the strongest correlation with expression and copy number. Regions on chromosomes 3, 7, 8, and 20 were most frequently increased in copy number (> 40% of samples. Within these regions, 703/1370 (51% unique gene expression probesets were differentially expressed when samples with gain were compared to samples without gain. 30% of these differentially expressed probesets also showed a strong positive correlation (r > or =0.6 between expression and copy number. We also identified 21 regions of high amplitude copy number gain, in which 32 known protein coding genes showed a strong positive correlation between expression and copy number. Overall, our data validates previously known ovarian cancer genes, such as ERBB2, and also identified novel potential drivers such as MYNN, PUF60 and TPX2.

  13. Selection of suitable endogenous reference genes for relative copy number detection in sugarcane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Bantong; Guo, Jinlong; Que, Youxiong; Fu, Zhiwei; Wu, Luguang; Xu, Liping

    2014-05-19

    Transgene copy number has a great impact on the expression level and stability of exogenous gene in transgenic plants. Proper selection of endogenous reference genes is necessary for detection of genetic components in genetically modification (GM) crops by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) or by qualitative PCR approach, especially in sugarcane with polyploid and aneuploid genomic structure. qPCR technique has been widely accepted as an accurate, time-saving method on determination of copy numbers in transgenic plants and on detection of genetically modified plants to meet the regulatory and legislative requirement. In this study, to find a suitable endogenous reference gene and its real-time PCR assay for sugarcane (Saccharum spp. hybrids) DNA content quantification, we evaluated a set of potential "single copy" genes including P4H, APRT, ENOL, CYC, TST and PRR, through qualitative PCR and absolute quantitative PCR. Based on copy number comparisons among different sugarcane genotypes, including five S. officinarum, one S. spontaneum and two S. spp. hybrids, these endogenous genes fell into three groups: ENOL-3--high copy number group, TST-1 and PRR-1--medium copy number group, P4H-1, APRT-2 and CYC-2--low copy number group. Among these tested genes, P4H, APRT and CYC were the most stable, while ENOL and TST were the least stable across different sugarcane genotypes. Therefore, three primer pairs of P4H-3, APRT-2 and CYC-2 were then selected as the suitable reference gene primer pairs for sugarcane. The test of multi-target reference genes revealed that the APRT gene was a specific amplicon, suggesting this gene is the most suitable to be used as an endogenous reference target for sugarcane DNA content quantification. These results should be helpful for establishing accurate and reliable qualitative and quantitative PCR analysis of GM sugarcane.

  14. Inducible amplification of gene copy number and heterologous protein production in the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morlino, G B; Tizzani, L; Fleer, R; Frontali, L; Bianchi, M M

    1999-11-01

    Heterologous protein production can be doubled by increasing the copy number of the corresponding heterologous gene. We constructed a host-vector system in the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis that was able to induce copy number amplification of pKD1 plasmid-based vectors upon expression of an integrated copy of the plasmid recombinase gene. We increased the production and secretion of two heterologous proteins, glucoamylase from the yeast Arxula adeninivorans and mammalian interleukin-1beta, following gene dosage amplification when the heterologous genes were carried by pKD1-based vectors. The choice of the promoters for expression of the integrated recombinase gene and of the episomal heterologous genes are critical for the mitotic stability of the host-vector system.

  15. ALK Gene Copy Number Gain and Immunohistochemical Expression Status Using Three Antibodies in Neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Kyung; Kim, Sewha

    2017-01-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase ( ALK) gene aberrations-such as mutations, amplifications, and copy number gains-represent a major genetic predisposition to neuroblastoma (NB). This study aimed to evaluate the correlation between ALK gene copy number status, ALK protein expression, and clinicopathological parameters. We retrospectively retrieved 30 cases of poorly differentiated NB and constructed tissue microarrays (TMAs). ALK copy number changes were assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) assays, and ALK immunohistochemistry (IHC) testing was performed using three different antibodies (ALK1, D5F3, and 5A4 clones). ALK amplification and copy number gain were observed in 10% (3/30) and 53.3% (16/30) of the cohort, respectively. There were positive correlations between ALK copy number and IHC-positive rate in ALK1 and 5A4 antibodies ( P copy number gain differed among the three antibodies, with 75% sensitivity in D5F3 and 0% sensitivity in ALK1. ALK-amplified NBs were correlated with synchronous MYCN amplification and chromosome 1p deletion. ALK IHC positivity was frequently observed in INSS stage IV and high-risk group patients. In conclusion, this study identified that an increase in the ALK copy number is a frequent genetic alteration in poorly differentiated NB. ALK-amplified NBs showed consistent ALK IHC positivity with all kinds of antibodies. In contrast, the detection performance of ALK copy number gain was antibody dependent, with the D5F3 antibody showing the best sensitivity.

  16. Copy number variation of KIR genes influences HIV-1 control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pelak, Kimberly; Need, Anna C; Fellay, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    A genome-wide screen for large structural variants showed that a copy number variant (CNV) in the region encoding killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) associates with HIV-1 control as measured by plasma viral load at set point in individuals of European ancestry. This CNV encompasses...... the KIR3DL1-KIR3DS1 locus, encoding receptors that interact with specific HLA-Bw4 molecules to regulate the activation of lymphocyte subsets including natural killer (NK) cells. We quantified the number of copies of KIR3DS1 and KIR3DL1 in a large HIV-1 positive cohort, and showed that an increase in KIR3...... individuals with multiple copies of KIR3DL1, in the presence of KIR3DS1 and the appropriate ligands, inhibit HIV-1 replication more robustly, and associated with a significant expansion in the frequency of KIR3DS1+, but not KIR3DL1+, NK cells in their peripheral blood. Our results suggest that the relative...

  17. TOP1 gene copy numbers are increased in cancers of the bile duct and pancreas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunnet, Mie; Calatayud, Dan; Schultz, Nicolai Aa.

    2015-01-01

    ) poison. Top1 protein, TOP1 gene copy number and mRNA expression, respectively, have been proposed as predictive biomarkers of response to irinotecan in other cancers. Here we investigate the occurrence of TOP1 gene aberrations in cancers of the bile ducts and pancreas. Material and methods. TOP1...... and centromere 20 (CEN-20) numbers were investigated by fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses in tumor tissue from 226 patients. The frequencies of aberration in the TOP1 gene copy number, the CEN-20 copy number and the TOP1/CEN-20 ratio were analyzed. As TOP1 is located on chromosome 20, the CEN-20 probe...... was included to distinguish between chromosomal and gene amplifications. Results. In PC, 29.8% had an increased TOP1 copy number (≥3.5n gene copies per cell) and 10.8% had a TOP1/CEN-20 ratio >1.5. In bile duct cancer, 12.8 % had an increased TOP1 copy number and 6.4% had a TOP1/CEN-20 ratio >1.5. Neither...

  18. Integrated analyses of copy number variations and gene expression in lung adenocarcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Pin Lu

    Full Text Available Numerous efforts have been made to elucidate the etiology and improve the treatment of lung cancer, but the overall five-year survival rate is still only 15%. Identification of prognostic biomarkers for lung cancer using gene expression microarrays poses a major challenge in that very few overlapping genes have been reported among different studies. To address this issue, we have performed concurrent genome-wide analyses of copy number variation and gene expression to identify genes reproducibly associated with tumorigenesis and survival in non-smoking female lung adenocarcinoma. The genomic landscape of frequent copy number variable regions (CNVRs in at least 30% of samples was revealed, and their aberration patterns were highly similar to several studies reported previously. Further statistical analysis for genes located in the CNVRs identified 475 genes differentially expressed between tumor and normal tissues (p<10(-5. We demonstrated the reproducibility of these genes in another lung cancer study (p = 0.0034, Fisher's exact test, and showed the concordance between copy number variations and gene expression changes by elevated Pearson correlation coefficients. Pathway analysis revealed two major dysregulated functions in lung tumorigenesis: survival regulation via AKT signaling and cytoskeleton reorganization. Further validation of these enriched pathways using three independent cohorts demonstrated effective prediction of survival. In conclusion, by integrating gene expression profiles and copy number variations, we identified genes/pathways that may serve as prognostic biomarkers for lung tumorigenesis.

  19. Selection of Suitable Endogenous Reference Genes for Relative Copy Number Detection in Sugarcane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bantong Xue

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Transgene copy number has a great impact on the expression level and stability of exogenous gene in transgenic plants. Proper selection of endogenous reference genes is necessary for detection of genetic components in genetically modification (GM crops by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR or by qualitative PCR approach, especially in sugarcane with polyploid and aneuploid genomic structure. qPCR technique has been widely accepted as an accurate, time-saving method on determination of copy numbers in transgenic plants and on detection of genetically modified plants to meet the regulatory and legislative requirement. In this study, to find a suitable endogenous reference gene and its real-time PCR assay for sugarcane (Saccharum spp. hybrids DNA content quantification, we evaluated a set of potential “single copy” genes including P4H, APRT, ENOL, CYC, TST and PRR, through qualitative PCR and absolute quantitative PCR. Based on copy number comparisons among different sugarcane genotypes, including five S. officinarum, one S. spontaneum and two S. spp. hybrids, these endogenous genes fell into three groups: ENOL-3—high copy number group, TST-1 and PRR-1—medium copy number group, P4H-1, APRT-2 and CYC-2—low copy number group. Among these tested genes, P4H, APRT and CYC were the most stable, while ENOL and TST were the least stable across different sugarcane genotypes. Therefore, three primer pairs of P4H-3, APRT-2 and CYC-2 were then selected as the suitable reference gene primer pairs for sugarcane. The test of multi-target reference genes revealed that the APRT gene was a specific amplicon, suggesting this gene is the most suitable to be used as an endogenous reference target for sugarcane DNA content quantification. These results should be helpful for establishing accurate and reliable qualitative and quantitative PCR analysis of GM sugarcane.

  20. Single-Copy Genes as Molecular Markers for Phylogenomic Studies in Seed Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen; De La Torre, Amanda R; Sterck, Lieven; Cánovas, Francisco M; Avila, Concepción; Merino, Irene; Cabezas, José Antonio; Cervera, María Teresa; Ingvarsson, Pär K; Van de Peer, Yves

    2017-05-01

    Phylogenetic relationships among seed plant taxa, especially within the gymnosperms, remain contested. In contrast to angiosperms, for which several genomic, transcriptomic and phylogenetic resources are available, there are few, if any, molecular markers that allow broad comparisons among gymnosperm species. With few gymnosperm genomes available, recently obtained transcriptomes in gymnosperms are a great addition to identifying single-copy gene families as molecular markers for phylogenomic analysis in seed plants. Taking advantage of an increasing number of available genomes and transcriptomes, we identified single-copy genes in a broad collection of seed plants and used these to infer phylogenetic relationships between major seed plant taxa. This study aims at extending the current phylogenetic toolkit for seed plants, assessing its ability for resolving seed plant phylogeny, and discussing potential factors affecting phylogenetic reconstruction. In total, we identified 3,072 single-copy genes in 31 gymnosperms and 2,156 single-copy genes in 34 angiosperms. All studied seed plants shared 1,469 single-copy genes, which are generally involved in functions like DNA metabolism, cell cycle, and photosynthesis. A selected set of 106 single-copy genes provided good resolution for the seed plant phylogeny except for gnetophytes. Although some of our analyses support a sister relationship between gnetophytes and other gymnosperms, phylogenetic trees from concatenated alignments without 3rd codon positions and amino acid alignments under the CAT + GTR model, support gnetophytes as a sister group to Pinaceae. Our phylogenomic analyses demonstrate that, in general, single-copy genes can uncover both recent and deep divergences of seed plant phylogeny. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  1. Copy number variation of KIR genes influences HIV-1 control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pelak, Kimberly; Need, Anna C; Fellay, Jacques;

    2011-01-01

    A genome-wide screen for large structural variants showed that a copy number variant (CNV) in the region encoding killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) associates with HIV-1 control as measured by plasma viral load at set point in individuals of European ancestry. This CNV encompasses...... the KIR3DL1-KIR3DS1 locus, encoding receptors that interact with specific HLA-Bw4 molecules to regulate the activation of lymphocyte subsets including natural killer (NK) cells. We quantified the number of copies of KIR3DS1 and KIR3DL1 in a large HIV-1 positive cohort, and showed that an increase in KIR3......DS1 count associates with a lower viral set point if its putative ligand is present (p = 0.00028), as does an increase in KIR3DL1 count in the presence of KIR3DS1 and appropriate ligands for both receptors (p = 0.0015). We further provide functional data that demonstrate that NK cells from...

  2. Structural organization of the genes encoding the small nuclear RNAs U1 to U6 of Tetrahymena thermophila is very similar to that of plant small nuclear RNA genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orum, H; Nielsen, Henrik; Engberg, J

    1992-01-01

    We report the sequences of the genes encoding the small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) U1 to U6 of the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila. The genes of the individual snRNAs exist in two to six slightly different copies per haploid genome. Sequence analyses of the gene-flanking regions indicate that there ar......We report the sequences of the genes encoding the small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) U1 to U6 of the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila. The genes of the individual snRNAs exist in two to six slightly different copies per haploid genome. Sequence analyses of the gene-flanking regions indicate...

  3. EPSPS Gene Copy Number and Whole-Plant Glyphosate Resistance Level in Kochia scoparia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaines, Todd A; Barker, Abigail L; Patterson, Eric L; Westra, Philip; Westra, Eric P; Wilson, Robert G; Jha, Prashant; Kumar, Vipan; Kniss, Andrew R

    2016-01-01

    Glyphosate-resistant (GR) Kochia scoparia has evolved in dryland chemical fallow systems throughout North America and the mechanism of resistance involves 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) gene duplication. Agricultural fields in four states were surveyed for K. scoparia in 2013 and tested for glyphosate-resistance level and EPSPS gene copy number. Glyphosate resistance was confirmed in K. scoparia populations collected from sugarbeet fields in Colorado, Wyoming, and Nebraska, and Montana. Glyphosate resistance was also confirmed in K. scoparia accessions collected from wheat-fallow fields in Montana. All GR samples had increased EPSPS gene copy number, with median population values up to 11 from sugarbeet fields and up to 13 in Montana wheat-fallow fields. The results indicate that glyphosate susceptibility can be accurately diagnosed using EPSPS gene copy number.

  4. Evaluation of β-globin gene therapy constructs in single-copy transgenic mice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Ellis (James); K.C. Tan-Un; P. Pasceri; A. Harper; X. Wu; P.J. Fraser (Peter); F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractEffective gene therapy constructs based on retrovirus or adeno-associated virus vectors will require regulatory elements that direct expression of genes transduced at single copy. Most beta-globin constructs designed for therapy of beta-thalassemias are regulated by the 5'HS2 component o

  5. Comparison of quantitative PCR assays for Escherichia coli targeting ribosomal RNA and single copy genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aims: Compare specificity and sensitivity of quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays targeting single and multi-copy gene regions of Escherichia coli. Methods and Results: A previously reported assay targeting the uidA gene (uidA405) was used as the basis for comparing the taxono...

  6. Evolutionary relationships within the lamioid tribe Synandreae (Lamiaceae) based on multiple low-copy nuclear loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Tilottama; Catlin, Nathan S.; Garner, Drake M.G.; Cantino, Philip D.; Scheen, Anne-Cathrine

    2016-01-01

    The subfamily Lamioideae (Lamiaceae) comprises ten tribes, of which only Stachydeae and Synandreae include New World members. Previous studies have investigated the phylogenetic relationships among the members of Synandreae based on plastid and nuclear ribosomal DNA loci. In an effort to re-examine the phylogenetic relationships within Synandreae, the current study incorporates data from four low-copy nuclear loci, PHOT1, PHOT2, COR, and PPR. Our results confirm previous studies based on chloroplast and nuclear ribosomal markers in supporting the monophyly of tribe Synandreae, as well as sister relationships between Brazoria and Warnockia, and between that pair of genera and a monophyletic Physostegia. However, we observe incongruence in the relationships of Macbridea and Synandra. The placement of Synandreae within Lamioideae is poorly resolved and incongruent among different analyses, and the sister group of Synandreae remains enigmatic. Comparison of the colonization and migration patterns corroborates a single colonization of the New World by Synandreae during the Late Miocene/Tortonian age. This is in contrast to the only other lamioid tribe that includes New World members, Stachydeae, which colonized the New World at least twice—during the mid-Miocene and Pliocene. Edaphic conditions and intolerance of soil acidity may be factors that restricted the distribution of most genera of Synandreae to southeastern and south–central North America, whereas polyploidy could have increased the colonizing capability of the more wide-ranging genus, Physostegia. PMID:27547537

  7. Low AMY1 Gene Copy Number Is Associated with Increased Body Mass Index in Prepubertal Boys.

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    M Loredana Marcovecchio

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies have identified more than 60 single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with Body Mass Index (BMI. Additional genetic variants, such as copy number variations (CNV, have also been investigated in relation to BMI. Recently, the highly polymorphic CNV in the salivary amylase (AMY1 gene, encoding an enzyme implicated in the first step of starch digestion, has been associated with obesity in adults and children. We assessed the potential association between AMY1 copy number and a wide range of BMI in a population of Italian school-children.744 children (354 boys, 390 girls, mean age (±SD: 8.4±1.4years underwent anthropometric assessments (height, weight and collection of saliva samples for DNA extraction. AMY1 copies were evaluated by quantitative PCR.A significant increase of BMI z-score by decreasing AMY1 copy number was observed in boys (β: -0.117, p = 0.033, but not in girls. Similarly, waist circumference (β: -0.155, p = 0.003, adjusted for age was negatively influenced by AMY1 copy number in boys. Boys with 8 or more AMY1 copy numbers presented a significant lower BMI z-score (p = 0.04 and waist circumference (p = 0.01 when compared to boys with less than 8 copy numbers.In this pediatric-only, population-based study, a lower AMY1 copy number emerged to be associated with increased BMI in boys. These data confirm previous findings from adult studies and support a potential role of a higher copy number of the salivary AMY1 gene in protecting from excess weight gain.

  8. Low AMY1 Gene Copy Number Is Associated with Increased Body Mass Index in Prepubertal Boys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verginelli, Fabio; De Lellis, Laura; Capelli, Cristian; Verzilli, Delfina; Chiarelli, Francesco; Mohn, Angelika; Cama, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Background Genome-wide association studies have identified more than 60 single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with Body Mass Index (BMI). Additional genetic variants, such as copy number variations (CNV), have also been investigated in relation to BMI. Recently, the highly polymorphic CNV in the salivary amylase (AMY1) gene, encoding an enzyme implicated in the first step of starch digestion, has been associated with obesity in adults and children. We assessed the potential association between AMY1 copy number and a wide range of BMI in a population of Italian school-children. Methods 744 children (354 boys, 390 girls, mean age (±SD): 8.4±1.4years) underwent anthropometric assessments (height, weight) and collection of saliva samples for DNA extraction. AMY1 copies were evaluated by quantitative PCR. Results A significant increase of BMI z-score by decreasing AMY1 copy number was observed in boys (β: -0.117, p = 0.033), but not in girls. Similarly, waist circumference (β: -0.155, p = 0.003, adjusted for age) was negatively influenced by AMY1 copy number in boys. Boys with 8 or more AMY1 copy numbers presented a significant lower BMI z-score (p = 0.04) and waist circumference (p = 0.01) when compared to boys with less than 8 copy numbers. Conclusions In this pediatric-only, population-based study, a lower AMY1 copy number emerged to be associated with increased BMI in boys. These data confirm previous findings from adult studies and support a potential role of a higher copy number of the salivary AMY1 gene in protecting from excess weight gain. PMID:27149670

  9. Duplication and relocation of the functional DPY19L2 gene within low copy repeats

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    Cheung Joseph

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low copy repeats (LCRs are thought to play an important role in recent gene evolution, especially when they facilitate gene duplications. Duplicate genes are fundamental to adaptive evolution, providing substrates for the development of new or shared gene functions. Moreover, silencing of duplicate genes can have an indirect effect on adaptive evolution by causing genomic relocation of functional genes. These changes are theorized to have been a major factor in speciation. Results Here we present a novel example showing functional gene relocation within a LCR. We characterize the genomic structure and gene content of eight related LCRs on human Chromosomes 7 and 12. Two members of a novel transmembrane gene family, DPY19L, were identified in these regions, along with six transcribed pseudogenes. One of these genes, DPY19L2, is found on Chromosome 12 and is not syntenic with its mouse orthologue. Instead, the human locus syntenic to mouse Dpy19l2 contains a pseudogene, DPY19L2P1. This indicates that the ancestral copy of this gene has been silenced, while the descendant copy has remained active. Thus, the functional copy of this gene has been relocated to a new genomic locus. We then describe the expansion and evolution of the DPY19L gene family from a single gene found in invertebrate animals. Ancient duplications have led to multiple homologues in different lineages, with three in fish, frogs and birds and four in mammals. Conclusion Our results show that the DPY19L family has expanded throughout the vertebrate lineage and has undergone recent primate-specific evolution within LCRs.

  10. Topoisomerase-1 gene copy aberrations are frequent in patients with breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kümler, Iben; Balslev, Eva; Poulsen, Tim S.

    2015-01-01

    of TOP1 gene copy gain in BC. The prevalence of TOP1 gene copy gain was investigated by fluorescence in situ hybridization with a TOP1/CEN-20 probemix in normal breast tissue (N=100) and in tissue from patients with metastatic BC in a discovery (N=100) and a validation cohort (N=205). As amplification...... of 20q including CEN-20 is common in BC a TOP1/CEN-2 probemix was applied to the validation cohort. More than 30% of the patients had gene copy numbers of ≥ 4 and approximately 20% of the patients had TOP1/CEN-20 ratios ≥ 1.5. The CEN-2 probe did not add any information. Gain of the TOP1 gene appears...... to be common in BC making the gene a potential biomarker for response to treatment with Top1 inhibitors. As 20q amplification is a common finding in BC and as no other suitable reference gene has yet been identified, TOP1 copy number may be a more valid method of detecting gain than using a gene...

  11. Copy number polymorphism of the salivary amylase gene: implications in human nutrition research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, J L; Saus, E; Smalley, S V; Cataldo, L R; Alberti, G; Parada, J; Gratacòs, M; Estivill, X

    2012-01-01

    The salivary α-amylase is a calcium-binding enzyme that initiates starch digestion in the oral cavity. The α-amylase genes are located in a cluster on the chromosome that includes salivary amylase genes (AMY1), two pancreatic α-amylase genes (AMY2A and AMY2B) and a related pseudogene. The AMY1 genes show extensive copy number variation which is directly proportional to the salivary α-amylase content in saliva. The α-amylase amount in saliva is also influenced by other factors, such as hydration status, psychosocial stress level, and short-term dietary habits. It has been shown that the average copy number of AMY1 gene is higher in populations that evolved under high-starch diets versus low-starch diets, reflecting an intense positive selection imposed by diet on amylase copy number during evolution. In this context, a number of different aspects can be considered in evaluating the possible impact of copy number variation of the AMY1 gene on nutrition research, such as issues related to human diet gene evolution, action on starch digestion, effect on glycemic response after starch consumption, modulation of the action of α-amylases inhibitors, effect on taste perception and satiety, influence on psychosocial stress and relation to oral health.

  12. Accelerated evolution after gene duplication: a time-dependent process affecting just one copy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegueroles, Cinta; Laurie, Steve; Albà, M Mar

    2013-08-01

    Gene duplication is widely regarded as a major mechanism modeling genome evolution and function. However, the mechanisms that drive the evolution of the two, initially redundant, gene copies are still ill defined. Many gene duplicates experience evolutionary rate acceleration, but the relative contribution of positive selection and random drift to the retention and subsequent evolution of gene duplicates, and for how long the molecular clock may be distorted by these processes, remains unclear. Focusing on rodent genes that duplicated before and after the mouse and rat split, we find significantly increased sequence divergence after duplication in only one of the copies, which in nearly all cases corresponds to the novel daughter copy, independent of the mechanism of duplication. We observe that the evolutionary rate of the accelerated copy, measured as the ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous substitutions, is on average 5-fold higher in the period spanning 4-12 My after the duplication than it was before the duplication. This increase can be explained, at least in part, by the action of positive selection according to the results of the maximum likelihood-based branch-site test. Subsequently, the rate decelerates until purifying selection completely returns to preduplication levels. Reversion to the original rates has already been accomplished 40.5 My after the duplication event, corresponding to a genetic distance of about 0.28 synonymous substitutions per site. Differences in tissue gene expression patterns parallel those of substitution rates, reinforcing the role of neofunctionalization in explaining the evolution of young gene duplicates.

  13. New single-copy nuclear genes for scale insect systematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despite the advent of next-generation sequencing, the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Sanger sequencing remain useful tools for molecular identification and systematics. To date, molecular systematics of scale insects has been constrained by the paucity of loci that researchers have been able to...

  14. Gyrase activity and number of copies of the gyrase B subunit gene in Haemophilus influenzae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabrera-Juarez, E.; Setlow, J.K.

    1985-11-01

    Gyrase activities in extracts of various strains of Haemophilus influenzae can differ by more than an order of magnitude. Measurements of in vitro activity and copy number indicated that most of these differences arose from variations in the number of copies of the gene for the gyrase B subunit, with some strains containing multicopy plasmids coding for that subunit. The quantitative relationship between gyrase and copy number depended on the mutations in the plasmids and in the host. The possibility that the in vivo gyrase activity did not reflect the in vitro data was explored by measurement of alkaline phosphatase and ATPase activity in the extracts. Alkaline phosphatase activity increased with increasing gyrase activity measured in vitro, but ATPase activity did not. The authors conclude that extra supercoiling enhanced transcription of the alkaline phosphatase gene but not the ATPase gene and that it is unlikely that there is much discrepancy between gyrase activity assayed in vitro and the activity in the cell.

  15. Pyruvate Kinase and Fcγ Receptor Gene Copy Numbers Associated With Malaria Phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faik, Imad; van Tong, Hoang; Lell, Bertrand; Meyer, Christian G; Kremsner, Peter G; Velavan, Thirumalaisamy P

    2017-07-15

    Genetic factors are associated with susceptibility to many infectious diseases and may be determinants of clinical progression. Gene copy number variation (CNV) has been shown to be associated with phenotypes of numerous diseases, including malaria. We quantified gene copy numbers of the pyruvate kinase, liver, and red blood cell (PKLR) gene as well as of the Fcγ receptor 2A and Fcγ receptor 2C (FCGR2A, FCGR2C) and Fcγ receptor 3 (FCGR3) genes using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) assays in Gabonese children with severe (n = 184) or and mild (n = 189) malaria and in healthy Gabonese and white individuals (n = 76 each). The means of PKLR, FCGR2A, FCGR2C, and FCGR3 copy numbers were significantly higher among children with severe malaria compared to those with mild malaria (P malaria severity. Copy numbers of the FCGR2A and FCGR2C genes were significantly lower (P = .005) in Gabonese individuals compared with white individuals. In conclusion, CNV of the PKLR, FCGR2A, FCGR2C, and FCGR3 genes is associated with malaria severity, and our results provide evidence for a role of CNV in host responses to malaria. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Copy number change: evolving views on gene amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Kathryn T; Cuff, Laura E; Neidle, Ellen L

    2013-07-01

    The rapid pace of genomic sequence analysis is increasing the awareness of intrinsically dynamic genetic landscapes. Gene duplication and amplification (GDA) contribute to adaptation and evolution by allowing DNA regions to expand and contract in an accordion-like fashion. This process affects diverse aspects of bacterial infection, including antibiotic resistance and host-pathogen interactions. In this review, microbial GDA is discussed, primarily using recent bacterial examples that demonstrate medical and evolutionary consequences. Interplay between GDA and horizontal gene transfer further impact evolutionary trajectories. Complementing the discovery of gene duplication in clinical and environmental settings, experimental evolution provides a powerful method to document genetic change over time. New methods for GDA detection highlight both its importance and its potential application for genetic engineering, synthetic biology and biotechnology.

  17. submitter Metabolomic Profile of Low–Copy Number Carriers at the Salivary α-Amylase Gene Suggests a Metabolic Shift Toward Lipid-Based Energy Production

    CERN Document Server

    Arredouani, Abdelilah; Culeddu, Nicola; Moustafa, Julia El-Sayed; Tichet, Jean; Balkau, Beverley; Brousseau, Thierry; Manca, Marco; Falchi, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Low serum salivary amylase levels have been associated with a range of metabolic abnormalities, including obesity and insulin resistance. We recently suggested that a low copy number at the AMY1 gene, associated with lower enzyme levels, also increases susceptibility to obesity. To advance our understanding of the effect of AMY1 copy number variation on metabolism, we compared the metabolomic signatures of high– and low–copy number carriers. We analyzed, using mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), the sera of healthy normal-weight women carrying either low–AMY1 copies (LAs: four or fewer copies; n = 50) or high–AMY1 copies (HAs: eight or more copies; n = 50). Best-fitting multivariate models (empirical P < 1 × $10^{−3})$ of mass spectrometry and NMR data were concordant in showing differences in lipid metabolism between the two groups. In particular, LA carriers showed lower levels of long- and medium-chain fatty acids, and higher levels of dicarboxylic fatty acids and 2-hydrox...

  18. Conserved Organisation of 45S rDNA Sites and rDNA Gene Copy Number among Major Clades of Early Land Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosato, Marcela; Kovařík, Aleš; Garilleti, Ricardo; Rosselló, Josep A

    2016-01-01

    Genes encoding ribosomal RNA (rDNA) are universal key constituents of eukaryotic genomes, and the nuclear genome harbours hundreds to several thousand copies of each species. Knowledge about the number of rDNA loci and gene copy number provides information for comparative studies of organismal and molecular evolution at various phylogenetic levels. With the exception of seed plants, the range of 45S rDNA locus (encoding 18S, 5.8S and 26S rRNA) and gene copy number variation within key evolutionary plant groups is largely unknown. This is especially true for the three earliest land plant lineages Marchantiophyta (liverworts), Bryophyta (mosses), and Anthocerotophyta (hornworts). In this work, we report the extent of rDNA variation in early land plants, assessing the number of 45S rDNA loci and gene copy number in 106 species and 25 species, respectively, of mosses, liverworts and hornworts. Unexpectedly, the results show a narrow range of ribosomal locus variation (one or two 45S rDNA loci) and gene copies not present in vascular plant lineages, where a wide spectrum is recorded. Mutation analysis of whole genomic reads showed higher (3-fold) intragenomic heterogeneity of Marchantia polymorpha (Marchantiophyta) rDNA compared to Physcomitrella patens (Bryophyta) and two angiosperms (Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tomentosifomis) suggesting the presence of rDNA pseudogenes in its genome. No association between phylogenetic position, taxonomic adscription and the number of rDNA loci and gene copy number was found. Our results suggest a likely evolutionary rDNA stasis during land colonisation and diversification across 480 myr of bryophyte evolution. We hypothesise that strong selection forces may be acting against ribosomal gene locus amplification. Despite showing a predominant haploid phase and infrequent meiosis, overall rDNA homogeneity is not severely compromised in bryophytes.

  19. Conserved Organisation of 45S rDNA Sites and rDNA Gene Copy Number among Major Clades of Early Land Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosato, Marcela; Kovařík, Aleš; Garilleti, Ricardo; Rosselló, Josep A.

    2016-01-01

    Genes encoding ribosomal RNA (rDNA) are universal key constituents of eukaryotic genomes, and the nuclear genome harbours hundreds to several thousand copies of each species. Knowledge about the number of rDNA loci and gene copy number provides information for comparative studies of organismal and molecular evolution at various phylogenetic levels. With the exception of seed plants, the range of 45S rDNA locus (encoding 18S, 5.8S and 26S rRNA) and gene copy number variation within key evolutionary plant groups is largely unknown. This is especially true for the three earliest land plant lineages Marchantiophyta (liverworts), Bryophyta (mosses), and Anthocerotophyta (hornworts). In this work, we report the extent of rDNA variation in early land plants, assessing the number of 45S rDNA loci and gene copy number in 106 species and 25 species, respectively, of mosses, liverworts and hornworts. Unexpectedly, the results show a narrow range of ribosomal locus variation (one or two 45S rDNA loci) and gene copies not present in vascular plant lineages, where a wide spectrum is recorded. Mutation analysis of whole genomic reads showed higher (3-fold) intragenomic heterogeneity of Marchantia polymorpha (Marchantiophyta) rDNA compared to Physcomitrella patens (Bryophyta) and two angiosperms (Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tomentosifomis) suggesting the presence of rDNA pseudogenes in its genome. No association between phylogenetic position, taxonomic adscription and the number of rDNA loci and gene copy number was found. Our results suggest a likely evolutionary rDNA stasis during land colonisation and diversification across 480 myr of bryophyte evolution. We hypothesise that strong selection forces may be acting against ribosomal gene locus amplification. Despite showing a predominant haploid phase and infrequent meiosis, overall rDNA homogeneity is not severely compromised in bryophytes. PMID:27622766

  20. Identification and expression analysis of multiple FRO gene copies in Medicago truncatula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del C Orozco-Mosqueda, Ma; Santoyo, G; Farías-Rodríguez, R; Macías-Rodríguez, L; Valencia-Cantero, E

    2012-12-17

    Iron (Fe) is an essential element for plant growth. Commonly, this element is found in an oxidized form in soil, which is poorly available for plants. Therefore, plants have evolved ferric-chelate reductase enzymes (FRO) to reduce iron into a more soluble ferrous form. Fe scarcity in plants induce the FRO enzyme activity. Although the legume Medicago truncatula has been employed as a model for FRO activity studies, only one copy of the M. truncatula MtFRO1 gene has been characterized so far. In this study, we identified multiple gene copies of the MtFRO gene in the genome of M. truncatula by an in silico search, using BLAST analysis in the database of the M. truncatula Genome Sequencing Project and the National Center for Biotechnology Information, and also determined whether they are functional. We identified five genes apart from MtFRO1, which had been already characterized. All of the MtFRO genes exhibited high identity with homologous FRO genes from Lycopersicon esculentum, Citrus junos and Arabidopsis thaliana. The gene copies also presented characteristic conserved FAD and NADPH motifs, transmembrane regions and oxidoreductase signature motifs. We also detected expression in five of the putative MtFRO sequences by semiquantitative RT-PCR analysis, performed with mRNA from root and shoot tissues. Iron scarcity might be a condition for an elevated expression of the MtFRO genes observed in different M. truncatula tissues.

  1. Deletion of a single-copy DAAM1 gene in congenital heart defect: a case report

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    Bao Bihui

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With an increasing incidence of congenital heart defects (CHDs in recent years, genotype-phenotype correlation and array-based methods have contributed to the genome-wide analysis and understanding of genetic variations in the CHD population. Here, we report a copy number deletion of chromosomal 14q23.1 in a female fetus with complex congenital heart defects. This is the first description of DAAM1 gene deletion associated with congenital heart anomalies. Case Presentation Compared with the control population, one CHD fetus showed a unique copy number deletion of 14q23.1, a region that harbored DAAM1 and KIAA0666 genes. Conclusions Results suggest that the copy number deletion on chromosome 14q23.1 may be critical for cardiogenesis. However, the exact relationship and mechanism of how DAAM1 and KIAA0666 deletion contributes to the onset of CHD is yet to be determined.

  2. Copy number variation of age-related macular degeneration relevant genes in the Korean population.

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    Jung Hyun Park

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Studies that analyzed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP in various genes have shown that genetic factors are strongly associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD susceptibility. Copy number variation (CNV may be an additional type of genetic variation that contributes to AMD pathogenesis. This study investigated CNV in 4 AMD-relevant genes in Korean AMD patients and control subjects. METHODS: Four CNV candidate regions located in AMD-relevant genes (VEGFA, ARMS2/HTRA1, CFH and VLDLR, were selected based on the outcomes of our previous study which elucidated common CNVs in the Asian populations. Real-time PCR based TaqMan Copy Number Assays were performed on CNV candidates in 273 AMD patients and 257 control subjects. RESULTS: The predicted copy number (PCN, 0, 1, 2 or 3+ of each region was called using the CopyCaller program. All candidate genes except ARMS2/HTRA1 showed CNV in at least one individual, in which losses of VEGFA and VLDLR represent novel findings in the Asian population. When the frequencies of PCN were compared, only the gain in VLDLR showed significant differences between AMD patients and control subjects (p = 0.025. Comparisons of the raw copy values (RCV revealed that 3 of 4 candidate genes showed significant differences (2.03 vs. 1.92 for VEGFA, p<0.01; 2.01 vs. 1.97 for CFH, p<0.01; 1.97 vs. 2.01, p<0.01 for ARMS2/HTRA1. CONCLUSION: CNVs located in AMD-relevant genes may be associated with AMD susceptibility. Further investigations encompassing larger patient cohorts are needed to elucidate the role of CNV in AMD pathogenesis.

  3. Alpha-defensin DEFA1A3 gene copy number elevation in Danish Crohn's disease patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersgaard, Cathrine; Fode, Peder; Dybdahl, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE OF STUDY: Extensive copy number variation is observed for the DEFA1A3 gene encoding alpha-defensins 1-3. The objective of this study was to determine the involvement of alpha-defensins in colonic tissue from Crohn's disease (CD) patients and the possible genetic association...

  4. Dietary Variation and Evolution of Gene Copy Number among Dog Breeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, Taylor; Jagoda, Evelyn; Capellini, Terence D

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged human interactions and artificial selection have influenced the genotypic and phenotypic diversity among dog breeds. Because humans and dogs occupy diverse habitats, ecological contexts have likely contributed to breed-specific positive selection. Prior to the advent of modern dog-feeding practices, there was likely substantial variation in dietary landscapes among disparate dog breeds. As such, we investigated one type of genetic variant, copy number variation, in three metabolic genes: glucokinase regulatory protein (GCKR), phytanol-CoA 2-hydroxylase (PHYH), and pancreatic α-amylase 2B (AMY2B). These genes code for proteins that are responsible for metabolizing dietary products that originate from distinctly different food types: sugar, meat, and starch, respectively. After surveying copy number variation among dogs with diverse dietary histories, we found no correlation between diet and positive selection in either GCKR or PHYH. Although it has been previously demonstrated that dogs experienced a copy number increase in AMY2B relative to wolves during or after the dog domestication process, we demonstrate that positive selection continued to act on amylase copy number in dog breeds that consumed starch-rich diets in time periods after domestication. Furthermore, we found that introgression with wolves is not responsible for deterioration of positive selection on AMY2B among diverse dog breeds. Together, this supports the hypothesis that the amylase copy number expansion is found universally in dogs.

  5. Dietary Variation and Evolution of Gene Copy Number among Dog Breeds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor Reiter

    Full Text Available Prolonged human interactions and artificial selection have influenced the genotypic and phenotypic diversity among dog breeds. Because humans and dogs occupy diverse habitats, ecological contexts have likely contributed to breed-specific positive selection. Prior to the advent of modern dog-feeding practices, there was likely substantial variation in dietary landscapes among disparate dog breeds. As such, we investigated one type of genetic variant, copy number variation, in three metabolic genes: glucokinase regulatory protein (GCKR, phytanol-CoA 2-hydroxylase (PHYH, and pancreatic α-amylase 2B (AMY2B. These genes code for proteins that are responsible for metabolizing dietary products that originate from distinctly different food types: sugar, meat, and starch, respectively. After surveying copy number variation among dogs with diverse dietary histories, we found no correlation between diet and positive selection in either GCKR or PHYH. Although it has been previously demonstrated that dogs experienced a copy number increase in AMY2B relative to wolves during or after the dog domestication process, we demonstrate that positive selection continued to act on amylase copy number in dog breeds that consumed starch-rich diets in time periods after domestication. Furthermore, we found that introgression with wolves is not responsible for deterioration of positive selection on AMY2B among diverse dog breeds. Together, this supports the hypothesis that the amylase copy number expansion is found universally in dogs.

  6. MAP kinase pathway gene copy alterations in NRAS/BRAF wild-type advanced melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orouji, Elias; Orouji, Azadeh; Gaiser, Timo; Larribère, Lionel; Gebhardt, Christoffer; Utikal, Jochen

    2016-05-01

    Recent therapeutic advances have improved melanoma patientś clinical outcome. Novel therapeutics targeting BRAF, NRAS and cKit mutant melanomas are widely used in clinical practice. However therapeutic options in NRAS(wild-type) /BRAF(wild-type) /cKit(wild-type) melanoma patients are limited. Our study shows that gene copy numbers of members of the MAPK signaling pathway vary in different melanoma subgroups. NRAS(wild-type) /BRAF(wild-type) melanoma metastases are characterized by significant gains of MAP2K1 (MEK1) and MAPK3 (ERK1) gene loci. These additional gene copies could lead to an activation of the MAPK signaling pathway via a gene-dosage effect. Our results suggest that downstream analyses of the pMEK and pERK expression status in NRAS(wild-type) /BRAF(wild-type) melanoma patients identify patients that could benefit from targeted therapies with MEK and ERK inhibitors.

  7. EPSPS Gene Copy Number and Whole-Plant Glyphosate Resistance Level in Kochia scoparia

    OpenAIRE

    Gaines, Todd A.; Barker, Abigail L.; Patterson, Eric L.; Westra, Philip; Westra, Eric P.; Wilson, Robert G.; Jha, Prashant; Kumar, Vipan; Andrew R Kniss

    2016-01-01

    Glyphosate-resistant (GR) Kochia scoparia has evolved in dryland chemical fallow systems throughout North America and the mechanism of resistance involves 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) gene duplication. Agricultural fields in four states were surveyed for K. scoparia in 2013 and tested for glyphosate-resistance level and EPSPS gene copy number. Glyphosate resistance was confirmed in K. scoparia populations collected from sugarbeet fields in Colorado, Wyoming, and Nebrask...

  8. Incorporating 16S Gene Copy Number Information Improves Estimates of Microbial Diversity and Abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kembel, Steven W.; Wu, Martin; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Green, Jessica L.

    2012-01-01

    The abundance of different SSU rRNA (“16S”) gene sequences in environmental samples is widely used in studies of microbial ecology as a measure of microbial community structure and diversity. However, the genomic copy number of the 16S gene varies greatly – from one in many species to up to 15 in some bacteria and to hundreds in some microbial eukaryotes. As a result of this variation the relative abundance of 16S genes in environmental samples can be attributed both to variation in the relative abundance of different organisms, and to variation in genomic 16S copy number among those organisms. Despite this fact, many studies assume that the abundance of 16S gene sequences is a surrogate measure of the relative abundance of the organisms containing those sequences. Here we present a method that uses data on sequences and genomic copy number of 16S genes along with phylogenetic placement and ancestral state estimation to estimate organismal abundances from environmental DNA sequence data. We use theory and simulations to demonstrate that 16S genomic copy number can be accurately estimated from the short reads typically obtained from high-throughput environmental sequencing of the 16S gene, and that organismal abundances in microbial communities are more strongly correlated with estimated abundances obtained from our method than with gene abundances. We re-analyze several published empirical data sets and demonstrate that the use of gene abundance versus estimated organismal abundance can lead to different inferences about community diversity and structure and the identity of the dominant taxa in microbial communities. Our approach will allow microbial ecologists to make more accurate inferences about microbial diversity and abundance based on 16S sequence data. PMID:23133348

  9. Systematic Inference of Copy-Number Genotypes from Personal Genome Sequencing Data Reveals Extensive Olfactory Receptor Gene Content Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waszak, Sebastian M.; Hasin, Yehudit; Zichner, Thomas; Olender, Tsviya; Keydar, Ifat; Khen, Miriam; Stütz, Adrian M.; Schlattl, Andreas; Lancet, Doron; Korbel, Jan O.

    2010-01-01

    Copy-number variations (CNVs) are widespread in the human genome, but comprehensive assignments of integer locus copy-numbers (i.e., copy-number genotypes) that, for example, enable discrimination of homozygous from heterozygous CNVs, have remained challenging. Here we present CopySeq, a novel computational approach with an underlying statistical framework that analyzes the depth-of-coverage of high-throughput DNA sequencing reads, and can incorporate paired-end and breakpoint junction analysis based CNV-analysis approaches, to infer locus copy-number genotypes. We benchmarked CopySeq by genotyping 500 chromosome 1 CNV regions in 150 personal genomes sequenced at low-coverage. The assessed copy-number genotypes were highly concordant with our performed qPCR experiments (Pearson correlation coefficient 0.94), and with the published results of two microarray platforms (95–99% concordance). We further demonstrated the utility of CopySeq for analyzing gene regions enriched for segmental duplications by comprehensively inferring copy-number genotypes in the CNV-enriched >800 olfactory receptor (OR) human gene and pseudogene loci. CopySeq revealed that OR loci display an extensive range of locus copy-numbers across individuals, with zero to two copies in some OR loci, and two to nine copies in others. Among genetic variants affecting OR loci we identified deleterious variants including CNVs and SNPs affecting ∼15% and ∼20% of the human OR gene repertoire, respectively, implying that genetic variants with a possible impact on smell perception are widespread. Finally, we found that for several OR loci the reference genome appears to represent a minor-frequency variant, implying a necessary revision of the OR repertoire for future functional studies. CopySeq can ascertain genomic structural variation in specific gene families as well as at a genome-wide scale, where it may enable the quantitative evaluation of CNVs in genome-wide association studies involving high

  10. Copy number variations in alternative splicing gene networks impact lifespan.

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    Joseph T Glessner

    Full Text Available Longevity has a strong genetic component evidenced by family-based studies. Lipoprotein metabolism, FOXO proteins, and insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathways in model systems have shown polygenic variations predisposing to shorter lifespan. To test the hypothesis that rare variants could influence lifespan, we compared the rates of CNVs in healthy children (0-18 years of age with individuals 67 years or older. CNVs at a significantly higher frequency in the pediatric cohort were considered risk variants impacting lifespan, while those enriched in the geriatric cohort were considered longevity protective variants. We performed a whole-genome CNV analysis on 7,313 children and 2,701 adults of European ancestry genotyped with 302,108 SNP probes. Positive findings were evaluated in an independent cohort of 2,079 pediatric and 4,692 geriatric subjects. We detected 8 deletions and 10 duplications that were enriched in the pediatric group (P=3.33×10(-8-1.6×10(-2 unadjusted, while only one duplication was enriched in the geriatric cohort (P=6.3×10(-4. Population stratification correction resulted in 5 deletions and 3 duplications remaining significant (P=5.16×10(-5-4.26×10(-2 in the replication cohort. Three deletions and four duplications were significant combined (combined P=3.7×10(-4-3.9×10(-2. All associated loci were experimentally validated using qPCR. Evaluation of these genes for pathway enrichment demonstrated ~50% are involved in alternative splicing (P=0.0077 Benjamini and Hochberg corrected. We conclude that genetic variations disrupting RNA splicing could have long-term biological effects impacting lifespan.

  11. A next-generation sequencing method for overcoming the multiple gene copy problem in polyploid phylogenetics, applied to Poa grasses

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    Robin Charles

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polyploidy is important from a phylogenetic perspective because of its immense past impact on evolution and its potential future impact on diversification, survival and adaptation, especially in plants. Molecular population genetics studies of polyploid organisms have been difficult because of problems in sequencing multiple-copy nuclear genes using Sanger sequencing. This paper describes a method for sequencing a barcoded mixture of targeted gene regions using next-generation sequencing methods to overcome these problems. Results Using 64 3-bp barcodes, we successfully sequenced three chloroplast and two nuclear gene regions (each of which contained two gene copies with up to two alleles per individual in a total of 60 individuals across 11 species of Australian Poa grasses. This method had high replicability, a low sequencing error rate (after appropriate quality control and a low rate of missing data. Eighty-eight percent of the 320 gene/individual combinations produced sequence reads, and >80% of individuals produced sufficient reads to detect all four possible nuclear alleles of the homeologous nuclear loci with 95% probability. We applied this method to a group of sympatric Australian alpine Poa species, which we discovered to share an allopolyploid ancestor with a group of American Poa species. All markers revealed extensive allele sharing among the Australian species and so we recommend that the current taxonomy be re-examined. We also detected hypermutation in the trnH-psbA marker, suggesting it should not be used as a land plant barcode region. Some markers indicated differentiation between Tasmanian and mainland samples. Significant positive spatial genetic structure was detected at Conclusions Our results demonstrate that 454 sequencing of barcoded amplicon mixtures can be used to reliably sample all alleles of homeologous loci in polyploid species and successfully investigate phylogenetic relationships among

  12. Somatic Copy Number Alterations at Oncogenic Loci Show Diverse Correlations with Gene Expression

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    Roszik, Jason; Wu, Chang-Jiun; Siroy, Alan E.; Lazar, Alexander J.; Davies, Michael A.; Woodman, Scott E.; Kwong, Lawrence N.

    2016-01-01

    Somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs) affecting oncogenic drivers have a firmly established role in promoting cancer. However, no agreed-upon standard exists for calling locus-specific amplifications and deletions in each patient sample. Here, we report the correlative analysis of copy number amplitude and length with gene expression across 6,109 samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) dataset across 16 cancer types. Using specificity, sensitivity, and precision-based scores, we assigned optimized amplitude and length cutoffs for nine recurrent SCNAs affecting known oncogenic drivers, using mRNA expression as a functional readout. These cutoffs captured the majority of SCNA-driven, highly-expression-altered samples. The majority of oncogenes required only amplitude cutoffs, as high amplitude samples were almost invariably focal; however, CDKN2A and PTEN uniquely required both amplitude and length cutoffs as primary predictors. For PTEN, these extended to downstream AKT activation. In contrast, SCNA genes located peri-telomerically or in fragile sites showed poor expression-copy number correlations. Overall, our analyses identify optimized amplitude and length cutoffs as efficient predictors of gene expression changes for specific oncogenic SCNAs, yet warn against one-size-fits-all interpretations across all loci. Our results have implications for cancer data analyses and the clinic, where copy number and mutation data are increasingly used to personalize cancer therapy.

  13. Evolution of Three Parent Genes and Their Retrogene Copies in Drosophila Species

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    Ryan S. O'Neill

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Retrogenes form a class of gene duplicate lacking the regulatory sequences found outside of the mRNA-coding regions of the parent gene. It is not clear how a retrogene’s lack of parental regulatory sequences affects the evolution of the gene pair. To explore the evolution of parent genes and retrogenes, we investigated three such gene pairs in the family Drosophilidae; in Drosophila melanogaster, these gene pairs are CG8331 and CG4960, CG17734 and CG11825, and Sep2 and Sep5. We investigated the embryonic expression patterns of these gene pairs across multiple Drosophila species. Expression patterns of the parent genes and their single copy orthologs are relatively conserved across species, whether or not a species has a retrogene copy, although there is some variation in CG8331 and CG17734. In contrast, expression patterns of the retrogene orthologs have diversified. We used the genome sequences of 20 Drosophila species to investigate coding sequence evolution. The coding sequences of the three gene pairs appear to be evolving predominantly under negative selection; however, the parent genes and retrogenes show some distinct differences in amino acid sequence. Therefore, in general, retrogene expression patterns and coding sequences are distinct compared to their parents and, in some cases, retrogene expression patterns diversify.

  14. Construction and function of recombinant AcMNPV with double copies of v-cath gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Two recombinant baculoviruses, dciAcMNPV and dcdAcMNPV in which another copy of the v-cath gene controlled by ie1 promoter and polh promoter was inserted, were respectively constructed by the Bac-to-Bac system. The expression of the v-cath gene of the recombinant baculoviruses in Sf9 cells at different phases was investigated by SDS- PAGE and Western blot. The results showed that only recombinant virus dciAcMNPV containing late gene v-cath driven by early gene promoter could express V-CATH protein, cathepsin encoded by virus genome, 12 h post-infection and dcdAcMNPV containing late gene v-cath driven by late and very late gene promoters could express more V-CATH protein. Negative control ncAcMNPV, a mutant deleted v- cath gene, could not express V-CATH protein at all. The Spodopera exigua larvae were infected with viruses respectively and the results showed that the toxicity was as follows: dcdAcMNPV>dciAcMNPV>wtAcMNPV>ncAcMNPV. The toxicity of recombinant viruses and the characters of dead larvae showed that the v-cath gene was relative to viral toxicity and host liquefaction. Recombinant baculovirus dcdAcMNPV might be used as a new kind of safe viral-pes- ticide, because of its high toxicity obtained by adding another gene copy and changing the expression level of its own gene relative to virulence.

  15. Genome-wide copy number profiling to detect gene amplifications in neural progenitor cells

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    U. Fischer

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available DNA sequence amplification occurs at defined stages during normal development in amphibians and flies and seems to be restricted in humans to drug-resistant and tumor cells only. We used array-CGH to discover copy number changes including gene amplifications and deletions during differentiation of human neural progenitor cells. Here, we describe cell culture features, DNA extraction, and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH analysis tailored towards the identification of genomic copy number changes. Further detailed analysis of amplified chromosome regions associated with this experiment, was published by Fischer and colleagues in PLOS One in 2012 (Fischer et al., 2012. We provide detailed information on deleted chromosome regions during differentiation and give an overview on copy number changes during differentiation induction for two representative chromosome regions.

  16. Copy number variations of the ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCC6 gene and its pseudogenes

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    Kringen Marianne K

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCC6 gene is located on chromosome 16 between its two pseudogenes (ABCC6P1 and ABCC6P2. Previously, we have shown that ABCC6P1 is transcribed and affects ABCC6 at the transcriptional level. In this study we aimed to determine copy number variations of ABCC6, ABCC6P1 and ABCC6P2 in different populations. Moreover, we sought to study the transcription pattern of ABCC6 and ABCC6 pseudogenes in 39 different human tissues. Findings Genomic DNA from healthy individuals from five populations, Chinese (n = 24, Middle East (n = 20, Mexicans (n = 24, Caucasians (n = 50 and Africans (n = 24, were examined for copy number variations of ABCC6 and its pseudogenes by pyrosequencing and quantitative PCR. Copy number variation of ABCC6 was very rare (2/142; 1.4%. However, one or three copies of ABCC6P1 were relatively common (3% and 8%, respectively. Only one person had a single copy of ABCC6P2 while none had three copies. In Chinese, deletions or duplications of ABCC6P1 were more frequent than in any other population (9/24; 37.5%. The transcription pattern of ABCC6P2 was highly similar to ABCC6 and ABCC6P1, with highest transcription in liver and kidney. Interestingly, the total transcription level of pseudogenes, ABCC6P1 + ABCC6P2, was higher than ABCC6 in most tissues, including liver and kidney. Conclusions Copy number variations of the ABCC6 pseudogenes are quite common, especially in populations of Chinese ancestry. The expression pattern of ABCC6P2 in 39 human tissues was highly similar to that of ABCC6 and ABCC6P1 suggesting similar regulatory mechanisms for ABCC6 and its pseudogenes.

  17. Copy Number Deletion Has Little Impact on Gene Expression Levels in Racehorses

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    Kyung-Do Park

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Copy number variations (CNVs, important genetic factors for study of human diseases, may have as large of an effect on phenotype as do single nucleotide polymorphisms. Indeed, it is widely accepted that CNVs are associated with differential disease susceptibility. However, the relationships between CNVs and gene expression have not been characterized in the horse. In this study, we investigated the effects of copy number deletion in the blood and muscle transcriptomes of Thoroughbred racing horses. We identified a total of 1,246 CNVs of deletion polymorphisms using DNA re-sequencing data from 18 Thoroughbred racing horses. To discover the tendencies between CNV status and gene expression levels, we extracted CNVs of four Thoroughbred racing horses of which RNA sequencing was available. We found that 252 pairs of CNVs and genes were associated in the four horse samples. We did not observe a clear and consistent relationship between the deletion status of CNVs and gene expression levels before and after exercise in blood and muscle. However, we found some pairs of CNVs and associated genes that indicated relationships with gene expression levels: a positive relationship with genes responsible for membrane structure or cytoskeleton and a negative relationship with genes involved in disease. This study will lead to conceptual advances in understanding the relationship between CNVs and global gene expression in the horse.

  18. Spectrum of EGFR gene copy number changes and KRAS gene mutation status in Korean triple negative breast cancer patients.

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    Yoonjung Kim

    Full Text Available Anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR therapy has been tried in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC patients without evaluation of molecular and clinical predictors in several randomized clinical studies. Only fewer than 20% of metastatic TNBCs showed response to anti-EGFR therapy. In order to increase the overall response rate, first step would be to classify TNBC into good or poor responders according to oncogenic mutation profiles. This study provides the molecular characteristics of TNBCs including EGFR gene copy number changes and mutation status of EGFR and KRAS gene in Korean TNBC patients. Mutation analysis for EGFR, KRAS, BRAF and TP53 from a total of 105 TNBC tissue samples was performed by direct sequencing, peptide nucleic acid-mediated PCR clamping method and real-time PCR. Copy number changes of EGFR gene were evaluated using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. Out of all 105 TNBCs, 15.2% (16/105 showed EGFR copy number changes. Among them, increased or decreased EGFR copy number was detected in 13 (5 single copy gain, 2 amplification and 4 high-copy number amplification and 3 cases (3 hemizygous deletion, respectively. The mutation frequencies of KRAS, EGFR and TP53 gene were 1.9% (G12V and G12D, 1.0% (exon 19 del and 31.4%, respectively. There was no BRAF V600E mutation found. Future studies are needed to evaluate the clinical outcomes of TNBC patients who undergo anti-EGFR therapy according to the genetic status of EGFR.

  19. Impact of duplicate gene copies on phylogenetic analysis and divergence time estimates in butterflies

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    Liswi Saif W

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The increase in availability of genomic sequences for a wide range of organisms has revealed gene duplication to be a relatively common event. Encounters with duplicate gene copies have consequently become almost inevitable in the context of collecting gene sequences for inferring species trees. Here we examine the effect of incorporating duplicate gene copies evolving at different rates on tree reconstruction and time estimation of recent and deep divergences in butterflies. Results Sequences from ultraviolet-sensitive (UVRh, blue-sensitive (BRh, and long-wavelength sensitive (LWRh opsins,EF-1α and COI were obtained from 27 taxa representing the five major butterfly families (5535 bp total. Both BRh and LWRh are present in multiple copies in some butterfly lineages and the different copies evolve at different rates. Regardless of the phylogenetic reconstruction method used, we found that analyses of combined data sets using either slower or faster evolving copies of duplicate genes resulted in a single topology in agreement with our current understanding of butterfly family relationships based on morphology and molecules. Interestingly, individual analyses of BRh and LWRh sequences also recovered these family-level relationships. Two different relaxed clock methods resulted in similar divergence time estimates at the shallower nodes in the tree, regardless of whether faster or slower evolving copies were used, with larger discrepancies observed at deeper nodes in the phylogeny. The time of divergence between the monarch butterfly Danaus plexippus and the queen D. gilippus (15.3–35.6 Mya was found to be much older than the time of divergence between monarch co-mimic Limenitis archippus and red-spotted purple L. arthemis (4.7–13.6 Mya, and overlapping with the time of divergence of the co-mimetic passionflower butterflies Heliconius erato and H. melpomene (13.5–26.1 Mya. Our family-level results are congruent with

  20. Clinical Omics Analysis of Colorectal Cancer Incorporating Copy Number Aberrations and Gene Expression Data

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    Tsuyoshi Yoshida

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Colorectal cancer (CRC is one of the most frequently occurring cancers in Japan, and thus a wide range of methods have been deployed to study the molecular mechanisms of CRC. In this study, we performed a comprehensive analysis of CRC, incorporating copy number aberration (CRC and gene expression data. For the last four years, we have been collecting data from CRC cases and organizing the information as an “omics” study by integrating many kinds of analysis into a single comprehensive investigation. In our previous studies, we had experienced difficulty in finding genes related to CRC, as we observed higher noise levels in the expression data than in the data for other cancers. Because chromosomal aberrations are often observed in CRC, here, we have performed a combination of CNA analysis and expression analysis in order to identify some new genes responsible for CRC. This study was performed as part of the Clinical Omics Database Project at Tokyo Medical and Dental University. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanism of genetic instability in CRC by this combination of expression analysis and CNA, and to establish a new method for the diagnosis and treatment of CRC. Materials and methods: Comprehensive gene expression analysis was performed on 79 CRC cases using an Affymetrix Gene Chip, and comprehensive CNA analysis was performed using an Affymetrix DNA Sty array. To avoid the contamination of cancer tissue with normal cells, laser micro-dissection was performed before DNA/RNA extraction. Data analysis was performed using original software written in the R language. Result: We observed a high percentage of CNA in colorectal cancer, including copy number gains at 7, 8q, 13 and 20q, and copy number losses at 8p, 17p and 18. Gene expression analysis provided many candidates for CRC-related genes, but their association with CRC did not reach the level of statistical significance. The combination of CNA and gene

  1. Critical evaluation of HPV16 gene copy number quantification by SYBR green PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Ian; Ng, Grace; Foster, Nicola; Stanley, Margaret; Herdman, Michael T; Pett, Mark R; Teschendorff, Andrew; Coleman, Nicholas

    2008-07-24

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) load and physical status are considered useful parameters for clinical evaluation of cervical squamous cell neoplasia. However, the errors implicit in HPV gene quantification by PCR are not well documented. We have undertaken the first rigorous evaluation of the errors that can be expected when using SYBR green qPCR for quantification of HPV type 16 gene copy numbers. We assessed a modified method, in which external calibration curves were generated from a single construct containing HPV16 E2, HPV16 E6 and the host gene hydroxymethylbilane synthase in a 1:1:1 ratio. When testing dilutions of mixed HPV/host DNA in replicate runs, we observed errors in quantifying E2 and E6 amplicons of 5-40%, with greatest error at the lowest DNA template concentration (3 ng/microl). Errors in determining viral copy numbers per diploid genome were 13-53%. Nevertheless, in cervical keratinocyte cell lines we observed reasonable agreement between viral loads determined by qPCR and Southern blotting. The mean E2/E6 ratio in episome-only cells was 1.04, but with a range of 0.76-1.32. In three integrant-only lines the mean E2/E6 ratios were 0.20, 0.72 and 2.61 (values confirmed by gene-specific Southern blotting). When E2/E6 ratios in fourteen HPV16-positive cervical carcinomas were analysed, conclusions regarding viral physical state could only be made in three cases, where the E2/E6 ratio was unavoidable inaccuracies that should be allowed for when quantifying HPV gene copy number. While E6 copy numbers can be considered to provide a useable indication of viral loads, the E2/E6 ratio is of limited value. Previous studies may have overestimated the frequency of mixed episomal/integrant HPV infections.

  2. Proteomic changes resulting from gene copy number variations in cancer cells.

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    Tamar Geiger

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Along the transformation process, cells accumulate DNA aberrations, including mutations, translocations, amplifications, and deletions. Despite numerous studies, the overall effects of amplifications and deletions on the end point of gene expression--the level of proteins--is generally unknown. Here we use large-scale and high-resolution proteomics combined with gene copy number analysis to investigate in a global manner to what extent these genomic changes have a proteomic output and therefore the ability to affect cellular transformation. We accurately measure expression levels of 6,735 proteins and directly compare them to the gene copy number. We find that the average effect of these alterations on the protein expression is only a few percent. Nevertheless, by using a novel algorithm, we find the combined impact that many of these regional chromosomal aberrations have at the protein level. We show that proteins encoded by amplified oncogenes are often overexpressed, while adjacent amplified genes, which presumably do not promote growth and survival, are attenuated. Furthermore, regulation of biological processes and molecular complexes is independent of general copy number changes. By connecting the primary genome alteration to their proteomic consequences, this approach helps to interpret the data from large-scale cancer genomics efforts.

  3. Focal DNA copy number changes in neuroblastoma target MYCN regulated genes.

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    Candy Kumps

    Full Text Available Neuroblastoma is an embryonic tumor arising from immature sympathetic nervous system cells. Recurrent genomic alterations include MYCN and ALK amplification as well as recurrent patterns of gains and losses of whole or large partial chromosome segments. A recent whole genome sequencing effort yielded no frequently recurring mutations in genes other than those affecting ALK. However, the study further stresses the importance of DNA copy number alterations in this disease, in particular for genes implicated in neuritogenesis. Here we provide additional evidence for the importance of focal DNA copy number gains and losses, which are predominantly observed in MYCN amplified tumors. A focal 5 kb gain encompassing the MYCN regulated miR-17~92 cluster as sole gene was detected in a neuroblastoma cell line and further analyses of the array CGH data set demonstrated enrichment for other MYCN target genes in focal gains and amplifications. Next we applied an integrated genomics analysis to prioritize MYCN down regulated genes mediated by MYCN driven miRNAs within regions of focal heterozygous or homozygous deletion. We identified RGS5, a negative regulator of G-protein signaling implicated in vascular normalization, invasion and metastasis, targeted by a focal homozygous deletion, as a new MYCN target gene, down regulated through MYCN activated miRNAs. In addition, we expand the miR-17~92 regulatory network controlling TGFß signaling in neuroblastoma with the ring finger protein 11 encoding gene RNF11, which was previously shown to be targeted by the miR-17~92 member miR-19b. Taken together, our data indicate that focal DNA copy number imbalances in neuroblastoma (1 target genes that are implicated in MYCN signaling, possibly selected to reinforce MYCN oncogene addiction and (2 serve as a resource for identifying new molecular targets for treatment.

  4. iGC-an integrated analysis package of gene expression and copy number alteration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Yi-Pin; Wang, Liang-Bo; Wang, Wei-An; Lai, Liang-Chuan; Tsai, Mong-Hsun; Lu, Tzu-Pin; Chuang, Eric Y

    2017-01-14

    With the advancement in high-throughput technologies, researchers can simultaneously investigate gene expression and copy number alteration (CNA) data from individual patients at a lower cost. Traditional analysis methods analyze each type of data individually and integrate their results using Venn diagrams. Challenges arise, however, when the results are irreproducible and inconsistent across multiple platforms. To address these issues, one possible approach is to concurrently analyze both gene expression profiling and CNAs in the same individual. We have developed an open-source R/Bioconductor package (iGC). Multiple input formats are supported and users can define their own criteria for identifying differentially expressed genes driven by CNAs. The analysis of two real microarray datasets demonstrated that the CNA-driven genes identified by the iGC package showed significantly higher Pearson correlation coefficients with their gene expression levels and copy numbers than those genes located in a genomic region with CNA. Compared with the Venn diagram approach, the iGC package showed better performance. The iGC package is effective and useful for identifying CNA-driven genes. By simultaneously considering both comparative genomic and transcriptomic data, it can provide better understanding of biological and medical questions. The iGC package's source code and manual are freely available at https://www.bioconductor.org/packages/release/bioc/html/iGC.html .

  5. Infrageneric phylogeny and temporal divergence of Sorghum (Andropogoneae, Poaceae) based on low-copy nuclear and plastid sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qing; Liu, Huan; Wen, Jun; Peterson, Paul M

    2014-01-01

    The infrageneric phylogeny and temporal divergence of Sorghum were explored in the present study. Sequence data of two low-copy nuclear (LCN) genes, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase 4 (Pepc4) and granule-bound starch synthase I (GBSSI), from 79 accessions of Sorghum plus Cleistachne sorghoides together with those from outgroups were used for maximum likelihood (ML) and Bayesian inference (BI) analyses. Bayesian dating based on three plastid DNA markers (ndhA intron, rpl32-trnL, and rps16 intron) was used to estimate the ages of major diversification events in Sorghum. The monophyly of Sorghum plus Cleistachne sorghoides (with the latter nested within Sorghum) was strongly supported by the Pepc4 data using BI analysis, and the monophyly of Sorghum was strongly supported by GBSSI data using both ML and BI analyses. Sorghum was divided into three clades in the Pepc4, GBSSI, and plastid phylograms: the subg. Sorghum lineage; the subg. Parasorghum and Stiposorghum lineage; and the subg. Chaetosorghum and Heterosorghum lineage. Two LCN homoeologous loci of Cleistachne sorghoides were first discovered in the same accession. Sorghum arundinaceum, S. bicolor, S. x drummondii, S. propinquum, and S. virgatum were closely related to S. x almum in the Pepc4, GBSSI, and plastid phylograms, suggesting that they may be potential genome donors to S. almum. Multiple LCN and plastid allelic variants have been identified in S. halepense of subg. Sorghum. The crown ages of Sorghum plus Cleistachne sorghoides and subg. Sorghum are estimated to be 12.7 million years ago (Mya) and 8.6 Mya, respectively. Molecular results support the recognition of three distinct subgenera in Sorghum: subg. Chaetosorghum with two sections, each with a single species, subg. Parasorghum with 17 species, and subg. Sorghum with nine species and we also provide a new nomenclatural combination, Sorghum sorghoides.

  6. Low-copy piggyBac transposon mutagenesis in mice identifies genes driving melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Thomas K; Landrette, Sean F; Bjornson, Robert D; Bosenberg, Marcus W; Xu, Tian

    2013-09-17

    Despite considerable efforts to sequence hypermutated cancers such as melanoma, distinguishing cancer-driving genes from thousands of recurrently mutated genes remains a significant challenge. To circumvent the problematic background mutation rates and identify new melanoma driver genes, we carried out a low-copy piggyBac transposon mutagenesis screen in mice. We induced eleven melanomas with mutation burdens that were 100-fold lower relative to human melanomas. Thirty-eight implicated genes, including two known drivers of human melanoma, were classified into three groups based on high, low, or background-level mutation frequencies in human melanomas, and we further explored the functional significance of genes in each group. For two genes overlooked by prevailing discovery methods, we found that loss of membrane associated guanylate kinase, WW and PDZ domain containing 2 and protein tyrosine phosphatase, receptor type, O cooperated with the v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B (BRAF) recurrent V600E mutation to promote cellular transformation. Moreover, for infrequently mutated genes often disregarded by current methods, we discovered recurrent mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 1 (Map3k1)-activating insertions in our screen, mirroring recurrent MAP3K1 up-regulation in human melanomas. Aberrant expression of Map3k1 enabled growth factor-autonomous proliferation and drove BRAF-independent ERK signaling, thus shedding light on alternative means of activating this prominent signaling pathway in melanoma. In summary, our study contributes several previously undescribed genes involved in melanoma and establishes an important proof-of-principle for the utility of the low-copy transposon mutagenesis approach for identifying cancer-driving genes, especially those masked by hypermutation.

  7. The positioning logic and copy number control of genes in bacteria under stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiucen; Austin, Robert; Vyawahare, Saurabh; Lau, Alexandra

    2013-03-01

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells when challenged with sublethal concentrations of the genotoxic antibiotic ciprofloxacin cease to divide and form long filaments which contain multiple bacterial chromosomes. These filaments are individual mesoscopic environmental niches which provide protection for a community of chromosomes (as opposed to cells) under mutagenic stress and can provide an evolutionary fitness advantage within the niche. We use comparative genomic hybridization to show that the mesoscopic niche evolves within 20 minutes of ciprofloxacin exposure via replication of multiple copies of genes expressing ATP dependent transporters. We show that this rapid genomic amplification is done in a time efficient manner via placement of the genes encoding the pumps near the origin of replication on the bacterial chromosome. The de-amplification of multiple copies back to the wild type number is a function of the duration is a function of the ciprofloxacin exposure duration: the longer the exposure, the slower the removal of the multiple copies. The project described was supported by the National Science Foundation and the National Cancer Institute

  8. DNA copy-number alterations underlie gene expression differences between microsatellite stable and unstable colorectal cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorissen, Robert N; Lipton, Lara; Gibbs, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: About 15% of colorectal cancers harbor microsatellite instability (MSI). MSI-associated gene expression changes have been identified in colorectal cancers, but little overlap exists between signatures hindering an assessment of overall consistency. Little is known about the causes...... and downstream effects of differential gene expression. Experimental Design: DNA microarray data on 89 MSI and 140 microsatellite-stable (MSS) colorectal cancers from this study and 58 MSI and 77 MSS cases from three published reports were randomly divided into test and training sets. MSI-associated gene...... expression changes were assessed for cross-study consistency using training samples and validated as MSI classifier using test samples. Differences in biological pathways were identified by functional category analysis. Causation of differential gene expression was investigated by comparison to DNA copy...

  9. TOP1 gene copy number and TOP1/CEN-20 ratio in stage III colorectal cancer samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rømer, Maria Unni Koefoed; Nygård, Sune Boris; Christensen, Ib Jarle

    AIM OF STUDY To investigate if TOP1 gene copy number and/or the TOP1/CEN-20 ratio in colorectal cancer (CRC) areassociated with prognosis. BACKGROUND TOP1, localized on chromosome 20, encodes topoisomerase I (TOP1), which is the sole molecular target of irinotecan. TOP1 immunoreactivity in formalin...... analyses on 50 FFPE primary CRC tissues. When compared with results from normal colorectal mucosa, 80 % of the tumors showed increased TOP1 gene copy number and 2/3 had increased TOP1/CEN-20 ratio. MATERIALS AND METHODS FFPE samples from 154 stage III CRC patients not receiving adjuvant chemotherapy were...... included. For each patient TOP1 gene copy number and CEN-20 reference number were determined in 60 nuclei from the malignant tumor by FISH using a TOP1/CEN-20 probe mix. Similarly, the TOP1 gene copy number and and CEN-20 reference number were dertermined in the normal colorectal mucosa in 105 of the 154...

  10. From DNA Copy Number to Gene Expression: Local aberrations, Trisomies and Monosomies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shay, Tal

    The goal of my PhD research was to study the effect of DNA copy number changes on gene expression. DNA copy number aberrations may be local, encompassing several genes, or on the level of an entire chromosome, such as trisomy and monosomy. The main dataset I studied was of Glioblastoma, obtained in the framework of a collaboration, but I worked also with public datasets of cancer and Down's Syndrome. The molecular basis of expression changes in Glioblastoma. Glioblastoma is the most common and aggressive type of primary brain tumors in adults. In collaboration with Prof. Hegi (CHUV, Switzerland), we analyzed a rich Glioblastoma dataset including clinical information, DNA copy number (array CGH) and expression profiles. We explored the correlation between DNA copy number and gene expression at the level of chromosomal arms and local genomic aberrations. We detected known amplification and over expression of oncogenes, as well as deletion and down-regulation of tumor suppressor genes. We exploited that information to map alterations of pathways that are known to be disrupted in Glioblastoma, and tried to characterize samples that have no known alteration in any of the studied pathways. Identifying local DNA aberrations of biological significance. Many types of tumors exhibit chromosomal losses or gains and local amplifications and deletions. A region that is aberrant in many tumors, or whose copy number change is stronger, is more likely to be clinically relevant, and not just a by-product of genetic instability. We developed a novel method that defines and prioritizes aberrations by formalizing these intuitions. The method scores each aberration by the fraction of patients harboring it, its length and its amplitude, and assesses the significance of the score by comparing it to a null distribution obtained by permutations. This approach detects genetic locations that are significantly aberrant, generating a 'genomic aberration profile' for each sample. The 'genomic

  11. The Porcine TSPY Gene Is Tricopy but Not a Copy Number Variant.

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    Anh T Quach

    Full Text Available The testis-specific protein Y-encoded (TSPY gene is situated on the mammalian Y-chromosome and exhibits some remarkable biological characteristics. It has the highest known copy number (CN of all protein coding genes in the human and bovine genomes (up to 74 and 200, respectively and also shows high individual variability. Although the biological function of TSPY has not yet been elucidated, its specific expression in the testis and several identified binding domains within the protein suggests roles in male reproduction. Here we describe the porcine TSPY, as a multicopy gene with three copies located on the short arm of the Y-chromosome with no variation at three exon loci among 20 animals of normal reproductive health from four breeds of domestic pigs (Piétrain, Landrace, Duroc and Yorkshire. To further investigate the speculation that porcine TSPY is not a copy number variant, we have included five Low-fertility boars and five boars with exceptional High-fertility records. Interestingly, there was no difference between the High- and Low-fertile groups, but we detected slightly lower TSPY CN at all three exons (2.56-2.85 in both groups, as compared to normal animals, which could be attributed to technical variability or somatic mosaicism. The results are based on both relative quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR and droplet digital PCR (ddPCR. Chromosomal localization of the porcine TSPY was done using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH with gene specific PCR probes.

  12. Antigen-presenting genes and genomic copy number variations in the Tasmanian devil MHC

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    Cheng Yuanyuan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii is currently under threat of extinction due to an unusual fatal contagious cancer called Devil Facial Tumour Disease (DFTD. DFTD is caused by a clonal tumour cell line that is transmitted between unrelated individuals as an allograft without triggering immune rejection due to low levels of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC diversity in Tasmanian devils. Results Here we report the characterization of the genomic regions encompassing MHC Class I and Class II genes in the Tasmanian devil. Four genomic regions approximately 960 kb in length were assembled and annotated using BAC contigs and physically mapped to devil Chromosome 4q. 34 genes and pseudogenes were identified, including five Class I and four Class II loci. Interestingly, when two haplotypes from two individuals were compared, three genomic copy number variants with sizes ranging from 1.6 to 17 kb were observed within the classical Class I gene region. One deletion is particularly important as it turns a Class Ia gene into a pseudogene in one of the haplotypes. This deletion explains the previously observed variation in the Class I allelic number between individuals. The frequency of this deletion is highest in the northwestern devil population and lowest in southeastern areas. Conclusions The third sequenced marsupial MHC provides insights into the evolution of this dynamic genomic region among the diverse marsupial species. The two sequenced devil MHC haplotypes revealed three copy number variations that are likely to significantly affect immune response and suggest that future work should focus on the role of copy number variations in disease susceptibility in this species.

  13. Formation of chimeric genes by copy-number variation as a mutational mechanism in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rippey, Caitlin; Walsh, Tom; Gulsuner, Suleyman; Brodsky, Matt; Nord, Alex S; Gasperini, Molly; Pierce, Sarah; Spurrell, Cailyn; Coe, Bradley P; Krumm, Niklas; Lee, Ming K; Sebat, Jonathan; McClellan, Jon M; King, Mary-Claire

    2013-10-03

    Chimeric genes can be caused by structural genomic rearrangements that fuse together portions of two different genes to create a novel gene. We hypothesize that brain-expressed chimeras may contribute to schizophrenia. Individuals with schizophrenia and control individuals were screened genome wide for copy-number variants (CNVs) that disrupted two genes on the same DNA strand. Candidate events were filtered for predicted brain expression and for frequency genes in localization, regulation, or function. Subcellular localizations of DNAJA2-NETO2 and MAP3K3-DDX42 differed from their parent genes. On the basis of the expression profile of the MATK promoter, MATK-ZFR2 is likely to be far more highly expressed in the brain during development than the ZFR2 parent gene. MATK-ZFR2 includes a ZFR2-derived isoform that we demonstrate localizes preferentially to neuronal dendritic branch sites. These results suggest that the formation of chimeric genes is a mechanism by which CNVs contribute to schizophrenia and that, by interfering with parent gene function, chimeras may disrupt critical brain processes, including neurogenesis, neuronal differentiation, and dendritic arborization.

  14. An alternative to ITS, a hypervariable, single-copy nuclear intron in corals, and its use in detecting cryptic species within the octocoral genus Carijoa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concepcion, G. T.; Crepeau, M. W.; Wagner, D.; Kahng, S. E.; Toonen, R. J.

    2008-06-01

    Here we report a highly variable nuclear marker that can be used for both soft and stony corals. Primers that amplify a ˜177 bp fragment from the nuclear gene encoding the 54 kDa subunit of the signal recognition particle (SRP54) were developed for the octocoral genus Carijoa. Cloning results from 141 individuals suggest that this hypervariable nuclear locus is a single-copy gene. Sequencing revealed a potential cryptic species previously thought to be Carijoa riisei. Results from an Analysis of Molecular Variance (AMOVA) based on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) explained 33% of the variation ( F st = 0.54). Using previously reported degenerate primers for SRP54, high levels of sequence variation were found at this locus across both scleractinian and octocorals. For example, pairwise sequence divergence within octocorals was ˜8 13 times greater with SRP54 than with mtDNA, and, up to 2.8% pairwise sequence divergence was found in SRP54 among individuals of Pocillopora whereas no variation at all was found in mtDNA markers. This case study with the octocoral C. riisei shows that variation in SRP54 appears sufficient to address questions of phylogeography as well as systematics of closely related species.

  15. Critical evaluation of HPV16 gene copy number quantification by SYBR green PCR

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    Pett Mark R

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human papilloma virus (HPV load and physical status are considered useful parameters for clinical evaluation of cervical squamous cell neoplasia. However, the errors implicit in HPV gene quantification by PCR are not well documented. We have undertaken the first rigorous evaluation of the errors that can be expected when using SYBR green qPCR for quantification of HPV type 16 gene copy numbers. We assessed a modified method, in which external calibration curves were generated from a single construct containing HPV16 E2, HPV16 E6 and the host gene hydroxymethylbilane synthase in a 1:1:1 ratio. Results When testing dilutions of mixed HPV/host DNA in replicate runs, we observed errors in quantifying E2 and E6 amplicons of 5–40%, with greatest error at the lowest DNA template concentration (3 ng/μl. Errors in determining viral copy numbers per diploid genome were 13–53%. Nevertheless, in cervical keratinocyte cell lines we observed reasonable agreement between viral loads determined by qPCR and Southern blotting. The mean E2/E6 ratio in episome-only cells was 1.04, but with a range of 0.76–1.32. In three integrant-only lines the mean E2/E6 ratios were 0.20, 0.72 and 2.61 (values confirmed by gene-specific Southern blotting. When E2/E6 ratios in fourteen HPV16-positive cervical carcinomas were analysed, conclusions regarding viral physical state could only be made in three cases, where the E2/E6 ratio was ≤ 0.06. Conclusion Run-to-run variation in SYBR green qPCR produces unavoidable inaccuracies that should be allowed for when quantifying HPV gene copy number. While E6 copy numbers can be considered to provide a useable indication of viral loads, the E2/E6 ratio is of limited value. Previous studies may have overestimated the frequency of mixed episomal/integrant HPV infections.

  16. Systematic prioritization and integrative analysis of copy number variations in schizophrenia reveal key schizophrenia susceptibility genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiongjian; Huang, Liang; Han, Leng; Luo, Zhenwu; Hu, Fang; Tieu, Roger; Gan, Lin

    2014-11-01

    Schizophrenia is a common mental disorder with high heritability and strong genetic heterogeneity. Common disease-common variants hypothesis predicts that schizophrenia is attributable in part to common genetic variants. However, recent studies have clearly demonstrated that copy number variations (CNVs) also play pivotal roles in schizophrenia susceptibility and explain a proportion of missing heritability. Though numerous CNVs have been identified, many of the regions affected by CNVs show poor overlapping among different studies, and it is not known whether the genes disrupted by CNVs contribute to the risk of schizophrenia. By using cumulative scoring, we systematically prioritized the genes affected by CNVs in schizophrenia. We identified 8 top genes that are frequently disrupted by CNVs, including NRXN1, CHRNA7, BCL9, CYFIP1, GJA8, NDE1, SNAP29, and GJA5. Integration of genes affected by CNVs with known schizophrenia susceptibility genes (from previous genetic linkage and association studies) reveals that many genes disrupted by CNVs are also associated with schizophrenia. Further protein-protein interaction (PPI) analysis indicates that protein products of genes affected by CNVs frequently interact with known schizophrenia-associated proteins. Finally, systematic integration of CNVs prioritization data with genetic association and PPI data identifies key schizophrenia candidate genes. Our results provide a global overview of genes impacted by CNVs in schizophrenia and reveal a densely interconnected molecular network of de novo CNVs in schizophrenia. Though the prioritized top genes represent promising schizophrenia risk genes, further work with different prioritization methods and independent samples is needed to confirm these findings. Nevertheless, the identified key candidate genes may have important roles in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia, and further functional characterization of these genes may provide pivotal targets for future therapeutics and

  17. Copy Number Variation of UGT 2B Genes in Indian Families Using Whole Genome Scans

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    Avinash M. Veerappa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives. Uridine diphospho-glucuronosyltransferase 2B (UGT2B is a family of genes involved in metabolizing steroid hormones and several other xenobiotics. These UGT2B genes are highly polymorphic in nature and have distinct polymorphisms associated with specific regions around the globe. Copy number variations (CNVs status of UGT2B17 in Indian population is not known and their disease associations have been inconclusive. It was therefore of interest to investigate the CNV profile of UGT2B genes. Methods. We investigated the presence of CNVs in UGT2B genes in 31 members from eight Indian families using Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP Array 6.0 chip. Results. Our data revealed >50% of the study members carried CNVs in UGT2B genes, of which 76% showed deletion polymorphism. CNVs were observed more in UGT2B17 (76.4% than in UGT2B15 (17.6%. Molecular network and pathway analysis found enrichment related to steroid metabolic process, carboxylesterase activity, and sequence specific DNA binding. Interpretation and Conclusion. We report the presence of UGT2B gene deletion and duplication polymorphisms in Indian families. Network analysis indicates the substitutive role of other possible genes in the UGT activity. The CNVs of UGT2B genes are very common in individuals indicating that the effect is neutral in causing any suspected diseases.

  18. Association of variation in Fc gamma receptor 3B gene copy number with rheumatoid arthritis in Caucasian samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McKinney, Cushla; Fanciulli, Manuela; Merriman, Marilyn E.; Phipps-Green, Amanda; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z.; Koeleman, Bobby P. C.; Dalbeth, Nicola; Gow, Peter J.; Harrison, Andrew A.; Highton, John; Jones, Peter B.; Stamp, Lisa K.; Steer, Sophia; Barrera, Pilar; Coenen, Marieke J. H.; Franke, Barbara; van Riel, Piet L. C. M.; Vyse, Tim J.; Aitman, Tim J.; Radstake, Timothy R. D. J.; Merriman, Tony R.

    2010-01-01

    Objective There is increasing evidence that variation in gene copy number (CN) influences clinical phenotype. The low-affinity Fc gamma receptor 3B (FCGR3B) located in the FCGR gene cluster is a CN polymorphic gene involved in the recruitment to sites of inflammation and activation of polymorphonucl

  19. Post-polyploidisation morphotype diversification associates with gene copy number variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiessl, Sarah; Huettel, Bruno; Kuehn, Diana; Reinhardt, Richard; Snowdon, Rod

    2017-01-01

    Genetic models for polyploid crop adaptation provide important information relevant for future breeding prospects. A well-suited model is Brassica napus, a recent allopolyploid closely related to Arabidopsis thaliana. Flowering time is a major adaptation trait determining life cycle synchronization with the environment. Here we unravel natural genetic variation in B. napus flowering time regulators and investigate associations with evolutionary diversification into different life cycle morphotypes. Deep sequencing of 35 flowering regulators was performed in 280 diverse B. napus genotypes. High sequencing depth enabled high-quality calling of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), insertion-deletions (InDels) and copy number variants (CNVs). By combining these data with genotyping data from the Brassica 60 K Illumina® Infinium SNP array, we performed a genome-wide marker distribution analysis across the 4 ecogeographical morphotypes. Twelve haplotypes, including Bna.FLC.A10, Bna.VIN3.A02 and the Bna.FT promoter on C02_random, were diagnostic for the diversification of winter and spring types. The subspecies split between oilseed/kale (B. napus ssp. napus) and swedes/rutabagas (B. napus ssp. napobrassica) was defined by 13 haplotypes, including genomic rearrangements encompassing copies of Bna.FLC, Bna.PHYA and Bna.GA3ox1. De novo variation in copies of important flowering-time genes in B. napus arose during allopolyploidisation, enabling sub-functionalisation that allowed different morphotypes to appropriately fine-tune their lifecycle. PMID:28165502

  20. NDRG2 gene copy number is not altered in colorectal carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorentzen, Anders Blomkild; Mitchelmore, Cathy

    2017-01-01

    levels using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR); interaction of the MYC gene-regulatory protein with the NDRG2 promoter using chromatin immunoprecipitation; and NDRG2 promoter methylation using bisulfite sequencing. Furthermore, we performed qPCR to analyse the copy......AIM To investigate if the down-regulation of N-myc Downstream Regulated Gene 2 (NDRG2) expression in colorectal carcinoma (CRC) is due to loss of the NDRG2 allele(s). METHODS The following were investigated in the human colorectal cancer cell lines DLD-1, LoVo and SW-480: NDRG2 mRNA expression...... numbers of NDRG2 and MYC genes in the above three cell lines, 8 normal colorectal tissue samples and 40 CRC tissue samples. RESULTS As expected, NDRG2 mRNA levels were low in the three colorectal cancer cell lines, compared to normal colon. Endogenous MYC protein interacted with the NDRG2 core promoter...

  1. Establishment of TaqMan Real-time Quantitative PCR Assay for Foreign Gene Copy Numbers in Transgenic Soybean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiu You-wen; Gao Xue-jun; Qi Bang-ruo; Li Lu; Zhen Zhen

    2012-01-01

    TaqMan quantitative PCR technique was used to detect the copies of exogenous CaMV35S flanks sequence in transgenic soybean. With soybean lectin as the endogenous reference gene, and gene complex DNA in non-GMO soybeans as the endogenous reference standard, the gradient dilution method was used to separately calculate Ct value of endogenous reference gene and plasmid DNA and correlation standard curve equation of logarithm of copies, and then to calculate the copies of samples through substituting thus-obtained Ct into the standard curve equation. The standard curve equation of endogenous reference gene was y =–3.422x+35.201, R2=0.998; the standard curve equation of exogenous gene was y =–3.495x+35.303, R2=0.999. The sample copies was got by putting Ct value into the standard curve equation, and it was the ratio of exogenous gene and reference gene. We found that CaMV35S gene in transgenic soy was single copy.

  2. Development of universal genetic markers based on single-copy orthologous (COSII) genes in Poaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hailan; Guo, Xiaoqin; Wu, Jiasheng; Chen, Guo-Bo; Ying, Yeqing

    2013-03-01

    KEY MESSAGE : We develop a set of universal genetic markers based on single-copy orthologous (COSII) genes in Poaceae. Being evolutionary conserved, single-copy orthologous (COSII) genes are particularly useful in comparative mapping and phylogenetic investigation among species. In this study, we identified 2,684 COSII genes based on five sequenced Poaceae genomes including rice, maize, sorghum, foxtail millet, and brachypodium, and then developed 1,072 COSII markers whose transferability and polymorphism among five bamboo species were further evaluated with 46 pairs of randomly selected primers. 91.3 % of the 46 primers obtained clear amplification in at least one bamboo species, and 65.2 % of them produced polymorphism in more than one species. We also used 42 of them to construct the phylogeny for the five bamboo species, and it might reflect more precise evolutionary relationship than the one based on the vegetative morphology. The results indicated a promising prospect of applying these markers to the investigation of genetic diversity and the classification of Poaceae. To ease and facilitate access of the information of common interest to readers, a web-based database of the COSII markers is provided ( http://www.sicau.edu.cn/web/yms/PCOSWeb/PCOS.html ).

  3. Epidermal growth factor receptor and AKT1 gene copy numbers by multi-gene fluorescence in situ hybridization impact on prognosis in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiao; Su, Wei; Zhang, Sheng; Hu, Yunhui; Liu, Jingjing; Zhang, Xiaobei; Bai, Jingchao; Yuan, Weiping; Hu, Linping; Cheng, Tao; Zetterberg, Anders; Lei, Zhenmin; Zhang, Jin

    2015-05-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/PI3K/AKT signaling pathway aberrations play significant roles in breast cancer occurrence and development. However, the status of EGFR and AKT1 gene copy numbers remains unclear. In this study, we showed that the rates of EGFR and AKT1 gene copy number alterations were associated with the prognosis of breast cancer. Among 205 patients, high EGFR and AKT1 gene copy numbers were observed in 34.6% and 27.8% of cases by multi-gene fluorescence in situ hybridization, respectively. Co-heightened EGFR/AKT1 gene copy numbers were identified in 11.7% cases. No changes were found in 49.3% of patients. Although changes in EGFR and AKT1 gene copy numbers had no correlation with patients' age, tumor stage, histological grade and the expression status of other molecular makers, high EGFR (P = 0.0002) but not AKT1 (P = 0.1177) gene copy numbers correlated with poor 5-year overall survival. The patients with co-heightened EGFR/AKT1 gene copy numbers displayed a poorer prognosis than those with tumors with only high EGFR gene copy numbers (P = 0.0383). Both Univariate (U) and COX multivariate (C) analyses revealed that high EGFR and AKT1 gene copy numbers (P = 0.000 [U], P = 0.0001 [C]), similar to histological grade (P = 0.001 [U], P = 0.012 [C]) and lymph node metastasis (P = 0.046 [U], P = 0.158 [C]), were independent prognostic indicators of 5-year overall survival. These results indicate that high EGFR and AKT1 gene copy numbers were relatively frequent in breast cancer. Co-heightened EGFR/AKT1 gene copy numbers had a worse outcome than those with only high EGFR gene copy numbers, suggesting that evaluation of these two genes together may be useful for selecting patients for anti-EGFR-targeted therapy or anti-EGFR/AKT1-targeted therapy and for predicting outcomes. © 2015 The Authors. Cancer Science published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  4. An integrated analysis of miRNA and gene copy numbers in xenografts of Ewing's sarcoma

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    Mosakhani Neda

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Xenografts have been shown to provide a suitable source of tumor tissue for molecular analysis in the absence of primary tumor material. We utilized ES xenograft series for integrated microarray analyses to identify novel biomarkers. Method Microarray technology (array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH and micro RNA arrays was used to screen and identify copy number changes and differentially expressed miRNAs of 34 and 14 passages, respectively. Incubated cells used for xenografting (Passage 0 were considered to represent the primary tumor. Four important differentially expressed miRNAs (miR-31, miR-31*, miR-145, miR-106 were selected for further validation by real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Integrated analysis of aCGH and miRNA data was performed on 14 xenograft passages by bioinformatic methods. Results The most frequent losses and gains of DNA copy number were detected at 9p21.3, 16q and at 8, 15, 17q21.32-qter, 1q21.1-qter, respectively. The presence of these alterations was consistent in all tumor passages. aCGH profiles of xenograft passages of each series resembled their corresponding primary tumors (passage 0. MiR-21, miR-31, miR-31*, miR-106b, miR-145, miR-150*, miR-371-5p, miR-557 and miR-598 showed recurrently altered expression. These miRNAS were predicted to regulate many ES-associated genes, such as genes of the IGF1 pathway, EWSR1, FLI1 and their fusion gene (EWS-FLI1. Twenty differentially expressed miRNAs were pinpointed in regions carrying altered copy numbers. Conclusion In the present study, ES xenografts were successfully applied for integrated microarray analyses. Our findings showed expression changes of miRNAs that were predicted to regulate many ES associated genes, such as IGF1 pathway genes, FLI1, EWSR1, and the EWS-FLI1 fusion genes.

  5. Between-species differences in gene copy number are enriched among functions critical for adaptive evolution in Arabidopsis halleri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryawanshi, Vasantika; Talke, Ina N; Weber, Michael; Eils, Roland; Brors, Benedikt; Clemens, Stephan; Krämer, Ute

    2016-12-22

    Gene copy number divergence between species is a form of genetic polymorphism that contributes significantly to both genome size and phenotypic variation. In plants, copy number expansions of single genes were implicated in cultivar- or species-specific tolerance of high levels of soil boron, aluminium or calamine-type heavy metals, respectively. Arabidopsis halleri is a zinc- and cadmium-hyperaccumulating extremophile species capable of growing on heavy-metal contaminated, toxic soils. In contrast, its non-accumulating sister species A. lyrata and the closely related reference model species A. thaliana exhibit merely basal metal tolerance. For a genome-wide assessment of the role of copy number divergence (CND) in lineage-specific environmental adaptation, we conducted cross-species array comparative genome hybridizations of three plant species and developed a global signal scaling procedure to adjust for sequence divergence. In A. halleri, transition metal homeostasis functions are enriched twofold among the genes detected as copy number expanded. Moreover, biotic stress functions including mostly disease Resistance (R) gene-related genes are enriched twofold among genes detected as copy number reduced, when compared to the abundance of these functions among all genes. Our results provide genome-wide support for a link between evolutionary adaptation and CND in A. halleri as shown previously for Heavy metal ATPase4. Moreover our results support the hypothesis that elemental defences, which result from the hyperaccumulation of toxic metals, allow the reduction of classical defences against biotic stress as a trade-off.

  6. Copy number variation analysis implicates the cell polarity gene glypican 5 as a human spina bifida candidate gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassuk, Alexander G.; Muthuswamy, Lakshmi B.; Boland, Riley; Smith, Tiffany L.; Hulstrand, Alissa M.; Northrup, Hope; Hakeman, Matthew; Dierdorff, Jason M.; Yung, Christina K.; Long, Abby; Brouillette, Rachel B.; Au, Kit Sing; Gurnett, Christina; Houston, Douglas W.; Cornell, Robert A.; Manak, J. Robert

    2013-01-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are common birth defects of complex etiology. Family and population-based studies have confirmed a genetic component to NTDs. However, despite more than three decades of research, the genes involved in human NTDs remain largely unknown. We tested the hypothesis that rare copy number variants (CNVs), especially de novo germline CNVs, are a significant risk factor for NTDs. We used array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) to identify rare CNVs in 128 Caucasian and 61 Hispanic patients with non-syndromic lumbar-sacral myelomeningocele. We also performed aCGH analysis on the parents of affected individuals with rare CNVs where parental DNA was available (42 sets). Among the eight de novo CNVs that we identified, three generated copy number changes of entire genes. One large heterozygous deletion removed 27 genes, including PAX3, a known spina bifida-associated gene. A second CNV altered genes (PGPD8, ZC3H6) for which little is known regarding function or expression. A third heterozygous deletion removed GPC5 and part of GPC6, genes encoding glypicans. Glypicans are proteoglycans that modulate the activity of morphogens such as Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) and bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), both of which have been implicated in NTDs. Additionally, glypicans function in the planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway, and several PCP genes have been associated with NTDs. Here, we show that GPC5 orthologs are expressed in the neural tube, and that inhibiting their expression in frog and fish embryos results in NTDs. These results implicate GPC5 as a gene required for normal neural tube development. PMID:23223018

  7. Copy number of pilus gene clusters in Haemophilus influenzae and variation in the hifE pilin gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, T D; Satola, S W; Opdyke, J A; Farley, M M

    1998-04-01

    Brazilian purpuric fever (BPF)-associated Haemophilus influenzae biogroup aegyptius strain F3031 contains two identical copies of a five gene cluster (hifA to hifE) encoding pili similar to well-characterized Hif fimbriae of H. influenzae type b. HifE, the putative pilus tip adhesin of F3031, shares only 40% amino acid sequence similarity with the same molecule from type b strains, whereas the other four proteins have 75 to 95% identity. To determine whether pilus cluster duplication and the hifE(F3031) allele were special features of BPF-associated bacteria, we analyzed a collection of H. influenzae strains by PCR with hifA- and hifE-specific oligonucleotides, by Southern hybridization with a hifC gene probe, and by nucleotide sequencing. The presence of two pilus clusters was limited to some H. influenzae biogroup aegyptius strains. The hifE(F3031) allele was limited to H. influenzae biogroup aegyptius. Two strains contained one copy of hifE(F3031) and one copy of a variant hifE allele. We determined the nucleotide sequences of four hifE genes from H. influenzae biogroup aegyptius and H. influenzae capsule serotypes a and c. The predicted proteins produced by these genes demonstrated only 35 to 70% identity to the three published HifE proteins from nontypeable H. influenzae, serotype b, and BPF strains. The C-terminal third of the molecules implicated in chaperone binding was the most highly conserved region. Three conserved domains in the otherwise highly variable N-terminal putative receptor-binding region of HifE were similar to conserved portions in the N terminus of Neisseria pilus adhesin PilC. We concluded that two pilus clusters and hifE(F3031) were not specific for BPF-causing H. influenzae, and we also identified portions of HifE possibly involved in binding mammalian cell receptors.

  8. Dietary starch intake modifies the relation between copy number variation in the salivary amylase gene and BMI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rukh, Gull; Ericson, Ulrika; Andersson-Assarsson, Johanna; Orho-Melander, Marju; Sonestedt, Emily

    2017-07-01

    Background: Studies have shown conflicting associations between the salivary amylase gene (AMY1) copy number and obesity. Salivary amylase initiates starch digestion in the oral cavity; starch is a major source of energy in the diet.Objective: We investigated the association between AMY1 copy number and obesity traits, and the effect of the interaction between AMY1 copy number and starch intake on these obesity traits.Design: We first assessed the association between AMY1 copy number (genotyped by digital droplet polymerase chain reaction) and obesity traits in 4800 individuals without diabetes (mean age: 57 y; 60% female) from the Malmö Diet and Cancer Cohort. Then we analyzed interactions between AMY1 copy number and energy-adjusted starch intake (obtained by a modified diet history method) on body mass index (BMI) and body fat percentage.Results:AMY1 copy number was not associated with BMI (P = 0.80) or body fat percentage (P = 0.38). We observed a significant effect of the interaction between AMY1 copy number and starch intake on BMI (P-interaction = 0.007) and body fat percentage (P-interaction = 0.03). Upon stratification by dietary starch intake, BMI tended to decrease with increasing AMY1 copy numbers in the low-starch intake group (P = 0.07) and tended to increase with increasing AMY1 copy numbers in the high-starch intake group (P = 0.08). The lowest mean BMI was observed in the group of participants with a low AMY1 copy number and a high dietary intake of starch.Conclusions: Our findings suggest an effect of the interaction between starch intake and AMY1 copy number on obesity. Individuals with high starch intake but low genetic capacity to digest starch had the lowest BMI, potentially because larger amounts of undigested starch are transported through the gastrointestinal tract, contributing to fewer calories extracted from ingested starch. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  9. Intragenomic polymorphisms among high-copy loci: a genus-wide study of nuclear ribosomal DNA in Asclepias (Apocynaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Weitemier

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite knowledge that concerted evolution of high-copy loci is often imperfect, studies that investigate the extent of intragenomic polymorphisms and comparisons across a large number of species are rarely made. We present a bioinformatic pipeline for characterizing polymorphisms within an individual among copies of a high-copy locus. Results are presented for nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA across the milkweed genus, Asclepias. The 18S-26S portion of the nrDNA cistron of Asclepias syriaca served as a reference for assembly of the region from 124 samples representing 90 species of Asclepias. Reads were mapped back to each individual’s consensus and at each position reads differing from the consensus were tallied using a custom perl script. Low frequency polymorphisms existed in all individuals (mean = 5.8%. Most nrDNA positions (91% were polymorphic in at least one individual, with polymorphic sites being less frequent in subunit regions and loops. Highly polymorphic sites existed in each individual, with highest abundance in the “noncoding” ITS regions. Phylogenetic signal was present in the distribution of intragenomic polymorphisms across the genus. Intragenomic polymorphisms in nrDNA are common in Asclepias, being found at higher frequency than any other study to date. The high and variable frequency of polymorphisms across species highlights concerns that phylogenetic applications of nrDNA may be error-prone. The new analytical approach provided here is applicable to other taxa and other high-copy regions characterized by low coverage genome sequencing (genome skimming.

  10. Intragenomic polymorphisms among high-copy loci: a genus-wide study of nuclear ribosomal DNA in Asclepias (Apocynaceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, Shannon C.K.; Fishbein, Mark; Liston, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Despite knowledge that concerted evolution of high-copy loci is often imperfect, studies that investigate the extent of intragenomic polymorphisms and comparisons across a large number of species are rarely made. We present a bioinformatic pipeline for characterizing polymorphisms within an individual among copies of a high-copy locus. Results are presented for nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA) across the milkweed genus, Asclepias. The 18S-26S portion of the nrDNA cistron of Asclepias syriaca served as a reference for assembly of the region from 124 samples representing 90 species of Asclepias. Reads were mapped back to each individual’s consensus and at each position reads differing from the consensus were tallied using a custom perl script. Low frequency polymorphisms existed in all individuals (mean = 5.8%). Most nrDNA positions (91%) were polymorphic in at least one individual, with polymorphic sites being less frequent in subunit regions and loops. Highly polymorphic sites existed in each individual, with highest abundance in the “noncoding” ITS regions. Phylogenetic signal was present in the distribution of intragenomic polymorphisms across the genus. Intragenomic polymorphisms in nrDNA are common in Asclepias, being found at higher frequency than any other study to date. The high and variable frequency of polymorphisms across species highlights concerns that phylogenetic applications of nrDNA may be error-prone. The new analytical approach provided here is applicable to other taxa and other high-copy regions characterized by low coverage genome sequencing (genome skimming). PMID:25653903

  11. Diversity and population-genetic properties of copy number variations and multicopy genes in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickhart, Derek M; Xu, Lingyang; Hutchison, Jana L; Cole, John B; Null, Daniel J; Schroeder, Steven G; Song, Jiuzhou; Garcia, Jose Fernando; Sonstegard, Tad S; Van Tassell, Curtis P; Schnabel, Robert D; Taylor, Jeremy F; Lewin, Harris A; Liu, George E

    2016-06-01

    The diversity and population genetics of copy number variation (CNV) in domesticated animals are not well understood. In this study, we analysed 75 genomes of major taurine and indicine cattle breeds (including Angus, Brahman, Gir, Holstein, Jersey, Limousin, Nelore, and Romagnola), sequenced to 11-fold coverage to identify 1,853 non-redundant CNV regions. Supported by high validation rates in array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and qPCR experiments, these CNV regions accounted for 3.1% (87.5 Mb) of the cattle reference genome, representing a significant increase over previous estimates of the area of the genome that is copy number variable (∼2%). Further population genetics and evolutionary genomics analyses based on these CNVs revealed the population structures of the cattle taurine and indicine breeds and uncovered potential diversely selected CNVs near important functional genes, including AOX1, ASZ1, GAT, GLYAT, and KRTAP9-1 Additionally, 121 CNV gene regions were found to be either breed specific or differentially variable across breeds, such as RICTOR in dairy breeds and PNPLA3 in beef breeds. In contrast, clusters of the PRP and PAG genes were found to be duplicated in all sequenced animals, suggesting that subfunctionalization, neofunctionalization, or overdominance play roles in diversifying those fertility-related genes. These CNV results provide a new glimpse into the diverse selection histories of cattle breeds and a basis for correlating structural variation with complex traits in the future. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Kazusa DNA Research Institute 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  12. Involvement of plastid, mitochondrial and nuclear genomes in plant-to-plant horizontal gene transfer

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    Maria Virginia Sanchez-Puerta

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This review focuses on plant-to-plant horizontal gene transfer (HGT involving the three DNA-containing cellular compartments. It highlights the great incidence of HGT in the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA of angiosperms, the increasing number of examples in plant nuclear genomes, and the lack of any convincing evidence for HGT in the well-studied plastid genome of land plants. Most of the foreign mitochondrial genes are non-functional, generally found as pseudogenes in the recipient plant mtDNA that maintains its functional native genes. The few exceptions involve chimeric HGT, in which foreign and native copies recombine leading to a functional and single copy of the gene. Maintenance of foreign genes in plant mitochondria is probably the result of genetic drift, but a possible evolutionary advantage may be conferred through the generation of genetic diversity by gene conversion between native and foreign copies. Conversely, a few cases of nuclear HGT in plants involve functional transfers of novel genes that resulted in adaptive evolution. Direct cell-to-cell contact between plants (e.g. host-parasite relationships or natural grafting facilitate the exchange of genetic material, in which HGT has been reported for both nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, and in the form of genomic DNA, instead of RNA. A thorough review of the literature indicates that HGT in mitochondrial and nuclear genomes of angiosperms is much more frequent than previously expected and that the evolutionary impact and mechanisms underlying plant-to-plant HGT remain to be uncovered.

  13. Expression of epithelial-mesenchymal transition-related genes increases with copy number in multiple cancer types.

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    Zhao, Min; Liu, Yining; Qu, Hong

    2016-04-26

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a cellular process through which epithelial cells transform into mesenchymal cells. EMT-implicated genes initiate and promote cancer metastasis because mesenchymal cells have greater invasive and migration capacities than epithelial cells. In this pan-cancer analysis, we explored the relationship between gene expression changes and copy number variations (CNVs) for EMT-implicated genes. Based on curated 377 EMT-implicated genes from the literature, we identified 212 EMT-implicated genes associated with more frequent copy number gains (CNGs) than copy number losses (CNLs) using data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Then by correlating these CNV data with TCGA gene expression data, we identified 71 EMT-implicated genes with concordant CNGs and gene up-regulation in 20 or more tumor samples. Of those, 14 exhibited such concordance in over 110 tumor samples. These 14 genes were predominantly apoptosis regulators, which may implies that apoptosis is critical during EMT. Moreover, the 71 genes with concordant CNG and up-regulation were largely involved in cellular functions such as phosphorylation cascade signaling. This is the first observation of concordance between CNG and up-regulation of specific genes in hundreds of samples, which may indicate that somatic CNGs activate gene expression by increasing the gene dosage.

  14. Pathogenic mutations of nuclear genes associated with mitochondrial disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoyu Zhu; Xuerui Peng; Min-Xin Guan; Qingfeng Yan

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondrial disorders are clinical phenotypes associated with mitochondrial dysfunction, which can be caused by mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) or nuclear genes. In this review, we summarized the pathogenic mutations of nuclear genes associated with mitochondrial disorders. These nuclear genes encode, components of mitochondrial translational machinery and structural subunits and assembly factors of the oxidative phosphorylation, that complex. The molecular mechanisms, that nuclear modifier genes modulate the phenotypic expression of mtDNA mutations, are discussed in detail.

  15. Genomic Copy Number Dictates a Gene-Independent Cell Response to CRISPR/Cas9 Targeting | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system enables genome editing and somatic cell genetic screens in mammalian cells. We performed genome-scale loss-of-function screens in 33 cancer cell lines to identify genes essential for proliferation/survival and found a strong correlation between increased gene copy number and decreased cell viability after genome editing. Within regions of copy-number gain, CRISPR/Cas9 targeting of both expressed and unexpressed genes, as well as intergenic loci, led to significantly decreased cell proliferation through induction of a G2 cell-cycle arrest.

  16. Genomic Copy Number Variations of the Complement Component C4B Gene Are Associated With Chronic Central Serous Chorioretinopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breukink, M.B.; Schellevis, R.L.; Boon, C.J.F.; Fauser, S.; Hoyng, C.B.; Hollander, A.I. den; Jong, E.K.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Chronic central serous chorioretinopathy (cCSC) has recently been associated to variants in the complement factor H gene. To further investigate the role of the complement system in cCSC, the genomic copy number variations in the complement component 4 gene (C4) were studied. METHODS: C4A

  17. Genomic Copy Number Variations of the Complement Component C4B Gene Are Associated With Chronic Central Serous Chorioretinopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breukink, M.B.; Schellevis, R.L.; Boon, C.J.F.; Fauser, S.; Hoyng, C.B.; Hollander, A.I. den; Jong, E.K.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Chronic central serous chorioretinopathy (cCSC) has recently been associated to variants in the complement factor H gene. To further investigate the role of the complement system in cCSC, the genomic copy number variations in the complement component 4 gene (C4) were studied. METHODS: C4A a

  18. Selective regain of egfr gene copies in CD44+/CD24-/low breast cancer cellular model MDA-MB-468

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Antje

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increased transcription of oncogenes like the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR is frequently caused by amplification of the whole gene or at least of regulatory sequences. Aim of this study was to pinpoint mechanistic parameters occurring during egfr copy number gains leading to a stable EGFR overexpression and high sensitivity to extracellular signalling. A deeper understanding of those marker events might improve early diagnosis of cancer in suspect lesions, early detection of cancer progression and the prediction of egfr targeted therapies. Methods The basal-like/stemness type breast cancer cell line subpopulation MDA-MB-468 CD44high/CD24-/low, carrying high egfr amplifications, was chosen as a model system in this study. Subclones of the heterogeneous cell line expressing low and high EGF receptor densities were isolated by cell sorting. Genomic profiling was carried out for these by means of SNP array profiling, qPCR and FISH. Cell cycle analysis was performed using the BrdU quenching technique. Results Low and high EGFR expressing MDA-MB-468 CD44+/CD24-/low subpopulations separated by cell sorting showed intermediate and high copy numbers of egfr, respectively. However, during cell culture an increase solely for egfr gene copy numbers in the intermediate subpopulation occurred. This shift was based on the formation of new cells which regained egfr gene copies. By two parametric cell cycle analysis clonal effects mediated through growth advantage of cells bearing higher egfr gene copy numbers could most likely be excluded for being the driving force. Subsequently, the detection of a fragile site distal to the egfr gene, sustaining uncapped telomere-less chromosomal ends, the ladder-like structure of the intrachromosomal egfr amplification and a broader range of egfr copy numbers support the assumption that dynamic chromosomal rearrangements, like breakage-fusion-bridge-cycles other than proliferation drive the gain

  19. Association between the SMN2 gene copy number and clinical characteristics of patients with spinal muscular atrophy with homozygous deletion of exon 7 of the SMN1 gene

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    Žarkov Marija

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by degeneration of alpha motor neurons in the spinal cord and the medulla oblongata, causing progressive muscle weakness and atrophy. The aim of this study was to determine association between the SMN2 gene copy number and disease phenotype in Serbian patients with SMA with homozygous deletion of exon 7 of the SMN1 gene. Methods. The patients were identified using regional Serbian hospital databases. Investigated clinical characteristics of the disease were: patients’ gender, age at disease onset, achieved and current developmental milestones, disease duration, current age, and the presence of the spinal deformities and joint contractures. The number of SMN1 and SMN2 gene copies was determined using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Results. Among 43 identified patients, 37 (86.0% showed homozygous deletion of SMN1 exon 7. One (2.7% of 37 patients had SMA type I with 3 SMN2 copies, 11 (29.7% patients had SMA type II with 3.1 ± 0.7 copies, 17 (45.9% patients had SMA type III with 3.7 ± 0.9 copies, while 8 (21.6% patients had SMA type IV with 4.2 ± 0.9 copies. There was a progressive increase in the SMN2 gene copy number from type II towards type IV (p < 0.05. A higher SMN2 gene copy number was associated with better current motor performance (p < 0.05. Conclusion. In the Serbian patients with SMA, a higher SMN2 gene copy number correlated with less severe disease phenotype. A possible effect of other phenotype modifiers should not be neglected.

  20. Yersinia spp. Identification Using Copy Diversity in the Chromosomal 16S rRNA Gene Sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Huijing; Liang, Junrong; Duan, Ran; Chen, Yuhuang; Liu, Chang; Xiao, Yuchun; Li, Xu; Su, Mingming; Jing, Huaiqi; Wang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    API 20E strip test, the standard for Enterobacteriaceae identification, is not sufficient to discriminate some Yersinia species for some unstable biochemical reactions and the same biochemical profile presented in some species, e.g. Yersinia ferderiksenii and Yersinia intermedia, which need a variety of molecular biology methods as auxiliaries for identification. The 16S rRNA gene is considered a valuable tool for assigning bacterial strains to species. However, the resolution of the 16S rRNA gene may be insufficient for discrimination because of the high similarity of sequences between some species and heterogeneity within copies at the intra-genomic level. In this study, for each strain we randomly selected five 16S rRNA gene clones from 768 Yersinia strains, and collected 3,840 sequences of the 16S rRNA gene from 10 species, which were divided into 439 patterns. The similarity among the five clones of 16S rRNA gene is over 99% for most strains. Identical sequences were found in strains of different species. A phylogenetic tree was constructed using the five 16S rRNA gene sequences for each strain where the phylogenetic classifications are consistent with biochemical tests; and species that are difficult to identify by biochemical phenotype can be differentiated. Most Yersinia strains form distinct groups within each species. However Yersinia kristensenii, a heterogeneous species, clusters with some Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia ferderiksenii/intermedia strains, while not affecting the overall efficiency of this species classification. In conclusion, through analysis derived from integrated information from multiple 16S rRNA gene sequences, the discrimination ability of Yersinia species is improved using our method.

  1. Yersinia spp. Identification Using Copy Diversity in the Chromosomal 16S rRNA Gene Sequence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huijing Hao

    Full Text Available API 20E strip test, the standard for Enterobacteriaceae identification, is not sufficient to discriminate some Yersinia species for some unstable biochemical reactions and the same biochemical profile presented in some species, e.g. Yersinia ferderiksenii and Yersinia intermedia, which need a variety of molecular biology methods as auxiliaries for identification. The 16S rRNA gene is considered a valuable tool for assigning bacterial strains to species. However, the resolution of the 16S rRNA gene may be insufficient for discrimination because of the high similarity of sequences between some species and heterogeneity within copies at the intra-genomic level. In this study, for each strain we randomly selected five 16S rRNA gene clones from 768 Yersinia strains, and collected 3,840 sequences of the 16S rRNA gene from 10 species, which were divided into 439 patterns. The similarity among the five clones of 16S rRNA gene is over 99% for most strains. Identical sequences were found in strains of different species. A phylogenetic tree was constructed using the five 16S rRNA gene sequences for each strain where the phylogenetic classifications are consistent with biochemical tests; and species that are difficult to identify by biochemical phenotype can be differentiated. Most Yersinia strains form distinct groups within each species. However Yersinia kristensenii, a heterogeneous species, clusters with some Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia ferderiksenii/intermedia strains, while not affecting the overall efficiency of this species classification. In conclusion, through analysis derived from integrated information from multiple 16S rRNA gene sequences, the discrimination ability of Yersinia species is improved using our method.

  2. The Role of Nuclear Bodies in Gene Expression and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Marie; Boerkoel, Cornelius F.

    2013-01-01

    This review summarizes the current understanding of the role of nuclear bodies in regulating gene expression. The compartmentalization of cellular processes, such as ribosome biogenesis, RNA processing, cellular response to stress, transcription, modification and assembly of spliceosomal snRNPs, histone gene synthesis and nuclear RNA retention, has significant implications for gene regulation. These functional nuclear domains include the nucleolus, nuclear speckle, nuclear stress body, transcription factory, Cajal body, Gemini of Cajal body, histone locus body and paraspeckle. We herein review the roles of nuclear bodies in regulating gene expression and their relation to human health and disease. PMID:24040563

  3. The Role of Nuclear Bodies in Gene Expression and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Morimoto

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes the current understanding of the role of nuclear bodies in regulating gene expression. The compartmentalization of cellular processes, such as ribosome biogenesis, RNA processing, cellular response to stress, transcription, modification and assembly of spliceosomal snRNPs, histone gene synthesis and nuclear RNA retention, has significant implications for gene regulation. These functional nuclear domains include the nucleolus, nuclear speckle, nuclear stress body, transcription factory, Cajal body, Gemini of Cajal body, histone locus body and paraspeckle. We herein review the roles of nuclear bodies in regulating gene expression and their relation to human health and disease.

  4. Copy number variants in candidate genes are genetic modifiers of Hirschsprung disease.

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    Qian Jiang

    Full Text Available Hirschsprung disease (HSCR is a neurocristopathy characterized by absence of intramural ganglion cells along variable lengths of the gastrointestinal tract. The HSCR phenotype is highly variable with respect to gender, length of aganglionosis, familiality and the presence of additional anomalies. By molecular genetic analysis, a minimum of 11 neuro-developmental genes (RET, GDNF, NRTN, SOX10, EDNRB, EDN3, ECE1, ZFHX1B, PHOX2B, KIAA1279, TCF4 are known to harbor rare, high-penetrance mutations that confer a large risk to the bearer. In addition, two other genes (RET, NRG1 harbor common, low-penetrance polymorphisms that contribute only partially to risk and can act as genetic modifiers. To broaden this search, we examined whether a set of 67 proven and candidate HSCR genes harbored additional modifier alleles. In this pilot study, we utilized a custom-designed array CGH with ∼33,000 test probes at an average resolution of ∼185 bp to detect gene-sized or smaller copy number variants (CNVs within these 67 genes in 18 heterogeneous HSCR patients. Using stringent criteria, we identified CNVs at three loci (MAPK10, ZFHX1B, SOX2 that are novel, involve regulatory and coding sequences of neuro-developmental genes, and show association with HSCR in combination with other congenital anomalies. Additional CNVs are observed under relaxed criteria. Our research suggests a role for CNVs in HSCR and, importantly, emphasizes the role of variation in regulatory sequences. A much larger study will be necessary both for replication and for identifying the full spectrum of small CNV effects.

  5. Topoisomerase-1 and -2A gene copy numbers are elevated in mismatch repair-proficient colorectal cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sønderstrup, Ida Marie Heeholm; Nygård, Sune Boris; Poulsen, Tim Svenstrup

    2015-01-01

    (MMR) subtypes of CRC have been associated with benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy of primary CRC. Given the involvement of the topoisomerase enzymes in DNA replication and repair, we raised the hypothesis that an association may exist between TOP gene copy numbers and MMR proficiency/deficiency in CRC...... patients with deficient MMR (dMMR) CRC. TOP1 and TOP2A gene copy numbers and their ratios per nucleus were correlated with MMR status using the Mann-Whitney test. Validation cohort: FFPE samples from 154 patients with primary stage III CRC (originally included in the RANX05 study) were classified according...

  6. New class of gene-termini-associated human RNAs suggests a novel RNA copying mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapranov, Philipp; Ozsolak, Fatih; Kim, Sang Woo; Foissac, Sylvain; Lipson, Doron; Hart, Chris; Roels, Steve; Borel, Christelle; Antonarakis, Stylianos E; Monaghan, A Paula; John, Bino; Milos, Patrice M

    2010-07-29

    Small (<200 nucleotide) RNA (sRNA) profiling of human cells using various technologies demonstrates unexpected complexity of sRNAs with hundreds of thousands of sRNA species present. Genetic and in vitro studies show that these RNAs are not merely degradation products of longer transcripts but could indeed have a function. Furthermore, profiling of RNAs, including the sRNAs, can reveal not only novel transcripts, but also make clear predictions about the existence and properties of novel biochemical pathways operating in a cell. For example, sRNA profiling in human cells indicated the existence of an unknown capping mechanism operating on cleaved RNA, a biochemical component of which was later identified. Here we show that human cells contain a novel type of sRNA that has non-genomically encoded 5' poly(U) tails. The presence of these RNAs at the termini of genes, specifically at the very 3' ends of known mRNAs, strongly argues for the presence of a yet uncharacterized endogenous biochemical pathway in cells that can copy RNA. We show that this pathway can operate on multiple genes, with specific enrichment towards transcript-encoding components of the translational machinery. Finally, we show that genes are also flanked by sense, 3' polyadenylated sRNAs that are likely to be capped.

  7. Genetic variations related to maternal whole blood mitochondrial DNA copy number: a genome-wide and candidate gene study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Enquobahrie, Daniel A; Tadesse, Mahlet G; Hevner, Karin; Gelaye, Bizu; Sanchez, Sixto E; Williams, Michelle A

    2017-10-01

    We conducted genome-wide (GWAS) and candidate gene association studies of maternal mitochondrial DNA copy number. Maternal peripheral blood was collected during labor and delivery admission from 471 participants of a placental abruption case-control study conducted in Lima, Peru. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping was performed using the Illumina Cardio-Metabo Chip. Whole blood mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number was measured using qRT-PCR techniques. We evaluated 119,629 SNPs in the GWAS and 161 SNPs (in 29 mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative phosphorylation genes) in the candidate association study. Top hits from GWAS and the candidate gene study were selected to compute weighted genetic risk scores (wGRS). Linear regression models were used to calculate effect size estimates and related nominal p values. The top hit in our GWAS was chr19:51063065 in FOXA3 (empirical p values = 2.20e - 6). A total of 134 SNPs had p values copy number (p values copy number was significantly associated with wGRS based on top GWAS hits (β = 0.49, 95% CI:0.38-0.60, p copy number.

  8. Human PTCHD3 nulls: rare copy number and sequence variants suggest a non-essential gene

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    Lionel Anath C

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Copy number variations (CNVs can contribute to variable degrees of fitness and/or disease predisposition. Recent studies show that at least 1% of any given genome is copy number variable when compared to the human reference sequence assembly. Homozygous deletions (or CNV nulls that are found in the normal population are of particular interest because they may serve to define non-essential genes in human biology. Results In a genomic screen investigating CNV in Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs we detected a heterozygous deletion on chromosome 10p12.1, spanning the Patched-domain containing 3 (PTCHD3 gene, at a frequency of ~1.4% (6/427. This finding seemed interesting, given recent discoveries on the role of another Patched-domain containing gene (PTCHD1 in ASD. Screening of another 177 ASD probands yielded two additional heterozygous deletions bringing the frequency to 1.3% (8/604. The deletion was found at a frequency of ~0.73% (27/3,695 in combined control population from North America and Northern Europe predominately of European ancestry. Screening of the human genome diversity panel (HGDP-CEPH covering worldwide populations yielded deletions in 7/1,043 unrelated individuals and those detected were confined to individuals of European/Mediterranean/Middle Eastern ancestry. Breakpoint mapping yielded an identical 102,624 bp deletion in all cases and controls tested, suggesting a common ancestral event. Interestingly, this CNV occurs at a break of synteny between humans and mouse. Considering all data, however, no significant association of these rare PTCHD3 deletions with ASD was observed. Notwithstanding, our RNA expression studies detected PTCHD3 in several tissues, and a novel shorter isoform for PTCHD3 was characterized. Expression in transfected COS-7 cells showed PTCHD3 isoforms colocalize with calnexin in the endoplasmic reticulum. The presence of a patched (Ptc domain suggested a role for PTCHD3 in various biological

  9. Integrated analysis of gene expression, CpG island methylation, and gene copy number in breast cancer cells by deep sequencing.

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    Zhifu Sun

    Full Text Available We used deep sequencing technology to profile the transcriptome, gene copy number, and CpG island methylation status simultaneously in eight commonly used breast cell lines to develop a model for how these genomic features are integrated in estrogen receptor positive (ER+ and negative breast cancer. Total mRNA sequence, gene copy number, and genomic CpG island methylation were carried out using the Illumina Genome Analyzer. Sequences were mapped to the human genome to obtain digitized gene expression data, DNA copy number in reference to the non-tumor cell line (MCF10A, and methylation status of 21,570 CpG islands to identify differentially expressed genes that were correlated with methylation or copy number changes. These were evaluated in a dataset from 129 primary breast tumors. Gene expression in cell lines was dominated by ER-associated genes. ER+ and ER- cell lines formed two distinct, stable clusters, and 1,873 genes were differentially expressed in the two groups. Part of chromosome 8 was deleted in all ER- cells and part of chromosome 17 amplified in all ER+ cells. These loci encoded 30 genes that were overexpressed in ER+ cells; 9 of these genes were overexpressed in ER+ tumors. We identified 149 differentially expressed genes that exhibited differential methylation of one or more CpG islands within 5 kb of the 5' end of the gene and for which mRNA abundance was inversely correlated with CpG island methylation status. In primary tumors we identified 84 genes that appear to be robust components of the methylation signature that we identified in ER+ cell lines. Our analyses reveal a global pattern of differential CpG island methylation that contributes to the transcriptome landscape of ER+ and ER- breast cancer cells and tumors. The role of gene amplification/deletion appears to more modest, although several potentially significant genes appear to be regulated by copy number aberrations.

  10. Phylogeny of the bears (Ursidae) based on nuclear and mitochondrial genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Li; Li, Qing-wei; Ryder, O A; Zhang, Ya-ping

    2004-08-01

    The taxomic classification and phylogenetic relationships within the bear family remain argumentative subjects in recent years. Prior investigation has been concentrated on the application of different mitochondrial (mt) sequence data, herein we employ two nuclear single-copy gene segments, the partial exon 1 from gene encoding interphotoreceptor retinoid binding protein (IRBP) and the complete intron 1 from transthyretin (TTR) gene, in conjunction with previously published mt data, to clarify these enigmatic problems. The combined analyses of nuclear IRBP and TTR datasets not only corroborated prior hypotheses, positioning the spectacled bear most basally and grouping the brown and polar bear together but also provided new insights into the bear phylogeny, suggesting the sister-taxa association of sloth bear and sun bear with strong support. Analyses based on combination of nuclear and mt genes differed from nuclear analysis in recognizing the sloth bears as the earliest diverging species among the subfamily ursine representatives while the exact placement of the sun bear did not resolved. Asiatic and American black bears clustered as sister group in all analyses with moderate levels of bootstrap support and high posterior probabilities. Comparisons between the nuclear and mtDNA findings suggested that our combined nuclear dataset have the resolving power comparable to mtDNA dataset for the phylogenetic interpretation of the bear family. As can be seen from present study, the unanimous phylogeny for this recently derived family was still not produced and additional independent genetic markers were in need.

  11. Successful Recovery of Nuclear Protein-Coding Genes from Small Insects in Museums Using Illumina Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, Kojun; Pflug, James M; Sproul, John S; Dasenko, Mark A; Maddison, David R

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we explore high-throughput Illumina sequencing of nuclear protein-coding, ribosomal, and mitochondrial genes in small, dried insects stored in natural history collections. We sequenced one tenebrionid beetle and 12 carabid beetles ranging in size from 3.7 to 9.7 mm in length that have been stored in various museums for 4 to 84 years. Although we chose a number of old, small specimens for which we expected low sequence recovery, we successfully recovered at least some low-copy nuclear protein-coding genes from all specimens. For example, in one 56-year-old beetle, 4.4 mm in length, our de novo assembly recovered about 63% of approximately 41,900 nucleotides in a target suite of 67 nuclear protein-coding gene fragments, and 70% using a reference-based assembly. Even in the least successfully sequenced carabid specimen, reference-based assembly yielded fragments that were at least 50% of the target length for 34 of 67 nuclear protein-coding gene fragments. Exploration of alternative references for reference-based assembly revealed few signs of bias created by the reference. For all specimens we recovered almost complete copies of ribosomal and mitochondrial genes. We verified the general accuracy of the sequences through comparisons with sequences obtained from PCR and Sanger sequencing, including of conspecific, fresh specimens, and through phylogenetic analysis that tested the placement of sequences in predicted regions. A few possible inaccuracies in the sequences were detected, but these rarely affected the phylogenetic placement of the samples. Although our sample sizes are low, an exploratory regression study suggests that the dominant factor in predicting success at recovering nuclear protein-coding genes is a high number of Illumina reads, with success at PCR of COI and killing by immersion in ethanol being secondary factors; in analyses of only high-read samples, the primary significant explanatory variable was body length, with small beetles

  12. Genome-wide copy number analysis uncovers a new HSCR gene: NRG3.

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    Clara Sze-Man Tang

    Full Text Available Hirschsprung disease (HSCR is a congenital disorder characterized by aganglionosis of the distal intestine. To assess the contribution of copy number variants (CNVs to HSCR, we analysed the data generated from our previous genome-wide association study on HSCR patients, whereby we identified NRG1 as a new HSCR susceptibility locus. Analysis of 129 Chinese patients and 331 ethnically matched controls showed that HSCR patients have a greater burden of rare CNVs (p = 1.50 × 10(-5, particularly for those encompassing genes (p = 5.00 × 10(-6. Our study identified 246 rare-genic CNVs exclusive to patients. Among those, we detected a NRG3 deletion (p = 1.64 × 10(-3. Subsequent follow-up (96 additional patients and 220 controls on NRG3 revealed 9 deletions (combined p = 3.36 × 10(-5 and 2 de novo duplications among patients and two deletions among controls. Importantly, NRG3 is a paralog of NRG1. Stratification of patients by presence/absence of HSCR-associated syndromes showed that while syndromic-HSCR patients carried significantly longer CNVs than the non-syndromic or controls (p = 1.50 × 10(-5, non-syndromic patients were enriched in CNV number when compared to controls (p = 4.00 × 10(-6 or the syndromic counterpart. Our results suggest a role for NRG3 in HSCR etiology and provide insights into the relative contribution of structural variants in both syndromic and non-syndromic HSCR. This would be the first genome-wide catalog of copy number variants identified in HSCR.

  13. Copy number variants in patients with intellectual disability affect the regulation of ARX transcription factor gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Minaka; Manning, Elizabeth; Shoubridge, Cheryl; Krecsmarik, Monika; Hawkins, Thomas A; Giacomotto, Jean; Zhao, Ting; Mueller, Thomas; Bader, Patricia I; Cheung, Sau W; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Bain, Nicole L; Hackett, Anna; Reddy, Chilamakuri C S; Mechaly, Alejandro S; Peers, Bernard; Wilson, Stephen W; Lenhard, Boris; Bally-Cuif, Laure; Gecz, Jozef; Becker, Thomas S; Rinkwitz, Silke

    2015-11-01

    Protein-coding mutations in the transcription factor-encoding gene ARX cause various forms of intellectual disability (ID) and epilepsy. In contrast, variations in surrounding non-coding sequences are correlated with milder forms of non-syndromic ID and autism and had suggested the importance of ARX gene regulation in the etiology of these disorders. We compile data on several novel and some already identified patients with or without ID that carry duplications of ARX genomic region and consider likely genetic mechanisms underlying the neurodevelopmental defects. We establish the long-range regulatory domain of ARX and identify its brain region-specific autoregulation. We conclude that neurodevelopmental disturbances in the patients may not simply arise from increased dosage due to ARX duplication. This is further exemplified by a small duplication involving a non-functional ARX copy, but with duplicated enhancers. ARX enhancers are located within a 504-kb region and regulate expression specifically in the forebrain in developing and adult zebrafish. Transgenic enhancer-reporter lines were used as in vivo tools to delineate a brain region-specific negative and positive autoregulation of ARX. We find autorepression of ARX in the telencephalon and autoactivation in the ventral thalamus. Fluorescently labeled brain regions in the transgenic lines facilitated the identification of neuronal outgrowth and pathfinding disturbances in the ventral thalamus and telencephalon that occur when arxa dosage is diminished. In summary, we have established a model for how breakpoints in long-range gene regulation alter the expression levels of a target gene brain region-specifically, and how this can cause subtle neuronal phenotypes relating to the etiology of associated neuropsychiatric disease.

  14. DNA Copy Number Variants of Known Glaucoma Genes in Relation to Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yutao; Garrett, Melanie E.; Yaspan, Brian L.; Bailey, Jessica Cooke; Loomis, Stephanie J.; Brilliant, Murray; Budenz, Donald L.; Christen, William G.; Fingert, John H.; Gaasterland, Douglas; Gaasterland, Terry; Kang, Jae H.; Lee, Richard K.; Lichter, Paul; Moroi, Sayoko E.; Realini, Anthony; Richards, Julia E.; Schuman, Joel S.; Scott, William K.; Singh, Kuldev; Sit, Arthur J.; Vollrath, Douglas; Weinreb, Robert; Wollstein, Gadi; Zack, Donald J.; Zhang, Kang; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Pasquale, Louis R.; Wiggs, Janey L.; Allingham, R. Rand; Ashley-Koch, Allison E.; Hauser, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. We examined the role of DNA copy number variants (CNVs) of known glaucoma genes in relation to primary open angle glaucoma (POAG). Methods. Our study included DNA samples from two studies (NEIGHBOR and GLAUGEN). All the samples were genotyped with the Illumina Human660W_Quad_v1 BeadChip. After removing non–blood-derived and amplified DNA samples, we applied quality control steps based on the mean Log R Ratio and the mean B allele frequency. Subsequently, data from 3057 DNA samples (1599 cases and 1458 controls) were analyzed with PennCNV software. We defined CNVs as those ≥5 kilobases (kb) in size and interrogated by ≥5 consecutive probes. We further limited our investigation to CNVs in known POAG-related genes, including CDKN2B-AS1, TMCO1, SIX1/SIX6, CAV1/CAV2, the LRP12-ZFPM2 region, GAS7, ATOH7, FNDC3B, CYP1B1, MYOC, OPTN, WDR36, SRBD1, TBK1, and GALC. Results. Genomic duplications of CDKN2B-AS1 and TMCO1 were each found in a single case. Two cases carried duplications in the GAS7 region. Genomic deletions of SIX6 and ATOH7 were each identified in one case. One case carried a TBK1 deletion and another case carried a TBK1 duplication. No controls had duplications or deletions in these six genes. A single control had a duplication in the MYOC region. Deletions of GALC were observed in five cases and two controls. Conclusions. The CNV analysis of a large set of cases and controls revealed the presence of rare CNVs in known POAG susceptibility genes. Our data suggest that these rare CNVs may contribute to POAG pathogenesis and merit functional evaluation. PMID:25414181

  15. Association of copy numbers of survival motor neuron gene 2 and neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein gene with the natural history in a Chinese spinal muscular atrophy cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yu-jin; Ge, Xiu-shan; Bai, Jin-li; Wang, Li-wen; Cao, Yan-yan; Lu, Yan-yu; Jin, Yu-wei; Wang, Hong; Song, Fang

    2015-03-01

    We evaluated survival motor neuron 2 (SMN2) and neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein (NAIP) gene copy distribution and the association of copy number with survival in 232 Chinese spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) patients. The SMN2 and NAIP copy numbers correlated positively with the median onset age (r = 0.72 and 0.377). The risk of death for patients with fewer copies of SMN2 or NAIP was much higher than for those with more copies (P < .01). The survival probabilities at 5 years were 5.1%, 90.7%, and 100% for 2, 3, and 4 SMN2 copies and 27.9%, 66.7%, and 87.2% for 0, 1, and 2 NAIP copies, respectively. Our results indicated that combined SMN1-SMN2-NAIP genotypes with fewer copies were associated with earlier onset age and poorer survival probability. Better survival status for Chinese type I SMA might due to a higher proportion of 3 SMN2 and a lower rate of zero NAIP.

  16. Topoisomerase 1(TOP1) gene copy number in stage III colorectal cancer patients and its relation to prognosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rømer, Maria Unni Koefoed; Nygård, Sune Boris; Christensen, Ib Jarle

    2013-01-01

    A Topoisomerase 1 (Top1) poison is frequently included in the treatment regimens for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). However, no predictive biomarkers for Top1 poisons are available. We here report a study on the TOP1 gene copy number in CRC patients and its association with patient prognosis...

  17. Tandem duplication and copy number polymorphism of the SRY gene in patients with sex chromosome anomalies and males exposed to natural background radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premi, Sanjay; Srivastava, Jyoti; Chandy, Sebastian Padinjarel; Ahmad, Jamal; Ali, Sher

    2006-02-01

    Mutations in the SRY gene encompassing the HMG box have been well characterized in gonadal dysgenesis, male infertility and other types of sex chromosome related anomalies (SCRA). However, no information is available on copy number status of this gene under such abnormal conditions. Employing 'Taqman Probe Assay' specific to the SRY gene, we screened 16 DNA samples from patients with SCRA and 36 samples from males exposed to high levels of natural background radiation (HNBR). Patients with SCRA showed 2-16 copies of the SRY gene of which, one, Oxen (49, XYYYY) had eight copies with sequences different from one another. Of the 36 HNBR samples, 12 had one copy whereas 24 harboured 2-8 copies of the SRY gene. A HNBR male 33F had one normal and one mutated copy of this gene. Analysis of 25 DNA samples from blood and semen of normal males showed only one copy of this gene. Despite multiple copies in affected males, fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) with SRY probe detected a single signal on the Y chromosome in HNBR males suggesting its possible localized tandem duplication. Copy number status of the other Y-linked loci is envisaged to augment DNA diagnostics facilitating genetic counselling to affected patients.

  18. Cancer gene prioritization by integrative analysis of mRNA expression and DNA copy number data: a comparative review

    CERN Document Server

    Lahti, Leo; Klein, Hans-Ulrich; Bicciato, Silvio; Dugas, Martin

    2011-01-01

    A variety of genome-wide profiling techniques are available to probe complementary aspects of genome structure and function. Integrative analysis of heterogeneous data sources can reveal higher-level interactions that cannot be detected based on individual observations. A standard integration task in cancer studies is to identify altered genomic regions that induce changes in the expression of the associated genes based on joint analysis of genome-wide gene expression and copy number profiling measurements. In this review, we provide a comparison among various modeling procedures for integrating genome-wide profiling data of gene copy number and transcriptional alterations and highlight common approaches to genomic data integration. A transparent benchmarking procedure is introduced to quantitatively compare the cancer gene prioritization performance of the alternative methods. The benchmarking algorithms and data sets are available at http://intcomp.r-forge.r-project.org

  19. Use of the MLPA assay in the molecular diagnosis of gene copy number alterations in human genetic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuppia, Liborio; Antonucci, Ivana; Palka, Giandomenico; Gatta, Valentina

    2012-01-01

    Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) assay is a recently developed technique able to evidence variations in the copy number of several human genes. Due to this ability, MLPA can be used in the molecular diagnosis of several genetic diseases whose pathogenesis is related to the presence of deletions or duplications of specific genes. Moreover, MLPA assay can also be used in the molecular diagnosis of genetic diseases characterized by the presence of abnormal DNA methylation. Due to the large number of genes that can be analyzed by a single technique, MLPA assay represents the gold standard for molecular analysis of all pathologies derived from the presence of gene copy number variation. In this review, the main applications of the MLPA technique for the molecular diagnosis of human diseases are described.

  20. Nuclear AXIN2 represses MYC gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rennoll, Sherri A.; Konsavage, Wesley M.; Yochum, Gregory S., E-mail: gsy3@psu.edu

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •AXIN2 localizes to cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments in colorectal cancer cells. •Nuclear AXIN2 represses the activity of Wnt-responsive luciferase reporters. •β-Catenin bridges AXIN2 to TCF transcription factors. •AXIN2 binds the MYC promoter and represses MYC gene expression. -- Abstract: The β-catenin transcriptional coactivator is the key mediator of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. In the absence of Wnt, β-catenin associates with a cytosolic and multi-protein destruction complex where it is phosphorylated and targeted for proteasomal degradation. In the presence of Wnt, the destruction complex is inactivated and β-catenin translocates into the nucleus. In the nucleus, β-catenin binds T-cell factor (TCF) transcription factors to activate expression of c-MYC (MYC) and Axis inhibition protein 2 (AXIN2). AXIN2 is a member of the destruction complex and, thus, serves in a negative feedback loop to control Wnt/β-catenin signaling. AXIN2 is also present in the nucleus, but its function within this compartment is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that AXIN2 localizes to the nuclei of epithelial cells within normal and colonic tumor tissues as well as colorectal cancer cell lines. In the nucleus, AXIN2 represses expression of Wnt/β-catenin-responsive luciferase reporters and forms a complex with β-catenin and TCF. We demonstrate that AXIN2 co-occupies β-catenin/TCF complexes at the MYC promoter region. When constitutively localized to the nucleus, AXIN2 alters the chromatin structure at the MYC promoter and directly represses MYC gene expression. These findings suggest that nuclear AXIN2 functions as a rheostat to control MYC expression in response to Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

  1. High risk genetic factor in Chinese patients with idiopathic male infertility:deletion of DAZ gene copy on Y chromosome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨元; 肖翠英; 张思仲; 张思孝; 黄明孔; 林立

    2004-01-01

    @@ Idiopathic azoospermia or oligozoospermia affects approximately 2%-4% of all married males. Recently studies have confirmed that the deletion of DAZ in AZFc region of Y chromosome may be one of the important genetic aetiologies of Caucasian male infertility. To determine the relationship between DAZ gene deletion and idiopathic male infertility in Chinese population, we analysed the DAZ gene copy number of AZFc region in patients with idiopathic azoospermia or oligozoospermia, as well as fertile Chinese men.

  2. A low-copy-number plasmid for retrieval of toxic genes from BACs and generation of conditional targeting constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Giyoun; Wolfe, Andrew; Ko, Chemyong; Youn, Hyesook; Lee, Young-Min; Byun, Sung June; Jeon, Iksoo; Koo, Yongbum

    2013-06-01

    Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) clones are widely used for retrieving genomic DNA sequences for gene targeting. In this study, low-copy-number plasmids pBAC-FB, pBAC-FC, and pBAC-DE, which carry the F plasmid replicon, were generated from pBACe3.6. pBAC-FB was successfully used to retrieve a sequence of a BAC that was resistant to retrieval by a high-copy-number plasmid via λ Red-mediated recombineering (gap-repair cloning). This plasmid was also used to retrieve two other genes from BAC, indicating its general usability retrieving genes from BAC. The retrieved genes were manipulated in generating targeting vectors for gene knockouts by recombineering. The functionality of the targeting vector was further validated in a targeting experiment with C57BL/6 embryonic stem cells. The low-copy-number plasmid pBAC-FB is a plasmid of choice to retrieve toxic DNA sequences from BACs and to manipulate them to generate gene-targeting constructs by recombineering.

  3. Comparison of cyanobacterial microcystin synthetase (mcy) E gene transcript levels, mcy E gene copies, and biomass as indicators of microcystin risk under laboratory and field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngwa, Felexce F; Madramootoo, Chandra A; Jabaji, Suha

    2014-08-01

    Increased incidences of mixed assemblages of microcystin-producing and nonproducing cyanobacterial strains in freshwater bodies necessitate development of reliable proxies for cyanotoxin risk assessment. Detection of microcystin biosynthetic genes in water blooms of cyanobacteria is generally indicative of the presence of potentially toxic cyanobacterial strains. Although much effort has been devoted toward elucidating the microcystin biosynthesis mechanisms in many cyanobacteria genera, little is known about the impacts of co-occurring cyanobacteria on cellular growth, mcy gene expression, or mcy gene copy distribution. The present study utilized conventional microscopy, qPCR assays, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to study how competition between microcystin-producing Microcystis aeruginosa CPCC 299 and Planktothrix agardhii NIVA-CYA 126 impacts mcyE gene expression, mcyE gene copies, and microcystin concentration under controlled laboratory conditions. Furthermore, analyses of environmental water samples from the Missisquoi Bay, Quebec, enabled us to determine how the various potential toxigenic cyanobacterial biomass proxies correlated with cellular microcystin concentrations in a freshwater lake. Results from our laboratory study indicated significant downregulation of mcyE gene expression in mixed cultures of M. aeruginosa plus P. agardhii on most sampling days in agreement with depressed growth recorded in the mixed cultures, suggesting that interaction between the two species probably resulted in suppressed growth and mcyE gene expression in the mixed cultures. Furthermore, although mcyE gene copies and McyE transcripts were detected in all laboratory and field samples with measureable microcystin levels, only mcyE gene copies showed significant positive correlations (R(2) > 0.7) with microcystin concentrations, while McyE transcript levels did not. These results suggest that mcyE gene copies are better indicators of potential risks from microcystins

  4. Comparison of cyanobacterial microcystin synthetase (mcy) E gene transcript levels, mcy E gene copies, and biomass as indicators of microcystin risk under laboratory and field conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngwa, Felexce F; Madramootoo, Chandra A; Jabaji, Suha

    2014-01-01

    Increased incidences of mixed assemblages of microcystin-producing and nonproducing cyanobacterial strains in freshwater bodies necessitate development of reliable proxies for cyanotoxin risk assessment. Detection of microcystin biosynthetic genes in water blooms of cyanobacteria is generally indicative of the presence of potentially toxic cyanobacterial strains. Although much effort has been devoted toward elucidating the microcystin biosynthesis mechanisms in many cyanobacteria genera, little is known about the impacts of co-occurring cyanobacteria on cellular growth, mcy gene expression, or mcy gene copy distribution. The present study utilized conventional microscopy, qPCR assays, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to study how competition between microcystin-producing Microcystis aeruginosa CPCC 299 and Planktothrix agardhii NIVA-CYA 126 impacts mcyE gene expression, mcyE gene copies, and microcystin concentration under controlled laboratory conditions. Furthermore, analyses of environmental water samples from the Missisquoi Bay, Quebec, enabled us to determine how the various potential toxigenic cyanobacterial biomass proxies correlated with cellular microcystin concentrations in a freshwater lake. Results from our laboratory study indicated significant downregulation of mcyE gene expression in mixed cultures of M. aeruginosa plus P. agardhii on most sampling days in agreement with depressed growth recorded in the mixed cultures, suggesting that interaction between the two species probably resulted in suppressed growth and mcyE gene expression in the mixed cultures. Furthermore, although mcyE gene copies and McyE transcripts were detected in all laboratory and field samples with measureable microcystin levels, only mcyE gene copies showed significant positive correlations (R2 > 0.7) with microcystin concentrations, while McyE transcript levels did not. These results suggest that mcyE gene copies are better indicators of potential risks from microcystins

  5. Investigation of modifier genes within copy number variations in Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artuso, Rosangela; Papa, Filomena T; Grillo, Elisa; Mucciolo, Mafalda; Yasui, Dag H; Dunaway, Keith W; Disciglio, Vittoria; Mencarelli, Maria A; Pollazzon, Marzia; Zappella, Michele; Hayek, Giuseppe; Mari, Francesca; Renieri, Alessandra; Lasalle, Janine M; Ariani, Francesca

    2011-07-01

    MECP2 mutations are responsible for two different phenotypes in females, classical Rett syndrome and the milder Zappella variant (Z-RTT). We investigated whether copy number variants (CNVs) may modulate the phenotype by comparison of array-CGH data from two discordant pairs of sisters and four additional discordant pairs of unrelated girls matched by mutation type. We also searched for potential MeCP2 targets within CNVs by chromatin immunopreceipitation microarray (ChIP-chip) analysis. We did not identify one major common gene/region, suggesting that modifiers may be complex and variable between cases. However, we detected CNVs correlating with disease severity that contain candidate modifiers. CROCC (1p36.13) is a potential MeCP2 target, in which a duplication in a Z-RTT and a deletion in a classic patient were observed. CROCC encodes a structural component of ciliary motility that is required for correct brain development. CFHR1 and CFHR3, on 1q31.3, may be involved in the regulation of complement during synapse elimination, and were found to be deleted in a Z-RTT but duplicated in two classic patients. The duplication of 10q11.22, present in two Z-RTT patients, includes GPRIN2, a regulator of neurite outgrowth and PPYR1, involved in energy homeostasis. Functional analyses are necessary to confirm candidates and to define targets for future therapies.

  6. Confirmation of the spinal motor neuron gene 2 (SMN2) copy numbers by real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieme, Maamouri-Hicheri; Monia Ben, Hammer; Yosr, Bouhlal; Sihem, Souilem; Nawel, Toumi; Ines, Manai-Azizi; Wajdi, Bennour; Najla, Khmiri; Houda, Nahdi; Faycal, Hentati; Rim, Amouri

    2012-09-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive disease caused by mutation or deletion of the survival motor neuron gene 1 (SMN1). SMN2, a copy gene, influences the severity of SMA and may be used in somatic gene therapy of patients with SMA in the future. The SMA carrier analysis developed at the Institute of Medical Genetics, Catholic University (Rome), on the Applied Biosystems real-time PCR instruments by Dr Danilo Tiziano and his group, provides a robust workflow to evaluate SMA carrier status. In this study, the SMN2 copy number was confirmed on 22 patients by developing our own assay on the basis of a relative real-time PCR system using the 7500 Fast Real-Time PCR System.

  7. Impact of copy number of distinct SV40PolyA segments on expression of a GFP reporter gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The presence of Alu repeats downregulates the expression of the green fluorescent protein(GFP) gene.We found that SV40PolyA(PolyA,240 bp),in either orientation,eliminated the inhibition of GFP gene expression induced by Alu repeats when it was placed between the GFP gene and the Alu repeats.In this study,4 different segments(each 60 bp) were amplified from antisense PolyA(PolyAas) by PCR,and inserted upstream of Alu14 in pAlu14 plasmid(14 Alu repeats inserted downstream of the GFP gene in vector pEGFP-C1 in a head-tail tandem manner).Segments 1F1R(the first 60 bp segment at the 5’ end of PolyAas) and 4F4R(the fourth 60 bp segment from the 5’ end of PolyAas) did not activate GFP gene expression,whereas 2F2R and 3F3R(the middle two segments) did(as detected by Northern blot analysis and fluorescent microscopy).Different copy numbers of 2F2R and 3F3R segments,in a head and tail tandem manner,were inserted downstream of the GFP gene in pAlu14.p2F2R*4-Alu28,p3F3R*4-Alu18 and p3F3R*4-Alu28 were used as length controls to verify that the decrease in the expression of GFP was not due to the increased length of the inserted segment in the expression vectors.We found that 2 and 4 copies of 2F2R or 3F3R activated the GFP gene more strongly than one copy of them.However,more than 8 copies of 2F2R or 3F3R reduced the activation of the GFP gene.We concluded that SV40PolyAas contained at least two gene-activating elements(2F2R and 3F3R) and 2-4 copies of 2F2R or 3F3R were optimal for the expression of the GFP gene.

  8. Determination of Cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6 Gene Copy Number by Real-Time Quantitative PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Bodin

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene dosage by real-time quantitative PCR has proved to be accurate for measuring gene copy number. The aim of this study was to apply this approach to the CYP2D6 gene to allow for rapid identification of poor and ultrarapid metabolizers (0, 1, or more than 2 gene copy number. Using the 2−ΔΔCt calculation method and a duplex reaction, the number of CYP2D6 gene copies was determined. Quantitative PCR was performed on 43 samples previously analyzed by Southern blotting and long PCR including 20 samples with a heterozygous deletion, 11 with normal copy number (2 copies, and 12 samples with duplicated genes. The average ratio ranged from 1.02 to 1.28, 1.85 to 2.21, and 2.55 to 3.30, respectively, for the samples with 1 copy, 2 copies, and 3 copies. This study shows that this method is sensitive enough to detect either a heterozygous gene deletion or duplication.

  9. Focal chromosomal copy number aberrations identify CMTM8 and GPR177 as new candidate driver genes in osteosarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joeri Both

    Full Text Available Osteosarcoma is an aggressive bone tumor that preferentially develops in adolescents. The tumor is characterized by an abundance of genomic aberrations, which hampers the identification of the driver genes involved in osteosarcoma tumorigenesis. Our study aims to identify these genes by the investigation of focal copy number aberrations (CNAs, <3 Mb. For this purpose, we subjected 26 primary tumors of osteosarcoma patients to high-resolution single nucleotide polymorphism array analyses and identified 139 somatic focal CNAs. Of these, 72 had at least one gene located within or overlapping the focal CNA, with a total of 94 genes. For 84 of these genes, the expression status in 31 osteosarcoma samples was determined by expression microarray analysis. This enabled us to identify the genes of which the over- or underexpression was in more than 35% of cases in accordance to their copy number status (gain or loss. These candidate genes were subsequently validated in an independent set and furthermore corroborated as driver genes by verifying their role in other tumor types. We identified CMTM8 as a new candidate tumor suppressor gene and GPR177 as a new candidate oncogene in osteosarcoma. In osteosarcoma, CMTM8 has been shown to suppress EGFR signaling. In other tumor types, CMTM8 is known to suppress the activity of the oncogenic protein c-Met and GPR177 is known as an overexpressed upstream regulator of the Wnt-pathway. Further studies are needed to determine whether these proteins also exert the latter functions in osteosarcoma tumorigenesis.

  10. Ribosomal Protein Genes S23 and L35 from Amphioxus Branchiostoma belcheri tsingtauense: Identification and Copy Number

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xian LI; Shi-Cui ZHANG; Zhen-Hui LIU; Hong-Yan LI

    2005-01-01

    The complete cDNA and deduced amino acid sequences of the ribosomal proteins S23 (AmphiS23) and L35 (AmphiL35) from amphioxus Branchiostoma belcheri tsingtauense were identified in this study. AmphiS23 cDNA is 546 bp long and encodes a protein of 143 amino acids. It has a predicted molecular mass of 15,851 Da and a pI of 10.7. AmphiL35 cDNA comprises 473 bp, and codes for a protein of 123 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 14,543 Da and a pI of 10.8. AmphiS23 shares more than 83% identity with its homologues in the vertebrates and more than 84% identity with those in the invertebrates. AmphiL35 is more than 63% identical to its counterparts in the vertebrates and more than 52% identical to those in the invertebrates, Southern blot analysis demonstrated the existence of 1-2 copies of the S23 gene and 2-3 copies of the L35 gene in the genome of amphioxus B. belcheri tsingtauense. This is in sharp contrast to the presence of 6-13 copies of the S23 gene and 15-17 copies of the L35 gene in the rat genome. It is clear that the housekeeping genes like S23 and L35 underwent a large-scale duplication in the vertebrate lineage, reinforcing the gene/genome duplication hypothesis.

  11. The copy number of chloroplast gene minicircles changes dramatically with growth phase in the dinoflagellate Amphidinium operculatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koumandou, V L; Howe, Christopher J

    2007-01-01

    The chloroplast genome of algae and plants typically comprises a circular DNA molecule of 100-200kb, which harbours approximately 120 genes, and is present in 50-100 copies per chloroplast. However, in peridinin dinoflagellates, an ecologically important group of unicellular algae, the chloroplast genome is fragmented into plasmid-like 'minicircles', each of 2-3kb. Furthermore, the chloroplast gene content of dinoflagellates is dramatically reduced. Only 14 genes have been found on dinoflagellate minicircles, and recent evidence from EST studies suggests that most of the genes typically located in the chloroplast in other algae and plants are located in the nucleus. In this study, Southern blot analysis was used to estimate the copy number per cell of a variety of minicircles during different growth stages in the dinoflagellate Amphidinium operculatum. It was found that minicircle copy number is low during the exponential growth stage but increases during the later growth phase to resemble the situation seen in other plants and algae. The control of minicircle replication is discussed in the light of these findings.

  12. Detection of copy number variants reveals association of cilia genes with neural tube defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoli Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neural tube defects (NTDs are one of the most common birth defects caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Currently, little is known about the genetic basis of NTDs although up to 70% of human NTDs were reported to be attributed to genetic factors. Here we performed genome-wide copy number variants (CNVs detection in a cohort of Chinese NTD patients in order to exam the potential role of CNVs in the pathogenesis of NTDs. METHODS: The genomic DNA from eighty-five NTD cases and seventy-five matched normal controls were subjected for whole genome CNVs analysis. Non-DGV (the Database of Genomic Variants CNVs from each group were further analyzed for their associations with NTDs. Gene content in non-DGV CNVs as well as participating pathways were examined. RESULTS: Fifty-five and twenty-six non-DGV CNVs were detected in cases and controls respectively. Among them, forty and nineteen CNVs involve genes (genic CNV. Significantly more non-DGV CNVs and non-DGV genic CNVs were detected in NTD patients than in control (41.2% vs. 25.3%, p<0.05 and 37.6% vs. 20%, p<0.05. Non-DGV genic CNVs are associated with a 2.65-fold increased risk for NTDs (95% CI: 1.24-5.87. Interestingly, there are 41 cilia genes involved in non-DGV CNVs from NTD patients which is significantly enriched in cases compared with that in controls (24.7% vs. 9.3%, p<0.05, corresponding with a 3.19-fold increased risk for NTDs (95% CI: 1.27-8.01. Pathway analyses further suggested that two ciliogenesis pathways, tight junction and protein kinase A signaling, are top canonical pathways implicated in NTD-specific CNVs, and these two novel pathways interact with known NTD pathways. CONCLUSIONS: Evidence from the genome-wide CNV study suggests that genic CNVs, particularly ciliogenic CNVs are associated with NTDs and two ciliogenesis pathways, tight junction and protein kinase A signaling, are potential pathways involved in NTD pathogenesis.

  13. Integrated Analysis of Genome-Wide Copy Number Alterations and Gene Expression Profiling of Lung Cancer in Xuanwei, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanliang; Xue, Qiuyue; Pan, Guoqing; Meng, Qing H.; Tuo, Xiaoyu; Cai, Xuemei; Chen, Zhenghui; Li, Ya; Huang, Tao; Duan, Xincen; Duan, Yong

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Lung cancer in Xuanwei (LCXW), China, is known throughout the world for its distinctive characteristics, but little is known about its pathogenesis. The purpose of this study was to screen potential novel “driver genes” in LCXW. Methods Genome-wide DNA copy number alterations (CNAs) were detected by array-based comparative genomic hybridization and differentially expressed genes (DEGs) by gene expression microarrays in 8 paired LCXW and non-cancerous lung tissues. Candidate driver genes were screened by integrated analysis of CNAs and DEGs. The candidate genes were further validated by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Results Large numbers of CNAs and DEGs were detected, respectively. Some of the most frequently occurring CNAs included gains at 5p15.33-p15.32, 5p15.1-p14.3, and 5p14.3-p14.2 and losses at 11q24.3, 21q21.1, 21q22.12-q22.13, and 21q22.2. Integrated analysis of CNAs and DEGs identified 24 candidate genes with frequent copy number gains and concordant upregulation, which were considered potential oncogenes, including CREB3L4, TRIP13, and CCNE2. In addition, the analysis identified 19 candidate genes with a negative association between copy number change and expression change, considered potential tumor suppressor genes, including AHRR, NKD2, and KLF10. One of the most studied oncogenes, MYC, may not play a carcinogenic role in LCXW. Conclusions This integrated analysis of CNAs and DEGs identified several potential novel LCXW-related genes, laying an important foundation for further research on the pathogenesis of LCXW and identification of novel biomarkers or therapeutic targets. PMID:28056099

  14. Multiple horizontal transfers of nuclear ribosomal genes between phylogenetically distinct grass lineages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahelka, Václav; Krak, Karol; Kopecký, David; Fehrer, Judith; Šafář, Jan; Bartoš, Jan; Hobza, Roman; Blavet, Nicolas; Blattner, Frank R.

    2017-01-01

    The movement of nuclear DNA from one vascular plant species to another in the absence of fertilization is thought to be rare. Here, nonnative rRNA gene [ribosomal DNA (rDNA)] copies were identified in a set of 16 diploid barley (Hordeum) species; their origin was traceable via their internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequence to five distinct Panicoideae genera, a lineage that split from the Pooideae about 60 Mya. Phylogenetic, cytogenetic, and genomic analyses implied that the nonnative sequences were acquired between 1 and 5 Mya after a series of multiple events, with the result that some current Hordeum sp. individuals harbor up to five different panicoid rDNA units in addition to the native Hordeum rDNA copies. There was no evidence that any of the nonnative rDNA units were transcribed; some showed indications of having been silenced via pseudogenization. A single copy of a Panicum sp. rDNA unit present in H. bogdanii had been interrupted by a native transposable element and was surrounded by about 70 kbp of mostly noncoding sequence of panicoid origin. The data suggest that horizontal gene transfer between vascular plants is not a rare event, that it is not necessarily restricted to one or a few genes only, and that it can be selectively neutral. PMID:28137844

  15. Mutations in MAPT gene cause chromosome instability and introduce copy number variations widely in the genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Giacomina; Conconi, Donatella; Panzeri, Elena; Redaelli, Serena; Piccoli, Elena; Paoletta, Laura; Dalprà, Leda; Tagliavini, Fabrizio

    2013-01-01

    In addition to the main function of promoting polymerization and stabilization of microtubules, other roles are being attributed to tau, now considered a multifunctional protein. In particular, previous studies suggest that tau is involved in chromosome stability and genome protection. We performed cytogenetic analysis, including molecular karyotyping, on lymphocytes and fibroblasts from patients affected by frontotemporal lobar degeneration carrying different mutations in the microtubule-associated protein tau gene, to investigate the effects of these mutations on genome stability. Furthermore, we analyzed the response of mutated lymphoblastoid cell lines to genotoxic agents to evaluate the participation of tau to DNA repair systems. We found a significantly higher level of chromosome aberrations in mutated than in control cells. Mutated lymphocytes showed higher percentages of stable lesions, clonal and total aneuploidy (medians: 2 versus 0, p $\\ll$ 0.01; 1.5 versus 0, p $\\ll$ 0.01; 16.5 versus 0, p $\\ll$ 0.01, respectively). Fibroblasts of patients showed higher percentages of stable lesions, structural aberrations and total aneuploidy (medians: 0 versus 0, p = 0.03; 5.8 versus 0, p = 0.02; 26.5 versus 12.6, p $\\ll$ 0.01, respectively). In addition, the in depth analysis of DNA copy number variations showed a higher tendency to non-allelic homologous recombination in mutated cells. Finally, while our analysis did not support an involvement of tau in DNA repair systems, it revealed its role in stabilization of chromatin. In summary, our findings indicate a role of tau in genome and chromosome stability that can be ascribed to its function as a microtubule-associated protein as well as a protein protecting chromatin integrity through interaction with DNA.

  16. A meta-analysis of multiple matched copy number and transcriptomics data sets for inferring gene regulatory relationships.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Newton

    Full Text Available Inferring gene regulatory relationships from observational data is challenging. Manipulation and intervention is often required to unravel causal relationships unambiguously. However, gene copy number changes, as they frequently occur in cancer cells, might be considered natural manipulation experiments on gene expression. An increasing number of data sets on matched array comparative genomic hybridisation and transcriptomics experiments from a variety of cancer pathologies are becoming publicly available. Here we explore the potential of a meta-analysis of thirty such data sets. The aim of our analysis was to assess the potential of in silico inference of trans-acting gene regulatory relationships from this type of data. We found sufficient correlation signal in the data to infer gene regulatory relationships, with interesting similarities between data sets. A number of genes had highly correlated copy number and expression changes in many of the data sets and we present predicted potential trans-acted regulatory relationships for each of these genes. The study also investigates to what extent heterogeneity between cell types and between pathologies determines the number of statistically significant predictions available from a meta-analysis of experiments.

  17. Gene construction, expression, and characterization of double-copy truncated form of human insulin-like growth factor I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, H Y; Liu, X H; Liang, S W

    2001-07-01

    To increase the production of recombinant truncated form of insulin-like growth factor I [des(1-3)IGF-I], purify the expressed product, and compare its bioactivity with that of standard IGF-I. The second copy of des(1-3)IGF-I gene was inserted into the previously constructed pExSec1/IGF-I to form a pExSec1/2(IGF-I) expression plasmid, then the plasmid was transformed into a protease-deficient E coli strain BL21(DE3). The engineered bacteria were cultured and induced by IPTG at 12 degrees C. The expressed product was purified through ultrafiltration and Sephadex G-50 gelfiltration. The bioactivity of the preliminarily purified protein was tested by MTT method and compared with standard IGF-I. The amount of des(1-3)IGF-I expressed by pExSec1/2(IGF-I) reached up to 20 % of the total soluble bacterial protein, which was higher than the amount (12 %) expressed by a single copy of pExSec1/IGF-I gene. The purity of recombinant des(1-3)IGF-I reached 49 % and 82 % after ultrafiltration and gelfiltration. The bioactivity of des(1-3)IGF-I after gelfiltration was about 77 % of standard IGF-I at the same concentration. The yield of recombinant des(1-3)IGF-I was increased about 8 % by construction of expression plasmid with two copies of des(1-3)IGF-I gene compared with only one copy of gene, and preliminarily purified des(1-3)IGF-I showed about 77 % bioactivity compared with standard IGF-I.

  18. SMAD5 Gene Expression, Rearrangements, Copy Number, Amplification at Fragile Site FRA5C in Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drazen B. Zimonjic

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Signaling by the transforming growth factor (TGFfamily members is transduced from the cell surface to the nucleus by the Smad group of intracellular proteins. Because we detected alterations on the long arm of chromosome 5, we examined the status of the SMAD5 gene in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC cell lines and primary HCC. In 16 cell lines, chromosome alterations of chromosome 5 were observed in nine cell lines by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH, an increase in SMAD5 gene copy number relative to the ploidy level was found in eight lines. The breakpoints in unbalanced translocations and deletions frequently occurred near the SMAD5 locus, but apparently did not cause loss of SMAD5. In one cell line, where comparative genomic hybridization showed DNA copy number gain confined to the region 5831, we detected by FISH high-level amplification of the SMAD5 gene located within the fragile site FRA5C. Semiquantitative polymerase chain reaction did not reveal changes in SMAD5 DNA levels in 15 of 17 primary HCC specimens. In 17 HCC cell lines, SMAD5 mRNA levels were either maintained or upregulated by an increase in gene dosage or another mechanism. Collectively, our results show that SMAD5 undergoes copy number gain and increased expression, rather than loss of expression, therefore suggest that this gene does not act as a tumorsuppressor gene in HCC. The Hep-40 HCC cell line with high-level amplification and significant overexpression of SMAD5 may be useful in studying the interaction of SMAD5 with other genes.

  19. blaKPC RNA Expression Correlates with Two Transcriptional Start Sites but Not Always with Gene Copy Number in Four Genera of Gram-Negative Pathogens▿

    OpenAIRE

    Roth, Amanda L.; Kurpiel, Philip M.; Lister, Philip D.; Hanson, Nancy D.

    2011-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)-producing organisms are therapeutically and diagnostically challenging. It is possible that blaKPC gene expression plays a role in the variability observed in clinical susceptibility testing. blaKPC transformants together with 10 clinical isolates representing four genera were evaluated for blaKPC copy number and gene expression and correlated with β-lactam MIC data. The data suggest that mechanisms other than gene copy number and expression of blaKPC...

  20. Low C4 gene copy numbers are associated with superior graft survival in patients transplanted with a deceased donor kidney

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Jakob T; Schejbel, Lone; Madsen, Hans O

    2013-01-01

    Complement C4 is a central component of the classical and the lectin pathways of the complement system. The C4 protein exists as two isotypes C4A and C4B encoded by the C4A and C4B genes, both of which are found with varying copy numbers. Deposition of C4 has been implicated in kidney graft...... rejection, but a relationship between graft survival and serum C4 concentration as well as C4 genetic variation has not been established. We evaluated this using a prospective study design of 676 kidney transplant patients and 211 healthy individuals as controls. Increasing C4 gene copy numbers...... significantly correlated with the C4 serum concentration in both patients and controls. Patients with less than four total copies of C4 genes transplanted with a deceased donor kidney experienced a superior 5-year graft survival (hazard ratio 0.46, 95% confidence interval: 0.25-0.84). No significant association...

  1. Stratification of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) genomes by gene-directed copy number alteration (CNA) analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiesen, H-J; Steinbeck, F; Maruschke, M; Koczan, D; Ziems, B; Hakenberg, O W

    2017-01-01

    Tumorigenic processes are understood to be driven by epi-/genetic and genomic alterations from single point mutations to chromosomal alterations such as insertions and deletions of nucleotides up to gains and losses of large chromosomal fragments including products of chromosomal rearrangements e.g. fusion genes and proteins. Overall comparisons of copy number alterations (CNAs) presented in 48 clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) genomes resulted in ratios of gene losses versus gene gains between 26 ccRCC Fuhrman malignancy grades G1 (ratio 1.25) and 20 G3 (ratio 0.58). Gene losses and gains of 15762 CNA genes were mapped to 795 chromosomal cytoband loci including 280 KEGG pathways. CNAs were classified according to their contribution to Fuhrman tumour gradings G1 and G3. Gene gains and losses turned out to be highly structured processes in ccRCC genomes enabling the subclassification and stratification of ccRCC tumours in a genome-wide manner. CNAs of ccRCC seem to start with common tumour related gene losses flanked by CNAs specifying Fuhrman grade G1 losses and CNA gains favouring grade G3 tumours. The appearance of recurrent CNA signatures implies the presence of causal mechanisms most likely implicated in the pathogenesis and disease-outcome of ccRCC tumours distinguishing lower from higher malignant tumours. The diagnostic quality of initial 201 genes (108 genes supporting G1 and 93 genes G3 phenotypes) has been successfully validated on published Swiss data (GSE19949) leading to a restricted CNA gene set of 171 CNA genes of which 85 genes favour Fuhrman grade G1 and 86 genes Fuhrman grade G3. Regarding these gene sets overall survival decreased with the number of G3 related gene losses plus G3 related gene gains. CNA gene sets presented define an entry to a gene-directed and pathway-related functional understanding of ongoing copy number alterations within and between individual ccRCC tumours leading to CNA genes of prognostic and predictive value.

  2. Differences in AMY1 Gene Copy Numbers Derived from Blood, Buccal Cells and Saliva Using Quantitative and Droplet Digital PCR Methods: Flagging the Pitfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Siong Gim; Chan, Yiong Huak; Heng, Chew Kiat

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The human salivary (AMY1) gene, encoding salivary α-amylase, has variable copy number variants (CNVs) in the human genome. We aimed to determine if real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and the more recently available Droplet Digital PCR (ddPCR) can provide a precise quantification of the AMY1 gene copy number in blood, buccal cells and saliva samples derived from the same individual. Methods Seven participants were recruited and DNA was extracted from the blood, buccal cells and saliva samples provided by each participant. Taqman assay real-time qPCR and ddPCR were conducted to quantify AMY1 gene copy numbers. Statistical analysis was carried out to determine the difference in AMY1 gene copy number between the different biological specimens and different assay methods. Results We found significant within-individual difference (p<0.01) in AMY1 gene copy number between different biological samples as determined by qPCR. However, there was no significant within-individual difference in AMY1 gene copy number between different biological samples as determined by ddPCR. We also found that AMY1 gene copy number of blood samples were comparable between qPCR and ddPCR, while there is a significant difference (p<0.01) between AMY1 gene copy numbers measured by qPCR and ddPCR for both buccal swab and saliva samples. Conclusions Despite buccal cells and saliva samples being possible sources of DNA, it is pertinent that ddPCR or a single biological sample, preferably blood sample, be used for determining highly polymorphic gene copy numbers like AMY1, due to the large within-individual variability between different biological samples if real time qPCR is employed. PMID:28125683

  3. Copy number loss in the region of the ASPN gene in patients with acetabular dysplasia: ASPN CNV in acetabular dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekimoto, T; Ishii, M; Emi, M; Kurogi, S; Funamoto, T; Yonezawa, Y; Tajima, T; Sakamoto, T; Hamada, H; Chosa, E

    2017-07-01

    We have previously investigated an association between the genome copy number variation (CNV) and acetabular dysplasia (AD). Hip osteoarthritis is associated with a genetic polymorphism in the aspartic acid repeat in the N-terminal region of the asporin (ASPN) gene; therefore, the present study aimed to investigate whether the CNV of ASPN is involved in the pathogenesis of AD. Acetabular coverage of all subjects was evaluated using radiological findings (Sharp angle, centre-edge (CE) angle, acetabular roof obliquity (ARO) angle, and minimum joint space width). Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes. Agilent's region-targeted high-density oligonucleotide tiling microarray was used to analyse 64 female AD patients and 32 female control subjects. All statistical analyses were performed using EZR software (Fisher's exact probability test, Pearson's correlation test, and Student's t-test). CNV analysis of the ASPN gene revealed a copy number loss in significantly more AD patients (9/64) than control subjects (0/32; p = 0.0212). This loss occurred within a 60 kb region on 9q22.31, which harbours the gene for ASPN. The mean radiological parameters of these AD patients were significantly worse than those of the other subjects (Sharp angle, p = 0.0056; CE angle, p = 0.0076; ARO angle, p = 0.0065), and all nine patients required operative therapy such as total hip arthroplasty or pelvic osteotomy. Moreover, six of these nine patients had a history of operative or conservative therapy for developmental dysplasia of the hip. Copy number loss within the region harbouring the ASPN gene on 9q22.31 is associated with severe AD. A copy number loss in the ASPN gene region may play a role in the aetiology of severe AD.Cite this article: T. Sekimoto, M. Ishii, M. Emi, S. Kurogi, T. Funamoto, Y. Yonezawa, T. Tajima, T. Sakamoto, H. Hamada, E. Chosa. Copy number loss in the region of the ASPN gene in patients with acetabular dysplasia: ASPN CNV in acetabular

  4. Gene-based comparative analysis of tools for estimating copy number alterations using whole-exome sequencing data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung-Yong; Choi, Jin-Woo; Lee, Jeong-Yeon; Kong, Gu

    2017-01-01

    Accurate detection of copy number alterations (CNAs) using next-generation sequencing technology is essential for the development and application of more precise medical treatments for human cancer. Here, we evaluated seven CNA estimation tools (ExomeCNV, CoNIFER, VarScan2, CODEX, ngCGH, saasCNV, and falcon) using whole-exome sequencing data from 419 breast cancer tumor-normal sample pairs from The Cancer Genome Atlas. Estimations generated using each tool were converted into gene-based copy numbers; concordance for gains and losses and the sensitivity and specificity of each tool were compared to validated copy numbers from a single nucleotide polymorphism reference array. The concordance and sensitivity of the tumor-normal pair methods for estimating CNAs (saasCNV, ExomeCNV, and VarScan2) were better than those of the tumor batch methods (CoNIFER and CODEX). SaasCNV had the highest gain and loss concordances (65.0%), sensitivity (69.4%), and specificity (89.1%) for estimating copy number gains or losses. These findings indicate that improved CNA detection algorithms are needed to more accurately interpret whole-exome sequencing results in human cancer. PMID:28460482

  5. Mosaic supernumerary inv dup(15) chromosome with four copies of the P gene in a boy with pigmentary dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akahoshi, Keiko; Spritz, Richard A; Fukai, Kazuyoshi; Mitsui, Norimasa; Matsushima, Kazushige; Ohashi, Hirofumi

    2004-04-30

    Association of the pink-eye-dilution gene (P) with hypopigmentation is seen in patients who have oculocutaneous albinism type 2 (OCA2) and Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) or Angelman syndrome (AS). However, it remains unknown whether duplication or amplification of the P gene causes hyperpigmentation. We previously reported a woman who had hyperpigmentation with a duplication of the proximal part of 15q, including the P gene. Here, we describe an additional patient with mosaicism of inv dup(15) and clinical manifestations of severe psychmoter retardation, epilepsy, and pigmentary dysplasia showing mottled and linear patterns of hyperpigmentation. His karyotype was 47,XY,+idic(15)(pter-->q14::q14-->pter)[38]/46,XY[12] de novo. Chromosomal fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) showed six copies of the P gene. Therefore, his cutaneous mosaicism might be caused by the presence of both normal and hyperpigmented skin due to multicopies of the P gene.

  6. Variation of B1 gene and AF146527 repeat element copy numbers according to Toxoplasma gondii strains assessed using real-time quantitative PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Jean-Marc; Bretagne, Stéphane

    2012-04-01

    Using the multicopy B1 gene and AF146527 element for the amplification of Toxoplasma gondii DNA raises the issue of reliable quantification for clinical diagnosis. We applied relative quantification to reference strains using the single-copy P30 gene as a reference. According to the parasite type, the copy numbers for the B1 gene and AF146527 element were found to be 5 to 12 and 4 to 8 times lower than the previous estimations of 35 and 230 copies, respectively.

  7. Construction, expression and characterization of double-copy genes oftruncated form of human insulin-like growth factor-Ⅰ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Ying Sun; Xiao Hui Liu; Shu Wen Liang

    2000-01-01

    AIM To increase the production of recombinant des (1 - 3) IGF- I by increasing the copy number of genecarried on an expression vector, and to partially purify the expressed des (1 - 3) IGF-Ⅰ , as well as compareits bio-activity with standard IGF-Ⅰ.METHODS Second copy of des (1 - 3) IGF-Ⅰ gene was inserted into pExSecl/IGF-Ⅰ expression vectorconstructed by our previous work and carryed already one des (1 -3) IGF-Ⅰ gene, to form PExSec1/2 (IGF-Ⅰ) expression plasmid, which carried two copies of tandem des (1 - 3) IGF-Ⅰ gene. This plasmid wastranformed into a protease-deficient E. coli strain BL21 (DE3). The engineered bacteria was cultured andinduced at low temperature. The expressed product was purified through ultra-filtration and gel-filtration.The bio-activity of partially purified protein was tested by MTT method and compared with standard IGF-Ⅰ.RESULTS The amount of des (1-3) IGF-Ⅰ expressed by pExSec 1/2 (IGF-Ⅰ) reached up to 19% -22%of the total soluble bacterial protein, which is about 7% higher than that of des (1 -3) IGF-Ⅰ expressed bypExSec1/IGF-Ⅰ. The purity of recombinant des (1 - 3) IGF-Ⅰ reached 49% and 82% respectively after thetreatments by ultra-filtration and gel-filtration. The result of MTT assay showed that the bio-activity of des(1- 3) 1GF-I after gel-filtration was about 77% of that of standard IGF-Ⅰ at the same concentration.CONCLUSION The yield of recombinant des (1 - 3) IGF-Ⅰ was increased about 7% by construction ofexpression plasmid with two copies of des (1 -3) IGF-Ⅰ gene, compared with only one copy of gene,preliminarily purified des (1 -3) IGF-Ⅰ showed relatively high biological activity, which was about 77% ofthat of standard IGF-Ⅰ.

  8. CCL3L gene copy number and survival in an HIV-1 infected Zimbabwean population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Margit Hørup; Thørner, Lise Wegner; Zinyama, Rutendo

    2012-01-01

    The C-C motif chemokine ligand 3-like (CCL3L) protein is a potent chemoattractant which by binding to C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) inhibits human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) entry. Copy number variation (CNV) of the CCL3L has been shown to be associated with HIV susceptibility and progre......The C-C motif chemokine ligand 3-like (CCL3L) protein is a potent chemoattractant which by binding to C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) inhibits human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) entry. Copy number variation (CNV) of the CCL3L has been shown to be associated with HIV susceptibility.......9), viral load (P=0.9), or CCL3 protein levels (P=1.0). Survival among the HIV infected individuals did not differ according to CCL3L copy number. In this cohort, CCL3L CNV did not affect HIV status, pathogenesis, or survival....

  9. Nuclear and mitochondrial genes for inferring Trichuris phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callejón, Rocío; Cutillas, Cristina; Nadler, Steven A

    2015-12-01

    Nucleotide sequences of the triose phosphate isomerase (TPI) gene (624 bp) and mitochondrial cytochrome b (cob) gene (520 bp) were obtained by PCR and evaluated for utility in inferring the phylogenetic relationships among Trichuris species. Published sequences of one other nuclear gene (18S or SSU rRNA, 1816-1846 bp) and one additional mitochondrial (mtDNA) gene (cytochrome oxidase 1, cox1, 342 bp) were also analyzed. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference methods were used to infer phylogenies for each gene separately but also for the combined mitochondrial data (two genes), the combined nuclear data (two genes), and the total evidence (four gene) dataset. Few Trichuris clades were uniformly resolved across separate analyses of individual genes. For the mtDNA, the cob gene trees had greater phylogenetic resolution and tended to have higher support values than the cox1 analyses. For nuclear genes, the SSU gene trees had slightly greater resolution and support values than the TPI analyses, but TPI was the only gene with reliable support for the deepest nodes in the tree. Combined analyses of genes yielded strongly supported clades in most cases, with the exception of the relationship among Trichuris clades 1, 2, and 3, which showed conflicting results between nuclear and mitochondrial genes. Both the TPI and cob genes proved valuable for inferring Trichuris relationships, with greatest resolution and support values achieved through combined analysis of multiple genes. Based on the phylogeny of the combined analysis of nuclear and mitochondrial genes, parsimony mapping of definitive host utilization depicts artiodactyls as the ancestral hosts for these Trichuris, with host-shifts into primates, rodents, and Carnivora.

  10. Whole-genome sequencing reveals the diversity of cattle copy number variations and multicopy genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Structural and functional impacts of copy number variations (CNVs) on livestock genomes are not yet well understood. We identified 1853 CNV regions using population-scale sequencing data generated from 75 cattle representing 8 breeds (Angus, Brahman, Gir, Holstein, Jersey, Limousin, Nelore, Romagnol...

  11. Diversity and population-genetic properties of copy number variations and multicopy genes in cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    The diversity and population-genetics of copy number variation (CNV) in domesticated animals are not well understood. In this study, we analyzed 75 genomes of major taurine and indicine cattle breeds (including Angus, Brahman, Gir, Holstein, Jersey, Limousin, Nelore, Romagnola), sequenced to 11-fold...

  12. miRNA and miRNA target genes in copy number variations occurring in individuals with intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Ying; Badduke, Chansonette; Mercier, Eloi; Lewis, Suzanne M E; Pavlidis, Paul; Rajcan-Separovic, Evica

    2013-08-10

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a family of short, non-coding RNAs modulating expression of human protein coding genes (miRNA target genes). Their dysfunction is associated with many human diseases, including neurodevelopmental disorders. It has been recently shown that genomic copy number variations (CNVs) can cause aberrant expression of integral miRNAs and their target genes, and contribute to intellectual disability (ID). To better understand the CNV-miRNA relationship in ID, we investigated the prevalence and function of miRNAs and miRNA target genes in five groups of CNVs. Three groups of CNVs were from 213 probands with ID (24 de novo CNVs, 46 familial and 216 common CNVs), one group of CNVs was from a cohort of 32 cognitively normal subjects (67 CNVs) and one group of CNVs represented 40 ID related syndromic regions listed in DECIPHER (30 CNVs) which served as positive controls for CNVs causing or predisposing to ID. Our results show that 1). The number of miRNAs is significantly higher in de novo or DECIPHER CNVs than in familial or common CNV subgroups (P genes are found in de novo, familial and DECIPHER CNVs than in the common CNV subgroup (P genes from de novo and DECIPHER CNV subgroups. Our findings reveal an increase in miRNA and miRNA target gene content in de novo versus common CNVs in subjects with ID. Their expression profile and participation in pathways support a possible role of miRNA copy number change in cognition and/or CNV-mediated developmental delay. Systematic analysis of expression/function of miRNAs in addition to coding genes integral to CNVs could uncover new causes of ID.

  13. Distinct nuclear arrangement of active and inactive c-myc genes in control and differentiated colon carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnicarová, Andrea; Kozubek, Stanislav; Pacherník, Jirí; Krejci, Jana; Bártová, Eva

    2006-12-10

    Using sequential RNA-DNA fluorescence in situ hybridization, the nuclear arrangement of both the active and inactive c-myc gene as well as its transcription was investigated in colon cancer HT-29 cells induced to differentiate into enterocytes. Cytogenetic studies revealed the presence of two chromosomes 8 in HT-29 cells, of which the one containing c-myc gene amplicons was substantially larger and easily distinguished from the normal chromosome. This observation enabled detection of both activity and nuclear localization of c-myc genes in single cells and in individual chromosome territories. Similar transcriptional activity of the c-myc gene was observed in both the normal and derivative chromosome 8 territories showing no influence of the amplification on the c-myc gene expression. Our experiments demonstrate strikingly specific nuclear and territorial arrangements of active genes as compared with inactive ones: on the periphery of their territories facing to the very central region of the cell nucleus. Nuclear arrangement of c-myc genes and transcripts was conserved during cell differentiation and, therefore, independent of the level of differentiation-specific c-myc gene expression. However, after the induction of differentiation, a more internal territorial location was found for the single copy c-myc gene of normal chromosome 8, while amplicons conserved their territorial topography.

  14. MET gene copy number predicts worse overall survival in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC; a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasios Dimou

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: MET is a receptor present in the membrane of NSCLC cells and is known to promote cell proliferation, survival and migration. MET gene copy number is a common genetic alteration and inhibition o MET emerges as a promising targeted therapy in NSCLC. Here we aim to combine in a meta-analysis, data on the effect of high MET gene copy number on the overall survival of patients with resected NSCLC. METHODS: Two independent investigators applied parallel search strategies with the terms "MET AND lung cancer", "MET AND NSCLC", "MET gene copy number AND prognosis" in PubMed through January 2014. We selected the studies that investigated the association of MET gene copy number with survival, in patients who received surgery. RESULTS: Among 1096 titles that were identified in the initial search, we retrieved 9 studies on retrospective cohorts with adequate retrievable data regarding the prognostic impact of MET gene copy number on the survival of patients with NSCLC. Out of those, 6 used FISH and the remaining 3 used RT PCR to assess the MET gene copy number in the primary tumor. We calculated the I2 statistic to assess heterogeneity (I2 = 72%. MET gene copy number predicted worse overall survival when all studies were combined in a random effects model (HR = 1.78, 95% CI 1.22-2.60. When only the studies that had at least 50% of adenocarcinoma patients in their populations were included, the effect was significant (five studies, HR 1.55, 95% CI 1.23-1.94. This was not true when we included only the studies with no more than 50% of the patients having adenocarcinoma histology (four studies HR 2.18, 95% CI 0.97-4.90. CONCLUSIONS: Higher MET gene copy number in the primary tumor at the time of diagnosis predicts worse outcome in patients with NSCLC. This prognostic impact may be adenocarcinoma histology specific.

  15. Low-copy nuclear DNA, phylogeny and the evolution of dichogamy in the betel nut palms and their relatives (Arecinae; Arecaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loo, Adrian H B; Dransfield, John; Chase, Mark W; Baker, William J

    2006-06-01

    For the betel nut palm genus Areca and the other seven genera in subtribe Arecinae (Areceae; Arecoideae; Arecaceae) we collected DNA sequences from two low-copy nuclear genes, phosphoribulokinase (PRK) and the second largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (RPB2). The data were used to evaluate monophyly of the subtribe and its component genera, explore the radiation of the group across its range, and examine evolution of protandry and protogyny, which is particularly diverse in Arecinae. The subtribe and some genera are not monophyletic. Three lineages of Arecinae are recovered: one widespread, but centered on the Sunda Shelf, another endemic to the islands east of Wallace's line and a third, comprising the Sri Lanka endemic Loxococcus, that is most closely related to genera from outside subtribe Arecinae. Strong support is obtained for broadening the circumscription of the genus Hydriastele to include Gronophyllum, Gulubia and Siphokentia. In clarifying phylogenetic relationships, we have demonstrated that a perceived bimodal distribution of the subtribe across Wallace's line does not in fact exist. Character optimizations indicate that the evolution of protogyny, an unusual condition in palms, is potentially correlated with a large radiation in the genus Pinanga and possibly also to dramatic diversification in pollen morphology and genome size. The evolution of dichogamy in the clade endemic to the east of Wallace's line is complex and reveals a pattern of numerous transformations between protandry and protogyny that is in marked contrast with other Arecinae. We suggest that this contrast is most likely a reflection of differing geological histories and pollinator spectra in each region.

  16. GeneBreak: detection of recurrent DNA copy number aberration-associated chromosomal breakpoints within genes [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evert van den Broek

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Development of cancer is driven by somatic alterations, including numerical and structural chromosomal aberrations. Currently, several computational methods are available and are widely applied to detect numerical copy number aberrations (CNAs of chromosomal segments in tumor genomes. However, there is lack of computational methods that systematically detect structural chromosomal aberrations by virtue of the genomic location of CNA-associated chromosomal breaks and identify genes that appear non-randomly affected by chromosomal breakpoints across (large series of tumor samples. ‘GeneBreak’ is developed to systematically identify genes recurrently affected by the genomic location of chromosomal CNA-associated breaks by a genome-wide approach, which can be applied to DNA copy number data obtained by array-Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH or by (low-pass whole genome sequencing (WGS. First, ‘GeneBreak’ collects the genomic locations of chromosomal CNA-associated breaks that were previously pinpointed by the segmentation algorithm that was applied to obtain CNA profiles. Next, a tailored annotation approach for breakpoint-to-gene mapping is implemented. Finally, dedicated cohort-based statistics is incorporated with correction for covariates that influence the probability to be a breakpoint gene. In addition, multiple testing correction is integrated to reveal recurrent breakpoint events. This easy-to-use algorithm, ‘GeneBreak’, is implemented in R (www.cran.r-project.org and is available from Bioconductor (www.bioconductor.org/packages/release/bioc/html/GeneBreak.html.

  17. Gene targeting in the red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae: single- and multi-copy insertion using authentic and chimeric selection markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Takayuki; Ohnuma, Mio; Yoshida, Masaki; Kuroiwa, Tsuneyoshi; Hirano, Tatsuya

    2013-01-01

    The unicellular red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae is an emerging model organism for studying organelle division and inheritance: the cell is composed of an extremely simple set of organelles (one nucleus, one mitochondrion and one chloroplast), and their genomes are completely sequenced. Although a fruitful set of cytological and biochemical methods have now been developed, gene targeting techniques remain to be fully established in this organism. Thus far, only a single selection marker, URA Cm-Gs , has been available that complements the uracil-auxotrophic mutant M4. URA Cm-Gs , a chimeric URA5.3 gene of C. merolae and the related alga Galdieria sulphuraria, was originally designed to avoid gene conversion of the mutated URA5.3 allele in the parental strain M4. Although an early example of targeted gene disruption by homologous recombination was reported using this marker, the genome structure of the resultant transformants had never been fully characterized. In the current study, we showed that the use of the chimeric URA Cm-Gs selection marker caused multicopy insertion at high frequencies, accompanied by undesired recombination events at the targeted loci. The copy number of the inserted fragments was variable among the transformants, resulting in high yet uneven levels of transgene expression. In striking contrast, when the authentic URA5.3 gene (URA Cm-Cm ) was used as a selection marker, efficient single-copy insertion was observed at the targeted locus. Thus, we have successfully established a highly reliable and reproducible method for gene targeting in C. merolae. Our method will be applicable to a number of genetic manipulations in this organism, including targeted gene disruption, replacement and tagging.

  18. CCL3L1 gene copy number in individuals with and without HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder

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    Brown A

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Amanda Brown1, Ned Sacktor1, Karen Marder2, Bruce Cohen3, Giovanni Schifitto4, Richard L Skolasky1, Jason Creighton1, Liping Guo1, Justin C McArthur11Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 2Department of Neurology, Psychiatry, Sergievsky Center and Taub Institute on Alzheimers Disease and the Aging Brain, New York Presbyterian Hospital, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY, 3Department of Neurology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, 4Department of Neurology, University of Rochester, School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, NY, USABackground: CCL3L1 copy number variation has been implicated as a marker for susceptibility and immunity to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 infection and its pathogenic sequelae. Some of these findings have been confirmed in several, but not all, subsequent independent cohort studies. A three-fold risk for the development of HIV-associated dementia was reported in individuals possessing a CCL3L1 copy number below the ethnic group median combined with a detrimental CCR5 genotype. With the availability of antiretroviral therapy since 1996, there has been a significant decline in HIV-associated dementia, and milder forms of HIV-associated neurocognitive impairment (HAND are now most prevalent. Moreover, patients are living longer with HIV-1 infection and it is recognized that aging may be a contributory factor to the development of cognitive disorder. Thus, the need for biomarkers that can be used in clinical practice to identify and provide optimal treatment for those at increased risk for HAND is great. HAND affects 20%–30% of HIV-infected individuals, and several genetic loci which have been shown to confer susceptibility to HIV infection may also modulate the development of neurocognitive disorder. The aim of this study was to determine whether CCL3L1 chemokine gene copy number in self-defined ethnic

  19. Algorithms to model single gene, single chromosome, and whole genome copy number changes jointly in tumor phylogenetics.

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    Salim Akhter Chowdhury

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We present methods to construct phylogenetic models of tumor progression at the cellular level that include copy number changes at the scale of single genes, entire chromosomes, and the whole genome. The methods are designed for data collected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH, an experimental technique especially well suited to characterizing intratumor heterogeneity using counts of probes to genetic regions frequently gained or lost in tumor development. Here, we develop new provably optimal methods for computing an edit distance between the copy number states of two cells given evolution by copy number changes of single probes, all probes on a chromosome, or all probes in the genome. We then apply this theory to develop a practical heuristic algorithm, implemented in publicly available software, for inferring tumor phylogenies on data from potentially hundreds of single cells by this evolutionary model. We demonstrate and validate the methods on simulated data and published FISH data from cervical cancers and breast cancers. Our computational experiments show that the new model and algorithm lead to more parsimonious trees than prior methods for single-tumor phylogenetics and to improved performance on various classification tasks, such as distinguishing primary tumors from metastases obtained from the same patient population.

  20. Algorithms to model single gene, single chromosome, and whole genome copy number changes jointly in tumor phylogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Salim Akhter; Shackney, Stanley E; Heselmeyer-Haddad, Kerstin; Ried, Thomas; Schäffer, Alejandro A; Schwartz, Russell

    2014-07-01

    We present methods to construct phylogenetic models of tumor progression at the cellular level that include copy number changes at the scale of single genes, entire chromosomes, and the whole genome. The methods are designed for data collected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), an experimental technique especially well suited to characterizing intratumor heterogeneity using counts of probes to genetic regions frequently gained or lost in tumor development. Here, we develop new provably optimal methods for computing an edit distance between the copy number states of two cells given evolution by copy number changes of single probes, all probes on a chromosome, or all probes in the genome. We then apply this theory to develop a practical heuristic algorithm, implemented in publicly available software, for inferring tumor phylogenies on data from potentially hundreds of single cells by this evolutionary model. We demonstrate and validate the methods on simulated data and published FISH data from cervical cancers and breast cancers. Our computational experiments show that the new model and algorithm lead to more parsimonious trees than prior methods for single-tumor phylogenetics and to improved performance on various classification tasks, such as distinguishing primary tumors from metastases obtained from the same patient population.

  1. Genomic mosaicism with increased amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene copy number in single neurons from sporadic Alzheimer's disease brains.

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    Bushman, Diane M; Kaeser, Gwendolyn E; Siddoway, Benjamin; Westra, Jurgen W; Rivera, Richard R; Rehen, Stevens K; Yung, Yun C; Chun, Jerold

    2015-02-04

    Previous reports have shown that individual neurons of the brain can display somatic genomic mosaicism of unknown function. In this study, we report altered genomic mosaicism in single, sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD) neurons characterized by increases in DNA content and amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene copy number. AD cortical nuclei displayed large variability with average DNA content increases of ~8% over non-diseased controls that were unrelated to trisomy 21. Two independent single-cell copy number analyses identified amplifications at the APP locus. The use of single-cell qPCR identified up to 12 copies of APP in sampled neurons. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes targeting APP, combined with super-resolution microscopy detected primarily single fluorescent signals of variable intensity that paralleled single-cell qPCR analyses. These data identify somatic genomic changes in single neurons, affecting known and unknown loci, which are increased in sporadic AD, and further indicate functionality for genomic mosaicism in the CNS.

  2. SLC26A4 gene copy number variations in Chinese patients with non-syndromic enlarged vestibular aqueduct

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    Zhao Jiandong

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many patients with enlarged vestibular aqueduct (EVA have either only one allelic mutant of the SLC26A4 gene or lack any detectable mutation. In this study, multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA was used to screen for copy number variations (CNVs of SLC26A4 and to reveal the pathogenic mechanisms of non-syndromic EVA (NSEVA. Methods Between January 2003 and March 2010, 923 Chinese patients (481 males, 442 females with NSEVA were recruited. Among these, 68 patients (7.4% were found to carry only one mutant allele of SLC26A4 and 39 patients (4.2% lacked any detectable mutation in SLC26A4; these 107 patients without double mutant alleles were assigned to the patient group. Possible copy number variations in SLC26A4 were detected by SALSA MLPA. Results Using GeneMapper, no significant difference was observed between the groups, as compared with the standard probe provided in the assay. The results of the capillary electrophoresis showed no significant difference between the patients and controls. Conclusion Our results suggest that CNVs and the exon deletion in SLC26A4 are not important factors in NSEVA. However, it would be premature to conclude that CNVs have no role in EVA. Genome-wide studies to explore CNVs within non-coding regions of the SLC26A4 gene and neighboring regions are warranted, to elucidate their roles in NSEVA etiology.

  3. Accurately assessing the risk of schizophrenia conferred by rare copy-number variation affecting genes with brain function.

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    Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Korn, Joshua M; McCarroll, Steven A; Altshuler, David; Sklar, Pamela; Purcell, Shaun; Daly, Mark J

    2010-09-09

    Investigators have linked rare copy number variation (CNVs) to neuropsychiatric diseases, such as schizophrenia. One hypothesis is that CNV events cause disease by affecting genes with specific brain functions. Under these circumstances, we expect that CNV events in cases should impact brain-function genes more frequently than those events in controls. Previous publications have applied "pathway" analyses to genes within neuropsychiatric case CNVs to show enrichment for brain-functions. While such analyses have been suggestive, they often have not rigorously compared the rates of CNVs impacting genes with brain function in cases to controls, and therefore do not address important confounders such as the large size of brain genes and overall differences in rates and sizes of CNVs. To demonstrate the potential impact of confounders, we genotyped rare CNV events in 2,415 unaffected controls with Affymetrix 6.0; we then applied standard pathway analyses using four sets of brain-function genes and observed an apparently highly significant enrichment for each set. The enrichment is simply driven by the large size of brain-function genes. Instead, we propose a case-control statistical test, cnv-enrichment-test, to compare the rate of CNVs impacting specific gene sets in cases versus controls. With simulations, we demonstrate that cnv-enrichment-test is robust to case-control differences in CNV size, CNV rate, and systematic differences in gene size. Finally, we apply cnv-enrichment-test to rare CNV events published by the International Schizophrenia Consortium (ISC). This approach reveals nominal evidence of case-association in neuronal-activity and the learning gene sets, but not the other two examined gene sets. The neuronal-activity genes have been associated in a separate set of schizophrenia cases and controls; however, testing in independent samples is necessary to definitively confirm this association. Our method is implemented in the PLINK software package.

  4. Accurately Assessing the Risk of Schizophrenia Conferred by Rare Copy-Number Variation Affecting Genes with Brain Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Korn, Joshua M.; McCarroll, Steven A.; Altshuler, David; Sklar, Pamela; Purcell, Shaun; Daly, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    Investigators have linked rare copy number variation (CNVs) to neuropsychiatric diseases, such as schizophrenia. One hypothesis is that CNV events cause disease by affecting genes with specific brain functions. Under these circumstances, we expect that CNV events in cases should impact brain-function genes more frequently than those events in controls. Previous publications have applied “pathway” analyses to genes within neuropsychiatric case CNVs to show enrichment for brain-functions. While such analyses have been suggestive, they often have not rigorously compared the rates of CNVs impacting genes with brain function in cases to controls, and therefore do not address important confounders such as the large size of brain genes and overall differences in rates and sizes of CNVs. To demonstrate the potential impact of confounders, we genotyped rare CNV events in 2,415 unaffected controls with Affymetrix 6.0; we then applied standard pathway analyses using four sets of brain-function genes and observed an apparently highly significant enrichment for each set. The enrichment is simply driven by the large size of brain-function genes. Instead, we propose a case-control statistical test, cnv-enrichment-test, to compare the rate of CNVs impacting specific gene sets in cases versus controls. With simulations, we demonstrate that cnv-enrichment-test is robust to case-control differences in CNV size, CNV rate, and systematic differences in gene size. Finally, we apply cnv-enrichment-test to rare CNV events published by the International Schizophrenia Consortium (ISC). This approach reveals nominal evidence of case-association in neuronal-activity and the learning gene sets, but not the other two examined gene sets. The neuronal-activity genes have been associated in a separate set of schizophrenia cases and controls; however, testing in independent samples is necessary to definitively confirm this association. Our method is implemented in the PLINK software package

  5. Plasticity of the Leishmania genome leading to gene copy number variations and drug resistance [version 1; referees: 5 approved

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    Marie-Claude N. Laffitte

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Leishmania has a plastic genome, and drug pressure can select for gene copy number variation (CNV. CNVs can apply either to whole chromosomes, leading to aneuploidy, or to specific genomic regions. For the latter, the amplification of chromosomal regions occurs at the level of homologous direct or inverted repeated sequences leading to extrachromosomal circular or linear amplified DNAs. This ability of Leishmania to respond to drug pressure by CNVs has led to the development of genomic screens such as Cos-Seq, which has the potential of expediting the discovery of drug targets for novel promising drug candidates.

  6. Restriction fragment length polymorphism and multiple copies of DNA sequences homologous with probes for P-fimbriae and hemolysin genes among uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

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    Hull, S I; Bieler, S; Hull, R A

    1988-03-01

    Hemolysin and P-fimbriae are two virulence traits frequently found together in uropathogenic Escherichia coli. Previous studies have discovered evidence both for linkage between the genes for these traits and for their duplication in the chromosomes of a limited number of strains. To test whether these observations are characteristic of uropathogenic Escherichia coli, the method of DNA hybridization to DNA restriction fragments separated by electrophoresis and transferred to nylon was used to determine copy number of genes for P-fimbriae (pap) among 51 E. coli strains isolated from symptomatic urinary tract infections. Twenty percent of the strains had more than one copy of pap homologous sequences. Fifteen strains, each representing a unique clone, were examined for the presence of sequences homologous with cloned hemolysin genes (hly). Samples of DNA from 14 of the 15 strains hybridized with hly probes. In eight strains the number of copies of pap equalled the number of copies of hly, including one strain with two apparent copies of each. Five strains appeared to have one more copy of pap than of hly, and one strain had an extra copy of hly.

  7. Association study of copy number variants in FCGR3A and FCGR3B gene with risk of ankylosing spondylitis in a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Yang, Xiao; Cai, Guoqi; Xin, Lihong; Xia, Qing; Zhang, Xu; Li, Xiaona; Wang, Mengmeng; Wang, Kang; Xia, Guo; Xu, Shengqian; Xu, Jianhua; Zou, Yanfeng; Pan, Faming

    2016-03-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a common inherited autoimmune disease. Copy number variation (CNV) of DNA segments has been found to be an important part of genetic variation, and the FCGR3A and FCGR3B gene CNVs have been associated with various autoimmune disorders. The aim of the study was to determine whether CNVs of FCGR3A and FCGR3B were also associated with the susceptibility of AS. A total of 801 individuals including 402 AS patients and 399 healthy controls were enrolled in this study. The copy numbers of FCGR3 gene (two fragments, included FCGR3A and FCGR3B) were measured by AccuCopy™ methods. Chi-square test and logistic regression model were used to evaluate association between FCGR3 gene CNVs and AS susceptibility. P values, odds ratio, and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to estimate the effects of risk. Significantly, difference in the frequencies of FCGR3A and FCGR3B gene CNVs was founded between the patients with AS and controls. For the FCGR3A gene, a low (≤3) copy number was significantly associated with AS [for ≤3 copies versus 4 copies, (OR 2.17, 95% CI (1.41, 3.34), P < 0.001, adjusted OR 2.22, 95% CI (1.44, 3.43), P < 0.001)]. A low FCGR3B copy number was also significantly associated with increasing risk of AS [for ≤3 copies versus 4 copies, (OR 1.87, 95% CI (1.25, 2.79), P = 0.002, adjusted OR 1.94, 95% CI (1.29, 2.91), P = 0.001)]; however, both the high FCGR3A and FCGR3B copy numbers (≥5) were not significantly associated with the risk of AS (≥5 copies versus 4 copies). The lower copy numbers (≤3) of FCGR3A and FCGR3B genes confer a risk factor for AS susceptibility.

  8. PCR amplification of a multi-copy mitochondrial gene (cox3) improves detection of Cytauxzoon felis infection as compared to a ribosomal gene (18S).

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    Schreeg, Megan E; Marr, Henry S; Griffith, Emily H; Tarigo, Jaime L; Bird, David M; Reichard, Mason V; Cohn, Leah A; Levy, Michael G; Birkenheuer, Adam J

    2016-07-30

    Cytauxzoon felis is a tick-transmitted protozoan parasite that infects felids. Clinical disease caused by acute C. felis infection rapidly progresses in domestic cats, leading to high morbidity and mortality. Accurately diagnosing cytauxzoonosis as soon as possible during acute infection would allow for earlier initiation of antiprotozoal therapy which could lead to higher survival rates. Molecular detection of parasite rRNA genes (18S) by PCR has previously been shown to be a sensitive method of diagnosing C. felis infections. Based on evidence from related apicomplexan species, we hypothesized that C. felis mitochondrial genes would exist at higher copy numbers than 18S and would be a more sensitive diagnostic target. In this study we have designed a PCR assay targeting the C. felis mitochondrial gene cytochrome c oxidase subunit III (cox3). Herein we demonstrate that (1) the cox3 PCR can detect as low as 1 copy of DNA target and can detect C. felis in samples with known mitochondrial sequence heterogeneity, (2) cox3 copy number is increased relative to 18S in blood and tissue samples from acutely infected cats, and (3) the cox3 PCR is more sensitive than 18S PCR for detection of C. felis during early infections.

  9. The Symbiotic Performance of Chickpea Rhizobia Can Be Improved by Additional Copies of the clpB Chaperone Gene.

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    Paço, Ana; Brígido, Clarisse; Alexandre, Ana; Mateos, Pedro F; Oliveira, Solange

    2016-01-01

    The ClpB chaperone is known to be involved in bacterial stress response. Moreover, recent studies suggest that this protein has also a role in the chickpea-rhizobia symbiosis. In order to improve both stress tolerance and symbiotic performance of a chickpea microsymbiont, the Mesorhizobium mediterraneum UPM-Ca36T strain was genetically transformed with pPHU231 containing an extra-copy of the clpB gene. To investigate if the clpB-transformed strain displays an improved stress tolerance, bacterial growth was evaluated under heat and acid stress conditions. In addition, the effect of the extra-copies of the clpB gene in the symbiotic performance was evaluated using plant growth assays (hydroponic and pot trials). The clpB-transformed strain is more tolerant to heat shock than the strain transformed with pPHU231, supporting the involvement of ClpB in rhizobia heat shock tolerance. Both plant growth assays showed that ClpB has an important role in chickpea-rhizobia symbiosis. The nodulation kinetics analysis showed a higher rate of nodule appearance with the clpB-transformed strain. This strain also induced a greater number of nodules and, more notably, its symbiotic effectiveness increased ~60% at pH5 and 83% at pH7, compared to the wild-type strain. Furthermore, a higher frequency of root hair curling was also observed in plants inoculated with the clpB-transformed strain, compared to the wild-type strain. The superior root hair curling induction, nodulation ability and symbiotic effectiveness of the clpB-transformed strain may be explained by an increased expression of symbiosis genes. Indeed, higher transcript levels of the nodulation genes nodA and nodC (~3 folds) were detected in the clpB-transformed strain. The improvement of rhizobia by addition of extra-copies of the clpB gene may be a promising strategy to obtain strains with enhanced stress tolerance and symbiotic effectiveness, thus contributing to their success as crop inoculants, particularly under

  10. Resolution of deep angiosperm phylogeny using conserved nuclear genes and estimates of early divergence times

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    Zeng, Liping; Zhang, Qiang; Sun, Renran; Kong, Hongzhi; Zhang, Ning; Ma, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Angiosperms are the most successful plants and support human livelihood and ecosystems. Angiosperm phylogeny is the foundation of studies of gene function and phenotypic evolution, divergence time estimation and biogeography. The relationship of the five divergent groups of the Mesangiospermae (~99.95% of extant angiosperms) remains uncertain, with multiple hypotheses reported in the literature. Here transcriptome data sets are obtained from 26 species lacking sequenced genomes, representing each of the five groups: eudicots, monocots, magnoliids, Chloranthaceae and Ceratophyllaceae. Phylogenetic analyses using 59 carefully selected low-copy nuclear genes resulted in highly supported relationships: sisterhood of eudicots and a clade containing Chloranthaceae and Ceratophyllaceae, with magnoliids being the next sister group, followed by monocots. Our topology allows a re-examination of the evolutionary patterns of 110 morphological characters. The molecular clock estimates of Mesangiospermae diversification during the late to middle Jurassic correspond well to the origins of some insects, which may have been a factor facilitating early angiosperm radiation. PMID:25249442

  11. MYC and Human Telomerase Gene (TERC) Copy Number Gain in Early-stage Non–small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flacco, Antonella; Ludovini, Vienna; Bianconi, Fortunato; Ragusa, Mark; Bellezza, Guido; Tofanetti, Francesca R.; Pistola, Lorenza; Siggillino, Annamaria; Vannucci, Jacopo; Cagini, Lucio; Sidoni, Angelo; Puma, Francesco; Varella-Garcia, Marileila; Crinò, Lucio

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We investigated the frequency of MYC and TERC increased gene copy number (GCN) in early-stage non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and evaluated the correlation of these genomic imbalances with clinicopathologic parameters and outcome. Materials and Methods Tumor tissues were obtained from 113 resected NSCLCs. MYC and TERC GCNs were tested by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) according to the University of Colorado Cancer Center (UCCC) criteria and based on the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) classification. Results When UCCC criteria were applied, 41 (36%) cases for MYC and 41 (36%) cases for TERC were considered FISH-positive. MYC and TERC concurrent FISH-positive was observed in 12 cases (11%): 2 (17%) cases with gene amplification and 10 (83%) with high polysomy. By using the ROC analysis, high MYC (mean ≥2.83 copies/cell) and TERC (mean ≥2.65 copies/cell) GCNs were observed in 60 (53.1%) cases and 58 (51.3%) cases, respectively. High TERC GCN was associated with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) histology (P = 0.001). In univariate analysis, increased MYC GCN was associated with shorter overall survival (P = 0.032 [UCCC criteria] or P = 0.02 [ROC classification]), whereas high TERC GCN showed no association. In multivariate analysis including stage and age, high MYC GCN remained significantly associated with worse overall survival using both the UCCC criteria (P = 0.02) and the ROC classification (P = 0.008). Conclusions Our results confirm MYC as frequently amplified in early-stage NSCLC and increased MYC GCN as a strong predictor of worse survival. Increased TERC GCN does not have prognostic impact but has strong association with squamous histology. PMID:25806711

  12. Differences in AMY1 Gene Copy Numbers Derived from Blood, Buccal Cells and Saliva Using Quantitative and Droplet Digital PCR Methods: Flagging the Pitfall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, Delicia Shu Qin; Tan, Verena Ming Hui; Ong, Siong Gim; Chan, Yiong Huak; Heng, Chew Kiat; Lee, Yung Seng

    2017-01-01

    The human salivary (AMY1) gene, encoding salivary α-amylase, has variable copy number variants (CNVs) in the human genome. We aimed to determine if real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and the more recently available Droplet Digital PCR (ddPCR) can provide a precise quantification of the AMY1 gene copy number in blood, buccal cells and saliva samples derived from the same individual. Seven participants were recruited and DNA was extracted from the blood, buccal cells and saliva samples provided by each participant. Taqman assay real-time qPCR and ddPCR were conducted to quantify AMY1 gene copy numbers. Statistical analysis was carried out to determine the difference in AMY1 gene copy number between the different biological specimens and different assay methods. We found significant within-individual difference (pcopy number between different biological samples as determined by qPCR. However, there was no significant within-individual difference in AMY1 gene copy number between different biological samples as determined by ddPCR. We also found that AMY1 gene copy number of blood samples were comparable between qPCR and ddPCR, while there is a significant difference (pcopy numbers measured by qPCR and ddPCR for both buccal swab and saliva samples. Despite buccal cells and saliva samples being possible sources of DNA, it is pertinent that ddPCR or a single biological sample, preferably blood sample, be used for determining highly polymorphic gene copy numbers like AMY1, due to the large within-individual variability between different biological samples if real time qPCR is employed.

  13. Network-guided analysis of genes with altered somatic copy number and gene expression reveals pathways commonly perturbed in metastatic melanoma.

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    Armand Valsesia

    Full Text Available Cancer genomes frequently contain somatic copy number alterations (SCNA that can significantly perturb the expression level of affected genes and thus disrupt pathways controlling normal growth. In melanoma, many studies have focussed on the copy number and gene expression levels of the BRAF, PTEN and MITF genes, but little has been done to identify new genes using these parameters at the genome-wide scale. Using karyotyping, SNP and CGH arrays, and RNA-seq, we have identified SCNA affecting gene expression ('SCNA-genes' in seven human metastatic melanoma cell lines. We showed that the combination of these techniques is useful to identify candidate genes potentially involved in tumorigenesis. Since few of these alterations were recurrent across our samples, we used a protein network-guided approach to determine whether any pathways were enriched in SCNA-genes in one or more samples. From this unbiased genome-wide analysis, we identified 28 significantly enriched pathway modules. Comparison with two large, independent melanoma SCNA datasets showed less than 10% overlap at the individual gene level, but network-guided analysis revealed 66% shared pathways, including all but three of the pathways identified in our data. Frequently altered pathways included WNT, cadherin signalling, angiogenesis and melanogenesis. Additionally, our results emphasize the potential of the EPHA3 and FRS2 gene products, involved in angiogenesis and migration, as possible therapeutic targets in melanoma. Our study demonstrates the utility of network-guided approaches, for both large and small datasets, to identify pathways recurrently perturbed in cancer.

  14. Phylogenomic approaches to common problems encountered in the analysis of low copy repeats: The sulfotransferase 1A gene family example

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    Benner Steven A

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Blocks of duplicated genomic DNA sequence longer than 1000 base pairs are known as low copy repeats (LCRs. Identified by their sequence similarity, LCRs are abundant in the human genome, and are interesting because they may represent recent adaptive events, or potential future adaptive opportunities within the human lineage. Sequence analysis tools are needed, however, to decide whether these interpretations are likely, whether a particular set of LCRs represents nearly neutral drift creating junk DNA, or whether the appearance of LCRs reflects assembly error. Here we investigate an LCR family containing the sulfotransferase (SULT 1A genes involved in drug metabolism, cancer, hormone regulation, and neurotransmitter biology as a first step for defining the problems that those tools must manage. Results Sequence analysis here identified a fourth sulfotransferase gene, which may be transcriptionally active, located on human chromosome 16. Four regions of genomic sequence containing the four human SULT1A paralogs defined a new LCR family. The stem hominoid SULT1A progenitor locus was identified by comparative genomics involving complete human and rodent genomes, and a draft chimpanzee genome. SULT1A expansion in hominoid genomes was followed by positive selection acting on specific protein sites. This episode of adaptive evolution appears to be responsible for the dopamine sulfonation function of some SULT enzymes. Each of the conclusions that this bioinformatic analysis generated using data that has uncertain reliability (such as that from the chimpanzee genome sequencing project has been confirmed experimentally or by a "finished" chromosome 16 assembly, both of which were published after the submission of this manuscript. Conclusion SULT1A genes expanded from one to four copies in hominoids during intra-chromosomal LCR duplications, including (apparently one after the divergence of chimpanzees and humans. Thus, LCRs may

  15. Focal chromosomal copy number aberrations identify CMTM8 and GPR177 as new candidate driver genes in osteosarcoma.

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    Both, Joeri; Krijgsman, Oscar; Bras, Johannes; Schaap, Gerard R; Baas, Frank; Ylstra, Bauke; Hulsebos, Theo J M

    2014-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is an aggressive bone tumor that preferentially develops in adolescents. The tumor is characterized by an abundance of genomic aberrations, which hampers the identification of the driver genes involved in osteosarcoma tumorigenesis. Our study aims to identify these genes by the investigation of focal copy number aberrations (CNAs, GPR177 as a new candidate oncogene in osteosarcoma. In osteosarcoma, CMTM8 has been shown to suppress EGFR signaling. In other tumor types, CMTM8 is known to suppress the activity of the oncogenic protein c-Met and GPR177 is known as an overexpressed upstream regulator of the Wnt-pathway. Further studies are needed to determine whether these proteins also exert the latter functions in osteosarcoma tumorigenesis.

  16. Physical Mapping of Amplified Copies of the 5-Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-Phosphate Synthase Gene in Glyphosate-Resistant Amaranthus tuberculatus1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Andrew; Varanasi, Vijay K.; Koo, Dal-Hoe; Nakka, Sridevi; Peterson, Dallas E.; Friebe, Bernd

    2017-01-01

    Recent and rapid evolution of resistance to glyphosate, the most widely used herbicides, in several weed species, including common waterhemp (Amaranthus tuberculatus), poses a serious threat to sustained crop production. We report that glyphosate resistance in A. tuberculatus was due to amplification of the 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-P synthase (EPSPS) gene, which encodes the molecular target of glyphosate. There was a positive correlation between EPSPS gene copies and its transcript expression. We analyzed the distribution of EPSPS copies in the genome of A. tuberculatus using fluorescence in situ hybridization on mitotic metaphase chromosomes and interphase nuclei. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis mapped the EPSPS gene to pericentromeric regions of two homologous chromosomes in glyphosate sensitive A. tuberculatus. In glyphosate-resistant plants, a cluster of EPSPS genes on the pericentromeric region on one pair of homologous chromosomes was detected. Intriguingly, two highly glyphosate-resistant plants harbored an additional chromosome with several EPSPS copies besides the native chromosome pair with EPSPS copies. These results suggest that the initial event of EPSPS gene duplication may have occurred because of unequal recombination mediated by repetitive DNA. Subsequently, gene amplification may have resulted via several other mechanisms, such as chromosomal rearrangements, deletion/insertion, transposon-mediated dispersion, or possibly by interspecific hybridization. This report illustrates the physical mapping of amplified EPSPS copies in A. tuberculatus. PMID:27956489

  17. Comparative analyses of gene copy number and mRNA expression in GBM tumors and GBM xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodgson, J. Graeme; Yeh, Ru-Fang; Ray, Amrita; Wang, Nicholas J.; Smirnov, Ivan; Yu, Mamie; Hariono, Sujatmi; Silber, Joachim; Feiler, Heidi S.; Gray, Joe W.; Spellman, Paul T.; Vandenberg, Scott R.; Berger, Mitchel S.; James, C. David

    2009-04-03

    Development of model systems that recapitulate the molecular heterogeneity observed among glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) tumors will expedite the testing of targeted molecular therapeutic strategies for GBM treatment. In this study, we profiled DNA copy number and mRNA expression in 21 independent GBM tumor lines maintained as subcutaneous xenografts (GBMX), and compared GBMX molecular signatures to those observed in GBM clinical specimens derived from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). The predominant copy number signature in both tumor groups was defined by chromosome-7 gain/chromosome-10 loss, a poor-prognosis genetic signature. We also observed, at frequencies similar to that detected in TCGA GBM tumors, genomic amplification and overexpression of known GBM oncogenes, such as EGFR, MDM2, CDK6, and MYCN, and novel genes, including NUP107, SLC35E3, MMP1, MMP13, and DDX1. The transcriptional signature of GBMX tumors, which was stable over multiple subcutaneous passages, was defined by overexpression of genes involved in M phase, DNA replication, and chromosome organization (MRC) and was highly similar to the poor-prognosis mitosis and cell-cycle module (MCM) in GBM. Assessment of gene expression in TCGA-derived GBMs revealed overexpression of MRC cancer genes AURKB, BIRC5, CCNB1, CCNB2, CDC2, CDK2, and FOXM1, which form a transcriptional network important for G2/M progression and/or checkpoint activation. Our study supports propagation of GBM tumors as subcutaneous xenografts as a useful approach for sustaining key molecular characteristics of patient tumors, and highlights therapeutic opportunities conferred by this GBMX tumor panel for testing targeted therapeutic strategies for GBM treatment.

  18. bla(KPC) RNA expression correlates with two transcriptional start sites but not always with gene copy number in four genera of Gram-negative pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Amanda L; Kurpiel, Philip M; Lister, Philip D; Hanson, Nancy D

    2011-08-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)-producing organisms are therapeutically and diagnostically challenging. It is possible that bla(KPC) gene expression plays a role in the variability observed in clinical susceptibility testing. bla(KPC) transformants together with 10 clinical isolates representing four genera were evaluated for bla(KPC) copy number and gene expression and correlated with β-lactam MIC data. The data suggest that mechanisms other than gene copy number and expression of bla(KPC) contribute to variability in susceptibility when testing KPC-producing isolates.

  19. Determination of protein expression and plasmid copy number from cloned genes in Escherichia coli by flow injection analysis using an enzyme indicator vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schendel, F J; Baude, E J; Flickinger, M C

    1989-10-20

    On-line determination of expression rates from cloned genes in Escherichia coli and of plasmid copy number would be useful for monitoring accumulation of non-secreted proteins. As an initial model for monitoring gene expression in intact cells, a non-gene-fusion enzyme-based indicator plasmid has been constructed containing the phoA gene coding for alkaline phosphatase (AP) in pUCIS and pACYC184. The activity of AP can be rapidly determined in permeabilized cells. A flow injection analysis (FIA) assay has been developed which allows the direct real-time measurement of the AP activity during cell growth. A model target gene coding for E. coli cyanase (cynS) has been inserted in order to determine the ratio between the expression of the target and indicator, AP. A linear relationship has been found between plasmid copy number and AP activity for the high-copy pUC vector. To minimize indicator expression, transcription terminators have been inserted between the cynS and phoA genes, altering the target-to-indicator ratio by 10- to 40-fold. These vectors may be useful for the rapid continuous determination of plasmid copy number and target gene expression for nonsecreted proteins and would overcome the limitations of in situ probe biosensors for real-time determination of the accumulation of proteins from cloned genes in E. coli.

  20. Novel genes involved in severe early-onset obesity revealed by rare copy number and sequence variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Serra-Juhé

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a multifactorial disorder with high heritability (50-75%, which is probably higher in early-onset and severe cases. Although rare monogenic forms and several genes and regions of susceptibility, including copy number variants (CNVs, have been described, the genetic causes underlying the disease still remain largely unknown. We searched for rare CNVs (>100kb in size, altering genes and present in 3 standard deviations above the mean at <3 years of age using SNP array molecular karyotypes. We then performed case control studies (480 EOO cases/480 non-obese controls with the validated CNVs and rare sequence variants (RSVs detected by targeted resequencing of selected CNV genes (n = 14, and also studied the inheritance patterns in available first-degree relatives. A higher burden of gain-type CNVs was detected in EOO cases versus controls (OR = 1.71, p-value = 0.0358. In addition to a gain of the NPY gene in a familial case with EOO and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, likely pathogenic CNVs included gains of glutamate receptors (GRIK1, GRM7 and the X-linked gastrin-peptide receptor (GRPR, all inherited from obese parents. Putatively functional RSVs absent in controls were also identified in EOO cases at NPY, GRIK1 and GRPR. A patient with a heterozygous deletion disrupting two contiguous and related genes, SLCO4C1 and SLCO6A1, also had a missense RSV at SLCO4C1 on the other allele, suggestive of a recessive model. The genes identified showed a clear enrichment of shared co-expression partners with known genes strongly related to obesity, reinforcing their role in the pathophysiology of the disease. Our data reveal a higher burden of rare CNVs and RSVs in several related genes in patients with EOO compared to controls, and implicate NPY, GRPR, two glutamate receptors and SLCO4C1 in highly penetrant forms of familial obesity.

  1. Novel genes involved in severe early-onset obesity revealed by rare copy number and sequence variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra-Juhé, Clara; Martos-Moreno, Gabriel Á; Bou de Pieri, Francesc; Flores, Raquel; González, Juan R; Rodríguez-Santiago, Benjamín; Argente, Jesús; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A

    2017-05-01

    Obesity is a multifactorial disorder with high heritability (50-75%), which is probably higher in early-onset and severe cases. Although rare monogenic forms and several genes and regions of susceptibility, including copy number variants (CNVs), have been described, the genetic causes underlying the disease still remain largely unknown. We searched for rare CNVs (>100kb in size, altering genes and present in obesity (EOO: body mass index >3 standard deviations above the mean at obese controls) with the validated CNVs and rare sequence variants (RSVs) detected by targeted resequencing of selected CNV genes (n = 14), and also studied the inheritance patterns in available first-degree relatives. A higher burden of gain-type CNVs was detected in EOO cases versus controls (OR = 1.71, p-value = 0.0358). In addition to a gain of the NPY gene in a familial case with EOO and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, likely pathogenic CNVs included gains of glutamate receptors (GRIK1, GRM7) and the X-linked gastrin-peptide receptor (GRPR), all inherited from obese parents. Putatively functional RSVs absent in controls were also identified in EOO cases at NPY, GRIK1 and GRPR. A patient with a heterozygous deletion disrupting two contiguous and related genes, SLCO4C1 and SLCO6A1, also had a missense RSV at SLCO4C1 on the other allele, suggestive of a recessive model. The genes identified showed a clear enrichment of shared co-expression partners with known genes strongly related to obesity, reinforcing their role in the pathophysiology of the disease. Our data reveal a higher burden of rare CNVs and RSVs in several related genes in patients with EOO compared to controls, and implicate NPY, GRPR, two glutamate receptors and SLCO4C1 in highly penetrant forms of familial obesity.

  2. Optimization protein productivity of human interleukin-2 through codon usage, gene copy number and intracellular tRNA concentration in CHO cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Kua-Chun; Wang, Chih-Yang; Liu, Kuan-Ting; Chen, Yi-Ling; Chen, Yi-Chen; Lai, Ming-Derg; Yen, Meng-Chi

    2014-11-14

    Transfer RNA (tRNA) abundance is one of the critical factors for the enhancement of protein productivity in prokaryotic and eukaryotic hosts. Gene copy number of tRNA and tRNA codon usage bias are generally used to match tRNA abundance of protein-expressing hosts and to optimize the codons of recombinant proteins. Because sufficient concentration of intracellular tRNA and optimized codons of recombinant proteins enhanced translation efficiency, we hypothesized that sufficient supplement of host's tRNA improved protein productivity in mammalian cells. First, the small tRNA sequencing results of CHO-K1 cells showed moderate positive correlation with gene copy number and codon usage bias. Modification of human interleukin-2 (IL-2) through codons with high gene copy number and high codon usage bias (IL-2 HH, modified on Leu, Thr, Glu) significantly increased protein productivity in CHO-K1 cells. In contrast, modification through codons with relatively high gene copy number and low codon usage bias (IL-2 HL, modified on Ala, Thr, Val), or relatively low gene copy number and low codon usage bias (IL-2 LH, modified on Ala, Thr, Val) did not increase IL-2 productivity significantly. Furthermore, supplement of the alanine tRNA or threonine tRNA increased IL-2 productivity of IL-2 HL. In summary, we revealed a potential strategy to enhance productivity of recombinant proteins, which may be applied in production of protein drug or design of DNA vaccine.

  3. Copy number variation and missense mutations of the agouti signaling protein (ASIP) gene in goat breeds with different coat colors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontanesi, L; Beretti, F; Riggio, V; Gómez González, E; Dall'Olio, S; Davoli, R; Russo, V; Portolano, B

    2009-01-01

    In goats, classical genetic studies reported a large number of alleles at the Agouti locus with effects on coat color and pattern distribution. From these early studies, the dominant A(Wt) (white/tan) allele was suggested to cause the white color of the Saanen breed. Here, we sequenced the coding region of the goat ASIP gene in 6 goat breeds (Girgentana, Maltese, Derivata di Siria, Murciano-Granadina, Camosciata delle Alpi, and Saanen), with different coat colors and patterns. Five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified, 3 of which caused missense mutations in conserved positions of the cysteine-rich carboxy-terminal domain of the protein (p.Ala96Gly, p.Cys126Gly, and p.Val128Gly). Allele and genotype frequencies suggested that these mutations are not associated or not completely associated with coat color in the investigated goat breeds. Moreover, genotyping and sequencing results, deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, as well as allele copy number evaluation from semiquantitative fluorescent multiplex PCR, indicated the presence of copy number variation (CNV) in all investigated breeds. To confirm the presence of CNV and evaluate its extension, we applied a bovine-goat cross-species array comparative genome hybridization (aCGH) experiment using a custom tiling array based on bovine chromosome 13. aCGH results obtained for 8 goat DNA samples confirmed the presence of CNV affecting a region of less that 100 kb including the ASIP and AHCY genes. In Girgentana and Saanen breeds, this CNV might cause the A(Wt) allele, as already suggested for a similar structural mutation in sheep affecting the ASIP and AHCY genes, providing evidence for a recurrent interspecies CNV. However, other mechanisms may also be involved in determining coat color in these 2 breeds.

  4. Integrative analysis of DNA copy number and gene expression in metastatic oral squamous cell carcinoma identifies genes associated with poor survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chang; Liu, Yan; Wang, Pei; Fan, Wenhong; Rue, Tessa C; Upton, Melissa P; Houck, John R; Lohavanichbutr, Pawadee; Doody, David R; Futran, Neal D; Zhao, Lue Ping; Schwartz, Stephen M; Chen, Chu; Méndez, Eduardo

    2010-06-11

    Lymphotropism in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is one of the most important prognostic factors of 5-year survival. In an effort to identify genes that may be responsible for the initiation of OSCC lymphotropism, we examined DNA copy number gains and losses and corresponding gene expression changes from tumor cells in metastatic lymph nodes of patients with OSCC. We performed integrative analysis of DNA copy number alterations (CNA) and corresponding mRNA expression from OSCC cells isolated from metastatic lymph nodes of 20 patients using Affymetrix 250 K Nsp I SNP and U133 Plus 2.0 arrays, respectively. Overall, genome CNA accounted for expression changes in 31% of the transcripts studied. Genome region 11q13.2-11q13.3 shows the highest correlation between DNA CNA and expression. With a false discovery rate expression. Among these, we found two subsets that were significantly associated with OSCC (n = 122) when compared to controls, and with survival (n = 27), as tested using an independent dataset with genome-wide expression profiles for 148 primary OSCC and 45 normal oral mucosa. We fit Cox models to calculate a principal component analysis-derived risk-score for these two gene sets ('122-' or '27-transcript PC'). The models combining the 122- or 27-transcript PC with stage outperformed the model using stage alone in terms of the Area Under the Curve (AUC = 0.82 or 0.86 vs. 0.72, with p = 0.044 or 0.011, respectively). Genes exhibiting CNA-correlated expression may have biological impact on carcinogenesis and cancer progression in OSCC. Determination of copy number-associated transcripts associated with clinical outcomes in tumor cells with an aggressive phenotype (i.e., cells metastasized to the lymph nodes) can help prioritize candidate transcripts from high-throughput data for further studies.

  5. Copy number and orientation determine the susceptibility of a gene to silencing by nearby heterochromatin in Drosophila

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabl, J.F. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)]|[Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Henikoff, S. [Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA (United States)]|[Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Seattle, WA (United States)

    1996-02-01

    The classical phenomenon of position-effect variegation (PEV) is the mosaic expression that occurs when a chromosomal rearrangements moves a euchromatic gene near heterochromatin. A striking feature of this phenomenon is that genes far away from the junction with heterochromatin can be affected, as if the heterochromatic state {open_quotes}spreads.{close_quotes} We have investigated classical PEV of a Drosophila brown transgene affected by a heterochromatic junction {approximately} 60 kb away. PEV was enhanced when the transgene was locally duplicated using P transposase. Successive rounds of P transpose mutagenesis and phenotypic selection produced a series of PEV alleles with differences in phenotype that depended on transgene copy number and orientation. As for other examples of classical PEV, nearby heterochromatin was required for gene silencing. Modifications of classical PEV by alterations at a single site are unexpected, and these observations contradict models for spreading that invoke propagation of heterochromatin along the chromosome. Rather, our results support a model in which local alterations affect the affinity of a gene region for nearby heterochromatin via homology-based pairing, suggesting an alternative explanation for this 65-year-old phenomenon. 63 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Expression of a transferred nuclear gene in a mitochondrial genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yichun Qiu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Transfer of mitochondrial genes to the nucleus, and subsequent gain of regulatory elements for expression, is an ongoing evolutionary process in plants. Many examples have been characterized, which in some cases have revealed sources of mitochondrial targeting sequences and cis-regulatory elements. In contrast, there have been no reports of a nuclear gene that has undergone intracellular transfer to the mitochondrial genome and become expressed. Here we show that the orf164 gene in the mitochondrial genome of several Brassicaceae species, including Arabidopsis, is derived from the nuclear ARF17 gene that codes for an auxin responsive protein and is present across flowering plants. Orf164 corresponds to a portion of ARF17, and the nucleotide and amino acid sequences are 79% and 81% identical, respectively. Orf164 is transcribed in several organ types of Arabidopsis thaliana, as detected by RT-PCR. In addition, orf164 is transcribed in five other Brassicaceae within the tribes Camelineae, Erysimeae and Cardamineae, but the gene is not present in Brassica or Raphanus. This study shows that nuclear genes can be transferred to the mitochondrial genome and become expressed, providing a new perspective on the movement of genes between the genomes of subcellular compartments.

  7. RefCNV: Identification of Gene-Based Copy Number Variants Using Whole Exome Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Lun-Ching; Das, Biswajit; Lih, Chih-Jian; Si, Han; Camalier, Corinne E.; McGregor, Paul M.; Polley, Eric

    2016-01-01

    With rapid advances in DNA sequencing technologies, whole exome sequencing (WES) has become a popular approach for detecting somatic mutations in oncology studies. The initial intent of WES was to characterize single nucleotide variants, but it was observed that the number of sequencing reads that mapped to a genomic region correlated with the DNA copy number variants (CNVs). We propose a method RefCNV that uses a reference set to estimate the distribution of the coverage for each exon. The construction of the reference set includes an evaluation of the sources of variability in the coverage distribution. We observed that the processing steps had an impact on the coverage distribution. For each exon, we compared the observed coverage with the expected normal coverage. Thresholds for determining CNVs were selected to control the false-positive error rate. RefCNV prediction correlated significantly (r = 0.96–0.86) with CNV measured by digital polymerase chain reaction for MET (7q31), EGFR (7p12), or ERBB2 (17q12) in 13 tumor cell lines. The genome-wide CNV analysis showed a good overall correlation (Spearman’s coefficient = 0.82) between RefCNV estimation and publicly available CNV data in Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia. RefCNV also showed better performance than three other CNV estimation methods in genome-wide CNV analysis. PMID:27147817

  8. Obesity, starch digestion and amylase: association between copy number variants at human salivary (AMY1) and pancreatic (AMY2) amylase genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Danielle; Dhar, Sugandha; Mitchell, Laura M; Fu, Beiyuan; Tyson, Jess; Shwan, Nzar A A; Yang, Fengtang; Thomas, Mark G; Armour, John A L

    2015-06-15

    The human salivary amylase genes display extensive copy number variation (CNV), and recent work has implicated this variation in adaptation to starch-rich diets, and in association with body mass index. In this work, we use paralogue ratio tests, microsatellite analysis, read depth and fibre-FISH to demonstrate that human amylase CNV is not a smooth continuum, but is instead partitioned into distinct haplotype classes. There is a fundamental structural distinction between haplotypes containing odd or even numbers of AMY1 gene units, in turn coupled to CNV in pancreatic amylase genes AMY2A and AMY2B. Most haplotypes have one copy each of AMY2A and AMY2B and contain an odd number of copies of AMY1; consequently, most individuals have an even total number of AMY1. In contrast, haplotypes carrying an even number of AMY1 genes have rearrangements leading to CNVs of AMY2A/AMY2B. Read-depth and experimental data show that different populations harbour different proportions of these basic haplotype classes. In Europeans, the copy numbers of AMY1 and AMY2A are correlated, so that phenotypic associations caused by variation in pancreatic amylase copy number could be detected indirectly as weak association with AMY1 copy number. We show that the quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay previously applied to the high-throughput measurement of AMY1 copy number is less accurate than the measures we use and that qPCR data in other studies have been further compromised by systematic miscalibration. Our results uncover new patterns in human amylase variation and imply a potential role for AMY2 CNV in functional associations.

  9. Quantification, by solid-phase minisequencing, of the telomeric and centromeric copies of the survival motor neuron gene in families with spinal muscular atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwartz, M; Sørensen, N; Hansen, F J

    1997-01-01

    In an analysis of 30 families affected by spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) we have used the solid-phase minisequencing method to determine the ratio between the number of telomeric and centromeric copies of the survival motor neuron gene (SMN and cBCD541 respectively) on normal and SMA chromosomes....... This has enabled us to establish haplotypes with regard to SMN and cBCD541, and estimate their frequencies, on both types of chromosomes. Six predominant haplotypes were identified, three for normal chromosomes and three for SMA chromosomes, characterized by having 0, 1, or 2 copies, respectively, of c......BCD541. We found evidence for the presence of patients homozygous for a deletion of SMN and with only one copy of cBCD541, but found none deleted for all copies of this gene. Several asymptomatic carriers of SMA with only a single copy of SMN and no copy of cBCD541 were identified. We could not confirm...

  10. Intrinsic karyotype stability and gene copy number variations may have laid the foundation for tetraploid wheat formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huakun; Bian, Yao; Gou, Xiaowan; Dong, Yuzhu; Rustgi, Sachin; Zhang, Bangjiao; Xu, Chunming; Li, Ning; Qi, Bao; Han, Fangpu; von Wettstein, Diter; Liu, Bao

    2013-11-26

    Polyploidy or whole-genome duplication is recurrent in plant evolution, yet only a small fraction of whole-genome duplications has led to successful speciation. A major challenge in the establishment of nascent polyploids is sustained karyotype instability, which compromises fitness. The three putative diploid progenitors of bread wheat, with AA, SS (S ∼ B), and DD genomes occurred sympatrically, and their cross-fertilization in different combinations may have resulted in fertile allotetraploids with various genomic constitutions. However, only SSAA or closely related genome combinations have led to the speciation of tetraploid wheats like Triticum turgidum and Triticum timopheevii. We analyzed early generations of four newly synthesized allotetraploid wheats with genome compositions S(sh)S(sh)A(m)A(m), S(l)S(l)AA, S(b)S(b)DD, and AADD by combined fluorescence and genomic in situ hybridization-based karyotyping. Results of karyotype analyses showed that although S(sh)S(sh)A(m)A(m) and S(l)S(l)AA are characterized by immediate and persistent karyotype stability, massive aneuploidy and extensive chromosome restructuring are associated with S(b)S(b)DD and AADD in which parental subgenomes showed markedly different propensities for chromosome gain/loss and rearrangements. Although compensating aneuploidy and reciprocal translocation between homeologs prevailed, reproductive fitness was substantially compromised due to chromosome instability. Strikingly, localized genomic changes in repetitive DNA and copy-number variations in gene homologs occurred in both chromosome stable lines, S(sh)S(sh)A(m)A(m) and S(l)S(l)AA. Our data demonstrated that immediate and persistent karyotype stability is intrinsic to newly formed allotetraploid wheat with genome combinations analogous to natural tetraploid wheats. This property, coupled with rapid gene copy-number variations, may have laid the foundation of tetraploid wheat establishment.

  11. Heterogeneous EGFR gene copy number increase is common in colorectal cancer and defines response to anti-EGFR therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annika Ålgars

    Full Text Available Anti-EGFR therapy is commonly used to treat colorectal cancer (CRC, although only a subset of patients benefit from the treatment. While KRAS mutation predicts non-responsiveness, positive predictive markers are not in clinical practice. We previously showed that immunohistochemistry (IHC-guided EGFR gene copy number (GCN analysis may identify CRC patients benefiting from anti-EGFR treatment. Here we tested the predictive value of such analysis in chemorefractory metastatic CRC, elucidated EGFR GCN heterogeneity within the tumors, and evaluated the association between EGFR GCN, KRAS status, and anti-EGFR antibody response in CRC cell lines. The chemorefractory patient cohort consisted of 54 KRAS wild-type (WT metastatic CRC patients. EGFR GCN status was analyzed by silver in situ hybridization using a cut-off value of 4.0 EGFR gene copies/cell. KRAS-WT and KRAS mutant CRC cell lines with different EGFR GCN were used in in vitro studies. The chemorefractory CRC tumors with EGFR GCN increase (≥4.0 responded better to anti-EGFR therapy than EGFR GCN (<4.0 tumors (clinical benefit, P = 0.0004; PFS, HR = 0.23, 95% CI 0.12-0.46. EGFR GCN counted using EGFR IHC guidance was significantly higher than the value from randomly selected areas verifying intratumoral EGFR GCN heterogeneity. In CRC cell lines, EGFR GCN correlated with EGFR expression. Best anti-EGFR response was seen with KRAS-WT, EGFR GCN = 4 cells and poorest response with KRAS-WT, EGFR GCN = 2 cells. Anti-EGFR response was associated with AKT and ERK1/2 phosphorylation, which was effectively inhibited only in cells with KRAS-WT and increased EGFR GCN. In conclusion, IHC-guided EGFR GCN is a promising predictor of anti-EGFR treatment efficacy in chemorefractory CRC.

  12. A single-copy Sleeping Beauty transposon mutagenesis screen identifies new PTEN-cooperating tumor suppressor genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Rosa, Jorge; Weber, Julia; Friedrich, Mathias Josef; Li, Yilong; Rad, Lena; Ponstingl, Hannes; Liang, Qi; de Quirós, Sandra Bernaldo; Noorani, Imran; Metzakopian, Emmanouil; Strong, Alexander; Li, Meng Amy; Astudillo, Aurora; Fernández-García, María Teresa; Fernández-García, María Soledad; Hoffman, Gary J; Fuente, Rocío; Vassiliou, George S; Rad, Roland; López-Otín, Carlos; Bradley, Allan; Cadiñanos, Juan

    2017-03-20

    The overwhelming number of genetic alterations identified through cancer genome sequencing requires complementary approaches to interpret their significance and interactions. Here we developed a novel whole-body insertional mutagenesis screen in mice, which was designed for the discovery of Pten-cooperating tumor suppressors. Toward this aim, we coupled mobilization of a single-copy inactivating Sleeping Beauty transposon to Pten disruption within the same genome. The analysis of 278 transposition-induced prostate, breast and skin tumors detected tissue-specific and shared data sets of known and candidate genes involved in cancer. We validated ZBTB20, CELF2, PARD3, AKAP13 and WAC, which were identified by our screens in multiple cancer types, as new tumor suppressor genes in prostate cancer. We demonstrated their synergy with PTEN in preventing invasion in vitro and confirmed their clinical relevance. Further characterization of Wac in vivo showed obligate haploinsufficiency for this gene (which encodes an autophagy-regulating factor) in a Pten-deficient context. Our study identified complex PTEN-cooperating tumor suppressor networks in different cancer types, with potential clinical implications.

  13. Characterization of gene mutations and copy number changes in acute myeloid leukemia using a rapid target enrichment protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolli, Niccolò; Manes, Nicla; McKerrell, Thomas; Chi, Jianxiang; Park, Naomi; Gundem, Gunes; Quail, Michael A; Sathiaseelan, Vijitha; Herman, Bram; Crawley, Charles; Craig, Jenny I O; Conte, Natalie; Grove, Carolyn; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Campbell, Peter J; Varela, Ignacio; Costeas, Paul; Vassiliou, George S

    2015-02-01

    Prognostic stratification is critical for making therapeutic decisions and maximizing survival of patients with acute myeloid leukemia. Advances in the genomics of acute myeloid leukemia have identified several recurrent gene mutations whose prognostic impact is being deciphered. We used HaloPlex target enrichment and Illumina-based next generation sequencing to study 24 recurrently mutated genes in 42 samples of acute myeloid leukemia with a normal karyotype. Read depth varied between and within genes for the same sample, but was predictable and highly consistent across samples. Consequently, we were able to detect copy number changes, such as an interstitial deletion of BCOR, three MLL partial tandem duplications, and a novel KRAS amplification. With regards to coding mutations, we identified likely oncogenic variants in 41 of 42 samples. NPM1 mutations were the most frequent, followed by FLT3, DNMT3A and TET2. NPM1 and FLT3 indels were reported with good efficiency. We also showed that DNMT3A mutations can persist post-chemotherapy and in 2 cases studied at diagnosis and relapse, we were able to delineate the dynamics of tumor evolution and give insights into order of acquisition of variants. HaloPlex is a quick and reliable target enrichment method that can aid diagnosis and prognostic stratification of acute myeloid leukemia patients.

  14. Copy number variations of genes involved in stress responses reflect the redox state and DNA damage in brewing yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, Jagoda; Deregowska, Anna; Skoneczny, Marek; Skoneczna, Adrianna; Natkanska, Urszula; Kwiatkowska, Aleksandra; Rawska, Ewa; Potocki, Leszek; Kuna, Ewelina; Panek, Anita; Lewinska, Anna; Wnuk, Maciej

    2016-09-01

    The yeast strains of the Saccharomyces sensu stricto complex involved in beer production are a heterogeneous group whose genetic and genomic features are not adequately determined. Thus, the aim of the present study was to provide a genetic characterization of selected group of commercially available brewing yeasts both ale top-fermenting and lager bottom-fermenting strains. Molecular karyotyping revealed that the diversity of chromosome patterns and four strains with the most accented genetic variabilities were selected and subjected to genome-wide array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) analysis. The differences in the gene copy number were found in five functional gene categories: (1) maltose metabolism and transport, (2) response to toxin, (3) siderophore transport, (4) cellular aldehyde metabolic process, and (5) L-iditol 2-dehydrogenase activity (p < 0.05). In the Saflager W-34/70 strain (Fermentis) with the most affected array-CGH profile, loss of aryl-alcohol dehydrogenase (AAD) gene dosage correlated with an imbalanced redox state, oxidative DNA damage and breaks, lower levels of nucleolar proteins Nop1 and Fob1, and diminished tolerance to fermentation-associated stress stimuli compared to other strains. We suggest that compromised stress response may not only promote oxidant-based changes in the nucleolus state that may affect fermentation performance but also provide novel directions for future strain improvement.

  15. Comparisons of Copy Number, Genomic Structure, and Conserved Motifs for α-Amylase Genes from Barley, Rice, and Wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qisen Zhang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Barley is an important crop for the production of malt and beer. However, crops such as rice and wheat are rarely used for malting. α-amylase is the key enzyme that degrades starch during malting. In this study, we compared the genomic properties, gene copies, and conserved promoter motifs of α-amylase genes in barley, rice, and wheat. In all three crops, α-amylase consists of four subfamilies designated amy1, amy2, amy3, and amy4. In wheat and barley, members of amy1 and amy2 genes are localized on chromosomes 6 and 7, respectively. In rice, members of amy1 genes are found on chromosomes 1 and 2, and amy2 genes on chromosome 6. The barley genome has six amy1 members and three amy2 members. The wheat B genome contains four amy1 members and three amy2 members, while the rice genome has three amy1 members and one amy2 member. The B genome has mostly amy1 and amy2 members among the three wheat genomes. Amy1 promoters from all three crop genomes contain a GA-responsive complex consisting of a GA-responsive element (CAATAAA, pyrimidine box (CCTTTT and TATCCAT/C box. This study has shown that amy1 and amy2 from both wheat and barley have similar genomic properties, including exon/intron structures and GA-responsive elements on promoters, but these differ in rice. Like barley, wheat should have sufficient amy activity to degrade starch completely during malting. Other factors, such as high protein with haze issues and the lack of husk causing Lauting difficulty, may limit the use of wheat for brewing.

  16. Nuclear Gene Indicates Coat-Color Polymorphism in Mammoths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Römpler, Holger; Rohland, Nadin; Lalueza-Fox, Carles

    2006-01-01

    By amplifying the melanocortin type 1 receptor from the woolly mammoth, we can report the complete nucleotide sequence of a nuclear-encoded gene from an extinct species. We found two alleles and show that one allele produces a functional protein whereas the other one encodes a protein with strongly...

  17. Reconciling gene and genome duplication events: using multiple nuclear gene families to infer the phylogeny of the aquatic plant family Pontederiaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ness, Rob W; Graham, Sean W; Barrett, Spencer C H

    2011-11-01

    Most plant phylogenetic inference has used DNA sequence data from the plastid genome. This genome represents a single genealogical sample with no recombination among genes, potentially limiting the resolution of evolutionary relationships in some contexts. In contrast, nuclear DNA is inherently more difficult to employ for phylogeny reconstruction because major mutational events in the genome, including polyploidization, gene duplication, and gene extinction can result in homologous gene copies that are difficult to identify as orthologs or paralogs. Gene tree parsimony (GTP) can be used to infer the rooted species tree by fitting gene genealogies to species trees while simultaneously minimizing the estimated number of duplications needed to reconcile conflicts among them. Here, we use GTP for five nuclear gene families and a previously published plastid data set to reconstruct the phylogenetic backbone of the aquatic plant family Pontederiaceae. Plastid-based phylogenetic studies strongly supported extensive paraphyly of Eichhornia (one of the four major genera) but also depicted considerable ambiguity concerning the true root placement for the family. Our results indicate that species trees inferred from the nuclear genes (alone and in combination with the plastid data) are highly congruent with gene trees inferred from plastid data alone. Consideration of optimal and suboptimal gene tree reconciliations place the root of the family at (or near) a branch leading to the rare and locally restricted E. meyeri. We also explore methods to incorporate uncertainty in individual gene trees during reconciliation by considering their individual bootstrap profiles and relate inferred excesses of gene duplication events on individual branches to whole-genome duplication events inferred for the same branches. Our study improves understanding of the phylogenetic history of Pontederiaceae and also demonstrates the utility of GTP for phylogenetic analysis.

  18. MARCH5 gene is duplicated in rainbow trout, but only fish-specific gene copy is up-regulated after VHSV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebl, Alexander; Köbis, Judith M; Fischer, Uwe; Takizawa, Fumio; Verleih, Marieke; Wimmers, Klaus; Goldammer, Tom

    2011-12-01

    Ubiquitination regulates the activity, stability, and localization of a wide variety of proteins. Several mammalian MARCH ubiquitin E3 ligase proteins have been suggested to control cell surface immunoreceptors. The mitochondrial protein MARCH5 is a positive regulator of Toll-like receptor 7-mediated NF-κB activation in mammals. In the present study, duplicated MARCH5-like cDNA sequences were isolated from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) comprising open reading frames of 882 bp (MARCH5A) and 885 bp (MARCH5B), respectively. Trout MARCH5A and MARCH5B-encoding sequences share only 65% sequence identity. Phylogenetic analyses including an additionally isolated MARCH5-like sequence from whitefish (Coregonus maraena) suggest that teleosts possess an additional MARCH5 gene copy resulting from a fish-specific whole genome duplication. Coding sequences of MARCH5A and MARCH5B genes from trout are distributed over six exons. Hypothetical MARCH5 proteins from trout comprise four transmembrane helices and a single motif similar to a RING variant domain (RINGv) including eight highly conserved cysteine and histidine residues. A 'reverse-northern blot' analysis revealed furthermore a MARCH5B Δexon5 transcript variant. Both MARCH5 genes from trout show a strain-, tissue- and cell-specific expression profile indicating different functional roles. Fish-specific MARCH5A gene for instance might be involved in defense mechanisms, since in vivo-challenge with the viral pathogen VHSV caused a significant 1.7-fold elevated copy number of the respective gene in gills four days after infection, whereas MARCH5B transcript level did not increase.

  19. Original Copies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Tim Flohr

    2013-01-01

    of similarity by looking at artefactual similarity as the results of prototyping and as a production of simulacra. In this light, the concept of copying turns out to be more than simply a matter of trying to imitate an exotic or prestigious original, and it fundamentally raises the question how different a copy...

  20. Rapid evolution and copy number variation of primate RHOXF2, an X-linked homeobox gene involved in male reproduction and possibly brain function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Rui

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Homeobox genes are the key regulators during development, and they are in general highly conserved with only a few reported cases of rapid evolution. RHOXF2 is an X-linked homeobox gene in primates. It is highly expressed in the testicle and may play an important role in spermatogenesis. As male reproductive system is often the target of natural and/or sexual selection during evolution, in this study, we aim to dissect the pattern of molecular evolution of RHOXF2 in primates and its potential functional consequence. Results We studied sequences and copy number variation of RHOXF2 in humans and 16 nonhuman primate species as well as the expression patterns in human, chimpanzee, white-browed gibbon and rhesus macaque. The gene copy number analysis showed that there had been parallel gene duplications/losses in multiple primate lineages. Our evidence suggests that 11 nonhuman primate species have one RHOXF2 copy, and two copies are present in humans and four Old World monkey species, and at least 6 copies in chimpanzees. Further analysis indicated that the gene duplications in primates had likely been mediated by endogenous retrovirus (ERV sequences flanking the gene regions. In striking contrast to non-human primates, humans appear to have homogenized their two RHOXF2 copies by the ERV-mediated non-allelic recombination mechanism. Coding sequence and phylogenetic analysis suggested multi-lineage strong positive selection on RHOXF2 during primate evolution, especially during the origins of humans and chimpanzees. All the 8 coding region polymorphic sites in human populations are non-synonymous, implying on-going selection. Gene expression analysis demonstrated that besides the preferential expression in the reproductive system, RHOXF2 is also expressed in the brain. The quantitative data suggests expression pattern divergence among primate species. Conclusions RHOXF2 is a fast-evolving homeobox gene in primates. The rapid

  1. U3 snoRNA genes are multi-copy and frequently linked to U5 snRNA genes in Euglena gracilis§

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charette J Michael

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background U3 snoRNA is a box C/D small nucleolar RNA (snoRNA involved in the processing events that liberate 18S rRNA from the ribosomal RNA precursor (pre-rRNA. Although U3 snoRNA is present in all eukaryotic organisms, most investigations of it have focused on fungi (particularly yeasts, animals and plants. Relatively little is known about U3 snoRNA and its gene(s in the phylogenetically broad assemblage of protists (mostly unicellular eukaryotes. In the euglenozoon Euglena gracilis, a distant relative of the kinetoplastid protozoa, Southern analysis had previously revealed at least 13 bands hybridizing with U3 snoRNA, suggesting the existence of multiple copies of U3 snoRNA genes. Results Through screening of a λ genomic library and PCR amplification, we recovered 14 U3 snoRNA gene variants, defined by sequence heterogeneities that are mostly located in the U3 3'-stem-loop domain. We identified three different genomic arrangements of Euglena U3 snoRNA genes: i stand-alone, ii linked to tRNAArg genes, and iii linked to a U5 snRNA gene. In arrangement ii, the U3 snoRNA gene is positioned upstream of two identical tRNAArg genes that are convergently transcribed relative to the U3 gene. This scenario is reminiscent of a U3 snoRNA-tRNA gene linkage previously described in trypanosomatids. We document here twelve different U3 snoRNA-U5 snRNA gene arrangements in Euglena; in each case, the U3 gene is linked to a downstream and convergently oriented U5 gene, with the intergenic region differing in length and sequence among the variants. Conclusion The multiple U3 snoRNA-U5 snRNA gene linkages, which cluster into distinct families based on sequence similarities within the intergenic spacer, presumably arose by genome, chromosome, and/or locus duplications. We discuss possible reasons for the existence of the unusually large number of U3 snoRNA genes in the Euglena genome. Variability in the signal intensities of the multiple Southern

  2. Molecular basis for gene-specific transactivation by nuclear receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Mads Aagaard; Siersbæk, Rasmus; Mandrup, Susanne

    2010-01-01

    most likely be accounted for by mechanisms involving receptor-specific interactions with DNA as well as receptor-specific interactions with protein complexes binding to adjacent and distant DNA sequences. Here, we review key molecular aspects of transactivation by NRs with special emphasis......Nuclear receptors (NRs) are key transcriptional regulators of metazoan physiology and metabolism. Different NRs bind to similar or even identical core response elements; however, they regulate transcription in a highly receptor- and gene-specific manner. These differences in gene activation can...... on the recent advances in the molecular mechanisms responsible for receptor- and gene-specific transcriptional activation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Translating nuclear receptors from health to disease....

  3. Individual differences in AMY1 gene copy number, salivary α-amylase levels, and the perception of oral starch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail L Mandel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The digestion of dietary starch in humans is initiated by salivary α-amylase, an endo-enzyme that hydrolyzes starch into maltose, maltotriose and larger oligosaccharides. Salivary amylase accounts for 40 to 50% of protein in human saliva and rapidly alters the physical properties of starch. Importantly, the quantity and enzymatic activity of salivary amylase show significant individual variation. However, linking variation in salivary amylase levels with the oral perception of starch has proven difficult. Furthermore, the relationship between copy number variations (CNVs in the AMY1 gene, which influence salivary amylase levels, and starch viscosity perception has not been explored. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we demonstrate that saliva containing high levels of amylase has sufficient activity to rapidly hydrolyze a viscous starch solution in vitro. Furthermore, we show with time-intensity ratings, which track the digestion of starch during oral manipulation, that individuals with high amylase levels report faster and more significant decreases in perceived starch viscosity than people with low salivary amylase levels. Finally, we demonstrate that AMY1 CNVs predict an individual's amount and activity of salivary amylase and thereby, ultimately determine their perceived rate of oral starch viscosity thinning. CONCLUSIONS: By linking genetic variation and its consequent salivary enzymatic differences to the perceptual sequellae of these variations, we show that AMY1 copy number relates to salivary amylase concentration and enzymatic activity level, which, in turn, account for individual variation in the oral perception of starch viscosity. The profound individual differences in salivary amylase levels and salivary activity may contribute significantly to individual differences in dietary starch intake and, consequently, to overall nutritional status.

  4. Identification of copy number variation in the gene for autosomal dominant optic atrophy, OPA1, in a Chinese pedigree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, X; Chen, Y H; Liu, Z; Deng, Y; Li, N N; Huang, H; Qi, M; Yi, X; Zhu, J

    2015-09-21

    Autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA) is an optic neuropathy characterized by bilateral optic nerve pallor and decreased visual acuity. It has been reported to be associated with two genes, OPA1, OPA3, and the OPA4, OPA5, and OPA8 loci. However, mutations in OPA1 constitute the most prevalent cause of ADOA. The purpose of this study was to identify the underlying genetic defect in a Chinese pedigree with ADOA. DNA from six members of a Chinese pedigree was collected for testing genomic and copy number variation (CNV) by targeted region capture and next generation sequencing (targeted NGS). A new developmental CNV detection method was applied to analyze the sequence data. Further verification of CNV was performed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Three members of the pedigree with clinically diagnosed ADOA were screened for pathogenic genes related to ophthalmic genetic disease. No eligible pathogenic point mutations associated with ADOA disease-causing genes were found in pedigree members with ADOA. Upon further analysis for CNVs, we found a heterozygous deletion in exons 1-9 of OPA1, which was confirmed by real-time PCR. In this study we used a new developmental method to detect CNVs associated with ADOA in a Chinese pedigree. To our knowledge, this is the first case of ADOA caused by a CNV of the OPA1 gene in Chinese patients. The findings suggest that CNVs might be an important mutation type in Chinese patients with ADOA, and that CNV screening should be performed when point mutation screens are negative in these patients.

  5. Transposon-induced nuclear mutations that alter chloroplast gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barkan, A.

    1992-01-01

    The goal of this project is to use mutant phenotypes as a guide to nuclear genes that determine the timing and localization of chloroplast development The immediate goals are to identify nuclear mutants with defects in chloroplast gene expression from maize lines harboring active Mu transposons; characterize their phenotypes to determine the precise defect in gene expression; clone several of the most interesting mutations by exploiting the transposon tag; and use the clones to further define the roles of these genes in modulating chloroplast gene expression. Three mutants were described earlier that had global defects in chloroplast gene expression. We have found that two of these mutations are allelic. Both alleles have global defects in chloroplast translation initiation, as revealed by the failure to assemble chloroplast mRNAs into polysomes. We have isolated and characterized three new mutants from Mu lines that have novel defects in chloroplast RNA metabolism. We are now ready to begin the task of cloning several of these genes, by using the Mu transposon tag.

  6. TMPRSS2-ERG Gene Fusion Causing ERG Overexpression Precedes Chromosome Copy Number Changes in Prostate Carcinomas, Paired HGPIN Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno Cerveira

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available TMPRSS2-ETS gene fusions have been found recurrently in prostate carcinomas, but not in the presumed precursor lesion, high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN. However, HGPIN lesions may share chromosomal changes with prostate cancer. To determine the relative order of genetic events in prostate carcinogenesis, we have analyzed 34 prostate carcinomas, 19 paired HGPIN lesions, 14 benign prostate hyperplasias, 11 morphologically normal prostatic tissues for TMPRSS2-ERG, TMPRSS2-ETV1 rearrangements, genomic imbalances. TMPRSS2 exon 1 was fused in-frame with ERG exon 4 in 17 of 34 (50% prostate carcinomas, in 4 of 19 (21% HGPIN lesions, but in none of controls. The findings were further validated by sequencing analysis, by the real-time polymerase chain reaction quantification of TMPRSS2-ERG fusion transcript, the ERG exons 5/6:exons 1/2 expression ratio. Chromosome copy number changes were detected by comparative genomic hybridization in 42% of clinically confined carcinomas, in none of the 16 HGPIN lesions analyzed. We demonstrate for the first time that the TMPRSS2-ERG fusion gene can be detected in a proportion of HGPIN lesions, that this molecular rearrangement is an early event that may precede chromosome-level alterations in prostate carcinogenesis.

  7. A Six Nuclear Gene Phylogeny of Citrus (Rutaceae) Taking into Account Hybridization and Lineage Sorting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keremane, Manjunath L.; Lee, Richard F.; Maureira-Butler, Ivan J.; Roose, Mikeal L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Genus Citrus (Rutaceae) comprises many important cultivated species that generally hybridize easily. Phylogenetic study of a group showing extensive hybridization is challenging. Since the genus Citrus has diverged recently (4–12 Ma), incomplete lineage sorting of ancestral polymorphisms is also likely to cause discrepancies among genes in phylogenetic inferences. Incongruence of gene trees is observed and it is essential to unravel the processes that cause inconsistencies in order to understand the phylogenetic relationships among the species. Methodology and Principal Findings (1) We generated phylogenetic trees using haplotype sequences of six low copy nuclear genes. (2) Published simple sequence repeat data were re-analyzed to study population structure and the results were compared with the phylogenetic trees constructed using sequence data and coalescence simulations. (3) To distinguish between hybridization and incomplete lineage sorting, we developed and utilized a coalescence simulation approach. In other studies, species trees have been inferred despite the possibility of hybridization having occurred and used to generate null distributions of the effect of lineage sorting alone (by coalescent simulation). Since this is problematic, we instead generate these distributions directly from observed gene trees. Of the six trees generated, we used the most resolved three to detect hybrids. We found that 11 of 33 samples appear to be affected by historical hybridization. Analysis of the remaining three genes supported the conclusions from the hybrid detection test. Conclusions We have identified or confirmed probable hybrid origins for several Citrus cultivars using three different approaches–gene phylogenies, population structure analysis and coalescence simulation. Hybridization and incomplete lineage sorting were identified primarily based on differences among gene phylogenies with reference to null expectations via coalescence simulations. We

  8. A six nuclear gene phylogeny of Citrus (Rutaceae taking into account hybridization and lineage sorting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrika Ramadugu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genus Citrus (Rutaceae comprises many important cultivated species that generally hybridize easily. Phylogenetic study of a group showing extensive hybridization is challenging. Since the genus Citrus has diverged recently (4-12 Ma, incomplete lineage sorting of ancestral polymorphisms is also likely to cause discrepancies among genes in phylogenetic inferences. Incongruence of gene trees is observed and it is essential to unravel the processes that cause inconsistencies in order to understand the phylogenetic relationships among the species. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: (1 We generated phylogenetic trees using haplotype sequences of six low copy nuclear genes. (2 Published simple sequence repeat data were re-analyzed to study population structure and the results were compared with the phylogenetic trees constructed using sequence data and coalescence simulations. (3 To distinguish between hybridization and incomplete lineage sorting, we developed and utilized a coalescence simulation approach. In other studies, species trees have been inferred despite the possibility of hybridization having occurred and used to generate null distributions of the effect of lineage sorting alone (by coalescent simulation. Since this is problematic, we instead generate these distributions directly from observed gene trees. Of the six trees generated, we used the most resolved three to detect hybrids. We found that 11 of 33 samples appear to be affected by historical hybridization. Analysis of the remaining three genes supported the conclusions from the hybrid detection test. CONCLUSIONS: We have identified or confirmed probable hybrid origins for several Citrus cultivars using three different approaches-gene phylogenies, population structure analysis and coalescence simulation. Hybridization and incomplete lineage sorting were identified primarily based on differences among gene phylogenies with reference to null expectations via coalescence

  9. Quantification, by solid-phase minisequencing, of the telomeric and centromeric copies of the survival motor neuron gene in families with spinal muscular atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwartz, M; Sørensen, N; Hansen, F J

    1997-01-01

    In an analysis of 30 families affected by spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) we have used the solid-phase minisequencing method to determine the ratio between the number of telomeric and centromeric copies of the survival motor neuron gene (SMN and cBCD541 respectively) on normal and SMA chromosomes...

  10. High copy number variation of cancer-related microRNA genes and frequent amplification of DICER1 and DROSHA in lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czubak, Karol; Lewandowska, Marzena Anna; Klonowska, Katarzyna; Roszkowski, Krzysztof; Kowalewski, Janusz; Figlerowicz, Marek; Kozlowski, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of evidence indicates that miRNAs may be a class of genetic elements that can either drive or suppress oncogenesis. In this study we analyzed the somatic copy number variation of 14 miRNA genes frequently found to be either over- or underexpressed in lung cancer, as well as two miRNA biogenesis genes, DICER1 and DROSHA, in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Our analysis showed that most analyzed miRNA genes undergo substantial copy number alteration in lung cancer. The most frequently amplified miRNA genes include the following: miR-30d, miR-21, miR-17 and miR-155. We also showed that both DICER1 and DROSHA are frequently amplified in NSCLC. The copy number variation of DICER1 and DROSHA correlates well with their expression and survival of NSCLC and other cancer patients. The increased expression of DROSHA and DICER1 decreases and increases the survival, respectively. In conclusion, our results show that copy number variation may be an important mechanism of upregulation/downregulation of miRNAs in cancer and suggest an oncogenic role for DROSHA. PMID:26156018

  11. Lactase persistence and augmented salivary alpha-amylase gene copy numbers might have been selected by the combined toxic effects of gluten and (food born) pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pruimboom, Leo; Fox, Tom; Muskiet, Frits A. J.

    2014-01-01

    Various positively selected adaptations to new nutrients have been identified. Lactase persistence is among the best known, conferring the ability for drinking milk at post weaning age. An augmented number of amylase gene (AMY1) copies, giving rise to higher salivary amylase activity, has been impli

  12. Lactase persistence and augmented salivary alpha-amylase gene copy numbers might have been selected by the combined toxic effects of gluten and (food born) pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pruimboom, Leo; Fox, Tom; Muskiet, Frits A. J.

    Various positively selected adaptations to new nutrients have been identified. Lactase persistence is among the best known, conferring the ability for drinking milk at post weaning age. An augmented number of amylase gene (AMY1) copies, giving rise to higher salivary amylase activity, has been

  13. Targeted array comparative genomic hybridization--a new diagnostic tool for the detection of large copy number variations in nemaline myopathy-causing genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiiski, K; Laari, L; Lehtokari, V-L; Lunkka-Hytönen, M; Angelini, C; Petty, R; Hackman, P; Wallgren-Pettersson, C; Pelin, K

    2013-01-01

    Nemaline myopathy (NM) constitutes a heterogeneous group of congenital myopathies. Mutations in the nebulin gene (NEB) are the main cause of recessively inherited NM. NEB is one of the most largest genes in human. To date, 68 NEB mutations, mainly small deletions or point mutations have been published. The only large mutation characterized is the 2.5 kb deletion of exon 55 in the Ashkenazi Jewish population. To investigate any copy number variations in this enormous gene, we designed a novel custom comparative genomic hybridization microarray, NM-CGH, targeted towards the seven known genes causative for NM. During the validation of the NM-CGH array we identified two novel deletions in two different families. The first is the largest deletion characterized in NEB to date, (∼53 kb) encompassing 24 exons. The second deletion (1 kb) covers two exons. In both families, the copy number change was the second mutation to be characterized and shown to have been inherited from one of the healthy carrier parents. In addition to these novel mutations, copy number variation was identified in four samples in three families in the triplicate region of NEB. We conclude that this method appears promising for the detection of copy number variations in NEB. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Copy Number Variation of TLR-7 Gene and its Association with the Development of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus in Female Patients from Yucatan Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Guillermo Valencia; Cruz, Darig Cámara; González Herrera, Lizbeth J; Pérez Mendoza, Gerardo J; Adrián Amaro, Guadalupe I; Nakazawa Ueji, Yumi E; Angulo Ramírez, Angélica V

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a systemic autoimmune disease characterized by the production of autoantibodies against self-antigens, which occurs most often in women between 15 and 40 years of age. The innate immunity is involved in the pathogenesis of SLE through TLR- 7. Genetic factors such as copy number variation (CNV) of target genes may contribute to disease development, but this possible risk has not yet been studied in SLE patients from Yucatan, Mexico. The CNV of TLR-7 gene was determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay using TaqMan probes in 80 SLE women and 150 control subjects. The results showed that 10% of SLE patients exhibited more than two copies of TLR-7 gene, whereas no mRNA overexpression was detected. These data suggested that increased CNV of the TLR-7 gene in Yucatan SLE women can be a risk factor for this disease.

  15. Application of a nuclear localization signal gene in transgene mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Efficient gene transfer by cytoplasm co-injec- tion will offer a powerful means for transgenic animals. Using co-injection in cytoplasm, two independent gene constructs, including bovine (?-s1-casein-hG-CSF and a mammal expression vector expressing a nuclear localization signal (mNLS), were introduced into fertilized mouse eggs. The target gene construct was docked into host nucleus probably by the nuclear localization signal. Transgene mice have been obtained at 58% (29/50) of integration ratio. Expression level of the positive transgene mice was detected by Western blotting. Maximal expression of human G-CSF was estimated about 540 mg/L of milk. The expression ratio was up to 75% (9/12). The results here have important practical implications for the generation of mammary gland bioreactors and other transgene studies. Co-injection of a target gene with an expression vector of a mammal nuclear localization signal by cytoplasm appears to be a useful, efficient and easy strategy for generating transgenic animals, which may be able to substitute the routine method of pronucleus-injection of fertilized eggs.

  16. Exome sequencing and arrayCGH detection of gene sequence and copy number variation between ILS and ISS mouse strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Laura; Dickens, C Michael; Anderson, Nathan; Davis, Jonathan; Bennett, Beth; Radcliffe, Richard A; Sikela, James M

    2014-06-01

    It has been well documented that genetic factors can influence predisposition to develop alcoholism. While the underlying genomic changes may be of several types, two of the most common and disease associated are copy number variations (CNVs) and sequence alterations of protein coding regions. The goal of this study was to identify CNVs and single-nucleotide polymorphisms that occur in gene coding regions that may play a role in influencing the risk of an individual developing alcoholism. Toward this end, two mouse strains were used that have been selectively bred based on their differential sensitivity to alcohol: the Inbred long sleep (ILS) and Inbred short sleep (ISS) mouse strains. Differences in initial response to alcohol have been linked to risk for alcoholism, and the ILS/ISS strains are used to investigate the genetics of initial sensitivity to alcohol. Array comparative genomic hybridization (arrayCGH) and exome sequencing were conducted to identify CNVs and gene coding sequence differences, respectively, between ILS and ISS mice. Mouse arrayCGH was performed using catalog Agilent 1 × 244 k mouse arrays. Subsequently, exome sequencing was carried out using an Illumina HiSeq 2000 instrument. ArrayCGH detected 74 CNVs that were strain-specific (38 ILS/36 ISS), including several ISS-specific deletions that contained genes implicated in brain function and neurotransmitter release. Among several interesting coding variations detected by exome sequencing was the gain of a premature stop codon in the alpha-amylase 2B (AMY2B) gene specifically in the ILS strain. In total, exome sequencing detected 2,597 and 1,768 strain-specific exonic gene variants in the ILS and ISS mice, respectively. This study represents the most comprehensive and detailed genomic comparison of ILS and ISS mouse strains to date. The two complementary genome-wide approaches identified strain-specific CNVs and gene coding sequence variations that should provide strong candidates to

  17. Measurement of absolute copy number variation of Glutathione S-Transferase M1 gene by digital droplet PCR and association analysis in Tunisian Rheumatoid Arthritis population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achour, Yosser; Ben Kilani, Mohamed Sahbi; Ben Hamad, Mariem; Marzouk, Sameh; Mahfoudh, Nadia; Bahloul, Zouheir; Keskes, Leila; Petit-Teixeira, Elisabeth; Maalej, Abdellatif

    2017-07-13

    The investigation of copy number variations (CNVs) analysis of candidate genes is currently an important research area in modulating human diseases. We aimed to quantify CNVs in glutathione S-transferase M1 (GSTM1) gene and determine its genetic contribution in Tunisian rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and its subsets through an innovative technique for quantification. A total of 165 RA cases and 102 healthy controls were included in the study. Using a recently powerful approach of digital droplet PCR (ddPCR), we quantified GSTM1 gene to determine the presence of no, one, or multiple copy number (CN) at high levels of sensitivity and specificity. Odds ratio and Fisher exact test were performed to estimate the association risk for GSTM1CNVs in RA. Copy number identified by ddPCR was 0, 1, and 2 copies per diploid genome. A high frequency of '0' copy was revealed with 54% in RA patients. The deletion ('0' copy) of GSTM1 was found to be a significant risk factor for anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) positive RA (OR=4.16, CI95% =[1.17-14.7]). In addition, a lack of association was found when comparing between the CNVs of RA patients and those of controls. This study highlights the powerful accuracy of ddPCR for the quantification of CNVs and suggests that the variation in the CN of GSTM1 is associated with anti-CCP positivity in RA. However, it does not indicate a specific role in the susceptibility to the disease in our Tunisian sample. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Ancient Origin of the U2 Small Nuclear RNA Gene-Targeting Non-LTR Retrotransposons Utopia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji K Kojima

    Full Text Available Most non-long terminal repeat (non-LTR retrotransposons encoding a restriction-like endonuclease show target-specific integration into repetitive sequences such as ribosomal RNA genes and microsatellites. However, only a few target-specific lineages of non-LTR retrotransposons are distributed widely and no lineage is found across the eukaryotic kingdoms. Here we report the most widely distributed lineage of target sequence-specific non-LTR retrotransposons, designated Utopia. Utopia is found in three supergroups of eukaryotes: Amoebozoa, SAR, and Opisthokonta. Utopia is inserted into a specific site of U2 small nuclear RNA genes with different strength of specificity for each family. Utopia families from oomycetes and wasps show strong target specificity while only a small number of Utopia copies from reptiles are flanked with U2 snRNA genes. Oomycete Utopia families contain an "archaeal" RNase H domain upstream of reverse transcriptase (RT, which likely originated from a plant RNase H gene. Analysis of Utopia from oomycetes indicates that multiple lineages of Utopia have been maintained inside of U2 genes with few copy numbers. Phylogenetic analysis of RT suggests the monophyly of Utopia, and it likely dates back to the early evolution of eukaryotes.

  19. Ancient Origin of the U2 Small Nuclear RNA Gene-Targeting Non-LTR Retrotransposons Utopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Kenji K; Jurka, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

    Most non-long terminal repeat (non-LTR) retrotransposons encoding a restriction-like endonuclease show target-specific integration into repetitive sequences such as ribosomal RNA genes and microsatellites. However, only a few target-specific lineages of non-LTR retrotransposons are distributed widely and no lineage is found across the eukaryotic kingdoms. Here we report the most widely distributed lineage of target sequence-specific non-LTR retrotransposons, designated Utopia. Utopia is found in three supergroups of eukaryotes: Amoebozoa, SAR, and Opisthokonta. Utopia is inserted into a specific site of U2 small nuclear RNA genes with different strength of specificity for each family. Utopia families from oomycetes and wasps show strong target specificity while only a small number of Utopia copies from reptiles are flanked with U2 snRNA genes. Oomycete Utopia families contain an "archaeal" RNase H domain upstream of reverse transcriptase (RT), which likely originated from a plant RNase H gene. Analysis of Utopia from oomycetes indicates that multiple lineages of Utopia have been maintained inside of U2 genes with few copy numbers. Phylogenetic analysis of RT suggests the monophyly of Utopia, and it likely dates back to the early evolution of eukaryotes.

  20. [High efficiency genome walking method for flanking sequences of cotton mitochondrial double-copy atpA gene based on optimized inverse PCR and TAIL-PCR].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao; Zhang, Rui; Sun, Guoqing; Shi, Ji; Meng, Zhigang; Zhou, Tao; Hou, Siyu; Liang, Chengzhen; Yu, Yuanhua; Guo, Sandui

    2012-01-01

    Cloning of flanking sequences of double-copy gene is a challenge in molecular biology. We developed a method to solve this problem by combining an optimized inverse PCR (iPCR) with TAIL-PCR. First, Southern blotting analysis was used to determine a proper restriction enzyme that could obtain proper-length restriction fragments that contained the target gene. Then optimized iPCR was performed to amplify the restriction fragments that contained the separated copies of the gene. Based on the obtained sequences, TAIL-PCR was performed to amplify further flanking regions of the gene. With this method, we obtained all of the EcoR I restriction fragments (2.2-5.1 kb) and Hind III restriction fragments (8.5-11.7 kb) of mitochondrial atpA gene in cytoplasmic male sterile (CMS) line and maintainer line of Upland cotton. The results showed that this method was an efficient approach to clone flanking sequences of double-copy gene.

  1. The Tomato spotted wilt virus cell-to-cell movement protein (NSM) triggers a hypersensitive response in Sw-5 containing resistant tomato lines and Nicotiana benthamiana transformed with the functional Sw-5b resistance gene copy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hallwass, M.; Silva de Oliveira, A.; Dianese, E.C.; Lohuis, D.; Boiteux, L.S.; Inoue-Nagata, A.K.; Resende, de R.O.; Kormelink, R.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Although the Sw-5 gene cluster has been cloned, and Sw-5b has been identified as the functional gene copy that confers resistance to Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV), its avirulence (Avr) determinant has not been identified to date. Nicotiana tabacum SR1 plants transformed with a copy of the Sw-5b

  2. Relationship between epidermal growth factor receptor gene mutation and copy number in Chinese patients with non-small cell lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lan-Jun Zhang; Ling Cai; Zhe Li; Wu-Ping Wang; Kang Guo; Jian-Yong Shao; Jun-Ye Wang; Hui Yu; Tie-Hua Rong

    2012-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFP) gene mutation and copy number are useful predictive markers that guide the selection of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients for EGFR-targeting therapy.This study aimed to investigate the correlation between EGFR gene mutation and copy number and clinicopathologic characteristics of Chinese patients with NSCLC.NSCLC specimens collected from 205 patients between November 2009 and January 2011 were selected to detect EGFR gene mutations with real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and to detect EGFR gene copy number with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH).EGFR mutations primarily occurred in females,non-smokers,and patients with adenocarinomas (all P < 0.001).Tissues from 128 (62%) patients were FISH-positive for EGFR,including 37 (18%) with gene amplification and 91 (44%) with high polysomy.EGFR gene mutation was correlated with FISH-positive status (R =0.340,P < 0.001).Multivariate analysis showed that not smoking (OR =5.910,95% CI =2.363-14.779,P < 0.001) and having adenocarcinoma (OR =0.122,95% CI =0.026-0.581,P =0.008) were favorable factors for EGFR gene mutation.These results show a high frequency of EGFR FISH positivity in NSCLC tissues from Chinese patients and a significant relevance between EGFR gene mutations and FISH-positive status.Among the FISH-positive samples,EGFR gene mutation occurred more frequently in samples with gene amplification compared to those with high polysomy,suggesting that EGFR mutation and gene amplification should be used as clinical decision parameters to predict response to EGFR-targeting therapy.

  3. Epidermal growth factor receptor gene copy number in 101 advanced colorectal cancer patients treated with chemotherapy plus cetuximab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeuli Massimo

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Responsiveness to Cetuximab alone can be mediated by an increase of Epidermal Growth factor Receptor (EGFR Gene Copy Number (GCN. Aim of this study was to assess the role of EGFR-GCN in advanced colorectal cancer (CRC patients receiving chemotherapy plus Cetuximab. Methods One hundred and one advanced CRC patients (43 untreated- and 58 pre-treated were retrospectively studied by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH to assess EGFR-GCN and by immunohistochemistry (IHC to determine EGFR expression. Sixty-one out of 101 patients were evaluated also for k-ras status by direct sequencing. Clinical end-points were response rate (RR, progression-free survival (PFS and overall survival (OS. Results Increased EGFR-GCN was found in 60/101 (59% tumor samples. There was no correlation between intensity of EGFR-IHC and EGFR-GCN (p = 0.43. Patients receiving chemotherapy plus Cetuximab as first line treatment had a RR of 70% (30/43 while it was 18% (10/56 in the group with previous lines of therapy (p Conclusion In metastatic CRC patients treated with chemotherapy plus Cetuximab number of chemotherapy lines and increased EGFR-GCN were significantly associated with a better clinical outcome, independent of k-ras status.

  4. Whole Genome Pathway Analysis Identifies an Association of Cadmium Response Gene Loss with Copy Number Variation in Mutant p53 Bearing Uterine Endometrial Carcinomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe Ryan Delaney

    Full Text Available Massive chromosomal aberrations are a signature of advanced cancer, although the factors promoting the pervasive incidence of these copy number alterations (CNAs are poorly understood. Gatekeeper mutations, such as p53, contribute to aneuploidy, yet p53 mutant tumors do not always display CNAs. Uterine Corpus Endometrial Carcinoma (UCEC offers a unique system to begin to evaluate why some cancers acquire high CNAs while others evolve another route to oncogenesis, since about half of p53 mutant UCEC tumors have a relatively flat CNA landscape and half have 20-90% of their genome altered in copy number.We extracted copy number information from 68 UCEC genomes mutant in p53 by the GISTIC2 algorithm. GO term pathway analysis, via GOrilla, was used to identify suppressed pathways. Genes within these pathways were mapped for focal or wide distribution. Deletion hotspots were evaluated for temporal incidence.Multiple pathways contributed to the development of pervasive CNAs, including developmental, metabolic, immunological, cell adhesion and cadmium response pathways. Surprisingly, cadmium response pathway genes are predicted as the earliest loss events within these tumors: in particular, the metallothionein genes involved in heavy metal sequestration. Loss of cadmium response genes were associated with copy number changes and poorer prognosis, contrasting with 'copy number flat' tumors which instead exhibited substantive mutation.Metallothioneins are lost early in the development of high CNA endometrial cancer, providing a potential mechanism and biological rationale for increased incidence of endometrial cancer with cadmium exposure. Developmental and metabolic pathways are altered later in tumor progression.

  5. DNA copy number alterations, gene expression changes and disease-free survival in patients with colorectal cancer: a 10 year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigagli, Elisabetta; De Filippo, Carlotta; Castagnini, Cinzia; Toti, Simona; Acquadro, Francesco; Giudici, Francesco; Fazi, Marilena; Dolara, Piero; Messerini, Luca; Tonelli, Francesco; Luceri, Cristina

    2016-12-01

    DNA copy number alterations (CNAs) and gene expression changes have amply been encountered in colorectal cancers (CRCs), but the extent at which CNAs affect gene expression, as well as their relevance for tumor development, are still poorly defined. Here we aimed at assessing the clinical relevance of these parameters in a 10 year follow-up study. Tumors and normal adjacent colon mucosa, obtained at primary surgery from 21 CRC patients, were subjected to (i) high-resolution array CGH (a-CGH) for the detection of CNAs and (ii) microarray-based transcriptome profiling for the detection of gene expression (GE) changes. Correlations between these genomic and transcriptomic changes and their associations with clinical and histopathological parameters were assessed with the aim to identify molecular signatures associated with disease-free survival of the CRC patients during a 10 year follow-up. DNA copy number gains were frequently detected in chromosomes 7, 8q, 13, 19, 20q and X, whereas DNA copy number losses were frequently detected in chromosomes 1p, 4, 8p, 15, 17p, 18, 19 and 22q. None of these alterations were observed in all samples. In addition, we found that 2,498 genes were up- and that 1,094 genes were down-regulated in the tumor samples compared to their corresponding normal mucosa (p copy number gains, whereas decreased expression levels of the MUC1, E2F2, HRAS and SIRT3 genes were associated with copy number losses. Pathways related to cell cycle progression, eicosanoid metabolism, and TGF-β and apoptosis signaling, were found to be most significantly affected. Our results suggest that CNAs in CRC tumor tissues are associated with concomitant changes in the expression of cancer-related genes. In other genes epigenetic mechanism may be at work. Up-regulation of the IL17RA, IGF2BP2 and ABCC2 genes, and of genes acting in the mTOR and cytokine receptor pathways, appear to be associated with a poor survival. These alterations may, in addition to Dukes

  6. Signatures derived from increase in SHARPIN gene copy number are associated with poor prognosis in patients with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojo, Diane; Seliman, Maryam; Tang, Damu

    2017-12-01

    We report three signatures produced from SHARPIN gene copy number increase (GCN-Increase) and their effects on patients with breast cancer (BC). In the Metabric dataset (n = 2059, cBioPortal), SHARPIN GCN-Increase occurs preferentially or mutual exclusively with mutations in TP53, PIK3CA, and CDH1. These genomic alterations constitute a signature (SigMut) that significantly correlates with reductions in overall survival (OS) in BC patients (n = 1980; p = 1.081e - 6). Additionally, SHARPIN GCN-Increase is associated with 4220 differentially expressed genes (DEGs). These DEGs are enriched in activation of the pathways regulating cell cycle progression, RNA transport, ribosome biosynthesis, DNA replication, and in downregulation of the pathways related to extracellular matrix. These DEGs are thus likely to facilitate the proliferation and metastasis of BC cells. Additionally, through forward (FWD) and backward (BWD) stepwise variate selections among the top 160 downregulated and top 200 upregulated DEGs using the Cox regression model, a 6-gene (SigFWD) and a 50-gene (SigBWD) signature were derived. Both signatures robustly associate with decreases in OS in BC patients within the Curtis (n = 1980; p = 6.16e - 11 for SigFWD; p = 1.06e - 10, for SigBWD) and TCGA cohort (n = 817; p = 4.53e - 4 for SigFWD and p = 0.00525 for SigBWD). After adjusting for known clinical factors, SigMut (HR 1.21, p = 0.0297), SigBWD (HR 1.25, p = 0.0263), and likely SigFWD (HR 1.17, p = 0.062) remain independent risk factors of BC deaths. Furthermore, the proportion of patients positive for these signatures is significantly increased in ER -, Her2-enriched, basal-like, and claudin-low BCs compared to ER + and luminal BCs. Collectively, these SHARPIN GCN-Increase-derived signatures may have clinical applications in management of patients with BC.

  7. Short interspersed nuclear elements (SINEs) are abundant in Solanaceae and have a family-specific impact on gene structure and genome organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibt, Kathrin M; Wenke, Torsten; Muders, Katja; Truberg, Bernd; Schmidt, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Short interspersed nuclear elements (SINEs) are highly abundant non-autonomous retrotransposons that are widespread in plants. They are short in size, non-coding, show high sequence diversity, and are therefore mostly not or not correctly annotated in plant genome sequences. Hence, comparative studies on genomic SINE populations are rare. To explore the structural organization and impact of SINEs, we comparatively investigated the genome sequences of the Solanaceae species potato (Solanum tuberosum), tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), wild tomato (Solanum pennellii), and two pepper cultivars (Capsicum annuum). Based on 8.5 Gbp sequence data, we annotated 82 983 SINE copies belonging to 10 families and subfamilies on a base pair level. Solanaceae SINEs are dispersed over all chromosomes with enrichments in distal regions. Depending on the genome assemblies and gene predictions, 30% of all SINE copies are associated with genes, particularly frequent in introns and untranslated regions (UTRs). The close association with genes is family specific. More than 10% of all genes annotated in the Solanaceae species investigated contain at least one SINE insertion, and we found genes harbouring up to 16 SINE copies. We demonstrate the involvement of SINEs in gene and genome evolution including the donation of splice sites, start and stop codons and exons to genes, enlargement of introns and UTRs, generation of tandem-like duplications and transduction of adjacent sequence regions. © 2016 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Copy number variation in chemokine superfamily: the complex scene of CCL3L-CCL4L genes in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colobran, R; Pedrosa, E; Carretero-Iglesia, L; Juan, M

    2010-10-01

    Genome copy number changes (copy number variations: CNVs) include inherited, de novo and somatically acquired deviations from a diploid state within a particular chromosomal segment. CNVs are frequent in higher eukaryotes and associated with a substantial portion of inherited and acquired risk for various human diseases. CNVs are distributed widely in the genomes of apparently healthy individuals and thus constitute significant amounts of population-based genomic variation. Human CNV loci are enriched for immune genes and one of the most striking examples of CNV in humans involves a genomic region containing the chemokine genes CCL3L and CCL4L. The CCL3L-CCL4L copy number variable region (CNVR) shows extensive architectural complexity, with smaller CNVs within the larger ones and with interindividual variation in breakpoints. Furthermore, the individual genes embedded in this CNVR account for an additional level of genetic and mRNA complexity: CCL4L1 and CCL4L2 have identical exonic sequences but produce a different pattern of mRNAs. CCL3L2 was considered previously as a CCL3L1 pseudogene, but is actually transcribed. Since 2005, CCL3L-CCL4L CNV has been associated extensively with various human immunodeficiency virus-related outcomes, but some recent studies called these associations into question. This controversy may be due in part to the differences in alternative methods for quantifying gene copy number and differentiating the individual genes. This review summarizes and discusses the current knowledge about CCL3L-CCL4L CNV and points out that elucidating their complete phenotypic impact requires dissecting the combinatorial genomic complexity posed by various proportions of distinct CCL3L and CCL4L genes among individuals.

  9. Zinc-dependent global transcriptional control, transcriptional deregulation, and higher gene copy number for genes in metal homeostasis of the hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis halleri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talke, Ina N; Hanikenne, Marc; Krämer, Ute

    2006-09-01

    The metal hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis halleri exhibits naturally selected zinc (Zn) and cadmium (Cd) hypertolerance and accumulates extraordinarily high Zn concentrations in its leaves. With these extreme physiological traits, A. halleri phylogenetically belongs to the sister clade of Arabidopsis thaliana. Using a combination of genome-wide cross species microarray analysis and real-time reverse transcription-PCR, a set of candidate genes is identified for Zn hyperaccumulation, Zn and Cd hypertolerance, and the adjustment of micronutrient homeostasis in A. halleri. Eighteen putative metal homeostasis genes are newly identified to be more highly expressed in A. halleri than in A. thaliana, and 11 previously identified candidate genes are confirmed. The encoded proteins include HMA4, known to contribute to root-shoot transport of Zn in A. thaliana. Expression of either AtHMA4 or AhHMA4 confers cellular Zn and Cd tolerance to yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Among further newly implicated proteins are IRT3 and ZIP10, which have been proposed to contribute to cytoplasmic Zn influx, and FRD3 required for iron partitioning in A. thaliana. In A. halleri, the presence of more than a single genomic copy is a hallmark of several highly expressed candidate genes with possible roles in metal hyperaccumulation and metal hypertolerance. Both A. halleri and A. thaliana exert tight regulatory control over Zn homeostasis at the transcript level. Zn hyperaccumulation in A. halleri involves enhanced partitioning of Zn from roots into shoots. The transcriptional regulation of marker genes suggests that in the steady state, A. halleri roots, but not the shoots, act as physiologically Zn deficient under conditions of moderate Zn supply.

  10. Isolation and characterization of a gene, pmrD, from Salmonella typhimurium that confers resistance to polymyxin when expressed in multiple copies.

    OpenAIRE

    Roland, K L; Esther, C R; Spitznagel, J K

    1994-01-01

    We have isolated from Salmonella typhimurium a gene, designated pmrD, that confers resistance to the membrane-damaging drug, polymyxin B when expressed from the medium-copy-number plasmid pHSG576. The gene maps to 46 min on the standard genetic map, near the menB gene, and is therefore distinct from the previously described pmrA locus. We have mapped the polymyxin resistance activity to a 1.3-kb ClaI-PvuII fragment which contains a small open reading frame that could encode an 85-amino-acid p...

  11. The Clinical Isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa MMA83 Carries Two Copies of the blaNDM-1 Gene in a Novel Genetic Context

    OpenAIRE

    Jovčić, Branko; Lepsanović, Zorica; Begović, Jelena; Rakonjac, Bojan; Perovanović, Jelena; Topisirović, Ljubiša; Kojić, Milan

    2013-01-01

    The genetic context of the blaNDM-1 gene in the genome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa MMA83 was investigated. Sequencing of the cosmid selected for the blaNDM-1 gene revealed the presence of two blaNDM-1 copies in the genome of P. aeruginosa MMA83 in a unique genetic environment. Additionally, mating assays, DNA-DNA hybridization, and an S1 nuclease assay strongly suggest that the blaNDM-1 gene in P. aeruginosa MMA83 is chromosome borne.

  12. High frequency of rare copy number variants affecting functionally related genes in patients with structural brain malformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kariminejad, Roxana; Lind-Thomsen, Allan; Tümer, Zeynep;

    2011-01-01

    ) to investigate copy number variants (CNVs) in a cohort of 169 patients with various structural brain malformations including lissencephaly, polymicrogyria, focal cortical dysplasia, and corpus callosum agenesis. The majority of the patients had intellectual disabilities (ID) and suffered from symptomatic...

  13. S-SCAM, a rare copy number variation gene, induces schizophrenia-related endophenotypes in transgenic mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nanyan; Zhong, Peng; Shin, Seung Min; Metallo, Jacob; Danielson, Eric; Olsen, Christopher M; Liu, Qing-song; Lee, Sang H

    2015-02-01

    Accumulating genetic evidence suggests that schizophrenia (SZ) is associated with individually rare copy number variations (CNVs) of diverse genes, often specific to single cases. However, the causality of these rare mutations remains unknown. One of the rare CNVs found in SZ cohorts is the duplication of Synaptic Scaffolding Molecule (S-SCAM, also called MAGI-2), which encodes a postsynaptic scaffolding protein controlling synaptic AMPA receptor levels, and thus the strength of excitatory synaptic transmission. Here we report that, in a transgenic mouse model simulating the duplication conditions, elevation of S-SCAM levels in excitatory neurons of the forebrain was sufficient to induce multiple SZ-related endophenotypes. S-SCAM transgenic mice showed an increased number of lateral ventricles and a reduced number of parvalbumin-stained neurons. In addition, the mice exhibited SZ-like behavioral abnormalities, including hyperlocomotor activity, deficits in prepulse inhibition, increased anxiety, impaired social interaction, and working memory deficit. Notably, the S-SCAM transgenic mice showed a unique sex difference in showing these behavioral symptoms, which is reminiscent of human conditions. These behavioral abnormalities were accompanied by hyperglutamatergic function associated with increased synaptic AMPA receptor levels and impaired long-term potentiation. Importantly, reducing glutamate release by the group 2 metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist LY379268 ameliorated the working memory deficits in the transgenic mice, suggesting that hyperglutamatergic function underlies the cognitive functional deficits. Together, these results contribute to validate a causal relationship of the rare S-SCAM CNV and provide supporting evidence for the rare CNV hypothesis in SZ pathogenesis. Furthermore, the S-SCAM transgenic mice provide a valuable new animal model for studying SZ pathogenesis.

  14. Human genes for U2 small nuclear RNA map to a major adenovirus 12 modification site on chromosome 17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, V; Ares, M; Weiner, A M; Francke, U

    U2 RNA is one of the abundant, highly conserved species of small nuclear RNA (snRNA) molecules implicated in RNA processing. As is typical of mammalian snRNAs, human U1 and U2 are each encoded by a multigene family. In the human genome, defective copies of the genes (pseudogenes) far outnumber the authentic genes. The majority or all of the 35 to 100 bona fide U1 genes have at least 20 kilobases (kb) of nearly perfect 5' and 3' flanking homology in common with each other; these U1 genes are clustered loosely in chromosome band 1p36 (refs 5, 7) with intergenic distances exceeding 44 kb. In contrast, the 10 to 20 U2 genes are clustered tightly in a virtually perfect tandem array which has a strict 6-kb repeating unit. We report here the assignment, by in situ hybridization, of the U2 gene cluster to chromosome 17, bands q21-q22. Surprisingly, this region is one of three major adenovirus 12 modification sites which undergo chromosome decondensation ('uncoiling') in permissive human cells infected by highly oncogenic strains of adenovirus. The two other major modification sites, 1p36 and 1q21, coincide with the locations of U1 genes and class I U1 pseudogenes, respectively. We suggest that snRNA genes are the major targets of viral chromosome modification.

  15. Copy number variation analysis detects novel candidate genes involved in follicular growth and oocyte maturation in a cohort of premature ovarian failure cases

    OpenAIRE

    Tšuiko, O.; Nõukas, M.; Žilina, O.; Hensen, K; Tapanainen, J.S.; Mägi, R.; Kals, M.; Kivistik, P. A.; Haller-Kikkatalo, K.; Salumets, A.; Kurg, A.

    2016-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Can spontaneous premature ovarian failure (POF) patients derived from population-based biobanks reveal the association between copy number variations (CNVs) and POF? SUMMARY ANSWER CNVs can hamper the functional capacity of ovaries by disrupting key genes and pathways essential for proper ovarian function. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY POF is defined as the cessation of ovarian function before the age of 40 years. POF is a major reason for female infertility, although its cause remains...

  16. Discovery of nuclear-encoded genes for the neurotoxin saxitoxin in dinoflagellates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stüken, Anke; Orr, Russell J S; Kellmann, Ralf; Murray, Shauna A; Neilan, Brett A; Jakobsen, Kjetill S

    2011-01-01

    Saxitoxin is a potent neurotoxin that occurs in aquatic environments worldwide. Ingestion of vector species can lead to paralytic shellfish poisoning, a severe human illness that may lead to paralysis and death. In freshwaters, the toxin is produced by prokaryotic cyanobacteria; in marine waters, it is associated with eukaryotic dinoflagellates. However, several studies suggest that saxitoxin is not produced by dinoflagellates themselves, but by co-cultured bacteria. Here, we show that genes required for saxitoxin synthesis are encoded in the nuclear genomes of dinoflagellates. We sequenced >1.2×10(6) mRNA transcripts from the two saxitoxin-producing dinoflagellate strains Alexandrium fundyense CCMP1719 and A. minutum CCMP113 using high-throughput sequencing technology. In addition, we used in silico transcriptome analyses, RACE, qPCR and conventional PCR coupled with Sanger sequencing. These approaches successfully identified genes required for saxitoxin-synthesis in the two transcriptomes. We focused on sxtA, the unique starting gene of saxitoxin synthesis, and show that the dinoflagellate transcripts of sxtA have the same domain structure as the cyanobacterial sxtA genes. But, in contrast to the bacterial homologs, the dinoflagellate transcripts are monocistronic, have a higher GC content, occur in multiple copies, contain typical dinoflagellate spliced-leader sequences and eukaryotic polyA-tails. Further, we investigated 28 saxitoxin-producing and non-producing dinoflagellate strains from six different genera for the presence of genomic sxtA homologs. Our results show very good agreement between the presence of sxtA and saxitoxin-synthesis, except in three strains of A. tamarense, for which we amplified sxtA, but did not detect the toxin. Our work opens for possibilities to develop molecular tools to detect saxitoxin-producing dinoflagellates in the environment.

  17. CBF gene copy number variation at Frost Resistance-2 is associated with levels of freezing tolerance in temperate-climate cereals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, Andrea K; Dhillon, Taniya; Cheng, Hongmei; Tondelli, Alessandro; Pecchioni, Nicola; Stockinger, Eric J

    2010-06-01

    Frost Resistance-1 (FR-1) and FR-2 are two loci affecting freezing tolerance and winter hardiness of the temperate-climate cereals. FR-1 is hypothesized to be due to the pleiotropic effects of VRN-1. FR-2 spans a cluster of C-Repeat Binding Factor (CBF) genes. These loci are genetically and functionally linked. Recent studies indicate CBF transcripts are downregulated by the VRN-1 encoded MADS-box protein or a factor in the VRN-1 pathway. Here, we report that barley genotypes 'Dicktoo' and 'Nure' carrying a vrn-H1 winter allele at VRN-H1 harbor increased copy numbers of CBF coding sequences relative to Vrn-H1 spring allele genotypes 'Morex' and 'Tremois'. Sequencing bacteriophage lambda genomic clones from these four genotypes alongside DNA blot hybridizations indicate approximately half of the eleven CBF orthologs at FR-H2 are duplicated in individual genomes. One of these duplications discriminates vrn-H1 genotypes from Vrn-H1 genotypes. The vrn-H1 winter allele genotypes harbor tandem segmental duplications through the CBF2A-CBF4B genomic region and maintain two distinct CBF2 paralogs, while the Vrn-H1 spring allele genotypes harbor single copies of CBF2 and CBF4. An additional CBF gene, CBF13, is a pseudogene interrupted by multiple non-sense codons in 'Tremois' whereas CBF13 is a complete uninterrupted coding sequence in 'Dicktoo' and 'Nure'. DNA blot hybridization with wheat DNAs reveals greater copy numbers of CBF14 also occurs in winter wheats than in spring wheats. These data indicate that variation in CBF gene copy numbers is widespread in the Triticeae and suggest selection for winter hardiness co-selects winter alleles at both VRN-1 and FR-2.

  18. Multi-platform whole-genome microarray analyses refine the epigenetic signature of breast cancer metastasis with gene expression and copy number.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Andrews

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We have previously identified genome-wide DNA methylation changes in a cell line model of breast cancer metastasis. These complex epigenetic changes that we observed, along with concurrent karyotype analyses, have led us to hypothesize that complex genomic alterations in cancer cells (deletions, translocations and ploidy are superimposed over promoter-specific methylation events that are responsible for gene-specific expression changes observed in breast cancer metastasis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We undertook simultaneous high-resolution, whole-genome analyses of MDA-MB-468GFP and MDA-MB-468GFP-LN human breast cancer cell lines (an isogenic, paired lymphatic metastasis cell line model using Affymetrix gene expression (U133, promoter (1.0R, and SNP/CNV (SNP 6.0 microarray platforms to correlate data from gene expression, epigenetic (DNA methylation, and combination copy number variant/single nucleotide polymorphism microarrays. Using Partek Software and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis we integrated datasets from these three platforms and detected multiple hypomethylation and hypermethylation events. Many of these epigenetic alterations correlated with gene expression changes. In addition, gene dosage events correlated with the karyotypic differences observed between the cell lines and were reflected in specific promoter methylation patterns. Gene subsets were identified that correlated hyper (and hypo methylation with the loss (or gain of gene expression and in parallel, with gene dosage losses and gains, respectively. Individual gene targets from these subsets were also validated for their methylation, expression and copy number status, and susceptible gene pathways were identified that may indicate how selective advantage drives the processes of tumourigenesis and metastasis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our approach allows more precisely profiling of functionally relevant epigenetic signatures that are associated with cancer

  19. Integrative analysis of copy number and gene expression in breast cancer using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded core biopsy tissue: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iddawela, Mahesh; Rueda, Oscar; Eremin, Jenny; Eremin, Oleg; Cowley, Jed; Earl, Helena M; Caldas, Carlos

    2017-07-11

    An absence of reliable molecular markers has hampered individualised breast cancer treatments, and a major limitation for translational research is the lack of fresh tissue. There are, however, abundant banks of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue. This study evaluated two platforms available for the analysis of DNA copy number and gene expression using FFPE samples. The cDNA-mediated annealing, selection, extension, and ligation assay (DASL™) has been developed for gene expression analysis and the Molecular Inversion Probes assay (Oncoscan™), were used for copy number analysis using FFPE tissues. Gene expression and copy number were evaluated in core-biopsy samples from patients with breast cancer undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). Forty-three core-biopsies were evaluated and characteristic copy number changes in breast cancers, gains in 1q, 8q, 11q, 17q and 20q and losses in 6q, 8p, 13q and 16q, were confirmed. Regions that frequently exhibited gains in tumours showing a pathological complete response (pCR) to NAC were 1q (55%), 8q (40%) and 17q (40%), whereas 11q11 (37%) gain was the most frequent change in non-pCR tumours. Gains associated with poor survival were 11q13 (62%), 8q24 (54%) and 20q (47%). Gene expression assessed by DASL correlated with immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis for oestrogen receptor (ER) [area under the curve (AUC) = 0.95], progesterone receptor (PR)(AUC = 0.90) and human epidermal growth factor type-2 receptor (HER-2) (AUC = 0.96). Differential expression analysis between ER+ and ER- cancers identified over-expression of TTF1, LAF-4 and C-MYB (p ≤ 0.05), and between pCR vs non-pCRs, over-expression of CXCL9, AREG, B-MYB and under-expression of ABCG2. This study was an integrative analysis of copy number and gene expression using FFPE core biopsies and showed that molecular marker data from FFPE tissues were consistent with those in previous studies using fresh-frozen samples. FFPE tissue can provide

  20. Role of histone deacetylases in gene regulation at nuclear lamina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice C Milon

    Full Text Available Theoretical models suggest that gene silencing at the nuclear periphery may involve "closing" of chromatin by transcriptional repressors, such as histone deacetylases (HDACs. Here we provide experimental evidence confirming these predictions. Histone acetylation, chromatin compactness, and gene repression in lamina-interacting multigenic chromatin domains were analyzed in Drosophila S2 cells in which B-type lamin, diverse HDACs, and lamina-associated proteins were downregulated by dsRNA. Lamin depletion resulted in decreased compactness of the repressed multigenic domain associated with its detachment from the lamina and enhanced histone acetylation. Our data reveal the major role for HDAC1 in mediating deacetylation, chromatin compaction, and gene silencing in the multigenic domain, and an auxiliary role for HDAC3 that is required for retention of the domain at the lamina. These findings demonstrate the manifold and central involvement of class I HDACs in regulation of lamina-associated genes, illuminating a mechanism by which these enzymes can orchestrate normal and pathological development.

  1. MNSs genotyping by MALDI-TOF MS shows high concordance with serology, allows gene copy number testing and reveals new St(a) alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Stefan; Vollmert, Caren; Trost, Nadine; Sigurdardottir, Sonja; Portmann, Claudia; Gottschalk, Jochen; Ries, Judith; Markovic, Alexander; Infanti, Laura; Buser, Andreas; Amar El Dusouqui, Soraya; Rigal, Emmanuel; Castelli, Damiano; Weingand, Bettina; Maier, Andreas; Mauvais, Simon M; Sarraj, Amira; Braisch, Monica C; Thierbach, Jutta; Hustinx, Hein; Frey, Beat M; Gassner, Christoph

    2016-08-01

    Results of genotyping with true high-throughput capability for MNSs antigens are underrepresented, probably because of technical issues, due to the high level of nucleotide sequence homology of the paralogous genes GYPA, GYPB and GYPE. Eight MNSs-specific single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) were detected using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization, time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) in 5800 serologically M/N and S/s pre-typed Swiss blood donors and 50 individuals of known or presumptive black African ethnicity. Comparison of serotype with genotype delivered concordance rates of 99·70% and 99·90% and accuracy of genotyping alone of 99·88% and 99·95%, for M/N and S/s, respectively. The area under the curve of peak signals was measured in intron 1 of the two highly homologous genes GYPB and GYPE and allowed for gene copy number variation estimates in all individuals investigated. Elevated GYPB:GYPE ratios accumulated in several carriers of two newly observed GYP*401 variants, termed type G and H, both encoding for the low incidence antigen St(a). In black Africans, reduced GYPB gene contents were proven in pre-typed S-s-U- phenotypes and could be reproduced in unknown specimens. Quantitative gene copy number estimates represented a highly attractive supplement to conventional genotyping, solely based on MNSs SNPs. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Characterization of copy number variants for CCL3L1 gene in rheumatoid arthritis for French trio families and Tunisian cases and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Kilani, Mohamed Sahbi; Achour, Yosser; Perea, Javier; Cornelis, François; Bardin, Thomas; Chaudru, Valérie; Maalej, Abdellatif; Petit-Teixeira, Elisabeth

    2016-08-01

    Analyses of copy number variants (CNVs) for candidate genes in complex diseases are currently a promising research field. CNVs of C-C chemokine ligand 3-like 1 (CCL3L1) gene are candidate genomic factors in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We investigated CCL3L1 CNVs association with a case-control study in Tunisians and a transmission analysis in French trio families. Relative copy number (rCN) of CCL3L1 gene was quantified by droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) in 100 French trio families (RA patients and their two parents) and in 166 RA cases and 102 healthy controls from Tunisia. We calculated odds ratio (OR) to investigate association risk for CCL3L1 CNVs in RA. rCN identified varied from 0 to 4 in the French population and from 0 to 7 in the Tunisian population. A significant difference was observed in the distribution of these rCNs between the two populations (p = 2.34 × 10(-10)), as when rCN from French and Tunisian RA patients were compared (p = 2.83 × 10(-5)). CNVs transmission in French RA trios allowed the characterization of genotypes with the presence of tandem duplication and triplication on the same chromosome. RA association tests highlighted a protective effect of rCN = 5 for CCL3L1 gene in the Tunisian population (OR = 0.056; CI 95 % [0.01-0.46]). Characterization of CCL3L1 CNVs with ddPCR methodology highlighted specific CN genotypes in a French family sample. A copy number polymorphism of a RA candidate gene was quantified, and its significant association with RA was revealed in a Tunisian sample.

  3. Lactase persistence and augmented salivary alpha-amylase gene copy numbers might have been selected by the combined toxic effects of gluten and (food born) pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruimboom, Leo; Fox, Tom; Muskiet, Frits A J

    2014-03-01

    Various positively selected adaptations to new nutrients have been identified. Lactase persistence is among the best known, conferring the ability for drinking milk at post weaning age. An augmented number of amylase gene (AMY1) copies, giving rise to higher salivary amylase activity, has been implicated in the consumption of starch-rich foods. Higher AMY1 copy numbers have been demonstrated in populations with recent histories of starchy-rich diets. It is however questionable whether the resulting polymorphisms have exerted positive selection only by providing easily available sources of macro and micronutrients. Humans have explored new environments more than any other animal. Novel environments challenge the host, but especially its immune system with new climatic conditions, food and especially pathogens. With the advent of the agricultural revolution and the concurrent domestication of cattle came new pathogens. We contend that specific new food ingredients (e.g., gluten) and novel pathogens drove selection for lactase persistence and higher AMY gene copy numbers. Both adaptations provide ample glucose for activating the sodium glucose-dependent co-transporter 1 (SGLT1), which is the principal glucose, sodium and water transporter in the gastro-intestinal tract. Their rapid uptake confers protection against potentially lethal dehydration, hyponatremia and ultimately multiple organ failure. Oral rehydration therapy aims at SGLT1 activity and is the current treatment of choice for chronic diarrhoea and vomiting. We hypothesize that lifelong lactase activity and rapid starch digestion should be looked at as the evolutionary covalent of oral rehydration therapy.

  4. High-Throughput Amplicon-Based Copy Number Detection of 11 Genes in Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Ovarian Tumour Samples by MLPA-Seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondrashova, Olga; Love, Clare J; Lunke, Sebastian; Hsu, Arthur L; Waring, Paul M; Taylor, Graham R

    2015-01-01

    Whilst next generation sequencing can report point mutations in fixed tissue tumour samples reliably, the accurate determination of copy number is more challenging. The conventional Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) assay is an effective tool for measurement of gene dosage, but is restricted to around 50 targets due to size resolution of the MLPA probes. By switching from a size-resolved format, to a sequence-resolved format we developed a scalable, high-throughput, quantitative assay. MLPA-seq is capable of detecting deletions, duplications, and amplifications in as little as 5ng of genomic DNA, including from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumour samples. We show that this method can detect BRCA1, BRCA2, ERBB2 and CCNE1 copy number changes in DNA extracted from snap-frozen and FFPE tumour tissue, with 100% sensitivity and >99.5% specificity.

  5. Design and Generation of MLPA Probe Sets for Combined Copy Number and Small-Mutation Analysis of Human Genes: EGFR as an Example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata Marcinkowska

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA is a multiplex copy number analysis method that is routinely used to identify large mutations in many clinical and research labs. One of the most important drawbacks of the standard MLPA setup is a complicated, and therefore expensive, procedure of generating long MLPA probes. This drawback substantially limits the applicability of MLPA to those genomic regions for which ready-to-use commercial kits are available. Here we present a simple protocol for designing MLPA probe sets that are composed entirely of short oligonucleotide half-probes generated through chemical synthesis. As an example, we present the design and generation of an MLPA assay for parallel copy number and small-mutation analysis of the EGFR gene.

  6. GAPDH as a control gene to estimate genome copy number in Great Tits, with cross-amplification in Blue Tits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atema, E.; Van Oers, K.; Verhulst, S.

    2013-01-01

    Estimating the number of genome copies in a tissue sample can serve various purposes. For example, such an estimate serves as scaling variable when measuring telomeres with quantitative PCR. We describe the primer development and evaluation for the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) ge

  7. GAPDH as a control gene to estimate genome copy number in Great Tits, with cross-amplification in Blue Tits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atema, Els; van Oers, Kees; Verhulst, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Estimating the number of genome copies in a tissue sample can serve various purposes. For example, such an estimate serves as a scaling variable when measuring telomeres with quantitative PCR. We describe the primer development and evaluation for the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH)

  8. Genome-wide copy number variation study associates metabotropic glutamate receptor gene networks with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elia, J.; Glessner, J.T.; Wang, K.; Takahashi, N.; Shtir, C.J.; Hadley, D.; Sleiman, P.M.; Zhang, H.; Kim, C.E.; Robison, R.; Lyon, G.J.; Flory, J.H.; Bradfield, J.P.; Imielinski, M.; Hou, C.; Frackelton, E.C.; Chiavacci, R.M.; Sakurai, T.; Rabin, C.; Middleton, F.A.; Thomas, K.A.; Garris, M.; Mentch, F.; Freitag, C.M.; Steinhausen, H.C.; Todorov, A.A.; Reif, A.; Rothenberger, A.; Franke, B.; Mick, E.O.; Roeyers, H.; Buitelaar, J.K.; Lesch, K.P.; Banaschewski, T.; Ebstein, R.P.; Mulas, F.; Oades, R.D.; Sergeant, J.A.; Sonuga-Barke, E.J.S.; Renner, T.J.; Romanos, M.; Romanos, J.; Warnke, A.; Walitza, S.; Meyer, J.; Palmason, H.; Seitz, C.; Loo, S.K.; Smalley, S.L.; Biederman, J.; Kent, L.; Asherson, P.; Anney, R.J.; Gaynor, J.W.; Shaw, P.; Devoto, M.; White, P.S.; Grant, S.F.; Buxbaum, J.D.; Rapoport, J.L.; Williams, N.M.; Nelson, S.F.; Faraone, S.V.; Hakonarson, H.

    2011-01-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common, heritable neuropsychiatric disorder of unknown etiology. We performed a whole-genome copy number variation (CNV) study on 1,013 cases with ADHD and 4,105 healthy children of European ancestry using 550,000 SNPs. We evaluated statistically

  9. Phenotype of transgenic mice carrying a very low copy number of the mutant human G93A superoxide dismutase-1 gene associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey S Deitch

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a progressive neurodegenerative disease of the motor neuron. While most cases of ALS are sporadic, 10% are familial (FALS with 20% of FALS caused by a mutation in the gene that codes for the enzyme Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1. There is variability in sporadic ALS as well as FALS where even within the same family some siblings with the same mutation do not manifest disease. A transgenic (Tg mouse model of FALS containing 25 copies of the mutant human SOD1 gene demonstrates motor neuron pathology and progressive weakness similar to ALS patients, leading to death at approximately 130 days. The onset of symptoms and survival of these transgenic mice are directly related to the number of copies of the mutant gene. We report the phenotype of a very low expressing (VLE G93A SOD1 Tg carrying only 4 copies of the mutant G93ASOD1 gene. While weakness can start at 9 months, only 74% of mice 18 months or older demonstrate disease. The VLE mice show decreased motor neurons compared to wild-type mice as well as increased cytoplasmic translocation of TDP-43. In contrast to the standard G93A SOD1 Tg mouse which always develops motor weakness leading to death, not all VLE animals manifested clinical disease or shortened life span. In fact, approximately 20% of mice older than 24 months had no motor symptoms and only 18% of VLE mice older than 22 months reached end stage. Given the variable penetrance of clinical phenotype, prolonged survival, and protracted loss of motor neurons the VLE mouse provides a new tool that closely mimics human ALS. This tool will allow the study of pathologic events over time as well as the study of genetic and environmental modifiers that may not be causative, but can exacerbate or accelerate motor neuron disease.

  10. EGFR gene copy number as a predictive/biomarker for patients with non-small-cell lung cancer receiving tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Yiwen; Tang, Hailing; He, Jianxing

    2017-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene copy number has been proposed as a candidate biomarker for predicting treatment response to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs) in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). MEDLINE, PubMed, Cochrane, and Google Scholar databases were searched until October 21, 2015 using the following search terms: lung neoplasms/lung cancer/non-small cell lung cancer/NSCLC, EGFR, gene amplification, copy number, erlotinib, gefitinib, tyrosine-kinase inhibitor/TKI, predictor. 17 studies were included in the analysis with a total of 2047 patients. The overall analysis found that increased EGFR gene copy number was associated with higher overall response rate (ORR), overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS; p values ≤0.008) compared with patients without a high EGFR gene copy number. Subgroup analysis found that in a population of patients who were primarily Caucasian, a higher EGFR gene copy number was also associated with increased ORR, OS, and PFS (p values ≤0.018). The results were similar in a population of Asian patients, except that a higher EGFR gene copy number was not associated with improved OS (p=0.248). Sensitivity analysis indicated that no one study overly influenced the results and that the findings are robust. The result of the analysis found that EGFR gene copy number was associated with increased OS and PFS, supporting the idea that EGFR gene copy number is a biomarker for response to EGFR-TKI therapy in patients with advanced NSCLC. Copyright © 2016 American Federation for Medical Research.

  11. Evolution Analysis of the Aux/IAA Gene Family in Plants Shows Dual Origins and Variable Nuclear Localization Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wentao Wu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The plant hormone auxin plays pivotal roles in many aspects of plant growth and development. The auxin/indole-3-acetic acid (Aux/IAA gene family encodes short-lived nuclear proteins acting on auxin perception and signaling, but the evolutionary history of this gene family remains to be elucidated. In this study, the Aux/IAA gene family in 17 plant species covering all major lineages of plants is identified and analyzed by using multiple bioinformatics methods. A total of 434 Aux/IAA genes was found among these plant species, and the gene copy number ranges from three (Physcomitrella patens to 63 (Glycine max. The phylogenetic analysis shows that the canonical Aux/IAA proteins can be generally divided into five major clades, and the origin of Aux/IAA proteins could be traced back to the common ancestor of land plants and green algae. Many truncated Aux/IAA proteins were found, and some of these truncated Aux/IAA proteins may be generated from the C-terminal truncation of auxin response factor (ARF proteins. Our results indicate that tandem and segmental duplications play dominant roles for the expansion of the Aux/IAA gene family mainly under purifying selection. The putative nuclear localization signals (NLSs in Aux/IAA proteins are conservative, and two kinds of new primordial bipartite NLSs in P. patens and Selaginella moellendorffii were discovered. Our findings not only give insights into the origin and expansion of the Aux/IAA gene family, but also provide a basis for understanding their functions during the course of evolution.

  12. Enzymatic repair of selected cross-linked homoduplex molecules enhances nuclear gene rescue from Pompeii and Herculaneum remains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Bernardo, Giovanni; Del Gaudio, Stefania; Cammarota, Marcella; Galderisi, Umberto; Cascino, Antonino; Cipollaro, Marilena

    2002-02-15

    Ancient DNA (aDNA) samples extracted from the bone remains of six equids buried by the Vesuvius eruption in 79 AD were investigated to test pre-amplification and enzymatic repair procedures designed to enhance the rescue of nuclear genes. The extracts, which proved all positive for Equidae mtDNA amplification, proved positive only four times out of 18 when tested for single-copy Equidae nuclear genes (epsilon globin, p53 and gamma interferon). Pre-amplification did not change the number of retrieved aDNA sequences but 10 times out of 14 enzymatic repair restored the amplifiability of the genes analysed, proving that repair increases the rate of successful rescue from 22 to alpha(lambda)mu(omicron)sigma(tau) 80%. These findings support the hypothesis that some of these cross-linked aDNA molecules, which are not completely separated when DNA is extracted under denaturing conditions, become homoduplex substrates for Pol I and/or T4 ligase action upon renaturation. aDNA authenticity is proved by the homology of the nucleotide sequences of loci tested to the corresponding modern Equidae sequences. Data also indicate that cross-linked homoduplex molecules selected by denaturation of the extract are repaired without any chimera formation. The general features of aDNA amplification with and without denaturation and enzymatic repair are discussed.

  13. Combined analysis of fourteen nuclear genes refines the Ursidae phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagès, Marie; Calvignac, Sébastien; Klein, Catherine; Paris, Mathilde; Hughes, Sandrine; Hänni, Catherine

    2008-04-01

    Despite numerous studies, questions remain about the evolutionary history of Ursidae and additional independent genetic markers were needed to elucidate these ambiguities. For this purpose, we sequenced ten nuclear genes for all the eight extant bear species. By combining these new sequences with those of four other recently published nuclear markers, we provide new insights into the phylogenetic relationships of the Ursidae family members. The hypothesis that the giant panda was the first species to diverge among ursids is definitively confirmed and the precise branching order within the Ursus genus is clarified for the first time. Moreover, our analyses indicate that the American and the Asiatic black bears do not cluster as sister taxa, as had been previously hypothesised. Sun and sloth bears clearly appear as the most basal ursine species but uncertainties about their exact relationships remain. Since our larger dataset did not enable us to clarify this last question, identifying rare genomic changes in bear genomes could be a promising solution for further studies.

  14. A large scale survey reveals that chromosomal copy-number alterations significantly affect gene modules involved in cancer initiation and progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cigudosa Juan C

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent observations point towards the existence of a large number of neighborhoods composed of functionally-related gene modules that lie together in the genome. This local component in the distribution of the functionality across chromosomes is probably affecting the own chromosomal architecture by limiting the possibilities in which genes can be arranged and distributed across the genome. As a direct consequence of this fact it is therefore presumable that diseases such as cancer, harboring DNA copy number alterations (CNAs, will have a symptomatology strongly dependent on modules of functionally-related genes rather than on a unique "important" gene. Methods We carried out a systematic analysis of more than 140,000 observations of CNAs in cancers and searched by enrichments in gene functional modules associated to high frequencies of loss or gains. Results The analysis of CNAs in cancers clearly demonstrates the existence of a significant pattern of loss of gene modules functionally related to cancer initiation and progression along with the amplification of modules of genes related to unspecific defense against xenobiotics (probably chemotherapeutical agents. With the extension of this analysis to an Array-CGH dataset (glioblastomas from The Cancer Genome Atlas we demonstrate the validity of this approach to investigate the functional impact of CNAs. Conclusions The presented results indicate promising clinical and therapeutic implications. Our findings also directly point out to the necessity of adopting a function-centric, rather a gene-centric, view in the understanding of phenotypes or diseases harboring CNAs.

  15. A simple screening method for detection of Klinefelter syndrome and other X-chromosome aneuploidies based on copy number of the androgen receptor gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottesen, A M; Garn, I D; Aksglaede, L;

    2007-01-01

    -gene expression. The XIST-expression based assay was correct in only 29/36 samples (81%). Our findings demonstrated that the AR-qPCR technique is a simple and reliable screening method for diagnosis of patients with Klinefelter syndrome or other chromosomal disorders involving an aberrant number of X-chromosomes.......Due to the high prevalence and variable phenotype of patients with Klinefelter syndrome, there is a need for a robust and rapid screening method allowing early diagnosis. Here, we report on the development and detailed clinical validation of a quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR)-based method...... chromosome abnormalities (46,XX males; 47,XYY)(n = 4) and normal karyotypes (46,XY) (n = 13). The reference range for the AR-copy number was established as 0.8-1.2 for one copy and 1.7-2.3 for two copies. The qPCR results were within the reference range in 17/18 samples (94%) or 30/31 (97%) samples with one...

  16. Evaluation of C-ErbB-2 Overexpression and Her-2/neu Gene Copy Number Heterogeneity in Barrett’s Adenocarcinoma

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    Axel Walch

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Amplifiction of the Her-2/neu gene is accompanied by overexpression of its cell surface receptor product, c‐erbB‐2 protein. To investigate the degree of intratumoural heterogeneity we applied immunohistochemistry in primary Barrett’s adenocarcinoma (BCA (n = 6 and dysplasia adjacent to the carcinoma (n = 4. In addition, fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH was performed in primary BCA (n=5 and dysplastic areas (n=4. For an objective evaluation digital image analysis and laser scanning microscopy were used. Five of six BCA showed a marked intratumoural heterogeneous staining pattern ranging from areas in which the tumour cells were negative or faintly positive to tumour areas with a strong staining of the entire membrane. Among the two dysplastic areas also a heterogenous staining pattern was observed. FISH analysis revealed marked heterogeneity of intratumoural gene copy number changes in all BCA showing populations with different fractions of cells with polysomy, low level amplification and high level amplification. One dysplasia showed a minor population with Her‐2/neu signal clusters. In conclusion, we observed marked intratumoural heterogeneity of c‐erbB‐2 protein overexpression and Her‐2/neu gene copy number in the majority of the primary BCA analyzed. Digital image analysis and laser scanning microscopy were helpful in quantifying the variations in protein expression and DNA copy number in individual tumour cells. The observed heterogeneity could hamper the exact diagnostic determination of the c‐erbB‐2 status in small biopsies and possibly influence the effectiveness of a potential c‐erbB‐2 targeting therapy.

  17. Evolutionary changes in gene expression, coding sequence and copy-number at the Cyp6g1 locus contribute to resistance to multiple insecticides in Drosophila.

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    Thomas W R Harrop

    Full Text Available Widespread use of insecticides has led to insecticide resistance in many populations of insects. In some populations, resistance has evolved to multiple pesticides. In Drosophila melanogaster, resistance to multiple classes of insecticide is due to the overexpression of a single cytochrome P450 gene, Cyp6g1. Overexpression of Cyp6g1 appears to have evolved in parallel in Drosophila simulans, a sibling species of D. melanogaster, where it is also associated with insecticide resistance. However, it is not known whether the ability of the CYP6G1 enzyme to provide resistance to multiple insecticides evolved recently in D. melanogaster or if this function is present in all Drosophila species. Here we show that duplication of the Cyp6g1 gene occurred at least four times during the evolution of different Drosophila species, and the ability of CYP6G1 to confer resistance to multiple insecticides exists in D. melanogaster and D. simulans but not in Drosophila willistoni or Drosophila virilis. In D. virilis, which has multiple copies of Cyp6g1, one copy confers resistance to DDT and another to nitenpyram, suggesting that the divergence of protein sequence between copies subsequent to the duplication affected the activity of the enzyme. All orthologs tested conferred resistance to one or more insecticides, suggesting that CYP6G1 had the capacity to provide resistance to anthropogenic chemicals before they existed. Finally, we show that expression of Cyp6g1 in the Malpighian tubules, which contributes to DDT resistance in D. melanogaster, is specific to the D. melanogaster-D. simulans lineage. Our results suggest that a combination of gene duplication, regulatory changes and protein coding changes has taken place at the Cyp6g1 locus during evolution and this locus may play a role in providing resistance to different environmental toxins in different Drosophila species.

  18. Copy number variation of the beta defensin gene cluster on chromosome 8p influences the bacterial microbiota within the nasopharynx of otitis-prone children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Eric A; Kananurak, Anchasa; Bevins, Charles L; Hollox, Edward J; Bakaletz, Lauren O

    2014-01-01

    As there is increasing evidence that aberrant defensin expression is related to susceptibility for infectious disease and inflammatory disorders, we sought to determine if copy number of the beta-defensin gene cluster located on chromosome 8p23.1 (DEFB107, 106, 105, 104, 103, DEFB4 and SPAG11), that shows copy number variation as a block, was associated with susceptibility to otitis media (OM). The gene DEFB103 within this complex encodes human beta defensin-3 (hBD-3), an antimicrobial peptide (AP) expressed by epithelial cells that line the mammalian airway, important for defense of mucosal surfaces and previously shown to have bactericidal activity in vitro against multiple human pathogens, including the three that predominate in OM. To this end, we conducted a retrospective case-control study of 113 OM prone children and 267 controls aged five to sixty months. We identified the copy number of the above defined beta-defensin gene cluster (DEFB-CN) in each study subject by paralogue ratio assays. The mean DEFB-CN was indistinguishable between subjects classified as OM prone based on a recent history of multiple episodes of OM and control subjects who had no history of OM (4.4 ± 0.96 versus 4.4 ± 1.08, respectively: Odds Ratio [OR]: 1.16 (95% CI: 0.61, 2.20). Despite a lack of direct association, we observed a statistically significant correlation between DEFB-CN and nasopharyngeal bacterial colonization patterns. Collectively, our findings suggested that susceptibility to OM might be mediated by genetic variation among individuals, wherein a DEFB-CN less than 4 exerts a marked influence on the microbiota of the nasopharynx, specifically with regard to colonization by the three predominant bacterial pathogens of OM.

  19. Copy number variation of the beta defensin gene cluster on chromosome 8p influences the bacterial microbiota within the nasopharynx of otitis-prone children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric A Jones

    Full Text Available As there is increasing evidence that aberrant defensin expression is related to susceptibility for infectious disease and inflammatory disorders, we sought to determine if copy number of the beta-defensin gene cluster located on chromosome 8p23.1 (DEFB107, 106, 105, 104, 103, DEFB4 and SPAG11, that shows copy number variation as a block, was associated with susceptibility to otitis media (OM. The gene DEFB103 within this complex encodes human beta defensin-3 (hBD-3, an antimicrobial peptide (AP expressed by epithelial cells that line the mammalian airway, important for defense of mucosal surfaces and previously shown to have bactericidal activity in vitro against multiple human pathogens, including the three that predominate in OM. To this end, we conducted a retrospective case-control study of 113 OM prone children and 267 controls aged five to sixty months. We identified the copy number of the above defined beta-defensin gene cluster (DEFB-CN in each study subject by paralogue ratio assays. The mean DEFB-CN was indistinguishable between subjects classified as OM prone based on a recent history of multiple episodes of OM and control subjects who had no history of OM (4.4 ± 0.96 versus 4.4 ± 1.08, respectively: Odds Ratio [OR]: 1.16 (95% CI: 0.61, 2.20. Despite a lack of direct association, we observed a statistically significant correlation between DEFB-CN and nasopharyngeal bacterial colonization patterns. Collectively, our findings suggested that susceptibility to OM might be mediated by genetic variation among individuals, wherein a DEFB-CN less than 4 exerts a marked influence on the microbiota of the nasopharynx, specifically with regard to colonization by the three predominant bacterial pathogens of OM.

  20. c-myc Gene Copy Number Variation in Cervical Exfoliated Cells Detected on Fluorescence in situ Hybridization for Cervical Cancer Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei-Hong; Hao, Min; Cheng, Xiao-Tong; Yang, Xin; Wang, Zhi-Lian; Cheng, Ke-Yan; Liu, Fang-Li; Bai, Yao-Xian

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed the clinical significance of c-myc gene copy number gain detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in the prediction of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) progression. We retrospectively investigated 140 Thinprep cytologic test (TCT) specimens that were histopathologically diagnosed with various stages of cervical neoplasia or malignancy. The specimens were subjected to TCT, human papillomavirus (HPV) testing, and FISH analysis with a c-myc-specific probe. The diagnostic reliability of these methods in determining progression was assessed according to sensitivity, specificity, and κ coefficients. The gene copy number gain of c-myc was significantly higher in the cervical lesion of advanced histologic grade (p c-myc gene test and either the TCT or the HPV DNA test were 0.538 and 0.399, respectively (p c-myc oncogene could be a useful adjunct screening method for the early diagnosis of high-grade cervical lesions. Moreover, c-myc may be a new molecular biomarker for the early diagnosis of cervical lesion progression. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Nuclear Reprogramming and Mitosis--how does mitosis enhance changes in gene expression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halley-Stott, Richard P

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear reprogramming changes the identity of cells by changing gene expression programmes. Two recent pieces of work have highlighted the role that mitosis plays in enhancing the success of nuclear reprogramming. This Point of View article examines this work in the context of nuclear reprogramming.

  2. Basal-like Breast cancer DNA copy number losses identify genes involved in genomic instability, response to therapy, and patient survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigman, Victor J; Chao, Hann-Hsiang; Shabalin, Andrey A; He, Xiaping; Parker, Joel S; Nordgard, Silje H; Grushko, Tatyana; Huo, Dezheng; Nwachukwu, Chika; Nobel, Andrew; Kristensen, Vessela N; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Perou, Charles M

    2012-06-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease with known expression-defined tumor subtypes. DNA copy number studies have suggested that tumors within gene expression subtypes share similar DNA Copy number aberrations (CNA) and that CNA can be used to further sub-divide expression classes. To gain further insights into the etiologies of the intrinsic subtypes, we classified tumors according to gene expression subtype and next identified subtype-associated CNA using a novel method called SWITCHdna, using a training set of 180 tumors and a validation set of 359 tumors. Fisher's exact tests, Chi-square approximations, and Wilcoxon rank-sum tests were performed to evaluate differences in CNA by subtype. To assess the functional significance of loss of a specific chromosomal region, individual genes were knocked down by shRNA and drug sensitivity, and DNA repair foci assays performed. Most tumor subtypes exhibited specific CNA. The Basal-like subtype was the most distinct with common losses of the regions containing RB1, BRCA1, INPP4B, and the greatest overall genomic instability. One Basal-like subtype-associated CNA was loss of 5q11-35, which contains at least three genes important for BRCA1-dependent DNA repair (RAD17, RAD50, and RAP80); these genes were predominantly lost as a pair, or all three simultaneously. Loss of two or three of these genes was associated with significantly increased genomic instability and poor patient survival. RNAi knockdown of RAD17, or RAD17/RAD50, in immortalized human mammary epithelial cell lines caused increased sensitivity to a PARP inhibitor and carboplatin, and inhibited BRCA1 foci formation in response to DNA damage. These data suggest a possible genetic cause for genomic instability in Basal-like breast cancers and a biological rationale for the use of DNA repair inhibitor related therapeutics in this breast cancer subtype.

  3. Increased copy number for methylated maternal 15q duplications leads to changes in gene and protein expression in human cortical samples

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    Scoles Haley A

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Duplication of chromosome 15q11-q13 (dup15q accounts for approximately 3% of autism cases. Chromosome 15q11-q13 contains imprinted genes necessary for normal mammalian neurodevelopment controlled by a differentially methylated imprinting center (imprinting center of the Prader-Willi locus, PWS-IC. Maternal dup15q occurs as both interstitial duplications and isodicentric chromosome 15. Overexpression of the maternally expressed gene UBE3A is predicted to be the primary cause of the autistic features associated with dup15q. Previous analysis of two postmortem dup15q frontal cortical samples showed heterogeneity between the two cases, with one showing levels of the GABAA receptor genes, UBE3A and SNRPN in a manner not predicted by copy number or parental imprint. Methods Postmortem human brain tissue (Brodmann area 19, extrastriate visual cortex was obtained from 8 dup15q, 10 idiopathic autism and 21 typical control tissue samples. Quantitative PCR was used to confirm duplication status. Quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot analyses were performed to measure 15q11-q13 transcript and protein levels, respectively. Methylation-sensitive high-resolution melting-curve analysis was performed on brain genomic DNA to identify the maternal:paternal ratio of methylation at PWS-IC. Results Dup15q brain samples showed a higher level of PWS-IC methylation than control or autism samples, indicating that dup15q was maternal in origin. UBE3A transcript and protein levels were significantly higher than control and autism in dup15q, as expected, although levels were variable and lower than expected based on copy number in some samples. In contrast, this increase in copy number did not result in consistently increased GABRB3 transcript or protein levels for dup15q samples. Furthermore, SNRPN was expected to be unchanged in expression in dup15q because it is expressed from the single unmethylated paternal allele, yet SNRPN levels were significantly

  4. Nonallelic homologous recombination of the FCGR2/3 locus results in copy number variation and novel chimeric FCGR2 genes with aberrant functional expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagelkerke, S Q; Tacke, C E; Breunis, W B; Geissler, J; Sins, J W R; Appelhof, B; van den Berg, T K; de Boer, M; Kuijpers, T W

    2015-09-01

    The human FCGR2/3 locus, containing five highly homologous genes encoding the major IgG receptors, shows extensive copy number variation (CNV) associated with susceptibility to autoimmune diseases. Having genotyped >4000 individuals, we show that all CNV at this locus can be explained by nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR) of the two paralogous repeats that constitute the majority of the locus, and describe four distinct CNV regions (CNRs) with a highly variable prevalence in the population. Apart from CNV, NAHR events also created several hitherto unidentified chimeric FCGR2 genes. These include an FCGR2A/2C chimeric gene that causes a decreased expression of FcγRIIa on phagocytes, resulting in a decreased production of reactive oxygen species in response to immune complexes, compared with wild-type FCGR2A. Conversely, FCGR2C/2A chimeric genes were identified to lead to an increased expression of FCGR2C. Finally, a rare FCGR2B null-variant allele was found, in which a polymorphic stop codon of FCGR2C is introduced into one FCGR2B gene, resulting in a 50% reduction in protein expression. Our study on CNRs and the chimeric genes is essential for the correct interpretation of association studies on FCGR genes as a determinant for disease susceptibility, and may explain some as yet unidentified extreme phenotypes of immune-mediated disease.

  5. Clinical array-based karyotyping of breast cancer with equivocal HER2 status resolves gene copy number and reveals chromosome 17 complexity

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    Zadeh Soheila

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HER2 gene copy status, and concomitant administration of trastuzumab (Herceptin, remains one of the best examples of targeted cancer therapy based on understanding the genomic etiology of disease. However, newly diagnosed breast cancer cases with equivocal HER2 results present a challenge for the oncologist who must make treatment decisions despite the patient's unresolved HER2 status. In some cases both immunohistochemistry (IHC and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH are reported as equivocal, whereas in other cases IHC results and FISH are discordant for positive versus negative results. The recent validation of array-based, molecular karyotyping for clinical oncology testing provides an alternative method for determination of HER2 gene copy number status in cases remaining unresolved by traditional methods. Methods In the current study, DNA extracted from 20 formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE tissue samples from newly diagnosed cases of invasive ductal carcinoma referred to our laboratory with unresolved HER2 status, were analyzed using a clinically validated genomic array containing 127 probes covering the HER2 amplicon, the pericentromeric regions, and both chromosome 17 arms. Results Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH analysis of chromosome 17 resolved HER2 gene status in [20/20] (100% of cases and revealed additional chromosome 17 copy number changes in [18/20] (90% of cases. Array CGH analysis also revealed two false positives and one false negative by FISH due to "ratio skewing" caused by chromosomal gains and losses in the centromeric region. All cases with complex rearrangements of chromosome 17 showed genome-wide chromosomal instability. Conclusions These results illustrate the analytical power of array-based genomic analysis as a clinical laboratory technique for resolution of HER2 status in breast cancer cases with equivocal results. The frequency of complex chromosome 17

  6. An influence of the copy number of biosynthetic gene clusters on the production level of antibiotics in a heterologous host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manderscheid, Niko; Bilyk, Bohdan; Busche, Tobias; Kalinowski, Jörn; Paululat, Thomas; Bechthold, Andreas; Petzke, Lutz; Luzhetskyy, Andriy

    2016-08-20

    Streptomyces albus J1074 is a well-known host for heterologous expression of secondary metabolites. To further increase its potential and to study the influence of cluster multiplication, additional φC31-attachment site was integrated into its genome using a system for transposon mutagenesis. Four secondary metabolite clusters were expressed in strains with different numbers of attachment sites, ranging from one to three copies of the site. Secondary metabolite production was examined and a new compound could be detected, purified and its structure was elucidated.

  7. Genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation, copy number variation, and gene expression in monozygotic twins discordant for primary biliary cirrhosis

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    Carlo eSelmi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC is an uncommon autoimmune disease with a homogeneous clinical phenotype that reflects incomplete disease concordance in monozygotic (MZ twins. We have taken advantage of a unique collection consisting of genomic DNA and mRNA from peripheral blood cells of female MZ twins (n=3 sets and sisters of similar age (n=8 pairs discordant for disease. We performed a genome-wide study to investigate differences in (i DNA methylation (using a custom tiled 4-plex array containing tiled 50-mers 19,084 randomly chosen methylation sites, (ii copy number variation (CNV (with a chip including markers derived from the 1000 Genomes Project, all three HapMap phases, and recently published studies, and/or (iii gene expression (by whole-genome expression arrays. Based on the results obtained from these three approaches we utilized quantitative PCR to compare the expression of candidate genes. Importantly, our data support consistent differences in discordant twins and siblings for the (i methylation profiles of 60 gene regions, (ii CNV of 10 genes, and (iii the expression of 2 interferon-dependent genes. Quantitative PCR analysis showed that 17 of these genes are differentially expressed in discordant sibling pairs. In conclusion, we report that MZ twins and sisters discordant for PBC manifest particular epigenetic differences and highlight the value of the epigenetic study of twins.

  8. Copy number variation of Fc gamma receptor genes in HIV-infected and HIV-tuberculosis co-infected individuals in sub-Saharan Africa.

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    Lee R Machado

    Full Text Available AIDS, caused by the retrovirus HIV, remains the largest cause of morbidity in sub-Saharan Africa yet almost all genetic studies have focused on cohorts from Western countries. HIV shows high co-morbidity with tuberculosis (TB, as HIV stimulates the reactivation of latent tuberculosis (TB. Recent clinical trials suggest that an effective anti-HIV response correlates with non-neutralising antibodies. Given that Fcγ receptors are critical in mediating the non-neutralising effects of antibodies, analysis of the extensive variation at Fcγ receptor genes is important. Single nucleotide variation and copy number variation (CNV of Fcγ receptor genes affects the expression profile, activatory/inhibitory balance, and IgG affinity of the Fcγ receptor repertoire of each individual. In this study we investigated whether CNV of FCGR2C, FCGR3A and FCGR3B as well as the HNA1 allotype of FCGR3B is associated with HIV load, response to highly-active antiretroviral therapy (HAART and co-infection with TB. We confirmed an effect of TB-co-infection status on HIV load and response to HAART, but no conclusive effect of the genetic variants we tested. We observed a small effect, in Ethiopians, of FCGR3B copy number, where deletion was more frequent in HIV-TB co-infected patients than those infected with HIV alone.

  9. Cut, copy, move, delete: The study of human interferon genes reveal multiple mechanisms underlying their evolution in amniotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Christopher D; Pestka, Sidney

    2015-12-01

    Interferons (IFNs) are rapidly evolving cytokines released when viral infections are detected in cells. Previous research suggests that genes encoding IFNs and their receptors duplicated extensively throughout vertebrate evolution. We present molecular genetic evidence that supports the use of nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR) to expand select IFN genes during amniote evolution. The duplication of long regions of genome (encompassing at least one functional IFN gene) followed by the insertion of this genome fragment near its parent's location, is commonly observed in many amniote genomes. Duplicates inserted away from duplication hotspots are not as frequently perturbed with new duplicates, and tend to survive long periods of evolution, sometimes becoming new IFN subtypes. Although most duplicates are inserted parallel to and near the original sequence, the insertion of the Kelch-like 9 gene within the Type I IFN locus of placental mammals promoted antiparallel insertion of gene duplicates between the Kelch-like 9 and IFN-ε loci. Genetic exchange between highly similar Type I gene duplicates as well as between Type III IFN gene duplicates homogenized their diversification. Oddly, Type III IFN genes migrated long distances throughout the genome more frequently than did Type I IFN genes. The inter-chromosomal movement of Type I IFN genes in amniotes correlated with complete intron loss in their gene structure, and repeatedly occurred with occasional Type III IFN genes.

  10. Multiplex Ligation-Dependent Probe Amplification Analysis of GATA4 Gene Copy Number Variations in Patients with Isolated Congenital Heart Disease

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    Valentina Guida

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available GATA4 mutations are found in patients with different isolated congenital heart defects (CHDs, mostly cardiac septal defects and tetralogy of Fallot. In addition, GATA4 is supposed to be the responsible gene for the CHDs in the chromosomal 8p23 deletion syndrome, which is recognized as a malformation syndrome with clinical symptoms of facial anomalies, microcephaly, mental retardation, and congenital heart defects. Thus far, no study has been carried out to investigate the role of GATA4 copy number variations (CNVs in non-syndromic CHDs. To explore the possible occurrence of GATA4 gene CNVs in isolated CHDs, we analyzed by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA a cohort of 161 non-syndromic patients with cardiac anomalies previously associated with GATA4 gene mutations. The patients were mutation-negative for GATA4, NKX2.5, and FOG2 genes after screening with denaturing high performance liquid chromatography. MLPA analysis revealed that normalized MLPA signals were all found within the normal range values for all exons in all patients, excluding a major contribution of GATA4 gene CNVs in CHD pathogenesis.

  11. Correlation of epidermal growth factor receptor overexpression with increased epidermal growth factor receptor gene copy number in esophageal squamous cell carcinomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Yan-li; XU Kan-lun; ZHOU Yan; GAO Xin; CHEN Li-rong

    2012-01-01

    Background Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is one of the most frequent malignancies in China and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is widely distributed in human epithelial cell membrane.The aim of this study was to investigate the protein overexpression and gene copy number of EGFR in ESCC,and help to identify patients who may benefit from EGFR targeted therapies.Methods Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was performed to analyze the expression of EGFR in 105 cases of ESCC,16 cases of squamous epithelial atypical hyperplasia,and 11 cases of normal esophageal tissue.Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was performed to analyze the gene copy number in 80 cases of ESCC,eight cases of squamous epithelial atypical hyperplasia,and eight samples of normal esophageal tissue.Results The IHC-positive rates of EGFR in 105 cases of ESCC,16 cases of squamous epithelial atypical hyperplasia,and 11 normal esophageal tissues were 97% (102/105),44% (7/16),and 18% (2/11) respectively.The difference in the expression of EGFR among different esophageal tissue groups had statistically significance (P <0.05).Among the 105 cases of ESCC,overexpression of EGFR was found in 90 cases (86%),of which 55 cases scored 3+ for EGFR staining and 35 cases scored 2+.In ESCC,the expression of EGFR was significantly correlated with depth of invasion and TNM stage (P<0.05),but not with other parameters.The FISH-positive rates of EGFR in 80 cases of ESCC,the eight cases of squamous epithelial atypical hyperplasia,and eight samples of normal esophageal tissue were 31.3% (25/80),0 (0/8) and 0 (0/8) respectively.In ESCC,EGFR gene amplification was found in 17 (21%) cases,high polysomy in 8 (10%) cases,disomy in 34 cases,low trisomy in 17 cases,and high trisomy in four cases.EGFR FISH-positive was significantly correlated with depth of invasion and lymph node metastasis (P <0.05).EGFR FISH-positive was significantly associated with overexpression of EGFR.Conclusion Protein

  12. Deficit of mito-nuclear genes on the human X chromosome predates sex chromosome formation

    OpenAIRE

    Dean, R; Zimmer, F.; Mank, J E

    2015-01-01

    Two taxa studied to date, the therian mammals and Caenorhaditis elegans, display under-representations of mito-nuclear genes (mt-N genes, nuclear genes whose products are imported to and act within the mitochondria) on their X chromosomes. This pattern has been interpreted as the result of sexual conflict driving mt-N genes off of the X chromosome. However, studies in several other species have failed to detect a convergent biased distribution of sex-linked mt-N genes, leading to questions ov...

  13. Hacking DNA copy number for circuit engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Feilun; You, Lingchong

    2017-07-27

    DNA copy number represents an essential parameter in the dynamics of synthetic gene circuits but typically is not explicitly considered. A new study demonstrates how dynamic control of DNA copy number can serve as an effective strategy to program robust oscillations in gene expression circuits.

  14. Genome-wide loss of heterozygosity and copy number alteration in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma using the Affymetrix GeneChip Mapping 10 K array

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    Goldstein Alisa M

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC is a common malignancy worldwide. Comprehensive genomic characterization of ESCC will further our understanding of the carcinogenesis process in this disease. Results Genome-wide detection of chromosomal changes was performed using the Affymetrix GeneChip 10 K single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP array, including loss of heterozygosity (LOH and copy number alterations (CNA, for 26 pairs of matched germ-line and micro-dissected tumor DNA samples. LOH regions were identified by two methods – using Affymetrix's genotype call software and using Affymetrix's copy number alteration tool (CNAT software – and both approaches yielded similar results. Non-random LOH regions were found on 10 chromosomal arms (in decreasing order of frequency: 17p, 9p, 9q, 13q, 17q, 4q, 4p, 3p, 15q, and 5q, including 20 novel LOH regions (10 kb to 4.26 Mb. Fifteen CNA-loss regions (200 kb to 4.3 Mb and 36 CNA-gain regions (200 kb to 9.3 Mb were also identified. Conclusion These studies demonstrate that the Affymetrix 10 K SNP chip is a valid platform to integrate analyses of LOH and CNA. The comprehensive knowledge gained from this analysis will enable improved strategies to prevent, diagnose, and treat ESCC.

  15. Novel Candidate Key Drivers in the Integrative Network of Genes, MicroRNAs, Methylations, and Copy Number Variations in Squamous Cell Lung Carcinoma

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    Tao Huang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms of lung cancer are highly complex. Not only mRNA gene expression but also microRNAs, DNA methylation, and copy number variation (CNV play roles in tumorigenesis. It is difficult to incorporate so much information into a single model that can comprehensively reflect all these lung cancer mechanisms. In this study, we analyzed the 129 TCGA (The Cancer Genome Atlas squamous cell lung carcinoma samples with gene expression, microRNA expression, DNA methylation, and CNV data. First, we used variance inflation factor (VIF regression to build the whole genome integrative network. Then, we isolated the lung cancer subnetwork by identifying the known lung cancer genes and their direct regulators. This subnetwork was refined by the Bayesian method, and the directed regulations among mRNA genes, microRNAs, methylations, and CNVs were obtained. The novel candidate key drivers in this refined subnetwork, such as the methylation of ARHGDIB and HOXD3, microRNA let-7a and miR-31, and the CNV of AGAP2, were identified and analyzed. On three large public available lung cancer datasets, the key drivers ARHGDIB and HOXD3 demonstrated significant associations with the overall survival of lung cancer patients. Our results provide new insights into lung cancer mechanisms.

  16. Germline DNA copy number variation in individuals with Argyrophilic grain disease reveals CTNS as a plausible candidate gene

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    Darine Villela

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Argyrophilic grain disease (AGD is a progressive neurodegenerative disease of the human brain that has never been associated to a particular gene locus. In the present study, we report the results of a CNV investigation in 29 individuals whose anatomopathologic investigation of the brain showed AGD. Rare CNVs were identified in six patients (21%, in particular a 40 kb deletion at 17p13.2 encompassing the CTNS gene. Homozygote mutations in CTNS are known to cause cystinosis, a disorder characterized by the intralysosomal accumulation of cystine in all tissues. We present the first CNV results in individuals presenting AGD and a possible candidate gene implicated in the disorder.

  17. Susceptibility for Lupus Nephritis by Low Copy Number of the FCGR3B Gene Is Linked to Increased Levels of Pathogenic Autoantibodies

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    Johannes C. Nossent

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Low copy number (CN of the FCGR3B gene reduces FCGR3B membrane expression on neutrophils and results in clearance of a smaller amount of immune complex. We investigated FCGR3B CN in relation to the clinical phenotype in a Caucasian SLE cohort (. FCGR3B CN was determined by three different qPCR parameter estimations (Ct−, Cy0, and cpD1 and confirmed by the FCGR2C/FCGR2A paralog ratio test. Clinical and serological data were then analyzed for their association with FCGR3B CN. Low FCGR3B CN (2. In multivariate analyses, LN was independently associated with anti-C1q-Ab levels ( and low FCGR3B CN (. We conclude that the susceptibility for LN in patients with low FCGR3B CN is linked to increased levels of pathogenic autoantibodies.

  18. Assessment of the topoisomerase I gene copy number as a predictive biomarker of objective response to irinotecan in metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygård, Sune Boris; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Nielsen, Signe Lykke;

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective. DNA topoisomerase I is a putative biomarker of irinotecan efficacy with clinical associations previously demonstrated at the protein level. The purpose of the present study was to perform the first clinical investigation of the association between the DNA topoisomerase I gene...... (TOP1) copy number and objective response following irinotecan treatment in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. Materials and methods. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor samples from 78 patients, who received irinotecan monotherapy in second line, were included. TOP1 was assessed....... Despite limitations of the study the positive associations between TOP1 and objective response suggest that further analysis in larger tumor material, preferably in a randomized setting, is highly warranted....

  19. Age-dependent brain gene expression and copy number anomalies in autism suggest distinct pathological processes at young versus mature ages.

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    Maggie L Chow

    Full Text Available Autism is a highly heritable neurodevelopmental disorder, yet the genetic underpinnings of the disorder are largely unknown. Aberrant brain overgrowth is a well-replicated observation in the autism literature; but association, linkage, and expression studies have not identified genetic factors that explain this trajectory. Few studies have had sufficient statistical power to investigate whole-genome gene expression and genotypic variation in the autistic brain, especially in regions that display the greatest growth abnormality. Previous functional genomic studies have identified possible alterations in transcript levels of genes related to neurodevelopment and immune function. Thus, there is a need for genetic studies involving key brain regions to replicate these findings and solidify the role of particular functional pathways in autism pathogenesis. We therefore sought to identify abnormal brain gene expression patterns via whole-genome analysis of mRNA levels and copy number variations (CNVs in autistic and control postmortem brain samples. We focused on prefrontal cortex tissue where excess neuron numbers and cortical overgrowth are pronounced in the majority of autism cases. We found evidence for dysregulation in pathways governing cell number, cortical patterning, and differentiation in young autistic prefrontal cortex. In contrast, adult autistic prefrontal cortex showed dysregulation of signaling and repair pathways. Genes regulating cell cycle also exhibited autism-specific CNVs in DNA derived from prefrontal cortex, and these genes were significantly associated with autism in genome-wide association study datasets. Our results suggest that CNVs and age-dependent gene expression changes in autism may reflect distinct pathological processes in the developing versus the mature autistic prefrontal cortex. Our results raise the hypothesis that genetic dysregulation in the developing brain leads to abnormal regional patterning, excess

  20. Age-dependent brain gene expression and copy number anomalies in autism suggest distinct pathological processes at young versus mature ages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Maggie L; Pramparo, Tiziano; Winn, Mary E; Barnes, Cynthia Carter; Li, Hai-Ri; Weiss, Lauren; Fan, Jian-Bing; Murray, Sarah; April, Craig; Belinson, Haim; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony; Schork, Nicholas J; Courchesne, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Autism is a highly heritable neurodevelopmental disorder, yet the genetic underpinnings of the disorder are largely unknown. Aberrant brain overgrowth is a well-replicated observation in the autism literature; but association, linkage, and expression studies have not identified genetic factors that explain this trajectory. Few studies have had sufficient statistical power to investigate whole-genome gene expression and genotypic variation in the autistic brain, especially in regions that display the greatest growth abnormality. Previous functional genomic studies have identified possible alterations in transcript levels of genes related to neurodevelopment and immune function. Thus, there is a need for genetic studies involving key brain regions to replicate these findings and solidify the role of particular functional pathways in autism pathogenesis. We therefore sought to identify abnormal brain gene expression patterns via whole-genome analysis of mRNA levels and copy number variations (CNVs) in autistic and control postmortem brain samples. We focused on prefrontal cortex tissue where excess neuron numbers and cortical overgrowth are pronounced in the majority of autism cases. We found evidence for dysregulation in pathways governing cell number, cortical patterning, and differentiation in young autistic prefrontal cortex. In contrast, adult autistic prefrontal cortex showed dysregulation of signaling and repair pathways. Genes regulating cell cycle also exhibited autism-specific CNVs in DNA derived from prefrontal cortex, and these genes were significantly associated with autism in genome-wide association study datasets. Our results suggest that CNVs and age-dependent gene expression changes in autism may reflect distinct pathological processes in the developing versus the mature autistic prefrontal cortex. Our results raise the hypothesis that genetic dysregulation in the developing brain leads to abnormal regional patterning, excess prefrontal neurons

  1. An open label phase II study evaluating first-line EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor erlotinib in non-small cell lung cancer patients with tumors showing high EGFR gene copy number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczyk, Anna; Suszko-Kazarnowicz, Malgorzata; Duchnowska, Renata; Szczesna, Aleksandra; Ratajska, Magdalena; Sowa, Aleksander; Limon, Janusz; Biernat, Wojciech; Burzykowski, Tomasz; Jassem, Jacek; Dziadziuszko, Rafal

    2017-01-01

    Background First-line treatment with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors in NSCLC is effective in patients with activating EGFR mutations. The activity of erlotinib in patients harboring high EGFR gene copy number has been considered debatable. Patients and Methods A multicenter, open-label, single-arm phase II clinical trial was performed to test the efficacy of erlotinib in the first-line treatment of NSCLC patients harboring high EGFR gene copy number defined as =4 copies in =40% of cells. Findings Between December 2007 and April 2011, tumor samples from 149 subjects were screened for EGFR gene copy number by fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH), Out of 49 patients with positive EGFR FISH test, 45 were treated with erlotinib. Median PFS in the intent-to-treat population was 3.3 months (95%CI: 1.83.9 months), and median overall survival was 7.9 months (95% CI: 5.112.6 months). Toxicity profile of erlotinib was consistent with its known safety profile. The trial was stopped prematurely at 63% of originally planned sample size due to accumulating evidence that EGFR gene copy number should not be used to select NSCLC patients to first-line therapy with EGFR TKI. Data on erlotinib efficacy according to EGFR, KRAS and BRAF mutations are additionally presented. Interpretation This trial argues against using high gene copy number for selection of NSCLC patients to first-line therapy with EGFR TKIs. The study adds to the discussion on efficacy of other targeted agents in patients with target gene amplified tumors. PMID:27924059

  2. Diagnosing Smith-Magenis syndrome and duplication 17p11.2 syndrome by RAI1 gene copy number variation using quantitative real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Hoa T; Solaymani-Kohal, Sara; Baker, Kevin R; Girirajan, Santhosh; Williams, Stephen R; Vlangos, Christopher N; Smith, Ann C M; Bunyan, David J; Roffey, Paul E; Blanchard, Christopher L; Elsea, Sarah H

    2008-03-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) and duplication 17p11.2 (dup17p11.2) syndrome are multiple congenital anomalies/mental retardation disorders resulting from either a deletion or duplication of the 17p11.2 region, respectively. The retinoic acid induced 1 (RAI1) gene is the causative gene for SMS and is included in the 17p11.2 region of dup17p11.2 syndrome. Currently SMS and dup17p11.2 syndrome are diagnosed using a combination of clinically recognized phenotypes and molecular cytogenetic analyses such as fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). However, these methods have proven to be highly expensive, time consuming, and dependent upon the low resolving capabilities of the assay. To address the need for improved diagnostic methods for SMS and dup17p11.2 syndrome, we designed a quantitative real-time PCR (Q-PCR) assay that measures RAI1 copy number using the comparative C(t) method, DeltaDeltaC(t). We tested our assay with samples blinded to their previous SMS or dup17p11.2 syndrome status. In all cases, we were able to determine RAI1 copy number status and render a correct diagnosis accordingly. We validated these results by both FISH and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA). We conclude that Q-PCR is an accurate, reproducible, low-cost, and reliable assay that can be employed for routine use in SMS and dup17p11.2 diagnosis.

  3. Are there any more ovarian tumor suppressor genes? A new perspective using ultra high-resolution copy number and loss of heterozygosity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorringe, Kylie L; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Williams, Louise H; Sridhar, Anita; Boyle, Samantha E; Bearfoot, Jennifer L; Li, Jason; Anglesio, Michael S; Campbell, Ian G

    2009-10-01

    Ovarian cancer is characterized by complex genetic alterations, including copy number loss and copy number-neutral loss of heterozygosity (LOH). These alterations are assumed to represent the "second hit" of the underlying tumor suppressor gene (TSG), however, relative to the number of LOH hotspots reported, few ovarian TSGs have been identified. We conducted a high-resolution LOH analysis using SNP arrays (500K and SNP6.0) of 106 primary ovarian tumors of various histological subtypes together with matching normal DNA. LOH was detected in at least 35% of samples on chromosomes 17, 19p, 22q, Xp, 13q, 8p, 6q, 4q, 5q, 1p, 16q, and 9q with a median minimal region of overlap of only 300 kb. Subtype-specific differences in LOH frequency were noted, particularly for mucinous cases. We also identified 192 somatic homozygous deletions (HDs). Recurrent HDs targeted known TSGs such as CDKN2A (eight samples), RB1 (five samples), and PTEN (three samples). Additional recurrent HDs targeted 16 candidate TSGs near minimal regions of LOH on chromosomes 17, 13, 8p, 5q, and X. Given the importance of HDs in inactivating known genes, these candidates are highly likely to be ovarian TSGs. Our data suggest that the poor success of previous LOH studies was due to the inability of previous technology to resolve complex genomic alterations and distinguish true LOH from allelic imbalance. This study shows that recurrent regions of LOH and HD frequently align with known TSGs suggesting that LOH analysis remains a valid approach to discovering new candidates.

  4. A rhomboid gene controls speciation through regulation of nuclear-mitochondrial compatibility in Triticum

    Science.gov (United States)

    The nuclear encoded species cytoplasm specific (scs) genes control nuclear-cytoplasmic compatibility in Triticum. Alloplasmic cells, which have nucleus and cytoplasm derived from different species, produce vigorous and vital organisms only when the correct version of scs is present in their nucleus....

  5. Gene set of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial regulators is enriched for common inherited variation in obesity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadja Knoll

    Full Text Available There are hints of an altered mitochondrial function in obesity. Nuclear-encoded genes are relevant for mitochondrial function (3 gene sets of known relevant pathways: (1 16 nuclear regulators of mitochondrial genes, (2 91 genes for oxidative phosphorylation and (3 966 nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes. Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA showed no association with type 2 diabetes mellitus in these gene sets. Here we performed a GSEA for the same gene sets for obesity. Genome wide association study (GWAS data from a case-control approach on 453 extremely obese children and adolescents and 435 lean adult controls were used for GSEA. For independent confirmation, we analyzed 705 obesity GWAS trios (extremely obese child and both biological parents and a population-based GWAS sample (KORA F4, n = 1,743. A meta-analysis was performed on all three samples. In each sample, the distribution of significance levels between the respective gene set and those of all genes was compared using the leading-edge-fraction-comparison test (cut-offs between the 50(th and 95(th percentile of the set of all gene-wise corrected p-values as implemented in the MAGENTA software. In the case-control sample, significant enrichment of associations with obesity was observed above the 50(th percentile for the set of the 16 nuclear regulators of mitochondrial genes (p(GSEA,50 = 0.0103. This finding was not confirmed in the trios (p(GSEA,50 = 0.5991, but in KORA (p(GSEA,50 = 0.0398. The meta-analysis again indicated a trend for enrichment (p(MAGENTA,50 = 0.1052, p(MAGENTA,75 = 0.0251. The GSEA revealed that weak association signals for obesity might be enriched in the gene set of 16 nuclear regulators of mitochondrial genes.

  6. Gene set of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial regulators is enriched for common inherited variation in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoll, Nadja; Jarick, Ivonne; Volckmar, Anna-Lena; Klingenspor, Martin; Illig, Thomas; Grallert, Harald; Gieger, Christian; Wichmann, Heinz-Erich; Peters, Annette; Hebebrand, Johannes; Scherag, André; Hinney, Anke

    2013-01-01

    There are hints of an altered mitochondrial function in obesity. Nuclear-encoded genes are relevant for mitochondrial function (3 gene sets of known relevant pathways: (1) 16 nuclear regulators of mitochondrial genes, (2) 91 genes for oxidative phosphorylation and (3) 966 nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes). Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) showed no association with type 2 diabetes mellitus in these gene sets. Here we performed a GSEA for the same gene sets for obesity. Genome wide association study (GWAS) data from a case-control approach on 453 extremely obese children and adolescents and 435 lean adult controls were used for GSEA. For independent confirmation, we analyzed 705 obesity GWAS trios (extremely obese child and both biological parents) and a population-based GWAS sample (KORA F4, n = 1,743). A meta-analysis was performed on all three samples. In each sample, the distribution of significance levels between the respective gene set and those of all genes was compared using the leading-edge-fraction-comparison test (cut-offs between the 50(th) and 95(th) percentile of the set of all gene-wise corrected p-values) as implemented in the MAGENTA software. In the case-control sample, significant enrichment of associations with obesity was observed above the 50(th) percentile for the set of the 16 nuclear regulators of mitochondrial genes (p(GSEA,50) = 0.0103). This finding was not confirmed in the trios (p(GSEA,50) = 0.5991), but in KORA (p(GSEA,50) = 0.0398). The meta-analysis again indicated a trend for enrichment (p(MAGENTA,50) = 0.1052, p(MAGENTA,75) = 0.0251). The GSEA revealed that weak association signals for obesity might be enriched in the gene set of 16 nuclear regulators of mitochondrial genes.

  7. Global Developmental Gene Programing Involves a Nuclear Form of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor-1 (FGFR1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Terranova

    Full Text Available Genetic studies have placed the Fgfr1 gene at the top of major ontogenic pathways that enable gastrulation, tissue development and organogenesis. Using genome-wide sequencing and loss and gain of function experiments the present investigation reveals a mechanism that underlies global and direct gene regulation by the nuclear form of FGFR1, ensuring that pluripotent Embryonic Stem Cells differentiate into Neuronal Cells in response to Retinoic Acid. Nuclear FGFR1, both alone and with its partner nuclear receptors RXR and Nur77, targets thousands of active genes and controls the expression of pluripotency, homeobox, neuronal and mesodermal genes. Nuclear FGFR1 targets genes in developmental pathways represented by Wnt/β-catenin, CREB, BMP, the cell cycle and cancer-related TP53 pathway, neuroectodermal and mesodermal programing networks, axonal growth and synaptic plasticity pathways. Nuclear FGFR1 targets the consensus sequences of transcription factors known to engage CREB-binding protein, a common coregulator of transcription and established binding partner of nuclear FGFR1. This investigation reveals the role of nuclear FGFR1 as a global genomic programmer of cell, neural and muscle development.

  8. Global Developmental Gene Programing Involves a Nuclear Form of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor-1 (FGFR1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terranova, Christopher; Narla, Sridhar T; Lee, Yu-Wei; Bard, Jonathan; Parikh, Abhirath; Stachowiak, Ewa K; Tzanakakis, Emmanuel S; Buck, Michael J; Birkaya, Barbara; Stachowiak, Michal K

    2015-01-01

    Genetic studies have placed the Fgfr1 gene at the top of major ontogenic pathways that enable gastrulation, tissue development and organogenesis. Using genome-wide sequencing and loss and gain of function experiments the present investigation reveals a mechanism that underlies global and direct gene regulation by the nuclear form of FGFR1, ensuring that pluripotent Embryonic Stem Cells differentiate into Neuronal Cells in response to Retinoic Acid. Nuclear FGFR1, both alone and with its partner nuclear receptors RXR and Nur77, targets thousands of active genes and controls the expression of pluripotency, homeobox, neuronal and mesodermal genes. Nuclear FGFR1 targets genes in developmental pathways represented by Wnt/β-catenin, CREB, BMP, the cell cycle and cancer-related TP53 pathway, neuroectodermal and mesodermal programing networks, axonal growth and synaptic plasticity pathways. Nuclear FGFR1 targets the consensus sequences of transcription factors known to engage CREB-binding protein, a common coregulator of transcription and established binding partner of nuclear FGFR1. This investigation reveals the role of nuclear FGFR1 as a global genomic programmer of cell, neural and muscle development.

  9. Comparative Analysis of Codon Usage Patterns Among Mitochondrion, Chloroplast and Nuclear Genes in Triticum aestivum L.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Juan Zhang; Jie Zhou; Zuo-Feng Li; Li Wang; Xun Gu; Yang Zhong

    2007-01-01

    In many organisms, the difference in codon usage patterns among genes reflects variation in local base compositional biases and the intensity of natural selection. In this study, a comparative analysis was performed to investigate the characteristics of codon bias and factors in shaping the codon usage patterns among mitochondrion,chloroplast and nuclear genes in common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). GC contents in nuclear genes were higher than that in mitochondrion and chloroplast genes. The neutrality and correspondence analyses indicated that the codon usage in nuclear genes would be a result of relative strong mutational bias, while the codon usage patterns of rnitochondrion and chloroplast genes were more conserved in GC content and influenced by translation level.The Parity Rule 2 (PR2) plot analysis showed that pyrimidines were used more frequently than purines at the third codon position in the three genomes. In addition, using a new alterative strategy, 11, 12, and 24 triplets were defined as preferred codons in the mitochondrion, chloroplast and nuclear genes, respectively. These findings suggested that the mitochondrion, chloroplast and nuclear genes shared particularly different features of codon usage and evolutionary constraints.

  10. Identification of rare high-risk copy number variants affecting the dopamine transporter gene in mental disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoeffding, Louise K; Duong, Linh T T; Ingason, Andrés;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The dopamine transporter, also known as solute carrier 6A3 (SLC6A3), plays an important role in synaptic transmission by regulating the reuptake of dopamine in the synapses. In line with this, variations in the gene encoding this transporter have been linked to both schizophrenia...... rare high-risk variants of psychiatric disorders. METHODS: We performed a systematic screening for CNVs affecting SLC6A3 in 761 healthy controls, 672 schizophrenia patients, and 194 patients with bipolar disorder in addition to 253 family members from six large pedigrees affected by mental disorders...... sizes and two affected several genes in addition to SLC6A3. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that rare high-risk CNVs affecting the gene encoding the dopamine transporter contribute to the pathogenesis of schizophrenia and affective disorders....

  11. Collateral damage: Spread of repeat-induced point mutation from a duplicated DNA sequence into an adjoining single-copy gene in Neurospora crassa

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Meenal Vyas; Durgadas P Kasbekar

    2005-02-01

    Repeat-induced point mutation (RIP) is an unusual genome defense mechanism that was discovered in Neurospora crassa. RIP occurs during a sexual cross and induces numerous G : C to A : T mutations in duplicated DNA sequences and also methylates many of the remaining cytosine residues. We measured the susceptibility of the erg-3 gene, present in single copy, to the spread of RIP from duplications of adjoining sequences. Genomic segments of defined length (1, 1.5 or 2 kb) and located at defined distances (0, 0.5, 1 or 2 kb) upstream or downstream of the erg-3 open reading frame (ORF) were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and the duplications were created by transformation of the amplified DNA. Crosses were made with the duplication strains and the frequency of erg-3 mutant progeny provided a measure of the spread of RIP from the duplicated segments into the erg-3 gene. Our results suggest that ordinarily RIP-spread does not occur. However, occasionally the mechanism that confines RIP to the duplicated segment seems to fail (frequency 0.1–0.8%) and then RIP can spread across as much as 1 kb of unduplicated DNA. Additionally, the bacterial hph gene appeared to be very susceptible to the spread of RIP-associated cytosine methylation.

  12. Effect of MPG gene rs2858056 polymorphism, copy number variation, and level of serum MPG protein on the risk for rheumatoid arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Ming Huang

    Full Text Available This study examined the role of SNP rs2858056 of the MPG gene on the incidence and severity of rheumatoid arthritis (RA.This cohort study enrolled 365 RA patients and 375 age- and gender-matched healthy controls, all of whom had Han Chinese ethnicity and were from Taiwan. Gene polymorphism of the SNP rs2858056 of MPG was determined from genomic DNA. Allelic frequencies and genotypes were compared among cases and controls. Quantitation of rs2858056 copy number variation (CNV was determined. Serum samples from RA patients and controls were analyzed to determine serum levels of MPG. The relationship between rs2858056 polymorphism and clinical manifestations of RA was evaluated.Our results indicated a statistically significant difference in genotype frequency distributions at rs2858056 for RA patients and controls (p = 0.05 and a significant difference in allelic frequency in patients and controls (p = 0.04. Furthermore, there was a significantly greater level of serum MPG protein in patients than controls (p < 0.001. However, the cases and controls had no significant differences in MPG CNV (p = 0.12. We also did not detect any association of the MPG rs2858056 with rheumatoid factor (RF, extraarticular involvement, or bone erosion in the RA patients.Our study suggests that RA is associated with a polymorphism in the MPG gene (rs2858056 and increased serum level of the MPG protein.

  13. Constructing Bayesian networks by integrating gene expression and copy number data identifies NLGN4Y as a novel regulator of prostate cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yixuan; Wang, Li; Chippada-Venkata, Uma; Dai, Xudong; Oh, William K; Zhu, Jun

    2016-10-18

    To understand the heterogeneity of prostate cancer (PCa) and identify novel underlying drivers, we constructed integrative molecular Bayesian networks (IMBNs) for PCa by integrating gene expression and copy number alteration data from published datasets. After demonstrating such IMBNs with superior network accuracy, we identified multiple sub-networks within IMBNs related to biochemical recurrence (BCR) of PCa and inferred the corresponding key drivers. The key drivers regulated a set of common effectors including genes preferentially expressed in neuronal cells. NLGN4Y-a protein involved in synaptic adhesion in neurons-was ranked as the top gene closely linked to key drivers of myogenesis subnetworks. Lower expression of NLGN4Y was associated with higher grade PCa and an increased risk of BCR. We show that restoration of the protein expression of NLGN4Y in PC-3 cells leads to decreased cell proliferation, migration and inflammatory cytokine expression. Our results suggest that NLGN4Y is an important negative regulator in prostate cancer progression. More importantly, it highlights the value of IMBNs in generating biologically and clinically relevant hypotheses about prostate cancer that can be validated by independent studies.

  14. PABPN1 overexpression leads to upregulation of genes encoding nuclear proteins that are sequestered in oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy nuclear inclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbeil-Girard, Louis-Philippe; Klein, Arnaud F; Sasseville, A Marie-Josée; Lavoie, Hugo; Dicaire, Marie-Josée; Saint-Denis, Anik; Pagé, Martin; Duranceau, André; Codère, François; Bouchard, Jean-Pierre; Karpati, George; Rouleau, Guy A; Massie, Bernard; Langelier, Yves; Brais, Bernard

    2005-04-01

    Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) is an adult-onset disease caused by expanded (GCN)12-17 stretches encoding the N-terminal polyalanine domain of the poly(A) binding protein nuclear 1 (PABPN1). OPMD is characterized by intranuclear inclusions (INIs) in skeletal muscle fibers, which contain PABPN1, molecular chaperones, ubiquitin, proteasome subunits, and poly(A)-mRNA. We describe an adenoviral model of PABPN1 expression that produces INIs in most cells. Microarray analysis revealed that PABPN1 overexpression reproducibly changed the expression of 202 genes. Sixty percent of upregulated genes encode nuclear proteins, including many RNA and DNA binding proteins. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that all tested nuclear proteins encoded by eight upregulated genes colocalize with PABPN1 within the INIs: CUGBP1, SFRS3, FKBP1A, HMG2, HNRPA1, PRC1, S100P, and HSP70. In addition, CUGBP1, SFRS3, and FKBP1A were also found in OPMD muscle INIs. This study demonstrates that a large number of nuclear proteins are sequestered in OPMD INIs, which may compromise cellular function.

  15. Computational characterization of modes of transcriptional regulation of nuclear receptor genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogita Sharma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nuclear receptors are a large structural class of transcription factors that act with their co-regulators and repressors to maintain a variety of biological and physiological processes such as metabolism, development and reproduction. They are activated through the binding of small ligands, which can be replaced by drug molecules, making nuclear receptors promising drug targets. Transcriptional regulation of the genes that encode them is central to gaining a deeper understanding of the diversity of their biochemical and biophysical roles and their role in disease and therapy. Even though they share evolutionary history, nuclear receptor genes have fundamentally different expression patterns, ranging from ubiquitously expressed to tissue-specific and spatiotemporally complex. However, current understanding of regulation in nuclear receptor gene family is still nascent. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we investigate the relationship between long-range regulation of nuclear receptor family and their known functionality. Towards this goal, we identify the nuclear receptor genes that are potential targets based on counts of highly conserved non-coding elements. We validate our results using publicly available expression (RNA-seq and histone modification (ChIP-seq data from the ENCODE project. We find that nuclear receptor genes involved in developmental roles show strong evidence of long-range mechanism of transcription regulation with distinct cis-regulatory content they feature clusters of highly conserved non-coding elements distributed in regions spanning several Megabases, long and multiple CpG islands, bivalent promoter marks and statistically significant higher enrichment of enhancer mark around their gene loci. On the other hand nuclear receptor genes that are involved in tissue-specific roles lack these features, having simple transcriptional controls and a greater variety of mechanisms for producing paralogs. We

  16. The inner nuclear membrane protein Src1 associates with subtelomeric genes and alters their regulated gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grund, Stefanie E; Fischer, Tamás; Cabal, Ghislain G; Antúnez, Oreto; Pérez-Ortín, José E; Hurt, Ed

    2008-09-08

    Inner nuclear membrane proteins containing a LEM (LAP2, emerin, and MAN1) domain participate in different processes, including chromatin organization, gene expression, and nuclear envelope biogenesis. In this study, we identify a robust genetic interaction between transcription export (TREX) factors and yeast Src1, an integral inner nuclear membrane protein that is homologous to vertebrate LEM2. DNA macroarray analysis revealed that the expression of the phosphate-regulated genes PHO11, PHO12, and PHO84 is up-regulated in src1Delta cells. Notably, these PHO genes are located in subtelomeric regions of chromatin and exhibit a perinuclear location in vivo. Src1 spans the nuclear membrane twice and exposes its N and C domains with putative DNA-binding motifs to the nucleoplasm. Genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation-on-chip analyses indicated that Src1 is highly enriched at telomeres and subtelomeric regions of the yeast chromosomes. Our data show that the inner nuclear membrane protein Src1 functions at the interface between subtelomeric gene expression and TREX-dependent messenger RNA export through the nuclear pore complexes.

  17. Expression profiling reveals functionally redundant multiple-copy genes related to zinc, iron and cadmium responses in Brassica rapa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, J.; Liu, B.; Cheng, F.; Wang, X.; Aarts, M.G.M.; Wu, J.

    2014-01-01

    Genes underlying environmental adaptability tend to be over-retained in polyploid plant species. Zinc deficiency (ZnD) and iron deficiency (FeD), excess Zn (ZnE) and cadmium exposure (CdE) are major environmental problems for crop cultivation, but little is known about the differential expression of

  18. Expression profiling reveals functionally redundant multiple-copy genes related to zinc, iron and cadmium responses in Brassica rapa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, J.; Liu, B.; Cheng, F.; Wang, X.; Aarts, M.G.M.; Wu, J.

    2014-01-01

    Genes underlying environmental adaptability tend to be over-retained in polyploid plant species. Zinc deficiency (ZnD) and iron deficiency (FeD), excess Zn (ZnE) and cadmium exposure (CdE) are major environmental problems for crop cultivation, but little is known about the differential expression of

  19. Nuclear transfer of goat somatic cells transgenic for human lactoferrin gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lan LI; Wei SHEN; Lingjiang MIN; Qingyu PAN; Yujiang SUN; Jixian DENG; Qingjie PAN

    2008-01-01

    Transgenic animal mammary gland bioreactors are used to produce recombinant proteins with appropri-ate post-translational modifications.The nuclear transfer of transgenic somatic cells is a powerful method to pro-duce mammary gland bioreactors.We established an effi-cient gene transfer and nuclear transfer approach in goat somatic cells.Gene targeting vector pGBC2LF was con-structed by cloning human lactoferrin (LF) gene cDNA into exon 2 of the milk goat beta-casein gene and the endogenous start codon was replaced by that of human LF gene.Goat fetal fibroblasts were transfected with lin-earized pGBC2LF and 14 cell lines were positive accord-ing to PCR and Southern blot.The transgenic cells were used as donor cells of nuclear transfer and some of recon-structed embryos could develop into blastocyst in vitro.

  20. The Relationship Between Transcript Expression Levels of Nuclear Encoded (TFAM, NRF1 and Mitochondrial Encoded (MT-CO1 Genes in Single Human Oocytes During Oocyte Maturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghaffari Novin M.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In some cases of infertility in women, human oocytes fail to mature when they reach the metaphase II (MII stage. Mitochondria plays an important role in oocyte maturation. A large number of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA, copied in oocytes, is essential for providing adenosine triphosphate (ATP during oocyte maturation. The purpose of this study was to identify the relationship between transcript expression levels of the mitochondrial encoded gene (MT-CO1 and two nuclear encoded genes, nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF1 and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM in various stages of human oocyte maturation. Nine consenting patients, age 21-35 years old, with male factors were selected for ovarian stimulation and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI procedures. mRNA levels of mitochondrial- related genes were performed by singlecell TaqMan® quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR. There was no significant relationship between the relative expression levels in germinal vesicle (GV stage oocytes (p = 0.62. On the contrary, a significant relationship was seen between the relative expression levels of TFAM and NRF1 and the MT-CO1 genes at the stages of metaphase I (MI and MII (p = 0.03 and p = 0.002. A relationship exists between the transcript expression levels of TFAM and NRF1, and MT-CO1 genes in various stages of human oocyte maturation.

  1. Gain of ALK gene copy number may predict lack of benefit from anti-EGFR treatment in patients with advanced colorectal cancer and RAS-RAF-PI3KCA wild-type status.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Pietrantonio

    Full Text Available Although cetuximab and panitumumab show an increased efficacy for patients with KRAS-NRAS-BRAF and PI3KCA wild-type metastatic colorectal cancer, primary resistance occurs in a relevant subset of molecularly enriched populations.We evaluated the outcome of 68 patients with advanced colorectal cancer and RAS, BRAF and PI3KCA status according to ALK gene status (disomic vs. gain of ALK gene copy number--defined as mean of 3 to 5 fusion signals in ≥ 10% of cells. All consecutive patients received cetuximab and irinotecan or panitumumab alone for chemorefractory disease.No ALK translocations or amplifications were detected. ALK gene copy number gain was found in 25 (37% tumors. Response rate was significantly higher in patients with disomic ALK as compared to those with gain of gene copy number (70% vs. 32%; p = 0.0048. Similarly, progression-free survival was significantly different when comparing the two groups (6.7 vs. 5.3 months; p = 0.045. A trend was observed also for overall survival (18.5 vs. 15.6 months; p = 0.885.Gain of ALK gene copy number might represent a negative prognostic factor in mCRC and may have a role in resistance to anti-EGFR therapy.

  2. Phylogeography and conservation genetics of the Caribbean Zamia clade: an integrated systematic approach with SSRs and single copy nuclear genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Zamia pumila L. complex (Cycadales: Zamiaceae) is a monophyletic, diploid (2n = 16) and distinctive assemblage of cycad populations restricted to the West Indies and southeastern U. S. that has been treated as comprising one to nine species. Our research project seeks to simultaneously investi...

  3. Toward Understanding Anophelinae (Diptera, Culicidae) Phylogeny: Insights from Nuclear Single-Copy Genes and the Weight of Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    used to evaluate incongruence among data partitions (Templeton, 1983; Kishino and Hasegawa, 1989; Rodrigo et al., 1993; Fards et al., 1995...KWIATOWSKI, J., D. SKARECKY, S. HERNANDEZ, D. PHAM, F. QUIJAS, AND E J. AYALA . 1991. High fidelity of the polymerase chain reaction. Mol. Biol. Evol. 8:884...9:225--235. RODRIGO , A. G., M. KELLY-BORGES, P. R. BERGQUIST, AND P. L. BERGQUIST. 1993. A randomization test of the null hypothesis that two

  4. Scaling up Copy Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xian; Dong, Xin Luna; Lyons, Kenneth B.; Meng, Weiyi; Srivastava, Divesh

    2015-01-01

    Recent research shows that copying is prevalent for Deep-Web data and considering copying can significantly improve truth finding from conflicting values. However, existing copy detection techniques do not scale for large sizes and numbers of data sources, so truth finding can be slowed down by one to two orders of magnitude compared with the corresponding techniques that do not consider copying. In this paper, we study {\\em how to improve scalability of copy detection on structured data}. Ou...

  5. The B chromosomes of the African cichlid fish Haplochromis obliquidens harbour 18S rRNA gene copies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martins Cesar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diverse plant and animal species have B chromosomes, also known as accessory, extra or supernumerary chromosomes. Despite being widely distributed among different taxa, the genomic nature and genetic behavior of B chromosomes are still poorly understood. Results In this study we describe the occurrence of B chromosomes in the African cichlid fish Haplochromis obliquidens. One or two large B chromosome(s occurring in 39.6% of the analyzed individuals (both male and female were identified. To better characterize the karyotype and assess the nature of the B chromosomes, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH was performed using probes for telomeric DNA repeats, 18S and 5S rRNA genes, SATA centromeric satellites, and bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs enriched in repeated DNA sequences. The B chromosomes are enriched in repeated DNAs, especially non-active 18S rRNA gene-like sequences. Conclusion Our results suggest that the B chromosome could have originated from rDNA bearing subtelo/acrocentric A chromosomes through formation of an isochromosome, or by accumulation of repeated DNAs and rRNA gene-like sequences in a small proto-B chromosome derived from the A complement.

  6. The relationship between mitochondrial DNA copy number and stallion sperm function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darr, Christa R; Moraes, Luis E; Connon, Richard E; Love, Charles C; Teague, Sheila; Varner, Dickson D; Meyers, Stuart A

    2017-05-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number has been utilized as a measure of sperm quality in several species including mice, dogs, and humans, and has been suggested as a potential biomarker of fertility in stallion sperm. The results of the present study extend this recent discovery using sperm samples from American Quarter Horse stallions of varying age. By determining copy number of three mitochondrial genes, cytochrome b (CYTB), NADH dehydrogenase 1 (ND1) and NADH dehydrogenase 4 (ND4), instead of a single gene, we demonstrate an improved understanding of mtDNA fate in stallion sperm mitochondria following spermatogenesis. Sperm samples from 37 stallions ranging from 3 to 24 years old were collected at four breeding ranches in north and central Texas during the 2015 breeding season. Samples were analyzed for sperm motion characteristics, nuclear DNA denaturability and mtDNA copy number. Mitochondrial DNA content in individual sperm was determined by real-time qPCR and normalized with a single copy nuclear gene, Beta actin. Exploratory correlation analysis revealed that total motility was negatively correlated with CYTB copy number and sperm chromatin structure. Stallion age did not have a significant effect on copy number for any of the genes. Copy number differences existed between the three genes with CYTB having the greatest number of copies (20.6 ± 1.2 copies, range: 6.0 to 41.1) followed by ND4 (15.5 ± 0.8 copies, range: 6.7 to 27.8) and finally ND1 (12.0 ± 1.0 copies, range: 0.4 to 26.6) (P copy number across mitochondrial genes is likely to be a result of mtDNA fragmentation and degradation since downregulation of sperm mtDNA occurs during spermatogenesis and may be important for normal sperm function. Beta regression analysis suggested that for every unit increase in mtDNA copy number of CYTB, there was a 4% decrease in the odds of sperm movement (P = 0.001). Influential analysis suggested that results are robust and not highly influenced by

  7. Optimisation of tomato Micro-tom regeneration and selection on glufosinate/Basta and dependency of gene silencing on transgene copy number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuong, Thi Thu Huong; Crété, Patrice; Robaglia, Christophe; Caffarri, Stefano

    2013-09-01

    An efficient protocol of transformation and selection of transgenic lines of Micro-tom, a widespread model cultivar for tomato, is reported. RNA interference silencing efficiency and stability have been investigated and correlated with the number of insertions. Given its small size and ease of cultivation, the tomato (Solanum lycopersicon) cultivar Micro-tom is of widespread use as a model tomato plant. To create and screen transgenic plants, different selectable markers are commonly used. The bar marker carrying the resistance to the herbicide glufosinate/Basta, has many advantages, but it has been little utilised and with low efficiency for identification of tomato transgenic plants. Here we describe a procedure for accurate selection of transgenic Micro-tom both in vitro and in soil. Immunoblot, Southern blot and phenotypic analyses showed that 100 % of herbicide-resistant plants were transgenic. In addition, regeneration improvement has been obtained by using 2 mg/l Gibberellic acid in the shoot elongation medium; rooting optimisation on medium containing 1 mg/l IAA allowed up to 97 % of shoots developing strong and very healthy roots after only 10 days. Stable transformation frequency by infection of leaf explants with Agrobacterium reached 12 %. Shoots have been induced by combination of 1 mg/l zeatin-trans and 0.1 mg/l IAA. Somatic embryogenesis of cotyledon on medium containing 1 mg/l zeatin + 2 mg/l IAA is described in Micro-tom. The photosynthetic psbS gene has been used as reporter gene for RNA silencing studies. The efficiency of gene silencing has been found equivalent using three different target gene fragments of 519, 398 and 328 bp. Interestingly, silencing efficiency decreased from T0 to the T3 generation in plants containing multiple copies of the inserted T-DNA, while it was stable in plants containing a single insertion.

  8. Identification of RCN1 and RSA3 as ethanol-tolerant genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a high copy barcoded library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Michael J; Barker, Sarah L; Boone, Charlie; Measday, Vivien

    2012-02-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) encounters a multitude of stresses during industrial processes such as wine fermentation including ethanol toxicity. High levels of ethanol reduce the viability of yeast and may prevent completion of fermentation. The identification of ethanol-tolerant genes is important for creating stress-resistant industrial yeast, and S. cerevisiae genomic resources have been utilized for this purpose. We have employed a molecular barcoded yeast open reading frame (MoBY-ORF) high copy plasmid library to identify ethanol-tolerant genes in both the S. cerevisiae S288C laboratory and M2 wine strains. We find that increased dosage of either RCN1 or RSA3 improves tolerance of S288C and M2 to toxic levels of ethanol. RCN1 is a regulator of calcineurin, whereas RSA3 has a role in ribosome maturation. Additional fitness advantages conferred upon overproduction of RCN1 and RSA3 include increased resistance to cell wall degradation, heat, osmotic and oxidative stress. We find that the M2 wine yeast strain is generally more tolerant of stress than S288C with the exception of translation inhibition, which affects M2 growth more severely than S288C. We conclude that regulation of ribosome biogenesis and ultimately translation is a critical factor for S. cerevisiae survival during industrial-related environmental stress. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Molecular phylogeny of the Oriental butterfly genus Arhopala (Lycaenidae, Theclinae) inferred from mitochondrial and nuclear genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Megens, H.J.W.C.; Nes, Van W.J.; Moorsel, van C.H.M.; Pierce, N.E.; Jong, de R.

    2004-01-01

    We present a phylogeny for a selection of species of the butterfly genus Arhopala Boisduval, 1832 based on molecular characters. We sequenced 1778 bases of the mitochondrial genes Cytochrome Oxidase 1 and 2 including tRNALeu, and a 393-bp fragment of the nuclear wingless gene for a total of 42 speci

  10. Nuclear Compartmentalization Contributes to Stage-Specific Gene Expression Control in Trypanosoma cruzi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastro, Lucía; Smircich, Pablo; Di Paolo, Andrés; Becco, Lorena; Duhagon, María A.; Sotelo-Silveira, José; Garat, Beatriz

    2017-01-01

    In the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, as in other trypanosomatids, transcription of protein coding genes occurs in a constitutive fashion, producing large polycistronic transcription units. These units are composed of non-functionally related genes which are pervasively processed to yield each mRNA. Therefore, post-transcriptional processes are crucial to regulate gene expression. Considering that nuclear compartmentalization could contribute to gene expression regulation, we comparatively studied the nuclear, cytoplasmic and whole cell transcriptomes of the non-infective epimastigote stage of T. cruzi, using RNA-Seq. We found that the cytoplasmic transcriptome tightly correlates with the whole cell transcriptome and both equally correlate with the proteome. Nonetheless, 1,200 transcripts showed differential abundance between the nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions. For the genes with transcript content augmented in the nucleus, significant structural and compositional differences were found. The analysis of the reported epimastigote translatome and proteome, revealed scarce ribosome footprints and encoded proteins for them. Ontology analyses unveiled that many of these genes are distinctive of other parasite life-cycle stages. Finally, the relocalization of transcript abundance in the metacyclic trypomastigote infective stage was confirmed for specific genes. While gene expression is strongly dependent on transcript steady-state level, we here highlight the importance of the distribution of transcripts abundance between compartments in T. cruzi. Particularly, we show that nuclear compartmentation is playing an active role in the developmental stage determination preventing off-stage expression. PMID:28243589

  11. Phototropin encoded by a single-copy gene mediates chloroplast photorelocation movements in the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Aino; Terai, Mika; Ishizaki, Kimitsune; Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Tsuboi, Hidenori; Nishihama, Ryuichi; Yamato, Katsuyuki T; Wada, Masamitsu; Kohchi, Takayuki

    2014-09-01

    Blue-light-induced chloroplast photorelocation movement is observed in most land plants. Chloroplasts move toward weak-light-irradiated areas to efficiently absorb light (the accumulation response) and escape from strong-light-irradiated areas to avoid photodamage (the avoidance response). The plant-specific kinase phototropin (phot) is the blue-light receptor for chloroplast movements. Although the molecular mechanisms for chloroplast photorelocation movement have been analyzed, the overall aspects of signal transduction common to land plants are still unknown. Here, we show that the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha exhibits the accumulation and avoidance responses exclusively induced by blue light as well as specific chloroplast positioning in the dark. Moreover, in silico and Southern-blot analyses revealed that the M. polymorpha genome encodes a single PHOT gene, MpPHOT, and its knockout line displayed none of the chloroplast photorelocation movements, indicating that the sole MpPHOT gene mediates all types of movement. Mpphot was localized on the plasma membrane and exhibited blue-light-dependent autophosphorylation both in vitro and in vivo. Heterologous expression of MpPHOT rescued the defects in chloroplast movement of phot mutants in the fern Adiantum capillus-veneris and the seed plant Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). These results indicate that Mpphot possesses evolutionarily conserved regulatory activities for chloroplast photorelocation movement. M. polymorpha offers a simple and versatile platform for analyzing the fundamental processes of phototropin-mediated chloroplast photorelocation movement common to land plants.

  12. PCR primers for 30 novel gene regions in the nuclear genomes of Lepidoptera

    OpenAIRE

    Wahlberg, Niklas; Peña, Carlos; Ahola, Milla; Wheat, Christopher W.; Rota, Jadranka

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We report primer pairs for 30 new gene regions in the nuclear genomes of Lepidoptera that can be amplified using a standard PCR protocol. The new primers were tested across diverse Lepidoptera , including nonditrysians and a wide selection of ditrysians. These new gene regions give a total of 11,043 bp of DNA sequence data and they show similar variability to traditionally used nuclear gene regions in studies of Lepidoptera . We feel that a PCR-based approach still has its place in m...

  13. A phase II study of weekly irinotecan in patients with locally advanced or metastatic HER2- negative breast cancer and increased copy numbers of the topoisomerase 1 (TOP1) gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kümler, Iben; Balslev, Eva; Stenvang, Jan;

    2015-01-01

    stops, if more than 7 patients have clinical benefit a total of 40 patients will be included. DISCUSSION: This ongoing trial is the first to prospectively test copy number of the topoisomerase I gene as a predictive biomarker of response to irinotecan. TRIAL REGISTRATION: EudraCT number 2012-002348-26 ....

  14. Retrograde regulation of nuclear gene expression in CW-CMS of rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Sota; Komatsu, Setsuko; Toriyama, Kinya

    2007-02-01

    The CW-cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) line has the cytoplasm of Oryza rufipogon Griff, and mature pollen is morphologically normal under an optical microscope but lacks the ability to germinate; restorer gene Rf17 has been identified as restoring this ability. The difference between nuclear gene expression in mature anthers was compared for the CW-CMS line, [cms-CW] rf17rf17, and a maintainer line with normal cytoplasm of Oryza sativa L., [normal] rf17rf17. Using a 22-k rice oligoarray we detected 58 genes that were up-regulated more than threefold in the CW-CMS line. Expression in other organs was further investigated for 20 genes using RT-PCR. Five genes, including genes for alternative oxidase, were found to be preferentially expressed in [cms-CW] rf17rf17 but not in [normal] rf17rf17 or [cms-CW] Rf17Rf17. Such [cms-CW] rf17rf17-specific gene expression was only observed in mature anthers but not in leaves, stems, or roots, indicating the presence of anther-specific mitochondrial retrograde regulation of nuclear gene expression, and that Rf17 has a role in restoring the ectopic gene expression. We also used a proteomic approach to discover the retrograde regulated proteins and identified six proteins that were accumulated differently. These results reveal organ-specific induced mitochondrial retrograde pathways affecting nuclear gene expression possibly related to CMS.

  15. Significant prognostic values of nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial complex I subunits in tumor patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L D; Sun, H F; Bai, Y; Gao, S P; Jiang, H L; Jin, W

    2016-01-01

    In cancer biology, it remains still open question concerning the oncogenic versus oncosuppressor behavior of metabolic genes, which includes those encoding mitochondrial complex I (CI) subunits. The prognostic value of nuclear genome mRNAs expression of CI subunits is to be evaluated in the tumor patients. We used the Kaplan Meier plotter database, the cBio Cancer Genomics Portal, and the Oncomine in which gene expression data and survival information were from thousands of tumor patients to assess the relevance of nuclear genome mRNAs level of CI subunits to patients' survival, as well as their alterations in gene and expression level in tumors. We presented that the relative expression level of overwhelming majority of the nuclear genes of CI subunits with survival significance (overall survival, relapse free survival, progression free survival, distant metastasis free survival, post progression survival, and first progression), had consistent effects for patients in each type of four tumors separately, including breast cancer, ovarian cancer, lung cancer, and gastric cancer. However, in gene level, frequent cumulative or individual alteration of these genes could not significantly affect patients' survival and the overexpression of the individual gene was not ubiquitous in tumors versus normal tissues. Given that reprogrammed energy metabolism was viewed as an emerging hallmark of tumor, thus tumor patients' survival might potentially to be evaluated by certain threshold for overall expression of CI subunits. Comprehensive understanding of the nuclear genome encoded CI subunits may have guiding significance for the diagnosis and prognosis in tumor patients.

  16. The DUB/USP17 deubiquitinating enzymes: A gene family within a tandemly repeated sequence, is also embedded within the copy number variable Beta-defensin cluster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Christopher J

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The DUB/USP17 subfamily of deubiquitinating enzymes were originally identified as immediate early genes induced in response to cytokine stimulation in mice (DUB-1, DUB-1A, DUB-2, DUB-2A. Subsequently we have identified a number of human family members and shown that one of these (DUB-3 is also cytokine inducible. We originally showed that constitutive expression of DUB-3 can block cell proliferation and more recently we have demonstrated that this is due to its regulation of the ubiquitination and activity of the 'CAAX' box protease RCE1. Results Here we demonstrate that the human DUB/USP17 family members are found on both chromosome 4p16.1, within a block of tandem repeats, and on chromosome 8p23.1, embedded within the copy number variable beta-defensin cluster. In addition, we show that the multiple genes observed in humans and other distantly related mammals have arisen due to the independent expansion of an ancestral sequence within each species. However, it is also apparent when sequences from humans and the more closely related chimpanzee are compared, that duplication events have taken place prior to these species separating. Conclusions The observation that the DUB/USP17 genes, which can influence cell growth and survival, have evolved from an unstable ancestral sequence which has undergone multiple and varied duplications in the species examined marks this as a unique family. In addition, their presence within the beta-defensin repeat raises the question whether they may contribute to the influence of this repeat on immune related conditions.

  17. Gene associations: true romance or chance meeting in a nuclear neighborhood?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Jeanne B; Clemson, Christine M

    2008-09-22

    Many recent studies have raised interest in the nuclear associations of coregulated genes from different chromosomes, often evoking interpretations of gene-gene interactions, communication, and even "romance." However, in some cases, the associations may be indirect and infrequent and may reflect the segregation of active and inactive genes into different nuclear compartments. The study by Brown et al. (see p. 1083 of this issue) reports that the apparent association of erythroid genes is not a direct interaction nor colocalization to one tiny transcription factory but arises as a result of the known clustering of many active genes with larger splicing factor-rich speckles (a.k.a., SC35-defined domains). This clustering appears largely stochastic but is impacted by the chromosomal neighborhood of the gene as well as its transcriptional status. The study adds a new twist by examining the same gene in a foreign chromosomal context, providing evidence that this impacts a gene's propensity to form gene-domain (or apparent gene-gene) associations within nuclei.

  18. Genome-wide analysis of short interspersed nuclear elements SINES revealed high sequence conservation, gene association and retrotranspositional activity in wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-David, Smadar; Yaakov, Beery; Kashkush, Khalil

    2013-10-01

    Short interspersed nuclear elements (SINEs) are non-autonomous non-LTR retroelements that are present in most eukaryotic species. While SINEs have been intensively investigated in humans and other animal systems, they are poorly studied in plants, especially in wheat (Triticum aestivum). We used quantitative PCR of various wheat species to determine the copy number of a wheat SINE family, termed Au SINE, combined with computer-assisted analyses of the publicly available 454 pyrosequencing database of T. aestivum. In addition, we utilized site-specific PCR on 57 Au SINE insertions, transposon methylation display and transposon display on newly formed wheat polyploids to assess retrotranspositional activity, epigenetic status and genetic rearrangements in Au SINE, respectively. We retrieved 3706 different insertions of Au SINE from the 454 pyrosequencing database of T. aestivum, and found that most of the elements are inserted in A/T-rich regions, while approximately 38% of the insertions are associated with transcribed regions, including known wheat genes. We observed typical retrotransposition of Au SINE in the second generation of a newly formed wheat allohexaploid, and massive hypermethylation in CCGG sites surrounding Au SINE in the third generation. Finally, we observed huge differences in the copy numbers in diploid Triticum and Aegilops species, and a significant increase in the copy numbers in natural wheat polyploids, but no significant increase in the copy number of Au SINE in the first four generations for two of three newly formed allopolyploid species used in this study. Our data indicate that SINEs may play a prominent role in the genomic evolution of wheat through stress-induced activation. © 2013 Ben-Gurion University The Plant Journal © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Inferring angiosperm phylogeny from EST data with widespread gene duplication

    OpenAIRE

    Sanderson, Michael J.; McMahon, Michelle M.

    2007-01-01

    Background Most studies inferring species phylogenies use sequences from single copy genes or sets of orthologs culled from gene families. For taxa such as plants, with very high levels of gene duplication in their nuclear genomes, this has limited the exploitation of nuclear sequences for phylogenetic studies, such as those available in large EST libraries. One rarely used method of inference, gene tree parsimony, can infer species trees from gene families undergoing duplication and loss, bu...

  20. Quantum copying: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Hillery

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Quantum information is stored in two-level quantum systems known as qubits. The no-cloning theorem states that the state of an unknown qubit cannot be copied. This is in contrast to classical information which can be copied. If one drops the requirement that the copies be perfect it is possible to design quantum copiers. This paper presents a short review of the theory of quantum copying.

  1. Identification and characterization of nuclear genes involved in photosynthesis in Populus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bowen; Du, Qingzhang; Yang, Xiaohui; Zhang, Deqiang

    2014-03-27

    The gap between the real and potential photosynthetic rate under field conditions suggests that photosynthesis could potentially be improved. Nuclear genes provide possible targets for improving photosynthetic efficiency. Hence, genome-wide identification and characterization of the nuclear genes affecting photosynthetic traits in woody plants would provide key insights on genetic regulation of photosynthesis and identify candidate processes for improvement of photosynthesis. Using microarray and bulked segregant analysis strategies, we identified differentially expressed nuclear genes for photosynthesis traits in a segregating population of poplar. We identified 515 differentially expressed genes in this population (FC ≥ 2 or FC ≤ 0.5, P photosynthesis by the nuclear genome mainly involves transport, metabolism and response to stimulus functions. This study provides new genome-scale strategies for the discovery of potential candidate genes affecting photosynthesis in Populus, and for identification of the functions of genes involved in regulation of photosynthesis. This work also suggests that improving photosynthetic efficiency under field conditions will require the consideration of multiple factors, such as stress responses.

  2. Identification and characterization of nuclear genes involved in photosynthesis in Populus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The gap between the real and potential photosynthetic rate under field conditions suggests that photosynthesis could potentially be improved. Nuclear genes provide possible targets for improving photosynthetic efficiency. Hence, genome-wide identification and characterization of the nuclear genes affecting photosynthetic traits in woody plants would provide key insights on genetic regulation of photosynthesis and identify candidate processes for improvement of photosynthesis. Results Using microarray and bulked segregant analysis strategies, we identified differentially expressed nuclear genes for photosynthesis traits in a segregating population of poplar. We identified 515 differentially expressed genes in this population (FC ≥ 2 or FC ≤ 0.5, P photosynthesis by the nuclear genome mainly involves transport, metabolism and response to stimulus functions. Conclusions This study provides new genome-scale strategies for the discovery of potential candidate genes affecting photosynthesis in Populus, and for identification of the functions of genes involved in regulation of photosynthesis. This work also suggests that improving photosynthetic efficiency under field conditions will require the consideration of multiple factors, such as stress responses. PMID:24673936

  3. Identification of single-copy orthologous genes between Physalis and Solanum lycopersicum and analysis of genetic diversity in Physalis using molecular markers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingli Wei

    Full Text Available The genus Physalis includes a number of commercially important edible and ornamental species. Its high nutritional value and potential medicinal properties leads to the increased commercial interest in the products of this genus worldwide. However, lack of molecular markers prevents the detailed study of genetics and phylogeny in Physalis, which limits the progress of breeding. In the present study, we compared the DNA sequences between Physalis and tomato, and attempted to analyze genetic diversity in Physalis using tomato markers. Blasting 23180 DNA sequences derived from Physalis against the International Tomato Annotation Group (ITAG Release2.3 Predicted CDS (SL2.40 discovered 3356 single-copy orthologous genes between them. A total of 38 accessions from at least six species of Physalis were subjected to genetic diversity analysis using 97 tomato markers and 25 SSR markers derived from P. peruviana. Majority (73.2% of tomato markers could amplify DNA fragments from at least one accession of Physalis. Diversity in Physalis at molecular level was also detected. The average Nei's genetic distance between accessions was 0.3806 with a range of 0.2865 to 0.7091. These results indicated Physalis and tomato had similarity at both molecular marker and DNA sequence levels. Therefore, the molecular markers developed in tomato can be used in genetic study in Physalis.

  4. Identification of single-copy orthologous genes between Physalis and Solanum lycopersicum and analysis of genetic diversity in Physalis using molecular markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jingli; Hu, Xiaorong; Yang, Jingjing; Yang, Wencai

    2012-01-01

    The genus Physalis includes a number of commercially important edible and ornamental species. Its high nutritional value and potential medicinal properties leads to the increased commercial interest in the products of this genus worldwide. However, lack of molecular markers prevents the detailed study of genetics and phylogeny in Physalis, which limits the progress of breeding. In the present study, we compared the DNA sequences between Physalis and tomato, and attempted to analyze genetic diversity in Physalis using tomato markers. Blasting 23180 DNA sequences derived from Physalis against the International Tomato Annotation Group (ITAG) Release2.3 Predicted CDS (SL2.40) discovered 3356 single-copy orthologous genes between them. A total of 38 accessions from at least six species of Physalis were subjected to genetic diversity analysis using 97 tomato markers and 25 SSR markers derived from P. peruviana. Majority (73.2%) of tomato markers could amplify DNA fragments from at least one accession of Physalis. Diversity in Physalis at molecular level was also detected. The average Nei's genetic distance between accessions was 0.3806 with a range of 0.2865 to 0.7091. These results indicated Physalis and tomato had similarity at both molecular marker and DNA sequence levels. Therefore, the molecular markers developed in tomato can be used in genetic study in Physalis.

  5. Generation of hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase gene knockout rabbits by homologous recombination and gene trapping through somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Mingru; Jiang, Weihua; Fang, Zhenfu; Kong, Pengcheng; Xing, Fengying; Li, Yao; Chen, Xuejin; Li, Shangang

    2015-11-02

    The rabbit is a common animal model that has been employed in studies on various human disorders, and the generation of genetically modified rabbit lines is highly desirable. Female rabbits have been successfully cloned from cumulus cells, and the somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technology is well established. The present study generated hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene knockout rabbits using recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated homologous recombination and SCNT. Gene trap strategies were employed to enhance the gene targeting rates. The male and female gene knockout fibroblast cell lines were derived by different strategies. When male HPRT knockout cells were used for SCNT, no live rabbits were obtained. However, when female HPRT(+/-) cells were used for SCNT, live, healthy rabbits were generated. The cloned HPRT(+/-) rabbits were fertile at maturity. We demonstrate a new technique to produce gene-targeted rabbits. This approach may also be used in the genetic manipulation of different genes or in other species.

  6. Detection of gene copy number aberrations in mantle cell lymphoma by a single quantitative multiplex PCR assay: clinicopathological relevance and prognosis value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardin, Fabrice; Picquenot, Jean-Michel; Parmentier, Françoise; Ruminy, Philippe; Cornic, Marie; Penther, Dominique; Bertrand, Philippe; Lanic, Hélène; Cassuto, Ophélie; Humbrecht, Catherine; Lemasle, Emilie; Wautier, Agathe; Bastard, Christian; Tilly, Hervé

    2009-09-01

    The t(11;14)(q13;q32) is the hallmark of mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). Additional genetic alterations occur in the majority of cases. This study aimed to design a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay to determine the incidence and relevance of recurrent gene copy number aberrations in this disease. Forty-two MCL cases with frozen- or paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues were selected. Three different quantitative Multiplex PCR of Short Fluorescent Fragments (QMPSF) assays were designed to simultaneously analyse eight genes (CDKN2A, RB1, ATM, CDK2, TP53, MYC, CDKN1B, MDM2), to analyse the 9p21 locus (CDKN2A/CDKN2B) and FFPE tissues. Gains of MYC, CDK2, CDKN1B, and MDM2 were observed in 10% of cases. Losses of RB1, CDKN2A, ATM or TP53 were observed in 38%, 31%, 24% and 10% of cases, respectively. Analysis of the 9p21 locus indicated that, in most cases, tumours displayed a complete inactivation of p14(ARF)/p15I(NK4B)/p16I(NK4A). CDKN2A and MYC aberrations were associated with a high MCL international prognostic index (MIPI). CDK2/MDM2 gains and CDKN2A/TP53 losses correlated with an unfavourable outcome. PCR experiments with frozen and FFPE-tissues indicated that our approach is valid in a routine diagnostic setting, providing a powerful tool that could be used for patient stratification in combination with MIPI in future clinical trials.

  7. SATB1 regulates {beta}-like globin genes through matrix related nuclear relocation of the cluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Huan; Wang, Zhao; Zhao, Guo-wei; Lv, Xiang; Wei, Gong-hong; Wang, Li [National Laboratory of Medical Molecular Biology, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences (CAMS) and Peking Union Medical College (PUMC), 5 Dong Dan San Tiao, Beijing 100005 (China); Liu, De-pei, E-mail: liudp@pumc.edu.cn [National Laboratory of Medical Molecular Biology, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences (CAMS) and Peking Union Medical College (PUMC), 5 Dong Dan San Tiao, Beijing 100005 (China); Liang, Chih-chuan [National Laboratory of Medical Molecular Biology, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences (CAMS) and Peking Union Medical College (PUMC), 5 Dong Dan San Tiao, Beijing 100005 (China)

    2009-05-22

    The nuclear location and relocation of genes play crucial regulatory roles in gene expression. SATB1, a MAR-binding protein, has been found to regulate {beta}-like globin genes through chromatin remodeling. In this study, we generated K562 cells over-expressing wild-type or nuclear matrix targeting sequences (NMTS)-deficient SATB1 and found that like wild-type SATB1, NMTS-deficient SATB1 induces out loop of {beta}-globin cluster from its chromosome territory (CT), while it is unable to associate the cluster with the nuclear matrix as wild-type SATB1 does and had no regulatory functions to the {beta}-globin cluster. Besides, our data showed that the transacting factor occupancies and chromatin modifications at {beta}-globin cluster were differentially affected by wild-type and NMTS-deficient SATB1. These results indicate that SATB1 regulates {beta}-like globin genes at the nuclear level interlaced with chromatin and DNA level, and emphasize the nuclear matrix binding activity of SATB1 to its regulatory function.

  8. Detection of genomic copy number changes in patients with idiopathic mental retardation by high-resolution X-array-CGH: important role for increased gene dosage of XLMR genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froyen, Guy; Van Esch, Hilde; Bauters, Marijke; Hollanders, Karen; Frints, Suzanna G M; Vermeesch, Joris R; Devriendt, Koen; Fryns, Jean-Pierre; Marynen, Peter

    2007-10-01

    A tiling X-chromosome-specific genomic array with a theoretical resolution of 80 kb was developed to screen patients with idiopathic mental retardation (MR) for submicroscopic copy number differences. Four patients with aberrations previously detected at lower resolution were first analyzed. This facilitated delineation of the location and extent of the aberration at high resolution and subsequently, more precise genotype-phenotype analyses. A cohort of 108 patients was screened, 57 of which were suspected of X-linked mental retardation (XLMR), 26 were probands of brother pairs, and 25 were sporadic cases. A total of 15 copy number changes in 14 patients (13%) were detected, which included two deletions and 13 duplications ranging from 0.1 to 2.7 Mb. The aberrations are associated with the phenotype in five patients (4.6%), based on the following criteria: de novo aberration; involvement of a known or candidate X-linked nonsyndromic(syndromic) MR (MRX(S)) gene; segregation with the disease in the family; absence in control individuals; and skewed X-inactivation in carrier females. These include deletions that contain the MRX(S) genes CDKL5, OPHN1, and CASK, and duplications harboring CDKL5, NXF5, MECP2, and GDI1. In addition, seven imbalances were apparent novel polymorphic regions because they do not fulfill the proposed criteria. Taken together, our data strongly suggest that not only deletions but also duplications on the X chromosome contribute to the phenotype more often than expected, supporting the increased gene dosage mechanism for deregulation of normal cognitive development.

  9. Plastid-Nuclear Interaction and Accelerated Coevolution in Plastid Ribosomal Genes in Geraniaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Mao-Lun; Ruhlman, Tracey A; Jansen, Robert K

    2016-06-27

    Plastids and mitochondria have many protein complexes that include subunits encoded by organelle and nuclear genomes. In animal cells, compensatory evolution between mitochondrial and nuclear-encoded subunits was identified and the high mitochondrial mutation rates were hypothesized to drive compensatory evolution in nuclear genomes. In plant cells, compensatory evolution between plastid and nucleus has rarely been investigated in a phylogenetic framework. To investigate plastid-nuclear coevolution, we focused on plastid ribosomal protein genes that are encoded by plastid and nuclear genomes from 27 Geraniales species. Substitution rates were compared for five sets of genes representing plastid- and nuclear-encoded ribosomal subunit proteins targeted to the cytosol or the plastid as well as nonribosomal protein controls. We found that nonsynonymous substitution rates (dN) and the ratios of nonsynonymous to synonymous substitution rates (ω) were accelerated in both plastid- (CpRP) and nuclear-encoded subunits (NuCpRP) of the plastid ribosome relative to control sequences. Our analyses revealed strong signals of cytonuclear coevolution between plastid- and nuclear-encoded subunits, in which nonsynonymous substitutions in CpRP and NuCpRP tend to occur along the same branches in the Geraniaceae phylogeny. This coevolution pattern cannot be explained by physical interaction between amino acid residues. The forces driving accelerated coevolution varied with cellular compartment of the sequence. Increased ω in CpRP was mainly due to intensified positive selection whereas increased ω in NuCpRP was caused by relaxed purifying selection. In addition, the many indels identified in plastid rRNA genes in Geraniaceae may have contributed to changes in plastid subunits.

  10. DRPLA transgenic mouse substrains carrying single copy of full-length mutant human DRPLA gene with variable sizes of expanded CAG repeats exhibit CAG repeat length- and age-dependent changes in behavioral abnormalities and gene expression profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Kazushi; Zhou, Jiayi; Sato, Toshiya; Takao, Keizo; Miyagawa, Tsuyoshi; Oyake, Mutsuo; Yamada, Mitunori; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Takahashi, Yuji; Goto, Jun; Tsuji, Shoji

    2012-05-01

    Dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA) is an autosomal dominant progressive neurodegenerative disorder with intellectual deterioration and various motor deficits including ataxia, choreoathetosis, and myoclonus, caused by an abnormal expansion of CAG repeats in the DRPLA gene. Longer expanded CAG repeats contribute to an earlier age of onset, faster progression, and more severe neurological symptoms in DRPLA patients. In this study, we have established DRPLA transgenic mouse lines (sublines) harboring a single copy of the full-length mutant human DRPLA gene carrying various lengths of expanded CAG repeats (Q76, Q96, Q113, and Q129), which have clearly shown motor deficits and memory disturbance whose severity increases with the length of expanded CAG repeats and age, and successfully replicated the CAG repeat length- and age-dependent features of DRPLA patients. Neuronal intranuclear accumulation of the mutant DRPLA protein has been suggested to cause transcriptional dysregulation, leading to alteration in gene expression and neuronal dysfunction. In this study, we have conducted a comprehensive analysis of gene expression profiles in the cerebrum and cerebellum of transgenic mouse lines at 4, 8, and 12 weeks using multiple microarray platforms, and demonstrated that both the number and expression levels of the altered genes are highly dependent on CAG repeat length and age in both brain regions. Specific groups of genes and their function categories were identified by further agglomerative cluster analysis and gene functional annotation analysis. Calcium signaling and neuropeptide signaling, among others, were implicated in the pathophysiology of DRPLA. Our study provides unprecedented CAG-repeat-length-dependent mouse models of DRPLA, which are highly valuable not only for elucidating the CAG-repeat-length-dependent pathophysiology of DRPLA but also for developing therapeutic strategies for DRPLA.

  11. Gene associations: true romance or chance meeting in a nuclear neighborhood?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Jeanne B.; Clemson, Christine M.

    2008-01-01

    Many recent studies have raised interest in the nuclear associations of coregulated genes from different chromosomes, often evoking interpretations of gene–gene interactions, communication, and even “romance.” However, in some cases, the associations may be indirect and infrequent and may reflect the segregation of active and inactive genes into different nuclear compartments. The study by Brown et al. (see p. 1083 of this issue) reports that the apparent association of erythroid genes is not a direct interaction nor colocalization to one tiny transcription factory but arises as a result of the known clustering of many active genes with larger splicing factor–rich speckles (a.k.a., SC35-defined domains). This clustering appears largely stochastic but is impacted by the chromosomal neighborhood of the gene as well as its transcriptional status. The study adds a new twist by examining the same gene in a foreign chromosomal context, providing evidence that this impacts a gene's propensity to form gene–domain (or apparent gene–gene) associations within nuclei. PMID:18809719

  12. Lipopolysaccharide triggers nuclear import of Lpcat1 to regulate inducible gene expression in lung epithelia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bryon; Ellis; Leah; Kaercher; Courtney; Snavely

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To report that Lpcat1 plays an important role in regulating lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inducible gene tran-scription. METHODS:Gene expression in Murine Lung Epithelial MLE-12 cells with LPS treatment or Haemophilus influenza and Escherichia coli infection was analyzed by employing quantitative Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction techniques. Nucleofection was used to deliver Lenti-viral system to express or knock down Lpcat1 in MLE cells. Subcellular protein fractionation and Western blotting were utilized to study Lpcat1 nuclear relocation. RESULTS:Lpcat1 translocates into the nucleus from thecytoplasm in murine lung epithelia (MLE) after LPS treatment. Haemophilus influenza and Escherichia coli , two LPS-containing pathogens that cause pneumonia, triggered Lpcat1 nuclear translocation from the cytoplasm. The LPS inducible gene expression profile was determined by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction after silencing Lpcat1 or overexpression of the enzyme in MLE cells. We detected that 17 out of a total 38 screened genes were upregulated, 14 genes were suppressed, and 7 genes remained unchanged in LPS treated cells in comparison to controls. Knockdown of Lpcat1 by shRNA dramatically changed the spectrum of the LPS inducible gene transcription, as 18 genes out of 38 genes were upregulated, of which 20 genes were suppressed or unchanged. Notably, in Lpcat1 overex-pressed cells, 25 genes out of 38 genes were reduced in the setting of LPS treatment.CONCLUSION:These observations suggest that Lpcat1 relocates into the nucleus in response to bacterial infection to differentially regulate gene transcriptional repression.

  13. Mitochondrial retrograde regulation tuning fork in nuclear genes expressions of higher plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinghua Yang; Mingfang Zhang; Jingquan Yu

    2008-01-01

    In plant cells, there are three organelles: the nucleus, chloroplast, and mitochondria that store genetic information. The nucleus possesses the majority of genetic information and controls most aspects of organelles gene expression, growth, and development. In return,organdies also send signals back to regulate nuclear gene expression, a process defined as retrograde regulation. The best studies of organelles to nucleus retrograde regulation exist in plant chloroplast-to-nuclear regulation and yeast mitochondria-to-nuclear regulation. In this review, we summarize the recent understanding of mitochondrial retrograde regulation in higher plant, which involves multiple potential signaling pathway in relation to cytoplasmic male-sterility, biotic stress, and abiotie stress. With respect to mitochondrial retrograde regulation signal pathways involved in cytoplasmic male-sterility, we consider that nuclear transcriptional factor genes are the targeted genes regulated by mitoehondria to determine the abnormal reproductive development, and the MAPK signaling pathway may be involved in this regulation in Brassica juncea. When plants suffer biotic and abiotie stress, plant cells will initiate cell death or other events directed toward recovering from stress. During this process, we propose that mitochondria may determine how plant cell responds to a given stress through retrograde regulation. Meanwhile, several transducer molecules have also been discussed here. In particular, thePaepe research group reported that leaf mitochondrial modulated whole cell redox homeostasis, set antioxidant capacity, and determinedstress resistance through altered signaling and diurnal regulation, which is an indication of plant mitochondria with more active function than ever.

  14. Phylogenetic analyses of basal angiosperms based on nine plastid, mitochondrial, and nuclear genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qiu, Y.L.; Dombrovska, O.; Lee, J.; Li, L.; Whitlock, B.A.; Bernasconi-Quadroni, F.; Rest, J.S.; Davis, C.C.; Borsch, T.; Hilu, K.W.; Renner, S.S.; Soltis, D.E.; Soltis, P.E.; Zanis, M.J.; Cannone, J.J.; Powell, M.; Savolainen, V.; Chatrou, L.W.; Chase, M.W.

    2005-01-01

    DNA sequences of nine genes (plastid: atpB, matK, and rbcL; mitochondrial: atp1, matR, mtSSU, and mtLSU; nuclear: 18S and 26S rDNAs) from 100 species of basal angiosperms and gymnosperms were analyzed using parsimony, Bayesian, and maximum likelihood methods. All of these analyses support the follow

  15. Phylogenetic analyses of basal angiosperms based on nine plastid, mitochondrial, and nuclear genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qiu, Y.L.; Dombrovska, O.; Lee, J.; Li, L.; Whitlock, B.A.; Bernasconi-Quadroni, F.; Rest, J.S.; Davis, C.C.; Borsch, T.; Hilu, K.W.; Renner, S.S.; Soltis, D.E.; Soltis, P.E.; Zanis, M.J.; Cannone, J.J.; Powell, M.; Savolainen, V.; Chatrou, L.W.; Chase, M.W.

    2005-01-01

    DNA sequences of nine genes (plastid: atpB, matK, and rbcL; mitochondrial: atp1, matR, mtSSU, and mtLSU; nuclear: 18S and 26S rDNAs) from 100 species of basal angiosperms and gymnosperms were analyzed using parsimony, Bayesian, and maximum likelihood methods. All of these analyses support the

  16. Molecular mapping of three nuclear male sterility mutant genes in cultivated sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The nuclear male sterility (NMS) trait is a useful tool for sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) breeding and genetic programs. Previously, we induced NMS mutants in cultivated line HA 89. The mutants possessed single recessive genes, ms6, ms7, and ms8, respectively, in NMS HA 89-872, NMS HA 89-552, and...

  17. "Cryptic" group-I introns in the nuclear SSU-rRNA gene of Verticillium dahliae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaioannou, Ioannis A; Dimopoulou, Chrysoula D; Typas, Milton A

    2014-08-01

    Group-I introns are widespread--though irregularly distributed--in eukaryotic organisms, and they have been extensively used for discrimination and phylogenetic analyses. Within the Verticillium genus, which comprises important phytopathogenic fungi, a group-I intron was previously identified in the SSU-rRNA (18S) gene of only V. longisporum. In this work, we aimed at elucidating the SSU-located intron distribution in V. dahliae and other Verticillium species, and the assessment of heterogeneity regarding intron content among rDNA repeats of fungal strains. Using conserved PCR primers for the amplification of the SSU gene, a structurally similar novel intron (sub-group IC1) was detected in only a few V. dahliae isolates. However, when intron-specific primers were used for the screening of a diverse collection of Verticillium isolates that originally failed to produce intron-containing SSU amplicons, most were found to contain one or both intron types, at variable rDNA repeat numbers. This marked heterogeneity was confirmed with qRT-PCR by testing rDNA copy numbers (varying from 39 to 70 copies per haploid genome) and intron copy ratios in selected isolates. Our results demonstrate that (a) IC1 group-I introns are not specific to V. longisporum within the Verticillium genus, (b) V. dahliae isolates of vegetative compatibility groups (VCGs) 4A and 6, which bear the novel intron at most of their rDNA repeats, are closely related, and (c) there is considerable intra-genomic heterogeneity for the presence or absence of introns among the ribosomal repeats. These findings underline that distributions of introns in the highly heterogeneous repetitive rDNA complex should always be verified with sensitive methods to avoid misleading conclusions for the phylogeny of fungi and other organisms.

  18. Comparative studies on codon usage pattern of chloroplasts and their host nuclear genes in four plant species

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Qingpo Liu; Qingzhong Xue

    2005-04-01

    A detailed comparison was made of codon usage of chloroplast genes with their host (nuclear) genes in the four angiosperm species Oryza sativa, Zea mays, Triticum aestivum and Arabidopsis thaliana. The average GC content of the entire genes, and at the three codon positions individually, was higher in nuclear than in chloroplast genes, suggesting different genomic organization and mutation pressures in nuclear and chloroplast genes. The results of Nc-plots and neutrality plots suggested that nucleotide compositional constraint had a large contribution to codon usage bias of nuclear genes in O. sativa, Z. mays, and T. aestivum, whereas natural selection was likely to be playing a large role in codon usage bias in chloroplast genomes. Correspondence analysis and chi-test showed that regardless of the genomic environment (species) of the host, the codon usage pattern of chloroplast genes differed from nuclear genes of their host species by their AU-richness. All the chloroplast genomes have predominantly A- and/or U-ending codons, whereas nuclear genomes have G-, C- or U-ending codons as their optimal codons. These findings suggest that the chloroplast genome might display particular characteristics of codon usage that are different from its host nuclear genome. However, one feature common to both chloroplast and nuclear genomes in this study was that pyrimidines were found more frequently than purines at the synonymous codon position of optimal codons.

  19. Nuclear Imaging for Assessment of Prostate Cancer Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-04-01

    Sambrook, E.F. Fritsch, T. Maniatis , Molecular Cloning : A laboratory Manual, second ed., Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press, Cold Spring Harbor, NY, 1989...1994) C1–C6. [22] G.M. Yousef, A. Scorilas, K. Jung, L.K. Ashworth, E.P. Diamandis, Molecular cloning of the human kallikrein 15 gene (KLK15). Up...such patients tends to have hormone refractory disease later in the course of treatment [2]. Recent advances in molecular biology offer new hope in

  20. Highly informative single-copy nuclear microsatellite DNA markers developed using an AFLP-SSR approach in black spruce (Picea mariana and red spruce (P. rubens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Zhong Shi

    Full Text Available Microsatellites or simple sequence repeats (SSRs are highly informative molecular markers for various biological studies in plants. In spruce (Picea and other conifers, the development of single-copy polymorphic genomic microsatellite markers is quite difficult, owing primarily to the large genome size and predominance of repetitive DNA sequences throughout the genome. We have developed highly informative single-locus genomic microsatellite markers in black spruce (Picea mariana and red spruce (Picea rubens using a simple but efficient method based on a combination of AFLP and microsatellite technologies.A microsatellite-enriched library was constructed from genomic AFLP DNA fragments of black spruce. Sequencing of the 108 putative SSR-containing clones provided 94 unique sequences with microsatellites. Twenty-two of the designed 34 primer pairs yielded scorable amplicons, with single-locus patterns. Fourteen of these microsatellite markers were characterized in 30 black spruce and 30 red spruce individuals drawn from many populations. The number of alleles at a polymorphic locus ranged from 2 to 18, with a mean of 9.3 in black spruce, and from 3 to 15, with a mean of 6.2 alleles in red spruce. The polymorphic information content or expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.340 to 0.909 (mean = 0.67 in black spruce and from 0.161 to 0.851 (mean = 0.62 in red spruce. Ten SSR markers showing inter-parental polymorphism inherited in a single-locus Mendelian mode, with two cases of distorted segregation. Primer pairs for almost all polymorphic SSR loci resolved microsatellites of comparable size in Picea glauca, P. engelmannii, P. sitchensis, and P. abies.The AFLP-based microsatellite-enriched library appears to be a rapid, cost-effective approach for isolating and developing single-locus informative genomic microsatellite markers in black spruce. The markers developed should be useful in black spruce, red spruce and other Picea species for

  1. Development of a Double Nuclear Gene-Targeting Method by Two-Step Transformation Based on a Newly Established Chloramphenicol-Selection System in the Red Alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Takayuki; Ohnuma, Mio; Kuroiwa, Tsuneyoshi; Ohbayashi, Ryudo; Hirooka, Shunsuke; Miyagishima, Shin-Ya

    2017-01-01

    The unicellular red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae possesses a simple cellular architecture that consists of one mitochondrion, one chloroplast, one peroxisome, one Golgi apparatus, and several lysosomes. The nuclear genome content is also simple, with very little genetic redundancy (16.5 Mbp, 4,775 genes). In addition, molecular genetic tools such as gene targeting and inducible gene expression systems have been recently developed. These cytological features and genetic tractability have facilitated various omics analyses. However, only a single transformation selection marker URA has been made available and thus the application of genetic modification has been limited. Here, we report the development of a nuclear targeting method by using chloramphenicol and the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene. In addition, we found that at least 200-bp homologous arms are required and 500-bp arms are sufficient for a targeted single-copy insertion of the CAT selection marker into the nuclear genome. By means of a combination of the URA and CAT transformation systems, we succeeded in producing a C. merolae strain that expresses HA-cyclin 1 and FLAG-CDKA from the chromosomal CYC1 and CDKA loci, respectively. These methods of multiple nuclear targeting will facilitate genetic manipulation of C. merolae. PMID:28352279

  2. Development of a Double Nuclear Gene-Targeting Method by Two-Step Transformation Based on a Newly Established Chloramphenicol-Selection System in the Red Alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Takayuki; Ohnuma, Mio; Kuroiwa, Tsuneyoshi; Ohbayashi, Ryudo; Hirooka, Shunsuke; Miyagishima, Shin-Ya

    2017-01-01

    The unicellular red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae possesses a simple cellular architecture that consists of one mitochondrion, one chloroplast, one peroxisome, one Golgi apparatus, and several lysosomes. The nuclear genome content is also simple, with very little genetic redundancy (16.5 Mbp, 4,775 genes). In addition, molecular genetic tools such as gene targeting and inducible gene expression systems have been recently developed. These cytological features and genetic tractability have facilitated various omics analyses. However, only a single transformation selection marker URA has been made available and thus the application of genetic modification has been limited. Here, we report the development of a nuclear targeting method by using chloramphenicol and the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene. In addition, we found that at least 200-bp homologous arms are required and 500-bp arms are sufficient for a targeted single-copy insertion of the CAT selection marker into the nuclear genome. By means of a combination of the URA and CAT transformation systems, we succeeded in producing a C. merolae strain that expresses HA-cyclin 1 and FLAG-CDKA from the chromosomal CYC1 and CDKA loci, respectively. These methods of multiple nuclear targeting will facilitate genetic manipulation of C. merolae.

  3. Expression studies and promoter analysis of the nuclear gene for mitochondrial transcription factor 1 (MTF1) in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, P S; Stein, T; Hehl, S; Lisowsky, T

    1999-08-01

    The basal mitochondrial transcription apparatus of Saccharomyces cerevisiae consists of the core enzyme for mitochondrial RNA polymerase and the specificity factor. The core enzyme is homologous to those of bacteriophages T3, T7 and SP6 whereas the specificity factor shows similarities with bacterial sigma factors. Recently it was shown that the bacteriophage-type core enzyme is widespread among the eukaryotic lineage and a common picture for the mitochondrial transcription apparatus in eukaryotic cells is now emerging. In contrast to the situation for the core enzyme, the gene for the specificity factor has only been identified from S. cerevisiae and more recently from two other yeast species. As the specificity factor is the key component for initiation of transcription at the mitochondrial promoter we wanted to study in more detail gene expression, regulation, and the function of the promoter of the nuclear MTF1 gene. For this purpose the messenger RNA level for scMTF1 was investigated under a large number of different growth conditions and thereby exhibited a very low, but regulated and carbon source-dependent, expression. Deletion experiments identify the minimal promoter for functional complementation in yeast. To evaluate the functional conservation of the promoter elements the homologous MTF1 gene from the closely related yeast Saccharomyces douglasii was isolated and tested in heterologous complementation experiments. In spite of a highly conserved protein sequence these studies demonstrate that at low-copy number sdMTF1 is not able to substitute for scMTF1 in S. cerevisiae. Promoter exchange experiments with MTF1 from S. cerevisiae and S. douglasii demonstrate that differences in gene expression are responsible for the failure in heterologous complementation. This finding prompted us to compare the promoter regions of MTF1 from four different yeast species. For this purpose the sequences of the 5' regions from S. douglasii, S. kluyveri and Kluyveromyces

  4. A nuclear mutant of Chlamydomonas that exhibits increased sensitivity to UV irradiation, reduced recombination of nuclear genes, and altered transmission of chloroplast genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, H; Newman, S M; Boynton, J E; Gillham, N W

    1991-01-01

    Meiotic progeny of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii normally receive chloroplast genomes only from the mt+ parent. However, exceptional zygotes, which transmit the chloroplast genomes of both parents or, more rarely, only those of the mt- parent, arise at a low frequency. Mutations at the mt(+)-linked mat-3 locus were found previously to elevate the transmission of chloroplast genomes from the mt- parent, resulting in a much higher than normal frequency of exceptional zygotes. In this paper we demonstrate that an ultraviolet-sensitive nuclear mutation mapping at the uvsE1 locus, which is unlinked to mating type, also promotes chloroplast genome transmission from the mt- parent. This mutant, which was previously shown to reduce recombination of nuclear genes in meiosis, acts synergistically with the mat-3-3 mutation to produce an extremely high frequency of exceptional zygotes. Through the use of restriction fragment length polymorphisms existing in the chloroplast genomes of C. reinhardtii and the interfertile strain C. smithii, we show that chloroplast DNA fragments from the mt- parent normally begin to disappear shortly after zygote formation. However, this process appears to be blocked totally in the absence of wild-type uvsE1 and mat-3 gene products. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that both gene products contribute to the mechanism responsible for uniparental inheritance of the chloroplast genome from the mt+ parent.

  5. 哈维弧菌16S rRNA基因拷贝数的种内变异%Intra-species variation of 16S rRNA gene copy number of Vibrio harveyi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑嘉来; 阎永伟; 唐姝; 杨坤杰; 李长红; 王凯; 张德民

    2015-01-01

    利用荧光定量PCR法测定哈维弧菌( Vibrio harveyi)基因组内16S rRNA基因拷贝数. 基于16S rDNA、pyrH、rpoA和recA4个基因的系统发育学分析鉴定弧菌菌株,然后通过重叠PCR构建包含哈维弧菌模式菌株16S rD-NA和gyrB基因片段的标准质粒,建立了定量PCR测定细胞内16S rRNA基因拷贝数方法,并测定了6株测试菌株和哈维弧菌模式株的16S rRNA基因拷贝数,同时以已知拷贝数的菌株ATCC BAA-1116做对照. 6个测试菌株均为哈维弧菌. 菌株ATCC BAA-1116的16S rRNA基因拷贝数为11个,与已知值相符. 模式菌株MCCC 1H00031T和6个测试菌株SXB-C、SCB-4、NBV00029、NBV00035、NBV00039和NBV00269的拷贝数分别为9、12、13、12、11、13和9个. 利用荧光定量PCR法测定哈维弧菌基因组内16S rRNA基因拷贝数的方法简单可行. 哈维弧菌16S rRNA基因拷贝数的种内变异可能是其适应近岸多变生境的原因之一.%This study aims to determine intra-genomic 16S rRNA gene copy number of Vibrio harveyi strains by a method of fluorescent quantitative PCR. Vibrio strains were identified by multilocussequence analysis based on 16S rDNA, pyrH, rpoA and recA. A standard plasmid, harboring fragments of 16S rDNA and the single copy gene gyrB from V. harveyi type strain, was constructed. A fluorescent quantitative method was established and used to determine the intra-genomic 16S rRNA gene copy number of the tested 6 strains, taken the type strains of V. harveyi and V. harvei ATCC BAA-1116 as reference, whose 16S rRNA gene copy number is well known. All the 6 tested Vibrio strains were identified as V. harveyi. The copy number of 16S rRNA gene in strain ATCC BAA-1116 was 11, consistent with the known values. The copy number of strain MCCC 1H00031T, SXB-C, SCB-4, NBV00029, NBV00035, NBV00039 and NBV00269 was 9, 12, 13, 12, 11, 13 and 9, respectively. Fluorescent quantitative PCR method is simple and reliable for determi-ning 16S rRNA gene copy number

  6. Transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen gene.

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    The steady-state mRNA levels of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) gene are growth regulated. In a previous paper (L. Ottavio, C.-D. Chang, M. G. Rizzo, S. Travali, C. Casadevall, and R. Baserga, Mol. Cell. Biol. 10:303-309, 1990), we reported that introns (especially intron 4) participate in growth regulation of the PCNA gene. We have now investigated the role of the 5'-flanking sequence of the human PCNA gene stably transfected into BALB/c 3T3 cells. Promoters of different length...

  7. The Art of Copying

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Hans Dam

    2017-01-01

    This article discusses copies within the field of art museums by way of mapping strategies for copy practices. This mapping leans heavily towards parts of the writings of Jacques Derrida (1930–2004). Against the backdrop of this theoretical premise, the article distinguishes five main strategies....... An informational copy is just as unique as an original object of art, and at the same time, it defines the original and is itself defined by this opposition. Lastly, the strategy for the imagined relation between original and copy follows. This strategy is dependent upon several of the previous approaches, and...

  8. The Ancestral Gene for Transcribed, Low-Copy Repeats in the Prader-Willi/Angleman Region Encodes a Large Protein Implicated in Protein Trafficking that is Deficient in Mice with Neuromuscular and

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Y.

    1999-01-01

    Transcribed, low-copy repeat elements are associated with the breakpoint regions of common deletions in Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes. We report here the identification of the ancestral gene ( HERC2 ) and a family of duplicated, truncated copies that comprise these low-copy repeats. This gene encodes a highly conserved giant protein, HERC2, that is distantly related to p532 (HERC1), a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) implicated in vesicular trafficking. The mouse genome contains a single Herc2 locus, located in the jdf2 (juvenile development and fertility-2) interval of chromosome 7C. We have identified single nucleotide splice junction mutations in Herc2 in three independent N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced jdf2 mutant alleles, each leading to exon skipping with premature termination of translation and/or deletion of conserved amino acids. Therefore, mutations in Herc2 lead to the neuromuscular secretory vesicle and sperm acrosome defects, other developmental abnormalities and juvenile lethality of jdf2 mice. Combined, these findings suggest that HERC2 is an important gene encoding a GEF involved in protein trafficking and degradation pathways in the cell.

  9. Generation of hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase gene knockout rabbits by homologous recombination and gene trapping through somatic cell nuclear transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Mingru Yin; Weihua Jiang; Zhenfu Fang; Pengcheng Kong; Fengying Xing; Yao Li; Xuejin Chen; Shangang Li

    2015-01-01

    The rabbit is a common animal model that has been employed in studies on various human disorders, and the generation of genetically modified rabbit lines is highly desirable. Female rabbits have been successfully cloned from cumulus cells, and the somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technology is well established. The present study generated hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene knockout rabbits using recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated homologous recombination and SCNT....

  10. Detection of Exogenous Gene Copies in Transgenic Soybean by Taqman Quantitative PCR Technique%Taqman定量PCR技术检测转基因大豆中外源基因拷贝数

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    仇有文; 张明辉; 高学军; 曲波; 敖金霞; 袁育寒; 刘营; 霍楠

    2011-01-01

    [Objective] Taqman Quantitative PCR technique was adopted to detect the copies of exogenous nos terminator in transgenic hybrid soybean. [ Method] Wrth soybean Lectin as the endogenous reference gene, and gene complex DNA in non-GMO soybeans as the endogenous reference standard, the method of gradient dilution was used for separately calculate Ct value of endogenous reference gene and plasmid DNA and correlation standard curve equation of logarithm of copies, and then to calculate the copies of samples through substituting thus-obtained Ct into the standard curve equation. [ Result] The standard curve equation of endogenous reference gene is y = -3.422×+35.201, R2 = 0.998;and the standard curve equation of exogenous gene is y = -3.348x +34.890, R2 =0.999. Nos terminator and its lower boundary sequences in transgenic soybean is of single copy. [ Conclusion] The study has provided a theoretical basis for determining exogenous gene copies in transgenic soybean.%[目的]采用Taqman定量PCR技术检测转基因杂交大豆中外源nos终止子基因的拷贝数.[方法]以大豆凝集素基因为内参照基因,以非转基因大豆基因组DNA为内参照基因标准品,通过梯度稀释法分别求取了内参照基因和质粒DNA的Ct值与拷贝数对数值的相关性标准曲线方程,并通过将得到的Ct值代入标准曲线方程求取了样品的拷贝数.[结果]内参照基因标准曲线方程为y=-3.422x+35.201,R(2)=0.998;外源基因标准曲线方程为y=-3.348x+34.890,R(2)=0.999.nos终止子基因及其下游边界序列在转基因杂交大豆中为单拷贝.[结论]该研究为确定转基因大豆外源基因拷贝数提供厂理论依据.

  11. Detection of Foreign Gene Copies in Transgenic Soybean by Taqman Quantitative PCR Technique%Taqman定量PCR技术检测转基因大豆中外源基因拷贝数

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    仇有文; 张明辉; 高学军; 曲波; 敖金霞; 袁肖寒; 刘营; 霍楠

    2011-01-01

    [目的[采用Taqman定量PCR技术检测转基因杂交大豆中外源nos终止子基因的拷贝数.[方法]以大豆凝集素基因为内参照基因,以非转基因大豆基因组DNA为内参照基因标准品,通过梯度稀释法分别求取了内参照基因和质粒DNA的Ct值与拷贝数对数值的相关性标准曲线方程,并通过将得到的Ct值代入标准曲线方程求取了样品的拷贝数.[结果]内参照基因标准曲线方程为y=-3.422x+35.201,R2=0.998;外源基因标准曲线方程为y=-3.348x+34.890,R2=0.999.nos终止子基因及其下游边界序列在转基因杂交大豆中为单拷贝.[结论]为确定转基因大豆外源基因拷贝数提供了理论依据.%[ Objective ] It is to adopt Taqman quantitative PCR technique to detect the copies of foreign nos terminator in transgenic hybrid soybean. [ Method ] With endogenous reference gene of soybean lectin, and endogenous reference standard of gene complex DNA in non-GMO soybeans, the method of gradient dilution was used to separately calculate Ct value of endogenous reference gene and plasmid DNA and relevance standard curve equation of logarithm of copies, and then to calculate the copies of samples through substituting thus-obtained Ct into standard curve equation. [ Result ] The standard curve equation of endogenous reference gene isy = - 3.422x + 35. 201 , R2 = 0. 998; and the standard curve equation of foreign gene is y = - 3. 348x + 34. 890, R2 = 0.999. Nos terminator and its lower boundary sequences in transgenic soybean is of single copy. [ Conclusion] The study has provided a theoretical basis for determining foreign gene copies in transgenic soybean.

  12. Wolfram gene (WFS1) mutation causes autosomal dominant congenital nuclear cataract in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Vanita; Gregory-Evans, Cheryl; Emmett, Warren; Waseem, Naushin; Raby, Jacob; Prescott, DeQuincy; Moore, Anthony T; Bhattacharya, Shomi S

    2013-12-01

    Congenital cataracts are an important cause of bilateral visual impairment in infants. Through genome-wide linkage analysis in a four-generation family of Irish descent, the disease-associated gene causing autosomal-dominant congenital nuclear cataract was mapped to chromosome 4p16.1. The maximum logarithm of odds (LOD) score was 2.62 at a recombination fraction θ=0, obtained for marker D4S432 physically close to the Wolfram gene (WFS1). By sequencing the coding regions and intron-exon boundaries of WFS1, we identified a DNA substitution (c.1385A-to-G) in exon 8, causing a missense mutation at codon 462 (E462G) of the Wolframin protein. This is the first report of a mutation in this gene causing an isolated nuclear congenital cataract. These findings suggest that the membrane trafficking protein Wolframin may be important for supporting the developing lens.

  13. Nuclear DISC1 regulates CRE-mediated gene transcription and sleep homeostasis in the fruit fly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawamura, N; Ando, T; Maruyama, Y; Fujimuro, M; Mochizuki, H; Honjo, K; Shimoda, M; Toda, H; Sawamura-Yamamoto, T; Makuch, L A; Hayashi, A; Ishizuka, K; Cascella, N G; Kamiya, A; Ishida, N; Tomoda, T; Hai, T; Furukubo-Tokunaga, K; Sawa, A

    2008-12-01

    Disrupted-in-schizophrenia-1 (DISC1) is one of major susceptibility factors for a wide range of mental illnesses, including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depression and autism spectrum conditions. DISC1 is located in several subcellular domains, such as the centrosome and the nucleus, and interacts with various proteins, including NudE-like (NUDEL/NDEL1) and activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4)/CREB2. Nevertheless, a role for DISC1 in vivo remains to be elucidated. Therefore, we have generated a Drosophila model for examining normal functions of DISC1 in living organisms. DISC1 transgenic flies with preferential accumulation of exogenous human DISC1 in the nucleus display disturbance in sleep homeostasis, which has been reportedly associated with CREB signaling/CRE-mediated gene transcription. Thus, in mammalian cells, we characterized nuclear DISC1, and identified a subset of nuclear DISC1 that colocalizes with the promyelocytic leukemia (PML) bodies, a nuclear compartment for gene transcription. Furthermore, we identified three functional cis-elements that regulate the nuclear localization of DISC1. We also report that DISC1 interacts with ATF4/CREB2 and a corepressor N-CoR, modulating CRE-mediated gene transcription.

  14. Interactions between the nuclear matrix and an enhancer of the tryptophan oxygenase gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaneoka, Hidenori [Department of Biotechnology, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Miyake, Katsuhide, E-mail: miyake@nubio.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Biotechnology, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Iijima, Shinji [Department of Biotechnology, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2009-10-02

    The gene for tryptophan oxygenase (TO) is expressed in adult hepatocytes in a tissue- and differentiation-specific manner. The TO promoter has two glucocorticoid-responsive elements (GREs), and its expression is regulated by glucocorticoid hormone in the liver. We found a novel GRE in close proximity to a scaffold/matrix attachment region (S/MAR) that was located around -8.5 kb from the transcriptional start site of the TO gene by electrophoretic mobility shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. A combination of nuclear fractionation and quantitative PCR analysis showed that the S/MAR was tethered to the nuclear matrix in both fetal and adult hepatocytes. ChIP assay showed that, in adult hepatocytes, the S/MAR-GRE and the promoter proximal regions interacted with lamin and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U in a dexamethasone dependent manner, but this was not the case in fetal cells, suggesting that developmental stage-specific expression of the TO gene might rely on the binding of the enhancer (the -8.5 kb S/MAR-GRE) and the promoter to the inner nuclear matrix.

  15. Comparison of Nuclear Accumulation of p53 Protein with Mutations in the p53 Gene of Human Breast Cancer Tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王萱仪; 查小明; 武正炎; 范萍

    2001-01-01

    Objective The objective was to compare nuclear accumulation of p53 protein with mutations in the p53 gene on the tissues of human breast cancer. Methods Fifty-four invasive ductal carcinomas of breast were analyzed by the method of polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformational polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) silver stain and strep-avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex (SABC) immunohistochemistry. Results A statistically significant association between the presence of p53 gene mutation and nuclear accumulation of p53 protein was found (P<0.01). 22 tumors that demonstrated p53 gene mutations showed nuclear accumulation of p53 protein, while only 9 (28%) showed nuclear accumulation of p53 protein in 32 tumors without p53 gene mutations. Both p53 mutation protein and p53 gene mutations were prevalent in steroid and progesterone receptors negative tumors (P<0.05). A statistically significant association was found between the nuclear accumulation of p53 protein and lymph node invasion (P<0.05), and between p53 gene mutations and lymph node invasion (P<0.05). p53 abnormalities might be associated with an aggressive phenotype in breast cancer. Conclusion The immunohistochemical detection of nuclear p53 protein accumulation is highly associated with p53 gene mutations in breast cancer tissues, and that this method is useful for rapid screening of p53 abnormalities. However, in order to avoid false positive reaction, the p53 gene mutations should be determined in cases slightly positive for p53 nuclear protein.

  16. Timing major conflict between mitochondrial and nuclear genes in species relationships of Polygonia butterflies (Nymphalidae: Nymphalini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warren Andrew D

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Major conflict between mitochondrial and nuclear genes in estimating species relationships is an increasingly common finding in animals. Usually this is attributed to incomplete lineage sorting, but recently the possibility has been raised that hybridization is important in generating such phylogenetic patterns. Just how widespread ancient and/or recent hybridization is in animals and how it affects estimates of species relationships is still not well-known. Results We investigate the species relationships and their evolutionary history over time in the genus Polygonia using DNA sequences from two mitochondrial gene regions (COI and ND1, total 1931 bp and four nuclear gene regions (EF-1α, wingless, GAPDH and RpS5, total 2948 bp. We found clear, strongly supported conflict between mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences in estimating species relationships in the genus Polygonia. Nodes at which there was no conflict tended to have diverged at the same time when analyzed separately, while nodes at which conflict was present diverged at different times. We find that two species create most of the conflict, and attribute the conflict found in Polygonia satyrus to ancient hybridization and conflict found in Polygonia oreas to recent or ongoing hybridization. In both examples, the nuclear gene regions tended to give the phylogenetic relationships of the species supported by morphology and biology. Conclusion Studies inferring species-level relationships using molecular data should never be based on a single locus. Here we show that the phylogenetic hypothesis generated using mitochondrial DNA gives a very different interpretation of the evolutionary history of Polygonia species compared to that generated from nuclear DNA. We show that possible cases of hybridization in Polygonia are not limited to sister species, but may be inferred further back in time. Furthermore, we provide more evidence that Haldane's effect might not be as

  17. The nuclear IκB family of proteins controls gene regulation and immune homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MaruYama, Takashi

    2015-10-01

    The inhibitory IκB family of proteins is subdivided into two groups based on protein localization in the cytoplasm or in the nucleus. These proteins interact with NF-κB, a major transcription factor regulating the expression of many inflammatory cytokines, by modulating its transcriptional activity. However, nuclear IκB family proteins not only interact with NF-κB to change its transcriptional activity, but they also bind to chromatin and control gene expression. This review provides an overview of nuclear IκB family proteins and their role in immune homeostasis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Increased pfmdr1 gene copy number and the decline in pfcrt and pfmdr1 resistance alleles in Ghanaian Plasmodium falciparum isolates after the change of anti-malarial drug treatment policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duah, Nancy O; Matrevi, Sena A; de Souza, Dziedzom K; Binnah, Daniel D; Tamakloe, Mary M; Opoku, Vera S; Onwona, Christiana O; Narh, Charles A; Quashie, Neils B; Abuaku, Benjamin; Duplessis, Christopher; Kronmann, Karl C; Koram, Kwadwo A

    2013-10-30

    With the introduction of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) in 2005, monitoring of anti-malarial drug efficacy, which includes the use of molecular tools to detect known genetic markers of parasite resistance, is important for first-hand information on the changes in parasite susceptibility to drugs in Ghana. This study investigated the Plasmodium falciparum multidrug resistance gene (pfmdr1) copy number, mutations and the chloroquine resistance transporter gene (pfcrt) mutations in Ghanaian isolates collected in seven years to detect the trends in prevalence of mutations. Archived filter paper blood blots collected from children aged below five years with uncomplicated malaria in 2003-2010 at sentinel sites were used. Using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), 756 samples were assessed for pfmdr1 gene copy number. PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) were used to detect alleles of pfmdr1 86 in 1,102 samples, pfmdr1 184, 1034, 1042 and 1246 in 832 samples and pfcrt 76 in 1,063 samples. Merozoite surface protein 2 (msp2) genotyping was done to select monoclonal infections for copy number analysis. The percentage of isolates with increased pfmdr1 copy number were 4, 27, 9, and 18% for 2003-04, 2005-06, 2007-08 and 2010, respectively. Significant increasing trends for prevalence of pfmdr1 N86 (×(2) = 96.31, p resistance has been reported. The decreasing trend in the prevalence of chloroquine resistance markers after change of treatment policy presents the possibility for future introduction of chloroquine as prophylaxis for malaria risk groups such as children and pregnant women in Ghana.

  19. Nuclear fusion occurs during mating in Candida albicans and is dependent on the KAR3 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Richard J; Miller, Mathew G; Chua, Penelope R; Maxon, Mary E; Johnson, Alexander D

    2005-02-01

    It is now well established that mating can occur between diploid a and alpha cells of Candida albicans. There is, however, controversy over when, and with what efficiency, nuclear fusion follows cell fusion to create stable tetraploid a/alpha cells. In this study, we have analysed the mating process between C. albicans strains using both cytological and genetic approaches. Using strains derived from SC5314, we used a number of techniques, including time-lapse microscopy, to demonstrate that efficient nuclear fusion occurs in the zygote before formation of the first daughter cell. Consistent with these observations, zygotes micromanipulated from mating mixes gave rise to mononuclear tetraploid cells, even when no selection for successful mating was applied to them. Mating between different clinical isolates of C. albicans revealed that while all isolates could undergo nuclear fusion, the efficiency of nuclear fusion varied in different crosses. We also show that nuclear fusion in C. albicans requires the Kar3 microtubule motor protein. Deletion of the CaKAR3 gene from both mating partners had little or no effect on zygote formation but reduced the formation of stable tetraploids more than 600-fold, as determined by quantitative mating assays. These findings demonstrate that nuclear fusion is an active process that can occur in C. albicans at high frequency to produce stable, mononucleate mating products.

  20. Insertion of a nuclear factor kappa B DNA nuclear-targeting sequence potentiates suicide gene therapy efficacy in lung cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cramer, F; Christensen, C L; Poulsen, T T

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer currently causes the majority of cancer-related deaths worldwide and new treatments are in high demand. Gene therapy could be a promising treatment but currently lacks sufficient efficiency for clinical use, primarily due to limited cellular and nuclear DNA delivery. In the present...... improve plasmid nuclear delivery and enhance the therapeutic effect of a validated transcriptionally cancer-targeted suicide gene therapy system. A clear correlation between the number of inserted NFκB-binding sites and the therapeutic effect of the suicide system was observed in both small cell lung....... This is to our knowledge the first time a DTS strategy has been implemented for suicide gene therapy....

  1. Molecular profiling of gene copy number abnormalities in key regulatory genes in high-risk B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia: frequency and their association with clinicopathological findings in Indian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Prerana; Ahmad, Firoz; Das, Bibhu Ranjan

    2017-05-01

    Genes related to key cellular pathways are frequently altered in B cell ALL and are associated with poor survival especially in high-risk (HR) subgroups. We examined gene copy number abnormalities (CNA) in 101 Indian HR B cell ALL patients and their correlation with clinicopathological features by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. Overall, CNA were detected in 59 (59%) cases, with 26, 10 and 23% of cases harboring 1, 2 or +3 CNA. CNA were more prevalent in BCR-ABL1 (60%), pediatric (64%) and high WCC (WBC count) (63%) patients. Frequent genes deletions included CDNK2A/B (26%), IKZF1 (25%), PAX5 (14%), JAK2 (7%), BTG1 (6%), RB1 (5%), EBF1 (4%), ETV6 (4%), while PAR1 region genes were predominantly duplicated (20%). EBF1 deletions selectively associated with adults, IKZF1 deletions occurred frequently in high WCC and BCR-ABL1 cases, while PAR1 region gains significantly associated with MLL-AF4 cases. IKZF1 haploinsufficiency group was predominant, especially in adults (65%), high WCC (60%) patients and BCR-ABL1-negative (78%) patients. Most cases harbored multiple concurrent CNA, with IKZF1 concomitantly occurring with CDNK2A/B, PAX5 and BTG1, while JAK2 occurred with CDNK2A/B and PAX5. Mutually exclusive CNA included ETV6 and IKZF1/RB1, and EBF1 and JAK2. Our results corroborate with global reports, aggregating molecular markers in Indian HR B-ALL cases. Integration of CNA data from rapid methods like MLPA, onto background of existing gold-standard methods detecting significant chromosomal abnormalities, provides a comprehensive genetic profile in B-ALL.

  2. Targeted disruption of Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated gene in miniature pigs by somatic cell nuclear transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young June; Ahn, Kwang Sung; Kim, Minjeong; Kim, Min Ju; Park, Sang-Min; Ryu, Junghyun; Ahn, Jin Seop; Heo, Soon Young; Kang, Jee Hyun; Choi, You Jung [Department of Nanobiomedical Science and BK21 PLUS NBM Global Research Center for Regenerative Medicine, Dankook University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Seong-Jun [Institute of Tissue Regeneration Engineering, Dankook University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Shim, Hosup, E-mail: shim@dku.edu [Department of Nanobiomedical Science and BK21 PLUS NBM Global Research Center for Regenerative Medicine, Dankook University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Tissue Regeneration Engineering, Dankook University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physiology, Dankook University School of Medicine, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • ATM gene-targeted pigs were produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer. • A novel large animal model for ataxia telangiectasia was developed. • The new model may provide an alternative to the mouse model. - Abstract: Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a recessive autosomal disorder associated with pleiotropic phenotypes, including progressive cerebellar degeneration, gonad atrophy, and growth retardation. Even though A-T is known to be caused by the mutations in the Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene, the correlation between abnormal cellular physiology caused by ATM mutations and the multiple symptoms of A-T disease has not been clearly determined. None of the existing ATM mouse models properly reflects the extent to which neurological degeneration occurs in human. In an attempt to provide a large animal model for A-T, we produced gene-targeted pigs with mutations in the ATM gene by somatic cell nuclear transfer. The disrupted allele in the ATM gene of cloned piglets was confirmed via PCR and Southern blot analysis. The ATM gene-targeted pigs generated in the present study may provide an alternative to the current mouse model for the study of mechanisms underlying A-T disorder and for the development of new therapies.

  3. Cumulus-specific genes are transcriptionally silent following somatic cell nuclear transfer in a mouse model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated whether four cumulus-specific genes: follicular stimulating hormone receptor (FSHr), hyaluronan synthase 2 (Has2), prostaglandin synthase 2 (Ptgs2) and steroidogenic acute regulator protein (Star), were correctly reprogrammed to be transcriptionally silent following somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) in a murine model. Cumulus cells of C57×CBA F1 female mouse were injected into enucleated oocytes, followed by activation in 10 μmol/L strontium chloride for 5 h and subsequent in vitro culture up to the blastocyst stage. Expression of cumulus-specific genes in SCNT-derived embryos at 2-cell, 4-cell and day 4.5 blastocyst stages was compared with corresponding in vivo fertilized embryos by real-time PCR. It was demonstrated that immediately after the first cell cycle, SCNT-derived 2-cell stage embryos did not express all four cumulus-specific genes, which continually remained silent at the 4-cell and blastocyst stages. It is therefore concluded that all four cumulus-specific genes were correctly reprogrammed to be silent following nuclear transfer with cumulus donor cells in the mouse model. This would imply that the poor preimplantation developmental competence of SCNT embryos derived from cumulus cells is due to incomplete reprogramming of other embryonic genes, rather than cumulus-specific genes.

  4. EGFR gene copy number as a predictive biomarker for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer with anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zu-Yao

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epidermal growth factor receptor gene copy number (EGFR GCN has been heavily investigated as a potential predictive biomarker for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC with anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies (MAbs. The objective of this study was to systematically review current evidences on this issue. Methods PubMed, EMBASE, The Cochrane Library, Chinese Biomedical Literature Database, Wanfang Data, and the conference abstracts of American Society of Clinical Oncology and European Society of Medical Oncology were comprehensively searched. Studies that reported the objective response rate (ORR, progression-free survival, and/or overall survival of mCRC patients treated with anti-EGFR MAbs, stratified by EGFR GCN status, were included. The effect measures for binary outcome (response and time-to-event outcomes (progression-free survival and overall survival were risk difference and hazard ratio, respectively. Statistical heterogeneity among the studies was assessed by the Cochran’s Q-test and the I2 statistic. If appropriate, a quantitative synthesis of data from different studies would be conducted with a random-effects model. Results Nineteen eligible studies were identified. The criteria for increased EGFR GCN (GCN+ were highly inconsistent across different studies. The prevalence of GCN + ranged from 6.9% to 88.9%, and the difference in ORR between patients with GCN + and those with non-increased EGFR GCN (GCN- varied from −28% to 84%. Because of the significant heterogeneity, no quantitative synthesis of data was performed. There was a general trend towards higher ORR in patients with GCN+. The difference in ORRs between patients with GCN + and those with GCN- was even greater in KRAS wild-type patients, while in KRAS mutated patients the difference often did not exist. Almost all patients with EGFR amplification responded to the treatment. However, the prevalence of EGFR amplification was

  5. Prognostic value of MET gene copy number and protein expression in patients with surgically resected non-small cell lung cancer: a meta-analysis of published literatures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baoping Guo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The prognostic value of the copy number (GCN and protein expression of the mesenchymal-epithelial transition (MET gene for survival of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC remains controversial. This study aims to comprehensively and quantitatively asses the suitability of MET GCN and protein expression to predict patients' survival. METHODS: PubMed, Embase, Web of Science and Google Scholar were searched for articles comparing overall survival in patients with high MET GCN or protein expression with those with low level. Pooled hazard ratio (HR and 95% confidence intervals (CIs were calculated using the random and the fixed-effects models. Subgroup and sensitivity analyses were also performed. RESULTS: Eighteen eligible studies enrolling 5,516 patients were identified. Pooled analyses revealed that high MET GCN or protein expression was associated with poor overall survival (OS (GCN: HR = 1.90, 95% CI 1.35-2.68, p<0.001; protein expression: HR = 1.52, 95% CI 1.08-2.15, p = 0.017. In Asian populations (GCN: HR = 2.22, 95% CI 1.46-3.38, p<0.001; protein expression: HR = 1.89, 95% CI 1.34-2.68, p<0.001, but not in the non-Asian subset. For adenocarcinoma, high MET GCN or protein expression indicated decreased OS (GCN: HR = 1.49, 95% CI 1.05-2.10, p = 0.025; protein expression: HR = 1.69, 95% CI 1.31-2.19, p<0.001. Results were similar for multivariate analysis (GCN: HR = 1.61, 95% CI 1.15-2.25, p = 0.005; protein expression: HR = 2.18, 95% CI 1.60-2.97, p<0.001. The results of the sensitivity analysis were not materially altered and did not draw different conclusions. CONCLUSIONS: Increased MET GCN or protein expression was significantly associated with poorer survival in patients with surgically resected NSCLC; this information could potentially further stratify patients in clinical treatment.

  6. Nuclear-cytoplasmic conflict in pea (Pisum sativum L.) is associated with nuclear and plastidic candidate genes encoding acetyl-CoA carboxylase subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanova, Vera S; Zaytseva, Olga O; Mglinets, Anatoliy V; Shatskaya, Natalia V; Kosterin, Oleg E; Vasiliev, Gennadiy V

    2015-01-01

    In crosses of wild and cultivated peas (Pisum sativum L.), nuclear-cytoplasmic incompatibility frequently occurs manifested as decreased pollen fertility, male gametophyte lethality, sporophyte lethality. High-throughput sequencing of plastid genomes of one cultivated and four wild pea accessions differing in cross-compatibility was performed. Candidate genes for involvement in the nuclear-plastid conflict were searched in the reconstructed plastid genomes. In the annotated Medicago truncatula genome, nuclear candidate genes were searched in the portion syntenic to the pea chromosome region known to harbor a locus involved in the conflict. In the plastid genomes, a substantial variability of the accD locus represented by nucleotide substitutions and indels was found to correspond to the pattern of cross-compatibility among the accessions analyzed. Amino acid substitutions in the polypeptides encoded by the alleles of a nuclear locus, designated as Bccp3, with a complementary function to accD, fitted the compatibility pattern. The accD locus in the plastid genome encoding beta subunit of the carboxyltransferase of acetyl-coA carboxylase and the nuclear locus Bccp3 encoding biotin carboxyl carrier protein of the same multi-subunit enzyme were nominated as candidate genes for main contribution to nuclear-cytoplasmic incompatibility in peas. Existence of another nuclear locus involved in the accD-mediated conflict is hypothesized.

  7. Dual Targeting and Retrograde Translocation: Regulators of Plant Nuclear Gene Expression Can Be Sequestered by Plastids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Krupinska

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Changes in the developmental or metabolic state of plastids can trigger profound changes in the transcript profiles of nuclear genes. Many nuclear transcription factors were shown to be controlled by signals generated in the organelles. In addition to the many different compounds for which an involvement in retrograde signaling is discussed, accumulating evidence suggests a role for proteins in plastid-to-nucleus communication. These proteins might be sequestered in the plastids before they act as transcriptional regulators in the nucleus. Indeed, several proteins exhibiting a dual localization in the plastids and the nucleus are promising candidates for such a direct signal transduction involving regulatory protein storage in the plastids. Among such proteins, the nuclear transcription factor WHIRLY1 stands out as being the only protein for which an export from plastids and translocation to the nucleus has been experimentally demonstrated. Other proteins, however, strongly support the notion that this pathway might be more common than currently believed.

  8. Dual localized mitochondrial and nuclear proteins as gene expression regulators in plants?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe eGiegé

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria heavily depend on the coordinated expression of both mitochondrial and nuclear genomes because some of their most significant activities are held by multi-subunit complexes composed of both mitochondrial and nuclear encoded proteins. Thus, precise communication and signaling pathways are believed to exist between the two compartments. Proteins dual localized to both mitochondria and the nucleus make excellent candidates for a potential involvement in the envisaged communication. Here, we review the identified instances of dual localized nucleo-mitochondrial proteins with an emphasis on plant proteins and discuss their functions, which are seemingly mostly related to gene expression regulation. We discuss whether dual localization could be achieved by dual targeting and / or by re-localization and try to apprehend the signals required for the respective processes. Finally, we propose that in some instances, dual localized mitochondrial and nuclear proteins might act as retrograde signaling molecules for mitochondrial biogenesis.

  9. The onset of foreign gene transcription in nuclear-transferred embryos of fish

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The transcriptional onset of hGH-transgene in fish was studied in the following three cases: the first is in MThGH-transgenic F4 common carp (Cyprinus carpio) embryos, the second is in nuclear-transferred embryos supported by the transgenic F4 embryonic nuclei, and the third is in nuclear-transferred embryos supported by the transgenic F4 tail-fin nuclei. RT-PCR results show that the hGH-transgene initiates its transcriptional activity from early-gastrula stage, the early blas-tula stage and even 16-cell stage in the first, second and third cases, respectively. It looks like that fish egg cytoplasm could just offer a very restricted reprogramming on transcriptional activity of specific gene in differentiated cell nuclei by nuclear transplantation.

  10. The onset of foreign gene transcription in nuclear-transferred embryos of fish

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙永华; 陈尚萍; 汪亚平; 朱作言

    2000-01-01

    The transcriptional onset ot hGH-transgene in fish was studied in the following three cases: the first is in MThGH-transgenic F4 common carp (Cyprinus carpio) embryos, the second is in nuclear-transferred embryos supported by the transgenic F4 embryonic nuclei, and the third is in nuclear-transferred embryos supported by the transgenic F4 tail-fin nuclei. RT-PCR results show that the hGH-transgene initiates its transcriptional activity from early-gastrula stage, the early blastula stage and even 16-cell stage in the first, second and third cases, respectively. It looks like that fish egg cytoplasm could just offer a very restricted reprogramming on transcriptional activity of specific gene in differentiated cell nuclei by nuclear transplantation.

  11. Associations of common copy number variants in glutathione S-transferase mu 1 and D-dopachrome tautomerase-like protein genes with risk of schizophrenia in a Japanese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Toru; Ohnuma, Tohru; Hanzawa, Ryo; Takebayashi, Yuto; Takeda, Mayu; Nishimon, Shohei; Sannohe, Takahiro; Katsuta, Narimasa; Higashiyama, Ryoko; Shibata, Nobuto; Arai, Heii

    2015-10-01

    Oxidative-stress, genetic regions of interest (1p13 and 22q11), and common copy number variations (CNVs) may play roles in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. In the present study, we confirmed associations between schizophrenia and the common CNVs in the glutathione (GSH)-related genes GSTT1, DDTL, and GSTM1 using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analyses of 620 patients with schizophrenia and in 622 controls. No significant differences in GSTT1 copy number distributions were found between patient groups. However, frequencies of characterized CNVs and assumed gain alleles of DDTL and GSTM1 were significantly higher in patients with schizophrenia. In agreement with a previous report, the present data indicate that gains in the CNV alleles DDTL and GSTM1 are genetic risk factors in Japanese patients with schizophrenia, and suggest involvement of micro-inflammation and oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia.

  12. TOP1 gene copy numbers in colorectal cancer samples and cell lines and their association to in vitro drug sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rømer, Maria Unni; Jensen, Niels Frank; Nielsen, Signe Lykke

    2012-01-01

    and in vitro sensitivity to SN-38 (the active metabolite of irinotecan) and oxaliplatin were tested for 10 CRC cell lines. Results: The crude TOP1 copy numbers as well as the TOP1/CEN-20 mean ratio +/- 3 STD were determined in non-affected mucosa and in the malignant epithelium of the tumors. In the malignant...

  13. Specific status of Echinococcus canadensis (Cestoda: Taeniidae) inferred from nuclear and mitochondrial gene sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagida, Tetsuya; Lavikainen, Antti; Hoberg, Eric P; Konyaev, Sergey; Ito, Akira; Sato, Marcello Otake; Zaikov, Vladimir A; Beckmen, Kimberlee; Nakao, Minoru

    2017-08-07

    The specific status of Echinococcus canadensis has long been controversial, mainly because it consists of the mitochondrial lineages G6, G7, G8 and G10 with different host affinity: G6 (camel strain) and G7 (pig strain) with domestic cycles and G8 (cervid strain) and G10 (Fennoscandian cervid strain) with sylvatic or semi-domestic cycles. There is an argument whether the mitochondrial lineages should be recognised as separate species which correspond to the biological or epidemiological aggregation. In the present study, the specific status of E. canadensis was investigated using mitochondrial DNA and single copy nuclear DNA markers. Nucleotide sequences of complete mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) and partial nuclear phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (pepck) and DNA polymerase delta (pold) were determined for 48 isolates of E. canadensis collected from different hosts in a wide range of regions. The mitochondrial phylogeny of cox1 showed that all the isolates were clearly divided into three clades corresponding to G6/G7, G8 and G10. Five and three alleles were confirmed at pepck and pold loci, respectively. These alleles were generally divided into two groups corresponding to G6/G7 or G8 and G10. However, allele sharing was confirmed among individuals belonging to different lineages. The allele sharing occurred primarily in regions where different mitochondrial DNA lineages were found in sympatry. The resultant nuclear mitochondrial discordance suggests the genetic exchangeability among E. canadensis isolates belonging to different lineages. An apparently mosaic parasite fauna that reflects faunal mixing due to natural and anthropogenic disturbance, including introductions and invasion, precludes us from designating each of G6/G7, G8 and G10 into a different species. Copyright © 2017 Australian Society for Parasitology. All rights reserved.

  14. Altered Intra-Nuclear Organisation of Heterochromatin and Genes in ICF Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferson, Andrew; Colella, Stefano; Moralli, Daniela; Wilson, Natalie; Yusuf, Mohammed; Gimelli, Giorgio; Ragoussis, Jiannis; Volpi, Emanuela V.

    2010-01-01

    The ICF syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder, the most common symptoms of which are immunodeficiency, facial anomalies and cytogenetic defects involving decondensation and instability of chromosome 1, 9 and 16 centromeric regions. ICF is also characterised by significant hypomethylation of the classical satellite DNA, the major constituent of the juxtacentromeric heterochromatin. Here we report the first attempt at analysing some of the defining genetic and epigenetic changes of this syndrome from a nuclear architecture perspective. In particular, we have compared in ICF (Type 1 and Type 2) and controls the large-scale organisation of chromosome 1 and 16 juxtacentromeric heterochromatic regions, their intra-nuclear positioning, and co-localisation with five specific genes (BTG2, CNN3, ID3, RGS1, F13A1), on which we have concurrently conducted expression and methylation analysis. Our investigations, carried out by a combination of molecular and cytological techniques, demonstrate the existence of specific and quantifiable differences in the genomic and nuclear organisation of the juxtacentromeric heterochromatin in ICF. DNA hypomethylation, previously reported to correlate with the decondensation of centromeric regions in metaphase described in these patients, appears also to correlate with the heterochromatin spatial configuration in interphase. Finally, our findings on the relative positioning of hypomethylated satellite sequences and abnormally expressed genes suggest a connection between disruption of long-range gene-heterochromatin associations and some of the changes in gene expression in ICF. Beyond its relevance to the ICF syndrome, by addressing fundamental principles of chromosome functional organisation within the cell nucleus, this work aims to contribute to the current debate on the epigenetic impact of nuclear architecture in development and disease. PMID:20613881

  15. Molecular mapping of a new induced gene for nuclear male sterility in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new NMS line, NMS HA89-872, induced by mitomycin C and streptomycin carries a single recessive male-sterile gene ms6. An F2 population of 88 plants was obtained from a cross between nuclear male-sterile mutant NMS HA89-872 (msms) and male-fertile line RHA271 (MsMs). 225 SSR primers and 9 RFLP-deri...

  16. The Art of Copying

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Hans Dam

    2017-01-01

    This article discusses copies within the field of art museums by way of mapping strategies for copy practices. This mapping leans heavily towards parts of the writings of Jacques Derrida (1930–2004). Against the backdrop of this theoretical premise, the article distinguishes five main strategies...... for the informational originalcopy will be discussed as it has a vital function in terms of talking about museum originals and copies. This is the strategy which grants the original artifacts their status as museum objects. An informational originalcopy is just as unique as an original object of art, and at the same...

  17. Similar Efficacies of Selection Shape Mitochondrial and Nuclear Genes in Both Drosophila melanogaster and Homo sapiens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Brandon S; Burrus, Chad R; Ji, Chao; Hahn, Matthew W; Montooth, Kristi L

    2015-08-21

    Deleterious mutations contribute to polymorphism even when selection effectively prevents their fixation. The efficacy of selection in removing deleterious mitochondrial mutations from populations depends on the effective population size (Ne) of the mitochondrial DNA and the degree to which a lack of recombination magnifies the effects of linked selection. Using complete mitochondrial genomes from Drosophila melanogaster and nuclear data available from the same samples, we reexamine the hypothesis that nonrecombining animal mitochondrial DNA harbor an excess of deleterious polymorphisms relative to the nuclear genome. We find no evidence of recombination in the mitochondrial genome, and the much-reduced level of mitochondrial synonymous polymorphism relative to nuclear genes is consistent with a reduction in Ne. Nevertheless, we find that the neutrality index, a measure of the excess of nonsynonymous polymorphism relative to the neutral expectation, is only weakly significantly different between mitochondrial and nuclear loci. This difference is likely the result of the larger proportion of beneficial mutations in X-linked relative to autosomal loci, and we find little to no difference between mitochondrial and autosomal neutrality indices. Reanalysis of published data from Homo sapiens reveals a similar lack of a difference between the two genomes, although previous studies have suggested a strong difference in both species. Thus, despite a smaller Ne, mitochondrial loci of both flies and humans appear to experience similar efficacies of purifying selection as do loci in the recombining nuclear genome.

  18. The nuclear receptor gene family in the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, contains a novel subfamily group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogeler, Susanne; Galloway, Tamara S; Lyons, Brett P; Bean, Tim P

    2014-05-15

    Nuclear receptors are a superfamily of transcription factors important in key biological, developmental and reproductive processes. Several of these receptors are ligand- activated and through their ability to bind endogenous and exogenous ligands, are potentially vulnerable to xenobiotics. Molluscs are key ecological species in defining aquatic and terrestrial habitats and are sensitive to xenobiotic compounds in the environment. However, the understanding of nuclear receptor presence, function and xenobiotic disruption in the phylum Mollusca is limited. Here, forty-three nuclear receptor sequences were mined from the genome of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas. They include members of NR0-NR5 subfamilies, notably lacking any NR6 members. Phylogenetic analyses of the oyster nuclear receptors have been conducted showing the presence of a large novel subfamily group not previously reported, which is named NR1P. Homologues to all previous identified nuclear receptors in other mollusc species have also been determined including the putative heterodimer partner retinoid X receptor, estrogen receptor and estrogen related receptor. C. gigas contains a highly diverse set of nuclear receptors including a novel NR1 group, which provides important information on presence and evolution of this transcription factor superfamily in invertebrates. The Pacific oyster possesses two members of NR3, the sex steroid hormone receptor analogues, of which there are 9 in humans. This provides increasing evidence that steroid ligand specific expansion of this family is deuterostome specific. This new knowledge on divergence and emergence of nuclear receptors in C. gigas provides essential information for studying regulation of molluscan gene expression and the potential effects of xenobiotics.

  19. Germ cell nuclear factor directly represses the transcription of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chengqiang He; Naizheng Ding; Jie Kang

    2008-01-01

    Germ cell nuclear factor (GCNF) is a transcription factor that can repress gene transcription and plays an important role during spermatogenesis. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta (PPARδ) is a nuclear hormone receptor belonging to the steroid receptor superfamily.It can activate the expression of many genes,including those involved in lipid metabolism.In this report,we showed that GCNF specifically interacts with PPARδ promoter.Overexpression of GCNF in African green monkey SV40 transformed kidney fibroblast COS7 cells and mouse embryo fibroblast NIH 3T3 cells represses the activity of PPARδ promoter.The mutation of GCNF response element in PPARδ promoter relieves the repression in NIH 3T3 cells and mouse testis.Moreover,we showed that GCNF in nuclear extracts of mouse testis is able to bind to PPARδ promoter directly.We also found that GCNF and PPARδ mRNA were expressed with different patterns in mouse testis by in situ hybridization.These results suggested that GCNF might be a negative regulator of PPARδ gene expression through its direct interaction with PPARδ promoter in mouse testis.

  20. Early evolutionary colocalization of the nuclear ribosomal 5S and 45S gene families in seed plants: evidence from the living fossil gymnosperm Ginkgo biloba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galián, J A; Rosato, M; Rosselló, J A

    2012-06-01

    In seed plants, the colocalization of the 5S loci within the intergenic spacer (IGS) of the nuclear 45S tandem units is restricted to the phylogenetically derived Asteraceae family. However, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) colocalization of both multigene families has also been observed in other unrelated seed plant lineages. Previous work has identified colocalization of 45S and 5S loci in Ginkgo biloba using FISH, but these observations have not been confirmed recently by sequencing a 1.8 kb IGS. In this work, we report the presence of the 45S-5S linkage in G. biloba, suggesting that in seed plants the molecular events leading to the restructuring of the ribosomal loci are much older than estimated previously. We obtained a 6.0 kb IGS fragment showing structural features of functional sequences, and a single copy of the 5S gene was inserted in the same direction of transcription as the ribosomal RNA genes. We also obtained a 1.8 kb IGS that was a truncate variant of the 6.0 kb IGS lacking the 5S gene. Several lines of evidence strongly suggest that the 1.8 kb variants are pseudogenes that are present exclusively on the satellite chromosomes bearing the 45S-5S genes. The presence of ribosomal IGS pseudogenes best reconciles contradictory results concerning the presence or absence of the 45S-5S linkage in Ginkgo. Our finding that both ribosomal gene families have been unified to a single 45S-5S unit in Ginkgo indicates that an accurate reassessment of the organization of rDNA genes in basal seed plants is necessary.

  1. The human NTT gene: Identification of a novel 17-kb noncoding nuclear RNA expressed in activated CD4{sup +} T cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, A.Y.; Torchia, B.S.; Migeon, B.R. [Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)] [and others

    1997-01-15

    We describe the cloning and characterization of the NTT gene (noncoding transcript in T cells), identified by differential display RT-PCR based on the differential presence of its transcript in a subset of activated, human CD4{sup +} T-cell clones. The full-length cDNA and genomic sequences were cloned and found to produce a 17-kb transcript that is polyadenylated, but is not spliced. Consistent with the transcript`s nuclear predominance, NTT has no open reading frame larger than 270 bp. It is transcribed in a select subset of CD4{sup +} T-cell clones propagated in vitro. Its transcription can also be induced in freshly isolated T cells by in vitro activation with PHA or with PMA and ionomycin. In vivo, NTT transcripts are found only in activated, but not resting, T cells. Transcripts were absent in a variety of lymphoid cell lines and transformed lines from other tissues. NTT is a new member of the small group of genes including XIST (X{sub i}-specific transcript), H19, and IPW (imprinted gene in the Prader-Willi syndrome region), which are transcribed but not translated, and may have a role in the regulation of neighboring genes. XIST, H19, and IPW exhibit monoallelic expression, but both NTT alleles are expressed in CD4{sup +} T-cell clones. Southern blot and fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses show that NTT is a single-copy gene residing in chromosome 6q23-q24, near the interferon-{gamma} receptor gene (IFN-{gamma}R). Their proximity and shared expression pattern suggest a possible functional relationship. 57 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Reconstruction of Family-Level Phylogenetic Relationships within Demospongiae (Porifera) Using Nuclear Encoded Housekeeping Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Malcolm S.; Hill, April L.; Lopez, Jose; Peterson, Kevin J.; Pomponi, Shirley; Diaz, Maria C.; Thacker, Robert W.; Adamska, Maja; Boury-Esnault, Nicole; Cárdenas, Paco; Chaves-Fonnegra, Andia; Danka, Elizabeth; De Laine, Bre-Onna; Formica, Dawn; Hajdu, Eduardo; Lobo-Hajdu, Gisele; Klontz, Sarah; Morrow, Christine C.; Patel, Jignasa; Picton, Bernard; Pisani, Davide; Pohlmann, Deborah; Redmond, Niamh E.; Reed, John; Richey, Stacy; Riesgo, Ana; Rubin, Ewelina; Russell, Zach; Rützler, Klaus; Sperling, Erik A.; di Stefano, Michael; Tarver, James E.; Collins, Allen G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Demosponges are challenging for phylogenetic systematics because of their plastic and relatively simple morphologies and many deep divergences between major clades. To improve understanding of the phylogenetic relationships within Demospongiae, we sequenced and analyzed seven nuclear housekeeping genes involved in a variety of cellular functions from a diverse group of sponges. Methodology/Principal Findings We generated data from each of the four sponge classes (i.e., Calcarea, Demospongiae, Hexactinellida, and Homoscleromorpha), but focused on family-level relationships within demosponges. With data for 21 newly sampled families, our Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian-based approaches recovered previously phylogenetically defined taxa: Keratosap, Myxospongiaep, Spongillidap, Haploscleromorphap (the marine haplosclerids) and Democlaviap. We found conflicting results concerning the relationships of Keratosap and Myxospongiaep to the remaining demosponges, but our results strongly supported a clade of Haploscleromorphap+Spongillidap+Democlaviap. In contrast to hypotheses based on mitochondrial genome and ribosomal data, nuclear housekeeping gene data suggested that freshwater sponges (Spongillidap) are sister to Haploscleromorphap rather than part of Democlaviap. Within Keratosap, we found equivocal results as to the monophyly of Dictyoceratida. Within Myxospongiaep, Chondrosida and Verongida were monophyletic. A well-supported clade within Democlaviap, Tetractinellidap, composed of all sampled members of Astrophorina and Spirophorina (including the only lithistid in our analysis), was consistently revealed as the sister group to all other members of Democlaviap. Within Tetractinellidap, we did not recover monophyletic Astrophorina or Spirophorina. Our results also reaffirmed the monophyly of order Poecilosclerida (excluding Desmacellidae and Raspailiidae), and polyphyly of Hadromerida and Halichondrida. Conclusions/Significance These results, using an

  3. A binding site for the transcription factor Grainyhead/Nuclear transcription factor-1 contributes to regulation of the Drosophila proliferating cell nuclear antigen gene promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Y; Yamagishi, M; Nishimoto, Y; Taguchi, O; Matsukage, A; Yamaguchi, M

    1999-12-03

    The Drosophila proliferating cell nuclear antigen promoter contains multiple transcriptional regulatory elements, including upstream regulatory element (URE), DNA replication-related element, E2F recognition sites, and three common regulatory factor for DNA replication and DNA replication-related element-binding factor genes recognition sites. In nuclear extracts of Drosophila embryos, we detected a protein factor, the URE-binding factor (UREF), that recognizes the nucleotide sequence 5'-AAACCAGTTGGCA located within URE. Analyses in Drosophila Kc cells and transgenic flies revealed that the UREF-binding site plays an important role in promoter activity both in cultured cells and in living flies. A yeast one-hybrid screen using URE as a bait allowed isolation of a cDNA encoding a transcription factor, Grainyhead/nuclear transcription factor-1 (GRH/NTF-1). The nucleotide sequence required for binding to GRH was indistinguishable from that for UREF detected in embryo nuclear extracts. Furthermore, a specific antibody to GRH reacted with UREF in embryo nuclear extracts. From these results we conclude that GRH is identical to UREF. Although GRH has been thought to be involved in regulation of differentiation-related genes, this study demonstrates, for the first time, involvement of a GRH-binding site in regulation of the DNA replication-related proliferating cell nuclear antigen gene.

  4. Analysis of cosmid clones of nuclear DNA from Trypanosome brucei shows that the genes for variant surface glycoproteins are clustered in the genome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Valerio (Dinko); T. de Lange; P. Borst (Piet); F.G. Grosveld (Frank); L.H.T. van der Ploeg

    1982-01-01

    textabstractTrypanosoma brucei contains more than a hundred genes coding for the different variant surface glycoproteins (VSGs). Activation of some of these genes involves the duplication of the gene (the basic copy or BC) and transposition of the duplicate to an expression site (yielding the expres

  5. Outsourcing the Nucleus: Nuclear Pore Complex Genes are no Longer Encoded in Nucleomorph Genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadja Neumann

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The nuclear pore complex (NPC facilitates transport between nucleus and cytoplasm. The protein constituents of the NPC, termed nucleoporins (Nups, are conserved across a wide diversity of eukaryotes. In apparent exception to this, no nucleoporin genes have been identified in nucleomorph genomes. Nucleomorphs, nuclear remnants of once free-living eukaryotes, took up residence as secondary endosymbionts in cryptomonad and chlorarachniophyte algae. As these genomes are highly reduced, Nup genes may have been lost, or relocated to the host nucleus. However, Nup genes are often poorly conserved between species, so absence may be an artifact of low sequence similarity. We therefore constructed an evolutionary bioinformatic screen to establish whether the apparent absence of Nup genes in nucleomorph genomes is due to genuine absence or the inability of current methods to detect homologues. We searched green plant (Arabidopsis and rice, green alga (Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and red alga (Cyanidioschyzon merolae genomes, plus two nucleomorph genomes (Bigelowiella natans and Guillardia theta with profile hidden Markov models (HMMs from curated alignments of known vertebrate/yeast Nups. Since the plant, algal and nucleomorph genomes all belong to the kingdom Plantae, and are evolutionarily distant from the outgroup (vertebrate/yeast training set, we use the plant and algal genomes as internal positive controls for the sensitivity of the searches in nucleomorph genomes. We fi nd numerous Nup homologues in all plant and free-living algal species, but none in either nucleomorph genome. BLAST searches using identified plant and algal Nups also failed to detect nucleomorph homologues. We conclude that nucleomorph Nup genes have either been lost, being replaced by host Nup genes, or, that nucleomorph Nup genes have been transferred to the host nucleus twice independently; once in the evolution of the red algal nucleomorph and once in the green algal nucleomorph.

  6. The nuclear protein-coding gene ANKRD23 negatively regulates myoblast differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaojing; Zeng, Rui; Xu, Haiyang; Xu, Zaiyan; Zuo, Bo

    2017-09-20

    Muscle fiber formation is a complex process and subject to fine regulation of a variety of protein-coding genes and non-coding RNA. In this study, we identified a nuclear protein-coding gene ANKRD23 which was highly expressed in muscle. Quantitative real-time PCR, western blotting and immunofluorescence were used to detect the expression change of myoblast differentiation marker genes after knockdown and overexpression of ANKRD23. The results showed that the expression of myoblast differentiation marker genes were increased by interference and reduced by ANKRD23 overexpression, indicating that ANKRD23 played a negative role in the myoblast differentiation. Interestingly, we discovered a long non-coding RNA-AK004293 which was overlapped with the 3'UTR of ANKRD23 gene. Then we detected the effect of AK004293 on the expression of ANKRD23 and myoblast differentiation marker genes in C2C12 myoblasts. The results showed that AK004293 had no significant effect on the expression of myoblast differentiation maker genes and ANKRD23. In conclusion, our results established the foundation for further studies about the regulation mechanism of ANKRD23 in muscle development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Ancient Origin of the U2 Small Nuclear RNA Gene-Targeting Non-LTR Retrotransposons Utopia: e0140084

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kenji K Kojima; Jerzy Jurka[dagger

    2015-01-01

    .... Utopia is found in three supergroups of eukaryotes: Amoebozoa, SAR, and Opisthokonta. Utopia is inserted into a specific site of U2 small nuclear RNA genes with different strength of specificity for each family...

  8. Transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, C.D.; Ottavio, L.; Travali, S.; Lipson, K.E.; Baserga, R. (Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA (USA). School of Medicine)

    1990-07-01

    The steady-state mRNA levels of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) gene are growth regulated. In a previous paper the authors reported that introns (especially intron 4) participate in growth regulation of the PCNA gene. They have now investigated the role of the 5{prime}-flanking sequence of the human PCNA gene stably transfected into BALB/c 3T3 cells. Promoters of different lengths (from{minus}2856 to {minus}45 upstream of the cap site) were tested. All promoters except the Aatll promoter ({minus}45), including a short HpaII promoter ({minus}210), were sufficient for a response to serum, platelet-derived growth factor, and to a lesser extent epidermal growth factor. No construct responded to insulin or platelet-poor plasma. The AatII promoter had little detectable activity. Transcriptional activity was also determined in BALB/c 3T3 cells carrying various constructs of the human PCNA gene by two methods: run-on transcription and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (the latter measuring the heterogeneous nuclear RNA (hnRNA) steady-state levels).

  9. Microbiota regulate intestinal epithelial gene expression by suppressing the transcription factor Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, James M.; Lickwar, Colin R.; Song, Lingyun; Breton, Ghislain; Crawford, Gregory E.; Rawls, John F.

    2017-01-01

    Microbiota influence diverse aspects of intestinal physiology and disease in part by controlling tissue-specific transcription of host genes. However, host genomic mechanisms mediating microbial control of intestinal gene expression are poorly understood. Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 (HNF4) is the most ancient family of nuclear receptor transcription factors with important roles in human metabolic and inflammatory bowel diseases, but a role in host response to microbes is unknown. Using an unbiased screening strategy, we found that zebrafish Hnf4a specifically binds and activates a microbiota-suppressed intestinal epithelial transcriptional enhancer. Genetic analysis revealed that zebrafish hnf4a activates nearly half of the genes that are suppressed by microbiota, suggesting microbiota negatively regulate Hnf4a. In support, analysis of genomic architecture in mouse intestinal epithelial cells disclosed that microbiota colonization leads to activation or inactivation of hundreds of enhancers along with drastic genome-wide reduction of HNF4A and HNF4G occupancy. Interspecies meta-analysis suggested interactions between HNF4A and microbiota promote gene expression patterns associated with human inflammatory bowel diseases. These results indicate a critical and conserved role for HNF4A in maintaining intestinal homeostasis in response to microbiota. PMID:28385711

  10. Peripheral neuropathy predicts nuclear gene defect in patients with mitochondrial ophthalmoplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horga, Alejandro; Pitceathly, Robert D S; Blake, Julian C; Woodward, Catherine E; Zapater, Pedro; Fratter, Carl; Mudanohwo, Ese E; Plant, Gordon T; Houlden, Henry; Sweeney, Mary G; Hanna, Michael G; Reilly, Mary M

    2014-12-01

    Progressive external ophthalmoplegia is a common clinical feature in mitochondrial disease caused by nuclear DNA defects and single, large-scale mitochondrial DNA deletions and is less frequently associated with point mutations of mitochondrial DNA. Peripheral neuropathy is also a frequent manifestation of mitochondrial disease, although its prevalence and characteristics varies considerably among the different syndromes and genetic aetiologies. Based on clinical observations, we systematically investigated whether the presence of peripheral neuropathy could predict the underlying genetic defect in patients with progressive external ophthalmoplegia. We analysed detailed demographic, clinical and neurophysiological data from 116 patients with genetically-defined mitochondrial disease and progressive external ophthalmoplegia. Seventy-eight patients (67%) had a single mitochondrial DNA deletion, 12 (10%) had a point mutation of mitochondrial DNA and 26 (22%) had mutations in either POLG, C10orf2 or RRM2B, or had multiple mitochondrial DNA deletions in muscle without an identified nuclear gene defect. Seventy-seven patients had neurophysiological studies; of these, 16 patients (21%) had a large-fibre peripheral neuropathy. The prevalence of peripheral neuropathy was significantly lower in patients with a single mitochondrial DNA deletion (2%) as compared to those with a point mutation of mitochondrial DNA or with a nuclear DNA defect (44% and 52%, respectively; Pneuropathy as the only independent predictor associated with a nuclear DNA defect (P=0.002; odds ratio 8.43, 95% confidence interval 2.24-31.76). Multinomial logistic regression analysis identified peripheral neuropathy, family history and hearing loss as significant predictors of the genotype, and the same three variables showed the highest performance in genotype classification in a decision tree analysis. Of these variables, peripheral neuropathy had the highest specificity (91%), negative predictive value

  11. Disorders of phospholipid metabolism: an emerging class of mitochondrial disease due to defects in nuclear genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Wen eLu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The human nuclear and mitochondrial genomes co-exist within each cell. While the mitochondrial genome encodes for a limited number of proteins, transfer RNAs, and ribosomal RNAs, the vast majority of mitochondrial proteins are encoded in the nuclear genome. Of the multitude of mitochondrial disorders known to date, only a fifth are maternally inherited. The recent characterization of the mitochondrial proteome therefore serves as an important step towards delineating the nosology of a large spectrum of phenotypically heterogeneous diseases. Following the identification of the first nuclear gene defect to underlie a mitochondrial disorder, a plenitude of genetic variants that provoke mitochondrial pathophysiology have been molecularly elucidated and classified into six categories that impact: 1 oxidative phosphorylation (subunits and assembly factors; 2 mitochondrial DNA maintenance and expression; 3 mitochondrial protein import and assembly; 4 mitochondrial quality control (chaperones and proteases; 5 iron-sulfur cluster homeostasis; and 6 mitochondrial dynamics (fission and fusion. Here, we propose that an additional class of genetic variant be included in the classification schema to acknowledge the role of genetic defects in phospholipid biosynthesis, remodeling, and metabolism in mitochondrial pathophysiology. This seventh class includes a small but notable group of nuclear-encoded proteins whose dysfunction impacts normal mitochondrial phospholipid metabolism. The resulting human disorders present with a diverse array of pathologic consequences that reflect the variety of functions that phospholipids have in mitochondria and highlight the important role of proper membrane homeostasis in mitochondrial biology.

  12. Natural disease course and genotype-phenotype correlations in Complex I deficiency caused by nuclear gene defects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koene, S; Rodenburg, R J; van der Knaap, M S;

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial complex I is the largest multi-protein enzyme complex of the oxidative phosphorylation system. Seven subunits of this complex are encoded by the mitochondrial and the remainder by the nuclear genome. We review the natural disease course and signs and symptoms of 130 patients (four new...... cases and 126 from literature) with mutations in nuclear genes encoding structural complex I proteins or those involved in its assembly. Complex I deficiency caused by a nuclear gene defect is usually a non-dysmorphic syndrome, characterized by severe multi-system organ involvement and a poor prognosis...

  13. How Many Genes are Needed to Resolve Phylogenetic Incongruence?

    OpenAIRE

    Bin Ai; Ming Kang

    2015-01-01

    The question how many genes are needed to resolve phylogenetic incongruence has been investigated at various taxonomic levels, yet few studies have investigated the minimum required numbers of selected genes based on single-gene tree performance at the genus level or lower. We conducted resampling analyses by compiling transcriptome-based single-copy nuclear gene sequences of 11 species of Primulina (Gesneriaceae) to investigate the minimum numbers of both random and selected genes needed to ...

  14. Jumping the nuclear envelop barrier: Improving polyplex-mediated gene transfection efficiency by a selective CDK1 inhibitor RO-3306.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xuefei; Liu, Xiangrui; Zhao, Bingxiang; Liu, Xin; Zhu, Dingcheng; Qiu, Nasha; Zhou, Quan; Piao, Ying; Zhou, Zhuxian; Tang, Jianbin; Shen, Youqing

    2016-07-28

    Successful transfection of plasmid DNA (pDNA) requires intranuclear internalization of pDNA effectively and the nuclear envelope appears to be one of the critical intracellular barriers for polymer mediated pDNA delivery. Polyethylenimine (PEI), as the classic cationic polymer, compact the negatively charged pDNA tightly and make up stable polyplexes. The polyplexes are too large to enter the nuclear through nuclear pores and it is believed that the nuclear envelope breakdown in mitosis could facilitate the nuclear entry of polyplexes. To jump the nuclear envelope barrier, we used a selective and reversible CDK1 inhibitor RO-3306 to control the G2/M transition of the cell cycle and increased the proportion of mitotic cells which have disappeared nuclear envelope during transfection. Herein, we show that RO-3306 remarkably increases the transfection efficiency of PEI polyplexes through enhanced nuclear localization of PEI and pDNA. However, RO-3306 is less effective to the charge-reversal polymer poly[(2-acryloyl)ethyl(p-boronic acid benzyl)diethylammonium bromide] (B-PDEAEA) which responses to cellular stimuli and releases free pDNA in cytoplasm. Our findings not only offer new opportunities for improving non-viral based gene delivery but also provide theoretical support for the rational design of novel functional polymers for gene delivery. We also report current data showing that RO-3306 synergizes TRAIL gene induced apoptosis in cancer cells.

  15. H2A.Z-mediated localization of genes at the nuclear periphery confers epigenetic memory of previous transcriptional state.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna Garvey Brickner

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Many genes are recruited to the nuclear periphery upon transcriptional activation. The mechanism and functional significance of this recruitment is unclear. We find that recruitment of the yeast INO1 and GAL1 genes to the nuclear periphery is rapid and independent of transcription. Surprisingly, these genes remain at the periphery for generations after they are repressed. Localization at the nuclear periphery serves as a form of memory of recent transcriptional activation, promoting reactivation. Previously expressed GAL1 at the nuclear periphery is activated much more rapidly than long-term repressed GAL1 in the nucleoplasm, even after six generations of repression. Localization of INO1 at the nuclear periphery is necessary and sufficient to promote more rapid activation. This form of transcriptional memory is chromatin based; the histone variant H2A.Z is incorporated into nucleosomes within the recently repressed INO1 promoter and is specifically required for rapid reactivation of both INO1 and GAL1. Furthermore, H2A.Z is required to retain INO1 at the nuclear periphery after repression. Therefore, H2A.Z-mediated localization of recently repressed genes at the nuclear periphery represents an epigenetic state that confers memory of transcriptional activation and promotes reactivation.

  16. A phylogenetic analysis of the genus Psathyrostachys (Poaceae) based on one nuclear gene, three plastid genes, and morphology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Gitte; Seberg, Ole; Baden, Claus

    2004-01-01

    A phylogenetic analysis of the small, Central Asian genus Psathyrostachys Nevski is presented. The analysis is based on morphological characters and nucleotide sequence data from one nuclear gene, DMC1, and three plastid genes, rbcL, rpoA, and rpoC2. Separate analyses of the three data partitions...

  17. Copy-Number Variation of the Glucose Transporter Gene SLC2A3 and Congenital Heart Defects in the 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Mlynarski, Elisabeth E.; Sheridan, Molly B.; Xie, Michael; Guo, Tingwei; Racedo, Silvia E.; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M.; Gai, Xiaowu; Chow, Eva W.C.; Vorstman, Jacob; Swillen, Ann; Devriendt, Koen; Breckpot, Jeroen; Digilio, Maria Cristina; Marino, Bruno; Dallapiccola, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS; velocardiofacial/DiGeorge syndrome; VCFS/DGS) is the most common microdeletion syndrome and the phenotypic presentation is highly variable. Approximately 65% of individuals with 22q11DS have a congenital heart defect (CHD), mostly of the conotruncal type, and/or an aortic arch defect. The etiology of this phenotypic variability is not currently known. We hypothesized that copy-number variants (CNVs) outside the 22q11.2 deleted region might increase the ...

  18. DNA Topoisomerase I Gene Copy Number and mRNA Expression Assessed as Predictive Biomarkers for Adjuvant Irinotecan in Stage II/III Colon Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygård, Sune Boris; Vainer, Ben; Nielsen, Signe L;

    2016-01-01

    (PETACC3) where patients were randomized to 5-fluorouracil/folinic acid with or without additional irinotecan. TOP1 copy number status was analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using a TOP1/CEN20 dual-probe combination. TOP1 mRNA data were available from previous analyses. RESULTS: TOP1......RNA data were available from 580 patients with stage III disease. Benefit of irinotecan was restricted to patients characterized by TOP1 mRNA expression ≥ 3rd quartile (RFS: HRadjusted, 0.59; P = .09; OS: HRadjusted, 0.44; P = 0.03). The treatment by TOP1 mRNA interaction was not statistically significant...

  19. Contribut